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Sample records for high-purity factor ix

  1. In vitro characterization of high purity factor IX concentrates for the treatment of hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Limentani, S A; Gowell, K P; Deitcher, S R

    1995-04-01

    This study employed sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis and immunoblotting to assess the purity of seven high purity factor IX concentrates: Aimafix (Aima), AlphaNine-SD (Alpha Therapeutic), Factor IX VHP (Biotransfusion), Immunine (Immuno), Mononine (Armour Pharmaceutical), Nanotiv (Kabi Pharmacia), and 9MC (Blood Products Laboratory). The mean specific activity of these products ranged from 68 U factor IX/mg (Aimafix) to 246 U factor IX/mg (Mononine). SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the highest purity product, Mononine, had a single contaminating band under non-reducing conditions. Two additional bands were detected when this product was analyzed under reducing conditions. All other products had multiple contaminating bands that were more apparent under reducing than non-reducing conditions. The immunoblot for factor IX showed a dominant factor IX band for all products. In addition, visible light chain of factor IX was detected for AlphaNine-SD, Factor IX VHP, Immunine, Mononine, Nanotiv, and 9MC, suggesting that the factor IX in these products had undergone partial activation to factor IXa. Another contaminating band was visible at 49,500 for all of the products except 9MC. In addition to this band, high molecular weight contaminants were apparent for some products, most notably AlphaNine-SD. The identity of these bands is unknown. Immunoblotting failed to demonstrate factor VII as a contaminant of any of the high purity products, although factor VIIa could be detected in some lots of Immunine, Nanotiv, and 9MC by a clot-based assay. Factor X contaminated Aimafix, AlphaNine-SD, Factor IX VHP, Immunine, Nanotiv, and 9MC, but activation products of factor X were not detected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Inactivation and clearance of viruses during the manufacture of high purity factor IX.

    PubMed

    Johnston, A; Macgregor, A; Borovec, S; Hattarki, M; Stuckly, K; Anderson, D; Goss, N H; Oates, A; Uren, E

    2000-09-01

    Haemophilia is a bleeding disorder characterised by a deficiency in Factor IX. Replacement therapy in the form of a Factor IX concentrate is a widely accepted practice. In this paper we describe a double virus inactivated chromatographic process for producing a high purity Factor IX product, MonoFIX((R))-VF. The process involves separation of the prothrombin complex by cryoprecipitation, fraction I precipitation and DEAE-cellulose adsorption, further ion-exchange chromatography of crude Factor IX, followed by solvent/detergent treatment. Heparin affinity chromatography is then used to further purify Factor IX. Final nanofiltration is sequential through 35 nm then 15 nm membrane filters. The principal virus inactivation/removal steps are solvent/detergent treatment and nanofiltration and the partitioning of relevant and model viruses provides further reduction in virus load through the production process.Solvent/detergent treatment was shown to achieve log reduction factors of 4.5 for HIV-1, 5.1 for Sindbis virus, 6.1 for vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), 5.1 for bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) and 5.3 for pseudorabies virus (PRV). BVDV is a model for hepatitis C virus (HCV), and pseudorabies virus (PRV), like hepatitis B virus (HBV) is an enveloped DNA virus. Using scaled down models of the production process, we have also demonstrated the neutralization/partitioning of at least 6 logs of hepatitis A virus (HAV) during cryoprecipitation, Fraction I precipitation, and the DEAE adsorption and elution step, and a further 1.6 log reduction in HAV load as a result of heparin affinity chromatography. The log reduction factors for HAV as a result of the second ion-exchange chromatography step and as a result of enhanced neutralisation associated with solvent/detergent treatment were not significant. Nanofiltration was shown to contribute a further log reduction factor of 6.7 for HAV and 5.8 for BVDV indicating that log reduction factors of this order would be obtained

  3. Factor IX assay

    MedlinePlus

    Christmas factor assay; Serum factor IX; Hemophilic factor B; Plasma thromboplastin component; PTC ... chap 137. Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Factor IX (Christmas factor, hemophilic factor B, plasma thromboplastin component, PTC) - ...

  4. Purification and characterization of an abnormal factor IX (Christmas factor) molecule. Factor IX Chapel Hill.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, K S; Madar, D A; Goldsmith, J C; Kingdon, H S; Roberts, H R

    1978-01-01

    Human Factor IX (Christmas factor) was isolated from the plasma of a patient with mild hemophilia B. The patient's plasma contained 5% Factor IX clotting activity but 100% Factor IX antigenic activity as determined by immunological assays, which included inhibitor neutralization and a radioimmunoassay for Factor IX. This abnormal Factor IX is called Factor IX Chapel Hill (Factor IXCH). Both normal Factor IX and Factor IXCH have tyrosine as the NH2-terminal amino acid. The two proteins have a similar molecular weight, a similar amino acid analysis, the same number of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid residues (10 gamma-carboxyglutamic acid residues), and a similar carbohydrate content. Both exist as a single-chain glycoprotein in plasma. The major difference between normal Factor IX and Factor IXCH is that the latter exhibits delayed activation to Factor IXa in the presence of Factor XIa and Ca2+. Thus, Factor IXCH differs from other previously described abnormal Factor IX molecules. Images PMID:711853

  5. Activation of human factor IX (Christmas factor).

    PubMed Central

    Di Scipio, R G; Kurachi, K; Davie, E W

    1978-01-01

    Human Factor IX (Christmas factor) is a single-chain plasma glycoprotein (mol wt 57,000) that participates in the middle phase of the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. It is present in plasma as a zymogen and is converted to a serine protease, Factor IXabeta, by Factor XIa (activated plasma thromboplastin antecedent) in the presence of calcium ions. In the activation reaction, two internal peptide bonds are hydrolyzed in Factor IX. These cleavages occur at a specific arginyl-alanine peptide bond and a specific arginyl-valine peptide bond. This results in the release of an activation peptide (mol wt approximately equal to 11,000) from the internal region of the precursor molecule and the generation of Factor IXabeta (mol wt approximately equal to 46,000). Factor IXabeta is composed of a light chain (mol wt approximately equal to 18,000) and a heavy chain (mol wt approximately equal to 28,000), and these chains are held together by a disulfide bond(s). The light chain originates from the amino terminal portion of the precursor molecule and has an amino terminal sequence of Tyr-Asn-Ser-Gly-Lys. The heavy chain originates from the carboxyl terminal region of the precursor molecule and contains an amino terminal sequence of Val-Val-Gly-Gly-Glu. The heavy chain of Factor IXabeta also contains the active site sequence of Phe-Cys-Ala-Gly-Phe-His-Glu-Gly-Arg-Asp-Ser-Cys-Gln-Gly-Asp-SER-Gly-Gly-Pro. The active site serine residue is shown in capital letters. Factor IX is also converted to Factor IXaalpha by a protease from Russell's viper venom. This activation reaction, however, occurs in a single step and involves only the cleavage of the internal arginyl-valine peptide bond. Human Factor IXabeta was inhibited by human antithrombin III by the formation of a one-to-one complex of enzyme and inhibitor. In this reaction, the inhibitor was tightly bound to the heavy chain of the enzyme. These data indicate that the mechanism of activation of human Factor IX and its

  6. High purity tungsten targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    High purity tungsten, which is used for targets in X-ray tubes was considered for space processing. The demand for X-ray tubes was calculated using the growth rates for dental and medical X-ray machines. It is concluded that the cost benefits are uncertain.

  7. High purity tungsten targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    High purity tungsten, which is used for targets in X-ray tubes was considered for space processing. The demand for X-ray tubes was calculated using the growth rates for dental and medical X-ray machines. It is concluded that the cost benefits are uncertain.

  8. In vitro and in vivo characterization of a high-purity, solvent/detergent-treated factor VIII concentrate: evidence for its therapeutic efficacy in von Willebrand's disease.

    PubMed

    Mazurier, C; De Romeuf, C; Parquet-Gernez, A; Goudemand, M

    1989-07-01

    A factor VIII (FVIII) concentrate, virus-inactivated by the solvent/detergent procedure, was studied in vitro. In contrast with most high-purity, virus-inactivated FVIII concentrates, it contains not only high levels of von Willebrand factor (vWF) antigen and ristocetin cofactor activity but also high molecular weight forms of von Willebrand factor. Furthermore, it is able to promote platelet adhesion on collagen in a perfusion system. In vivo studies performed in patients with different types of von Willebrand's disease provided evidence that this concentrate corrects Duke's bleeding time and prevents or stops haemorrhages. Thus, the particular advantages of this FVIII/vWF preparation are safety, low content of contamination proteins, and efficacy in von Willebrand's disease.

  9. Evaluation of factor IX deficiency by interdigitated electrode (IDE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Hashim, Uda; Uda, M. N. A.

    2017-03-01

    Factor IX deficiency is the main cause of hemophilia A and B. This a severe excessive bleeding disorder that can even kill the patient if not treated with the right prescription of Factor IX hormone to stop the bleeding. The bleeding can be caused by an injury or even a sudden bleeding in some very rare cases. To find the Factor IX effectiveness and to understand the deficiency more carefully for the future of medicine, experiments are conducted to test the Factor IX using the Interdigitated Electrode (IDE) and gold Nanoparticle with the help of Nanoelectrical technology.

  10. Cleavage and activation of human factor IX by serine proteases

    SciTech Connect

    Enfield, D.L.; Thompson, A.R.

    1984-10-01

    Human factor IX circulates as a single-chain glycoprotein. Upon activation in vitro, it is cleaved into disulfide-linked light and heavy chains and an activation peptide. After reduction of activated /sup 125/I-factor IX, the heavy and light chains are readily identified by gel electrophoresis. A direct, immunoradiometric assay for factor IXa was developed to assess activation of factor IX for proteases that cleaved it. The assay utilized radiolabeled antithrombin III with heparin to identify the active site and antibodies to distinguish factor IX. After cleavage of factor IX by factor XIa, factor VIIa-tissue thromboplastin complex, or the factor X-activating enzyme from Russell's viper venom, antithrombin III bound readily to factor IXa. Cleavage of /sup 125/I-factor IX by trypsin, chymotrypsin, and granulocyte elastase in the presence of calcium yielded major polypeptide fragments of the sizes of the factor XIa-generated light and heavy chains. When the immunoradiometric assay was used to assess trypsin-cleaved factor IX, the product bound antithrombin III, but not maximally. After digesting with insolubilized trypsin, clotting activity confirmed activation. In evaluating activation of factor IX, physical evidence of activation cleavages does not necessarily correlate with generation of an active site.

  11. Labeled factor IX kinetics in patients with hemophilia-B

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.J.; Thompson, A.R.

    1981-09-01

    Labeled factor IX was infused five time into four patients with hemophilia-B. Ten-minute plasma recovery average 35% (SD +/- 2) and the mean T 1/2 beta-phase elimination was 23 hr (+/- 5). No alteration in the postinfusion 125I-factor-IX could be detected by radioautography of plasma samples run on polyacrylamide gels or on crossed-immunoelectrophoresis. Label was excreted into the urine as free 125I-iodide. Kinetics were similar when the labeled preparation was infused alone or with a commercial concentrate containing unlabeled factor IX. Infusion of factor IX in man is best described by a two-compartment open pharmacokinetic model where factor IX is distributed in a space larger than the plasma volume.

  12. Comparison of the inactivation of canine and bovine parvovirus by freeze-drying and dry-heat treatment in two high purity factor VIII concentrates.

    PubMed

    Roberts, P L; Hart, H

    2000-09-01

    The inactivation of bovine parvovirus (BPV) and canine parvovirus (CPV) by freeze-drying and terminal dry-heat treatment at 80 degrees C for 72 h has been investigated in two high purity factor VIII concentrates. In one product, CPV was slightly more resistant to freeze-drying compared to BPV, i.e. 0.7 vs. 1.4 log. However, BPV was substantially more resistant to heat-treatment compared to CPV, i.e. 1.3 vs. > 3.1 log inactivation after 72 h at 80 degrees C. In a second product, CPV was also slightly more resistant to freeze-drying than BPV, i.e. 0.2 vs. 1.3 log inactivation. However, heat-treatment gave essentially similar inactivation for both viruses, i.e. 2.8-3.4 log after 72 h at 80 degrees C. In conclusion, the resistance of these parvovirus models is dependent both on the type of virus and on the specific product involved. Copyright 2000 The International Association for Biologicals.

  13. Production of high purity radiothallium

    DOEpatents

    Lebowitz, Elliot; Greene, Margaret W.

    1976-11-23

    The method of producing high purity thallium-201 for use as a myocardial scanning agent comprising the steps of irradiating a thallium target with protons to give the reaction .sup.203 Tl(p,3n) .sup.201.sub.Pb, separating in ion exchange columns the lead from the thallium isotopes, permitting the lead to decay, and then purifying the thallium solution and converting the thallium present to thallous form in which it can be used.

  14. Preparation of high purity phosphorus

    DOEpatents

    Rupp, Arthur F.; Woo, David V.

    1981-01-01

    High purity phosphorus and phosphorus compounds are prepared by first reacting H.sub.3 PO.sub.4 with a lead compound such as PbO to form Pb.sub.3 (PO.sub.4).sub.2. The Pb.sub.3 (PO.sub.4).sub.2 is reduced with H.sub.2 at a temperature sufficient to form gaseous phosphorus which can be recovered as a high purity phosphorus product. Phosphorus compounds can be easily prepared by reacting the phosphorus product with gaseous reactants. For example, the phosphorus product is reacted with gaseous Cl.sub.2 to form PCl.sub.5. PCl.sub.5 is reduced to PCl.sub.3 by contacting it in the gaseous phase with solid elemental phosphorus. POCl.sub.3 can be prepared by contacting PCl.sub.5 in the gaseous phase with solid P.sub.2 O.sub.5. The general process is particularly suitable for the preparation of radiophosphorus compounds.

  15. Muscle as a target for supplementary factor IX gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Brad E; Dobrzynski, Eric; Wang, Lixin; Hirao, Lauren; Mingozzi, Federico; Cao, Ou; Herzog, Roland W

    2007-07-01

    Immune responses to the factor IX (F.IX) transgene product are a concern in gene therapy for the X-linked bleeding disorder hemophilia B. The risk for such responses is determined by several factors, including the vector, target tissue, and others. Previously, we have demonstrated that hepatic gene transfer with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors can induce F.IX-specific immune tolerance. Muscle-derived F.IX expression, however, is limited by a local immune response. Here, skeletal muscle was investigated as a target for supplemental gene transfer. Given the low invasiveness of intramuscular injections, this route would be ideal for secondary gene transfer, thereby boosting levels of transgene expression. However, this is feasible only if immune tolerance established by compartmentalization of expression to the liver extends to other sites. Immune tolerance to human F.IX established by prior hepatic AAV-2 gene transfer was maintained after subsequent injection of AAV-1 or adenoviral vector into skeletal muscle, and tolerized mice failed to form antibodies or an interferon (IFN)-gamma(+) T cell response to human F.IX. A sustained increase in systemic transgene expression was obtained for AAV-1, whereas an increase after adenoviral gene transfer was transient. A CD8(+) T cell response specifically against adenovirus-transduced fibers was observed, suggesting that cytotoxic T cell responses against viral antigens were sufficient to eliminate expression in muscle. In summary, the data demonstrate that supplemental F.IX gene transfer to skeletal muscle does not break tolerance achieved by liver-derived expression. The approach is efficacious, if the vector for muscle gene transfer does not express immunogenic viral proteins.

  16. High purity silica reflective heat shield development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachtscheim, P. R.; Blome, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    A hyperpure vitreous silica material is being developed for use as a reflective and ablative heat shield for planetary entry. Various purity grades and forms of raw materials were evaluated along with various processing methods. Slip casting of high purity grain was selected as the best processing method, resulting in a highly reflective material in the wavelength bands of interest (the visible and ultraviolet regions). The selected material was characterized with respect to optical, mechanical and physical properties using a limited number of specimens. The process has been scaled up to produce a one-half scale heat shield (18 in. dia.) (45.72 cm) for a Jupiter entry vehicle. This work is now being extended to improve the structural safety factor of the heat shield by making hyperpure silica material tougher through the addition of silica fibers.

  17. Immunogenicity and immune tolerance coagulation Factors VIII and IX.

    PubMed

    Rup, B

    2003-01-01

    Some of the major issues related to the development and control of antibodies that occur during treatment of haemophilia with replacement factors (Factor VIII and Factor IX) are reviewed. Information on analytical issues, immunogenicity, and immune tolerance may be applicable to the study of other therapeutic proteins. Conversely, new information obtained from evaluation of other therapeutic protein products may address issues that remain unresolved for Factor VIII and FIX replacement therapy.

  18. Kinetics of the Factor XIa catalyzed activation of human blood coagulation Factor IX

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, P.N.; Bradford, H.; Sinha, D.; Piperno, J.R.; Tuszynski, G.P.

    1984-05-01

    The kinetics of activation of human Factor IX by human Factor XIa was studied by measuring the release of a trichloroacetic acid-soluble tritium-labeled activation peptide from Factor IX. Initial rates of trichloroacetic acid-soluble /sup 3/H-release were linear over 10-30 min of incubation of Factor IX (88 nM) with CaCl/sub 2/ (5 mM) and with pure (greater than 98%) Factor XIa (0.06-1.3 nM), which was prepared by incubating human Factor XI with bovine Factor XIIa. Release of /sup 3/H preceded the appearance of Factor IXa activity, and the percentage of /sup 3/H released remained constant when the mole fraction of /sup 3/H-labeled and unlabeled Factor IX was varied and the total Factor IX concentration remained constant. A linear correlation (r greater than 0.98, P less than 0.001) was observed between initial rates of /sup 3/H-release and the concentration of Factor XIa, measured by chromogenic assay and by radioimmunoassay and added at a Factor IX:Factor XIa molar ratio of 70-5,600. Kinetic parameters, determined by Lineweaver-Burk analysis, include K/sub m/ (0.49 microM) of about five- to sixfold higher than the plasma Factor IX concentration, which could therefore regulate the reaction. The catalytic constant (k/sub cat/) (7.7/s) is approximately 20-50 times higher than that reported by Zur and Nemerson for Factor IX activation by Factor VIIa plus tissue factor. Therefore, depending on the relative amounts of Factor XIa and Factor VIIa generated in vivo and other factors which may influence reaction rates, these kinetic parameters provide part of the information required for assessing the relative contributions of the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways to Factor IX activation, and suggest that the Factor XIa catalyzed reaction is physiologically significant.

  19. APPARATUS FOR HIGH PURITY METAL RECOVERY

    DOEpatents

    Magel, T.T.

    1959-02-10

    An apparatus is described for preparing high purity metal such as uranium, plutonium and the like from an impure mass of the same metal. The apparatus is arranged so that the impure metal is heated and swept by a stream of hydrogen gas bearing a halogen such as iodine. The volatiie metal halide formed is carried on to a hot filament where the metal halide is decomposed and the molten high purity metal is collected in a rceeiver below

  20. [Evaluation of viral safety of a high-purity human factor VIII concentrate submitted to 2 specific virus inactivation treatments (FANDHI)].

    PubMed

    Ristol, P; Gensana, M; Fernández, J; Massot, M; Biescas, H; Darling, A; Jorquera, J I; Vericat, F

    1996-04-01

    To perform a validation study of the production process of a human high purity FVIII concentrate, obtained by affinity chromatography and treated with solvent-detergent and 80 degrees C, 72- hour dry heating in the final vial, in order to demonstrate its viral safety. The ability to inactivate or eliminate viruses was studied in the steps of PEG precipitation, solvent-detergent treatment (6 h 25 degrees C), affinity chromatography and lyophilization plus heating 80 degrees C for 72 h. HIV and models for hepatitis A, B and C, as well as a model for parvovirus B-19 were employed. The experiments were carried out by spiking the samples at each step with 10% of their volume with the highest titer available virus culture. The samples were processed under validated conditions (mimicking the industrial process) and the residual infectivity was determined (as well as p24 antigen and reverse transcriptase for HIV at the solvent-detergent step). No residual infectivity could be detected for enveloped viruses (HIV and models for hepatitis B and C) after the first minutes of solvent-detergent treatment, which lasts 6 hours. Lyophilization followed by heating 80 degrees C for 72 hours caused complete disappearance of infectivity for the models of hepatitis A and C, before 24 hours of a treatment which lasts 72. Furthermore, lyophilization plus heating reduced infectivity for the models of hepatitis B and parvovirus B-19 by 3.4 and 4.1 logs, respectively. The affinity chromatography reduced infectivity by 7.6 logs for the model of hepatitis B and 2 logs for HIV. PEG precipitation also reduced the infectivity by 3.3 logs for the model of hepatitis A and by 1.2 logs for the model of parvovirus B-19. Taking the process as whole, the study showed cumulative reduction values between 5.3 and > 19 logs of the analyzed viruses. 25 million FVIII units have been transfused so far as FANHDI, with no seroconversion detected. Furthermore, no increase in FVIII inhibitor frequency has been

  1. New polymorphic variants of human blood clotting factor IX

    SciTech Connect

    Surin, V.L.; Luk`yanenko, A.V.; Tagiev, A.F.; Smirnova, O.V.; Plutalov, O.V.; Berlin, Yu.A.

    1995-04-01

    The polymorphism of Alu-repeats, which are located in the introns of the human factor IX gene (copies 1-3), was studied. To identify polymorphic variants, direct sequencing of PCR products that contained appropriate repeats was used. In each case, 20 unrelated X chromosomes were studied. A polymorphic Dra I site was found near the 3{prime}-end of Alu copy 3 within the region of the polyA tract. A PCR-based testing system with internal control of restriction hydrolysis was suggested. Testing 81 unrelated X chromosomes revealed that the frequency of the polymorphic Dra I site is 0.23. Taq I polymorphism, which was revealed in Alu copy 4 of factor IX gene in our previous work, was found to be closely linked to Dra I polymorphism. Studies in linkage between different types of polymorphisms of the factor IX gene revealed the presence of a rare polymorphism in intron a that was located within the same minisatellite region as the known polymorphic insertion 50 bp/Dde I. However, the size of the insertion in our case was 26 bp. Only one polymorphic variant was found among over 150 unrelated X chromosomes derived from humans from Moscow and its vicinity. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Protein sieving characteristics of sub-20-nm pore size filters at varying ionic strength during nanofiltration of Coagulation Factor IX.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Clint J; Jorba, Nuria; Shitanishi, Kenneth T; Herring, Steven W

    2013-05-01

    Nanofiltration assures that protein therapeutics are free of adventitious agents such as viruses. Nanofilter pores must allow passage of protein drugs but be small enough to retain viruses. Five nanofilters have been evaluated to identify those that can be used interchangeably to yield a high purity Coagulation Factor IX product. When product preparations prior to nanofiltration were analyzed using electrophoresis, Western blot, liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry and size exclusion HPLC, factor IX, inter - α - trypsin inhibitor and C4b binding protein (C4BP) were observed. C4BP was removed from product by all five nanofilters when nanofiltration was performed at physiological ionic strength. However, at high ionic strength, C4BP was removed by only two nanofilters. HPLC indicated that the Stokes radius of C4BP was larger at low ionic strength than at high ionic strength. The results suggest that C4BP exists in an open conformation at physiological ionic strength and is removed by nanofiltration whereas, at high ionic strength, the protein collapses to an extent that allows passage through some nanofilters. Manufacturers should be aware that protein contaminants in other nanofiltered protein drugs could behave similarly and conditions of nanofiltration must be evaluated to ensure consistent product purity.

  3. High purity silane and silicon production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, William C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Silicon tetrachloride, hydrogen and metallurgical silicon are reacted at about 400.degree.-600.degree. C. and at pressures in excess of 100 psi, and specifically from about 300 up to about 600 psi to form di- and trichlorosilane that is subjected to disproportionation in the presence of an anion exchange resin to form high purity silane. By-product and unreacted materials are recycled, with metallurgical silicon and hydrogen being essentially the only consumed feed materials. The silane product may be further purified, as by means of activated carbon or cryogenic distillation, and decomposed in a fluid bed or free space reactor to form high purity polycrystalline silicon and by-product hydrogen which can be recycled for further use. The process results in simplified waste disposal operations and enhances the overall conversion of metallurgical grade silicon to silane and high purity silicon for solar cell and semiconductor silicon applications.

  4. Long-Acting Recombinant Fusion Protein Linking Coagulation Factor IX with Albumin (rIX-FP) in Children

    PubMed Central

    Chambost, Hervé; Male, Christoph; Lambert, Thierry; Halimeh, Susan; Chernova, Tatiana; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Curtin, Julie; Voigt, Christine; Li, Yanyan; Jacobs, Iris; Santagostino, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Summary A global phase 3 study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety of a recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor IX with albumin (rIX-FP) in 27 previously treated male children (1–11 years) with severe and moderately severe haemophilia B (factor IX [FIX] activity ≤2 IU/dl). All patients received routine prophylaxis once every seven days for up to 77 weeks, and treated any bleeding episodes on-demand. The mean terminal half-life of rIX-FP was 91.4 hours (h), 4.3-fold longer than previous FIX treatment and clearance was 1.11 ml/h/kg, 6.4-fold slower than previous FIX treatment. The median (Q1, Q3) annualised spontaneous bleeding rate was 0.00 (0.00, 0.91) and was similar between the <6 years and ≥6 years age groups, with a weekly median prophylactic dose of 46 IU/kg. In addition, patients maintained a median trough level of 13.4 IU/dl FIX activity on weekly prophylaxis. Overall, 97.2% of bleeding episodes were successfully treated with one or two injections of rIX-FP (95% CI: 92% to 99%), 88.7% with one injection, and 96% of the treatments were rated effective (excellent or good) by the Investigator. No patient developed FIX inhibitors and no safety concerns were identified. These results indicate that rIX-FP is safe and effective for preventing and treating bleeding episodes in children with haemophilia B with weekly prophylaxis. Routine prophylaxis with rIX-FP at treatment intervals of up to 14 days are currently being investigated in children with severe and moderately severe haemophilia B. Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01662531) PMID:27583313

  5. Major role of local immune responses in antibody formation to factor IX in AAV gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Cao, O; Swalm, B; Dobrzynski, E; Mingozzi, F; Herzog, R W

    2005-10-01

    The risk of an immune response to the coagulation factor IX (F.IX) transgene product is a concern in gene therapy for the X-linked bleeding disorder hemophilia B. In order to investigate the mechanism of F.IX-specific lymphocyte activation in the context of adeno-associated viral (AAV) gene transfer to skeletal muscle, we injected AAV-2 vector expressing human F.IX (hF.IX) into outbred immune-competent mice. Systemic hF.IX levels were transiently detected in the circulation, but diminished concomitant with activation of CD4+ T and B cells. ELISPOT assays documented robust responses to hF.IX in the draining lymph nodes of injected muscle by day 14. Formation of inhibitory antibodies to hF.IX was observed over a wide range of vector doses, with increased doses causing stronger immune responses. A prolonged inflammatory reaction in muscle started at 1.5-2 months, but ultimately failed to eliminate transgene expression. By 1.5 months, hF.IX antigen re-emerged in circulation in approximately 70% of animals injected with high vector dose. Hepatic gene transfer elicited only infrequent and weaker immune responses, with higher vector doses causing a reduction in T-cell responses to hF.IX. In summary, the data document substantial influence of target tissue, local antigen presentation, and antigen levels on lymphocyte responses to F.IX.

  6. High purity silica reflecting heat shield development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Congdon, W.

    1974-01-01

    A reflecting heat shield composed of fused silica in which the scattering results from the refractive index mismatch between silica particles and the voids introduced during the fabrication process is developed. Major considerations and conclusions of the development are: the best material to use is Type A, which is capable of ultra-high-purity and which does not show the 0.243 micrometer absorption band; the reflection efficiency of fused silica is decreased at higher temperatures due to the bathochromic shift of the ultraviolet cut-off; for a given silica material, over the wavelength region and particle sizes tested, the monodisperse particle size configurations produce higher reflectances than continuous particle size configurations; and the smaller monodisperse particle size configurations give higher reflectance than the larger ones. A reflecting silica configuration that is an efficient reflector of shock layer radiation at high ablation temperatures is achieved by tailoring the matrix for optimum scattering and using an ultra-high-purity material.

  7. Method of high purity silane preparation

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Y. Simon; Belov, Eugene P.; Gerlivanov, Vadim G.; Zadde, Vitali V.; Kleschevnikova, Solomonida I.; Korneev, Nikolai N.; Lebedev, Eugene N.; Pinov, Akhsarbek B.; Ryabenko, Eugene A.; Strebkov, Dmitry S.; Chernyshev, Eugene A.

    2000-01-01

    A process for the preparation of high purity silane, suitable for forming thin layer silicon structures in various semiconductor devices and high purity poly- and single crystal silicon for a variety of applications, is provided. Synthesis of high-purity silane starts with a temperature assisted reaction of metallurgical silicon with alcohol in the presence of a catalyst. Alcoxysilanes formed in the silicon-alcohol reaction are separated from other products and purified. Simultaneous reduction and oxidation of alcoxysilanes produces gaseous silane and liquid secondary products, including, active part of a catalyst, tetra-alcoxysilanes, and impurity compounds having silicon-hydrogen bonds. Silane is purified by an impurity adsorption technique. Unreacted alcohol is extracted and returned to the reaction with silicon. Concentrated mixture of alcoxysilanes undergoes simultaneous oxidation and reduction in the presence of a catalyst at the temperature -20.degree. C. to +40.degree. C. during 1 to 50 hours. Tetra-alcoxysilane extracted from liquid products of simultaneous oxidation and reduction reaction is directed to a complete hydrolysis. Complete hydrolysis of tetra-alcoxysilane results in formation of industrial silica sol and alcohol. Alcohol is dehydrated by tetra-alcoxysilane and returned to the reaction with silicon.

  8. Characterization of the clotting activities of structurally different forms of activated factor IX. Enzymatic properties of normal human factor IXa alpha, factor IXa beta, and activated factor IX Chapel Hill.

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, M J; Breitkreutz, L; Trapp, H; Briet, E; Noyes, C M; Lundblad, R L; Roberts, H R

    1985-01-01

    Two structurally different forms of activated human Factor IX (Factor IXa alpha and IXa beta) have been previously reported to have essentially identical clotting activity in vitro. Although it has been shown that activated Factor IX Chapel Hill, an abnormal Factor IX isolated from the plasma of a patient with mild hemophilia B, and normal Factor IXa alpha are structurally very similar, the clotting activity of activated Factor IX Chapel Hill is much lower (approximately fivefold) than that of normal Factor IXa beta. In the present study we have prepared activated Factor IX by incubating human Factor IX with calcium and Russell's viper venom covalently bound to agarose. Fractionation of the activated Factor IX by high-performance liquid chromatography demonstrated the presence of both Factors IXa alpha and IXa beta. On the basis of active site concentration, determined by titration with antithrombin III, the clotting activities of activated Factor IX Chapel Hill and IXa alpha were similar, but both activities were less than 20% of the clotting activity of Factor IXa beta. Activated Factor IX activity was also measured in the absence of calcium, phospholipid, and Factor VIII, by determination of the rate of Factor X activation in the presence of polylysine. In the presence of polylysine, the rates of Factor X activation by activated Factor IX Chapel Hill, Factor IXa alpha, and Factor IXa beta were essentially identical. We conclude that the clotting activity of activated Factor IX Chapel Hill is reduced when compared with that of Factor IXa beta but essentially normal when compared with that of Factor IXa alpha. PMID:3871202

  9. Evidence for a prevalent dimorphism in the activation peptide of human coagulation factor IX.

    PubMed Central

    McGraw, R A; Davis, L M; Noyes, C M; Lundblad, R L; Roberts, H R; Graham, J B; Stafford, D W

    1985-01-01

    We have independently isolated and characterized cDNA and genomic clones for the human coagulation factor IX. Sequence analysis in both cases indicates that threonine is encoded by the triplet ACT as the third residue of the activation peptide. This is in agreement with some earlier reports but in disagreement with others that show the alanine triplet GCT at this position. The discrepancy can thus be accounted for by natural variation of a single nucleotide in the normal population. Amino acid sequence analyses of activated factor IX from plasma samples of four individuals yielded two cases of alanine and two cases of threonine at the third position of the activation peptide. In factor IX from pooled plasma and in factor IX from a heterozygous individual, however, both alanine and threonine were found. Taken together, the findings show that a prevalent nondeleterious dimorphism exists in the activation peptide of human coagulation factor IX. PMID:3857619

  10. High-purity thermoacoustic isotope enrichment.

    PubMed

    Swift, G W; Geller, D A; Backhaus, S N

    2014-08-01

    In a tube many wavelengths long, thermoacoustic separation of a gas mixture can produce very high purities. A flexible wall allows a spatially continuous supply of acoustic power into such a long tube. Coiling the tube and immersing it in a fluid lets a single-wavelength, circulating, traveling pressure wave in the fluid drive all the wavelengths in the tube wall and gas. Preliminary measurements confirm many aspects of the concept with neon ((20)Ne and (22)Ne) and highlight some challenges of practical implementation.

  11. Method for preparing high purity vanadium

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.; Carlson, O.N.

    1984-05-16

    A method for preparing high purity vanadium having a low silicon content has been developed. Vanadium pentoxide is reduced with a stoichiometric, or slightly deficient amount of aluminum to produce a vanadium-aluminum alloy containing an excess of oxygen. Silicon is removed by electron-beam melting the alloy under oxidizing conditions to promote the formation of SiO which is volatile at elevated temperatures. Excess oxygen is removed by heating the alloy in the presence of calcium metal to form calcium oxide.

  12. Method for preparing high purity vanadium

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick; Carlson, O. Norman

    1986-09-09

    A method for preparing high purity vanadium having a low silicon content has been developed. Vanadium pentoxide is reduced with a stoichiometric, or slightly deficient amount of aluminum to produce a vanadium-aluminum alloy containing an excess of oxygen. Silicon is removed by electron-beam melting the alloy under oxidizing conditions to promote the formation of SiO which is volatile at elevated temperatures. Excess oxygen is removed by heating the alloy in the presence of calcium metal to form calcium oxide.

  13. Coagulation Factor IX concentrate: method of preparation and assessment of potential in vivo thrombogenicity in animal models.

    PubMed

    Menache, D; Behre, H E; Orthner, C L; Nunez, H; Anderson, H D; Triantaphyllopoulos, D C; Kosow, D P

    1984-12-01

    Thrombosis and/or disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) are complications specifically associated with the use of factor IX complex in some patients. Assuming that these complications might result from zymogen overload, we have produced, using diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-Sephadex (Pharmacia, Piscataway, NJ) and sulfated dextran chromatography, a factor IX concentrate (coagulation factor IX) that is essentially free of prothrombin, factor VII, and factor X. Factor IX specific activity is at least 5 U/mg protein, a 250-fold purification compared to plasma. Amounts of factors II, VII, and X are less than 5 units each per 100 units of factor IX. The concentrate is essentially free of activated clotting factors and contains no added heparin. In the rabbit stasis model, a dose of 200 factor IX U/kg was less thrombogenic than 100 factor IX U/kg of the DEAE-Sephadex eluate from which the concentrate was derived. Infusion of 200 factor IX U/kg did not induce DIC in the nonstasis rabbit model, whereas 100 factor IX U/kg of the DEAE-Sephadex eluate resulted in DIC in this model. Several factor IX lots were found to have shortened nonactivated partial thromboplastin times (PTTs), but were nonthrombogenic in both animal models. These data indicate that coagulation factor IX concentrate is less thrombogenic than factor IX complex.

  14. Process for producing high purity aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mayes, W.W.

    1980-05-20

    High-purity C7 and/or C8 aromatic hydrocarbons are produced by reforming a C7 or C8 full boiling carbon number naphtha feed fraction or combinations thereof under reforming conditions of sufficient severity to convert essentially all of the nonaromatic portion of the naphtha feed boiling in the C7 to C8 aromatic boiling range to C7 and/or C8 aromatics, and then separating the reformate by fractional distillation into highpurity fractions of C7 and/or C8 aromatic hydrocarbons. Preferably, the C7 and/or C8 full boiling carbon number naphtha feed fraction is reformed in a plurality of reformer reaction stages with increasingly more severe conditions in order to maximize the yield of the C7 and C8 aromatics.

  15. High purity silica reflective heat shield development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blome, J.

    1974-01-01

    Progress is reported on the development of a high purity reflective heat shield material. Silicon dioxide was selected as the material because it is highly reflective in the correct wavelength band, has good ablation characteristics, is thermal shock resistant, and is readily fabricated to full size at reasonable cost. Conclusions indicate that: reflectance is affected by purity and morphology; the pure material is readily available; required purity and morphology can be maintained with reasonable care; high reflectances are determined (0.99 from 0.4 to 1.2 microns); major processing steps are defined; and the material appears to be cost effective. It is indicated that the materials are developed to the point of readiness for full scale fabrication and characterization.

  16. Workshop on Preserving High Purity Uranium-233

    SciTech Connect

    Krichinsky, Alan M; Giaquinto, Joseph; Canaan, R Douglas {Doug}

    2016-01-01

    A workshop was held on at the MARC X conference to provide a forum for the scientific community to communicate needs for high-purity 233U and its by-products in order to preserve critical items otherwise slated for downblending and disposal. Currently, only a small portion of the U.S. holdings of separated 233U is being preserved. However, many additional kilograms of 233U (>97% pure) still are destined to be downblended which will permanently destroy their potential value for many other applications. It is not likely that this material will ever be replaced due to a lack of operating production capability. Summaries of information conveyed at the workshop and feedback obtained from the scientific community are presented herein.

  17. Production of high purity titanium by electrorefining

    SciTech Connect

    Kanda, Minoru; Sato, Kazusuke; Kimura, Etsuji

    1996-10-01

    The behavior of impurities in electrorefining of Ti by NaCl-KCl-TiClx molten salts and the production process of its molten salts have been studied. As a result, purification of salts, materials for the apparatus and the quality of anode Ti were important for the production of high purity Ti. By using purified molten salts and the apparatus constructed of Ni, impurities of the Ti deposit, such as Fe, Ni, could be lowered to about 0.01 ppm. The contents of Al and Cr of this Ti were about 0.1 ppm. Volatile impurities were removed from the Ti obtained in this process by electron beam melting and Ti ingots with grades in excess of 6N (except for gas elements) were obtained.

  18. Processing to obtain high-purity gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista, Renato G.

    2003-03-01

    Gallium has become increasingly popular as a substrate material for electronic devices. Aside from ore, gallium can be obtained from such industrial sources as the Bayer process caustic liquor that is a byproduct of bauxite processing, flue dust removed from the fume-collection system in plants that produce aluminum by the electrolytic process, zinc refinery residues, gallium scrap materials, and coal fly ash. The purification process for gallium can start with solvent-extraction processes where the concentrations of impurities, especially metals, are reduced to the ppm range. This article describes how ultra-purification techniques can be employed to reduce the undesirable impurities to the low ppb range. The various procedures described give an idea as to the extent of work needed to obtain and prepare high-purity gallium for electronic application.

  19. Recombinant Human Factor IX Produced from Transgenic Porcine Milk

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Meng-Hwan; Lin, Yin-Shen; Tu, Ching-Fu; Yen, Chon-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Production of biopharmaceuticals from transgenic animal milk is a cost-effective method for highly complex proteins that cannot be efficiently produced using conventional systems such as microorganisms or animal cells. Yields of recombinant human factor IX (rhFIX) produced from transgenic porcine milk under the control of the bovine α-lactalbumin promoter reached 0.25 mg/mL. The rhFIX protein was purified from transgenic porcine milk using a three-column purification scheme after a precipitation step to remove casein. The purified protein had high specific activity and a low ratio of the active form (FIXa). The purified rhFIX had 11.9 γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) residues/mol protein, which approached full occupancy of the 12 potential sites in the Gla domain. The rhFIX was shown to have a higher isoelectric point and lower sialic acid content than plasma-derived FIX (pdFIX). The rhFIX had the same N-glycosylation sites and phosphorylation sites as pdFIX, but had a higher specific activity. These results suggest that rhFIX produced from porcine milk is physiologically active and they support the use of transgenic animals as bioreactors for industrial scale production in milk. PMID:24955355

  20. Recombinant human factor IX produced from transgenic porcine milk.

    PubMed

    Lee, Meng-Hwan; Lin, Yin-Shen; Tu, Ching-Fu; Yen, Chon-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Production of biopharmaceuticals from transgenic animal milk is a cost-effective method for highly complex proteins that cannot be efficiently produced using conventional systems such as microorganisms or animal cells. Yields of recombinant human factor IX (rhFIX) produced from transgenic porcine milk under the control of the bovine α-lactalbumin promoter reached 0.25 mg/mL. The rhFIX protein was purified from transgenic porcine milk using a three-column purification scheme after a precipitation step to remove casein. The purified protein had high specific activity and a low ratio of the active form (FIXa). The purified rhFIX had 11.9 γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) residues/mol protein, which approached full occupancy of the 12 potential sites in the Gla domain. The rhFIX was shown to have a higher isoelectric point and lower sialic acid content than plasma-derived FIX (pdFIX). The rhFIX had the same N-glycosylation sites and phosphorylation sites as pdFIX, but had a higher specific activity. These results suggest that rhFIX produced from porcine milk is physiologically active and they support the use of transgenic animals as bioreactors for industrial scale production in milk.

  1. Identification of the molecular defect in factor IX Chapel Hill: substitution of histidine for arginine at position 145.

    PubMed Central

    Noyes, C M; Griffith, M J; Roberts, H R; Lundblad, R L

    1983-01-01

    Hemophilia B Chapel Hill is a mild hereditary hemorrhagic disorder in which the factor IX antigen is present in normal amounts but factor IX biological activity is markedly reduced. Previous studies have demonstrated that purified factor IX Chapel Hill has 8% of the activity of normal human factor IX and that the activation of factor IX Chapel Hill is defective in that only one of the two peptide bonds hydrolyzed during activation of normal factor IX is cleaved. The tryptic peptides from normal human factor IX and factor IX Chapel Hill were subjected to analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography. Comparison of the elution profile of the peptides obtained from factor IX Chapel Hill and normal factor IX demonstrated that the tripeptide Leu-Thr-Arg, which is derived from the normal molecule (positions 143-145) immediately amino-terminal from the Arg-Ala peptide bond at 145-146 that is cleaved during the activation of factor IX with factor XIa, was absent in the digest obtained from factor factor IX Chapel Hill. The elongated "activation peptide" from factor factor IX Chapel Hill was obtained by further high-performance liquid chromatographic fractionation and subjected to primary structure analysis. The following sequence, corresponding to positions 143-147, was obtained: Leu-Thr-His-Ala-Glu. Thus, the primary molecular defect in factor factor IX Chapel Hill is the substitution of histidine for arginine at position 145. This substitution precludes cleavage by factor XIa at this peptide bond, and the activation peptide region remains associated with the light chain of factor IXa Chapel Hill. PMID:6603618

  2. Factor IX mutations in haemophilia B patients in Malaysia: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Balraj, Pauline; Ahmad, Munirah; Khoo, Alan Soo Beng; Ayob, Yasmin

    2012-06-01

    Haemophilia B is caused by coagulation defects in the factor IX gene located in Xq27.1 on the X chromosome. Identification of mutations contributing to defective factor IX may be advantageous for precise carrier and prenatal diagnosis. We studied 16 patients from 11 families, consisting of 8 patients of the Malay ethnic group, of which 6 were siblings. Factor IX mutations have not been previously reported in the Malay ethnic group. The functional region of the factor IX gene was sequenced and mutations were identified in either the exon or intronic regions in 15 of the patients. One novel mutation, 6660_6664delTTCTT was identified in siblings with moderate form of haemophilia B. Mutations identified in our patients when linked with disease severity were similar to findings in other populations. In summary, this preliminary data will be used to build a Malaysian mutation database which would facilitate genetic counseling.

  3. Dynamic shear deformation in high purity Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Cerreta, Ellen K; Bingert, John F; Trujillo, Carl P; Lopez, Mike F; Gray, George T

    2009-01-01

    The forced shear test specimen, first developed by Meyer et al. [Meyer L. et al., Critical Adiabatic Shear Strength of Low Alloyed Steel Under Compressive Loading, Metallurgical Applications of Shock Wave and High Strain Rate Phenomena (Marcel Decker, 1986), 657; Hartmann K. et al., Metallurgical Effects on Impact Loaded Materials, Shock Waves and High Strain rate Phenomena in Metals (Plenum, 1981), 325-337.], has been utilized in a number of studies. While the geometry of this specimen does not allow for the microstructure to exactly define the location of shear band formation and the overall mechanical response of a specimen is highly sensitive to the geometry utilized, the forced shear specimen is useful for characterizing the influence of parameters such as strain rate, temperature, strain, and load on the microstructural evolution within a shear band. Additionally, many studies have utilized this geometry to advance the understanding of shear band development. In this study, by varying the geometry, specifically the ratio of the inner hole to the outer hat diameter, the dynamic shear localization response of high purity Fe was examined. Post mortem characterization was performed to quantify the width of the localizations and examine the microstructural and textural evolution of shear deformation in a bcc metal. Increased instability in mechanical response is strongly linked with development of enhanced intergranular misorientations, high angle boundaries, and classical shear textures characterized through orientation distribution functions.

  4. Biaxial deformation in high purity aluminum

    DOE PAGES

    Livescu, V.; Bingert, J. F.; Liu, C.; ...

    2015-09-25

    The convergence of multiple characterization tools has been applied to investigate the relationship of microstructure on damage evolution in high purity aluminum. The extremely coarse grain size of the disc-shaped sample provided a quasi-two dimensional structure from which the location of surface-measured features could be inferred. In particular, the role of pre-existing defects on damage growth was accessible due to the presence of casting porosity in the aluminum. Micro tomography, electron backscatter diffraction, and digital image correlation were applied to interrogate the sample in three dimensions. Recently micro-bulge testing apparatus was used to deform the pre-characterized disc of aluminum inmore » biaxial tension, and related analysis techniques were applied to map local strain fields. Subsequent post-mortem characterization of the failed sample was performed to correlate structure to damaged regions. We determined that strain localization and associated damage was most strongly correlated with grain boundary intersections and plastic anisotropy gradients between grains. Pre-existing voids played less of an apparent role than was perhaps initially expected. Finally, these combined techniques provide insight to the mechanism of damage initiation, propagation, and failure, along with a test bed for predictive damage models incorporating anisotropic microstructural effects.« less

  5. High-purity germanium crystal growing

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, W.L.; Haller, E.E.

    1982-10-01

    The germanium crystals used for the fabrication of nuclear radiation detectors are required to have a purity and crystalline perfection which is unsurpassed by any other solid material. These crystals should not have a net electrically active impurity concentration greater than 10/sup 10/cm/sup -3/ and be essentially free of charge trapping defects. Such perfect crystals of germanium can be grown only because of the highly favorable chemical and physical properties of this element. However, ten years of laboratory scale and commercial experience has still not made the production of such crystals routine. The origin and control of many impurities and electrically active defect complexes is now fairly well understood but regular production is often interrupted for long periods due to the difficulty of achieving the required high purity or to charge trapping in detectors made from crystals seemingly grown under the required conditions. The compromises involved in the selection of zone refining and crystal grower parts and ambients is discussed and the difficulty in controlling the purity of key elements in the process is emphasized. The consequences of growing in a hydrogen ambient are discussed in detail and it is shown how complexes of neutral defects produce electrically active centers.

  6. Biaxial deformation in high purity aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Livescu, V.; Bingert, J. F.; Liu, C.; Lovato, M. L.; Patterson, B. M.

    2015-09-25

    The convergence of multiple characterization tools has been applied to investigate the relationship of microstructure on damage evolution in high purity aluminum. The extremely coarse grain size of the disc-shaped sample provided a quasi-two dimensional structure from which the location of surface-measured features could be inferred. In particular, the role of pre-existing defects on damage growth was accessible due to the presence of casting porosity in the aluminum. Micro tomography, electron backscatter diffraction, and digital image correlation were applied to interrogate the sample in three dimensions. Recently micro-bulge testing apparatus was used to deform the pre-characterized disc of aluminum in biaxial tension, and related analysis techniques were applied to map local strain fields. Subsequent post-mortem characterization of the failed sample was performed to correlate structure to damaged regions. We determined that strain localization and associated damage was most strongly correlated with grain boundary intersections and plastic anisotropy gradients between grains. Pre-existing voids played less of an apparent role than was perhaps initially expected. Finally, these combined techniques provide insight to the mechanism of damage initiation, propagation, and failure, along with a test bed for predictive damage models incorporating anisotropic microstructural effects.

  7. Factor IX gene analysis in 70 unrelated patients with haemophilia B: description of 13 new mutations.

    PubMed

    Attali, O; Vinciguerra, C; Trzeciak, M C; Durin, A; Pernod, G; Gay, V; Ménart, C; Sobas, F; Dechavanne, M; Négrier, C

    1999-11-01

    Seventy unrelated patients suffering from haemophilia B have been screened for determining the molecular defect and for evaluating the spectrum of factor IX mutations in the Rhône Alpes region in France. Most patients were characterized with respect to factor IX antigen and factor IX coagulant activity. We have used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to obtain a full scanning of the whole coding, promoter, and exon flanking sequences of the factor IX gene. This technique enabled us to determine the molecular defect in 68 out of 70 families (97%), and the mutation was further identified in the two last patients with a direct sequencing of the gene. A total of 2 complete gene deletions in patients with antifactor IX inhibitor, 6 small insertions/deletions and 62 point mutations were found. Two of these nucleotide substitutions (Arg145His and Ala233Thr) were detected in 21 patients (30%) suggesting the existence of a local founder effect. Thirteen mutations were previously undescribed, including 7 missense mutations. The detection of mutations in patients affected with haemophilia B may shed some light in the structure-function relationship of factor IX molecule within the coagulation system.

  8. Transforming the treatment for hemophilia B patients: update on the clinical development of recombinant fusion protein linking recombinant coagulation factor IX with recombinant albumin (rIX-FP).

    PubMed

    Santagostino, Elena

    2016-05-01

    Recombinant fusion protein linking recombinant coagulation factor IX with recombinant albumin (rIX-FP; Idelvion®(†)) is an innovative new treatment designed to extend the half-life of factor IX (FIX) and ease the burden of care for hemophilia B patients. The rIX-FP clinical development program - PROLONG-9FP - is in its advanced phases, with pivotal studies in previously treated adults, adolescents, and pediatrics now completed. Across all age groups studied, rIX-FP has demonstrated a markedly improved pharmacokinetic profile compared with plasma-derived and recombinant FIX treatments, with a 30-40% higher incremental recovery, an approximately 5-fold longer half-life, a lower clearance, and a greater area under the curve. rIX-FP has been very well tolerated with an excellent safety profile. In the pivotal studies, there have been no reports of FIX inhibitors or antidrug antibodies, and few treatment-related adverse events have been observed. Prophylactic regimens of rIX-FP administered once weekly to once every 14 days have been highly effective. When used for surgical prophylaxis, a single infusion of rIX-FP has been sufficient to maintain hemostasis, even during major orthopedic surgery. An ongoing study is now enrolling previously untreated patients and evaluating the possibility of extending the dosing interval to every 21 days. There is little doubt that rIX-FP will transform the treatment of hemophilia B. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

  9. Validation of the manufacturing process used to produce long-acting recombinant factor IX Fc fusion protein.

    PubMed

    McCue, J; Osborne, D; Dumont, J; Peters, R; Mei, B; Pierce, G F; Kobayashi, K; Euwart, D

    2014-07-01

    Recombinant factor IX Fc (rFIXFc) fusion protein is the first of a new class of bioengineered long-acting factors approved for the treatment and prevention of bleeding episodes in haemophilia B. The aim of this work was to describe the manufacturing process for rFIXFc, to assess product quality and to evaluate the capacity of the process to remove impurities and viruses. This manufacturing process utilized a transferable and scalable platform approach established for therapeutic antibody manufacturing and adapted for production of the rFIXFc molecule. rFIXFc was produced using a process free of human- and animal-derived raw materials and a host cell line derived from human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293H cells. The process employed multi-step purification and viral clearance processing, including use of a protein A affinity capture chromatography step, which binds to the Fc portion of the rFIXFc molecule with high affinity and specificity, and a 15 nm pore size virus removal nanofilter. Process validation studies were performed to evaluate identity, purity, activity and safety. The manufacturing process produced rFIXFc with consistent product quality and high purity. Impurity clearance validation studies demonstrated robust and reproducible removal of process-related impurities and adventitious viruses. The rFIXFc manufacturing process produces a highly pure product, free of non-human glycan structures. Validation studies demonstrate that this product is produced with consistent quality and purity. In addition, the scalability and transferability of this process are key attributes to ensure consistent and continuous supply of rFIXFc. © 2014 The Authors. Haemophilia Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Validation of the manufacturing process used to produce long-acting recombinant factor IX Fc fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    McCue, J; Osborne, D; Dumont, J; Peters, R; Mei, B; Pierce, G F; Kobayashi, K; Euwart, D

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant factor IX Fc (rFIXFc) fusion protein is the first of a new class of bioengineered long-acting factors approved for the treatment and prevention of bleeding episodes in haemophilia B. The aim of this work was to describe the manufacturing process for rFIXFc, to assess product quality and to evaluate the capacity of the process to remove impurities and viruses. This manufacturing process utilized a transferable and scalable platform approach established for therapeutic antibody manufacturing and adapted for production of the rFIXFc molecule. rFIXFc was produced using a process free of human- and animal-derived raw materials and a host cell line derived from human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293H cells. The process employed multi-step purification and viral clearance processing, including use of a protein A affinity capture chromatography step, which binds to the Fc portion of the rFIXFc molecule with high affinity and specificity, and a 15 nm pore size virus removal nanofilter. Process validation studies were performed to evaluate identity, purity, activity and safety. The manufacturing process produced rFIXFc with consistent product quality and high purity. Impurity clearance validation studies demonstrated robust and reproducible removal of process-related impurities and adventitious viruses. The rFIXFc manufacturing process produces a highly pure product, free of non-human glycan structures. Validation studies demonstrate that this product is produced with consistent quality and purity. In addition, the scalability and transferability of this process are key attributes to ensure consistent and continuous supply of rFIXFc. PMID:24811361

  11. High-purity silicon for solar cell applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dosaj, V. D.; Hunt, L. P.; Schei, A.

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses the production of solar cells from high-purity silicon. The process consists of reducing the level of impurities in the raw materials, preventing material contamination before and after entering the furnace, and performing orders-of-magnitude reduction of metal impurity concentrations. The high-purity raw materials are considered with reference to carbon reductants, silica, and graphite electrodes. Attention is also given to smelting experiments used to demonstrate, in an experimental-scale furnace, the production of high-purity SoG-Si. It is found that high-purity silicon may be produced from high-purity quartz and chemically purified charcoal in a 50-kVA arc furnace. The major contamination source is shown to be impurities from the carbon reducing materials.

  12. High-purity silicon for solar cell applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dosaj, V. D.; Hunt, L. P.; Schei, A.

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses the production of solar cells from high-purity silicon. The process consists of reducing the level of impurities in the raw materials, preventing material contamination before and after entering the furnace, and performing orders-of-magnitude reduction of metal impurity concentrations. The high-purity raw materials are considered with reference to carbon reductants, silica, and graphite electrodes. Attention is also given to smelting experiments used to demonstrate, in an experimental-scale furnace, the production of high-purity SoG-Si. It is found that high-purity silicon may be produced from high-purity quartz and chemically purified charcoal in a 50-kVA arc furnace. The major contamination source is shown to be impurities from the carbon reducing materials.

  13. Characteristics of GRIFFIN high-purity germanium clover detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizwan, U.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Andreoiu, C.; Ball, G. C.; Chester, A.; Domingo, T.; Dunlop, R.; Hackman, G.; Rand, E. T.; Smith, J. K.; Starosta, K.; Svensson, C. E.; Voss, P.; Williams, J.

    2016-06-01

    The Gamma-Ray Infrastructure For Fundamental Investigations of Nuclei, GRIFFIN, is a new experimental facility for radioactive decay studies at the TRIUMF-ISAC laboratory. The performance of the 16 high-purity germanium (HPGe) clover detectors that will make up the GRIFFIN spectrometer is reported. The energy resolution, efficiency, timing resolution, crosstalk and preamplifier properties of each crystal were measured using a combination of analog and digital data acquisition techniques. The absolute efficiency and add-back factors are determined for the energy range of 80-3450 keV. The detectors show excellent performance with an average over all 64 crystals of a FWHM energy resolution of 1.89(6) keV and relative efficiency with respect to a 3 in . × 3 in . NaI detector of 41(1)% at 1.3 MeV.

  14. Biodegradable hydrophilic carriers for the oral delivery of hematological factor IX for hemophilia B treatment.

    PubMed

    Horava, Sarena D; Moy, Katie J; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2016-11-30

    Current protein replacement therapies for hemophilia B, a genetic bleeding disorder caused by a deficiency in coagulation factor IX, rely on IV injections and infusions. Oral delivery of factor IX is a desirable needle-free option, especially for prophylaxis. We have developed a biodegradable, pH-responsive hydrogel microcarrier system based on the poly(methacrylic acid)-grafted-poly(ethylene glycol) [P(MAA-g-EG)]. Incorporation of an enzymatically degradable peptide crosslinking agent allows for site-specific degradation by trypsin in the small intestine. P(MAA-g-EG) polymer was synthesized by UV polymerization, and then subsequently crosslinked with peptide crosslinking agent using EDC-NHS chemistry. Physical characterization included FTIR for determining the composition of the peptide crosslinked polymer and SEM for microparticle morphology. The pH-responsive swelling and enzyme-specific degradation were confirmed by bright-field microscopy and the corresponding kinetics were determined by turbidimetric measurements. Evaluating the drug delivery application of this degradable system, factor IX release studies showed site-specific release, and in vitro transport studies resulted in improved factor IX absorption. Incorporation of the degradable crosslinking agent significantly improved the delivery potential as compared to previously reported non-degradable drug delivery systems. Using this degradable P(MAA-g-EG) system as a delivery vehicle for factor IX can possibly lead to an orally administered prophylactic treatment for hemophilia B patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. An important role for the activation peptide domain in controlling factor IX levels in the blood of haemophilia B mice.

    PubMed

    Begbie, Megan E; Mamdani, Asif; Gataiance, Sharon; Eltringham-Smith, Louise J; Bhakta, Varsha; Hortelano, Gonzalo; Sheffield, William P

    2005-12-01

    The factors responsible for the removal of injected factor IX (fIX) from the blood of individuals with haemophilia B are only partly understood, and may include binding to endothelial or subendothelial sites, passive extravasation related to size or charge, or interactions requiring fIX activation. To investigate these issues, we have produced and characterised recombinant fIX proteins with amino acid changes: delta155-177, an internal deletion which removes most of the activation peptide while retaining the activation cleavage sites; S365A, which inactivates the serine protease activity of fIXa; and K5A, previously shown to eliminate fIX binding of endothelial/subendothelial collagen IV. All proteins were expressed in stably transfected HEK 293 cells, purified by immunoaffinity chromatography, and compared to the wild type HEK 293-derived protein (fIX (WT)). Mutant fIX proteins K5A and delta155-177 exhibited 72 and 202% of the specific activity of fIX (WT), respectively; S365A was without activity. Following intravenous injection in haemophilia B (fIX knockout) mice, recoveries did not differ for fIX (WT) and delta155-177, but were higher for K5A and S365A. The terminal catabolic half-life of delta155-177, alone among the mutants, was increased, by 45% versus fIX (WT). Nine hours post-injection, the observed areas under the clearance curve (AUCs) of delta155-177 and K5, but not S365A, were elevated 2-fold. delta155-177 was equally effective as fIX (WT) in reducing blood loss following tail vein transection in haemophilia B mice. Our results suggest that deletion of the multiple sites of fIX post-translational modification found within the activation peptide eliminated important fIX clearance motifs.

  16. Production of High Purity Niobium Ingots at CBMM

    SciTech Connect

    Moura, Lourenco de; Faria Sousa, Clovis Antonio de; Burgos Cruz, Edmundo

    2011-03-31

    CBMM is a fully integrated company, from the mine to the end line of the production chain, supplying different niobium products to the world market: ferroniobium, nickelniobium, niobium pentoxide and high purity metallic niobium. This high purity metallic niobium has long been known to exhibit superconductivity below 9.25 Kelvin. This characteristic has the potential to bring technological benefits for many different areas such as medicine, computing and environment. This paper presents the raw material requirements as well as CBMM experience on producing high purity niobium ingots. The results prove that CBMM material can be the best solution for special applications such as low cost superconductive radiofrequency cavities.

  17. Production of High Purity Niobium Ingots at CBMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Moura, Lourenço; de Faria Sousa, Clovis Antonio; Cruz, Edmundo Burgos

    2011-03-01

    CBMM is a fully integrated company, from the mine to the end line of the production chain, supplying different niobium products to the world market: ferroniobium, nickelniobium, niobium pentoxide and high purity metallic niobium. This high purity metallic niobium has long been known to exhibit superconductivity below 9.25 Kelvin. This characteristic has the potential to bring technological benefits for many different areas such as medicine, computing and environment. This paper presents the raw material requirements as well as CBMM experience on producing high purity niobium ingots. The results prove that CBMM material can be the best solution for special applications such as low cost superconductive radiofrequency cavities.

  18. Collaborative study for the establishment of replacement batches for human coagulation factor IX concentrate reference standards.

    PubMed

    Gray, E; Pickering, W; Hockley, J; Rigsby, P; Weinstein, M; Terao, E; Buchheit, K-H

    2008-12-01

    The European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) batch 1, the World Health Organisation (WHO) 3rd International Standard, Human (IS, 96/854) and the FDA Standard for human blood coagulation Factor IX concentrate have been available since 1996, following their establishment by a common collaborative study. Due to dwindling stocks of all three standards, a new WHO-EDQM-FDA tri-partite collaborative study was launched to establish replacement batches. Thirty laboratories from fourteen countries took part in the collaborative study to assign potency values to candidate preparations. Three candidates, one of recombinant and two of human plasma-derived origins, were assayed against the 3rd IS for Blood Coagulation Factor IX, Concentrate, Human (96/854). The 3rd IS for Blood Coagulation Factors II, VII, IX and X, Plasma, Human (99/826) was also included to evaluate the relationship between the factor IX plasma and concentrate unitage. Thirty-two sets of clotting assay results and two sets of chromogenic assay data were analysed. There was a significant difference in potency estimates by these two methods for the recombinant candidate (sample B) and the plasma IS (sample P). Similar potency values were obtained for the plasma derived products (monoclonal antibody- and chromatography-purified factor IX, samples C and D) by clotting and chromogenic assays. For the clotting assays, intra-laboratory variability (GCV) was found to range from 0.5 - 21.7%, with the GCV for the majority of laboratories being less than 10%. Good inter-laboratory agreement, with the majority of the GCV being less than 10% (GCV range = 4.7 - 10.6 %) was also obtained. The mean potency values estimated by the clotting assay using plasma as pre-diluent (as directed by the Ph. Eur. general chapter method) did not differ from values obtained using buffer. Taking into account the preliminary stability data, the intra- and inter-laboratory variability, and the differences

  19. Long-acting recombinant coagulation factor IX albumin fusion protein (rIX-FP) in hemophilia B: results of a phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Santagostino, Elena; Martinowitz, Uri; Lissitchkov, Toshko; Pan-Petesch, Brigitte; Hanabusa, Hideji; Oldenburg, Johannes; Boggio, Lisa; Negrier, Claude; Pabinger, Ingrid; von Depka Prondzinski, Mario; Altisent, Carmen; Castaman, Giancarlo; Yamamoto, Koji; Álvarez-Roman, Maria-Teresa; Voigt, Christine; Blackman, Nicole; Jacobs, Iris

    2016-04-07

    A global phase 3 study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor IX with albumin (rIX-FP) in 63 previously treated male patients (12-61 years) with severe hemophilia B (factor IX [FIX] activity ≤2%). The study included 2 groups: group 1 patients received routine prophylaxis once every 7 days for 26 weeks, followed by either 7-, 10-, or 14-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 50, 38, or 51 weeks, respectively; group 2 patients received on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes for 26 weeks and then switched to a 7-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 45 weeks. The mean terminal half-life of rIX-FP was 102 hours, 4.3-fold longer than previous FIX treatment. Patients maintained a mean trough of 20 and 12 IU/dL FIX activity on prophylaxis with rIX-FP 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks, respectively. There was 100% reduction in median annualized spontaneous bleeding rate (AsBR) and 100% resolution of target joints when subjects switched from on-demand to prophylaxis treatment with rIX-FP (P< .0001). The median AsBR was 0.00 for all prophylaxis regimens. Overall, 98.6% of bleeding episodes were treated successfully, including 93.6% that were treated with a single injection. No patient developed an inhibitor, and no safety concerns were identified. These results indicate rIX-FP is safe and effective for preventing and treating bleeding episodes in patients with hemophilia B at dosing regimens of 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT0101496274.

  20. Long-acting recombinant coagulation factor IX albumin fusion protein (rIX-FP) in hemophilia B: results of a phase 3 trial

    PubMed Central

    Martinowitz, Uri; Lissitchkov, Toshko; Pan-Petesch, Brigitte; Hanabusa, Hideji; Oldenburg, Johannes; Boggio, Lisa; Negrier, Claude; Pabinger, Ingrid; von Depka Prondzinski, Mario; Altisent, Carmen; Castaman, Giancarlo; Yamamoto, Koji; Álvarez-Roman, Maria-Teresa; Voigt, Christine; Blackman, Nicole; Jacobs, Iris

    2016-01-01

    A global phase 3 study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor IX with albumin (rIX-FP) in 63 previously treated male patients (12-61 years) with severe hemophilia B (factor IX [FIX] activity ≤2%). The study included 2 groups: group 1 patients received routine prophylaxis once every 7 days for 26 weeks, followed by either 7-, 10-, or 14-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 50, 38, or 51 weeks, respectively; group 2 patients received on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes for 26 weeks and then switched to a 7-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 45 weeks. The mean terminal half-life of rIX-FP was 102 hours, 4.3-fold longer than previous FIX treatment. Patients maintained a mean trough of 20 and 12 IU/dL FIX activity on prophylaxis with rIX-FP 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks, respectively. There was 100% reduction in median annualized spontaneous bleeding rate (AsBR) and 100% resolution of target joints when subjects switched from on-demand to prophylaxis treatment with rIX-FP (P < .0001). The median AsBR was 0.00 for all prophylaxis regimens. Overall, 98.6% of bleeding episodes were treated successfully, including 93.6% that were treated with a single injection. No patient developed an inhibitor, and no safety concerns were identified. These results indicate rIX-FP is safe and effective for preventing and treating bleeding episodes in patients with hemophilia B at dosing regimens of 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT0101496274. PMID:26755710

  1. Safety and pharmacokinetics of a novel recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor IX with albumin (rIX-FP) in hemophilia B patients

    PubMed Central

    Negrier, Claude; Klamroth, Robert; Tiede, Andreas; Pabinger-Fasching, Ingrid; Voigt, Christine; Jacobs, Iris; Morfini, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    A recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor IX (FIX) with human albumin (rIX-FP) has been developed to facilitate hemophilia B treatment by less frequent FIX dosing. This first-in-human dose-escalation trial in 25 previously treated subjects with hemophilia B (FIX ≤ 2 IU/dL) examined the safety and pharmacokinetics of 25, 50, and 75 IU/kg rIX-FP. Patients in the 50-IU/kg cohort underwent a comparative pharmacokinetics assessment with their previous FIX product (plasma-derived or recombinant). No allergic reactions or inhibitors were observed. Four mild, possibly treatment-related adverse events were reported. In the 50-IU/kg cohort (13 subjects), the mean half-life of rIX-FP was 92 hours, more than 5 times longer than the subjects' previous FIX product. After 25 or 50 IU/kg rIX-FP administration, the baseline-corrected mean FIX activity remained elevated at day 7 (7.4 IU/dL and 13.4 IU/dL, respectively) and day 14 (2.5 IU/dL and 5.5 IU/dL, respectively). The incremental recovery of rIX-FP was higher than both recombinant and plasma-derived FIX (1.4 vs 0.95 and 1.1 IU/dL per IU/kg, respectively). These results demonstrated both the safety and improved pharmacokinetics of rIX-FP, thus indicating this new product with extended half-life as possibly able to control and prevent bleeding with less frequent injection. The trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as no. NCT01233440. PMID:22859609

  2. Delta Doping High Purity CCDs and CMOS for LSST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Elliott, S. Tom; Bebek, Chris; Holland, Steve; Kolbe, Bill

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing delta doping high purity CCD's and CMOS for LSST is shown. The topics include: 1) Overview of JPL s versatile back-surface process for CCDs and CMOS; 2) Application to SNAP and ORION missions; 3) Delta doping as a back-surface electrode for fully depleted LBNL CCDs; 4) Delta doping high purity CCDs for SNAP and ORION; 5) JPL CMP thinning process development; and 6) Antireflection coating process development.

  3. Industrialization progress of high-purity hafnium for optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijun; Zhang, Shunli; Zhang, Jiandong; Chen, Yang; Peng, Jiaqing

    2016-03-01

    Hafnium oxide, hafnium crystal bar and high-purity hafnium were prepared using extraction separation, reduction, electrolytic refining, iodide refining and electron beam melting process by General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals. A hundreds-kilogram production line has been built. The purity of the high-purity hafnium was Zr/(Zr+Hf) <0.3wt% and Zr+Hf>99.99wt%, which enables a high laser induced damage threshold.

  4. Analysis of trace halocarbon contaminants in ultra high purity helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fewell, Larry L.

    1994-01-01

    This study describes the analysis of ultra high purity helium. Purification studies were conducted and containment removal was effected by the utilization of solid adsorbent purge-trap systems at cryogenic temperatures. Volatile organic compounds in ultra high purity helium were adsorbed on a solid adsorbent-cryogenic trap, and thermally desorbed trace halocarbon and other contaminants were analyzed by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  5. Delta Doping High Purity CCDs and CMOS for LSST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Elliott, S. Tom; Bebek, Chris; Holland, Steve; Kolbe, Bill

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing delta doping high purity CCD's and CMOS for LSST is shown. The topics include: 1) Overview of JPL s versatile back-surface process for CCDs and CMOS; 2) Application to SNAP and ORION missions; 3) Delta doping as a back-surface electrode for fully depleted LBNL CCDs; 4) Delta doping high purity CCDs for SNAP and ORION; 5) JPL CMP thinning process development; and 6) Antireflection coating process development.

  6. Somatic mosaicism and female-to-female transmission in a kindred with hemophilia B (factor IX deficiency)

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S.A.M.; Deugau, K.V.; Lillicrap, D.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Studies have shown that hemophilia B (Christmas disease; factor IX deficiency) results from many different mutations in the factor IX gene, of which {gt}95% are single nulceotide substitutions. This study has identified a previously unreported form of hemophilia B in a patient who was a somatic mosaic for a guanine-to-cytosine transversion at nucleotide 31,170 in the factor IX gene. This point mutation changes the codon for residue 350 in the catalytic domain of factor IX from a cysteine to a serine. The authors used differential termination of primer extension to confirm and measure the degree of mosaicism. The study shows that a varying proportion of cells from hepatic, renal, smooth muscle, and hematopoietic populations possessed normal as well as mutant factor IX sequences. These results indicate that the mutation in this patient occurred either as an uncorrected half-chromatid mutation in the female gamete or as a replication or postreplication error in the initial mitotic divisions of the zygote preceding implantation. In addition, this kindred also contains two females in successive generations who have moderately severe factor IX deficiency. The molecular pathogenesis of this latter phenomenon has been studied and seems to relate to the unaccompanied expression of the mutant factor IX gene consequent upon a second, as yet undefined, genetic event that has prevented inactivation of sequences including the mutant factor IX gene on the X chromosome inherited from the affected male.

  7. Activation of clotting factors XI and IX in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Minnema, M C; Peters, R J; de Winter, R; Lubbers, Y P; Barzegar, S; Bauer, K A; Rosenberg, R D; Hack, C E; ten Cate, H

    2000-11-01

    In acute coronary events, plaque rupture and the subsequent formation of the catalytic tissue factor-factor VIIa complex is considered to initiate coagulation. It is unknown whether clotting factors XI and IX are activated in acute coronary events. Therefore, we prospectively investigated the activation of clotting factors XI and IX as well as activation of the contact system and the common pathway in 50 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), in 50 patients with unstable angina pectoris (UAP), and in 50 patients with stable angina pectoris (SAP). Factor XIa-C1 inhibitor complexes, which reflect acute activation of factor XI, were detected in 24% of the patients with AMI, 8% of the patients with UAP, and 4% of the patients with SAP (P<0.05), whereas factor XIa-alpha(1)-antitrypsin complexes, which reflect chronic activation, were observed equally in all 3 study groups. Factor IX peptide levels were significantly higher in the patients with AMI and UAP compared with the patients with SAP (P<0.01). No differences regarding markers of the common pathway were demonstrated. Fibrinopeptide A levels were elevated in patients with AMI compared with patients with UAP and those with SAP (P<0.01). Factor XIIa- or kallikrein-C1 inhibitor complexes were not increased. In conclusion, this is the first demonstration of the activation of clotting factors XI and IX in patients with acute coronary syndromes. Because these clotting factors are considered to be important for continuous thrombin generation and clot stability, their activation might have clinical and therapeutic consequences.

  8. High-purity silica reflecting heat shield development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Congdon, W. M.

    1974-01-01

    A high-purity, fused-silica reflecting heat shield for the thermal protection of outer-planet probes was developed. Factors that strongly influence the performance of a silica heat shield were studied. Silica-bonded silica configurations, each prepared by a different technique, were investigated and rated according to its relative merits. Slip-casting was selected as the preferred fabrication method because it produced good reflectivity and good strength, and is relatively easy to scale up for a full-size outer-planet probe. The slips were cast using a variety of different particle sizes: continuous particle-size slips; monodisperse particle-size slips; and blends of monodisperse particle-size slips were studied. In general, smaller particles gave the highest reflectance. The monodisperse slips as well as the blend slips gave a higher reflectance than the continuous particle-size slips. An upgraded and fused natural quartz was used to study the effects of microstructure on reflectance and as the baseline to ascertain the increase in reflectance obtained from using a higher-purity synthetic material.

  9. Recent developments in high purity niobium metal production at CBMM

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, Gustavo Giovanni Ribeiro Sousa, Clovis Antonio de Faria Guimarães, Rogério Contato Ribas, Rogério Marques Vieira, Alaércio Salvador Martins Menezes, Andréia Duarte Fridman, Daniel Pallos Cruz, Edmundo Burgos

    2015-12-04

    CBMM is a global supplier of high quality niobium products including pure niobium, the focus of this paper. CBMM’s position has been consolidated over three decades of producing high purity niobium metal ingots. The company supplies, among other products, commercial and reactor grade niobium ingots. One of the main uses of CBMM’s ingots is for the manufacture of particle accelerators (superconducting radio frequency – SRF – cavities), where the purity and homogeneity of niobium metal is essentially important for good performance. CBMM constantly strives to improve process controls and product quality, and is currently implementing innovations in production, research and development to further improve ingot quality. The main aim is to reduce the content of interstitial elements, such as nitrogen (N), oxygen (O), carbon (C), and hydrogen (H), starting with the raw materials through the final step of ingot production. CBMM held the first trial to produce the world’s largest-diameter niobium ingot (as cast 535 mm). The results of this initial trial presented very low levels of interstitial impurities (N, O, C, H), allowing the achievement of residual resistivity ratio (RRR) values very close to 300 in a six-melt process in an electron beam furnace. These values were reached with 850 ppm of tantalum. SRF cavities will be produced with this material in order to study the effect of low impurities and high RRR on the Q factor and accelerating gradient.

  10. Recent developments in high purity niobium metal production at CBMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, Gustavo Giovanni Ribeiro; Sousa, Clovis Antonio de Faria; Guimarães, Rogério Contato; Ribas, Rogério Marques; Vieira, Alaércio Salvador Martins; Menezes, Andréia Duarte; Fridman, Daniel Pallos; Cruz, Edmundo Burgos

    2015-12-01

    CBMM is a global supplier of high quality niobium products including pure niobium, the focus of this paper. CBMM's position has been consolidated over three decades of producing high purity niobium metal ingots. The company supplies, among other products, commercial and reactor grade niobium ingots. One of the main uses of CBMM's ingots is for the manufacture of particle accelerators (superconducting radio frequency - SRF - cavities), where the purity and homogeneity of niobium metal is essentially important for good performance. CBMM constantly strives to improve process controls and product quality, and is currently implementing innovations in production, research and development to further improve ingot quality. The main aim is to reduce the content of interstitial elements, such as nitrogen (N), oxygen (O), carbon (C), and hydrogen (H), starting with the raw materials through the final step of ingot production. CBMM held the first trial to produce the world's largest-diameter niobium ingot (as cast 535 mm). The results of this initial trial presented very low levels of interstitial impurities (N, O, C, H), allowing the achievement of residual resistivity ratio (RRR) values very close to 300 in a six-melt process in an electron beam furnace. These values were reached with 850 ppm of tantalum. SRF cavities will be produced with this material in order to study the effect of low impurities and high RRR on the Q factor and accelerating gradient.

  11. Purification and some characteristics of the coagulation factor IX from human plasma.

    PubMed Central

    Osterud, B; Flengsrud, R

    1975-01-01

    Non-activated coagulation factor IX was purified approx. 10,000-fold from human plasma. The final product was electrophoretically homogeneous and comprised a tingle polypeptide chain with a molecular weight of about 70,000 and a pI of 4.3-4.45. The N-terminal amino acid was glycine. The amino acid and the carbohydrate contents were analysed and a monospecific antiserum to the factor was raised in rabbits. Images PLATE 1 PLATE 2 PMID:1171684

  12. Expression of human factor IX in rat capillary endothelial cells: Toward somatic gene therapy for hemophilia B

    SciTech Connect

    Shounan Yao; Wilson, J.M.; Nabel, E.G.; Kurachi, Sumiko; Hachiya, H.L.; Kurachi, Kotoku )

    1991-09-15

    In aiming to develop a gene therapy approach for hemophilia B, the authors expressed and characterized human factor IX in rat capillary endothelial cells (CECs). Moloney murine leukemia virus-derived retrovirus vectors that contain human factor IX cDNA linked to heterologous promoters and the neomycin-resistant gene were constructed and employed to prepare recombinant retroviruses. Rat CECs and NIH 3T3 cells infected with these viruses were selected with the neomycin analogue, G418 sulfate, and tested for expression of factor IX. A construct with the factor IX cDNA under direct control by long terminal repeat gave the highest level of expression as quantitated by immunoassays as well as clotting activity assays. A single RNA transcript of 4.4 kilobases predicted by the construct and a recombinant factor IX were found. The recombinant human factor IX produced showed full clotting activity, demonstrating that CECs have an efficient mechanism for posttranslational modifications, including {gamma}-carboxylation, essential for its biological activity. These results, in addition to other properties of the endothelium, including large number of cells, accessibility, and direct contact with the circulating blood, suggest that CECs can serve as an efficient drug delivery vehicle producing factor IX in a somatic gene therapy for hemophilia B.

  13. Use of proteomics for validation of the isolation process of clotting factor IX from human plasma.

    PubMed

    Clifton, James; Huang, Feilei; Gaso-Sokac, Dajana; Brilliant, Kate; Hixson, Douglas; Josic, Djuro

    2010-01-03

    The use of proteomic techniques in the monitoring of different production steps of plasma-derived clotting factor IX (pd F IX) was demonstrated. The first step, solid-phase extraction with a weak anion-exchange resin, fractionates the bulk of human serum albumin (HSA), immunoglobulin G, and other non-binding proteins from F IX. The proteins that strongly bind to the anion-exchange resin are eluted by higher salt concentrations. In the second step, anion-exchange chromatography, residual HSA, some proteases and other contaminating proteins are separated. In the last chromatographic step, affinity chromatography with immobilized heparin, the majority of the residual impurities are removed. However, some contaminating proteins still remain in the eluate from the affinity column. The next step in the production process, virus filtration, is also an efficient step for the removal of residual impurities, mainly high molecular weight proteins, such as vitronectin and inter-alpha inhibitor proteins. In each production step, the active component, pd F IX and contaminating proteins are monitored by biochemical and immunochemical methods and by LC-MS/MS and their removal documented. Our methodology is very helpful for further process optimization, rapid identification of target proteins with relatively low abundance, and for the design of subsequent steps for their removal or purification.

  14. Factor IX Amagasaki: A new mutation in the catalytic domain resulting in the loss of both coagulant and esterase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Toshiyuki; Iwanaga, Sadaaki ); Sakai, Toshiyuki; Sugimoto, Mitsuhiko; Naka, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kazukuni; Yoshioka, Akira; Fukui, Hiromu ); Mitsui, Kotoko; Kamiya, Kensyu; Umeyama, Hideaki )

    1991-11-26

    Factor IX Amagasaki (AMG) is a naturally occurring mutant of factor IX having essentially no coagulant activity, even though normal levels of antigen are detected in plasma. Factor IX AMG was purified from the patient's plasma by immunoaffinity chromatography with an anti-factor IX monoclonal antibody column. Factor IX AMG was cleaved normally by factor VIIa-tissue factor complex, yielding a two-chain factor IXa. Amino acid composition and sequence analysis of one of the tryptic peptides isolated from factor IX AMG revealed that Gly-311 had been replaced by Glu. The authors identified a one-base substitution of guanine to adenine in exon VIII by amplifying exon VIII using the polymerase chain reaction method and sequencing the product. This base mutation also supported the replacement of Gly-311 by Glu. In the purified system, factor IXa AMG did not activate for factor X in the presence of factor VIII, phospholipids, and Ca{sup 2+}, and no esterase activity toward Z-Arg-p-nitrobenzyl ester was observed. The model building of the serine protease domain of factor IXa suggests that the Gly-311 {yields} Glu exchange would disrupt the specific conformational state in the active site environment, resulting in the substrate binding site not forming properly. This is the first report to show the experimental evidence for importance of a highly conserved Gly-142 (chymotrypsinogen numbering) located in the catalytic site of mammalian serine proteases so far known.

  15. In Vivo Gene Therapy of Hemophilia B: Sustained Partial Correction in Factor IX-Deficient Dogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Mark A.; Rothenberg, Steven; Landen, Charles N.; Bellinger, Dwight A.; Leland, Frances; Toman, Carol; Finegold, Milton; Thompson, Arthur R.; Read, M. S.; Brinkhous, Kenneth M.; Woo, Savio L. C.

    1993-10-01

    The liver represents a model organ for gene therapy. A method has been developed for hepatic gene transfer in vivo by the direct infusion of recombinant retroviral vectors into the portal vasculature, which results in the persistent expression of exogenous genes. To determine if these technologies are applicable for the treatment of hemophilia B patients, preclinical efficacy studies were done in a hemophilia B dog model. When the canine factor IX complementary DNA was transduced directly into the hepatocytes of affected dogs in vivo, the animals constitutively expressed low levels of canine factor IX for more than 5 months. Persistent expression of the clotting. factor resulted in reductions of whole blood clotting and partial thromboplastin times of the treated animals. Thus, long-term treatment of hemophilia B patients may be feasible by direct hepatic gene therapy in vivo.

  16. Luminescence and photoconductivity of high-purity cadmium selenide

    SciTech Connect

    Martynov, V.N.

    1995-10-01

    Slightly off-stoichlometric high-purity cadmium and zinc chalcogenides are used as high-efficiency sensors in various optoelectronic devices. The procedure for preparing high-purity chalcogenides was described elsewhere. Such materials (wurtzite-type structure, sp. gr. C{sup 4}{sub 6v}) exhibit exciton luminescence and the photoconductivity associated with the A-, B-, and C-excitonic series over a wide temperature range. In this work, we studied the luminescence and photoconductivity (PC) of cadmium selenide prepared as described.

  17. Molecular Analysis of Factor VIII and Factor IX Genes in Hemophilia Patients: Identification of Novel Mutations and Molecular Dynamics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Al-Allaf, Faisal A.; Taher, Mohiuddin M.; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Bouazzaoui, Abdellatif; Athar, Mohammed; Bogari, Neda M.; Abalkhail, Halah A.; Owaidah, Tarek MA.

    2017-01-01

    Background Hemophilias A and B are X-linked bleeding disorders caused by mutations in the factor VIII and factor IX genes, respectively. Our objective was to identify the spectrum of mutations of the factor VIII and factor IX genes in Saudi Arabian population and determine the genotype and phenotype correlations by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Methods For genotyping, blood samples from Saudi Arabian patients were collected, and the genomic DNA was amplified, and then sequenced by Sanger method. For molecular simulations, we have used softwares such as CHARMM (Chemistry at Harvard Macromolecular Mechanics; http://www.charmm-gui.org) and GROMACS. In addition, the secondary structure was determined based on the solvent accessibility for the confirmation of the protein stability at the site of mutation. Results Six mutations (three novel and three known) were identified in factor VIII gene, and six mutations (one novel and five known) were identified in factor IX gene. The factor VIII novel mutations identified were c.99G>T, p. (W33C) in exon 1, c.2138 DelA, p. (N713Tfs*9) in eon14, also a novel mutation at splicing acceptor site of exon 23 c.6430 - 1G>A. In factor IX, we found a novel mutation c.855G>C, p. (E285D) in exon 8. These novel mutations were not reported in any factor VIII or factor IX databases previously. The deleterious effects of these novel mutations were confirmed by PolyPhen2 and SIFT programs. Conclusion The protein functional and structural studies and the models built in this work would be appropriate for predicting the effects of deleterious amino acid substitutions causing these genetic disorders. These findings are useful for genetic counseling in the case of consanguineous marriages which is more common in the Saudi Arabia. PMID:28270892

  18. Ares I-X Flight Test Development Challenges and Success Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askins, Bruce; Davis, Steve; Olsen, Ronald; Taylor, James

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Constellation Program's Ares I-X rocket launched successfully on October 28, 2009 collecting valuable data and providing risk reduction for the Ares I project. The Ares I-X mission was formulated and implemented in less than four years commencing with the Exploration Systems Architecture Study in 2005. The test configuration was founded upon assets and processes from other rocket programs including Space Shuttle, Atlas, and Peacekeeper. For example, the test vehicle's propulsion element was a Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor. The Ares I-X rocket comprised a motor assembly, mass and outer mold line simulators of the Ares I Upper Stage, Orion Spacecraft and Launch Abort System, a roll control system, avionics, and other miscellaneous components. The vehicle was 327 feet tall and weighed approximately 1,800,000 pounds. During flight the rocket reached a maximum speed of Mach 4.8 and an altitude of 150,000 feet. The vehicle demonstrated staging at 130,000 feet, tested parachutes for recovery of the motor, and utilized approximately 900 sensors for data collection. Developing a new launch system and preparing for a safe flight presented many challenges. Specific challenges included designing a system to withstand the environments, manufacturing large structures, and re-qualifying heritage hardware. These and other challenges, if not mitigated, may have resulted in test cancellation. Ares I-X succeeded because the mission was founded on carefully derived objectives, led by decisive and flexible management, implemented by an exceptionally talented and dedicated workforce, and supported by a thorough independent review team. Other major success factors include the use of proven heritage hardware, a robust System Integration Laboratory, multi-NASA center and contractor team, concurrent operations, efficient vehicle assembly, effective risk management, and decentralized element development with a centralized control board. Ares I-X was a technically complex test that

  19. Ares I-X Flight Test Development Challenges and Success Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askins, Bruce; Davis, Steve; Olsen, Ronald; Taylor, James

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Constellation Program's Ares I-X rocket launched successfully on October 28, 2009 collecting valuable data and providing risk reduction for the Ares I project. The Ares I-X mission was formulated and implemented in less than four years commencing with the Exploration Systems Architecture Study in 2005. The test configuration was founded upon assets and processes from other rocket programs including Space Shuttle, Atlas, and Peacekeeper. For example, the test vehicle's propulsion element was a Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor. The Ares I-X rocket comprised a motor assembly, mass and outer mold line simulators of the Ares I Upper Stage, Orion Spacecraft and Launch Abort System, a roll control system, avionics, and other miscellaneous components. The vehicle was 327 feet tall and weighed approximately 1,800,000 pounds. During flight the rocket reached a maximum speed of Mach 4.8 and an altitude of 150,000 feet. The vehicle demonstrated staging at 130,000 feet, tested parachutes for recovery of the motor, and utilized approximately 900 sensors for data collection. Developing a new launch system and preparing for a safe flight presented many challenges. Specific challenges included designing a system to withstand the environments, manufacturing large structures, and re-qualifying heritage hardware. These and other challenges, if not mitigated, may have resulted in test cancellation. Ares I-X succeeded because the mission was founded on carefully derived objectives, led by decisive and flexible management, implemented by an exceptionally talented and dedicated workforce, and supported by a thorough independent review team. Other major success factors include the use of proven heritage hardware, a robust System Integration Laboratory, multi-NASA center and contractor team, concurrent operations, efficient vehicle assembly, effective risk management, and decentralized element development with a centralized control board. Ares I-X was a technically complex test that

  20. Pharmacokinetics, thrombogenicity and safety of a double viral inactivated factor IX concentrate compared with a prothrombin complex concentrate.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sáez, A; Hong, A; Arguello, A; Echenagucia, M; Boadas, A; Fabbrizzi, F; Minichilli, F; Bosch, N B

    2005-11-01

    Therapeutic options for developing countries have to assure an optimum safety and efficacy and low-cost antihaemophilic concentrates. A single blind randomized crossover study was carried out in 12 previously treated HB patients, comparing the pharmacokinetics (PK), thrombogenicity (TG) and safety of two plasma-derived double-inactivated (solvent/detergent heating at 100 degrees C, 30 min) factor IX (FIX) concentrates, UMAN COMPLEX DI (product A) [plasma-derived prothrombin concentrates (PCC)] and a high purity FIX concentrate AIMAFIX DI (product B, HPFIX). In a non-bleeding state, they received one single intravenous dose 50 IU FIX kg(-1) of PCC or HPFIX, and after a wash-out period of 14 days, the other product. We evaluated acute tolerance and determined PK parameters based on FIX levels measured over a 50 h postinfusion period. We studied fibrinogen, platelets, antithrombin, F1 + 2, TAT, D-dimer, over a 360 min postinfusion period. Ten cases remained in on-demand treatment for 6 months, five with PCC and five with HPFIX. PK and anti-FIX inhibitors were repeated at 3 and 6 months. No inhibitors were detected. PK values (PCC vs. HPFIX): clearence (CL; mL h(-1) kg(-1)) 5.2 +/- 1.4 vs. 6.5 +/- 1.4; the volume of distribution at steady state (mL kg(-1)) 154.9 +/- 54.9 vs. 197.5 +/- 72.5; mean residence time (h) 29.7 +/- 8.1 vs. 30.7 +/- 9.2; T(1/2) (h) 22.3 +/- 7 vs. 23.5 +/- 12.3; incremental recovery (IR; U dL(-1) U(-1) kg(-1)) 0.96 +/- 0.17 vs. 0.76 +/- 0.13. HPFIX showed significant lower IR and higher CL. There were no differences in PK at 3 and 6 months. In TG, significant increments in TAT and F1 + 2 at 30 min and 6 h were found with PCC. Product B PK results agrees with reported results for other HPFIX preparations. Use of PCC product A has to consider its thrombogenic activity.

  1. Relation of factor VIII and IX inhibitors with ABO blood groups in 150 patients with haemophilia A and B.

    PubMed

    Torghabeh, Hassan Mansouri; Pourfathollah, Aliakbar; Shooshtari, Mahmood Mahmoodian; Yazdi, Zahra Rezaie

    2006-03-01

    Many investigations have proved relations between ABO blood groups with some diseases and factor VIII and von willebrand level in plasma. In this study we investigated a relation between ABO blood groups and factor VIII and IX inhibitors in 102 patients with haemophilia A and 48 patients with haemophilia B. The assay of inhibitor was done by Bethesda method. There were no relation between ABO blood groups and factor VIII and IX inhibitors.

  2. Low cost routes to high purity silicon and derivatives thereof

    DOEpatents

    Laine, Richard M; Krug, David James; Marchal, Julien Claudius; Mccolm, Andrew Stewart

    2013-07-02

    The present invention is directed to a method for providing an agricultural waste product having amorphous silica, carbon, and impurities; extracting from the agricultural waste product an amount of the impurities; changing the ratio of carbon to silica; and reducing the silica to a high purity silicon (e.g., to photovoltaic silicon).

  3. Electrochemical study of aluminum corrosion in boiling high purity water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draley, J. E.; Legault, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    Electrochemical study of aluminum corrosion in boiling high-purity water includes an equation relating current and electrochemical potential derived on the basis of a physical model of the corrosion process. The work involved an examination of the cathodic polarization behavior of 1100 aluminum during aqueous oxidation.

  4. Preparation of high purity copper fluoride by fluorinating copper hydroxyfluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Lundquist, J. R.

    1969-01-01

    Copper fluoride containing no more than 50 ppm of any contaminating element was prepared by the fluorination of copper hydroxyfluoride. The impurity content was obtained by spark source mass spectrometry. High purity copper fluoride is needed as a cathode material for high energy density batteries.

  5. Factor Activity Assays for Monitoring Extended Half-Life FVIII and Factor IX Replacement Therapies.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Steve; Tiefenbacher, Stefan; Gosselin, Robert

    2017-04-01

    The advent of modified factor VIII (FVIII) and factor IX (FIX) molecules with extended half-lives (EHLs) compared with native FVIII and FIX represents a major advance in the field of hemophilia care, with the potential to reduce the frequency of prophylactic injections and/or to increase the trough level prior to subsequent injections. Monitoring treatment through laboratory assays will be an important part of ensuring patient safety, including any tailoring of prophylaxis. Several approaches have been used to extend half-lives, including PEGylation, and fusion to albumin or immunoglobulin. Some of these modifications affect factor assays as routinely performed in hemophilia centers; so, laboratories will need to use FVIII and FIX assays which have been shown to be suitable on a product-by-product basis. For some products, there are marked differences between results obtained using one-stage or chromogenic assays and results obtained using different reagents in the one-stage assay. The laboratory should use an assay in which the recovery of the product closely aligns with the assay used by the pharmaceutical company to assign potency to the product, so that the units reported by the laboratory agree with those used to demonstrate efficacy of the product during clinical trials. Reported assay differences in relation to several of the EHL FVIII and FIX molecules will be reviewed in this article.

  6. The prevalence of factor VIII and IX inhibitors among Saudi patients with hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Owaidah, Tarek; Momen, Abdulkareem Al; Alzahrani, Hazzaa; Almusa, Abdulrahman; Alkasim, Fawaz; Tarawah, Ahmed; Nouno, Randa Al; Batniji, Fatima Al; Alothman, Fahad; Alomari, Ali; Abu-Herbish, Saud; Abu-Riash, Mahmoud; Siddiqui, Khawar; Ahmed, Mansor; Mohamed, SY; Saleh, Mahasen

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Hemophilia A and B are X-linked diseases that predominantly affect male patients. Patients can develop coagulation factor inhibitors, which exponentially increases the treatment cost. However, the prevalence of factor VIII and IX inhibitors in Saudi Arabia is unclear. This study aimed to determine the Saudi prevalence of factor VIII and IX inhibitors. This 4-year, 7-center, cross-sectional study evaluated the Saudi prevalences of hemophilia A and B. We collected the patients’ clinical data, evaluated their disease, and tested for factor inhibitors. We included 202 patients with hemophilia (median age at diagnosis: 0.13 years, range: birth–34.8 years). The patients included 198 male patients (98%), 148 patients with hemophilia A (73.3%), and 54 patients with hemophilia B (26.7%). The patients exhibited severe factor VIII activity (<1%; 121 patients; 5.2%), moderate activity (1–5%; 7 patients; 4.9%), and mild activity (14 patients; 9.9%). Among the patients with care-related data, most patients were treated for episodic bleeding (76.8%) or received prophylaxis (22.6%); 1 patient received both treatments. Among the patients with source-related data, the factor replacements were derived from plasma (48.4%), recombinant concentrates (22.9%), both sources (14.6%), or fresh frozen plasma (14.1%). Factor VIII inhibitors were observed in 43 (29.3%) of the 147 patients, and only 1 of the 54 patients developed factor IX inhibitors. Most patients who developed inhibitors had severe hemophilia (40/44; 90.9%), and inhibitors were also common among patients who received recombinant products (14/43; 32.6%). The Saudi prevalence of factor inhibitors was similar to those among other ethnic populations. PMID:28079788

  7. Role of the vector genome and underlying factor IX mutation in immune responses to AAV gene therapy for hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Geoffrey L; Martino, Ashley T; Zolotukhin, Irene; Ertl, Hildegund C J; Herzog, Roland W

    2014-01-25

    Self-complementary adeno-associated virus (scAAV) vectors have become a desirable vector for therapeutic gene transfer due to their ability to produce greater levels of transgene than single-stranded AAV (ssAAV). However, recent reports have suggested that scAAV vectors are more immunogenic than ssAAV. In this study, we investigated the effects of a self-complementary genome during gene therapy with a therapeutic protein, human factor IX (hF.IX). Hemophilia B mice were injected intramuscularly with ss or scAAV1 vectors expressing hF.IX. The outcome of gene transfer was assessed, including transgene expression as well as antibody and CD8⁺ T cell responses to hF.IX. Self-complementary AAV1 vectors induced similar antibody responses (which eliminated systemic hF.IX expression) but stronger CD8⁺ T cell responses to hF.IX relative to ssAAV1 in mice with F9 gene deletion. As a result, hF.IX-expressing muscle fibers were effectively eliminated in scAAV-treated mice. In contrast, mice with F9 nonsense mutation (late stop codon) lacked antibody or T cell responses, thus showing long-term expression regardless of the vector genome. The nature of the AAV genome can impact the CD8⁺ T cell response to the therapeutic transgene product. In mice with endogenous hF.IX expression, however, this enhanced immunogenicity did not break tolerance to hF.IX, suggesting that the underlying mutation is a more important risk factor for transgene-specific immunity than the molecular form of the AAV genome.

  8. Internal friction measurement in high purity tungsten single crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieu, G. E.

    1974-01-01

    Internal friction peaks observed after small deformation in high purity tungsten single crystals between liquid helium temperature and 800 K in the frequency range 30-50 KHz, are studied as a function of orientation. An orientation effect is observed in the internal friction spectra due to the creation of internal stresses. The elementary processes related to these peaks are discussed in terms of kink generation and geometric kink motion on screw and edge dislocations in an internal stress field.

  9. High-Purity Silicon Seeds for Silane Pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.; Rohatgi, N. K.; Morrison, A.

    1985-01-01

    Seed particles for fluidized-bed production of silicon made by new contamination-free, economical method. In new method, large particles of semiconductor-grade silicon fired at each other by high-speed streams of gas and thereby break up into particles of suitable size for fluidized bed. No foreign materials introduced, and leaching unnecessary. Method used to feed fluidized-bed reactor for continuous production of high-purity silicon.

  10. Effects of genetic fusion of factor IX to albumin on in vivo clearance in mice and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, William P; Mamdani, Asif; Hortelano, Gonzalo; Gataiance, Sharon; Eltringham-Smith, Louise; Begbie, Megan E; Leyva, Rina A; Liaw, Peter S; Ofosu, Frederick A

    2004-08-01

    Individuals with haemophilia B require replacement therapy with recombinant or plasma-derived coagulation factor IX (fIX). More benefit per injected dose might be obtained if fIX clearance could be slowed. The contribution of overall size to fIX clearance was explored, using genetic fusion to albumin. Recombinant murine fIX (MIX), and three proteins with C-terminal epitope tags were expressed in HEK 293 cells: tagged MIX (MIXT), tagged mouse serum albumin (MSAT) and MFUST, in which MIX and MSAT were fused in a single polypeptide chain. Proteins MFUST and MIXT were two- to threefold less active in clotting assays than MIX. In mice, the area under the clearance curve (AUC) was reduced for MFUST compared with MSAT or plasma-derived MSA (pd-MSA); the terminal catabolic half-life (t(0.5)) did not differ amongst the three proteins. Two minutes after injection, >40% of the injected MFUST was found in the liver, compared with <10% of either MSAT or pd-MSA. In rabbits, the AUC for MFUST was reduced compared to MIXT, MSAT, or pd-MSA, while the t(0.5) of the fusion protein fell between that of MIXT and MSAT or pd-MSA. Similar results were obtained with non-radioactive fused or non-fused recombinant human fIX in fIX knockout mice. The clearance behaviour of the fusion protein thus more closely resembled that of fIX than that of albumin despite a modest increase in terminal half-life, suggesting that fIX-specific interactions that are important in determining clearance were maintained in spite of the increased size of the fusion protein.

  11. Dimensional stability of high-purity Invar 36

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolowski, Witold M.; Jacobs, Stephen F.; Lane, Marc S.; O'Donnell, Timothy P.; Hsieh, Cheng

    1993-12-01

    High performance requirements for the Imaging Science Subsystem/Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) instrument on the NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Cassini spacecraft impose very stringent demands for dimensional stability of metering rods in the camera's athermalizing system. Invar 36 was chosen as a baseline material because it possibly could meet these requirements through high purity control and appropriate thermomechanical processes. A powder metallurgy process appears to be the manufacturing method to ensure high purity and cleanliness of this material. Therefore, a powder metallurgy manufacturer was contacted and high purity (HP) Invar 36 was produced per JPL engineering requirements. Several heat treatments were established and heat treated HP Invar 36 samples were evaluated. Coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), thermal hysteresis and temporal stability test results are reported here. The test results indicate that JPL has succeeded in obtaining possibly the most dimensionally stable (lowest CTE plus lowest temporal change) Invar 36 material ever produced. CTE < 1 ppm/ degree(s)C are reported here along with temporal stability < 1 ppm/year. These dimensional stability properties will meet the requirements for metering rods on the NAC.

  12. The rates and patterns of deletions in the human factor IX gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ketterling, R.P.; Vielhaber, E.L.; Lind, T.J.; Thorland, E.C.; Sommer S.S. )

    1994-02-01

    Deletions are commonly observed in genes with either segments of highly homologous sequences or excessive gene length. However, in the factor IX gene and in most genes, deletions (of [ge]21 bp) are uncommon. The authors have analyzed DNA from 290 families with hemophilia B (203 independent mutations) and have found 12 deletions >20 bp. Eleven of these are >2 kb (range >3-163 kb), and one is 1.1 kb. The junctions of the four deletions that are completely contained within the factor IX gene have been determined. A novel mutation occurred in patient HB128: the data suggest that a 26.8-kb deletion occurred between two segments of alternating purines and pyrimidines and that a 2.3-kb sense strand segment derived from the deleted region was inserted. For a sample of 203 independent mutations, the authors estimate the [open quotes]baseline[close quotes] rates of deletional mutation per base pair per generation as a function of size. The rate for large (>2 kb)I deletions is exceedingly low. For every mutational event in which a given base is at the junction of a large deletion, there are an estimated 58 microdeletions (<20 bp) and 985 single-base substitutions at that base. Analysis of the nine reported deletion junctions in the factor IX gene literature reveals that (i) five are associated with inversion, orphan sequences, or sense strand insertions; (ii) four are simple deletions that display an excess of short direct repeats at their junctions; (iii) there is no dramatic clustering of junctions within the gene; and (iv) with the exception of alternating purines and pyrimidines, deletion junctions are not preferentially associated with repetitive DNA. 58 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Hemophilia as a defect of the tissue factor pathway of blood coagulation: Effect of factors VIII and IX on factor X activation in a continuous-flow reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Repke, D.; Gemmell, C.H.; Guha, A.; Turitto, V.T.; Nemerson, Y. ); Broze, G.J. Jr. )

    1990-10-01

    The effect of factors VIII and IX on the ability of the tissue factor-factor VIIa complex to activate factor X was studied in a continuous-flow tubular enzyme reactor. Tissue factor immobilized in a phospholipid bilayer on the inner surface of the tube was exposed to a perfusate containing factors VIIa, VIII, IX, and X flowing at a wall shear rate of 57, 300, or 1130 sec{sup {minus}1}. The addition of factors VIII and IX at their respective plasma concentrations resulted in a further 2{endash}-to 3{endash}fold increase. The direct activation of factor X by tissue factor-factor VIIa could be virtually eliminated by the lipoprotein-associated coagulation inhibitor. These results suggest that the tissue factor pathway, mediated through factors VIII and IX, produces significant levels of factor Xa even in the presence of an inhibitor of the tissue factor-factor VIIa complex; moreover, the activation is dependent on local shear conditions. These findings are consistent both with a model of blood coagulation in which initiation of the system results from tissue factor and with the bleeding observed in hemophilia.

  14. Encapsulation of factor IX-engineered mesenchymal stem cells in fibrinogen-alginate microcapsules enhances their viability and transgene secretion.

    PubMed

    Sayyar, Bahareh; Dodd, Megan; Wen, Jianping; Ma, Shirley; Marquez-Curtis, Leah; Janowska-Wieczorek, Anna; Hortelano, Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    Cell microencapsulation holds significant promise as a strategy for cellular therapies; however, inadequate survival and functionality of the enclosed cells limit its application in hemophilia treatment. Here, we evaluated the use of alginate-based microcapsules to enhance the viability and transgene secretion of human cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells in three-dimensional cultures. Given the positive effects of extracellular matrix molecules on mesenchymal stem cell growth, we tested whether fibrinogen-supplemented alginate microcapsules can improve the efficiency of encapsulated factor IX-engineered mesenchymal stem cells as a treatment of hemophilia B. We found that fibrinogen-supplemented alginate microcapsules (a) significantly enhanced the viability and proliferation of factor IX-engineered mesenchymal stem cells and (b) increased factor IX secretion by mesenchymal stem cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells in nonsupplemented microcapsules. Moreover, we observed the osteogenic, but not chondrogenic or adipogenic, differentiation capability of factor IX-engineered cord blood mesenchymal stem cells and their efficient factor IX secretion while encapsulated in fibrinogen-supplemented alginate microcapsules. Thus, the use of engineered mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in fibrinogen-modified microcapsules may have potential application in the treatment of hemophilia or other protein deficiency diseases.

  15. Neutron energy determination with a high-purity germanium detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Gene A.

    1992-01-01

    Two areas that are related to planetary gamma-ray spectrometry are investigated. The first task was the investigation of gamma rays produced by high-energy charged particles and their secondaries in planetary surfaces by means of thick target bombardments. The second task was the investigation of the effects of high-energy neutrons on gamma-ray spectral features obtained with high-purity Ge-detectors. For both tasks, as a function of the funding level, the experimental work was predominantly tied to that of other researchers, whenever there was an opportunity to participate in bombardment experiments at large or small accelerators for charged particles.

  16. Method and apparatus for producing high purity silicon

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.

    1984-01-01

    A method for producing high purity silicon includes forming a copper silie alloy and positioning the alloy within an enclosure. A filament member is also placed within the enclosure opposite the alloy. The enclosure is then filled with a chemical vapor transport gas adapted for transporting silicon. Finally, both the filament member and the alloy are heated to temperatures sufficient to cause the gas to react with silicon at the alloy surface and deposit the reacted silicon on the filament member. In addition, an apparatus for carrying out this method is also disclosed.

  17. A novel method to synthesize high purity, nanostructured copper

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, A M; Wang, Y M; Barbee, T W

    2005-08-30

    Nanostructured high purity (99.999%) copper foils, 10 cm in diameter and 22-25 microns thick were produced using nanoscale multilayer technology. The foils were produced using five different layer thicknesses ranging from 1.25 to 43.6 nm (18,000 to 520 layers). This process delivers the ability to produce multiple large-scale samples during a single deposition run with very small residual stresses. Tensile and indentation tests demonstrate that the material produced is a high strength copper ({sigma}{sub y} {approx} 540-690 MPa).

  18. The GALATEA test-facility for high purity germanium detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Dönmez, B.; Garbini, L.; Irlbeck, S.; Majorovits, B.; Palermo, M.; Schulz, O.; Seitz, H.; Stelzer, F.

    2015-05-01

    GALATEA is a test facility designed to investigate bulk and surface effects in high purity germanium detectors. A vacuum tank houses a cold volume with the detector inside. A system of three precision motorized stages allows an almost complete scan of the detector. The main feature of GALATEA is that there is no material between source and detector. This allows the usage of alpha and beta sources to study surface effects. A 19-fold segmented true-coaxial germanium detector was used for commissioning. A first analysis of data obtained with an alpha source is presented here.

  19. Bulk and surface effects in segmented high purity germanium detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Dönmez, B.; Irlbeck, S.; Majorovits, B.; Volynets, O.

    2013-08-01

    Segmented high-purity germanium detectors have been developed for a variety of experiments. The segmentation is used to augment the excellent energy resolution of such a device with spatial information to disentangle event topologies. Several performance aspects of true-coaxial segmented detectors are presented, especially the effects due to the crystallographic axes and the problem of events close to the surfaces of the detector. A test stand and Monte Carlo tools developed to study such effects are introduced. The simulation tools can also be used to design novel detectors, such as segmented point-contact detectors. A particular design is presented and discussed.

  20. Analysis of the N-glycans of recombinant human Factor IX purified from transgenic pig milk

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Geun-Cheol; Velander, William H; Van Cott, Kevin E

    2008-01-01

    Glycosylation of recombinant proteins is of particular importance because it can play significant roles in the clinical properties of the glycoprotein. In this work, the N-glycan structures of recombinant human Factor IX (tg-FIX) produced in the transgenic pig mammary gland were determined. The majority of the N-glycans of transgenic pig-derived Factor IX (tg-FIX) are complex, bi-antennary with one or two terminal N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) moieties. We also found that the N-glycan structures of tg-FIX produced in the porcine mammary epithelial cells differed with respect to N-glycans from glycoproteins produced in other porcine tissues. tg-FIX contains no detectable Neu5Gc, the sialic acid commonly found in porcine glycoproteins produced in other tissues. Additionally, we were unable to detect glycans in tg-FIX that have a terminal Galα(1,3)Gal disaccharide sequence, which is strongly antigenic in humans. The N-glycan structures of tg-FIX are also compared to the published N-glycan structures of recombinant human glycoproteins produced in other transgenic animal species. While tg-FIX contains only complex structures, antithrombin III (goat), C1 inhibitor (rabbit), and lactoferrin (cow) have both high mannose and complex structures. Collectively, these data represent a beginning point for the future investigation of species-specific and tissue/cell-specific differences in N-glycan structures among animals used for transgenic animal bioreactors. PMID:18456721

  1. Analysis of the N-glycans of recombinant human Factor IX purified from transgenic pig milk.

    PubMed

    Gil, Geun-Cheol; Velander, William H; Van Cott, Kevin E

    2008-07-01

    Glycosylation of recombinant proteins is of particular importance because it can play significant roles in the clinical properties of the glycoprotein. In this work, the N-glycan structures of recombinant human Factor IX (tg-FIX) produced in the transgenic pig mammary gland were determined. The majority of the N-glycans of transgenic pig-derived Factor IX (tg-FIX) are complex, bi-antennary with one or two terminal N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) moieties. We also found that the N-glycan structures of tg-FIX produced in the porcine mammary epithelial cells differed with respect to N-glycans from glycoproteins produced in other porcine tissues. tg-FIX contains no detectable Neu5Gc, the sialic acid commonly found in porcine glycoproteins produced in other tissues. Additionally, we were unable to detect glycans in tg-FIX that have a terminal Galalpha(1,3)Gal disaccharide sequence, which is strongly antigenic in humans. The N-glycan structures of tg-FIX are also compared to the published N-glycan structures of recombinant human glycoproteins produced in other transgenic animal species. While tg-FIX contains only complex structures, antithrombin III (goat), C1 inhibitor (rabbit), and lactoferrin (cow) have both high mannose and complex structures. Collectively, these data represent a beginning point for the future investigation of species-specific and tissue/cell-specific differences in N-glycan structures among animals used for transgenic animal bioreactors.

  2. Systemic delivery of factor IX messenger RNA for protein replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Suvasini; Tonnu, Nina; Tachikawa, Kiyoshi; Limphong, Pattraranee; Vega, Jerel B.; Karmali, Priya P.; Chivukula, Pad; Verma, Inder M.

    2017-01-01

    Safe and efficient delivery of messenger RNAs for protein replacement therapies offers great promise but remains challenging. In this report, we demonstrate systemic, in vivo, nonviral mRNA delivery through lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) to treat a Factor IX (FIX)-deficient mouse model of hemophilia B. Delivery of human FIX (hFIX) mRNA encapsulated in our LUNAR LNPs results in a rapid pulse of FIX protein (within 4–6 h) that remains stable for up to 4–6 d and is therapeutically effective, like the recombinant human factor IX protein (rhFIX) that is the current standard of care. Extensive cytokine and liver enzyme profiling showed that repeated administration of the mRNA–LUNAR complex does not cause any adverse innate or adaptive immune responses in immune-competent, hemophilic mice. The levels of hFIX protein that were produced also remained consistent during repeated administrations. These results suggest that delivery of long mRNAs is a viable therapeutic alternative for many clotting disorders and for other hepatic diseases where recombinant proteins may be unaffordable or unsuitable. PMID:28202722

  3. Systemic delivery of factor IX messenger RNA for protein replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Suvasini; Tonnu, Nina; Tachikawa, Kiyoshi; Limphong, Pattraranee; Vega, Jerel B; Karmali, Priya P; Chivukula, Pad; Verma, Inder M

    2017-03-07

    Safe and efficient delivery of messenger RNAs for protein replacement therapies offers great promise but remains challenging. In this report, we demonstrate systemic, in vivo, nonviral mRNA delivery through lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) to treat a Factor IX (FIX)-deficient mouse model of hemophilia B. Delivery of human FIX (hFIX) mRNA encapsulated in our LUNAR LNPs results in a rapid pulse of FIX protein (within 4-6 h) that remains stable for up to 4-6 d and is therapeutically effective, like the recombinant human factor IX protein (rhFIX) that is the current standard of care. Extensive cytokine and liver enzyme profiling showed that repeated administration of the mRNA-LUNAR complex does not cause any adverse innate or adaptive immune responses in immune-competent, hemophilic mice. The levels of hFIX protein that were produced also remained consistent during repeated administrations. These results suggest that delivery of long mRNAs is a viable therapeutic alternative for many clotting disorders and for other hepatic diseases where recombinant proteins may be unaffordable or unsuitable.

  4. [Commutability of reference materials for coagulation factor VIII and factor IX activity on three measurement systems].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenbin; Li, Chenbin; Zhang, Haipeng; Cheng, Fei; Peng, Mingting

    2015-09-08

    To evaluate the comparability of measurement results for coagulation factor VIII (FVIII)and factor IX (FIX) activity and the commutability of reference materials on different measurement systems. The study was performed according to CLSI guideline EP30 and China health standard WS/T 356-2011. Clinical samples with different levels of FVIII and FIX which covered over the clinical analytical range, five lots of homemade reference materials (F20140601-F20140605) and a coagulation reference material (SSCLOT4) provided by NIBSC were detected for FVIII and FIX activity on three popular measurement systems in China, which including Stago STA-R Evolution, IL ACL TOP700 and Sysmex CA7000 automatic coagulation analyzers using supplementary reagents. The results between measurement systems were analyzed pairwise. To evaluate the comparability, the linear regression and the biases between the results of clinical samples from two measurement systems were calculated. The comparability was evaluated by the regression coefficient and the biases inside the acceptable range. After eliminated outliers from the results, linear regressions were run again and the 95% confidence intervals were calculated. The commutability of the homemade reference materials and NIBSC reference material were evaluated by comparing the results with the limits of the intervals. The ranges of FVIII and FIX level of clinical samples were 0.5%-218.0% and 1.6%-156.5%, which covered the sample levels in routine work and fit the requirements for commutability evaluation. The square of correlation coefficients (R²) of measurement results of clinical samples for FVIII and FIX activity assays were 0.89-0.94 and 0.81-0.93. The proportions of outliers were all less than 10%. The comparability of measurement results of FVIII and FIX in different measurement systems was acceptable.According to the acceptable criteria for bias, the measurement results of 42, 41 and 45 clinical samples for FVIII and 44, 42 and 41

  5. The compressibility of high purity YbB2.

    PubMed

    Kalkan, B; Suzer, S; Ozdas, E

    2012-08-29

    The compressibility and phase stability of Y bB(2) are investigated under high pressure using high-resolution synchrotron x-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell. The bulk modules of high purity Y bB(2) is obtained as ∼182 GPa using the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state. The patterns measured up to 20 GPa and the pressure dependence of normalized lattice parameters, a/a(0) and c/c(0), reveal that the compressibility of Y bB(2) is low and fairly isotropic, and this material can be classified as a hard material. X-ray photoemission studies demonstrate that Yb in Y bB(2) has a mostly trivalent valence state at room temperature. Moreover, sample preparation details provide a new insight into the high purity synthesis of Y bB(2) at ambient pressure and moderate temperatures. The presented structural and compressibility results are in agreement with the available theoretical and experimental data on binary rare-earth borides and can serve as a reliable reference for future studies.

  6. Development of high purity large forgings for nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yasuhiko; Sato, Ikuo

    2011-10-01

    The recent increase in the size of energy plants has been supported by the development of manufacturing technology for high purity large forgings for the key components of the plant. To assure the reliability and performance of the large forgings, refining technology to make high purity steels, casting technology for gigantic ingots, forging technology to homogenize the material and consolidate porosity are essential, together with the required heat treatment and machining technologies. To meet these needs, the double degassing method to reduce impurities, multi-pouring methods to cast the gigantic ingots, vacuum carbon deoxidization, the warm forging process and related technologies have been developed and further improved. Furthermore, melting facilities including vacuum induction melting and electro slag re-melting furnaces have been installed. By using these technologies and equipment, large forgings have been manufactured and shipped to customers. These technologies have also been applied to the manufacture of austenitic steel vessel components of the fast breeder reactors and components for fusion experiments.

  7. Oral delivery of bioencapsulated coagulation factor IX prevents inhibitor formation and fatal anaphylaxis in hemophilia B mice

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Dheeraj; Moghimi, Babak; LoDuca, Paul A.; Singh, Harminder D.; Hoffman, Brad E.; Herzog, Roland W.; Daniell, Henry

    2010-01-01

    To address complications of pathogenic antibody or life-threatening anaphylactic reactions in protein replacement therapy for patients with hemophilia or other inherited protein deficiencies, we have developed a prophylactic protocol using a murine hemophilia B model. Oral delivery of coagulation factor IX fused with cholera toxin β-subunit (with or without a furin cleavage site; CTB-FFIX or CTB-FIX), expressed in chloroplasts (up to 3.8% soluble protein or 0.4 mg/g leaf tissue), bioencapsulated in plant cells, effectively blocked formation of inhibitory antibodies (undetectable or up to 100-fold less than controls). Moreover, this treatment eliminated fatal anaphylactic reactions that occurred after four to six exposures to intravenous F.IX. Whereas only 20–25% of control animals survived after six to eight F.IX doses, 90–93% of F.IX-fed mice survived 12 injections without signs of allergy or anaphylaxis. Immunostaining confirmed delivery of F.IX to Peyer's patches in the ileum. Within 2–5 h, feeding of CTB-FFIX additionally resulted in systemic delivery of F.IX antigen. This high-responder strain of hemophilia B mice represents a new animal model to study anaphylactic reactions. The protocol was effective over a range of oral antigen doses (equivalent to 5–80 μg recombinant F.IX/kg), and controlled inhibitor formation and anaphylaxis long-term, up to 7 months (∼40% life span of this mouse strain). Oral antigen administration caused a deviant immune response that suppressed formation of IgE and inhibitory antibodies. This cost-effective and efficient approach of antigen delivery to the gut should be applicable to several genetic diseases that are prone to pathogenic antibody responses during treatment. PMID:20351275

  8. Precipitation of hydrides in high purity niobium after different treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Barkov, F.; Romanenko, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Grassellino, A.

    2013-01-01

    Precipitation of lossy non-superconducting niobium hydrides represents a known problem for high purity niobium in superconducting applications. Using cryogenic optical and laser confocal scanning microscopy we have directly observed surface precipitation and evolution of niobium hydrides in samples after different treatments used for superconducting RF cavities for particle acceleration. Precipitation is shown to occur throughout the sample volume, and the growth of hydrides is well described by the fast diffusion-controlled process in which almost all hydrogen is precipitated at $T=140$~K within $\\sim30$~min. 120$^{\\circ}$C baking and mechanical deformation are found to affect hydride precipitation through their influence on the number of nucleation and trapping centers.

  9. Study on the Properties of High Purity Germanium Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, G.; Mei, H.; Guan, Y. T.; Wang, G. J.; Mei, D. M.; Irmscher, K.

    2015-05-01

    In the crystal growth lab of South Dakota University, we are growing high purity germanium (HPGe) crystals and using the grown crystals to make radiation detectors. As the detector grade HPGe crystals, they have to meet two critical requirements: an impurity level of ∼109 to 10 atoms /cm3 and a dislocation density in the range of ∼102 to 104 / cm3. In the present work, we have used the following four characterization techniques to investigate the properties of the grown crystals. First of all, an x-ray diffraction method was used to determine crystal orientation. Secondly, the van der Pauw Hall effect measurement was used to measure the electrical properties. Thirdly, a photo-thermal ionization spectroscopy (PTIS) was used to identify what the impurity atoms are in the crystal. Lastly, an optical microscope observation was used to measure dislocation density in the crystal. All of these characterization techniques have provided great helps to our crystal activities.

  10. Development of high purity niobium used in SRF accelerating cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Xie, Wei-Ping; Li, Ming-Yang; He, Ji-Lin; Fan, Hui-Ru; Zhang, Bao-Cheng; He, Fei-Si; Zhao, Kui; Chen, Jia-Er; Liu, Ke-Xin

    2008-12-01

    Niobium is widely used in SRF (Superconducting Radio Frequency) cavities due to its excellent superconductivity and workability. With the continuous development of technology, higher demands of material are raised. One of the key issues is that RRR (Residual Resistance Ratio) of the Nb material should be more than 300, which requires that the Nb ingot have even higher RRR. This article introduces the development and the experimental results of high purity niobium in OTIC in Ningxia (Ningxia Orient Tantalum Industry Co. Ltd.), and the test results of the single cell TESLA (Tera Electron volt energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator) shaped cavity manufactured by Peking University using Nb material from OTIC. Supported by National Basic Research Program of China (2002CB713600)

  11. Springback in Deep Drawn High Purity Niobium for Superconductor Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapati Rao Myneni; Peter Kneisel

    2005-09-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made from deep drawn high-purity niobium have become a popular approach for the design of particle accelerators. A number of current accelerators use this technology and it is a leading candidate for future designs. The development of this technology has required significant advances in many scientific fields including metallurgy, high vacuum physics, surface science, and forming. Recently proposed modifications to the current process for fabrication of these cavities has resulted in increased concern about the distribution of deformation, residual stress patterns, and springback. This presentation will report on the findings of a recently initiated program to study plastic flow and springback in the fabrication of these cavities and the influence of metallurgical variables including grain size and impurity content.

  12. Secondary emission conductivity of high purity silica fabric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belanger, V. J.; Eagles, A. E.

    1977-01-01

    High purity silica fabrics were proposed for use as a material to control the effects of electrostatic charging of satellites at synchronous altitudes. These materials exhibited very quiet behavior when placed in simulated charging environments as opposed to other dielectrics used for passive thermal control which exhibit varying degrees of electrical arcing. Secondary emission conductivity is proposed as a mechanism for this superior behavior. Design of experiments to measure this phenomena and data taken on silica fabrics are discussed as they relate to electrostatic discharge (ESD) control on geosynchronous orbit spacecraft. Studies include the apparent change in resistivity of the material as a function of the electron beam energy, flux intensity, and the effect of varying electric fields impressed across the material under test.

  13. Physiological levels of blood coagulation factors IX and X control coagulation kinetics in an in vitro model of circulating tissue factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tormoen, Garth W.; Khader, Ayesha; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2013-06-01

    Thrombosis significantly contributes to cancer morbidity and mortality. The mechanism behind thrombosis in cancer may be circulating tissue factor (TF), as levels of circulating TF are associated with thrombosis. However, circulating TF antigen level alone has failed to predict thrombosis in patients with cancer. We hypothesize that coagulation factor levels regulate the kinetics of circulating TF-induced thrombosis. Coagulation kinetics were measured as a function of individual coagulation factor levels and TF particle concentration. Clotting times increased when pooled plasma was mixed at or above a ratio of 4:6 with PBS. Clotting times increased when pooled plasma was mixed at or above a ratio of 8:2 with factor VII-depleted plasma, 7:3 with factor IX- or factor X-depleted plasmas, or 2:8 with factor II-, V- or VIII-depleted plasmas. Addition of coagulation factors VII, X, IX, V and II to depleted plasmas shortened clotting and enzyme initiation times, and increased enzyme generation rates in a concentration-dependent manner. Only additions of factors IX and X from low-normal to high-normal levels shortened clotting times and increased enzyme generation rates. Our results demonstrate that coagulation kinetics for TF particles are controlled by factor IX and X levels within the normal physiological range. We hypothesize that individual patient factor IX and X levels may be prognostic for susceptibility to circulating TF-induced thrombosis.

  14. Fibre-integrated noise gating of high-purity heralded single photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis-Jones, Robert J. A.; Mosley, Peter J.

    2017-10-01

    We present an all-fibre source of high-purity heralded single photons with an integrated conditional optical gate that reduces uncorrelated noise by almost an order of magnitude. Generating photon pairs by four-wave mixing in photonic crystal fibre, we observe with the noise gate active a factor of 7 reduction in the rate of single counts in the heralded channel with no measurable drop in coincidence count rate. In contrast to electronic post-selection of coincidence events, the real reduction in the flux of unwanted photons is beneficial for example to avoid bleaching light-sensitive samples or in generating entangled states.

  15. Automation of the Characterization of High Purity Germanium Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugger, Charles ``Chip''

    2014-09-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is a rare hypothesized process that may yield valuable insight into the fundamental properties of the neutrino. Currently there are several experiments trying to observe this process, including the Majorana DEMONSTRAOR experiment, which uses high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to generate and search for these events. Because the event happens internally, it is essential to have the lowest background possible. This is done through passive detector shielding, as well as event discrimination techniques that distinguish between multi-site events characteristic of gamma-radiation, and single-site events characteristic of neutrinoless double beta decay. Before fielding such an experiment, the radiation response of the detectors must be characterized. A robotic arm is being tested for future calibration of HPGe detectors. The arm will hold a source at locations relative to the crystal while data is acquired. Several radioactive sources of varying energy levels will be used to determine the characteristics of the crystal. In this poster, I will present our work with the robot, as well as the characterization of data we took with an underground HPGe detector at the WIPP facility in Carlsbad, NM (2013). Neutrinoless double beta decay is a rare hypothesized process that may yield valuable insight into the fundamental properties of the neutrino. Currently there are several experiments trying to observe this process, including the Majorana DEMONSTRAOR experiment, which uses high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to generate and search for these events. Because the event happens internally, it is essential to have the lowest background possible. This is done through passive detector shielding, as well as event discrimination techniques that distinguish between multi-site events characteristic of gamma-radiation, and single-site events characteristic of neutrinoless double beta decay. Before fielding such an experiment, the radiation response of

  16. Modified matrix volatilization setup for characterization of high purity germanium.

    PubMed

    Meruva, Adisesha Reddy; Raparthi, Shekhar; Kumar, Sunil Jai

    2016-01-01

    Modified matrix volatilization (MV) method has been described to characterize high purity germanium material of 7 N (99.99999%) purity. Transport of both, the chlorine gas generated in-situ in this method and the argon gas (carrier) is fine controlled by means of a mass flow controller. This enabled both uniform reaction of chlorine gas with the germanium matrix and smooth removal of germanium matrix as its chloride. This resulted in improvement in the reproducibility of the analytical results. The use of quartz reaction vessel has lead to the reduction in the process blank levels. The combined effect of these modifications in the MV setup has resulted in very consistent and low process blanks and hence improved detection limits of this method. Applicability of the method has been expanded to rare earth elements and other elements after examining their recoveries. The quantification is done by using inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometer (ICP-QMS) and continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (CS-GFAAS). In the absence of certified reference materials for high pure germanium, the accuracy of the method is established by spike recovery tests. The precision of the method has been found to vary from 1 to 30% for concentrations between 1 and 30 ng g(-1). The limits of detection (LOD) for the target analytes are found to be between 18 and 0.033 ng g(-1). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Permeation of oxygen through high purity, large grain silver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Outlaw, R. A.; Peregoy, W. K.; Hoflund, Gar B.

    1987-01-01

    The permeation of high purity, large grain Ag membranes by oxygen has been studied over the temperature range 400 to 800 C. The permeability was found to be quite linear and repeatable, but the magnitude was 3.2 times smaller than that determined by past research. Since previous investigators studied substantially less pure Ag and conducted experiments within much poorer vacuum environments (which indicates that their grain boundary density was much greater), the data presented here suggest oxygen transport through the membrane is primarily by grain boundary diffusion. The diffusivity measurements were found to exhibit two distinct linear regions, one above and one below a critical temperature of 630 C. The high-temperature data have an activation energy (11.1 kcal/mole) similar to that reported by others, but the low-temperature data have a higher activation energy (15.3 kcal/mole), which can be explained by impurity trapping in the grain boundaries. Vacuum desorption of the oxygen-saturated Ag was found to occur at a threshold of 630 C, which is consistent with the onset of increased mobility within the grain boundaries.

  18. High Purity Zirconium Tetrafluoride For Fluoride Glass Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withers, Howard P.; Monk, V. A.; Cooper, G. A.

    1989-06-01

    A totally anhydrous process has been developed for the preparation of high purity zirconium tetrafluoride for use in low loss fluoride glass applications. The ZrF4 purityis 99.99997% with respect to all transition elements (excluding HO based on analysis by spark source mass spectrometry (SSMS) and graphite furnace/atomic absorption spectroscopy (GF/AA). The only transition elements detected by these techniques were Fe, Ni and Cr, while Co and Cu were consistently below the detection limits. The anhydrous nature of the process, which is strictly maintained by the choice of reactants, affords product with very low oxide and hydroxide content. Total oxygen concentrations of less than 10 ppm have been measured by the inert gas fusion technique. A ZBLAN glass composition prepared using this ZrF4 showed extremely low UV absorption having an absorption constant of 1 cm-1 at 198 nm. ZrF4 from this process was also used in a ZBLAN glass fiber whose minimum optical loss was measured at 6.3 dB/km over 150 meters of fiber. The process is straightforward to scale up and has also been demonstrated to be useful for the preparation of HfF4, BaF2, A1F3 and LaF3.

  19. PERFORMANCES OF HIGH PURITY NIOBIUM CAVITIES WITH DIFFERENT GRAIN SIZES

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Peter Kneisel; Ganapati Myneni; Swapan Chattopadhyay

    2006-08-21

    Grain boundaries have for some time been suspected of influencing the performance of RF cavities made from high purity niobium by limiting the temperature dependent BCS surface resistance to a residual resistance because of impurity segregation and by causing field limitations due to flux penetration. We have carried out a comparative study of the RF behavior of 2.2 GHz TM{sub 010} cavities of identical shape, fabricated from single crystal niobium, niobium of grain sizes of the order of several cm{sup 2} and standard poly-crystalline material. All the cavities were treated with buffered chemical polishing (BCP), post-purified at 1250 ?C and ?in-situ? baked at 120 C. This contribution reports about the results of the measurements of the temperature dependence of the surface resistance Rs(T) and the Q0 vs. Eacc behavior at 2 K. From the analysis of the Rs(T) data at low RF fields material parameters such as gap value, mean free path and residual resistance could be extracted. The dependence of the Q-value on RF field was analyzed with respect to the medium field Q-slope, Q-drop at high fields and the quench fields. The best performance resulted in a breakdown field of {approx}165 mT, corresponding to an accelerating gradient of E{sub acc} {approx} 38 MV/m.

  20. PERFORMANCES OF HIGH PURITY NIOBIUM CAVITIES WITH DIFFERENT GRAIN SIZES

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Peter Kneisel; Ganapati Myneni; Ganapati Rao Myneni; Ganapati Rao Myneni; Swapan Chattopadhyay

    2006-08-04

    Grain boundaries have for some time been suspected of influencing the performance of RF cavities made from high purity niobium by limiting the temperature dependent BCS surface resistance to a residual resistance because of impurity segregation and by causing field limitations due to flux penetration. We have carried out a comparative study of the RF behavior of 2.2 GHz TM010 cavities of identical shape, fabricated from single crystal niobium, niobium of grain sizes of the order of several cm2 and standard poly-crystalline material. All the cavities were treated with buffered chemical polishing (BCP), post-purified at 1250 C and ''in-situ'' baked at 120 C. This contribution reports about the results of the measurements of the temperature dependence of the surface resistance Rs(T) and the Q0 vs. Eacc behavior at 2 K. From the analysis of the Rs(T) data at low RF fields material parameters such as gap value, mean free path and residual resistance could be extracted. The dependence of the Q-value on RF field was analyzed with respect to the medium field Q-slope, ''Q-drop'' at high fields and the ''quench'' fields. The best performance resulted in a breakdown field of {approx} 165 mT, corresponding to an accelerating gradient of Eacc {approx} 38 MV/m.

  1. Spectroscopic Determination of Trace Contaminants in High Purity Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornung, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen used for extravehicular activities (EVA) must be free of contaminants because a difference in a few tenths of a percent of argon or nitrogen content can mean significant reduction in available EVA time. These inert gases build up in the extravehicular mobility unit because they are not metabolized or scrubbed from the atmosphere. Measurement of oxygen purity above 99.5% is problematic, and currently only complex instruments such as gas chromatographs or mass spectrometers are used for these determinations. Because liquid oxygen boil-off from the space shuttle will no longer be available to supply oxygen for EVA use, other concepts are being developed to produce and validate high purity oxygen from cabin air aboard the International Space Station. A prototype optical emission technique capable of detecting argon and nitrogen below 0.1% in oxygen was developed at White Sands Test Facility. This instrument uses a glow discharge in reduced pressure gas to produce atomic emission from the species present. Because the atomic emission lines from oxygen, nitrogen, and argon are discrete and in many cases well-separated, trace amounts of argon and nitrogen can be detected in the ultraviolet and visible spectrum. This is a straightforward, direct measurement of the target contaminants and may lend itself to a device capable of on-orbit verification of oxygen purity. System design and optimized measurement parameters are presented.

  2. Observing bulk diamond spin coherence in high-purity nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Helena S.; Kara, Dhiren M.; Atatüre, Mete

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres in diamond are attractive for research straddling quantum information science, nanoscale magnetometry and thermometry. Whereas ultrapure bulk diamond NVs sustain the longest spin coherence times among optically accessible spins, nanodiamond NVs exhibit persistently poor spin coherence. Here we introduce high-purity nanodiamonds accommodating record-long NV coherence times, >60 μs, observed through universal dynamical decoupling. We show that the main contribution to decoherence comes from nearby nitrogen impurities rather than surface states. We protect the NV spin free precession, essential to d.c. magnetometry, by driving solely these impurities into the motional narrowing regime. This extends the NV free induction decay time from 440 ns, longer than that in type Ib bulk diamond, to 1.27 μs, which is comparable to that in type IIa (impurity-free) diamond. These properties allow the simultaneous exploitation of both high sensitivity and nanometre resolution in diamond-based emergent quantum technologies.

  3. Effective gene therapy for haemophilic mice with pathogenic factor IX antibodies.

    PubMed

    Markusic, David M; Hoffman, Brad E; Perrin, George Q; Nayak, Sushrusha; Wang, Xiaomei; LoDuca, Paul A; High, Katherine A; Herzog, Roland W

    2013-11-01

    Formation of pathogenic antibodies is a major problem in replacement therapies for inherited protein deficiencies. For example, antibodies to coagulation factors ('inhibitors') seriously complicate treatment of haemophilia. While immune tolerance induction (ITI) protocols have been developed, inhibitors against factor IX (FIX) are difficult to eradicate due to anaphylactic reactions and nephrotic syndrome and thus substantially elevate risks for morbidity and mortality. However, hepatic gene transfer with an adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 8 vector expressing FIX (at levels of ≥4% of normal) rapidly reversed pre-existing high-titre inhibitors in haemophilia B mice, eliminated antibody production by B cells, desensitized from anaphylaxis (even if protein therapy was resumed) and provided long-term correction. High levels of FIX protein suppressed memory B cells and increased Treg induction, indicating direct and indirect mechanisms of suppression of inhibitor formation. Persistent presence of Treg was required to prevent relapse of antibodies. Together, these data suggest that hepatic gene transfer-based ITI provides a safe and effective alternative to eradicate inhibitors. This strategy may be broadly applicable to reversal of antibodies in different genetic diseases.

  4. High-purity Cu nanocrystal synthesis by a dynamic decomposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Xian; Cao, Yu; Chen, Guozhang; Wang, Chao; Tang, Hui; Yin, Liangjun; Luan, Chunhong; Liang, Yinglin; Jiang, Jing; Wu, Sixin; Zeng, Qing; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Chengui

    2014-12-01

    Cu nanocrystals are applied extensively in several fields, particularly in the microelectron, sensor, and catalysis. The catalytic behavior of Cu nanocrystals depends mainly on the structure and particle size. In this work, formation of high-purity Cu nanocrystals is studied using a common chemical vapor deposition precursor of cupric tartrate. This process is investigated through a combined experimental and computational approach. The decomposition kinetics is researched via differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis using Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, Kissinger, and Starink methods. The growth was found to be influenced by the factors of reaction temperature, protective gas, and time. And microstructural and thermal characterizations were performed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. Decomposition of cupric tartrate at different temperatures was simulated by density functional theory calculations under the generalized gradient approximation. High crystalline Cu nanocrystals without floccules were obtained from thermal decomposition of cupric tartrate at 271°C for 8 h under Ar. This general approach paves a way to controllable synthesis of Cu nanocrystals with high purity.

  5. Large-scale production and properties of a solvent-detergent-treated factor IX concentrate from human plasma.

    PubMed

    Michalski, C; Bal, F; Burnouf, T; Goudemand, M

    1988-01-01

    A human solvent-detergent (SD)-treated factor IX concentrate has been produced from cryoprecipitate-poor plasma using DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B and heparin-Sepharose CL-6B chromatography. The DEAE eluate was incubated with an SD mixture [0.3% tri(n-butyl) phosphate-1% Tween 80, 6-h at 24 degrees C] which was found to inactivate, in less than 1 h, more than 3.8 log10 of vesicular stomatitis virus and more than 4.8 log10 of Sindbis virus; the SD was removed by a subsequent heparin adsorption step. The specific activity of the concentrate was 10.9 +/- 1.3 IU factor IX: c/mg protein (n = 15). The factor IX coagulant to antigen ratio was 0.7 +/- 0.1. The concentrate was essentially free of factors II, VII and X, and protein C. The usual major contaminants of prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) were absent: the concentrate contained about 94% alpha-1 proteins, and only 4 major proteins were resolved by SDS-PAGE (respective apparent molecular weight: 130, 86, 76 and 69 kilodaltons), and by crossed immunoelectrophoresis against an anti-PCC serum. The nonactivated partial thromboplastin time was equivalent to that of PCC; the product was devoid of factor IXa, of other activated procoagulant factors and of coagulant-active phospholipids (removed with SD in the heparin breakthrough fraction). Animal studies using the Wessler test and acute-toxicity test in rabbits revealed no adverse side effects. SD treatment could thus be used to inactivate viruses in factor IX concentrate and improve the safety of replacement therapy in hemophilia B.

  6. Synthesis of high purity sinterable silicon carbide powder

    SciTech Connect

    Boecker, W.D.; Mehosky, B.L.; Rogers, R.S.C.; Storm, R.S.; Venkateswaran, V. . Structural Ceramics Div.)

    1989-11-01

    High purity, submicron silicon carbide powders were produced via gas phase synthesis using a hydrogen/argon plasma. Two test facilities were constructed, a bench-scale unit and a larger pilot scale reactor. Three candidate silicon sources were evaluated:silicon tetrachloride (SiCl{sub 4}). dimethyldichlorosilane (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}(SiCl{sub 2}) and methyltrichlorosilane (CH{sub 3}SiCl{sub 3}). Product powders were evaluated on the basis of pressureless sinterability, surface area, agglomeration, particle size distribution, phase distribution and chemistry. Three commercial powders, Starck A10, Starck B10, and Carborundum submicron alpha silicon carbide, were also evaluated for comparison to the product powders. Powders were reproducibly synthesized at a rate of one pound per hour for standard run times of five hours. Product powders exhibited chemical and physical properties equal to or exceeding the commercial powders evaluated. In limited attempts to pressureless sinter the product powders, densities of 91% of theoretical were obtained with as-produced powder. Post-processing permitted densities in excess of 97% of theoretical. X-ray diffraction of the product indicates that the product powders are primarily beta poly-types, with traces of alpha present. Increased production rates to a target level of seven pounds per hour were not possible due to current transients produced by the pilot scale power supply. Extensive unsuccessful efforts to reduce or eliminate the transients are described. Low recovered product yields resulted from a failure of a product collection filter that was not discovered until the completion of the project.

  7. Factor IXMadrid 2: a deletion/insertion in factor IX gene which abolishes the sequence of the donor junction at the exon IV-intron d splice site.

    PubMed Central

    Solera, J; Magallón, M; Martin-Villar, J; Coloma, A

    1992-01-01

    DNA from a patient with severe hemophilia B was evaluated by RFLP analysis, producing results which suggested the existence of a partial deletion within the factor IX gene. The deletion was further localized and characterized by PCR amplification and sequencing. The altered allele has a 4,442-bp deletion which removes both the donor splice site located at the 5' end of intron d and the two last coding nucleotides located at the 3' end of exon IV in the normal factor IX gene; this fragment has been replaced by a 47-bp sequence from the normal factor IX gene, although this fragment has been inserted in inverted orientation. Two homologous sequences have been discovered at the ends of the deleted DNA fragment. Images Figure 1 PMID:1346483

  8. Factor IXMadrid 2: a deletion/insertion in factor IX gene which abolishes the sequence of the donor junction at the exon IV-intron d splice site.

    PubMed

    Solera, J; Magallón, M; Martin-Villar, J; Coloma, A

    1992-02-01

    DNA from a patient with severe hemophilia B was evaluated by RFLP analysis, producing results which suggested the existence of a partial deletion within the factor IX gene. The deletion was further localized and characterized by PCR amplification and sequencing. The altered allele has a 4,442-bp deletion which removes both the donor splice site located at the 5' end of intron d and the two last coding nucleotides located at the 3' end of exon IV in the normal factor IX gene; this fragment has been replaced by a 47-bp sequence from the normal factor IX gene, although this fragment has been inserted in inverted orientation. Two homologous sequences have been discovered at the ends of the deleted DNA fragment.

  9. Factor IX[sub Madrid 2]: A deletion/insertion in Facotr IX gene which abolishes the sequence of the donor junction at the exon IV-intron d splice site

    SciTech Connect

    Solera, J. ); Magallon, M.; Martin-Villar, J. ); Coloma, A. )

    1992-02-01

    DNA from a patient with severe hemophilia B was evaluated by RFLP analysis, producing results which suggested the existence of a partial deletion within the factor IX gene. The deletion was further localized and characterized by PCR amplification and sequencing. The altered allele has a 4,442-bp deletion which removes both the donor splice site located at the 5[prime] end of intron d and the two last coding nucleotides located at the 3[prime] end of exon IV in the normal factor IX gene; this fragment has been inserted in inverted orientation. Two homologous sequences have been discovered at the ends of the deleted DNA fragment.

  10. Levels of factor VIII and factor IX in fresh-frozen plasma produced from whole blood stored at 4 °C overnight in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Agus, Neval; Yilmaz, Nisel; Colak, Ayfer; Liv, Fatma

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess whether the quantities of factor VIII and factor IX in fresh-frozen plasma produced from whole blood stored at 4 °C for 24 hours are adequate for their intended purpose. Materials and methods Fresh-frozen plasma separated from whole blood after storage at 4 °C overnight (24 hours from donation) was compared with plasma prepared 8 hours after donation using a standard method. The amounts of factor VIII and factor IX obtained with the two methods were compared. Results Compared to the levels of factor VIII and factor IX in plasma prepared within 8 hours of blood collection, the levels in plasma prepared after 24 hours of storage at 4 °C were 25% and 9% lower, respectively. Ninety percent of the factor VIII and 100% of the factor IX levels were above 0.5 IU/mL (standard haematology reference range) after 24 hours of storage. Discussion These data suggest that there is good retention of coagulation factor activity in plasma produced from whole blood stored at 4 ºC for 24 hours and that such plasma would be an acceptable product for most patients requiring fresh-frozen plasma. PMID:22153689

  11. Levels of factor VIII and factor IX in fresh-frozen plasma produced from whole blood stored at 4 °C overnight in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Agus, Neval; Yilmaz, Nisel; Colak, Ayfer; Liv, Fatma

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether the quantities of factor VIII and factor IX in fresh-frozen plasma produced from whole blood stored at 4 °C for 24 hours are adequate for their intended purpose. Fresh-frozen plasma separated from whole blood after storage at 4 °C overnight (24 hours from donation) was compared with plasma prepared 8 hours after donation using a standard method. The amounts of factor VIII and factor IX obtained with the two methods were compared. Compared to the levels of factor VIII and factor IX in plasma prepared within 8 hours of blood collection, the levels in plasma prepared after 24 hours of storage at 4 °C were 25% and 9% lower, respectively. Ninety percent of the factor VIII and 100% of the factor IX levels were above 0.5 IU/mL (standard haematology reference range) after 24 hours of storage. These data suggest that there is good retention of coagulation factor activity in plasma produced from whole blood stored at 4 ºC for 24 hours and that such plasma would be an acceptable product for most patients requiring fresh-frozen plasma.

  12. Molecular Basis and Therapeutic Strategies to Rescue Factor IX Variants That Affect Splicing and Protein Function.

    PubMed

    Tajnik, Mojca; Rogalska, Malgorzata Ewa; Bussani, Erica; Barbon, Elena; Balestra, Dario; Pinotti, Mirko; Pagani, Franco

    2016-05-01

    Mutations that result in amino acid changes can affect both pre-mRNA splicing and protein function. Understanding the combined effect is essential for correct diagnosis and for establishing the most appropriate therapeutic strategy at the molecular level. We have identified a series of disease-causing splicing mutations in coagulation factor IX (FIX) exon 5 that are completely recovered by a modified U1snRNP particle, through an SRSF2-dependent enhancement mechanism. We discovered that synonymous mutations and missense substitutions associated to a partial FIX secretion defect represent targets for this therapy as the resulting spliced-corrected proteins maintains normal FIX coagulant specific activity. Thus, splicing and protein alterations contribute to define at the molecular level the disease-causing effect of a number of exonic mutations in coagulation FIX exon 5. In addition, our results have a significant impact in the development of splicing-switching therapies in particular for mutations that affect both splicing and protein function where increasing the amount of a correctly spliced protein can circumvent the basic functional defects.

  13. Molecular Basis and Therapeutic Strategies to Rescue Factor IX Variants That Affect Splicing and Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Bussani, Erica; Barbon, Elena; Pinotti, Mirko; Pagani, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Mutations that result in amino acid changes can affect both pre-mRNA splicing and protein function. Understanding the combined effect is essential for correct diagnosis and for establishing the most appropriate therapeutic strategy at the molecular level. We have identified a series of disease-causing splicing mutations in coagulation factor IX (FIX) exon 5 that are completely recovered by a modified U1snRNP particle, through an SRSF2-dependent enhancement mechanism. We discovered that synonymous mutations and missense substitutions associated to a partial FIX secretion defect represent targets for this therapy as the resulting spliced-corrected proteins maintains normal FIX coagulant specific activity. Thus, splicing and protein alterations contribute to define at the molecular level the disease-causing effect of a number of exonic mutations in coagulation FIX exon 5. In addition, our results have a significant impact in the development of splicing-switching therapies in particular for mutations that affect both splicing and protein function where increasing the amount of a correctly spliced protein can circumvent the basic functional defects. PMID:27227676

  14. SVA retrotransposition in exon 6 of the coagulation factor IX gene causing severe hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuki; Murata, Moe; Takagi, Yuki; Kozuka, Toshihiro; Nakata, Yukiko; Hasebe, Ryo; Takagi, Akira; Kitazawa, Jun-ichi; Shima, Midori; Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2015-07-01

    Hemophilia B is an X-linked recessive bleeding disorder caused by abnormalities of the coagulation factor IX gene (F9). Insertion mutations in F9 ranging from a few to more than 100 base pairs account for only a few percent of all hemophilia B cases. We investigated F9 to elucidate genetic abnormalities causing severe hemophilia B in a Japanese subject. We performed PCR-mediated analysis of F9 and identified a large insertion in exon 6. Next, we carried out direct sequencing of a PCR clone of the whole insert using nested deletion by exonuclease III and S1 nuclease. We identified an approximately 2.5-kb SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA)-F element flanked by 15-bp duplications in the antisense orientation in exon 6. Additionally, we carried out exontrap analysis to assess the effect of this retrotransposition on mRNA splicing. We observed that regular splicing at exons 5 and 6 of F9 was disturbed by the SVA retrotransposition, suggesting that abnormal FIX mRNA may be reduced by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. In conclusion, this is the first report of SVA retrotransposition causing severe hemophilia B; only five cases of LINE-1 or Alu retrotranspositions in F9 have been reported previously.

  15. Evaluation of engineered AAV capsids for hepatic factor IX gene transfer in murine and canine models.

    PubMed

    Markusic, David M; Nichols, Timothy C; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Palaschak, Brett; Zolotukhin, Irene; Marsic, Damien; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Srivastava, Arun; Herzog, Roland W

    2017-05-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy vectors have shown the best outcomes in human clinical studies for the treatment of genetic diseases such as hemophilia. However, these pivotal investigations have also identified several challenges. For example, high vector doses are often used for hepatic gene transfer, and cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses against viral capsid may occur. Therefore, achieving therapy at reduced vector doses and other strategies to reduce capsid antigen presentation are desirable. We tested several engineered AAV capsids for factor IX (FIX) expression for the treatment of hemophilia B by hepatic gene transfer. These capsids lack potential phosphorylation or ubiquitination sites, or had been generated through molecular evolution. AAV2 capsids lacking either a single lysine residue or 3 tyrosine residues directed substantially higher coagulation FIX expression in mice compared to wild-type sequence or other mutations. In hemophilia B dogs, however, expression from the tyrosine-mutant vector was merely comparable to historical data on AAV2. Evolved AAV2-LiC capsid was highly efficient in hemophilia B mice but lacked efficacy in a hemophilia B dog. Several alternative strategies for capsid modification improve the in vivo performance of AAV vectors in hepatic gene transfer for correction of hemophilia. However, capsid optimization solely in mouse liver may not predict efficacy in other species and thus is of limited translational utility.

  16. Expression of human coagulation Factor IX in transgenic tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Lingxia; Chen, Yuhui; Cui, Lijie; Ren, Weiwei; Tang, Kexuan

    2007-10-01

    In the present study, a plant binary expression vector PG-pRD12-hFIX (where PG is polygalacturonase) harbouring the hFIX (human coagulation Factor IX) gene was constructed and introduced into tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. After kanamycin selection, 32 putative independent transgenic tomato plants were regenerated. PCR and Southern-blot analyses confirmed the transgenic status of some plants. RT (reverse transcription)-PCR analysis for the expression of the introduced gene (hFIX) demonstrated that the hFIX gene was expressed specifically in fruits of the tomato. Western-blot analysis confirmed the presence of a 56 kDa band specific to hFIX in the transformed tomatoes. ELISA results showed that the expression of hFIX protein reached a maximum of 15.84 ng/g fresh weight in mature fruit. A blood-clotting assay demonstrated the clotting activity of the expressed hFIX protein in transgenic tomato fruits. This is the first report on the expression of hFIX in plants, and our research provides potentially valuable knowledge for further development of the plant-derived therapeutic proteins.

  17. Approaches for recombinant human factor IX production in serum-free suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    do Amaral, Robson Luis Ferraz; de Sousa Bomfim, Aline; de Abreu-Neto, Mário Soares; Picanço-Castro, Virgínia; de Sousa Russo, Elisa Maria; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Swiech, Kamilla

    2016-03-01

    To establish a serum-free suspension process for production of recombinant human factor IX (rhFIX) based on the human cell line HEK 293T by evaluating two approaches: (1) serum-free suspension adaptation of previously genetic modified cells (293T-FIX); and (2) genetic modification of cells already adapted to such conditions (293T/SF-FIX). After 10 months, 293T-FIX cells had become adapted to FreeStyle 293 serum-free medium (SFM) in Erlenmeyer flasks. After 48 and 72 h of culture, 2.1 µg rhFIX/ml and 3.3 µg rhFIX/ml were produced, respectively. However, no biological activity was detected. In the second approach, wild-type 293T cells were adapted to the same SFM (adaptation process took only 2 months) and then genetically modified for rhFIX production. After 48 h of culture, rhFIX reached 1.5 µg/ml with a biological activity of 0.2 IU/ml, while after 72 h, the production was 2.4 µg/ml with a biological activity of 0.3 IU/ml. The findings demonstrate that the best approach to establish an rhFIX production process in suspension SFM involves the genetic modification of cells already adapted to the final conditions. This approach is time saving and may better ensure the quality of the produced protein.

  18. Anion-exchange purification of recombinant factor IX from cell culture supernatant using different chromatography supports.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Daniel A; Passos, Douglas F; Ferraz, Helen C; Castilho, Leda R

    2013-11-01

    Both recombinant and plasma-derived factor IX concentrates are used in replacement therapies for the treatment of haemophilia B. In the present work, the capture step for a recombinant FIX (rFIX) purification process was investigated. Different strong anion-exchange chromatography media (the resins Q Sepharose(®) FF and Fractogel(®) TMAE, the monolith CIM(®) QA and the membrane adsorber Sartobind(®) Q) were tested for their rFIX binding capacity under dynamic conditions. In these experiments, crude supernatant from CHO cells was used, thus in the presence of supernatant contaminants and mimicking process conditions. The highest dynamic binding capacity was obtained for the monolith, which was then further investigated. To study pseudoaffinity elution of functional rFIX with Ca(2+) ions, a design of experiments to evaluate the effects of pH, NaCl and CaCl2 on yield and purification factor was carried out. The effect of pH was not statistically significant, and a combination of no NaCl and 45mM CaCl2 yielded a good purification factor combined with a high yield of active rFIX. Under these conditions, activity yield of rFIX was higher than the mass yield, confirming selective elution of functional, γ-carboxylated rFIX. Scaling-up of this process 8 fold resulted in very similar process performance. Monitoring of the undesired activated FIX (FIXa) revealed that the FIXa/FIX ratio (1.94%) was higher in the eluate than in the loaded sample, but was still within an acceptable range. HCP and DNA clearances were high (1256 and 7182 fold, respectively), indicating that the proposed process is adequate for the intended rFIX capture step.

  19. Once-weekly prophylactic dosing of recombinant factor IX improves adherence in hemophilia B

    PubMed Central

    Djambas Khayat, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Regular prophylactic treatment in severe hemophilia should be considered an optimal treatment. There is no general agreement on the optimal prophylaxis regimen, and adherence to prophylaxis is a main challenge due to medical, psychosocial, and cost controversies. Improved approaches in prophylaxis regimen of hemophilia B are needed to make patients’ lives easier. There is some evidence to support the efficacy of once-weekly prophylaxis. Longer sampling schedules are required for the determination of pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of factor IX (FIX). The half-life of FIX seems to be longer than previously described and is expected to be 34 hours. The clinical significance of maintaining a 1% trough level is widely debated in hemophilia B. The overall relationship between factor concentrate levels and incidence of joint bleeding was found to be very weak. Data also indicate that the distribution of FIX into an extravascular FIX compartment may contribute to hemostasis independently of circulating plasma FIX levels. Clinical assessment of the frequency and severity of bleeds remain an important measure of the efficacy of treatment. Role of PK-guided therapy remains to be established. Two prospective randomized studies had evaluated the efficacy and safety of 100 IU/kg once-weekly prophylaxis with nonacog alfa, and this prophylaxis regimen was found to be associated with lower annual bleeding rate compared with on-demand treatment in adolescents and adults with moderately severe-to-severe hemophilia B. Secondary prophylaxis therapy with 100 IU/kg nonacog alfa once weekly reduced annual bleeding rate by 89.4% relative to on-demand treatment. Residual FIX may be supportive of effectiveness. Once-weekly prophylaxis was well tolerated in the two studies, with a safety profile similar to that reported during the on-demand treatment period. To individually tailor treatment to clinical response and to minimize costs of factor concentrate, it would be of interest to

  20. Once-weekly prophylactic dosing of recombinant factor IX improves adherence in hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Djambas Khayat, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Regular prophylactic treatment in severe hemophilia should be considered an optimal treatment. There is no general agreement on the optimal prophylaxis regimen, and adherence to prophylaxis is a main challenge due to medical, psychosocial, and cost controversies. Improved approaches in prophylaxis regimen of hemophilia B are needed to make patients' lives easier. There is some evidence to support the efficacy of once-weekly prophylaxis. Longer sampling schedules are required for the determination of pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of factor IX (FIX). The half-life of FIX seems to be longer than previously described and is expected to be 34 hours. The clinical significance of maintaining a 1% trough level is widely debated in hemophilia B. The overall relationship between factor concentrate levels and incidence of joint bleeding was found to be very weak. Data also indicate that the distribution of FIX into an extravascular FIX compartment may contribute to hemostasis independently of circulating plasma FIX levels. Clinical assessment of the frequency and severity of bleeds remain an important measure of the efficacy of treatment. Role of PK-guided therapy remains to be established. Two prospective randomized studies had evaluated the efficacy and safety of 100 IU/kg once-weekly prophylaxis with nonacog alfa, and this prophylaxis regimen was found to be associated with lower annual bleeding rate compared with on-demand treatment in adolescents and adults with moderately severe-to-severe hemophilia B. Secondary prophylaxis therapy with 100 IU/kg nonacog alfa once weekly reduced annual bleeding rate by 89.4% relative to on-demand treatment. Residual FIX may be supportive of effectiveness. Once-weekly prophylaxis was well tolerated in the two studies, with a safety profile similar to that reported during the on-demand treatment period. To individually tailor treatment to clinical response and to minimize costs of factor concentrate, it would be of interest to

  1. The Hydrometallurgical Extraction and Recovery of High-Purity Silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, James E.

    2012-06-01

    -bearing inputs, will be described in detail to demonstrate how typical chemical engineering unit process and unit operations have supplanted classic smelting and fire refining techniques. The Kennecott Copper Company, which has operated a hydrometallurgical circuit successfully for the recovery of high-purity silver from the slimes wet chlorination residue, has permitted me to provide some operation information and results using the technology. Both Phelps Dodge and Kennecott should be recognized for their forward-looking attitude in undertaking the conversion of conceptual chemistry into successful, full-scale plants. The process as employed at Phelps Dodge is discussed at length in reference (J.E. Hoffmann and B. Wesstrom: Hydrometallurgy, 1994, vol. 94, pp. 69-105).

  2. A light hydrocarbon fuel processor producing high-purity hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löffler, Daniel G.; Taylor, Kyle; Mason, Dylan

    This paper discusses the design process and presents performance data for a dual fuel (natural gas and LPG) fuel processor for PEM fuel cells delivering between 2 and 8 kW electric power in stationary applications. The fuel processor resulted from a series of design compromises made to address different design constraints. First, the product quality was selected; then, the unit operations needed to achieve that product quality were chosen from the pool of available technologies. Next, the specific equipment needed for each unit operation was selected. Finally, the unit operations were thermally integrated to achieve high thermal efficiency. Early in the design process, it was decided that the fuel processor would deliver high-purity hydrogen. Hydrogen can be separated from other gases by pressure-driven processes based on either selective adsorption or permeation. The pressure requirement made steam reforming (SR) the preferred reforming technology because it does not require compression of combustion air; therefore, steam reforming is more efficient in a high-pressure fuel processor than alternative technologies like autothermal reforming (ATR) or partial oxidation (POX), where the combustion occurs at the pressure of the process stream. A low-temperature pre-reformer reactor is needed upstream of a steam reformer to suppress coke formation; yet, low temperatures facilitate the formation of metal sulfides that deactivate the catalyst. For this reason, a desulfurization unit is needed upstream of the pre-reformer. Hydrogen separation was implemented using a palladium alloy membrane. Packed beds were chosen for the pre-reformer and reformer reactors primarily because of their low cost, relatively simple operation and low maintenance. Commercial, off-the-shelf balance of plant (BOP) components (pumps, valves, and heat exchangers) were used to integrate the unit operations. The fuel processor delivers up to 100 slm hydrogen >99.9% pure with <1 ppm CO, <3 ppm CO 2. The

  3. Activation of Carbonic Anhydrase IX by Alternatively Spliced Tissue Factor Under Late-Stage Tumor Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ramchandani, Divya; Unruh, Dusten; Lewis, Clayton S.; Bogdanov, Vladimir Y.; Weber, Georg F.

    2016-01-01

    Molecules of the coagulation pathway predispose patients to cancer-associated thrombosis and also trigger intracellular signaling pathways that promote cancer progression. The primary transcript of Tissue Factor, the main physiologic trigger of blood clotting, can undergo alternative splicing yielding a secreted variant, termed asTF (alternatively spliced Tissue Factor). asTF is not required for normal hemostasis, but its expression levels positively correlate with advanced tumor stages in several cancers, including pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The asTF-over-expressing pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell line Pt45.P1/asTF+ and its parent cell line Pt45.P1 were tested for growth and mobility under normoxic conditions that model early stage tumors, and in the hypoxic environment of late-stage cancers. asTF over-expression in Pt45.P1 cells conveys increased proliferative ability. According to cell cycle analysis, the major fraction of Pt45.P1/asTF+ cells reside in the dividing G2/M phase of the cell cycle, whereas the parental Pt45.P1 cells are mostly confined to the quiescent G0/G1 phase. asTF over-expression is also associated with significantly higher mobility in cells plated under either normoxia or hypoxia. A hypoxic environment leads to upregulation of Carbonic Anhydrase IX (CAIX), which is more pronounced in Pt45.P1/asTF+ cells. Inhibition of CAIX by the compound U-104 significantly decreases cell growth and mobility of Pt45.P1/asTF+ cells in hypoxia, but not in normoxia. U-104 also reduces the growth of Pt45.P1/asTF+ orthotopic tumors in nude mice. CAIX is a novel downstream mediator of asTF in pancreatic cancer, particularly under hypoxic conditions that model late-stage tumor micro-environment. PMID:27721473

  4. The first EGF domain of coagulation factor IX attenuates cell adhesion and induces apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tomomi; Kitano, Hisataka; Mamiya, Atsushi; Kokubun, Shinichiro; Hidai, Chiaki

    2016-07-01

    Coagulation factor IX (FIX) is an essential plasma protein for blood coagulation. The first epidermal growth factor (EGF) motif of FIX (EGF-F9) has been reported to attenuate cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM). The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of this motif on cell adhesion and apoptosis. Treatment with a recombinant EGF-F9 attenuated cell adhesion to the ECM within 10 min. De-adhesion assays with native FIX recombinant FIX deletion mutant proteins suggested that the de-adhesion activity of EGF-F9 requires the same process of FIX activation as that which occurs for coagulation activity. The recombinant EGF-F9 increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity release into the medium and increased the number of cells stained with annexin V and activated caspase-3, by 8.8- and 2.7-fold respectively, indicating that EGF-F9 induced apoptosis. Activated caspase-3 increased very rapidly after only 5 min of administration of recombinant EGF-F9. Treatment with EGF-F9 increased the level of phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), but not that of phosphorylated MAPK 44/42 or c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Inhibitors of caspase-3 suppressed the release of LDH. Caspase-3 inhibitors also suppressed the attenuation of cell adhesion and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK by EGF-F9. Our data indicated that EGF-F9 activated signals for apoptosis and induced de-adhesion in a caspase-3 dependent manner.

  5. Expression of active human blood clotting factor IX in transgenic mice: use of a cDNA with complete mRNA sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Choo, K H; Raphael, K; McAdam, W; Peterson, M G

    1987-01-01

    Haemophilia B is a bleeding disorder caused by a functional deficiency of the clotting factor IX. A full length human factor IX complementary DNA clone containing all the natural mRNA sequences plus some flanking intron sequences was constructed with a metallothionein promoter and introduced into transgenic mice by microinjection into the pronuclei of fertilised eggs. The transgenic mice expressed high levels of messenger RNA, gamma-carboxylated and glycosylated protein, and biological clotting activity that are indistinguishable from normal human plasma factor IX. This study demonstrates the feasibility of expressing highly complex heterologous proteins in transgenic mice. It also provides the groundwork for the production of large amounts of human factor IX in larger transgenic livestock for therapeutic use, and the investigation of alternative genetic therapies for haemophilia B. Images PMID:3029708

  6. Factor IX and prothrombin in amniotic fluid and fetal plasma: constraints on prenatal diagnosis of hemophilia B and evidence of proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, A R

    1984-10-01

    Potential limitations of prenatal diagnosis of hemophilia B, as compared to hemophilia A, include (1) occurrence of far more frequent defects with abnormal circulating antigen, (2) lower levels of factor IX in fetal plasma at 16 to 20 weeks gestation, and (3) the presence of factor IX antigen in amniotic fluid. In addition, proteolysis could occur, especially with amniotic fluid contamination of fetal plasma. A sensitive polyclonal immunoradiometric assay for factor IX antigen was used to characterize the range of levels in amniotic fluids and fetal plasma samples. To assess for altered forms, factor IX species were compared to those of a homologous clotting factor, prothrombin. Fourteen postmortem abortus blood samples from fetuses of 14 to 23 weeks gestation had factor IX antigen levels that averaged 5.1 U/dL and ranged from 1.7 to 15 U/dL. Amniotic fluid factor IX antigen averaged 2.9 U/dL, with a range from 1.4 to 8.5 U/dL in 19 separate amniocentesis samples. Thus, in a male fetus at risk of hemophilia B and with a low circulating level of gene product, mixture of fetal plasma with amniotic fluid could severely limit prenatal diagnosis, assuming that the amniotic fluid factor IX is of maternal origin. Despite rapid processing of amniotic fluid samples, the prothrombin was extensively cleaved, suggesting that it had been activated in vivo. On gel electrophoresis of amniotic fluid samples, however, factor IX was only minimally cleaved. In the postmortem fetal blood specimens, prothrombin was partially cleaved. On crossed-immunoelectrophoresis, fetal plasma prothrombin showed decreased migration in calcium, compared to EDTA, indicative of mature gamma-glutamyl carboxylation. The latter presumably resulted from fetal hepatic synthesis.

  7. Preparation of high purity lanthanum compounds for use in fluoride optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, K.J.; Buckner, L.; Jaganathan, J.; Ginther, R.; Aggarwal, I.D. . Optical Sciences Div.)

    1989-02-01

    The preparation of ultra-pure lanthanum nitrate by co-precipitation is described. Preparation of high purity lanthanum carbonate from the pure nitrate is also described. Hydrofluorination of pure lanthanum carbonate produces high purity lanthanum fluoride used in the preparation of heavy metal fluoride glasses.

  8. Replacement therapy with recombinant factor IX. A multicentre evaluation of current dosing practices in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Rocca, Alessandra; Pizzinelli, Simona; Oliovecchio, Emily; Santagostino, Elena; Rocino, Angiola; Iorio, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Background The in vivo recovery of recombinant factor IX (rFIX) is reported to be lower than that of plasma-derived products, with potential clinical implications for dosing. In clinical practice, a conversion (augmentation) factor is suggested to calculate the necessary doses of rFIX. The aim of this study was to assess the range of values for the conversion factor in usual clinical practice in Italy. Materials and methods The study was questionnaire-based and proposed to all Italian Haemophilia centres treating patients with haemophilia B. Age, weight, dosage used in the last effective infusion, treatment regimen (prophylaxis versus on-demand), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) status, and years of previous therapy with rFIX were recorded for patients with severe haemophilia B treated with rFIX. Mean, standard deviation, median and range were calculated for demographic and treatment data for the overall population and for subgroups. The conversion factor for the theoretical dosage of 40 IU/Kg was calculated. Results Among 207 patients with severe haemophilia B being followed in 24 centres, 138 (66.7%) were being treated with rFIX. The sample of 207 patients represents 83.1% of the population of Italian patients with severe haemophilia B. The age range of the studied patients was 0–72 years (mean, 24 years) and the weight range was 3–108 kg (mean, 60 kg). Nineteen patients (14.4%) were positive for HIV and 51 (42.9%) were positive for HCV. The mean dosage of rFIX was 44 IU/Kg, with no significant difference between those receiving the product as prophylaxis or on-demand. A reduction in dosage was observed with increasing age (0.23 IU/kg/year). The mean value for the conversion factor was 1.10 ± 0.36 (median 1.00, range 0.51–2.08), when estimated for the whole population. No effect of HIV and HCV status was found on the dose prescribed. No evident correlation was found with the underlying genetic mutation. Discussion We found

  9. Ultrasound-targeted hepatic delivery of factor IX in hemophiliac mice

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, C D; Moisyadi, S; Avelar, A; Walton, C B; Shohet, R V

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) was used to direct the delivery of plasmid and transposase-based vectors encoding human factor IX (hFIX) to the livers of hemophilia B (FIX−/−) mice. The DNA vectors were incorporated into cationic lipid microbubbles, injected intravenously, and transfected into hepatocytes by acoustic cavitation of the bubbles as they transited the liver. Ultrasound parameters were identified that produced transfection of hepatocytes in vivo without substantial damage or bleeding in the livers of the FIX-deficient mice. These mice were treated with a conventional expression plasmid, or one containing a piggyBac transposon construct, and hFIX levels in the plasma and liver were evaluated at multiple time points after UTMD. We detected hFIX in the plasma by western blotting from mice treated with either plasmid during the 12 days after UTMD, and in the hepatocytes of treated livers by immunofluorescence. Reductions in clotting time and improvements in the percentage of FIX activity were observed for both plasmids, conventional (4.15±1.98%), and transposon based (2.70±.75%), 4 to 5 days after UTMD compared with untreated FIX (−/−) control mice (0.92±0.78%) (P=0.001 and P=0.012, respectively). Reduced clotting times persisted for both plasmids 12 days after treatment (reflecting percentage FIX activity of 3.12±1.56%, P=0.02 and 3.08±0.10%, P=0.001, respectively). Clotting times from an additional set of mice treated with pmGENIE3-hFIX were evaluated for long-term effects and demonstrated a persistent reduction in average clotting time 160 days after a single treatment. These data suggest that UTMD could be a minimally invasive, nonviral approach to enhance hepatic FIX expression in patients with hemophilia. PMID:26960037

  10. Sustained expression of coagulation factor IX by modified cord blood-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Megan; Marquez-Curtis, Leah; Janowska-Wieczorek, Anna; Hortelano, Gonzalo

    2014-01-01

    Hemophilia B patients are subject to frequent and spontaneous bleeding caused by a deficiency of clotting factor IX (FIX). Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been used in cellular therapies as a result of their immunomodulatory properties, the ability to home to sites of injury and their amenability to various ex vivo modifications, including lentiviral-mediated gene transfer. MSCs were isolated from human umbilical cord blood and differentiated into adipogenic, chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages. A lentiviral DNA vector containing the human FIX gene was generated using traditional restriction enzyme digest and ligation techniques to generate viable replication-incompetent lentiviral particles that were used to transduce MSCs. Quantitative measurement of FIX expression was conducted using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The over-expression of FIX was sustained in vitro at levels > 4 µg/10(6) cells/24 h and FIX coagulant activity was > 2.5 mIU/10(6) cells/24 h for the 6-week duration of study. Lentiviral modification of cells with a multiplicity of infection of 10 did not adversely affect the potential of cord blood (CB) MSCs to differentiate to adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteoblastic cells, and the expression of functional FIX was sustained after differentiation and was similar to that in nondifferentiated cells. Modification of human CB MSCs with a lentiviral vector resulted in sustained high FIX expression in vitro after differentiation to adipogenic, chondrogenic and osteoblastic cells. These modified MSCs could have applications in cellular therapies for hemophilia B. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Pilot production of recombinant human clotting factor IX from transgenic sow milk.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-ling; Chang, Yuo-sheng; Lin, Yin-shen; Yen, Chon-ho

    2012-06-01

    Valuable pharmaceutical proteins produced from the mammary glands of transgenic livestock have potential use in the biomedical industry. In this study, recombinant human clotting factor IX (rhFIX) produced from transgenic sow milk for preclinical animal studies have been established. The transgenic sow milk was skimmed and treated with sodium phosphate buffer to remove abundant casein protein. Then, the γ-carboxylated rhFIX fraction was segregated through the Q Sepharose chromatography from uncarboxylated one. For safety issue, the process included virus inactivation by solvent/detergent (S/D) treatment. Subsequently, the S/D treated sample was loaded into the Heparin Sepharose column to recover the rhFIX fraction, which was then reapplied to the Heparin Sepharose column to enhance rhFIX purity and lower the ratio of activated form rhFIX (rhFIXa) easily. This was possible due to the higher affinity of the Heparin affinity sorbent for rhFIXa than for the rhFIX zymogen. Furthermore, an IgA removal column was used to eliminate porcine IgA in purified rhFIX. Finally, nanofiltration was performed for viral clearance. Consequently, a high-quality rhFIX product was produced (approximately 700 mg per batch). Other values for final rhFIX preparation were as follows: purity, >99%; average specific activity, 415.6±57.7 IU/mL and total milk impurity, <0.5 ng/mg. This is the first report that described the whole process and stable production of bioactive rhFIX from transgenic sow milk. The overall manufacturing process presented here has the potential for industrial production of rhFIX for treatment of hemophilia B patients.

  12. EGF domain of coagulation factor IX is conducive to exposure of phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Hidai, Chiaki; Fujiwara, Yusuke; Kokubun, Shinichiro; Kitano, Hisataka

    2017-04-01

    Lipid rafts are an initiation site for many different signals. Recently, we reported that an EGF domain in activated coagulation factor IX (EGF-F9) increases lipid raft formation and accelerates cell migration. However, the detailed mechanism is not well understood. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of EGF-F9 on the cell membrane. A431 cells (derived from human squamous cell carcinoma) were treated with recombinant EGF-F9. Cells were immunocytochemically stained with probes for lipid rafts or phosphatidylserine (PS). After 3 min of treatment with EGF-F9, cholera toxin subunit B (CTxB) binding domains emerged at the adhesive tips of filopodia. Subsequently, CTxB staining was observed on the filopodial shaft. Finally, large clusters of CTxB domains were observed at the edge of cell bodies. Markers for lipid rafts, such as caveolin-1 and a GPI anchored protein, co-localized with CTxB. Staining with annexin V and XII revealed that PS was exposed at the tips of filopodia, translocated on filopodial shafts, and co-localized with CTxB at the rafts. Immunocytochemistry showed that scramblase-1 protein was present at the filopodial tips. Our data indicates that EGF-F9 accelerates PS exposure around the filopodial adhesion complex and induces clustering of lipid rafts in the cell body. PS exposure is thought to occur on cells undergoing apoptosis. Further study of the function of the EGF-F9 motif in mediating signal transduction is necessary because it is shared by a number of proteins.

  13. SIMULTANEOUS PRODUCTION OF HIGH-PURITY HYDROGEN AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2 FROM SYNGAS

    SciTech Connect

    Linda Denton; Hana Lorethova; Tomasz Wiltowski; Court Moorefield; Parag Kulkarni; Vladimir Zamansky; Ravi Kumar

    2003-12-01

    This final report summarizes the progress made on the program ''Simultaneous Production of High-Purity Hydrogen and Sequestration-Ready CO{sub 2} from Syngas (contract number DE-FG26-99FT40682)'', during October 2000 through September of 2003. GE Energy and Environmental Research (GE-EER) and Southern Illinois University (SIU) at Carbondale conducted the research work for this program. This program addresses improved methods to efficiently produce simultaneous streams of high-purity hydrogen and separated carbon dioxide from synthesis gas (syngas). The syngas may be produced through either gasification of coal or reforming of natural gas. The process of production of H{sub 2} and separated CO{sub 2} utilizes a dual-bed reactor and regenerator system. The reactor produces hydrogen and the regenerator produces separated CO{sub 2}. The dual-bed system can be operated under either a circulating fluidized-bed configuration or a cyclic fixed-bed configuration. Both configurations were evaluated in this project. The experimental effort was divided into lab-scale work at SIU and bench-scale work at GE-EER. Tests in a lab-scale fluidized bed system demonstrated the process for the conversion of syngas to high purity H{sub 2} and separated CO{sub 2}. The lab-scale system generated up to 95% H{sub 2} (on a dry basis). Extensive thermodynamic analysis of chemical reactions between the syngas and the fluidized solids determined an optimum range of temperature and pressure operation, where the extent of the undesirable reactions is minimum. The cycling of the process between hydrogen generation and oxygen regeneration has been demonstrated. The fluidized solids did not regenerate completely and the hydrogen purity in the reuse cycle dropped to 70% from 95% (on a dry basis). Changes in morphology and particle size may be the most dominant factor affecting the efficiency of the repeated cycling between hydrogen production and oxygen regeneration. The concept of simultaneous

  14. Influence of formulation factors on methyl-ALA-induced protoporphyrin IX accumulation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Ryan F; Juzenas, Petras; McCarron, Paul A; Ma, Li-Wei; Woolfson, A David; Moan, Johan

    2006-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a medical treatment by which a combination of a photosensitising drug and visible light cause the destruction of selected cells. Thick lesions, such as nodular basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), or lesions with overlying keratinous debris, are reported as being difficult to eradicate using 5-aminolevulinic acid-based photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT). Such treatment failures have been attributed to the shallow penetration of water-soluble drugs like ALA. In addition, the current scarcity of sophisticated drug delivery research centered on PDT applications has meant that accurate comparison of similar clinical studies is difficult. This paper investigates, for the first time, novel drug delivery systems for controlled drug delivery of methyl-ALA (M-ALA). Pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) and bioadhesive patches containing defined M-ALA loadings and a standard cream containing equivalent amounts of drug were applied to the skin of mice for defined periods of time and the fluorescence of the protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) induced measured over 24h. Of major importance, the PSA patches containing low drug loadings induced high PpIX levels, which were limited to the site of application, after only 1h applications. Such systems have the potential to improve selectivity of PpIX accumulation, increase simplicity of treatment and, due to the low drug loadings required, reduce costs of clinical PDT. PSA patches would be most suitable for application to areas of dry skin, while bioadhesive patches would be suitable for moist areas, such as the mouth or lower female reproductive tract and have been shown here to induce significant PpIX production at the site of application after 4h applications of patches containing high drug loadings.

  15. Magneto-Optical Study High-Purity Niobium for Superconducting RF Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyanskii, A. A.; Lee, P. J.; Gurevich, A.; Sung, Zu-Hawn; Larbalestier, D. C.

    2011-03-01

    In this review we present a summary of our recent Magneto-Optical (MO) imaging of high-purity Nb for SRF cavity application. Superconducting RF cavities have been chosen as the accelerating technology for the International Linear Collider, and it is of vital importance to understand the limiting factors to the performance of these devices. We have been using a combination of MO, imaging, magnetization measurements and a variety of non-contact surface topology measurement techniques to characterize samples of high purity Nb supplied by Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF). Localized non-uniformities in the superconducting properties were revealed on samples which were cut from rolled polycrystalline sheets (FNAL) and subjected to buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and heat treatments (HT) steps designed to simulate typical SRF cavity production. MO examination of the polycrystalline Nb sheets in perpendicular and in-plane fields reveals the perturbations in the critical currents caused by topological defects such as the steps between adjacent grains produced by BCP. MO examination of bi-crystals prepared from a disc cut directly from a very large grain size ingot (manufactured for TJNAF by CBMM) showed preferential flux penetration at grain boundaries for bi-crystal samples in which the GB interface was almost parallel to the externally applied field. This result was the first direct evidence of depressed superconductivity at GBs. By developing an understanding of how and why such behavior occurs, we hope to be able to improve the properties of cavity accelerators.

  16. Efficacy and safety of long-acting recombinant fusion protein linking factor IX with albumin in haemophilia B patients undergoing surgery.

    PubMed

    Négrier, C; Abdul Karim, F; Lepatan, L M; Lienhart, A; López-Fernández, M F; Mahlangu, J; Pabinger, I; Li, Y; Wolko, D; Voigt, C; Jacobs, I; Santagostino, E

    2016-07-01

    Recombinant factor IX fusion protein (rIX-FP) has been developed to improve the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of factor IX (FIX), allowing maintenance of desired FIX activity between injections at extended intervals, ultimately optimizing haemophilia B treatment. To determine the efficacy and safety of rIX-FP in the perioperative setting. Subjects were adult and paediatric patients with severe to moderately severe haemophilia B (FIX ≤ 2%) participating in three Phase III clinical trials and undergoing a surgical procedure. PK profiles were established prior to surgery for each patient. Haemostatic efficacy was assessed by the investigator for up to 72 h after surgery. Safety measurements during the study included adverse events and inhibitors to FIX. FIX activity was monitored during and after surgery to determine if repeat dosing was required. Twenty-one, both major and minor, surgeries were performed in 19 patients. Haemostatic efficacy was rated as excellent (n = 17) or good (n = 4) in all surgeries. A single preoperative dose maintained intraoperative haemostasis in 20 of 21 surgeries. Nine major orthopaedic surgeries were conducted in eight patients with a mean of 7 (range: 6-12) rIX-FP injections during surgery and the 14-day postoperative period. Median rIX-FP consumption for orthopaedic surgeries was 87 IU kg(-1) preoperatively and 375 IU kg(-1) overall. No subject developed inhibitors to FIX or antibodies to rIX-FP. Recombinant factor IX fusion protein was well tolerated and effectively maintained haemostasis during and after surgery. Stable FIX activity was achieved with a prolonged dosing interval and reduced consumption compared to conventional or currently available long-acting recombinant FIX. © 2016 The Authors. Haemophilia Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Characterization of IXINITY® (Trenonacog Alfa), a Recombinant Factor IX with Primary Sequence Corresponding to the Threonine-148 Polymorph

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Dougald M.; Jenny, Richard J.; Van Cott, Kevin E.; Saward, Laura L.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of these studies was to extensively characterize the first recombinant FIX therapeutic corresponding to the threonine-148 (Thr-148) polymorph, IXINITY (trenonacog alfa [coagulation factor IX (recombinant)]). Gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism, and gel filtration were used to determine purity and confirm structure. Chromatographic and mass spectrometry techniques were used to identify and quantify posttranslational modifications. Activity was assessed as the ability to activate factor X (FX) both with and without factor VIIIa (FVIIIa) and in a standard clotting assay. All results were consistent across multiple lots. Trenonacog alfa migrated as a single band on Coomassie-stained gels; activity assays were normal and showed <0.002 IU of activated factor IX (FIXa) per IU of FIX. The molecule has >97%  γ-carboxylation and underwent the appropriate structural change upon binding calcium ions. Trenonacog alfa was activated normally with factor XIa (FXIa); once activated it bound to FVIIIa and FXa. When activated to FIXa, it was inhibited efficiently by antithrombin. Glycosylation patterns were similar to plasma-derived FIX with sialic acid content consistent with the literature reports of good pharmacokinetic performance. These studies have shown that trenonacog alfa is a highly pure product with a primary sequence and posttranslational modifications consistent with the common Thr-148 polymorphism of plasma-derived FIX. PMID:26997955

  18. Characterization of three abnormal factor IX variants (Bm Lake Elsinore, Long Beach, and Los Angeles) of hemophilia-B. Evidence for defects affecting the latent catalytic site.

    PubMed Central

    Usharani, P; Warn-Cramer, B J; Kasper, C K; Bajaj, S P

    1985-01-01

    Abnormal factor IX variant proteins were isolated from the plasmas of three unrelated severe hemophilia-B families that had been previously shown to contain functionally impaired molecules immunologically similar to normal factor IX. The families studied were: (1) a patient with markedly prolonged ox brain prothrombin time, designated factor IX Bm Lake Elsinore (IXBmLE); (b) three patients (brothers) with moderately prolonged ox brain prothrombin time, designated factor IX Long Beach (IXLB); and (c) a patient with normal ox brain prothrombin time designated factor IX Los Angeles (IXLA). Each variant molecule comigrates with normal factor IX (IXN) both in the sodium dodecyl sulfate and in the nondenaturing alkaline gel electrophoresis. All three variant proteins are indistinguishable from IXN in their amino acid compositions, isoelectric points, carbohydrate distributions and number of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid residues. Each variant protein undergoes a similar pattern of cleavage by factor XIa/Ca2+ and by factor VIIa/Ca2+/tissue factor, and is activated at a rate similar to that observed for IXN. All of the three variant proteins also react with an anti-IXN monoclonal antibody that interferes with the binding of activated IXN(IXaN) to thrombin-treated factor VIIIC. However, in contrast to IXaN, the cleaved IXBmLE has negligible activity (approximately 0.2%), and cleaved forms of IXLA and IXLB have significantly reduced activity (approximately 5-6%) in binding to antithrombin-III/heparin, and in activating factor VII (plus Ca2+ and phospholipid) or factor X (plus Ca2+ and phospholipid) +/- factor VIII. These data, taken together, strongly indicate that the defect in these three variant proteins resides near or within the latent catalytic site. This results in virtually a complete loss of catalytic activity of the cleaved IXBmLE molecule and approximately 95% loss of catalytic activity of the cleaved IXLA and IXLB molecules. Images PMID:3965513

  19. Characterization of three abnormal factor IX variants (Bm Lake Elsinore, Long Beach, and Los Angeles) of hemophilia-B. Evidence for defects affecting the latent catalytic site.

    PubMed

    Usharani, P; Warn-Cramer, B J; Kasper, C K; Bajaj, S P

    1985-01-01

    Abnormal factor IX variant proteins were isolated from the plasmas of three unrelated severe hemophilia-B families that had been previously shown to contain functionally impaired molecules immunologically similar to normal factor IX. The families studied were: (1) a patient with markedly prolonged ox brain prothrombin time, designated factor IX Bm Lake Elsinore (IXBmLE); (b) three patients (brothers) with moderately prolonged ox brain prothrombin time, designated factor IX Long Beach (IXLB); and (c) a patient with normal ox brain prothrombin time designated factor IX Los Angeles (IXLA). Each variant molecule comigrates with normal factor IX (IXN) both in the sodium dodecyl sulfate and in the nondenaturing alkaline gel electrophoresis. All three variant proteins are indistinguishable from IXN in their amino acid compositions, isoelectric points, carbohydrate distributions and number of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid residues. Each variant protein undergoes a similar pattern of cleavage by factor XIa/Ca2+ and by factor VIIa/Ca2+/tissue factor, and is activated at a rate similar to that observed for IXN. All of the three variant proteins also react with an anti-IXN monoclonal antibody that interferes with the binding of activated IXN(IXaN) to thrombin-treated factor VIIIC. However, in contrast to IXaN, the cleaved IXBmLE has negligible activity (approximately 0.2%), and cleaved forms of IXLA and IXLB have significantly reduced activity (approximately 5-6%) in binding to antithrombin-III/heparin, and in activating factor VII (plus Ca2+ and phospholipid) or factor X (plus Ca2+ and phospholipid) +/- factor VIII. These data, taken together, strongly indicate that the defect in these three variant proteins resides near or within the latent catalytic site. This results in virtually a complete loss of catalytic activity of the cleaved IXBmLE molecule and approximately 95% loss of catalytic activity of the cleaved IXLA and IXLB molecules.

  20. A method for systematic purification from bovine plasma of six vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors: prothrombin, factor X, factor IX, protein S, protein C, and protein Z.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, N; Morita, T; Iwanaga, S

    1985-05-01

    A systematic purification scheme is presented for the isolation of six vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors from bovine plasma in a functionally and biochemically pure state. The vitamin K-dependent proteins concentrated by the ordinary barium citrate adsorption were first separated into four fractions, fractions A, B, C, and D, by DEAE-Sephadex A-50 chromatography. From the pooled fraction A, protein S, factor IX, and prothrombin were purified by column chromatography on Blue-Sepharose CL-6B. Heparin-Sepharose chromatography of the pooled fraction B provided mainly pure factor IX, in addition to homogeneous prothrombin. A high degree of resolution of protein C and prothrombin from the pooled fraction C was obtained with a Blue-Sepharose column. This dye-ligand chromatographic procedure was also very effective for the separation of protein Z and factor X contained in the pooled fraction D. Thus, these preparative procedures allowed high recovery of milligram and gram quantities of six vitamin K-dependent proteins from 15 liters of plasma in only two chromatographic steps, except for protein S, which required three (the third step was rechromatography on Blue-Sepharose CL-6B).

  1. The first EGF-like domain from human factor IX contains a high-affinity calcium binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Handford, P A; Baron, M; Mayhew, M; Willis, A; Beesley, T; Brownlee, G G; Campbell, I D

    1990-01-01

    It has been suggested that epidermal growth factor-like (EGF-like) domains, containing conserved carboxylate residues, are responsible for the high-affinity calcium binding exhibited by a number of vitamin K-dependent plasma proteins involved in the control of the blood coagulation cascade. These include the procoagulant factors IX and X, and the anticoagulants protein C and protein S. To test this hypothesis we have expressed the first EGF-like domain from human factor IX (residues 46-84) using a yeast secretion system, and examined calcium binding to the domain. Using 1H-NMR to measure a calcium-dependent shift assigned to Tyr69 we have detected a high-affinity calcium binding site (Kd = 200-300 microM). We suggest that other EGF-like domains of this type may have similar calcium binding properties. In addition, we have completely assigned the aromatic region of the NMR spectrum by NOESY and COSY analysis, and have used these data to discuss the effect of calcium and pH on the conformation of the domain with reference to a model based on the structure of human EGF. PMID:2406129

  2. Expression of human factor IX in rabbit hepatocytes by retrovirus-mediated gene transfer: Potential for gene therapy of hemophilia B

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.R. Puget Sound Blood Center, Seattle, WA ); Darlington, G. ); Armentano, D.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1990-08-01

    Hemophilia B (Christmas disease) is a chromosome X-linked blood clotting disorder which results when factor IX is deficient or functionally defective. The enzyme is synthesized in the liver, and the existence of animal models for this genetic disease will permit the development of somatic gene therapy protocols aimed at transfer of the functional gene into the liver. The authors report the construction of an N2-based recombinant retroviral vector, NCMVFIX, for efficient transfer and expression of human factor IX cDNA in primary rabbit hepatocytes. In this construct the human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter directs the expression of factor IX. Hepatocytes were isolated from 3-week-old New Zealand White rabbits, infected with the recombinant virus, and analyzed for secretion of active factor IX. The infected rabbit hepatocytes produced human factor IX that is indistinguishable from enzyme derived from normal human plasma. The recombinant protein is sufficiently {gamma}-carboxylated and is functionally active in clotting assays. These results establish the feasibility of using infected hepatocytes for the expression of this protein and are a step toward the goal of correcting hemophilia B by hepatic gene transfer.

  3. Sustained and therapeutic delivery of factor IX in nude haemophilia B mice by encapsulated C2C12 myoblasts: concurrent tumourigenesis.

    PubMed

    Hortelano, G; Wang, L; Xu, N; Ofosu, F A

    2001-03-01

    This study reports the generation of an immunodeficient murine model for haemophilia B, obtained by breeding factor IX-deficient mice with an immunodeficient mouse strain, and use of this mouse model to evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety of a gene therapy strategy for treating haemophilia B. Nude haemophilic mice were implanted with biocompatible microcapsules enclosing recombinant myoblasts secreting human factor IX. The activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) of plasma of mice thus treated was invariably shortened 3 weeks after microcapsule implantation, and remained shortened for at least 77 days. Shortening of the APTT of the haemophilia mice coincided with the appearance of human factor IX in mice plasmas (up to 600 ng mL(-1) on day 77), and normalization of the tail-bleeding time. Thus, the microencapsulated myoblasts reversed the clinical phenotype of haemophilia B. In contrast, plasmas of immunocompetent haemophilic mice similarly implanted with microcapsules only showed a transient shortening of APTT, and coincident transient delivery of human factor IX antigen. Rapid disappearance of human factor IX from plasmas of immunocompetent mice also coincided with production of antibodies to the human transgene. Significantly, 86% of the nude haemophilia mice developed tumours of myoblast origin. Thus, while this study revealed the feasibility of this gene therapy approach to treat severe haemophilia B, it also highlights the importance of using safer cell lines to prevent tumour development.

  4. Breeding of transgenic cattle for human coagulation factor IX by a combination of lentiviral system and cloning.

    PubMed

    Monzani, P S; Sangalli, J R; De Bem, T H C; Bressan, F F; Fantinato-Neto, P; Pimentel, J R V; Birgel-Junior, E H; Fontes, A M; Covas, D T; Meirelles, F V

    2013-02-28

    Recombinant coagulation factor IX must be produced in mammalian cells because FIX synthesis involves translational modifications. Human cell culture-based expression of human coagulation factor IX (hFIX) is expensive, and large-scale production capacity is limited. Transgenic animals may greatly increase the yield of therapeutic proteins and reduce costs. In this study, we used a lentiviral system to obtain transgenic cells and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to produce transgenic animals. Lentiviral vectors carrying hFIX driven by 3 bovine β-casein promoters were constructed. Bovine epithelial mammary cells were transduced by lentivirus, selected with blasticidin, plated on extracellular matrix, and induced by lactogenic hormones; promoter activity was evaluated by quantitative PCR. Transcriptional activity of the 5.335-kb promoter was 6-fold higher than the 3.392- and 4.279-kb promoters, which did not significantly differ. Transgenic bovine fibroblasts were transduced with lentivirus carrying the 5.335-kb promoter and used as donor cells for SCNT. Cloned transgenic embryo production yielded development rates of 28.4%, similar to previous reports on cloned non-transgenic embryos. The embryos were transferred to recipient cows (N = 21) and 2 births of cloned transgenic cattle were obtained. These results suggest combination of the lentiviral system and cloning may be a good strategy for production of transgenic cattle.

  5. Persistent expression of human clotting factor IX from mouse liver after intravenous injection of adeno-associated virus vectors

    PubMed Central

    Koeberl, Dwight D.; Alexander, Ian E.; Halbert, Christine L.; Russell, David W.; Miller, A. Dusty

    1997-01-01

    We previously found that gene transduction by adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors in cell culture can be stimulated over 100-fold by treatment of the target cells with agents that affect DNA metabolism, such as irradiation or topoisomerase inhibitors. Here we show that previous γ-irradiation increased the transduction rate in mouse liver by up to 900-fold, and the topoisomerase inhibitor etoposide increased transduction by about 20-fold. Similar rates of hepatic transduction were obtained by direct injection of the liver or by systemic delivery via tail vein injection. Hepatocytes were much more efficiently transduced than other cells after systemic delivery, and up to 3% of all hepatocytes could be transduced after one vector injection. The presence of wild-type AAV, which contaminates many AAV vector preparations, was required to observe a full response to γ-irradiation. Injection of mice with AAV vectors encoding human clotting factor IX after γ-irradiation resulted in synthesis of low levels of human clotting factor IX for the 5-month period of observation. These studies show the potential of targeted gene transduction of the liver by AAV vectors for treatment of various hematological or metabolic diseases. PMID:9037069

  6. Targeting of the epidermal growth factor receptor with mesoporphyrin IX-peptide conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Fontenot, Krystal R.; Ongarora, Benson G.; LeBlanc, Logan E.; Zhou, Zehua; Jois, Seetharama D.; Vicente, M. Graça H.

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis and in vitro evaluation of four mesoporphyrin IX-peptide conjugates designed to target EGFR, over-expressed in colorectal and other cancers, are reported. Two peptides with known affinity for EGFR, LARLLT (1) and GYHWYGYTPQNVI (2), were conjugated to mesoporphyrin IX (MPIX, 3) via one or both the propionic side chains, directly (4, 5) or with a triethylene glycol spacer (7, 8). The conjugates were characterized using NMR, MS, CD, SPR, UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopies. Energy minimization and molecular dynamics suggest different conformations for the conjugates. SPR studies show that conjugate 4, bearing two LARLLT with no PEG spacers, has the greatest affinity for binding to EGFR, followed by conjugate 7 with two PEG and two LARLLT sequences. Molecular modeling and docking studies suggest that both conjugates 4 and 7 can bind to monomer and dimer EGFR in open and closed conformations. The cytotoxicity and cellular targeting ability of the conjugates were investigated in human HEp2 cells over-expressing EGFR. All conjugates showed low dark- and photo-toxicities. The cellular uptake was highest for conjugates 4 and 8 and lowest for 7 bearing two LARLLT linked via PEG groups, likely due to decreased hydrophobicity. Among the conjugates investigated 4 is the most efficient EGFR-targeting agent, and therefore the most promising for the detection of cancers that over-express EGFR. PMID:27738394

  7. Targeting of the epidermal growth factor receptor with mesoporphyrin IX-peptide conjugates.

    PubMed

    Fontenot, Krystal R; Ongarora, Benson G; LeBlanc, Logan E; Zhou, Zehua; Jois, Seetharama D; Vicente, M Graça H

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis and in vitro evaluation of four mesoporphyrin IX-peptide conjugates designed to target EGFR, over-expressed in colorectal and other cancers, are reported. Two peptides with known affinity for EGFR, LARLLT (1) and GYHWYGYTPQNVI (2), were conjugated to mesoporphyrin IX (MPIX, 3) via one or both the propionic side chains, directly (4, 5) or with a triethylene glycol spacer (7, 8). The conjugates were characterized using NMR, MS, CD, SPR, UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopies. Energy minimization and molecular dynamics suggest different conformations for the conjugates. SPR studies show that conjugate 4, bearing two LARLLT with no PEG spacers, has the greatest affinity for binding to EGFR, followed by conjugate 7 with two PEG and two LARLLT sequences. Molecular modeling and docking studies suggest that both conjugates 4 and 7 can bind to monomer and dimer EGFR in open and closed conformations. The cytotoxicity and cellular targeting ability of the conjugates were investigated in human HEp2 cells over-expressing EGFR. All conjugates showed low dark- and photo-toxicities. The cellular uptake was highest for conjugates 4 and 8 and lowest for 7 bearing two LARLLT linked via PEG groups, likely due to decreased hydrophobicity. Among the conjugates investigated 4 is the most efficient EGFR-targeting agent, and therefore the most promising for the detection of cancers that over-express EGFR.

  8. Low-factor consumption for major surgery in haemophilia B with long-acting recombinant glycoPEGylated factor IX.

    PubMed

    Escobar, M A; Tehranchi, R; Karim, F A; Caliskan, U; Chowdary, P; Colberg, T; Giangrande, P; Giermasz, A; Mancuso, M E; Serban, M; Tsay, W; Mahlangu, J N

    2017-01-01

    Surgery in patients with haemophilia B carries a high risk of excessive bleeding and requires adequate haemostatic control until wound healing. Nonacog beta pegol, a long-acting recombinant glycoPEGylated factor IX (FIX), was used in the perioperative management of patients undergoing major surgery. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of nonacog beta pegol in patients with haemophilia B who undergo major surgery. This was an open-label, multicentre, non-controlled surgery trial aimed at assessing peri- and postoperative efficacy and safety of nonacog beta pegol in 13 previously treated patients with haemophilia B. All patients received a preoperative nonacog beta pegol bolus injection of 80 IU kg(-1) . Postoperatively, the patients received fixed nonacog beta pegol doses of 40 IU kg(-1) , repeated at the investigator's discretion. Safety assessments included monitoring of immunogenicity and adverse events. Intraoperative haemostatic effect was rated 'excellent' or 'good' in all 13 cases. Apart from the preoperative injection, none of the patients needed additional doses of nonacog beta pegol on the day of surgery. The median number of postoperative doses of nonacog beta pegol was 2.0 from days 1 to 6 and 1.5 from days 7 to 13. No unexpected intra- or postoperative complications were observed including deaths or thromboembolic events. No patients developed inhibitors. These results indicated that nonacog beta pegol was safe and effective in the perioperative setting, allowing major surgical interventions in patients with haemophilia B with minimal peri- and postoperative concentrate consumption and infrequent injections as reported with standard FIX products. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Synthesis of High Purity Sinterable Silicon Carbide Powder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    adsorption and diffusion. Molecular diffusion is therefore, and important factor for condensational growth. The rate of condensational growth of a...Silicon Carbide Hydrogen Chloride Water Total Temperature. °F Pressure, psia Mol Frac Vapor Molecular Wt. GPM SCFH SLM Total H, 42.05 42.05 70...Silicon Carbide Hydrogen Chloride Water 6.77 24.31 37.28 Total 6.77 24.31 37.28 Temperature, °F Pressure, psia Mol Frac Vapor Molecular Wt

  10. Synthesis of High Purity Silicon from Rice Husks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larbi, Kingsley Kweku

    Impurity optimized silicon is needed for the advancement of terrestrial photovoltaic power generation. In this study the possibility of producing solar grade silicon from rice husks has been pursued. An integrated process flowsheet was developed and practiced that included initial leaching, reduction of Rice husk ash (RHA) and post-reduction purification of silicon. Metallothermic reduction of purified RHA with magnesium was investigated within the temperature range of 500-950 °C. The reduction product was purified by two stage acid leaching sequence. Analysis of the final silicon powder product by XRD and ICP-OES showed crystalline silicon with boron content to be less than 3ppm- corresponding to reduction by a factor greater than 10, whilst the phosphorus content was reduced by a factor of over 20 and reaching less than 73ppm. The effects of temperature, magnesium amount and leaching agents optimized in this study. A one step test melting was also carried out to convert the silicon powder into silicon chunks.

  11. Visualizing the von Willebrand factor/glycoprotein Ib-IX axis with a platelet-type von Willebrand disease mutation.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Jose A; Kyei, Mark; Russell, Susan; Liu, Junling; Gartner, T Kent; Storrie, Brian; Ware, Jerry

    2009-12-24

    Platelet-type von Willebrand disease (PT-VWD) is a bleeding disorder of the platelet glycoprotein Ib-IX/von Willebrand factor (VWF) axis caused by mutations in the glycoprotein Ib-IX receptor that lead to an increased affinity with VWF. In this report, platelets from a mouse expressing a mutation associated with PT-VWD have been visualized using state-of-the art image collection and processing. Confocal analysis revealed that VWF bound to the surface of single platelets and bridging micro-aggregates of platelets. Surface-bound VWF appears as a large, linear structure on the surface of 50% of the PT-VWD platelets. In vivo thrombus formation after chemical injury to the carotid artery revealed a severe impairment to occlusion as a consequence of the PT-VWD mutation. In vitro stimulation of PT-VWD platelets with adenosine diphosphate or thrombin demonstrates a significant block in their ability to bind fibrinogen. The impairment of in vivo thrombus formation and in vitro fibrinogen binding are more significant than might be expected from the observed platelet binding to VWF polymers over a small portion of the plasma membrane. Visualization of the receptor/ligand interaction and characterization of a severe antithrombotic phenotype provide a new understanding on the molecular basis of bleeding associated with the PT-VWD phenotype.

  12. Mechanical Properties of High Purity Niobium - Novel Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapati Myneni

    2003-09-01

    One of the procedures to improve the performance of superconducting niobium cavities is a heat treatment for several hours in an ultrahigh vacuum at temperatures between 800C and 1400C for hydrogen degassing or post-purification, respectively. However, it was recently observed with Spallation Neutron Source Project (SNS) prototype cavities, that a heat treatment at 800 C for even 1 hour degraded the mechanical properties of RRR niobium, in particular the yield strength. This lower strength resulted in cavity deformations during handling thus affecting both their resonant frequency and field profile. In addition to lowering the yield strength, it was observed in some lots of material that the Young's modulus was also apparently reduced by a factor of 2 as a result of the hydrogen outgassing at 800 C. Surprisingly, material received at other national laboratories exhibited similar anomalous behavior even without any heat treatments in vacuum. Based on these observations a multi-institutional collaborative basic research activity on high RRR niobium (determination of Nb yield strength as a function of grain size, work hardening, chemical composition, and heat treatment temperature) has been initiated by JLAB to gain a better understanding of the material properties affecting the mechanical behavior In this contribution, a brief review of the measurements at JLAB, at the Materials Science and Engineering Department of the University of Virginia, at the Analytical Chemistry and Metallurgy Divisions of the National Institute of Standard and Technology, Gaithersburg and in the Department of Physics, SUNY, Albany are presented. The measurements include yield strength, hardness, ultrasonic velocity, crystallographic structure, microstructure, determination of interstitial contents using internal friction; particular emphasis is placed on determining the hydrogen concentration in the niobium via Cold Neutron Prompt Gamma-Ray Activation Analysis and Neutron Incoherent

  13. The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative s High-Purity Uranium-233 Preservation Effort

    SciTech Connect

    Krichinsky, Alan M; Bostick, Debra A; Giaquinto, Joseph; Bayne, Charles; Goldberg, Dr. Steven A.; Humphrey, Dr. Marc; Hutcheon, Dr. Ian D.; Sobolev, Taissa

    2012-01-01

    High-purity 233U serves as a crucial reference material for accurately quantifying and characterizing uranium. The most accurate analytical results which can be obtained only with high-purity 233U certified reference material (CRM) are required when used to confirm compliance with international safeguards obligations and international nonproliferation agreements. The U.S. supply of 233U CRM is almost depleted, and existing domestic stocks of this synthetic isotope are scheduled to be down-blended for disposition with depleted uranium beginning in 2015. Down blending batches of high-purity 233U will permanently eliminate the value of this material as a CRM. Furthermore, no replacement 233U stocks are expected to be produced in the future due to a lack of operating production capability and the high cost of replacing such capability. Therefore, preserving select batches of high-purity 233U is of great value and will assist in retaining current analytical capabilities for uranium-bearing samples. Any organization placing a priority on accurate results of uranium analyses, or on the confirmation of trace uranium in environmental samples, has a vested interest in preserving this material. This paper describes the need for high-purity 233U, the consequences organizations and agencies face if this material is not preserved, and the progress and future plans for preserving select batches of the purest 233U materials from disposition. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nonproliferation and International Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  14. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy of high purity crystals at millikelvin temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, Warrick G.; Creedon, Daniel L.; Goryachev, Maxim; Benmessai, Karim; Tobar, Michael E.

    2013-12-01

    Progress in the emerging field of engineered quantum systems requires the development of devices that can act as quantum memories. The realisation of such devices by doping solid state cavities with paramagnetic ions imposes a trade-off between ion concentration and cavity coherence time. Here, we investigate an alternative approach involving interactions between photons and naturally occurring impurity ions in ultra-pure crystalline microwave cavities exhibiting exceptionally high quality factors. We implement a hybrid Whispering Gallery/Electron Spin Resonance method to perform rigorous spectroscopy of an undoped single-crystal sapphire resonator over the frequency range 8{19 GHz, and at external applied DC magnetic fields up to 0.9 T. Measurements of a high purity sapphire cooled close to 100 mK reveal the presence of Fe3+, Cr3+, and V2+ impurities. A host of electron transitions are measured and identified, including the two-photon classically forbidden quadrupole transition (Δms = 2) for Fe3+, as well as hyperfine transitions of V2+.

  15. Metallurgical and Technological Request for High Purity Niobium in SRF Application

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, W.

    2006-05-24

    Properties of niobium are analyzed regarding application in superconducting radio frequency accelerator systems. High purity niobium should meet the tough specification. Interstitially dissolved impurities like oxygen, nitrogen and carbon should be kept under few wt. ppm. Hydrogen can under definite condition significantly reduce the cavity quality factor (hydrogen decease) and should be carefully controlled during fabrication as well as during cavity treatment. The main metallic impurity is tantalum. Clusters of foreign material can essentially deteriorate the cavity performance. An eddy current scanning system with rotating table is applied for diagnostic of foreign material inclusions and cracks in niobium sheets. In addition the acceptance tests for Nb sheets include the RRR (RRR - Residual Resistivity Ratio) measurement, microstructure analysis, analysis of interstitial and metallic impurities, hardness measurement and tensile test.High thermal conductivity in the cavity wall in order to guide the dissipated RF power away is required. It can be additionally improved almost by one order of magnitude during the post purification (solid state gettering) applied for Tesla Test Facility TTF cavities at DESY. The cavities are heated to 1350-1400 deg. C and a thin titanium layer is evaporated on the surface. Softening of Nb and grain growth is the main drawback of the purification annealing.

  16. Development, fabrication and test of a high purity silica heat shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rusert, E. L.; Drennan, D. N.; Biggs, M. S.

    1978-01-01

    A highly reflective hyperpure ( 25 ppm ion impurities) slip cast fused silica heat shield material developed for planetary entry probes was successfully scaled up. Process development activities for slip casting large parts included green strength improvements, casting slip preparation, aggregate casting, strength, reflectance, and subscale fabrication. Successful fabrication of a one-half scale Saturn probe (shape and size) heat shield was accomplished while maintaining the silica high purity and reflectance through the scale-up process. However, stress analysis of this original aggregate slip cast material indicated a small margin of safety (MS. = +4%) using a factor of safety of 1.25. An alternate hyperpure material formulation to increase the strength and toughness for a greater safety margin was evaluated. The alternate material incorporates short hyperpure silica fibers into the casting slip. The best formulation evaluated has a 50% by weight fiber addition resulting in an 80% increase in flexural strength and a 170% increase in toughness over the original aggregate slip cast materials with comparable reflectance.

  17. Population pharmacokinetic modelling of recombinant factor IX Fc fusion protein (rFIXFc) in patients with haemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Diao, Lei; Li, Shuanglian; Ludden, Thomas; Gobburu, Jogarao; Nestorov, Ivan; Jiang, Haiyan

    2014-05-01

    Recombinant factor IX Fc fusion protein (rFIXFc) is a clotting factor developed using monomeric Fc fusion technology to prolong the circulating half-life of factor IX. The objective of this analysis was to elucidate the pharmacokinetic characteristics of rFIXFc in patients with haemophilia B and identify covariates that affect rFIXFc disposition. Population pharmacokinetic analysis using NONMEM(®) was performed with clinical data from two completed trials in previously treated patients with severe to moderate haemophilia B. Twelve patients from a phase 1/2a study and 123 patients from a registrational phase 3 study were included in this population analysis. A three-compartment model was found to best describe the pharmacokinetics of rFIXFc. For a typical 73 kg patient, the clearance (CL), volume of the central compartment (V 1) and volume of distribution at steady state (V ss) were 2.39 dL/h, 71.4 dL and 198 dL, respectively. Because of repeat pharmacokinetic profiles at week 26 for patients in a subgroup, inclusion of inter-occasion variability (IOV) on CL and V 1 were evaluated and significantly improved the model. The magnitude of IOV on CL and V 1 were both low to moderate (<20 %) and less than the corresponding inter-individual variability. Body weight (BW) was found to be the only significant covariate for rFIXFc disposition. However, the impact of BW was limited, as the BW power exponents on CL and V 1 were 0.436 and 0.396, respectively. This is the first population pharmacokinetic analysis that systematically characterized the pharmacokinetics of long-lasting rFIXFc in patients with haemophilia B. The population pharmacokinetic model for rFIXFc can be utilized to evaluate and optimize dosing regimens for the treatment of patients with haemophilia B.

  18. Impurity distribution in high purity germanium crystal and its impact on the detector performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guojian; Amman, Mark; Mei, Hao; Mei, Dongming; Irmscher, Klaus; Guan, Yutong; Yang, Gang

    High-purity germanium crystals were grown in a hydrogen atmosphere using the Czochralski method. The axial and radial distributions of impurities in the crystals were measured by Hall effect and Photo-thermal ionization spectroscopy (PTIS). Amorphous semiconductor contacts were deposited on the germanium crystals to make detectors. Three planar detectors were fabricated from three crystals with different net carrier concentrations (1.7, 7.9 and 10x1010 cm-3). We evaluated the electrical and spectral performance of three detectors. Measurements of gamma-ray spectra from 137Cs, 241Am and 60Co sources demonstrate that the detectors have excellent energy resolution. The relationship between the impurities and detector's energy resolution was analyzed. Keywords: High-purity germanium crystal, High-purity germanium detector This work is supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-10ER46709 and the state of South Dakota..

  19. Blood Oxygenation Level-dependent Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Breast Cancer: Correlation with Carbonic Anhydrase IX and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Min; Jin, Mu-Lan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Blood oxygenation level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-MRI) is a functional MRI technique which involves using the paramagnetic properties of deoxyhemoglobin to image the local tissue oxygen concentration. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether BOLD-MRI could evaluate hypoxia and angiogenesis of breast invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Methods: Ninety-eight female patients with IDC were retrospectively included in this research. All patients underwent breast BOLD-MRI at 3.0 T before surgery. R2* values of BOLD-MRI were measured. The expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Spearman's correlation analysis was used to correlate R2* value with CA IX and VEGF levels. Results: Heterogeneous intensity on BOLD-MRI images was the main finding of IDCs. The mean R2* value was 52.8 ± 18.6 Hz. The R2* values in patients with axillary lymph node metastasis were significantly higher than the R2* values in patients without axillary lymph node metastasis (t = 2.882, P = 0.005). R2* values increased with CA IX level and positively correlated with the level of CA IX (r = 0.616, P < 0.001); however, R2* value had no significantly correlation with the level of VEGF (r = 0.110, P = 0.281). Conclusion: BOLD-MRI could noninvasively evaluate chronic hypoxia of IDC, but not angiogenesis. PMID:28051026

  20. Impact of the underlying mutation and the route of vector administration on immune responses to factor IX in gene therapy for hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ou; Hoffman, Brad E; Moghimi, Babak; Nayak, Sushrusha; Cooper, Mario; Zhou, Shangzhen; Ertl, Hildegund C J; High, Katherine A; Herzog, Roland W

    2009-10-01

    Immune responses to factor IX (F.IX), a major concern in gene therapy for hemophilia, were analyzed for adeno-associated viral (AAV-2) gene transfer to skeletal muscle and liver as a function of the F9 underlying mutation. Vectors identical to those recently used in clinical trials were administered to four lines of hemophilia B mice on a defined genetic background [C3H/HeJ with deletion of endogenous F9 and transgenic for a range of nonfunctional human F.IX (hF.IX) variants]. The strength of the immune response to AAV-encoded F.IX inversely correlated with the degree of conservation of endogenous coding information and levels of endogenous antigen. Null mutation animals developed T- and B-cell responses in both protocols. However, inhibitor titers were considerably higher upon muscle gene transfer (or protein therapy). Transduced muscles of Null mice had strong infiltrates with CD8+ cells, which were much more limited in the liver and not seen for the other mutations. Sustained expression was achieved with liver transduction in mice with crm(-) nonsense and missense mutations, although they still formed antibodies upon muscle gene transfer. Therefore, endogenous expression prevented T-cell responses more effectively than antibody formation, and immune responses varied substantially depending on the protocol and the underlying mutation.

  1. The pattern of factor IX germ-line mutation in Asians is similar to that of Caucasians.

    PubMed Central

    Bottema, C D; Ketterling, R P; Yoon, H S; Sommer, S S

    1990-01-01

    To begin documenting the pattern of germ-line mutations in different human races, we have delineated the mutation in nine Korean families with hemophilia B by direct genomic sequencing of the regions of likely functional significance in the factor IX gene. An evaluation of these mutations in combination with previously described point mutations in the factor IX gene of Asians indicates that transitions predominate followed by transversions and microdeletions/insertions. Transitions at the dinucleotide CpG are a dramatic hot spot of mutation. This pattern of mutation is very similar to that observed in Caucasians with hemophilia B, despite the many differences between Asians (mostly Koreans) and Caucasians in diet, environment and cultural life-styles. The similarity may reflect the predominance of endogenous processes or ubiquitous mutagens rather than specific mutagens in the environment. The following additional conclusions emerge: (1) The missense mutations in Asians occur at evolutionarily conserved amino acids. When combined with the previous data this makes it likely that more than two-thirds of the missense mutations which could possibly occur at nonconserved amino acids do not cause hemophilia B. (2) Surprisingly, a change in the sixth base of the intron 2 donor splice-junction sequence is associated with severe disease in HB 74/77. (3) Direct carrier testing of nine Korean families demonstrates that the stability of DNA at ambient temperature in blood with the anticoagulant ACD solution B makes it feasible for a diagnostic laboratory to perform such testing at a distance of 7,000 miles. Carrier testing revealed that the mutation in HB78 arose in his mother's germ-line.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2220823

  2. Development of low-loss cryo-accelerating structure with high-purity copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iino, Akihiro; Yamaguchi, Seiya; Shintomi, Takakazu; Higo, Toshiyasu; Funahashi, Yoshisato; Matsumoto, Shuji; Michizono, Shinichiro; Ueno, Kenji; Endo, Katsumi

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, the development of an accelerating structure with high-purity copper operated at approximately 20 K is described. The aim is to obtain a dramatic increase in the quality factor (Q factor), which is an important parameter as regards enhancement of the acceleration gradient in a normal-conducting accelerating structure that has been operated at room temperature in the past. First, the Q factors of pillbox cavities comprised of two types of copper with different purities (99.99% and 99.99998%) were measured, at room temperature (300 K) and at a relatively low temperature (20 K); the resultant ratios, Q0(20 K)/Q0(300 K), were then compared with calculated values. Hence, it was found that the experimental and calculated values agree to within several percent, and converge to a constant value (approximately 5.3) when the residual resistance ratio is above 500. Next, a C-band accelerating structure was fabricated using a copper material having a purity of 99.99998%, and high-power testing of the structure was conducted at 20 K. Hence, it was found that the accelerating gradient Eacc reaches 30.9 MV/m with a 1.0-μs pulse width and 50-Hz repetition rate. In the high-power test, it was revealed that the radiation dose rate for C-band structure (20 K) was about two orders of magnitude lower than that for S-band structure (303 K) under the same conditions. Further, the magnitude of the dark current generated in this structure was estimated to be several femtoamps, which was below the detection limit. This finding was based on the assumption that the dark current magnitude is proportional to the radiation dose; however, no dark current was observed.

  3. Population genetics of coagulant factor IX: frequencies of two DNA polymorphisms in five ethnic groups.

    PubMed Central

    Lubahn, D B; Lord, S T; Bosco, J; Kirshtein, J; Jeffries, O J; Parker, N; Levtzow, C; Silverman, L M; Graham, J B

    1987-01-01

    Two frequently used restriction-enzyme polymorphisms (RFLPs) of coagulant F.IX, TaqI and XmnI, have been examined in five ethnic groups: white Americans, black Americans, East Indians, Chinese, and Malays. There is a distinct "cline" in the frequencies of both polymorphisms, from white Americans to Malays. The rarer type 2 alleles of both polymorphisms, in which middle recognition sites are present--and which in our sample reach their highest frequencies in white Americans--are marginally higher in four groups of Europeans previously reported by others. The frequencies of the rarer alleles are significantly higher in Europeans than in black Americans and East Indians, and these alleles are essentially absent in Chinese and Malays. The frequency of heterozygosity diminishes in the same order, being zero in Malays for both polymorphisms. The polymorphisms are in strong linkage disequilibrium, and in all groups the type 1 allele for TaqI is disproportionately accompanied by the type 1 allele for XmnI. The paucity of type 2 alleles and the low rate of heterozygosity in four non-European groups suggest that the polymorphisms will be of little diagnostic value south of Gibraltar and east of Suez. This prediction is confirmed by the observed haplotype frequencies in the black American and the Oriental groups. PMID:2884869

  4. Low temperature recombination and trapping analysis in high purity gallium arsenide by microwave photodielectric techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khambaty, M. B.; Hartwig, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    Some physical theories pertinent to the measurement properties of gallium arsenide are presented and experimental data are analyzed. A model for explaining recombination and trapping high purity gallium arsenide, valid below 77 K is assembled from points made at various places and an appraisal is given of photodielectric techniques for material property studies.

  5. Production of High-purity Radium-223 from Legacy Actinium-Beryllium Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Z. Soderquist, Chuck; K. McNamara, Bruce; R. Fisher, Darrell

    2012-06-01

    Radium-223 is a short-lived alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides with potential applications in cancer treatment. Research to develop new radiopharmaceuticals employing 223Ra has been hindered by poor availability due to the small quantities of parent actinium-227 available world-wide. The purpose of this study was to develop innovative and cost-effective methods to obtain high-purity 223Ra from 227Ac. We obtained 227Ac from two surplus actinium-beryllium neutron generators. We retrieved the actinium/beryllium buttons from the sources and dissolved them in a sulfuric-nitric acid solution. A crude actinium solid was recovered from the solution by coprecipitation with thorium fluoride, leaving beryllium in solution. The crude actinium was purified to provide about 40 milligrams of actinium nitrate using anion exchange in methanol-water-nitric acid solution. The purified actinium was then used to generate high-purity 223Ra. We extracted 223Ra using anion exchange in a methanol-water-nitric acid solution. After the radium was separated, actinium and thorium were then eluted from the column and dried for interim storage. This single-pass separation produces high purity, carrier-free 223Ra product, and does not disturb the 227Ac/227Th equilibrium. A high purity, carrier-free 227Th was also obtained from the actinium using a similar anion exchange in nitric acid. These methods enable efficient production of 223Ra for research and new alpha-emitter radiopharmaceutical development.

  6. Production of high-purity radium-223 from legacy actinium-beryllium neutron sources.

    PubMed

    Soderquist, Chuck Z; McNamara, Bruce K; Fisher, Darrell R

    2012-07-01

    Radium-223 is a short-lived alpha-particle-emitting radionuclide with potential applications in cancer treatment. Research to develop new radiopharmaceuticals employing (223)Ra has been hindered by poor availability due to the small quantities of parent actinium-227 available world-wide. The purpose of this study was to develop innovative and cost-effective methods to obtain high-purity (223)Ra from (227)Ac. We obtained (227)Ac from two surplus actinium-beryllium neutron generators. We retrieved the actinium/beryllium buttons from the sources and dissolved them in a sulfuric-nitric acid solution. A crude actinium solid was recovered from the solution by coprecipitation with thorium fluoride, leaving beryllium in solution. The crude actinium was purified to provide about 40 milligrams of actinium nitrate using anion exchange in methanol-water-nitric acid solution. The purified actinium was then used to generate high-purity (223)Ra. We extracted (223)Ra using anion exchange in a methanol-water-nitric acid solution. After the radium was separated, actinium and thorium were then eluted from the column and dried for interim storage. This single-pass separation produces high purity, carrier-free (223)Ra product, and does not disturb the (227)Ac/(227)Th equilibrium. A high purity, carrier-free (227)Th was also obtained from the actinium using a similar anion exchange in nitric acid. These methods enable efficient production of (223)Ra for research and new alpha-emitter radiopharmaceutical development.

  7. Determination of uranium, thorium, and 18 other elements in high-purity molybdenum by radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Theimer, K.H.; Krivan, V. )

    1990-12-15

    A radiochemical neutron activation analysis technique for the determination of uranium and thorium in high-purity molybdenum via the indicator radionuclides {sup 239}Np for U and {sup 233}Pa for Th has been developed. Simultaneously, the elements Ag, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Ga, In, Ir, K, Mn, Na, Ni, Rb, Ru, Sc, Se, and Zn can be determined, too. The elements Hf, Sb, Ta, Sn, and W were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The radiochemical separation is performed by anion exchange on a Dowex 1 {times} 8 column from a 20 M HF/3% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} medium. A limit of detection of 4 ng/g for uranium and 40 pg/g for thorium can be achieved. For the other elements, the limits of detection are between 1 pg/g and 100 ng/g. A modified more selective separation of the indicator radionuclide of Th, {sup 233}Pa, allows improvement of the limit of detection for Th by a factor up to 5. This technique was applied to the analysis of high-purity molybdenum, and the results of a number of elements were compared with those of other techniques.

  8. Liver gene therapy by lentiviral vectors reverses anti-factor IX pre-existing immunity in haemophilic mice

    PubMed Central

    Annoni, Andrea; Cantore, Alessio; Della Valle, Patrizia; Goudy, Kevin; Akbarpour, Mahzad; Russo, Fabio; Bartolaccini, Sara; D'Angelo, Armando; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Naldini, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    A major complication of factor replacement therapy for haemophilia is the development of anti-factor neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors). Here we show that liver gene therapy by lentiviral vectors (LVs) expressing factor IX (FIX) strongly reduces pre-existing anti-FIX antibodies and eradicates FIX inhibitors in haemophilia B mice. Concomitantly, plasma FIX levels and clotting activity rose to 50–100% of normal. The treatment was effective in 75% of treated mice. FIX-specific plasma cells (PCs) and memory B cells were reduced, likely because of memory B-cell depletion in response to constant exposure to high doses of FIX. Regulatory T cells displaying FIX-specific suppressive capacity were induced in gene therapy treated mice and controlled FIX-specific T helper cells. Gene therapy proved safer than a regimen mimicking immune tolerance induction (ITI) by repeated high-dose FIX protein administration, which induced severe anaphylactoid reactions in inhibitors-positive haemophilia B mice. Liver gene therapy can thus reverse pre-existing immunity, induce active tolerance to FIX and establish sustained FIX activity at therapeutic levels. These data position gene therapy as an attractive treatment option for inhibitors-positive haemophilic patients. PMID:24106222

  9. Performance of A Compact Multi-crystal High-purity Germanium Detector Array for Measuring Coincident Gamma-ray Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, Chris; Daigle, Stephen; Buckner, Matt; Erikson, Luke E.; Runkle, Robert C.; Stave, Sean C.; Champagne, Art; Cooper, Andrew; Downen, Lori; Glasgow, Brian D.; Kelly, Keegan; Sallaska, Anne

    2015-02-18

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a 14-crystal array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors housed in a single cryostat. The array was used to measure the astrophysical S-factor for the 14N(p,γ)15O* reaction for several transition energies at an effective center of mass energy of 163 keV. Owing to the segmented nature of the MARS detector, the effect of gamma-ray summing was greatly reduced in comparison to past experiments which utilized large, single-crystal detectors. The new S-factor values agree within the uncertainties with the past measurements. Details of the analysis and detector performance will be presented.

  10. Bleeding risk in warfarinized patients with a therapeutic international normalized ratio: the effect of low factor IX levels.

    PubMed

    Dargaud, Y; Hoffman, M; Lefrapper, L; Lin, F-C; Genty, A; Chatard, B; Marin, S; Négrier, C; Monroe, D M

    2013-06-01

    Bleeding is the main complication of warfarin therapy, even patients with an international normalized ratio (INR) in the target range can suffer bleeding, suggesting that INR does not perfectly reflect the therapeutic effect of warfarin. We hypothesized the INR might underestimate the level of anticoagulation in a subject with a lower factor (F) IX level than average. We modeled warfarin anticoagulation in our in vitro thrombin generation (TG) model by adjusting the levels of vitamin K-dependent factors to those of patients with an INR of 2-3. Variation in FIX had a marked effect on TG but had no effect on the prothrombin time (PT)-INR. A prospective observational, cross-sectional clinical study including 341 consecutive patients admitted to the emergency department with an INR between 2 and 3, showed a statistically lower FIX activity in bleeders (P = 0.004) compared with others. No correlation was found between TG capacity and PT-INR results (P = 0.36). However, in patients, presenting with a warfarin-related hemorrhage, TG was significantly lower (P < 0.001) than others. A correlation on the boundary of significance was observed between TG capacity and FIX levels (P = 0.09). These data demonstrates that patients who bleed when their PT-INR is in the target range 2-3 might have defective TG related to a lower level of FIX than expected. © 2013 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  11. Abnormal joint and bone wound healing in hemophilia mice is improved by extending factor IX activity after hemarthrosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Junjiang; Hua, Baolai; Livingston, Eric W; Taves, Sarah; Johansen, Peter B; Hoffman, Maureane; Ezban, Mirella; Monroe, Dougald M; Bateman, Ted A; Monahan, Paul E

    2017-04-13

    Wound healing requires interactions between coagulation, inflammation, angiogenesis, cellular migration, and proliferation. Healing in dermal wounds of hemophilia B mice is delayed when compared with hemostatically normal wild-type (WT) mice, with abnormal persistence of iron deposition, inflammation, and neovascularity. We observed healing following induced joint hemorrhage in WT and factor IX (FIX) knockout (FIX(-/-)) mice, examining also parameters previously studied in an excisional skin wound model. Hemostatically normal mice tolerated this joint bleeding challenge, cleared blood from the joint, and healed with minimal pathology, even if additional autologous blood was injected intra-articularly at the time of wounding. Following hemarthrosis, joint wound healing in hemophilia B mice was impaired and demonstrated similar abnormal histologic features as previously described in hemophilic dermal wounds. Therefore, studies of pathophysiology and therapy of hemophilic joint bleeding performed in hemostatically normal animals are not likely to accurately reflect the healing defect of hemophilia. We additionally explored the hypothesis that the use of a FIX replacement protein with extended circulating FIX activity could improve synovial and osteochondral wound healing in hemophilic mice, when compared with treatment with unmodified recombinant FIX (rFIX) in the established joint bleeding model. Significantly improved synovial wound healing and preservation of normal osteochondral architecture are achieved by extending FIX activity after hemarthrosis using glycoPEGylated FIX when compared with an equivalent dose of rFIX. These results suggest that treating joint bleeding only until hemostasis is achieved may not result in optimal joint healing, which is improved by extending factor activity.

  12. Modulating immunogenicity of factor IX by fusion to an immunoglobulin Fc domain: a study using a hemophilia B mouse model.

    PubMed

    Levin, D; Lagassé, H A D; Burch, E; Strome, S; Tan, S; Jiang, H; Sauna, Z E; Golding, B

    2017-04-01

    Essentials Fc-fusion increases a therapeutic's half-life, but FcγR interactions may impact immunogenicity. Species-specific Fc-FcγR interactions allow for mechanistic in vivo studies using mouse models. Fc fusion modulates the immune response to factor IX in hemophilia B mice by eliciting Th1 bias. This model could inform future studies of IgE-associated anaphylaxis in hemophilia B patients. Background Fc fusion is a platform technology used to increase the circulating half-life of protein and peptide therapeutics. However, there are potential immunological consequences with this approach, such as changes in the molecule's immunogenicity as well as possible interactions with a repertoire of Fc receptors (FcR) that can modulate immune responses. Objectives/Methods Using a mouse hemophilia B (HB) model, we compared the immune responses to infusions of recombinant human factor IX (hFIX) and hFIX fused to mouse IgG2a-Fc (hFIX-mFc). The mFc was employed to allow species-specific Fc-FcγR interactions. Results Although treatment with hFIX-mFc altered the early development of anti-FIX IgG, no significant differences in anti-FIX antibody titers were observed at the end of the treatment regimen (5 weeks) or upon anamnestic response (5 months). However, treatment with hFIX-mFc elicited higher FIX-neutralizing antibody levels and resulted in reduced IgE titers compared with the hFIX-treated group. Additionally, differences in plasma cytokine levels and in vitro CD4(+) T-cell responses suggest that whereas hFIX treatment triggered a Th2-biased immune response, hFIX-mFc treatment induced Th1-biased CD4(+) T cells. We also show that hFIX-mFc bound to soluble FcγRs and engaged with FcγRs on different cell types, which may impact antigen presentation. Conclusions These studies provide a model system to study how Fc-fusion proteins may affect immune mechanisms. We used this model to demonstrate a plausible mechanism by which Fc fusion may modulate the IgE response to hFIX. This

  13. Survey of the anti-factor IX immunoglobulin profiles in patients with hemophilia B using a fluorescence-based immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Boylan, B; Rice, A S; Neff, A T; Manco-Johnson, M J; Kempton, C L; Miller, C H

    2016-10-01

    Essentials Studies characterizing neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) in hemophilia B (HB) are lacking. The current study describes anti-factor (F) IX antibody profiles in 37 patients who have HB. Anti-FIX IgG4 levels exhibited a strong positive correlation with Nijmegen-Bethesda results. These data will help to more clearly define, predict, and treat alloantibody formation in HB. Background Hemophilia B (HB) is an inherited bleeding disorder caused by the absence or dysfunction of coagulation factor IX (FIX). A subset of patients who have HB develop neutralizing alloantibodies (inhibitors) against FIX after infusion therapy. HB prevalence and the proportion of patients who develop inhibitors are much lower than those for hemophilia A (HA), which makes studies of inhibitors in patients with HB challenging due to the limited availability of samples. As a result, there is a knowledge gap regarding HB inhibitors. Objective Evaluate the largest group of patients with inhibitor-positive HB studied to date to assess the relationship between anti-FIX antibody profiles and inhibitor formation. Methods A fluorescence immunoassay was used to detect anti-FIX antibodies in plasma samples from 37 patients with HB. Results Assessments of antibody profiles showed that anti-FIX IgG1-4 , IgA, and IgE were detected significantly more often in patients with a positive Nijmegen-Bethesda assay (NBA). All NBA-positive samples were positive for IgG4 . Anti-FIX IgG4 demonstrated a strong correlation with the NBA, while correlations were significant, yet more moderate, for anti-FIX IgG1-2 and IgA. Conclusions The anti-FIX antibody profile in HB patients who develop inhibitors is diverse and correlates well with the NBA across immunoglobulin (sub)class, and anti-FIX IgG4 is particularly relevant to functional inhibition. The anti-FIX fluorescence immunoassay may serve as a useful tool to confirm the presence of antibodies in patients who have low positive NBA results and to more clearly

  14. [Simultaneously preparation of grams of high purity tyrosol, crenulatin and salidroside from Rhodiola crenulata].

    PubMed

    Luo, Xin; Wang, Xue-jing; Li, Shi-ping; Zhang, Qiao; Zhao, Yi-wu; Huang Wen-zhe; Wang, Zhen-zhong; Xiao, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Tyrosol, crenulatin and salidroside are the main active constituents of Rhodiola crenulata, with extensive pharmacological activities. In the study, grams of high purity tyrosol, crenulatin and salidroside were simultaneously separated from R. crenulata by the first time. Firstly, R. crenulata was extracted by 70% alcohol. Then, with the yields of three compounds as the index, the macroporous resin was optimized. At last, grams of high purity tyrosol, crenulatin and salidroside were isolated by D-101 macroporousresin, purified by column chromatography. Detected by HPLC, the purity of three compounds were higher than 98%. This method has the advantages of simple process and operation, less dosage of organic solvent, highly yield and reproducibility, suitable for the simultaneously preparation of tyrosol, crenulatin and salidroside.

  15. Microstructure Evolution in High Purity Aluminum Single Crystal Processed by Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP).

    PubMed

    Dong, Jinfang; Dong, Qing; Dai, Yongbing; Xing, Hui; Han, Yanfeng; Ma, Jianbo; Zhang, Jiao; Wang, Jun; Sun, Baode

    2017-01-22

    Aluminum single crystal with 99.999% purity was deformed at room temperature by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) up to 16 passes. Grain size and misorientation of processed samples were quantitatively characterized by TEM and EBSD. The results show that the refinement efficiency of high purity aluminum single crystal was poor in the initial stage. Extrusion by fewer ECAP passes (n ≤ 8) resulted in only elongated grains containing a large number of subgrains and small misorientations between grains. Stable microstructures of nearly equiaxed grains with high misorientations were obtained by 15 passages, indicating that the initial extremely coarse grains and highly uniform grain orientation are not conducive to the accumulation of strain energy. The initial state of high purity aluminum has a significant effect on the refining efficiency of the ECAP process.

  16. [Determination of trace sodium ion in high purity water by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xia; Shen, Shi-gang; Sun, Han-wen

    2007-01-01

    The present paper studied on the determination of trace Na+ in high purity water by graphite furnace atom absorption spectrometry. A method of directly on-line concentrating samples in graphite furnace, multiple charging, ashing, then determining once by directly charging into pools of graphite furnace, was set up. The goal of concentrating samples and avoiding contamination as well as raising sensitivity were finally achieved. To prevent the background of purity water and regent in experiment from covering the ion concentration of the sample, the authors prepared the high purity water and regent to meet the requirement of the experiment by electrodialysis in series with distillation and below-boiling-point quartz distillation at pure worktable. Satisfactory results of linearity and detection limit were obtained. The detection limit with this method was 0. 086 microg x L(-1) for Na+. The recovery was 101%-104%.

  17. Microstructure Evolution in High Purity Aluminum Single Crystal Processed by Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP)

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jinfang; Dong, Qing; Dai, Yongbing; Xing, Hui; Han, Yanfeng; Ma, Jianbo; Zhang, Jiao; Wang, Jun; Sun, Baode

    2017-01-01

    Aluminum single crystal with 99.999% purity was deformed at room temperature by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) up to 16 passes. Grain size and misorientation of processed samples were quantitatively characterized by TEM and EBSD. The results show that the refinement efficiency of high purity aluminum single crystal was poor in the initial stage. Extrusion by fewer ECAP passes (n ≤ 8) resulted in only elongated grains containing a large number of subgrains and small misorientations between grains. Stable microstructures of nearly equiaxed grains with high misorientations were obtained by 15 passages, indicating that the initial extremely coarse grains and highly uniform grain orientation are not conducive to the accumulation of strain energy. The initial state of high purity aluminum has a significant effect on the refining efficiency of the ECAP process. PMID:28772447

  18. Fabrication of novel cryomill for synthesis of high purity metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nirmal; Biswas, Krishanu

    2015-08-01

    The successful preparation of free standing metal nanoparticles with high purity in bulk quantity is the pre-requisite for any potential application. This is possible by using ball milling at cryogenic temperature. However, the most of ball mills available in the market do not allow preparing high purity metal nanoparticles by this route. In addition, it is not possible to carry out in situ measurements of process parameters as well as diagnostic of the process. In the present investigation, we present a detailed study on the fabrication of a cryomill, which is capable of avoiding contaminations in the product. It also provides in situ measurements and diagnostic of the low temperature milling process. Online monitoring of the milling temperature and observation of ball motion are the important aspects in the newly designed mill. The nanoparticles prepared using this fabricated mill have been found to be free standing and also free from contaminations.

  19. Characterization of a high-purity germanium detector for small-animal SPECT.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lindsay C; Campbell, Desmond L; Hull, Ethan L; Peterson, Todd E

    2011-09-21

    We present an initial evaluation of a mechanically cooled, high-purity germanium double-sided strip detector as a potential gamma camera for small-animal SPECT. It is 90 mm in diameter and 10 mm thick with two sets of 16 orthogonal strips that have a 4.5 mm width with a 5 mm pitch. We found an energy resolution of 0.96% at 140 keV, an intrinsic efficiency of 43.3% at 122 keV and a FWHM spatial resolution of approximately 1.5 mm. We demonstrated depth-of-interaction estimation capability through comparison of pinhole acquisitions with a point source on and off axes. Finally, a flood-corrected flood image exhibited a strip-level uniformity of less than 1%. This high-purity germanium offers many desirable properties for small-animal SPECT.

  20. Radiotracer study of the preparation of high-purity lanthanum fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, K.J.; Jaganathan, J.; Peitersen, L.; Aggarwal, I.D. ); Sommers, J.A.; Fahey, J.V. )

    1992-06-01

    This paper reports that the behavior of the impurities iron, cobalt, yttrium, and cerium is determined via radiotracer techniques for the preparation of high-purity lanthanum fluoride. The behavior of nickel and copper during the coprecipitation of a lanthanum nitrate solution is determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric (GFAAS) analysis. There is no commercially available radiotracer for neodymium, a key impurity associated with absorption losses in fluoride glasses. However, the chemical behavior of neodymium and that of yttrium are very similar and, therefore, it is reasonable to assume that the behavior of yttrium throughout the processing is indicative of the behavior of neodymium. The concentrations of impurities in lanthanum nitrate, carbonate, and fluoride are estimated using the radiotracer and GFAAS data for each processing step. Results indicate that while high-purity lanthanum carbonate can be prepared, any impurities present in the lanthanum carbonate will be carried quantitatively into lanthanum fluoride upon hydrofluorination.

  1. Method to deliver ultra high purity helium gas to a use point

    SciTech Connect

    Graczk, L.S.; Francis, A.W.

    1988-08-30

    This patent describes a method to deliver helium gas to a use point comprising: (A) providing gaseous helium from a high pressure cylinder or tube into a storage container containing liquid helium; (B) passing the gaseous helium in heat exchange relation with the liquid helium to: (i) vaporize liquid helium, (ii) increase or maintain the helium pressure, and (iii) condense and/or solidify impurities out of the gaseous helium; (C) withdrawing ultra high purity helium gas comprising resulting vaporized helium and cleaned gaseous helium from the storage container; and (D) providing ultra high purity helium gas to a use point without need for further pressurization, the helium gas containing less than 10 ppm impurities.

  2. Comparison of Deformation in High-Purity Single/Large Grain and Polycrystalline Niobium Superconducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapati Rao Myneni; Peter Kneisel

    2005-07-10

    The current approach for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities is to roll and deep draw sheets of polycrystalline high-purity niobium. Recently, a new technique was developed at Jefferson Laboratory that enables the fabrication of single-crystal high-purity Nb SRF cavities. To better understand the differences between SRF cavities fabricated out of fine-grained polycrystalline sheet in the standard manner and single crystal cavities fabricated by the new technique, two half-cells were produced according to the two different procedures and compared using a variety of analytical techniques including optical microscopy, scanning laser confocal microscopy, profilometry, and X-ray diffraction. Crystallographic orientations, texture, and residual stresses were determined in the samples before and after forming and this poster presents the results of this ongoing study.

  3. Characterization of a high-purity germanium detector for small-animal SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lindsay C; Campbell, Desmond L; Hull, Ethan L; Peterson, Todd E

    2011-01-01

    We present an initial evaluation of a mechanically-cooled, high-purity germanium double-sided strip detector as a potential gamma camera for small-animal SPECT. It is 90 mm in diameter and 10 mm thick with two sets of 16 orthogonal strips that have a 4.5 mm width with a 5 mm pitch. We found an energy resolution of 0.96% at 140 keV, an intrinsic efficiency of 43.3% at 122 keV and a FWHM spatial resolution of approximately 1.5 mm. We demonstrated depth-of-interaction estimation capability through comparison of pinhole acquisitions with a point source on and off axis. Finally, a flood-corrected-flood image exhibited a strip-level uniformity of less than 1%. This high-purity germanium offers many desirable properties for small-animal SPECT. PMID:21852723

  4. Diels-Alder reactions as an efficient route to high purity cyclic polymers.

    PubMed

    Glassner, Mathias; Blinco, James P; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2011-05-18

    A simple and efficient route for the synthesis of cyclic polymer systems is presented. Linear furan protected α-maleimide-ω-cyclopentadienyl functionalized precursors (poly(methyl methacrylate) and poly(tert-butyl acrylate)) were synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and subsequent substitution of the bromine end-group with cyclopentadiene. Upon heating at high dilution, deprotection of the dieneophile occurs followed by an intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction yielding a high purity cyclic product.

  5. Aluminium. II - A review of deformation properties of high purity aluminium and dilute aluminium alloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, R. P.

    1972-01-01

    The elastic and plastic deformation behavior of high-purity aluminum and of dilute aluminum alloys is reviewed. Reliable property data, including elastic moduli, elastic coefficients, tensile, creep, fatigue, hardness, and impact are presented. Single crystal tensile results are discussed. Rather comprehensive reference lists, containing publications of the past 20 years, are included for each of the above categories. Defect structures and mechanisms responsible for mechanical behavior are presented. Strengthening techniques (alloys, cold work, irradiation, quenching, composites) and recovery are briefly reviewed.

  6. Combined ultrafiltration-electrodeionization technique for production of high purity water.

    PubMed

    Wardani, Anita Kusuma; Hakim, Ahmad Nurul; Khoiruddin; Wenten, I Gede

    2017-06-01

    Electrodeionization (EDI) is the most common method to produce high purity water used for boiler feed water, microelectronic, and pharmaceutical industries. Commonly, EDI is combined with reverse osmosis (RO) to meet the requirement of EDI feed water, with hardness less than 1 ppm. However, RO requires a relatively high operating pressure and ultrafiltration (UF) as pretreatment which results in high energy consumption and high complexity in piping and instrumentation. In this work, UF was used as the sole pretreatment of EDI to produce high purity water. Tap water with conductivity 248 μS/cm was fed to UF-EDI system. The UF-EDI system showed good performance with ion removal more than 99.4% and produced water with low conductivity from 0.2 to 1 μS/cm and total organic compounds less than 0.3 ppm. Generally, product conductivity decreased with the increase of current density of EDI and the decrease of feed velocity and UF pressure. The energy consumption for UF-EDI system in this work was 0.89-2.36 kWh/m(3). These results proved that UF-EDI system meets the standards of high purity water for pharmaceutical and boiler feed water with lower investment and energy consumption than RO-EDI system.

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of High-Purity Bismuth Nanowires via Seed-Assisted Growth Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Xin; Zhao, Wen-Yu; He, Dan-Qi; Zhou, Hong-Yu; Zhu, Wan-Ting; Zhang, Qing-Jie

    2015-06-01

    Nanowires are considered as high-performance thermoelectric materials with large Seebeck coefficients due to quantum confinement and low thermal conductivity because of enhanced boundary scattering of phonons. In this work, a seed-assisted growth method has been developed to synthesize high-purity bismuth nanowires. The bismuth seeds were first synthesized by reducing BiCl3 in the ice water with NaBH4. The high-purity bismuth nanowires about 40-50 nm in diameter and several tens of micrometers in length were then grown on bismuth seeds by reducing NaBiO3 with ethylene glycol. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were employed to characterize the crystal structure, microstructure, and growth direction of the bismuth seeds and nanowires. The effects of temperature, reductant, and bismuth seeds template on the microstructures of the bismuth nanowires were also investigated. The synthesis conditions of bismuth seeds and nanowires were optimized. The selected area electron diffraction pattern confirms that the growth direction of bismuth nanowires is parallel to [] direction. It was discovered that high-purity bismuth nanowires with high aspect ratio can be synthesized by precisely controlling the temperature to adjust the nucleation rate of the bismuth nuclei, selecting the appropriate reductant to maintain a low nucleation rate, and using bismuth seeds as the template of the epitaxial growth of the bismuth nuclei.

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of High-Purity Tellurium Nanowires via Self-seed-Assisted Growth Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Zhao, Wen-yu; Mu, Xin; Liu, Xing; He, Dan-qi; Zhu, Wan-ting; Zhang, Qing-jie

    2016-03-01

    Nanowires have attracted intense attention in recent years due to their novel physical properties. In this work, we prepare high-purity tellurium nanowires through the self-seed-assisted growth method previously developed by us. The tellurium seeds were firstly synthesized by reducing Na2TeO3 in the ice water with NaBH4. The high-purity tellurium nanowires with a diameter of 40-50 nm and a length of several tens of micrometers were then grown on tellurium seeds by reducing Na2TeO3 with hydrazine hydrate. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed to characterize the crystal structure, microstructure, and growth direction of tellurium seeds and nanowires. The effects of temperature, time, surfactant and tellurium seeds on microstructures of tellurium nanowires has also been investigated. The synthesis conditions of tellurium seeds and nanowires was optimized. The selected area electron diffraction pattern confirms that the growth direction of tellurium nanowires is parallel to [0001] direction. It was discovered that high-purity tellurium nanowires with high aspect ratio can be synthesized by precisely controlling the temperature to adjust the nucleation rate of the tellurium nuclei, selecting the appropriate surfactant to induce the coordination along the macromolecular chain, and using tellurium seeds as the templates of the epitaxial growth of tellurium nuclei.

  9. Determination of trace metallic impurities in high-purity quartz by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Dash, K; Chandrasekaran, K; Thangavel, S; Dhaville, S M; Arunachalam, J

    2004-01-02

    A method has been developed for the determination of relevant trace impurities (alkali, alkaline and transition metals) in high purity quartz by ion-chromatography. In situ reagent (HF) purification and simultaneous sample dissolution was achieved in a multichannel vapour phase digestion assembly. Twenty-one samples can be digested at a time in this vapour phase system. Significant decrease in the process blank levels for all the analytes was observed. Drastic reduction (250 times) of NH4+ blank was achieved in the described vapour phase digestion, which enables the determination of trace concentration of sodium in high purity quartz. After volatilisation of the matrix and unreacted HF, the clear water leached solutions were injected into an ion-chromatograph equipped with conductivity detector for the determination of alkali and alkaline earth metals. In the case of transition metals, the trace residues were leached with 10 mM HCl and after separation on a mixed bed analytical column (IonPac CS5) were detected by spectrophotometry after post column derivatisation using 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol (PAR). The accuracy of the result was checked by their comparison with those obtained by independent methods like inductively coupled plasma (ICP) MS and ICP atomic emission spectrometry. The achievable detection limits are between 0.4 ng/g (Li) and 22 ng/g (Mn). The application of the method to the determination of the above trace metals in two high-purity-grade quartz samples is demonstrated.

  10. Simple HPLC method for detection of trace ephedrine and pseudoephedrine in high-purity methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Makino, Yukiko

    2012-03-01

    A simple and sensitive HPLC technique was developed for the qualitative determination of ephedrine and pseudoephedrine (ephedrines), used as precursors of clandestine d-methamphetamine hydrochloride of high purity. Good separation of ephedrines from bulk d-methamphetamine was achieved, without any extraction or derivatization procedure on a CAPCELLPACK C18 MGII (250 × 4.6 mm) column. The mobile phase consisted of 50 mM KH2 PO4-acetonitrile (94:6 v/v %) using an isocratic pump system within 20 min for detecting two analytes. One run took about 50 min as it was necessary to wash out overloaded methamphetamine for column conditioning. The analytes were detected by UV absorbance measurement at 210 nm. A sample (20 mg) was simply dissolved in 1 mL of water, and a 50 μL aliquot of the solution was injected into the HPLC. The detection limits for ephedrine and pseudoephedrine in bulk d-methamphetamine were as low as 3 ppm each. This analytical separation technique made it possible to detect ephedrine and/or pseudoephedrine in seven samples of high-purity d-methamphetamine hydrochloride seized in Japan. The presence of trace ephedrines in illicit methamphetamine may strongly indicate a synthetic route via ephedrine in methamphetamine profiling. This method is simple and sensitive, requiring only commonly available equipment, and should be useful for high-purity methamphetamine profiling.

  11. Reduced bleeding events with subcutaneous administration of recombinant human factor IX in immune-tolerant hemophilia B dogs.

    PubMed

    Russell, Karen E; Olsen, Eva H N; Raymer, Robin A; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Bellinger, Dwight A; Read, Marjorie S; Rup, Bonita J; Keith, James C; McCarthy, Kyle P; Schaub, Robert G; Nichols, Timothy C

    2003-12-15

    Intravenous administration of recombinant human factor IX (rhFIX) acutely corrects the coagulopathy in hemophilia B dogs. To date, 20 of 20 dogs developed inhibitory antibodies to the xenoprotein, making it impossible to determine if new human FIX products, formulations, or methods of chronic administration can reduce bleeding frequency. Our goal was to determine whether hemophilia B dogs rendered tolerant to rhFIX would have reduced bleeding episodes while on sustained prophylactic rhFIX administered subcutaneously. Reproducible methods were developed for inducing tolerance to rhFIX in this strain of hemophilia B dogs, resulting in a significant reduction in the development of inhibitors relative to historical controls (5 of 12 versus 20 or 20, P <.001). The 7 of 12 tolerized hemophilia B dogs exhibited shortened whole blood clotting times (WBCTs), sustained detectable FIX antigen, undetectable Bethesda inhibitors, transient or no detectable antihuman FIX antibody titers by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and normal clearance of infused rhFIX. Tolerized hemophilia B dogs had 69% reduction in bleeding frequency in year 1 compared with nontolerized hemophilia B dogs (P =.0007). If proven safe in human clinical trials, subcutaneous rhFIX may provide an alternate approach to prophylactic therapy in selected patients with hemophilia B.

  12. Fibronectin-Alginate microcapsules improve cell viability and protein secretion of encapsulated Factor IX-engineered human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Sayyar, Bahareh; Dodd, Megan; Marquez-Curtis, Leah; Janowska-Wieczorek, Anna; Hortelano, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Continuous delivery of proteins by engineered cells encapsu-lated in biocompatible polymeric microcapsules is of considerable therapeutic potential. However, this technology has not lived up to expectations due to inadequate cell--matrix interactions and subsequent cell death. In this study we hypoth-esize that the presence of fibronectin in an alginate matrix may enhance the viability and functionality of encapsulated human cord blood-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) expressing the human Factor IX (FIX) gene. MSCs were encapsulated in alginate-PLL microcapsules containing 10, 100, or 500 μg/ml fibronectin to ameliorate cell survival. MSCs in microcapsules with 100 and 500 μg/ml fibronectin demonstrated improved cell viability and proliferation and higher FIX secretion compared to MSCs in non-supplemented microcapsules. In contrast, 10 μg/ml fibronectin did not significantly affect the viability and protein secretion from the encapsulated cells. Differentiation studies demonstrated osteogenic (but not chondrogenic or adipogenic) differentiation capability and efficient FIX secretion of the enclosed MSCs in the fibronectin-alginate suspension culture. Thus, the use of recombinant MSCs encapsulated in fibronectin-alginate microcapsules in basal or osteogenic cultures may be of practical use in the treatment of hemophilia B.

  13. Low cost industrial production of coagulation factor IX bioencapsulated in lettuce cells for oral tolerance induction in hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin; Zhu, Liqing; Sherman, Alexandra; Wang, Xiaomei; Lin, Shina; Kamesh, Aditya; Norikane, Joey H; Streatfield, Stephen J; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2015-11-01

    Antibodies (inhibitors) developed by hemophilia B patients against coagulation factor IX (FIX) are challenging to eliminate because of anaphylaxis or nephrotic syndrome after continued infusion. To address this urgent unmet medical need, FIX fused with a transmucosal carrier (CTB) was produced in a commercial lettuce (Simpson Elite) cultivar using species specific chloroplast vectors regulated by endogenous psbA sequences. CTB-FIX (∼1 mg/g) in lyophilized cells was stable with proper folding, disulfide bonds and pentamer assembly when stored ∼2 years at ambient temperature. Feeding lettuce cells to hemophilia B mice delivered CTB-FIX efficiently to the gut immune system, induced LAP(+) regulatory T cells and suppressed inhibitor/IgE formation and anaphylaxis against FIX. Lyophilized cells enabled 10-fold dose escalation studies and successful induction of oral tolerance was observed in all tested doses. Induction of tolerance in such a broad dose range should enable oral delivery to patients of different age groups and diverse genetic background. Using Fraunhofer cGMP hydroponic system, ∼870 kg fresh or 43.5 kg dry weight can be harvested per 1000 ft(2) per annum yielding 24,000-36,000 doses for 20-kg pediatric patients, enabling first commercial development of an oral drug, addressing prohibitively expensive purification, cold storage/transportation and short shelf life of current protein drugs.

  14. [Successful management of neurosurgical procedures with continuous infusion of recombinant factor IX in a child with hemophilia B].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Mariko; Nakadate, Hisaya; Iguchi, Umefumi; Masuda, Hiroshi; Sakai, Hirokazu; Ishiguro, Akira

    2013-03-01

    This report describes the successful management of neurosurgical procedures with continuous infusion of recombinant factor IX (rFIX). A 1-year-old boy with severe hemophilia B was administered prophylactic therapy with rFIX after intracranial bleeding. We found the enlargement of an arachnoid cyst in a follow-up CT scan. He underwent marsupialization of the cyst under the continuous infusion of rFIX. FIX levels were examined in our hospital and the rFIX infusion rate was adjusted in an attempt to keep FIX levels above 90% intraoperatively, and 70% until his 7th post-operative day. We studied the pharmacokinetic profile of rFIX and found a half-time of 25 hours and mean in vivo recovery of 0.69 IU/dl/IU/kg. Reconstituted rFIX also retained at least 95% activity after 72 hours at room temperature. This is the first report of the perioperative management of a child undergoing a neurosurgical procedure under the continuous infusion of rFIX in Japan. Further studies are required before the routine use of this product for continuous infusion.

  15. Variations among Japanese of the factor IX gene (F9) detected by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Chiyoko; Takahashi, Norio; Asakawa, Junichi; Hiyama, Keiko; Kodaira, Meiko )

    1993-01-01

    In the course of feasibility studies to examine the efficiencies and practicalities of various techniques for screening for genetic variations, the human coagulation factor IX (F9) genes of 63 Japanese families were examined by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Four target sequences with lengths of 983-2,891 bp from the F9 genes of 126 unrelated individuals from Hiroshima and their 100 children were amplified by PCR, digested with restriction enzymes to approximately 500-bp fragments, and examined by DGGE - a total of 6,724 bp being examined per individual. GC-rich sequences (GC-clamps) of 40 bp were attached to both ends of the target sequences, as far as was feasible. Eleven types of new nucleotide substitutions were detected in the population, none of which produced RFLPs or caused hemophilia B. By examining two target sequences in a single lane, approximately 8,000 bp in a diploid individual could be examined. This approach is very effective for the detection of variations in DNA and is applicable to large-scale population studies. 46 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Stability of nonaqueous suspension formulations of plasma derived factor IX and recombinant human alpha interferon at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Knepp, V M; Muchnik, A; Oldmark, S; Kalashnikova, L

    1998-07-01

    To identify a suitable nonaqueous, parenterally acceptable suspending vehicle whereby a therapeutic protein is delivered as a stable flowable powder, making it amenable to delivery from sustained delivery systems maintained at body temperature. Formulations of plasma derived Factor IX (pdFIX) and recombinant human alpha interferon (rhalpha-IFN) were formulated as dry powders, suspended in various vehicles (perfluorodecalin, perfluorotributylamine, methoxyflurane, polyethylene glycol 400, soybean oil, tetradecane or octanol) and stored at 37 degrees C. Stability was assessed by size exclusion chromatography, reverse phase chromatography, ion exchange chromatography, and bioassay, and was compared to the stability of dry powder formulations stored at 37 degrees C and -80 degrees C. PdFIX was stable when stored at 37 degrees C as a dry powder, or when the dry powder was suspended in the pharmaceutically acceptable vehicles perfluorodecalin or perfluorotributylamine. Suspensions of the powder in other pharmaceutically/parenterally acceptable vehicles such as soybean oil or PEG 400 resulted in aggregation and loss of bioactivity. A dry powder formulation of rhalpha-IFN suspended in perfluorodecalin was also stable at 37 degrees C. This study shows the potential utility of perfluorinated hydrocarbons as nonaqueous suspending vehicles for long term in-vivo delivery of therapeutic proteins.

  17. Low cost industrial production of coagulation factor IX bioencapsulated in lettuce cells for oral tolerance induction in hemophilia B

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jin; Zhu, Liqing; Sherman, Alexandra; Wang, Xiaomei; Lin, Shina; Kamesh, Aditya; Norikane, Joey H.; Streatfield, Stephen J.; Herzog, Roland W.; Daniell, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies (inhibitors) developed by hemophilia B patients against coagulation factor IX (FIX) are challenging to eliminate because of anaphylaxis or nephrotic syndrome after continued infusion. To address this urgent unmet medical need, FIX fused with a transmucosal carrier (CTB) was produced in a commercial lettuce (Simpson Elite) cultivar using species specific chloroplast vectors regulated by endogenous psbA sequences. CTB-FIX (~1mg/g) in lyophilized cells was stable with proper folding, disulfide bonds and pentamer assembly when stored ~2 years at ambient temperature. Feeding lettuce cells to hemophilia B mice delivered CTB-FIX efficiently to the gut immune system, induced LAP+ regulatory T cells and suppressed inhibitor/IgE formation and anaphylaxis against FIX. Lyophilized cells enabled 10-fold dose escalation studies and successful induction of oral tolerance was observed in all tested doses. Induction of tolerance in such a broad dose range should enable oral delivery to patients of different age groups and diverse genetic background. Using Fraunhofer cGMP hydroponic system, ~870 kg fresh or 43.5 kg dry weight can be harvested per 1000 ft2 per annum yielding 24,000–36,000 doses for 20-kg pediatric patients, enabling first commercial development of an oral drug, addressing prohibitively expensive purification, cold storage/transportation and short shelf life of current protein drugs. PMID:26302233

  18. [Construction of nonsense-mutated eukaryotic expression vector of factor IX gene and its expression in COS-7 cells].

    PubMed

    Nie, Xin; Yang, Lin-Hua; Chai, Bao-Feng; Shen, Quan; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Yao-Fang; Chen, Jian-Fang

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to construct 4 types of nonsense-mutated eukaryotic expression plasmids of fIX gene, using pcDNA3.1 plasmid containing fIX cDNA as template, and to identify, then to perform their expression in COS-7 cells. These stop mutants constructed by site-directed mutagenesis based on PCR, and further confirmed by DNA sequencing. COS-7 cells were transfected with either the wild-type or mutated fIX expression constructs, then the relative expression levels of fIX mRNA were detected by real time fluorescent quantitative PCR. The result showed that except the designed sites, there were no other nucleotide mutation in the sequences of four nonsense mutants. The results of real time PCR proved that the nonsense-mutated vectors can be effectively expressed in COS-7 cells. It is concluded that the nonsense-mutated eukaryotic expression vectors of fIX gene have been successfully constructed and can express in COS-7 cells, which provides the material basis for further researches on mechanism and treatment of FIX deficiency and the function defects caused by nonsense mutation.

  19. A two-component system regulates gene expression of the type IX secretion component proteins via an ECF sigma factor

    PubMed Central

    Kadowaki, Tomoko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Naito, Mariko; Sato, Keiko; Kikuchi, Yuichiro; Kondo, Yoshio; Shoji, Mikio; Nakayama, Koji

    2016-01-01

    The periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis secretes potent pathogenic proteases, gingipains, via the type IX secretion system (T9SS). This system comprises at least 11 components; however, the regulatory mechanism of their expression has not yet been elucidated. Here, we found that the PorY (PGN_2001)-PorX (PGN_1019)-SigP (PGN_0274) cascade is involved in the regulation of T9SS. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis revealed a direct interaction between a recombinant PorY (rPorY) and a recombinant PorX (rPorX). rPorY autophosphorylated and transferred a phosphoryl group to rPorX in the presence of Mn2+. These results demonstrate that PorX and PorY act as a response regulator and a histidine kinase, respectively, of a two component system (TCS), although they are separately encoded on the chromosome. T9SS component-encoding genes were down-regulated in a mutant deficient in a putative extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor, PGN_0274 (SigP), similar to the porX mutant. Electrophoretic gel shift assays showed that rSigP bound to the putative promoter regions of T9SS component-encoding genes. The SigP protein was lacking in the porX mutant. Co-immunoprecipitation and SPR analysis revealed the direct interaction between SigP and PorX. Together, these results indicate that the PorXY TCS regulates T9SS-mediated protein secretion via the SigP ECF sigma factor. PMID:26996145

  20. Dielectric Performance of a High Purity HTCC Alumina at High Temperatures - a Comparison Study with Other Polycrystalline Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liangyu

    2014-01-01

    A very high purity (99.99+%) high temperature co-fired ceramic (HTCC) alumina has recently become commercially available. The raw material of this HTCC alumina is very different from conventional HTCC alumina, and more importantly there is no glass additive in this alumina material for co-firing processing. Previously, selected HTCC and LTCC (low temperature co-fired ceramic) alumina materials were evaluated at high temperatures as dielectric and compared to a regularly sintered 96% polycrystalline alumina (96% Al2O3), where 96% alumina was used as the benchmark. A prototype packaging system based on regular 96% alumina with Au thickfilm metallization successfully facilitated long term testing of high temperature silicon carbide (SiC) electronic devices for over 10,000 hours at 500 C. In order to evaluate this new high purity HTCC alumina for possible high temperature packaging applications, the dielectric properties of this HTCC alumina substrate were measured and compared with those of 96% alumina and a previously tested LTCC alumina from room temperature to 550 C at frequencies of 120 Hz, 1 KHz, 10 KHz, 100 KHz, and 1 MHz. A parallel-plate capacitive device with dielectric of the HTCC alumina and precious metal electrodes were used for measurements of the dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the co-fired alumina material in the temperature and frequency ranges. The capacitance and AC parallel conductance of the capacitive device were directly measured by an AC impedance meter, and the dielectric constant and parallel AC conductivity of the dielectric were calculated from the capacitance and conductance measurement results. The temperature and frequency dependent dielectric constant, AC conductivity, and dissipation factor of the HTCC alumina substrate are presented and compared to those of 96% alumina and a selected LTCC alumina. Other technical advantages of this new co-fired material for possible high packaging applications are also discussed.

  1. Migration of grain boundaries and triple junctions in high-purity aluminum during annealing after slight cold rolling

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Wenhong; Wang, Weiguo; Fang, Xiaoying; Qin, Congxiang; Xing, Xiaoguang

    2015-09-15

    Grain orientations and grain boundary migrations near triple junctions in a high purity aluminum were analyzed by electron back scattered diffraction. The results indicate that there are good correlations between the Schmid factors or Taylor factors and the misorientation values of point to original point in grains near the triple junctions in a slightly deformed sample. Grains with higher Schmid factors or lower Taylor factors typically correspond to higher misorientation values near the triple junctions. In a subsequent annealing at 400 °C, both grain boundaries and triple junctions migrate, but the former leave ghost lines. During such migration, a grain boundary grows from the grain with lower Schmid factor (higher Taylor factor) into the grain with higher Schmid factor (lower Taylor factor). Usually, the amount of migration of a grain boundary is considerably greater than that of a triple junction, and the grain boundary becomes more curved after migration. These observations indicate that the triple junctions have drag effects on grain boundary migration. - Highlights: • Polycrystalline aluminum with fine grains about 30 μm were used. • Off-line in situ EBSD was used to identify TJs before and after annealing. • Grains with higher SFs have higher misorientation values near TJs after deformation. • Grain boundaries grow from hard grains into soft grains during annealing. • Triple junctions have drag effects on grain boundaries migration.

  2. [Possibilities of systemic radiotherapy with high-purity 89Sr chloride in the treatment of bone metastases].

    PubMed

    Fomin, D K; Tararukhina, O B; Nazarov, A A

    2012-01-01

    To study the efficiency of treatment via single administration of high-purity 89Sr chloride in the standard activity of 150 MBq for pain syndrome in patients with multiple bone metastases. The authors carried out clinical trials of high-purity 89Sr chloride used to treat 30 patients with multiple bone metastases from cancers at various sites. The results of treatment were analyzed in 30 patients with multiple bone metastases, who had received systemic radiation therapy with high-purity 89Sr chloride in the standard activity of 150 MBq. These were assessed using some indicators: the intensity of pain syndrome and the blood concentrations of hemoglobin, leukocytes, and platelets. There was evidence for the use of high-purity 89Sr chloride in the therapy of patients with cancer at various sites with multiple bone metastases. The major indicators (pain syndrome, the blood concentrations of hemoglobin, leukocytes, and platelets) were compared before and after the treatment. These were also compared with those obtained with the use of usual 89Sr chloride. The therapeutic action of high-purity 89Sr chloride is comparable with that of 89Sr chloride in the standard activity; moreover, the analgesic effect of high-purity 89Sr chloride is being significantly higher. It has less significant myelotoxic activity than usual 89Sr chloride. High-purity 89Sr chloride is an effective radiopharmaceutical agent and may be used for systemic radiotherapy in patients with multiple bone metastatic lesion.

  3. The prevalence of factor VIII and IX inhibitors among Saudi patients with hemophilia: Results from the Saudi national hemophilia screening program.

    PubMed

    Owaidah, Tarek; Momen, Abdulkareem Al; Alzahrani, Hazzaa; Almusa, Abdulrahman; Alkasim, Fawaz; Tarawah, Ahmed; Nouno, Randa Al; Batniji, Fatima Al; Alothman, Fahad; Alomari, Ali; Abu-Herbish, Saud; Abu-Riash, Mahmoud; Siddiqui, Khawar; Ahmed, Mansor; Mohamed, S Y; Saleh, Mahasen

    2017-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are X-linked diseases that predominantly affect male patients. Patients can develop coagulation factor inhibitors, which exponentially increases the treatment cost. However, the prevalence of factor VIII and IX inhibitors in Saudi Arabia is unclear.This study aimed to determine the Saudi prevalence of factor VIII and IX inhibitors.This 4-year, 7-center, cross-sectional study evaluated the Saudi prevalences of hemophilia A and B. We collected the patients' clinical data, evaluated their disease, and tested for factor inhibitors.We included 202 patients with hemophilia (median age at diagnosis: 0.13 years, range: birth-34.8 years). The patients included 198 male patients (98%), 148 patients with hemophilia A (73.3%), and 54 patients with hemophilia B (26.7%). The patients exhibited severe factor VIII activity (<1%; 121 patients; 5.2%), moderate activity (1-5%; 7 patients; 4.9%), and mild activity (14 patients; 9.9%). Among the patients with care-related data, most patients were treated for episodic bleeding (76.8%) or received prophylaxis (22.6%); 1 patient received both treatments. Among the patients with source-related data, the factor replacements were derived from plasma (48.4%), recombinant concentrates (22.9%), both sources (14.6%), or fresh frozen plasma (14.1%). Factor VIII inhibitors were observed in 43 (29.3%) of the 147 patients, and only 1 of the 54 patients developed factor IX inhibitors. Most patients who developed inhibitors had severe hemophilia (40/44; 90.9%), and inhibitors were also common among patients who received recombinant products (14/43; 32.6%).The Saudi prevalence of factor inhibitors was similar to those among other ethnic populations.

  4. Recombinant factor IX (BAX326) in previously treated paediatric patients with haemophilia B: a prospective clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Urasinski, T; Stasyshyn, O; Andreeva, T; Rusen, L; Perina, F G; Oh, M S; Chapman, M; Pavlova, B G; Valenta-Singer, B; Abbuehl, B E

    2015-03-01

    A newly developed recombinant factor IX (BAX326(1) ) was investigated for prophylactic use in paediatric patients aged <12 years with severe (FIX level <1%) or moderately severe (FIX level 1-2%) haemophilia B. The aim of this prospective clinical trial was to assess the safety, haemostatic efficacy and pharmacokinetic profile of BAX326 in previously treated paediatric patients. BAX326 was administered as prophylaxis twice a week for a period of 6 months, and on demand for treatment of bleeds. Safety was assessed by the occurrence of related AEs, thrombotic events and immunologic assessments. Efficacy was evaluated by annualized bleeding rate (ABR), and by treatment response rating (excellent, good, fair, none). PK was assessed over 72 h. None of the 23 treated paediatric subjects had treatment-related SAEs or AEs. There were no thrombotic events, inhibitory or specific binding antibodies against FIX, rFurin or CHO protein. Twenty-six bleeds (19 non-joint vs. 7 joint bleeds) occurred (mean ABR 2.7 ± 3.14, median 2.0), of which 23 were injury-related. Twenty subjects (87%) did not experience any bleeds of spontaneous aetiology. Haemostatic efficacy of BAX326 was excellent or good for >96% of bleeds (100% of minor, 88.9% of moderate and 100% of major bleeds); the majority (88.5%) resolved after 1-2 infusions. Longer T1/2 and lower IR were observed in younger children (<6 years) compared to those aged 6 to 12 years. BAX326 administered as prophylactic treatment as well as for controlling bleeds is efficacious and safe in paediatric patients aged <12 years with haemophilia B.

  5. Sustained and therapeutic levels of human factor IX in hemophilia B mice implanted with microcapsules: key role of encapsulated cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jianping; Vargas, Andrew Gómez; Ofosu, Frederick A; Hortelano, Gonzalo

    2006-03-01

    A gene therapy delivery system based on microcapsules enclosing recombinant cells engineered to secrete a therapeutic protein was explored in this study. In order to prevent immune rejection of the delivered cells, they were enclosed in non-antigenic biocompatible alginate microcapsules prior to being implanted intraperitoneally into mice. We have shown that encapsulated C2C12 myoblasts can temporarily deliver therapeutic levels of factor IX (FIX) in mice, but the C2C12 myoblasts elicited an immune response to FIX. In this study we report the use of mouse fetal G8 myoblasts secreting hFIX in hemophilia mice. Mouse G8 myoblasts were transduced with MFG-FIX vector. A pool of recombinant G8 myoblasts secreting approximately 1500 ng hFIX/10(6) cells/24 h in vitro were enclosed in biocompatible alginate microcapsules and implanted intraperitoneally into immunocompetent C57BL/6 and hemophilic mice. Circulating levels of hFIX in treated mice reached approximately 400 ng/ml for at least 120 days (end of experiment). Interestingly, mice treated with encapsulated G8 myoblasts did not develop anti-hFIX antibodies. Activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) of plasmas obtained from treated hemophilic mice was reduced from 107 to 82 sec on day 60 post-treatment, and whole blood clotting time (WBCT) was also corrected from 7-9 min before treatment to 3-5 min following microcapsule implantation. Further, mice were protected against bleeding following major trauma. Thus, the FIX delivery in vivo was biologically active. Our findings suggest that the type of cells encapsulated play a key role in the generation of immune responses against the transgene. Further, a judicious selection of encapsulated cells is critical for achieving sustained gene expression. Our findings support the feasibility of encapsulated G8 myoblasts as a gene therapy approach for hemophilia B.

  6. Pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy of a recombinant factor IX product, trenonacog alfa in previously treated haemophilia B patients.

    PubMed

    Collins, P W; Quon, D V K; Makris, M; Chowdary, P; Kempton, C L; Apte, S J; Ramanan, M V; Hay, C R M; Drobic, B; Hua, Y; Babinchak, T J; Gomperts, E D

    2017-08-17

    Trenonacog alfa (IB1001) is a recombinant factor IX (rFIX) manufactured in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. IB1001 was evaluated in a multicentre clinical trial with haemophilia B patients. The aim was to establish IB1001 pharmacokinetic non-inferiority to comparator rFIX, safety and efficacy in previously treated patients (PTPs) with haemophilia B. Subjects were severe or moderately severe haemophilia B adult and adolescent PTPs with no history of FIX inhibitors. IB1001 PK non-inferiority to comparator rFIX was demonstrated through ratio of AUC0-∞ in 32 subjects. IB1001 was well tolerated in all 76 treated subjects; the most common adverse drug reaction was headache (2.6% of subjects) and there were no reports of FIX inhibitors. Transient non-inhibitory binding FIX antibodies and anti-CHO cell protein antibodies developed in 21% and 29% of subjects respectively; no safety concerns were associated with development of these antibodies. Prophylaxis (mean duration ± SD: 17.9 ± 9.6 months, mean dose: 55.5 ± 12.9 IU/kg, median 1.0 infusion per week) was effective in preventing bleeds (median annual bleed rate: 1.52, interquartile range: 0.0-3.46). One or two IB1001 infusions resolved 84% of the bleeds, while for 84% of treatments haemostatic efficacy of IB1001 was rated excellent or good. IB1001 haemostatic efficacy for all 19 major surgeries was rated adequate or better than adequate. IB1001 is safe and efficacious for treatment of bleeds, routine prophylaxis and perioperative management in haemophilia B patients. © 2017 The Authors. Haemophilia Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. In vivo efficacy of human recombinant factor IX produced by the human hepatoma cell line HuH-7.

    PubMed

    Enjolras, N; Perot, E; Le Quellec, S; Indalecio, A; Girard, J; Negrier, C; Dargaud, Y

    2015-07-01

    Post-translational modifications of the CHO-cell-derived-recombinant human factor IX (FIX) currently used for the treatment of hemophilia B (HB) are different from plasma derived FIX. Our previous studies described a rFIX (HIX) having better profile of post-translational modifications than rFIX produced by CHO cells. The aim of the study consisted to verify the improved post-translational modifications effect of HIX on in vivo recovery. HIX has been produced in a bioreactor and then purified from supernatants. In vitro activation and activity were evaluated measured by thrombin generation tests (TGT) and compared to commercial molecules, Benefix(®) , Mononine(®) . The three molecules were then administrated (i.v.) to FIX-knockout mice and two minutes after injection, blood samples were collected and subjected to human FIX-specific-ELISA and TGT. The clotting function of HIX, activation courses of HIX by FXIa and FVIIa-TF complex appear normal as did activation of Benefix(®) , Mononine(®) and TG constants of each FIX were equivalent. After injection to HB mice, circulating HIX did not present any significant difference in term of antigen value with Benefix(®) . Intriguingly, TGT were clearly exhibiting a better velocity for HIX than Benefix(®) and Mononine(®) . These data suggested that HIX may improve in vivo coagulant efficacy in comparison with the two commercial FIX injected at the same dose. The study shows that HuH-7-derived-rFIX has better in vivo haemostatic activity in hemophilia B mice compared to the reference rFIX molecule despite similar in vivo recovery rates, suggesting that HuH-7 cells could represent an effective cellular system for production of rFIX. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Survey of the Anti-Factor IX Immunoglobulin Profiles in Patients With Hemophilia B Using a Fluorescence-Based Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Boylan, Brian; Rice, Anne S.; Neff, Anne T.; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn J.; Kempton, Christine L.; Miller, Connie H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Hemophilia B (HB) is an inherited bleeding disorder caused by the absence or dysfunction of coagulation factor IX (FIX). A subset of patients who have HB develop neutralizing alloantibodies (inhibitors) against FIX following infusion therapy. HB prevalence and the proportion of patients who develop inhibitors are much lower than that of hemophilia A (HA), which makes studies of inhibitors in patients with HB challenging due to the limited availability of samples. As a result, there is a knowledge gap regarding HB inhibitors. Objective Evaluate the largest group of inhibitor positive HB patients studied to date to assess the relationship between anti-FIX antibody profiles and inhibitor formation. Methods A fluorescence immunoassay (FLI) was used to detect anti-FIX antibodies in plasma samples from 37 patients with HB. Results Assessments of antibody profiles showed that anti-FIX IgG1-4, IgA, and IgE were detected significantly more often in patients with a positive Nijmegen-Bethesda Assay (NBA). All NBA-positive samples were positive for IgG4. Anti-FIX IgG4 demonstrated a strong correlation with the NBA, while correlations were significant, yet more moderate, for anti-FIX IgG1-2 and IgA. Conclusions The anti-FIX antibody profile in HB patients who develop inhibitors is diverse and correlates well with the NBA across immunoglobulin (sub)class, and anti-FIX IgG4 is particularly relevant to functional inhibition. The anti-FIX FLI may serve as a useful tool to confirm the presence of antibodies in patients who have low positive NBA results and to more clearly define, predict, and treat alloantibody formation against FIX. PMID:27501440

  9. Thromboembolic complications associated with the use of prothrombin complex and factor IX concentrates.

    PubMed

    Köhler, M; Hellstern, P; Lechler, E; Uberfuhr, P; Müller-Berghaus, G

    1998-09-01

    In 1994, shortly after a heat-treated prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) had been withdrawn from the German market due to transmission of hepatitis B, the license of another brand was withdrawn, due to 3 acute fatalities associated with the use of this product. We report on the clinical data of altogether 5 patients, who died during a 3 month period in Germany after having received this brand of PCC. All patients had surgery, acquired deficiencies of coagulation factors, and underlying diseases predisposing for thrombosis or disseminated intravascular coagulation. PCC was administered for the prevention of bleeding. In three patients, a drug interaction of PCC with aprotinin may also have played a role. Several points, however, are suspicious of a major causative effect of the respective product, (a) the close temporal correlation between administration of the drug and the subsequent clinical as well as laboratory deterioration, (b) the accumulation of these adverse events in a short period of time, when the use and market share of this brand increased due to the shortage of other products, and (c) laboratory abnormalities of this brand which have been consistently observed in several in vitro studies.

  10. High Purity Americium-241 for Fuel Cycle R&D Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Paul A. Lessing

    2011-07-01

    Previously the U.S. Department of Energy released Am-241 for various applications such as smoke detectors and Am-Be neutron sources for oil wells. At this date there is a shortage of usable, higher purity Am-241 in metal and oxide form available in the United States. Recently, the limited source of Am-241 has been from Russia with production being contracted to existing customers. The shortage has resulted in the price per gram rising dramatically over the last few years. DOE-NE currently has need for high purity Am-241 metal and oxide to fabricate fuel pellets for reactor testing in the Fuel Cycle R&D program. All the available high purity americium has been gathered from within the DOE system of laboratories. However, this is only a fraction of the projected needs of FCRD over the next 10 years. Therefore, FCR&D has proposed extraction and purification concepts to extract Am-241 from a mixed AmO2-PuO2 feedstock stored at the Savannah River Site. The most simple extraction system is based upon high temperature reduction using lanthanum metal with concurrent evaporation and condensation to produce high purity Am metal. Metallic americium has over a four order of magnitude higher vapor pressure than plutonium. Results from small-scale reduction experiments are presented. These results confirm thermodynamic predictions that at 1000 deg C metallic lanthanum reduces both PuO2 and AmO2. Faster kinetics are expected for temperatures up to about 1500 deg C.

  11. Understanding Friction and Wear Mechanisms of High-Purity Titanium against Steel in Liquid Nitrogen Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Bikramjit; Sarkar, J.; Mishra, Ravi

    2009-02-01

    Although the friction and wear properties of several metallic alloys in unlubricated conditions are widely investigated, such understanding for high-purity metals in cryogenic environment is rather limited. This article reports the tribological properties of high-purity α-titanium ( α-Ti), prepared by cold rolling and recrystallization annealing, under liquid nitrogen (LN2) and room temperature (RT) environments against steel (bearing grade: SAE 52100) at varying loads (up to 15 N) and sliding speeds (0.6 to 4.19 m/s). It has been found that the steady-state coefficient of friction (COF) of titanium under LN2 environment (˜0.27 to 0.33) is lower than that at RT COF (˜0.33 to 0.58) irrespective of sliding speed. For cryogenic sliding conditions, the COF decreased steadily with sliding speed to a mean value of about 0.28 and no appreciable variation in COF is noticed for sliding speed of more than 1.5 m/s. The wear rate under both environment conditions was of the order of 10-3 mm3 N-1 m-1 irrespective of variation in operating parameters, but the RT wear rate was found to be higher compared to the LN2 case. Overall, the experimental results demonstrate improved tribological properties of high-purity titanium at LN2 temperature compared to the RT. Flow localization at tribological interfaces because of the large strain rate and subsequent damage accumulation at the titanium test piece are some of the attributes of the wear of Ti at LN2 temperature. In addition, the galling of titanium was also observed to occur under large contact stress and sliding speed conditions.

  12. High-purity cobalt thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy prepared by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ootera, Yasuaki; Shimada, Takuya; Kado, Masaki; Quinsat, Michael; Morise, Hirofumi; Nakamura, Shiho; Kondo, Tsuyoshi

    2015-11-01

    A study of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of high-purity cobalt thin films is described. The Co layer prepared by a thermal CVD technique with a Pt/Ta underlayer and a Pt cap layer shows a saturation magnetization (Ms) of ∼1.8 T and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) with an anisotropy energy (Ku) of ∼105 J/m3. The cobalt thickness dependence of Ku reveals that the interfacial anisotropy at the Pt/Co interface is most likely the origin of the obtained PMA.

  13. Formation and evolution of tweed structures on high-purity aluminum polycrystalline foils under cyclic tension

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, P. V.; Vlasov, I. V.; Sklyarova, E. A.; Smekalina, T. V.

    2015-10-27

    Peculiarities of formation and evolution of tweed structures on the surface of high-purity aluminum polycrystalline foils under cyclic tension were studied using an atom force microscope and a white light interferometer. Tweed structures of micron and submicron sizes were found on the foils at different number of cycles. In the range of 42,000 < N < 95,000 cycles destruction of tweed patterns is observed, which leads to their disappearance from the surface of the foils. Formation of tweed structures of various scales is discussed in terms of the Grinfeld instability.

  14. Method for growing low defect, high purity crystalline layers utilizing lateral overgrowth of a patterned mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D. (Inventor); Daud, Taher (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A method for growing a high purity, low defect layer of semiconductor is described. This method involves depositing a patterned mask of a material impervious to impurities of the semiconductor on a surface of a blank. When a layer of semiconductor is grown on the mask, the semiconductor will first grow from the surface portions exposed by the openings in the mask and will bridge the connecting portions of the mask to form a continuous layer having improved purity, since only the portions overlying the openings are exposed to defects and impurities. The process can be iterated and the mask translated to further improve the quality of grown layers.

  15. Impurity removal process for high-purity silica production by acid leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, M.; Hajji, M.; Ezzaouia, H.

    2012-06-01

    In our days obtaining silica sand with very high purity is a primordial stage in photovoltaic industry. The effects of acids on the removal of impurity from silica sand have been studied using leaching acids: mixture composed of HF/HCl/H2O with a volume composition of (1:7:24).The obtained material was characterized using Ultraviolet-Visible absorbance (UV-Vis) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Results of the application of this technique show a significant reduction of the amounts of undesirable impurities present in natural silica (such as Co, Fe, Ca, Al, Mg …).

  16. High-precision efficiency calibration of a high-purity co-axial germanium detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, B.; Souin, J.; Ascher, P.; Audirac, L.; Canchel, G.; Gerbaux, M.; Grévy, S.; Giovinazzo, J.; Guérin, H.; Nieto, T. Kurtukian; Matea, I.; Bouzomita, H.; Delahaye, P.; Grinyer, G. F.; Thomas, J. C.

    2015-03-01

    A high-purity co-axial germanium detector has been calibrated in efficiency to a precision of about 0.15% over a wide energy range. High-precision scans of the detector crystal and γ-ray source measurements have been compared to Monte-Carlo simulations to adjust the dimensions of a detector model. For this purpose, standard calibration sources and short-lived online sources have been used. The resulting efficiency calibration reaches the precision needed e.g. for branching ratio measurements of super-allowed β decays for tests of the weak-interaction standard model.

  17. Formation of High-Purity Indium Oxide Nanoparticles and Their Application to Sensitive Detection of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Sanjeev K.; Bhardwaj, Neha; Kukkar, Manil; Sharma, Amit L.; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Deep, Akash

    2015-01-01

    High-purity In2O3 nanoparticles were recovered from scrap indium tin oxide substrates in a stepwise process involving acidic leaching, liquid-liquid extraction with a phosphine oxide extractant, and combustion of the organic phase. The morphological and structural parameters of the recovered nanoparticles were investigated to support the formation of the desired products. These In2O3 nanoparticles were used for sensitive sensing of ammonia gas using a four-probe electrode device. The proposed sensor offered very quick response time (around 10 s) and highly sensitive detection of ammonia (at a detection limit of 1 ppm). PMID:26694415

  18. The preparation and detection of high purity silicon tetrachloride with optical fibres level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Ye; Zhao, Xiong; Guo, Shuhu; Yan, Dazhou; Yang, Dian; Wang, Lei

    2017-06-01

    This article showed a technology for producing high purity silicon tetrachloride with optical fiber level, which using the method of adsorption unite distillation, whose material belong to by-product of polysilicon system. This technology could remove chlorosilane, metal impurities and impurities containing hydrogen effectively. Test’s results showed that most indexes can meet or exceed the standards of Evonic, indicating that product produced by this technology can meet the demand of processing optical fiber preforms what is OVD level completely. This technology has the advantages of simple process, continuous operation, and large capacity and so on, and industrialization can be realized.

  19. Corrosion behavior of surface films on boron-implanted high purity iron and stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. J.; Carter, W. B.; Hochman, R. F.; Meletis, E. I.

    1985-01-01

    Boron (dose, 2 x 10 to the 17th ions/sq cm) was implanted into high purity iron, AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel, and AISI 440C martensitic stainless steel, at 40 keV. The film structure of implanted samples was examined and characterized by contrast and diffraction analyses utilizing transmission electron microscopy. The effect of B(+) ion implantation on the corrosion behavior was studied using the potentiodynamic polarization technique. Tests were performed in deaerated 1 N H2SO4 and 0.1 M NaCl solutions. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the morphology of the corroded surfaces after testing.

  20. Compensation Mechanism in High Purity Semi-Insulating 4H-SiC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    online 15 March 2007 A study of deep levels in high purity semi-insulating 4H-SiC has been made using temperature dependent Hall effect TDH , thermal and...optical admittance spectroscopies, and secondary ion mass spectrometry SIMS. Thermal activation energies from TDH varied from a low of 0.55 eV to a...high of 1.65 eV. All samples studied showed n-type conduction with the Fermi level in the upper half of the band gap. Fits of the TDH data to

  1. SABRE - A test of DAMA with high-purity NaI(Tl) crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jingke; Calaprice, Frank; Froborg, Francis; Shields, Emily; Suerfu, Burkhant

    2015-08-01

    The dark matter claim by DAMA is both significant and controversial. Several experiments have claimed to rule out DAMA/LIBRA, but the comparisons are made based on dark matter halo and dark matter-interaction models that are currently unknown. Therefore, an unambiguous test of DAMA/LIBRA is best made using NaI(Tl) crystals with lower residual background than that of DAMA/LIBRA, and the SABRE experiment is designed to achieve this goal. In this paper we will discuss the development of high-purity SABRE NaI(Tl) crystals and detectors, and progress of the SABRE experiment toward testing DAMA/LIBRA.

  2. Corrosion behavior of surface films on boron-implanted high purity iron and stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. J.; Carter, W. B.; Hochman, R. F.; Meletis, E. I.

    1985-01-01

    Boron (dose, 2 x 10 to the 17th ions/sq cm) was implanted into high purity iron, AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel, and AISI 440C martensitic stainless steel, at 40 keV. The film structure of implanted samples was examined and characterized by contrast and diffraction analyses utilizing transmission electron microscopy. The effect of B(+) ion implantation on the corrosion behavior was studied using the potentiodynamic polarization technique. Tests were performed in deaerated 1 N H2SO4 and 0.1 M NaCl solutions. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the morphology of the corroded surfaces after testing.

  3. Title IX Resource Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office for Civil Rights, US Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (Title IX) prohibits discrimination based on sex in education programs and activities in federally funded schools at all levels. If any part of a school district or college receives any Federal funds for any purpose, all of the operations of the district or college are covered by Title IX. The essence…

  4. Key role of glycoprotein Ib/V/IX and von Willebrand factor in platelet activation-dependent fibrin formation at low shear flow

    PubMed Central

    Cosemans, Judith M. E. M.; Schols, Saskia E. M.; Stefanini, Lucia; de Witt, Susanne; Feijge, Marion A. H.; Hamulyák, Karly; Deckmyn, Hans; Bergmeier, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    A microscopic method was developed to study the role of platelets in fibrin formation. Perfusion of adhered platelets with plasma under coagulating conditions at a low shear rate (250−1) resulted in the assembly of a star-like fibrin network at the platelet surface. The focal fibrin formation on platelets was preceded by rises in cytosolic Ca2+, morphologic changes, and phosphatidylserine exposure. Fibrin formation was slightly affected by αIIbβ3 blockage, but it was greatly delayed and reduced by the following: inhibition of thrombin or platelet activation; interference in the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to glycoprotein Ib/V/IX (GpIb-V-IX); plasma or blood from patients with type 1 von Willebrand disease; and plasma from mice deficient in VWF or the extracellular domain of GpIbα. In this process, the GpIb-binding A1 domain of VWF was similarly effective as full-length VWF. Prestimulation of platelets enhanced the formation of fibrin, which was abrogated by blockage of phosphatidylserine. Together, these results show that, in the presence of thrombin and low shear flow, VWF-induced activation of GpIb-V-IX triggers platelet procoagulant activity and anchorage of a star-like fibrin network. This process can be relevant in hemostasis and the manifestation of von Willebrand disease. PMID:21037087

  5. Recovery of high purity sulfuric acid from the waste acid in toluene nitration process by rectification.

    PubMed

    Song, Kai; Meng, Qingqiang; Shu, Fan; Ye, Zhengfang

    2013-01-01

    Waste sulfuric acid is a byproduct generated from numerous industrial chemical processes. It is essential to remove the impurities and recover the sulfuric acid from the waste acid. In this study the rectification method was introduced to recover high purity sulfuric acid from the waste acid generated in toluene nitration process by using rectification column. The waste acid quality before and after rectification were evaluated using UV-Vis spectroscopy, GC/MS, HPLC and other physical and chemical analysis. It was shown that five nitro aromatic compounds in the waste acid were substantially removed and high purity sulfuric acid was also recovered in the rectification process at the same time. The COD was removed by 94% and the chrominance was reduced from 1000° to 1°. The recovered sulfuric acid with the concentration reaching 98.2 wt% had a comparable quality with commercial sulfuric acid and could be recycled back into the toluene nitration process, which could avoid waste of resources and reduce the environmental impact and pollution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Solution and slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for the analysis of high purity quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptkorn, Susanne; Krivan, Viliam

    1996-07-01

    A slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) method for the determination of Al, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn and Na at trace and ultratrace level in high purity quartz samples has been developed. The influence of atomization temperature, internal gas flow during atomization and carbide modification of the graphite tube on the background absorption has been studied. Simple quantification via calibration curves, recorded with aqueous standards, is possible for all elements except Al. The performance and the accuracy of the slurry sampling technique are compared to those of the analysis of hydrofluoric acid digests. With both methods, the blanks could be substantially reduced by minimization of sample handling. Because of essentially higher applicable sample portions, the solution technique provides lower limits of detection for all elements excluding Al, Na and K. For the slurry sampling technique, the achievable limits of detection are in the range of 2 (Mg) to 500 (Fe) ng g -1 and for the solution technique, they are between 0.4 (Mg) and 500 (Al) ng g -1. Thus, both developed methods are well suited for ultratrace analysis of high purity quartz for microelectronic applications. The results obtained by these two ETAAS techniques are compared with those of independent methods including neutron activation analysis.

  7. The behavior of high-purity, low-density air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Helminiak, Yanar NM

    2009-12-01

    Research on the behavior of high-purity, low-density (85%) air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBC) with NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying is described. The microstructure of the APS topcoats is one variable in this study intended to maximize the coating thicknesses that can be applied without spallation and to minimize the thermal conduction through the YSZ layer. The specimens were evaluated using cyclic oxidation tests and important properties of the TBCs, such as resistance to sintering and phase transformation, were determined. The high purity resulted in top coats which are highly resistant to sintering and transformation from the metastable tetragonal phase to the equilibrium mixture of monoclinic and cubic phases. The porous topcoat microstructure also resulted in significant durability during thermal cycling. The actual failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on topcoat thickness, CTE of the superalloy substrate and the nature of the thermal exposure.

  8. Surface preparation for high purity alumina ceramics enabling direct brazing in hydrogen atmospheres

    DOEpatents

    Cadden, Charles H.; Yang, Nancy Yuan Chi; Hosking, Floyd M.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for preparing the surface of a high purity alumina ceramic or sapphire specimen that enables direct brazing in a hydrogen atmosphere using an active braze alloy. The present invention also relates to a method for directly brazing a high purity alumina ceramic or sapphire specimen to a ceramic or metal member using this method of surface preparation, and to articles produced by this brazing method. The presence of silicon, in the form of a SiO.sub.2 -containing surface layer, can more than double the tensile bond strength in alumina ceramic joints brazed in a hydrogen atmosphere using an active Au-16Ni-0.75 Mo-1.75V filler metal. A thin silicon coating applied by PVD processing can, after air firing, produce a semi-continuous coverage of the alumina surface with a SiO.sub.2 film. Room temperature tensile strength was found to be proportional to the fraction of air fired surface covered by silicon-containing films. Similarly, the ratio of substrate fracture versus interface separation was also related to the amount of surface silicon present prior to brazing. This process can replace the need to perform a "moly-manganese" metallization step.

  9. In-line System to Produce High-Purity Acid Solutions.

    PubMed

    Masunaga, Hiroto; Higo, Yuji; Ishii, Mizuo; Maruyama, Noboru; Yamazaki, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report a new device that generates a high-purity acid solution. It comprises three compartments divided by anion-exchange membranes and filled with ion-exchange resins. Fluorochemical cation-exchange membranes, which tolerate electrochemical wear and permit bulk flow, are inserted between each electrode and the anion-exchange resin. A bipolar boundary is a composite boundary comprising anion and cation exchangers. This device has four bipolar boundaries to separate the location of acid generation from the location where water is electrolyzed. It can tolerate high pressures, resist degradation due to electrolysis at the electrodes, and produce high-purity acid solutions that are free from gases and cationic impurities. The acid solution is generated on the basis of an electrokinetic phenomenon at the surfaces of ion-exchange resins and membranes in an electric field; its concentration can be controlled at rates from 0.01 to 100 μmol/min by adjusting the electrical current applied to the device.

  10. Device to generate high purity hydroxide solution in-line for ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Masunaga, Hiroto; Higo, Yuji; Ishii, Mizuo; Maruyama, Noboru; Yamazaki, Shigeo

    2016-05-06

    Herein, we report a new device that generates a high-purity hydroxide solution in line. The device's container has three compartments that are isolated from each other by two cation exchange (CE) membranes. In each end of the container, an electrode is installed. The three compartments are filled with ion exchange resins. A bipolar boundary is a composite boundary comprising anion- and cation-exchangers. This device has two bipolar boundaries, which are used to separate the location of hydroxide solution generation from the location where water is electrolyzed. Therefore, it can produce high-purity hydroxide solutions that are free from gases and anionic impurities. The hydroxide solution is generated on the basis of an electrokinetic phenomenon at the surfaces of ion-exchange resins and membranes in an electric field; NaOH concentration can be controlled at rates from 0.01 to 100mM per 1mL/min by adjusting the electrical current (0-200mA) applied to the device. As the generated solution is used as an eluent for a suppressed anion chromatography, the electrical conductivity of the effluent from the suppressor is as low as that of ultra-pure water. Thus, the noise of the base-line electrical conductivity is improved, and so the detection limit of anions on the sub-ng/mL order can be achieved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Streamer knotwilg branching: sudden transition in morphology of positive streamers in high-purity nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heijmans, L. C. J.; Clevis, T. T. J.; Nijdam, S.; van Veldhuizen, E. M.; Ebert, U.

    2015-09-01

    We describe a peculiar branching phenomenon in positive repetitive streamer discharges in high purity nitrogen. We name it knotwilg branching after the Dutch word for a pollard willow tree. In a knotwilg branching a thick streamer suddenly splits into many thin streamers. Under some conditions this happens for all streamers in a discharge at about the same distance from the high-voltage electrode tip. At this distance, the thick streamers suddenly bend sharply and appear to propagate over a virtual surface surrounding the high-voltage electrode, rather than following the background electric field lines. From these bent thick streamers many, much thinner, streamers emerge that roughly follow the background electric field lines, creating the characteristic knotwilg branching. We have only found this particular morphology in high purity nitrogen at pressures in the range 50 to 200 mbar and for pulse repetition rates above 1 Hz; the experiments were performed for an electrode distance of 16 cm and for fast voltage pulses of 20 or 30 kV. These observations clearly disagree with common knowledge on streamer propagation. We have analyzed the data of several tens of thousands of discharges to clarify the phenomena. We also present some thoughts on how the ionization of the previous discharges could concentrate into some pre-ionization region near the needle electrode and create the knotwilg morphology, but we present no final explanation.

  12. Recycling of high purity selenium from CIGS solar cell waste materials.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Anna M K; Foreman, Mark R StJ; Ekberg, Christian

    2014-10-01

    Copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) is a promising material in thin film solar cell production. To make CIGS solar cells more competitive, both economically and environmentally, in comparison to other energy sources, methods for recycling are needed. In addition to the generally high price of the material, significant amounts of the metals are lost in the manufacturing process. The feasibility of recycling selenium from CIGS through oxidation at elevated temperatures was therefore examined. During oxidation gaseous selenium dioxide was formed and could be separated from the other elements, which remained in solid state. Upon cooling, the selenium dioxide sublimes and can be collected as crystals. After oxidation for 1h at 800°C all of the selenium was separated from the CIGS material. Two different reduction methods for reduction of the selenium dioxide to selenium were tested. In the first reduction method an organic molecule was used as the reducing agent in a Riley reaction. In the second reduction method sulphur dioxide gas was used. Both methods resulted in high purity selenium. This proves that the studied selenium separation method could be the first step in a recycling process aimed at the complete separation and recovery of high purity elements from CIGS.

  13. Recyclable Strategy for the Production of High-Purity Galacto-oligosaccharides by Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huaisheng; You, Shengping; Wang, Mengfan; Qi, Wei; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2016-07-20

    A recyclable strategy for the production of high-purity (>95%) galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) was developed using Kluyveromyces lactis in both the synthesis and purification steps. For the synthesis of GOS, ethanol-permeabilized cells (p-cells) of K. lactis were used because the enhanced permeability facilitated the mass transfer of the substrate and the release of oligosaccharide products. For the purification of GOS, non-permeabilized K. lactis cells (np-cells) were preferred as a result of their intrinsic cell membrane barrier toward GOS, which led to the selective consumption of carbohydrate. In this way, undesired glucose, galactose, and lactose in the raw GOS solution can be completely removed. This strategy is recyclable not only because of the high stability and reusability of p-cells and np-cells but also because the ethanol, which is simultaneously generated during the purification, can be reused for the preparation of p-cells. The strategy proposed in this study is a promising candidate for the efficient production of high-purity GOS.

  14. Preparation and Evaluation of High-Purity La2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gwang Seop; Uchikoshi, Masahito; Mimura, Kouji; Isshiki, Minoru

    2010-06-01

    A separation procedure based on extraction chromatography using the di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) impregnated resin, anion exchange with DIAION SA 10 resin, and oxalate precipitation has been developed for the preparation of high-purity La2O3 in hydrochloric acid media at a high La concentration. The metallic impurities Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, K, Mg, Ca, Zn, Cu, Co, Mn, Pb, Al, In, and Fe, but not Bi, were removed efficiently from La by extraction chromatography using a D2EHPA impregnated resin. The Bi was separated from the La by anion exchange (DIAION SA 10) separation. Thus, a high-purity LaCl3 solution was obtained by anion exchange separation and extraction chromatography. La2O3 was prepared from the purified LaCl3 solution by oxalate precipitation. Glow discharge mass spectrometry was applied for purity evaluation of the prepared La2O3. The purity of the prepared La2O3 was more than 99.9998 pct total rare earth oxide.

  15. Process for producing high purity isoolefins and dimers thereof by dissociation of ethers

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Jones, Jr., Edward M.; Hearn, Dennis

    1984-01-01

    Alkyl tertiary butyl ether or alkyl tertiary amyl ether is dissociated by vapor phase contact with a cation acidic exchange resin at temperatures in the range of 150.degree. to 250.degree. F. at LHSV of 0.1 to 20 to produce a stream consisting of unreacted ether, isobutene or isoamylene and an alcohol corresponding to the alkyl radical. After the alcohol is removed, the ether/isoolefin stream may be fractionated to obtain a high purity isoolefin (99+%) or the ether/isoolefin stream can be contacted in liquid phase with a cation acidic exchange resin to selectively dimerize the isoolefin in a highly exothermic reaction, followed by fractionation of the dimerization product to produce high purity diisoolefin (97+%). In the case where the alkyl is C.sub.3 to C.sub.6 and the corresponding alcohol is produced on dissociation of the ether, combined dissociation-distillation may be carried out such that isoolefin is the overhead product and alcohol the bottom.

  16. Process for producing high purity isoolefins and dimers thereof by dissociation of ethers

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Jones, E.M. Jr.; Hearn, D.

    1984-05-08

    Alkyl tertiary butyl ether or alkyl tertiary amyl ether is dissociated by vapor phase contact with a cation acidic exchange resin at temperatures in the range of 150 to 250 F at LHSV of 0.1 to 20 to produce a stream consisting of unreacted ether, isobutene or isoamylene and an alcohol corresponding to the alkyl radical. After the alcohol is removed, the ether/isoolefin stream may be fractionated to obtain a high purity isoolefin (99+%) or the ether/isoolefin stream can be contacted in liquid phase with a cation acidic exchange resin to selectively dimerize the isoolefin in a highly exothermic reaction, followed by fractionation of the dimerization product to produce high purity diisoolefin (97+%). In the case where the alkyl is C[sub 3] to C[sub 6] and the corresponding alcohol is produced on dissociation of the ether, combined dissociation-distillation may be carried out such that isoolefin is the overhead product and alcohol the bottom. 2 figs.

  17. High purity silver microcrystals recovered from silver wastes by eco-friendly process using hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Gatemala, Harnchana; Ekgasit, Sanong; Wongravee, Kanet

    2017-07-01

    A simple, rapid, and environmentally friendly process using hydrogen peroxide, was developed for recovering high purity silver directly from industry and laboratory wastes. Silver ammine complex, [Ag(NH3)2](+)Cl(-), derived from AgCl were generated and then directly reduced using H2O2 to reliably turn into high purity microcrystalline silver (99.99%) examined by EDS and XRD. Morphology of the recovered silver microcrystals could be selectively tuned by an addition of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone). The main parameters in the recovering process including pH, concentration of Ag(+) and the mole ratio of H2O2:Ag(+) were carefully optimized though the central composite design (CCD). The optimized condition was employed for a trial recovery of 50 L silver ammine complex prepared from a collection of silver-wastes during 3-year research on industrial nanoparticle production. The recovered silver microcrystals >700 g could be recovered with 91.27%. The remaining solution after filtering of the recovered silver microcrystals can be used repeatedly (at least 8 cycles) without losing recovery efficiency. Matrix interferences including Pb(2+) and Cl(-) play a minimal role in our silver recovery process. Furthermore, the direct usage of the recovered silver microcrystals was demonstrated by using as a raw material of silver clay for creating a set of wearable silver jewelries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. High Purity NaI(Tl) Scintillator to Search for Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fushimi, Ken-Ichi; Ejiri, Hiroyasu; Hazama, Ryuta; Ikeda, Haruo; Inoue, Kunio; Imagawa, Kyoshiro; Kanzaki, Gakuji; Kozlov, Alexandre; Orito, Reiko; Shima, Tatsushi; Takemoto, Yasuhiro; Teraoka, Yuri; Umehara, Saori; Yoshida, Sei

    A high purity and large volume NaI(Tl) scintillator was developed to search for cosmic dark matter. The required densities of radioactive impurities (RIs) such as U-chain, Th-chain are less than a few ppt to establish high sensitivity to dark matter. The impurity of RIs were effectively reduced by selecting raw materials of crucible and by performing chemical reduction of lead ion in NaI raw powder. The impurity of 226Ra was reduced less than 100 µBq/kg in NaI(Tl) crystal. It should be remarked that the impurity of 210Pb, which is difficult to reduce, is effectively reduced by chemical processing of NaI raw powder down to less than 30 µBq/kg. The expected sensitivity to cosmic dark matter by using 250 kg of the high purity and large volume NaI(Tl) scintillator (PICO-LON; Pure Inorganic Crystal Observatory for LOw-background Neutr(al)ino) is 7 × 10-45 cm2 for 50 GeV/c2 WIMPs.

  19. Secondary electron emission characteristics of ion-textured copper and high-purity isotropic graphite surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curren, A. N.; Jensen, K. A.

    1984-01-01

    Experimentally determined values of true secondary electron emission and relative values of reflected primary electron yield for untreated and ion textured oxygen free high conductivity copper and untreated and ion textured high purity isotropic graphite surfaces are presented for a range of primary electron beam energies and beam impingement angles. This investigation was conducted to provide information that would improve the efficiency of multistage depressed collectors (MDC's) for microwave amplifier traveling wave tubes in space communications and aircraft applications. For high efficiency, MDC electrode surfaces must have low secondary electron emission characteristics. Although copper is a commonly used material for MDC electrodes, it exhibits relatively high levels of secondary electron emission if its surface is not treated for emission control. Recent studies demonstrated that high purity isotropic graphite is a promising material for MDC electrodes, particularly with ion textured surfaces. The materials were tested at primary electron beam energies of 200 to 2000 eV and at direct (0 deg) to near grazing (85 deg) beam impingement angles. True secondary electron emission and relative reflected primary electron yield characteristics of the ion textured surfaces were compared with each other and with those of untreated surfaces of the same materials. Both the untreated and ion textured graphite surfaces and the ion treated copper surface exhibited sharply reduced secondary electron emission characteristics relative to those of untreated copper. The ion treated graphite surface yielded the lowest emission levels.

  20. Photoconductive response of compensating impurities in photothermal ionization spectroscopy of high-purity silicon and germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Darken, L.S.; Hyder, S.A.

    1983-04-15

    In photothermal ionization spectroscopy both positive and negative photoconductivity responses have been reported from compensating centers neutralized by minority carriers generated by band-edge light. Here, the response of compensating impurities in both n-type and p-type high-purity (Vertical BarN/sub A/-N/sub D/Vertical Bar roughly-equal10/sup 10/--10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/) nuclear-detector-grade silicon and germanium is reported. Negative photoconductive responses from compensating impurities were observed only when the distance the photothermally generated majority carriers traveled before recapture by shallow levels was longer than the sample length (contact to contact). We propose that in high-purity semiconductors, such as used in this study, it is the contact configuration that is responsible for the apparent rapid recombination of minority carriers which causes negative minority-carrier photoconductivity. n/sup +/nn/sup +/ or p/sup +/pp/sup +/ structures allow multiple traversals through the sample by only majority carriers. The dependence of the band-edge light generated excess carrier density on applied electric field supports this mechanism.

  1. Process for producing high purity silicon nitride by the direct reaction between elemental silicon and nitrogen-hydrogen liquid reactants

    DOEpatents

    Pugar, Eloise A.; Morgan, Peter E. D.

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for producing, at a low temperature, a high purity reaction product consisting essentially of silicon, nitrogen, and hydrogen which can then be heated to produce a high purity alpha silicon nitride. The process comprises: reacting together a particulate elemental high purity silicon with a high purity nitrogen-hydrogen reactant in its liquid state (such as ammonia or hydrazine) having the formula: N.sub.n H.sub.(n+m) wherein: n=1-4 and m=2 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is straight chain, and 0 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is cyclic. High purity silicon nitride can be formed from this intermediate product by heating the intermediate product at a temperature of from about 1200.degree.-1700.degree. C. for a period from about 15 minutes up to about 2 hours to form a high purity alpha silicon nitride product. The discovery of the existence of a soluble Si-N-H intermediate enables chemical pathways to be explored previously unavailable in conventional solid state approaches to silicon-nitrogen ceramics.

  2. Process for producing high purity silicon nitride by the direct reaction between elemental silicon and nitrogen-hydrogen liquid reactants

    DOEpatents

    Pugar, E.A.; Morgan, P.E.D.

    1987-09-15

    A process is disclosed for producing, at a low temperature, a high purity reaction product consisting essentially of silicon, nitrogen, and hydrogen which can then be heated to produce a high purity alpha silicon nitride. The process comprises: reacting together a particulate elemental high purity silicon with a high purity nitrogen-hydrogen reactant in its liquid state (such as ammonia or hydrazine) having the formula: N/sub n/H/sub (n+m)/ wherein: n = 1--4 and m = 2 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is straight chain, and 0 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is cyclic. High purity silicon nitride can be formed from this intermediate product by heating the intermediate product at a temperature of from about 1200--1700/degree/C for a period from about 15 minutes up to about 2 hours to form a high purity alpha silicon nitride product. The discovery of the existence of a soluble Si/endash/N/endash/H intermediate enables chemical pathways to be explored previously unavailable in conventional solid-state approaches to silicon-nitrogen ceramics

  3. Efficient purification of high-purity compounds from the stem of Lonicera japonica Thunb using two-dimensional preparative chromatography.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hongli; Liu, Yanfang; Feng, Jiatao; Guo, Zhimou; Wang, Chaoran; Zhong, Zhengsheng; Peng, Xiaojun; Dang, Jun; Tao, Yanduo; Liang, Xinmiao

    2013-08-01

    Purification of high-purity compounds from traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) plays an important role in investigating their bioactivity. Nevertheless, it is often quite difficult to isolate compounds with high purity because of the complexity of TCMs in chemical composition. In this work, a two-dimensional preparation method was successfully developed for the preparation of high-purity compounds from the stem of Lonicera japonica Thunb, based on two novel polar copolymerized RP stationary phases, XAqua C3 and XAqua C18. An XAqua C3 prep column was used to separate the sample in the first-dimensional preparation, and 14 g of sample was fractionated into eight fractions with a recovery of 82%. An XAqua C18 prep column was selected to prepare high-purity compounds in the second-dimensional preparation for its good orthogonality with the XAqua C3 stationary phase. As a result, major compounds in the sample were isolated with more than 99% purity. This method is a potent method to realize the efficient purification of compounds with high purity from the stem of L. japonica Thunb and it shows great potential in the separation of high-purity compounds from complex samples.

  4. Preliminary study on non-viral transfection of F9 (factor IX) gene by nucleofection in human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Olmedillas López, Susana; Garcia-Arranz, Mariano; Garcia-Olmo, Damian

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hemophilia is a rare recessive X-linked disease characterized by a deficiency of coagulation factor VIII or factor IX. Its current treatment is merely palliative. Advanced therapies are likely to become the treatment of choice for the disease as they could provide a curative treatment. Methods. The present study looks into the use of a safe non-viral transfection method based on nucleofection to express and secrete human clotting factor IX (hFIX) where human adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells were used as target cells in vitro studies and NOD. Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice were used to analyze factor IX expression in vivo studies. Previously, acute liver injury was induced by an injected intraperitoneal dose of 500 mg/kg body weight of acetaminophen. Results. Nucleofection showed a percentage of positive cells ranging between 30.7% and 41.9% and a cell viability rate of 29.8%, and cells were shown to secrete amounts of hFIX between 36.8 and 71.9 ng/mL. hFIX levels in the blood of NSG mice injected with ASCs transfected with this vector, were 2.7 ng/mL 48 h after injection. Expression and secretion of hFIX were achieved both in vitro cell culture media and in vivo in the plasma of mice treated with the transfected ASCs. Such cells are capable of eventually migrating to a previously damaged target tissue (the liver) where they secrete hFIX, releasing it to the bloodstream over a period of at least five days from administration. Conclusions. The results obtained in the present study may form a preliminary basis for the establishment of a future ex vivo non-viral gene/cellular safe therapy protocol that may eventually contribute to advancing the treatment of hemophilia. PMID:27114871

  5. Confirmation of warfarin resistance of naturally occurring VKORC1 variants by coexpression with coagulation factor IX and in silico protein modelling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background VKORC1 has been identified some years ago as the gene encoding vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) – the target protein for coumarin derivates like warfarin or phenprocoumon. Resistance against warfarin and other coumarin-type anticoagulants has been frequently reported over the last 50 years in rodents due to problems in pest control as well as in thrombophilic patients showing variable response to anticoagulant treatment. Many different mutations have already been detected in the VKORC1 gene leading to warfarin resistance in rats, mice and in humans. Since the conventional in vitro dithiothreitol (DTT)-driven VKOR enzymatic assay often did not reflect the in vivo status concerning warfarin resistance, we recently developed a cell culture-based method for coexpression of VKORC1 with coagulation factor IX and subsequent measurement of secreted FIX in order to test warfarin inhibition in wild-type and mutated VKORC1. Results In the present study, we coexpressed wild-type factor IX with 12 different VKORC1 variants which were previously detected in warfarin resistant rats and mice. The results show that amino acid substitutions in VKORC1 maintain VKOR activity and are associated with warfarin resistance. When we projected in silico the amino acid substitutions onto the published three-dimensional model of the bacterial VKOR enzyme, the predicted effects matched well the catalytic mechanism proposed for the bacterial enzyme. Conclusions The established cell-based system for coexpression of VKORC1 and factor IX uses FIX activity as an indicator of carboxylation efficiency. This system reflects the warfarin resistance status of VKORC1 mutations from anticoagulant resistant rodents more closely than the traditional DTT-driven enzyme assay. All mutations studied were also predicted to be involved in the reaction mechanism. PMID:24491178

  6. A computer-based model to assess costs associated with the use of factor VIII and factor IX one-stage and chromogenic activity assays.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, S; Blakemore, J; Friedman, K D; Hart, D P; Ko, R H; Perry, D; Platton, S; Tan-Castillo, D; Young, G; Luddington, R J

    2016-04-01

    Measurement of coagulation factor factor VIII (FVIII) and factor IX (FIX) activity can be associated with a high level of variability using one-stage assays based on activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). Chromogenic assays show less variability, but are less commonly used in clinical laboratories. In addition, one-stage assay accuracy using certain reagent and instrument combinations is compromised by some modified recombinant factor concentrates. Reluctance among some in the hematology laboratory community to adopt the use of chromogenic assays may be partly attributable to lack of familiarity and perceived higher associated costs. To identify and characterize key cost parameters associated with one-stage APTT and chromogenic assays for FVIII and FIX activity using a computer-based cost analysis model. A cost model for FVIII and FIX chromogenic assays relative to APTT assays was generated using assumptions derived from interviews with hematologists and laboratory scientists, common clinical laboratory practise, manufacturer list prices and assay kit configurations. Key factors that contribute to costs are factor-deficient plasma and kit reagents for one-stage and chromogenic assays, respectively. The stability of chromogenic assay kit reagents also limits the cost efficiency compared with APTT testing. Costs for chromogenic assays might be reduced by 50-75% using batch testing, aliquoting and freezing of kit reagents. Both batch testing and aliquoting of chromogenic kit reagents might improve cost efficiency for FVIII and FIX chromogenic assays, but would require validation. Laboratory validation and regulatory approval as well as education and training in the use of chromogenic assays might facilitate wider adoption by clinical laboratories. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  7. Protein modification during anti-viral heat-treatment bioprocessing of factor VIII concentrates, factor IX concentrates, and model proteins in the presence of sucrose.

    PubMed

    Smales, C Mark; Pepper, Duncan S; James, David C

    2002-01-05

    To ensure the optimal safety of plasma derived and new generation recombinant proteins, heat treatment is customarily applied in the manufacturing of such biopharmaceuticals as a means of viral inactivation. In subjecting proteins to anti-viral heat-treatment it is necessary to use high concentrations of thermostabilizing excipients to prevent protein damage, and it is therefore imperative that the correct balance between bioprocessing conditions, maintenance of protein integrity and virus kill is found. In this study we have utilized model proteins (lysozyme, fetuin, and human serum albumin) and plasma-derived therapeutic proteins (factor VIII and factor IX) to investigate the protein modifications that occur during anti-viral heat treatment. Specifically, we investigated the relationship between bioprocessing conditions and the type and extent of protein modification under a variety of industrially relevant wet and lyophilized heat treatments using sucrose as a thermostabilizing agent. Heat treatment led to the formation of disulfide crosslinks and aggregates in proteins containing free cysteine residues. Terminal oligosaccharide sialic acid residues were hydrolyzed from the glycan moieties of glycoproteins during anti-viral heat treatment. Heat treatment promoted sucrose hydrolysis to yield glucose and fructose, leading, in turn, to the glycation of lysine amino groups in those proteins containing di-lysine motifs. During extended hear treatments, 1,2-dicarbonyl type advanced glycation end-products were also formed. Glycation-type modifications were more prevalent in wet heat-treated protein formulations.

  8. Experimental research of phase transition's kinetics in a liquid melt of high-purity aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorontsov, V. B.; Zhuravlev, D. V.; Cherepanov, A. S.

    2015-08-01

    This scientific work is devoted to the studying of the genetic connection structures of solid and liquid phases. Fourier analysis of signals of acoustic emission (AE) accompanying melting high purity aluminum from the melting point up to t = 860°C was performed. Based on the results of previous studies cluster formations in the melt - the micro-regions, those retain crystallinity (areas with short-range order of symmetry) were considered as the source of AE. The experimental data allowed to follow the dynamics of disorder zones range order in the melt with increasing melt temperature up to their complete destruction. The presented results of spectral analysis of the signals were analyzed from the standpoint of the theory of cluster melting metals.

  9. Formation of recrystallization cube texture in high purity face-centered cubic metal sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, W.

    1999-10-01

    An investigation on recrystallization textures in high purity face-centered cubic (fcc) aluminum, copper, and nickel indicated that the cube texture is a unique dominant final texture. In a macroview of rolling deformation, a balanced activation of four slip systems can result in certain stability of some substructure with cube orientation in the deformed matrix. In the stable substructure the dislocation density is very low, and the dislocation configuration is rather simple in comparison to other orientations so that the cube substructure can easily be transformed into cube recrystallization nuclei by a recovery process. A high orientation gradient and correspondingly high angle boundaries to the deformed matrix are usually expected around the cube nuclei, which, therefore, grow rapidly. After the primary recrystallization, the size of cube grains is much larger than the grains with other orientations, which will be expensed as the cube grains grow further, so that the cube texture can finally become a dominant texture component.

  10. Annealing Behavior at Triple Junctions in High-Purity Aluminum After Slight Cold Rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Wenhong; Wang, Weiguo; Fang, Xiaoying; Qin, Congxiang

    2017-04-01

    High-purity polycrystalline aluminum samples with a typical grain size of approximately 30 μm were slightly cold-rolled with a thickness reduction of 15%, and then, off-line in situ electron backscatter diffraction was used to identify the annealing behavior at triple junctions during annealing at 400 °C. The results show that recrystallization nuclei are developed at some triple junctions during annealing. High-angle grain boundaries migrate from harder grains to softer grains at the triple junctions leading to the formation of nuclei. All such nuclei show Σ3 orientation relationships with the parent grains, and the bounded Σ3 boundaries are found to be incoherent. During further annealing, these nuclei are consumed by other growing grains, indicating that their presence is just a release of the strain concentration at the triple junctions.

  11. URANIUM RECOVERY AND PURIFICATION PROCESS AND PRODUCTION OF HIGH PURITY URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Bailes, R.H.; Long, R.S.; Grinstead, R.R.

    1957-09-17

    A process is described wherein an anionic exchange technique is employed to separate uramium from a large variety of impurities. Very efficient and economical purification of contamimated uranium can be achieved by treatment of the contaminated uranium to produce a solution containing a high concentration of chloride. Under these conditions the uranium exists as an aniomic chloride complex. Then the uranium chloride complex is adsorbed from the solution on an aniomic exchange resin, whereby a portion of the impurities remain in the solution and others are retained with the uramium by the resin. The adsorbed impurities are then removed by washing the resin with pure concentrated hydrochloric acid, after which operation the uranium is eluted with pure water yielding an acidic uranyl chloride solution of high purity.

  12. Detection of moisture content in high-purity ammonia by means of diode-laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, A. G.; Nadezhdinskii, A. I.; Ponurovskii, Y. Y.; Stavrovskii, D. B.; Vyazov, I. E.; Kotkov, A. P.; Ivanov, V. A.; Grishnova, N. D.; Polezhaev, D. M.; Sidorov, V. A.; Kotkov, D. A.

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this work was the development of an as-simple-as-possible instrument for trace moisture concentration measurements in high-purity ammonia. A near-infrared diode-laser-based instrument has been applied to measure the humidity in a process of on-line detection of water in ammonia during industrial purification. The results of water concentration measurements were compared with alternative techniques (primarily dew-point detection) and good agreement was achieved. The long-term sensitivity of such a diode-laser-based instrument was estimated to be 5 ppm. The calculation of the water concentration from measurements of the integrated volume of water contained in the heavy fraction, extracted during the purification process, yields an even lower detection limit of less than 0.1 ppm, depending on the initial ammonia purity.

  13. Scalable fabrication of high purity diamond nanocrystals with long-spin-coherence nitrogen vacancy centers.

    PubMed

    Trusheim, Matthew E; Li, Luozhou; Laraoui, Abdelghani; Chen, Edward H; Bakhru, Hassaram; Schröder, Tim; Gaathon, Ophir; Meriles, Carlos A; Englund, Dirk

    2014-01-08

    The combination of long spin coherence time and nanoscale size has made nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in nanodiamonds the subject of much interest for quantum information and sensing applications. However, currently available high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) nanodiamonds have a high concentration of paramagnetic impurities that limit their spin coherence time to the order of microseconds, less than 1% of that observed in bulk diamond. In this work, we use a porous metal mask and a reactive ion etching process to fabricate nanocrystals from high-purity chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond. We show that NV centers in these CVD nanodiamonds exhibit record-long spin coherence times in excess of 200 μs, enabling magnetic field sensitivities of 290 nT Hz(-1/2) with the spatial resolution characteristic of a 50 nm diameter probe.

  14. Map showing high-purity silica sand of Middle Ordovician age in the Midwestern states

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ketner, Keith B.

    1979-01-01

    Certain quartz sands of Middle Ordovician age in the Midwestern States are well known for their purity and are exploited for a wide variety of industrial uses. The principal Middle Ordovician formations containing high-purity sands are the St. Peter Sandstone which crops out extensively from Minnesota to Arkansas; the Everton Formation principally of Arkansas; and the Oil Creek, McLish, and Tulip Creek Formations (all of the Simpson Group) of Oklahoma. The St. Peter and sandy beds in the other formations are commonly called "sandstones," but a more appropriate term is "sands" for in most fresh exposures they are completely uncemented or very weakly cemented. On exposure to air, uncemented sands usually become "case hardened" where evaporating ground water precipitates mineral matter at the surface; but this is a surficial effect. This report summarizes the available information on the extent of exposures, range of grain size, and chemical composition of the Middle Ordovician sands.

  15. Nodular graphite formation in vacuum melted high purity Fe-C-Si alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhindaw, B.; Verhoeven, J. D.

    1980-06-01

    This paper describes a study of the cast structure of vacuum melted high purity Fe-C-Si alloys with emphasis on hypoeutectic and eutectic compositions. Nodular graphite was observed to form at high cooling rates and coral graphite at low cooling rates. This result was also confirmed by a limited study on directional solidification of alloys prepared from the same starting materials. The formation of nodular graphite at the high cooling rates was suppressed to near zero by changing the starting iron from 99.94 pct electrolytic iron to an ultra-pure zone refined iron, or by holding the melt at a low super-heat prior to cooling. Chemical analysis showed only that the impurity responsible for nodular formation was present at the low ppm level. An attempt is made to explain the appearance of the various microstructures in terms of the nucleation and growth of nodular graphite, coral graphite and the carbide structure of white iron.

  16. High-purity InAs1-xSbx epilayer grown by a LPE technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Y. F.; Hu, S. H.; Xu, Y. G.; Zhou, W.; Wang, Y.; Wang, R.; Yu, G. L.; Dai, N.

    2015-04-01

    High-purity InAs1-xSbx films with x=0.06 were successfully grown on InAs (100) substrates by liquid phase epitaxy (LPE). Procedures were applied to purify InAs1-xSbx precursor material, which included prolonging baking time in hydrogen and adding rare-earth element gadolinium (Gd) to the growth melt. Electrical transport properties of InAs1-xSbx film were investigated by Hall measurements in the condition of the conductive InAs substrate being removed completely by chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) to eliminate its influence on the measurements. Hall measurement results show carrier concentration and mobility of our InAs1-xSbx samples are superior to the other reported values when a combinational purification procedure is applied.

  17. Production of carbon monoxide-free hydrogen and helium from a high-purity source

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Timothy Christopher [Allentown, PA; Farris, Thomas Stephen [Bethlehem, PA

    2008-11-18

    The invention provides vacuum swing adsorption processes that produce an essentially carbon monoxide-free hydrogen or helium gas stream from, respectively, a high-purity (e.g., pipeline grade) hydrogen or helium gas stream using one or two adsorber beds. By using physical adsorbents with high heats of nitrogen adsorption, intermediate heats of carbon monoxide adsorption, and low heats of hydrogen and helium adsorption, and by using vacuum purging and high feed stream pressures (e.g., pressures of as high as around 1,000 bar), pipeline grade hydrogen or helium can purified to produce essentially carbon monoxide -free hydrogen and helium, or carbon monoxide, nitrogen, and methane-free hydrogen and helium.

  18. A Rapid and Cost-Effective Laser Based Synthesis of High Purity Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Gondall, M A; Qahtan, Talal F; Dastageer, M A; Yamani, Z H; Anjum, D H

    2016-01-01

    A rapid and cost effective method is developed to synthesize high purity cadmium Selenide (CdSe) quantum dots in acetone medium using second harmonic of Nd:YAG nanosecond pulsed laser of 532 nm wavelength. The thermal agglomeration due the nanosecond pulse duration of the laser was successfully eliminated by using unfocussed laser beam and thereby providing a favorable conditions for the synthesis of quantum dots having the grain size of 3 nm. The morphological and optical characterizations like XRD, HRTEM, optical absorption of the synthesized CdSe quantum dots, reveal that the material possesses the similar characteristics of the one synthesized through cumbersome wet chemical methods. Relative to the CdSe bulk material, the synthesized CdSe quantum dots showed a blue shift in the measured band gap energy from near infrared spectral region to visible region, making this material very attractive for many solar energy harvesting applications like photo-catalysis and solar cells.

  19. Hot working of high purity Fe-C alloys in the α-range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montheillet, F.; Le Coze, J.

    2010-07-01

    The influence of carbon in solid solution on the stress-strain curves of α-iron was investigated using model alloys prepared from high purity iron. Uniaxial compression tests were carried out within the ferritic domain at temperatures between 700 and 880 °C. Oscillating stress-strain curves observed at high temperatures and low strain rates indicate that discontinuous dynamic recrystallization takes place. The macroscopic strain rate sensitivities m and apparent activation energies Q associated with the flow stress are not significantly modified by carbon additions. By contrast, the "mesoscopic" parameters h and r associated with strain hardening and dynamic recovery, respectively, are strongly dependent on the carbon content. Finally, an estimation of the grain boundary mobilities during dynamic recrystallization was carried out from the above rheological data.

  20. Defects interaction processes in deformed high purity polycrystalline molybdenum at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambri, O. A.; Bonifacich, F. G.; Bozzano, P. B.; Zelada, G. I.; Plazaola, F.; García, J. A.

    2014-10-01

    Mechanical spectroscopy (damping and elastic modulus as a function of temperature) and transmission electron microscopy studies have been performed in high purity polycrystalline molybdenum plastically deformed to different values of tensile and torsion strain. Mechanical spectroscopy measurements were performed from room temperature up to 1285 K. A relaxation peak in polycrystalline molybdenum related to the movement of dislocations into lower energy configurations near grain boundaries has been discovered to appear around 1170 K. The activation energy of the peak is 4.2 eV ± 0.5 eV. This relaxation phenomenon involves the interaction between vacancies and mobile dislocations near the grain boundaries. It should be highlighted that this relaxation process is controlled by the arrangement of vacancies and dislocations which occur at temperature below 1070 K.

  1. The importance of Soret transport in the production of high purity silicon for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.

    1985-01-01

    Temperature-gradient-driven diffusion, or Soret transport, of silicon vapor and liquid droplets is analyzed under conditions typical of current production reactors for obtaining high purity silicon for solar cells. Contrary to the common belief that Soret transport is negligible, it is concluded that some 15-20 percent of the silicon vapor mass flux to the reactor walls is caused by the high temperature gradients that prevail inside such reactors. Moreover, since collection of silicon is also achieved via deposition of silicon droplets onto the walls, the Soret transport mechanism becomes even more crucial due to size differences between diffusing species. It is shown that for droplets in the 0.01 to 1 micron diameter range, collection by Soret transport dominates both Brownian and turbulent mechanisms.

  2. Diffusion Resistant, High-Purity Wafer Carriers For SI Semiconductor Production

    SciTech Connect

    Tiegs, T.N.; Leaskey, L.

    2000-10-01

    The Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was directed towards development of diffusion resistant, high-purity wafer carriers for Si semiconductor production with improved properties compared to current materials. The determination of the infiltration behavior is important for controlling the fabrication process to. obtain consistent high-quality products. Ammonium molybdate or molybdenum carbide were found to be suitable as a precursor to produce SiC-MoSi{sub 2}-Si composites by Si infiltration into carbon preforms. Experiments on the pyrolysis of the preforms showed variable infiltration behavior by the molten Si (within the range of conditions in the present study). Further research is required to reproducibly and consistently fabricate flaw-free articles. The strength of the composites fabricated to-date was 325{+-}124 MPa, which is higher than current commercial products. Better process control should result in higher average strengths and reduce the variability.

  3. The importance of Soret transport in the production of high purity silicon for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.

    1985-01-01

    Temperature-gradient-driven diffusion, or Soret transport, of silicon vapor and liquid droplets is analyzed under conditions typical of current production reactors for obtaining high purity silicon for solar cells. Contrary to the common belief that Soret transport is negligible, it is concluded that some 15-20 percent of the silicon vapor mass flux to the reactor walls is caused by the high temperature gradients that prevail inside such reactors. Moreover, since collection of silicon is also achieved via deposition of silicon droplets onto the walls, the Soret transport mechanism becomes even more crucial due to size differences between diffusing species. It is shown that for droplets in the 0.01 to 1 micron diameter range, collection by Soret transport dominates both Brownian and turbulent mechanisms.

  4. Effect of Sintering Temperature on the Synthesis of High Purity Cordierite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, Y. P.; Chow, T. Y.; Mohamad, H.

    2008-03-01

    Cordierite is silicate material widely used in ceramic industry. The effect of sintering temperature to the properties of cordierite by sol gel method was studied with utilizing magnesium nitrate, aluminum nitrate, ethanol, and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as starting materials. Gels are dried and sintered at different temperature (1000 °C, 1200 °C, 1300 °C and 1350 °C) then characterized by varies analysis techniques. XRD analysis shows that spinel, μ-cordierite and cristobalite are formed at 1000 °C which spinel as predominant phase. At 1200 °C, μ-cordierite occured as predominant phase, spinel, sapphirine and cristobalite are formed as minor phases. It also confirmed that high purity α-cordierite formed at 1300 °C and clearly observed at 1350 °C. Result of EDX analysis proved that magnesium, aluminum, silicon and oxygen was existed in the cordierite.

  5. Application of Thermodynamic Calculations to the Pyro-refining Process for Production of High Purity Bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezbahul-Islam, Mohammad; Belanger, Frederic; Chartrand, Patrice; Jung, In-Ho; Coursol, Pascal

    2017-02-01

    The present work has been performed with the aim to optimize the existing process for the production of high purity bismuth (99.999 pct). A thermo-chemical database including most of the probable impurities of bismuth (Bi-X, X = Ag, Au, Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, S, Sb, Sn, Si, Te, Zn) has been constructed to perform different thermodynamic calculations required for the refining process. Thermodynamic description for eight of the selected binaries, Bi-Ca, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, S, Sb, and Sn, has been given in the current paper. Using the current database, different thermodynamic calculations have been performed to explain the steps involved in the bismuth refining process.

  6. High Strain-Rate Response of High Purity Aluminum at Temperatures Approaching Melt

    SciTech Connect

    Grunschel, S E; Clifton, R J; Jiao, T

    2010-01-28

    High-temperature, pressure-shear plate impact experiments were conducted to investigate the rate-controlling mechanisms of the plastic response of high-purity aluminum at high strain rates (10{sup 6} s{sup -1}) and at temperatures approaching melt. Since the melting temperature of aluminum is pressure dependent, and a typical pressure-shear plate impact experiment subjects the sample to large pressures (2 GPa-7 GPa), a pressure-release type experiment was used to reduce the pressure in order to measure the shearing resistance at temperatures up to 95% of the current melting temperature. The measured shearing resistance was remarkably large (50 MPa at a shear strain of 2.5) for temperatures this near melt. Numerical simulations conducted using a version of the Nemat-Nasser/Isaacs constitutive equation, modified to model the mechanism of geometric softening, appear to capture adequately the hardening/softening behavior observed experimentally.

  7. Statistics of high purity nickel microstructure from high energy x-ray diffraction microscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Hefferan, C. M.; Li, S. F.; Lind, J. F.; Lienert, U.; Rollett, A. D.; Winblatt, P.; Suter, R. M.; X-Ray Science Division; Univ. of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon Univ.

    2009-01-01

    We have measured and reconstructed via forward modeling a small volume of microstructure of high purity, well annealed nickel using high energy xray diffraction microscopy (HEDM). Statistical distributions characterizing grain orientations, intra-granular misorientations, and nearest neighbor grain misorientations are extracted. Results are consistent with recent electron backscatter diffraction measurements. Peaks in the grain neighbor misorientation angle distribution at 60 degrees (S3) and 39 degrees (S9) have resolution limited widths of {approx}0:14 degree FWHM. The analysis demonstrates that HEDM can recover grain and grain boundary statistics comparable to OIM volume measurements; more extensive data sets will lead to full, five parameter grain boundary character distributions. Due to its non-destructive nature, HEDM can then watch, both statistically and through tracking of individual grains and boundaries, the evolution of such distributions with processing of the sample.

  8. Role of deformation twins in static recrystallization kinetics of high-purity alpha titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Jong Woo; Lee, Taekyung; Hong, Seong-Gu; Lee, Yongmoon; Lee, Jeong Hun; Lee, Chong Soo

    2016-11-01

    The importance of deformation twins in static recrystallization kinetics of high-purity alpha titanium was investigated by carrying out thermal annealing tests of deformed materials in combination with electron-backscatterdiffraction- based microstructural analysis. Prior to thermal annealing, the material was compressed to a true strain of 0.22 along three directions to introduce different twinning characteristics. Our results showed that deformation twins substantially promoted the static recrystallization process by deepening the microstructural inhomogeneity induced by the formation of twin boundaries and twinning-induced crystallographic lattice reorientation. Twin morphology was also observed to be important because it influenced the extent of microstructural inhomogeneity. Intersecting twin morphology, caused by the activation of multiple twin variants, was more effective than parallel twin morphology, caused by the activation of a single twin variant (or a twin variant pair), because it gave rise to more twin boundaries, more twin boundary junctions (intersections, triple junctions, etc.), and greater in-grain crystallographic orientation spread.

  9. Effect of Rest Periods on Fatigue of High-Purity Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, J. W.; Lemaitre, J.; Valluri, S. R.

    1958-01-01

    The effect of rest periods on the fatigue life of high-purity aluminum was investigated under two conditions. In one the specimens were tested at elevated temperatures and the rest periods were given at room temperature; in the second the specimens were tested at room temperature and the rest periods were given at elevated temperature. The results obtained indicated that the increase of life was negligible in the first condition, but an increase of life may be obtained in the second. In order to check this increase in fatigue life a second series of tests has been carried out on a different lot of specimens and again an increase in life was found. This increase of life appeared to be from 30 to 60 percent from the average of the results of 20 tests for each test condition.

  10. Annealing Behavior at Triple Junctions in High-Purity Aluminum After Slight Cold Rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Wenhong; Wang, Weiguo; Fang, Xiaoying; Qin, Congxiang

    2017-02-01

    High-purity polycrystalline aluminum samples with a typical grain size of approximately 30 μm were slightly cold-rolled with a thickness reduction of 15%, and then, off-line in situ electron backscatter diffraction was used to identify the annealing behavior at triple junctions during annealing at 400 °C. The results show that recrystallization nuclei are developed at some triple junctions during annealing. High-angle grain boundaries migrate from harder grains to softer grains at the triple junctions leading to the formation of nuclei. All such nuclei show Σ3 orientation relationships with the parent grains, and the bounded Σ3 boundaries are found to be incoherent. During further annealing, these nuclei are consumed by other growing grains, indicating that their presence is just a release of the strain concentration at the triple junctions.

  11. Efficient single photon emission from a high-purity hexagonal boron nitride crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, L. J.; Pelini, T.; Waselowski, V.; Maze, J. R.; Gil, B.; Cassabois, G.; Jacques, V.

    2016-09-01

    Among a variety of layered materials used as building blocks in van der Waals heterostructures, hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) appears as an ideal platform for hosting optically active defects owing to its large band gap (˜6 eV ). Here we study the optical response of a high-purity hBN crystal under green laser illumination. By means of photon correlation measurements, we identify individual defects emitting a highly photostable fluorescence under ambient conditions. A detailed analysis of the photophysical properties reveals a high quantum efficiency of the radiative transition, leading to a single photon source with very high brightness (˜4 ×106 counts s-1). These results illustrate how the wide range of applications offered by hBN could be further extended to photonic-based quantum information science and metrology.

  12. In-growth of an electrically active defect in high-purity silicon after proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nylandsted Larsen, A.; Juul Pedersen, H.; Christian Petersen, M.; Privitera, V.; Gurimskaya, Y.; Mesli, A.

    2013-12-14

    Defect-related energy levels in the lower half of the band gap of silicon have been studied with transient-capacitance techniques in high-purity, carbon and oxygen lean, plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition grown, n-and p-type silicon layers after 2-MeV proton irradiations at temperatures at or just below room temperature. The in-growth of a distinct line in deep-level transient spectroscopy spectra, corresponding to a level in the band gap at E{sub V} + 0.357 eV where E{sub V} is the energy of the valence band edge, takes place for anneal temperatures at around room temperature with an activation energy of 0.95 ± 0.08 eV. The line disappears at an anneal temperature of around 450 K. The corresponding defect is demonstrated not to contain boron, carbon, oxygen, or phosphorus. Possible defect candidates are discussed.

  13. The relationship between induction time for pitting and pitting potential for high purity aluminum.

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Frederick Douglas; Vandenavyle, Justin J.; Martinez, Michael A.

    2003-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if a distribution of pit induction times (from potentiostatic experiments) could be used to predict a distribution of pitting potentials (from potentiodynamic experiments) for high-purity aluminum. Pit induction times were measured for 99.99 Al in 50 mM NaCl at potentials of -0.35, -0.3, -0.25, and -0.2 V vs. saturated calomel electrode. Analysis of the data showed that the pit germination rate generally was an exponential function of the applied potential; however, a subset of the germination rate data appeared to be mostly potential insensitive. The germination rate behavior was used as an input into a mathematical relationship that provided a prediction of pitting potential distribution. Good general agreement was found between the predicted distribution and an experimentally determined pitting potential distribution, suggesting that the relationships presented here provide a suitable means for quantitatively describing pit germination rate.

  14. High purity polyimide analysis by solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Rafael F.; Carvalho, Gabriel S.; Duarte, Fabio A.; Bolzan, Rodrigo C.; Flores, Erico M. M.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, Cr, Cu, Mn, Na and Ni were determined in high purity polyimides (99.5%) by solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-GFAAS) using Zeeman effect background correction system with variable magnetic field, making possible the simultaneous measurement at high or low sensitivity. The following analytical parameters were evaluated: pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, feasibility of calibration with aqueous solution, linear calibration range, sample mass range and the use of chemical modifier. Calibration with aqueous standard solutions was feasible for all analytes. No under or overestimated results were observed and up to 10 mg sample could be introduced on the platform for the determination of Cr, Cu, Mn, Na and Ni. The relative standard deviation ranged from 3 to 20%. The limits of detection (LODs) achieved using the high sensitivity mode were as low as 7.0, 2.5, 1.7, 17 and 0.12 ng g- 1 for Cr, Cu, Mn, Na and Ni, respectively. No addition of chemical modifier was necessary, except for Mn determination where Pd was required. The accuracy was evaluated by analyte spike and by comparison of the results with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after microwave-assisted digestion in a single reaction chamber system and also by neutron activation analysis. No difference among the results obtained by SS-GFAAS and those obtained by alternative analytical methods using independent techniques. SS-GFAAS method showed some advantages, such as the determination of metallic contaminants in high purity polyimides with practically no sample preparation, very low LODs, calibration with aqueous standards and determination in a wide range of concentration.

  15. Preparation and characterization of (10)B boric acid with high purity for nuclear industry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijiang; Liu, Tianyu; Xu, Jiao

    2016-01-01

    Boric acid is often added into coolant as neutron capture agent for pressurized water reactor, whose amount is influenced by its abundance and purity. Therefore, the preparation of enriched (10)B boric acid with high purity is beneficial to nuclear industry. (10)B is also used in developing tumor-specific boronated drugs in boron neutron capture therapy. The boronated drug can be administered to patient intravenously, intratumorally, or deposited at tumor site in surgical excision. Thus, enriched (10)B boric acid is of practical significance in the field of medicine. Self-made boron trifluoride-methanol-complex solution was selected as one of the experimental reagents, and the preparation of (10)B acid was realized by one-step reaction for the complexes with water and calcium chloride. The determination of electrical conductivity in reaction process proves that the optimum reaction time was 16-20 h. Furthermore, the effect of reaction time, ratio of calcium chloride to complex as well as the amount of water on the purity and yield of boric acid was investigated. Finally, the optimum reaction time was 20 h, the optimal solid-liquid ratio (molar ratio) was 3:1, and the amount of water was 1 L of deionized water for each mol of the complex. H2O2 was added in the reaction process to remove Fe(2+). After recrystallization, IR spectra of (10)B boric acid was measured and compared with standard to verify the product of boric acid. The feasibility of the preparation method was determined by the detection of XRD of boric acid. To observe the morphology by polarizing microscope, crystal structure was obtained. The purity of the final product is 99.95 %, and the yield is 96.47 %. The ion concentration of boric acid accords with the national standard of high purity, which was determined by ICP.

  16. Recycling of high purity selenium from CIGS solar cell waste materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafsson, Anna M.K. Foreman, Mark R.StJ.; Ekberg, Christian

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A new method for recycling of selenium from CIGS solar cell materials is presented. • Separation of selenium as selenium dioxide after heating in oxygen atmosphere. • Complete selenium separation after oxidation of <63 μm particles at 800 °C for 1 h. • After reduction of selenium dioxide the selenium purity was higher than 99.999 wt%. - Abstract: Copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) is a promising material in thin film solar cell production. To make CIGS solar cells more competitive, both economically and environmentally, in comparison to other energy sources, methods for recycling are needed. In addition to the generally high price of the material, significant amounts of the metals are lost in the manufacturing process. The feasibility of recycling selenium from CIGS through oxidation at elevated temperatures was therefore examined. During oxidation gaseous selenium dioxide was formed and could be separated from the other elements, which remained in solid state. Upon cooling, the selenium dioxide sublimes and can be collected as crystals. After oxidation for 1 h at 800 °C all of the selenium was separated from the CIGS material. Two different reduction methods for reduction of the selenium dioxide to selenium were tested. In the first reduction method an organic molecule was used as the reducing agent in a Riley reaction. In the second reduction method sulphur dioxide gas was used. Both methods resulted in high purity selenium. This proves that the studied selenium separation method could be the first step in a recycling process aimed at the complete separation and recovery of high purity elements from CIGS.

  17. Generation of high-purity human ventral midbrain dopaminergic progenitors for in vitro maturation and intracerebral transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nolbrant, Sara; Heuer, Andreas; Parmar, Malin; Kirkeby, Agnete

    2017-09-01

    Generation of precisely patterned neural cells from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) is instrumental in developing disease models and stem cell therapies. Here, we provide a detailed 16-d protocol for obtaining high-purity ventral midbrain (VM) dopamine (DA) progenitors for intracerebral transplantation into animal models and for in vitro maturation into neurons. We have successfully transplanted such cells into the rat; however, in principle, the cells can be used for transplantation into any animal model, and the protocol is designed to also be compatible with clinical transplantation into humans. We show how to precisely set the balance of patterning factors to obtain specifically the caudal VM progenitors that give rise to DA-rich grafts. By specifying how to perform quality control (QC), troubleshooting and adaptation of the procedure, this protocol will facilitate implementation in different laboratories and with a variety of hPSC lines. To facilitate reproducibility of experiments and enable shipping of cells between centers, we present a method for cryopreservation of the progenitors for subsequent direct transplantation or terminal differentiation into DA neurons. This protocol is free of xeno-derived products and can be performed under good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions.

  18. Evolutionary pattern of mutation in the factor IX genes of great apes: How does it compare to the pattern of recent germline mutation in patients with hemophilia B?

    SciTech Connect

    Grouse, L.H.; Ketterling, R.P.; Sommer, S.S.

    1994-09-01

    Most mutations causing hemophilia B have arisen within the past 150 years. By correcting for multiple biases, the underlying rates of spontaneous germline mutation have been estimated in the factor IX gene. From these rates, an underlying pattern of mutation has emerged. To determine if this pattern compares to a underlying pattern found in the great apes, sequence changes were determined in intronic regions of the factor IX gene. The following species were studied: Gorilla gorilla, Pan troglodytes (chimpanzee), Pongo pygmacus (orangutan) and Homo sapiens. Intronic sequences at least 200 bp from a splice junction were randomly chosen, amplified by cross-species PCR, and sequenced. These regions are expected to be subject to little if any selective pressure. Early diverged species of Old World monkeys were also studied to help determine the direction of mutational changes. A total of 62 sequence changes were observed. Initial data suggest that the average pattern since evolution of the great apes has a paucity of transitions at CpG dinucleotides and an excess of microinsertions to microdeletions when compared to the pattern observed in humans during the past 150 years (p<.05). A larger study is in progress to confirm these results.

  19. Influence of strain rate and temperature on the structure/property behavior of high-purity titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, G.T. III

    1997-05-01

    The effect of strain rate, temperature, grain size, and texture on the substructure and mechanical response of high-purity polycrystalline titanium is presented. The compressive stress-strain response of 20 and 240 {mu}m grain size high-purity Ti was found to depend on both the applied strain rate; 0.001 {le} {epsilon} {le} 7500 s{sup -1}, and the test temperature; 77 {le} T {le} 873 K. The rate of strain hardening in Ti is seen to increase with increasing strain rate. The substructure of high-purity Ti deformed at high-strain-rate or quasi-statically at 77K displayed a higher incidence of deformation twinning than during quasi-static deformation at 298K.

  20. Preparation & characterization of high purity Cu2 ZnSn(SxSe1-x)4 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negash, Bethlehem G.

    Research in thin film solar cells applies novel techniques to synthesize cost effective and highly efficient absorber materials in order to generate electricity directly from solar energy. Of these materials, copper zinc tin sulfoselenide (Cu2ZnSn(SxSe1-x) 4) nanoparticles have shown great promise in solar cell applications due to optimal material properties as well as low cost & relative abundance of materials.1,2 Sulfoselenide nanoparticles have also a broader impact in other industries including electronics3, LED 4, and biomedical research5. Of the many routes of manufacturing these class of semiconductors, colloidal synthesis of Cu 2ZnSn(SxSe1-x)4 offers a scalable, low cost and high-throughput route for manufacturing high efficiency thin-film solar cells. Hydrazine processed Cu2ZnSn(SxSe1-x )4 devices have reached a record power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 12.6%, much higher than the 9.6% reported for physical vapor deposition (PVD) systems.6,7. Despite high efficiencies, wet synthesis of nanoparticles, however, is made more complicated in multi-element, quaternary and quinary systems such as copper zinc tin sulfoselenide (CZTSSe) and copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGSe). One major disadvantage in these systems is growth of the desired quaternary or quinary phase in competition with unwanted binary and ternary phases with low energy of formation.8,9 Moreover, various reaction parameters such as reaction time, temperature, and choice of ligand also affect, chemical as well as physical properties of resulting nanoparticles. Understanding of the formation mechanisms of the particles is necessary in order to address some of these challenges in wet synthesis of CZTSSe nanoparticles. In this study, we investigate synthesis conditions & reaction parameters which yield high purity Cu2ZnSn(SxSe1-x) 4 nanoparticles as well as attempt to understand the growth mechanism of these nanoparticles. This was achieved by manipulating anion precursor preparation routes as

  1. Sequence-specific sup 1 H NMR assignments, secondary structure, and location of the calcium binding site in the first epidermal growth factor like domain of blood coagulation factor IX

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.H.; Cheng, H.; Sweeney, W.V. ); Pardi, A. ); Tam, J.P. )

    1991-07-30

    Factor IX is a blood clotting protein that contains three regions, including a {gamma}-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain, two tandemly connected epidermal growth factor like (EGF-like) domains, and a serine protease region. The protein exhibits a high-affinity calcium binding site in the first EGF0like domain, in addition to calcium binding in the Gla domain. The first EGF-like domain, factor IX (45-87), has been synthesized. Sequence-specific resonance assignment of the peptide has been made by using 2D NMR techniques, and its secondary structure has been determined. The protein is found to have two antiparallel {beta}-sheets, and preliminary distance geometry calculations indicate that the protein has two domains, separated by Trp{sup 28}, with the overall structure being similar to that of EGF. An NMR investigation of the calcium-bound first EGF-like domain indicates the presence and location of a calcium binding site involving residues on both strands of one of the {beta}-sheets as well as the N-terminal region of the peptide. These results suggest that calcium binding in the first EGF-like domain could induce long-range (possibly interdomain) conformational changes in factor IX, rather than causing structural alterations in the EGF-like domain itself.

  2. Multidimensional Study on Spall Behavior of High-Purity Copper Under Sliding Detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Peng, Zhiqiang; Guo, Zhaoliang; Luo, Shuhong; Tang, Tiegang; Hu, Haibo; Zhang, Qingming

    2015-09-01

    The spall behaviors of high-purity copper samples with different heat treatment histories were investigated using optical microscopy and X-ray computer tomography (XRCT). The spall samples were obtained by sliding detonation experiments at low pressures (2 to 4 GPa). It was found that the spall planes created by sliding detonation in this experiment are similar to the spall planes created by plate impact test, except for more secondary damage residual around the main spall plane. The results of damage degree, the shape, and the distributions of voids obtained by the means of metallography (2D) and XRCT (3D) statistics were consistent. For similar microstructure, the maximum damage degree and damage zone width increase with increasing shock stress. Whereas the ranges of voids distribution parallel to the shock stress direction decreases with the increasing of shock stress. For the shock stress is similar, the shape of voids in annealed samples are closed to spheres, their mean flatness is 0.51. The voids in samples with thermo-mechanical treatment histories are sheet like with mean flatness 0.16. The difference in grain size (40 and 9 μm) may be the main reason of such difference.

  3. Production of Ultrafine, High-purity Ceramic Powders Using the US Bureau of Mines Developed Turbomill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyer, Jesse L.

    1993-01-01

    Turbomilling, an innovative grinding technology developed by the U.S. Bureau of Mines in the early 1960's for delaminating filler-grade kaolinitic clays, has been expanded into the areas of particle size reduction, material mixing, and process reaction kinetics. The turbomill, originally called an attrition grinder, has been used for particle size reduction of many minerals, including natural and synthetic mica, pyrophyllite, talc, and marble. In recent years, an all-polymer version of the turbomill has been used to produce ultrafine, high-purity, advanced ceramic powders such as SiC, Si3N4, TiB2, and ZrO2. In addition to particle size reduction, the turbomill has been used to produce intimate mixtures of high surface area powders and whiskers. Raw materials, TiN, AlN, and Al2O3, used to produce a titanium nitride/aluminum oxynitride (TiN/AlON) composite, were mixed in the turbomill, resulting in strength increases over samples prepared by dry ball milling. Using the turbomill as a leach vessel, it was found that 90.4 pct of the copper was extracted from the chalcopyrite during a 4-hour leach test in ferric sulfate versus conventional processing which involves either roasting of the ore for Cu recovery or leaching of the ore for several days.

  4. Effectiveness of a high purity chlorine dioxide solution in eliminating intracanal Enterococcus faecalis biofilm.

    PubMed

    Herczegh, Anna; Ghidan, Agoston; Friedreich, Dóra; Gyurkovics, Milán; Bendő, Zsolt; Lohinai, Zsolt

    2013-03-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) solution in comparison to sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) in the elimination of intracanal Enterococcus faecalis biofilm. Extracted human teeth were inoculated with E. faecalis. After preparation the canals were irrigated with ClO2, NaOCl, CHX or physiologic saline for control. Two and five days later bacterial samples were collected and streaked onto Columbia agar. CFU/mL were counted. The canal walls were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The gas phase was investigated in an upside down Petri dish where E. faecalis was inoculated onto blood agar. The irrigants were placed on absorbent paper into the cover. Bacteria were detectable in the control group, but not in any of the irrigants groups. There was a massive reinfection 2 or 5 days after irrigation in the control group. The lowest reinfection was found after the ClO2 treatment. These findings were confirmed by SEM images. We observed an antibacterial effect of ClO2 and NaOCl gas phases on E. faecalis growth, but not of CHX. ClO2 eliminates intracanal biofilm and keeps canal nearly free from bacteria. We suggest the use of high purity ClO2 as a root canal irrigant in clinical practice.

  5. High-energy proton radiation damage of high-purity germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pehl, R. H.; Varnell, L. S.; Metzger, A. E.

    1978-01-01

    Quantitative studies of radiation damage in high-purity germanium gamma-ray detectors due to high-energy charged particles have been carried out; two 1.0 cm thick planar detectors were irradiated by 6 GeV/c protons. Under proton bombardment, degradation in the energy resolution was found to begin below 7 x 10 to the 7th protons/sq cm and increased proportionately in both detectors until the experiment was terminated at a total flux of 5.7 x 10 to the 8th protons/sq cm, equivalent to about a six year exposure to cosmic-ray protons in space. At the end of the irradiation, the FWHM resolution measured at 1332 keV stood at 8.5 and 13.6 keV, with both detectors of only marginal utility as a spectrometer due to the severe tailing caused by charge trapping. Annealing these detectors after proton damage was found to be much easier than after neutron damage.

  6. Influence of Ta content in high purity niobium on cavity performance: preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, Tadeu; Klinkenberg, Christian; Kneisel, Peter; Myneni, Ganapati; Singer, Waldemar; Singer, Xenia; Proch, Dieter

    2004-08-01

    In a previous paper [1] a program for reducing the costs of high purity niobium was outlined. This program was based on the fact that niobium prices could be reduced, if a higher content of Ta, which does not significantly affect the RRR-value, could be tolerated for high performance cavities. This contribution reports on the execution of this program and its present status. Four ingots with different Ta contents have been melted and transformed into sheets. In each manufacturing step material quality has been monitored, using chemical analysis, thermal conductivity measurements and evaluation of mechanical properties. The niobium sheets have been scanned for defects by an eddy current device. Two single cell cavities (CEBAF geometry) have been fabricated from each of three ingots, with Ta concentrations of 150, 600 and 1300 wtppm. A series of tests have been performed on each cavity with increasing amount of material removal. This contribution reports on the test results and gives an analysis of the data.

  7. High-purity semi-insulating 4H-SiC for microwave device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenny, J. R.; Malta, D. P.; Müller, St G.; Powell, A. R.; Tsvetkov, V. F.; Hobgood, H. Mcd; Glass, R. C.; Carter, C. H., Jr.

    2003-05-01

    High-purity, semi-insulating (HPSI) 4H-SiC crystals with diameters up to 75 mm have been grown by the seeded sublimation technique without the intentional introduction of elemental deep-level dopants, such as vanadium. Wafers cut from these crystals exhibit homogeneous activation energies near mid gap and thermally stable semi-insulating (SI) behavior (>109 ohm-cm) throughout device processing. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy, deep-level transient spectroscopy, optical admittance spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance data suggest that the SI behavior originates from several deep levels associated with intrinsic point defects. Micropipe densities in HPSI substrates have been demonstrated to be as low as 10 cm-2 in 2-in. substrates, and the room-temperature thermal conductivity of this material is near the theoretical maximum of 5 W/cm·K for 4H-SiC. Devices fabricated on these HPSI wafers do not exhibit any substrate related back-gating effects and have power densities as high as 5.2 W/mm with 63% power added efficiency.

  8. Water-Assisted Preparation of High-Purity Semiconducting (14,4) Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng; Wang, Xiao; Si, Jia; Zhao, Xiulan; Qi, Kuo; Jin, Chuanhong; Zhang, Zeyao; Li, Meihui; Zhang, Daqi; Yang, Juan; Zhang, Zhiyong; Xu, Zhi; Peng, Lian-Mao; Bai, Xuedong; Li, Yan

    2017-01-24

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWNTs) with diameters of 1.0-1.5 nm (with similar bandgap to crystalline silicon) are highly desired for nanoelectronics. Up to date, the highest reported content of s-SWNTs as-grown is ∼97%, which is still far below the daunting requirements of high-end applications. Herein, we report a feasible and green pathway to use H2O vapor to modulate the structure of the intermetallic W6Co7 nanocrystals. By using the resultant W6Co7 nanocatalysts with a high percentage of (1 0 10) planes as structural templates, we realized the direct growth of s-SWNT with the purity of ∼99%, in which ∼97% is (14,4) tubes (diameter 1.29 nm). H2O can also act as an environmentally friendly and facile etchant for eliminating metallic SWNTs, and the content of s-SWNTs was further improved to 99.8% and (14,4) tubes to 98.6%. High purity s-SWNTs with even bandgap determined by their uniform structure can be used for the exquisite applications in different fields.

  9. Optimization of extraction of high purity all-trans-lycopene from tomato pulp waste.

    PubMed

    Poojary, Mahesha M; Passamonti, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to optimize the extraction of pure all-trans-lycopene from the pulp fractions of tomato processing waste. A full factorial design (FFD) consisting of four independent variables including extraction temperature (30-50 °C), time (1-60 min), percentage of acetone in n-hexane (25-75%, v/v) and solvent volume (10-30 ml) was used to investigate the effects of process variables on the extraction. The absolute amount of lycopene present in the pulp waste was found to be 0.038 mg/g. The optimal conditions for extraction were as follows: extraction temperature 20 °C, time 40 min, a solvent composition of 25% acetone in n-hexane (v/v) and solvent volume 40 ml. Under these conditions, the maximal recovery of lycopene was 94.7%. The HPLC-DAD analysis demonstrated that, lycopene was obtained in the all-trans-configuration at a very high purity grade of 98.3% while the amount of cis-isomers and other carotenoids were limited.

  10. Interaction between a high purity magnesium surface and PCL and PLA coatings during dynamic degradation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Song, Yang; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Li, Jianan; Zhao, Changli; Zhang, Xiaonong

    2011-04-01

    In this study, polycaprolactone (PCL) and polylactic acid (PLA) coatings were prepared on the surface of high purity magnesium (HPMs), respectively, and electrochemical and dynamic degradation tests were used to investigate the degradation behaviors of these polymer-coated HPMs. The experimental results indicated that two uniform and smooth polymer films with thicknesses between 15 and 20 µm were successfully prepared on the HPMs. Electrochemical tests showed that both PCL-coated and PLA-coated HPMs had higher free corrosion potentials (E(corr)) and smaller corrosion currents (I(corr)) in the modified simulated body fluid (m-SBF) at 37 °C, compared to those of the uncoated HPMs. Dynamic degradation tests simulating the flow conditions in coronary arteries were carried out on a specific test platform. The weight of the specimens and the pH over the tests were recorded to characterize the corrosion performance of those samples. The surfaces of the specimens after the dynamic degradation tests were also examined. The data implied that there was a special interaction between HPM and its polymer coatings during the dynamic degradation tests, which undermined the corrosion resistance of the coated HPMs. A model was proposed to illustrate the interaction between the polymer coatings and HPM. This study also suggested that this reciprocity may also exist on the implanted magnesium stents coated with biodegradable polymers, which is a potential obstacle for the further development of drug-eluting magnesium stents.

  11. Improving axion detection sensitivity in high purity germanium detector based experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenqin; Elliott, Steven

    2015-04-01

    Thanks to their excellent energy resolution and low energy threshold, high purity germanium (HPGe) crystals are widely used in low background experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay, e.g. the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and the GERDA experiments, and low mass dark matter, e.g. the CDMS and the EDELWEISS experiments. A particularly interesting candidate for low mass dark matter is the axion, which arises from the Peccei-Quinn solution to the strong CP problem and has been searched for in many experiments. Due to axion-photon coupling, the postulated solar axions could coherently convert to photons via the Primakeoff effect in periodic crystal lattices, such as those found in HPGe crystals. The conversion rate depends on the angle between axions and crystal lattices, so the knowledge of HPGe crystal axis is important. In this talk, we will present our efforts to improve the HPGe experimental sensitivity to axions by considering the axis orientations in multiple HPGe crystals simultaneously. We acknowledge the support of the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program.

  12. High-energy proton radiation damage of high-purity germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pehl, R. H.; Varnell, L. S.; Metzger, A. E.

    1978-01-01

    Quantitative studies of radiation damage in high-purity germanium gamma-ray detectors due to high-energy charged particles have been carried out; two 1.0 cm thick planar detectors were irradiated by 6 GeV/c protons. Under proton bombardment, degradation in the energy resolution was found to begin below 7 x 10 to the 7th protons/sq cm and increased proportionately in both detectors until the experiment was terminated at a total flux of 5.7 x 10 to the 8th protons/sq cm, equivalent to about a six year exposure to cosmic-ray protons in space. At the end of the irradiation, the FWHM resolution measured at 1332 keV stood at 8.5 and 13.6 keV, with both detectors of only marginal utility as a spectrometer due to the severe tailing caused by charge trapping. Annealing these detectors after proton damage was found to be much easier than after neutron damage.

  13. A solvent-extraction module for cyclotron production of high-purity technetium-99m.

    PubMed

    Martini, Petra; Boschi, Alessandra; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Uccelli, Licia; Pasquali, Micòl; Duatti, Adriano; Pupillo, Gaia; Marengo, Mario; Loriggiola, Massimo; Esposito, Juan

    2016-12-01

    The design and fabrication of a fully-automated, remotely controlled module for the extraction and purification of technetium-99m (Tc-99m), produced by proton bombardment of enriched Mo-100 molybdenum metallic targets in a low-energy medical cyclotron, is here described. After dissolution of the irradiated solid target in hydrogen peroxide, Tc-99m was obtained under the chemical form of (99m)TcO4(-), in high radionuclidic and radiochemical purity, by solvent extraction with methyl ethyl ketone (MEK). The extraction process was accomplished inside a glass column-shaped vial especially designed to allow for an easy automation of the whole procedure. Recovery yields were always >90% of the loaded activity. The final pertechnetate saline solution Na(99m)TcO4, purified using the automated module here described, is within the Pharmacopoeia quality control parameters and is therefore a valid alternative to generator-produced (99m)Tc. The resulting automated module is cost-effective and easily replicable for in-house production of high-purity Tc-99m by cyclotrons.

  14. A Comparison of Methods for Computing the Residual Resistivity Ratio of High-Purity Niobium.

    PubMed

    Splett, J D; Vecchia, D F; Goodrich, L F

    2011-01-01

    We compare methods for estimating the residual resistivity ratio (RRR) of high-purity niobium and investigate the effects of using different functional models. RRR is typically defined as the ratio of the electrical resistances measured at 273 K (the ice point) and 4.2 K (the boiling point of helium at standard atmospheric pressure). However, pure niobium is superconducting below about 9.3 K, so the low-temperature resistance is defined as the normal-state (i.e., non-superconducting state) resistance extrapolated to 4.2 K and zero magnetic field. Thus, the estimated value of RRR depends significantly on the model used for extrapolation. We examine three models for extrapolation based on temperature versus resistance, two models for extrapolation based on magnetic field versus resistance, and a new model based on the Kohler relationship that can be applied to combined temperature and field data. We also investigate the possibility of re-defining RRR so that the quantity is not dependent on extrapolation.

  15. Determination of nitrogen monoxide in high purity nitrogen gas with an atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, K.

    1985-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometric (API-MS) method was studied for the determination of residual NO in high purity N2 gas. The API-MS is very sensitive to NO, but the presence of O2 interferes with the NO measurement. Nitrogen gas in cylinders as sample gas was mixed with NO standard gas and/or O2 standard gas, and then introduced into the API-MS. The calibration curves of NO and O2 has linearity in the region of 0 - 2 ppm, but the slopes changed with every cylinder. The effect of O2 on NO+ peak was additive and proportional to O2 concentration in the range of 0 - 0.5 ppm. The increase in NO+ intensity due to O2 was (0.07 - 0.13)%/O2, 1 ppm. Determination of NO and O2 was carried out by the standard addition method to eliminate the influence of variation of slopes. The interference due to O2 was estimated from the product of the O2 concentration and the ratio of slope A to Slope B. Slope A is the change in the NO+ intensity with the O2 concentration. Slope B is the intensity with O2 concentration.

  16. 28-Day oral toxicity study in rats with high purity barley beta-glucan (Glucagel).

    PubMed

    Jonker, D; Hasselwander, O; Tervilä-Wilo, A; Tenning, P P

    2010-01-01

    Beta-glucans are glucose polymers present in cereal grains, particularly barley and oat. Consumption of these grains or concentrated beta-glucan preparations has been shown to lower blood cholesterol. The present study was conducted to assess the safety of a high purity (>75%) barley beta-glucan (Glucagel). The product was fed to Wistar rats (5/sex/group) at dietary levels of 0% (control), 1%, 5% and 10% for 28 days. Clinical and neurobehavioural observations, growth, feed and water consumption, ophthalmoscopy, haematology, clinical chemistry, urinalysis, organ weights, necropsy and histopathological examination revealed no adverse effects of Glucagel. High-dose males exhibited lower plasma cholesterol and phospholipids levels and a higher plasma urea level. These slight changes were considered of no toxicological significance. Full and empty caecum weights were increased in mid- and high-dose males. This caecal enlargement was a physiological response to the consumption of a high amount of indigestible carbohydrate and considered of no toxicological concern. In conclusion, feeding Glucagel at dietary levels up to 10% for 28 days was tolerated without any signs of toxicity. This dietary level was equivalent to 7.7 g Glucagel (5.8 g beta-glucan)/kg body weight/day in male rats and 7.8 g Glucagel (5.9 g beta-glucan)/kg body weight/day in female rats. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. High-purity circular RNA isolation method (RPAD) reveals vast collection of intronic circRNAs

    PubMed Central

    De, Supriyo; Grammatikakis, Ioannis; Munk, Rachel; Yang, Xiaoling; Piao, Yulan; Dudekula, Dawood B.; Gorospe, Myriam

    2017-01-01

    Abstract High-throughput RNA sequencing methods coupled with specialized bioinformatic analyses have recently uncovered tens of thousands of unique circular (circ)RNAs, but their complete sequences, genes of origin and functions are largely unknown. Given that circRNAs lack free ends and are thus relatively stable, their association with microRNAs (miRNAs) and RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) can influence gene expression programs. While exoribonuclease treatment is widely used to degrade linear RNAs and enrich circRNAs in RNA samples, it does not efficiently eliminate all linear RNAs. Here, we describe a novel method for the isolation of highly pure circRNA populations involving RNase R treatment followed by Polyadenylation and poly(A)+ RNA Depletion (RPAD), which removes linear RNA to near completion. High-throughput sequencing of RNA prepared using RPAD from human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells and mouse C2C12 myoblasts led to two surprising discoveries: (i) many exonic circRNA (EcircRNA) isoforms share an identical backsplice sequence but have different body sizes and sequences, and (ii) thousands of novel intronic circular RNAs (IcircRNAs) are expressed in cells. In sum, isolating high-purity circRNAs using the RPAD method can enable quantitative and qualitative analyses of circRNA types and sequence composition, paving the way for the elucidation of circRNA functions. PMID:28444238

  18. Simulation study comparing high-purity germanium and cadmium zinc telluride detectors for breast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, DL; Peterson, TE

    2014-01-01

    We conducted simulations to compare the potential imaging performance for breast cancer detection with High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) systems with 1% and 3.8% energy resolution at 140 keV, respectively. Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation package, we modelled both 5 mm-thick CZT and 10 mm-thick HPGe detectors with the same parallel-hole collimator for the imaging of a breast/torso phantom. Simulated energy spectra were generated, and planar images were created for various energy windows around the 140-keV photopeak. Relative sensitivity and scatter and the torso fractions were calculated along with tumour contrast and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Simulations showed that utilizing a ±1.25% energy window with an HPGe system better suppressed torso background and small-angle scattered photons than a comparable CZT system using a −5%/+10% energy window. Both systems provided statistically similar contrast and SNR, with HPGe providing higher relative sensitivity. Lowering the counts of HPGe images to match CZT count density still yielded equivalent contrast between HPGe and CZT. Thus, an HPGe system may provide equivalent breast imaging capability at lower injected radioactivity levels when acquiring for equal imaging time. PMID:25360792

  19. Simulation study comparing high-purity germanium and cadmium zinc telluride detectors for breast imaging.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D L; Peterson, T E

    2014-11-21

    We conducted simulations to compare the potential imaging performance for breast cancer detection with High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) systems with 1% and 3.8% energy resolution at 140 keV, respectively. Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation package, we modelled both 5 mm-thick CZT and 10 mm-thick HPGe detectors with the same parallel-hole collimator for the imaging of a breast/torso phantom. Simulated energy spectra were generated, and planar images were created for various energy windows around the 140 keV photopeak. Relative sensitivity and scatter and the torso fractions were calculated along with tumour contrast and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Simulations showed that utilizing a ±1.25% energy window with an HPGe system better suppressed torso background and small-angle scattered photons than a comparable CZT system using a -5%/+10% energy window. Both systems provided statistically similar contrast and SNR, with HPGe providing higher relative sensitivity. Lowering the counts of HPGe images to match CZT count density still yielded equivalent contrast between HPGe and CZT. Thus, an HPGe system may provide equivalent breast imaging capability at lower injected radioactivity levels when acquiring for equal imaging time.

  20. Growth, characterisation and surface cleaning procedures for high-purity tungsten single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortenraad, R.; Ermolov, S. N.; Semenov, V. N.; Denier van der Gon, A. W.; Glebovsky, V. G.; Bozhko, S. I.; Brongersma, H. H.

    2001-01-01

    High-purity tungsten (W) single crystals have been prepared by the electron-beam floating zone melting technique. The structural quality of these crystals was subsequently improved by the application of a strain-annealing technique. X-ray diffraction methods revealed the near-perfect crystallographic structure, and confirmed the absence of first- and second-order subgrains. The observation of the anomalous transmission of X-rays through the thick crystals, also referred to as the Borrmann effect, further substantiated the structural perfection of the crystals. Well-ordered clean W surfaces free from all contaminants, were obtained by a two-step heating procedure. First, the crystals were heated to 1500 K in an oxygen atmosphere for the removal of the carbon impurities. Subsequent flashing to high temperatures (approximately 2500 K) removed the excess oxygen remaining on the surface from the carbon-removal procedure. Low-energy ion scattering and Auger electron spectroscopy confirmed that the cleaning procedures removed all impurities and that the crystal faces expose only tungsten in the outermost atomic layers. Low-energy electron diffraction patterns showed unreconstructed (1×1) surfaces for the main crystallographic orientations.

  1. Microwave photoconductivity decay characterization of high-purity 4H-SiC substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R. J.; Borrego, J. M.; Gutmann, R. J.; Jenny, J. R.; Malta, D. P.; Hobgood, H. McD.; Carter, C. H.

    2007-07-01

    A microwave photoconductivity decay (MPCD) technique, which probes conductivity change in wafers in response to either an above-band-gap or below-band-gap laser pulse, has been used to characterize recombination lifetime in high-purity 4H-SiC substrates produced with three different anneal processes. The above-band-gap (266nm) decay times vary from ˜10ns to tens of microseconds in the 4H-SiC substrates depending on the wafer growth parameters. Wafers produced using the three processes A (as-grown), B (annealed at 2000°C), and C (annealed at 2600°C) have decay times of 10-20ns, 50-500ns, and tens of microseconds, respectively. The differences in decay times are attributed to low, medium, and high densities of recombination centers in process C, B, and A wafers, respectively. The MPCD results correlate with other characterization results such as deep level transient spectroscopy, which also showed that the 2600°C anneal process significantly reduces defect densities, resulting in the enhanced recombination lifetimes. Modeling and one-dimensional simulations indicate a trapping center closer to the conduction band results in a longer MPCD decay transient, but such a trapping based model for the enhanced lifetimes is not compatible with the wide range of experimental characterization results described in this work, which indicate an annealing out of recombination centers at 2600°C.

  2. Influence of Ta content in high purity niobium on cavity performance

    SciTech Connect

    P. Kneisel; G. Ciovati; G. R. Myneni; W. Singer; X. Singer; D. Proch; T. Carneiro

    2005-05-01

    In a previous paper [1] we have reported about initial tests of single cell 1500 MHz cavities made from high purity niobium with three different Ta contents of 160 ppm , {approx}600 ppm and {approx}1400 ppm. These cavities had been treated by buffered chemical polishing several times and 100 {micro}m, 200 {micro}m and 300 {micro}m of material had been removed from the surfaces. This contribution reports about subsequent tests following post purification heat treatments with Ti and ''in situ'' baking. As a result, all cavities exhibited increased quench fields due to the improved thermal conductivity after the heat treatment. After the ''in situ'' baking at 120 C for {approx} 40 hrs the always present Q-drop at high fields disappeared and further improvements in accelerating gradient could be realized. Gradients as high as E{sub acc} = 35 MV/m were achieved and there were no clear indications that the cavity performance was influenced by the Ta content in the material. A multi-cell cavity from the high Ta content material has been fabricated and initial results are reported.

  3. In vivo recovery with products of very high purity--assay discrepancies.

    PubMed

    Lusher, J M; Hillman-Wiseman, C; Hurst, D

    1998-07-01

    In view of reports of FVIII assay discrepancies in post-infusion plasma samples depending on methods used, we compared FVIII results run by each of four different methods following infusion of rFVIII (Kogenate). Nine persons with haemophilia A were infused with each of two lots of product. Plasma samples were obtained at baseline, and at 10 min, 30 min, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 14, 30 and 48 h post-infusion for measurement of FVIII. FVIII assay methods were chromogenic, and one-stage APTT using three different types of activators: micronized, silica, ellagic acid, and kaolin. The same reference plasma standard was used throughout. Results demonstrated a consistent difference in FVIII values, with chromogenic assays being considerably higher than those run by one-stage assays. The discrepancy was greatest when kaolin was the activator. These results point out the problems in attempting to determine the "correct" FVIII level in patient plasma samples following infusion of high purity FVIII preparations. Potential "pitfalls" include the standard used for defining product potency, the methods, reagents, instrumentation and standards used in assaying plasma samples and, in some instances, the characteristics of the product itself. This situation has considerable cost implications, potential impact on patient care, and makes it difficult to compare results between laboratories.

  4. High-purity propionate production from glycerol in mixed culture fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Wang, Ting; Shen, Nan; Zhang, Fang; Zeng, Raymond J

    2016-11-01

    High-purity propionate production from glycerol in mixed culture fermentation (MCF) induced by high ammonium concentration was investigated. Fed-batch experiments revealed that higher ammonium concentration (>2.9g/L) had simultaneous negative effects on acetate and propionate degradation. Propionate production and yield was up to 22.6g/L and 0.45g COD/g COD glycerol, respectively, with a purity of 96%. Sequential batch experiments demonstrated that the yields of propionate were 0.3±0.05, 0.32±0.01, and 0.34±0.03g COD/g COD at a glycerol concentration of 2.78, 4.38, and 5.56g/L, respectively, and the purity of propionate was 91-100%. Microbial community analysis showed that the phylum Firmicutes dominated the bacterial community at different glycerol concentrations. However, the Methanosaeta population decreased from 46% to 6% when glycerol concentration increased from 2.78 to 5.56g/L, resulting in lower acetate degradation rate. Thus, the present study might provide an alternative option for the production of propionate from glycerol via MCF.

  5. High purity isolation and quantification of semiconducting carbon nanotubes via column chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tulevski, George S; Franklin, Aaron D; Afzali, Ali

    2013-04-23

    The isolation of semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to ultrahigh (ppb) purity is a prerequisite for their integration into high-performance electronic devices. Here, a method employing column chromatography is used to isolate semiconducting nanotubes to 99.9% purity. The study finds that by modifying the solution preparation step, both the metallic and semiconducting fraction are resolved and elute using a single surfactant system, allowing for multiple iterations. Iterative processing enables a far more rapid path to achieving the level of purities needed for high performance computing. After a single iteration, the metallic peak in the absorption spectra is completely attenuated. Although absorption spectroscopy is typically used to characterize CNT purity, it is found to be insufficient in quantifying solutions of high purity (>98 to 99%) due to low signal-to-noise in the metallic region of ultrahigh purity solutions. Therefore, a high throughput electrical testing method was developed to quantify the degree of separation by characterizing ∼4000 field-effect transistors fabricated from the separated nanotubes after multiple iterations of the process. The separation and characterization methods described here provide a path to produce the ultrahigh purity semiconducting CNT solutions needed for high performance electronics.

  6. Determination of halogens and sulfur in high-purity polyimide by IC after digestion by MIC.

    PubMed

    Krzyzaniak, Sindy R; Santos, Rafael F; Dalla Nora, Flavia M; Cruz, Sandra M; Flores, Erico M M; Mello, Paola A

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a method for sample preparation of high-purity polyimide was proposed for halogens and sulfur determination by ion chromatography (IC) with conductivity detection and, alternatively, by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A relatively high polyimide mass (600mg) was completely digested by microwave-induced combustion (MIC) using 20bar of O2 and 50mmolL(-1) NH4OH as absorbing solution. These conditions allowed final solutions with low carbon content (<10mgL(-1)) and suitable pH for analysis by both IC and ICP-MS. The accuracy was evaluated using a certified reference material of polymer for Cl, Br and S and spike recovery experiments for all analytes. No statistical difference (t-test, 95% of confidence level) was observed between the results obtained for Cl, Br and S by IC after MIC and the certified values. In addition, spike recoveries obtained for F, Cl, Br, I and S ranged from 94% to 101%. The proposed method was suitable for polyimide decomposition for further determination of halogens and sulfur by IC and by ICP-MS (Br and I only). Taking into account the lack of methods and the difficulty of bringing this material into solution, MIC can be considered as a suitable alternative for the decomposition of polyimide for routine quality control of halogens and sulfur using IC or ICP-MS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Microstructure and helium irradiation performance of high purity tungsten processed by cold rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhe; Han, Wenjia; Yu, Jiangang; Kecskes, Laszlo; Zhu, Kaigui; Wei, Qiuming

    2016-10-01

    This work aims to investigate the effects of confined cold rolling on the evolution of microstructure, hardness, and helium irradiation performance of high purity tungsten (W). Using a final rolling temperature of 450 °C, W samples were severely deformed by confined cold rolling up to equivalent strains (εeq) of 1.6 and 3.3. Experimental results indicate that the average grain size of W specimens processed by confined cold rolling has been greatly reduced, and the rolled W samples with εeq ∼3.3 do not show an "ideal texture" of (001)[110] which is the expected texture of bcc metals processed by conventional cold rolling. The irradiation resistance against 60 keV He+ ions with up to a dose of 1.5 × 1022 ions·m-2 of the rolled W is compared to that of the as-received W. Results show that, due to an improvement of the metal's ductility, blister bursting with a partially opened lid forms on the surface of the rolled W, whereas blister bursting with a fully opened lid forms on the surface of the as-received W.

  8. Preparation of the high purity gingerols from ginger by dummy molecularly imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wenhua; Ma, Xiuli; Zhang, Jinghua; Xie, Hongkai; Liu, Feng; Wang, Xiao

    2015-03-27

    In this work, a dummy molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were developed as the selective sorbents for preparation of the high purity gingerols from ginger for the first time. The dummy template molecule with similar structural skeleton to gingerols, N-vanillylnonanamide, has been designed and synthesized. The performance of the MIPs and non-imprinted polymers (NIPs) were evaluated including selective recognition capacity, adsorption isotherm, and adsorption kinetics. Optimization of various parameters affecting dummy molecular imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE), such as the type and flow rate of the loading solvent, the composition and volume of the eluting solvent, and the composition and volume of the washing solvent were investigated. Gingerols with the percent recovery of 80 and the percent purity of 99.1 were obtained from the extracts of ginger by MISPE. Besides, gingerols obtained by MISPE had more powerful activity of eliminating free radical compared with extracts before extraction with the MISPE column. Application of MIPs with a high affinity toward three gingerols provides a novel method for obtaining a group of compounds which have likely active groups from natural products.

  9. Evaluation of Electric Load Following Capability on Fuel Cell System Fueled by High-Purity Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, Yusuke; Park, Deaheum; Ishida, Masayoshi; Fujisawa, Akitoshi; Miura, Shinichi

    This paper describes the electrical response in load change concerning a fuel cell system fueled by high-purity hydrogen. The purpose of this study is that the fuel cell system is applied to make up for unstable electrical output of a photovoltaic system as a renewable energy. As an alternative method of secondary battery, the fuel cell system, which is able to continuously generate power as long as fuel is supplied, is expected to provide power with high reliability and stability. To evaluate the load-following capability of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) system, an experimental equipment was constructed with a 200W PEFC stack (number of cells: 20, cell area: 200cm2) which was supplied with hydrogen from a compressed hydrogen cylinder and a metal hydride canister. We measured the transient phenomenon of current and cell voltage when the PEFC stack was inputted step-up current loads that changed in the range of 0∼300mA/cm2. As a result, we have found that the PEFC system with both hydrogen supply sources is able to response at a time constant of 6.6∼11.6μsec under enough oxygen supply and a load below the PEFC rated power.

  10. Compensation mechanism in high purity semi-insulating 4H-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchel, W. C.; Mitchell, William D.; Smith, H. E.; Landis, G.; Smith, S. R.; Glaser, E. R.

    2007-03-01

    A study of deep levels in high purity semi-insulating 4H-SiC has been made using temperature dependent Hall effect (TDH), thermal and optical admittance spectroscopies, and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Thermal activation energies from TDH varied from a low of 0.55eV to a high of 1.65eV. All samples studied showed n-type conduction with the Fermi level in the upper half of the band gap. Fits of the TDH data to different charge balance equations and comparison of the fitting results with SIMS measurements indicated that the deep levels are acceptorlike even though they are in the upper half of the band gap. Carrier concentration measurements indicated that the deep levels are present in concentrations in the low 1015cm-3 range, while SIMS results demonstrate nitrogen and boron concentrations in the low to mid-1015-cm-3 range. The results suggest that compensation in this material is a complex process involving multiple deep levels.

  11. Effect of chromium on low-temperature deformation of high-purity iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. J.; Stoloff, N. S.

    1976-01-01

    A series of very low interstitial Fe-Cr alloys containing 0, 1, 3, 5, and 10 wt% Cr were prepared by vacuum melting and fabricated under argon to 1.83 mm diam wires exposed in an alumina system to wet hydrogen for 200 h at 1423 K followed by 1000 h in ZrH2-purified hydrogen at 1573 K. The wires were then transverse-rolled into thin sheet and cut into tensile specimens subjected to electropolishing and strained to fracture in a series of cryogenic baths ranging from 4.2 K to room temperature. It is shown that small Cr additions lower the twinning stress so that yielding occurs by twinning rather than by slip. Cr in amounts up to 10 wt% has little effect on the yield strength of high-purity Fe between 147 and 300 K, and ductility is not greatly affected at any test temperature. Higher solute contents provide appreciable strengthening only at temperatures of 112 K and below.

  12. Simulation study comparing high-purity germanium and cadmium zinc telluride detectors for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, D. L.; Peterson, T. E.

    2014-11-01

    We conducted simulations to compare the potential imaging performance for breast cancer detection with High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) systems with 1% and 3.8% energy resolution at 140 keV, respectively. Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation package, we modelled both 5 mm-thick CZT and 10 mm-thick HPGe detectors with the same parallel-hole collimator for the imaging of a breast/torso phantom. Simulated energy spectra were generated, and planar images were created for various energy windows around the 140 keV photopeak. Relative sensitivity and scatter and the torso fractions were calculated along with tumour contrast and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Simulations showed that utilizing a ±1.25% energy window with an HPGe system better suppressed torso background and small-angle scattered photons than a comparable CZT system using a -5%/+10% energy window. Both systems provided statistically similar contrast and SNR, with HPGe providing higher relative sensitivity. Lowering the counts of HPGe images to match CZT count density still yielded equivalent contrast between HPGe and CZT. Thus, an HPGe system may provide equivalent breast imaging capability at lower injected radioactivity levels when acquiring for equal imaging time.

  13. Safety studies conducted on a proprietary high-purity aloe vera inner leaf fillet preparation, Qmatrix.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lonnie D; Burdock, George A; Shin, Eunju; Kim, Seunghyun; Jo, T H; Jones, Kenneth N; Matulka, Ray A

    2010-06-01

    The aloe vera plant has a long history of safe use for oral and topical applications. This publication describes safety studies conducted on a proprietary high-purity aloe vera inner leaf fillet preparation, Qmatrix. In a 13-week study in rats, Qmatrix was administered via gavage at 0, 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day. There were no significant changes in food or water consumption, body weight, serum biochemistry or hematology at any of the doses tested. Sporadic, significant increases were observed in some of the measured urinalysis parameters; however, these variations were not treatment-related, as most were observed only in one sex, not dose-dependent and within historical control values. Organ weights were unaffected, except for a statistically significant, though not dose-dependent, increase in absolute and relative weights of the right kidney in males at 500 and 2000 mg/kg bw/day, respectively. Histopathological analysis revealed no abnormal signs. Qmatrix was non-mutagenic in an Ames test and a chromosomal aberration test at concentrations up to 10,000 microg/plate, and in an in vivo bone marrow micronucleus test at doses up to 5000 mg/kg bw/day. Based on these results, Qmatrix is not genotoxic in vitro or in vivo and; has an oral NOAEL greater than 2000 mg/kg bw/day following 90 days of oral exposure. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of high purity lycopene from tomato wastes using a new pressurized extraction approach.

    PubMed

    Naviglio, Daniele; Caruso, Tonino; Iannece, Patrizia; Aragòn, Alejandro; Santini, Antonello

    2008-08-13

    In this paper, a method for the extraction of high purity lycopene from tomato wastes is presented. The method is based on a pressurized extraction that uses the Extractor Naviglio, and it is performed in the 0.7-0.9 MPa range. Tomato skin, the byproduct deriving from manufacturing of tomato, in a water dispersion, are used as starting material. Lycopene is transferred, for the effect of the high pressure used, in the form of molecular aggregates into the water as a dispersion, while apolar compounds remain in the matrix. The aggregates are easily purified in a single subsequent step by using methanol, thus, obtaining lycopene at 98% chromatographic purity or higher. A new stationary phase, phenyl-hexyl silicone, and a simple water/acetonitrile gradient were used for HPLC analysis of lycopene. The extract was characterized by UV-Vis spectrophotometry, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. An average recovery of 2.8 mg lycopene/kg tomato waste can be obtained after 4 hours of extraction and using tap water as the extracting liquid. The recovery percentage was of about 10%. The exhausted tomato byproduct can be easily dried and used in agriculture or as feeding for animals.

  15. Platelet Glycoprotein Ib-IX and Malignancy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    cancer to metastatic disease . During the next year we propose to examine the relevance of platelet receptors in models of spontaneous metastasis. A...the prognosis for recovery from breast cancer cannot be under emphasized. Indeed, the spread of metastatic disease represents a fundamental change in...IX have been identified, including von Willebrand factor (vWF) and thrombin, illustrating platelet GP Ib-IX as a major initiator of platelet thrombus

  16. Heat capacity of high-purity isotope-enriched germanium-76 in the temperature range of 2-15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. V.; Gibin, A. M.; Andryushchenko, I. A.; Gavva, V. A.; Kozyrev, E. A.

    2015-09-01

    The heat capacity of high-purity isotopically-enriched germanium Ge-76 has been measured in the range of 2.5-15 K. In this range, the heat capacity of Ge-76 is 6-15% higher than the heat capacity of germanium of the natural isotopic composition, which is determined by a change in the average mass.

  17. Development and validation of a reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method for routine identification and purity assessment of high-purity steviol glycoside sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Bililign, Tsion; Moore, Jeffrey C; Tan, Shane; Leeks, Allan T

    2014-02-12

    The widespread application of stevia-based sweeteners in food products has resulted in the need for reliable analytical methods for measuring the purity and identity of high-purity steviol glycoside ingredients. The objective of this research was to develop and validate a new reversed-phase separation method capable of separating and quantifying nine steviol glycosides present in typical high-purity stevia extract ingredients. Results of the study established the linearity of the method at a correlation factor of 1.000 for the two major components and other minor components of this food ingredient. Method accuracy values were in the range of 99.1-100.9%. The percent relative standard deviation for six independent assay determinations was 1.0%. The method was determined to be robust for minor changes in column temperature, initial acetonitrile content, flow rate, and wavelength. The validated high-performance liquid chromatography method was found to be suitable to be included by USP as a Food Chemicals Codex compendial standard for steviol glycosides.

  18. N-Type delta Doping of High-Purity Silicon Imaging Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Hoenk, Michael; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2005-01-01

    A process for n-type (electron-donor) delta doping has shown promise as a means of modifying back-illuminated image detectors made from n-doped high-purity silicon to enable them to detect high-energy photons (ultraviolet and x-rays) and low-energy charged particles (electrons and ions). This process is applicable to imaging detectors of several types, including charge-coupled devices, hybrid devices, and complementary metal oxide/semiconductor detector arrays. Delta doping is so named because its density-vs.-depth characteristic is reminiscent of the Dirac delta function (impulse function): the dopant is highly concentrated in a very thin layer. Preferably, the dopant is concentrated in one or at most two atomic layers in a crystal plane and, therefore, delta doping is also known as atomic-plane doping. The use of doping to enable detection of high-energy photons and low-energy particles was reported in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles. As described in more detail in those articles, the main benefit afforded by delta doping of a back-illuminated silicon detector is to eliminate a "dead" layer at the back surface of the silicon wherein high-energy photons and low-energy particles are absorbed without detection. An additional benefit is that the delta-doped layer can serve as a back-side electrical contact. Delta doping of p-type silicon detectors is well established. The development of the present process addresses concerns specific to the delta doping of high-purity silicon detectors, which are typically n-type. The present process involves relatively low temperatures, is fully compatible with other processes used to fabricate the detectors, and does not entail interruption of those processes. Indeed, this process can be the last stage in the fabrication of an imaging detector that has, in all other respects, already been fully processed, including metallized. This process includes molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) for deposition of three layers, including

  19. High-Purity Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: A Key Enabling Material in Emerging Electronics.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Jacques; Ding, Jianfu; Li, Zhao; Finnie, Paul; Lopinski, Gregory; Malenfant, Patrick R L

    2017-09-13

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) are emerging as a promising material for high-performance, high-density devices as well as low-cost, large-area macroelectronics produced via additive manufacturing methods such as roll-to-roll printing. Proof-of-concept demonstrations have indicated the potential of sc-SWCNTs for digital electronics, radiofrequency circuits, radiation hard memory, improved sensors, and flexible, stretchable, conformable electronics. Advances toward commercial applications bring numerous opportunities in SWCNT materials development and characterization as well as fabrication processes and printing technologies. Commercialization in electronics will require large quantities of sc-SWCNTs, and the challenge for materials science is the development of scalable synthesis, purification, and enrichment methods. While a few synthesis routes have shown promising results in making near-monochiral SWCNTs, gram quantities are available only for small-diameter sc-SWCNTs, which underperform in transistors. Most synthesis routes yield mixtures of SWCNTs, typically 30% metallic and 70% semiconducting, necessitating the extraction of sc-SWCNTs from their metallic counterparts in high purity using scalable postsynthetic methods. Numerous routes to obtain high-purity sc-SWCNTs from raw soot have been developed, including density-gradient ultracentrifugation, chromatography, aqueous two-phase extraction, and selective DNA or polymer wrapping. By these methods (termed sorting or enrichment), >99% sc-SWCNT content can be achieved. Currently, all of these approaches have drawbacks and limitations with respect to electronics applications, such as excessive dilution, expensive consumables, and high ionic impurity content. Excess amount of dispersant is a common challenge that hinders direct inclusion of sc-SWCNTs into electronic devices. At present, conjugated polymer extraction may represent the most practical route to sc-SWCNTs. By the use of

  20. Evaluation of purity with its uncertainty value in high purity lead stick by conventional and electro-gravimetric methods.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nahar; Singh, Niranjan; Tripathy, S Swarupa; Soni, Daya; Singh, Khem; Gupta, Prabhat K

    2013-06-26

    A conventional gravimetry and electro-gravimetry study has been carried out for the precise and accurate purity determination of lead (Pb) in high purity lead stick and for preparation of reference standard. Reference materials are standards containing a known amount of an analyte and provide a reference value to determine unknown concentrations or to calibrate analytical instruments. A stock solution of approximate 2 kg has been prepared after dissolving approximate 2 g of Pb stick in 5% ultra pure nitric acid. From the stock solution five replicates of approximate 50 g have been taken for determination of purity by each method. The Pb has been determined as PbSO4 by conventional gravimetry, as PbO2 by electro gravimetry. The percentage purity of the metallic Pb was calculated accordingly from PbSO4 and PbO2. On the basis of experimental observations it has been concluded that by conventional gravimetry and electro-gravimetry the purity of Pb was found to be 99.98 ± 0.24 and 99.97 ± 0.27 g/100 g and on the basis of Pb purity the concentration of reference standard solutions were found to be 1000.88 ± 2.44 and 1000.81 ± 2.68 mg kg-1 respectively with 95% confidence level (k = 2). The uncertainty evaluation has also been carried out in Pb determination following EURACHEM/GUM guidelines. The final analytical results quantifying uncertainty fulfills this requirement and gives a measure of the confidence level of the concerned laboratory. Gravimetry is the most reliable technique in comparison to titremetry and instrumental method and the results of gravimetry are directly traceable to SI unit. Gravimetric analysis, if methods are followed carefully, provides for exceedingly precise analysis. In classical gravimetry the major uncertainties are due to repeatability but in electro-gravimetry several other factors also affect the final results.

  1. Evaluation of purity with its uncertainty value in high purity lead stick by conventional and electro-gravimetric methods

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A conventional gravimetry and electro-gravimetry study has been carried out for the precise and accurate purity determination of lead (Pb) in high purity lead stick and for preparation of reference standard. Reference materials are standards containing a known amount of an analyte and provide a reference value to determine unknown concentrations or to calibrate analytical instruments. A stock solution of approximate 2 kg has been prepared after dissolving approximate 2 g of Pb stick in 5% ultra pure nitric acid. From the stock solution five replicates of approximate 50 g have been taken for determination of purity by each method. The Pb has been determined as PbSO4 by conventional gravimetry, as PbO2 by electro gravimetry. The percentage purity of the metallic Pb was calculated accordingly from PbSO4 and PbO2. Results On the basis of experimental observations it has been concluded that by conventional gravimetry and electro-gravimetry the purity of Pb was found to be 99.98 ± 0.24 and 99.97 ± 0.27 g/100 g and on the basis of Pb purity the concentration of reference standard solutions were found to be 1000.88 ± 2.44 and 1000.81 ± 2.68 mg kg-1 respectively with 95% confidence level (k = 2). The uncertainty evaluation has also been carried out in Pb determination following EURACHEM/GUM guidelines. The final analytical results quantifying uncertainty fulfills this requirement and gives a measure of the confidence level of the concerned laboratory. Conclusions Gravimetry is the most reliable technique in comparison to titremetry and instrumental method and the results of gravimetry are directly traceable to SI unit. Gravimetric analysis, if methods are followed carefully, provides for exceedingly precise analysis. In classical gravimetry the major uncertainties are due to repeatability but in electro-gravimetry several other factors also affect the final results. PMID:23800080

  2. Dielectric Performance of High Purity HTCC Alumina at High Temperatures - A Comparison Study with Other Polycrystalline Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liang-Yu

    2012-01-01

    A very high purity (99.99+) high temperature co-fired ceramic (HTCC) alumina has recently become commercially available. The raw material of this HTCC alumina is very different from conventional HTCC alumina, and more importantly there is no glass additive in this co-fired material. Previously, selected HTCC and LTCC (low temperature co-fired ceramic) alumina materials were evaluated at high temperatures as dielectric and compared to a regularly sintered 96 polycrystalline alumina (96 Al2O3), where 96 alumina was used as the benchmark. A prototype packaging system based on regular 96 alumina with Au thick-film metallization successfully facilitated long term testing of high temperature silicon carbide (SiC) electronic devices for over 10,000 hours at 500C. In order to evaluate this new HTCC alumina for possible high temperature packaging applications, the dielectric properties of this HTCC alumina substrate were measured and compared with those of 96 alumina and a LTCC alumina from room temperature to 550C at frequencies of 120 Hz, 1 KHz, 10 KHz, 100 KHz, and 1 MHz. A parallel-plate capacitive device with dielectric of the HTCC alumina and precious metal electrodes were used for measurements of the dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the co-fired alumina material in the temperature and frequency ranges. The capacitance and AC parallel conductance of the capacitive device were directly measured by an AC impedance meter, and the dielectric constant and parallel AC conductivity of the dielectric were calculated from the capacitance and conductance measurement results. The temperature and frequency dependent dielectric constant, AC conductivity, and dissipation factor of the HTCC alumina substrate are presented and compared to those of 96 alumina. Other technical advantages of this new co-fired material for possible high packaging applications are also discussed.

  3. The rates of G:C-->T:A and G:C-->C:G transversions at CpG dinucleotides in the human factor IX gene.

    PubMed

    Ketterling, R P; Vielhaber, E; Sommer, S S

    1994-05-01

    We have identified eight independent transversions at CpG in 290 consecutive families with hemophilia B. These eight transversions account for 16.3% of all independent transversions in our sample, yet the expected frequency of CpG transversions at random in the factor IX gene is only 2.6% (P < .01). The aggregate data suggest that the two types of CpG transversions (G:C-->T:A and G:C-->C:G) possess similar mutation rates (24.8 x 10(-10) and 20.6 x 10(-10), respectively), which are about fivefold greater than the comparable rates for transversions at non-CpG dinucleotides. The enhancement of transversions at CpG suggests that the model by which mutations occur at CpG may need to be reevaluated. The relationship, if any, between deamination of 5-methyl cytosine and enhancement of transversions at CpG remains to be defined.

  4. High-Purity Nickel Prepared by Electron Beam Melting: Purification Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Shang, Zaiyan; Chen, Ming; He, Jinjiang; Lv, Baoguo; Wang, Xingquan; Xiong, Xiaodong

    2013-12-01

    A bulk cylindrical high-purity nickel ingot, with purity of more than 99.999 pct (5N) in mass, was obtained from the raw nickel with 99.95 pct (3N5) initial purity by virtue of double electron beam melting (EBM). A chemical analysis was performed by using glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS) analysis for all elements in the periodic table except carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, which were tested by the high-performance combustion and fusion method. The major impurities B, Na, Al, Si, P, S, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Cu, Co, Zn, As, Ag, Sb, and Pb showed an excellent removal effect with removal efficiency of more than 85 pct following the double EBMs. Li, Mg, Cl, K, V, Mn, Ga, Ge, Cd, Se, In, Sn, Tl, Au, and Pt were below the detection limit. No significant change in concentration was found for the refractory elements W, Mo, Ta, Nb, and Ir. Be, F, Sc, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, Y, Ru, Rh, Pd, Te, I, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Hf, Re, Os, Hg, Bi, Th, and U were not detectable following the purification as compared to the raw nickel. Gaseous impurities, C, N, O, especially for N, was removed sufficiently. Theoretical calculations for removal efficiency of impurity Fe based on the calculated vapor pressure, activity coefficient, and melt temperature were in good agreement with measured results, and the purification mechanism was ascribed to the evaporation of major impurities and subsequently evacuation by repetitive EBM.

  5. Detection of trace water vapor in high-purity phosphine using cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Funke, Hans H; Raynor, Mark W; Bertness, Kris A; Chen, Yu

    2007-04-01

    The presence of trace water vapor in process gases such as phosphine, used for compound semiconductor epitaxial growth, can negatively affect the optical and electrical properties of the final device. Therefore, sensitive H2O measurement techniques are required to monitor precursor purity and detect unacceptable contamination levels. A commercial cavity ring-down spectrometer that monitors an H2O absorption line at a wavelength of 1392.53 nm was investigated for service in high purity PH3. Spectral parameters such as the line shape of water vapor in the presence of PH3 as well as background features due to PH3 were measured at different pressures and incorporated into the data analysis software for accurate moisture readings. Test concentrations generated with a diffusion vialbased H2O source and dilution manifold were used to verify instrument accuracy, sensitivity, linearity, and response time. H2O readings at 13.2 kPa corresponded well to added concentrations (slope=0.990+/-0.01) and were linear in the tested range (0-52.7 nmol mol-1). The analyzer was sensitive to changes in H2O concentration of 1.3 nmol mol-1 based on 3sigma of the calibration curve intercept for a weighted linear fit. Local PH3 absorption features that could not be distinguished from the H2O line were present in the purified PH3 spectra and resulted in an additional systematic uncertainty of 9.0 nmol mol-1. Equilibration to changing H2O levels at a flow rate of 80 std cm3 min-1 PH3 occurred in 10-30 minutes. The results indicate that cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) at 1392.53 nm may be useful for applications such as on-line monitoring (and dry-down) of phosphine gas delivery lines or the quality control of cylinder sources.

  6. Electrochemical Characterization of a Solid Oxide Membrane Electrolyzer for Production of High-Purity Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, Soobhankar; Yoon, Kyung Joong; Gopalan, Srikanth; Pal, Uday B.

    2009-12-01

    A laboratory-scale solid oxide membrane (SOM) steam electrolyzer that can potentially use energy value in waste or any source of carbon or hydrocarbon to produce high-purity hydrogen has been fabricated and evaluated. The SOM electrolyzer comprises an oxygen-ion-conducting yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte with a Ni-YSZ cermet cathode coated on one side and liquid-metal anode on the other side. The SOM electrolyzer is operated at 1000 °C by providing a steam-rich gas feed to the Ni-YSZ cermet cathode and feeding a reductant source into the liquid-metal anode. The steam is reduced over the cathode, and oxygen ions are transported through the YSZ electrolyte and are oxidized at the molten metal electrode by the reductant feed. The advantage of SOM electrolyzer over the state-of-the-art solid oxide electrolyzer is its ability to use solid, liquid, and gaseous reductant feed in the liquid-metal anode to reduce the oxygen chemical potential and drive the reaction for hydrogen production. In this study, an electrochemical process model for a SOM electrolyzer was developed. The condition of the liquid-metal anode with reductant was simulated by bubbling humidified hydrogen (3 pct H2O) in the liquid metal, and the electrochemical performance of the SOM electrolyzer was modeled. The experimental data were curve-fitted into the model to identify the various polarization losses. It showed that the performance of the SOM electrolyzer was dominated by the ohmic resistance of the YSZ membrane. Based on the results of this study, future work is needed toward increasing the performance efficiency of the SOM electrolyzer.

  7. Raman and photoelectron spectroscopic investigation of high-purity niobium materials: Oxides, hydrides, and hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nageshwar; Deo, M. N.; Nand, Mangla; Jha, S. N.; Roy, S. B.

    2016-09-01

    We present investigations of the presence of oxides, hydrides, and hydrocarbons in high-purity (residual resistivity ratio, ˜300) niobium (Nb) materials used in fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for particle accelerators. Raman spectroscopy of Nb materials (as-received from the vendor as well as after surface chemical- and thermal processing) revealed numerous peaks, which evidently show the presence of oxides (550 cm-1), hydrides (1277 and 1385 cm-1: ˜80 K temperature), and groups of hydrocarbons (1096, 2330, 2710, 2830, 2868, and 3080 cm-1). The present work provides direct spectroscopic evidence of hydrides in the electropolished Nb materials typically used in SRF cavities. Raman spectroscopy thus can provide vital information about the near-surface chemical species in niobium materials and will help in identifying the cause for the performance degradation of SRF cavities. Furthermore, photoelectron spectroscopy was performed on the Nb samples to complement the Raman spectroscopy study. This study reveals the presence of C and O in the Nb samples. Core level spectra of Nb (doublet 3d5/2 and 3d3/2) show peaks near 206.6 and 209.4 eV, which can be attributed to the Nb5+ oxidation state. The core level spectra of C 1 s of the samples are dominated by graphitic carbon (binding energy, 284.6 eV), while the spectra of O 1 s are asymmetrically peaked near binding energy of ˜529 eV, and that indicates the presence of metal-oxide Nb2O5. The valence-band spectra of the Nb samples are dominated by a broad peak similar to O 2p states, but after sputtering (for 10 min) a peak appears at ˜1 eV, which is a feature of the elemental Nb atom.

  8. Supercapacitor Electrodes Based on High-Purity Electrospun Polyaniline and Polyaniline-Carbon Nanotube Nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Simotwo, Silas K; DelRe, Christopher; Kalra, Vibha

    2016-08-24

    Freestanding, binder-free supercapacitor electrodes based on high-purity polyaniline (PANI) nanofibers were fabricated via a single step electrospinning process. The successful electrospinning of nanofibers with an unprecedentedly high composition of PANI (93 wt %) was made possible due to blending ultrahigh molecular weight poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) with PANI in solution to impart adequate chain entanglements, a critical requirement for electrospinning. To further enhance the conductivity and stability of the electrodes, a small concentration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was added to the PANI/PEO solution prior to electrospinning to generate PANI/CNT/PEO nanofibers (12 wt % CNTs). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) porosimetry were conducted to characterize the external morphology of the nanofibers. The electrospun nanofibers were further probed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The electroactivity of the freestanding PANI and PANI/CNT nanofiber electrodes was examined using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Competitive specific capacitances of 308 and 385 F g(-1) were achieved for PANI and PANI-CNT based electrodes, respectively, at a current density of 0.5 A g(-1). Moreover, specific capacitance retentions of 70 and 81.4% were observed for PANI and PANI-CNT based electrodes, respectively, after 1000 cycles. The promising electrochemical performance of the fabricated electrodes, we believe, stems from the porous 3-D electrode structure characteristic of the nonwoven interconnected nanostructures. The interconnected nanofiber network facilitates efficient electron conduction while the inter- and intrafiber porosity enable excellent electrolyte penetration within the polymer matrix, allowing fast ion transport to the active sites.

  9. Evaluation of Prebiotic Effects of High-Purity Galactooligosaccharides in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ki Bae; Kim, Jae Hwan; Kwon, Hyuk Kon; Han, Sung Hee

    2016-01-01

    Summary Galactooligosaccharides (GOS) are an important class of dietary prebiotics that exert beneficial effects on intestinal microbiota and gut barrier function. In this study, high-purity GOS (HP-GOS) were investigated in vitro and in vivo and confirmed as prebiotic ingredients in rat diet. HP-GOS were successfully produced using a two-step process, enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation by yeast. They were found to serve as a good substrate and carbon source for supporting the growth of probiotic bacteria more effectively than other commercial GOS. Following administration of 1% (by mass) of HP-GOS to rats, the growth of Bifidobacterium bifidum and B. longum in the gut increased most rapidly up to 12 h, and thereafter the increase was slow. Therefore, 1% HP-GOS was found to be acceptable for the growth of probiotic bacteria. Groups of animals that were orally administered HP-GOS and bifidobacteria during the study, and the group administered HP-GOS during the 2nd (days 13–15) and 4th (days 28–30) period of the study had significantly (p<0.05) higher numbers of bifidobacteria in faeces than groups receiving a single dose of bifidobacteria. HP-GOS affected the expression of genes encoding glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY). There was a significant upregulation of GLP-1 and PYY mRNA with HP-GOS and bifidobacteria intake. We propose that the prebiotic properties of HP-GOS are potentially valuable for the production of functional foods for human consumption. PMID:27904405

  10. Gamma background studies for the XENON experiment using a High Purity Germanium Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angle, Jesse Isaac

    The XENON Dark Matter Experiment, deployed at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy on March 2006, is a liquid noble gas detector designed to directly detect dark matter. The detector uses a dual-phase (gas/liquid) Xenon target to search for nuclear recoils associated with nucleus-WIMP interactions. Due to the high sensitivity needed in such an experiment, it is vital to not only reduce the background but to also understand the remaining background so as to aid in the understanding of the data as well as to facilitate upgrades beyond the early Research and Development phases. Many of the components of the XENON10 detector have been screened using a High Purity Germanium Detector known as the GATOR detector. Full analysis of the screening data requires Monte Carlo simulations of the GATOR detector and the sample. Results from this screening will be presented. Using the information obtained from the screening operation, Monte Carlo simulations of the XENON10 electron recoil background will be examined and compared to the actual detector data. The success of this simulation to data comparison indicates that we have a good understanding of the XENON10 gamma background and will be able to make more informed decisions regarding the next stage of detector development. This type of analysis has aided in the selection and design of many of the materials and components being incorporated into the new XENON100 detector, the next generation detector which will be capable of improving the limit set by XENON10 by at least an order of magnitude. (Full text of this dissertation may be available via the University of Florida Libraries web site. Please check http:/ /www.uflib.ufl.edu/etd.html)

  11. High-purity 3D nano-objects grown by focused-electron-beam induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdoba, Rosa; Sharma, Nidhi; Kölling, Sebastian; Koenraad, Paul M.; Koopmans, Bert

    2016-09-01

    To increase the efficiency of current electronics, a specific challenge for the next generation of memory, sensing and logic devices is to find suitable strategies to move from two- to three-dimensional (3D) architectures. However, the creation of real 3D nano-objects is not trivial. Emerging non-conventional nanofabrication tools are required for this purpose. One attractive method is focused-electron-beam induced deposition (FEBID), a direct-write process of 3D nano-objects. Here, we grow 3D iron and cobalt nanopillars by FEBID using diiron nonacarbonyl Fe2(CO)9, and dicobalt octacarbonyl Co2(CO)8, respectively, as starting materials. In addition, we systematically study the composition of these nanopillars at the sub-nanometer scale by atom probe tomography, explicitly mapping the homogeneity of the radial and longitudinal composition distributions. We show a way of fabricating high-purity 3D vertical nanostructures of ˜50 nm in diameter and a few micrometers in length. Our results suggest that the purity of such 3D nanoelements (above 90 at% Fe and above 95 at% Co) is directly linked to their growth regime, in which the selected deposition conditions are crucial for the final quality of the nanostructure. Moreover, we demonstrate that FEBID and the proposed characterization technique not only allow for growth and chemical analysis of single-element structures, but also offers a new way to directly study 3D core-shell architectures. This straightforward concept could establish a promising route to the design of 3D elements for future nano-electronic devices.

  12. High-Purity Aluminum Magnet Technology for Advanced Space Transportation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, R. G.; Pullam, B.; Rickle, D.; Litchford, R. J.; Robertson, G. A.; Schmidt, D. D.; Cole, John (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Basic research on advanced plasma-based propulsion systems is routinely focused on plasmadynamics, performance, and efficiency aspects while relegating the development of critical enabling technologies, such as flight-weight magnets, to follow-on development work. Unfortunately, the low technology readiness levels (TRLs) associated with critical enabling technologies tend to be perceived as an indicator of high technical risk, and this, in turn, hampers the acceptance of advanced system architectures for flight development. Consequently, there is growing recognition that applied research on the critical enabling technologies needs to be conducted hand in hand with basic research activities. The development of flight-weight magnet technology, for example, is one area of applied research having broad crosscutting applications to a number of advanced propulsion system architectures. Therefore, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Louisiana State University (LSU), and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) have initiated an applied research project aimed at advancing the TRL of flight-weight magnets. This Technical Publication reports on the group's initial effort to demonstrate the feasibility of cryogenic high-purity aluminum magnet technology and describes the design, construction, and testing of a 6-in-diameter by 12-in-long aluminum solenoid magnet. The coil was constructed in the machine shop of the Department of Physics and Astronomy at LSU and testing was conducted in NHMFL facilities at Florida State University and at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The solenoid magnet was first wound, reinforced, potted in high thermal conductivity epoxy, and bench tested in the LSU laboratories. A cryogenic container for operation at 77 K was also constructed and mated to the solenoid. The coil was then taken to NHMFL facilities in Tallahassee, FL. where its magnetoresistance was measured in a 77 K environment under steady magnetic fields as high as 10 T. In

  13. Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper for linear collider accelerator structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmer, J. W.; Klingmann, J.; van Bibber, K.

    2001-05-01

    Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper were investigated to develop procedures for joining precision machined copper components for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). Diffusion bonds were made over a range of temperatures from 400 °C to 1000 °C, under two different loading conditions [3.45 kPa (0.5 psi) and 3.45 MPa (500 psi)], and on two different diamond machined surface finishes. Brazes were made using pure silver, pure gold, and gold-nickel alloys, and different heating rates produced by both radiation and induction heating. Braze materials were applied by both physical vapor deposition (PVD) and conventional braze alloy shims. Results of the diffusion bonding experiments showed that bond strengths very near that of the copper base metal could be made at bonding temperatures of 700 °C or higher at 3.45 MPa bonding pressure. At lower temperatures, only partial strength diffusion bonds could be made. At low bonding pressures (3.45 kPa), full strength bonds were made at temperatures of 800 °C and higher, while no bonding (zero strength) was observed at temperatures of 700 °C and lower. Observations of the fracture surfaces of the diffusion bonded samples showed the effects of surface finish on the bonding mechanism. These observations clearly indicate that bonding began by point asperity contact, and flatter surfaces resulted in a higher percentage of bonded area under similar bonding conditions. Results of the brazing experiments indicated that pure silver worked very well for brazing under both conventional and high heating rate scenarios. Similarly, pure silver brazed well for both the PVD layers and the braze alloy shims. The gold and gold-containing brazes had problems, mainly due to the high diffusivity of gold in copper. These problems led to the necessity of overdriving the temperature to ensure melting, the presence of porosity in the joint, and very wide braze joints. Based on the overall findings of this study, a two-step joining method

  14. Characterization of high-purity niobium structures fabricated using the electron beam melting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrazas Najera, Cesar Adrian

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) refers to the varied set of technologies utilized for the fabrication of complex 3D components from digital data in a layer-by-layer fashion. The use of these technologies promises to revolutionize the manufacturing industry. The electron beam melting (EBM) process has been utilized for the fabrication of fully dense near-net-shape components from various metallic materials. This process, catalogued as a powder bed fusion technology, consists of the deposition of thin layers (50 - 120microm) of metallic powder particles which are fused by the use of a high energy electron beam and has been commercialized by Swedish company Arcam AB. Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities are key components that are used in linear accelerators and other light sources for studies of elemental physics. Currently, cavity fabrication is done by employing different forming processes including deep-drawing and spinning. In both of the latter techniques, a feedstock high-purity niobium sheet with a thickness ranging from 3-4 mm is mechanically deformed and shaped into the desired geometry. In this manner, half cavities are formed that are later joined by electron beam welding (EBW). The welding step causes variability in the shape of the cavity and can also introduce impurities at the surface of the weld interface. The processing route and the purity of niobium are also of utmost importance since the presence of impurities such as inclusions or defects can be detrimental for the SRF properties of cavities. The focus of this research was the use of the EBM process in the manufacture of high purity niobium parts with potential SRF applications. Reactor grade niobium was plasma atomized and used as the precursor material for fabrication using EBM. An Arcam A2 system was utilized for the fabrication. The system had all internal components of the fabrication chamber replaced and was cleaned to prevent contamination of niobium powder. A mini-vat, developed at

  15. Matrix elimination ion chromatography method for the determination of trace levels of anionic impurities in high purity cesium iodide.

    PubMed

    Ayushi; Kumar, Sangita D; Reddy, A V R

    2012-01-01

    In the present study an ion chromatographic method based on matrix elimination has been developed for the determination of anionic impurities in high purity cesium iodide crystals. The presence of impurities has a detrimental effect on the characteristics of detectors based on cesium iodide crystals. In particular, oxygen-containing anions inhibit the resolving power of scintillators and decrease the optical absorption. The quantitative determination of anions (fluoride, chloride, bromide, nitrate, phosphate, and sulphate) simultaneously in the high-purity cesium iodide crystals has not been carried out before. The large concentration of iodide poses a challenge in the determination of anions (especially phosphate and sulphate); hence, matrix elimination is accomplished by adopting a sample pretreatment technique. The method is validated for linearity, accuracy, and precision. The limit of detection for different anions is in the range of 0.3-3 µg/g, and the relative standard deviation is in the range of 4-6% for the overall method.

  16. Nonlinear dynamic behaviors and control based on simulation of high-purity heat integrated air separation column.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yao; Liu, Xinggao

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the dynamic behaviors on the basis of simulation for high-purity heat integrated air separation column (HIASC) are studied. A nonlinear generic model control (GMC) scheme is proposed based on the nonlinear behavior analyses of a HIASC process, and an adaptive generic model control (AGMC) scheme is further presented to correct the model parameters online. Related internal model control (IMC) scheme and multi-loop PID (M-PID) scheme are also developed as the comparative base. The comparative researches are carried out among these linear and nonlinear control schemes in detail. The simulation research results show that the proposed AGMC schemes present advantages in both servo control and regulatory control for the high-purity HIASC. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Equilibrium between titanium ions and high-purity titanium electrorefining in a NaCl-KCl melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jian-xun; Wang, Qiu-yu; Hu, Guo-jing; Zhu, Xiao-bo; Jiao, Shu-qiang; Zhu, Hong-min

    2014-07-01

    TiCl x ( x = 2.17) was prepared by using titanium sponge to reduce the concentration of TiCl4 in a NaCl-KCl melt under negative pressure. The as-prepared NaCl-KCl-TiCl x melt was employed as the electrolyte, and two parallel crude titanium plates and one high-purity titanium plate were used as the anode and cathode, respectively. A series of electrochemical tests were performed to investigate the influence of electrolytic parameters on the current efficiency and quality of cathodic products. The results indicated that the quality of cathodic products was related to the current efficiency, which is significantly dependent on the current density and the initial concentration of titanium ions. The significance of this study is the attainment of high-purity titanium with a low oxygen content of 30 × 10-6.

  18. A facile route to preparation of high purity nanoporous silica from acid-leached residue of serpentine.

    PubMed

    Bai, Penn; Sharratt, Paul; Yeo, Tze Yuen; Bu, Jie

    2014-09-01

    As the current cost of mineral carbonation is too high for an economically viable industrial process, it is desirable to produce value-added products from CO2 mineralization process. In this work, a facile and cost-effective process was developed for the production of high purity SiO2 from acid-leached serpentine residue. The Si extraction rate is fast even under ambient conditions due to the highly defective structure of the residue. The reaction kinetics were studied and it was found that the Si extraction rate was under a combination of chemical reaction control and film diffusion control. The SiO2 sample prepared has high purity with a nanoporous structure, which renders it a potential candidate for applications such as an adsorbent and a catalyst support.

  19. Production of high-purity isomalto-oligosaccharides syrup by the enzymatic conversion of transglucosidase and fermentation of yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yen-Chung; Lee, Wen-Chien

    2005-03-30

    A method for the production of high-purity isomalto-oligosaccharides (IMO) involving the transglucosylation by transglucosidase and yeast fermentation was proposed. The starch of rice crumbs was enzymatically liquefied and saccharified, and then converted to low-purity IMO syrup by transglucosylation. The low-purity IMO produced either from rice crumbs or tapioca flour as the starch source could be effectively converted to high-purity IMO by yeast fermentation to remove the digestible sugars including glucose, maltose, and maltotriose. Both Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were able to ferment glucose in the IMO syrup. Cells of S. carlsbergensis harvested from the medium of malt juice were also able to ferment maltose and maltotriose. A combination of these two yeasts or S. carlsbergensis alone could be used to totally remove the digestible sugars in the IMO, coupled with the production of ethanol. The resultant high-purity IMO, including mainly isomaltose, panose, and isomaltotriose made up more than 98% w/w of the total sugars after a 3-day fermentation. When the low-purity IMO was produced from the starch of tapioca flour, 3-day fermentation under the same conditions resulted in IMO with purity lower than that from rice crumbs. For low-purity IMO from rice crumbs, fermentation with washed S. carlsbergensis cells harvested at log phase was the most effective. However, for the low-purity IMO from tapioca flour, incubation with S. cerevisiae for the first 24 h and then supplementing with an equal amount of S. carlsbergensis cells for further fermentation was the most effective approach for producing high-purity IMO.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of coagulation factor IX-binding protein from habu snake venom at pH 6.5 and 4.6

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Shikamoto, Yasuo; Fujimoto, Zui; Morita, Takashi; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    Crystals of habu coagulation factor IX-binding protein have been obtained at pH 6.5 and 4.6 and characterized by X-ray diffraction. Coagulation factor IX-binding protein isolated from Trimeresurus flavoviridis (IX-bp) is a C-type lectin-like protein. It is an anticoagulant protein consisting of homologous subunits A and B. The subunits both contain a Ca{sup 2+}-binding site with differing affinity (K{sub d} values of 14 and 130 µM at pH 7.5). These binding characteristics are pH-dependent; under acidic conditions, the affinity of the low-affinity site was reduced considerably. In order to identify which site has high affinity and also to investigate the Ca{sup 2+}-releasing mechanism, IX-bp was crystallized at pH 6.5 and 4.6. The crystals at pH 6.5 and 4.6 diffracted to 1.72 and 2.29 Å resolution, respectively; the former crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.7, b = 63.5, c = 66.9 Å, β = 117.0°, while the latter belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with a = 134.1, b = 37.8, c = 55.8 Å, β = 110.4°.

  1. Intra- and inter-tube exciton relaxation dynamics in high purity semiconducting and metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichida, Masao; Saito, Shingo; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Kataura, Hiromichi; Ando, Hiroaki

    2013-02-01

    We have measured the exciton and carrier dynamics in the high purity semiconducting (S-) and metallic (M-) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in the isolated and aggregated (bundled) forms. The exciton relaxation decay times are measured by using the pump-probe spectroscopy. For bundled samples, the relaxation time becomes shorter than that for isolated SWNTs sample, because of the existence of inter-tube relaxation. We estimate the relaxation rates from S-SWNT to S-SWNT and S-SWNT to M-SWNT using the decay times for isolated SWNTs, high purity S-SWNTs bundle, and doped S-SWNTs in high purity M-SWNTs bundle. For S-SWNTs, inter-tube relaxation plays an important role in the relaxation dynamics. However, for M-SWNTs, the inter-tube relaxation is not so important, and the transition energy and intensity of exciton in M-SWNTs is strongly affected by the photoexcited carriers which plays like as photo doping.

  2. The three-dimensional structure of the first EGF-like module of human factor IX: comparison with EGF and TGF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Baron, M; Norman, D G; Harvey, T S; Handford, P A; Mayhew, M; Tse, A G; Brownlee, G G; Campbell, I D

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the first epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like module from human factor IX has been determined in solution using two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (in the absence of calcium and at pH 4.5). The structure was found to resemble closely that of EGF and the homologous transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha). Residues 60-65 form an antiparallel beta-sheet with residues 68-73. In the C-terminal subdomain a type II beta-turn is found between residues 74 and 77 and a five-residue turn is found between residues 79 and 83. Glu 78 and Leu 84 pair in an antiparallel beta-sheet conformation. In the N-terminal region a loop is found between residues 50 and 55 such that the side chains of both are positioned above the face of the beta-sheet. Residues 56-60 form a turn that leads into the first strand of the beta-sheet. Whereas the global fold closely resembles that of EGF, the N-terminal residues of the module (46-49) do not form a beta-strand but are ill-defined in the structure, probably due to the local flexibility of this region. The structure is discussed with reference to recent site-directed mutagenesis data, which have identified certain conserved residues as ligands for calcium.

  3. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α/hypoxia inducible factor-1α interplay sustains carbonic anhydrase IX and apoliprotein E expression in breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Papi, Alessio; Storci, Gianluca; Guarnieri, Tiziana; De Carolis, Sabrina; Bertoni, Sara; Avenia, Nicola; Sanguinetti, Alessandro; Sidoni, Angelo; Santini, Donatella; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Taffurelli, Mario; Orlandi, Marina; Bonafé, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cell biology is tightly connected to the regulation of the pro-inflammatory cytokine network. The concept of cancer stem cells "inflammatory addiction" leads to envisage the potential role of anti-inflammatory molecules as new anti-cancer targets. Here we report on the relationship between nuclear receptors activity and the modulation of the pro-inflammatory phenotype in breast cancer stem cells. Breast cancer stem cells were expanded as mammospheres from normal and tumor human breast tissues and from tumorigenic (MCF7) and non tumorigenic (MCF10) human breast cell lines. Mammospheres were exposed to the supernatant of breast tumor and normal mammary gland tissue fibroblasts. In mammospheres exposed to the breast tumor fibroblasts supernatant, autocrine tumor necrosis factor-α signalling engenders the functional interplay between peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α and hypoxia inducible factor-1α (PPARα/HIF1α). The two proteins promote mammospheres formation and enhance each other expression via miRNA130b/miRNA17-5p-dependent mechanism which is antagonized by PPARγ. Further, the PPARα/HIF1α interplay regulates the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6, the hypoxia survival factor carbonic anhydrase IX and the plasma lipid carrier apolipoprotein E. Our data demonstrate the importance of exploring the role of nuclear receptors (PPARα/PPARγ) in the regulation of pro-inflammatory pathways, with the aim to thwart breast cancer stem cells functioning.

  4. Fabrication process development for high-purity germanium radiation detectors with amorphous semiconductor contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looker, Quinn

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) radiation detectors are well established as a valuable tool in nuclear science, astrophysics, and nuclear security applications. HPGe detectors excel in gamma-ray spectroscopy, offering excellent energy resolution with large detector sizes for high radiation detection efficiency. Although a robust fabrication process has been developed, improvement is needed, especially in developing electrical contact and surface passivation technology for position-sensitive detectors. A systematic study is needed to understand how the detector fabrication process impacts detector performance and reliability. In order to provide position sensitivity, the electrical contacts are segmented to form multiple electrodes. This segmentation creates new challenges in the fabrication process and warrants consideration of additional detector effects related to the segmentation. A key area of development is the creation of the electrical contacts in a way that enables reliable operation, provides low electronic noise, and allows fine segmentation of electrodes, giving position sensitivity for radiation interactions in the detector. Amorphous semiconductor contacts have great potential to facilitate new HPGe detector designs by providing a thin, high-resistivity surface coating that is the basis for electrical contacts that block both electrons and holes and can easily be finely segmented. Additionally, amorphous semiconductor coatings form a suitable passivation layer to protect the HPGe crystal surface from contamination. This versatility allows a simple fabrication process for fully passivated, finely segmented detectors. However, the fabrication process for detectors with amorphous semiconductors is not as highly developed as for conventional technologies. The amorphous semiconductor layer properties can vary widely based on how they are created and these can translate into varying performance of HPGe detectors with these contacts. Some key challenges include

  5. Intermediate purification of CHO-derived recombinant human Factor IX using hydrophobic interaction membrane-based chromatography and its comparison to a sulfated resin.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Daniel A; Passos, Douglas F; Ferraz, Helen C; Castilho, Leda R

    2017-09-04

    This work investigated the use of hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography for intermediate purification of recombinant human Factor IX (rFIX) produced by CHO cells. The first purification step was based on a strong anion exchange monolith, thus forming a purification process fully based on convective media, which allow operation at high flow rates and low pressure drops, as well as modular scale-up. Although the starting material was challenging (CHO cell culture supernatant harvested at 70% cell viability), the two-step purification process showed promising results, with a global purification factor of 298, a global recovery of 69%, and DNA and endotoxin levels close to regulatory limits. Final host cell DNA (68.8 ng per dose of 500 IU), endotoxins (60 EU per dose of 500 IU) and activated FIX (FIXa/FIX = 2.33%) were in levels close to those recommended by regulatory authorities. HCP removal was of 99.98%, decreasing from 9 424 358 ppm in the supernatant to a final HCP value of 2071 ppm. The use of a supernatant harvested at higher viability and/or the addition of a third polishing step focusing on HCP removal could allow meeting the desired HCP range of 50-100 ppm, as well as the regulatory requirements for the other critical contaminants. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Desensitization and immune tolerance induction in children with severe factor IX deficiency; inhibitors and adverse reactions to replacement therapy: a case-report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Bon, Andrea; Morfini, Massimo; Dini, Alessandro; Mori, Francesca; Barni, Simona; Gianluca, Sottilotta; de Martino, Maurizio; Novembre, Elio

    2015-02-19

    Hemophilia B is a rare X-linked recessive disorder with plasma factor IX (FIX) deficiency. 1-3% of patients treated with exogenous FIX-containing products develop inhibitors (i.e. polyclonal high affinity immunoglobulins) that neutralize the procoagulant activity of a specific coagulation factor. Although the incidence of inhibitors in hemophilia B patients is low, most are "high titer" and frequently associated with the development of severe allergic or anaphylactic reactions. Immune tolerance induction as a strategy for inhibitor eradication was first described in 1984. Unfortunately, the overall reported success of immune tolerance induction in FIX deficiency with inhibitors is approximately 25-40%.We report the case of a 2-year-old boy with hemophilia B severe FIX deficiency (<1%), inhibitor antibodies to FIX development, and a history of adverse reactions to FIX infusions, who underwent a successful desensitization and immune tolerance induction with a daily FIX infusion. With this regimen the inhibitor titer decreased with effective bleeding prevention.

  7. Intercollegiate Athletics and Title IX

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Thomas A.

    1977-01-01

    The application of Title IX and the HEW regulation to intercollegiate sports is described, and the relationships among Title IX, the equal protection doctrine, and the proposed equal rights amendment to the Constitution are assessed. (LBH)

  8. Roles of Carbonic Anhydrase IX in Development of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuji; Dong, Ming; Sheng, Weiwei; Huang, Longping

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to study the effects of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) towards the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic cancer. The expressions of CA IX in 58 cases of pancreatic cancer and paired paracancerous normal tissues, obtained from 2005 to 2012 in the first Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, were detected, as well as its expressions in different pancreatic cancer cell lines, aiming to detect the impacts of CA IX silencing towards the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells. The CA IX expressions in 58 pancreatic cancer cases were higher than those in the paired paracancerous normal tissues (P < 0.01), and positively correlated with the tumor size and the UICC staging UICC (P < 0.05), the multivariate analysis showed that the high expression of CA IX was the independent risk factor towards the prognosis of pancreatic cancer (P < 0.05). The CA IX was highly expressed in AxPC-1 and Miapaca-2, and the interference effects were significant. CA IX silencing could significantly inhibit the invasion and metastasis of AxPC-1 and Miapaca. We support a pro-tumor role of CA IX in the development and progression of pancreatic cancer.

  9. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 86 - Experimentally Determining the R-Factor for Bench Aging Durability Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the R-Factor for Bench Aging Durability Procedures The R-Factor is the catalyst thermal reactivity... several catalysts (minimum of 3 of the same catalyst design) at different control temperatures between the normal operating temperature and the damage limit temperature. Measure emissions (or...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 86 - Experimentally Determining the R-Factor for Bench Aging Durability Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the R-Factor for Bench Aging Durability Procedures The R-Factor is the catalyst thermal reactivity... several catalysts (minimum of 3 of the same catalyst design) at different control temperatures between the normal operating temperature and the damage limit temperature. Measure emissions (or...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 86 - Experimentally Determining the R-Factor for Bench Aging Durability Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-Factor for Bench Aging Durability Procedures The R-Factor is the catalyst thermal reactivity coefficient... several catalysts (minimum of 3 of the same catalyst design) at different control temperatures between the normal operating temperature and the damage limit temperature. Measure emissions (or...

  12. Novel electric power-driven hydrodynamic injection system for gene delivery: safety and efficacy of human factor IX delivery in rats.

    PubMed

    Yokoo, T; Kamimura, K; Suda, T; Kanefuji, T; Oda, M; Zhang, G; Liu, D; Aoyagi, Y

    2013-08-01

    The development of a safe and reproducible gene delivery system is an essential step toward the clinical application of the hydrodynamic gene delivery (HGD) method. For this purpose, we have developed a novel electric power-driven injection system called the HydroJector-EM, which can replicate various time-pressure curves preloaded into the computer program before injection. The assessment of the reproducibility and safety of gene delivery system in vitro and in vivo demonstrated the precise replication of intravascular time-pressure curves and the reproducibility of gene delivery efficiency. The highest level of luciferase expression (272 pg luciferase per mg of proteins) was achieved safely using the time-pressure curve, which reaches 30 mm Hg in 10 s among various curves tested. Using this curve, the sustained expression of a therapeutic level of human factor IX protein (>500 ng ml(-1)) was maintained for 2 months after the HGD of the pBS-HCRHP-FIXIA plasmid. Other than a transient increase in liver enzymes that recovered in a few days, no adverse events were seen in rats. These results confirm the effectiveness of the HydroJector-EM for reproducible gene delivery and demonstrate that long-term therapeutic gene expression can be achieved by automatic computer-controlled hydrodynamic injection that can be performed by anyone.

  13. Transgenic pigs as bioreactors: a comparison of gamma-carboxylation of glutamic acid in recombinant human protein C and factor IX by the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Van Cott, K E; Butler, S P; Russell, C G; Subramanian, A; Lubon, H; Gwazdauskas, F C; Knight, J; Drohan, W N; Velander, W H

    1999-11-01

    The mammary gland of transgenic livestock can be used as a bioreactor for producing complex therapeutic proteins. However, the capacity for making a given post-translational modification upon any given polypeptide is uncertain. For example, the efficiency of gamma-carboxylation of glutamic acid in the amino terminal regions of recombinant human protein C (rhPC) and recombinant human Factor IX (rhFIX) is different at similar expression levels. At an expression level of about 200 microg/ml in the milk of transgenic pigs, rhFIX is highly gamma-carboxylated as indicated by pro-coagulant activity and amino acid sequencing. However, only about 20-35% of rhPC has a native, gamma-carboxyglutamic acid-dependent conformation and anti-coagulant activity. Thus, this work provides an example of apparent differences in substrate specificity between two homologous proteins to the endogenous carboxylase of porcine mammary epithelium which leads to varying degrees of post-translational modification.

  14. Cell-matrix Interactions of Factor IX (FIX)-engineered human mesenchymal stromal cells encapsulated in RGD-alginate vs. fibrinogen-alginate microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Sayyar, Bahareh; Dodd, Megan; Marquez-Curtis, Leah; Janowska-Wieczorek, Anna; Hortelano, Gonzalo

    2014-04-01

    The success of cell microencapsulation technology in tissue engineering and protein delivery applications depends on the viability and functionality of the encapsulated cells, which in turn are dependent upon cell/matrix interactions. In this work, we compared the viability of cord blood-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (CB MSCs), engineered to secrete factor IX (FIX) for hemophilia treatment, and encapsulated in arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD)-alginate versus fibrinogen-alginate microcapsules. We evaluated the effect of the biomimetic matrix on cell attachment, proliferation, and secretion of FIX. Compared with nonsupplemented alginate matrix, RGD-alginate significantly enhanced the viability of the encapsulated MSCs. Further, cells in RGD-alginate displayed distinct attachment morphology, thus suggesting that RGD-alginate can potentially be used for the encapsulation of MSCs in tissue engineering applications that require enhanced cell attachment and viability. However, our data also showed that RGD-alginate microcapsules, in contrast to fibrinogen-alginate microcapsules, did not significantly improve cell proliferation of or FIX secretion by encapsulated MSCs. Our findings suggest that evidence of cell attachment alone may not accurately predict the functionality of cells in biomimetic microcapsules.

  15. Functionally important regions of the factor IX gene have a low rate of polymorphism and a high rate of mutation in the dinucleotide CpG.

    PubMed Central

    Koeberl, D D; Bottema, C D; Buerstedde, J M; Sommer, S S

    1989-01-01

    We have recently described genomic amplification with transcript sequencing (GAWTS), a three-step procedure that allows direct genomic sequencing. By GAWTS more than 100,000 bp of sequence have been generated from eight regions of the factor IX gene, which include the putative promoter region, the coding region, and the splice junctions. All eight regions were examined in 20 unrelated normal individuals of defined ethnicity and subsequently in 22 hemophiliacs in different families. The following three major conclusions emerge: (1) The rate of polymorphism in these eight regions of functional significance has been measured in an X-linked gene, and it is about one-third of the average rate observed for intronic and intergenic sequences on the X chromosome. The rate is low enough that the causative mutation should be the only sequence change seen in the overwhelming majority of hemophiliacs. (2) Transitions of CpG account for 31% (5/16) of the distinct mutations and for 38% (5/13) of the single-base changes. The rate of transitions at CpG is elevated by an estimated 77-fold, presumably owing to lack of repair of thymidine generated by the spontaneous deamination of 5-methylcytidine. (3) High-quality, reproducible sequence data can be obtained on a time scale that makes direct carrier testing and prenatal diagnosis feasible. Images Figure 3 PMID:2773937

  16. The rates of G:C[yields]T:A and G:C[yields]C:G transversions at CpG dinucleotides in the human factor IX gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ketterling, R.P.; Vielhaber, E.; Sommer, S.S. )

    1994-05-01

    The authors have identified eight independent transversions at CpG in 290 consecutive families with hemophilia B. These eight transversions account for 16.3% of all independent transversions in the sample, yet the expected frequency of CpG transversions at random in the factor IX gene is only 2.6% (P<0.1). The aggregate data suggest that the two types of CpG transversions (G:C[yields]T:A and G:C[yields]C:G) possess similar mutation rates (24.8 [times] 10[sup [minus]10] and 20.6 [times] 10[sup [minus]10], respectively), which are about fivefold greater than the comparable rates for transversions at non-CpG dinucleotides. The enhancement of transversions at CpG suggest that the model by which mutations occur at CpG may need to be reevaluated. The relationship, if any, between deamination of 5-methyl cytosine and enhancement of transversions at CpG remains to be defined. 28 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. High Purity Hydrogen Production with In-Situ Carbon Dioxide and Sulfur Capture in a Single Stage Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Nihar Phalak; Shwetha Ramkumar; Daniel Connell; Zhenchao Sun; Fu-Chen Yu; Niranjani Deshpande; Robert Statnick; Liang-Shih Fan

    2011-07-31

    Enhancement in the production of high purity hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from fuel gas, obtained from coal gasification, is limited by thermodynamics of the water gas shift (WGS) reaction. However, this constraint can be overcome by conducting the WGS in the presence of a CO{sub 2}-acceptor. The continuous removal of CO{sub 2} from the reaction mixture helps to drive the equilibrium-limited WGS reaction forward. Since calcium oxide (CaO) exhibits high CO{sub 2} capture capacity as compared to other sorbents, it is an ideal candidate for such a technique. The Calcium Looping Process (CLP) developed at The Ohio State University (OSU) utilizes the above concept to enable high purity H{sub 2} production from synthesis gas (syngas) derived from coal gasification. The CLP integrates the WGS reaction with insitu CO{sub 2}, sulfur and halide removal at high temperatures while eliminating the need for a WGS catalyst, thus reducing the overall footprint of the hydrogen production process. The CLP comprises three reactors - the carbonator, where the thermodynamic constraint of the WGS reaction is overcome by the constant removal of CO{sub 2} product and high purity H{sub 2} is produced with contaminant removal; the calciner, where the calcium sorbent is regenerated and a sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} stream is produced; and the hydrator, where the calcined sorbent is reactivated to improve its recyclability. As a part of this project, the CLP was extensively investigated by performing experiments at lab-, bench- and subpilot-scale setups. A comprehensive techno-economic analysis was also conducted to determine the feasibility of the CLP at commercial scale. This report provides a detailed account of all the results obtained during the project period.

  18. Determination of rare earth impurities in high purity samarium oxide using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after extraction chromatographic separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinquan; Liu, Jinglei; Yi, Yong; Liu, Yonglin; Li, Xiang; Su, Yaqin; Lin, Ping

    2007-01-01

    A method for the determination of trace of 14 rare earth elements (REEs) as impurities in high purity samarium oxide (Sm2O3) using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was described. Analytes, such as La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Gd, Tb, Lu and Y were measured without Sm matrix separation because of no interference problems occurring that could affect the analysis of these elements. On the other hand, analytes, such as Dy, Ho, Er, Tm and Yb were carried out after Sm matrix being eliminated completely by means of 2-ethylhexyl hydrogen-ethylhexy phosphonate (EHEHP) extraction chromatographic separation. The inherent problem associated with matrix-induced suppression was effectively compensated with spiking In as internal standard element and the mass spectra isobaric interferences of atomic and molecular ions arose from Sm matrix had been overcome after the removal of Sm matrix. The limits of quantitations (LOQ) for 14 REEs impurities were from 0.01 to 0.07 [mu]g g-1 together with the recoveries of spiking sample of 14 REEs were found to be in the range of 85-110% and the proposed method precision was less than 5%. A synthetic standard Sm2O3 sample with well-known 14 REEs concentrations was prepared and analysed in order to prove the accuracy and precision of the proposed method together with another high purity Sm2O3 was also measured using ICP-MS. The methodology had been found to be suitable for the determination of trace of 14 REEs in 99.999-99.9999% high purity Sm2O3.

  19. Sintering, microstructural, radiographic, and strength characterization of a high-purity Si3N4-based composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiser, J. D.; Sanders, W. A.; Mieskowski, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    A commercially available high purity alpha-Si3N4 powder (UBE SN-E10) was characterized, milled with additives, and sintered in a high-pressure nitrogen atmosphere at temperatures ranging from 1750 to 2140 C. The composition selected for this study has been previously examined using a different alpha-Si3N4 powder. Densification behavior, microstructure characteristics, X-radiographic appearance, room- and high-temperatures flexural strength, and fracture-initiating flaw sites were determined. The high-temperature flexural strengths significantly exceeded those observed in the earlier studies using an identical composition (different alpha-Si3N4 powder) and similar processing techniques.

  20. Characterization of Intrinsic Defects in High-Purity High-Resistivity p-Type 6H-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Hideharu; Yanase, Hirokazu; Takahashi, Miyuki

    2008-09-01

    The densities, cross sections, and energy levels of intrinsic defects in high-purity high-resistivity (approximately 106 Ω cm) p-type 6H-SiC are determined using isothermal capacitance transient spectroscopy (ICTS). Five intrinsic defects are detected ranging from 0.76 to 1.35 eV above the valence band. Since the sum of the densities of intrinsic defects detected is the same order of magnitude as the acceptor density in the p-type 6H-SiC, the intrinsic defects are found to decrease the majority-carrier concentration making its resistivity as high as approximately 106 Ω cm.

  1. Gas chromatographic separation of nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and carbon monoxide using custom-made porous polymers from high purity divinylbenzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.; Ohara, D.; Hollis, O. L.

    1984-01-01

    Existing porous polymers were surveyed for their ability to separate the subject gases. Certain products that showed more promise than others were synthesized and the existing synthetic procedures studied and modified to produce new polymers with enhanced ability to separate the subject gases. Evaluation of the porous polymers was carried out practically by gas chromatography at ambient temperature. The modified synthetic procedures were somewhat simpler than the originals. The new porous polymers made with high purity divinylbenzene enabled use of shorter columns to obtain the separations desired.

  2. High-purity hydrogen generation by ultraviolet illumination with the membrane composed of titanium dioxide nanotube array and Pd layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Masashi; Noda, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi

    2011-09-01

    High-purity hydrogen generation was observed by using a membrane composed of a bilayer of an anodized titanium dioxide nanotube array (TNA) and a hydrogen permeable metal. This membrane was fabricated by transferring a TNA embedded in a titanium foil onto a sputtered 10-μm-thick palladium film. Alcohols are reformed photocatalytically and concurrently generated hydrogen is purified through the Pd layer. H2 with a purity of more than 99% was obtained from liquid alcohols under ultraviolet illumination onto the membrane. Thus, we demonstrated the integration of photocatalytic hydrogen production and purification within a single membrane.

  3. Using standard calibrated geometries to characterize a coaxial high purity germanium gamma detector for Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Graaf, E. R.; Dendooven, P.; Brandenburg, S.

    2014-06-01

    A detector model optimization procedure based on matching Monte Carlo simulations with measurements for two experimentally calibrated sample geometries which are frequently used in radioactivity measurement laboratories results in relative agreement within 5% between simulated and measured efficiencies for a high purity germanium detector. The optimization procedure indicated that the increase in dead layer thickness is largely responsible for a detector efficiency decrease in time. The optimized detector model allows Monte Carlo efficiency calibration for all other samples of which the geometry and bulk composition is known. The presented method is a competitive and economic alternative to more elaborate detector scanning methods and results in a comparable accuracy.

  4. Using standard calibrated geometries to characterize a coaxial high purity germanium gamma detector for Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    van der Graaf, E R; Dendooven, P; Brandenburg, S

    2014-06-01

    A detector model optimization procedure based on matching Monte Carlo simulations with measurements for two experimentally calibrated sample geometries which are frequently used in radioactivity measurement laboratories results in relative agreement within 5% between simulated and measured efficiencies for a high purity germanium detector. The optimization procedure indicated that the increase in dead layer thickness is largely responsible for a detector efficiency decrease in time. The optimized detector model allows Monte Carlo efficiency calibration for all other samples of which the geometry and bulk composition is known. The presented method is a competitive and economic alternative to more elaborate detector scanning methods and results in a comparable accuracy.

  5. Magnetic and magnetothermal properties and the magnetic phase diagram of high purity single crystalline terbium along the easy magnetization direction.

    PubMed

    Zverev, V I; Tishin, A M; Chernyshov, A S; Mudryk, Ya; Gschneidner, K A; Pecharsky, V K

    2014-02-12

    The magnetic and magnetothermal properties of a high purity terbium single crystal have been re-investigated from 1.5 to 350 K in magnetic fields ranging from 0 to 75 kOe using magnetization, ac magnetic susceptibility and heat capacity measurements. The magnetic phase diagram has been refined by establishing a region of the fan-like phase broader than reported in the past, by locating a tricritical point at 226 K, and by a more accurate definition of the critical fields and temperatures associated with the magnetic phases observed in Tb.

  6. Magnetic and magnetothermal properties and the magnetic phase diagram of high purity single crystalline terbium along the easy magnetization direction

    SciTech Connect

    Zverev, V. I.; Tishin, A. M.; Chernyshov, A. S.; Mudryk, Ya; Gschneidner Jr., Karl A.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    2014-01-21

    The magnetic and magnetothermal properties of a high purity terbium single crystal have been re-investigated from 1.5 to 350 K in magnetic fields ranging from 0 to 75 kOe using magnetization, ac magnetic susceptibility and heat capacity measurements. The magnetic phase diagram has been refined by establishing a region of the fan-like phase broader than reported in the past, by locating a tricritical point at 226 K, and by a more accurate definition of the critical fields and temperatures associated with the magnetic phases observed in Tb.

  7. Using standard calibrated geometries to characterize a coaxial high purity germanium gamma detector for Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Graaf, E. R. van der Dendooven, P.; Brandenburg, S.

    2014-06-15

    A detector model optimization procedure based on matching Monte Carlo simulations with measurements for two experimentally calibrated sample geometries which are frequently used in radioactivity measurement laboratories results in relative agreement within 5% between simulated and measured efficiencies for a high purity germanium detector. The optimization procedure indicated that the increase in dead layer thickness is largely responsible for a detector efficiency decrease in time. The optimized detector model allows Monte Carlo efficiency calibration for all other samples of which the geometry and bulk composition is known. The presented method is a competitive and economic alternative to more elaborate detector scanning methods and results in a comparable accuracy.

  8. Gas chromatographic separation of nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and carbon monoxide using custom-made porous polymers from high purity divinylbenzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.; Ohara, D.; Hollis, O. L.

    1984-01-01

    Existing porous polymers were surveyed for their ability to separate the subject gases. Certain products that showed more promise than others were synthesized and the existing synthetic procedures studied and modified to produce new polymers with enhanced ability to separate the subject gases. Evaluation of the porous polymers was carried out practically by gas chromatography at ambient temperature. The modified synthetic procedures were somewhat simpler than the originals. The new porous polymers made with high purity divinylbenzene enabled use of shorter columns to obtain the separations desired.

  9. Preparation of uniform nanoparticles of ultra-high purity metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, metals, and metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Woodfield, Brian F.; Liu, Shengfeng; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Liu, Qingyuan; Smith, Stacey Janel

    2012-07-03

    In preferred embodiments, metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal (alloy) nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal oxide nanoparticles are provided. According to embodiments, the nanoparticles may possess narrow size distributions and high purities. In certain preferred embodiments, methods of preparing metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal nanoparticles are provided. These methods may provide tight control of particle size, size distribution, and oxidation state. Other preferred embodiments relate to a precursor material that may be used to form nanoparticles. In addition, products prepared from such nanoparticles are disclosed.

  10. Processing and properties of high-purity, fine-grain-size depleted-uranium, deep-drawn shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, R J; Lundberg, M R; Bruchey, W L

    1980-10-01

    Unalloyed uranium is a candidate material for shaped charge liners used in conventional ordinance applications. For test purposes, it was decided that a high-grade uranium material with good toughness should be used. This report describes a process for producing a high-purity (less than 500 ppM total impurities) wrought material consisting of a recrystallized, equiaxed grain structure with a 10 micron (ASTM-8) average grain size. The fabrication process is discussed in detail. In all, six material conditions having a wide range of mechanical and structural properties were investigated. The tensile, hardness, and microstructural properties of these six material conditions are reported in detail.

  11. Rapid Single-Stage Separation of Micrometer-Long and High-Purity Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes by Gel Filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thendie, Boanerges; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Kitaura, Ryo; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Matsuda, Kazunari; Shinohara, Hisanori

    2013-06-01

    We demonstrate the separation of high-purity, long semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) by single-stage gel filtration. Semiconducting SWCNTs are preferentially adsorbed on an allyl dextran-based gel column and then eluted with surfactant solution at a rate that depends on nanotube length as well as electronic type of nanotubes. These differences allow the separation of length-sorted and purity-enhanced s-SWCNTs by fractionated collection of the eluate, which provides the desired nanotubes for electronic device applications.

  12. Ion chromatographic preconcentration of Cu and Cd from ultra-high-purity water and determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scaccia, S; Zappa, G; Basili, N

    2001-04-27

    A method based on preconcentration of Cu and Cd from ultra-high-purity water by ion chromatography (IC) and determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry is described. A small low-capacity ion-exchange concentrator Dionex HPIC-CG5 and mobile phase of 3 mM pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (PDCA) are used. Water samples are loaded onto the preconcentration column at a flow-rate ranging from 1 to 3.5 ml min(-1). Large sample volumes (up to 200 ml) can be loaded onto the concentrator without losing metal ions. Elution is carried out in the reverse direction of sample loading and the volumes of effluent are as small as 0.150 and 0.200 ml for copper and cadmium, respectively. Under these conditions the preconcentrated ions coelute. The detection limits, based on the Hubaux-Vos method, for Cu using a 1300-fold preconcentration in the IC step was found to be 1 pg ml(-1), and was limited due to impurity in PDCA, while the detection limit found for Cd using a 1000-fold preconcentration was 0.02 pg ml(-1). Ultra-high-purity water produced by a Millipore system is successfully analysed by the proposed method and the content of Cu and Cd are found to lie in the range 1-10 pg ml(-1).

  13. Tensile properties and interfacial bonding of multi-layered, high-purity titanium strips fabricated by ARB process.

    PubMed

    Ghafari-Gousheh, Soroush; Nedjad, Syamak Hossein; Khalil-Allafi, Jafar

    2015-11-01

    Severe plastic deformation (SPD) processing has shown very effective in promotion of mechanical properties of metals and alloys. In this study, the results of investigating mechanical properties and also inter-layer bond performance of accumulative roll bonded high purity titanium (HP-Ti) strips are presented. High purity titanium plates were severely deformed by use of a combination of cold rolling (CR) to a thickness reduction of approximately 87% and then accumulative roll bonding (ARB) for three cycles (N=3) at ambient temperature. Optical and scanning electron microscopy, tensile testing, and hardness measurements were conducted. The ARB strips exhibited lower tensile strength and ductility in comparison to cold rolled one which can basically be attributed to the poor function of the latest bonds established in the centerlines of the strips. Fractographic examinations revealed the interfacial de-bonding along the centerline between the layers having undergone roll bonding for just one cycle. It was while the interfaces having experienced roll bonding for more cycles showed much higher resistance against delaminating.

  14. High purity recombinant human Growth Hormone (rhGH) expression in Escherichia coli under phoA promoter.

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Jiang, Jingxin; Wang, Xuedong; Zhang, Jianguo

    2016-07-26

    ABSTACT Recombinant human Growth Hormone (rhGH) is an important protein for human growth and is in high demand in clinics. Hence, it is necessary to develop an efficient fermentation process to produce highly pure rhGH. In this study, rhGH was expressed in Escherichia coli under alkaline phosphatase (phoA) promoter. The cultivation conditions for high expression level and purity of rhGH were investigated. The best initial phosphate concentration for rhGH expression, out of the 4 levels of initial phosphate concentration tests performed, was 12.6 mmol/L. Subsequently, 2 fed-batch cultivations under low dissolved oxygen (DO) (0% - 10%) and high DO (20% - 30%) conditions were carried out. High purity rhGH (92%) was obtained from 20% - 30% DO-stat cultivation, although the biomass did not show any significant difference. In summary, this research provided an efficient fermentation process for high purity rhGH production from E. coli under phoA promoter, which can lower the production and purification costs for large-scale production of rhGH.

  15. Impurity analyses of high-purity carbon monoxide gas using micro gas chromatography for development as a certified reference material.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Watanabe, Takuro; Kato, Kenji

    2013-03-22

    High-purity carbon monoxide (CO) gas as a certified reference material (CRM) was analyzed using a micro gas chromatograph (micro-GC) with a micro thermal conductivity detector. The main reason to select the micro-GC was its compact size to provide a safe experimental environment. Thus, both the CO gas cylinder and the micro-GC were placed inside a draft shield with a limited small space. Peaks of several impurities were found in chromatograms of the micro-GC. The main impurities in the CO gas were helium, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon dioxide. It was found that helium was the impurity of the highest concentration. High-accuracy calibration gas mixtures were used to construct calibration lines for the micro-GC. The mixtures were precisely prepared by the gravimetric blending method. Calibration lines had enough linearity and accuracy for quantitative analyses of the impurities. The values of detection limit of the impurities were 0.7-4μmol/mol. The purity of the high-purity CO gas was around 99.996%, which was the value estimated from the sum of the concentrations of the impurities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Determination of trace elements in high purity alumina powder by helium enhanced direct current glow discharge mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sehoon; Kim, Sunhye; Hinrichs, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Trace impurities in high purity alumina powder were determined by fast flow direct current glow discharge mass spectrometry (GD-MS). The non-conductive samples were prepared with high purity graphite powder and used as a sample binder and as a secondary cathode. To improve the sensitivity of the GD-MS analysis, helium was introduced as an additional glow discharge gas to argon plasma. The quantification results of the GD-MS measurement were calculated by external calibration with matrix matched certified reference materials. The GD-MS results for the determination of Na, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Ga in the alumina samples agreed well with the certified values of a reference material and the results of chemical analysis using wet sample digestion with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The GD-MS analysis is a rapid analysis technique to determine trace elements in non-conductive alumina to below mg·kg- 1 levels.

  17. [Determination of trace impurities in high purity titanium dioxide by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Mei; Xie, Hua-Lin; Nie, Xi-Du; Tang, You-Gen

    2007-06-01

    An analytical method using high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS) for the rapid simultaneous determination of twenty six elements (Be, Na, Mg, Al, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Mo, Cd, Sn, Sb, Ba, Ce, Nd, Sm, Pt, Pb and Bi) in high purity titanium dioxide was described. Samples were decomposed by (NH4)2SO4 and H2SO4. Most of the spectral interferences could be avoided by measuring in the high-resolution mode. The matrix effects due to the presence of excess sulfuric acid and Ti were evaluated. The optimum conditions for the determination were tested and discussed. The standard addition method was employed for quantitative analysis. The detection limits are 0.004-0.63 microg x g(-1), the recovery ratio is 87.6%-106.4%, and the RSD is less than 3.5%. The method is accurate, quick and convenient. It has been applied to the determination of trace impurities in high purity titanium dioxide with satisfactory results.

  18. Matrix Elimination Ion Chromatography Method for the Determination of Trace Levels of Anionic Impurities in High Purity Cesium Iodide

    PubMed Central

    Ayushi; Kumar, Sangita D.; Reddy, A.V.R.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study an ion chromatographic method based on matrix elimination has been developed for the determination of anionic impurities in high purity cesium iodide crystals. The presence of impurities has a detrimental effect on the characteristics of detectors based on cesium iodide crystals. In particular, oxygen-containing anions inhibit the resolving power of scintillators and decrease the optical absorption. The quantitative determination of anions (fluoride, chloride, bromide, nitrate, phosphate, and sulphate) simultaneously in the high-purity cesium iodide crystals has not been carried out before. The large concentration of iodide poses a challenge in the determination of anions (especially phosphate and sulphate); hence, matrix elimination is accomplished by adopting a sample pretreatment technique. The method is validated for linearity, accuracy, and precision. The limit of detection for different anions is in the range of 0.3–3 µg/g, and the relative standard deviation is in the range of 4–6% for the overall method. PMID:22291061

  19. Qualification and initial characterization of a high-purity 233U spike for use in uranium analyses

    DOE PAGES

    Mathew, K. J.; Canaan, R. D.; Hexel, C.; ...

    2015-08-20

    Several high-purity 233U items potentially useful as isotope dilution mass spectrometry standards for safeguards, non-proliferation, and nuclear forensics measurements are identified and rescued from downblending. By preserving the supply of 233U materials of different pedigree for use as source materials for certified reference materials (CRMs), it is ensured that the safeguards community has high quality uranium isotopic standards required for calibration of the analytical instruments. One of the items identified as a source material for a high-purity CRM is characterized for the uranium isotope-amount ratios using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Additional verification measurements on this material using quadrupole inductivelymore » coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) are also performed. As a result, the comparison of the ICPMS uranium isotope-amount ratios with the TIMS data, with much smaller uncertainties, validated the ICPMS measurement practices. ICPMS is proposed for the initial screening of the purity of items in the rescue campaign.« less

  20. Qualification and initial characterization of a high-purity 233U spike for use in uranium analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, K. J.; Canaan, R. D.; Hexel, C.; Giaquinto, J.; Krichinsky, A. M.

    2015-08-20

    Several high-purity 233U items potentially useful as isotope dilution mass spectrometry standards for safeguards, non-proliferation, and nuclear forensics measurements are identified and rescued from downblending. By preserving the supply of 233U materials of different pedigree for use as source materials for certified reference materials (CRMs), it is ensured that the safeguards community has high quality uranium isotopic standards required for calibration of the analytical instruments. One of the items identified as a source material for a high-purity CRM is characterized for the uranium isotope-amount ratios using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Additional verification measurements on this material using quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) are also performed. As a result, the comparison of the ICPMS uranium isotope-amount ratios with the TIMS data, with much smaller uncertainties, validated the ICPMS measurement practices. ICPMS is proposed for the initial screening of the purity of items in the rescue campaign.

  1. Multicentre, randomized, open-label study of on-demand treatment with two prophylaxis regimens of recombinant coagulation factor IX in haemophilia B subjects.

    PubMed

    Valentino, L A; Rusen, L; Elezovic, I; Smith, L M; Korth-Bradley, J M; Rendo, P

    2014-05-01

    Few randomized studies have reported on the use of factor IX (FIX) for secondary prophylaxis in haemophilia B patients. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of two secondary prophylaxis regimens of recombinant coagulation FIX, nonacog alfa, compared with on-demand therapy. Male subjects aged 6-65 years with severe or moderately severe haemophilia B (FIX:C ≤ 2, n = 50) and ≥12 bleeding episodes (including ≥6 haemarthroses episodes) within 12 months of study participation were enrolled in this multicentre, randomized, open-label, four-period crossover trial. The primary measure was the annualized bleeding rate (ABR) of two prophylactic regimens vs. on-demand therapy. In the intent-to-treat group, mean ABR values were 35.1, 2.6 and 4.6 for the first on-demand period, the 50 IU kg(-1) twice-weekly period, and the 100 IU kg(-1) once-weekly period respectively. Differences in ABR between the first on-demand period and both prophylaxis regimens were significant (P < 0.0001); no significant differences were observed between prophylaxis regimens (P = 0.22). Seven serious adverse events occurred in five subjects, none related to study drug. Results demonstrated that secondary prophylaxis therapy with nonacog alfa 50 IU kg(-1) twice weekly or 100 IU kg(-1) once weekly reduced ABR by 89.4% relative to on-demand treatment. Both prophylaxis regimens demonstrated favourable safety profiles in subjects with haemophilia B.

  2. Recombinant long-acting glycoPEGylated factor IX (nonacog beta pegol) in haemophilia B: assessment of target joints in multinational phase 3 clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Negrier, C; Young, G; Abdul Karim, F; Collins, P W; Hanabusa, H; Colberg, T; Goldman, B; Walsh, C E

    2016-07-01

    The paradigm(™) 2 and 4 phase 3 clinical trials investigated the safety and efficacy of nonacog beta pegol, a recombinant glycoPEGylated factor IX (FIX) with extended half-life, in previously treated haemophilia B patients. These post hoc analyses investigated the bleeding patterns in target joints. Patients randomized to 40 or 10 IU kg(-1) once weekly prophylaxis who had at least one target joint were included. Baseline demographics and disease-specific data were collected. Bleeding patterns were assessed, and an International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) definition of target joints was used. A total of 67% and 8% of patients in the 40 and 10 IU kg(-1) arm, respectively, did not experience target joint bleeds during the paradigm(™) 2 trial. Twenty-four target joints were recorded in each prophylaxis arm at baseline. During the paradigm(™) 2 trial, no bleeds were reported in 17 (71%) and 7 (29%) target joints in the 40 and 10 IU kg(-1) arms respectively. All target joint bleeds in the 40 IU kg(-1) once weekly prophylaxis arm were controlled with a single injection of 40 IU kg(-1) nonacog beta pegol. By the latest ISTH definition, 90% and 58% of target joints in the 40 and 10 IU kg(-1) arms, respectively, were no longer considered target joints at the end of the paradigm(™) 2 trial. At the end of the paradigm(™) 4 extension trial, all target joints in the 40 IU kg(-1) arm were no longer considered target joints. Routine prophylaxis with 40 IU kg(-1) once weekly nonacog beta pegol has the potential for effective management of target joint bleeds in haemophilia B patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Platelets, glycoprotein Ib-IX, and von Willebrand factor are required for FeCl3-induced occlusive thrombus formation in the inferior vena cava of mice

    PubMed Central

    Joglekar, M.; Ware, Jerry; Xu, Jin; Fitzgerald, Malinda E. C.; Gartner, T. Kent

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a leading cause of death from cardiovascular disease. Despite the importance of the glycoprotein (GP) Ib-IX/von Willebrand factor (vWF) axis in arterial thrombosis, its requirement in venous, not venule thrombosis in response to endothelial injury (not stenosis or stasis) is uncharacterized. GPIbα-vWF participation in FeCl3-induced thrombus formation was evaluated in the inferior vena cava (IVC). Stable, occlusive thrombus formation in response to FeCl3-induced injury of the IVC was studied. FeCl3 (20% FeCl3, 10 minutes)-induced occlusive thrombosis required platelets as confirmed by a lack of occlusion in thrombocytopenic mice, and stable occlusion in control animals. No IVC occlusion was observed using GPIbα-deficient animals, a model of the human Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BSS). Transgenic IL-4R/GPIbα mice (lack murine GPIbα, but express the extracellular domain of the human interleukin (IL)-4 receptor fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of human GPIbα), were studied to determine if the absence of IVC occlusion in the BSS mouse was caused by GPIbα extracellular domain deficiency rather than platelet BSS phenotype associated abnormalities. As with GPIbα knock-out (KO) mice, no occlusion was observed in the IVC of IL-4R/GPIbα mice. The IVC of vWF-deficient mice also failed to occlude in response to FeCl3 treatment. The chimeric protein GPIbα(2V)-Fc prevented occlusion, demonstrating that GPIbα-vWF A1 domain interaction is required for FeCl3-induced stable thrombus formation in the IVC. Therefore, FeCl3-induced stable, occlusive thrombus formation in the IVC is platelet, GPIbα-vWF interaction-dependent despite the large diameter and low venous flow rate in the IVC. PMID:22720736

  4. An ordered sequential mechanism for Factor IX and Factor IXa binding to platelet receptors in the assembly of the Factor X-activating complex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xia; Walsh, Peter N

    2005-08-15

    To define the contributions of the Omega-loop of the Gla (gamma-carboxyglutamic acid) domain and the EGF2 (second epidermal growth factor) domain of FIXa (Factor IXa) in the assembly of the FX-activating complex on activated platelets and phospholipid membranes, three recombinant FIXa chimeras were prepared with corresponding residues from the homologous coagulation protein, FVII: (i) Gly4-Gln11 (FIXa7Omegaloop), (ii) Cys88-Cys124 (FIXa7EGF2), and (iii) both Gly4-Gln11 and Cys88-Cys124 (FIXa7Omegaloop7EGF2). All three chimeras were similar to wild-type FIXa, as assessed by SDS/PAGE, active-site titration, content of Gla residues, activation rates by FXIa and rates of FXa generation in solution. Titrations of FX or FVIIIa on SFLLRN peptide-activated platelets and on phospholipid vesicles in the presence of FVIIIa revealed normal substrate and cofactor binding to all chimeras. In kinetic assays in the presence of phospholipid vesicles and FVIIIa, compared with wild-type FIXa K(d, app) approximately 4 nM, the FIX7Omegaloop chimera showed a 1.6-fold increase in K(d, app), the FIX7EGF2 chimera had a 7.4-fold increase in K(d, app), and the FIX7Omegaloop7EGF2 chimera showed a 21-fold increase in K(d, app). In kinetic assays and equilibrium platelet-binding assays with activated platelets and FVIIIa, compared with wild-type FIXa (V(max) approximately 5 nM min(-1); K(d, app) approximately 0.5 nM; B(max) approximately 550 sites/platelet; K(d) approximately 0.5 nM), the FIX7Omegaloop chimera displayed 2-fold decreases in V(max) and B(max) and 2-fold increases in K(d, app) and K(d). The FIX7EGF2 chimera displayed 2-fold decreases in V(max) and B(max) and 10-fold increases in K(d, app) and K(d). The FIX7Omegaloop7EGF2 chimera showed non-saturable curves and severely impaired rates of FXa generation, and non-saturable, non-specific, low-level binding to activated platelets. Thus both the Gla domain Omega-loop (Gly4-Gln11) and the EGF2 domain (Cys88-Cys124) are required to

  5. High purity 100 GeV electron identification with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depero, E.; Banerjee, D.; Burtsev, V.; Chumakov, A.; Cooke, D.; Dermenev, A. V.; Donskov, S. V.; Dubinin, F.; Dusaev, R. R.; Emmenegger, S.; Fabich, A.; Frolov, V. N.; Gardikiotis, A.; Gninenko, S. N.; Hösgen, M.; Karneyeu, A. E.; Ketzer, B.; Kirsanov, M. M.; Konorov, I. V.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lyubovitskij, V. E.; Lysan, V.; Matveev, V. A.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Myalkovskiy, V. V.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peshekhonov, D. V.; Polyakov, V. A.; Radics, B.; Rubbia, A.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tlisov, D. A.; Toropin, A. N.; Vasilishin, B.; Arenas, G. Vasquez; Ulloa, P.; Crivelli, P.

    2017-09-01

    In high energy experiments such as active beam dump searches for rare decays and missing energy events, the beam purity is a crucial parameter. In this paper we present a technique to reject heavy charged particle contamination in the 100 GeV electron beam of the H4 beam line at CERN SPS. The method is based on the detection with BGO scintillators of the synchrotron radiation emitted by the electrons passing through a bending dipole magnet. A 100 GeV π- beam is used to test the method in the NA64 experiment resulting in a suppression factor of 10-5 while the efficiency for electron detection is ∼95%. The spectra and the rejection factors are in very good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation. The reported suppression factors are significantly better than previously achieved.

  6. ARES I-X Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-27

    NASA Ares I-X Launch Director Ed Mango, left, laughs as NASA Ares I-X Assistant Launch Director Pete Nickolenko looks out the window of Firing Room One of the Launch Control Center (LCC) at the Kennedy Space Center prior to the launch of the Ares I-X rocket from pad 39b at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2009. The flight test of Ares I-X will provide NASA with an early opportunity to test and prove flight characteristics, hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with the Ares I. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. Effect of a low molecular weight, high-purity β-glucan on in vitro digestion and glycemic response.

    PubMed

    Thondre, Pariyarath Sangeetha; Henry, Christiani Jeya Kumar

    2011-11-01

    β-Glucans are believed to lower postprandial glycemia due to their ability to increase viscosity and slow down gastric emptying. The effect of high-purity barley β-glucan (Glucagel) was tested on in vitro starch digestibility and glycemic response of chapattis. In a randomized controlled crossover trial, 10 healthy human subjects consumed chapattis containing 0, 4 and 8% β-glucan on different occasions. Capillary blood samples were collected before and at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min after consuming the chapattis. There was no significant difference either in the amount of glucose released after in vitro digestion or in the glycemic response to chapattis with 0, 4 and 8% β-glucan (P>0.05). It may be concluded that low molecular weight barley β-glucan, although of 75% purity, was not effective in lowering glycemic response possibly due to its inability to influence starch digestion and particle breakdown during in vitro digestion.

  8. Enhanced quantum efficiency of high-purity silicon imaging detectors by ultralow temperature surface modification using Sb doping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Hoenk, Michael E.; Elliott, S. Tom; Holland, Stephen E.; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2005-01-01

    A low temperature process for Sb doping of silicon has been developed as a backsurface treatment for high-purity n-type imaging detectors. Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is used to achieve very high dopant incorporation in a thin, surface-confined layer. The growth temperature is kept below 450 (deg)C for compatibility with Al-metallized devices. Imaging with MBE-modified 1kx1k charge coupled devices (CCDs) operated in full depletion has been demonstrated. Dark current is comparable to the state-of-the-art process, which requires a high temperature step. Quantum efficiency is improved, especially in the UV, for thin doped layers placed closer to the backsurface. Near 100% internal quantum efficiency has been demonstrated in the ultraviolet for a CCD with a 1.5 nm silicon cap layer.

  9. Industrial-scale separation of high-purity single-chirality single-wall carbon nanotubes for biological imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yomogida, Yohei; Tanaka, Takeshi; Zhang, Minfang; Yudasaka, Masako; Wei, Xiaojun; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2016-06-01

    Single-chirality, single-wall carbon nanotubes are desired due to their inherent physical properties and performance characteristics. Here, we demonstrate a chromatographic separation method based on a newly discovered chirality-selective affinity between carbon nanotubes and a gel containing a mixture of the surfactants. In this system, two different selectivities are found: chiral-angle selectivity and diameter selectivity. Since the chirality of nanotubes is determined by the chiral angle and diameter, combining these independent selectivities leads to high-resolution single-chirality separation with milligram-scale throughput and high purity. Furthermore, we present efficient vascular imaging of mice using separated single-chirality (9,4) nanotubes. Due to efficient absorption and emission, blood vessels can be recognized even with the use of ~100-fold lower injected dose than the reported value for pristine nanotubes. Thus, 1 day of separation provides material for up to 15,000 imaging experiments, which is acceptable for industrial use.

  10. Role of Chemical Driving Force in Martensitic Transformations of High-Purity Fe-Cr-Ni Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behjati, P.; Najafizadeh, A.

    2011-12-01

    The main objective of the present work is to point out the respective roles of chemical driving force and stacking fault energy (SFE) in the occurrence of martensitic transformations in high-purity Fe-Cr-Ni alloys. For this purpose, the transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffractometer, thermal differential microanalyzer (TDA), and tension test were employed to report M s temperatures, austenite stacking fault energies, and driving forces for the concerned alloys. It was observed that the martensitic transformations in the studied alloys occur through the γ → ɛ → α' steps. As a remarkable result, it was shown that a low SFE, if necessary to ɛ-phase nucleation, is not a sufficient condition for nucleation of α' phase. In fact, the formation of stable α' nuclei from α' embryos occur if the required chemical driving force is provided. Also, an equation was proposed for the kinetics of spontaneous martensitic transformation as a function of driving force.

  11. Microfluidic Pipette Tip for High-Purity and High-Throughput Blood Plasma Separation from Whole Blood.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byeongyeon; Oh, Sein; You, Dongwon; Choi, Sungyoung

    2017-02-07

    Blood plasma separation from whole blood is often limited by numerous blood cells which can compromise separation processes and thus deteriorate separation performance such as purity and throughput. To address this challenge, we present a microfluidic pipet tip composed of slant array ridges that enable autonomous blood cell focusing without significant deviation as well as facilitating a high degree of parallelization without compromising separation purity. With these advantages, we achieved high-purity (99.88%) and high-throughput (904.3 μL min(-1)) plasma separation from whole blood. In combination with a smart pipet, we successfully demonstrated rapid, inexpensive, and equipment-free blood plasma preparation for pretransfusion testing.

  12. Seed-mediated synthesis of gold octahedra in high purity and with well-controlled sizes and optical properties.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Youb; Li, Weiyang; Ma, Yanyun; Yu, Taekyung; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Park, O Ok; Xia, Younan

    2011-04-18

    We report a facile method for the synthesis of uniform Au octahedra with well-controlled sizes and optical properties by seed-mediated growth. Starting from single-crystal seeds of Au spheres with a uniform size, we could reproducibly obtain Au octahedra with a narrow size distribution (<7% in standard deviation) and in high purity (>90%). Moreover, the edge lengths of these Au octahedra could be readily tuned in a controllable fashion from 16 to 77 nm by varying the amount of seeds, the concentration of HAuCl(4) , or both. We have also investigated the effects of water and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) in the system, as well as the reaction temperature, on the evolution of octahedral shape. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Carbon ejection from a SiO2/SiC(0001) interface by annealing in high-purity Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takuma; Kimoto, Tsunenobu

    2017-08-01

    We found that carbon-associated byproducts formed at the dry-oxidized SiO2/SiC(0001) interface could be decomposed and emitted on the SiO2 side by high-purity Ar annealing. We measured the concentration of ejected carbon atoms in SiO2 by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and found that it strongly depended on the condition of oxide formation (dry-oxidation, nitridation treatment, and phosphorus treatment). This work provides indirect but unambiguous evidence for the formation of carbon byproducts at the SiO2/SiC interface, and indicates that phosphorus treatment removes these byproducts, leading to a significant reduction in interface defects.

  14. Phase transformations of high-purity PbI2 nanoparticles synthesized from lead-acid accumulator anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malevu, T. D.; Ocaya, R. O.; Tshabalala, K. G.

    2016-09-01

    High-purity hexagonal lead iodide nanoparticles have been synthesized from a depleted sealed lead acid battery anode. The synthesized product was found to consist of the rare 6R polytype form of PbI2 that is thought to have good potential in photovoltaic applications. We investigate the effects of annealing time and post-melting temperature on the structure and optical properties using 1.5418 Å CuKα radiation. Photoluminescence measurements were done under 150 W/221 nm wavelength xenon excitation. Phase transformation was observed through XRD peaks when annealing time increased from 0.5-5 h. The nanoparticle grain size and inter-planar distance appeared to be independent of annealing time. PL measurements show three broad peaks in a range of 400 nm to 700 nm that are attributed to excitonic, donor-acceptor pair and luminescence bands from the deep levels.

  15. Purification of Al(OH)3 synthesized by Bayer process for preparation of high purity alumina as sapphire raw material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, No-Kuk; Choi, Hee-Young; Kim, Do-Hyeong; Lee, Tae Jin; Kang, Misook; Lee, Won Gun; Kim, Heun Duk; Park, Joon Woo

    2013-06-01

    To produce high purity alumina as the raw material for sapphire growth, gibbsite, which is the precursor for the synthesis of alumina, was synthesized by the Bayer process, and treated with an acid solution to remove the sodium component. In this study, the digestion process was carried out under the following conditions: an Al/Na ratio of 0.9 with a 5 N NaOH solution and a temperature of 140 °C. Bauxite containing 75 wt% alumina was converted to a sodium aluminate solution, and 60 wt% of the dissolved aluminate was crystallized to gibbsite. The sodium content in the gibbsite, which was measured by inductively coupled plasma/optical emission spectroscopy, was reduced by approximately 5700 ppm and below 2900 ppm after the water washing and acid treatments, respectively. The sodium content decreased with increasing acid concentration in the solution, temperature and acid treatment time.

  16. Large-scale fabrication of boron nitride nanotubes with high purity via solid-state reaction method

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    An effective solid-state reaction method is reported for synthesizing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in large scale and with high purity by annealing amorphous boron powder and ferric chloride (FeCl3) catalyst in ammonia atmosphere at elevated temperatures. FeCl3 that has rarely been utilized before is introduced not only as a catalyst but also as an efficient transforming agent which converts boron powder into boron chloride (BCl3) vapor in situ. The nanotubes are bamboo in shape and have an average diameter of about 90 nm. The effect of synthetic temperatures on nanotube morphology and yield is investigated. The photoluminescence (PL) measurement shows emission bands of the nanotubes at 354, 423, 467, and 666 nm. A combined growth mechanism of vapor–liquid-solid (VLS) and solid–liquid-solid (SLS) model is proposed for the formation of the BNNTs. PMID:25313303

  17. Industrial-scale separation of high-purity single-chirality single-wall carbon nanotubes for biological imaging.

    PubMed

    Yomogida, Yohei; Tanaka, Takeshi; Zhang, Minfang; Yudasaka, Masako; Wei, Xiaojun; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2016-06-28

    Single-chirality, single-wall carbon nanotubes are desired due to their inherent physical properties and performance characteristics. Here, we demonstrate a chromatographic separation method based on a newly discovered chirality-selective affinity between carbon nanotubes and a gel containing a mixture of the surfactants. In this system, two different selectivities are found: chiral-angle selectivity and diameter selectivity. Since the chirality of nanotubes is determined by the chiral angle and diameter, combining these independent selectivities leads to high-resolution single-chirality separation with milligram-scale throughput and high purity. Furthermore, we present efficient vascular imaging of mice using separated single-chirality (9,4) nanotubes. Due to efficient absorption and emission, blood vessels can be recognized even with the use of ∼100-fold lower injected dose than the reported value for pristine nanotubes. Thus, 1 day of separation provides material for up to 15,000 imaging experiments, which is acceptable for industrial use.

  18. Delta-Doped High Purity Silicon UV-NIR CCDs with High QE and Low Dark Current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael; Blacksberg, Jordana; Nikzad, Shouleh; Elliott, S. Tom; Holland, Steve; Bebek, Chris; Scowen, Paul; Veach, Todd

    2006-01-01

    Delta doping process was developed on p-channel CCDs for MIDEX-Orion and JDEM/SNAP and was applied to large format (2k x4k) CCDs. Delta doping is applied to fully-fabricated CCDs (complete with Al metallization). High QE and low dark current is demonstrated with delta doped p-channel CCDs. In-house AR coating is demonstrated. Advantages include: Delta doping enables high QE and stability across the entire spectral range attainable with silicon. Delta doping is a low temperature process and is compatible with fully-fabricated detector arrays. Same base device for Orion two channels. High radiation tolerance and no thinning requirements of high purity p-channel. CCDs are additional advantages.

  19. Engineering of high purity ultra-long optical needle field through reversing the electric dipole array radiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiming; Chen, Weibin; Zhan, Qiwen

    2010-10-11

    We report a new method to create high purity longitudinally polarized field with extremely long depth of focus in the focal volume of a high numerical aperture (NA) objective lens. Through reversing the radiated field from an electric dipole array situated near the focus of the high-NA lens, the required incident field distribution in the pupil plane for the creation of an ultra-long optical needle field can be found. Numerical examples demonstrate that an optical needle field with a depth of focus up to 8λ is obtainable. Throughout the depth of focus, this engineered focal field maintains a diffraction limited transverse spot size (<0.43λ) with high longitudinal polarization purity. From the calculated pupil plane distribution, a simplified discrete complex pupil filter can be designed and significant improvements over the previously reported complex filters are clearly demonstrated.

  20. Enhanced quantum efficiency of high-purity silicon imaging detectors by ultralow temperature surface modification using Sb doping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Hoenk, Michael E.; Elliott, S. Tom; Holland, Stephen E.; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2005-01-01

    A low temperature process for Sb doping of silicon has been developed as a backsurface treatment for high-purity n-type imaging detectors. Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is used to achieve very high dopant incorporation in a thin, surface-confined layer. The growth temperature is kept below 450 (deg)C for compatibility with Al-metallized devices. Imaging with MBE-modified 1kx1k charge coupled devices (CCDs) operated in full depletion has been demonstrated. Dark current is comparable to the state-of-the-art process, which requires a high temperature step. Quantum efficiency is improved, especially in the UV, for thin doped layers placed closer to the backsurface. Near 100% internal quantum efficiency has been demonstrated in the ultraviolet for a CCD with a 1.5 nm silicon cap layer.

  1. Formation and annihilation of intrinsic defects induced by electronic excitation in high-purity crystalline SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kajihara, Koichi; Skuja, Linards; Hosono, Hideo

    2013-04-14

    Formation and thermal annihilation of intrinsic defects in {alpha}-quartz were examined using high-purity samples, while minimizing the contributions of reactions involving metallic impurities. Electronic excitation with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays was employed to avoid radiation-induced amorphization. The results clearly show that formation of oxygen vacancies (Si-Si bonds) as a result of decomposition of regular Si-O-Si bonds (Frenkel process) is the dominant intrinsic defect process. Compared with amorphous SiO{sub 2}, in {alpha}-quartz, the formation yield of Si-Si bonds is an order of magnitude smaller, the 7.6 eV optical absorption band is less broadened, and their thermal annihilation is complete at a lower temperature, around the {alpha}-{beta} quartz transition. In contrast, radiation-induced interstitial oxygen atoms practically do not form interstitial oxygen molecules.

  2. The use of a high-purity germanium detector for routine measurements of {sup 125}I in radiation workers

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, P.; Bergmann, H.; Havlik, E.; Aiginger, H.; Unfried, E.; Riedlmayer, L.

    1994-12-01

    A high-purity germanium detector was calibrated for the assessment of {sup 125}I uptake in the thyroid gland of radiation workers. A cylindrical water phantom (perspex walls) with high flexibility for position and size of the thyroid was constructed. Within a massive shielding chamber built for a whole-body counter, an activity of 2.2 Bq was detectable (MDA). This is well below the very restrictive limiting value of 20 Bq for inhalation specified by Austrian law. An activity of 128 Bq was measured with a statistical uncertainty of 5% in a counting period of 10 min. Various parameters influencing the result are investigated as well as the performance of two other measurement geometries outside the shielding chamber. 13 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. A facile approach for synthesizing Fe-based layered double hydroxides with high purity and its exfoliation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinling; Li, Fajun; Dong, Shengye; Liu, Xiaowang; Li, Maoguo

    2016-04-01

    Transition metal (e.g., Fe, Co, Ni)-based layered double hydroxides (LDHs) and their exfoliated nanosheets have great potential applications due to their redox and magnetic properties. Here we report a facile approach for the preparation of Co-Fe LDHs with good crystallinity and high purity. The proposed approach includes two steps: (1) The mixed divalent metal (e.g., Co(2+), Fe(2+)) hydroxides were first synthesized using a homogeneous precipitation without piping N2 into the system; hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) was the hydrolysis agent providing OH(-), and hydroxylamine hydrochloride (HAH) was used as both a reducing and a complexing reagent. (2) Then the as-prepared hydroxides were slowly oxidated by air and simultaneously intercalated by CO3(2-) to form CO3-intercalated LDHs. The Co-Fe LDHs were roundly characterized by XRD, SEM, EDX and FT-IR. The effect of HAH on the morphology and structure of the Co-Fe LDHs was also studied. The magnetism of Co-Fe LDHs at room temperature was investigated and the results showed that the LDHs displayed a low saturation magnetization value of 6.3emug(-1), suggesting that the purity of the products was very high. In addition, the intercalated CO3(2-) in the Co-Fe LDHs could be successfully exchanged with other anions such as Cl(-) and ClO4(-). Furthermore, the exchanged-LDHs could be exfoliated in formamide. This work establishes a new method for the synthesis of Fe-based LDHs with good crystallinity and high purity under mild conditions, and can accelerate the development of applications using these layered materials.

  4. Determination of trace impurities in high purity gold by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with prior matrix removal by electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. C.; Hsieh, C. H.; Lin, T. S.; Wen, J. C.

    2000-09-01

    A novel method for the determination of 11 trace impurities (Be, Mg, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ag, Pd, Sn and Pb) in high purity gold with a combination of electrochemical deposition separation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric measurement was investigated. In the present study, an efficient separation procedure was developed to remove the gold matrix by the electrodepositon method on the basis of the difference in reduction potential of gold and the other trace impurities. The effects of deposition potential, deposition time and composition of the electrolyte on the separation efficiency were studied. According to our experimental results, most impurities, except for silver, can remain in the electrolyte and the interference from gold can be completely removed through the application of electrodeposition at suitable potential. To achieve simultaneous separation of silver from the gold matrix, a unique complexation reaction between silver ions and ammonia ions was successfully employed to alter the reduction potential of silver ion. By way of a suitable adjustment of the deposition potential and the composition of electrolytes, the spike recoveries of 11 interesting impurities were found to be in the range of 85-105%. The limit of detection (based on the 3-σ criterion) of these elements was 10 -1-10 -2 μg g -1. The applicability of the proposed method has also been validated by the analysis of high purity gold reference materials (FAU9 and FAU11, Royal Canadian Mint). Comparing with the certified values, the recoveries of interesting elements were found to be in the range of 82-118% through the use of proposed method.

  5. Measurement of the high-field Q-drop in a high-purity large-grain niobium cavity for different oxidation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter; gurevich, alex

    2007-06-01

    The most challenging issue for understanding the performance of superconducting radio-frequency (rf) cavities made of high-purity (residual resistivity ratio > 200) niobium is due to a sharp degradation (“Q-drop”) of the cavity quality factor Q0(Bp) as the peak surface magnetic field (Bp) exceeds about 90 mT, in the absence of field emission. In addition, a low-temperature (100 – 140 C) “in-situ” baking of the cavity was found to be beneficial in reducing the Q-drop. In this contribution, we present the results from a series of rf tests at 1.7 K and 2.0 K on a single-cell cavity made of high-purity large (with area of the order of few cm2) grain niobium which underwent various oxidation processes, after initial buffered chemical polishing, such as anodization, baking in pure oxygen atmosphere and baking in air up to 180 °C, with the objective of clearly identifying the role of oxygen and the oxide layer on the Q-drop. During each rf test a temperature mapping system allows measuring the local temperature rise of the cavity outer surface due to rf losses, which gives information about the losses location, their field dependence and space distribution. The results confirmed that the depth affected by baking is about 20 – 30 nm from the surface and showed that the Q-drop did not re-appear in a previously baked cavity by further baking at 120 °C in pure oxygen atmosphere or in air up to 180 °C. These treatments increased the oxide thickness and oxygen concentration, measured on niobium samples which were processed with the cavity and were analyzed with Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). Nevertheless, the performance of the cavity after air baking at 180 °C degraded significantly and the temperature maps showed high losses, uniformly distributed on the surface, which could be completely recovered only by a post-purification treatment at 1250 °C. A statistic of the position of the “hot-spots” on the

  6. Effect of sulfur and oxygen on weld penetration of high-purity austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aidun, D. K.; Martin, S. A.

    1997-08-01

    Convective flow during arc welding depends upon the surface tension gradient (dy/dT, Marangoni flow), buoyancy, arc drag force, electromagnetic force, shielding gas, and the viscosity of the melt. The Marangoni and the buoyancy-driven flow are the major factors in controlling weld penetration in ferrous alloys, especially austenitic stainless steels such as 304 and 316. Small variations in the concentration of surfactants, such as sulfur and oxygen, in stainless steels cause significant changes in the weld penetration and depth/width (D/W) ratio of the fusion zone. Gas-tungsten arc (GTA) welds were done on low- and high-sulfur 304 and 316 heats using pure argon and argon/oxygen shielding gases. Also, laser beam (LB) welds were done on the 304 and 316 heats using pure argon as the shielding gas. Increase in the sulfur content decreased the D/W ratio for the GTA 304 welds using pure argon, but for the case of LB 304 welds the results were the opposite. For the GTA 316 welds and LB 316 welds, increase in sulfur increased the D/W ratio of the fusion zone. Oxygen increased the D/W ratio of both the 304 and 316 GTA welds.

  7. High-Purity Composite Briquette for Direct UMG-Si Production in Arc Furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perruchoud, Raymond; Fischer, Jean-Claude

    2013-12-01

    In metallurgical grade Si (MG-Si), the coal (B) and charcoal (P) contents are on average above 30 ppm as the carbon reduction materials used in the arc furnace are either rich in B or in P. A decrease of both impurities by a factor of 3 using purer raw materials would allow for the direct production of the upgraded metallurgical grade (UMG).This would significantly improve the efficiency of the resulting photovoltaic (PV) cells made with the refined solar grade silicon (SoG-Si) or massively decrease the costs of Si purification by shortening the number of steps needed for reaching B and P contents below 1 ppm requested for the SoG-Si used for the PV cells. A composite C/SiO2 briquette fulfilling the purity targets for the direct production of UMG-Si in the arc furnace was developed. The composite contains several carbon materials with different levels of reactivities and quartz sand. The raw materials aspects, the paste and briquette preparation, as well as the final carbonization step are discussed. The finished briquettes are free of volatiles and are mechanically and thermally very stable, thus, ensuring stable arc furnace charges with minimum losses of dust and SiO gas. Semi-industrial trials including the downstream purification steps for the production of SoG-Si by a metallurgical low-cost route are contemplated.

  8. Comparison of deterministic and stochastic simulation for capacity extension of high-purity water delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Riedewald, Frank; Byrne, Edmond; Cronin, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a deterministic and a stochastic model for the simulation of industrial-size deionized water and water for injection (DI/WFI) systems. The objective of the simulations is to determine if additional DI/WFI demand from future production processes can be supported by an existing DI/WFI system. The models utilize discrete event simulation to compute the demand profile from the distribution system; they also use a continuous simulation to calculate the variation of the water level in the storage tank. Whereas the deterministic model ignores uncertainties, the stochastic model allows for both volume and schedule uncertainties. The Monte Carlo method is applied to solve the stochastic method. This paper compares the deterministic and stochastic models and shows that the deterministic model may be suitable for most applications and that the stochastic model should only be used if found necessary by the deterministic simulation. The models are programmed within Excel 2003 and are available for download as open public domain software (1), allowing for public modifications and improvements of the model. The proposed models may also be utilized to determine size or analyze the performance of other utilities, such as heat transfer media, drinking water, etc. Water for injection (WFI) and other pharmaceutical water distribution systems are notoriously difficult to analyze analytically due to the highly dynamic variable demand that is drawn from these systems. Discrete event simulation may provide an answer where the typical engineering approach of utilizing a diversity factor fails. This paper develops an Excel based deterministic and stochastic model for a WFI system with the latter allowing for the modeling of offtake volume and schedule uncertainty. The paper also compares the deterministic and stochastic models and shows that the deterministic model may be suitable for most applications while the stochastic model should only be used if found necessary. The

  9. Title IX: Boom or Bust?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mather, Marilyn J.

    2003-01-01

    Athletics has been significantly impacted by Title IX through an increase the number of female athletes, the number of teams available, and indirectly, the development of women's professional leagues. However, women in leadership positions in athletics have declined significantly since Title IX was signed into law. A concern about the…

  10. An Exon-Specific U1snRNA Induces a Robust Factor IX Activity in Mice Expressing Multiple Human FIX Splicing Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Balestra, Dario; Scalet, Daniela; Pagani, Franco; Rogalska, Malgorzata Ewa; Mari, Rosella; Bernardi, Francesco; Pinotti, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    In cellular models we have demonstrated that a unique U1snRNA targeting an intronic region downstream of a defective exon (Exon-specific U1snRNA, ExSpeU1) can rescue multiple exon-skipping mutations, a relevant cause of genetic disease. Here, we explored in mice the ExSpeU1 U1fix9 toward two model Hemophilia B-causing mutations at the 5′ (c.519A > G) or 3′ (c.392-8T > G) splice sites of F9 exon 5. Hydrodynamic injection of wt-BALB/C mice with plasmids expressing the wt and mutant (hFIX-2G5′ss and hFIX-8G3′ss) splicing-competent human factor IX (hFIX) cassettes resulted in the expression of hFIX transcripts lacking exon 5 in liver, and in low plasma levels of inactive hFIX. Coinjection of U1fix9, but not of U1wt, restored exon inclusion of variants and in the intrinsically weak FIXwt context. This resulted in appreciable circulating hFIX levels (mean ± SD; hFIX-2G5′ss, 1.0 ± 0.5 µg/ml; hFIX-8G3′ss, 1.2 ± 0.3 µg/ml; and hFIXwt, 1.9 ± 0.6 µg/ml), leading to a striking shortening (from ~100 seconds of untreated mice to ~80 seconds) of FIX-dependent coagulation times, indicating a hFIX with normal specific activity. This is the first proof-of-concept in vivo that a unique ExSpeU1 can efficiently rescue gene expression impaired by distinct exon-skipping variants, which extends the applicability of ExSpeU1s to panels of mutations and thus cohort of patients. PMID:27701399

  11. Long-term safety and efficacy of extended-interval prophylaxis with recombinant factor IX Fc fusion protein (rFIXFc) in subjects with haemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Pasi, K John; Fischer, Kathelijn; Ragni, Margaret; Nolan, Beatrice; Perry, David J; Kulkarni, Roshni; Ozelo, Margareth; Mahlangu, Johnny; Shapiro, Amy D; Baker, Ross I; Bennett, Carolyn M; Barnes, Christopher; Oldenburg, Johannes; Matsushita, Tadashi; Yuan, Huixing; Ramirez-Santiago, Alejandra; Pierce, Glenn F; Allen, Geoffrey; Mei, Baisong

    2017-02-28

    The safety, efficacy, and prolonged half-life of recombinant factor IX Fc fusion protein (rFIXFc) were demonstrated in the Phase 3 B-LONG (adults/adolescents ≥12 years) and Kids B-LONG (children <12 years) studies of subjects with haemophilia B (≤2 IU/dl). Here, we report interim, long-term safety and efficacy data from B-YOND, the rFIXFc extension study. Eligible subjects who completed B-LONG or Kids B-LONG could enrol in B-YOND. There were four treatment groups: weekly prophylaxis (20-100 IU/kg every 7 days), individualised prophylaxis (100 IU/kg every 8-16 days), modified prophylaxis (further dosing personalisation to optimise prophylaxis), and episodic (on-demand) treatment. Subjects could change treatment groups at any point. Primary endpoint was inhibitor development. One hundred sixteen subjects enrolled in B-YOND. From the start of the parent studies to the B-YOND interim data cut, median duration of rFIXFc treatment was 39.5 months and 21.9 months among adults/adolescents and children, respectively; 68/93 (73.1 %) adults/adolescents and 9/23 (39.1 %) children had ≥100 cumulative rFIXFc exposure days. No inhibitors were observed. Median annualised bleeding rates (ABRs) were low in all prophylaxis regimens: weekly (≥12 years: 2.3; <6 years: 0.0; 6 to <12 years: 2.7), individualised (≥12 years: 2.3; 6 to <12 years: 2.4), and modified (≥12 years: 2.4). One or two infusions were sufficient to control 97 % (adults/adolescents) and 95 % (children) of bleeding episodes. Interim data from B-YOND are consistent with data from B-LONG and Kids B-LONG, and confirm the long-term safety of rFIXFc, absence of inhibitors, and maintenance of low ABRs with prophylactic dosing every 1 to 2 weeks.

  12. Comparative field study: impact of laboratory assay variability on the assessment of recombinant factor IX Fc fusion protein (rFIXFc) activity.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Jurg M; Buyue, Yang; Bardan, Sara; Peters, Robert T; Jiang, Haiyan; Kamphaus, George D; Gray, Elaine; Pierce, Glenn F

    2014-11-01

    Due to variability in the one-stage clotting assay, the performance of new factor IX (FIX) products should be assessed in this assay. The objective of this field study was to evaluate the accuracy of measuring recombinant FIX Fc fusion protein (rFIXFc) activity in clinical haemostasis laboratories using the one-stage clotting assay. Human haemophilic donor plasma was spiked with rFIXFc or BeneFIX® at 0.80, 0.20, or 0.05 IU/ml based on label potency. Laboratories tested blinded samples using their routine one-stage assay and in-house FIX plasma standard. The mean spike recoveries for BeneFIX (n=30 laboratories) were 121 %, 144 %, and 168 % of expected at nominal 0.80, 0.20, and 0.05 IU/ml concentrations, respectively. Corresponding rFIXFc spike recoveries were 88 %, 107 %, and 132 % of expected, respectively. All BeneFIX concentrations were consistently overestimated by most laboratories. rFIXFc activity was reagent-dependent; ellagic acid and silica gave higher values than kaolin, which underestimated rFIXFc. BeneFIX demonstrated significantly reduced chromogenic assay activity relative to one-stage assay results and nominal activity, while rFIXFc activity was close to nominal activity at three concentrations with better dilution linearity than the typical one-stage assay. In conclusion, laboratory- and reagent-specific assay variabilities were revealed, with progressively higher variability at lower FIX concentrations. Non-parallelism against the FIX plasma standard was observed in all one-stage assays with rFIXFc and BeneFIX, leading to significant overestimation of FIX activity at lower levels and generally high inter-laboratory variability. Compared to the accuracy currently achieved in clinical laboratories when measuring other rFIX products, most laboratories measured rFIXFc activity with acceptable accuracy and reliability using routine one-stage assay methods and commercially available plasma standards.

  13. Purification of high-purity glycyrrhizin from licorice using hydrophilic interaction solid phase extraction coupled with preparative reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenyi; Jin, Hongli; Shen, Aijin; Deng, Liang; Shi, Jianlian; Xue, Xingya; Guo, Yadong; Liu, Yanfang; Liang, Xinmiao

    2017-01-01

    Glycyrrhizin (GA), a major bioactive compound in licorice, has been extensively used throughout the world as a medicine to treat chronic viral hepatitis and allergic dermatitis. In this study, a new method based on hydrophilic interaction solid phase extraction (HILIC-SPE) and preparative reversed-phase liquid chromatography (prep-RPLC) was developed to purify GA with high purity from the complex licorice extract. Via evaluation of retention behavior of GA and flavonoids in different commercially available columns, a hydrophilic column--Click XIon was finally chosen for the purification due to its excellent resolution toward GA and flavonoids under HILIC mode. To optimize the SPE elution conditions, relative factors including water content, pH and ionic strength had been investigated in chromatographic condition. The result indicated that the most appropriate water content was 30% and pH at 4.00, as well as salt concentration should be controlled at 5mM. In addition, the optimization revealed that GA experiences both hydrophilic interaction and ion-exchange interaction on the Click XIon material. According to the chromatographic evaluation, the optimized conditions were applied to HILIC-SPE to enrich GA from licorice, which leads to an increased content of GA from 13.67% to 64.22%. Finally, prep-RPLC was performed to obtain GA with purity higher than 99.00%,which demonstrating great prospect in large-scale preparation of GA. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Preparation of high purity crystalline silicon by electro-catalytic reduction of sodium hexafluorosilicate with sodium below 180 °C.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan; Liu, Yang; Wang, Xin; Li, Kai; Chen, Pu

    2014-01-01

    The growing field of silicon solar cells requires a substantial reduction in the cost of semiconductor grade silicon, which has been mainly produced by the rod-based Siemens method. Because silicon can react with almost all of the elements and form a number of alloys at high temperatures, it is highly desired to obtain high purity crystalline silicon at relatively low temperatures through low cost process. Here we report a fast, complete and inexpensive reduction method for converting sodium hexafluorosilicate into silicon at a relatively low reaction temperature (∼ 200 °C). This temperature could be further decreased to less than 180 °C in combination with an electrochemical approach. The residue sodium fluoride is dissolved away by pure water and hydrochloric acid solution in later purifying processes below 15 °C. High purity silicon in particle form can be obtained. The relative simplicity of this method might lead to a low cost process in producing high purity silicon.

  15. Characterization of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) as an endogenous marker of chronic hypoxia in live human tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vordermark, Dirk . E-mail: vordermark_d@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.de; Kaffer, Anja; Riedl, Susanne; Katzer, Astrid; Flentje, Michael

    2005-03-15

    Purpose: Published clinical studies provide conflicting data regarding the prognostic significance of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) overexpression as an endogenous marker of tumor hypoxia and its comparability with other methods of hypoxia detection. We performed a systematic analysis of CA IX protein levels under various in vitro conditions of tumor hypoxia in HT 1080 human fibrosarcoma and FaDu human pharyngeal carcinoma cells. Because sorting of live CA IX positive cells from tumors provides a tool to study the radiosensitivity of chronically hypoxic cells, we modified and tested a CA IX flow cytometry protocol on mixed hypoxic/aerobic suspensions of HT 1080 and FaDu cells. Methods and materials: HT 1080 and FaDu cells were treated with up to 24 h of in vitro hypoxia and up to 96 h of reoxygenation. To test the effect of nonhypoxic stimuli, glucose and serum availability, pH and cell density were modified. CA IX protein was quantified in Western blots of whole-cell lysates. Mixed suspensions with known percentages of hypoxic cells were prepared for CA IX flow cytometry. The same mixtures were assayed for clonogenic survival after 10 Gy. Results: Hypoxia-induced CA IX protein expression was seen after >6 h at {<=}5% O{sub 2}, and protein was stable over 96 h of reoxygenation in both cell lines. Glucose deprivation abolished the hypoxic CA IX response, and high cell density caused CA IX induction under aerobic conditions. Measured percentages of CA IX-positive cells in mixtures closely reflected known percentages of hypoxic cells in HT 1080 and were associated with radioresistance of mixtures after 10 Gy. Conclusion: CA IX is a stable marker of current or previous chronic hypoxia but influenced by nonhypoxic stimuli. Except the time course of accumulation, all properties of this marker resembled our previous findings for hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha}. A modified flow cytometry protocol provided good separability of CA IX-negative and -positive cells in vitro

  16. Effect of low-temperature (77 K) quasihydrostatic extrusion on the properties of high-purity titanium: The role of initial structural state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonovsky, M. A.; Khaimovich, P. A.; Kutniy, K. V.; Kislyak, I. F.; Okovit, V. S.; Rudycheva, T. Yu.

    2013-11-01

    This is a study of the effect of quasihydrostatic extrusion at liquid nitrogen and room temperatures on the evolution of the structure and mechanical properties of high-purity titanium produced by severe plastic deformation in a swaging-extrusion-drawing regime and with subsequent annealing at temperatures of 350-550 °C. It is shown that a combination of severe plastic deformation and cryogenic quasihydrostatic extrusion makes it possible to create high-purity nanocrystalline titanium with high strength and plasticity.

  17. ARES I-X Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-27

    NASA Ares I-X Launch Director Ed Mango, 3rd from left, along with other mission managers watches the launch of the Ares I-X rocket from Firing Room One of the Launch Control Center (LCC) at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2009. The flight test of Ares I-X will provide NASA with an early opportunity to test and prove flight characteristics, hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with the Ares I. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Production of High-Purity Anhydrous Nickel(II) Perrhenate for Tungsten-Based Sintered Heavy Alloys.

    PubMed

    Leszczyńska-Sejda, Katarzyna; Benke, Grzegorz; Kopyto, Dorota; Majewski, Tomasz; Drzazga, Michał

    2017-04-24

    This paper presents a method for the production of high-purity anhydrous nickel(II) perrhenate. The method comprises sorption of nickel(II) ions from aqueous nickel(II) nitrate solutions, using strongly acidic C160 cation exchange resin, and subsequent elution of sorbed nickel(II) ions using concentrated perrhenic acid solutions. After the neutralization of the resulting rhenium-nickel solutions, hydrated nickel(II) perrhenate is then separated and then dried at 160 °C to obtain the anhydrous form. The resulting compound is reduced in an atmosphere of dissociated ammonia in order to produce a Re-Ni alloy powder. This study provides information on the selected properties of the resulting Re-Ni powder. This powder was used as a starting material for the production of 77W-20Re-3Ni heavy alloys. Microstructure examination results and selected properties of the produced sintered heavy alloys were compared to sintered alloys produced using elemental W, Re, and Ni powders. This study showed that the application of anhydrous nickel(II) perrhenate in the production of 77W-20Re-3Ni results in better properties of the sintered alloys compared to those made from elemental powders.

  19. Production of High-Purity Anhydrous Nickel(II) Perrhenate for Tungsten-Based Sintered Heavy Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Leszczyńska-Sejda, Katarzyna; Benke, Grzegorz; Kopyto, Dorota; Majewski, Tomasz; Drzazga, Michał

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a method for the production of high-purity anhydrous nickel(II) perrhenate. The method comprises sorption of nickel(II) ions from aqueous nickel(II) nitrate solutions, using strongly acidic C160 cation exchange resin, and subsequent elution of sorbed nickel(II) ions using concentrated perrhenic acid solutions. After the neutralization of the resulting rhenium-nickel solutions, hydrated nickel(II) perrhenate is then separated and then dried at 160 °C to obtain the anhydrous form. The resulting compound is reduced in an atmosphere of dissociated ammonia in order to produce a Re-Ni alloy powder. This study provides information on the selected properties of the resulting Re-Ni powder. This powder was used as a starting material for the production of 77W-20Re-3Ni heavy alloys. Microstructure examination results and selected properties of the produced sintered heavy alloys were compared to sintered alloys produced using elemental W, Re, and Ni powders. This study showed that the application of anhydrous nickel(II) perrhenate in the production of 77W-20Re-3Ni results in better properties of the sintered alloys compared to those made from elemental powders. PMID:28772808

  20. Towards a single step process to create high purity gold structures by electron beam induced deposition at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansilla, C.; Mehendale, S.; Mulders, J. J. L.; Trompenaars, P. H. F.

    2016-10-01

    Highly pure metallic structures can be deposited by electron beam induced deposition and they have many important applications in different fields. The organo-metallic precursor is decomposed and deposited under the electron beam, and typically it is purified with post-irradiation in presence of O2. However, this approach limits the purification to the surface of the deposit. Therefore, ‘in situ’ purification during deposition using simultaneous flows of both O2 and precursor in parallel with two gas injector needles has been tested and verified. To simplify the practical arrangements, a special concentric nozzle has been designed allowing deposition and purification performed together in a single step. With this new device metallic structures with high purity can be obtained more easily, while there is no limit on the height of the structures within a practical time frame. In this work, we summarize the first results obtained for ‘in situ’ Au purification using this concentric nozzle, which is described in more detail, including flow simulations. The operational parameter space is explored in order to optimize the shape as well as the purity of the deposits, which are evaluated through scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy measurements, respectively. The observed variations are interpreted in relation to other variables, such as the deposition yield. The resistivity of purified lines is also measured, and the influence of additional post treatments as a last purification step is studied.

  1. A simple dissolved metals mixing method to produce high-purity MgTiO{sub 3} nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Pratapa, Suminar E-mail: suminar-pratapa@physics.its.ac.id; Baqiya, Malik A. E-mail: suminar-pratapa@physics.its.ac.id; Istianah, E-mail: suminar-pratapa@physics.its.ac.id; Lestari, Rina E-mail: suminar-pratapa@physics.its.ac.id; Angela, Riyan E-mail: suminar-pratapa@physics.its.ac.id

    2014-02-24

    A simple dissolved metals mixing method has been effectively used to produce high-purity MgTiO{sub 3} (MT) nanocrystals. The method involves the mixing of independently dissolved magnesium and titanium metal powders in hydrochloric acid followed by calcination. The phase purity and nanocrystallinity were determined by making use of laboratory x-ray diffraction data, to which Rietveld-based analyses were performed. Results showed that the method yielded only one type magnesium titanate powders, i.e. MgTiO{sub 3}, with no Mg{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} or MgTi{sub 2}O{sub 5} phases. The presence of residual rutile or periclase was controlled by adding excessive Mg up to 5% (mol) in the stoichiometric mixing. The method also resulted in MT nanocrystals with estimated average crystallite size of 76±2 nm after calcination at 600°C and 150±4 nm (at 800°C). A transmission electron micrograph confirmed the formation of the nanocrystallites.

  2. Development of High-purity Certified Reference Materials for 17 Proteinogenic Amino Acids by Traceable Titration Methods.

    PubMed

    Kato, Megumi; Yamazaki, Taichi; Kato, Hisashi; Eyama, Sakae; Goto, Mari; Yoshioka, Mariko; Takatsu, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    To ensure the reliability of amino acid analyses, the National Metrology Institute of Japan of the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (NMIJ/AIST) has developed high-purity certified reference materials (CRMs) for 17 proteinogenic amino acids. These CRMs are intended for use as primary reference materials to enable the traceable quantification of amino acids. The purity of the present CRMs was determined based on two traceable methods: nonaqueous acidimetric titration and nitrogen determination by the Kjeldahl method. Since neither method could distinguish compounds with similar structures, such as amino acid-related impurities, impurities were thoroughly quantified by combining several HPLC methods, and subtracted from the obtained purity of each method. The property value of each amino acid was calculated as a weighted mean of the corrected purities by the two methods. The uncertainty of the property value was obtained by combining measurement uncertainties of the two methods, a difference between the two methods, the uncertainty from the contribution of impurities, and the uncertainty derived from inhomogeneity. The uncertainty derived from instability was considered to be negligible based on stability monitoring of some CRMs. The certified value of each amino acid, property value with uncertainty, was given for both with or without enantiomeric separation.

  3. Evaluation of a new contact technology for a planar high-purity germanium double-sided strip detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Emily

    This thesis is an evaluation of a new electrode technology for segmented germanium gamma-ray detectors. The detector assessed herein is a planar high-purity germanium wafer (a LEPS or low-energy photon spectrometer) with 16 photolithographic-deposited, amorphous-germanium contacts on either side. This new contact material is shown to be an improvement over the current standard, lithium and boron electrodes, in both ease-of-manufacture and in performance. The symmetry gained with the use of one material for all the contacts is shown to greatly reduce the difference in energy collected by strips on either side. The stability of the amorphous germanium allows for finer electrode segmentation, reducing the gap between each strip. This smaller gap leads to a more uniform electric field in the active volume and ultimately less charge loss between strips. These improvements are quantified with the analysis of the energy difference and distribution of one- and two-hit interactions in the crystal by mono-energetic gamma rays from a 137Cs source. The detector is shown to be a major step forward in the development of contact technologies necessary for the application of position-sensitive gamma-detection outside of fundamental research, such as in nuclear medicine, astrophysics, and homeland security.

  4. Thermoluminescence (TL) properties and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of high purity CaSO4:Dy TL material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamarudin, Nadira; Abdullah, Wan Saffiey Wan; Hamid, Muhammad Azmi Abdul; Dollah, Mohd Taufik

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents the characterization and TL properties of dysprosium (Dy) doped calcium sulfate (CaSO4) TL material produced by co-precipitation technique with 0.5mol% concentration of dopant. The morphology of the produced TL material was studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the micrograph shows that rectangular parallelepiped shaped crystal with the average of 150 μm in length were produced. The crystallinity of the produced powder was studied using x-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The XRD spectra show that the TL material produced is high purity anhydrite CaSO4 with average crystallite size of 74 nm with orthorhombic crystal system. The TL behavior of produced CaSO4:Dy was studied using a TLD reader after exposure to gamma ray by Co60 source with the doses of 1,5 and 10 Gy. The glow curve shows linear response with glow peak around 230°C which is desired development in the field of radiation dosimetry.

  5. High purity H2 by sorption-enhanced chemical looping reforming of waste cooking oil in a packed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Pimenidou, P; Rickett, G; Dupont, V; Twigg, M V

    2010-12-01

    High purity hydrogen (>95%) was produced at 600 degrees C and 1 atm by steam reforming of waste cooking oil at a molar steam to carbon ratio of 4 using chemical looping, a process that features redox cycles of a Ni catalyst with the in-situ carbonation/calcination of a CO(2) sorbent (dolomite) in a packed bed reactor under alternated feedstreams of fuel-steam and air. The fuel and steam conversion were higher with the sorbent present than without it. Initially, the dolomite carbonation was very efficient (100%), and 98% purity hydrogen was produced, but the carbonation decreased to around 56% with a purity of 95% respectively in the following cycles. Reduction of the nickel catalyst occurred alongside steam reforming, water gas shift and carbonation, with H(2) produced continuously under fuel-steam feeds. Catalyst and CO(2)-sorbent regeneration was observed, and long periods of autothermal operation within each cycle were demonstrated. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Large-scale isolation of high-purity anthocyanin monomers from mulberry fruits by combined chromatographic techniques.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Du, Fang; Wang, Wei; Li, Qian; Zheng, Daheng; Zhang, Weijie; Zhao, Ting; Mao, Guanghua; Feng, Weiwei; Wu, Xiangyang; Yang, Liuqing

    2017-09-01

    Anthocyanins have attracted attention over the past several decades because of their beneficial health effects. In this research, a strategy combining column chromatography and high-speed countercurrent chromatography was developed for the separation of high-purity anthocyanin monomers from mulberry fruits. After purification using Amberlite XAD-7HP column with 80% ethanol (0.1% HCl), a fraction of anthocyanins mixtures with a purity of 68.6% was obtained. High-speed countercurrent chromatography with a biphasic solvent system of n-butanol/methyl tert-butyl ether/acetonitrile/water/trifluoroacetic acid (30:10:10:50:0.05, v/v) was used to separate the anthocyanin monomers. Three monomers of delphinidin-3-O-rutinoside, cyanidin-3-O-rutinoside, and cyanidin-3-O-glucoside were obtained, and identified by (1) H and (13) C NMR spectroscopy and high-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. The method developed in this work can be used to conduct large-scale separations of anthocyanin monomers from mulberry fruits and other plants. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Synthesis of high-purity, layered structured K2Ta4O11 intermediate phase nanocrystals for photocatalytic water splitting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Sun, Feng; Kim, Jin Hyun; Kim, Ju Hun; Yang, JunHe; Wang, XianYing; Lee, Jae Sung

    2016-10-07

    High-purity K2Ta4O11 (kalitantite) intermediate phase with a layered structure, as a new family member of alkali-metal tantalate semiconductors, was successfully prepared via a simple and cost-effective flux growth technique using potassium chloride (KCl) at a low temperature of 800 °C for only 4 h. The as-synthesized K2Ta4O11 was characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, STEM/EDS, and UV-Vis DRS, etc. It was found that the K2Ta4O11 single nanocrystals were non-stoichiometric in the size range of 100-500 nm, and the indirect band gap of K2Ta4O11 was correctly determined to be 4.15 eV. The K2Ta4O11 not only exhibited a high and stable photocatalytic H2 generation rate of ∼45.3 μmol h(-1) g(-1) in an aqueous methanolic solution with the photodeposition of Pt as co-catalysts, but also possessed the photocatalytic ability for simultaneous evolution of H2 and O2 in a stoichiometric ratio, with loading of NiO particles as cocatalysts. Thus, it can be mainly attributed to the benefits of KCl flux lowing the reaction temperature, and increasing the surface area and crystallinity of K2Ta4O11, that the charge efficiency and enhancement of the photoreactivity for water splitting are improved.

  8. Tunable and high-purity room temperature single-photon emission from atomic defects in hexagonal boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Grosso, Gabriele; Moon, Hyowon; Lienhard, Benjamin; Ali, Sajid; Efetov, Dmitri K; Furchi, Marco M; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Ford, Michael J; Aharonovich, Igor; Englund, Dirk

    2017-09-26

    Two-dimensional van der Waals materials have emerged as promising platforms for solid-state quantum information processing devices with unusual potential for heterogeneous assembly. Recently, bright and photostable single photon emitters were reported from atomic defects in layered hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), but controlling inhomogeneous spectral distribution and reducing multi-photon emission presented open challenges. Here, we demonstrate that strain control allows spectral tunability of hBN single photon emitters over 6 meV, and material processing sharply improves the single photon purity. We observe high single photon count rates exceeding 7 × 10(6) counts per second at saturation, after correcting for uncorrelated photon background. Furthermore, these emitters are stable to material transfer to other substrates. High-purity and photostable single photon emission at room temperature, together with spectral tunability and transferability, opens the door to scalable integration of high-quality quantum emitters in photonic quantum technologies.Inhomogeneous spectral distribution and multi-photon emission are currently hindering the use of defects in layered hBN as reliable single photon emitters. Here, the authors demonstrate strain-controlled wavelength tuning and increased single photon purity through suitable material processing.

  9. CO{sub 2} looping cycle performance of a high-purity limestone after thermal activation/doping

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilije Manovic; Edward J. Anthony; Gemma Grasa; J. Carlos Abanades

    2008-09-15

    The influence of thermal pretreatment on the performance of a high-purity limestone (La Blanca) during CO{sub 2} capture cycles is investigated in this paper. This limestone was chosen for more detailed investigation because, in earlier research, it failed to show any favorable effect as a result of thermal pretreatment. Here, the original sample, with a particle size of 0.4-0.6 mm, and ground samples were thermally pretreated at 1000-1200{sup o}C, for 6-24 h, and then subjected to several carbonation/calcination cycles in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). This work shows that thermal pretreatment failed to produce a significant self-reactivation effect during CO{sub 2} cycles, despite the use of a wide range of conditions during pretreatment (grinding, temperature, and pretreatment duration) as well as during cycling (CO{sub 2} concentration and duration of the carbonation stage). Additional doping experiments showed that both high Na content and lack of Al in La Blanca limestone cause poor self-reactivation performance after thermal pretreatment. Scanning electron microscope-energy-dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX) analyses also confirmed more pronounced sintering and loss of activity, which we believe are caused by the relatively high Na content. However, stabilization of sorbent particle morphology by Al can allow this limestone to show self-reactivation performance and higher conversions over a longer series of CO{sub 2} cycles. 35 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Purity analyses of high-purity organic compounds with nitroxyl radicals based on the Curie–Weiss law

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Nobuhiro Shimosaka, Takuya

    2015-05-07

    This work reports an attempt to quantify the purities of powders of high-purity organic compounds with stable nitroxyl radicals (namely, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO), 1-oxyl-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-hydroxypiperidine (TEMPOL), and 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl benzoate (4-hydroxy-TEMPO benzoate)) in terms of mass fractions by using our “effective magnetic moment method,” which is based on both the Curie–Weiss law and a fundamental equation of electron paramagnetic resonance (ESR). The temperature dependence of the magnetic moment resulting from the radicals was measured with a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. The g value for each compound was measured with an X-band ESR spectrometer. The results of the purities were (0.998 ± 0.064) kg kg{sup −1} for TEMPO, (1.019 ± 0.040) kg kg{sup −1} for TEMPOL, and (1.001 ± 0.048) kg kg{sup −1} for 4-hydroxy-TEMPO benzoate. These results demonstrate that this analytical method as a future candidate of potential primary direct method can measure the purities with expanded uncertainties of approximately 5%.

  11. Nearly Blinking-Free, High-Purity Single-Photon Emission by Colloidal InP/ZnSe Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Vigneshwaran; Tessier, Mickaël D; Dupont, Dorian; Geiregat, Pieter; Hens, Zeger; Brainis, Edouard

    2017-10-11

    Colloidal core/shell InP/ZnSe quantum dots (QDs), recently produced using an improved synthesis method, have a great potential in life-science applications as well as in integrated quantum photonics and quantum information processing as single-photon emitters. Single-particle spectroscopy of 10 nm QDs with 3.2 nm cores reveals strong photon antibunching attributed to fast (70 ps) Auger recombination of multiple excitons. The QDs exhibit very good photostability under strong optical excitation. We demonstrate that the antibunching is preserved when the QDs are excited above the saturation intensity of the fundamental-exciton transition. This result paves the way toward their usage as high-purity on-demand single-photon emitters at room temperature. Unconventionally, despite the strong Auger blockade mechanism, InP/ZnSe QDs also display very little luminescence intermittency ("blinking"), with a simple on/off blinking pattern. The analysis of single-particle luminescence statistics places these InP/ZnSe QDs in the class of nearly blinking-free QDs, with emission stability comparable to state-of-the-art thick-shell and alloyed-interface CdSe/CdS, but with improved single-photon purity.

  12. High Purity and Yield of Boron Nitride Nanotubes Using Amorphous Boron and a Nozzle-Type Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaewoo; Seo, Duckbong; Yoo, Jeseung; Jeong, Wanseop; Seo, Young-Soo; Kim, Jaeyong

    2014-01-01

    Enhancement of the production yield of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) with high purity was achieved using an amorphous boron-based precursor and a nozzle-type reactor. Use of a mixture of amorphous boron and Fe decreases the milling time for the preparation of the precursor for BNNTs synthesis, as well as the Fe impurity contained in the B/Fe interdiffused precursor nanoparticles by using a simple purification process. We also explored a nozzle-type reactor that increased the production yield of BNNTs compared to a conventional flow-through reactor. By using a nozzle-type reactor with amorphous boron-based precursor, the weight of the BNNTs sample after annealing was increased as much as 2.5-times with much less impurities compared to the case for the flow-through reactor with the crystalline boron-based precursor. Under the same experimental conditions, the yield and quantity of BNNTs were estimated as much as ~70% and ~1.15 g/batch for the former, while they are ~54% and 0.78 g/batch for the latter. PMID:28788161

  13. Development of nanostructured magnetic materials based on high-purity rare-earth metals and study of their fundamental characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelevin, I. A.; Tereshina, I. S.; Burkhanov, G. S.; Dobatkin, S. V.; Kaminskaya, T. P.; Karpenkov, D. Yu.; Zaleski, A.; Tereshina, E. A.

    2014-09-01

    The effect of the structural state on magnetic and hysteretic properties of compounds with high contents of a 3 d transition metal, i.e., R 2Fe14 - x Co x B and RFe11 - x Co x Ti (where R = Y, Sm; 0 ≤ x ≤ 8), was studied. Alloys were prepared using high-purity rare-earth metals by two different methods: induction melting and argon-arc melting. Severe plastic deformation and rapid melt-quenching allowed preparation of nanostructured samples. Structural studies of the samples were performed by X-ray powder diffraction and atomic-force microscopy methods. Magnetic hysteretic properties were studied using a PPMS magnetometer in the temperature range of 4.2-300 K in fields to 20 kOe. It was shown that the dependences of fundamental magnetic parameters (Curie temperature, saturation magnetization, and magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant) on the cobalt content exhibit a similarity for both systems. It was found that, depending on sample treatment, the grain size varies from 30 to 70 nm after severe plastic deformation and in wider ranges (from 10 to 100 nm) after rapid quenching, not exceeding the single-domain size. The interrelation between the microstructure and magnetic characteristics was investigated. It was revealed that the concentration dependence of the coercivity for both systems has a maximum at the same cobalt content, i.e., x = 2.

  14. Influence of Grain Boundaries and their Composition on the Deformation Strength of High-purity, Synthetic Forsterite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillman, Amanda Marie

    Grain boundaries are an important feature of the mantle. With recent studies suggesting the majority of the upper mantle deforms by grain boundary sliding (Hirth and Kohlstedt, 2003; Hansen et al., 2013), understanding the role grain boundaries play is key. As grain boundary sliding always requires an accommodation mechanism, directly determining the contribution of grain boundary sliding to total strain on a sample is important for modeling deformation in the mantle. Altering grain boundary composition can change the structure and viscosity of the boundary. Understanding the effects of grain boundary composition is necessary for comparing data sets of different olivine as well as for accurately extrapolating experimental data to represent the mantle. In Chapter 2, uniaxial deformation experiments on high-purity synthetic forsterite at high temperature and ambient pressure are used to characterize the contribution of grain boundary sliding to strain in diffusion creep. Experiments were conducted in a one-atmosphere deformation rig, which allowed the polished surfaces of the samples to be analyzed with atomic force microscopy. The high temperature necessary for deformation enabled a great deal of thermal grooving, which can dramatically alter the topography of an initially polished surface. A methodology was developed to correct for the effect of thermal grooving and determine the amount of grain boundary sliding as a function of grain size and stress. A comparison is also made between two popular methods for determining grain size: the line intercept method and the equivalent area circle method. The line intercept method consistently produces larger grain sizes than the equivalent area circle method. In Chapter 3, triaxial compression experiments on forsterite are used to determine the effect of grain boundary chemistry on deformation strength. High-purity synthetic forsterite was doped with either Ca or Pr and then deformed at high temperature and a confining

  15. Wafer and bulk high-purity silicon trace element analysis at the Texas A and M University Nuclear Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dalsem, Daniel James

    1998-11-24

    A trace element analysis program for wafer and bulk high-purity silicon (Si) samples has been operating at the Texas A and M University Nuclear Science Center (TAMU NSC) since 1996. Samples are irradiated in the NSC's 1-MW TRIGA research reactor at a thermal neutron fluence rate of 10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}/s for 14 hours. After an appropriate decay length, bulk samples are chemically etched to remove surface contamination while wafer surfaces are first rinsed with acid to determine surface contamination and then etched to obtain epitaxial layer contamination information. All samples, along with the appropriate etching solutions are analyzed using gamma-ray spectroscopy to quantitatively determine the various radioisotopes created during irradiation. Elements typically determined are antimony (Sb), arsenic (As), bromine (Br), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), gallium (Ga), gold (Au), iron (Fe), molybdenum (Mo), potassium (K), silver (Ag), sodium (Na) tungsten (W) and zinc (Zn). The potential exists to also determine cesium (Cs), iridium (Ir), lanthanum (La), mercury (Hg), rubidium (Rb), scandium (Sc), and zirconium (Zr). Detection limits range from 10{sup 14} down to 10{sup 7} atoms/cm{sup 2} in surface analysis and 10{sup 13} down to 10{sup 8} atoms/cm{sup 3} in bulk Si.

  16. Determination of indium in high purity antimony by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) using boric acid as a modifier.

    PubMed

    Dash, K; Thangavel, S; Chaurasia, S C; Arunachalam, J

    2006-10-15

    The use of boric acid as a modifier for the determination of trace amount of indium in high purity antimony by electrothermal atomic absorption is described. It was found that the negative influence of the hydrofluoric acid, used for the digestion could not be eliminated by using stabilized temperature platform furnace (STPF) alone. Due to the high dissociation energy (D(0)=506kJmol(-1)) of indium fluoride, it is difficult to dissociate in the gas phase and hence is lost. In presence of HF (used for the dissolution of antimony), the universal Pd-Mg modifier does not work satisfactorily. Additionally, rising corrosion and reduced tube lifetime were observed when the acid digested (HF-HNO(3)) antimony solution was injected in to the platform. Improvement in platform life and elimination of interferences were achieved by the addition of boric acid as a chemical modifier together with ruthenium coating of the platform. Corrosive changes of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA) platform surface were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The standard addition method was applied. A characteristic mass of 36pg was obtained. The detection limit of the proposed method is around 0.04mugg(-1). The developed method was applied to the determination of indium in real samples. The data obtained by this method were in good agreement with those obtained by ICP-MS.

  17. Direct determination of impurities in high purity silicon carbide by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry using slurry nebulization technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Qiu, Deren; Ni, Zheming; Tao, Guangyi; Yang, Pengyuan

    2006-09-08

    A novel method for the determination of Al, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni and Ti in high purity silicon carbide (SiC) using slurry introduction axial viewed inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) was described. The various sizes of SiC slurry were dispersed by adding dispersant polyethylene imine (PEI). The stability of slurry was characterized by zeta potential measurement, SEM observation and signal stability testing. The optimal concentration of PEI was found to be 0.5 wt% for the SiC slurry. Analytical results of sub-mum size SiC by the slurry introduction were in good accordance with those by the alkaline fusion method which verified that determination could be calibrated by aqueous standards. For mum size SiC, results of most elements have a negative deviation and should be calibrated by the Certified Reference Material slurry. Owing to a rather low contamination in the sample preparation and stability of the slurry, the limits of detection (LODs), which are in the range of 40-2000 ng g(-1), superior to those of the conventional nebulization technique by ICP-OES or ICP-MS.

  18. High-Purity Isolation and Recovery of Circulating Tumor Cells using Conducting Polymer-deposited Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, SeungHyun; Hong, WooYoung; Lee, Eun Sook; Cho, Youngnam

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a conductive nano-roughened microfluidic device and demonstrated its use as an electrically modulated capture and release system for studying rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The microchannel surfaces were covalently decorated with epithelial cancer-specific anti-EpCAM antibody by electrochemical deposition of biotin-doped polypyrrole (Ppy), followed by the assembly of streptavidin and biotinylated antibody. Our method utilizes the unique topographical features and excellent electrical activity of Ppy for i) surface-induced preferential recognition and release of CTCs, and ii) selective elimination of non-specifically immobilized white blood cells (WBCs), which are capable of high-purity isolation of CTCs. In addition, the direct incorporation of biotin molecules offers good flexibility, because it allows the modification of channel surfaces with diverse antibodies, in addition to anti-EpCAM, for enhanced detection of multiple types of CTCs. By engineering a series of electrical, chemical, and topographical cues, this simple yet efficient device provides a significant advantage to CTC detection technology as compared with other conventional methods. PMID:25250093

  19. Industrial-scale separation of high-purity single-chirality single-wall carbon nanotubes for biological imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yomogida, Yohei; Tanaka, Takeshi; Zhang, Minfang; Yudasaka, Masako; Wei, Xiaojun; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2016-01-01

    Single-chirality, single-wall carbon nanotubes are desired due to their inherent physical properties and performance characteristics. Here, we demonstrate a chromatographic separation method based on a newly discovered chirality-selective affinity between carbon nanotubes and a gel containing a mixture of the surfactants. In this system, two different selectivities are found: chiral-angle selectivity and diameter selectivity. Since the chirality of nanotubes is determined by the chiral angle and diameter, combining these independent selectivities leads to high-resolution single-chirality separation with milligram-scale throughput and high purity. Furthermore, we present efficient vascular imaging of mice using separated single-chirality (9,4) nanotubes. Due to efficient absorption and emission, blood vessels can be recognized even with the use of ∼100-fold lower injected dose than the reported value for pristine nanotubes. Thus, 1 day of separation provides material for up to 15,000 imaging experiments, which is acceptable for industrial use. PMID:27350127

  20. Plastic deformation of high-purity a-titanium: model development and validation using the Taylor cylinder impact test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandola, Nitin; Revil-Baudard, Benoit; Cazacu, Oana

    2016-08-01

    Results of an experimental study on the quasi-static and high-rate plastic deformation due to impact of a high-purity, polycrystalline, a-titanium material are presented. To quantify the plastic anisotropy and tension-compression asymmetry of the material, first monotonic uniaxial compression and tension tests were carried out at room temperature under quasi-static conditions. It was found that the material is transversely isotropic and displays strong strength differential effects. To characterize the material's strain rate sensitivity, Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar tests in tension and compression were also conducted. Taylor impact tests were performed for impact velocity of 196 m/s. Plastic deformation extended to 64% of the length of the deformed specimen, with little radial spreading. To model simultaneously the observed anisotropy, strain-rate sensitivity, and tension-compression asymmetry of the material, a three-dimensional constitutive model was developed. Key in the formulation is a macroscopic yield function [1] that incorporates the specificities of the plastic flow, namely the combined effects of anisotropy and tension-compression asymmetry. Comparison between model predictions and data show the capabilities of the model to describe with accuracy the plastic behavior of the a-Ti material for both quasi-static and dynamic loadings, in particular, a very good agreement was obtained between the simulated and experimental post-test Taylor specimen geometries.

  1. High Purity and Yield of Boron Nitride Nanotubes Using Amorphous Boron and a Nozzle-Type Reactor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaewoo; Seo, Duckbong; Yoo, Jeseung; Jeong, Wanseop; Seo, Young-Soo; Kim, Jaeyong

    2014-08-11

    Enhancement of the production yield of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) with high purity was achieved using an amorphous boron-based precursor and a nozzle-type reactor. Use of a mixture of amorphous boron and Fe decreases the milling time for the preparation of the precursor for BNNTs synthesis, as well as the Fe impurity contained in the B/Fe interdiffused precursor nanoparticles by using a simple purification process. We also explored a nozzle-type reactor that increased the production yield of BNNTs compared to a conventional flow-through reactor. By using a nozzle-type reactor with amorphous boron-based precursor, the weight of the BNNTs sample after annealing was increased as much as 2.5-times with much less impurities compared to the case for the flow-through reactor with the crystalline boron-based precursor. Under the same experimental conditions, the yield and quantity of BNNTs were estimated as much as ~70% and ~1.15 g/batch for the former, while they are ~54% and 0.78 g/batch for the latter.

  2. Recovery of silicon from sewage sludge for production of high-purity nano-SiO(2).

    PubMed

    Zou, Jinlong; Dai, Ying; Pan, Kai; Jiang, Baojiang; Tian, Chungui; Tian, Guohui; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Lei; Wang, Xue; Fu, Honggang

    2013-02-01

    Generation of excess sewage sludge has already caused many environmental problems. A novel investigation for recovery of Si from the carbonized raw sewage sludge (RS) has been conducted in this study. Results show that early rupture (by OH(-)) of Si-O-Si bond in the networks of SiO(4)(4-) tetrahedron is the key step for formation of RS-derived sodium silicate (Na(2)O·(SiO(2))(x)·(H(2)O)(y)). SiO(2) gel is formed through the silica colloidal-particles cohesion, which is partly affected by the bridging role of the hydrated Na(+) (1070.7eV). O1s peaks of the SiO(2) can be decomposed into two components, i.e. Si-O bridging oxygen atoms (532.4 eV) and hydroxyl groups (O-H, 533.0 eV). Intensity of the O-H stretching vibration bands around 3450 cm(-1) (residual Si-OH), which is inversely related to the condensation degree, decreases as sol pH increases. Properties of this high purity RS-SiO(2) enable it to have the potential for numerous technological (environmental and biotechnology) applications. Reutilization of RS for production of SiO(2) may provide an environmental benefits to communities by protecting water, soil and air.

  3. The formation of high-purity isocyanurate through proazaphosphatrane-catalysed isocyanate cyclo-trimerisation: computational insights.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Jack N; Goodman, Jonathan M

    2013-01-07

    Polyurethane foams are widely used materials and control of their physical properties is a significant challenge. Management of cyclo-trimerisation during the polymerisation process is vital when tailoring the mechanical properties of the foam. Proazaphosphatranes are known to efficiently catalyse the cyclo-trimerisation of organic isocyanates, giving high purity isocyanurate with little uretdione by-product. The mechanism of this catalysis was previously unknown, although some zwitterionic intermediates have been identified spectroscopically. We have investigated a nucleophilic-catalysis reaction pathway involving sequential addition of methyl isocyanate to activated zwitterionic intermediates using density functional theory calculations. Evidence for significant transannulation by the proazaphosphatrane nitrogen was found for all intermediates, offering stabilisation of the phosphonium cation. Steric crowding at the proazaphosphatrane nucleophilic phosphorus gives rise to a preference for direct isocyanurate formation rather than via the uretdione, in sharp contrast to the uncatalysed system which has been found to preferentially proceed via the kinetic uretdione product. The investigations suggest the mechanism of proazaphosphatrane catalysed cyclo-oligomerisation does not proceed via the uretdione product, and hence why little of this impurity is observed experimentally.

  4. Physical activity in individuals with haemophilia and experience with recombinant factor VIII Fc fusion protein and recombinant factor IX Fc fusion protein for the treatment of active patients: a literature review and case reports

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Michael; Álvarez-Román, María Teresa; Chowdary, Pratima; Quon, Doris V.; Schafer, Kim

    2016-01-01

    The World Federation of Hemophilia and the National Hemophilia Foundation encourage people with haemophilia (PWH) to participate in routine physical activity. The benefits of physical activity for PWH include improvements in joint, bone, and muscle health. Accordingly, a number of studies suggest that levels of physical activity among PWH are similar to those of their healthy peers, especially among individuals who began prophylaxis at an early age (≤3 years). Importantly, several studies found either no increased risk or only a transient increase in risk of bleeding with more intensive physical activity compared with less intensive physical activity. Data on optimal prophylaxis regimens for PWH who participate in physical/sporting activities; however, remain sparse. Long-acting recombinant factor VIII Fc fusion protein (rFVIIIFc) and recombinant factor IX Fc fusion protein (rFIXFc) demonstrated efficacy for the prevention and treatment of bleeding episodes in Phase 3 clinical trials of participants with haemophilia A and B, respectively, with most individuals able to maintain or increase their physical activities. This manuscript reviews the current literature that describes physical activity in PWH. Additionally, case studies are presented to provide supplemental information to clinicians illustrating the use of rFVIIIFc and rFIXFc in physically active patients with haemophilia A and B, respectively. These case reports demonstrate that it is possible for patients to be physically active and maintain good control of their haemophilia with extended interval prophylactic dosing using rFVIIIFc or rFIXFc. PMID:27116081

  5. A common G10430A mutation (Gly 60 Ser) in the factor IX gene describes the presence of moderate and mild hemophilia B in the majority of the Gujarati population.

    PubMed

    Quadros, Leera; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Shetty, Shrimati

    2007-05-01

    Hemophilia B is an X-linked recessively inherited bleeding disorder afflicting humans across all socio-economic as well as racial groups. A wide range of mutations showing high heterogeneity has been reported in different populations. Thus, it has been difficult to adopt a cost-effective strategy for the genetic diagnosis of hemophilia B families. We report the presence of a common G10430A mutation in exon d of the factor IX gene, wherein the highly conserved Gly 60 residue of the first epidermal growth like domain was changed to Ser in 22 out of 22 moderately severe to mild hemophilia B patients originating from Gujarat. None of the eight Gujarati severe hemophilia B patients, 30 normal Gujarati men, and 20 moderately severe to mild hemophilia B patients belonging to other communities showed the presence of this mutation. This mutation occurred in the same haplotype background thereby suggesting a 'founder effect.' The direct detection of this G10430A mutation can be used for accurate carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis in mild to moderate factor-IX-deficient patients belonging to the Gujarat state of western India.

  6. ARES I-X Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-27

    NASA Ares I-X mission managers watch as NASA's Ares I-X rocket launches from pad 39b at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2009. The flight test will provide NASA with an early opportunity to test and prove flight characteristics, hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with the Ares I. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. Refinement of Eutectic Si in High Purity Al-5Si Alloys with Combined Ca and P Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Thomas Hartmut; Li, Jiehua; Schaffer, Paul Louis; Schumacher, Peter; Arnberg, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The effects of combined additions of Ca and P on the eutectic Si in a series of high purity Al-5 wt pct Si alloys have been investigated with the entrained droplet technique and complementary sets of conventional castings. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal analysis were used to investigate the eutectic droplet undercooling and the recalescence undercooling, respectively. Optical microscopy, SEM, EPMA, and TEM were employed to characterize the resultant microstructures. It was found that 250 ppm Ca addition to Al-5Si wt pct alloys with higher P contents leads to a significant increase of the eutectic droplet undercooling. For low or moderate cooling rates, the TEM results underline that Ca additions do not promote Si twinning. Thus, a higher twin density cannot be expected in Ca containing Al-Si alloys after, e.g., sand casting. Consequently, a refinement of the eutectic Si from coarse flake-like to fine plate-like structure, rather than a modification of the eutectic Si to a fibrous morphology, was achieved. This strongly indicates that the main purpose of Ca additions is to counteract the coarsening effect of the eutectic Si imposed by higher P concentrations. Significant multiple Si twinning was observed in melt-spun condition; however, this can be attributed to the higher cooling rate. After DSC heating (slow cooling), most of Si twins disappeared. Thus, the well-accepted impurity-induced twinning mechanism may be not valid in the case of Ca addition. The possible refinement mechanisms were discussed in terms of nucleation and growth of eutectic Si. We propose that the pre-eutectic Al2Si2Ca phase and preferential formation of Ca3P2 deactivate impurity particles, most likely AlP, poisoning the nucleation sites for eutectic Si.

  8. Investigation of the shear response and geometrically necessary dislocation densities in shear localization in high-purity titanium

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Chaoyi; Livescu, Veronica; Harrington, Tyler; ...

    2017-03-31

    The influence of microstructural anisotropy on shear response of high-purity titanium was studied using the compact forced-simple-shear specimen (CFSS) loaded under quasi-static loading conditions. Post-mortem characterization reveals significant difference in shear response of different directions in the same material due to material crystallographic texture anisotropy. Shear bands are narrower in specimens in which the shear zone is aligned along the direction with a strong {0001} basal texture. Twinning was identified as an active mechanism to accommodate strains in the shear region in both orientations. This paper confirms the applicability of the CFSS design for the investigation of differences in themore » shear response of materials as a function of process-induced crystallographic texture. A detailed, systematic approach to quantifying shear band evolution by evaluating geometrically necessary dislocations (GND) associated with crystallographic anisotropy is presented. Finally, the results show that: i) line average GND density profiles, for Ti samples that possess a uniform equiaxed-grain structure, but with strong crystallographic anisotropy, exhibit significant differences in GND density close to the shear band center; ii) GND profiles decrease steadily away from the shear band as the plastic strain diminishes, in agreement with Ashby's theory of work hardening, where the higher GND density in the through-thickness (TT) orientation is a result of restricted < a > type slip in the shear band compared with in-plane (IP) samples; iii) the anisotropy in deformation response is derived from initial crystallographic texture of the materials, where GND density of < a > GNDs are higher adjacent to the shear band in the through-thickness sample oriented away from easy slip, but the density of < c+a > type GNDs are very similar in these two samples; and iv) the increase in grain average GND density was determined to have strong correlation to an increase in the

  9. PpIX induces mitochondria-related apoptosis in murine leukemia L1210 cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaomin; Chen, Yan; Wang, Xiaobing; Wang, Yuan; Wang, Pan; Li, Long; Liu, Quanhong

    2014-07-01

    Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), a well-known sensitizer that can enhance laser light or ultrasound induced cytotoxicity in photodynamic and sonodynamic therapy. However, PpIX alone could effectively cause anti-tumor effect and the underlying mechanisms are rarely been reported. Therefore, this study was to investigate the possible mechanism by which PpIX revealed anti-proliferative effect on murine leukemia L1210 cells. The accumulation of PpIX in L1210 cells and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was evaluated with flow cytometry. The subcellular localization of PpIX and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) translocation were determined by confocal microscope. The cell viability was examined by MTT assay. Annexin V-PE/7-AAD and DAPI staining were used to detect apoptotic cells. The mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) changes were tested by rhodamine123 staining. DNA damage was measured by comet assay. PpIX preferentially accumulated in L1210 cells compared to PBMCs and PpIX mainly located in the mitochondria of L1210 cells. PpIX at a concentration of 1 µg/ml or above exerted significant anti-tumor effect and the cell viability loss presented PpIX dose-dependent manner. Typical apoptotic features such as chromatin condensation were observed by DAPI staining. Annexin V-PE/7-AAD analysis showed 5 µg/ml PpIX could induce about 24% cell apoptosis, which was inhibited by cyclosporin A (CsA), an inhibitor of mitochondrial permeability transition pore. In addition, the PpIX caused MMP loss, AIF translocation to nucleus and serious DNA damage were also suppressed by CsA. The results indicate mitochondria-dependent apoptosis were involved in PpIX caused cell damage on L1210 cells.

  10. A rapid culture independent methodology to quantitatively detect and identify common human bacterial pathogens associated with contaminated high purity water.

    PubMed

    Minogue, Elizabeth; Tuite, Nina L; Smith, Cindy J; Reddington, Kate; Barry, Thomas

    2015-02-18

    Water and High Purity Water (HPW) distribution systems can be contaminated with human pathogenic microorganisms. This biocontamination may pose a risk to human health as HPW is commonly used in the industrial, pharmaceutical and clinical sectors. Currently, routine microbiological testing of HPW is performed using slow and labour intensive traditional microbiological based techniques. There is a need to develop a rapid culture independent methodology to quantitatively detect and identify biocontamination associated with HPW. A novel internally controlled 5-plex real-time PCR Nucleic Acid Diagnostics assay (NAD), was designed and optimised in accordance with Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments guidelines, to rapidly detect, identify and quantify the human pathogenic bacteria Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Burkholderia species, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens which are commonly associated with the biocontamination of water and water distribution systems. The specificity of the 5-plex assay was tested against genomic DNA isolated from a panel of 95 microorganisms with no cross reactivity observed. The analytical sensitivities of the S. maltophilia, B. cepacia, P. aeruginosa and the S. marcescens assays are 8.5, 5.7, 3.2 and 7.4 genome equivalents respectively. Subsequently, an analysis of HPW supplied by a Millipore Elix 35 water purification unit performed using standard microbiological methods revealed high levels of naturally occurring microbiological contamination. Five litre water samples from this HPW delivery system were also filtered and genomic DNA was purified directly from these filters. These DNA samples were then tested using the developed multiplex real-time PCR NAD assay and despite the high background microbiological contamination observed, both S. maltophilia and Burkholderia species were quantitatively detected and identified. At both sampling points the levels of both S. maltophilia and

  11. Efficient synthesis of high purity homo-arm and mikto-arm poly(ethylene glycol) stars using epoxide and azide-alkyne coupling chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Boyu; Zhang, Hong; Elupula, Ravinder; Alb, Alina M; Grayson, Scott M

    2014-01-01

    High purity homo-arm and mikto-arm poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) stars are successfully prepared by the combination of epoxide ring-openings and azide-alkyne click reactions. First, monohydroxy-PEG was modified via epoxide chemistry to bear one hydroxyl and one azide functionality at the same end. An alkyne-functionalized PEG chain was then coupled to the azide. Subsequently, the remaining hydroxyl could be reactivated to an azide again and again to enable stepwise addition of alkyne-functionalized polymer arms. The use of efficient reactions for this iterative route provides star polymers with an exact number of arms, and a tailorable degree of polymerization for each arm. Detailed characterization confirms the high purity of multi-arm polyethylene glycol products. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Unique low-molecular-weight lignin with high purity extracted from wood by deep eutectic solvents (DES): a source of lignin for valorization

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez-Vasco, Carlos; Ma, Ruoshui; Quintero, Melissa; Guo, Mond; Geleynse, Scott; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Wolcott, Michael; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a new method of applying Deep Eutectic Solvents (DES) for extracting lignin from woody biomass with high yield and high purity. DES mixtures prepared from Choline Chloride (ChCl) and four hydrogen-bond donors–acetic acid, lactic acid, levulinic acid and glycerol–were evaluated for treatment of hardwood (poplar) and softwood (D. fir). It was found that these DES treatments can selectively extract a significant amount of lignin from wood with high yields: 78% from poplar and 58% from D. fir. The extracted lignin has high purity (95%) with unique structural properties. We discover that DES can selectively cleave ether linkages in wood lignin and facilitate lignin removal from wood. The mechanism of DES cleavage of ether bonds between phenylpropane units was investigated. The results from this study demonstrate that DES is a promising solvent for wood delignification and the production of a new source of lignin with promising potential applications.

  13. In-vivo fluorescence dosimetry of aminolevulinate-based protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) accumulation in human nonmelanoma skin cancers and precancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Christine B.; Lohser, Sara; Chang, Sung; Bailin, Philip A.; Maytin, Edward V.

    2009-06-01

    PDT is clinically useful for precancers (actinic keratoses; AK) of the skin, but the optimal duration for 5-ALA application is still controversial. For basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), cure rates remain inferior to surgical excision. Lack of knowledge about regional levels of PpIX levels within target tissues clearly contribute to these suboptimal results. To investigate PpIX levels achievable in human skin neoplasias in-vivo, a clinical study to monitor PpIX accumulation in vivo was performed. PpIX-fluorescence in patients undergoing ALA-PDT for facial AK was monitored via real-time in-vivo fluorescence dosimetry, with measurements q20 min following application of 5-ALA (Levulan Kerastick). PpIX accumulation followed linear kinetics in nearly all cases. The slopes varied widely, and did not correlate with clinical outcome in all patients. Some patients with a low accumulation of PpIX fluorescence had a good response to therapy, whereas others with high PpIX accumulation required repeat treatment (although not necessarily of the same lesion). PpIX accumulation rates did correlate to a certain degree with the overall amount of erythema. We conclude that unknown factors besides PpIX levels must be critical for the response to treatment. To assess the relationship between PpIX levels in various skin cancers, patients undergoing routine Mohs surgery for BCC or SCC were measured by in-vivo dosimetry at 2 h after 5-ALA application. Overall, a progressive increase in PpIX signal during malignant progression was observed, in the following rank order: Normal skin < AK < SCC ~ BCC.

  14. Effect of small additions of silicon, iron, and aluminum on the room-temperature tensile properties of high-purity uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, R.L.

    1983-11-14

    Eleven binary and ternary alloys of uranium and very low concentrations of iron, silicon, and aluminum were prepared and tested for room-temperature tensile properties after various heat treatments. A yield strength approximately double that of high-purity derby uranium was obtained from a U-400 ppM Si-200 ppM Fe alloy after beta solution treatment and alpha aging. Higher silicon plus iron alloy contents resulted in increased yield strength, but showed an unacceptable loss of ductility.

  15. Preparation of High Purity Crystalline Silicon by Electro-Catalytic Reduction of Sodium Hexafluorosilicate with Sodium below 180°C

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuan; Liu, Yang; Wang, Xin; Li, Kai; Chen, Pu

    2014-01-01

    The growing field of silicon solar cells requires a substantial reduction in the cost of semiconductor grade silicon, which has been mainly produced by the rod-based Siemens method. Because silicon can react with almost all of the elements and form a number of alloys at high temperatures, it is highly desired to obtain high purity crystalline silicon at relatively low temperatures through low cost process. Here we report a fast, complete and inexpensive reduction method for converting sodium hexafluorosilicate into silicon at a relatively low reaction temperature (∼200°C). This temperature could be further decreased to less than 180°C in combination with an electrochemical approach. The residue sodium fluoride is dissolved away by pure water and hydrochloric acid solution in later purifying processes below 15°C. High purity silicon in particle form can be obtained. The relative simplicity of this method might lead to a low cost process in producing high purity silicon. PMID:25153509

  16. Ionic liquid-based extraction followed by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of trace heavy metals in high-purity iron metal.

    PubMed

    Matsumiya, Hiroaki; Kato, Tatsuya; Hiraide, Masataka

    2014-02-01

    The analysis of high-purity materials for trace impurities is an important and challenging task. The present paper describes a facile and sensitive method for the determination of trace heavy metals in high-purity iron metal. Trace heavy metals in an iron sample solution were rapidly and selectively preconcentrated by the extraction into a tiny volume of an ionic liquid [1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide] for the determination by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). A nitrogen-donating neutral ligand, 2,4,6-tris(2-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine (TPTZ), was found to be effective in the ionic liquid-based selective extraction, allowing the nearly complete (~99.8%) elimination of the iron matrix. The combination with the optimized GFAAS was successful. The detectability reached sub-μg g(-1) levels in iron metal. The novel use of TPTZ in ionic liquid-based extraction followed by GFAAS was successfully applied to the determination of traces of Co, Ni, Cu, Cd, and Pb in certified reference materials for high-purity iron metal.

  17. Zn protoporphyrin IX is formed not from heme but from protoporphyrin IX.

    PubMed

    Wakamatsu, Jun-Ichi; Okui, Jun; Hayashi, Nobutaka; Nishimura, Takanori; Hattori, Akihito

    2007-12-01

    We examined the effects of exogenous myoglobin, a bivalent chelator, and nitrite on Zn protoporphyrin IX (ZPP) formation by using model systems. ZPP was formed in a model solution without addition of exogenous myoglobin. After incubation, the amount of ZPP in a model solution was increased but that of heme was not decreased compared with the amounts before incubation. Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) instead of ZPP also accumulated in a model solution with addition of EDTA, but the amount of heme was not reduced. These results suggested that ZPP was not formed by the Fe-Zn substitution in heme but was formed by the insertion of Zn into PPIX, which was formed independently. The fact that the effects of various factors in model systems with/without addition of a bivalent chelator were similar suggested that ZPP formation was strongly affected by PPIX formation. Inhibition of PPIX formation by nitrite might be the reason for the low levels of ZPP in cured meats.

  18. Reconsidering the Status of Title IX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Ben

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the controversy over Title IX and women's participation in college athletics. Critics say the mandate shortchanges men's teams, while proponents say that women's sports programs remain underfunded in spite of Title IX. Describes some proposed modifications to Title IX and their potential effects. (SLD)

  19. [Title IX and Intercollegiate Athletics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health , Education, and Welfare, Washington., DC. Office of the Secretary.

    Title IX of the 1972 Education Amendments is the topic of these Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (DHEW) notices, which include both a proposed policy interpretation regarding intercollegiate athletic programs and a proposed amendment regarding federal regulation of school dress codes. The purpose of the first action is to ensure that…

  20. Title IX Athletics Investigator's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnette, Valerie M.; Daniel, Lamar

    This guide is designed for use in investigating college athletics program compliance with Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972, prohibiting sex discrimination in programs and activities receiving federal financial assistance. It is organized to assist investigators from the time a complaint is received or compliance review scheduled to…

  1. Sub-band gap photo-enhanced secondary electron emission from high-purity single-crystal chemical-vapor-deposited diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Yater, J. E. Shaw, J. L.; Pate, B. B.; Feygelson, T. I.

    2016-02-07

    Secondary-electron-emission (SEE) current measured from high-purity, single-crystal (100) chemical-vapor-deposited diamond is found to increase when sub-band gap (3.06 eV) photons are incident on the hydrogenated surface. Although the light does not produce photoemission directly, the SEE current increases by more than a factor of 2 before saturating with increasing laser power. In energy distribution curves (EDCs), the emission peak shows a corresponding increase in intensity with increasing laser power. However, the emission-onset energy in the EDCs remains constant, indicating that the bands are pinned at the surface. On the other hand, changes are observed on the high-energy side of the distribution as the laser power increases, with a well-defined shoulder becoming more pronounced. From an analysis of this feature in the EDCs, it is deduced that upward band bending is present in the near-surface region during the SEE measurements and this band bending suppresses the SEE yield. However, sub-band gap photon illumination reduces the band bending and thereby increases the SEE current. Because the bands are pinned at the surface, we conclude that the changes in the band levels occur below the surface in the electron transport region. Sample heating produces similar effects as observed with sub-band gap photon illumination, namely, an increase in SEE current and a reduction in band bending. However, the upward band bending is not fully removed by either increasing laser power or temperature, and a minimum band bending of ∼0.8 eV is established in both cases. The sub-band gap photo-excitation mechanism is under further investigation, although it appears likely at present that defect or gap states play a role in the photo-enhanced SEE process. In the meantime, the study demonstrates the ability of visible light to modify the electronic properties of diamond and enhance the emission capabilities, which may have potential impact for diamond-based vacuum electron

  2. Sub-band gap photo-enhanced secondary electron emission from high-purity single-crystal chemical-vapor-deposited diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yater, J. E.; Shaw, J. L.; Pate, B. B.; Feygelson, T. I.

    2016-02-01

    Secondary-electron-emission (SEE) current measured from high-purity, single-crystal (100) chemical-vapor-deposited diamond is found to increase when sub-band gap (3.06 eV) photons are incident on the hydrogenated surface. Although the light does not produce photoemission directly, the SEE current increases by more than a factor of 2 before saturating with increasing laser power. In energy distribution curves (EDCs), the emission peak shows a corresponding increase in intensity with increasing laser power. However, the emission-onset energy in the EDCs remains constant, indicating that the bands are pinned at the surface. On the other hand, changes are observed on the high-energy side of the distribution as the laser power increases, with a well-defined shoulder becoming more pronounced. From an analysis of this feature in the EDCs, it is deduced that upward band bending is present in the near-surface region during the SEE measurements and this band bending suppresses the SEE yield. However, sub-band gap photon illumination reduces the band bending and thereby increases the SEE current. Because the bands are pinned at the surface, we conclude that the changes in the band levels occur below the surface in the electron transport region. Sample heating produces similar effects as observed with sub-band gap photon illumination, namely, an increase in SEE current and a reduction in band bending. However, the upward band bending is not fully removed by either increasing laser power or temperature, and a minimum band bending of ˜0.8 eV is established in both cases. The sub-band gap photo-excitation mechanism is under further investigation, although it appears likely at present that defect or gap states play a role in the photo-enhanced SEE process. In the meantime, the study demonstrates the ability of visible light to modify the electronic properties of diamond and enhance the emission capabilities, which may have potential impact for diamond-based vacuum electron

  3. Effect of terminal (dry) heat treatment on non-enveloped viruses in coagulation factor concentrates.

    PubMed

    Hart, H F; Hart, W G; Crossley, J; Perrie, A M; Wood, D J; John, A; McOmish, F

    1994-01-01

    Terminal dry heat treatment effectively inactivated hepatitis A virus (HAV) and canine parvovirus added to high-purity factor VIII. After 24 h at 80 degrees C, HAV infectivity was reduced by > or = 4.3 log10 TCID50, as measured in a newly developed infectivity assay. The same reduction in virus titer was achieved after 2 h and before 6 h at 90 degrees C. Inactivation of hepatitis A virus was also seen in the freeze-drying step prior to heat treatment with an approximately 2.0 log10 reduction in titer. Similar results were obtained with a high-purity factor IX concentrate. Canine parvovirus was also inactivated at both temperatures, with residual infectivity being undetected after 48 h at 80 degrees C or 10 h at 90 degrees C. Canine parvovirus was not affected by lyophilisation. Canine parvovirus measurements by PCR did not reflect the levels of infectivity measured by the tissue-culture-based method. The addition of the terminal dry heat treatment to solvent/detergent could effectively eliminate the potential contamination of solvent/detergent-treated coagulation factor concentrates by non-lipid-enveloped viruses. However, careful evaluation for any increased induction of non-antigens for factor VIII, as a consequence of such treatment, is needed before use in patients can be recommended.

  4. ARES I-X Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-27

    NASA's Ares I-X rocket is seen through the windows of Firing Room One of teh Launch Control Center (LCC) at the Kennedy Space Center as it launches from pad 39b in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2009. The flight test will provide NASA with an early opportunity to test and prove flight characteristics, hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with the Ares I. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Influence of the chloride ion concentration on the corrosion of high-purity Mg, ZE41 and AZ91 in buffered Hank's solution.

    PubMed

    Taltavull, C; Shi, Z; Torres, B; Rams, J; Atrens, A

    2014-02-01

    This research studied the influence of the chloride ion concentration on the corrosion behaviour of high-purity magnesium (Mg) and two Mg alloys in Hank's solution, using hydrogen evolution and weight loss. A buffer based on CO2 and NaHCO3 was used to maintain the pH constant. The corrosion behaviour was governed by a partially protective surface film, and film breakdown by the chloride ions. The carbonated calcium phosphate layer that formed in Hank's solution was important in determining the protective properties of the surface film.

  6. STARS/LiBerACE: Segmented silicon and high-purity germanium detector arrays for low-energy nuclear reaction and structure studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesher, S. R.; Phair, L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Burke, J. T.; Church, J. A.; Fallon, P.; Gibelin, J.; Scielzo, N. D.; Wiedeking, M.

    2010-09-01

    The Silicon Telescope Array for Reaction Studies (STARS) consists of large-area annular double-sided silicon detectors for charged-particle identification. The Livermore Berkeley Array for Collaborative Experiments (LiBerACE) is an array of six Compton-suppressed high-purity germanium Clover detectors for efficient detection of γ-rays. These detector arrays are versatile tools for studies of neutron-induced reaction cross-sections, fission, light neutron-rich nuclei, and other low-energy nuclear physics topics through transfer, fusion, incomplete-fusion, and inelastic-scattering reactions. The STARS and LiBerACE arrays and typical experimental configurations are described in detail.

  7. Effect of low-energy alpha-particles irradiation on surface structure and physical-mechanical properties of high-purity tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldabergenova, T. M.; Kislitsin, S. B.; Larionov, A. S.; Yar-Mukhamedova, G. S.

    2016-11-01

    Effect of radiation by low-energy alpha-particles on the surface structure and physical-mechanical properties of high-purity tungsten was studied. Samples of tungsten were irradiated by 4He+2 ions with the energy of 45 keV at low-energy channel of accelerator DC-60 in Astana branch of Institute Nuclear Physics. Irradiation fluence was 1.5 × 1018 cm-2, irradiation temperature was 150°C. Experimentally found that irradiation with low-energy alpha particles results in formation of helium filled bubbles in the straggling region.

  8. Ongoing advances in quantitative PpIX fluorescence guided intracranial tumor resection (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Jonathan D.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Bravo, Jaime J.; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2016-03-01

    Aminolevulinc-acid induced protoporphyrin IX (ALA-PpIX) is being investigated as a biomarker to guide neurosurgical resection of brain tumors. ALA-PpIX fluorescence can be observed visually in the surgical field; however, raw fluorescence emissions can be distorted by factors other than the fluorophore concentration. Specifically, fluorescence emissions are mixed with autofluorescence and attenuated by background absorption and scattering properties of the tissue. Recent work at Dartmouth has developed advanced fluorescence detection approaches that return quantitative assessments of PpIX concentration, which are independent of background optical properties. The quantitative fluorescence imaging (qFI) approach has increased sensitivity to residual disease within the resection cavity at the end of surgery that was not visible to the naked eye through the operating microscope. This presentation outlines clinical observations made during an ongoing investigation of ALA-PpIX based guidance of tumor resection. PpIX fluorescence measurements made in a wide-field hyperspectral imaging approach are co-registered with point-assessment using a fiber optic probe. Data show variations in the measured PpIX accumulation among different clinical tumor grades (i.e. high grade glioma, low grade glioma), types (i.e. primary tumors. metastases) and normal structures of interest (e.g. normal cortex, hippocampus). These results highlight the contrast enhancement and underscore the potential clinical benefit offered from quantitative measurements of PpIX concentration during resection of intracranial tumors.

  9. Mechanisms of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Inactivation by Protoporphyrin IX, Zinc-protoporphyrin IX and Mesoporphyrin IX.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Oliveira, Christine; Almeida, Andreza F; Freire, João M; Caruso, Marjolly B; Morando, Maria A; Ferreira, Vivian N S; Assunção-Miranda, Iranaia; Gomes, Andre M O; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Da Poian, Andrea T

    2017-03-27

    Virus resistance to antiviral therapies is an increasing concern that makes urgent the development of broad spectrum antiviral drugs. Targeting viral envelope, a component shared by a large number of viruses, emerges as a promising strategy to overcome this problem. Natural and synthetic porphyrins, due to their relative hydrophobicity and pro-oxidant character, are good candidates for antivirals' development. In the present work, we characterized the antiviral activity of protoprophyrin IX (PPIX), Zn-protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX) and mesoporphyrin IX (MPIX) against vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), and evaluated the mechanisms involved in this activity. VSV treatment with PPIX, ZnPPIX and MPIX promoted a dose-dependent virus inactivation, which was potentiated by porphyrin photoactivation. All three porphyrins inserted into lipid vesicles and disturbed viral membrane organization. In addition, the porphyrins also affected viral proteins, inducing VSV glycoprotein cross-linking, which was enhanced by porphyrin photoactivation. Virus incubation with sodium azide and α-tocopherol partially protected VSV inactivation by porphyrins, suggesting that singlet oxygen ((1)O2) was the main reactive oxygen species produced by photoactivation of these molecules. Furthermore, (1)O2 was detected by DMA oxidation in photoactivated porphyrin samples, reinforcing this hypothesis. These results reveal the potential therapeutic application of PPIX, ZnPPIX and MPIX as good models for broad antiviral drug design.

  10. Janus Graphene Oxide Sponges for High-Purity Fast Separation of Both Water-in-Oil and Oil-in-Water Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jongju; Khan, Fakhre Alam; Baik, Seunghyun

    2017-05-17

    Membrane separation of oil and water with high purity and high permeability is of great interest in environmental and industrial processes. However, membranes with fixed wettability can separate only one type of surfactant-stabilized emulsion (water-in-oil or oil-in-water). Here, we report on Janus graphene oxide (J-GO) sponges for high purity and high permeability separation of both water-in-oil and oil-in-water emulsions. Millimeter-scale reduced GO sponges with a controlled pore size (11.2 or 94.1 μm) are synthesized by freeze drying, and the wettability is further controlled by fluorine (hydrophobic/oleophilic in air) or oxygen (hydrophilic/oleophilic in air) functionalization. J-GO sponges are prepared by the fluorine functionalization on one side and oxygen functionalization on the other side. Interestingly, the oil wettability of oxygen-functionalized surface turns into an oleophobic surface when immersed in water, which is explained by Young's theory. This effect is further used in the separation of both water-in-oil and oil-in-water emulsions by changing the flow direction. The purity of the separated oil and water is very high (≥99.2%), and the permeability is more than an order of magnitude greater than those of the other Janus membranes reported. J-GO sponges can be reused with an excellent repeatability, demonstrating feasibility in practical applications.

  11. Determination of traces of rubidium in high purity cesium chloride by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) using boric acid as a modifier.

    PubMed

    Dash, K; Thangavel, S; Chaurasia, S C; Arunachalam, J

    2007-02-12

    The use of boric acid as a modifier for the determination of trace amount of rubidium in high purity cesium chloride matrix by electrothermal atomic absorption is described. It was found that the negative influence of the chloride matrix could not be eliminated using stabilized temperature platform (STPF) alone. Due to the high dissociation energy (D(0)=427 kJ mol(-1)) of rubidium chloride, it was difficult to dissociate in the gas phase and hence is lost. Elimination of interferences was achieved by the addition of boric acid as a chemical modifier. Diluted cesium chloride samples (5%, m/v) were analyzed applying the standard addition method. The characteristic mass of 24 pg was obtained. The detection limit of the proposed method is around 26 ng g(-1). The developed method was applied to the determination of traces of rubidium in high purity cesium chloride samples. The data obtained by this method were in good agreement with those obtained by other independent method like FAAS.

  12. Determination of rare earth elements in high purity rare earth oxides by liquid chromatography, thermionic mass spectrometry and combined liquid chromatography/thermionic mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stijfhoorn, D. E.; Stray, H.; Hjelmseth, H.

    1993-03-01

    A high-performance liquid Chromatographie (HPLC) method for the determination of rare earth elements in rocks has been modified and used for the determination of rare earth elements (REE) in high purity rare earth oxides. The detection limit was 1-1.5 ng or 2-3 mg/kg when a solution corresponding to 0.5 mg of the rare earth oxide was injected. The REE determination was also carried out by adding a mixture of selected REE isotopes to the sample and analysing the collected HPLC-fractions by mass spectrometry (MS) using a thermionic source. Since the matrix element was not collected, interference from this element during the mass spectrometric analysis was avoided. Detection limits as low as 0.5 mg/kg could then be obtained. Detection limits as low as 0.05 mg/kg were possible by MS without HPLC-pre-separation, but this approach could only be used for those elements that were not affected by the matrix. Commercial samples of high purity Nd 2O 3, Gd 2O 3 and Dy 2O 3 were analysed in this study, and a comparison of results obtained by HPLC, combined HPLC/MS and direct MS are presented.

  13. Pre-degenerated peripheral nerves co-cultured with bone marrow-derived cells: a new technique for harvesting high-purity Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Pan; Wu, Min; Guan, Jian-Zhong; Wang, Zhao-Dong; Gao, Xu-Bin; Liu, Yang-Yang

    2016-10-01

    Schwann cells play an important role in the peripheral nervous system, especially in nerve repair following injury, so artificial nerve regeneration requires an effective technique for obtaining purified Schwann cells. In vivo and in vitro pre-degeneration of peripheral nerves have been shown to obtain high-purity Schwann cells. We believed that in vitro pre-degeneration was simple and controllable, and available for the clinic. Thus, we co-cultured the crushed sciatic nerves with bone marrow-derived cells in vitro. Results demonstrated that, 3 hours after injury, a large number of mononuclear cells moved to the crushed nerves and a large number of bone marrow-derived cells infiltrated the nerve segments. These changes promoted the degradation of the nerve segments, and the dedifferentiation and proliferation of Schwann cells. Neural cell adhesion molecule and glial fibrillary acidic protein expression were detected in the crushed nerves. Schwann cell yield was 9.08 ± 2.01 × 10(4)/mg. The purity of primary cultured Schwann cells was 88.4 ± 5.79%. These indicate a successful new method for obtaining Schwann cells of high purity and yield from adult crushed sciatic nerve using bone marrow-derived cells.

  14. Pre-degenerated peripheral nerves co-cultured with bone marrow-derived cells: a new technique for harvesting high-purity Schwann cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-pan; Wu, Min; Guan, Jian-zhong; Wang, Zhao-dong; Gao, Xu-bin; Liu, Yang-yang

    2016-01-01

    Schwann cells play an important role in the peripheral nervous system, especially in nerve repair following injury, so artificial nerve regeneration requires an effective technique for obtaining purified Schwann cells. In vivo and in vitro pre-degeneration of peripheral nerves have been shown to obtain high-purity Schwann cells. We believed that in vitro pre-degeneration was simple and controllable, and available for the clinic. Thus, we co-cultured the crushed sciatic nerves with bone marrow-derived cells in vitro. Results demonstrated that, 3 hours after injury, a large number of mononuclear cells moved to the crushed nerves and a large number of bone marrow-derived cells infiltrated the nerve segments. These changes promoted the degradation of the nerve segments, and the dedifferentiation and proliferation of Schwann cells. Neural cell adhesion molecule and glial fibrillary acidic protein expression were detected in the crushed nerves. Schwann cell yield was 9.08 ± 2.01 × 104/mg. The purity of primary cultured Schwann cells was 88.4 ± 5.79%. These indicate a successful new method for obtaining Schwann cells of high purity and yield from adult crushed sciatic nerve using bone marrow-derived cells. PMID:27904498

  15. [Separation with ion exchange fiber column and determination of La, Nd, Eu and Gd in high purity ytterbium oxide by ICP-AES].

    PubMed

    Gong, Qi; Chen, Jie; Ji, Ri-Wen; Pan, Xue-Zhen; Wu, Juan

    2010-02-01

    In the present paper, trace La, Nd, Eu and Gd were separated and enriched with strong acid ion exchange fiber column from high purity Yb2 O3, and then determined by Optima 5 300 DV ICP-AES. The ion exchange fiber's breakthrough capacity for Yb was 134 mg x g(-1). The separation condition using 4.0 g fiber column was that after the test solution (pH = 3.0) was fed into the ion exchange fiber column at 1.0 mL x min(-1), the column was pre--leached by dilute nitric acid (pH = 3.00) of 80 mL at 1.5 mL x min(-1) at first, and then was eluted by 0.01 mol x L(-1) ammonium EDTA (pH = 5.00) at the same flow rate. The results showed that 10 mg Yb could reach the baseline separation with 0.100 microg of the four rare earth impurities, and after 100 mg Yb in feed solution had been separated, only 0.017 1 microg x mL(-1) Yb remained in the impurities enriched effluent. When the concentration of Yb2 O3 is less than 100 microg x mL(-1) (87.8 microg x mL(-1) Yb), the matrix interference from Yb on with determination of La, Nd, Eu and Gd can be neglected. The enrichment factors were 3.68 x 10(5) for La2 O3, 4.20 x 10(5) for Nds O3, 3.82 x 10(5) for Eu2 O3, and 4.01 x 10(5) for Gd2 O3, and the detection limits of the method were 0.005 0, 0.014, 0.001 8 and 0.008 2 pg x mL(-1) for La2 O3, Nd2 O3, Eu2 O3 and Gd2 O3 respectively. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of 99.99% Yb2 O3 with RSD (%, n = 5) of 6.2, 5.9, 7.3 and 2.5 for La2 O3, Nd2 O3, Eu2 O3 and Gd2 O3 respectively, and the average recoveries of standard addition were 94.2%, 107%, 97.8% and 102% for La2 O3, Nd2 O3, Eu2 O3 and Gd2 O3 respectively. The calibration curve did not need matrix matching with Yb, and the analysis period was within 4 hour.

  16. ARES I-X Launch Prep

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-26

    NASA Ares I-X Assistant Launch Director Pete Nickolenko, left, and NASA Ares I-X Launch Director Ed Mango monitor the launch countdown from Firing Room One of the Launch Control Center (LCC) at the Kennedy Space Center during the planned launch of the Ares I-X rocket from pad 39b at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2009. The flight test of Ares I-X will provide NASA with an early opportunity to test and prove flight characteristics, hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with the Ares I. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. ARES I-X Launch Prep

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-26

    Mission managers, from left, NASA Ares I-X Assistant Launch Director Pete Nickolenko, Ground Operations Manager Philip "Pepper" Phillips, Ares I-X Launch Director Ed Mango, and Constellation Program manager Jeff Hanley review the latest weather radar from Firing Room One of the Launch Control Center (LCC) at the Kennedy Space Center during the launch countdown of the Ares I-X rocket in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2009. The flight test of Ares I-X will provide NASA with an early opportunity to test and prove flight characteristics, hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with the Ares I. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. ARES I-X Launch Prep

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-26

    Mission managers, from left, NASA Constellation Program manager Jeff Hanley, Ares I-X Launch Director Ed Mango, Ares I-X mission manager Bob Ess, Ground Operations Manager Philip "Pepper" Phillips, review the latest data in Firing Room One of the Launch Control Center (LCC) at the Kennedy Space Center during the launch countdown of the Ares I-X rocket in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2009. The flight test of Ares I-X will provide NASA with an early opportunity to test and prove flight characteristics, hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with the Ares I. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Breakpoint of a balanced translocation (X:14) (q27.1;q32.3) in a girl with severe hemophilia B maps proximal to the factor IX gene.

    PubMed

    Di Paola, J; Goldman, T; Qian, Q; Patil, S R; Schutte, B C; Schute, B C

    2004-03-01

    Hemophilia B is an X-linked bleeding disorder caused by the deficiency of coagulation factor (F)IX, with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 30 000 male births. It is almost exclusively seen in males with rare exceptions. We report a girl who was diagnosed with severe (<1%) FIX deficiency at 4 months of age. Cytogenetic studies in the patient showed a balanced translocation between one of the X-chromosomes and chromosome 14, with breakpoints at bands Xq27.1 and 14q32.3. Both parents were found to have normal chromosomes. Late replication studies by incorporation of 5-bromodeoxyuridine showed non-random inactivation of the normal X-chromosome, a phenomenon frequently seen in balanced X/autosome translocations. To map the breakpoint, fluorescent in-situ hybridization was performed. A PAC DNA probe, RP6-88D7 (which contains the FIX gene) hybridized only on the normal chromosome X as well as onto the derivative 14. Using a PAC DNA probe, RP11-963P9 that is located proximal to the FIX gene, we obtained signals on the normal and derivative X and also on the derivative 14. We conclude that the breakpoint is located within the DNA sequence of this clone mapping proximal to the FIX gene. Since the FIX gene seems to be intact in the derivative 14, the breakpoint may affect an upstream regulatory sequence that subjects the gene to position effect variegation (PEV).

  20. 34 CFR Subject Index to Title IX... - Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2016-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2016-07-01 2016-07-01 false Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1 Index Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the...] Procedures. Subject Index Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1 1 Preamble paragraph...