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Sample records for high-purity factor ix

  1. Purification and characterization of an abnormal factor IX (Christmas factor) molecule. Factor IX Chapel Hill.

    PubMed

    Chung, K S; Madar, D A; Goldsmith, J C; Kingdon, H S; Roberts, H R

    1978-11-01

    Human Factor IX (Christmas factor) was isolated from the plasma of a patient with mild hemophilia B. The patient's plasma contained 5% Factor IX clotting activity but 100% Factor IX antigenic activity as determined by immunological assays, which included inhibitor neutralization and a radioimmunoassay for Factor IX. This abnormal Factor IX is called Factor IX Chapel Hill (Factor IXCH). Both normal Factor IX and Factor IXCH have tyrosine as the NH2-terminal amino acid. The two proteins have a similar molecular weight, a similar amino acid analysis, the same number of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid residues (10 gamma-carboxyglutamic acid residues), and a similar carbohydrate content. Both exist as a single-chain glycoprotein in plasma. The major difference between normal Factor IX and Factor IXCH is that the latter exhibits delayed activation to Factor IXa in the presence of Factor XIa and Ca2+. Thus, Factor IXCH differs from other previously described abnormal Factor IX molecules.

  2. A process for preparation of 'high-purity' factor VIII by controlled pore glass treatment.

    PubMed

    Margolis, J; Gallovich, C M; Rhoades, P

    1984-01-01

    A simple process for large-scale manufacture of 'high-purity' factor VIII is described in detail. A crude concentrate prepared from washed cryo is treated with controlled pore glass (CPG, 500 A pore diameter) in proportion of 20-30 ml of CPG to 1 g input of protein. The slurry is poured into a separation column and the effluent purified concentrate collected. The remaining factor VIII in the void volume is displaced by a wash solution. After passage through a 0.2 micron membrane filter the product is dispensed and lyophilized. Maintaining the operating pH at 6.5-6.7 and adding synthetic amino acids improved the yield and solubility. The current concentrate contains 1 unit of factor VIII per mg protein (10 units mg fibrinogen) with a recovery of 250 units/kg plasma. The CPG stage is non-destructive, yielding more than 90% of the input factor VIII. In 1980-1983, more than 3 X 10(6) units have been used in New South Wales, mostly for massive cover in surgical patients. In collaboration with the Commonwealth Serum Laboratories, it is intended to expand production for use in other Australian States.

  3. Immunologic studies of factor IX (Christmas factor). II. Immunoradiometric assay of factor IX antigen.

    PubMed

    Yang, H C

    1978-06-01

    A solid-phase two-site immunoradiometric assay has been developed which measures factor IX antigen levels as low as 0.0004 u per ml of plasma. In normal individuals, the factor IX antigen level correlated with the factor IX procoagulant level. In haemophilia B, 14 patients had markedly reduced antigen levels (less than 0.06 u/ml) and five had normal levels (greater than 0.60 u/ml).

  4. Activation of human factor IX (Christmas factor).

    PubMed

    Di Scipio, R G; Kurachi, K; Davie, E W

    1978-06-01

    Human Factor IX (Christmas factor) is a single-chain plasma glycoprotein (mol wt 57,000) that participates in the middle phase of the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. It is present in plasma as a zymogen and is converted to a serine protease, Factor IXabeta, by Factor XIa (activated plasma thromboplastin antecedent) in the presence of calcium ions. In the activation reaction, two internal peptide bonds are hydrolyzed in Factor IX. These cleavages occur at a specific arginyl-alanine peptide bond and a specific arginyl-valine peptide bond. This results in the release of an activation peptide (mol wt approximately equal to 11,000) from the internal region of the precursor molecule and the generation of Factor IXabeta (mol wt approximately equal to 46,000). Factor IXabeta is composed of a light chain (mol wt approximately equal to 18,000) and a heavy chain (mol wt approximately equal to 28,000), and these chains are held together by a disulfide bond(s). The light chain originates from the amino terminal portion of the precursor molecule and has an amino terminal sequence of Tyr-Asn-Ser-Gly-Lys. The heavy chain originates from the carboxyl terminal region of the precursor molecule and contains an amino terminal sequence of Val-Val-Gly-Gly-Glu. The heavy chain of Factor IXabeta also contains the active site sequence of Phe-Cys-Ala-Gly-Phe-His-Glu-Gly-Arg-Asp-Ser-Cys-Gln-Gly-Asp-SER-Gly-Gly-Pro. The active site serine residue is shown in capital letters. Factor IX is also converted to Factor IXaalpha by a protease from Russell's viper venom. This activation reaction, however, occurs in a single step and involves only the cleavage of the internal arginyl-valine peptide bond. Human Factor IXabeta was inhibited by human antithrombin III by the formation of a one-to-one complex of enzyme and inhibitor. In this reaction, the inhibitor was tightly bound to the heavy chain of the enzyme. These data indicate that the mechanism of activation of human Factor IX and its

  5. High purity tungsten targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    High purity tungsten, which is used for targets in X-ray tubes was considered for space processing. The demand for X-ray tubes was calculated using the growth rates for dental and medical X-ray machines. It is concluded that the cost benefits are uncertain.

  6. Cleavage and activation of human factor IX by serine proteases

    SciTech Connect

    Enfield, D.L.; Thompson, A.R.

    1984-10-01

    Human factor IX circulates as a single-chain glycoprotein. Upon activation in vitro, it is cleaved into disulfide-linked light and heavy chains and an activation peptide. After reduction of activated /sup 125/I-factor IX, the heavy and light chains are readily identified by gel electrophoresis. A direct, immunoradiometric assay for factor IXa was developed to assess activation of factor IX for proteases that cleaved it. The assay utilized radiolabeled antithrombin III with heparin to identify the active site and antibodies to distinguish factor IX. After cleavage of factor IX by factor XIa, factor VIIa-tissue thromboplastin complex, or the factor X-activating enzyme from Russell's viper venom, antithrombin III bound readily to factor IXa. Cleavage of /sup 125/I-factor IX by trypsin, chymotrypsin, and granulocyte elastase in the presence of calcium yielded major polypeptide fragments of the sizes of the factor XIa-generated light and heavy chains. When the immunoradiometric assay was used to assess trypsin-cleaved factor IX, the product bound antithrombin III, but not maximally. After digesting with insolubilized trypsin, clotting activity confirmed activation. In evaluating activation of factor IX, physical evidence of activation cleavages does not necessarily correlate with generation of an active site.

  7. Proteolytic processing of human coagulation factor IX by plasmin.

    PubMed

    Samis, J A; Ramsey, G D; Walker, J B; Nesheim, M E; Giles, A R

    2000-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that thrombin generation in vivo caused a 92% decrease in factor IX (F.IX) activity and the appearance of a cleavage product after immunoblotting that comigrated with activated F.IX (F.IXa). Under these conditions, the fibrinolytic system was clearly activated, suggesting plasmin may have altered F.IX. Thus, the effect(s) of plasmin on human F.IX was determined in vitro. Plasmin (50 nM) decreased the 1-stage clotting activity of F.IX (4 microM) by 80% and the activity of F.IXa (4 microM) by 50% after 30 minutes at 37 degrees C. Plasmin hydrolysis of F.IX yields products of 45, 30, 20, and 14 kd on reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and 2 products of 52 and 14 kd under nonreducing conditions. Plasmin-treated F.IX did not bind the active site probe, p-aminobenzamidine, or form an SDS-stable complex with antithrombin. It only marginally activated human factor X in the presence of phospholipid and activated factor VIII. Although dansyl-Glu-Gly-Arg-chloromethyl ketone inactivated-F. IXa inhibited the clotting activity of F.IXa, plasmin-treated F.IX did not. Plasmin cleaves F.IX after Lys43, Arg145, Arg180, Lys316, and Arg318, but F.IXa is not appreciably generated despite cleavage at the 2 normal activation sites (Arg145 and Arg180). Tissue plasminogen activator-catalyzed lysis of fibrin formed in human plasma results in generation of the 45- and 30-kd fragments of F.IX and decreased F.IX clotting activity. Collectively, the results suggest that plasmin is able to down-regulate coagulation by inactivating F.IX. PMID:10648407

  8. Labeled factor IX kinetics in patients with hemophilia-B

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.J.; Thompson, A.R.

    1981-09-01

    Labeled factor IX was infused five time into four patients with hemophilia-B. Ten-minute plasma recovery average 35% (SD +/- 2) and the mean T 1/2 beta-phase elimination was 23 hr (+/- 5). No alteration in the postinfusion 125I-factor-IX could be detected by radioautography of plasma samples run on polyacrylamide gels or on crossed-immunoelectrophoresis. Label was excreted into the urine as free 125I-iodide. Kinetics were similar when the labeled preparation was infused alone or with a commercial concentrate containing unlabeled factor IX. Infusion of factor IX in man is best described by a two-compartment open pharmacokinetic model where factor IX is distributed in a space larger than the plasma volume.

  9. A comparison of human prothrombin, factor IX (Christmas factor), factor X (Stuart factor), and protein S.

    PubMed

    Di Scipio, R G; Hermodson, M A; Yates, S G; Davie, E W

    1977-02-22

    Human prothrombin, factor IX, and factor X have been idolated in high yield and characterized as the their amino-terminal sequence, molecular weight, amino acid composition, and migration in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. An additional human plasma protein, called protein S, has also been purified and its properties have been compared with those of prothrombin, factor IX, and factor X. Prothrombin (mol wt 72 000), factor IX (mol wt 57 000), and protein S (mol wt 69 000) are single-chain glycoproteins, while factor X (mol wt 59 000) is a glycoprotein composed of two polypeptide chains held together by a disulfide bond(s). The amino-terminal sequence of the light chain of human factor X is homologous with prothrombin, factor IX, and protein S. The heavy chain of human factor X is slightly larger than the heavy chain of bovine factor X and differs from bovine factor X in its amino-terminal sequence.

  10. Expression of active human factor IX in transfected cells.

    PubMed

    Busby, S; Kumar, A; Joseph, M; Halfpap, L; Insley, M; Berkner, K; Kurachi, K; Woodbury, R

    Factor IX is the precursor of a serine protease that functions in the intrinsic blood clotting pathway. Deficiencies in this plasma glycoprotein result in haemophilia B (or Christmas disease) and occur in about 1 in 30,000 males. Patients are currently treated with fresh frozen plasma or prothrombin complex concentrates prepared from pooled plasma from normal individuals. There are several problems with this method of treatment, including the probable exposure of the patients to contaminants such as the viral agents responsible for hepatitis and AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome). As a first step towards an alternative source of pure human factor IX, we report here on the use of recombinant DNA techniques to produce biologically active factor IX in cultured mammalian cells. Stable cell lines were produced by cotransfecting a baby hamster kidney (BHK) cell line with a plasmid containing a gene for factor IX and a plasmid containing a selectable marker. Protein secreted by these cell lines reduces the clotting time of plasma from factor IX-deficient patients. We present additional evidence that this protein is authentic human factor IX.

  11. A comparison of bovine prothrombin, factor IX (Christmas factor), and factor X (Stuart factor).

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, K; Coan, M H; Enfield, D L; Titani, K; Ericsson, L H; Davie, E W

    1974-02-01

    A comparison has been made of the electrophoretic behavior, chemical composition, amino-terminal sequence, and immunological properties of bovine prothrombin, factor IX (Christmas factor), and factor X (Stuart factor). Some immunological crossreactivity was found between the antibody to prothrombin and factor X although prothrombin and factor X differ substantially in amino-acid and carbohydrate composition. Considerable amino-acid sequence homology was found in the amino-terminal portion of prothrombin, factor IX, and the light chain of factor X. These data provide further evidence to support the hypothesis that at least three of the vitamin K-dependent clotting factors have evolved from a common ancestral gene.

  12. Immunoaffinity purification of factor IX (Christmas factor) by using conformation-specific antibodies directed against the factor IX-metal complex.

    PubMed Central

    Liebman, H A; Limentani, S A; Furie, B C; Furie, B

    1985-01-01

    Factor IX is a vitamin K-dependent blood clotting zymogen that is functionally defective or absent in patients with hemophilia B. A method of immunoaffinity chromatography has been developed for a one-step high yield purification of factor IX directly from plasma. The technique utilizes conformation-specific antibodies that bind solely to the metal-stabilized factor IX conformer, but not to the conformer of factor IX found in the absence of metal ions. Anti-factor IX-Ca(II) antibodies were immobilized on an agarose matrix. Human plasma in the presence of 7.5 mM MgCl2 was applied to the antibody-agarose column. The factor IX that binds to these antibodies was specifically eluted by metal chelation with EDTA. This immunopurification resulted in a 10,000-fold one-step purification of the fully functional zymogen. Purified factor IX yielded a single band upon gel electrophoresis in Na-DodSO4 and had a specific activity of 120-150 units/mg. The purified factor IX was separated from other vitamin K-dependent blood clotting proteins and hepatitis virus; no activated factor IX was detected. This method has application for the large scale purification of factor IX for the treatment of hemophilia B. Images PMID:2408269

  13. Immunoaffinity purification of factor IX (Christmas factor) by using conformation-specific antibodies directed against the factor IX-metal complex.

    PubMed

    Liebman, H A; Limentani, S A; Furie, B C; Furie, B

    1985-06-01

    Factor IX is a vitamin K-dependent blood clotting zymogen that is functionally defective or absent in patients with hemophilia B. A method of immunoaffinity chromatography has been developed for a one-step high yield purification of factor IX directly from plasma. The technique utilizes conformation-specific antibodies that bind solely to the metal-stabilized factor IX conformer, but not to the conformer of factor IX found in the absence of metal ions. Anti-factor IX-Ca(II) antibodies were immobilized on an agarose matrix. Human plasma in the presence of 7.5 mM MgCl2 was applied to the antibody-agarose column. The factor IX that binds to these antibodies was specifically eluted by metal chelation with EDTA. This immunopurification resulted in a 10,000-fold one-step purification of the fully functional zymogen. Purified factor IX yielded a single band upon gel electrophoresis in Na-DodSO4 and had a specific activity of 120-150 units/mg. The purified factor IX was separated from other vitamin K-dependent blood clotting proteins and hepatitis virus; no activated factor IX was detected. This method has application for the large scale purification of factor IX for the treatment of hemophilia B.

  14. Production of high purity radiothallium

    DOEpatents

    Lebowitz, Elliot; Greene, Margaret W.

    1976-11-23

    The method of producing high purity thallium-201 for use as a myocardial scanning agent comprising the steps of irradiating a thallium target with protons to give the reaction .sup.203 Tl(p,3n) .sup.201.sub.Pb, separating in ion exchange columns the lead from the thallium isotopes, permitting the lead to decay, and then purifying the thallium solution and converting the thallium present to thallous form in which it can be used.

  15. Neutrophil elastase cleavage of human factor IX generates an activated factor IX-like product devoid of coagulant function.

    PubMed

    Samis, J A; Kam, E; Nesheim, M E; Giles, A R

    1998-08-15

    In preliminary studies, the generation of thrombin in vivo was found to induce a 92% loss of functional activity of factor IX (F.IX) despite the detection by Western blotting of a product resembling activated F.IX (F.IXa) and a 25% increase in F.IX antigen levels (Hoogendoorn et al, Thromb Haemost 69:1127, 1993 [abstr]). These changes were associated with evidence of increased elastase availability. To study the possibility that these two observations were related, a detailed physical and functional characterization of the hydrolysis of purified human F.IX by human neutrophil elastase (HNE) was performed in vitro. An activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) clotting assay demonstrated that, although HNE eliminated the potential of F.IX to be activated, it only marginally reduced the F.IXa activity. Reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) indicated that HNE treatment of F.IX generated cleavage products of 30 and 20 kD that could not be distinguished from the respective heavy and light chain peptides that were identified in parallel studies when F.IX was activated by activated bovine F.XI (F.XIa), one of its physiological activators. In addition, nonreducing SDS-PAGE demonstrated that HNE-treated F.IX formed no complexes with antithrombin III (ATIII) in the presence of heparin. Furthermore, HNE-treated F.IX was unable to (1) bind the active site probe p-aminobenzamidine; (2) hydrolyze the synthetic peptide substrate CH3SO2-Leu-Gly-Arg-p-nitroanilide; and (3) activate human factor X (F.X). In contrast to dansyl-Glu-Gly-Arg-chloromethyl ketone (dEGR)-inactivated F.IXa, HNE-treated F.IX (0.01 to 10,000 pmol/L) failed to inhibit the clotting activity of F.IXa (10 pmol/L) in the aPTT. NH2-terminal sequencing indicated that HNE cleaved human F.IX at Thr140, Thr144, Ile164, Thr172, and Val181. The cleavages at Thr140/Thr144 and at Thr172/Val181 are both very close to the normal F.XIa alpha-(Arg145) and beta-(Arg180) cleavage sites

  16. Preparation of high purity phosphorus

    DOEpatents

    Rupp, Arthur F.; Woo, David V.

    1981-01-01

    High purity phosphorus and phosphorus compounds are prepared by first reacting H.sub.3 PO.sub.4 with a lead compound such as PbO to form Pb.sub.3 (PO.sub.4).sub.2. The Pb.sub.3 (PO.sub.4).sub.2 is reduced with H.sub.2 at a temperature sufficient to form gaseous phosphorus which can be recovered as a high purity phosphorus product. Phosphorus compounds can be easily prepared by reacting the phosphorus product with gaseous reactants. For example, the phosphorus product is reacted with gaseous Cl.sub.2 to form PCl.sub.5. PCl.sub.5 is reduced to PCl.sub.3 by contacting it in the gaseous phase with solid elemental phosphorus. POCl.sub.3 can be prepared by contacting PCl.sub.5 in the gaseous phase with solid P.sub.2 O.sub.5. The general process is particularly suitable for the preparation of radiophosphorus compounds.

  17. Exosite-mediated substrate recognition of factor IX by factor XIa. The factor XIa heavy chain is required for initial recognition of factor IX.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Taketoshi; Verhamme, Ingrid M; Sun, Mao-Fu; Bock, Paul E; Gailani, David

    2005-06-24

    Studies of the mechanisms of blood coagulation zymogen activation demonstrate that exosites (sites on the activating complex distinct from the protease active site) play key roles in macromolecular substrate recognition. We investigated the importance of exosite interactions in recognition of factor IX by the protease factor XIa. Factor XIa cleavage of the tripeptide substrate S2366 was inhibited by the active site inhibitors p-aminobenzamidine (Ki 28 +/- 2 microM) and aprotinin (Ki 1.13 +/- 0.07 microM) in a classical competitive manner, indicating that substrate and inhibitor binding to the active site was mutually exclusive. In contrast, inhibition of factor XIa cleavage of S2366 by factor IX (Ki 224 +/- 32 nM) was characterized by hyperbolic mixed-type inhibition, indicating that factor IX binds to free and S2366-bound factor XIa at exosites. Consistent with this premise, inhibition of factor XIa activation of factor IX by aprotinin (Ki 0.89 +/- 0.52 microM) was non-competitive, whereas inhibition by active site-inhibited factor IXa beta was competitive (Ki 0.33 +/- 0.05 microM). S2366 cleavage by isolated factor XIa catalytic domain was competitively inhibited by p-aminobenzamidine (Ki 38 +/- 14 microM) but was not inhibited by factor IX, consistent with loss of factor IX-binding exosites on the non-catalytic factor XI heavy chain. The results support a model in which factor IX binds initially to exosites on the factor XIa heavy chain, followed by interaction at the active site with subsequent bond cleavage, and support a growing body of evidence that exosite interactions are critical determinants of substrate affinity and specificity in blood coagulation reactions. PMID:15829482

  18. Challenges of the management of severe hemophilia A with inhibitors: two case reports emphasizing the potential interest of a high-purity human Factor VIII/von Willebrand factor concentrate and individually tailored prophylaxis guided by thrombin-generation test.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Sophie; Crampe, Carine; Dargaud, Yesim; Lavigne-Lissalde, Géraldine; Escuriola-Ettingshausen, Carmen; Tardy, Brigitte; Meley, Roland; Thouvenin, Sandrine; Stephan, Jean L; Berger, Claire

    2015-12-01

    Severe hemophilia A is an X-linked bleeding disorder. Immune tolerance induction (ITI) is the best strategy of treatment when patients develop inhibitors. The objective is to illustrate the benefit of a high-purity human factor VIII/von Willebrand factor (VWF) concentrate (Octanate) in the management of ITI. We also wanted to raise the potential interest of laboratory assays such as thrombin-generation test (TGT) and epitope mapping. Two patients were treated during ITI, first with a recombinant FVIII and then with plasma-derived factor VIII without success, and, finally, with Octanate. Bypassing agents were used based on the results of TGT. Epitope mapping was performed during ITI therapy. These observations suggest the potential contribution of Octanate in the management of ITI in difficult cases. The use of bypassing agents can be necessary in prophylaxis or to treat bleedings, and may be guided by TGT results. Epitope mapping is used to describe the inhibitor. This article shows a decrease of the inhibitor directed against the C2 domain after initiation of Octanate. A high-purity human factor VIII/von Willebrand factor concentrate (Octanate) may be a valuable therapeutical option for ITI therapy. TGT and epitope mapping could be of help in the management of ITI.

  19. Challenges of the management of severe hemophilia A with inhibitors: two case reports emphasizing the potential interest of a high-purity human Factor VIII/von Willebrand factor concentrate and individually tailored prophylaxis guided by thrombin-generation test.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Sophie; Crampe, Carine; Dargaud, Yesim; Lavigne-Lissalde, Géraldine; Escuriola-Ettingshausen, Carmen; Tardy, Brigitte; Meley, Roland; Thouvenin, Sandrine; Stephan, Jean L; Berger, Claire

    2015-12-01

    Severe hemophilia A is an X-linked bleeding disorder. Immune tolerance induction (ITI) is the best strategy of treatment when patients develop inhibitors. The objective is to illustrate the benefit of a high-purity human factor VIII/von Willebrand factor (VWF) concentrate (Octanate) in the management of ITI. We also wanted to raise the potential interest of laboratory assays such as thrombin-generation test (TGT) and epitope mapping. Two patients were treated during ITI, first with a recombinant FVIII and then with plasma-derived factor VIII without success, and, finally, with Octanate. Bypassing agents were used based on the results of TGT. Epitope mapping was performed during ITI therapy. These observations suggest the potential contribution of Octanate in the management of ITI in difficult cases. The use of bypassing agents can be necessary in prophylaxis or to treat bleedings, and may be guided by TGT results. Epitope mapping is used to describe the inhibitor. This article shows a decrease of the inhibitor directed against the C2 domain after initiation of Octanate. A high-purity human factor VIII/von Willebrand factor concentrate (Octanate) may be a valuable therapeutical option for ITI therapy. TGT and epitope mapping could be of help in the management of ITI. PMID:26517064

  20. Kinetics of the Factor XIa catalyzed activation of human blood coagulation Factor IX

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, P.N.; Bradford, H.; Sinha, D.; Piperno, J.R.; Tuszynski, G.P.

    1984-05-01

    The kinetics of activation of human Factor IX by human Factor XIa was studied by measuring the release of a trichloroacetic acid-soluble tritium-labeled activation peptide from Factor IX. Initial rates of trichloroacetic acid-soluble /sup 3/H-release were linear over 10-30 min of incubation of Factor IX (88 nM) with CaCl/sub 2/ (5 mM) and with pure (greater than 98%) Factor XIa (0.06-1.3 nM), which was prepared by incubating human Factor XI with bovine Factor XIIa. Release of /sup 3/H preceded the appearance of Factor IXa activity, and the percentage of /sup 3/H released remained constant when the mole fraction of /sup 3/H-labeled and unlabeled Factor IX was varied and the total Factor IX concentration remained constant. A linear correlation (r greater than 0.98, P less than 0.001) was observed between initial rates of /sup 3/H-release and the concentration of Factor XIa, measured by chromogenic assay and by radioimmunoassay and added at a Factor IX:Factor XIa molar ratio of 70-5,600. Kinetic parameters, determined by Lineweaver-Burk analysis, include K/sub m/ (0.49 microM) of about five- to sixfold higher than the plasma Factor IX concentration, which could therefore regulate the reaction. The catalytic constant (k/sub cat/) (7.7/s) is approximately 20-50 times higher than that reported by Zur and Nemerson for Factor IX activation by Factor VIIa plus tissue factor. Therefore, depending on the relative amounts of Factor XIa and Factor VIIa generated in vivo and other factors which may influence reaction rates, these kinetic parameters provide part of the information required for assessing the relative contributions of the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways to Factor IX activation, and suggest that the Factor XIa catalyzed reaction is physiologically significant.

  1. The gene structure of human anti-haemophilic factor IX.

    PubMed

    Anson, D S; Choo, K H; Rees, D J; Giannelli, F; Gould, K; Huddleston, J A; Brownlee, G G

    1984-05-01

    The mRNA sequence of the human intrinsic clotting factor IX (Christmas factor) has been completed and is 2802 residues long, including a 29 residue long 5' non-coding and a 1390 residue long 3' non-coding region, but excluding the poly(A) tail. The factor IX gene is approximately 34 kb long and we define, by the sequencing of 5280 residues, the presumed promoter region, all eight exons, and some intron and flanking sequence. Introns account for 92% of the gene length and the longest is estimated to be 10 100 residues. Exons conform roughly to previously designated protein regions, but the catalytic region of the protein is coded by two separate exons. This differs from the arrangement in the other characterized serine protease genes which are further subdivided in this region.

  2. New polymorphic variants of human blood clotting factor IX

    SciTech Connect

    Surin, V.L.; Luk`yanenko, A.V.; Tagiev, A.F.; Smirnova, O.V.; Plutalov, O.V.; Berlin, Yu.A.

    1995-04-01

    The polymorphism of Alu-repeats, which are located in the introns of the human factor IX gene (copies 1-3), was studied. To identify polymorphic variants, direct sequencing of PCR products that contained appropriate repeats was used. In each case, 20 unrelated X chromosomes were studied. A polymorphic Dra I site was found near the 3{prime}-end of Alu copy 3 within the region of the polyA tract. A PCR-based testing system with internal control of restriction hydrolysis was suggested. Testing 81 unrelated X chromosomes revealed that the frequency of the polymorphic Dra I site is 0.23. Taq I polymorphism, which was revealed in Alu copy 4 of factor IX gene in our previous work, was found to be closely linked to Dra I polymorphism. Studies in linkage between different types of polymorphisms of the factor IX gene revealed the presence of a rare polymorphism in intron a that was located within the same minisatellite region as the known polymorphic insertion 50 bp/Dde I. However, the size of the insertion in our case was 26 bp. Only one polymorphic variant was found among over 150 unrelated X chromosomes derived from humans from Moscow and its vicinity. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Preparation of factor IX deficient human plasma by immunoaffinity chromatography using a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Goodall, A H; Kemble, G; O'Brien, D P; Rawlings, E; Rotblat, F; Russell, G C; Janossy, G; Tuddenham, E G

    1982-03-01

    A murine hybridoma clone is described that grows continuously in culture and produces a monoclonal antibody we have called Royal Free Monoclonal Antibody to factor IX No. 1 (RFF-IX/1). This has high affinity for a coagulation site on factor IX. RFF-IX/1 immobilised on sepharose can be used to deplete factor IX from normal human plasma. This immunoaffinity depleted plasma is indistinguishable from severe Christmas disease plasma and can be used as the substrate in a one stage coagulation assay for factor IX. The affinity column has high capacity and can be regenerated so that large scale production from normal plasma of factor IX deficient plasma as a diagnostic reagent is now feasible.

  4. Active gamma-carboxylated human factor IX expressed using recombinant DNA techniques.

    PubMed

    de la Salle, H; Altenburger, W; Elkaim, R; Dott, K; Dieterlé, A; Drillien, R; Cazenave, J P; Tolstoshev, P; Lecocq, J P

    Factor IX (Christmas factor), a vitamin K-dependent plasma protein made in the liver, functions in the middle phase of the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. A functional deficiency of factor IX underlies haemophilia B, a chromosome X-linked recessive disease for which the major therapeutic approach is replacement treatment using factor IX concentrates. The cloning and characterization of the gene for human factor IX would mean that human factor IX could be produced in greater yield and purity through using recombinant DNA techniques. We have now used a human factor IX cDNA clone, inserted into a vaccinia virus-derived vector, to infect human hepatoma cells which normally produce no factor IX, and mouse fibroblasts. Fully active factor IX was produced by the hepatoma cells, whereas the fibroblasts produced a protein less active than natural factor IX, even in the presence of high levels of vitamin K. Human factor IX is extensively post-translationally modified, and thus represents probably the most complex protein produced in active form by recombinant DNA techniques to date. Our study also illustrates the potential of vaccinia virus-based vectors for expressing significant amounts of complex, clinically useful proteins in eukaryotic cells, in addition to its already demonstrated usefulness for producing live recombinant vaccines.

  5. High purity silica reflective heat shield development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachtscheim, P. R.; Blome, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    A hyperpure vitreous silica material is being developed for use as a reflective and ablative heat shield for planetary entry. Various purity grades and forms of raw materials were evaluated along with various processing methods. Slip casting of high purity grain was selected as the best processing method, resulting in a highly reflective material in the wavelength bands of interest (the visible and ultraviolet regions). The selected material was characterized with respect to optical, mechanical and physical properties using a limited number of specimens. The process has been scaled up to produce a one-half scale heat shield (18 in. dia.) (45.72 cm) for a Jupiter entry vehicle. This work is now being extended to improve the structural safety factor of the heat shield by making hyperpure silica material tougher through the addition of silica fibers.

  6. Long-Acting Recombinant Fusion Protein Linking Coagulation Factor IX with Albumin (rIX-FP) in Children

    PubMed Central

    Chambost, Hervé; Male, Christoph; Lambert, Thierry; Halimeh, Susan; Chernova, Tatiana; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Curtin, Julie; Voigt, Christine; Li, Yanyan; Jacobs, Iris; Santagostino, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Summary A global phase 3 study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety of a recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor IX with albumin (rIX-FP) in 27 previously treated male children (1–11 years) with severe and moderately severe haemophilia B (factor IX [FIX] activity ≤2 IU/dl). All patients received routine prophylaxis once every seven days for up to 77 weeks, and treated any bleeding episodes on-demand. The mean terminal half-life of rIX-FP was 91.4 hours (h), 4.3-fold longer than previous FIX treatment and clearance was 1.11 ml/h/kg, 6.4-fold slower than previous FIX treatment. The median (Q1, Q3) annualised spontaneous bleeding rate was 0.00 (0.00, 0.91) and was similar between the <6 years and ≥6 years age groups, with a weekly median prophylactic dose of 46 IU/kg. In addition, patients maintained a median trough level of 13.4 IU/dl FIX activity on weekly prophylaxis. Overall, 97.2% of bleeding episodes were successfully treated with one or two injections of rIX-FP (95% CI: 92% to 99%), 88.7% with one injection, and 96% of the treatments were rated effective (excellent or good) by the Investigator. No patient developed FIX inhibitors and no safety concerns were identified. These results indicate that rIX-FP is safe and effective for preventing and treating bleeding episodes in children with haemophilia B with weekly prophylaxis. Routine prophylaxis with rIX-FP at treatment intervals of up to 14 days are currently being investigated in children with severe and moderately severe haemophilia B. Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01662531) PMID:27583313

  7. Expression of active human clotting factor IX from recombinant DNA clones in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Anson, D S; Austen, D E; Brownlee, G G

    Haemophilia B, or Christmas disease, is an inherited X-chromosome-linked bleeding disorder caused by a defect in clotting factor IX and occurs in about 1 in 30,000 males in the United Kingdom. Injection of factor IX concentrate obtained from blood donors allows most patients to be successfully managed. However, because of impurities in the factor IX concentrate presently in use, this treatment involves some risk of infection by blood-borne viruses such as non-A, non-B hepatitis and the virus causing acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Because of the recent concern about the increasing incidence of AIDS amongst haemophiliacs, a factor IX preparation derived from a source other than blood is desirable. Here, we report that after introduction of human factor IX DNA clones into a rat hepatoma cell line using recombinant DNA methods, we were able to isolate small amounts of biologically active human factor IX.

  8. Factor IX molecular defects in diagnosing hemophilia B: a review.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, M

    1989-07-01

    The past several years have seen an explosive growth in the application of recombinant DNA methods to study the molecular pathology of various inherited disorders. As a consequence, molecular defects responsible for the disease have been identified at the sequence level. In this review, I briefly describe the recent progress in the uses of factor IX gene probes in clinical diagnosis of hemophilia B (Christmas disease) carriers, as well as their use for analyzing the structural gene abnormalities that are responsible for the disease.

  9. APPARATUS FOR HIGH PURITY METAL RECOVERY

    DOEpatents

    Magel, T.T.

    1959-02-10

    An apparatus is described for preparing high purity metal such as uranium, plutonium and the like from an impure mass of the same metal. The apparatus is arranged so that the impure metal is heated and swept by a stream of hydrogen gas bearing a halogen such as iodine. The volatiie metal halide formed is carried on to a hot filament where the metal halide is decomposed and the molten high purity metal is collected in a rceeiver below

  10. Characterization of the clotting activities of structurally different forms of activated factor IX. Enzymatic properties of normal human factor IXa alpha, factor IXa beta, and activated factor IX Chapel Hill.

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, M J; Breitkreutz, L; Trapp, H; Briet, E; Noyes, C M; Lundblad, R L; Roberts, H R

    1985-01-01

    Two structurally different forms of activated human Factor IX (Factor IXa alpha and IXa beta) have been previously reported to have essentially identical clotting activity in vitro. Although it has been shown that activated Factor IX Chapel Hill, an abnormal Factor IX isolated from the plasma of a patient with mild hemophilia B, and normal Factor IXa alpha are structurally very similar, the clotting activity of activated Factor IX Chapel Hill is much lower (approximately fivefold) than that of normal Factor IXa beta. In the present study we have prepared activated Factor IX by incubating human Factor IX with calcium and Russell's viper venom covalently bound to agarose. Fractionation of the activated Factor IX by high-performance liquid chromatography demonstrated the presence of both Factors IXa alpha and IXa beta. On the basis of active site concentration, determined by titration with antithrombin III, the clotting activities of activated Factor IX Chapel Hill and IXa alpha were similar, but both activities were less than 20% of the clotting activity of Factor IXa beta. Activated Factor IX activity was also measured in the absence of calcium, phospholipid, and Factor VIII, by determination of the rate of Factor X activation in the presence of polylysine. In the presence of polylysine, the rates of Factor X activation by activated Factor IX Chapel Hill, Factor IXa alpha, and Factor IXa beta were essentially identical. We conclude that the clotting activity of activated Factor IX Chapel Hill is reduced when compared with that of Factor IXa beta but essentially normal when compared with that of Factor IXa alpha. PMID:3871202

  11. Molecular cloning of the gene for human anti-haemophilic factor IX.

    PubMed

    Choo, K H; Gould, K G; Rees, D J; Brownlee, G G

    1982-09-01

    A functional deficiency of factor IX, one of the coagulation factors involved in blood clotting, leads to the bleeding disorder known as Christmas disease, or haemophilia B. Both this disease and haemophilia A (factor VIII (C) deficiency) are X chromosome-linked and together occur at a frequency of approximately 1 in 10,000 males. The molecular basis for the functional alteration of factor IX in Christmas disease is not clearly understood. As a first step towards the elucidation of the molecular events involved, we have attempted molecular cloning of the factor IX gene. We used a bovine factor IX cDNA clone, isolated using synthetic oligonucleotides as probes, to screen a cloned human gene library. Here we report the isolation and partial characterization of a lambda recombinant phage containing the human factor IX gene.

  12. Gene deletions in patients with haemophilia B and anti-factor IX antibodies.

    PubMed

    Giannelli, F; Choo, K H; Rees, D J; Boyd, Y; Rizza, C R; Brownlee, G G

    Christmas disease, or haemophilia B, is an inherited X-linked haemorrhagic disease which at present occurs in 798 known cases in the United Kingdom, corresponding to a frequency of about 1 in 30,000 males. Patients are deficient in the intrinsic clotting factor IX and are treated by replacement of this protein prepared from pooled plasma obtained from normal individuals. Occasionally treatment is complicated by the appearance of specific anti-factor IX antibodies. It seemed to us that this might be due to the absence of 'self' factor IX causing the immune system to regard the infused normal factor IX as foreign. The absence of all or part of the factor IX gene was an obvious possible reason for this, which we have now tested using our previously isolated gene probe. We have found four patients with gross gene defects.

  13. Activation of factor IX bound to cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stern, D M; Drillings, M; Kisiel, W; Nawroth, P; Nossel, H L; LaGamma, K S

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that factor IX and its activated form, factor IXa, bind to cultured vascular endothelial cells and that cell-bound factor IXa retains its procoagulant activity. The present studies provide evidence that factor IX bound to cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells can be activated. Factor IX activation was assessed by finding cleavage of the factor IX molecule on NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by the generation of procoagulant activity as assessed by thrombin-treated factor VIII-dependent generation of factor Xa activity. Cell-bound factor IX (0.8 micrograms per 4 X 10(8) cells per ml) could be activated by factor XIa (5 micrograms/ml) or by factor VIIa (0.1 micrograms/ml) without exogenous tissue factor when endothelial cells were treated with phorbol ester and acquired tissue factor-like procoagulant activity. Regardless of how factor IX was activated, the cell-bound factor IXa required thrombin-treated factor VIII and calcium, but not exogenous phospholipid, to activate factor X. In further experiments, factor X bound to endothelial cells specifically and reversibly with a dependence on calcium and with a lower affinity (half-maximal at 480 nM) than factor IX. At saturation, 9.1 X 10(6) factor X molecules were bound per cell. After activation of factor X by factor IXa, approximately 50% of the factor Xa formed could be eluted from the cells by 10 mM EDTA, suggesting that the factor Xa was cell associated. These observations indicate that endothelial cells can bind and promote the activation of factors IX and X in the absence of platelets or exogenous phospholipid. PMID:6608105

  14. High purity silane and silicon production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, William C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Silicon tetrachloride, hydrogen and metallurgical silicon are reacted at about 400.degree.-600.degree. C. and at pressures in excess of 100 psi, and specifically from about 300 up to about 600 psi to form di- and trichlorosilane that is subjected to disproportionation in the presence of an anion exchange resin to form high purity silane. By-product and unreacted materials are recycled, with metallurgical silicon and hydrogen being essentially the only consumed feed materials. The silane product may be further purified, as by means of activated carbon or cryogenic distillation, and decomposed in a fluid bed or free space reactor to form high purity polycrystalline silicon and by-product hydrogen which can be recycled for further use. The process results in simplified waste disposal operations and enhances the overall conversion of metallurgical grade silicon to silane and high purity silicon for solar cell and semiconductor silicon applications.

  15. Inhibitor-neutralisation assay and electro-immuno assay of human factor IX (Christmas factor).

    PubMed

    Bertina, R M; van der Linden, I K

    1977-06-15

    A rabbit antibody specifically precipitating human factor IX has been used in the assay of factor IX antigen. The results obtained with two different methods (inhibitor-neutralisation assay and electro-immunoassay) have been compared in a group of healthy individuals and in a group of hemophilia B patients and carriers. In general, identical results are obtained with both methods, except in some hemophilia B+ carriers and patients, where the electroimmuno assay gives 1.5-2.0 times higher levels. Results obtained by electroimmuno assay are more accurate and reproducible than those obtained by inhibitor-neutralisation assay, which is of importance for its potential use in carrier detection.

  16. Delayed diagnosis of congenital factor IX deficiency (Christmas disease) in a girl with Turner's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, G; Monagle, P; Barnes, C

    2006-10-01

    Patients with Turner's syndrome are at risk of X-linked recessive disorders. We report a case of a young girl with Turner's syndrome with persistent mildly abnormal coagulation studies associated with a mild to moderate bleeding diathesis. The abnormalities were initially attributed to intrahepatic cholestasis and were partially responsive to vitamin K. After an interval of several years an episode of unexplained iron deficiency anaemia prompted re-investigation of the mild coagulopathy. Disproportionate reduction in the factor IX concentration and restoration of haemostasis with factor IX concentrate lead to a revised provisional diagnosis of mild haemophilia B which was subsequently confirmed by sequencing the factor IX gene.

  17. Recombinant Human Factor IX Produced from Transgenic Porcine Milk

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Meng-Hwan; Lin, Yin-Shen; Tu, Ching-Fu; Yen, Chon-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Production of biopharmaceuticals from transgenic animal milk is a cost-effective method for highly complex proteins that cannot be efficiently produced using conventional systems such as microorganisms or animal cells. Yields of recombinant human factor IX (rhFIX) produced from transgenic porcine milk under the control of the bovine α-lactalbumin promoter reached 0.25 mg/mL. The rhFIX protein was purified from transgenic porcine milk using a three-column purification scheme after a precipitation step to remove casein. The purified protein had high specific activity and a low ratio of the active form (FIXa). The purified rhFIX had 11.9 γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) residues/mol protein, which approached full occupancy of the 12 potential sites in the Gla domain. The rhFIX was shown to have a higher isoelectric point and lower sialic acid content than plasma-derived FIX (pdFIX). The rhFIX had the same N-glycosylation sites and phosphorylation sites as pdFIX, but had a higher specific activity. These results suggest that rhFIX produced from porcine milk is physiologically active and they support the use of transgenic animals as bioreactors for industrial scale production in milk. PMID:24955355

  18. Effect of stanozolol on factors VIII and IX and serum aminotransferases in haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Greer, I A; Greaves, M; Madhok, R; McLoughlin, K; Porter, N; Lowe, G D; Preston, F E; Forbes, C D

    1985-06-24

    The treatment of haemophilia has been dramatically improved since the introduction of factor VIII and IX concentrates, however these concentrates have brought new problems such as hepatitis and A.I.D.S. An oral agent which could raise endogenous levels of factor VIII and IX would be of great benefit. Danazol, an anabolic steroid, has recently been shown to increase levels of factors VIII and IX in haemophilia. We therefore studied the effect of stanozolol, a closely related anabolic steroid, in 15 patients with haemophilia A or Christmas disease over a 2-4 week period. There was no consistent change in factor VIIIc or factor IX, and fibrinolysis was significantly enhanced. No effect was apparent on the incidence of spontaneous bleeds. However serum aminotransferases which were abnormal in 11 of the 15 patients at the start of the study fell significantly with stanozolol therapy. This raises the interesting possibility that anabolic steroids may be beneficial in patients with chronic liver diseases.

  19. Method of high purity silane preparation

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Y. Simon; Belov, Eugene P.; Gerlivanov, Vadim G.; Zadde, Vitali V.; Kleschevnikova, Solomonida I.; Korneev, Nikolai N.; Lebedev, Eugene N.; Pinov, Akhsarbek B.; Ryabenko, Eugene A.; Strebkov, Dmitry S.; Chernyshev, Eugene A.

    2000-01-01

    A process for the preparation of high purity silane, suitable for forming thin layer silicon structures in various semiconductor devices and high purity poly- and single crystal silicon for a variety of applications, is provided. Synthesis of high-purity silane starts with a temperature assisted reaction of metallurgical silicon with alcohol in the presence of a catalyst. Alcoxysilanes formed in the silicon-alcohol reaction are separated from other products and purified. Simultaneous reduction and oxidation of alcoxysilanes produces gaseous silane and liquid secondary products, including, active part of a catalyst, tetra-alcoxysilanes, and impurity compounds having silicon-hydrogen bonds. Silane is purified by an impurity adsorption technique. Unreacted alcohol is extracted and returned to the reaction with silicon. Concentrated mixture of alcoxysilanes undergoes simultaneous oxidation and reduction in the presence of a catalyst at the temperature -20.degree. C. to +40.degree. C. during 1 to 50 hours. Tetra-alcoxysilane extracted from liquid products of simultaneous oxidation and reduction reaction is directed to a complete hydrolysis. Complete hydrolysis of tetra-alcoxysilane results in formation of industrial silica sol and alcohol. Alcohol is dehydrated by tetra-alcoxysilane and returned to the reaction with silicon.

  20. In vitro carboxylation of a blood coagulation factor IX precursor produced by recombinant-DNA technology.

    PubMed

    Soute, B A; Balland, A; Faure, T; de la Salle, H; Vermeer, C

    1989-04-25

    Blood coagulation factor IX (Christmas factor) is a plasma protein which is required for normal haemostasis. A functional deficiency of factor IX results in haemophilia B, a bleeding disorder which is generally treated by infusions of factor IX concentrates prepared from pooled human plasma. The use of human blood products is connected with the risk of transmitting viral agents responsible for diseases such as hepatitis B and AIDS. Recombinant DNA techniques may provide the means to produce the required proteins without exposing the patients to these risks and at lower costs. One of the problems which has to be overcome before recombinant factor IX can be used for therapeutical purposes is related to the vitamin K-dependent carboxylation of its 12 NH2-terminal glutamate residues. In cell cultures this carboxylation, which is required to render the protein its procoagulant activity, is far from complete, especially at high expression levels. In this paper we describe the in vitro carboxylation of non and/or partly carboxylated recombinant factor IX produced by transformed Chinese hamster ovary cells. The identity of the newly formed Gla residues was verified and it could be demonstrated that all carboxyl groups had been incorporated into the recombinant factor IX.

  1. Christmas factor: dosage compensation and the production of blood coagulation factor IX.

    PubMed

    FROTA-PESSOA, O; GOMES, E L; CALICCHIO, T R

    1963-01-25

    The amount of factor IX (Christmas factor) for different genotypic classes was determined by means of a variant of the thromboplastin generation test. The mean value for females heterozygous for the Christmas gene was about half the mean values for normal males and for normal homozygous females; means for the latter two groups were about equal. This dosage compensation is interpreted as evidence in support of Lyon's hypothesis, according to which one X chromosome is inactive in mammalian females.

  2. Factor IX levels in patients with hemophilia B (Christmas disease) following transfusion with concentrates of factor IX or fresh frozen plasma (FFP).

    PubMed

    Zauber, N P; Levin, J

    1977-05-01

    There has been no systematic re-examination of variables that may affect the level and duration of response of patients with hemophilia B (Christmas disease) to transfusion. Therefore, 49 of our transfusion episodes and 171 previously reported transfusions were evaluated. Mean calculated initial increase of Factor IX levels (delta %/unit (U) of procoagulant activity infused/kg) was 0.82 +/- 0.09% (mean +/-S.E.) in previously reported cases and 1.01 +/- 0.13% in our patients, after transfusion of concentrate; but only 0.05 +/- 0.11% after fresh frozen plasma (FFP). Response was not altered by acute hemorrhage, baseline Factor IX levels, or body weight. Proplex (Hyland) and Konyne (Cutter) produced similar responses. Following transfusion, the disappearance curve was biphasic. The mean T1/2 for the second component was 27.5 hrs, but the direct T1/2 was only 6.4 +/- 1.0 hr. Regardless of common clinical variables, increase of Factor IX following transfusion of American concentrates is 1.0% (or 0.01 U)/1 administered/kg. Appropriate frequency of transfusion depends upon an understanding of the biphasic disappearance of Factor IX. Importantly, the initial frequency of transfusion therapy should be based on a direct T1/2 of only 6 to 8 hrs.

  3. Method for preparing high purity vanadium

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick; Carlson, O. Norman

    1986-09-09

    A method for preparing high purity vanadium having a low silicon content has been developed. Vanadium pentoxide is reduced with a stoichiometric, or slightly deficient amount of aluminum to produce a vanadium-aluminum alloy containing an excess of oxygen. Silicon is removed by electron-beam melting the alloy under oxidizing conditions to promote the formation of SiO which is volatile at elevated temperatures. Excess oxygen is removed by heating the alloy in the presence of calcium metal to form calcium oxide.

  4. Method for preparing high purity vanadium

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.; Carlson, O.N.

    1984-05-16

    A method for preparing high purity vanadium having a low silicon content has been developed. Vanadium pentoxide is reduced with a stoichiometric, or slightly deficient amount of aluminum to produce a vanadium-aluminum alloy containing an excess of oxygen. Silicon is removed by electron-beam melting the alloy under oxidizing conditions to promote the formation of SiO which is volatile at elevated temperatures. Excess oxygen is removed by heating the alloy in the presence of calcium metal to form calcium oxide.

  5. High-purity thermoacoustic isotope enrichment.

    PubMed

    Swift, G W; Geller, D A; Backhaus, S N

    2014-08-01

    In a tube many wavelengths long, thermoacoustic separation of a gas mixture can produce very high purities. A flexible wall allows a spatially continuous supply of acoustic power into such a long tube. Coiling the tube and immersing it in a fluid lets a single-wavelength, circulating, traveling pressure wave in the fluid drive all the wavelengths in the tube wall and gas. Preliminary measurements confirm many aspects of the concept with neon ((20)Ne and (22)Ne) and highlight some challenges of practical implementation. PMID:25096099

  6. Concurrent acquired inhibitors to factor VIII and IX, a laboratory artifact: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Doma, Saša Anžej; Hillarp, Andreas; Pajič, Tadej; Andoljšek, Dušan; Černelč, Peter; Preldžnik Zupan, Irena

    2016-01-01

    Acquired inhibitors to coagulation factors other than factor VIII are extremely rare. We describe a case of a 59-year-old woman with abnormal bleeding, diagnosed with concurrent inhibitor antibodies to factor VIII and IX by Bethesda testing. We demonstrate that anti-FVIII antibodies of a very high titre are capable of disturbing the aPTT-based Bethesda assay, resulting in falsely-positive antibodies to factor IX. The case also illustrates the usefulness of the immunological assay (ELISA) in complementing the inhibitor diagnosis. PMID:27346976

  7. An investigation of three patients with Christmas disease due to an abnormal type of factor IX.

    PubMed

    Denson, K W; Biggs, R; Mannucci, P M

    1968-03-01

    Three patients with Christmas disease whose plasma was shown to have a prolonged one-stage prothrombin time with ox brain thromboplastin have been investigated. These patients have an inhibitor for the reaction between factor X, factor VII, and ox brain extract. The abnormal constituent responsible for this inhibitor appears to be factor IX whuch is functionally inactive but antigenically indistinguishable from normal factor IX. It is proposed that patients might be classified into haemophilia B(+) for patients with this defect (Christmas disease(+)) and haemophilia B(-) (Christmas disease(-)) for patients who have classical Christmas disease.

  8. Spontaneous disappearance of an IgA anti-factor IX inhibitor in a child with Christmas disease.

    PubMed

    Carroll, R R; Panush, R S; Kitchens, C S

    1984-10-01

    The few inhibitors to blood coagulation factor IX in patients with Christmas disease (hemophilia B) that have been studied have been shown to belong to the IgG class of immunoglobulins. We report the first case in which a factor IX inhibitor was of the IgA class. Additionally, he appears to be the youngest patient with hemophilia B to have developed an inhibitor. His inhibitor complicated treatment of the patient for several years because of its anamnestic rise following factor IX concentrate administration. It then spontaneously vanished and has not returned in spite of repeated factor IX complex administration.

  9. Workshop on Preserving High Purity Uranium-233

    SciTech Connect

    Krichinsky, Alan M; Giaquinto, Joseph; Canaan, R Douglas {Doug}

    2016-01-01

    A workshop was held on at the MARC X conference to provide a forum for the scientific community to communicate needs for high-purity 233U and its by-products in order to preserve critical items otherwise slated for downblending and disposal. Currently, only a small portion of the U.S. holdings of separated 233U is being preserved. However, many additional kilograms of 233U (>97% pure) still are destined to be downblended which will permanently destroy their potential value for many other applications. It is not likely that this material will ever be replaced due to a lack of operating production capability. Summaries of information conveyed at the workshop and feedback obtained from the scientific community are presented herein.

  10. Validation of the manufacturing process used to produce long-acting recombinant factor IX Fc fusion protein.

    PubMed

    McCue, J; Osborne, D; Dumont, J; Peters, R; Mei, B; Pierce, G F; Kobayashi, K; Euwart, D

    2014-07-01

    Recombinant factor IX Fc (rFIXFc) fusion protein is the first of a new class of bioengineered long-acting factors approved for the treatment and prevention of bleeding episodes in haemophilia B. The aim of this work was to describe the manufacturing process for rFIXFc, to assess product quality and to evaluate the capacity of the process to remove impurities and viruses. This manufacturing process utilized a transferable and scalable platform approach established for therapeutic antibody manufacturing and adapted for production of the rFIXFc molecule. rFIXFc was produced using a process free of human- and animal-derived raw materials and a host cell line derived from human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293H cells. The process employed multi-step purification and viral clearance processing, including use of a protein A affinity capture chromatography step, which binds to the Fc portion of the rFIXFc molecule with high affinity and specificity, and a 15 nm pore size virus removal nanofilter. Process validation studies were performed to evaluate identity, purity, activity and safety. The manufacturing process produced rFIXFc with consistent product quality and high purity. Impurity clearance validation studies demonstrated robust and reproducible removal of process-related impurities and adventitious viruses. The rFIXFc manufacturing process produces a highly pure product, free of non-human glycan structures. Validation studies demonstrate that this product is produced with consistent quality and purity. In addition, the scalability and transferability of this process are key attributes to ensure consistent and continuous supply of rFIXFc.

  11. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 86 - Experimentally Determining the R-Factor for Bench Aging Durability Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-Factor for Bench Aging Durability Procedures IX Appendix IX to Part 86 Protection of Environment... the R-Factor for Bench Aging Durability Procedures The R-Factor is the catalyst thermal reactivity coefficient used in the bench aging time (BAT) equation . Manufacturers may determine the value of...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 86 - Experimentally Determining the R-Factor for Bench Aging Durability Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-Factor for Bench Aging Durability Procedures IX Appendix IX to Part 86 Protection of Environment...-Factor for Bench Aging Durability Procedures The R-Factor is the catalyst thermal reactivity coefficient used in the bench aging time (BAT) equation . Manufacturers may determine the value of R...

  13. Collaborative study for the establishment of replacement batches for human coagulation factor IX concentrate reference standards.

    PubMed

    Gray, E; Pickering, W; Hockley, J; Rigsby, P; Weinstein, M; Terao, E; Buchheit, K-H

    2008-12-01

    The European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) batch 1, the World Health Organisation (WHO) 3rd International Standard, Human (IS, 96/854) and the FDA Standard for human blood coagulation Factor IX concentrate have been available since 1996, following their establishment by a common collaborative study. Due to dwindling stocks of all three standards, a new WHO-EDQM-FDA tri-partite collaborative study was launched to establish replacement batches. Thirty laboratories from fourteen countries took part in the collaborative study to assign potency values to candidate preparations. Three candidates, one of recombinant and two of human plasma-derived origins, were assayed against the 3rd IS for Blood Coagulation Factor IX, Concentrate, Human (96/854). The 3rd IS for Blood Coagulation Factors II, VII, IX and X, Plasma, Human (99/826) was also included to evaluate the relationship between the factor IX plasma and concentrate unitage. Thirty-two sets of clotting assay results and two sets of chromogenic assay data were analysed. There was a significant difference in potency estimates by these two methods for the recombinant candidate (sample B) and the plasma IS (sample P). Similar potency values were obtained for the plasma derived products (monoclonal antibody- and chromatography-purified factor IX, samples C and D) by clotting and chromogenic assays. For the clotting assays, intra-laboratory variability (GCV) was found to range from 0.5 - 21.7%, with the GCV for the majority of laboratories being less than 10%. Good inter-laboratory agreement, with the majority of the GCV being less than 10% (GCV range = 4.7 - 10.6 %) was also obtained. The mean potency values estimated by the clotting assay using plasma as pre-diluent (as directed by the Ph. Eur. general chapter method) did not differ from values obtained using buffer. Taking into account the preliminary stability data, the intra- and inter-laboratory variability, and the differences

  14. Isolation of a human anti-haemophilic factor IX cDNA clone using a unique 52-base synthetic oligonucleotide probe deduced from the amino acid sequence of bovine factor IX.

    PubMed

    Jaye, M; de la Salle, H; Schamber, F; Balland, A; Kohli, V; Findeli, A; Tolstoshev, P; Lecocq, J P

    1983-04-25

    A unique 52mer oligonucleotide deduced from the amino acid sequence of bovine Factor IX was synthesized and used as a probe to screen a human liver cDNA bank. The Factor IX clone isolated shows 5 differences in nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence as compared to a previously isolated clone. In addition, precisely one codon has been deleted.Images

  15. Long-acting recombinant coagulation factor IX albumin fusion protein (rIX-FP) in hemophilia B: results of a phase 3 trial

    PubMed Central

    Martinowitz, Uri; Lissitchkov, Toshko; Pan-Petesch, Brigitte; Hanabusa, Hideji; Oldenburg, Johannes; Boggio, Lisa; Negrier, Claude; Pabinger, Ingrid; von Depka Prondzinski, Mario; Altisent, Carmen; Castaman, Giancarlo; Yamamoto, Koji; Álvarez-Roman, Maria-Teresa; Voigt, Christine; Blackman, Nicole; Jacobs, Iris

    2016-01-01

    A global phase 3 study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor IX with albumin (rIX-FP) in 63 previously treated male patients (12-61 years) with severe hemophilia B (factor IX [FIX] activity ≤2%). The study included 2 groups: group 1 patients received routine prophylaxis once every 7 days for 26 weeks, followed by either 7-, 10-, or 14-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 50, 38, or 51 weeks, respectively; group 2 patients received on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes for 26 weeks and then switched to a 7-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 45 weeks. The mean terminal half-life of rIX-FP was 102 hours, 4.3-fold longer than previous FIX treatment. Patients maintained a mean trough of 20 and 12 IU/dL FIX activity on prophylaxis with rIX-FP 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks, respectively. There was 100% reduction in median annualized spontaneous bleeding rate (AsBR) and 100% resolution of target joints when subjects switched from on-demand to prophylaxis treatment with rIX-FP (P < .0001). The median AsBR was 0.00 for all prophylaxis regimens. Overall, 98.6% of bleeding episodes were treated successfully, including 93.6% that were treated with a single injection. No patient developed an inhibitor, and no safety concerns were identified. These results indicate rIX-FP is safe and effective for preventing and treating bleeding episodes in patients with hemophilia B at dosing regimens of 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT0101496274. PMID:26755710

  16. Long-acting recombinant coagulation factor IX albumin fusion protein (rIX-FP) in hemophilia B: results of a phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Santagostino, Elena; Martinowitz, Uri; Lissitchkov, Toshko; Pan-Petesch, Brigitte; Hanabusa, Hideji; Oldenburg, Johannes; Boggio, Lisa; Negrier, Claude; Pabinger, Ingrid; von Depka Prondzinski, Mario; Altisent, Carmen; Castaman, Giancarlo; Yamamoto, Koji; Álvarez-Roman, Maria-Teresa; Voigt, Christine; Blackman, Nicole; Jacobs, Iris

    2016-04-01

    A global phase 3 study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor IX with albumin (rIX-FP) in 63 previously treated male patients (12-61 years) with severe hemophilia B (factor IX [FIX] activity ≤2%). The study included 2 groups: group 1 patients received routine prophylaxis once every 7 days for 26 weeks, followed by either 7-, 10-, or 14-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 50, 38, or 51 weeks, respectively; group 2 patients received on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes for 26 weeks and then switched to a 7-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 45 weeks. The mean terminal half-life of rIX-FP was 102 hours, 4.3-fold longer than previous FIX treatment. Patients maintained a mean trough of 20 and 12 IU/dL FIX activity on prophylaxis with rIX-FP 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks, respectively. There was 100% reduction in median annualized spontaneous bleeding rate (AsBR) and 100% resolution of target joints when subjects switched from on-demand to prophylaxis treatment with rIX-FP (P< .0001). The median AsBR was 0.00 for all prophylaxis regimens. Overall, 98.6% of bleeding episodes were treated successfully, including 93.6% that were treated with a single injection. No patient developed an inhibitor, and no safety concerns were identified. These results indicate rIX-FP is safe and effective for preventing and treating bleeding episodes in patients with hemophilia B at dosing regimens of 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT0101496274.

  17. Somatic mosaicism and female-to-female transmission in a kindred with hemophilia B (factor IX deficiency)

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S.A.M.; Deugau, K.V.; Lillicrap, D.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Studies have shown that hemophilia B (Christmas disease; factor IX deficiency) results from many different mutations in the factor IX gene, of which {gt}95% are single nulceotide substitutions. This study has identified a previously unreported form of hemophilia B in a patient who was a somatic mosaic for a guanine-to-cytosine transversion at nucleotide 31,170 in the factor IX gene. This point mutation changes the codon for residue 350 in the catalytic domain of factor IX from a cysteine to a serine. The authors used differential termination of primer extension to confirm and measure the degree of mosaicism. The study shows that a varying proportion of cells from hepatic, renal, smooth muscle, and hematopoietic populations possessed normal as well as mutant factor IX sequences. These results indicate that the mutation in this patient occurred either as an uncorrected half-chromatid mutation in the female gamete or as a replication or postreplication error in the initial mitotic divisions of the zygote preceding implantation. In addition, this kindred also contains two females in successive generations who have moderately severe factor IX deficiency. The molecular pathogenesis of this latter phenomenon has been studied and seems to relate to the unaccompanied expression of the mutant factor IX gene consequent upon a second, as yet undefined, genetic event that has prevented inactivation of sequences including the mutant factor IX gene on the X chromosome inherited from the affected male.

  18. Somatic mosaicism and female-to-female transmission in a kindred with hemophilia B (factor IX deficiency).

    PubMed

    Taylor, S A; Deugau, K V; Lillicrap, D P

    1991-01-01

    Studies have shown that hemophilia B (Christmas disease; factor IX deficiency) results from many different mutations in the factor IX gene, of which greater than 95% are single nucleotide substitutions. This study has identified a previously unreported form of hemophilia B in a patient who was a somatic mosaic for a guanine-to-cytosine transversion at nucleotide 31,170 in the factor IX gene. This point mutation changes the codon for residue 350 in the catalytic domain of factor IX from a cysteine to a serine. We used differential termination of primer extension to confirm and measure the degree of mosaicism. Our study shows that a varying proportion of cells from hepatic, renal, smooth muscle, and hematopoietic populations possessed normal as well as mutant factor IX sequences. These results indicate that the mutation in this patient occurred either as an uncorrected half-chromatid mutation in the female gamete or as a replication or postreplication error in the initial mitotic divisions of the zygote preceding implantation. In addition, this kindred also contains two females in successive generations who have moderately severe factor IX deficiency. The molecular pathogenesis of this latter phenomenon has been studied and seems to relate to the unaccompanied expression of the mutant factor IX gene consequent upon a second, as yet undefined, genetic event that has prevented inactivation of sequences including the mutant factor IX gene on the X chromosome inherited from the affected male.

  19. Isolation and characterization of human factor IX cDNA: identification of Taq I polymorphism and regional assignment.

    PubMed

    Jagadeeswaran, P; Lavelle, D E; Kaul, R; Mohandas, T; Warren, S T

    1984-09-01

    Hemophilia B or Christmas disease is an X-linked condition caused by absent or reduced levels of functional coagulation factor IX. Based upon the peptide sequence of bovine factor IX, we synthesized a 17-base pair oligonucleotide probe to screen a human liver cDNA library. A recombinant clone was identified with a 917-nucleotide insert whose sequence corresponds to 70% of the coding region of human factor IX. This factor IX cDNA was used to probe restriction endonuclease digested human DNA to identify a Taq I polymorphism associated with the genomic factor IX gene as well as to verify that there is a single copy of this gene per haploid genome. The factor IX cDNA was also used to map the locus for factor IX to a region from Xq26 to Xqter. The cloning of human factor IX cDNA and identification of a Taq I polymorphism and its regional localization will provide a means to study the molecular genetics of hemophilia B and permit linkage analysis with nearby loci.

  20. Biaxial deformation in high purity aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Livescu, V.; Bingert, J. F.; Liu, C.; Lovato, M. L.; Patterson, B. M.

    2015-09-25

    The convergence of multiple characterization tools has been applied to investigate the relationship of microstructure on damage evolution in high purity aluminum. The extremely coarse grain size of the disc-shaped sample provided a quasi-two dimensional structure from which the location of surface-measured features could be inferred. In particular, the role of pre-existing defects on damage growth was accessible due to the presence of casting porosity in the aluminum. Micro tomography, electron backscatter diffraction, and digital image correlation were applied to interrogate the sample in three dimensions. Recently micro-bulge testing apparatus was used to deform the pre-characterized disc of aluminum in biaxial tension, and related analysis techniques were applied to map local strain fields. Subsequent post-mortem characterization of the failed sample was performed to correlate structure to damaged regions. We determined that strain localization and associated damage was most strongly correlated with grain boundary intersections and plastic anisotropy gradients between grains. Pre-existing voids played less of an apparent role than was perhaps initially expected. Finally, these combined techniques provide insight to the mechanism of damage initiation, propagation, and failure, along with a test bed for predictive damage models incorporating anisotropic microstructural effects.

  1. Biaxial deformation in high purity aluminum

    DOE PAGES

    Livescu, V.; Bingert, J. F.; Liu, C.; Lovato, M. L.; Patterson, B. M.

    2015-09-25

    The convergence of multiple characterization tools has been applied to investigate the relationship of microstructure on damage evolution in high purity aluminum. The extremely coarse grain size of the disc-shaped sample provided a quasi-two dimensional structure from which the location of surface-measured features could be inferred. In particular, the role of pre-existing defects on damage growth was accessible due to the presence of casting porosity in the aluminum. Micro tomography, electron backscatter diffraction, and digital image correlation were applied to interrogate the sample in three dimensions. Recently micro-bulge testing apparatus was used to deform the pre-characterized disc of aluminum inmore » biaxial tension, and related analysis techniques were applied to map local strain fields. Subsequent post-mortem characterization of the failed sample was performed to correlate structure to damaged regions. We determined that strain localization and associated damage was most strongly correlated with grain boundary intersections and plastic anisotropy gradients between grains. Pre-existing voids played less of an apparent role than was perhaps initially expected. Finally, these combined techniques provide insight to the mechanism of damage initiation, propagation, and failure, along with a test bed for predictive damage models incorporating anisotropic microstructural effects.« less

  2. Dynamic shear deformation in high purity Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Cerreta, Ellen K; Bingert, John F; Trujillo, Carl P; Lopez, Mike F; Gray, George T

    2009-01-01

    The forced shear test specimen, first developed by Meyer et al. [Meyer L. et al., Critical Adiabatic Shear Strength of Low Alloyed Steel Under Compressive Loading, Metallurgical Applications of Shock Wave and High Strain Rate Phenomena (Marcel Decker, 1986), 657; Hartmann K. et al., Metallurgical Effects on Impact Loaded Materials, Shock Waves and High Strain rate Phenomena in Metals (Plenum, 1981), 325-337.], has been utilized in a number of studies. While the geometry of this specimen does not allow for the microstructure to exactly define the location of shear band formation and the overall mechanical response of a specimen is highly sensitive to the geometry utilized, the forced shear specimen is useful for characterizing the influence of parameters such as strain rate, temperature, strain, and load on the microstructural evolution within a shear band. Additionally, many studies have utilized this geometry to advance the understanding of shear band development. In this study, by varying the geometry, specifically the ratio of the inner hole to the outer hat diameter, the dynamic shear localization response of high purity Fe was examined. Post mortem characterization was performed to quantify the width of the localizations and examine the microstructural and textural evolution of shear deformation in a bcc metal. Increased instability in mechanical response is strongly linked with development of enhanced intergranular misorientations, high angle boundaries, and classical shear textures characterized through orientation distribution functions.

  3. The spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infection in patients with factor IX deficiency (Christmas disease)

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, J M; Variakojis, D; Phair, J P; Green, D

    1987-06-01

    Early reports suggested that hemophiliacs with factor IX deficiency (Christmas Disease) may be at less risk for developing the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) than patients with classic hemophilia. We evaluated 12 factor IX deficient patients for clinical and immunologic abnormalities related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Antibody to HIV was not detected in these patients prior to 1982. By 1985, 66 percent (eight of 12) patients were seropositive. All three concentrates available commercially before 1985 were associated with seropositivity. Furthermore, seropositive hemophiliacs had received on average significantly more factor IX concentrate than seronegative hemophiliacs (27,825 +/- 17,976 (S.D.) versus 1,250 +/- 1,500 factor units/year, (p less than 0.02). Half of the seropositive individuals had generalized lymphadenopathy with splenomegaly. Two seropositive patients have developed AIDS, one with cryptococcal meningitis and another with a large cell immunoblastic lymphoma. Infection with HIV has occurred with high frequency in hemophiliacs who received unmodified factor IX concentrates.

  4. Alprolix (recombinant Factor IX Fc fusion protein): extended half-life product for the prophylaxis and treatment of hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Ducore, Jonathan M; Miguelino, Maricel G; Powell, Jerry S

    2014-10-01

    Hemophilia B is a genetic disease caused by mutation of the gene for coagulation protein Factor IX. When severe, the disease leads to spontaneous life-threatening bleeding episodes. Current therapy requires frequent intravenous infusions of therapeutic recombinant or plasma-derived protein concentrates containing Factor IX. Alprolix™ (recombinant Factor IX Fc fusion protein), is a therapeutic Factor IX preparation that has been engineered for a prolonged half-life in circulation, has completed pivotal clinical trials and has been approved recently in the USA, Canada, Australia and Japan for use in the clinic for patients with hemophilia B. This promising therapy should allow patients to use fewer infusions to maintain appropriate Factor IX activity levels in all clinical settings, and its use may be indicated in both on demand and prophylactic treatments.

  5. Characterization of a factor IX variant with a glycine207 to glutamic acid mutation.

    PubMed

    Lin, S W; Lin, C N; Hamaguchi, N; Smith, K J; Shen, M C

    1994-09-15

    Factor IXTaipei9 is a factor IX variant from a hemophilia B patient with reduced levels of circulating protein molecules (cross-reacting material reduced, CRM). This variant contained a glycine (Gly) to glutamic acid (Glu) substitution at the 207th codon of mature factor IX. The functional consequences of the Gly-->Glu mutation in factor IXTaipei9 (IXG207E) were characterized in this study. Plasma-derived IXG207E exhibited a mobility similar to that of normal factor IX on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Its specific activity was estimated to be 3.5% that of the purified normal factor IX in a one-stage partial thromboplastin time assay (aPTT). Cleavage of factor IXG207E by factor XIa or factor VIIa-tissue factor complex appeared to be normal. When the calcium-dependent conformational change was examined by monitoring quenching of intrinsic fluorescence, both normal factor IX and IXG207E exhibited equivalent intrinsic fluorescence quenching. Activated factor IXG207E (IXaG207E) also binds antithrombin III equally as well as normal factor IXa. However, aberrant binding of the active site probe p-aminobenzamidine was observed for factor XIa-activated factor IXG207E, indicating that the active site pocket of the heavy chain of factor IXaG207E was abnormal. Moreover, the rate of activation of factor X by factor IXaG207E, as measured in a purified system using chromogenic substrates, was estimated to be 1/40 of that of normal factor IXa. A computer-modeled heavy-chain structure of factor IXa predicts a hydrophobic environment surrounding Gly-207 and this Gly forms a hydrogen bound to the active site serine-365. The molecular mechanism of the Gly-->Glu mutation in factor IXTaipei9 might result in the alteration of the microenvironment of the active site pocket which renders the active site serine-365 inaccessible to its substrate. PMID:7915915

  6. Activation of clotting factors XI and IX in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Minnema, M C; Peters, R J; de Winter, R; Lubbers, Y P; Barzegar, S; Bauer, K A; Rosenberg, R D; Hack, C E; ten Cate, H

    2000-11-01

    In acute coronary events, plaque rupture and the subsequent formation of the catalytic tissue factor-factor VIIa complex is considered to initiate coagulation. It is unknown whether clotting factors XI and IX are activated in acute coronary events. Therefore, we prospectively investigated the activation of clotting factors XI and IX as well as activation of the contact system and the common pathway in 50 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), in 50 patients with unstable angina pectoris (UAP), and in 50 patients with stable angina pectoris (SAP). Factor XIa-C1 inhibitor complexes, which reflect acute activation of factor XI, were detected in 24% of the patients with AMI, 8% of the patients with UAP, and 4% of the patients with SAP (P<0.05), whereas factor XIa-alpha(1)-antitrypsin complexes, which reflect chronic activation, were observed equally in all 3 study groups. Factor IX peptide levels were significantly higher in the patients with AMI and UAP compared with the patients with SAP (P<0.01). No differences regarding markers of the common pathway were demonstrated. Fibrinopeptide A levels were elevated in patients with AMI compared with patients with UAP and those with SAP (P<0.01). Factor XIIa- or kallikrein-C1 inhibitor complexes were not increased. In conclusion, this is the first demonstration of the activation of clotting factors XI and IX in patients with acute coronary syndromes. Because these clotting factors are considered to be important for continuous thrombin generation and clot stability, their activation might have clinical and therapeutic consequences.

  7. Nonacog gamma, a novel recombinant factor IX with low factor IXa content for treatment and prophylaxis of bleeding episodes.

    PubMed

    Turecek, Peter L; Abbühl, Brigitt; Tangada, Srilatha D; Chapman, Miranda; Gritsch, Herbert; Rottensteiner, Hanspeter; Schrenk, Gerald; Mitterer, Artur; Dietrich, Barbara; Höllriegl, Werner; Schiviz, Alexandra; Horling, Frank; Reipert, Birgit M; Muchitsch, Eva-Maria; Pavlova, Borislava G; Scheiflinger, Friedrich

    2015-03-01

    Nonacog gamma is a new recombinant factor IX to treat factor IX deficiency. It is indicated for control of bleeding episodes, perioperative management and routine prophylaxis to prevent or reduce the frequency of bleeding episodes in adults and children with hemophilia B. Nonacog gamma was first approved in the USA in June 2013 under the trade name RIXUBIS followed by market approvals in Australia and the EU in 2014, and marketing authorization decision is pending in Japan. Nonacog gamma is derived from a recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cell line using a state of the art biotechnological manufacturing process. Recombinant factor IX is produced by Baxter's protein-free fermentation technology, which was first developed for ADVATE. The product is purified and formulated in the absence of any human or animal-derived protein. Nonacog gamma was characterized both in comprehensive in vitro and in vivo non-clinical studies as well as in an extensive clinical trial program. PMID:25660348

  8. The structures of the carbohydrate moieties of bovine blood coagulation factor IX (Christmas factor).

    PubMed

    Mizuochi, T; Taniguchi, T; Fujikawa, K; Titani, K; Kobata, A

    1983-05-25

    Bovine blood coagulation factor IX (Christmas factor) contains four asparagine-linked sugar chains in one molecule. The sugar chains were quantitatively liberated as radioactive oligosaccharides from the polypeptide moiety by hydrazinolysis followed by N-acetylation and NaB3H4 reduction. The structures of these sugar chains were determined by sequential exoglycosidase digestion in combination with methylation analysis. Bovine factor IX contained two unique penta- and tetrasialyl triantennary sugar chains with the structures shown below in addition to tetra-, tri-, and disialyl biantennary sugar chains of Sia alpha 2 leads to 3 Gal beta 1 leads 3(Sia alpha 2 leads to 6)GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 2Man alpha 1 leads to 6[Sia alpha 2 leads to 3Gal beta 1 leads to 3(Sia alpha 2 leads to 6)GlcNac beta 1 leads to 2Man alpha 1 leads to 3]Man beta 1 leads to 4GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 4GlcNAc, Sia alpha 2 leads to 6Gal beta 1 leads to 4GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 2Man alpha 1 leads to 6[Sia alpha 2 leads to 3Gal beta 1 leads to 3(Sia alpha 2 leads to 6)GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 2Man alpha 1 leads to 3]Man beta 1 leads to 4GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 4GlcNAc, and Sia alpha 2 leads to 6Gal beta 1 leads to 4GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 2Man alpha 1 leads to 6(Sia alpha 2 leads to 6Gal beta 1 leads to 4GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 2Man alpha 1 leads to 3)Man beta 1 leads to 4GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 4GlcNAc and their partially desialized forms.

  9. Expression of human factor IX in rat capillary endothelial cells: Toward somatic gene therapy for hemophilia B

    SciTech Connect

    Shounan Yao; Wilson, J.M.; Nabel, E.G.; Kurachi, Sumiko; Hachiya, H.L.; Kurachi, Kotoku )

    1991-09-15

    In aiming to develop a gene therapy approach for hemophilia B, the authors expressed and characterized human factor IX in rat capillary endothelial cells (CECs). Moloney murine leukemia virus-derived retrovirus vectors that contain human factor IX cDNA linked to heterologous promoters and the neomycin-resistant gene were constructed and employed to prepare recombinant retroviruses. Rat CECs and NIH 3T3 cells infected with these viruses were selected with the neomycin analogue, G418 sulfate, and tested for expression of factor IX. A construct with the factor IX cDNA under direct control by long terminal repeat gave the highest level of expression as quantitated by immunoassays as well as clotting activity assays. A single RNA transcript of 4.4 kilobases predicted by the construct and a recombinant factor IX were found. The recombinant human factor IX produced showed full clotting activity, demonstrating that CECs have an efficient mechanism for posttranslational modifications, including {gamma}-carboxylation, essential for its biological activity. These results, in addition to other properties of the endothelium, including large number of cells, accessibility, and direct contact with the circulating blood, suggest that CECs can serve as an efficient drug delivery vehicle producing factor IX in a somatic gene therapy for hemophilia B.

  10. Characteristics of GRIFFIN high-purity germanium clover detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizwan, U.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Andreoiu, C.; Ball, G. C.; Chester, A.; Domingo, T.; Dunlop, R.; Hackman, G.; Rand, E. T.; Smith, J. K.; Starosta, K.; Svensson, C. E.; Voss, P.; Williams, J.

    2016-06-01

    The Gamma-Ray Infrastructure For Fundamental Investigations of Nuclei, GRIFFIN, is a new experimental facility for radioactive decay studies at the TRIUMF-ISAC laboratory. The performance of the 16 high-purity germanium (HPGe) clover detectors that will make up the GRIFFIN spectrometer is reported. The energy resolution, efficiency, timing resolution, crosstalk and preamplifier properties of each crystal were measured using a combination of analog and digital data acquisition techniques. The absolute efficiency and add-back factors are determined for the energy range of 80-3450 keV. The detectors show excellent performance with an average over all 64 crystals of a FWHM energy resolution of 1.89(6) keV and relative efficiency with respect to a 3 in . × 3 in . NaI detector of 41(1)% at 1.3 MeV.

  11. Use of proteomics for validation of the isolation process of clotting factor IX from human plasma.

    PubMed

    Clifton, James; Huang, Feilei; Gaso-Sokac, Dajana; Brilliant, Kate; Hixson, Douglas; Josic, Djuro

    2010-01-01

    The use of proteomic techniques in the monitoring of different production steps of plasma-derived clotting factor IX (pd F IX) was demonstrated. The first step, solid-phase extraction with a weak anion-exchange resin, fractionates the bulk of human serum albumin (HSA), immunoglobulin G, and other non-binding proteins from F IX. The proteins that strongly bind to the anion-exchange resin are eluted by higher salt concentrations. In the second step, anion-exchange chromatography, residual HSA, some proteases and other contaminating proteins are separated. In the last chromatographic step, affinity chromatography with immobilized heparin, the majority of the residual impurities are removed. However, some contaminating proteins still remain in the eluate from the affinity column. The next step in the production process, virus filtration, is also an efficient step for the removal of residual impurities, mainly high molecular weight proteins, such as vitronectin and inter-alpha inhibitor proteins. In each production step, the active component, pd F IX and contaminating proteins are monitored by biochemical and immunochemical methods and by LC-MS/MS and their removal documented. Our methodology is very helpful for further process optimization, rapid identification of target proteins with relatively low abundance, and for the design of subsequent steps for their removal or purification.

  12. High-purity silicon for solar cell applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dosaj, V. D.; Hunt, L. P.; Schei, A.

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses the production of solar cells from high-purity silicon. The process consists of reducing the level of impurities in the raw materials, preventing material contamination before and after entering the furnace, and performing orders-of-magnitude reduction of metal impurity concentrations. The high-purity raw materials are considered with reference to carbon reductants, silica, and graphite electrodes. Attention is also given to smelting experiments used to demonstrate, in an experimental-scale furnace, the production of high-purity SoG-Si. It is found that high-purity silicon may be produced from high-purity quartz and chemically purified charcoal in a 50-kVA arc furnace. The major contamination source is shown to be impurities from the carbon reducing materials.

  13. In Vivo Gene Therapy of Hemophilia B: Sustained Partial Correction in Factor IX-Deficient Dogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Mark A.; Rothenberg, Steven; Landen, Charles N.; Bellinger, Dwight A.; Leland, Frances; Toman, Carol; Finegold, Milton; Thompson, Arthur R.; Read, M. S.; Brinkhous, Kenneth M.; Woo, Savio L. C.

    1993-10-01

    The liver represents a model organ for gene therapy. A method has been developed for hepatic gene transfer in vivo by the direct infusion of recombinant retroviral vectors into the portal vasculature, which results in the persistent expression of exogenous genes. To determine if these technologies are applicable for the treatment of hemophilia B patients, preclinical efficacy studies were done in a hemophilia B dog model. When the canine factor IX complementary DNA was transduced directly into the hepatocytes of affected dogs in vivo, the animals constitutively expressed low levels of canine factor IX for more than 5 months. Persistent expression of the clotting. factor resulted in reductions of whole blood clotting and partial thromboplastin times of the treated animals. Thus, long-term treatment of hemophilia B patients may be feasible by direct hepatic gene therapy in vivo.

  14. An unusual complication in a gravida with factor IX deficiency: case report with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Guy, G P; Baxi, L V; Hurlet-Jensen, A; Chao, C R

    1992-09-01

    Factor IX deficiency (hemophilia B, Christmas disease) is an X-linked recessive coagulation disorder. It occurs in one out of every 25,000-30,000 male births and requires even rarer genetic circumstances for phenotypic expression in females. We report the occurrence of a large, late-trimester subchorionic hematoma in a gravida with factor IX deficiency and with laboratory evidence of consumptive coagulopathy during treatment. The patient was managed conservatively and had a successful outcome at term. The only four reported cases of antepartum management of factor IX deficiency in the English literature are reviewed.

  15. In vitro mutagenesis study of two critical glutamic acids in the calcium binding loop of the factor IX heavy chain.

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, N; Stafford, D

    1994-12-01

    We investigated the structural and functional significance of calcium binding in the factor IXa heavy chain by introducing point mutations into the probable calcium binding site (residues 235 and 245). According to factor IXa computer modelling based on trypsin x-ray structure, side chains of two glutamic acid residues, 235 and 245, together with backbone carbonyl groups of residues 237 and 240, bind a calcium ion. Factor IX clotting activity decreased approximately 25 percent on substitution of glutamic acid 235 with lysine. Activity decreased more than 90 percent on substitution of glutamic acid 245 with lysine. Activity also decreased more than 90 percent on substitution of both glutamic acids by lysines. Factor XIa cleavage of factor IXGlu235Lys and factor IXGlu245Lys appeared normal by polyacrylamide gel analysis. (Factor IXGlu235Lys: Factor IX with Lysine substituted for Glutamic acid at residue 235. Factor IXGlu245Lys: Factor IX with Lysine substituted for Glutamic acid at residue 245. Factor IXGlu235&245Lys: Factor IX with Lysine substituted for Glutamic acid at residues 235 and 245.) Activated factor IXGlu235Lys bound the fluorescent active site probe, p-aminobenzamidine, normally, while factor XIa cleaved factor IXGlu245Lys and factor IXGlu235&245Lys failed to bind p-aminobenzamidine. Plasma purified factor IX titrated with terbium showed an increase in luminescence; however, factor IXGlu235Lys and factor IXGlu245Lys had no effect on terbium luminescence. Radioimmunoassays indicate that in calcium's absence, factor IXGlu245Lys adopts a conformation similar to normal factor IX in the presence of calcium. By contrast, factor IXGlu245Lys's conformation in the presence of calcium is similar to that of plasma purified factor IX in the absence of calcium.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7740454

  16. Ares I-X Flight Test Development Challenges and Success Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askins, Bruce; Davis, Steve; Olsen, Ronald; Taylor, James

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Constellation Program's Ares I-X rocket launched successfully on October 28, 2009 collecting valuable data and providing risk reduction for the Ares I project. The Ares I-X mission was formulated and implemented in less than four years commencing with the Exploration Systems Architecture Study in 2005. The test configuration was founded upon assets and processes from other rocket programs including Space Shuttle, Atlas, and Peacekeeper. For example, the test vehicle's propulsion element was a Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor. The Ares I-X rocket comprised a motor assembly, mass and outer mold line simulators of the Ares I Upper Stage, Orion Spacecraft and Launch Abort System, a roll control system, avionics, and other miscellaneous components. The vehicle was 327 feet tall and weighed approximately 1,800,000 pounds. During flight the rocket reached a maximum speed of Mach 4.8 and an altitude of 150,000 feet. The vehicle demonstrated staging at 130,000 feet, tested parachutes for recovery of the motor, and utilized approximately 900 sensors for data collection. Developing a new launch system and preparing for a safe flight presented many challenges. Specific challenges included designing a system to withstand the environments, manufacturing large structures, and re-qualifying heritage hardware. These and other challenges, if not mitigated, may have resulted in test cancellation. Ares I-X succeeded because the mission was founded on carefully derived objectives, led by decisive and flexible management, implemented by an exceptionally talented and dedicated workforce, and supported by a thorough independent review team. Other major success factors include the use of proven heritage hardware, a robust System Integration Laboratory, multi-NASA center and contractor team, concurrent operations, efficient vehicle assembly, effective risk management, and decentralized element development with a centralized control board. Ares I-X was a technically complex test that

  17. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA coding for human factor IX.

    PubMed

    Kurachi, K; Davie, E W

    1982-11-01

    A cDNA library prepared from human liver has been screened for factor IX (Christmas factor), a clotting factor that participates in the middle phase of blood coagulation. The library was screened with a single-stranded DNA prepared from enriched mRNA for baboon factor IX and a synthetic oligonucleotide mixture. A plasmid was identified that contained a cDNA insert of 1,466 base pairs coding for human factor IX. The insert is flanked by G-C tails of 11 and 18 base pairs at the 5' and 3' ends, respectively. It also included 138 base pairs that code for an amino-terminal leader sequence, 1,248 base pairs that code for the mature protein, a stop codon, and 48 base pairs of noncoding sequence at the 3' end. The leader sequence contains 46 amino acid residues, and it is proposed that this sequence includes both a signal sequence and a pro sequence for the mature protein that circulates in plasma. The 1,248 base pairs code for a polypeptide chain composed of 416 amino acids. The amino-terminal region for this protein contains 12 glutamic acid residues that are converted to gamma-carboxyglutamic acid in the mature protein. These glutamic acid residues are coded for by both GAA and GAG. The arginyl peptide bonds that are cleaved in the conversion of human factor IX to factor IXa by factor XIa were identified as Arg145-Ala146 and Arg180-Val181. The cleavage of these two internal peptide bonds results in the formation of an activation peptide (35 amino acids) and factor IXa, a serine protease composed of a light chain (145 amino acids) and a heavy chain (236 amino acids), and these two chains are held together by a disulfide bond(s). The active site residues including histidine, aspartate, and serine are located in the heavy chain at positions 221, 270, and 366, respectively. These amino acids are homologous with His57, Asp102, and Ser195 in the active site of chymotrypsin. Two potential carbohydrate binding sites (Asn-X-Thr) were identified in the activation peptide, and

  18. Role of enhanced half-life factor VIII and IX in the treatment of haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Mahdi, Ali J; Obaji, Samya G; Collins, Peter W

    2015-06-01

    Treatment of congenital haemophilia with factor VIII and IX concentrates often requires frequent infusions. This has obvious implications in establishing effective administration strategies and, in turn, adherence. To overcome these issues, three main technologies--polyethylene-glycol, Fc-neonatal IgG1 and albumin fusion products--have emerged into various stages of clinical development. Published data indicates an approximately 1·5- and fivefold increase in half-life of factor VIII and IX, respectively, compared to standard recombinant concentrates. Studies into efficacy and safety are starting to be published. Monitoring and optimal use of these new concentrates remains unknown. Weekly factor IX prophylaxis appears to be a feasible prophylactic regimen in haemophilia B patients. Weekly longer-acting FVIII is unlikely to provide adequate prophylaxis in most patients with haemophilia A but may reduce the frequency of infusions. Ongoing clinical trials and real life experience will help shape how these products can be used in practice and their cost effectiveness. The drive for convenience however should not overshadow the ultimate goal of prophylaxis, namely, preventing bleeding and arthropathy.

  19. Factor IX gene mutations in haemophilia B: a New Zealand population-based study.

    PubMed

    VAN DE Water, N S; Williams, R; Berry, E W; Ockelford, P A; Browett, P J

    1996-01-01

    Haemophilia B (Christmas disease) is an X-linked bleeding disorder resulting from an inherited deficiency of coagulation factor IX activity. Due to the heterogeneity of mutations within the factor IX gene there is a marked clinical variability in disease severity. By applying techniques of mutational analysis and direct sequencing of PCR products it is now potentially possible to determine the pathogenic gene defect in entire haemophilia B populations. We report here characterization of the factor IX gene defect in all the haemophilia B patients in New Zealand as part of a nationwide approach towards providing efficient and cost-effective haemophilia B genetic counselling services for these families. Twenty-six different mutations were identified in 32 unrelated haemophilia B families. Three defects at nucleotide positions +8,6659 and 17696 are novel mutations which have not been reported by other laboratories. A PCR-based diagnostic screening test for direct mutational analysis could be performed in most cases; 17 of the 26 mutations altered a restriction enzyme recognition sequence and, with the exception of the total gene deletion, base changes not affecting a restriction enzyme site could be detected by allele-specific PCR.

  20. Production of High Purity Niobium Ingots at CBMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Moura, Lourenço; de Faria Sousa, Clovis Antonio; Cruz, Edmundo Burgos

    2011-03-01

    CBMM is a fully integrated company, from the mine to the end line of the production chain, supplying different niobium products to the world market: ferroniobium, nickelniobium, niobium pentoxide and high purity metallic niobium. This high purity metallic niobium has long been known to exhibit superconductivity below 9.25 Kelvin. This characteristic has the potential to bring technological benefits for many different areas such as medicine, computing and environment. This paper presents the raw material requirements as well as CBMM experience on producing high purity niobium ingots. The results prove that CBMM material can be the best solution for special applications such as low cost superconductive radiofrequency cavities.

  1. Production of High Purity Niobium Ingots at CBMM

    SciTech Connect

    Moura, Lourenco de; Faria Sousa, Clovis Antonio de; Burgos Cruz, Edmundo

    2011-03-31

    CBMM is a fully integrated company, from the mine to the end line of the production chain, supplying different niobium products to the world market: ferroniobium, nickelniobium, niobium pentoxide and high purity metallic niobium. This high purity metallic niobium has long been known to exhibit superconductivity below 9.25 Kelvin. This characteristic has the potential to bring technological benefits for many different areas such as medicine, computing and environment. This paper presents the raw material requirements as well as CBMM experience on producing high purity niobium ingots. The results prove that CBMM material can be the best solution for special applications such as low cost superconductive radiofrequency cavities.

  2. Danazol increases factor VIII and factor IX in classic hemophilia and Christmas disease.

    PubMed

    Gralnick, H R; Rick, M E

    1983-06-01

    We gave danazol (600 mg per day orally for 14 days), an attenuated androgen, to four adults with classic hemophilia and one adult with Christmas disease. The levels of factor VIII in the patients with classic hemophilia ranged from 1 to 3 per cent before treatment and rose to 3 to 8 per cent during the treatment period. The level of factor IX in the patient with Christmas disease rose from 5 to 14 per cent. The rise in clotting-factor activity was usually observed within five to six days after the initiation of therapy and peaked between 7 and 13 days. The drug had no untoward effects. During the 70 patient-days of therapy, only two patients required plasma products, each on one occasion. These data suggest that danazol therapy may decrease the hemorrhagic tendency and reduce the need for transfusions of plasma products in classic hemophilia and Christmas disease. Controlled clinical trials will be required to establish its value in these applications.

  3. Pharmacokinetics, thrombogenicity and safety of a double viral inactivated factor IX concentrate compared with a prothrombin complex concentrate.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sáez, A; Hong, A; Arguello, A; Echenagucia, M; Boadas, A; Fabbrizzi, F; Minichilli, F; Bosch, N B

    2005-11-01

    Therapeutic options for developing countries have to assure an optimum safety and efficacy and low-cost antihaemophilic concentrates. A single blind randomized crossover study was carried out in 12 previously treated HB patients, comparing the pharmacokinetics (PK), thrombogenicity (TG) and safety of two plasma-derived double-inactivated (solvent/detergent heating at 100 degrees C, 30 min) factor IX (FIX) concentrates, UMAN COMPLEX DI (product A) [plasma-derived prothrombin concentrates (PCC)] and a high purity FIX concentrate AIMAFIX DI (product B, HPFIX). In a non-bleeding state, they received one single intravenous dose 50 IU FIX kg(-1) of PCC or HPFIX, and after a wash-out period of 14 days, the other product. We evaluated acute tolerance and determined PK parameters based on FIX levels measured over a 50 h postinfusion period. We studied fibrinogen, platelets, antithrombin, F1 + 2, TAT, D-dimer, over a 360 min postinfusion period. Ten cases remained in on-demand treatment for 6 months, five with PCC and five with HPFIX. PK and anti-FIX inhibitors were repeated at 3 and 6 months. No inhibitors were detected. PK values (PCC vs. HPFIX): clearence (CL; mL h(-1) kg(-1)) 5.2 +/- 1.4 vs. 6.5 +/- 1.4; the volume of distribution at steady state (mL kg(-1)) 154.9 +/- 54.9 vs. 197.5 +/- 72.5; mean residence time (h) 29.7 +/- 8.1 vs. 30.7 +/- 9.2; T(1/2) (h) 22.3 +/- 7 vs. 23.5 +/- 12.3; incremental recovery (IR; U dL(-1) U(-1) kg(-1)) 0.96 +/- 0.17 vs. 0.76 +/- 0.13. HPFIX showed significant lower IR and higher CL. There were no differences in PK at 3 and 6 months. In TG, significant increments in TAT and F1 + 2 at 30 min and 6 h were found with PCC. Product B PK results agrees with reported results for other HPFIX preparations. Use of PCC product A has to consider its thrombogenic activity.

  4. Recombinant to modified factor VIII and factor IX - chromogenic and one-stage assays issues.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, S; Kershaw, G; Tiefenbacher, S

    2016-07-01

    The recent development of modified recombinant factor VIII (FVIII) and factor IX (FIX) therapeutic products with extended half-lives will create challenges for the haemostasis laboratory in obtaining recovery estimates of these products in clinical samples using existing assays. The new long-acting therapeutic concentrates contain molecular modifications of Fc fusion, site-specific of polyethylene glycol or albumin fusion. The optimum methods for monitoring each new product will need to be assessed individually and laboratories should select an assay which gives similar results to the assay used to assign potency to the product in question. For some extended half-life FVIII and FIX products some one stage assays are entirely unsuitable for monitoring purposes. For most products and assay reagents studied so far, and reviewed in this manuscript, chromogenic FVIII or FIX assays can be safely used with conventional plasma standards. If one stage assays are used then they should be performed using carefully selected reagents/methods which have been shown to recover activity close to the labelled potency for the specific product being monitored. PMID:27405680

  5. Analysis of trace halocarbon contaminants in ultra high purity helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fewell, Larry L.

    1994-01-01

    This study describes the analysis of ultra high purity helium. Purification studies were conducted and containment removal was effected by the utilization of solid adsorbent purge-trap systems at cryogenic temperatures. Volatile organic compounds in ultra high purity helium were adsorbed on a solid adsorbent-cryogenic trap, and thermally desorbed trace halocarbon and other contaminants were analyzed by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  6. Recent developments in high purity niobium metal production at CBMM

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, Gustavo Giovanni Ribeiro Sousa, Clovis Antonio de Faria Guimarães, Rogério Contato Ribas, Rogério Marques Vieira, Alaércio Salvador Martins Menezes, Andréia Duarte Fridman, Daniel Pallos Cruz, Edmundo Burgos

    2015-12-04

    CBMM is a global supplier of high quality niobium products including pure niobium, the focus of this paper. CBMM’s position has been consolidated over three decades of producing high purity niobium metal ingots. The company supplies, among other products, commercial and reactor grade niobium ingots. One of the main uses of CBMM’s ingots is for the manufacture of particle accelerators (superconducting radio frequency – SRF – cavities), where the purity and homogeneity of niobium metal is essentially important for good performance. CBMM constantly strives to improve process controls and product quality, and is currently implementing innovations in production, research and development to further improve ingot quality. The main aim is to reduce the content of interstitial elements, such as nitrogen (N), oxygen (O), carbon (C), and hydrogen (H), starting with the raw materials through the final step of ingot production. CBMM held the first trial to produce the world’s largest-diameter niobium ingot (as cast 535 mm). The results of this initial trial presented very low levels of interstitial impurities (N, O, C, H), allowing the achievement of residual resistivity ratio (RRR) values very close to 300 in a six-melt process in an electron beam furnace. These values were reached with 850 ppm of tantalum. SRF cavities will be produced with this material in order to study the effect of low impurities and high RRR on the Q factor and accelerating gradient.

  7. Recent developments in high purity niobium metal production at CBMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, Gustavo Giovanni Ribeiro; Sousa, Clovis Antonio de Faria; Guimarães, Rogério Contato; Ribas, Rogério Marques; Vieira, Alaércio Salvador Martins; Menezes, Andréia Duarte; Fridman, Daniel Pallos; Cruz, Edmundo Burgos

    2015-12-01

    CBMM is a global supplier of high quality niobium products including pure niobium, the focus of this paper. CBMM's position has been consolidated over three decades of producing high purity niobium metal ingots. The company supplies, among other products, commercial and reactor grade niobium ingots. One of the main uses of CBMM's ingots is for the manufacture of particle accelerators (superconducting radio frequency - SRF - cavities), where the purity and homogeneity of niobium metal is essentially important for good performance. CBMM constantly strives to improve process controls and product quality, and is currently implementing innovations in production, research and development to further improve ingot quality. The main aim is to reduce the content of interstitial elements, such as nitrogen (N), oxygen (O), carbon (C), and hydrogen (H), starting with the raw materials through the final step of ingot production. CBMM held the first trial to produce the world's largest-diameter niobium ingot (as cast 535 mm). The results of this initial trial presented very low levels of interstitial impurities (N, O, C, H), allowing the achievement of residual resistivity ratio (RRR) values very close to 300 in a six-melt process in an electron beam furnace. These values were reached with 850 ppm of tantalum. SRF cavities will be produced with this material in order to study the effect of low impurities and high RRR on the Q factor and accelerating gradient.

  8. High-purity silica reflecting heat shield development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Congdon, W. M.

    1974-01-01

    A high-purity, fused-silica reflecting heat shield for the thermal protection of outer-planet probes was developed. Factors that strongly influence the performance of a silica heat shield were studied. Silica-bonded silica configurations, each prepared by a different technique, were investigated and rated according to its relative merits. Slip-casting was selected as the preferred fabrication method because it produced good reflectivity and good strength, and is relatively easy to scale up for a full-size outer-planet probe. The slips were cast using a variety of different particle sizes: continuous particle-size slips; monodisperse particle-size slips; and blends of monodisperse particle-size slips were studied. In general, smaller particles gave the highest reflectance. The monodisperse slips as well as the blend slips gave a higher reflectance than the continuous particle-size slips. An upgraded and fused natural quartz was used to study the effects of microstructure on reflectance and as the baseline to ascertain the increase in reflectance obtained from using a higher-purity synthetic material.

  9. Comparison of amino acid sequence of bovine coagulation Factor IX (Christmas Factor) with that of other vitamin K-dependent plasma proteins.

    PubMed

    Katayama, K; Ericsson, L H; Enfield, D L; Walsh, K A; Neurath, H; Davie, E W; Titani, K

    1979-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of bovine blood coagulation Factor IX (Christmas Factor) is presented and compared with the sequences of other vitamin K-dependent plasma proteins and pancreatic trypsinogen. The 416-residue sequence of Factor IX was determined largely by automated Edman degradation of two large segments, containing 181 and 235 residues, isolated after activating Factor IX with a protease from Russell's viper venom. Subfragments of the two segments were produced by enzymatic digestion and by chemical cleavage of methionyl, tryptophyl, and asparaginyl-glycyl bonds. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of Factor IX, Factor X, and Protein C demonstrates that they are homologous throughout. Their homology with prothrombin, however, is restricted to the amino-terminal region, which is rich in gamma-carboxyglutamic acid, and the carboxyl-terminal region, which represents the catalytic domain of these proteins and corresponds to that of pancreatic serine proteases.

  10. Characterisation of two AGATA asymmetric high purity germanium capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colosimo, S. J.; Moon, S.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Cresswell, J. R.; Harkness-Brennan, L.; Judson, D. S.; Lazarus, I. H.; Nolan, P. J.; Simpson, J.; Unsworth, C.

    2015-02-01

    The AGATA spectrometer is an array of highly segmented high purity germanium detectors. The spectrometer uses pulse shape analysis in order to track Compton scattered γ-rays to increase the efficiency of nuclear spectroscopy studies. The characterisation of two high purity germanium detector capsules for AGATA of the same A-type has been performed at the University of Liverpool. This work will examine the uniformity of performance of the two capsules, including a comparison of the resolution and efficiency as well as a study of charge collection. The performance of the capsules shows good agreement, which is essential for the efficient operation of the γ-ray tracking array.

  11. Electrochemical study of aluminum corrosion in boiling high purity water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draley, J. E.; Legault, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    Electrochemical study of aluminum corrosion in boiling high-purity water includes an equation relating current and electrochemical potential derived on the basis of a physical model of the corrosion process. The work involved an examination of the cathodic polarization behavior of 1100 aluminum during aqueous oxidation.

  12. Preparation of high purity copper fluoride by fluorinating copper hydroxyfluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Lundquist, J. R.

    1969-01-01

    Copper fluoride containing no more than 50 ppm of any contaminating element was prepared by the fluorination of copper hydroxyfluoride. The impurity content was obtained by spark source mass spectrometry. High purity copper fluoride is needed as a cathode material for high energy density batteries.

  13. Low cost routes to high purity silicon and derivatives thereof

    DOEpatents

    Laine, Richard M; Krug, David James; Marchal, Julien Claudius; Mccolm, Andrew Stewart

    2013-07-02

    The present invention is directed to a method for providing an agricultural waste product having amorphous silica, carbon, and impurities; extracting from the agricultural waste product an amount of the impurities; changing the ratio of carbon to silica; and reducing the silica to a high purity silicon (e.g., to photovoltaic silicon).

  14. Disruption of a C/EBP binding site in the factor IX promoter is associated with haemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Crossley, M; Brownlee, G G

    1990-05-31

    Haemophilia B (or Christmas disease) is an inherited, X-linked bleeding disorder caused by mutations in the gene for clotting factor IX. There is a rare class of patients, exemplified by haemophilia B Leyden, who suffer from haemophilia B as children but improve after puberty. In these patients, plasma factor IX concentrations are less than 10% of normal during childhood, but after puberty they gradually rise to between 40 and 80% of normal. Mutations clustered around the main transcription start point (defined as +1 (ref.2)) have been reported in seven of these patients (at -20 (refs 1, 3, 4); -6 (refs 5, 6) and +13 (refs 7, 8)). To determine how these mutations interfere with factor IX expression, we have assayed for transcription factors binding to this area and have identified a nuclear factor-1 liver (NF1-L) binding site (-99 to -76) and a binding site for the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) (+1 to +18). We show that the A----G mutation at +13 prevents the binding of C/EBP to this site. Furthermore, we show that C/EBP is capable of transactivating a cotransfected normal factor IX promoter but not the mutant promoter. This is the first natural mutation to be reported which disrupts a C/EBP binding site and is an illustration of the importance of this transcription factor in humans.

  15. Physiological levels of blood coagulation factors IX and X control coagulation kinetics in an in vitro model of circulating tissue factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tormoen, Garth W.; Khader, Ayesha; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2013-06-01

    Thrombosis significantly contributes to cancer morbidity and mortality. The mechanism behind thrombosis in cancer may be circulating tissue factor (TF), as levels of circulating TF are associated with thrombosis. However, circulating TF antigen level alone has failed to predict thrombosis in patients with cancer. We hypothesize that coagulation factor levels regulate the kinetics of circulating TF-induced thrombosis. Coagulation kinetics were measured as a function of individual coagulation factor levels and TF particle concentration. Clotting times increased when pooled plasma was mixed at or above a ratio of 4:6 with PBS. Clotting times increased when pooled plasma was mixed at or above a ratio of 8:2 with factor VII-depleted plasma, 7:3 with factor IX- or factor X-depleted plasmas, or 2:8 with factor II-, V- or VIII-depleted plasmas. Addition of coagulation factors VII, X, IX, V and II to depleted plasmas shortened clotting and enzyme initiation times, and increased enzyme generation rates in a concentration-dependent manner. Only additions of factors IX and X from low-normal to high-normal levels shortened clotting times and increased enzyme generation rates. Our results demonstrate that coagulation kinetics for TF particles are controlled by factor IX and X levels within the normal physiological range. We hypothesize that individual patient factor IX and X levels may be prognostic for susceptibility to circulating TF-induced thrombosis.

  16. Physiological levels of blood coagulation factors IX and X control coagulation kinetics in an in vitro model of circulating tissue factor

    PubMed Central

    Tormoen, Garth W.; Khader, Ayesha; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J.T.

    2013-01-01

    Thrombosis significantly contributes to cancer morbidity and mortality. The mechanism behind thrombosis in cancer may be circulating tissue factor (TF), as levels of circulating TF are associated with thrombosis. However, circulating TF antigen level alone has failed to predict thrombosis in patients with cancer. We hypothesize that coagulation factor levels regulate the kinetics of circulating TF-induced thrombosis. Coagulation kinetics were measured as a function of individual coagulation factor levels and TF particle concentration. Clotting times increased when pooled plasma was mixed at or above a ratio of 4:6 with PBS. Clotting times increased when pooled plasma was mixed at or above a ratio of 8:2 with factor VII-depleted plasma, 7:3 with factor IX- or factor X-depleted plasmas, or 2:8 with factor II-, V- or VIII-depleted plasmas. Addition of coagulation factors VII, X, IX, V and II to depleted plasmas shortened clotting and enzyme initiation times, and increased enzyme generation rates in a concentration-dependent manner. Only additions of factors IX and X from low-normal to high-normal levels shortened clotting times and increased enzyme generation rates. Our results demonstrate that coagulation kinetics for TF particles are controlled by factor IX and X levels within the normal physiological range. We hypothesize that individual patient factor IX and X levels may be prognostic for susceptibility to circulating TF-induced thrombosis. PMID:23585459

  17. Hydrogen concentration and distribution in high-purity germanium crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, W.L.; Haller, E.E.; Luke, P.N.

    1981-10-01

    High-purity germanium crystals used for making nuclear radiation detectors are usually grown in a hydrogen ambient from a melt contained in a high-purity silica crucible. The benefits and problems encountered in using a hydrogen ambient are reviewed. A hydrogen concentration of about 2 x 10/sup 15/cm/sup -3/ has been determined by growing crystals in hydrogen spiked with tritium and counting the tritium ..beta..-decays in detectors made from these crystals. Annealing studies show that the hydrogen is strongly bound, either to defects or as H/sub 2/ with a dissociation energy > 3 eV. This is lowered to 1.8 eV when copper is present. Etching defects in dislocation-free crystals grown in hydrogen have been found by etch stripping to have a density of about 1 x 10/sup 7/ cm/sup -3/ and are estimated to contain 10/sup 8/ H atoms each.

  18. Haemophilia B caused by a point mutation in a donor splice junction of the human factor IX gene.

    PubMed

    Rees, D J; Rizza, C R; Brownlee, G G

    Haemophilia B (Christmas disease) is an inherited, recessive, sex-linked, haemorrhagic condition caused by a defect in the intrinsic clotting factor IX. This disease occurs in males at a frequency of approximately 1 in 30,000. Patients differ in the severity of their clinical symptoms, and variation in the clotting activity and in the concentration of factor IX antigen in their plasma has been demonstrated. There is probably heterogeneity in the molecular defects of the factor IX gene causing the disease. Here we study a severely affected, antigen-negative patient, and show that the only significant sequence difference from the normal factor IX gene is a point mutation changing the obligatory GT to a TT within the donor splice junction of exon f. We infer that this change is the cause of the disease in this individual. In addition, we have used oligodeoxynucleotide probes specific for this mutation to demonstrate the feasibility of carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis for relatives of the patient.

  19. Inhibitors of propagation of coagulation (factors VIII, IX and XI): a review of current therapeutic practice

    PubMed Central

    Franchini, Massimo; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2011-01-01

    The management of patients with congenital haemophilia who develop alloantibodies against factors of the propagation phase of blood coagulation, commonly known as inhibitors, is the most important challenge facing haemophilia caregivers at present, as this complication not only compromises the efficacy of replacement therapy but also consumes an enormous amount of economic resources. Development of inhibitors further complicates the clinical course of severe haemophilia, with a prevalence of up to 30% in patients with haemophilia A (factor VIII deficiency) and up to 5% in those with haemophilia B (factor IX deficiency) and haemophilia C (factor XI deficiency). While the short-term goal of treatment of patients who develop alloantibodies is the control of bleeding, the eradication of the inhibitor is the main long-term goal. The management of severe bleeding episodes and the eradication of the autoantibody are also the mainstays of treatment of patients with acquired haemophilia, a rare but life-threatening haemorrhagic condition characterized by the development of inhibitory autoantibodies against coagulation factor VIII. The most recent options available for treating patients with congenital haemophilia complicated by inhibitors and acquired haemophilia because of autoantibodies against factor VIII are summarized in this review article. PMID:21204915

  20. High-Purity Silicon Seeds for Silane Pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.; Rohatgi, N. K.; Morrison, A.

    1985-01-01

    Seed particles for fluidized-bed production of silicon made by new contamination-free, economical method. In new method, large particles of semiconductor-grade silicon fired at each other by high-speed streams of gas and thereby break up into particles of suitable size for fluidized bed. No foreign materials introduced, and leaching unnecessary. Method used to feed fluidized-bed reactor for continuous production of high-purity silicon.

  1. Comparative pharmacokinetics of factor VIII and recombinant factor IX: for which coagulation factors should half-life change with age?

    PubMed

    Björkman, S

    2013-11-01

    The half-life of factor VIII (FVIII) increases with the age of the patient, while studies on recombinant factor IX (rFIX) and factor VIIa (rFVIIa) have not demonstrated corresponding age-related changes. The purpose of this analysis was to relate the changes in FVIII and rFIX pharmacokinetics (PK) with age to developmental changes in body size and fluid volumes and explain why the elimination half-life of FVIII, but not of rFIX, would change with age, and to consider how the findings could be applied prospectively to other coagulation factors. Published PK data for FVIII from 186 patients aged 1-74 years and for rFIX from 56 patients aged 4-56 years were used. The relationships of FVIII and rFIX clearance (CL) with body weight could be described by allometric expressions. Relative changes in CL with age or weight were similar for FVIII and rFIX. The age-related change in volume of distribution at steady state (V(ss)) of rFIX was parallel to the change in CL in the children while for FVIII the change was much less pronounced. Elimination half-life was clearly age-dependent for FVIII while only a very weak trend could be seen for rFIX. Limited data suggest that rFVIIa in this respect resembles rFIX, with parallel changes in CL and V(ss) producing insignificant change in half-life. To what extent the elimination half-life of a coagulation factor would show a correlation with age can in principle be predicted from the characteristics of its CL and distribution.

  2. Practical analysis of high-purity chemicals-I Preparation and characterization of high-purity EDTA.

    PubMed

    Barnard, A J; Joy, E F; Little, K; Brooks, J D

    1970-09-01

    Advanced laboratories have requirements for high-purity chemicals with less than 500 ppm total impurities (ultrapure chemicals) and with broad analytical definition of each lot. Some economically feasible approaches to the practical analysis of such chemicals, both inorganic and organic, are delineated. Compounds used in the study of lunar samples and in other advanced programmes are noted. EDTA, as the free add, has been prepared by dissolution in water with base and precipitation by addition of add. The product has been broadly characterized. Precision assay is achieved by weight titrimetry, potentiometrically as a triprotic add and photometrically as a chelatmg agent. Other tests applied include elemental analysis, ash, loss on drying, particulatc matter, and tests for nitrilotriacetate, arsenic, and chloride. Boron, silicon, and trace metals are determined by emission spectrography. Many of the procedures are applicable to other high-purity organic chemicals.

  3. Recombinant Factor IX Fc Fusion Protein Maintains Full Procoagulant Properties and Exhibits Prolonged Efficacy in Hemophilia B Mice

    PubMed Central

    Toby, Garabet G.; Liu, Tongyao; Buyue, Yang; Zhang, Xin; Bitonti, Alan J.; Pierce, Glenn F.; Sommer, Jurg M.; Jiang, Haiyan; Peters, Robert T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hemophilia B is an inherited X chromosome–linked disorder characterized by impaired blood clotting owing to the absence of functional coagulation factor IX. Due to the relatively short half-life of factor IX, patients with hemophilia B require frequent factor IX infusions to maintain prophylaxis. We have developed a recombinant factor IX (rFIX) fused to the Fc region of IgG (rFIXFc) with an extended half-life in animals and humans. Materials and Methods Procoagulant properties of rFIXFc and rFIX (BENEFIX®) were compared to determine the effect of the Fc region on rFIXFc hemostatic function. Specifically, we assessed rFIXFc activation, intermolecular interactions within the Xase complex, inactivation by antithrombin III (AT) and thrombin generation potential compared with rFIX. We also assessed the acute and prophylactic efficacy profiles of rFIXFc and rFIX in vivo in hemophilia B mouse bleeding models. Results and Conclusions The activation by factor XIa or factor VIIa/tissue factor, inhibition by AT, interaction profiles with phospholipids, affinities for factor VIIIa within the context of the Xase complex, and thrombin generation profiles were similar for rFIXFc and rFIX. Xase complexes formed with either molecule exhibited similar kinetic profiles for factor Xa generation. In acute efficacy models, mice infused with rFIXFc or rFIX were equally protected from bleeding. However, in prophylactic efficacy models, protection from bleeding was maintained approximately three times longer in rFIXFc-dosed mice than in those given rFIX; this prolonged efficacy correlates with the previously observed half-life extension. We conclude that rFIXFc retains critical FIX procoagulant attributes and that the extension in rFIXFc half-life translates into prolonged efficacy in hemophilia B mice. PMID:26840952

  4. Improving the efficiency of high purity water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bukay, M.; Youngberg, D.

    1994-05-01

    High purity water (HPW) production involves the consumption of substantial amounts of energy, precious potable water, harsh/hazardous chemicals, and other environmental/impact materials. The discharge of some of the waste products from HPW systems is also a concern. The purpose of this paper is to discuss techniques to improve the efficiency of HPW production and thereby reduce any negative effects on the environment. It provides specific examples of how end-users and equipment suppliers are increasing the efficiency of their pretreatment, reverse osmosis, ion-exchange, and sanitization technology while frequently citing capital and operating cost reductions.

  5. Neutron energy determination with a high-purity germanium detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Gene A.

    1992-01-01

    Two areas that are related to planetary gamma-ray spectrometry are investigated. The first task was the investigation of gamma rays produced by high-energy charged particles and their secondaries in planetary surfaces by means of thick target bombardments. The second task was the investigation of the effects of high-energy neutrons on gamma-ray spectral features obtained with high-purity Ge-detectors. For both tasks, as a function of the funding level, the experimental work was predominantly tied to that of other researchers, whenever there was an opportunity to participate in bombardment experiments at large or small accelerators for charged particles.

  6. A novel method to synthesize high purity, nanostructured copper

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, A M; Wang, Y M; Barbee, T W

    2005-08-30

    Nanostructured high purity (99.999%) copper foils, 10 cm in diameter and 22-25 microns thick were produced using nanoscale multilayer technology. The foils were produced using five different layer thicknesses ranging from 1.25 to 43.6 nm (18,000 to 520 layers). This process delivers the ability to produce multiple large-scale samples during a single deposition run with very small residual stresses. Tensile and indentation tests demonstrate that the material produced is a high strength copper ({sigma}{sub y} {approx} 540-690 MPa).

  7. Factor IXMadrid 2: a deletion/insertion in factor IX gene which abolishes the sequence of the donor junction at the exon IV-intron d splice site.

    PubMed

    Solera, J; Magallón, M; Martin-Villar, J; Coloma, A

    1992-02-01

    DNA from a patient with severe hemophilia B was evaluated by RFLP analysis, producing results which suggested the existence of a partial deletion within the factor IX gene. The deletion was further localized and characterized by PCR amplification and sequencing. The altered allele has a 4,442-bp deletion which removes both the donor splice site located at the 5' end of intron d and the two last coding nucleotides located at the 3' end of exon IV in the normal factor IX gene; this fragment has been replaced by a 47-bp sequence from the normal factor IX gene, although this fragment has been inserted in inverted orientation. Two homologous sequences have been discovered at the ends of the deleted DNA fragment.

  8. Factor IXMadrid 2: a deletion/insertion in factor IX gene which abolishes the sequence of the donor junction at the exon IV-intron d splice site.

    PubMed Central

    Solera, J; Magallón, M; Martin-Villar, J; Coloma, A

    1992-01-01

    DNA from a patient with severe hemophilia B was evaluated by RFLP analysis, producing results which suggested the existence of a partial deletion within the factor IX gene. The deletion was further localized and characterized by PCR amplification and sequencing. The altered allele has a 4,442-bp deletion which removes both the donor splice site located at the 5' end of intron d and the two last coding nucleotides located at the 3' end of exon IV in the normal factor IX gene; this fragment has been replaced by a 47-bp sequence from the normal factor IX gene, although this fragment has been inserted in inverted orientation. Two homologous sequences have been discovered at the ends of the deleted DNA fragment. Images Figure 1 PMID:1346483

  9. Development of high purity large forgings for nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yasuhiko; Sato, Ikuo

    2011-10-01

    The recent increase in the size of energy plants has been supported by the development of manufacturing technology for high purity large forgings for the key components of the plant. To assure the reliability and performance of the large forgings, refining technology to make high purity steels, casting technology for gigantic ingots, forging technology to homogenize the material and consolidate porosity are essential, together with the required heat treatment and machining technologies. To meet these needs, the double degassing method to reduce impurities, multi-pouring methods to cast the gigantic ingots, vacuum carbon deoxidization, the warm forging process and related technologies have been developed and further improved. Furthermore, melting facilities including vacuum induction melting and electro slag re-melting furnaces have been installed. By using these technologies and equipment, large forgings have been manufactured and shipped to customers. These technologies have also been applied to the manufacture of austenitic steel vessel components of the fast breeder reactors and components for fusion experiments.

  10. Molecular Basis and Therapeutic Strategies to Rescue Factor IX Variants That Affect Splicing and Protein Function.

    PubMed

    Tajnik, Mojca; Rogalska, Malgorzata Ewa; Bussani, Erica; Barbon, Elena; Balestra, Dario; Pinotti, Mirko; Pagani, Franco

    2016-05-01

    Mutations that result in amino acid changes can affect both pre-mRNA splicing and protein function. Understanding the combined effect is essential for correct diagnosis and for establishing the most appropriate therapeutic strategy at the molecular level. We have identified a series of disease-causing splicing mutations in coagulation factor IX (FIX) exon 5 that are completely recovered by a modified U1snRNP particle, through an SRSF2-dependent enhancement mechanism. We discovered that synonymous mutations and missense substitutions associated to a partial FIX secretion defect represent targets for this therapy as the resulting spliced-corrected proteins maintains normal FIX coagulant specific activity. Thus, splicing and protein alterations contribute to define at the molecular level the disease-causing effect of a number of exonic mutations in coagulation FIX exon 5. In addition, our results have a significant impact in the development of splicing-switching therapies in particular for mutations that affect both splicing and protein function where increasing the amount of a correctly spliced protein can circumvent the basic functional defects. PMID:27227676

  11. Molecular Basis and Therapeutic Strategies to Rescue Factor IX Variants That Affect Splicing and Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Bussani, Erica; Barbon, Elena; Pinotti, Mirko; Pagani, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Mutations that result in amino acid changes can affect both pre-mRNA splicing and protein function. Understanding the combined effect is essential for correct diagnosis and for establishing the most appropriate therapeutic strategy at the molecular level. We have identified a series of disease-causing splicing mutations in coagulation factor IX (FIX) exon 5 that are completely recovered by a modified U1snRNP particle, through an SRSF2-dependent enhancement mechanism. We discovered that synonymous mutations and missense substitutions associated to a partial FIX secretion defect represent targets for this therapy as the resulting spliced-corrected proteins maintains normal FIX coagulant specific activity. Thus, splicing and protein alterations contribute to define at the molecular level the disease-causing effect of a number of exonic mutations in coagulation FIX exon 5. In addition, our results have a significant impact in the development of splicing-switching therapies in particular for mutations that affect both splicing and protein function where increasing the amount of a correctly spliced protein can circumvent the basic functional defects. PMID:27227676

  12. A simple technique to reduce epistaxis and nasopharyngeal trauma during nasotracheal intubation in a child with factor IX deficiency having dental restoration.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Anita V; Sanders, John C

    2004-10-01

    Epistaxis and airway trauma are often associated with nasotracheal intubation. We describe a patient with Factor IX deficiency who required nasotracheal intubation. An inexpensive, nonproprietary, rapid technique was used to reduce the trauma of intubation.

  13. Precipitation of hydrides in high purity niobium after different treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Barkov, F.; Romanenko, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Grassellino, A.

    2013-01-01

    Precipitation of lossy non-superconducting niobium hydrides represents a known problem for high purity niobium in superconducting applications. Using cryogenic optical and laser confocal scanning microscopy we have directly observed surface precipitation and evolution of niobium hydrides in samples after different treatments used for superconducting RF cavities for particle acceleration. Precipitation is shown to occur throughout the sample volume, and the growth of hydrides is well described by the fast diffusion-controlled process in which almost all hydrogen is precipitated at $T=140$~K within $\\sim30$~min. 120$^{\\circ}$C baking and mechanical deformation are found to affect hydride precipitation through their influence on the number of nucleation and trapping centers.

  14. Ultrasound-targeted hepatic delivery of factor IX in hemophiliac mice.

    PubMed

    Anderson, C D; Moisyadi, S; Avelar, A; Walton, C B; Shohet, R V

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) was used to direct the delivery of plasmid and transposase-based vectors encoding human factor IX (hFIX) to the livers of hemophilia B (FIX-/-) mice. The DNA vectors were incorporated into cationic lipid microbubbles, injected intravenously, and transfected into hepatocytes by acoustic cavitation of the bubbles as they transited the liver. Ultrasound parameters were identified that produced transfection of hepatocytes in vivo without substantial damage or bleeding in the livers of the FIX-deficient mice. These mice were treated with a conventional expression plasmid, or one containing a piggyBac transposon construct, and hFIX levels in the plasma and liver were evaluated at multiple time points after UTMD. We detected hFIX in the plasma by western blotting from mice treated with either plasmid during the 12 days after UTMD, and in the hepatocytes of treated livers by immunofluorescence. Reductions in clotting time and improvements in the percentage of FIX activity were observed for both plasmids, conventional (4.15±1.98%), and transposon based (2.70±.75%), 4 to 5 days after UTMD compared with untreated FIX (-/-) control mice (0.92±0.78%) (P=0.001 and P=0.012, respectively). Reduced clotting times persisted for both plasmids 12 days after treatment (reflecting percentage FIX activity of 3.12±1.56%, P=0.02 and 3.08±0.10%, P=0.001, respectively). Clotting times from an additional set of mice treated with pmGENIE3-hFIX were evaluated for long-term effects and demonstrated a persistent reduction in average clotting time 160 days after a single treatment. These data suggest that UTMD could be a minimally invasive, nonviral approach to enhance hepatic FIX expression in patients with hemophilia.

  15. Accumulation of functional recombinant human coagulation factor IX in transgenic soybean seeds.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Nicolau B; Murad, André M; Ramos, Gustavo L; Maranhão, Andréia Q; Brígido, Marcelo M; Araújo, Ana Cláudia G; Lacorte, Cristiano; Aragão, Francisco J L; Covas, Dimas T; Fontes, Aparecida M; Souza, Gustavo H M F; Vianna, Giovanni R; Rech, Elíbio L

    2011-08-01

    The seed-based production of recombinant proteins is an efficient strategy to achieve the accumulation, correct folding, and increased stability of these recombinant proteins. Among potential plant molecular farming systems, soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] is a viable option for the production of recombinant proteins due to its high protein content, known regulatory sequences, efficient gene transfer protocols, and a scalable production system under greenhouse conditions. We report here the expression and stable accumulation of human coagulation factor IX (hFIX) in transgenic soybean seeds. A biolistic process was utilised to co-introduce a plasmid carrying the hFIX gene under the transcriptional control of the α' subunit of a β-conglycinin seed-specific promoter and an α-Coixin signal peptide in soybean embryonic axes from mature seeds. The 56-kDa hFIX protein was expressed in the transgenic seeds at levels of up to 0.23% (0.8 g kg(-1) seed) of the total soluble seed protein as determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blot. Ultrastructural immunocytochemistry assays indicated that the recombinant hFIX in seed cotyledonary cells was efficiently directed to protein storage vacuoles. Mass spectrometry characterisation confirmed the presence of the hFIX recombinant protein sequence. Protein extracts from transgenic seeds showed a blood-clotting activity of up to 1.4% of normal plasma. Our results demonstrate the correct processing and stable accumulation of functional hFIX in soybean seeds stored for 6 years under room temperature conditions (22 ± 2°C).

  16. In silico designing of hyper-glycosylated analogs for the human coagulation factor IX.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Fahimeh; Zomorodipour, Alireza; Karkhane, Ali Asghar; Khorramizadeh, M Reza

    2016-07-01

    N-glycosylation is a process during which a glycan moiety attaches to the asparagine residue in the N-glycosylation consensus sequence (Asn-Xxx-Ser/Thr), where Xxx can be any amino acid except proline. Introduction of a new N-glycosylation site into a protein backbone leads to its hyper-glycosylation, and may improve the protein properties such as solubility, folding, stability, and secretion. Glyco-engineering is an approach to facilitate the hyper-glycosylation of recombinant proteins by application of the site-directed mutagenesis methods. In this regard, selection of a suitable location on the surface of a protein for introduction of a new N-glycosylation site is a main concern. In this work, a computational approach was conducted to select suitable location(s) for introducing new N-glycosylation sites into the human coagulation factor IX (hFIX). With this aim, the first 45 residues of mature hFIX were explored to find out suitable positions for introducing either Asn or Ser/Thr residues, to create new N-glycosylation site(s). Our exploration lead to detection of five potential positions, for hyper-glycosylation. For each suggested position, an analog was defined and subjected for N-glycosylation efficiency prediction. After generation of three-dimensional structures, by homology-based modeling, the five designed analogs were examined by molecular dynamic (MD) simulations, to predict their stability levels and probable structural distortions caused by amino acid substitutions, relative to the native counterpart. Three out of five suggested analogs, namely; E15T, K22N, and R37N, reached equilibration state with relatively constant Root Mean Square Deviation values. Additional analysis on the data obtained during MD simulations, lead us to conclude that, R37N is the only qualified analog with the most similar structure and dynamic behavior to that of the native counterpart, to be considered for further experimental investigations. PMID:27356208

  17. Pilot production of recombinant human clotting factor IX from transgenic sow milk.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-ling; Chang, Yuo-sheng; Lin, Yin-shen; Yen, Chon-ho

    2012-06-01

    Valuable pharmaceutical proteins produced from the mammary glands of transgenic livestock have potential use in the biomedical industry. In this study, recombinant human clotting factor IX (rhFIX) produced from transgenic sow milk for preclinical animal studies have been established. The transgenic sow milk was skimmed and treated with sodium phosphate buffer to remove abundant casein protein. Then, the γ-carboxylated rhFIX fraction was segregated through the Q Sepharose chromatography from uncarboxylated one. For safety issue, the process included virus inactivation by solvent/detergent (S/D) treatment. Subsequently, the S/D treated sample was loaded into the Heparin Sepharose column to recover the rhFIX fraction, which was then reapplied to the Heparin Sepharose column to enhance rhFIX purity and lower the ratio of activated form rhFIX (rhFIXa) easily. This was possible due to the higher affinity of the Heparin affinity sorbent for rhFIXa than for the rhFIX zymogen. Furthermore, an IgA removal column was used to eliminate porcine IgA in purified rhFIX. Finally, nanofiltration was performed for viral clearance. Consequently, a high-quality rhFIX product was produced (approximately 700 mg per batch). Other values for final rhFIX preparation were as follows: purity, >99%; average specific activity, 415.6±57.7 IU/mL and total milk impurity, <0.5 ng/mg. This is the first report that described the whole process and stable production of bioactive rhFIX from transgenic sow milk. The overall manufacturing process presented here has the potential for industrial production of rhFIX for treatment of hemophilia B patients.

  18. Automation of the Characterization of High Purity Germanium Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugger, Charles ``Chip''

    2014-09-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is a rare hypothesized process that may yield valuable insight into the fundamental properties of the neutrino. Currently there are several experiments trying to observe this process, including the Majorana DEMONSTRAOR experiment, which uses high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to generate and search for these events. Because the event happens internally, it is essential to have the lowest background possible. This is done through passive detector shielding, as well as event discrimination techniques that distinguish between multi-site events characteristic of gamma-radiation, and single-site events characteristic of neutrinoless double beta decay. Before fielding such an experiment, the radiation response of the detectors must be characterized. A robotic arm is being tested for future calibration of HPGe detectors. The arm will hold a source at locations relative to the crystal while data is acquired. Several radioactive sources of varying energy levels will be used to determine the characteristics of the crystal. In this poster, I will present our work with the robot, as well as the characterization of data we took with an underground HPGe detector at the WIPP facility in Carlsbad, NM (2013). Neutrinoless double beta decay is a rare hypothesized process that may yield valuable insight into the fundamental properties of the neutrino. Currently there are several experiments trying to observe this process, including the Majorana DEMONSTRAOR experiment, which uses high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to generate and search for these events. Because the event happens internally, it is essential to have the lowest background possible. This is done through passive detector shielding, as well as event discrimination techniques that distinguish between multi-site events characteristic of gamma-radiation, and single-site events characteristic of neutrinoless double beta decay. Before fielding such an experiment, the radiation response of

  19. Modified matrix volatilization setup for characterization of high purity germanium.

    PubMed

    Meruva, Adisesha Reddy; Raparthi, Shekhar; Kumar, Sunil Jai

    2016-01-01

    Modified matrix volatilization (MV) method has been described to characterize high purity germanium material of 7 N (99.99999%) purity. Transport of both, the chlorine gas generated in-situ in this method and the argon gas (carrier) is fine controlled by means of a mass flow controller. This enabled both uniform reaction of chlorine gas with the germanium matrix and smooth removal of germanium matrix as its chloride. This resulted in improvement in the reproducibility of the analytical results. The use of quartz reaction vessel has lead to the reduction in the process blank levels. The combined effect of these modifications in the MV setup has resulted in very consistent and low process blanks and hence improved detection limits of this method. Applicability of the method has been expanded to rare earth elements and other elements after examining their recoveries. The quantification is done by using inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometer (ICP-QMS) and continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (CS-GFAAS). In the absence of certified reference materials for high pure germanium, the accuracy of the method is established by spike recovery tests. The precision of the method has been found to vary from 1 to 30% for concentrations between 1 and 30 ng g(-1). The limits of detection (LOD) for the target analytes are found to be between 18 and 0.033 ng g(-1). PMID:26695261

  20. High Purity Zirconium Tetrafluoride For Fluoride Glass Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withers, Howard P.; Monk, V. A.; Cooper, G. A.

    1989-06-01

    A totally anhydrous process has been developed for the preparation of high purity zirconium tetrafluoride for use in low loss fluoride glass applications. The ZrF4 purityis 99.99997% with respect to all transition elements (excluding HO based on analysis by spark source mass spectrometry (SSMS) and graphite furnace/atomic absorption spectroscopy (GF/AA). The only transition elements detected by these techniques were Fe, Ni and Cr, while Co and Cu were consistently below the detection limits. The anhydrous nature of the process, which is strictly maintained by the choice of reactants, affords product with very low oxide and hydroxide content. Total oxygen concentrations of less than 10 ppm have been measured by the inert gas fusion technique. A ZBLAN glass composition prepared using this ZrF4 showed extremely low UV absorption having an absorption constant of 1 cm-1 at 198 nm. ZrF4 from this process was also used in a ZBLAN glass fiber whose minimum optical loss was measured at 6.3 dB/km over 150 meters of fiber. The process is straightforward to scale up and has also been demonstrated to be useful for the preparation of HfF4, BaF2, A1F3 and LaF3.

  1. Photothermal ionization spectroscopy of donors in high-purity germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Darken, L.S.

    1989-02-01

    The results of narrow linewidth (0.10 cm/sup -1/ FWHM) photothermal ionization spectroscopy (PTIS) investigations of shallow donors in high-purity germanium are reported. The donors observed include phosphorus, arsenic, lithium, a hydrogen-oxygen complex, and three lithium-related complexes. One lithium-related complex designated D(Li,Y) is reported here for the first time. Within experimental accuracy, energies of the excited states with respect to the conduction band are the same for all donors. Fourteen different 1S..-->..excited state transitions (five previously unreported, two others seen for the first time in PTIS from the ground state) have been observed. The Zeeman effect was used to help identify these levels. PTIS lines from the ground state to 2P/sub 0/ and 3P/sub 0/ were found to be relatively weak but their intensity was in good agreement with the intensity calculated by means of the Cascade theory. In as-grown samples, linewidth broadening of group V donors was observed that depended on the square root of the dislocation density (etch pit density) and with features expected from deformation potential theory.

  2. Modified matrix volatilization setup for characterization of high purity germanium.

    PubMed

    Meruva, Adisesha Reddy; Raparthi, Shekhar; Kumar, Sunil Jai

    2016-01-01

    Modified matrix volatilization (MV) method has been described to characterize high purity germanium material of 7 N (99.99999%) purity. Transport of both, the chlorine gas generated in-situ in this method and the argon gas (carrier) is fine controlled by means of a mass flow controller. This enabled both uniform reaction of chlorine gas with the germanium matrix and smooth removal of germanium matrix as its chloride. This resulted in improvement in the reproducibility of the analytical results. The use of quartz reaction vessel has lead to the reduction in the process blank levels. The combined effect of these modifications in the MV setup has resulted in very consistent and low process blanks and hence improved detection limits of this method. Applicability of the method has been expanded to rare earth elements and other elements after examining their recoveries. The quantification is done by using inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometer (ICP-QMS) and continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (CS-GFAAS). In the absence of certified reference materials for high pure germanium, the accuracy of the method is established by spike recovery tests. The precision of the method has been found to vary from 1 to 30% for concentrations between 1 and 30 ng g(-1). The limits of detection (LOD) for the target analytes are found to be between 18 and 0.033 ng g(-1).

  3. Permeation of oxygen through high purity, large grain silver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Outlaw, R. A.; Peregoy, W. K.; Hoflund, Gar B.

    1987-01-01

    The permeation of high purity, large grain Ag membranes by oxygen has been studied over the temperature range 400 to 800 C. The permeability was found to be quite linear and repeatable, but the magnitude was 3.2 times smaller than that determined by past research. Since previous investigators studied substantially less pure Ag and conducted experiments within much poorer vacuum environments (which indicates that their grain boundary density was much greater), the data presented here suggest oxygen transport through the membrane is primarily by grain boundary diffusion. The diffusivity measurements were found to exhibit two distinct linear regions, one above and one below a critical temperature of 630 C. The high-temperature data have an activation energy (11.1 kcal/mole) similar to that reported by others, but the low-temperature data have a higher activation energy (15.3 kcal/mole), which can be explained by impurity trapping in the grain boundaries. Vacuum desorption of the oxygen-saturated Ag was found to occur at a threshold of 630 C, which is consistent with the onset of increased mobility within the grain boundaries.

  4. Spectroscopic Determination of Trace Contaminants in High Purity Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornung, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen used for extravehicular activities (EVA) must be free of contaminants because a difference in a few tenths of a percent of argon or nitrogen content can mean significant reduction in available EVA time. These inert gases build up in the extravehicular mobility unit because they are not metabolized or scrubbed from the atmosphere. Measurement of oxygen purity above 99.5% is problematic, and currently only complex instruments such as gas chromatographs or mass spectrometers are used for these determinations. Because liquid oxygen boil-off from the space shuttle will no longer be available to supply oxygen for EVA use, other concepts are being developed to produce and validate high purity oxygen from cabin air aboard the International Space Station. A prototype optical emission technique capable of detecting argon and nitrogen below 0.1% in oxygen was developed at White Sands Test Facility. This instrument uses a glow discharge in reduced pressure gas to produce atomic emission from the species present. Because the atomic emission lines from oxygen, nitrogen, and argon are discrete and in many cases well-separated, trace amounts of argon and nitrogen can be detected in the ultraviolet and visible spectrum. This is a straightforward, direct measurement of the target contaminants and may lend itself to a device capable of on-orbit verification of oxygen purity. System design and optimized measurement parameters are presented.

  5. Characterization of IXINITY® (Trenonacog Alfa), a Recombinant Factor IX with Primary Sequence Corresponding to the Threonine-148 Polymorph

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Dougald M.; Jenny, Richard J.; Van Cott, Kevin E.; Saward, Laura L.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of these studies was to extensively characterize the first recombinant FIX therapeutic corresponding to the threonine-148 (Thr-148) polymorph, IXINITY (trenonacog alfa [coagulation factor IX (recombinant)]). Gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism, and gel filtration were used to determine purity and confirm structure. Chromatographic and mass spectrometry techniques were used to identify and quantify posttranslational modifications. Activity was assessed as the ability to activate factor X (FX) both with and without factor VIIIa (FVIIIa) and in a standard clotting assay. All results were consistent across multiple lots. Trenonacog alfa migrated as a single band on Coomassie-stained gels; activity assays were normal and showed <0.002 IU of activated factor IX (FIXa) per IU of FIX. The molecule has >97%  γ-carboxylation and underwent the appropriate structural change upon binding calcium ions. Trenonacog alfa was activated normally with factor XIa (FXIa); once activated it bound to FVIIIa and FXa. When activated to FIXa, it was inhibited efficiently by antithrombin. Glycosylation patterns were similar to plasma-derived FIX with sialic acid content consistent with the literature reports of good pharmacokinetic performance. These studies have shown that trenonacog alfa is a highly pure product with a primary sequence and posttranslational modifications consistent with the common Thr-148 polymorphism of plasma-derived FIX. PMID:26997955

  6. Ca(2+) -induced binding of anticoagulation factor II from the venom of Agkistrodon acutus with factor IX.

    PubMed

    Shen, Deng-Ke; Xu, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Yan; Song, Jia-Jia; Yan, Xin-Cheng; Guo, Ming-Chun

    2012-10-01

    Anticoagulation factor II (ACF II), a coagulation factor X- binding protein from the venom of Agkistrodon acutus has both anticoagulant and hypotensive activities. Previous studies show that ACF II binds specifically with activated factor X (FXa) in a Ca(2+) -dependent manner and inhibits intrinsic coagulation pathway. In this study, the inhibition of extrinsic coagulation pathway by ACF II was measured in vivo by prothrombin time assay and the binding of ACF II to factor IX (FIX) was investigated by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The results indicate that ACF II also inhibits extrinsic coagulation pathway, but does not inhibit thrombin activity. ACF II also binds with FIX with high binding affinity in a Ca(2+) -dependent manner and their maximal binding occurs at about 0.1 mM Ca(2+) . ACF II has similar binding affinity to FIX and FX as determined by SPR. Ca(2+) has a slight effect on the secondary structure of FIX as determined by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Ca(2+) ions are required to maintain in vivo function of FIX Gla domain for its recognition of ACF II. However, Ca(2+) at high concentrations (>0.1 mM) inhibits the binding of ACF II to FIX. Ca(2+) functions as a switch for the binding between ACF II and FIX. ACF II extends activated partial thromboplastin time more strongly than prothrombin time, suggesting that the binding of ACF II with FIX may play a dominant role in the anticoagulation of ACF II in vivo. PMID:22806501

  7. High-purity Cu nanocrystal synthesis by a dynamic decomposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Xian; Cao, Yu; Chen, Guozhang; Wang, Chao; Tang, Hui; Yin, Liangjun; Luan, Chunhong; Liang, Yinglin; Jiang, Jing; Wu, Sixin; Zeng, Qing; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Chengui

    2014-12-01

    Cu nanocrystals are applied extensively in several fields, particularly in the microelectron, sensor, and catalysis. The catalytic behavior of Cu nanocrystals depends mainly on the structure and particle size. In this work, formation of high-purity Cu nanocrystals is studied using a common chemical vapor deposition precursor of cupric tartrate. This process is investigated through a combined experimental and computational approach. The decomposition kinetics is researched via differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis using Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, Kissinger, and Starink methods. The growth was found to be influenced by the factors of reaction temperature, protective gas, and time. And microstructural and thermal characterizations were performed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. Decomposition of cupric tartrate at different temperatures was simulated by density functional theory calculations under the generalized gradient approximation. High crystalline Cu nanocrystals without floccules were obtained from thermal decomposition of cupric tartrate at 271°C for 8 h under Ar. This general approach paves a way to controllable synthesis of Cu nanocrystals with high purity.

  8. Analysis of potential functional regions using local degeneracy: mutational hotspots in human factor IX are localized in high-degeneracy regions.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Chen, R; Xiao, Z X

    1994-11-15

    To study the relationship between the potential functional regions with the primary amino acid sequence, we introduced a new factor termed local degeneracy to analyze the degree of the degeneracy in a given segment of the protein. Using the defined local degeneracy, we have analyzed the human coagulation Factor IX (Christmas factor) which is an essential component of the clotting cascade. The mutational hotspots in Factor IX are primarily distributed in the high-degeneracy regions, suggesting a direct correlation of the functional regions with high degree of the degeneracy. This method may be useful to predict and to evaluate potential functional domains of a protein.

  9. Expression of human factor IX in rabbit hepatocytes by retrovirus-mediated gene transfer: Potential for gene therapy of hemophilia B

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.R. Puget Sound Blood Center, Seattle, WA ); Darlington, G. ); Armentano, D.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1990-08-01

    Hemophilia B (Christmas disease) is a chromosome X-linked blood clotting disorder which results when factor IX is deficient or functionally defective. The enzyme is synthesized in the liver, and the existence of animal models for this genetic disease will permit the development of somatic gene therapy protocols aimed at transfer of the functional gene into the liver. The authors report the construction of an N2-based recombinant retroviral vector, NCMVFIX, for efficient transfer and expression of human factor IX cDNA in primary rabbit hepatocytes. In this construct the human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter directs the expression of factor IX. Hepatocytes were isolated from 3-week-old New Zealand White rabbits, infected with the recombinant virus, and analyzed for secretion of active factor IX. The infected rabbit hepatocytes produced human factor IX that is indistinguishable from enzyme derived from normal human plasma. The recombinant protein is sufficiently {gamma}-carboxylated and is functionally active in clotting assays. These results establish the feasibility of using infected hepatocytes for the expression of this protein and are a step toward the goal of correcting hemophilia B by hepatic gene transfer.

  10. Expression of human factor IX in rabbit hepatocytes by retrovirus-mediated gene transfer: potential for gene therapy of hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Armentano, D; Thompson, A R; Darlington, G; Woo, S L

    1990-08-01

    Hemophilia B (Christmas disease) is a chromosome X-linked blood clotting disorder which results when factor IX is deficient or functionally defective. The enzyme is synthesized in the liver, and the existence of animal models for this genetic disease will permit the development of somatic gene therapy protocols aimed at transfer of the functional gene into the liver. We report the construction of an N2-based recombinant retroviral vector, NCMVFIX, for efficient transfer and expression of human factor IX cDNA in primary rabbit hepatocytes. In this construct the human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter directs the expression of factor IX. Hepatocytes were isolated from 3-week-old New Zealand White rabbits, infected with the recombinant virus, and analyzed for secretion of active factor IX. The infected rabbit hepatocytes produced human factor IX that is indistinguishable from enzyme derived from normal human plasma. The recombinant protein is sufficiently gamma-carboxylated and is functionally active in clotting assays. These results establish the feasibility of using infected hepatocytes for the expression of this protein and are a step toward the goal of correcting hemophilia B by hepatic gene transfer.

  11. Breeding of transgenic cattle for human coagulation factor IX by a combination of lentiviral system and cloning.

    PubMed

    Monzani, P S; Sangalli, J R; De Bem, T H C; Bressan, F F; Fantinato-Neto, P; Pimentel, J R V; Birgel-Junior, E H; Fontes, A M; Covas, D T; Meirelles, F V

    2013-02-28

    Recombinant coagulation factor IX must be produced in mammalian cells because FIX synthesis involves translational modifications. Human cell culture-based expression of human coagulation factor IX (hFIX) is expensive, and large-scale production capacity is limited. Transgenic animals may greatly increase the yield of therapeutic proteins and reduce costs. In this study, we used a lentiviral system to obtain transgenic cells and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to produce transgenic animals. Lentiviral vectors carrying hFIX driven by 3 bovine β-casein promoters were constructed. Bovine epithelial mammary cells were transduced by lentivirus, selected with blasticidin, plated on extracellular matrix, and induced by lactogenic hormones; promoter activity was evaluated by quantitative PCR. Transcriptional activity of the 5.335-kb promoter was 6-fold higher than the 3.392- and 4.279-kb promoters, which did not significantly differ. Transgenic bovine fibroblasts were transduced with lentivirus carrying the 5.335-kb promoter and used as donor cells for SCNT. Cloned transgenic embryo production yielded development rates of 28.4%, similar to previous reports on cloned non-transgenic embryos. The embryos were transferred to recipient cows (N = 21) and 2 births of cloned transgenic cattle were obtained. These results suggest combination of the lentiviral system and cloning may be a good strategy for production of transgenic cattle.

  12. The Hydrometallurgical Extraction and Recovery of High-Purity Silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, James E.

    2012-06-01

    -bearing inputs, will be described in detail to demonstrate how typical chemical engineering unit process and unit operations have supplanted classic smelting and fire refining techniques. The Kennecott Copper Company, which has operated a hydrometallurgical circuit successfully for the recovery of high-purity silver from the slimes wet chlorination residue, has permitted me to provide some operation information and results using the technology. Both Phelps Dodge and Kennecott should be recognized for their forward-looking attitude in undertaking the conversion of conceptual chemistry into successful, full-scale plants. The process as employed at Phelps Dodge is discussed at length in reference (J.E. Hoffmann and B. Wesstrom: Hydrometallurgy, 1994, vol. 94, pp. 69-105).

  13. A light hydrocarbon fuel processor producing high-purity hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löffler, Daniel G.; Taylor, Kyle; Mason, Dylan

    This paper discusses the design process and presents performance data for a dual fuel (natural gas and LPG) fuel processor for PEM fuel cells delivering between 2 and 8 kW electric power in stationary applications. The fuel processor resulted from a series of design compromises made to address different design constraints. First, the product quality was selected; then, the unit operations needed to achieve that product quality were chosen from the pool of available technologies. Next, the specific equipment needed for each unit operation was selected. Finally, the unit operations were thermally integrated to achieve high thermal efficiency. Early in the design process, it was decided that the fuel processor would deliver high-purity hydrogen. Hydrogen can be separated from other gases by pressure-driven processes based on either selective adsorption or permeation. The pressure requirement made steam reforming (SR) the preferred reforming technology because it does not require compression of combustion air; therefore, steam reforming is more efficient in a high-pressure fuel processor than alternative technologies like autothermal reforming (ATR) or partial oxidation (POX), where the combustion occurs at the pressure of the process stream. A low-temperature pre-reformer reactor is needed upstream of a steam reformer to suppress coke formation; yet, low temperatures facilitate the formation of metal sulfides that deactivate the catalyst. For this reason, a desulfurization unit is needed upstream of the pre-reformer. Hydrogen separation was implemented using a palladium alloy membrane. Packed beds were chosen for the pre-reformer and reformer reactors primarily because of their low cost, relatively simple operation and low maintenance. Commercial, off-the-shelf balance of plant (BOP) components (pumps, valves, and heat exchangers) were used to integrate the unit operations. The fuel processor delivers up to 100 slm hydrogen >99.9% pure with <1 ppm CO, <3 ppm CO 2. The

  14. Targeting of the epidermal growth factor receptor with mesoporphyrin IX-peptide conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Fontenot, Krystal R.; Ongarora, Benson G.; LeBlanc, Logan E.; Zhou, Zehua; Jois, Seetharama D.; Vicente, M. Graça H.

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis and in vitro evaluation of four mesoporphyrin IX-peptide conjugates designed to target EGFR, over-expressed in colorectal and other cancers, are reported. Two peptides with known affinity for EGFR, LARLLT (1) and GYHWYGYTPQNVI (2), were conjugated to mesoporphyrin IX (MPIX, 3) via one or both the propionic side chains, directly (4, 5) or with a triethylene glycol spacer (7, 8). The conjugates were characterized using NMR, MS, CD, SPR, UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopies. Energy minimization and molecular dynamics suggest different conformations for the conjugates. SPR studies show that conjugate 4, bearing two LARLLT with no PEG spacers, has the greatest affinity for binding to EGFR, followed by conjugate 7 with two PEG and two LARLLT sequences. Molecular modeling and docking studies suggest that both conjugates 4 and 7 can bind to monomer and dimer EGFR in open and closed conformations. The cytotoxicity and cellular targeting ability of the conjugates were investigated in human HEp2 cells over-expressing EGFR. All conjugates showed low dark- and photo-toxicities. The cellular uptake was highest for conjugates 4 and 8 and lowest for 7 bearing two LARLLT linked via PEG groups, likely due to decreased hydrophobicity. Among the conjugates investigated 4 is the most efficient EGFR-targeting agent, and therefore the most promising for the detection of cancers that over-express EGFR. PMID:27738394

  15. SIMULTANEOUS PRODUCTION OF HIGH-PURITY HYDROGEN AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2 FROM SYNGAS

    SciTech Connect

    Linda Denton; Hana Lorethova; Tomasz Wiltowski; Court Moorefield; Parag Kulkarni; Vladimir Zamansky; Ravi Kumar

    2003-12-01

    This final report summarizes the progress made on the program ''Simultaneous Production of High-Purity Hydrogen and Sequestration-Ready CO{sub 2} from Syngas (contract number DE-FG26-99FT40682)'', during October 2000 through September of 2003. GE Energy and Environmental Research (GE-EER) and Southern Illinois University (SIU) at Carbondale conducted the research work for this program. This program addresses improved methods to efficiently produce simultaneous streams of high-purity hydrogen and separated carbon dioxide from synthesis gas (syngas). The syngas may be produced through either gasification of coal or reforming of natural gas. The process of production of H{sub 2} and separated CO{sub 2} utilizes a dual-bed reactor and regenerator system. The reactor produces hydrogen and the regenerator produces separated CO{sub 2}. The dual-bed system can be operated under either a circulating fluidized-bed configuration or a cyclic fixed-bed configuration. Both configurations were evaluated in this project. The experimental effort was divided into lab-scale work at SIU and bench-scale work at GE-EER. Tests in a lab-scale fluidized bed system demonstrated the process for the conversion of syngas to high purity H{sub 2} and separated CO{sub 2}. The lab-scale system generated up to 95% H{sub 2} (on a dry basis). Extensive thermodynamic analysis of chemical reactions between the syngas and the fluidized solids determined an optimum range of temperature and pressure operation, where the extent of the undesirable reactions is minimum. The cycling of the process between hydrogen generation and oxygen regeneration has been demonstrated. The fluidized solids did not regenerate completely and the hydrogen purity in the reuse cycle dropped to 70% from 95% (on a dry basis). Changes in morphology and particle size may be the most dominant factor affecting the efficiency of the repeated cycling between hydrogen production and oxygen regeneration. The concept of simultaneous

  16. High Purity Germanium Detectors and Angular Distribution of 2Al(p,g)28Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Andre

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to study high purity germanium detector systems, and to calculate and compare absorption ratios of 27Al(p,g)28Si. Work with the germanium detector online array for gamma ray spectroscopy in nuclear astrophysics in the Nuclear Science Laboratory at the University of Notre Dame, also known as Georgina, including energy calibrations and work with software and hardware logic, provided the necessary background and experience with high purity germanium detectors and angular distribution of gamma rays. The knowledge taken from work with the Georgina detectors was then applied to the analysis of 27Al(p,g)28Si. Previous experimental data of 27Al(p,g)28Si was analyzed using the Ep = 1778.9 keV resonance. The data used was taken from a 2010 experiment completed in the Nuclear Science Laboratory at the University of Notre Dame using the 4MV KN particle accelerator. A 1977 paper by A. Anttila and J. Keinonen with analysis of the same reaction using the Ep = 992 keV resonance was used for the energy calibration and gamma energies. Peak fitting and background reduction of the spectra were completed using analysis software, jtek. Angular distribution ratios from a 56Co source were used for the normalization of the 27Al data. Angular dependent absorption factors were used to analyze the angular distribution of γ-rays from the 27Al beam target. With these absorption factors, relative gamma intensity measurements of 27Al(p,g)28Si were calculated.

  17. Rate-limiting roles of the tenase complex of factors VIII and IX in platelet procoagulant activity and formation of platelet-fibrin thrombi under flow.

    PubMed

    Swieringa, Frauke; Kuijpers, Marijke J E; Lamers, Moniek M E; van der Meijden, Paola E J; Heemskerk, Johan W M

    2015-06-01

    The importance of factor Xa generation in thrombus formation has not been studied extensively so far. Here, we used mice deficient in either factor VIII or factor IX to determine the role of platelet-stimulated tenase activity in the formation of platelet-fibrin thrombi on collagen. With tissue factor present, deficiency in factor VIII or IX markedly suppressed thrombus growth, fibrin formation and platelet procoagulant activity (phosphatidylserine exposure). In either case, residual fibrin formation was eliminated in the absence of tissue factor. Effects of factor deficiencies were antagonized by supplementation of the missing coagulation factor. In wild-type thrombi generated under flow, phosphatidylserine-exposing platelets bound (activated) factor IX and factor X, whereas factor VIII preferentially co-localized at sites of von Willebrand factor binding. Furthermore, proteolytic activity of the generated activated factor X and thrombin was confined to the sites of phosphatidylserine exposure. With blood from a hemophilia A or B patient, the formation of platelet-fibrin thrombi was greatly delayed and reduced, even in the presence of high concentrations of tissue factor. A direct activated factor X inhibitor, rivaroxaban, added to human blood, suppressed both thrombin and fibrin formation. Together, these data point to a potent enforcement loop in thrombus formation due to factor X activation, subsequent thrombin and fibrin generation, causing activated factor X-mediated stimulation of platelet phosphatidylserine exposure. This implies that the factor VIII/factor IX-dependent stimulation of platelet procoagulant activity is a limiting factor for fibrin formation under flow conditions, even at high tissue factor concentrations.

  18. Bonding efficacy and side effects of the high purity glyceryl mono-methacrylate.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Y; Itoh, K; Manabe, A; Tani, C; Hisamitsu, H

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of experimentally developed high purity glyceryl mono-methacrylate (GM) as a dentine primer and to evaluate the possibility of allergic reaction. The efficacy of experimental dentine primers was evaluated by measuring the polymerization contraction gap width and the tensile bond strength. Allergic reaction was evaluated by the guinea-pig maximization test. The skin reaction was evaluated according to the criteria of the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group. Contraction gap formation was completely prevented and the tensile bond strength was not significantly affected by priming with GM on high-purity GM. The allergic response decreased when high-purity GM was employed as the challenger. It was concluded that the clinical use of the high-purity GM is beneficial as the delayed allergic reaction could be avoided with no detrimental effect on the dentine bonding. PMID:15544652

  19. Trace element analysis of K, U and Th in high purity materials by neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pillalamarri, Ila

    2005-09-08

    The concept and usage of 'high purity' are explained. Trace element analysis of K, U and Th by neutron activation analysis is described, the radio-isotopes and their corresponding gamma-rays used to identify the elements are listed. The interfering elements are described. The advantages and disadvantages of using neutron activation analysis are discussed. Some examples of trace impurity determinations in high purity materials are provided.

  20. Recovery of high-purity metallic Pd from Pd(II)-sorbed biosorbents by incineration.

    PubMed

    Won, Sung Wook; Lim, Areum; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2013-06-01

    This work reports a direct way to recover metallic palladium with high purity from Pd(II)-sorbed polyethylenimine-modified Corynebacterium glutamicum biosorbent using a combined method of biosorption and incineration. This study is focused on the incineration part which affects the purity of recovered Pd. The incineration temperature and the amount of Pd loaded on the biosorbent were considered as major factors in the incineration process, and their effects were examined. The results showed that both factors significantly affected the enhancement of the recovery efficiency and purity of the recovered Pd. SEM-EDX and XRD analyses were used to confirm that Pd phase existed in the ash. As a result, the recovered Pd was changed from PdO to zero-valent Pd as the incineration temperature was increased from 600 to 900°C. Almost 100% pure metallic Pd was recovered with recovery efficiency above 99.0% under the conditions of 900°C and 136.9 mg/g.

  1. Oxygen transport through high-purity, large-grain Ag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Outlaw, R. A.; Sankaran, S. N.; Hoflund, G. B.; Davidson, M. R.

    1988-01-01

    The permeability of oxygen through pure, large-grain Ag membrames has been found to be linear and repeatable over the 400-800 C range, but only at a magnitude that is a factor of 3.2 smaller than ascribed by prior research. AES data indicate the pertinence of grain-boundary considerations, due to the virtual undetectability of intragranular oxygen. Vacuum-desorption of oxygen-saturated Ag is found to occur at the critical temperature of 630 C; this is consistent with the increased mobility of oxygen atoms in the higher temperature regime.

  2. A five year experience of the use of factor IX type DE(I) concentrate for the treatment of Christmas disease of Oxford.

    PubMed

    Lane, J L; Rizza, C R; Snape, T J

    1975-08-01

    A survey is presented of the use of the Oxford type DE(I) II-IX-X concentrate in the treatment of Christmas disease in Oxford from January 1970 to September 1974. 72 different patients were treated with a total of 2436 bottles of this concentrate from 143 different batches (each bottle containing 800-1000 units of factor IX). Although most doses were given for the treatment of minor haemorrhages into joints and muscles, 717 bottles of concentrate were used to treat 11 patients who underwent 14 major surgical operations. No episode of intravascular clotting or pulmonary embolism was seen in any patient receiving the concentrate. A detailed study of the plasma levels of factor V, VIII, total progressive antithrombin, platelets and fibrinogen degradation products was carried out before and after transfusion of type DE(I) concentrate in 14 patients. No significant alteration in those factors was found after the transfusion.

  3. Viral validation of the manufacturing process of high purity albumin from placentas.

    PubMed

    Grandgeorge, M; Véron, J L

    1993-01-01

    We report on the viral validation of an industrial purification process which is used to manufacture high purity human albumin from frozen placentas. This process has been used without any modification since 1980 except for a progressive increase in production scale to reach a capacity of 19 tons of placentas per day. The extraction purification process includes five alcohol manufacturing steps, some with strict conditions of alcohol concentration, acid pH, temperature and one including chloroform. These steps are followed by three chromatographies. Albumin is finally submitted to pasteurization both in bulk and in the final container. Selected steps of this process have been tested for their ability to remove or inactivate viruses. Viruses used were HBV, HIV-1, HIV-2 and model viruses poliovirus, avian reovirus, MuLV, Sindbis, SV40 and Aujeszky's. In vitro infectivity titration assays were used for all viruses except for HBV where DNA and antigen titrations were performed. Reduction factors obtained were from 10 to 29 log10 depending on the viral marker. Moreover, testing done on regular production batches demonstrated the absence of HBV, HIV-1 and HCV genomic sequence in the final lots. Viral risk calculation for HBV, HIV-1 and HCV was made considering the maximal theoretically possible contamination of the starting material. This calculation showed the very large safety margin the manufacturing process with respect to virus transmission for these viruses or possibly other unknown ones.

  4. Resistivity recovery in high purity iron after fission- and fusion- neutron irradiation*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, H.; Takehana, S.; Guinan, M. W.

    1988-07-01

    A resistometric study of high-purity iron has been performed after irradiation at 20 K by 14 MeV neutrons in RTNS-II or by fission neutrons in Kyoto University Reactor (KUR). The annealing behavior of iron after fusion neutrons is very different from that after electron irradiation. The fractional recovery in stage I is much smaller and the recovery of vacancy type defects starts to occur at a much lower temperature with a lower activation energy than after electron iradiation. The difference between fission and fusion neutron irradiation, however, is much smaller; the isochronal curves for these two types of irradiation are essentially the same below 170 K. It is concluded that the local defect configuration for these two types of irradiation is similar. The induced resistivity by fusion neutrons is about a factor of 2 larger than by fission neutrons (fluence for E > 1 MeV). This is in accord with a rough estimation of the ratio of damage energy cross sections.

  5. Development, fabrication and test of a high purity silica heat shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rusert, E. L.; Drennan, D. N.; Biggs, M. S.

    1978-01-01

    A highly reflective hyperpure ( 25 ppm ion impurities) slip cast fused silica heat shield material developed for planetary entry probes was successfully scaled up. Process development activities for slip casting large parts included green strength improvements, casting slip preparation, aggregate casting, strength, reflectance, and subscale fabrication. Successful fabrication of a one-half scale Saturn probe (shape and size) heat shield was accomplished while maintaining the silica high purity and reflectance through the scale-up process. However, stress analysis of this original aggregate slip cast material indicated a small margin of safety (MS. = +4%) using a factor of safety of 1.25. An alternate hyperpure material formulation to increase the strength and toughness for a greater safety margin was evaluated. The alternate material incorporates short hyperpure silica fibers into the casting slip. The best formulation evaluated has a 50% by weight fiber addition resulting in an 80% increase in flexural strength and a 170% increase in toughness over the original aggregate slip cast materials with comparable reflectance.

  6. Functionally competent eosinophils differentiated ex vivo in high purity from normal mouse bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, Kimberly D.; Moser, Jennifer M.; Czapiga, Meggan; Siegel, Steven J.; Percopo, Caroline M.; Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2009-01-01

    We have devised an ex vivo culture system which generates large numbers of eosinophils at high purity (>90%) from unselected mouse bone marrow progenitors. In response to four days of culture with recombinant mouse (rm)FLT3-L and rmSCF followed by rmIL-5 alone thereafter, the resulting bone-marrow derived eosinophils (bmEos) express immunoreactive major basic protein, Siglec F, IL-5 receptor alpha chain, and transcripts encoding mouse eosinophil peroxidase, CC chemokine receptor 3, the IL-3/IL-5/GMCSF receptor common beta-chain (βc), and the transcription factor GATA-1. BmEos are functionally competent: they undergo chemotaxis toward mouse eotaxin-1 and produce characteristic cytokines, including interferon-γ, IL-4, MIP-1α and IL-6. The rodent pathogen, pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) replicates in bmEos, and elevated levels of IL-6 are detected in supernatants of bmEos cultures in response to active infection. Finally, differentiating bmEos are readily transfected with lentiviral vectors, suggesting a means for rapid production of genetically manipulated cells. PMID:18768855

  7. Mechanical Properties of High Purity Niobium - Novel Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapati Myneni

    2003-09-01

    One of the procedures to improve the performance of superconducting niobium cavities is a heat treatment for several hours in an ultrahigh vacuum at temperatures between 800C and 1400C for hydrogen degassing or post-purification, respectively. However, it was recently observed with Spallation Neutron Source Project (SNS) prototype cavities, that a heat treatment at 800 C for even 1 hour degraded the mechanical properties of RRR niobium, in particular the yield strength. This lower strength resulted in cavity deformations during handling thus affecting both their resonant frequency and field profile. In addition to lowering the yield strength, it was observed in some lots of material that the Young's modulus was also apparently reduced by a factor of 2 as a result of the hydrogen outgassing at 800 C. Surprisingly, material received at other national laboratories exhibited similar anomalous behavior even without any heat treatments in vacuum. Based on these observations a multi-institutional collaborative basic research activity on high RRR niobium (determination of Nb yield strength as a function of grain size, work hardening, chemical composition, and heat treatment temperature) has been initiated by JLAB to gain a better understanding of the material properties affecting the mechanical behavior In this contribution, a brief review of the measurements at JLAB, at the Materials Science and Engineering Department of the University of Virginia, at the Analytical Chemistry and Metallurgy Divisions of the National Institute of Standard and Technology, Gaithersburg and in the Department of Physics, SUNY, Albany are presented. The measurements include yield strength, hardness, ultrasonic velocity, crystallographic structure, microstructure, determination of interstitial contents using internal friction; particular emphasis is placed on determining the hydrogen concentration in the niobium via Cold Neutron Prompt Gamma-Ray Activation Analysis and Neutron Incoherent

  8. Low cost industrial production of coagulation factor IX bioencapsulated in lettuce cells for oral tolerance induction in hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin; Zhu, Liqing; Sherman, Alexandra; Wang, Xiaomei; Lin, Shina; Kamesh, Aditya; Norikane, Joey H; Streatfield, Stephen J; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2015-11-01

    Antibodies (inhibitors) developed by hemophilia B patients against coagulation factor IX (FIX) are challenging to eliminate because of anaphylaxis or nephrotic syndrome after continued infusion. To address this urgent unmet medical need, FIX fused with a transmucosal carrier (CTB) was produced in a commercial lettuce (Simpson Elite) cultivar using species specific chloroplast vectors regulated by endogenous psbA sequences. CTB-FIX (∼1 mg/g) in lyophilized cells was stable with proper folding, disulfide bonds and pentamer assembly when stored ∼2 years at ambient temperature. Feeding lettuce cells to hemophilia B mice delivered CTB-FIX efficiently to the gut immune system, induced LAP(+) regulatory T cells and suppressed inhibitor/IgE formation and anaphylaxis against FIX. Lyophilized cells enabled 10-fold dose escalation studies and successful induction of oral tolerance was observed in all tested doses. Induction of tolerance in such a broad dose range should enable oral delivery to patients of different age groups and diverse genetic background. Using Fraunhofer cGMP hydroponic system, ∼870 kg fresh or 43.5 kg dry weight can be harvested per 1000 ft(2) per annum yielding 24,000-36,000 doses for 20-kg pediatric patients, enabling first commercial development of an oral drug, addressing prohibitively expensive purification, cold storage/transportation and short shelf life of current protein drugs.

  9. Targeting of the Human Coagulation Factor IX Gene at rDNA Locus of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junlin; Xue, Jinfeng; Hu, Youjin; Feng, Mai; Niu, Wenbin; Yang, Qiurui; Lei, Ming; Xia, Jiahui; Wu, Lingqian; Liang, Desheng

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic modification is a prerequisite to realizing the full potential of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in human genetic research and regenerative medicine. Unfortunately, the random integration methods that have been the primary techniques used keep creating problems, and the primary alternative method, gene targeting, has been effective in manipulating mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) but poorly in hESCs. Methodology/Principal Findings Human ribosomal DNA (rDNA) repeats are clustered on the short arm of acrocentric chromosomes. They consist of approximately 400 copies of the 45S pre-RNA (rRNA) gene per haploid. In the present study, we targeted a physiological gene, human coagulation factor IX, into the rDNA locus of hESCs via homologous recombination. The relative gene targeting efficiency (>50%) and homologous recombination frequency (>10−5) were more than 10-fold higher than those of loci targeted in previous reports. Meanwhile, the targeted clones retained both a normal karyotype and the main characteristics of ES cells. The transgene was found to be stably and ectopically expressed in targeted hESCs. Conclusion/Significance This is the first targeting of a human physiological gene at a defined locus on the hESC genome. Our findings indicate that the rDNA locus may serve as an ideal harbor for transgenes in hESCs. PMID:22615895

  10. Low cost industrial production of coagulation factor IX bioencapsulated in lettuce cells for oral tolerance induction in hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin; Zhu, Liqing; Sherman, Alexandra; Wang, Xiaomei; Lin, Shina; Kamesh, Aditya; Norikane, Joey H; Streatfield, Stephen J; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2015-11-01

    Antibodies (inhibitors) developed by hemophilia B patients against coagulation factor IX (FIX) are challenging to eliminate because of anaphylaxis or nephrotic syndrome after continued infusion. To address this urgent unmet medical need, FIX fused with a transmucosal carrier (CTB) was produced in a commercial lettuce (Simpson Elite) cultivar using species specific chloroplast vectors regulated by endogenous psbA sequences. CTB-FIX (∼1 mg/g) in lyophilized cells was stable with proper folding, disulfide bonds and pentamer assembly when stored ∼2 years at ambient temperature. Feeding lettuce cells to hemophilia B mice delivered CTB-FIX efficiently to the gut immune system, induced LAP(+) regulatory T cells and suppressed inhibitor/IgE formation and anaphylaxis against FIX. Lyophilized cells enabled 10-fold dose escalation studies and successful induction of oral tolerance was observed in all tested doses. Induction of tolerance in such a broad dose range should enable oral delivery to patients of different age groups and diverse genetic background. Using Fraunhofer cGMP hydroponic system, ∼870 kg fresh or 43.5 kg dry weight can be harvested per 1000 ft(2) per annum yielding 24,000-36,000 doses for 20-kg pediatric patients, enabling first commercial development of an oral drug, addressing prohibitively expensive purification, cold storage/transportation and short shelf life of current protein drugs. PMID:26302233

  11. Variations among Japanese of the factor IX gene (F9) detected by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Chiyoko; Takahashi, Norio; Asakawa, Junichi; Hiyama, Keiko; Kodaira, Meiko )

    1993-01-01

    In the course of feasibility studies to examine the efficiencies and practicalities of various techniques for screening for genetic variations, the human coagulation factor IX (F9) genes of 63 Japanese families were examined by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Four target sequences with lengths of 983-2,891 bp from the F9 genes of 126 unrelated individuals from Hiroshima and their 100 children were amplified by PCR, digested with restriction enzymes to approximately 500-bp fragments, and examined by DGGE - a total of 6,724 bp being examined per individual. GC-rich sequences (GC-clamps) of 40 bp were attached to both ends of the target sequences, as far as was feasible. Eleven types of new nucleotide substitutions were detected in the population, none of which produced RFLPs or caused hemophilia B. By examining two target sequences in a single lane, approximately 8,000 bp in a diploid individual could be examined. This approach is very effective for the detection of variations in DNA and is applicable to large-scale population studies. 46 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. A two-component system regulates gene expression of the type IX secretion component proteins via an ECF sigma factor

    PubMed Central

    Kadowaki, Tomoko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Naito, Mariko; Sato, Keiko; Kikuchi, Yuichiro; Kondo, Yoshio; Shoji, Mikio; Nakayama, Koji

    2016-01-01

    The periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis secretes potent pathogenic proteases, gingipains, via the type IX secretion system (T9SS). This system comprises at least 11 components; however, the regulatory mechanism of their expression has not yet been elucidated. Here, we found that the PorY (PGN_2001)-PorX (PGN_1019)-SigP (PGN_0274) cascade is involved in the regulation of T9SS. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis revealed a direct interaction between a recombinant PorY (rPorY) and a recombinant PorX (rPorX). rPorY autophosphorylated and transferred a phosphoryl group to rPorX in the presence of Mn2+. These results demonstrate that PorX and PorY act as a response regulator and a histidine kinase, respectively, of a two component system (TCS), although they are separately encoded on the chromosome. T9SS component-encoding genes were down-regulated in a mutant deficient in a putative extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor, PGN_0274 (SigP), similar to the porX mutant. Electrophoretic gel shift assays showed that rSigP bound to the putative promoter regions of T9SS component-encoding genes. The SigP protein was lacking in the porX mutant. Co-immunoprecipitation and SPR analysis revealed the direct interaction between SigP and PorX. Together, these results indicate that the PorXY TCS regulates T9SS-mediated protein secretion via the SigP ECF sigma factor. PMID:26996145

  13. Recombinant long-acting glycoPEGylated factor IX in hemophilia B: a multinational randomized phase 3 trial

    PubMed Central

    Young, Guy; Knobe, Karin; Karim, Faraizah Abdul; Angchaisuksiri, Pantep; Banner, Claus; Gürsel, Türkiz; Mahlangu, Johnny; Matsushita, Tadashi; Mauser-Bunschoten, Eveline P.; Oldenburg, Johannes; Walsh, Christopher E.; Negrier, Claude

    2014-01-01

    This multinational, randomized, single-blind trial investigated the safety and efficacy of nonacog beta pegol, a recombinant glycoPEGylated factor IX (FIX) with extended half-life, in 74 previously treated patients with hemophilia B (FIX activity ≤2 IU/dL). Patients received prophylaxis for 52 weeks, randomized to either 10 IU/kg or 40 IU/kg once weekly or to on-demand treatment of 28 weeks. No patients developed inhibitors, and no safety concerns were identified. Three hundred forty-five bleeding episodes were treated, with an estimated success rate of 92.2%. The median annualized bleeding rates (ABRs) were 1.04 in the 40 IU/kg prophylaxis group, 2.93 in the 10 IU/kg prophylaxis group, and 15.58 in the on-demand treatment group. In the 40 IU/kg group, 10 (66.7%) of 15 patients experienced no bleeding episodes into target joints compared with 1 (7.7%) of 13 patients in the 10 IU/kg group. Health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) assessed with the EuroQoL-5 Dimensions visual analog scale score improved from a median of 75 to 90 in the 40 IU/kg prophylaxis group. Nonacog beta pegol was well tolerated and efficacious for the treatment of bleeding episodes and was associated with low ABRs in patients receiving prophylaxis. Once-weekly prophylaxis with 40 IU/kg resolved target joint bleeds in 66.7% of the affected patients and improved HR-QoL. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01333111. PMID:25261199

  14. Production of High-purity Radium-223 from Legacy Actinium-Beryllium Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Z. Soderquist, Chuck; K. McNamara, Bruce; R. Fisher, Darrell

    2012-06-01

    Radium-223 is a short-lived alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides with potential applications in cancer treatment. Research to develop new radiopharmaceuticals employing 223Ra has been hindered by poor availability due to the small quantities of parent actinium-227 available world-wide. The purpose of this study was to develop innovative and cost-effective methods to obtain high-purity 223Ra from 227Ac. We obtained 227Ac from two surplus actinium-beryllium neutron generators. We retrieved the actinium/beryllium buttons from the sources and dissolved them in a sulfuric-nitric acid solution. A crude actinium solid was recovered from the solution by coprecipitation with thorium fluoride, leaving beryllium in solution. The crude actinium was purified to provide about 40 milligrams of actinium nitrate using anion exchange in methanol-water-nitric acid solution. The purified actinium was then used to generate high-purity 223Ra. We extracted 223Ra using anion exchange in a methanol-water-nitric acid solution. After the radium was separated, actinium and thorium were then eluted from the column and dried for interim storage. This single-pass separation produces high purity, carrier-free 223Ra product, and does not disturb the 227Ac/227Th equilibrium. A high purity, carrier-free 227Th was also obtained from the actinium using a similar anion exchange in nitric acid. These methods enable efficient production of 223Ra for research and new alpha-emitter radiopharmaceutical development.

  15. Production of high-purity radium-223 from legacy actinium-beryllium neutron sources.

    PubMed

    Soderquist, Chuck Z; McNamara, Bruce K; Fisher, Darrell R

    2012-07-01

    Radium-223 is a short-lived alpha-particle-emitting radionuclide with potential applications in cancer treatment. Research to develop new radiopharmaceuticals employing (223)Ra has been hindered by poor availability due to the small quantities of parent actinium-227 available world-wide. The purpose of this study was to develop innovative and cost-effective methods to obtain high-purity (223)Ra from (227)Ac. We obtained (227)Ac from two surplus actinium-beryllium neutron generators. We retrieved the actinium/beryllium buttons from the sources and dissolved them in a sulfuric-nitric acid solution. A crude actinium solid was recovered from the solution by coprecipitation with thorium fluoride, leaving beryllium in solution. The crude actinium was purified to provide about 40 milligrams of actinium nitrate using anion exchange in methanol-water-nitric acid solution. The purified actinium was then used to generate high-purity (223)Ra. We extracted (223)Ra using anion exchange in a methanol-water-nitric acid solution. After the radium was separated, actinium and thorium were then eluted from the column and dried for interim storage. This single-pass separation produces high purity, carrier-free (223)Ra product, and does not disturb the (227)Ac/(227)Th equilibrium. A high purity, carrier-free (227)Th was also obtained from the actinium using a similar anion exchange in nitric acid. These methods enable efficient production of (223)Ra for research and new alpha-emitter radiopharmaceutical development.

  16. Production of high-purity radium-223 from legacy actinium-beryllium neutron sources.

    PubMed

    Soderquist, Chuck Z; McNamara, Bruce K; Fisher, Darrell R

    2012-07-01

    Radium-223 is a short-lived alpha-particle-emitting radionuclide with potential applications in cancer treatment. Research to develop new radiopharmaceuticals employing (223)Ra has been hindered by poor availability due to the small quantities of parent actinium-227 available world-wide. The purpose of this study was to develop innovative and cost-effective methods to obtain high-purity (223)Ra from (227)Ac. We obtained (227)Ac from two surplus actinium-beryllium neutron generators. We retrieved the actinium/beryllium buttons from the sources and dissolved them in a sulfuric-nitric acid solution. A crude actinium solid was recovered from the solution by coprecipitation with thorium fluoride, leaving beryllium in solution. The crude actinium was purified to provide about 40 milligrams of actinium nitrate using anion exchange in methanol-water-nitric acid solution. The purified actinium was then used to generate high-purity (223)Ra. We extracted (223)Ra using anion exchange in a methanol-water-nitric acid solution. After the radium was separated, actinium and thorium were then eluted from the column and dried for interim storage. This single-pass separation produces high purity, carrier-free (223)Ra product, and does not disturb the (227)Ac/(227)Th equilibrium. A high purity, carrier-free (227)Th was also obtained from the actinium using a similar anion exchange in nitric acid. These methods enable efficient production of (223)Ra for research and new alpha-emitter radiopharmaceutical development. PMID:22697483

  17. Low temperature recombination and trapping analysis in high purity gallium arsenide by microwave photodielectric techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khambaty, M. B.; Hartwig, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    Some physical theories pertinent to the measurement properties of gallium arsenide are presented and experimental data are analyzed. A model for explaining recombination and trapping high purity gallium arsenide, valid below 77 K is assembled from points made at various places and an appraisal is given of photodielectric techniques for material property studies.

  18. Performance of A Compact Multi-crystal High-purity Germanium Detector Array for Measuring Coincident Gamma-ray Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, Chris; Daigle, Stephen; Buckner, Matt; Erikson, Luke E.; Runkle, Robert C.; Stave, Sean C.; Champagne, Art; Cooper, Andrew; Downen, Lori; Glasgow, Brian D.; Kelly, Keegan; Sallaska, Anne

    2015-02-18

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a 14-crystal array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors housed in a single cryostat. The array was used to measure the astrophysical S-factor for the 14N(p,γ)15O* reaction for several transition energies at an effective center of mass energy of 163 keV. Owing to the segmented nature of the MARS detector, the effect of gamma-ray summing was greatly reduced in comparison to past experiments which utilized large, single-crystal detectors. The new S-factor values agree within the uncertainties with the past measurements. Details of the analysis and detector performance will be presented.

  19. Performance of a compact multi-crystal high-purity germanium detector array for measuring coincident gamma-ray emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Chris; Daigle, Stephen; Buckner, Matt; Erikson, Luke E.; Runkle, Robert C.; Stave, Sean C.; Champagne, Arthur E.; Cooper, Andrew; Downen, Lori; Glasgow, Brian D.; Kelly, Keegan; Sallaska, Anne

    2015-05-01

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a 14-crystal array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors housed in a single cryostat. The array was used to measure the astrophysical S-factor for the 14N(p,γ)15O* reaction for several transition energies at an effective center-of-mass energy of 163 keV. Owing to the granular nature of the MARS detector, the effect of gamma-ray summing was greatly reduced in comparison to past experiments which utilized large, single-crystal detectors. The new S-factor values agree within their uncertainties with the past measurements. Details of the analysis and detector performance are presented.

  20. Factor IX assay

    MedlinePlus

    ... LE, Heslop HE, Weitz JI, Anastasi J, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... LE, Heslop HE, Weitz JI, Anastasi J, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  1. Preliminary study on non-viral transfection of F9 (factor IX) gene by nucleofection in human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Olmedillas López, Susana; Garcia-Arranz, Mariano; Garcia-Olmo, Damian

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hemophilia is a rare recessive X-linked disease characterized by a deficiency of coagulation factor VIII or factor IX. Its current treatment is merely palliative. Advanced therapies are likely to become the treatment of choice for the disease as they could provide a curative treatment. Methods. The present study looks into the use of a safe non-viral transfection method based on nucleofection to express and secrete human clotting factor IX (hFIX) where human adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells were used as target cells in vitro studies and NOD. Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice were used to analyze factor IX expression in vivo studies. Previously, acute liver injury was induced by an injected intraperitoneal dose of 500 mg/kg body weight of acetaminophen. Results. Nucleofection showed a percentage of positive cells ranging between 30.7% and 41.9% and a cell viability rate of 29.8%, and cells were shown to secrete amounts of hFIX between 36.8 and 71.9 ng/mL. hFIX levels in the blood of NSG mice injected with ASCs transfected with this vector, were 2.7 ng/mL 48 h after injection. Expression and secretion of hFIX were achieved both in vitro cell culture media and in vivo in the plasma of mice treated with the transfected ASCs. Such cells are capable of eventually migrating to a previously damaged target tissue (the liver) where they secrete hFIX, releasing it to the bloodstream over a period of at least five days from administration. Conclusions. The results obtained in the present study may form a preliminary basis for the establishment of a future ex vivo non-viral gene/cellular safe therapy protocol that may eventually contribute to advancing the treatment of hemophilia. PMID:27114871

  2. Transport studies on very high purity gallium arsenide grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Cheung Fat

    1997-12-01

    Very high purity GaAs layers have been grown in a modified organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) system using trimethyl gallium (TMGa) and arsine including the purest layer ever reported from these chemical sources with purity approaching the very best reported by the chloride-VPE technique. Several of these high purity GaAs samples were chemically etched into Kelvin and Greek cross structures which were fabricated with PdGe ohmic contacts for the specific contact resistivity, Hall effect, and persistent photo-Hall measurements performed in the full temperature range (4.2 K to 305 K). Resonant excitation photoluminescence technique operated at zero magnetic field was used to discriminate the impurity species in the very high purity layer where Ge and C were detected as the principle impurities. The consistency of growing GaAs layers with very low donor impurity concentration was found to be limited by the variability of arsine quality from bottle to bottle. Peak mobilities of the high purity GaAs layers are shown to be linearly dependent on the donor concentration while the low temperature mobilities are limited by the acceptor impurity level and the degree of carrier compensation. The acoustic deformation potential is generally conceived as a material constant but is demonstrated in the analysis as a variable parameter that has a linear relationship with the total impurity concentration. As for the contact resistivity of PdGe contacts on high purity GaAs layers, a room temperature Nsb{D}sp{-1/2} dependence was confirmed. Inhomogeneities in several samples were detected by the persistent photo-Hall measurements and the impurity band formation-like characteristics were observed at the very low temperatures. This technique was also used to facilitate the measurement of a carrier-depleted, high purity GaAs layer that has a relatively high carrier compensation. Finally, chemical etching techniques for the fabrication of the measurement samples including the micro

  3. Incorporation of the factor IX Padua mutation into FIX-Triple improves clotting activity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chung-Yang; Yang, Shu-Jhu; Tao, Mi-Hua; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Yu, I-Shing; Lin, Shu-Wha

    2013-08-01

    Using gain-of-function factor IX (FIX) for replacement therapy for haemophilia B (HB) is an attractive strategy. We previously reported a high-activity FIX, FIX-Triple (FIX-V86A/E277A/R338A) as a good substitute for FIX-WT (wild-type) in protein replacement therapy, gene therapy, and cell therapy. Here we generated a new recombinant FIX-TripleL (FIX-V86A/E277A/R338L) by replacing the alanine at residue 338 of FIX-Triple with leucine as in FIX-Padua (FIX-R338L). Purified FIX-TripleL exhibited 22-fold higher specific clotting activity and 15-fold increased binding affinity to activated FVIII compared to FIX-WT. FIX-TripleL increased the therapeutic potential of FIX-Triple by nearly 100% as demonstrated with calibrated automated thrombogram and thromboelastography. FIX-TripleL demonstrated a normal clearance rate in HB mice. The clotting activity of FIX-TripleL was consistently 2- to 3-fold higher in these mice than that of FIX-Triple or FIX-R338L. Gene delivery of adeno-associated virus (AAV) in HB mice showed that FIX-TripleL had 15-fold higher specific clotting activity than FIX-WT, and this activity was significantly better than FIX-Triple (10-fold) or FIX-R338L (6-fold). At a lower viral dose, FIX-TripleL improved FIX activity from sub-therapeutic to therapeutic levels. Under physiological conditions, no signs of adverse thrombotic events were observed in long-term AAV-FIX-treated C57Bl/6 mice. Hepatocellular adenomas were observed in the high- but not the medium- or the low-dose AAV-treated mice expressing FIX-WT or FIX-Triple, indicating the advantages of using hyperfunctional FIX variants to reduce viral doses while maintaining therapeutic clotting activity. Thus, incorporation of the FIX Padua mutation significantly improves the clotting function of FIX-Triple so as to optimise protein replacement therapy and gene therapy. PMID:23676890

  4. Confirmation of warfarin resistance of naturally occurring VKORC1 variants by coexpression with coagulation factor IX and in silico protein modelling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background VKORC1 has been identified some years ago as the gene encoding vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) – the target protein for coumarin derivates like warfarin or phenprocoumon. Resistance against warfarin and other coumarin-type anticoagulants has been frequently reported over the last 50 years in rodents due to problems in pest control as well as in thrombophilic patients showing variable response to anticoagulant treatment. Many different mutations have already been detected in the VKORC1 gene leading to warfarin resistance in rats, mice and in humans. Since the conventional in vitro dithiothreitol (DTT)-driven VKOR enzymatic assay often did not reflect the in vivo status concerning warfarin resistance, we recently developed a cell culture-based method for coexpression of VKORC1 with coagulation factor IX and subsequent measurement of secreted FIX in order to test warfarin inhibition in wild-type and mutated VKORC1. Results In the present study, we coexpressed wild-type factor IX with 12 different VKORC1 variants which were previously detected in warfarin resistant rats and mice. The results show that amino acid substitutions in VKORC1 maintain VKOR activity and are associated with warfarin resistance. When we projected in silico the amino acid substitutions onto the published three-dimensional model of the bacterial VKOR enzyme, the predicted effects matched well the catalytic mechanism proposed for the bacterial enzyme. Conclusions The established cell-based system for coexpression of VKORC1 and factor IX uses FIX activity as an indicator of carboxylation efficiency. This system reflects the warfarin resistance status of VKORC1 mutations from anticoagulant resistant rodents more closely than the traditional DTT-driven enzyme assay. All mutations studied were also predicted to be involved in the reaction mechanism. PMID:24491178

  5. Protein modification during anti-viral heat-treatment bioprocessing of factor VIII concentrates, factor IX concentrates, and model proteins in the presence of sucrose.

    PubMed

    Smales, C Mark; Pepper, Duncan S; James, David C

    2002-01-01

    To ensure the optimal safety of plasma derived and new generation recombinant proteins, heat treatment is customarily applied in the manufacturing of such biopharmaceuticals as a means of viral inactivation. In subjecting proteins to anti-viral heat-treatment it is necessary to use high concentrations of thermostabilizing excipients to prevent protein damage, and it is therefore imperative that the correct balance between bioprocessing conditions, maintenance of protein integrity and virus kill is found. In this study we have utilized model proteins (lysozyme, fetuin, and human serum albumin) and plasma-derived therapeutic proteins (factor VIII and factor IX) to investigate the protein modifications that occur during anti-viral heat treatment. Specifically, we investigated the relationship between bioprocessing conditions and the type and extent of protein modification under a variety of industrially relevant wet and lyophilized heat treatments using sucrose as a thermostabilizing agent. Heat treatment led to the formation of disulfide crosslinks and aggregates in proteins containing free cysteine residues. Terminal oligosaccharide sialic acid residues were hydrolyzed from the glycan moieties of glycoproteins during anti-viral heat treatment. Heat treatment promoted sucrose hydrolysis to yield glucose and fructose, leading, in turn, to the glycation of lysine amino groups in those proteins containing di-lysine motifs. During extended hear treatments, 1,2-dicarbonyl type advanced glycation end-products were also formed. Glycation-type modifications were more prevalent in wet heat-treated protein formulations.

  6. Combustion synthesis process for the rapid preparation of high-purity SrO powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados-Correa, Francisco; Bonifacio-Martínez, Juan

    2014-12-01

    A rapid, safe and simple technique for the production of high purity strontium oxide powders via a chemical combustion process is reported. The combustion reactions were performed to optimize the fuel to oxidizer ratios in the reaction mixtures required to obtain pure SrO powders by varying the molar ratio of chemical precursors and the temperature. The synthesized powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and N2-physisorption measurements. The results indicate that crystalline SrO was obtained using a 1:1 strontium nitrate: urea molar ratio at 1000 °C after 5 minutes. In addition, high-purity, homogeneous and crystalline SrO powders were easily produced in a short time via a chemical combustion process.

  7. Control of high-purity distillation column using a nonlinear wave theory

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Myungwan; Park, Sunwon )

    1993-05-01

    A new model-based controller for profile position control of high-purity distillation columns is presented. The controller has been developed by incorporating nonlinear wave model into the generic model control framework. An observer based on the nonlinear wave theory is also proposed to determine the profile position. The performance of the nonlinear control scheme has been tested in simulation experiments of high-purity binary distillation columns. Tight control of profile position, which leads to fast stabilization of product compositions, has been achieved. Since the profile position control alone produces a slight offset from the desired product concentration, the composition/profile position cascade system has been used to remove the offset. The control scheme can handle significant disturbances and model-plant mismatch.

  8. An improved procedure for high purity gaseous peroxyacyl nitrate production: Use of heavy lipid solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Fajer, R.; Senum, G. I.

    An improved procedure is described for the production of peroxyacyl nitrates (PAN's) in the gas phase. The method of Nielsen et al. (1982) has been modified to yield PAN's of high purity with no further Chromatographic purification required. Extraction of PAN's from the nitration of the peracids is accomplished by use of a heavy lipid solvent ( n-tridecane). This solvent's low vapor pressure allows the simple separation and preparation of high purity gaseous PAN's (> 98 %) as determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Using this method infrared integrated band strengths are reported for peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) perdeutero-peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN-D 3) and peroxyproprionyl nitrate (PPN). The method allows facile production of large amounts of gaseous PAN's for smog chamber and laboratory studies, lexicological and health effects research, as well as for calibration of PAN analyses.

  9. Characterization of a high-purity germanium detector for small-animal SPECT.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lindsay C; Campbell, Desmond L; Hull, Ethan L; Peterson, Todd E

    2011-09-21

    We present an initial evaluation of a mechanically cooled, high-purity germanium double-sided strip detector as a potential gamma camera for small-animal SPECT. It is 90 mm in diameter and 10 mm thick with two sets of 16 orthogonal strips that have a 4.5 mm width with a 5 mm pitch. We found an energy resolution of 0.96% at 140 keV, an intrinsic efficiency of 43.3% at 122 keV and a FWHM spatial resolution of approximately 1.5 mm. We demonstrated depth-of-interaction estimation capability through comparison of pinhole acquisitions with a point source on and off axes. Finally, a flood-corrected flood image exhibited a strip-level uniformity of less than 1%. This high-purity germanium offers many desirable properties for small-animal SPECT.

  10. Characterization of a high-purity germanium detector for small-animal SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lindsay C; Campbell, Desmond L; Hull, Ethan L; Peterson, Todd E

    2011-01-01

    We present an initial evaluation of a mechanically-cooled, high-purity germanium double-sided strip detector as a potential gamma camera for small-animal SPECT. It is 90 mm in diameter and 10 mm thick with two sets of 16 orthogonal strips that have a 4.5 mm width with a 5 mm pitch. We found an energy resolution of 0.96% at 140 keV, an intrinsic efficiency of 43.3% at 122 keV and a FWHM spatial resolution of approximately 1.5 mm. We demonstrated depth-of-interaction estimation capability through comparison of pinhole acquisitions with a point source on and off axis. Finally, a flood-corrected-flood image exhibited a strip-level uniformity of less than 1%. This high-purity germanium offers many desirable properties for small-animal SPECT. PMID:21852723

  11. Preparation of High-Purity Cobalt by Anion-Exchange Separation and Plasma Arc Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchikoshi, Masahito; Shibuya, Hideka; Imaizumi, Junichi; Kékesi, Tamás; Mimura, Kouji; Isshiki, Minoru

    2010-04-01

    High-purity Co was prepared with valence-controlled anion-exchange separation, oxidation refining using plasma arc melting, and H2-Ar plasma arc melting on a pilot scale. The result of a laboratory-scale experiment indicated that the slower flow rate is more effective to remove the impurities by anion-exchange separation. However, the separation efficiency is reduced by scaling up the column from the laboratory to pilot scale. The discussion of the decrease in the separation efficiency implies that the distribution coefficient increases as the concentration of the adsorbate is lowered, but a reduced slower flow rate might increase the final purity of Co. In addition to anion-exchange separation, Co oxidation refining using plasma arc melting was useful. Consequently, a high-purity Co of 99.9998 pct by mass excluding gaseous elements was prepared, which represents the highest purity reported.

  12. Fabrication of novel cryomill for synthesis of high purity metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nirmal; Biswas, Krishanu

    2015-08-01

    The successful preparation of free standing metal nanoparticles with high purity in bulk quantity is the pre-requisite for any potential application. This is possible by using ball milling at cryogenic temperature. However, the most of ball mills available in the market do not allow preparing high purity metal nanoparticles by this route. In addition, it is not possible to carry out in situ measurements of process parameters as well as diagnostic of the process. In the present investigation, we present a detailed study on the fabrication of a cryomill, which is capable of avoiding contaminations in the product. It also provides in situ measurements and diagnostic of the low temperature milling process. Online monitoring of the milling temperature and observation of ball motion are the important aspects in the newly designed mill. The nanoparticles prepared using this fabricated mill have been found to be free standing and also free from contaminations.

  13. A novel and efficient method for enzymatic synthesis of high purity maltose using moranoline (1-deoxynojirimycin).

    PubMed

    Maruo, S; Yamashita, H; Miyazaki, K; Yamamoto, H; Kyotani, Y; Ogawa, H; Kojima, M; Ezure, Y

    1992-09-01

    A transglycosylation reaction with moranoline (1-deoxynojirimycin) was done with soluble starch as the glucosyl donor and Bacillus macerans amylase as a cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase [EC 2.4.1.19]. The resultant transglycosylation products with moranoline, obtained by treating the reaction mixture with a strong cation exchange resin, were hydrolyzed by beta-amylase [EC 3.2.1.2] from sweet potatoes. The hydrolysate was treated with a strong cation exchange resin, and high purity maltose was obtained. PMID:1368945

  14. Aluminium. II - A review of deformation properties of high purity aluminium and dilute aluminium alloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, R. P.

    1972-01-01

    The elastic and plastic deformation behavior of high-purity aluminum and of dilute aluminum alloys is reviewed. Reliable property data, including elastic moduli, elastic coefficients, tensile, creep, fatigue, hardness, and impact are presented. Single crystal tensile results are discussed. Rather comprehensive reference lists, containing publications of the past 20 years, are included for each of the above categories. Defect structures and mechanisms responsible for mechanical behavior are presented. Strengthening techniques (alloys, cold work, irradiation, quenching, composites) and recovery are briefly reviewed.

  15. Recovering iron, manganese, copper, cobalt, and high-purity nickel from sea nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohga, Tetsuyoshi; Imamura, Masaki; Takahashi, Junichi; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Nishizawa, Tokuo

    1995-12-01

    Many studies have investigated methods of recovering valuable metals from sea nodules. Recently, a research group in Japan developed a smelting and chlorine process after investigating a variety of existing processes and comparing their respective efficiencies with the same nodules. The best results were obtained by combining pyrometallurgical and hydrometallurgical treatments, which enabled the efficient recovery of manganese, nickel, copper, and cobalt. High-purity nickel can be also produced through further solvent extraction.

  16. A novel and efficient method for enzymatic synthesis of high purity maltose using moranoline (1-deoxynojirimycin).

    PubMed

    Maruo, S; Yamashita, H; Miyazaki, K; Yamamoto, H; Kyotani, Y; Ogawa, H; Kojima, M; Ezure, Y

    1992-09-01

    A transglycosylation reaction with moranoline (1-deoxynojirimycin) was done with soluble starch as the glucosyl donor and Bacillus macerans amylase as a cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase [EC 2.4.1.19]. The resultant transglycosylation products with moranoline, obtained by treating the reaction mixture with a strong cation exchange resin, were hydrolyzed by beta-amylase [EC 3.2.1.2] from sweet potatoes. The hydrolysate was treated with a strong cation exchange resin, and high purity maltose was obtained.

  17. Charge collection performance of a segmented planar high-purity germanium detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, R. J.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Cresswell, J. R.; Grint, A. N.; Harkness, L. J.; Nolan, P. J.; Oxley, D. C.; Scraggs, D. P.; Lazarus, I.; Simpson, J.; Dobson, J.

    2008-10-01

    High-precision scans of a segmented planar high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector have been performed with a range of finely collimated gamma ray beams allowing the response as a function of gamma ray interaction position to be quantified. This has allowed the development of parametric pulse shape analysis (PSA) techniques and algorithms for the correction of imperfections in performance. In this paper we report on the performance of this detector, designed for use in a positron emission tomography (PET) development system.

  18. Integration of High-Purity Carbon Nanotube Solution into Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulevski, George; IBM TJ Watson Reserach Center Team

    Due to their exceptional electronic properties, carbon nanotubes (cnt) are leading candidates to be employed as channel materials in future nanoelectronic devices. A key bottleneck to realizing device integration is the sorting of carbon nanotubes, namely the isolation of high-purity, semiconducting cnt solutions. This talk will describe our efforts in using polymer-based sorting methods to isolate high-density and high-purity semiconducting cnt solutions. We explore the dependence of starting material and polymer to cnt ratio on the effectiveness of the separation. We confirm optically and electrically that the semiconducting purity is >99.99% through several thousand individual device measurements. In addition to single-cnt devices, thin-film transistors were also fabricated and tested. Due to the high purity of the solutions, device switching (~105 ION/IOFF) was observed at channel lengths below the percolation threshold (<500 nm). Operating below the percolation threshold allows for devices with much higher current densities and effective mobilities as transport is now the result of direct transport as opposed to hopping between cnts.

  19. Simple HPLC method for detection of trace ephedrine and pseudoephedrine in high-purity methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Makino, Yukiko

    2012-03-01

    A simple and sensitive HPLC technique was developed for the qualitative determination of ephedrine and pseudoephedrine (ephedrines), used as precursors of clandestine d-methamphetamine hydrochloride of high purity. Good separation of ephedrines from bulk d-methamphetamine was achieved, without any extraction or derivatization procedure on a CAPCELLPACK C18 MGII (250 × 4.6 mm) column. The mobile phase consisted of 50 mM KH2 PO4-acetonitrile (94:6 v/v %) using an isocratic pump system within 20 min for detecting two analytes. One run took about 50 min as it was necessary to wash out overloaded methamphetamine for column conditioning. The analytes were detected by UV absorbance measurement at 210 nm. A sample (20 mg) was simply dissolved in 1 mL of water, and a 50 μL aliquot of the solution was injected into the HPLC. The detection limits for ephedrine and pseudoephedrine in bulk d-methamphetamine were as low as 3 ppm each. This analytical separation technique made it possible to detect ephedrine and/or pseudoephedrine in seven samples of high-purity d-methamphetamine hydrochloride seized in Japan. The presence of trace ephedrines in illicit methamphetamine may strongly indicate a synthetic route via ephedrine in methamphetamine profiling. This method is simple and sensitive, requiring only commonly available equipment, and should be useful for high-purity methamphetamine profiling.

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of High-Purity Tellurium Nanowires via Self-seed-Assisted Growth Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Zhao, Wen-yu; Mu, Xin; Liu, Xing; He, Dan-qi; Zhu, Wan-ting; Zhang, Qing-jie

    2016-03-01

    Nanowires have attracted intense attention in recent years due to their novel physical properties. In this work, we prepare high-purity tellurium nanowires through the self-seed-assisted growth method previously developed by us. The tellurium seeds were firstly synthesized by reducing Na2TeO3 in the ice water with NaBH4. The high-purity tellurium nanowires with a diameter of 40-50 nm and a length of several tens of micrometers were then grown on tellurium seeds by reducing Na2TeO3 with hydrazine hydrate. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed to characterize the crystal structure, microstructure, and growth direction of tellurium seeds and nanowires. The effects of temperature, time, surfactant and tellurium seeds on microstructures of tellurium nanowires has also been investigated. The synthesis conditions of tellurium seeds and nanowires was optimized. The selected area electron diffraction pattern confirms that the growth direction of tellurium nanowires is parallel to [0001] direction. It was discovered that high-purity tellurium nanowires with high aspect ratio can be synthesized by precisely controlling the temperature to adjust the nucleation rate of the tellurium nuclei, selecting the appropriate surfactant to induce the coordination along the macromolecular chain, and using tellurium seeds as the templates of the epitaxial growth of tellurium nuclei.

  1. Migration of grain boundaries and triple junctions in high-purity aluminum during annealing after slight cold rolling

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Wenhong; Wang, Weiguo; Fang, Xiaoying; Qin, Congxiang; Xing, Xiaoguang

    2015-09-15

    Grain orientations and grain boundary migrations near triple junctions in a high purity aluminum were analyzed by electron back scattered diffraction. The results indicate that there are good correlations between the Schmid factors or Taylor factors and the misorientation values of point to original point in grains near the triple junctions in a slightly deformed sample. Grains with higher Schmid factors or lower Taylor factors typically correspond to higher misorientation values near the triple junctions. In a subsequent annealing at 400 °C, both grain boundaries and triple junctions migrate, but the former leave ghost lines. During such migration, a grain boundary grows from the grain with lower Schmid factor (higher Taylor factor) into the grain with higher Schmid factor (lower Taylor factor). Usually, the amount of migration of a grain boundary is considerably greater than that of a triple junction, and the grain boundary becomes more curved after migration. These observations indicate that the triple junctions have drag effects on grain boundary migration. - Highlights: • Polycrystalline aluminum with fine grains about 30 μm were used. • Off-line in situ EBSD was used to identify TJs before and after annealing. • Grains with higher SFs have higher misorientation values near TJs after deformation. • Grain boundaries grow from hard grains into soft grains during annealing. • Triple junctions have drag effects on grain boundaries migration.

  2. Dielectric Performance of a High Purity HTCC Alumina at High Temperatures - a Comparison Study with Other Polycrystalline Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liangyu

    2014-01-01

    A very high purity (99.99+%) high temperature co-fired ceramic (HTCC) alumina has recently become commercially available. The raw material of this HTCC alumina is very different from conventional HTCC alumina, and more importantly there is no glass additive in this alumina material for co-firing processing. Previously, selected HTCC and LTCC (low temperature co-fired ceramic) alumina materials were evaluated at high temperatures as dielectric and compared to a regularly sintered 96% polycrystalline alumina (96% Al2O3), where 96% alumina was used as the benchmark. A prototype packaging system based on regular 96% alumina with Au thickfilm metallization successfully facilitated long term testing of high temperature silicon carbide (SiC) electronic devices for over 10,000 hours at 500 C. In order to evaluate this new high purity HTCC alumina for possible high temperature packaging applications, the dielectric properties of this HTCC alumina substrate were measured and compared with those of 96% alumina and a previously tested LTCC alumina from room temperature to 550 C at frequencies of 120 Hz, 1 KHz, 10 KHz, 100 KHz, and 1 MHz. A parallel-plate capacitive device with dielectric of the HTCC alumina and precious metal electrodes were used for measurements of the dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the co-fired alumina material in the temperature and frequency ranges. The capacitance and AC parallel conductance of the capacitive device were directly measured by an AC impedance meter, and the dielectric constant and parallel AC conductivity of the dielectric were calculated from the capacitance and conductance measurement results. The temperature and frequency dependent dielectric constant, AC conductivity, and dissipation factor of the HTCC alumina substrate are presented and compared to those of 96% alumina and a selected LTCC alumina. Other technical advantages of this new co-fired material for possible high packaging applications are also discussed.

  3. A3 domain region 1803-1818 contributes to the stability of activated factor VIII and includes a binding site for activated factor IX.

    PubMed

    Bloem, Esther; Meems, Henriet; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B

    2013-09-01

    A recent chemical footprinting study in our laboratory suggested that region 1803-1818 might contribute to A2 domain retention in activated factor VIII (FVIIIa). This site has also been implicated to interact with activated factor IX (FIXa). Asn-1810 further comprises an N-linked glycan, which seems incompatible with a role of the amino acids 1803-1818 for FIXa or A2 domain binding. In the present study, FVIIIa stability and FIXa binding were evaluated in a FVIII-N1810C variant, and two FVIII variants in which residues 1803-1810 and 1811-1818 are replaced by the corresponding residues of factor V (FV). Enzyme kinetic studies showed that only FVIII/FV 1811-1818 has a decreased apparent binding affinity for FIXa. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that fluorescent FIXa exhibits impaired complex formation with only FVIII/FV 1811-1818 on lipospheres. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that Phe-1816 contributes to the interaction with FIXa. To evaluate FVIIIa stability, the FVIII/FV chimeras were activated by thrombin, and the decline in cofactor function was followed over time. FVIII/FV 1803-1810 and FVIII/FV 1811-1818 but not FVIII-N1810C showed a decreased FVIIIa half-life. However, when the FVIII variants were activated in presence of FIXa, only FVIII/FV 1811-1818 demonstrated an enhanced decline in cofactor function. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that the FVIII variants K1813A/K1818A, E1811A, and F1816A exhibit enhanced dissociation after activation. The results together demonstrate that the glycan at 1810 is not involved in FVIII cofactor function, and that Phe-1816 of region 1811-1818 contributes to FIXa binding. Both regions 1803-1810 and 1811-1818 contribute to FVIIIa stability.

  4. Surface-loop residue Lys316 in blood coagulation Factor IX is a major determinant for Factor X but not antithrombin recognition.

    PubMed

    Kolkman, J A; Mertens, K

    2000-09-15

    The active site of activated Factor IX (FIXa) and related blood-coagulation enzymes is surrounded by a number of highly variable surface loops, which contribute to the characteristic substrate specificity of each individual enzyme. FIX residue Lys(316) is located in one of these loops and mutation of this residue to Glu is associated with haemophilia B. In the present study we investigated the functional role of Lys(316) in human FIXa by analysing the purified and activated FIX mutants FIXa-K316E and FIXa-K316A. FIXa-K316E was indistinguishable from normal FIXa in binding the competitive active-site inhibitor p-aminobenzamidine. In addition, substitution of Glu for Lys(316) had no significant effect on the reactivity towards various synthetic tripeptide substrates. Inhibition by the macromolecular inhibitor antithrombin was only slightly reduced for both FIXa mutants (less than 2-fold). In contrast, proteolytic activity of FIXa-K316E towards the natural substrate Factor X (FX) was virtually lacking, while the Lys(316) to Ala mutation resulted in a more than 10-fold reduction in FX activation. Thus residue Lys(316) plays a key role in FIXa activity towards FX. The requirement for Lys at position 316 for FX activation was also evident in the presence of the cofactor activated Factor VIII, although to a lesser extent than in its absence. These data demonstrate that Lys(316) specifically determines the reactivity of FIXa towards its natural substrate FX, but not to synthetic peptide substrates or antithrombin. PMID:10970782

  5. A3 domain region 1803-1818 contributes to the stability of activated factor VIII and includes a binding site for activated factor IX.

    PubMed

    Bloem, Esther; Meems, Henriet; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B

    2013-09-01

    A recent chemical footprinting study in our laboratory suggested that region 1803-1818 might contribute to A2 domain retention in activated factor VIII (FVIIIa). This site has also been implicated to interact with activated factor IX (FIXa). Asn-1810 further comprises an N-linked glycan, which seems incompatible with a role of the amino acids 1803-1818 for FIXa or A2 domain binding. In the present study, FVIIIa stability and FIXa binding were evaluated in a FVIII-N1810C variant, and two FVIII variants in which residues 1803-1810 and 1811-1818 are replaced by the corresponding residues of factor V (FV). Enzyme kinetic studies showed that only FVIII/FV 1811-1818 has a decreased apparent binding affinity for FIXa. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that fluorescent FIXa exhibits impaired complex formation with only FVIII/FV 1811-1818 on lipospheres. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that Phe-1816 contributes to the interaction with FIXa. To evaluate FVIIIa stability, the FVIII/FV chimeras were activated by thrombin, and the decline in cofactor function was followed over time. FVIII/FV 1803-1810 and FVIII/FV 1811-1818 but not FVIII-N1810C showed a decreased FVIIIa half-life. However, when the FVIII variants were activated in presence of FIXa, only FVIII/FV 1811-1818 demonstrated an enhanced decline in cofactor function. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that the FVIII variants K1813A/K1818A, E1811A, and F1816A exhibit enhanced dissociation after activation. The results together demonstrate that the glycan at 1810 is not involved in FVIII cofactor function, and that Phe-1816 of region 1811-1818 contributes to FIXa binding. Both regions 1803-1810 and 1811-1818 contribute to FVIIIa stability. PMID:23884417

  6. A3 Domain Region 1803–1818 Contributes to the Stability of Activated Factor VIII and Includes a Binding Site for Activated Factor IX

    PubMed Central

    Bloem, Esther; Meems, Henriet; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B.

    2013-01-01

    A recent chemical footprinting study in our laboratory suggested that region 1803–1818 might contribute to A2 domain retention in activated factor VIII (FVIIIa). This site has also been implicated to interact with activated factor IX (FIXa). Asn-1810 further comprises an N-linked glycan, which seems incompatible with a role of the amino acids 1803–1818 for FIXa or A2 domain binding. In the present study, FVIIIa stability and FIXa binding were evaluated in a FVIII-N1810C variant, and two FVIII variants in which residues 1803–1810 and 1811–1818 are replaced by the corresponding residues of factor V (FV). Enzyme kinetic studies showed that only FVIII/FV 1811–1818 has a decreased apparent binding affinity for FIXa. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that fluorescent FIXa exhibits impaired complex formation with only FVIII/FV 1811–1818 on lipospheres. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that Phe-1816 contributes to the interaction with FIXa. To evaluate FVIIIa stability, the FVIII/FV chimeras were activated by thrombin, and the decline in cofactor function was followed over time. FVIII/FV 1803–1810 and FVIII/FV 1811–1818 but not FVIII-N1810C showed a decreased FVIIIa half-life. However, when the FVIII variants were activated in presence of FIXa, only FVIII/FV 1811–1818 demonstrated an enhanced decline in cofactor function. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that the FVIII variants K1813A/K1818A, E1811A, and F1816A exhibit enhanced dissociation after activation. The results together demonstrate that the glycan at 1810 is not involved in FVIII cofactor function, and that Phe-1816 of region 1811–1818 contributes to FIXa binding. Both regions 1803–1810 and 1811–1818 contribute to FVIIIa stability. PMID:23884417

  7. Evolutionary pattern of mutation in the factor IX genes of great apes: How does it compare to the pattern of recent germline mutation in patients with hemophilia B?

    SciTech Connect

    Grouse, L.H.; Ketterling, R.P.; Sommer, S.S.

    1994-09-01

    Most mutations causing hemophilia B have arisen within the past 150 years. By correcting for multiple biases, the underlying rates of spontaneous germline mutation have been estimated in the factor IX gene. From these rates, an underlying pattern of mutation has emerged. To determine if this pattern compares to a underlying pattern found in the great apes, sequence changes were determined in intronic regions of the factor IX gene. The following species were studied: Gorilla gorilla, Pan troglodytes (chimpanzee), Pongo pygmacus (orangutan) and Homo sapiens. Intronic sequences at least 200 bp from a splice junction were randomly chosen, amplified by cross-species PCR, and sequenced. These regions are expected to be subject to little if any selective pressure. Early diverged species of Old World monkeys were also studied to help determine the direction of mutational changes. A total of 62 sequence changes were observed. Initial data suggest that the average pattern since evolution of the great apes has a paucity of transitions at CpG dinucleotides and an excess of microinsertions to microdeletions when compared to the pattern observed in humans during the past 150 years (p<.05). A larger study is in progress to confirm these results.

  8. Macromolecular substrate-binding exosites on both the heavy and light chains of factor XIa mediate the formation of the Michaelis complex required for factor IX-activation.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Dipali; Marcinkiewicz, Mariola; Navaneetham, Duraiswamy; Walsh, Peter N

    2007-08-28

    Binding of factor IX (FIX) to an exosite on the heavy chain of factor XIa (FXIa) is essential for the optimal activation of FIX (Sinha, D., Seaman, F. S., and Walsh, P. N. (1987) Biochemistry 26, 3768-3775). To gain further insight into the mechanisms of activation of FIX by FXIa, we have investigated the kinetic properties of FXIa-light chain (FXIa-LC) with its active site occupied by either a reversible inhibitor of serine proteases (p-aminobenzamidine, PAB) or a small peptidyl substrate (S-2366) and have examined FIX cleavage products resulting from activation by FXIa or FXIa-LC. PAB inhibited the hydrolysis of S-2366 by FXIa-LC in a classically competitive fashion. In contrast, PAB was found to be a noncompetitive inhibitor of the activation of the macromolecular substrate FIX. Occupancy of the active site of the FXIa-LC by S-2366 also resulted in noncompetitive inhibition of FIX activation. These results demonstrate the presence of an exosite for FIX binding on the FXIa-LC remote from its active site. Furthermore, examination of the cleavage products of FIX indicated that in the absence of either Ca2+ or the heavy chain of FXIa there was substantial accumulation of the inactive intermediate FIXalpha, indicating a slower rate of cleavage of the scissile bond Arg180-Val181. We conclude that binding to two substrate-binding exosites one on the heavy chain and the other on the light chain of FXIa is required to mediate the formation of the Michaelis complex and efficient cleavages of the two spatially separated scissile bonds of FIX. PMID:17676929

  9. Sequence-specific sup 1 H NMR assignments, secondary structure, and location of the calcium binding site in the first epidermal growth factor like domain of blood coagulation factor IX

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.H.; Cheng, H.; Sweeney, W.V. ); Pardi, A. ); Tam, J.P. )

    1991-07-30

    Factor IX is a blood clotting protein that contains three regions, including a {gamma}-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain, two tandemly connected epidermal growth factor like (EGF-like) domains, and a serine protease region. The protein exhibits a high-affinity calcium binding site in the first EGF0like domain, in addition to calcium binding in the Gla domain. The first EGF-like domain, factor IX (45-87), has been synthesized. Sequence-specific resonance assignment of the peptide has been made by using 2D NMR techniques, and its secondary structure has been determined. The protein is found to have two antiparallel {beta}-sheets, and preliminary distance geometry calculations indicate that the protein has two domains, separated by Trp{sup 28}, with the overall structure being similar to that of EGF. An NMR investigation of the calcium-bound first EGF-like domain indicates the presence and location of a calcium binding site involving residues on both strands of one of the {beta}-sheets as well as the N-terminal region of the peptide. These results suggest that calcium binding in the first EGF-like domain could induce long-range (possibly interdomain) conformational changes in factor IX, rather than causing structural alterations in the EGF-like domain itself.

  10. High Purity Americium-241 for Fuel Cycle R&D Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Paul A. Lessing

    2011-07-01

    Previously the U.S. Department of Energy released Am-241 for various applications such as smoke detectors and Am-Be neutron sources for oil wells. At this date there is a shortage of usable, higher purity Am-241 in metal and oxide form available in the United States. Recently, the limited source of Am-241 has been from Russia with production being contracted to existing customers. The shortage has resulted in the price per gram rising dramatically over the last few years. DOE-NE currently has need for high purity Am-241 metal and oxide to fabricate fuel pellets for reactor testing in the Fuel Cycle R&D program. All the available high purity americium has been gathered from within the DOE system of laboratories. However, this is only a fraction of the projected needs of FCRD over the next 10 years. Therefore, FCR&D has proposed extraction and purification concepts to extract Am-241 from a mixed AmO2-PuO2 feedstock stored at the Savannah River Site. The most simple extraction system is based upon high temperature reduction using lanthanum metal with concurrent evaporation and condensation to produce high purity Am metal. Metallic americium has over a four order of magnitude higher vapor pressure than plutonium. Results from small-scale reduction experiments are presented. These results confirm thermodynamic predictions that at 1000 deg C metallic lanthanum reduces both PuO2 and AmO2. Faster kinetics are expected for temperatures up to about 1500 deg C.

  11. Formation and evolution of tweed structures on high-purity aluminum polycrystalline foils under cyclic tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, P. V.; Vlasov, I. V.; Sklyarova, E. A.; Smekalina, T. V.

    2015-10-01

    Peculiarities of formation and evolution of tweed structures on the surface of high-purity aluminum polycrystalline foils under cyclic tension were studied using an atom force microscope and a white light interferometer. Tweed structures of micron and submicron sizes were found on the foils at different number of cycles. In the range of 42,000 < N < 95,000 cycles destruction of tweed patterns is observed, which leads to their disappearance from the surface of the foils. Formation of tweed structures of various scales is discussed in terms of the Grinfeld instability.

  12. Formation and evolution of tweed structures on high-purity aluminum polycrystalline foils under cyclic tension

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, P. V.; Vlasov, I. V.; Sklyarova, E. A.; Smekalina, T. V.

    2015-10-27

    Peculiarities of formation and evolution of tweed structures on the surface of high-purity aluminum polycrystalline foils under cyclic tension were studied using an atom force microscope and a white light interferometer. Tweed structures of micron and submicron sizes were found on the foils at different number of cycles. In the range of 42,000 < N < 95,000 cycles destruction of tweed patterns is observed, which leads to their disappearance from the surface of the foils. Formation of tweed structures of various scales is discussed in terms of the Grinfeld instability.

  13. Initial Field Measurements with the Multisensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) High Purity Germanium (HPGe) Detector Array

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, James E.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Dorow, Kevin E.; Glasgow, Brian D.; Jensen, Jeffrey L.; Morris, Scott J.; Orrell, John L.; Pitts, W. Karl; Rohrer, John S.; Todd, Lindsay C.

    2010-06-29

    Abstract: The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) project has developed a new single cryostat detector array design for high purity germanium (HPGe) gamma ray spectrometers that achieves the high detection efficiency required for stand-off detection and actionable characterization of radiological threats. This approach is necessary since a high efficiency HPGe detector can only be built as an array due to limitations in growing large germanium crystals. The system is ruggedized and shock mounted for use in a variety of field applications. This paper reports on results from initial field measurements conducted in a truck and on two different boats.

  14. Formation of High-Purity Indium Oxide Nanoparticles and Their Application to Sensitive Detection of Ammonia.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Sanjeev K; Bhardwaj, Neha; Kukkar, Manil; Sharma, Amit L; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Deep, Akash

    2015-01-01

    High-purity In₂O₃ nanoparticles were recovered from scrap indium tin oxide substrates in a stepwise process involving acidic leaching, liquid-liquid extraction with a phosphine oxide extractant, and combustion of the organic phase. The morphological and structural parameters of the recovered nanoparticles were investigated to support the formation of the desired products. These In₂O₃ nanoparticles were used for sensitive sensing of ammonia gas using a four-probe electrode device. The proposed sensor offered very quick response time (around 10 s) and highly sensitive detection of ammonia (at a detection limit of 1 ppm).

  15. Effects of annealing on texture evolution of cross shear rolled high-purity Al foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Liu, Y.; Song, X.; He, J.; Zuo, L.

    2015-04-01

    The effects of annealing on recrystallization texture of cross shear rolled high-purity Al foil were investigated by orientation distribution functions (ODFs) and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The results show that the intermediate annealing is beneficial to the development of the cube texture. The cube texture can be promoted by annealing, and the critical annealing temperature is about 280 °C. The cubic orientation grains firstly nucleate, and then expand into other grains with a high growth speed, and large angle grain boundary ratio increases, finally can swallow up most of the original grains, which results in the cube texture

  16. Corrosion behavior of surface films on boron-implanted high purity iron and stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. J.; Carter, W. B.; Hochman, R. F.; Meletis, E. I.

    1985-01-01

    Boron (dose, 2 x 10 to the 17th ions/sq cm) was implanted into high purity iron, AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel, and AISI 440C martensitic stainless steel, at 40 keV. The film structure of implanted samples was examined and characterized by contrast and diffraction analyses utilizing transmission electron microscopy. The effect of B(+) ion implantation on the corrosion behavior was studied using the potentiodynamic polarization technique. Tests were performed in deaerated 1 N H2SO4 and 0.1 M NaCl solutions. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the morphology of the corroded surfaces after testing.

  17. Formation of High-Purity Indium Oxide Nanoparticles and Their Application to Sensitive Detection of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Sanjeev K.; Bhardwaj, Neha; Kukkar, Manil; Sharma, Amit L.; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Deep, Akash

    2015-01-01

    High-purity In2O3 nanoparticles were recovered from scrap indium tin oxide substrates in a stepwise process involving acidic leaching, liquid-liquid extraction with a phosphine oxide extractant, and combustion of the organic phase. The morphological and structural parameters of the recovered nanoparticles were investigated to support the formation of the desired products. These In2O3 nanoparticles were used for sensitive sensing of ammonia gas using a four-probe electrode device. The proposed sensor offered very quick response time (around 10 s) and highly sensitive detection of ammonia (at a detection limit of 1 ppm). PMID:26694415

  18. Recovery of high purity sulfuric acid from the waste acid in toluene nitration process by rectification.

    PubMed

    Song, Kai; Meng, Qingqiang; Shu, Fan; Ye, Zhengfang

    2013-01-01

    Waste sulfuric acid is a byproduct generated from numerous industrial chemical processes. It is essential to remove the impurities and recover the sulfuric acid from the waste acid. In this study the rectification method was introduced to recover high purity sulfuric acid from the waste acid generated in toluene nitration process by using rectification column. The waste acid quality before and after rectification were evaluated using UV-Vis spectroscopy, GC/MS, HPLC and other physical and chemical analysis. It was shown that five nitro aromatic compounds in the waste acid were substantially removed and high purity sulfuric acid was also recovered in the rectification process at the same time. The COD was removed by 94% and the chrominance was reduced from 1000° to 1°. The recovered sulfuric acid with the concentration reaching 98.2 wt% had a comparable quality with commercial sulfuric acid and could be recycled back into the toluene nitration process, which could avoid waste of resources and reduce the environmental impact and pollution.

  19. In-line System to Produce High-Purity Acid Solutions.

    PubMed

    Masunaga, Hiroto; Higo, Yuji; Ishii, Mizuo; Maruyama, Noboru; Yamazaki, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report a new device that generates a high-purity acid solution. It comprises three compartments divided by anion-exchange membranes and filled with ion-exchange resins. Fluorochemical cation-exchange membranes, which tolerate electrochemical wear and permit bulk flow, are inserted between each electrode and the anion-exchange resin. A bipolar boundary is a composite boundary comprising anion and cation exchangers. This device has four bipolar boundaries to separate the location of acid generation from the location where water is electrolyzed. It can tolerate high pressures, resist degradation due to electrolysis at the electrodes, and produce high-purity acid solutions that are free from gases and cationic impurities. The acid solution is generated on the basis of an electrokinetic phenomenon at the surfaces of ion-exchange resins and membranes in an electric field; its concentration can be controlled at rates from 0.01 to 100 μmol/min by adjusting the electrical current applied to the device. PMID:27302592

  20. Device to generate high purity hydroxide solution in-line for ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Masunaga, Hiroto; Higo, Yuji; Ishii, Mizuo; Maruyama, Noboru; Yamazaki, Shigeo

    2016-05-01

    Herein, we report a new device that generates a high-purity hydroxide solution in line. The device's container has three compartments that are isolated from each other by two cation exchange (CE) membranes. In each end of the container, an electrode is installed. The three compartments are filled with ion exchange resins. A bipolar boundary is a composite boundary comprising anion- and cation-exchangers. This device has two bipolar boundaries, which are used to separate the location of hydroxide solution generation from the location where water is electrolyzed. Therefore, it can produce high-purity hydroxide solutions that are free from gases and anionic impurities. The hydroxide solution is generated on the basis of an electrokinetic phenomenon at the surfaces of ion-exchange resins and membranes in an electric field; NaOH concentration can be controlled at rates from 0.01 to 100mM per 1mL/min by adjusting the electrical current (0-200mA) applied to the device. As the generated solution is used as an eluent for a suppressed anion chromatography, the electrical conductivity of the effluent from the suppressor is as low as that of ultra-pure water. Thus, the noise of the base-line electrical conductivity is improved, and so the detection limit of anions on the sub-ng/mL order can be achieved.

  1. Device to generate high purity hydroxide solution in-line for ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Masunaga, Hiroto; Higo, Yuji; Ishii, Mizuo; Maruyama, Noboru; Yamazaki, Shigeo

    2016-05-01

    Herein, we report a new device that generates a high-purity hydroxide solution in line. The device's container has three compartments that are isolated from each other by two cation exchange (CE) membranes. In each end of the container, an electrode is installed. The three compartments are filled with ion exchange resins. A bipolar boundary is a composite boundary comprising anion- and cation-exchangers. This device has two bipolar boundaries, which are used to separate the location of hydroxide solution generation from the location where water is electrolyzed. Therefore, it can produce high-purity hydroxide solutions that are free from gases and anionic impurities. The hydroxide solution is generated on the basis of an electrokinetic phenomenon at the surfaces of ion-exchange resins and membranes in an electric field; NaOH concentration can be controlled at rates from 0.01 to 100mM per 1mL/min by adjusting the electrical current (0-200mA) applied to the device. As the generated solution is used as an eluent for a suppressed anion chromatography, the electrical conductivity of the effluent from the suppressor is as low as that of ultra-pure water. Thus, the noise of the base-line electrical conductivity is improved, and so the detection limit of anions on the sub-ng/mL order can be achieved. PMID:27063368

  2. Adiabatic Calorimetry as Support to the Certification of High-Purity Liquid Reference Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldan, A.; Bosma, R.; Peruzzi, A.; van der Veen, A. M. H.; Shimizu, Y.

    2009-02-01

    The certification of high-purity liquid reference materials is supported by several analytical techniques (e.g., gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, Karl Fischer coulometry, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, differential scanning calorimetry, adiabatic calorimetry). Most of them provide information on a limited set of specific impurities present in the sample (indirect methods). Adiabatic calorimetry [1] complementarily provides the overall molar fraction of impurities with sensitivity down to few μmol · mol-1 without giving any information about the nature of the impurities present in the sample (direct method). As the combination of adiabatic calorimetry with one (or more than one) indirect chemical techniques was regarded as an optimal methodology, NMi VSL developed an adiabatic calorimetry facility for the purity determination of high-purity liquid reference materials [2]. Within the framework of collaboration with NMIJ, a benzene-certified reference material (NMIJ CRM 4002) from NMIJ was analyzed by adiabatic calorimetry at NMi VSL. The results of this measurement are reported in this paper. Good agreement with the NMIJ-certified purity value (99.992 ± 0.003) cmol · mol-1 was found. The influence of different data analysis approaches (e.g., extrapolation functions, melting ranges) on the measurement results is reported. The uncertainty of the measured purity was estimated.

  3. Isolation of high-purity anthocyanin mixtures and monomers from blueberries using combined chromatographic techniques.

    PubMed

    Wang, Erlei; Yin, Yongguang; Xu, Caina; Liu, Jingbo

    2014-01-31

    Research on the isolation and preparation of anthocyanins has intensified in recent years because of the requirements of quantitative and bioactive analyses. However, simple and effective methods for the scale purification of pure anthocyanins from natural products are rarely reported. In this study, high-purity anthocyanin mixtures and monomers were successfully isolated from wild blueberries using a combination of column chromatography and semi-preparative HPLC. We established an effective elution system to separate high-purity anthocyanin mixtures with aqueous ethanol containing 0.01% HCl first in an Amberlite XAD-7HP column (ethanol/H2O=35:65) and then in a Sephadex LH-20 column (ethanol/H2O=25:75). Crude anthocyanin extracts were isolated using the Amberlite column, and a purity of 32% was obtained based on UV-vis analysis. Three fractions of anthocyanin mixtures were isolated from the crude extracts using the Sephadex column with purities ranging from 59% to 68%. Three pure monomeric anthocyanins of malvidin-3-O-glucoside, petunidin-3-O-glucoside, and delphinidin-3-O-glucoside were also isolated by semi-preparative HPLC and identified by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS. The purities of these anthocyanins were determined by analytical HPLC and estimated to be 97.7%, 99.3%, and 95.4%, respectively. The results of this study may help promote the purification of anthocyanins from most blueberry varieties as well as from other plant materials.

  4. Recycling of high purity selenium from CIGS solar cell waste materials.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Anna M K; Foreman, Mark R StJ; Ekberg, Christian

    2014-10-01

    Copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) is a promising material in thin film solar cell production. To make CIGS solar cells more competitive, both economically and environmentally, in comparison to other energy sources, methods for recycling are needed. In addition to the generally high price of the material, significant amounts of the metals are lost in the manufacturing process. The feasibility of recycling selenium from CIGS through oxidation at elevated temperatures was therefore examined. During oxidation gaseous selenium dioxide was formed and could be separated from the other elements, which remained in solid state. Upon cooling, the selenium dioxide sublimes and can be collected as crystals. After oxidation for 1h at 800°C all of the selenium was separated from the CIGS material. Two different reduction methods for reduction of the selenium dioxide to selenium were tested. In the first reduction method an organic molecule was used as the reducing agent in a Riley reaction. In the second reduction method sulphur dioxide gas was used. Both methods resulted in high purity selenium. This proves that the studied selenium separation method could be the first step in a recycling process aimed at the complete separation and recovery of high purity elements from CIGS.

  5. Recycling of high purity selenium from CIGS solar cell waste materials.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Anna M K; Foreman, Mark R StJ; Ekberg, Christian

    2014-10-01

    Copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) is a promising material in thin film solar cell production. To make CIGS solar cells more competitive, both economically and environmentally, in comparison to other energy sources, methods for recycling are needed. In addition to the generally high price of the material, significant amounts of the metals are lost in the manufacturing process. The feasibility of recycling selenium from CIGS through oxidation at elevated temperatures was therefore examined. During oxidation gaseous selenium dioxide was formed and could be separated from the other elements, which remained in solid state. Upon cooling, the selenium dioxide sublimes and can be collected as crystals. After oxidation for 1h at 800°C all of the selenium was separated from the CIGS material. Two different reduction methods for reduction of the selenium dioxide to selenium were tested. In the first reduction method an organic molecule was used as the reducing agent in a Riley reaction. In the second reduction method sulphur dioxide gas was used. Both methods resulted in high purity selenium. This proves that the studied selenium separation method could be the first step in a recycling process aimed at the complete separation and recovery of high purity elements from CIGS. PMID:24472714

  6. Fused salt processing of impure plutonium dioxide to high-purity plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, L.J.; Christensen, D.C.; Babcock, B.R.

    1982-01-01

    A process for converting impure plutonium dioxide (approx. 96% pure) to high-purity plutonium metal (>99.9%) was developed. The process consists of reducing the oxide to an impure plutonium metal intermediate with calcium metal in molten calcium chloride. The impure intermediate metal is cast into an anode and electrorefined to produce high-purity plutonium metal. The oxide reduction step is being done now on a 0.6-kg scale with the resulting yield being >99.5%. The electrorefining is being done on a 4.0-kg scale with the resulting yield being 80 to 85%. The purity of the product, which averages 99.98%, is essentially insensitive to the purity of the feed metal. The yield, however, is directly dependent on the chemical composition of the feed. To date, approximately 250 kg of impure oxide has been converted to pure metal by this processing sequence. The availability of impure plutonium dioxide, together with the need for pure plutonium metal, makes this sequence a valuable plutonium processing tool.

  7. Recyclable Strategy for the Production of High-Purity Galacto-oligosaccharides by Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huaisheng; You, Shengping; Wang, Mengfan; Qi, Wei; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2016-07-20

    A recyclable strategy for the production of high-purity (>95%) galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) was developed using Kluyveromyces lactis in both the synthesis and purification steps. For the synthesis of GOS, ethanol-permeabilized cells (p-cells) of K. lactis were used because the enhanced permeability facilitated the mass transfer of the substrate and the release of oligosaccharide products. For the purification of GOS, non-permeabilized K. lactis cells (np-cells) were preferred as a result of their intrinsic cell membrane barrier toward GOS, which led to the selective consumption of carbohydrate. In this way, undesired glucose, galactose, and lactose in the raw GOS solution can be completely removed. This strategy is recyclable not only because of the high stability and reusability of p-cells and np-cells but also because the ethanol, which is simultaneously generated during the purification, can be reused for the preparation of p-cells. The strategy proposed in this study is a promising candidate for the efficient production of high-purity GOS.

  8. Process for producing high purity isoolefins and dimers thereof by dissociation of ethers

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Jones, E.M. Jr.; Hearn, D.

    1984-05-08

    Alkyl tertiary butyl ether or alkyl tertiary amyl ether is dissociated by vapor phase contact with a cation acidic exchange resin at temperatures in the range of 150 to 250 F at LHSV of 0.1 to 20 to produce a stream consisting of unreacted ether, isobutene or isoamylene and an alcohol corresponding to the alkyl radical. After the alcohol is removed, the ether/isoolefin stream may be fractionated to obtain a high purity isoolefin (99+%) or the ether/isoolefin stream can be contacted in liquid phase with a cation acidic exchange resin to selectively dimerize the isoolefin in a highly exothermic reaction, followed by fractionation of the dimerization product to produce high purity diisoolefin (97+%). In the case where the alkyl is C[sub 3] to C[sub 6] and the corresponding alcohol is produced on dissociation of the ether, combined dissociation-distillation may be carried out such that isoolefin is the overhead product and alcohol the bottom. 2 figs.

  9. Process for producing high purity isoolefins and dimers thereof by dissociation of ethers

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Jones, Jr., Edward M.; Hearn, Dennis

    1984-01-01

    Alkyl tertiary butyl ether or alkyl tertiary amyl ether is dissociated by vapor phase contact with a cation acidic exchange resin at temperatures in the range of 150.degree. to 250.degree. F. at LHSV of 0.1 to 20 to produce a stream consisting of unreacted ether, isobutene or isoamylene and an alcohol corresponding to the alkyl radical. After the alcohol is removed, the ether/isoolefin stream may be fractionated to obtain a high purity isoolefin (99+%) or the ether/isoolefin stream can be contacted in liquid phase with a cation acidic exchange resin to selectively dimerize the isoolefin in a highly exothermic reaction, followed by fractionation of the dimerization product to produce high purity diisoolefin (97+%). In the case where the alkyl is C.sub.3 to C.sub.6 and the corresponding alcohol is produced on dissociation of the ether, combined dissociation-distillation may be carried out such that isoolefin is the overhead product and alcohol the bottom.

  10. The behavior of high-purity, low-density air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Helminiak, Yanar NM

    2009-12-01

    Research on the behavior of high-purity, low-density (85%) air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBC) with NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying is described. The microstructure of the APS topcoats is one variable in this study intended to maximize the coating thicknesses that can be applied without spallation and to minimize the thermal conduction through the YSZ layer. The specimens were evaluated using cyclic oxidation tests and important properties of the TBCs, such as resistance to sintering and phase transformation, were determined. The high purity resulted in top coats which are highly resistant to sintering and transformation from the metastable tetragonal phase to the equilibrium mixture of monoclinic and cubic phases. The porous topcoat microstructure also resulted in significant durability during thermal cycling. The actual failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on topcoat thickness, CTE of the superalloy substrate and the nature of the thermal exposure.

  11. Surface preparation for high purity alumina ceramics enabling direct brazing in hydrogen atmospheres

    DOEpatents

    Cadden, Charles H.; Yang, Nancy Yuan Chi; Hosking, Floyd M.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for preparing the surface of a high purity alumina ceramic or sapphire specimen that enables direct brazing in a hydrogen atmosphere using an active braze alloy. The present invention also relates to a method for directly brazing a high purity alumina ceramic or sapphire specimen to a ceramic or metal member using this method of surface preparation, and to articles produced by this brazing method. The presence of silicon, in the form of a SiO.sub.2 -containing surface layer, can more than double the tensile bond strength in alumina ceramic joints brazed in a hydrogen atmosphere using an active Au-16Ni-0.75 Mo-1.75V filler metal. A thin silicon coating applied by PVD processing can, after air firing, produce a semi-continuous coverage of the alumina surface with a SiO.sub.2 film. Room temperature tensile strength was found to be proportional to the fraction of air fired surface covered by silicon-containing films. Similarly, the ratio of substrate fracture versus interface separation was also related to the amount of surface silicon present prior to brazing. This process can replace the need to perform a "moly-manganese" metallization step.

  12. Process for producing high purity silicon nitride by the direct reaction between elemental silicon and nitrogen-hydrogen liquid reactants

    DOEpatents

    Pugar, Eloise A.; Morgan, Peter E. D.

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for producing, at a low temperature, a high purity reaction product consisting essentially of silicon, nitrogen, and hydrogen which can then be heated to produce a high purity alpha silicon nitride. The process comprises: reacting together a particulate elemental high purity silicon with a high purity nitrogen-hydrogen reactant in its liquid state (such as ammonia or hydrazine) having the formula: N.sub.n H.sub.(n+m) wherein: n=1-4 and m=2 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is straight chain, and 0 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is cyclic. High purity silicon nitride can be formed from this intermediate product by heating the intermediate product at a temperature of from about 1200.degree.-1700.degree. C. for a period from about 15 minutes up to about 2 hours to form a high purity alpha silicon nitride product. The discovery of the existence of a soluble Si-N-H intermediate enables chemical pathways to be explored previously unavailable in conventional solid state approaches to silicon-nitrogen ceramics.

  13. Process for producing high purity silicon nitride by the direct reaction between elemental silicon and nitrogen-hydrogen liquid reactants

    DOEpatents

    Pugar, E.A.; Morgan, P.E.D.

    1987-09-15

    A process is disclosed for producing, at a low temperature, a high purity reaction product consisting essentially of silicon, nitrogen, and hydrogen which can then be heated to produce a high purity alpha silicon nitride. The process comprises: reacting together a particulate elemental high purity silicon with a high purity nitrogen-hydrogen reactant in its liquid state (such as ammonia or hydrazine) having the formula: N/sub n/H/sub (n+m)/ wherein: n = 1--4 and m = 2 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is straight chain, and 0 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is cyclic. High purity silicon nitride can be formed from this intermediate product by heating the intermediate product at a temperature of from about 1200--1700/degree/C for a period from about 15 minutes up to about 2 hours to form a high purity alpha silicon nitride product. The discovery of the existence of a soluble Si/endash/N/endash/H intermediate enables chemical pathways to be explored previously unavailable in conventional solid-state approaches to silicon-nitrogen ceramics

  14. Extraction-spectrometric determination of lead in high-purity aluminium salts.

    PubMed

    Koksal, Jiří; Synek, Václav; Janos, Pavel

    2002-08-23

    Trace amounts of lead were determined in high purity aluminium salts (especially in ammonium aluminium sulfate) using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) after extractive pre-concentration and matrix separation. Metals were extracted from the aluminium matrix in the form of chelates with ammonium pyrolidine dithoocarbamate into methyl isobutyketone. The organic extract was digested with nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The limit of detection for the determination of lead in crystalline ammonium aluminium sulfate was ca. 0.044 mug g(-1). The relative expanded uncertainty of the lead determination was ca. 23% at the level of 0.2 mug g(-1) and ca. 16% at the level of 1.0 mug g(-1). The main uncertainty contribution was associated with repeatability of the whole analytical procedure. PMID:18968757

  15. The relationship between induction time for pitting and pitting potential for high purity aluminum.

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Frederick Douglas; Vandenavyle, Justin J.; Martinez, Michael A.

    2003-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if a distribution of pit induction times (from potentiostatic experiments) could be used to predict a distribution of pitting potentials (from potentiodynamic experiments) for high-purity aluminum. Pit induction times were measured for 99.99 Al in 50 mM NaCl at potentials of -0.35, -0.3, -0.25, and -0.2 V vs. saturated calomel electrode. Analysis of the data showed that the pit germination rate generally was an exponential function of the applied potential; however, a subset of the germination rate data appeared to be mostly potential insensitive. The germination rate behavior was used as an input into a mathematical relationship that provided a prediction of pitting potential distribution. Good general agreement was found between the predicted distribution and an experimentally determined pitting potential distribution, suggesting that the relationships presented here provide a suitable means for quantitatively describing pit germination rate.

  16. Application of Thermodynamic Calculations to the Pyro-refining Process for Production of High Purity Bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezbahul-Islam, Mohammad; Belanger, Frederic; Chartrand, Patrice; Jung, In-Ho; Coursol, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    The present work has been performed with the aim to optimize the existing process for the production of high purity bismuth (99.999 pct). A thermo-chemical database including most of the probable impurities of bismuth (Bi-X, X = Ag, Au, Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, S, Sb, Sn, Si, Te, Zn) has been constructed to perform different thermodynamic calculations required for the refining process. Thermodynamic description for eight of the selected binaries, Bi-Ca, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, S, Sb, and Sn, has been given in the current paper. Using the current database, different thermodynamic calculations have been performed to explain the steps involved in the bismuth refining process.

  17. The importance of Soret transport in the production of high purity silicon for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.

    1985-01-01

    Temperature-gradient-driven diffusion, or Soret transport, of silicon vapor and liquid droplets is analyzed under conditions typical of current production reactors for obtaining high purity silicon for solar cells. Contrary to the common belief that Soret transport is negligible, it is concluded that some 15-20 percent of the silicon vapor mass flux to the reactor walls is caused by the high temperature gradients that prevail inside such reactors. Moreover, since collection of silicon is also achieved via deposition of silicon droplets onto the walls, the Soret transport mechanism becomes even more crucial due to size differences between diffusing species. It is shown that for droplets in the 0.01 to 1 micron diameter range, collection by Soret transport dominates both Brownian and turbulent mechanisms.

  18. Crystallographic Analysis of Nucleation at Hardness Indentations in High-Purity Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chaoling; Zhang, Yubin; Lin, Fengxiang; Wu, Guilin; Liu, Qing; Juul Jensen, Dorte

    2016-08-01

    Nucleation at Vickers hardness indentations has been studied in high-purity aluminum cold-rolled 12 pct. Electron channeling contrast was used to measure the size of the indentations and to detect nuclei, while electron backscattering diffraction was used to determine crystallographic orientations. It is found that indentations are preferential nucleation sites. The crystallographic orientations of the deformed grains affect the hardness and the nucleation potentials at the indentations. Higher hardness gives increased nucleation probabilities. Orientation relationships between nuclei developed at different indentations within one original grain are analyzed and it is found that the orientation distribution of the nuclei is far from random. It is suggested that it relates to the orientations present near the indentation tips which in turn depend on the orientation of the selected grain in which they form. Finally, possible nucleation mechanisms are briefly discussed.

  19. In-growth of an electrically active defect in high-purity silicon after proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nylandsted Larsen, A.; Juul Pedersen, H.; Christian Petersen, M.; Privitera, V.; Gurimskaya, Y.; Mesli, A.

    2013-12-14

    Defect-related energy levels in the lower half of the band gap of silicon have been studied with transient-capacitance techniques in high-purity, carbon and oxygen lean, plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition grown, n-and p-type silicon layers after 2-MeV proton irradiations at temperatures at or just below room temperature. The in-growth of a distinct line in deep-level transient spectroscopy spectra, corresponding to a level in the band gap at E{sub V} + 0.357 eV where E{sub V} is the energy of the valence band edge, takes place for anneal temperatures at around room temperature with an activation energy of 0.95 ± 0.08 eV. The line disappears at an anneal temperature of around 450 K. The corresponding defect is demonstrated not to contain boron, carbon, oxygen, or phosphorus. Possible defect candidates are discussed.

  20. Production of carbon monoxide-free hydrogen and helium from a high-purity source

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Timothy Christopher; Farris, Thomas Stephen

    2008-11-18

    The invention provides vacuum swing adsorption processes that produce an essentially carbon monoxide-free hydrogen or helium gas stream from, respectively, a high-purity (e.g., pipeline grade) hydrogen or helium gas stream using one or two adsorber beds. By using physical adsorbents with high heats of nitrogen adsorption, intermediate heats of carbon monoxide adsorption, and low heats of hydrogen and helium adsorption, and by using vacuum purging and high feed stream pressures (e.g., pressures of as high as around 1,000 bar), pipeline grade hydrogen or helium can purified to produce essentially carbon monoxide -free hydrogen and helium, or carbon monoxide, nitrogen, and methane-free hydrogen and helium.

  1. Efficient single photon emission from a high-purity hexagonal boron nitride crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, L. J.; Pelini, T.; Waselowski, V.; Maze, J. R.; Gil, B.; Cassabois, G.; Jacques, V.

    2016-09-01

    Among a variety of layered materials used as building blocks in van der Waals heterostructures, hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) appears as an ideal platform for hosting optically active defects owing to its large band gap (˜6 eV ). Here we study the optical response of a high-purity hBN crystal under green laser illumination. By means of photon correlation measurements, we identify individual defects emitting a highly photostable fluorescence under ambient conditions. A detailed analysis of the photophysical properties reveals a high quantum efficiency of the radiative transition, leading to a single photon source with very high brightness (˜4 ×106 counts s-1). These results illustrate how the wide range of applications offered by hBN could be further extended to photonic-based quantum information science and metrology.

  2. Physical and mechanical metallurgy of high purity Nb for accelerator cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieler, T. R.; Wright, N. T.; Pourboghrat, F.; Compton, C.; Hartwig, K. T.; Baars, D.; Zamiri, A.; Chandrasekaran, S.; Darbandi, P.; Jiang, H.; Skoug, E.; Balachandran, S.; Ice, G. E.; Liu, W.

    2010-03-01

    In the past decade, high Q values have been achieved in high purity Nb superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Fundamental understanding of the physical metallurgy of Nb that enables these achievements is beginning to reveal what challenges remain to establish reproducible and cost-effective production of high performance SRF cavities. Recent studies of dislocation substructure development and effects of recrystallization arising from welding and heat treatments and their correlations with cavity performance are considered. With better fundamental understanding of the effects of dislocation substructure evolution and recrystallization on electron and phonon conduction, as well as the interior and surface states, it will be possible to design optimal processing paths for cost-effective performance using approaches such as hydroforming, which minimizes or eliminates welds in a cavity.

  3. Observation of Impact Ionization of Shallow States in Sub-Kelvin, High-Purity Germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, A.; Sadoulet, B.; Sundqvist, K. M.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the observation of impact ionization processes involving shallow impurity states in a sub-Kelvin, high-purity n-type germanium detector similar to those used by direct detection dark matter experiments such as the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search. An optical fiber is used to generate packets of charge carriers near one surface of the detector. The charge carriers drift to the opposite surface by application of an electric field. The resulting drift current is measured by a high-speed charge amplifier. The onset of impact ionization for both electron and hole transport is clearly observed in the drift current as the applied electric field is increased above ≈ 5 V/cm. We present the effective charge collection efficiency and trapping length as a function of applied electric field for electrons and holes. We estimate the impact ionization cross section to be on the order of 5× 10^{-13} mathrm {cm}^2.

  4. High Strain-Rate Response of High Purity Aluminum at Temperatures Approaching Melt

    SciTech Connect

    Grunschel, S E; Clifton, R J; Jiao, T

    2010-01-28

    High-temperature, pressure-shear plate impact experiments were conducted to investigate the rate-controlling mechanisms of the plastic response of high-purity aluminum at high strain rates (10{sup 6} s{sup -1}) and at temperatures approaching melt. Since the melting temperature of aluminum is pressure dependent, and a typical pressure-shear plate impact experiment subjects the sample to large pressures (2 GPa-7 GPa), a pressure-release type experiment was used to reduce the pressure in order to measure the shearing resistance at temperatures up to 95% of the current melting temperature. The measured shearing resistance was remarkably large (50 MPa at a shear strain of 2.5) for temperatures this near melt. Numerical simulations conducted using a version of the Nemat-Nasser/Isaacs constitutive equation, modified to model the mechanism of geometric softening, appear to capture adequately the hardening/softening behavior observed experimentally.

  5. A Rapid and Cost-Effective Laser Based Synthesis of High Purity Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Gondall, M A; Qahtan, Talal F; Dastageer, M A; Yamani, Z H; Anjum, D H

    2016-01-01

    A rapid and cost effective method is developed to synthesize high purity cadmium Selenide (CdSe) quantum dots in acetone medium using second harmonic of Nd:YAG nanosecond pulsed laser of 532 nm wavelength. The thermal agglomeration due the nanosecond pulse duration of the laser was successfully eliminated by using unfocussed laser beam and thereby providing a favorable conditions for the synthesis of quantum dots having the grain size of 3 nm. The morphological and optical characterizations like XRD, HRTEM, optical absorption of the synthesized CdSe quantum dots, reveal that the material possesses the similar characteristics of the one synthesized through cumbersome wet chemical methods. Relative to the CdSe bulk material, the synthesized CdSe quantum dots showed a blue shift in the measured band gap energy from near infrared spectral region to visible region, making this material very attractive for many solar energy harvesting applications like photo-catalysis and solar cells. PMID:27398538

  6. URANIUM RECOVERY AND PURIFICATION PROCESS AND PRODUCTION OF HIGH PURITY URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Bailes, R.H.; Long, R.S.; Grinstead, R.R.

    1957-09-17

    A process is described wherein an anionic exchange technique is employed to separate uramium from a large variety of impurities. Very efficient and economical purification of contamimated uranium can be achieved by treatment of the contaminated uranium to produce a solution containing a high concentration of chloride. Under these conditions the uranium exists as an aniomic chloride complex. Then the uranium chloride complex is adsorbed from the solution on an aniomic exchange resin, whereby a portion of the impurities remain in the solution and others are retained with the uramium by the resin. The adsorbed impurities are then removed by washing the resin with pure concentrated hydrochloric acid, after which operation the uranium is eluted with pure water yielding an acidic uranyl chloride solution of high purity.

  7. Map showing high-purity silica sand of Middle Ordovician age in the Midwestern states

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ketner, Keith B.

    1979-01-01

    Certain quartz sands of Middle Ordovician age in the Midwestern States are well known for their purity and are exploited for a wide variety of industrial uses. The principal Middle Ordovician formations containing high-purity sands are the St. Peter Sandstone which crops out extensively from Minnesota to Arkansas; the Everton Formation principally of Arkansas; and the Oil Creek, McLish, and Tulip Creek Formations (all of the Simpson Group) of Oklahoma. The St. Peter and sandy beds in the other formations are commonly called "sandstones," but a more appropriate term is "sands" for in most fresh exposures they are completely uncemented or very weakly cemented. On exposure to air, uncemented sands usually become "case hardened" where evaporating ground water precipitates mineral matter at the surface; but this is a surficial effect. This report summarizes the available information on the extent of exposures, range of grain size, and chemical composition of the Middle Ordovician sands.

  8. Effect of Rest Periods on Fatigue of High-Purity Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, J. W.; Lemaitre, J.; Valluri, S. R.

    1958-01-01

    The effect of rest periods on the fatigue life of high-purity aluminum was investigated under two conditions. In one the specimens were tested at elevated temperatures and the rest periods were given at room temperature; in the second the specimens were tested at room temperature and the rest periods were given at elevated temperature. The results obtained indicated that the increase of life was negligible in the first condition, but an increase of life may be obtained in the second. In order to check this increase in fatigue life a second series of tests has been carried out on a different lot of specimens and again an increase in life was found. This increase of life appeared to be from 30 to 60 percent from the average of the results of 20 tests for each test condition.

  9. Preparation and characterization of (10)B boric acid with high purity for nuclear industry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijiang; Liu, Tianyu; Xu, Jiao

    2016-01-01

    Boric acid is often added into coolant as neutron capture agent for pressurized water reactor, whose amount is influenced by its abundance and purity. Therefore, the preparation of enriched (10)B boric acid with high purity is beneficial to nuclear industry. (10)B is also used in developing tumor-specific boronated drugs in boron neutron capture therapy. The boronated drug can be administered to patient intravenously, intratumorally, or deposited at tumor site in surgical excision. Thus, enriched (10)B boric acid is of practical significance in the field of medicine. Self-made boron trifluoride-methanol-complex solution was selected as one of the experimental reagents, and the preparation of (10)B acid was realized by one-step reaction for the complexes with water and calcium chloride. The determination of electrical conductivity in reaction process proves that the optimum reaction time was 16-20 h. Furthermore, the effect of reaction time, ratio of calcium chloride to complex as well as the amount of water on the purity and yield of boric acid was investigated. Finally, the optimum reaction time was 20 h, the optimal solid-liquid ratio (molar ratio) was 3:1, and the amount of water was 1 L of deionized water for each mol of the complex. H2O2 was added in the reaction process to remove Fe(2+). After recrystallization, IR spectra of (10)B boric acid was measured and compared with standard to verify the product of boric acid. The feasibility of the preparation method was determined by the detection of XRD of boric acid. To observe the morphology by polarizing microscope, crystal structure was obtained. The purity of the final product is 99.95 %, and the yield is 96.47 %. The ion concentration of boric acid accords with the national standard of high purity, which was determined by ICP. PMID:27516940

  10. Recycling of high purity selenium from CIGS solar cell waste materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafsson, Anna M.K. Foreman, Mark R.StJ.; Ekberg, Christian

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A new method for recycling of selenium from CIGS solar cell materials is presented. • Separation of selenium as selenium dioxide after heating in oxygen atmosphere. • Complete selenium separation after oxidation of <63 μm particles at 800 °C for 1 h. • After reduction of selenium dioxide the selenium purity was higher than 99.999 wt%. - Abstract: Copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) is a promising material in thin film solar cell production. To make CIGS solar cells more competitive, both economically and environmentally, in comparison to other energy sources, methods for recycling are needed. In addition to the generally high price of the material, significant amounts of the metals are lost in the manufacturing process. The feasibility of recycling selenium from CIGS through oxidation at elevated temperatures was therefore examined. During oxidation gaseous selenium dioxide was formed and could be separated from the other elements, which remained in solid state. Upon cooling, the selenium dioxide sublimes and can be collected as crystals. After oxidation for 1 h at 800 °C all of the selenium was separated from the CIGS material. Two different reduction methods for reduction of the selenium dioxide to selenium were tested. In the first reduction method an organic molecule was used as the reducing agent in a Riley reaction. In the second reduction method sulphur dioxide gas was used. Both methods resulted in high purity selenium. This proves that the studied selenium separation method could be the first step in a recycling process aimed at the complete separation and recovery of high purity elements from CIGS.

  11. Preparation and characterization of (10)B boric acid with high purity for nuclear industry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijiang; Liu, Tianyu; Xu, Jiao

    2016-01-01

    Boric acid is often added into coolant as neutron capture agent for pressurized water reactor, whose amount is influenced by its abundance and purity. Therefore, the preparation of enriched (10)B boric acid with high purity is beneficial to nuclear industry. (10)B is also used in developing tumor-specific boronated drugs in boron neutron capture therapy. The boronated drug can be administered to patient intravenously, intratumorally, or deposited at tumor site in surgical excision. Thus, enriched (10)B boric acid is of practical significance in the field of medicine. Self-made boron trifluoride-methanol-complex solution was selected as one of the experimental reagents, and the preparation of (10)B acid was realized by one-step reaction for the complexes with water and calcium chloride. The determination of electrical conductivity in reaction process proves that the optimum reaction time was 16-20 h. Furthermore, the effect of reaction time, ratio of calcium chloride to complex as well as the amount of water on the purity and yield of boric acid was investigated. Finally, the optimum reaction time was 20 h, the optimal solid-liquid ratio (molar ratio) was 3:1, and the amount of water was 1 L of deionized water for each mol of the complex. H2O2 was added in the reaction process to remove Fe(2+). After recrystallization, IR spectra of (10)B boric acid was measured and compared with standard to verify the product of boric acid. The feasibility of the preparation method was determined by the detection of XRD of boric acid. To observe the morphology by polarizing microscope, crystal structure was obtained. The purity of the final product is 99.95 %, and the yield is 96.47 %. The ion concentration of boric acid accords with the national standard of high purity, which was determined by ICP.

  12. Cyanex 923 as the extractant in a rare earth element impurity analysis of high-purity cerium oxide.

    PubMed

    Duan, Taicheng; Li, Hongfei; Kang, JianZhen; Chen, Hangting

    2004-06-01

    In this work, the feasibility of employing Cyanex 923 as an extractant into the non-cerium REE (rare earth elements) impurity analysis of high-purity cerium oxide was investigated. Through investigations on the choice of the extraction medium, the optimium extraction acidity, matrix Ce4+ effect on the non-cerium REE ion extraction, the optimium extractant concentration and suitable extracting time, and oscillation strengh, it was found that when the phase ratio was at 1:1 and the acicidity was about 2% H2SO4, by gently shaking by hand for about 2 min, 10 mL of 30% Cyanex 923 could not extract even for a 20 ng amount of non-cerium REE3+ ions. However, the extraction efficiency for Ce4+ of 100 mg total amount under the same conditions was about 96%, indicating that a 25-fold preconcentration factor could be achieved. Thus, it was concluded that Cyanex 923 could be used in a REE impurity analysis of 99.9999% or so pure cerium oxide for primary sepapation to elimilate matrix-induced interferences encountered in an ICP-MS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy) determination.

  13. Intergranular Corrosion for Extra High Purity Austenitic Stainless Steel in Boiling Nitric Acid with Cr(VI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioka, Ikuo; Kato, Chiaki; Kiuchi, Kiyoshi; Nakayama, Junpei

    Austenitic stainless steels suffer intergranular attack in boiling nitric acid with oxidants. The intergranular corrosion is mainly caused by the segregation of impurities at the grain. An extra high purity austenitic stainless steel (EHP alloys) was developed with conducting the new multiple refined melting technique in order to suppress the total harmful impurities less than 100ppm. The corrosion behavior of type 310 EHP alloy with respect to nitric acid solution with highly oxidizing ions (boiling 8kmol/m3 HNO3 solutions containing 1kg/m3 Cr(VI) ions) was investigated. The straining, aging and recrystallizing (SAR) treated type 310 EHP alloy showed superior corrosion resistance for intergranular attack than solution annealed (ST) type 310 EHP alloy with same impurity level. Boron segregation at the grain boundary was detected in only ST specimen using a Fission Track Etching method. It is believed that the segregated boron along the grain boundaries in type 310 EHP alloy was one of main factor of intergranular corrosion. The SAR treatment was effective to restrain the intergranular corrosion for type 310 EHP alloy with B less than 7ppm.

  14. Enhanced production of human serum albumin by fed-batch culture of Hansenula polymorpha with high-purity oxygen.

    PubMed

    Youn, Jong Kyu; Shang, Longan; Kim, Moon Il; Jeong, Chang Moon; Chang, Ho Nam; Hahm, Moon Sun; Rhee, Sang Ki; Kang, Hyun Ah

    2010-11-01

    Fed-batch cultures of Hansenula polymorpha were studied to develop an efficient biosystem to produce recombinant human serum albumin (HSA). To comply with this purpose, we used high purity oxygen supplying strategy to increase viable cell density in a bioreactor and enhance the production of target protein. A mutant strain, H. polymorpha GOT7 was utilized in this study as a host strain in both 5-L and 30-L scale fermentors. To supply high purity oxygen into a bioreactor, nearly 100 % high purity oxygen from commercial bomb or higher than 93 % oxygen available in-situ from a pressure swing adsorption oxygen generator (PSA) was employed. Under the optimal fermentation of H. polymorpha with high purity oxygen, the final cell densities and produced HSA concentrations were 24.6 g/L and 5.1 g/L in the 5-L fermentor, and 24.8 g/L and 4.5 g/L in the 30-L fermentor, respectively. These were about 2-10 times higher than those obtained in air-based fed-batch fermentations. The discrepancies between the 5-L and 30-L fermentors with air supply were presumably due to the higher contribution of surface aeration over submerged aeration in the 5-L fermentor. This study, therefore, proved the positive effect of high purity oxygen to enhance viable cell density as well as target recombinant protein production in microbial fermentations. PMID:21124059

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of coagulation factor IX-binding protein from habu snake venom at pH 6.5 and 4.6

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Shikamoto, Yasuo; Fujimoto, Zui; Morita, Takashi; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    Crystals of habu coagulation factor IX-binding protein have been obtained at pH 6.5 and 4.6 and characterized by X-ray diffraction. Coagulation factor IX-binding protein isolated from Trimeresurus flavoviridis (IX-bp) is a C-type lectin-like protein. It is an anticoagulant protein consisting of homologous subunits A and B. The subunits both contain a Ca{sup 2+}-binding site with differing affinity (K{sub d} values of 14 and 130 µM at pH 7.5). These binding characteristics are pH-dependent; under acidic conditions, the affinity of the low-affinity site was reduced considerably. In order to identify which site has high affinity and also to investigate the Ca{sup 2+}-releasing mechanism, IX-bp was crystallized at pH 6.5 and 4.6. The crystals at pH 6.5 and 4.6 diffracted to 1.72 and 2.29 Å resolution, respectively; the former crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.7, b = 63.5, c = 66.9 Å, β = 117.0°, while the latter belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with a = 134.1, b = 37.8, c = 55.8 Å, β = 110.4°.

  16. How precisely can data from transgenic mouse mutation-detection systems be extrapolated to humans?: lesions from the human factor IX gene.

    PubMed

    Sommer, S S; Ketterling, R P

    1994-06-01

    Transgenic mutation-detection systems have been pioneered in mice, but the approach is applicable to any species in which transgenic animals can be generated. The observed mutations seen in mutation-detection systems are influenced by the underlying pattern of mutation, i.e., the mutational pattern that occurs in wild-type organisms in endogenous segments of DNA that are not under selective pressure. Unfortunately, the biology of most genes and assays markedly skew the underlying pattern of mutation. Herein, we raise multiple issues that must be addressed in order to estimate the underlying pattern of spontaneous mutation from transgenic mouse mutation-detection systems. If these issues can be addressed, the underlying pattern of spontaneous mutation can then be deduced for multiple cell types and for transgenes integrated into different parts of the genome. Even though transgenic methodology cannot be applied directly to humans, it is likely that comparable data on the underlying pattern of spontaneous mutation will be available in humans. Such data are currently available for germline mutations in the factor IX gene. These data are reviewed because of their relevance to two of the multiple issues that must be addressed in transgenic mouse mutation-detection systems: (1) How can the underlying pattern of mutation be deduced from the observed pattern? and (2) How similar are the underlying patterns of mutation in humans and in mice? The analysis of recent germ-line mutation in the factor IX gene yield estimates of the mutation rates per base pair per generation. In brief, the mutation rates vary from 0.037 x 10(-10) for deletions (> 20 bp) to 360 x 10(-10) for transitions at the dinucleotide CpG. If these mutation rates are extrapolated to the entire genome, the aggregate mutation rate is estimated to be 36 x 10(-10). This implies that the diploid genome of each person contains about 21 de novo mutations. In the future, the underlying pattern of spontaneous

  17. High-purity propionate production from glycerol in mixed culture fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Wang, Ting; Shen, Nan; Zhang, Fang; Zeng, Raymond J

    2016-11-01

    High-purity propionate production from glycerol in mixed culture fermentation (MCF) induced by high ammonium concentration was investigated. Fed-batch experiments revealed that higher ammonium concentration (>2.9g/L) had simultaneous negative effects on acetate and propionate degradation. Propionate production and yield was up to 22.6g/L and 0.45g COD/g COD glycerol, respectively, with a purity of 96%. Sequential batch experiments demonstrated that the yields of propionate were 0.3±0.05, 0.32±0.01, and 0.34±0.03g COD/g COD at a glycerol concentration of 2.78, 4.38, and 5.56g/L, respectively, and the purity of propionate was 91-100%. Microbial community analysis showed that the phylum Firmicutes dominated the bacterial community at different glycerol concentrations. However, the Methanosaeta population decreased from 46% to 6% when glycerol concentration increased from 2.78 to 5.56g/L, resulting in lower acetate degradation rate. Thus, the present study might provide an alternative option for the production of propionate from glycerol via MCF. PMID:27544916

  18. Determination of halogens and sulfur in high-purity polyimide by IC after digestion by MIC.

    PubMed

    Krzyzaniak, Sindy R; Santos, Rafael F; Dalla Nora, Flavia M; Cruz, Sandra M; Flores, Erico M M; Mello, Paola A

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a method for sample preparation of high-purity polyimide was proposed for halogens and sulfur determination by ion chromatography (IC) with conductivity detection and, alternatively, by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A relatively high polyimide mass (600mg) was completely digested by microwave-induced combustion (MIC) using 20bar of O2 and 50mmolL(-1) NH4OH as absorbing solution. These conditions allowed final solutions with low carbon content (<10mgL(-1)) and suitable pH for analysis by both IC and ICP-MS. The accuracy was evaluated using a certified reference material of polymer for Cl, Br and S and spike recovery experiments for all analytes. No statistical difference (t-test, 95% of confidence level) was observed between the results obtained for Cl, Br and S by IC after MIC and the certified values. In addition, spike recoveries obtained for F, Cl, Br, I and S ranged from 94% to 101%. The proposed method was suitable for polyimide decomposition for further determination of halogens and sulfur by IC and by ICP-MS (Br and I only). Taking into account the lack of methods and the difficulty of bringing this material into solution, MIC can be considered as a suitable alternative for the decomposition of polyimide for routine quality control of halogens and sulfur using IC or ICP-MS. PMID:27343595

  19. Characterization of High-purity Germanium Crystals for Rare Event Physics Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Miranda

    2012-10-01

    Germanium detectors are made with high-purity crystals grown in a hydrogen atmosphere at the University of South Dakota. Before these crystals can be effectively utilized, they need to be characterized for their purity, dislocation density and carrier mobility. These measurements will provide feedback to improve the crystal growth process. X-ray diffraction is used to determine the orientation of grown crystals and quality of crystalline structure. Dislocations occur when the crystal lattice structure of the germanium does not stay uniform throughout the layers. Dislocation density should be within a range of 100-10,000/cm^3 in order to avoid hydrogen-bonding issues. Our group has achieved acceptable dislocation densities of 3294/cm^2 and 7361/cm^2. The crystals have reached purity levels of 99.99999999999%, but remaining unintentional impurities need to be identified to verify their nature and source. We used Photothermal Ionization Spectroscopy to determine shallow level impurities. These results are incorporated with the Van Der Pauw Hall Effect measurement, which is used to determine whether the crystal is n-type or p-type, as well as the carrier concentration and mobility. The dominant impurities are Al, B, and P. We show an entire calibration program in our research group.

  20. Multidimensional Study on Spall Behavior of High-Purity Copper Under Sliding Detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Peng, Zhiqiang; Guo, Zhaoliang; Luo, Shuhong; Tang, Tiegang; Hu, Haibo; Zhang, Qingming

    2015-09-01

    The spall behaviors of high-purity copper samples with different heat treatment histories were investigated using optical microscopy and X-ray computer tomography (XRCT). The spall samples were obtained by sliding detonation experiments at low pressures (2 to 4 GPa). It was found that the spall planes created by sliding detonation in this experiment are similar to the spall planes created by plate impact test, except for more secondary damage residual around the main spall plane. The results of damage degree, the shape, and the distributions of voids obtained by the means of metallography (2D) and XRCT (3D) statistics were consistent. For similar microstructure, the maximum damage degree and damage zone width increase with increasing shock stress. Whereas the ranges of voids distribution parallel to the shock stress direction decreases with the increasing of shock stress. For the shock stress is similar, the shape of voids in annealed samples are closed to spheres, their mean flatness is 0.51. The voids in samples with thermo-mechanical treatment histories are sheet like with mean flatness 0.16. The difference in grain size (40 and 9 μm) may be the main reason of such difference.

  1. Detection of gamma rays using a coupled array of high-purity germanium detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debiak, T. W.; Bocskor, S. J.; D'Agostino, M. D.; Schneid, E. J.; Hughlock, B. W.

    1990-12-01

    The characteristics of a seven-element hexagonal close-packed array of high-purity germanium detectors were measured. The energy resolution or full width at half maximum (FWHM) and full width at 10 percent maximum (FW.1M) were measured in both the uncoupled mode and the sum-coincidence mode between 333 keV and 2.612 MeV. The fractional peak efficiency improvement obtained in sum-coincidence mode compared with the uncoupled mode increased from 0 percent at 80 keV to 19.7 percent at 2.612 MeV. A Monte Carlo code developed to compare these results with theoretical models shows substantial agreement with experiments from 80 keV to 1.332 MeV. A description of the detector, signal processing electronics, data acquisition system, and software is given. A technique based on real-time compensation of gain and offset drift is developed to minimize the peak broadening in real-time sum-coincidence spectra. This technique allows data acquisition to commence shortly after turn-on while the system approaches temperature stabilization.

  2. Optimization of extraction of high purity all-trans-lycopene from tomato pulp waste.

    PubMed

    Poojary, Mahesha M; Passamonti, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to optimize the extraction of pure all-trans-lycopene from the pulp fractions of tomato processing waste. A full factorial design (FFD) consisting of four independent variables including extraction temperature (30-50 °C), time (1-60 min), percentage of acetone in n-hexane (25-75%, v/v) and solvent volume (10-30 ml) was used to investigate the effects of process variables on the extraction. The absolute amount of lycopene present in the pulp waste was found to be 0.038 mg/g. The optimal conditions for extraction were as follows: extraction temperature 20 °C, time 40 min, a solvent composition of 25% acetone in n-hexane (v/v) and solvent volume 40 ml. Under these conditions, the maximal recovery of lycopene was 94.7%. The HPLC-DAD analysis demonstrated that, lycopene was obtained in the all-trans-configuration at a very high purity grade of 98.3% while the amount of cis-isomers and other carotenoids were limited.

  3. Electrical properties of as-grown and proton-irradiated high purity silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupka, Jerzy; Karcz, Waldemar; Kamiński, Paweł; Jensen, Leif

    2016-08-01

    The complex permittivity of as-grown and proton-irradiated samples of high purity silicon obtained by the floating zone method was measured as a function of temperature at a few frequencies in microwave spectrum by employing the quasi TE011 and whispering gallery modes excited in the samples under test. The resistivity of the samples was determined from the measured imaginary part of the permittivity. The resistivity was additionally measured at RF frequencies employing capacitive spectroscopy as well as in a standard direct current experiment. The sample of as-grown material had the resistivity of ∼85 kΩ cm at room temperature. The sample irradiated with 23-MeV protons had the resistivity of ∼500 kΩ cm at 295 K and its behavior was typical of the intrinsic material at room and at elevated temperatures. For the irradiated sample, the extrinsic conductivity region is missing and at temperatures below 250 K hopping conductivity occurs. Thermal cycle hysteresis of the resistivity for the sample of as-grown material is observed. After heating and subsequent cooling of the sample, its resistivity decreases and then slowly (∼50 h) returns to the initial value.

  4. Determination of halogens and sulfur in high-purity polyimide by IC after digestion by MIC.

    PubMed

    Krzyzaniak, Sindy R; Santos, Rafael F; Dalla Nora, Flavia M; Cruz, Sandra M; Flores, Erico M M; Mello, Paola A

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a method for sample preparation of high-purity polyimide was proposed for halogens and sulfur determination by ion chromatography (IC) with conductivity detection and, alternatively, by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A relatively high polyimide mass (600mg) was completely digested by microwave-induced combustion (MIC) using 20bar of O2 and 50mmolL(-1) NH4OH as absorbing solution. These conditions allowed final solutions with low carbon content (<10mgL(-1)) and suitable pH for analysis by both IC and ICP-MS. The accuracy was evaluated using a certified reference material of polymer for Cl, Br and S and spike recovery experiments for all analytes. No statistical difference (t-test, 95% of confidence level) was observed between the results obtained for Cl, Br and S by IC after MIC and the certified values. In addition, spike recoveries obtained for F, Cl, Br, I and S ranged from 94% to 101%. The proposed method was suitable for polyimide decomposition for further determination of halogens and sulfur by IC and by ICP-MS (Br and I only). Taking into account the lack of methods and the difficulty of bringing this material into solution, MIC can be considered as a suitable alternative for the decomposition of polyimide for routine quality control of halogens and sulfur using IC or ICP-MS.

  5. Isolation of Ubiquitinated Proteins to High Purity from In Vivo Samples.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Juanma; Min, Mingwei; Barrio, Rosa; Lindon, Catherine; Mayor, Ugo

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitination pathways are widely used within eukaryotic cells. The complexity of ubiquitin signaling gives rise to a number of problems in the study of specific pathways. One problem is that not all processes regulated by ubiquitin are shared among the different cells of an organism (e.g., neurotransmitter release is only carried out in neuronal cells). Moreover, these processes are often highly temporally dynamic. It is essential therefore to use the right system for each biological question, so that we can characterize pathways specifically in the tissue or cells of interest. However, low stoichiometry, and the unstable nature of many ubiquitin conjugates, presents a technical barrier to studying this modification in vivo. Here, we describe two approaches to isolate ubiquitinated proteins to high purity. The first one favors isolation of the whole mixture of ubiquitinated material from a given tissue or cell type, generating a survey of the ubiquitome landscape for a specific condition. The second one favors the isolation of just one specific protein, in order to facilitate the characterization of its ubiquitinated fraction. In both cases, highly stringent denaturing buffers are used to minimize the presence of contaminating material in the sample. PMID:27613036

  6. Effect of chromium on low-temperature deformation of high-purity iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. J.; Stoloff, N. S.

    1976-01-01

    A series of very low interstitial Fe-Cr alloys containing 0, 1, 3, 5, and 10 wt% Cr were prepared by vacuum melting and fabricated under argon to 1.83 mm diam wires exposed in an alumina system to wet hydrogen for 200 h at 1423 K followed by 1000 h in ZrH2-purified hydrogen at 1573 K. The wires were then transverse-rolled into thin sheet and cut into tensile specimens subjected to electropolishing and strained to fracture in a series of cryogenic baths ranging from 4.2 K to room temperature. It is shown that small Cr additions lower the twinning stress so that yielding occurs by twinning rather than by slip. Cr in amounts up to 10 wt% has little effect on the yield strength of high-purity Fe between 147 and 300 K, and ductility is not greatly affected at any test temperature. Higher solute contents provide appreciable strengthening only at temperatures of 112 K and below.

  7. Determination of nitrogen monoxide in high purity nitrogen gas with an atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, K.

    1985-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometric (API-MS) method was studied for the determination of residual NO in high purity N2 gas. The API-MS is very sensitive to NO, but the presence of O2 interferes with the NO measurement. Nitrogen gas in cylinders as sample gas was mixed with NO standard gas and/or O2 standard gas, and then introduced into the API-MS. The calibration curves of NO and O2 has linearity in the region of 0 - 2 ppm, but the slopes changed with every cylinder. The effect of O2 on NO+ peak was additive and proportional to O2 concentration in the range of 0 - 0.5 ppm. The increase in NO+ intensity due to O2 was (0.07 - 0.13)%/O2, 1 ppm. Determination of NO and O2 was carried out by the standard addition method to eliminate the influence of variation of slopes. The interference due to O2 was estimated from the product of the O2 concentration and the ratio of slope A to Slope B. Slope A is the change in the NO+ intensity with the O2 concentration. Slope B is the intensity with O2 concentration.

  8. Microstructure and helium irradiation performance of high purity tungsten processed by cold rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhe; Han, Wenjia; Yu, Jiangang; Kecskes, Laszlo; Zhu, Kaigui; Wei, Qiuming

    2016-10-01

    This work aims to investigate the effects of confined cold rolling on the evolution of microstructure, hardness, and helium irradiation performance of high purity tungsten (W). Using a final rolling temperature of 450 °C, W samples were severely deformed by confined cold rolling up to equivalent strains (εeq) of 1.6 and 3.3. Experimental results indicate that the average grain size of W specimens processed by confined cold rolling has been greatly reduced, and the rolled W samples with εeq ∼3.3 do not show an "ideal texture" of (001)[110] which is the expected texture of bcc metals processed by conventional cold rolling. The irradiation resistance against 60 keV He+ ions with up to a dose of 1.5 × 1022 ions·m-2 of the rolled W is compared to that of the as-received W. Results show that, due to an improvement of the metal's ductility, blister bursting with a partially opened lid forms on the surface of the rolled W, whereas blister bursting with a fully opened lid forms on the surface of the as-received W.

  9. Evaluation of Electric Load Following Capability on Fuel Cell System Fueled by High-Purity Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, Yusuke; Park, Deaheum; Ishida, Masayoshi; Fujisawa, Akitoshi; Miura, Shinichi

    This paper describes the electrical response in load change concerning a fuel cell system fueled by high-purity hydrogen. The purpose of this study is that the fuel cell system is applied to make up for unstable electrical output of a photovoltaic system as a renewable energy. As an alternative method of secondary battery, the fuel cell system, which is able to continuously generate power as long as fuel is supplied, is expected to provide power with high reliability and stability. To evaluate the load-following capability of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) system, an experimental equipment was constructed with a 200W PEFC stack (number of cells: 20, cell area: 200cm2) which was supplied with hydrogen from a compressed hydrogen cylinder and a metal hydride canister. We measured the transient phenomenon of current and cell voltage when the PEFC stack was inputted step-up current loads that changed in the range of 0∼300mA/cm2. As a result, we have found that the PEFC system with both hydrogen supply sources is able to response at a time constant of 6.6∼11.6μsec under enough oxygen supply and a load below the PEFC rated power.

  10. Influence of Ta content in high purity niobium on cavity performance

    SciTech Connect

    P. Kneisel; G. Ciovati; G. R. Myneni; W. Singer; X. Singer; D. Proch; T. Carneiro

    2005-05-01

    In a previous paper [1] we have reported about initial tests of single cell 1500 MHz cavities made from high purity niobium with three different Ta contents of 160 ppm , {approx}600 ppm and {approx}1400 ppm. These cavities had been treated by buffered chemical polishing several times and 100 {micro}m, 200 {micro}m and 300 {micro}m of material had been removed from the surfaces. This contribution reports about subsequent tests following post purification heat treatments with Ti and ''in situ'' baking. As a result, all cavities exhibited increased quench fields due to the improved thermal conductivity after the heat treatment. After the ''in situ'' baking at 120 C for {approx} 40 hrs the always present Q-drop at high fields disappeared and further improvements in accelerating gradient could be realized. Gradients as high as E{sub acc} = 35 MV/m were achieved and there were no clear indications that the cavity performance was influenced by the Ta content in the material. A multi-cell cavity from the high Ta content material has been fabricated and initial results are reported.

  11. Simulation study comparing high-purity germanium and cadmium zinc telluride detectors for breast imaging.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D L; Peterson, T E

    2014-11-21

    We conducted simulations to compare the potential imaging performance for breast cancer detection with High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) systems with 1% and 3.8% energy resolution at 140 keV, respectively. Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation package, we modelled both 5 mm-thick CZT and 10 mm-thick HPGe detectors with the same parallel-hole collimator for the imaging of a breast/torso phantom. Simulated energy spectra were generated, and planar images were created for various energy windows around the 140 keV photopeak. Relative sensitivity and scatter and the torso fractions were calculated along with tumour contrast and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Simulations showed that utilizing a ±1.25% energy window with an HPGe system better suppressed torso background and small-angle scattered photons than a comparable CZT system using a -5%/+10% energy window. Both systems provided statistically similar contrast and SNR, with HPGe providing higher relative sensitivity. Lowering the counts of HPGe images to match CZT count density still yielded equivalent contrast between HPGe and CZT. Thus, an HPGe system may provide equivalent breast imaging capability at lower injected radioactivity levels when acquiring for equal imaging time.

  12. High-Purity Germanium Spectroscopy at Rates in Excess of 10^{6} Events/s

    SciTech Connect

    VanDevender, Brent A.; Dion, Michael P.; Fast, James E.; Rodriguez, Douglas C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Wilen, Christopher D.; Wood, Lynn S.; Wright, Michael E.

    2014-10-01

    Abstract—In gamma spectroscopy, a compromise must be made between energy resolution and event-rate capability. Some foreseen nuclear material safeguards applications require a spectrometer with energy resolution typical of high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, operated at rates up to and exceeding 106 events per second. We report the performance of an HPGe spectrometer adapted to run at such rates. Our system consists of a commercial semi-coaxial HPGe detector, a modified high-voltagerail, resistive-feedback, charge-sensitive preamplifier and a continuous waveform digitizer. Digitized waveforms are analyzed offline with a novel time-variant trapezoidal filter algorithm. Several time-invariant trapezoidal filters are run in parallel and the slowest one not rejected by instantaneous pileup conditions is used to measure each pulse height. We have attained full-widthat- half-maximum energy resolution of less than 8 keV measured at 662 keV with 1:08*106 per second incoming event rate and 38% throughput. An additional constraint on the width of the fast trigger filter removes a significant amount of edge pileup that passes the first pileup cut, reducing throughput to 26%. While better resolution has been reported by other authors, our throughput is over an order of magnitude higher than any other reported HPGe system operated at such an event rate.

  13. High purity isolation and quantification of semiconducting carbon nanotubes via column chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tulevski, George S; Franklin, Aaron D; Afzali, Ali

    2013-04-23

    The isolation of semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to ultrahigh (ppb) purity is a prerequisite for their integration into high-performance electronic devices. Here, a method employing column chromatography is used to isolate semiconducting nanotubes to 99.9% purity. The study finds that by modifying the solution preparation step, both the metallic and semiconducting fraction are resolved and elute using a single surfactant system, allowing for multiple iterations. Iterative processing enables a far more rapid path to achieving the level of purities needed for high performance computing. After a single iteration, the metallic peak in the absorption spectra is completely attenuated. Although absorption spectroscopy is typically used to characterize CNT purity, it is found to be insufficient in quantifying solutions of high purity (>98 to 99%) due to low signal-to-noise in the metallic region of ultrahigh purity solutions. Therefore, a high throughput electrical testing method was developed to quantify the degree of separation by characterizing ∼4000 field-effect transistors fabricated from the separated nanotubes after multiple iterations of the process. The separation and characterization methods described here provide a path to produce the ultrahigh purity semiconducting CNT solutions needed for high performance electronics. PMID:23484490

  14. Production of Ultrafine, High-purity Ceramic Powders Using the US Bureau of Mines Developed Turbomill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyer, Jesse L.

    1993-01-01

    Turbomilling, an innovative grinding technology developed by the U.S. Bureau of Mines in the early 1960's for delaminating filler-grade kaolinitic clays, has been expanded into the areas of particle size reduction, material mixing, and process reaction kinetics. The turbomill, originally called an attrition grinder, has been used for particle size reduction of many minerals, including natural and synthetic mica, pyrophyllite, talc, and marble. In recent years, an all-polymer version of the turbomill has been used to produce ultrafine, high-purity, advanced ceramic powders such as SiC, Si3N4, TiB2, and ZrO2. In addition to particle size reduction, the turbomill has been used to produce intimate mixtures of high surface area powders and whiskers. Raw materials, TiN, AlN, and Al2O3, used to produce a titanium nitride/aluminum oxynitride (TiN/AlON) composite, were mixed in the turbomill, resulting in strength increases over samples prepared by dry ball milling. Using the turbomill as a leach vessel, it was found that 90.4 pct of the copper was extracted from the chalcopyrite during a 4-hour leach test in ferric sulfate versus conventional processing which involves either roasting of the ore for Cu recovery or leaching of the ore for several days.

  15. Simulation study comparing high-purity germanium and cadmium zinc telluride detectors for breast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, DL; Peterson, TE

    2014-01-01

    We conducted simulations to compare the potential imaging performance for breast cancer detection with High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) systems with 1% and 3.8% energy resolution at 140 keV, respectively. Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation package, we modelled both 5 mm-thick CZT and 10 mm-thick HPGe detectors with the same parallel-hole collimator for the imaging of a breast/torso phantom. Simulated energy spectra were generated, and planar images were created for various energy windows around the 140-keV photopeak. Relative sensitivity and scatter and the torso fractions were calculated along with tumour contrast and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Simulations showed that utilizing a ±1.25% energy window with an HPGe system better suppressed torso background and small-angle scattered photons than a comparable CZT system using a −5%/+10% energy window. Both systems provided statistically similar contrast and SNR, with HPGe providing higher relative sensitivity. Lowering the counts of HPGe images to match CZT count density still yielded equivalent contrast between HPGe and CZT. Thus, an HPGe system may provide equivalent breast imaging capability at lower injected radioactivity levels when acquiring for equal imaging time. PMID:25360792

  16. Mechanisms of stress-corrosion cracking of alloy X-750 in high-purity water

    SciTech Connect

    Grove, C.A.; Petzold, L.D.

    1985-09-01

    The high-strength, nickel-base alloy X-750 is susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in high-purity, deaerated water. Crack initiation occurs at high temperatures (>400F (204C)). Crack propagation occurs in both high-temperature and lowtemperature (<300F(149C)) water. High-temperature crack growth rates are on the order of mils per day. Low-temperature cracking is extremely rapid (approx. =100 in. (250 cm) per day). Three heat treatments of Alloy X-750 are investigated: stress equalized1625F (885C)/24 hours + 1300F (704C)/20 hours, direct aged-1300F (704C)/24 hours, and solution annealed and direct aged-2000F (1093C)/ 1 hour + 1300F (704C)/20 hours. Stress-equalized Alloy X-750 is most susceptible to SCC; solution-annealed and direct-aged Alloy X-750 is least susceptible. A hydrogen embrittlement model of SCC is developed that predicts SCC performance on the basis of grain boundary chemistry and grain boundary carbides. Phosphorus segregates to the grain boundary in concentrations of up to approx. =100 times the bulk concentration during processing and heat treatment. Phosphorus at the grain boundaries increases susceptibility to high- and low-temperature SCC. The presence of M23C6-type carbides and/or the absence of MC-type carbides at the grain boundaries improves SCC performance in high-temperature water.

  17. Mechanism of stress-corrosion cracking of Alloy X-750 in high purity water

    SciTech Connect

    Grove, C.A.; Petzold, L.D.

    1985-11-01

    The high strength Ni-base Alloy X-750 is susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in high purity, deaerated water. Crack initiation occurs at high temperatures (>400F). Crack propagation occurs in both high-temperature and low-temperature (<300F) water. High-temperature crack growth rates are on the order of mils/day. Low-temperature cracking is extremely rapid (approx.100 in./day). Three heat treatments of Alloy X-750 are investigated: (1) Stress Equalized - 1625F/24 hr + 1300F/20 hr, (2) Direct Aged - 1300F/24 hr, and (3) Solution Annealed and Direct Aged - 2000F/1 hr + 1300F/20 hr. Stress-equalized Alloy X-750 is most susceptible to SCC; solution-annealed and direct-aged Alloy X-750 is least susceptible. A Hydrogen Embrittlement Model of SCC is developed that predicts SCC performance on the basis of grain boundary chemistry and grain boundary carbides. Phosphorus segregates to the grain boundary in concentrations of up to approx.100 times the bulk concentration during processing and heat treatment. Phosphorus at the grain boundaries increases susceptibility to high- and low-temperature SCC. The presence of M23C6-type carbides and/or the absence of MC-type carbides at the grain boundaries improves SCC performance in high-temperature water. 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Safety studies conducted on high-purity trans-resveratrol in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lonnie D; Burdock, George A; Edwards, James A; Beck, Mareike; Bausch, Jochen

    2009-09-01

    trans-Resveratrol is a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound found in a variety of foods, but predominantly in grapes. Safety studies were conducted on high-purity trans-resveratrol (Resvida), including skin and eye irritation, dermal sensitization, subchronic and reproductive toxicity, genotoxicity, and absorption, metabolism and excretion. Resvida was non-irritating to skin and eyes and non-sensitizing. It was non-mutagenic in a bacterial reverse mutation assay in Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli, but exhibited clastogenic activity in a chromosomal aberration test in human lymphocytes. However, in an in vivo bone marrow micronucleus test in rats, Resvida was non-genotoxic. In a 28-day study, Resvida caused no adverse effects in rats at 50, 150 and 500 mg/kg bw/day. Similarly, in a 90-day study, Resvida did not cause any adverse effects in rats at up to 700 mg/kg bw/day; the highest dose tested. Resvida did not induce any adverse reproductive effects in an embryo-fetal toxicity study in rats at a dose of 750 mg/kg bw/day. Also, in vitro and in vivo absorption, metabolism, and excretion studies in Caco-2 cells, rat primary hepatocytes and male and female rats (in vivo) show that Resvida is readily absorbed, metabolized and excreted. These studies provide evidence that Resvida is well tolerated and non-toxic.

  19. High-energy proton radiation damage of high-purity germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pehl, R. H.; Varnell, L. S.; Metzger, A. E.

    1978-01-01

    Quantitative studies of radiation damage in high-purity germanium gamma-ray detectors due to high-energy charged particles have been carried out; two 1.0 cm thick planar detectors were irradiated by 6 GeV/c protons. Under proton bombardment, degradation in the energy resolution was found to begin below 7 x 10 to the 7th protons/sq cm and increased proportionately in both detectors until the experiment was terminated at a total flux of 5.7 x 10 to the 8th protons/sq cm, equivalent to about a six year exposure to cosmic-ray protons in space. At the end of the irradiation, the FWHM resolution measured at 1332 keV stood at 8.5 and 13.6 keV, with both detectors of only marginal utility as a spectrometer due to the severe tailing caused by charge trapping. Annealing these detectors after proton damage was found to be much easier than after neutron damage.

  20. Identification of a point mutation in type IIB von Willebrand disease illustrating the regulation of von Willebrand factor affinity for the platelet membrane glycoprotein Ib-IX receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, J.; Dent, J.A.; Azuma, Hiroyuki; Sugimoto, Mitsuhiko; Kyrle, P.A.; Yoshioka, Akira; Ruggeri, Z.M. )

    1991-04-01

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) supports platelet adhesion on thrombogenic surfaces by binding to platelet membrane glycoprotein (GP) Ib in the GP Ib-IX receptor complex. This interaction is physiologically regulated so that it does not occur between circulating vWF and platelets but, rather, only at a site of vascular injury. The abnormal vWF found in type IIB von Willebrand disease, however, has a characteristically increased affinity for GP Ib and binds to circulating platelets. The authors have analyzed the molecular basis of this abnormality by sequence analysis of a type IIB vWF cDNA and have identified a single amino acid change, Trp{sup 550} to Cys{sup 550}, located in the GP IB-binding domain of the molecule comprising residues 449-728. Bacterial expression of recombinant fragments corresponding to this vWF domain yielded molecules that, whether containing a normal Trp{sup 550} or a mutant Cys{sup 550} residue, bound directly to GP Ib in the absence of modulators and with similar affinity. These results identify a region of vWF that, although not thought to be directly involved in binding to GP Ib, may modulate the interaction through conformational changes.

  1. Dielectric Performance of High Purity HTCC Alumina at High Temperatures - A Comparison Study with Other Polycrystalline Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liang-Yu

    2012-01-01

    A very high purity (99.99+) high temperature co-fired ceramic (HTCC) alumina has recently become commercially available. The raw material of this HTCC alumina is very different from conventional HTCC alumina, and more importantly there is no glass additive in this co-fired material. Previously, selected HTCC and LTCC (low temperature co-fired ceramic) alumina materials were evaluated at high temperatures as dielectric and compared to a regularly sintered 96 polycrystalline alumina (96 Al2O3), where 96 alumina was used as the benchmark. A prototype packaging system based on regular 96 alumina with Au thick-film metallization successfully facilitated long term testing of high temperature silicon carbide (SiC) electronic devices for over 10,000 hours at 500C. In order to evaluate this new HTCC alumina for possible high temperature packaging applications, the dielectric properties of this HTCC alumina substrate were measured and compared with those of 96 alumina and a LTCC alumina from room temperature to 550C at frequencies of 120 Hz, 1 KHz, 10 KHz, 100 KHz, and 1 MHz. A parallel-plate capacitive device with dielectric of the HTCC alumina and precious metal electrodes were used for measurements of the dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the co-fired alumina material in the temperature and frequency ranges. The capacitance and AC parallel conductance of the capacitive device were directly measured by an AC impedance meter, and the dielectric constant and parallel AC conductivity of the dielectric were calculated from the capacitance and conductance measurement results. The temperature and frequency dependent dielectric constant, AC conductivity, and dissipation factor of the HTCC alumina substrate are presented and compared to those of 96 alumina. Other technical advantages of this new co-fired material for possible high packaging applications are also discussed.

  2. Volunteer Voice. Volume IX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volunteer Voice, 1992

    1992-01-01

    This document consists of the three volume IX issues of "Volunteer Voice," a newsletter of the Tacoma Community House Training Project. The first issue consists of one teacher's personal account of English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) teaching and includes the following: an annotated list of ESL text books, a list of activities resources,…

  3. N-Type delta Doping of High-Purity Silicon Imaging Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Hoenk, Michael; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2005-01-01

    A process for n-type (electron-donor) delta doping has shown promise as a means of modifying back-illuminated image detectors made from n-doped high-purity silicon to enable them to detect high-energy photons (ultraviolet and x-rays) and low-energy charged particles (electrons and ions). This process is applicable to imaging detectors of several types, including charge-coupled devices, hybrid devices, and complementary metal oxide/semiconductor detector arrays. Delta doping is so named because its density-vs.-depth characteristic is reminiscent of the Dirac delta function (impulse function): the dopant is highly concentrated in a very thin layer. Preferably, the dopant is concentrated in one or at most two atomic layers in a crystal plane and, therefore, delta doping is also known as atomic-plane doping. The use of doping to enable detection of high-energy photons and low-energy particles was reported in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles. As described in more detail in those articles, the main benefit afforded by delta doping of a back-illuminated silicon detector is to eliminate a "dead" layer at the back surface of the silicon wherein high-energy photons and low-energy particles are absorbed without detection. An additional benefit is that the delta-doped layer can serve as a back-side electrical contact. Delta doping of p-type silicon detectors is well established. The development of the present process addresses concerns specific to the delta doping of high-purity silicon detectors, which are typically n-type. The present process involves relatively low temperatures, is fully compatible with other processes used to fabricate the detectors, and does not entail interruption of those processes. Indeed, this process can be the last stage in the fabrication of an imaging detector that has, in all other respects, already been fully processed, including metallized. This process includes molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) for deposition of three layers, including

  4. High-purity 3D nano-objects grown by focused-electron-beam induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdoba, Rosa; Sharma, Nidhi; Kölling, Sebastian; Koenraad, Paul M.; Koopmans, Bert

    2016-09-01

    To increase the efficiency of current electronics, a specific challenge for the next generation of memory, sensing and logic devices is to find suitable strategies to move from two- to three-dimensional (3D) architectures. However, the creation of real 3D nano-objects is not trivial. Emerging non-conventional nanofabrication tools are required for this purpose. One attractive method is focused-electron-beam induced deposition (FEBID), a direct-write process of 3D nano-objects. Here, we grow 3D iron and cobalt nanopillars by FEBID using diiron nonacarbonyl Fe2(CO)9, and dicobalt octacarbonyl Co2(CO)8, respectively, as starting materials. In addition, we systematically study the composition of these nanopillars at the sub-nanometer scale by atom probe tomography, explicitly mapping the homogeneity of the radial and longitudinal composition distributions. We show a way of fabricating high-purity 3D vertical nanostructures of ∼50 nm in diameter and a few micrometers in length. Our results suggest that the purity of such 3D nanoelements (above 90 at% Fe and above 95 at% Co) is directly linked to their growth regime, in which the selected deposition conditions are crucial for the final quality of the nanostructure. Moreover, we demonstrate that FEBID and the proposed characterization technique not only allow for growth and chemical analysis of single-element structures, but also offers a new way to directly study 3D core–shell architectures. This straightforward concept could establish a promising route to the design of 3D elements for future nano-electronic devices.

  5. Raman and photoelectron spectroscopic investigation of high-purity niobium materials: Oxides, hydrides, and hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nageshwar; Deo, M. N.; Nand, Mangla; Jha, S. N.; Roy, S. B.

    2016-09-01

    We present investigations of the presence of oxides, hydrides, and hydrocarbons in high-purity (residual resistivity ratio, ˜300) niobium (Nb) materials used in fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for particle accelerators. Raman spectroscopy of Nb materials (as-received from the vendor as well as after surface chemical- and thermal processing) revealed numerous peaks, which evidently show the presence of oxides (550 cm-1), hydrides (1277 and 1385 cm-1: ˜80 K temperature), and groups of hydrocarbons (1096, 2330, 2710, 2830, 2868, and 3080 cm-1). The present work provides direct spectroscopic evidence of hydrides in the electropolished Nb materials typically used in SRF cavities. Raman spectroscopy thus can provide vital information about the near-surface chemical species in niobium materials and will help in identifying the cause for the performance degradation of SRF cavities. Furthermore, photoelectron spectroscopy was performed on the Nb samples to complement the Raman spectroscopy study. This study reveals the presence of C and O in the Nb samples. Core level spectra of Nb (doublet 3d5/2 and 3d3/2) show peaks near 206.6 and 209.4 eV, which can be attributed to the Nb5+ oxidation state. The core level spectra of C 1 s of the samples are dominated by graphitic carbon (binding energy, 284.6 eV), while the spectra of O 1 s are asymmetrically peaked near binding energy of ˜529 eV, and that indicates the presence of metal-oxide Nb2O5. The valence-band spectra of the Nb samples are dominated by a broad peak similar to O 2p states, but after sputtering (for 10 min) a peak appears at ˜1 eV, which is a feature of the elemental Nb atom.

  6. Gamma background studies for the XENON experiment using a High Purity Germanium Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angle, Jesse Isaac

    The XENON Dark Matter Experiment, deployed at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy on March 2006, is a liquid noble gas detector designed to directly detect dark matter. The detector uses a dual-phase (gas/liquid) Xenon target to search for nuclear recoils associated with nucleus-WIMP interactions. Due to the high sensitivity needed in such an experiment, it is vital to not only reduce the background but to also understand the remaining background so as to aid in the understanding of the data as well as to facilitate upgrades beyond the early Research and Development phases. Many of the components of the XENON10 detector have been screened using a High Purity Germanium Detector known as the GATOR detector. Full analysis of the screening data requires Monte Carlo simulations of the GATOR detector and the sample. Results from this screening will be presented. Using the information obtained from the screening operation, Monte Carlo simulations of the XENON10 electron recoil background will be examined and compared to the actual detector data. The success of this simulation to data comparison indicates that we have a good understanding of the XENON10 gamma background and will be able to make more informed decisions regarding the next stage of detector development. This type of analysis has aided in the selection and design of many of the materials and components being incorporated into the new XENON100 detector, the next generation detector which will be capable of improving the limit set by XENON10 by at least an order of magnitude. (Full text of this dissertation may be available via the University of Florida Libraries web site. Please check http:/ /www.uflib.ufl.edu/etd.html)

  7. Supercapacitor Electrodes Based on High-Purity Electrospun Polyaniline and Polyaniline-Carbon Nanotube Nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Simotwo, Silas K; DelRe, Christopher; Kalra, Vibha

    2016-08-24

    Freestanding, binder-free supercapacitor electrodes based on high-purity polyaniline (PANI) nanofibers were fabricated via a single step electrospinning process. The successful electrospinning of nanofibers with an unprecedentedly high composition of PANI (93 wt %) was made possible due to blending ultrahigh molecular weight poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) with PANI in solution to impart adequate chain entanglements, a critical requirement for electrospinning. To further enhance the conductivity and stability of the electrodes, a small concentration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was added to the PANI/PEO solution prior to electrospinning to generate PANI/CNT/PEO nanofibers (12 wt % CNTs). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) porosimetry were conducted to characterize the external morphology of the nanofibers. The electrospun nanofibers were further probed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The electroactivity of the freestanding PANI and PANI/CNT nanofiber electrodes was examined using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Competitive specific capacitances of 308 and 385 F g(-1) were achieved for PANI and PANI-CNT based electrodes, respectively, at a current density of 0.5 A g(-1). Moreover, specific capacitance retentions of 70 and 81.4% were observed for PANI and PANI-CNT based electrodes, respectively, after 1000 cycles. The promising electrochemical performance of the fabricated electrodes, we believe, stems from the porous 3-D electrode structure characteristic of the nonwoven interconnected nanostructures. The interconnected nanofiber network facilitates efficient electron conduction while the inter- and intrafiber porosity enable excellent electrolyte penetration within the polymer matrix, allowing fast ion transport to the active sites. PMID:27467445

  8. High-purity 3D nano-objects grown by focused-electron-beam induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdoba, Rosa; Sharma, Nidhi; Kölling, Sebastian; Koenraad, Paul M.; Koopmans, Bert

    2016-09-01

    To increase the efficiency of current electronics, a specific challenge for the next generation of memory, sensing and logic devices is to find suitable strategies to move from two- to three-dimensional (3D) architectures. However, the creation of real 3D nano-objects is not trivial. Emerging non-conventional nanofabrication tools are required for this purpose. One attractive method is focused-electron-beam induced deposition (FEBID), a direct-write process of 3D nano-objects. Here, we grow 3D iron and cobalt nanopillars by FEBID using diiron nonacarbonyl Fe2(CO)9, and dicobalt octacarbonyl Co2(CO)8, respectively, as starting materials. In addition, we systematically study the composition of these nanopillars at the sub-nanometer scale by atom probe tomography, explicitly mapping the homogeneity of the radial and longitudinal composition distributions. We show a way of fabricating high-purity 3D vertical nanostructures of ˜50 nm in diameter and a few micrometers in length. Our results suggest that the purity of such 3D nanoelements (above 90 at% Fe and above 95 at% Co) is directly linked to their growth regime, in which the selected deposition conditions are crucial for the final quality of the nanostructure. Moreover, we demonstrate that FEBID and the proposed characterization technique not only allow for growth and chemical analysis of single-element structures, but also offers a new way to directly study 3D core-shell architectures. This straightforward concept could establish a promising route to the design of 3D elements for future nano-electronic devices.

  9. Expression and Characterization of Gly-317 Variants of Factor IX Causing Variable Bleeding in Hemophilia B Patients.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiuya; Yang, Likui; Manithody, Chandrashekhara; Wang, Xuefeng; Rezaie, Alireza R

    2015-06-23

    We recently identified two hemophilia B patients who carried Gly-317 to Arg (FIX-G317R) or Gly-317 to Glu (FIX-G317E) substitutions in their FIX gene. The former mutation caused severe and the latter moderate bleeding in afflicted patients. To understand the molecular basis for the variable clinical manifestation of Gly-317 mutations, we prepared recombinant G317R and G317E derivatives of FIX and compared their kinetic properties to those of recombinant wild-type FIX in appropriate assay systems. Both physiological activators, factor XIa and extrinsic Tenase (factor VIIa-tissue factor), activated both zymogen variants with an ∼1.5-fold elevated K(m); however, extrinsic Tenase activated FIX-G317E with an ∼2-fold improved k(cat). By contrast to zymogen activation, the catalytic activities of both FIXa-G317R and FIXa-G317E enzymes toward the natural substrate, factor X, were dramatically (>4 orders of magnitude) impaired, but their apparent affinity for interaction with factor VIIIa was only slightly (<2-fold) decreased. Further studies revealed that the reactivity of FIXa-G317R and FIXa-G317E with antithrombin has been impaired 10- and 13-fold, respectively, in the absence and 166- and 500-fold, respectively, in the presence of pentasaccharide. As expected, the clotting activities of FIX variants could not be measured by the aPTT assay. These results implicate a critical role for Gly-317 in maintaining normal catalytic function for FIX/FIXa in the clotting cascade. The results further suggest that improved k(cat) of FIX-G317E activation in the extrinsic pathway together with dramatically impaired reactivity of FIXa-G317E with antithrombin may account for the less severe bleeding phenotype of a hemophilia B patient carrying the FIX-G317E mutation.

  10. Expression and Characterization of Gly-317 Variants of Factor IX Causing Variable Bleeding in Hemophilia B Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qiuya; Yang, Likui; Manithody, Chandrashekhara; Wang, Xuefeng; Rezaie, Alireza R.

    2015-01-01

    We recently identified two hemophilia B patients who carried Gly-317 to Arg (FIX-G317R) or Gly-317 to Glu (FIX-G317E) substitutions in their FIX gene. The former mutation caused severe and the latter one moderate bleeding in afflicted patients. To understand the molecular basis for the variable clinical manifestation of Gly-317 mutations, we prepared recombinant G317R and G317E derivatives of FIX and compared their kinetic properties to recombinant wild-type FIX in appropriate assay systems. Both physiological activators, factor XIa and extrinsic Tenase (factor VIIa-tissue factor) activated both zymogen variants with ~1.5-fold elevated Km, however, extrinsic Tenase activated FIX-G317E with ~2-fold improved kcat. By contrast to zymogen activation, the catalytic activities of both FIXa-G317R and FIXa-G317E enzymes toward the natural substrate, factor X, were dramatically (more than four orders of magnitude) impaired, but their apparent affinity for interaction with factor VIIIa was only slightly (<2-fold) decreased. Further studies revealed that the reactivity of FIXa-G317R and FIXa-G317E with antithrombin has been impaired 10- and 13-fold, respectively, in the absence and 166- and 500-fold, respectively, in the presence of pentasaccharide. As expected, the clotting activities of FIX variants were not measurable by the aPTT assay. These results implicate a critical role for Gly-317 in maintaining normal catalytic function for FIX/FIXa in the clotting cascade. The results further suggest that improved kcat of FIX-G317E activation in the extrinsic pathway together with dramatically impaired reactivity of FIXa-G317E with antithrombin may account for the less severe bleeding phenotype of hemophilia B patient carrying the FIX-G317E mutation. PMID:26023895

  11. High-Purity Aluminum Magnet Technology for Advanced Space Transportation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, R. G.; Pullam, B.; Rickle, D.; Litchford, R. J.; Robertson, G. A.; Schmidt, D. D.; Cole, John (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Basic research on advanced plasma-based propulsion systems is routinely focused on plasmadynamics, performance, and efficiency aspects while relegating the development of critical enabling technologies, such as flight-weight magnets, to follow-on development work. Unfortunately, the low technology readiness levels (TRLs) associated with critical enabling technologies tend to be perceived as an indicator of high technical risk, and this, in turn, hampers the acceptance of advanced system architectures for flight development. Consequently, there is growing recognition that applied research on the critical enabling technologies needs to be conducted hand in hand with basic research activities. The development of flight-weight magnet technology, for example, is one area of applied research having broad crosscutting applications to a number of advanced propulsion system architectures. Therefore, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Louisiana State University (LSU), and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) have initiated an applied research project aimed at advancing the TRL of flight-weight magnets. This Technical Publication reports on the group's initial effort to demonstrate the feasibility of cryogenic high-purity aluminum magnet technology and describes the design, construction, and testing of a 6-in-diameter by 12-in-long aluminum solenoid magnet. The coil was constructed in the machine shop of the Department of Physics and Astronomy at LSU and testing was conducted in NHMFL facilities at Florida State University and at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The solenoid magnet was first wound, reinforced, potted in high thermal conductivity epoxy, and bench tested in the LSU laboratories. A cryogenic container for operation at 77 K was also constructed and mated to the solenoid. The coil was then taken to NHMFL facilities in Tallahassee, FL. where its magnetoresistance was measured in a 77 K environment under steady magnetic fields as high as 10 T. In

  12. Co-immobilized poly(ethylene glycol)-block-polyamines promote sensitivity and restrict biofouling on gold sensor surface for detecting factor IX in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Lakshmipriya, Thangavel; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2014-08-21

    In order to detect an extremely low amount of human coagulation factor IX (FIX), poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)/aptamer co-immobilized surface was constructed using original PEG-polyamine surface modification agents on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor chip. Initially, a gold (Au) sensor chip of SPR was modified using poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PEG-b-PAMA) followed by treatment with SH-dT20 and was duplexed with anti-FIX aptamer extended using A24. Furthermore, the co-immobilization of pentaethylenehexamine-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) (N6-PEG) on the sensing surface completely quenched bio-fouling. On this dual tethered PEG-surface, we determined that the dissociation constant for FIX-aptamer interaction was 37 ± 10 pM, and the sensitivity of detection could reach up to 800 fM on using aptamer-FIX-antibody sandwich pattern detected by gold nanoparticle-conjugated anti-mouse antibody. We could detect FIX in the presence of abundant albumin. Furthermore, to mimic the actual detection of FIX in clinical samples, we demonstrated our experimental results with human blood plasma instead of FIX. Higher-sensitivity was attained because of dual polymers immobilized on Au surface, and this can emerge as a common strategy for any aptamer-protein interactions. The selective binding of aptamer in human blood plasma described here indicates the suitability of the present strategy for detection in clinically relevant samples.

  13. Recombinant factor IX-Fc fusion protein (rFIXFc) demonstrates safety and prolonged activity in a phase 1/2a study in hemophilia B patients

    PubMed Central

    Ragni, Margaret V.; Valentino, Leonard A.; Key, Nigel S.; Josephson, Neil C.; Powell, Jerry S.; Cheng, Gregory; Thompson, Arthur R.; Goyal, Jaya; Tubridy, Karen L.; Peters, Robert T.; Dumont, Jennifer A.; Euwart, Donald; Li, Lian; Hallén, Bengt; Gozzi, Peter; Bitonti, Alan J.; Jiang, Haiyan; Luk, Alvin

    2012-01-01

    Current factor IX (FIX) products display a half-life (t1/2) of ∼ 18 hours, requiring frequent intravenous infusions for prophylaxis and treatment in patients with hemophilia B. This open-label, dose-escalation trial in previously treated adult subjects with hemophilia B examined the safety and pharmacokinetics of rFIXFc. rFIXFc is a recombinant fusion protein composed of FIX and the Fc domain of human IgG1, to extend circulating time. Fourteen subjects received a single dose of rFIXFc; 1 subject each received 1, 5, 12.5, or 25 IU/kg, and 5 subjects each received 50 or 100 IU/kg. rFIXFc was well tolerated, and most adverse events were mild or moderate in intensity. No inhibitors were detected in any subject. Dose-proportional increases in rFIXFc activity and Ag exposure were observed. With baseline subtraction, mean activity terminal t1/2 and mean residence time for rFIXFc were 56.7 and 71.8 hours, respectively. This is ∼ 3-fold longer than that reported for current rFIX products. The incremental recovery of rFIXFc was 0.93 IU/dL per IU/kg, similar to plasma-derived FIX. These results show that rFIXFc may offer a viable therapeutic approach to achieve prolonged hemostatic protection and less frequent dosing in patients with hemophilia B. The trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00716716. PMID:22110246

  14. Characterization of high-purity niobium structures fabricated using the electron beam melting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrazas Najera, Cesar Adrian

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) refers to the varied set of technologies utilized for the fabrication of complex 3D components from digital data in a layer-by-layer fashion. The use of these technologies promises to revolutionize the manufacturing industry. The electron beam melting (EBM) process has been utilized for the fabrication of fully dense near-net-shape components from various metallic materials. This process, catalogued as a powder bed fusion technology, consists of the deposition of thin layers (50 - 120microm) of metallic powder particles which are fused by the use of a high energy electron beam and has been commercialized by Swedish company Arcam AB. Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities are key components that are used in linear accelerators and other light sources for studies of elemental physics. Currently, cavity fabrication is done by employing different forming processes including deep-drawing and spinning. In both of the latter techniques, a feedstock high-purity niobium sheet with a thickness ranging from 3-4 mm is mechanically deformed and shaped into the desired geometry. In this manner, half cavities are formed that are later joined by electron beam welding (EBW). The welding step causes variability in the shape of the cavity and can also introduce impurities at the surface of the weld interface. The processing route and the purity of niobium are also of utmost importance since the presence of impurities such as inclusions or defects can be detrimental for the SRF properties of cavities. The focus of this research was the use of the EBM process in the manufacture of high purity niobium parts with potential SRF applications. Reactor grade niobium was plasma atomized and used as the precursor material for fabrication using EBM. An Arcam A2 system was utilized for the fabrication. The system had all internal components of the fabrication chamber replaced and was cleaned to prevent contamination of niobium powder. A mini-vat, developed at

  15. Characterization of high-purity niobium structures fabricated using the electron beam melting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrazas Najera, Cesar Adrian

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) refers to the varied set of technologies utilized for the fabrication of complex 3D components from digital data in a layer-by-layer fashion. The use of these technologies promises to revolutionize the manufacturing industry. The electron beam melting (EBM) process has been utilized for the fabrication of fully dense near-net-shape components from various metallic materials. This process, catalogued as a powder bed fusion technology, consists of the deposition of thin layers (50 - 120microm) of metallic powder particles which are fused by the use of a high energy electron beam and has been commercialized by Swedish company Arcam AB. Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities are key components that are used in linear accelerators and other light sources for studies of elemental physics. Currently, cavity fabrication is done by employing different forming processes including deep-drawing and spinning. In both of the latter techniques, a feedstock high-purity niobium sheet with a thickness ranging from 3-4 mm is mechanically deformed and shaped into the desired geometry. In this manner, half cavities are formed that are later joined by electron beam welding (EBW). The welding step causes variability in the shape of the cavity and can also introduce impurities at the surface of the weld interface. The processing route and the purity of niobium are also of utmost importance since the presence of impurities such as inclusions or defects can be detrimental for the SRF properties of cavities. The focus of this research was the use of the EBM process in the manufacture of high purity niobium parts with potential SRF applications. Reactor grade niobium was plasma atomized and used as the precursor material for fabrication using EBM. An Arcam A2 system was utilized for the fabrication. The system had all internal components of the fabrication chamber replaced and was cleaned to prevent contamination of niobium powder. A mini-vat, developed at

  16. An ordered sequential mechanism for Factor IX and Factor IXa binding to platelet receptors in the assembly of the Factor X-activating complex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xia; Walsh, Peter N

    2005-08-15

    To define the contributions of the Omega-loop of the Gla (gamma-carboxyglutamic acid) domain and the EGF2 (second epidermal growth factor) domain of FIXa (Factor IXa) in the assembly of the FX-activating complex on activated platelets and phospholipid membranes, three recombinant FIXa chimeras were prepared with corresponding residues from the homologous coagulation protein, FVII: (i) Gly4-Gln11 (FIXa7Omegaloop), (ii) Cys88-Cys124 (FIXa7EGF2), and (iii) both Gly4-Gln11 and Cys88-Cys124 (FIXa7Omegaloop7EGF2). All three chimeras were similar to wild-type FIXa, as assessed by SDS/PAGE, active-site titration, content of Gla residues, activation rates by FXIa and rates of FXa generation in solution. Titrations of FX or FVIIIa on SFLLRN peptide-activated platelets and on phospholipid vesicles in the presence of FVIIIa revealed normal substrate and cofactor binding to all chimeras. In kinetic assays in the presence of phospholipid vesicles and FVIIIa, compared with wild-type FIXa K(d, app) approximately 4 nM, the FIX7Omegaloop chimera showed a 1.6-fold increase in K(d, app), the FIX7EGF2 chimera had a 7.4-fold increase in K(d, app), and the FIX7Omegaloop7EGF2 chimera showed a 21-fold increase in K(d, app). In kinetic assays and equilibrium platelet-binding assays with activated platelets and FVIIIa, compared with wild-type FIXa (V(max) approximately 5 nM min(-1); K(d, app) approximately 0.5 nM; B(max) approximately 550 sites/platelet; K(d) approximately 0.5 nM), the FIX7Omegaloop chimera displayed 2-fold decreases in V(max) and B(max) and 2-fold increases in K(d, app) and K(d). The FIX7EGF2 chimera displayed 2-fold decreases in V(max) and B(max) and 10-fold increases in K(d, app) and K(d). The FIX7Omegaloop7EGF2 chimera showed non-saturable curves and severely impaired rates of FXa generation, and non-saturable, non-specific, low-level binding to activated platelets. Thus both the Gla domain Omega-loop (Gly4-Gln11) and the EGF2 domain (Cys88-Cys124) are required to

  17. Analysis of high-purity germanium dioxide by ETV-ICP-AES with preliminary concentration of trace elements.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, Nickolay S; Shaverina, Anastasiya V; Tsygankova, Alphiya R; Saprykin, Anatoly I

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents a combined technique of germanium dioxide analysis by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) with preconcentration of trace elements by distilling off matrix and electrothermal (ETV) introduction of the trace elements concentrate into the ICP. Evaluation of metrological characteristics of the developed technique of high-purity germanium dioxide analysis was performed. The limits of detection (LODs) for 25 trace elements ranged from 0.05 to 20ng/g. The accuracy of proposed technique is confirmed by "added-found" («or spiking») experiment and comparing the results of ETV-ICP-AES and ICP-AES analysis of high purity germanium dioxide samples.

  18. Matrix elimination ion chromatography method for the determination of trace levels of anionic impurities in high purity cesium iodide.

    PubMed

    Ayushi; Kumar, Sangita D; Reddy, A V R

    2012-01-01

    In the present study an ion chromatographic method based on matrix elimination has been developed for the determination of anionic impurities in high purity cesium iodide crystals. The presence of impurities has a detrimental effect on the characteristics of detectors based on cesium iodide crystals. In particular, oxygen-containing anions inhibit the resolving power of scintillators and decrease the optical absorption. The quantitative determination of anions (fluoride, chloride, bromide, nitrate, phosphate, and sulphate) simultaneously in the high-purity cesium iodide crystals has not been carried out before. The large concentration of iodide poses a challenge in the determination of anions (especially phosphate and sulphate); hence, matrix elimination is accomplished by adopting a sample pretreatment technique. The method is validated for linearity, accuracy, and precision. The limit of detection for different anions is in the range of 0.3-3 µg/g, and the relative standard deviation is in the range of 4-6% for the overall method.

  19. A facile route to preparation of high purity nanoporous silica from acid-leached residue of serpentine.

    PubMed

    Bai, Penn; Sharratt, Paul; Yeo, Tze Yuen; Bu, Jie

    2014-09-01

    As the current cost of mineral carbonation is too high for an economically viable industrial process, it is desirable to produce value-added products from CO2 mineralization process. In this work, a facile and cost-effective process was developed for the production of high purity SiO2 from acid-leached serpentine residue. The Si extraction rate is fast even under ambient conditions due to the highly defective structure of the residue. The reaction kinetics were studied and it was found that the Si extraction rate was under a combination of chemical reaction control and film diffusion control. The SiO2 sample prepared has high purity with a nanoporous structure, which renders it a potential candidate for applications such as an adsorbent and a catalyst support.

  20. Local deposition of high-purity Pt nanostructures by combining electron beam induced deposition and atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mackus, A. J. M.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de; Kessels, W. M. M.; Mulders, J. J. L.

    2010-06-15

    An approach for direct-write fabrication of high-purity platinum nanostructures has been developed by combining nanoscale lateral patterning by electron beam induced deposition (EBID) with area-selective deposition of high quality material by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Because virtually pure, polycrystalline Pt nanostructures are obtained, the method extends the application possibilities of EBID, whereas compared to other area-selective ALD approaches, a much higher resolution is attainable; potentially down to sub-10 nm lateral dimensions.

  1. Intra- and inter-tube exciton relaxation dynamics in high purity semiconducting and metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichida, Masao; Saito, Shingo; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Kataura, Hiromichi; Ando, Hiroaki

    2013-02-01

    We have measured the exciton and carrier dynamics in the high purity semiconducting (S-) and metallic (M-) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in the isolated and aggregated (bundled) forms. The exciton relaxation decay times are measured by using the pump-probe spectroscopy. For bundled samples, the relaxation time becomes shorter than that for isolated SWNTs sample, because of the existence of inter-tube relaxation. We estimate the relaxation rates from S-SWNT to S-SWNT and S-SWNT to M-SWNT using the decay times for isolated SWNTs, high purity S-SWNTs bundle, and doped S-SWNTs in high purity M-SWNTs bundle. For S-SWNTs, inter-tube relaxation plays an important role in the relaxation dynamics. However, for M-SWNTs, the inter-tube relaxation is not so important, and the transition energy and intensity of exciton in M-SWNTs is strongly affected by the photoexcited carriers which plays like as photo doping.

  2. Fabrication process development for high-purity germanium radiation detectors with amorphous semiconductor contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looker, Quinn

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) radiation detectors are well established as a valuable tool in nuclear science, astrophysics, and nuclear security applications. HPGe detectors excel in gamma-ray spectroscopy, offering excellent energy resolution with large detector sizes for high radiation detection efficiency. Although a robust fabrication process has been developed, improvement is needed, especially in developing electrical contact and surface passivation technology for position-sensitive detectors. A systematic study is needed to understand how the detector fabrication process impacts detector performance and reliability. In order to provide position sensitivity, the electrical contacts are segmented to form multiple electrodes. This segmentation creates new challenges in the fabrication process and warrants consideration of additional detector effects related to the segmentation. A key area of development is the creation of the electrical contacts in a way that enables reliable operation, provides low electronic noise, and allows fine segmentation of electrodes, giving position sensitivity for radiation interactions in the detector. Amorphous semiconductor contacts have great potential to facilitate new HPGe detector designs by providing a thin, high-resistivity surface coating that is the basis for electrical contacts that block both electrons and holes and can easily be finely segmented. Additionally, amorphous semiconductor coatings form a suitable passivation layer to protect the HPGe crystal surface from contamination. This versatility allows a simple fabrication process for fully passivated, finely segmented detectors. However, the fabrication process for detectors with amorphous semiconductors is not as highly developed as for conventional technologies. The amorphous semiconductor layer properties can vary widely based on how they are created and these can translate into varying performance of HPGe detectors with these contacts. Some key challenges include

  3. Characterisation of factor IX with a glycine-to-valine missense mutation at residue 190 in a patient with severe haemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chung-Yang; Lin, Chia-Ni; Yang, Yung-Li; Hamaguchi, Nobuko; Yang, Shu-Jhu; Shen, Ming-Ching; Kao, Jau-Tsuen; Lin, Shu-Wha

    2011-04-01

    A patient with severe haemophilia B with a glycine-to-valine missense mutation at residue 190 (c25, chymotrypsin numbering) in factor IX (FIX; FIX-G190V or FIX-FuChou) had <1% of normal FIX clotting activity and 36% of normal FIX antigen levels (cross-reacting material- reduced, CRMr). Residue 190 in the C-terminal protease domain of human FIX is highly conserved in mammalian species and the serine protease family, suggesting that it has an indispensable role in protein function. To explore the pathological mechanism by which this mutation contributes to dysfunction of the FIX molecule, we functionally characterised FIX-G190V in vitro and in vivo. Liver-specific FIX-G190V gene expression following hydrodynamic plasmid delivery into haemophilia B mice revealed a 5.7-fold reduction in specific clotting activity compared with FIX-WT (wild type) and a two-fold decrease in plasma FIX-G190V concentration. Pulse-chase analysis demonstrated that FIX-G190V was secreted at a significantly slower rate than was FIX-WT. Purified FIX-G190V and FIX-WT displayed normal calcium-dependent conformational changes as shown by intrinsic fluorescence quenching. The in vivo half-lives of FIX-G190V and FIX-WT were indistinguishable. FIX-G190V was, however, more readily degraded than FIX-WT, especially after being activated by the active form of FXI. The vulnerable sites were mapped to the peptide bonds at Arg¹¹⁶-Leu¹¹⁷, Lys²⁶⁵-Tyr²⁶⁶, Arg³²⁷-Val³²⁸, and Arg³³⁸-Ser³³⁹, which are in the exposed loops of the FIX molecule. Also, failure of FXIa-activated FIX-G190V to bind p-aminobenzamidine indicated an abnormal conformation of the active-site pocket. Thus, the mutation at residue 190 of FIX may result in protein misfolding that affects secretion, clotting function, and hydrolysis. PMID:21301787

  4. Title IX: Boom or Bust?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mather, Marilyn J.

    2003-01-01

    Athletics has been significantly impacted by Title IX through an increase the number of female athletes, the number of teams available, and indirectly, the development of women's professional leagues. However, women in leadership positions in athletics have declined significantly since Title IX was signed into law. A concern about the…

  5. Management of third molar removal with doses of native plasma-derived factor IX (Octanine) and local measures in a female patient with severe hemophilia B: a case report.

    PubMed

    Peisker, Andre; Kentouche, Karim; Raschke, Gregor Franziskus; Schultze-Mosgau, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    Patients with hemophilia are at high risk of bleeding following oral surgery. As an X-linked recessive chromosomal bleeding disorder it is very rare in female patients. This is the first described case of management of third molar removal in a female patient suffering from severe hemophilia B. Excellent hemostasis was achieved by following a protocol using defined pre- and postoperative doses of factor IX and local hemostatic measures of collagen fleece, fibrin glue, primary suture, and tranexamic acid solution. Following defined protocols is essential in the management of oral surgery in patients with hemophilia and helps to prevent postoperative hemorrhages.

  6. High Purity Hydrogen Production with In-Situ Carbon Dioxide and Sulfur Capture in a Single Stage Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Nihar Phalak; Shwetha Ramkumar; Daniel Connell; Zhenchao Sun; Fu-Chen Yu; Niranjani Deshpande; Robert Statnick; Liang-Shih Fan

    2011-07-31

    Enhancement in the production of high purity hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from fuel gas, obtained from coal gasification, is limited by thermodynamics of the water gas shift (WGS) reaction. However, this constraint can be overcome by conducting the WGS in the presence of a CO{sub 2}-acceptor. The continuous removal of CO{sub 2} from the reaction mixture helps to drive the equilibrium-limited WGS reaction forward. Since calcium oxide (CaO) exhibits high CO{sub 2} capture capacity as compared to other sorbents, it is an ideal candidate for such a technique. The Calcium Looping Process (CLP) developed at The Ohio State University (OSU) utilizes the above concept to enable high purity H{sub 2} production from synthesis gas (syngas) derived from coal gasification. The CLP integrates the WGS reaction with insitu CO{sub 2}, sulfur and halide removal at high temperatures while eliminating the need for a WGS catalyst, thus reducing the overall footprint of the hydrogen production process. The CLP comprises three reactors - the carbonator, where the thermodynamic constraint of the WGS reaction is overcome by the constant removal of CO{sub 2} product and high purity H{sub 2} is produced with contaminant removal; the calciner, where the calcium sorbent is regenerated and a sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} stream is produced; and the hydrator, where the calcined sorbent is reactivated to improve its recyclability. As a part of this project, the CLP was extensively investigated by performing experiments at lab-, bench- and subpilot-scale setups. A comprehensive techno-economic analysis was also conducted to determine the feasibility of the CLP at commercial scale. This report provides a detailed account of all the results obtained during the project period.

  7. Characterization of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) as an endogenous marker of chronic hypoxia in live human tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vordermark, Dirk . E-mail: vordermark_d@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.de; Kaffer, Anja; Riedl, Susanne; Katzer, Astrid; Flentje, Michael

    2005-03-15

    Purpose: Published clinical studies provide conflicting data regarding the prognostic significance of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) overexpression as an endogenous marker of tumor hypoxia and its comparability with other methods of hypoxia detection. We performed a systematic analysis of CA IX protein levels under various in vitro conditions of tumor hypoxia in HT 1080 human fibrosarcoma and FaDu human pharyngeal carcinoma cells. Because sorting of live CA IX positive cells from tumors provides a tool to study the radiosensitivity of chronically hypoxic cells, we modified and tested a CA IX flow cytometry protocol on mixed hypoxic/aerobic suspensions of HT 1080 and FaDu cells. Methods and materials: HT 1080 and FaDu cells were treated with up to 24 h of in vitro hypoxia and up to 96 h of reoxygenation. To test the effect of nonhypoxic stimuli, glucose and serum availability, pH and cell density were modified. CA IX protein was quantified in Western blots of whole-cell lysates. Mixed suspensions with known percentages of hypoxic cells were prepared for CA IX flow cytometry. The same mixtures were assayed for clonogenic survival after 10 Gy. Results: Hypoxia-induced CA IX protein expression was seen after >6 h at {<=}5% O{sub 2}, and protein was stable over 96 h of reoxygenation in both cell lines. Glucose deprivation abolished the hypoxic CA IX response, and high cell density caused CA IX induction under aerobic conditions. Measured percentages of CA IX-positive cells in mixtures closely reflected known percentages of hypoxic cells in HT 1080 and were associated with radioresistance of mixtures after 10 Gy. Conclusion: CA IX is a stable marker of current or previous chronic hypoxia but influenced by nonhypoxic stimuli. Except the time course of accumulation, all properties of this marker resembled our previous findings for hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha}. A modified flow cytometry protocol provided good separability of CA IX-negative and -positive cells in vitro

  8. Magnetic and magnetothermal properties and the magnetic phase diagram of high purity single crystalline terbium along the easy magnetization direction

    SciTech Connect

    Zverev, V. I.; Tishin, A. M.; Chernyshov, A. S.; Mudryk, Ya; Gschneidner Jr., Karl A.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    2014-01-21

    The magnetic and magnetothermal properties of a high purity terbium single crystal have been re-investigated from 1.5 to 350 K in magnetic fields ranging from 0 to 75 kOe using magnetization, ac magnetic susceptibility and heat capacity measurements. The magnetic phase diagram has been refined by establishing a region of the fan-like phase broader than reported in the past, by locating a tricritical point at 226 K, and by a more accurate definition of the critical fields and temperatures associated with the magnetic phases observed in Tb.

  9. Magnetic and magnetothermal properties and the magnetic phase diagram of high purity single crystalline terbium along the easy magnetization direction.

    PubMed

    Zverev, V I; Tishin, A M; Chernyshov, A S; Mudryk, Ya; Gschneidner, K A; Pecharsky, V K

    2014-02-12

    The magnetic and magnetothermal properties of a high purity terbium single crystal have been re-investigated from 1.5 to 350 K in magnetic fields ranging from 0 to 75 kOe using magnetization, ac magnetic susceptibility and heat capacity measurements. The magnetic phase diagram has been refined by establishing a region of the fan-like phase broader than reported in the past, by locating a tricritical point at 226 K, and by a more accurate definition of the critical fields and temperatures associated with the magnetic phases observed in Tb. PMID:24451321

  10. Magnetic and magnetothermal properties and the magnetic phase diagram of high purity single crystalline terbium along the easy magnetization direction.

    PubMed

    Zverev, V I; Tishin, A M; Chernyshov, A S; Mudryk, Ya; Gschneidner, K A; Pecharsky, V K

    2014-02-12

    The magnetic and magnetothermal properties of a high purity terbium single crystal have been re-investigated from 1.5 to 350 K in magnetic fields ranging from 0 to 75 kOe using magnetization, ac magnetic susceptibility and heat capacity measurements. The magnetic phase diagram has been refined by establishing a region of the fan-like phase broader than reported in the past, by locating a tricritical point at 226 K, and by a more accurate definition of the critical fields and temperatures associated with the magnetic phases observed in Tb.

  11. Preparation of uniform nanoparticles of ultra-high purity metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, metals, and metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Woodfield, Brian F.; Liu, Shengfeng; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Liu, Qingyuan; Smith, Stacey Janel

    2012-07-03

    In preferred embodiments, metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal (alloy) nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal oxide nanoparticles are provided. According to embodiments, the nanoparticles may possess narrow size distributions and high purities. In certain preferred embodiments, methods of preparing metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal nanoparticles are provided. These methods may provide tight control of particle size, size distribution, and oxidation state. Other preferred embodiments relate to a precursor material that may be used to form nanoparticles. In addition, products prepared from such nanoparticles are disclosed.

  12. Physical activity in individuals with haemophilia and experience with recombinant factor VIII Fc fusion protein and recombinant factor IX Fc fusion protein for the treatment of active patients: a literature review and case reports

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Michael; Álvarez-Román, María Teresa; Chowdary, Pratima; Quon, Doris V.; Schafer, Kim

    2016-01-01

    The World Federation of Hemophilia and the National Hemophilia Foundation encourage people with haemophilia (PWH) to participate in routine physical activity. The benefits of physical activity for PWH include improvements in joint, bone, and muscle health. Accordingly, a number of studies suggest that levels of physical activity among PWH are similar to those of their healthy peers, especially among individuals who began prophylaxis at an early age (≤3 years). Importantly, several studies found either no increased risk or only a transient increase in risk of bleeding with more intensive physical activity compared with less intensive physical activity. Data on optimal prophylaxis regimens for PWH who participate in physical/sporting activities; however, remain sparse. Long-acting recombinant factor VIII Fc fusion protein (rFVIIIFc) and recombinant factor IX Fc fusion protein (rFIXFc) demonstrated efficacy for the prevention and treatment of bleeding episodes in Phase 3 clinical trials of participants with haemophilia A and B, respectively, with most individuals able to maintain or increase their physical activities. This manuscript reviews the current literature that describes physical activity in PWH. Additionally, case studies are presented to provide supplemental information to clinicians illustrating the use of rFVIIIFc and rFIXFc in physically active patients with haemophilia A and B, respectively. These case reports demonstrate that it is possible for patients to be physically active and maintain good control of their haemophilia with extended interval prophylactic dosing using rFVIIIFc or rFIXFc. PMID:27116081

  13. Determination of trace elements in high purity alumina powder by helium enhanced direct current glow discharge mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sehoon; Kim, Sunhye; Hinrichs, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Trace impurities in high purity alumina powder were determined by fast flow direct current glow discharge mass spectrometry (GD-MS). The non-conductive samples were prepared with high purity graphite powder and used as a sample binder and as a secondary cathode. To improve the sensitivity of the GD-MS analysis, helium was introduced as an additional glow discharge gas to argon plasma. The quantification results of the GD-MS measurement were calculated by external calibration with matrix matched certified reference materials. The GD-MS results for the determination of Na, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Ga in the alumina samples agreed well with the certified values of a reference material and the results of chemical analysis using wet sample digestion with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The GD-MS analysis is a rapid analysis technique to determine trace elements in non-conductive alumina to below mg·kg- 1 levels.

  14. Evaluation of New Contact Technology for A Planar High-Purity Germanium Double-Sided Strip Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, E.; Chowdhury, P.; Lister, C. J.; Diaz, C.; Skinner, M.; Hull, E.; Pehl, R.

    2013-10-01

    New technologies for making position sensitive γ-ray detectors have applications in space science, medical imaging, homeland security, and nuclear structure research. One promising approach uses high-purity germanium wafers in Low Energy Photon Spectrometer (LEPS) geometry, where segmentation of the electrodes into strips forms a Double-Sided Strip Detector (DSSD). The position-sensitivity afforded by the many strips is ideal for the study of Compton scattering and polarization. However, challenges with the manufacture and performance of the rectifying contacts continue to plague the advancement of planar DSSDs. The data gathered from the combination of multiple strips' signals suffers from cross-talk between the strips and charge loss due to wide inter-strip gaps. A planar, high-purity DSSD has been developed by PHDs Co. with an alternative electrode material, amorphous germanium, that can be placed such that the gaps between the strips are half the width required by other contact material. This research seeks to quantify the performance gains of the amorphous germanium contacts and smaller inter-strip gaps while exploring the possibilities for this DSSD as an imager and polarization detector. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FG02-94ER40848).

  15. All electrochemical fabrication of a bilayer membrane composed of nanotubular photocatalyst and palladium toward high-purity hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Masashi; Noda, Kei

    2015-12-01

    We developed an all-electrochemical technique for fabricating a bilayer structure of a titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotube array (TNA) and a palladium film (TNA/Pd membrane), which works for photocatalytic high-purity hydrogen production. Electroless plating was used for depositing the Pd film on the TNA surface prepared by anodizing a titanium foil. A 3-μm-thick TNA/Pd membrane without any pinholes in a 1.5-cm-diameter area was fabricated by transferring a 1-μm-thick TNA onto an electroless-plated 2-μm-thick Pd film with a mechanical peel-off process. This ultrathin membrane with sufficient mechanical robustness showed photocatalytic H2 production via methanol reforming under ultraviolet illumination on the TNA side, immediately followed by the purification of the generated H2 gas through the Pd layer. The hydrogen production rate and the apparent quantum yield for high-purity H2 production from methanol/water mixture with the TNA/Pd membrane were also examined. This work suggests that palladium electroless plating is more suitable and practical for preparing a well-organized TNA/Pd heterointerface than palladium sputter deposition.

  16. Tensile properties and interfacial bonding of multi-layered, high-purity titanium strips fabricated by ARB process.

    PubMed

    Ghafari-Gousheh, Soroush; Nedjad, Syamak Hossein; Khalil-Allafi, Jafar

    2015-11-01

    Severe plastic deformation (SPD) processing has shown very effective in promotion of mechanical properties of metals and alloys. In this study, the results of investigating mechanical properties and also inter-layer bond performance of accumulative roll bonded high purity titanium (HP-Ti) strips are presented. High purity titanium plates were severely deformed by use of a combination of cold rolling (CR) to a thickness reduction of approximately 87% and then accumulative roll bonding (ARB) for three cycles (N=3) at ambient temperature. Optical and scanning electron microscopy, tensile testing, and hardness measurements were conducted. The ARB strips exhibited lower tensile strength and ductility in comparison to cold rolled one which can basically be attributed to the poor function of the latest bonds established in the centerlines of the strips. Fractographic examinations revealed the interfacial de-bonding along the centerline between the layers having undergone roll bonding for just one cycle. It was while the interfaces having experienced roll bonding for more cycles showed much higher resistance against delaminating. PMID:26253205

  17. Qualification and initial characterization of a high-purity 233U spike for use in uranium analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, K. J.; Canaan, R. D.; Hexel, C.; Giaquinto, J.; Krichinsky, A. M.

    2015-08-20

    Several high-purity 233U items potentially useful as isotope dilution mass spectrometry standards for safeguards, non-proliferation, and nuclear forensics measurements are identified and rescued from downblending. By preserving the supply of 233U materials of different pedigree for use as source materials for certified reference materials (CRMs), it is ensured that the safeguards community has high quality uranium isotopic standards required for calibration of the analytical instruments. One of the items identified as a source material for a high-purity CRM is characterized for the uranium isotope-amount ratios using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Additional verification measurements on this material using quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) are also performed. As a result, the comparison of the ICPMS uranium isotope-amount ratios with the TIMS data, with much smaller uncertainties, validated the ICPMS measurement practices. ICPMS is proposed for the initial screening of the purity of items in the rescue campaign.

  18. Qualification and initial characterization of a high-purity 233U spike for use in uranium analyses

    DOE PAGES

    Mathew, K. J.; Canaan, R. D.; Hexel, C.; Giaquinto, J.; Krichinsky, A. M.

    2015-08-20

    Several high-purity 233U items potentially useful as isotope dilution mass spectrometry standards for safeguards, non-proliferation, and nuclear forensics measurements are identified and rescued from downblending. By preserving the supply of 233U materials of different pedigree for use as source materials for certified reference materials (CRMs), it is ensured that the safeguards community has high quality uranium isotopic standards required for calibration of the analytical instruments. One of the items identified as a source material for a high-purity CRM is characterized for the uranium isotope-amount ratios using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Additional verification measurements on this material using quadrupole inductivelymore » coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) are also performed. As a result, the comparison of the ICPMS uranium isotope-amount ratios with the TIMS data, with much smaller uncertainties, validated the ICPMS measurement practices. ICPMS is proposed for the initial screening of the purity of items in the rescue campaign.« less

  19. Application of a Barrier Filter at a High Purity Synthetic Graphite Plant, CRADA 99-F035, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2000-08-31

    Superior Graphite Company and the US Department of Energy have entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to study the application of ceramic barrier filters at its Hopkinsville, Kentucky graphite plant. Superior Graphite Company is a worldwide leader in the application of advanced thermal processing technology to produce high purity graphite and carbons. The objective of the CRADA is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of incorporating the use of high-temperature filters to improve the performance of the offgas treatment system. A conceptual design was developed incorporating the ceramic filters into the offgas treatment system to be used for the development of a capital cost estimate and economic feasibility assessment of this technology for improving particulate removal. This CRADA is a joint effort of Superior Graphite Company, Parsons Infrastructure and Technology Group, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the US Department of Energy (DOE).

  20. A hybrid-membrane migration method to isolate high-purity adipose-derived stem cells from fat tissues

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Akon; Wang, Ching-Tang; Ling, Qing-Dong; Lee, Henry Hsin-chung; Kumar, S. Suresh; Chang, Yung; Alarfaj, Abdullah A.; Munusamy, Murugan A.; Hsu, Shih-Tien; Wu, Gwo-Jang; Umezawa, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) exhibit heterogeneous characteristics, indicating various genotypes and differentiation abilities. The isolated hADSCs can possess different purity levels and divergent properties depending on the purification methods used. We developed a hybrid-membrane migration method that purifies hADSCs from a fat tissue solution with extremely high purity and pluripotency. A primary fat-tissue solution was permeated through the porous membranes with a pore size from 8 to 25 μm, and the membranes were incubated in cell culture medium for 15-18 days. The hADSCs that migrated from the membranes contained an extremely high percentage (e.g., >98%) of cells positive for mesenchymal stem cell markers and showed almost one order of magnitude higher expression of some pluripotency genes (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and Nanog) compared with cells isolated using the conventional culture method. PMID:25970301

  1. Role of Chemical Driving Force in Martensitic Transformations of High-Purity Fe-Cr-Ni Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behjati, P.; Najafizadeh, A.

    2011-12-01

    The main objective of the present work is to point out the respective roles of chemical driving force and stacking fault energy (SFE) in the occurrence of martensitic transformations in high-purity Fe-Cr-Ni alloys. For this purpose, the transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffractometer, thermal differential microanalyzer (TDA), and tension test were employed to report M s temperatures, austenite stacking fault energies, and driving forces for the concerned alloys. It was observed that the martensitic transformations in the studied alloys occur through the γ → ɛ → α' steps. As a remarkable result, it was shown that a low SFE, if necessary to ɛ-phase nucleation, is not a sufficient condition for nucleation of α' phase. In fact, the formation of stable α' nuclei from α' embryos occur if the required chemical driving force is provided. Also, an equation was proposed for the kinetics of spontaneous martensitic transformation as a function of driving force.

  2. High purity H2 by sorption-enhanced chemical looping reforming of waste cooking oil in a packed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Pimenidou, P; Rickett, G; Dupont, V; Twigg, M V

    2010-12-01

    High purity hydrogen (>95%) was produced at 600 degrees C and 1 atm by steam reforming of waste cooking oil at a molar steam to carbon ratio of 4 using chemical looping, a process that features redox cycles of a Ni catalyst with the in-situ carbonation/calcination of a CO(2) sorbent (dolomite) in a packed bed reactor under alternated feedstreams of fuel-steam and air. The fuel and steam conversion were higher with the sorbent present than without it. Initially, the dolomite carbonation was very efficient (100%), and 98% purity hydrogen was produced, but the carbonation decreased to around 56% with a purity of 95% respectively in the following cycles. Reduction of the nickel catalyst occurred alongside steam reforming, water gas shift and carbonation, with H(2) produced continuously under fuel-steam feeds. Catalyst and CO(2)-sorbent regeneration was observed, and long periods of autothermal operation within each cycle were demonstrated.

  3. Industrial-scale separation of high-purity single-chirality single-wall carbon nanotubes for biological imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yomogida, Yohei; Tanaka, Takeshi; Zhang, Minfang; Yudasaka, Masako; Wei, Xiaojun; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2016-06-01

    Single-chirality, single-wall carbon nanotubes are desired due to their inherent physical properties and performance characteristics. Here, we demonstrate a chromatographic separation method based on a newly discovered chirality-selective affinity between carbon nanotubes and a gel containing a mixture of the surfactants. In this system, two different selectivities are found: chiral-angle selectivity and diameter selectivity. Since the chirality of nanotubes is determined by the chiral angle and diameter, combining these independent selectivities leads to high-resolution single-chirality separation with milligram-scale throughput and high purity. Furthermore, we present efficient vascular imaging of mice using separated single-chirality (9,4) nanotubes. Due to efficient absorption and emission, blood vessels can be recognized even with the use of ~100-fold lower injected dose than the reported value for pristine nanotubes. Thus, 1 day of separation provides material for up to 15,000 imaging experiments, which is acceptable for industrial use.

  4. Pitting Corrosion in CVD SiC at 300°C in Deoxygenated High-Purity Water

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Pitman, Stan G.; Senor, David J.; Geelhood, Ken J.; Painter, Chad L.

    2008-08-15

    SiC is a candidate for nuclear applications at elevated temperatures but has not been fully studied under typical light-water reactor operating conditions, such as moderate temperatures and high pressures. Coupons of high-purity chemical vapor deposited SiC were exposed to deoxygenated, pressurized water at 573K and 100 Bar for up to 4000 hours. Ceramographic examination of the exposed SiC surfaces revealed both embryonic and large, d > 300 µm, pits on the surface. The pits were characterized using scanning electron microscopy for structure and chemistry analysis. Pit densities were also determined by standard counting methods. The chemical analysis revealed that the pits are associated with the formation of silica and subsequent loss of Si, which is expected due to several suggested reactions between SiC and water.

  5. Phase transformations of high-purity PbI2 nanoparticles synthesized from lead-acid accumulator anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malevu, T. D.; Ocaya, R. O.; Tshabalala, K. G.

    2016-09-01

    High-purity hexagonal lead iodide nanoparticles have been synthesized from a depleted sealed lead acid battery anode. The synthesized product was found to consist of the rare 6R polytype form of PbI2 that is thought to have good potential in photovoltaic applications. We investigate the effects of annealing time and post-melting temperature on the structure and optical properties using 1.5418 Å CuKα radiation. Photoluminescence measurements were done under 150 W/221 nm wavelength xenon excitation. Phase transformation was observed through XRD peaks when annealing time increased from 0.5-5 h. The nanoparticle grain size and inter-planar distance appeared to be independent of annealing time. PL measurements show three broad peaks in a range of 400 nm to 700 nm that are attributed to excitonic, donor-acceptor pair and luminescence bands from the deep levels.

  6. Synthesis and optical properties of high-purity CoO nanowires prepared by an environmentally friendly molten salt route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenzhong; Zhang, Guling

    2009-08-01

    CoO nanowires with diameters of 50 _80 nm, and lengths of up to more than 5 μm have been successfully synthesized by a simple environmentally friendly molten salt route, in which the precursor CoCO 3 nanoparticles are decomposed to form high-purity CoO nanowires in NaCl flux. The structure features and morphology of the as-prepared CoO nanowires were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). The chemical composition and oxidation state of the prepared nanowires were systemically studied by X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and laser Raman spectroscopy. The results indicated that the as-prepared CoO nanowires were composed of pure cubic CoO phase. The growth mechanism of the synthesized nanowires was also discussed in detail based on the experimental results.

  7. Enhanced quantum efficiency of high-purity silicon imaging detectors by ultralow temperature surface modification using Sb doping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Hoenk, Michael E.; Elliott, S. Tom; Holland, Stephen E.; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2005-01-01

    A low temperature process for Sb doping of silicon has been developed as a backsurface treatment for high-purity n-type imaging detectors. Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is used to achieve very high dopant incorporation in a thin, surface-confined layer. The growth temperature is kept below 450 (deg)C for compatibility with Al-metallized devices. Imaging with MBE-modified 1kx1k charge coupled devices (CCDs) operated in full depletion has been demonstrated. Dark current is comparable to the state-of-the-art process, which requires a high temperature step. Quantum efficiency is improved, especially in the UV, for thin doped layers placed closer to the backsurface. Near 100% internal quantum efficiency has been demonstrated in the ultraviolet for a CCD with a 1.5 nm silicon cap layer.

  8. Formation and annihilation of intrinsic defects induced by electronic excitation in high-purity crystalline SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kajihara, Koichi; Skuja, Linards; Hosono, Hideo

    2013-04-14

    Formation and thermal annihilation of intrinsic defects in {alpha}-quartz were examined using high-purity samples, while minimizing the contributions of reactions involving metallic impurities. Electronic excitation with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays was employed to avoid radiation-induced amorphization. The results clearly show that formation of oxygen vacancies (Si-Si bonds) as a result of decomposition of regular Si-O-Si bonds (Frenkel process) is the dominant intrinsic defect process. Compared with amorphous SiO{sub 2}, in {alpha}-quartz, the formation yield of Si-Si bonds is an order of magnitude smaller, the 7.6 eV optical absorption band is less broadened, and their thermal annihilation is complete at a lower temperature, around the {alpha}-{beta} quartz transition. In contrast, radiation-induced interstitial oxygen atoms practically do not form interstitial oxygen molecules.

  9. The use of a high-purity germanium detector for routine measurements of {sup 125}I in radiation workers

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, P.; Bergmann, H.; Havlik, E.; Aiginger, H.; Unfried, E.; Riedlmayer, L.

    1994-12-01

    A high-purity germanium detector was calibrated for the assessment of {sup 125}I uptake in the thyroid gland of radiation workers. A cylindrical water phantom (perspex walls) with high flexibility for position and size of the thyroid was constructed. Within a massive shielding chamber built for a whole-body counter, an activity of 2.2 Bq was detectable (MDA). This is well below the very restrictive limiting value of 20 Bq for inhalation specified by Austrian law. An activity of 128 Bq was measured with a statistical uncertainty of 5% in a counting period of 10 min. Various parameters influencing the result are investigated as well as the performance of two other measurement geometries outside the shielding chamber. 13 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Large-scale fabrication of boron nitride nanotubes with high purity via solid-state reaction method

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    An effective solid-state reaction method is reported for synthesizing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in large scale and with high purity by annealing amorphous boron powder and ferric chloride (FeCl3) catalyst in ammonia atmosphere at elevated temperatures. FeCl3 that has rarely been utilized before is introduced not only as a catalyst but also as an efficient transforming agent which converts boron powder into boron chloride (BCl3) vapor in situ. The nanotubes are bamboo in shape and have an average diameter of about 90 nm. The effect of synthetic temperatures on nanotube morphology and yield is investigated. The photoluminescence (PL) measurement shows emission bands of the nanotubes at 354, 423, 467, and 666 nm. A combined growth mechanism of vapor–liquid-solid (VLS) and solid–liquid-solid (SLS) model is proposed for the formation of the BNNTs. PMID:25313303

  11. Effects of grain, grain boundary, and dc electric field on giant dielectric response in high purity CuO ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thongbai, Prasit; Maensiri, Santi; Yamwong, Teerapon

    2008-08-01

    Giant dielectric constant ɛ' of ˜(2.8-3.7)×104 was observed in high purity CuO (99.999%) ceramics with grain sizes of 4.57±1.71 and 9.57±3.01 μm. The ɛ' and Ea increase with an increase in grain size due to the different electrical properties in the grains. The high dielectric response observed in the CuO ceramics can be described by the internal barrier layer capacitance model. The resistance of grain boundaries (Rgb) and the dielectric constant of the CuO samples decrease with increasing dc bias due to the decrease in grain boundaries capacitance, whereas the resistance of grains (Rg) remains constant.

  12. Measurement of the high-field Q-drop in a high-purity large-grain niobium cavity for different oxidation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter; gurevich, alex

    2007-06-01

    The most challenging issue for understanding the performance of superconducting radio-frequency (rf) cavities made of high-purity (residual resistivity ratio > 200) niobium is due to a sharp degradation (“Q-drop”) of the cavity quality factor Q0(Bp) as the peak surface magnetic field (Bp) exceeds about 90 mT, in the absence of field emission. In addition, a low-temperature (100 – 140 C) “in-situ” baking of the cavity was found to be beneficial in reducing the Q-drop. In this contribution, we present the results from a series of rf tests at 1.7 K and 2.0 K on a single-cell cavity made of high-purity large (with area of the order of few cm2) grain niobium which underwent various oxidation processes, after initial buffered chemical polishing, such as anodization, baking in pure oxygen atmosphere and baking in air up to 180 °C, with the objective of clearly identifying the role of oxygen and the oxide layer on the Q-drop. During each rf test a temperature mapping system allows measuring the local temperature rise of the cavity outer surface due to rf losses, which gives information about the losses location, their field dependence and space distribution. The results confirmed that the depth affected by baking is about 20 – 30 nm from the surface and showed that the Q-drop did not re-appear in a previously baked cavity by further baking at 120 °C in pure oxygen atmosphere or in air up to 180 °C. These treatments increased the oxide thickness and oxygen concentration, measured on niobium samples which were processed with the cavity and were analyzed with Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). Nevertheless, the performance of the cavity after air baking at 180 °C degraded significantly and the temperature maps showed high losses, uniformly distributed on the surface, which could be completely recovered only by a post-purification treatment at 1250 °C. A statistic of the position of the “hot-spots” on the

  13. High-purity 60GHz band millimeter-wave generation based on optically injected semiconductor laser under subharmonic microwave modulation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li; Xia, Guangqiong; Chen, Jianjun; Tang, Xi; Liang, Qing; Wu, Zhengmao

    2016-08-01

    Based on an optically injected semiconductor laser (OISL) operating at period-one (P1) nonlinear dynamical state, high-purity millimeter-wave generation at 60 GHz band is experimentally demonstrated via 1/4 and 1/9 subharmonic microwave modulation (the order of subharmonic is with respect to the frequency fc of the acquired 60 GHz band millimeter-wave but not the fundamental frequency f0 of P1 oscillation). Optical injection is firstly used to drive a semiconductor laser into P1 state. For the OISL operates at P1 state with a fundamental frequency f0 = 49.43 GHz, by introducing 1/4 subharmonic modulation with a modulation frequency of fm = 15.32 GHz, a 60 GHz band millimeter-wave with central frequency fc = 61.28 GHz ( = 4fm) is experimentally generated, whose linewidth is below 1.6 kHz and SSB phase noise at offset frequency 10 kHz is about -96 dBc/Hz. For fm is varied between 13.58 GHz and 16.49 GHz, fc can be tuned from 54.32 GHz to 65.96 GHz under matched modulation power Pm. Moreover, for the OISL operates at P1 state with f0 = 45.02 GHz, a higher order subharmonic modulation (1/9) is introduced into the OISL for obtaining high-purity 60 GHz band microwave signal. With (fm, Pm) = (7.23 GHz, 13.00 dBm), a microwave signal at 65.07 GHz ( = 9fm) with a linewidth below 1.6 kHz and a SSB phase noise less than -98 dBc/Hz is experimentally generated. Also, the central frequency fc can be tuned in a certain range through adjusting fm and selecting matched Pm.

  14. High-purity 60GHz band millimeter-wave generation based on optically injected semiconductor laser under subharmonic microwave modulation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li; Xia, Guangqiong; Chen, Jianjun; Tang, Xi; Liang, Qing; Wu, Zhengmao

    2016-08-01

    Based on an optically injected semiconductor laser (OISL) operating at period-one (P1) nonlinear dynamical state, high-purity millimeter-wave generation at 60 GHz band is experimentally demonstrated via 1/4 and 1/9 subharmonic microwave modulation (the order of subharmonic is with respect to the frequency fc of the acquired 60 GHz band millimeter-wave but not the fundamental frequency f0 of P1 oscillation). Optical injection is firstly used to drive a semiconductor laser into P1 state. For the OISL operates at P1 state with a fundamental frequency f0 = 49.43 GHz, by introducing 1/4 subharmonic modulation with a modulation frequency of fm = 15.32 GHz, a 60 GHz band millimeter-wave with central frequency fc = 61.28 GHz ( = 4fm) is experimentally generated, whose linewidth is below 1.6 kHz and SSB phase noise at offset frequency 10 kHz is about -96 dBc/Hz. For fm is varied between 13.58 GHz and 16.49 GHz, fc can be tuned from 54.32 GHz to 65.96 GHz under matched modulation power Pm. Moreover, for the OISL operates at P1 state with f0 = 45.02 GHz, a higher order subharmonic modulation (1/9) is introduced into the OISL for obtaining high-purity 60 GHz band microwave signal. With (fm, Pm) = (7.23 GHz, 13.00 dBm), a microwave signal at 65.07 GHz ( = 9fm) with a linewidth below 1.6 kHz and a SSB phase noise less than -98 dBc/Hz is experimentally generated. Also, the central frequency fc can be tuned in a certain range through adjusting fm and selecting matched Pm. PMID:27505789

  15. Determination of trace impurities in high purity gold by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with prior matrix removal by electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. C.; Hsieh, C. H.; Lin, T. S.; Wen, J. C.

    2000-09-01

    A novel method for the determination of 11 trace impurities (Be, Mg, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ag, Pd, Sn and Pb) in high purity gold with a combination of electrochemical deposition separation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric measurement was investigated. In the present study, an efficient separation procedure was developed to remove the gold matrix by the electrodepositon method on the basis of the difference in reduction potential of gold and the other trace impurities. The effects of deposition potential, deposition time and composition of the electrolyte on the separation efficiency were studied. According to our experimental results, most impurities, except for silver, can remain in the electrolyte and the interference from gold can be completely removed through the application of electrodeposition at suitable potential. To achieve simultaneous separation of silver from the gold matrix, a unique complexation reaction between silver ions and ammonia ions was successfully employed to alter the reduction potential of silver ion. By way of a suitable adjustment of the deposition potential and the composition of electrolytes, the spike recoveries of 11 interesting impurities were found to be in the range of 85-105%. The limit of detection (based on the 3-σ criterion) of these elements was 10 -1-10 -2 μg g -1. The applicability of the proposed method has also been validated by the analysis of high purity gold reference materials (FAU9 and FAU11, Royal Canadian Mint). Comparing with the certified values, the recoveries of interesting elements were found to be in the range of 82-118% through the use of proposed method.

  16. Enzymic conversion of alpha-oxyprotohaem IX into biliverdin IX alpha by haem oxygenase.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshinaga, T; Sudo, Y; Sano, S

    1990-01-01

    Conversion of four isomers of meso-oxyprotohaem IX into the corresponding biliverdin IX was attempted with a reconstituted haem oxygenase system in the presence of NADPH-cytochrome c reductase and NADPH. Only the alpha-isomer of meso-oxyprotohaem IX was converted effectively into biliverdin IX alpha, which was further reduced to bilirubin IX alpha by biliverdin reductase. Only trace amounts of biliverdins IX beta, IX gamma and IX delta were respectively formed from the incubation mixture of the corresponding oxyprotohaemin IX isomers with the complete haem oxygenase system under the same conditions. In a kinetic study, the Km for alpha-meso-oxyprotohaem IX was 3.6 microM, which was 2-fold higher than that for protohaem IX. The maximum velocity (Vmax.) of the conversion of alpha-meso-oxyprotohaem IX into biliverdin IX alpha was twice as fast as that of protohaem IX. These results demonstrate that alpha-meso-oxyprotohaem IX is an intermediate of haem degradation and it was converted stereospecifically into biliverdin IX alpha via verdohaem IX alpha. PMID:2122884

  17. In-vivo fluorescence dosimetry of aminolevulinate-based protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) accumulation in human nonmelanoma skin cancers and precancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Christine B.; Lohser, Sara; Chang, Sung; Bailin, Philip A.; Maytin, Edward V.

    2009-06-01

    PDT is clinically useful for precancers (actinic keratoses; AK) of the skin, but the optimal duration for 5-ALA application is still controversial. For basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), cure rates remain inferior to surgical excision. Lack of knowledge about regional levels of PpIX levels within target tissues clearly contribute to these suboptimal results. To investigate PpIX levels achievable in human skin neoplasias in-vivo, a clinical study to monitor PpIX accumulation in vivo was performed. PpIX-fluorescence in patients undergoing ALA-PDT for facial AK was monitored via real-time in-vivo fluorescence dosimetry, with measurements q20 min following application of 5-ALA (Levulan Kerastick). PpIX accumulation followed linear kinetics in nearly all cases. The slopes varied widely, and did not correlate with clinical outcome in all patients. Some patients with a low accumulation of PpIX fluorescence had a good response to therapy, whereas others with high PpIX accumulation required repeat treatment (although not necessarily of the same lesion). PpIX accumulation rates did correlate to a certain degree with the overall amount of erythema. We conclude that unknown factors besides PpIX levels must be critical for the response to treatment. To assess the relationship between PpIX levels in various skin cancers, patients undergoing routine Mohs surgery for BCC or SCC were measured by in-vivo dosimetry at 2 h after 5-ALA application. Overall, a progressive increase in PpIX signal during malignant progression was observed, in the following rank order: Normal skin < AK < SCC ~ BCC.

  18. Preparation of high purity crystalline silicon by electro-catalytic reduction of sodium hexafluorosilicate with sodium below 180 °C.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan; Liu, Yang; Wang, Xin; Li, Kai; Chen, Pu

    2014-01-01

    The growing field of silicon solar cells requires a substantial reduction in the cost of semiconductor grade silicon, which has been mainly produced by the rod-based Siemens method. Because silicon can react with almost all of the elements and form a number of alloys at high temperatures, it is highly desired to obtain high purity crystalline silicon at relatively low temperatures through low cost process. Here we report a fast, complete and inexpensive reduction method for converting sodium hexafluorosilicate into silicon at a relatively low reaction temperature (∼ 200 °C). This temperature could be further decreased to less than 180 °C in combination with an electrochemical approach. The residue sodium fluoride is dissolved away by pure water and hydrochloric acid solution in later purifying processes below 15 °C. High purity silicon in particle form can be obtained. The relative simplicity of this method might lead to a low cost process in producing high purity silicon.

  19. Towards a single step process to create high purity gold structures by electron beam induced deposition at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Mansilla, C; Mehendale, S; Mulders, J J L; Trompenaars, P H F

    2016-10-14

    Highly pure metallic structures can be deposited by electron beam induced deposition and they have many important applications in different fields. The organo-metallic precursor is decomposed and deposited under the electron beam, and typically it is purified with post-irradiation in presence of O2. However, this approach limits the purification to the surface of the deposit. Therefore, 'in situ' purification during deposition using simultaneous flows of both O2 and precursor in parallel with two gas injector needles has been tested and verified. To simplify the practical arrangements, a special concentric nozzle has been designed allowing deposition and purification performed together in a single step. With this new device metallic structures with high purity can be obtained more easily, while there is no limit on the height of the structures within a practical time frame. In this work, we summarize the first results obtained for 'in situ' Au purification using this concentric nozzle, which is described in more detail, including flow simulations. The operational parameter space is explored in order to optimize the shape as well as the purity of the deposits, which are evaluated through scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy measurements, respectively. The observed variations are interpreted in relation to other variables, such as the deposition yield. The resistivity of purified lines is also measured, and the influence of additional post treatments as a last purification step is studied. PMID:27587078

  20. Gas-induced formation of Cu nanoparticle as catalyst for high-purity straight and helical carbon nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Jian, Xian; Jiang, Man; Zhou, Zuowan; Zeng, Qun; Lu, Jun; Wang, Dingchuan; Zhu, Junting; Gou, Jihua; Wang, Yong; Hui, David; Yang, Mingli

    2012-10-23

    The facile preparation of high-purity carbon nanofibers (CNFs) remains challenging due to the high complexity and low controllability in reaction. A novel approach using gas-induced formation of Cu crystals to control the growth of CNFs is developed in this study. By adjusting the atmospheric composition, controllable preparation of Cu nanoparticles (NPs) with specific size and shape is achieved, and they are further used as a catalyst for the growth of straight or helical CNFs with good selectivity and high yield. The preparation of Cu NPs and the formation of CNFs are completed by a one-step process. The inducing effect of N(2), Ar, H(2), and C(2)H(2) on the formation of Cu NPs is systematically investigated through a combined experimental and computational approach. The morphology of CNFs obtained under different conditions is rationalized in terms of Cu NP and CNF growth models. The results suggest that the shapes of CNFs, namely, straight or helical, depend closely on the size, shape, and facet activity of Cu NPs, while such a gas-inducing method offers a simple way to control the formation of Cu NPs.

  1. Purity analyses of high-purity organic compounds with nitroxyl radicals based on the Curie–Weiss law

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Nobuhiro Shimosaka, Takuya

    2015-05-07

    This work reports an attempt to quantify the purities of powders of high-purity organic compounds with stable nitroxyl radicals (namely, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO), 1-oxyl-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-hydroxypiperidine (TEMPOL), and 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl benzoate (4-hydroxy-TEMPO benzoate)) in terms of mass fractions by using our “effective magnetic moment method,” which is based on both the Curie–Weiss law and a fundamental equation of electron paramagnetic resonance (ESR). The temperature dependence of the magnetic moment resulting from the radicals was measured with a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. The g value for each compound was measured with an X-band ESR spectrometer. The results of the purities were (0.998 ± 0.064) kg kg{sup −1} for TEMPO, (1.019 ± 0.040) kg kg{sup −1} for TEMPOL, and (1.001 ± 0.048) kg kg{sup −1} for 4-hydroxy-TEMPO benzoate. These results demonstrate that this analytical method as a future candidate of potential primary direct method can measure the purities with expanded uncertainties of approximately 5%.

  2. Wafer and bulk high-purity silicon trace element analysis at the Texas A and M University Nuclear Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dalsem, Daniel James

    1998-11-24

    A trace element analysis program for wafer and bulk high-purity silicon (Si) samples has been operating at the Texas A and M University Nuclear Science Center (TAMU NSC) since 1996. Samples are irradiated in the NSC's 1-MW TRIGA research reactor at a thermal neutron fluence rate of 10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}/s for 14 hours. After an appropriate decay length, bulk samples are chemically etched to remove surface contamination while wafer surfaces are first rinsed with acid to determine surface contamination and then etched to obtain epitaxial layer contamination information. All samples, along with the appropriate etching solutions are analyzed using gamma-ray spectroscopy to quantitatively determine the various radioisotopes created during irradiation. Elements typically determined are antimony (Sb), arsenic (As), bromine (Br), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), gallium (Ga), gold (Au), iron (Fe), molybdenum (Mo), potassium (K), silver (Ag), sodium (Na) tungsten (W) and zinc (Zn). The potential exists to also determine cesium (Cs), iridium (Ir), lanthanum (La), mercury (Hg), rubidium (Rb), scandium (Sc), and zirconium (Zr). Detection limits range from 10{sup 14} down to 10{sup 7} atoms/cm{sup 2} in surface analysis and 10{sup 13} down to 10{sup 8} atoms/cm{sup 3} in bulk Si.

  3. Towards a single step process to create high purity gold structures by electron beam induced deposition at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansilla, C.; Mehendale, S.; Mulders, J. J. L.; Trompenaars, P. H. F.

    2016-10-01

    Highly pure metallic structures can be deposited by electron beam induced deposition and they have many important applications in different fields. The organo-metallic precursor is decomposed and deposited under the electron beam, and typically it is purified with post-irradiation in presence of O2. However, this approach limits the purification to the surface of the deposit. Therefore, ‘in situ’ purification during deposition using simultaneous flows of both O2 and precursor in parallel with two gas injector needles has been tested and verified. To simplify the practical arrangements, a special concentric nozzle has been designed allowing deposition and purification performed together in a single step. With this new device metallic structures with high purity can be obtained more easily, while there is no limit on the height of the structures within a practical time frame. In this work, we summarize the first results obtained for ‘in situ’ Au purification using this concentric nozzle, which is described in more detail, including flow simulations. The operational parameter space is explored in order to optimize the shape as well as the purity of the deposits, which are evaluated through scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy measurements, respectively. The observed variations are interpreted in relation to other variables, such as the deposition yield. The resistivity of purified lines is also measured, and the influence of additional post treatments as a last purification step is studied.

  4. Plastic deformation of high-purity a-titanium: model development and validation using the Taylor cylinder impact test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandola, Nitin; Revil-Baudard, Benoit; Cazacu, Oana

    2016-08-01

    Results of an experimental study on the quasi-static and high-rate plastic deformation due to impact of a high-purity, polycrystalline, a-titanium material are presented. To quantify the plastic anisotropy and tension-compression asymmetry of the material, first monotonic uniaxial compression and tension tests were carried out at room temperature under quasi-static conditions. It was found that the material is transversely isotropic and displays strong strength differential effects. To characterize the material's strain rate sensitivity, Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar tests in tension and compression were also conducted. Taylor impact tests were performed for impact velocity of 196 m/s. Plastic deformation extended to 64% of the length of the deformed specimen, with little radial spreading. To model simultaneously the observed anisotropy, strain-rate sensitivity, and tension-compression asymmetry of the material, a three-dimensional constitutive model was developed. Key in the formulation is a macroscopic yield function [1] that incorporates the specificities of the plastic flow, namely the combined effects of anisotropy and tension-compression asymmetry. Comparison between model predictions and data show the capabilities of the model to describe with accuracy the plastic behavior of the a-Ti material for both quasi-static and dynamic loadings, in particular, a very good agreement was obtained between the simulated and experimental post-test Taylor specimen geometries.

  5. Effects of hydrogen on the mixed mode I/III toughness of a high-purity rotor steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.M.; Hirth, J.P. ); Moody, N.R.; Gordon, J.A. )

    1993-06-01

    Recently, the authors reported the effects of hydrogen on the mixed mode 1/111 toughness of a high-purity Ni-Cr-Mo-V rotor steel. The steel was tested both in the uncharged and hydrogen-charged conditions. It was shown that the presence of hydrogen degraded the overall J toughness incrementally by approximately 30 pct, with the degree of degradation increasing with the mode III component. Also, in the uncharged condition, the J toughness decreased to a minimum as the mode I/III ratio decreased and increased again for pure mode III loading. However, the authors could not determine if a similar variation of toughness was displayed by the hydrogen-charged steel, because the pure mode III tests could not be completed at that time. The pure mode III tests are now complete, and these new results are presented in this communication. The chemical composition of the steel used in these studies was 0.25C-3.7Ni-1.7Cr-0.4Mo-0.12V-0.05Mn- 0.02Si-0.003(P,Sn,As)-O.002Sb-0.0015 S (wt pct).

  6. Towards a single step process to create high purity gold structures by electron beam induced deposition at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Mansilla, C; Mehendale, S; Mulders, J J L; Trompenaars, P H F

    2016-10-14

    Highly pure metallic structures can be deposited by electron beam induced deposition and they have many important applications in different fields. The organo-metallic precursor is decomposed and deposited under the electron beam, and typically it is purified with post-irradiation in presence of O2. However, this approach limits the purification to the surface of the deposit. Therefore, 'in situ' purification during deposition using simultaneous flows of both O2 and precursor in parallel with two gas injector needles has been tested and verified. To simplify the practical arrangements, a special concentric nozzle has been designed allowing deposition and purification performed together in a single step. With this new device metallic structures with high purity can be obtained more easily, while there is no limit on the height of the structures within a practical time frame. In this work, we summarize the first results obtained for 'in situ' Au purification using this concentric nozzle, which is described in more detail, including flow simulations. The operational parameter space is explored in order to optimize the shape as well as the purity of the deposits, which are evaluated through scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy measurements, respectively. The observed variations are interpreted in relation to other variables, such as the deposition yield. The resistivity of purified lines is also measured, and the influence of additional post treatments as a last purification step is studied.

  7. The formation of high-purity isocyanurate through proazaphosphatrane-catalysed isocyanate cyclo-trimerisation: computational insights.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Jack N; Goodman, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    Polyurethane foams are widely used materials and control of their physical properties is a significant challenge. Management of cyclo-trimerisation during the polymerisation process is vital when tailoring the mechanical properties of the foam. Proazaphosphatranes are known to efficiently catalyse the cyclo-trimerisation of organic isocyanates, giving high purity isocyanurate with little uretdione by-product. The mechanism of this catalysis was previously unknown, although some zwitterionic intermediates have been identified spectroscopically. We have investigated a nucleophilic-catalysis reaction pathway involving sequential addition of methyl isocyanate to activated zwitterionic intermediates using density functional theory calculations. Evidence for significant transannulation by the proazaphosphatrane nitrogen was found for all intermediates, offering stabilisation of the phosphonium cation. Steric crowding at the proazaphosphatrane nucleophilic phosphorus gives rise to a preference for direct isocyanurate formation rather than via the uretdione, in sharp contrast to the uncatalysed system which has been found to preferentially proceed via the kinetic uretdione product. The investigations suggest the mechanism of proazaphosphatrane catalysed cyclo-oligomerisation does not proceed via the uretdione product, and hence why little of this impurity is observed experimentally.

  8. CO{sub 2} looping cycle performance of a high-purity limestone after thermal activation/doping

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilije Manovic; Edward J. Anthony; Gemma Grasa; J. Carlos Abanades

    2008-09-15

    The influence of thermal pretreatment on the performance of a high-purity limestone (La Blanca) during CO{sub 2} capture cycles is investigated in this paper. This limestone was chosen for more detailed investigation because, in earlier research, it failed to show any favorable effect as a result of thermal pretreatment. Here, the original sample, with a particle size of 0.4-0.6 mm, and ground samples were thermally pretreated at 1000-1200{sup o}C, for 6-24 h, and then subjected to several carbonation/calcination cycles in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). This work shows that thermal pretreatment failed to produce a significant self-reactivation effect during CO{sub 2} cycles, despite the use of a wide range of conditions during pretreatment (grinding, temperature, and pretreatment duration) as well as during cycling (CO{sub 2} concentration and duration of the carbonation stage). Additional doping experiments showed that both high Na content and lack of Al in La Blanca limestone cause poor self-reactivation performance after thermal pretreatment. Scanning electron microscope-energy-dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX) analyses also confirmed more pronounced sintering and loss of activity, which we believe are caused by the relatively high Na content. However, stabilization of sorbent particle morphology by Al can allow this limestone to show self-reactivation performance and higher conversions over a longer series of CO{sub 2} cycles. 35 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Industrial-scale separation of high-purity single-chirality single-wall carbon nanotubes for biological imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yomogida, Yohei; Tanaka, Takeshi; Zhang, Minfang; Yudasaka, Masako; Wei, Xiaojun; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2016-01-01

    Single-chirality, single-wall carbon nanotubes are desired due to their inherent physical properties and performance characteristics. Here, we demonstrate a chromatographic separation method based on a newly discovered chirality-selective affinity between carbon nanotubes and a gel containing a mixture of the surfactants. In this system, two different selectivities are found: chiral-angle selectivity and diameter selectivity. Since the chirality of nanotubes is determined by the chiral angle and diameter, combining these independent selectivities leads to high-resolution single-chirality separation with milligram-scale throughput and high purity. Furthermore, we present efficient vascular imaging of mice using separated single-chirality (9,4) nanotubes. Due to efficient absorption and emission, blood vessels can be recognized even with the use of ∼100-fold lower injected dose than the reported value for pristine nanotubes. Thus, 1 day of separation provides material for up to 15,000 imaging experiments, which is acceptable for industrial use. PMID:27350127

  10. High-Purity Isolation and Recovery of Circulating Tumor Cells using Conducting Polymer-deposited Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, SeungHyun; Hong, WooYoung; Lee, Eun Sook; Cho, Youngnam

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a conductive nano-roughened microfluidic device and demonstrated its use as an electrically modulated capture and release system for studying rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The microchannel surfaces were covalently decorated with epithelial cancer-specific anti-EpCAM antibody by electrochemical deposition of biotin-doped polypyrrole (Ppy), followed by the assembly of streptavidin and biotinylated antibody. Our method utilizes the unique topographical features and excellent electrical activity of Ppy for i) surface-induced preferential recognition and release of CTCs, and ii) selective elimination of non-specifically immobilized white blood cells (WBCs), which are capable of high-purity isolation of CTCs. In addition, the direct incorporation of biotin molecules offers good flexibility, because it allows the modification of channel surfaces with diverse antibodies, in addition to anti-EpCAM, for enhanced detection of multiple types of CTCs. By engineering a series of electrical, chemical, and topographical cues, this simple yet efficient device provides a significant advantage to CTC detection technology as compared with other conventional methods. PMID:25250093

  11. Development of High-purity Certified Reference Materials for 17 Proteinogenic Amino Acids by Traceable Titration Methods.

    PubMed

    Kato, Megumi; Yamazaki, Taichi; Kato, Hisashi; Eyama, Sakae; Goto, Mari; Yoshioka, Mariko; Takatsu, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    To ensure the reliability of amino acid analyses, the National Metrology Institute of Japan of the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (NMIJ/AIST) has developed high-purity certified reference materials (CRMs) for 17 proteinogenic amino acids. These CRMs are intended for use as primary reference materials to enable the traceable quantification of amino acids. The purity of the present CRMs was determined based on two traceable methods: nonaqueous acidimetric titration and nitrogen determination by the Kjeldahl method. Since neither method could distinguish compounds with similar structures, such as amino acid-related impurities, impurities were thoroughly quantified by combining several HPLC methods, and subtracted from the obtained purity of each method. The property value of each amino acid was calculated as a weighted mean of the corrected purities by the two methods. The uncertainty of the property value was obtained by combining measurement uncertainties of the two methods, a difference between the two methods, the uncertainty from the contribution of impurities, and the uncertainty derived from inhomogeneity. The uncertainty derived from instability was considered to be negligible based on stability monitoring of some CRMs. The certified value of each amino acid, property value with uncertainty, was given for both with or without enantiomeric separation.

  12. Thermoluminescence (TL) properties and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of high purity CaSO4:Dy TL material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamarudin, Nadira; Abdullah, Wan Saffiey Wan; Hamid, Muhammad Azmi Abdul; Dollah, Mohd Taufik

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents the characterization and TL properties of dysprosium (Dy) doped calcium sulfate (CaSO4) TL material produced by co-precipitation technique with 0.5mol% concentration of dopant. The morphology of the produced TL material was studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the micrograph shows that rectangular parallelepiped shaped crystal with the average of 150 μm in length were produced. The crystallinity of the produced powder was studied using x-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The XRD spectra show that the TL material produced is high purity anhydrite CaSO4 with average crystallite size of 74 nm with orthorhombic crystal system. The TL behavior of produced CaSO4:Dy was studied using a TLD reader after exposure to gamma ray by Co60 source with the doses of 1,5 and 10 Gy. The glow curve shows linear response with glow peak around 230°C which is desired development in the field of radiation dosimetry.

  13. Cobalt(I) Olefin Complexes: Precursors for Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition of High Purity Cobalt Metal Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Jeff A; Pugh, Thomas; Johnson, Andrew L; Kingsley, Andrew J; Richards, Stephen P

    2016-07-18

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a family of organometallic cobalt(I) metal precursors based around cyclopentadienyl and diene ligands. The molecular structures of the complexes cyclopentadienyl-cobalt(I) diolefin complexes are described, as determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Thermogravimetric analysis and thermal stability studies of the complexes highlighted the isoprene, dimethyl butadiene, and cyclohexadiene derivatives [(C5H5)Co(η(4)-CH2CHC(Me)CH2)] (1), [(C5H5)Co(η(4)-CH2C(Me)C(Me)CH2)] (2), and [(C5H5)Co(η(4)-C6H8)] (4) as possible cobalt metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) precursors. Atmospheric pressure MOCVD was employed using precursor 1, to synthesize thin films of metallic cobalt on silicon substrates under an atmosphere (760 torr) of hydrogen (H2). Analysis of the thin films deposited at substrate temperatures of 325, 350, 375, and 400 °C, respectively, by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy reveal temperature-dependent growth features. Films grown at these temperatures are continuous, pinhole-free, and can be seen to be composed of hexagonal particles clearly visible in the electron micrograph. Powder X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy all show the films to be highly crystalline, high-purity metallic cobalt. Raman spectroscopy was unable to detect the presence of cobalt silicides at the substrate/thin film interface. PMID:27348614

  14. A simple dissolved metals mixing method to produce high-purity MgTiO{sub 3} nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Pratapa, Suminar E-mail: suminar-pratapa@physics.its.ac.id; Baqiya, Malik A. E-mail: suminar-pratapa@physics.its.ac.id; Istianah, E-mail: suminar-pratapa@physics.its.ac.id; Lestari, Rina E-mail: suminar-pratapa@physics.its.ac.id; Angela, Riyan E-mail: suminar-pratapa@physics.its.ac.id

    2014-02-24

    A simple dissolved metals mixing method has been effectively used to produce high-purity MgTiO{sub 3} (MT) nanocrystals. The method involves the mixing of independently dissolved magnesium and titanium metal powders in hydrochloric acid followed by calcination. The phase purity and nanocrystallinity were determined by making use of laboratory x-ray diffraction data, to which Rietveld-based analyses were performed. Results showed that the method yielded only one type magnesium titanate powders, i.e. MgTiO{sub 3}, with no Mg{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} or MgTi{sub 2}O{sub 5} phases. The presence of residual rutile or periclase was controlled by adding excessive Mg up to 5% (mol) in the stoichiometric mixing. The method also resulted in MT nanocrystals with estimated average crystallite size of 76±2 nm after calcination at 600°C and 150±4 nm (at 800°C). A transmission electron micrograph confirmed the formation of the nanocrystallites.

  15. Gas-induced formation of Cu nanoparticle as catalyst for high-purity straight and helical carbon nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Jian, Xian; Jiang, Man; Zhou, Zuowan; Zeng, Qun; Lu, Jun; Wang, Dingchuan; Zhu, Junting; Gou, Jihua; Wang, Yong; Hui, David; Yang, Mingli

    2012-10-23

    The facile preparation of high-purity carbon nanofibers (CNFs) remains challenging due to the high complexity and low controllability in reaction. A novel approach using gas-induced formation of Cu crystals to control the growth of CNFs is developed in this study. By adjusting the atmospheric composition, controllable preparation of Cu nanoparticles (NPs) with specific size and shape is achieved, and they are further used as a catalyst for the growth of straight or helical CNFs with good selectivity and high yield. The preparation of Cu NPs and the formation of CNFs are completed by a one-step process. The inducing effect of N(2), Ar, H(2), and C(2)H(2) on the formation of Cu NPs is systematically investigated through a combined experimental and computational approach. The morphology of CNFs obtained under different conditions is rationalized in terms of Cu NP and CNF growth models. The results suggest that the shapes of CNFs, namely, straight or helical, depend closely on the size, shape, and facet activity of Cu NPs, while such a gas-inducing method offers a simple way to control the formation of Cu NPs. PMID:22963353

  16. Title IX--Its Impact.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerou, Nancy

    Fear, judgements, and violence have characterized discrimination throughout history. In sex discrimination, both sexes have a responsibility to fight discriminatory attitudes. Women should retain their distinctly feminine characteristics while at the same time being provided the same opportunities as men of equal ability. Title IX of the Education…

  17. Refinement of Eutectic Si in High Purity Al-5Si Alloys with Combined Ca and P Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Thomas Hartmut; Li, Jiehua; Schaffer, Paul Louis; Schumacher, Peter; Arnberg, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The effects of combined additions of Ca and P on the eutectic Si in a series of high purity Al-5 wt pct Si alloys have been investigated with the entrained droplet technique and complementary sets of conventional castings. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal analysis were used to investigate the eutectic droplet undercooling and the recalescence undercooling, respectively. Optical microscopy, SEM, EPMA, and TEM were employed to characterize the resultant microstructures. It was found that 250 ppm Ca addition to Al-5Si wt pct alloys with higher P contents leads to a significant increase of the eutectic droplet undercooling. For low or moderate cooling rates, the TEM results underline that Ca additions do not promote Si twinning. Thus, a higher twin density cannot be expected in Ca containing Al-Si alloys after, e.g., sand casting. Consequently, a refinement of the eutectic Si from coarse flake-like to fine plate-like structure, rather than a modification of the eutectic Si to a fibrous morphology, was achieved. This strongly indicates that the main purpose of Ca additions is to counteract the coarsening effect of the eutectic Si imposed by higher P concentrations. Significant multiple Si twinning was observed in melt-spun condition; however, this can be attributed to the higher cooling rate. After DSC heating (slow cooling), most of Si twins disappeared. Thus, the well-accepted impurity-induced twinning mechanism may be not valid in the case of Ca addition. The possible refinement mechanisms were discussed in terms of nucleation and growth of eutectic Si. We propose that the pre-eutectic Al2Si2Ca phase and preferential formation of Ca3P2 deactivate impurity particles, most likely AlP, poisoning the nucleation sites for eutectic Si.

  18. Ongoing advances in quantitative PpIX fluorescence guided intracranial tumor resection (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Jonathan D.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Bravo, Jaime J.; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2016-03-01

    Aminolevulinc-acid induced protoporphyrin IX (ALA-PpIX) is being investigated as a biomarker to guide neurosurgical resection of brain tumors. ALA-PpIX fluorescence can be observed visually in the surgical field; however, raw fluorescence emissions can be distorted by factors other than the fluorophore concentration. Specifically, fluorescence emissions are mixed with autofluorescence and attenuated by background absorption and scattering properties of the tissue. Recent work at Dartmouth has developed advanced fluorescence detection approaches that return quantitative assessments of PpIX concentration, which are independent of background optical properties. The quantitative fluorescence imaging (qFI) approach has increased sensitivity to residual disease within the resection cavity at the end of surgery that was not visible to the naked eye through the operating microscope. This presentation outlines clinical observations made during an ongoing investigation of ALA-PpIX based guidance of tumor resection. PpIX fluorescence measurements made in a wide-field hyperspectral imaging approach are co-registered with point-assessment using a fiber optic probe. Data show variations in the measured PpIX accumulation among different clinical tumor grades (i.e. high grade glioma, low grade glioma), types (i.e. primary tumors. metastases) and normal structures of interest (e.g. normal cortex, hippocampus). These results highlight the contrast enhancement and underscore the potential clinical benefit offered from quantitative measurements of PpIX concentration during resection of intracranial tumors.

  19. The Transmembrane Domains of β and IX Subunits Mediate the Localization of the Platelet Glycoprotein Ib-IX Complex to the Glycosphingolipid-enriched Membrane Domain.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guofeng; Shang, Dan; Zhang, Zuping; Shaw, Tanner S; Ran, Yali; López, José A; Peng, Yuandong

    2015-09-01

    We have previously reported that the structural elements of the GP Ib-IX complex required for its localization to glycosphingolipid-enriched membranes (GEMs) reside in the Ibβ and IX subunits. To identify them, we generated a series of cell lines expressing mutant GP Ibβ and GP IX where 1) the cytoplasmic tails (CTs) of either or both GP Ibβ and IX are truncated, and 2) the transmembrane domains (TMDs) of GP Ibβ and GP IX were swapped with the TMD of a non-GEMs associating molecule, human transferrin receptor. Sucrose density fractionation analysis showed that the removal of either or both of the CTs from GP Ibβ and GP IX does not alter GP Ibα-GEMs association when compared with the wild type. In contrast, swapping of the TMDs of either GP Ibβ or GP IX with that of transferrin receptor results in a significant loss (∼ 50%) of GP Ibα from the low density GEMs fractions, with the largest effect seen in the dual TMD-replaced cells (> 80% loss) when compared with the wild type cells (100% of GP Ibα present in the GEMs fractions). Under high shear flow, the TMD-swapped cells adhere poorly to a von Willebrand factor-immobilized surface to a much lesser extent than the previously reported disulfide linkage dysfunctional GP Ibα-expressing cells. Thus, our data demonstrate that the bundle of GP Ibβ and GP IX TMDs instead of their individual CTs is the structural element that mediates the β/IX complex localization to the membrane GEMs, which through the α/β disulfide linkage brings GP Ibα into the GEMs. PMID:26203189

  20. Determination of trace selenium in high purity tellurium by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry after solid phase extraction of a diaminobenzidine-selenium chelate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Wang; Ying, Zeng; Jinyong, Xu

    2016-09-01

    Macroporous adsorption resin was used as the sorbent for solid phase extraction and determination of the trace Se content in high purity tellurium prior to hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry analysis. Selenium was converted into an organic Se chelate using 3,3‧-diaminobenzidine and was separated from the tellurium matrix by solid phase extraction. The resin was packed as a column for solid phase extraction. Under optimum conditions, trace Se can be quantitatively extracted and the tellurium matrix can be removed. The Se in the eluate was determined by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The limit of detection (3σ) of this method was 0.22 ng g- 1 and the relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 5) ranged from 2.0 to 2.5% for the three investigated tellurium samples. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of the trace Se content in high purity tellurium samples.

  1. Comparison of planar SDS-PAGE, CGE-on-a-chip, and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for analysis of the enzymatic de-N-glycosylation of antithrombin III and coagulation factor IX with PNGase F.

    PubMed

    Müller, R; Marchetti, M; Kratzmeier, M; Elgass, H; Kuschel, M; Zenker, A; Allmaier, G

    2007-11-01

    Three different analytical techniques (planar SDS-PAGE, CGE-on-a-chip and MALDI-TOF-MS) applied for determination of the molecular weight of intact and partly and completely de-N-glycosylated human serum glycoproteins (antithrombin III and coagulation factor IX) have been compared. N-Glycans were removed from the protein backbone of both complex glycoproteins using PNGase F, which cleaves all types of asparagine-attached N-glycan provided the oligosaccharide has at least the length of a chitobiose core unit. Two of the applied techniques were based on gel electrophoretic separation in the liquid phase while the third technique was the gas-phase technique mass spectrometry. It was demonstrated that the enzymatic de-N-glycosylation generally worked well (completely or partially) with both glycoproteins (one containing only N-glycans and the second N- and O-glycans). All three methods were suitable for monitoring the de-N-glycosylation progress. While the molecular weights determined with MALDI-TOF-MS were most accurate, both gel electrophoretic methods provided molecular weights that were too high because of the attached glycan structures.

  2. Effect of small additions of silicon, iron, and aluminum on the room-temperature tensile properties of high-purity uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, R.L.

    1983-11-14

    Eleven binary and ternary alloys of uranium and very low concentrations of iron, silicon, and aluminum were prepared and tested for room-temperature tensile properties after various heat treatments. A yield strength approximately double that of high-purity derby uranium was obtained from a U-400 ppM Si-200 ppM Fe alloy after beta solution treatment and alpha aging. Higher silicon plus iron alloy contents resulted in increased yield strength, but showed an unacceptable loss of ductility.

  3. Preparation of High Purity Crystalline Silicon by Electro-Catalytic Reduction of Sodium Hexafluorosilicate with Sodium below 180°C

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuan; Liu, Yang; Wang, Xin; Li, Kai; Chen, Pu

    2014-01-01

    The growing field of silicon solar cells requires a substantial reduction in the cost of semiconductor grade silicon, which has been mainly produced by the rod-based Siemens method. Because silicon can react with almost all of the elements and form a number of alloys at high temperatures, it is highly desired to obtain high purity crystalline silicon at relatively low temperatures through low cost process. Here we report a fast, complete and inexpensive reduction method for converting sodium hexafluorosilicate into silicon at a relatively low reaction temperature (∼200°C). This temperature could be further decreased to less than 180°C in combination with an electrochemical approach. The residue sodium fluoride is dissolved away by pure water and hydrochloric acid solution in later purifying processes below 15°C. High purity silicon in particle form can be obtained. The relative simplicity of this method might lead to a low cost process in producing high purity silicon. PMID:25153509

  4. Ionic liquid-based extraction followed by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of trace heavy metals in high-purity iron metal.

    PubMed

    Matsumiya, Hiroaki; Kato, Tatsuya; Hiraide, Masataka

    2014-02-01

    The analysis of high-purity materials for trace impurities is an important and challenging task. The present paper describes a facile and sensitive method for the determination of trace heavy metals in high-purity iron metal. Trace heavy metals in an iron sample solution were rapidly and selectively preconcentrated by the extraction into a tiny volume of an ionic liquid [1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide] for the determination by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). A nitrogen-donating neutral ligand, 2,4,6-tris(2-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine (TPTZ), was found to be effective in the ionic liquid-based selective extraction, allowing the nearly complete (~99.8%) elimination of the iron matrix. The combination with the optimized GFAAS was successful. The detectability reached sub-μg g(-1) levels in iron metal. The novel use of TPTZ in ionic liquid-based extraction followed by GFAAS was successfully applied to the determination of traces of Co, Ni, Cu, Cd, and Pb in certified reference materials for high-purity iron metal.

  5. Title IX: A Brief History. 25 Years of Title IX. WEEA Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentin, Iram

    This brief history of Title IX points out that the role of women and girls in education and the work force began to change significantly with the passage of Title IX as part of the Education Amendments to the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Title IX ensures legal protection against discrimination for students and employees. This article discusses the…

  6. 45 CFR Subject Index to Title IX... - Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2015-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2015-10-01 2015-10-01 false Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1 Index Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1 Public Welfare Department of Health and... Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1 1 Preamble paragraph numbers are in brackets [ ]....

  7. 45 CFR Subject Index to Title Ix... - Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2002-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2002-10-01 2002-10-01 false Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1 Index Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1 Public Welfare GENERAL ADMINISTRATION... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Procedures Interim procedures. Pt. 86, Index Subject Index to Title IX Preamble...

  8. 45 CFR Subject Index to Title IX... - Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2006-10-01

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  9. 45 CFR Subject Index to Title Ix... - Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2005-10-01

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  10. 34 CFR Subject Index to Title Ix... - Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2005-07-01

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  12. 34 CFR Subject Index to Title Ix... - Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1

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    1998-10-01

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  14. 45 CFR Subject Index to Title Ix... - Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation \\1\\

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2000-10-01

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  15. 45 CFR Subject Index to Title Ix... - Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2003-10-01

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  16. 45 CFR Subject Index to Title Ix... - Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2009-10-01

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  17. 34 CFR Subject Index to Title IX... - Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2015-07-01

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  18. 45 CFR Subject Index to Title Ix... - Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2001-10-01

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  19. 45 CFR Subject Index to Title Ix... - Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2004-10-01

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  20. 34 CFR Subject Index to Title Ix... - Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2007-07-01

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  1. 45 CFR Subject Index to Title Ix... - Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2008-10-01

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    1999-10-01

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  3. 34 CFR Subject Index to Title Ix... - Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2003-07-01

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  4. 34 CFR Subject Index to Title IX... - Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2016-07-01

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  5. 34 CFR Subject Index to Title Ix... - Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1

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    2004-07-01

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  6. 45 CFR Subject Index to Title Ix... - Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2007-10-01

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  7. 45 CFR Subject Index to Title Ix... - Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation \\1\\

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    1997-10-01

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  8. 34 CFR Subject Index to Title Ix... - Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2006-07-01

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  9. 45 CFR Subject Index to Title Ix... - Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation \\1\\

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    1996-10-01

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  10. 34 CFR Subject Index to Title Ix... - Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2009-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1 Index Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the.... Subject Index Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1 1 Preamble paragraph numbers are...

  11. High-purity magnesium interference screws promote fibrocartilaginous entheses regeneration in the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction rabbit model via accumulation of BMP-2 and VEGF.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Pengfei; Han, Pei; Zhao, Changli; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Wu, Hongliu; Ni, Jiahua; Hou, Peng; Zhang, Yuanzhuang; Liu, Jingyi; Xu, Haidong; Liu, Shen; Zhang, Xiaonong; Zheng, Yufeng; Chai, Yimin

    2016-03-01

    Interference screw in the fixation of autologous tendon graft to the bone tunnel is widely accepted for the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), but the regeneration of fibrocartilaginous entheses could hardly be achieved with the traditional interference screw. In the present work, biodegradable high-purity magnesium (HP Mg) showed good cytocompatibility and promoted the expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibrocartilage markers (Aggrecan, COL2A1 and SOX-9), and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) production in vitro. The HP Mg screw was applied to fix the semitendinosus autograft to the femoral tunnel in a rabbit model of ACL reconstruction with titanium (Ti) screw as the control. The femur-tendon graft-tibia complex was retrieved at 3, 6, 9 and 12 weeks. Gross observation and range of motion (ROM) of the animal model reached normal levels at 12 weeks. No sign of host reaction was found in the X-ray scanning. The HP Mg group was comparable to the Ti group with respect to biomechanical properties of the reconstructed ACL, and the ultimate load to failure and stiffness increased 12 weeks after surgery. In the histological analysis, the HP Mg group formed distinct fibrocartilage transition zones at the tendon-bone interface 12 weeks after surgery, whereas a disorganized fibrocartilage layer was found in the Ti group. In the immunohistochemical analysis, highly positive staining of BMP-2, VEGF and the specific receptor for BMP-2 (BMPR1A) was shown at the tendon-bone interface of the HP Mg group compared with the Ti group. Furthermore, the HP Mg group had significantly higher expression of BMP-2 and VEGF than the Ti group in the early phase of tendon-bone healing, followed by enhanced expression of fibrocartilage markers and GAG production. Therefore we proposed that the stimulation of BMP-2 and VEGF by Mg ions was responsible for the fibrochondrogenesis of Mg materials. HP Mg was promising as a

  12. High-purity magnesium interference screws promote fibrocartilaginous entheses regeneration in the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction rabbit model via accumulation of BMP-2 and VEGF.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Pengfei; Han, Pei; Zhao, Changli; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Wu, Hongliu; Ni, Jiahua; Hou, Peng; Zhang, Yuanzhuang; Liu, Jingyi; Xu, Haidong; Liu, Shen; Zhang, Xiaonong; Zheng, Yufeng; Chai, Yimin

    2016-03-01

    Interference screw in the fixation of autologous tendon graft to the bone tunnel is widely accepted for the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), but the regeneration of fibrocartilaginous entheses could hardly be achieved with the traditional interference screw. In the present work, biodegradable high-purity magnesium (HP Mg) showed good cytocompatibility and promoted the expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibrocartilage markers (Aggrecan, COL2A1 and SOX-9), and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) production in vitro. The HP Mg screw was applied to fix the semitendinosus autograft to the femoral tunnel in a rabbit model of ACL reconstruction with titanium (Ti) screw as the control. The femur-tendon graft-tibia complex was retrieved at 3, 6, 9 and 12 weeks. Gross observation and range of motion (ROM) of the animal model reached normal levels at 12 weeks. No sign of host reaction was found in the X-ray scanning. The HP Mg group was comparable to the Ti group with respect to biomechanical properties of the reconstructed ACL, and the ultimate load to failure and stiffness increased 12 weeks after surgery. In the histological analysis, the HP Mg group formed distinct fibrocartilage transition zones at the tendon-bone interface 12 weeks after surgery, whereas a disorganized fibrocartilage layer was found in the Ti group. In the immunohistochemical analysis, highly positive staining of BMP-2, VEGF and the specific receptor for BMP-2 (BMPR1A) was shown at the tendon-bone interface of the HP Mg group compared with the Ti group. Furthermore, the HP Mg group had significantly higher expression of BMP-2 and VEGF than the Ti group in the early phase of tendon-bone healing, followed by enhanced expression of fibrocartilage markers and GAG production. Therefore we proposed that the stimulation of BMP-2 and VEGF by Mg ions was responsible for the fibrochondrogenesis of Mg materials. HP Mg was promising as a

  13. Sub-band gap photo-enhanced secondary electron emission from high-purity single-crystal chemical-vapor-deposited diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yater, J. E.; Shaw, J. L.; Pate, B. B.; Feygelson, T. I.

    2016-02-01

    Secondary-electron-emission (SEE) current measured from high-purity, single-crystal (100) chemical-vapor-deposited diamond is found to increase when sub-band gap (3.06 eV) photons are incident on the hydrogenated surface. Although the light does not produce photoemission directly, the SEE current increases by more than a factor of 2 before saturating with increasing laser power. In energy distribution curves (EDCs), the emission peak shows a corresponding increase in intensity with increasing laser power. However, the emission-onset energy in the EDCs remains constant, indicating that the bands are pinned at the surface. On the other hand, changes are observed on the high-energy side of the distribution as the laser power increases, with a well-defined shoulder becoming more pronounced. From an analysis of this feature in the EDCs, it is deduced that upward band bending is present in the near-surface region during the SEE measurements and this band bending suppresses the SEE yield. However, sub-band gap photon illumination reduces the band bending and thereby increases the SEE current. Because the bands are pinned at the surface, we conclude that the changes in the band levels occur below the surface in the electron transport region. Sample heating produces similar effects as observed with sub-band gap photon illumination, namely, an increase in SEE current and a reduction in band bending. However, the upward band bending is not fully removed by either increasing laser power or temperature, and a minimum band bending of ˜0.8 eV is established in both cases. The sub-band gap photo-excitation mechanism is under further investigation, although it appears likely at present that defect or gap states play a role in the photo-enhanced SEE process. In the meantime, the study demonstrates the ability of visible light to modify the electronic properties of diamond and enhance the emission capabilities, which may have potential impact for diamond-based vacuum electron

  14. The platelet glycoprotein Ib-IX complex.

    PubMed

    López, J A

    1994-02-01

    The GP Ib-IX complex is part of a conglomerate of polypeptides on the platelet surface that perform several key roles of central importance to the haemostatic function of platelets. When deranged, these interactions can also lead to pathological thrombosis, with potentially disastrous consequences for the organism. In this manuscript, several aspects of the structure and biology of the complex are reviewed, including the structures of its polypeptides and their relationships to other members of a phylogenetically widespread protein family, its topology on the platelet membrane and relationship with cytoskeletal components, peptide sequences involved in binding its ligands, von Willebrand factor and thrombin, its polymorphisms, its biosynthesis, and the organizations of the genes that encode its subunits.

  15. Statistical Evidence and Compliance with Title IX

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheslock, John J.; Eckes, Suzanne E.

    2008-01-01

    The scope of Title IX clearly includes all aspects of education, but the legislation's application to college athletics receives the most attention. Athletics programs, unlike most academic activities, are sex segregated, so the proper interpretation of the intercollegiate athletics provisions of Title IX is less clear-cut. This article examines…

  16. Title IX and Sex Discrimination. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office for Civil Rights (ED), Washington, DC.

    Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 protects people from discrimination based on sex in education programs or activities that receive Federal financial assistance. This brochure outlines the responsibilities of education programs and activities covered by Title IX, the responsibilities of the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) in enforcing…

  17. Comparison of the rates of joint arthroplasty in patients with severe factor VIII and IX deficiency: an index of different clinical severity of the 2 coagulation disorders.

    PubMed

    Tagariello, Giuseppe; Iorio, Alfonso; Santagostino, Elena; Morfini, Massimo; Bisson, Ruggero; Innocenti, Massimo; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Mazzucconi, Maria Gabriella; Pasta, Gian Luigi; Radossi, Paolo; Rodorigo, Giuseppina; Santoro, Cristina; Sartori, Roberto; Scaraggi, Antonio; Solimeno, Luigi Pier; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2009-07-23

    Data from the Italian Hemophilia Centres were collected to perform a retrospective survey of joint arthroplasty in patients with severe hemophilia. Twenty-nine of 49 hemophilia centers reported that 328 of the 347 operations were carried out in 253 patients with severe hemophilia A (HA) and 19 in 15 patients with severe hemophilia B (HB). When results were normalized to the whole Italian hemophilia population (1770 severe HA and 319 severe HB), patients with HA had a 3-fold higher risk of undergoing joint arthroplasty (odds ratio [OR], 3.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.97-5.77; P < .001). These results were confirmed after adjustment for age, HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV), and inhibitor in a Cox regression model (HR, 2.65; 95% CI, 1.62-4.33; P < .001). The survival analysis of time to joint arthroplasty in the subset of patients with severe HA was not affected by the severity of factor VIII (FVIII) gene mutations. A systematic review of literature articles reporting joint arthroplasties in HA and HB showed that the proportion of HA patients who had undergone arthroplasties was higher than that of HB patients, in agreement with the findings in our Italian cohort. These data suggest that the 2 inherited coagulation disorders have a different severity of clinical phenotype.

  18. Characteristics of Signals Originating near the Lithium-Diffused N+ Contact of High Purity Germanium P-Type Point Contact Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo, E.; Amman, M.; Avignone, F. T.; Barton, P. J.; Beene, James R; Bertrand Jr, Fred E; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Chan, Y-D; Christofferson, C. D.; Collar, Juan I.; Combs, D. C.; Detwiler, J.A.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, V.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Esterline, J.; Fast, J.E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Gehman, V. M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, M. P.; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E.W.; Horton, M.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K.J.; Kidd, M. F.; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, O.; Konovalov, S.I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; Leviner, L. E.; Looker, Q.; Luke, P.N.; MacMullin, S.; Martin, R.D.; Merriman, J. H.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, L.; Orrell, John L.; Overman, N. R.; Perumpilly, G.; Phillips II, D. G.; et al.

    2013-01-01

    A study of signals originating near the lithium-diffused n+ contact of p-type point contact (PPC) high purity germanium detectors (HPGe) is presented. The transition region between the active germanium and the fully dead layer of the n+ contact is examined. Energy depositions in this transition region are shown to result in partial charge collection. This provides a mechanism for events with a well defined energy to contribute to the continuum of the energy spectrum at lower energies. A novel technique to quantify the contribution from this source of background is introduced. Experiments that operate germanium detectors with a very low energy threshold may benefit from the methods presented herein.

  19. Optimal recovery of high-purity rutin crystals from the whole plant of Fagopyrum esculentum Moench (buckwheat) by extraction, fractionation, and recrystallization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Heon; Lee, Ki Won; Kim, Dong Young; Park, Hyung Hwan; Kwon, Ik Boo; Lee, Hyong Joo

    2005-10-01

    Rutin, one of the flavonoids derived from plants, is increasingly in demand in the food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries due to its various biological and physiological activities including antioxidation, anti-inflammation, and anti-hypertension. The whole plant of buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) is a major source of natural rutin. This study developed a low-cost process encompassing the efficient extraction, fractionation, and recrystallization to obtain high-purity rutin from buckwheat, and it could improve the economic utilization of this abundant low-value agricultural product. The sequential separation and purification procedures established in this study involved extraction with 50% (v/v) aqueous ethanol at 80 degrees C for 1 h followed by elution with water and aqueous ethanols at 20% and 30% (v/v) on a styrene-based resin column, and recrystallization at 4 degrees C for 12 h. These conditions resulted in the recovery of 92% of total rutin with over 95% purity. In the present study, high-purity rutin was obtained from whole buckwheat through low-cost processes, the separation and purification strategy established in this study could provide valuable information to the relevant industries.

  20. Employing a gain-of-function factor IX variant R338L to advance the efficacy and safety of hemophilia B human gene therapy: preclinical evaluation supporting an ongoing adeno-associated virus clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Monahan, Paul E; Sun, Junjiang; Gui, Tong; Hu, Genlin; Hannah, William B; Wichlan, David G; Wu, Zhijian; Grieger, Joshua C; Li, Chengwen; Suwanmanee, Thipparat; Stafford, Darrel W; Booth, Carmen J; Samulski, Jade J; Kafri, Tal; McPhee, Scott W J; Samulski, R Jude

    2015-02-01

    Vector capsid dose-dependent inflammation of transduced liver has limited the ability of adeno-associated virus (AAV) factor IX (FIX) gene therapy vectors to reliably convert severe to mild hemophilia B in human clinical trials. These trials also identified the need to understand AAV neutralizing antibodies and empty AAV capsids regarding their impact on clinical success. To address these safety concerns, we have used a scalable manufacturing process to produce GMP-grade AAV8 expressing the FIXR338L gain-of-function variant with minimal (<10%) empty capsid and have performed comprehensive dose-response, biodistribution, and safety evaluations in clinically relevant hemophilia models. The scAAV8.FIXR338L vector produced greater than 6-fold increased FIX specific activity compared with wild-type FIX and demonstrated linear dose responses from doses that produced 2-500% FIX activity, associated with dose-dependent hemostasis in a tail transection bleeding challenge. More importantly, using a bleeding model that closely mimics the clinical morbidity of hemophilic arthropathy, mice that received the scAAV8.FIXR338L vector developed minimal histopathological findings of synovitis after hemarthrosis, when compared with mice that received identical doses of wild-type FIX vector. Hemostatically normal mice (n=20) and hemophilic mice (n=88) developed no FIX antibodies after peripheral intravenous vector delivery. No CD8(+) T cell liver infiltrates were observed, despite the marked tropism of scAAV8.FIXR338L for the liver in a comprehensive biodistribution evaluation (n=60 animals). With respect to the role of empty capsids, we demonstrated that in vivo FIXR338L expression was not influenced by the presence of empty AAV particles, either in the presence or absence of various titers of AAV8-neutralizing antibodies. Necropsy of FIX(-/-) mice 8-10 months after vector delivery revealed no microvascular or macrovascular thrombosis in mice expressing FIXR338L (plasma FIX activity

  1. Recovery behavior of high purity cubic SiC polycrystals by post-irradiation annealing up to 1673 K after low temperature neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, Mohd Idzat; Yamazaki, Saishun; Yoshida, Katsumi; Yano, Toyohiko

    2015-10-01

    Two kinds of high purity cubic (β) SiC polycrystals, PureBeta-SiC and CVD-SiC, were irradiated in the BR2 reactor (Belgium) up to a fluence of 2.0-2.5 × 1024 (E > 0.1 MeV) at 333-363 K. Changes in macroscopic lengths were examined by post-irradiation thermal annealing using a precision dilatometer up to 1673 K with a step-heating method. The specimen was held at each temperature step for 6 h and the change in length of the specimen was recorded during each isothermal annealing step from 373 K to 1673 K with 50 K increments. The recovery curves were analyzed with the first order model, and rate constants at each annealing step were obtained. Recovery of defects, induced by neutron irradiation in high purity β-SiC, has four stages of different activation energies. At 373-573 K, the activation energy of PureBeta-SiC and CVD-SiC was in the range of 0.17-0.24 eV and 0.12-0.14 eV; 0.002-0.04 eV and 0.006-0.04 eV at 723-923 K; 0.20-0.27 eV and 0.26-0.31 eV at 923-1223 K; and 1.37-1.38 eV and 1.26-1.29 eV at 1323-1523 K, respectively. Below ∼1223 K the recombination occurred possibly for closely positioned C and Si Frenkel pairs, and no long range migration is deemed essential. Nearly three-fourths of recovery, induced by neutron irradiation, occur by this mechanism. In addition, at 1323-1523 K, recombination of slightly separated C Frenkel pairs and more long-range migration of Si interstitials may have occurred for PureBeta-SiC and CVD-SiC specimens. Migration of both vacancies may be restricted up to ∼1523 K. Comparing to hexagonal α-SiC, high purity β-SiC recovered more quickly in the lower annealing temperature range of less than 873 K, in particular less than 573 K.

  2. El Titulo IX y La Discriminacion por Sexo (Title IX and Sex Discrimination).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office for Civil Rights (ED), Washington, DC.

    Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 protects people from discrimination based on sex in education programs or activities that receive Federal financial assistance. This brochure outlines the responsibilities of education programs and activities covered by Title IX, the responsibilities of the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) in enforcing…

  3. Characteristics of signals originating near the lithium-diffused N+ contact of high purity germanium p-type point contact detectors

    DOE PAGES

    Aguayo, E.; Amman, M.; Avignone, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Barton, P. J.; Beene, J. R.; Bertrand, F. E.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; et al

    2012-11-09

    A study of signals originating near the lithium-diffused n+ contact of p-type point contact (PPC) high purity germanium detectors (HPGe) is presented. The transition region between the active germanium and the fully dead layer of the n+ contact is examined. Energy depositions in this transition region are shown to result in partial charge collection. This provides a mechanism for events with a well defined energy to contribute to the continuum of the energy spectrum at lower energies. A novel technique to quantify the contribution from this source of background is introduced. Furthermore, experiments that operate germanium detectors with a verymore » low energy threshold may benefit from the methods presented herein.« less

  4. An improved back-flush-to-vent gas chromatographic method for determination of trace permanent gases and carbon dioxide in ultra-high purity ammonia.

    PubMed

    Trubyanov, Maxim M; Mochalov, Georgy M; Vorotyntsev, Ilya V; Vorotyntsev, Andrey V; Suvorov, Sergey S; Smirnov, Konstantin Y; Vorotyntsev, Vladimir M

    2016-05-20

    A novel method for rapid, quantitative determination of trace permanent gases and carbon dioxide in ultra-high purity ammonia by dual-channel two-dimensional GC-PDHID is presented. An improved matrix back-flush-to-vent approach combining back-flush column switching technique with auxiliary NaHSO4 ammonia trap is described. The NaHSO4 trap prevents traces of ammonia from entering the analytical column and is shown not to affect the impurity content of the sample. The approach allows shortening the analysis time and increasing the amount of measurements without extensive maintenance of the GC-system. The performance of the configuration has been evaluated utilizing ammonia- and helium-based calibration standards. The method has been applied for the analysis of 99.9999+% ammonia purified by high-pressure distillation at the production site.

  5. Characteristics of signals originating near the lithium-diffused N+ contact of high purity germanium p-type point contact detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo, E.; Amman, M.; Avignone, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Barton, P. J.; Beene, J. R.; Bertrand, F. E.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Chan, Y. -D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Collar, J. I.; Combs, D. C.; Cooper, R. J.; Detwiler, J. A.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yu.; Egorov, V.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Esterline, J.; Fast, J. E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, F. M.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gehman, V. M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, M. P.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Horton, M.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, O.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; Leviner, L. E.; Loach, J. C.; Looker, Q.; Luke, P. N.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, M. G.; Martin, R. D.; Merriman, J. H.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, L.; Nomachi, M.; Orrell, J. L.; Overman, N. R.; Perumpilly, G.; Phillips, D. G.; Poon, A. W. P.; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, A. G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, K. J.; Steele, D.; Strain, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Yakushev, E.; Yaver, H.; Young, A. R.; Yu, C. -H.; Yumatov, V.

    2012-11-09

    A study of signals originating near the lithium-diffused n+ contact of p-type point contact (PPC) high purity germanium detectors (HPGe) is presented. The transition region between the active germanium and the fully dead layer of the n+ contact is examined. Energy depositions in this transition region are shown to result in partial charge collection. This provides a mechanism for events with a well defined energy to contribute to the continuum of the energy spectrum at lower energies. A novel technique to quantify the contribution from this source of background is introduced. Furthermore, experiments that operate germanium detectors with a very low energy threshold may benefit from the methods presented herein.

  6. Possible influence of surface oxides on the optical response of high-purity niobium material used in the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nageshwar; Deo, M. N.; Roy, S. B.

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the possible influence of surface oxides on the optical properties of a high-purity niobium (Nb) material for fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities. Various peaks in the infrared region were identified using Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Optical response functions such as complex refractive index, dielectric and conductivity of niobium were compared with the existing results on oxides free Nb and Cu. It was observed that the presence of a mixture of niobium-oxides, and probably near other surface impurities, appreciably influence the conducting properties of the material causing deviation from the typical metallic characteristics. In this way, the key result of this work is the observation, identification of vibrational modes of some of surface complexes and study of its influences on the optical responses of materials. This method of spectroscopic investigation will help in understanding the origin of degradation of performance of SCRF cavities.

  7. An improved back-flush-to-vent gas chromatographic method for determination of trace permanent gases and carbon dioxide in ultra-high purity ammonia.

    PubMed

    Trubyanov, Maxim M; Mochalov, Georgy M; Vorotyntsev, Ilya V; Vorotyntsev, Andrey V; Suvorov, Sergey S; Smirnov, Konstantin Y; Vorotyntsev, Vladimir M

    2016-05-20

    A novel method for rapid, quantitative determination of trace permanent gases and carbon dioxide in ultra-high purity ammonia by dual-channel two-dimensional GC-PDHID is presented. An improved matrix back-flush-to-vent approach combining back-flush column switching technique with auxiliary NaHSO4 ammonia trap is described. The NaHSO4 trap prevents traces of ammonia from entering the analytical column and is shown not to affect the impurity content of the sample. The approach allows shortening the analysis time and increasing the amount of measurements without extensive maintenance of the GC-system. The performance of the configuration has been evaluated utilizing ammonia- and helium-based calibration standards. The method has been applied for the analysis of 99.9999+% ammonia purified by high-pressure distillation at the production site. PMID:27083259

  8. In situ matrix evaporation by isothermal distillation of high-purity reagents for the determination of trace impurities by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Dhavile, S M; Thangavel, S; Chandrasekaran, K; Dash, K; Rao, S V; Chaurasia, S C

    2004-10-01

    In situ matrix evaporation of high-purity acids based on isothermal distillation was achieved in a high-density polyethylene (HDPE) container on a water bath, to avoid contamination from the laboratory environment. The solubility of water and acid vapours in glycerol due to co-association was utilized to achieve complete evaporation. All major sources which contribute to the process blank were taken care of in a simple and effective way. A 50-fold preconcentration with >99.9% matrix removal was achieved for the analysis of low-boiling acids, HCl, HF, HNO3 and H2O2. The non-volatile ions NH4+, Li+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, SO4(2-) and PO4(3-) were determined by ion chromatograph with conductivity detection. The detection limits were 6-130 ng/l with recoveries of 85-110% for all ions studied.

  9. Measured Attenuation of Coplanar Waveguide on 6H, p-type SiC and High Purity Semi-Insulating 4H SiC through 800 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Schwartz, Zachary D.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Downey, Alan N.

    2004-01-01

    Wireless sensors for high temperature applications such as oil drilling and mining, automobiles, and jet engine performance monitoring require circuits built on wide bandgap semiconductors. In this paper, the characteristics of microwave transmission lines on 4H-High Purity Semi-Insulating SiC and 6H, p-type SiC is presented as a function of temperature and frequency. It is shown that the attenuation of 6H, p-type substrates is too high for microwave circuits, large leakage current will flow through the substrate, and that unusual attenuation characteristics are due to trapping in the SiC. The 4H-HPSI SiC is shown to have low attenuation and leakage currents over the entire temperature range.

  10. Integrated Approach To Producing High-Purity Trehalose from Maltose by the Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica Displaying Trehalose Synthase (TreS) on the Cell Surface.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Wang, Hengwei; Li, Lijuan; Cheng, Huiling; Liu, Dawen; Cheng, Hairong; Deng, Zixin

    2016-08-10

    An alternative strategy that integrated enzyme production, trehalose biotransformation, and bioremoval in one bioreactor was developed in this study, thus simplifying the traditional procedures used for trehalose production. The trehalose synthase gene from a thermophilic archaea, Picrophilus torridus, was first fused to the YlPir1 anchor gene and then inserted into the genome of Yarrowia lipolytica, thus yielding an engineered yeast strain. The trehalose yield reached 73% under optimal conditions. The thermal and pH stabilities of the displayed enzyme were improved compared to those of its free form purified from recombinant Escherichia coli. After biotransformation, the glucose byproduct and residual maltose were directly fermented to ethanol by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. Ethanol can be separated by distillation, and high-purity trehalose can easily be obtained from the fermentation broth. The results show that this one-pot procedure is an efficient approach to the economical production of trehalose from maltose. PMID:27472444

  11. High-purity isolation of anthocyanins mixtures from fruits and vegetables--a novel solid-phase extraction method using mixed mode cation-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    He, Jian; Giusti, M Monica

    2011-11-01

    Research on biological activity of anthocyanins requires the availability of high purity materials. However, current methods to isolate anthocyanins or anthocyanin mixtures are tedious and expensive or insufficient for complete isolation. We applied a novel cation-exchange/reversed-phase combination solid-phase extraction (SPE) technique, and optimized the use of water/organic buffer mobile phases to selectively separate anthocyanins. Crude extracts of various representative anthocyanin sources were purified with this technique and compared to 3 commonly used SPE techniques: C(18), HLB, and LH-20. Purified anthocyanin fractions were analyzed with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to photodiode array (PDA) and mass spectrometry (MS) detectors and by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The UV-visible chromatograms quantitatively demonstrated that our novel technique achieved significantly higher (P<0.05) anthocyanin purity than the C(18) cartridge, the next best method, for 11 of the 12 anthocyanin sources tested. Among them, eight were purified to greater than 99% purity (based on UV-visible chromatograms). The new method efficiently removed non-anthocyanin phenolics. MS and FT-IR results semi-quantitatively confirmed extensive reduction of impurities. Due to strong ionic interaction, our sorbent capacity was superior to others, resulting in the highest throughput and least use of organic solvents. This new methodology for isolation of anthocyanin mixtures drastically increased purity and efficiency while maintaining excellent recovery rate and low cost. The availability of high purity anthocyanin mixtures will facilitate anthocyanin studies and promote the application of anthocyanins in the food and nutraceutical industries.

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of gamma-ray interactions in an over-square high-purity germanium detector for in-vivo measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saizu, Mirela Angela

    2016-09-01

    The developments of high-purity germanium detectors match very well the requirements of the in-vivo human body measurements regarding the gamma energy ranges of the radionuclides intended to be measured, the shape of the extended radioactive sources, and the measurement geometries. The Whole Body Counter (WBC) from IFIN-HH is based on an “over-square” high-purity germanium detector (HPGe) to perform accurate measurements of the incorporated radionuclides emitting X and gamma rays in the energy range of 10 keV-1500 keV, under conditions of good shielding, suitable collimation, and calibration. As an alternative to the experimental efficiency calibration method consisting of using reference calibration sources with gamma energy lines that cover all the considered energy range, it is proposed to use the Monte Carlo method for the efficiency calibration of the WBC using the radiation transport code MCNP5. The HPGe detector was modelled and the gamma energy lines of 241Am, 57Co, 133Ba, 137Cs, 60Co, and 152Eu were simulated in order to obtain the virtual efficiency calibration curve of the WBC. The Monte Carlo method was validated by comparing the simulated results with the experimental measurements using point-like sources. For their optimum matching, the impact of the variation of the front dead layer thickness and of the detector photon absorbing layers materials on the HPGe detector efficiency was studied, and the detector’s model was refined. In order to perform the WBC efficiency calibration for realistic people monitoring, more numerical calculations were generated simulating extended sources of specific shape according to the standard man characteristics.

  13. A combined arc-melting and tilt-casting furnace for the manufacture of high-purity bulk metallic glass materials.

    PubMed

    Soinila, E; Pihlajamäki, T; Bossuyt, S; Hänninen, H

    2011-07-01

    An arc-melting furnace which includes a tilt-casting facility was designed and built, for the purpose of producing bulk metallic glass specimens. Tilt-casting was chosen because reportedly, in combination with high-purity processing, it produces the best fatigue endurance in Zr-based bulk metallic glasses. Incorporating the alloying and casting facilities in a single piece of equipment reduces the amount of laboratory space and capital investment needed. Eliminating the sample transfer step from the production process also saves time and reduces sample contamination. This is important because the glass forming ability in many alloy systems, such as Zr-based glass-forming alloys, deteriorates rapidly with increasing oxygen content of the specimen. The challenge was to create a versatile instrument, in which high purity conditions can be maintained throughout the process, even when melting alloys with high affinity for oxygen. Therefore, the design provides a high-vacuum chamber to be filled with a low-oxygen inert atmosphere, and takes special care to keep the system hermetically sealed throughout the process. In particular, movements of the arc-melting electrode and sample manipulator arm are accommodated by deformable metal bellows, rather than sliding O-ring seals, and the whole furnace is tilted for tilt-casting. This performance of the furnace is demonstrated by alloying and casting Zr(55)Cu(30)Al(10)Ni(5) directly into rods up to ø 10 mm which are verified to be amorphous by x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, and to exhibit locally ductile fracture at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  14. A combined arc-melting and tilt-casting furnace for the manufacture of high-purity bulk metallic glass materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soinila, E.; Pihlajamäki, T.; Bossuyt, S.; Hänninen, H.

    2011-07-01

    An arc-melting furnace which includes a tilt-casting facility was designed and built, for the purpose of producing bulk metallic glass specimens. Tilt-casting was chosen because reportedly, in combination with high-purity processing, it produces the best fatigue endurance in Zr-based bulk metallic glasses. Incorporating the alloying and casting facilities in a single piece of equipment reduces the amount of laboratory space and capital investment needed. Eliminating the sample transfer step from the production process also saves time and reduces sample contamination. This is important because the glass forming ability in many alloy systems, such as Zr-based glass-forming alloys, deteriorates rapidly with increasing oxygen content of the specimen. The challenge was to create a versatile instrument, in which high purity conditions can be maintained throughout the process, even when melting alloys with high affinity for oxygen. Therefore, the design provides a high-vacuum chamber to be filled with a low-oxygen inert atmosphere, and takes special care to keep the system hermetically sealed throughout the process. In particular, movements of the arc-melting electrode and sample manipulator arm are accommodated by deformable metal bellows, rather than sliding O-ring seals, and the whole furnace is tilted for tilt-casting. This performance of the furnace is demonstrated by alloying and casting Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 directly into rods up to ø 10 mm which are verified to be amorphous by x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, and to exhibit locally ductile fracture at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  15. Foundations for quantitative microstructural models to track evolution of the metallurgical state during high purity Nb cavity fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Bieler, Thomas R; Wright, Neil T; Compton, Chris C

    2014-03-15

    The goal of the Materials Science SRF Cavity Group of Michigan State University and the National Superconducting Cyclotron has been (and continues to be) to understand quantitatively the effects of process history on functional properties. These relationships were assessed via studies on Nb samples and cavity parts, which had various combinations of forming processes, welding, heat treatments, and surface preparation. A primary focus was on large-grain cavity building strategies. Effects of processing operations and exposure to hydrogen on the thermal conductivity has been identified in single and bi-crystal samples, showing that the thermal conductivity can be altered by a factor of 5 depending on process history. Characterization of single crystal tensile samples show a strong effect of crystal orientation on deformation resistance and shape changes. Large grain half cells were examined to characterize defect content and surface damage effects, which provided quantitative information about the depth damage layers from forming.

  16. Synthesis of few-layered, high-purity graphene oxide sheets from different graphite sources for biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasim, Dhifaf A.; Lozano, Neus; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2016-03-01

    This work aimed to interrogate the role that the starting graphitic material played on the physicochemical properties of graphene oxide (GO) sheets and their impact on mammalian cell viability following exposure to those flakes. Three different GO thin sheets were synthesised from three starting graphite material: flakes (GO-f), ground (GO-g) and powder (GO-p) using a modified Hummers’ method. The synthetic yield of this methodology was found to differ according to type of starting material, with GO-p resulting in most efficient yields. Structural and morphological comparison of the three GO sheet types were carried out using transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Optical properties were measured using UV/visible and fluorescence spectroscopy. Surface characteristics and chemistry were determined using a battery of techniques. Exposure to human cells was studied using the human A549 lung epithelial cultures. Our results revealed that all three GO samples were composed of few-layer sheets with similar physicochemical and surface characteristics. However, significant differences were observed in terms of their lateral dimensions with GO-p, prepared from graphite powder, being the largest among the GOs. No cytotoxicity was detected for any of the GO samples following exposure onto A549 cells up to 48 h. In conclusion, the form and type of the starting graphite material is shown to be an important factor that can determine the synthetic yield and the structural characteristics of the resulting GO sheets.

  17. Quantum supersymmetric Bianchi IX cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damour, Thibault; Spindel, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    We study the quantum dynamics of a supersymmetric squashed three-sphere by dimensionally reducing (to one timelike dimension) the action of D =4 simple supergravity for a S U (2 ) -homogeneous (Bianchi IX) cosmological model. The quantization of the homogeneous gravitino field leads to a 64-dimensional fermionic Hilbert space. After imposition of the diffeomorphism constraints, the wave function of the Universe becomes a 64-component spinor of spin(8,4) depending on the three squashing parameters, which satisfies Dirac-like, and Klein-Gordon-like, wave equations describing the propagation of a "quantum spinning particle" reflecting off spin-dependent potential walls. The algebra of the supersymmetry constraints and of the Hamiltonian one is found to close. One finds that the quantum Hamiltonian is built from operators that generate a 64-dimensional representation of the (infinite-dimensional) maximally compact subalgebra of the rank-3 hyperbolic Kac-Moody algebra A E3 . The (quartic-in-fermions) squared-mass term μ^ 2 entering the Klein-Gordon-like equation has several remarkable properties: (i) it commutes with all the other (Kac-Moody-related) building blocks of the Hamiltonian; (ii) it is a quadratic function of the fermion number NF; and (iii) it is negative in most of the Hilbert space. The latter property leads to a possible quantum avoidance of the singularity ("cosmological bounce"), and suggests imposing the boundary condition that the wave function of the Universe vanish when the volume of space tends to zero (a type of boundary condition which looks like a final-state condition when considering the big crunch inside a black hole). The space of solutions is a mixture of "discrete-spectrum states" (parametrized by a few constant parameters, and known in explicit form) and of continuous-spectrum states (parametrized by arbitrary functions entering some initial-value problem). The predominantly negative values of the squared-mass term lead to a "bottle

  18. Title IX: With New Opportunities, Girls' Interest Rises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toporek, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    On June 23, 1972, President Richard M. Nixon signed into law Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, which prohibits gender discrimination in any federally financed education program or activity. Title IX is far-reaching, but the law is most often associated with school and college athletics. Title IX allows schools to prove their athletic…

  19. Feminizing Science: The Alchemy of Title IX

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hausman, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    The author scrutinizes the National Academy of Sciences report "Beyond Bias and Barriers: Fulfilling the Potential of Women in Academic Science and Engineering" and its dangerous call to place the sciences under the sledgehammer of Title IX. Her findings: A one-sided, inaccurate, and internally contradictory report prepared by a committee lacking…

  20. Ares I-X Vibroacoustic Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Curtis E.; Schuster, David M.; Kaufman, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) team recommendations and observations following participation with the Ares I-X Vibroacoustic (VA) Environments Panel in meetings at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in March and April 2008, respectively.

  1. Robust Low-Cost Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor for High-Purity Hydrogen Production form Coal-Derived Syngas

    SciTech Connect

    James Torkelson; Neng Ye; Zhijiang Li; Decio Coutinho; Mark Fokema

    2008-05-31

    This report details work performed in an effort to develop a low-cost, robust water gas shift membrane reactor to convert coal-derived syngas into high purity hydrogen. A sulfur- and halide-tolerant water gas shift catalyst and a sulfur-tolerant dense metallic hydrogen-permeable membrane were developed. The materials were integrated into a water gas shift membrane reactor in order to demonstrate the production of >99.97% pure hydrogen from a simulated coal-derived syngas stream containing 2000 ppm hydrogen sulfide. The objectives of the program were to (1) develop a contaminant-tolerant water gas shift catalyst that is able to achieve equilibrium carbon monoxide conversion at high space velocity and low steam to carbon monoxide ratio, (2) develop a contaminant-tolerant hydrogen-permeable membrane with a higher permeability than palladium, (3) demonstrate 1 L/h purified hydrogen production from coal-derived syngas in an integrated catalytic membrane reactor, and (4) conduct a cost analysis of the developed technology.

  2. An oxidoreduction potential shift control strategy for high purity propionic acid production by Propionibacterium freudenreichii CCTCC M207015 with glycerol as sole carbon source.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Feng, Xiao-Hai; Liang, Jin-Feng; Xu, Hong; Ouyang, Ping-Kai

    2013-09-01

    The effects of oxidoreduction potential (ORP) regulation on the process of propionic acid production by Propionibacterium freudenreichii CCTCC M207015 have been investigated. Potassium ferricyanide and sodium borohydride were determined as ORP control agents through serum bottle experiment. In batch fermentation, cell growth, propionic acid and by-products distribution were changed with ORP levels in the range of 0-160 mV. Based on these analysis results, an ORP-shift control strategy was proposed: at first 156 h, ORP was controlled at 120 mV to obtain higher cell growth rate and propionic acid formation rate, and then it was shifted to 80 mV after 156 h to maintain the higher propionic acid formation rate. By applying this strategy, the optimal parameters were obtained as follows: the propionic acid concentration 45.99 g L(-1), productivity 0.192 g L(-1) h(-1), the proportion of propionic acid to total organic acids 92.26 % (w/w) and glycerol conversion efficiency 76.65 %. The mechanism of ORP regulation was discussed by the ratio of NADH/NAD(+), ATP levels, and metabolic flux analysis. The results suggest that it is possible to redistribute energy and metabolic fluxes by the ORP-shift control strategy, and the strategy could provide a simple and efficient tool to realize high purity propionic acid production with glycerol as carbon source.

  3. Microfluidic device with integrated microfilter of conical-shaped holes for high efficiency and high purity capture of circulating tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yadong; Shi, Jian; Li, Sisi; Wang, Li; Cayre, Yvon E.; Chen, Yong

    2014-08-01

    Capture of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from peripheral blood of cancer patients has major implications for metastatic detection and therapy analyses. Here we demonstrated a microfluidic device for high efficiency and high purity capture of CTCs. The key novelty of this approach lies on the integration of a microfilter with conical-shaped holes and a micro-injector with cross-flow components for size dependent capture of tumor cells without significant retention of non-tumor cells. Under conditions of constant flow rate, tumor cells spiked into phosphate buffered saline could be recovered and then cultured for further analyses. When tumor cells were spiked in blood of healthy donors, they could also be recovered at high efficiency and high clearance efficiency of white blood cells. When the same device was used for clinical validation, CTCs could be detected in blood samples of cancer patients but not in that of healthy donors. Finally, the capture efficiency of tumor cells is cell-type dependent but the hole size of the filter should be more closely correlated to the nuclei size of the tumor cells. Together with the advantage of easy operation, low-cost and high potential of integration, this approach offers unprecedented opportunities for metastatic detection and cancer treatment monitoring.

  4. Thermoluminescence (TL) properties and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of high purity CaSO{sub 4}:Dy TL material

    SciTech Connect

    Kamarudin, Nadira; Abdullah, Wan Saffiey Wan; Dollah, Mohd Taufik; Hamid, Muhammad Azmi Abdul

    2014-09-03

    This paper presents the characterization and TL properties of dysprosium (Dy) doped calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) TL material produced by co-precipitation technique with 0.5mol% concentration of dopant. The morphology of the produced TL material was studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the micrograph shows that rectangular parallelepiped shaped crystal with the average of 150 μm in length were produced. The crystallinity of the produced powder was studied using x-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The XRD spectra show that the TL material produced is high purity anhydrite CaSO{sub 4} with average crystallite size of 74 nm with orthorhombic crystal system. The TL behavior of produced CaSO{sub 4}:Dy was studied using a TLD reader after exposure to gamma ray by Co{sup 60} source with the doses of 1,5 and 10 Gy. The glow curve shows linear response with glow peak around 230°C which is desired development in the field of radiation dosimetry.

  5. Carbonic anhydrase IX, a hypoxia-induced catalytic component of the pH regulating machinery in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sedlakova, Olga; Svastova, Eliska; Takacova, Martina; Kopacek, Juraj; Pastorek, Jaromir; Pastorekova, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Acidic tissue microenvironment contributes to tumor progression via multiple effects including the activation of angiogenic factors and proteases, reduced cell-cell adhesion, increased migration and invasion, etc. In addition, intratumoral acidosis can influence the uptake of anticancer drugs and modulate the response of tumors to conventional therapy. Acidification of the tumor microenvironment often develops due to hypoxia-triggered oncogenic metabolism, which leads to the extensive production of lactate, protons, and carbon dioxide. In order to avoid intracellular accumulation of the acidic metabolic products, which is incompatible with the survival and proliferation, tumor cells activate molecular machinery that regulates pH by driving transmembrane inside-out and outside-in ion fluxes. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is a hypoxia-induced catalytic component of the bicarbonate import arm of this machinery. Through its catalytic activity, CA IX directly participates in many acidosis-induced features of tumor phenotype as demonstrated by manipulating its expression and/or by in vitro mutagenesis. CA IX can function as a survival factor protecting tumor cells from hypoxia and acidosis, as a pro-migratory factor facilitating cell movement and invasion, as a signaling molecule transducing extracellular signals to intracellular pathways (including major signaling and metabolic cascades) and converting intracellular signals to extracellular effects on adhesion, proteolysis, and other processes. These functional implications of CA IX in cancer are supported by numerous clinical studies demonstrating the association of CA IX with various clinical correlates and markers of aggressive tumor behavior. Although our understanding of the many faces of CA IX is still incomplete, existing knowledge supports the view that CA IX is a biologically and clinically relevant molecule, exploitable in anticancer strategies aimed at targeting adaptive responses to hypoxia and/or acidosis

  6. Low-temperature chemical vapor deposition of ruthenium dioxide from ruthenium tetroxide: A simple approach to high-purity RuO[sub 2] films

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Z.; Puddephatt, R.J. ); Sayer, M. )

    1993-07-01

    Films of ruthenium dioxide are important for several electronic and electrochemical applications, and are usually obtained by solution methods from ruthenium-(III) chloride or other ruthenium compounds. Such films of RuO[sub 2] are often contaminated with chloride impurities and show poor adhesion. Recently, the preparation of high-quality RuO[sub 2] thin films on silicon wafers has become of interest for electrode structures for developing new ferroelectric memories based on lead zirconate titanate (PZT). Deposition of PZT films by a sol-gel process has been well established, but since uniform, adherent RuO[sub 2] films are difficult to prepare using such solution methods, the synthesis of RuO[sub 2] films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is attractive. This article reports that RuO[sub 4] is an excellent precursor for CVD of RuO[sub 2] and, since the only other product is O[sub 2], the films are of high purity. It has previously been noted that thermal annealing of RuO[sub 2] films can lead to loss of ruthenium by disproportionation to Ru + RuO[sub 4], which is volatile, and that vapor transport and crystal growth of RuO[sub 2] at 1100[degrees]C may involve the reversible formation of volatile RuO[sub 4]. The boiling point of RuO[sub 4] is 129[degrees]C (it melts at 27[degrees]C), so it is much more volatile than metallorganic precursors. 16 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. High temperature annealing effects on deep-level defects in a high purity semi-insulating 4H-SiC substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamoto, Naoya Azarov, Alexander; Svensson, Bengt G.; Ohshima, Takeshi; Moe, Anne Marie M.

    2015-07-28

    Effects of high-temperature annealing on deep-level defects in a high-purity semi-insulating 4H silicon carbide substrate have been studied by employing current-voltage, capacitance-voltage, junction spectroscopy, and chemical impurity analysis measurements. Secondary ion mass spectrometry data reveal that the substrate contains boron with concentration in the mid 10{sup 15 }cm{sup −3} range, while other impurities including nitrogen, aluminum, titanium, vanadium and chromium are below their detection limits (typically ∼10{sup 14 }cm{sup −3}). Schottky barrier diodes fabricated on substrates annealed at 1400–1700 °C exhibit metal/p-type semiconductor behavior with a current rectification of up to 8 orders of magnitude at bias voltages of ±3 V. With increasing annealing temperature, the series resistance of the Schottky barrier diodes decreases, and the net acceptor concentration in the substrates increases approaching the chemical boron content. Admittance spectroscopy results unveil the presence of shallow boron acceptors and deep-level defects with levels in lower half of the bandgap. After the 1400 °C annealing, the boron acceptor still remains strongly compensated at room temperature by deep donor-like levels located close to mid-gap. However, the latter decrease in concentration with increasing annealing temperature and after 1700 °C, the boron acceptor is essentially uncompensated. Hence, the deep donors are decisive for the semi-insulating properties of the substrates, and their thermal evolution limits the thermal budget for device processing. The origin of the deep donors is not well-established, but substantial evidence supporting an assignment to carbon vacancies is presented.

  8. Neutron Damage in Mechanically-Cooled High-Purity Germanium Detectors for Field-Portable Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) Systems

    SciTech Connect

    E.H. Seabury; C.J. Wharton; A.J. Caffrey; J.B. McCabe; C. DeW. Van Siclen

    2013-10-01

    Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation (PGNAA) systems require the use of a gamma-ray spectrometer to record the gamma-ray spectrum of an object under test and allow the determination of the object’s composition. Field-portable systems, such as Idaho National Laboratory’s PINS system, have used standard liquid-nitrogen-cooled high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to perform this function. These detectors have performed very well in the past, but the requirement of liquid-nitrogen cooling limits their use to areas where liquid nitrogen is readily available or produced on-site. Also, having a relatively large volume of liquid nitrogen close to the detector can impact some assessments, possibly leading to a false detection of explosives or other nitrogen-containing chemical. Use of a mechanically-cooled HPGe detector is therefore very attractive for PGNAA applications where nitrogen detection is critical or where liquid-nitrogen logistics are problematic. Mechanically-cooled HPGe detectors constructed from p-type germanium, such as Ortec’s trans-SPEC, have been commercially available for several years. In order to assess whether these detectors would be suitable for use in a fielded PGNAA system, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been performing a number of tests of the resistance of mechanically-cooled HPGe detectors to neutron damage. These detectors have been standard commercially-available p-type HPGe detectors as well as prototype n-type HPGe detectors. These tests compare the performance of these different detector types as a function of crystal temperature and incident neutron fluence on the crystal.

  9. Preparation of High Purity, High Molecular-Weight Chitin from Ionic Liquids for Use as an Adsorbate for the Extraction of Uranium from Seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Robin

    2013-12-21

    Ensuring a domestic supply of uranium is a key issue facing the wider implementation of nuclear power. Uranium is mostly mined in Kazakhstan, Australia, and Canada, and there are few high-grade uranium reserves left worldwide. Therefore, one of the most appealing potential sources of uranium is the vast quantity dissolved in the oceans (estimated to be 4.4 billion tons worldwide). There have been research efforts centered on finding a means to extract uranium from seawater for decades, but so far none have resulted in an economically viable product, due in part to the fact that the materials that have been successfully demonstrated to date are too costly (in terms of money and energy) to produce on the necessary scale. Ionic Liquids (salts which melt below 100{degrees}C) can completely dissolve raw crustacean shells, leading to recovery of a high purity, high molecular weight chitin powder and to fibers and films which can be spun directly from the extract solution suggesting that continuous processing might be feasible. The work proposed here will utilize the unprecedented control this makes possible over the chitin fiber a) to prepare electrospun nanofibers of very high surface area and in specific architectures, b) to modify the fiber surfaces chemically with selective extractant capacity, and c) to demonstrate their utility in the direct extraction and recovery of uranium from seawater. This approach will 1) provide direct extraction of chitin from shellfish waste thus saving energy over the current industrial process for obtaining chitin; 2) allow continuous processing of nanofibers for very high surface area fibers in an economical operation; 3) provide a unique high molecular weight chitin not available from the current industrial process, leading to stronger, more durable fibers; and 4) allow easy chemical modification of the large surface areas of the fibers for appending uranyl selective functionality providing selectivity and ease of stripping. The

  10. High temperature annealing effects on deep-level defects in a high purity semi-insulating 4H-SiC substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Naoya; Azarov, Alexander; Ohshima, Takeshi; Moe, Anne Marie M.; Svensson, Bengt G.

    2015-07-01

    Effects of high-temperature annealing on deep-level defects in a high-purity semi-insulating 4H silicon carbide substrate have been studied by employing current-voltage, capacitance-voltage, junction spectroscopy, and chemical impurity analysis measurements. Secondary ion mass spectrometry data reveal that the substrate contains boron with concentration in the mid 1015 cm-3 range, while other impurities including nitrogen, aluminum, titanium, vanadium and chromium are below their detection limits (typically ˜1014 cm-3). Schottky barrier diodes fabricated on substrates annealed at 1400-1700 °C exhibit metal/p-type semiconductor behavior with a current rectification of up to 8 orders of magnitude at bias voltages of ±3 V. With increasing annealing temperature, the series resistance of the Schottky barrier diodes decreases, and the net acceptor concentration in the substrates increases approaching the chemical boron content. Admittance spectroscopy results unveil the presence of shallow boron acceptors and deep-level defects with levels in lower half of the bandgap. After the 1400 °C annealing, the boron acceptor still remains strongly compensated at room temperature by deep donor-like levels located close to mid-gap. However, the latter decrease in concentration with increasing annealing temperature and after 1700 °C, the boron acceptor is essentially uncompensated. Hence, the deep donors are decisive for the semi-insulating properties of the substrates, and their thermal evolution limits the thermal budget for device processing. The origin of the deep donors is not well-established, but substantial evidence supporting an assignment to carbon vacancies is presented.

  11. Ring-opening metathesis polymerization with the second generation Hoveyda-Grubbs catalyst: an efficient approach toward high-purity functionalized macrocyclic oligo(cyclooctene)s.

    PubMed

    Blencowe, Anton; Qiao, Greg G

    2013-04-17

    Herein, we present a facile and general strategy to prepare functionalized macrocyclic oligo(cyclooctene)s (cOCOEs) in high purity and high yield by exploiting the ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) intramolecular backbiting process with the commercially available second generation Hoveyda-Grubbs (HG2) catalyst. In the first instance, ROMP of 5-acetyloxycyclooct-1-ene (ACOE) followed by efficient quenching and removal of the catalyst using an isocyanide derivative afforded macrocyclic oligo(5-acetyloxycyclooct-1-ene) (cOACOE) in high yield (95%), with a weight-average molecular weight (Mw) of 1.6 kDa and polydispersity index (PDI) of 1.6, as determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The structure and purity of the macrocycles were confirmed by NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis, which indicated the complete absence of end-groups. This was further supported by GPC-matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (GPC-MALDI ToF MS), which revealed the exclusive formation of macrocyclic derivatives composed of up to 45 repeat units. Complete removal of residual ruthenium from the macrocycles was confirmed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The same methodology was subsequently extended to the ROMP of 5-bromocyclooct-1-ene and 1,5-cyclooctadiene to prepare their macrocyclic derivatives, which were further derivatized to produce a library of functionalized macrocyclic oligo(cyclooctene)s. A comparative study using the second and third generation Grubbs catalysts in place of the HG2 catalyst for the polymerization of ACOE provided macrocycles contaminated with linear species, thus indicating that the bidendate benzylidene ligand of the Hoveyda-Grubbs catalyst plays an important role in the observed product distributions.

  12. eEF1A1 binds and enriches protoporphyrin IX in cancer cells in 5-aminolevulinic acid based photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhichao; Cui, Xiaojun; Wei, Dan; Liu, Wei; Li, Buhong; He, Hao; Ye, Huamao; Zhu, Naishuo; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), which is endogenously derived from 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) or its derivatives, is a promising modality for the treatment of both pre-malignant and malignant lesions. However, the mechanisms of how ALA-induced PpIX selectively accumulated in the tumors are not fully elucidated. Here we discovered that eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 alpha 1 (eEF1A1) interacted with PpIX (with an affinity constant of 2.96 × 10(6) M(-1)). Microscopy imaging showed that ALA-induced PpIX was co-localized with eEF1A1 in cancer cells. eEF1A1 was found to enrich ALA-induced PpIX in cells by competitively blocking the downstream bioavailability of PpIX. Taken together, our study discovered eEF1A1 as a novel photosensitizer binding protein, which may play an essential role in the enrichment of ALA-induced PpIX in cancer cells during PDT. These suggested eEF1A1 as a molecular marker to predict the selectivity and efficiency of 5-ALA based PDT in cancer therapy. PMID:27150264

  13. eEF1A1 binds and enriches protoporphyrin IX in cancer cells in 5-aminolevulinic acid based photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhichao; Cui, Xiaojun; Wei, Dan; Liu, Wei; Li, Buhong; He, Hao; Ye, Huamao; Zhu, Naishuo; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), which is endogenously derived from 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) or its derivatives, is a promising modality for the treatment of both pre-malignant and malignant lesions. However, the mechanisms of how ALA-induced PpIX selectively accumulated in the tumors are not fully elucidated. Here we discovered that eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 alpha 1 (eEF1A1) interacted with PpIX (with an affinity constant of 2.96 × 106 M‑1). Microscopy imaging showed that ALA-induced PpIX was co-localized with eEF1A1 in cancer cells. eEF1A1 was found to enrich ALA-induced PpIX in cells by competitively blocking the downstream bioavailability of PpIX. Taken together, our study discovered eEF1A1 as a novel photosensitizer binding protein, which may play an essential role in the enrichment of ALA-induced PpIX in cancer cells during PDT. These suggested eEF1A1 as a molecular marker to predict the selectivity and efficiency of 5-ALA based PDT in cancer therapy.

  14. Pp IX silica nanoparticles demonstrate differential interactions with in vitro tumor cell lines and in vivo mouse models of human cancers.

    PubMed

    Simon, Virginie; Devaux, Corinne; Darmon, Audrey; Donnet, Thibault; Thiénot, Edouard; Germain, Matthieu; Honnorat, Jérôme; Duval, Alex; Pottier, Agnès; Borghi, Elsa; Levy, Laurent; Marill, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Protoporphyrin IX (Pp IX) silica nanoparticles, developed for effective use in photodynamic therapy (PDT), were explored in in vitro and in vivo models with the ambition to improve knowledge on the role of biological factors in the photodamage. Pp IX silica nanoparticles are found efficient at temperature with extreme metabolic downregulation, which suggest a high proportion of passive internalization. For the first time, clearance of silica nanoparticles on tumor cells is established. Cell viability assessment in six tumor cell lines is reported. In all tumor types, Pp IX silica nanoparticles are more efficient than free Pp IX. A strong fluorescence signal of reactive oxygen species generation colocalized with Pp IX silica nanoparticles, correlates with 100% of cell death. In vivo studies performed in HCT 116, A549 and glioblastoma multiforme tumors-bearing mice show tumor uptake of Pp IX silica nanoparticles with better tumor accumulation than the control alone, highlighting a high selectivity for tumor tissues. As observed in in vitro tests, tumor cell type is likely a major determinant but tumor microenvironment could more influence this differential time accumulation dynamic. The present results strongly suggest that Pp IX silica nanoparticles may be involved in new alternative local applications of PDT. PMID:19769577

  15. eEF1A1 binds and enriches protoporphyrin IX in cancer cells in 5-aminolevulinic acid based photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhichao; Cui, Xiaojun; Wei, Dan; Liu, Wei; Li, Buhong; He, Hao; Ye, Huamao; Zhu, Naishuo; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), which is endogenously derived from 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) or its derivatives, is a promising modality for the treatment of both pre-malignant and malignant lesions. However, the mechanisms of how ALA-induced PpIX selectively accumulated in the tumors are not fully elucidated. Here we discovered that eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 alpha 1 (eEF1A1) interacted with PpIX (with an affinity constant of 2.96 × 106 M−1). Microscopy imaging showed that ALA-induced PpIX was co-localized with eEF1A1 in cancer cells. eEF1A1 was found to enrich ALA-induced PpIX in cells by competitively blocking the downstream bioavailability of PpIX. Taken together, our study discovered eEF1A1 as a novel photosensitizer binding protein, which may play an essential role in the enrichment of ALA-induced PpIX in cancer cells during PDT. These suggested eEF1A1 as a molecular marker to predict the selectivity and efficiency of 5-ALA based PDT in cancer therapy. PMID:27150264

  16. Ares I-X 30 Day Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ess, Bob; Smith, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation represents the 30 day report on the Ares I-X test flight. Included in the review is information on the following areas: (1) Ground Systems, (2) Guidance, Navigation and Control, (3) Roll Response, (4) Vehicle Response, (5) Control System Performance, (6) Structural Damping, (7) Thrust Oscillation, (8) Stage Separation, (9) Connector Assessment, (10) USS Splashdown, (11) Data Recorder and (12) FS Hardware Assessment.

  17. On the mechanism of the chemical and enzymic oxygenations of alpha-oxyprotohemin IX to Fe.biliverdin IX alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Sano, S; Sano, T; Morishima, I; Shiro, Y; Maeda, Y

    1986-01-01

    alpha-Oxyprotohemin IX, an early intermediate in heme catabolism, was synthesized and its autoxidation to biliverdin IX alpha was studied. In anaerobic aqueous pyridine, alpha-oxyprotohemin (hexacoordinated) underwent autoreduction to yield an Fe(II) alpha-oxyprotoporphyrin pi-neutral radical bis(pyridine) complex, which reacted with an equimolar amount of dioxygen to give pyridine.verdohemochrome IX alpha and CO in 75-80% yield via an intermediate with an absorption maximum at 893 nm. Verdohemochrome IX alpha did not react with further dioxygen. Reconstituted apomyoglobin.alpha-oxyprotohemin IX complex (pentacoordinated) reacted with an equimolar amount of dioxygen to form an Fe(II) oxyporphyrin pi-neutral radical intermediate, which rearranged to a green compound (lambda max 660 and 704 nm) with elision of CO. The green product, which is probably an apomyoglobin.verdoheme pi-radical complex, reacted with another equimolar amount of dioxygen to give Fe(III).biliverdin IX alpha. Demetallation of this gave biliverdin IX alpha in overall yield of 70-75%. These results indicate that the sequence of oxyheme autoxidation in the presence of apomyoglobin is alpha-oxyprotoheme IX O2----CO----verdohemochrome IX alpha pi-radical O2----Fe(III).biliverdin IX alpha. A similar mechanism may prevail in vivo. The hexa- and pentacoordinated Fe(II) pi-radical form of the oxyporphyrin is crucial in triggering the autoxidation of the complex to verdohemochrome IX alpha. Further oxygenation of verdohemochrome IX alpha to Fe(III).biliverdin IX alpha occurred only in the pentacoordinated apomyoglobin.verdoheme Fe(II) complex. PMID:3456152

  18. Some optimisation studies relevant to the production of high-purity 124I and 120gI at a small-sized cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Qaim, S M; Hohn, A; Bastian, Th; El-Azoney, K M; Blessing, G; Spellerberg, S; Scholten, B; Coenen, H H

    2003-01-01

    Optimisation experiments on the production of the positron emitting radionuclides 124I(T(1/2) = 4.18d) and (120g)I (T(1/2) = 1.35 h) were carried out. The TeO(2)-target technology and dry distillation method of radioiodine separation were used. The removal of radioiodine was studied as a function of time and the loss of TeO(2) from the target as a function of oven temperature and time of distillation. A distillation time of 15 min at 750 degrees C was found to be ideal. Using a very pure source and comparing the intensities of the annihilation and X-ray radiation, a value of 22.0 +/- 0.5% for the beta(+) branching in 124I was obtained. Production of 124I was done using 200 mg/cm(2) targets of 99.8% enriched 124TeO(2) on Pt-backing, 16 MeV proton beam intensities of 10 microA, and irradiation times of about 8 h. The average yield of 124I at EOB was 470 MBq(12.7 mCi). At the time of application (about 70 h after EOB) the radionuclidic impurity 123I (T(1/2) = 13.2 h) was <1%. The levels of other impurities were negligible (126I < 0.0001%;125I = 0.01%). Special care was taken to determine the 125I impurity. For the production of (120g)I only a thin 30 mg target (on 0.5 cm(2) area) of 99.9% enriched 120TeO(2) was available. Irradiations were done with 16 MeV protons for 80 min at beam currents of 7 microA. The 120gI yield achieved at EOB was 700 MBq(19 mCi), and the only impurity detected was the isomeric state 120 mI(T(1/2) = 53 min) at a level of 4.0%. The radiochemical purity of both 124I and 120gI was checked via HPLC and TLC. The radioiodine collected in 0.02 M NaOH solution existed >98% as iodide. The amount of inactive Te found in radioiodine was <1 microg. High purity 124I and 120gI can thus be advantageously produced on a medium scale using the low-energy (p,n) reaction at a small-sized cyclotron.

  19. Couples Magnetic and Structural Transitions in High-Purity Dy and Gd5SbxGe4-x

    SciTech Connect

    Chernyshov, Alexander S.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic materials exhibiting magnetic phase transitions simultaneously with structural rearrangements of their crystal lattices hold a promise for numerous applications including magnetic refrigeration, magnetomechanical devices and sensors. We undertook a detailed study of a single crystal of dysprosium metal, which is a classical example of a system where magnetic and crystallographic sublattices can be either coupled or decoupled from one another. Magnetocaloric effect, magnetization, ac magnetic susceptibility, and heat capacity of high purity single crystals of dysprosium have been investigated over broad temperature and magnetic field intervals with the magnetic field vector parallel to either the a- or c-axes of the crystal. Notable differences in the behavior of the physical properties when compared to Dy samples studied in the past have been observed between 110 K and 125 K, and between 178 K and ~210 K. A plausible mechanism based on the formation of antiferromagnetic clusters in the impure Dy has been suggested in order to explain the reduction of the magnetocaloric effect in the vicinity of the Neel point. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the influence of commensurability effects on the magnetic phase diagram and the value of the magnetocaloric effect have been conducted. The presence of newly found anomalies in the physical properties has been considered as evidence of previously unreported states of Dy. The refined magnetic phase diagram of dysprosium with the magnetic field vector parallel to the a-axis of a crystal has been constructed and discussed. The magnetic and crystallographic properties of Gd5SbxGe4-x pseudo-binary system were studied by x-ray diffraction (at room temperature), heat capacity, ac-magnetic susceptibility, and magnetization in the temperature interval 5-320 K in magnetic fields up to 100 kOe. The magnetic properties of three composition (x = 0.5, 1,2) were examined in detail. The

  20. 45 CFR Subject Index to Title Ix... - Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 1 Index Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... obligation, 86.4(b) Form, 86.4(c) Athletics, ; 86.41 Adjustment period, ; 86.41(d) Contact sport defined, 86... responsible employee”, 86.8(a) (b) H Health and Insurance Benefits and Services, ; 86.39, 86.56...

  1. Constitutive episomal expression of polypeptide IX (pIX) in a 293-based cell line complements the deficiency of pIX mutant adenovirus type 5.

    PubMed Central

    Caravokyri, C; Leppard, K N

    1995-01-01

    The human adenovirus type 5 capsid is composed of a number of distinct polypeptides. It has been shown previously that one of these, polypeptide IX (pIX), is not absolutely required for the production of viable virus. However, viruses lacking this polypeptide have a significantly reduced packaging limit and, in the one case studied, also show a thermolabile virion phenotype. This report describes the use of eukaryotic episomal vectors based on the Epstein-Barr virus replicon to generate cells which stably express pIX. These cells provide pIX that is efficiently incorporated into virions that are genetically pIX-; such enhanced thermostability. These cells have also been used to isolate a genetically pIX- virus having a genome of length some 2.3 kbp in excess of the previously defined packaging limit for pIX- virus; the resulting virions have wild-type thermostability. These cells expand the theoretical capacity of adenovirus vectors for foreign DNA to around 9.2 kbp and may therefore be useful in gene therapy applications in which vector capacity is limiting. PMID:7474071

  2. Analysis of Rare Earth Elements (REE) in vein quartz and quartz-sandstone host rock in the Zhelannoe high purity quartz deposit, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemskova, Marina; Prokofiev, Vsevolod; Bychkov, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    The Zhelannoe high purity quartz deposit is located on the western slope of the Polar Urals. It is one of the largest deposits of vein quartz and rock crystal in Russia. Most of the mineralization is hosted within a single horizon of very firm quartz-sandstone, where plastic deformation did not occur almost entirely. All tectonic stress was released by the development of numerous thrust faults of different scales. Cavities formed during this process were later filled with quartz and rock crystal. In order to obtain more details on conditions under which mineralization took place, analysis of trace element contents in vein quartz and host rocks, and the micro-thermometric study of fluid inclusions in quartz have been carried out. The trace element composition of vein quartz and of the host rock has been determined by ICP-MS. The results have shown that concentrations of most of the 46 studied elements in quartz are two orders of magnitude lower than in chondrite, and more than three orders of magnitude lower than in the upper crust. Even though Pb and Li have the highest concentrations in quartz samples, levels are only nearly comparable in chondrite, and substantially lower in the upper crust. At the same time, negative anomalies of Pb and Li concentrations in the host rock may indicate the removal of these elements during vein quartz formation. Contents of most REEs are two orders of magnitude lower than in chondrite, and three orders of magnitude lower than in the host rock. Generally, the patterns of REE distribution in vein quartz and the host rock express a clear correlation; confirming the genetic link between vein quartz and quartz-sandstone host rock. However, the process of quartz recrystallization led to an intense decrease of REEs content, and of all other impurities, which consequently influenced industrial value of the Zhelannoe deposit. As a result of the micro-thermometric study of fluid inclusions in quartz, the following physical

  3. Dexamethasone downregulates expression of carbonic anhydrase IX via HIF-1α and NF-κB-dependent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Simko, Veronika; Takacova, Martina; Debreova, Michaela; Laposova, Katarina; Ondriskova-Panisova, Elena; Pastorekova, Silvia; Csaderova, Lucia; Pastorek, Jaromir

    2016-01-01

    Dexamethasone is a synthetic glucocorticoid frequently used to suppress side-effects of anticancer chemotherapy. In the present study, we showed that dexamethasone treatment leads to concentration-dependent downregulation of cancer-associated marker, carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX), at the level of promoter activity, mRNA and protein expression in 2D and 3D cancer cell models. The effect of dexamethasone on CA IX expression under hypoxic conditions is predominantly mediated by impaired transcriptional activity and decreased protein level of the main hypoxic transcription factor HIF-1α. In addition, CA9 downregulation can be caused by protein-protein interactions between activated glucocorticoid receptors, major effectors of glucocorticoid action, and transcription factors that trigger CA9 transcription (e.g. AP-1). Moreover, we identified a potential NF-κB binding site in the CA9 promoter and propose the involvement of NF-κB in the dexamethasone-mediated inhibition of CA9 transcription. As high level of CA IX is often linked to aggressive tumor behavior, poor prognosis and chemo- and radiotherapy resistance, uncovering its reduction after dexa-methasone treatment and implication of additional regulatory mechanisms can be relevant for the CA IX-related clinical applications. PMID:27431580

  4. Cranial Nerves IX, X, XI, and XII

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    This article concludes the series on cranial nerves, with review of the final four (IX–XII). To summarize briefly, the most important and common syndrome caused by a disorder of the glossopharyngeal nerve (craniel nerve IX) is glossopharyngeal neuralgia. Also, swallowing function occasionally is compromised in a rare but disabling form of tardive dyskinesia called tardive dystonia, because the upper motor portion of the glossopharyngel nerve projects to the basal ganglia and can be affected by lesions in the basal ganglia. Vagus nerve funtion (craniel nerve X) can be compromised in schizophrenia, bulimia, obesity, and major depression. A cervical lesion to the nerve roots of the spinal accessory nerve (craniel nerve XI) can cause a cervical dystonia, which sometimes is misdiagnosed as a dyskinesia related to neuroleptic use. Finally, unilateral hypoglossal (craniel nerve XII) nerve palsy is one of the most common mononeuropathies caused by brain metastases. Supranuclear lesions of cranial nerve XII are involved in pseudobulbar palsy and ALS, and lower motor neuron lesions of cranial nerve XII can also be present in bulbar palsy and in ALS patients who also have lower motor neuron involvement. This article reviews these and other syndromes related to cranial nerves IX through XII that might be seen by psychiatry. PMID:20532157

  5. Ares I-X Ground Diagnostic Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwabacher, Mark A.; Martin, Rodney Alexander; Waterman, Robert D.; Oostdyk, Rebecca Lynn; Ossenfort, John P.; Matthews, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    The automation of pre-launch diagnostics for launch vehicles offers three potential benefits: improving safety, reducing cost, and reducing launch delays. The Ares I-X Ground Diagnostic Prototype demonstrated anomaly detection, fault detection, fault isolation, and diagnostics for the Ares I-X first-stage Thrust Vector Control and for the associated ground hydraulics while the vehicle was in the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and while it was on the launch pad. The prototype combines three existing tools. The first tool, TEAMS (Testability Engineering and Maintenance System), is a model-based tool from Qualtech Systems Inc. for fault isolation and diagnostics. The second tool, SHINE (Spacecraft Health Inference Engine), is a rule-based expert system that was developed at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. We developed SHINE rules for fault detection and mode identification, and used the outputs of SHINE as inputs to TEAMS. The third tool, IMS (Inductive Monitoring System), is an anomaly detection tool that was developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The three tools were integrated and deployed to KSC, where they were interfaced with live data. This paper describes how the prototype performed during the period of time before the launch, including accuracy and computer resource usage. The paper concludes with some of the lessons that we learned from the experience of developing and deploying the prototype.

  6. School Environment and Academic Achievement of Standard IX Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, A. S. Arul; Vimala, A.

    2012-01-01

    The present study School Environment and Academic Achievement of standard IX students was probed to find the relationship between School Environment and Academic Achievement of standard IX students. Data for the study were collected using self-made School Environment Scale (SES). The investigator used stratified random sampling technique for…

  7. Tilting the Playing Field: Schools, Sports, Sex and Title IX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gavora, Jessica

    This book suggests that Title IX of the Education Amendments is not creating more female athletes but instead eliminating some of the most prestigious men's sports programs in the name of gender equity. It shows how Title IX has affected every aspect of education, from kindergarten through graduate school, making profound changes in areas as…

  8. A Model Community College Grievance Procedure for Title IX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noonan, Roberta L.

    Through a review of the literature, analysis of eleven Title IX grievance plans, and interviews with four compliance officers, twelve criteria essential to an effective grievance procedure for use by students were identified and incorporated into a model Title IX grievance procedure for Moraine Valley Community College (Illinois). The twelve…

  9. A License for Bias: Sex Discrimination, Schools, and Title IX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Susan Ed.

    This report discusses non-sports-related Title IX complaints filed with the Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights (OCR) from 1993-1997. Its purpose is to dispel the popular belief that Title IX is a sports-equity law and to determine the effectiveness of the legislation. The document examines the kinds of complaints filed, the status…

  10. Rape on College Campuses: Reform through Title IX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Terry Nicole

    1991-01-01

    This article first, analyzes the growing problem of campus rape; second, evaluates some college rape reduction programs; third, uses case law to demonstrate that rape should be considered sex discrimination under Title IX; and, fourth, suggests an amendment to Title IX, defining rape as sex discrimination. Appropriate implementation measures by…

  11. Sex Bias in Secondary Schools: The Impact of Title IX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishel, Andrew; Pottker, Janice

    Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 is the first comprehensive anti-sex discrimination law that covers students. Although most of the attention given to the law since its passage has focused on its impact on colleges, Title IX will have the greatest impact on the elementary and secondary levels of education. All school districts in the…

  12. ARES I-X USS Fracture Analysis Loads Spectra Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Curtis; Mackey, Alden

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the development of a set of bounding load spectra for the ARES I-X launch vehicle. These load spectra are used in the determination of the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) of the welds in the ARES I-X upper stage simulator (USS).

  13. 77 FR 64401 - Order of Succession for HUD Region IX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Order of Succession for HUD Region IX AGENCY: Office of Field Policy and Management, HUD. ACTION: Notice of Order of Succession. SUMMARY: In this notice, the Assistant Deputy Secretary... Succession for the San Francisco Regional Office and its Field Offices (Region IX). This Order of...

  14. 2 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 200 - Hospital Cost Principles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... guidance is proposed and implemented for hospitals, the existing principles located at 45 CFR Part 74... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hospital Cost Principles IX Appendix IX to Part 200 Grants and Agreements Office of Management and Budget Guidance for Grants and...

  15. Ares I-X Ground Diagnostic Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwabacher, Mark; Martin, Rodney; Waterman, Robert; Oostdyk, Rebecca; Ossenfort, John; Matthews, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    Automating prelaunch diagnostics for launch vehicles offers three potential benefits. First, it potentially improves safety by detecting faults that might otherwise have been missed so that they can be corrected before launch. Second, it potentially reduces launch delays by more quickly diagnosing the cause of anomalies that occur during prelaunch processing. Reducing launch delays will be critical to the success of NASA's planned future missions that require in-orbit rendezvous. Third, it potentially reduces costs by reducing both launch delays and the number of people needed to monitor the prelaunch process. NASA is currently developing the Ares I launch vehicle to bring the Orion capsule and its crew of four astronauts to low-earth orbit on their way to the moon. Ares I-X will be the first unmanned test flight of Ares I. It is scheduled to launch on October 27, 2009. The Ares I-X Ground Diagnostic Prototype is a prototype ground diagnostic system that will provide anomaly detection, fault detection, fault isolation, and diagnostics for the Ares I-X first-stage thrust vector control (TVC) and for the associated ground hydraulics while it is in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and on the launch pad. It will serve as a prototype for a future operational ground diagnostic system for Ares I. The prototype combines three existing diagnostic tools. The first tool, TEAMS (Testability Engineering and Maintenance System), is a model-based tool that is commercially produced by Qualtech Systems, Inc. It uses a qualitative model of failure propagation to perform fault isolation and diagnostics. We adapted an existing TEAMS model of the TVC to use for diagnostics and developed a TEAMS model of the ground hydraulics. The second tool, Spacecraft Health Inference Engine (SHINE), is a rule-based expert system developed at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. We developed SHINE rules for fault detection and mode identification. The prototype

  16. Ares I-X USS Material Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, David S.; Smith, Stephen W.; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2008-01-01

    An independent assessment was conducted to determine the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) for the flange-to-skin weld in the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS). Material characterization tests were conducted to quantify the material behavior for use in the CIFS analyses. Fatigue crack growth rate, Charpy impact, and fracture tests were conducted on the parent and welded A516 Grade 70 steel. The crack growth rate tests confirmed that the material behaved in agreement with literature data and that a salt water environment would not significantly degrade the fatigue resistance. The Charpy impact tests confirmed that the fracture resistance of the material did not have a significant reduction for the expected operational temperatures of the vehicle.

  17. Ares I-X Flight Test Philosophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S. R.; Tuma, M. L.; Heitzman, K.

    2007-01-01

    In response to the Vision for Space Exploration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has defined a new space exploration architecture to return humans to the Moon and prepare for human exploration of Mars. One of the first new developments will be the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), which will carry the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), into Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to support International Space Station (ISS) missions and, later, support lunar missions. As part of Ares I development, NASA will perform a series of Ares I flight tests. The tests will provide data that will inform the engineering and design process and verify the flight hardware and software. The data gained from the flight tests will be used to certify the new Ares/Orion vehicle for human space flight. The primary objectives of this first flight test (Ares I-X) are the following: Demonstrate control of a dynamically similar integrated Ares CLV/Orion CEV using Ares CLV ascent control algorithms; Perform an in-flight separation/staging event between an Ares I-similar First Stage and a representative Upper Stage; Demonstrate assembly and recovery of a new Ares CLV-like First Stage element at Kennedy Space Center (KSC); Demonstrate First Stage separation sequencing, and quantify First Stage atmospheric entry dynamics and parachute performance; and Characterize the magnitude of the integrated vehicle roll torque throughout the First Stage (powered) flight. This paper will provide an overview of the Ares I-X flight test process and details of the individual flight tests.

  18. ALA-induced PpIX fluorescence in epileptogenic tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleen, Jonathan K.; Valdes, Pablo A.; Harris, Brent T.; Holmes, Gregory L.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Roberts, David W.

    2011-03-01

    Astrogliotic tissue displays markedly increased levels of ALA-induced PpIX fluorescence, making it useful for fluorescence-guided resection in glioma surgery. In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and corresponding animal models, there are areas of astrogliosis that often co-localize with the epileptic focus, which can be resected to eliminate seizures in the majority of treated patients. If this epileptogenic tissue can exhibit PpIX fluorescence that is sufficiently localized, it could potentially help identify margins in epilepsy surgery. We tested the hypothesis that ALA-induced PpIX fluorescence could visually accentuate epileptogenic tissue, using an established animal model of chronic TLE. An acute dose of pilocarpine was used to induce chronic seizure activity in a rat. This rat and a normal control were given ALA, euthanized, and brains examined post-mortem for PpIX fluorescence and neuropathology. Preliminary evidence indicates increased PpIX fluorescence in areas associated with chronic epileptic changes and seizure generation in TLE, including the hippocampus and parahippocampal areas. In addition, strong PpIX fluorescence was clearly observed in layer II of the piriform cortex, a region known for epileptic reorganization and involvement in the generation of seizures in animal studies. We are further investigating whether ALA-induced PpIX fluorescence can consistently identify epileptogenic zones, which could warrant the extension of this technique to clinical studies for use as an adjuvant guidance technology in the resection of epileptic tissue.

  19. IBM PC/IX operating system evaluation plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Granier, Martin; Hall, Philip P.; Triantafyllopoulos, Spiros

    1984-01-01

    An evaluation plan for the IBM PC/IX Operating System designed for IBM PC/XT computers is discussed. The evaluation plan covers the areas of performance measurement and evaluation, software facilities available, man-machine interface considerations, networking, and the suitability of PC/IX as a development environment within the University of Southwestern Louisiana NASA PC Research and Development project. In order to compare and evaluate the PC/IX system, comparisons with other available UNIX-based systems are also included.

  20. 29. Photocopy of 1921 photograph. Glass Negative Box IX, Tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Photocopy of 1921 photograph. Glass Negative Box IX, Tower Grove, Missouri Botanical Garden. ITALIAN GARDEN AND NEW PALM HOUSE (DEMOLISHED), LOOKING NORTHEAST - Missouri Botanical Garden, 2345 Tower Grove Avenue, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  1. 26. Photocopy of August 1918 photograph. Glass Negative Box IX, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Photocopy of August 1918 photograph. Glass Negative Box IX, Tower Grove, Missouri Botanical Garden. ITALIAN GARDEN, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - Missouri Botanical Garden, 2345 Tower Grove Avenue, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  2. Function of carbonic anhydrase IX in glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Proescholdt, Martin A; Merrill, Marsha J; Stoerr, Eva-Maria; Lohmeier, Annette; Pohl, Fabian; Brawanski, Alexander

    2012-11-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) IX is over-expressed in glioblastoma; however, its functions in this context are unknown. Metabolically, glioblastomas are highly glycolytic, leading to a significant lactic acid load. Paradoxically, the intracellular pH is alkaline. We hypothesized that CAIX contributes to the extrusion of hydrogen ions into the extracellular space, thereby moderating intra- and extracellular pH and creating an environment conductive to enhanced invasion. We investigated the role of CAIX as a prognostic marker in patients with glioblastoma and its biological function in vitro. CAIX expression was analyzed in 59 patients with glioblastoma by immunohistochemistry. The expression levels were correlated to overall survival. In vitro, U251 and Ln 18 glioblastoma cells were incubated under hypoxia to induce CAIX expression, and RNA interference (RNAi) was used to examine the function of CAIX on cell attachment, invasion, intracellular energy transfer, and susceptibility to adjuvant treatment. High CAIX expression was identified as an independent factor for poor survival in patients with glioblastoma. In vitro, cell attachment and invasion were strongly reduced after knockdown of CAIX. Finally, the effects of radiation and chemotherapy were strongly augmented after CAIX interference and were accompanied by a higher rate of apoptotic cell death. CAIX is an independent prognostic factor for poor outcome in patients with glioblastoma. Cell attachment, invasion, and survival during adjuvant treatment are significantly influenced by high CAIX expression. These results indicate that inhibition of CAIX is a potential metabolic target for the treatment of patients with glioblastoma. PMID:23074198

  3. Anisotropic Bianchi types VIII and IX locally rotationally symmetric cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Assad, M.J.D.; Soares, I.D.

    1983-10-15

    We present a class of exact cosmological solutions of Einstein-Maxwell equations, which are anisotropic and spatially homogeneous of Bianchi types VIII and IX, and class IIIb in the Stewart-Ellis classification of locally rotationally symmetric models. If we take the electromagnetic field equal to zero, a class of Bianchi types VIII/IX spatially homogeneous anisotropic cosmological solutions with perfect fluid is obtained.

  4. beta-meso-Phenylbiliverdin IX alpha and N-phenylprotoporphyrin IX, products of the reaction of phenylhydrazine with oxyhemoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Saito, S; Itano, H A

    1981-01-01

    Oxyhemoglobin and oxymyoglobin were allowed to react aerobically with phenylhydrazine and p-tolylhydrazine. The chloroform extract of each reaction mixture, after treatment with H2SO4/methanol, yielded a blue pigment and a green pigment, which were identified by electronic absorption, mass, and proton NMR spectroscopy as the dimethyl esters of beta-meso-arylbiliverdin IX alpha and N-arylprotoporphyrin IX, respectively. N-Phenylprotoporphyrin IX dimethyl ester formed complexes with Zn2+, Cd2+, and Hg2+ but not with other cations. The proton NMR spectrum of the zinc complex suggested binding of the phenyl group to one of the two pyrrole rings of protoporphyrin IX with a propionic acid substituent. The effectiveness of phenylhydrazine as an inducer of Heinz body formation may be due to destabilization of the hemoglobin molecule by the replacement of heme with phenyl adducts of biliverdin and protoporphyrin. PMID:6946488

  5. Oxygen Availability for Porphyrin Biosynthesis Enzymes Determines the Production of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) during Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Shimpei; Matsumoto, Kentaro; Nakajima, Motowo; Tanaka, Tohru; Ogura, Shun-Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a precursor of porphyrin, is specifically converted to the fluorescent substance protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in tumors to be used as a prodrug for photodynamic therapy and diagnosis. Hypoxia, a common feature of solid tumors, decreases the efficacy of ALA-based photodynamic therapy and diagnosis. This decrease results from the excretion of porphyrin precursor coproporphyrinogen III (CPgenIII), an intermediate in the biosynthesis of PpIX. However, the mechanism of CPgenIII excretion during hypoxia remains unclear. In this study, we revealed the importance of mitochondrial respiration for the production of PpIX during hypoxia. Porphyrin concentrations were estimated in human gastric cancer cell lines by HPLC. Expression levels of porphyrin biosynthesis genes were measured by qRT-PCR and immunoblotting. Blockage of porphyrin biosynthesis was an oxygen-dependent phenomenon resulting from decreased PpIX production in mitochondria under hypoxic conditions. PpIX production was increased by the inhibition of mitochondrial respiration complexes, which indicates that the enzymes of porphyrin biosynthesis compete with respiration complexes for molecular oxygen. Our results indicate that targeting the respiration complexes is a rationale for enhancing the effect of ALA-mediated treatment and diagnosis. PMID:26717566

  6. Oxygen Availability for Porphyrin Biosynthesis Enzymes Determines the Production of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) during Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Shimpei; Matsumoto, Kentaro; Nakajima, Motowo; Tanaka, Tohru; Ogura, Shun-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a precursor of porphyrin, is specifically converted to the fluorescent substance protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in tumors to be used as a prodrug for photodynamic therapy and diagnosis. Hypoxia, a common feature of solid tumors, decreases the efficacy of ALA-based photodynamic therapy and diagnosis. This decrease results from the excretion of porphyrin precursor coproporphyrinogen III (CPgenIII), an intermediate in the biosynthesis of PpIX. However, the mechanism of CPgenIII excretion during hypoxia remains unclear. In this study, we revealed the importance of mitochondrial respiration for the production of PpIX during hypoxia. Porphyrin concentrations were estimated in human gastric cancer cell lines by HPLC. Expression levels of porphyrin biosynthesis genes were measured by qRT-PCR and immunoblotting. Blockage of porphyrin biosynthesis was an oxygen-dependent phenomenon resulting from decreased PpIX production in mitochondria under hypoxic conditions. PpIX production was increased by the inhibition of mitochondrial respiration complexes, which indicates that the enzymes of porphyrin biosynthesis compete with respiration complexes for molecular oxygen. Our results indicate that targeting the respiration complexes is a rationale for enhancing the effect of ALA-mediated treatment and diagnosis. PMID:26717566

  7. Verdohemochrome IX alpha: preparation and oxidoreductive cleavage to biliverdin IX alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Saito, S; Itano, H A

    1982-01-01

    Several studies have shown that both terminal oxygen atoms of biliverdin are derived from molecular oxygen. Since the conversion of verdohemochrome to biliverdin has been assumed to be hydrolytic, these findings seemed to exclude verdohemochrome as an intermediate in the degradation of heme to biliverdin. Coupled oxidation of myoglobin and ascorbate yielded a pure preparation of verdohemochrome IX alpha. The structure and ferrous state of this product were determined from its composition, ligand reactions, 1H NMR spectrum, and conversion to biliverdin IX alpha dimethyl ester. Reaction with ascorbate and 18O2 converted this compound to biliverdin that contained an atom of 18O. Successive treatment of verdohemochrome, first oxidation with H2O2 and then reduction with phenylhydrazine, yielded the iron complex of biliverdin. These results showed that hydrolysis is not an obligatory step in the conversion of verdohemochrome to biliverdin and, moreover, indicated how heme can be converted, with verdohemochrome as an intermediate, into biliverdin in which the two terminal oxygen atoms are derived from different O2 molecules. PMID:6951184

  8. Ares I-X Flight Test - The Future Begins Here

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Stephan R.

    2008-01-01

    In less than two years, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) will launch the Ares I-X mission. This will be the first flight of the Ares I crew launch vehicle, which, together with the Ares V cargo launch vehicle, will eventually send humans to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. As the countdown to this first Ares mission continues, personnel from across the Ares I-X Mission Management Office (MMO) are finalizing designs and fabricating vehicle hardware for an April 2009 launch. This paper will discuss the hardware and programmatic progress of the Ares I-X mission. Like the Apollo program, the Ares launch vehicles will rely upon extensive ground, flight, and orbital testing before sending the Orion crew exploration vehicle into space with humans on board. The first flight of Ares I, designated Ares I-X, will be a suborbital development flight test. Ares I-X gives NASA its first opportunity to gather critical data about the flight dynamics of the integrated launch vehicle stack; understand how to control its roll during flight; better characterize the severe stage separation environments that the upper stage engine will experience during future operational flights; and demonstrate the first stage recovery system. NASA also will begin modifying the launch infrastructure and fine-tuning ground and mission operations, as the agency makes the transition from the Space Shuttle to the Ares/Orion system.

  9. Carbonic anhydrase IX: regulation and role in cancer.

    PubMed

    Benej, Martin; Pastorekova, Silvia; Pastorek, Jaromir

    2014-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment substantially influences the process of tumorigenesis. In many solid tumors, imbalance between the demand of rapidly proliferating cancer cells and the capabilities of the vascular system generates areas with insufficient oxygen supply. In response to tumor hypoxia, cancer cells modulate their gene expression pattern to match the requirements of the altered microenvironment. One of the most significant adaptations to this milieu is the shift towards anaerobic glycolysis to keep up the energy demands. This oncogenic metabolism is often maintained also in aerobic cells. Lactic acid, its metabolic end-product, accumulates hand-in-hand with carbon dioxide, leading to acidification of the extracellular environment. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is the most widely expressed gene in response to hypoxia. Its crucial role in intracellular pH maintenance represents the means by which cancer cells adapt to the toxic conditions of the extracellular milieu. Furthermore, the activity of CA IX stimulates the migratory pathways of cancer cells and is connected with the increase of the aggressive/invasive phenotype of tumors. CA IX expression in many types of tumors indicates its relevance as a general marker of tumor hypoxia. Moreover, its expression is closely related to prognosis of the clinical outcome in several tumor types. All above mentioned facts support the strong position of CA IX as a potential drug therapy target. Here, we summarize the state-of-the-art knowledge on its regulation and role in cancer development.

  10. Development of a high-resolution inductively-coupled argon plasma apparatus for derivative spectrometry and its application to the determination of hafnium in high-purity zirconium oxide.

    PubMed

    Ishii, H; Satoh, K

    1982-04-01

    A high-resolution apparatus for inductively-coupled plasma emission spectrometry (ICPES) has been developed, based on an echelle spectrometer modified for wavelength modulation with a quartz refractor plate. The selectivity of the technique is thus improved, and small amounts of hafnium in high-purity zirconium oxide can be determined directly without prior separation or preconcentration. A straight-line calibration curve passing through the origin is obtained without any correction for the interference from zirconium which exists in large excess. The detection limit for hafnium is 0.06 microg/ml, and the relative standard deviation (10 replicates) for hafnium at the 1.2 microg/ml level is about 3%.

  11. Determination of the type of stacking faults in single-crystal high-purity diamond with a low dislocation density of <50 cm-2 by synchrotron X-ray topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuya, Satoshi; Hanada, Kenji; Uematsu, Takumi; Moribayashi, Tomoya; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Kasu, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    The properties of stacking faults in a single-crystal high-purity diamond with a very low dislocation density of <50 cm-2 and a very low impurity concentration of <0.1 ppm were investigated by synchrotron X-ray topography. We found stacking faults on the {111} plane and determined the fault vector f of the stacking faults to be \\textbf{f} = a/3< 111> on the basis of the f · g extinction criteria. Furthermore, we have found that the partial dislocations are of the Shockley type on the basis of the b · g extinction criteria. Consequently, we concluded that the stacking faults are of the Shockley type and formed because of the decomposition of dislocations with \\textbf{b} = a/2< 1\\bar{1}0> into dislocations with \\textbf{b} = a/6< 2\\bar{1}1> and a/6< 1\\bar{2}\\bar{1}> .

  12. Measurements of gamma (γ)-emitting radionuclides with a high-purity germanium detector: the methods and reliability of our environmental assessments on the Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Tetsuro; Mimura, Mari; Komiyama, Chiyo; Miyamoto, Masaaki; Kitamura, Akira

    2014-01-01

    The severe accident of Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant due to the Tohoku Region Pacific Coast Earthquake in 11 March 2011 caused wide contamination and pollution by radionuclides in Fukushima and surrounding prefectures. In the current JPR symposium, a group of plant scientists attempted to examine the impact of the radioactive contamination on wild and cultivated plants. Measurements of gamma (γ) radiation from radionuclides in "Fukushima samples", which we called and collected from natural and agricultural areas in Fukushima prefecture were mostly done with a high-purity Ge detector in the Graduate School of Maritime Sciences, Kobe University. In this technical note, we describe the methods of sample preparation and measurements of radioactivity of the samples and discuss the reliability of our data in regards to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Interlaboratory comparisons and proficiency test (IAEA proficiency test).

  13. Improved murine glioma detection following modified diet and photobleaching of skin PpIX fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, Summer L.; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Pogue, Brian W.

    2007-02-01

    The Aminolevulinic Acid (ALA) - Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) system is unique in the world of photosensitizers in that the prodrug ALA is enzymatically transformed via the tissue of interest into fluorescently detectable levels of PpIX. This system can be used to monitor cellular metabolism of tumor tissue for applications such as therapy monitoring. Detecting PpIX fluorescence noninvasively has proven difficult due to the high levels of PpIX produced in the skin compared to other tissue both with and without ALA administration. In the current study, methods to decrease skin PpIX autofluorescence and skin PpIX fluorescence following ALA administration have been examined. Use of a purified diet is found to decrease both skin PpIX autofluorescence and skin PpIX fluorescence following ALA administration, while addition of a broad spectrum antibiotic to the water shows little effect. Following ALA administration, improved brain tumor detection is seen when skin PpIX fluorescence is photobleached via blue light prior to transmission spectroscopic measurements of tumor bearing and control animals. Both of these methods to decrease skin PpIX autofluorescence and skin PpIX fluorescence following ALA administration are shown to have a large effect on the ability to detect tumor tissue PpIX fluorescence noninvasively in vivo.

  14. Star Formation Rate in Holmberg IX Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andjelic, M. M.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we use previously determined Hα fluxes for dwarf galaxy Holmberg IX (Arbutina et al. 2009) to calculate star formation rate (SFR) in this galaxy. We discuss possible contaminations of Hα flux and, for the first time, we take into account optical emission from supernova remnants (SNRs) as a possible source of contamination of Hα flux. Derived SFR for Holmberg IX is 3.4×10-4M_{⊙} yr-1. Our value is lower then in previous studies, due to luminous shock-heated source M&H 9-10, possible hypernova remnant, which we excluded from the total Hα flux in our calculation of SFR.

  15. Ares I-X: First Flight of a New Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Stephan R.; Askins, Bruce R.

    2010-01-01

    The Ares I-X suborbital development flight test demonstrated NASA s ability to design, develop, launch and control a new human-rated launch vehicle (Figure 14). This hands-on missions experience will provide the agency with necessary skills and insights regardless of the future direction of space exploration. The Ares I-X team, having executed a successful launch, will now focus on analyzing the flight data and extracting lessons learned that will be used to support the development of future vehicles.

  16. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 264 - Ground-Water Monitoring List

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ground-Water Monitoring List IX... Pt. 264, App. IX Appendix IX to Part 264—Ground-Water Monitoring List Ground-Water Monitoring List... species in the ground water that contain this element are included. 3 CAS index names are those used...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 264 - Ground-Water Monitoring List

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ground-Water Monitoring List IX... Pt. 264, App. IX Appendix IX to Part 264—Ground-Water Monitoring List Ground-Water Monitoring List... species in the ground water that contain this element are included. 3 CAS index names are those used...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 264 - Ground-Water Monitoring List

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ground-Water Monitoring List IX... Pt. 264, App. IX Appendix IX to Part 264—Ground-Water Monitoring List Ground-Water Monitoring List... species in the ground water that contain this element are included. 3 CAS index names are those used...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 264 - Ground-Water Monitoring List

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ground-Water Monitoring List IX... Pt. 264, App. IX Appendix IX to Part 264—Ground-Water Monitoring List Ground-Water Monitoring List... species in the ground water that contain this element are included. 3 CAS index names are those used...

  20. Ares I-X Launch Vehicle Modal Test Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Bartolotta, Paul A.; Templeton, Justin D.; Reaves, Mercedes C.; Horta, Lucas G.; Gaspar, James L.; Parks, Russell A.; Lazor, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01

    The first test flight of NASA's Ares I crew launch vehicle, called Ares I-X, is scheduled for launch in 2009. Ares IX will use a 4-segment reusable solid rocket booster from the Space Shuttle heritage with mass simulators for the 5th segment, upper stage, crew module and launch abort system. Flight test data will provide important information on ascent loads, vehicle control, separation, and first stage reentry dynamics. As part of hardware verification, a series of modal tests were designed to verify the dynamic finite element model (FEM) used in loads assessments and flight control evaluations. Based on flight control system studies, the critical modes were the first three free-free bending mode pairs. Since a test of the free-free vehicle is not practical within project constraints, modal tests for several configurations in the nominal integration flow were defined to calibrate the FEM. A traceability study by Aerospace Corporation was used to identify the critical modes for the tested configurations. Test configurations included two partial stacks and the full Ares I-X launch vehicle on the Mobile Launcher Platform. This paper provides an overview for companion papers in the Ares I-X Modal Test Session. The requirements flow down, pre-test analysis, constraints and overall test planning are described.

  1. Ares I-X Malfunction Turn Range Safety Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaty, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    Ares I-X was the designation given to the flight test version of the Ares I rocket which was developed by NASA (also known as the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) component of the Constellation Program). The Ares I-X flight test vehicle achieved a successful flight test on October 28, 2009, from Pad LC-39B at Kennedy Space Center, Florida (KSC). As part of the flight plan approval for the test vehicle, a range safety malfunction turn analysis was performed to support the risk assessment and vehicle destruct criteria development processes. Several vehicle failure scenarios were identified which could have caused the vehicle trajectory to deviate from its normal flight path. The effects of these failures were evaluated with an Ares I-X 6 degrees-of-freedom (6-DOF) digital simulation, using the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories Version II (POST2) simulation tool. The Ares I-X simulation analysis provided output files containing vehicle trajectory state information. These were used by other risk assessment and vehicle debris trajectory simulation tools to determine the risk to personnel and facilities in the vicinity of the launch area at KSC, and to develop the vehicle destruct criteria used by the flight test range safety officer in the event of a flight test anomaly of the vehicle. The simulation analysis approach used for this study is described, including descriptions of the failure modes which were considered and the underlying assumptions and ground rules of the study.

  2. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Region IX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report represents a detailed summation of existing workforce levels, training programs, career potential, and staffing level projections through 1981 for EPA Region IX. This region serves the states of Arizona, California, Hawaii, and Nevada. The specific pollution programs considered include air, noise, pesticides, potable water, radiation…

  3. Methods of producing protoporphyrin IX and bacterial mutants therefor

    DOEpatents

    Zhou, Jizhong; Qiu, Dongru; He, Zhili; Xie, Ming

    2016-03-01

    The presently disclosed inventive concepts are directed in certain embodiments to a method of producing protoporphyrin IX by (1) cultivating a strain of Shewanella bacteria in a culture medium under conditions suitable for growth thereof, and (2) recovering the protoporphyrin IX from the culture medium. The strain of Shewanella bacteria comprises at least one mutant hemH gene which is incapable of normal expression, thereby causing an accumulation of protoporphyrin IX. In certain embodiments of the method, the strain of Shewanella bacteria is a strain of S. loihica, and more specifically may be S. loihica PV-4. In certain embodiments, the mutant hemH gene of the strain of Shewanella bacteria may be a mutant of shew_2229 and/or of shew_1140. In other embodiments, the presently disclosed inventive concepts are directed to mutant strains of Shewanella bacteria having at least one mutant hemH gene which is incapable of normal expression, thereby causing an accumulation of protoporphyrin IX during cultivation of the bacteria. In certain embodiments the strain of Shewanella bacteria is a strain of S. loihica, and more specifically may be S. loihica PV-4. In certain embodiments, the mutant hemH gene of the strain of Shewanella bacteria may be a mutant of shew_2229 and/or shew_1140.

  4. Ares I-X Flight Test Vehicle Modal Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Templeton, Justin D.; Reaves, Mercedes C.; Horta, Lucas G.; Gaspar, James L.; Bartolotta, Paul A.; Parks, Russel A.; Lazor, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01

    The first test flight of NASA's Ares I crew launch vehicle, called Ares I-X, was launched on October 28, 2009. Ares I-X used a 4-segment reusable solid rocket booster from the Space Shuttle heritage with mass simulators for the 5th segment, upper stage, crew module and launch abort system. Flight test data will provide important information on ascent loads, vehicle control, separation, and first stage reentry dynamics. As part of hardware verification, a series of modal tests were designed to verify the dynamic finite element model (FEM) used in loads assessments and flight control evaluations. Based on flight control system studies, the critical modes were the first three free-free bending mode pairs. Since a test of the free-free vehicle was not practical within project constraints, modal tests for several configurations during vehicle stacking were defined to calibrate the FEM. Test configurations included two partial stacks and the full Ares I-X flight test vehicle on the Mobile Launcher Platform. This report describes the test requirements, constraints, pre-test analysis, test execution and results for the Ares I-X flight test vehicle modal test on the Mobile Launcher Platform. Initial comparisons between pre-test predictions and test data are also presented.

  5. Electron beam chemistry produces high purity metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.; May, C. E.; Marsik, S. J.; Lad, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Application of radiation chemistry for deposition of metals by irradiation of aqueous solutions with high energy electrons is presented. Design of reaction vessel for irradiation of solution is illustrated. Features of radiochemical technique and procedures followed are described.

  6. Ultra high purity, dimensionally stable INVAR 36

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Witold M. (Inventor); Lane, Marc S. (Inventor); Hsieh, Cheng H. (Inventor); Odonnell, Timothy P. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An INVAR 36 material having long-term dimensional stability is produced by sintering a blend of powders of nickel and iron under pressure in an inert atmosphere to form an alloy containing less than 0.01 parts of carbon and less than 0.1 part aggregate and preferably 0.01 part individually of Mn, Si, P, S and Al impurities. The sintered alloy is heat treated and slowly and uniformly cooled to form a material having a coefficient of thermal expansion of less than 1 ppm/C and a temporal stability of less than 1 ppm/year.

  7. Ultra high purity, dimensionally stable INVAR 36

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Witold M. (Inventor); Lane, Marc S. (Inventor); Odonnell, Timothy P. (Inventor); Hsieh, Cheng H. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An INVAR 36 material having long-term dimensional stability is produced by sintering a blend of powders of nickel and iron under pressure in an inert atmosphere to form an alloy containing less than 0.01 parts of carbon and less than 0.1 part aggregate and preferably 0.01 part individually of Mn, Si, P, S and Al impurities. The sintered alloy is heat treated and slowly and uniformly cooled to form a material having a coefficient of thermal expansion of less than 1 ppm/C and a temporal stability of less than 1 ppm/year.

  8. High purity silica reflective heat shield development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blome, J. C.; Drennan, D. N.; Schmitt, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Measurements were made of reflectance in the vacuum ultraviolet down to 0.15 micron. Scattering coefficients (S) and absorption coefficients (K) were also measured. These coefficients express the optical properties and are used directly in a thermodynamic analysis for sizing a heat shield. The effect of the thin silica melt layer formed during entry was also studied from the standpoint of trapped radiant energy.

  9. High Purity Pion Beam at TRIUMF

    SciTech Connect

    Kettell, S.; Kettell, S.; Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Blecher, M.; Bryman, D.A.; Comfort, J.; Doornbos, J.; Doria, L.; Hussein, A.; Ito, N.; et al.

    2009-10-11

    An extension of the TRIUMF M13 low-energy pion channel designed to suppress positrons based on an energy-loss technique is described. A source of beam channel momentum calibration from the decay {pi}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu} is also described.

  10. Ares I-X Flight Data Evaluation: Executive Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, Lawrence D.; Waits, David A.; Lewis, Donny L.; Richards, James S.; Coates, R. H., Jr.; Cruit, Wendy D.; Bolte, Elizabeth J.; Bangham, Michal E.; Askins, Bruce R.; Trausch, Ann N.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Constellation Program (CxP) successfully launched the Ares I-X flight test vehicle on October 28, 2009. The Ares I-X flight was a developmental flight test to demonstrate that this very large, long, and slender vehicle could be controlled successfully. The flight offered a unique opportunity for early engineering data to influence the design and development of the Ares I crew launch vehicle. As the primary customer for flight data from the Ares I-X mission, the Ares Projects Office (APO) established a set of 33 flight evaluation tasks to correlate flight results with prospective design assumptions and models. The flight evaluation tasks used Ares I-X data to partially validate tools and methodologies in technical disciplines that will ultimately influence the design and development of Ares I and future launch vehicles. Included within these tasks were direct comparisons of flight data with preflight predictions and post-flight assessments utilizing models and processes being applied to design and develop Ares I. The benefits of early development flight testing were made evident by results from these flight evaluation tasks. This overview provides summary information from assessment of the Ares I-X flight test data and represents a small subset of the detailed technical results. The Ares Projects Office published a 1,600-plus-page detailed technical report that documents the full set of results. This detailed report is subject to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) and is available in the Ares Projects Office archives files.

  11. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 268 - Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and Structural Integrity Test (Method 1310B)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and Structural Integrity Test (Method 1310B) IX Appendix IX to Part 268 Protection of.... 268, App. IX Appendix IX to Part 268—Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 268 - Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and Structural Integrity Test (Method 1310B)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and Structural Integrity Test (Method 1310B) IX Appendix IX to Part 268 Protection of.... 268, App. IX Appendix IX to Part 268—Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 268 - Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and Structural Integrity Test (Method 1310B)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and Structural Integrity Test (Method 1310B) IX Appendix IX to Part 268 Protection of.... 268, App. IX Appendix IX to Part 268—Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 268 - Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and Structural Integrity Test (Method 1310B)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and Structural Integrity Test (Method 1310B) IX Appendix IX to Part 268 Protection of.... 268, App. IX Appendix IX to Part 268—Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and...

  15. Switching from EPA + DHA (Omega-3-acid Ethyl Esters) to High-Purity EPA (Icosapent Ethyl) in a Statin-Treated Patient with Persistent Dyslipidemia and High Cardiovascular Risk: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Crandell, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) risk may remain despite statin treatment, and there is a need to address this risk with add-on therapy. The lipid effects of two different prescription omega-3 fatty acid therapies are described in a 55-year-old statin- and niacin-treated female with severe dyslipidemia and high CV risk. The patient was initially treated with omega-3-acid ethyl esters (eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA] and docosahexaenoic acid) 4 g/day. Due to persistently elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), she was switched to icosapent ethyl (high-purity EPA ethyl ester) 4 g/day. Approximately 28 months after switching to icosapent ethyl, her LDL-C decreased by 69% to 52 mg/dL, triglycerides decreased by 35% to 119 mg/dL, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) decreased by 63% to 76 mg/dL, total cholesterol decreased by 44% to 137 mg/dL, and HDL-C increased by 45% to 61 mg/dL. Total and small dense LDL particle concentrations decreased by 60 and 59%, respectively. Treatment was well tolerated, with improvements maintained over two years. PMID:27478390

  16. Switching from EPA + DHA (Omega-3-acid Ethyl Esters) to High-Purity EPA (Icosapent Ethyl) in a Statin-Treated Patient with Persistent Dyslipidemia and High Cardiovascular Risk: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Crandell, James R

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) risk may remain despite statin treatment, and there is a need to address this risk with add-on therapy. The lipid effects of two different prescription omega-3 fatty acid therapies are described in a 55-year-old statin- and niacin-treated female with severe dyslipidemia and high CV risk. The patient was initially treated with omega-3-acid ethyl esters (eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA] and docosahexaenoic acid) 4 g/day. Due to persistently elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), she was switched to icosapent ethyl (high-purity EPA ethyl ester) 4 g/day. Approximately 28 months after switching to icosapent ethyl, her LDL-C decreased by 69% to 52 mg/dL, triglycerides decreased by 35% to 119 mg/dL, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) decreased by 63% to 76 mg/dL, total cholesterol decreased by 44% to 137 mg/dL, and HDL-C increased by 45% to 61 mg/dL. Total and small dense LDL particle concentrations decreased by 60 and 59%, respectively. Treatment was well tolerated, with improvements maintained over two years. PMID:27478390

  17. The Development of the Ares I-X Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ess, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Constellation Program (CxP) has identified a series of tests to provide insight into the design and development of the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) and the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). Ares I-X was created as the first suborbital development flight test to help meet CxP objectives. The Ares I-X flight vehicle is an early operational model of Ares, with specific emphasis on Ares I and ground operation characteristics necessary to meet Ares I-X flight test objectives. Ares I-X will encompass the design and construction of an entire system that includes the Flight Test Vehicle (FTV) and associated operations. The FTV will be a test model based on the Ares I design. Select design features will be incorporated in the FTV design to emulate the operation of the CLV in order to meet the flight test objectives. The operations infrastructure and processes will be customized for Ares I-X, while still providing data to inform the developers of the launch processing system for Ares/Orion. The FTV is comprised of multiple elements and components that will be developed at different locations. The components will be delivered to the launch/assembly site, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), for assembly of the elements and components into an integrated, flight-ready, launch vehicle. The FTV will fly a prescribed trajectory in order to obtain the necessary data to meet the objectives. Ares I-X will not be commanded or controlled from the ground during flight, but the FTV will be equipped with telemetry systems, a data recording capability and a flight termination system (FTS). The in-flight part of the test includes a trajectory to simulate maximum dynamic pressure during flight and perform a stage separation representative of the CLV. The in-flight test also includes separation of the Upper Stage Simulator (USS) from the First Stage and recovery of the First Stage. The data retrieved from the flight test will be analyzed

  18. Coagulation factors in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, G W; Davies, S H; Darg, A; Richmond, J

    1969-03-01

    Coagulation studies were carried out on 30 patients with chronic liver disease. The clotting defect was complex and involved factors V, VII, IX (Christmas factor), and prothrombin. Some patients showed a significant depression of factor IX in the presence of a normal one-stage prothrombin time. Thrombotest was found to be a good indicator of factor IX deficiency in this group of patients and may be of use as an additional liver function test. The screening of patients with liver disease for surgery or liver biopsy should assess the coagulation factors involved in both intrinsic and extrinsic thromboplastin generation.

  19. Arabidopsis Lectin Receptor Kinases LecRK-IX.1 and LecRK-IX.2 Are Functional Analogs in Regulating Phytophthora Resistance and Plant Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Cordewener, Jan H G; America, Antoine H P; Shan, Weixing; Bouwmeester, Klaas; Govers, Francine

    2015-09-01

    L-type lectin receptor kinases (LecRK) are potential immune receptors. Here, we characterized two closely-related Arabidopsis LecRK, LecRK-IX.1 and LecRK-IX.2, of which T-DNA insertion mutants showed compromised resistance to Phytophthora brassicae and Phytophthora capsici, with double mutants showing additive susceptibility. Overexpression of LecRK-IX.1 or LecRK-IX.2 in Arabidopsis and transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana increased Phytophthora resistance but also induced cell death. Phytophthora resistance required both the lectin domain and kinase activity, but for cell death, the lectin domain was not needed. Silencing of the two closely related mitogen-activated protein kinase genes NbSIPK and NbNTF4 in N. benthamiana completely abolished LecRK-IX.1-induced cell death but not Phytophthora resistance. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of protein complexes coimmunoprecipitated in planta with LecRK-IX.1 or LecRK-IX.2 as bait, resulted in the identification of the N. benthamiana ABC transporter NbPDR1 as a potential interactor of both LecRK. The closest homolog of NbPDR1 in Arabidopsis is ABCG40, and coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that ABCG40 associates with LecRK-IX.1 and LecRK-IX.2 in planta. Similar to the LecRK mutants, ABCG40 mutants showed compromised Phytophthora resistance. This study shows that LecRK-IX.1 and LecRK-IX.2 are Phytophthora resistance components that function independent of each other and independent of the cell-death phenotype. They both interact with the same ABC transporter, suggesting that they exploit similar signal transduction pathways.

  20. Hantavirus Prevalence in the IX Region of Chile

    PubMed Central

    Vial, Pablo C.; Castillo, Constanza H.; Godoy, Paula M.; Hjelle, Brian; Ferrés, Marcela G.

    2003-01-01

    An epidemiologic and seroprevalence survey was conducted (n=830) to assess proportion of persons exposed to hantavirus in IX Region Chile, which accounts for 25% of reported cases of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome. This region has three geographic areas with different disease incidences and a high proportion of aboriginals. Serum samples were tested for immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay against Sin Nombre virus N antigen by strip immunoblot assay against Sin Nombre, Puumala, Río Mamoré, and Seoul N antigens. Samples from six patients were positive for IgG antibodies reactive with Andes virus; all patients lived in the Andes Mountains. Foresting was also associated with seropositivity; but not sex, age, race, rodent exposure, or farming activities. Exposure to hantavirus varies in different communities of IX Region. Absence of history of pneumonia or hospital admission in persons with specific IgG antibodies suggests that infection is clinically inapparent. PMID:12890323

  1. Ares I-X Thermal Model Correlation and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundsen, Ruth M.

    2010-01-01

    The Ares I-X vehicle launched and flew successfully on October 28, 2009. This paper will describe the correlation of the vehicle thermal model to both ground testing and flight data. A main purpose of the vehicle model and ground testing was to ensure that the avionics within the vehicle were held within their thermal limits prior to launch and during flight. The correlation of the avionics box temperatures will be shown. Also, the lessons learned in the thermal discipline during the modeling, test, correlation to test, and flight of the Ares I-X flight test vehicle will be described. Lessons learned will cover thermal modeling, as well as management of the thermal discipline, thermal team, and thermal-related actions in design, testing, and flight.

  2. Ares I-X Best Estimated Trajectory Analysis and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlgaard, Christopher D.; Beck, Roger E.; Starr, Brett R.; Derry, Stephen D.; Brandon, Jay; Olds, Aaron D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I-X trajectory reconstruction produced best estimated trajectories of the flight test vehicle ascent through stage separation, and of the first and upper stage entries after separation. The trajectory reconstruction process combines on-board, ground-based, and atmospheric measurements to produce the trajectory estimates. The Ares I-X vehicle had a number of on-board and ground based sensors that were available, including inertial measurement units, radar, air-data, and weather balloons. However, due to problems with calibrations and/or data, not all of the sensor data were used. The trajectory estimate was generated using an Iterative Extended Kalman Filter algorithm, which is an industry standard processing algorithm for filtering and estimation applications. This paper describes the methodology and results of the trajectory reconstruction process, including flight data preprocessing and input uncertainties, trajectory estimation algorithms, output transformations, and comparisons with preflight predictions.

  3. Homoclinic chaos in axisymmetric Bianchi-IX cosmological models with an ad hoc quantum potential

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, G. C.; Stuchi, T. J.; Joras, S. E.

    2010-04-15

    In this work we study the dynamics of the axisymmetric Bianchi-IX cosmological model with a term of quantum potential added. As it is well known, this class of Bianchi-IX models is homogeneous and anisotropic with two scale factors, A(t) and B(t), derived from the solution of Einstein's equation for general relativity. The model we use in this work has a cosmological constant and the matter content is dust. To this model we add a quantum-inspired potential that is intended to represent short-range effects due to the general relativistic behavior of matter in small scales and play the role of a repulsive force near the singularity. We find that this potential restricts the dynamics of the model to positive values of A(t) and B(t) and alters some qualitative and quantitative characteristics of the dynamics studied previously by several authors. We make a complete analysis of the phase space of the model finding critical points, periodic orbits, stable/unstable manifolds using numerical techniques such as Poincare section, numerical continuation of orbits, and numerical globalization of invariant manifolds. We compare the classical and the quantum models. Our main result is the existence of homoclinic crossings of the stable and unstable manifolds in the physically meaningful region of the phase space [where both A(t) and B(t) are positive], indicating chaotic escape to inflation and bouncing near the singularity.

  4. Technical Progress on the Ares I-X Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S.R.; Robinson, K.F.; Flynn, K.C.

    2008-01-01

    Ares I-X will be NASA's first test flight for a new human-rated launch vehicle since 1981, and the team is well on its way toward completing the vehicle's design and hardware fabrication for an April 2009 launch. This uncrewed suborbital development test flight gives NASA its first opportunities to: gather critical data about the flight dynamics of the integrated launch vehicle; understand how to control its roll during flight; better characterize the stage separation environments during future flight; and demonstrate the first stage recovery system. The Ares I-X Flight Test Vehicle (FTV) incorporates a mix of flight and mockup hardware. It is powered by a four-segment solid rocket booster, and will be modified to include a fifth, spacer segment; the upper stage, Orion crew exploration vehicle, and launch abort system are simulator hardware to make the FTV aerodynamically similar to the same size, shape, and weight of Ares I. The Ares IX first stage includes an existing Shuttle solid rocket motor and thrust vector control system controlled by an Ascent Thrust Vector Controller (ATVC) designed and built by Honeywell International. The avionics system will be tested in a dedicated System Integration Laboratory located at Lockheed Martin Space Systems (LMSS) in Denver, Colorado. The Upper Stage Simulator (USS) is made up of cylindrical segments that will be stacked and integrated at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for launch. Glenn Research Center is already building these segments, along with their internal access structures. The active Roll Control System (RoCS) includes two thruster units harvested from Peacekeeper missiles. Duty cycle testing for RoCS was conducted, and fuel tanking and detanking tests will occur at KSC in early 2008. This important flight will provide valuable experience for the ground operations team in integrating, stacking, and launching Ares I. Data from Ares I-X will ensure the safety and reliability of America's newest launch vehicle.

  5. Loop quantum cosmology of Bianchi type IX models

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2010-08-15

    The loop quantum cosmology 'improved dynamics' of the Bianchi type IX model are studied. The action of the Hamiltonian constraint operator is obtained via techniques developed for the Bianchi type I and type II models, no new input is required. It is shown that the big bang and big crunch singularities are resolved by quantum gravity effects. We also present effective equations which provide quantum geometry corrections to the classical equations of motion.

  6. Ares I-X: On the Threshold of Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Stephan R.; Askins, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Ares I-X, the first flight of the Ares I crew launch vehicle, is less than a year from launch. Ares I-X will test the flight characteristics of Ares I from liftoff to first stage separation and recovery. The flight also will demonstrate the computer hardware and software (avionics) needed to control the vehicle; deploy the parachutes that allow the first stage booster to land in the ocean safely; measure and control how much the rocket rolls during flight; test and measure the effects of first stage separation; and develop and try out new ground handling and rocket stacking procedures in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) and first stage recovery procedures at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. All Ares I-X major elements have completed their critical design reviews, and are nearing final fabrication. The first stage--four-segment solid rocket booster from the Space Shuttle inventory--incorporates new simulated forward structures to match the Ares I five-segment booster. The upper stage, Orion crew module, and launch abort system will comprise simulator hardware that incorporates developmental flight instrumentation for essential data collection during the mission. The upper stage simulator consists of smaller cylindrical segments, which were transported to KSC in fall 2008. The crew module and launch abort system simulator were shipped in December 2008. The first stage hardware, active roll control system (RoCS), and avionics components will be delivered to KSC in 2009. This paper will provide detailed statuses of the Ares I-X hardware elements as NASA's Constellation Program prepares for this first flight of a new exploration era in the summer of 2009.

  7. Prognostic value of serum carbonic anhydrase IX in testicular germ cell tumor patients

    PubMed Central

    Kalavska, Katarina; Chovanec, Michal; Zatovicova, Miriam; Takacova, Martina; Gronesova, Paulina; Svetlovska, Daniela; Baratova, Magdalena; Miskovska, Vera; Obertova, Jana; Palacka, Patrik; Rajec, Jan; Sycova-Mila, Zuzana; Cierna, Zuzana; Kajo, Karol; Spanik, Stanislav; Babal, Pavel; Mardiak, Jozef; Pastorekova, Silvia; Mego, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) are one of the most chemosensitive solid tumors, a small proportion of patients fail to be cured following cisplatin-based first line chemotherapy. Upregulation of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) in various solid tumors is associated with poor outcome. The current prospective study investigated the prognostic value of serum CA IX level in TGCTs. In total, 83 patients (16 non-metastatic following orchiectomy with no evidence of disease, 57 metastatic chemotherapy-naïve and 10 metastatic relapsed chemotherapy-pretreated) starting adjuvant and/or new line of chemotherapy and 35 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Serum CA IX values were determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and intratumoral CA IX was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Metastatic chemotherapy-naïve patients had significantly higher mean CA IX serum levels than healthy controls (490.6 vs. 249.6 pg/ml, P=0.005), while there was no difference in serum CA IX levels in non-metastatic or relapsed TGCT patients compared with healthy controls. There was no significant difference in the mean serum CA IX levels between different groups of patients and between the first and second cycle of chemotherapy, nor association with patients/tumor characteristics. Serum CA IX was not prognostic for progression-free survival [hazard ratio (HR)=0.81, P=0.730] or overall survival (HR=0.64, P=0.480). However, there was a significant association between intratumoral CA IX expression and serum CA IX concentration (rho=0.51, P=0.040). These results suggest that serum CA IX level correlates with tumor CA IX expression in TGCT patients, but fails to exhibit either a prognostic value or an association with patients/tumor characteristics. PMID:27698832

  8. Prognostic value of serum carbonic anhydrase IX in testicular germ cell tumor patients

    PubMed Central

    Kalavska, Katarina; Chovanec, Michal; Zatovicova, Miriam; Takacova, Martina; Gronesova, Paulina; Svetlovska, Daniela; Baratova, Magdalena; Miskovska, Vera; Obertova, Jana; Palacka, Patrik; Rajec, Jan; Sycova-Mila, Zuzana; Cierna, Zuzana; Kajo, Karol; Spanik, Stanislav; Babal, Pavel; Mardiak, Jozef; Pastorekova, Silvia; Mego, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) are one of the most chemosensitive solid tumors, a small proportion of patients fail to be cured following cisplatin-based first line chemotherapy. Upregulation of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) in various solid tumors is associated with poor outcome. The current prospective study investigated the prognostic value of serum CA IX level in TGCTs. In total, 83 patients (16 non-metastatic following orchiectomy with no evidence of disease, 57 metastatic chemotherapy-naïve and 10 metastatic relapsed chemotherapy-pretreated) starting adjuvant and/or new line of chemotherapy and 35 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Serum CA IX values were determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and intratumoral CA IX was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Metastatic chemotherapy-naïve patients had significantly higher mean CA IX serum levels than healthy controls (490.6 vs. 249.6 pg/ml, P=0.005), while there was no difference in serum CA IX levels in non-metastatic or relapsed TGCT patients compared with healthy controls. There was no significant difference in the mean serum CA IX levels between different groups of patients and between the first and second cycle of chemotherapy, nor association with patients/tumor characteristics. Serum CA IX was not prognostic for progression-free survival [hazard ratio (HR)=0.81, P=0.730] or overall survival (HR=0.64, P=0.480). However, there was a significant association between intratumoral CA IX expression and serum CA IX concentration (rho=0.51, P=0.040). These results suggest that serum CA IX level correlates with tumor CA IX expression in TGCT patients, but fails to exhibit either a prognostic value or an association with patients/tumor characteristics.

  9. SHIP-2 forms a tetrameric complex with filamin, actin, and GPIb-IX-V: localization of SHIP-2 to the activated platelet actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Jennifer M; Munday, Adam D; Kong, Anne M; Huysmans, Richard D; Matzaris, Maria; Layton, Meredith J; Nandurkar, Harshal H; Berndt, Michael C; Mitchell, Christina A

    2003-08-01

    The platelet receptor for the von Willebrand factor (VWF) glycoprotein Ib-IX-V (GPIb-IX-V) complex mediates platelet adhesion at sites of vascular injury. The cytoplasmic tail of the GPIbalpha subunit interacts with the actin-binding protein, filamin, anchoring the receptor in the cytoskeleton. In motile cells, the second messenger phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5 trisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5)P3) induces submembraneous actin remodeling. The inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase, Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase-2 (SHIP-2), hydrolyzes PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 forming phosphatidylinositol 3,4 bisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4)P2) and regulates membrane ruffling via complex formation with filamin. In this study we investigate the intracellular location and association of SHIP-2 with filamin, actin, and the GPIb-IX-V complex in platelets. Immunoprecipitation of SHIP-2 from the Triton-soluble fraction of unstimulated platelets demonstrated association between SHIP-2, filamin, actin, and GPIb-IX-V. SHIP-2 associated with filamin or GPIb-IX-V was active and demonstrated PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 5-phosphatase activity. Following thrombin or VWF-induced platelet activation, detection of the SHIP-2, filamin, and receptor complex decreased in the Triton-soluble fraction, although in control studies the level of SHIP-2, filamin, or GPIb-IX-V immunoprecipitated by their respective antibodies did not change following platelet activation. In activated platelets spreading on a VWF matrix, SHIP-2 localized intensely with actin at the central actin ring and colocalized with actin and filamin at filopodia and lamellipodia. In spread platelets, GPIb-IX-V localized to the center of the platelet and showed little colocalization with filamin at the plasma membrane. These studies demonstrate a functionally active complex between SHIP-2, filamin, actin, and GPIb-IX-V that may orchestrate the localized hydrolysis of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 and thereby regulate cortical and submembraneous actin.

  10. Overexpression of Intrinsic Hypoxia Markers HIF1{alpha} and CA-IX Predict for Local Recurrence in Stage T1-T2 Glottic Laryngeal Carcinoma Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schrijvers, M.L.; Laan, B.F.A.M. van der; Bock, G.H. de; Pattje, W.J.; Mastik, M.F.; Menkema, L.; Langendijk, J.A.; Kluin, P.M.; Schuuring, E.; Wal, J.E. van der

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To examine the prognostic value of three endogenous hypoxia markers (hypoxia inducible factor 1 {alpha} subunit [HIF1{alpha}], carbonic anhydrase IX [CA-IX], and glucose transporter type 1 [GLUT-1]) on the clinical outcome in patients with early-stage glottic carcinoma primarily treated with radiotherapy (RT) and to determine the predictive hypoxic profile to choose the optimal treatment of early-stage laryngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemistry for HIF1{alpha}, CA-IX, and GLUT-1 was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, pretreatment tissue samples of 91 glottic squamous cell carcinoma specimens. The patient group consisted only of those with early-stage (T1-T2) glottic carcinoma, and all patients were treated with RT only. Relative tumor staining was scored on the tissue samples. Receiver operating curve analysis was performed to determine the optimal cutoff value for each tumor marker. Cox regression analyses for the variables HIF1{alpha}, CA-IX, GLUT-1, gender, age, hemoglobin level, T category, N category, tobacco use, and alcohol use were performed with local control and overall survival as endpoints. Results: HIF1{alpha} overexpression in early-stage glottic carcinoma correlated significantly with worse local control (hazard ratio [HR], 3.05; p = 0.021) and overall survival (HR, 2.92; p = 0.016). CA-IX overexpression correlated significantly with worse local control (HR, 2.93; p = 0.020). GLUT-1 overexpression did not show any correlation with the clinical outcome parameters. Tumors with a nonhypoxic profile (defined as low HIF1{alpha} and low CA-IX expression) had significantly better local control (HR, 6.32; p 0.013). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that early-stage glottic laryngeal carcinomas with low HIF1{alpha} and CA-IX expression are highly curable with RT. For this group, RT is a good treatment option. For tumors with HIF1{alpha} or CA-IX overexpression, hypoxic modification before RT or primary

  11. Evidence that biliverdin-IX beta reductase and flavin reductase are identical.

    PubMed Central

    Shalloe, F; Elliott, G; Ennis, O; Mantle, T J

    1996-01-01

    A search of the database shows that human biliverdin-IX beta reductase and flavin reductase are identical. We have isolated flavin reductase from bovine erythrocytes and show that the activity co-elutes with biliverdin-IX beta reductase. Preparations of the enzyme that are electrophoretically homogeneous exhibit both flavin reductase and biliverdin-IX beta reductase activities; however, they are not capable of catalysing the reduction of biliverdin-IX alpha. Although there is little obvious sequence identity between biliverdin-IX alpha reductase (BVR-A) and biliverdin-IX beta reductase (BVR-B), they do show weak immunological cross-reactivity. Both enzymes bind to 2',5'-ADP-Sepharose. PMID:8687377

  12. Determination of aminolevulinic-acid-induced protoporphyrin IX in mice skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolik, S.; Tomás, S. A.; Ramón-Gallegos, E.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Sánchez-Sinencio, F.

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) production in mice skin was studied by photoacoustic spectroscopy. PpIX was induced in mice by intraperitoneal administration of δ-aminolevulinic acid (δ-ALA) in doses of 10, 20, and 30 mg/kg. Mice were sacrificed at specific times within an 8 h interval following δ-ALA administration, and their abdominal skin was excised for the optical measurements. The PpIX content was determined from the photoacoustic amplitude at 410 nm, where PpIX presents its Soret band. For each dose, maximum PpIX was observed at two points. The first maximum occurred at around 15-45 min, depending on the ALA dose, and the second one took place approximately 2 h after δ-ALA administration. These peaks are associated with PpIX production in blood vessels and tissue, respectively. Fluorescence measurements of the PpIX content in plasma extracted intracardiacally confirmed the previous statement. Finally, phase resolved photoacoustic spectroscopy was applied to evaluate the mean depth at which PpIX is generated within the mice skin. This evaluation confirms that the ALA-induced porphyrins in skin are rather produced in the epidermis than in the dermis.

  13. The Structure of Carbonic Anhydrase IX Is Adapted for Low-pH Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Brian P; Bhatt, Avni; Socorro, Lilien; Driscoll, Jenna M; Okoh, Cynthia; Lomelino, Carrie L; Mboge, Mam Y; Kurian, Justin J; Tu, Chingkuang; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Frost, Susan C; McKenna, Robert

    2016-08-23

    Human carbonic anhydrase IX (hCA IX) expression in many cancers is associated with hypoxic tumors and poor patient outcome. Inhibitors of hCA IX have been used as anticancer agents with some entering Phase I clinical trials. hCA IX is transmembrane protein whose catalytic domain faces the extracellular tumor milieu, which is typically associated with an acidic microenvironment. Here, we show that the catalytic domain of hCA IX (hCA IX-c) exhibits the necessary biochemical and biophysical properties that allow for low pH stability and activity. Furthermore, the unfolding process of hCA IX-c appears to be reversible, and its catalytic efficiency is thought to be correlated directly with its stability between pH 3.0 and 8.0 but not above pH 8.0. To rationalize this, we determined the X-ray crystal structure of hCA IX-c to 1.6 Å resolution. Insights from this study suggest an understanding of hCA IX-c stability and activity in low-pH tumor microenvironments and may be applicable to determining pH-related effects on enzymes. PMID:27439028

  14. Cell cycle dependence of protophorphyrin IX generation in 9L rat gliosarcoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shiming; Da, Xing; Chen, Qun

    2006-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a cancer therapy that utilizes optical energy to activate a photosensitizer drug in a target tissue. Always, the curative effect is dependent on the light fluence, the concentration of the photosensitizer and the concentration of the oxygen. To date, Protophorphyrin IX (PpIX) as the only one endogenous photosensitizer is widely used in PDT of brain tumors. Since PpIX is synthesized in intracellular structure, and is likely dependent on the phase of the cell cycle. The cell cycle dependence of PpIX production is thus investigated in the current work in 9L gliosarcoma cells.

  15. Evaluation of PpIX formation in Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia I (CIN) using widefield fluorescence images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbinatto, Fernanda M.; Inada, Natalia M.; Fortunato, Thereza C.; Lombardi, Welington; da Silva, Eduardo V.; Vollet Filho, José D.; Kurachi, Cristina; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2016-03-01

    Optical techniques has been described as auxiliary technology for screening of neoplasia because shows the potential for tissues differentiation in real-time and it is a noninvasive detection and safe. However, only endogenous fluorophores presents the lesion may be insufficient and needed of the administration of the fluorophores synthesized, such as, precursor molecule of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) induced by 5- aminolevulinic acid and your derivatives. Topical application of methylaminolevulinate (MAL), induces formation of the endogenous photosensitizer, PpIX in tissues where carcinogenesis has begun. The PpIX tend to accumulate in premalignant and malignant tissues and the illumination with light with appropriate wavelength beginning to excitation of PpIX fluorescence, which helps to localize PpIX-rich areas and identify potentially malignant tissues. The aim of the study is to evaluate the production of PpIX in the cervix with CIN I through of the fluorescence images captured after 1 hour of cream application. It was possible to visualize PpIX fluorescence in cervix and it was possible to observe the selectivity in fluorescence in squamous-columnar junction, which a pre-cancerous condition (CIN) and usually is localized. Through the image processing it was possible to quantify the increase of red fluorescence. For the CIN I the increase of red fluorescence was approximately of 4 times indicating a good PpIX formation.

  16. Saccharin: a lead compound for structure-based drug design of carbonic anhydrase IX inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Brian P; Hendon, Alex M; Driscoll, Jenna M; Rankin, Gregory M; Poulsen, Sally-Ann; Supuran, Claudiu T; McKenna, Robert

    2015-02-15

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is a key modulator of aggressive tumor behavior and a prognostic marker and target for several cancers. Saccharin (SAC) based compounds may provide an avenue to overcome CA isoform specificity, as they display both nanomolar affinity and preferential binding, for CA IX compared to CA II (>50-fold for SAC and >1000-fold when SAC is conjugated to a carbohydrate moiety). The X-ray crystal structures of SAC and a SAC-carbohydrate conjugate bound to a CA IX-mimic are presented and compared to CA II. The structures provide substantial new insight into the mechanism of SAC selective CA isoform inhibition.

  17. Mg-Protoporphyrin IX Signals Enhance Plant’s Tolerance to Cold Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Wu, Zi-Li; Feng, Ling-Yang; Dong, Li-Hua; Song, An-Jun; Yuan, Ming; Chen, Yang-Er; Zeng, Jian; Chen, Guang-Deng; Yuan, Shu

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between Mg-protoporphyrin IX (Mg-Proto IX) signals and plant’s tolerance to cold stress is investigated. Arabidopsis seedlings grown for 3 weeks were pretreated with 2 mM glutamate (Glu) and 2 mM MgCl2 for 48 h at room temperature to induce Mg-Proto IX accumulation. Then cold stress was performed at 4°C for additional 72 h. Glu + MgCl2 pre-treatments alleviated the subsequent cold stress significantly by rising the leaf temperature through inducing Mg-Proto IX signals. The protective role of Glu + MgCl2 treatment was greatly compromised in the mutants of Mg-Proto IX synthesis, Mg-Proto IX signaling, and cyanide-resistant respiration. And the enhancement of cold-responsive gene expression was greatly compromised in the mutants of Mg-Proto IX synthesis, Mg-Proto IX signaling and ABA signaling, but not in the mutant of cyanide-resistant respiration. Cold stress promoted cyanide-resistant respiration and leaf total respiration exponentially, which could be further induced by the Glu + MgCl2 treatment. Mg-Proto IX signals also activate antioxidant enzymes and increase non-enzymatic antioxidants [glutathione but not ascorbic acid (AsA)] to maintain redox equilibrium during the cold stress. PMID:27803706

  18. Mice lacking alpha 1 (IX) collagen develop noninflammatory degenerative joint disease.

    PubMed Central

    Fässler, R; Schnegelsberg, P N; Dausman, J; Shinya, T; Muragaki, Y; McCarthy, M T; Olsen, B R; Jaenisch, R

    1994-01-01

    Type IX collagen is a nonfibrillar collagen composed of three gene products, alpha 1(IX), alpha 2(IX), and alpha 3(IX). Type IX molecules are localized on the surface of type II-containing fibrils and consist of two arms, a long arm that is crosslinked to type II collagen and a short arm that projects into the perifibrillar space. In hyaline cartilage, the alpha 1(IX) collagen transcript encodes a polypeptide with a large N-terminal globular domain (NC4), whereas in many other tissues an alternative transcript encodes an alpha 1(IX) chain with a truncated NC4 domain. It has been proposed that type IX molecules are involved in the interaction of fibrils with each other or with other components of the extracellular matrix. To test this hypothesis, we have generated a mouse strain lacking both isoforms of the alpha 1(IX) chain. Homozygous mutant mice are viable and show no detectable abnormalities at birth but develop a severe degenerative joint disease resembling human osteoarthritis. Images PMID:8197187

  19. Comparison in different species of biliary bilirubin-IX alpha conjugates with the activities of hepatic and renal bilirubin-IX alpha-uridine diphosphate glycosyltransferases.

    PubMed Central

    Fevery, J; Van de Vijver, M; Michiels, R; Heirwegh, K P

    1977-01-01

    The bilrubin-IXalpha conjugates in bile and the activities of bilirubin-IX alpha--UDP-glycosyltransferases in liver and kidney were determined for ten species of mammals and for the chicken. 1. In the mammalian species, bilirubin-IX alpha glucuronide was the predominant bile pigment. Excretion of neutral glycosides was unimportant, except in the cat, the mouse, the rabbit and the dog, where glucose and xylose represented 12--41% of total conjugating groups bound to bilirubin-IX alpha. In chicken bile, glucoside and glucuronide conjugates were of equal importance. They probably represent only a small fraction of the total bile pigment. 2. The transferase activities in liver showed pronounced species variation. This was also apparent with regard to activation by digitonin, pH optimum and relative activities of transferases acting on either UDP-glucuronic acid or neutral UDP-sugars. 3. Man, the dog, the cat and the rat excrete bilirubin-IX alpha largely as diconjugated derivatives. In general, diconjugated bilirubin-IX alpha could also be synthesized in vitro with liver homogenate, bilirubin-IX alpha and UDP-sugar. In contrast, for the other species examined, bilirubin pigments consisted predominantly of monoconjugated bilirubin-IX alpha. Synthesis in vitro with UDP-glucuronic acid, UDP-glucose or UDP-xylose as the sugar donor led exclusively to the formation of monoconjugated bilirubin-IX alpha. 4. The transferase activities in the kidney were restricted to the cortex and were important only for the rat and the dog. No activity at all could be detected for several species, including man. 5. Comparison of the transferase activities in liver with reported values of the maximal rate of excretion in bile suggests a close linkage between conjugation and biliary secretion of bilirubin-IX alpha. PMID:407905

  20. Enhanced Detection of Low-Abundance Host Cell Protein Impurities in High-Purity Monoclonal Antibodies Down to 1 ppm Using Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Multidimensional Liquid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Doneanu, Catalin E; Anderson, Malcolm; Williams, Brad J; Lauber, Matthew A; Chakraborty, Asish; Chen, Weibin

    2015-10-20

    The enormous dynamic range of proteinaceous species present in protein biotherapeutics poses a significant challenge for current mass spectrometry (MS)-based methods to detect low-abundance HCP impurities. Previously, an HCP assay based on two-dimensional chromatographic separation (high pH/low pH) coupled to high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry and developed in the author's laboratory has been shown to achieve a detection limit of about 50 ppm (parts per milion) for the identification and quantification of HCPs present in monoclonal antibodies following Protein A purification.1 To improve the HCP detection limit we have explored the utility of several new analytical techniques for HCP analysis and thereby developed an improved liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) methodology for enhanced detection of HCPs. The new method includes (1) the use of a new charge-surface-modified (CSH) C18 stationary phase to mitigate the challenges of column saturation, peak tailing, and distortion that are commonly observed in the HCP analysis; (2) the incorporation of traveling-wave ion mobility (TWIM) separation of coeluting peptide precursors, and (3) the improvement of fragmentation efficiency of low-abundance HCP peptides by correlating the collision energy used for precursor fragmentation with their mobility drift time. As a result of these improvements, the detection limit of the new methodology was greatly improved, and HCPs present at a concentration as low as 1 ppm (1 ng HCP/mg mAb) were successfully identified and quantified. The newly developed method was applied to analyze two high-purity mAbs (NIST mAb and Infliximab) expressed in a murine cell line. For both samples, low-abundance HCPs (down to 1 ppm) were confidently identified, and the identities of the HCPs were further confirmed by targeted MS/MS experiments. In addition, the performance of the assay was evaluated by an interlaboratory study in which three independent