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Sample records for high-resolution angle-resolved measurements

  1. Laser-based spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy for rapid, high-resolution measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotlieb, Kenneth; Bostwick, Aaron; Hussain, Zahid; Lanzara, Alessandra; Jozwiak, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    A unique spin-and angle-resolved photoemission spectrometer (spin-ARPES) is coupled with a 6 eV laser to achieve unprecedented measurements of near-EF physics in topological insulators and Rashba systems. The pairing of the spin-ARPES system with the laser allows for energy and angular resolutions never before seen in a spin-ARPES experiment. Most importantly, the high efficiency of the system and high photon flux of the laser make measurements very rapid, permitting exploration of a large experimental phase space.

  2. High-resolution angle-resolved measurements of light scattered at small angles by red blood cells in suspension.

    PubMed

    Turcu, Ioan; Pop, Cristian V L; Neamtu, Silvia

    2006-03-20

    Red blood cells (RBCs) scatter light mainly in the forward direction, where the scattering phase function has a narrow peak. We performed an experimental investigation into the angular distribution of light scattered by blood in the small-angle domain. A highly diluted suspension of RBCs (hematocrits in the range 5 x 10(-5)-10(-2)) was illuminated with a He-Ne laser with 633 nm wavelength. We focused our research on two main topics: the scattering efficiency of the RBCs given by the mean scattering cross section and the scattering anisotropy obtained from the angular distribution of the scattered photons. The collimated beam transmission and the angular distribution of scattered light were measured and compared with the predictions of the effective phase function model. The RBCs' mean scattering cross section and scattering anisotropy were obtained by fitting of the experimental data. PMID:16579566

  3. Nodal Quasiparticle Meltdown in Ultra-High Resolution Pump-Probe Angle-Resolved Photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Jeff; Jozwiak, Chris; Smallwood, Chris L.; Eisaki, H.; Kaindl, Robert A.; Lee, Dung-Hai; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2011-06-03

    High-T{sub c} cuprate superconductors are characterized by a strong momentum-dependent anisotropy between the low energy excitations along the Brillouin zone diagonal (nodal direction) and those along the Brillouin zone face (antinodal direction). Most obvious is the d-wave superconducting gap, with the largest magnitude found in the antinodal direction and no gap in the nodal direction. Additionally, while antin- odal quasiparticle excitations appear only below T{sub c}, superconductivity is thought to be indifferent to nodal excitations as they are regarded robust and insensitive to T{sub c}. Here we reveal an unexpected tie between nodal quasiparticles and superconductivity using high resolution time- and angle-resolved photoemission on optimally doped Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} . We observe a suppression of the nodal quasiparticle spectral weight following pump laser excitation and measure its recovery dynamics. This suppression is dramatically enhanced in the superconducting state. These results reduce the nodal-antinodal dichotomy and challenge the conventional view of nodal excitation neutrality in superconductivity. The electronic structures of high-Tc cuprates are strongly momentum-dependent. This is one reason why the momentum-resolved technique of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has been a central tool in the field of high-temperature superconductivity. For example, coherent low energy excitations with momenta near the Brillouin zone face, or antinodal quasiparticles (QPs), are only observed below T{sub c} and have been linked to superfluid density. They have therefore been the primary focus of ARPES studies. In contrast, nodal QPs, with momenta along the Brillouin zone diagonal, have received less attention and are usually regarded as largely immune to the superconducting transition because they seem insensitive to perturbations such as disorder, doping, isotope exchange, charge ordering, and temperature. Clearly

  4. High Resolution Angle Resolved Photoemission Studies on Quasi-Particle Dynamics in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Leem, C.S.

    2010-06-02

    We obtained the spectral function of the graphite H point using high resolution angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). The extracted width of the spectral function (inverse of the photo-hole lifetime) near the H point is approximately proportional to the energy as expected from the linearly increasing density of states (DOS) near the Fermi energy. This is well accounted by our electron-phonon coupling theory considering the peculiar electronic DOS near the Fermi level. And we also investigated the temperature dependence of the peak widths both experimentally and theoretically. The upper bound for the electron-phonon coupling parameter is 0.23, nearly the same value as previously reported at the K point. Our analysis of temperature dependent ARPES data at K shows that the energy of phonon mode of graphite has much higher energy scale than 125K which is dominant in electron-phonon coupling.

  5. Design of a High Resolution and High Flux Beam line for VUV Angle-Resolved Photoemission at UVSOR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Shin-ichi; Ito, Takahiro; Nakamura, Eiken; Hosaka, Masahito; Katoh, Masahiro

    2007-01-19

    A high-energy-resolution angle-resolved photoemission beamline in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) region has been designed for a 750 MeV synchrotron light source UVSOR-II. The beamline equips an APPLE-II-type undulator with the horizontally/vertically linear and right/left circular polarizations, a modified Wadsworth-type monochromator and a high-resolution photoelectron analyzer. The monochromator covers the photon energy range of 6 - 40 eV. The energy resolution (hv/{delta}hv) and the photon flux on samples are expected to be 2 x 104 and 1012 photons/sec at 10 eV, 4 x 104 and 5 x 1011 photons/sec at 20 eV, and 6 x 104 and 1011 photons/sec at 40 eV, respectively. The beamline provides the high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy less than 1 meV in the whole VUV energy range.

  6. Experimental electronic structure and Fermi-surface instability of the correlated 3d sulphide BaVS3 : High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrovic, S.; Fazekas, P.; Søndergaard, C.; Ariosa, D.; Barišić, N.; Berger, H.; Cloëtta, D.; Forró, L.; Höchst, H.; Kupčić, I.; Pavuna, D.; Margaritondo, G.

    2007-04-01

    The correlated 3d sulphide BaVS3 exhibits an interesting coexistence of one-dimensional and three-dimensional properties. Our experiments determine the electronic band structure and shed light on this puzzle. High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements in a 4-eV -wide range below the Fermi energy level uncover and investigate the coexistence of a1g wide-band and eg narrow-band d electrons, which lead to the complicated electronic properties of this material. We explore the effects of strong correlations and the Fermi surface instability associated with the metal-insulator transition.

  7. High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission study of UN and USb; Dual character of 5f electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, T.; Kumigashira, H.; Souma, S.; Takahashi, T.; Suzuki, T.

    2001-05-01

    We have performed high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on UN and USb to study the electronic structure near the Fermi level ( EF) and the nature of U 5f electrons. We found that the pnictogen (N and Sb) p bands are fully occupied in contrast with Ce monopnictides and shows a good qualitative agreement with the band calculation by treating the U 5f states as bands. On the other hand, we have not observed dispersive U 5f bands near EF predicted by the band calculation, instead we found two non-dispersive bands near EF, which are assigned as the 5f 2-final-state multiplet indicative of localized U 5f states. The intensity of multiplet structure is stronger in USb than in UN. These results indicate the dual character of U 5f electrons and its difference between USb and UN.

  8. Angle resolved scatter measurement of bulk scattering in transparent ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Saurabh; Miller, J. Keith; Shori, Ramesh K.; Goorsky, Mark S.

    2015-02-01

    Bulk scattering in polycrystalline laser materials (PLM), due to non-uniform refractive index across the bulk, is regarded as the primary loss mechanism leading to degradation of laser performance with higher threshold and lower output power. The need for characterization techniques towards identifying bulk scatter and assessing the quality. Assessment of optical quality and the identification of bulk scatter have been by simple visual inspection of thin samples of PLMs, thus making the measurements highly subjective and inaccurate. Angle Resolved Scatter (ARS) measurement allows for the spatial mapping of scattered light at all possible angles about a sample, mapping the intensity for both forward scatter and back-scatter regions. The cumulative scattered light intensity, in the forward scatter direction, away from the specular beam is used for the comparison of bulk scattering between samples. This technique employ the detection of scattered light at all angles away from the specular beam directions and represented as a 2-D polar map. The high sensitivity of the ARS technique allows us to compare bulk scattering in different PLM samples which otherwise had similar transmitted beam wavefront distortions.

  9. Rapid high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with pulsed laser source and time-of-flight spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Gotlieb, K; Hussain, Z; Bostwick, A; Lanzara, A; Jozwiak, C

    2013-09-01

    A high-efficiency spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES) spectrometer is coupled with a laboratory-based laser for rapid high-resolution measurements. The spectrometer combines time-of-flight (TOF) energy measurements with low-energy exchange scattering spin polarimetry for high detection efficiencies. Samples are irradiated with fourth harmonic photons generated from a cavity-dumped Ti:sapphire laser that provides high photon flux in a narrow bandwidth, with a pulse timing structure ideally matched to the needs of the TOF spectrometer. The overall efficiency of the combined system results in near-E(F) spin-resolved ARPES measurements with an unprecedented combination of energy resolution and acquisition speed. This allows high-resolution spin measurements with a large number of data points spanning multiple dimensions of interest (energy, momentum, photon polarization, etc.) and thus enables experiments not otherwise possible. The system is demonstrated with spin-resolved energy and momentum mapping of the L-gap Au(111) surface states, a prototypical Rashba system. The successful integration of the spectrometer with the pulsed laser system demonstrates its potential for simultaneous spin- and time-resolved ARPES with pump-probe based measurements. PMID:24089838

  10. Rapid high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with pulsed laser source and time-of-flight spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotlieb, K.; Hussain, Z.; Bostwick, A.; Lanzara, A.; Jozwiak, C.

    2013-09-01

    A high-efficiency spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES) spectrometer is coupled with a laboratory-based laser for rapid high-resolution measurements. The spectrometer combines time-of-flight (TOF) energy measurements with low-energy exchange scattering spin polarimetry for high detection efficiencies. Samples are irradiated with fourth harmonic photons generated from a cavity-dumped Ti:sapphire laser that provides high photon flux in a narrow bandwidth, with a pulse timing structure ideally matched to the needs of the TOF spectrometer. The overall efficiency of the combined system results in near-EF spin-resolved ARPES measurements with an unprecedented combination of energy resolution and acquisition speed. This allows high-resolution spin measurements with a large number of data points spanning multiple dimensions of interest (energy, momentum, photon polarization, etc.) and thus enables experiments not otherwise possible. The system is demonstrated with spin-resolved energy and momentum mapping of the L-gap Au(111) surface states, a prototypical Rashba system. The successful integration of the spectrometer with the pulsed laser system demonstrates its potential for simultaneous spin- and time-resolved ARPES with pump-probe based measurements.

  11. Rapid high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with pulsed laser source and time-of-flight spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Gotlieb, K; Hussain, Z; Bostwick, A; Lanzara, A; Jozwiak, C

    2013-09-01

    A high-efficiency spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES) spectrometer is coupled with a laboratory-based laser for rapid high-resolution measurements. The spectrometer combines time-of-flight (TOF) energy measurements with low-energy exchange scattering spin polarimetry for high detection efficiencies. Samples are irradiated with fourth harmonic photons generated from a cavity-dumped Ti:sapphire laser that provides high photon flux in a narrow bandwidth, with a pulse timing structure ideally matched to the needs of the TOF spectrometer. The overall efficiency of the combined system results in near-E(F) spin-resolved ARPES measurements with an unprecedented combination of energy resolution and acquisition speed. This allows high-resolution spin measurements with a large number of data points spanning multiple dimensions of interest (energy, momentum, photon polarization, etc.) and thus enables experiments not otherwise possible. The system is demonstrated with spin-resolved energy and momentum mapping of the L-gap Au(111) surface states, a prototypical Rashba system. The successful integration of the spectrometer with the pulsed laser system demonstrates its potential for simultaneous spin- and time-resolved ARPES with pump-probe based measurements.

  12. Rapid high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with pulsed laser source and time-of-flight spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Gotlieb, K.; Hussain, Z.; Bostwick, A.; Jozwiak, C.; Lanzara, A.

    2013-09-15

    A high-efficiency spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES) spectrometer is coupled with a laboratory-based laser for rapid high-resolution measurements. The spectrometer combines time-of-flight (TOF) energy measurements with low-energy exchange scattering spin polarimetry for high detection efficiencies. Samples are irradiated with fourth harmonic photons generated from a cavity-dumped Ti:sapphire laser that provides high photon flux in a narrow bandwidth, with a pulse timing structure ideally matched to the needs of the TOF spectrometer. The overall efficiency of the combined system results in near-E{sub F} spin-resolved ARPES measurements with an unprecedented combination of energy resolution and acquisition speed. This allows high-resolution spin measurements with a large number of data points spanning multiple dimensions of interest (energy, momentum, photon polarization, etc.) and thus enables experiments not otherwise possible. The system is demonstrated with spin-resolved energy and momentum mapping of the L-gap Au(111) surface states, a prototypical Rashba system. The successful integration of the spectrometer with the pulsed laser system demonstrates its potential for simultaneous spin- and time-resolved ARPES with pump-probe based measurements.

  13. Coupling parameters of many-body interactions for the Al(100) surface state: A high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J.; Shimada, K.; Hayashi, H.; Iwasawa, H.; Aiura, Y.; Namatame, H.; Taniguchi, M.

    2011-10-01

    We examined the dimensionless coupling parameters of many-body interactions for a free-electron-like surface-derived state in Al(100) by means of high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. A kink structure was found to exist in the energy-band dispersion near the Fermi level (EF), which was attributed to the electron-phonon interaction. At 50 K, the coupling parameters of the electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions were estimated as λep=0.67±0.05 and λee˜0.003, respectively, indicating that the effective mass enhancement was mainly derived from the electron-phonon interaction. The temperature dependence of the kink structure, as measured by λep(T), was consistent with a theoretical calculation based on the Eliashberg function. A quasiparticle peak with a width of 15-20 meV was found near EF, which was explained well by the simulated spectral function incorporating the self-energy evaluated in this study. We found that the electrons at the surface were strongly scattered by the defects at the surface and that the linewidth was significantly broadened (Γ0=0.238±0.006 eV).

  14. High-resolution three-dimensional spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectrometer using vacuum ultraviolet laser light.

    PubMed

    Yaji, Koichiro; Harasawa, Ayumi; Kuroda, Kenta; Toyohisa, Sogen; Nakayama, Mitsuhiro; Ishida, Yukiaki; Fukushima, Akiko; Watanabe, Shuntaro; Chen, Chuangtian; Komori, Fumio; Shin, Shik

    2016-05-01

    We describe a spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (SARPES) apparatus with a vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) laser (hν = 6.994 eV) developed at the Laser and Synchrotron Research Center at the Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo. The spectrometer consists of a hemispherical photoelectron analyzer equipped with an electron deflector function and twin very-low-energy-electron-diffraction-type spin detectors, which allows us to analyze the spin vector of a photoelectron three-dimensionally with both high energy and angular resolutions. The combination of the high-performance spectrometer and the high-photon-flux VUV laser can achieve an energy resolution of 1.7 meV for SARPES. We demonstrate that the present laser-SARPES machine realizes a quick SARPES on the spin-split band structure of a Bi(111) film even with 7 meV energy and 0.7(∘) angular resolutions along the entrance-slit direction. This laser-SARPES machine is applicable to the investigation of spin-dependent electronic states on an energy scale of a few meV. PMID:27250396

  15. High-resolution three-dimensional spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectrometer using vacuum ultraviolet laser light.

    PubMed

    Yaji, Koichiro; Harasawa, Ayumi; Kuroda, Kenta; Toyohisa, Sogen; Nakayama, Mitsuhiro; Ishida, Yukiaki; Fukushima, Akiko; Watanabe, Shuntaro; Chen, Chuangtian; Komori, Fumio; Shin, Shik

    2016-05-01

    We describe a spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (SARPES) apparatus with a vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) laser (hν = 6.994 eV) developed at the Laser and Synchrotron Research Center at the Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo. The spectrometer consists of a hemispherical photoelectron analyzer equipped with an electron deflector function and twin very-low-energy-electron-diffraction-type spin detectors, which allows us to analyze the spin vector of a photoelectron three-dimensionally with both high energy and angular resolutions. The combination of the high-performance spectrometer and the high-photon-flux VUV laser can achieve an energy resolution of 1.7 meV for SARPES. We demonstrate that the present laser-SARPES machine realizes a quick SARPES on the spin-split band structure of a Bi(111) film even with 7 meV energy and 0.7(∘) angular resolutions along the entrance-slit direction. This laser-SARPES machine is applicable to the investigation of spin-dependent electronic states on an energy scale of a few meV.

  16. High-resolution three-dimensional spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectrometer using vacuum ultraviolet laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaji, Koichiro; Harasawa, Ayumi; Kuroda, Kenta; Toyohisa, Sogen; Nakayama, Mitsuhiro; Ishida, Yukiaki; Fukushima, Akiko; Watanabe, Shuntaro; Chen, Chuangtian; Komori, Fumio; Shin, Shik

    2016-05-01

    We describe a spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (SARPES) apparatus with a vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) laser (hν = 6.994 eV) developed at the Laser and Synchrotron Research Center at the Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo. The spectrometer consists of a hemispherical photoelectron analyzer equipped with an electron deflector function and twin very-low-energy-electron-diffraction-type spin detectors, which allows us to analyze the spin vector of a photoelectron three-dimensionally with both high energy and angular resolutions. The combination of the high-performance spectrometer and the high-photon-flux VUV laser can achieve an energy resolution of 1.7 meV for SARPES. We demonstrate that the present laser-SARPES machine realizes a quick SARPES on the spin-split band structure of a Bi(111) film even with 7 meV energy and 0.7∘ angular resolutions along the entrance-slit direction. This laser-SARPES machine is applicable to the investigation of spin-dependent electronic states on an energy scale of a few meV.

  17. High-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS at the Swiss Light Source for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    Strocov, V. N.; Schmitt, T.; Flechsig, U.; Schmidt, T.; Imhof, A.; Chen, Q.; Raabe, J.; Betemps, R.; Zimoch, D.; Krempasky, J.; Wang, X.; Grioni, M.; Piazzalunga, A.; Patthey, L.

    2010-01-01

    The concepts and technical realisation of the high-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS operating in the energy range from 300 to 1600 eV and intended for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) are described. The photon source is an undulator of novel fixed-gap design where longitudinal movement of permanent magnetic arrays controls not only the light polarization (including circular and 0–180° rotatable linear polarizations) but also the energy without changing the gap. The beamline optics is based on the well established scheme of plane-grating monochromator operating in collimated light. The ultimate resolving power E/ΔE is above 33000 at 1 keV photon energy. The choice of blazed versus lamellar gratings and optimization of their profile parameters is described. Owing to glancing angles on the mirrors as well as optimized groove densities and profiles of the gratings, the beamline is capable of delivering high photon flux up to 1 × 1013 photons s−1 (0.01% BW)−1 at 1 keV. Ellipsoidal refocusing optics used for the RIXS endstation demagnifies the vertical spot size down to 4 µm, which allows slitless operation and thus maximal transmission of the high-resolution RIXS spectrometer delivering E/ΔE > 11000 at 1 keV photon energy. Apart from the beamline optics, an overview of the control system is given, the diagnostics and software tools are described, and strategies used for the optical alignment are discussed. An introduction to the concepts and instrumental realisation of the ARPES and RIXS endstations is given. PMID:20724785

  18. Cellular organization and substructure measured using angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry.

    PubMed Central

    Wax, Adam; Yang, Changhuei; Backman, Vadim; Badizadegan, Kamran; Boone, Charles W; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S

    2002-01-01

    We measure the organization and substructure of HT29 epithelial cells in a monolayer using angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry. This new technique probes cellular structure by measuring scattered light, as in flow cytometry, but offers an advantage in that the structure can be examined in situ, avoiding the need to disrupt the cell monolayer. We determine the size distribution of the cell nuclei by fitting measured light-scattering spectra to the predictions of Mie theory. In addition, we obtain information about the cellular organization and substructure by examining the spatial correlations within the monolayer. A remarkable finding is that the spatial correlations over small length scales take the form of an inverse power law, indicating the fractal nature of the packing of the subcellular structures. We also identify spatial correlations on a scale large compared with the size of a cell, indicating an overlying order within the monolayer. PMID:11916880

  19. High Resolution PDF Measurements on Ag Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Tulio C. R.; Martin, Chris; Kycia, Stefan; Zanchet, Daniela

    2009-01-29

    The quantitative analysis of structural defects in Ag nanoparticles was addressed in this work. We performed atomic scale structural characterization by a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) using the Pair Distribution Function analysis (PDF) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The XRD measurements were performed using an innovative instrumentation setup to provide high resolution PDF patterns.

  20. The band structure of VO2 measured by angle-resolved photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreschini, Luca; Chang, Young Jun; Innocenti, Davide; Walter, Andrew L.; Kim, Young Su; Gaines, Geoffrey; Bostwick, Aaron; Denlinger, Jonathan; Rotenberg, Eli

    2011-03-01

    The origin of the 340K metal-insulator transition (MIT) in VO2 is still under debate. the main reason is that no direct experimental verifications of the electronic structure of VO2 exist up to this point. The quality of the available single crystals is not sufficient for ARPES measurements, so that photoemission is limited to angle-integrated mode. New opportunities are offered by oxide films, on which data of equal or even higher quality have been reported (Saeki et al., PRB 2009). WIth the in situ pulsed-laser-deposition (PLD) system available on beamline 7.0.1 at the Advanced Light Source we have grown VO2(001) films on a TiO2 substrate and measured the Fermi surface of the metallic phase. These results will permit a direct comparison with the existing band calculations and open the way to the study of the MIT as a function, e.g., of film thickness or electron doping with Cr. Work supported by U.S. DOE (DE-AC02-05CH11231 for ALS), the Max Planck Society, and the Swiss National Science Foundation (PBELP2-125484).

  1. Quantitative angle-resolved small-spot reflectance measurements on plasmonic perfect absorbers: impedance matching and disorder effects.

    PubMed

    Tittl, Andreas; Harats, Moshe G; Walter, Ramon; Yin, Xinghui; Schäferling, Martin; Liu, Na; Rapaport, Ronen; Giessen, Harald

    2014-10-28

    Plasmonic devices with absorbance close to unity have emerged as essential building blocks for a multitude of technological applications ranging from trace gas detection to infrared imaging. A crucial requirement for such elements is the angle independence of the absorptive performance. In this work, we develop theoretically and verify experimentally a quantitative model for the angular behavior of plasmonic perfect absorber structures based on an optical impedance matching picture. To achieve this, we utilize a simple and elegant k-space measurement technique to record quantitative angle-resolved reflectance measurements on various perfect absorber structures. Particularly, this method allows quantitative reflectance measurements on samples where only small areas have been nanostructured, for example, by electron-beam lithography. Combining these results with extensive numerical modeling, we find that matching of both the real and imaginary parts of the optical impedance is crucial to obtain perfect absorption over a large angular range. Furthermore, we successfully apply our model to the angular dispersion of perfect absorber geometries with disordered plasmonic elements as a favorable alternative to current array-based designs. PMID:25251075

  2. Development of a high-resolution soft x-ray (30--1500 eV) beamline at the Advanced Light Source and its use for the study of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, W R.A.

    1996-02-01

    ALS Bending magnet beamline 9.3.2 is for high resolution spectroscopy, with circularly polarized light. Fixed included-angle SGM uses three gratings for 30--1500 eV photons; circular polarization is produced by an aperture for selecting the beam above or below the horizontal plane. Photocurrent from upper and lower jaws of entrance slit sets a piezoelectric drive feedback loop on the vertically deflecting mirror for stable beam. End station has a movable platform. With photomeission data from Stanford, structure of c(2{times}2)P/Fe(100) was determined using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS). Multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) calculations indicate that P atoms adsorb in fourfold hollow sites 1.02A above the first Fe layer. Self-consistent-field X{alpha} scattered wave calculation confirm that the Fe{sub 1}-Fe{sub 2} space is contracted for S/Fe but not for P/Fe; comparison is made to atomic N and O on Fe(100). Final-state effects on ARPEFS curves used literature data from the S 1s and 2p core levels of c(2{times}2)S/Ni(001); a generalized Ramsauer-Townsend splitting is present in the 1s but not 2p data. An approximate method for analyzing ARPEFS data from a non-s initial state using only the higher-{ell} partial wave was tested successfully. ARPEFS data from clean surfaces were collected normal to Ni(111) (3p core levels) and 5{degree} off-normal from Cu(111)(3s, 3p). Fourier transforms (FT) resemble adsorbate systems, showing backscattering signals from atoms up to 4 layers below emitters. 3p FTs show scattering from 6 nearest neighbors in the same crystal layer as the emitters. MSSW calulation indicate that Cu 3p photoemission is mostly d-wave. FTs also indicate double-scattering and single-scattering from laterally distant atoms; calculations indicate that the signal is dominated by photoemission from the first 2 crystal layers.

  3. A Portable, High Resolution, Surface Measurement Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihlefeld, Curtis M.; Burns, Bradley M.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    A high resolution, portable, surface measurement device has been demonstrated to provide micron-resolution topographical plots. This device was specifically developed to allow in-situ measurements of defects on the Space Shuttle Orbiter windows, but is versatile enough to be used on a wide variety of surfaces. This paper discusses the choice of an optical sensor and then the decisions required to convert a lab bench optical measurement device into an ergonomic portable system. The necessary trade-offs between performance and portability are presented along with a description of the device developed to measure Orbiter window defects.

  4. High resolution wavefront measurement of aspheric optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erichsen, I.; Krey, S.; Heinisch, J.; Ruprecht, A.; Dumitrescu, E.

    2008-08-01

    With the recently emerged large volume production of miniature aspheric lenses for a wide range of applications, a new fast fully automatic high resolution wavefront measurement instrument has been developed. The Shack-Hartmann based system with reproducibility better than 0.05 waves is able to measure highly aspheric optics and allows for real time comparison with design data. Integrated advanced analysis tools such as calculation of Zernike coefficients, 2D-Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), Point Spread Function (PSF), Strehl-Ratio and the measurement of effective focal length (EFL) as well as flange focal length (FFL) allow for the direct verification of lens properties and can be used in a development as well as in a production environment.

  5. Measurement of an exceptionally weak electron-phonon coupling on the surface of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Z-H; Fedorov, A V; Gardner, D; Lee, Y S; Chu, S; Valla, T

    2012-05-01

    Gapless surface states on topological insulators are protected from elastic scattering on nonmagnetic impurities which makes them promising candidates for low-power electronic applications. However, for widespread applications, these states should have to remain coherent at ambient temperatures. Here, we studied temperature dependence of the electronic structure and the scattering rates on the surface of a model topological insulator, Bi2Se3, by high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We found an extremely weak broadening of the topological surface state with temperature and no anomalies in the state's dispersion, indicating exceptionally weak electron-phonon coupling. Our results demonstrate that the topological surface state is protected not only from elastic scattering on impurities, but also from scattering on low-energy phonons, suggesting that topological insulators could serve as a basis for room-temperature electronic devices.

  6. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2006-01-01

    The major research activities performed during the cooperative agreement enhanced our spectroscopic knowledge of molecules of atmospheric interest such as H2O (water vapor), O3 (ozone), HCN (hydrogen cyanide), CH4 (methane), NO2 (nitrogen dioxide) and CO (carbon monoxide). The data required for the analyses were obtained from two different Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS); one of which is located at the National Solar Observatory (NSO) on Kitt Peak, Arizona and the other instrument is located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) at Richland, Washington. The data were analyzed using a modified multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting algorithm developed by Dr. D. Chris Benner of the College of William and Mary. The results from these studies made significant improvements in the line positons and intensities for these molecules. The measurements of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients and the temperature dependence of pressure broadening and pressure induced shift coefficients for hundreds of infrared transitions of HCN, CO3 CH4 and H2O were also performed during this period. Results from these studies have been used for retrievals of stratospheric gas concentration profiles from data collected by several Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) infrared instruments as well as in the analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra such as those acquired by space-based, ground-based, and various balloon- and aircraft-borne experiments. Our results made significant contributions in several updates of the HITRAN (HIgh resolution TRANsmission) spectral line parameters database. This database enjoys worldwide recognition in research involving diversified scientific fields. The research conducted during the period 2003-2006 has resulted in publications given in this paper. In addition to Journal publications, several oral and poster presentations were given at various Scientific conferences within the United States

  7. Analyzing spatial correlations in tissue using angle-resolved low coherence interferometry measurements guided by co-located optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sanghoon; Heflin, Stephanie; Kresty, Laura A; Halling, Meredith; Perez, Laura N; Ho, Derek; Crose, Michael; Brown, William; Farsiu, Sina; Arshavsky, Vadim; Wax, Adam

    2016-04-01

    Angle-resolved low coherence interferometry (a/LCI) is an optical technique used to measure nuclear morphology in situ. However, a/LCI is not an imaging modality and can produce ambiguous results when the measurements are not properly oriented to the tissue architecture. Here we present a 2D a/LCI system which incorporates optical coherence tomography imaging to guide the measurements. System design and characterization are presented, along with example cases which demonstrate the utility of the combined measurements. In addition, future development and applications of this dual modality approach are discussed. PMID:27446664

  8. Analyzing spatial correlations in tissue using angle-resolved low coherence interferometry measurements guided by co-located optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sanghoon; Heflin, Stephanie; Kresty, Laura A.; Halling, Meredith; Perez, Laura N.; Ho, Derek; Crose, Michael; Brown, William; Farsiu, Sina; Arshavsky, Vadim; Wax, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Angle-resolved low coherence interferometry (a/LCI) is an optical technique used to measure nuclear morphology in situ. However, a/LCI is not an imaging modality and can produce ambiguous results when the measurements are not properly oriented to the tissue architecture. Here we present a 2D a/LCI system which incorporates optical coherence tomography imaging to guide the measurements. System design and characterization are presented, along with example cases which demonstrate the utility of the combined measurements. In addition, future development and applications of this dual modality approach are discussed. PMID:27446664

  9. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2003-01-01

    Spectroscopic parameters (such as line position, intensity, broadening and shifting coefficients and their temperature dependences, line mixing coefficients etc.) for various molecular species of atmospheric interest are determined. In order to achieve these results, infrared spectra of several molecular bands are obtained using high-resolution recording instruments such as tunable diode laser spectrometer and Fourier transform spectrometers. Using sophisticated analysis routines (Multispectrum nonlinear least squares technique) these high-resolution infrared spectra are processed to determine the various spectral line parameters that are cited above. Spectra were taken using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak, Arizona as well as the Bruker FTS at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at Richland, Washington. Most of the spectra are acquired not only at room temperature, but also at several different cold temperatures. This procedure is necessary to study the variation of the spectral line parameters as a function of temperature in order to simulate the Earth's and other planetary atmospheric environments. Depending upon the strength or weakness of the various bands recorded and analyzed, the length(s) of the absorption cells in which the gas samples under study are kept varied from a few centimeters up to several meters and the sample temperatures varied from approximately +30 C to -63 C. Research on several infrared bands of various molecular species and their isotopomers are undertaken. Those studies are briefly described.

  10. High resolution spectroscopy to support atmospheric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Mary Ann H.; Devi, V. Malathy; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Benner, D. Chris; Harvey, Gale A.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the molecular spectra of ozone and other infrared-active atmospheric species is needed for accurate calculation of atmospheric heating and cooling rates in climate models. Remote sensing experiments on the Nimbus-7 satellites and the Spacelab-3 Space Shuttle Mission have shown that space-based measurements of infrared absorption or emission can be used to accurately determine the concentrations and distributions of stratospheric species on a global scale. The objective of this research task is to improve knowledge of the spectroscopic line parameters (positions, intensities, assignments, halfwidths, and pressure-induced shifts) of key atmospheric constituents through laboratory measurements.

  11. High resolution image measurements of nuclear tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirk, E. K.; Price, P. B.

    1980-01-01

    The striking clarity and high contrast of the mouths of tracks etched in CR-39 plastic detectors allow automatic measurement of track parameters to be made with simple image-recognition equipment. Using a commercially available Vidicon camera system with a microprocessor-controlled digitizer, resolution for normally incident C-12 and N-14 ions at 32 MeV/amu equivalent to a 14sigma separation of adjacent charges was demonstrated.

  12. Terahertz magnetotransport measurements in underdoped Pr2-xCexCuO4 and comparison with angle-resolved photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, G. S.; Schmadel, D. C.; Bach, P. L.; Greene, R. L.; Béchamp-Laganière, X.; Roberge, G.; Fournier, P.; Drew, H. D.

    2009-06-01

    We present magnetotransport measurements performed on underdoped Pr2-xCexCuO4 at THz frequencies as a function of temperature and doping. A rapidly decreasing Hall mass is observed as the doping is reduced consistent with the formation of small electron Fermi pockets. However, both dc and infrared magnetotransport data strongly deviate from the predictions of transport theory within the relaxation-time approximation based on angular-resolved photoemission data. Furthermore, the Hall mass remains negative with no signature of a change in Fermi-surface topology at or above the Néel temperature and the characteristic temperature at which the optical gap fully closes. In the paramagnetic state, this behavior of the Hall mass may be qualitatively understood as arising from current vertex corrections to the Hall conductivity due to magnetic fluctuations as observed in overdoped Pr2-xCexCuO4 [G. S. Jenkins , arXiv:0901.1701 (unpublished)].

  13. Design and validation of an angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry fiber probe for in vivo clinical measurements of depth-resolved nuclear morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yizheng; Terry, Neil G.; Woosley, John T.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Wax, Adam

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel Fourier-domain angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry (a /LCI) fiber probe designed for in vivo clinical application in gastrointestinal endoscopy. The a/LCI technique measures the depth-resolved angular scattering distribution to determine the size distribution and optical density of cell nuclei for assessing the health of epithelial tissues. Clinical application is enabled by an endoscopic fiber-optic probe that employs a 2.3-m-long coherent fiber bundle and is compatible with the standard 2.8-mm-diam biopsy channel of a gastroscope. The probe allows for real-time data acquisition by collecting the scattering from multiple angles in parallel, enabled by the Fourier domain approach. The performance of the probe is characterized through measurement of critical parameters. The depth-resolved sizing capability of the system is demonstrated using single- and double-layer microsphere phantoms with subwavelength sizing precision and accuracy achieved. Initial results from a clinical feasibility test are also presented to show in vivo application in the human esophagus.

  14. Omnidirectional Measurements of Angle-Resolved Heat Capacity for Complete Detection of Superconducting Gap Structure in the Heavy-Fermion Antiferromagnet UPd_{2}Al_{3}.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yusei; Kittaka, Shunichiro; Sakakibara, Toshiro; Tsutsumi, Yasumasa; Nomoto, Takuya; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Machida, Kazushige; Homma, Yoshiya; Aoki, Dai

    2016-07-15

    Quasiparticle excitations in UPd_{2}Al_{3} were studied by means of heat-capacity (C) measurements under rotating magnetic fields using a high-quality single crystal. The field dependence shows C(H)∝H^{1/2}-like behavior at low temperatures for both two hexagonal crystal axes, i.e., H∥[0001] (c axis) and H∥[112[over ¯]0] (a axis), suggesting the presence of nodal quasiparticle excitations from heavy bands. At low temperatures, the polar-angle (θ) dependence of C exhibits a maximum along H∥[0001] with a twofold symmetric oscillation below 0.5 T, and an unusual shoulder or hump anomaly has been found around 30°-60° from the c axis in C(θ) at intermediate fields (1≲μ_{0}H≲2  T). These behaviors in UPd_{2}Al_{3} purely come from the superconducting nodal quasiparticle excitations, and can be successfully reproduced by theoretical calculations assuming the gap symmetry with a horizontal linear line node. We demonstrate the whole angle-resolved heat-capacity measurements done here as a novel spectroscopic method for nodal gap determination, which can be applied to other exotic superconductors. PMID:27472129

  15. Design and validation of an angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry fiber probe for in vivo clinical measurements of depth-resolved nuclear morphology

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yizheng; Terry, Neil G.; Woosley, John T.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Wax, Adam

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel Fourier-domain angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry (a ∕LCI) fiber probe designed for in vivo clinical application in gastrointestinal endoscopy. The a∕LCI technique measures the depth-resolved angular scattering distribution to determine the size distribution and optical density of cell nuclei for assessing the health of epithelial tissues. Clinical application is enabled by an endoscopic fiber-optic probe that employs a 2.3-m-long coherent fiber bundle and is compatible with the standard 2.8-mm-diam biopsy channel of a gastroscope. The probe allows for real-time data acquisition by collecting the scattering from multiple angles in parallel, enabled by the Fourier domain approach. The performance of the probe is characterized through measurement of critical parameters. The depth-resolved sizing capability of the system is demonstrated using single- and double-layer microsphere phantoms with subwavelength sizing precision and accuracy achieved. Initial results from a clinical feasibility test are also presented to show in vivo application in the human esophagus. PMID:21280890

  16. Note: Differential amplified high-resolution tilt angle measurement system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shijie; Li, Yan; Zhang, Enyao; Huang, Pei; Wei, Haoyun

    2014-09-01

    A high-resolution tilt angle measurement system is presented in this paper. In this system, the measurement signal is amplified by two steps: (1) amplified by operational amplifier and (2) differential amplified by two MEMS-based inclinometers. The novel application not only amplifies the signal but, more importantly, substantially reduces the electrical interference and common-mode noise among the same circuit design. Thus, both the extremely high resolution and great long-term stability are achieved in this system. Calibrated by an autocollimator, the system shows a resolution of 2 arc sec. The accuracy is better than ±1.5 arc sec. The zero-drift error is below ±1 arc sec and ±2 arc sec in the short and long term, respectively.

  17. Note: Differential amplified high-resolution tilt angle measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shijie; Li, Yan; Zhang, Enyao; Huang, Pei; Wei, Haoyun

    2014-09-01

    A high-resolution tilt angle measurement system is presented in this paper. In this system, the measurement signal is amplified by two steps: (1) amplified by operational amplifier and (2) differential amplified by two MEMS-based inclinometers. The novel application not only amplifies the signal but, more importantly, substantially reduces the electrical interference and common-mode noise among the same circuit design. Thus, both the extremely high resolution and great long-term stability are achieved in this system. Calibrated by an autocollimator, the system shows a resolution of 2 arc sec. The accuracy is better than ±1.5 arc sec. The zero-drift error is below ±1 arc sec and ±2 arc sec in the short and long term, respectively.

  18. High-Resolution Wind Measurements for Offshore Wind Energy Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, Son V.; Neumann, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical transform, called the Rosette Transform, together with a new method, called the Dense Sampling Method, have been developed. The Rosette Transform is invented to apply to both the mean part and the fluctuating part of a targeted radar signature using the Dense Sampling Method to construct the data in a high-resolution grid at 1-km posting for wind measurements over water surfaces such as oceans or lakes.

  19. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.J.

    1985-03-01

    Measurements of the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) from the S(1s) core level of a c(2 x 2)S/Ni(001) are analyzed to determine the spacing between the S overlayer and the first and second Ni layers. ARPEFS is a type of photoelectron diffraction measurement in which the photoelectron kinetic energy is swept typically from 100 to 600 eV. By using this wide range of intermediate energies we add high precision and theoretical simplification to the advantages of the photoelectron diffraction technique for determining surface structures. We report developments in the theory of photoelectron scattering in the intermediate energy range, measurement of the experimental photoemission spectra, their reduction to ARPEFS, and the surface structure determination from the ARPEFS by combined Fourier and multiple-scattering analyses. 202 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. High Resolution Measurements and Electronic Structure Calculations of a Diazanaphthalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruet, Sébastien; Goubet, Manuel; Pirali, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) have long been suspected to be the carriers of so called Unidentified Infrared Bands (UIBs). Most of the results published in the literature report rotationally unresolved spectra of pure carbon as well as heteroatom-containing PAHs species. To date for this class of molecules, the principal source of rotational informations is ruled by microwave (MW) spectroscopy while high resolution measurements reporting rotational structure of the infrared (IR) vibrational bands are very scarce. Recently, some high resolution techniques provided interesting new results to rotationally resolve the IR and far-IR bands of these large carbonated molecules of astrophysical interest. One of them is to use the bright synchrotron radiation as IR continuum source of a high resolution Fourier transform (FTIR) spectrometer. We report the very complementary analysis of the [1,6] naphthyridine (a N-bearing PAH) for which we recorded the microwave spectrum at the PhLAM laboratory (Lille) and the high resolution far-infrared spectrum on the AILES beamline at synchrotron facility SOLEIL. MW spectroscopy provided highly accurate rotational constants in the ground state to perform Ground State Combinations Differences (GSCD) allowing the analysis of the two most intense FT-FIR bands in the 50-900 wn range. Moreover, during this presentation the negative value of the inertial defect in the GS of the molecule will be discussed. A. Leger, J. L. Puget, Astron. Astrophys. 137, L5-L8 (1984) L. J. Allamandola et al. Astrophys. J. 290, L25-L28 (1985). Z. Kisiel et al. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 217, 115 (2003) S. Thorwirth et al. Astrophys. J. 662, 1309 (2007) D. McNaughton et al. J. Chem. Phys. 124, 154305 (2011). S. Albert et al. Faraday Discuss. 150, 71-99 (2011) B. E. Brumfield et al. Phys. Chem. Lett. 3, 1985-1988 (2012) O. Pirali et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 15, 10141 (2013).

  1. High-resolution Angle Measurement based on Michelson Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Fang; Fan, Kuang-Chao

    In this paper a reconfigured Michelson interferometer for high-resolution angle measurement is proposed. The anglular displacement of the object mirror will cause optical path difference that generates interference. With an optical phase shift module the photodetectors will collect quadrature signals with 90° phase shift. With pulse counting and phase subdivision processing the optical path change can be calculated and then converted to anglular displacement. The proposed structure is also featured by its miniature design. The optical system is only 55 mm by 55 mm in area. In order to facilitate the alignment of optical components and improve the signal quality, a new optical bonding technology by mechanical fixture is proposed so that the optics can be permanently pressed together without air gap in between. Experiments show that the resolution is 0.01", the accuracy is less than 0.03", and the repeatability is within 0.1" for the measurement range of ± 50 arc seconds.

  2. Wide and high resolution tension measurement using FRET in embryo.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Tsuboi, Takashi; Ishinabe, Nanako; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Michiue, Tatsuo

    2016-06-23

    During embryonic development, physical force plays an important role in morphogenesis and differentiation. Stretch sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) has the potential to provide non-invasive tension measurements inside living tissue. In this study, we introduced a FRET-based actinin tension sensor into Xenopus laevis embryos and demonstrated that this sensor captures variation of tension across differentiating ectoderm. The actinin tension sensor, containing mCherry and EGFP connected by spider silk protein, was validated in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells and embryos. It co-localized with actin filaments and changed FRET efficiencies in response to actin filament destruction, myosin deactivation, and osmotic perturbation. Time-lapse FRET analysis showed that the prospective neural ectoderm bears higher tension than the epidermal ectoderm during gastrulation and neurulation, and cells morphogenetic behavior correlated with the tension difference. These data confirmed that the sensor enables us to measure tension across tissues concurrently and with high resolution.

  3. Wide and high resolution tension measurement using FRET in embryo

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Tsuboi, Takashi; Ishinabe, Nanako; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Michiue, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    During embryonic development, physical force plays an important role in morphogenesis and differentiation. Stretch sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) has the potential to provide non-invasive tension measurements inside living tissue. In this study, we introduced a FRET-based actinin tension sensor into Xenopus laevis embryos and demonstrated that this sensor captures variation of tension across differentiating ectoderm. The actinin tension sensor, containing mCherry and EGFP connected by spider silk protein, was validated in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells and embryos. It co-localized with actin filaments and changed FRET efficiencies in response to actin filament destruction, myosin deactivation, and osmotic perturbation. Time-lapse FRET analysis showed that the prospective neural ectoderm bears higher tension than the epidermal ectoderm during gastrulation and neurulation, and cells morphogenetic behavior correlated with the tension difference. These data confirmed that the sensor enables us to measure tension across tissues concurrently and with high resolution. PMID:27335157

  4. Measuring Large-Scale Social Networks with High Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Sekara, Vedran; Sapiezynski, Piotr; Cuttone, Andrea; Madsen, Mette My; Larsen, Jakob Eg; Lehmann, Sune

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the deployment of a large-scale study designed to measure human interactions across a variety of communication channels, with high temporal resolution and spanning multiple years—the Copenhagen Networks Study. Specifically, we collect data on face-to-face interactions, telecommunication, social networks, location, and background information (personality, demographics, health, politics) for a densely connected population of 1 000 individuals, using state-of-the-art smartphones as social sensors. Here we provide an overview of the related work and describe the motivation and research agenda driving the study. Additionally, the paper details the data-types measured, and the technical infrastructure in terms of both backend and phone software, as well as an outline of the deployment procedures. We document the participant privacy procedures and their underlying principles. The paper is concluded with early results from data analysis, illustrating the importance of multi-channel high-resolution approach to data collection. PMID:24770359

  5. Wide and high resolution tension measurement using FRET in embryo.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Tsuboi, Takashi; Ishinabe, Nanako; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Michiue, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    During embryonic development, physical force plays an important role in morphogenesis and differentiation. Stretch sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) has the potential to provide non-invasive tension measurements inside living tissue. In this study, we introduced a FRET-based actinin tension sensor into Xenopus laevis embryos and demonstrated that this sensor captures variation of tension across differentiating ectoderm. The actinin tension sensor, containing mCherry and EGFP connected by spider silk protein, was validated in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells and embryos. It co-localized with actin filaments and changed FRET efficiencies in response to actin filament destruction, myosin deactivation, and osmotic perturbation. Time-lapse FRET analysis showed that the prospective neural ectoderm bears higher tension than the epidermal ectoderm during gastrulation and neurulation, and cells morphogenetic behavior correlated with the tension difference. These data confirmed that the sensor enables us to measure tension across tissues concurrently and with high resolution. PMID:27335157

  6. High resolution rainfall measurements around a high rise building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Stijn; van de Giesen, Nick; Hut, Rolf

    2010-05-01

    A number of disdrometers (acoustic rain gauge) has been placed around a high rise building on a place where variation in spatial distribution of precipitation is expected, to show the advantage of high resolution rainfall measurements in a urban area. The standard recommendation for the placement of a rain gauge is that the gauge is positioned at a distance corresponding to two to four times the height of any nearby obstruction to obtain a measurement that is representative for the surrounding area. In an urban area it is almost impossible to find a location that suits this recommendation. Rain measurements in urban area with a high spatial resolution are desired, to obtain a better understanding of urban hydrology, but costs may be prohibitive. A low cost disdrometer has been developed to make it affordable to perform rain measurements with a very high spatial and temporal resolution. The disdrometer is tested around a high rise building on the Delft University of Technology campus. The faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science (EWI) on the campus of Delft University of Technology consists of a high rise building of 90 meters and a low rise building of 15 meters. Sensors are placed on the low rise building to measure the impact of the high rise building on the spatial distribution of precipitation. In addition to the disdrometer, two other methods are used to measure precipitation differences around the high rise building. Tipping bucket rain gauges have been placed on two elevator shaft housings on the low rise building, of which one is situated in the shadow of the high rise building. Simultaneously, runoff from the elevator shafts is measured. A comparison of the different methods will be presented.

  7. High-resolution measurements of humidity and temperature with lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, Andreas; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Spaeth, Florian; Hammann, Eva; Muppa, Shravan Kumar; Metzendorf, Simon; Riede, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    3-dimensional thermodynamic fields of temperature and moisture including their turbulent fluctuations have been observed with the two scanning lidar systems of University of Hohenheim in three field campaigns in 2013 and 2014. In this contribution, we will introduce these two self-developed instruments and illustrate their performance with measurement examples. Finally, an outlook to envisioned future research activities with the new data sets of the instruments is given. Our temperature lidar is based on the rotational Raman technique. The scanning rotational Raman lidar (RRL) uses a seeded frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 355 nm. A two-mirror scanner with a 40-cm telescope collects the atmospheric backscatter signals. Humidity measurements are made with a scanning water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) which uses a titanium sapphire laser at 820 nm as transmitter. This laser is pumped with a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser and injection-seeded for switching between the online and offline wavelengths. The DIAL receiver consists of a scanning 80-cm telescope. The measured temperature and humidity profiles of both instruments have typical resolutions of only a few seconds and 100 m in the atmospheric boundary layer both in day- and night-time. Recent field experiments with the RRL and the DIAL of University of Hohenheim were (1) the HD(CP)2 Prototype Experiment (HOPE) in spring 2013 in western Germany - this activity is embedded in the project HD(CP)2 (High-definition clouds and precipitation for advancing climate prediction); (2) a measurement campaign in Hohenheim in autumn 2013; (3) the campaign SABLE (Surface Atmospheric Boundary Layer Exchange) in south-western Germany in summer 2014. The collected moisture and temperature data will serve as initial thermodynamic fields for forecast experiments related to the formation of clouds and precipitation. Due to their high resolution and high precision, the systems are capable of resolving

  8. Measurement of stratospheric HBr using high resolution far infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlotti, M.; Ade, P. A. R.; Carli, B.; Ciarpallini, P.; Cortesi, U.; Griffin, M. J.; Lepri, G.; Mencaraglia, F.; Murray, A. G.; Nolt, I. G.; Park, J. H.; Radostitz, J. V.

    Far infrared spectral features of HBr have been observed in the stratospheric emission spectrum using a balloon borne high resolution Fourier transform spectrometer equipped with a high sensitivity detector specially designed for this purpose. The value of 1.6±0.6 parts per trillion in volume for the HBr mixing ratio has been retrieved, from the global-fit analysis of 121 spectra, in the 25-36.5 km altitude range. The result is briefly compared with models and previous assessments.

  9. Angle-resolved diffraction grating biosensor based on porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Changwu; Jia, Zhenhong; Liu, Yajun; Mo, Jiaqing; Li, Peng; Lv, Xiaoyi

    2016-03-01

    In this study, an optical biosensor based on a porous silicon composite structure was fabricated using a simple method. This structure consists of a thin, porous silicon surface diffraction grating and a one-dimensional porous silicon photonic crystal. An angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum was obtained by measuring the diffraction efficiency at a range of incident angles. The angle-resolved diffraction efficiency of the 2nd and 3rd orders was studied experimentally and theoretically. The device was sensitive to the change of refractive index in the presence of a biomolecule indicated by the shift of the diffraction efficiency spectrum. The sensitivity of this sensor was investigated through use of an 8 base pair antifreeze protein DNA hybridization. The shifts of the angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum showed a relationship with the change of the refractive index, and the detection limit of the biosensor reached 41.7 nM. This optical device is highly sensitive, inexpensive, and simple to fabricate. Using shifts in diffraction efficiency spectrum to detect biological molecules has not yet been explored, so this study establishes a foundation for future work.

  10. HIGH RESOLUTION EMITTANCE MEASUREMENTS AT SNS FRONT END

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac accelerates an H- beam from 2.5MeV up to 1GeV. Recently the emittance scanner in the MEBT (2.5 MeV) was upgraded. In addition to the slit - harp measurement, we now can use a slit installed on the same actuator as the harp. In combination with a faraday cup located downstream in DTL part of the linac, it represents a classical slit-slit emittance measurement device. While a slit slit scan takes much longer, it is immune to harp related problems such as wire cross talk, and thus looks promising for accurate halo measurements. Time resolution of the new device seems to be sufficient to estimate the amount of beam in the chopper gap (the scanner is downstream of the chopper), and probably to measure its emittance. This paper describes the initial measurements with the new device and some model validation data.

  11. High-Resolution Parallax Measurements of Scorpius X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, C. F.; Fomalont, E. B.; Geldzahler, B. J.

    1999-02-01

    The results of eight VLBA observations at 5 GHz, spanning 3 yr, have yielded a measured trigonometric parallax for Sco X-1 of 0.00036"+/-0.00004" hence, its distance is 2.8+/-0.3 kpc. This is the most precise parallax measured to date. Although our measured distance is 40% farther away than previous estimates based on X-ray luminosity, our Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer observations, with a measured luminosity of 2.3×1038 ergs s-1, and determined distance continue to support the hypothesis that Z-source low-mass X-ray binary systems, like Sco X-1, radiate at the Eddington luminosity at a particular point in their X-ray color-color diagram.

  12. High resolution wind measurements for offshore wind energy development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, Son Van (Inventor); Neumann, Gregory (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method, apparatus, system, article of manufacture, and computer readable storage medium provide the ability to measure wind. Data at a first resolution (i.e., low resolution data) is collected by a satellite scatterometer. Thin slices of the data are determined. A collocation of the data slices are determined at each grid cell center to obtain ensembles of collocated data slices. Each ensemble of collocated data slices is decomposed into a mean part and a fluctuating part. The data is reconstructed at a second resolution from the mean part and a residue of the fluctuating part. A wind measurement is determined from the data at the second resolution using a wind model function. A description of the wind measurement is output.

  13. High resolution DNA content measurements of mammalian sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkel, D.; Lake, S.; Gledhill, B.L.; Van Dilla, M.A.; Stephenson, D.; Watchmaker, G.

    1982-01-01

    The high condensation and flat shape of the mammalian sperm nucleus present unique difficulties to flow cytometric measurement of DNA content. Chromatin compactness makes quantitative fluorescent staining for DNA difficult and causes a high index of refraction. The refractive index makes optical measurements sensitive to sperm head orientation. We demonstrate that the optical problems can be overcome using the commercial ICP22 epiillumination flow cytometer (Ortho Instruments, Westwood, MA) or a specially built cell orientating flow cytometer (OFCM). The design and operation of the OFCM are described. Measurements of the angular dependence of fluorescence from acriflavine stained rabbit sperm show that it is capable of orienting flat sperm with a tolerance of +-7/sup 0/. Differences in the angular dependence for the similarly shaped bull and rabbit sperm allow discrimination of these cells. We show that DNA staining with 4-6 diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) or an ethidium bromide mithramycin combination allows resolution of the X and Y populations in mouse sperm. They have also been successful with sperm from the bull, ram, rabbit, and boar. Reliable results with human sperm are not obtained. The accuracy of the staining and measurement techniques are verified by the correct determination of the relative content of these two populations in sperm from normal mice and those with the Cattanach (7 to X) translocation. Among the potential uses of these techniques are measurement of DNA content errors induced in sperm due to mutagen exposure, and assessment of the fractions of X and Y sperm in semen that may have one population artifically enriched.

  14. High resolution redox potential measurements: techniques, interpretation and value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorenhout, Michel; van der Geest, Harm G.

    2013-04-01

    The ongoing improvement of techniques for the in situ measurement of redox potentials has led to a large number of studies on redox variability in various environments. These studies originate from a wide array of scientific disciplines, amongst which ecology (sediment biogeochemistry), environmental chemistry (degradation studies) and archaeology (in situ preservation). To gain insight in the potential applications, this paper presents three examples of studies in which a newly developed measurement technique was used in soils and where spatial and temporal variation plays an important role. The first one is a microcosm study on the effects of biota on the dynamics of redox conditions in the toplayer of aquatic sediments, showing that the presence of microbiota has a direct influence on biogeochemical parameters. The second is the study of the redox potential in the world heritage site of Bryggen (Bergen, NO) that is under threat of oxidation. The oxidation, caused by a lowered groundwater table, causes soil degradation and unstable conditions for the monumental buildings of the Medieval site. The third study shows variability in a sandy flood plain in Bangladesh, where redox processes dictate the environmental behaviour of Arsenic. This toxic metal is present in many wells used for drinking water, but shows very local variation in dissolution dynamics. In these three studies, continuous measurements of (changes in) redox conditions revealed a strong variability in these systems and consequences for the interpretation of single point measurements or low frequency sampling campaigns are discussed. In these and many other cases, the continuous measurement of the redox potential in soil media will aid in the understanding of the system under study.

  15. High Resolution Viscosity Measurement by Thermal Noise Detection

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar Sandoval, Felipe; Sepúlveda, Manuel; Bellon, Ludovic; Melo, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    An interferometric method is implemented in order to accurately assess the thermal fluctuations of a micro-cantilever sensor in liquid environments. The power spectrum density (PSD) of thermal fluctuations together with Sader’s model of the cantilever allow for the indirect measurement of the liquid viscosity with good accuracy. The good quality of the deflection signal and the characteristic low noise of the instrument allow for the detection and corrections of drawbacks due to both the cantilever shape irregularities and the uncertainties on the position of the laser spot at the fluctuating end of the cantilever. Variation of viscosity below 0.03 mPa·s was detected with the alternative to achieve measurements with a volume as low as 50 μL. PMID:26540061

  16. High Resolution Viscosity Measurement by Thermal Noise Detection.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Felipe Aguilar; Sepúlveda, Manuel; Bellon, Ludovic; Melo, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    An interferometric method is implemented in order to accurately assess the thermal fluctuations of a micro-cantilever sensor in liquid environments. The power spectrum density (PSD) of thermal fluctuations together with Sader's model of the cantilever allow for the indirect measurement of the liquid viscosity with good accuracy. The good quality of the deflection signal and the characteristic low noise of the instrument allow for the detection and corrections of drawbacks due to both the cantilever shape irregularities and the uncertainties on the position of the laser spot at the fluctuating end of the cantilever. Variation of viscosity below 0:03mPa·s was detected with the alternative to achieve measurements with a volume as low as 50 µL. PMID:26540061

  17. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOEpatents

    Bonanos, P.

    1992-01-07

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity. 4 figs.

  18. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOEpatents

    Bonanos, Peter

    1992-01-01

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity.

  19. High-resolution measurement of circadian periodicities in Acetabularia.

    PubMed

    von Lindern, L; Berger, S; Mergenhagen, D

    1994-02-01

    Well-expressed endogenous circadian rhythms in Acetabularia acetabulum were spectrally analyzed and recorded in time-period distributions. The stability of the circadian periods under constant conditions and their changes could be monitored continually in step sizes close to the circadian period length. The resolution of period estimates of the circadian component was increased by a factor of approximately 4-10 by adapting analyzed interval lengths to full period sizes of the corresponding main component. Methodological aspects of the applied algorithms are discussed by means of examples that measure the temperature dependency of the circadian period.

  20. High resolution measurement of FGM thin films using picosecond ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aebi, L.; Schwank, L.; Vollmann, J.; Bryner, J.; Wenke, I.; Dual, J.

    2010-01-01

    Functionally Graded Materials (FGMs) are materials with elastic properties λ, μ and density ρ depending on spatial coordinates. When between two homogeneous materials the transition layer thickness is of the same order of magnitude as the mechanical wave length, the wave scattering behavior at the interface becomes frequency dependent. The effect is of growing importance for micro- and nanostructures since the relative size of the interface layers is generally larger than in macroscopic structures. In this work a linear material grading is achieved with physical vapor deposition by magnetron sputtering. The used materials are aluminum (Al) and tantalum (Ta) due to their strong variation in acoustic impedance (bulk force reflection coefficient 0.6) and their good intermixing properties. In the sample investigated here the material transition layer thickness amounts to 60nm. With Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) measurements and electron microscopy (SEM/TEM) the material properties of the sample are characterized. Mechanical waves in the specimen are excited and detected using a pump probe laser acoustic setup. The frequency dependent wave propagation in FGM is demonstrated by investigating the spectral response in theory and experiments. The entire experimental setup is modeled using a finite difference algorithm for better interpretation of the measurements. The frequency dependent wave propagation in FGM is analyzed to characterize the interface and finds applications in high frequency filters, semiconductor manufacturing or thermal barrier layers.

  1. Note: A new angle-resolved proton energy spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Y.; Su, L. N.; Liu, M.; Liu, B. C.; Shen, Z. W.; Fan, H. T.; Li, Y. T.; Chen, L. M.; Lu, X.; Ma, J. L.; Wang, W. M.; Wang, Z. H.; Wei, Z. Y.; Zhang, J.

    2013-09-15

    In typical laser-driven proton acceleration experiments Thomson parabola proton spectrometers are used to measure the proton spectra with very small acceptance angle in specific directions. Stacks composed of CR-39 nuclear track detectors, imaging plates, or radiochromic films are used to measure the angular distributions of the proton beams, respectively. In this paper, a new proton spectrometer, which can measure the spectra and angular distributions simultaneously, has been designed. Proton acceleration experiments performed on the Xtreme light III laser system demonstrates that the spectrometer can give angle-resolved spectra with a large acceptance angle. This will be conductive to revealing the acceleration mechanisms, optimization, and applications of laser-driven proton beams.

  2. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of atomic oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meulen, P.; Krause, M. O.; de Lange, C. A.

    1991-06-01

    Using synchrotron-radiation-based, angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, the relative partial photoionization cross sections for the production of the 4 S 0 and 2 D 0 ionic states in atomic oxygen, as well as the corresponding asymmetry parameters, are measured from threshold at 13.62 to about 30 eV. The cross sections are placed on an absolute scale using previous data obtained with an electron spectroscopy modulation method. Attention is focused on the numerous autoionization resonances below the 2p -12D0, 2p -12P0, and 2s -14Pe limits. The behavior of the asymmetry parameters across these resonances is observed for the first time. The 2s2p4(4Pe)3p(3S0,3P0,3D0) resonances are fitted by a Fano-type profile to obtain accurate values for the position, width, and q parameter.

  3. Resolution-Tunable Angle-Resolved X-ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Keiichi

    2004-05-12

    A resolution-tunable double-crystal device was successfully applied to angle-resolved x-ray imaging. The angular resolution of a Si (220) double-crystal analyzer was tuned between 0.5'' and 2.3'' through the offset angle at {lambda} = 0.0733nm. The throughput of the analyzer was higher than 90%. The angle-resolved images of a spider were recorded on nuclear emulsion plates at various angular resolutions. It was clearly observed that the quality of the angle-resolved image varies with the angular resolution of the analyzer.

  4. [Measurement of OH radicals in flame with high resolution differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Liu, Wen-Qing; Kan, Rui-Feng; Si, Fu-Qi; Xu, Zhen-Yu; Hu, Ren-Zhi; Xie, Pin-Hua

    2011-10-01

    The present paper describes a new developed high resolution differential optical absorption spectroscopy instrument used for the measurement of OH radicals in flame. The instrument consists of a Xenon lamp for light source; a double pass high resolution echelle spectrometer with a resolution of 3.3 pm; a multiple-reflection cell of 20 meter base length, in which the light reflects in the cell for 176 times, so the whole path length of light can achieve 3 520 meters. The OH radicals'6 absorption lines around 308 nm were simultaneously observed in the experiment. By using high resolution DOAS technology, the OH radicals in candles, kerosene lamp, and alcohol burner flames were monitored, and their concentrations were also inverted. PMID:22250529

  5. Highly Angle-Resolved X-Ray Photoelectron Diffraction from Solid Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, K.; Shiraki, S.; Ishii, H.; Owari, M.; Nihei, Y.

    We have carried out the highly angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPED) measurements by using the input-lens system for restriction of the detection angle. In the input-lens system, high angular resolution and high throughput are accomplished by placing an aperture not on the image plane but on the diffraction plane of electron optics. The aperture sizes (ϕ 4 mm, ϕ 2 mm, ϕ 0.5 mm, ϕ 0.25 mm) correspond to the angular resolutions (± 0.6°, ± 0.3°, ± 0.08°, ± 0.04°) respectively. Highly angle-resolved Ge3d XPED patterns from Ge(111) obtained by the angle-resolving system contain fine structure such as Kikuchi patterns. The fine structure was reproduced by multiple scattering cluster calculations.

  6. Performance of high-resolution X-band radar for rainfall measurement in The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Beek, C. Z.; Leijnse, H.; Stricker, J. N. M.; Uijlenhoet, R.; Russchenberg, H. W. J.

    2009-09-01

    This study presents an analysis of 195 rainfall events gathered with the X-band weather radar SOLIDAR and a tipping bucket rain gauge network near Delft, The Netherlands, between May 1993 and April 1994. The high spatial (120 m) and temporal (16 s) resolution of the radar combined with the extent of the database make this study a climatological analysis of the potential for high-resolution rainfall measurement with non-polarimetric X-band radar over completely flat terrain. An appropriate radar reflectivity - rain rate relation is derived from measurements of raindrop size distributions and compared with radar - rain gauge data. The radar calibration is assessed using a long-term comparison of rain gauge measurements with corresponding radar reflectivities as well as by analyzing the evolution of the stability of ground clutter areas over time. Three different methods for ground clutter correction as well as the effectiveness of forward and backward attenuation correction algorithms have been studied. Five individual rainfall events are discussed in detail to illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of high-resolution X-band radar and the effectiveness of the presented correction methods. X-band radar is found to be able to measure the space-time variation of rainfall at high resolution, far greater than can be achieved by rain gauge networks or a typical operational C-band weather radar. On the other hand, SOLIDAR can suffer from receiver saturation, wet radome attenuation as well as signal loss along the path. During very strong convective situations the signal can even be lost completely. In combination with several rain gauges for quality control, high resolution X-band radar is considered to be suitable for rainfall monitoring over relatively small (urban) catchments. These results offer great prospects for the new high resolution polarimetric doppler X-band radar IDRA.

  7. Performance of high-resolution X-band radar for rainfall measurement in The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Beek, C. Z.; Leijnse, H.; Stricker, J. N. M.; Uijlenhoet, R.; Russchenberg, H. W. J.

    2010-02-01

    This study presents an analysis of 195 rainfall events gathered with the X-band weather radar SOLIDAR and a tipping bucket rain gauge network near Delft, The Netherlands, between May 1993 and April 1994. The aim of this paper is to present a thorough analysis of a climatological dataset using a high spatial (120 m) and temporal (16 s) resolution X-band radar. This makes it a study of the potential for high-resolution rainfall measurements with non-polarimetric X-band radar over flat terrain. An appropriate radar reflectivity - rain rate relation is derived from measurements of raindrop size distributions and compared with radar - rain gauge data. The radar calibration is assessed using a long-term comparison of rain gauge measurements with corresponding radar reflectivities as well as by analyzing the evolution of the stability of ground clutter areas over time. Three different methods for ground clutter correction as well as the effectiveness of forward and backward attenuation correction algorithms have been studied. Five individual rainfall events are discussed in detail to illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of high-resolution X-band radar and the effectiveness of the presented correction methods. X-band radar is found to be able to measure the space-time variation of rainfall at high resolution, far greater than what can be achieved by rain gauge networks or a typical operational C-band weather radar. On the other hand, SOLIDAR can suffer from receiver saturation, wet radome attenuation as well as signal loss along the path. During very strong convective situations the signal can even be lost completely. In combination with several rain gauges for quality control, high resolution X-band radar is considered to be suitable for rainfall monitoring over relatively small (urban) catchments. These results offer great prospects for the new high resolution polarimetric doppler X-band radar IDRA.

  8. Performance of high-resolution X-band radar for rainfall measurement in The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Beek, C. Z.; Leijnse, H.; Stricker, J. N. M.; Uijlenhoet, R.; Russchenberg, H. W. J.

    2010-05-01

    This study presents an analysis of 195 rainfall events gathered with the X-band weather radar SOLIDAR and a tipping bucket rain gauge network near Delft, The Netherlands, between May 1993 and April 1994. The aim of this paper is to present a thorough analysis of a climatological dataset using a high spatial (120 m) and temporal (16 s) resolution X-band radar. This makes it a study of the potential for high-resolution rainfall measurements with non-polarimetric X-band radar over flat terrain. An appropriate radar reflectivity - rain rate relation is derived from measurements of raindrop size distributions and compared with radar - rain gauge data. The radar calibration is assessed using a long-term comparison of rain gauge measurements with corresponding radar reflectivities as well as by analyzing the evolution of the stability of ground clutter areas over time. Three different methods for ground clutter correction as well as the effectiveness of forward and backward attenuation correction algorithms have been studied. Five individual rainfall events are discussed in detail to illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of high-resolution X-band radar and the effectiveness of the presented correction methods. X-band radar is found to be able to measure the space-time variation of rainfall at high resolution, far greater than what can be achieved by rain gauge networks or a typical operational C-band weather radar. On the other hand, SOLIDAR can suffer from receiver saturation, wet radome attenuation as well as signal loss along the path. During very strong convective situations the signal can even be lost completely. In combination with several rain gauges for quality control, high resolution X-band radar is considered to be suitable for rainfall monitoring over relatively small (urban) catchments. These results offer great prospects for the new high resolution polarimetric doppler X-band radar IDRA.

  9. High-resolution setup for measuring wavelength sensitivity of photoyellowing of translucent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaskuri, Anna; Kärhä, Petri; Heikkilä, Anu; Ikonen, Erkki

    2015-10-01

    Polystyrene and many other materials turn yellow when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. All photodegradation mechanisms including photoyellowing are functions of the exposure wavelength, which can be described with an action spectrum. In this work, a new high-resolution transmittance measurement setup based on lasers has been developed for measuring color changes, such as the photoyellowing of translucent materials aged with a spectrograph. The measurement setup includes 14 power-stabilized laser lines between 325 nm and 933 nm wavelengths, of which one at a time is directed on to the aged sample. The power transmitted through the sample is measured with a silicon detector utilizing an integrating sphere. The sample is mounted on a high-resolution XY translation stage. Measurement at various locations aged with different wavelengths of exposure radiation gives the transmittance data required for acquiring the action spectrum. The combination of a UV spectrograph and the new high-resolution transmittance measurement setup enables a novel method for studying the UV-induced ageing of translucent materials with a spectral resolution of 3-8 nm, limited by the adjustable spectral bandwidth range of the spectrograph. These achievements form a significant improvement over earlier methods.

  10. High-resolution setup for measuring wavelength sensitivity of photoyellowing of translucent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vaskuri, Anna Kärhä, Petri; Heikkilä, Anu

    2015-10-15

    Polystyrene and many other materials turn yellow when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. All photodegradation mechanisms including photoyellowing are functions of the exposure wavelength, which can be described with an action spectrum. In this work, a new high-resolution transmittance measurement setup based on lasers has been developed for measuring color changes, such as the photoyellowing of translucent materials aged with a spectrograph. The measurement setup includes 14 power-stabilized laser lines between 325 nm and 933 nm wavelengths, of which one at a time is directed on to the aged sample. The power transmitted through the sample is measured with a silicon detector utilizing an integrating sphere. The sample is mounted on a high-resolution XY translation stage. Measurement at various locations aged with different wavelengths of exposure radiation gives the transmittance data required for acquiring the action spectrum. The combination of a UV spectrograph and the new high-resolution transmittance measurement setup enables a novel method for studying the UV-induced ageing of translucent materials with a spectral resolution of 3–8 nm, limited by the adjustable spectral bandwidth range of the spectrograph. These achievements form a significant improvement over earlier methods.

  11. High-resolution absorption measurements of NH3 at high temperatures: 500-2100 cm-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Emma J.; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Clausen, Sønnik; Fateev, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution absorption spectra of NH3 in the region 500-2100 cm-1 at temperatures up to 1027 °C and approximately atmospheric pressure (1013±20 mbar) are measured. NH3 concentrations of 1000 ppm, 0.5% and 1% in volume fraction were used in the measurements. Spectra are recorded in high temperature gas flow cells using a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer at a nominal resolution of 0.09 cm-1. Measurements at 22.7 °C are compared to high-resolution cross sections available from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The higher temperature spectra are analysed by comparison to a variational line list, BYTe, and experimental energy levels determined using the MARVEL procedure. Approximately 2000 lines have been assigned, of which 851 are newly assigned to mainly hot bands involving vibrational states as high as v2=5.

  12. Experimental measurement of human head motion for high-resolution computed tomography system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Chen, Zhiqiang; Jin, Xin; Yu, Hengyong; Wang, Ge

    2010-06-01

    Human head motion has been experimentally measured for high-resolution computed tomography (CT) design using a Canon digital camera. Our goal is to identify the minimal movements of the human head under ideal conditions without rigid fixation. In our experiments, all the 19 healthy volunteers were lying down with strict self-control. All of them were asked to be calm without pressures. Our results showed that the mean absolute value of the measured translation excursion was about 0.35 mm, which was much less than the measurements on real patients. Furthermore, the head motions in different directions were correlated. These results are useful for the design of the new instant CT system for in vivo high-resolution imaging (about 40 μm).

  13. High-resolution compact shear stress sensor for direct measurement of skin friction in fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Muchen; Kim, Chang-Jin ``Cj''

    2015-11-01

    The high-resolution measurement of skin friction in complex flows has long been of great interest but also a challenge in fluid mechanics. Compared with indirect measurement methods (e.g., laser Doppler velocimetry), direct measurement methods (e.g., floating element) do not involve any analogy and assumption but tend to suffer from instrumentation challenges, such as low sensing resolution or misalignments. Recently, silicon micromachined floating plates showed good resolution and perfect alignment but were too small for general purposes and too fragile to attach other surface samples repeatedly. In this work, we report a skin friction sensor consisting of a monolithic floating plate and a high-resolution optical encoder to measure its displacement. The key for the high resolution is in the suspension beams, which are very narrow (e.g., 0.25 mm) to sense small frictions along the flow direction but thick (e.g., 5 mm) to be robust along all other directions. This compact, low profile, and complete sensor is easy to use and allows repeated attachment and detachment of surface samples. The sheer-stress sensor has been tested in water tunnel and towing tank at different flow conditions, showing high sensing resolution for skin friction measurement. Supported by National Science Foundation (NSF) (No. 1336966) and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) (No. HR0011-15-2-0021).

  14. Comparative Analysis of two Methods for High-Resolution Differential Conductance Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusick, David; Naito, Michio; Ramos, Roberto

    We compare two methods of differential conductance measurement. The first is a traditional method in which current and voltage data is acquired via four-wire measurement, then averaged and differentiated numerically. The second method calculates dI / dV in real time by superimposing a small DC signal dI on the input step function, alternating between addition and subtraction of the signal with each step, then averaging the small signal voltage response over three steps to obtain dV . This requires two instruments: a DC current source and a high-resolution voltmeter. Keithley Instruments has commercially promoted the Keithley 622x current source and 2182A nanovoltmeter as means to achieve this measurement; we therefore refer to it as the Keithley method. We compare the two methods by performing high-resolution measurements of the energy gap of MgB2 thin film Josephson junctions. We show that the Keithley method has advantages of cleaner data, easier implementation, and overall faster data collection, but may lack the traditional method's high resolution. R.C.R. acknowledges support from National Science Foundation Grant # DMR-1555775.

  15. High resolution frequency to time domain transformations applied to the stepped carrier MRIS measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardalan, Sasan H.

    1992-01-01

    Two narrow-band radar systems are developed for high resolution target range estimation in inhomogeneous media. They are reformulations of two presently existing systems such that high resolution target range estimates may be achieved despite the use of narrow bandwidth radar pulses. A double sideband suppressed carrier radar technique originally derived in 1962, and later abandoned due to its inability to accurately measure target range in the presence of an interfering reflection, is rederived to incorporate the presence of an interfering reflection. The new derivation shows that the interfering reflection causes a period perturbation in the measured phase response. A high resolution spectral estimation technique is used to extract the period of this perturbation leading to accurate target range estimates independent of the signal-to-interference ratio. A non-linear optimal signal processing algorithm is derived for a frequency-stepped continuous wave radar system. The resolution enhancement offered by optimal signal processing of the data over the conventional Fourier Transform technique is clearly demonstrated using measured radar data. A method for modeling plane wave propagation in inhomogeneous media based on transmission line theory is derived and studied. Several simulation results including measurement of non-uniform electron plasma densities that develop near the heat tiles of a space re-entry vehicle are presented which verify the validity of the model.

  16. High-Resolution UV Holography Lens for Particle Size Distribution Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Morris Kaufman; Capelle, Gene; Grover, Mike; Sorenson, Dan; Pazuchanics, Pete

    2010-01-01

    A high-resolution UV holography relay lens, shown in Figure 1, has been developed for measuring particle size distributions down to 0.5 μm in a 12-mm-diameter by 5-mm-thick volume. This work has been selected by an independent judging panel and editors of R&D Magazine as a recipient of a 2009 R&D 100 Award. This award recognizes the 100 most technologically significant products introduced during the past year.

  17. Applications of High Resolution Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy for Atmospheric and Environmental Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roscioli, Joseph R.; McManus, J. Barry; Nelson, David; Zahniser, Mark; Herndon, Scott C.; Shorter, Joanne; Yacovitch, Tara I.; Jervis, Dylan; Dyroff, Christoph; Kolb, Charles E.

    2016-06-01

    For the past 20 years, high resolution infrared spectroscopy has served as a valuable tool to measure gas-phase concentrations of ambient gas samples. We review recent advances in atmospheric sampling using direct absorption high resolution mid-infrared spectroscopy from the perspective of light sources, detectors, and optical designs. Developments in diode, quantum cascade and interband cascade laser technology have led to thermoelectrically-cooled single-mode laser sources capable of operation between 800 wn and 3100 wn, with <10 MHz resolution and >10 mW power. Advances in detector and preamplifier technology have yielded thermoelectriocally-cooled sensors capable of room-temperature operation with extremely high detectivities. Finally, novel spectrometer optical designs have led to robust multipass absorption cells capable of >400 m effective pathlength in a compact package. In combination with accurate spectroscopic databases, these developments have afforded dramatic improvements in measurement sensitivity, accuracy, precision, and selectivity. We will present several examples of the applications of high resolution mid-IR spectrometers in real-world field measurements at sampling towers and aboard mobile platforms such as vehicles and airplanes.

  18. A sensitive, high resolution magic angle turning experiment for measuring chemical shift tensor principal values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderman, D. W.

    1998-12-01

    A sensitive, high-resolution 'FIREMAT' two-dimensional (2D) magic-angle-turning experiment is described that measures chemical shift tensor principal values in powdered solids. The spectra display spinning-sideband patterns separated by their isotropic shifts. The new method's sensitivity and high resolution in the isotropic-shift dimension result from combining the 5pi magic-angle-turning pulse sequence, an extension of the pseudo-2D sideband-suppression data rearrangement, and the TIGER protocol for processing 2D data. TPPM decoupling is used to enhance resolution. The method requires precise synchronization of the pulses and sampling to the rotor position. It is shown that the technique obtains 35 natural-abundance 13C tensors from erythromycin in 19 hours, and high quality naturalabundance 15N tensors from eight sites in potassium penicillin V in three days on a 400MHz spectrometer.

  19. Indoor and outdoor in situ high-resolution gamma radiation measurements in urban areas of Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Svoukis, E; Tsertos, H

    2007-01-01

    In situ, high-resolution, gamma-ray spectrometry of a total number of 70 outdoor and 20 indoor representative measurements were performed in preselected, common locations of the main urban areas of Cyprus. Specific activities and gamma absorbed dose rates in air due to the naturally occurring radionuclides of (232)Th and (238)U series, and (40)K are determined and discussed. Effective dose rate to the Cyprus population due to terrestrial gamma radiation is derived directly from this work. The results obtained outdoors match very well with those derived previously by high-resolution gamma spectrometry of soil samples, which were collected from the main island bedrock surface. This implies that the construction and building materials in urban areas do not affect the external gamma dose rate; thus they are mostly of local origin. Finally, the indoor/outdoor gamma dose ratio was found to be 1.4 +/- 0.5. PMID:17065195

  20. High resolution magnetostriction measurements in pulsed magnetic fields using fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daou, Ramzy; Weickert, Franziska; Nicklas, Michael; Steglich, Frank; Haase, Ariane; Doerr, Mathias

    2010-03-01

    We report on a new high resolution apparatus for measuring magnetostriction suitable for use at cryogenic temperatures in pulsed high magnetic fields which we have developed at the Hochfeld-Magnetlabor Dresden. Optical fiber strain gauges based on fiber Bragg gratings are used to measure the strain in small (˜1 mm) samples. We describe the implementation of a fast measurement system capable of resolving strains in the order of 10-7 with a full bandwidth of 47 kHz, and demonstrate its use on single crystal samples of GdSb and GdSi.

  1. High-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements of SiGe/Si structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan-Sweet, J.L.; Mooney, P.M.; Stephenson, G.B.

    1995-09-01

    High-resolution x-ray diffraction is an excellent probe of strain relaxation in complex SiGe structures. The high flux provided by synchrotron sources enables one to make extensive reciprocal space map measurements and evaluate many samples. The diffraction peak positions of each layer in a step-graded structure, measured for two different reflections, yield quantitative values for the relaxation and alloy composition in the layer. Grazing-incidence diffraction allows one to determine the in-plane structure of very thin layers, which have thickness-broadened peaks at conventional diffraction geometries. They demonstrate the power of these techniques with two examples.

  2. High-Resolution Group Quantization Phase Processing Method in Radio Frequency Measurement Range.

    PubMed

    Du, Baoqing; Feng, Dazheng; Tang, Yaohua; Geng, Xin; Zhang, Duo; Cai, Chaofeng; Wan, Maoquan; Yang, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Aiming at the more complex frequency translation, the longer response time and the limited measurement precision in the traditional phase processing, a high-resolution phase processing method by group quantization higher than 100 fs level is proposed in radio frequency measurement range. First, the phase quantization is used as a step value to quantize every phase difference in a group by using the fixed phase relationships between different frequencies signals. The group quantization is formed by the results of the quantized phase difference. In the light of frequency drift mainly caused by phase noise of measurement device, a regular phase shift of the group quantization is produced, which results in the phase coincidence of two comparing signals which obtain high-resolution measurement. Second, in order to achieve the best coincidences pulse, a subtle delay is initiatively used to reduce the width of the coincidences fuzzy area according to the transmission characteristics of the coincidences in the specific medium. Third, a series of feature coincidences pulses of fuzzy area can be captured by logic gate to achieve the best phase coincidences information for the improvement of the measurement precision. The method provides a novel way to precise time and frequency measurement. PMID:27388587

  3. High-Resolution Group Quantization Phase Processing Method in Radio Frequency Measurement Range

    PubMed Central

    Du, Baoqing; Feng, Dazheng; Tang, Yaohua; Geng, Xin; Zhang, Duo; Cai, Chaofeng; Wan, Maoquan; Yang, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Aiming at the more complex frequency translation, the longer response time and the limited measurement precision in the traditional phase processing, a high-resolution phase processing method by group quantization higher than 100 fs level is proposed in radio frequency measurement range. First, the phase quantization is used as a step value to quantize every phase difference in a group by using the fixed phase relationships between different frequencies signals. The group quantization is formed by the results of the quantized phase difference. In the light of frequency drift mainly caused by phase noise of measurement device, a regular phase shift of the group quantization is produced, which results in the phase coincidence of two comparing signals which obtain high-resolution measurement. Second, in order to achieve the best coincidences pulse, a subtle delay is initiatively used to reduce the width of the coincidences fuzzy area according to the transmission characteristics of the coincidences in the specific medium. Third, a series of feature coincidences pulses of fuzzy area can be captured by logic gate to achieve the best phase coincidences information for the improvement of the measurement precision. The method provides a novel way to precise time and frequency measurement. PMID:27388587

  4. High-Resolution Group Quantization Phase Processing Method in Radio Frequency Measurement Range.

    PubMed

    Du, Baoqing; Feng, Dazheng; Tang, Yaohua; Geng, Xin; Zhang, Duo; Cai, Chaofeng; Wan, Maoquan; Yang, Zhigang

    2016-07-08

    Aiming at the more complex frequency translation, the longer response time and the limited measurement precision in the traditional phase processing, a high-resolution phase processing method by group quantization higher than 100 fs level is proposed in radio frequency measurement range. First, the phase quantization is used as a step value to quantize every phase difference in a group by using the fixed phase relationships between different frequencies signals. The group quantization is formed by the results of the quantized phase difference. In the light of frequency drift mainly caused by phase noise of measurement device, a regular phase shift of the group quantization is produced, which results in the phase coincidence of two comparing signals which obtain high-resolution measurement. Second, in order to achieve the best coincidences pulse, a subtle delay is initiatively used to reduce the width of the coincidences fuzzy area according to the transmission characteristics of the coincidences in the specific medium. Third, a series of feature coincidences pulses of fuzzy area can be captured by logic gate to achieve the best phase coincidences information for the improvement of the measurement precision. The method provides a novel way to precise time and frequency measurement.

  5. High-Resolution Group Quantization Phase Processing Method in Radio Frequency Measurement Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Baoqing; Feng, Dazheng; Tang, Yaohua; Geng, Xin; Zhang, Duo; Cai, Chaofeng; Wan, Maoquan; Yang, Zhigang

    2016-07-01

    Aiming at the more complex frequency translation, the longer response time and the limited measurement precision in the traditional phase processing, a high-resolution phase processing method by group quantization higher than 100 fs level is proposed in radio frequency measurement range. First, the phase quantization is used as a step value to quantize every phase difference in a group by using the fixed phase relationships between different frequencies signals. The group quantization is formed by the results of the quantized phase difference. In the light of frequency drift mainly caused by phase noise of measurement device, a regular phase shift of the group quantization is produced, which results in the phase coincidence of two comparing signals which obtain high-resolution measurement. Second, in order to achieve the best coincidences pulse, a subtle delay is initiatively used to reduce the width of the coincidences fuzzy area according to the transmission characteristics of the coincidences in the specific medium. Third, a series of feature coincidences pulses of fuzzy area can be captured by logic gate to achieve the best phase coincidences information for the improvement of the measurement precision. The method provides a novel way to precise time and frequency measurement.

  6. A model-based approach for the calibration and traceability of the angle resolved scattering light sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seewig, Jörg; Eifler, Matthias; Schneider, Frank; Kirsch, Benjamin; Aurich, Jan C.

    2016-06-01

    Within the field of geometric product specification there is a growing need for the application of inline measurement systems. The use of inline measurement requires robust and fast measurement principles. A very robust optical measurement principle is the angle resolved scattering light (ARS) sensor. The ARS sensor provides high precision and high resolution measurement data of technical surfaces because the surface angles are measured as an intensity distribution on a detector instead of measuring a series of discrete height values. However, until now, there were no specific measurement standards for the calibration of the ARS sensor and no traceability was ensured. In this paper, new strategies for the calibration of an ARS sensor are proposed. A new mathematical model for the ARS sensor is introduced. Based on this, two new measurement standards for the calibration of the sensor parameters are derived. These standards are designed with a model-based approach and can calibrate sensor-specific properties of the ARS sensor. The manufacturing of the standards is described and measurement results are provided.

  7. High resolution at low beam energy in the SEM: resolution measurement of a monochromated SEM.

    PubMed

    Michael, Joseph R

    2011-01-01

    The resolution of secondary electron low beam energy imaging of a scanning electron microscope equipped with a monochromator is quantitatively measured using the contrast transfer function (CTF) method. High-resolution images, with sub-nm resolutions, were produced using low beam energies. The use of a monochromator is shown to quantitatively improve the resolution of the SEM at low beam energies by limiting the chromatic aberration contribution to the electron probe size as demonstrated with calculations and images of suitable samples. Secondary electron image resolution at low beam energies is ultimately limited by noise in the images as shown by the CTFs.

  8. Technical note: quantitative measures of iris color using high resolution photographs.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Melissa; Gozdzik, Agnes; Ross, Kendra; Miles, Jon; Parra, Esteban J

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the genetic architecture of iris color is still limited. This is partly related to difficulties associated with obtaining quantitative measurements of eye color. Here we introduce a new automated method for measuring iris color using high resolution photographs. This method extracts color measurements in the CIE 1976 L*a*b* (CIELAB) color space from a 256 by 256 pixel square sampled from the 9:00 meridian of the iris. Color is defined across three dimensions: L* (the lightness coordinate), a* (the red-green coordinate), and b* (the blue-yellow coordinate). We applied this method to a sample of individuals of diverse ancestry (East Asian, European and South Asian) that was genotyped for the HERC2 rs12913832 polymorphism, which is strongly associated with blue eye color. We identified substantial variation in the CIELAB color space, not only in the European sample, but also in the East Asian and South Asian samples. As expected, rs12913832 was significantly associated with quantitative iris color measurements in subjects of European ancestry. However, this SNP was also strongly associated with iris color in the South Asian sample, although there were no participants with blue irides in this sample. The usefulness of this method is not restricted only to the study of iris pigmentation. High-resolution pictures of the iris will also make it possible to study the genetic variation involved in iris textural patterns, which show substantial heritability in human populations.

  9. A digitally configurable measurement platform using audio cards for high-resolution electronic transport studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopman, D. B.; Bedau, D.; Kent, A. D.

    2012-05-01

    We report on a software-defined digitally configurable measurement platform for determining electronic transport properties in nanostructures with small readout signals. By using a high-resolution audio analog-to-digital/digital-to-analog converter in a digitally compensated bridge configuration we significantly increase the measurement speed compared to established techniques and simultaneously acquire large and small signal characteristics. We characterize the performance (16 bit resolution, 100 dB dynamic range at 192 kS/s) and demonstrate the application of this measurement platform for studying the transport properties of spin-valve nanopillars, a two-terminal device that exhibits giant magnetoresistance and whose resistance can be switched between two levels by applied magnetic fields and by currents applied by the audio card. The high resolution and fast sampling capability permits rapid acquisition of deep statistics on the switching of a spin-valve nanopillar and reduces the time to acquire the basic properties of the device - a state-diagram showing the magnetic configurations as function of applied current and magnetic field - by orders of magnitude.

  10. High-resolution measurement of absolute {alpha}-decay widths in {sup 16}O

    SciTech Connect

    Wheldon, C.; Ashwood, N. I.; Barr, M.; Curtis, N.; Freer, M.; Kokalova, Tz.; Malcolm, J. D.; Spencer, S. J.; Ziman, V. A.; Faestermann, Th.; Kruecken, R.; Wirth, H.-F.; Hertenberger, R.; Lutter, R.; Bergmaier, A.

    2011-06-15

    By using a large-acceptance position-sensitive silicon detector array in coincidence with the high-resolution Munich Q3D spectrograph, unambiguous measurements have been made of the absolute {alpha}-particle decay widths from excited states in {sup 16}O* in the energy range 13.85 to 15.87 MeV. Carbon targets have been bombarded with 42-MeV {sup 6}Li beams to induce {sub 6}{sup 12}C({sub 3}{sup 6}Li, d){sub 8}{sup 16}O* reactions. The deuteron ejectiles were measured in the Q3D and the results gated by {sup 4}He+{sup 12}C breakup products detected in the silicon array, the efficiency of which was modeled using Monte Carlo simulations. By comparing total population and breakup-gated spectra, the following absolute {alpha}-decay widths have been measured with high resolution: {Gamma}{sub {alpha}}0/{Gamma}{sub tot} = 0.87{+-}0.11 (13.980 MeV), 1.04{+-}0.15 (14.302 MeV), 0.92{+-}0.10 (14.399 MeV), 0.59{+-}0.04 (14.815 MeV), 0.88{+-}0.18 (15.785 MeV), and {Gamma}{sub {alpha}}1/{Gamma}{sub tot}=1.14{+-}0.08 (14.660 MeV), 0.46{+-}0.06 (14.815 MeV).

  11. A high-resolution beam profile measuring system for high-current ion implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujishita, N.; Noguchi, K.; Sasaki, S.; Yamamoto, H.

    1991-04-01

    A high-resolution beam profile measuring system (BPM) has been developed to analyze the correlation between charging damage and the ion beam profile for high-current ion implanters. With the increase of the ion beam current, insulators such as thin oxide layers of VLSI devices are subject to charging damage during ion implantation. To obtain accurate information on the local current density of the ion beam, 125 Faraday cups are placed in the BPM. This system has two measuring modes. One is a topographic mode that can detect the ion beam current density of 12500 sampling points in 30 s. A high-resolution contour map of the current density distribution is displayed on a CRT. The other is a real-time mode in which the current density distribution (125 sampling points) of the ion beam can be monitored every half second on the CRT. In this mode, fine adjustment of the ion beam profile is easily possible by visual control. The charging damage of insulating layers in the TEG (test element group) to the beam profile was investigated using this newly developed BPM. It has been proven that the damage probability increases rapidly above some threshold level of the beam current density. It is confirmed that for high-current implantation a uniform current density distribution of the ion beam is very effective to prevent charging damage. It is concluded that this measuring system is valuable not only for quick analysis of damage phenomena, but also for evaluating machine performance.

  12. A digitally configurable measurement platform using audio cards for high-resolution electronic transport studies.

    PubMed

    Gopman, D B; Bedau, D; Kent, A D

    2012-05-01

    We report on a software-defined digitally configurable measurement platform for determining electronic transport properties in nanostructures with small readout signals. By using a high-resolution audio analog-to-digital/digital-to-analog converter in a digitally compensated bridge configuration we significantly increase the measurement speed compared to established techniques and simultaneously acquire large and small signal characteristics. We characterize the performance (16 bit resolution, 100 dB dynamic range at 192 kS/s) and demonstrate the application of this measurement platform for studying the transport properties of spin-valve nanopillars, a two-terminal device that exhibits giant magnetoresistance and whose resistance can be switched between two levels by applied magnetic fields and by currents applied by the audio card. The high resolution and fast sampling capability permits rapid acquisition of deep statistics on the switching of a spin-valve nanopillar and reduces the time to acquire the basic properties of the device - a state-diagram showing the magnetic configurations as function of applied current and magnetic field - by orders of magnitude. PMID:22667635

  13. High-resolution laboratory measurements of coronal lines in the 198-218 å region

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, Peter; Träbert, Elmar; Lepson, Jaan K.; Brickhouse, Nancy S.; Golub, Leon

    2014-06-10

    We present high-resolution laboratory measurements of the emission from various ions of C, N, O, F, Ne, S, Ar, Fe, and Ni in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength band centered around the λ211 Fe XIV channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. While all of the strong iron lines in this region are well known, we note many weaker lines of iron that are not yet identified. The high resolution of our measurements also allows us to resolve several lines in Fe XI, Fe XII, and Fe XIII between 200 and 205 Å, whose identities were in question based on a disagreement between different databases. The spectra of the elements other than iron are much less known, and we find a multitude of lines that are not yet in the databases. For example, the CHIANTI database clearly disagrees with the NIST data listings on several of the argon lines we observe and also it contains only about half of the observed sulfur lines.

  14. Precision angle-resolved autoionization resonances in Ar and Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Berrah, N.; Langer, B.; Gorczyca, T.W.

    1997-04-01

    Theoretical work has shown that the electron angular distribution and the shape of the autoionization resonances are crucial to the understanding of certain types of electron-electron correlation. Autoionization resonances in Ne (Ar) result from the decay of the excited discrete state Ne{sup *} 2s2p{sup 6} np (Ar{sup *} 3s3p{sup 6} np) into the continuum state Ne{sup +} 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 5} + e{sup {minus}} (ks,kd) (Ar{sup +} 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 5} + e{sup {minus}} (ks,kd)). Since the continuum can also be reached by direct photoionization, both paths add coherently, giving rise to interferences that produce the characteristic Beutler-Fano line shape. In this work, the authors report on quantitative angle-resolved electron spectrometry studies of (a) the Ne 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6} {r_arrow} 2s2p{sup 6} np (n=3-5) autoionizing resonances and the 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6} {r_arrow} 2p{sup 4}3s3p doubly excited resonance, (b) the Ar 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6} {r_arrow} 3s3p{sup 6} np (n=4-9) autoionization resonances and extended R-matrix calculations of the angular-distribution parameters for both Ne and Ar measurements. Their results are compared with previous theoretical work by Taylor.

  15. PROBING NEAR-SURFACE ATMOSPHERIC TURBULENCE WITH LIDAR MEASUREMENTS AND HIGH-RESOLUTION HYDRODYNAMIC MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    J. KAO; D. COOPER; ET AL

    2000-11-01

    As lidar technology is able to provide fast data collection at a resolution of meters in an atmospheric volume, it is imperative to promote a modeling counterpart of the lidar capability. This paper describes an integrated capability based on data from a scanning water vapor lidar and a high-resolution hydrodynamic model (HIGRAD) equipped with a visualization routine (VIEWER) that simulates the lidar scanning. The purpose is to better understand the spatial and temporal representativeness of the lidar measurements and, in turn, to extend their utility in studying turbulence fields in the atmospheric boundary layer. Raman lidar water vapor data collected over the Pacific warm pool and the simulations with the HIGRAD code are used for identifying the underlying physics and potential aliasing effects of spatially resolved lidar measurements. This capability also helps improve the trade-off between spatial-temporal resolution and coverage of the lidar measurements.

  16. Dual Wavelength Laser Writing and Measurement Methodology for High Resolution Bimetallic Grayscale Photomasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qarehbaghi, Reza

    Grayscale bimetallic photomasks consist of bi-layer thermal resists (Bismuth-on-Indium or Tin-on-Indium) which become controllably transparent when exposed to a focused laser beam as a function of the absorbed power changing from ~3OD (unexposed) to <0.22OD (fully exposed). To achieve high accuracy grayscale pattern, the OD must be measured and controlled while writing. This thesis investigates using two wavelength beams for mask writing (514.5nm) and OD measurement (457.9nm) separated from a multi-line Argon ion laser source: a Dual Wavelength Writing and Measurement System. The writing laser profile was modified to a top-hat using a beam shaper. Several mask patterns tested the creation of high resolution grayscale masks. Finally, for creation of 3D structures in photoresist, the mask transparency to resist thickness requirements was formulated and linear slope patterns were successfully created.

  17. Measurement of water content in polymer electrolyte membranes using high resolution neutron imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Spernjak, Dusan; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L; Davey, John; Mukherjee, Partha P; Hussey, Daniel S; Jacobson, David

    2010-01-01

    Sufficient water content within a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) is necessary for adequate ionic conductivity. Membrane hydration is therefore a fundamental requirement for fuel cell operation. The hydration state of the membrane affects the water transport within, as both the diffusion coefficient and electro-osmotic drag depend on the water content. Membrane's water uptake is conventionally measured ex situ by weighing free-swelling samples equilibrated at controlled water activity. In the present study, water profiles in Nafion{reg_sign} membranes were measured using the high-resolution neutron imaging. The state-of-the-art, 10 {micro}m resolution neutron detector is capable of resolving water distributions across N1120, N1110 and N117 membranes. It provides a means to measure the water uptake and transport properties of fuel cell membranes in situ.

  18. Measurement of Water Content in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes using High Resolution Neutron Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Partha P

    2010-01-01

    Sufficient water content within a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) is necessary for adequate ionic conductivity. Membrane hydration is therefore a fundamental requirement for fuel cell operation. The hydration state of the membrane affects the water transport within, as both the diffusion coefficient and electroosmotic drag depend on the water content. Membrane s water uptake is conventionally measured ex situ by weighing freeswelling samples equilibrated at controlled water activity. In the present study, water profiles in Nafion membranes were measured using high-resolution neutron imaging. The state-of-theart, 13 m resolution neutron detector is capable of resolving water distributions across N1120, N1110 and N117 membranes. It provides a means to measure the water uptake and transport properties of fuel cell membranes in situ.

  19. High-resolution spectroscopy used to measure inertial confinement fusion neutron spectra on Omega (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, C. J.; Radha, P. B.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; Pruyne, A.; Romanofsky, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J. III; Stoeckl, C.; Casey, D. T.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Gardner, S.

    2012-10-15

    The areal density ({rho}R) of cryogenic DT implosions on Omega is inferred by measuring the spectrum of neutrons that elastically scatter off the dense deuterium (D) and tritium (T) fuel. Neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) techniques are used to measure the energy spectrum with high resolution. High signal-to-background data has been recorded on cryogenic DT implosions using a well-collimated 13.4-m line of sight and an nTOF detector with an advanced liquid scintillator compound. An innovative method to analyze the elastically scattered neutron spectra was developed using well-known cross sections of the DT nuclear reactions. The estimated areal densities are consistent with alternative {rho}R measurements and 1-D simulations.

  20. High Resolution Measurements In U-Channel Technique And Implications For Sedimentological Purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acar, Dursun; Cagatay, Namık; Sarı, Erol; Eris, Kadir; Biltekin, Demet; Akcer, Sena; Meydan Gokdere, Feray; Makaroglu, Ozlem; Bulkan, Ozlem; Arslan, Tugce; Albut, Gulum; Yalamaz, Burak; Yakupoglu, Nurettin; Sabuncu, Asen; Fillikci, Betul; Yıldız, Guliz

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical features in-stu drilling for sediment cores and vacuum forces that affect while obtaining the sediments to the core tube are formed concave shaped deformations. Even in the half sections, concave deformation form still appears. During MCSL measurements, Laminae which forms concave shaped deformation, show interference thus, values indicate overall results for several laminae instead of single lamina. These interferenced data is not appropriate for paleoceanography studies which require extend accuracy and high frequency data set to describe geochemical and climatological effects in high resolution. U-Channel technique provides accurate location and isolated values for each lamina. In EMCOL Laboratories, U-channel provide well saturated and air-free environment for samples and, by using these technique U-channels are prepared with modificated MCSL for data acquisition. Even below millimeter scale sampling rate provides the separation of each lamina and, physical properties of every each lamina. Cover of u-channel is made by homogenous plastic in shape of rectangular prism geometry. Thus, during measurement, MSCL sensors may harm the sediment; however u-channel covers the sediment from this unwanted deformation from MSCL itself. U-channel technique can present micro scale angular changes in the laminae. Measurements that have been taken from U-channel are compared with the traditional half core measurements. Interestingly, accuracy of the positions for each lamina is much more detailed and, the resolution is progressively higher. Results from P Wave and Gamma ray density provide removed interference effects on each lamina. In this technique, it is high recommended that U-channel widens the resolution of core logging and generates more cleansed measurements in MCSL. For P- Wave Used Synthetic seismograms that modelled by MSCL data set which created from U-channel technique dictates each anomalies related with climatological and geological changes. Keywords

  1. High-resolution, continuous method for measurement of acidity in ice cores.

    PubMed

    Pasteris, Daniel R; McConnell, Joseph R; Edwards, Ross

    2012-02-01

    The acid content of ice core samples provides information regarding the history of volcanism, biogenic activity, windblown dust, forest fires, and pollution-induced acid rain. A continuous ice core analysis allows for collection of high-resolution data in a very efficient manner, but this technique has not been readily applied to the measurement of pH and acidity in ice cores. The difficulty arises because the sample is highly undersaturated with respect to carbon dioxide (CO(2)) immediately after melting, making it difficult to maintain stable concentrations of dissolved carbon dioxide and carbonic acid (H(2)CO(3)). Here, we present a solution to this problem in the form of a small flow-through bubbling chamber that is supplied with a known concentration of CO(2). The bubbling action allows for quick equilibration while the small size of the chamber limits sample mixing in order to maintain high resolution. Thorough error analysis provides a measurement uncertainty of ±0.20 μM or ±5% of the acidity value, whichever is greater, and the T95 signal response time is determined to be 1.25 min. The performance of the technique is further evaluated with data from a 63-year ice core from northwest Greenland for which all major ion species were also measured. The measured acidity closely matches the acidity derived from a charge balance calculation, indicating that all of the analytes were measured accurately. The performance specifications that we provide are applicable to ice cores with low concentrations of alkaline dust (<500 ppb), which includes the vast majority of ice cores that are collected. To date, the method has not been evaluated with samples containing high alkaline dust concentrations, such as Greenland cores from the last glacial period, where measurement could be made difficult by memory effects as particles coat the internal surfaces of the sample stream.

  2. High-resolution, continuous method for measurement of acidity in ice cores.

    PubMed

    Pasteris, Daniel R; McConnell, Joseph R; Edwards, Ross

    2012-02-01

    The acid content of ice core samples provides information regarding the history of volcanism, biogenic activity, windblown dust, forest fires, and pollution-induced acid rain. A continuous ice core analysis allows for collection of high-resolution data in a very efficient manner, but this technique has not been readily applied to the measurement of pH and acidity in ice cores. The difficulty arises because the sample is highly undersaturated with respect to carbon dioxide (CO(2)) immediately after melting, making it difficult to maintain stable concentrations of dissolved carbon dioxide and carbonic acid (H(2)CO(3)). Here, we present a solution to this problem in the form of a small flow-through bubbling chamber that is supplied with a known concentration of CO(2). The bubbling action allows for quick equilibration while the small size of the chamber limits sample mixing in order to maintain high resolution. Thorough error analysis provides a measurement uncertainty of ±0.20 μM or ±5% of the acidity value, whichever is greater, and the T95 signal response time is determined to be 1.25 min. The performance of the technique is further evaluated with data from a 63-year ice core from northwest Greenland for which all major ion species were also measured. The measured acidity closely matches the acidity derived from a charge balance calculation, indicating that all of the analytes were measured accurately. The performance specifications that we provide are applicable to ice cores with low concentrations of alkaline dust (<500 ppb), which includes the vast majority of ice cores that are collected. To date, the method has not been evaluated with samples containing high alkaline dust concentrations, such as Greenland cores from the last glacial period, where measurement could be made difficult by memory effects as particles coat the internal surfaces of the sample stream. PMID:22148513

  3. High resolution gamma ray tomography scanner for flow measurement and non-destructive testing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, U.; Bieberle, A.; Hoppe, D.; Kronenberg, J.; Schleicher, E.; Sühnel, T.; Zimmermann, F.; Zippe, C.

    2007-10-01

    We report on the development of a high resolution gamma ray tomography scanner that is operated with a Cs-137 isotopic source at 662keV gamma photon energy and achieves a spatial image resolution of 0.2linepairs/mm at 10% modulation transfer function for noncollimated detectors. It is primarily intended for the scientific study of flow regimes and phase fraction distributions in fuel element assemblies, chemical reactors, pipelines, and hydrodynamic machines. Furthermore, it is applicable to nondestructive testing of larger radiologically dense objects. The radiation detector is based on advanced avalanche photodiode technology in conjunction with lutetium yttrium orthosilicate scintillation crystals. The detector arc comprises 320 single detector elements which are operated in pulse counting mode. For measurements at fixed vessels or plant components, we built a computed tomography scanner gantry that comprises rotational and translational stages, power supply via slip rings, and data communication to the measurement personal computer via wireless local area network.

  4. Fallspeed measurement and high-resolution multi-angle photography of hydrometeors in freefall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, T. J.; Fallgatter, C.; Shkurko, K.; Howlett, D.

    2012-07-01

    We describe here a new instrument for imaging hydrometeors in freefall. The Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC) captures high resolution photographs of hydrometeors from three angles while simultaneously measuring their fallspeed. Based on the stereoscopic photographs captured over the two months of continuous measurements obtained at a high altitude location within the Wasatch Front in Utah, we derive statistics for fallspeed, hydrometeor size, shape, orientation and aspect ratio. From a selection of the photographed hydrometeors, an illustration is provided for how the instrument might be used for making improved microwave scattering calculations. Complex, aggregated snowflake shapes appear to be more strongly forward scattering, at the expense of reduced back-scatter, than graupel particles of similar size.

  5. Fall speed measurement and high-resolution multi-angle photography of hydrometeors in free fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, T. J.; Fallgatter, C.; Shkurko, K.; Howlett, D.

    2012-11-01

    We describe here a new instrument for imaging hydrometeors in free fall. The Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC) captures high-resolution photographs of hydrometeors from three angles while simultaneously measuring their fall speed. Based on the stereoscopic photographs captured over the two months of continuous measurements obtained at a high altitude location within the Wasatch Front in Utah, we derive statistics for fall speed, hydrometeor size, shape, orientation and aspect ratio. From a selection of the photographed hydrometeors, an illustration is provided for how the instrument might be used for making improved microwave scattering calculations. Complex, aggregated snowflake shapes appear to be more strongly forward scattering, at the expense of reduced back-scatter, than heavily rimed graupel particles of similar size.

  6. High resolution gamma ray tomography scanner for flow measurement and non-destructive testing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hampel, U.; Bieberle, A.; Hoppe, D.; Kronenberg, J.; Schleicher, E.; Suehnel, T.; Zimmermann, F.; Zippe, C.

    2007-10-15

    We report on the development of a high resolution gamma ray tomography scanner that is operated with a Cs-137 isotopic source at 662 keV gamma photon energy and achieves a spatial image resolution of 0.2 line pairs/mm at 10% modulation transfer function for noncollimated detectors. It is primarily intended for the scientific study of flow regimes and phase fraction distributions in fuel element assemblies, chemical reactors, pipelines, and hydrodynamic machines. Furthermore, it is applicable to nondestructive testing of larger radiologically dense objects. The radiation detector is based on advanced avalanche photodiode technology in conjunction with lutetium yttrium orthosilicate scintillation crystals. The detector arc comprises 320 single detector elements which are operated in pulse counting mode. For measurements at fixed vessels or plant components, we built a computed tomography scanner gantry that comprises rotational and translational stages, power supply via slip rings, and data communication to the measurement personal computer via wireless local area network.

  7. High resolution measurements of galactic cosmic-ray neon, magnesium, and silicon isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Spalding, J. D.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    High-resolution measurements of the abundances of individual isotopes of neon, magnesium and silicon in galactic cosmic rays are reported. The Caltech Heavy Isotope Spectrometer Telescope on board the ISEE 3 spacecraft was used to obtain measurements in the range 30 to 180 MeV/n at an rms mass resolution of 0.20 amu. Results indicate excesses of Ne-22 as well as Mg-25 and Mg-26 in galactic cosmic rays with respect to their solar system abundances. Calculations of the effects of interstellar propagation and solar modulation on cosmic-ray isotope abundances also imply an Mg-25 + Mg-26 cosmic ray source fraction significantly greater than the solar system fraction, and it is suggested that the cosmic ray source material and solar system material were synthesized under different conditions.

  8. Roughness of stylolites: implications of 3D high resolution topography measurements.

    PubMed

    Schmittbuhl, J; Renard, F; Gratier, J P; Toussaint, R

    2004-12-01

    Stylolites are natural pressure-dissolution surfaces in sedimentary rocks. We present 3D high resolution measurements at laboratory scales of their complex roughness. The topography is shown to be described by a self-affine scaling invariance. At large scales, the Hurst exponent is zeta(1) approximately 0.5 and very different from that at small scales where zeta(2) approximately 1.2. A crossover length scale at around L(c)=1 mm is well characterized. Measurements are consistent with a Langevin equation that describes the growth of a stylolitic interface as a competition between stabilizing long range elastic interactions at large scales or local surface tension effects at small scales and a destabilizing quenched material disorder.

  9. MARVEL analysis of the measured high-resolution spectra of 14NH3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Derzi, Afaf R.; Furtenbacher, Tibor; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Császár, Attila G.

    2015-08-01

    Accurate, experimental rotational-vibrational energy levels and line positions, with associated labels and uncertainties, are reported for the ground electronic state of the symmetric-top 14NH3 molecule. All levels and lines are based on critically reviewed and validated high-resolution experimental spectra taken from 56 literature sources. The transition data are in the 0.7-17 000 cm-1 region, with a large gap between 7000 and 15 000 cm-1. The MARVEL (Measured Active Rotational-Vibrational Energy Levels) algorithm is used to determine the energy levels. Out of the 29 450 measured transitions 10 041 and 18 947 belong to ortho- and para-14NH3, respectively. A careful analysis of the related experimental spectroscopic network (SN) allows 28 530 of the measured transitions to be validated, 18 178 of these are unique, while 462 transitions belong to floating components. Despite the large number of spectroscopic measurements published over the last 80 years, the transitions determine only 30 vibrational band origins of 14NH3, 8 for ortho- and 22 for para-14NH3. The highest J value, where J stands for the rotational quantum number, for which an energy level is validated is 31. The number of experimental-quality ortho- and para-14NH3 rovibrational energy levels is 1724 and 3237, respectively. The MARVEL energy levels are checked against ones in the BYTe first-principles database, determined previously. The lists of validated lines and levels for 14NH3 are deposited in the Supporting Information to this paper. Combination of the MARVEL energy levels with first-principles absorption intensities yields a huge number of experimental-quality rovibrational lines, which should prove to be useful for the understanding of future complex high-resolution spectroscopy on 14NH3; these lines are also deposited in the Supporting Information to this paper.

  10. Ultrafast angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of quantum materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallwood, Christopher L.; Kaindl, Robert A.; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2016-07-01

    Techniques in time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy have facilitated a number of recent advances in the study of quantum materials. We review developments in this field related to the study of incoherent nonequilibrium electron dynamics, the analysis of interactions between electrons and collective excitations, the exploration of dressed-state physics, and the illumination of unoccupied band structure. Future prospects are also discussed.

  11. High-Resolution, Noninvasive, Two-Photon Fluorescence Measurement of Molecular Concentrations in Corneal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Liping; Huxlin, Krystel R.; Xu, Lisen; MacRae, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To perform high-resolution, noninvasive, calibrated measurements of the concentrations and diffusion profiles of fluorescent molecules in the live cornea after topical application to the ocular surface. Methods. An 800-nm femtosecond laser was used to perform two-photon fluorescence (TPF) axial scanning measurements. Calibration solutions consisting of sodium fluorescein (Na-Fl; concentration range, 0.01%–2.5%) and riboflavin (concentration range, 0.0125%–0.1%) were tested in well slides, and TPF signals were assessed. Excised feline eyeballs preserved in corneal storage medium and with either intact or removed corneal epithelia were then treated with Na-Fl, riboflavin, or fluorescein dextran (Fl-d) of different molecular weight (MW) for 30 minutes. Calibrated TPF was then used immediately to measure the concentration of these molecules across the central corneal depth. Results. The axial resolution of our TPF system was 6 μm, and a linear relationship was observed between TPF signal and low concentrations of most fluorophores. Intact corneas treated with Na-Fl or riboflavin exhibited a detectable penetration depth of only approximately 20 μm, compared with approximately 400 to 600 μm when the epithelium was removed before fluorophore application. Peak concentrations for intact corneas were half those attained with epithelial removal. Debrided corneas treated with 2,000,000 MW Fl-d showed a half-maximum penetration depth of 156.7 μm compared with 384 μm for the 3,000 MW dextran. The peak concentration of the high MW dextran was one quarter that of the lower MW dextran. Conclusions. TPF is an effective, high-resolution, noninvasive method of quantifying the diffusion and concentration of fluorescent molecules across the cornea. PMID:21228379

  12. Density, specific surface area, and correlation length of snow measured by high-resolution penetrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proksch, Martin; Löwe, Henning; Schneebeli, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Precise measurements of snow structural parameters are crucial to understand the formation of snowpacks by deposition and metamorphism and to characterize the stratigraphy for many applications and remote sensing in particular. The area-wide acquisition of structural parameters at high spatial resolution from state-of-the-art methods is, however, still cumbersome, since the time required for a single profile is a serious practical limitation. As a remedy we have developed a statistical model to extract three major snow structural parameters: density, correlation length, and specific surface area (SSA) solely from the SnowMicroPen (SMP), a high-resolution penetrometer, which allows a meter profile to be measured with millimeter resolution in less than 1 min. The model was calibrated by combining SMP data with 3-D microstructural data from microcomputed tomography which was used to reconstruct full-depth snow profiles from different snow climates (Alpine, Arctic, and Antarctic). Density, correlation length, and SSA were derived from the SMP with a mean relative error of 10.6%, 16.4%, and 23.1%, respectively. For validation, we compared the density and SSA derived from the SMP to traditional measurements and near-infrared profiles. We demonstrate the potential of our method by the retrieval of a two-dimensional stratigraphy at Kohnen Station, Antarctica, from a 46 m long SMP transect. The result clearly reveals past depositional and metamorphic events, and our findings show that the SMP can be used as an objective, high-resolution tool to retrieve essential snow structural parameters efficiently in the field.

  13. A digital approach for real time high-rate high-resolution radiation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerardi, G.; Abbene, L.

    2014-12-01

    Modern spectrometers are currently developed by using digital pulse processing (DPP) systems, showing several advantages over traditional analog electronics. The aim of this work is to present digital strategies, in a time domain, for the development of real time high-rate high-resolution spectrometers. We propose a digital method, based on the single delay line (SDL) shaping technique, able to perform multi-parameter analysis with high performance even at high photon counting rates. A robust pulse shape and height analysis (PSHA), applied on single isolated time windows of the detector output waveforms, is presented. The potentialities of the proposed strategy are highlighted through both theoretical and experimental approaches. To strengthen our approach, the implementation of the method on a real-time system together with some experimental results are presented. X-ray spectra measurements with a semiconductor detector are performed both at low and high photon counting rates (up to 1.1 Mcps).

  14. Imaging spectrometer for high resolution measurements of stratospheric trace constituents in the ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, Marsha R.; Torr, D. G.

    1988-01-01

    A high-resolution spectrometer has been developed for studies of minor constituents in the middle atmosphere at ultraviolet wavelengths. In particular, the instrument is intended for observations of upper stratospheric UV bands. The spectrometer has a slit width of 0.08 A obtained by means of an echelle grating and a cross-disperser grating. The image plane detector is an intensified CCD consisting of a high gain proximity focused image intensifier that is fiber optically coupled to a two-dimensional CCD array. An instantaneous bandwidth of 9.2 A is resolved across 488 pixels at 0.018 A/pixel, permitting simultaneous acquisition of multiple lines of selected OH bands and the neighboring background. The spectrometer and the approach have been successfully demonstrated as a technique for measuring the concentration of OH on two high-altitude balloon flights. This paper reports the instrument design and its achieved performance.

  15. Proton-silicon interaction potential extracted from high-resolution measurements of crystal rainbows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, S.; Nešković, N.; Ćosić, M.; Motapothula, M.; Breese, M. B. H.

    2015-10-01

    This study provides a way to produce very accurate ion-atom interaction potentials. We present the high-resolution measurements of angular distributions of protons of energies between 2.0 and 0.7 MeV channeled in a 55 nm thick (0 0 1) silicon membrane. Analysis is performed using the theory of crystal rainbows in which the Molière's interaction potential is modified to make it accurate both close to the channel axis and close to the atomic strings defining the channel. This modification is based on adjusting the shapes of the rainbow lines appearing in the transmission angle plane, with the resulting theoretical angular distributions of transmitted protons being in excellent agreement with the corresponding experimental distributions.

  16. High-Resolution Correlated Fission Product Measurements of 235U (nth , f) with SPIDER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Dan; Spider Team

    2015-10-01

    The SPIDER detector (SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research) has obtained high-resolution, moderate-efficiency, correlated fission product data needed for many applications including the modeling of next generation nuclear reactors, stockpile stewardship, and the fundamental understanding of the fission process. SPIDER simultaneously measures velocity and energy of both fission products to calculate fission product yields (FPYs), neutron multiplicity (ν), and total kinetic energy (TKE). These data will be some of the first of their kind available to nuclear data evaluations. An overview of the SPIDER detector, analytical method, and preliminary results for 235U (nth , f) will be presented. LA-UR-15-20130 This work benefited from the use of the LANSCE accelerator facility and was performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by Los Alamos Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  17. Potassium Stable Isotopic Compositions Measured by High-Resolution MC-ICP-MS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Leah E.; Lloyd, Nicholas S.; Ellam, Robert M.; Simon, Justin I.

    2012-01-01

    Potassium isotopic (K-41/K-39) compositions are notoriously difficult to measure. TIMS measurements are hindered by variable fractionation patterns throughout individual runs and too few isotopes to apply an internal spike method for instrumental mass fractionation corrections. Internal fractionation corrections via the K-40/K-39 ratio can provide precise values but assume identical K-40/K-39 ratios (e.g. 0.05% (1sigma) in [1]); this is appropriate in some cases (e.g. identifying excess K-41) but not others (e.g., determining mass fractionation effects and metrologically traceable isotopic abundances). SIMS analyses have yielded measurements with 0.25% precisions (1sigma) [2]. ICP-MS analyses are significantly affected by interferences from molecular species such as Ar-38H(+) and Ar-40H(+) and instrument mass bias. Single collector ICP-MS instruments in "cold plasma" mode have yielded uncertainties as low as 2% (1sigma, e.g. [3]). Although these precisions may be acceptable for some concentration determinations, they do not resolve isotopic variation in terrestrial materials. Here we present data from a series of measurements made on the Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus multi-collector ICP-MS that demonstrate the ability to make K-41/K-39 ratio measurements with 0.07% precisions (1sigma). These data, collected on NIST K standards, indicate the potential for MC-ICP-MS measurements to look for K isotopic variations at the sub-permil level. The NEPTUNE Plus can sufficiently resolve 39K and 41K from the interfering 38ArH+ and 40ArH+ peaks in wet cold plasma and high-resolution mode. Measurements were made on small but flat, interference-free, plateaus (ca. 50 ppm by mass width for K-41). Although ICP-MS does not yield accurate K-41/K-39 values due to significant instrumental mass fractionation (ca. 6%), this bias can be sufficiently stable over the time required for several measurements so that relative K-41/K-39 values can be precisely determined via sample

  18. Concentration-Discharge Patterns Revealed from High Resolution Nitrate Measurements in Agricultural Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boland, S. J.; Basu, N. B.

    2012-12-01

    Riverine export of nutrients is a major component of nutrient cycles, particularly with respect to nitrogen; ~ 25 percent of terrestrially applied nitrogen (N) is removed via riverine export. Understanding the patterns in N export during a storm event is critical for developing a conceptual model of the dominant processes and pathways of N transformation, and designing appropriate management strategies to mitigate N pollution in streams and receiving water bodies. Most studies however, are limited by the lack of high-resolution water quality data to elucidate these pathways and mechanisms. We explored concentration-discharge relationships using high-resolution (15 minute) discharge (Q) and nitrate concentration (C) data (measured using an in-situ Nitratax Sonde) at multiple nested scales (from 151.3 km2 to 8900 km2) in two watersheds in Iowa: Clear Creek Watershed and the Raccoon River watershed. Three distinct regimes of nitrate transport were revealed: (1) a linear regime in which C increases with increasing Q, (2) a saturation regime in which C remains constant against increasing Q, and (3) a dilution regime in which concentration decreases as Q increases. The tight clustering of the data along these patterns is indicative of emergent behavior in such human-dominated systems. All three regimes were apparent in the Raccoon River Watershed, while only the saturation and dilution regimes were apparent in the Clear Creek Watershed. We hypothesize that surface flow is dominant in the Clear Creek Watershed leading to a saturation/dilution regimes, while subsurface flow is dominant in the more heavily tile-drained Raccoon River Watershed, leading to the occurrence of all three regimes. A parsimonious model was developed to test the hypothesis and develop C-Q patterns as a function of the partitioning of flow through the different pathways.

  19. Determination of band oscillator strengths of atmospheric molecules from high resolution vacuum ultraviolet cross section measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of progress in work on (1) the determination of band oscillator strengths of the Schumann-Runge absorption bands of (16)O2 and (18)O2 from cross section measurements conducted at 79 K; (2) the determination of the absolute absorption cross section of the Schumann-Runge bands of (16)O(18)O from optical depth measurements performed on mixtures of (16)O2, (18)O2 and (16)O(18)O at 79K; and (3) the influence of Schumann-Runge linewing contributions on the determination of the Herzberg continuum absorption cross section of (16)O2 in the wavelength region 194 to 204 nm. The experimental investigations are effected at high resolution with a 6.65 m scanning spectrometer which is, by virtue of its small instrumental width (EWHM = 0.0013 nm), uniquely suitable for cross section measurements of molecular bands with discrete rotational structure. Absolute cross sections, which are independent of the instrumental function and from which band oscillator strengths are directly determined, are measured for the absorption bands that are most predissociated. Such measurements are needed for (1) accurate calculations of the stratospheric production of atomic oxygen and heavy ozone formed following the photopredissociation of (18)O(16)O by solar radiation penetrating between the absorption lines of (16)O2; (2) elucidation of the mechanism of predissociation of the upper state of the Schumann-Runge bands; and (3) determination of the true shape of the Herzberg continuum cross section.

  20. Combination of comprehensive geophysical measurements and conventional soil sampling for high resolution soil mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werban, U.; Nuesch, A.; Vienken, T.; Dietrich, P.; Behrens, T.

    2010-12-01

    The focus of the FP7-EU project iSOIL “Interactions between soil related sciences - Linking geophysics, soil science and digital soil mapping” is to develop new and to improve existing strategies and innovative methods for generating accurate, high-resolution soil property maps. Thus we will develop, validate, and evaluate concepts and strategies for transferring measured physical parameter distributions into soil property, soil function and soil threat maps of different scales. The resulting soil property maps can be used for agriculture applications and soil degradation threats studies, e.g. erosion, compaction and soil organic matter decline. A fast and cost efficient way to detect physical parameters of soils at large areas is the application of mobile geophysical platforms. An advantage of these platforms is the flexibility since different kind of instruments can be mounted and combined. Following instruments are used on platforms within iSOIL project: EMI, GPR, gamma-spectrometry and magnetics. Since geophysical methods provide only physical parameters it is essential to combine them with conventional soil sampling methods for ground truthing. Physical parameters have to be converted into soil parameters via (site specific) transfer functions. One focus of the project was the development of measuring designs for the evaluation and combination of different geophysical methods. The application of a hierarchical approach is one way to combine different scales and parameters. The implementation of this approach will be presented and can be summarized as follows: - The first step is a survey of the total area with EMI and gamma-spectrometry. The distance between two lines is 10 - 20 meters. - By means of the geophysical data and a digital elevation model, representative soil sampling points are chosen, via a weighted conditioned latin hypercube sampling scheme (wLHS) based on conditioned latin hypercube sampling (cLHS). - All soil sampling points are probed

  1. On the measurement of frequency and of its sample variance with high-resolution counters

    SciTech Connect

    Rubiola, Enrico

    2005-05-15

    A frequency counter measures the input frequency {nu} averaged over a suitable time {tau}, versus the reference clock. High resolution is achieved by interpolating the clock signal. Further increased resolution is obtained by averaging multiple frequency measurements highly overlapped. In the presence of additive white noise or white phase noise, the square uncertainty improves from {sigma}{sub {nu}}{sup 2}{proportional_to}1/{tau}{sup 2} to {sigma}{sub {nu}}{sup 2}{proportional_to}1/{tau}{sup 3}. Surprisingly, when a file of contiguous data is fed into the formula of the two-sample (Allan) variance {sigma}{sub y}{sup 2}({tau})=E{l_brace}(1/2)(y{sub k+1}-y{sub k}){sup 2}{r_brace} of the fractional frequency fluctuation y, the result is the modified Allan variance mod {sigma}{sub y}{sup 2}({tau}). But if a sufficient number of contiguous measures are averaged in order to get a longer {tau} and the data are fed into the same formula, the results is the (nonmodified) Allan variance. Of course interpretation mistakes are around the corner if the counter internal process is not well understood. The typical domain of interest is the the short-term stability measurement of oscillators.

  2. A compact and miniaturized high resolution capacitance dilatometer for measuring thermal expansion and magnetostriction

    SciTech Connect

    Kuechler, R.; Bauer, T.; Brando, M.; Steglich, F.

    2012-09-15

    We describe the design, construction, calibration, and two different applications of a miniature capacitance dilatometer. The device is suitable for thermal expansion and magnetostriction measurements from 300 K down to about 25 mK, with a resolution of 0.02 A at low temperatures. The main body of the dilatometer is fabricated from a single block of a Be-Cu alloy by electrical discharge milling. This creates an extremely compact high-resolution measuring cell. We have successfully tested and operated dilatometers of this new type with the commonly used physical property measurement system by quantum design, as well as with several other cryogenic refrigeration systems down to 25 mK and in magnetic fields up to 20 T. Here, the capacitance is measured with a commercially available capacitance bridge. Using a piezoelectric rotator from Attocube Systems, the cell can be rotated at T= 25 mK inside of an inner vacuum chamber of 40 mm diameter. The miniaturized design for the one-axis rotation setup allows a rotation of 360 Degree-Sign .

  3. UDECON: deconvolution optimization software for restoring high-resolution records from pass-through paleomagnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Chuang; Oda, Hirokuni

    2015-11-01

    The rapid accumulation of continuous paleomagnetic and rock magnetic records acquired from pass-through measurements on superconducting rock magnetometers (SRM) has greatly contributed to our understanding of the paleomagnetic field and paleo-environment. Pass-through measurements are inevitably smoothed and altered by the convolution effect of SRM sensor response, and deconvolution is needed to restore high-resolution paleomagnetic and environmental signals. Although various deconvolution algorithms have been developed, the lack of easy-to-use software has hindered the practical application of deconvolution. Here, we present standalone graphical software UDECON as a convenient tool to perform optimized deconvolution for pass-through paleomagnetic measurements using the algorithm recently developed by Oda and Xuan (Geochem Geophys Geosyst 15:3907-3924, 2014). With the preparation of a format file, UDECON can directly read pass-through paleomagnetic measurement files collected at different laboratories. After the SRM sensor response is determined and loaded to the software, optimized deconvolution can be conducted using two different approaches (i.e., "Grid search" and "Simplex method") with adjustable initial values or ranges for smoothness, corrections of sample length, and shifts in measurement position. UDECON provides a suite of tools to view conveniently and check various types of original measurement and deconvolution data. Multiple steps of measurement and/or deconvolution data can be compared simultaneously to check the consistency and to guide further deconvolution optimization. Deconvolved data together with the loaded original measurement and SRM sensor response data can be saved and reloaded for further treatment in UDECON. Users can also export the optimized deconvolution data to a text file for analysis in other software.

  4. Single CMOS sensor system for high resolution double volume measurement applied to membrane distillation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, M. G.; Izquierdo-Gil, M. A.; Sanchez-Reillo, R.; Fernandez-Pineda, C.

    2007-01-01

    Membrane distillation (MD) [1] is a relatively new process that is being investigated world-wide as a low cost, energy saving alternative to conventional separation processes such as distillation and reverse osmosis (RO). This process offers some advantages compared to other more popular separation processes, such as working at room conditions (pressure and temperature); low-grade, waste and/or alternative energy sources such as solar and geothermal energy may be used; a very high level of rejection with inorganic solutions; small equipment can be employed, etc. The driving force in MD processes is the vapor pressure difference across the membrane. A temperature difference is imposed across the membrane, which results in a vapor pressure difference. The principal problem in this kind of system is the accurate measurement of the recipient volume change, especially at very low flows. A cathetometer, with up to 0,05 mm resolution, is the instrument used to take these measurements, but the necessary human intervention makes this instrument not suitable for automated systems. In order to overcome this lack, a high resolution system is proposed, that makes automatic measurements of the volume of both recipients, cold and hot, at a rate of up to 10 times per second.

  5. High-resolution atmospheric water vapor measurements with a scanning differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Späth, F.; Behrendt, A.; Muppa, S. K.; Metzendorf, S.; Riede, A.; Wulfmeyer, V.

    2014-11-01

    The scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH) is presented. The UHOH DIAL is equipped with an injection-seeded frequency-stabilized high-power Ti:sapphire laser operated at 818 nm with a repetition rate of 250 Hz. A scanning transceiver unit with a 80 cm primary mirror receives the atmospheric backscatter signals. The system is capable of water vapor measurements with temporal resolutions of a few seconds and a range resolution between 30 and 300 m at daytime. It allows to investigate surface-vegetation-atmosphere exchange processes with high resolution. In this paper, we present the design of the instrument and illustrate its performance with recent water vapor measurements taken in Stuttgart-Hohenheim and in the frame of the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE). HOPE was located near research center Jülich, in western Germany, in spring 2013 as part of the project "High Definition of Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction" (HD(CP)2). Scanning measurements reveal the 3-dimensional structures of the water vapor field. The influence of uncertainties within the calculation of the absorption cross-section at wavelengths around 818 nm for the WV retrieval is discussed. Radiosonde intercomparisons show a very small bias between the instruments of only (-0.04 ± 0.11) g m-3 or (-1.0 ± 2.3) % in the height range of 0.5 to 3 km.

  6. Method for local temperature measurement in a nanoreactor for in situ high-resolution electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vendelbo, S B; Kooyman, P J; Creemer, J F; Morana, B; Mele, L; Dona, P; Nelissen, B J; Helveg, S

    2013-10-01

    In situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of solids under reactive gas conditions can be facilitated by microelectromechanical system devices called nanoreactors. These nanoreactors are windowed cells containing nanoliter volumes of gas at ambient pressures and elevated temperatures. However, due to the high spatial confinement of the reaction environment, traditional methods for measuring process parameters, such as the local temperature, are difficult to apply. To address this issue, we devise an electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) method that probes the local temperature of the reaction volume under inspection by the electron beam. The local gas density, as measured using quantitative EELS, is combined with the inherent relation between gas density and temperature, as described by the ideal gas law, to obtain the local temperature. Using this method we determined the temperature gradient in a nanoreactor in situ, while the average, global temperature was monitored by a traditional measurement of the electrical resistivity of the heater. The local gas temperatures had a maximum of 56 °C deviation from the global heater values under the applied conditions. The local temperatures, obtained with the proposed method, are in good agreement with predictions from an analytical model. PMID:23831940

  7. Measurement of real and imaginary form factors of silver atom using a high resolution HPGe detector.

    PubMed

    Krishnananda; Niranjana, K M; Badiger, N M

    2013-01-01

    The real and imaginary form factors of silver atom have been determined by using EDXRF method. The K x-ray photons in the energy range from 8.62 keV to 52.18 keV are generated by sending 59.56 keV gamma photons from ^{241}Am radioactive source on various targets. These K x-ray photons are transmitted through silver foils of suitable thickness. The incident and transmitted K x-ray photon intensities have been measured with a high resolution HPGe detector which is coupled to 16K MCA. The photoelectric cross sections at different K x-ray energies have been determined by measuring the intensities of the incident and transmitted x-ray photons. From these photoelectric cross section values, the imaginary form factors and the real form factors have been determined at various photon energies. Measured imaginary and real form factor values have been compared with theoretical values predicted by XCOM [23] and FFAST [24].

  8. Measuring stellar magnetic fields from high resolution spectroscopy of near-infrared lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, F.; Vacca, W. D.; Stift, M. J.

    2003-10-01

    Zeeman splitting of otherwise degenerate levels provides a straight-forward method of measuring stellar magnetic fields. In the optical, the relative displacements of the Zeeman components are quite small compared to the rotational line broadening, and therefore observations of Zeeman splitting are usually possible only for rather strong magnetic fields in very slowly rotating stars. However, the magnitude of the Zeeman splitting is proportional to the square of the wavelength, whereas rotational line broadening mechanisms are linear in wavelength; therefore, there is a clear advantage in using near-infrared spectral lines to measure surface stellar magnetic fields. We have obtained high resolution (R >= 25 000) spectra in the 15 625-15 665 Å region for two magnetic chemically peculiar stars, viz. HD 176232 and HD 201601, and for the suspected magnetic chemically peculiar star HD 180583, as part of a pilot study aimed at determining the accuracy with which we can measure stellar magnetic fields using the Zeeman splitting of near-infrared lines. We confirm that in principle the magnetic field strength can be estimated from the magnetic intensification of spectral lines, i.e. the increase in equivalent width of a line over the zero-field value. However, due to line blending as well as the dependence of this intensification on abundance and field geometry, accurate estimates of the magnetic field strengths can be obtained only by modelling the line profiles by means of spectral synthesis techniques. Using this approach, we find a 1.4 kG magnetic field modulus in HD 176132 and an upper limit of 0.2 kG in HD 180583. The very weak infrared lines in the spectrum of HD 201601 are consistent with a 3.9 kG field modulus estimated from the splitting of the Fe II 6149.258 Å line seen in an optical spectrum. Finally, we would like to draw attention to the fact that there are no sufficiently detailed and reliable atomic line lists available for the near-infrared region that

  9. The investigation of active Martian dune fields using very high resolution photogrammetric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungrack; Kim, Younghwi; Park, Minseong

    2016-10-01

    At the present time, arguments continue regarding the migration speeds of Martian dune fields and their correlation with atmospheric circulation. However, precisely measuring the spatial translation of Martian dunes has succeeded only a very few times—for example, in the Nili Patera study (Bridges et al. 2012) using change-detection algorithms and orbital imagery. Therefore, in this study, we developed a generic procedure to precisely measure the migration of dune fields with recently introduced 25-cm resolution orbital imagery specifically using a high-accuracy photogrammetric processor. The processor was designed to trace estimated dune migration, albeit slight, over the Martian surface by 1) the introduction of very high resolution ortho images and stereo analysis based on hierarchical geodetic control for better initial point settings; 2) positioning error removal throughout the sensor model refinement with a non-rigorous bundle block adjustment, which makes possible the co-alignment of all images in a time series; and 3) improved sub-pixel co-registration algorithms using optical flow with a refinement stage conducted on a pyramidal grid processor and a blunder classifier. Moreover, volumetric changes of Martian dunes were additionally traced by means of stereo analysis and photoclinometry. The established algorithms have been tested using high-resolution HIRISE time-series images over several Martian dune fields. Dune migrations were iteratively processed both spatially and volumetrically, and the results were integrated to be compared to the Martian climate model. Migrations over well-known crater dune fields appeared to be almost static for the considerable temporal periods and were weakly correlated with wind directions estimated by the Mars Climate Database (Millour et al. 2015). As a result, a number of measurements over dune fields in the Mars Global Dune Database (Hayward et al. 2014) covering polar areas and mid-latitude will be demonstrated

  10. High resolution measurement of light in terrestrial ecosystems using photodegrading dyes.

    PubMed

    Roales, Javier; Durán, Jorge; Bechtold, Heather A; Groffman, Peter M; Rosi-Marshall, Emma J

    2013-01-01

    Incoming solar radiation is the main determinant of terrestrial ecosystem processes, such as primary production, litter decomposition, or soil mineralization rates. Light in terrestrial ecosystems is spatially and temporally heterogeneous due to the interaction among sunlight angle, cloud cover and tree-canopy structure. To integrate this variability and to know light distribution over time and space, a high number of measurements are needed, but tools to do this are usually expensive and limited. An easy-to-use and inexpensive method that can be used to measure light over time and space is needed. We used two photodegrading fluorescent organic dyes, rhodamine WT (RWT) and fluorescein, for the quantification of light. We measured dye photodegradation as the decrease in fluorescence across an irradiance gradient from full sunlight to deep shade. Then, we correlated it to accumulated light measured with PAR quantum sensors and obtained a model for this behavior. Rhodamine WT and fluorescein photodegradation followed an exponential decay curve with respect to accumulated light. Rhodamine WT degraded slower than fluorescein and remained unaltered after exposure to temperature changes. Under controlled conditions, fluorescence of both dyes decreased when temperatures increased, but returned to its initial values after cooling to the pre-heating temperature, indicating no degradation. RWT and fluorescein can be used to measure light under a varying range of light conditions in terrestrial ecosystems. This method is particularly useful to integrate solar radiation over time and to measure light simultaneously at different locations, and might be a better alternative to the expensive and time consuming traditional light measurement methods. The accuracy, low price and ease of this method make it a powerful tool for intensive sampling of large areas and for developing high resolution maps of light in an ecosystem. PMID:24069440

  11. A High Resolution Fourier-Transform Spectrometer for the Measurement of Atmospheric Column Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cageao, R.; Sander, S.; Blavier, J.; Jiang, Y.; Nemtchinov, V.

    2000-01-01

    A compact, high resolution Fourier-transform spectrometer for atmospheric near ultraviolet spectroscopy has been installed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Table Mountain Facility (34.4N, 117.7 W, elevation 2290m).

  12. High-resolution thermal expansion measurements under helium-gas pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Manna, Rudra Sekhar; Wolf, Bernd; Souza, Mariano de; Lang, Michael

    2012-08-15

    We report on the realization of a capacitive dilatometer, designed for high-resolution measurements of length changes of a material for temperatures 1.4 K Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To T Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 300 K and hydrostatic pressure P Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 250 MPa. Helium ({sup 4}He) is used as a pressure-transmitting medium, ensuring hydrostatic-pressure conditions. Special emphasis has been given to guarantee, to a good approximation, constant-pressure conditions during temperature sweeps. The performance of the dilatometer is demonstrated by measurements of the coefficient of thermal expansion at pressures P Asymptotically-Equal-To 0.1 MPa (ambient pressure) and 104 MPa on a single crystal of azurite, Cu{sub 3}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}, a quasi-one-dimensional spin S = 1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet. The results indicate a strong effect of pressure on the magnetic interactions in this system.

  13. Simultaneous high-resolution measurement of mitochondrial respiration and hydrogen peroxide production.

    PubMed

    Krumschnabel, Gerhard; Fontana-Ayoub, Mona; Sumbalova, Zuzana; Heidler, Juliana; Gauper, Kathrin; Fasching, Mario; Gnaiger, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiration is associated with the formation of reactive oxygen species, primarily in the form of superoxide (O2 (•-)) and particularly hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Since H2O2 plays important roles in physiology and pathology, measurement of hydrogen peroxide has received considerable attention over many years. Here we describe how the well-established Amplex Red assay can be used to detect H2O2 production in combination with the simultaneous assessment of mitochondrial bioenergetics by high-resolution respirometry. Fundamental instrumental and methodological parameters were optimized for analysis of the effects of various substrate, uncoupler, and inhibitor titrations (SUIT) on respiration versus H2O2 production. The sensitivity of the H2O2 assay was strongly influenced by compounds contained in different mitochondrial respiration media, which also exerted significant effects on chemical background fluorescence changes. Near linearity of the fluorescence signal was restricted to narrow ranges of accumulating resorufin concentrations independent of the nature of mitochondrial respiration media. Finally, we show an application example using isolated mouse brain mitochondria as an experimental model for the simultaneous measurement of mitochondrial respiration and H2O2 production in SUIT protocols.

  14. Patterning pallet arrays for cell selection based on high-resolution measurements of fluorescent biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Shadpour, Hamed; Zawistowski, Jon S.; Herman, Annadele; Hahn, Klaus; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    Pallet arrays enable cells to be separated while they remain adherent to a surface and provide a much greater range of cell selection criteria relative to that of current technologies. However there remains a need to further broaden cell selection criteria to include dynamic intracellular signaling events. To demonstrate the feasibility of measuring cellular protein behavior on the arrays using high resolution microscopy, the surfaces of individual pallets were modified to minimize the impact of scattered light at the pallet edges. The surfaces of the three-dimensional pallets on an array were patterned with a coating such as fibronectin using a customized stamping tool. Micropatterns of varying shape and size were printed in designated regions on the pallets in single or multiple steps to demonstrate the reliability and precision of patterning molecules on the pallet surface. Use of a fibronectin matrix stamped at the center of each pallet permitted the localization of H1299 and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells to the pallet centers and away from the edges. Compared to pallet arrays with fibronection coating the entire top surface, arrays with a central fibronectin pattern increased the percentage of cells localized to the pallet center by 3-4 fold. Localization of cells to the pallet center also enabled the physical separation of cells from optical artifacts created by the rough pallet side walls. To demonstrate the measurement of dynamic intracellular signaling on the arrays, fluorescence measurements of high spatial resolution were performed using a RhoA GTPase biosensor. This biosensor utilized fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to measure localized RhoA activity in cellular ruffles at the cell periphery. These results demonstrated the ability to perform spatially resolved measurements of fluorescence-based sensors on the pallet arrays. Thus, the patterned pallet

  15. Patterning pallet arrays for cell selection based on high-resolution measurements of fluorescent biosensors.

    PubMed

    Shadpour, Hamed; Zawistowski, Jon S; Herman, Annadele; Hahn, Klaus; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2011-06-24

    Pallet arrays enable cells to be separated while they remain adherent to a surface and provide a much greater range of cell selection criteria relative to that of current technologies. However there remains a need to further broaden cell selection criteria to include dynamic intracellular signaling events. To demonstrate the feasibility of measuring cellular protein behavior on the arrays using high resolution microscopy, the surfaces of individual pallets were modified to minimize the impact of scattered light at the pallet edges. The surfaces of the three-dimensional pallets on an array were patterned with a coating such as fibronectin using a customized stamping tool. Micropatterns of varying shape and size were printed in designated regions on the pallets in single or multiple steps to demonstrate the reliability and precision of patterning molecules on the pallet surface. Use of a fibronectin matrix stamped at the center of each pallet permitted the localization of H1299 and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells to the pallet centers and away from the edges. Compared to pallet arrays with fibronectin coating the entire top surface, arrays with a central fibronectin pattern increased the percentage of cells localized to the pallet center by 3-4-fold. Localization of cells to the pallet center also enabled the physical separation of cells from optical artifacts created by the rough pallet side walls. To demonstrate the measurement of dynamic intracellular signaling on the arrays, fluorescence measurements of high spatial resolution were performed using a RhoA GTPase biosensor. This biosensor utilized fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to measure localized RhoA activity in cellular ruffles at the cell periphery. These results demonstrated the ability to perform spatially resolved measurements of fluorescence-based sensors on the pallet arrays. Thus, the patterned pallet arrays

  16. Using High-Resolution Hand-Held Radiometers To Measure In-Situ Thermal Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burch, Douglas M.; Krintz, Donald F.

    1984-03-01

    A field study was carried out to investigate the accuracy of using high-resolution radiometers to determine the in situ thermal resistance of building components having conventional residential construction. Two different types of radiometers were used to determine the thermal resistances of the walls of six test buildings located at the National Bureau of Standards. These radiometer thermal resistance measurements were compared to reference thermal resistance values determined from steady-state series resistance predictions, time-averaged heat-flow-sensor measurements, and guarded-hot-box measurements. When measurements were carried out 5 hours after sunset when the outdoor temperature was relatively steady and the heating plant was operated in a typical cyclic fashion, the following results were obtained: for lightweight wood-frame cavity walls, the radiometer procedures were found to distinguish wall thermal resistance 4.4 h.ft2- °F/Btu (0.77 m2•K/W) systematically higher than corresponding reference values. Such a discrimination will per-mit insulated and uninsulated walls to be distinguished. However, in the case of walls having large heat capacity (e.g., masonry and log), thermal storage effects produced large time lags between the outdoor diurnal temperature variation and the heat-flow response at the inside surface. This phenomenon caused radiometer thermal resistances to deviate substantially from corresponding reference values. This study recommends that the ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 101-1981 be modified requiring the heating plant to be operated in a typical cyclic fashion instead of being turned off prior to and during radiometer measurements.

  17. High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging Enhanced With Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles Measures Macrophage Burden in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Morishige, Kunio; Kacher, Daniel F.; Libby, Peter; Josephson, Lee; Ganz, Peter; Weissleder, Ralph; Aikawa, Masanori

    2010-01-01

    Background Macrophages contribute to the progression and acute complications of atherosclerosis. Macrophage imaging may serve as a biomarker to identify subclinical inflamed lesions, to predict future risk, and to aid in the assessment of novel therapies. Methods and Results To test the hypothesis that nanoparticle-enhanced, high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can measure plaque macrophage accumulation, we used 3-T MRI with a macrophage-targeted superparamagnetic nanoparticle preparation (monocrystalline iron oxide nanoparticles-47 [MION-47]) in cholesterol-fed New Zealand White rabbits 6 months after balloon injury. In vivo MRI visualized thickened abdominal aortas on both T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo images (T1 spin echo, 20 axial slices per animal; T2 spin echo, 28 slices per animal). Seventy-two hours after MION-47 injection, aortas exhibited lower T2 signal intensity compared with before contrast imaging (signal intensity ratio, aortic wall/muscle: before, 1.44±0.26 versus after, 0.95±0.22; 164 slices; P<0.01), whereas T1 spin echo images showed no significant change. MRI on ex vivo specimens provided similar results. Histological studies colocalized iron accumulation with immunoreactive macrophages in atheromata. The magnitude of signal intensity reduction on T2 spin echo in vivo images further correlated with macrophage areas in situ (150 slices; r=0.73). Treatment with rosuvastatin for 3 months yielded diminished macrophage content (P<0.05) and reversed T2 signal intensity changes (P<0.005). Signal changes in rosuvastatin-treated rabbits correlated with reduced macrophage burden (r=0.73). In vitro validation studies showed concentration-dependent MION-47 uptake by human primary macrophages. Conclusion The magnitude of T2 signal intensity reduction in high-resolution MRI after administration of superparamagnetic phagocytosable nanoparticles can assess macrophage burden in atheromata, providing a clinically translatable tool to identify

  18. High resolution measurement of neutron inelastic scattering cross-sections for 23Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouki, C.; Archier, P.; Borcea, C.; De Saint Jean, C.; Drohé, J. C.; Kopecky, S.; Moens, A.; Nankov, N.; Negret, A.; Noguère, G.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Stanoiu, M.

    2012-04-01

    The neutron inelastic scattering cross-section of 23Na has been measured in response to the relevant request of the OECD-NEA High Priority Request List, which requires a target uncertainty of 4% in the energy range up to 1.35 MeV for the development of sodium-cooled fast reactors. The measurement was performed at the GELINA facility with the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS), featuring eight high purity germanium detectors. The setup is installed at a 200 m flight path from the neutron source and provides high resolution measurements using the (n,n'γ)-technique. The sample was an 80 mm diameter metallic sodium disk prepared at IRMM. Transitions up to the seventh excited state were observed and the differential gamma cross-sections at 110° and 150° were measured, showing mostly isotropic gamma emission. From these the gamma production, level and inelastic cross-sections were determined for neutron energies up to 3838.9 keV. The results agree well with the existing data and the evaluated nuclear data libraries in the low energies, and provide new experimental points in the little studied region above 2 MeV. Following a detailed review of the methodology used for the gamma efficiency calibrations and flux normalization of GAINS data, an estimated total uncertainty of 2.2% was achieved for the inelastic cross-section integrals over the energy ranges 0.498-1.35 MeV and 1.35-2.23 MeV, meeting the required targets.

  19. High-resolution surface connectivity measurements and runoff dynamics in five urban watersheds in Knoxville, TN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epps, T.

    2015-12-01

    Impervious surfaces and stormwater drainage networks transmit rainfall quickly to urban stream systems with greater frequency, volume, energy, and pollutant loadings than in predevelopment conditions. This has a well-established negative impact on stream ecology, channel morphology, and water quality. Green infrastructure retrofits for urban drainage systems promote more natural hydrologic pathways by disconnecting concentrated flows. However, they are expensive due to high land costs and physical constraints. If a systematic strategy for siting green infrastructure is sought to restore natural flows throughout an urban catchment, greater knowledge of the drainage patterns and areas contributing frequent surface runoff is necessary. Five diverse urban watersheds in Knoxville, TN, were assessed using high-resolution topography, land cover, and artificial drainage network data to identify how surface connectivity differs among watersheds and contributes to altered flow regimes. Rainfall-runoff patterns were determined from continuous rainfall and streamflow monitoring over the previous ten years. Fine-scale flowpath connectivity of impervious surfaces was measured by both a binary approach and by a method incorporating runoff potential by saturation excess. The effect of the spatial distribution of connected surfaces was investigated by incorporating several distance-weighting schema along established urban drainage flowpaths. Statistical relationships between runoff generation and connectivity were measured to determine the ability of these different measures of connectivity to predict runoff thresholds, frequency, volumes, and peak flows. Initial results suggest that rapid assessment of connected surficial flowpaths can be used to identify known green infrastructure assets and highly connected impervious areas and that the differences in connectivity measured between watersheds reflects differing runoff patterns observed in monitored data.

  20. Measurement of ciliary beat frequency using ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jason J.; Jing, Joseph C.; Su, Erica; Badger, Christopher; Coughlan, Carolyn A.; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2016-02-01

    Ciliated epithelial cells populate up to 80% of the surface area of the human airway and are responsible for mucociliary transport, which is the key protective mechanism that provides the first line of defense in the respiratory tract. Cilia beat in a rhythmic pattern and may be easily affected by allergens, pollutants, and pathogens, altering ciliary beat frequency (CBF) subsequently. Diseases including cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and primary ciliary dyskinesia may also decrease CBF. CBF is therefore a critical component of respiratory health. The current clinical method of measuring CBF is phase-contrast microscopy, which involves a tissue biopsy obtained via brushing of the nasal cavity. While this method is minimally invasive, the tissue sample must be oriented to display its profile view, making the visualization of a single layer of cilia challenging. In addition, the conventional method requires subjective analysis of CBF, e.g., manually counting by visual inspection. On the contrary, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used to study the retina in ophthalmology as well as vasculature in cardiology, and offers higher resolution than conventional computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Based on this technology, our lab specifically developed an ultra-high resolution OCT system to image the microstructure of the ciliated epithelial cells. Doppler analysis was also performed to determine CBF. Lastly, we also developed a program that utilizes fast Fourier transform to determine CBF under phase-contrast microscopy, providing a more objective method compared to the current method.

  1. Spatial variability of the Black Sea surface temperature from high resolution modeling and satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizyuk, Artem; Senderov, Maxim; Korotaev, Gennady

    2016-04-01

    Large number of numerical ocean models were implemented for the Black Sea basin during last two decades. They reproduce rather similar structure of synoptical variability of the circulation. Since 00-s numerical studies of the mesoscale structure are carried out using high performance computing (HPC). With the growing capacity of computing resources it is now possible to reconstruct the Black Sea currents with spatial resolution of several hundreds meters. However, how realistic these results can be? In the proposed study an attempt is made to understand which spatial scales are reproduced by ocean model in the Black Sea. Simulations are made using parallel version of NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean). A two regional configurations with spatial resolutions 5 km and 2.5 km are described. Comparison of the SST from simulations with two spatial resolutions shows rather qualitative difference of the spatial structures. Results of high resolution simulation are compared also with satellite observations and observation-based products from Copernicus using spatial correlation and spectral analysis. Spatial scales of correlations functions for simulated and observed SST are rather close and differs much from satellite SST reanalysis. Evolution of spectral density for modelled SST and reanalysis showed agreed time periods of small scales intensification. Using of the spectral analysis for satellite measurements is complicated due to gaps. The research leading to this results has received funding from Russian Science Foundation (project № 15-17-20020)

  2. High-resolution measurements of shock behavior across frictional Be/Cu interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, E.; Hammerberg, J.; Cooley, J. C.; Shimada, T.; Johnson, R. P.; Peralta, P.; Olson, R.; Gray, G. T.

    2015-05-01

    A longstanding question in the field of multi-material behavior pertains to the treatment of interfaces possessing finite frictional strength under high dynamic pressures and shear. Here, we examine the effects of constrained interface sliding on local deformation near the boundary using new, high-resolution measurements combined with simulations to infer friction strength. The experiments use laser driven plate impacts at the Los Alamos National Laboratory TRIDENT Laser Facility to launch a shock wave into a target consisting of a central cylindrical plate of Be and an outer ring of Cu oriented, such that the shock propagates at nearly a 90° angle to the interface normal producing a large velocity gradient across the material boundary. Impact experiments were performed on targets that underwent diffusion bonding of the two materials and on targets that were only press fit together. Friction-induced surface deformation was diagnosed using line-imaging velocity interferometry and surface Transient Imaging Displacement Interferometry in the immediate region of the interface. In these studies, we observed a significant behavioral change in both simulations and experiments between targets with diffusion bonded interfaces and those that were press fit. Bonded targets exhibited a mutual dragging between the Be and Cu parts throughout the entire experiment, whereas unbonded targets displayed a surface slope reversal on the Cu side of the interface, which simulations suggest arise due to altered wave interactions from a 3× lower frictional force compared to the bonded interface.

  3. Angle-resolved effective potentials for disk-shaped molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, Thomas; Palczynski, Karol; Dzubiella, Joachim; Klapp, Sabine H. L.

    2014-12-01

    We present an approach for calculating coarse-grained angle-resolved effective pair potentials for uniaxial molecules. For integrating out the intramolecular degrees of freedom we apply umbrella sampling and steered dynamics techniques in atomistically-resolved molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Throughout this study we focus on disk-like molecules such as coronene. To develop the methods we focus on integrating out the van der Waals and intramolecular interactions, while electrostatic charge contributions are neglected. The resulting coarse-grained pair potential reveals a strong temperature and angle dependence. In the next step we fit the numerical data with various Gay-Berne-like potentials to be used in more efficient simulations on larger scales. The quality of the resulting coarse-grained results is evaluated by comparing their pair and many-body structure as well as some thermodynamic quantities self-consistently to the outcome of atomistic MD simulations of many-particle systems. We find that angle-resolved potentials are essential not only to accurately describe crystal structures but also for fluid systems where simple isotropic potentials start to fail already for low to moderate packing fractions. Further, in describing these states it is crucial to take into account the pronounced temperature dependence arising in selected pair configurations due to bending fluctuations.

  4. Angle-resolved effective potentials for disk-shaped molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, Thomas Klapp, Sabine H. L.; Palczynski, Karol Dzubiella, Joachim

    2014-12-07

    We present an approach for calculating coarse-grained angle-resolved effective pair potentials for uniaxial molecules. For integrating out the intramolecular degrees of freedom we apply umbrella sampling and steered dynamics techniques in atomistically-resolved molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Throughout this study we focus on disk-like molecules such as coronene. To develop the methods we focus on integrating out the van der Waals and intramolecular interactions, while electrostatic charge contributions are neglected. The resulting coarse-grained pair potential reveals a strong temperature and angle dependence. In the next step we fit the numerical data with various Gay-Berne-like potentials to be used in more efficient simulations on larger scales. The quality of the resulting coarse-grained results is evaluated by comparing their pair and many-body structure as well as some thermodynamic quantities self-consistently to the outcome of atomistic MD simulations of many-particle systems. We find that angle-resolved potentials are essential not only to accurately describe crystal structures but also for fluid systems where simple isotropic potentials start to fail already for low to moderate packing fractions. Further, in describing these states it is crucial to take into account the pronounced temperature dependence arising in selected pair configurations due to bending fluctuations.

  5. Angle-resolved effective potentials for disk-shaped molecules.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Thomas; Palczynski, Karol; Dzubiella, Joachim; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2014-12-01

    We present an approach for calculating coarse-grained angle-resolved effective pair potentials for uniaxial molecules. For integrating out the intramolecular degrees of freedom we apply umbrella sampling and steered dynamics techniques in atomistically-resolved molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Throughout this study we focus on disk-like molecules such as coronene. To develop the methods we focus on integrating out the van der Waals and intramolecular interactions, while electrostatic charge contributions are neglected. The resulting coarse-grained pair potential reveals a strong temperature and angle dependence. In the next step we fit the numerical data with various Gay-Berne-like potentials to be used in more efficient simulations on larger scales. The quality of the resulting coarse-grained results is evaluated by comparing their pair and many-body structure as well as some thermodynamic quantities self-consistently to the outcome of atomistic MD simulations of many-particle systems. We find that angle-resolved potentials are essential not only to accurately describe crystal structures but also for fluid systems where simple isotropic potentials start to fail already for low to moderate packing fractions. Further, in describing these states it is crucial to take into account the pronounced temperature dependence arising in selected pair configurations due to bending fluctuations.

  6. High-resolution Measurement Of Magnetic Anomalies With An Unmanned Airship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzke, M.; Hofmeister, P.; Auster, H.; Hoerdt, A.; Glassmeier, K.

    2011-12-01

    High-resolution magnetic mapping of areas is a suitable way to determine location, geometry and physical parameters of disturbing objects that cause magnetic anomalies. Areas are often difficult to walk and handheld measurements can become costly. It can also be dangerous to enter areas where ordnance is suspected. In these cases it may be advantageous to use an aircraft to perform the measurement. We use a 6.5 m long unmanned airship. Compared to helicopters or gyrocopters, an advantage is that the damage in case of hazards is almost negligible. We made considerable efforts to construct a system that is easy to control without intense training under moderate wind conditions (up to 2 m/s wind speed). The airship has a mass of 10 kg and is powered by four electric motors with a maximum total power of 4.8 kW. Two of the rotors are used to control the altitude of the ship; the other two can be used to control direction and speed. The required energy is provided by four 4S1P Lithium-Polymer battery packs. Batteries are designed to provide a maximum of 125 A at 14.8 V. They have a capacity of 0.3 kWh and can be recharged in 20 minutes. The airship carries a differential GPS receiver that measures the position of the airship at 100 Hz with a precision of 10 cm. The distance to the ground is measured with ultrasonic sensors. A fluxgate magnetometer measures the magnetic field with an accuracy of 1 nT, also at 100 Hz. The flight path does not follow a rigid measuring grid but is a random walk, with roughly constant altitude to achieve a mean sensor position of 2 m above the ground. Thus, near-surface disturbing bodies are well resolved if their distance from each other is greater than 4 m. First measurements demonstrate the feasibility of the system. Future applications will be mid-scale measurements which are too large or too cumbersome for handheld measurements, and too small to justify the use of a manned helicopter.

  7. High-Resolution X-Ray and Light Beam Induced Current (LBIC) Measurements of Multcrystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Budai, John D; Bennett, Charlee J C; Tischler, Jonathan Zachary; Duty, Chad E; Yelundur, V.; Rohatgi, A.

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution, spatially-resolved x-ray Laue patterns and high-resolution light beam induced current (LBIC) measurements are combined to study two multicrystalline solar cells made from the Heat Exchanger Method (HEM) and the Sting Ribbon Growth technique. The LBIC measurements were made at 4 different wavelengths (488, 633, 780, and 980 nm), resulting in penetration depths ranging from <1 {mu}m to >100 {mu}m. There is a strong correlation between the x-ray and LBIC measurements, showing that some twins and grain boundaries are effective in the reduction of local quantum efficiency, while others are benign.

  8. Differential membrane-based nanocalorimeter for high-resolution measurements of low-temperature specific heat.

    PubMed

    Tagliati, S; Krasnov, V M; Rydh, A

    2012-05-01

    A differential, membrane-based nanocalorimeter for general specific heat studies of very small samples, ranging from 0.5 mg to sub-μg in mass, is described. The calorimeter operates over the temperature range from above room temperature down to 0.5 K. It consists of a pair of cells, each of which is a stack of heaters and thermometer in the center of a silicon nitride membrane, in total giving a background heat capacity less than 100 nJ/K at 300 K, decreasing to 10 pJ/K at 1 K. The device has several distinctive features: (i) The resistive thermometer, made of a Ge(1 - x)Au(x) alloy, displays a high dimensionless sensitivity ∣dlnR∕dlnT∣ ≳ 1 over the entire temperature range. (ii) The sample is placed in direct contact with the thermometer, which is allowed to self-heat. The thermometer can thus be operated at high dc current to increase the resolution. (iii) Data are acquired with a set of eight synchronized lock-in amplifiers measuring dc, 1st and 2nd harmonic signals of heaters and thermometer. This gives high resolution and allows continuous output adjustments without additional noise. (iv) Absolute accuracy is achieved via a variable-frequency-fixed-phase technique in which the measurement frequency is automatically adjusted during the measurements to account for the temperature variation of the sample heat capacity and the device thermal conductance. The performance of the calorimeter is illustrated by studying the heat capacity of a small Au sample and the specific heat of a 2.6 μg piece of superconducting Pb in various magnetic fields.

  9. A high-resolution spectropolarimetric survey of Herbig Ae/Be stars - I. Observations and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alecian, E.; Wade, G. A.; Catala, C.; Grunhut, J. H.; Landstreet, J. D.; Bagnulo, S.; Böhm, T.; Folsom, C. P.; Marsden, S.; Waite, I.

    2013-02-01

    This is the first in a series of papers in which we describe and report the analysis of a large survey of Herbig Ae/Be stars in circular spectropolarimetry. Using the ESPaDOnS and Narval high-resolution spectropolarimeters at the Canada-France-Hawaii and Bernard Lyot Telescopes, respectively, we have acquired 132 circularly polarized spectra of 70 Herbig Ae/Be stars and Herbig candidates. The large majority of these spectra are characterized by a resolving power of about 65 000, and a spectral coverage from about 3700 Å to 1 μm. The peak signal-to-noise ratio per CCD pixel ranges from below 100 (for the faintest targets) to over 1000 (for the brightest). The observations were acquired with the primary aim of searching for magnetic fields in these objects. However, our spectra are suitable for a variety of other important measurements, including rotational properties, variability, binarity, chemical abundances, circumstellar environment conditions and structure, etc. In this paper, we describe the sample selection, the observations and their reduction, and the measurements that will comprise the basis of much of our following analysis. We describe the determination of fundamental parameters for each target. We detail the least-squares deconvolution (LSD) that we have applied to each of our spectra, including the selection, editing and tuning of the LSD line masks. We describe the fitting of the LSD Stokes I profiles using a multicomponent model that yields the rotationally broadened photospheric profile (providing the projected rotational velocity and radial velocity for each observation) as well as circumstellar emission and absorption components. Finally, we diagnose the longitudinal Zeeman effect via the measured circular polarization, and report the longitudinal magnetic field and Stokes V Zeeman signature detection probability. As an appendix, we provide a detailed review of each star observed.

  10. An Economical High Resolution Spectrograph Optimized for Radial Velocity Measurements at 5000 Angstroms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, D.; Arion, D. N.

    2004-12-01

    A high resolution spectrometer was built and calibrated on an optical bench. The target resolution of the instrument was designed to allow accurate measurement of the Doppler shifts of the 5007 Angstrom O III line in planetary nebulae due to their expansion. The optical components of the instrument include two Meade ETX 90 Maksutov-Cassegrain telescopes, a Richardson Grating Laboratory reflection diffraction grating, nickel-plated glass slides used as slit apertures, and an SBIG ST-8E CCD imaging camera. The mounts for each of the optical components were machined out of aluminum bar and plate stock. The instrument was calibrated using He and Hg gas discharge tubes generating spectra of known wavelengths. A total of four sets of lines were imaged and analyzed to calibrate the instrument. The line shapes in the images were manually fit with functions approximating the pressure and Doppler broadening of the lines, as expected for the behavior of the lines emitted by the spectrum tubes. These fits were used to identify the line peak positions, which were then compared to standard line wavelengths to determine the instrument calibration. The He I line at 5015.678 Angstrom line was carefully analyzed to determine the system wavelength uncertainty, which determines the smallest resolvable difference in wavelength that the instrument can determine. The resulting operating resolution at 5007 Angstroms was found to be 206474, making the instrument capable of resolving Doppler shifts at 5007 Angstroms corresponding to +/- 1.4 kilometers per second. The program was thus successful in developing an instrument suitable for a variety of relatively low velocity Doppler measurements, especially those associated with planetary nebula expansions. Future work entails developing a mounting system to rigidly hold the instrument on a suitable telescope, while maintaining the necessary precision to retain the instrumental resolution. This work was supported in part by Carthage College

  11. Ambient Aerosol in Southeast Asia: High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Measurements Over Oil Palm (Elaeis guineensis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, G.; Dimarco, C.; Misztal, P.; Nemitz, E.; Farmer, D.; Kimmel, J.; Jimenez, J.

    2008-12-01

    The emission of organic compounds in the troposphere is important factor in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). A very large proportion of organic material emitted globally is estimated to arise from biogenic sources, with almost half coming from tropical and sub-tropical forests. Preliminary analyses of leave cuvette emission studies suggest that oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) is a significantly larger source of isoprene than tropical forest. Much larger sources of isoprene over oil palm allied with a larger anthropogenic component of local emissions contrast greatly with the remote tropical forest environment and therefore the character of SOA formed may differ significantly. These issues, allied with the high price of palm oil on international markets leading to increased use of land for oil palm production, could give rise to rapidly changing chemical and aerosol regimes in the tropics. It is therefore important to understand the current emissions and composition of organic aerosol over all important land-uses in the tropical environment. This in turn will lead to a greater understanding of the present, and to an improvement in predictive capacity for the future system. To help address these issues, a high resolution time of flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed in the Sabahmas (PPB OIL) oil palm plantation near Lahad Datu, in Eastern Sabah, as part of the field component of the Aerosol Coupling in the Earth System (ACES) project, part of the UK NERC APPRAISE program. This project was allied closely with measurements made of similar chemical species and aerosol components at a forest site in the Danum Valley as part of the UK Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes above a Southeast Asian tropical rainforest (OP3) project. Measurements of submicron non- refractory aerosol composition are presented along with some preliminary analysis of chemically resolved aerosol fluxes made with a new eddy covariance system, based on the

  12. Angle-Resolved Second-Harmonic Light Scattering from Colloidal Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, N.; Angerer, W. E.; Yodh, A. G.

    2001-09-01

    We report angle-resolved second-harmonic generation (SHG) measurements from suspensions of centrosymmetric micron-size polystyrene spheres with surface-adsorbed dye (malachite green). The second-harmonic scattering profiles differ qualitatively from linear light scattering profiles of the same particles. We investigated these radiation patterns using several polarization configurations and particle diameters. We introduce a simple Rayleigh-Gans-Debye model to account for the SHG scattering anisotropy. The model compares favorably with our experimental data. Our measurements suggest scattering anisotropy may be used to isolate particle nonlinear optics from other bulk nonlinear optical effects in suspension.

  13. Angle-Resolved Second-Harmonic Light Scattering from Colloidal Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, N.; Angerer, W. E.; Yodh, A. G.

    2001-09-03

    We report angle-resolved second-harmonic generation (SHG) measurements from suspensions of centrosymmetric micron-size polystyrene spheres with surface-adsorbed dye (malachite green). The second-harmonic scattering profiles differ qualitatively from linear light scattering profiles of the same particles. We investigated these radiation patterns using several polarization configurations and particle diameters. We introduce a simple Rayleigh-Gans-Debye model to account for the SHG scattering anisotropy. The model compares favorably with our experimental data. Our measurements suggest scattering anisotropy may be used to isolate particle nonlinear optics from other bulk nonlinear optical effects in suspension.

  14. Emerging Trends on the Volatile Chemistry in Comets as Measured with High-Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dello Russo, Neil; Kawakita, Hideyo; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Weaver, Harold A.

    2016-10-01

    A systematic analysis of the mixing ratios with respect to H2O for eight species (CH3OH, HCN, NH3, H2CO, C2H2, C2H6, CH4, and CO) measured with high-resolution infrared spectroscopy is presented. Some trends are beginning to emerge when mixing ratios in individual comets are compared to average mixing ratios obtained for all species within the population. The variation in mixing ratios for all measured species is at least an order of magnitude. Overall, Jupiter-family comets are depleted in volatile species with respect to H2O compared to long-period Oort cloud comets, with the most volatile species showing the greatest relative depletion. There is a high positive correlation between the mixing ratios of HCN, C2H6, and CH4, whereas NH3, H2CO, and C2H2 are moderately correlated with each other but generally uncorrelated or show only weak correlation with other species. CO is generally uncorrelated with the other measured species possibly because it has the highest volatility and is therefore more susceptible to thermal evolutionary effects. Molecular mixing ratios for CH3OH, HCN, C2H6, and CH4 show an expected behavior with heliocentric distance suggesting a dominant ice source, whereas there is emerging evidence that the mixing ratios of NH3, H2CO, and C2H2 may increase at small heliocentric distances, suggesting the possibility of additional sources related to the thermal decomposition of organic dust. Although this provides information on the composition of the most volatile grains in comets, it presents an additional difficulty in classifying comet chemistry because most comets within this dataset were only observed over a limited range of heliocentric distance. Optical and infrared comparisons indicate that mixing ratios of daughter species and potential parents from cometary ices are sometimes but not always consistent with one another. This suggests that in many comets there are significant sources of C2 and/or CN from grains, and that the importance of these

  15. High precision titanium isotope measurements on geological samples by high resolution MC-ICPMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leya, Ingo; Schönbächler, Maria; Wiechert, Uwe; Krähenbühl, Urs; Halliday, Alex N.

    2007-05-01

    A method has been developed for the precise and reproducible measurement of Ti isotopes in natural materials using high resolution MC-ICPMS. Instrumental mass fractionation is internally corrected using 49Ti/47Ti. Replicate measurements of synthetic standard solutions, terrestrial rocks, and the carbonaceous chondrite Allende yield a long-term reproducibility (2[sigma]) of 0.28[var epsilon], 0.34[var epsilon], and 0.28[var epsilon] for 50Ti/47Ti, 48Ti/47Ti, and 46Ti/47Ti, respectively. Isobaric interferences from 46,48Ca+, 50V+, 50Cr+, and doubly charged Zr can be corrected for reliably in separated Ti solutions with Ca/Ti < 5, V/Ti < 0.3, Cr/Ti < 0.2, and Zr/Ti < 1, respectively. Such elemental ratios are achieved easily in most samples using the anion-exchange procedure presented. Single and double charged polyatomic ions can either be resolved, e.g., 14N36Ar+, or do not compromise the measurements. The method has been successfully applied to terrestrial rocks, meteorites, and various mineral separates. Terrestrial samples and standards agree within analytical uncertainties but are consistently different from the recommended values of Niederer et al. [F.R. Niederer, D.A. Papanastassiou, G.J. Wasserburg, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 45 (1981) 1017] with the largest effect on 50Ti/47Ti. The new results provide evidence that the recommended terrestrial 50Ti/47Ti is not well constrained; our data are higher by ~13[var epsilon] than the recommended value. Better agreement is found with the values recommended by Heydegger et al. [H.R. Heydegger, J.J. Foster, W. Compston, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 58 (1982) 406]. Our best estimate for the isotopic composition of terrestrial Ti (relative to 49Ti/47Ti = 0.749766) is: 50Ti/47Ti = 0.73010, 48Ti/47Ti = 10.06884, and 46Ti/47Ti = 1.09325. This corresponds to an atomic weight of 47.877, significantly different from the value of 47.867 recommended by IUPAC. A 50Ti/47Ti anomaly for bulk Allende of 3.37 ± 0.51[var epsilon] is found

  16. Angle-resolved photoemission study of Ag(1 1 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edamoto, K.; Miyazaki, E.; Shimokoshi, K.; Kato, H.

    1990-01-01

    The (1 1 1) face of Ag has been studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy utilizing synchrotron radiation as the excitation source (25 <= hv <= 50eV). The overlapping Ag 4d bands were deconvolved by the modified FIRO method. The peak positions thus determined are used to map the dispersion curves along the lang1 1 1rang (Γ-L) direction. The results show general agreement with calculated band structure, so far as the energy levels and symmetries are concerned. However, it is found that the density of state effect is dominant in the spectra obtained in the present photon energy region. The emission from the Ag 5s, p bands is observed to be broadened due to the indirect transition process.

  17. High-Resolution Fourier-Transform Ultraviolet-Visible Spectrometer for the Measurement of Atmospheric Trace Species: Application to OH.

    PubMed

    Cageao, R P; Blavier, J F; McGuire, J P; Jiang, Y; Nemtchinov, V; Mills, F P; Sander, S P

    2001-04-20

    A compact, high-resolution Fourier-transform spectrometer for atmospheric near-ultraviolet spectroscopy has been installed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Table Mountain Facility (34.4 degrees N, 117.7 degrees W, elevation 2290 m). This instrument is designed with an unapodized resolving power near 500,000 at 300 nm to provide high-resolution spectra from 290 to 675 nm for the quantification of column abundances of trace atmospheric species. The measurement technique used is spectral analysis of molecular absorptions of solar radiation. The instrument, accompanying systems designs, and results of the atmospheric hydroxyl column observations are described. PMID:18357206

  18. High resolution satellite measurements of coastal wind field and sea state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, Susanne

    TerraSAR-X is a new high resolution right looking radar satellite that has been launched on June 15, 2007. (http://www.dlr.de/tsx). TSX carries a high frequency X-band SAR sensor that can be operated in different modes (resolutions) and polarization. Since February 2008 the data are available for general scientific use. The satellite design is based on technology and knowledge achieved from the successful Synthetic Aperture Radar missions X-SAR/SIR-C and SRTM. The sensor operates in different modes: • the "Spotlight" mode with 10 x 10 km scenes at a resolution of 1-2 meters, • the "Stripmap"mode with 30 km wide strips at a resolution between 3 and 6 meters, • the "ScanSAR" mode with 100 km wide strips at a resolution of 16 meters. These images are of particularly interest for oceanographers due to the fact that using radar the sea surface can be observed through clouds and independent of illumination by sunlight. Radar images give the intensity of the backscattered signal, over the sea surface this signal is related to the roughness of the surface and therefore to the wind speed and the sea state. A new algorithm to deduce wind speed from TerraSAR X images is derived The streaks on the sea surface of the image are used to determine the wind direction. Wind shadow behind the coast helps to resolve the 180 degree ambiguity. The intensity of the image (further depending on incidence angle) is used to derive the wind speed by a new XMOD algorithm. From the radar images ocean wave length down to 10meters, direction and significant wave height is determined. The wave length of the ocean waves approaching the shoreline and breaking is measured and compared to in Situ measurements. Thus coastal processes affecting offshore buildings can be studied in detail. Examples from the English Channel, the Strait of Gibraltar and Offshore wind farms situated in the North Sea are given.

  19. Collision cross section measurements for biomolecules within a high-resolution FT-ICR cell: theory.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dan; Xin, Yi; Li, Dayu; Xu, Wei

    2015-04-14

    In this study, an energetic hard-sphere ion-neutral collision model was proposed to bridge-link ion collision cross section (CCS) with the image current collected from a high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) cell. By investigating the nonlinear effects induced by high-order electric fields and image charge forces, the energetic hard-sphere collision model was validated through experiments. Suitable application regions for the energetic hard-sphere collision model, as well as for the conventional Langevin and hard-sphere collision models, were also discussed. The energetic hard-sphere collision model was applied in the extraction of ion CCSs from high-resolution FT-ICR mass spectra. Discussions in the present study also apply to FT-Orbitraps and FT-quadrupole ion traps.

  20. Collision cross section measurements for biomolecules within a high-resolution FT-ICR cell: theory.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dan; Xin, Yi; Li, Dayu; Xu, Wei

    2015-04-14

    In this study, an energetic hard-sphere ion-neutral collision model was proposed to bridge-link ion collision cross section (CCS) with the image current collected from a high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) cell. By investigating the nonlinear effects induced by high-order electric fields and image charge forces, the energetic hard-sphere collision model was validated through experiments. Suitable application regions for the energetic hard-sphere collision model, as well as for the conventional Langevin and hard-sphere collision models, were also discussed. The energetic hard-sphere collision model was applied in the extraction of ion CCSs from high-resolution FT-ICR mass spectra. Discussions in the present study also apply to FT-Orbitraps and FT-quadrupole ion traps. PMID:25754983

  1. Measurement method for roll angular displacement with a high resolution by using diffraction gratings and a heterodyne interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Shanzhi; Wang, Zhao; Gao, Jianmin; Guo, Junjie

    2014-04-15

    The roll angle measurement is difficult to be achieved directly using a typical commercial interferometer due to its low sensitivity in axial direction, where the axial direction is orthogonal to the plane of the roll angular displacement. A roll angle measurement method combined diffraction gratings with a laser heterodyne interferometer is discussed in this paper. The diffraction grating placed in the plane of a roll angular displacement and the interferometer arranged in the plane's orthogonal direction, constitute the measurement pattern for the roll angle with high resolution. The roll angular displacement, considered as the linear, can be tested precisely when the corresponding angle is very small. Using the proposed method, the angle roll measurement obtains the high resolution of 0.002{sup ″}. Experiment has proved its feasibility and practicability.

  2. Measurement method for roll angular displacement with a high resolution by using diffraction gratings and a heterodyne interferometer.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shanzhi; Wang, Zhao; Gao, Jianmin; Guo, Junjie

    2014-04-01

    The roll angle measurement is difficult to be achieved directly using a typical commercial interferometer due to its low sensitivity in axial direction, where the axial direction is orthogonal to the plane of the roll angular displacement. A roll angle measurement method combined diffraction gratings with a laser heterodyne interferometer is discussed in this paper. The diffraction grating placed in the plane of a roll angular displacement and the interferometer arranged in the plane's orthogonal direction, constitute the measurement pattern for the roll angle with high resolution. The roll angular displacement, considered as the linear, can be tested precisely when the corresponding angle is very small. Using the proposed method, the angle roll measurement obtains the high resolution of 0.002″. Experiment has proved its feasibility and practicability.

  3. Extended-range grazing-incidence spectrometer for high-resolution extreme ultraviolet measurements on an electron beam ion trap.

    PubMed

    Beiersdorfer, P; Magee, E W; Brown, G V; Hell, N; Träbert, E; Widmann, K

    2014-11-01

    A high-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for performing very high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Å to above 300 Å. The instrument operates without an entrance slit and focuses the light emitted by highly charged ions located in the roughly 50 μm wide electron beam onto a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The measured line widths are below 0.025 Å above 100 Å, and the resolving power appears to be limited by the source size and Doppler broadening of the trapped ions. Comparisons with spectra obtained with existing grating spectrometers show an order of magnitude improvement in spectral resolution.

  4. Extended-range grazing-incidence spectrometer for high-resolution extreme ultraviolet measurements on an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V.; Träbert, E.; Widmann, K.; Hell, N.

    2014-11-15

    A high-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for performing very high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Å to above 300 Å. The instrument operates without an entrance slit and focuses the light emitted by highly charged ions located in the roughly 50 μm wide electron beam onto a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The measured line widths are below 0.025 Å above 100 Å, and the resolving power appears to be limited by the source size and Doppler broadening of the trapped ions. Comparisons with spectra obtained with existing grating spectrometers show an order of magnitude improvement in spectral resolution.

  5. Model validation: Issues regarding comparisons of point measurements and high-resolution modeling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandvik, Anne D.; Skagseth, Øystein; Skogen, Morten D.

    2016-10-01

    In this study we compare a high resolution model of waters on the Norwegian Shelf with hydrographic observations obtained during 2009 at Ingøy, a fixed coastal station off northwestern Norway operated by the Institute of Marine Research. The observations comprise snapshots from Ingøy every two weeks, whereas the model represents an average over a certain volume and is continuous in time. We suggest that bias is the best way to compare the modeled and observed times series, while acknowledging the short-term variability (within a day) it is recommended to use the modeled range to estimate an acceptable deviation between single points in the series. Using the suggested method we conclude that an acceptable deviation between the modeled and observed surface temperatures at Ingøy is 0.6 °C. With such an acceptance level the model is correct in 27 out of 33 points for the time series considered.

  6. High resolution measurements of the low state of Cyg X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, R. E.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Cyg X-1 was observed on two occasions separated by a year by the same X-ray rocket payload. High resolution temporal and spectral data reveal that Cyg X-1 was essentially unchanged in these two observations a year apart, with bursts of millisecond duration observed in the earlier flight and also, observed in the second. Analysis of these bursts has failed to reveal any internal temporal structure, either luminous or spectral. The shot noise character of temporal fluctuations on timescales approximately 1 second can be explained by the presence of exponential pulses with a fraction of a second time constant and a rate near 8 sec/1. The possible connection of these pulses with the bursts is examined.

  7. High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Imaging Measurements Using Externally Segmented Germanium Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callas, J.; Mahoney, W.; Skelton, R.; Varnell, L.; Wheaton, W.

    1994-01-01

    Fully two-dimensional gamma-ray imaging with simultaneous high-resolution spectroscopy has been demonstrated using an externally segmented germanium sensor. The system employs a single high-purity coaxial detector with its outer electrode segmented into 5 distinct charge collection regions and a lead coded aperture with a uniformly redundant array (URA) pattern. A series of one-dimensional responses was collected around 511 keV while the system was rotated in steps through 180 degrees. A non-negative, linear least-squares algorithm was then employed to reconstruct a 2-dimensional image. Corrections for multiple scattering in the detector, and the finite distance of source and detector are made in the reconstruction process.

  8. High-Resolution UV Relay Lens for Particle Size Distribution Measurements Using Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Robert M. Malone, Brent C. Frogget, Morris I. Kaufman, Aric Tibbits, Gene A. Capelle, Mike Grover, Gerald D. Stevens, William D. Turley

    2008-03-01

    Shock waves passing through a metal sample can produce ejecta particulates at a metal-vacuum interface. Holography records particle size distributions by using a highpower, short-pulse laser to freeze particle motion. The sizes of the ejecta particles are recorded using an in-line Fraunhofer holography technique. Because the holographic plate would be destroyed in this energetic environment, a high-resolution lens has been designed to relay the interference fringes to a safe environment. Particle sizes within a 12-mm-diameter, 5-mm-thick volume are recorded on holographic film. To achieve resolution down to 0.5 microns, ultraviolet (UV) light (in this case supplied by a tripled Nd:YAG laser) is needed. The design and assembly of a nine-element lens that achieves >2000 lp/mm resolution and operates at f/0.85 will be described. To set up this lens system, a doublet lens is temporarily attached that enables operation with 532-nm (green) light and 1100 lp/mm resolution. Thus, the setup and alignment is performed with green light, but the dynamic recording is done with UV light. During setup, the 532-nm beam provides enough focus shift to accommodate the placement of a resolution pattern outside the ejecta volume; this resolution pattern does not interfere with the calibrated wires and pegs surrounding the ejecta volume. A television microscope archives images of resolution patterns that prove that the calibration wires, interference filter, holographic plate, and relay lenses are in their correct positions. Part of this lens is under vacuum, at the point where the laser illumination passes through a focus. Alignment and tolerancing of this high-resolution lens will be presented, and resolution variation through the 5-mm depth of field will be discussed.

  9. High-Resolution UV Relay Lens for Particle Size Distribution Measurements Using Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Robert M.; Capelle, Gene A.; Frogget, Brent C.; Grover, Mike; Kaufman, Morris I.; Pazuchanics, Peter; Sorenson, Danny S.; Stevens, Gerald D.; Tibbits, Aric; Turley, William D.

    2008-08-29

    Shock waves passing through a metal sample can produce ejecta particulates at a metal-vacuum interface. Holography records particle size distributions by using a high-power, short-pulse laser to freeze particle motion. The sizes of the ejecta particles are recorded using an in-line Fraunhofer holography technique. Because the holographic plate would be destroyed in an energetic environment, a high-resolution lens has been designed to relay the interference fringes to a safe environment. Particle sizes within a 12-mm-diameter, 5-mm-thick volume are recorded onto holographic film. To achieve resolution down to 0.5 μm, ultraviolet laser (UV) light is needed. The design and assembly of a nine-element lens that achieves >2000 lp/mm resolution and operates at f/0.89 will be described. To set up this lens system, a doublet lens is temporarily attached that enables operation with 532-nm laser light and 1100 lp/mm resolution. Thus, the setup and alignment are performed with green light, but the dynamic recording is done with UV light. During setup, the 532-nm beam provides enough focus shift to accommodate the placement of a resolution target outside the ejecta volume; this resolution target does not interfere with the calibrated wires and pegs surrounding the ejecta volume. A television microscope archives images of resolution patterns that prove that the calibration wires, interference filter, holographic plate, and relay lenses are in their correct positions. Part of this lens is under vacuum, at the point where the laser illumination passes through a focus. Alignment and tolerancing of this high-resolution lens will be presented, and resolution variation through the 5-mm depth of field will be discussed.

  10. Study of M1 and E1 excitations by high-resolution proton inelastic scattering measurement at forward angles

    SciTech Connect

    Tamii, A.; Adachi, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Kaneda, T.; Matsubara, H.; Okamura, H.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Yosoi, M.; Carter, J.; Dozono, M.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Itoh, M.; Kawabata, T.; Nakanishi, K.; Sasamoto, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von

    2007-06-13

    Experimental technique for measuring proton inelastic scattering with high-resolution at 295 MeV and at forward angles including zero degrees is described. The method is useful for extracting spin part of the M1 strength via nuclear excitation as well as E1 strength via Coulomb excitation. An excitation energy resolution of 20 keV, good scattering angle resolution, and low background condition have been achieved. The experimental technique was applied for several sd and pf shell nuclei.

  11. Angle-resolved multioctave supercontinua from mid-infrared laser filaments.

    PubMed

    Mitrofanov, A V; Voronin, A A; Sidorov-Biryukov, D A; Mitryukovsky, S I; Rozhko, M V; Pugžlys, A; Fedotov, A B; Panchenko, V Ya; Baltuška, A; Zheltikov, A M

    2016-08-01

    Angle-resolved spectral analysis of a multioctave high-energy supercontinuum output of mid-infrared laser filaments is shown to provide a powerful tool for understanding intricate physical scenarios behind laser-induced filamentation in the mid-infrared. The ellipticity of the mid-infrared driver beam breaks the axial symmetry of filamentation dynamics, offering a probe for a truly (3+1)-dimensional spatiotemporal evolution of mid-IR pulses in the filamentation regime. With optical harmonics up to the 15th order contributing to supercontinuum generation in such filaments alongside Kerr-type and ionization-induced nonlinearities, the output supercontinuum spectra span over five octaves from the mid-ultraviolet deep into the mid-infrared. Full (3+1)-dimensional field evolution analysis is needed for an adequate understanding of this regime of laser filamentation. Supercomputer simulations implementing such analysis articulate the critical importance of angle-resolved measurements for both descriptive and predictive power of filamentation modeling. Strong enhancement of ionization-induced blueshift is shown to offer new approaches in filamentation-assisted pulse compression, enabling the generation of high-power few- and single-cycle pulses in the mid-infrared. PMID:27472598

  12. Angle-resolved multioctave supercontinua from mid-infrared laser filaments.

    PubMed

    Mitrofanov, A V; Voronin, A A; Sidorov-Biryukov, D A; Mitryukovsky, S I; Rozhko, M V; Pugžlys, A; Fedotov, A B; Panchenko, V Ya; Baltuška, A; Zheltikov, A M

    2016-08-01

    Angle-resolved spectral analysis of a multioctave high-energy supercontinuum output of mid-infrared laser filaments is shown to provide a powerful tool for understanding intricate physical scenarios behind laser-induced filamentation in the mid-infrared. The ellipticity of the mid-infrared driver beam breaks the axial symmetry of filamentation dynamics, offering a probe for a truly (3+1)-dimensional spatiotemporal evolution of mid-IR pulses in the filamentation regime. With optical harmonics up to the 15th order contributing to supercontinuum generation in such filaments alongside Kerr-type and ionization-induced nonlinearities, the output supercontinuum spectra span over five octaves from the mid-ultraviolet deep into the mid-infrared. Full (3+1)-dimensional field evolution analysis is needed for an adequate understanding of this regime of laser filamentation. Supercomputer simulations implementing such analysis articulate the critical importance of angle-resolved measurements for both descriptive and predictive power of filamentation modeling. Strong enhancement of ionization-induced blueshift is shown to offer new approaches in filamentation-assisted pulse compression, enabling the generation of high-power few- and single-cycle pulses in the mid-infrared.

  13. Measurement of pyrethroid, organophosphorus, and carbamate insecticides in human plasma using isotope dilution gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pérez, José J; Williams, Megan K; Weerasekera, Gayanga; Smith, Kimberly; Whyatt, Robin M; Needham, Larry L; Barr, Dana Boyd

    2010-10-01

    We have developed a gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry method for measuring pyrethroid, organophosphorus, carbamate and fipronil pesticides and the synergist piperonyl butoxide in human plasma. Plasma samples were extracted using solid phase extraction and were then concentrated for injection and analysis using isotope dilution gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry. The limits of detection ranged from 10 to 158 pg/mL with relative recoveries at concentrations near the LODs (e.g., 25 or 250 pg/mL) ranging from 87% to 156% (9 of the 16 compounds were within ±15% of 100%). The extraction recoveries ranged from 20% to 98% and the overall method relative standard deviations were typically less than 20% with some exceptions. Analytical characteristics were determined at 25, 250, and 1000 pg/mL.

  14. High-resolution measurements of the multilayer ultra-structure of articular cartilage and their translational potential

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Current musculoskeletal imaging techniques usually target the macro-morphology of articular cartilage or use histological analysis. These techniques are able to reveal advanced osteoarthritic changes in articular cartilage but fail to give detailed information to distinguish early osteoarthritis from healthy cartilage, and this necessitates high-resolution imaging techniques measuring cells and the extracellular matrix within the multilayer structure of articular cartilage. This review provides a comprehensive exploration of the cellular components and extracellular matrix of articular cartilage as well as high-resolution imaging techniques, including magnetic resonance image, electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, second harmonic generation microscopy, and laser scanning confocal arthroscopy, in the measurement of multilayer ultra-structures of articular cartilage. This review also provides an overview for micro-structural analysis of the main components of normal or osteoarthritic cartilage and discusses the potential and challenges associated with developing non-invasive high-resolution imaging techniques for both research and clinical diagnosis of early to late osteoarthritis. PMID:24946278

  15. Substrate interactions with suspended and supported monolayer MoS2: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Jin, Wencan; Yeh, Po -Chun; Zaki, Nader; Zhang, Datong; Liou, Jonathan T.; Dadap, Jerry I.; Barinov, Alexey; Yablonskikh, Mikhail; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Sutter, Peter; et al

    2015-03-17

    We report the directly measured electronic structure of exfoliated monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂) using micrometer-scale angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Measurements of both suspended and supported monolayer MoS₂ elucidate the effects of interaction with a substrate. Thus, a suggested relaxation of the in-plane lattice constant is found for both suspended and supported monolayer MoS₂ crystals. For suspended MoS₂, a careful investigation of the measured uppermost valence band gives an effective mass at Γ¯ and Κ¯ of 2.00m₀ and 0.43m₀, respectively. We also measure an increase in the band linewidth from the midpoint of Γ¯Κ¯ to the vicinity of Κ¯ and briefly discussmore » its possible origin.« less

  16. Very high resolution measurement of the penetration depth of superconductors by a novel single-coil inductance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauzzi, A.; Le Cochec, J.; Lamura, G.; Jönsson, B. J.; Gasparov, V. A.; Ladan, F. R.; Plaçais, B.; Probst, P. A.; Pavuna, D.; Bok, J.

    2000-05-01

    We describe a novel single-coil mutual inductance technique for measuring the magnetic penetration depth λ of superconductors at 2-4 MHz as a function of temperature in the 4-100 K range. We combine a single-coil configuration with a high-stability marginal oscillator; this enables us to measure the absolute value of λ on both bulk samples and thin films with very high resolution (δλ=10 pm) and a precision of 30 nm. As example of application, we report measurements on NbTi bulk samples and Nb films. This contactless technique is suited for probing the superconducting properties of samples over large surfaces.

  17. High-resolution isotope measurements resolve rapid ecohydrological dynamics at the soil-plant interface.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Till H M; Haberer, Kristine; Gessler, Arthur; Weiler, Markus

    2016-05-01

    Plants rely primarily on rainfall infiltrating their root zones - a supply that is inherently variable, and fluctuations are predicted to increase on most of the Earth's surface. Yet, interrelationships between water availability and plant use on short timescales are difficult to quantify and remain poorly understood. To overcome previous methodological limitations, we coupled high-resolution in situ observations of stable isotopes in soil and transpiration water. We applied the approach along with Bayesian mixing modeling to track the fate of (2) H-labeled rain pulses following drought through soil and plants of deciduous tree ecosystems. We resolve how rainwater infiltrates the root zones in a nonequilibrium process and show that tree species differ in their ability to quickly acquire the newly available source. Sessile oak (Quercus petraea) adjusted root uptake to vertical water availability patterns under drought, but readjustment toward the rewetted topsoil was delayed. By contrast, European beech (Fagus sylvatica) readily utilized water from all soil depths independent of water depletion, enabling faster uptake of rainwater. Our results demonstrate that species-specific plasticity and responses to water supply fluctuations on short timescales can now be identified and must be considered to predict vegetation functional dynamics and water cycling under current and future climatic conditions.

  18. Using high-resolution phosphorus data to investigate mitigation measures in headwater river catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. M.; Jordan, P.; Arnscheidt, J.

    2014-09-01

    This study reports the use of high resolution water quality monitoring to assess the influence of changes in landuse management on total phosphorus (TP) transfers in two 5 km2 agricultural sub-catchments. Specifically, the work investigates the "wicked problem" of agricultural soil P management and subsequent diffuse transfers at high river flows over a five year timescale. The work also investigates the phenomenon of low flow P pollution from septic tank systems (STS) and mitigation efforts - here termed the "filthy issue" of rural catchment management. Results showed an inconsistent response to soil P management over five years with one catchment showing a convergence to optimum P concentrations and the other an overall increase. Both catchments indicated an overall increase in P concentration in defined high flow ranges. Low flow P concentration showed little change or higher P concentrations in defined low flow ranges despite replacement of defective systems and this is possibly due to a number of confounding reasons including increased housing densities due to new-builds. The work indicates fractured responses to catchment management advice and mitigation and that the short to medium term may be an insufficient time to expect the full implementation of policies (here defined as convergence to optimum soil P concentration and mitigation of STS) and also to gauge their effectiveness.

  19. Radioactivity of a Rock Profile from Rio do Rasto Formation Measured by High Resolution Gamma Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, Rodrigo O.; Appoloni, Carlos R.; Pinese, José P. P.

    2011-08-01

    Natural occurring radionuclides are present in different concentrations in sedimentary rocks. Generally, their distribution correlates reasonably with their geo-physicochemical behavior during sediment deposition and rock consolidation. This fact permits to study some geological characteristics of the rocks by analyzing the radionuclide distribution in the rocks, as it might reflect the origin of the sediments, the depositional environment, and more recent events such as weathering and erosion. In this work, rocks from an exposed profile of the Rio do Rasto Formation were collected and analyzed in laboratory by high resolution gamma spectrometry for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K determination. It was employed a standard gamma ray spectrometry electronic chain, with a 66% relative efficiency HPGe detector. The efficiency calibration, as well as its validation, was accomplished with eight International Atomic Energy Agency certified samples. The outcrop exposes layers of sandstone and siltstone and, secondarily, claystone, with varying colors (gray, red and green). The rocks were collected along this profile, each of them was dried in the open air during 48 hours, grounded, sieved through 4 mm mesh and sealed in cylindrical recipients. The 226Ra, 232Th and 40K activity concentrations are presented, their distribution and the possible relations among activities are analyzed. The general pattern of radionuclides distribution respects well the hypotheses on geo-physicochemical behavior of radioactive elements.

  20. High resolution measures of polarization and color of selected lunar areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, L. A.; Hall, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    High resolution observations of intensity, color (UBV) and polarization were obtained with scanning techniques for a number of lunar areas of special interest, including boundaries of some of the brightest and darkest lunar regions, certain Apollo landing sites and prominent craters. Two dimensional raster scans of colors were obtained for Alphonsus, Aristarchus, and Herodotus. The degree of polarization for any given phase angle appears to be roughly indicative of age. The darker younger mare surface are more highly polarized than the lighter and older mare surfaces, which appear to be more contaminated by lighter material from the highlands or by ray material thrown out from fresh craters. All mare surfaces are more highly polarized than the still older and lighter terra regions surrounding the maria. The very oldest craters are either dark-floored and show polarization characteristics similar to those of the mare surfaces, or if located in the highlands, they are less and less distinguishable from the highland background with greater age, and show the general highland polarization characteristics.

  1. Evaluation of High-Resolution Ocean Surface Vector Winds Measured by QuikSCAT Scatterometer in Coastal Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Wenqing; Liu, W. Timothy; Stiles, Bryan W.

    2004-01-01

    The SeaWinds scatterometer onboard QuikSCAT covers approximately 90% of the global ocean under clear and cloudy condition in 24 h, and the standard data product has 25-km spatial resolution. Such spatial resolution is not sufficient to resolve small-scale processes, especially in coastal oceans. Based on range-compressed normalized backscatter and a modified wind retrieval algorithm, a coastal wind dataset at 12.5-km resolution was produced. Even with larger error, the high-resolution winds, in medium to high strength, would still be useful over coastal ocean. Using measurements from moored buoys from the National Buoy Data Center, the high-resolution QuikSCAT wind data are found to have similar accuracy as standard data in the open ocean. The accuracy of both high- and standard-resolution winds, particularly in wind directions, is found to degrade near shore. The increase in error is likely caused by the inadequacy of the geophysical model function/ambiguity removal scheme in addressing coastal conditions and light winds situations. The modified algorithm helps to bring the directional accuracy of the high-resolution winds to the accuracy of the standard-resolution winds in near-shore regions, particularly in the nadir and far zones across the satellite track.

  2. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies of cuprate superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Palczewski, Ari Deibert

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is comprised of three different angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies on cuprate superconductors. The first study compares the band structure from two different single layer cuprates Tl2Ba2CuO6+δ (Tl2201) Tc, max ≈ 95 K and (Bi 1.35Pb0.85)(Sr1.47La0.38)CuO6+δ (Bi2201) Tc, max ≈ 35 K. The aim of the study was to provide some insight into the reasons why single layer cuprate's maximum transition temperatures are so different. The study found two major differences in the band structure. First, the Fermi surface segments close to (π,0) are more parallel in Tl2201 than in Bi2201. Second, the shadow band usually related to crystal structure is only present in Bi2201, but absent in higher Tc Tl2201. The second study looks at the different ways of doping Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi2212) in-situ by only changing the post bake-out vacuum conditions and temperature. The aim of the study is to systematically look into the generally overlooked experimental conditions that change the doping of a cleaved sample in ultra high vacuum (UHV) experiments. The study found two major experimental facts. First, in inadequate UHV conditions the carrier concentration of Bi2212 increases with time, due to the absorption of oxygen from CO2/CO molecules, prime contaminants present in UHV systems. Second, in a very clean UHV system at elevated temperatures (above about 200 K), the carrier concentration decreases due to the loss of oxygen atoms from the Bi-O layer. The final study probed the particle-hole symmetry of the pseudogap phase in high temperature superconducting cuprates by looking at the thermally excited bands above the Fermi level. The data showed a particle-hole symmetric pseudogap which symmetrically closes away from the nested FS before the node. The data is consistent

  3. Surface structure of imidazolium-based ionic liquids: Quantitative comparison between simulations and high-resolution RBS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kaoru; Nakanishi, Shunto; Lísal, Martin; Kimura, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    Elemental depth profiles of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([CnMIM][TFSI], n = 4, 6, 8) are measured using high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (HRBS). The profiles are compared with the results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Both MD simulations and HRBS measurements show that the depth profiles deviate from the uniform stoichiometric composition in the surface region, showing preferential orientations of ions at the surface. The MD simulations qualitatively reproduce the observed HRBS profiles but the agreement is not satisfactory. The observed discrepancy is ascribed to the capillary waves. By taking account of the surface roughness induced by the capillary waves, the agreement becomes almost perfect.

  4. Measurement of low radioactivity background in a high voltage cable by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vacri, M. L. di; Nisi, S.; Balata, M.

    2013-08-08

    The measurement of naturally occurring low level radioactivity background in a high voltage (HV) cable by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR ICP MS) is presented in this work. The measurements were performed at the Chemistry Service of the Gran Sasso National Laboratory. The contributions to the radioactive background coming from the different components of the heterogeneous material were separated. Based on the mass fraction of the cable, the whole contamination was calculated. The HR ICP MS results were cross-checked by gamma ray spectroscopy analysis that was performed at the low background facility STELLA (Sub Terranean Low Level Assay) of the LNGS underground lab using HPGe detectors.

  5. Determination of Spectroscopic Properties of Atmospheric Molecules from High Resolution Vacuum Ultraviolet Cross Section and Wavelength Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Yoshino, K.

    1997-01-01

    An account is given of progress during the period 8/l/96-7/31/97 on work on (a) cross section measurements of O2 S-R using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at the Photon Factory in Japan; (b) the determination of the predissociation linewidths of the Schumann-Runge bands (S-R) of 02; (c) cross section measurements of 02 Herzberg bands using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at Imperial College; and (d) cross section measurements of H2O in the wavelength region 120-188 nm. The experimental investigations are effected at high resolution with a 6.65 m scanning spectrometer and with the Fourier transform spectrometer. Below 175 nm, synchrotron radiation is most suitable for cross section measurements in combination with spectrometers at the Photon Factory Japan. Cross section measurements of the Doppler limited bands depend on using the very high resolution, available with the Fourier transform spectrometer, (0.025/cm resolution). All of these spectroscopic measurements are needed for accurate calculations of the production of atomic oxygen, the penetration of solar radiation into the Earth's atmosphere, and photochemistry of minor molecules.

  6. A brief update of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on a correlated electron system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.S.

    2010-02-24

    In this paper, we briefly summarize the capabilities of state-of-the-art angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) in the field of experimental condensed matter physics. Due to the advancement of the detector technology and the high flux light sources, ARPES has become a powerful tool to study the low energy excitations of solids, especially those novel quantum materials in which many-body physics are at play. To benchmark today's state-of-the-art ARPES technique, we demonstrate that the precision of today's ARPES has advanced to a regime comparable to the bulk-sensitive de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) measurements. Finally, as an example of new discoveries driven by the advancement of the ARPES technique, we summarize some of our recent ARPES measurements on underdoped high-T{sub c} superconducting cuprates, which have provided further insight into the complex pseudogap problem.

  7. Mapping unoccupied electronic states of freestanding graphene by angle-resolved low-energy electron transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicki, Flavio; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2016-08-01

    We report angle-resolved electron transmission measurements through freestanding graphene sheets in the energy range of 18 to 30 eV above the Fermi level. The measurements are carried out in a low-energy electron point source microscope, which allows simultaneously probing the transmission for a large angular range. The characteristics of low-energy electron transmission through graphene depend on its electronic structure above the vacuum level. The experimental technique described here allows mapping of the unoccupied band structure of freestanding two-dimensional materials as a function of the energy and probing angle, respectively, in-plane momentum. Our experimental findings are consistent with theoretical predictions of a resonance in the band structure of graphene above the vacuum level [V. U. Nazarov, E. E. Krasovskii, and V. M. Silkin, Phys. Rev. B 87, 041405 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.87.041405].

  8. Angle-resolved conical emission spectra from filamentation in a solid with an Airy pattern and a Gaussian laser beam.

    PubMed

    Gong, Cheng; Li, ZiXi; Hua, LinQiang; Quan, Wei; Liu, XiaoJun

    2016-09-15

    Filamentation dynamics in fused silica are investigated using an Airy pattern and a Gaussian laser beam. The angle-resolved conical emission spectra are measured and compared with the predictions of several models. Our experimental observations are consistent with the X-waves model in both cases. This indicates that both laser beams spontaneously evolve into nonlinear X-waves and suggests a universal evolution of filaments in fused silica, regardless of the initial laser beam profile. PMID:27628383

  9. A colorimetric DET technique for the high-resolution measurement of two-dimensional alkalinity distributions in sediment porewaters.

    PubMed

    Bennett, William W; Welsh, David T; Serriere, Antoine; Panther, Jared G; Teasdale, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of porewater alkalinity are fundamental to the study of organic matter mineralization in sediments, which plays an essential role in the global cycles of carbon and nutrients. A new colorimetric diffusive equilibration in thin film (DET) technique is described for measuring two-dimensional total alkalinity distributions in sediment porewaters at high resolution (1-2 mm(2)). Thin polyacrylamide hydrogel layers (0.8 mm) equilibrate with the porewater and, after removal, are immediately laid onto another hydrogel containing formic acid, which reacts with alkalinity-generating species, and the pH-indicator bromophenol blue. The resultant color change is quantified using computer-imaging densitometry. The lower limit of detection is 0.2 meq L(-1) and the upper measurement limit is 8 meq L(-1). Deployment in seagrass colonized sediment revealed high levels of spatial heterogeneity in the porewater alkalinity distribution, with concentrations ranging from 2.28 meq L(-1) in the overlying water to 5.13 meq L(-1) in some parts of the sediment. This is the first time that two-dimensional, high-resolution distributions of porewater alkalinity have been measured. PMID:25112581

  10. Modeling angle-resolved photoemission of graphene and black phosphorus nano structures

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Han; Kwon, Soonnam

    2016-01-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data on electronic structure are difficult to interpret, because various factors such as atomic structure and experimental setup influence the quantum mechanical effects during the measurement. Therefore, we simulated ARPES of nano-sized molecules to corroborate the interpretation of experimental results. Applying the independent atomic-center approximation, we used density functional theory calculations and custom-made simulation code to compute photoelectron intensity in given experimental setups for every atomic orbital in poly-aromatic hydrocarbons of various size, and in a molecule of black phosphorus. The simulation results were validated by comparing them to experimental ARPES for highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite. This database provides the calculation method and every file used during the work flow. PMID:27164313

  11. Angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of square antidot lattices studied by Brillouin light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gubbiotti, G.; Tacchi, S.; Madami, M.; Carlotti, G.; Ding, J.; Adeyeye, A. O.

    2015-06-29

    The Brillouin light scattering technique has been exploited to study the angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of squared Permalloy antidot lattice. Frequency dispersion of spin waves has been measured for a set of fixed wave vector magnitudes, while varying the wave vector in-plane orientation with respect to the applied magnetic field. The magnonic band gap between the two most dispersive modes exhibits a minimum value at an angular position, which exclusively depends on the product between the selected wave vector magnitude and the lattice constant of the array. The experimental data are in very good agreement with predictions obtained by dynamical matrix method calculations. The presented results are relevant for magnonic devices where the antidot lattice, acting as a diffraction grating, is exploited to achieve multidirectional spin wave emission.

  12. Tunable vacuum ultraviolet laser based spectrometer for angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Rui; Mou, Daixiang; Wu, Yun; Huang, Lunan; Kaminski, Adam; McMillen, Colin D.; Kolis, Joseph; Giesber, Henry G.; Egan, John J.

    2014-03-15

    We have developed an angle-resolved photoemission spectrometer with tunable vacuum ultraviolet laser as a photon source. The photon source is based on the fourth harmonic generation of a near IR beam from a Ti:sapphire laser pumped by a CW green laser and tunable between 5.3 eV and 7 eV. The most important part of the set-up is a compact, vacuum enclosed fourth harmonic generator based on potassium beryllium fluoroborate crystals, grown hydrothermally in the US. This source can deliver a photon flux of over 10{sup 14} photon/s. We demonstrate that this energy range is sufficient to measure the k{sub z} dispersion in an iron arsenic high temperature superconductor, which was previously only possible at synchrotron facilities.

  13. Preparation of layered thin film samples for angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, S. E.; Zhou, B.; Huo, Y.; Harris, J. S.; Pushp, A.; Kellock, A. J.; Parkin, S. S. P.; Chen, Y.; Hesjedal, T.

    2014-09-22

    Materials with layered van der Waals crystal structures are exciting research topics in condensed matter physics and materials science due to outstanding physical properties associated with their strong two dimensional nature. Prominent examples include bismuth tritelluride and triselenide topological insulators (TIs), which are characterized by a bulk bandgap and pairwise counter-propagating spin-polarized electronic surface states. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) of ex-situ grown thin film samples has been limited by the lack of suitable surface preparation techniques. We demonstrate the shortcomings of previously successful conventional surface preparation techniques when applied to ternary TI systems which are susceptible to severe oxidation. We show that in-situ cleaving is a simple and effective technique for preparation of clean surfaces on ex-situ grown thin films for high quality ARPES measurements. The method presented here is universally applicable to other layered van der Waals systems as well.

  14. Modeling angle-resolved photoemission of graphene and black phosphorus nano structures.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Han; Kwon, Soonnam

    2016-01-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data on electronic structure are difficult to interpret, because various factors such as atomic structure and experimental setup influence the quantum mechanical effects during the measurement. Therefore, we simulated ARPES of nano-sized molecules to corroborate the interpretation of experimental results. Applying the independent atomic-center approximation, we used density functional theory calculations and custom-made simulation code to compute photoelectron intensity in given experimental setups for every atomic orbital in poly-aromatic hydrocarbons of various size, and in a molecule of black phosphorus. The simulation results were validated by comparing them to experimental ARPES for highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite. This database provides the calculation method and every file used during the work flow. PMID:27164313

  15. Evidencing the need for high spatial resolution in angle-resolved photoemission experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joucken, Frédéric; Reckinger, Nicolas; Lorcy, Stéphane; Avila, José; Chen, Chaoyu; Lagoute, Jérôme; Colomer, Jean-François; Ghijsen, Jacques; Asensio, Maria Carmen; Sporken, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) is the most direct tool to measure the electronic structure of materials. In particular, fine features of the spectra can be analyzed for evaluating the electron self-energy. Owing to a setup allowing ARPES investigation with submicron resolution and state-of-the-art energy and momentum resolution, we show here first that ARPES spectra of pristine and virtually undoped monolayer graphene acquired on a small spot do not display manifestations of self-energy. We next demonstrate that, although the region of the sample investigated is a unique graphene domain, it displays faint spatial inhomogeneity, both in its crystallographic orientation and its thickness, which is undetectable with conventional ARPES but renders the spectra improper for self-energy extraction. These results indicate that care should be taken when analyzing ARPES spectra obtained with poor spatial resolution.

  16. Modeling angle-resolved photoemission of graphene and black phosphorus nano structures.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Han; Kwon, Soonnam

    2016-05-10

    Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data on electronic structure are difficult to interpret, because various factors such as atomic structure and experimental setup influence the quantum mechanical effects during the measurement. Therefore, we simulated ARPES of nano-sized molecules to corroborate the interpretation of experimental results. Applying the independent atomic-center approximation, we used density functional theory calculations and custom-made simulation code to compute photoelectron intensity in given experimental setups for every atomic orbital in poly-aromatic hydrocarbons of various size, and in a molecule of black phosphorus. The simulation results were validated by comparing them to experimental ARPES for highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite. This database provides the calculation method and every file used during the work flow.

  17. Scientific system for high-resolution measurement of the circumsolar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrott, Simeon; Schmidt, Thomas; Hornung, Thorsten; Nitz, Peter

    2014-09-01

    We developed a camera based system for measurements of the circumsolar radiation with a high angular resolution of 0.1 mrad. Subsequent measurements may be taken at intervals as short as 15 s. In this publication we describe the optical system in detail and discuss some aspects of the measurement method. First results from two days of measurement at Freiburg i. Br., Germany, are presented and compared to data from literature. The good results encourage us to perform longer measurement campaigns in future to better understand the influence of circumsolar radiation on the power yield of concentrating photovoltaic systems.

  18. New Measurements of Doubly Ionized Iron Group Spectra by High Resolution Fourier Transform and Grating Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smillie, D. G.; Pickering, J. C.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R. J.; Smith, Peter L.; Nave, G.

    2006-01-01

    We report new measurements of doubly ionized iron group element spectra, important in the analysis of B-type (hot) stars whose spectra they dominate. These measurements include Co III and Cr III taken with the Imperial College VUV Fourier transform (FT) spectrometer and measurements of Co III taken with the normal incidence vacuum spectrograph at NIST, below 135 nm. We report new Fe III grating spectra measurements to complement our FT spectra. Work towards transition wavelengths, energy levels and branching ratios (which, combined with lifetimes, produce oscillator strengths) for these ions is underway.

  19. High-resolution frequency measurement method with a wide-frequency range based on a quantized phase step law.

    PubMed

    Du, Baoqiang; Dong, Shaofeng; Wang, Yanfeng; Guo, Shuting; Cao, Lingzhi; Zhou, Wei; Zuo, Yandi; Liu, Dan

    2013-11-01

    A wide-frequency and high-resolution frequency measurement method based on the quantized phase step law is presented in this paper. Utilizing a variation law of the phase differences, the direct different frequency phase processing, and the phase group synchronization phenomenon, combining an A/D converter and the adaptive phase shifting principle, a counter gate is established in the phase coincidences at one-group intervals, which eliminates the ±1 counter error in the traditional frequency measurement method. More importantly, the direct phase comparison, the measurement, and the control between any periodic signals have been realized without frequency normalization in this method. Experimental results show that sub-picosecond resolution can be easily obtained in the frequency measurement, the frequency standard comparison, and the phase-locked control based on the phase quantization processing technique. The method may be widely used in navigation positioning, space techniques, communication, radar, astronomy, atomic frequency standards, and other high-tech fields.

  20. High resolution time interval meter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

  1. Dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurements with high resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Jidong; Liu, Shenggang; Ma, Heli; Tao, Tianjiong; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Cangli; Tan, Hua

    2014-11-15

    A unique dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurement has been developed recently. This paper presents the working principle of the new interferometric system, which uses a photonic crystal fiber to transmit the wide-spectrum light beams and a high-speed streak camera or frame camera to record the interference stripes. Preliminary measurements of harmonic vibrations of a speaker, driven by a radio, and the changes in the tip clearance of a rotating gear wheel show that this new type of interferometer has the ability to perform absolute distance measurements both with high time- and distance-resolution.

  2. High-Resolution Measurements of Photoionization of Ions Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, A.; Covington, A.M.; Emmons, E.D.; Gharaibeh, M.F.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Hinojosa, G.; Dominguez, I.; Ackerman, G.; Bozek, J.D.; Canton, S.; Rude, B.; Sant'Anna, M.M.; Schlachter, A. S.; Folkmann, F.

    2003-08-26

    Measurement of absolute cross sections for photoionization of ions has become feasible by merging a well-collimated ion beam with a monochromatic beam of synchrotron radiation. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source permits such measurements to be extended to multiply charged ions, and makes possible systematic studies along isoelectronic sequences. The evolution of atomic spectra along such sequences is commonly studied theoretically, but the predictive ability of the theoretical methods remains largely untested. Absolute cross-section measurements are presented for the first three ionic members of the isoelectronic sequence of nitrogen (O+, F2+ and Ne3+)

  3. Ice Fog and Light Snow Measurements Using a High-Resolution Camera System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Thomas; Gultepe, Ismail

    2016-07-01

    Ice fog, diamond dust, and light snow usually form over extremely cold weather conditions, and they affect both visibility and Earth's radiative energy budget. Prediction of these hydrometeors using models is difficult because of limited knowledge of the microphysical properties at the small size ranges due to measurement issues. These phenomena need to be better represented in forecast and climate models; therefore, in addition to remote sensing accurate measurements using ground-based instrumentation are required. An imaging instrument, aimed at measuring ice fog and light snow particles, has been built and is presented here. The ice crystal imaging (ICI) probe samples ice particles into a vertical, tapered inlet with an inlet flow rate of 11 L min-1. A laser beam across the vertical air flow containing the ice crystals allows for their detection by a photodetector collecting the scattered light. Detected particles are then imaged with high optical resolution. An illuminating LED flash and image capturing are triggered by the photodetector. In this work, ICI measurements collected during the fog remote sensing and modeling (FRAM) project, which took place during Winter of 2010-2011 in Yellowknife, NWT, Canada, are summarized and challenges related to measuring small ice particles are described. The majority of ice particles during the 2-month-long campaign had sizes between 300 and 800 μm. During ice fog events the size distribution measured had a lower mode diameter of 300 μm compared to the overall campaign average with mode at 500 μm.

  4. Thermal Contraction Measurements of Various Materials Using High Resolution Extensometers between 290 K and 7 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyilas, A.

    2004-06-01

    Thermal contraction measurements are carried out between 290 K and 7 K using a 50 mm gauge length double extensometer system. This new technique is developed as an in situ working thermal expansion testing unit placed inside a variable temperature cryostat having the accuracy of better than +/- 15 μm/m. The resolution of the extensometers based on strain gauge technology is below 0.1 μm. Using these extensometers the displacement of the materials are measured overnight during the warm up period of the cryostat. These measurements use the reference curve of the material Zerodur®, an ultra low thermal expansion glass ceramic commercial product. The reference curve consists of the cool down and warm up displacement behavior of the extensometers. The advantage of this system is that it allows measuring of ˜ 60 mm long samples with thickness between 0.2 mm and 20 mm. In toto, several structural materials used by ITER superconducting coils are measured with respect to their thermal expansion behavior. Within this context also a set of fully austenitic nitrogen alloyed stainless steels with Mn contents up to 40 % are characterized with respect to their thermal expansion. In addition, superconducting Nb3Sn wires, high Tc tapes of Type Bi-2223, and Si/Ge single crystals are also directly measured using this methodology.

  5. Ice Fog and Light Snow Measurements Using a High-Resolution Camera System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Thomas; Gultepe, Ismail

    2016-09-01

    Ice fog, diamond dust, and light snow usually form over extremely cold weather conditions, and they affect both visibility and Earth's radiative energy budget. Prediction of these hydrometeors using models is difficult because of limited knowledge of the microphysical properties at the small size ranges due to measurement issues. These phenomena need to be better represented in forecast and climate models; therefore, in addition to remote sensing accurate measurements using ground-based instrumentation are required. An imaging instrument, aimed at measuring ice fog and light snow particles, has been built and is presented here. The ice crystal imaging (ICI) probe samples ice particles into a vertical, tapered inlet with an inlet flow rate of 11 L min-1. A laser beam across the vertical air flow containing the ice crystals allows for their detection by a photodetector collecting the scattered light. Detected particles are then imaged with high optical resolution. An illuminating LED flash and image capturing are triggered by the photodetector. In this work, ICI measurements collected during the fog remote sensing and modeling (FRAM) project, which took place during Winter of 2010-2011 in Yellowknife, NWT, Canada, are summarized and challenges related to measuring small ice particles are described. The majority of ice particles during the 2-month-long campaign had sizes between 300 and 800 μm. During ice fog events the size distribution measured had a lower mode diameter of 300 μm compared to the overall campaign average with mode at 500 μm.

  6. High resolution light diffraction tomography: nearfield measurements of 10 MHz continuous wave ultrasound

    PubMed

    Almqvist; Holm; Jansson; Persson; Lindstrom

    1999-06-01

    Light diffraction tomography is an ultrasound measurement method that offers possibilities to make high spatial resolution measurements. The aim of this study was to investigate the spatial resolution of light diffraction tomography by characterizing the complex pressure and phase patterns 0.5-1 mm from the surface of a 5 mm diameter 10 MHz ultrasound transducer. Three different transducers were measured with a detection width of 5 microm, sample distances of 20-40 microm and 50-100 projections/180 degrees. They were excited with a 10 Vpp CW-signal. To verify the results the optical measurements were compared with 75 microm diameter hydrophone measurements and with theoretical calculations. The light diffraction tomography results show very good agreement with the hydrophone measurements and pressure peaks separated 160 microm were resolved. Comparison with the theoretical calculation shows that small distortions, caused by defects in the matching layer or in the piezo-electric disc, disturb the symmetric ring-pattern characteristic of an ideal piston source. PMID:10499805

  7. Nanometer-scale displacement measurement with high resolution using dual cavity Fabry-Pérot interferometer for biomimetic robots.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Hyuk; Kim, Dae-Hyun

    2014-10-01

    A sensor of a biomimetic robot has to measure very small environmental changes such as, nanometer scale strains or displacements. Fiber optic sensor can be also one of candidates for the biomimetic sensor because the sensor is like thread and the shape of the sensor is similar to muscle fiber. A fiber optic interferometer, which is an optical-based sensor, can measure displacement precisely, so such device has been widely studied for the measurement of displacement on a nanometer-scale. Especially, a Quadrature Phase-Shifted Fiber Fabry-Pérot interferometer (QPS-FFPI) uses phase-information for this measurement, allowing it to provide a precision result with high resolution. In theory, the QPS-FFPI generates two sinusoidal signals of which the phase difference should be 90 degrees for the exact measurement of the displacement. In order to guarantee the condition of the phase difference, the relative adjustment of the cavities of the optical fibers is required. However, with such precise adjustment it is very hard to fix the proper difference of the two cavities for quadrature-phase-shifting. In this paper, a dual-cavity FFPI is newly proposed to measure the displacement on a nanometer-scale with a specific type of signal processing. In the signal processing, a novel phase-compensation algorithm is applied to force the phase difference to be exactly 90 degrees without any physical adjustment. As a result, the paper shows that the phase-compensated dual-cavity FFPI can effectively measure nanometer-scale displacement with high resolution under dynamic conditions.

  8. Nanometer-scale displacement measurement with high resolution using dual cavity Fabry-Pérot interferometer for biomimetic robots.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Hyuk; Kim, Dae-Hyun

    2014-10-01

    A sensor of a biomimetic robot has to measure very small environmental changes such as, nanometer scale strains or displacements. Fiber optic sensor can be also one of candidates for the biomimetic sensor because the sensor is like thread and the shape of the sensor is similar to muscle fiber. A fiber optic interferometer, which is an optical-based sensor, can measure displacement precisely, so such device has been widely studied for the measurement of displacement on a nanometer-scale. Especially, a Quadrature Phase-Shifted Fiber Fabry-Pérot interferometer (QPS-FFPI) uses phase-information for this measurement, allowing it to provide a precision result with high resolution. In theory, the QPS-FFPI generates two sinusoidal signals of which the phase difference should be 90 degrees for the exact measurement of the displacement. In order to guarantee the condition of the phase difference, the relative adjustment of the cavities of the optical fibers is required. However, with such precise adjustment it is very hard to fix the proper difference of the two cavities for quadrature-phase-shifting. In this paper, a dual-cavity FFPI is newly proposed to measure the displacement on a nanometer-scale with a specific type of signal processing. In the signal processing, a novel phase-compensation algorithm is applied to force the phase difference to be exactly 90 degrees without any physical adjustment. As a result, the paper shows that the phase-compensated dual-cavity FFPI can effectively measure nanometer-scale displacement with high resolution under dynamic conditions. PMID:25942819

  9. Determination of Spectroscopic Properties of Atmospheric Molecules from High Resolution Vacuum Ultraviolet Cross Section and Wavelength Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Yoshino, K.

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the spectroscopy and the cross sections of the simple molecules of atmospheric interest such as oxygen, nitric oxide, carbon dioxide, and water. We have made cross section measurements on an absolute base without the effects from the limited instrumental resolution. We have used the following different instruments- the grating spectrometer (6.65-m at CfA, 3-m at Photon Factory), VUV Fourier transform spectrometer at Imperial College, and then moved the same one to the Photon Factory. Selection of the instruments depend on the appearance of molecular bands, and their wavelength region. For example, the cross section measurements of Doppler limited bands can been done with the Fourier transform spectrometer at the very high resolution (0.025/ cm resolution). All of these spectroscopic measurements are needed for accurate calculations of the production of atomic oxygen penetration of solar radiation into the Earth's atmosphere, and photochemistry of minor molecules.

  10. The Kinect as a low cost high resolution small scale LiDAR for water surface and shallow subsurface measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankoff, K. D.; Russo, T. A.

    2012-04-01

    The Microsoft Kinect, a video game input device designed for the Xbox system, can be used by earth scientists as a low cost high resolution LiDAR sensor. The device can see through at least 1 m of clear still water, or image the surface of opaque water. When observing through water the measurement is distorted by the refraction at the air/water interface. We present initial results of a calibration for sub-aqueous measurements, and describe a method for measuring sub-aqueous features and water height. When waves exist on the surface the signal is further convoluted and both the waves and subsurface are captured in the signal. We discuss signal deconvolution and techniques for capturing the relative and/or absolute values of surface waves and subsurface features.

  11. Deflection Measurements of a Thermally Simulated Nuclear Core Using a High-Resolution CCD-Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanojev, B. J.; Houts, M.

    2004-01-01

    Space fission systems under consideration for near-term missions all use compact. fast-spectrum reactor cores. Reactor dimensional change with increasing temperature, which affects neutron leakage. is the dominant source of reactivity feedback in these systems. Accurately measuring core dimensional changes during realistic non-nuclear testing is therefore necessary in predicting the system nuclear equivalent behavior. This paper discusses one key technique being evaluated for measuring such changes. The proposed technique is to use a Charged Couple Device (CCD) sensor to obtain deformation readings of electrically heated prototypic reactor core geometry. This paper introduces a technique by which a single high spatial resolution CCD camera is used to measure core deformation in Real-Time (RT). Initial system checkout results are presented along with a discussion on how additional cameras could be used to achieve a three- dimensional deformation profile of the core during test.

  12. Characteristics of High-Resolution Hemoglobin Measurement Microchip Integrated with Signal Processing Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Toshihiko; Takao, Hidekuni; Ashiki, Mitsuaki; Ebi, Hiroyuki; Sawada, Kazuaki; Ishida, Makoto

    2004-04-01

    In this study, a microchip for measurement of hemoglobin in human blood has been proposed, fabricated and evaluated. The measurement principle of hemoglobin is based on the “cyanmethemoglobin method” that calculates the cyanmethemoglobin concentration by absorption photometry. A glass/silicon/silicon structure was used for the microchip. The middle silicon layer includes flow channels, and 45° mirrors formed at each end of the flow channels. Photodiodes and metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) integrated circuits were fabricated on the bottom silicon layer. The performance of the microchip for hemoglobin measurement was evaluated using a solution of red food color instead of a real blood sample. The fabricated microchip exhibited a similar performance to a nonminiaturized absorption cell which has the same optical path length. Signal processing output varied with solution concentration from 5.32 V to 5.55 V with very high stability due to differential signal processing.

  13. Ice fog and light snow measurements using a high resolution camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Thomas; Gultepe, Ismail

    2016-04-01

    In this presentation, measurements collected by the ice crystal imaging (ICI) probe employed during FRAM (Fog Remote Sensing and Modeling) project for the Winter of 2010-2011 in Yellowknife, NWT, Canada are analysed to study small ice crystal impact on aviation operations. Ice fog, diamond dust, and light snow form during cold weather conditions and they affect aviation operations through visibility and deposition over the surfaces. In addition, these events influence the local heat budget through radiative cooling. Prediction of these hydrometeors using models is difficult because of limited knowledge of the microphysical properties at the small size ranges. These phenomena need to be better represented in forecast and climate models and this can only be done using accurate measurements from ground-based instrumentation. Imaging of ice particles' properties can complement other in-situ measurements being collected routinely. The newly developed ICI probe, aimed at measuring ice fog and light snow particles, is presented here. The ICI probe samples ice particles through a vertical inlet, where a laser beam and photodetector detect ice crystals contained in the flow. The detected particles are then imaged with high optical resolution between 10 to 1000 micron size range. An illuminating LED flash and image capturing for measurements are triggered by the photodetector. The results suggested that the majority of ice particles during the two-month long campaign were small with sizes between 300 μm and 800 μm. During ice fog events, the size distribution measured had a lower mode diameter of 300 μm compared to the overall campaign average with mode at 500 μm. In this presentation, challenges and issues related to small ice crystals are described and their importance for aviation operations and climate change are discussed.

  14. Real-time high-resolution measurement of collagen alignment in dynamically loaded soft tissue.

    PubMed

    York, Timothy; Kahan, Lindsey; Lake, Spencer P; Gruev, Viktor

    2014-06-01

    A technique for creating maps of the direction and strength of fiber alignment in collagenous soft tissues is presented. The method uses a division of focal plane polarimeter to measure circularly polarized light transmitted through the tissue. The architecture of the sensor allows measurement of the retardance and fiber alignment at the full frame rate of the sensor without any moving optics. The technique compares favorably to the standard method of using a rotating polarizer. How the new technique enables real-time capture of the full angular spread of fiber alignment and retardance under various cyclic loading conditions is illustrated. PMID:24972359

  15. High resolution kilometric range optical telemetry in air by radio frequency phase measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillory, Joffray; Šmíd, Radek; García-Márquez, Jorge; Truong, Daniel; Alexandre, Christophe; Wallerand, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    We have developed an optical Absolute Distance Meter (ADM) based on the measurement of the phase accumulated by a Radio Frequency wave during its propagation in the air by a laser beam. In this article, the ADM principle will be described and the main results will be presented. In particular, we will emphasize how the choice of an appropriate photodetector can significantly improve the telemeter performances by minimizing the amplitude to phase conversion. Our prototype, tested in the field, has proven its efficiency with a resolution better than 15 μm for a measurement time of 10 ms and distances up to 1.2 km.

  16. Small scale high resolution LiDAR measurements of a subglacial conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankoff, K. D.; Gulley, J.

    2012-04-01

    We present direct measurements of surface roughness in a sub-glacial conduit system underneath the Rieperbreen Glacier, Svalbard, Norway. Data was collected with a low-cost (129 USD) Microsoft Kinect video game device used as a LIDAR sensor. Surface roughness is a primary control on water flow in rivers, channels, and cave conduit systems and understanding the effects of surface roughness on water flow has been problematic due to lack of direct measurements of roughness in natural systems. We use the ice scallop dimensions to derive flow velocity and explore implications of the changing roughness parameters as the cave grows and shrinks.

  17. High resolution kilometric range optical telemetry in air by radio frequency phase measurement.

    PubMed

    Guillory, Joffray; Šmíd, Radek; García-Márquez, Jorge; Truong, Daniel; Alexandre, Christophe; Wallerand, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    We have developed an optical Absolute Distance Meter (ADM) based on the measurement of the phase accumulated by a Radio Frequency wave during its propagation in the air by a laser beam. In this article, the ADM principle will be described and the main results will be presented. In particular, we will emphasize how the choice of an appropriate photodetector can significantly improve the telemeter performances by minimizing the amplitude to phase conversion. Our prototype, tested in the field, has proven its efficiency with a resolution better than 15 μm for a measurement time of 10 ms and distances up to 1.2 km.

  18. High resolution kilometric range optical telemetry in air by radio frequency phase measurement.

    PubMed

    Guillory, Joffray; Šmíd, Radek; García-Márquez, Jorge; Truong, Daniel; Alexandre, Christophe; Wallerand, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    We have developed an optical Absolute Distance Meter (ADM) based on the measurement of the phase accumulated by a Radio Frequency wave during its propagation in the air by a laser beam. In this article, the ADM principle will be described and the main results will be presented. In particular, we will emphasize how the choice of an appropriate photodetector can significantly improve the telemeter performances by minimizing the amplitude to phase conversion. Our prototype, tested in the field, has proven its efficiency with a resolution better than 15 μm for a measurement time of 10 ms and distances up to 1.2 km. PMID:27475593

  19. Prediction of sugarcane sucrose content with high resolution, hyperspectral leaf reflectance measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to determine if leaf reflectance measurements could be used to predict theoretically recoverable sugar (TRS) levels in sugarcane prior to harvest. Leaf and stalk samples were collected from multi-variety first-ratoon (FR) sugarcane maturity studies in 2005 at three sample ...

  20. Prediction of sugarcane sucrose content with high resolution, hyperspectral leaf reflectance measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing for crop maturity parameters may offer sugarcane producers a method to develop harvest schedules that maximize sucrose production. Several tests were conducted to determine if leaf reflectance measurements could be used to predict theoretically recoverable sugar (TRS) levels (crop mat...

  1. High-resolution wind speed measurements using actively heated fiber optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayde, Chadi; Thomas, Christoph K.; Wagner, James; Selker, John

    2015-11-01

    We present a novel technique to simultaneously measure wind speed (U) at thousands of locations continuously in time based on measurement of velocity-dependent heat transfer from a heated surface. Measuring temperature differences between paired passive and actively heated fiber-optic (AHFO) cables with a distributed temperature sensing system allowed estimation of U at over 2000 sections along the 230 m transect (resolution of 0.375 m and 5.5 s). The underlying concept is similar to that of a hot wire anemometer extended in space. The correlation coefficient between U measured by two colocated sonic anemometers and the AHFO were 0.91 during the day and 0.87 at night. The combination of classical passive and novel AHFO provides unprecedented dynamic observations of both air temperature and wind speed spanning 4 orders of magnitude in spatial scale (0.1-1000 m) while resolving individual turbulent motions, opening new opportunities for testing basic theories for near-surface geophysical flows.

  2. High resolution measured and modelled three-dimensional airflow over a coastal bowl blowout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, Thomas A. G.; Jackson, Derek W. T.; Cooper, J. Andrew G.

    2012-12-01

    Blowouts are common landforms found within coastal dunes. Their dynamics are primarily driven by aeolian transport caused by surface wind stress, though patterns of deflation and deposition within blowouts are poorly understood as near surface wind flow is complex. Three-dimensional wind flows around blowouts have yet to be properly quantified, especially within zones of separation, re-attachment and acceleration. This has been largely due to inadequate measurement of airflow and a lack of suitable airflow models. With this in mind, we present results from a study that has quantified alongshore and oblique onshore wind flow dynamics over a bowl blowout on the Belmullet Peninsula, Ireland. Using ultrasonic three-dimensional anemometry (measuring at 50 Hz) and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modelling, we measure and model for the first time in 3D a detailed picture of the heterogeneity of wind flow over this type of terrain. During alongshore wind conditions, wind speeds within the deflation basin were retarded by 50% compared to the foredune zone and flow separation restricted to a small zone in lee of the windward rim. Wind was directed into the deflation basin through a gap in a western erosional wall, termed the blowout throat. In oblique onshore wind, airflow orientated with the blowout throat remained unchanged in direction and slowed by only 30% compared to wind speed on the foredune. In lee of the erosional wall adjacent to the blowout throat, small zones of flow separation occurred close to the erosional wall. In both cases, the highest variation in wind speed and direction occurred in zones of separation and attachment whilst flow increased in steadiness with height over the erosional walls. The results illustrate that wind is manipulated according to localised topography within the bowl blowout itself. Resulting zones of potential sediment transport (erosion and deposition) are spatially complex and alter with wind direction. The

  3. High-Resolution LDA Measurements of Reynolds Stress in Boundary Layers and Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orloff, Kenneth; Olson, Lawrence E.

    1982-01-01

    The turbulent character of the boundary layer and wake associated with an airfoil has been studied at a Reynolds number of 10(exp 6) and a Mach number of 0.1. To accomplish these measurements, a unique laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) has been developed that is capable of sensing two velocity components from a remote distance of 2.13 m. Using special simultaneity logic and counter-type signal processors, the geometrical features of the LDA have been exploited to provide variable spatial resolution as low as 0.2 mm. By combining the LDA with an on-line computerized data acquisition and display system, it has been possible to measure mean velocity and Reynolds stress tensor distribution at several locations along the upper surface of a 0.9 m chord, flapped airfoil installed in the Ames 7- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel.

  4. High-resolution LDA measurements of Reynolds stress in boundary layers and wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orloff, K. L.; Olson, L. E.

    1980-01-01

    The turbulent character of the boundary layer and wake associated with an airfoil has been studied at a Reynolds number of 1,000,000 and a Mach number of 0.1. To accomplish these measurements, a unique laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) has been developed that is capable of sensing two velocity components from a remote distance of 2.13 m. Using special simultaneity logic and counter-type signal processors, the geometrical features of the LDA have been exploited to provide variable spatial resolution as low as 0.2 mm. By combining the LDA with an on-line computerized data acquisition and display system, it has been possible to measure mean velocity and Reynolds stress tensor distribution at several locations along the upper surface of a 0.9-m-chord, flapped airfoil installed in the Ames 7- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel.

  5. A high resolution capacitive sensing system for the measurement of water content in crude oil.

    PubMed

    Zubair, Muhammad; Tang, Tong Boon

    2014-06-25

    This paper presents the design of a non-intrusive system to measure ultra-low water content in crude oil. The system is based on a capacitance to phase angle conversion method. Water content is measured with a capacitance sensor comprising two semi-cylindrical electrodes mounted on the outer side of a glass tube. The presence of water induces a capacitance change that in turn converts into a phase angle, with respect to a main oscillator. A differential sensing technique is adopted not only to ensure high immunity against temperature variation and background noise, but also to eliminate phase jitter and amplitude variation of the main oscillator that could destabilize the output. The complete capacitive sensing system was implemented in hardware and experiment results using crude oil samples demonstrated that a resolution of ± 50 ppm of water content in crude oil was achieved by the proposed design.

  6. A High Resolution Capacitive Sensing System for the Measurement of Water Content in Crude Oil

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Muhammad Zubair; Tang, Tong Boon

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a non-intrusive system to measure ultra-low water content in crude oil. The system is based on a capacitance to phase angle conversion method. Water content is measured with a capacitance sensor comprising two semi-cylindrical electrodes mounted on the outer side of a glass tube. The presence of water induces a capacitance change that in turn converts into a phase angle, with respect to a main oscillator. A differential sensing technique is adopted not only to ensure high immunity against temperature variation and background noise, but also to eliminate phase jitter and amplitude variation of the main oscillator that could destabilize the output. The complete capacitive sensing system was implemented in hardware and experiment results using crude oil samples demonstrated that a resolution of ±50 ppm of water content in crude oil was achieved by the proposed design. PMID:24967606

  7. Characterization of fracture permeability with high-resolution vertical flow measurements during borehole pumping.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Hess, A.E.; Cheng, C.H.; Hardin, E.

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of fracture permeability in granitic rocks was investigated by measuring the distribution of vertical flow in boreholes during periods of steady pumping. Pumping tests were conducted at two sites chosen to provide examples of moderately fractured rocks near Mirror Lake, New Hampshire and intensely fractured rocks near Oracle, Arizona. A sensitive heat-pulse flowmeter was used for accurate measurements of vertical flow as low as 0.2 liter per minute. Results indicate zones of fracture permeability in crystalline rocks are composed of irregular conduits that cannot be approximated by planar fractures of uniform aperture, and that the orientation of permeability zones may be unrelated to the orientation of individual fractures within those zones.-Authors

  8. Integrated reflectivity measurements of hydrogen phthalate crystals for high-resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zastrau, U.; Förster, E.

    2014-09-01

    The integrated x-ray reflectivity of Potassium Hydrogen Phthalate (KAP) and Rubidium Hydrogen Phthalate (RAP) crystals is studied at a photon energy of (1740±14) eV using a double-crystal setup. The absolute measured reflectivities are in < 5% agreement with the values predicted by the dynamic diffraction theory for perfect crystals when absorption is included. Within 4% experimental error margins, specimen that were exposed to ambient conditions over many years show identical reflectivity as specimen that were cleaved just before the measurement. No differences are observed between cleaving off a 10 μm surface layer and splitting the entire crystal bulk of 2 mm thickness. We conclude that at 1.7 keV photon energy the penetration depth of ~ 1 μm is large compared to a potentially deteriorated surface layer of a few 10 nm.

  9. High-resolution micromechanical measurement in real time of forces exerted by living cells

    PubMed Central

    Swierczewski, Robert; Hedley, John; Redfern, Chris P. F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to compare uniaxial traction forces exerted by different cell types using a novel sensor design and to test the dependence of measured forces on cytoskeletal integrity. The sensor design detects forces generated between 2 contact points by cells spanning a gap. The magnitude of these forces varied according to cell type and were dependent on cytoskeletal integrity. The response time for drug-induced cytoskeletal disruption also varied between cell types: dermal fibroblasts exerted the greatest forces and had the slowest drug response times; EBV-transformed epithelial cells also had slow cytoskeletal depolymerisation times but exerted the lowest forces overall. Conversely, lung epithelial tumor cells exerted low forces but had the fastest depolymerisation drug response. These results provide proof of principle for a new design of force-measurement sensor based on optical interferometry, an approach that can be used to study cytoskeletal dynamics in real time. PMID:26645140

  10. Measuring Curved Crystal Performance for a High Resolution, Imaging X-ray Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Haugh and Richard Stewart

    2010-06-07

    This paper describes the design, crystal selection, and crystal testing for a vertical Johann spectrometer operating in the 13 keV range to measure ion Doppler broadening in inertial confinement plasmas. The spectrometer is designed to use thin, curved, mica crystals to achieve a resolving power of E/ΔE>2000. A number of natural mica crystals were screened for flatness and X-ray diffraction width to find samples of sufficient perfection for use in the instrument. Procedures to select and mount high quality mica samples are discussed. A diode-type X-ray source coupled to a dual goniometer arrangement was used to measure the crystal reflectivity curve. A procedure was developed for evaluating the goniometer performance using a set of diffraction grade Si crystals. This goniometer system was invaluable for identifying the best original crystals for further use and developing the techniques to select satisfactory curved crystals for the spectrometer.

  11. Contribution to the standardization of 3D measurements using a high-resolution PMD camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lietz, Henrik; Eberhardt, Jörg

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional image acquisition is still a growing field in optical metrology. Various methods are available to reconstruct an object's three-dimensional surface. The five main types of 3D cameras are stereo cameras, triangulation (pattern or laser scanning), interferometry, light-field cameras and ToF (time-of-flight) cameras. PMD (photonic mixing device) cameras measure the time of light, and thus belong to the field of ToF cameras. Each camera type has fields of application for which it is particularly well suited. Even within PMD cameras, there is a distinction made between applications for indoor and outdoor use. Until today, there is no method to measure and characterize 3D cameras uniformly. Desirable would be a method, which is able to measure all types of cameras equally. With this work, we want to contribute to the standardization of 3D cameras. In this case, we use a PMD camera for outdoor applications with relatively large pixels. It is shown how to determine the spatial resolution of a PMD camera from both, the amplitude and the distance image. Further, a novel method is presented how to determine the resolution enhancement in an image via gradient image evaluation. Finally, a method is proposed which evaluates the quality of resolution enhancement, when no ground truth data is available. Both are particularly interesting for the use of super-resolution (SR) applications.

  12. High-resolution 2D NMR spectroscopy of bicelles to measure the membrane interaction of ligands.

    PubMed

    Dvinskikh, Sergey V; Dürr, Ulrich H N; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2007-01-31

    Magnetically aligned bicelles are increasingly being used as model membranes in solution- and solid-state NMR studies of the structure, dynamics, topology, and interaction of membrane-associated peptides and proteins. These studies commonly utilize the PISEMA pulse sequence to measure dipolar coupling and chemical shift, the two key parameters used in subsequent structural analysis. In the present study, we demonstrate that the PISEMA and other rotating-frame pulse sequences are not suitable for the measurement of long-range heteronuclear dipolar couplings, and that they provide inaccurate values when multiple protons are coupled to a 13C nucleus. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a laboratory-frame separated-local-field experiment is capable of overcoming these difficulties in magnetically aligned bicelles. An extension of this approach to accurately measure 13C-31P and 1H-31P couplings from phospholipids, which are useful to understand the interaction of molecules with the membrane, is also described. In these 2D experiments, natural abundance 13C was observed from bicelles containing DMPC and DHPC lipid molecules. As a first application, these solid-state NMR approaches were utilized to probe the membrane interaction of an antidepressant molecule, desipramine, and its location in the membrane.

  13. Implementation of Ultrasonic Sensing for High Resolution Measurement of Binary Gas Mixture Fractions

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Richard; Battistin, Michele; Berry, Stephane; Bitadze, Alexander; Bonneau, Pierre; Bousson, Nicolas; Boyd, George; Bozza, Gennaro; Crespo-Lopez, Olivier; Riva, Enrico Da; Degeorge, Cyril; Deterre, Cecile; DiGirolamo, Beniamino; Doubek, Martin; Favre, Gilles; Godlewski, Jan; Hallewell, Gregory; Hasib, Ahmed; Katunin, Sergey; Langevin, Nicolas; Lombard, Didier; Mathieu, Michel; McMahon, Stephen; Nagai, Koichi; Pearson, Benjamin; Robinson, David; Rossi, Cecilia; Rozanov, Alexandre; Strauss, Michael; Vitek, Michal; Vacek, Vaclav; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    We describe an ultrasonic instrument for continuous real-time analysis of the fractional mixture of a binary gas system. The instrument is particularly well suited to measurement of leaks of a high molecular weight gas into a system that is nominally composed of a single gas. Sensitivity < 5 × 10−5 is demonstrated to leaks of octaflouropropane (C3F8) coolant into nitrogen during a long duration (18 month) continuous study. The sensitivity of the described measurement system is shown to depend on the difference in molecular masses of the two gases in the mixture. The impact of temperature and pressure variances on the accuracy of the measurement is analysed. Practical considerations for the implementation and deployment of long term, in situ ultrasonic leak detection systems are also described. Although development of the described systems was motivated by the requirements of an evaporative fluorocarbon cooling system, the instrument is applicable to the detection of leaks of many other gases and to processes requiring continuous knowledge of particular binary gas mixture fractions. PMID:24961217

  14. SU-E-I-40: New Method for Measurement of Task-Specific, High-Resolution Detector System Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Loughran, B; Singh, V; Jain, A; Bednarek, D; Rudin, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Although generalized linear system analytic metrics such as GMTF and GDQE can evaluate performance of the whole imaging system including detector, scatter and focal-spot, a simplified task-specific measured metric may help to better compare detector systems. Methods: Low quantum-noise images of a neuro-vascular stent with a modified ANSI head phantom were obtained from the average of many exposures taken with the high-resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) and with a Flat Panel Detector (FPD). The square of the Fourier Transform of each averaged image, equivalent to the measured product of the system GMTF and the object function in spatial-frequency space, was then divided by the normalized noise power spectra (NNPS) for each respective system to obtain a task-specific generalized signal-to-noise ratio. A generalized measured relative object detectability (GM-ROD) was obtained by taking the ratio of the integral of the resulting expressions for each detector system to give an overall metric that enables a realistic systems comparison for the given detection task. Results: The GM-ROD provides comparison of relative performance of detector systems from actual measurements of the object function as imaged by those detector systems. This metric includes noise correlations and spatial frequencies relevant to the specific object. Additionally, the integration bounds for the GM-ROD can be selected to emphasis the higher frequency band of each detector if high-resolution image details are to be evaluated. Examples of this new metric are discussed with a comparison of the MAF to the FPD for neuro-vascular interventional imaging. Conclusion: The GM-ROD is a new direct-measured task-specific metric that can provide clinically relevant comparison of the relative performance of imaging systems. Supported by NIH Grant: 2R01EB002873 and an equipment grant from Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation.

  15. High resolution deformation measurements at active volcanoes: a new remote sensing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hort, M. K.; Scharff, L.; Gerst, A.; Meier, K.; Falk, S.; Peters, G.; Ripepe, M.

    2013-12-01

    It is known from observations at different volcanoes using ULP seismic observations that the volcanic edifice deforms slightly prior to an eruption. It can be expected that immediately prior to an eruption the largest deformation should occur in the vicinity of the vent. However, placing instruments at the vent is impossible as they will be destroyed during an eruption. Here we present new, high temporal resolution (up to 300Hz) deformation measurement that utilizes the phase information of a frequency modulated Doppler radar system. We decompose the Doppler signal into two parts, one part which allows us to measure speeds significantly above 0.5m/s (i.e. the movement of volcanic ash and clasts). The other part utilizes the slow phase changes of the signal reflected from non-moving objects, i.e. the volcanic edifice. This signal is used to measure very slow and longer term deformations, which are the main subject of this study. The method has been tested measuring the displacement of high rise buildings during strong winds. It can be shown that displacements down to 50 μm can be resolved without a problem. We apply this method to different data sets collected at Stromboli volcano, Italy, as well as Santiaguito volcano, Guatemala. At Stromboli we observed the NE crater once in 2008 and once in 2011. During both campaigns we observe on average a displacement between 1 and 5mm before different eruptions. This displacement can be interpreted as a widening of the conduit prior to an eruption. In a couple of cases even an oscillatory movement is observed with frequencies of about 0.5Hz. Finite element modeling of the rise of a pressurized slug indicates that deformations at the crater rim on the order of a 1mm or less are certainly reasonable. In the case of Santiaguito volcano prior to an eruption we observe a pre eruptive displacement 5-15mm and after the end of an eruption a displacement of up to 1m before the next eruption occurs. This can be interpreted as in

  16. Characterization of Biogeochemical Variability in a Tidal Estuary Using High Resolution Optical Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, G.; Jones, C.; Martin, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Berry's Creek Study Area (BCSA) is a tidal estuary located in New Jersey. Several chemicals of potential concern (COPCs) are present in the BCSA waterway and marshes, including mercury, methyl mercury, and polychlorinated biphenyls. Concentrations of COPCs and suspended solids in the BCSA vary temporally and spatially due to tidal variability, freshwater flow events, and interaction of marsh, waterway, and sediment bed materials. This system-wide variability confounds evaluation of COPC sources and transport mechanisms when using conventional laboratory-based analysis of discrete water column samples. Therefore, an optically-based biogeochemical monitoring program was conducted using near-continuous measurements of optical properties and an optical-biogeochemical partial least-squares regression model pioneered by B. Bergamaschi (USGS) and colleagues. The objective of the study was to characterize COPC concentration dynamics in the BCSA water column and relate the analysis to sediment bed processes. Optical-biogeochemical model results indicated that, in general, measured optical properties were sufficient for predicting COPC concentrations to within 10% of the accuracy of laboratory-based analytical measurements. The continuous, high temporal resolution time series of COPC concentrations determined by the optical-biogeochemical model enabled evaluation of the sediment bed dynamics and variability of COPCs in the surface water of the BCSA. Results indicate that tidally-induced resuspension of waterway sediment bed particulates is the primary mechanism for transport of COPCs to surface water. Waterway-marsh tidal exchange shows a net mass flux of particulate COPCs from waterway to marsh, indicating that particulate COPCs are retained and accumulate in the marshes with relatively little net export of dissolved COPCs from the marshes to the waterway.

  17. High-resolution methane emission estimates using surface measurements and the InTEM inversion system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, Sarah; Manning, Alistair; Robinson, Andrew; Riddick, Stuart; Forster, Grant; Oram, Dave; O'Doherty, Simon; Harris, Neil

    2015-04-01

    High quality GHG emission estimates will be required to successfully tackle climate change. There is a growing need for comparisons between emission estimates produced using bottom-up and top-down techniques at high spatial resolution. Here, a top-down inversion approach combining multi-year atmospheric measurements and an inversion model, InTEM, was used to estimate methane emissions for a region in the South East of the UK (~100 x 150 km). We present results covering a 2-year period (July 2012 - July 2014) in which atmospheric methane concentrations were recorded at 1 - 2 minute time-steps at four locations within the region of interest. Precise measurements were obtained using gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection (GC-FID) for all sites except one, which used a PICARRO Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (CRDS). These observations, along with the UK Met Office's Lagrangian particle dispersion model, NAME, were used within InTEM to produce the methane emission fields. We present results from both Bayesian and non-prior based inversion analysis at varying spatial resolutions, for annual, seasonal and monthly time frames. These results are compared with the UK National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI) which is compiled using bottom-up methods and available at 1x1 km resolution. A thorough assessment of uncertainty is incorporated into this technique which is represented in the results. This project is part of the UK GAUGE campaign which aims to produce robust estimates of the UK GHG budget using new and existing measurement networks (e.g. the UK DECC GHG network) and modelling activities at a range of scales.

  18. A new instrument for high resolution stereoscopic photography of falling hydrometeors with simultaneous measurement of fallspeed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuter, S. E.; Garrett, T. J.; Fallgatter, C.; Shkurko, K.; Howlett, D.; Dean, J.; Hardin, N.

    2012-12-01

    We introduce a new instrument, the Fallgatter Technologies Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC), that provides <30 micron resolution stereoscopic photographic images of individual large falling hydrometeors with accurate measurements of their fallspeed. Previously, identification of hydrometeor form has required initial collection on a flat surface, a process that is somewhat subjective and remarkably finicky due to the fragile nature of the particles. Other hydrometeor instruments such as the 2DVD, are automated and leave the particle untouched and provide fallspeed data. However, they provide only 200 micron resolution silhouettes, which can be insufficient for habit and riming identification and the requirements of microwave scattering calculations. The MASC is like the 2DVD but uses a sensitive IR motion sensor for a trigger and actually photographs the particle surface from multiple angles. Field measurements from Alta Ski Area near Salt Lake City are providing beautiful images and fallspeed data, suggesting that MASC measurements may help development of improved parameterizations for hydrometeor microwave scattering. Hundreds of thousands of images have been collected enabling comparisons of hydrometeor development, morphology and fallspeed with a co-located vertically pointing 24 GHz MicroRainRadar radar. Here we show multi-angle images from the MASC, size fallspeed relationships, and discrete dipole approximation scattering calculations for a range of hydrometeor forms at the frequencies of 24 GHz, 94 GHz and 183 GHz. The scattering calculations indicate that complex, aggregated snowflake shapes appear to be more strongly forward scattering, at the expense of reduced back-scatter, than graupel particles of similar size.

  19. Very high-resolution heat-capacity measurements near the lambda point of helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipa, J. A.; Chui, T. C. P.

    1983-01-01

    New measurements of the heat capacity of a sample of helium 3-mm high are reported, which extend to within 5 x 10 to the -8th deg of the lambda transition at the vapor pressure. From an analysis of the results allowing for the effect of gravity, the values -0.0127 + or - 0.0026 (2 sigma) for the exponent alpha (= alpha-prime) and 1,058 + or - 0.004 for the leading singularity ratio A/A-prime are obtained. These values are in closer agreement with the theoretical predictions than those reported previously.

  20. High resolution hydrological modeling with measured precipitation data for the city of Amsterdam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Vossen, Jojanneke; Schuurmans, Hanneke; Siemerink, Martijn; van Leeuwen, Elgard; Oudhuis, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Assessing measures to reduce flooding in densely populated urban areas require a high level of detail to properly analyse the hydrological response to precipitation events. This means detailed data (for example elevation and landuse) and fast models that can cope with this level of detail. This also indicates the value of having a similar level of detail in precipitation data. We present an approach in which Dutch National Rainfall Radar data are combined with a new approach to hydrological modeling called 3di. This is illustrated for a case in the city of Amsterdam to assess the effects of precipitation events and the possibilities for suitable measures in the public space to reduce the effects of flooding. Dutch National Rainfall Radar is a consortium of water authorities and the industry and scientific experts/universities/research centers to improve the available radar data in the Netherlands. This is achieved by making a composite of the radar stations in The Netherlands together with German and Belgian radar stations. In addition, the composite image is calibrated with local rainfall stations. 3Di is a novel approach to calculate the hydrological response of catchments as a function of properties, such as surface elevation and land use. Because of the ability of the model to take the detail of the elevation and land-use (both 0,5x0m5 meter) into the calculations, this model allows for a very detailed modeling of the hydrological response of urban areas to precipitation events. In addition, the model is extremely fast and allows for real-time and interactive changes in the geometry, making it a very powerful tool to assess the effects of measures in the public space for reducing flooding. We illustrate this approach for a case for the city of Amsterdam, a densely populated, low-lying city in The Netherlands. The obtained level of detail allows to study which houses are flooded, which roads remain available for emergency services etc. The model is used to show

  1. A High Resolution Radar Altimeter to Measure the Topography of Ice Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawul, Rudolf A.

    1997-01-01

    This thesis is a reference for the Advanced Application Flight Experiment (AAFE) altimeter. The transmitter and receiver subsections are described and measurements of their current state is provided. During the 1994 NASA Greenland Experiment, the altimeter experienced several hardware malfunctions. The process of returning the radar to its fully operational state is presented in detail and necessary design modifications are explained. An updated radar user's manual is included along with various circuit designs which need to be implemented. The thesis is intended to provide an incoming graduate student with a solid foundation of the fundamentals of AAFE altimeter operation.

  2. Mid-Infrared OPO for High Resolution Measurements of Trace Gases in the Mars Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Numata,Kenji; Riris, haris; Abshire, James B.; Allan, Graham; Sun, Xiaoli; Krainak, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The Martian atmosphere is composed primarily (>95%) of CO2 and N2 gas, with CO, O2, CH4, and inert gases such as argon comprising most of the remainder. It is surprisingly dynamic with various processes driving changes in the distribution of CO2, dust, haze, clouds and water vapor on global scales in the meteorology of Mars atmosphere [I]. The trace gases and isotopic ratios in the atmosphere offer important but subtle clues as to the origins of the planet's atmosphere, hydrology, geology, and potential for biology. In the search for life on Mars, an important process is the ability of bacteria to metabolize inorganic substrates (H2, CO2 and rock) to derive energy and produce methane as a by-product of anaerobic metabolism. Trace gases have been measured in the Mars atmosphere from Earth, Mars orbit, and from the Mars surface. The concentration of water vapor and various carbon-based trace gases are observed in variable concentrations. Within the past decade multiple groups have reported detection of CH4, with concentrations in the 10's of ppb, using spectroscopic observations from Earth [2]. Passive spectrometers in the mid-infrared (MIR) are restricted to the sunlit side of the planet, generally in the mid latitudes, and have limited spectral and spatial resolution. To accurately map the global distribution and to locate areas of possibly higher concentrations of these gases such as plumes or vents requires an instrument with high sensitivity and fine spatial resolution that also has global coverage and can measure during both day and night. Our development goal is a new MIR lidar capable of measuring, on global scales, with sensitivity, resolution and precision needed to characterize the trace gases and isotopic ratios of the Martian atmosphere. An optical parametric oscillator operating in the MIR is well suited for this instrument. The sufficient wavelength tuning range of the OPO can extend the measurements to other organic molecules, CO2, atmospheric water

  3. Ultra-precise characterization of LCLS hard X-ray focusing mirrors by high resolution slope measuring deflectometry.

    PubMed

    Siewert, Frank; Buchheim, Jana; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J; Montanez, Paul A; Krzywinski, Jacek; Signorato, Riccardo

    2012-02-13

    We present recent results on the inspection of a first diffraction-limited hard X-ray Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirror pair for the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The full KB system - mirrors and holders - was under inspection by use of high resolution slope measuring deflectometry. The tests confirmed that KB mirrors of 350mm aperture length characterized by an outstanding residual figure error of <1 nm rms has been realized. This corresponds to the residual figure slope error of about 0.05µrad rms, unprecedented on such long elliptical mirrors. Additional measurements show the clamping of the mirrors to be a critical step for the final - shape preserving installation of such outstanding optics.

  4. High resolution ion mobility measurements for gas phase proteins: correlation between solution phase and gas phase conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudgins, Robert R.; Woenckhaus, Jürgen; Jarrold, Martin F.

    1997-11-01

    Our high resolution ion mobility apparatus has been modified by attaching an electrospray source to perform measurements for biological molecules. While the greater resolving power permits the resolution of more conformations for BPTI and cytochrome c, the resolved features are generally much broader than expected for a single rigid conformation. A major advantage of the new experimental configuration is the much gentler introduction of ions into the drift tube, so that the observed gas phase conformations appear to more closely reflect those present in solution. For example, it is possible to distinguish between the native state of cytochrome c and the methanol-denatured form on the basis of the ion mobility measurements; the mass spectra alone are not sensitive enough to detect this change. Thus this approach may provide a quick and sensitive tool for probing the solution phase conformations of biological molecules.

  5. Switchable wiring for high-resolution electronic measurements at very low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Schirm, C; Pernau, H-F; Scheer, E

    2009-02-01

    Low-temperature transport measurements with high energy resolution require effective filtering of high-frequency input. The high dc resistance of standard RC filters results in considerable heat input and hampers measurements with high currents or voltages. We developed a wiring scheme that incorporates a commercial latching relay at very low temperature between two sets of wires. In our application one set of wires comprises a voltage divider and a high-Ohmic reference resistance at low temperature as well. The other set has low dc resistance and no voltage divider. Both sets are high frequency filtered with very robust and compact filters, though, for insuring effective damping at gigahertz frequencies. We demonstrate that with the first set, we obtain a voltage resolution of 6 microV and a current resolution of 100 pA, which is sufficient for the recording and analysis of multiparticle transport in superconducting point contacts. The second set is used for electromigration experiments on superconducting point contacts and allows application of currents up to 1 mA and voltages up to 20 V, while the sample is at 1 K. More versatile applications of the scheme are possible. PMID:19256670

  6. High-resolution multiwire proportional soft x-ray diagnostic measurements on TCV

    SciTech Connect

    Sushkov, A.; Andreev, V.; Camenen, Y.; Pochelon, A.; Klimanov, I.; Scarabosio, A.; Weisen, H.

    2008-02-15

    A multiwire proportional x-ray (MPX) detector is used on the TCV tokamak (Tokamak a configuration variable) as a high spatial and temporal resolution soft x-ray emissivity imaging diagnostic. The MPX system consists of 64 vertically viewing channels and has been designed to complement the existing TCV soft x-ray tomography system by enhancing the spatial resolution. The MPX detector is suitable for the measurement of fast and localized phenomena and can be used, for instance, for the observation of magnetohydrodynamic activity, for the characterization of transport barriers or for an improved determination of the electron cyclotron heating power deposition profile. The MPX detector operates in continuous-current mode and measures the plasma soft x-ray emission in the 3-30 keV range with a radial resolution of about 5 mm - 1% of plasma diameter - and a frequency bandwidth of 50 kHz. A detailed description of the MPX detector construction and the principle of its operation are given. The properties of the detector in photon-counting and continuous-current operation modes are studied. The implementation of the system on TCV and experimental results illustrating the potential of the diagnostic are also presented.

  7. High resolution measurement of striation patterns and sarcomere motions in cardiac muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, J W; Denton, A

    1992-01-01

    We describe an extension of the method of Myers et al. (1982) to measure with high precision the uniformity of contractile motions that occur between sarcomeres in the isolated cardiac muscle cell (guinea pig and rat). The image of the striations, observed with modulation contrast microscopy, was detected by a linear array of photodiodes. Sarcomere length was measured greater than 500/s from the frequency of the array's video signal at two selectable regions of the cell. A precision test grating demonstrated that method resolves known differences in the spacing between two contiguous striations to +/- 0.01 micron and that the effects of image translation and microscopic resolution are minor. The distribution of striation spacing appears to be discrete in isolated segments of the cell, and patches of fairly uniform length can be identified that are laterally contiguous. When electrically triggered, contraction is synchronous and the sarcomeres shorten and relengthen smoothly. The contrast between the striations is transiently enhanced during relengthening, an indication that the contracting cell can not be treated as a simple grating. Pauses that occur during late in relengthening (and transient contractile alternans) are characterized by very synchronized activity. These forms of irregular contractile behavior are not explained by desynchronization of a mechanism of release of intracellular calcium. A companion article describes application of the technique to study the nonuniform motions that occur between sarcomeres. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:1540686

  8. A simple fiber-optic microprobe for high resolution light measurements: application in marine sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, B. B.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    A fiber-optic microphobe is described which is inexpensive and simple to build and use. It consists of an 80-micrometers optical fiber which at the end is tapered down to a rounded sensing tip of 20-30-micrometers diameter. The detector is a hybrid photodiode/amplifier. The probe has a sensitivity of 0.01 microEinst m-2 s-1 and a spectral range of 300-1,100 nm. Spectral light gradients were measured in fine-grained San Francisco Bay sediment that had an undisturbed diatom coating on the surface. The photic zone of the mud was only 0.4 mm deep. Measured in situ spectra showed extinction maxima at 430-520, 620-630, 670, and 825-850 nm due to absorption by chlorophyll a, carotenoids, phycocyanin, and bacterio-chlorophyll a. Maximum light penetration in the visible range was found in both the violet and the red < or = 400 and > or = 700 nm.

  9. High-resolution Tangential AXUV Arrays for Radiated Power Density Measurements on NSTX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado-Aparicio, L; Bell, R E; Faust, I; Tritz, K; Diallo, A; Gerhardt, S P; Kozub, T A; LeBlanc, B P; Stratton, B C

    2014-07-01

    Precise measurements of the local radiated power density and total radiated power are a matter of the uttermost importance for understanding the onset of impurity-induced instabilities and the study of particle and heat transport. Accounting of power balance is also needed for the understanding the physics of various divertor con gurations for present and future high-power fusion devices. Poloidal asymmetries in the impurity density can result from high Mach numbers and can impact the assessment of their flux-surface-average and hence vary the estimates of P[sub]rad (r, t) and (Z[sub]eff); the latter is used in the calculation of the neoclassical conductivity and the interpretation of non-inductive and inductive current fractions. To this end, the bolometric diagnostic in NSTX-U will be upgraded, enhancing the midplane coverage and radial resolution with two tangential views, and adding a new set of poloidally-viewing arrays to measure the 2D radiation distribution. These systems are designed to contribute to the near- and long-term highest priority research goals for NSTX-U which will integrate non-inductive operation at reduced collisionality, with high-pressure, long energy-confinement-times and a divertor solution with metal walls.

  10. A simple fiber-optic microprobe for high resolution light measurements: application in marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, B B; Des Marais, D J

    1986-01-01

    A fiber-optic microphobe is described which is inexpensive and simple to build and use. It consists of an 80-micrometers optical fiber which at the end is tapered down to a rounded sensing tip of 20-30-micrometers diameter. The detector is a hybrid photodiode/amplifier. The probe has a sensitivity of 0.01 microEinst m-2 s-1 and a spectral range of 300-1,100 nm. Spectral light gradients were measured in fine-grained San Francisco Bay sediment that had an undisturbed diatom coating on the surface. The photic zone of the mud was only 0.4 mm deep. Measured in situ spectra showed extinction maxima at 430-520, 620-630, 670, and 825-850 nm due to absorption by chlorophyll a, carotenoids, phycocyanin, and bacterio-chlorophyll a. Maximum light penetration in the visible range was found in both the violet and the red < or = 400 and > or = 700 nm. PMID:11542043

  11. Real-time high-resolution heterodyne-based measurements of spectral dynamics in fibre lasers

    PubMed Central

    Sugavanam, Srikanth; Fabbri, Simon; Le, Son Thai; Lobach, Ivan; Kablukov, Sergey; Khorev, Serge; Churkin, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Conventional tools for measurement of laser spectra (e.g. optical spectrum analysers) capture data averaged over a considerable time period. However, the generation spectrum of many laser types may involve spectral dynamics whose relatively fast time scale is determined by their cavity round trip period, calling for instrumentation featuring both high temporal and spectral resolution. Such real-time spectral characterisation becomes particularly challenging if the laser pulses are long, or they have continuous or quasi-continuous wave radiation components. Here we combine optical heterodyning with a technique of spatio-temporal intensity measurements that allows the characterisation of such complex sources. Fast, round-trip-resolved spectral dynamics of cavity-based systems in real-time are obtained, with temporal resolution of one cavity round trip and frequency resolution defined by its inverse (85 ns and 24 MHz respectively are demonstrated). We also show how under certain conditions for quasi-continuous wave sources, the spectral resolution could be further increased by a factor of 100 by direct extraction of phase information from the heterodyned dynamics or by using double time scales within the spectrogram approach. PMID:26984634

  12. Rotation and winds of exoplanet HD 189733 b measured with high-resolution transmission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogi, Matteo

    2015-12-01

    At the dawn of exoplanet science, the first discoveries revealed the existence of giant planets orbiting very close to their parent stars, called hot Jupiters. Early theories suggested that these planets should be tidally locked, although their spin rotation has never been measured directly. On top of rotation, hot Jupiters can show equatorial super-rotation via eastward jet streams and/or high-altitude winds flowing from the day- to the night-side hemisphere. All these patterns broaden and distort the planet spectral lines to an extent that is detectable with measurements at high spectral resolution.High-dispersion observations have recently excelled in robustly detecting molecules in the atmospheres of transiting and non-transiting hot Jupiters, and in measuring their relative abundances. Here the method is applied to the transmission spectrum of HD 189733 b, a Jupiter-size planet orbiting a K1-2V star in 2.2 days, observed around 2.3μm with CRIRES at the ESO Very Large Telescope. At a spectral resolution of R~100,000, the combined absorption of carbon monoxide and water vapor is detected in the planet spectrum at a confidence level of 7σ. The signal is obtained by cross correlating with theoretical spectra and it is maximized for a planet rotational velocity of 3.5+1.1-2.6 km/s. This corresponds to a planet rotational period of 1.7+4.9-0.4 days, consistent with the known orbital period of 2.2 days and therefore with tidal locking. Although planet rotations faster than 1.1 days can be ruled out at high confidence (3σ), sub-synchronous rotational velocities (Vrot < 2.7 km/s) or no-rotation are only marginally excluded (1.2σ). Finally, no significant day-to-night side winds are detected. When compared to the recent detection of sodium Doppler shifted by -8 km/s, this likely implies a strong wind shear between the atmospheric levels probed by these high-dispersion observations and the outermost atmospheric layers where the core of the sodium lines are formed.

  13. First measurements with new high-resolution gadolinium-GEM neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, D.; Resnati, F.; Birch, J.; Etxegarai, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Höglund, C.; Hultman, L.; Llamas-Jansa, I.; Oliveri, E.; Oksanen, E.; Robinson, L.; Ropelewski, L.; Schmidt, S.; Streli, C.; Thuiner, P.

    2016-05-01

    European Spallation Source instruments like the macromolecular diffractometer (NMX) require an excellent neutron detection efficiency, high-rate capabilities, time resolution, and an unprecedented spatial resolution in the order of a few hundred micrometers over a wide angular range of the incoming neutrons. For these instruments solid converters in combination with Micro Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGDs) are a promising option. A GEM detector with gadolinium converter was tested on a cold neutron beam at the IFE research reactor in Norway. The μTPC analysis, proven to improve the spatial resolution in the case of 10B converters, is extended to gadolinium based detectors. For the first time, a Gd-GEM was successfully operated to detect neutrons with a measured efficiency of 11.8% at a wavelength of 2 Åand a position resolution better than 250 μm.

  14. Fast, high-resolution surface potential measurements in air with heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joseph L.; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2016-06-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) adapts an atomic force microscope to measure electric potential on surfaces at nanometer length scales. Here we demonstrate that Heterodyne-KPFM enables scan rates of several frames per minute in air, and concurrently maintains spatial resolution and voltage sensitivity comparable to frequency-modulation KPFM, the current spatial resolution standard. Two common classes of topography-coupled artifacts are shown to be avoidable with H-KPFM. A second implementation of H-KPFM is also introduced, in which the voltage signal is amplified by the first cantilever resonance for enhanced sensitivity. The enhanced temporal resolution of H-KPFM can enable the imaging of many dynamic processes, such as such as electrochromic switching, phase transitions, and device degredation (battery, solar, etc), which take place over seconds to minutes and involve changes in electric potential at nanometer lengths.

  15. High Resolution Transmission Grating Spectrometer for Edge Toroidal Rotation Measurements of Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, A; May, M; Beiersdorfer, P; Magee, E; Lawrence, M; Terry, J; Rice, J

    2004-04-29

    We present a high throughput (f/3) visible (3500 - 7000 Angstrom) Doppler spectrometer for toroidal rotation velocity measurements of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak plasma. The spectrometer has a temporal response of 1 ms and a rotation velocity sensitivity of {approx}10{sup 5} cm/s. This diagnostic will have a tangential view and map out the plasma rotation at several locations along the outer half of the minor radius (r/a > 0.5). The plasma rotation will be determined from the Doppler shifted wavelengths of D{sub alpha} and magnetic and electric dipole transitions of highly ionized impurities in the plasma. The fast time resolution and high spectral resolving power are possible due to a 6' diameter circular transmission grating that is capable of {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} {approx} 15500 at 5769 Angstrom in conjunction with a 50 {micro}m slit.

  16. Improving high resolution emission inventories with local proxies and urban eddy covariance flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioli, Beniamino; Gualtieri, Giovanni; Busillo, Caterina; Calastrini, Francesca; Zaldei, Alessandro; Toscano, Piero

    2015-08-01

    Emission inventories are the fundamental official data on atmospheric emissions of pollutants and greenhouse gases at a variety of spatial and temporal scales worldwide. This study makes use of direct CO2 emission measurements made with the eddy covariance technique over a completely urbanized area, with no confounding effect of vegetation, where emissions are mostly controlled by natural gas combustion processes and road traffic. Objectives are: i) to validate top-down spatially and temporally disaggregated emission inventories at yearly, monthly, weekly and hourly time scales; ii) to quantify the improvement achieved in official inventories when replacing built-in temporal disaggregation proxies with customized proxies based on local data of road traffic and natural gas consumption. We demonstrate that the overall performance of official inventory at yearly scale is rather good with an emission of 3.08 g CO2 m-2 h-1 against a measured emission of 3.21 ± 0.12 g CO2 m-2 h-1. When temporally disaggregating annual emissions, the agreement between inventory and observations always significantly improves when using local proxies, by 47% (from 0.70 to 0.37 g CO2 m-2 h-1 RMSE) at monthly scale, by 26% (from 0.58 to 0.43 g CO2 m-2 h-1 RMSE) at weekly scale, and by 32% (from 1.26 to 0.85 g CO2 m-2 h-1 RMSE), at hourly scale. The validity of this analysis goes beyond CO2 since the temporal proxies used by the inventories mimic the intensity of specific emission processes, therefore species emitted in the same processes as CO2, would benefit from the improved parameterization of temporal proxies shown here. These results indicate that effort should be put into developing improved temporal proxies based on local rather than national scale data, that can better mimic site dependent behaviors.

  17. Functional exploratory data analysis for high-resolution measurements of urban particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Ranalli, M Giovanna; Rocco, Giorgia; Jona Lasinio, Giovanna; Moroni, Beatrice; Castellini, Silvia; Crocchianti, Stefano; Cappelletti, David

    2016-09-01

    In this work we propose the use of functional data analysis (FDA) to deal with a very large dataset of atmospheric aerosol size distribution resolved in both space and time. Data come from a mobile measurement platform in the town of Perugia (Central Italy). An OPC (Optical Particle Counter) is integrated on a cabin of the Minimetrò, an urban transportation system, that moves along a monorail on a line transect of the town. The OPC takes a sample of air every six seconds and counts the number of particles of urban aerosols with a diameter between 0.28 μm and 10 μm and classifies such particles into 21 size bins according to their diameter. Here, we adopt a 2D functional data representation for each of the 21 spatiotemporal series. In fact, space is unidimensional since it is measured as the distance on the monorail from the base station of the Minimetrò. FDA allows for a reduction of the dimensionality of each dataset and accounts for the high space-time resolution of the data. Functional cluster analysis is then performed to search for similarities among the 21 size channels in terms of their spatiotemporal pattern. Results provide a good classification of the 21 size bins into a relatively small number of groups (between three and four) according to the season of the year. Groups including coarser particles have more similar patterns, while those including finer particles show a more different behavior according to the period of the year. Such features are consistent with the physics of atmospheric aerosol and the highlighted patterns provide a very useful ground for prospective model-based studies. PMID:27072888

  18. Functional exploratory data analysis for high-resolution measurements of urban particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Ranalli, M Giovanna; Rocco, Giorgia; Jona Lasinio, Giovanna; Moroni, Beatrice; Castellini, Silvia; Crocchianti, Stefano; Cappelletti, David

    2016-09-01

    In this work we propose the use of functional data analysis (FDA) to deal with a very large dataset of atmospheric aerosol size distribution resolved in both space and time. Data come from a mobile measurement platform in the town of Perugia (Central Italy). An OPC (Optical Particle Counter) is integrated on a cabin of the Minimetrò, an urban transportation system, that moves along a monorail on a line transect of the town. The OPC takes a sample of air every six seconds and counts the number of particles of urban aerosols with a diameter between 0.28 μm and 10 μm and classifies such particles into 21 size bins according to their diameter. Here, we adopt a 2D functional data representation for each of the 21 spatiotemporal series. In fact, space is unidimensional since it is measured as the distance on the monorail from the base station of the Minimetrò. FDA allows for a reduction of the dimensionality of each dataset and accounts for the high space-time resolution of the data. Functional cluster analysis is then performed to search for similarities among the 21 size channels in terms of their spatiotemporal pattern. Results provide a good classification of the 21 size bins into a relatively small number of groups (between three and four) according to the season of the year. Groups including coarser particles have more similar patterns, while those including finer particles show a more different behavior according to the period of the year. Such features are consistent with the physics of atmospheric aerosol and the highlighted patterns provide a very useful ground for prospective model-based studies.

  19. Real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements on shocked crystals at a synchrotron facility.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Y M; Turneaure, Stefan J; Perkins, K; Zimmerman, K; Arganbright, N; Shen, G; Chow, P

    2012-12-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory was used to obtain real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements to determine the microscopic response of shock-compressed single crystals. Disk shaped samples were subjected to plane shock wave compression by impacting them with half-inch diameter, flat-faced projectiles. The projectiles were accelerated to velocities ranging between 300 and 1200 m/s using a compact powder gun designed specifically for use at a synchrotron facility. The experiments were designed to keep the sample probed volume under uniaxial strain and constant stress for a duration longer than the 153.4 ns spacing between x-ray bunches. X-rays from a single pulse (<100 ps duration) out of the periodic x-ray pulses emitted by the synchrotron were used for the diffraction measurements. A synchronization and x-ray detection technique was developed to ensure that the measured signal was obtained unambiguously from the desired x-ray pulse incident on the sample while the sample was in a constant uniaxial strain state. The synchronization and x-ray detection techniques described can be used for a variety of x-ray measurements on shock compressed solids and liquids at the APS. Detailed procedures for applying the Bragg-Brentano parafocusing approach to single crystals at the APS are presented. Analytic developments to determine the effects of crystal substructure and non-ideal geometry on the diffraction pattern position and shape are presented. Representative real-time x-ray diffraction data, indicating shock-induced microstructural changes, are presented for a shock-compressed Al(111) sample. The experimental developments presented here provided, in part, the impetus for the Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) currently under development at the APS. Both the synchronization∕x-ray detection methods and the analysis equations for high-resolution single crystal x-ray diffraction can be used at the DCS.

  20. Real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements on shocked crystals at a synchrotron facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Y. M.; Turneaure, Stefan J.; Perkins, K.; Zimmerman, K.; Arganbright, N.; Shen, G.; Chow, P.

    2012-12-15

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory was used to obtain real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements to determine the microscopic response of shock-compressed single crystals. Disk shaped samples were subjected to plane shock wave compression by impacting them with half-inch diameter, flat-faced projectiles. The projectiles were accelerated to velocities ranging between 300 and 1200 m/s using a compact powder gun designed specifically for use at a synchrotron facility. The experiments were designed to keep the sample probed volume under uniaxial strain and constant stress for a duration longer than the 153.4 ns spacing between x-ray bunches. X-rays from a single pulse (<100 ps duration) out of the periodic x-ray pulses emitted by the synchrotron were used for the diffraction measurements. A synchronization and x-ray detection technique was developed to ensure that the measured signal was obtained unambiguously from the desired x-ray pulse incident on the sample while the sample was in a constant uniaxial strain state. The synchronization and x-ray detection techniques described can be used for a variety of x-ray measurements on shock compressed solids and liquids at the APS. Detailed procedures for applying the Bragg-Brentano parafocusing approach to single crystals at the APS are presented. Analytic developments to determine the effects of crystal substructure and non-ideal geometry on the diffraction pattern position and shape are presented. Representative real-time x-ray diffraction data, indicating shock-induced microstructural changes, are presented for a shock-compressed Al(111) sample. The experimental developments presented here provided, in part, the impetus for the Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) currently under development at the APS. Both the synchronization/x-ray detection methods and the analysis equations for high-resolution single crystal x-ray diffraction can be used at the DCS.

  1. High-resolution multitemporal measurement of rockglacier dynamics and periglacial sediment storage in the eastern Alps, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusik, Jana-Marie; Haas, Florian; Heckmann, Tobias; Hilger, Ludwig; Neugirg, Fabian; Leopold, Matthias; Becht, Michael

    2013-04-01

    High alpine environments are subject to rapid change due to melting glaciers and permafrost. As a consequence, rockwalls and moraines experience destabilization and increased mobilization of sediment. The work presented here is part of the joint project PROSA (High-resolution measurements of morphodynamics in rapidly changing PROglacial Systems of the Alps) which deals with the calculation and quantification of the sediment budget for an alpine catchment situated in the Kaunertal, Austrian Alps. Rockglaciers are frequently appearing landforms in the Kaunertal and represent large sediment storages. Usually the sediment flux of rockglaciers is rather small, depending on their activity status. All activity forms of rockglaciers (active, inactive and relict) are present in the catchment area. Besides the highly active and well-known Ölgrube rockglacier, this work deals especially with the examination of the Riffeltal rockglacier which is situated on the opposite valley side. The activity status of the Riffeltal rockglacier is assessed and compared to the Ölgrube rockglacier with respect to the local parameters aspect, altitude, existence/absence of glaciers, geology and catchment area. Furthermore sediment volumes of both rockglaciers, their rates of movement and therefore their contribution to the sediment budget of the Kaunertal-catchment area is estimated. The internal structure of the Riffeltal rockglacier was inferred from geophysical measurements (refraction seismics, ground penetrating radar and electrical resistivity tomography). Temperature loggers were placed on and around the rockglacier before the first snowfall to measure the bottom temperature of snowcover (BTS) once per hour during winter, and BTS measurements will be performed with a probe in February, March and April to infer permafrost probability. Rockglacier dynamics are identified with the analysis of multitemporal orthophotos and digital elevation models, derived from high-resolution airborne

  2. High Resolution Measurement of Changing Near Bed Flow Structure and Implications for Ecological Functioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambrook Smith, G.; Nicholas, A.

    2004-05-01

    Data acquired using traditional techniques to investigate the links between flow hydraulics and river ecology are often subject to a number of limitations. 1) There is often a mismatch (of at least an order of magnitude) between the resolution at which hydraulic measurements are taken and the scale of instream fauna to which they are applied. 2) Many studies have not assessed the full range of flow variability. This is an important oversight as it is generally the maximum force experienced by an organism that determines its presence or absence. 3) The spatial resolution of velocity data has also often been inappropriate for its intended purpose. Isolated velocity profiles may not adequately characterise the flow field at the relevant scale or be well related to the bed surface above which they were obtained. 4) There has been little consideration of how patterns of near-bed flow may change over short time scales (within a flow event) in response to changing bed micro-topography as a result of sediment transport and deposition. The aim of this paper is to assess the potential for addressing these issues using the relatively new techniques of particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). PIV allows contemporaneous quantification of the entire instantaneous two-dimensional flow field. The advantage of this approach is that data can be collected at a scale more appropriate to instream fauna. Thus U (downstream) and V (vertical) velocity data can be obtained at a resolution of c. 3 mm. In addition, since it is a non-intrusive technique, measurements can be taken very close to the bed surface itself. Thus the technique goes a considerable way to addressing points 1-3 raised above. To investigate point 4, the experiments reported here are designed to simulate the progressive effect of sand deposition on a gravel bed. Such a situation may be common, for example, on the falling limb of a hydrograph. To simulate sand infilling around gravel a

  3. Ice shelf flexure at Antarctic grounding lines observed by high resolution satellite and ground measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rack, Wolfgang; Wild, Christian; Ryan, Michelle; Marsh, Oliver; McDonald, Adrian; King, Matt; Floricioiu, Dana; Wiesmann, Andreas; Price, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Climate change is expected to impact Antarctic ice sheets primarily through changes in the oceans. This will be felt most strongly near the grounding line, where the ice sheet first comes into contact with ocean water and becomes an ice shelf. The primary objective of this work is to make use of satellite techniques for better monitoring and interpretation of the link between floating ice shelves and grounded ice. By measuring the flexure of ice due to tides we can obtain critical data to derive information on ice properties. Satellites can measure tidal bending over discrete time intervals and over large areas, whereas ground stations monitor ice dynamics continuously at discrete points. By the combination of the two we derive a complete picture of vertical ice displacement by tides for different grounding line geometries. Our field site is the Southern McMurdo Ice Shelf in the western Ross Sea region at which horizontal ice dynamics can be neglected which simplifies corresponding satellite data analysis. During a field survey in 2014/15, we acquired data of tidal flexure along a straight line perpendicular to the grounding line using 8 ground stations equipped with differential GPS receivers and high precision tiltmeters. The most landward station was located close to the grounding line, and the last station was placed 5 km away at a point which was assumed to be freely floating. Additional data acquired for the flexure analysis are ice thickness, snow and ice stratigraphy and basal ice properties using ground radar systems; as well as information of snow morphology from snow pits and ice cores. During the same period a series of TerraSAR-X 11-day repeat pass satellite data have been acquired to map tidal displacement using differential SAR interferometry (DInSAR). Before the onset of the melting season in December all interferograms show generally high coherence and are suitable for tidal flexure analysis. The ice shelf in the area is around 200m thick, and

  4. Case study of wave breaking with high-resolution turbulence measurements with LITOS and WRF simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Andreas; Söder, Jens; Gerding, Michael; Wagner, Johannes; Lübken, Franz-Josef

    2016-04-01

    Gravity waves in their final stage produce turbulence and dissipation. In the stratosphere only few studies of this phenomenon exist because the observation is technically challenging. In order to precisely infer energy dissipation rates, the viscous subrange has to be covered, which in the stratosphere lies at scales of centimetres and below. With our balloon-borne instrument LITOS (Leibniz-Institute Turbulence Observations in the Stratosphere), which has a vertical resolution below 1 mm, measurements were performed from Kiruna (68°N, 21°E) as well as from Kühlungsborn (54°N, 12°E). To characterise the atmospheric background conditions, WRF simulations driven by ECMWF reanalysis data were performed for the times of the flights. Averaged dissipation rates observed by LITOS are connected to wave signatures seen in the model. Particularly, larger dissipation rates correlate to larger amplitudes seen in the horizontal divergence or vertical winds in the model and vice versa. For one flight, a very pronounced maximum in dissipation is observed below the tropopause. It is connected to a wind reversal and dynamic instability. In the corresponding WRF simulation, turbulent kinetic energies (TKE) and amplitudes in horizontal divergence are enhanced in this region. For the other flights, no such pronounced maximum in dissipation but also no enhanced values of TKE outside of the boundary layer are observed. That means that low and moderate turbulence is not resolved in WRF, but is observed by LITOS throughout all altitudes.

  5. High Resolution Plasma Measurements From The Fast Plasma Investigation On Magnetospheric Multiscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, launched in March 2015, targets understanding of the fundamental physics of magnetic reconnection using Earth's magnetosphere as a laboratory within which to study this naturally occurring process. The first mission phase, currently in progress, focuses on reconnection occurring at Earth's dayside magnetopause. The relevant electron and ion scale processes have never before been fully resolved and differentiated, owing to limitations in the time (thus spatial) resolution available. The Fast Plasma Investigation (FPI) was developed for flight on MMS in order to fully resolve 3D plasma distribution functions on both the ion scale and the substantially smaller electron scale. MMS is designed to provide multi-point measurements of fast plasma, electric and magnetic fields, ion composition and energetic particles at the four points of a variably sized tetrahedron. Thus, MMS enables specification of all relevant plasma parameters and their spatial derivatives in order to understand the roles of the various terms in the Generalized Ohm's Law that governs the plasma behavior at reconnection sites. In this talk, we provide a brief description of FPI and show a sampling of early results, including MMS crossings of the magnetopause.

  6. Characterization of the Abydos region through OSIRIS high-resolution images in support of CIVA measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchetti, A.; Cremonese, G.; Jorda, L.; Poulet, F.; Bibring, J.-P.; Pajola, M.; La Forgia, F.; Massironi, M.; El-Maarry, M. R.; Oklay, N.; Sierks, H.; Barbieri, C.; Lamy, P.; Rodrigo, R.; Koschny, D.; Rickman, H.; Keller, H. U.; Agarwal, J.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Barucci, M. A.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Bertini, I.; Da Deppo, V.; Davidsson, B.; Debei, S.; De Cecco, M.; Fornasier, S.; Fulle, M.; Groussin, O.; Gutierrez, P. J.; Güttler, C.; Hviid, S. F.; Ip, W.-H.; Knollenberg, J.; Kramm, J.-R.; Kührt, E.; Küppers, M.; Lara, L. M.; Lazzarin, M.; Lopez Moreno, J. J.; Marzari, F.; Mottola, S.; Naletto, G.; Preusker, F.; Scholten, F.; Thomas, N.; Tubiana, C.; Vincent, J.-B.

    2016-01-01

    Context. On 12 November 2014, the European mission Rosetta delivered the Philae lander on the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P). After the first touchdown, the lander bounced three times before finally landing at a site named Abydos. Aims: We provide a morphologically detailed analysis of the Abydos landing site to support Philae's measurements and to give context for the interpretation of the images coming from the Comet Infrared and Visible Analyser (CIVA) camera system onboard the lander. Methods: We used images acquired by the OSIRIS Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) on 6 December 2014 to perform the analysis of the Abydos landing site, which provided the geomorphological map, the gravitational slope map, the size-frequency distribution of the boulders. We also computed the albedo and spectral reddening maps. Results: The morphological analysis of the region could suggest that Philae is located on a primordial terrain. The Abydos site is surrounded by two layered and fractured outcrops and presents a 0.02 km2 talus deposit rich in boulders. The boulder size frequency distribution gives a cumulative power-law index of -4.0 + 0.3/-0.4, which is correlated with gravitational events triggered by sublimation and/or thermal fracturing causing regressive erosion. The average value of the albedo is 5.8% at λ1 = 480.7 nm and 7.4% at λ2 = 649.2 nm, which is similar to the global albedos derived by OSIRIS and CIVA, respectively.

  7. Robust high-resolution imaging and quantitative force measurement with tuned-oscillator atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagdeviren, Omur E.; Götzen, Jan; Hölscher, Hendrik; Altman, Eric I.; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2016-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectroscopy are based on locally detecting the interactions between a surface and a sharp probe tip. For highest resolution imaging, noncontact modes that avoid tip-sample contact are used; control of the tip’s vertical position is accomplished by oscillating the tip and detecting perturbations induced by its interaction with the surface potential. Due to this potential’s nonlinear nature, however, achieving reliable control of the tip-sample distance is challenging, so much so that despite its power vacuum-based noncontact AFM has remained a niche technique. Here we introduce a new pathway to distance control that prevents instabilities by externally tuning the oscillator’s response characteristics. A major advantage of this operational scheme is that it delivers robust position control in both the attractive and repulsive regimes with only one feedback loop, thereby providing an easy-to-implement route to atomic resolution imaging and quantitative tip-sample interaction force measurement.

  8. HIGH-RESOLUTION RADIO CONTINUUM MEASUREMENTS OF THE NUCLEAR DISKS OF Arp 220

    SciTech Connect

    Barcos-Muñoz, L.; Evans, A. S.; Privon, G. C.; Stierwalt, S.; Leroy, A. K.; Condon, J.; Reichardt, A.; Armus, L.; Mazzarella, J. M.; Murphy, E. J.; Meier, D. S.; Momjian, E.; Ott, J.; Sakamoto, K.; Sanders, D. B.; Schinnerer, E.; Walter, F.; Surace, J. A.; Thompson, T. A.

    2015-01-20

    1}kpc{sup –2}. These values, especially for the western nucleus are, to our knowledge, the highest luminosity surface densities and star formation rate surface densities measured for any star-forming system. Despite these high values, the nuclei appear to lie below the dusty Eddington limit in which radiation pressure is balanced only by self-gravity. The small measured sizes also imply that at wavelengths shorter than λ = 1 mm, dust absorption effects must play an important role in the observed light distribution while below 5 GHz free-free absorption contributes substantial opacity. According to these calculations, the nuclei of Arp 220 are only transparent in the frequency range ∼5-350 GHz. Our results offer no clear evidence that an active galactic nucleus dominates the emission from either nucleus at 33 GHz.

  9. Merging Field Measurements and High Resolution Modeling to Predict Possible Societal Impacts of Permafrost Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovsky, V. E.; Nicolsky, D.; Marchenko, S. S.; Cable, W.; Panda, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    A general warming trend in permafrost temperatures has triggered permafrost degradation in Alaska, especially at locations influenced by human activities. Various phenomena related to permafrost degradation are already commonly observed, including increased rates of coastal and riverbank erosion, increased occurrences of retrogressive thaw slumps and active layer detachment slides, and the disappearance of tundra lakes. The combination of thawing permafrost and erosion is damaging local community infrastructure such as buildings, roads, airports, pipelines, water and sanitation facilities, and communication systems. The potential scale of direct ecological and economical damage due to degrading permafrost has just begun to be recognized. While the projected changes in permafrost are generally available on global and regional scales, these projections cannot be effectively employed to estimate the societal impacts because of their coarse resolution. Intrinsic problems with the classical "spatial grid" approach in spatially distributed modeling applications preclude the use of this modeling approach to solve the above stated problem. Two types of models can be used to study permafrost dynamics in this case. One approach is a site-specific application of the GIPL2.0 permafrost model and another is a very high (tens to hundred meter) resolution spatially distributed version of the same model. The results of properly organized field measurements are also needed to calibrate and validate these models for specific locations and areas of interest. We are currently developing a "landscape unit" approach that allows practically unlimited spatial resolution of the modeling products. Classification of the study area into particular "landscape units" should be performed in accordance with the main factors controlling the expression of climate on permafrost in the study area, typically things such as vegetation, hydrology, soil properties, topography, etc. In areas with little

  10. High-resolution accurate mass measurements of biomolecules using a new electrospray ionization ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Winger, B E; Hofstadler, S A; Bruce, J E; Udseth, H R; Smith, R D

    1993-07-01

    A novel electrospray ionization/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer based on a 7-T superconducting magnet was developed for high-resolution accurate mass measurements of large biomolecules. Ions formed at atmospheric pressure using electrospray ionization (ESI) were transmitted (through six differential pumping stages) to the trapped ion cell maintained below 10(-9) torr. The increased pumping speed attainable with cryopumping (> 10(5) L/s) allowed brief pressure excursions to above 10(-4) torr, with greatly enhanced trapping efficiencies and subsequent short pumpdown times, facilitating high-resolution mass measurements. A set of electromechanical shutters were also used to minimize the effect of the directed molecular beam produced by the ES1 source and were open only during ion injection. Coupled with the use of the pulsed-valve gas inlet, the trapped ion cell was generally filled to the space charge limit within 100 ms. The use of 10-25 ms ion injection times allowed mass spectra to be obtained from 4 fmol of bovine insulin (Mr 5734) and ubiquitin (Mr 8565, with resolution sufficient to easily resolve the isotopic envelopes and determine the charge states. The microheterogeneity of the glycoprotein ribonuclease B was examined, giving a measured mass of 14,898.74 Da for the most abundant peak in the isotopic envelope of the normally glycosylated protein (i.e., with five mannose and two N-acetylglucosamine residues (an error of approximately 2 ppm) and an average error of approximately 1 ppm for the higher glycosylated and various H3PO4 adducted forms of the protein. Time-domain signals lasting in excess of 80 s were obtained for smaller proteins, producing, for example, a mass resolution of more than 700,000 for the 4(+) charge state (m/z 1434) of insulin. PMID:24227643

  11. High resolution measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect in galaxy clusters at 90 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Alexander H.

    The MUltiplexed SQUID/TES Array at Ninety GHz (MUSTANG) is a 64-pixel array of transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers built at the University of Pennsylvania (UPenn) for the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in collaboration with a number of universities and government agencies such as NASA-GSFC, NRAO, and NIST. MUSTANG carried out observations between 2008 and 2013 and will soon be replaced by a new receiver (MUSTANG-1.5). MUSTANG-1.5 is a 223-pixel array of feedhorn-coupled polarimeters, which are read out with a novel microwave SQUID multiplexer. MUSTANG-1.5 offers many advantages over MUSTANG including more stable cryogenics, a larger field of view (5.5' compared to 42" for MUSTANG), and a significant improvement in sensitivity. These capabilities enable a far more comprehensive observing program. MUSTANG is aimed at measuring the distortion in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) spectrum that arises due to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE). The SZE is the inverse Compton-scattering of CMB photons as they pass through the dense plasma in clusters of galaxies. The SZE is a nearly redshift-independent, complementary probe of the ICM to X-ray emission and combined analyses of both data sets provide a better understanding of astrophysical phenomena such as shocks, cold fronts, and Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) outbursts. Understanding how substructure, especially in merging clusters, affects the scaling between SZE flux and total cluster mass is essential to placing tight constraints on cosmological parameters with SZE surveys. In this thesis, I present some of the last ever observations carried out by MUSTANG, which are centered on two massive galaxy clusters, MACS J0647.7+7015 and MACS J1206.2-0847. I discuss a model-fitting technique that has been used to quantitatively compare MUSTANG and lower resolution SZE data from Bolocam to study ICM pressure profiles. I report on the design, commissioning, and current status of MUSTANG-1.5 including the detectors

  12. New turbidity current model based on high-resolution monitoring of the longest flow ever measured

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azpiroz, Maria; Cartigny, Matthieu; Talling, Peter; Parsons, Daniel; Simmons, Steve; Clare, Michael; Sumner, Esther; Pope, Ed

    2016-04-01

    Turbidity currents transport large amounts of sediment from shallow waters towards deep ocean basins. Little is known about these flows, despite their potential hazard for damaging expensive and strategically important seafloor infrastructure. So far turbidity currents have been profiled in only 6 deep ocean locations worldwide. Our current knowledge of these flows is therefore mainly based on scaled-down experimental and computationally-limited numerical modelling. Here we present results from the monitoring of a one-week long turbidity current in the Congo Canyon that had a discharge close to that of the Mississippi River. Measurements taken every 5 seconds give the most detailed image yet of a turbidity current deep-water over an unprecedented duration. Our analysis reveals a different flow structure than that presented in previous models. Classical models display a thick front of the flow followed by a thinner and faster flow, which gives way to a short and quasi-steady body. Instead, we observe a thin frontal cell that outruns a thicker (~80 m), long and slower quasi-steady flow. In contrast to the previous model, where the thinner faster flow feeds sediment into the head, the Congo Canyon turbidity current shows a frontal cell that feeds sediment into, and at the same time outruns, the succeeding quasi-steady flow. As a result of the faster moving frontal cell, the flow should continuously stretch and grow in length while propagating down the system. Within the quasi-steady body, the flow switches between what appears to be two stable flow modes. One mode exhibits a fast and thin velocity profile whose maximum is a low distance from the seabed and resembles Froude-supercritical flow conditions, while the other mode is similar to Froude-subcritical flow conditions as the flow is thicker and slower. These first observations provide new insights into the behaviour of deep water long duration flows that differ from traditional models and provide an exciting

  13. High Resolution CH4 Emissions and Dissolved CH4 Measurements Elucidate Surface Gas Exchange Processes in Toolik Lake, Arctic Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Sontro, T.; Sollberger, S.; Kling, G. W.; Shaver, G. R.; Eugster, W.

    2013-12-01

    Approximately 14% of the Alaskan North Slope is covered in lakes of various sizes and depths. Diffusive carbon emissions (CH4 and CO2) from these lakes offset the tundra sink by ~20 %, but the offset would substantially increase if ebullitive CH4 emissions were also considered. Ultimately, arctic lake CH4 emissions are not insignificant in the global CH4 budget and their contribution is bound to increase due to impacts from climate change. Here we present high resolution CH4 emission data as measured via eddy covariance and a Los Gatos gas analyzer during the ice free period from Toolik Lake, a deep (20 m) Arctic lake located on the Alaskan North Slope, over the last few summers. Emissions are relatively low (< 25 mg CH4 m-2 d-1) with little variation over the summer. Diurnal variations regularly occur, however, with up to 3 times higher fluxes at night. Gas exchange is a relatively difficult process to estimate, but is normally done so as the product of the CH4 gradient across the air-water interface and the gas transfer velocity, k. Typically, k is determined based on the turbulence on the water side of the interface, which is most commonly approximated by wind speed; however, it has become increasingly apparent that this assumption does not remain valid across all water bodies. Dissolved CH4 profiles in Toolik revealed a subsurface peak in CH4 at the thermocline of up to 3 times as much CH4 as in the surface water. We hypothesize that convective mixing at night due to cooling surface waters brings the subsurface CH4 to the surface and causes the higher night fluxes. In addition to high resolution flux emission estimates, we also acquired high resolution data for dissolved CH4 in surface waters of Toolik Lake during the last two summers using a CH4 equilibrator system connected to a Los Gatos gas analyzer. Thus, having both the flux and the CH4 gradient across the air-water interface measured directly, we can calculate k and investigate the processes influencing

  14. Application of an ultra-high-resolution FBG strain sensor for crustal deformation measurements at the Aburatsubo Bay, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, T.; Liu, Q.; He, Z.; Mogi, K.; Matsui, H.; Wang, H. F.; Kato, T.

    2011-12-01

    For crustal deformation measurements, high-resolution strain sensors on the order of tens of nano-strains are desirable. Current sensors for this purpose include quartz-tube extensometers, free-space laser interferometers, and borehole strainmeters. The former two sensors show quite high strain resolution, however, these are large in size, from tens to hundreds of meter long, and hence, are difficult to measure spatial strain distribution. The optical fiber strain sensors have advantages of multiplexing capability and relatively low cost, and are widely adopted in the applications for structural health monitoring of civil structures such as bridges and buildings. Thus, as long as the strain resolution can be high enough to meet the requirement of crustal deformation measurements, fiber strain sensors can be an attractive tool. We have been developing an ultra-high strain-resolution fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor for static strain measurement, interrogated by a narrow line-width tunable laser. The sensor consists of a pair of FBGs, one for strain sensing and the other for temperature compensation. The Bragg wavelength difference between the two FBGs is evaluated using a cross-correlation algorithm. We already demonstrated that an ultra-high resolution corresponding to 2.6 nano-strain was obtained in the case where no strain was applied to the sensor, which was considered to be the ultimate performance of our measurement system. By directly applying variable strains to the developed sensor with a piezo-stage, a resolution of 17.6 nano-strain was demonstrated. This time, the sensor was installed into the vault at Aburatsubo, Japan, to measure crustal deformation caused by ocean tide, and the measured data were compared with the results obtained by a quartz-tube extensometer at the site, which has been measured by the University of Tokyo's Earthquake Research Institute. The deformation induced by oceanic tide was measured by the FBG sensor with the resolution about

  15. High resolution data acquisition

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, Glenn W.; Fuller, Kenneth R.

    1993-01-01

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock (38) pulse train (37) and analog circuitry (44) for generating a triangular wave (46) synchronously with the pulse train (37). The triangular wave (46) has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter (18, 32) forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter (26) counts the clock pulse train (37) during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer (52) then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  16. High resolution data acquisition

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, G.W.; Fuller, K.R.

    1993-04-06

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock, pulse train, and analog circuitry for generating a triangular wave synchronously with the pulse train (as seen in diagram on patent). The triangular wave has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter counts the clock pulse train during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  17. Development of a high resolution beta camera for a direct measurement of positron distribution on brain surface

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, S.; Seki, C.; Kashikura, K.

    1996-12-31

    We have developed and tested a high resolution beta camera for a direct measurement of positron distribution on brain surface of animals. The beta camera consists of a thin CaF{sub 2}(Eu) scintillator, a tapered fiber optics plate (taper fiber) and a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The taper fiber is the key component of the camera. We have developed two types of beta cameras. One is 20mm diameter field of view camera for imaging brain surface of cats. The other is 10mm diameter camera for that of rats. Spatial resolutions of beta camera for cats and rats were 0.8mm FWHM and 0.5mm FWHM, respectively. We confirmed that developed beta cameras may overcome the limitation of the spatial resolution of the positron emission tomography (PET).

  18. New High-Resolution Absorption Cross-Section Measurements of HCFC-142B in the Mid-Ir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bris, Karine; Strong, Kimberly; Melo, Stella

    2009-06-01

    HCFC-142b (1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane) is a temporary substitute for ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). However, due to its high absorption cross-sections in the mid-IR, HCFC-142b is also a highly potent greenhouse gas, now detectable from space by satellite missions. So far, the accuracy of the retrieval has been limited by the lack of reference data in a range of temperatures compatible with atmospheric observations. We present new absorption cross section measurements of HCFC-142b at high-resolution (0.02 cm^{-1}) from 223 K to 283 K in the 600 cm^{-1}- 4000 cm^{-1} spectral window. The composite spectra are calculated for each temperature from a set of acquisitions at different pressures by Fourier transform spectroscopy.

  19. A scanning, all-fiber Sagnac interferometer for high resolution magneto-optic measurements at 820 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, Alexander; Fejer, Martin; Kapitulnik, Aharon

    2014-10-15

    The Sagnac Interferometer has historically been used for detecting non-reciprocal phenomena, such as rotation. We demonstrate an apparatus in which this technique is employed for high resolution measurements of the Magneto-Optical Polar Kerr effect—a direct indicator of magnetism. Previous designs have incorporated free-space components which are bulky and difficult to align. We improve upon this technique by using all fiber-optic coupled components and demonstrate operation at a new wavelength, 820 nm, with which we can achieve better than 1 μrad resolution. Mounting the system on a piezo-electric scanner allows us to acquire diffraction limited images with 1.5 μm spatial resolution. We also provide extensive discussion on the details and of the Sagnac Interferometer's construction.

  20. High-resolution core-level photoemission measurements on the pentacene single crystal surface assisted by photoconduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Yasuo; Uragami, Yuki; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yonezawa, Keiichirou; Mase, Kazuhiko; Kera, Satoshi; Ishii, Hisao; Ueno, Nobuo

    2016-03-01

    Upon charge carrier transport behaviors of high-mobility organic field effect transistors of pentacene single crystal, effects of ambient gases and resultant probable ‘impurities’ at the crystal surface have been controversial. Definite knowledge on the surface stoichiometry and chemical composites is indispensable to solve this question. In the present study, high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements on the pentacene single crystal samples successfully demonstrated a presence of a few atomic-percent of (photo-)oxidized species at the first molecular layer of the crystal surface through accurate analyses of the excitation energy (i.e. probing depth) dependence of the C1s peak profiles. Particular methodologies to conduct XPS on organic single crystal samples, without any charging nor damage of the sample in spite of its electric insulating character and fragility against x-ray irradiation, is also described in detail.

  1. Accurate High-Resolution Measurements of 3-D Tissue Dynamics With Registration-Enhanced Displacement Encoded MRI

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Samer S.; Hsu, Edward W.

    2014-01-01

    Displacement fields are important to analyze deformation, which is associated with functional and material tissue properties often used as indicators of health. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques like DENSE and image registration methods like Hyperelastic Warping have been used to produce pixel-level deformation fields that are desirable in high-resolution analysis. However, DENSE can be complicated by challenges associated with image phase unwrapping, in particular offset determination. On the other hand, Hyperelastic Warping can be hampered by low local image contrast. The current work proposes a novel approach for measuring tissue displacement with both DENSE and Hyperelastic Warping, incorporating physically accurate displacements obtained by the latter to improve phase characterization in DENSE. The validity of the proposed technique is demonstrated using numerical and physical phantoms, and in vivo small animal cardiac MRI. PMID:24771572

  2. Interior channels in Martian valleys: Constraints on fluvial erosion by measurements of the Mars Express High Resolution Stereo Camera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaumann, R.; Reiss, D.; Frei, S.; Neukum, G.; Scholten, F.; Gwinner, K.; Roatsch, T.; Matz, K.-D.; Mertens, V.; Hauber, E.; Hoffmann, H.; Kohler, U.; Head, J.W.; Hiesinger, H.; Carr, M.H.

    2005-01-01

    In High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) images of the Mars Express Mission a 130 km long interior channel is identified within a 400 km long valley network system located in the Lybia Montes. Ages of the valley floor and the surroundings as derived from crater counts define a period of ???350 Myrs during which the valley might have been formed. Based on HRSC stereo measurements the discharge of the interior channel is estimated at ???4800 in m3/S, corresponding to a runoff production rate of ??? cm/day. Mass balances indicate erosion rates of a few cm/year implying the erosion activity in the valley to a few thousand years for continuous flow, or one or more orders of magnitude longer time spans for more intermittent flows. Therefore, during the Hesperian, relatively brief but recurring episodes of erosion intervals are more likely than sustained flow. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. High-Resolution B Dot Probe for Measuring 3D Magnetic Fields in the MOCHI Labjet Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuara Rosales, Manuel; von der Linden, Jens; You, Setthivoine

    2014-10-01

    The MOCHI Labjet experiment will use a triple electrode planar plasma gun to explore canonical helicity transport in laboratory astrophysical jets. Canonical helicity transport suggests that destabilizing magnetic energy can be converted into stabilizing shear flows at two-fluid spatial scales li ~c/wpi . A high-resolution . B probe array, capable of measuring magnetic field dynamics at length and time scales important to canonical helicity transport is being built. The probe array consists of three tridents, made of 5 . 13 mm OD and 4 . 32 mm ID stainless steel tubes of 102 cm length, enclosing a total of 1215 commercial inductor chips with a three axis spatial resolution of 11 mm. The average value for the effective NA of each inductor chip is 1 . 21 .10-4 m2. The probe array lays in a plane perpendicular to the jet, and is axially translatable. This work is supported by US DOE Grant DE-SC0010340.

  4. New Insights on Dynamic Recrystallization Mechanisms in Ice from High Resolution EBSD Observations and Strain Field Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnat, M.; Chauve, T.; Journaux, B.; Barou, F.

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic recrystallization (DRX) strongly affects the evolution of microstructure (grain size and shape) and texture (crystal preferred orientation) during deformation at high temperature. Since texturing leads to anisotropic physical properties, predicting the effect of DRX in metals is essential for industrial applications, in rocks for interpreting geophysical data and modeling geodynamic flows, or in ice for predicting ice sheet flow and climate evolution. Along ice cores extracted from ice sheets, Continuous DRX (CDRX) and Discontinuous DRX (DDRX) mechanisms are observed at various depths, the later being favoured by the high temperature encountered close to the bedrock, and local high level of strain. In laboratory conditions, with higher strain rate and stress levels, DDRX dominates mechanical response during tertiary creep, when deviatoric stress is low enough to avoid micro fracturation (σ < 1MPa). Similarly to the case of metals or rocks, relations between DRX nucleation mechanisms and strain heterogeneities at the grain scale remain poorly known and therefore poorly constrained in DRX modeling. We will present recent observations performed on laboratory made and deformed ice polycrystals (σ ~ 0.5 MPa, T ~ -7°C) that enable to access high resolution observations of intragranular sub-structures (dislocation field, subgrains, nucleus) via Electron BackScattering Diffraction (EBSD), and high resolution strain field measurements around DRX nucleation area. Analyses of these observations highlight the complexity of nucleation mechanisms in ice, with the formation of kink bands, of bulging, and of "spontaneous" nucleation. Strain field measurements evidence the influence of nucleation on the relaxation of strain incompatibilities at grain boundaries and triple junctions. At last, torsion experiments enabled to draw hypotheses about the role of nucleation on DRX textures.

  5. High-resolution 3D surface displacements from 2004 - 2012 at Santorini volcano, Greece measured by LiDAR-differencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, M.; Pyle, D. M.; Nissen, E.; Mather, T. A.; Raptakis, C.; Nomikou, P.

    2012-12-01

    In January 2011 Santorini volcano entered a period of unrest characterised by earthquake swarms and caldera-wide uplift. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) measurements indicate vertical motions of 8 - 14 cm across the central volcanic island of Nea Kameni since the onset of unrest. In April 2004, a NERC funded Airborne Research and Survey Facility (ARSF) flight acquired high-resolution (1m per pixel) light detection and ranging laser radar (LiDAR) data over the central volcanic islands of Nea Kameni and Palea Kameni. This survey was repeated in May 2012 to provide an updated digital elevation model (DEM). We apply a new method of differencing pre- and post- deformation LiDAR point clouds using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm to produce a high-resolution grid of 3D surface displacements from 2004 - 2012. The 2004 ("source") and 2012 ("target") point clouds are first split into square subsets ("windows") and the displacement for each window is determined by iterating three steps: (1) identifying closest point pairs; (2) calculating the translation and rotation required that best aligns the paired points; (3) applying this transformation to the source cloud. The surface displacement map spans both a period of slow subsidence (from 2004 - 2010), and a subsequent period of inflation (from 2011 - 2012). We shall compare our results with those obtained from simple DEM elevation differencing and from InSAR. To our knowledge, this is the first application of the ICP technique to measuring volcanic deformation. This approach may be implemented at other volcanoes to monitor 3D surface displacements during periods of unrest.

  6. A high-resolution near-infrared extraterrestrial solar spectrum derived from ground-based Fourier transform spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menang, Kaah P.; Coleman, Marc D.; Gardiner, Tom D.; Ptashnik, Igor V.; Shine, Keith P.

    2013-06-01

    A detailed spectrally resolved extraterrestrial solar spectrum (ESS) is important for line-by-line radiative transfer modeling in the near-IR. Very few observationally based high-resolution ESS are available in this spectral region. Consequently, the theoretically calculated ESS by Kurucz has been widely adopted. We present the CAVIAR (Continuum Absorption at Visible and Infrared Wavelengths and its Atmospheric Relevance) ESS, which is derived using the Langley technique applied to calibrated observations using a ground-based high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) in atmospheric windows from 2000 to 10,000 cm-1 (1-5 µm). There is good agreement between the strengths and positions of solar lines between the CAVIAR and the satellite-based Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-FTS ESS, in the spectral region where they overlap, and good agreement with other ground-based FTS measurements in two near-IR windows. However, there are significant differences in the structure between the CAVIAR ESS and spectra from semiempirical models. In addition, we found a difference of up to 8% in the absolute (and hence the wavelength-integrated) irradiance between the CAVIAR ESS and that of Thuillier et al., which was based on measurements from the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science satellite and other sources. In many spectral regions, this difference is significant, because the coverage factor k = 2 (or 95% confidence limit) uncertainties in the two sets of observations do not overlap. Because the total solar irradiance is relatively well constrained, if the CAVIAR ESS is correct, then this would indicate an integrated "loss" of solar irradiance of about 30 W m-2 in the near-IR that would have to be compensated by an increase at other wavelengths.

  7. PHOENIX: A Scoring Function for Affinity Prediction Derived Using High-Resolution Crystal Structures and Calorimetry Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yat T.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2011-01-01

    Binding affinity prediction is one of the most critical components to computer-aided structure-based drug design. Despite advances in first-principle methods for predicting binding affinity, empirical scoring functions that are fast and only relatively accurate are still widely used in structure-based drug design. With the increasing availability of X-ray crystallographic structures in the Protein Data Bank and continuing application of biophysical methods such as isothermal titration calorimetry to measure thermodynamic parameters contributing to binding free energy, sufficient experimental data exists that scoring functions can now be derived by separating enthalpic (ΔH) and entropic (TΔS) contributions to binding free energy (ΔG). PHOENIX, a scoring function to predict binding affinities of protein-ligand complexes, utilizes the increasing availability of experimental data to improve binding affinity predictions by the following: model training and testing using high-resolution crystallographic data to minimize structural noise, independent models of enthalpic and entropic contributions fitted to thermodynamic parameters assumed to be thermodynamically biased to calculate binding free energy, use of shape and volume descriptors to better capture entropic contributions. A set of 42 descriptors and 112 protein-ligand complexes were used to derive functions using partial least squares for change of enthalpy (ΔH) and change of entropy (TΔS) to calculate change of binding free energy (ΔG), resulting in a predictive r2 (r2pred) of 0.55 and a standard error (SE) of 1.34 kcal/mol. External validation using the 2009 version of the PDBbind “refined set” (n = 1612) resulted in a Pearson correlation coefficient (Rp) of 0.575 and a mean error (ME) of 1.41 pKd. Enthalpy and entropy predictions were of limited accuracy individually. However, their difference resulted in a relatively accurate binding free energy. While the development of an accurate and applicable

  8. A simple calculation algorithm to separate high-resolution CH4 flux measurements into ebullition and diffusion-derived components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Mathias; Schulz-Hanke, Maximilian; Garcia Alba, Joana; Jurisch, Nicole; Hagemann, Ulrike; Sachs, Torsten; Sommer, Michael; Augustin, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Processes driving methane (CH4) emissions in wetland ecosystems are highly complex. Especially, the separation of CH4 emissions into ebullition and diffusion derived flux components, a perquisite for the mechanistic process understanding and identification of potential environmental driver is rather challenging. We present a simple calculation algorithm, based on an adaptive R-script, which separates open-water, closed chamber CH4 flux measurements into diffusion- and ebullition-derived components. Hence, flux component specific dynamics are revealed and potential environmental driver identified. Flux separation is based on a statistical approach, using ebullition related sudden concentration changes obtained during high resolution CH4 concentration measurements. By applying the lower and upper quartile ± the interquartile range (IQR) as a variable threshold, diffusion dominated periods of the flux measurement are filtered. Subsequently, flux calculation and separation is performed. The algorithm was verified in a laboratory experiment and tested under field conditions, using flux measurement data (July to September 2013) from a flooded, former fen grassland site. Erratic ebullition events contributed 46% to total CH4 emissions, which is comparable to values reported by literature. Additionally, a shift in the diurnal trend of diffusive fluxes throughout the measurement period, driven by the water temperature gradient, was revealed.

  9. Determination of spectroscopic properties of atmospheric molecules from high resolution vacuum ultraviolet cross section and wavelength measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Yoshino, K.; Freeman, D. E.

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of progress during the six-month period 1 Nov. 1992 to 30 Apr. 1993 on work on (1) cross section measurements of the Schumann-Runge continuum; (2) the determination of the predissociation linewidths of the Schumann-Runge bands of O2; (3) the determination of the molecular constants of the ground state of O2; (4) cross section measurements of CO2 in wavelength region 120-170 nm; and (4) determination of dissociation energy of O2. The experimental investigations are effected at high resolution with a 6.65 m scanning spectrometer which is, by virtue of its small instrumental width (FWHM = 0.0013 nm), uniquely suitable for cross section measurements of molecular bands with discrete rotational structure. Below 175 nm and in the region of the S-R continuum, synchrotron radiation is suitable for cross section measurements. All of these spectroscopic measurements are needed for accurate calculations of the production of atomic oxygen and penetration of solar radiation into the Earth's atmosphere.

  10. High-Resolution Laser Spectroscopy of S1-S0 Transition of Naphthalene: Measurement of Vibrationally Excited States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Takumi; Yamamoto, Ryo; Kasahara, Shunji

    2015-06-01

    Naphthalene is one of the simple polycyclic aromatic molecule, and it is interesting that the excited state dynamics take place. To understand the excited state dynamics, rotationally resolved fluorescence excitation spectra of several vibronic bands were measured. In this work, we have measured high-resolution fluorescence excitation spectra across a single mode laser and molecular beam at light angle. Vibronic bands, which lies 2866 cm -1 and 3068 cm -1 above the 0-0 band (000 + 2866 cm-1 band and 000 + 3068 cm-1 band), were measured. Absolute wavenumber was calibrated with accuracy 0.0002 cm-1 by the measurement of Doppler-free absorption spectrum of I2 molecule and transmitting light intensity of the stabilized etalon. Rotational lines of the 000 + 2866 cm-1 band were almost resolved. A part of the rotational lines were assigned, and several energy shifts were found. On the other hand, rotational lines were not completely resolved for the 000 + 3068 cm-1 band. K. Yoshida, Y. Semba, S. Kasahara, T. Yamanaka, and M. Baba, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 19304 (2009) H. Kato, M. Baba, and S. Kasahara, Bull. Chem. Soc. Jpn. 80, 456 (2007)

  11. High-resolution 3D volumetry versus conventional measuring techniques for the assessment of experimental lymphedema in the mouse hindlimb

    PubMed Central

    Frueh, Florian S.; Körbel, Christina; Gassert, Laura; Müller, Andreas; Gousopoulos, Epameinondas; Lindenblatt, Nicole; Giovanoli, Pietro; Laschke, Matthias W.; Menger, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary lymphedema is a common complication of cancer treatment characterized by chronic limb swelling with interstitial inflammation. The rodent hindlimb is a widely used model for the evaluation of novel lymphedema treatments. However, the assessment of limb volume in small animals is challenging. Recently, high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) imaging modalities have been introduced for rodent limb volumetry. In the present study we evaluated the validity of microcomputed tomography (μCT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound in comparison to conventional measuring techniques. For this purpose, acute lymphedema was induced in the mouse hindlimb by a modified popliteal lymphadenectomy. The 4-week course of this type of lymphedema was first assessed in 6 animals. In additional 12 animals, limb volumes were analyzed by μCT, 9.4 T MRI and 30 MHz ultrasound as well as by planimetry, circumferential length and paw thickness measurements. Interobserver correlation was high for all modalities, in particular for μCT analysis (r = 0.975, p < 0.001). Importantly, caliper-measured paw thickness correlated well with μCT (r = 0.861), MRI (r = 0.821) and ultrasound (r = 0.800). Because the assessment of paw thickness represents a time- and cost-effective approach, it may be ideally suited for the quantification of rodent hindlimb lymphedema. PMID:27698469

  12. The geometric phase analysis method based on the local high resolution discrete Fourier transform for deformation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xianglu; Xie, Huimin; Wang, Huaixi; Li, Chuanwei; Liu, Zhanwei; Wu, Lifu

    2014-02-01

    The geometric phase analysis (GPA) method based on the local high resolution discrete Fourier transform (LHR-DFT) for deformation measurement, defined as LHR-DFT GPA, is proposed to improve the measurement accuracy. In the general GPA method, the fundamental frequency of the image plays a crucial role. However, the fast Fourier transform, which is generally employed in the general GPA method, could make it difficult to locate the fundamental frequency accurately when the fundamental frequency is not located at an integer pixel position in the Fourier spectrum. This study focuses on this issue and presents a LHR-DFT algorithm that can locate the fundamental frequency with sub-pixel precision in a specific frequency region for the GPA method. An error analysis is offered and simulation is conducted to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method; both results show that the LHR-DFT algorithm can accurately locate the fundamental frequency and improve the measurement accuracy of the GPA method. Furthermore, typical tensile and bending tests are carried out and the experimental results verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. Digital tomosynthesis and high resolution computed tomography as clinical tools for vertebral endplate topography measurements: Comparison with microcomputed tomography.

    PubMed

    Oravec, Daniel; Quazi, Abrar; Xiao, Angela; Yang, Ellen; Zauel, Roger; Flynn, Michael J; Yeni, Yener N

    2015-12-01

    Endplate morphology is understood to play an important role in the mechanical behavior of vertebral bone as well as degenerative processes in spinal tissues; however, the utility of clinical imaging modalities in assessment of the vertebral endplate has been limited. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of two clinical imaging modalities (digital tomosynthesis, DTS; high resolution computed tomography, HRCT) to assess endplate topography by correlating the measurements to a microcomputed tomography (μCT) standard. DTS, HRCT, and μCT images of 117 cadaveric thoracolumbar vertebrae (T10-L1; 23 male, 19 female; ages 36-100 years) were segmented, and inferior and superior endplate surface topographical distribution parameters were calculated. Both DTS and HRCT showed statistically significant correlations with μCT approaching a moderate level of correlation at the superior endplate for all measured parameters (R(2)Adj=0.19-0.57), including averages, variability, and higher order statistical moments. Correlation of average depths at the inferior endplate was comparable to the superior case for both DTS and HRCT (R(2)Adj=0.14-0.51), while correlations became weak or nonsignificant for higher moments of the topography distribution. DTS was able to capture variations in the endplate topography to a slightly better extent than HRCT, and taken together with the higher speed and lower radiation cost of DTS than HRCT, DTS appears preferable for endplate measurements.

  14. High Resolution Gamma Ray Tomography and its Application to the Measurement of Phase Fractions in Chemical Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, Uwe; Bieberle, Andre; Schleicher, Eckhard; Hessel, Günther; Zippe, Cornelius; Friedrich, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-06-01

    We applied gamma ray tomography to the problem of phase fraction measurement in chemical reactors. Therefore, we used a new tomography device that is operated with a Cs-137 source and a high resolution gamma ray detector. One application example is the reconstruction of the fluid distribution and the measurement of radial gas fraction profiles in a laboratory scale stirred vessel. The tomograph was used to obtain radiographic projections of the averaged gamma ray attenuation for different stirrer speeds along the height of the vessel. With tomographic reconstruction techniques we calculated the angularly averaged radial distribution of the attenuation coefficient for as many as 150 single cross-sectional planes and synthesised from this data set the axial and radial fluid distribution pattern. Further, we exemplarily reconstructed the radial gas fraction distributions induced by the stirrer in the area of the stirrer blades. In a second application the gamma ray measurement system was used to visualise gas inclusions in a water cleaning column that is used to remove hazardous heavy metal species from water.

  15. Angle-resolved second harmonic light scattering from colloidal suspensions and second harmonic particle microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ningping

    2001-08-01

    We have carried out two nonlinear optical experiments with colloidal particles. Our first nonlinear optical experiment studied Second-Harmonic Generation (SHG) light scattering from colloidal suspension. In particular, we measured the angle-resolved second-harmonic generation light scattering from suspensions of centrosymmetric micron-size polystyrene spheres with surface-adsorbed dye (malachite green). The second-harmonic scattering angular profiles differ qualitatively from the linear light scattering angular profiles of the same particles. We have investigated these radiation patterns using several polarization configurations and particle diameters. We introduce a simple Rayleigh-Gans-Debye model to account for the SHG scattering anisotropy. The model compares favorably with our experimental data. Our measurements suggest scattering anisotropy may be used to isolate particle nonlinear optical effect from other bulk nonlinear optical effects in suspension. Our second nonlinear optical experiment studied the Second-Harmonic Generation (SHG) from single micron-size particles. We built a nonlinear optical microscope for this purpose. We report experimental observations of second harmonic generation from single micron-size polystyrene (PS), silica, and PolyMethylMethAcrylate (PMMA) spheres on flat substrates by SHG microscopy. At low input light intensities the SH signals depend quadratically on the intensity of the excitation beam, but at larger input intensities some of the SH signals increase exponentially with increasing input intensity. This exponential enhancement depends on particle size and sphere composition. We describe the experiments, report the observations and provide an approximate analytical framework for understanding our measurements.

  16. A flexible setup for angle-resolved X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with laboratory sources.

    PubMed

    Spanier, M; Herzog, C; Grötzsch, D; Kramer, F; Mantouvalou, I; Lubeck, J; Weser, J; Streeck, C; Malzer, W; Beckhoff, B; Kanngießer, B

    2016-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is one of the standard tools for the analysis of stratified materials and is widely applied for the investigation of electronics and coatings. The composition and thickness of the layers can be determined quantitatively and non-destructively. Recent work showed that these capabilities can be extended towards retrieving stratigraphic information like concentration depth profiles using angle-resolved XRF (ARXRF). This paper introduces an experimental sample chamber which was developed as a multi-purpose tool enabling different measurement geometries suited for transmission measurements, conventional XRF, ARXRF, etc. The chamber was specifically designed for attaching all kinds of laboratory X-ray sources for the soft and hard X-ray ranges as well as various detection systems. In detail, a setup for ARXRF using an X-ray tube with a polycapillary X-ray lens as source is presented. For such a type of setup, both the spectral and lateral characterizations of the radiation field are crucial for quantitative ARXRF measurements. The characterization is validated with the help of a stratified validation sample. PMID:27036820

  17. A flexible setup for angle-resolved X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with laboratory sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanier, M.; Herzog, C.; Grötzsch, D.; Kramer, F.; Mantouvalou, I.; Lubeck, J.; Weser, J.; Streeck, C.; Malzer, W.; Beckhoff, B.; Kanngießer, B.

    2016-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is one of the standard tools for the analysis of stratified materials and is widely applied for the investigation of electronics and coatings. The composition and thickness of the layers can be determined quantitatively and non-destructively. Recent work showed that these capabilities can be extended towards retrieving stratigraphic information like concentration depth profiles using angle-resolved XRF (ARXRF). This paper introduces an experimental sample chamber which was developed as a multi-purpose tool enabling different measurement geometries suited for transmission measurements, conventional XRF, ARXRF, etc. The chamber was specifically designed for attaching all kinds of laboratory X-ray sources for the soft and hard X-ray ranges as well as various detection systems. In detail, a setup for ARXRF using an X-ray tube with a polycapillary X-ray lens as source is presented. For such a type of setup, both the spectral and lateral characterizations of the radiation field are crucial for quantitative ARXRF measurements. The characterization is validated with the help of a stratified validation sample.

  18. In situ measurement of ions parameters of laser produced ion source using high resolution Thomson Parabola Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasia, S.; Kaur, C.; Rastogi, V.; Poswal, A. K.; Munda, D. S.; Bhatia, R. K.; Nataraju, V.

    2016-08-01

    The laser produced plasma based heavy ion source has become an outstanding front end for heavy ion accelerators. Before being implemented in the heavy ion accelerators its detailed characterization is required. For this purpose, a high resolution and high dispersion Thomson parabola spectrometer comprising of Time-of-Flight diagnostics has been developed for the characterization of ions with energy in the range from 1 keV to 1 MeV/nucleon and incorporated in the Laser plasma experimental chamber. The ion spectrometer is optimized with graphite target. The carbon ions of charge states C1+ to C6+ are observed in the energy range from 3 keV to 300 keV, which has also been verified by Time-of-Flight measurement. Experimental results were matched with simulation done by SIMION 7.0 code which is used for the design of the spectrometer. We also developed data analysis software using Python language to measure in situ ion's parameters and the results are in better agreement to the experimental results than the commercially available software SIMION 7.0. The resolution of the spectrometer is ΔE/E = 0.026 @ 31 keV for charge state (C4+) of carbon.

  19. High-resolution elasticity maps and cytoskeletal dynamics of neurons measured by combined fluorescence and atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staii, Cristian

    2014-03-01

    Detailed knowledge of mechanical parameters such as cell elasticity, stiffness of the growth substrate, or traction stresses generated during axonal extensions is essential for understanding the mechanisms that control neuronal growth. Here I present results obtained in my research group, which combine Atomic Force Microscopy and Fluorescence Microscopy measurements to produce systematic, high-resolution elasticity maps for different types of live neuronal cells cultured on glass or biopolymer-based substrates. We measure how the stiffness of neurons changes both during neurite outgrowth and upon chemical modification (disruption of the cytoskeleton) of the cell. We find a reversible local stiffening of the cell during growth, and show that the increase in local elastic modulus is primarily due to the formation of microtubules in the cell soma. We also report a reversible shift in the elastic modulus of the cortical neurons cytoskeleton with temperature, from tubulin dominated regions at 37C to actin dominated regions at 25C. We demonstrate that the dominant mechanism by which the elasticity of the neuronal soma changes in response to temperature is the contractile stiffening of the actin component of the cytoskeleton induced by the activity of myosin II motors. We acknowledge financial support from NSF grant CBET 1067093.

  20. Photodissociation in the atmosphere of Mars - Impact of high resolution, temperature-dependent CO2 cross-section measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, A. D.; Allen, M.; Nair, H. A.

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the impact of high resolution, temperature-dependent CO2 cross-section measurements, reported by Lewis and Carver (1983), on calculations of photodissociation rate coefficients in the Martian atmosphere. We find that the adoption of 50 A intervals for the purpose of computational efficiency results in errors in the calculated values for photodissociation of CO2, H2O, and O2 which are generally not above 10 percent, but as large as 20 percent in some instances. These are acceptably small errors, especially considering the uncertainties introduced by the large temperature dependence of the CO2 cross section. The inclusion of temperature-dependent CO2 cross sections is shown to lead to a decrease in the diurnally averaged rate of CO2 photodissociation as large as 33 percent at some altitudes, and increases of as much as 950 percent and 80 percent in the photodissociation rate coefficients of H2O and O2, respectively. The actual magnitude of the changes depends on the assumptions used to model the CO2 absorption spectrum at temperatures lower than the available measurements, and at wavelengths longward of 1970 A.

  1. Chiral signatures in angle-resolved valence photoelectron spectroscopy of pure glycidol enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Gustavo A; Nahon, Laurent; Harding, Chris J; Powis, Ivan

    2008-03-28

    Photoionization of the chiral molecule glycidol has been investigated in the valence region. Photoelectron circular dichroism (PECD) curves have been obtained at various photon energies by using circularly polarized VUV synchrotron radiation and a velocity map imaging technique to record angle-resolved photoelectron spectra (PES). The measured chiral asymmetries vary dramatically with the photon energy as well as with the ionized orbital, improving the effective orbital resolution of the PECD spectrum with respect to the PES. Typical asymmetry factors of 5% are observed, but the peak values measured range up to 15%. The experimental results are interpreted by continuum multiple scattering (CMS-Xalpha) calculations for several thermally accessible glycidol conformers. We find that a nearly quantitative agreement between theory and experiments can be achieved for the ionization of several molecular orbitals. Owing to the sensitivity of PECD to molecular conformation this allows us to identify the dominant conformer. The influence of intramolecular hydrogen bond orbital polarization is found to play a small yet significant role in determining the chiral asymmetry in the electron angular distributions.

  2. Detection of intestinal dysplasia using angle-resolved low coherence interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, Neil; Zhu, Yizheng; Thacker, Julie K. M.; Migaly, John; Guy, Cynthia; Mantyh, Christopher R.; Wax, Adam

    2011-10-01

    Angle-resolved low coherence interferometry (a/LCI) is an optical biopsy technique that allows for depth-resolved, label-free measurement of the average size and optical density of cell nuclei in epithelial tissue to assess the tissue health. a/LCI has previously been used clinically to identify the presence of dysplasia in Barrett's Esophagus patients undergoing routine surveillance. We present the results of a pilot, ex vivo study of tissues from 27 patients undergoing partial colonic resection surgery, conducted to evaluate the ability of a/LCI to identify dysplasia. Performance was determined by comparing the nuclear morphology measurements with pathological assessment of co-located physical biopsies. A statistically significant correlation between increased average nuclear size, reduced nuclear density, and the presence of dysplasia was noted at the basal layer of the epithelium, at a depth of 200 to 300 μm beneath the tissue surface. Using a decision line determined from a receiver operating characteristic, a/LCI was able to separate dysplastic from healthy tissues with a sensitivity of 92.9% (13/14), a specificity of 83.6% (56/67), and an overall accuracy of 85.2% (69/81). The study illustrates the extension of the a/LCI technique to the detection of intestinal dysplasia, and demonstrates the need for future in vivo studies.

  3. Angle-resolved photoemission study of the Kitaev candidate α -RuCl3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoqing; Li, Haoxiang; Waugh, J. A.; Parham, S.; Kim, Heung-Sik; Sears, J. A.; Gomes, A.; Kee, Hae-Young; Kim, Young-June; Dessau, D. S.

    2016-10-01

    α -RuCl3 has been hinted to be a spin-orbital-assisted Mott insulator in proximity to a Kitaev spin liquid state. Here we present angle-resolved photoemission measurements on single-crystal α -RuCl3 in both the pristine and electron-doped states, and combine them with Local Density Approximation (LDA)+Spin Orbital Coupling (SOC)+U calculations performed for several low-energy competing magnetically ordered states as well as the paramagnetic state. A large Mott gap is found in the measured band structure of the pristine compound that persists to more than 30 times beyond the magnetic ordering temperature, though the paramagnetic calculation shows almost no gap. Upon electron doping, spectral weight is transferred into the gap but the new states still maintain a sizable gap from the Fermi edge. These findings are most consistent with a Mott insulator with a somewhat exotic evolution out of the Mott state with both temperature and doping, likely related to unusually strong spin fluctuations.

  4. A new method for high-resolution methane measurements on polar ice cores using continuous flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Schüpbach, Simon; Federer, Urs; Kaufmann, Patrik R; Hutterli, Manuel A; Buiron, Daphné; Blunier, Thomas; Fischer, Hubertus; Stocker, Thomas F

    2009-07-15

    Methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. Rapid variations of the CH4 concentration, as frequently registered, for example, during the last ice age, have been used as reliable time markers for the definition of a common time scale of polar ice cores. In addition, these variations indicate changes in the sources of methane primarily associated with the presence of wetlands. In order to determine the exact time evolution of such fast concentration changes, CH4 measurements of the highest resolution in the ice core archive are required. Here, we present a new, semicontinuous and field-deployable CH4 detection method, which was incorporated in a continuous flow analysis (CFA) system. In CFA, samples cut along the axis of an ice core are melted at a melt speed of typically 3.5 cm/min. The air from bubbles in the ice core is extracted continuously from the meltwater and forwarded to a gas chromatograph (GC) for high-resolution CH4 measurements. The GC performs a measurement every 3.5 min, hence, a depth resolution of 15 cm is achieved atthe chosen melt rate. An even higher resolution is not necessary due to the low pass filtering of air in ice cores caused by the slow bubble enclosure process and the diffusion of air in firn. Reproducibility of the new method is 3%, thus, for a typical CH4 concentration of 500 ppb during an ice age, this corresponds to an absolute precision of 15 ppb, comparable to traditional analyses on discrete samples. Results of CFA-CH4 measurements on the ice core from Talos Dome (Antarctica) illustrate the much higher temporal resolution of our method compared with established melt-refreeze CH4 measurements and demonstrate the feasibility of the new method.

  5. An Angle Resolved Photoemission Survey of the Band Structure of the Heavy Fermion Superconductor, CeCoIn5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reber, Theodore; Rameau, Jonathon; Hu, Rongwei; Petrovic, Cedomir; Johnson, Peter

    2015-03-01

    With the highest Tc of the non-radioactive heavy fermion materials, CeCoIn5 has been extensively studied by a host of techniques. However direct measurements of the band structure via angle resolved photo-emission spectroscopy has been limited to just a few experiments. We will present our studies of the momentum, temperature, photon energy and polarization dependence of the band structure of CeCoIn5. We will compare our results with theory and other experimental results. Present address: Rutgers Center for Emergent Materials and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University

  6. Measurement of post-eruptive volcanic deformation and depositional features using high-resolution remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlpin, D. B.; Meyer, F. J.

    2011-12-01

    This proposal examines changes in volcanic geomorphology and topography using a new, multi-sensor approach to produce high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) and surface deformation maps that measure post-eruption volcanic changes and depositional features, including lava domes, lahars, and pyroclastic flow deposits. The advantage of this new approach is to exploit available data sets that have not previously been used systematically, or in full coordination. The use of readily available spaceborne remote sensing data is therefore maximized in a manner that is routine in method, but of sufficient quality to answer many important geophysical questions. Finally, this method provides these benefits while reducing expensive and potentially hazardous field campaigns. The multi-sensor approach involves a mix of stereoscopic optical, interferometric radar, and thermal space borne images to generate high-resolution DEMs and multi-sensor analyses of volcanic domes, as well as lower resolution analyses of deposits from other volcanic activity. The terrain of volcanic areas is subject to rapid topographic change. The time and elevation information obtained from DEMs of these areas enable us to perform accurate topographic phase correction of interferograms derived from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) imaging and therefore facilitates the use of InSAR data for monitoring centimeter scale surface motion. It also allows us to determine quantitative volume estimates of dynamically emplaced deposits from lahars, tsunamis, and mud flows, and it provides information for emergency planners to use in risk assessments facing communities in volcanically active areas. A principal test scenario for our method is Redoubt Volcano in South-Central Alaska. During March and April, 2009, Redoubt erupted in a series of explosive eruptions that melted the Drift Glacier on its North flank, and produced lahars that inundated the adjacent Drift River Valley. Quantitative

  7. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance measurements in inhomogeneous magnetic fields: A fast two-dimensional J-resolved experiment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuqing; Lin, Yung-Ya; Cai, Shuhui; Yang, Yu; Sun, Huijun; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-03-14

    High spectral resolution in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a prerequisite for achieving accurate information relevant to molecular structures and composition assignments. The continuous development of superconducting magnets guarantees strong and homogeneous static magnetic fields for satisfactory spectral resolution. However, there exist circumstances, such as measurements on biological tissues and heterogeneous chemical samples, where the field homogeneity is degraded and spectral line broadening seems inevitable. Here we propose an NMR method, named intermolecular zero-quantum coherence J-resolved spectroscopy (iZQC-JRES), to face the challenge of field inhomogeneity and obtain desired high-resolution two-dimensional J-resolved spectra with fast acquisition. Theoretical analyses for this method are given according to the intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence treatment. Experiments on (a) a simple chemical solution and (b) an aqueous solution of mixed metabolites under externally deshimmed fields, and on (c) a table grape sample with intrinsic field inhomogeneity from magnetic susceptibility variations demonstrate the feasibility and applicability of the iZQC-JRES method. The application of this method to inhomogeneous chemical and biological samples, maybe in vivo samples, appears promising. PMID:26979686

  8. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance measurements in inhomogeneous magnetic fields: A fast two-dimensional J-resolved experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuqing; Lin, Yung-Ya; Cai, Shuhui; Yang, Yu; Sun, Huijun; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-03-01

    High spectral resolution in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a prerequisite for achieving accurate information relevant to molecular structures and composition assignments. The continuous development of superconducting magnets guarantees strong and homogeneous static magnetic fields for satisfactory spectral resolution. However, there exist circumstances, such as measurements on biological tissues and heterogeneous chemical samples, where the field homogeneity is degraded and spectral line broadening seems inevitable. Here we propose an NMR method, named intermolecular zero-quantum coherence J-resolved spectroscopy (iZQC-JRES), to face the challenge of field inhomogeneity and obtain desired high-resolution two-dimensional J-resolved spectra with fast acquisition. Theoretical analyses for this method are given according to the intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence treatment. Experiments on (a) a simple chemical solution and (b) an aqueous solution of mixed metabolites under externally deshimmed fields, and on (c) a table grape sample with intrinsic field inhomogeneity from magnetic susceptibility variations demonstrate the feasibility and applicability of the iZQC-JRES method. The application of this method to inhomogeneous chemical and biological samples, maybe in vivo samples, appears promising.

  9. A High Resolution, Multi-stop, Time-to-Digital Converter for Nuclear Time-of-Flight Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    D. F. Spencer; J. Cole; M. Drigert; R. Aryaeinejad

    2006-01-01

    A high-resolution, multi-stop, time-to-digital converter (TDC) was designed and developed to precisely measure the times-of-flight (TOF) of incident neutrons responsible for induced fission and capture reactions on actinide targets. The minimum time resolution is ±1 ns. The TDC design was implemented into a single, dual-wide CAMAC module. The CAMAC bus is used for command and control as well as an alternative data output. A high-speed ECL interface, compatible with LeCroy FERA modules, was also provided for the principle data output path. An Actel high-speed field programmable gate array (FPGA) chip was incorporated with an external oscillator and an internal multiple clock phasing system. This device implemented the majority of the high-speed register functions, the state machine for the FERA interface, and the high-speed counting circuit used for the TDC conversion. An external microcontroller was used to monitor and control system-level changes. In this work we discuss the performance of this TDC module as well as its application.

  10. High-resolution magic angle spinning (1) H NMR measurement of ligand concentration in solvent-saturated chromatographic beads.

    PubMed

    Elwinger, Fredrik; Furó, István

    2016-04-01

    A method based on (1) H high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR has been developed for measuring concentration accurately in heterogeneous materials like that of ligands in chromatography media. Ligand concentration is obtained by relating the peak integrals for a butyl ligand in the spectrum of a water-saturated chromatography medium to the integral of the added internal reference. The method is fast, with capacity of 10 min total sample preparation and analysis time per sample; precise, with a reproducibility expressed as 1.7% relative standard deviation; and accurate, as indicated by the excellent agreement of derived concentration with that obtained previously by (13) C single-pulse excitation MAS NMR. The effects of radiofrequency field inhomogeneity, spin rate, temperature increase due to spinning, and distribution and re-distribution of medium and reference solvent both inside the rotor during spinning and between bulk solvent and pore space are discussed in detail. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance measurements in inhomogeneous magnetic fields: A fast two-dimensional J-resolved experiment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuqing; Lin, Yung-Ya; Cai, Shuhui; Yang, Yu; Sun, Huijun; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-03-14

    High spectral resolution in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a prerequisite for achieving accurate information relevant to molecular structures and composition assignments. The continuous development of superconducting magnets guarantees strong and homogeneous static magnetic fields for satisfactory spectral resolution. However, there exist circumstances, such as measurements on biological tissues and heterogeneous chemical samples, where the field homogeneity is degraded and spectral line broadening seems inevitable. Here we propose an NMR method, named intermolecular zero-quantum coherence J-resolved spectroscopy (iZQC-JRES), to face the challenge of field inhomogeneity and obtain desired high-resolution two-dimensional J-resolved spectra with fast acquisition. Theoretical analyses for this method are given according to the intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence treatment. Experiments on (a) a simple chemical solution and (b) an aqueous solution of mixed metabolites under externally deshimmed fields, and on (c) a table grape sample with intrinsic field inhomogeneity from magnetic susceptibility variations demonstrate the feasibility and applicability of the iZQC-JRES method. The application of this method to inhomogeneous chemical and biological samples, maybe in vivo samples, appears promising.

  12. Angle-resolved heat capacity of heavy fermion superconductors.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Toshiro; Kittaka, Shunichiro; Machida, Kazushige

    2016-09-01

    Owing to a strong Coulomb repulsion, heavy electron superconductors mostly have anisotropic gap functions which have nodes for certain directions in the momentum space. Since the nodal structure is closely related to the pairing mechanism, its experimental determination is of primary importance. This article discusses the experimental methods of the gap determination by bulk heat capacity measurements in a rotating magnetic field. The basic idea is based on the fact that the quasiparticle density of states in the vortex state of nodal superconductors is field and direction dependent. We present our recent experimental results of the field-orientation dependence of the heat capacity in heavy fermion superconductors CeTIn5 (T  =  Co, Ir), UPt3, CeCu2Si2, and UBe13 and discuss their gap structures. PMID:27482621

  13. Angle-resolved heat capacity of heavy fermion superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Toshiro; Kittaka, Shunichiro; Machida, Kazushige

    2016-09-01

    Owing to a strong Coulomb repulsion, heavy electron superconductors mostly have anisotropic gap functions which have nodes for certain directions in the momentum space. Since the nodal structure is closely related to the pairing mechanism, its experimental determination is of primary importance. This article discusses the experimental methods of the gap determination by bulk heat capacity measurements in a rotating magnetic field. The basic idea is based on the fact that the quasiparticle density of states in the vortex state of nodal superconductors is field and direction dependent. We present our recent experimental results of the field-orientation dependence of the heat capacity in heavy fermion superconductors CeTIn5 (T  =  Co, Ir), UPt3, CeCu2Si2, and UBe13 and discuss their gap structures.

  14. Imaging electron dynamics with time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova-Gorelova, Daria; Küpper, Jochen; Santra, Robin

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically study how time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy can be applied for imaging coherent electron dynamics in molecules. We consider a process in which a pump pulse triggers coherent electronic dynamics in a molecule by creating a valence electron hole. An ultrashort extreme ultraviolet probe pulse creates a second electron hole in the molecule. Information about the electron dynamics is accessed by analyzing angular distributions of photoemission probabilities at a fixed photoelectron energy. We demonstrate that a rigorous theoretical analysis, which takes into account the indistinguishability of transitions induced by the ultrashort, broadband probe pulse and electron hole correlation effects, is necessary for the interpretation of time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectra. We show how a Fourier analysis of time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectra from a molecule can be applied to follow its electron dynamics by considering photoelectron distributions from an indole molecular cation with coherent electron dynamics.

  15. Fourier-domain angle-resolved low coherence interferometry for clinical detection of dysplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, Neil G.; Zhu, Yizheng; Wax, Adam

    2010-02-01

    Improved methods for detecting dysplasia, or pre-cancerous growth are a current clinical need, particularly in the esophagus. The currently accepted method of random biopsy and histological analysis provides only a limited examination of tissue in question while being coupled with a long time delay for diagnosis. Light scattering spectroscopy, in contrast, allows for inspection of the cellular structure and organization of tissue in vivo. Fourier-domain angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry (a/LCI) is a novel light scattering spectroscopy technique that provides quantitative depth-resolved morphological measurements of the size and optical density of the examined cell nuclei, which are characteristic biomarkers of dysplasia. Previously, clinical viability of the a/LCI system was demonstrated through analysis of ex vivo human esophageal tissue in Barrett's esophagus patients using a portable a/LCI, as was the development of a clinical a/LCI system. Data indicating the feasibility of the technique in other organ sites (colon, oral cavity) will be presented. We present an adaptation of the a/LCI system that will be used to investigate the presence of dysplasia in vivo in Barrett's esophagus patients.

  16. Angle resolved photoemission study of the c(2 × 2)Si overlayer on Fe(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egert, B.; Grabke, H. J.; Sakisaka, Y.; Rhodin, T. N.

    1984-06-01

    Angle resolved photoemission experiments utilizing polarized synchrotron radiation were performed to study the electronic structure of valence levels of Si segregated in a c(2 × 2) overlayer on the α-Fe(100) surface. The spectra were taken at varying photon energies (14 ⩽ ω ⩽ 40 eV), in dependence on the polarization of the incoming light, and as a function of the photoelectron emission angle in the symmetry directions T¯M¯' and T¯X¯' of the surface Brillouin zone. Evaluation of the photoemission data shows that the Si 3p levels form energy bands for the ordered c(2 × 2) overlayer on Fe(100). The initial state energy of the Si 3p states depends on k∥ being measured. At T¯ a bonding Si 3p z state (a 1 symmetry) and an antibonding Si 3p xp y state (e symmetry) is analyzed, which are separated by 0.8 eV in binding energy. In going from T¯ to M¯' the Si 3p z induced level disperses ~ 0.8 eV to lower initial state energies. In the T¯X¯' direction the overall Si 3p band width is approximate 1.3 eV. Though the interaction between silicon and iron surface atoms are relatively weak compared to Fe(100)-c(2 × 2)S, modifications in the Fe derived valence band states occur, including the formation of a hybridization state located 1.4 eV below EF.

  17. Phonon-assisted indirect transitions in angle-resolved photoemission spectra of graphite and graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayria, Pourya; Tanaka, Shin-ichiro; Nugraha, Ahmad R. T.; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Saito, Riichiro

    2016-08-01

    Indirect transitions of electrons in graphene and graphite are investigated by means of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) with several different incident photon energies and light polarizations. The theoretical calculations of the indirect transition for graphene and for a single crystal of graphite are compared with the experimental measurements for highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite and a single crystal of graphite. The dispersion relations for the transverse optical (TO) and the out-of-plane longitudinal acoustic (ZA) phonon modes of graphite and the TO phonon mode of graphene can be extracted from the inelastic ARPES intensity. We find that the TO phonon mode for k points along the Γ -K and K -M -K' directions in the Brillouin zone can be observed in the ARPES spectra of graphite and graphene by using a photon energy ≈11.1 eV. The relevant mechanism in the ARPES process for this case is the resonant indirect transition. On the other hand, the ZA phonon mode of graphite can be observed by using a photon energy ≈6.3 eV through a nonresonant indirect transition, while the ZA phonon mode of graphene within the same mechanism should not be observed.

  18. Simultaneous measurements of indoor radon, radon-thoron progeny and high-resolution gamma spectrometry in Greek dwellings.

    PubMed

    Clouvas, A; Xanthos, S; Antonopoulos-Domis, M

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous indoor radon, radon-thoron progeny and high-resolution in situ gamma spectrometry measurements, with portable high-purity Ge detector were performed in 26 dwellings of Thessaloniki, the second largest town of Greece, during March 2003-January 2005. The radon gas was measured with an AlphaGUARD ionisation chamber (in each of the 26 dwellings) every 10 min, for a time period between 7 and 10 d. Most of the values of radon gas concentration are between 20 and 30 Bq m(-3), with an arithmetic mean of 34 Bq m(-3). The maximum measured value of radon gas concentration is 516 Bq m(-3). The comparison between the radon gas measurements, performed with AlphaGUARD and short-term electret ionisation chamber, shows very good agreement, taking into account the relative short time period of the measurement and the relative low radon gas concentration. Radon and thoron progeny were measured with a SILENA (model 4s) instrument. From the radon and radon progeny measurements, the equilibrium factor F could be deduced. Most of the measurements of the equilibrium factor are within the range 0.4-0.5. The mean value of the equilibrium factor F is 0.49 +/- 0.10, i.e. close to the typical value of 0.4 adopted by UNSCEAR. The mean equilibrium equivalent thoron concentration measured in the 26 dwellings is EEC(thoron) = 1.38 +/- 0.79 Bq m(-3). The mean equilibrium equivalent thoron to radon ratio concentration, measured in the 26 dwellings, is 0.1 +/- 0.06. The mean total absorbed dose rate in air, owing to gamma radiation, is 58 +/- 12 nGy h(-1). The contribution of the different radionuclides to the total indoor gamma dose rate in air is 38% due to 40K, 36% due to thorium series and 26% due to uranium series. The annual effective dose, due to the different source terms (radon, thoron and external gamma radiation), is 1.05, 0.39 and 0.28 mSv, respectively. PMID:16410290

  19. Development of high-resolution cathodoluminescence system for STEM and application to plasmonic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naoki

    2016-08-01

    A high-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) system for scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) has been developed by employing a field emission gun and a spherical aberration corrector, which realizes a probe size of 1 nm even at an accelerating voltage of 80 kV and beam current of the order of 1 nA. Angle resolved measurement of light emission from a sample in the STEM is possible by combining a parabolic mirror and position-controlled pinhole. CL spectra are successively acquired by a highly sensitive charge-coupled device while scanning the incident electron beam or pinhole, which enables various detection modes, i.e. (i) angle resolved spectral pattern, (ii) beam scan spectral image and (iii) photon map. In order to calibrate the acquired spectrum, the correction function is created from the comparison between the observed and theoretical spectra of the transition radiation. Furthermore, the modification of polarization by the parabolic mirror is discussed. Some examples of the applications of the STEM-CL system to plasmonics are presented to demonstrate the unique measurement features of the CL system, i.e. (i) multipole modes in silver nanoparticles, (ii) surface plasmon polariton modes in a 2D plasmonic crystal and (iii) localized surface plasmon modes in a gold bow tie nano-antenna.

  20. Development of high-resolution cathodoluminescence system for STEM and application to plasmonic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naoki

    2016-08-01

    A high-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) system for scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) has been developed by employing a field emission gun and a spherical aberration corrector, which realizes a probe size of 1 nm even at an accelerating voltage of 80 kV and beam current of the order of 1 nA. Angle resolved measurement of light emission from a sample in the STEM is possible by combining a parabolic mirror and position-controlled pinhole. CL spectra are successively acquired by a highly sensitive charge-coupled device while scanning the incident electron beam or pinhole, which enables various detection modes, i.e. (i) angle resolved spectral pattern, (ii) beam scan spectral image and (iii) photon map. In order to calibrate the acquired spectrum, the correction function is created from the comparison between the observed and theoretical spectra of the transition radiation. Furthermore, the modification of polarization by the parabolic mirror is discussed. Some examples of the applications of the STEM-CL system to plasmonics are presented to demonstrate the unique measurement features of the CL system, i.e. (i) multipole modes in silver nanoparticles, (ii) surface plasmon polariton modes in a 2D plasmonic crystal and (iii) localized surface plasmon modes in a gold bow tie nano-antenna. PMID:27473259

  1. A new method using evaporation for high-resolution measurements of soil thermal conductivity at changing water contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markert, A.; Trinks, S.; Facklam, M.; Wessolek, G.

    2012-04-01

    The thermal conductivity of soils is a key parameter to know if their use as heat source or sink is planned. It is required to calculate the efficiency of ground-source heat pump systems in combination with soil heat exchangers. Apart from geothermal energy, soil thermal conductivity is essential to estimate the ampacity for buried power cables. The effective thermal conductivity of saturated and unsaturated soils, as a function of water transport, water vapour transport and heat conduction, mainly depends on the soil water content, its bulk density and texture. The major objectives of this study are (i) to describe the thermal conductivity of soil samples with a non-steady state measurement at changing water contents and for different bulk densities. Based on that it is (ii) tested if available soil thermal conductivity models are able to describe the measured data for the whole range of water contents. The new method allows a continuous measurement of thermal conductivity for soil from full water saturation to air-dryness. Thermal conductivity is measured with a thermal needle probe in predefined time intervals while the change of water content is controlled by evaporation. To relate the measured thermal conductivity to the current volumetric water content, the decrease in weight of the sample, due to evaporation, is logged with a lab scale. Soil texture of the 11 soil substrates tested in this study range between coarse sand and silty clay. To evaluate the impact of the bulk density on heat transport processes, thermal conductivity at 20°C was measured at 1.5g/cm3; 1.7g/cm3 and 1.9g/cm3 for each soil substrate. The results correspond well to literature values used to describe heat transport in soils. Due to the high-resolution and non-destructive measurements, the specific effects of the soil texture and bulk density on thermal conductivity could be proved. Decreasing water contents resulted in a non-linear decline of the thermal conductivity for all samples

  2. First High-Resolution Infrared Spectroscopic Measurements of Comet 2P/Encke: Unusual Organic Composition and Low Rotational Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radeva, Yana L.; Mumma, M. J.; Villanueva, G. L.; Bonev, B. P.; DiSanti, M. A.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Dello Russo, N.

    2012-10-01

    We present the first high-resolution infrared spectra of the ecliptic comet 2P/Encke, acquired on UT 4 - 6 Nov. 2003, with the Near Infrared Echelle Spectrograph (NIRSPEC) on the Keck II telescope. 2P/Encke is a dynamical end-member among comets. Its very short period of 3.3 years (with perihelion at 0.34 AU and aphelion at 4.09 AU) exposes the nucleus to unusually high insolation throughout its orbit, raising the prospect that native ices may have experienced significant fractionation over time. Here, we present flux-calibrated spectra, production rates, and mixing ratios for H2O, CH3OH, HCN, H2CO, C2H2, C2H6, CH4 and CO, and compare the abundance ratios with the “organics-normal” population. We also extracted very low rotational temperatures (20 - 30 K) for H2O, HCN, and CH3OH in the near-nucleus coma, which correlate with one of the lowest cometary gas production rates ( 1027 molecules s-1) measured thus far in the infrared. We determined that 2P/Encke is enriched in CH3OH, but depleted in C2H6, C2H2, HCN, CH4, H2CO and CO. We compared mixing ratios of these organic species measured on separate dates, and found no evidence of macroscopic chemical heterogeneity in this cometary nucleus, however, we are limited by sparse temporal sampling of our observations. The depleted abundances of most measured species but retention of the high temperature volatiles (H2O, CH3OH) are consistent with fractionation of 2P/Encke’s native ices by thermal processing while in its current orbit. 2P/Encke is unique in terms of its short period, unusual organic composition, low rotational temperatures and low production rates. The discovery of its unusual organic composition is an important contribution to the emerging chemical taxonomy of comets.

  3. A new method to measure bowen ratios using high resolution vertical dry and wet bulb temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euser, T.; Luxemburg, W.; Everson, C.; Mengistu, M.; Clulow, A.; Bastiaanssen, W.

    2013-06-01

    The Bowen ratio surface energy balance method is a relatively simple method to determine the latent heat flux and the actual land surface evaporation. Despite its simplicity, the Bowen ratio method is generally considered to be unreliable due to the use of two-level sensors that are installed by default in operational Bowen ratio systems. In this paper we present the concept of a new measurement methodology to estimate the Bowen ratio from high resolution vertical dry and wet bulb temperature profiles. A short field experiment with Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) in a fibre optic cable having 13 levels was undertaken. A dry and a wetted section of a fibre optic cable were suspended on a 6 m high tower installed over a sugar beet trial near Pietermaritzburg (South Africa). Using the DTS cable as a psychrometer, a near continuous observation of vapour pressure and temperature at 0.20 m intervals was established. These data allows the computation of the Bowen ratio with a high precision. By linking the Bowen ratio to net radiation and soil heat flux, the daytime latent heat flux was estimated. The latent heat flux derived from DTS-based Bowen ratio (BR-DTS) showed consistent agreement (correlation coefficients between 0.97 and 0.98) with results derived from eddy covariance, surface layer scintillometer and surface renewal techniques. The latent heat from BR-DTS overestimated the latent heat derived with the eddy covariance by 4% and the latent heat derived with the surface layer scintillometer by 8%. Through this research, a new window is opened to engage on simplified, inexpensive and easy to interpret in situ measurement techniques for measuring evaporation.

  4. TRMM Precipitation Radar Reflectivity Profiles Compared to High-Resolution Airborne and Ground-Based Radar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, G. M.; Geerts, B.; Tian, L.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Satellite) Precipitation Radar (PR) products are evaluated by means of simultaneous comparisons with data from the high-altitude ER-2 Doppler Radar (EDOP), as well as ground-based radars. The comparison is aimed primarily at the vertical reflectivity structure, which is of key importance in TRMM rain type classification and latent heating estimation. The radars used in this study have considerably different viewing geometries and resolutions, demanding non-trivial mapping procedures in common earth-relative coordinates. Mapped vertical cross sections and mean profiles of reflectivity from the PR, EDOP, and ground-based radars are compared for six cases. These cases cover a stratiform frontal rainband, convective cells of various sizes and stages, and a hurricane. For precipitating systems that are large relative to the PR footprint size, PR reflectivity profiles compare very well to high-resolution measurements thresholded to the PR minimum reflectivity, and derived variables such as bright band height and rain types are accurate, even at high PR incidence angles. It was found that for, the PR reflectivity of convective cells small relative to the PR footprint is weaker than in reality. Some of these differences can be explained by non-uniform beam filling. For other cases where strong reflectivity gradients occur within a PR footprint, the reflectivity distribution is spread out due to filtering by the PR antenna illumination pattern. In these cases, rain type classification may err and be biased towards the stratiform type, and the average reflectivity tends to be underestimated. The limited sensitivity of the PR implies that the upper regions of precipitation systems remain undetected and that the PR storm top height estimate is unreliable, usually underestimating the actual storm top height. This applies to all cases but the discrepancy is larger for smaller cells where limited sensitivity is compounded

  5. Subsea Target Measurement Technique of High Resolution Multi-Beam Sonar System -A Case Study of Ocean Oil & Gas Production Platform and Pipeline Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, J.; Tang, Q.; Zhou, X.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract: with fast development of modern science and technology, subsea pipeline detection means have been increasingly improved which have not only improved detection efficiency, but also extremely advanced the detection precision. The article has integrated the performance characteristics of high resolution multi-beam measurement system in recent years, which has introduced the relevant technique and detection achievement of subsea pipeline detecting (especially for exposed pipeline) by detection cases. The final detection result has been verified that high resolution multi-beam measurement system could accurately detect subsea minisize target object, which has provided the technical reference with popularization and application of new characteristics.

  6. High-resolution infrared spectroscopic measurements of Comet 2P/Encke: Unusual organic composition and low rotational temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radeva, Yana L.; Mumma, Michael J.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; Bonev, Boncho P.; DiSanti, Michael A.; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Dello Russo, Neil

    2013-03-01

    We present high-resolution infrared spectroscopic measurements of the ecliptic Comet 2P/Encke, observed on 4-6 November 2003 during its close approach to the Earth, using the Near Infrared Echelle Spectrograph on the Keck II telescope. We present flux-calibrated spectra, production rates, and mixing ratios for H2O, CH3OH, HCN, H2CO, C2H2, C2H6, CH4 and CO. Comet 2P/Encke is a dynamical end-member among comets because of its short period of 3.3 years. Relative to “organics-normal” comets, we determined that 2P/Encke is depleted in HCN, H2CO, C2H2, C2H6, CH4 and CO, but it is enriched in CH3OH. We compared mixing ratios of these organic species measured on separate dates, and we see no evidence of macroscopic chemical heterogeneity in the nucleus of 2P/Encke, however, this conclusion is limited by sparse temporal sampling. The depleted abundances of most measured species suggest that 2P/Encke may have formed closer to the young Sun, before its insertion to the Kuiper belt, compared with “organics-normal” comets - as was previously suggested for other depleted comets (e.g. C/1999 S4 (LINEAR)). We measured very low rotational temperatures of 20-30 K for H2O, CH3OH and HCN in the near nucleus region of 2P/Encke, which correlate with one of the lowest cometary gas production rates (∼2.6 × 1027 molecules s-1) measured thus far in the infrared. This suggests that we are seeing the effects of more efficient radiative cooling, insufficient collisional excitation, and/or inefficient heating by fast H-atoms (and icy grains) in the observed region of the coma. Its extremely short orbital period, very low gas production rate, and classification as an ecliptic comet, make 2P/Encke an important addition to our growing database, and contribute significantly to the establishment of a chemical taxonomy of comets.

  7. High-Resolution Infrared Spectroscopic Measurements of Comet 2PlEncke: Unusual Organic Composition and Low Rotational Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radeva, Yana L.; Mumma, Michael J.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; Bonev, Boncho P.; DiSanti, Michael A.; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Dello Russo, Neil

    2013-01-01

    We present high-resolution infrared spectroscopic measurements of the ecliptic comet 2P/Encke, observed on 4-6 Nov. 2003 during its close approach to the Earth, using the Near Infrared Echelle Spectrograph on the Keck II telescope. We present flux-calibrated spectra, production rates, and mixing ratios for H2O, CH3OH, HCN, H2CO, C2H2, C2H6, CH4 and CO. Comet 2P/Encke is a dynamical end-member among comets because of its short period of 3.3 years. Relative to "organics-normal" comets, we determined that 2PlEncke is depleted in HCN, H2CO, C2H2, C2H6, CH4 and CO, but it is enriched in CH3OH. We compared mixing ratios of these organic species measured on separate dates, and we see no evidence of macroscopic chemical heterogeneity in the nucleus of 2P/Encke, however, this conclusion is limited by sparse temporal sampling. The depleted abundances of most measured species suggest that 2P/Encke may have formed closer to the young Sun, before its insertion to the Kuiper belt, compared with "organics-normal" comets - as was previously suggested for other depleted comets (e.g. C/1999 S4 (LINEAR)). We measured very low rotational temperatures of 20 - 30 K for H2O, CH3OH and HCN in the near nucleus region of 2P/Encke, which correlate with one of the lowest cometary gas production rates (approx. 2.6 x 10(exp 27) molecules/s) measured thus far in the infrared. This suggests that we are seeing the effects of more efficient radiative cooling, insufficient collisional excitation, and/or inefficient heating by fast H-atoms (and icy grains) in the observed region of the coma. Its extremely short orbital period, very low gas production rate, and classification as an ecliptic comet, make 2PlEncke an important addition to our growing database, and contribute significantly to the establishment of a chemical taxonomy of comets.

  8. Extraction of trench geometry and linewidth of nanoscale grating targets in (110)-oriented silicon using angle-resolved scatterometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, Heather J.; Germer, Thomas A.; Cresswell, Michael W.; Li, Bin; Huang, Huai; Ho, Paul S.

    2008-08-01

    The extraction of nanoscale dimensions and feature geometry of grating targets using signature-based optical techniques is an area of continued interest in semiconductor manufacturing. In the current work, we have performed angle-resolved scatterometry measurements on grating targets of 180 nm pitch fabricated by electron beam lithography and anisotropic wet etching of (110)-oriented silicon. The use of oriented silicon results in grating lines with nominally vertical sidewalls, with linewidths estimated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to be in the sub-50 nm range. The targets were designed to be suitable for both optical scatterometry and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) measurement. As a consequence of the lattice-plane selective etch used for fabrication, the target trenches do not have a flat bottom, but rather have a wide vee shape. We demonstrate extraction of linewidth, line height, and trench profile using scatterometry, with an emphasis on modeling the trench angle, which is well decoupled from other grating parameters in the scatterometry model and is driven by the crystalline orientation of the Si lattice planes. Issues such as the cross-correlation of grating height and linewidth in the scatterometry model, the limits of resolution for angle-resolved scatterometry at the wavelength used in this study (532 nm), and prospects for improving the height and linewidth resolution obtained from scatterometry of the targets, are discussed.

  9. High resolution imaging Fourier transform spectrometer with no moving components for the measurement of atmospheric trace gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortimer, H.

    2014-12-01

    A high resolution Static Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer, SIFTS, with no moving parts has been developed for the detection of atmospheric gases. The instrument has been shown to have high spectral resolution (4 cm-1) and temporal resolution (10kHz) resolution in both the mid and near infrared and moderate spectral resolution (14cm-1) in the visible. This instrument has been developed for the remote sensing and in-situ measurements of atmospheric gases. It has been identified that due to the low mass and compact size of the instrument system, that the SIFTS could be deployed as a remote sensing instrument onboard a Earth Observation satellite or Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV), or conversely as a radiosonde instrument for in-situ measurements of atmospheric gases. The technique is based on a static optical configuration whereby light is split into two paths and made to recombine along a focal plane producing an interference pattern. The spectral information is returned using a detector array to digitally capture the interferogram which can then be processed into a spectrum by applying a Fourier transform. As there are no moving components, the speed of measurement is determined by the frame rate of the detector array. Thus, this instrument has a temporal advantage over common Michelson FTIR instruments. Using a high speed Toshiba CCD line array, sensitive over the spectral region of 400 - 1100nm, spectra have been recorded at a rate of one every 100 microseconds. Using an uncooled microbolometer infrared detector array, sensitive over the spectral region of 2 to 15μm, the gases NH3, O3 and CH4 have been used to demonstrate the sensitivity of the SIFTS instrument. It has been shown that the Signal to Noise of the SIFTSMIR is >1200 using an integration time of 77msec. The novel optical design has reduced the optics to only 3 optical components, and the detector array, to generate and measure the interferogram. The experimental performance of the SIFTS instrument

  10. Tropospheric Carbon Monoxide Measurements from the Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder during SAFARI 2000 on September 7, 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, W. W.; McCourt, M. L.; Sparling, L.; Lukovich, J.; Revercomb, H.; Knuteson, R.; Antonelli, P.

    2002-05-01

    Tropospheric carbon monoxide (CO) column densities are presented for more than 9000 spectra obtained by the University of Wisconsin--Madison (UWis) Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (SHIS) during a flight on the NASA ER-2 on September 7, 2000, as part of the SAFARI 2000 international field campaign. CO retrievals were performed utilizing a portion of the CO 1--0 vibration-rotation band centered at 2142~wn with an algorithm previously demonstrated for the SHIS predecessor HIS instrument. On this flight, enhancements in tropospheric column CO were seen in the vicinity of a controlled burn in the Timbavati Game Reserve near Kruger National Park in northeastern South Africa and over the edge of the river of smoke in south central Mozambique. Relatively clean air was observed over the far southern coast of Mozambique on the other side of the waning baroclinic westerly wave responsible for driving the river of smoke. Quantitative comparisons are presented with in situ measurements from five different instruments flying on two other aircraft, the University of Washington Convair-580 and South Africa JRB, in the vicinity of the Timbavati fire. Measured tropospheric CO columns (extrapolated from 337 mb to 100 mb) of 2.1 x 1018 cm-2 in background air and up to 1.5 x 1019 cm-2 in the smoke plume agree extremely well with SHIS retrieved tropospheric CO columns of 2.3 +/- 0.25 x 1018 cm-2 over background air near the fire and 1.5 +/- 0.35 x 1019 cm-2 over the smoke plume. Qualitative inter-comparisons are presented for three other in situ CO profiles obtained by the South African JRA aircraft over Mozambique and northern South Africa showing the influence of the river of smoke. 13 SHIS flights remain to be studied in detail with more comparisons to in situ measurements and eventual use of the full suite of SHIS CO retrievals for validation of the MOPITT instrument onboard the NASA Terra satellite.

  11. Control of the chemical state change of sulfur in solid compound targets during high-resolution PIXE measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Hyung-Joo; Choi, Han-Woo; Kim, Gi-Dong; Kim, Joon-Kon

    2012-07-01

    A high-energy-resolution wavelength-dispersive (WD) X-ray spectrometer in the Johansson geometry, which allowed energy resolution below the natural linewidth of the K α lines was employed in measurements of the proton-induced K α X-ray emission spectra for six typical sulfur compounds (CdS, Na2SO3, Na2 S2O5, NaHSO3, (NH4)2SO4, and Na2SO4) to investigate the chemical state change during 2.4-MeV proton irradiation with a current density of 7.5 nA/mm2. We found that the chemical state change of each compound depended on the various factors affecting the surface temperature increase, such as target thickness, mounting method, and existence of active cooling during the measurement. The chemical state of sulfur on the target surface of S4+ compounds was gradually changed into S6+ without exception through irradiation under poor cooling conditions. Sulfur compounds of the S0 and S6+ states with closed shell structures were proven to be chemically stable against proton bombardment, as expected. However, (NH4)2SO4 was found to be most sensitive to proton irradiation among the sulfur compounds, and S0, one of the reaction products, became a major element at doses higher than 3 × 108 Gy. If thick targets were mounted by using a carbon adhesive tape, chemical state change could be observed in some cases even with lowtemperature cooling down to -80 °C, however, the chemical state change seemed to be remarkably suppressed by using very thin targets mounted with a silver paste even without active cooling. In conclusion, the chemical states of sulfur compounds could be preserved without significant change for an accumulated dose of about 3 × 107 Gy, equivalent to a typical high-resolution PIXE scanning period, by adopting a proper target preparation scheme to discharge proton-induced thermal energy effectively from the irradiated target surface.

  12. Feasibility study of high-resolution DCE-MRI for glomerular filtration rate (GFR) measurement in a routine clinical modal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Dong; Wu, Chen-Jiang; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Liu, Xi-Sheng; Shi, Hai-Bin

    2015-10-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MR renography has been identified as an interesting tool to determine single-kidney GFR. However, a fundamental issue for the applicability of MR-based estimate of single-kidney GFR is selecting a balance between spatial and temporal resolution of DCE-MRI data. The purpose is to assess the feasibility of GFR estimate from high-resolution (HR) dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI in a routine clinical modal. Standard MR renography (2.4s/phase, total 4min; 4-ml Gd) and five-phase, HR-based imaging protocol (0, 30, 70, 120, and 240s; 0.05mmol/kg Gd) were prospectively performed in twelve volunteers who were scheduled for routine renal MRI. Data were plotted with Patlak, two-compartment modified Tofts model (2CTM), and two-compartment filtration model (2CFM) for GFR estimate. During all the measurements, only the signal intensities in the aorta and whole kidney parenchyma were considered. Standard 2CFM and 2CTM produced lower residuals over the fitted interval than HR-based measures (p<0.05); and HR-bases 2CFM and 2CTM did not reflect significant correlation to standard values. Standard Patlak plots with 0-240s data points produced significantly lower GFR and higher residuals than that plots with 0-120s data points (p<0.05). HR-based Patlak plots with 0, 30, 70, and 120s data points significantly correlated with reference values (Pearson ρ=0.97, p<0.01), and produced a 33.2% underestimation of reference value, which was better than that plots with 0, 30, 70, 120, and 240s data points (ρ=0.92, p<0.01; 58.6% underestimation of reference value). It concludes that it is feasible to estimate GFR with HR-based DCE-MRI and appreciate kinetic model. Patlak plots from 0, 30, 70, and 120s data points is better than plots from 0, 30, 70, 120, and 240s data points.

  13. Fast Airborne Aerosol Size and Chemistry Measurements with the High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer during the MILAGRO Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCarlo, P. F.; Dunlea, E. J.; Kimmel, J. R.; Aiken, A. C.; Sueper, D.; Crounse, J.; Wennberg, P. O.; Emmons, L.; Shinozuka, Y.; Clarke, A.; Zhou, J.; Tomlinson, J.; Collins,D. R.; Knapp, D.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Montzka,D. D.; Campos,T.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    The concentration, size, and composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM(sub l)) was measured over Mexico City and central Mexico with a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) onboard the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft as part of the MILAGRO field campaign. This was the first aircraft deployment of the HR-ToF-AMS. During the campaign the instrument performed very well, and provided 12 s data. The aerosol mass from the AMS correlates strongly with other aerosol measurements on board the aircraft. Organic aerosol (OA) species dominate the NR-PM(sub l) mass. OA correlates strongly with CO and HCN indicating that pollution (mostly secondary OA, SOA) and biomass burning (BB) are the main OA sources. The OA to CO ratio indicates a typical value for aged air of around 80 microg/cubic m (STP) ppm(exp -1). This is within the range observed in outflow from the Northeastern US, which could be due to a compensating effect between higher BB but lower biogenic VOC emissions during this study. The O/C atomic ratio for OA is calculated from the HR mass spectra and shows a clear increase with photochemical age, as SOA forms rapidly and quickly overwhelms primary urban OA, consistent with Volkamer et al. (2006) and Kleinman et al. (2008). The stability of the OA/CO while O/C increases with photochemical age implies a net loss of carbon from the OA. BB OA is marked by signals at m/z 60 and 73, and also by a signal enhancement at large m/z indicative of larger molecules or more resistance to fragmentation. The main inorganic components show different spatial patterns and size distributions. Sulfate is regional in nature with clear volcanic and petrochemical/power plant sources, while the urban area is not a major regional source for this species. Nitrate is enhanced significantly in the urban area and immediate outflow, and is strongly correlated with CO indicating a strong urban source. The importance of nitrate decreases with distance from the city

  14. High-resolution spatial distribution of temperature over Berlin simulated by the mesoscale model METRAS and comparison with measured data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodoudi, Sahar; Schäfer, Kerstin; Grawe, David; Petrik, Ronny; Heinke Schlünzen, K.

    2014-05-01

    The world's population is projected to increase in the next decades especially in urban areas. Additionally, the living conditions are affected largely by the local urban climate. The urban climate is a complex local system which might change differently than the regional climate. Studying the spatial distribution of air temperature and urban heat island intensity is one of the major concerns in the climate change scenarios. Due to the expected higher frequency of heat waves in the future and the related heat stress, high resolution distribution of air temperature is an important key for urban planning and development. In this study the non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Transport and Fluid Model (METRAS) developed at the University of Hamburg is used to simulate the air temperature for the urban area of Berlin. The forcing data have been derived from the ECMWF reanalysis data. We have used three nested domains (resolution of 4 km, 1 km, 200 m) to simulate the temperature in Berlin. Evaluation of these mesoscale model results is challenging for urban areas, due to the sparse and heterogeneous distribution of meteorological stations and the heterogeneous land cover in urban areas. The Meteorological Institute of the Free University of Berlin organized six measurement campaigns in 2012. Measurements were taken at 31 different routes through Berlin using mobile measurement systems. In comparison with data from permanent weather stations the mobile measurements show a general overestimation of temperature and underestimation of relative humidity values. This may be the result of the different land cover types and places, where the mobile measurements and the stationary measurements were taken. The highly resolved (200 m) simulated air temperature from METRAS has been verified for three different selected summer days in 2012 with different pressure patterns over Berlin. For the model evaluation, the data from the measuring campaign and 34 permanent stations have been used. The

  15. Edge Density Imaging Measurements of DIII-D Tokamak Plasmas using a Lithium Beam Probe and High Resolution Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, M. F.; Stoschus, H.; Thomas, D. M.; Pace, D. C.

    2012-10-01

    The Lithium Atomic Beam (LIBEAM) used on DIII-D has shown considerable potential to diagnose the density profile ne(r) with a radial resolution of δr = 0.5 cm within the pedestal region. The LIBEAM parameters are E < 30 keV and ˜10 mA of equivalent neutral lithium current. Through the use of a filtered high resolution PCO Pixelfly CCD camera, the spectroscopic emission of the 670.8 nm Li[2p-2s] transition due to collisional excitation of the neutral lithium atoms is captured and analyzed. By appropriate image analysis, a high resolution profile of the beam intensity Ib can be discerned. Through the use of this beam intensity profile and collisional radiative models (CRM) the fine scale structure of the edge density profile ne(r) can be observed.

  16. Factor analysis of combined organic and inorganic aerosol mass spectra from high resolution aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. L.; Zhang, Q.; Schwab, J. J.; Yang, T.; Ng, N. L.; Demerjian, K. L.

    2012-09-01

    Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to the merged high resolution mass spectra of organic and inorganic aerosols from aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements to investigate the sources and evolution processes of submicron aerosols in New York City in summer 2009. This new approach is able to study the distribution of organic and inorganic species in different types of aerosols, the acidity of organic aerosol (OA) factors, and the fragment ion patterns related to photochemical processing. In this study, PMF analysis of the unified AMS spectral matrix resolved 8 factors. The hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and cooking OA (COA) factors contain negligible amounts of inorganic species. The two factors that are primarily ammonium sulfate (SO4-OA) and ammonium nitrate (NO3-OA), respectively, are overall neutralized. Among all OA factors the organic fraction of SO4-OA shows the highest degree of oxidation (O/C = 0.69). Two semi-volatile oxygenated OA (OOA) factors, i.e., a less oxidized (LO-OOA) and a more oxidized (MO-OOA), were also identified. MO-OOA represents local photochemical products with a diurnal profile exhibiting a pronounced noon peak, consistent with those of formaldehyde (HCHO) and Ox(= O3 + NO2). The NO+/NO2+ ion ratio in MO-OOA is much higher than that in NO3-OA and in pure ammonium nitrate, indicating the formation of organic nitrates. The nitrogen-enriched OA (NOA) factor contains ~25% of acidic inorganic salts, suggesting the formation of secondary OA via acid-base reactions of amines. The size distributions of OA factors derived from the size-resolved mass spectra show distinct diurnal evolving behaviors but overall a progressing evolution from smaller to larger particle mode as the oxidation degree of OA increases. Our results demonstrate that PMF analysis of the unified aerosol mass spectral matrix which contains both inorganic and organic aerosol signals may enable the deconvolution of more OA factors and gain more insights into the

  17. Substrate interactions with suspended and supported monolayer MoS2: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Wencan; Yeh, Po -Chun; Zaki, Nader; Zhang, Datong; Liou, Jonathan T.; Dadap, Jerry I.; Barinov, Alexey; Yablonskikh, Mikhail; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Sutter, Peter; Herman, Irving P.; Osgood, Jr., Richard M.

    2015-03-17

    We report the directly measured electronic structure of exfoliated monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂) using micrometer-scale angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Measurements of both suspended and supported monolayer MoS₂ elucidate the effects of interaction with a substrate. Thus, a suggested relaxation of the in-plane lattice constant is found for both suspended and supported monolayer MoS₂ crystals. For suspended MoS₂, a careful investigation of the measured uppermost valence band gives an effective mass at Γ¯ and Κ¯ of 2.00m₀ and 0.43m₀, respectively. We also measure an increase in the band linewidth from the midpoint of Γ¯Κ¯ to the vicinity of Κ¯ and briefly discuss its possible origin.

  18. Research on the fiber dispersion and compensation in large-scale high-resolution broadband frequency-modulated continuous wave laser measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xinke; Liu, Guodong; Liu, Bingguo; Chen, Fengdong; Zhuang, Zhitao; Gan, Yu; Lu, Cheng

    2015-07-01

    The influence of a fiber dispersion calibration interferometer on the measurement results for a large-scale high-resolution broadband frequency-modulated continuous wave (FMCW) measurement system was studied. A model was constructed to simulate the influences of fiber dispersion on the measurements when using a frequency sampling method that corrects the tuning nonlinearity. The results indicated that a broadband external cavity tunable laser, in comparison with a semiconductor laser, causes linear variations in the measurement results because of the effect of the fiber dispersion in the calibration interference path for large-scale high-resolution measurements, and these variations decreased the resolution of the measurements. A method that combines chirp slope calibration and phase compensation to reduce the effects of the fiber dispersion was proposed. A gauge block with a height difference of 200 μm at a distance of 2.43 m was measured during the experiments. Before calibrating the fiber dispersion, the frequency spectrum showed false peaks, and it was difficult to distinguish the peaks of the targets. After compensating for the dispersion, the peaks of the targets could be clearly distinguished, and a height difference of 199.6 μm was measured. Using this model and the method to compensate for the dispersion will provide a reference for large-scale high-resolution broadband FMCW laser measurements.

  19. Angle-resolved light scattering of individual rod-shaped bacteria based on Fourier transform light scattering

    PubMed Central

    Jo, YoungJu; Jung, JaeHwang; Lee, Jee Woong; Shin, Della; Park, HyunJoo; Nam, Ki Tae; Park, Ji-Ho; Park, YongKeun

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional angle-resolved light scattering maps of individual rod-shaped bacteria are measured at the single-cell level. Using quantitative phase imaging and Fourier transform light scattering techniques, the light scattering patterns of individual bacteria in four rod-shaped species (Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus casei, Synechococcus elongatus, and Escherichia coli) are measured with unprecedented sensitivity in a broad angular range from −70° to 70°. The measured light scattering patterns are analyzed along the two principal axes of rod-shaped bacteria in order to systematically investigate the species-specific characteristics of anisotropic light scattering. In addition, the cellular dry mass of individual bacteria is calculated and used to demonstrate that the cell-to-cell variations in light scattering within bacterial species is related to the cellular dry mass and growth. PMID:24867385

  20. Angle-resolved light scattering of individual rod-shaped bacteria based on Fourier transform light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Youngju; Jung, Jaehwang; Lee, Jee Woong; Shin, Della; Park, Hyunjoo; Nam, Ki Tae; Park, Ji-Ho; Park, Yongkeun

    2014-05-01

    Two-dimensional angle-resolved light scattering maps of individual rod-shaped bacteria are measured at the single-cell level. Using quantitative phase imaging and Fourier transform light scattering techniques, the light scattering patterns of individual bacteria in four rod-shaped species (Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus casei, Synechococcus elongatus, and Escherichia coli) are measured with unprecedented sensitivity in a broad angular range from -70° to 70°. The measured light scattering patterns are analyzed along the two principal axes of rod-shaped bacteria in order to systematically investigate the species-specific characteristics of anisotropic light scattering. In addition, the cellular dry mass of individual bacteria is calculated and used to demonstrate that the cell-to-cell variations in light scattering within bacterial species is related to the cellular dry mass and growth.

  1. High Resolution Doppler Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Paul B.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) on UARS spacecraft during the period 4/l/96 - 3/31/99. During this period, HRDI operation, data processing, and data analysis continued, and there was a high level of vitality in the HRDI project. The HRDI has been collecting data from the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere since instrument activation on October 1, 1991. The HRDI team has stressed three areas since operations commenced: 1) operation of the instrument in a manner which maximizes the quality and versatility of the collected data; 2) algorithm development and validation to produce a high-quality data product; and 3) scientific studies, primarily of the dynamics of the middle atmosphere. There has been no significant degradation in the HRDI instrument since operations began nearly 8 years ago. HRDI operations are fairly routine, although we have continued to look for ways to improve the quality of the scientific product, either by improving existing modes, or by designing new ones. The HRDI instrument has been programmed to collect data for new scientific studies, such as measurements of fluorescence from plants, measuring cloud top heights, and lower atmosphere H2O.

  2. Time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of hydrated electrons near a liquid water surface.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yo-ichi; Suzuki, Yoshi-Ichi; Tomasello, Gaia; Horio, Takuya; Karashima, Shutaro; Mitríc, Roland; Suzuki, Toshinori

    2014-05-01

    We present time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of trapped electrons near liquid surfaces. Photoemission from the ground state of a hydrated electron at 260 nm is found to be isotropic, while anisotropic photoemission is observed for the excited states of 1,4-diazabicyclo[2,2,2]octane and I- in aqueous solutions. Our results indicate that surface and subsurface species create hydrated electrons in the bulk side. No signature of a surface-bound electron has been observed.

  3. The role of angle-resolved photoemission in understanding the high temperature superconductors.

    SciTech Connect

    Campuzano, J. C.; Kaminski, A.; Fretwell, H.; Mesot, J.; Sato, T.; Takahashi, T.; Norman, M.; Randeria, M.; Kadowaki, K.; Hinks, D.; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; Tohuku Univ.; Tata Inst.; Tsukuba Univ.

    2001-01-01

    The two-dimensional nature of the high temperature superconductors allows the determination of the energy-momentum relationship of electronic states by angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES). Furthermore, the shape of the ARPES spectra provides information on the many body interactions so prevalent in these materials. In this paper we review some results obtained by our group on the question of the existence of quasiparticles and their interactions.

  4. Angle-resolved scattering spectroscopy of explosives using an external cavity quantum cascade laser

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, Jonathan D.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2012-04-01

    Investigation of angle-resolved scattering from solid explosives residues on a car door for non-contact sensing geometries. Illumination with a mid-infrared external cavity quantum cascade laser tuning between 7 and 8 microns was detected both with a sensitive single point detector and a hyperspectral imaging camera. Spectral scattering phenomena were discussed and possibilities for hyperspectral imaging at large scattering angles were outlined.

  5. Detection of microscopic defects in optical fiber coatings using angle-resolved skew rays.

    PubMed

    Chen, George Y; Monro, Tanya M; Lancaster, David G

    2016-09-01

    Microscopic defects in optical fiber coatings can be an impending catastrophe for high-power fiber laser and telecommunications systems and are difficult to detect with conventional methods. We demonstrate a highly sensitive interrogation technique that can readily identify faults such as microscopic nicks, scrapes, low-quality recoatings, and internal defects in fibers and their coatings, based on skew ray excitation and angle-resolved analysis.

  6. Detection of microscopic defects in optical fiber coatings using angle-resolved skew rays.

    PubMed

    Chen, George Y; Monro, Tanya M; Lancaster, David G

    2016-09-01

    Microscopic defects in optical fiber coatings can be an impending catastrophe for high-power fiber laser and telecommunications systems and are difficult to detect with conventional methods. We demonstrate a highly sensitive interrogation technique that can readily identify faults such as microscopic nicks, scrapes, low-quality recoatings, and internal defects in fibers and their coatings, based on skew ray excitation and angle-resolved analysis. PMID:27607966

  7. Time- and Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy of Hydrated Electrons Near a Liquid Water Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yo-ichi; Suzuki, Yoshi-Ichi; Tomasello, Gaia; Horio, Takuya; Karashima, Shutaro; Mitríc, Roland; Suzuki, Toshinori

    2014-05-01

    We present time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of trapped electrons near liquid surfaces. Photoemission from the ground state of a hydrated electron at 260 nm is found to be isotropic, while anisotropic photoemission is observed for the excited states of 1,4-diazabicyclo[2,2,2]octane and I- in aqueous solutions. Our results indicate that surface and subsurface species create hydrated electrons in the bulk side. No signature of a surface-bound electron has been observed.

  8. High-harmonic XUV source for time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dakovski, Georgi L; Li, Yinwan; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Rodriguez, George

    2009-01-01

    We present a laser-based apparatus for visible pump/XUV probe time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (TRARPES) utilizing high-harmonic generation from a noble gas. Femtosecond temporal resolution for each selected harmonic is achieved by using a time-delay-compensated monochromator (TCM). The source has been used to obtain photoemission spectra from insulators (UO{sub 2}) and ultrafast pump/probe processes in semiconductors (GaAs).

  9. Direct Observation of Localized Spin Antiferromagnetic Transition in PdCrO2 by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Han-Jin; Jeong, Jinwon; Chang, Bin; Jeong, Dahee; Moon, Hyun Sook; Cho, En-Jin; Ok, Jong Mok; Kim, Jun Sung; Kim, Kyoo; Min, B. I.; Lee, Han-Koo; Kim, Jae-Young; Park, Byeong-Gyu; Kim, Hyeong-Do; Lee, Seongsu

    2014-01-01

    We report the first case of the successful measurements of a localized spin antiferromagnetic transition in delafossite-type PdCrO2 by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). This demonstrates how to circumvent the shortcomings of ARPES for investigation of magnetism involved with localized spins in limited size of two-dimensional crystals or multi-layer thin films that neutron scattering can hardly study due to lack of bulk compared to surface. Also, our observations give direct evidence for the spin ordering pattern of Cr3+ ions in PdCrO2 suggested by neutron diffraction and quantum oscillation measurements, and provide a strong constraint that has to be satisfied by a microscopic mechanism for the unconventional anomalous Hall effect recently reported in this system. PMID:24419488

  10. Development of a soft X-ray angle-resolved photoemission system applicable to 100 µm crystals

    PubMed Central

    Muro, Takayuki; Kato, Yukako; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Kinoshita, Toyohiko; Watanabe, Yoshio; Okazaki, Hiroyuki; Yokoya, Takayoshi; Sekiyama, Akira; Suga, Shigemasa

    2011-01-01

    A system for angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) of small single crystals with sizes down to 100 µm has been developed. Soft X-ray synchrotron radiation with a spot size of ∼40 µm × 65 µm at the sample position is used for the excitation. Using this system an ARPES measurement has been performed on a Si crystal of size 120 µm × 100 µm × 80 µm. The crystal was properly oriented on a sample stage by measuring the Laue spots. The crystal was cleaved in situ with a microcleaver at 100 K. The cleaved surface was adjusted to the beam spot using an optical microscope. Consequently, clear band dispersions along the Γ–X direction reflecting the bulk electronic states were observed with a photon energy of 879 eV. PMID:21997912

  11. Structural studies of molecular and metallic overlayers using angle- resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.

    1992-10-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) was used to study molecular and metallic overlayers on metal surfaces through analysis of p2mg(2[times]1)CO/Ni(110) and the p(2[times]2)K/Ni(111) adsorption. For the dense p2mg(2[times]1)CO/Ni(110) surface layer, photoemission intensities from C 1s level were measured in three directions at photoelectron kinetic energies 60-400 eV. Using multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) modeling, it was found that CO molecules are adsorbed on short-bridge sites, with adjacent CO along the [110] direction displaced alternatively in opposite directions towards the [001] azimuths to form a zigzag chain geometry. The tilt angle is 16[plus minus]2[degree] from the surface normal for the direction linking the C atom and the center of the Ni bridge. The carbon C-Ni interatomic distance was determined to be 1.94[plus minus]0.02[Angstrom]. The first- to second-layer spacing of Ni is 1.27[plus minus]0.04[Angstrom], up from 1.10[Angstrom] for the clean Ni(110) surface, but close to the 1.25[Angstrom] Ni interlayer spacing in the bulk. The C-O bond length and tilt angle were varied within small ranges (1.10--1.20[Angstrom] and 15--23[degrees]) in our MSSW simulations. Best agreement between experiment and simulations was achieved at 1.16[Angstrom] and 19[degrees]. This yields an O-O distance of 2.95[Angstrom] for the two nearest CO molecules, (van der Waals' radius [approximately] 1.5 [Angstrom] for oxygen). Two different partial-wave phase-shifts were used in MSSW, and structural results from both are in very good agreement. For the p(2[times]2)K/Ni(111) overlayer, ARPEFS [chi](k) curves from K 1s level measured along [111] and [771] at 130K showed that the K atoms are preferentially adsorbed on the atop sites, in agreement with a LEED study of the same system.

  12. Structural studies of molecular and metallic overlayers using angle- resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.

    1992-10-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) was used to study molecular and metallic overlayers on metal surfaces through analysis of p2mg(2{times}1)CO/Ni(110) and the p(2{times}2)K/Ni(111) adsorption. For the dense p2mg(2{times}1)CO/Ni(110) surface layer, photoemission intensities from C 1s level were measured in three directions at photoelectron kinetic energies 60-400 eV. Using multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) modeling, it was found that CO molecules are adsorbed on short-bridge sites, with adjacent CO along the [110] direction displaced alternatively in opposite directions towards the [001] azimuths to form a zigzag chain geometry. The tilt angle is 16{plus_minus}2{degree} from the surface normal for the direction linking the C atom and the center of the Ni bridge. The carbon C-Ni interatomic distance was determined to be 1.94{plus_minus}0.02{Angstrom}. The first- to second-layer spacing of Ni is 1.27{plus_minus}0.04{Angstrom}, up from 1.10{Angstrom} for the clean Ni(110) surface, but close to the 1.25{Angstrom} Ni interlayer spacing in the bulk. The C-O bond length and tilt angle were varied within small ranges (1.10--1.20{Angstrom} and 15--23{degrees}) in our MSSW simulations. Best agreement between experiment and simulations was achieved at 1.16{Angstrom} and 19{degrees}. This yields an O-O distance of 2.95{Angstrom} for the two nearest CO molecules, (van der Waals` radius {approximately} 1.5 {Angstrom} for oxygen). Two different partial-wave phase-shifts were used in MSSW, and structural results from both are in very good agreement. For the p(2{times}2)K/Ni(111) overlayer, ARPEFS {chi}(k) curves from K 1s level measured along [111] and [771] at 130K showed that the K atoms are preferentially adsorbed on the atop sites, in agreement with a LEED study of the same system.

  13. Spectral data of specular reflectance, narrow-angle transmittance and angle-resolved surface scattering of materials for solar concentrators

    PubMed Central

    Good, Philipp; Cooper, Thomas; Querci, Marco; Wiik, Nicolay; Ambrosetti, Gianluca; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    The spectral specular reflectance of conventional and novel reflective materials for solar concentrators is measured with an acceptance angle of 17.5 mrad over the wavelength range 300−2500 nm at incidence angles 15–60° using a spectroscopic goniometry system. The same experimental setup is used to determine the spectral narrow-angle transmittance of semi-transparent materials for solar collector covers at incidence angles 0–60°. In addition, the angle-resolved surface scattering of reflective materials is recorded by an area-scan CCD detector over the spectral range 350–1050 nm. A comprehensive summary, discussion, and interpretation of the results are included in the associated research article “Spectral reflectance, transmittance, and angular scattering of materials for solar concentrators” in Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells. PMID:26862556

  14. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of adsorption process and electronic structure of silver on ZnO(1010).

    PubMed

    Ozawa, K; Sato, T; Kato, M; Edamoto, K; Aiura, Y

    2005-08-01

    The adsorption process and valence band structure of Ag on ZnO(1010) have been investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy utilizing synchrotron radiation. The coverage-dependent measurements of the Ag 4d band structure reveal that the Ag bands with a dispersing feature are formed even at low coverages and that the basic structure of the bands is essentially the same throughout the submonolayer region. These results indicate that the Ag atoms aggregate to form islands with an atomically ordered structure from the low coverages. Upon annealing the Ag-covered surface at 900 K, the Ag 4d band undergoes only a minor change, suggesting that the ordered structure within the Ag islands is persistent against mild annealing. From the dispersive feature of the Ag 4d states, we propose that the atomic structure has locally rectangular symmetry with a good lattice matching with the ZnO(1010) surface.

  15. Valence Electronic Structure of Oxygen-Modified α-Mo2C(0001) Surface:. Angle-Resolved Photoemission Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, M.; Ozawa, K.; Sato, T.; Edamoto, K.

    Adsorption of oxygen on α-Mo2C(0001) is investigated with Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) utilizing synchrotron radiation. It is found that C KLL Auger peak intensity does not change during O2 exposure, indicating that the depletion of C atoms does not proceed. It is deduced from ARPES and LEED results that adsorbed oxygen atoms from a well-ordered (1 × 1) lattice on the α-Mo2C(0001) surface. The ARPES study shows that oxygen adsorption induces a peculiar state around Fermi level (EF). Off-normal-emission measurements prove that the state is a half-filled metallic state.

  16. Spectral data of specular reflectance, narrow-angle transmittance and angle-resolved surface scattering of materials for solar concentrators.

    PubMed

    Good, Philipp; Cooper, Thomas; Querci, Marco; Wiik, Nicolay; Ambrosetti, Gianluca; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    The spectral specular reflectance of conventional and novel reflective materials for solar concentrators is measured with an acceptance angle of 17.5 mrad over the wavelength range 300-2500 nm at incidence angles 15-60° using a spectroscopic goniometry system. The same experimental setup is used to determine the spectral narrow-angle transmittance of semi-transparent materials for solar collector covers at incidence angles 0-60°. In addition, the angle-resolved surface scattering of reflective materials is recorded by an area-scan CCD detector over the spectral range 350-1050 nm. A comprehensive summary, discussion, and interpretation of the results are included in the associated research article "Spectral reflectance, transmittance, and angular scattering of materials for solar concentrators" in Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells.

  17. High-resolution non-contact measurement of the electrical activity of plants in situ using optical recording

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dong-Jie; Chen, Yang; Wang, Zi-Yang; Xue, Lin; Mao, Tong-Lin; Liu, Yi-Min; Wang, Zhong-Yi; Huang, Lan

    2015-01-01

    The limitations of conventional extracellular recording and intracellular recording make high-resolution multisite recording of plant bioelectrical activity in situ challenging. By combining a cooled charge-coupled device camera with a voltage-sensitive dye, we recorded the action potentials in the stem of Helianthus annuus and variation potentials at multiple sites simultaneously with high spatial resolution. The method of signal processing using coherence analysis was used to determine the synchronization of the selected signals. Our results provide direct visualization of the phloem, which is the distribution region of the electrical activities in the stem and leaf of H. annuus, and verify that the phloem is the main action potential transmission route in the stems of higher plants. Finally, the method of optical recording offers a unique opportunity to map the dynamic bioelectrical activity and provides an insight into the mechanisms of long-distance electrical signal transmission in higher plants. PMID:26333536

  18. Comparison of Methods to Map and Measure River Terraces using High-Resolution Airborne LiDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, A. J.; Snyder, N. P.

    2013-12-01

    Fluvial terraces are important recorders of land-use, climate, and tectonic history that form in both erosional and depositional landscapes and consist of a flat surface bounded by valley walls and a steep-sloping scarp adjacent to the river channel. Combining these defining characteristics with high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) surveys, several methods have been developed to identify and map terraces. The goals of this research are to compare some of these existing techniques and develop an objective approach to map terraces over entire watersheds using lidar DEMs. Additionally, we aim to quantify the thickness and volume of fill terrace deposits. Our preliminary application is to the Sheepscot River watershed, Maine, where strath and fill terraces are present and record Pleistocene deglaciation, Holocene eustatic forcing, and Anthropocene land-use change. We identify terraces along the longitudinal profile using an algorithm developed by Finnegan and Balco (2013), that computes the elevation frequency distribution at regularly spaced cross-sections normal to the channel. Next, we delineate terrace spatial extent using three separate methodologies: (1) image processing using Matlab, (2) feature classification algorithms developed by Wood (1996), and (3) image interpretation using manually placed points on known terraces to construct interpolated surfaces (Walter and Merritts, 2008). Lastly, we determine the thickness and volume of fill terrace sediments by subtracting an interpolated, adjacent water surface elevation from the defined terrace points. We compare our LiDAR-based results with field mapping, stratigraphic columns of terrace landforms, and ground penetrating radar over terrace surfaces. These findings suggest powerful new ways to rapidly analyze landscape history over large regions using high-resolution lidar DEMs, with less reliance on detailed and costly field data collection.

  19. Waterline Detection and Monitoring in the German Wadden Sea Using High Resolution Satellite-Based Radar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiehle, S.; Lehner, S.; Pleskachevsky, A.

    2015-04-01

    High resolution TerraSAR-X/TanDEM-X as well as Sentinel-1 remote sensing Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data are used to determine and monitor the waterline in the Wadden Sea. In this very unique and dynamic coastal region in the southeastern North Sea, tidal flats extend several kilometers away from the coast during low tide with features like tidal inlets and sand banks. Under the influence of tidal water currents transporting large amounts of eroded material, inlets and sand banks move over time; heavy storms can even cause large variations in their extensions in merely a few hours. Observation of these obstacles is crucial for maritime security as high ship traffic is caused by the ports of Hamburg, Bremerhaven, Wilhelmshaven and others. Conventional monitoring campaigns with ships or airplanes are economically expensive and can only provide limited coverage. We present an automatic algorithm with Near Real-Time capability for extracting the waterline at the time of recording from SAR images, which allows for a fast and large scale determination of changes in coastal outlines. The comparison of recent acquisitions of TerraSAR-X and Sentinel-1 to bathymetry data of the Elbe estuary obtained in 2010 reveals significant changes in tidal flat structures.

  20. High-resolution Impedance Manometry Measurement of Bolus Flow Time in Achalasia and its Correlation with Dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhiyue; Carlson, Dusty; Dykstra, Kristina; Sternbach, Joel; Hungness, Eric; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Ciolino, Jody D.; Pandolfino, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Background We assessed whether a high-resolution impedance manometry (HRIM) metric, bolus flow time (BFT) across the esophagogastric junction (EGJ), was abnormal in achalasia patients subtyped by the Chicago Classification and compared BFT to other HRM metrics. Methods HRIM studies were performed in 60 achalasia patients (14 type I, 36 type II and 10 type III) and 15 healthy controls. Studies were analyzed with a MATLAB program to calculate BFT using a virtual HRIM sleeve. Integrated relaxation pressure (IRP) and basal end-expiratory EGJ pressure were also calculated. The relationship between BFT and dysphagia symptom scores was assessed using the impaction dysphagia questionnaire (IDQ). Key Results Median BFT was significantly lower in achalasia patients (0.5 s, range 0.0 to 3.5 s) compared to controls (3.5 s, range 2.0 to 5.0 s) (P<0.05). BFT was significantly lower in types I and II than in type III achalasia in both the supine and upright positions (p<0.0001). BFT was the only HRIM metric significantly associated with IDQ score in both the supine (R2 =0.20, p=0.0046) and upright positions (R2 =0.27, p=0.0002). Conclusions & Inferences BFT was significantly reduced in all subtypes of achalasia and complementary to the IRP as a diagnostic discriminant in equivocal achalasia cases. Additionally, BFT had a more robust correlation with dysphagia severity compared to other metrics of EGJ function. PMID:26088614

  1. Electronic structure, Dirac points and Fermi arc surface states in three-dimensional Dirac semimetal Na3Bi from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiji, Liang; Chaoyu, Chen; Zhijun, Wang; Youguo, Shi; Ya, Feng; Hemian, Yi; Zhuojin, Xie; Shaolong, He; Junfeng, He; Yingying, Peng; Yan, Liu; Defa, Liu; Cheng, Hu; Lin, Zhao; Guodong, Liu; Xiaoli, Dong; Jun, Zhang; M, Nakatake; H, Iwasawa; K, Shimada; M, Arita; H, Namatame; M, Taniguchi; Zuyan, Xu; Chuangtian, Chen; Hongming, Weng; Xi, Dai; Zhong, Fang; Xing-Jiang, Zhou

    2016-07-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) Dirac semimetals have linearly dispersive 3D Dirac nodes where the conduction band and valence band are connected. They have isolated 3D Dirac nodes in the whole Brillouin zone and can be viewed as a 3D counterpart of graphene. Recent theoretical calculations and experimental results indicate that the 3D Dirac semimetal state can be realized in a simple stoichiometric compound A 3Bi (A = Na, K, Rb). Here we report comprehensive high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) measurements on the two cleaved surfaces, (001) and (100), of Na3Bi. On the (001) surface, by comparison with theoretical calculations, we provide a proper assignment of the observed bands, and in particular, pinpoint the band that is responsible for the formation of the three-dimensional Dirac cones. We observe clear evidence of 3D Dirac cones in the three-dimensional momentum space by directly measuring on the k x –k y plane and by varying the photon energy to get access to different out-of-plane k z s. In addition, we reveal new features around the Brillouin zone corners that may be related with surface reconstruction. On the (100) surface, our ARPES measurements over a large momentum space raise an issue on the selection of the basic Brillouin zone in the (100) plane. We directly observe two isolated 3D Dirac nodes on the (100) surface. We observe the signature of the Fermi-arc surface states connecting the two 3D Dirac nodes that extend to a binding energy of ∼150 meV before merging into the bulk band. Our observations constitute strong evidence on the existence of the Dirac semimetal state in Na3Bi that are consistent with previous theoretical and experimental work. In addition, our results provide new information to clarify on the nature of the band that forms the 3D Dirac cones, on the possible formation of surface reconstruction of the (001) surface, and on the issue of basic Brillouin zone selection for the (100) surface. Project supported by the

  2. Electronic structure, Dirac points and Fermi arc surface states in three-dimensional Dirac semimetal Na3Bi from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiji, Liang; Chaoyu, Chen; Zhijun, Wang; Youguo, Shi; Ya, Feng; Hemian, Yi; Zhuojin, Xie; Shaolong, He; Junfeng, He; Yingying, Peng; Yan, Liu; Defa, Liu; Cheng, Hu; Lin, Zhao; Guodong, Liu; Xiaoli, Dong; Jun, Zhang; M, Nakatake; H, Iwasawa; K, Shimada; M, Arita; H, Namatame; M, Taniguchi; Zuyan, Xu; Chuangtian, Chen; Hongming, Weng; Xi, Dai; Zhong, Fang; Xing-Jiang, Zhou

    2016-07-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) Dirac semimetals have linearly dispersive 3D Dirac nodes where the conduction band and valence band are connected. They have isolated 3D Dirac nodes in the whole Brillouin zone and can be viewed as a 3D counterpart of graphene. Recent theoretical calculations and experimental results indicate that the 3D Dirac semimetal state can be realized in a simple stoichiometric compound A 3Bi (A = Na, K, Rb). Here we report comprehensive high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) measurements on the two cleaved surfaces, (001) and (100), of Na3Bi. On the (001) surface, by comparison with theoretical calculations, we provide a proper assignment of the observed bands, and in particular, pinpoint the band that is responsible for the formation of the three-dimensional Dirac cones. We observe clear evidence of 3D Dirac cones in the three-dimensional momentum space by directly measuring on the k x -k y plane and by varying the photon energy to get access to different out-of-plane k z s. In addition, we reveal new features around the Brillouin zone corners that may be related with surface reconstruction. On the (100) surface, our ARPES measurements over a large momentum space raise an issue on the selection of the basic Brillouin zone in the (100) plane. We directly observe two isolated 3D Dirac nodes on the (100) surface. We observe the signature of the Fermi-arc surface states connecting the two 3D Dirac nodes that extend to a binding energy of ˜150 meV before merging into the bulk band. Our observations constitute strong evidence on the existence of the Dirac semimetal state in Na3Bi that are consistent with previous theoretical and experimental work. In addition, our results provide new information to clarify on the nature of the band that forms the 3D Dirac cones, on the possible formation of surface reconstruction of the (001) surface, and on the issue of basic Brillouin zone selection for the (100) surface. Project supported by the

  3. Band alignment of HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.18}Al{sub 0.82}N determined by angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Man Hon Samuel E-mail: yeo@ieee.org; Bhuiyan, Maruf Amin; Yeo, Yee-Chia E-mail: yeo@ieee.org; Zhang, Zheng; Pan, Ji Sheng; Tok, Eng Soon

    2014-07-21

    The band-alignment of atomic layer deposited (ALD)-HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.18}Al{sub 0.82}N was studied by high resolution angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The band bending near the HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.18}Al{sub 0.82}N interface was investigated, and the potential variation across the interface was taken into account in the band alignment calculation. It is observed that the binding energies for N 1s and Al 2p in In{sub 0.18}Al{sub 0.82}N decreases and the corresponding extracted valence band offsets increases with increasing θ (i.e., closer to the HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.18}Al{sub 0.82}N interface), as a result of an upward energy band bending towards the HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.18}Al{sub 0.82}N interface. The resultant valence band offset and the conduction band offset for the ALD-HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.18}Al{sub 0.82}N interface calculated was found to be 0.69 eV and 1.01 eV, respectively.

  4. Coexistence of two sharp-mode couplings and their unusual momentum dependence in the superconducting state of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(8+δ) revealed by laser-based angle-resolved photoemission.

    PubMed

    He, Junfeng; Zhang, Wentao; Bok, Jin Mo; Mou, Daixiang; Zhao, Lin; Peng, Yingying; He, Shaolong; Liu, Guodong; Dong, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jun; Wen, J S; Xu, Z J; Gu, G D; Wang, Xiaoyang; Peng, Qinjun; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Shenjin; Yang, Feng; Chen, Chuangtian; Xu, Zuyan; Choi, H-Y; Varma, C M; Zhou, X J

    2013-09-01

    High-resolution laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements have been carried out on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(8+δ) (Bi2212) superconductors to investigate momentum dependence of electron coupling with collective excitations (modes). Two coexisting energy scales are clearly revealed over a large momentum space for the first time in the superconducting state of the overdoped Bi2212 superconductor. These two energy scales exhibit distinct momentum dependence: one keeps its energy near 78 meV over a large momentum space while the other changes its energy from ∼40  meV near the antinodal region to ∼70  meV near the nodal region. These observations provide a new picture on momentum evolution of electron-boson coupling in Bi2212 that electrons are coupled with two sharp modes simultaneously over a large momentum space in the superconducting states. Their unusual momentum dependence poses a challenge to our current understanding of electron-mode-coupling and its role for high-temperature superconductivity in cuprate superconductors.

  5. High Resolution Formaldehyde Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernest, C. T.; Bauer, D.; Hynes, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is the most abundant and most important organic carbonyl compound in the atmosphere. The sources of formaldehyde are the oxidation of methane, isoprene, acetone, and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); fossil fuel combustion; and biomass burning. The dominant loss mechanism for formaldehyde is photolysis which occurs via two pathways: (R1) HCHO + hv → HCO + H (R2) HCHO + hv → H2 + CO The first pathway (R1) is referred to as the radical channel, while the second pathway (R2) is referred to as the molecular channel. The products of both pathways play a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. The CO that is produced in the molecular channel undergoes further oxidation to produce CO2. Under atmospheric conditions, the H atom and formyl radical that are produced in the radical channel undergo rapid reactions with O2 to produce the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) via (R3) and (R4). (R3) HCO + O2 → HO2 + CO (R4) H + O2 → HO2 Thus, for every photon absorbed, the photolysis of formaldehyde can contribute one CO2 molecule to the global greenhouse budget or two HO2 radicals to the tropospheric HOx (OH + HO2) cycle. The HO2 radicals produced during formaldehyde photolysis have also been implicated in the formation of photochemical smog. The HO2 radicals act as radical chain carriers and convert NO to NO2, which ultimately results in the catalytic production of O3. Constraining the yield of HO2 produced via HCHO photolysis is essential for improving tropospheric chemistry models. In this study, both the absorption cross section and the quantum yield of the radical channel (R1) were measured at high resolution over the tropospherically relevant wavelength range 304-330 nm. For the cross section measurements a narrow linewidth Nd:YAG pumped dye laser was used with a multi-pass cell. Partial pressures of HCHO were kept below 0.3 torr. Simultaneous measurement of OH LIF in a flame allowed absolute calibration of the wavelength scale. Pressure

  6. High-resolution headlamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gut, Carsten; Cristea, Iulia; Neumann, Cornelius

    2016-04-01

    The following article shall describe how human vision by night can be influenced. At first, front lighting systems that are already available on the market will be described, followed by their analysis with respect to the positive effects on traffic safety. Furthermore, how traffic safety by night can be increased since the introduction of high resolution headlamps shall be discussed.

  7. Angle-Resolved Photoemission of Solvated Electrons in Sodium-Doped Clusters.

    PubMed

    West, Adam H C; Yoder, Bruce L; Luckhaus, David; Saak, Clara-Magdalena; Doppelbauer, Maximilian; Signorell, Ruth

    2015-04-16

    Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of the unpaired electron in sodium-doped water, methanol, ammonia, and dimethyl ether clusters is presented. The experimental observations and the complementary calculations are consistent with surface electrons for the cluster size range studied. Evidence against internally solvated electrons is provided by the photoelectron angular distribution. The trends in the ionization energies seem to be mainly determined by the degree of hydrogen bonding in the solvent and the solvation of the ion core. The onset ionization energies of water and methanol clusters do not level off at small cluster sizes but decrease slightly with increasing cluster size.

  8. First-principles and angle-resolved photoemission study of lithium doped metallic black phosphorous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanna, A.; Fedorov, A. V.; Verbitskiy, N. I.; Fink, J.; Krellner, C.; Petaccia, L.; Chikina, A.; Usachov, D. Yu; Grüneis, A.; Profeta, G.

    2016-06-01

    First principles calculations demonstrate the metallization of phosphorene by means of Li doping filling the unoccupied antibonding p z states. The electron–phonon coupling in the metallic phase is strong enough to eventually lead to a superconducting phase at T c = 17 K for LiP8 stoichiometry. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy we confirm that the surface of black phosphorus can be chemically functionalized using Li atoms which donate their 2s electron to the conduction band. The combined theoretical and experimental study demonstrates the semiconductor-metal transition indicating a feasible way to induce a superconducting phase in phosphorene and few-layer black phosphorus.

  9. Simple surface structure determination from Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Y. |; Shirley, D.A.

    1995-02-01

    The authors show by Fourier analyses of experimental data, with no further treatment, that the positions of all the strong peaks in Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) from adsorbed surfaces can be explicitly predicted from a trial structure with an accuracy of about {+-} 0.3 {angstrom} based on a single-scattering cluster model together with the concept of a strong backscattering cone, and without any additional analysis. This characteristic of ARPEFS Fourier transforms can be developed as a simple method for determining the structures of adsorbed surfaces to an accuracy of about {+-} 0.1 {angstrom}.

  10. Use of angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy in the study of autoionization in molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    A discussion is made of the types of information available from angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy coupled to synchrotron radiation that can be used to study the dynamics of autoionization in molecules. In particular, the importance is brought out of studying the changes in the angular distribution parameter, ..beta.., as one goes over an autoionization resonance. To illustrate this discussion, recent unpublished data are presented on N/sub 2/O, N/sub 2/, and HI, which have employed the CIS (constant ionic state) method to yield simultaneous cross sections and ..beta.. values over various regions of autoionization. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  11. First-principles and angle-resolved photoemission study of lithium doped metallic black phosphorous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanna, A.; Fedorov, A. V.; Verbitskiy, N. I.; Fink, J.; Krellner, C.; Petaccia, L.; Chikina, A.; Usachov, D. Yu; Grüneis, A.; Profeta, G.

    2016-06-01

    First principles calculations demonstrate the metallization of phosphorene by means of Li doping filling the unoccupied antibonding p z states. The electron-phonon coupling in the metallic phase is strong enough to eventually lead to a superconducting phase at T c = 17 K for LiP8 stoichiometry. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy we confirm that the surface of black phosphorus can be chemically functionalized using Li atoms which donate their 2s electron to the conduction band. The combined theoretical and experimental study demonstrates the semiconductor-metal transition indicating a feasible way to induce a superconducting phase in phosphorene and few-layer black phosphorus.

  12. High-resolution ionospheric observations and modeling over Belgium during the solar eclipse of 20 March 2015 including first results of ionospheric tilt and plasma drift measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhulst, Tobias G. W.; Sapundjiev, Danislav; Stankov, Stanimir M.

    2016-06-01

    The ionospheric behavior over Belgium during the partial solar eclipse of 20 March 2015 is analyzed based on high-resolution solar radio flux, vertical incidence sounding, and GPS TEC measurements. First results of ionosonde-based ionospheric plasma drift and tilt observations are presented and analyzed, including some traveling ionospheric disturbances caused by the eclipse. Also, collocated ionosonde and GPS measurements are used to reconstruct the time evolution of the vertical electron density distribution using the Royal Meteorological Institute (RMI) ionospheric specification system, called Local Ionospheric Electron Density profile Reconstruction (LIEDR).

  13. Turbulence sources, character, and effects in the stable boundary layer: Insights from multi-scale direct numerical simulations and new, high-resolution measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritts, Dave; Wang, Ling; Balsley, Ben; Lawrence, Dale

    2013-04-01

    A number of sources contribute to intermittent small-scale turbulence in the stable boundary layer (SBL). These include Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI), gravity wave (GW) breaking, and fluid intrusions, among others. Indeed, such sources arise naturally in response to even very simple "multi-scale" superpositions of larger-scale GWs and smaller-scale GWs, mean flows, or fine structure (FS) throughout the atmosphere and the oceans. We describe here results of two direct numerical simulations (DNS) of these GW-FS interactions performed at high resolution and high Reynolds number that allow exploration of these turbulence sources and the character and effects of the turbulence that arises in these flows. Results include episodic turbulence generation, a broad range of turbulence scales and intensities, PDFs of dissipation fields exhibiting quasi-log-normal and more complex behavior, local turbulent mixing, and "sheet and layer" structures in potential temperature that closely resemble high-resolution measurements. Importantly, such multi-scale dynamics differ from their larger-scale, quasi-monochromatic gravity wave or quasi-horizontally homogeneous shear flow instabilities in significant ways. The ability to quantify such multi-scale dynamics with new, very high-resolution measurements is also advancing rapidly. New in-situ sensors on small, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), balloons, or tethered systems are enabling definition of SBL (and deeper) environments and turbulence structure and dissipation fields with high spatial and temporal resolution and precision. These new measurement and modeling capabilities promise significant advances in understanding small-scale instability and turbulence dynamics, in quantifying their roles in mixing, transport, and evolution of the SBL environment, and in contributing to improved parameterizations of these dynamics in mesoscale, numerical weather prediction, climate, and general circulation models. We expect such measurement

  14. Water erosion as a cause for agricultural soil loss: modeling of dynamic processes using high-resolution ground based LiDAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oz, Imri; Filin, Sagi; Assouline, Shmuel; Shtain, Zachi; Furman, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion by rainfall and water flow is a frequent natural geomorphic process shaping the earth's surface at various scales. Conventional agrotechnical methods enhance soil erosion at the field scale and are at the origin of the reduction of the upper soil layer depth. This reduction is expressed in two aspects: decrease of soil depth, mainly due to erosion, and the diminution of soil quality, mainly due to the loss of fine material, nutrients and organic matter. Rain events, not even the most extremes, cause detachment and transport of fertile soil rich in organic matter and nutrients away from the fields, filling and plugging drainage channels, blocking infrastructure and contaminating water sources. Empirical, semi-empirical and mechanistic models are available to estimate soil erosion by water flow and sediment transport (e.g. WEPP, KINEROSS, EUROSEM). Calibration of these models requires data measured at high spatial and temporal resolutions. Development of high-resolution measurement tools (for both spatial and temporal aspects) should improve the calibration of functions related to particles detachment and transport from the soil surface. In addition, despite the great impact of different tillage systems on the soil erosion process, the vast majority of the models ignore this fundamental factor. The objective of this study is to apply high-resolution ground-based LiDAR measurements to different tillage schemes and scales to improve the ability of models to accurately describe the process of soil erosion induced by rainfall and overland flow. Ground-based laser scans provide high resolution accurate and subtle geomorphic changes, as well as larger-scale deformations. As such, it allows frequent monitoring, so that even the effect of a single storm can be measured, thus improving the calibration of the erosion models. Preliminary results for scans made in the field show the potential and limitations of ground-based LiDAR, and at this point qualitatively can

  15. Technical Note: Skin thickness measurements using high-resolution flat-panel cone-beam dedicated breast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Linxi; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew; O'Connell, Avice M.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the mean and range of location-averaged breast skin thickness using high-resolution dedicated breast CT for use in Monte Carlo-based estimation of normalized glandular dose coefficients. Methods: This study retrospectively analyzed image data from a clinical study investigating dedicated breast CT. An algorithm similar to that described by Huang et al.['The effect of skin thickness determined using breast CT on mammographic dosimetry,' Med. Phys. 35(4), 1199-1206 (2008)] was used to determine the skin thickness in 137 dedicated breast CT volumes from 136 women. The location-averaged mean breast skin thickness for each breast was estimated and the study population mean and range were determined. Pathology results were available for 132 women, and were used to investigate if the distribution of location-averaged mean breast skin thickness varied with pathology. The effect of surface fitting to account for breast curvature was also studied. Results: The study mean ({+-} interbreast SD) for breast skin thickness was 1.44 {+-} 0.25 mm (range: 0.87-2.34 mm), which was in excellent agreement with Huang et al. Based on pathology, pair-wise statistical analysis (Mann-Whitney test) indicated that at the 0.05 significance level, there were no significant difference in the location-averaged mean breast skin thickness distributions between the groups: benign vs malignant (p= 0.223), benign vs hyperplasia (p= 0.651), hyperplasia vs malignant (p= 0.229), and malignant vs nonmalignant (p= 0.172). Conclusions: Considering this study used a different clinical prototype system, and the study participants were from a different geographical location, the observed agreement between the two studies suggests that the choice of 1.45 mm thick skin layer comprising the epidermis and the dermis for breast dosimetry is appropriate. While some benign and malignant conditions could cause skin thickening, in this study cohort the location-averaged mean breast skin thickness

  16. High-resolution measurement and mapping of tungstate in waters, soils and sediments using the low-disturbance DGT sampling technique.

    PubMed

    Guan, Dong-Xing; Williams, Paul N; Xu, Hua-Cheng; Li, Gang; Luo, Jun; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-10-01

    Increasing tungsten (W) use for industrial and military applications has resulted in greater W discharge into natural waters, soils and sediments. Risk modeling of W transport and fate in the environment relies on measurement of the release/mobilization flux of W in the bulk media and the interfaces between matrix compartments. Diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT) is a promising passive sampling technique to acquire such information. DGT devices equipped with the newly developed high-resolution binding gels (precipitated zirconia, PZ, or ferrihydrite, PF, gels) or classic/conventional ferrihydrite slurry gel were comprehensively assessed for measuring W in waters. (Ferrihydrite)DGT can measure W at various ionic strengths (0.001-0.5molL(-1) NaNO3) and pH (4-8), while (PZ)DGT can operate across slightly wider environmental conditions. The three DGT configurations gave comparable results for soil W measurement, showing that typically W resupply is relatively poorly sustained. 1D and 2D high-resolution W profiling across sediment-water and hotspot-bulk media interfaces from Lake Taihu were obtained using (PZ)DGT coupled with laser ablation ICP-MS measurement, and the apparent diffusion fluxes across the interfaces were calculated using a numerical model. PMID:27209520

  17. a universal regulation for the angle resolved transport properties of Dirac cones and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenzhu; Liu, Zhirong

    A universal regulation for the angle resolved transport properties of two-dimensional (2D) Dirac cones, such as graphene, graphynes or even beyond, was established for the first time. The anisotropy and isotropy properties of 2D Dirac cones were investigated theoretically combining with first-principles calculation. It was found the moving direction of Dirac cones (θmove) varies with the strain orientation (θq) can be approximately described by a linear law. Moreover, θmove is related the hopping (S12) between two bases with respective to the strain. The coefficients, ax, ay, aγ in the taylor expansion formula of S12 and strain were determined with DFT calculations. Graphene and graphynes were calculated to check the universality of the theory, which turns out to be working well. This new regulation could also be recommended into semiconductive systems to predict their transport behaviors, such as phosphorene or MoS2, whose angle resolved transport properties have been widely investigated experimentally for comparison.

  18. Is the Separable Propagator Perturbation Approach Accurate in Calculating Angle Resolved Photoelectron Diffraction Spectra?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. N.; Chu, T. P.; Wu, Huasheng; Tong, S. Y.; Huang, Hong

    1997-03-01

    We compare multiple scattering results of angle-resolved photoelectron diffraction spectra between the exact slab method and the separable propagator perturbation method. In the slab method,footnote C.H. Li, A.R. Lubinsky and S.Y. Tong, Phys. Rev. B17, 3128 (1978). the source wave and multiple scattering within the strong scattering atomic layers are expanded in spherical waves while interlayer scattering is expressed in plane waves. The transformation between spherical waves and plane waves is done exactly. The plane waves are then matched across the solid-vacuum interface to a single outgoing plane wave in the detector's direction. The separable propagator perturbation approach uses two approximations: (i) A separable representation of the Green's function propagator and (ii) A perturbation expansion of multiple scattering terms. Results of c(2x2) S-Ni(001) show that this approximate method fails to converge due to the very slow convergence of the separable representation for scattering angles less than 90^circ. However, this method is accurate in the backscattering regime and may be applied to XAFS calculations.(J.J. Rehr and R.C. Albers, Phys. Rev. B41, 8139 (1990).) The use of this method for angle-resolved photoelectron diffraction spectra is substantially less reliable.

  19. High-Resolution Autoradiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towe, George C; Gomberg, Henry J; Freemen, J W

    1955-01-01

    This investigation was made to adapt wet-process autoradiography to metallurgical samples to obtain high resolution of segregated radioactive elements in microstructures. Results are confined to development of the technique, which was perfected to a resolution of less than 10 microns. The radioactive samples included carbon-14 carburized iron and steel, nickel-63 electroplated samples, a powder product containing nickel-63, and tungsten-185 in N-155 alloy.

  20. Ultra high resolution tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, W.S.

    1994-11-15

    Recent work and results on ultra high resolution three dimensional imaging with soft x-rays will be presented. This work is aimed at determining microscopic three dimensional structure of biological and material specimens. Three dimensional reconstructed images of a microscopic test object will be presented; the reconstruction has a resolution on the order of 1000 A in all three dimensions. Preliminary work with biological samples will also be shown, and the experimental and numerical methods used will be discussed.

  1. SAFE for PTSD: noncontact psychophysiological measure based on high-resolution thermal imaging to aid in PTSD diagnosis and assessment of treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Familoni, Babajide O.; Ma, Lein; Hutchinson, J. Andrew; Morgan, C. Andrew, III; Rasmusson, Ann; O'Kane, Barbara L.

    2012-06-01

    Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) sometimes develops following exposure to very stressful or traumatic events such as motor vehicle accidents, rape, and war. It is arguably the signature injury of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Previous studies have demonstrated that PTSD sufferers exhibit autonomic hyper-responsiveness to both neutral and trauma-related stimuli. In this study, we propose using high resolution thermal imaging of sweat-pores to obtain a noncontact, remote, and quantifiable measure of the sympathetic autonomic nervous reactivity to guide diagnosis, assess response to treatment, and tease out important cues to suicidality as a PTSD comorbidity.

  2. Flat-field grating spectrometer for high-resolution soft x-ray and EUV measurements on an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P; Magee, E; Trabert, E; Chen, H; Lepson, J K; Gu, M F; Schmidt, M

    2004-03-27

    A R = 44.3 m grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Angstrom up to 50 Angstrom. The instrument uses a grating with variable line spacing (about 2400 l/mm) for a flat field of view. Spectra are recorded with a back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The new instrument greatly improves upon the resolution achieved with existing grating spectrometers and complements crystal spectrometers at the shorter wavelengths both in terms of wavelength coverage and polarization independent reflectivity response.

  3. Measurement of the retinal arteriolar response to a hyperoxic provocation in nonsmokers and smokers, using a high-resolution confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O' Halloran, Margaret; O'Donoghue, Eamonn; Dainty, Chris

    2014-07-01

    We used a high-resolution confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope to measure the magnitude of change in retinal arteriolar diameters in response to oxygen breathing in young, healthy nonsmokers and smokers. Image sequences were obtained before and during oxygen breathing. Image sequences were desinusoided, registered, and averaged, before vessel diameters were measured using a sliding linear regression filter. Arteriole diameters were observed to constrict during the first 5 min. of oxygen breathing, plateau, and remain stable while hyperoxia was maintained, returning to baseline at the end of the hyperoxic period. Blood flow to the temporal retina was found to be higher than to the nasal retina (p=0.008). The percentage constriction of vessels did not vary across retinal quadrants (p=0.372, analysis of variance) and did not depend on vessel size (p=0.538). Baseline diameters were unaffected by acute cigarette smoking. The magnitude of vasoconstriction was diminished in smokers compared to nonsmokers (p=0.017), while acute smoking did not influence the percentage constriction attained by the vessels (p=0.621). Using a high-resolution imaging technique allowed us to measure reactivity to a high degree of accuracy and to assess it in vessels of smaller caliber than were previously studied.

  4. Eddy covariance measurements with high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry: a new approach to chemically-resolved aerosol fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, D. K.; Kimmel, J. R.; Phillips, G.; Docherty, K. S.; Worsnop, D. R.; Sueper, D.; Nemitz, E.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    Although laboratory studies show that biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) yield substantial secondary organic aerosol (SOA), production of biogenic SOA as indicated by upward fluxes has not been conclusively observed over forests. Further, while aerosols are known to deposit to surfaces, few techniques exist to provide chemically-resolved particle deposition fluxes. To better constrain aerosol sources and sinks, we have developed a new technique to directly measure fluxes of chemically-resolved submicron aerosols using the high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) in a new, fast eddy covariance mode. This approach takes advantage of the instrument's ability to quantitatively identify both organic and inorganic components, including ammonium, sulphate and nitrate, at a temporal resolution of several Hz. The new approach has been successfully deployed over a temperate ponderosa pine plantation in California during the BEARPEX-2007 campaign, providing both total and chemically resolved non-refractory (NR) PM1 fluxes. Average deposition velocity for total NR-PM1 aerosol at noon was 2.05 ± 0.04 mm/s. Using a high resolution measurement of the NH2+ and NH3+ fragments, we demonstrate the first eddy covariance flux measurements of particulate ammonium, which show a noon-time deposition velocity of 1.9 ± 0.7 mm/s and are dominated by deposition of ammonium sulphate.

  5. Eddy covariance measurements with high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry: a new approach to chemically resolved aerosol fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, D. K.; Kimmel, J. R.; Phillips, G.; Docherty, K. S.; Worsnop, D. R.; Sueper, D.; Nemitz, E.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2011-06-01

    Although laboratory studies show that biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) yield substantial secondary organic aerosol (SOA), production of biogenic SOA as indicated by upward fluxes has not been conclusively observed over forests. Further, while aerosols are known to deposit to surfaces, few techniques exist to provide chemically-resolved particle deposition fluxes. To better constrain aerosol sources and sinks, we have developed a new technique to directly measure fluxes of chemically-resolved submicron aerosols using the high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) in a new, fast eddy covariance mode. This approach takes advantage of the instrument's ability to quantitatively identify both organic and inorganic components, including ammonium, sulphate and nitrate, at a temporal resolution of several Hz. The new approach has been successfully deployed over a temperate ponderosa pine plantation in California during the BEARPEX-2007 campaign, providing both total and chemically resolved non-refractory (NR) PM1 fluxes. Average deposition velocities for total NR-PM1 aerosol at noon were 2.05 ± 0.04 mm s-1. Using a high resolution measurement of the NH2+ and NH3+ fragments, we demonstrate the first eddy covariance flux measurements of particulate ammonium, which show a noon-time deposition velocity of 1.9 ± 0.7 mm s-1 and are dominated by deposition of ammonium sulphate.

  6. High-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer for temperature measurements of low-Z ions emitting in the 100-300 Å spectral band.

    PubMed

    Widmann, K; Beiersdorfer, P; Magee, E W; Boyle, D P; Kaita, R; Majeski, R

    2014-11-01

    We have constructed a high-resolution grazing-incidence spectrometer designed for measuring the ion temperature of low-Z elements, such as Li(+) or Li(2 +), which radiate near 199 Å and 135 Å, respectively. Based on measurements at the Livermore Electron Beam Ion Trap we have shown that the instrumental resolution is better than 48 mÅ at the 200 Å setting and better than 40 mÅ for the 135-Å range. Such a high spectral resolution corresponds to an instrumental limit for line-width based temperature measurements of about 45 eV for the 199 Å Li(+) and 65 eV for the 135 Å Li(2 +) lines. Recently obtained survey spectra from the Lithium Tokamak Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory show the presence of these lithium emission lines and the expected core ion temperature of approximately 70 eV is sufficiently high to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing our high-resolution spectrometer as an ion-temperature diagnostic.

  7. High-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer for temperature measurements of low-Z ions emitting in the 100–300 Å spectral band

    SciTech Connect

    Widmann, K. Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Boyle, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.

    2014-11-15

    We have constructed a high-resolution grazing-incidence spectrometer designed for measuring the ion temperature of low-Z elements, such as Li{sup +} or Li{sup 2+}, which radiate near 199 Å and 135 Å, respectively. Based on measurements at the Livermore Electron Beam Ion Trap we have shown that the instrumental resolution is better than 48 mÅ at the 200 Å setting and better than 40 mÅ for the 135-Å range. Such a high spectral resolution corresponds to an instrumental limit for line-width based temperature measurements of about 45 eV for the 199 Å Li{sup +} and 65 eV for the 135 Å Li{sup 2+} lines. Recently obtained survey spectra from the Lithium Tokamak Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory show the presence of these lithium emission lines and the expected core ion temperature of approximately 70 eV is sufficiently high to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing our high-resolution spectrometer as an ion-temperature diagnostic.

  8. Developing and testing a low cost method for high resolution measurements of volcanic water vapour emissions at Vulcano and Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pering, Tom D.; McGonigle, Andrew J. S.; Tamburello, Giancarlo; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Bitetto, Marcello; Rubino, Cosimo

    2015-04-01

    The most voluminous of emissions from volcanoes are from water vapour (H2O) (Carroll and Holloway, 1994), however, measurements of this species receive little focus due to the difficulty of independent measurement, largely a result of high atmospheric background concentrations which often undergo rapid fluctuations. A feasible method of measuring H2O emissions at high temporal and spatial resolutions would therefore be highly valuable. We describe a new and low-cost method combining modified web cameras (i.e. with infrared filters removed) with measurements of temperature and relative humidity to produce high resolution measurements (≈ 0.25 Hz) of H2O emissions. The cameras are affixed with near-infrared filters at points where water vapour absorbs (940 nm) and doesn't absorb (850 nm) incident light. Absorption of H2O is then determined by using Lambert-Beer's law on a pixel by pixel basis, producing a high spatial resolution image. The system is then calibrated by placing a Multi-GAS unit within the gas source and camera field-of-view, which measures; SO2, CO2, H2S and relative humidity. By combining the point measurements of the Multi-GAS unit with pixel values for absorption, first correcting for the width of the gas source (generally a Gaussian distribution), a calibration curve is produced which allows the conversion of absorption values to mass of water within a pixel. In combination with relative humidity measurements made outside of the plume it is then possible to subtract the non-volcanic background H2O concentration to produce a high resolution calibrated volcanic H2O flux. This technique is demonstrated in detail at the active fumarolic system on Vulcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy). Data processing and image acquisition was completed in Matlab® using a purpose built code. The technique is also demonstrated for the plume of the North-East Crater of Mt. Etna (Sicily, Italy). Here, contemporaneously acquired measurements of SO2 using a UV camera, combined

  9. X-ray rocking curve measurements of bent crystals. [used in High Resolution Spectrometer in Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakim, M. B.; Muney, W. S.; Fowler, W. B.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1988-01-01

    A three-crystal laboratory X-ray spectrometer is used to measure the Bragg reflection from concave cylindrically curved crystals to be used in the high-resolution X-ray spectrometer of the NASA Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). The first two crystals, in the dispersive (1.1) arrangement, select a narrow collimated monochromatic beam in the Cu K-alpha(1) line at 1.5 A (8.1 keV), which illuminates the test crystal. The angular centroids of rocking curves measured along the surface provide a measure of the conformity of the crystal to the desired radius of curvature. Individual and combined rocking-curve widths and areas provide a measure of the resolution and efficiency at 1.54 A. The crystals analyzed included LiF(200), PET, and acid phthalates such as TAP.

  10. Development of a High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Measurement of Ion-Temperature and Rotation-Velocity Profiles in Fusion Energy Research Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K W; Broennimann, Ch; Eikenberry, E F; Ince-Cushman, A; Lee, S G; Rice, J E; Scott, S

    2008-02-27

    A new imaging high resolution x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) has been developed to measure continuous profiles of ion temperature and rotation velocity in fusion plasmas. Following proof-of-principle tests on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak and the NSTX spherical tokamak, and successful testing of a new silicon, pixilated detector with 1MHz count rate capability per pixel, an imaging XCS is being designed to measure full profiles of Ti and vφ on C-Mod. The imaging XCS design has also been adopted for ITER. Ion-temperature uncertainty and minimum measurable rotation velocity are calculated for the C-Mod spectrometer. The affects of x-ray and nuclear-radiation background on the measurement uncertainties are calculated to predict performance on ITER.

  11. Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy Studies of the Mott Insulator to Superconductor Evolution in Ca2-xNaxCuO2Cl2

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Kyle Michael

    2005-09-02

    It is widely believed that many of the exotic physical properties of the high-T{sub c} cuprate superconductors arise from the proximity of these materials to the strongly correlated, antiferromagnetic Mott insulating state. Therefore, one of the fundamental questions in the field of high-temperature superconductivity is to understand the insulator-to-superconductor transition and precisely how the electronic structure of Mott insulator evolves as the first holes are doped into the system. This dissertation presents high-resolution, doping dependent angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) studies of the cuprate superconductor Ca{sub 2-x}Na{sub x}CuO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, spanning from the undoped parent Mott insulator to a high-temperature superconductor with a T{sub c} of 22 K. A phenomenological model is proposed to explain how the spectral lineshape, the quasiparticle band dispersion, and the chemical potential all progress with doping in a logical and self-consistent framework. This model is based on Franck-Condon broadening observed in polaronic systems where strong electron-boson interactions cause the quasiparticle residue, Z, to be vanishingly small. Comparisons of the low-lying states to different electronic states in the valence band strongly suggest that the coupling of the photohole to the lattice (i.e. lattice polaron formation) is the dominant broadening mechanism for the lower Hubbard band states. Combining this polaronic framework with high-resolution ARPES measurements finally provides a resolution to the long-standing controversy over the behavior of the chemical potential in the high-T{sub c} cuprates. This scenario arises from replacing the conventional Fermi liquid quasiparticle interpretation of the features in the Mott insulator by a Franck-Condon model, allowing the reassignment of the position of the quasiparticle pole. As a function of hole doping, the chemical potential shifts smoothly into the valence band while spectral weight is transferred

  12. Obtaining biophysical measurements of woody vegetation from high resolution digital aerial photography in tropical and arid environments: Northern Territory, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staben, G. W.; Lucieer, A.; Evans, K. G.; Scarth, P.; Cook, G. D.

    2016-10-01

    Biophysical parameters obtained from woody vegetation are commonly measured using field based techniques which require significant investment in resources. Quantitative measurements of woody vegetation provide important information for ecological studies investigating landscape change. The fine spatial resolution of aerial photography enables identification of features such as trees and shrubs. Improvements in spatial and spectral resolution of digital aerial photographic sensors have increased the possibility of using these data in quantitative remote sensing. Obtaining biophysical measurements from aerial photography has the potential to enable it to be used as a surrogate for the collection of field data. In this study quantitative measurements obtained from digital aerial photography captured at ground sampling distance (GSD) of 15 cm (n = 50) and 30 cm (n = 52) were compared to woody biophysical parameters measured from 1 ha field plots. Supervised classification of the aerial photography using object based image analysis was used to quantify woody and non-woody vegetation components in the imagery. There was a high correlation (r ≥ 0.92) between all field measured woody canopy parameters and aerial derived green woody cover measurements, however only foliage projective cover (FPC) was found to be statistically significant (paired t-test; α = 0.01). There was no significant difference between measurements derived from imagery captured at either GSD of 15 cm and 30 cm over the same field site (n = 20). Live stand basal area (SBA) (m2 ha-1) was predicted from the aerial photographs by applying an allometric equation developed between field-measured live SBA and woody FPC. The results show that there was very little difference between live SBA predicted from FPC measured in the field or from aerial photography. The results of this study show that accurate woody biophysical parameters can be obtained from aerial photography from a range of woody vegetation

  13. High-pressure and high-temperature mineral-fluid interface cell for high-resolution x-ray reflectivity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Changyong; Kenney-Benson, Curtis

    2013-06-01

    Ordering of water at the mineral-fluid interface is a fundamental process governing mineral hydration, ion-adsorption, dissolution, growth, and charge transfers across the mineral surface. However, the influence of pressure and temperature on this fundamental process is still largely unknown. The experimental determination is limited due to the lack of a sample cell which can properly handle the pressure and temperature of the fluidic component and simultaneously allow measurement of the interfacial structure, e.g., by high-resolution x-ray reflectivity. We recently developed a new high-pressure and high-temperature mineral-fluid interface cell to achieve the high-resolution x-ray reflectivity measurement from single crystalline mineral surfaces under the PT conditions of fluid up to ~750 K and ~40 MPa. The interfacial structures at single crystal mineral surfaces interacting with various hydrothermal fluids will promote our understanding of the molecular aspects of hydrous alteration processes of rocks in deep Earth environments. The application can be extended to mineral surface sciences, geological carbon sequestration, and nuclear engineering. Instrumental development under auspices of Deep Carbon Observatory Deep Energy Directorate and HPCAT (CDAC, GL, LLNL, UNLV).

  14. High-Resolution Temperature-Dependent Photoabsorption Cross Section Measurements of S2, with Application to HST UV Spectra of SL9/Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. Y. Robert

    1997-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) UV spectra of Jupiter after the collision of Comet SL9 show predominantly molecular features of S2, CS2, NH3, and H2S in the 1800-3200 A region. The HST observations were made under various phases of impact conditions which gave temperatures higher than 1000 K. It is thus clear that temperature-dependent laboratory cross section data are required in order to determine the molecular abundances in Jupiter's atmosphere after the impact of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9. The required high-resolution temperature dependent S2 absorption cross sections have not been directly measured in the laboratory. To provide the required data for modelers our objective is to accurately measure the high-resolution (FWHM = 0.003 A) and medium resolution (FWHM - 0.08 A) temperature dependent S2 in the 2450-3200 A region. Using the experimental setup we have obtained absorbtion spectra of S2 under various temperature conditions.

  15. High resolution Microwave Spectrometer Sounder (HIMSS) instrument program. Appendix: TRMM study (an instrument for NASA's tropical rainfall measuring mission)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobl, E. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The TRMM (Tropical Rain Measuring Mission) Study shows the feasibility of a conically scanned, total power radiometer. The heritage of the TRMM radiometer is the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) flying for the Air Force DMSP.

  16. High-resolution measurements of morphodynamics in rapidly changing PROglacial Systems of the Alps - results from the PROSA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilger, Ludwig; Dusik, Jana-Marie; Heckmann, Tobias; Haas, Florian; Näher, Martin; Philipp, Rumohr; Philipp, Glira; Lucas, Vehling; Michael, Becht

    2016-04-01

    In June 2012, the PROSA-project was initiated with the goal to construct a sediment budget of the Upper Kaunertal Valley, Ötztal Alps, Austria. A unique feature of the project being the dedicated usage of study-area wide multi-volume LiDAR survey data of relatively high density on a meso-scale catchment resulting in a data base of over 4 billion LiDAR measurement points. A high effort was undertaken to produce classified point data as a methodological backbone of the project. Both ALS and georeferenced TLS data as well as other remote sensing and mapping products were used in addition to extensive fieldwork as basis for a regionalization of monitoring-site based measurements to arrive at basin-wide sediment production rates and identification of sediment pathways. Results can now be presented for: Rock fall (plot-based measurement and subsequent model-based regionalization), debris flows (study area-wide direct measurement from LiDAR and analysis of historical orthophotos), rock glaciers (feature-tracking and direct differencing), hillslope channels (plot-based measurements and model-based regionalization) and avalanches (sample site measurement, mapping and extrapolation). Sediment budgets were subsequently constructed for different representative subsystems within the 62.5 km2 catchment. Although also glacier and main channel transport was looked into by the PROSA-project, the presentation will focus on the processes mentioned above.

  17. Joint space width measures cartilage thickness in osteoarthritis of the knee: high resolution plain film and double contrast macroradiographic investigation.

    PubMed Central

    Buckland-Wright, J C; Macfarlane, D G; Lynch, J A; Jasani, M K; Bradshaw, C R

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To test reliability of joint space width (JSW) measurements as a predictor of cartilage thickness in knees of patients with osteoarthritis (OA), using high definition microfocal radiography. METHOD--JSW was measured from weight bearing plain film macroradiographs taken in the tunnel view and compared with the sum of femoral and tibial cartilage thicknesses measured from double contrast macroarthrograms of the same regions of the same knees obtained in the non-weight bearing lateral position. RESULTS--All knees had medial compartment OA. Comparison of the JSW with the sum of the tibial and femoral cartilage thicknesses revealed a highly significant correlation (p < 0.0001) between the two measurements in the medial but not the lateral compartment. In the middle region of both compartments, JSW was smaller than the cartilage thickness, indicating that, on standing, the curvature of the femoral condyles compressed the cartilage in this region. CONCLUSIONS--JSW reliably measured cartilage thickness in the medial but not the lateral compartment of knees with medial compartment OA. Depending upon the stage of OA disease, JSW reliably reflects cartilage thinning and compression. Images PMID:7763102

  18. Temporal measurement and analysis of high-resolution spectral signatures of plants and relationships to biophysical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostater, Charles R., Jr.; Rebbman, Jan; Hall, Carlton; Provancha, Mark; Vieglais, David

    1995-11-01

    Measurements of temporal reflectance signatures as a function of growing season for sand live oak (Quercus geminata), myrtle oak (Q. myrtifolia, and saw palmetto (Serenoa repens) were collected during a two year study period. Canopy level spectral reflectance signatures, as a function of 252 channels between 368 and 1115 nm, were collected using near nadir viewing geometry and a consistent sun illumination angle. Leaf level reflectance measurements were made in the laboratory using a halogen light source and an environmental optics chamber with a barium sulfate reflectance coating. Spectral measurements were related to several biophysical measurements utilizing optimal passive ambient correlation spectroscopy (OPACS) technique. Biophysical parameters included percent moisture, water potential (MPa), total chlorophyll, and total Kjeldahl nitrogen. Quantitative data processing techniques were used to determine optimal bands based on the utilization of a second order derivative or inflection estimator. An optical cleanup procedure was then employed that computes the double inflection ratio (DIR) spectra for all possible three band combinations normalized to the previously computed optimal bands. These results demonstrate a unique approach to the analysis of high spectral resolution reflectance signatures for estimation of several biophysical measures of plants at the leaf and canopy level from optimally selected bands or bandwidths.

  19. High Frequency Transducer Dedicated to the High-resolution in Situ Measurement of the Distance between Two Nuclear Fuel Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaz, G.; Dekkious, A.; Meignen, P. A.; Calzavara, Y.; Le Clézio, E.; Despaux, G.

    Most high flux reactors for research purposes have fuel elements composed of plates and not pencils. The measure of inter-plate distance of a fuel element is tricky since a resolution of a micron is searched to measure plate swellings of about ten microns while the dimension between the plates is close to the millimeter. This measure should provide information about the fuel and particularly its history of irradiation. That is the reason why a solution has been considered: a robust device based upon high frequency ultrasonic probes adapted to the high radiation environment and thinned to 1 mm to be inserted into a 1.8 mm width water channel between two fuel plates. To achieve the expected resolution, the system is excited with frequencies up to 150 MHz. Thanks to a specific signal processing, this device allows the distance measurement through an ultrasonic wave's time of flight. The feasibility of such challenging distance measurement has already been proved with success on a full size irradiated fuel element of the RHF.

  20. Birefringent dual-frequency laser Doppler velocimeter using a low-frequency lock-in amplifier technique for high-resolution measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongbin; Chen, Junbao; Guo, Dongmei; Xia, Wei; Hao, Hui; Wang, Ming

    2016-06-01

    A birefringent dual-frequency laser with a half-intracavity has been used to develop a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). The developed LDV utilizes a new signal-processing method based on a lock-in amplifier to achieve high-resolution velocity measurements and the discrimination of positive and negative velocities. Theoretical analysis and simulation results are presented. The velocity measurement experiments by using a high-precision linear stage are performed to verify the performance of the LDV. Compared with the previous dual-frequency LDVs, the average velocity resolution of the developed LDV is improved from 0.31 mm/s to 0.028 mm/s for a target without the rotational velocity. The measurement results show that our new technique can offer a powerful instrument for metrology sciences. PMID:27411198

  1. High resolution inelastic gamma-ray measurements with a white neutron source from 1 to 200 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.O.; Laymon, C.M.; Wender, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of prompt gamma rays following neutron-induced reactions have recently been made at the spallation neutron source at the WNR target area of LAMPF using germanium detectors. These experiments provide extensive excitation function data for inelastic neutron scattering as well as for other reactions such as (n,{alpha}), (n,n{alpha}), (n,p), (n,np), (n,nnp) and (n,xn) for 1 {le} {times} {le} 11. The continuous energy coverage available from 1 MeV to over 200 MeV is ideal for excitation function measurements and greatly extends the energy range for such data. The results of these measurements will provide a database for interpretation of gamma-ray spectra from the planned Mars Observer mission, aid in radiation transport calculations, allow verification of nuclear reaction models, and improve the evaluated neutron reaction data base.

  2. Distortion measurement of antennas under space simulation conditions with high accuracy and high resolution by means of holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H. U.

    1984-01-01

    The use of laser holography for measuring the distortion of antennas under space simulation conditions is described. The subject is the so-called double exposure procedure which allows to measure the distortion in the order of 1 to 30/micrometers + or - 0.5 per hologramme of an area of 4 m diameter max. The method of holography takes into account the constraints of the space simulation facility. The test method, the test set up and the constraints by the space simulation facility are described. The results of the performed tests are presented and compared with the theoretical predictions. The test on the K-Band Antenna e.g., showed a distortion of approximately 140/micrometers + or - 5/micrometers measured during the cool down from -10 C to -120 C.

  3. High resolution Hall measurements across the VO2 metal-insulator transition reveal impact of spatial phase separation

    PubMed Central

    Yamin, Tony; Strelniker, Yakov M.; Sharoni, Amos

    2016-01-01

    Many strongly correlated transition metal oxides exhibit a metal-insulator transition (MIT), the manipulation of which is essential for their application as active device elements. However, such manipulation is hindered by lack of microscopic understanding of mechanisms involved in these transitions. A prototypical example is VO2, where previous studies indicated that the MIT resistance change correlate with changes in carrier density and mobility. We studied the MIT using Hall measurements with unprecedented resolution and accuracy, simultaneously with resistance measurements. Contrast to prior reports, we find that the MIT is not correlated with a change in mobility, but rather, is a macroscopic manifestation of the spatial phase separation which accompanies the MIT. Our results demonstrate that, surprisingly, properties of the nano-scale spatially-separated metallic and semiconducting domains actually retain their bulk properties. This study highlights the importance of taking into account local fluctuations and correlations when interpreting transport measurements in highly correlated systems. PMID:26783076

  4. High resolution x-ray Thomson scattering measurements from cryogenic hydrogen jets using the linac coherent light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, L. B.; Zastrau, U.; Galtier, E.; Gamboa, E. J.; Goede, S.; Schumaker, W.; Ravasio, A.; Gauthier, M.; MacDonald, M. J.; Chen, Z.; Granados, E.; Lee, H. J.; Fry, A.; Kim, J. B.; Roedel, C.; Mishra, R.; Pelka, A.; Kraus, D.; Barbrel, B.; Döppner, T.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    We present the first spectrally resolved measurements of x-rays scattered from cryogenic hydrogen jets in the single photon counting limit. The 120 Hz capabilities of the LCLS, together with a novel hydrogen jet design [J. B. Kim et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. (these proceedings)], allow for the ability to record a near background free spectrum. Such high-dynamic-range x-ray scattering measurements enable a platform to study ultra-fast, laser-driven, heating dynamics of hydrogen plasmas. This measurement has been achieved using two highly annealed pyrolytic graphite crystal spectrometers to spectrally resolve 5.5 keV x-rays elastically and inelastically scattered from cryogenic hydrogen and focused on Cornell-SLAC pixel array detectors [S. Herrmann et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 718, 550 (2013)].

  5. High resolution Hall measurements across the VO2 metal-insulator transition reveal impact of spatial phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamin, Tony; Strelniker, Yakov M.; Sharoni, Amos

    2016-01-01

    Many strongly correlated transition metal oxides exhibit a metal-insulator transition (MIT), the manipulation of which is essential for their application as active device elements. However, such manipulation is hindered by lack of microscopic understanding of mechanisms involved in these transitions. A prototypical example is VO2, where previous studies indicated that the MIT resistance change correlate with changes in carrier density and mobility. We studied the MIT using Hall measurements with unprecedented resolution and accuracy, simultaneously with resistance measurements. Contrast to prior reports, we find that the MIT is not correlated with a change in mobility, but rather, is a macroscopic manifestation of the spatial phase separation which accompanies the MIT. Our results demonstrate that, surprisingly, properties of the nano-scale spatially-separated metallic and semiconducting domains actually retain their bulk properties. This study highlights the importance of taking into account local fluctuations and correlations when interpreting transport measurements in highly correlated systems.

  6. High resolution Hall measurements across the VO2 metal-insulator transition reveal impact of spatial phase separation.

    PubMed

    Yamin, Tony; Strelniker, Yakov M; Sharoni, Amos

    2016-01-01

    Many strongly correlated transition metal oxides exhibit a metal-insulator transition (MIT), the manipulation of which is essential for their application as active device elements. However, such manipulation is hindered by lack of microscopic understanding of mechanisms involved in these transitions. A prototypical example is VO2, where previous studies indicated that the MIT resistance change correlate with changes in carrier density and mobility. We studied the MIT using Hall measurements with unprecedented resolution and accuracy, simultaneously with resistance measurements. Contrast to prior reports, we find that the MIT is not correlated with a change in mobility, but rather, is a macroscopic manifestation of the spatial phase separation which accompanies the MIT. Our results demonstrate that, surprisingly, properties of the nano-scale spatially-separated metallic and semiconducting domains actually retain their bulk properties. This study highlights the importance of taking into account local fluctuations and correlations when interpreting transport measurements in highly correlated systems. PMID:26783076

  7. Spin- and angle-resolved photoemission on the topological Kondo insulator candidate: SmB6.

    PubMed

    Xu, Nan; Ding, Hong; Shi, Ming

    2016-09-14

    Topological Kondo insulators are a new class of topological insulators in which metallic surface states protected by topological invariants reside in the bulk band gap at low temperatures. Unlike other 3D topological insulators, a truly insulating bulk state, which is critical for potential applications in next-generation electronic devices, is guaranteed by many-body effects in the topological Kondo insulator. Furthermore, the system has strong electron correlations that can serve as a testbed for interacting topological theories. This topical review focuses on recent advances in the study of SmB6, the most promising candidate for a topological Kondo insulator, from the perspective of spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with highlights of some important transport results.

  8. Angle resolved photoemission study of the strongly correlated metal V2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Vecchio, Irene; Denlinger, Jonathan D.; Krupin, Oleg; Kim, Bumjoon; Metcalf, Patricia; Lupi, Stefano; Allen, James W.; Lanzara, Alessandra

    V2O3 is often considered as the textbook example for the Mott metal-insulator transition. It has been the playground for multiple theoretical approaches and attempts to describe its metallic ground state for half a century. However, the experimental electronic structure is still unknown because of difficulties related to the three-dimensional character of the Fermi surface and the inhomogeneous cleavage of single crystals. Here we reveal for the first time the band structure of V2O3 using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Direct comparison with theory is presented highlighting the important role of electron correlation for the physics of this material. Experiments at the Advanced Light Source were supported by the U.S. DOE Basic Energy Sciences (DE-AC02-05CH11231).

  9. Angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of two-color XUV–NIR ionization with polarization control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Düsterer, S.; Hartmann, G.; Babies, F.; Beckmann, A.; Brenner, G.; Buck, J.; Costello, J.; Dammann, L.; De Fanis, A.; Geßler, P.; Glaser, L.; Ilchen, M.; Johnsson, P.; Kazansky, A. K.; Kelly, T. J.; Mazza, T.; Meyer, M.; Nosik, V. L.; Sazhina, I. P.; Scholz, F.; Seltmann, J.; Sotoudi, H.; Viefhaus, J.; Kabachnik, N. M.

    2016-08-01

    Electron emission caused by extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation in the presence of a strong near infrared (NIR) field leads to multiphoton interactions that depend on several parameters. Here, a comprehensive study of the influence of the angle between the polarization directions of the NIR and XUV fields on the two-color angle-resolved photoelectron spectra of He and Ne is presented. The resulting photoelectron angular distribution strongly depends on the orientation of the NIR polarization plane with respect to that of the XUV field. The prevailing influence of the intense NIR field over the angular emission characteristics for He(1s) and Ne(2p) ionization lines is shown. The underlying processes are modeled in the frame of the strong field approximation (SFA) which shows very consistent agreement with the experiment reaffirming the power of the SFA for multicolor-multiphoton ionization in this regime.

  10. A high-order harmonic generation apparatus for time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Frietsch, B.; Gahl, C.; Teichmann, M.; Weinelt, M.; Carley, R.; Döbrich, K.; Schwarzkopf, O.; Wernet, Ph.

    2013-07-15

    We present a table top setup for time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy to investigate band structure dynamics of correlated materials driven far from equilibrium by femtosecond laser pulse excitation. With the electron-phonon equilibration time being in the order of 1–2 ps it is necessary to achieve sub-picosecond time resolution. Few techniques provide both the necessary time and energy resolution to map non-equilibrium states of the band structure. Laser-driven high-order harmonic generation is such a technique. In our experiment, a grating monochromator delivers tunable photon energies up to 40 eV. A photon energy bandwidth of 150 meV and a pulse duration of 100 fs FWHM allow us to cover the k-space necessary to map valence bands at different k{sub z} and detect outer core states.

  11. Final-state diffraction effects in angle-resolved photoemission at an organic-metal interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocquet, F. C.; Giovanelli, L.; Amsalem, P.; Petaccia, L.; Topwal, D.; Gorovikov, S.; Abel, M.; Koch, N.; Porte, L.; Goldoni, A.; Themlin, J.-M.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper it is shown that angle-resolved photoemission performed using low-energy photons on an organic-metal interface allows to clearly distinguish genuine interface states from features of substrate photoelectrons diffracted by the molecular lattice. As a model system an ordered monolayer of Zn-phthalocyanine is used as a diffraction lattice to probe the electronic band structure of a Ag(110) substrate. Photoemission close to normal emission geometry reveals strongly dispersive features absent in the pristine substrate spectra. Density functional theory modeling helped identifying these as bulk sp direct transitions undergoing surface-umklapp processes. The present results establish the important role of final-state diffraction effects in photoemission experiments at organic-inorganic interfaces.

  12. Angle-resolved Auger electron spectra induced by neon ion impact on aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.; Aron, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    Auger electron emission from aluminum bombarded with 1 to 5 keV neon ions was studied by angle-resolved electron spectroscopy. The position and shape of the spectral features depended on the incident ion energy, angle of ion incidence, and electron take-off angle with respect to the aluminum surface. These spectral dependencies were interpreted in terms of the Doppler shift given to the Auger electron velocity by the excited atom ejected into the vacuum. For oblique ion incidence it is concluded that a flux of high energy atoms are ejected in a direction close to the projection of the ion beam on the target surface. In addition, a new spectral feature was found and identified as due to Auger emission from excited neon in the aluminum matrix.

  13. The intrinsic electronic structure of bilayer manganites from Angle Resolved Photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Sanne; Kukreja, R.; Hossain, M. A.; Golden, M. S.; van Heumen, E.; Massee, F.; Huang, Y.; Boothroyd, A. T.; Pabhakaran, P.; Walter, A.; Bostwick, A.; Rotenberg, E.; Durr, H. A.

    2012-02-01

    The Colossal MagnetoResistant (CMR) manganites are one of the most studied condensed matter physics systems since decades. Yet, the mechanism behind the CMR effect and their electronic structure are still under hot debate. Recent angle resolved photoemission (ARPES) studies on the bilayer manganite La(2-2x)Sr(1+2x)Mn3O7, LSMO327, reported contradictory results [1]. Here we present an ARPES study unveiling the intrinsic k-- and temperature dependent electronic structure of LSMO327, while carefully steering away from the recently reported sample inhomogeneities [2] that have caused all the confusion. [4pt] [1] N. Mannella, Nature (2005); S. Sun Nature Phys. (2007); S. de Jong, PRB (2007)[0pt] [2] F. Massee, Nature Phys(2011)

  14. Angle-resolved spectroscopy study of Ni-based superconductor SrNi2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, L.-K.; Richard, P.; van Roekeghem, A.; Yin, J.-X.; Wu, S.-F.; Chen, Z. G.; Wang, N. L.; Biermann, S.; Qian, T.; Ding, H.

    2016-07-01

    We performed an angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of the Ni-based superconductor SrNi2As2 . Electron and hole Fermi surface pockets are observed, but their different shapes and sizes lead to very poor nesting conditions. The experimental electronic band structure of SrNi2As2 is in good agreement with first-principles calculations after a slight renormalization (by a factor 1.1), confirming the picture of Hund's exchange-dominated electronic correlations decreasing with increasing filling of the 3 d shell in the Fe-, Co-, and Ni-based compounds. These findings emphasize the importance of Hund's coupling and 3 d -orbital filling as key tuning parameters of electronic correlations in transition-metal pnictides.

  15. Electronic structure of MgB2 from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, H; Shen, K M; Lee, S; Damascelli, A; Lu, D H; Feng, D L; Shen, Z-X; Tajima, S

    2002-04-15

    The first angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy results from MgB2 single crystals are reported. Along the GammaK and GammaM directions, we observed three distinct dispersive features approaching the Fermi energy. These can be assigned to the theoretically predicted sigma (B 2p(x,y)) and pi (B 2p(z)) bands. In addition, a small parabolic-like band is detected around the Gamma point, which can be attributed to a surface-derived state. The overall agreement between our results and the band calculations suggests that the electronic structure of MgB2 is of a conventional nature, thus implying that electron correlations are weak and may be of little importance to superconductivity in this system.

  16. Spin- and angle-resolved photoemission on the topological Kondo insulator candidate: SmB6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Nan; Ding, Hong; Shi, Ming

    2016-09-01

    Topological Kondo insulators are a new class of topological insulators in which metallic surface states protected by topological invariants reside in the bulk band gap at low temperatures. Unlike other 3D topological insulators, a truly insulating bulk state, which is critical for potential applications in next-generation electronic devices, is guaranteed by many-body effects in the topological Kondo insulator. Furthermore, the system has strong electron correlations that can serve as a testbed for interacting topological theories. This topical review focuses on recent advances in the study of SmB6, the most promising candidate for a topological Kondo insulator, from the perspective of spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with highlights of some important transport results.

  17. Angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of two-color XUV-NIR ionization with polarization control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Düsterer, S.; Hartmann, G.; Babies, F.; Beckmann, A.; Brenner, G.; Buck, J.; Costello, J.; Dammann, L.; De Fanis, A.; Geßler, P.; Glaser, L.; Ilchen, M.; Johnsson, P.; Kazansky, A. K.; Kelly, T. J.; Mazza, T.; Meyer, M.; Nosik, V. L.; Sazhina, I. P.; Scholz, F.; Seltmann, J.; Sotoudi, H.; Viefhaus, J.; Kabachnik, N. M.

    2016-08-01

    Electron emission caused by extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation in the presence of a strong near infrared (NIR) field leads to multiphoton interactions that depend on several parameters. Here, a comprehensive study of the influence of the angle between the polarization directions of the NIR and XUV fields on the two-color angle-resolved photoelectron spectra of He and Ne is presented. The resulting photoelectron angular distribution strongly depends on the orientation of the NIR polarization plane with respect to that of the XUV field. The prevailing influence of the intense NIR field over the angular emission characteristics for He(1s) and Ne(2p) ionization lines is shown. The underlying processes are modeled in the frame of the strong field approximation (SFA) which shows very consistent agreement with the experiment reaffirming the power of the SFA for multicolor-multiphoton ionization in this regime.

  18. Angle-resolved DIET of negative ions from halogenated molecules on Ru(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, L.; Sack, N. J.; Madey, T. E.

    1995-06-01

    We present data on the electron stimulated desorption (ESD) of negative ions from PF 3 and CCl 4 adsorbed on Ru(0001) at 100 K. We use a two-dimensional digital ESDIAD detector with time-of-flight capability which allows mass and angle resolved ion detection. We find F - and F 2- to desorb from PF 3, yielding hexagonal ESDIAD patterns, and Cl - and Cl 2- from CCl 4, desorbing in a broad normal emission. The ratio of F 2- to F - and of Cl 2- to Cl - is more than a factor 10 higher than in electron induced gas phase dissociation. We compare the negative ion yields to those of positive ions.

  19. Angle resolved photo-emission spectroscopy signature of the resonant excitonic state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montiel, X.; Kloss, T.; Pépin, C.

    2016-09-01

    We calculate the angle resolved photo-emission spectroscopy (ARPES) signature of the resonant excitonic state (RES) that was proposed as the pseudo-gap state of cuprate superconductors (Kloss T. et al., arXiv:1510.03038 (2015)). This new state can be described as a set of excitonic (particle-hole) patches with an internal checkerboard modulation. Here, we modelize the RES as a charge order with 2\\textbf{p}F wave vectors, where 2\\textbf{p}F is the ordering vector connecting two opposite sides of the Fermi surface. We calculate the spectral weight and the density of states in the RES and we find that our model correctly reproduces the opening of the PG in Bi-2201.

  20. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as (13)C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. (13)C) and abundant I (e.g. (1)H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of (1)H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance l-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions. PMID:27187211

  1. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as (13)C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. (13)C) and abundant I (e.g. (1)H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of (1)H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance l-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions.

  2. A new method to measure Bowen ratios using high-resolution vertical dry and wet bulb temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euser, T.; Luxemburg, W. M. J.; Everson, C. S.; Mengistu, M. G.; Clulow, A. D.; Bastiaanssen, W. G. M.

    2014-06-01

    The Bowen ratio surface energy balance method is a relatively simple method to determine the latent heat flux and the actual land surface evaporation. The Bowen ratio method is based on the measurement of air temperature and vapour pressure gradients. If these measurements are performed at only two heights, correctness of data becomes critical. In this paper we present the concept of a new measurement method to estimate the Bowen ratio based on vertical dry and wet bulb temperature profiles with high spatial resolution. A short field experiment with distributed temperature sensing (DTS) in a fibre optic cable with 13 measurement points in the vertical was undertaken. A dry and a wetted section of a fibre optic cable were suspended on a 6 m high tower installed over a sugar beet trial plot near Pietermaritzburg (South Africa). Using the DTS cable as a psychrometer, a near continuous observation of vapour pressure and air temperature at 0.20 m intervals was established. These data allowed the computation of the Bowen ratio with a high spatial and temporal precision. The daytime latent and sensible heat fluxes were estimated by combining the Bowen ratio values from the DTS-based system with independent measurements of net radiation and soil heat flux. The sensible heat flux, which is the relevant term to evaluate, derived from the DTS-based Bowen ratio (BR-DTS) was compared with that derived from co-located eddy covariance (R2 = 0.91), surface layer scintillometer (R2 = 0.81) and surface renewal (R2 = 0.86) systems. By using multiple measurement points instead of two, more confidence in the derived Bowen ratio values is obtained.

  3. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as 13C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. 13C) and abundant I (e.g. 1H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of 1H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance L-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions.

  4. Microfabricated thermal conductivity sensor: a high resolution tool for quantitative thermal property measurement of biomaterials and solutions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xin M; Ding, Weiping; Chen, Hsiu-hung; Shu, Zhiquan; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Hai-feng; Gao, Dayong

    2011-10-01

    Obtaining accurate thermal properties of biomaterials plays an important role in the field of cryobiology. Currently, thermal needle, which is constructed by enclosing a manually winded thin metal wire with an insulation coating in a metallic sheath, is the only available device that is capable of measuring thermal conductivity of biomaterials. Major drawbacks, such as macroscale sensor size, lack of versatile format to accommodate samples with various shapes and sizes, neglected effects of heat transfer inside the probe and thermal contact resistance between the sensing element and the probe body, difficult to mass produce, poor data repeatability and reliability and labor-intense sensor calibration, have significantly reduced their potential to be an essential measurement tool to provide key thermal property information of biological specimens. In this study, we describe the development of an approach to measure thermal conductivity of liquids and soft bio-tissues using a proof-of-concept MEMS based thermal probe. By employing a microfabricated closely-packed gold wire to function as the heater and the thermistor, the presented thermal sensor can be used to measure thermal conductivities of fluids and natural soft biomaterials (particularly, the sensor may be directly inserted into soft tissues in living animal/plant bodies or into tissues isolated from the animal/plant bodies), where other more standard approaches cannot be used. Thermal standard materials have been used to calibrate two randomly selected thermal probes at room temperature. Variation between the obtained system calibration constants is less than 10%. By incorporating the previously obtained system calibration constant, three randomly selected thermal probes have been successfully utilized to measure the thermal conductivities of various solutions and tissue samples under different temperatures. Overall, the measurements are in agreement with the recommended values (percentage error less than 5

  5. Structural and functional measurements of fertilized mouse oocytes with combined high-resolution OCT and inverted microscope (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnowski, Karol; Ajduk, Anna; Wojtkowski, Maciej; Szkulmowski, Maciej

    2016-03-01

    We present a comprehensive imaging methodology for 3D structural and functional measurements of fertilized mouse oocytes. In contrary to methods used for mouse zygote imaging so far OCT provides 3D data without z axis movement of sample or objective lens. Furthermore, complex scanning protocols used in this study give access to different scales of repetition times and thus may become a tool for investigation of a different dynamic processes. Additionally, proposed scanning approach via variety of statistic operations can be used to enhance the quality of structural images. OCT system capabilities are presented and compared to standard microscopy. With a single 3D measurements one can extract 3D structure of the oocytes as well as en-face images that correspond to both bright and dark field microscopy. As an example of dynamic oocyte imaging pronuclei motion during development is presented. Limitations and possibilities of the new system are discussed.

  6. Measurement of HO2 and other trace gases in the stratosphere using a high resolution far-infrared spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traub, Wesley A.; Chance, Kelley V.; Johnson, David G.; Jucks, Kenneth W.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Xue, Changqin; Ciarpallini, Paola

    1994-01-01

    This report covers the time period 1 Jul. to 31 Dec. 1993. There were no balloon or airplane flights during this reporting period, instead we concentrated on analyzing our existing data. This was facilitated by a recently completed program of enhancements made in our data reduction software. We are using our data sets to examine the changes in stratospheric chemistry over a variety of time scales. Ongoing projects include investigating the diurnal variation of OH, HO2, and H2O2 and exploring their relationships with other simultaneously measured species; measuring long term trends in HF and HCl; and looking for changes caused by the June 1991 Pinatubo eruption. We are also continuing to analyze the large set of data collected during the AASE 2.

  7. Kalman-filtered compressive sensing for high resolution estimation of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions from sparse measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Jaideep; Lee, Jina; Lefantzi, Sophia; Yadav, Vineet; Michalak, Anna M.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2013-09-01

    The estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2) from limited ground-based and satellite measurements of CO2 concentrations will form a key component of the monitoring of treaties aimed at the abatement of greenhouse gas emissions. The limited nature of the measured data leads to a severely-underdetermined estimation problem. If the estimation is performed at fine spatial resolutions, it can also be computationally expensive. In order to enable such estimations, advances are needed in the spatial representation of ffCO2 emissions, scalable inversion algorithms and the identification of observables to measure. To that end, we investigate parsimonious spatial parameterizations of ffCO2 emissions which can be used in atmospheric inversions. We devise and test three random field models, based on wavelets, Gaussian kernels and covariance structures derived from easily-observed proxies of human activity. In doing so, we constructed a novel inversion algorithm, based on compressive sensing and sparse reconstruction, to perform the estimation. We also address scalable ensemble Kalman filters as an inversion mechanism and quantify the impact of Gaussian assumptions inherent in them. We find that the assumption does not impact the estimates of mean ffCO2 source strengths appreciably, but a comparison with Markov chain Monte Carlo estimates show significant differences in the variance of the source strengths. Finally, we study if the very different spatial natures of biogenic and ffCO2 emissions can be used to estimate them, in a disaggregated fashion, solely from CO2 concentration measurements, without extra information from products of incomplete combustion e.g., CO. We find that this is possible during the winter months, though the errors can be as large as 50%.

  8. Assignment of resonances in dissociative recombination of HD{sup +} ions: High-resolution measurements compared with accurate computations

    SciTech Connect

    Waffeu Tamo, F. O.; Buhr, H.; Schwalm, D.; Motapon, O.; Altevogt, S.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.; Grieser, M.; Lammich, L.; Lestinsky, M.; Motsch, M.; Novotny, S.; Orlov, D. A.; Pedersen, H. B.; Sprenger, F.; Weigel, U.; Wolf, A.; Nevo, I.; Urbain, X.; Schneider, I. F.

    2011-08-15

    The collision-energy resolved rate coefficient for dissociative recombination of HD{sup +} ions in the vibrational ground state is measured using the photocathode electron target at the heavy-ion storage ring TSR. Rydberg resonances associated with rovibrational excitation of the HD{sup +} core are scanned as a function of the electron collision energy with an instrumental broadening below 1 meV in the low-energy limit. The measurement is compared to calculations using multichannel quantum defect theory, accounting for rotational structure and interactions and considering the six lowest rotational energy levels as initial ionic states. Using thermal-equilibrium-level populations at 300 K to approximate the experimental conditions, close correspondence between calculated and measured structures is found up to the first vibrational excitation threshold of the cations near 0.24 eV. Detailed assignments, including naturally broadened and overlapping Rydberg resonances, are performed for all structures up to 0.024 eV. Resonances from purely rotational excitation of the ion core are found to have similar strengths as those involving vibrational excitation. A dominant low-energy resonance is assigned to contributions from excited rotational states only. The results indicate strong modifications in the energy dependence of the dissociative recombination rate coefficient through the rotational excitation of the parent ions, and underline the need for studies with rotationally cold species to obtain results reflecting low-temperature ionized media.

  9. Absolute optical oscillator strengths for the electronic excitation of atoms at high resolution: Experimental methods and measurements for helium

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, W.F.; Cooper, G.; Brion, C.E. )

    1991-07-01

    An alternative method is described for the measurement of absolute optical oscillator strengths (cross sections) for electronic excitation of free atoms and molecules throughout the discrete region of the valence-shell spectrum at high energy resolution (full width at half maximum of 0.048 eV). The technique, utilizing the virtual-photon field of a fast electron inelastically scattered at negligible momentum transfer, avoids many of the difficulties associated with the various direct optical techniques that have traditionally been used for absolute optical oscillator strength measurements. The method is also free of the bandwidth (line saturation) effects that can seriously limit the accuracy of photoabsorption cross-section measurements for discrete transitions of narrow linewidth obtained using the Beer-Lambert law ({ital I}{sub 0}/{ital I}=exp({ital nl}{sigma}{sub {ital p}})). Since the line-saturation effects are not widely appreciated and are only usually considered in the context of peak heights, a detailed analysis of this problem is presented, with consideration of the integrated cross section (oscillator strength) over the profile of each discrete peak.

  10. An angle measurement system of high resolution for the upper limbs using a low-cost servomotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botero V., J.-S.; Restrepo Z., J.-P.; De Ossa J., M.-T.

    2016-07-01

    In the here presented study, the biomechanical design and coupling of a servomotor as measuring element for determining the angle of elbow flexion in humans is presented. This task requires a digital servomotor with a 12-bit low charge encoder type ’’contactless absolute”, which makes the holding torque negligible. Because the servomotor is used as a sensor and not as an actuator, and is expected to produce the least possible resistance to the movement of the elbow, this is a crucial point. Additionally, the biomechanical design of the structure for coupling the servomotor was carried out considering the different movements of the arm and forearm, and the necessity to not interfere with the natural movement of the arm. The measurement resolution allows obtaining the flexion angle to an accuracy of 0.088; and integrated into the embedded system used to communicate with the servomotor, that allows obtaining and analyzing data and temporarily integrating information for counting repeats or measuring the speed of movements, among others. This system will also be useful to calibrate and compare other compatible biomechanical analysis models, where the same movement is analyzed.

  11. A chronometric exploration of high-resolution 'sensitive TMS masking' effects on subjective and objective measures of vision.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Tom A; Herring, Jim; Sack, Alexander T

    2011-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can induce masking by interfering with ongoing neural activity in early visual cortex. Previous work has explored the chronometry of occipital involvement in vision by using single pulses of TMS with high temporal resolution. However, conventionally TMS intensities have been high and the only measure used to evaluate masking was objective in nature. Recent studies have begun to incorporate subjective measures of vision, alongside objective ones. The current study goes beyond previous work in two regards. First, we explored both objective vision (an orientation discrimination task) and subjective vision (a stimulus visibility rating on a four-point scale), across a wide range of time windows with high temporal resolution. Second, we used a very sensitive TMS-masking paradigm: stimulation was at relatively low TMS intensities, with a figure-8 coil, and the small stimulus was difficult to discriminate already at baseline level. We hypothesized that this should increase the effective temporal resolution of our paradigm. Perhaps for this reason, we are able to report a rather interesting masking curve. Within the classical-masking time window, previously reported to encompass broad SOAs anywhere between 60 and 120 ms, we report not one, but at least two dips in objective performance, with no masking in-between. The subjective measure of vision did not mirror this pattern. These preliminary data from our exploratory design suggest that, with sensitive TMS masking, we might be able to reveal visual processes in early visual cortex previously unreported. PMID:21161191

  12. High-resolution air quality monitoring from space: a fast retrieval scheme for CO from hyperspectral infrared measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, N.; Huang, H.-L.; Weisz, E.; Annegarn, H. J.; Pierce, R. B.

    2011-06-01

    The first results of the Fast Linear Inversion Trace gas System (FLITS) retrieval scheme are presented here for CO from IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) measurements using RAQMS (Real time Air Quality Modelling System) as atmospheric background. FLITS is a simple linear inversion scheme with a stable performance that retrieves total column CO concentrations (molec cm-2) at single field-of-view (FOV) irrespective of cloud cover. A case study is presented here for a biomass burning plume over the Pacific on 29 March 2010. For each FOV a single tropospheric CO density, vertically integrated over 200-800 hPa, is retrieved with 12 channels in the spectral range 2050-2225 cm-1. Despite variations in cloud cover and temperature, the degrees of freedom for signal (DFS) of the solution ranges between 0.8 and 0.95. In addition, the retrieval error is at least half the background error of 10 %, with dominant contribution from uncertainty in the measurement and temperature. With its stability and processing speed, FLITS meet two of the key requirements for operational processing. We conclude that the linear combination of space-borne measurements with a chemical transport model in the FLITS retrieval scheme holds potential for real-time air quality monitoring and evaluation of pollutant transport at high spatial resolution.

  13. Low-power, open-path mobile sensing platform for high-resolution measurements of greenhouse gases and air pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Lei; Sun, Kang; Miller, David J.; Pan, Dan; Golston, Levi M.; Zondlo, Mark A.

    2015-04-01

    A low-power mobile sensing platform has been developed with multiple open-path gas sensors to measure the ambient concentrations of greenhouse gases and air pollutants with high temporal and spatial resolutions over extensive spatial domains. The sensing system consists of four trace gas sensors including two custom quantum cascade laser-based open-path sensors and two LICOR open-path sensors to measure CO2, CO, CH4, N2O, NH3, and H2O mixing ratios simultaneously at 10 Hz. In addition, sensors for meteorological and geolocation data are incorporated into the system. The system is powered by car batteries with a low total power consumption (~200 W) and is easily transportable due to its low total mass (35 kg). Multiple measures have been taken to ensure robust performance of the custom, open-path sensors located on top of the vehicle where the optics are exposed to the harsh on-road environment. The mobile sensing system has been integrated and installed on top of common passenger vehicles and participated in extensive field campaigns (>400 h on-road time with >18,000 km total distance) in both the USA and China. The simultaneous detection of multiple trace gas species makes the mobile sensing platform a unique and powerful tool to identify and quantify different emission sources through mobile mapping.

  14. High-resolution measurement of beryllium-10 content in the Dome Fuji shallow ice core during the Maunder Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, H.; Yokoyama, Y.; Matsuzaki, H.; Horiuchi, K.; Motoyama, H.

    2007-12-01

    The production rate of the beryllium-10 in the atmosphere is basically proportional to the intensity of incoming galactic cosmic rays which show 11 year periodicity associated with the state of solar magnetic field. In order to examine the feasibility of detecting the 11 year solar cycle in the Dome Fuji shallow ice core covering over 3000 years, we measured the Be-10 content with high temporal resolution of 0.7-1.0 years. The Be-10/Be-9 ratio is measured by the Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (AMS) at the Micro Analysis Laboratory, Tandem accelerator (MALT), at the University of Tokyo. We report the preliminary data of the Be-10 concentration in the Dome Fuji shallow ice core around the 17th and the 18th century including the era of the Maunder Minimum. The average content of Be-10 in the ice core for this period is about 105 atoms/g. The 11 year periodicity is clearly detected with amplitude of about 30 %. We compare the obtained Be-10 data with the sunspot data and the other beryllium-10 data to evaluate the validity of our measurement and to examine the accuracy of the dating of the ice sheets for this period. Based on the results, we discuss the variation of solar cycle and the magnetic polarity during the Maunder Minimum.

  15. Measurement of the isotope enrichment of stable isotope-labeled proteins using high-resolution mass spectra of peptides.

    PubMed

    MacCoss, Michael J; Wu, Christine C; Matthews, Dwight E; Yates, John R

    2005-12-01

    Stable isotope-enriched molecules are used as internal standards and as tracers of in vivo substrate metabolism. The accurate conversion of measured ratios in the mass spectrometer to mole ratios is complicated because a polyatomic molecule containing enriched atoms will result in a combinatorial distribution of isotopomers depending on the enrichment and number of "labeled" atoms. This effect could potentially cause a large error in the mole ratio measurement depending on which isotope peak or peaks were used to determine the ratio. We report a computational method that predicts isotope distributions over a range of enrichments and compares the predicted distributions to experimental peptide isotope distributions obtained by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Our approach is accurate with measured enrichments within 1.5% of expected isotope distributions. The method is also precise with 4.9, 2.0, and 0.8% relative standard deviations for peptides containing 59, 79, and 99 atom % excess (15)N, respectively. The approach is automated making isotope enrichment calculations possible for thousands of peptides in a single muLC-FTICR-MS experiment.

  16. CAD-II: the second version current-mode readout ASIC for high-resolution timing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Z. X.; Deng, Z.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Y. N.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the second version of a fully current-mode front-end ASIC, CAD (Current Amplifier and Discriminator), for MRPC detectors for TOF applications. Several upgrades have been made in this new version, including: 1). Using differential input stages with input impedance down to 30 Ω and LVDS compatible outputs; 2). Much higher current gain and bandwidth of 4.5 A/A and 380 MHz 3). Fabricated in 0.18 μ m CMOS process instead of 0.35 μ m CMOS technology used in CAD-I. The detailed design of the ASIC will be described as well as the measurement results. The single-ended input impedance could be as low as 32 Ω and the power consumption was measured to be 15 mW per channel. Input referred RMS noise current was about 0.56 μ A. The threshold could be set as low as 4.5 μ A referred to input, corresponding to 9 fC for the typical MRPC detector signal with 2 ns width. Sub-10 ps resolution has been measured for input signal above 200 μ A.

  17. A chronometric exploration of high-resolution 'sensitive TMS masking' effects on subjective and objective measures of vision.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Tom A; Herring, Jim; Sack, Alexander T

    2011-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can induce masking by interfering with ongoing neural activity in early visual cortex. Previous work has explored the chronometry of occipital involvement in vision by using single pulses of TMS with high temporal resolution. However, conventionally TMS intensities have been high and the only measure used to evaluate masking was objective in nature. Recent studies have begun to incorporate subjective measures of vision, alongside objective ones. The current study goes beyond previous work in two regards. First, we explored both objective vision (an orientation discrimination task) and subjective vision (a stimulus visibility rating on a four-point scale), across a wide range of time windows with high temporal resolution. Second, we used a very sensitive TMS-masking paradigm: stimulation was at relatively low TMS intensities, with a figure-8 coil, and the small stimulus was difficult to discriminate already at baseline level. We hypothesized that this should increase the effective temporal resolution of our paradigm. Perhaps for this reason, we are able to report a rather interesting masking curve. Within the classical-masking time window, previously reported to encompass broad SOAs anywhere between 60 and 120 ms, we report not one, but at least two dips in objective performance, with no masking in-between. The subjective measure of vision did not mirror this pattern. These preliminary data from our exploratory design suggest that, with sensitive TMS masking, we might be able to reveal visual processes in early visual cortex previously unreported.

  18. High-resolution continuous-flow analysis setup for water isotopic measurement from ice cores using laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuelsson, B. D.; Baisden, W. T.; Bertler, N. A. N.; Keller, E. D.; Gkinis, V.

    2015-07-01

    Here we present an experimental setup for water stable isotope (δ18O and δD) continuous-flow measurements and provide metrics defining the performance of the setup during a major ice core measurement campaign (Roosevelt Island Climate Evolution; RICE). We also use the metrics to compare alternate systems. Our setup is the first continuous-flow laser spectroscopy system that is using off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS; analyzer manufactured by Los Gatos Research, LGR) in combination with an evaporation unit to continuously analyze water samples from an ice core. A Water Vapor Isotope Standard Source (WVISS) calibration unit, manufactured by LGR, was modified to (1) enable measurements on several water standards, (2) increase the temporal resolution by reducing the response time and (3) reduce the influence from memory effects. While this setup was designed for the continuous-flow analysis (CFA) of ice cores, it can also continuously analyze other liquid or vapor sources. The custom setups provide a shorter response time (~ 54 and 18 s for 2013 and 2014 setup, respectively) compared to the original WVISS unit (~ 62 s), which is an improvement in measurement resolution. Another improvement compared to the original WVISS is that the custom setups have a reduced memory effect. Stability tests comparing the custom and WVISS setups were performed and Allan deviations (σAllan) were calculated to determine precision at different averaging times. For the custom 2013 setup the precision after integration times of 103 s is 0.060 and 0.070 ‰ for δ18O and δD, respectively. The corresponding σAllan values for the custom 2014 setup are 0.030, 0.060 and 0.043 ‰ for δ18O, δD and δ17O, respectively. For the WVISS setup the precision is 0.035, 0.070 and 0.042 ‰ after 103 s for δ18O, δD and δ17O, respectively. Both the custom setups and WVISS setup are influenced by instrumental drift with δ18O being more drift sensitive than δD. The

  19. Edge impurity rotation profile measurement by using high-resolution ultraviolet/visible spectrometer on J-TEXT.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Z F; Luo, J; Wang, Z J; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, X L; Hou, S Y; Cheng, C; Li, Z; Zhuang, G

    2014-11-01

    An upgrade of the edge rotation diagnostic system is achieved by increasing the number of viewing channels to 17 on J-TEXT tokamak. With the upgrade, the spatial resolution reaches 1 cm. The bulk plasma is used as the calibration light source. And the toroidal velocity profile of C V (carbon V) at edge region is obtained by using a spatial deconvolution technique. The valid measurement region is at ρ = 0.6-0.9, corresponding to the emitting region of C V. The preliminary experimental results express that the velocity of plasma may have a zero point near ρ = 0.85.

  20. High-resolution continuous flow analysis setup for water isotopic measurement from ice cores using laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuelsson, B. D.; Baisden, W. T.; Bertler, N. A. N.; Keller, E. D.; Gkinis, V.

    2014-12-01

    Here we present an experimental setup for water stable isotopes (δ18O and δD) continuous flow measurements. It is the first continuous flow laser spectroscopy system that is using Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS; analyzer manufactured by Los Gatos Research - LGR) in combination with an evaporation unit to continuously analyze sample from an ice core. A Water Vapor Isotopic Standard Source (WVISS) calibration unit, manufactured by LGR, was modified to: (1) increase the temporal resolution by reducing the response time (2) enable measurements on several water standards, and (3) to reduce the influence from memory effects. While this setup was designed for the Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) of ice cores, it can also continuously analyze other liquid or vapor sources. The modified setup provides a shorter response time (~54 and 18 s for 2013 and 2014 setup, respectively) compared to the original WVISS unit (~62 s), which is an improvement in measurement resolution. Another improvement compared to the original WVISS is that the modified setup has a reduced memory effect. Stability tests comparing the modified WVISS and WVISS setups were performed and Allan deviations (σAllan) were calculated to determine precision at different averaging times. For the 2013 modified setup the precision after integration times of 103 s are 0.060 and 0.070‰ for δ18O and δD, respectively. For the WVISS setup the corresponding σAllan values are 0.030, 0.060 and 0.043‰ for δ18O, δD and δ17O, respectively. For the WVISS setup the precision is 0.035, 0.070 and 0.042‰ after 103 s for δ18O, δD and δ17O, respectively. Both the modified setups and WVISS setup are influenced by instrumental drift with δ18O being more drift sensitive than δD. The σAllan values for δ18O of 0.30 and 0.18‰ for the modified (2013) and WVISS setup, respectively after averaging times of 104 s (2.78 h). The Isotopic Water Analyzer (IWA)-modified WVISS setup used during the

  1. High resolution, high precision, simultaneous measurements of δD and δ18O using a CRDS analyzer with an ultrasonic nebulizer sample preparation module.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkinis, Vasileios; Morrie, Valerie; Jones, Tyler; Vaughn, Bruce; White, James

    2013-04-01

    The recent advent of commercial Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) has initiated the development of numerous new Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) methods for high resolution, high precision measurements of greenhouse gas concentrations and isotopic ratios of water from ice cores. Depending on the sample preparation method and the calibration schemes applied, these new systems have proved to be precise, accurate and extremely versatile, allowing for high quality measurements performed in the field. However there are still challenges to be addressed. Measurements need to be accurately calibrated with respect to international standards (SMOW - SLAP in the case of water). A proper characterization of the precision and the accuracy of a system is another task that needs to be performed. Apparent sample diffusion affects the produced signals in ways that are unique not only to different systems but also to different implementations of the same system, reducing the resolution that can be obtained. Parameters such as melt rate, sample flow, cavity volume and the method of sample preparation can significantly alter the performance of the analytical method. These effects can be accurately characterized with a series of experiments and consequently corrected for using spectral filtering techniques. Last but not least, proper monitoring of the melting process is necessary in order to assign an ice core depth scale on the data produced. In this work we present an integrated system for high resolution, high precision water isotopic analysis from a continuously melted ice core sample, using a commercial CRDS analyzer (Picarro L2130 -i) . The system utilizes an ultrasonic concentric nebulizer in order to achieve complete fractionation free vaporization of the continuous flow water sample. An adjacent home made calibration module allows for the injection of local standards accurately characterized with respect to the SMOW - SLAP scale. The system has been used for the high

  2. Direct Observation of Localized Spin Antiferromagnetic Transition in PdCrO2 by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Han-Jin; Jeong, Jinwon; Chang, Bin; Jeong, Dahee; Moon, Hyun Sook; Cho, En-Jin; Ok, Jong Mok; Kim, Jun Sung; Kim, Kyoo; Min, B. I.; Lee, Han-Koo; Kim, Jae-Young; Park, Byeong-Gyu; Kim, Hyeong-Do; Lee, Seongsu

    2014-03-01

    We report the first case of the successful measurements of a localized spin antiferromagnetic transition in delafossite-type PdCrO2 by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). This demonstrates how to circumvent the shortcomings of ARPES for investigation of magnetism involved with localized spins in limited size of two-dimensional crystals or multi-layer thin films that neutron scattering can hardly study due to lack of bulk compared to surface. Also, our observations give direct evidence for the spin ordering pattern of Cr3+ ions in PdCrO2 suggested by neutron diffraction and quantum oscillation measurements, and provide a strong constraint that has to be satisfied by a microscopic mechanism for the unconventional anomalous Hall effect recently reported in this system. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation (NRF) of Korea Grant funded by the Korean Government (MEST) (Nos. 2010-0010771 and 2012M2B2A4029607). K.K. and B.I.M. acknowledge the support of NRF (Nos. 2009-0079947 and 2011-0025237) and KISTI.

  3. High-resolution wave number spectrum using multi-point measurements in space - the Multi-point Signal Resonator (MSR) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Y.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Motschmann, U.

    2011-02-01

    A new analysis method is presented that provides a high-resolution power spectrum in a broad wave number domain based on multi-point measurements. The analysis technique is referred to as the Multi-point Signal Resonator (MSR) and it benefits from Capon's minimum variance method for obtaining the proper power spectral density of the signal as well as the MUSIC algorithm (Multiple Signal Classification) for considerably reducing the noise part in the spectrum. The mathematical foundation of the analysis method is presented and it is applied to synthetic data as well as Cluster observations of the interplanetary magnetic field. Using the MSR technique for Cluster data we find a wave in the solar wind propagating parallel to the mean magnetic field with relatively small amplitude, which is not identified by the Capon spectrum. The Cluster data analysis shows the potential of the MSR technique for studying waves and turbulence using multi-point measurements.

  4. A high-resolution thermoelectric module-based calorimeter for measuring the energetics of isolated ventricular trabeculae at body temperature.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Callum M; Han, June-Chiew; Ruddy, Bryan P; Nielsen, Poul M F; Taberner, Andrew J

    2015-07-15

    Isolated ventricular trabeculae are the most common experimental preparations used in the study of cardiac energetics. However, the experiments have been conducted at subphysiological temperatures. We have overcome this limitation by designing and constructing a novel calorimeter with sufficiently high thermal resolution for simultaneously measuring the heat output and force production of isolated, contracting, ventricular trabeculae at body temperature. This development was largely motivated by the need to better understand cardiac energetics by performing such measurements at body temperature to relate tissue performance to whole heart behavior in vivo. Our approach uses solid-state thermoelectric modules, tailored for both temperature sensing and temperature control. The thermoelectric modules have high sensitivity and low noise, which, when coupled with a multilevel temperature control system, enable an exceptionally high temperature resolution with a noise-equivalent power an order of magnitude greater than those of other existing muscle calorimeters. Our system allows us to rapidly and easily change the experimental temperature without disturbing the state of the muscle. Our calorimeter is useful in many experiments that explore the energetics of normal physiology as well as pathophysiology of cardiac muscle.

  5. Validation of high-resolution WRF-ARW model runs against airborne measurements over complex terrain in central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carotenuto, Federico; Gioli, Beniamino; Toscano, Piero; Gualtieri, Giovanni; Miglietta, Franco; Wohlfahrt, Georg

    2015-04-01

    An intensive aerial campaign was flown in the context of the CARBIUS project (Maselli et al., 2010) between July 2004 and December 2005. The flights covered, over more than 240 Km, a target area in central Italy (between the regions of Lazio and Tuscany) characterized by various land uses and topography, ranging from coastal zones to mountainous landscapes (Colline Metallifere, Tuscany). The aerial vector (Sky Arrow 650 ERA) was equipped for high frequency (50 Hz) measurements of the three components of mean wind and turbulence, as well as air temperature, CO2 and H2O concentrations. While the aim of the CARBIUS campaign was focused on GHG fluxes, the dataset is used in the present work as a benchmark to assess the capability of mesoscale models to correctly simulate transport fields. A first assessment has been done by comparing the dataset to a coupled WRF-NMM-CALMET system (Gioli et al., 2014), but the aim of the present work is to expand on those foundations by comparing the data to higher resolution WRF-ARW simulations. WRF-ARW outputs are, in fact, frequently used as inputs to multiple dispersion models and any misrepresentation of the "real" situation is therefore propagated through the modelling chain. Our aim is to assess these potential errors keeping into account different topographic situations and seasons thanks to the existent aerial dataset. Moreover the sensitivity of the WRF-ARW model to different initial and boundary conditions (ECMWF vs. CFSR) is explored, since also the initial forcing may influence the representation of the transport field. Results show that the model is generally capable of reproducing the main features of the mean wind field independently from the choice of the initial forcing. Terrain features still show an impact on the model outputs (especially on wind directions), moreover the performance of the model is also influenced by seasonal effects. Gioli B., Gualtieri G., Busillo C., Calastrini F., Gozzini B., Miglietta F. (2014

  6. Development of a high-resolution automatic digital (urine/electrolytes) flow volume and rate measurement system of miniature size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, F. F.

    1975-01-01

    To aid in the quantitative analysis of man's physiological rhythms, a flowmeter to measure circadian patterns of electrolyte excretion during various environmental stresses was developed. One initial flowmeter was designed and fabricated, the sensor of which is the approximate size of a wristwatch. The detector section includes a special type of dielectric integrating type sensor which automatically controls, activates, and deactivates the flow sensor data output by determining the presence or absence of fluid flow in the system, including operation under zero-G conditions. The detector also provides qualitative data on the composition of the fluid. A compact electronic system was developed to indicate flow rate as well as total volume per release or the cumulative volume of several releases in digital/analog forms suitable for readout or telemetry. A suitable data readout instrument is also provided. Calibration and statistical analyses of the performance functions required of the flowmeter were also conducted.

  7. A high resolution 7-Tesla resting-state fMRI test-retest dataset with cognitive and physiological measures.

    PubMed

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J; Mendes, Natacha; Wilfling, Domenica; Wladimirow, Elisabeth; Gauthier, Claudine J; Bonnen, Tyler; Ruby, Florence J M; Trampel, Robert; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Cozatl, Roberto; Smallwood, Jonathan; Margulies, Daniel S

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a test-retest dataset of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data acquired at rest. 22 participants were scanned during two sessions spaced one week apart. Each session includes two 1.5 mm isotropic whole-brain scans and one 0.75 mm isotropic scan of the prefrontal cortex, giving a total of six time-points. Additionally, the dataset includes measures of mood, sustained attention, blood pressure, respiration, pulse, and the content of self-generated thoughts (mind wandering). This data enables the investigation of sources of both intra- and inter-session variability not only limited to physiological changes, but also including alterations in cognitive and affective states, at high spatial resolution. The dataset is accompanied by a detailed experimental protocol and source code of all stimuli used.

  8. Measurement of HO2 and other trace gases in the stratosphere using a high resolution far-infrared spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traub, Wesley A.; Chance, Kelly V.; Johnson, David G.; Jucks, Kenneth W.; Salawitch, Ross J.; Xue, Jim Changqin; Ciarpallini, Paola

    1995-01-01

    This report covers the time period 1 January 1994 to 31 December 1994. During this reporting period we had our fourth Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) correlative balloon flight; the data from this flight have been reduced and submitted to the UARS CDHF. We have spent most of the past year analyzing data from this and past flights. For example, using data from our September 1989 balloon flight we have demonstrated for the first time ever that the rates of production and loss of ozone are in balance in the upper stratosphere. As part of this analysis, we have completed the most detailed study to date of radical partitioning throughout the stratosphere. We have also produced the first measurement of HBr and HOBr mixing ratio profiles over a full diurnal cycle.

  9. High-resolution spectroscopy for Doppler-broadening ion temperature measurements of implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J. A.; Stewart, R. E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Shepherd, R.; Schneider, M. B.; Miles, A. R.; Scott, H. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Hsing, W. W.

    2012-10-15

    Future implosion experiments at the national ignition facility (NIF) will endeavor to simultaneously measure electron and ion temperatures with temporal and spatial resolution in order to explore non-equilibrium temperature distributions and their relaxation toward equilibrium. In anticipation of these experiments, and with understanding of the constraints of the NIF facility environment, we have explored the use of Doppler broadening of mid-Z dopant emission lines, such as krypton He-{alpha} at 13 keV, as a diagnostic of time- and potentially space-resolved ion temperature. We have investigated a number of options analytically and with numerical raytracing, and we have identified several promising candidate spectrometer designs that meet the expected requirements of spectral and temporal resolution and data signal-to-noise ratio for gas-filled exploding pusher implosions, while providing maximum flexibility for use on a variety of experiments that potentially include burning plasma.

  10. High-resolution spectroscopy for Doppler-broadening ion temperature measurements of implosions at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Koch, J A; Stewart, R E; Beiersdorfer, P; Shepherd, R; Schneider, M B; Miles, A R; Scott, H A; Smalyuk, V A; Hsing, W W

    2012-10-01

    Future implosion experiments at the national ignition facility (NIF) will endeavor to simultaneously measure electron and ion temperatures with temporal and spatial resolution in order to explore non-equilibrium temperature distributions and their relaxation toward equilibrium. In anticipation of these experiments, and with understanding of the constraints of the NIF facility environment, we have explored the use of Doppler broadening of mid-Z dopant emission lines, such as krypton He-α at 13 keV, as a diagnostic of time- and potentially space-resolved ion temperature. We have investigated a number of options analytically and with numerical raytracing, and we have identified several promising candidate spectrometer designs that meet the expected requirements of spectral and temporal resolution and data signal-to-noise ratio for gas-filled exploding pusher implosions, while providing maximum flexibility for use on a variety of experiments that potentially include burning plasma. PMID:23126948

  11. A high resolution 7-Tesla resting-state fMRI test-retest dataset with cognitive and physiological measures

    PubMed Central

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J; Mendes, Natacha; Wilfling, Domenica; Wladimirow, Elisabeth; Gauthier, Claudine J; Bonnen, Tyler; Ruby, Florence J.M; Trampel, Robert; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Cozatl, Roberto; Smallwood, Jonathan; Margulies, Daniel S

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a test-retest dataset of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data acquired at rest. 22 participants were scanned during two sessions spaced one week apart. Each session includes two 1.5 mm isotropic whole-brain scans and one 0.75 mm isotropic scan of the prefrontal cortex, giving a total of six time-points. Additionally, the dataset includes measures of mood, sustained attention, blood pressure, respiration, pulse, and the content of self-generated thoughts (mind wandering). This data enables the investigation of sources of both intra- and inter-session variability not only limited to physiological changes, but also including alterations in cognitive and affective states, at high spatial resolution. The dataset is accompanied by a detailed experimental protocol and source code of all stimuli used. PMID:25977805

  12. Stress distribution and contact area measurements of a gecko toe using a high-resolution tactile sensor.

    PubMed

    Eason, Eric V; Hawkes, Elliot W; Windheim, Marc; Christensen, David L; Libby, Thomas; Cutkosky, Mark R

    2015-02-02

    The adhesive systems of geckos have been widely studied and have been a great source of bioinspiration. Load-sharing (i.e. preventing stress concentrations through equal distribution of loads) is necessary to maximize the performance of an adhesive system, but it is not known to what extent load-sharing occurs in gecko toes. In this paper, we present in vivo measurements of the stress distribution and contact area on the toes of a tokay gecko (Gekko gecko) using a custom tactile sensor with 100 μm spatial resolution. We found that the stress distributions were nonuniform, with large variations in stress between and within lamellae, suggesting that load-sharing in the tokay gecko is uneven. These results may be relevant to the understanding of gecko morphology and the design of improved synthetic adhesive systems.

  13. UAS and DTS: Using Drones and Fiber Optics to Measure High Resolution Temperature of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predosa, R. A.; Darricau, B.; Higgins, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is the lowest part of the atmosphere that directly interacts with the planet's surface. The development of the ABL plays a vital role, as it affects the transport of atmospheric constituents such as air pollutants, water vapor, and greenhouse gases. Measurements of the processes in the ABL have been difficult due to the limitations in the spatial and temporal resolutions of the equipment as well as the height of the traditional flux tower. Recent advances in the unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and distributed temperature sensing (DTS) technologies have provided us with new tools to study the complex processes in ABL. We conducted a series of pioneering experiments in Eastern Oregon using a platform that combines UAV and DTS to collect data during morning and evening transitions in the ABL. The major components of this platform consists of a quad-copter, a DTS computer unit, and a set of customized fiber optic cables. A total of 75 flights were completed to investigate: (1) the capability of a duplexed fiber optic cable to reduce noise in the high spatial and temporal temperature measurements taken during the morning transition; (2) the possibility of using fiber optic cable as "wet bulb" thermometer to calculate relative humidity in the ABL at high spatial and temporal resolution. The preliminary results showed that using a fiber optic cable in a duplexed configuration with the UAV-DTS platform can effectively reduce noise level during the morning transition data collection. The customized "wet bulb" fiber optic cable is capable of providing information for the calculation of relative humidity in the ABL at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. From this study, the UAV-DTS platform demonstrated great potential in collecting temperature data in the ABL and with the development of atmospheric sensor technologies, it will have more applications in the future.

  14. An Observational Method for Verifying Trends in Urban CO2 Emissions Using Continuous Measurements and High Resolution Meteorology (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wofsy, S. C.; McKain, K.; Eluszkiewicz, J.; Nehrkorn, T.; Pataki, D. E.; Ehleringer, J.

    2010-12-01

    Nations of the world are attempting to reach international and domestic agreements to limit greenhouse gas emissions. Participants will demonstrate their compliance to such commitments with self-reported emissions estimates based largely on measurements of behavior and generalized conversion factors. Atmospheric observations are the only source of information that will allow reported emissions to be independently and directly verified. Testing of observation-based verification methods is required to establish current capabilities, identify and prioritize areas for improvement, and ensure that policy goals are verifiable. In particular, observations made in major source regions, such as cities, could provide a great deal of information about trends and patterns in anthropogenic emissions with relatively modest investment. This study presents an inaugural effort to estimate carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from a city using atmospheric measurements. We have developed an observation-modeling framework to track changes in urban emissions, which, in addition to the observations, utilizes an atmospheric transport model and a prior emissions estimates. We have conducted a pilot study of the method using an existing longterm dataset of CO2 observations from Salt Lake City, Utah. Model-simulated CO2 concentrations track diurnal and synoptic patterns in observations reasonably well, although areas for improvement are evident. The modeling framework tends to underestimate observed CO2 enhancements, especially at night, which could be due to underestimated emissions and/or to excessive ventilation in the modeled meteorology. Despite some deficiencies, modeled and observed CO2 values are quantitatively and systematically related and application of a scaling factor to previously estimated emissions improves the match between modeled and observed values. This pilot-study presents a generalized, albeit provisional, method for using urban atmospheric greenhouse gas observations to

  15. Application of high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry measurements to estimate volatility distributions of α-pinene and naphthalene oxidation products

    DOE PAGES

    Chhabra, P. S.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Kimmel, J. R.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-01-05

    Recent developments in high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) have made it possible to directly detect atmospheric organic compounds in real time with high sensitivity and with little or no fragmentation, including low-volatility, highly oxygenated organic vapors that are precursors to secondary organic aerosol formation. Here, using ions identified by high-resolution spectra from an HR-ToF-CIMS with acetate reagent ion chemistry, we develop an algorithm to estimate the vapor pressures of measured organic acids. The algorithm uses identified ion formulas and calculated double bond equivalencies, information unavailable in quadrupole CIMS technology, as constraints for the number of possible oxygen-containing functionalmore » groups. The algorithm is tested with acetate chemical ionization mass spectrometry (acetate-CIMS) spectra of O3 and OH oxidation products of α-pinene and naphthalene formed in a flow reactor with integrated OH exposures ranged from 1.2 × 1011 to 9.7 × 1011 molec s cm−3, corresponding to approximately 1.0 to 7.5 days of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. Measured gas-phase organic acids are similar to those previously observed in environmental chamber studies. For both precursors, we find that acetate-CIMS spectra capture both functionalization (oxygen addition) and fragmentation (carbon loss) as a function of OH exposure. The level of fragmentation is observed to increase with increased oxidation. The predicted condensed-phase secondary organic aerosol (SOA) average acid yields and O/C and H/C ratios agree within uncertainties with previous chamber and flow reactor measurements and ambient CIMS results. While acetate reagent ion chemistry is used to selectively measure organic acids, in principle this method can be applied to additional reagent ion chemistries depending on the application.« less

  16. Background dust emission following grassland fire: a snapshot across the particle-size spectrum highlights how high-resolution measurements enhance detection

    SciTech Connect

    Whicker, Jeffrey J; Martin, Luis M; Field, Jason P; Villegas, Juan C; Brehsears, David D; Law, Darin J; Urgeghe, Anna M

    2009-01-01

    Dust emission rates vary temporally and with particle size. Many studies of dust emission focus on a particular temporal scale and the portion of the particle-size spectrum associated with a single instrument; fewer studies have assessed dust emission across the particle-size spectrum and associated temporal scales using multiple instruments. Particularly lacking are measurements following disturbances such as fire that are high-resolution and focused on finer particles - those with direct implications for human health and potential for long-distance biogeochemical transport - during less windy but more commonly occurring background conditions. We measured dust emissions in unburned and burned semiarid grassland using four different instruments spanning different combinations of temporal resolution and particle-size spectrum: Big Springs Number Eight (BSNE) and Sensit instruments for larger saltating particles, DustTrak instruments for smaller suspended particles, and Total Suspended Particulate (TSP) samplers for measuring the entire range of particle sizes. Unburned and burned sites differed in vegetation cover and aerodynamic roughness, yet surprisingly differences in dust emission rates were only detectable for saltation using BSNE and for smaller aerosols using DustTrak. Our results, surprising in the lack of consistently detected differences, indicate that high-resolution DustTrak measurements offered the greatest promise for detecting differences in background emission rates and that BSNE samplers, which integrate across height, were effective for longer intervals. More generally, our results suggest that interplay between particle size, temporal resolution, and integration across time and height can be complex and may need to be considered more explicitly for effective sampling for background dust emissions.

  17. High resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the calcaneus: age-related changes in trabecular structure and comparison with dual X-ray absorptiometry measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouyang, X.; Selby, K.; Lang, P.; Engelke, K.; Klifa, C.; Fan, B.; Zucconi, F.; Hottya, G.; Chen, M.; Majumdar, S.; Genant, H. K.

    1997-01-01

    A high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol, together with specialized image processing techniques, was applied to the quantitative measurement of age-related changes in calcaneal trabecular structure. The reproducibility of the technique was assessed and the annual rates of change for several trabecular structure parameters were measured. The MR-derived trabecular parameters were compared with calcaneal bone mineral density (BMD), measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in the same subjects. Sagittal MR images were acquired at 1.5 T in 23 healthy women (mean age: 49.3 +/- 16.6 [SD]), using a three-dimensional gradient echo sequence. Image analysis procedures included internal gray-scale calibration, bone and marrow segmentation, and run-length methods. Three trabecular structure parameters, apparent bone volume (ABV/TV), intercept thickness (I.Th), and intercept separation (I.Sp) were calculated from the MR images. The short- and long-term precision errors (mean %CV) of these measured parameters were in the ranges 1-2% and 3-6%, respectively. Linear regression of the trabecular structure parameters vs. age showed significant correlation: ABV/TV (r2 = 33.7%, P < 0.0037), I.Th (r2 = 26.6%, P < 0.0118), I.Sp (r2 = 28.9%, P < 0.0081). These trends with age were also expressed as annual rates of change: ABV/TV (-0.52%/year), I.Th (-0.33%/year), and I.Sp (0.59%/year). Linear regression analysis also showed significant correlation between the MR-derived trabecular structure parameters and calcaneal BMD values. Although a larger group of subjects is needed to better define the age-related changes in trabecular structure parameters and their relation to BMD, these preliminary results demonstrate that high-resolution MRI may potentially be useful for the quantitative assessment of trabecular structure.

  18. Tetragonal and collapsed-tetragonal phases of CaFe2As2 : A view from angle-resolved photoemission and dynamical mean-field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Roekeghem, Ambroise; Richard, Pierre; Shi, Xun; Wu, Shangfei; Zeng, Lingkun; Saparov, Bayrammurad; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Qian, Tian; Sefat, Athena S.; Biermann, Silke; Ding, Hong

    2016-06-01

    We present a study of the tetragonal to collapsed-tetragonal transition of CaFe2As2 using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and dynamical mean field theory-based electronic structure calculations. We observe that the collapsed-tetragonal phase exhibits reduced correlations and a higher coherence temperature due to the stronger Fe-As hybridization. Furthermore, a comparison of measured photoemission spectra and theoretical spectral functions shows that momentum-dependent corrections to the density functional band structure are essential for the description of low-energy quasiparticle dispersions. We introduce those using the recently proposed combined "screened exchange + dynamical mean field theory" scheme.

  19. Preferential occupation of interface bands in La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 films as seen via angle-resolved photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tebano, A.; Orsini, A.; Medaglia, P. G.; di Castro, D.; Balestrino, G.; Freelon, B.; Bostwick, A.; Chang, Young Jun; Gaines, G.; Rotenberg, E.; Saini, N. L.

    2010-12-01

    We performed in situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements on La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 thin and ultrathin films deposited onto SrTiO3 substrates in order to determine their electronic band structure. We directly identified, in ultrathin films, an enhancement of the occupation of the out-of-plane Mn3deg (3z2-r2) band at the expense of the in-plane 3deg (x2-y2) band. Such a disproportionate change in orbital occupation is interpreted as the origin of the strong depression of the magnetotransport properties at the interface between manganite films and substrates.

  20. Direct and High-Resolution Measurements of Retardation and Transport in Whole Rock Samples under Unsaturated Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Q.; Wang, J.

    2001-12-01

    Evaluation of chemical sorption and transport is very important in the investigations of contaminant remediation, risk assessment, and waste disposal (e.g., the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada). Characterization of transport parameters for whole rock samples has typically been performed in batch systems with arbitrary grain sizes and a high water/rock ratio. Measurement of these parameters under conditions more representative of fractured rocks in situ provides a better understanding of the processes occurring there. The effective Kd approach has been commonly employed to quantify the extent of contaminant-medium-fluid interactions. Unrepresentative Kd values will lead to unrealistic assessments of contaminant transport. Experimentally determined Kd values are predominantly obtained from batch experiments under saturated and well-mixed conditions. Batch-sorption experiments can be problematic because: (1) saturated conditions with large waterrock ratios are not representative of the in situ vadose condition, and (2) crushed rock samples are used, with the sample size (in the range of microns to sub-millimeters) chosen more or less arbitrarily and mainly for experimental convenience, and (3) for weakly sorbing contaminants, a batch-sorption approach can yield variable and even negative Kd values, because of the inherent methodology of calculating the Kd values by subtracting two large numbers (i.e., initial and final aqueous concentration). In this work, we use an unsaturated transport-sorption approach to quantify the sorption behavior of contaminants and evaluate the applicability of the conventional batch-sorption approach in unsaturated rock. Transient experiments are designed to investigate water imbibition and chemical transport into the rock sample (with size in the centimeter range) by contacting one end of a sample with water containing chemical tracers. Capillary-driven imbibition transports chemicals farther away

  1. High-resolution positron Q-value measurements and nuclear-structure studies far from the stability line. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Avignone, F.T. III.

    1981-02-28

    Extensive data analysis and theoretical analysis has been done to complete the extensive decay scheme investigation of /sup 206/ /sup 208/Fr and the level structures of /sup 206/ /sup 208/Rn. A final version of a journal article is presented in preprint form. Extensive Monte Carlo calculations have been made to correct the end point energies of positron spectra taken with intrinsic Ge detectors for annihilation radiation interferences. These calculations were tested using the decay of /sup 82/Sr which has previously measured positron branches. This technique was applied to the positron spectra collected at the on-line UNISOR isotope separator. The reactions used were /sup 60/Ni(/sup 20/Ne;p2n)/sup 77/Rb and /sup 60/Ni(/sup 20/Ne;pn)/sup 78/Rb. Values for 5, ..gamma..-..beta../sup +/ coincidence positron end point energies are given for the decay of /sup 77/Rb. The implied Q-value is 5.075 +- 0.010 MeV. A complete paper on the calculated corrections is presented. A flow chart of a more complete program which accounts for positrons scattering out of the detector and for bremsstralung radiation is also presented. End-point energies of four ..beta../sup +/ branches in /sup 77/Rb are given as well as a proposed energy level scheme of /sup 75/Kr based on ..gamma..-..gamma.. coincidence data taken at UNISOR.

  2. A New Automated Way to Measure Polyethylene Wear in THA Using a High Resolution CT Scanner: Method and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Maguire Jr., Gerald Q.; Noz, Marilyn E.; Olivecrona, Henrik; Zeleznik, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    As the most advantageous total hip arthroplasty (THA) operation is the first, timely replacement of only the liner is socially and economically important because the utilization of THA is increasing as younger and more active patients are receiving implants and they are living longer. Automatic algorithms were developed to infer liner wear by estimating the separation between the acetabular cup and femoral component head given a computed tomography (CT) volume. Two series of CT volumes of a hip phantom were acquired with the femoral component head placed at 14 different positions relative to the acetabular cup. The mean and standard deviation (SD) of the diameter of the acetabular cup and femoral component head, in addition to the range of error in the expected wear values and the repeatability of all the measurements, were calculated. The algorithms resulted in a mean (±SD) for the diameter of the acetabular cup of 54.21 (±0.011) mm and for the femoral component head of 22.09 (±0.02) mm. The wear error was ±0.1 mm and the repeatability was 0.077 mm. This approach is applicable clinically as it utilizes readily available computed tomography imaging systems and requires only five minutes of human interaction. PMID:24587727

  3. Exploiting artificial intelligence for in-situ analysis of high-resolution radio emission measurements on a CubeSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isham, Brett; Bergman, Jan; Krause, Linda; Rincon-Charris, Amilcar; Bruhn, Fredrik; Funk, Peter; Stramkals, Arturs

    2016-07-01

    CubeSat missions are intentionally constrained by the limitations of their small platform. Mission payloads designed for low volume, mass, and power, may however be disproportionally limited by available telemetry allocations. In many cases, it is the data delivered to the ground which determines the value of the mission. However, transmitting more data does not necessarily guarantee high value, since the value also depends on data quality. By exploiting fast on-board computing and efficient artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms for analysis and data selection, the usage of the telemetry link can be optimized and value added to the mission. This concept is being implemented on the Puerto Rico CubeSat, which will make measurements of ambient ionospheric radio waves and ion irregularities and turbulence. Principle project goals include providing aerospace and systems engineering experiences to students. Science objectives include the study of natural space plasma processes to aid in better understanding of space weather and the Sun to Earth connection, and in-situ diagnostics of ionospheric modification experiments using high-power ground-based radio transmitters. We hope that this project might point the way to the productive use of AI in space and other remote, low-data-bandwidth environments.

  4. Imaging crystal spectrometer for high-resolution x-ray measurements on electron beam ion traps and tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Hell, N.; Brown, G. V.

    2016-11-01

    We describe a crystal spectrometer implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps that employ two spherically bent quartz crystals and a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector to measure x rays with a nominal resolving power of λ/Δλ ≥ 10 000. Its focusing properties allow us to record x rays either with the plane of dispersion perpendicular or parallel to the electron beam and, thus, to preferentially select one of the two linear x-ray polarization components. Moreover, by choice of dispersion plane and focussing conditions, we use the instrument either to image the distribution of the ions within the 2 cm long trap region, or to concentrate x rays of a given energy to a point on the detector, which optimizes the signal-to-noise ratio. We demonstrate the operation and utility of the new instrument by presenting spectra of Mo34+, which prepares the instrument for use as a core impurity diagnostic on the NSTX-U spherical torus and other magnetic fusion devices that employ molybdenum as plasma facing components.

  5. Multi-Needle Langmuir Probe concept for high-resolution plasma density measurements: A potential novel plasma sensor for Cubesats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moen, J.; Pedersen, A.; Bekkeng, T. A.; Lindem, T.; Jacobsen, K. S.

    2008-09-01

    A new concept Langmuir probe to measure absolute electron density at 2 kHz sampling rate will be presented. It comprises multiple Needle Langmuir Probes (m-NLP) with diameter smaller than the Debye shielding length. Each probe is fixed at a different potential, positive above the platform potential to draw electrons. With this method we eliminate the need to determine the electron temperature in deriving the electron density. A 4-NLP system has now been completed for the ICI-2 sounding rocket to investigate HF radar backscatter irregularities above Svalbard in December 2008. The weight of the experiment is <100g, i.e. a low weight and high performance instrument. Simulations and test results from the plasma tank at ESTEC will be presented. Furthermore we will outline a preliminary plan for an m-NLP system to be prepared for a Norwegian Cubesat. The main motivation is to develop a new capability to monitor Fregion irregularities in Equatorial and Polar Regions, that is a particularly relevant space weather issue for satellite communication and navigation systems.

  6. The effects of magnetic fields exposure on relative permittivity of saline solutions measured by a high resolution SPR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li; Zhao, Xinyuan; Fei, Yue; Yu, Dongdong; Qian, Jun; Tong, Jinguang; Chen, Guangdi; He, Sailing

    2016-04-01

    A measurement system for the relative permittivity of a physiological solution under 50 Hz magnetic fields (MF) is presented. It is based on a phase-sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR) system. Relative permittivity was analyzed for different solute concentrations of sodium chloride under various MF exposure parameters. We found that MF exposure at 0.2–4.0 mT step-wise decreased significantly the SPR phase signal of a 0.9% sodium chloride solution while 0.1 mT of MF exposure did not. The decreases in the SPR phase signal depended on the duration of MF exposure, and the signal reached a plateau after 15 min of exposure. Interestingly, the decreased SPR phase signal showed a gradual increase and approached the background level when the exposure was drawn off. In addition, we found that the response of the sodium chloride solution to MF also depended on its concentration. In brief, the relative permittivity of sodium chloride in solutions appears to be practically affected by 50 Hz MF exposure. Our data indicates that the relative permittivity of the saline solution influenced by MF exposure should be considered when investigating the biological effects of MF exposure on organisms in experimental study.

  7. Prominent conjugate processes in the PCI recapture of photoelectrons revealed by high resolution Auger electron measurements of Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Yoshiro; Kosugi, Satoshi; Suzuki, Norihiro; Shigemasa, Eiji; Iwayama, Hiroshi; Koike, Fumihiro

    2016-05-01

    The Xe (N5O2 , 3O2 , 3) Auger electron spectrum originating from 4d5/ 2 - 1 photoionization was measured with the photon energy tuned very close above the ionization threshold. As the photon energy approached the 4d5/ 2 - 1 photoionization threshold, Rydberg series structures including several angular momentum components were formed within the Auger profile by the recapture of the photoelectrons into high-lying final ion orbitals. Our spectrum with resolution much narrower than the lifetime width of the corresponding core excited state allowed us to resolve detailed structures due to the orbital angular momenta very clearly. Unexpectedly, conjugate peaks originating from the exchange of angular momentum between the photoelectron and the Auger electron through Post-Collision-Interaction were found to dominate the spectrum. The new assignments were in accord with the quantum defect values obtained for the high Rydberg series for singly charged ionic Xe + 5 p(1S0) ml. This work was supported by Japan Society for the Promotion of Science through Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research No. 23600009.

  8. The effects of magnetic fields exposure on relative permittivity of saline solutions measured by a high resolution SPR system

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Li; Zhao, Xinyuan; Fei, Yue; Yu, Dongdong; Qian, Jun; Tong, Jinguang; Chen, Guangdi; He, Sailing

    2016-01-01

    A measurement system for the relative permittivity of a physiological solution under 50 Hz magnetic fields (MF) is presented. It is based on a phase-sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR) system. Relative permittivity was analyzed for different solute concentrations of sodium chloride under various MF exposure parameters. We found that MF exposure at 0.2–4.0 mT step-wise decreased significantly the SPR phase signal of a 0.9% sodium chloride solution while 0.1 mT of MF exposure did not. The decreases in the SPR phase signal depended on the duration of MF exposure, and the signal reached a plateau after 15 min of exposure. Interestingly, the decreased SPR phase signal showed a gradual increase and approached the background level when the exposure was drawn off. In addition, we found that the response of the sodium chloride solution to MF also depended on its concentration. In brief, the relative permittivity of sodium chloride in solutions appears to be practically affected by 50 Hz MF exposure. Our data indicates that the relative permittivity of the saline solution influenced by MF exposure should be considered when investigating the biological effects of MF exposure on organisms in experimental study. PMID:27121618

  9. Sensitivity of honeybee hygroreceptors to slow humidity changes and temporal humidity variation detected in high resolution by mobile measurements.

    PubMed

    Tichy, Harald; Kallina, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The moist cell and the dry cell on the antenna of the male honeybee were exposed to humidities slowly rising and falling at rates between -1.5%/s and +1.5%/s and at varying amplitudes in the 10 to 90% humidity range. The two cells respond to these slow humidity oscillations with oscillations in impulse frequency which depend not only on instantaneous humidity but also on the rate with which humidity changes. The impulse frequency of each cell was plotted as a function of these two parameters and regression planes were fitted to the data points of single oscillation periods. The regression slopes, which estimate sensitivity, rose with the amplitude of humidity oscillations. During large-amplitude oscillations, moist and dry cell sensitivity for instantaneous humidity and its rate of change was high. During small-amplitude oscillations, their sensitivity for both parameters was low, less exactly reflecting humidity fluctuations. Nothing is known about the spatial and temporal humidity variations a honeybee may encounter when flying through natural environments. Microclimatic parameters (absolute humidity, temperature, wind speed) were measured from an automobile traveling through different landscapes of Lower Austria. Landscape type affected extremes and mean values of humidity. Differences between peaks and troughs of humidity fluctuations were generally smaller in open grassy fields or deciduous forests than in edge habitats or forest openings. Overall, fluctuation amplitudes were small. In this part of the stimulus range, hygroreceptor sensitivity is not optimal for encoding instantaneous humidity and the rate of humidity change. It seems that honeybee's hygroreceptors are specialized for detecting large-amplitude fluctuations that are relevant for a specific behavior, namely, maintaining a sufficiently stable state of water balance. The results suggest that optimal sensitivity of both hygroreceptors is shaped not only by humidity oscillation amplitudes but also

  10. A statistical look at turbulence from high-resolution temperature measurements above a deep-ocean sloping seafloor.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimatoribus, Andrea; van Haren, Hans

    2016-04-01

    A detailed analysis of the statistics of temperature in an oceanographic observational dataset is presented. The data is collected using a moored array of 144 thermistors, 100m tall, deployed above the slopes of a seamount in the North Eastern Atlantic Ocean from April to August 2013. The thermistors are built in-house at the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, and provide a precision better than 10‑3 K and very low noise levels. The thermistors measure temperature every second, synchronised throughout the moored array. The thermistor array ends 5m above the bottom, and no bottom mixed layer is visible in the data, indicating that restratification is constantly occurring and that a mixed layer is either absent or very thin. Intense turbulence is observed, and a strong dependence of turbulence parameters on the phase of the semidiurnal tidal wave (the dominant frequency in the power spectrum) is also evident. We present an overview of the results obtained form this dataset, exploiting the unprecedent detail of the observations. We compute the statistical moments (generalised structure functions) of order up to 10 of the distributions of temperature increments. Strong intermittency is observed, in particular, during the downslope phase of the tide, and farther from the seafloor. In the lower half of the mooring during the upslope phase, the temperature statistics are consistent with those of a passive scalar. In the upper half of the mooring, the temperature statistics deviate from those of a passive scalar, and evidence of turbulent convective activity is found. The downslope phase is generally thought to be more shear-dominated, but our results suggest on the other hand that convective activity is present. High-order moments also show that the turbulence scaling behaviour breaks at a well-defined scale (of the order of the buoyancy length scale), which is however dependent on the flow state (tidal phase, height above the bottom). At larger scales, wave

  11. A statistical look at turbulence from high-resolution temperature measurements above a deep-ocean sloping seafloor.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimatoribus, Andrea; van Haren, Hans

    2016-04-01

    A detailed analysis of the statistics of temperature in an oceanographic observational dataset is presented. The data is collected using a moored array of 144 thermistors, 100m tall, deployed above the slopes of a seamount in the North Eastern Atlantic Ocean from April to August 2013. The thermistors are built in-house at the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, and provide a precision better than 10-3 K and very low noise levels. The thermistors measure temperature every second, synchronised throughout the moored array. The thermistor array ends 5m above the bottom, and no bottom mixed layer is visible in the data, indicating that restratification is constantly occurring and that a mixed layer is either absent or very thin. Intense turbulence is observed, and a strong dependence of turbulence parameters on the phase of the semidiurnal tidal wave (the dominant frequency in the power spectrum) is also evident. We present an overview of the results obtained form this dataset, exploiting the unprecedent detail of the observations. We compute the statistical moments (generalised structure functions) of order up to 10 of the distributions of temperature increments. Strong intermittency is observed, in particular, during the downslope phase of the tide, and farther from the seafloor. In the lower half of the mooring during the upslope phase, the temperature statistics are consistent with those of a passive scalar. In the upper half of the mooring, the temperature statistics deviate from those of a passive scalar, and evidence of turbulent convective activity is found. The downslope phase is generally thought to be more shear-dominated, but our results suggest on the other hand that convective activity is present. High-order moments also show that the turbulence scaling behaviour breaks at a well-defined scale (of the order of the buoyancy length scale), which is however dependent on the flow state (tidal phase, height above the bottom). At larger scales, wave

  12. Sensitivity of Honeybee Hygroreceptors to Slow Humidity Changes and Temporal Humidity Variation Detected in High Resolution by Mobile Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Tichy, Harald; Kallina, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The moist cell and the dry cell on the antenna of the male honeybee were exposed to humidities slowly rising and falling at rates between –1.5%/s and +1.5%/s and at varying amplitudes in the 10 to 90% humidity range. The two cells respond to these slow humidity oscillations with oscillations in impulse frequency which depend not only on instantaneous humidity but also on the rate with which humidity changes. The impulse frequency of each cell was plotted as a function of these two parameters and regression planes were fitted to the data points of single oscillation periods. The regression slopes, which estimate sensitivity, rose with the amplitude of humidity oscillations. During large-amplitude oscillations, moist and dry cell sensitivity for instantaneous humidity and its rate of change was high. During small-amplitude oscillations, their sensitivity for both parameters was low, less exactly reflecting humidity fluctuations. Nothing is known about the spatial and temporal humidity variations a honeybee may encounter when flying through natural environments. Microclimatic parameters (absolute humidity, temperature, wind speed) were measured from an automobile traveling through different landscapes of Lower Austria. Landscape type affected extremes and mean values of humidity. Differences between peaks and troughs of humidity fluctuations were generally smaller in open grassy fields or deciduous forests than in edge habitats or forest openings. Overall, fluctuation amplitudes were small. In this part of the stimulus range, hygroreceptor sensitivity is not optimal for encoding instantaneous humidity and the rate of humidity change. It seems that honeybee's hygroreceptors are specialized for detecting large-amplitude fluctuations that are relevant for a specific behavior, namely, maintaining a sufficiently stable state of water balance. The results suggest that optimal sensitivity of both hygroreceptors is shaped not only by humidity oscillation amplitudes but also

  13. High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, Jeff; Goetz, Alexander F. H.

    1990-01-01

    Earth resources observed in greater detail. High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer, undergoing development for use in NASA's Earth Observing System, measures reflectance of Earth's surface in visible and near-infrared wavelengths. From an orbit around Earth, instrument scans surface of Earth in 200 wavelength bands simultaneously. Produces images enabling identification of minerals in rocks and soils, important algal pigments in oceans and inland waters, changes in spectra associated with biochemistry of plant canopies, compositions of atmospheric aerosols, sizes of grains in snow, and contamination of snow by impurities that absorb visible light.

  14. in situ studied correlated oxide LaNiO3 ultra thin film by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, H. K.; Chang, Y. J.; Kim, K. S.; Moreschini, L.; Jeong, D. W.; Kim, Y. S.; Bostwick, A.; Rotenberg, E.; Noh, T. W.

    2012-02-01

    Recently, RNiO3 (R: rare earth) attracted increasing attention due to the possible realization of the electronic band structure similar to the high-temperature superconductor cuprates. Among them, LaNiO3 based heterostructures have shown various fascinating physical properties such as dimensionality controlled electronic phase transitions. Theoretical works on confined LaNiO3 through heterostructuring predicted cuprate-like band structure and magnetic properties. Here, we reports in-situ angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy results on the LaNiO3 films grown by pulsed laser deposition method. We carefully controlled the thickness of LaNiO3 films from one to 30 unit cells and measured the thickness dependent band dispersions. First, we will discuss the strong electronic correlation effect in bulk-like band structure of thick LaNiO3 films comparing to the previously reported LDA+DMFT calculation. Moreover, we will discuss the thickness dependent band structure. As decreasing the film thickness, we observed the charge redistribution of two Ni eg orbitals at the Fermi surface. The origins of thickness dependent electronic structure will be discussed.

  15. Interlayer-state-driven superconductivity in CaC6 studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyung, Wonshik; Kim, Yeongkwan; Han, Garam; Leem, Choonshik; Kim, Chul; Koh, Yoonyoung; Kim, Beomyoung; Kim, Youngwook; Kim, Jun Sung; Kim, Keun Su; Rotenberg, Eli; Denlinger, Jonathan D.; Kim, Changyoung

    2015-12-01

    We performed angle-resolved photoemission experiments on CaC6 and measured kz-dependent electronic structures to investigate the interlayer states. The results reveal a spherical interlayer Fermi surface centered at the Γ point. We also find that the graphene-driven band possesses a weak kz dispersion. The overall electronic structure shows a peculiar single-graphene-layer periodicity in the kz direction although the CaC6 unit cell is supposed to contain three graphene layers. This suggests that the c -axis ordering of Ca has little effect on the electronic structure of CaC6. In addition to CaC6, we also studied the a low-temperature superconductor BaC6. For BaC6, the graphene-band Dirac-point energy is smaller than that of CaC6. Based on data from CaC6 and BaC6, we rule out the Cx y phonon mode as the origin of the superconductivity in CaC6, which strongly suggests interlayer-state-driven superconductivity.

  16. High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy with Simultaneous Energy and Momentum Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xuetao; Cao, Yanwei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Jia, Xun; Guo, Qinlin; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Linfan; Kesmodel, Larry; Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, Ward; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-03-01

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) has been demonstrated as a powerful technique to probe vibrational and electronic surface excitations of solids. The dispersion relation of the surface excitations, i.e. energy as a function of momentum, can be obtained via the angle resolved measurements by rotating the sample or the analyzer in a conventional HREELS measurement. The sampling density in the momentum space and the detecting efficiency are restricted by the mechanical rotation. Here we introduce a new design of the HREELS system, by combining the traditional Ibach-type electron source with the mainstream hemispherical electron energy analyzer, which could simultaneously measure the energy and momentum of the scattered electrons without any mechanical rotation. The new system possesses higher efficiency and sampling density of momentum-resolved measurements by at least one order of magnitude than conventional spectrometers without deteriorating the resolution of energy and momentum. Using Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ as an example, we show that an energy loss spectrum can be scanned throughout the first Brillouin zone and a momentum-dependent spectral intensity distribution could be obtained in one measurement.

  17. High Resolution Laboratory Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brünken, S.; Schlemmer, S.

    2016-05-01

    In this short review we will highlight some of the recent advancements in the field of high-resolution laboratory spectroscopy that meet the needs dictated by the advent of highly sensitive and broadband telescopes like ALMA and SOFIA. Among these is the development of broadband techniques for the study of complex organic molecules, like fast scanning conventional absorption spectroscopy based on multiplier chains, chirped pulse instrumentation, or the use of synchrotron facilities. Of similar importance is the extension of the accessible frequency range to THz frequencies, where many light hydrides have their ground state rotational transitions. Another key experimental challenge is the production of sufficiently high number densities of refractory and transient species in the laboratory, where discharges have proven to be efficient sources that can also be coupled to molecular jets. For ionic molecular species sensitive action spectroscopic schemes have recently been developed to overcome some of the limitations of conventional absorption spectroscopy. Throughout this review examples demonstrating the strong interplay between laboratory and observational studies will be given.

  18. Dirac Fermions in graphene and graphite---a view from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shuyun

    The research in graphene has exploded in the past few years, due to its intriguing physics as an emerging paradigm for relativistic condensed matter physics as well as its great promise for application in next generation electronics. Understanding the low energy electronic structure of graphene is fundamental as most of the intriguing properties of graphene arise from its peculiar electronic dispersion, which resembles that of relativistic Dirac Fermions. This thesis presents a detailed study of the low energy electronic structure of graphene and its related three dimensional material - graphite - by using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), a direct probe of the electronic structure. In particular, the evolution of the Dirac Fermions in graphene and graphite as well as the effect of impurities is the focus of this thesis. This thesis is organized as follows. The first chapter is an introduction of the electronic structure of graphene and graphite, and the specialty of Dirac fermions compared to quasiparticles in conventional condensed matter systems. Chapter 2 is an introduction of the techniques used throughout this thesis - angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and low energy electron microscopy (LEEM). Chapter 3 discusses the growth and characterization of epitaxial graphene on SiC wafers. Chapters 4 and 5 present the ARPES results on epitaxial graphene, the evolution of the low energy electronic dynamics as a function of sample thickness and how to make graphene a finite band gap semiconductor. More specifically, chapter 4 discusses how a gap is induced between the valence and conduction bands by graphene-substrate interaction and chapter 6 shows how a reversible metal-insulator transition can be possibly induced in epitaxial graphene by hole doping. Chapters 6 and 7 show the ARPES results on three dimensional graphite samples. Chapter 6 shows the coexistence of Dirac fermions with massive

  19. MISTiC Winds, a Micro-Satellite Constellation Approach to High Resolution Observations of the Atmosphere using Infrared Sounding and 3D Winds Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maschhoff, K. R.; Polizotti, J. J.; Susskind, J.; Aumann, H. H.

    2015-12-01

    MISTiCTM Winds is an approach to improve short-term weather forecasting based on a miniature high resolution, wide field, thermal emission spectrometry instrument that will provide global tropospheric vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature and humidity at high (3-4 km) horizontal and vertical ( 1 km) spatial resolution. MISTiC's extraordinarily small size, payload mass of less than 15 kg, and minimal cooling requirements can be accommodated aboard a 27U-class CubeSat or an ESPA-Class micro-satellite. Low fabrication and launch costs enable a LEO sun-synchronous sounding constellation that would collectively provide frequent IR vertical profiles and vertically resolved atmospheric motion vector wind observations in the troposphere. These observations are highly complementary to present and emerging environmental observing systems, and would provide a combination of high vertical and horizontal resolution not provided by any other environmental observing system currently in operation. The spectral measurements that would be provided by MISTiC Winds are similar to those of NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder that was built by BAE Systems and operates aboard the AQUA satellite. These new observations, when assimilated into high resolution numerical weather models, would revolutionize short-term and severe weather forecasting, save lives, and support key economic decisions in the energy, air transport, and agriculture arenas-at much lower cost than providing these observations from geostationary orbit. In addition, this observation capability would be a critical tool for the study of transport processes for water vapor, clouds, pollution, and aerosols. Key technical risks are being reduced through laboratory and airborne testing under NASA's Instrument Incubator Program.

  20. High resolution measurements of methane and carbon dioxide in surface waters over a natural seep reveal dynamics of dissolved phase air-sea flux.

    PubMed

    Du, Mengran; Yvon-Lewis, Shari; Garcia-Tigreros, Fenix; Valentine, David L; Mendes, Stephanie D; Kessler, John D

    2014-09-01

    Marine hydrocarbon seeps are sources of methane and carbon dioxide to the ocean, and potentially to the atmosphere, though the magnitude of the fluxes and dynamics of these systems are poorly defined. To better constrain these variables in natural environments, we conducted the first high-resolution measurements of sea surface methane and carbon dioxide concentrations in the massive natural seep field near Coal Oil Point (COP), California. The corresponding high resolution fluxes were calculated, and the total dissolved phase air-sea fluxes over the surveyed plume area (∼363 km(2)) were 6.66 × 10(4) to 6.71 × 10(4) mol day(-1) with respect to CH4 and -6.01 × 10(5) to -5.99 × 10(5) mol day(-1) with respect to CO2. The mean and standard deviation of the dissolved phase air-sea fluxes of methane and carbon dioxide from the contour gridding analysis were estimated to be 0.18 ± 0.19 and -1.65 ± 1.23 mmol m(-2) day(-1), respectively. This methane flux is consistent with previous, lower-resolution estimates and was used, in part, to conservatively estimate the total area of the dissolved methane plume at 8400 km(2). The influx of carbon dioxide to the surface water refutes the hypothesis that COP seep methane appreciably influences carbon dioxide dynamics. Seeing that the COP seep field is one of the biggest natural seeps, a logical conclusion could be drawn that microbial oxidation of methane from natural seeps is of insufficient magnitude to change the resulting plume area from a sink of atmospheric carbon dioxide to a source.

  1. Mapping of ferroelectric domain structure using angle-resolved piezoresponse force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K. L.; Huber, J. E.

    2015-01-15

    Angle-resolved piezoresponse force microscopy (AR-PFM) was used in conjunction with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to study ferroelectric domain structure in polycrystalline near-morphotropic lead zirconate titanate (PZT). We introduce the details of AR-PFM including experimental method, the process to generate AR-PFM maps, and the interpretation of AR-PFM map, using domain patterns observed in bulk PZT. The spatial distortion caused by scanner creep and non-linearity in scanning probe microscopy was corrected through image registration, taking advantage of the features present in topography images. Domain structures were mapped using AR-PFM data, and the maps consistently show alternating piezoresponse axes in a lamellar pattern of non-180° domain structure. Comparison of AR-PFM and EBSD data showed a discrepancy between the direction of lateral surface displacement and the in-plane polarization direction. Additionally, using suitable domain patterns, AR-PFM enabled discrimination between the tetragonal and rhombohedral phases at the sub-grain scale.

  2. Angle-resolved photoelectron cross section of CF/sub 4/

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, T.A.; Fahlman, A.; Svensson, W.A.; Krause, M.O.; Whitley, T.A.; Grimm, F.A.; Piancastelli, M.N.; Taylor, J.W.

    1984-11-01

    Partial photoelectron cross sections sigma and angular distribution parameters ..beta.. were obtained for the first five valence orbitals in CF/sub 4/: 1t/sub 1/, 4t/sub 2/, 1e, 3t/sub 2/, and 4a/sub 1/, as a function of photon energy from 17 to 70 eV. These data were taken with the aid of angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation. The results were compared with earlier data on CCl/sub 4/. Substantial differences were found. These are explained partly in terms of the absence of a Cooper minimum with a fluorine compound as opposed to the presence of a Cooper minimum with chlorine compounds and partly in terms of the position of shape resonances. Data on CF/sub 4/ were also compared with recent calculations of Stephens et al., who used the multiple-scattering X..cap alpha.. method. Structure in the photoelectron spectrum of CF/sub 4/ lying on the low energy side of the third band was identified as due to autoionization and evidence is given as to its specific nature.

  3. Angle resolved photoemission from organic semiconductors: orbital imaging beyond the molecular orbital interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauth, M.; Wiessner, M.; Feyer, V.; Schöll, A.; Puschnig, P.; Reinert, F.; Kümmel, S.

    2014-10-01

    Fascinating pictures that can be interpreted as showing molecular orbitals have been obtained with various imaging techniques. Among these, angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has emerged as a particularly powerful method. Orbital images have been used to underline the physical credibility of the molecular orbital concept. However, from the theory of the photoemission process it is evident that imaging experiments do not show molecular orbitals, but Dyson orbitals. The latter are not eigenstates of a single-particle Hamiltonian and thus do not fit into the usual simple interpretation of electronic structure in terms of molecular orbitals. In a combined theoretical and experimental study we thus check whether a Dyson-orbital and a molecular-orbital based interpretation of ARPES lead to differences that are relevant on the experimentally observable scale. We discuss a scheme that allows for approximately calculating Dyson orbitals with moderate computational effort. Electronic relaxation is taken into account explicitly. The comparison reveals that while molecular orbitals are frequently good approximations to Dyson orbitals, a detailed understanding of photoemission intensities may require one to go beyond the molecular orbital picture. In particular we clearly observe signatures of the Dyson-orbital character for an adsorbed semiconductor molecule in ARPES spectra when these are recorded over a larger momentum range than in earlier experiments.

  4. Mapping of ferroelectric domain structure using angle-resolved piezoresponse force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, K L; Huber, J E

    2015-01-01

    Angle-resolved piezoresponse force microscopy (AR-PFM) was used in conjunction with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to study ferroelectric domain structure in polycrystalline near-morphotropic lead zirconate titanate (PZT). We introduce the details of AR-PFM including experimental method, the process to generate AR-PFM maps, and the interpretation of AR-PFM map, using domain patterns observed in bulk PZT. The spatial distortion caused by scanner creep and non-linearity in scanning probe microscopy was corrected through image registration, taking advantage of the features present in topography images. Domain structures were mapped using AR-PFM data, and the maps consistently show alternating piezoresponse axes in a lamellar pattern of non-180° domain structure. Comparison of AR-PFM and EBSD data showed a discrepancy between the direction of lateral surface displacement and the in-plane polarization direction. Additionally, using suitable domain patterns, AR-PFM enabled discrimination between the tetragonal and rhombohedral phases at the sub-grain scale. PMID:25638088

  5. Mapping of ferroelectric domain structure using angle-resolved piezoresponse force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. L.; Huber, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Angle-resolved piezoresponse force microscopy (AR-PFM) was used in conjunction with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to study ferroelectric domain structure in polycrystalline near-morphotropic lead zirconate titanate (PZT). We introduce the details of AR-PFM including experimental method, the process to generate AR-PFM maps, and the interpretation of AR-PFM map, using domain patterns observed in bulk PZT. The spatial distortion caused by scanner creep and non-linearity in scanning probe microscopy was corrected through image registration, taking advantage of the features present in topography images. Domain structures were mapped using AR-PFM data, and the maps consistently show alternating piezoresponse axes in a lamellar pattern of non-180° domain structure. Comparison of AR-PFM and EBSD data showed a discrepancy between the direction of lateral surface displacement and the in-plane polarization direction. Additionally, using suitable domain patterns, AR-PFM enabled discrimination between the tetragonal and rhombohedral phases at the sub-grain scale.

  6. Coulomb disorder effects on angle-resolved photoemission and nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra in cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Khaliullin, Giniyat; Sushkov, Oleg P.

    2009-09-01

    The role of Coulomb disorder, either of extrinsic origin or introduced by dopant ions in undoped and lightly doped cuprates, is studied. We demonstrate that charged surface defects in an insulator lead to a Gaussian broadening of the angle-resolved photoemisson spectroscopy (ARPES) lines. The effect is due to the long-range nature of the Coulomb interaction. A tiny surface concentration of defects about a fraction of one percent is sufficient to explain the line broadening observed in Sr2CuO2Cl2 , La2CuO4 , and Ca2CuO2Cl2 . Due to the Coulomb screening, the ARPES spectra evolve dramatically with doping, changing their shape from a broad Gaussian form to narrow Lorentzian ones. To understand the screening mechanism and the line-shape evolution in detail, we perform Hartree-Fock simulations with random positions of surface defects and dopant ions. To check validity of the model we calculate the nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) line shapes as a function of doping and reproduce the experimentally observed NQR spectra. Our study also indicates opening of a substantial Coulomb gap at the chemical potential. For a surface CuO2 layer the value of the gap is on the order of 10 meV while in the bulk it is reduced to the value about a few meV.

  7. Identifying ferroelectric phase and domain structure using angle-resolved piezoresponse force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K. L.; Huber, J. E.

    2014-03-24

    We used angle-resolved piezoresponse force microscopy (AR-PFM), vertical PFM (VPFM), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to provide a systematic interpretation of domain patterns in polycrystalline, near-morphotropic lead zirconate titanate. This material was used to illustrate the power of AR-PFM methods in resolving complex domain patterns where multiple phases may be present. AR-PFM was carried out with a 30° rotation interval, and the resulting data were analysed to identify the orientation of the underlying axis of piezoelectricity. The additional information provided by AR-PFM was studied, comparing its capabilities to those of 3-dimensional PFM, consisting of one VPFM image and two orthogonal lateral PFM (LPFM) images. We show that, in certain conditions, using AR-PFM can identify the phases present at the sub-grain scale. This was confirmed using VPFM and EBSD data. Furthermore, the method can discriminate laminated domain patterns that appear similar in VPFM and can reliably expose domain patterns that may not be seen in LPFM data from a single orientation, or even in 3D PFM data.

  8. Measuring Hg and MeHg fluxes from dynamic systems using high resolution in situ monitoring - case study: the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleck, J. A.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Downing, B. D.; Lionberger, M. A.; Schoellhamer, D.; Boss, E.; Heim, W.; Stephenson, M.

    2006-12-01

    Quantifying net loads in tidal systems is difficult, time consuming, and often very expensive. Owing to the relatively rapid nature of tidal exchange, numerous measurements are required in a brief amount of time to accurately quantify constituent fluxes between a tidal wetland and its surrounding waters. Further complicating matters, the differences in chemical concentrations of a constituent between the flood and ebb tides are often small, so that the net export of the constituent is orders of magnitude smaller than the bulk exchange in either direction over the tidal cycle. Thus, high-resolution sampling coupled with high-sensitivity instruments over an adequate amount of time is required to accurately determine a net flux. These complications are exacerbated for mercury species because of the difficulties related to clean sampling and trace-level analysis. The USGS currently is collecting data to determine the fluxes of total mercury (Hg) and methyl-Hg (MeHg) in dissolved and particulate phases at Browns Island in the San Francisco Bay-Delta, a tidally influenced estuarine system. Our field deployment package consists of an upward-looking current profiler to quantify water flux, and an array of other instruments measuring the following parameters: UV absorption, DO, pH, salinity, temperature, water depth, optical backscatter, fluorescence, and spectral attenuation. Measurements are collected at 30-minute intervals for seasonal, month-long deployments in the main slough of Brown's Island. We infer Hg and MeHg concentrations by using multivariate analysis of spectral absorbance and fluorescence properties of the continuous measurements, and comparing them to those of discrete samples taken hourly over a 25-hour tidal cycle for each deployment. Preliminary results indicate that in situ measurements can be used to predict MeHg concentrations in a tidal wetland slough in both the filtered (r2=0.96) and unfiltered (r2=0.95) fractions. Despite seasonal differences in

  9. High-resolution imaging ellipsometer.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Qiwen; Leger, James R

    2002-08-01

    We report on a novel imaging ellipsometer using a high-numerical-aperture (NA) objective lens capable of measuring a two-dimensional ellipsometric signal with high resolution. Two-dimensional ellipsometric imaging is made possible by spatial filtering at the pupil plane of the objective. A Richards-Wolf vectorial diffraction model and geometrical optics model are developed to simulate the system. The thickness profile of patterned polymethyl methacrylate is measured for calibration purposes. Our instrument has a sensitivity of 5 A and provides spatial resolution of approximately 0.5 microm with 632.8-nm illumination. Its capability of measuring refractive-index variations with high spatial resolution is also demonstrated.

  10. A high resolution TDC subsystem

    SciTech Connect

    Geiges, R.; Merle, K. )

    1994-02-01

    A high resolution TDC subsystem was developed at the Institute for Nuclear Physics in Mainz. The TDC chip offers a time resolution of less than 300 ps and a programmable measurement range from 0 to 16 [mu]sec. The time measurement is done with a new, purely digital counting method. The chip can be operated in common start or common stop mode. In common start mode the chip is able to store up to 4 multiple hits per channel. The chip is used to build a transputer controlled subsystem for the measurement of the drift times of a vertical drift chamber. The design of the subsystem will be described and the first results from the tests of the prototype system will be presented.

  11. High-resolution and nondestructive profile measurement by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography with a visible broadband light source for optical-device fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Tsuyoshi; Ozaki, Nobuhiko; Oikawa, Yoichi; Miyaji, Kunio; Ohsato, Hirotaka; Watanabe, Eiichiro; Ikeda, Naoki; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa

    2016-08-01

    We developed a spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) using a visible broadband light source (vis-OCT) for application to high-resolution and nondestructive profile measurement and imaging in semiconductor optical-device fabrication. By using visible broadband light centered at 625 nm and with spectral bandwidth of 260 nm, an axial resolution of 0.69 µm in air was obtained. This was effective for inspection of a transparent photoresist film with thickness of 1-2 µm coated on a semiconductor wafer; the interface between the photoresist film and its substrate and the interface between the photoresist and air were resolved, and the film thickness was measured. In addition, the interface between an opaque epitaxially grown semiconductor layer (Al0.35Ga0.65As) and a GaAs substrate was also detected by vis-OCT. Here we propose a thickness-measurement technique that combines finite-difference time-domain simulation with vis-OCT. This method enables us to determine the thickness of even an optically absorbent epitaxial layer and offers a profile-measurement method that is particularly suitable for the fabrication of semiconductor optical devices.

  12. Conformational ordering of biomolecules in the gas phase: nitrogen collision cross sections measured on a prototype high resolution drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    May, Jody C; Goodwin, Cody R; Lareau, Nichole M; Leaptrot, Katrina L; Morris, Caleb B; Kurulugama, Ruwan T; Mordehai, Alex; Klein, Christian; Barry, William; Darland, Ed; Overney, Gregor; Imatani, Kenneth; Stafford, George C; Fjeldsted, John C; McLean, John A

    2014-02-18

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry measurements which describe the gas-phase scaling of molecular size and mass are of both fundamental and pragmatic utility. Fundamentally, such measurements expand our understanding of intrinsic intramolecular folding forces in the absence of solvent. Practically, reproducible transport properties, such as gas-phase collision cross-section (CCS), are analytically useful metrics for identification and characterization purposes. Here, we report 594 CCS values obtained in nitrogen drift gas on an electrostatic drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) instrument. The instrument platform is a newly developed prototype incorporating a uniform-field drift tube bracketed by electrodynamic ion funnels and coupled to a high resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The CCS values reported here are of high experimental precision (±0.5% or better) and represent four chemically distinct classes of molecules (quaternary ammonium salts, lipids, peptides, and carbohydrates), which enables structural comparisons to be made between molecules of different chemical compositions for the rapid "omni-omic" characterization of complex biological samples. Comparisons made between helium and nitrogen-derived CCS measurements demonstrate that nitrogen CCS values are systematically larger than helium values; however, general separation trends between chemical classes are retained regardless of the drift gas. These results underscore that, for the highest CCS accuracy, care must be exercised when utilizing helium-derived CCS values to calibrate measurements obtained in nitrogen, as is the common practice in the field.

  13. High-resolution and nondestructive profile measurement by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography with a visible broadband light source for optical-device fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Tsuyoshi; Ozaki, Nobuhiko; Oikawa, Yoichi; Miyaji, Kunio; Ohsato, Hirotaka; Watanabe, Eiichiro; Ikeda, Naoki; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa

    2016-08-01

    We developed a spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) using a visible broadband light source (vis-OCT) for application to high-resolution and nondestructive profile measurement and imaging in semiconductor optical-device fabrication. By using visible broadband light centered at 625 nm and with spectral bandwidth of 260 nm, an axial resolution of 0.69 µm in air was obtained. This was effective for inspection of a transparent photoresist film with thickness of 1–2 µm coated on a semiconductor wafer; the interface between the photoresist film and its substrate and the interface between the photoresist and air were resolved, and the film thickness was measured. In addition, the interface between an opaque epitaxially grown semiconductor layer (Al0.35Ga0.65As) and a GaAs substrate was also detected by vis-OCT. Here we propose a thickness-measurement technique that combines finite-difference time-domain simulation with vis-OCT. This method enables us to determine the thickness of even an optically absorbent epitaxial layer and offers a profile-measurement method that is particularly suitable for the fabrication of semiconductor optical devices.

  14. Depth- and momentum- resolved electronic structure at buried oxide interfaces from standing-wave angle-resolved photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadley, Charles

    2015-03-01

    It is clear that interfaces in complex oxide heterostructures often represent emergent materials that possess surprising properties not associated with the parent oxides, such as two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs), superconductivity, and magnetism. A detailed knowledge of the composition, atomic structure, and electronic structure through such interfaces is thus critical. Photomission (PES) and angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) represent techniques of choice for such studies, but have certain limitations in being too surface sensitive and in not being able to focus specifically on buried interfaces or heterostructure layers. In this talk, I will discuss combining two newer elements of PES/ARPES to deal with this challenge: - the use of soft x-rays in the ca. few hundred-to-2000 eV regime, or even into the true hard x-ray regime, to probe more deeply into the structure, and - tailoring of the x-ray intensity profile into a strong standing wave (SW) through reflection from a multilayer heterostructure to provide much enhanced depth resolution. The relative advantages of soft/hard x-ray PES and ARPES and their complementarity to conventional VUV ARPES in the ca. 5-150 eV regime will be considered. As illustrative examples, by combining SW-PES and SW-ARPES, it has been possible to measure for the first time the detailed concentration profiles and momentum-resolved electronic structure at the SrTiO3/La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 interface and to directly measure the depth profile of the 2DEG at SrTiO3/GdTiO3 interfaces. Future directions for such measurements will also be discussed. Supported by US DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, ARO-MURI Grant W911-NF-09-1-0398, and the PALM-APTCOM Project (France).

  15. Non-contact distance measurement and profilometry using thermal near-field radiation towards a high resolution inspection and metrology solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijster, Roy; Sadeghian, Hamed; van Keulen, Fred

    2016-03-01

    Optical near-field technologies such as solid immersion lenses and hyperlenses are candidate solutions for high resolution and high throughput wafer inspection and metrology for the next technology nodes. Besides sub-diffraction limited optical performance, these concepts share the necessity of extreme proximity to the sample at distances that are measured in tens of nanometers. For the instrument this poses two major challenges: 1) how to measure the distance to the sample? and 2) how to position accurately and at high speed? For the first challenge near-field thermal radiation is proposed as a mechanism for an integrated distance sensor (patent pending). This sensor is realized by making a sensitive calorimeter (accuracy of 2:31nW root sum squared). When used for distance measurement an equivalent uncertainty of 1nm can be achieved for distances smaller than 100 nm. By scanning the distance sensor over the sample, thermal profilometry is realized, which can be used to inspect surfaces in a non-intrusive and non-contact way. This reduces wear of the probe and minimizes the likelihood of damaging the sample.

  16. Applications of High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry to Measurements of Average Oxygen to Carbon Ratios in Secondary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, Adam P.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2012-07-02

    The applicability of high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR ESI-MS) to measurements of the average oxygen to carbon ratio (O/C) in organic aerosols was investigated. Solutions with known average O/C containing up to 10 standard compounds representative of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) were analyzed and corresponding electrospray ionization efficiencies were quantified. The assumption of equal ionization efficiency commonly used in estimating O/C ratios of organic aerosols was found to be reasonably accurate. We found that the accuracy of the measured O/C ratios increases by averaging the values obtained from both (+) and (-) modes. A correlation was found between the ratio of the ionization efficiencies in the positive and negative ESI modes with the octanol-water partition constant, and more importantly, with the compound's O/C. To demonstrate the utility of this correlation for estimating average O/C values of unknown mixtures, we analyzed the ESI (+) and ESI (-) data for SOA produced by oxidation of limonene and isoprene and compared to online O/C measurements using an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). This work demonstrates that the accuracy of the HR ESI-MS methods is comparable to that of the AMS, with the added benefit of molecular identification of the aerosol constituents.

  17. ST-segment changes in high-resolution body surface potential maps measured during exercise to assess myocardial ischemia: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Zaczek, Rajmund; Zavala-Fernandez, Heriberto; Janusek, Dariusz; Kobylecka, Małgorzata; Królicki, Leszek; Opolski, Grzegorz; Maniewski, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to assess myocardial ischemia by analysis of ST-segment changes in high-resolution body surface potential maps (HR-BSPM) measured at rest and during an exercise stress test. Material and methods The study was carried out on a group of 28 patients with stable coronary artery disease and 15 healthy volunteers. The HR-BSPM were measured at rest and during the exercise stress test on a supine ergometer. The workload was increased in stages by 25 W every 2 min, beginning at 50 W. The maps of ST-segment depression (ST60) were calculated from time averaged recordings at rest and at maximal workload. Results The efficiency in detection of myocardial ischemia was higher for HR-BSPM than for standard 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) when both methods were evaluated by outcomes of coronarography. The sensitivity of HR-BSPM was 82.4% while for the standard 12-lead ECG exercise stress test it was 58.8%. For some patients significant changes in the ST segment were observed at stress HR-BSPM but were not visible in standard 12-lead ECG recorded under the same conditions. Conclusions Obtained high values of sensitivity and specificity in myocardial ischemia detection suggest that maps of ST60 calculated from HR-BSPM can improve detection of patients with ischemic heart disease in comparison to the standard electrocardiographic exercise stress test examinations. PMID:25624843

  18. High-Resolution Respirometry for Simultaneous Measurement of Oxygen and Hydrogen Peroxide Fluxes in Permeabilized Cells, Tissue Homogenate and Isolated Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Makrecka-Kuka, Marina; Krumschnabel, Gerhard; Gnaiger, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Whereas mitochondria are well established as the source of ATP in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), it is debated if they are also the major cellular sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we describe the novel approach of combining high-resolution respirometry and fluorometric measurement of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production, applied to mitochondrial preparations (permeabilized cells, tissue homogenate, isolated mitochondria). The widely used H2O2 probe Amplex Red inhibited respiration in intact and permeabilized cells and should not be applied at concentrations above 10 µM. H2O2 fluxes were generally less than 1% of oxygen fluxes in physiological substrate and coupling states, specifically in permeabilized cells. H2O2 flux was consistently highest in the Complex II-linked LEAK state, reduced with CI&II-linked convergent electron flow and in mitochondria respiring at OXPHOS capacity, and were further diminished in uncoupled mitochondria respiring at electron transfer system capacity. Simultaneous measurement of mitochondrial respiration and H2O2 flux requires careful optimization of assay conditions and reveals information on mitochondrial function beyond separate analysis of ROS production.

  19. Dirac cones, Floquet side bands, and theory of time-resolved angle-resolved photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Aaron; Arsenault, A.; Pereg-Barnea, T.

    2016-10-01

    Pump-probe techniques with high temporal resolution allow one to drive a system of interest out of equilibrium and at the same time probe its properties. Recent advances in these techniques open the door to studying new, nonequilibrium phenomena such as Floquet topological insulators and superconductors. These advances also necessitate the development of theoretical tools for understanding the experimental findings and predicting new ones. In the present paper, we provide a theoretical foundation to understand the nonequilibrium behavior of a Dirac system. We present detailed numerical calculations and simple analytic results for the time evolution of a Dirac system irradiated by light. These results are framed by appealing to the recently revitalized notion of side bands [A. Farrell and T. Pereg-Barnea, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 106403 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.106403; Phys. Rev. B 93, 045121 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.045121], extended to the case of nonperiodic drive where the fast oscillations are modified by an envelope function. We apply this formalism to the case of photocurrent generated by a second probe pulse. We find that, under the application of circularly polarized light, a Dirac point only ever splits into two copies of side bands. Meanwhile, the application of linearly polarized light leaves the Dirac point intact while producing side bands. In both cases the population of the side bands are time dependent through their nonlinear dependence on the envelope of the pump pulse. Our immediate interest in this work is in connection to time- and angle-resolved photoemission experiments, where we find excellent qualitative agreement between our results and those in the literature [Wang et al., Science 342, 453 (2013), 10.1126/science.1239834]. However, our results are general and may prove useful beyond this particular application and should be relevant to other pump-probe experiments.

  20. Direct angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and superconductivity of strained high-Tc films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuna, Davor; Ariosa, Daniel; Cloetta, Dominique; Cancellieri, Claudia; Abrecht, Mike

    2008-02-01

    Since 1997 we systematically perform direct angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) on in-situ grown thin (<30 nm) cuprate films. Specifically, we probe low-energy electronic structure and properties of high-T_{c} superconductors (HTSC) under different degrees of epitaxial ({compressive vs. tensile}) strain. In overdoped and underdoped in-plane compressed (the strain is induced by the choice of substrate) ≈15 nm thin La_{2-x}Sr_{x}CuO_{4} (LSCO) films we almost double T_{c} to 40 K, from 20 K and 24 K, respectively. Yet the Fermi surface (FS) remains essentially two-dimensional. In contrast, ARPES data under {tensile} strain exhibit the dispersion that is three-dimensional, yet T_{c} drastically decreases. It seems that the in-plane compressive strain tends to push the apical oxygen far away from the CuO_{2} plane, enhances the two-dimensional character of the dispersion and increases T_{c}, while the tensile strain acts in the opposite direction and the resulting dispersion is three-dimensional. We have established the shape of the FS for both cases, and all our data are consistent with other ongoing studies, like EXAFS. As the actual lattice of cuprates is like a `Napoleon-cake', i.e. rigid CuO_{2 } planes alternating with softer `reservoir', that distort differently under strain, our data rule out all oversimplified two-dimensional (rigid lattice) mean field models. The work is still in progress on optimized La-doped Bi-2201 films with enhanced T_{c}.