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Sample records for high-resolution angle-resolved measurements

  1. High resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy for 3D spin vectorial analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, Taichi; Miyamoto, Koji; Kimura, Akio; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki

    2013-03-01

    Spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (SARPES) is the excellent tool which can directly observe the band structure of crystals with separating spin-up and -down states. Recent findings of new class of materials possessing strong spin orbit interaction such as Rashba spin splitting systems or topological insulators stimulate to develop new SARPES apparatuses and many sophisticated techniques have been reported recently. Here we report our newly developed a SARPES apparatus for spin vectorial analysis with high precision at Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center. Highly efficient spin polarimeter utilizing very low energy electron diffraction (VLEED) makes high resolution (ΔE < 10 meV, Δθ ~ +/- 0.2 °) compatible with the SARPES measurement. By placing two VLEED spin detectors orthogonally we have realized the polarization measurement of all spin components (x, y and z) with the high resolution. Some examples of the three-dimensional spin observation will be presented. This work is supported by KAKENHI (23244066), Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (A) of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

  2. Nodal Quasiparticle Meltdown in Ultra-High Resolution Pump-Probe Angle-Resolved Photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Jeff; Jozwiak, Chris; Smallwood, Chris L.; Eisaki, H.; Kaindl, Robert A.; Lee, Dung-Hai; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2011-06-03

    High-T{sub c} cuprate superconductors are characterized by a strong momentum-dependent anisotropy between the low energy excitations along the Brillouin zone diagonal (nodal direction) and those along the Brillouin zone face (antinodal direction). Most obvious is the d-wave superconducting gap, with the largest magnitude found in the antinodal direction and no gap in the nodal direction. Additionally, while antin- odal quasiparticle excitations appear only below T{sub c}, superconductivity is thought to be indifferent to nodal excitations as they are regarded robust and insensitive to T{sub c}. Here we reveal an unexpected tie between nodal quasiparticles and superconductivity using high resolution time- and angle-resolved photoemission on optimally doped Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} . We observe a suppression of the nodal quasiparticle spectral weight following pump laser excitation and measure its recovery dynamics. This suppression is dramatically enhanced in the superconducting state. These results reduce the nodal-antinodal dichotomy and challenge the conventional view of nodal excitation neutrality in superconductivity. The electronic structures of high-Tc cuprates are strongly momentum-dependent. This is one reason why the momentum-resolved technique of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has been a central tool in the field of high-temperature superconductivity. For example, coherent low energy excitations with momenta near the Brillouin zone face, or antinodal quasiparticles (QPs), are only observed below T{sub c} and have been linked to superfluid density. They have therefore been the primary focus of ARPES studies. In contrast, nodal QPs, with momenta along the Brillouin zone diagonal, have received less attention and are usually regarded as largely immune to the superconducting transition because they seem insensitive to perturbations such as disorder, doping, isotope exchange, charge ordering, and temperature. Clearly

  3. High Resolution Angle Resolved Photoemission Studies on Quasi-Particle Dynamics in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Leem, C.S.

    2010-06-02

    We obtained the spectral function of the graphite H point using high resolution angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). The extracted width of the spectral function (inverse of the photo-hole lifetime) near the H point is approximately proportional to the energy as expected from the linearly increasing density of states (DOS) near the Fermi energy. This is well accounted by our electron-phonon coupling theory considering the peculiar electronic DOS near the Fermi level. And we also investigated the temperature dependence of the peak widths both experimentally and theoretically. The upper bound for the electron-phonon coupling parameter is 0.23, nearly the same value as previously reported at the K point. Our analysis of temperature dependent ARPES data at K shows that the energy of phonon mode of graphite has much higher energy scale than 125K which is dominant in electron-phonon coupling.

  4. Invited Article: High resolution angle resolved photoemission with tabletop 11 eV laser.

    PubMed

    He, Yu; Vishik, Inna M; Yi, Ming; Yang, Shuolong; Liu, Zhongkai; Lee, James J; Chen, Sudi; Rebec, Slavko N; Leuenberger, Dominik; Zong, Alfred; Jefferson, C Michael; Moore, Robert G; Kirchmann, Patrick S; Merriam, Andrew J; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2016-01-01

    We developed a table-top vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser with 113.778 nm wavelength (10.897 eV) and demonstrated its viability as a photon source for high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). This sub-nanosecond pulsed VUV laser operates at a repetition rate of 10 MHz, provides a flux of 2 × 10(12) photons/s, and enables photoemission with energy and momentum resolutions better than 2 meV and 0.012 Å(-1), respectively. Space-charge induced energy shifts and spectral broadenings can be reduced below 2 meV. The setup reaches electron momenta up to 1.2 Å(-1), granting full access to the first Brillouin zone of most materials. Control over the linear polarization, repetition rate, and photon flux of the VUV source facilitates ARPES investigations of a broad range of quantum materials, bridging the application gap between contemporary low energy laser-based ARPES and synchrotron-based ARPES. We describe the principles and operational characteristics of this source and showcase its performance for rare earth metal tritellurides, high temperature cuprate superconductors, and iron-based superconductors.

  5. Invited Article: High resolution angle resolved photoemission with tabletop 11 eV laser

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yu; Vishik, Inna M.; Yi, Ming; Yang, Shuolong; Lee, James J.; Chen, Sudi; Rebec, Slavko N.; Leuenberger, Dominik; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Liu, Zhongkai; Zong, Alfred; Jefferson, C. Michael; Merriam, Andrew J.; Moore, Robert G.; Kirchmann, Patrick S.

    2016-01-15

    We developed a table-top vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser with 113.778 nm wavelength (10.897 eV) and demonstrated its viability as a photon source for high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). This sub-nanosecond pulsed VUV laser operates at a repetition rate of 10 MHz, provides a flux of 2 × 10{sup 12} photons/s, and enables photoemission with energy and momentum resolutions better than 2 meV and 0.012 Å{sup −1}, respectively. Space-charge induced energy shifts and spectral broadenings can be reduced below 2 meV. The setup reaches electron momenta up to 1.2 Å{sup −1}, granting full access to the first Brillouin zone of most materials. Control over the linear polarization, repetition rate, and photon flux of the VUV source facilitates ARPES investigations of a broad range of quantum materials, bridging the application gap between contemporary low energy laser-based ARPES and synchrotron-based ARPES. We describe the principles and operational characteristics of this source and showcase its performance for rare earth metal tritellurides, high temperature cuprate superconductors, and iron-based superconductors.

  6. Invited Article: High resolution angle resolved photoemission with tabletop 11 eV laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yu; Vishik, Inna M.; Yi, Ming; Yang, Shuolong; Liu, Zhongkai; Lee, James J.; Chen, Sudi; Rebec, Slavko N.; Leuenberger, Dominik; Zong, Alfred; Jefferson, C. Michael; Moore, Robert G.; Kirchmann, Patrick S.; Merriam, Andrew J.; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2016-01-01

    We developed a table-top vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser with 113.778 nm wavelength (10.897 eV) and demonstrated its viability as a photon source for high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). This sub-nanosecond pulsed VUV laser operates at a repetition rate of 10 MHz, provides a flux of 2 × 1012 photons/s, and enables photoemission with energy and momentum resolutions better than 2 meV and 0.012 Å-1, respectively. Space-charge induced energy shifts and spectral broadenings can be reduced below 2 meV. The setup reaches electron momenta up to 1.2 Å-1, granting full access to the first Brillouin zone of most materials. Control over the linear polarization, repetition rate, and photon flux of the VUV source facilitates ARPES investigations of a broad range of quantum materials, bridging the application gap between contemporary low energy laser-based ARPES and synchrotron-based ARPES. We describe the principles and operational characteristics of this source and showcase its performance for rare earth metal tritellurides, high temperature cuprate superconductors, and iron-based superconductors.

  7. Design of a High Resolution and High Flux Beam line for VUV Angle-Resolved Photoemission at UVSOR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Shin-ichi; Ito, Takahiro; Nakamura, Eiken; Hosaka, Masahito; Katoh, Masahiro

    2007-01-19

    A high-energy-resolution angle-resolved photoemission beamline in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) region has been designed for a 750 MeV synchrotron light source UVSOR-II. The beamline equips an APPLE-II-type undulator with the horizontally/vertically linear and right/left circular polarizations, a modified Wadsworth-type monochromator and a high-resolution photoelectron analyzer. The monochromator covers the photon energy range of 6 - 40 eV. The energy resolution (hv/{delta}hv) and the photon flux on samples are expected to be 2 x 104 and 1012 photons/sec at 10 eV, 4 x 104 and 5 x 1011 photons/sec at 20 eV, and 6 x 104 and 1011 photons/sec at 40 eV, respectively. The beamline provides the high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy less than 1 meV in the whole VUV energy range.

  8. Electronic band structure of ReS2 by high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, James L.; Hart, Lewis S.; Wolverson, Daniel; Chen, Chaoyu; Avila, Jose; Asensio, Maria C.

    2017-09-01

    The rhenium-based transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are atypical of the TMD family due to their highly anisotropic crystalline structure and are recognized as promising materials for two-dimensional heterostructure devices. The nature of the band gap (direct or indirect) for bulk, few-, and single-layer forms of ReS2 is of particular interest, due to its comparatively weak interplanar interaction. However, the degree of interlayer interaction and the question of whether a transition from indirect to direct gap is observed on reducing thickness (as in other TMDs) are controversial. We present a direct determination of the valence band structure of bulk ReS2 using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We find a clear in-plane anisotropy due to the presence of chains of Re atoms, with a strongly directional effective mass which is larger in the direction orthogonal to the Re chains (2.2 me ) than along them (1.6 me ). An appreciable interplane interaction results in an experimentally measured difference of ≈100 -200 meV between the valence band maxima at the Z point (0,0,1/2 ) and the Γ point (0,0,0) of the three-dimensional Brillouin zone. This leads to a direct gap at Z and a close-lying but larger gap at Γ , implying that bulk ReS2 is marginally indirect. This may account for recent conflicting transport and photoluminescence measurements and the resulting uncertainty about the nature of the band gap in this material.

  9. High resolution-angle resolved photoemission studies of high temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, C.G.; Liu, R.; Lynch, D.W.; Veal, B.W.; Chang, Y.C.; Jiang, P.Z.; Liu, J.Z.; Paulikas, A.P.; Arko, A.J.; List, R.S.; Argonne National Lab., IL; Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1989-08-01

    Recent photoemission studies of Y 123 and Bi 2212 performed with high energy and angular resolution have provided detailed information on the nature of the states near the Fermi level. Measurements of the superconducting gap, band dispersion, and the density of states near the Fermi level in the normal state all support a Fermi liquid description of these materials. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Angle resolved scatter measurement of bulk scattering in transparent ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Saurabh; Miller, J. Keith; Shori, Ramesh K.; Goorsky, Mark S.

    2015-02-01

    Bulk scattering in polycrystalline laser materials (PLM), due to non-uniform refractive index across the bulk, is regarded as the primary loss mechanism leading to degradation of laser performance with higher threshold and lower output power. The need for characterization techniques towards identifying bulk scatter and assessing the quality. Assessment of optical quality and the identification of bulk scatter have been by simple visual inspection of thin samples of PLMs, thus making the measurements highly subjective and inaccurate. Angle Resolved Scatter (ARS) measurement allows for the spatial mapping of scattered light at all possible angles about a sample, mapping the intensity for both forward scatter and back-scatter regions. The cumulative scattered light intensity, in the forward scatter direction, away from the specular beam is used for the comparison of bulk scattering between samples. This technique employ the detection of scattered light at all angles away from the specular beam directions and represented as a 2-D polar map. The high sensitivity of the ARS technique allows us to compare bulk scattering in different PLM samples which otherwise had similar transmitted beam wavefront distortions.

  11. Rapid high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with pulsed laser source and time-of-flight spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Gotlieb, K.; Hussain, Z.; Bostwick, A.; Jozwiak, C.; Lanzara, A.

    2013-09-15

    A high-efficiency spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES) spectrometer is coupled with a laboratory-based laser for rapid high-resolution measurements. The spectrometer combines time-of-flight (TOF) energy measurements with low-energy exchange scattering spin polarimetry for high detection efficiencies. Samples are irradiated with fourth harmonic photons generated from a cavity-dumped Ti:sapphire laser that provides high photon flux in a narrow bandwidth, with a pulse timing structure ideally matched to the needs of the TOF spectrometer. The overall efficiency of the combined system results in near-E{sub F} spin-resolved ARPES measurements with an unprecedented combination of energy resolution and acquisition speed. This allows high-resolution spin measurements with a large number of data points spanning multiple dimensions of interest (energy, momentum, photon polarization, etc.) and thus enables experiments not otherwise possible. The system is demonstrated with spin-resolved energy and momentum mapping of the L-gap Au(111) surface states, a prototypical Rashba system. The successful integration of the spectrometer with the pulsed laser system demonstrates its potential for simultaneous spin- and time-resolved ARPES with pump-probe based measurements.

  12. High-resolution three-dimensional spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectrometer using vacuum ultraviolet laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaji, Koichiro; Harasawa, Ayumi; Kuroda, Kenta; Toyohisa, Sogen; Nakayama, Mitsuhiro; Ishida, Yukiaki; Fukushima, Akiko; Watanabe, Shuntaro; Chen, Chuangtian; Komori, Fumio; Shin, Shik

    2016-05-01

    We describe a spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (SARPES) apparatus with a vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) laser (hν = 6.994 eV) developed at the Laser and Synchrotron Research Center at the Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo. The spectrometer consists of a hemispherical photoelectron analyzer equipped with an electron deflector function and twin very-low-energy-electron-diffraction-type spin detectors, which allows us to analyze the spin vector of a photoelectron three-dimensionally with both high energy and angular resolutions. The combination of the high-performance spectrometer and the high-photon-flux VUV laser can achieve an energy resolution of 1.7 meV for SARPES. We demonstrate that the present laser-SARPES machine realizes a quick SARPES on the spin-split band structure of a Bi(111) film even with 7 meV energy and 0.7∘ angular resolutions along the entrance-slit direction. This laser-SARPES machine is applicable to the investigation of spin-dependent electronic states on an energy scale of a few meV.

  13. High-resolution three-dimensional spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectrometer using vacuum ultraviolet laser light

    SciTech Connect

    Yaji, Koichiro Harasawa, Ayumi; Kuroda, Kenta; Toyohisa, Sogen; Nakayama, Mitsuhiro; Ishida, Yukiaki; Fukushima, Akiko; Komori, Fumio; Shin, Shik; Watanabe, Shuntaro; Chen, Chuangtian

    2016-05-15

    We describe a spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (SARPES) apparatus with a vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) laser (hν = 6.994 eV) developed at the Laser and Synchrotron Research Center at the Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo. The spectrometer consists of a hemispherical photoelectron analyzer equipped with an electron deflector function and twin very-low-energy-electron-diffraction-type spin detectors, which allows us to analyze the spin vector of a photoelectron three-dimensionally with both high energy and angular resolutions. The combination of the high-performance spectrometer and the high-photon-flux VUV laser can achieve an energy resolution of 1.7 meV for SARPES. We demonstrate that the present laser-SARPES machine realizes a quick SARPES on the spin-split band structure of a Bi(111) film even with 7 meV energy and 0.7{sup ∘} angular resolutions along the entrance-slit direction. This laser-SARPES machine is applicable to the investigation of spin-dependent electronic states on an energy scale of a few meV.

  14. Temperature-Induced Electronic Structure Evolution of ZrTe5 Revealed by High resolution & Laser Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Chenlu; Liu, Guodong; Chen, Genfu; Yu, Li; He, Shaolong; Zhao, Lin; Chen, Chuangtian; Xu, Zuyan; Zhou, Xingjiang

    The transition metal pentatellurides ZrTe5 have attracted consideration attention since the 70s, due to the unusual transport properties like resistivity peak at ~140K and the sign change of the Hall coefficient and thermopower. The origin of the most peculiar resistivity peak remains controversial. In this talk we will present high resolution angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) study on the Fermi surface and band structure of ZrTe5, by using our high resolution ARPES system equipped with the VUV laser and the time-of-flight (TOF) electron energy analyzer. Upon cooling down, we found a gradual transition from hole-like band into electron-like band around the Brillouin zone center. Such an electron state transition forms the underlying physics for the abnormal transport properties. We will also comment on the possibility of a Dirac semimetal in ZrTe5.

  15. An experimental setup for high resolution 10.5 eV laser-based angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using a time-of-flight electron analyzer.

    PubMed

    Berntsen, M H; Götberg, O; Tjernberg, O

    2011-09-01

    We present an experimental setup for laser-based angle-resolved time-of-flight photoemission. Using a picosecond pulsed laser, photons of energy 10.5 eV are generated through higher harmonic generation in xenon. The high repetition rate of the light source, variable between 0.2 and 8 MHz, enables high photoelectron count rates and short acquisition times. By using a time-of-flight analyzer with angle-resolving capabilities, electrons emitted from the sample within a circular cone of up to ±15° can be collected. Hence, simultaneous acquisition of photoemission data for a complete area of the Brillouin zone is possible. The current photon energy enables bulk sensitive measurements, high angular resolution, and the resulting covered momentum space is large enough to enclose the entire Brillouin zone in cuprate high-T(c) superconductors. Fermi edge measurements on polycrystalline Au shows an energy resolution better than 5 meV. Data from a test measurement of the Au(111) surface state are presented along with measurements of the Fermi surface of the high-T(c) superconductor Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8 + δ) (Bi2212).

  16. An ultrafast angle-resolved photoemission apparatus for measuring complex materials.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Christopher L; Jozwiak, Christopher; Zhang, Wentao; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2012-12-01

    We present technical specifications for a high resolution time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy setup based on a hemispherical electron analyzer and cavity-dumped solid state Ti:sapphire laser used to generate pump and probe beams, respectively, at 1.48 and 5.93 eV. The pulse repetition rate can be tuned from 209 Hz to 54.3 MHz. Under typical operating settings the system has an overall energy resolution of 23 meV, an overall momentum resolution of 0.003 Å(-1), and an overall time resolution of 310 fs. We illustrate the system capabilities with representative data on the cuprate superconductor Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+δ). The descriptions and analyses presented here will inform new developments in ultrafast electron spectroscopy.

  17. Valence band dispersion measurements of perovskite single crystals using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congcong; Ecker, Benjamin R; Wei, Haotong; Huang, Jinsong; Meng, Jian-Qiao; Gao, Yongli

    2017-02-15

    The electronic structure of a cleaved perovskite (CH3NH3PbBr3) single crystal was studied in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (IPES). Highly reproducible dispersive features of the valence bands were observed with symmetry about the Brillouin zone center and boundaries. The largest dispersion width was found to be ∼0.73 eV and ∼0.98 eV along the ΓX and ΓM directions, respectively. The effective mass of the holes was estimated to be ∼0.59m0. The quality of the surface was verified using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The elemental composition was investigated using high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The experimental electronic structure shows a good agreement with the theoretical calculation.

  18. High-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS at the Swiss Light Source for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    Strocov, V. N.; Schmitt, T.; Flechsig, U.; Schmidt, T.; Imhof, A.; Chen, Q.; Raabe, J.; Betemps, R.; Zimoch, D.; Krempasky, J.; Wang, X.; Grioni, M.; Piazzalunga, A.; Patthey, L.

    2010-01-01

    The concepts and technical realisation of the high-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS operating in the energy range from 300 to 1600 eV and intended for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) are described. The photon source is an undulator of novel fixed-gap design where longitudinal movement of permanent magnetic arrays controls not only the light polarization (including circular and 0–180° rotatable linear polarizations) but also the energy without changing the gap. The beamline optics is based on the well established scheme of plane-grating monochromator operating in collimated light. The ultimate resolving power E/ΔE is above 33000 at 1 keV photon energy. The choice of blazed versus lamellar gratings and optimization of their profile parameters is described. Owing to glancing angles on the mirrors as well as optimized groove densities and profiles of the gratings, the beamline is capable of delivering high photon flux up to 1 × 1013 photons s−1 (0.01% BW)−1 at 1 keV. Ellipsoidal refocusing optics used for the RIXS endstation demagnifies the vertical spot size down to 4 µm, which allows slitless operation and thus maximal transmission of the high-resolution RIXS spectrometer delivering E/ΔE > 11000 at 1 keV photon energy. Apart from the beamline optics, an overview of the control system is given, the diagnostics and software tools are described, and strategies used for the optical alignment are discussed. An introduction to the concepts and instrumental realisation of the ARPES and RIXS endstations is given. PMID:20724785

  19. High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission studies of high Tc superconductor Bi sub 2 Sr sub 2 CaCu sub 2 O sub 8

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Rong.

    1990-09-21

    An angle-resolved photoemission study of the normal and superconducting states in Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} was performed. Measurements in the normal state show bands dispersing through the Fermi level from at least 350 meV below E{sub F}. The Fermi level crossings are consistant with local-density band calculation, including a point calculated to be of Bi-O character. Additional measurements were made where bands crossed the Fermi level between 100 and 250K, along with measurements on an adjacent Pt foil. The Fermi edges of both materials agree to within the noise. Below the Fermi level, the spectra show correlation effects on the form of an increased effective mass. The shape of the spectra can be explained by a lifetime-broadened photohole and secondary electrons. The effective inverse photohole lifetime is linear in energy. A superconducting gap has been measured at a number of points where there is density at the Fermi level in the normal state. By proper modeling, a gap of 24 meV was obtained for all these points, including points of Cu-O and Bi-O character respectively, according to band calculation. The lack of gap anisotropy in the basal plane suggests that pinning in this material is not d-wave pairing.

  20. Cellular organization and substructure measured using angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry.

    PubMed Central

    Wax, Adam; Yang, Changhuei; Backman, Vadim; Badizadegan, Kamran; Boone, Charles W; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S

    2002-01-01

    We measure the organization and substructure of HT29 epithelial cells in a monolayer using angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry. This new technique probes cellular structure by measuring scattered light, as in flow cytometry, but offers an advantage in that the structure can be examined in situ, avoiding the need to disrupt the cell monolayer. We determine the size distribution of the cell nuclei by fitting measured light-scattering spectra to the predictions of Mie theory. In addition, we obtain information about the cellular organization and substructure by examining the spatial correlations within the monolayer. A remarkable finding is that the spatial correlations over small length scales take the form of an inverse power law, indicating the fractal nature of the packing of the subcellular structures. We also identify spatial correlations on a scale large compared with the size of a cell, indicating an overlying order within the monolayer. PMID:11916880

  1. Comparison of models and measurements of angle-resolved scatter from irregular aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milstein, Adam B.; Richardson, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed and validated a method for modeling the elastic scattering properties of biological and inert aerosols of irregular shape at near- and mid-wave infrared wavelengths. The method, based on Gaussian random particles, calculates the ensemble-average optical cross section and Mueller scattering matrix, using the measured aerodynamic size distribution and previously-reported refractive index as inputs. The utility of the Gaussian particle model is that it is controlled by only two parameters (σ and Γ) which we have optimized such that the model best reproduces the full angle-resolved Mueller scattering matrices measured at λ=1.55 μm in the Standoff Aerosol Active Signature Testbed (SAAST). The method has been applied to wet-generated singlet biological spore samples, dry-generated biological spore clusters, and kaolin. The scattering computation is performed using the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA), which requires significant computational resources, and is thus implemented on LLGrid, a large parallel grid computer. For the cases presented, the best fit Gaussian particle model is in good qualitative correspondence with microscopy images of the corresponding class of particles. The measured and computed cross sections agree well within a factor of two overall, with certain cases bearing closer correspondence. In particular, the DDA reproduces the shape of the measured scatter function more accurately than Mie predictions. The DDA-computed depolarization factors are also in good agreement with measurement.

  2. Complete Fermi Surface and Surface State in WTe2 Revealed by High-Resolution Laser-Based Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenlu; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Guodong; Mao, Zhiqiang; He, Shaolong; Zhao, Lin; Chen, Chuangtian; Xu, Zuyan; Zhou, Xingjiang

    WTe2, an unique transition metal dichalcogenide, attracts considerable attention recently, which shows an extremely large magnetoresistance (MR) with no saturation under very high field. In this talk, we will present our high resolution laser-ARPES study on WTe2. Our distinctive ARPES system is equipped with the VUV laser and the time-of-flight (TOF) electron energy analyzer, being featured by super-high energy resolution, simultaneous data acquisition for two-dimensional momentum space and much reduced nonlinearity effect. With this advanced apparatus, the very high quality of electronic structure data are obtained for WTe2 which gives a full picture of the Fermi surface. Meanwhile, the obtained systematic temperature dependence of its electronic state leads us to a better understanding on the origin of large magnetoresistance in WTe2.

  3. High Resolution PDF Measurements on Ag Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Tulio C. R.; Martin, Chris; Kycia, Stefan; Zanchet, Daniela

    2009-01-29

    The quantitative analysis of structural defects in Ag nanoparticles was addressed in this work. We performed atomic scale structural characterization by a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) using the Pair Distribution Function analysis (PDF) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The XRD measurements were performed using an innovative instrumentation setup to provide high resolution PDF patterns.

  4. Label-free, high-throughput measurements of dynamic changes in cell nuclei using angle-resolved low coherence interferometry.

    PubMed

    Chalut, Kevin J; Chen, Sulin; Finan, John D; Giacomelli, Michael G; Guilak, Farshid; Leong, Kam W; Wax, Adam

    2008-06-01

    Accurate measurements of nuclear deformation, i.e., structural changes of the nucleus in response to environmental stimuli, are important for signal transduction studies. Traditionally, these measurements require labeling and imaging, and then nuclear measurement using image analysis. This approach is time-consuming, invasive, and unavoidably perturbs cellular systems. Light scattering, an emerging biophotonics technique for probing physical characteristics of living systems, offers a promising alternative. Angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry (a/LCI), a novel light scattering technique, was developed to quantify nuclear morphology for early cancer detection. In this study, a/LCI is used for the first time to noninvasively measure small changes in nuclear morphology in response to environmental stimuli. With this new application, we broaden the potential uses of a/LCI by demonstrating high-throughput measurements and by probing aspherical nuclei. To demonstrate the versatility of this approach, two distinct models relevant to current investigations in cell and tissue engineering research are used. Structural changes in cell nuclei due to subtle environmental stimuli, including substrate topography and osmotic pressure, are profiled rapidly without disrupting the cells or introducing artifacts associated with traditional measurements. Accuracy > or = 3% is obtained for the range of nuclear geometries examined here, with the greatest deviations occurring for the more complex geometries. Given the high-throughput nature of the measurements, this deviation may be acceptable for many biological applications that seek to establish connections between morphology and function.

  5. Nodal gap detection through polar angle-resolved density of states measurements in uniaxial superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumi, Yasumasa; Nomoto, Takuya; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Machida, Kazushige

    2016-12-01

    We propose a spectroscopic method to identify the nodal gap structure in unconventional superconductors. This method is best suited for locating the horizontal line node and for pinpointing the isolated point nodes by measuring polar angle (θ ) resolved zero-energy density of states N (θ ) . This is measured by specific heat or thermal conductivity at low temperatures under a magnetic field. We examine a variety of uniaxially symmetric nodal structures, including point and/or line nodes with linear and quadratic dispersions, by solving the Eilenberger equation in vortex states. It is found that (a) the maxima of N (θ ) continuously shift from the antinodal to the nodal direction (θn) as a field increases accompanying the oscillation pattern reversal at low and high fields. Furthermore, (b) local minima emerge next to θn on both sides, except for the case of the linear point node. These features are robust and detectable experimentally. Experimental results of N (θ ) performed on several superconductors, UPd2Al3,URu2Si2,CuxBi2Se3 , and UPt3, are examined and commented on in light of the present theory.

  6. The band structure of VO2 measured by angle-resolved photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreschini, Luca; Chang, Young Jun; Innocenti, Davide; Walter, Andrew L.; Kim, Young Su; Gaines, Geoffrey; Bostwick, Aaron; Denlinger, Jonathan; Rotenberg, Eli

    2011-03-01

    The origin of the 340K metal-insulator transition (MIT) in VO2 is still under debate. the main reason is that no direct experimental verifications of the electronic structure of VO2 exist up to this point. The quality of the available single crystals is not sufficient for ARPES measurements, so that photoemission is limited to angle-integrated mode. New opportunities are offered by oxide films, on which data of equal or even higher quality have been reported (Saeki et al., PRB 2009). WIth the in situ pulsed-laser-deposition (PLD) system available on beamline 7.0.1 at the Advanced Light Source we have grown VO2(001) films on a TiO2 substrate and measured the Fermi surface of the metallic phase. These results will permit a direct comparison with the existing band calculations and open the way to the study of the MIT as a function, e.g., of film thickness or electron doping with Cr. Work supported by U.S. DOE (DE-AC02-05CH11231 for ALS), the Max Planck Society, and the Swiss National Science Foundation (PBELP2-125484).

  7. Design and calibration of hot-electron spectrometer array for angle-resolved measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huiya; An, Honghai; Shen, Jie; Kang, Ning; Zhou, Shenlei; Lei, Anle; Lin, Zunqi

    2017-05-01

    A hot-electron spectrometer array with two-dimensional distribution has been designed with a wide-angle range and high-energy resolution to measure the spatially resolved electron spectra for high-power-laser plasma interaction experiments. It consisted of 19 identical electron spectrometers set in three directions with an interval of 10°. Each electron spectrometer was designed with a uniform magnetic field to detect electrons in the range from 20 to 500 keV. The spectrometers were calibrated using electrons from an accelerator. In an experiment, the spatially resolved electron energy spectra, which approximately had a Maxwell distribution, were obtained from an aluminum foil target irradiated by a 0.53-μm laser pulse.

  8. Quantitative angle-resolved small-spot reflectance measurements on plasmonic perfect absorbers: impedance matching and disorder effects.

    PubMed

    Tittl, Andreas; Harats, Moshe G; Walter, Ramon; Yin, Xinghui; Schäferling, Martin; Liu, Na; Rapaport, Ronen; Giessen, Harald

    2014-10-28

    Plasmonic devices with absorbance close to unity have emerged as essential building blocks for a multitude of technological applications ranging from trace gas detection to infrared imaging. A crucial requirement for such elements is the angle independence of the absorptive performance. In this work, we develop theoretically and verify experimentally a quantitative model for the angular behavior of plasmonic perfect absorber structures based on an optical impedance matching picture. To achieve this, we utilize a simple and elegant k-space measurement technique to record quantitative angle-resolved reflectance measurements on various perfect absorber structures. Particularly, this method allows quantitative reflectance measurements on samples where only small areas have been nanostructured, for example, by electron-beam lithography. Combining these results with extensive numerical modeling, we find that matching of both the real and imaginary parts of the optical impedance is crucial to obtain perfect absorption over a large angular range. Furthermore, we successfully apply our model to the angular dispersion of perfect absorber geometries with disordered plasmonic elements as a favorable alternative to current array-based designs.

  9. Development of a high-resolution soft x-ray (30--1500 eV) beamline at the Advanced Light Source and its use for the study of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, Welcome Rex Anthony

    1996-02-01

    ALS Bending magnet beamline 9.3.2 is for high resolution spectroscopy, with circularly polarized light. Fixed included-angle SGM uses three gratings for 30--1500 eV photons; circular polarization is produced by an aperture for selecting the beam above or below the horizontal plane. Photocurrent from upper and lower jaws of entrance slit sets a piezoelectric drive feedback loop on the vertically deflecting mirror for stable beam. End station has a movable platform. With photomeission data from Stanford, structure of c(2x2)P/Fe(100) was determined using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS). Multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) calculations indicate that P atoms adsorb in fourfold hollow sites 1.02A above the first Fe layer. Self-consistent-field Xα scattered wave calculation confirm that the Fe1-Fe2 space is contracted for S/Fe but not for P/Fe; comparison is made to atomic N and O on Fe(100). Final-state effects on ARPEFS curves used literature data from the S 1s and 2p core levels of c(2x2)S/Ni(001); a generalized Ramsauer-Townsend splitting is present in the 1s but not 2p data. An approximate method for analyzing ARPEFS data from a non-s initial state using only the higher-ℓ partial wave was tested successfully. ARPEFS data from clean surfaces were collected normal to Ni(111) (3p core levels) and 5° off-normal from Cu(111)(3s, 3p). Fourier transforms (FT) resemble adsorbate systems, showing backscattering signals from atoms up to 4 layers below emitters. 3p FTs show scattering from 6 nearest neighbors in the same crystal layer as the emitters. MSSW calulation indicate that Cu 3p photoemission is mostly d-wave. FTs also indicate double-scattering and single-scattering from laterally distant atoms; calculations indicate that the signal is dominated by photoemission from the first 2 crystal layers.

  10. High Resolution Convective Heat Transfer Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-30

    ONR Thermal Materials Workshop 2001 1 HIGH RESOLUTION CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER MEASUREMENTS Peter Ireland and Terry Jones R-R UTC in Heat Transfer...temperatures. • Fluid dynamics correct through use of Reynolds number, Mach number and Prandtl number. Mach)Pr,(Re,fNu Dimensionless heat transfer...depends on local h su rf ac e te m p T s gas temperature Tg timestart of test hTc Calibration Test data ONR Thermal Materials Workshop 2001 10 Heat

  11. A Portable, High Resolution, Surface Measurement Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihlefeld, Curtis M.; Burns, Bradley M.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    A high resolution, portable, surface measurement device has been demonstrated to provide micron-resolution topographical plots. This device was specifically developed to allow in-situ measurements of defects on the Space Shuttle Orbiter windows, but is versatile enough to be used on a wide variety of surfaces. This paper discusses the choice of an optical sensor and then the decisions required to convert a lab bench optical measurement device into an ergonomic portable system. The necessary trade-offs between performance and portability are presented along with a description of the device developed to measure Orbiter window defects.

  12. Measuring the electronic structure of atomically uniform silver films grown on silicon using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speer, Nathan James

    Electronic structures derived from Valence electrons in thin films and at surfaces are often much different from those of their bulk counter parts. When the film thickness is less than the electron-coherence length, the boundary conditions at the surface and interface can give rise to standing-wave-like quantum-well states. Electrons in these states are often described as particles in a box. Confinement in the perpendicular direction gives rise to a quantized band structure along the same direction, where the energy spacing is determined by the film thickness. Changing the film by a single atomic layer can cause properties derived from the band structure to vary like ˜ 1/N , where N is the number of monolayers. Recent advances in thin film techniques have made it possible to fabricate films with atomically uniform thickness. Because the electronic structure is a function of film thickness, such techniques are crucial to efforts for a comprehensive understanding of thin films. In this thesis, the electronic properties of atomically uniform Ag films grown on Si(111) substrates are studied using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) deposition at low temperatures, we are able to fabricate atomically uniform, ultra-thin Ag films on Si substrates for the first time, and the electronic structures are measured using ARPES. The electrons in these uniform film systems have very long coherence lengths and occupy standing-wave-like quantum-well states that propagate through the film and, surprisingly, can reach deep into the substrate despite a lattice mismatched, incommensurate interface. This interaction with the substrate is so strong that it can produce an electronic interference pattern in the photoemission spectra. As the film thickness increases, the electronic structure evolves to form the bulk band continuum plus separates surfaces states. A careful analysis of this evolution allows us to separate surface from bulk

  13. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, D. Chris; Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2000-01-01

    The major research activities performed during the cooperative agreement enhanced our spectroscopic knowledge of molecules of atmospheric interest such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, ozone, methane, and carbon monoxide, to name a few. Measurements were made using the NASA Langley Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometer System (TDL) and several Fourier Transform Spectrometer Systems (FTS) around the globe. The results from these studies made remarkable improvements in the line positions and intensities for several molecules, particularly ozone and carbon dioxide in the 2 to 17-micrometer spectral region. Measurements of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients and the temperature dependence of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients for infrared transitions of ozone, methane, and water vapor were also performed. Results from these studies have been used for retrievals of stratospheric gas concentration profiles from data collected by several Upper Atmospheric Research satellite (UARS) infrared instruments as well as in the analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra such as those acquired by space-based, ground-based, and various balloon-and aircraft-borne experiments. Our results made significant contributions in several updates of the HITRAN (HIgh resolution TRANsmission) spectral line parameters database. This database enjoys worldwide recognition in research involving diversified scientific fields.

  14. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, D. Chris; Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2000-01-01

    The major research activities performed during the cooperative agreement enhanced our spectroscopic knowledge of molecules of atmospheric interest such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, ozone, methane, and carbon monoxide, to name a few. Measurements were made using the NASA Langley Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometer System (TDL) and several Fourier Transform Spectrometer Systems (FTS) around the globe. The results from these studies made remarkable improvements in the line positions and intensities for several molecules, particularly ozone and carbon dioxide in the 2 to 17-micrometer spectral region. Measurements of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients and the temperature dependence of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients for infrared transitions of ozone, methane, and water vapor were also performed. Results from these studies have been used for retrievals of stratospheric gas concentration profiles from data collected by several Upper Atmospheric Research satellite (UARS) infrared instruments as well as in the analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra such as those acquired by space-based, ground-based, and various balloon- and aircraft-borne experiments. Our results made significant contributions in several updates of the HITRAN (HIgh resolution TRANsmission) spectral line parameters database. This database enjoys worldwide recognition in research involving diversified scientific fields.

  15. High resolution wavefront measurement of aspheric optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erichsen, I.; Krey, S.; Heinisch, J.; Ruprecht, A.; Dumitrescu, E.

    2008-08-01

    With the recently emerged large volume production of miniature aspheric lenses for a wide range of applications, a new fast fully automatic high resolution wavefront measurement instrument has been developed. The Shack-Hartmann based system with reproducibility better than 0.05 waves is able to measure highly aspheric optics and allows for real time comparison with design data. Integrated advanced analysis tools such as calculation of Zernike coefficients, 2D-Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), Point Spread Function (PSF), Strehl-Ratio and the measurement of effective focal length (EFL) as well as flange focal length (FFL) allow for the direct verification of lens properties and can be used in a development as well as in a production environment.

  16. Analyzing spatial correlations in tissue using angle-resolved low coherence interferometry measurements guided by co-located optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sanghoon; Heflin, Stephanie; Kresty, Laura A; Halling, Meredith; Perez, Laura N; Ho, Derek; Crose, Michael; Brown, William; Farsiu, Sina; Arshavsky, Vadim; Wax, Adam

    2016-04-01

    Angle-resolved low coherence interferometry (a/LCI) is an optical technique used to measure nuclear morphology in situ. However, a/LCI is not an imaging modality and can produce ambiguous results when the measurements are not properly oriented to the tissue architecture. Here we present a 2D a/LCI system which incorporates optical coherence tomography imaging to guide the measurements. System design and characterization are presented, along with example cases which demonstrate the utility of the combined measurements. In addition, future development and applications of this dual modality approach are discussed.

  17. Analyzing spatial correlations in tissue using angle-resolved low coherence interferometry measurements guided by co-located optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sanghoon; Heflin, Stephanie; Kresty, Laura A.; Halling, Meredith; Perez, Laura N.; Ho, Derek; Crose, Michael; Brown, William; Farsiu, Sina; Arshavsky, Vadim; Wax, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Angle-resolved low coherence interferometry (a/LCI) is an optical technique used to measure nuclear morphology in situ. However, a/LCI is not an imaging modality and can produce ambiguous results when the measurements are not properly oriented to the tissue architecture. Here we present a 2D a/LCI system which incorporates optical coherence tomography imaging to guide the measurements. System design and characterization are presented, along with example cases which demonstrate the utility of the combined measurements. In addition, future development and applications of this dual modality approach are discussed. PMID:27446664

  18. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2006-01-01

    The major research activities performed during the cooperative agreement enhanced our spectroscopic knowledge of molecules of atmospheric interest such as H2O (water vapor), O3 (ozone), HCN (hydrogen cyanide), CH4 (methane), NO2 (nitrogen dioxide) and CO (carbon monoxide). The data required for the analyses were obtained from two different Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS); one of which is located at the National Solar Observatory (NSO) on Kitt Peak, Arizona and the other instrument is located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) at Richland, Washington. The data were analyzed using a modified multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting algorithm developed by Dr. D. Chris Benner of the College of William and Mary. The results from these studies made significant improvements in the line positons and intensities for these molecules. The measurements of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients and the temperature dependence of pressure broadening and pressure induced shift coefficients for hundreds of infrared transitions of HCN, CO3 CH4 and H2O were also performed during this period. Results from these studies have been used for retrievals of stratospheric gas concentration profiles from data collected by several Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) infrared instruments as well as in the analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra such as those acquired by space-based, ground-based, and various balloon- and aircraft-borne experiments. Our results made significant contributions in several updates of the HITRAN (HIgh resolution TRANsmission) spectral line parameters database. This database enjoys worldwide recognition in research involving diversified scientific fields. The research conducted during the period 2003-2006 has resulted in publications given in this paper. In addition to Journal publications, several oral and poster presentations were given at various Scientific conferences within the United States

  19. High Resolution Measurement of the Glycolytic Rate

    PubMed Central

    Bittner, Carla X.; Loaiza, Anitsi; Ruminot, Iván; Larenas, Valeria; Sotelo-Hitschfeld, Tamara; Gutiérrez, Robin; Córdova, Alex; Valdebenito, Rocío; Frommer, Wolf B.; Barros, L. Felipe

    2010-01-01

    The glycolytic rate is sensitive to physiological activity, hormones, stress, aging, and malignant transformation. Standard techniques to measure the glycolytic rate are based on radioactive isotopes, are not able to resolve single cells and have poor temporal resolution, limitations that hamper the study of energy metabolism in the brain and other organs. A new method is described in this article, which makes use of a recently developed FRET glucose nanosensor to measure the rate of glycolysis in single cells with high temporal resolution. Used in cultured astrocytes, the method showed for the first time that glycolysis can be activated within seconds by a combination of glutamate and K+, supporting a role for astrocytes in neurometabolic and neurovascular coupling in the brain. It was also possible to make a direct comparison of metabolism in neurons and astrocytes lying in close proximity, paving the way to a high-resolution characterization of brain energy metabolism. Single-cell glycolytic rates were also measured in fibroblasts, adipocytes, myoblasts, and tumor cells, showing higher rates for undifferentiated cells and significant metabolic heterogeneity within cell types. This method should facilitate the investigation of tissue metabolism at the single-cell level and is readily adaptable for high-throughput analysis. PMID:20890447

  20. Intermolecular band dispersion of quasi-single crystalline organic semiconductor monolayer measured by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtomo, Manabu; Shimada, Toshihiro; Hasegawa, Tetsuya

    2010-03-01

    Band structure of organic semiconductors is important knowledge to improve the molecular design. Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) studies using highly conductive single domain samples grown in-situ is the most direct technique. In this study, we developed a novel method to grow quasi-single crystalline monolayer on conductive substrate and electronic structure was investigated. As a template for orientation control, we used a step-bunched Si(111) substrate with dangling bond termination. In case of pentacene, it was confirmed that the crystal is quasi-single crystal with 2.2^o rotated twins. The band dispersion was identical to that of thin-film phase. The effective mass and transfer integrals are evaluated using two-dimensional tight binding fit and compared with band calculations [1]. We also report the growth of 2,7-Dipheny[1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene (DPh-BTBT) [2] on Bi-Si substrate and compare discuss its band structure. [4pt] [1] M.Ohtomo et al., APL 95, 123308 (2009).[0pt] [2] K.Takimiya, JACS 128, 3044 (2006).

  1. High Resolution Radar Measurements of Snow Avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElwaine, Jim; Sovilla, Betty; Vriend, Nathalie; Brennan, Paul; Ash, Matt; Keylock, Chris

    2013-04-01

    Geophysical mass flows, such as snow avalanches, are a major hazard in mountainous areas and have a significant impact on the infrastructure, economy and tourism of such regions. Obtaining a thorough understanding of the dynamics of snow avalanches is crucial for risk assessment and the design of defensive structures. However, because the underlying physics is poorly understood there are significant uncertainties concerning current models, which are poorly validated due to a lack of high resolution data. Direct observations of the denser core of a large avalanche are particularly difficult, since it is frequently obscured by the dilute powder cloud. We have developed and installed a phased array FMCW radar system that penetrates the powder cloud and directly images the dense core with a resolution of around 1 m at 50 Hz over the entire slope. We present data from recent avalanches at Vallee de la Sionne that show a wealth of internal structure and allow the tracking of individual fronts, roll waves and surges down the slope for the first time. We also show good agreement between the radar results and existing measurement systems that record data at particular points on the avalanche track.

  2. High Resolution Radar Measurements of Snow Avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElwaine, J. N.; Vriend, N. M.; Sovilla, B.; Keylock, C. J.; Brennan, P.; Ash, M.

    2012-12-01

    Geophysical mass flows, such as snow avalanches, are a major hazard in mountainous areas and have a significant impact on the infrastructure, economy and tourism of such regions. Obtaining a thorough understanding of the dynamics of snow avalanches is crucial for risk assessment and the design of defensive structures. However, because the underlying physics is poorly understood there are significant uncertainties concerning current models, which are poorly validated due to a lack of high resolution data. Direct observations of the denser core of a large avalanche are particularly difficult, since it is frequently obscured by the dilute powder cloud. We have developed and installed a phased array FMCW radar system that penetrates the powder cloud and directly images the dense core with a resolution of around 1 m at 50 Hz over the entire slope. We present data from recent avalanches at Vallée de la Sionne that show a wealth of internal structure and allow the tracking of individual fronts, roll waves and surges down the slope for the first time. We also show good agreement between the radar results and existing measurement systems that record data at particular points on the avalanche track.

  3. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2003-01-01

    Spectroscopic parameters (such as line position, intensity, broadening and shifting coefficients and their temperature dependences, line mixing coefficients etc.) for various molecular species of atmospheric interest are determined. In order to achieve these results, infrared spectra of several molecular bands are obtained using high-resolution recording instruments such as tunable diode laser spectrometer and Fourier transform spectrometers. Using sophisticated analysis routines (Multispectrum nonlinear least squares technique) these high-resolution infrared spectra are processed to determine the various spectral line parameters that are cited above. Spectra were taken using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak, Arizona as well as the Bruker FTS at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at Richland, Washington. Most of the spectra are acquired not only at room temperature, but also at several different cold temperatures. This procedure is necessary to study the variation of the spectral line parameters as a function of temperature in order to simulate the Earth's and other planetary atmospheric environments. Depending upon the strength or weakness of the various bands recorded and analyzed, the length(s) of the absorption cells in which the gas samples under study are kept varied from a few centimeters up to several meters and the sample temperatures varied from approximately +30 C to -63 C. Research on several infrared bands of various molecular species and their isotopomers are undertaken. Those studies are briefly described.

  4. High resolution spectroscopy to support atmospheric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Mary Ann H.; Devi, V. Malathy; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Benner, D. Chris; Harvey, Gale A.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the molecular spectra of ozone and other infrared-active atmospheric species is needed for accurate calculation of atmospheric heating and cooling rates in climate models. Remote sensing experiments on the Nimbus-7 satellites and the Spacelab-3 Space Shuttle Mission have shown that space-based measurements of infrared absorption or emission can be used to accurately determine the concentrations and distributions of stratospheric species on a global scale. The objective of this research task is to improve knowledge of the spectroscopic line parameters (positions, intensities, assignments, halfwidths, and pressure-induced shifts) of key atmospheric constituents through laboratory measurements.

  5. High resolution X-ray scattering measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zombeck, M. V.; Braeuninger, H.; Ondrusch, A.; Predehl, P.

    1982-01-01

    The results of high angular resolution grazing incidence scattering measurements of highly polished, coated optical flats in the X-ray spectral range of 1.5 to 6.4 keV are reported. The interpretation of these results in terms of surface microtopography is presented and the implications for grazing incidence X-ray imaging are discussed.

  6. High resolution image measurements of nuclear tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirk, E. K.; Price, P. B.

    1980-01-01

    The striking clarity and high contrast of the mouths of tracks etched in CR-39 plastic detectors allow automatic measurement of track parameters to be made with simple image-recognition equipment. Using a commercially available Vidicon camera system with a microprocessor-controlled digitizer, resolution for normally incident C-12 and N-14 ions at 32 MeV/amu equivalent to a 14sigma separation of adjacent charges was demonstrated.

  7. Circular dichroism in the angle-resolved photoemission spectrum of the high-temperature Bi_{2}Sr_{2}CaCu_{2}O_{8+delta} superconductor: can these measurements be interpreted as evidence for time-reversal symmetry breaking?

    PubMed

    Arpiainen, V; Bansil, A; Lindroos, M

    2009-08-07

    We report first-principles computations of the angle-resolved photoemission response with circularly polarized light in Bi_{2}Sr_{2}CaCu_{2}O_{8+delta} for the purpose of delineating contributions to the circular dichroism resulting from distortions and modulations of the crystal lattice. Comparison with available experimental results shows that the measured circular dichroism from antinodal mirror planes is reproduced in quantitative detail in calculations employing the average orthorhombic crystal structure. We thus conclude that the existing angle-resolved photoemission measurements can be understood essentially within the framework of the conventional picture, without the need to invoke unconventional mechanisms.

  8. High resolution pollutant measurements in complex urban ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Measuring air pollution in real-time using an instrumented vehicle platform has been an emerging strategy to resolve air pollution trends at a very fine spatial scale (10s of meters). Achieving second-by-second data representative of urban air quality trends requires advanced instrumentation, such as a quantum cascade laser utilized to resolve carbon monoxide and real-time optical detection of black carbon. An equally challenging area of development is processing and visualization of complex geospatial air monitoring data to decipher key trends of interest. EPA’s Office of Research and Development staff have applied air monitoring to evaluate community air quality in a variety of environments, including assessing air quality surrounding rail yards, evaluating noise wall or tree stand effects on roadside and on-road air quality, and surveying of traffic-related exposure zones for comparison with land-use regression estimates. ORD has ongoing efforts to improve mobile monitoring data collection and interpretation, including instrumentation testing, evaluating the effect of post-processing algorithms on derived trends, and developing a web-based tool called Real-Time Geospatial Data Viewer (RETIGO) allowing for a simple plug-and-play of mobile monitoring data. Example findings from mobile data sets include an estimated 50% in roadside ultrafine particle levels when immediately downwind of a noise barrier, increases in neighborhood-wide black carbon levels (3

  9. Design and validation of an angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry fiber probe for in vivo clinical measurements of depth-resolved nuclear morphology.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yizheng; Terry, Neil G; Woosley, John T; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Wax, Adam

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel Fourier-domain angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry (a /LCI) fiber probe designed for in vivo clinical application in gastrointestinal endoscopy. The a/LCI technique measures the depth-resolved angular scattering distribution to determine the size distribution and optical density of cell nuclei for assessing the health of epithelial tissues. Clinical application is enabled by an endoscopic fiber-optic probe that employs a 2.3-m-long coherent fiber bundle and is compatible with the standard 2.8-mm-diam biopsy channel of a gastroscope. The probe allows for real-time data acquisition by collecting the scattering from multiple angles in parallel, enabled by the Fourier domain approach. The performance of the probe is characterized through measurement of critical parameters. The depth-resolved sizing capability of the system is demonstrated using single- and double-layer microsphere phantoms with subwavelength sizing precision and accuracy achieved. Initial results from a clinical feasibility test are also presented to show in vivo application in the human esophagus.

  10. Design and validation of an angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry fiber probe for in vivo clinical measurements of depth-resolved nuclear morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yizheng; Terry, Neil G.; Woosley, John T.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Wax, Adam

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel Fourier-domain angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry (a /LCI) fiber probe designed for in vivo clinical application in gastrointestinal endoscopy. The a/LCI technique measures the depth-resolved angular scattering distribution to determine the size distribution and optical density of cell nuclei for assessing the health of epithelial tissues. Clinical application is enabled by an endoscopic fiber-optic probe that employs a 2.3-m-long coherent fiber bundle and is compatible with the standard 2.8-mm-diam biopsy channel of a gastroscope. The probe allows for real-time data acquisition by collecting the scattering from multiple angles in parallel, enabled by the Fourier domain approach. The performance of the probe is characterized through measurement of critical parameters. The depth-resolved sizing capability of the system is demonstrated using single- and double-layer microsphere phantoms with subwavelength sizing precision and accuracy achieved. Initial results from a clinical feasibility test are also presented to show in vivo application in the human esophagus.

  11. Design and validation of an angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry fiber probe for in vivo clinical measurements of depth-resolved nuclear morphology

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yizheng; Terry, Neil G.; Woosley, John T.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Wax, Adam

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel Fourier-domain angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry (a ∕LCI) fiber probe designed for in vivo clinical application in gastrointestinal endoscopy. The a∕LCI technique measures the depth-resolved angular scattering distribution to determine the size distribution and optical density of cell nuclei for assessing the health of epithelial tissues. Clinical application is enabled by an endoscopic fiber-optic probe that employs a 2.3-m-long coherent fiber bundle and is compatible with the standard 2.8-mm-diam biopsy channel of a gastroscope. The probe allows for real-time data acquisition by collecting the scattering from multiple angles in parallel, enabled by the Fourier domain approach. The performance of the probe is characterized through measurement of critical parameters. The depth-resolved sizing capability of the system is demonstrated using single- and double-layer microsphere phantoms with subwavelength sizing precision and accuracy achieved. Initial results from a clinical feasibility test are also presented to show in vivo application in the human esophagus. PMID:21280890

  12. Omnidirectional Measurements of Angle-Resolved Heat Capacity for Complete Detection of Superconducting Gap Structure in the Heavy-Fermion Antiferromagnet UPd_{2}Al_{3}.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yusei; Kittaka, Shunichiro; Sakakibara, Toshiro; Tsutsumi, Yasumasa; Nomoto, Takuya; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Machida, Kazushige; Homma, Yoshiya; Aoki, Dai

    2016-07-15

    Quasiparticle excitations in UPd_{2}Al_{3} were studied by means of heat-capacity (C) measurements under rotating magnetic fields using a high-quality single crystal. The field dependence shows C(H)∝H^{1/2}-like behavior at low temperatures for both two hexagonal crystal axes, i.e., H∥[0001] (c axis) and H∥[112[over ¯]0] (a axis), suggesting the presence of nodal quasiparticle excitations from heavy bands. At low temperatures, the polar-angle (θ) dependence of C exhibits a maximum along H∥[0001] with a twofold symmetric oscillation below 0.5 T, and an unusual shoulder or hump anomaly has been found around 30°-60° from the c axis in C(θ) at intermediate fields (1≲μ_{0}H≲2  T). These behaviors in UPd_{2}Al_{3} purely come from the superconducting nodal quasiparticle excitations, and can be successfully reproduced by theoretical calculations assuming the gap symmetry with a horizontal linear line node. We demonstrate the whole angle-resolved heat-capacity measurements done here as a novel spectroscopic method for nodal gap determination, which can be applied to other exotic superconductors.

  13. Angle-resolved RABBITT: theory and numerics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockett, Paul

    2017-08-01

    Angle-resolved (AR) RABBITT measurements offer a high information content measurement scheme, due to the presence of multiple, interfering, ionization channels combined with a phase-sensitive observable in the form of angle and time-resolved photoelectron interferograms. In order to explore the characteristics and potentials of AR-RABBITT, a perturbative 2-photon model is developed; based on this model, example AR-RABBITT results are computed for model and real systems, for a range of RABBITT schemes. These results indicate some of the phenomena to be expected in AR-RABBITT measurements, and suggest various applications of the technique in photoionization metrology.

  14. Feasibility of clinical detection of cervical dysplasia using angle-resolved low coherence interferometry measurements of depth-resolved nuclear morphology.

    PubMed

    Ho, Derek; Drake, Tyler K; Smith-McCune, Karen K; Darragh, Teresa M; Hwang, Loris Y; Wax, Adam

    2017-03-15

    This study sought to establish the feasibility of using in situ depth-resolved nuclear morphology measurements for detection of cervical dysplasia. Forty enrolled patients received routine cervical colposcopy with angle-resolved low coherence interferometry (a/LCI) measurements of nuclear morphology. a/LCI scans from 63 tissue sites were compared to histopathological analysis of co-registered biopsy specimens which were classified as benign, low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL), or high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL). Results were dichotomized as dysplastic (LSIL/HSIL) versus non-dysplastic and HSIL versus LSIL/benign to determine both accuracy and potential clinical utility of a/LCI nuclear morphology measurements. Analysis of a/LCI data was conducted using both traditional Mie theory based processing and a new hybrid algorithm that provides improved processing speed to ascertain the feasibility of real-time measurements. Analysis of depth-resolved nuclear morphology data revealed a/LCI was able to detect a significant increase in the nuclear diameter at the depth bin containing the basal layer of the epithelium for dysplastic versus non-dysplastic and HSIL versus LSIL/Benign biopsy sites (both p < 0.001). Both processing techniques resulted in high sensitivity and specificity (>0.80) in identifying dysplastic biopsies and HSIL. The hybrid algorithm demonstrated a threefold decrease in processing time at a slight cost in classification accuracy. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using a/LCI as an adjunctive clinical tool for detecting cervical dysplasia and guiding the identification of optimal biopsy sites. The faster speed from the hybrid algorithm offers a promising approach for real-time clinical analysis. © 2016 UICC.

  15. Angle-resolved optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Adrien Emmanuel

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has emerged as a powerful tool for probing the microstructure of biological tissue non-invasively at high-speed. OCT measures depth-resolved reflectance of infrared light, generating cross-sectional images non-invasively with micron-scale resolution. As with other imaging modalities that employ coherent detection, OCT images are confounded by speckle noise. Speckle imposes a grainy texture on images that reduces the signal-to-noise ratio to near unity values. As a result, it conceals subtle differences in scattering properties known to be crucial for differentiating normal from diseased tissue states. In this thesis, we developed a novel OCT modality called "Angle-Resolved OCT" in which depth scans (A-lines) are obtained simultaneously from a broad range of backscattering angles. We demonstrated that high levels of speckle reduction can be achieved by averaging the magnitudes of A-lines corresponding to the same transverse locations. With both experimental and analytic approaches, we demonstrated that this averaging method does not lead to a substantial loss in spatial resolution. We developed two different imaging systems for performing Angle-Resolved OCT. With the first system, angular data was acquired simultaneously; with the second, it was acquired sequentially. The first system had superior speckle-reduction capabilities but image quality degraded significantly with small sample movements. The second system allowed for in vivo imaging, as demonstrated with Resolved OCT systems, the speckle-reduced images showed hitherto unprecedented delineation of tissue microstructure.

  16. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.J.

    1985-03-01

    Measurements of the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) from the S(1s) core level of a c(2 x 2)S/Ni(001) are analyzed to determine the spacing between the S overlayer and the first and second Ni layers. ARPEFS is a type of photoelectron diffraction measurement in which the photoelectron kinetic energy is swept typically from 100 to 600 eV. By using this wide range of intermediate energies we add high precision and theoretical simplification to the advantages of the photoelectron diffraction technique for determining surface structures. We report developments in the theory of photoelectron scattering in the intermediate energy range, measurement of the experimental photoemission spectra, their reduction to ARPEFS, and the surface structure determination from the ARPEFS by combined Fourier and multiple-scattering analyses. 202 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. High-Resolution Wind Measurements for Offshore Wind Energy Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, Son V.; Neumann, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical transform, called the Rosette Transform, together with a new method, called the Dense Sampling Method, have been developed. The Rosette Transform is invented to apply to both the mean part and the fluctuating part of a targeted radar signature using the Dense Sampling Method to construct the data in a high-resolution grid at 1-km posting for wind measurements over water surfaces such as oceans or lakes.

  18. Arterial diameter measurement using high resolution ultrasonography: in vitro validation.

    PubMed

    Brum, Javier; Bia, Daniel; Benech, Nicolas; Balay, Guillermo; Armentano, Ricardo L; Negreira, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Simultaneous measurement of pressure and diameter in blood vessels or vascular prosthesis is of great importance in cardiovascular research. Knowledge of diameter changes as response to intravascular pressure is the basis to estimate the biomechanical properties of blood vessel. In this work a new method to quantify arterial diameter based in high resolution ultrasonography is proposed. Measurements on an arterial phantom placed on a cardiovascular simulator were performed. The results were compared to sonomicrometry measurements considered as gold standard technique. The obtained results indicate that the new method ensure an optimal diameter quantification. This method presents two main advantages respect to sonomicrometry: is noninvasive and the vessel wall strain can be measured directly.

  19. Measuring molecular flows with high-resolution stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    She, C. Y.; Fairbank, W. M., Jr.; Exton, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    It is proposed to use high-resolution stimulated Raman spectroscopy to directly measure high-speed molecular flow velocities in wind tunnels and in combustive chambers. A feasibility study indicates that flow speeds from Mach 0.04 up may be measured with the proposed method using available laser systems. It is pointed out that the success of the proposed technique will make it possible to measure all interesting flow parameters, i.e., species concentration, temperature, and velocity, in a time of less than 1 microsecond at a repetition rate of 10,000/s using a single experimental arrangement.

  20. Bulk Electronic Structure of Superconducting LaRu2P2 Single Crystals Measured by Soft-X-Ray Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razzoli, E.; Kobayashi, M.; Strocov, V. N.; Delley, B.; Bukowski, Z.; Karpinski, J.; Plumb, N. C.; Radovic, M.; Chang, J.; Schmitt, T.; Patthey, L.; Mesot, J.; Shi, M.

    2012-06-01

    We present a soft x-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (SX-ARPES) study of the stoichiometric pnictide superconductor LaRu2P2. The observed electronic structure is in good agreement with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. However, it is significantly different from its counterpart in high-temperature superconducting Fe pnictides. In particular, the bandwidth renormalization present in the Fe pnictides (˜2-3) is negligible in LaRu2P2 even though the mass enhancement is similar in both systems. Our results suggest that the superconductivity in LaRu2P2 has a different origin with respect to the iron pnictides. Finally, we demonstrate that the increased probing depth of SX-ARPES, compared to the widely used ultraviolet ARPES, is essential in determining the bulk electronic structure in the experiment.

  1. Multifractal analysis of high resolution solar wind proton density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Carbone, Francesco; Leonardis, Ersilia; Chen, Christopher H. K.; Šafránková, Jana; Němeček, Zdenek

    2017-03-01

    The solar wind is a highly turbulent medium, with a high level of field fluctuations throughout a broad range of scales. These include an inertial range where a turbulent cascade is assumed to be active. The solar wind cascade shows intermittency, which however may depend on the wind conditions. Recent observations have shown that ion-scale magnetic turbulence is almost self-similar, rather than intermittent. A similar result was observed for the high resolution measurements of proton density provided by the spacecraft Spektr-R. Intermittency may be interpreted as the result of the multifractal properties of the turbulent cascade. In this perspective, this paper is devoted to the description of the multifractal properties of the high resolution density measurements. In particular, we have used the standard coarse-graining technique to evaluate the generalized dimensions Dq , and from these the multifractal spectrum f (α) , in two ranges of scale. A fit with the p-model for intermittency provided a quantitative measure of multifractality. Such indicator was then compared with alternative measures: the width of the multifractal spectrum, the peak of the kurtosis, and its scaling exponent. The results indicate that the small-scale fluctuations are multifractal, and suggest that different measures of intermittency are required to fully understand the small scale cascade.

  2. Wind measurements with the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, W. R.; Hays, P. B.; Abreu, V. J.

    1985-01-01

    The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), to be launched in 1989, is to provide a global data set required to understand the mechanisms controlling upper atmosphere structure and processes, as well as the response of the upper atmosphere to natural and human perturbations. The High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) is the primary instrument for measuring the dynamics of the stratosphere and mesosphere. The goal of HRDI is to measure wind velocities in the stratosphere and mesosphere during the day and the mesosphere and thermosphere at night with an accuracy of 5 m/sec. HRDI will determine winds by measuring Doppler shifts of atmosphere absorption and emission features. Line of sight winds will be taken in two directions, thus allowing the wind vector to be formed. The HRDI instrument is overviewed. The basis of the measurement is explained, as is an outline of the instrument. Since neither instrument nor observational techniques is fully mature, only a brief sketch is presented.

  3. Measuring Large-Scale Social Networks with High Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Sekara, Vedran; Sapiezynski, Piotr; Cuttone, Andrea; Madsen, Mette My; Larsen, Jakob Eg; Lehmann, Sune

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the deployment of a large-scale study designed to measure human interactions across a variety of communication channels, with high temporal resolution and spanning multiple years—the Copenhagen Networks Study. Specifically, we collect data on face-to-face interactions, telecommunication, social networks, location, and background information (personality, demographics, health, politics) for a densely connected population of 1 000 individuals, using state-of-the-art smartphones as social sensors. Here we provide an overview of the related work and describe the motivation and research agenda driving the study. Additionally, the paper details the data-types measured, and the technical infrastructure in terms of both backend and phone software, as well as an outline of the deployment procedures. We document the participant privacy procedures and their underlying principles. The paper is concluded with early results from data analysis, illustrating the importance of multi-channel high-resolution approach to data collection. PMID:24770359

  4. High resolution wind turbine wake measurements with a scanning lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herges, T. G.; Maniaci, D. C.; Naughton, B. T.; Mikkelsen, T.; Sjöholm, M.

    2017-05-01

    High-resolution lidar wake measurements are part of an ongoing field campaign being conducted at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology facility by Sandia National Laboratories and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory using a customized scanning lidar from the Technical University of Denmark. One of the primary objectives is to collect experimental data to improve the predictive capability of wind plant computational models to represent the response of the turbine wake to varying inflow conditions and turbine operating states. The present work summarizes the experimental setup and illustrates several wake measurement example cases. The cases focus on demonstrating the impact of the atmospheric conditions on the wake shape and position, and exhibit a sample of the data that has been made public through the Department of Energy Atmosphere to Electrons Data Archive and Portal.

  5. Wide and high resolution tension measurement using FRET in embryo

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Tsuboi, Takashi; Ishinabe, Nanako; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Michiue, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    During embryonic development, physical force plays an important role in morphogenesis and differentiation. Stretch sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) has the potential to provide non-invasive tension measurements inside living tissue. In this study, we introduced a FRET-based actinin tension sensor into Xenopus laevis embryos and demonstrated that this sensor captures variation of tension across differentiating ectoderm. The actinin tension sensor, containing mCherry and EGFP connected by spider silk protein, was validated in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells and embryos. It co-localized with actin filaments and changed FRET efficiencies in response to actin filament destruction, myosin deactivation, and osmotic perturbation. Time-lapse FRET analysis showed that the prospective neural ectoderm bears higher tension than the epidermal ectoderm during gastrulation and neurulation, and cells morphogenetic behavior correlated with the tension difference. These data confirmed that the sensor enables us to measure tension across tissues concurrently and with high resolution. PMID:27335157

  6. Determining Small Scale Albedos Using High Resolution Multiangle Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markowski, G. R.; Davies, R.

    2005-05-01

    Current satellite short-wave (SW) albedo measurements, such as CERES's, have only a broad spatial resolution and cannot by themselves accurately measure reflectance (roughly solar "forcing") on small space and time scales. The major difficulty is that earth's surface reflectivity, including the atmosphere and clouds, is substantially anisotropic. However, accurate regional and time-dependent albedos are needed for studying causes of climate variability and change, and improving models from global to at least cloud resolving scales. A first step to obtain these albedos, for which we show results, is to accurately relate (and verify) the high resolution spatial and angular surface narrow-band MISR (Multi-Angle Imaging Spectroradiometer) radiance measurements aboard the Terra satellite to coincident total shortwave broadband (SWB) low resolution measurements from the onboard CERES instrument. Because MISR measures radiance of the same points along an orbital swath, it becomes possible to check and improve Angular (reflection) Distribution Models (ADMs) at small scales (< 1 km). The ADMs can later be used to invert a measured angular radiance to a local albedo. The difficulty lies in obtaining accurate ADMs for earth's highly varied surface and lighting conditions. We show prediction accuracy examples of CERES SWB vs. single and multiple band MISR data regressions. We include view angle dependence (9 angles: nadir plus 26, 46, 60, and 70 degrees fore and aft) and show improved accuracy when surface data, e.g., solar zenith and scattering angle, and surface type are included. In many cases, we predict angular (bidirectional) reflectance to ~ 0.01, or about 10 watts/sq m in irradiance. We also show examples of "difficult" scene types, such as varying levels of broken clouds, where accuracy degrades by a factor of ~2.

  7. High-resolution measurements of humidity and temperature with lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, Andreas; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Spaeth, Florian; Hammann, Eva; Muppa, Shravan Kumar; Metzendorf, Simon; Riede, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    3-dimensional thermodynamic fields of temperature and moisture including their turbulent fluctuations have been observed with the two scanning lidar systems of University of Hohenheim in three field campaigns in 2013 and 2014. In this contribution, we will introduce these two self-developed instruments and illustrate their performance with measurement examples. Finally, an outlook to envisioned future research activities with the new data sets of the instruments is given. Our temperature lidar is based on the rotational Raman technique. The scanning rotational Raman lidar (RRL) uses a seeded frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 355 nm. A two-mirror scanner with a 40-cm telescope collects the atmospheric backscatter signals. Humidity measurements are made with a scanning water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) which uses a titanium sapphire laser at 820 nm as transmitter. This laser is pumped with a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser and injection-seeded for switching between the online and offline wavelengths. The DIAL receiver consists of a scanning 80-cm telescope. The measured temperature and humidity profiles of both instruments have typical resolutions of only a few seconds and 100 m in the atmospheric boundary layer both in day- and night-time. Recent field experiments with the RRL and the DIAL of University of Hohenheim were (1) the HD(CP)2 Prototype Experiment (HOPE) in spring 2013 in western Germany - this activity is embedded in the project HD(CP)2 (High-definition clouds and precipitation for advancing climate prediction); (2) a measurement campaign in Hohenheim in autumn 2013; (3) the campaign SABLE (Surface Atmospheric Boundary Layer Exchange) in south-western Germany in summer 2014. The collected moisture and temperature data will serve as initial thermodynamic fields for forecast experiments related to the formation of clouds and precipitation. Due to their high resolution and high precision, the systems are capable of resolving

  8. Spectral angle resolved scattering of thin film coatings.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Sven; Unglaub, David; Trost, Marcus; Cheng, Xinbin; Zhang, Jinlong; Duparré, Angela

    2014-02-01

    The light scattering of interference coatings is strongly dependent on the wavelength. In addition to the general strong increase of scattering as the wavelengths get shorter, dramatic scatter effects in and around the resonance regions can occur. This is discussed in detail for highly reflective and chirped mirrors. A new instrument is presented which enables spectral angle resolved scatter measurements of high-quality optical components to be performed between 250 and 1500 nm.

  9. High Resolution Measurement of Auroral "Hiss" and "Roar"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.; Labelle, J.; Weatherwax, A.

    2004-05-01

    In December 2002, a Versatile Electromagnetic Wave Receiver (VIEW) together with a new digitization system was deployed at South Pole station. The motivation was to measure three types of auroral radio emissions: Auroral Roar, a relatively narrowband (Δ f/f <0.1) emission near 2 and 3 times the F region ionospheric electron cyclotron frequency (fce); Auroral Hiss, a whistler mode wave emission with frequencies lower than 1MHz ; and Auroral medium frequency (MF) burst, broadband impulsive radio emissions observed at ground level during the breakup phase of auroral substorms. High resolution broad band structure of those three emissions are recorded automatically at South Pole, and are crucial to our understanding the mechanism and relations of auroral radio emissions. This experiment uses a 3x3 meter square magnetic dipole antenna, located 1.7 km away from the South Pole station. A pre-amplifier is buried right below the eastern pylon of the antenna, connected by a 1.7 km long co-axial cable to a LF-HF receiver in the station. The output of the receiver is fed into the Versatile Electromagnetic Wave Receiver (VIEW) and Windows system equipped with a digitization board. Software is written to digitize the selected signals at 1 or 2 MHz. This data acquisition system was designed so that researchers at Dartmouth College can review the data from South Pole weekly and save interesting parts according to instructions sent from Dartmouth. In the year of 2003, the experiment concentrated on the auroral roar frequency band. With 3 hours window per day, it captured more than 30 auroral roar events at South Pole station. The data show detailed structure of Auroral Roar, which is comprised of multiple narrow band features drifting in frequencies in a complicated pattern. ( LaBelle et al., 1995; Shepherd et al., 1998) Starting in 2004, the experiment is concentrating on the auroral hiss frequency band. This mode promises to caputure the first detailed structure of auroral hiss

  10. Joint Measurements of Terahertz Wave Generation and High-Harmonic Generation from Aligned Nitrogen Molecules Reveal Angle-Resolved Molecular Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yindong; Meng, Chao; Wang, Xiaowei; Lü, Zhihui; Zhang, Dongwen; Chen, Wenbo; Zhao, Jing; Yuan, Jianmin; Zhao, Zengxiu

    2015-09-01

    We report the synchronized measurements of terahertz wave generation and high-harmonic generation from aligned nitrogen molecules in dual-color laser fields. Both yields are found to be alignment dependent, showing the importance of molecular structures in the generation processes. By calibrating the angular ionization rates with the terahertz yields, we present a new way of retrieving the angular differential photoionization cross section (PICS) from the harmonic signals which avoids specific model calculations or separate measurements of the alignment-dependent ionization rates. The measured PICS is found to be consistent with theoretical predications, although some discrepancies exist. This all-optical method provides a new alternative for investigating molecular structures.

  11. High Resolution Measurement of LF Auroral Hiss at South Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.; Labelle, J.

    2005-05-01

    In December 2002, a Versatile Electromagnetic Wave Receiver (VIEW) and a new digitization system were deployed at South Pole station(-74° magnetic latitude). The motivation was to measure three types of auroral radio emissions: Auroral Roar, a relatively narrowband (δf/f<0.1) emission near 2 and 3 times the F region ionospheric electron cyclotron frequency (fce); Auroral Hiss, a whistler mode wave emission with frequencies lower than 1MHz; and Auroral medium frequency (MF) burst, broadband impulsive radio emissions observed at ground level during the breakup phase of auroral substorms. High resolution broad band structure of those three emissions are recorded automatically at South Pole, and are crucial to our understanding the mechanism and relations of auroral radio emissions. This experiment uses a 3×3 meter square magnetic dipole antenna, located 1.7 km away from the South Pole station. A pre-amplifier is buried right below the eastern pylon of the antenna, connected by a 1.7 km long co-axial cable to a LF-HF receiver in the station. The output of the receiver is fed into the Versatile Electromagnetic Wave Receiver (VIEW) and Windows system equipped with a digitization board. Customed software was used to digitize the selected signals at 1-2 MHz. This data acquisition system was designed so that researchers at Dartmouth College can review the data from South Pole weekly and save interesting parts according to instructions sent from Dartmouth. In the year of 2004(from Jan through September), the experiment concentrated on the auroral hiss frequency band, covering either 0-500 kHz or 0-1000 kHz. With 3-6 hours window per day, VIEW captured more than 30 GBytes data of auroral hiss waveforms. Many experiments report wave forms of VLF auroral hiss at f < 30 kHz. We focused on waveforms of LF auroral hiss, typically at 100-300 kHz. At these frequencies, the hiss shows striking fine structure. We classified our LF hiss events into three different types: standard

  12. Angle-resolved diffraction grating biosensor based on porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Changwu; Jia, Zhenhong; Liu, Yajun; Mo, Jiaqing; Li, Peng; Lv, Xiaoyi

    2016-03-01

    In this study, an optical biosensor based on a porous silicon composite structure was fabricated using a simple method. This structure consists of a thin, porous silicon surface diffraction grating and a one-dimensional porous silicon photonic crystal. An angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum was obtained by measuring the diffraction efficiency at a range of incident angles. The angle-resolved diffraction efficiency of the 2nd and 3rd orders was studied experimentally and theoretically. The device was sensitive to the change of refractive index in the presence of a biomolecule indicated by the shift of the diffraction efficiency spectrum. The sensitivity of this sensor was investigated through use of an 8 base pair antifreeze protein DNA hybridization. The shifts of the angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum showed a relationship with the change of the refractive index, and the detection limit of the biosensor reached 41.7 nM. This optical device is highly sensitive, inexpensive, and simple to fabricate. Using shifts in diffraction efficiency spectrum to detect biological molecules has not yet been explored, so this study establishes a foundation for future work.

  13. Angle-resolved diffraction grating biosensor based on porous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Changwu; Li, Peng; Jia, Zhenhong Liu, Yajun; Mo, Jiaqing; Lv, Xiaoyi

    2016-03-07

    In this study, an optical biosensor based on a porous silicon composite structure was fabricated using a simple method. This structure consists of a thin, porous silicon surface diffraction grating and a one-dimensional porous silicon photonic crystal. An angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum was obtained by measuring the diffraction efficiency at a range of incident angles. The angle-resolved diffraction efficiency of the 2nd and 3rd orders was studied experimentally and theoretically. The device was sensitive to the change of refractive index in the presence of a biomolecule indicated by the shift of the diffraction efficiency spectrum. The sensitivity of this sensor was investigated through use of an 8 base pair antifreeze protein DNA hybridization. The shifts of the angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum showed a relationship with the change of the refractive index, and the detection limit of the biosensor reached 41.7 nM. This optical device is highly sensitive, inexpensive, and simple to fabricate. Using shifts in diffraction efficiency spectrum to detect biological molecules has not yet been explored, so this study establishes a foundation for future work.

  14. High-resolution optical fiber heterodyne interferometer for measuring displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Wang, Jia; Cao, Mang; Li, Dacheng

    1990-07-01

    Many Methods have been developed to .easure displace.ent with high accuracy, for exap1e, with a dual frequency laser interferometer (AC interferometer) and an classic interferoseter (DC interferoeter) which use a stabilized laser and fringe counter, and an AC interfero.eter has ore advantage over the DC one. An AC interfero.eter with a Zee.an laser can get a high resolution, in the order of nanoMeters, but its resolution extension liRited by nonlinear relation between phase and displace.ent which caused by the two-frequency coRponents in interferoaeter[1]. Because the fundaaental length scale of the interferometer is the wavelength of the light source in the air. The accuracy of an interferoeter is li.ited by the operating envireaent, teRperature, husidity, pressure, etc. because the aiRs of interferoseters expose in the air. A high resolution optical fiber heterodyne interfermeter is described in the paper.

  15. Kramer-Pesch approximation for analyzing field-angle-resolved measurements made in unconventional superconductors: a calculation of the zero-energy density of states.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yuki; Hayashi, Nobuhiko

    2008-08-29

    By measuring the angular-oscillations behavior of the heat capacity with respect to the applied field direction, one can detect the details of the gap structure. We introduce the Kramer-Pesch approximation as a new method to analyze the field-angle-dependent experiments, which improves the previous Doppler-shift technique. We show that the Fermi-surface anisotropy is an indispensable factor for identifying the superconducting gap symmetry.

  16. Kramer-Pesch Approximation for Analyzing Field-Angle-Resolved Measurements Made in Unconventional Superconductors: A Calculation of the Zero-Energy Density of States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Yuki; Hayashi, Nobuhiko

    2008-08-01

    By measuring the angular-oscillations behavior of the heat capacity with respect to the applied field direction, one can detect the details of the gap structure. We introduce the Kramer-Pesch approximation as a new method to analyze the field-angle-dependent experiments, which improves the previous Doppler-shift technique. We show that the Fermi-surface anisotropy is an indispensable factor for identifying the superconducting gap symmetry.

  17. HIGH RESOLUTION EMITTANCE MEASUREMENTS AT SNS FRONT END

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac accelerates an H- beam from 2.5MeV up to 1GeV. Recently the emittance scanner in the MEBT (2.5 MeV) was upgraded. In addition to the slit - harp measurement, we now can use a slit installed on the same actuator as the harp. In combination with a faraday cup located downstream in DTL part of the linac, it represents a classical slit-slit emittance measurement device. While a slit slit scan takes much longer, it is immune to harp related problems such as wire cross talk, and thus looks promising for accurate halo measurements. Time resolution of the new device seems to be sufficient to estimate the amount of beam in the chopper gap (the scanner is downstream of the chopper), and probably to measure its emittance. This paper describes the initial measurements with the new device and some model validation data.

  18. High resolution measurement of water levels in optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murrieta-Rico, Fabian N.; Petranovskii, Vitalii; Sergiyenko, Oleg; Hernandez-Balbuena, Daniel; Raymond-Herrera, Oscar

    2016-09-01

    Systems for optical analysis use vacuum chambers, where low pressures are reached. Remaining water molecules are the prevalent contaminant in high vacuum chambers. For this reason measurement of water levels is an important task that allows correct equipment operation. In this work, a different approach is presented for detecting and quantifying the water molecules inside a the vacuum chamber used in optical systems. A zeolite coated quartz crystal microbalance is used for detecting the water molecules, and the change in the resonance frequency is measured using a novel technique known as the principle of rational approximations. Theoretical results show how nanograms of adsorbed molecules are measured, and the number of molecules are quantified.

  19. Angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the surface of imidazolium ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Lockett, Vera; Sedev, Rossen; Bassell, Chris; Ralston, John

    2008-03-07

    The surfaces of three imidazolium based ionic liquids with a common anion were studied with angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs): 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (bmim), 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium (hmim), and 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium (omim) tetrafluoroborates, were meticulously purified and dried under vacuum. Survey and high-resolution spectra were obtained at different take-off angles (0-84 degrees ), thus increasing the surface sensitivity of the measurement. No impurities were detected and the survey spectra at normal emission (0 degrees ) confirmed the stoichiometric composition of the liquids. However, the spectra at take-off angles of 60, 70, 80 and 84 degrees indicated a higher amount of carbon. High resolution spectra of C1s, at these angles, showed an increased amount of aliphatic carbon when compared to the spectra at normal emission. The longer the side chain (R) of the imidazolium cation (Rmim), the larger was the amount of aliphatic carbon detected. Previous studies with other surface sensitive techniques have yielded contradictory conclusions about the surface orientation of the Rmim. We conclude unequivocally that the alkyl chain of the imidazolium ring of the investigated RTILs is oriented away from the liquid. Our study demonstrates the ability of XPS to probe the structure, along with the composition, of the free liquid surface by comparing signals from different penetration depths.

  20. High-resolution near-field measurements of microwave circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantor, R.; Shvets, I. V.

    2004-04-01

    In this paper we report on measurements of electric field intensities of microwave field above surface of microwave circuits using miniaturized coaxial antennas. During the scanning process the antenna is driven at various distances above the sample surface according to topographic data acquired prior to the field measurement. A position/signal difference method is used to increase the spatial resolution of the antenna to about 20 μm (λ/104) -- one order of magnitude better than contemporary microwave scanning systems. For measurement of the tangential field components parallel to the sample surface the antenna is tilted by about 45° relative to the sample surface. By its rotation about the vertical axis various components of the field are measured, vertical and horizontal electric field intensities are recalculated. Performance of our scanning system utilizing these methods is tested using a PCB surface capacitor, a microstrip filter and a microstrip transmission line.

  1. High resolution wind measurements for offshore wind energy development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, Son Van (Inventor); Neumann, Gregory (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method, apparatus, system, article of manufacture, and computer readable storage medium provide the ability to measure wind. Data at a first resolution (i.e., low resolution data) is collected by a satellite scatterometer. Thin slices of the data are determined. A collocation of the data slices are determined at each grid cell center to obtain ensembles of collocated data slices. Each ensemble of collocated data slices is decomposed into a mean part and a fluctuating part. The data is reconstructed at a second resolution from the mean part and a residue of the fluctuating part. A wind measurement is determined from the data at the second resolution using a wind model function. A description of the wind measurement is output.

  2. High-resolution capacitance measurement and potentiometry by force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Yves; Abraham, David W.; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar

    1988-03-01

    We demonstrate the usefulness and high sensitivity of the atomic force microscope (AFM) for imaging surface dielectric properties and for potentiometry through the detection of electrostatic forces. Electric forces as small as 10-10 N have been measured, corresponding to a capacitance of 10-19 farad. The sensitivity of our AFM should ultimately allow us to detect capacitances as low as 8×10-22 F. The method enables us to detect the presence of dielectric material over Si, and to measure the voltage in a p-n junction with submicron spatial resolution.

  3. High resolution DNA content measurements of mammalian sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkel, D.; Lake, S.; Gledhill, B.L.; Van Dilla, M.A.; Stephenson, D.; Watchmaker, G.

    1982-01-01

    The high condensation and flat shape of the mammalian sperm nucleus present unique difficulties to flow cytometric measurement of DNA content. Chromatin compactness makes quantitative fluorescent staining for DNA difficult and causes a high index of refraction. The refractive index makes optical measurements sensitive to sperm head orientation. We demonstrate that the optical problems can be overcome using the commercial ICP22 epiillumination flow cytometer (Ortho Instruments, Westwood, MA) or a specially built cell orientating flow cytometer (OFCM). The design and operation of the OFCM are described. Measurements of the angular dependence of fluorescence from acriflavine stained rabbit sperm show that it is capable of orienting flat sperm with a tolerance of +-7/sup 0/. Differences in the angular dependence for the similarly shaped bull and rabbit sperm allow discrimination of these cells. We show that DNA staining with 4-6 diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) or an ethidium bromide mithramycin combination allows resolution of the X and Y populations in mouse sperm. They have also been successful with sperm from the bull, ram, rabbit, and boar. Reliable results with human sperm are not obtained. The accuracy of the staining and measurement techniques are verified by the correct determination of the relative content of these two populations in sperm from normal mice and those with the Cattanach (7 to X) translocation. Among the potential uses of these techniques are measurement of DNA content errors induced in sperm due to mutagen exposure, and assessment of the fractions of X and Y sperm in semen that may have one population artifically enriched.

  4. High resolution redox potential measurements: techniques, interpretation and value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorenhout, Michel; van der Geest, Harm G.

    2013-04-01

    The ongoing improvement of techniques for the in situ measurement of redox potentials has led to a large number of studies on redox variability in various environments. These studies originate from a wide array of scientific disciplines, amongst which ecology (sediment biogeochemistry), environmental chemistry (degradation studies) and archaeology (in situ preservation). To gain insight in the potential applications, this paper presents three examples of studies in which a newly developed measurement technique was used in soils and where spatial and temporal variation plays an important role. The first one is a microcosm study on the effects of biota on the dynamics of redox conditions in the toplayer of aquatic sediments, showing that the presence of microbiota has a direct influence on biogeochemical parameters. The second is the study of the redox potential in the world heritage site of Bryggen (Bergen, NO) that is under threat of oxidation. The oxidation, caused by a lowered groundwater table, causes soil degradation and unstable conditions for the monumental buildings of the Medieval site. The third study shows variability in a sandy flood plain in Bangladesh, where redox processes dictate the environmental behaviour of Arsenic. This toxic metal is present in many wells used for drinking water, but shows very local variation in dissolution dynamics. In these three studies, continuous measurements of (changes in) redox conditions revealed a strong variability in these systems and consequences for the interpretation of single point measurements or low frequency sampling campaigns are discussed. In these and many other cases, the continuous measurement of the redox potential in soil media will aid in the understanding of the system under study.

  5. High Resolution Viscosity Measurement by Thermal Noise Detection

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar Sandoval, Felipe; Sepúlveda, Manuel; Bellon, Ludovic; Melo, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    An interferometric method is implemented in order to accurately assess the thermal fluctuations of a micro-cantilever sensor in liquid environments. The power spectrum density (PSD) of thermal fluctuations together with Sader’s model of the cantilever allow for the indirect measurement of the liquid viscosity with good accuracy. The good quality of the deflection signal and the characteristic low noise of the instrument allow for the detection and corrections of drawbacks due to both the cantilever shape irregularities and the uncertainties on the position of the laser spot at the fluctuating end of the cantilever. Variation of viscosity below 0.03 mPa·s was detected with the alternative to achieve measurements with a volume as low as 50 μL. PMID:26540061

  6. High Resolution Viscosity Measurement by Thermal Noise Detection.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Felipe Aguilar; Sepúlveda, Manuel; Bellon, Ludovic; Melo, Francisco

    2015-11-03

    An interferometric method is implemented in order to accurately assess the thermal fluctuations of a micro-cantilever sensor in liquid environments. The power spectrum density (PSD) of thermal fluctuations together with Sader's model of the cantilever allow for the indirect measurement of the liquid viscosity with good accuracy. The good quality of the deflection signal and the characteristic low noise of the instrument allow for the detection and corrections of drawbacks due to both the cantilever shape irregularities and the uncertainties on the position of the laser spot at the fluctuating end of the cantilever. Variation of viscosity below 0:03mPa·s was detected with the alternative to achieve measurements with a volume as low as 50 µL.

  7. Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Nikhiles

    2016-10-01

    Angle Resolved Photo Emission Spectroscopy (ARPES) has been a very effective tool to study the electronic states of solids, from simple metals to complex systems like cuprate superconductors. For photon energy in the range of 10 - 100 eV, it is a surface sensitive process as the free path of the photo emitted electrons is of the order of a few lattice parameters. However to interpret the experimental data one needs to have a theoretical foundation for the photoemission process. From the theory of photoemission it may be seen that one can get information about the state from which the electron has been excited. As the translational periodicity is broken normal to the surface, a new type of electron state in the forbidden energy gap can exist localized in the surface region. ARPES can reveal the existence and the property of such surface states. We shall also discuss briefly how the electromagnetic field of the photons are influenced by the presence of the surface and how one can try to take that into account in photoemission theory.

  8. Study of High Temperature Superconductors with Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Lisa

    2003-05-13

    The Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) recently emerged as a powerful tool for the study of highly correlated materials. This thesis describes the new generation of ARPES experiment, based on the third generation synchrotron radiation source and utilizing very high resolution electron energy and momentum analyzer. This new setup is used to study the physics of high temperature superconductors. New results on the Fermi surfaces, dispersions, scattering rate and superconducting gap in high temperature superconductors are presented.

  9. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOEpatents

    Bonanos, Peter

    1992-01-01

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity.

  10. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOEpatents

    Bonanos, P.

    1992-01-07

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity. 4 figs.

  11. High-resolution measurements of pressure solution creep.

    PubMed

    Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Renard, Francois; Feder, Jens; Jamtveit, Bjørn; Meakin, Paul; Jøssang, Torstein

    2003-07-01

    Two dilatometers with high precision and stability have been developed for measurement of indentation by pressure solution creep. The indentation of gold wires or glass cylinders into sodium chloride has been measured with down to 10 A accuracy and 6% precision. The indentation curves show a strong history dependence and the indentation rate decreases by three orders of magnitude over 400 h. The indentation mechanism is shown to be a pressure solution creep process in which material is dissolved at the indentor-sodium chloride contacts and transported to the free surface, where it precipitates in the proximity of the indentors. The indentation rates are not controlled by precipitation rates, the density of preexisting dislocations in the material, by change in the contact widths, or by ordinary plastic deformation. Small amplitude sinusoidal variations of temperature and normal stress are shown to have a large effect on the indentation rate. Moreover, sudden increase in normal stress from the indentor on the sodium chloride is shown to initiate an increased, time-dependent indentation rate. A model for pressure solution creep with time-dependent contact sizes explains the history dependence of the indentation data presented.

  12. High resolution albedo measurements on Io from Voyager 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, R. T.; Danielson, G. E.

    1981-09-01

    The photometric properties of the Io surface were investigated at high spatial resolution from the four-color, 8 km/line pair resolution photomosaic taken by Voyager 1. Regions categorized on the basis of visual color include white, yellow, orange, red, brown and black regions. Data were plotted as a function of intensity versus photometric angles for each of the color regions using a Minnaert function. A large scatter on the darker regions indicates a continuous distribution of albedos on Io and gives evidence of compositional mixing. Limb darkening coefficients are found for the white and brown regions, and color ratio plots of the reflectances are constructed. Distribution of ratios of the various color regions are compared to laboratory measurements of solid SO2 and various allotropes of sulfur, which indicate that SO2 is the major component of the white regions.

  13. Extraction of dynamical information from high resolution satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isern-Fontanet, J.; Chapron, B.; Klein, P.; Collard, F.; Lapeyre, G.; Danioux, E.

    2009-04-01

    Satellite altimetry has significantly advanced the study of ocean variability. However, noise level and track separation has limited the investigation of scales smaller than 100 km. In contrast to altimeters, other sensors such as visible and infrared radiometers and imaging radars such as SAR have demonstrated their capability to provide measurements at high spatial resolutions. Nevertheless, their main limitation for dynamical studies have been the difficulty to extract quantitative information. To further explore this question we have compared sea surface roughness images obtained by SAR with nearly simultaneous Brightness Temperature (BT) images. Results clearly revealed that the most intense patterns observed in the SAR image, when environmental conditions makes roughness unveil the flow topology, were located in the same position as strong thermal gradients. Assuming that hydrodynamic modulation is the main imaging mechanism in our case, our observations implies that strong thermal gradients have associated strong divergences and convergences. To further investigate this hypothesis we have directly estimated the vorticity field from BT images. To this end we have used a new theoretical framework based on an effective version of the Surface Quasi-Geostrophic (eSQG) equations. The comparisons of these fields with the SAR image reveals a very good coincidence between the patterns in the SAR image and vorticity gradients. A dynamical interpretation ofthis result will be discussed.

  14. High Resolution Thermal Conductivity Measurements of Wide Gap Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollak, Fred

    2002-03-01

    Despite the considerable amount of work on the electronic, optical, and structural properties of wide gap semiconductors (e.g. GaN, AlN, SiC, ZnO) relatively few thermal conductivity (κ)results have been reported. κ is a function of both intrinsic (anharmonic phonon-phonon scattering) and extrinsic (phonon scattering by dislocations, imputities, process-induced damage). Thus κ provides a measure of a material's quality and hence is important from both applied (device heat management, sample quality) and fundamental perspectives. κ can be evaluated by a number of methods including steady-state longitudinal heat flow, modified Angstrom's method, optical pump-probe, laser flash, third harmonic, and scanning thermal microscopy (SThM). With the exception of SThM these approaches require either contacts (destructive) and/or samples thicker than about 100 microns. SThM is essentially nondestructive. flexible, and has a spatial/depth resolution of 2-3 microns. The latter is important for examining low-defect techniques such as LEO in addition to mapping variations in κ across a wafer. This talk will review recent SThM thermal conductivity results on (0001) GaN [LEO (2.0-2.1 W/cm-K), for OMCVD materials sample thickness, n-type doping, grain boundaries, process-induced effects], thick free standing films of (0001) AlN (3.0-3.3 W/cm-K), (0001) SiC wafers including mapping (3.8-3.9 W/cm-K), and the Zn (1.16 W/cm-K) and O (1.02 W/cm-K) faces of bulk (0001) ZnO. Work supported by ONR contract N00014-99-C-0663 administered by Dr. Colin Wood

  15. Angle-resolved spectroscopy: a tissue-mimicking phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Vasefi, Fartash; Chamson-Reig, Astrid; Najiminainia, Mohamadreza; Kaminska, Bozena; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2012-03-01

    The Radial Angular Filter Array (RAFA) is a novel optical filter consisting of a radially-distributed series of micromachined channels with a focal length of a few millimeters. The RAFA filters photons passing through the focal point according to the propagation direction and has proven to be capable of collecting the angular distribution and the spectral information of photons simultaneously and non-invasively, which allows angle-resolved spectroscopic measurement of a turbid medium. To explore the feasibility of using this device to characterize the optical abnormalities in human tissues, we tested the performance of an angle-resolved RAFA-based spectroscopy system to detect absorption targets embedded within a tissue-mimicking phantom. The body of the phantom was made of 0.1% IntralipidTM/agarose gel (7 mm in thickness) and the targets were spherical (1.5 mm in radius) and contained 10 μM Indocyanine Green (ICG). The illumination source was a broadband near infrared (NIR) collimated beam. Photons were angularly filtered by the RAFA and spectrally resolved by a pushbroom spectrometer. The experimental results confirmed that the RAFA preferentially filtered photons that carried absorption and scattering information of the embedded targets.

  16. Small-size, high-resolution angular displacement measurement technology based on an imaging detector.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai; Wan, Qiuhua; Lu, Xinran; Du, Yingcai; Yang, Shouwang

    2017-01-20

    It is challenging to design a photoelectric encoder that is small in size while ensuring it has sufficiently high resolution and accuracy. Traditional displacement measurement via the moiré fringe signal does not facilitate high resolution at small grate sizes; photoelectric and digital photo processing can significantly improve the angle measurement resolution over traditional techniques. The primary focus of this paper includes grating displacement coding and decoding, as well as the corresponding high-resolution subdivision and measurement error factors. A small-size absolute photographic encoder was designed (50 mm diameter) that exhibits resolution of 1.24'' (20 bit) with a standard deviation of error of 14.3''. The results presented here may provide a theoretical and technological foundation for further research on small-size, high-resolution photographic rotary encoders.

  17. Tachometer Derived From Brushless Shaft-Angle Resolver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, David E.; Smith, Dennis A.

    1995-01-01

    Tachometer circuit operates in conjunction with brushless shaft-angle resolver. By performing sequence of straightforward mathematical operations on resolver signals and utilizing simple trigonometric identity, generates voltage proportional to rate of rotation of shaft. One advantage is use of brushless shaft-angle resolver as main source of rate signal: no brushes to wear out, no brush noise, and brushless resolvers have proven robustness. No switching of signals to generate noise. Another advantage, shaft-angle resolver used as shaft-angle sensor, tachometer input obtained without adding another sensor. Present circuit reduces overall size, weight, and cost of tachometer.

  18. Tachometer Derived From Brushless Shaft-Angle Resolver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, David E.; Smith, Dennis A.

    1995-01-01

    Tachometer circuit operates in conjunction with brushless shaft-angle resolver. By performing sequence of straightforward mathematical operations on resolver signals and utilizing simple trigonometric identity, generates voltage proportional to rate of rotation of shaft. One advantage is use of brushless shaft-angle resolver as main source of rate signal: no brushes to wear out, no brush noise, and brushless resolvers have proven robustness. No switching of signals to generate noise. Another advantage, shaft-angle resolver used as shaft-angle sensor, tachometer input obtained without adding another sensor. Present circuit reduces overall size, weight, and cost of tachometer.

  19. High Resolution Measurements of Nonlinear Internal Waves and Mixing on the Washington Continental Shelf

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    High resolution measurements of nonlinear internal waves and mixing on the Washington continental...problems such as pollutant dispersal and biological productivity. Most of the ocean’s physical and acoustic environments are significantly modified by...internal waves. In the specific case of nonlinear internal waves (NLIWs), the currents and displacements of the waves are strong enough to impact surface

  20. The high-resolution extraterrestrial solar spectrum (QASUMEFTS) determined from ground-based solar irradiance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröbner, Julian; Kröger, Ingo; Egli, Luca; Hülsen, Gregor; Riechelmann, Stefan; Sperfeld, Peter

    2017-09-01

    A high-resolution extraterrestrial solar spectrum has been determined from ground-based measurements of direct solar spectral irradiance (SSI) over the wavelength range from 300 to 500 nm using the Langley-plot technique. The measurements were obtained at the Izaña Atmospheric Research Centre from the Agencia Estatal de Meteorología, Tenerife, Spain, during the period 12 to 24 September 2016. This solar spectrum (QASUMEFTS) was combined from medium-resolution (bandpass of 0.86 nm) measurements of the QASUME (Quality Assurance of Spectral Ultraviolet Measurements in Europe) spectroradiometer in the wavelength range from 300 to 500 nm and high-resolution measurements (0.025 nm) from a Fourier transform spectroradiometer (FTS) over the wavelength range from 305 to 380 nm. The Kitt Peak solar flux atlas was used to extend this high-resolution solar spectrum to 500 nm. The expanded uncertainties of this solar spectrum are 2 % between 310 and 500 nm and 4 % at 300 nm. The comparison of this solar spectrum with solar spectra measured in space (top of the atmosphere) gave very good agreements in some cases, while in some other cases discrepancies of up to 5 % were observed. The QASUMEFTS solar spectrum represents a benchmark dataset with uncertainties lower than anything previously published. The metrological traceability of the measurements to the International System of Units (SI) is assured by an unbroken chain of calibrations leading to the primary spectral irradiance standard of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt in Germany.

  1. High-resolution setup for measuring wavelength sensitivity of photoyellowing of translucent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vaskuri, Anna Kärhä, Petri; Heikkilä, Anu

    2015-10-15

    Polystyrene and many other materials turn yellow when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. All photodegradation mechanisms including photoyellowing are functions of the exposure wavelength, which can be described with an action spectrum. In this work, a new high-resolution transmittance measurement setup based on lasers has been developed for measuring color changes, such as the photoyellowing of translucent materials aged with a spectrograph. The measurement setup includes 14 power-stabilized laser lines between 325 nm and 933 nm wavelengths, of which one at a time is directed on to the aged sample. The power transmitted through the sample is measured with a silicon detector utilizing an integrating sphere. The sample is mounted on a high-resolution XY translation stage. Measurement at various locations aged with different wavelengths of exposure radiation gives the transmittance data required for acquiring the action spectrum. The combination of a UV spectrograph and the new high-resolution transmittance measurement setup enables a novel method for studying the UV-induced ageing of translucent materials with a spectral resolution of 3–8 nm, limited by the adjustable spectral bandwidth range of the spectrograph. These achievements form a significant improvement over earlier methods.

  2. High-resolution setup for measuring wavelength sensitivity of photoyellowing of translucent materials.

    PubMed

    Vaskuri, Anna; Kärhä, Petri; Heikkilä, Anu; Ikonen, Erkki

    2015-10-01

    Polystyrene and many other materials turn yellow when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. All photodegradation mechanisms including photoyellowing are functions of the exposure wavelength, which can be described with an action spectrum. In this work, a new high-resolution transmittance measurement setup based on lasers has been developed for measuring color changes, such as the photoyellowing of translucent materials aged with a spectrograph. The measurement setup includes 14 power-stabilized laser lines between 325 nm and 933 nm wavelengths, of which one at a time is directed on to the aged sample. The power transmitted through the sample is measured with a silicon detector utilizing an integrating sphere. The sample is mounted on a high-resolution XY translation stage. Measurement at various locations aged with different wavelengths of exposure radiation gives the transmittance data required for acquiring the action spectrum. The combination of a UV spectrograph and the new high-resolution transmittance measurement setup enables a novel method for studying the UV-induced ageing of translucent materials with a spectral resolution of 3-8 nm, limited by the adjustable spectral bandwidth range of the spectrograph. These achievements form a significant improvement over earlier methods.

  3. High-resolution setup for measuring wavelength sensitivity of photoyellowing of translucent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaskuri, Anna; Kärhä, Petri; Heikkilä, Anu; Ikonen, Erkki

    2015-10-01

    Polystyrene and many other materials turn yellow when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. All photodegradation mechanisms including photoyellowing are functions of the exposure wavelength, which can be described with an action spectrum. In this work, a new high-resolution transmittance measurement setup based on lasers has been developed for measuring color changes, such as the photoyellowing of translucent materials aged with a spectrograph. The measurement setup includes 14 power-stabilized laser lines between 325 nm and 933 nm wavelengths, of which one at a time is directed on to the aged sample. The power transmitted through the sample is measured with a silicon detector utilizing an integrating sphere. The sample is mounted on a high-resolution XY translation stage. Measurement at various locations aged with different wavelengths of exposure radiation gives the transmittance data required for acquiring the action spectrum. The combination of a UV spectrograph and the new high-resolution transmittance measurement setup enables a novel method for studying the UV-induced ageing of translucent materials with a spectral resolution of 3-8 nm, limited by the adjustable spectral bandwidth range of the spectrograph. These achievements form a significant improvement over earlier methods.

  4. High-resolution absorption measurements of NH3 at high temperatures: 500-2100 cm-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Emma J.; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Clausen, Sønnik; Fateev, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution absorption spectra of NH3 in the region 500-2100 cm-1 at temperatures up to 1027 °C and approximately atmospheric pressure (1013±20 mbar) are measured. NH3 concentrations of 1000 ppm, 0.5% and 1% in volume fraction were used in the measurements. Spectra are recorded in high temperature gas flow cells using a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer at a nominal resolution of 0.09 cm-1. Measurements at 22.7 °C are compared to high-resolution cross sections available from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The higher temperature spectra are analysed by comparison to a variational line list, BYTe, and experimental energy levels determined using the MARVEL procedure. Approximately 2000 lines have been assigned, of which 851 are newly assigned to mainly hot bands involving vibrational states as high as v2=5.

  5. High-resolution gamma-ray measurement systems using a compact electro- mechanically cooled detector system and intelligent software

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, W.M.; Carlson, J.B.; Neufeld, K.W.

    1995-09-27

    Obtaining high-resolution gamma-ray measurements using high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors in the field has been of limited practicality due to the need to use and maintain a supply of liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}). This same constraint limits high-resolution gamma measurements in unattended safeguards or treaty Verification applications. We are developing detectors and software to greatly extend the applicability of high-resolution germanium-based measurements for these situations.

  6. High-resolution compact shear stress sensor for direct measurement of skin friction in fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Muchen; Kim, Chang-Jin ``Cj''

    2015-11-01

    The high-resolution measurement of skin friction in complex flows has long been of great interest but also a challenge in fluid mechanics. Compared with indirect measurement methods (e.g., laser Doppler velocimetry), direct measurement methods (e.g., floating element) do not involve any analogy and assumption but tend to suffer from instrumentation challenges, such as low sensing resolution or misalignments. Recently, silicon micromachined floating plates showed good resolution and perfect alignment but were too small for general purposes and too fragile to attach other surface samples repeatedly. In this work, we report a skin friction sensor consisting of a monolithic floating plate and a high-resolution optical encoder to measure its displacement. The key for the high resolution is in the suspension beams, which are very narrow (e.g., 0.25 mm) to sense small frictions along the flow direction but thick (e.g., 5 mm) to be robust along all other directions. This compact, low profile, and complete sensor is easy to use and allows repeated attachment and detachment of surface samples. The sheer-stress sensor has been tested in water tunnel and towing tank at different flow conditions, showing high sensing resolution for skin friction measurement. Supported by National Science Foundation (NSF) (No. 1336966) and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) (No. HR0011-15-2-0021).

  7. Comparative Analysis of two Methods for High-Resolution Differential Conductance Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusick, David; Naito, Michio; Ramos, Roberto

    We compare two methods of differential conductance measurement. The first is a traditional method in which current and voltage data is acquired via four-wire measurement, then averaged and differentiated numerically. The second method calculates dI / dV in real time by superimposing a small DC signal dI on the input step function, alternating between addition and subtraction of the signal with each step, then averaging the small signal voltage response over three steps to obtain dV . This requires two instruments: a DC current source and a high-resolution voltmeter. Keithley Instruments has commercially promoted the Keithley 622x current source and 2182A nanovoltmeter as means to achieve this measurement; we therefore refer to it as the Keithley method. We compare the two methods by performing high-resolution measurements of the energy gap of MgB2 thin film Josephson junctions. We show that the Keithley method has advantages of cleaner data, easier implementation, and overall faster data collection, but may lack the traditional method's high resolution. R.C.R. acknowledges support from National Science Foundation Grant # DMR-1555775.

  8. High resolution frequency to time domain transformations applied to the stepped carrier MRIS measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardalan, Sasan H.

    1992-01-01

    Two narrow-band radar systems are developed for high resolution target range estimation in inhomogeneous media. They are reformulations of two presently existing systems such that high resolution target range estimates may be achieved despite the use of narrow bandwidth radar pulses. A double sideband suppressed carrier radar technique originally derived in 1962, and later abandoned due to its inability to accurately measure target range in the presence of an interfering reflection, is rederived to incorporate the presence of an interfering reflection. The new derivation shows that the interfering reflection causes a period perturbation in the measured phase response. A high resolution spectral estimation technique is used to extract the period of this perturbation leading to accurate target range estimates independent of the signal-to-interference ratio. A non-linear optimal signal processing algorithm is derived for a frequency-stepped continuous wave radar system. The resolution enhancement offered by optimal signal processing of the data over the conventional Fourier Transform technique is clearly demonstrated using measured radar data. A method for modeling plane wave propagation in inhomogeneous media based on transmission line theory is derived and studied. Several simulation results including measurement of non-uniform electron plasma densities that develop near the heat tiles of a space re-entry vehicle are presented which verify the validity of the model.

  9. High-Resolution UV Holography Lens for Particle Size Distribution Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Morris Kaufman; Capelle, Gene; Grover, Mike; Sorenson, Dan; Pazuchanics, Pete

    2010-01-01

    A high-resolution UV holography relay lens, shown in Figure 1, has been developed for measuring particle size distributions down to 0.5 μm in a 12-mm-diameter by 5-mm-thick volume. This work has been selected by an independent judging panel and editors of R&D Magazine as a recipient of a 2009 R&D 100 Award. This award recognizes the 100 most technologically significant products introduced during the past year.

  10. Applications of High Resolution Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy for Atmospheric and Environmental Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roscioli, Joseph R.; McManus, J. Barry; Nelson, David; Zahniser, Mark; Herndon, Scott C.; Shorter, Joanne; Yacovitch, Tara I.; Jervis, Dylan; Dyroff, Christoph; Kolb, Charles E.

    2016-06-01

    For the past 20 years, high resolution infrared spectroscopy has served as a valuable tool to measure gas-phase concentrations of ambient gas samples. We review recent advances in atmospheric sampling using direct absorption high resolution mid-infrared spectroscopy from the perspective of light sources, detectors, and optical designs. Developments in diode, quantum cascade and interband cascade laser technology have led to thermoelectrically-cooled single-mode laser sources capable of operation between 800 wn and 3100 wn, with <10 MHz resolution and >10 mW power. Advances in detector and preamplifier technology have yielded thermoelectriocally-cooled sensors capable of room-temperature operation with extremely high detectivities. Finally, novel spectrometer optical designs have led to robust multipass absorption cells capable of >400 m effective pathlength in a compact package. In combination with accurate spectroscopic databases, these developments have afforded dramatic improvements in measurement sensitivity, accuracy, precision, and selectivity. We will present several examples of the applications of high resolution mid-IR spectrometers in real-world field measurements at sampling towers and aboard mobile platforms such as vehicles and airplanes.

  11. Materials characterisation by angle-resolved scanning transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Caspary, Knut; Oppermann, Oliver; Grieb, Tim; Krause, Florian F.; Rosenauer, Andreas; Schowalter, Marco; Mehrtens, Thorsten; Beyer, Andreas; Volz, Kerstin; Potapov, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Solid-state properties such as strain or chemical composition often leave characteristic fingerprints in the angular dependence of electron scattering. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is dedicated to probe scattered intensity with atomic resolution, but it drastically lacks angular resolution. Here we report both a setup to exploit the explicit angular dependence of scattered intensity and applications of angle-resolved STEM to semiconductor nanostructures. Our method is applied to measure nitrogen content and specimen thickness in a GaNxAs1−x layer independently at atomic resolution by evaluating two dedicated angular intervals. We demonstrate contrast formation due to strain and composition in a Si- based metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) with GexSi1−x stressors as a function of the angles used for imaging. To shed light on the validity of current theoretical approaches this data is compared with theory, namely the Rutherford approach and contemporary multislice simulations. Inconsistency is found for the Rutherford model in the whole angular range of 16–255 mrad. Contrary, the multislice simulations are applicable for angles larger than 35 mrad whereas a significant mismatch is observed at lower angles. This limitation of established simulations is discussed particularly on the basis of inelastic scattering. PMID:27849001

  12. Materials characterisation by angle-resolved scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Caspary, Knut; Oppermann, Oliver; Grieb, Tim; Krause, Florian F.; Rosenauer, Andreas; Schowalter, Marco; Mehrtens, Thorsten; Beyer, Andreas; Volz, Kerstin; Potapov, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    Solid-state properties such as strain or chemical composition often leave characteristic fingerprints in the angular dependence of electron scattering. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is dedicated to probe scattered intensity with atomic resolution, but it drastically lacks angular resolution. Here we report both a setup to exploit the explicit angular dependence of scattered intensity and applications of angle-resolved STEM to semiconductor nanostructures. Our method is applied to measure nitrogen content and specimen thickness in a GaNxAs1‑x layer independently at atomic resolution by evaluating two dedicated angular intervals. We demonstrate contrast formation due to strain and composition in a Si- based metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) with GexSi1‑x stressors as a function of the angles used for imaging. To shed light on the validity of current theoretical approaches this data is compared with theory, namely the Rutherford approach and contemporary multislice simulations. Inconsistency is found for the Rutherford model in the whole angular range of 16–255 mrad. Contrary, the multislice simulations are applicable for angles larger than 35 mrad whereas a significant mismatch is observed at lower angles. This limitation of established simulations is discussed particularly on the basis of inelastic scattering.

  13. Materials characterisation by angle-resolved scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Müller-Caspary, Knut; Oppermann, Oliver; Grieb, Tim; Krause, Florian F; Rosenauer, Andreas; Schowalter, Marco; Mehrtens, Thorsten; Beyer, Andreas; Volz, Kerstin; Potapov, Pavel

    2016-11-16

    Solid-state properties such as strain or chemical composition often leave characteristic fingerprints in the angular dependence of electron scattering. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is dedicated to probe scattered intensity with atomic resolution, but it drastically lacks angular resolution. Here we report both a setup to exploit the explicit angular dependence of scattered intensity and applications of angle-resolved STEM to semiconductor nanostructures. Our method is applied to measure nitrogen content and specimen thickness in a GaNxAs1-x layer independently at atomic resolution by evaluating two dedicated angular intervals. We demonstrate contrast formation due to strain and composition in a Si- based metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) with GexSi1-x stressors as a function of the angles used for imaging. To shed light on the validity of current theoretical approaches this data is compared with theory, namely the Rutherford approach and contemporary multislice simulations. Inconsistency is found for the Rutherford model in the whole angular range of 16-255 mrad. Contrary, the multislice simulations are applicable for angles larger than 35 mrad whereas a significant mismatch is observed at lower angles. This limitation of established simulations is discussed particularly on the basis of inelastic scattering.

  14. High-resolution measurement of fiber length by using a mode-locked fiber laser configuration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y L; Zhan, L; Zhang, Z X; Luo, S Y; Xia, Y X

    2007-06-15

    A simple method to precisely measure fiber length has been experimentally demonstrated by using a mode-locked fiber laser configuration. Since the transit time in a cavity is exactly proportional to the cavity length, it is easy to obtain the fiber length from the generation of mode-locked pulses in the fiber laser with a long-range nonlinear optical loop mirror that includes the measured fiber. Our new method has a large measurement range, over hundreds of kilometers, and a high resolution, of the order of centimeters, as well as no measurement dead zone.

  15. A sensitive, high resolution magic angle turning experiment for measuring chemical shift tensor principal values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderman, D. W.

    1998-12-01

    A sensitive, high-resolution 'FIREMAT' two-dimensional (2D) magic-angle-turning experiment is described that measures chemical shift tensor principal values in powdered solids. The spectra display spinning-sideband patterns separated by their isotropic shifts. The new method's sensitivity and high resolution in the isotropic-shift dimension result from combining the 5pi magic-angle-turning pulse sequence, an extension of the pseudo-2D sideband-suppression data rearrangement, and the TIGER protocol for processing 2D data. TPPM decoupling is used to enhance resolution. The method requires precise synchronization of the pulses and sampling to the rotor position. It is shown that the technique obtains 35 natural-abundance 13C tensors from erythromycin in 19 hours, and high quality naturalabundance 15N tensors from eight sites in potassium penicillin V in three days on a 400MHz spectrometer.

  16. High resolution magnetostriction measurements in pulsed magnetic fields using fiber Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Daou, Ramzy; Weickert, Franziska; Nicklas, Michael; Steglich, Frank; Haase, Ariane; Doerr, Mathias

    2010-03-01

    We report on a new high resolution apparatus for measuring magnetostriction suitable for use at cryogenic temperatures in pulsed high magnetic fields which we have developed at the Hochfeld-Magnetlabor Dresden. Optical fiber strain gauges based on fiber Bragg gratings are used to measure the strain in small (approximately 1 mm) samples. We describe the implementation of a fast measurement system capable of resolving strains in the order of 10(-7) with a full bandwidth of 47 kHz, and demonstrate its use on single crystal samples of GdSb and GdSi.

  17. Sulphur Dioxide: High Resolution Ultra-Violet Photoabsorption Cross Section Measurements at 200K.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackie, D.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R.; Stark, G.; Pickering, J. C.; Rufus, J.; Thorne, A.; Smith, P. L.

    2007-12-01

    Sulphur Dioxide plays an important role not only within the Earth's atmosphere but also within the complex chemistry of both the upper atmosphere of Venus and the volcanically active Jovian moon Io. The lack of high resolution laboratory studies has prevented the full, accurate determination of absorption cross sections which are the basis for reliable photochemical models. High resolution laboratory measurements of SO2 are essential to resolve the complex SO2 spectrum and yield accurate photoabsorption cross sections. Using the Imperial College UV Fourier Transform Spectrometer new high resolution (λ/δλ ~ 450,000) measurements have been recorded over a range of temperatures and pressures. As part of an on-going series of measurements, current laboratory work focused on photoabsorption cross sections of SO2 at 200K across the wavelength range 220 → 325 nm. These measurements not only compliment previous room temperature measurements obtained at Imperial College in the 190 → 220 nm and 220 → 328 nm ranges (Stark et al., JGR Planets 104, 16, 585 (1999) and Rufus et al.,( JGR Planets 108, 2, 5 (2003)), but also coincide with the wavelength regions being recorded by the Venus Express mission through the UV-IR spectrometer SPICAV (ESA-SCI(2001)6). Our new measurements will allow accurate analysis of the chemical processes in the upper atmosphere of Venus. These absorption cross section measurements are the first to be acquired at this resolution, temperature and pressure. Results will be presented. This work was supported in part by NASA Grant NNG05GA03G, PPARC (UK), and the Leverhulme Trust.

  18. High-Resolution Group Quantization Phase Processing Method in Radio Frequency Measurement Range

    PubMed Central

    Du, Baoqing; Feng, Dazheng; Tang, Yaohua; Geng, Xin; Zhang, Duo; Cai, Chaofeng; Wan, Maoquan; Yang, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Aiming at the more complex frequency translation, the longer response time and the limited measurement precision in the traditional phase processing, a high-resolution phase processing method by group quantization higher than 100 fs level is proposed in radio frequency measurement range. First, the phase quantization is used as a step value to quantize every phase difference in a group by using the fixed phase relationships between different frequencies signals. The group quantization is formed by the results of the quantized phase difference. In the light of frequency drift mainly caused by phase noise of measurement device, a regular phase shift of the group quantization is produced, which results in the phase coincidence of two comparing signals which obtain high-resolution measurement. Second, in order to achieve the best coincidences pulse, a subtle delay is initiatively used to reduce the width of the coincidences fuzzy area according to the transmission characteristics of the coincidences in the specific medium. Third, a series of feature coincidences pulses of fuzzy area can be captured by logic gate to achieve the best phase coincidences information for the improvement of the measurement precision. The method provides a novel way to precise time and frequency measurement. PMID:27388587

  19. High-Resolution Group Quantization Phase Processing Method in Radio Frequency Measurement Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Baoqing; Feng, Dazheng; Tang, Yaohua; Geng, Xin; Zhang, Duo; Cai, Chaofeng; Wan, Maoquan; Yang, Zhigang

    2016-07-01

    Aiming at the more complex frequency translation, the longer response time and the limited measurement precision in the traditional phase processing, a high-resolution phase processing method by group quantization higher than 100 fs level is proposed in radio frequency measurement range. First, the phase quantization is used as a step value to quantize every phase difference in a group by using the fixed phase relationships between different frequencies signals. The group quantization is formed by the results of the quantized phase difference. In the light of frequency drift mainly caused by phase noise of measurement device, a regular phase shift of the group quantization is produced, which results in the phase coincidence of two comparing signals which obtain high-resolution measurement. Second, in order to achieve the best coincidences pulse, a subtle delay is initiatively used to reduce the width of the coincidences fuzzy area according to the transmission characteristics of the coincidences in the specific medium. Third, a series of feature coincidences pulses of fuzzy area can be captured by logic gate to achieve the best phase coincidences information for the improvement of the measurement precision. The method provides a novel way to precise time and frequency measurement.

  20. High resolution and stability roll angle measurement method for precision linear displacement stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Tao; Xia, Guizheng; Hou, Wenmei; Le, Yanfen; Han, Sen

    2017-02-01

    A method for high resolution roll angle measurement of linear displacement stages is developed theoretically and tested experimentally. The new optical configuration is based on a special differential plane mirror interferometer, a wedge prism assembly, and a wedge mirror assembly. The wedge prisms assembly is used as a roll angle sensor, which converts roll angle to the changes of optical path. The special interferometer, composed a polarization splitter plane, a half wave plate, a beam splitter, a retro-reflector and a quarter wave plate, is designed for high resolution measurement of the changes of the optical path. The interferometric beams are a completely common path for the adoption of the centrosymmetrical measurement structure, and the cross talk of the straightness, yaw, and pitch errors is avoided. The angle measurement resolution of the proposed method is 3.5 μrad in theoretical with a phase meter which has a resolution of 2 π /512 . The experimental result also shows the great stability and accuracy of the present roll angle measurement system.

  1. High-resolution surface temperature measurements on rotating turbine blades with an infrared pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uguccini, O. W.; Pollack, F. G.

    1976-01-01

    A high-resolution pyrometer was developed and tested on a modified turbine engine. The pyrometer was used to obtain temperature profiles of the viewed surface of turbine blades in the engine at tip speeds up to 366 meters per second. The combination of coherent fiber optics, a silicon avalanche detector, and high-speed electronics enabled surface resolution of a spot diameter of 0.05 centimeter. The data, in the form of temperature profiles, was obtained in near real time as a hard copy output from a computer display terminal. Temperatures measured with the pyrometer and with thermocouples agreed within 2 percent at temperatures between 977 to 1144 K.

  2. Measurements of angles of elevation of HF by a high resolution method using polarization diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demeure, Cedric; Ferreol, Anne; Rogier, Jean-Luc

    1994-07-01

    In this paper, we present the use of high resolution techniques and polarization diversity in order to analyze HF links in ionospheric propagation, links which are characterized in general by the presence of several modes of propagation giving rise to several incident waves with the reception. These modes are strongly correlated and can have very different polarizations. The high resolution techniques have the capacity to simultaneously measure several incident waves present in a given frequency channel of analysis, and are thus adapted particularly to the situation of jamming where a frequency and/or temporal separation is no longer possible. The use of a network with polarization diversity allows, beyond obtaining certain parameters of polarization, an increase in the resolution of the methods considered, because of the difference in polarization of the modes. A better knowledge of the phenomenon of propagation waves in this medium is the anticipated result of the application of these techniques. For a given connection and at first approximation (one neglects the effects due to the 'tilt', or the rebound on a tilted ground), the modes arrive under the same azimuth with different angles of elevation. In the experiment described in this paper, the measurement of the angles of elevation is made by supposing a knowledge of azimuth. Thus we use a linear network and let us direct it in order to obtain good performances for the estimate of the angles of elevation. The method high resolution with diversity of polarization used is method MUSIC adapted in order to take account of the use of sensors having gains different according to polarization from the received wave.

  3. Precision angle-resolved autoionization resonances in Ar and Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Berrah, N.; Langer, B.; Gorczyca, T.W.

    1997-04-01

    Theoretical work has shown that the electron angular distribution and the shape of the autoionization resonances are crucial to the understanding of certain types of electron-electron correlation. Autoionization resonances in Ne (Ar) result from the decay of the excited discrete state Ne{sup *} 2s2p{sup 6} np (Ar{sup *} 3s3p{sup 6} np) into the continuum state Ne{sup +} 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 5} + e{sup {minus}} (ks,kd) (Ar{sup +} 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 5} + e{sup {minus}} (ks,kd)). Since the continuum can also be reached by direct photoionization, both paths add coherently, giving rise to interferences that produce the characteristic Beutler-Fano line shape. In this work, the authors report on quantitative angle-resolved electron spectrometry studies of (a) the Ne 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6} {r_arrow} 2s2p{sup 6} np (n=3-5) autoionizing resonances and the 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6} {r_arrow} 2p{sup 4}3s3p doubly excited resonance, (b) the Ar 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6} {r_arrow} 3s3p{sup 6} np (n=4-9) autoionization resonances and extended R-matrix calculations of the angular-distribution parameters for both Ne and Ar measurements. Their results are compared with previous theoretical work by Taylor.

  4. Measurement of the Radial Velocity of Vega and SAO 104807 by high resolution spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas, F.; Ordoñez, J.; Suarez, W.; Quijano, A.

    2017-07-01

    The radial velocity is the component of the velocity with which a celestial object approaches (blueshift) or go away (redshift) of the observer. The precise measurement of the redshift allowed to Humason and Hubble discover the expansion of the Universe. In 1998 two research teams simultaneously discovered that this expansion is accelerated, for that reason the hypothesis of the dark energy has been raised to explain the existing repulsion. The present work shows the measurement of the radial velocity of Vega and SAO104807 by high resolution spectrometry. Using the instruments of the Astronomical Observatory of the University of Nariño, located in the south of Colombia, was measured the displacement that the spectral lines of both celestial objects suffer due to the Doppler effect. The results obtained were quite close to those recorded in databases such as SIMBAD, according to the used equipment. The instruments used were: Celestron CGE Pro 1400 Telescope, Shelyak LHIRES III High Resolution Spectrometer and SBIG ST-8300 CCD Camera. The characteristics of the spectrometer are: Diffraction grating: 2400 lines/mm, Spectral dispersion (H alpha): 0:012 nm/pixel, Radial velocity resolution: 5 km/s.

  5. High-resolution measurement of absolute {alpha}-decay widths in {sup 16}O

    SciTech Connect

    Wheldon, C.; Ashwood, N. I.; Barr, M.; Curtis, N.; Freer, M.; Kokalova, Tz.; Malcolm, J. D.; Spencer, S. J.; Ziman, V. A.; Faestermann, Th.; Kruecken, R.; Wirth, H.-F.; Hertenberger, R.; Lutter, R.; Bergmaier, A.

    2011-06-15

    By using a large-acceptance position-sensitive silicon detector array in coincidence with the high-resolution Munich Q3D spectrograph, unambiguous measurements have been made of the absolute {alpha}-particle decay widths from excited states in {sup 16}O* in the energy range 13.85 to 15.87 MeV. Carbon targets have been bombarded with 42-MeV {sup 6}Li beams to induce {sub 6}{sup 12}C({sub 3}{sup 6}Li, d){sub 8}{sup 16}O* reactions. The deuteron ejectiles were measured in the Q3D and the results gated by {sup 4}He+{sup 12}C breakup products detected in the silicon array, the efficiency of which was modeled using Monte Carlo simulations. By comparing total population and breakup-gated spectra, the following absolute {alpha}-decay widths have been measured with high resolution: {Gamma}{sub {alpha}}0/{Gamma}{sub tot} = 0.87{+-}0.11 (13.980 MeV), 1.04{+-}0.15 (14.302 MeV), 0.92{+-}0.10 (14.399 MeV), 0.59{+-}0.04 (14.815 MeV), 0.88{+-}0.18 (15.785 MeV), and {Gamma}{sub {alpha}}1/{Gamma}{sub tot}=1.14{+-}0.08 (14.660 MeV), 0.46{+-}0.06 (14.815 MeV).

  6. Pharyngeal swallow adaptations to bolus volume measured with high resolution manometry

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Matthew R.; Ciucci, Michelle R.; Mielens, Jason D.; Jiang, Jack J.; McCulloch, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of bolus volume on pharyngeal swallowing using high resolution manometry (HRM). Study design Repeated measures with subjects serving as own controls. Methods Twelve subjects swallowed four bolus volumes in the neutral head position: saliva; 5 ml water; 10 ml water; and 20 ml water. Pressure measurements were taken along the length of the pharynx using a high resolution manometer, with emphasis placed on the velopharynx, tongue base, and upper esophageal sphincter (UES). Variables were analyzed across bolus volumes using three-way repeated measures analysis of co-variance (ANCOVA) investigating the effect of sex, bolus volume, and pharynx length. Pearson’s product moment tests were performed to evaluate how pharyngeal pressure and timing events changed across bolus volume. Results Velopharyngeal duration, maximum tongue base pressure, tongue base pressure rise rate, UES opening duration, and total swallow duration varied significantly across bolus volume. Sex did not have an effect, while pharynx length appeared to affect tongue base pressure duration. Maximum velopharyngeal pressure and minimum UES pressure had a direct relationship with bolus volume, while maximum tongue base pressure had an inverse relationship. Velopharyngeal pressure duration, UES opening duration, and total swallow duration increased as bolus volume increased. Conclusions Differences in pharyngeal pressures and timing of key pressure events were detected across varying bolus volumes. Knowing the relationships between bolus volume and pharyngeal pressure activity can be valuable when diagnosing and treating dysphagic patients. Level of evidence N/A. PMID:21108425

  7. High-resolution laboratory measurements of coronal lines in the 198-218 å region

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, Peter; Träbert, Elmar; Lepson, Jaan K.; Brickhouse, Nancy S.; Golub, Leon

    2014-06-10

    We present high-resolution laboratory measurements of the emission from various ions of C, N, O, F, Ne, S, Ar, Fe, and Ni in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength band centered around the λ211 Fe XIV channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. While all of the strong iron lines in this region are well known, we note many weaker lines of iron that are not yet identified. The high resolution of our measurements also allows us to resolve several lines in Fe XI, Fe XII, and Fe XIII between 200 and 205 Å, whose identities were in question based on a disagreement between different databases. The spectra of the elements other than iron are much less known, and we find a multitude of lines that are not yet in the databases. For example, the CHIANTI database clearly disagrees with the NIST data listings on several of the argon lines we observe and also it contains only about half of the observed sulfur lines.

  8. Reconstructing seasonal climate from high-resolution carbon and oxygen isotope measurements across tree rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, B.; Jahren, H.

    2014-12-01

    Intra-annual records of carbon (δ13C) and oxygen (δ18O) isotope measurements across tree rings reveal significant changes in δ13C and δ18O value across each growing season. We previously found that across a broad range of climate regimes, the seasonal change in δ13C measured within tree rings reflects changes in seasonal precipitation amount, and demonstrated its utility for quantifying seasonal paleo-precipitation from non-permineralized, fossil wood. Here we produce an equation relating intra-ring changes in δ18O to seasonal changes in temperature and precipitation amount, but the equation yields for unknowns (summer and winter precipitation amounts, and cold and warm month mean temperatures). By combining high-resolution δ13C and δ18O records with independent estimates of mean annual temperature and mean annual precipitation, we show how our general, global relationships could be used to quantify seasonal climate information from fossil sites. We validate our approach using high-resolution δ13C and δ18O data from trees growing at five modern sites (Hawaii, Alaska, Norway, Guyana, and Kenya). The reconstructed estimates of seasonal precipitation and temperature showed excellent agreement with the known climate data for each site (precipitation: R2 = 0.98; temperature: R2 = 0.91). These results confirm that across diverse sites and tree species, seasonal climate information can be accurately quantified using a combination of carbon and oxygen intra-ring isotope profiles.

  9. Marvel Analysis of the Measured High-resolution Rovibronic Spectra of TiO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKemmish, Laura K.; Masseron, Thomas; Sheppard, Samuel; Sandeman, Elizabeth; Schofield, Zak; Furtenbacher, Tibor; Császár, Attila G.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Sousa-Silva, Clara

    2017-02-01

    Accurate, experimental rovibronic energy levels, with associated labels and uncertainties, are reported for 11 low-lying electronic states of the diatomic {}48{{Ti}}16{{O}} molecule, determined using the Marvel (Measured Active Rotational-Vibrational Energy Levels) algorithm. All levels are based on lines corresponding to critically reviewed and validated high-resolution experimental spectra taken from 24 literature sources. The transition data are in the 2-22,160 cm-1 region. Out of the 49,679 measured transitions, 43,885 are triplet-triplet, 5710 are singlet-singlet, and 84 are triplet-singlet transitions. A careful analysis of the resulting experimental spectroscopic network (SN) allows 48,590 transitions to be validated. The transitions determine 93 vibrational band origins of {}48{{Ti}}16{{O}}, including 71 triplet and 22 singlet ones. There are 276 (73) triplet-triplet (singlet-singlet) band-heads derived from Marvel experimental energies, 123(38) of which have never been assigned in low- or high-resolution experiments. The highest J value, where J stands for the total angular momentum, for which an energy level is validated is 163. The number of experimentally derived triplet and singlet {}48{{Ti}}16{{O}} rovibrational energy levels is 8682 and 1882, respectively. The lists of validated lines and levels for {}48{{Ti}}16{{O}} are deposited in the supporting information to this paper.

  10. Initial Development of a sub-micron Angle Resolved Photoemission Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, Aaron; McChesney, Jessica; Rotenberg, Eli

    2007-03-01

    -abstract- We have begun initial development of a sub-micron angle resolved photoemmision microscope. The current test system consists of an SES-200 detector and a zone plate based focusing system operating at 180eV photon energy. We have measured angle resolved spectra using the SES-200 angle-dispersive collection mode at resolution of ˜500nm. We have used this to show orientational contrast on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The domains on HOPG are on the order of 1-20 microns and are well orientated along the c-axis but show random azimuthal order. We are able to clearly image these domains even though they show no chemical contrast, and can measure the single crystal band structure on disordered polycrystalline sample. We believe this demonstrates the promise of such a system for the measurement of materials which cannot be found in bulk single crystals.

  11. High-resolution spectroscopy used to measure inertial confinement fusion neutron spectra on Omega (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, C. J.; Radha, P. B.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; Pruyne, A.; Romanofsky, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J. III; Stoeckl, C.; Casey, D. T.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Gardner, S.

    2012-10-15

    The areal density ({rho}R) of cryogenic DT implosions on Omega is inferred by measuring the spectrum of neutrons that elastically scatter off the dense deuterium (D) and tritium (T) fuel. Neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) techniques are used to measure the energy spectrum with high resolution. High signal-to-background data has been recorded on cryogenic DT implosions using a well-collimated 13.4-m line of sight and an nTOF detector with an advanced liquid scintillator compound. An innovative method to analyze the elastically scattered neutron spectra was developed using well-known cross sections of the DT nuclear reactions. The estimated areal densities are consistent with alternative {rho}R measurements and 1-D simulations.

  12. Measurement of water content in polymer electrolyte membranes using high resolution neutron imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Spernjak, Dusan; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L; Davey, John; Mukherjee, Partha P; Hussey, Daniel S; Jacobson, David

    2010-01-01

    Sufficient water content within a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) is necessary for adequate ionic conductivity. Membrane hydration is therefore a fundamental requirement for fuel cell operation. The hydration state of the membrane affects the water transport within, as both the diffusion coefficient and electro-osmotic drag depend on the water content. Membrane's water uptake is conventionally measured ex situ by weighing free-swelling samples equilibrated at controlled water activity. In the present study, water profiles in Nafion{reg_sign} membranes were measured using the high-resolution neutron imaging. The state-of-the-art, 10 {micro}m resolution neutron detector is capable of resolving water distributions across N1120, N1110 and N117 membranes. It provides a means to measure the water uptake and transport properties of fuel cell membranes in situ.

  13. Comparison of HRDI wind measurements with radar and rocket observations. [High Resolution Doppler Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrage, M. D.; Skinner, W. R.; Marshall, A. R.; Hays, P. B.; Lieberman, R. S.; Franke, S. J.; Gell, D. A.; Ortland, D. A.; Morton, Y. T.; Schmidlin, F. J.

    1993-01-01

    Wind fields in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere are obtained with the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) by observing the Doppler shifts of emission lines in the O2 Atmospheric band. The validity of the measured winds depends on an accurate knowledge of the positions on the detector of the observed lines in the absence of a wind-induced Doppler shift. These positions have been determined to an accuracy of approximately 5 m/s from the comparison of winds measured by HRDI with those obtained by MF radars. Excellent agreement is found between HRDI measured winds and winds observed with radars and rockets. In addition, the sensitivity of HRDI to migrating tides and other large scale waves is demonstrated.

  14. PROBING NEAR-SURFACE ATMOSPHERIC TURBULENCE WITH LIDAR MEASUREMENTS AND HIGH-RESOLUTION HYDRODYNAMIC MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    J. KAO; D. COOPER; ET AL

    2000-11-01

    As lidar technology is able to provide fast data collection at a resolution of meters in an atmospheric volume, it is imperative to promote a modeling counterpart of the lidar capability. This paper describes an integrated capability based on data from a scanning water vapor lidar and a high-resolution hydrodynamic model (HIGRAD) equipped with a visualization routine (VIEWER) that simulates the lidar scanning. The purpose is to better understand the spatial and temporal representativeness of the lidar measurements and, in turn, to extend their utility in studying turbulence fields in the atmospheric boundary layer. Raman lidar water vapor data collected over the Pacific warm pool and the simulations with the HIGRAD code are used for identifying the underlying physics and potential aliasing effects of spatially resolved lidar measurements. This capability also helps improve the trade-off between spatial-temporal resolution and coverage of the lidar measurements.

  15. High-resolution, continuous method for measurement of acidity in ice cores.

    PubMed

    Pasteris, Daniel R; McConnell, Joseph R; Edwards, Ross

    2012-02-07

    The acid content of ice core samples provides information regarding the history of volcanism, biogenic activity, windblown dust, forest fires, and pollution-induced acid rain. A continuous ice core analysis allows for collection of high-resolution data in a very efficient manner, but this technique has not been readily applied to the measurement of pH and acidity in ice cores. The difficulty arises because the sample is highly undersaturated with respect to carbon dioxide (CO(2)) immediately after melting, making it difficult to maintain stable concentrations of dissolved carbon dioxide and carbonic acid (H(2)CO(3)). Here, we present a solution to this problem in the form of a small flow-through bubbling chamber that is supplied with a known concentration of CO(2). The bubbling action allows for quick equilibration while the small size of the chamber limits sample mixing in order to maintain high resolution. Thorough error analysis provides a measurement uncertainty of ±0.20 μM or ±5% of the acidity value, whichever is greater, and the T95 signal response time is determined to be 1.25 min. The performance of the technique is further evaluated with data from a 63-year ice core from northwest Greenland for which all major ion species were also measured. The measured acidity closely matches the acidity derived from a charge balance calculation, indicating that all of the analytes were measured accurately. The performance specifications that we provide are applicable to ice cores with low concentrations of alkaline dust (<500 ppb), which includes the vast majority of ice cores that are collected. To date, the method has not been evaluated with samples containing high alkaline dust concentrations, such as Greenland cores from the last glacial period, where measurement could be made difficult by memory effects as particles coat the internal surfaces of the sample stream.

  16. High Resolution Measurements In U-Channel Technique And Implications For Sedimentological Purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acar, Dursun; Cagatay, Namık; Sarı, Erol; Eris, Kadir; Biltekin, Demet; Akcer, Sena; Meydan Gokdere, Feray; Makaroglu, Ozlem; Bulkan, Ozlem; Arslan, Tugce; Albut, Gulum; Yalamaz, Burak; Yakupoglu, Nurettin; Sabuncu, Asen; Fillikci, Betul; Yıldız, Guliz

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical features in-stu drilling for sediment cores and vacuum forces that affect while obtaining the sediments to the core tube are formed concave shaped deformations. Even in the half sections, concave deformation form still appears. During MCSL measurements, Laminae which forms concave shaped deformation, show interference thus, values indicate overall results for several laminae instead of single lamina. These interferenced data is not appropriate for paleoceanography studies which require extend accuracy and high frequency data set to describe geochemical and climatological effects in high resolution. U-Channel technique provides accurate location and isolated values for each lamina. In EMCOL Laboratories, U-channel provide well saturated and air-free environment for samples and, by using these technique U-channels are prepared with modificated MCSL for data acquisition. Even below millimeter scale sampling rate provides the separation of each lamina and, physical properties of every each lamina. Cover of u-channel is made by homogenous plastic in shape of rectangular prism geometry. Thus, during measurement, MSCL sensors may harm the sediment; however u-channel covers the sediment from this unwanted deformation from MSCL itself. U-channel technique can present micro scale angular changes in the laminae. Measurements that have been taken from U-channel are compared with the traditional half core measurements. Interestingly, accuracy of the positions for each lamina is much more detailed and, the resolution is progressively higher. Results from P Wave and Gamma ray density provide removed interference effects on each lamina. In this technique, it is high recommended that U-channel widens the resolution of core logging and generates more cleansed measurements in MCSL. For P- Wave Used Synthetic seismograms that modelled by MSCL data set which created from U-channel technique dictates each anomalies related with climatological and geological changes. Keywords

  17. A high-resolution x-ray spectrometer for a kaon mass measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelan, Kevin; Suzuki, Ken; Zmeskal, Johann; Tortorella, Daniele; Bühler, Matthias; Hertrich, Theo

    2017-02-01

    The ASPECT consortium (Adaptable Spectrometer Enabled by Cryogenic Technology) is currently constructing a generalised cryogenic platform for cryogenic detector work which will be able to accommodate a wide range of sensors. The cryogenics system is based on a small mechanical cooler with a further adiabatic demagnetisation stage and will work with cryogenic detectors at sub-Kelvin temperatures. The commercial aim of the consortium is to produce a compact, user-friendly device with an emphasis on reliability and portability which can easily be transported for specialised on-site work, such as beam-lines or telescope facilities. The cryogenic detector platform will accommodate a specially developed cryogenic sensor, either a metallic magnetic calorimeter or a magnetic penetration-depth thermometer. The detectors will be designed to work in various temperatures regions with an emphasis on optimising the various detector resolutions for specific temperatures. One resolution target is of about 10 eV at the energies range typically created in kaonic atoms experiments (soft x-ray energies). A following step will see the introduction of continuous, high-power, sub-Kelvin cooling which will bring the cryogenic basis for a high resolution spectrometer system to the market. The scientific goal of the project will produce an experimental set-up optimised for kaon-mass measurements performing high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy on a beam-line provided foreseeably by the J-PARC (Tokai, Japan) or DAΦNE (Frascati, Italy) facilities.

  18. High-resolution in situ measurement of nitrate in runoff from the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    PubMed

    Beaton, Alexander David; Wadham, Jemma L; Hawkings, Jon; Bagshaw, Elizabeth A; Lamarche-Gagnon, Guillaume; Mowlem, Matthew C; Tranter, Martyn

    2017-09-27

    We report the first in situ high-resolution nitrate time series from two proglacial meltwater rivers draining the Greenland Ice Sheet, using a recently developed submersible analyser based on lab-on-chip (LOC) technology. The low sample volume (320 μL) required by the LOC analyser meant that low concentration (few to sub μM), highly turbid subglacial meltwater could be filtered and colourimetrically analysed in situ. These data are linked to an unparalleled, multi-component data set. Nitrate concentrations in rivers draining Leverett Glacier in South-West Greenland and Kiattuut Sermiat in Southern Greenland exhibited a clear diurnal signal and a gradual decline at the commencement of the melt season, displaying trends would not be discernible using traditional daily manual sampling. Nitrate concentrations varied by 4.4 μM (+/- 0.2 μM) over a 10-day period at Kiattuut Sermiat and 3.0 μM (+/- 0.2 μM) over a 14 day period at Leverett Glacier. Marked changes in nitrate concentrations were observed when discharge began to increase. High resolution in situ measurements such as these have the potential to significantly advance the understanding of nutrient cycling in remote systems, where the dynamics of nutrient release are complex but are important for downstream biogeochemical cycles.

  19. [Microdiffraction measurements of natural tooth by high resolution X-ray diffraction equipment].

    PubMed

    Xue, Jing; Li, Wei; Liao, Yunmao; Zhou, Jinglin; Song, Jukun

    2008-02-01

    The main mineral component of natural tooth was determined as calcium apatite many years ago; most of them exist in the form of hydroxyapatite with different crystallites. If a tooth decayed, the crystalline of hydroxyapatite would be changed and decomposed. In our experiment, a natural tooth with caries was measured by high resolution XRD equipment: X'pert Pro. Three spots which included normal enamel, normal dentin and caries tissue were analyzed. The results showed that tooth was a kind of biological mixed crystal composed of many crystal phases, the main crystal phase was hydroxyapatite. From normal enamel to normal dentin and to caries tissue, the length of the a-axis of hydroxyapatite crystallite increased, the length of the c-axis of hydroxyapatite crystallite remained unchanged. The crystal sizes were: normal enamel D002 = 27.600 nm; normal dentin D002 = 16.561 nm; caries tissue D002 = 13.163 nm. Crystallinity: normal enamel>normal dentin>caries tissue. According to our experiment, tooth could be conveniently studied by high resolution microdiffracion XRD equipment.

  20. High-resolution Bio-Argo and Argo Measurements to Reveal Specific Oceanic Processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poteau, A.; Claustre, H.; Briggs, N.; D'Ortenzio, F.; Schmechtig, C.; Prieur, L. M.; Boss, E.

    2016-02-01

    Together with temperature and salinity measurements, Bio-Argo profiling floats now measure a significant range of biogeochemical (e.g. O2, NO3) and bio-optical variables (Chla, backscattering coefficient and radiometry). To transmit the very large amount of data acquired by this new generation of floats, it was required to substitute the Argos telemetry (Argo program) with iridium telemetry. The obvious consequence is not only a much greater flexibly on data transmission but also on data acquisition thanks to the two-way communication allowed by iridium. Our group has now deployed and managed over 100 Bio-Argo floats of this type. In particular we have set up high-resolution mode of acquisition for certain periods of time or for dedicated portions of the water column. Here we illustrate with three examples the potential of conducting high-resolution measurement to identify and explore certain oceanic processes. (1) High resolution measurements of pressure, temperature and salinity (every 2 s) when the float is finishing its ascent (without any pump action) in the upper 10 m layer are analyzed with respect to sea state. We particularly focus on the study of the speed anomaly as compared to a nominal speed expected for a calm sea state. By comparison between speed anomaly of a float in the Mediterranean Sea and concurrent sea state measurements by a weather buoy in the same area, we suggest that float behaviour can be an indicator of sea state. (2) Each year, in response to springtime phytoplankton blooms, the resolution of bio-optical variables (backscattering and Chla) in the top 1000 m was increased to at least 1 m (every 10 s) for all floats in the North Atlantic and Southern Ocean. This resolution allowed accurate estimation of the concentration of large phytoplankton aggregates and revealed systematic differences in bulk aggregate sinking rate between ocean basins. (3) Finally we continuously record all the variables at a 10 min resolution during the float

  1. A spin- and angle-resolving photoelectron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Berntsen, M. H.; Tjernberg, O.; Palmgren, P.; Leandersson, M.; Hahlin, A.; Aahlund, J.; Wannberg, B.; Maansson, M.

    2010-03-15

    A new type of hemispherical electron energy analyzer that permits angle and spin resolved photoelectron spectroscopy has been developed. The analyzer permits standard angle resolved spectra to be recorded with a two-dimensional detector in parallel with spin detection using a mini-Mott polarimeter. General design considerations as well as technical solutions are discussed and test results from the Au(111) surface state are presented.

  2. Baseline impedance measured during high-resolution esophageal impedance manometry reliably discriminates GERD patients.

    PubMed

    Ravi, K; Geno, D M; Vela, M F; Crowell, M D; Katzka, D A

    2017-05-01

    Baseline impedance measured with ambulatory impedance pH monitoring (MII-pH) and a mucosal impedance catheter detects gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, these tools are limited by cost or patient tolerance. We investigated whether baseline impedance measured during high-resolution impedance manometry (HRIM) distinguishes GERD patients from controls. Consecutive patients with clinical HRIM and MII-pH testing were identified. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was defined by esophageal pH <4 for ≥5% of both the supine and total study time, whereas controls had an esophageal pH <4 for ≤3% of the study performed off PPI. Baseline impedance was measured over 15 seconds during the landmark period of HRIM and over three 10 minute intervals during the overnight period of MII-pH. Among 29 GERD patients and 26 controls, GERD patients had a mean esophageal acid exposure time of 22.7% compared to 1.2% in controls (P<.0001). Mean baseline impedance during HRIM was lower in GERD (1061 Ω) than controls (2814 Ω) (P<.0001). Baseline mucosal impedance measured during HRIM and MII-pH correlated (r=0.59, P<.0001). High-resolution esophageal manometry baseline impedance had high diagnostic accuracy for GERD, with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.931 on receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. A HRIM baseline impedance threshold of 1582 Ω had a sensitivity of 86.2% and specificity of 88.5% for GERD, with a positive predictive value of 89.3% and negative predictive value of 85.2%. Baseline impedance measured during HRIM can reliably discriminate GERD patients with at least moderate esophageal acid exposure from controls. This diagnostic tool may represent an accurate, cost-effective, and less invasive test for GERD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. High resolution gamma ray tomography scanner for flow measurement and non-destructive testing applications.

    PubMed

    Hampel, U; Bieberle, A; Hoppe, D; Kronenberg, J; Schleicher, E; Sühnel, T; Zimmermann, F; Zippe, C

    2007-10-01

    We report on the development of a high resolution gamma ray tomography scanner that is operated with a Cs-137 isotopic source at 662 keV gamma photon energy and achieves a spatial image resolution of 0.2 line pairs/ mm at 10% modulation transfer function for noncollimated detectors. It is primarily intended for the scientific study of flow regimes and phase fraction distributions in fuel element assemblies, chemical reactors, pipelines, and hydrodynamic machines. Furthermore, it is applicable to nondestructive testing of larger radiologically dense objects. The radiation detector is based on advanced avalanche photodiode technology in conjunction with lutetium yttrium orthosilicate scintillation crystals. The detector arc comprises 320 single detector elements which are operated in pulse counting mode. For measurements at fixed vessels or plant components, we built a computed tomography scanner gantry that comprises rotational and translational stages, power supply via slip rings, and data communication to the measurement personal computer via wireless local area network.

  4. Studying Vortex Dynamics of Rotating Convection with High-resolution PIV Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hao; Sun, Shiwei; Wang, Yu; Zhou, Bowen; Wang, Yuan

    2016-11-01

    A novel experimental setup for studying vortex dynamics in rotating Rayleigh-Benard convection has been made in School of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing University. With water as the working fluid, three lasers with different frequencies and the corresponding three CCDs have been placed to complete 2D2C (two dimensions, two components) PIV measurement. The lasers are fixed on two crossing guiding ways and can move up and down to scan the flow field. An algorithm has been made to reconstruct 3D velocity field based on multiple 2D2C PIV data. This time, we are going to present the details of this new machine and algorithm, as well as some scientific understanding of vortex dynamics owing to this high-resolution velocity measurement system. This work was supported by "LMSWE Lab Funding No. 14380001".

  5. TOTAL: a rocket-borne instrument for high resolution measurements of neutral air turbulence during DYANA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillert, W.; Lübken, F.-J.; Lehmacher, G.

    1994-12-01

    An improved version of a rocket-borne instrument ('TOTAL'), optimized for high resolution measurements of relative density variations, was successfully employed during the DYANA campaign in winter 1990. Both the inertial-convective subrange and the viscous-diffusive subrange of turbulence were observed in the power spectra derived from density fluctuations. An extended spectral model which comprises both subranges has been used to analyse the data. In this paper we present altitude profiles of turbulent parameters, such as turbulent energy dissipation rates ɛ and turbulent diffusion coefficients K, which were derived from a total of eight successfully launched instruments at high (Andoya, 69°N) and middle (Biscarosse, 44°N) latitudes. The limitations of the measurement technique as well as instrumental errors are discussed. The results mainly show small values of ɛ and K throughout the whole campaign period. The turbopause was found at an altitude of 95 ± 3 km.

  6. Fall speed measurement and high-resolution multi-angle photography of hydrometeors in free fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, T. J.; Fallgatter, C.; Shkurko, K.; Howlett, D.

    2012-11-01

    We describe here a new instrument for imaging hydrometeors in free fall. The Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC) captures high-resolution photographs of hydrometeors from three angles while simultaneously measuring their fall speed. Based on the stereoscopic photographs captured over the two months of continuous measurements obtained at a high altitude location within the Wasatch Front in Utah, we derive statistics for fall speed, hydrometeor size, shape, orientation and aspect ratio. From a selection of the photographed hydrometeors, an illustration is provided for how the instrument might be used for making improved microwave scattering calculations. Complex, aggregated snowflake shapes appear to be more strongly forward scattering, at the expense of reduced back-scatter, than heavily rimed graupel particles of similar size.

  7. Fallspeed measurement and high-resolution multi-angle photography of hydrometeors in freefall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, T. J.; Fallgatter, C.; Shkurko, K.; Howlett, D.

    2012-07-01

    We describe here a new instrument for imaging hydrometeors in freefall. The Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC) captures high resolution photographs of hydrometeors from three angles while simultaneously measuring their fallspeed. Based on the stereoscopic photographs captured over the two months of continuous measurements obtained at a high altitude location within the Wasatch Front in Utah, we derive statistics for fallspeed, hydrometeor size, shape, orientation and aspect ratio. From a selection of the photographed hydrometeors, an illustration is provided for how the instrument might be used for making improved microwave scattering calculations. Complex, aggregated snowflake shapes appear to be more strongly forward scattering, at the expense of reduced back-scatter, than graupel particles of similar size.

  8. High resolution measurements of galactic cosmic-ray neon, magnesium, and silicon isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Spalding, J. D.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    High-resolution measurements of the abundances of individual isotopes of neon, magnesium and silicon in galactic cosmic rays are reported. The Caltech Heavy Isotope Spectrometer Telescope on board the ISEE 3 spacecraft was used to obtain measurements in the range 30 to 180 MeV/n at an rms mass resolution of 0.20 amu. Results indicate excesses of Ne-22 as well as Mg-25 and Mg-26 in galactic cosmic rays with respect to their solar system abundances. Calculations of the effects of interstellar propagation and solar modulation on cosmic-ray isotope abundances also imply an Mg-25 + Mg-26 cosmic ray source fraction significantly greater than the solar system fraction, and it is suggested that the cosmic ray source material and solar system material were synthesized under different conditions.

  9. Shuttle high resolution accelerometer package experiment results - Atmospheric density measurements between 60-160 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, R. C.; Hinson, E. W.; Nicholson, J. Y.

    1988-01-01

    Indirect or inferred values of atmospheric density encountered by the Shuttle Orbiter during reentry have been calculated from acceleration measurements made by the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP) and the Orbiter Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) liner accelerometers. The atmospheric density data developed from this study represent a significant gain with respect to the body of data collected to date by various techniques in the altitude range of 60 to 160 km. The data are unique in that they cover a very wide horizontal range during each flight and provide insight into the actual density variations encountered along the reentry flight path. The data, which were collected over about 3 years, are also characterized by variations in solar activity, geomagnetic index, and local solar time. Comparison of the flight-derived densities with various atmospheric models have been made, and analyses have attempted to characterize the data and to show correlation with selected physical variables.

  10. Instrument for high resolution magnetization measurements at high pressures, high magnetic fields and low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, K.; Hane, S.; Kamishima, K.; Goto, T.

    1998-08-01

    An instrument has been developed for the first time that makes high resolution magnetization measurements at high pressures, high magnetic fields and low temperatures. The instrument consists of an extraction-type magnetometer, a nonmagnetic high pressure clamp cell and a 20 T superconducting magnet with a 3He refrigerator and is able to precisely measure the magnetization of weakly magnetic materials. TiCu alloy with 3 wt % Ti is employed as a nonmagnetic material with high mechanical strength for the high pressure clamp cell. This apparatus can be used in the pressure range 0⩽P⩽13 kbar, the field range 0⩽H⩽200 kOe and the temperature range 0.5⩽T⩽4.2 K. The resolution of the instrument is estimated to be ±0.002 emu. For demonstrating the ability of the instrument, the experimental results on a heavy fermion antiferromagnet Ce7Ni3 is presented.

  11. High-resolution absorption measurements of NH3 at high temperatures: 2100-5500 cm-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Emma J.; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Clausen, Sønnik; Fateev, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    High-resolution absorption spectra of NH3 in the region 2100-5500 cm-1 at 1027 °C and approximately atmospheric pressure (1045±3 mbar) are measured. An NH3 concentration of 10% in volume fraction is used in the measurements. Spectra are recorded in a high-temperature gas-flow cell using a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer at a nominal resolution of 0.09 cm-1. The spectra are analysed by comparison to a variational line list, BYTe, and experimental energy levels determined using the MARVEL procedure. 2308 lines have been assigned to 45 different bands, of which 1755 and 15 have been assigned or observed for the first time in this work.

  12. High-resolution FTIR measurement of the ν4 band of methylene fluoride-d 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shastri, Aparna; Deo, M. N.; Kawaguchi, K.

    2004-10-01

    A high-resolution (0.002 cm -1) infrared absorption spectrum of methylene fluoride-d 2 (CD 2F 2) of the lowest fundamental mode ν4 in the region from 460 to 610 cm -1 has been measured on a Bruker IFS 120-HR Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. More than 3500 transitions have been assigned in this B-type band centered at 521.9 cm -1. The data have been combined with upper state pure rotational measurements in a weighted least-squares fit to obtain molecular constants for the upper state resulting in an overall standard deviation of 0.00018 cm -1. Accurate value for the band origin (521.9578036 cm -1) has been obtained and inclusion of transitions with very high J (⩽60) and Ka (⩽34) values has resulted in improved precision for sextic centrifugal distortion constants, in particular DK, HKJ, and HK.

  13. MARVEL analysis of the measured high-resolution spectra of 14NH3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Derzi, Afaf R.; Furtenbacher, Tibor; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Császár, Attila G.

    2015-08-01

    Accurate, experimental rotational-vibrational energy levels and line positions, with associated labels and uncertainties, are reported for the ground electronic state of the symmetric-top 14NH3 molecule. All levels and lines are based on critically reviewed and validated high-resolution experimental spectra taken from 56 literature sources. The transition data are in the 0.7-17 000 cm-1 region, with a large gap between 7000 and 15 000 cm-1. The MARVEL (Measured Active Rotational-Vibrational Energy Levels) algorithm is used to determine the energy levels. Out of the 29 450 measured transitions 10 041 and 18 947 belong to ortho- and para-14NH3, respectively. A careful analysis of the related experimental spectroscopic network (SN) allows 28 530 of the measured transitions to be validated, 18 178 of these are unique, while 462 transitions belong to floating components. Despite the large number of spectroscopic measurements published over the last 80 years, the transitions determine only 30 vibrational band origins of 14NH3, 8 for ortho- and 22 for para-14NH3. The highest J value, where J stands for the rotational quantum number, for which an energy level is validated is 31. The number of experimental-quality ortho- and para-14NH3 rovibrational energy levels is 1724 and 3237, respectively. The MARVEL energy levels are checked against ones in the BYTe first-principles database, determined previously. The lists of validated lines and levels for 14NH3 are deposited in the Supporting Information to this paper. Combination of the MARVEL energy levels with first-principles absorption intensities yields a huge number of experimental-quality rovibrational lines, which should prove to be useful for the understanding of future complex high-resolution spectroscopy on 14NH3; these lines are also deposited in the Supporting Information to this paper.

  14. The investigation of Martian dune fields using very high resolution photogrammetric measurements and time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Park, M.; Baik, H. S.; Choi, Y.

    2016-12-01

    At the present time, arguments continue regarding the migration speeds of Martian dune fields and their correlation with atmospheric circulation. However, precisely measuring the spatial translation of Martian dunes has rarely conducted only a very few times Therefore, we developed a generic procedure to precisely measure the migration of dune fields with recently introduced 25-cm resolution High Resolution Imaging Science Experimen (HIRISE) employing a high-accuracy photogrammetric processor and sub-pixel image correlator. The processor was designed to trace estimated dune migration, albeit slight, over the Martian surface by 1) the introduction of very high resolution ortho images and stereo analysis based on hierarchical geodetic control for better initial point settings; 2) positioning error removal throughout the sensor model refinement with a non-rigorous bundle block adjustment, which makes possible the co-alignment of all images in a time series; and 3) improved sub-pixel co-registration algorithms using optical flow with a refinement stage conducted on a pyramidal grid processor and a blunder classifier. Moreover, volumetric changes of Martian dunes were additionally traced by means of stereo analysis and photoclinometry. The established algorithms have been tested using high-resolution HIRISE images over a large number of Martian dune fields covering whole Mars Global Dune Database. Migrations over well-known crater dune fields appeared to be almost static for the considerable temporal periods and were weakly correlated with wind directions estimated by the Mars Climate Database (Millour et al. 2015). Only over a few Martian dune fields, such as Kaiser crater, meaningful migration speeds (>1m/year) compared to phtotogrammetric error residual have been measured. Currently a technical improved processor to compensate error residual using time series observation is under developing and expected to produce the long term migration speed over Martian dune

  15. Fossil Fuel Combustion Fingerprint in High-Resolution Urban Water Vapor Isotope Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorski, G.; Good, S. P.; Bowen, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing energy consumption and rapid urbanization have many important and poorly understood consequences for the hydrologic cycle in urban and suburban areas. Wide use of fossil fuels for transportation and heating releases isotopically distinctive water vapor that contributes to the overall water vapor budget in varying, usually unknown, concentrations. The use of long term, high resolution isotopic measurements can help determine different sources and proportions of water vapor at various time scales. We present two months of high-resolution water vapor isotope measurements coupled with CO2 concentrations and co-located meteorological observations from December 2013 - January 2014 in Salt Lake City, UT. Periods of atmospheric stagnation (cold-air inversions) show a buildup of CO2 from baseline values of 420 ppm to as high as 600 ppm and an associated decrease in water vapor deuterium-excess values from a baseline of approx. 10‰ to values as low as -10‰ (where d = δ2H - 8*δ18O, in per mil units). We suggest that the strong relationship between CO2and d during inversion periods is driven by the build-up of fossil fuel combustion-derived water vapor with very low d values (≤ -150‰). Based on our measurements of its isotopic composition, combustion-derived water vapor could contribute as much as 15% to the total water vapor budget during inversion periods. We present evidence of this effect at both the multi-day scale and the diurnal scale, where periods of increased automobile use and home heating can be identified. This study provides the first isotopic evidence that accumulation of water of combustion can be identified in boundary layer water vapor, suggests that an appreciable fraction of boundary layer vapor can be derived from combustion under certain atmospheric conditions, and indicates that the distinctive d values of combustion-derived vapor may be a useful tracer for this component of the atmospheric water budget in other urban regions.

  16. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy at ultra-low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Borisenko, Sergey V; Zabolotnyy, Volodymyr B; Kordyuk, Alexander A; Evtushinsky, Danil V; Kim, Timur K; Carleschi, Emanuela; Doyle, Bryan P; Fittipaldi, Rosalba; Cuoco, Mario; Vecchione, Antonio; Berger, Helmut

    2012-10-09

    The physical properties of a material are defined by its electronic structure. Electrons in solids are characterized by energy (ω) and momentum (k) and the probability to find them in a particular state with given ω and k is described by the spectral function A(k, ω). This function can be directly measured in an experiment based on the well-known photoelectric effect, for the explanation of which Albert Einstein received the Nobel Prize back in 1921. In the photoelectric effect the light shone on a surface ejects electrons from the material. According to Einstein, energy conservation allows one to determine the energy of an electron inside the sample, provided the energy of the light photon and kinetic energy of the outgoing photoelectron are known. Momentum conservation makes it also possible to estimate k relating it to the momentum of the photoelectron by measuring the angle at which the photoelectron left the surface. The modern version of this technique is called Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) and exploits both conservation laws in order to determine the electronic structure, i.e. energy and momentum of electrons inside the solid. In order to resolve the details crucial for understanding the topical problems of condensed matter physics, three quantities need to be minimized: uncertainty* in photon energy, uncertainty in kinetic energy of photoelectrons and temperature of the sample. In our approach we combine three recent achievements in the field of synchrotron radiation, surface science and cryogenics. We use synchrotron radiation with tunable photon energy contributing an uncertainty of the order of 1 meV, an electron energy analyzer which detects the kinetic energies with a precision of the order of 1 meV and a He(3) cryostat which allows us to keep the temperature of the sample below 1 K. We discuss the exemplary results obtained on single crystals of Sr2RuO4 and some other materials. The electronic structure of this material can be

  17. Electronic structure of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy: evidence for a nearly full surface spin polarization.

    PubMed

    Pan, Z-H; Vescovo, E; Fedorov, A V; Gardner, D; Lee, Y S; Chu, S; Gu, G D; Valla, T

    2011-06-24

    We performed high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies of the electronic structure and the spin texture on the surface of Bi2Se3, a model TI. By tuning the photon energy, we found that the topological surface state is well separated from the bulk states in the vicinity of kz = Z plane of the bulk Brillouin zone. The spin-resolved measurements in that region indicate a very high degree of spin polarization of the surface state, ~0.75, much higher than previously reported. Our results demonstrate that the topological surface state on Bi2Se3 is highly spin polarized and that the dominant factors limiting the polarization are mainly extrinsic.

  18. Electronic Structure of the Topological Insulator Bi2Se3 Using Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy: Evidence for a Nearly Full Surface Spin Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Z.H.; Vescovo, E.; Fedorov, A.V.; Gardner, D.; Lee, Y.S.; Chu, S.; Gu, G.D.; Valla, T.

    2011-06-22

    We performed high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies of the electronic structure and the spin texture on the surface of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, a model TI. By tuning the photon energy, we found that the topological surface state is well separated from the bulk states in the vicinity of k{sub z} = Z plane of the bulk Brillouin zone. The spin-resolved measurements in that region indicate a very high degree of spin polarization of the surface state, {approx}0.75, much higher than previously reported. Our results demonstrate that the topological surface state on Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is highly spin polarized and that the dominant factors limiting the polarization are mainly extrinsic.

  19. Electronic Structure of the Topological Insulator Bi2Se3 Using Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy: Evidence for a Nearly Full Surface Spin Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Z Pan; E Vescovo; A Fedorov; D Gardner; Y Lee; S Chu; G Gu; T Valla

    2011-12-31

    We performed high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies of the electronic structure and the spin texture on the surface of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, a model TI. By tuning the photon energy, we found that the topological surface state is well separated from the bulk states in the vicinity of k{sub z} = Z plane of the bulk Brillouin zone. The spin-resolved measurements in that region indicate a very high degree of spin polarization of the surface state, {approx}0.75, much higher than previously reported. Our results demonstrate that the topological surface state on Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is highly spin polarized and that the dominant factors limiting the polarization are mainly extrinsic.

  20. Precipitable water estimation from high-resolution split window radiance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.

    1990-01-01

    A technique that uses the spatial variance of image brightness temperature to derive total column precipitable water is applied to high-resolution multispectral aircraft scanner data for the June 19, 1986 COHMEX day. The technique has several advantages over other approaches in that it requires only relative calibration accuracy, is less susceptible to instrument error, and does not directly use a priori information. Results indicate significant horizontal variability of precipitable water at the mesoscale. Precipitable water gradients of 6 mm per 10 km are not uncommon. The results verify well against special rawinsonde measurements and the ensuing cloud field development. While only applied to this specialized aircraft data, the applicability of the technique to operational AVHRR and VAS data is discussed.

  1. Precipitable water estimation from high-resolution split window radiance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.

    1990-01-01

    A technique that uses the spatial variance of image brightness temperature to derive total column precipitable water is applied to high-resolution multispectral aircraft scanner data for the June 19, 1986 COHMEX day. The technique has several advantages over other approaches in that it requires only relative calibration accuracy, is less susceptible to instrument error, and does not directly use a priori information. Results indicate significant horizontal variability of precipitable water at the mesoscale. Precipitable water gradients of 6 mm per 10 km are not uncommon. The results verify well against special rawinsonde measurements and the ensuing cloud field development. While only applied to this specialized aircraft data, the applicability of the technique to operational AVHRR and VAS data is discussed.

  2. High-Resolution Correlated Fission Product Measurements of 235U (nth , f) with SPIDER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Dan; Spider Team

    2015-10-01

    The SPIDER detector (SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research) has obtained high-resolution, moderate-efficiency, correlated fission product data needed for many applications including the modeling of next generation nuclear reactors, stockpile stewardship, and the fundamental understanding of the fission process. SPIDER simultaneously measures velocity and energy of both fission products to calculate fission product yields (FPYs), neutron multiplicity (ν), and total kinetic energy (TKE). These data will be some of the first of their kind available to nuclear data evaluations. An overview of the SPIDER detector, analytical method, and preliminary results for 235U (nth , f) will be presented. LA-UR-15-20130 This work benefited from the use of the LANSCE accelerator facility and was performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by Los Alamos Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  3. A digital approach for real time high-rate high-resolution radiation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerardi, G.; Abbene, L.

    2014-12-01

    Modern spectrometers are currently developed by using digital pulse processing (DPP) systems, showing several advantages over traditional analog electronics. The aim of this work is to present digital strategies, in a time domain, for the development of real time high-rate high-resolution spectrometers. We propose a digital method, based on the single delay line (SDL) shaping technique, able to perform multi-parameter analysis with high performance even at high photon counting rates. A robust pulse shape and height analysis (PSHA), applied on single isolated time windows of the detector output waveforms, is presented. The potentialities of the proposed strategy are highlighted through both theoretical and experimental approaches. To strengthen our approach, the implementation of the method on a real-time system together with some experimental results are presented. X-ray spectra measurements with a semiconductor detector are performed both at low and high photon counting rates (up to 1.1 Mcps).

  4. Measurement of magnetic field aligned potential differences using high resolution conjugate photoelectron energy spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, W. K.; Doering, J. P.; Potemra, T. A.; Bostrom, C. O.; Brace, L. H.; Heelis, R. A.; Hanson, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    Simultaneous high-resolution observations of a distinctive feature in the energy spectrum of conjugate photoelectrons and spacecraft potential relative to the local ionosphere have allowed the net potential difference between magnetic conjugate points at latitudes below the region of low-energy (i.e., lower than 100 eV) auroral electron precipitation to be determined. Measurements made at 300 km from Atmosphere Explorer C show that there is normally no net potential difference between hemispheres in this region, which extended up to invariant latitudes as high as 74 deg. Two types of apparently related anomalous behavior were infrequently observed at high latitudes. During these periods the incident flux of conjugate photoelectrons was either decelerated by about 3 eV or was not detected.

  5. Analysis of traction-free assumption in high-resolution EBSD measurements.

    PubMed

    Hardin, T J; Ruggles, T J; Koch, D P; Niezgoda, S R; Fullwood, D T; Homer, E R

    2015-10-01

    The effects of using a traction-free (plane-stress) assumption to obtain the full distortion tensor from high-resolution EBSD measurements are analyzed. Equations are derived which bound the traction-free error arising from angular misorientation of the sample surface; the error in recovered distortion is shown to be quadratic with respect to that misorientation, and the maximum 'safe' angular misorientation is shown to be 2.7 degrees. The effects of localized stress fields on the traction-free assumption are then examined by a numerical case study, which uses the Boussinesq formalism to model stress fields near a free surface. Except in cases where localized stress field sources occur very close to sample points, the traction-free assumption appears to be admirably robust. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  6. Broadband acoustic backscatter and high-resolution morphology of fish: Measurement and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeder, D. Benjamin; Jech, J. Michael; Stanton, Timothy K.

    2004-08-01

    Broadband acoustic backscattering measurements, advanced high-resolution imaging of fish morphology using CT scans and phase-contrast x rays (in addition to traditional x rays), and associated scattering modeling using the images have been conducted involving alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), a swimbladder-bearing fish. A greater-than-octave bandwidth (40-95 kHz) signal was used to insonify live, individual, adult alewife that were tethered while being rotated in 1-deg increments over all angles in two planes of rotation (lateral and dorsal/ventral). These data, in addition to providing the orientation dependence of the scattering over a continuous band of frequencies, were also used (after pulse compression) to identify dominant scattering features of the fish (including the skull and swimbladder). The x-ray and CT scan images of the swimbladder were digitized and incorporated into two scattering models: (1) Kirchhoff-ray mode (KRM) model [Clay and Horne, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 96, 1661-1668 (1994)] and (2) conformal-mapping-based Fourier matching method (FMM), which has recently been extended to finite-length bodies [Reeder and Stanton, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 116. 729-746 (2004)]. Comparisons between the scattering predictions and data demonstrate the utility of the CT scan imagery for use in scattering models, as it provided a means for rapidly and noninvasively measuring the fish morphology in three dimensions and at high resolution. In addition to further validation of the KRM model, the potential of the new FMM formulation was demonstrated, which is a versatile approach, valid over a wide range of shapes, all frequencies and all angles of orientation.

  7. Non-equilibrium Dirac carrier dynamics in graphene investigated with time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gierz, Isabella; Link, Stefan; Starke, Ulrich; Cavalleri, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    We have used time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (tr-ARPES) to assess the influence of many-body interactions on the Dirac carrier dynamics in graphene. From the energy-dependence of the measured scattering rates we directly determine the imaginary part of the self-energy, visualizing the existence of a relaxation bottleneck associated with electron-phonon coupling. A comparison with static line widths obtained by high-resolution ARPES indicates that the dynamics of photo-excited carriers in graphene are solely determined by the equilibrium self-energy. Furthermore, the subtle interplay of different many-body interactions in graphene may allow for carrier multiplication, where the absorption of a single photon generates more than one electron-hole pair via impact ionization. We find that, after photo-excitation, the number of carriers in the conduction band along the ΓK-direction keeps increasing for about 40 fs after the pump pulse is gone. A definite proof of carrier multiplication in graphene, however, requires a more systematic study, carefully taking into account the contribution of momentum relaxation on the measured rise time.

  8. Potassium stable isotopic compositions measured by high-resolution MC-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, L. E.; Lloyd, N. S.; Ellam, R. M.; Simon, J. I.

    2012-12-01

    Potassium isotopic (41K/39K) compositions are notoriously difficult to measure. TIMS measurements are hindered by variable fractionation patterns throughout individual runs and too few isotopes to apply an internal spike method for instrumental mass fractionation corrections. Internal fractionation corrections via the 40K/39K ratio can provide precise values but assume identical 40K/39K ratios (e.g. 0.05‰ (1σ) in [1]); this is appropriate in some cases (e.g. identifying excess 41K) but not others (e.g., determining mass fractionation effects and metrologically traceable isotopic abundances). SIMS analyses have yielded measurements with 0.25‰ precisions (1σ) [2]. ICP-MS analyses are significantly affected by interferences from molecular species such as 38ArH+ and 40ArH+ and instrument mass bias. Single collector ICP-MS instruments in "cold plasma" mode have yielded uncertainties as low as 2‰ (1σ, e.g. [3]). Although these precisions may be acceptable for some concentration determinations, they do not resolve isotopic variation in terrestrial materials. Here we present data from a series of measurements made on the Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus multi-collector ICP-MS that demonstrate the ability to make 41K/39K ratio measurements with 0.07‰ precisions (1σ). These data, collected on NIST K standards, indicate the potential for MC-ICP-MS measurements to look for K isotopic variations at the sub-permil level. The NEPTUNE Plus can sufficiently resolve 39K and 41K from the interfering 38ArH+ and 40ArH+ peaks in wet cold plasma and high-resolution mode. Measurements were made on small but flat, interference-free, plateaus (ca. 50 ppm by mass width for 41K). Although ICP-MS does not yield accurate 41K/39K values due to significant instrumental mass fractionation (ca. 6%), this bias can be sufficiently stable over the time required for several measurements so that relative 41K/39K values can be precisely determined via sample-standard bracketing. As cold plasma

  9. Potassium Stable Isotopic Compositions Measured by High-Resolution MC-ICP-MS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Leah E.; Lloyd, Nicholas S.; Ellam, Robert M.; Simon, Justin I.

    2012-01-01

    Potassium isotopic (K-41/K-39) compositions are notoriously difficult to measure. TIMS measurements are hindered by variable fractionation patterns throughout individual runs and too few isotopes to apply an internal spike method for instrumental mass fractionation corrections. Internal fractionation corrections via the K-40/K-39 ratio can provide precise values but assume identical K-40/K-39 ratios (e.g. 0.05% (1sigma) in [1]); this is appropriate in some cases (e.g. identifying excess K-41) but not others (e.g., determining mass fractionation effects and metrologically traceable isotopic abundances). SIMS analyses have yielded measurements with 0.25% precisions (1sigma) [2]. ICP-MS analyses are significantly affected by interferences from molecular species such as Ar-38H(+) and Ar-40H(+) and instrument mass bias. Single collector ICP-MS instruments in "cold plasma" mode have yielded uncertainties as low as 2% (1sigma, e.g. [3]). Although these precisions may be acceptable for some concentration determinations, they do not resolve isotopic variation in terrestrial materials. Here we present data from a series of measurements made on the Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus multi-collector ICP-MS that demonstrate the ability to make K-41/K-39 ratio measurements with 0.07% precisions (1sigma). These data, collected on NIST K standards, indicate the potential for MC-ICP-MS measurements to look for K isotopic variations at the sub-permil level. The NEPTUNE Plus can sufficiently resolve 39K and 41K from the interfering 38ArH+ and 40ArH+ peaks in wet cold plasma and high-resolution mode. Measurements were made on small but flat, interference-free, plateaus (ca. 50 ppm by mass width for K-41). Although ICP-MS does not yield accurate K-41/K-39 values due to significant instrumental mass fractionation (ca. 6%), this bias can be sufficiently stable over the time required for several measurements so that relative K-41/K-39 values can be precisely determined via sample

  10. A High-Resolution, Reproducible Technique for Measuring Fracture Aperture in Centimeter-Scale Rock Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameli, P.; Detwiler, R. L.; Elkhoury, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    Mechanical and chemical processes can alter fracture surfaces and their corresponding aperture. Understanding the relationship between physicochemical processes and the alteration of fracture apertures is fundamental to quantifying the evolution of transport properties in the subsurface. Therefore, relevant experiments that quantify these processes require the ability to measure fracture surfaces and reconstruct fracture aperture fields at high resolutions before and after experiments. Furthermore, to meaningfully compare measured aperture fields before and after experiments, it is critical that the measurements are reproducible to ensure that differences in fracture apertures are due to physical changes and not data acquisition or reconstruction errors. Energy transmission techniques can provide direct, non-destructive measurement of fracture apertures. However, while X-ray CT is capable of μm-scale resolution, at those resolutions, it is limited to millimeter-scale cores. Alternatively, light absorbance techniques are limited to transparent analogs or casts of real rocks. Modern surface-profilometry instruments provide the ability to measure surface topography at high resolution, but it is difficult to reconstruct fracture apertures from the measured surfaces. We present a rigorous approach for using high-resolution measurements of surface topography to reproducibly reconstruct fracture aperture fields. An optical profilometer (NANOVEA ST400) provides surface topography measurements averaged over a spot size of 8 μm with spatial accuracy of ±0.1 μm and elevation accuracy of ±0.9 μm. Numerically mating the measured surfaces requires accurate, reproducible alignment of the two fracture halves in three-dimensional space. To facilitate alignment and provide a means for checking the alignment of scanned surfaces, we fabricated a jig for securing the halves of the core to the profilometer stage. The jig consists of two mated blocks of precision-milled steel that

  11. High resolution optical surface metrology with the slope measuring portable optical test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Alejandro V.

    New optical designs strive to achieve extreme performance, and continually increase the complexity of prescribed optical shapes, which often require wide dynamic range and high resolution. SCOTS, or the Software Configurable Optical Test System, can measure a wide range of optical surfaces with high sensitivity using surface slope. This dissertation introduces a high resolution version of SCOTS called SPOTS, or the Slope measuring Portable Optical Test System. SPOTS improves the metrology of surface features on the order of sub-millimeter to decimeter spatial scales and nanometer to micrometer level height scales. Currently there is no optical surface metrology instrument with the same utility. SCOTS uses a computer controlled display (such as an LCD monitor) and camera to measure surface slopes over the entire surface of a mirror. SPOTS differs in that an additional lens is placed near the surface under test. A small prototype system is discussed in general, providing the support for the design of future SPOTS devices. Then the SCOTS instrument transfer function is addressed, which defines the way the system filters surface heights. Lastly, the calibration and performance of larger SPOTS device is analyzed with example measurements of the 8.4-m diameter aspheric Large Synoptic Survey Telescope's (LSST) primary mirror. In general optical systems have a transfer function, which filters data. In the case of optical imaging systems the instrument transfer function (ITF) follows the modulation transfer function (MTF), which causes a reduction of contrast as a function of increasing spatial frequency due to diffraction. In SCOTS, ITF is shown to decrease the measured height of surface features as their spatial frequency increases, and thus the SCOTS and SPOTS ITF is proportional to their camera system's MTF. Theory and simulations are supported by a SCOTS measurement of a test piece with a set of lithographically written sinusoidal surface topographies. In addition, an

  12. Dimensional Crossover in a Charge Density Wave Material Probed by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, C. W.; Berthod, C.; Puppin, M.; Berger, H.; Wolf, M.; Hoesch, M.; Monney, C.

    2017-05-01

    High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data reveal evidence of a crossover from one-dimensional (1D) to three-dimensional (3D) behavior in the prototypical charge density wave (CDW) material NbSe3 . In the low-temperature 3D regime, gaps in the electronic structure are observed due to two incommensurate CDWs, in agreement with x-ray diffraction and electronic-structure calculations. At higher temperatures we observe a spectral weight depletion that approaches the power-law behavior expected in one dimension. From the warping of the quasi-1D Fermi surface at low temperatures, we extract the energy scale of the dimensional crossover. This is corroborated by a detailed analysis of the density of states, which reveals a change in dimensional behavior dependent on binding energy. Our results offer an important insight into the dimensionality of excitations in quasi-1D materials.

  13. Reference-free, high-resolution measurement method of timing jitter spectra of optical frequency combs

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Dohyeon; Jeon, Chan-Gi; Shin, Junho; Heo, Myoung-Sun; Park, Sang Eon; Song, Youjian; Kim, Jungwon

    2017-01-01

    Timing jitter is one of the most important properties of femtosecond mode-locked lasers and optical frequency combs. Accurate measurement of timing jitter power spectral density (PSD) is a critical prerequisite for optimizing overall noise performance and further advancing comb applications both in the time and frequency domains. Commonly used jitter measurement methods require a reference mode-locked laser with timing jitter similar to or lower than that of the laser-under-test, which is a demanding requirement for many laser laboratories, and/or have limited measurement resolution. Here we show a high-resolution and reference-source-free measurement method of timing jitter spectra of optical frequency combs using an optical fibre delay line and optical carrier interference. The demonstrated method works well for both mode-locked oscillators and supercontinua, with 2 × 10−9 fs2/Hz (equivalent to −174 dBc/Hz at 10-GHz carrier frequency) measurement noise floor. The demonstrated method can serve as a simple and powerful characterization tool for timing jitter PSDs of various comb sources including mode-locked oscillators, supercontinua and recently emerging Kerr-frequency combs; the jitter measurement results enabled by our method will provide new insights for understanding and optimizing timing noise in such comb sources. PMID:28102352

  14. High-resolution saturated hydraulic conductivity logging of borehole cores using air permeability measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogiers, B.; Winters, P.; Huysmans, M.; Beerten, K.; Mallants, D.; Gedeon, M.; Batelaan, O.; Dassargues, A.

    2014-09-01

    Saturated hydraulic conductivity ( K s) is one of the most important parameters determining groundwater flow and contaminant transport in both unsaturated and saturated porous media. The hand-held air permeameter technique was investigated for high-resolution hydraulic conductivity determination on borehole cores using a spatial resolution of ˜0.05 m. The suitability of such air permeameter measurements on friable to poorly indurated sediments was tested to improve the spatial prediction of classical laboratory-based K s measurements obtained at a much lower spatial resolution (˜2 m). In total, 368 K s measurements were made on ˜350 m of borehole cores originating from the Campine basin, northern Belgium, while ˜5,230 air permeability measurements were performed on the same cores, resulting in a K s range of seven orders of magnitude. Cross-validation demonstrated that, using air permeameter data as the secondary variable for laboratory based K s measurements, the performance increased from R 2 = 0.35 for ordinary kriging (laboratory K s only) to R 2 = 0.61 for co-kriging. The separate treatment of horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivity revealed considerable anisotropy in certain lithostratigraphical units, while others were clearly isotropic at the sample scale. Air permeameter measurements on borehole cores provide a cost-effective way to improve spatial predictions of traditional laboratory based K s.

  15. Reference-free, high-resolution measurement method of timing jitter spectra of optical frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Dohyeon; Jeon, Chan-Gi; Shin, Junho; Heo, Myoung-Sun; Park, Sang Eon; Song, Youjian; Kim, Jungwon

    2017-01-01

    Timing jitter is one of the most important properties of femtosecond mode-locked lasers and optical frequency combs. Accurate measurement of timing jitter power spectral density (PSD) is a critical prerequisite for optimizing overall noise performance and further advancing comb applications both in the time and frequency domains. Commonly used jitter measurement methods require a reference mode-locked laser with timing jitter similar to or lower than that of the laser-under-test, which is a demanding requirement for many laser laboratories, and/or have limited measurement resolution. Here we show a high-resolution and reference-source-free measurement method of timing jitter spectra of optical frequency combs using an optical fibre delay line and optical carrier interference. The demonstrated method works well for both mode-locked oscillators and supercontinua, with 2 × 10‑9 fs2/Hz (equivalent to ‑174 dBc/Hz at 10-GHz carrier frequency) measurement noise floor. The demonstrated method can serve as a simple and powerful characterization tool for timing jitter PSDs of various comb sources including mode-locked oscillators, supercontinua and recently emerging Kerr-frequency combs; the jitter measurement results enabled by our method will provide new insights for understanding and optimizing timing noise in such comb sources.

  16. Concentration-Discharge Patterns Revealed from High Resolution Nitrate Measurements in Agricultural Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boland, S. J.; Basu, N. B.

    2012-12-01

    Riverine export of nutrients is a major component of nutrient cycles, particularly with respect to nitrogen; ~ 25 percent of terrestrially applied nitrogen (N) is removed via riverine export. Understanding the patterns in N export during a storm event is critical for developing a conceptual model of the dominant processes and pathways of N transformation, and designing appropriate management strategies to mitigate N pollution in streams and receiving water bodies. Most studies however, are limited by the lack of high-resolution water quality data to elucidate these pathways and mechanisms. We explored concentration-discharge relationships using high-resolution (15 minute) discharge (Q) and nitrate concentration (C) data (measured using an in-situ Nitratax Sonde) at multiple nested scales (from 151.3 km2 to 8900 km2) in two watersheds in Iowa: Clear Creek Watershed and the Raccoon River watershed. Three distinct regimes of nitrate transport were revealed: (1) a linear regime in which C increases with increasing Q, (2) a saturation regime in which C remains constant against increasing Q, and (3) a dilution regime in which concentration decreases as Q increases. The tight clustering of the data along these patterns is indicative of emergent behavior in such human-dominated systems. All three regimes were apparent in the Raccoon River Watershed, while only the saturation and dilution regimes were apparent in the Clear Creek Watershed. We hypothesize that surface flow is dominant in the Clear Creek Watershed leading to a saturation/dilution regimes, while subsurface flow is dominant in the more heavily tile-drained Raccoon River Watershed, leading to the occurrence of all three regimes. A parsimonious model was developed to test the hypothesis and develop C-Q patterns as a function of the partitioning of flow through the different pathways.

  17. Determination of band oscillator strengths of atmospheric molecules from high resolution vacuum ultraviolet cross section measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of progress in work on (1) the determination of band oscillator strengths of the Schumann-Runge absorption bands of (16)O2 and (18)O2 from cross section measurements conducted at 79 K; (2) the determination of the absolute absorption cross section of the Schumann-Runge bands of (16)O(18)O from optical depth measurements performed on mixtures of (16)O2, (18)O2 and (16)O(18)O at 79K; and (3) the influence of Schumann-Runge linewing contributions on the determination of the Herzberg continuum absorption cross section of (16)O2 in the wavelength region 194 to 204 nm. The experimental investigations are effected at high resolution with a 6.65 m scanning spectrometer which is, by virtue of its small instrumental width (EWHM = 0.0013 nm), uniquely suitable for cross section measurements of molecular bands with discrete rotational structure. Absolute cross sections, which are independent of the instrumental function and from which band oscillator strengths are directly determined, are measured for the absorption bands that are most predissociated. Such measurements are needed for (1) accurate calculations of the stratospheric production of atomic oxygen and heavy ozone formed following the photopredissociation of (18)O(16)O by solar radiation penetrating between the absorption lines of (16)O2; (2) elucidation of the mechanism of predissociation of the upper state of the Schumann-Runge bands; and (3) determination of the true shape of the Herzberg continuum cross section.

  18. Development of the Experimental System for Time- and Angle-resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Azuma, Junpei; Tokudomi, Shinji; Kamada, Masao

    2007-01-19

    Experimental system for the time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy have been constructed at BL13 in SAGA Light Source, in order to study the electronic non-equilibrium in the surface layer of laser-excited materials The experimental system is very useful for photoemission spectroscopy in the wide temporal and angular ranges. The time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectra can be obtained with using the gate electronics for the MCP detector of the photoemission spectrometer. The gated MCP detector is synchronized with the laser pulse from Ti:sapphire regenerative amplifier with the repetition frequency of 10 to 300 kHz. The time-window of the gated MCP detector can be changed between 10 nano- and 160 micro-second. The time-resolved measurement in pico-second region can be performed with using the pump-probe technique which uses fundamental, second and third harmonics from the Ti:sapphire laser as the excitation source. Using these systems, we can perform the time- and angle-resolved photoemission study for various photo-excited phenomena and surface dynamics.

  19. Quantitative analysis of angle-resolved scattering properties of ovarian tissue using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Wang, Tianheng; Brewer, Molly

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Angle-resolved optical scattering properties of ovarian tissue, on different optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging planes, were quantitatively measured by fitting the compounded OCT A-lines into a single scattering model. Higher cross correlation value of angle-resolved scattering coefficients between different OCT imaging planes was found in normal ovaries than was present in malignant ovaries. The mean cross correlation coefficient (MCC) was introduced in this pilot study to characterize and differentiate normal, n=6, and malignant, n=4, ovaries. A specificity of 100 percent and a sensitivity of 100 percent were achieved by setting MCC threshold at 0.6. Collagen properties, within the OCT imaging penetration depth, were also qualitatively studied in terms of their content, structure and directivity. The homogeneous three-dimensional collagen fiber network, observed in the normal ovary, effectively explains the stronger cross correlation of angle-resolved scattering properties on different imaging planes while the heterogeneity, observed in the malignant ovary, suggests a weaker correlation. PMID:23085900

  20. A compact and miniaturized high resolution capacitance dilatometer for measuring thermal expansion and magnetostriction

    SciTech Connect

    Kuechler, R.; Bauer, T.; Brando, M.; Steglich, F.

    2012-09-15

    We describe the design, construction, calibration, and two different applications of a miniature capacitance dilatometer. The device is suitable for thermal expansion and magnetostriction measurements from 300 K down to about 25 mK, with a resolution of 0.02 A at low temperatures. The main body of the dilatometer is fabricated from a single block of a Be-Cu alloy by electrical discharge milling. This creates an extremely compact high-resolution measuring cell. We have successfully tested and operated dilatometers of this new type with the commonly used physical property measurement system by quantum design, as well as with several other cryogenic refrigeration systems down to 25 mK and in magnetic fields up to 20 T. Here, the capacitance is measured with a commercially available capacitance bridge. Using a piezoelectric rotator from Attocube Systems, the cell can be rotated at T= 25 mK inside of an inner vacuum chamber of 40 mm diameter. The miniaturized design for the one-axis rotation setup allows a rotation of 360 Degree-Sign .

  1. A modified high-resolution TEM for thermoelectric properties measurements of nanowires and nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dames, C.; Chen, S.; Harris, C. T.; Huang, J. Y.; Ren, Z. F.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Chen, G.

    2006-10-01

    Nanowires are interesting candidates for thermoelectric applications because of their potentially low thermal conductivity and high power factor. However, measurements at the single-wire level are challenging and tend to lack detailed information about the atomic-level structure of the sample and contacts. We are modifying a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) with integrated scanning tunneling microscope (STM) for in-situ measurements of the thermoelectric properties of individual nanowires and nanotubes. A slender hot-wire probe is used to make electrical and thermal contact to the free end of a nanowire or nanotube. The electrical conductance of the nanowire/nanotube can be measured with the usual STM mode of operation. The Seebeck coefficient can be extracted from the transient response to a step change in the joule heating of the hot-wire probe. The thermal conductance can be calculated from the temperature and heat leakage of the hot-wire probe. These measurements are combined with detailed HRTEM observations.

  2. On the measurement of frequency and of its sample variance with high-resolution counters

    SciTech Connect

    Rubiola, Enrico

    2005-05-15

    A frequency counter measures the input frequency {nu} averaged over a suitable time {tau}, versus the reference clock. High resolution is achieved by interpolating the clock signal. Further increased resolution is obtained by averaging multiple frequency measurements highly overlapped. In the presence of additive white noise or white phase noise, the square uncertainty improves from {sigma}{sub {nu}}{sup 2}{proportional_to}1/{tau}{sup 2} to {sigma}{sub {nu}}{sup 2}{proportional_to}1/{tau}{sup 3}. Surprisingly, when a file of contiguous data is fed into the formula of the two-sample (Allan) variance {sigma}{sub y}{sup 2}({tau})=E{l_brace}(1/2)(y{sub k+1}-y{sub k}){sup 2}{r_brace} of the fractional frequency fluctuation y, the result is the modified Allan variance mod {sigma}{sub y}{sup 2}({tau}). But if a sufficient number of contiguous measures are averaged in order to get a longer {tau} and the data are fed into the same formula, the results is the (nonmodified) Allan variance. Of course interpretation mistakes are around the corner if the counter internal process is not well understood. The typical domain of interest is the the short-term stability measurement of oscillators.

  3. A compact and miniaturized high resolution capacitance dilatometer for measuring thermal expansion and magnetostriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küchler, R.; Bauer, T.; Brando, M.; Steglich, F.

    2012-09-01

    We describe the design, construction, calibration, and two different applications of a miniature capacitance dilatometer. The device is suitable for thermal expansion and magnetostriction measurements from 300 K down to about 25 mK, with a resolution of 0.02 Å at low temperatures. The main body of the dilatometer is fabricated from a single block of a Be-Cu alloy by electrical discharge milling. This creates an extremely compact high-resolution measuring cell. We have successfully tested and operated dilatometers of this new type with the commonly used physical property measurement system by quantum design, as well as with several other cryogenic refrigeration systems down to 25 mK and in magnetic fields up to 20 T. Here, the capacitance is measured with a commercially available capacitance bridge. Using a piezoelectric rotator from Attocube Systems, the cell can be rotated at T = 25 mK inside of an inner vacuum chamber of 40 mm diameter. The miniaturized design for the one-axis rotation setup allows a rotation of 360°.

  4. A compact and miniaturized high resolution capacitance dilatometer for measuring thermal expansion and magnetostriction.

    PubMed

    Küchler, R; Bauer, T; Brando, M; Steglich, F

    2012-09-01

    We describe the design, construction, calibration, and two different applications of a miniature capacitance dilatometer. The device is suitable for thermal expansion and magnetostriction measurements from 300 K down to about 25 mK, with a resolution of 0.02 Å at low temperatures. The main body of the dilatometer is fabricated from a single block of a Be-Cu alloy by electrical discharge milling. This creates an extremely compact high-resolution measuring cell. We have successfully tested and operated dilatometers of this new type with the commonly used physical property measurement system by quantum design, as well as with several other cryogenic refrigeration systems down to 25 mK and in magnetic fields up to 20 T. Here, the capacitance is measured with a commercially available capacitance bridge. Using a piezoelectric rotator from Attocube Systems, the cell can be rotated at T = 25 mK inside of an inner vacuum chamber of 40 mm diameter. The miniaturized design for the one-axis rotation setup allows a rotation of 360°.

  5. A high resolution DIC technique for measuring small thermal expansion of film specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. G.; Tong, W.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we develop a high-resolution digital image correlation (HRDIC) platform for measuring small thermal deformation of film specimens with some negative factors eliminated which may affect the measurement accuracy, such as image noise, heat radiation and out-of-plane deformation. Firstly, to reduce the image noise level, the images acquired by the high-speed camera at a frame rate of 1000 fps at each temperature are first averaged and then analyzed by linear digital image correlation with bias correction. Secondly, a pneumatic device is added on the one side of the oven to eliminate the distortion effect of heat radiation from the heated oven on acquired images. Finally, by using a reference material with a known coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) with the test sample during the thermal loading and imaging, the effect of out-of-plane deformation on in-plane thermal strain measurement is corrected. Based on above improvements in the experimental set-up and post digital image processing, the proposed HRDIC technique is demonstrated to be able to reliably measure the very low CTEs of thin silicon film and Invar-like material.

  6. High-resolution gamma ray attenuation density measurements on mining exploration drill cores, including cut cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, P.-S.; Bourke, A.

    2017-01-01

    Physical property measurements are increasingly important in mining exploration. For density determinations on rocks, one method applicable on exploration drill cores relies on gamma ray attenuation. This non-destructive method is ideal because each measurement takes only 10 s, making it suitable for high-resolution logging. However calibration has been problematic. In this paper we present new empirical, site-specific correction equations for whole NQ and BQ cores. The corrections force back the gamma densities to the "true" values established by the immersion method. For the NQ core caliber, the density range extends to high values (massive pyrite, 5 g/cm3) and the correction is thought to be very robust. We also present additional empirical correction factors for cut cores which take into account the missing material. These "cut core correction factors", which are not site-specific, were established by making gamma density measurements on truncated aluminum cylinders of various residual thicknesses. Finally we show two examples of application for the Abitibi Greenstone Belt in Canada. The gamma ray attenuation measurement system is part of a multi-sensor core logger which also determines magnetic susceptibility, geochemistry and mineralogy on rock cores, and performs line-scan imaging.

  7. Improved reproducibility of high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography for measurement of bone quality.

    PubMed

    MacNeil, Joshua A; Boyd, Steven K

    2008-07-01

    A human high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography scanner (HR-pQCT) (XtremeCT, Scanco Medical, Switzerland) capable of measuring three important indicators of bone quality (micro-architectural morphology, mineralization and mechanical stiffness) has been developed. The goal of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility of male and female HR-pQCT in vivo measurements, and elucidate the causes of error in these measurements through a comparison with in vitro measurements. The best possible short-term reproducibility was found using a set of 10 in vitro measurements without repositioning, and a set of 10 with repositioning. Subsequently, in vivo measurements were performed on 15 male and 15 female subjects at baseline and follow-ups of 1 week and 4 months to determine the short- and long-term reproducibility of the system. In addition to the 2D area matching method used in the standard evaluation protocol, a custom developed 3D registration method was used to find the common region between repeated scans. The best possible reproducibility without movement artifacts and repositioning error was less than 0.5%, while the reproducibility with repositioning error was less than 1.5%. The in vivo reproducibility of density (<1%), morphological (<4.5%) and stiffness (<3.5) measurements was consistently poorer than the reproducibility of cadaver measurements, presumably due to small movement artifacts and repositioning errors. Using 3D image registration, repositioning error was reduced on average by 23% and 8% for measurements of the radius and tibia sites, respectively. This study has provided bounds for the reproducibility of HR-pQCT to monitor bone quality longitudinally, and a basis for clinical study design to determine detectable changes.

  8. High-resolution photoabsorption cross section measurements of sulfur dioxide between 198 nm and 325 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Glenn; Smith, Peter; Blackie, Douglas; Blackwell-Whitehead, Richard; Pickering, Juliet; Rufus, James; Thorne, Anne

    Accurate photoabsorption cross section data at a range of temperatures are required for the incorporation of sulfur dioxide into atmospheric photochemical models. In addition to its role in the terrestrial atmosphere, sulfur dioxide is observed in significant concentrations in the atmospheres of Venus and Io. Our laboratory measurement program focuses on the very congested SO2 spectrum in the ultraviolet. Using the Imperial College UV Fourier transform spectrometer, we have recorded high-resolution (resolving power (λ/∆λ) = 450,000) absorption spectra in the 198 to 325 nm region over a range of temperatures from 160 K to 295 K. This high resolving power allows resolutions approaching those required to fully resolve the Doppler profile of SO2 in the UV. We have reported absolute photoabsorption cross sections at 295 K [Stark et al., JGR Planets 104, 16585 (1999); Rufus et al. JGR Planets 108, doi:10.1029/2002JE001931,(2003)]. Further measurements, at 160 K in the 198 to 200 nm region and at 195 K in the 220 to 325 nm region, have been recorded and analyzed. We present an overview of our new measured cross sections at temperatures and pressures comparable to those found in planetary atmospheres. This work was supported in part by NASA Grant NNG05GA03G, PPARC (UK), and the Leverhulme Trust.

  9. High-resolution atmospheric water vapor measurements with a scanning differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Späth, F.; Behrendt, A.; Muppa, S. K.; Metzendorf, S.; Riede, A.; Wulfmeyer, V.

    2014-11-01

    The scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH) is presented. The UHOH DIAL is equipped with an injection-seeded frequency-stabilized high-power Ti:sapphire laser operated at 818 nm with a repetition rate of 250 Hz. A scanning transceiver unit with a 80 cm primary mirror receives the atmospheric backscatter signals. The system is capable of water vapor measurements with temporal resolutions of a few seconds and a range resolution between 30 and 300 m at daytime. It allows to investigate surface-vegetation-atmosphere exchange processes with high resolution. In this paper, we present the design of the instrument and illustrate its performance with recent water vapor measurements taken in Stuttgart-Hohenheim and in the frame of the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE). HOPE was located near research center Jülich, in western Germany, in spring 2013 as part of the project "High Definition of Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction" (HD(CP)2). Scanning measurements reveal the 3-dimensional structures of the water vapor field. The influence of uncertainties within the calculation of the absorption cross-section at wavelengths around 818 nm for the WV retrieval is discussed. Radiosonde intercomparisons show a very small bias between the instruments of only (-0.04 ± 0.11) g m-3 or (-1.0 ± 2.3) % in the height range of 0.5 to 3 km.

  10. Measurement of a velocity field in microvessels using a high resolution PIV technique.

    PubMed

    Sugii, Yasuhiko; Nishio, Shigeru; Okamoto, Koji

    2002-10-01

    Because endothelial cells are subject to flow shear stress, it is important to determine the velocity distribution in microvessels during studies of the mechanical interactions between the blood and the endothelium. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a quantitative method for measuring velocity fields instantaneously in experimental fluid mechanics. The authors have developed a high-resolution PIV technique that improves the dynamic flow range, spatial resolution, and measurement accuracy. The proposed method was applied to images of the arteriole in the rat mesentery, using an intravital microscope and high-speed digital video system. Taking the mesentery motion into account, the PIV technique was improved to measure red blood cell (RBC) velocity. Velocity distributions with spatial resolutions of 0.8 3 0.8 mm were obtained even near the wall in the center plane of the arteriole. The arteriole velocity profile was blunt in the center region of the vessel cross-section and sharp in the near-wall region. Typical flow features for non-Newtonian fluid are shown.

  11. Single CMOS sensor system for high resolution double volume measurement applied to membrane distillation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, M. G.; Izquierdo-Gil, M. A.; Sanchez-Reillo, R.; Fernandez-Pineda, C.

    2007-01-01

    Membrane distillation (MD) [1] is a relatively new process that is being investigated world-wide as a low cost, energy saving alternative to conventional separation processes such as distillation and reverse osmosis (RO). This process offers some advantages compared to other more popular separation processes, such as working at room conditions (pressure and temperature); low-grade, waste and/or alternative energy sources such as solar and geothermal energy may be used; a very high level of rejection with inorganic solutions; small equipment can be employed, etc. The driving force in MD processes is the vapor pressure difference across the membrane. A temperature difference is imposed across the membrane, which results in a vapor pressure difference. The principal problem in this kind of system is the accurate measurement of the recipient volume change, especially at very low flows. A cathetometer, with up to 0,05 mm resolution, is the instrument used to take these measurements, but the necessary human intervention makes this instrument not suitable for automated systems. In order to overcome this lack, a high resolution system is proposed, that makes automatic measurements of the volume of both recipients, cold and hot, at a rate of up to 10 times per second.

  12. High resolution acoustic measurement system and beam pattern reconstruction method for bat echolocation emissions.

    PubMed

    Gaudette, Jason E; Kloepper, Laura N; Warnecke, Michaela; Simmons, James A

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of the transmit beam patterns emitted by echolocating bats have previously been limited to cross-sectional planes or averaged over multiple signals using sparse microphone arrays. To date, no high-resolution measurements of individual bat transmit beams have been reported in the literature. Recent studies indicate that bats may change the time-frequency structure of their calls depending on the task, and suggest that their beam patterns are more dynamic than previously thought. To investigate beam pattern dynamics in a variety of bat species, a high-density reconfigurable microphone array was designed and constructed using low-cost ultrasonic microphones and custom electronic circuitry. The planar array is 1.83 m wide by 1.42 m tall with microphones positioned on a 2.54 cm square grid. The system can capture up to 228 channels simultaneously at a 500 kHz sampling rate. Beam patterns are reconstructed in azimuth, elevation, and frequency for visualization and further analysis. Validation of the array measurement system and post-processing functions is shown by reconstructing the beam pattern of a transducer with a fixed circular aperture and comparing the result with a theoretical model. To demonstrate the system in use, transmit beam patterns of the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus, are shown.

  13. Method for local temperature measurement in a nanoreactor for in situ high-resolution electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vendelbo, S B; Kooyman, P J; Creemer, J F; Morana, B; Mele, L; Dona, P; Nelissen, B J; Helveg, S

    2013-10-01

    In situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of solids under reactive gas conditions can be facilitated by microelectromechanical system devices called nanoreactors. These nanoreactors are windowed cells containing nanoliter volumes of gas at ambient pressures and elevated temperatures. However, due to the high spatial confinement of the reaction environment, traditional methods for measuring process parameters, such as the local temperature, are difficult to apply. To address this issue, we devise an electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) method that probes the local temperature of the reaction volume under inspection by the electron beam. The local gas density, as measured using quantitative EELS, is combined with the inherent relation between gas density and temperature, as described by the ideal gas law, to obtain the local temperature. Using this method we determined the temperature gradient in a nanoreactor in situ, while the average, global temperature was monitored by a traditional measurement of the electrical resistivity of the heater. The local gas temperatures had a maximum of 56 °C deviation from the global heater values under the applied conditions. The local temperatures, obtained with the proposed method, are in good agreement with predictions from an analytical model. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. High-resolution blood flow velocity measurements in the human finger.

    PubMed

    Klarhöfer, M; Csapo, B; Balassy, C; Szeles, J C; Moser, E

    2001-04-01

    MR phase contrast blood flow velocity measurements in the human index finger were performed with triggered, nontriggered, and cine acquisition schemes. A strong (G(max) = 200 mT/m), small bore (inner diameter 12 cm) gradient system inserted in a whole body 3 Tesla MR scanner allowed high-resolution imaging at short echo times, which decreases partial volume effects and flow artifacts. Arterial blood flow velocities ranging from 4.9-19 cm/sec were measured, while venous blood flow was significantly slower at 1.5-7.1 cm/sec. Taking into account the corresponding vessel diameters ranging from 800 microm to 1.8 mm, blood flow rates of 3.0-26 ml/min in arteries and 1.2-4.8 ml/min in veins are obtained. The results were compared to ultrasound measurements, resulting in comparable blood flow velocities in the same subjects. Magn Reson Med 45:716-719, 2001. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. UDECON: deconvolution optimization software for restoring high-resolution records from pass-through paleomagnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Chuang; Oda, Hirokuni

    2015-11-01

    The rapid accumulation of continuous paleomagnetic and rock magnetic records acquired from pass-through measurements on superconducting rock magnetometers (SRM) has greatly contributed to our understanding of the paleomagnetic field and paleo-environment. Pass-through measurements are inevitably smoothed and altered by the convolution effect of SRM sensor response, and deconvolution is needed to restore high-resolution paleomagnetic and environmental signals. Although various deconvolution algorithms have been developed, the lack of easy-to-use software has hindered the practical application of deconvolution. Here, we present standalone graphical software UDECON as a convenient tool to perform optimized deconvolution for pass-through paleomagnetic measurements using the algorithm recently developed by Oda and Xuan (Geochem Geophys Geosyst 15:3907-3924, 2014). With the preparation of a format file, UDECON can directly read pass-through paleomagnetic measurement files collected at different laboratories. After the SRM sensor response is determined and loaded to the software, optimized deconvolution can be conducted using two different approaches (i.e., "Grid search" and "Simplex method") with adjustable initial values or ranges for smoothness, corrections of sample length, and shifts in measurement position. UDECON provides a suite of tools to view conveniently and check various types of original measurement and deconvolution data. Multiple steps of measurement and/or deconvolution data can be compared simultaneously to check the consistency and to guide further deconvolution optimization. Deconvolved data together with the loaded original measurement and SRM sensor response data can be saved and reloaded for further treatment in UDECON. Users can also export the optimized deconvolution data to a text file for analysis in other software.

  16. The investigation of active Martian dune fields using very high resolution photogrammetric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungrack; Kim, Younghwi; Park, Minseong

    2016-10-01

    At the present time, arguments continue regarding the migration speeds of Martian dune fields and their correlation with atmospheric circulation. However, precisely measuring the spatial translation of Martian dunes has succeeded only a very few times—for example, in the Nili Patera study (Bridges et al. 2012) using change-detection algorithms and orbital imagery. Therefore, in this study, we developed a generic procedure to precisely measure the migration of dune fields with recently introduced 25-cm resolution orbital imagery specifically using a high-accuracy photogrammetric processor. The processor was designed to trace estimated dune migration, albeit slight, over the Martian surface by 1) the introduction of very high resolution ortho images and stereo analysis based on hierarchical geodetic control for better initial point settings; 2) positioning error removal throughout the sensor model refinement with a non-rigorous bundle block adjustment, which makes possible the co-alignment of all images in a time series; and 3) improved sub-pixel co-registration algorithms using optical flow with a refinement stage conducted on a pyramidal grid processor and a blunder classifier. Moreover, volumetric changes of Martian dunes were additionally traced by means of stereo analysis and photoclinometry. The established algorithms have been tested using high-resolution HIRISE time-series images over several Martian dune fields. Dune migrations were iteratively processed both spatially and volumetrically, and the results were integrated to be compared to the Martian climate model. Migrations over well-known crater dune fields appeared to be almost static for the considerable temporal periods and were weakly correlated with wind directions estimated by the Mars Climate Database (Millour et al. 2015). As a result, a number of measurements over dune fields in the Mars Global Dune Database (Hayward et al. 2014) covering polar areas and mid-latitude will be demonstrated

  17. High Resolution Measurement of Light in Terrestrial Ecosystems Using Photodegrading Dyes

    PubMed Central

    Roales, Javier; Durán, Jorge; Bechtold, Heather A.; Groffman, Peter M.; Rosi-Marshall, Emma J.

    2013-01-01

    Incoming solar radiation is the main determinant of terrestrial ecosystem processes, such as primary production, litter decomposition, or soil mineralization rates. Light in terrestrial ecosystems is spatially and temporally heterogeneous due to the interaction among sunlight angle, cloud cover and tree-canopy structure. To integrate this variability and to know light distribution over time and space, a high number of measurements are needed, but tools to do this are usually expensive and limited. An easy-to-use and inexpensive method that can be used to measure light over time and space is needed. We used two photodegrading fluorescent organic dyes, rhodamine WT (RWT) and fluorescein, for the quantification of light. We measured dye photodegradation as the decrease in fluorescence across an irradiance gradient from full sunlight to deep shade. Then, we correlated it to accumulated light measured with PAR quantum sensors and obtained a model for this behavior. Rhodamine WT and fluorescein photodegradation followed an exponential decay curve with respect to accumulated light. Rhodamine WT degraded slower than fluorescein and remained unaltered after exposure to temperature changes. Under controlled conditions, fluorescence of both dyes decreased when temperatures increased, but returned to its initial values after cooling to the pre-heating temperature, indicating no degradation. RWT and fluorescein can be used to measure light under a varying range of light conditions in terrestrial ecosystems. This method is particularly useful to integrate solar radiation over time and to measure light simultaneously at different locations, and might be a better alternative to the expensive and time consuming traditional light measurement methods. The accuracy, low price and ease of this method make it a powerful tool for intensive sampling of large areas and for developing high resolution maps of light in an ecosystem. PMID:24069440

  18. High resolution measurement of light in terrestrial ecosystems using photodegrading dyes.

    PubMed

    Roales, Javier; Durán, Jorge; Bechtold, Heather A; Groffman, Peter M; Rosi-Marshall, Emma J

    2013-01-01

    Incoming solar radiation is the main determinant of terrestrial ecosystem processes, such as primary production, litter decomposition, or soil mineralization rates. Light in terrestrial ecosystems is spatially and temporally heterogeneous due to the interaction among sunlight angle, cloud cover and tree-canopy structure. To integrate this variability and to know light distribution over time and space, a high number of measurements are needed, but tools to do this are usually expensive and limited. An easy-to-use and inexpensive method that can be used to measure light over time and space is needed. We used two photodegrading fluorescent organic dyes, rhodamine WT (RWT) and fluorescein, for the quantification of light. We measured dye photodegradation as the decrease in fluorescence across an irradiance gradient from full sunlight to deep shade. Then, we correlated it to accumulated light measured with PAR quantum sensors and obtained a model for this behavior. Rhodamine WT and fluorescein photodegradation followed an exponential decay curve with respect to accumulated light. Rhodamine WT degraded slower than fluorescein and remained unaltered after exposure to temperature changes. Under controlled conditions, fluorescence of both dyes decreased when temperatures increased, but returned to its initial values after cooling to the pre-heating temperature, indicating no degradation. RWT and fluorescein can be used to measure light under a varying range of light conditions in terrestrial ecosystems. This method is particularly useful to integrate solar radiation over time and to measure light simultaneously at different locations, and might be a better alternative to the expensive and time consuming traditional light measurement methods. The accuracy, low price and ease of this method make it a powerful tool for intensive sampling of large areas and for developing high resolution maps of light in an ecosystem.

  19. A High Resolution Fourier-Transform Spectrometer for the Measurement of Atmospheric Column Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cageao, R.; Sander, S.; Blavier, J.; Jiang, Y.; Nemtchinov, V.

    2000-01-01

    A compact, high resolution Fourier-transform spectrometer for atmospheric near ultraviolet spectroscopy has been installed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Table Mountain Facility (34.4N, 117.7 W, elevation 2290m).

  20. A High Resolution Fourier-Transform Spectrometer for the Measurement of Atmospheric Column Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cageao, R.; Sander, S.; Blavier, J.; Jiang, Y.; Nemtchinov, V.

    2000-01-01

    A compact, high resolution Fourier-transform spectrometer for atmospheric near ultraviolet spectroscopy has been installed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Table Mountain Facility (34.4N, 117.7 W, elevation 2290m).

  1. High resolution dissolved and dissolvable aluminum measurements along the GEOVIDE section (GEOTRACES section GA01)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achterberg, E. P.; Menzel Barraqueta, J. L.; Schlosser, C.; Planquette, H.; Cheize, M.; Boutorh, J.; Shelley, R.; Sarthou, G.; Gledhill, M.

    2016-02-01

    One of the main aims of the GEOTRACES programme is to investigate the distribution and cycling of key trace elements in the world oceans. Primary importance is given to tracers of oceanic and atmospheric processes, such as dissolved aluminum, which is used to estimate dust deposition rates to the ocean (Measures & Brown, 1996). For this study, samples for dissolved (filtered on 0.2 µm) and dissolvable (unfiltered) Al were collected in the water column at 32 stations in the North Atlantic Ocean along the GEOVIDE section. In addition, high resolution surface water sampling was undertaken. The transatlantic section sampled key areas of the thermohaline circulation, including the Iberian abyssal plain, West European basin, Reykjanes Ridge, Irminger Sea, Greenland margin and Labrador Sea. The transect allowed us the opportunity to assess the influence of outflow waters, boundary currents, shelf and deep water exchanges, hydrothermal vents and scavenging processes on the distribution of dissolved and disolvable dAl. Sample analysis was undertaken using a fluorometric technique with flow injection (Brown&Bruland 2008) and validated through SAFE and GEOTRACES reference seawater analysis. The results have provided insights into the sources and distribution of dissolved and dissolvable Al in the North Atlantic and the micronutrient aerosol deposition rates inferred from the dissolved Al measurements.

  2. Simultaneous high-resolution measurement of mitochondrial respiration and hydrogen peroxide production.

    PubMed

    Krumschnabel, Gerhard; Fontana-Ayoub, Mona; Sumbalova, Zuzana; Heidler, Juliana; Gauper, Kathrin; Fasching, Mario; Gnaiger, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiration is associated with the formation of reactive oxygen species, primarily in the form of superoxide (O2 (•-)) and particularly hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Since H2O2 plays important roles in physiology and pathology, measurement of hydrogen peroxide has received considerable attention over many years. Here we describe how the well-established Amplex Red assay can be used to detect H2O2 production in combination with the simultaneous assessment of mitochondrial bioenergetics by high-resolution respirometry. Fundamental instrumental and methodological parameters were optimized for analysis of the effects of various substrate, uncoupler, and inhibitor titrations (SUIT) on respiration versus H2O2 production. The sensitivity of the H2O2 assay was strongly influenced by compounds contained in different mitochondrial respiration media, which also exerted significant effects on chemical background fluorescence changes. Near linearity of the fluorescence signal was restricted to narrow ranges of accumulating resorufin concentrations independent of the nature of mitochondrial respiration media. Finally, we show an application example using isolated mouse brain mitochondria as an experimental model for the simultaneous measurement of mitochondrial respiration and H2O2 production in SUIT protocols.

  3. Dynamic maximum urethral closure pressures measured by high-resolution manometry increase markedly after sling surgery.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Anna C; Tan-Kim, Jasmine; Nager, Charles W

    2015-06-01

    The premise of midurethral sling (MUS) surgery is to apply a tension-free vaginal tape in the midurethra that does not constrict the urethra at rest but stabilizes the urethra and prevents downward descent and opening of the urethra during stress maneuvers, but current technology has limitations in measuring urethral pressures during dynamic conditions. Our objective was to describe the change in maximum urethral closure pressures (MUCPs) after MUS surgery using an 8F high-resolution manometry (HRM) system that can measure urethral pressures during cough and strain maneuvers (ManoScan® ESO; Covidien) without migration or withdrawal limitations. We measured rest, cough, and strain MUCPs in 26 women before and after retropubic or transobturator MUS for stress urinary incontinence using the HRM system. The objective success rate after MUS was 92.3 % based on postoperative cough stress testing. Mean resting MUCPs measured by HRM did not change after surgery (59.3 before vs. 59.7 cm H2O after surgery; p = 1.0). Mean cough MUCPs measured by HRM increased from 36.9 to 100.7 cm H2O (p < 0.001), and strain MUCPs increased from 35.0 to 92.7 cm H2O (p < 0.001). Advanced HRM technology to measure MUCPs under cough and strain conditions without withdrawal techniques provides new insights into the continence mechanism after tension-free MUS: MUCPs do not change at rest but do increase significantly during cough and strain maneuvers.

  4. Angle-resolved effective potentials for disk-shaped molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, Thomas; Palczynski, Karol; Dzubiella, Joachim; Klapp, Sabine H. L.

    2014-12-01

    We present an approach for calculating coarse-grained angle-resolved effective pair potentials for uniaxial molecules. For integrating out the intramolecular degrees of freedom we apply umbrella sampling and steered dynamics techniques in atomistically-resolved molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Throughout this study we focus on disk-like molecules such as coronene. To develop the methods we focus on integrating out the van der Waals and intramolecular interactions, while electrostatic charge contributions are neglected. The resulting coarse-grained pair potential reveals a strong temperature and angle dependence. In the next step we fit the numerical data with various Gay-Berne-like potentials to be used in more efficient simulations on larger scales. The quality of the resulting coarse-grained results is evaluated by comparing their pair and many-body structure as well as some thermodynamic quantities self-consistently to the outcome of atomistic MD simulations of many-particle systems. We find that angle-resolved potentials are essential not only to accurately describe crystal structures but also for fluid systems where simple isotropic potentials start to fail already for low to moderate packing fractions. Further, in describing these states it is crucial to take into account the pronounced temperature dependence arising in selected pair configurations due to bending fluctuations.

  5. Angle-resolved effective potentials for disk-shaped molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, Thomas Klapp, Sabine H. L.; Palczynski, Karol Dzubiella, Joachim

    2014-12-07

    We present an approach for calculating coarse-grained angle-resolved effective pair potentials for uniaxial molecules. For integrating out the intramolecular degrees of freedom we apply umbrella sampling and steered dynamics techniques in atomistically-resolved molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Throughout this study we focus on disk-like molecules such as coronene. To develop the methods we focus on integrating out the van der Waals and intramolecular interactions, while electrostatic charge contributions are neglected. The resulting coarse-grained pair potential reveals a strong temperature and angle dependence. In the next step we fit the numerical data with various Gay-Berne-like potentials to be used in more efficient simulations on larger scales. The quality of the resulting coarse-grained results is evaluated by comparing their pair and many-body structure as well as some thermodynamic quantities self-consistently to the outcome of atomistic MD simulations of many-particle systems. We find that angle-resolved potentials are essential not only to accurately describe crystal structures but also for fluid systems where simple isotropic potentials start to fail already for low to moderate packing fractions. Further, in describing these states it is crucial to take into account the pronounced temperature dependence arising in selected pair configurations due to bending fluctuations.

  6. Angle-resolved effective potentials for disk-shaped molecules.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Thomas; Palczynski, Karol; Dzubiella, Joachim; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2014-12-07

    We present an approach for calculating coarse-grained angle-resolved effective pair potentials for uniaxial molecules. For integrating out the intramolecular degrees of freedom we apply umbrella sampling and steered dynamics techniques in atomistically-resolved molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Throughout this study we focus on disk-like molecules such as coronene. To develop the methods we focus on integrating out the van der Waals and intramolecular interactions, while electrostatic charge contributions are neglected. The resulting coarse-grained pair potential reveals a strong temperature and angle dependence. In the next step we fit the numerical data with various Gay-Berne-like potentials to be used in more efficient simulations on larger scales. The quality of the resulting coarse-grained results is evaluated by comparing their pair and many-body structure as well as some thermodynamic quantities self-consistently to the outcome of atomistic MD simulations of many-particle systems. We find that angle-resolved potentials are essential not only to accurately describe crystal structures but also for fluid systems where simple isotropic potentials start to fail already for low to moderate packing fractions. Further, in describing these states it is crucial to take into account the pronounced temperature dependence arising in selected pair configurations due to bending fluctuations.

  7. Patterning pallet arrays for cell selection based on high-resolution measurements of fluorescent biosensors.

    PubMed

    Shadpour, Hamed; Zawistowski, Jon S; Herman, Annadele; Hahn, Klaus; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2011-06-24

    Pallet arrays enable cells to be separated while they remain adherent to a surface and provide a much greater range of cell selection criteria relative to that of current technologies. However there remains a need to further broaden cell selection criteria to include dynamic intracellular signaling events. To demonstrate the feasibility of measuring cellular protein behavior on the arrays using high resolution microscopy, the surfaces of individual pallets were modified to minimize the impact of scattered light at the pallet edges. The surfaces of the three-dimensional pallets on an array were patterned with a coating such as fibronectin using a customized stamping tool. Micropatterns of varying shape and size were printed in designated regions on the pallets in single or multiple steps to demonstrate the reliability and precision of patterning molecules on the pallet surface. Use of a fibronectin matrix stamped at the center of each pallet permitted the localization of H1299 and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells to the pallet centers and away from the edges. Compared to pallet arrays with fibronectin coating the entire top surface, arrays with a central fibronectin pattern increased the percentage of cells localized to the pallet center by 3-4-fold. Localization of cells to the pallet center also enabled the physical separation of cells from optical artifacts created by the rough pallet side walls. To demonstrate the measurement of dynamic intracellular signaling on the arrays, fluorescence measurements of high spatial resolution were performed using a RhoA GTPase biosensor. This biosensor utilized fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to measure localized RhoA activity in cellular ruffles at the cell periphery. These results demonstrated the ability to perform spatially resolved measurements of fluorescence-based sensors on the pallet arrays. Thus, the patterned pallet arrays

  8. Patterning pallet arrays for cell selection based on high-resolution measurements of fluorescent biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Shadpour, Hamed; Zawistowski, Jon S.; Herman, Annadele; Hahn, Klaus; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    Pallet arrays enable cells to be separated while they remain adherent to a surface and provide a much greater range of cell selection criteria relative to that of current technologies. However there remains a need to further broaden cell selection criteria to include dynamic intracellular signaling events. To demonstrate the feasibility of measuring cellular protein behavior on the arrays using high resolution microscopy, the surfaces of individual pallets were modified to minimize the impact of scattered light at the pallet edges. The surfaces of the three-dimensional pallets on an array were patterned with a coating such as fibronectin using a customized stamping tool. Micropatterns of varying shape and size were printed in designated regions on the pallets in single or multiple steps to demonstrate the reliability and precision of patterning molecules on the pallet surface. Use of a fibronectin matrix stamped at the center of each pallet permitted the localization of H1299 and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells to the pallet centers and away from the edges. Compared to pallet arrays with fibronection coating the entire top surface, arrays with a central fibronectin pattern increased the percentage of cells localized to the pallet center by 3-4 fold. Localization of cells to the pallet center also enabled the physical separation of cells from optical artifacts created by the rough pallet side walls. To demonstrate the measurement of dynamic intracellular signaling on the arrays, fluorescence measurements of high spatial resolution were performed using a RhoA GTPase biosensor. This biosensor utilized fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to measure localized RhoA activity in cellular ruffles at the cell periphery. These results demonstrated the ability to perform spatially resolved measurements of fluorescence-based sensors on the pallet arrays. Thus, the patterned pallet

  9. Using High-Resolution Hand-Held Radiometers To Measure In-Situ Thermal Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burch, Douglas M.; Krintz, Donald F.

    1984-03-01

    A field study was carried out to investigate the accuracy of using high-resolution radiometers to determine the in situ thermal resistance of building components having conventional residential construction. Two different types of radiometers were used to determine the thermal resistances of the walls of six test buildings located at the National Bureau of Standards. These radiometer thermal resistance measurements were compared to reference thermal resistance values determined from steady-state series resistance predictions, time-averaged heat-flow-sensor measurements, and guarded-hot-box measurements. When measurements were carried out 5 hours after sunset when the outdoor temperature was relatively steady and the heating plant was operated in a typical cyclic fashion, the following results were obtained: for lightweight wood-frame cavity walls, the radiometer procedures were found to distinguish wall thermal resistance 4.4 h.ft2- °F/Btu (0.77 m2•K/W) systematically higher than corresponding reference values. Such a discrimination will per-mit insulated and uninsulated walls to be distinguished. However, in the case of walls having large heat capacity (e.g., masonry and log), thermal storage effects produced large time lags between the outdoor diurnal temperature variation and the heat-flow response at the inside surface. This phenomenon caused radiometer thermal resistances to deviate substantially from corresponding reference values. This study recommends that the ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 101-1981 be modified requiring the heating plant to be operated in a typical cyclic fashion instead of being turned off prior to and during radiometer measurements.

  10. Measurement of Dynamic Urethral Pressures with a High Resolution Manometry System in Continent and Incontinent Women

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Anna C; Tan-Kim, Jasmine; Nager, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is caused by urethral dysfunction during dynamic conditions, but current technology has limitations in measuring urethral pressures under dynamic conditions. An 8-French high resolution manometry catheter (HRM) currently in clinical use in gastroenterology may accurately measure urethral pressures under dynamic conditions because it has a 25ms response rate and circumferential pressure sensors along the length of the catheter (ManoScan® ESO, Given Imaging). We evaluated the concordance, repeatability, and tolerability of this catheter. Methods We measured resting, cough, and strain maximum urethral closure pressures (MUCPs) using HRM and measured resting MUCPs with water perfusion side-hole catheter urethral pressure profilometry (UPP) in 37 continent and 28 stress incontinent subjects. Maneuvers were repeated after moving the HRM catheter along the urethral length to evaluate whether results depend on catheter positioning. Visual analog pain scores evaluated the comfort of HRM compared to UPP. Results The correlation coefficient for resting MUCPs measured by HRM vs. UPP was high (r = 0.79, p<0.001). Repeatability after catheter repositioning was high for rest, cough, and strain with HRM: r= 0.92, 0.89, and 0.89. Mean MUCPs (rest, cough, strain) were higher in continent than incontinent subjects (all p < 0.001) and decreased more in incontinent subjects than continent subjects during cough and strain maneuvers compared to rest. Conclusions This preliminary study shows that HRM is concordant with standard technology, repeatable, and well tolerated in the urethra. Incontinent women have more impairment of their urethral closure pressures during cough and strain than continent women. PMID:25185595

  11. High resolution measurements of aerial rainfall with X-band radars in New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland-Stacey, Luke; Shucksmith, Paul; Austin, Geoff

    2010-05-01

    The Atmospheric Physics Group runs a number of high resolution X-band mobile rain radars. The radars are unusual in that they operate at very high spatial and temporal resolution but short range (100m/20sec/20km) as compared with the C-band radars of the New Zealand Meteorological Service (2km/7min/240km). Portability was a key design criterion for the radars, which can either be towed by a personal four wheel drive vehicle or carted by a container truck. Past deployments include the slopes of an erupting volcano, the path of a tropical storm and overwintering in a mountain range. It is well known that sampling and representativeness problems associated with sparse gauge networks and C-band radars can result in high uncertainty in estimates of aerial rainfall. Some of this error is associated with poor sampling of the spatial and temporal scales which are important to precipitation processes. In the case of long range radar, the beam height increase with range also introduces uncertainty when trying to infer precipitation at the ground, even after reflectivity profile correction methods are applied. This paper describes a recently completed field campaign in a hydro power catchment in the North Island of New Zealand. The radar was deployed in a pasture on a farm overlooking the catchment which is about 15km x 10km in size. The catchment is about 150km from the nearest national C-band radar. A number of rain gauges, including high resolution drop counters, were deployed nearby. X-band and comparative C-band radar observations of particular events including orographically initiated convection, frontal systems and widespread rain types are presented. The convective events are characterised by short length scales and rapid evolution, but even the widespread rain has embedded structure. The observations indicate that the evolution time and spatial scales associated with many of the hydrometeors observed in this work precludes aerial estimates being made with sparse

  12. Measurement of ciliary beat frequency using ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jason J.; Jing, Joseph C.; Su, Erica; Badger, Christopher; Coughlan, Carolyn A.; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2016-02-01

    Ciliated epithelial cells populate up to 80% of the surface area of the human airway and are responsible for mucociliary transport, which is the key protective mechanism that provides the first line of defense in the respiratory tract. Cilia beat in a rhythmic pattern and may be easily affected by allergens, pollutants, and pathogens, altering ciliary beat frequency (CBF) subsequently. Diseases including cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and primary ciliary dyskinesia may also decrease CBF. CBF is therefore a critical component of respiratory health. The current clinical method of measuring CBF is phase-contrast microscopy, which involves a tissue biopsy obtained via brushing of the nasal cavity. While this method is minimally invasive, the tissue sample must be oriented to display its profile view, making the visualization of a single layer of cilia challenging. In addition, the conventional method requires subjective analysis of CBF, e.g., manually counting by visual inspection. On the contrary, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used to study the retina in ophthalmology as well as vasculature in cardiology, and offers higher resolution than conventional computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Based on this technology, our lab specifically developed an ultra-high resolution OCT system to image the microstructure of the ciliated epithelial cells. Doppler analysis was also performed to determine CBF. Lastly, we also developed a program that utilizes fast Fourier transform to determine CBF under phase-contrast microscopy, providing a more objective method compared to the current method.

  13. Spatial variability of the Black Sea surface temperature from high resolution modeling and satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizyuk, Artem; Senderov, Maxim; Korotaev, Gennady

    2016-04-01

    Large number of numerical ocean models were implemented for the Black Sea basin during last two decades. They reproduce rather similar structure of synoptical variability of the circulation. Since 00-s numerical studies of the mesoscale structure are carried out using high performance computing (HPC). With the growing capacity of computing resources it is now possible to reconstruct the Black Sea currents with spatial resolution of several hundreds meters. However, how realistic these results can be? In the proposed study an attempt is made to understand which spatial scales are reproduced by ocean model in the Black Sea. Simulations are made using parallel version of NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean). A two regional configurations with spatial resolutions 5 km and 2.5 km are described. Comparison of the SST from simulations with two spatial resolutions shows rather qualitative difference of the spatial structures. Results of high resolution simulation are compared also with satellite observations and observation-based products from Copernicus using spatial correlation and spectral analysis. Spatial scales of correlations functions for simulated and observed SST are rather close and differs much from satellite SST reanalysis. Evolution of spectral density for modelled SST and reanalysis showed agreed time periods of small scales intensification. Using of the spectral analysis for satellite measurements is complicated due to gaps. The research leading to this results has received funding from Russian Science Foundation (project № 15-17-20020)

  14. A modularized infrared light matrix system with high resolution for measuring animal behaviors.

    PubMed

    Young, M S; Li, Y C; Lin, M T

    1993-03-01

    The current study provides a new modularized infrared light matrix system (about $200 cost) which is designed to measure the horizontal gross or fine movements, vertical motion, clockwise or anticlockwise turnings, freezing time, and total distance traveled in rats. The system records the sequences of animal's activity in a computer-aided system with a resolution of 0.2 s in time or 1.6 cm in space, and permanently stores all the resulting data in file. The behavioral apparatus was tested for its sensitivity and usability by amphetamine-injected rats. It was found that intraperitoneal administration of amphetamine (1.25-2.50 mg/kg), but not normal saline, produced a dose-related increase in either the horizontal gross or fine movements, vertical motion, clockwise or anticlockwise turnings, or total distance traveled. However, amphetamine injections produced a dose-related decrease in freezing time. Apparently, most of the amphetamine-induced responses obtained by other detecting apparatus can be reproduced easily by the present apparatus. The current detection system possesses the following advantages: a) high resolution, b) high expansion potential, and c) precise and simplified algorithms for behavioral parameter analysis.

  15. New method for measuring myocardial blood flow by high resolution scintigraphy in the excised dog heart.

    PubMed

    Hung, C Y; Burow, R D; Scherlag, B J; Basmadjian, G P; Lazzara, R

    1986-10-01

    The standard method for measuring myocardial blood flow (MBF) with radioactive microspheres requires processing of selected tissue samples usually from the excised heart, and consequent loss of exact relation to myocardial morphology. A computer-based image processing method was developed by using [99mTc]microspheres (mean particle size 20 microns) for quantitative analysis of MBF in 25 dogs. A computer-controlled gamma camera was used to obtain the images of radioactive microsphere distribution in transaxial slices of the ex vivo heart. Any portion of these slice images could be quantitated by using a computer program based on modification of the formula for determining MBF by the standard microsphere method. Regional myocardial perfusion calculated by this technique correlated well with values obtained with reference microspheres (r = 0.96) over a broad range of MBF. The results show that our new method, accurately and with high resolution, delineated zones of differing MBF and confirmed the increase of MBF in surviving myocardium with healing.

  16. New method for measuring myocardial blood flow by high resolution scintigraphy in the excised dog heart

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, C.Y.; Burow, R.D.; Scherlag, B.J.; Basmadjian, G.P.; Lazzara, R.

    1986-10-01

    The standard method for measuring myocardial blood flow (MBF) with radioactive microspheres requires processing of selected tissue samples usually from the excised heart, and consequent loss of exact relation to myocardial morphology. A computer-based image processing method was developed by using (99mTc)microspheres (mean particle size 20 microns) for quantitative analysis of MBF in 25 dogs. A computer-controlled gamma camera was used to obtain the images of radioactive microsphere distribution in transaxial slices of the ex vivo heart. Any portion of these slice images could be quantitated by using a computer program based on modification of the formula for determining MBF by the standard microsphere method. Regional myocardial perfusion calculated by this technique correlated well with values obtained with reference microspheres (r = 0.96) over a broad range of MBF. The results show that our new method, accurately and with high resolution, delineated zones of differing MBF and confirmed the increase of MBF in surviving myocardium with healing.

  17. Consistency in the long-term environmental measurements with NOAA: Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciren, Pubu; Cao, Changyong; Sullivan, Jerry

    2006-08-01

    Lone-term satellite observations, such as Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), provide an irreplaceable means in monitoring Earth system through a series of satellites. However, to be able to detect the signal related to climate change, one of the critical requirements is the consistency and stability of calibration among the satellites. Applying Simultaneous Nadir Overpass (SNOs) method (Cao et al., 2002)., we fully accessed instrument-related consistency of AVHRR measurements covering all channels (from visible to IR) and time period from 1978 to 2003. It is seen that the inter-satellite biases in visible channels (channel 1 and 2) show larger inconsistency among satellites especially between NOAA-14 and NOAA-12. The inconsistency is shown as both the large bias and trend in the biases, mostly due to the lack of onboard calibration. Comparatively, the biases in IR channels, i.e., channel 4 and 5 are generally smaller, there are within +/- 1 k. However, the difference in the magnitude of the biases among satellites and the dependence of biases on the scene temperature may affect the quality of long term trend derived from such dataset. Analyses of bias root causes indicate that the effect from the difference in Spectral Response Function may not be large enough to account for the observed biases.

  18. High resolution measurement of neutron inelastic scattering cross-sections for 23Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouki, C.; Archier, P.; Borcea, C.; De Saint Jean, C.; Drohé, J. C.; Kopecky, S.; Moens, A.; Nankov, N.; Negret, A.; Noguère, G.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Stanoiu, M.

    2012-04-01

    The neutron inelastic scattering cross-section of 23Na has been measured in response to the relevant request of the OECD-NEA High Priority Request List, which requires a target uncertainty of 4% in the energy range up to 1.35 MeV for the development of sodium-cooled fast reactors. The measurement was performed at the GELINA facility with the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS), featuring eight high purity germanium detectors. The setup is installed at a 200 m flight path from the neutron source and provides high resolution measurements using the (n,n'γ)-technique. The sample was an 80 mm diameter metallic sodium disk prepared at IRMM. Transitions up to the seventh excited state were observed and the differential gamma cross-sections at 110° and 150° were measured, showing mostly isotropic gamma emission. From these the gamma production, level and inelastic cross-sections were determined for neutron energies up to 3838.9 keV. The results agree well with the existing data and the evaluated nuclear data libraries in the low energies, and provide new experimental points in the little studied region above 2 MeV. Following a detailed review of the methodology used for the gamma efficiency calibrations and flux normalization of GAINS data, an estimated total uncertainty of 2.2% was achieved for the inelastic cross-section integrals over the energy ranges 0.498-1.35 MeV and 1.35-2.23 MeV, meeting the required targets.

  19. Accuracy of high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography for measurement of bone quality.

    PubMed

    MacNeil, Joshua A; Boyd, Steven K

    2007-12-01

    The introduction of three-dimensional high-resolution peripheral in vivo quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) (XtremeCT, Scanco Medical, Switzerland; voxel size 82 microm) provides a new approach to monitor micro-architectural bone changes longitudinally. The accuracy of HR-pQCT for three important determinants of bone quality, including bone mineral density (BMD), architectural measurements and bone mechanics, was determined through a comparison with micro-computed tomography (microCT) and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Forty measurements from 10 cadaver radii with low bone mass were scanned using the three modalities, and image registration was used for 3D data to ensure identical regions were analyzed. The areal BMD of DXA correlated well with volumetric BMD by HR-pQCT despite differences in dimensionality (R(2) = 0.69), and the correlation improved when non-dimensional bone mineral content was assessed (R(2) = 0.80). Morphological parameters measured by HR-pQCT in a standard patient analysis, including bone volume ratio, trabecular number, derived trabecular thickness, derived trabecular separation, and cortical thickness correlated well with muCT measures (R(2) = 0.59-0.96). Additionally, some non-metric parameters such as connectivity density (R(2) = 0.90) performed well. The mechanical stiffness assessed by finite element analysis of HR-pQCT images was generally higher than for microCT data due to resolution differences, and correlated well at the continuum level (R(2) = 0.73). The validation here of HR-pQCT against gold-standards microCT and DXA provides insight into the accuracy of the system, and suggests that in addition to the standard patient protocol, additional indices of bone quality including connectivity density and mechanical stiffness may be appropriate to include as part of a standard patient analysis for clinical monitoring of bone quality.

  20. High-resolution surface connectivity measurements and runoff dynamics in five urban watersheds in Knoxville, TN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epps, T.

    2015-12-01

    Impervious surfaces and stormwater drainage networks transmit rainfall quickly to urban stream systems with greater frequency, volume, energy, and pollutant loadings than in predevelopment conditions. This has a well-established negative impact on stream ecology, channel morphology, and water quality. Green infrastructure retrofits for urban drainage systems promote more natural hydrologic pathways by disconnecting concentrated flows. However, they are expensive due to high land costs and physical constraints. If a systematic strategy for siting green infrastructure is sought to restore natural flows throughout an urban catchment, greater knowledge of the drainage patterns and areas contributing frequent surface runoff is necessary. Five diverse urban watersheds in Knoxville, TN, were assessed using high-resolution topography, land cover, and artificial drainage network data to identify how surface connectivity differs among watersheds and contributes to altered flow regimes. Rainfall-runoff patterns were determined from continuous rainfall and streamflow monitoring over the previous ten years. Fine-scale flowpath connectivity of impervious surfaces was measured by both a binary approach and by a method incorporating runoff potential by saturation excess. The effect of the spatial distribution of connected surfaces was investigated by incorporating several distance-weighting schema along established urban drainage flowpaths. Statistical relationships between runoff generation and connectivity were measured to determine the ability of these different measures of connectivity to predict runoff thresholds, frequency, volumes, and peak flows. Initial results suggest that rapid assessment of connected surficial flowpaths can be used to identify known green infrastructure assets and highly connected impervious areas and that the differences in connectivity measured between watersheds reflects differing runoff patterns observed in monitored data.

  1. High-Resolution X-Ray and Light Beam Induced Current (LBIC) Measurements of Multcrystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Budai, John D; Bennett, Charlee J C; Tischler, Jonathan Zachary; Duty, Chad E; Yelundur, V.; Rohatgi, A.

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution, spatially-resolved x-ray Laue patterns and high-resolution light beam induced current (LBIC) measurements are combined to study two multicrystalline solar cells made from the Heat Exchanger Method (HEM) and the Sting Ribbon Growth technique. The LBIC measurements were made at 4 different wavelengths (488, 633, 780, and 980 nm), resulting in penetration depths ranging from <1 {mu}m to >100 {mu}m. There is a strong correlation between the x-ray and LBIC measurements, showing that some twins and grain boundaries are effective in the reduction of local quantum efficiency, while others are benign.

  2. Differential membrane-based nanocalorimeter for high-resolution measurements of low-temperature specific heat.

    PubMed

    Tagliati, S; Krasnov, V M; Rydh, A

    2012-05-01

    A differential, membrane-based nanocalorimeter for general specific heat studies of very small samples, ranging from 0.5 mg to sub-μg in mass, is described. The calorimeter operates over the temperature range from above room temperature down to 0.5 K. It consists of a pair of cells, each of which is a stack of heaters and thermometer in the center of a silicon nitride membrane, in total giving a background heat capacity less than 100 nJ/K at 300 K, decreasing to 10 pJ/K at 1 K. The device has several distinctive features: (i) The resistive thermometer, made of a Ge(1 - x)Au(x) alloy, displays a high dimensionless sensitivity ∣dlnR∕dlnT∣ ≳ 1 over the entire temperature range. (ii) The sample is placed in direct contact with the thermometer, which is allowed to self-heat. The thermometer can thus be operated at high dc current to increase the resolution. (iii) Data are acquired with a set of eight synchronized lock-in amplifiers measuring dc, 1st and 2nd harmonic signals of heaters and thermometer. This gives high resolution and allows continuous output adjustments without additional noise. (iv) Absolute accuracy is achieved via a variable-frequency-fixed-phase technique in which the measurement frequency is automatically adjusted during the measurements to account for the temperature variation of the sample heat capacity and the device thermal conductance. The performance of the calorimeter is illustrated by studying the heat capacity of a small Au sample and the specific heat of a 2.6 μg piece of superconducting Pb in various magnetic fields.

  3. Temperature measurements and high-resolution IR images of mines at an arid site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trang, Anh H.; Baertlein, Brian A.

    2004-09-01

    During May and June of 2003, the US Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) and the Ohio State University (OSU) measured the thermal behavior of mines in an arid site. Thermistors were placed in contact with both surface-laid mines and native stones and monitored from before sunset until well after sundown. Measurements of local vegetation and measurements of the surrounding soil at 2.5 and 5 cm depths were also performed. A tripod-mounted MWIR sensor was used concurrently to collect high-resolution images to identify and understand the underlying phenomena. Data were collected during both clear, sunlit conditions and during an overcast day, but because of space limitations only data acquired under the (more typical) clear conditions are described here. The results contain a number of findings. First, local soil properties appear to have important implications for the apparent mine contrast. The same type of mine at locations only a few meters apart can show significantly different contrast with the native soil. Second, natural phenomena can be a significant clutter source. The temperature of vegetation can be similar to that of mines, and a small plant will occasionally produce a signature with a shape similar to that of a surface mine. Native stones are also a source of false alarms, but they tend to show somewhat less contrast. Third, at certain times, mines are best viewed with a low-elevation angle sensor. The construction of some mines causes the temperature of the side walls to be significantly different from that of the top surface at those times. Finally, disturbing the surface of desert soil through excavation, vehicle traffic or even repeated pedestrian traffic is often sufficient to produce a strong thermal signature. This fact could be used to advantage to detect buried mines in desert environments.

  4. Differential membrane-based nanocalorimeter for high-resolution measurements of low-temperature specific heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliati, S.; Krasnov, V. M.; Rydh, A.

    2012-05-01

    A differential, membrane-based nanocalorimeter for general specific heat studies of very small samples, ranging from 0.5 mg to sub-μg in mass, is described. The calorimeter operates over the temperature range from above room temperature down to 0.5 K. It consists of a pair of cells, each of which is a stack of heaters and thermometer in the center of a silicon nitride membrane, in total giving a background heat capacity less than 100 nJ/K at 300 K, decreasing to 10 pJ/K at 1 K. The device has several distinctive features: (i) The resistive thermometer, made of a Ge1 - xAux alloy, displays a high dimensionless sensitivity |dlnR/dlnT| ≳ 1 over the entire temperature range. (ii) The sample is placed in direct contact with the thermometer, which is allowed to self-heat. The thermometer can thus be operated at high dc current to increase the resolution. (iii) Data are acquired with a set of eight synchronized lock-in amplifiers measuring dc, 1st and 2nd harmonic signals of heaters and thermometer. This gives high resolution and allows continuous output adjustments without additional noise. (iv) Absolute accuracy is achieved via a variable-frequency-fixed-phase technique in which the measurement frequency is automatically adjusted during the measurements to account for the temperature variation of the sample heat capacity and the device thermal conductance. The performance of the calorimeter is illustrated by studying the heat capacity of a small Au sample and the specific heat of a 2.6 μg piece of superconducting Pb in various magnetic fields.

  5. A high-resolution spectropolarimetric survey of Herbig Ae/Be stars - I. Observations and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alecian, E.; Wade, G. A.; Catala, C.; Grunhut, J. H.; Landstreet, J. D.; Bagnulo, S.; Böhm, T.; Folsom, C. P.; Marsden, S.; Waite, I.

    2013-02-01

    This is the first in a series of papers in which we describe and report the analysis of a large survey of Herbig Ae/Be stars in circular spectropolarimetry. Using the ESPaDOnS and Narval high-resolution spectropolarimeters at the Canada-France-Hawaii and Bernard Lyot Telescopes, respectively, we have acquired 132 circularly polarized spectra of 70 Herbig Ae/Be stars and Herbig candidates. The large majority of these spectra are characterized by a resolving power of about 65 000, and a spectral coverage from about 3700 Å to 1 μm. The peak signal-to-noise ratio per CCD pixel ranges from below 100 (for the faintest targets) to over 1000 (for the brightest). The observations were acquired with the primary aim of searching for magnetic fields in these objects. However, our spectra are suitable for a variety of other important measurements, including rotational properties, variability, binarity, chemical abundances, circumstellar environment conditions and structure, etc. In this paper, we describe the sample selection, the observations and their reduction, and the measurements that will comprise the basis of much of our following analysis. We describe the determination of fundamental parameters for each target. We detail the least-squares deconvolution (LSD) that we have applied to each of our spectra, including the selection, editing and tuning of the LSD line masks. We describe the fitting of the LSD Stokes I profiles using a multicomponent model that yields the rotationally broadened photospheric profile (providing the projected rotational velocity and radial velocity for each observation) as well as circumstellar emission and absorption components. Finally, we diagnose the longitudinal Zeeman effect via the measured circular polarization, and report the longitudinal magnetic field and Stokes V Zeeman signature detection probability. As an appendix, we provide a detailed review of each star observed.

  6. High-resolution Measurement Of Magnetic Anomalies With An Unmanned Airship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzke, M.; Hofmeister, P.; Auster, H.; Hoerdt, A.; Glassmeier, K.

    2011-12-01

    High-resolution magnetic mapping of areas is a suitable way to determine location, geometry and physical parameters of disturbing objects that cause magnetic anomalies. Areas are often difficult to walk and handheld measurements can become costly. It can also be dangerous to enter areas where ordnance is suspected. In these cases it may be advantageous to use an aircraft to perform the measurement. We use a 6.5 m long unmanned airship. Compared to helicopters or gyrocopters, an advantage is that the damage in case of hazards is almost negligible. We made considerable efforts to construct a system that is easy to control without intense training under moderate wind conditions (up to 2 m/s wind speed). The airship has a mass of 10 kg and is powered by four electric motors with a maximum total power of 4.8 kW. Two of the rotors are used to control the altitude of the ship; the other two can be used to control direction and speed. The required energy is provided by four 4S1P Lithium-Polymer battery packs. Batteries are designed to provide a maximum of 125 A at 14.8 V. They have a capacity of 0.3 kWh and can be recharged in 20 minutes. The airship carries a differential GPS receiver that measures the position of the airship at 100 Hz with a precision of 10 cm. The distance to the ground is measured with ultrasonic sensors. A fluxgate magnetometer measures the magnetic field with an accuracy of 1 nT, also at 100 Hz. The flight path does not follow a rigid measuring grid but is a random walk, with roughly constant altitude to achieve a mean sensor position of 2 m above the ground. Thus, near-surface disturbing bodies are well resolved if their distance from each other is greater than 4 m. First measurements demonstrate the feasibility of the system. Future applications will be mid-scale measurements which are too large or too cumbersome for handheld measurements, and too small to justify the use of a manned helicopter.

  7. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of the insulating NaxWO3: Anderson localization, polaron formation, and remnant Fermi surface.

    PubMed

    Raj, S; Hashimoto, D; Matsui, H; Souma, S; Sato, T; Takahashi, T; Sarma, D D; Mahadevan, Priya; Oishi, S

    2006-04-14

    The electronic structure of the insulating sodium tungsten bronze, Na(0.025)WO(3), is investigated by high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We find that near-E(F) states are localized due to the strong disorder arising from random distribution of Na+ ions in the WO(3) lattice, which makes the system insulating. The temperature dependence of photoemission spectra provides direct evidence for polaron formation. The remnant Fermi surface of the insulator is found to be the replica of the real Fermi surface in the metallic system.

  8. Band splitting and Weyl nodes in trigonal tellurium studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, K.; Kuno, M.; Yamauchi, K.; Souma, S.; Sugawara, K.; Oguchi, T.; Sato, T.; Takahashi, T.

    2017-03-01

    We have performed high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) on trigonal tellurium consisting of helical chains in the crystal. Through the band-structure mapping in the three-dimensional Brillouin zone, we found a definitive evidence for the band splitting originating from the chiral nature of crystal. A direct comparison of the band dispersion between the ARPES results and the first-principles band-structure calculations suggests the presence of Weyl nodes and tiny spin-polarized hole pockets around the H point. The present result opens a pathway toward studying the interplay among crystal symmetry, band structure, and exotic physical properties in chiral crystals.

  9. An Economical High Resolution Spectrograph Optimized for Radial Velocity Measurements at 5000 Angstroms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, D.; Arion, D. N.

    2004-12-01

    A high resolution spectrometer was built and calibrated on an optical bench. The target resolution of the instrument was designed to allow accurate measurement of the Doppler shifts of the 5007 Angstrom O III line in planetary nebulae due to their expansion. The optical components of the instrument include two Meade ETX 90 Maksutov-Cassegrain telescopes, a Richardson Grating Laboratory reflection diffraction grating, nickel-plated glass slides used as slit apertures, and an SBIG ST-8E CCD imaging camera. The mounts for each of the optical components were machined out of aluminum bar and plate stock. The instrument was calibrated using He and Hg gas discharge tubes generating spectra of known wavelengths. A total of four sets of lines were imaged and analyzed to calibrate the instrument. The line shapes in the images were manually fit with functions approximating the pressure and Doppler broadening of the lines, as expected for the behavior of the lines emitted by the spectrum tubes. These fits were used to identify the line peak positions, which were then compared to standard line wavelengths to determine the instrument calibration. The He I line at 5015.678 Angstrom line was carefully analyzed to determine the system wavelength uncertainty, which determines the smallest resolvable difference in wavelength that the instrument can determine. The resulting operating resolution at 5007 Angstroms was found to be 206474, making the instrument capable of resolving Doppler shifts at 5007 Angstroms corresponding to +/- 1.4 kilometers per second. The program was thus successful in developing an instrument suitable for a variety of relatively low velocity Doppler measurements, especially those associated with planetary nebula expansions. Future work entails developing a mounting system to rigidly hold the instrument on a suitable telescope, while maintaining the necessary precision to retain the instrumental resolution. This work was supported in part by Carthage College

  10. Angle-Resolved Second-Harmonic Light Scattering from Colloidal Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, N.; Angerer, W. E.; Yodh, A. G.

    2001-09-03

    We report angle-resolved second-harmonic generation (SHG) measurements from suspensions of centrosymmetric micron-size polystyrene spheres with surface-adsorbed dye (malachite green). The second-harmonic scattering profiles differ qualitatively from linear light scattering profiles of the same particles. We investigated these radiation patterns using several polarization configurations and particle diameters. We introduce a simple Rayleigh-Gans-Debye model to account for the SHG scattering anisotropy. The model compares favorably with our experimental data. Our measurements suggest scattering anisotropy may be used to isolate particle nonlinear optics from other bulk nonlinear optical effects in suspension.

  11. High resolution magnetic Barkhausen noise measurements of slit defects in steel

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, T.W.; Atherton, D.L.

    1993-12-31

    During the magnetization process of a ferromagnetic material magnetic Barkhausen noise (MBN) occurs as a consequence of either (1) irreversible domain wall motion or (2) irreversible rotation of the domain vector magnetization. Conventionally, MBN measurements for NDT applications are performed with a pick-up coil and U core magnet applied to the surface of the sample. The pick-up coil is constructed by winding fine wire around a small cylindrical bobbin. Placed on a steel surface the pick-up coil senses perpendicular changes in flux from the induced voltages. Given that the diameter of the pick-up coil may be of the order of 10 mm and that the changing magnetic fields which the coil detects fall off as 1/r{sup 3}, where r is the distance from the center of the coil, high resolution in the MBN signal cannot be expected from this method. Read head technology in contrast, attempts to localize the measurement of the signal to as small a region as possible and, therefore, maximize the resolutions. This is accomplished by coupling the ``demagnetization`` fields, that are produced by the medium to be measured and that extend above the surface, through a narrow slit into the read head. MBN signals are detected by the abrupt localized changes of flux which produce voltages in pick-up coils threading the read head. In an effort to localize the range over which MBN signals are measured, and, therefore, increase the resolution of the MBN signal a small magnetic disk read head was mounted within a laminate U shaped sweep field core. When this was placed on a ferromagnetic test piece the application of a sweep field to the U core magnet induced MBN within the sample. The resolution of the read head device was tested by performing measurements across various slits and through cuts in several steel samples. The depression of the MBN signal in the vicinity of the slit or through cut was interpreted in terms of the corresponding depression of the magnetic fields in their vicinity.

  12. High-resolution median nerve sonographic measurements: correlations with median nerve conduction studies in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, Christina; Caldera, Franklin; Welty, Leah; Lai, Jean; Lento, Paul; Feldman, Eric; Sered, Heather; Sayeed, Yusef; Plastaras, Christopher

    2013-12-01

    To study relationships between median wrist and forearm sonographic measurements and median nerve conduction studies. The study population consisted of a prospective convenience sample of healthy adults. Interventions included high-resolution median nerve sonography and median motor and sensory nerve conduction studies. Main outcome measures included median motor nerve compound muscle action potential amplitude, distal latency, and conduction velocity; sensory nerve action potential amplitude and distal latency; and sonographic median nerve cross-sectional area. Median motor nerve and sensory nerve conduction studies of the index finger were performed using standard published techniques. A second examiner blinded to nerve conduction study results used a high-frequency linear array transducer to measure the cross-sectional area of the median nerve at the distal volar wrist crease (carpal tunnel inlet) and forearm (4 cm proximally), measured in the transverse plane on static sonograms. The outer margin of the median nerve was traced at the junction of the hypoechoic fascicles and adjacent outer connective tissue layer. Fifty median nerves were evaluated in 25 participants. The compound muscle action potential amplitude with wrist stimulation was positively related to the cross-sectional area, with the area increasing by 0.195 mm(2) for every millivolt increase in amplitude in the dominant hand (95% confidence interval, 0.020, 0.370 mm(2); P < .05) and 0.247 mm(2) in the nondominant hand (95% confidence interval, 0.035, 0.459 mm(2); P < .05). There was no significant linear association between the wrist median cross-sectional area and median motor and sensory distal latencies. Conduction velocity through the forearm was not significantly linearly associated with the forearm area or forearm-to-wrist area ratio (tapering ratio). The wrist area was inversely related to the sensory nerve action potential amplitude. Although associations were found between median nerve

  13. Ambient Aerosol in Southeast Asia: High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Measurements Over Oil Palm (Elaeis guineensis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, G.; Dimarco, C.; Misztal, P.; Nemitz, E.; Farmer, D.; Kimmel, J.; Jimenez, J.

    2008-12-01

    The emission of organic compounds in the troposphere is important factor in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). A very large proportion of organic material emitted globally is estimated to arise from biogenic sources, with almost half coming from tropical and sub-tropical forests. Preliminary analyses of leave cuvette emission studies suggest that oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) is a significantly larger source of isoprene than tropical forest. Much larger sources of isoprene over oil palm allied with a larger anthropogenic component of local emissions contrast greatly with the remote tropical forest environment and therefore the character of SOA formed may differ significantly. These issues, allied with the high price of palm oil on international markets leading to increased use of land for oil palm production, could give rise to rapidly changing chemical and aerosol regimes in the tropics. It is therefore important to understand the current emissions and composition of organic aerosol over all important land-uses in the tropical environment. This in turn will lead to a greater understanding of the present, and to an improvement in predictive capacity for the future system. To help address these issues, a high resolution time of flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed in the Sabahmas (PPB OIL) oil palm plantation near Lahad Datu, in Eastern Sabah, as part of the field component of the Aerosol Coupling in the Earth System (ACES) project, part of the UK NERC APPRAISE program. This project was allied closely with measurements made of similar chemical species and aerosol components at a forest site in the Danum Valley as part of the UK Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes above a Southeast Asian tropical rainforest (OP3) project. Measurements of submicron non- refractory aerosol composition are presented along with some preliminary analysis of chemically resolved aerosol fluxes made with a new eddy covariance system, based on the

  14. Depth of interaction resolution measurements for a high resolution PET detector using position sensitive avalanche photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongfeng; Dokhale, Purushottam A; Silverman, Robert W; Shah, Kanai S; McClish, Mickel A; Farrell, Richard; Entine, Gerald; Cherry, Simon R

    2006-05-07

    We explore dual-ended read out of LSO arrays with two position sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs) as a high resolution, high efficiency depth-encoding detector for PET applications. Flood histograms, energy resolution and depth of interaction (DOI) resolution were measured for unpolished LSO arrays with individual crystal sizes of 1.0, 1.3 and 1.5 mm, and for a polished LSO array with 1.3 mm pixels. The thickness of the crystal arrays was 20 mm. Good flood histograms were obtained for all four arrays, and crystals in all four arrays can be clearly resolved. Although the amplitude of each PSAPD signal decreases as the interaction depth moves further from the PSAPD, the sum of the two PSAPD signals is essentially constant with irradiation depth for all four arrays. The energy resolutions were similar for all four arrays, ranging from 14.7% to 15.4%. A DOI resolution of 3-4 mm (including the width of the irradiation band which is approximately 2 mm) was obtained for all the unpolished arrays. The best DOI resolution was achieved with the unpolished 1 mm array (average 3.5 mm). The DOI resolution for the 1.3 mm and 1.5 mm unpolished arrays was 3.7 and 4.0 mm respectively. For the polished array, the DOI resolution was only 16.5 mm. Summing the DOI profiles across all crystals for the 1 mm array only degraded the DOI resolution from 3.5 mm to 3.9 mm, indicating that it may not be necessary to calibrate the DOI response separately for each crystal within an array. The DOI response of individual crystals in the array confirms this finding. These results provide a detailed characterization of the DOI response of these PSAPD-based PET detectors which will be important in the design and calibration of a PET scanner making use of this detector approach.

  15. Mid-latitude cirrus investigations at high-resolution through ground-based lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionisi, Davide; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain; Gaudo, Thierry; Courcoux, Yann; Porteneuve, Jacques; Hoareau, Christophe; Congeduti, Fernando; Liberti, Gianluigi

    2013-04-01

    Although cirrus vertical distributions determine their local cooling or warming effects, one of the main missing information in Global Climate Models (GCMs) is the characterization of their vertical location and stratification. Lidar technique, in contrast, can detect cirrus with high spatial and temporal resolution, providing accurate information on their vertical distribution. In this work, the recent and on going studies about the the characterization of mid-latitude cirrus through lidar systems located at the Observatory of Haute Provence (OHP, 43.9 ° N, 5.7 ° E) in France and at Rome Tor Vergata (RTV, 41.8 ° N, 12.6 ° E) in Italy are presented. Cirrus have been firstly studied in terms of quasi-stationary periods regarding statistical variability. A clustering approach has been then adopted to derive cirrus classification (and climatology) over the period 1996-2007 for OHP lidar measurements and over 2007-2010 for RTV dataset. Three independent cirrus classes have been identified: I thin middle tropospheric cirrus, II thick upper tropospheric cirrus, III thin tropopause cirrus. The temporal variability of the optical properties of these classes has been then analyzed at lidar raw temporal sampling (180 sec). While advection dominates, at the first order, variability on timescale of minutes can be related to space fluctuations of cloud properties on typical scale of few kilometers. Lognormal distributions of the optical depth have been used to model variability of the cirrus optical depth as observed by lidars. Finally, the implementation of the OHP lidar system in terms of two analogic channels that collect the Rayleigh-Mie orthogonal and parallel component signals through an high-resolution acquisition chain (vertical and temporal sampling of 37.5 m and 1 sec, respectively) has been employed to investigate the high frequency cirrus variability in a recent campaign held at the OHP. The preliminary results of this campaign are also showed

  16. Spatial representativeness of ground-based solar radiation measurements estimated from high-resolution Meteosat data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyta Hakuba, Maria; Folini, Doris; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Wild, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The validation of gridded surface solar radiation (SSR) data often relies on the comparison with ground-based in-situ measurements. This poses the question on how representative a point measurement is for a larger-scale surrounding. We use the high-resolution (0.03° ) SIS MVIRI data from the Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) to study the spatial sub-grid variability in all-sky surface solar radiation (SSR) over Europe, Africa, and parts of South America as covered by the Meteosat disk. This is done for the CERES EBAF 1° standard grid and two equal-angle grids of 0.25° and 3° resolution. Furthermore, we quantify the spatial representativeness of numerous surface sites from the BSRN and the GEBA for their site-centered larger surroundings varying in size from 0.25° to 3°, as well as with respect to the given standard grids. These analyses are done on a climatological annual and monthly mean basis over the period 2001-2005. The annual mean sub-grid variability (mean absolute deviation) in the 1° standard grid over European land is on average 1.6% (2.4 Wm¯²), with a maximum of up to 10% in Northern Spain (Hakuba et al. 2013). As expected, highest sub-grid variability is found in mountainous and coastal regions. The annual mean representation error of point values at 143 surface sites in Europe with respect to their 1° surrounding and the 1° standard grid is on average 2% (3 Wm¯² ). For larger surroundings of 3°, the representation error increases to 3% (4.8 Wm¯²), which is of similar order as the measurement accuracy of in-situ observations. Most of the sites can thus be considered as representative for their larger surroundings of up to 3°, which holds also true for the majority of BSRN sites located in Africa and South America. This representation error can be reduced if site-specific correction factors are applied or when multiple sites are available in the same grid cell, i.e., three more sites reduce the error by 50

  17. Analysis and high resolution modelling of black carbon vertical profiles measured over three Italian valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandolfi, Ilaria; Curci, Gabriele; Falasca, Serena; Ferrero, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Analysis and high resolution modelling of black carbon vertical profiles measured over three Italian valleys Ilaria Gandolfi1,2, Gabriele Curci1,2, Serena Falasca1,2, Luca Ferrero3 1 Department of Physical and Chemical Sciences, University of L'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy 2 Center of Excellence CETEMPS, University of L'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy 3 POLARIS Research Centre, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126, Milan, Italy Last decades were characterized by a growing interest in aerosols: mainly for their effect on human health and on the energy balance of solar and planetary radiation, thus their role in climate change. In this study, we analyze the evolution of vertical profile of black carbon (BC) through tethered balloon observations and chemistry-transport modelling. Black carbon is regarded as the second most important anthropogenic climate forcing agent and its concentration varies significantly depending on the altitude and the sources on the territory. In winter of 2010 University Of Milan Bicocca conducted three intensive measurements campaigns over three Italian basin valleys (Terni, Po Valley, Passiria Valley). The choice of the valleys was made taking into consideration the orography and the river basin structure. The measurement campaign was based on a helium-filled tethered balloon, on which the instrumentation for the analysis has been mounted; the instrumentation consisted on a meteorological station, an OPC, a cascade impactor and a micro-Aethalometer. Subsequently, at University of L'Aquila simulations were produced to help interpretation of these vertical aerosol profiles (mass, composition and distribution) and related optical properties (scattering, absorption) using a chemistry-transport model (WRF-CHIMERE) at high horizontal resolution (1 km). The analysis focused primarily on the calculation of the heating rate and of the Direct Radiative Effect (DRE), and on the analysis of the

  18. Emerging Trends on the Volatile Chemistry in Comets as Measured with High-Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dello Russo, Neil; Kawakita, Hideyo; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Weaver, Harold A.

    2016-10-01

    A systematic analysis of the mixing ratios with respect to H2O for eight species (CH3OH, HCN, NH3, H2CO, C2H2, C2H6, CH4, and CO) measured with high-resolution infrared spectroscopy is presented. Some trends are beginning to emerge when mixing ratios in individual comets are compared to average mixing ratios obtained for all species within the population. The variation in mixing ratios for all measured species is at least an order of magnitude. Overall, Jupiter-family comets are depleted in volatile species with respect to H2O compared to long-period Oort cloud comets, with the most volatile species showing the greatest relative depletion. There is a high positive correlation between the mixing ratios of HCN, C2H6, and CH4, whereas NH3, H2CO, and C2H2 are moderately correlated with each other but generally uncorrelated or show only weak correlation with other species. CO is generally uncorrelated with the other measured species possibly because it has the highest volatility and is therefore more susceptible to thermal evolutionary effects. Molecular mixing ratios for CH3OH, HCN, C2H6, and CH4 show an expected behavior with heliocentric distance suggesting a dominant ice source, whereas there is emerging evidence that the mixing ratios of NH3, H2CO, and C2H2 may increase at small heliocentric distances, suggesting the possibility of additional sources related to the thermal decomposition of organic dust. Although this provides information on the composition of the most volatile grains in comets, it presents an additional difficulty in classifying comet chemistry because most comets within this dataset were only observed over a limited range of heliocentric distance. Optical and infrared comparisons indicate that mixing ratios of daughter species and potential parents from cometary ices are sometimes but not always consistent with one another. This suggests that in many comets there are significant sources of C2 and/or CN from grains, and that the importance of these

  19. Identification and classification of structural soil conservation measures based on very high resolution stereo satellite data.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Sandra; Tesfay Ghebremicael, Selamawit; Hurni, Hans; Kohler, Thomas

    2017-05-15

    Land degradation affects large areas of land around the globe, with grave consequences for those living off the land. Major efforts are being made to implement soil and water conservation measures that counteract soil erosion and help secure vital ecosystem services. However, where and to what extent such measures have been implemented is often not well documented. Knowledge about this could help to identify areas where soil and water conservation measures are successfully supporting sustainable land management, as well as areas requiring urgent rehabilitation of conservation structures such as terraces and bunds. This study explores the potential of the latest satellite-based remote sensing technology for use in assessing and monitoring the extent of existing soil and water conservation structures. We used a set of very high resolution stereo Geoeye-1 satellite data, from which we derived a detailed digital surface model as well as a set of other spectral, terrain, texture, and filtered information layers. We developed and applied an object-based classification approach, working on two segmentation levels. On the coarser level, the aim was to delimit certain landscape zones. Information about these landscape zones is useful in distinguishing different types of soil and water conservation structures, as each zone contains certain specific types of structures. On the finer level, the goal was to extract and identify different types of linear soil and water conservation structures. The classification rules were based mainly on spectral, textural, shape, and topographic properties, and included object relationships. This approach enabled us to identify and separate from other classes the majority (78.5%) of terraces and bunds, as well as most hillside terraces (81.25%). Omission and commission errors are similar to those obtained by the few existing studies focusing on the same research objective but using different types of remotely sensed data. Based on our results

  20. Effect of surface steps on the diffusion of adsorbates investigated with angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luh, Dah-An; Chen, Chi-Lu; Liang, Xihui; Cheng, Cheng-Maw; Tsuei, Ku-Ding

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the surface diffusion of chemisorbed H on Ag/Au(111) thin films with surface steps, we characterized the distribution of H atoms on the surface by measuring the Shockley states of these surfaces with angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Our results show that H atoms tend to diffuse and to remain on the terrace at the lower side of the surface steps during annealing. This diffusive behavior is explained qualitatively through the existence of an Ehrlich-Schwoebel potential barrier associated with the surface steps.

  1. Interlayer Interaction and Electronic Screening in Multilayer Graphene Investigated with Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Taisuke; Bostwick, Aaron; McChesney, J. L.; Seyller, Thomas; Horn, Karsten; Rotenberg, Eli

    2007-05-01

    The unusual transport properties of graphene are the direct consequence of a peculiar band structure near the Dirac point. We determine the shape of the π bands and their characteristic splitting, and find the transition from two-dimensional to bulk character for 1 to 4 layers of graphene by angle-resolved photoemission. By detailed measurements of the π bands we derive the stacking order, layer-dependent electron potential, screening length, and strength of interlayer interaction by comparison with tight binding calculations, yielding a comprehensive description of multilayer graphene’s electronic structure.

  2. Angle-resolved magnetotransport studies in anisotropic MgB2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, A. K.; Tokunaga, M.; Shi, Z. X.; Takano, Y.; Togano, K.; Kito, H.; Ihara, H.; Tamegai, T.

    2002-04-01

    We report the angle-resolved magnetotransport measurements on MgB2 single crystals that exhibit moderate anisotropy (γ) in upper critical fields with γ=2.6+/-0.1. Unusual ``kink'' features in resistivity are observed, which appear most clearly for field parallel to the c axis. We discuss the origin of the ``kink'' features in relation with the vortex-lattice melting and the recently proposed model of two-gap superconductivity. The influences of anisotropy on superconducting properties including the kink features are also demonstrated.

  3. Upscaling of Heterogeneous Porous Rocks Using High Resolution Hydrogeophysical Scanning Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussod, G. Y.; Svyatskiy, D.; Zyvoloski, G.; Boitnott, G. N.; Lichtner, P. C.; Moulton, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    This research is part of a DOE SBIR project that combines physical properties measurements on consolidated and unconsolidated subsurface lithologies, with numerical and effective media models that describe subsurface contaminant flow and transport. This paper presents results from an application of a new high-resolution methodology for the laboratory characterization of hydrogeophysical properties on core and field samples. The methodology is used to constrain contaminant flow and transport models for both unsaturated and saturated subsurface conditions. Spatially integrated fine-scale scanning (mm-cm resolution) of permeabilities, ultrasonic velocities and electrical conductivities on core and field samples are used to quantify heterogeneities at the smallest continuum scale. Through application of numerical and effective medium upscaling techniques, the scans provide a means to assign hydrogeophysical properties and model parameters at scales more appropriate to field applications, while preserving the physical influence of fine scale heterogeneities that cannot be explicitly modeled. The methodology is being applied to several contaminated DOE sites at LANL, NM, Hanford, WA and Rifle, CO. We illustrate that fine- and meso- scale heterogeneities (mm-m) can cause significant saturation dependent anisotropy in hydrogeophysical properties (e.g., electrical conductivity and relative permeability). These effects are captured in our upscaling methodology to provide more accurate model parameters used in representation of the contaminated subsurface. Through a series of examples, we show how quantification of the fine scale heterogeneities of a particular flow unit can be used to constrain upscaled model properties at the meter scale. We show that as a result of these heterogeneities, the change in scale from centimeters to meters requires a change in character of the capillary pressure / relative permeability relationships. As an example, we find that after applying

  4. Using High-Resolution Field Measurements to Model Dune Kinematics in a Large Elongate Meander Bend.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konsoer, K. M.; Rhoads, B. L.; Best, J.; Frias, C. E.; Abad, J. D.; Langendoen, E. J.

    2014-12-01

    Due to recent advances in hydroacoustic technology, such as the development of multibeam echo sounders, it is now possible to obtain highly accurate and detailed bathymetric data for river channels. These data provide the basis for detailed characterizations of bed form morphology ranging from individual ripples to composite dune fields. Theoretical models suggest that bed forms reach an equilibrium morphology based on hydraulic conditions during steady flow. However, at the scale of individual meander bends, bed form morphology will vary according to the local flow structure as influenced by overall bed morphology and planform curvature. Thus, the coevolution of flow structure, bed form morphology, and sediment transport should vary throughout a meander bend. This paper examines spatial variation in bed form characteristics and rates of bed form migration, and thus bed material transport, within a large, actively migrating, elongate meander loop. During a May 2013 flood event on Maier Bend, Wabash River (IL-IN, USA), repeat multibeam echo sounding surveys were conducted ~4 hours apart, providing estimates of dune celerity and volumetric rates of sediment transport at different locations around the bend. Three-dimensional velocity measurements, obtained using an acoustic Doppler current profiler, provide hydraulic data for evaluating interactions between flow structure and bed form morphology. Results show that bed form morphology is highly variable within the bend, ranging from barchans dunes on the upstream limb, 2D ripples across the point bar, and 3D composite dunes with wavelength of ~20 meters near the bend apex. Rates of dune celerity varied from 0.3 m/hr to 0.7 m/hr and were dependent on bed form geometry and local hydraulic conditions. The high-resolution data on flow and form are used to calibrate a 2D numerical model of sediment transport through the bend. Simulations using the calibrated model are used to evaluate the fluvial processes underlying

  5. Electronic structure of RSb ( R=Y, Ce, Gd, Dy, Ho, Tm, Lu) studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Yun; Lee, Yongbin; Kong, Tai; ...

    2017-07-15

    Here, we use high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and electronic structure calculations to study the electronic properties of rare-earth monoantimonides RSb (R = Y, Ce, Gd, Dy, Ho, Tm, Lu). The experimentally measured Fermi surface (FS) of RSb consists of at least two concentric hole pockets at the Γ point and two intersecting electron pockets at the X point. These data agree relatively well with the electronic structure calculations. Detailed photon energy dependence measurements using both synchrotron and laser ARPES systems indicate that there is at least one Fermi surface sheet with strong three-dimensionality centered at the Γ point. Duemore » to the “lanthanide contraction”, the unit cell of different rare-earth monoantimonides shrinks when changing the rare-earth ion from CeSb to LuSb. This results in the differences in the chemical potentials in these compounds, which are demonstrated by both ARPES measurements and electronic structure calculations. Interestingly, in CeSb, the intersecting electron pockets at the X point seem to be touching the valence bands, forming a fourfold-degenerate Dirac-like feature. On the other hand, the remaining rare-earth monoantimonides show significant gaps between the upper and lower bands at the X point. Furthermore, similar to the previously reported results of LaBi, a Dirac-like structure was observed at the Γ point in YSb, CeSb, and GdSb, compounds showing relatively high magnetoresistance. This Dirac-like structure may contribute to the unusually large magnetoresistance in these compounds.« less

  6. Electronic structure of R Sb (R =Y , Ce, Gd, Dy, Ho, Tm, Lu) studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yun; Lee, Yongbin; Kong, Tai; Mou, Daixiang; Jiang, Rui; Huang, Lunan; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Kaminski, Adam

    2017-07-01

    We use high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and electronic structure calculations to study the electronic properties of rare-earth monoantimonides RSb (R = Y, Ce, Gd, Dy, Ho, Tm, Lu). The experimentally measured Fermi surface (FS) of RSb consists of at least two concentric hole pockets at the Γ point and two intersecting electron pockets at the X point. These data agree relatively well with the electronic structure calculations. Detailed photon energy dependence measurements using both synchrotron and laser ARPES systems indicate that there is at least one Fermi surface sheet with strong three-dimensionality centered at the Γ point. Due to the "lanthanide contraction", the unit cell of different rare-earth monoantimonides shrinks when changing the rare-earth ion from CeSb to LuSb. This results in the differences in the chemical potentials in these compounds, which are demonstrated by both ARPES measurements and electronic structure calculations. Interestingly, in CeSb, the intersecting electron pockets at the X point seem to be touching the valence bands, forming a fourfold-degenerate Dirac-like feature. On the other hand, the remaining rare-earth monoantimonides show significant gaps between the upper and lower bands at the X point. Furthermore, similar to the previously reported results of LaBi, a Dirac-like structure was observed at the Γ point in YSb, CeSb, and GdSb, compounds showing relatively high magnetoresistance. This Dirac-like structure may contribute to the unusually large magnetoresistance in these compounds.

  7. Measurement method for roll angular displacement with a high resolution by using diffraction gratings and a heterodyne interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Shanzhi; Wang, Zhao; Gao, Jianmin; Guo, Junjie

    2014-04-15

    The roll angle measurement is difficult to be achieved directly using a typical commercial interferometer due to its low sensitivity in axial direction, where the axial direction is orthogonal to the plane of the roll angular displacement. A roll angle measurement method combined diffraction gratings with a laser heterodyne interferometer is discussed in this paper. The diffraction grating placed in the plane of a roll angular displacement and the interferometer arranged in the plane's orthogonal direction, constitute the measurement pattern for the roll angle with high resolution. The roll angular displacement, considered as the linear, can be tested precisely when the corresponding angle is very small. Using the proposed method, the angle roll measurement obtains the high resolution of 0.002{sup ″}. Experiment has proved its feasibility and practicability.

  8. Electrostatic ion trap and Fourier transform measurements for high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, K G; Gadkari, S C; Yakhmi, J V; Sahni, V C

    2007-08-01

    We report on the development of an electrostatic ion trap for high-resolution mass spectrometry. The trap works on purely electrostatic fields and hence trapping and storing of ions is not mass restrictive, unlike other techniques based on Penning, Paul, or radio frequency quadrupole ion traps. It allows simultaneous trapping and studying of multiple mass species over a large mass range. Mass spectra were recorded in "dispersive" and "self-bunching" modes of ions. Storage lifetimes of about 100 ms and mass resolving power of about 20,000 could be achieved from the fifth harmonic Fourier transform spectrum of Xe ions recorded in the self-bunching mode.

  9. Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy reveals spin charge separation in metallic MoSe2 grain boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yujing; Diaz, Horacio Coy; Avila, José; Chen, Chaoyu; Kalappattil, Vijaysankar; Das, Raja; Phan, Manh-Huong; Čadež, Tilen; Carmelo, José M. P.; Asensio, Maria C.; Batzill, Matthias

    2017-02-01

    Material line defects are one-dimensional structures but the search and proof of electron behaviour consistent with the reduced dimension of such defects has been so far unsuccessful. Here we show using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy that twin-grain boundaries in the layered semiconductor MoSe2 exhibit parabolic metallic bands. The one-dimensional nature is evident from a charge density wave transition, whose periodicity is given by kF/π, consistent with scanning tunnelling microscopy and angle resolved photoemission measurements. Most importantly, we provide evidence for spin- and charge-separation, the hallmark of one-dimensional quantum liquids. Our studies show that the spectral line splits into distinctive spinon and holon excitations whose dispersions exactly follow the energy-momentum dependence calculated by a Hubbard model with suitable finite-range interactions. Our results also imply that quantum wires and junctions can be isolated in line defects of other transition metal dichalcogenides, which may enable quantum transport measurements and devices.

  10. Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy reveals spin charge separation in metallic MoSe2 grain boundary

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yujing; Diaz, Horacio Coy; Avila, José; Chen, Chaoyu; Kalappattil, Vijaysankar; Das, Raja; Phan, Manh-Huong; Čadež, Tilen; Carmelo, José M. P.; Asensio, Maria C.; Batzill, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Material line defects are one-dimensional structures but the search and proof of electron behaviour consistent with the reduced dimension of such defects has been so far unsuccessful. Here we show using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy that twin-grain boundaries in the layered semiconductor MoSe2 exhibit parabolic metallic bands. The one-dimensional nature is evident from a charge density wave transition, whose periodicity is given by kF/π, consistent with scanning tunnelling microscopy and angle resolved photoemission measurements. Most importantly, we provide evidence for spin- and charge-separation, the hallmark of one-dimensional quantum liquids. Our studies show that the spectral line splits into distinctive spinon and holon excitations whose dispersions exactly follow the energy-momentum dependence calculated by a Hubbard model with suitable finite-range interactions. Our results also imply that quantum wires and junctions can be isolated in line defects of other transition metal dichalcogenides, which may enable quantum transport measurements and devices. PMID:28165445

  11. Velocity and Temperature Structure Functions in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere From High-Resolution Aircraft Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Perkins, P. J., 1976: Global measurements of gaseous and aerosol trace species in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere from daily flights of 747...Velocity and Temperature Structure Functions in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere from High-Resolution Aircraft Measurements DONALD E...probes mounted on an EGRETT high-altitude research aircraft were used to characterize turbulence in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere at

  12. High-resolution real-time 3D shape measurement on a portable device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpinsky, Nikolaus; Hoke, Morgan; Chen, Vincent; Zhang, Song

    2013-09-01

    Recent advances in technology have enabled the acquisition of high-resolution 3D models in real-time though the use of structured light scanning techniques. While these advances are impressive, they require large amounts of computing power, thus being limited to using large desktop computers with high end CPUs and sometimes GPUs. This is undesirable in making high-resolution real-time 3D scanners ubiquitous in our mobile lives. To address this issue, this work describes and demonstrates a real-time 3D scanning system that is realized on a mobile device, namely a laptop computer, which can achieve speeds of 20fps 3D at a resolution of 640x480 per frame. By utilizing a graphics processing unit (GPU) as a multipurpose parallel processor, along with a parallel phase shifting technique, we are able to realize the entire 3D processing pipeline in parallel. To mitigate high speed camera transfer problems, which typically require a dedicated frame grabber, we make use of USB 3.0 along with direct memory access (DMA) to transfer camera images to the GPU. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique, we experiment with the scanner on both static geometry of a statue and dynamic geometry of a deforming material sample in front of the system.

  13. Extended-range grazing-incidence spectrometer for high-resolution extreme ultraviolet measurements on an electron beam ion trapa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V.; Hell, N.; Träbert, E.; Widmann, K.

    2014-11-01

    A high-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for performing very high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Å to above 300 Å. The instrument operates without an entrance slit and focuses the light emitted by highly charged ions located in the roughly 50 μm wide electron beam onto a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The measured line widths are below 0.025 Å above 100 Å, and the resolving power appears to be limited by the source size and Doppler broadening of the trapped ions. Comparisons with spectra obtained with existing grating spectrometers show an order of magnitude improvement in spectral resolution.

  14. Extended-range grazing-incidence spectrometer for high-resolution extreme ultraviolet measurements on an electron beam ion trap.

    PubMed

    Beiersdorfer, P; Magee, E W; Brown, G V; Hell, N; Träbert, E; Widmann, K

    2014-11-01

    A high-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for performing very high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Å to above 300 Å. The instrument operates without an entrance slit and focuses the light emitted by highly charged ions located in the roughly 50 μm wide electron beam onto a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The measured line widths are below 0.025 Å above 100 Å, and the resolving power appears to be limited by the source size and Doppler broadening of the trapped ions. Comparisons with spectra obtained with existing grating spectrometers show an order of magnitude improvement in spectral resolution.

  15. Extended-range grazing-incidence spectrometer for high-resolution extreme ultraviolet measurements on an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V.; Träbert, E.; Widmann, K.; Hell, N.

    2014-11-15

    A high-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for performing very high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Å to above 300 Å. The instrument operates without an entrance slit and focuses the light emitted by highly charged ions located in the roughly 50 μm wide electron beam onto a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The measured line widths are below 0.025 Å above 100 Å, and the resolving power appears to be limited by the source size and Doppler broadening of the trapped ions. Comparisons with spectra obtained with existing grating spectrometers show an order of magnitude improvement in spectral resolution.

  16. The optimization of super-high resolution frequency measurement techniques based on phase quantization regularities between any frequencies.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiqi; Zhou, Wei; Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Xueping; Zhao, Jie

    2013-02-01

    Step phase quantization regularity between different nominal frequency signals is introduced in this paper. Based on this regularity, an optimized high resolution frequency measurement technique is presented. The key features and issues of phase quantization characteristics and measurements are described. Based on the relationship between the same or multiple nominal signals with a certain differences, the resolution of frequency measurements is developed and the range is widened. Several measurement results are provided to support the concepts with experimental evidence. The resolution of frequency measurement can reach 10(-12) (s(-1)) over a wide range or higher for specific frequency signals.

  17. High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Imaging Measurements Using Externally Segmented Germanium Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callas, J.; Mahoney, W.; Skelton, R.; Varnell, L.; Wheaton, W.

    1994-01-01

    Fully two-dimensional gamma-ray imaging with simultaneous high-resolution spectroscopy has been demonstrated using an externally segmented germanium sensor. The system employs a single high-purity coaxial detector with its outer electrode segmented into 5 distinct charge collection regions and a lead coded aperture with a uniformly redundant array (URA) pattern. A series of one-dimensional responses was collected around 511 keV while the system was rotated in steps through 180 degrees. A non-negative, linear least-squares algorithm was then employed to reconstruct a 2-dimensional image. Corrections for multiple scattering in the detector, and the finite distance of source and detector are made in the reconstruction process.

  18. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure: Multiple layers of emitters and multiple initial states

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, W.R.A.; Kellar, S.A.; Moler, E.J. |; Chen, Y.; Wu, H.; Shirley, D.A.; Hussain, Z.

    1995-08-01

    Recently, angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) has been applied to experimental systems involving multiple layers of emitters and non-s core-level photoemission in an effort to broaden the utility of the technique. Most of the previous systems have been comprised of atomic or molecular overlayers adsorbed onto a single-crystal, metal surface and the photoemission data were taken from an s atomic core-level in the overlayer. For such a system, the acquired ARPEFS data is dominated by the p{sub o} final state wave backscattering from the substrate atoms and is well understood. In this study, we investigate ARPEFS as a surface-region structure determination technique when applied to experimental systems comprised of multiple layers of photoemitters and arbitrary initial state core-level photoemission. Understanding the data acquired from multiple layers of photoemitters is useful for studying multilayer interfaces, ''buried'' surfaces, and clean crystals in ultra- high vacuum. The ability to apply ARPEFS to arbitrary initial state core-level photoemission obviously opens up many systems to analysis. Efforts have been ongoing to understand such data in depth. We present clean Cu(111) 3s, 3p, and 3d core-level, normal photoemission data taken on a high resolution soft x-ray beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, California and clean Ni(111) 3p normal photoemission data taken at the National Synchrotron Light Source in Upton, New York, USA.

  19. High-Resolution UV Relay Lens for Particle Size Distribution Measurements Using Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Robert M. Malone, Brent C. Frogget, Morris I. Kaufman, Aric Tibbits, Gene A. Capelle, Mike Grover, Gerald D. Stevens, William D. Turley

    2008-03-01

    Shock waves passing through a metal sample can produce ejecta particulates at a metal-vacuum interface. Holography records particle size distributions by using a highpower, short-pulse laser to freeze particle motion. The sizes of the ejecta particles are recorded using an in-line Fraunhofer holography technique. Because the holographic plate would be destroyed in this energetic environment, a high-resolution lens has been designed to relay the interference fringes to a safe environment. Particle sizes within a 12-mm-diameter, 5-mm-thick volume are recorded on holographic film. To achieve resolution down to 0.5 microns, ultraviolet (UV) light (in this case supplied by a tripled Nd:YAG laser) is needed. The design and assembly of a nine-element lens that achieves >2000 lp/mm resolution and operates at f/0.85 will be described. To set up this lens system, a doublet lens is temporarily attached that enables operation with 532-nm (green) light and 1100 lp/mm resolution. Thus, the setup and alignment is performed with green light, but the dynamic recording is done with UV light. During setup, the 532-nm beam provides enough focus shift to accommodate the placement of a resolution pattern outside the ejecta volume; this resolution pattern does not interfere with the calibrated wires and pegs surrounding the ejecta volume. A television microscope archives images of resolution patterns that prove that the calibration wires, interference filter, holographic plate, and relay lenses are in their correct positions. Part of this lens is under vacuum, at the point where the laser illumination passes through a focus. Alignment and tolerancing of this high-resolution lens will be presented, and resolution variation through the 5-mm depth of field will be discussed.

  20. High-Resolution UV Relay Lens for Particle Size Distribution Measurements Using Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Robert M.; Capelle, Gene A.; Frogget, Brent C.; Grover, Mike; Kaufman, Morris I.; Pazuchanics, Peter; Sorenson, Danny S.; Stevens, Gerald D.; Tibbits, Aric; Turley, William D.

    2008-08-29

    Shock waves passing through a metal sample can produce ejecta particulates at a metal-vacuum interface. Holography records particle size distributions by using a high-power, short-pulse laser to freeze particle motion. The sizes of the ejecta particles are recorded using an in-line Fraunhofer holography technique. Because the holographic plate would be destroyed in an energetic environment, a high-resolution lens has been designed to relay the interference fringes to a safe environment. Particle sizes within a 12-mm-diameter, 5-mm-thick volume are recorded onto holographic film. To achieve resolution down to 0.5 μm, ultraviolet laser (UV) light is needed. The design and assembly of a nine-element lens that achieves >2000 lp/mm resolution and operates at f/0.89 will be described. To set up this lens system, a doublet lens is temporarily attached that enables operation with 532-nm laser light and 1100 lp/mm resolution. Thus, the setup and alignment are performed with green light, but the dynamic recording is done with UV light. During setup, the 532-nm beam provides enough focus shift to accommodate the placement of a resolution target outside the ejecta volume; this resolution target does not interfere with the calibrated wires and pegs surrounding the ejecta volume. A television microscope archives images of resolution patterns that prove that the calibration wires, interference filter, holographic plate, and relay lenses are in their correct positions. Part of this lens is under vacuum, at the point where the laser illumination passes through a focus. Alignment and tolerancing of this high-resolution lens will be presented, and resolution variation through the 5-mm depth of field will be discussed.

  1. Study of M1 and E1 excitations by high-resolution proton inelastic scattering measurement at forward angles

    SciTech Connect

    Tamii, A.; Adachi, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Kaneda, T.; Matsubara, H.; Okamura, H.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Yosoi, M.; Carter, J.; Dozono, M.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Itoh, M.; Kawabata, T.; Nakanishi, K.; Sasamoto, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von

    2007-06-13

    Experimental technique for measuring proton inelastic scattering with high-resolution at 295 MeV and at forward angles including zero degrees is described. The method is useful for extracting spin part of the M1 strength via nuclear excitation as well as E1 strength via Coulomb excitation. An excitation energy resolution of 20 keV, good scattering angle resolution, and low background condition have been achieved. The experimental technique was applied for several sd and pf shell nuclei.

  2. Substrate interactions with suspended and supported monolayer MoS2: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Jin, Wencan; Yeh, Po -Chun; Zaki, Nader; ...

    2015-03-17

    We report the directly measured electronic structure of exfoliated monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂) using micrometer-scale angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Measurements of both suspended and supported monolayer MoS₂ elucidate the effects of interaction with a substrate. Thus, a suggested relaxation of the in-plane lattice constant is found for both suspended and supported monolayer MoS₂ crystals. For suspended MoS₂, a careful investigation of the measured uppermost valence band gives an effective mass at Γ¯ and Κ¯ of 2.00m₀ and 0.43m₀, respectively. We also measure an increase in the band linewidth from the midpoint of Γ¯Κ¯ to the vicinity of Κ¯ and briefly discussmore » its possible origin.« less

  3. Measurement of Pyrethroid, Organophosphorus, and Carbamate Insecticides in Human Plasma using Isotope Dilution Gas Chromatography-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, José J.; Williams, Megan K.; Weerasekera, Gayanga; Smith, Kimberly; Whyatt, Robin M.; Needham, Larry L.; Barr, Dana Boyd

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry method for measuring pyrethroid, organophosphorus, carbamate and fipronil pesticides and the synergist piperonyl butoxide in human plasma. Plasma samples were extracted using solid phase extraction and were then concentrated for injection and analysis using isotope dilution gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry. The limits of detection ranged from 10 to 158 pg/mL with relative recoveries at concentrations near the LODs (e.g., 25 or 250 pg/mL) ranging from 87% to 156% (9 of the 16 compounds were withing ± 15% of 100%). The extraction recoveries ranged from 20% to 98% and the overall method relative standard deviations were typically less than 20% with some exceptions. Analytical characteristics were determined at 25, 250, and 1000 pg/mL. PMID:20434413

  4. High-resolution measurements of the multilayer ultra-structure of articular cartilage and their translational potential

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Current musculoskeletal imaging techniques usually target the macro-morphology of articular cartilage or use histological analysis. These techniques are able to reveal advanced osteoarthritic changes in articular cartilage but fail to give detailed information to distinguish early osteoarthritis from healthy cartilage, and this necessitates high-resolution imaging techniques measuring cells and the extracellular matrix within the multilayer structure of articular cartilage. This review provides a comprehensive exploration of the cellular components and extracellular matrix of articular cartilage as well as high-resolution imaging techniques, including magnetic resonance image, electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, second harmonic generation microscopy, and laser scanning confocal arthroscopy, in the measurement of multilayer ultra-structures of articular cartilage. This review also provides an overview for micro-structural analysis of the main components of normal or osteoarthritic cartilage and discusses the potential and challenges associated with developing non-invasive high-resolution imaging techniques for both research and clinical diagnosis of early to late osteoarthritis. PMID:24946278

  5. High-resolution isotope measurements resolve rapid ecohydrological dynamics at the soil-plant interface.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Till H M; Haberer, Kristine; Gessler, Arthur; Weiler, Markus

    2016-05-01

    Plants rely primarily on rainfall infiltrating their root zones - a supply that is inherently variable, and fluctuations are predicted to increase on most of the Earth's surface. Yet, interrelationships between water availability and plant use on short timescales are difficult to quantify and remain poorly understood. To overcome previous methodological limitations, we coupled high-resolution in situ observations of stable isotopes in soil and transpiration water. We applied the approach along with Bayesian mixing modeling to track the fate of (2) H-labeled rain pulses following drought through soil and plants of deciduous tree ecosystems. We resolve how rainwater infiltrates the root zones in a nonequilibrium process and show that tree species differ in their ability to quickly acquire the newly available source. Sessile oak (Quercus petraea) adjusted root uptake to vertical water availability patterns under drought, but readjustment toward the rewetted topsoil was delayed. By contrast, European beech (Fagus sylvatica) readily utilized water from all soil depths independent of water depletion, enabling faster uptake of rainwater. Our results demonstrate that species-specific plasticity and responses to water supply fluctuations on short timescales can now be identified and must be considered to predict vegetation functional dynamics and water cycling under current and future climatic conditions.

  6. High Resolution Bathymetric LIDAR Measurements at San Luis Obispo Bay, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensky, T.; Seck, C.; Smith, D.

    2007-12-01

    The movement of sand by ocean currents is an invisible but critically important phenomenon to coastal communities and sea-vessel-dependent economies such as in San Luis Obispo Bay. Over time, sand (or sediment) can cause beaches to erode or rebuild and harbors to "silt up." Dredging harbors is an obvious control mechanism, but the process is messy and expensive. Thus, such "coastal management" decisions should be well informed. Unfortunately, the effect of ocean currents on sand and sediment levels on the ocean floor is poorly understood in part because it is hard to observe: it occurs at the bottom of the ocean. But questions remain: What are the sand movement dynamics at the bottom of San Luis Obispo Bay? Is the bay filling in? Emptying out? What effects do persistent wind and wave patterns have on the ocean bottom? What about large storms? In order to answer these questions, we have installed a bathymetric Light Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) system on the Cal Poly Center for Costal Marine Sciences Pier in Port San Luis Obispo, California. Using a 1 Watt ocean floor (benthic boundary layer or BBL). The photon detector is attached to a high resolution, multiple-stop timer, with 15 picoseconds of event-to-event resolution. This yields an approximate 1 cm resolution of LIDAR ranging and hence sediment transport dynamics. In this poster, we will present preliminary results of our work including evidence of surface- and BBL-scattered photons.

  7. Top-down modulation of hippocampal encoding activity as measured by high-resolution functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Carr, Valerie A; Engel, Stephen A; Knowlton, Barbara J

    2013-08-01

    Memory formation is known to be critically dependent upon the medial temporal lobe (MTL). Despite this well-characterized role, it remains unclear whether and how MTL encoding processes are affected by top-down goal states. Here, we examined the manner in which task demands at encoding affect MTL activity and its relation to subsequent memory performance. Participants were scanned using high-resolution neuroimaging of the MTL while engaging in two incidental encoding tasks: one that directed participants' attention to stimulus distinctiveness, and the other requiring evaluation of similarities across stimuli. We hypothesized that attending to distinctiveness would lead to the formation of more detailed memories and would more effectively engage the hippocampal circuit than attending to similarity. In line with our hypotheses, higher rates of subsequent recollection were observed for stimuli studied under the Distinctiveness than Similarity task. Critically, within the hippocampus, CA1 and the subiculum demonstrated an interaction between memory performance and task such that a significant subsequent memory effect was found only when task goals required attention to stimulus distinctiveness. To this end, robust engagement of the hippocampal circuit may underlie the observed behavioral benefits of attending to distinctiveness. Taken together, these findings advance understanding of the effects of top-down intentional information on successful memory formation across subregions of the MTL.

  8. High-Resolution THz Measurements of BrO Generated in AN Inductively Coupled Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemchick, Deacon J.; Drouin, Brian

    2017-06-01

    Building upon the foundation provided by previous work, the X_{1}^{2}Π_{3/2} and X_{2}^{2}Π_{1/2} states of the transient radical, BrO, were interrogated in previously unprobed spectral regions (0.5 to 1.7 THz) by employing JPL developed high-resolution cascaded frequency multiplier sources. Like other members of the halogen monoxides (XO), this species has been the target of several recent atmospheric remote sensing studies and is a known participant in a catalytic ozone degradation cycle. For the current work, BrO is generated in an inductively coupled plasma under dynamic flow conditions and rotational lines are observed directly at their Doppler-limited resolution. New spectral transitions including those owing to both the ground (ν=0) and excited (ν=1 and 2) vibrational states of isotopologues composed of permutations of natural abundance ^{16}O, ^{18}O, ^{79}Br, and ^{81}Br are fit to a global Hamiltonian containing both fine and hyperfine terms. In addition to further refining existing spectroscopic parameters, new observations will be made available to remote detection communities through addition to the JPL catalog. New findings will be discussed along with future plans to extend these studies to other halogen monoxides (X=Cl and I) and the more massive halogen dioxides (OXO & XOO).

  9. Variability of the North Atlantic Current: high resolution model data versus in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breckenfelder, Tilia; Rhein, Monika; Roessler, Achim; Behrens, Erik; Böning, Claus; Biastoch, Arne; Mertens, Christian

    2015-04-01

    The North Atlantic Current (NAC) provides an important heat source for the relatively warm winters in Western Europe by bringing warm and salty tropical/subtropical water into the subpolar gyre of the North Atlantic. The NAC is the northward extension of the Gulfstream and its warm and salty water form the warm upper branch of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). The NAC crosses the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) via the Charlie-Gibbs, Faraday and Maxwell Fracture Zones between 47° and 53°N. Along that section an array of four inverted echo sounders with bottom pressure sensors (PIES) are deployed since 2006 and combined with altimetry to quantify the NAC transport and its variability. The observed transport time series is compared to the high resolution output of the VIKING20 model, a 1/20° North Atlantic model which is embedded in a global model of 1/4° resolution (ORCA25) via a two-way nesting. We compare the horizontal and vertical flow fields, the mean transport and the variability as well as the water mass characteristics.

  10. High resolution measures of polarization and color of selected lunar areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, L. A.; Hall, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    High resolution observations of intensity, color (UBV) and polarization were obtained with scanning techniques for a number of lunar areas of special interest, including boundaries of some of the brightest and darkest lunar regions, certain Apollo landing sites and prominent craters. Two dimensional raster scans of colors were obtained for Alphonsus, Aristarchus, and Herodotus. The degree of polarization for any given phase angle appears to be roughly indicative of age. The darker younger mare surface are more highly polarized than the lighter and older mare surfaces, which appear to be more contaminated by lighter material from the highlands or by ray material thrown out from fresh craters. All mare surfaces are more highly polarized than the still older and lighter terra regions surrounding the maria. The very oldest craters are either dark-floored and show polarization characteristics similar to those of the mare surfaces, or if located in the highlands, they are less and less distinguishable from the highland background with greater age, and show the general highland polarization characteristics.

  11. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies of cuprate superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Palczewski, Ari Deibert

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is comprised of three different angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies on cuprate superconductors. The first study compares the band structure from two different single layer cuprates Tl2Ba2CuO6+δ (Tl2201) Tc, max ≈ 95 K and (Bi 1.35Pb0.85)(Sr1.47La0.38)CuO6+δ (Bi2201) Tc, max ≈ 35 K. The aim of the study was to provide some insight into the reasons why single layer cuprate's maximum transition temperatures are so different. The study found two major differences in the band structure. First, the Fermi surface segments close to (π,0) are more parallel in Tl2201 than in Bi2201. Second, the shadow band usually related to crystal structure is only present in Bi2201, but absent in higher Tc Tl2201. The second study looks at the different ways of doping Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi2212) in-situ by only changing the post bake-out vacuum conditions and temperature. The aim of the study is to systematically look into the generally overlooked experimental conditions that change the doping of a cleaved sample in ultra high vacuum (UHV) experiments. The study found two major experimental facts. First, in inadequate UHV conditions the carrier concentration of Bi2212 increases with time, due to the absorption of oxygen from CO2/CO molecules, prime contaminants present in UHV systems. Second, in a very clean UHV system at elevated temperatures (above about 200 K), the carrier concentration decreases due to the loss of oxygen atoms from the Bi-O layer. The final study probed the particle-hole symmetry of the pseudogap phase in high temperature superconducting cuprates by looking at the thermally excited bands above the Fermi level. The data showed a particle-hole symmetric pseudogap which symmetrically closes away from the nested FS before the node. The data is consistent

  12. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies of cuprate superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Palczewski, Ari Deibert

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is comprised of three different angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies on cuprate superconductors. The first study compares the band structure from two different single layer cuprates Tl2Ba2CuO6+δ (Tl2201) Tc,max ~95 K and (Bi1.35Pb0.85)(Sr1.47La0.38)CuO6+δ (Bi2201) Tc,max 35 K. The aim of the study was to provide some insight into the reasons why single layer cuprate's maximum transition temperatures are so different. The study found two major di erences in the band structure. First, the Fermi surface segments close to ( π,0) are more parallel in Tl2201 than in Bi2201. Second, the shadow band usually related to crystal structure is only present in Bi2201, but absent in higher Tc Tl2201. The second study looks at the different ways of doping Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi2212) in-situ by only changing the post bake-out vacuum conditions and temperature. The aim of the study is to systematically look into the generally overlooked experimental conditions that change the doping of a cleaved sample in ultra high vacuum (UHV) experiments. The study found two major experimental facts. First, in inadequate UHV conditions the carrier concentration of Bi2212 increases with time, due to the absorption of oxygen from CO2/CO molecules, prime contaminants present in UHV systems. Second, in a very clean UHV system at elevated temperatures (above about 200 K), the carrier concentration decreases due to the loss of oxygen atoms from the Bi-O layer. The final study probed the particle-hole symmetry of the pseudogap phase in high temperature superconducting cuprates by looking at the thermally excited bands above the Fermi level. The data showed a particle-hole symmetric pseudogap which symmetrically closes away from the nested FS before the node. The data is consistent with a

  13. Mapping unoccupied electronic states of freestanding graphene by angle-resolved low-energy electron transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicki, Flavio; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2016-08-01

    We report angle-resolved electron transmission measurements through freestanding graphene sheets in the energy range of 18 to 30 eV above the Fermi level. The measurements are carried out in a low-energy electron point source microscope, which allows simultaneously probing the transmission for a large angular range. The characteristics of low-energy electron transmission through graphene depend on its electronic structure above the vacuum level. The experimental technique described here allows mapping of the unoccupied band structure of freestanding two-dimensional materials as a function of the energy and probing angle, respectively, in-plane momentum. Our experimental findings are consistent with theoretical predictions of a resonance in the band structure of graphene above the vacuum level [V. U. Nazarov, E. E. Krasovskii, and V. M. Silkin, Phys. Rev. B 87, 041405 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.87.041405].

  14. Surface structure of imidazolium-based ionic liquids: Quantitative comparison between simulations and high-resolution RBS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kaoru; Nakanishi, Shunto; Lísal, Martin; Kimura, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    Elemental depth profiles of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([CnMIM][TFSI], n = 4, 6, 8) are measured using high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (HRBS). The profiles are compared with the results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Both MD simulations and HRBS measurements show that the depth profiles deviate from the uniform stoichiometric composition in the surface region, showing preferential orientations of ions at the surface. The MD simulations qualitatively reproduce the observed HRBS profiles but the agreement is not satisfactory. The observed discrepancy is ascribed to the capillary waves. By taking account of the surface roughness induced by the capillary waves, the agreement becomes almost perfect.

  15. Measurement of low radioactivity background in a high voltage cable by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vacri, M. L. di; Nisi, S.; Balata, M.

    2013-08-08

    The measurement of naturally occurring low level radioactivity background in a high voltage (HV) cable by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR ICP MS) is presented in this work. The measurements were performed at the Chemistry Service of the Gran Sasso National Laboratory. The contributions to the radioactive background coming from the different components of the heterogeneous material were separated. Based on the mass fraction of the cable, the whole contamination was calculated. The HR ICP MS results were cross-checked by gamma ray spectroscopy analysis that was performed at the low background facility STELLA (Sub Terranean Low Level Assay) of the LNGS underground lab using HPGe detectors.

  16. Determination of Spectroscopic Properties of Atmospheric Molecules from High Resolution Vacuum Ultraviolet Cross Section and Wavelength Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Yoshino, K.

    1997-01-01

    An account is given of progress during the period 8/l/96-7/31/97 on work on (a) cross section measurements of O2 S-R using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at the Photon Factory in Japan; (b) the determination of the predissociation linewidths of the Schumann-Runge bands (S-R) of 02; (c) cross section measurements of 02 Herzberg bands using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at Imperial College; and (d) cross section measurements of H2O in the wavelength region 120-188 nm. The experimental investigations are effected at high resolution with a 6.65 m scanning spectrometer and with the Fourier transform spectrometer. Below 175 nm, synchrotron radiation is most suitable for cross section measurements in combination with spectrometers at the Photon Factory Japan. Cross section measurements of the Doppler limited bands depend on using the very high resolution, available with the Fourier transform spectrometer, (0.025/cm resolution). All of these spectroscopic measurements are needed for accurate calculations of the production of atomic oxygen, the penetration of solar radiation into the Earth's atmosphere, and photochemistry of minor molecules.

  17. Angle-resolved molecular beam scattering of NO at the gas-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zutz, Amelia; Nesbitt, David J.

    2017-08-01

    This study presents first results on angle-resolved, inelastic collision dynamics of thermal and hyperthermal molecular beams of NO at gas-liquid interfaces. Specifically, a collimated incident beam of supersonically cooled NO (2 Π 1/2, J = 0.5) is directed toward a series of low vapor pressure liquid surfaces ([bmim][Tf2N], squalane, and PFPE) at θinc = 45(1)°, with the scattered molecules detected with quantum state resolution over a series of final angles (θs = -60°, -30°, 0°, 30°, 45°, and 60°) via spatially filtered laser induced fluorescence. At low collision energies [Einc = 2.7(9) kcal/mol], the angle-resolved quantum state distributions reveal (i) cos(θs) probabilities for the scattered NO and (ii) electronic/rotational temperatures independent of final angle (θs), in support of a simple physical picture of angle independent sticking coefficients and all incident NO thermally accommodating on the surface. However, the observed electronic/rotational temperatures for NO scattering reveal cooling below the surface temperature (Telec < Trot < TS) for all three liquids, indicating a significant dependence of the sticking coefficient on NO internal quantum state. Angle-resolved scattering at high collision energies [Einc = 20(2) kcal/mol] has also been explored, for which the NO scattering populations reveal angle-dependent dynamical branching between thermal desorption and impulsive scattering (IS) pathways that depend strongly on θs. Characterization of the data in terms of the final angle, rotational state, spin-orbit electronic state, collision energy, and liquid permit new correlations to be revealed and investigated in detail. For example, the IS rotational distributions reveal an enhanced propensity for higher J/spin-orbit excited states scattered into near specular angles and thus hotter rotational/electronic distributions measured in the forward scattering direction. Even more surprisingly, the average NO scattering angle (

  18. High resolution measurement of water drip rates in caves using an accoustic drip counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collister, C.; Mattey, D.

    2005-12-01

    Stable isotope records in speleothem provide one of the most promising means of reconstructing precipitation and temperature variations back into the past. The interpretation of speleothem oxygen isotope records in terms of a climate signal is not straightforward and much progress has been made through cave monitoring programs, where knowledge of the response of cave seepage rates to rain input on the surface provides vital information on aquifer processes. Continuous monitoring of drip rates at sites of active speleothem growth provides imortant constraints on processes that cause chemical and isotopic change in precipitation during its passage through the aquifer and into the cave environment. A widely used method of continuously monitoring drip rates employs tipping bucket devices which provide time integrated output dependent on the volume of the bucket and drip rate. Mechanical counting devices are sometimes unreliable in cave environments owing to condensation and carbonate precipitation interfering with the mechanism and unattended long term monitoring may be problematic. Accoustic drip counting is an attractive alternative method and we have designed an simple integrated acoustic drip counter/logger which counts the number of drips falling on the lid of the device over a user-defined time interval. This device provides a high resolution record of changing drip rates that is insensitive to spurious noise, deposition of calcite films, and can collect data for periods of 1-2 years without user intervention. The drip counter and logger is entirely solid state and fully self-contained in a rugged enclosure approximately 60mm x 60mm x 40mm. The lid of the box acts as a microphone which is tuned to record falling drops and exclude spurious signals. Low power electronics are used throughout, giving a battery life of approximately two years. The sensor will record drips falling from heights as low as 25 cm and drips at the rate of 5 per second can be resolved. Very

  19. Modeling angle-resolved photoemission of graphene and black phosphorus nano structures

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Han; Kwon, Soonnam

    2016-01-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data on electronic structure are difficult to interpret, because various factors such as atomic structure and experimental setup influence the quantum mechanical effects during the measurement. Therefore, we simulated ARPES of nano-sized molecules to corroborate the interpretation of experimental results. Applying the independent atomic-center approximation, we used density functional theory calculations and custom-made simulation code to compute photoelectron intensity in given experimental setups for every atomic orbital in poly-aromatic hydrocarbons of various size, and in a molecule of black phosphorus. The simulation results were validated by comparing them to experimental ARPES for highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite. This database provides the calculation method and every file used during the work flow. PMID:27164313

  20. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of liquid water at 29.5 eV

    PubMed Central

    Nishitani, Junichi; West, Christopher W.; Suzuki, Toshinori

    2017-01-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of liquid water was performed using extreme ultraviolet radiation at 29.5 eV and a time-of-flight photoelectron spectrometer. SiC/Mg coated mirrors were employed to select the single-order 19th harmonic from laser high harmonics, which provided a constant photon flux for different laser polarizations. The instrument was tested by measuring photoemission anisotropy for rare gases and water molecules and applied to a microjet of an aqueous NaI solution. The solute concentration was adjusted to eliminate an electric field gradient around the microjet. The observed photoelectron spectra were analyzed considering contributions from liquid water, water vapor, and an isotropic background. The anisotropy parameters of the valence bands (1b1, 3a1, and 1b2) of liquid water are considerably smaller than those of gaseous water, which is primarily attributed to electron scattering in liquid water. PMID:28405592

  1. Preparation of layered thin film samples for angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, S. E.; Zhou, B.; Huo, Y.; Harris, J. S.; Pushp, A.; Kellock, A. J.; Parkin, S. S. P.; Chen, Y.; Hesjedal, T.

    2014-09-22

    Materials with layered van der Waals crystal structures are exciting research topics in condensed matter physics and materials science due to outstanding physical properties associated with their strong two dimensional nature. Prominent examples include bismuth tritelluride and triselenide topological insulators (TIs), which are characterized by a bulk bandgap and pairwise counter-propagating spin-polarized electronic surface states. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) of ex-situ grown thin film samples has been limited by the lack of suitable surface preparation techniques. We demonstrate the shortcomings of previously successful conventional surface preparation techniques when applied to ternary TI systems which are susceptible to severe oxidation. We show that in-situ cleaving is a simple and effective technique for preparation of clean surfaces on ex-situ grown thin films for high quality ARPES measurements. The method presented here is universally applicable to other layered van der Waals systems as well.

  2. Modeling angle-resolved photoemission of graphene and black phosphorus nano structures.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Han; Kwon, Soonnam

    2016-05-10

    Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data on electronic structure are difficult to interpret, because various factors such as atomic structure and experimental setup influence the quantum mechanical effects during the measurement. Therefore, we simulated ARPES of nano-sized molecules to corroborate the interpretation of experimental results. Applying the independent atomic-center approximation, we used density functional theory calculations and custom-made simulation code to compute photoelectron intensity in given experimental setups for every atomic orbital in poly-aromatic hydrocarbons of various size, and in a molecule of black phosphorus. The simulation results were validated by comparing them to experimental ARPES for highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite. This database provides the calculation method and every file used during the work flow.

  3. Tunable vacuum ultraviolet laser based spectrometer for angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Rui; Mou, Daixiang; Wu, Yun; Huang, Lunan; McMillen, Colin D.; Kolis, Joseph; Giesber, Henry G.; Egan, John J.; Kaminski, Adam

    2014-03-01

    We have developed an angle-resolved photoemission spectrometer with tunable vacuum ultraviolet laser as a photon source. The photon source is based on the fourth harmonic generation of a near IR beam from a Ti:sapphire laser pumped by a CW green laser and tunable between 5.3 eV and 7 eV. The most important part of the set-up is a compact, vacuum enclosed fourth harmonic generator based on potassium beryllium fluoroborate crystals, grown hydrothermally in the US. This source can deliver a photon flux of over 1014 photon/s. We demonstrate that this energy range is sufficient to measure the kz dispersion in an iron arsenic high temperature superconductor, which was previously only possible at synchrotron facilities.

  4. Angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of square antidot lattices studied by Brillouin light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gubbiotti, G.; Tacchi, S.; Madami, M.; Carlotti, G.; Ding, J.; Adeyeye, A. O.

    2015-06-29

    The Brillouin light scattering technique has been exploited to study the angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of squared Permalloy antidot lattice. Frequency dispersion of spin waves has been measured for a set of fixed wave vector magnitudes, while varying the wave vector in-plane orientation with respect to the applied magnetic field. The magnonic band gap between the two most dispersive modes exhibits a minimum value at an angular position, which exclusively depends on the product between the selected wave vector magnitude and the lattice constant of the array. The experimental data are in very good agreement with predictions obtained by dynamical matrix method calculations. The presented results are relevant for magnonic devices where the antidot lattice, acting as a diffraction grating, is exploited to achieve multidirectional spin wave emission.

  5. Tunable vacuum ultraviolet laser based spectrometer for angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Rui; Mou, Daixiang; Wu, Yun; Huang, Lunan; Kaminski, Adam; McMillen, Colin D.; Kolis, Joseph; Giesber, Henry G.; Egan, John J.

    2014-03-15

    We have developed an angle-resolved photoemission spectrometer with tunable vacuum ultraviolet laser as a photon source. The photon source is based on the fourth harmonic generation of a near IR beam from a Ti:sapphire laser pumped by a CW green laser and tunable between 5.3 eV and 7 eV. The most important part of the set-up is a compact, vacuum enclosed fourth harmonic generator based on potassium beryllium fluoroborate crystals, grown hydrothermally in the US. This source can deliver a photon flux of over 10{sup 14} photon/s. We demonstrate that this energy range is sufficient to measure the k{sub z} dispersion in an iron arsenic high temperature superconductor, which was previously only possible at synchrotron facilities.

  6. Two-photon high-resolution measurement of partial pressure of oxygen in cerebral vasculature and tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sakadžić, Sava; Roussakis, Emmanuel; Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Mandeville, Emiri T.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Arai, Ken; Ruvinskaya, Svetlana; Devor, Anna; Lo, Eng H.; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Boas, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to measure oxygen partial pressure (pO2) with high temporal and spatial resolution in three dimensions is crucial for understanding oxygen delivery and consumption in normal and diseased brain. Among existing pO2 measurement methods, phosphorescence quenching is optimally suited for the task. However, previous attempts to couple phosphorescence with two-photon laser scanning microscopy have faced substantial difficulties because of extremely low two-photon absorption cross-sections of conventional phosphorescent probes. Here, we report the first practical in vivo two-photon high-resolution pO2 measurements in small rodents’ cortical microvasculature and tissue, made possible by combining an optimized imaging system with a two-photon-enhanced phosphorescent nanoprobe. The method features a measurement depth of up to 250 µm, sub-second temporal resolution and requires low probe concentration. Most importantly, the properties of the probe allowed for the first direct high-resolution measurement of cortical extravascular (tissue) pO2, opening numerous possibilities for functional metabolic brain studies. PMID:20693997

  7. A colorimetric DET technique for the high-resolution measurement of two-dimensional alkalinity distributions in sediment porewaters.

    PubMed

    Bennett, William W; Welsh, David T; Serriere, Antoine; Panther, Jared G; Teasdale, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of porewater alkalinity are fundamental to the study of organic matter mineralization in sediments, which plays an essential role in the global cycles of carbon and nutrients. A new colorimetric diffusive equilibration in thin film (DET) technique is described for measuring two-dimensional total alkalinity distributions in sediment porewaters at high resolution (1-2 mm(2)). Thin polyacrylamide hydrogel layers (0.8 mm) equilibrate with the porewater and, after removal, are immediately laid onto another hydrogel containing formic acid, which reacts with alkalinity-generating species, and the pH-indicator bromophenol blue. The resultant color change is quantified using computer-imaging densitometry. The lower limit of detection is 0.2 meq L(-1) and the upper measurement limit is 8 meq L(-1). Deployment in seagrass colonized sediment revealed high levels of spatial heterogeneity in the porewater alkalinity distribution, with concentrations ranging from 2.28 meq L(-1) in the overlying water to 5.13 meq L(-1) in some parts of the sediment. This is the first time that two-dimensional, high-resolution distributions of porewater alkalinity have been measured.

  8. Rotatable high-resolution ARPES system for tunable linear-polarization geometry

    PubMed Central

    Iwasawa, H.; Schwier, E. F.; Zheng, M.; Kojima, Y.; Hayashi, H.; Jiang, J.; Higashiguchi, M.; Aiura, Y.; Namatame, H.; Taniguchi, M.

    2017-01-01

    A rotatable high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) system has been developed to utilize tunable linear-polarization geometries on the linear undulator beamline (BL-1) at Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center. By rotating the whole ARPES measurement system, the photoelectron detection plane can be continuously changed from parallel to normal against the electric field vector of linearly polarized undulator radiation. This polarization tunability enables us to identify the symmetry of the initial electronic states with respect to the mirror planes, and to selectively observe the electronic states based on the dipole selection rule in the photoemission process. Specifications of the rotatable high-resolution ARPES system are described, as well as its capabilities with some representative experimental results. PMID:28664891

  9. Charge-density wave transition of 1T-VSe2 studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, K.; Sato, T.; Komatsu, H.; Takahashi, T.; Maeda, N.; Hayashi, K.

    2003-10-01

    High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has been performed on a layered transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) 1T-VSe2 to study the (4×4) charge-density wave (CDW) mechanism. We observed a partial Fermi-surface (FS) nesting on the electronlike FS centered at the M (L) point. The spectral weight near EF is considerably suppressed below the transition temperature (Tc=110 K) around the nested portion, while a negligible spectral change is observed even across Tc in other portions of FS. This suggests that the CDW transition in 1T-VSe2 is caused by the three-dimensional FS nesting. Implications are discussed in relation to the physical properties of 1T-VSe2 as well as the ARPES results of other TMDC’s.

  10. Bulk and surface electronic structure of hexagonal structured PtBi2 studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Q.; Du, Y. P.; Yang, X. J.; Zheng, Y.; Xu, D. F.; Niu, X. H.; Shen, X. P.; Yang, H. F.; Dudin, P.; Kim, T. K.; Hoesch, M.; Vobornik, I.; Xu, Z.-A.; Wan, X. G.; Feng, D. L.; Shen, D. W.

    2016-12-01

    PtBi2 with a layered hexagonal crystal structure was recently reported to exhibit an unconventional large linear magnetoresistance, while the mechanism involved is still elusive. Using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we present a systematic study on its bulk and surface electronic structure. Through careful comparison with first-principle calculations, our experiment distinguishes the low-lying bulk bands from entangled surface states, allowing the estimation of the real composition of samples. We find significant electron doping in PtBi2, implying a substantial Bi-deficiency-induced disorder therein. Intriguingly, we discover a Dirac-cone-like surface state on the boundary of the Brillouin zone, which is identified as an accidental Dirac band without topological protection. Our findings exclude linear band dispersion in the quantum limit as the cause of the unconventional large linear magnetoresistance but give support to the classical disorder model from the perspective of the electronic structure.

  11. Improved determination of seafloor absolute magnetization from uneven, near-seafloor magnetic measurements and high-resolution bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szitkar, F.; Dyment, J.; Choi, Y.; Fouquet, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Vector magnetometers installed on deep-sea submersibles offer a unique opportunity to achieve high resolution magnetic investigations at the scale of hundred to thousand meters. Once corrected for the vehicle induced and remanent magnetization, the measurements mostly reflect variations of the topography and the submersible path - i.e. the distance between the sources and the observation points. The interesting parameter, however, is the seafloor magnetization that can be interpreted in terms of geological processes. Here we present methods to compute absolute magnetization of the seafloor by taking advantage of the uneven track of the submersible. In these methods, synthetic anomalies are computed for a unit magnetization assuming the geometry of the experiment, i.e. the source and the submersible path. The absolute magnetization is determined by a comparison between the observed anomalies and the synthetic ones along sliding windows. The coherency between the two signals gives an estimation of the quality of the determination, and the phase provides information on the magnetic polarity, and therefore the age of volcanic features. Such a method has been developed by Honsho et al. (JGR, 2009) using deep-sea submersible data only, i.e. magnetic anomaly, depth and altitude of the submersible. The synthetic anomalies are computed using 2D forward modeling, i.e. assuming the structures to be infinite in the direction perpendicular to the submersible path. The method has been applied with success to linear profiles crossing elongated structures such as mid-ocean ridges, but may fail for structures departing from the 2D assumption. The adaptation of improving multibeam systems to autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) has opened the way to the collection of very high resolution bathymetric data (around 2m between each measurement). This development has triggered a new strategy to explore the seafloor using manned submersibles: an AUV is operated during night time to

  12. New Measurements of Doubly Ionized Iron Group Spectra by High Resolution Fourier Transform and Grating Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smillie, D. G.; Pickering, J. C.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R. J.; Smith, Peter L.; Nave, G.

    2006-01-01

    We report new measurements of doubly ionized iron group element spectra, important in the analysis of B-type (hot) stars whose spectra they dominate. These measurements include Co III and Cr III taken with the Imperial College VUV Fourier transform (FT) spectrometer and measurements of Co III taken with the normal incidence vacuum spectrograph at NIST, below 135 nm. We report new Fe III grating spectra measurements to complement our FT spectra. Work towards transition wavelengths, energy levels and branching ratios (which, combined with lifetimes, produce oscillator strengths) for these ions is underway.

  13. Remote sounding of stratospheric temperatures using high resolution radiance measurements from the IRIS-D. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallery, W. O.

    1974-01-01

    Remote sounding of stratospheric temperatures up to 3.2 millibars is attempted using high resolution (unapodized) radiance measurements in the 15 micron CO2 band from the Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer on Nimbus 4. Inversions are performed using the Chahine relaxation technique. Radiance data and simultaneous in situ temperature profiles are obtained from the Rocket/Nimbus Sounder Comparison. Numerical tests with synthetic radiance data show that the uncertainty in the retrieved temperatures due to random instrument noise is about 1.1 K when averaged over layers about 10 km thick. However, comparison of the measured radiances with the radiances calculated from the in situ profiles show the calculated radiances to be systematically higher than the measured radiances. The evidence indicates that systematic errors exist in both the radiance and the in situ measurements.

  14. High-resolution frequency measurement method with a wide-frequency range based on a quantized phase step law.

    PubMed

    Du, Baoqiang; Dong, Shaofeng; Wang, Yanfeng; Guo, Shuting; Cao, Lingzhi; Zhou, Wei; Zuo, Yandi; Liu, Dan

    2013-11-01

    A wide-frequency and high-resolution frequency measurement method based on the quantized phase step law is presented in this paper. Utilizing a variation law of the phase differences, the direct different frequency phase processing, and the phase group synchronization phenomenon, combining an A/D converter and the adaptive phase shifting principle, a counter gate is established in the phase coincidences at one-group intervals, which eliminates the ±1 counter error in the traditional frequency measurement method. More importantly, the direct phase comparison, the measurement, and the control between any periodic signals have been realized without frequency normalization in this method. Experimental results show that sub-picosecond resolution can be easily obtained in the frequency measurement, the frequency standard comparison, and the phase-locked control based on the phase quantization processing technique. The method may be widely used in navigation positioning, space techniques, communication, radar, astronomy, atomic frequency standards, and other high-tech fields.

  15. Determination of spectroscopic properties of atmospheric molecules from high resolution vacuum ultraviolet cross section and wavelength measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Yoshino, K.; Freeman, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Progress is given on work on: cross section measurements in the transmission window regions of the Schumann-Runge bands of oxygen; the determinations of predissociation linewidths; the theoretical calculation of band oscillator strengths of the Schumann-Runge absorption bands of O-16O-18; the determination of molecular spectroscopic constants; and the combined Herzberg continuum cross sections. The experimental investigations relevant to the cross section measurements, predissociation linewidths, and molecular spectroscopic constants are effected at high resolution with a 6.65 m scanning spectrometer which is, by virtue of its small instrumental width (FWHM = 0.0013 nm), suitable for cross section measurements of molecular bands with discrete rotational structure. Such measurements are needed for accurate calculations of the stratospheric production of atomic oxygen and heavy ozone formed following the photo-predissociation of O-16O-18 by solar radiation penetrating between the absorption lines of O-16(sub 2).

  16. High Resolution Temperature Measurement of Liquid Stainless Steel Using Hyperspectral Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Devesse, Wim; De Baere, Dieter; Guillaume, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    A contactless temperature measurement system is presented based on a hyperspectral line camera that captures the spectra in the visible and near infrared (VNIR) region of a large set of closely spaced points. The measured spectra are used in a nonlinear least squares optimization routine to calculate a one-dimensional temperature profile with high spatial resolution. Measurements of a liquid melt pool of AISI 316L stainless steel show that the system is able to determine the absolute temperatures with an accuracy of 10%. The measurements are made with a spatial resolution of 12 µm/pixel, justifying its use in applications where high temperature measurements with high spatial detail are desired, such as in the laser material processing and additive manufacturing fields. PMID:28067764

  17. Strong anisotropy of Dirac cones in SrMnBi2 and CaMnBi2 revealed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ya; Wang, Zhijun; Chen, Chaoyu; Shi, Youguo; Xie, Zhuojin; Yi, Hemian; Liang, Aiji; He, Shaolong; He, Junfeng; Peng, Yingying; Liu, Xu; Liu, Yan; Zhao, Lin; Liu, Guodong; Dong, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Chuangtian; Xu, Zuyan; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhou, X J

    2014-06-20

    The Dirac materials, such as graphene and three-dimensional topological insulators, have attracted much attention because they exhibit novel quantum phenomena with their low energy electrons governed by the relativistic Dirac equations. One particular interest is to generate Dirac cone anisotropy so that the electrons can propagate differently from one direction to the other, creating an additional tunability for new properties and applications. While various theoretical approaches have been proposed to make the isotropic Dirac cones of graphene into anisotropic ones, it has not yet been met with success. There are also some theoretical predictions and/or experimental indications of anisotropic Dirac cone in novel topological insulators and AMnBi2 (A = Sr and Ca) but more experimental investigations are needed. Here we report systematic high resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements that have provided direct evidence on the existence of strongly anisotropic Dirac cones in SrMnBi2 and CaMnBi2. Distinct behaviors of the Dirac cones between SrMnBi2 and CaMnBi2 are also observed. These results have provided important information on the strong anisotropy of the Dirac cones in AMnBi2 system that can be governed by the spin-orbital coupling and the local environment surrounding the Bi square net.

  18. Strong Anisotropy of Dirac Cones in SrMnBi2 and CaMnBi2 Revealed by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ya; Wang, Zhijun; Chen, Chaoyu; Shi, Youguo; Xie, Zhuojin; Yi, Hemian; Liang, Aiji; He, Shaolong; He, Junfeng; Peng, Yingying; Liu, Xu; Liu, Yan; Zhao, Lin; Liu, Guodong; Dong, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Chuangtian; Xu, Zuyan; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhou, X. J.

    2014-01-01

    The Dirac materials, such as graphene and three-dimensional topological insulators, have attracted much attention because they exhibit novel quantum phenomena with their low energy electrons governed by the relativistic Dirac equations. One particular interest is to generate Dirac cone anisotropy so that the electrons can propagate differently from one direction to the other, creating an additional tunability for new properties and applications. While various theoretical approaches have been proposed to make the isotropic Dirac cones of graphene into anisotropic ones, it has not yet been met with success. There are also some theoretical predictions and/or experimental indications of anisotropic Dirac cone in novel topological insulators and AMnBi2 (A = Sr and Ca) but more experimental investigations are needed. Here we report systematic high resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements that have provided direct evidence on the existence of strongly anisotropic Dirac cones in SrMnBi2 and CaMnBi2. Distinct behaviors of the Dirac cones between SrMnBi2 and CaMnBi2 are also observed. These results have provided important information on the strong anisotropy of the Dirac cones in AMnBi2 system that can be governed by the spin-orbital coupling and the local environment surrounding the Bi square net. PMID:24947490

  19. Band alignment of HfO2/In0.18Al0.82N determined by angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Man Hon Samuel; Bhuiyan, Maruf Amin; Zhang, Zheng; Pan, Ji Sheng; Tok, Eng Soon; Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2014-07-01

    The band-alignment of atomic layer deposited (ALD)-HfO2/In0.18Al0.82N was studied by high resolution angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The band bending near the HfO2/In0.18Al0.82N interface was investigated, and the potential variation across the interface was taken into account in the band alignment calculation. It is observed that the binding energies for N 1s and Al 2p in In0.18Al0.82N decreases and the corresponding extracted valence band offsets increases with increasing θ (i.e., closer to the HfO2/In0.18Al0.82N interface), as a result of an upward energy band bending towards the HfO2/In0.18Al0.82N interface. The resultant valence band offset and the conduction band offset for the ALD-HfO2/In0.18Al0.82N interface calculated was found to be 0.69 eV and 1.01 eV, respectively.

  20. A high-resolution optical measurement system for rapid acquisition of radiation flux density maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thelen, Martin; Raeder, Christian; Willsch, Christian; Dibowski, Gerd

    2017-06-01

    To identify the power and flux density of concentrated solar radiation the Institute of Solar Research at the German Aerospace Center (DLR - Deutsches Zentrum für Luft-und Raumfahrt e. V.) has used the camera-based measurement system FATMES (Flux and Temperature Measurement System) since 1995. The disadvantages of low resolution, difficult handling and poor computing power required a revision of the existing measurement system. The measurement system FMAS (Flux Mapping Acquisition system) is equipped with state-of-the-art-hardware, is compatible with computers off-the-shelf and is programmed in LabView. The expenditure of time for an image evaluation is reduced by the factor 60 compared to FATMES. The new measurement system is no longer associated with the facilities Solar Furnace and High Flux Solar Simulator at the DLR in Cologne but is also applicable as a mobile system. The data and the algorithms are transparent throughout the complete process. The measurement accuracy of FMAS is determined to at most ±3 % until now. The error of measurement of FATMES is at least 2 % higher according to the conducted comparison tests.

  1. High resolution time interval meter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

  2. Dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurements with high resolution.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jidong; Liu, Shenggang; Ma, Heli; Tao, Tianjiong; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Cangli; Tan, Hua

    2014-11-01

    A unique dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurement has been developed recently. This paper presents the working principle of the new interferometric system, which uses a photonic crystal fiber to transmit the wide-spectrum light beams and a high-speed streak camera or frame camera to record the interference stripes. Preliminary measurements of harmonic vibrations of a speaker, driven by a radio, and the changes in the tip clearance of a rotating gear wheel show that this new type of interferometer has the ability to perform absolute distance measurements both with high time- and distance-resolution.

  3. Dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurements with high resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Jidong; Liu, Shenggang; Ma, Heli; Tao, Tianjiong; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Cangli; Tan, Hua

    2014-11-15

    A unique dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurement has been developed recently. This paper presents the working principle of the new interferometric system, which uses a photonic crystal fiber to transmit the wide-spectrum light beams and a high-speed streak camera or frame camera to record the interference stripes. Preliminary measurements of harmonic vibrations of a speaker, driven by a radio, and the changes in the tip clearance of a rotating gear wheel show that this new type of interferometer has the ability to perform absolute distance measurements both with high time- and distance-resolution.

  4. High-resolution OH LIF velocity measurement technique for high-speed reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klavuhn, K. G.; Gauba, G.; Mcdaniel, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    A nonintrusive optical technique was developed for the quantitative study of velocity fields in steady, high-speed, reacting flows. A narrow-linewidth laser source was tuned through an isolated OH absorption line to measure the Doppler-shifted linecenter frequency relative to an iodine reference line. A counterpropagating beam approach was used to eliminate collisional impact shift effects. Pointwise measurements of velocity were made in a unique reacting underexpanded jet facility as an extensive calibration of the technique over a wide range of flow conditions. The extension of the technique to planar measurements is also discussed.

  5. High-resolution OH LIF velocity measurement technique for high-speed reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klavuhn, K. G.; Gauba, G.; Mcdaniel, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    A nonintrusive optical technique was developed for the quantitative study of velocity fields in steady, high-speed, reacting flows. A narrow-linewidth laser source was tuned through an isolated OH absorption line to measure the Doppler-shifted linecenter frequency relative to an iodine reference line. A counterpropagating beam approach was used to eliminate collisional impact shift effects. Pointwise measurements of velocity were made in a unique reacting underexpanded jet facility as an extensive calibration of the technique over a wide range of flow conditions. The extension of the technique to planar measurements is also discussed.

  6. A simple technique for high resolution time domain phase noise measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V. S.; Donahoe, T.

    1977-01-01

    A new time domain phase comparator is described. The device uses a novel technique to allow time domain phase measurements to be made with period and time interval counters without the use of offset reference oscillators. The device uses a single reference oscillator and allows measurements with a phase resolution greater than the noise floor of the reference. Data is presented showing a phase resolution of 0.02ps at 5 MHz with a crystal reference. The device has application in measuring the phase stability of systems where approximate phase quadrature can be maintained.

  7. High-Resolution Measurements of Photoionization of Ions Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, A.; Covington, A.M.; Emmons, E.D.; Gharaibeh, M.F.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Hinojosa, G.; Dominguez, I.; Ackerman, G.; Bozek, J.D.; Canton, S.; Rude, B.; Sant'Anna, M.M.; Schlachter, A. S.; Folkmann, F.

    2003-08-26

    Measurement of absolute cross sections for photoionization of ions has become feasible by merging a well-collimated ion beam with a monochromatic beam of synchrotron radiation. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source permits such measurements to be extended to multiply charged ions, and makes possible systematic studies along isoelectronic sequences. The evolution of atomic spectra along such sequences is commonly studied theoretically, but the predictive ability of the theoretical methods remains largely untested. Absolute cross-section measurements are presented for the first three ionic members of the isoelectronic sequence of nitrogen (O+, F2+ and Ne3+)

  8. High resolution surface morphology measurements using EBSD cross-correlation techniques and AFM.

    PubMed

    Vaudin, M D; Stan, G; Gerbig, Y B; Cook, R F

    2011-07-01

    The surface morphology surrounding wedge indentations in (001) Si has been measured using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). EBSD measurement of the lattice displacement field relative to a strain-free reference location allowed the surface uplift to be measured by summation of lattice rotations about the indentation axis. AFM was used in intermittent contact mode to determine surface morphology. The height profiles across the indentations for the two techniques agreed within 1 nm. Elastic uplift theory is used to model the data. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. High-resolution measurements of the spatial and temporal scalar structure of a turbulent plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crimaldi, J. P.; Koseff, J. R.

    Two techniques are described for measuring the scalar structure of turbulent flows. A planar laser-induced fluorescence technique is used to make highly resolved measurements of scalar spatial structure, and a single-point laser-induced fluorescence probe is used to make highly resolved measurements of scalar temporal structure. The techniques are used to measure the spatial and temporal structure of an odor plume released from a low-momentum, bed-level source in a turbulent boundary layer. For the experimental setup used in this study, a spatial resolution of 150μm and a temporal resolution of 1,000Hz are obtained. The results show a wide range of turbulent structures in rich detail; the nature of the structure varies significantly in different regions of the plume.

  10. Axial nano-displacement measurement with high resolution and wide range based on asymmetrical illumination.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Kuang, Cuifang; Ge, Jianhong; Liu, Xu

    2013-03-25

    We propose a novel axial nano-displacement measuring approach. Based on asymmetrical illumination, the axial drifts of the sample plane can be measured by detecting the position of the centroid of the focal spot. Both CCD and QD are used as the detector in the system and two data processing models are designed. With a relatively simple and applicable configuration, the proposed system can realize a wide measuring range of >4λand a high axial resolution of 2nm. Moreover, the presented approach is immune to the influence caused by the energy fluctuation of the laser source. Possessing these advantages, this measuring method has big potential to be applied in modern engineering and scientific researches.

  11. Flow Velocimetry for Weakly Conducting Electrolytes Based on High Resolution Lorentzforce Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, R.; Vasilyan, S.; Wiederhold, A.

    We demonstrate that a flow velocity measurement can be transformed into a non-invasive force measurement by metering the dragforce acting on a system of magnets that is arranged around a flow channel. This method is called Lorentzforce velocimetry and has been developed in the last years in our institute. It is a highly feasible principle for materials with large conductivity like liquid metals. To evolve this method for weakly conducting fluids like salt water or molten glass the dragforce measurement is the challenging bottleneck. Here forces of 10-8 and less of the weightforce of the magnet system have to be resolved in the rather noisy environment of the flow channel. In this paper different force measurement techniques get tested and compared. In the first setup the drag-force is acting on the magnets that are hanging as a pendulum with 0.5 m long wires on a mounting. Here the displacement in the range of a few μm can be detected with a laser interferometer and another optical positioning sensor. For the second setup the magnet system is attached to a state of the art electromagnetic force compensation balance. The balance is used in an unusual orientation: It is turned by 90 degrees to measure the horizontally acting Lorentzforce. Different ways of getting the correct force signal out of the two measurement setups will be presented and discussed. For generalization of the measurement principle the Lorentzforce is determined for different fluid profiles. In addition to that we have developed new systematic noise reduction methods to increase the resolution of both force measurement techniques by a factor of ten or larger which we will present here.

  12. Ice Fog and Light Snow Measurements Using a High-Resolution Camera System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Thomas; Gultepe, Ismail

    2016-09-01

    Ice fog, diamond dust, and light snow usually form over extremely cold weather conditions, and they affect both visibility and Earth's radiative energy budget. Prediction of these hydrometeors using models is difficult because of limited knowledge of the microphysical properties at the small size ranges due to measurement issues. These phenomena need to be better represented in forecast and climate models; therefore, in addition to remote sensing accurate measurements using ground-based instrumentation are required. An imaging instrument, aimed at measuring ice fog and light snow particles, has been built and is presented here. The ice crystal imaging (ICI) probe samples ice particles into a vertical, tapered inlet with an inlet flow rate of 11 L min-1. A laser beam across the vertical air flow containing the ice crystals allows for their detection by a photodetector collecting the scattered light. Detected particles are then imaged with high optical resolution. An illuminating LED flash and image capturing are triggered by the photodetector. In this work, ICI measurements collected during the fog remote sensing and modeling (FRAM) project, which took place during Winter of 2010-2011 in Yellowknife, NWT, Canada, are summarized and challenges related to measuring small ice particles are described. The majority of ice particles during the 2-month-long campaign had sizes between 300 and 800 μm. During ice fog events the size distribution measured had a lower mode diameter of 300 μm compared to the overall campaign average with mode at 500 μm.

  13. Measuring Eddy Heat and Constituent Fluxes with High-Resolution Na and Fe Doppler Lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, A. Z.; Gardner, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    Turbulent mixing by eddies generated by gravity wave breaking in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) can produce substantial vertical flux of heat and atmospheric constituent. Knowledge of the magnitude, geographic distribution and seasonal variability of this flux is important to a wide range of research problems, including general circulation modelling, atmospheric chemistry modelling, thermal balance calculations, and the study of the mesospheric metal and airglow layers. Because the eddy flux is difficult to measure, it is commonly parameterized as a diffusion process to account for the vertical transport. Doppler metal lidar techniques, coupled with large-aperture telescopes, now have the capability to directly measure this key transport process. In this work, the feasibility of deducing eddy flux from high spatial and temporal resolution lidar measurement is analysed in detail. It is shown that modern Doppler lidars should be able to measure the eddy fluxes and associated eddy diffusivity profiles throughout the mesopause region, when the raw measurements are collected at resolutions comparable to the inner scale of the turbulence spectrum. Like the measurements of gravity wave fluxes, long-term averaging, on the order of several tens of hours, would be required to obtain statistically significant results.

  14. Nanometer-scale displacement measurement with high resolution using dual cavity Fabry-Pérot interferometer for biomimetic robots.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Hyuk; Kim, Dae-Hyun

    2014-10-01

    A sensor of a biomimetic robot has to measure very small environmental changes such as, nanometer scale strains or displacements. Fiber optic sensor can be also one of candidates for the biomimetic sensor because the sensor is like thread and the shape of the sensor is similar to muscle fiber. A fiber optic interferometer, which is an optical-based sensor, can measure displacement precisely, so such device has been widely studied for the measurement of displacement on a nanometer-scale. Especially, a Quadrature Phase-Shifted Fiber Fabry-Pérot interferometer (QPS-FFPI) uses phase-information for this measurement, allowing it to provide a precision result with high resolution. In theory, the QPS-FFPI generates two sinusoidal signals of which the phase difference should be 90 degrees for the exact measurement of the displacement. In order to guarantee the condition of the phase difference, the relative adjustment of the cavities of the optical fibers is required. However, with such precise adjustment it is very hard to fix the proper difference of the two cavities for quadrature-phase-shifting. In this paper, a dual-cavity FFPI is newly proposed to measure the displacement on a nanometer-scale with a specific type of signal processing. In the signal processing, a novel phase-compensation algorithm is applied to force the phase difference to be exactly 90 degrees without any physical adjustment. As a result, the paper shows that the phase-compensated dual-cavity FFPI can effectively measure nanometer-scale displacement with high resolution under dynamic conditions.

  15. High-resolution airborne imaging DOAS measurements of NO2 above Bucharest during AROMAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Andreas Carlos; Schönhardt, Anja; Bösch, Tim; Richter, Andreas; Seyler, André; Ruhtz, Thomas; Constantin, Daniel-Eduard; Shaiganfar, Reza; Wagner, Thomas; Merlaud, Alexis; Van Roozendael, Michel; Belegante, Livio; Nicolae, Doina; Georgescu, Lucian; Burrows, John Philip

    2017-05-01

    In this study we report on airborne imaging DOAS measurements of NO2 from two flights performed in Bucharest during the AROMAT campaign (Airborne ROmanian Measurements of Aerosols and Trace gases) in September 2014. These measurements were performed with the Airborne imaging Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) instrument for Measurements of Atmospheric Pollution (AirMAP) and provide nearly gapless maps of column densities of NO2 below the aircraft with a high spatial resolution of better than 100 m. The air mass factors, which are needed to convert the measured differential slant column densities (dSCDs) to vertical column densities (VCDs), have a strong dependence on the surface reflectance, which has to be accounted for in the retrieval. This is especially important for measurements above urban areas, where the surface properties vary strongly. As the instrument is not radiometrically calibrated, we have developed a method to derive the surface reflectance from intensities measured by AirMAP. This method is based on radiative transfer calculation with SCIATRAN and a reference area for which the surface reflectance is known. While surface properties are clearly apparent in the NO2 dSCD results, this effect is successfully corrected for in the VCD results. Furthermore, we investigate the influence of aerosols on the retrieval for a variety of aerosol profiles that were measured in the context of the AROMAT campaigns. The results of two research flights are presented, which reveal distinct horizontal distribution patterns and strong spatial gradients of NO2 across the city. Pollution levels range from background values in the outskirts located upwind of the city to about 4 × 1016 molec cm-2 in the polluted city center. Validation against two co-located mobile car-DOAS measurements yields good agreement between the datasets, with correlation coefficients of R = 0.94 and R = 0.85, respectively. Estimations on the NOx

  16. High-resolution defect detection and noise reduction using wavelet methods for surface measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recknagel, Rolf-Jürgen; Kowarschik, Richard; Notni, Gunther

    2000-11-01

    Nowadays the demands on quality control are constantly increasing, hence an important step is a completely automated control with well defined risks. Very promising solutions are optical 3D, in addition to surface measurement. Here, an algorithm is presented to separate local defects from the surface and the noise (measurement error and surface roughness) with a given manufacturer's risk for piecewise smooth surfaces. The algorithm consists of a feature enhancement by means of special wavelets and thresholding and interpolation schemes to recover a defect- and noise-free surface and subsequently the extension and shape of the defects in all directions with reduced random errors. The limits of the algorithm such as accuracy, sensitivity, maximum cover rate of the surface with defects and rotation and translation invariance are shown theoretically and by numerical simulations. Experimentally, nanoindents are measured by means of confocal microscopy, and a reduction of the random errors by one order of magnitude is observed. Furthermore, a ceramic plate is measured by means of fringe projection and features are detected which are much smaller than the noise. Finally, a white light measurement is evaluated to demonstrate the scale and instrument independence of the method.

  17. The Kinect as a low cost high resolution small scale LiDAR for water surface and shallow subsurface measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankoff, K. D.; Russo, T. A.

    2012-04-01

    The Microsoft Kinect, a video game input device designed for the Xbox system, can be used by earth scientists as a low cost high resolution LiDAR sensor. The device can see through at least 1 m of clear still water, or image the surface of opaque water. When observing through water the measurement is distorted by the refraction at the air/water interface. We present initial results of a calibration for sub-aqueous measurements, and describe a method for measuring sub-aqueous features and water height. When waves exist on the surface the signal is further convoluted and both the waves and subsurface are captured in the signal. We discuss signal deconvolution and techniques for capturing the relative and/or absolute values of surface waves and subsurface features.

  18. Determination of Spectroscopic Properties of Atmospheric Molecules from High Resolution Vacuum Ultraviolet Cross Section and Wavelength Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Yoshino, K.

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the spectroscopy and the cross sections of the simple molecules of atmospheric interest such as oxygen, nitric oxide, carbon dioxide, and water. We have made cross section measurements on an absolute base without the effects from the limited instrumental resolution. We have used the following different instruments- the grating spectrometer (6.65-m at CfA, 3-m at Photon Factory), VUV Fourier transform spectrometer at Imperial College, and then moved the same one to the Photon Factory. Selection of the instruments depend on the appearance of molecular bands, and their wavelength region. For example, the cross section measurements of Doppler limited bands can been done with the Fourier transform spectrometer at the very high resolution (0.025/ cm resolution). All of these spectroscopic measurements are needed for accurate calculations of the production of atomic oxygen penetration of solar radiation into the Earth's atmosphere, and photochemistry of minor molecules.

  19. High Resolution Measurement of the ^16O(γ,pn)^14N_0,1,2... Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrow, Kenneth; Pywell, Rob; Kolb, Norm; Adimi, Farida; Vogt, Johannes; Jury, Jim; Thompson, Max; Kuzin, Alex

    1997-10-01

    Results of the ^16O(γ,pn)^14N_0,1,2... measurement will be presented. This measurement used the photon tagging facility located at the University of Saskatchewan Accelerator Laboratory. The tagged photon energy range was from 100 to 140 MeV. Events in which the photon interacted within the nucleus resulting in the simultaneous emission of a proton and a neutron were recorded. The protons were detected using high resolution CsI(Tl) detectors while the neutron's energy was determined by a time-of-flight measurement. In order to reconstruct the residual states in ^14N a net missing energy resolution of approximately 2 MeV FWHM was desired. By resolving the residual states and using the known spin, parity and isospin, information about the quantum numbers of the two nucleon photoabsortion mechanism can be extracted within the frame work of a spectator model for the recoil ^14N nucleus.

  20. Determining Metacarpophalangeal Flexion Angle Tolerance for Reliable Volumetric Joint Space Measurements by High-resolution Peripheral Quantitative Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Tom, Stephanie; Frayne, Mark; Manske, Sarah L; Burghardt, Andrew J; Stok, Kathryn S; Boyd, Steven K; Barnabe, Cheryl

    2016-10-01

    The position-dependence of a method to measure the joint space of metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints using high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) was studied. Cadaveric MCP were imaged at 7 flexion angles between 0 and 30 degrees. The variability in reproducibility for mean, minimum, and maximum joint space widths and volume measurements was calculated for increasing degrees of flexion. Root mean square coefficient of variance values were < 5% under 20 degrees of flexion for mean, maximum, and volumetric joint spaces. Values for minimum joint space width were optimized under 10 degrees of flexion. MCP joint space measurements should be acquired at < 10 degrees of flexion in longitudinal studies.

  1. High-resolution differential mode delay measurement for a multimode optical fiber using a modified optical frequency domain reflectometer.

    PubMed

    Ahn, T-J; Kim, D

    2005-10-03

    A novel differential mode delay (DMD) measurement technique for a multimode optical fiber based on optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) has been proposed. We have obtained a high-resolution DMD value of 0.054 ps/m for a commercial multimode optical fiber with length of 50 m by using a modified OFDR in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer structure with a tunable external cavity laser and a Mach-Zehnder interferometer instead of Michelson interferometer. We have also compared the OFDR measurement results with those obtained using a traditional time-domain measurement method. DMD resolution with our proposed OFDR technique is more than an order of magnitude better than a result obtainable with a conventional time-domain method.

  2. Determination of Spectroscopic Properties of Atmospheric Molecules from High Resolution Vacuum Ultraviolet Cross Section and Wavelength Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Yoshino, K.

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the spectroscopy and the cross sections of the simple molecules of atmospheric interest such as oxygen, nitric oxide, carbon dioxide, and water. We have made cross section measurements on an absolute base without the effects from the limited instrumental resolution. We have used the following different instruments- the grating spectrometer (6.65-m at CfA, 3-m at Photon Factory), VUV Fourier transform spectrometer at Imperial College, and then moved the same one to the Photon Factory. Selection of the instruments depend on the appearance of molecular bands, and their wavelength region. For example, the cross section measurements of Doppler limited bands can been done with the Fourier transform spectrometer at the very high resolution (0.025/ cm resolution). All of these spectroscopic measurements are needed for accurate calculations of the production of atomic oxygen penetration of solar radiation into the Earth's atmosphere, and photochemistry of minor molecules.

  3. High-Resolution Capacitance Measurement By Force Microscopy: Application To Sample Characterization And Potentiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, David W.; Martin, Yves; Wiekramasinghe, Kumar

    1988-07-01

    We demonstrate the usefulness and high sensitivity of the atomic force microscope (AFM) for imaging surface dielectric properties and for potentiometry through the detection of electrostatic forces. The attractive force with an applied voltage between tip and sample is generally much larger than the van der Waals force. On the other hand, electric forces as small as 10-10 N have been measured, corresponding to a capacitance of 10-19 farad. The sensitivity of our AFM should ultimately allow us to detect capacitances as low as 8 x 10-22 farad. We have used this technique to detect the presence of dielectric material over Si, and have made measure-ments of the voltage over a p-n junction with sub-micron spatial resolution.

  4. Deflection Measurements of a Thermally Simulated Nuclear Core Using a High-Resolution CCD-Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanojev, B. J.; Houts, M.

    2004-01-01

    Space fission systems under consideration for near-term missions all use compact. fast-spectrum reactor cores. Reactor dimensional change with increasing temperature, which affects neutron leakage. is the dominant source of reactivity feedback in these systems. Accurately measuring core dimensional changes during realistic non-nuclear testing is therefore necessary in predicting the system nuclear equivalent behavior. This paper discusses one key technique being evaluated for measuring such changes. The proposed technique is to use a Charged Couple Device (CCD) sensor to obtain deformation readings of electrically heated prototypic reactor core geometry. This paper introduces a technique by which a single high spatial resolution CCD camera is used to measure core deformation in Real-Time (RT). Initial system checkout results are presented along with a discussion on how additional cameras could be used to achieve a three- dimensional deformation profile of the core during test.

  5. Interrogating Biology with Force: Single Molecule High-Resolution Measurements with Optical Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Capitanio, Marco; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2013-01-01

    Single molecule force spectroscopy methods, such as optical and magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy, have opened up the possibility to study biological processes regulated by force, dynamics of structural conformations of proteins and nucleic acids, and load-dependent kinetics of molecular interactions. Among the various tools available today, optical tweezers have recently seen great progress in terms of spatial resolution, which now allows the measurement of atomic-scale conformational changes, and temporal resolution, which has reached the limit of the microsecond-scale relaxation times of biological molecules bound to a force probe. Here, we review different strategies and experimental configurations recently developed to apply and measure force using optical tweezers. We present the latest progress that has pushed optical tweezers’ spatial and temporal resolution down to today’s values, discussing the experimental variables and constraints that are influencing measurement resolution and how these can be optimized depending on the biological molecule under study. PMID:24047980

  6. Ice fog and light snow measurements using a high resolution camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Thomas; Gultepe, Ismail

    2016-04-01

    In this presentation, measurements collected by the ice crystal imaging (ICI) probe employed during FRAM (Fog Remote Sensing and Modeling) project for the Winter of 2010-2011 in Yellowknife, NWT, Canada are analysed to study small ice crystal impact on aviation operations. Ice fog, diamond dust, and light snow form during cold weather conditions and they affect aviation operations through visibility and deposition over the surfaces. In addition, these events influence the local heat budget through radiative cooling. Prediction of these hydrometeors using models is difficult because of limited knowledge of the microphysical properties at the small size ranges. These phenomena need to be better represented in forecast and climate models and this can only be done using accurate measurements from ground-based instrumentation. Imaging of ice particles' properties can complement other in-situ measurements being collected routinely. The newly developed ICI probe, aimed at measuring ice fog and light snow particles, is presented here. The ICI probe samples ice particles through a vertical inlet, where a laser beam and photodetector detect ice crystals contained in the flow. The detected particles are then imaged with high optical resolution between 10 to 1000 micron size range. An illuminating LED flash and image capturing for measurements are triggered by the photodetector. The results suggested that the majority of ice particles during the two-month long campaign were small with sizes between 300 μm and 800 μm. During ice fog events, the size distribution measured had a lower mode diameter of 300 μm compared to the overall campaign average with mode at 500 μm. In this presentation, challenges and issues related to small ice crystals are described and their importance for aviation operations and climate change are discussed.

  7. High resolution kilometric range optical telemetry in air by radio frequency phase measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillory, Joffray; Šmíd, Radek; García-Márquez, Jorge; Truong, Daniel; Alexandre, Christophe; Wallerand, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    We have developed an optical Absolute Distance Meter (ADM) based on the measurement of the phase accumulated by a Radio Frequency wave during its propagation in the air by a laser beam. In this article, the ADM principle will be described and the main results will be presented. In particular, we will emphasize how the choice of an appropriate photodetector can significantly improve the telemeter performances by minimizing the amplitude to phase conversion. Our prototype, tested in the field, has proven its efficiency with a resolution better than 15 μm for a measurement time of 10 ms and distances up to 1.2 km.

  8. High-Resolution Measurements of e++H2O Total Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loreti, A.; Kadokura, R.; Fayer, S. E.; Kövér, Á.; Laricchia, G.

    2016-12-01

    Using a purely electrostatic positron beam, the total cross section of positrons scattering from H2O has been measured for the first time with a high angular discrimination (≃1 ° ) against forward scattered projectiles. Results are presented in the energy range (10-300) eV. Significant deviations from previous measurements are found which are, if ascribed entirely to the angular acceptances of various experimental systems, in quantitative accord with ab initio theoretical predictions of the differential elastic scattering cross section.

  9. High resolution kilometric range optical telemetry in air by radio frequency phase measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Guillory, Joffray; García-Márquez, Jorge; Truong, Daniel; Wallerand, Jean-Pierre; Šmíd, Radek; Alexandre, Christophe

    2016-07-15

    We have developed an optical Absolute Distance Meter (ADM) based on the measurement of the phase accumulated by a Radio Frequency wave during its propagation in the air by a laser beam. In this article, the ADM principle will be described and the main results will be presented. In particular, we will emphasize how the choice of an appropriate photodetector can significantly improve the telemeter performances by minimizing the amplitude to phase conversion. Our prototype, tested in the field, has proven its efficiency with a resolution better than 15 μm for a measurement time of 10 ms and distances up to 1.2 km.

  10. Small scale high resolution LiDAR measurements of a subglacial conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankoff, K. D.; Gulley, J.

    2012-04-01

    We present direct measurements of surface roughness in a sub-glacial conduit system underneath the Rieperbreen Glacier, Svalbard, Norway. Data was collected with a low-cost (129 USD) Microsoft Kinect video game device used as a LIDAR sensor. Surface roughness is a primary control on water flow in rivers, channels, and cave conduit systems and understanding the effects of surface roughness on water flow has been problematic due to lack of direct measurements of roughness in natural systems. We use the ice scallop dimensions to derive flow velocity and explore implications of the changing roughness parameters as the cave grows and shrinks.

  11. Retrieval of Greenhouse Gas in the LA Basin Using High-Resolution CLARS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Natraj, V.; Shia, R.; Fu, D.; Wong, C.; Pongetti, T. J.; Sander, S. P.; Yung, Y. L.

    2013-12-01

    Megacities, such as Los Angeles, contribute significantly to the world's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In these areas, heavy pollution makes aerosol scattering, in particular, important in the analysis of remote sensing measurements. Since 2011, GHG column abundances in the LA basin have been measured by the Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) at the California Laboratory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (CLARS) located on Mt. Wilson, California. In the presence of haze, the measured column abundances display a low bias resulting from aerosol scattering in the near-infrared spectral region. In this study, we use a radiative transfer model to study the physical mechanism by which aerosols in the Los Angeles basin boundary layer contribute to this low bias and the feasibility of retrieving CO2 in the presence of aerosol. The retrieval algorithm is set up and tested with synthetic spectra. We also calculate the degrees of freedom and information content as a function of signal-to-noise-ratio and resolving power of the instrument to investigate the possibility of vertical profile retrieval. Retrieval biases caused by aerosol scattering in both the boundary layer and the free atmosphere are analyzed separately. By changing aerosol optical depth and solar zenith angle, we obtain the simulated daily variations of CO2 and O2 slant column densities, and compare the results with CLARS measurements.

  12. High resolution steady-state measurements of thermal contact resistance across thermal interface material junctions.

    PubMed

    Warzoha, Ronald J; Donovan, Brian F

    2017-09-01

    Thermal interface materials (TIMs) are meant to reduce the interfacial thermal resistance (RT) across bare metal contacts in commercial electronics packaging systems. However, there is little scientific consensus governing material design for optimized thermal performance. This is principally due to the inability to separate the effects of the intrinsic material thermal properties from the magnitude of heat flow crossing the TIM-substrate junction (RC). To date, efforts to isolate these effects using standard thermal interface material characterization techniques have not been successful. In this work, we develop an infrared thermography-based steady-state heat meter bar apparatus with a novel in situ thickness measurement system having 0.5 nm sensitivity. These in situ thickness measurements allow us to simultaneously determine RT and RC independently across current state-of-the-art TIMs with ±5% uncertainty. In this work, thermal pastes with bond line thicknesses ranging between 5 and 50 μm are used to illustrate the capability of the apparatus to measure extremely thin materials that are expected to achieve relatively low values of RT. Results suggest that the contribution of the thermal contact resistance to the total thermal resistance can range from 5% to 80% for these materials. This finding highlights the need for appropriate metrology and independent measurements of RC and RT to better optimize thermal interface materials for a number of important electronics applications.

  13. High resolution steady-state measurements of thermal contact resistance across thermal interface material junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warzoha, Ronald J.; Donovan, Brian F.

    2017-09-01

    Thermal interface materials (TIMs) are meant to reduce the interfacial thermal resistance (RT) across bare metal contacts in commercial electronics packaging systems. However, there is little scientific consensus governing material design for optimized thermal performance. This is principally due to the inability to separate the effects of the intrinsic material thermal properties from the magnitude of heat flow crossing the TIM-substrate junction (RC). To date, efforts to isolate these effects using standard thermal interface material characterization techniques have not been successful. In this work, we develop an infrared thermography-based steady-state heat meter bar apparatus with a novel in situ thickness measurement system having 0.5 nm sensitivity. These in situ thickness measurements allow us to simultaneously determine RT and RC independently across current state-of-the-art TIMs with ±5% uncertainty. In this work, thermal pastes with bond line thicknesses ranging between 5 and 50 μ m are used to illustrate the capability of the apparatus to measure extremely thin materials that are expected to achieve relatively low values of RT. Results suggest that the contribution of the thermal contact resistance to the total thermal resistance can range from 5% to 80% for these materials. This finding highlights the need for appropriate metrology and independent measurements of RC and RT to better optimize thermal interface materials for a number of important electronics applications.

  14. High resolution pollutant measurements in complex urban environments using mobile monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measuring air pollution in real-time using an instrumented vehicle platform has been an emerging strategy to resolve air pollution trends at a very fine spatial scale (10s of meters). Achieving second-by-second data representative of urban air quality trends requires advanced in...

  15. High resolution pollutant measurements in complex urban environments using mobile monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measuring air pollution in real-time using an instrumented vehicle platform has been an emerging strategy to resolve air pollution trends at a very fine spatial scale (10s of meters). Achieving second-by-second data representative of urban air quality trends requires advanced in...

  16. Prediction of sugarcane sucrose content with high resolution, hyperspectral leaf reflectance measurements

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Experiments were conducted to determine if leaf reflectance measurements could be used to predict theoretically recoverable sugar (TRS) levels in sugarcane prior to harvest. Leaf and stalk samples were collected from multi-variety first-ratoon (FR) sugarcane maturity studies in 2005 at three sample ...

  17. Prediction of sugarcane sucrose content with high resolution, hyperspectral leaf reflectance measurements

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Remote sensing for crop maturity parameters may offer sugarcane producers a method to develop harvest schedules that maximize sucrose production. Several tests were conducted to determine if leaf reflectance measurements could be used to predict theoretically recoverable sugar (TRS) levels (crop mat...

  18. High-resolution TALIF measurements of atomic oxygen: determination of gas temperature and collisional broadening coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Jean-Paul; Marinov, Daniil; Guaitella, Olivier; Drag, Cyril; Engeln, Richard; Golda, Judith; Schultz-von der Gathern, Volker

    2016-09-01

    Two-photon Absorption Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) is a well-established technique to measure relative (and with appropriate calibration techniques, absolute) densities of atoms in plasmas and flames. The excitation line profiles can provide additional information, but this is usually overlooked due to the mediocre spectral resolution of commercial pulsed dye laser systems. We have investigated O-atom TALIF excitation line profiles using a house-built narrow line-width pulsed UV laser system, based on pulsed Ti:Sa ring laser seeded by a cw infrared diode laser. The observed Doppler profiles allow unambiguous measurement of gas temperature with high precision in O2 and CO2 DC glow discharges. Sub-Doppler measurements, performed by reflecting the laser beam back through excitation zone, allow the pressure-broadened line shapes to be observed, both in a pure O2 DC discharge (up to 10 Torr pressure) and in an atmospheric pressure RF plasma jet in He/O2. Pressure broadening coefficients of the 3p3PJ state of O were determined for O2 and He bath gases, and were found to be an order of magnitude bigger than that predicted from the measured quenching rate. Work performed in the LABEX Plas@par project, with financial state aid (ANR-11-IDEX-0004-02 and ANR-13-BS09-0019).

  19. A high-resolution multi-slit phase space measurement technique for low-emittance beams

    SciTech Connect

    Thangaraj, J. C. T.; Piot, P.

    2012-12-21

    Precise measurement of transverse phase space of a high-brightness electron beamis of fundamental importance in modern accelerators and free-electron lasers. Often, the transverse phase space of a high-brightness, space-charge-dominated electron beam is measured using a multi-slit method. In this method, a transverse mask (slit/pepperpot) samples the beaminto a set of beamlets, which are then analyzed on to a screen downstream. The resolution in this method is limited by the type of screen used which is typically around 20 {mu}m for a high-sensitivity Yttrium Aluminum Garnet screen. Accurate measurement of sub-micron transverse emittance using this method would require a long drift space between the multi-slit mask and observation screen. In this paper, we explore a variation of the technique that incorporates quadrupole magnets between the multi-slit mask and the screen. It is shown that this arrangement can improve the resolution of the transverse-phase-space measurement with in a short footprint.

  20. High-resolution wind speed measurements using actively heated fiber optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayde, Chadi; Thomas, Christoph K.; Wagner, James; Selker, John

    2015-11-01

    We present a novel technique to simultaneously measure wind speed (U) at thousands of locations continuously in time based on measurement of velocity-dependent heat transfer from a heated surface. Measuring temperature differences between paired passive and actively heated fiber-optic (AHFO) cables with a distributed temperature sensing system allowed estimation of U at over 2000 sections along the 230 m transect (resolution of 0.375 m and 5.5 s). The underlying concept is similar to that of a hot wire anemometer extended in space. The correlation coefficient between U measured by two colocated sonic anemometers and the AHFO were 0.91 during the day and 0.87 at night. The combination of classical passive and novel AHFO provides unprecedented dynamic observations of both air temperature and wind speed spanning 4 orders of magnitude in spatial scale (0.1-1000 m) while resolving individual turbulent motions, opening new opportunities for testing basic theories for near-surface geophysical flows.

  1. High-resolution micromechanical measurement in real time of forces exerted by living cells.

    PubMed

    Swierczewski, Robert; Hedley, John; Redfern, Chris P F

    2016-05-03

    The aim of this study was to compare uniaxial traction forces exerted by different cell types using a novel sensor design and to test the dependence of measured forces on cytoskeletal integrity. The sensor design detects forces generated between 2 contact points by cells spanning a gap. The magnitude of these forces varied according to cell type and were dependent on cytoskeletal integrity. The response time for drug-induced cytoskeletal disruption also varied between cell types: dermal fibroblasts exerted the greatest forces and had the slowest drug response times; EBV-transformed epithelial cells also had slow cytoskeletal depolymerisation times but exerted the lowest forces overall. Conversely, lung epithelial tumor cells exerted low forces but had the fastest depolymerisation drug response. These results provide proof of principle for a new design of force-measurement sensor based on optical interferometry, an approach that can be used to study cytoskeletal dynamics in real time.

  2. High dynamic, high resolution and wide range single shot temporal pulse contrast measurement.

    PubMed

    Oksenhendler, Thomas; Bizouard, Pierre; Albert, Olivier; Bock, Stefan; Schramm, Ulrich

    2017-05-29

    A novel apparatus for the single-shot measurement of the temporal pulse contrast of modern ultra-short pulse lasers is presented, based on a simple yet conceptual refinement of the self-referenced spectral interferometry (SRSI) approach. The introduction of the spatial equivalent of a temporal delay by tilted beams analyzed with a high quality imaging spectrometer, enables unprecedented performance in dynamic, temporal range and resolution simultaneously. Demonstrated consistently in simulation and experiment at the front-end of the PW laser Draco, the full range of the ps temporal contrast defining the quality of relativistic laser-solid interaction could be measured with almost 80 dB dynamic range, 18ps temporal window, and 18fs temporal resolution. Additionally, spatio-temporal coupling as in the case of a pulse front tilt can be quantitatively explored.

  3. Integrated reflectivity measurements of hydrogen phthalate crystals for high-resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zastrau, U.; Förster, E.

    2014-09-01

    The integrated x-ray reflectivity of Potassium Hydrogen Phthalate (KAP) and Rubidium Hydrogen Phthalate (RAP) crystals is studied at a photon energy of (1740±14) eV using a double-crystal setup. The absolute measured reflectivities are in < 5% agreement with the values predicted by the dynamic diffraction theory for perfect crystals when absorption is included. Within 4% experimental error margins, specimen that were exposed to ambient conditions over many years show identical reflectivity as specimen that were cleaved just before the measurement. No differences are observed between cleaving off a 10 μm surface layer and splitting the entire crystal bulk of 2 mm thickness. We conclude that at 1.7 keV photon energy the penetration depth of ~ 1 μm is large compared to a potentially deteriorated surface layer of a few 10 nm.

  4. High resolution time-of-flight measurements in small and large scintillation counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Martellotti, G.; Massa, F.; Rambaldi, A.; Sciubba, A.

    1981-06-01

    In a test run, the experimental time-of-flight resolution was measured for several different scintillation counters of small (10 × 5 cm 2) and large (100 × 15 cm 2 and 75 × 25 cm 2) area. The design characteristics were decided on the basis of theoretical Monte Carlo calculations. We report results using twisted, fish-tail, and rectangular light-guides and different types of scintillator (NE114 and PILOT U). Time resolution up to ˜130-150 ps fwhm for the small counters and up to ˜280-300 ps fwhm for the large counters were obtained. The spatial resolution from time measurements in the large counters is also reported. The results of Monte Carlo calculations on the type of scintillator, the shape and dimensions of the light-guides, and the nature of the external wrapping surfaces — to be used in order to optimize the time resolution — are also summarized.

  5. High-resolution intracellular viscosity measurement using time-dependent fluorescence anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Parker, Wesley C; Chakraborty, Nilay; Vrikkis, Regina; Elliott, Gloria; Smith, Stuart; Moyer, Patrick J

    2010-08-02

    A low-cost pulsed laser is used in conjunction with a homebuilt laser confocal-scanning epifluorescence microscope having submicron lateral and axial spatial resolution to determine cytoplasmic viscosity at specific intracytoplasmic locations in J774 mouse macrophage cells. Time-dependent fluorescence anisotropy measurements are made at each location and global deconvolution techniques are used to determine rotational correlation times. These rotational correlation times are related to the hydrated volume of 8-hydroxyperene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (HPTS) to calculate viscosity at specific points inside the cell. In the cytoplasmic areas measured, rotational correlation times of HPTS ranged from 0.186 ns to 0.411 ns, corresponding to viscosities ranging from 1.00 +/- 0.03 cP to 2.21+/- 0.05 cP.

  6. Measuring high-resolution sky luminance distributions with a CCD camera.

    PubMed

    Tohsing, Korntip; Schrempf, Michael; Riechelmann, Stefan; Schilke, Holger; Seckmeyer, Gunther

    2013-03-10

    We describe how sky luminance can be derived from a newly developed hemispherical sky imager (HSI) system. The system contains a commercial compact charge coupled device (CCD) camera equipped with a fish-eye lens. The projection of the camera system has been found to be nearly equidistant. The luminance from the high dynamic range images has been calculated and then validated with luminance data measured by a CCD array spectroradiometer. The deviation between both datasets is less than 10% for cloudless and completely overcast skies, and differs by no more than 20% for all sky conditions. The global illuminance derived from the HSI pictures deviates by less than 5% and 20% under cloudless and cloudy skies for solar zenith angles less than 80°, respectively. This system is therefore capable of measuring sky luminance with the high spatial and temporal resolution of more than a million pixels and every 20 s respectively.

  7. A high-resolution magnetic tweezer for single-molecule measurements.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kipom; Saleh, Omar A

    2009-11-01

    Magnetic tweezers (MT) are single-molecule manipulation instruments that utilize a magnetic field to apply force to a biomolecule-tethered magnetic bead while using optical bead tracking to measure the biomolecule's extension. While relatively simple to set up, prior MT implementations have lacked the resolution necessary to observe sub-nanometer biomolecular configuration changes. Here, we demonstrate a reflection-interference technique for bead tracking, and show that it has much better resolution than traditional diffraction-based systems. We enhance the resolution by fabricating optical coatings on all reflecting surfaces that optimize the intensity and contrast of the interference image, and we implement feedback control of the focal position to remove drift. To test the system, we measure the length change of a DNA hairpin as it undergoes a folding/unfolding transition.

  8. Characterization of fracture permeability with high-resolution vertical flow measurements during borehole pumping.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Hess, A.E.; Cheng, C.H.; Hardin, E.

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of fracture permeability in granitic rocks was investigated by measuring the distribution of vertical flow in boreholes during periods of steady pumping. Pumping tests were conducted at two sites chosen to provide examples of moderately fractured rocks near Mirror Lake, New Hampshire and intensely fractured rocks near Oracle, Arizona. A sensitive heat-pulse flowmeter was used for accurate measurements of vertical flow as low as 0.2 liter per minute. Results indicate zones of fracture permeability in crystalline rocks are composed of irregular conduits that cannot be approximated by planar fractures of uniform aperture, and that the orientation of permeability zones may be unrelated to the orientation of individual fractures within those zones.-Authors

  9. Measuring Curved Crystal Performance for a High Resolution, Imaging X-ray Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Haugh and Richard Stewart

    2010-06-07

    This paper describes the design, crystal selection, and crystal testing for a vertical Johann spectrometer operating in the 13 keV range to measure ion Doppler broadening in inertial confinement plasmas. The spectrometer is designed to use thin, curved, mica crystals to achieve a resolving power of E/ΔE>2000. A number of natural mica crystals were screened for flatness and X-ray diffraction width to find samples of sufficient perfection for use in the instrument. Procedures to select and mount high quality mica samples are discussed. A diode-type X-ray source coupled to a dual goniometer arrangement was used to measure the crystal reflectivity curve. A procedure was developed for evaluating the goniometer performance using a set of diffraction grade Si crystals. This goniometer system was invaluable for identifying the best original crystals for further use and developing the techniques to select satisfactory curved crystals for the spectrometer.

  10. High resolution direct measurement of temperature distribution in silicon nanophotonics devices.

    PubMed

    Tzur, Mor; Desiatov, Boris; Goykhman, Ilya; Grajower, Meir; Levy, Uriel

    2013-12-02

    Following the miniaturization of photonic devices and the increase in data rates, the issues of self heating and heat removal in active nanophotonic devices should be considered and studied in more details. In this paper we use the approach of Scanning Thermal Microscopy (SThM) to obtain an image of the temperature field of a silicon micro ring resonator with sub-micron spatial resolution. The temperature rise in the device is a result of self heating which is caused by free carrier absorption in the doped silicon. The temperature is measured locally and directly using a temperature sensitive AFM probe. We show that this local temperature measurement is feasible in the photonic device despite the perturbation that is introduced by the probe. Using the above method we observed a significant self heating of about 10 degrees within the device.

  11. Kerr effect measurements in the high temperature superconductor LBCO using high resolution Sagnac interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karapetyan, Hovnatan; Kapitulnik, Aharon; Hucker, Markus; Gu, Genda; Tranquada, John

    2012-02-01

    Polar Kerr effect in LBCO high-Tc superconductor system was measured at zero magnetic field with high precision using a cryogenic Sagnac fiber interferometer with zero-area. We observed non-zero Kerr rotations of order ˜10 μrad appearing in charge ordered phase of LBCO-1/8. In this talk we will review our work on La1.875Ba0.125CuO4. In particular, we observe an emergence of Kerr signal that appears at temperature ˜ 54K, which is near charge ordering phase transition in this system. The signal peaks to 10 μrad at temperatures 30K to 40K and drops to a saturated value of ˜5 μrad at 5K. In addition, we we will present magnetic field training data of the Kerr signal. Through birefringence measurement, we also observe the first order structural phase transition in this system at ˜55K.

  12. An improved continuous flow analysis system for high-resolution field measurements on ice cores.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Patrik R; Federer, Urs; Hutterli, Manuel A; Bigler, Matthias; Schüpbach, Simon; Ruth, Urs; Schmitt, Jochen; Stocker, Thomas F

    2008-11-01

    Continuous flow analysis (CFA) is a well-established method to obtain information about impurity contents in ice cores as indicators of past changes in the climate system. A section of an ice core is continuously melted on a melter head supplying a sample water flow which is analyzed online. This provides high depth and time resolution of the ice core records and very efficient sample decontamination as only the inner part of the ice sample is analyzed. Here we present an improved CFA system which has been totally redesigned in view of a significantly enhanced overall efficiency and flexibility, signal quality, compactness, and ease of use. These are critical requirements especially for operations of CFA during field campaigns, e.g., in Antarctica or Greenland. Furthermore, a novel deviceto measure the total air content in the ice was developed. Subsequently, the air bubbles are now extracted continuously from the sample water flow for subsequent gas measurements.

  13. High-resolution, real-time three-dimensional shape measurement on graphics processing unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpinsky, Nikolaus; Hoke, Morgan; Chen, Vincent; Zhang, Song

    2014-02-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurement system that can simultaneously achieve 3-D shape acquisition, reconstruction, and display at 30 frames per second (fps) with 480,000 measurement points per frame is presented. The entire processing pipeline was realized on a graphics processing unit (GPU) without the need of substantial central processing unit (CPU) power, making it achievable on a portable device, namely a laptop computer. Furthermore, the system is extremely inexpensive compared with similar state-of-art systems, making it possible to be accessed by the general public. Specifically, advanced GPU techniques such as multipass rendering and offscreen rendering were used in conjunction with direct memory access to achieve the aforementioned performance. The developed system, implementation details, and experimental results to verify the performance of the proposed technique are presented.

  14. In-flight optical performance measurement of high-resolution airborne imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueler, Richard; Olson, Craig; Sparks, Andrew

    2017-05-01

    This paper examines the measurement of MTF of slant edge targets from airborne imagery. The MTF is calculated by extracting the edge spread function from the slant edge, deriving the line spread function, the performing an FFT to get the MTF. Because characteristics of airborne imagery are not controlled, using edge targets to get the system level MTF present challenges. A method to calculate the MTF from edge targets in airborne imagery is proposed by normalizing the scan lines in the edge spread function and low pass filtering it. An example using air borne imagery is shown and compared with analytical results and laboratory measurements. The paper also examines extracting the effects on the MTF due to image blur from jitter common with air borne imagery.

  15. High Resolution Measurements of Nonlinear Internal Waves and Mixing on the Washington Continental Shelf

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    SWIMS ) and shipboard acoustics (Biosonics). Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of...used our Shallow Water Integrated Mapping System ( SWIMS ) and Modular Microstructure Profiler (MMP) instruments to directly measure their spatial...towed and dropped profilers, the Shallow Water Integrated Mapping System ( SWIMS ) and the Modular Microstructure Profiler (MMP), as well as moorings

  16. High resolution mechano-optical method for acoustic field measurements in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welter, J. T.; Sathish, S.; Cherry, M. R.; Brodrick, P. G.

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic fields are typically visualized by measuring spatial variation of pressure in a medium, using optical (ie: Schlieren, laser interferometry) and electro-mechanical (ie: transducers, micro-electro-mechanical sensors) methods. These methods have limited ability to visualize acoustic fields in air, especially at high spatial resolution (< 0.5 mm). This paper presents a method to detect and quantify the acoustic fields in air by measuring the displacements of a micro-reflector attached to fiber with a laser interferometer. The potential of the method is demonstrated by measuring acoustic pressure of an air coupled transducer, and the variation of acoustic pressure in the focal region of an air coupled acoustic lens. In the current experimental arrangement an approximate spatial resolution of 250 microns and an approximate acoustic pressure of 7 mPa have been demonstrated. A physics based mathematical model is presented that has been used to analyze the spatial resolution and acoustic pressure. Limitations of the method and possible improvements to achieve higher spatial and temporal resolution are discussed.

  17. Implementation of Ultrasonic Sensing for High Resolution Measurement of Binary Gas Mixture Fractions

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Richard; Battistin, Michele; Berry, Stephane; Bitadze, Alexander; Bonneau, Pierre; Bousson, Nicolas; Boyd, George; Bozza, Gennaro; Crespo-Lopez, Olivier; Riva, Enrico Da; Degeorge, Cyril; Deterre, Cecile; DiGirolamo, Beniamino; Doubek, Martin; Favre, Gilles; Godlewski, Jan; Hallewell, Gregory; Hasib, Ahmed; Katunin, Sergey; Langevin, Nicolas; Lombard, Didier; Mathieu, Michel; McMahon, Stephen; Nagai, Koichi; Pearson, Benjamin; Robinson, David; Rossi, Cecilia; Rozanov, Alexandre; Strauss, Michael; Vitek, Michal; Vacek, Vaclav; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    We describe an ultrasonic instrument for continuous real-time analysis of the fractional mixture of a binary gas system. The instrument is particularly well suited to measurement of leaks of a high molecular weight gas into a system that is nominally composed of a single gas. Sensitivity < 5 × 10−5 is demonstrated to leaks of octaflouropropane (C3F8) coolant into nitrogen during a long duration (18 month) continuous study. The sensitivity of the described measurement system is shown to depend on the difference in molecular masses of the two gases in the mixture. The impact of temperature and pressure variances on the accuracy of the measurement is analysed. Practical considerations for the implementation and deployment of long term, in situ ultrasonic leak detection systems are also described. Although development of the described systems was motivated by the requirements of an evaporative fluorocarbon cooling system, the instrument is applicable to the detection of leaks of many other gases and to processes requiring continuous knowledge of particular binary gas mixture fractions. PMID:24961217

  18. Interrogating biology with force: single molecule high-resolution measurements with optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Capitanio, Marco; Pavone, Francesco S

    2013-09-17

    Single molecule force spectroscopy methods, such as optical and magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy, have opened up the possibility to study biological processes regulated by force, dynamics of structural conformations of proteins and nucleic acids, and load-dependent kinetics of molecular interactions. Among the various tools available today, optical tweezers have recently seen great progress in terms of spatial resolution, which now allows the measurement of atomic-scale conformational changes, and temporal resolution, which has reached the limit of the microsecond-scale relaxation times of biological molecules bound to a force probe. Here, we review different strategies and experimental configurations recently developed to apply and measure force using optical tweezers. We present the latest progress that has pushed optical tweezers' spatial and temporal resolution down to today's values, discussing the experimental variables and constraints that are influencing measurement resolution and how these can be optimized depending on the biological molecule under study. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Day and Night Variability of CO2 Fluxes and Priming Effects under zea Mays Measured in High Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Splettstoesser, Thomas; Pausch, Johanna

    2017-04-01

    Plant induced increase of soil organic matter turnover rates contribute to carbon emissions in agricultural land use systems. In order to better understand these rhizosphere priming effects, we conducted an experiment which enabled us to monitor CO2 fluxes under Zea mays plants in high resolution. The experiment was conducted in a climate chamber where the plants were grown in tightly sealed boxes for 40 days and CO2 efflux from soil was measured twice a day. Continuous 13C-CO2 label was used to allow differentiation between plant- and soil-derived CO2.This enabled us to monitor root respiration and soil organic matter turnover in the early stages of plant growth and to highlight changes in soil CO2 emissions and priming effects between day and night. The measurements were conducted with a PICARRO G2131-I C high-precision isotopic CO2 Analyzer (PICARRO INC.) utilizing an automated valve system governed by a CR1000 data logger (Campbell Scientific). After harvest roots and shoots were analyzed for 13C content. Microbial biomass, root length density and enzymatic activities in soil were measured and linked to soil organic matter turnover rates. Results show an increased soil CO2 efflux at day time periods and an overall increase with increasing plant biomass. No difference in chloroform fumigation extractable microbial biomass has been found but a strong negative priming effect was measured in the short experimental period, suggesting that the microbes shifted to the utilization of plant exudates without actual microbial growth triggered by the new labile C input. This is coherent with the observed shift in enzyme kinetics. With this experimental setup we show that measurement of priming effects in high resolution can be achieved.

  20. SU-E-I-40: New Method for Measurement of Task-Specific, High-Resolution Detector System Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Loughran, B; Singh, V; Jain, A; Bednarek, D; Rudin, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Although generalized linear system analytic metrics such as GMTF and GDQE can evaluate performance of the whole imaging system including detector, scatter and focal-spot, a simplified task-specific measured metric may help to better compare detector systems. Methods: Low quantum-noise images of a neuro-vascular stent with a modified ANSI head phantom were obtained from the average of many exposures taken with the high-resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) and with a Flat Panel Detector (FPD). The square of the Fourier Transform of each averaged image, equivalent to the measured product of the system GMTF and the object function in spatial-frequency space, was then divided by the normalized noise power spectra (NNPS) for each respective system to obtain a task-specific generalized signal-to-noise ratio. A generalized measured relative object detectability (GM-ROD) was obtained by taking the ratio of the integral of the resulting expressions for each detector system to give an overall metric that enables a realistic systems comparison for the given detection task. Results: The GM-ROD provides comparison of relative performance of detector systems from actual measurements of the object function as imaged by those detector systems. This metric includes noise correlations and spatial frequencies relevant to the specific object. Additionally, the integration bounds for the GM-ROD can be selected to emphasis the higher frequency band of each detector if high-resolution image details are to be evaluated. Examples of this new metric are discussed with a comparison of the MAF to the FPD for neuro-vascular interventional imaging. Conclusion: The GM-ROD is a new direct-measured task-specific metric that can provide clinically relevant comparison of the relative performance of imaging systems. Supported by NIH Grant: 2R01EB002873 and an equipment grant from Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation.

  1. A new instrument for high resolution stereoscopic photography of falling hydrometeors with simultaneous measurement of fallspeed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuter, S. E.; Garrett, T. J.; Fallgatter, C.; Shkurko, K.; Howlett, D.; Dean, J.; Hardin, N.

    2012-12-01

    We introduce a new instrument, the Fallgatter Technologies Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC), that provides <30 micron resolution stereoscopic photographic images of individual large falling hydrometeors with accurate measurements of their fallspeed. Previously, identification of hydrometeor form has required initial collection on a flat surface, a process that is somewhat subjective and remarkably finicky due to the fragile nature of the particles. Other hydrometeor instruments such as the 2DVD, are automated and leave the particle untouched and provide fallspeed data. However, they provide only 200 micron resolution silhouettes, which can be insufficient for habit and riming identification and the requirements of microwave scattering calculations. The MASC is like the 2DVD but uses a sensitive IR motion sensor for a trigger and actually photographs the particle surface from multiple angles. Field measurements from Alta Ski Area near Salt Lake City are providing beautiful images and fallspeed data, suggesting that MASC measurements may help development of improved parameterizations for hydrometeor microwave scattering. Hundreds of thousands of images have been collected enabling comparisons of hydrometeor development, morphology and fallspeed with a co-located vertically pointing 24 GHz MicroRainRadar radar. Here we show multi-angle images from the MASC, size fallspeed relationships, and discrete dipole approximation scattering calculations for a range of hydrometeor forms at the frequencies of 24 GHz, 94 GHz and 183 GHz. The scattering calculations indicate that complex, aggregated snowflake shapes appear to be more strongly forward scattering, at the expense of reduced back-scatter, than graupel particles of similar size.

  2. High-resolution methane emission estimates using surface measurements and the InTEM inversion system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, Sarah; Manning, Alistair; Robinson, Andrew; Riddick, Stuart; Forster, Grant; Oram, Dave; O'Doherty, Simon; Harris, Neil

    2015-04-01

    High quality GHG emission estimates will be required to successfully tackle climate change. There is a growing need for comparisons between emission estimates produced using bottom-up and top-down techniques at high spatial resolution. Here, a top-down inversion approach combining multi-year atmospheric measurements and an inversion model, InTEM, was used to estimate methane emissions for a region in the South East of the UK (~100 x 150 km). We present results covering a 2-year period (July 2012 - July 2014) in which atmospheric methane concentrations were recorded at 1 - 2 minute time-steps at four locations within the region of interest. Precise measurements were obtained using gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection (GC-FID) for all sites except one, which used a PICARRO Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (CRDS). These observations, along with the UK Met Office's Lagrangian particle dispersion model, NAME, were used within InTEM to produce the methane emission fields. We present results from both Bayesian and non-prior based inversion analysis at varying spatial resolutions, for annual, seasonal and monthly time frames. These results are compared with the UK National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI) which is compiled using bottom-up methods and available at 1x1 km resolution. A thorough assessment of uncertainty is incorporated into this technique which is represented in the results. This project is part of the UK GAUGE campaign which aims to produce robust estimates of the UK GHG budget using new and existing measurement networks (e.g. the UK DECC GHG network) and modelling activities at a range of scales.

  3. Characterization of Biogeochemical Variability in a Tidal Estuary Using High Resolution Optical Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, G.; Jones, C.; Martin, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Berry's Creek Study Area (BCSA) is a tidal estuary located in New Jersey. Several chemicals of potential concern (COPCs) are present in the BCSA waterway and marshes, including mercury, methyl mercury, and polychlorinated biphenyls. Concentrations of COPCs and suspended solids in the BCSA vary temporally and spatially due to tidal variability, freshwater flow events, and interaction of marsh, waterway, and sediment bed materials. This system-wide variability confounds evaluation of COPC sources and transport mechanisms when using conventional laboratory-based analysis of discrete water column samples. Therefore, an optically-based biogeochemical monitoring program was conducted using near-continuous measurements of optical properties and an optical-biogeochemical partial least-squares regression model pioneered by B. Bergamaschi (USGS) and colleagues. The objective of the study was to characterize COPC concentration dynamics in the BCSA water column and relate the analysis to sediment bed processes. Optical-biogeochemical model results indicated that, in general, measured optical properties were sufficient for predicting COPC concentrations to within 10% of the accuracy of laboratory-based analytical measurements. The continuous, high temporal resolution time series of COPC concentrations determined by the optical-biogeochemical model enabled evaluation of the sediment bed dynamics and variability of COPCs in the surface water of the BCSA. Results indicate that tidally-induced resuspension of waterway sediment bed particulates is the primary mechanism for transport of COPCs to surface water. Waterway-marsh tidal exchange shows a net mass flux of particulate COPCs from waterway to marsh, indicating that particulate COPCs are retained and accumulate in the marshes with relatively little net export of dissolved COPCs from the marshes to the waterway.

  4. High-Resolution ac Measurements of the Hall Effect in Organic Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Yi, H. T.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-03-01

    We describe a high resolving power technique for Hall-effect measurements, efficient in determining Hall mobility and carrier density in organic field-effect transistors and other low-mobility systems. We utilize a small low-frequency ac magnetic field (Brms<0.25 T ) and a phase-sensitive (lock-in) detection of Hall voltage, with the necessary corrections for Faraday induction. This method significantly enhances the signal-to-noise ratio and eliminates the necessity of using high magnetic fields in Hall-effect studies. With the help of this method, we are able to obtain the Hall mobility and carrier density in organic transistors with a mobility as low as μ ˜0.3 cm2 V-1 s-1 by using a compact desktop apparatus and low magnetic fields. We find a good agreement between Hall-effect and electric-field-effect measurements, indicating that, contrary to the common belief, certain organic semiconductors with mobilities below 1 cm2 V-1 s-1 can still exhibit a fully developed, band-semiconductor-like Hall effect, with the Hall mobility and carrier density matching those obtained in longitudinal transistor measurements. This suggests that, even when μ <1 cm2 V-1 s-1 , charges in organic semiconductors can still behave as delocalized coherent carriers. This technique paves the way to ubiquitous Hall-effect studies in a wide range of low-mobility materials and devices, where it is typically very difficult to resolve the Hall effect even in very high dc magnetic fields.

  5. High resolution measurements of dune movement in a scale model of the River Oder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüsener, Thorsten; Henning, Martin

    2010-05-01

    The paper presents the analysis of three dimensional river bed topographies of high spatial and temporal resolution, obtained from scale model experiments with movable bed. The use of a stereo photogrammetric system allowed for measuring the submerged river bed during the laboratory experiments. The system is based on three synchronized cameras and a bar code system for orientation and can be used in both dry and wet conditions. For bed surface elevation measurements, a grid is projected onto the channel bed, defining the bed surface via slide projection. When applied to subaqueous problems, the system provides reliable data and insight in the distribution and migration of bed forms and the impact of steady and unsteady discharges on bed topography. The presented data has been obtained from a hydraulic scale model with moveable bed, concerning an 8km long reach of the River Oder at the German-Polish border. The model has been set up in order to investigate the influence of river training measures on accessible water depths and on the development of river bed forms. To determine the movement of the dunes, a 3 x 3 m² area of the model, representing 90,000 m² in field scale, has been recorded over a time of 11 h, providing 4000 topographic data sets of about 10,000 data points each. To simulate nature like transport conditions, the natural bedload material was substituted by synthetic granules (polystyrene) with lesser density and coarser diameter. Due to the small density of polystyrene the dune migration was considerably faster than it would have been for the use of sand as bed load material. In theory, flow is often assumed to be steady and uniform. However, during sediment transport, bed topography changes continuously. The presented analysis of the data shows the wide spatial and temporal variety of occurring dunes and the correlation between dune dimen-sions and dune migration speed. Possible future analysis of the three-dimensional data will be discussed and

  6. High resolution hydrological modeling with measured precipitation data for the city of Amsterdam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Vossen, Jojanneke; Schuurmans, Hanneke; Siemerink, Martijn; van Leeuwen, Elgard; Oudhuis, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Assessing measures to reduce flooding in densely populated urban areas require a high level of detail to properly analyse the hydrological response to precipitation events. This means detailed data (for example elevation and landuse) and fast models that can cope with this level of detail. This also indicates the value of having a similar level of detail in precipitation data. We present an approach in which Dutch National Rainfall Radar data are combined with a new approach to hydrological modeling called 3di. This is illustrated for a case in the city of Amsterdam to assess the effects of precipitation events and the possibilities for suitable measures in the public space to reduce the effects of flooding. Dutch National Rainfall Radar is a consortium of water authorities and the industry and scientific experts/universities/research centers to improve the available radar data in the Netherlands. This is achieved by making a composite of the radar stations in The Netherlands together with German and Belgian radar stations. In addition, the composite image is calibrated with local rainfall stations. 3Di is a novel approach to calculate the hydrological response of catchments as a function of properties, such as surface elevation and land use. Because of the ability of the model to take the detail of the elevation and land-use (both 0,5x0m5 meter) into the calculations, this model allows for a very detailed modeling of the hydrological response of urban areas to precipitation events. In addition, the model is extremely fast and allows for real-time and interactive changes in the geometry, making it a very powerful tool to assess the effects of measures in the public space for reducing flooding. We illustrate this approach for a case for the city of Amsterdam, a densely populated, low-lying city in The Netherlands. The obtained level of detail allows to study which houses are flooded, which roads remain available for emergency services etc. The model is used to show

  7. A High Resolution Radar Altimeter to Measure the Topography of Ice Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawul, Rudolf A.

    1997-01-01

    This thesis is a reference for the Advanced Application Flight Experiment (AAFE) altimeter. The transmitter and receiver subsections are described and measurements of their current state is provided. During the 1994 NASA Greenland Experiment, the altimeter experienced several hardware malfunctions. The process of returning the radar to its fully operational state is presented in detail and necessary design modifications are explained. An updated radar user's manual is included along with various circuit designs which need to be implemented. The thesis is intended to provide an incoming graduate student with a solid foundation of the fundamentals of AAFE altimeter operation.

  8. High resolution measurement of DUF1220 domain copy number from whole genome sequence data.

    PubMed

    Astling, David P; Heft, Ilea E; Jones, Kenneth L; Sikela, James M

    2017-08-14

    DUF1220 protein domains found primarily in Neuroblastoma BreakPoint Family (NBPF) genes show the greatest human lineage-specific increase in copy number of any coding region in the genome. There are 302 haploid copies of DUF1220 in hg38 (~160 of which are human-specific) and the majority of these can be divided into 6 different subtypes (referred to as clades). Copy number changes of specific DUF1220 clades have been associated in a dose-dependent manner with brain size variation (both evolutionarily and within the human population), cognitive aptitude, autism severity, and schizophrenia severity. However, no published methods can directly measure copies of DUF1220 with high accuracy and no method can distinguish between domains within a clade. Here we describe a novel method for measuring copies of DUF1220 domains and the NBPF genes in which they are found from whole genome sequence data. We have characterized the effect that various sequencing and alignment parameters and strategies have on the accuracy and precision of the method and defined the parameters that lead to optimal DUF1220 copy number measurement and resolution. We show that copy number estimates obtained using our read depth approach are highly correlated with those generated by ddPCR for three representative DUF1220 clades. By simulation, we demonstrate that our method provides sufficient resolution to analyze DUF1220 copy number variation at three levels: (1) DUF1220 clade copy number within individual genes and groups of genes (gene-specific clade groups) (2) genome wide DUF1220 clade copies and (3) gene copy number for DUF1220-encoding genes. To our knowledge, this is the first method to accurately measure copies of all six DUF1220 clades and the first method to provide gene specific resolution of these clades. This allows one to discriminate among the ~300 haploid human DUF1220 copies to an extent not possible with any other method. The result is a greatly enhanced capability to analyze the

  9. Mid-Infrared OPO for High Resolution Measurements of Trace Gases in the Mars Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Numata,Kenji; Riris, haris; Abshire, James B.; Allan, Graham; Sun, Xiaoli; Krainak, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The Martian atmosphere is composed primarily (>95%) of CO2 and N2 gas, with CO, O2, CH4, and inert gases such as argon comprising most of the remainder. It is surprisingly dynamic with various processes driving changes in the distribution of CO2, dust, haze, clouds and water vapor on global scales in the meteorology of Mars atmosphere [I]. The trace gases and isotopic ratios in the atmosphere offer important but subtle clues as to the origins of the planet's atmosphere, hydrology, geology, and potential for biology. In the search for life on Mars, an important process is the ability of bacteria to metabolize inorganic substrates (H2, CO2 and rock) to derive energy and produce methane as a by-product of anaerobic metabolism. Trace gases have been measured in the Mars atmosphere from Earth, Mars orbit, and from the Mars surface. The concentration of water vapor and various carbon-based trace gases are observed in variable concentrations. Within the past decade multiple groups have reported detection of CH4, with concentrations in the 10's of ppb, using spectroscopic observations from Earth [2]. Passive spectrometers in the mid-infrared (MIR) are restricted to the sunlit side of the planet, generally in the mid latitudes, and have limited spectral and spatial resolution. To accurately map the global distribution and to locate areas of possibly higher concentrations of these gases such as plumes or vents requires an instrument with high sensitivity and fine spatial resolution that also has global coverage and can measure during both day and night. Our development goal is a new MIR lidar capable of measuring, on global scales, with sensitivity, resolution and precision needed to characterize the trace gases and isotopic ratios of the Martian atmosphere. An optical parametric oscillator operating in the MIR is well suited for this instrument. The sufficient wavelength tuning range of the OPO can extend the measurements to other organic molecules, CO2, atmospheric water

  10. Mid-Infrared OPO for High Resolution Measurements of Trace Gases in the Mars Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Numata,Kenji; Riris, haris; Abshire, James B.; Allan, Graham; Sun, Xiaoli; Krainak, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The Martian atmosphere is composed primarily (>95%) of CO2 and N2 gas, with CO, O2, CH4, and inert gases such as argon comprising most of the remainder. It is surprisingly dynamic with various processes driving changes in the distribution of CO2, dust, haze, clouds and water vapor on global scales in the meteorology of Mars atmosphere [I]. The trace gases and isotopic ratios in the atmosphere offer important but subtle clues as to the origins of the planet's atmosphere, hydrology, geology, and potential for biology. In the search for life on Mars, an important process is the ability of bacteria to metabolize inorganic substrates (H2, CO2 and rock) to derive energy and produce methane as a by-product of anaerobic metabolism. Trace gases have been measured in the Mars atmosphere from Earth, Mars orbit, and from the Mars surface. The concentration of water vapor and various carbon-based trace gases are observed in variable concentrations. Within the past decade multiple groups have reported detection of CH4, with concentrations in the 10's of ppb, using spectroscopic observations from Earth [2]. Passive spectrometers in the mid-infrared (MIR) are restricted to the sunlit side of the planet, generally in the mid latitudes, and have limited spectral and spatial resolution. To accurately map the global distribution and to locate areas of possibly higher concentrations of these gases such as plumes or vents requires an instrument with high sensitivity and fine spatial resolution that also has global coverage and can measure during both day and night. Our development goal is a new MIR lidar capable of measuring, on global scales, with sensitivity, resolution and precision needed to characterize the trace gases and isotopic ratios of the Martian atmosphere. An optical parametric oscillator operating in the MIR is well suited for this instrument. The sufficient wavelength tuning range of the OPO can extend the measurements to other organic molecules, CO2, atmospheric water

  11. High resolution ion mobility measurements for gas phase proteins: correlation between solution phase and gas phase conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudgins, Robert R.; Woenckhaus, Jürgen; Jarrold, Martin F.

    1997-11-01

    Our high resolution ion mobility apparatus has been modified by attaching an electrospray source to perform measurements for biological molecules. While the greater resolving power permits the resolution of more conformations for BPTI and cytochrome c, the resolved features are generally much broader than expected for a single rigid conformation. A major advantage of the new experimental configuration is the much gentler introduction of ions into the drift tube, so that the observed gas phase conformations appear to more closely reflect those present in solution. For example, it is possible to distinguish between the native state of cytochrome c and the methanol-denatured form on the basis of the ion mobility measurements; the mass spectra alone are not sensitive enough to detect this change. Thus this approach may provide a quick and sensitive tool for probing the solution phase conformations of biological molecules.

  12. High-resolution temperature sensor through measuring the frequency shift of single-frequency Erbium-doped fiber ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiwei; Shi, Wei; Duan, Liangcheng; Fu, Shijie; Sheng, Quan; Yao, Jianquan

    2017-02-01

    We propose a principle to achieve a high-resolution temperature sensor through measuring the central frequency shift in the single-frequency Erbium-doped fiber ring laser induced by the thermal drift via the optical heterodyne spectroscopy method. We achieve a temperature sensor with a sensitivity about 9.7 pm/°C and verify the detection accuracy through an experiment. Due to the narrow linewidth of the output singlefrequency signal and the high accuracy of the optical heterodyne spectroscopy method in measuring the frequency shift in the single-frequency ring laser, the temperature sensor can be employed to resolve a temperature drift up to 5.5×10-6 °C theoretically when the single-frequency ring laser has a linewidth of 1 kHz and 10-kHz frequency shift is achieved from the heterodyne spectra.

  13. Experimental study of nucleate boiling heat transfer under low gravity conditions using TLCs for high resolution temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Enno; Sodtke, Christof; Schweizer, Nils; Stephan, Peter

    2006-08-01

    Heat transfer in nucleate boiling is strongly influenced by a very small circular area in the vicinity of the three phase contact line where a thin liquid film approaches the heated wall. This area is characterised by high evaporation rates which trigger a local temperature drop in the wall. The wall temperature drop can be computed using an existing nucleate boiling model. To verify the complex model and the underlying assumptions, an experiment was designed with an artificial nucleation site in a thin electrically heated wall featuring a two-dimensional, high resolution temperature measurement technique using unencapsulated thermochromic liquid crystals and a high speed colour camera. The shape of the bubble is observed simultaneously with a second high speed camera. Experiments were conducted in a low gravity environment of a parabolic flight, causing larger bubble departure diameters than in normal gravity environments. Thus, it was possible to measure the evolution of the predicted temperature drop in a transient boiling process.

  14. Real-time high-resolution heterodyne-based measurements of spectral dynamics in fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugavanam, Srikanth; Fabbri, Simon; Le, Son Thai; Lobach, Ivan; Kablukov, Sergey; Khorev, Serge; Churkin, Dmitry

    2016-03-01

    Conventional tools for measurement of laser spectra (e.g. optical spectrum analysers) capture data averaged over a considerable time period. However, the generation spectrum of many laser types may involve spectral dynamics whose relatively fast time scale is determined by their cavity round trip period, calling for instrumentation featuring both high temporal and spectral resolution. Such real-time spectral characterisation becomes particularly challenging if the laser pulses are long, or they have continuous or quasi-continuous wave radiation components. Here we combine optical heterodyning with a technique of spatio-temporal intensity measurements that allows the characterisation of such complex sources. Fast, round-trip-resolved spectral dynamics of cavity-based systems in real-time are obtained, with temporal resolution of one cavity round trip and frequency resolution defined by its inverse (85 ns and 24 MHz respectively are demonstrated). We also show how under certain conditions for quasi-continuous wave sources, the spectral resolution could be further increased by a factor of 100 by direct extraction of phase information from the heterodyned dynamics or by using double time scales within the spectrogram approach.

  15. Real-time high-resolution heterodyne-based measurements of spectral dynamics in fibre lasers.

    PubMed

    Sugavanam, Srikanth; Fabbri, Simon; Le, Son Thai; Lobach, Ivan; Kablukov, Sergey; Khorev, Serge; Churkin, Dmitry

    2016-03-17

    Conventional tools for measurement of laser spectra (e.g. optical spectrum analysers) capture data averaged over a considerable time period. However, the generation spectrum of many laser types may involve spectral dynamics whose relatively fast time scale is determined by their cavity round trip period, calling for instrumentation featuring both high temporal and spectral resolution. Such real-time spectral characterisation becomes particularly challenging if the laser pulses are long, or they have continuous or quasi-continuous wave radiation components. Here we combine optical heterodyning with a technique of spatio-temporal intensity measurements that allows the characterisation of such complex sources. Fast, round-trip-resolved spectral dynamics of cavity-based systems in real-time are obtained, with temporal resolution of one cavity round trip and frequency resolution defined by its inverse (85 ns and 24 MHz respectively are demonstrated). We also show how under certain conditions for quasi-continuous wave sources, the spectral resolution could be further increased by a factor of 100 by direct extraction of phase information from the heterodyned dynamics or by using double time scales within the spectrogram approach.

  16. A simple fiber-optic microprobe for high resolution light measurements: application in marine sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, B. B.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    A fiber-optic microphobe is described which is inexpensive and simple to build and use. It consists of an 80-micrometers optical fiber which at the end is tapered down to a rounded sensing tip of 20-30-micrometers diameter. The detector is a hybrid photodiode/amplifier. The probe has a sensitivity of 0.01 microEinst m-2 s-1 and a spectral range of 300-1,100 nm. Spectral light gradients were measured in fine-grained San Francisco Bay sediment that had an undisturbed diatom coating on the surface. The photic zone of the mud was only 0.4 mm deep. Measured in situ spectra showed extinction maxima at 430-520, 620-630, 670, and 825-850 nm due to absorption by chlorophyll a, carotenoids, phycocyanin, and bacterio-chlorophyll a. Maximum light penetration in the visible range was found in both the violet and the red < or = 400 and > or = 700 nm.

  17. High-resolution nonlinear ellipse rotation measurements for 3D microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miguez, M. L.; Barbano, E. C.; Coura, J. A.; Zilio, S. C.; Misoguti, L.

    2015-03-01

    Nonlinear optical effects have been widely explored for microscopy due to the possibility of three-dimension (3D) image acquisition. Harmonic generation and nonlinear absorption, for instance, were used for this purpose. Each nonlinear effect has its own characteristic, complexity, type of contrast, advantage and disadvantage, etc. Recently, we developed a new simple and sensitive method for measuring nonlinear ellipse rotation (NER) using a dual-phase lock-in amplifier, which could be successfully applied for measuring local nonlinearity distribution on a sample and, consequently, the image acquisition. The NER is a particular refractive nonlinear effect which appears when strong elliptical polarized laser beam propagates along one nonlinear material. It is type of refractive Kerr nonlinearity similar to self-focalization responsible for the signal in the Z-scan technique. The self-focalization is one of the most important refractive effects, but it cannot be used for image acquisition. On the other hand, NER does. Furthermore, such refractive nonlinearities signal can be very strong and serves as a new contrast for nonlinear microscopy.

  18. X-ray microbeam measurements with a high resolution scintillator fibre-optic dosimeter.

    PubMed

    Archer, James; Li, Enbang; Petasecca, Marco; Dipuglia, Andrew; Cameron, Matthew; Stevenson, Andrew; Hall, Chris; Hausermann, Daniel; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Lerch, Michael

    2017-09-29

    Synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy is a novel external beam therapy under investigation, that uses highly brilliant synchrotron x-rays in microbeams 50 μm width, with separation of 400 μm, as implemented here. Due to the fine spatial fractionation dosimetry of these beams is a challenging and complicated problem. In this proof-of-concept work, we present a fibre optic dosimeter that uses plastic scintillator as the radiation conversion material. We claim an ideal one-dimensional resolution of 50 μm. Using plastic scintillator and fibre optic makes this dosimeter water-equivalent, a very desirable dosimetric property. The dosimeter was tested at the Australian Synchrotron, on the Imaging and Medical Beam-Line. The individual microbeams were able to be resolved and the peak-to-valley dose ratio and the full width at half maximum of the microbeams was measured. These results are compared to a semiconductor strip detector of the same spatial resolution. A percent depth dose was measured and compared to data acquired by an ionisation chamber. The results presented demonstrate significant steps towards the development of an optical dosimeter with the potential to be applied in quality assurance of microbeam radiation therapy, which is vital if clinical trials are to be performed on human patients.

  19. A simple fiber-optic microprobe for high resolution light measurements: application in marine sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, B. B.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    A fiber-optic microphobe is described which is inexpensive and simple to build and use. It consists of an 80-micrometers optical fiber which at the end is tapered down to a rounded sensing tip of 20-30-micrometers diameter. The detector is a hybrid photodiode/amplifier. The probe has a sensitivity of 0.01 microEinst m-2 s-1 and a spectral range of 300-1,100 nm. Spectral light gradients were measured in fine-grained San Francisco Bay sediment that had an undisturbed diatom coating on the surface. The photic zone of the mud was only 0.4 mm deep. Measured in situ spectra showed extinction maxima at 430-520, 620-630, 670, and 825-850 nm due to absorption by chlorophyll a, carotenoids, phycocyanin, and bacterio-chlorophyll a. Maximum light penetration in the visible range was found in both the violet and the red < or = 400 and > or = 700 nm.

  20. Real-time high-resolution heterodyne-based measurements of spectral dynamics in fibre lasers

    PubMed Central

    Sugavanam, Srikanth; Fabbri, Simon; Le, Son Thai; Lobach, Ivan; Kablukov, Sergey; Khorev, Serge; Churkin, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Conventional tools for measurement of laser spectra (e.g. optical spectrum analysers) capture data averaged over a considerable time period. However, the generation spectrum of many laser types may involve spectral dynamics whose relatively fast time scale is determined by their cavity round trip period, calling for instrumentation featuring both high temporal and spectral resolution. Such real-time spectral characterisation becomes particularly challenging if the laser pulses are long, or they have continuous or quasi-continuous wave radiation components. Here we combine optical heterodyning with a technique of spatio-temporal intensity measurements that allows the characterisation of such complex sources. Fast, round-trip-resolved spectral dynamics of cavity-based systems in real-time are obtained, with temporal resolution of one cavity round trip and frequency resolution defined by its inverse (85 ns and 24 MHz respectively are demonstrated). We also show how under certain conditions for quasi-continuous wave sources, the spectral resolution could be further increased by a factor of 100 by direct extraction of phase information from the heterodyned dynamics or by using double time scales within the spectrogram approach. PMID:26984634

  1. Real-time digital heterodyne interferometer for high resolution plasma density measurements at ISTTOK

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, T. G.; Gouveia, A.; Pereira, T.; Fortunato, J.; Carvalho, B. B.; Sousa, J.; Silva, C.; Fernandes, H.

    2008-10-15

    With the implementation of alternating discharges (ac) at the ISTTOK tokamak, the typical duration of the discharges increased from 35 to 250 ms. This time increase created the need for a real-time electron density measurement in order to control the plasma fueling. The diagnostic chosen for the real-time calculation was the microwave interferometer. The ISTTOK microwave interferometer is a heterodyne system with quadrature detection and a probing frequency of 100 GHz ({lambda}{sub 0}=3 mm). In this paper, a low-cost approach for real-time diagnostic using a digital signal programable intelligent computer embedded system is presented, which allows the measurement of the phase with a 1% fringe accuracy in less than 6 {mu}s. The system increases its accuracy by digitally correcting the offsets of the input signals and making use of a judicious lookup table optimized to improve the nonlinear behavior of the transfer curve. The electron density is determined at a rate of 82 kHz (limited by the analog to digital converter), and the data are transmitted for each millisecond although this last parameter could be much lower (around 12 {mu}s--each value calculated is transmitted). In the future, this same system is expected to control plasma actuators, such as the piezoelectric valve of the hydrogen injection system responsible for the plasma fueling.

  2. Real-time digital heterodyne interferometer for high resolution plasma density measurements at ISTTOK.

    PubMed

    Marques, T G; Gouveia, A; Pereira, T; Fortunato, J; Carvalho, B B; Sousa, J; Silva, C; Fernandes, H

    2008-10-01

    With the implementation of alternating discharges (ac) at the ISTTOK tokamak, the typical duration of the discharges increased from 35 to 250 ms. This time increase created the need for a real-time electron density measurement in order to control the plasma fueling. The diagnostic chosen for the real-time calculation was the microwave interferometer. The ISTTOK microwave interferometer is a heterodyne system with quadrature detection and a probing frequency of 100 GHz (lambda(0)=3 mm). In this paper, a low-cost approach for real-time diagnostic using a digital signal programmable intelligent computer embedded system is presented, which allows the measurement of the phase with a 1% fringe accuracy in less than 6 micros. The system increases its accuracy by digitally correcting the offsets of the input signals and making use of a judicious lookup table optimized to improve the nonlinear behavior of the transfer curve. The electron density is determined at a rate of 82 kHz (limited by the analog to digital converter), and the data are transmitted for each millisecond although this last parameter could be much lower (around 12 micros--each value calculated is transmitted). In the future, this same system is expected to control plasma actuators, such as the piezoelectric valve of the hydrogen injection system responsible for the plasma fueling.

  3. High-resolution Tangential AXUV Arrays for Radiated Power Density Measurements on NSTX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado-Aparicio, L; Bell, R E; Faust, I; Tritz, K; Diallo, A; Gerhardt, S P; Kozub, T A; LeBlanc, B P; Stratton, B C

    2014-07-01

    Precise measurements of the local radiated power density and total radiated power are a matter of the uttermost importance for understanding the onset of impurity-induced instabilities and the study of particle and heat transport. Accounting of power balance is also needed for the understanding the physics of various divertor con gurations for present and future high-power fusion devices. Poloidal asymmetries in the impurity density can result from high Mach numbers and can impact the assessment of their flux-surface-average and hence vary the estimates of P[sub]rad (r, t) and (Z[sub]eff); the latter is used in the calculation of the neoclassical conductivity and the interpretation of non-inductive and inductive current fractions. To this end, the bolometric diagnostic in NSTX-U will be upgraded, enhancing the midplane coverage and radial resolution with two tangential views, and adding a new set of poloidally-viewing arrays to measure the 2D radiation distribution. These systems are designed to contribute to the near- and long-term highest priority research goals for NSTX-U which will integrate non-inductive operation at reduced collisionality, with high-pressure, long energy-confinement-times and a divertor solution with metal walls.

  4. Case study of wave breaking with high-resolution turbulence measurements with LITOS and WRF simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Andreas; Wagner, Johannes; Söder, Jens; Gerding, Michael; Lübken, Franz-Josef

    2017-06-01

    Measurements of turbulent energy dissipation rates obtained from wind fluctuations observed with the balloon-borne instrument LITOS (Leibniz-Institute Turbulence Observations in the Stratosphere) are combined with simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to study the breakdown of waves into turbulence. One flight from Kiruna (68° N, 21° E) and two flights from Kühlungsborn (54° N, 12° E) are analysed. Dissipation rates are of the order of 0. 1 mW kg-1 (˜ 0.01 K d-1) in the troposphere and in the stratosphere below 15 km, increasing in distinct layers by about 2 orders of magnitude. For one flight covering the stratosphere up to ˜ 28 km, the measurement shows nearly no turbulence at all above 15 km. Another flight features a patch with highly increased dissipation directly below the tropopause, collocated with strong wind shear and wave filtering conditions. In general, small or even negative Richardson numbers are affirmed to be a sufficient condition for increased dissipation. Conversely, significant turbulence has also been observed in the lower stratosphere under stable conditions. Observed energy dissipation rates are related to wave patterns visible in the modelled vertical winds. In particular, the drop in turbulent fraction at 15 km mentioned above coincides with a drop in amplitude in the wave patterns visible in the WRF. This indicates wave saturation being visible in the LITOS turbulence data.

  5. Rotation and winds of exoplanet HD 189733 b measured with high-resolution transmission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogi, Matteo

    2015-12-01

    At the dawn of exoplanet science, the first discoveries revealed the existence of giant planets orbiting very close to their parent stars, called hot Jupiters. Early theories suggested that these planets should be tidally locked, although their spin rotation has never been measured directly. On top of rotation, hot Jupiters can show equatorial super-rotation via eastward jet streams and/or high-altitude winds flowing from the day- to the night-side hemisphere. All these patterns broaden and distort the planet spectral lines to an extent that is detectable with measurements at high spectral resolution.High-dispersion observations have recently excelled in robustly detecting molecules in the atmospheres of transiting and non-transiting hot Jupiters, and in measuring their relative abundances. Here the method is applied to the transmission spectrum of HD 189733 b, a Jupiter-size planet orbiting a K1-2V star in 2.2 days, observed around 2.3μm with CRIRES at the ESO Very Large Telescope. At a spectral resolution of R~100,000, the combined absorption of carbon monoxide and water vapor is detected in the planet spectrum at a confidence level of 7σ. The signal is obtained by cross correlating with theoretical spectra and it is maximized for a planet rotational velocity of 3.5+1.1-2.6 km/s. This corresponds to a planet rotational period of 1.7+4.9-0.4 days, consistent with the known orbital period of 2.2 days and therefore with tidal locking. Although planet rotations faster than 1.1 days can be ruled out at high confidence (3σ), sub-synchronous rotational velocities (Vrot < 2.7 km/s) or no-rotation are only marginally excluded (1.2σ). Finally, no significant day-to-night side winds are detected. When compared to the recent detection of sodium Doppler shifted by -8 km/s, this likely implies a strong wind shear between the atmospheric levels probed by these high-dispersion observations and the outermost atmospheric layers where the core of the sodium lines are formed.

  6. Robust high-resolution imaging and quantitative force measurement with tuned-oscillator atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dagdeviren, Omur E; Götzen, Jan; Hölscher, Hendrik; Altman, Eric I; Schwarz, Udo D

    2016-02-12

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectroscopy are based on locally detecting the interactions between a surface and a sharp probe tip. For highest resolution imaging, noncontact modes that avoid tip-sample contact are used; control of the tip's vertical position is accomplished by oscillating the tip and detecting perturbations induced by its interaction with the surface potential. Due to this potential's nonlinear nature, however, achieving reliable control of the tip-sample distance is challenging, so much so that despite its power vacuum-based noncontact AFM has remained a niche technique. Here we introduce a new pathway to distance control that prevents instabilities by externally tuning the oscillator's response characteristics. A major advantage of this operational scheme is that it delivers robust position control in both the attractive and repulsive regimes with only one feedback loop, thereby providing an easy-to-implement route to atomic resolution imaging and quantitative tip-sample interaction force measurement.

  7. A Slightly-Cooled, High-Resolution Michelson Interferometer For Limb Emission Measurements From Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fergg, F.; Fischer, H.

    1985-12-01

    Spaceborne Fourier Transform Spectrometers can be used to obtain IR limb emission spectra from which profiles of temperature and minor constituents can be derived simultaneously in the middle atmosphere. A corresponding experiment, called MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric SoundiTig) is und-6- development in Winich. MTPAS utilize? a novel type of interfero-meter which uses two double passed triple mirrors both being fixed to a rotating structure to produce optical path difference (P. Burkert, F. Fergg and H. Fischer, IEEE Transact. on Geosc. and Remote Sens. Vol GE-21, 345, 1983). A He-cooled version of MIPAS for broadband emission measurements was described previously (H. Fischer, F. Fergg, H. Oelhaf, D. Rabus, W. Volker and P. Burkert, Beitr. Phys. Atm. Vol. 56, 260, 1983).

  8. High resolution measurement of the carbon localized vibrational mode in gallium arsenide

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, Naoto

    2001-06-15

    The localized vibrational mode of carbon substituted at arsenic sites in gallium arsenide (GaAs) was measured with infrared absorption spectroscopy at 0.005 cm{sup {minus}1} resolution. Well-resolved fine structures were observed, yielding quantitative information on the line half widths and intensities. The relative intensities of the isotope lines are well fitted to a probability factor calculation using a natural abundance of 55.3% {sup 69}Ga. One explanation considered is that the dipole moment due to the relative displacement of carbon with respect to the gallium atoms has a tendency to be larger when the neighboring gallium atoms are heavier ({sup 71}Ga). {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  9. First measurements with new high-resolution gadolinium-GEM neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, D.; Resnati, F.; Birch, J.; Etxegarai, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Höglund, C.; Hultman, L.; Llamas-Jansa, I.; Oliveri, E.; Oksanen, E.; Robinson, L.; Ropelewski, L.; Schmidt, S.; Streli, C.; Thuiner, P.

    2016-05-01

    European Spallation Source instruments like the macromolecular diffractometer (NMX) require an excellent neutron detection efficiency, high-rate capabilities, time resolution, and an unprecedented spatial resolution in the order of a few hundred micrometers over a wide angular range of the incoming neutrons. For these instruments solid converters in combination with Micro Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGDs) are a promising option. A GEM detector with gadolinium converter was tested on a cold neutron beam at the IFE research reactor in Norway. The μTPC analysis, proven to improve the spatial resolution in the case of 10B converters, is extended to gadolinium based detectors. For the first time, a Gd-GEM was successfully operated to detect neutrons with a measured efficiency of 11.8% at a wavelength of 2 Åand a position resolution better than 250 μm.

  10. High Resolution Transmission Grating Spectrometer for Edge Toroidal Rotation Measurements of Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, A; May, M; Beiersdorfer, P; Magee, E; Lawrence, M; Terry, J; Rice, J

    2004-04-29

    We present a high throughput (f/3) visible (3500 - 7000 Angstrom) Doppler spectrometer for toroidal rotation velocity measurements of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak plasma. The spectrometer has a temporal response of 1 ms and a rotation velocity sensitivity of {approx}10{sup 5} cm/s. This diagnostic will have a tangential view and map out the plasma rotation at several locations along the outer half of the minor radius (r/a > 0.5). The plasma rotation will be determined from the Doppler shifted wavelengths of D{sub alpha} and magnetic and electric dipole transitions of highly ionized impurities in the plasma. The fast time resolution and high spectral resolving power are possible due to a 6' diameter circular transmission grating that is capable of {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} {approx} 15500 at 5769 Angstrom in conjunction with a 50 {micro}m slit.

  11. Fast, high-resolution surface potential measurements in air with heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joseph L.; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2016-06-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) adapts an atomic force microscope to measure electric potential on surfaces at nanometer length scales. Here we demonstrate that Heterodyne-KPFM enables scan rates of several frames per minute in air, and concurrently maintains spatial resolution and voltage sensitivity comparable to frequency-modulation KPFM, the current spatial resolution standard. Two common classes of topography-coupled artifacts are shown to be avoidable with H-KPFM. A second implementation of H-KPFM is also introduced, in which the voltage signal is amplified by the first cantilever resonance for enhanced sensitivity. The enhanced temporal resolution of H-KPFM can enable the imaging of many dynamic processes, such as such as electrochromic switching, phase transitions, and device degredation (battery, solar, etc), which take place over seconds to minutes and involve changes in electric potential at nanometer lengths.

  12. Improving high resolution emission inventories with local proxies and urban eddy covariance flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioli, Beniamino; Gualtieri, Giovanni; Busillo, Caterina; Calastrini, Francesca; Zaldei, Alessandro; Toscano, Piero

    2015-08-01

    Emission inventories are the fundamental official data on atmospheric emissions of pollutants and greenhouse gases at a variety of spatial and temporal scales worldwide. This study makes use of direct CO2 emission measurements made with the eddy covariance technique over a completely urbanized area, with no confounding effect of vegetation, where emissions are mostly controlled by natural gas combustion processes and road traffic. Objectives are: i) to validate top-down spatially and temporally disaggregated emission inventories at yearly, monthly, weekly and hourly time scales; ii) to quantify the improvement achieved in official inventories when replacing built-in temporal disaggregation proxies with customized proxies based on local data of road traffic and natural gas consumption. We demonstrate that the overall performance of official inventory at yearly scale is rather good with an emission of 3.08 g CO2 m-2 h-1 against a measured emission of 3.21 ± 0.12 g CO2 m-2 h-1. When temporally disaggregating annual emissions, the agreement between inventory and observations always significantly improves when using local proxies, by 47% (from 0.70 to 0.37 g CO2 m-2 h-1 RMSE) at monthly scale, by 26% (from 0.58 to 0.43 g CO2 m-2 h-1 RMSE) at weekly scale, and by 32% (from 1.26 to 0.85 g CO2 m-2 h-1 RMSE), at hourly scale. The validity of this analysis goes beyond CO2 since the temporal proxies used by the inventories mimic the intensity of specific emission processes, therefore species emitted in the same processes as CO2, would benefit from the improved parameterization of temporal proxies shown here. These results indicate that effort should be put into developing improved temporal proxies based on local rather than national scale data, that can better mimic site dependent behaviors.

  13. New Measurement of Singly Ionized Selenium Spectra by High Resolution Fourier Transform and Grating Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hala, Noman; Nave, G.; Kramida, A.; Ahmad, T.; Nahar, S.; Pradhan, A.

    2015-05-01

    We report new measurements of singly ionised selenium, an element of the iron group detected in nearly twice as many planetary nebulae as any other trans-iron element. We use the NIST 2 m UV/Vis/IR and FT700 UV/Vis Fourier transform spectrometers over the wavelength range of 2000 Å-2.5 μm, supplemented in the lower wavelength region 300-2400 Å with grating spectra taken on a 3-m normal incidence vacuum spectrograph. The analysis of Se II is being extended, covering the wide spectral region from UV to IR. From our investigation, we found serious inconsistency and incompleteness in the previously published results, where several levels were reported without any designation. The analysis is being revised and extended with the help of semiempirical quasi-relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations, starting with the 4s24p3- [4s24p2(4d +5d +5s +6s) +4s4p4] transition array. Out of fifty-two previously reported levels, we rejected thirteen and found several new level values. With the new measurements, we expect to observe transitions between 4s24p2(4d +5s) and 4s24p2(5p +4f), lying in the visible and IR region. A complete interpretation of the level system of both parities will be assisted by least squares fitted parametric calculations. In all, we have already classified about 450 observed lines involving 89 energy levels.

  14. Functional exploratory data analysis for high-resolution measurements of urban particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Ranalli, M Giovanna; Rocco, Giorgia; Jona Lasinio, Giovanna; Moroni, Beatrice; Castellini, Silvia; Crocchianti, Stefano; Cappelletti, David

    2016-09-01

    In this work we propose the use of functional data analysis (FDA) to deal with a very large dataset of atmospheric aerosol size distribution resolved in both space and time. Data come from a mobile measurement platform in the town of Perugia (Central Italy). An OPC (Optical Particle Counter) is integrated on a cabin of the Minimetrò, an urban transportation system, that moves along a monorail on a line transect of the town. The OPC takes a sample of air every six seconds and counts the number of particles of urban aerosols with a diameter between 0.28 μm and 10 μm and classifies such particles into 21 size bins according to their diameter. Here, we adopt a 2D functional data representation for each of the 21 spatiotemporal series. In fact, space is unidimensional since it is measured as the distance on the monorail from the base station of the Minimetrò. FDA allows for a reduction of the dimensionality of each dataset and accounts for the high space-time resolution of the data. Functional cluster analysis is then performed to search for similarities among the 21 size channels in terms of their spatiotemporal pattern. Results provide a good classification of the 21 size bins into a relatively small number of groups (between three and four) according to the season of the year. Groups including coarser particles have more similar patterns, while those including finer particles show a more different behavior according to the period of the year. Such features are consistent with the physics of atmospheric aerosol and the highlighted patterns provide a very useful ground for prospective model-based studies.

  15. Real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements on shocked crystals at a synchrotron facility.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Y M; Turneaure, Stefan J; Perkins, K; Zimmerman, K; Arganbright, N; Shen, G; Chow, P

    2012-12-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory was used to obtain real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements to determine the microscopic response of shock-compressed single crystals. Disk shaped samples were subjected to plane shock wave compression by impacting them with half-inch diameter, flat-faced projectiles. The projectiles were accelerated to velocities ranging between 300 and 1200 m/s using a compact powder gun designed specifically for use at a synchrotron facility. The experiments were designed to keep the sample probed volume under uniaxial strain and constant stress for a duration longer than the 153.4 ns spacing between x-ray bunches. X-rays from a single pulse (<100 ps duration) out of the periodic x-ray pulses emitted by the synchrotron were used for the diffraction measurements. A synchronization and x-ray detection technique was developed to ensure that the measured signal was obtained unambiguously from the desired x-ray pulse incident on the sample while the sample was in a constant uniaxial strain state. The synchronization and x-ray detection techniques described can be used for a variety of x-ray measurements on shock compressed solids and liquids at the APS. Detailed procedures for applying the Bragg-Brentano parafocusing approach to single crystals at the APS are presented. Analytic developments to determine the effects of crystal substructure and non-ideal geometry on the diffraction pattern position and shape are presented. Representative real-time x-ray diffraction data, indicating shock-induced microstructural changes, are presented for a shock-compressed Al(111) sample. The experimental developments presented here provided, in part, the impetus for the Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) currently under development at the APS. Both the synchronization∕x-ray detection methods and the analysis equations for high-resolution single crystal x-ray diffraction can be used at the DCS.

  16. Real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements on shocked crystals at a synchrotron facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Y. M.; Turneaure, Stefan J.; Perkins, K.; Zimmerman, K.; Arganbright, N.; Shen, G.; Chow, P.

    2012-12-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory was used to obtain real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements to determine the microscopic response of shock-compressed single crystals. Disk shaped samples were subjected to plane shock wave compression by impacting them with half-inch diameter, flat-faced projectiles. The projectiles were accelerated to velocities ranging between 300 and 1200 m/s using a compact powder gun designed specifically for use at a synchrotron facility. The experiments were designed to keep the sample probed volume under uniaxial strain and constant stress for a duration longer than the 153.4 ns spacing between x-ray bunches. X-rays from a single pulse (<100 ps duration) out of the periodic x-ray pulses emitted by the synchrotron were used for the diffraction measurements. A synchronization and x-ray detection technique was developed to ensure that the measured signal was obtained unambiguously from the desired x-ray pulse incident on the sample while the sample was in a constant uniaxial strain state. The synchronization and x-ray detection techniques described can be used for a variety of x-ray measurements on shock compressed solids and liquids at the APS. Detailed procedures for applying the Bragg-Brentano parafocusing approach to single crystals at the APS are presented. Analytic developments to determine the effects of crystal substructure and non-ideal geometry on the diffraction pattern position and shape are presented. Representative real-time x-ray diffraction data, indicating shock-induced microstructural changes, are presented for a shock-compressed Al(111) sample. The experimental developments presented here provided, in part, the impetus for the Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) currently under development at the APS. Both the synchronization/x-ray detection methods and the analysis equations for high-resolution single crystal x-ray diffraction can be used at the DCS.

  17. High resolution space characterization of water vapor from satellite measurements and local area model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montopoli, M.; Marzano, F. S.; Pichelli, E.; Cimini, D.; Ferretti, R.; Bonafoni, S.; Perissin, D.; Rocca, F.; Pierdicca, N.

    2009-04-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is a well established microwave imaging system from which measurements of surface deformations of the order of centimeters can be derived and than several useful land applications (e.g.: the analysis of progressive tectonic motions, or to the improvement of a Digital Terrain Model) can be provided to the community. Among the main limitations affecting the Interferometric SAR (InSAR) measurements, especially at C and X frequency bands, the atmosphere surely plays a relevant role. When two interferometric SAR images are not simultaneously acquired, the electromagnetic wave received from the SAR sensor, mounted on a satellite platform, after interactions with the ground, may be differently affected by the atmosphere which induces an unwanted component on the received signal. In particular, the random nature of the atmospheric state (i.e.: different humidity, temperature and pressure) between the two acquired SAR observations will have a visible and fatal consequences on the interferometric phase. Among others, the water vapor is an important contributor to the error budget of InSAR data and for this reason its spatial and temporal characterization plays an important role. In this work, the spatial characterization of vertical Integrated Water Vapor (IWV), as seen from various satellite sensors, will be dealt with. Data acquired from Envisat-Meris, and Terra-Modis and Aqua-Modis spectrometer, operating at infrared frequencies at spatial resolution of 0.3, 1 and 1 km respectively, will be compared with simulations derived from MM5 weather forecast model at 1km resolution as well. The InSAR signal from ASAR of Envisat platform and RadarSat is also exploited to derive estimates of differential IWV (dIWV) at very high spatial resolutions (about 100 m). dIWV estimates are analyzed as well and compared together with those derived from previously mentioned spectrometers in terms of correlation structures. The results of the comparisons here

  18. Hybrid Young interferometer for high resolution measurement of dynamic speckle using high birefringence liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennis, N.; Holdynski, Z.; Merta, I.; Marc, P.; Kula, P.; Mazur, R.; Piecek, W.; Jaroszewicz, L. R.

    2015-08-01

    It is well known that the Young interference experiment is the fundamental setup to combine two beams and to construct the phase modulated light. Moreover, homodyne phase demodulator is based on signal decoding in back Fourier focal plane using bicell photodetector (B-PD). On the above base, we propose a novel experimental approach to the signals demodulation by using the optical interferometer which operates in homodyne mode, combined with liquid crystal spatial light modulators operating both phase as speckle modulator. Dynamic phase changes between the two beams can be controlled by monopixel liquid crystals cell placed in one branch of the interferometer. A phase modulation effect in a signal arm of interferometer is observed as a dynamic shift of the speckle pattern. Simple arithmetic combination of signals from B-PD placed in speckle pattern plane is only one necessary numerical manipulation to obtain exactly phase difference. Concept of signals demodulation in the Fourier focal plane can be only used for exactly defined geometrical (B-PD as well as Young interferometer) and physical parameters (polarization, wavelength). We optimize the setup geometry to obtain extremely high measurement resolution. In this paper we focus on the principles of operation of each part of the system as well as discussion their requirement in order to increase the signal to noise ratio.

  19. Measurements of OH(X2pi) in the stratosphere by high resolution UV spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, D. G.; Swift, W.; Fennelly, J.; Liu, G.; Torr, M. R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports the first results obtained using high spectral resolution imaging ultraviolet spectroscopy to observe multiple rotational lines of OH A2 Sigma-X2pi (0-0) band. A 9.2 A spectral segment from 3075.8 A to 3085.0 A is imaged at 0.08 A FWHM spectral resolution, allowing the simultaneous acquisition of six of the brightest OH resonance fluorescence emission lines. The high spectral resolution and low scattered light design of the instrument allows these lines to be detected above the Rayleigh scattered sunlight background. The technique permits remote sensing of stratospheric OH from a high altitude instrument. The instrument was flown to an altitude of 40 km on Aug. 25, 1983, and again on June 12, 1986, on scientific balloons from Palestine, TX. The OH profiles inverted from the limb scans made during these flights are reported here. These profiles represent the first measurements of the temporal variation of OH over an extended height range. The results demonstrate that the technique can be used to monitor OH from orbit.

  20. High Resolution and Large Dynamic Range Resonant Pressure Sensor Based on Q-Factor Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor); Stell, Christopher B. (Inventor); Tang, Tony K. (Inventor); Vorperian, Vatche (Inventor); Wilcox, Jaroslava (Inventor); Shcheglov, Kirill (Inventor); Kaiser, William J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A pressure sensor has a high degree of accuracy over a wide range of pressures. Using a pressure sensor relying upon resonant oscillations to determine pressure, a driving circuit drives such a pressure sensor at resonance and tracks resonant frequency and amplitude shifts with changes in pressure. Pressure changes affect the Q-factor of the resonating portion of the pressure sensor. Such Q-factor changes are detected by the driving/sensing circuit which in turn tracks the changes in resonant frequency to maintain the pressure sensor at resonance. Changes in the Q-factor are reflected in changes of amplitude of the resonating pressure sensor. In response, upon sensing the changes in the amplitude, the driving circuit changes the force or strength of the electrostatic driving signal to maintain the resonator at constant amplitude. The amplitude of the driving signals become a direct measure of the changes in pressure as the operating characteristics of the resonator give rise to a linear response curve for the amplitude of the driving signal. Pressure change resolution is on the order of 10(exp -6) torr over a range spanning from 7,600 torr to 10(exp -6) torr. No temperature compensation for the pressure sensor of the present invention is foreseen. Power requirements for the pressure sensor are generally minimal due to the low-loss mechanical design of the resonating pressure sensor and the simple control electronics.

  1. An instrument for rapidly measuring plasma distribution functions with high resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, C. W.; Curtis, D. W.; Paschmann, G.; Michael, W.

    1982-01-01

    An instrument which can rapidly measure plasma particle distribution functions has been developed based upon recent innovations in electrostatic analyzer design and position sensitive particle detection. The new analyzer uses a quadrispherical geometry, but has a completely uniform 360 deg fan-shaped field of view. The polar angular distribution of entering particles is spatially imaged onto a position sensitive detector at the annular exit aperture after a deflection through 90 deg. Several methods of position sensitive detection have been successfully used in conjunction with this analyzer. The simplest is individual channel multipliers spaced around the annular exit. Microchannel plate electron multipliers permit greater position resolution to be obtained, and a detector using microchannel plates followed by a resistive anode image converter obtains angular resolution of about one degree, i.e., 360 individual angle pixels. Instruments of this type were flown on a sounding rocket in early 1982 and will be included on the Giotto comet mission and the AMPTE ion release module (IRM).

  2. High-resolution emission inventory of the Lombardy region: development and comparison with measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dommen, J.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Baertsch-Ritter, N.; Maffeis, G.; Longoni, M. G.; Grüebler, F. C.; Thielmann, A.

    In the framework of the EUROTRAC-2 subproject limitation of oxidant production an emission inventory was developed for the Lombardy region in Italy with a 1 h temporal and 3 km spatial resolution. The emissions were processed in a bottom-up approach. We outline the emissions processing strategy used and summarize the inventory characteristics. Spatial maps and diurnal series charts of the total emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO x), carbon monoxide CO, volatile organic compounds (VOC) are provided. The emission inventory shows distinct patterns for the urban area and the non-metropolitan region. We compare ratios of CO to NO x and CO to different VOC-classes between the emission inventory and measurements performed at two sites representative for the urban and non-metropolitan areas. Ratios were determined from the slopes of correlations between CO and the respective species class. Observed CO/NO x ratios are higher in the urban and non-metropolitan area by factors of 2 and 3, respectively. CO/VOC ratios show different discrepancies depending on the VOC-class but are generally lower in the emission inventory. Observations at the two sites yielded similar concentration ratios opposite to the inventory.

  3. High Frequency Acoustic Sensor Dedicated to the High Resolution Measurement of Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meignen, Pierre-Antoine; Le Clézio, Emmanuel; Despaux, Gilles

    Through acoustic signature, scanning acoustic microscopy can be used to quantify local mechanical properties of a medium thanks to the generation of surface waves, mostly Rayleigh waves. Despite being quite effective, this method requires to evaluate the mechanical properties of a single point the acquisition of many ultrasonic signals. This process is then time-consuming and is hardly adaptable to quantitative imaging. The solution considered in this paper to speed-up the method is to design a multi-element sensor allowing the extraction of information on Rayleigh waves with a reduced number of acquisitions. The work is conducted along two axes. As a first step, a model allowing the simulation of the acoustic wave behavior at a fluid/solid interface is developed. This model leads to a better understanding of the characterization of the mechanical properties and to the definition of an adapted sensor's design. As a second step, an experimental method for acoustic field reconstruction is used to characterize the multi-elements sensor and measurements of mechanical properties were done.

  4. High-resolution measurements from the airborne Atmospheric Nitrogen Dioxide Imager (ANDI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, J. P.; Anand, J. S.; Vande Hey, J. D.; White, J.; Leigh, R. R.; Monks, P. S.; Leigh, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    Nitrogen dioxide is both a primary pollutant with direct health effects and a key precursor of the secondary pollutant ozone. This paper reports on the development, characterisation and test flight of the Atmospheric Nitrogen Dioxide Imager (ANDI) remote sensing system. The ANDI system includes an imaging UV/Vis grating spectrometer able to capture scattered sunlight spectra for the determination of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations by way of DOAS slant column density and vertical column density measurements. Results are shown for an ANDI test flight over Leicester City in the UK on a cloud-free winter day in February 2013. Retrieved NO2 columns gridded to a surface resolution of 80 m × 20 m revealed hotspots in a series of locations around Leicester City, including road junctions, the train station, major car parks, areas of heavy industry, a nearby airport (East Midlands) and a power station (Ratcliffe-on-Soar). In the city centre the dominant source of NO2 emissions was identified as road traffic, contributing to a background concentration as well as producing localised hotspots. Quantitative analysis revealed a significant urban increment over the city centre which increased throughout the flight.

  5. High-resolution measurements from the airborne Atmospheric Nitrogen Dioxide Imager (ANDI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, J. P.; Anand, J. S.; Vande Hey, J. D.; Leigh, R. R.; Monks, P. S.; Leigh, R. J.

    2015-06-01

    Nitrogen Dioxide is both a primary pollutant with direct health effects and a key precursor of the secondary pollutant ozone. This paper reports on the development, characterisation and test flight of the Atmospheric Nitrogen Dioxide Imager (ANDI) remote sensing system. The ANDI system includes an imaging (UV)-vis grating spectrometer able to capture scattered sunlight spectra for the determination of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations by way of DOAS slant column density and vertical column density measurements. Results are shown for an ANDI test flight over Leicester City in the UK. Retrieved NO2 columns at a surface resolution of 80 m x 20 m revealed hot spots in a series of locations around Leicester City, including road junctions, the train station, major car parks, areas of heavy industry, a nearby airport (East Midlands) and a power station (Ratcliffe-on-Soar). In the city centre the dominant source of NO2 emissions was identified as road traffic, contributing to a background concentration as well as producing localised hot spots. Quantitative analysis revealed a significant urban increment over the city centre which increased throughout the flight.

  6. Isolation of Intact Mitochondria from Skeletal Muscle by Differential Centrifugation for High-resolution Respirometry Measurements.

    PubMed

    Djafarzadeh, Siamak; Jakob, Stephan Mathias

    2017-03-08

    Mitochondria are involved in cellular energy metabolism and use oxygen to produce energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Differential centrifugation at low- and high-speed is commonly used to isolate mitochondria from tissues and cultured cells. Crude mitochondrial fractions obtained by differential centrifugation are used for respirometry measurements. The differential centrifugation technique is based on the separation of organelles according to their size and sedimentation velocity. The isolation of mitochondria is performed immediately after tissue harvesting. The tissue is immersed in an ice-cold homogenization medium, minced using scissors and homogenized in a glass homogenizer with a loose-fitting pestle. The differential centrifugation technique is efficient, fast and inexpensive and the mitochondria obtained by differential centrifugation are pure enough for respirometry assays. Some of the limitations and disadvantages of isolated mitochondria, based on differential centrifugation, are that the mitochondria can be damaged during the homogenization and isolation procedure and that large amounts of the tissue biopsy or cultured cells are required for the mitochondrial isolation.

  7. Characterization of the Abydos region through OSIRIS high-resolution images in support of CIVA measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchetti, A.; Cremonese, G.; Jorda, L.; Poulet, F.; Bibring, J.-P.; Pajola, M.; La Forgia, F.; Massironi, M.; El-Maarry, M. R.; Oklay, N.; Sierks, H.; Barbieri, C.; Lamy, P.; Rodrigo, R.; Koschny, D.; Rickman, H.; Keller, H. U.; Agarwal, J.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Barucci, M. A.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Bertini, I.; Da Deppo, V.; Davidsson, B.; Debei, S.; De Cecco, M.; Fornasier, S.; Fulle, M.; Groussin, O.; Gutierrez, P. J.; Güttler, C.; Hviid, S. F.; Ip, W.-H.; Knollenberg, J.; Kramm, J.-R.; Kührt, E.; Küppers, M.; Lara, L. M.; Lazzarin, M.; Lopez Moreno, J. J.; Marzari, F.; Mottola, S.; Naletto, G.; Preusker, F.; Scholten, F.; Thomas, N.; Tubiana, C.; Vincent, J.-B.

    2016-01-01

    Context. On 12 November 2014, the European mission Rosetta delivered the Philae lander on the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P). After the first touchdown, the lander bounced three times before finally landing at a site named Abydos. Aims: We provide a morphologically detailed analysis of the Abydos landing site to support Philae's measurements and to give context for the interpretation of the images coming from the Comet Infrared and Visible Analyser (CIVA) camera system onboard the lander. Methods: We used images acquired by the OSIRIS Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) on 6 December 2014 to perform the analysis of the Abydos landing site, which provided the geomorphological map, the gravitational slope map, the size-frequency distribution of the boulders. We also computed the albedo and spectral reddening maps. Results: The morphological analysis of the region could suggest that Philae is located on a primordial terrain. The Abydos site is surrounded by two layered and fractured outcrops and presents a 0.02 km2 talus deposit rich in boulders. The boulder size frequency distribution gives a cumulative power-law index of -4.0 + 0.3/-0.4, which is correlated with gravitational events triggered by sublimation and/or thermal fracturing causing regressive erosion. The average value of the albedo is 5.8% at λ1 = 480.7 nm and 7.4% at λ2 = 649.2 nm, which is similar to the global albedos derived by OSIRIS and CIVA, respectively.

  8. Helium temperature measurements in a hot filament magnetic mirror plasma using high resolution Doppler spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, S.; McCarthy, P. J.; Ruth, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    Langmuir probe and spectroscopic diagnostics are used to routinely measure electron temperature and density over a wide operating range in a reconfigured Double Plasma device at University College Cork, Ireland. The helium plasma, generated through thermionic emission from a negatively biased tungsten filament, is confined by an axisymmetric magnetic mirror configuration using two stacks of NdFeB permanent magnets, each of length 20 cm and diameter 3 cm placed just outside the 15 mm water cooling jacket enclosing a cylindrical vacuum vessel of internal diameter 25 cm. Plasma light is analysed using a Fourier Transform-type Bruker spectrometer with a highest achievable resolution of 0.08 cm-1 . In the present work, the conventional assumption of room temperature ions in the analysis of Langmuir probe data from low temperature plasmas is examined critically using Doppler spectroscopy of the 468.6 nm He II line. Results for ion temperatures obtained from spectroscopic data for a variety of engineering parameters (discharge voltage, gas pressure and plasma current) will be presented.

  9. HIGH-RESOLUTION RADIO CONTINUUM MEASUREMENTS OF THE NUCLEAR DISKS OF Arp 220

    SciTech Connect

    Barcos-Muñoz, L.; Evans, A. S.; Privon, G. C.; Stierwalt, S.; Leroy, A. K.; Condon, J.; Reichardt, A.; Armus, L.; Mazzarella, J. M.; Murphy, E. J.; Meier, D. S.; Momjian, E.; Ott, J.; Sakamoto, K.; Sanders, D. B.; Schinnerer, E.; Walter, F.; Surace, J. A.; Thompson, T. A.

    2015-01-20

    1}kpc{sup –2}. These values, especially for the western nucleus are, to our knowledge, the highest luminosity surface densities and star formation rate surface densities measured for any star-forming system. Despite these high values, the nuclei appear to lie below the dusty Eddington limit in which radiation pressure is balanced only by self-gravity. The small measured sizes also imply that at wavelengths shorter than λ = 1 mm, dust absorption effects must play an important role in the observed light distribution while below 5 GHz free-free absorption contributes substantial opacity. According to these calculations, the nuclei of Arp 220 are only transparent in the frequency range ∼5-350 GHz. Our results offer no clear evidence that an active galactic nucleus dominates the emission from either nucleus at 33 GHz.

  10. Merging Field Measurements and High Resolution Modeling to Predict Possible Societal Impacts of Permafrost Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovsky, V. E.; Nicolsky, D.; Marchenko, S. S.; Cable, W.; Panda, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    A general warming trend in permafrost temperatures has triggered permafrost degradation in Alaska, especially at locations influenced by human activities. Various phenomena related to permafrost degradation are already commonly observed, including increased rates of coastal and riverbank erosion, increased occurrences of retrogressive thaw slumps and active layer detachment slides, and the disappearance of tundra lakes. The combination of thawing permafrost and erosion is damaging local community infrastructure such as buildings, roads, airports, pipelines, water and sanitation facilities, and communication systems. The potential scale of direct ecological and economical damage due to degrading permafrost has just begun to be recognized. While the projected changes in permafrost are generally available on global and regional scales, these projections cannot be effectively employed to estimate the societal impacts because of their coarse resolution. Intrinsic problems with the classical "spatial grid" approach in spatially distributed modeling applications preclude the use of this modeling approach to solve the above stated problem. Two types of models can be used to study permafrost dynamics in this case. One approach is a site-specific application of the GIPL2.0 permafrost model and another is a very high (tens to hundred meter) resolution spatially distributed version of the same model. The results of properly organized field measurements are also needed to calibrate and validate these models for specific locations and areas of interest. We are currently developing a "landscape unit" approach that allows practically unlimited spatial resolution of the modeling products. Classification of the study area into particular "landscape units" should be performed in accordance with the main factors controlling the expression of climate on permafrost in the study area, typically things such as vegetation, hydrology, soil properties, topography, etc. In areas with little

  11. New turbidity current model based on high-resolution monitoring of the longest flow ever measured

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azpiroz, Maria; Cartigny, Matthieu; Talling, Peter; Parsons, Daniel; Simmons, Steve; Clare, Michael; Sumner, Esther; Pope, Ed

    2016-04-01

    Turbidity currents transport large amounts of sediment from shallow waters towards deep ocean basins. Little is known about these flows, despite their potential hazard for damaging expensive and strategically important seafloor infrastructure. So far turbidity currents have been profiled in only 6 deep ocean locations worldwide. Our current knowledge of these flows is therefore mainly based on scaled-down experimental and computationally-limited numerical modelling. Here we present results from the monitoring of a one-week long turbidity current in the Congo Canyon that had a discharge close to that of the Mississippi River. Measurements taken every 5 seconds give the most detailed image yet of a turbidity current deep-water over an unprecedented duration. Our analysis reveals a different flow structure than that presented in previous models. Classical models display a thick front of the flow followed by a thinner and faster flow, which gives way to a short and quasi-steady body. Instead, we observe a thin frontal cell that outruns a thicker (~80 m), long and slower quasi-steady flow. In contrast to the previous model, where the thinner faster flow feeds sediment into the head, the Congo Canyon turbidity current shows a frontal cell that feeds sediment into, and at the same time outruns, the succeeding quasi-steady flow. As a result of the faster moving frontal cell, the flow should continuously stretch and grow in length while propagating down the system. Within the quasi-steady body, the flow switches between what appears to be two stable flow modes. One mode exhibits a fast and thin velocity profile whose maximum is a low distance from the seabed and resembles Froude-supercritical flow conditions, while the other mode is similar to Froude-subcritical flow conditions as the flow is thicker and slower. These first observations provide new insights into the behaviour of deep water long duration flows that differ from traditional models and provide an exciting

  12. High Resolution CH4 Emissions and Dissolved CH4 Measurements Elucidate Surface Gas Exchange Processes in Toolik Lake, Arctic Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Sontro, T.; Sollberger, S.; Kling, G. W.; Shaver, G. R.; Eugster, W.

    2013-12-01

    Approximately 14% of the Alaskan North Slope is covered in lakes of various sizes and depths. Diffusive carbon emissions (CH4 and CO2) from these lakes offset the tundra sink by ~20 %, but the offset would substantially increase if ebullitive CH4 emissions were also considered. Ultimately, arctic lake CH4 emissions are not insignificant in the global CH4 budget and their contribution is bound to increase due to impacts from climate change. Here we present high resolution CH4 emission data as measured via eddy covariance and a Los Gatos gas analyzer during the ice free period from Toolik Lake, a deep (20 m) Arctic lake located on the Alaskan North Slope, over the last few summers. Emissions are relatively low (< 25 mg CH4 m-2 d-1) with little variation over the summer. Diurnal variations regularly occur, however, with up to 3 times higher fluxes at night. Gas exchange is a relatively difficult process to estimate, but is normally done so as the product of the CH4 gradient across the air-water interface and the gas transfer velocity, k. Typically, k is determined based on the turbulence on the water side of the interface, which is most commonly approximated by wind speed; however, it has become increasingly apparent that this assumption does not remain valid across all water bodies. Dissolved CH4 profiles in Toolik revealed a subsurface peak in CH4 at the thermocline of up to 3 times as much CH4 as in the surface water. We hypothesize that convective mixing at night due to cooling surface waters brings the subsurface CH4 to the surface and causes the higher night fluxes. In addition to high resolution flux emission estimates, we also acquired high resolution data for dissolved CH4 in surface waters of Toolik Lake during the last two summers using a CH4 equilibrator system connected to a Los Gatos gas analyzer. Thus, having both the flux and the CH4 gradient across the air-water interface measured directly, we can calculate k and investigate the processes influencing

  13. Accurate high-resolution measurements of 3-D tissue dynamics with registration-enhanced displacement encoded MRI.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Arnold D; Merchant, Samer S; Hsu, Edward W

    2014-06-01

    Displacement fields are important to analyze deformation, which is associated with functional and material tissue properties often used as indicators of health. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques like DENSE and image registration methods like Hyperelastic Warping have been used to produce pixel-level deformation fields that are desirable in high-resolution analysis. However, DENSE can be complicated by challenges associated with image phase unwrapping, in particular offset determination. On the other hand, Hyperelastic Warping can be hampered by low local image contrast. The current work proposes a novel approach for measuring tissue displacement with both DENSE and Hyperelastic Warping, incorporating physically accurate displacements obtained by the latter to improve phase characterization in DENSE. The validity of the proposed technique is demonstrated using numerical and physical phantoms, and in vivo small animal cardiac MRI.

  14. Venous elastography: validation of a novel high-resolution ultrasound method for measuring vein compliance using finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Rohan; Patel, Prashant; Park, Dae W; Cichonski, Thomas J; Richards, Michael S; Rubin, Jonathan M; Hamilton, James; Weitzel, William F

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasonography for the noninvasive assessment of tissue properties has enjoyed widespread success. With the growing emphasis in recent years on arteriovenous fistulae (AVFs) for dialysis vascular access in patients with end-stage renal disease, and on reducing AVF failures, there is increasing interest in ultrasound for the preoperative evaluation of the mechanical and elastic properties of arteries and veins. This study used high-resolution ultrasound with phase-sensitive speckle tracking to obtain in vivo vein elasticity measurements during dilation. The results of this novel ultrasound technique were then compared to a computer model of venous strain. The computer model and ultrasound analysis of the vessel wall demonstrated internally consistent positive and negative longitudinal strain values as the vein wall underwent dilation. These results support further investigation of the use of phase-sensitive speckle tracking for ultrasound venous mapping for preoperative vascular access evaluation.

  15. A scanning, all-fiber Sagnac interferometer for high resolution magneto-optic measurements at 820 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, Alexander; Fejer, Martin; Kapitulnik, Aharon

    2014-10-15

    The Sagnac Interferometer has historically been used for detecting non-reciprocal phenomena, such as rotation. We demonstrate an apparatus in which this technique is employed for high resolution measurements of the Magneto-Optical Polar Kerr effect—a direct indicator of magnetism. Previous designs have incorporated free-space components which are bulky and difficult to align. We improve upon this technique by using all fiber-optic coupled components and demonstrate operation at a new wavelength, 820 nm, with which we can achieve better than 1 μrad resolution. Mounting the system on a piezo-electric scanner allows us to acquire diffraction limited images with 1.5 μm spatial resolution. We also provide extensive discussion on the details and of the Sagnac Interferometer's construction.

  16. High-resolution core-level photoemission measurements on the pentacene single crystal surface assisted by photoconduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Yasuo; Uragami, Yuki; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yonezawa, Keiichirou; Mase, Kazuhiko; Kera, Satoshi; Ishii, Hisao; Ueno, Nobuo

    2016-03-01

    Upon charge carrier transport behaviors of high-mobility organic field effect transistors of pentacene single crystal, effects of ambient gases and resultant probable ‘impurities’ at the crystal surface have been controversial. Definite knowledge on the surface stoichiometry and chemical composites is indispensable to solve this question. In the present study, high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements on the pentacene single crystal samples successfully demonstrated a presence of a few atomic-percent of (photo-)oxidized species at the first molecular layer of the crystal surface through accurate analyses of the excitation energy (i.e. probing depth) dependence of the C1s peak profiles. Particular methodologies to conduct XPS on organic single crystal samples, without any charging nor damage of the sample in spite of its electric insulating character and fragility against x-ray irradiation, is also described in detail.

  17. New High-Resolution Absorption Cross-Section Measurements of HCFC-142B in the Mid-Ir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bris, Karine; Strong, Kimberly; Melo, Stella

    2009-06-01

    HCFC-142b (1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane) is a temporary substitute for ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). However, due to its high absorption cross-sections in the mid-IR, HCFC-142b is also a highly potent greenhouse gas, now detectable from space by satellite missions. So far, the accuracy of the retrieval has been limited by the lack of reference data in a range of temperatures compatible with atmospheric observations. We present new absorption cross section measurements of HCFC-142b at high-resolution (0.02 cm^{-1}) from 223 K to 283 K in the 600 cm^{-1}- 4000 cm^{-1} spectral window. The composite spectra are calculated for each temperature from a set of acquisitions at different pressures by Fourier transform spectroscopy.

  18. Interior channels in Martian valleys: Constraints on fluvial erosion by measurements of the Mars Express High Resolution Stereo Camera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaumann, R.; Reiss, D.; Frei, S.; Neukum, G.; Scholten, F.; Gwinner, K.; Roatsch, T.; Matz, K.-D.; Mertens, V.; Hauber, E.; Hoffmann, H.; Kohler, U.; Head, J.W.; Hiesinger, H.; Carr, M.H.

    2005-01-01

    In High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) images of the Mars Express Mission a 130 km long interior channel is identified within a 400 km long valley network system located in the Lybia Montes. Ages of the valley floor and the surroundings as derived from crater counts define a period of ???350 Myrs during which the valley might have been formed. Based on HRSC stereo measurements the discharge of the interior channel is estimated at ???4800 in m3/S, corresponding to a runoff production rate of ??? cm/day. Mass balances indicate erosion rates of a few cm/year implying the erosion activity in the valley to a few thousand years for continuous flow, or one or more orders of magnitude longer time spans for more intermittent flows. Therefore, during the Hesperian, relatively brief but recurring episodes of erosion intervals are more likely than sustained flow. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Interior channels in Martian valleys: Constraints on fluvial erosion by measurements of the Mars Express High Resolution Stereo Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaumann, R.; Reiss, D.; Frei, S.; Neukum, G.; Scholten, F.; Gwinner, K.; Roatsch, T.; Matz, K.-D.; Mertens, V.; Hauber, E.; Hoffmann, H.; Köhler, U.; Head, J. W.; Hiesinger, H.; Carr, M. H.

    2005-08-01

    In High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) images of the Mars Express Mission a 130 km long interior channel is identified within a 400 km long valley network system located in the Lybia Montes. Ages of the valley floor and the surroundings as derived from crater counts define a period of ~350 Myrs during which the valley might have been formed. Based on HRSC stereo measurements the discharge of the interior channel is estimated at ~4800 m3/s, corresponding to a runoff production rate of ~1 cm/day. Mass balances indicate erosion rates of a few cm/year implying the erosion activity in the valley to a few thousand years for continuous flow, or one or more orders of magnitude longer time spans for more intermittent flows. Therefore, during the Hesperian, relatively brief but recurring episodes of erosion intervals are more likely than sustained flow.

  20. Development of a high resolution beta camera for a direct measurement of positron distribution on brain surface

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, S.; Seki, C.; Kashikura, K.

    1996-12-31

    We have developed and tested a high resolution beta camera for a direct measurement of positron distribution on brain surface of animals. The beta camera consists of a thin CaF{sub 2}(Eu) scintillator, a tapered fiber optics plate (taper fiber) and a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The taper fiber is the key component of the camera. We have developed two types of beta cameras. One is 20mm diameter field of view camera for imaging brain surface of cats. The other is 10mm diameter camera for that of rats. Spatial resolutions of beta camera for cats and rats were 0.8mm FWHM and 0.5mm FWHM, respectively. We confirmed that developed beta cameras may overcome the limitation of the spatial resolution of the positron emission tomography (PET).

  1. Application of an ultra-high-resolution FBG strain sensor for crustal deformation measurements at the Aburatsubo Bay, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, T.; Liu, Q.; He, Z.; Mogi, K.; Matsui, H.; Wang, H. F.; Kato, T.

    2011-12-01

    For crustal deformation measurements, high-resolution strain sensors on the order of tens of nano-strains are desirable. Current sensors for this purpose include quartz-tube extensometers, free-space laser interferometers, and borehole strainmeters. The former two sensors show quite high strain resolution, however, these are large in size, from tens to hundreds of meter long, and hence, are difficult to measure spatial strain distribution. The optical fiber strain sensors have advantages of multiplexing capability and relatively low cost, and are widely adopted in the applications for structural health monitoring of civil structures such as bridges and buildings. Thus, as long as the strain resolution can be high enough to meet the requirement of crustal deformation measurements, fiber strain sensors can be an attractive tool. We have been developing an ultra-high strain-resolution fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor for static strain measurement, interrogated by a narrow line-width tunable laser. The sensor consists of a pair of FBGs, one for strain sensing and the other for temperature compensation. The Bragg wavelength difference between the two FBGs is evaluated using a cross-correlation algorithm. We already demonstrated that an ultra-high resolution corresponding to 2.6 nano-strain was obtained in the case where no strain was applied to the sensor, which was considered to be the ultimate performance of our measurement system. By directly applying variable strains to the developed sensor with a piezo-stage, a resolution of 17.6 nano-strain was demonstrated. This time, the sensor was installed into the vault at Aburatsubo, Japan, to measure crustal deformation caused by ocean tide, and the measured data were compared with the results obtained by a quartz-tube extensometer at the site, which has been measured by the University of Tokyo's Earthquake Research Institute. The deformation induced by oceanic tide was measured by the FBG sensor with the resolution about

  2. High resolution data acquisition

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, G.W.; Fuller, K.R.

    1993-04-06

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock, pulse train, and analog circuitry for generating a triangular wave synchronously with the pulse train (as seen in diagram on patent). The triangular wave has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter counts the clock pulse train during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  3. High resolution data acquisition

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, Glenn W.; Fuller, Kenneth R.

    1993-01-01

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock (38) pulse train (37) and analog circuitry (44) for generating a triangular wave (46) synchronously with the pulse train (37). The triangular wave (46) has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter (18, 32) forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter (26) counts the clock pulse train (37) during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer (52) then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  4. High resolution data acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, G.W.; Fuller, K.R.

    1992-12-31

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock pulse train and analog circuitry for generating a triangular wave synchronously with the pulse train. The triangular wave has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter counts the clock pulse train during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  5. PHOENIX: a scoring function for affinity prediction derived using high-resolution crystal structures and calorimetry measurements.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yat T; Marshall, Garland R

    2011-02-28

    Binding affinity prediction is one of the most critical components to computer-aided structure-based drug design. Despite advances in first-principle methods for predicting binding affinity, empirical scoring functions that are fast and only relatively accurate are still widely used in structure-based drug design. With the increasing availability of X-ray crystallographic structures in the Protein Data Bank and continuing application of biophysical methods such as isothermal titration calorimetry to measure thermodynamic parameters contributing to binding free energy, sufficient experimental data exists that scoring functions can now be derived by separating enthalpic (ΔH) and entropic (TΔS) contributions to binding free energy (ΔG). PHOENIX, a scoring function to predict binding affinities of protein-ligand complexes, utilizes the increasing availability of experimental data to improve binding affinity predictions by the following: model training and testing using high-resolution crystallographic data to minimize structural noise, independent models of enthalpic and entropic contributions fitted to thermodynamic parameters assumed to be thermodynamically biased to calculate binding free energy, use of shape and volume descriptors to better capture entropic contributions. A set of 42 descriptors and 112 protein-ligand complexes were used to derive functions using partial least-squares for change of enthalpy (ΔH) and change of entropy (TΔS) to calculate change of binding free energy (ΔG), resulting in a predictive r2 (r(pred)2) of 0.55 and a standard error (SE) of 1.34 kcal/mol. External validation using the 2009 version of the PDBbind "refined set" (n = 1612) resulted in a Pearson correlation coefficient (R(p)) of 0.575 and a mean error (ME) of 1.41 pK(d). Enthalpy and entropy predictions were of limited accuracy individually. However, their difference resulted in a relatively accurate binding free energy. While the development of an accurate and applicable

  6. PHOENIX: A Scoring Function for Affinity Prediction Derived Using High-Resolution Crystal Structures and Calorimetry Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yat T.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2011-01-01

    Binding affinity prediction is one of the most critical components to computer-aided structure-based drug design. Despite advances in first-principle methods for predicting binding affinity, empirical scoring functions that are fast and only relatively accurate are still widely used in structure-based drug design. With the increasing availability of X-ray crystallographic structures in the Protein Data Bank and continuing application of biophysical methods such as isothermal titration calorimetry to measure thermodynamic parameters contributing to binding free energy, sufficient experimental data exists that scoring functions can now be derived by separating enthalpic (ΔH) and entropic (TΔS) contributions to binding free energy (ΔG). PHOENIX, a scoring function to predict binding affinities of protein-ligand complexes, utilizes the increasing availability of experimental data to improve binding affinity predictions by the following: model training and testing using high-resolution crystallographic data to minimize structural noise, independent models of enthalpic and entropic contributions fitted to thermodynamic parameters assumed to be thermodynamically biased to calculate binding free energy, use of shape and volume descriptors to better capture entropic contributions. A set of 42 descriptors and 112 protein-ligand complexes were used to derive functions using partial least squares for change of enthalpy (ΔH) and change of entropy (TΔS) to calculate change of binding free energy (ΔG), resulting in a predictive r2 (r2pred) of 0.55 and a standard error (SE) of 1.34 kcal/mol. External validation using the 2009 version of the PDBbind “refined set” (n = 1612) resulted in a Pearson correlation coefficient (Rp) of 0.575 and a mean error (ME) of 1.41 pKd. Enthalpy and entropy predictions were of limited accuracy individually. However, their difference resulted in a relatively accurate binding free energy. While the development of an accurate and applicable

  7. Using initial field campaigns for optimal placement of high resolution stable water isotope and water chemistry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahraei, Amirhossein; Kraft, Philipp; Windhorst, David; Orlowski, Natalie; Bestian, Konrad; Holly, Hartmut; Breuer, Lutz

    2017-04-01

    Understanding hydrological processes and flow paths is of major importance for the management of catchment water resources. The power of stable isotopes as a tracer and to encoder environmental information provides the opportunity to assess hydrological flow paths, catchment residence times, landscape influences, and the origin of water resources in catchments. High resolution isotope sampling of multiple sources ensures detailed comprehension of hydrological and biogeochemical interactions within catchments. Technical advances over the last years have made it feasible to directly measure stable water isotope signatures of various sources online in a high temporal resolution during field campaigns. However, measuring long time series in a high temporal resolutions are still costly and can only be performed at few places in a study area. The identification of locations where measurements should be implemented is still challenging. Our study is conducted in the developed landscape of the Schwingbach catchment located in central Germany. A reconnaissance assessment of the spatial distribution of runoff generating areas was performed in a short time frame prior to the selection of the final sampling site. We used a combination of: water quality snapshot sampling to identify spatial differences and potential hot spots, event-based hydrograph separation to differentiate possible flow paths, consecutive runoff measurements by salt dilution to identify gaining and loosing reaches, field reconnaissance mapping of potentially variable source areas in the riparian zone, infrared imagery of stream surface temperatures to locate potential concentrated groundwater discharge to the stream, and groundwater table mapping to identify sites where different dominant processes (e.g., groundwater flow, groundwater-surface water interactions and runoff generation) can be expected. First results indicated that precipitation and stream water are significantly different in isotopic

  8. Investigation of wadeable and unwadeable natural hydraulic jumps by integrating high resolution field surveying, digital terrain modeling, and process measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallé, B. L.; Pasternack, G. B.

    2002-12-01

    Recent research in fluvial geomorphology has emphasized the development of three-dimensional digital terrain models (DTMs) to better understand the interrelationship between river processes and channel form. However, no attempts have previously been made to apply DTMs to bedrock-controlled boulder-bed channels. Recent advances in integrating CAD techniques with intensive and iterative field surveys has allowed for the development of high-resolution digital terrain models for the bed and water surface topographies of two wadeable hydraulic jumps in the upper South Fork American River basin, CA, and one unwadeable hydraulic jump in the Cache Creek basin, CA. Field surveys varied based on the presence of subaerial, subaqueous, and wadeable conditions, and were conducted at two discharges. For unwadeable conditions, a new high-resolution mechanical surveying system was used to sample the bed and water surface. In addition, process measurements such as air content were recorded. Average point densities ranged from 4 to 22 pts per sq. m over a 6 to 68 sq. m area. Maximum point densities ranged from 33 to 64 pts per sq. m. Bed DTMs for all sites indicate a sub-channel width control on jump formation. Water surface DTMs indicate the presence of a strong stage-dependence on water surface topography, with shifts in the nappe profile and downstream water surface slopes at higher discharges. Further, rapidly varying supercritical flows had planar or convex shapes that could be empirically related to underlying bed topography. Air content DTMs showed significant spatial and temporal variability as well as rapid air entrainment at the jump toe. Air detrainment varied considerably. Subsequently, DTMs and process data were used to test a series of simple empirical relationships not previously investigated for natural hydraulic jumps. Further study will emphasize the development and deployment of process-based instrumentation such that the complex turbulent air-water flow dynamics

  9. The Reliability of Pharyngeal High Resolution Manometry with Impedance for Derivation of Measures of Swallowing Function in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Omari, Taher I.; Savilampi, Johanna; Kokkinn, Karmen; Schar, Mistyka; Lamvik, Kristin; Doeltgen, Sebastian; Cock, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. We evaluated the intra- and interrater agreement and test-retest reliability of analyst derivation of swallow function variables based on repeated high resolution manometry with impedance measurements. Methods. Five subjects swallowed 10 × 10 mL saline on two occasions one week apart producing a database of 100 swallows. Swallows were repeat-analysed by six observers using software. Swallow variables were indicative of contractility, intrabolus pressure, and flow timing. Results. The average intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for intra- and interrater comparisons of all variable means showed substantial to excellent agreement (intrarater ICC 0.85–1.00; mean interrater ICC 0.77–1.00). Test-retest results were less reliable. ICC for test-retest comparisons ranged from slight to excellent depending on the class of variable. Contractility variables differed most in terms of test-retest reliability. Amongst contractility variables, UES basal pressure showed excellent test-retest agreement (mean ICC 0.94), measures of UES postrelaxation contractile pressure showed moderate to substantial test-retest agreement (mean Interrater ICC 0.47–0.67), and test-retest agreement of pharyngeal contractile pressure ranged from slight to substantial (mean Interrater ICC 0.15–0.61). Conclusions. Test-retest reliability of HRIM measures depends on the class of variable. Measures of bolus distension pressure and flow timing appear to be more test-retest reliable than measures of contractility. PMID:27190520

  10. Determination of spectroscopic properties of atmospheric molecules from high resolution vacuum ultraviolet cross section and wavelength measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Yoshino, K.; Freeman, D. E.

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of progress during the six-month period 1 Nov. 1992 to 30 Apr. 1993 on work on (1) cross section measurements of the Schumann-Runge continuum; (2) the determination of the predissociation linewidths of the Schumann-Runge bands of O2; (3) the determination of the molecular constants of the ground state of O2; (4) cross section measurements of CO2 in wavelength region 120-170 nm; and (4) determination of dissociation energy of O2. The experimental investigations are effected at high resolution with a 6.65 m scanning spectrometer which is, by virtue of its small instrumental width (FWHM = 0.0013 nm), uniquely suitable for cross section measurements of molecular bands with discrete rotational structure. Below 175 nm and in the region of the S-R continuum, synchrotron radiation is suitable for cross section measurements. All of these spectroscopic measurements are needed for accurate calculations of the production of atomic oxygen and penetration of solar radiation into the Earth's atmosphere.

  11. Compton-scattering measurement of diagnostic x-ray spectrum using high-resolution Schottky CdTe detector.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Koji; Matsumoto, Masao; Taniguchi, Akira

    2005-06-01

    The analysis of x-ray spectra is important for quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) of radiographic systems. The aim of this study is to measure the diagnostic x-ray spectra under clinical conditions using a high-resolution Schottky CdTe detector. Under clinical conditions, the direct measurement of a diagnostic spectrum is difficult because of the high photon fluence rates that cause significant detector photon pile-up. An alternative way of measuring the output spectra from a tube is first to measure the 90 deg Compton scattered photons from a given sample. With this set-up detector, pile-up is not a problem. From the scattered spectrum one can then use an energy correction and the Klein-Nishina function to reconstruct the actual spectrum incident upon the scattering sample. The verification of whether our spectra measured by the Compton method are accurate was accomplished by comparing exposure rates calculated from the reconstructed spectra to those measured with an ionization chamber. We used aluminum (Al) filtration ranging in thickness from 0 to 6 mm. The half value layers (HVLs) obtained for a 70 kV beam were 2.78 mm via the ionization chamber measurements and 2.93 mm via the spectral measurements. For a 100 kV beam we obtained 3.98 and 4.32 mm. The small differences in HVLs obtained by both techniques suggest that Compton scatter spectroscopy with a Schottky CdTe detector is suitable for measuring the diagnostic x-ray spectra and useful for QA and QC of clinical x-ray equipment.

  12. Compton-scattering measurement of diagnostic x-ray spectrum using high-resolution Schottky CdTe detector.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Koji; Matsumoto, Masao; Taniguchi, Akira

    2005-06-01

    The analysis of x-ray spectra is important for quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) of radiographic systems. The aim of this study is to measure the diagnostic x-ray spectra under clinical conditions using a high-resolution Schottky CdTe detector. Under clinical conditions, the direct measurement of a diagnostic spectrum is difficult because of the high photon fluence rates that cause significant detector photon pile-up. An alternative way of measuring the output spectra from a tube is first to measure the 90 deg Compton scattered photons from a given sample. With this set-up detector, pile-up is not a problem. From the scattered spectrum one can then use an energy correction and the Klein-Nishina function to reconstruct the actual spectrum incident upon the scattering sample. The verification of whether our spectra measured by the Compton method are accurate was accomplished by comparing exposure rates calculated from the reconstructed spectra to those measured with an ionization chamber. We used aluminum (Al) filtration ranging in thickness from 0 to 6 mm. The half value layers (HVLs) obtained for a 70 kV beam were 2.78 mm via the ionization chamber measurements and 2.93 mm via the spectral measurements. For a 100 kV beam we obtained 3.98 and 4.32 mm. The small differences in HVLs obtained by both techniques suggest that Compton scatter spectroscopy with a Schottky CdTe detector is suitable for measuring the diagnostic x-ray spectra and useful for QA and QC of clinical x-ray equipment. © 2005 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  13. Digital Tomosynthesis and High Resolution Computed Tomography as Clinical Tools for Vertebral Endplate Topography Measurements: Comparison with Microcomputed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Oravec, Daniel; Quazi, Abrar; Xiao, Angela; Yang, Ellen; Zauel, Roger; Flynn, Michael J.; Yeni, Yener N.

    2015-01-01

    Endplate morphology is understood to play an important role in the mechanical behavior of vertebral bone as well as degenerative processes in spinal tissues; however, the utility of clinical imaging modalities in assessment of the vertebral endplate has been limited. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of two clinical imaging modalities (digital tomosynthesis, DTS; high resolution computed tomography, HRCT) to assess endplate topography by correlating the measurements to a microcomputed tomography (µCT) standard. DTS, HRCT, and µCT images of 117 cadaveric thoracolumbar vertebrae (T10-L1; 23 male, 19 female; ages 36–100 years) were segmented, and inferior and superior endplate surface topographical distribution parameters were calculated. Both DTS and HRCT showed statistically significant correlations with µCT approaching a moderate level of correlation at the superior endplate for all measured parameters (R2Adj=0.19–0.57), including averages, variability, and higher order statistical moments. Correlation of average depths at the inferior endplate was comparable to the superior case for both DTS and HRCT (R2Adj=0.14–0.51), while correlations became weak or nonsignificant for higher moments of the topography distribution. DTS was able to capture variations in the endplate topography to a slightly better extent than HRCT, and taken together with the higher speed and lower radiation cost of DTS than HRCT, DTS appears preferable for endplate measurements. PMID:26220145

  14. Digital tomosynthesis and high resolution computed tomography as clinical tools for vertebral endplate topography measurements: Comparison with microcomputed tomography.

    PubMed

    Oravec, Daniel; Quazi, Abrar; Xiao, Angela; Yang, Ellen; Zauel, Roger; Flynn, Michael J; Yeni, Yener N

    2015-12-01

    Endplate morphology is understood to play an important role in the mechanical behavior of vertebral bone as well as degenerative processes in spinal tissues; however, the utility of clinical imaging modalities in assessment of the vertebral endplate has been limited. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of two clinical imaging modalities (digital tomosynthesis, DTS; high resolution computed tomography, HRCT) to assess endplate topography by correlating the measurements to a microcomputed tomography (μCT) standard. DTS, HRCT, and μCT images of 117 cadaveric thoracolumbar vertebrae (T10-L1; 23 male, 19 female; ages 36-100 years) were segmented, and inferior and superior endplate surface topographical distribution parameters were calculated. Both DTS and HRCT showed statistically significant correlations with μCT approaching a moderate level of correlation at the superior endplate for all measured parameters (R(2)Adj=0.19-0.57), including averages, variability, and higher order statistical moments. Correlation of average depths at the inferior endplate was comparable to the superior case for both DTS and HRCT (R(2)Adj=0.14-0.51), while correlations became weak or nonsignificant for higher moments of the topography distribution. DTS was able to capture variations in the endplate topography to a slightly better extent than HRCT, and taken together with the higher speed and lower radiation cost of DTS than HRCT, DTS appears preferable for endplate measurements.

  15. Impact of Mutation Type and Amplicon Characteristics on Genetic Diversity Measures Generated Using a High-Resolution Melting Diversity Assay

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Matthew M.; Donnell, Deborah; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2013-01-01

    We adapted high-resolution melting (HRM) technology to measure genetic diversity without sequencing. Diversity is measured as a single numeric HRM score. Herein, we determined the impact of mutation types and amplicon characteristics on HRM diversity scores. Plasmids were generated with single-base changes, insertions, and deletions. Different primer sets were used to vary the position of mutations within amplicons. Plasmids and plasmid mixtures were analyzed to determine the impact of mutation type, position, and concentration on HRM scores. The impact of amplicon length and G/C content on HRM scores was also evaluated. Different mutation types affected HRM scores to varying degrees (1-bp deletion < 1-bp change < 3-bp insertion < 9-bp insertion). The impact of mutations on HRM scores was influenced by amplicon length and the position of the mutation within the amplicon. Mutations were detected at concentrations of 5% to 95%, with the greatest impact at 50%. The G/C content altered melting temperature values of amplicons but had no impact on HRM scores. These data are relevant to the design of assays that measure genetic diversity using HRM technology. PMID:23178437

  16. High-resolution 3D volumetry versus conventional measuring techniques for the assessment of experimental lymphedema in the mouse hindlimb

    PubMed Central

    Frueh, Florian S.; Körbel, Christina; Gassert, Laura; Müller, Andreas; Gousopoulos, Epameinondas; Lindenblatt, Nicole; Giovanoli, Pietro; Laschke, Matthias W.; Menger, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary lymphedema is a common complication of cancer treatment characterized by chronic limb swelling with interstitial inflammation. The rodent hindlimb is a widely used model for the evaluation of novel lymphedema treatments. However, the assessment of limb volume in small animals is challenging. Recently, high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) imaging modalities have been introduced for rodent limb volumetry. In the present study we evaluated the validity of microcomputed tomography (μCT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound in comparison to conventional measuring techniques. For this purpose, acute lymphedema was induced in the mouse hindlimb by a modified popliteal lymphadenectomy. The 4-week course of this type of lymphedema was first assessed in 6 animals. In additional 12 animals, limb volumes were analyzed by μCT, 9.4 T MRI and 30 MHz ultrasound as well as by planimetry, circumferential length and paw thickness measurements. Interobserver correlation was high for all modalities, in particular for μCT analysis (r = 0.975, p < 0.001). Importantly, caliper-measured paw thickness correlated well with μCT (r = 0.861), MRI (r = 0.821) and ultrasound (r = 0.800). Because the assessment of paw thickness represents a time- and cost-effective approach, it may be ideally suited for the quantification of rodent hindlimb lymphedema. PMID:27698469

  17. Validation of high-resolution gamma-ray computed tomography for quantitative gas holdup measurements in centrifugal pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieberle, André; Schäfer, Thomas; Neumann, Martin; Hampel, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    In this article, the capability of high-resolution gamma-ray computed tomography (HireCT) for quantitative gas-liquid phase distribution measurements in commercially available industrial pumps is experimentally investigated. The object of interest thereby operates under two-phase flow conditions. HireCT System comprises a collimated 137Cs isotopic source, a radiation detector arc with a multi-channel signal processing unit, and a rotary unit enabling CT scans of objects with diameters of up to 700 mm. The accuracy of gas holdup measurements was validated on a sophisticated modular test mockup replicating defined gas-liquid distributions, which are expected in impeller chambers of industrial centrifugal pumps under two-phase operation. Stationary as well as rotation-synchronized CT scanning techniques have been analyzed, which are both used to obtain sharply resolved gas phase distributions in rotating structures as well as non-rotating zones. A measuring accuracy of better than 1% absolute for variously distributed static gas holdups in the rotating frame has been verified with the modular test mockup using HireCT.

  18. Angle-resolved photoemission study of the Kitaev candidate α -RuCl3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoqing; Li, Haoxiang; Waugh, J. A.; Parham, S.; Kim, Heung-Sik; Sears, J. A.; Gomes, A.; Kee, Hae-Young; Kim, Young-June; Dessau, D. S.

    2016-10-01

    α -RuCl3 has been hinted to be a spin-orbital-assisted Mott insulator in proximity to a Kitaev spin liquid state. Here we present angle-resolved photoemission measurements on single-crystal α -RuCl3 in both the pristine and electron-doped states, and combine them with Local Density Approximation (LDA)+Spin Orbital Coupling (SOC)+U calculations performed for several low-energy competing magnetically ordered states as well as the paramagnetic state. A large Mott gap is found in the measured band structure of the pristine compound that persists to more than 30 times beyond the magnetic ordering temperature, though the paramagnetic calculation shows almost no gap. Upon electron doping, spectral weight is transferred into the gap but the new states still maintain a sizable gap from the Fermi edge. These findings are most consistent with a Mott insulator with a somewhat exotic evolution out of the Mott state with both temperature and doping, likely related to unusually strong spin fluctuations.

  19. Detection of intestinal dysplasia using angle-resolved low coherence interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, Neil; Zhu, Yizheng; Thacker, Julie K. M.; Migaly, John; Guy, Cynthia; Mantyh, Christopher R.; Wax, Adam

    2011-10-01

    Angle-resolved low coherence interferometry (a/LCI) is an optical biopsy technique that allows for depth-resolved, label-free measurement of the average size and optical density of cell nuclei in epithelial tissue to assess the tissue health. a/LCI has previously been used clinically to identify the presence of dysplasia in Barrett's Esophagus patients undergoing routine surveillance. We present the results of a pilot, ex vivo study of tissues from 27 patients undergoing partial colonic resection surgery, conducted to evaluate the ability of a/LCI to identify dysplasia. Performance was determined by comparing the nuclear morphology measurements with pathological assessment of co-located physical biopsies. A statistically significant correlation between increased average nuclear size, reduced nuclear density, and the presence of dysplasia was noted at the basal layer of the epithelium, at a depth of 200 to 300 μm beneath the tissue surface. Using a decision line determined from a receiver operating characteristic, a/LCI was able to separate dysplastic from healthy tissues with a sensitivity of 92.9% (13/14), a specificity of 83.6% (56/67), and an overall accuracy of 85.2% (69/81). The study illustrates the extension of the a/LCI technique to the detection of intestinal dysplasia, and demonstrates the need for future in vivo studies.

  20. Angle-resolved reflectance of obliquely aligned silver nanorods.

    PubMed

    Wang, X J; Abell, J L; Zhao, Y-P; Zhang, Z M

    2012-04-01

    Arrays of silver nanorods (AgNRs) formed by oblique-angle deposition (OAD) are strongly anisotropic, with either metallic or dielectric characteristics depending on the polarization of incident light, and may be used to enhance Raman scattering and surface plasmon polaritons. This work investigates the polarization-dependent reflectance of inclined AgNR arrays at the wavelengths of 635 and 977 nm. The specular reflectance at various incidence angles and the bidirectional reflectance distribution function were measured with a laser scatterometer, while the directional-hemispherical reflectance was measured with an integrating sphere. The AgNR layer is modeled as an effectively homogenous, optically uniaxial material using the effective medium theory to elucidate the dielectric or metallic response for differently polarized incidence. The thin-film optics formulation is modified considering optical anisotropy and surface scattering. This study helps gain a better understanding of optical properties of nanostructured materials.

  1. Electron-electron correlation in graphite: a combined angle-resolved photoemission and first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Grüneis, A; Attaccalite, C; Pichler, T; Zabolotnyy, V; Shiozawa, H; Molodtsov, S L; Inosov, D; Koitzsch, A; Knupfer, M; Schiessling, J; Follath, R; Weber, R; Rudolf, P; Wirtz, L; Rubio, A

    2008-01-25

    The full three-dimensional dispersion of the pi bands, Fermi velocities, and effective masses are measured with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and compared to first-principles calculations. The band structure by density-functional theory underestimates the slope of the bands and the trigonal warping effect. Including electron-electron correlation on the level of the GW approximation, however, yields remarkable improvement in the vicinity of the Fermi level. This demonstrates the breakdown of the independent electron picture in semimetallic graphite and points toward a pronounced role of electron correlation for the interpretation of transport experiments and double-resonant Raman scattering for a wide range of carbon based materials.

  2. Anisotropy in ordered sexithiophene thin films studied by angle-resolved photoemission using combined laser and synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiner, C. E.; Dreyer, J.; Hertel, I. V.; Koch, N.; Ritze, H.-H.; Widdra, W.; Winter, B.

    2005-08-01

    We present angle-resolved photoemission (PE) spectra of ordered multilayer sexithiophene (6T) films, 200nm thick, grown on a Au(110) single crystal. However, the measurement of sharp and nonshifted PE spectral features from the low-conducting organic material is only possible if the positive surface charge, generated in the PE process, is fully compensated. We have accomplished this by simultaneous laser irradiation. On the basis of the resulting data we found that for these thick films the 6T molecules are preferentially oriented with their long axes nearly normal to the surface.

  3. Electronic structure of electron doped BaAs2Fe2 superconductors revealed by Angle Resolved Photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilmercati, P.; Vobornik, I.; Unnikrishnan, M.; Fedorov, A.; Goldoni, A.; Panaccione, G.; Safa-Sefat, A.; Jin, R.; McGuire, M. A.; Sales, B. C.; Singh, D. J.; Mandrus, D.; Mannella, N.

    2009-03-01

    The electronic structure in the normal state of Co-doped BaAs2Fe2 superconductors has been measured by Angle Resolved photoemission (ARPES). Co doping on the Fe site results in electron doping [A. S. Sefat et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 117004 (2008)]. The data qualitatively reveal that Co-doping results in raising the chemical potential, as expected with electron doping. The Fermi surface topology and the possible relevance to the mechanism of spin fluctuation will also be discussed.

  4. Determination of accurate protein monoisotopic mass with the most abundant mass measurable using high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Fen; Chang, C Allen; Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Tsay, Yeou-Guang

    2013-09-01

    While recent developments in mass spectrometry enable direct evaluation of monoisotopic masses (M(mi)) of smaller compounds, protein M(mi) is mostly determined based on its relationship to average mass (Mav). Here, we propose an alternative approach to determining protein M(mi) based on its correlation with the most abundant mass (M(ma)) measurable using high-resolution mass spectrometry. To test this supposition, we first empirically calculated M(mi) and M(ma) of 6158 Escherichia coli proteins, which helped serendipitously uncover a linear correlation between these two protein masses. With the relationship characterized, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was employed to measure M(ma) of protein samples in its ion cluster with the highest signal in the mass spectrum. Generally, our method produces a short series of likely M(mi) in 1-Da steps, and the probability of each likely M(mi) is assigned statistically. It is remarkable that the mass error of this M(mi) is as miniscule as a few parts per million, indicating that our method is capable of determining protein M(mi) with high accuracy. Benefitting from the outstanding performance of modern mass spectrometry, our approach is a significant improvement over others and should be of great utility in the rapid assessment of protein primary structures.

  5. High-resolution elasticity maps and cytoskeletal dynamics of neurons measured by combined fluorescence and atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staii, Cristian

    2014-03-01

    Detailed knowledge of mechanical parameters such as cell elasticity, stiffness of the growth substrate, or traction stresses generated during axonal extensions is essential for understanding the mechanisms that control neuronal growth. Here I present results obtained in my research group, which combine Atomic Force Microscopy and Fluorescence Microscopy measurements to produce systematic, high-resolution elasticity maps for different types of live neuronal cells cultured on glass or biopolymer-based substrates. We measure how the stiffness of neurons changes both during neurite outgrowth and upon chemical modification (disruption of the cytoskeleton) of the cell. We find a reversible local stiffening of the cell during growth, and show that the increase in local elastic modulus is primarily due to the formation of microtubules in the cell soma. We also report a reversible shift in the elastic modulus of the cortical neurons cytoskeleton with temperature, from tubulin dominated regions at 37C to actin dominated regions at 25C. We demonstrate that the dominant mechanism by which the elasticity of the neuronal soma changes in response to temperature is the contractile stiffening of the actin component of the cytoskeleton induced by the activity of myosin II motors. We acknowledge financial support from NSF grant CBET 1067093.

  6. High-resolution measurements, line identification, and spectral modeling of K-alpha transitions in Fe XVIII-Fe XXV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Phillips, T.; Jacobs, V. L.; Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Von Goeler, S.; Kahn, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the iron K-alpha emission spectrum covering the wavelength region from 1.840 to 1.940 A is presented. Measurements are made with a high-resolution Bragg crystal spectrometer on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) tokamak for plasma conditions which closely resemble those of solar flares. A total of 40 features are identified, consisting of either single or multiple lines from eight charge states in iron, Fe XVIII - Fe XXV, and their wavelengths are determined with an accuracy of 0.1-0.4 mA. Many of these features are identified for the first time. In the interpretation of our observations we rely on model calculations that determine the ionic species abundances from electron density and temperature profiles measured independently with nonspectroscopic techniques and that incorporate theoretical collisional excitation and dielectronic recombination rates resulting in the excitation of the 1s2sr2ps configurations. The model calculations also include the effect of diffusive ion transport. Good overall agreement between the model calculations and the observations is obtained, which gives us confidence in our line identifications and spectral modeling capabilities. The results are compared with earlier analyses of the K-alpha emission from the Sun.

  7. Retrieving mesospheric winds and gravity waves using high resolution radar measurements of polar mesospheric summer echoes with MAARSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stober, G.; Sommer, S.; Schult, C.; Chau, J. L.; Latteck, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) located at the northern Norwegian island of Andøya (69.3 ° N, 16° E) observes polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) on a regular basis. This backscatter turned out to be an ideal tracer of atmospheric dynamics and to investigate the wind field at the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) at high spatial and temporal scales. MAARSY is dedicated to explore the polar mesosphere at such high resolution and employs an active phased array antenna with the capability to steer the beam on a pulse-to-pulse basis, which permits to perform systematic scanning of PMSE and to investigate the horizontal structure of the backscatter. The radar also uses a 16 channel receiver system for interferometric applications e.g. mean angle of arrival analysis or coherent radar imaging. Here we present measurements using these features of MAARSY to study the wind field at the MLT applying sophisticated wind analysis algorithms such as velocity azimuth display or volume velocity processing to derive gravity wave parameters such as horizontal wave length, phase speed and propagation direction. Further, we compare the interferometrically corrected and uncorrected wind measurements to emphasize the importance to account for likely edge effects using PMSE as tracer of the dynamics. The observations indicate huge deviations from the nominal beam pointing direction at the upper and lower edges of the PMSE altering the wind analysis.

  8. In situ measurement of ions parameters of laser produced ion source using high resolution Thomson Parabola Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasia, S.; Kaur, C.; Rastogi, V.; Poswal, A. K.; Munda, D. S.; Bhatia, R. K.; Nataraju, V.

    2016-08-01

    The laser produced plasma based heavy ion source has become an outstanding front end for heavy ion accelerators. Before being implemented in the heavy ion accelerators its detailed characterization is required. For this purpose, a high resolution and high dispersion Thomson parabola spectrometer comprising of Time-of-Flight diagnostics has been developed for the characterization of ions with energy in the range from 1 keV to 1 MeV/nucleon and incorporated in the Laser plasma experimental chamber. The ion spectrometer is optimized with graphite target. The carbon ions of charge states C1+ to C6+ are observed in the energy range from 3 keV to 300 keV, which has also been verified by Time-of-Flight measurement. Experimental results were matched with simulation done by SIMION 7.0 code which is used for the design of the spectrometer. We also developed data analysis software using Python language to measure in situ ion's parameters and the results are in better agreement to the experimental results than the commercially available software SIMION 7.0. The resolution of the spectrometer is ΔE/E = 0.026 @ 31 keV for charge state (C4+) of carbon.

  9. High-resolution measurements, line identification, and spectral modeling of K-alpha transitions in Fe XVIII-Fe XXV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Phillips, T.; Jacobs, V. L.; Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Von Goeler, S.; Kahn, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the iron K-alpha emission spectrum covering the wavelength region from 1.840 to 1.940 A is presented. Measurements are made with a high-resolution Bragg crystal spectrometer on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) tokamak for plasma conditions which closely resemble those of solar flares. A total of 40 features are identified, consisting of either single or multiple lines from eight charge states in iron, Fe XVIII - Fe XXV, and their wavelengths are determined with an accuracy of 0.1-0.4 mA. Many of these features are identified for the first time. In the interpretation of our observations we rely on model calculations that determine the ionic species abundances from electron density and temperature profiles measured independently with nonspectroscopic techniques and that incorporate theoretical collisional excitation and dielectronic recombination rates resulting in the excitation of the 1s2sr2ps configurations. The model calculations also include the effect of diffusive ion transport. Good overall agreement between the model calculations and the observations is obtained, which gives us confidence in our line identifications and spectral modeling capabilities. The results are compared with earlier analyses of the K-alpha emission from the Sun.

  10. Combining High Resolution Measurements and Simulations of Near-Bed Sediment Transport Processes Under Large-Scale Breaking Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, J. R.; Hurther, D.; van der Zanden, J.; van der A, D. A.; Ribberink, J.; O'Donoghue, T.; Li, M.

    2015-12-01

    Physical processes involved in near-bed sediment transport under regular, breaking waves are investigated using a combined framework of high resolution measurement and numerical simulation. Experiments are carried out at full scale (0.85 m wave height, 4 s period) in the CIEM wave flume above a mobile sand bed (d10, d50, d90 = 0.15 mm, 0.25 mm, 0.37 mm). Vertical profiles of co-located, two component (u, w) velocity and particle concentration are measured in the bottom boundary layer (BBL) using a multi-frequency acoustic concentration velocity profiler (ACVP) at several locations along the beach. The intra-wave free stream velocity measurements are provided as input to three dimensional Euler-Lagrange point-particle simulations of the BBL. Using a series of feedback controllers, the simulation forcing is adjusted to match the measured orbital velocity and turbulent intensities at an elevation of z~8 cm above the bed. The simulations treat sand grains both in the bed and in suspension as Lagrangian particles that respond to hydrodynamic and inter-particle forces. Particles are coupled to the near-bed hydrodynamics through the volume filtered Navier Stokes equations, which are solved in a finite volume LES framework at near particle scale. Several wave cycles are simulated in order to make direct comparisons of the mean and turbulent statistics with the measurements and to explore the near-bed particle response to wave breaking. Statistics of the space-time dependent grain-size distribution, a natural output of the particle-based simulations, are fed back into the acoustic calibration of the ACVP, improving the instrument's response to grain size sorting induced by the near bed flow. This cross validation and calibration of measurement and simulation allows for detailed interrogation of near-bed transport processes with minimal empirical assumptions relating to bed shear, particle pickup, or surface wave breaking.

  11. Angle-resolved heat capacity of heavy fermion superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Toshiro; Kittaka, Shunichiro; Machida, Kazushige

    2016-09-01

    Owing to a strong Coulomb repulsion, heavy electron superconductors mostly have anisotropic gap functions which have nodes for certain directions in the momentum space. Since the nodal structure is closely related to the pairing mechanism, its experimental determination is of primary importance. This article discusses the experimental methods of the gap determination by bulk heat capacity measurements in a rotating magnetic field. The basic idea is based on the fact that the quasiparticle density of states in the vortex state of nodal superconductors is field and direction dependent. We present our recent experimental results of the field-orientation dependence of the heat capacity in heavy fermion superconductors CeTIn5 (T  =  Co, Ir), UPt3, CeCu2Si2, and UBe13 and discuss their gap structures.

  12. Angle-Resolved Polarimetry of Antenna-Mediated Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohtashami, Abbas; Osorio, Clara I.; Koenderink, A. Femius

    2015-11-01

    Optical phase-array antennas can be used to control not only the angular distribution but also the polarization of fluorescence from quantum emitters. The emission pattern of the resulting system is determined by the properties of the antenna, the properties of the emitters, and the strength of the antenna-emitter coupling. Here we show that Fourier polarimetry can be used to characterize these three contributions. To this end, we measure the angle- and Stokes-parameter-resolved emission of bullseye plasmon antennas as well as spiral antennas excited by an ensemble of emitters. We estimate the average antenna-emitter coupling on the basis of the degree of polarization and determine the effect of anisotropy in the intrinsic emitter orientation on polarization of the resulting emission pattern. Our results provide not only new insights into the behavior of bullseye and spiral antennas but also demonstrate the potential of Fourier polarimetry when characterizing antenna-mediated fluorescence.

  13. Angle-resolved heat capacity of heavy fermion superconductors.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Toshiro; Kittaka, Shunichiro; Machida, Kazushige

    2016-09-01

    Owing to a strong Coulomb repulsion, heavy electron superconductors mostly have anisotropic gap functions which have nodes for certain directions in the momentum space. Since the nodal structure is closely related to the pairing mechanism, its experimental determination is of primary importance. This article discusses the experimental methods of the gap determination by bulk heat capacity measurements in a rotating magnetic field. The basic idea is based on the fact that the quasiparticle density of states in the vortex state of nodal superconductors is field and direction dependent. We present our recent experimental results of the field-orientation dependence of the heat capacity in heavy fermion superconductors CeTIn5 (T  =  Co, Ir), UPt3, CeCu2Si2, and UBe13 and discuss their gap structures.

  14. Extracting the temperature of hot carriers in time- and angle-resolved photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Ulstrup, Søren; Hofmann, Philip; Johannsen, Jens Christian; Grioni, Marco

    2014-01-15

    The interaction of light with a material's electronic system creates an out-of-equilibrium (non-thermal) distribution of optically excited electrons. Non-equilibrium dynamics relaxes this distribution on an ultrafast timescale to a hot Fermi-Dirac distribution with a well-defined temperature. The advent of time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (TR-ARPES) experiments has made it possible to track the decay of the temperature of the excited hot electrons in selected states in the Brillouin zone, and to reveal their cooling in unprecedented detail in a variety of emerging materials. It is, however, not a straightforward task to determine the temperature with high accuracy. This is mainly attributable to an a priori unknown position of the Fermi level and the fact that the shape of the Fermi edge can be severely perturbed when the state in question is crossing the Fermi energy. Here, we introduce a method that circumvents these difficulties and accurately extracts both the temperature and the position of the Fermi level for a hot carrier distribution by tracking the occupation statistics of the carriers measured in a TR-ARPES experiment.

  15. Extracting the temperature of hot carriers in time- and angle-resolved photoemission.

    PubMed

    Ulstrup, Søren; Johannsen, Jens Christian; Grioni, Marco; Hofmann, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of light with a material's electronic system creates an out-of-equilibrium (non-thermal) distribution of optically excited electrons. Non-equilibrium dynamics relaxes this distribution on an ultrafast timescale to a hot Fermi-Dirac distribution with a well-defined temperature. The advent of time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (TR-ARPES) experiments has made it possible to track the decay of the temperature of the excited hot electrons in selected states in the Brillouin zone, and to reveal their cooling in unprecedented detail in a variety of emerging materials. It is, however, not a straightforward task to determine the temperature with high accuracy. This is mainly attributable to an a priori unknown position of the Fermi level and the fact that the shape of the Fermi edge can be severely perturbed when the state in question is crossing the Fermi energy. Here, we introduce a method that circumvents these difficulties and accurately extracts both the temperature and the position of the Fermi level for a hot carrier distribution by tracking the occupation statistics of the carriers measured in a TR-ARPES experiment.

  16. A new method for high-resolution methane measurements on polar ice cores using continuous flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Schüpbach, Simon; Federer, Urs; Kaufmann, Patrik R; Hutterli, Manuel A; Buiron, Daphné; Blunier, Thomas; Fischer, Hubertus; Stocker, Thomas F

    2009-07-15

    Methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. Rapid variations of the CH4 concentration, as frequently registered, for example, during the last ice age, have been used as reliable time markers for the definition of a common time scale of polar ice cores. In addition, these variations indicate changes in the sources of methane primarily associated with the presence of wetlands. In order to determine the exact time evolution of such fast concentration changes, CH4 measurements of the highest resolution in the ice core archive are required. Here, we present a new, semicontinuous and field-deployable CH4 detection method, which was incorporated in a continuous flow analysis (CFA) system. In CFA, samples cut along the axis of an ice core are melted at a melt speed of typically 3.5 cm/min. The air from bubbles in the ice core is extracted continuously from the meltwater and forwarded to a gas chromatograph (GC) for high-resolution CH4 measurements. The GC performs a measurement every 3.5 min, hence, a depth resolution of 15 cm is achieved atthe chosen melt rate. An even higher resolution is not necessary due to the low pass filtering of air in ice cores caused by the slow bubble enclosure process and the diffusion of air in firn. Reproducibility of the new method is 3%, thus, for a typical CH4 concentration of 500 ppb during an ice age, this corresponds to an absolute precision of 15 ppb, comparable to traditional analyses on discrete samples. Results of CFA-CH4 measurements on the ice core from Talos Dome (Antarctica) illustrate the much higher temporal resolution of our method compared with established melt-refreeze CH4 measurements and demonstrate the feasibility of the new method.

  17. Angle-Resolved Auger Spectroscopy as a Sensitive Access to Vibronic Coupling.

    PubMed

    Knie, A; Patanen, M; Hans, A; Petrov, I D; Bozek, J D; Ehresmann, A; Demekhin, Ph V

    2016-05-13

    In the angle-averaged excitation and decay spectra of molecules, vibronic coupling may induce the usually weak dipole-forbidden transitions by the excitation intensity borrowing mechanism. The present complementary theoretical and experimental study of the resonant Auger decay of core-to-Rydberg excited CH_{4} and Ne demonstrates that vibronic coupling plays a decisive role in the formation of the angle-resolved spectra by additionally involving the decay rate borrowing mechanism. Thereby, we propose that the angle-resolved Auger spectroscopy can in general provide very insightful information on the strength of the vibronic coupling.

  18. Using high energy angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy to reveal the charge density in solids.

    PubMed

    Månsson, M; Claesson, T; Finazzi, M; Dallera, C; Brookes, N B; Tjernberg, O

    2008-11-28

    The charge density in solids is a fundamental parameter. Here we demonstrate that the charge density can be determined by the use of angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. The method, which involves a Fourier-like transform from momentum space to real space, is demonstrated by utilizing soft x-ray angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy to sample the complete three-dimensional Brillouin zone of copper. It is also shown that this can be done in an energy resolved way as to extract the charge density contribution from states of a particular energy.

  19. Angle-Resolved Auger Spectroscopy as a Sensitive Access to Vibronic Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knie, A.; Patanen, M.; Hans, A.; Petrov, I. D.; Bozek, J. D.; Ehresmann, A.; Demekhin, Ph. V.

    2016-05-01

    In the angle-averaged excitation and decay spectra of molecules, vibronic coupling may induce the usually weak dipole-forbidden transitions by the excitation intensity borrowing mechanism. The present complementary theoretical and experimental study of the resonant Auger decay of core-to-Rydberg excited CH4 and Ne demonstrates that vibronic coupling plays a decisive role in the formation of the angle-resolved spectra by additionally involving the decay rate borrowing mechanism. Thereby, we propose that the angle-resolved Auger spectroscopy can in general provide very insightful information on the strength of the vibronic coupling.

  20. Skeletal muscle satellite cell migration to injured tissue measured with 111In-oxine and high-resolution SPECT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Elster, Jennifer L.; Rathbone, Christopher R.; Liu, Zhonglin; Liu, Xiasong; Barrett, Harrison H.; Rhoads, Robert P.; Allen, Ronald E.

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of adult skeletal muscle stem cells, called satellite cells, to several injured muscles via the circulation would be useful, however, an improved understanding of cell fate and biodistribution following their delivery is important for this goal to be achieved. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of systemically delivered satellite cells to home to injured skeletal muscle using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of 111In-labeled satellite cells. Satellite cells labeled with 111In-oxine and green fluorescent protein (GFP) were injected intravenously after bupivicaine-induced injury to the tibialis anterior muscle. Animals were imaged with a high-resolution SPECT system called FastSPECT II for up to 7 days after transplantation. In vivo FastSPECT II imaging demonstrated a three to five-fold greater number of transplanted satellite cells in bupivicaine-injured muscle as compared to un-injured muscle after transplantation; a finding that was verified through autoradiograph analysis and quantification of GFP expression. Satellite cells also accumulated in other organs including the lung, liver, and spleen, as determined by biodistribution measurements. These data support the ability of satellite cells to home to injured muscle and support the use of SPECT and autoradiograph imaging techniques to track systemically transplanted 111In labeled satellite cells in vivo, and suggest their homing may be improved by reducing their entrapment in filter organs. PMID:24190365

  1. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance measurements in inhomogeneous magnetic fields: A fast two-dimensional J-resolved experiment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuqing; Lin, Yung-Ya; Cai, Shuhui; Yang, Yu; Sun, Huijun; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-03-14

    High spectral resolution in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a prerequisite for achieving accurate information relevant to molecular structures and composition assignments. The continuous development of superconducting magnets guarantees strong and homogeneous static magnetic fields for satisfactory spectral resolution. However, there exist circumstances, such as measurements on biological tissues and heterogeneous chemical samples, where the field homogeneity is degraded and spectral line broadening seems inevitable. Here we propose an NMR method, named intermolecular zero-quantum coherence J-resolved spectroscopy (iZQC-JRES), to face the challenge of field inhomogeneity and obtain desired high-resolution two-dimensional J-resolved spectra with fast acquisition. Theoretical analyses for this method are given according to the intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence treatment. Experiments on (a) a simple chemical solution and (b) an aqueous solution of mixed metabolites under externally deshimmed fields, and on (c) a table grape sample with intrinsic field inhomogeneity from magnetic susceptibility variations demonstrate the feasibility and applicability of the iZQC-JRES method. The application of this method to inhomogeneous chemical and biological samples, maybe in vivo samples, appears promising.

  2. High Resolution Coral Cd Measurements Using LA-ICP-MS and ID-ICP-MS: Calibration and Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, K. A.; Grottoli, A. G.; McDonough, W. F.; Palardy, J. E.

    2007-12-01

    Cadmium in coral skeleton ([Cd]coral) tracks oceanic upwelling. This study assessed the Cd signal in three species of coral ( Porites lobata, Pavona gigantea, Pavona clavus) from a seasonally upwelling region (Gulf of Panamá, Pacific Ocean) using high-resolution laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Single LA tracks in all species yielded variable results, however the average of multiple paths mirrored changes in in situ seawater Cd ([Cd]sw). In addition, averaged P. clavus data from LA-ICP-MS was correlated to isotope dilution-ICP-MS data, albeit with lower concentrations using the latter method. Although the seawater and coral time series trends were similar, maximum [Cd]coral preceded [Cd]sw by approximately 1 month. When applying this 1-month offset, [Cd]coral was well correlated to [Cd]sw, providing the first direct calibration for this upwelling proxy (distribution coefficient = 1.3-1.7). A three year record of cyclic [Cd]coral demonstrated the ability of LA-ICP-MS to rapidly generate long records for paleoupwelling reconstruction. Further improvements in measurement precision would make this technique comparable to existing ID-ICP-MS methods, but with higher sample throughput and temporal resolution.

  3. High-resolution magic angle spinning (1) H NMR measurement of ligand concentration in solvent-saturated chromatographic beads.

    PubMed

    Elwinger, Fredrik; Furó, István

    2016-04-01

    A method based on (1) H high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR has been developed for measuring concentration accurately in heterogeneous materials like that of ligands in chromatography media. Ligand concentration is obtained by relating the peak integrals for a butyl ligand in the spectrum of a water-saturated chromatography medium to the integral of the added internal reference. The method is fast, with capacity of 10 min total sample preparation and analysis time per sample; precise, with a reproducibility expressed as 1.7% relative standard deviation; and accurate, as indicated by the excellent agreement of derived concentration with that obtained previously by (13) C single-pulse excitation MAS NMR. The effects of radiofrequency field inhomogeneity, spin rate, temperature increase due to spinning, and distribution and re-distribution of medium and reference solvent both inside the rotor during spinning and between bulk solvent and pore space are discussed in detail. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance measurements in inhomogeneous magnetic fields: A fast two-dimensional J-resolved experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuqing; Lin, Yung-Ya; Cai, Shuhui; Yang, Yu; Sun, Huijun; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-03-01

    High spectral resolution in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a prerequisite for achieving accurate information relevant to molecular structures and composition assignments. The continuous development of superconducting magnets guarantees strong and homogeneous static magnetic fields for satisfactory spectral resolution. However, there exist circumstances, such as measurements on biological tissues and heterogeneous chemical samples, where the field homogeneity is degraded and spectral line broadening seems inevitable. Here we propose an NMR method, named intermolecular zero-quantum coherence J-resolved spectroscopy (iZQC-JRES), to face the challenge of field inhomogeneity and obtain desired high-resolution two-dimensional J-resolved spectra with fast acquisition. Theoretical analyses for this method are given according to the intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence treatment. Experiments on (a) a simple chemical solution and (b) an aqueous solution of mixed metabolites under externally deshimmed fields, and on (c) a table grape sample with intrinsic field inhomogeneity from magnetic susceptibility variations demonstrate the feasibility and applicability of the iZQC-JRES method. The application of this method to inhomogeneous chemical and biological samples, maybe in vivo samples, appears promising.

  5. A high-resolution, multi-stop, time-to-digital converter for nuclear time-of-flight measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, D. F.; Cole, J.; Drigert, M.; Aryaeinejad, R.

    2006-01-01

    A high-resolution, multi-stop, time-to-digital converter (TDC) was designed and developed to precisely measure the times-of-flight (TOF) of incident neutrons responsible for induced fission and capture reactions on actinide targets. The minimum time resolution is ±1 ns. The TDC design was implemented into a single, dual-wide CAMAC module. The CAMAC bus is used for command and control as well as an alternative data output. A high-speed ECL interface, compatible with LeCroy FERA modules, was also provided for the principle data output path. An Actel high-speed field programmable gate array (FPGA) chip was incorporated with an external oscillator and an internal multiple clock phasing system. This device implemented the majority of the high-speed register functions, the state machine for the FERA interface, and the high-speed counting circuit used for the TDC conversion. An external microcontroller was used to monitor and control system-level changes. In this work we discuss the performance of this TDC module as well as its application.

  6. Multidecadal oceanographic changes in the western Pacific detected through high-resolution bomb-derived radiocarbon measurements on corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, S.; Yokoyama, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Miyairi, Y.; Aze, T.

    2017-04-01

    High-resolution measurements of radiocarbon (14C) in corals can be used to reconstruct past variability in ocean conditions. Here we report seasonal Δ14C changes in coral from Ishigaki Island, Japan, and compare with previously reported data from Palau and Guam. Our data clearly indicate a significant increase in Δ14C from 1947 to 1998 related to atmospheric nuclear bomb testing. The three early Δ14C spikes related to the atmospheric nuclear bomb tests in the US Proving Grounds at Bikini and Enewerak atoll conducted in 1954, 1956, and 1958 were detected from the Ishigaki coral. After 1976, variability in the Mindanao Dome region related to North Equatorial Current (NEC) bifurcation latitude migration affected the Δ14C difference between Palau and Guam, whereas the difference between Ishigaki and Guam was not correlated with the bifurcation latitude. The Δ14C difference between Ishigaki and Guam may be due to mesoscale eddies in the Kuroshio area. On the decadal scale, the northward shift of NEC bifurcation latitude after 1976, the year as known as Pacific Decadal Oscillation regime shift from negative to positive, was concurrent with the abundant westward-propagating mesoscale eddies in the Subtropical Countercurrent region and stronger Kuroshio transport off the east Taiwan, which may be represented by a smaller Δ14C difference between Ishigaki and Guam after 1976.

  7. High-cycle fatigue of micromachined single-crystal silicon measured using high-resolution patterned specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikehara, T.; Tsuchiya, T.

    2008-07-01

    A single-crystal silicon fatigue test structure was fabricated using high-resolution lithography to improve smoothness and morphological uniformity. An on-chip test structure, including a notched test piece, a resonator, an electrostatic actuator and a deflection sensor, was fabricated using 0.6 µm resolution lithography. Fatigue tests were performed under different deflection amplitudes and humidity conditions. The lifetime scattering was limited nearly within 1 order at each condition, and this was a large improvement over other reported studies. Our test results indicated a clear tendency for the lifetime to lengthen when the strain amplitude or ambient humidity was decreased. Strain-life behaviors at two different humidity conditions were analyzed using Paris law and crack propagation exponents of 19.6 and 23.0 were obtained at 50%RH and 25%RH, respectively. A humidity dependence was clearly confirmed by the results of our low-scattering experiment. Moreover, for this measurement, a new parallel test system was built in which fatigue tests on up to 12 samples could be performed simultaneously. The drive circuit, which enables a deflection-controlled fatigue test, is described and its performance was demonstrated.

  8. Usage of four-phase high-resolution rhinomanometry and measurement of nasal resistance in sleep-disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Toh, Song-Tar; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Guilleminault, Christian

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the ease of use of four-phase high-resolution rhinomanometry (HRR), a new way of measuring nasal resistance, in measuring change in nasal resistance from supine to inclined position in a clinical sleep laboratory setting, and to correlate findings with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) tolerance. Retrospective review of clinical charts. Forty successively seen Caucasian subjects diagnosed with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) with complete charts were analyzed. Using four-phase HRR and acoustic rhinometry, nasal resistance and minimal cross-sectional area of the nasal cavity were objectively measured with the patient in the supine position and repeated in the inclined position (30° from the horizontal plane), respectively. From the supine to inclined position, reduction in total nasal resistance was observed in 87.5% (35 out of 40). There was a mean reduction of nasal resistance by 37.1 ± 21.6%. Five (12.5%) out of 40 subjects showed no change or mild increase in nasal resistance. Subjects with nasal resistance unresponsive to the inclined position change tended to have difficulty using nasal CPAP based on downloaded compliance card data. Four-phase HRR and acoustic rhinometry are tests that can be easily performed by sleep specialists to characterize nasal resistance in SDB patients and determine changes in resistance with positional changes. In this study, we found that patients who did not demonstrate a decrease in nasal resistance with inclined position were more likely to be noncompliant with nasal CPAP. These measurements may help us objectively identify patients who might have trouble tolerating nasal CPAP. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Definition for Rheumatoid Arthritis Erosions Imaged with High Resolution Peripheral Quantitative Computed Tomography and Interreader Reliability for Detection and Measurement.

    PubMed

    Barnabe, Cheryl; Toepfer, Dominique; Marotte, Hubert; Hauge, Ellen-Margrethe; Scharmga, Andrea; Kocijan, Roland; Kraus, Sebastian; Boutroy, Stephanie; Schett, Georg; Keller, Kresten Krarup; de Jong, Joost; Stok, Kathryn S; Finzel, Stephanie

    2016-10-01

    High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) sensitively detects erosions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however, nonpathological cortical bone disruptions are potentially misclassified as erosive. Our objectives were to set and test a definition for pathologic cortical bone disruptions in RA and to standardize reference landmarks for measuring erosion size. HR-pQCT images of metacarpophalangeal joints of RA and control subjects were used in an iterative process to achieve consensus on the definition and reference landmarks. Independent readers (n = 11) applied the definition to score 58 joints and measure pathologic erosions in 2 perpendicular multiplanar reformations for their maximum width and depth. Interreader reliability for erosion detection and variability in measurements between readers [root mean square coefficient of variation (RMSCV), intraclass correlation (ICC)] were calculated. Pathologic erosions were defined as cortical breaks extending over a minimum of 2 consecutive slices in perpendicular planes, with underlying trabecular bone loss and a nonlinear shape. Interreader agreement for classifying pathologic erosions was 90.2%, whereas variability for width and depth erosion assessment was observed (RMSCV perpendicular width 12.3%, axial width 20.6%, perpendicular depth 24.0%, axial depth 22.2%; ICC perpendicular width 0.206, axial width 0.665, axial depth 0.871, perpendicular depth 0.783). Mean erosion width was 1.84 mm (range 0.16-8.90) and mean depth was 1.86 mm (range 0.30-8.00). We propose a new definition for erosions visualized with HR-pQCT imaging. Interreader reliability for erosion detection is good, but further refinement of selection of landmarks for erosion size measurement, or automated volumetric methods, will be pursued.

  10. Simultaneous measurements of indoor radon, radon-thoron progeny and high-resolution gamma spectrometry in Greek dwellings.

    PubMed

    Clouvas, A; Xanthos, S; Antonopoulos-Domis, M

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous indoor radon, radon-thoron progeny and high-resolution in situ gamma spectrometry measurements, with portable high-purity Ge detector were performed in 26 dwellings of Thessaloniki, the second largest town of Greece, during March 2003-January 2005. The radon gas was measured with an AlphaGUARD ionisation chamber (in each of the 26 dwellings) every 10 min, for a time period between 7 and 10 d. Most of the values of radon gas concentration are between 20 and 30 Bq m(-3), with an arithmetic mean of 34 Bq m(-3). The maximum measured value of radon gas concentration is 516 Bq m(-3). The comparison between the radon gas measurements, performed with AlphaGUARD and short-term electret ionisation chamber, shows very good agreement, taking into account the relative short time period of the measurement and the relative low radon gas concentration. Radon and thoron progeny were measured with a SILENA (model 4s) instrument. From the radon and radon progeny measurements, the equilibrium factor F could be deduced. Most of the measurements of the equilibrium factor are within the range 0.4-0.5. The mean value of the equilibrium factor F is 0.49 +/- 0.10, i.e. close to the typical value of 0.4 adopted by UNSCEAR. The mean equilibrium equivalent thoron concentration measured in the 26 dwellings is EEC(thoron) = 1.38 +/- 0.79 Bq m(-3). The mean equilibrium equivalent thoron to radon ratio concentration, measured in the 26 dwellings, is 0.1 +/- 0.06. The mean total absorbed dose rate in air, owing to gamma radiation, is 58 +/- 12 nGy h(-1). The contribution of the different radionuclides to the total indoor gamma dose rate in air is 38% due to 40K, 36% due to thorium series and 26% due to uranium series. The annual effective dose, due to the different source terms (radon, thoron and external gamma radiation), is 1.05, 0.39 and 0.28 mSv, respectively.

  11. A new method to measure bowen ratios using high resolution vertical dry and wet bulb temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euser, T.; Luxemburg, W.; Everson, C.; Mengistu, M.; Clulow, A.; Bastiaanssen, W.

    2013-06-01

    The Bowen ratio surface energy balance method is a relatively simple method to determine the latent heat flux and the actual land surface evaporation. Despite its simplicity, the Bowen ratio method is generally considered to be unreliable due to the use of two-level sensors that are installed by default in operational Bowen ratio systems. In this paper we present the concept of a new measurement methodology to estimate the Bowen ratio from high resolution vertical dry and wet bulb temperature profiles. A short field experiment with Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) in a fibre optic cable having 13 levels was undertaken. A dry and a wetted section of a fibre optic cable were suspended on a 6 m high tower installed over a sugar beet trial near Pietermaritzburg (South Africa). Using the DTS cable as a psychrometer, a near continuous observation of vapour pressure and temperature at 0.20 m intervals was established. These data allows the computation of the Bowen ratio with a high precision. By linking the Bowen ratio to net radiation and soil heat flux, the daytime latent heat flux was estimated. The latent heat flux derived from DTS-based Bowen ratio (BR-DTS) showed consistent agreement (correlation coefficients between 0.97 and 0.98) with results derived from eddy covariance, surface layer scintillometer and surface renewal techniques. The latent heat from BR-DTS overestimated the latent heat derived with the eddy covariance by 4% and the latent heat derived with the surface layer scintillometer by 8%. Through this research, a new window is opened to engage on simplified, inexpensive and easy to interpret in situ measurement techniques for measuring evaporation.

  12. A new method using evaporation for high-resolution measurements of soil thermal conductivity at changing water contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markert, A.; Trinks, S.; Facklam, M.; Wessolek, G.

    2012-04-01

    The thermal conductivity of soils is a key parameter to know if their use as heat source or sink is planned. It is required to calculate the efficiency of ground-source heat pump systems in combination with soil heat exchangers. Apart from geothermal energy, soil thermal conductivity is essential to estimate the ampacity for buried power cables. The effective thermal conductivity of saturated and unsaturated soils, as a function of water transport, water vapour transport and heat conduction, mainly depends on the soil water content, its bulk density and texture. The major objectives of this study are (i) to describe the thermal conductivity of soil samples with a non-steady state measurement at changing water contents and for different bulk densities. Based on that it is (ii) tested if available soil thermal conductivity models are able to describe the measured data for the whole range of water contents. The new method allows a continuous measurement of thermal conductivity for soil from full water saturation to air-dryness. Thermal conductivity is measured with a thermal needle probe in predefined time intervals while the change of water content is controlled by evaporation. To relate the measured thermal conductivity to the current volumetric water content, the decrease in weight of the sample, due to evaporation, is logged with a lab scale. Soil texture of the 11 soil substrates tested in this study range between coarse sand and silty clay. To evaluate the impact of the bulk density on heat transport processes, thermal conductivity at 20°C was measured at 1.5g/cm3; 1.7g/cm3 and 1.9g/cm3 for each soil substrate. The results correspond well to literature values used to describe heat transport in soils. Due to the high-resolution and non-destructive measurements, the specific effects of the soil texture and bulk density on thermal conductivity could be proved. Decreasing water contents resulted in a non-linear decline of the thermal conductivity for all samples

  13. Bonner sphere measurements of 241Am-B and 241Am-F neutron energy spectra unfolded using high-resolution a priori data.

    PubMed

    Roberts, N J; Jones, L N; Liu, Z Z; Tagziria, H; Thomas, D J

    2014-10-01

    High-resolution neutron energy spectra, covering the entire energy range of interest, for two standard radionuclide neutron sources ((241)Am-B and (241)Am-F) have been derived from Bonner sphere measurements by using high-resolution a priori data in the unfolding process. In each case, two a priori spectra were used, one from a two-stage calculation and also one from a combination of the calculated spectrum with a high-resolution measured spectrum. The unfolded spectra are compared with those published elsewhere and show significant differences from the ISO- and IAEA-recommended spectra for (241)Am-B and (241)Am-F, respectively. Values for the fluence-average energy and fluence-to-dose-equivalent conversion coefficients are presented for the new spectra, and the implications of the new spectra for the emission rates of the sources when measured by the manganese bath technique are also determined. © Crown copyright 2013.

  14. Comparison of SMOS measurements of sea surface salinity during SPURS using a high-resolution, vertical profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walesby, Kieran; Sutherland, Graigory; Ten Doeschate, Anneke; Reverdin, Gilles; Font, Jordi; Ward, Brian

    2014-05-01

    The European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite was launched in 2009 and, for the first time, provides measurements of sea surface salinity on a global scale. Ocean salinity is a key parameter for climate change, being closely associated with the global hydrological cycle and an important driver in determining overall ocean circulation. This makes the advent of satellite measurements of salinity a significant advance. During the Salinity Processes in the Upper Ocean Regional Study (SPURS) field experiments, in September 2012 and March 2013, a variety of in-situ platforms were deployed with the purpose of validating the salinity observations from SMOS. One of these platforms was the Air-Sea Interaction Profiler, a microstructure profiler which provides high-resolution profiles of salinity, temperature and turbulence right up to the surface. This last capability is crucial. Most oceanic microstructure profilers operate when travelling downwards, and are therefore unable to accurately observe the layer of the ocean immediately below the surface. It is this top layer, approximately 1 cm in thickness, which satellites observe. In contrast, ASIP is upwardly-rising, allowing it to sample the same part of the water column as satellites, such as SMOS. This is important since large thermal and haline stratifications can develop close to the surface, particularly under conditions of strong evaporation. Although sea surface salinity in the open ocean is largely determined by the balance between evaporation and precipitation, the effects of various vertical mixing processes also contribute. ASIP is extremely well-suited to understanding the impact of these on differences between ASIP and SMOS, and some results are also presented here which demonstrate the important effect of such processes.

  15. High-resolution measurements, line identification, and spectral modeling of K{alpha} transitions in Fe XVIII-XXV

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Phillips, T.; Jacobs, V.L.; Hill, K.W.; Bitter, M.; von Goeler, S.; Kahn, S.M.

    1992-11-01

    The iron K{alpha} emission spectrum covering the wavelength region from 1.840 to 1.940 {Angstrom} is analyzed. Measurements are made with a high-resolution Bragg crystal spectrometer on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) tokamak for plasma conditions which closely resemble those of solar flares. A total of 40 features are identified consisting of either single or multiple lines from eight charge states in iron, Fe XVIII through Fe XXV, and their wavelengths are determined with an accuracy of 0.1--0.4 m{Angstrom}. Many of these features are identified for the first time. In the interpretation of our observations we rely on model calculations that determine the ionic species abundances from electron density and temperature profiles measured independently with non-spectroscopic techniques and that incorporate theoretical collisional excitation and dielectronic recombination rates resulting in the excitation of the 1s2s{sup r}2p{sup s} configurations. The model calculations also include the effect of diffusive ion transport. Good overall agreement between the model calculations and the observations is obtained, which gives us confidence in our line identifications and spectral modeling capabilities. The results are compared with earlier analyses of the K{alpha} emission from the Sun. While many similarities are found, a few differences arise from the somewhat higher electron density in tokamak plasmas (10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3}), which affects the fine-structure level populations of the ground states of the initial ion undergoing electron-impact excitation or dielectronic recombination. We also find that several spectral features are comprised of different transitions from those reported in earlier analyses of solar data.

  16. High-resolution measurements, line identification, and spectral modeling of K[alpha] transitions in Fe XVIII-XXV

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Phillips, T. ); Jacobs, V.L. . Condensed Matter and Radiation Sciences Div.); Hill, K.W.; Bitter, M.; von Goeler, S. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Kahn, S.M. )

    1992-11-01

    The iron K[alpha] emission spectrum covering the wavelength region from 1.840 to 1.940 [Angstrom] is analyzed. Measurements are made with a high-resolution Bragg crystal spectrometer on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) tokamak for plasma conditions which closely resemble those of solar flares. A total of 40 features are identified consisting of either single or multiple lines from eight charge states in iron, Fe XVIII through Fe XXV, and their wavelengths are determined with an accuracy of 0.1--0.4 m[Angstrom]. Many of these features are identified for the first time. In the interpretation of our observations we rely on model calculations that determine the ionic species abundances from electron density and temperature profiles measured independently with non-spectroscopic techniques and that incorporate theoretical collisional excitation and dielectronic recombination rates resulting in the excitation of the 1s2s[sup r]2p[sup s] configurations. The model calculations also include the effect of diffusive ion transport. Good overall agreement between the model calculations and the observations is obtained, which gives us confidence in our line identifications and spectral modeling capabilities. The results are compared with earlier analyses of the K[alpha] emission from the Sun. While many similarities are found, a few differences arise from the somewhat higher electron density in tokamak plasmas (10[sup 13] cm[sup [minus]3]), which affects the fine-structure level populations of the ground states of the initial ion undergoing electron-impact excitation or dielectronic recombination. We also find that several spectral features are comprised of different transitions from those reported in earlier analyses of solar data.

  17. TRMM Precipitation Radar Reflectivity Profiles Compared to High-Resolution Airborne and Ground-Based Radar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, G. M.; Geerts, B.; Tian, L.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Satellite) Precipitation Radar (PR) products are evaluated by means of simultaneous comparisons with data from the high-altitude ER-2 Doppler Radar (EDOP), as well as ground-based radars. The comparison is aimed primarily at the vertical reflectivity structure, which is of key importance in TRMM rain type classification and latent heating estimation. The radars used in this study have considerably different viewing geometries and resolutions, demanding non-trivial mapping procedures in common earth-relative coordinates. Mapped vertical cross sections and mean profiles of reflectivity from the PR, EDOP, and ground-based radars are compared for six cases. These cases cover a stratiform frontal rainband, convective cells of various sizes and stages, and a hurricane. For precipitating systems that are large relative to the PR footprint size, PR reflectivity profiles compare very well to high-resolution measurements thresholded to the PR minimum reflectivity, and derived variables such as bright band height and rain types are accurate, even at high PR incidence angles. It was found that for, the PR reflectivity of convective cells small relative to the PR footprint is weaker than in reality. Some of these differences can be explained by non-uniform beam filling. For other cases where strong reflectivity gradients occur within a PR footprint, the reflectivity distribution is spread out due to filtering by the PR antenna illumination pattern. In these cases, rain type classification may err and be biased towards the stratiform type, and the average reflectivity tends to be underestimated. The limited sensitivity of the PR implies that the upper regions of precipitation systems remain undetected and that the PR storm top height estimate is unreliable, usually underestimating the actual storm top height. This applies to all cases but the discrepancy is larger for smaller cells where limited sensitivity is compounded

  18. Subsea Target Measurement Technique of High Resolution Multi-Beam Sonar System -A Case Study of Ocean Oil & Gas Production Platform and Pipeline Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, J.; Tang, Q.; Zhou, X.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract: with fast development of modern science and technology, subsea pipeline detection means have been increasingly improved which have not only improved detection efficiency, but also extremely advanced the detection precision. The article has integrated the performance characteristics of high resolution multi-beam measurement system in recent years, which has introduced the relevant technique and detection achievement of subsea pipeline detecting (especially for exposed pipeline) by detection cases. The final detection result has been verified that high resolution multi-beam measurement system could accurately detect subsea minisize target object, which has provided the technical reference with popularization and application of new characteristics.

  19. High resolution measurements of carbon monoxide along a late Holocene Greenland ice core: evidence for in situ production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faïn, X.; Chappellaz, J.; Rhodes, R. H.; Stowasser, C.; Blunier, T.; McConnell, J. R.; Brook, E. J.; Preunkert, S.; Legrand, M.; Debois, T.; Romanini, D.

    2014-05-01

    We present high-resolution measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations from a shallow ice core of the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling project (NEEM-2011-S1). An optical-feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer (OF-CEAS) coupled to a continuous melter system performed continuous, online analysis during a four-week measurement campaign. This analytical setup generated stable measurements of CO concentrations with an external precision of 7.8 ppbv (1σ), based on repeated analyses of equivalent ice core sections. However, this first application of this measurement technique suffered from a poorly constrained procedural blank of 48 ± 25 ppbv and poor accuracy because an absolute calibration was not possible. The NEEM-2011-S1 CO record spans 1800 yr and the long-term trends within the most recent section of this record (i.e., post 1700 AD) resemble the existing discrete CO measurements from the Eurocore ice core. However, the CO concentration is highly variable (75-1327 ppbv range) throughout the ice core with high frequency (annual scale), high amplitude spikes characterizing the record. These CO signals are too abrupt and rapid to reflect atmospheric variability and their prevalence largely prevents interpretation of the record in terms of atmospheric CO variation. The abrupt CO spikes are likely the result of in situ production occurring within the ice itself, although the unlikely possibility of CO production driven by non-photolytic, fast kinetic processes within the continuous melter system cannot be excluded. We observe that 68% of the CO spikes are observed in ice layers enriched with pyrogenic aerosols. Such aerosols, originating from boreal biomass burning emissions, contain organic compounds, which may be oxidized or photodissociated to produce CO within the ice. However, the NEEM-2011-S1 record displays an increase of ~0.05 ppbv yr-1 in baseline CO level prior to 1700 AD (129 m depth) and the concentration remains elevated, even for ice

  20. High-resolution measurements of atmospheric molecular hydrogen and its isotopic composition at the West African coast of Mauritania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, S.; Kock, A.; Röckmann, T.

    2013-05-01

    Oceans are a net source of molecular hydrogen (H2) to the atmosphere, where nitrogen (N2) fixation is assumed to be the main biological production pathway followed by photochemical production from organic material. The sources can be distinguished using isotope measurements because of clearly differing isotopic signatures of the produced hydrogen. Here we present the first ship-borne measurements of atmospheric molecular H2 mixing ratio and isotopic composition at the West African coast of Mauritania (16-25° W, 17-24° N). This area is one of the biologically most active regions of the world's oceans with seasonal upwelling events and characterized by strongly differing hydrographical/biological properties and phytoplankton community structures. The aim of this study was to identify areas of H2 production and distinguish H2 sources by isotopic signatures of atmospheric H2. For this more than 100 air samples were taken during two cruises in February 2007 and 2008. During both cruises a transect from the Cape Verde Islands towards the Mauritanian Coast was sampled to cover differing oceanic regions such as upwelling and oligotrophic regimes. In 2007, additionally, four days were sampled at high resolution of one sample per hour to investigate a possible diurnal cycle of atmospheric H2. Our results indicate the influence of local sources and suggest the Banc d'Arguin as a pool for precursors for photochemical H2 production, whereas oceanic N2 fixation could not be identified as a source for atmospheric H2 during these two cruises. The variability in diurnal cycles is probably influenced by released precursors for photochemical H2 production and also affected by a varying origin of air masses. This means for future investigations that only measuring the mixing ratio of H2 is insufficient to explain the variability of an atmospheric diurnal cycle and support is needed, e.g. by isotopic measurements. Nevertheless, measurements of atmospheric H2 mixing ratios, which are

  1. High-resolution measurements of atmospheric molecular hydrogen and its isotopic composition at the West African coast of Mauritania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, S.; Kock, A.; Röckmann, T.

    2012-12-01

    Oceans are a net source of molecular hydrogen (N2) to the atmosphere, where nitrogen (N2) fixation is assumed to be the main biological production pathway besides photochemical production from organic material. The sources can be distinguished using isotope measurements because of clearly differing isotopic signatures of the produced hydrogen. Here we present the first ship-borne measurements of atmospheric molecular H2 mixing ratio and isotopic composition at the West African coast of Mauritania (16-25° W, 17-24° N). This area is one of the biologically most active regions of the world's oceans with seasonal upwelling events and characterized by strongly differing hydrographical/biological properties and phytoplankton community structures. The aim of this study was to identify areas of H2 production and distinguish H2 sources by isotopic signatures of atmospheric H2. Besides this a diurnal cycle of atmospheric H2 was investigated. For this more than 100 air samples were taken during two cruises in February 2007 and 2008, respectively. During both cruises a transect from the Cape Verde Island towards the Mauritanian Coast was sampled. In 2007 additionally four days were sampled with a high resolution of one sample per hour. Our results clearly indicate the influence of local sources and suggest the Banc d'Arguin as a pool for precursors for photochemical H2 production, whereas N2 fixation could not be identified as a H2 source during these two cruises. With our experimental setup we could demonstrate that variability in diurnal cycles is probably influenced and biased by released precursors for photochemical H2 production and the origin of air masses. This means for further investigations that just measuring the mixing ratio of H2 is insufficient to explain the variability of a diurnal cycle and support is needed, e.g. by isotopic measurements. However, measurements of H2 mixing ratios, which are easy to conduct online during ship cruises could be a helpful tool

  2. High-Resolution Infrared Spectroscopic Measurements of Comet 2PlEncke: Unusual Organic Composition and Low Rotational Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radeva, Yana L.; Mumma, Michael J.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; Bonev, Boncho P.; DiSanti, Michael A.; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Dello Russo, Neil

    2013-01-01

    We present high-resolution infrared spectroscopic measurements of the ecliptic comet 2P/Encke, observed on 4-6 Nov. 2003 during its close approach to the Earth, using the Near Infrared Echelle Spectrograph on the Keck II telescope. We present flux-calibrated spectra, production rates, and mixing ratios for H2O, CH3OH, HCN, H2CO, C2H2, C2H6, CH4 and CO. Comet 2P/Encke is a dynamical end-member among comets because of its short period of 3.3 years. Relative to "organics-normal" comets, we determined that 2PlEncke is depleted in HCN, H2CO, C2H2, C2H6, CH4 and CO, but it is enriched in CH3OH. We compared mixing ratios of these organic species measured on separate dates, and we see no evidence of macroscopic chemical heterogeneity in the nucleus of 2P/Encke, however, this conclusion is limited by sparse temporal sampling. The depleted abundances of most measured species suggest that 2P/Encke may have formed closer to the young Sun, before its insertion to the Kuiper belt, compared with "organics-normal" comets - as was previously suggested for other depleted comets (e.g. C/1999 S4 (LINEAR)). We measured very low rotational temperatures of 20 - 30 K for H2O, CH3OH and HCN in the near nucleus region of 2P/Encke, which correlate with one of the lowest cometary gas production rates (approx. 2.6 x 10(exp 27) molecules/s) measured thus far in the infrared. This suggests that we are seeing the effects of more efficient radiative cooling, insufficient collisional excitation, and/or inefficient heating by fast H-atoms (and icy grains) in the observed region of the coma. Its extremely short orbital period, very low gas production rate, and classification as an ecliptic comet, make 2PlEncke an important addition to our growing database, and contribute significantly to the establishment of a chemical taxonomy of comets.

  3. Relationship between vessel diameter and depth measurements within the limbus using ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Alabi, Emmanuel; Hutchings, Natalie; Bizheva, Kostadinka; Simpson, Trefford

    2017-06-16

    To establish a relationship between the diameter and depth position of vessels in the superior and inferior corneo-scleral limbus using ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT). Volumetric OCT images of the superior and inferior limbus were acquired from 14 healthy subjects with a research-grade UHR-OCT system. Differences in vessel diameter and depth between superior and inferior limbus were analyzed using repeated measured ANOVA in SPSS and R. The mean (± SD) superior and inferior diameters were 29±18μm and 24±18μm respectively, and the mean (± SD) superior and inferior depths were 177±109μm and 207±132μm respectively. The superior limbal vessels were larger than the inferior ones (RM-ANOVA, p=0.004), and the inferior limbal vessels were deeper than the superior vessels (RM-ANOVA, p=0.041). There was a positive linear association between limbal vessel depth and size within the superior and inferior limbus with Pearson correlation coefficients of 0.803 and 0.754, respectively. This study demonstrated that the UHR-OCT was capable of imaging morphometric characteristics such as the size and depth of vessels in the limbus. The results of this study suggest a difference in the size and depth of vessels across different positions of the limbus, which may be indicative of adaptations to chronic hypoxia caused by the covering of the superior limbus by the upper eyelid. UHR-OCT may be a useful tool to evaluate the effect of contact lenses on the microvascular properties within the limbus. Copyright © 2017 Spanish General Council of Optometry. All rights reserved.

  4. High-Resolution Synchrotron-Source FTIR measurements of hydration rinds on volcanic glasses as applied to archaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, L. E.; Watkins, J. M.; Renne, P. R.; Manga, M.; Shackley, M.; Martin, M. C.

    2006-12-01

    High-resolution synchrotron-source Fourier Transform Infrared (SR-FTIR) data on hydration rinds of obsidian clasts from sedimentary hosts are presented. Since SR-FTIR spectroscopy is a nondestructive technique, we use overlapping steps to obtain high spatial resolutions (1-3 microns). Variations in H2O and OH concentrations are represented by profiles of absorbance peaks at wavenumbers of ~1630 cm-1 and ~3570 cm-1, respectively. The spatial pattern of these inferred uptake profiles suggest a diffusion mechanism over the outermost 20-40 microns of the clast edge. In addition, intensity ratios of the two peaks vary systematically across hydrations rinds but are relatively constant in the interior of each sample. These measurements are relevant for archaeological applications in several ways. First, the lengthscales over which water concentrations vary do not coincide with visible hydration rind thicknesses. This is consistent with results from SIMS analyses by Anovitz et al. (1999) and suggests that diffusion of atmospheric water vapor into obsidian is not solely responsible for the growth of visible hydration rinds (c.f. Friedman et al 1997, and Stevenson et al. 1998). Second, when combined with independently obtained age data from archaeological sites, the data collected here should allow us to extend the temperature-dependent diffusivity of water in rhyolitic glasses to ambient surface conditions. Third, future work will seek to correlate these findings with cation mobility, particularly of K, which has proven to compromise the K-Ar system for dating in the case of glass shards with high surface area-to-volume ratios. Moreover, water speciation data via FTIR as well as D/H isotopic analyses via SIMS techniques should allow us to distinguish between meteoric water and water from a magmatic or hydrothermal source.

  5. Rapid topographic change measured by high-resolution satellite radar at Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat, 2008-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadge, G.; Cole, P.; Stinton, A.; Komorowski, J.-C.; Stewart, R.; Toombs, A. C.; Legendre, Y.

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution satellite radar observations of erupting volcanoes can yield valuable information on rapidly changing deposits and geomorphology. Using the TerraSAR-X (TSX) radar with a spatial resolution of about 2 m and a repeat interval of 11 days, we show how a variety of techniques were used to record some of the eruptive history of the Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat between July 2008 and February 2010. After a 15-month pause in lava dome growth, a vulcanian explosion occurred on 28 July 2008 from a vent that was hidden by dense cloud. We were able to show the civil authorities using TSX difference images of surface roughness change that this explosion had not disrupted the dome sufficiently to warrant continuation of a previous, precautionary evacuation. Change difference images also proved to be valuable in mapping new pyroclastic flow deposits: the valley-occupying block-and-ash component tended to increase backscatter and the marginal surge deposits to reduce it, with the pattern reversing after the event due to erosion and deposition. By comparing east- and west-looking images acquired 12 h apart, the deposition of some individual pyroclastic flows can be inferred from change differences. Some of the narrow upper sections of valleys draining the volcano received many tens of metres of rockfall and pyroclastic flow deposits over periods of a few weeks. By measuring the changing radar shadows cast by these valleys in TSX images the changing depth of infill by deposits could be estimated. In addition to using the amplitude data from the radar images we also used their phase information within the InSAR technique to calculate the topography during a period of no surface activity. This enabled areas of transient topography, crucial for directing future flows, to be captured.

  6. High resolution ultrasonic densitometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dress, W.B.

    1983-01-01

    The velocity of torsional stress pulses in an ultrasonic waveguide of non-circular cross section is affected by the temperature and density of the surrounding medium. Measurement of the transit times of acoustic echoes from the ends of a sensor section are interpreted as level, density, and temperature of the fluid environment surrounding that section. This paper examines methods of making these measurements to obtain high resolution, temperature-corrected absolute and relative density and level determinations of the fluid. Possible applications include on-line process monitoring, a hand-held density probe for battery charge state indication, and precise inventory control for such diverse fluids as uranium salt solutions in accountability storage and gasoline in service station storage tanks.

  7. High Resolution Measurement of Rhizosphere Priming Effects and Temporal Variability of CO2 Fluxes under Zea Mays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Splettstößer, T.; Pausch, J.

    2016-12-01

    Plant induced increase of soil organic matter turnover rates contribute to carbon emissions in agricultural land use systems. In order to better