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Sample records for high-resolution compton-suppressed czt

  1. High-Resolution Compton-Suppressed CZT Detector for Fission Products Identification

    SciTech Connect

    R. Aryaeinejd; J. K. Hartwell; Wade W. Scates

    2004-10-01

    Room temperature semiconductor CdZnTe (CZT) detectors are currently limited to total detector volumes of 1-2 cm3, which is dictated by the poor charge transport characteristics. Because of this size limitation one of the problems in accurately determining isotope identification is the enormous background from the Compton scattering events. Eliminating this background will not only increase the sensitivity and accuracy of measurements but also help us to resolve peaks buried under the background and peaks in close vicinity of others. We are currently developing a fission products detection system based on the Compton-suppressed CZT detector. In this application, the detection system is required to operate in high radiation fields. Therefore, a small 10x10x5 mm3 CZT detector is placed inside the center of a well-shielded 3" in diameter by 3" long Nal detector. So far we have been able to successfully reduce the Compton background by a factor of 5.4 for a 137Cs spectrum. This reduction of background will definitely enhance the quality of the gamma-ray spectrum in the information-rich energy range below 1 MeV, which consequently increases the detection sensitivity. In this work, we will discuss the performance of this detection system as well as its applications.

  2. A new design for a high resolution, high efficiency CZT gamma camera detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestais, C.; Baffert, N.; Bonnefoy, J. P.; Chapuis, A.; Koenig, A.; Monnet, O.; Ouvrier Buffet, P.; Rostaing, J. P.; Sauvage, F.; Verger, L.

    2001-02-01

    We have designed a CZT gamma camera detector that provides an array of CZT pixels and associated front-end electronics - including an ASIC - and permits gamma camera measurements using the method patented by CEA-LETI and reported by Verger et al. [1]. Electron response in each CZT pixel is registered by correcting pulse height for position of interaction based on fast rise-time information. This method brings advantages of high scatter rejection while allowing high detection efficiency. These techniques and the systems approach have been developed at CEA-LETI in an exclusive joint development with BICRON and CRISMATEC who in turn are commercializing the technology. The initial system is implemented in an array framework with 1920 pixels, approximately 180×215 mm 2 in dimension, but the system architecture expands readily to 4096 pixels, and these arrays can be ganged into groups of up to 8 for pixel planes totaling over 32 000 pixels without architecture changes. The overall system design is described and brain phantom images are presented that were obtained by scanning with a small number of pixels.

  3. Performance evaluation of high-resolution square parallel-hole collimators with a CZT room temperature pixelated semiconductor SPECT system: a Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Kang, W.

    2015-07-01

    The pixelated semiconductor based on cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) is a promising imaging device that provides many benefits compared with conventional scintillation detectors. By using a high-resolution square parallel-hole collimator with a pixelated semiconductor detector, we were able to improve both sensitivity and spatial resolution. Here, we present a simulation of a CZT pixleated semiconductor single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system with a high-resolution square parallel-hole collimator using various geometric designs of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mm X-axis hole size. We performed a simulation study of the eValuator-2500 (eV Microelectronics Inc., Saxonburg, PA, U.S.A.) CZT pixelated semiconductor detector using a Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE). To evaluate the performances of these systems, the sensitivity and spatial resolution was evaluated. Moreover, to evaluate the overall performance of the imaging system, a hot-rod phantom was designed. Our results showed that the average sensitivity of the 2.0 mm collimator X-axis hole size was 1.34, 1.95, and 3.92 times higher than that of the 1.5, 1.0, and 0.5 mm collimator X-axis hole size, respectively. Also, the average spatial resolution of the 0.5 mm collimator X-axis hole size was 28.69, 44.65, and 55.73% better than that of the 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mm collimator X-axis hole size, respectively. We discuss the high-resolution square parallel-hole collimator of various collimator geometric designs and our evaluations. In conclusion, we have successfully designed a high-resolution square parallel-hole collimator with a CZT pixelated semiconductor SPECT system.

  4. Modification of solid state CdZnTe (CZT) radiation detectors with high sensitivity or high resolution operation

    DOEpatents

    Washington, II, Aaron L; Duff, Martine C; Teague, Lucile C; Burger, Arnold; Groza, Michael

    2014-11-11

    An apparatus and process is provided to illustrate the manipulation of the internal electric field of CZT using multiple wavelength light illumination on the crystal surface at RT. The control of the internal electric field is shown through the polarization in the IR transmission image under illumination as a result of the Pockels effect.

  5. Development of Small-Pixel CZT Detectors for Future High-Resolution Hard X-ray Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilicke, Matthias

    Owing to recent breakthroughs in grazing incidence mirror technology, next-generation hard X-ray telescopes will achieve angular resolutions of between 5 and 10 arc seconds - about an order of magnitude better than that of the NuSTAR hard X-ray telescope. As a consequence, the next generation of hard X-ray telescopes will require pixelated hard X- ray detectors with pixels on a grid with a lattice constant of between 120 and 240 um. Additional detector requirements include a low energy threshold of less than 5 keV and an energy resolution of less than 1 keV. The science drivers for a high angular-resolution hard X-ray mission include studies and measurements of black hole spins, the cosmic evolution of super-massive black holes, AGN feedback, and the behavior of matter at very high densities. We propose a R&D research program to develop, optimize and study the performance of 100-200 um pixel pitch CdTe and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors of 1-2 mm thickness. Our program aims at a comparison of the performance achieved with CdTe and CZT detectors, and the optimization of the pixel, steering grid, and guard ring anode patterns. Although these studies will use existing ASICs (Application Specific Integrated Circuits), our program also includes modest funds for the development of an ultra-low noise ASIC with a 2-D grid of readout pads that can be directly bonded to the 100-200 um pixel pitch CdTe and CZT detectors. The team includes the Washington University group (Prof. M. Beilicke and Co-I Prof. H.S.W. Krawczynski et al.), and co-investigator G. De Geronimo at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The Washington University group has a 10 year track record of innovative CZT detector R&D sponsored by the NASA Astronomy and Physics Research and Analysis (APRA) program. The accomplishments to date include the development of CZT detectors with pixel pitches between 350 um and 2.5 mm for the ProtoExist, EXIST, and X-Calibur hard X-ray missions with some of the best

  6. Measurement and simulation of a Compton suppression system for safeguards application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Kyu; Seo, Hee; Won, Byung-Hee; Lee, Chaehun; Shin, Hee-Sung; Na, Sang-Ho; Song, Dae-Yong; Kim, Ho-Dong; Park, Geun-Il; Park, Se-Hwan

    2015-11-01

    Plutonium (Pu) contents in spent nuclear fuels, recovered uranium (U) or uranium/transuranium (U/TRU) products must be measured in order to secure the safeguardability of a pyroprocessing facility. Self-induced X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) and gamma-ray spectroscopy are useful techniques for determining Pu-to-U ratios and Pu isotope ratios of spent fuel. Photon measurements of spent nuclear fuel by using high-resolution spectrometers such as high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors show a large continuum background in the low-energy region, which is due in large part to Compton scattering of energetic gamma rays. This paper proposes a Compton suppression system for reducing of the Compton continuum background. In the present study, the system was configured by using an HPGe main detector and a BGO (bismuth germanate: Bi4Ge3O12) guard detector. The system performances for gamma-ray measurement and XRF were evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations and measurements of the radiation source. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) simulations were performed using the same geometry as for the experiments, and considered, for exact results, the production of secondary electrons and photons. As a performance test of the Compton suppression system, the peak-to-Compton ratio, which is a figure of merit to evaluate the gamma-ray detection, was enhanced by a factor of three or more when the Compton suppression system was used.

  7. Gamma-spectrometry with Compton suppressed detectors arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Schueck, C.; Hannachi, F.; Chapman, R.; Lisle, J.C.; Mo, J.N.; Paul, E.; Love, D.J.G.; Nolan, P.J.; Nelson, A.H.; Walker, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    Recent results of experiments performed with two different Compton-suppressed detectors arrays in Daresbury and Berkeley (/sup 163,164/Yb and /sup 154/Er, respectively), are presented together with a brief description of the national French array presently under construction in Strasbourg. 25 refs., 15 figs.

  8. Testing of the BGO Compton-suppression detectors for gammasphere

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Ahmad, I.; Annan, G.A.

    1995-08-01

    Gammasphere, the national {gamma}-ray facility, when completed will consist of 110 Compton-suppressed Ge detectors. The bismuth germanate (BGO) Compton-suppression detector system for each Ge detector consists of one tapered hexagonal BGO side shield and one slotted BGO back plug. Due to the geometry of the array, three types of annular shields are required. These types are referred to as B, C and D, and the array consists of 60, 30 and 20 of these units, respectively. Shield types B, C and D have a hexagonal geometry. They are divided into six optically separate sections, each with its own pair of photomultiplier tubes. Argonne assumed responsibility for the procurement and testing of the BGO Compton-suppression units. We received all detectors from the two vendors. In the past year, twenty-four of the B-type detectors were delivered to Stony Brook for evaluation tests. Since the number of crystals to test is quite large (six per detector), we involved undergraduate students working at ANL under the Department of Educational Programs (DEP) in this effort. The quality of students was excellent, and they played a major role in the performance testing of these detectors. Ninety-nine of the hexagonal side shields and 112 backplug detectors were shipped to LBL for use in Gammasphere. The remaining detectors did not meet the performance criteria when they were first delivered and tested and are either at the vendor being repaired or were returned to us for retesting. We anticipate that the remaining detectors will be ready for use in Gammasphere within the next few months.

  9. Compton suppression gamma-counting: The effect of count rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Millard, H.T.

    1984-01-01

    Past research has shown that anti-coincidence shielded Ge(Li) spectrometers enhanced the signal-to-background ratios for gamma-photopeaks, which are situated on high Compton backgrounds. Ordinarily, an anti- or non-coincidence spectrum (A) and a coincidence spectrum (C) are collected simultaneously with these systems. To be useful in neutron activation analysis (NAA), the fractions of the photopeak counts routed to the two spectra must be constant from sample to sample to variations must be corrected quantitatively. Most Compton suppression counting has been done at low count rate, but in NAA applications, count rates may be much higher. To operate over the wider dynamic range, the effect of count rate on the ratio of the photopeak counts in the two spectra (A/C) was studied. It was found that as the count rate increases, A/C decreases for gammas not coincident with other gammas from the same decay. For gammas coincident with other gammas, A/C increases to a maximum and then decreases. These results suggest that calibration curves are required to correct photopeak areas so quantitative data can be obtained at higher count rates. ?? 1984.

  10. Design and Modeling of a Compton-Suppressed Phoswich Detector for Radioxenon Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    modeled using MCNPX Version 2.5.0. The Compton suppression mechanism is integrated into the phoswich design to effectively reduce the Compton continuum...background radiation was modeled using MCNPX Version 2.5.0. The Compton suppression mechanism is integrated into the phoswich design to effectively reduce...be calculated through regions of interest corresponding to the four xenon radioisotopes in the 2D spectrum. An alternative solution to measure

  11. Compton suppressed LaBr3 detection system for use in nondestructive spent fuel assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, S.; Heidrich, B.; Ünlü, K.

    2015-06-01

    Current methods for safeguarding and accounting for spent nuclear fuel in reprocessing facilities are extremely resource and time intensive. The incorporation of autonomous passive gamma-ray detectors into the procedure could make the process significantly less burdensome. In measured gamma-ray spectra from spent nuclear fuel, the Compton continuum from dominant fission product photopeaks obscure the lower energy lines from other isotopes. The application of Compton suppression to gamma-ray measurements of spent fuel may reduce this effect and allow other less intense, lower energy peaks to be detected, potentially improving the accuracy of multivariate analysis algorithms. Compton suppressed spectroscopic measurements of spent nuclear fuel using HPGe, LaBr3, and NaI(Tl) primary detectors were performed. Irradiated fuel was measured in two configurations: as intact fuel elements viewed through a collimator and as feed solutions in a laboratory to simulate the measurement of a dissolved process stream. These two configurations allowed the direct assessment and quantification of the differences in measured gamma-ray spectra from the application of Compton suppression. In the first configuration, several irradiated fuel elements of varying cooling times from the Penn State Breazeale Reactor spent fuel inventory were measured using the three collimated Compton suppression systems. In the second geometry, Compton suppressed measurements of two samples of Approved Test Material commercial fuel elements were recorded inside the guard detector annulus to simulate the siphoning of small quantities from the main process stream for long dwell measurement periods. Compton suppression was found to improve measured gamma-ray spectra of spent fuel for multivariate analysis by notably lowering the Compton continuum from dominant photopeaks such as 137Cs and 140La, due to scattered interactions in the detector, which allowed more spectral features to be resolved. There was a

  12. Study of Compton suppression for use in spent nuclear fuel assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Sarah

    The focus of this study has been to assess Compton suppressed gamma-ray detection systems for the multivariate analysis of spent nuclear fuel. This objective has been achieved using direct measurement of samples of irradiated fuel elements in two geometrical configurations with Compton suppression systems. In order to address the objective to quantify the number of additionally resolvable photopeaks, direct Compton suppressed spectroscopic measurements of spent nuclear fuel in two configurations were performed: as intact fuel elements and as dissolved feed solutions. These measurements directly assessed and quantified the differences in measured gamma-ray spectrum from the application of Compton suppression. Several irradiated fuel elements of varying cooling time from the Penn State Breazeale Reactor spent fuel inventory were measured using three Compton suppression systems that utilized different primary detectors: HPGe, LaBr3, and NaI(Tl). The application of Compton suppression using a LaBr3 primary detector to the measurement of the current core fuel element, which presented the highest count rate, allowed four additional spectral features to be resolved. In comparison, the HPGe-CSS was able to resolve eight additional photopeaks as compared to the standalone HPGe measurement. Measurements with the NaI(Tl) primary detector were unable to resolve any additional peaks, due to its relatively low resolution. Samples of Approved Test Material (ATM) commercial fuel elements were obtained from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The samples had been processed using the beginning stages of the PUREX method and represented the unseparated feed solution from a reprocessing facility. Compton suppressed measurements of the ATM fuel samples were recorded inside the guard detector annulus, to simulate the siphoning of small quantities from the main process stream for long dwell measurement periods. Photopeak losses were observed in the measurements of the dissolved ATM

  13. CZT vs FFT: Flexibility vs Speed

    SciTech Connect

    S. Sirin

    2003-10-01

    Bluestein's Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), commonly called the Chirp-Z Transform (CZT), is a little-known algorithm that offers engineers a high-resolution FFT combined with the ability to specify bandwidth. In the field of digital signal processing, engineers are always challenged to detect tones, frequencies, signatures, or some telltale sign that signifies a condition that must be indicated, ignored, or controlled. One of these challenges is to detect specific frequencies, for instance when looking for tones from telephones or detecting 60-Hz noise on power lines. The Goertzel algorithm described in Embedded Systems Programming, September 2002, offered a powerful tool toward finding specific frequencies faster than the FFT.Another challenge involves analyzing a range of frequencies, such as recording frequency response measurements, matching voice patterns, or displaying spectrum information on the face of an amateur radio. To meet this challenge most engineers use the well-known FFT. The CZT gives the engineer the flexibility to specify bandwidth and outputs real and imaginary frequency components from which the magnitude and phase can be computed. A description of the CZT and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of CZT versus the FFT and Goertzel algorithms will be followed by situations in which the CZT would shine. The reader will find that the CZT is very useful but that flexibility has a price.

  14. Determination of airborne cadmium in environmental tobacco smoke using Compton suppression NAA

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberger, S.; Larson, S.; De Wu

    1992-01-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) is not well suited to determine cadmium below one part per million. Previous NAA methods used to determine very low levels of cadmium in biological materials have required prechemical or post-radiochemical separations. In this laboratory, the authors have been very successful using Compton suppression and epithermal NAA to determine cadmium in biological certified reference materials. They have begun a preliminary study to ascertain if this method is adequate to determine cadmium in environment tobacco smoke in public places.

  15. Studies of Nuclear Structure using Radioactive Decay and a Large Array of Compton Suppressed Ge Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, John L.

    2000-11-01

    Radioactive decay has long played a role in contributing to the elucidation of nuclear structure. However compared to in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy, which has been combined with the extraordinary power of multi-detector arrays, radioactive decay scheme studies have been carried out usually with rather modest detector set-ups (two detectors, no Compton suppression). An extensive program to rectify this situation has been initiated using the "8-PI spectrometer"[1]. This is an array of 20 Compton-suppressed Ge detectors with exceptional stability and peak-to-total ratio. Experiments performed[2] recently at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, to better characterize nuclear deformation properties and the onset of deformation in nuclei, will be described. Future plans for the study of nuclei far from beta stability at the TRIUMF/ISAC Facility using the 8-PI spectrometer will also be outlined. [1] J.P.Martin et al., Nucl.Instr.Meth. A 257, 301 (1987). [2] See, e.g., W.D.Kulp et al. Bull.Am.Phys.Soc. 44, 63 (1999); W.D.Kulp et al., ibid., Williamsburg Meeting, Oct 4-7 (2000).

  16. A Compton-suppression detection system for use in manganese bath measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghal-Eh, N.; Doostizadeh, H.; Hazami, Z.; Doust-Mohammadi, V.

    2015-07-01

    The manganese sulfate bath technique is a standard tool for neutron source strength measurement (Park et al., 2005). However, the dominate Compton continuum of most sodium iodide scintillators used in manganese bath systems (MBSs) does not allow the precise identification of induced gamma rays required for such measurements. In this research, to resolve this problem, a Compton-suppression system has been proposed which consists of a 2 in. by 2 in. NaI(Tl) right cylindrical scintillator as the main and a set of eight rectangular NE102 plastic scintillators of 12×12×15 cm3 dimensions as suppression detectors. Both detectors operate in anti-coincidence circuit to suppress the Compton continuum. The proposed system has been simulated with the MCNPX code with two different approaches and the corresponding measurements with 137Cs gamma-ray source and neutron-activated MnSO4 solution have been undertaken that give rise to a promising agreement.

  17. Handheld CZT radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Murray, William S.; Butterfield, Kenneth B.; Baird, William

    2004-08-24

    A handheld CZT radiation detector having a CZT gamma-ray sensor, a multichannel analyzer, a fuzzy-logic component, and a display component is disclosed. The CZT gamma-ray sensor may be a coplanar grid CZT gamma-ray sensor, which provides high-quality gamma-ray analysis at a wide range of operating temperatures. The multichannel analyzer categorizes pulses produce by the CZT gamma-ray sensor into channels (discrete energy levels), resulting in pulse height data. The fuzzy-logic component analyzes the pulse height data and produces a ranked listing of radioisotopes. The fuzzy-logic component is flexible and well-suited to in-field analysis of radioisotopes. The display component may be a personal data assistant, which provides a user-friendly method of interacting with the detector. In addition, the radiation detector may be equipped with a neutron sensor to provide an enhanced mechanism of sensing radioactive materials.

  18. Instruments of RT-2 experiment onboard CORONAS-PHOTON and their test and evaluation II: RT-2/CZT payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotoch, Tilak B.; Nandi, Anuj; Debnath, D.; Malkar, J. P.; Rao, A. R.; Hingar, M. K.; Madhav, Vaibhav P.; Sreekumar, S.; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2011-02-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors are high sensitivity and high resolution devices for hard X-ray imaging and spectroscopic studies. The new series of CZT detector modules (OMS40G256) manufactured by Orbotech Medical Solutions (OMS), Israel, are used in the RT-2/CZT payload onboard the CORONAS-PHOTON satellite. The CZT detectors, sensitive in the energy range of 20 to 150 keV, are used to image solar flares in hard X-rays. Since these modules are essentially manufactured for commercial applications, we have carried out a series of comprehensive tests on these modules so that they can be confidently used in space-borne systems. These tests lead us to select the best three pieces of the `Gold' modules for the RT-2/CZT payload. This paper presents the characterization of CZT modules and the criteria followed for selecting the ones for the RT-2/CZT payload. The RT-2/CZT payload carries, along with three CZT modules, a high spatial resolution CMOS detector for high resolution imaging of transient X-ray events. Therefore, we discuss the characterization of the CMOS detector as well.

  19. Determination of bromine, chlorine and iodine in environmental aqueous samples by epithermal neutron activation analysis and Compton suppression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landsberger, S.; O'Kelly, D. J.; Braisted, J.; Panno, S.

    2006-01-01

    Halides, particularly Br- and Cl-, have been used as indicators of potential sources of Na+ and Cl- in surface water and groundwater with limited success. Contamination of groundwater and surface water by Na+ and Cl- is a common occurrence in growing urban areas and adversely affects municipal and private water supplies in Illinois and other states, as well as vegetation in environmentally sensitive areas. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) can be effectively used to determine these halogens, but often the elevated concentrations of sodium and chlorine in water samples can give rise to very high detection limits for bromine and iodine due to elevated backgrounds from the activation process. We present a detailed analytical scheme to determine Cl, Br and I in aqueous samples with widely varying Na and Cl concentrations using epithermal NAA in conjunction with Compton suppression. ?? 2006 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  20. Investigation of trace elements in ancient pottery from Jenini, Brong Ahafo region, Ghana by INAA and Compton suppression spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyarko, B. J. B.; Bredwa-Mensah, Y.; Serfor-Armah, Y.; Dampare, S. B.; Akaho, E. H. K.; Osae, S.; Perbi, A.; Chatt, A.

    2007-10-01

    Concentrations of trace elements in ancient pottery excavated from Jenini in the Brong Ahafo region of Ghana were determined using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) in conjunction with both conventional and Compton suppression counting. Jenini was a slave Camp of Samory Toure during the indigenous slavery and the Trans-Atlantic slave trade. Pottery fragments found during the excavation of the grave tombs of the slaves who died in the slave camps were analysed. In all, 26 trace elements were determined in 40 pottery fragments. These elemental concentrations were processed using multivariate statistical methods, cluster, factor and discriminant analyses in order to determine similarities and correlation between the various samples. The suitability of the two counting systems for determination of trace elements in pottery objects has been evaluated.

  1. Compton suppression method and epithermal NAA in the determination of nutrients and heavy metals in Nigerian food and beverages.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Y A; Landsberger, S; O'Kelly, D J; Braisted, J; Gabdo, H; Ewa, I O B; Umar, I M; Funtua, I I

    2010-10-01

    We used in this study Compton suppression method and epithermal neutron activation analysis to determine the concentration of nutrients and heavy metals in Nigerian food and beverages. The work was performed at the University of Texas TRIGA Reactor by short, medium, and long irradiation protocols, using thermal flux of 1.4x10(12)n cm(-2)s(-1) and epithermal flux of 1.4x10(11)n cm(-2)s(-1). Application of Compton suppression method has reduced interferences from Compton scattered photons thereby allowing easy evaluation of Na, Cl, Ca, Cu, Mn, Mg, Co, Cr, Rb, Fe, and Se. The epithermal NAA method has enabled determination of Cd, As, Ba, Sr, Br, I, and V with little turn-around time. Quality Control and Quality Assurance of the method was tested by analyzing four Standard Reference Materials (non-fat powdered milk, apple leaves, citrus leaves, and peach leaves) obtained from National Institute for Standards and Technology. Our results show that sorghum, millet, and maize have high values of Zn, Mn, Fe, low values of Cd, As, and Se. Powdered milks, rice, beans, and soybeans were found to have moderate amounts of all the elements. Tobacco recorded high content of Cd, Mn, and As, whereas tea, tsobo leaves, Baobab leaves, and okro seed have more As values than others. However, biscuits, macaroni, spaghetti, and noodles show lower concentrations of all the elements. The distribution of these nutrients and heavy metals in these food and beverages shows the need to fortify biscuits and pastas with micro and macro-nutrients and reduce the use of tobacco, tea, tsobo leaves, Baobab leaves, and Okro seed to avoid intake of heavy elements. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Improved CZT for Gamma Detection

    SciTech Connect

    JAMES, R.

    2015-03-16

    The goal of the project is to advance the state of the art for spectroscopic and imaging detectors for nonproliferation uses by developing a fundamental understanding of defects limiting the performance of large-volume CZT detectors and fixing them, and increasing the detector size and electron mobility-lifetime product while reducing the cost of detector-grade crystals. Interaction points can be precisely determined in 3D for CZT detectors.

  3. Determination of airborne cadmium in environmental tobacco smoke by instrumental neutron activation analysis with a compton suppression system.

    PubMed

    Landsberger, S; Larson, S; Wu, D

    1993-06-01

    Concentrations of cadmium, a toxic trace element, were measured in the indoor air of several public places where environmental tobacco smoke was present. Particulate-phase cadmium concentrations were determined by analyzing air filter samples using epithermal instrumental neutron activation analysis in conjunction with a Compton suppression gamma-ray detection system, in which the detection limit for cadmium was reduced to a few nanograms per filter. A cascade impactor and a personal filter sampler were used to collect the indoor suspended particulate matter for size-fractionated mass as well as total mass, respectively. Results show that where environmental tobacco smoke is present, cadmium concentrations are significantly higher than background and that about 80% of the cadmium found in indoor airborne particulate matter is associated with particles with aerodynamic diameters less than 1.8 microns. In one instance, airborne cadmium concentrations in a music club were found to be 38 ng/m, which is at least 30 times higher than background.

  4. CZT sensors for Computed Tomography: from crystal growth to image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iniewski, K.

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in Traveling Heater Method (THM) growth and device fabrication that require additional processing steps have enabled to dramatically improve hole transport properties and reduce polarization effects in Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) material. As a result high flux operation of CZT sensors at rates in excess of 200 Mcps/mm2 is now possible and has enabled multiple medical imaging companies to start building prototype Computed Tomography (CT) scanners. CZT sensors are also finding new commercial applications in non-destructive testing (NDT) and baggage scanning. In order to prepare for high volume commercial production we are moving from individual tile processing to whole wafer processing using silicon methodologies, such as waxless processing, cassette based/touchless wafer handling. We have been developing parametric level screening at the wafer stage to ensure high wafer quality before detector fabrication in order to maximize production yields. These process improvements enable us, and other CZT manufacturers who pursue similar developments, to provide high volume production for photon counting applications in an economically feasible manner. CZT sensors are capable of delivering both high count rates and high-resolution spectroscopic performance, although it is challenging to achieve both of these attributes simultaneously. The paper discusses material challenges, detector design trade-offs and ASIC architectures required to build cost-effective CZT based detection systems. Photon counting ASICs are essential part of the integrated module platforms as charge-sensitive electronics needs to deal with charge-sharing and pile-up effects.

  5. High Resolution Computed Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-31

    samples. 14. SUBJECTTERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 38 High Resolution, Microfocus , Characterization, X - Ray , Micrography, Computed Tomography (CT), Failure...high resolutions (50 g.tm feature sensitivity) when a small field of view (50 mm) is used [11]. Specially designed detectors and a microfocus X - ray ...Wright Laboratories. Feldkamp [14] at Ford used a microfocus X - ray source and an X - ray image intensifier to develop a system capable of 20 g.m

  6. High-resolution headlamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gut, Carsten; Cristea, Iulia; Neumann, Cornelius

    2016-04-01

    The following article shall describe how human vision by night can be influenced. At first, front lighting systems that are already available on the market will be described, followed by their analysis with respect to the positive effects on traffic safety. Furthermore, how traffic safety by night can be increased since the introduction of high resolution headlamps shall be discussed.

  7. Design and Preliminary Monte Carlo Calculations of an Active Compton Suppressed LaBr3(Ce) Detector System for TRU Assay in Remote-Handled Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    J. Kulisek; J. K. Hartwell; M. E. McIlwain; R. P. Gardner

    2006-09-01

    Recent studies indicate LaBr3(Ce) scintillation detectors have desirable attributes, such as room temperature operability, which may make them viable alternatives as primary detectors (PD) in a Compton suppression spectrometer (CSS) used for remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste assay. A CSS with a LaBr3(Ce) PD has been designed and its expected performance evaluated using Monte Carlo analysis. The unique design of this unit minimizes the amount of "dead" material between the PD and the secondary guard detector. The analysis results indicate that this detector will have a relatively high Compton-suppression capability, with greater suppression ability for large angle-scattered photons in the PD. J. K. Hartwell1, M. E. McIlwain1, R. P. Gardner2, J. Kulisek3 1) Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2114 USA 2) North Carolina State University, Dept of Nuclear Eng., PO Box 7909, Raleigh, NC 27695 USA 3) Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 The US Department of Energy’s transuranic (TRU) waste inventory includes about 4,500 m3 of remote-handled TRU (RH-TRU) wastes. The RH-TRU waste stream is composed of a variety of containerized waste forms having a contact surface dose rate that exceeds 2 mSv/hr (200 mrem/hr) containing waste materials with a total TRU concentration greater than 3700 Bq/g (100 nCi/g). As part of a research project to investigate the use of active Compton-suppressed room-temperature gamma-ray detectors for direct non-destructive quantification of the TRU content of these RH-TRU wastes, we have designed and purchased a unique detector system using a LaBr3(Ce) primary detector and a NaI(Tl) suppression mantle. The expected detector performance has been modeled using MCNP-X [1] and CEARCPG [2], and incorporates certain design features modeled as important to active Compton suppression systems in previously-published work [3]. The unique detector system is sketched in Fig. 1. The ~25 mm diameter by 75 mm long LaBr3(Ce

  8. High resolution data acquisition

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, G.W.; Fuller, K.R.

    1993-04-06

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock, pulse train, and analog circuitry for generating a triangular wave synchronously with the pulse train (as seen in diagram on patent). The triangular wave has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter counts the clock pulse train during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  9. High resolution data acquisition

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, Glenn W.; Fuller, Kenneth R.

    1993-01-01

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock (38) pulse train (37) and analog circuitry (44) for generating a triangular wave (46) synchronously with the pulse train (37). The triangular wave (46) has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter (18, 32) forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter (26) counts the clock pulse train (37) during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer (52) then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  10. Panoramic High Resolution Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    2008-10-01

    Stellar populations in galaxies are vast repositories of fossil information. In recent years it has become possible to consider high resolution spectroscopic surveys of millions of stars. New high resolution multi-object spectrographs on 4-8m class telescopes (HERMES, WFMOS) will allow us for the first time to make large and detailed chemical abundance surveys of stars in the Galactic disk, bulge and halo, and apply the techniques of chemical tagging to recovering the fossil information left over from galaxy assembly. These instruments will have strong synergies with the GAIA astrometric satellite due to launch in 2011. The level of detail made possible by these future facilities will be necessary if we are to fully understand the physical processes involved in galaxy formation.

  11. High resolution data acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, G.W.; Fuller, K.R.

    1992-12-31

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock pulse train and analog circuitry for generating a triangular wave synchronously with the pulse train. The triangular wave has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter counts the clock pulse train during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  12. High-Resolution Autoradiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towe, George C; Gomberg, Henry J; Freemen, J W

    1955-01-01

    This investigation was made to adapt wet-process autoradiography to metallurgical samples to obtain high resolution of segregated radioactive elements in microstructures. Results are confined to development of the technique, which was perfected to a resolution of less than 10 microns. The radioactive samples included carbon-14 carburized iron and steel, nickel-63 electroplated samples, a powder product containing nickel-63, and tungsten-185 in N-155 alloy.

  13. Ultra high resolution tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, W.S.

    1994-11-15

    Recent work and results on ultra high resolution three dimensional imaging with soft x-rays will be presented. This work is aimed at determining microscopic three dimensional structure of biological and material specimens. Three dimensional reconstructed images of a microscopic test object will be presented; the reconstruction has a resolution on the order of 1000 A in all three dimensions. Preliminary work with biological samples will also be shown, and the experimental and numerical methods used will be discussed.

  14. Saturn's rings - high resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Voyager 2 obtained this high-resolution picture of Saturn's rings Aug. 22, when the spacecraft was 4 million kilometers (2.5 million miles) away. Evident here are the numerous 'spoke' features, in the B-ring; their very sharp, narrow appearance suggests short formation times. Scientists think electromagnetic forces are responsible in some way for these features, but no detailed theory has been worked out. Pictures such as this and analyses of Voyager 2's spoke movies may reveal more clues about the origins of these complex structures. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

  15. High resolution ultrasonic densitometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dress, W.B.

    1983-01-01

    The velocity of torsional stress pulses in an ultrasonic waveguide of non-circular cross section is affected by the temperature and density of the surrounding medium. Measurement of the transit times of acoustic echoes from the ends of a sensor section are interpreted as level, density, and temperature of the fluid environment surrounding that section. This paper examines methods of making these measurements to obtain high resolution, temperature-corrected absolute and relative density and level determinations of the fluid. Possible applications include on-line process monitoring, a hand-held density probe for battery charge state indication, and precise inventory control for such diverse fluids as uranium salt solutions in accountability storage and gasoline in service station storage tanks.

  16. High resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    F. Garibaldi

    2005-02-01

    Hypernuclear spectroscopy provides fundamental information for understanding the effective ?-Nucleon interaction. Jefferson Laboratory experiment E94-107 was designed to perform high resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy by electroproduction of strangeness in four 1p-shell nuclei: 12C, 9Be, 16O, and 7Li. The first part of the experiment on 12C and 9Be has been performed in January and April-May 2004 in Hall A at Jefferson Lab. Significant modifications were made to the standard Hall A apparatus for this challenging experiment: two septum magnets and a RICH detector have been added to get reasonable counting rates and excellent particle identification, as required for the experiment. A description of the apparatus and the preliminary analysis results are presented here.

  17. High Resolution Doppler Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Paul B.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) on UARS spacecraft during the period 4/l/96 - 3/31/99. During this period, HRDI operation, data processing, and data analysis continued, and there was a high level of vitality in the HRDI project. The HRDI has been collecting data from the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere since instrument activation on October 1, 1991. The HRDI team has stressed three areas since operations commenced: 1) operation of the instrument in a manner which maximizes the quality and versatility of the collected data; 2) algorithm development and validation to produce a high-quality data product; and 3) scientific studies, primarily of the dynamics of the middle atmosphere. There has been no significant degradation in the HRDI instrument since operations began nearly 8 years ago. HRDI operations are fairly routine, although we have continued to look for ways to improve the quality of the scientific product, either by improving existing modes, or by designing new ones. The HRDI instrument has been programmed to collect data for new scientific studies, such as measurements of fluorescence from plants, measuring cloud top heights, and lower atmosphere H2O.

  18. High Resolution Formaldehyde Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernest, C. T.; Bauer, D.; Hynes, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is the most abundant and most important organic carbonyl compound in the atmosphere. The sources of formaldehyde are the oxidation of methane, isoprene, acetone, and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); fossil fuel combustion; and biomass burning. The dominant loss mechanism for formaldehyde is photolysis which occurs via two pathways: (R1) HCHO + hv → HCO + H (R2) HCHO + hv → H2 + CO The first pathway (R1) is referred to as the radical channel, while the second pathway (R2) is referred to as the molecular channel. The products of both pathways play a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. The CO that is produced in the molecular channel undergoes further oxidation to produce CO2. Under atmospheric conditions, the H atom and formyl radical that are produced in the radical channel undergo rapid reactions with O2 to produce the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) via (R3) and (R4). (R3) HCO + O2 → HO2 + CO (R4) H + O2 → HO2 Thus, for every photon absorbed, the photolysis of formaldehyde can contribute one CO2 molecule to the global greenhouse budget or two HO2 radicals to the tropospheric HOx (OH + HO2) cycle. The HO2 radicals produced during formaldehyde photolysis have also been implicated in the formation of photochemical smog. The HO2 radicals act as radical chain carriers and convert NO to NO2, which ultimately results in the catalytic production of O3. Constraining the yield of HO2 produced via HCHO photolysis is essential for improving tropospheric chemistry models. In this study, both the absorption cross section and the quantum yield of the radical channel (R1) were measured at high resolution over the tropospherically relevant wavelength range 304-330 nm. For the cross section measurements a narrow linewidth Nd:YAG pumped dye laser was used with a multi-pass cell. Partial pressures of HCHO were kept below 0.3 torr. Simultaneous measurement of OH LIF in a flame allowed absolute calibration of the wavelength scale. Pressure

  19. High resolution time interval meter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

  20. Multi-element CZT array for nuclear safeguards applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sung-Woo Kwak; Jung-Ki Shin; Seunghoon Park; Heejun Chung; Yongkwon Kim

    2015-07-01

    To address drawbacks of a CZT detector due to its limited size, a dual-CZT array, consisting of two CZT detectors and a DAS (Data Acquisition System), was constructed and algorithm to handle the spectra from the CZT array was discussed in this study. Spectra of 4.5% enriched UO{sub 2} powder were obtained using the dual-CZT array. The detection efficiency acquired by the CZT array was about twice higher than that of a single CZT spectra, while FWHMs are nearly identical (about 7.0 keV) for each spectrum. The results of this study show that a much better detection efficiency of CZT can be achieved without degrading its energy resolution. (authors)

  1. Cathode depth sensing in CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, JaeSub; Bellm, Eric C.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Narita, Tomohiko

    2004-02-01

    Measuring the depth of interaction in thick Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) detectors allows improved imaging and spectroscopy for hard X-ray imaging above 100 keV. The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) will employ relatively thick (5 - 10 mm) CZT detectors, which are required to perform the broad energy-band sky survey. Interaction depth information is needed to correct events to the detector "focal plane" for correct imaging and can be used to improve the energy resolution of the detector at high energies by allowing event-based corrections for incomplete charge collection. Background rejection is also improved by allowing low energy events from the rear and sides of the detector to be rejected. We present experimental results of intereaction depth sensing in a 5 mm thick pixellated Au-contact IMARAD CZT detector. The depth sensing was done by making simultaneous measurements of cathode and anode signals, where the interaction depth at a given energy is proportional to the ratio of cathode/anode signals. We demonstrate how a simple empirical formula describing the event distributions in the cathode/anode signal space can dramatically improve the energy resolution. We also estimate the energy and depth resolution of the detector as a function of the energy and the interaction depth. We also show a depth-sensing prototype system currently under development for EXIST in which cathode signals from 8, 16 or 32 crystals can be read-out by a small multi-channel ASIC board that is vertically edge-mounted on the cathode electrode along every second CZT crystal boundary. This allows CZT crystals to be tiled contiguously with minimum impact on throughput of incoming photons. The robust packaging is crucial in EXIST, which will employ very large area imaging CZT detector arrays.

  2. Multi-Element CZT Array for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, S.-W.; Lee, A.-R.; Shin, J.-K.; Park, U.-R.; Park, S.; Kim, Y.; Chung, H.

    2016-12-01

    Due to its electronic properties, a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector has been used as a hand-held portable nuclear measurement instrument. However, a CZT detector has low detection efficiency because of a limitation of its single crystal growth. To address its low efficiency, we have constructed a portable four-CZT array based gamma-ray spectrometer consisting of a CZT array, electronics for signal processing and software. Its performance has been characterized in terms of energy resolution and detection efficiency using radioactive sources and nuclear materials. Experimental results showed that the detection efficiency of the four-CZT array based gamma-ray spectrometer was much higher than that of a single CZT detector in the array. The FWHMs of the CZT array were 9, 18, and 21 keV at 185.7, 662, and 1,332 keV, respectively. Some gamma-rays in a range of 100 keV to 200 keV were not clear in a single crystal detector while those from the CZT array system were observed to be clear. The energy resolution of the CZT array system was only slightely worse than those of the single CZT detectors. By combining several single crystals and summing signals from each single detector at a digital electronic circuit, the detection efficiency of a CZT array system increased without degradation of its energy resolution. The technique outlined in this paper shows a very promising method for designing a CZT-based gamma-ray spectroscopy that overcomes the fundamental limitations of a small volume CZT detector.

  3. High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan

    We propose to design and build the first imaging hard X-ray detector system that incorporates 3D stacking of closely packed detector readouts in finely-spaced imaging arrays with their required data processing and control electronics. In virtually all imaging astronomical detectors, detector readout is done with flex connectors or connections that are not vertical but rather horizontal , requiring loss of focal plane area. For high resolution pixel detectors needed for high speed event-based X-ray imaging, from low energy applications (CMOS) with focusing X-ray telescopes, to hard X-ray applications with pixelated CZT for large area coded aperture telescopes, this new detector development offers great promise. We propose to extend our previous and current APRA supported ProtoEXIST program that has developed the first large area imaging CZT detectors and demonstrated their astrophysical capabilities on two successful balloon flight to a next generation High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI), which would incorporate microvia technology for the first time to connect the readout ASIC on each CZT crystal directly to its control and data processing system. This 3-dimensional stacking of detector and readout/control system means that large area (>2m2) imaging detector planes for a High Resolution Wide-field hard X-ray telescope can be built with initially greatly reduced detector gaps and ultimately with no gaps. This increases detector area, efficiency, and simplicity of detector integration. Thus higher sensitivity wide-field imagers will be possible at lower cost. HREXI will enable a post-Swift NASA mission such as the EREXS concept proposed to PCOS to be conducted as a future MIDEX mission. This mission would conduct a high resolution (<2 arcmin) , broad band (5 200 keV) hard X-ray survey of black holes on all scales with ~10X higher sensitivity than Swift. In the current era of Time Domain Astrophysics, such a survey capability, in conjunction with a n

  4. High resolution digital delay timer

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Albert D.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay (20) provides a first output signal (24) at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits (26, 28) latch the high resolution data (24) to form a first synchronizing data set (60). A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters (142, 146, 154) and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses (32, 34) count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an interval which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD (184) corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD (74) to generate a second set of synchronizing data (76) which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data (60) for presentation to logic circuits (64). The logic circuits (64) further delay the internal output signal (72) to obtain a proper phase relationship of an output signal (80) with the internal pulses (32, 34). The final delayed output signal (80) thereafter enables the output pulse generator (82) to produce the desired output pulse (84) at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse (10, 12).

  5. High-resolution electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, R.

    1977-01-01

    Employing scanning transmission electron microscope as interferometer, relative phases of diffraction maximums can be determined by analysis of dark field images. Synthetic aperture technique and Fourier-transform computer processing of amplitude and phase information provide high resolution images at approximately one angstrom.

  6. Advanced very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The advanced very high resolution radiometer development program is considered. The program covered the design, construction, and test of a breadboard model, engineering model, protoflight model, mechanical structural model, and a life test model. Special bench test and calibration equipment was also developed for use on the program.

  7. High Resolution Orientation Imaging Microscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-02

    Functions, ICCES 2010, Las Vegas. 17. David Fullwood, Brent Adams, Mike Miles, Stuart Rogers, Ali Khosravani, Raj Mishra, Design for Ductility : Defect... Pseudo -Symmetries by High Resolution EBSD Methods, MS&T. 2009: Pittsburgh. 27. Oliver Johnson, Calvin Gardner, David Fullwood, Brent Adams, George...applied to strain measurements ................................... 6 2.3 Recovery of Lattice Tetragonality and Pseudo -Symmetry Resolution

  8. Study of a high-resolution, 3-D positioning cadmium zinc telluride detector for PET

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Y; Matteson, J L; Skelton, R T; Deal, A C; Stephan, E A; Duttweiler, F; Gasaway, T M; Levin, C S

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the performance of 1 mm resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors for positron emission tomography (PET) capable of positioning the 3-D coordinates of individual 511 keV photon interactions. The detectors comprise 40 mm × 40 mm × 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals that employ a novel cross-strip readout with interspersed steering electrodes to obtain high spatial and energy resolution. The study found a single anode FWHM energy resolution of 3.06±0.39% at 511 keV throughout most the detector volume. Improved resolution is expected with properly shielded front-end electronics. Measurements made using a collimated beam established the efficacy of the steering electrodes in facilitating enhanced charge collection across anodes, as well as a spatial resolution of 0.44±0.07 mm in the direction orthogonal to the electrode planes. Finally, measurements based on coincidence electronic collimation yielded a point spread function with 0.78±0.10 mm FWHM, demonstrating 1 mm spatial resolution capability transverse to the anodes – as expected from the 1 mm anode pitch. These findings indicate that the CZT-based detector concept has excellent performance and shows great promise for a high-resolution PET system. PMID:21335649

  9. Study of a high-resolution, 3D positioning cadmium zinc telluride detector for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y.; Matteson, J. L.; Skelton, R. T.; Deal, A. C.; Stephan, E. A.; Duttweiler, F.; Gasaway, T. M.; Levin, C. S.

    2011-03-01

    This paper investigates the performance of 1 mm resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors for positron emission tomography (PET) capable of positioning the 3D coordinates of individual 511 keV photon interactions. The detectors comprise 40 mm × 40 mm × 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals that employ a novel cross-strip readout with interspersed steering electrodes to obtain high spatial and energy resolution. The study found a single anode FWHM energy resolution of 3.06 ± 0.39% at 511 keV throughout most of the detector volume. Improved resolution is expected with properly shielded front-end electronics. Measurements made using a collimated beam established the efficacy of the steering electrodes in facilitating enhanced charge collection across anodes, as well as a spatial resolution of 0.44 ± 0.07 mm in the direction orthogonal to the electrode planes. Finally, measurements based on coincidence electronic collimation yielded a point spread function with 0.78 ± 0.10 mm FWHM, demonstrating 1 mm spatial resolution capability transverse to the anodes—as expected from the 1 mm anode pitch. These findings indicate that the CZT-based detector concept has excellent performance and shows great promise for a high-resolution PET system.

  10. Study of a high-resolution, 3D positioning cadmium zinc telluride detector for PET.

    PubMed

    Gu, Y; Matteson, J L; Skelton, R T; Deal, A C; Stephan, E A; Duttweiler, F; Gasaway, T M; Levin, C S

    2011-03-21

    This paper investigates the performance of 1 mm resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors for positron emission tomography (PET) capable of positioning the 3D coordinates of individual 511 keV photon interactions. The detectors comprise 40 mm × 40 mm × 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals that employ a novel cross-strip readout with interspersed steering electrodes to obtain high spatial and energy resolution. The study found a single anode FWHM energy resolution of 3.06 ± 0.39% at 511 keV throughout most of the detector volume. Improved resolution is expected with properly shielded front-end electronics. Measurements made using a collimated beam established the efficacy of the steering electrodes in facilitating enhanced charge collection across anodes, as well as a spatial resolution of 0.44 ± 0.07 mm in the direction orthogonal to the electrode planes. Finally, measurements based on coincidence electronic collimation yielded a point spread function with 0.78 ± 0.10 mm FWHM, demonstrating 1 mm spatial resolution capability transverse to the anodes-as expected from the 1 mm anode pitch. These findings indicate that the CZT-based detector concept has excellent performance and shows great promise for a high-resolution PET system.

  11. CZT nanoRAIDER_VFG Factsheet

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.; A. E. Bolotnikov; Cui, Yonggang

    2016-01-15

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is working with FLIR System Inc., the manufacturer of the nanoRAIDER, to design a handheld device based on a position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid (VFG) Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) detector array (with 1% or better energy resolution). The new device called nanoRAIDER VFG will be an improvement to the current nanoRAIDER, which is a compact gamma-ray detection instrument manufactured by FLIR Systems Inc. that employs relatively lower-performing CZT hemispheric detectors (i.e., 3%-FWHM CZT detectors). The nanoRAIDER will significantly improve the accuracy while maintaining similar efficiency, as compared to the nanoRAIDER, for in-field analysis of nuclear materials and detection of undeclared activities during inspections conducted by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Since the nanoRAIDER is currently used by the IAEA as part of its Complementary Access toolkit, a relatively quick acceptance of the nanoRAIDER VFG for safeguards is anticipated. The nanoRAIDER VFG will help address several items listed in the IAEA’s Long-Term R&D Plan that could enhance the abilities to detect undeclared nuclear material and activities.

  12. High-Resolution Radar Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-14

    vThe goal of this project is to formulate and investigate new approaches for forming images of radar targets from spotlight-mode, delay-doppler...the new methods we are studying. There are two modules in the program. The first module produces simulated radar back-scatter data. The simulation...gives the model and fundamental estimation equations for the method we are developing. The abstract is: "A new approach to high resolution radar

  13. Novel Method for Growing Te-Inclusion-Free CZT

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov,A.

    2008-06-17

    The authors propose a new method for growth of detector-grade CdZnTe (CZT) with reduced concentration and sizes of Te inclusions. The method is designed to impede the formation of Te-rich inclusions in crystals due to the use of new CZT growth method and a unique ampoule design.

  14. Line profile modelling for multi-pixel CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, T.; Vadawale, S. V.; Rao, A. R.; Bhattacharya, D.; Mithun, N. P. S.; Bhalerao, V.

    2016-07-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors have been the mainstay for hard X-ray astronomy for its high quantum efficiency, fine energy resolution, near room temperature operation, and radiation hardness. In order to fully utilize the spectroscopic capabilities of CZT detectors, it is important to generate accurate response matrix, which in turn requires precise modelling of the line profiles for the CZT detectors. We have developed a numerical model taking into account the mobility and lifetime of the charge carriers and intrpixel charge sharing for the CZT detectors. This paper describes the details of the modelling along with the experimental measurements of mobility, lifetime and charge sharing fractions for the CZT detector modules of thickness of 5 mm and 2.5 mm pixel size procured from Orbotech Medical Solutions (same modules used in AstroSat-CZTI).

  15. High Resolution Scanning Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R. (Inventor); Miranda, Felix A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a High Resolution Scanning Reflectarray Antenna (HRSRA) for the purpose of tracking ground terminals and space craft communication applications. The present invention provides an alternative to using gimbaled parabolic dish antennas and direct radiating phased arrays. When compared to a gimbaled parabolic dish, the HRSRA offers the advantages of vibration free steering without incurring appreciable cost or prime power penalties. In addition, it offers full beam steering at a fraction of the cost of direct radiating arrays and is more efficient.

  16. High-resolution multiphoton cryomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    König, Karsten; Uchugonova, Aisada; Breunig, Hans Georg

    2014-03-15

    An ultracompact high-resolution multiphoton cryomicroscope with a femtosecond near infrared fiber laser has been utilized to study the cellular autofluorescence during freezing and thawing of cells. Cooling resulted in an increase of the intracellular fluorescence intensity followed by morphological modifications at temperatures below -10 °C, depending on the application of the cryoprotectant DMSO and the cooling rate. Furthermore, fluorescence lifetime imaging revealed an increase of the mean lifetime with a decrease in temperature. Non-destructive, label-free optical biopsies of biomaterial in ice can be obtained with sub-20 mW mean powers.

  17. A High Resolution CCD Multiplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheu, Larry S.; Kadekod i, Narayan; Nugroho, Yohanes; Lo, Mike; Mortz, Margaret; Ibrahim, Ali

    1983-11-01

    This paper describes a high resolution CCD multiplexer for focal plane imaging systems. The multiplexer incorporates quadrilinear readout registers to achieve two times the resolution of conventional bilinear structure while using the same design rules. Complete parallel charge transfer are ensured by a novel buried channel poly gate isolation scheme. A monolithic silicon photodiode array of 8 Am pitch, 3533 elements was designed with the multi-plexer. Video preprocessing circuits of high speed four to one channel stitching, compensated sample and hold and bad pixel deletion were integrated on chip for improved performance. The modulation transfer functions due to the geometry and the transfer inefficiency are discussed. The theoretically calculated total MTF agrees with the experimental result. At Nyquist frequency of 62.5 c/mm the total MTF is better than 0.6 in the absence of the diffusion MTF degradation. The noise spectrum of the CCD and the output amplifier are presented. The RMS noise of the CCD in dark is approximately 0.35 my over 1 MHz bandwidth. The CCD noise increases with light input attributed primarily to the shot noise. The low noise nature of the multiplexer makes it ideal for the high resolution low light level detection applications.

  18. An energy-optimized collimator design for a CZT-based SPECT camera

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Fenghua; Bagchi, Srijeeta; Zan, Yunlong; Huang, Qiu; Seo, Youngho

    2015-01-01

    such as low-energy high resolution (LEHR) and medium energy general purpose (MEGP) collimators. PMID:26640308

  19. An energy-optimized collimator design for a CZT-based SPECT camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Fenghua; Bagchi, Srijeeta; Zan, Yunlong; Huang, Qiu; Seo, Youngho

    2016-01-01

    collimators such as low-energy high resolution (LEHR) and medium energy general purpose (MEGP) collimators.

  20. Enhanced High Resolution RBS System

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Thomas J.; Hass, James A.; Klody, George M.

    2011-06-01

    Improvements in full spectrum resolution with the second NEC high resolution RBS system are summarized. Results for 50 A ring TiN/HfO films on Si yielding energy resolution on the order of 1 keV are also presented. Detector enhancements include improved pulse processing electronics, upgraded shielding for the MCP/RAE detector, and reduced noise generated from pumping. Energy resolution measurements on spectra front edge coupled with calculations using 0.4mStr solid angle show that beam energy spread at 400 KeV from the Pelletron registered accelerator is less than 100 eV. To improve user throughput, magnet control has been added to the automatic data collection. Depth profiles derived from experimental data are discussed. For the thin films profiled, depth resolutions were on the Angstrom level with the non-linear energy/channel conversions ranging from 100 to 200 eV.

  1. Enhanced High Resolution RBS System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Thomas J.; Hass, James A.; Klody, George M.

    2011-06-01

    Improvements in full spectrum resolution with the second NEC high resolution RBS system are summarized. Results for 50 Å TiN/HfO films on Si yielding energy resolution on the order of 1 keV are also presented. Detector enhancements include improved pulse processing electronics, upgraded shielding for the MCP/RAE detector, and reduced noise generated from pumping. Energy resolution measurements on spectra front edge coupled with calculations using 0.4mStr solid angle show that beam energy spread at 400 KeV from the Pelletron® accelerator is less than 100 eV. To improve user throughput, magnet control has been added to the automatic data collection. Depth profiles derived from experimental data are discussed. For the thin films profiled, depth resolutions were on the Angstrom level with the non-linear energy/channel conversions ranging from 100 to 200 eV.

  2. High-resolution land topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massonnet, Didier; Elachi, Charles

    2006-11-01

    After a description of the background, methods of production and some scientific uses of high-resolution land topography, we present the current status and the prospect of radar interferometry, regarded as one of the best techniques for obtaining the most global and the most accurate topographic maps. After introducing briefly the theoretical aspects of radar interferometry - principles, limits of operation and various capabilities -, we will focus on the topographic applications that resulted in an almost global topographic map of the earth: the SRTM map. After introducing the Interferometric Cartwheel system, we will build on its expected performances to discuss the scientific prospects of refining a global topographic map to sub-metric accuracy. We also show how other fields of sciences such as hydrology may benefit from the products generated by interferometric radar systems. To cite this article: D. Massonnet, C. Elachi, C. R. Geoscience 338 (2006).

  3. HIRAS, high resolution IRAS images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bontekoe, Tj. R.; Kester, D. J. M.; Wesselius, P. R.

    The IRAS Software Telescope allows everyone to obtain the state-of-the-art IRAS products (survey, pointed observations, as well as low-resolution spectra) from raw uncalibrated scan data to FITS maps and any stage in between, any size area up to five by five degree, within 24 hours response time, and without the tedious proposal and refereeing process. This is done via an electronic mail server, without manual interaction. High Resolution Images can also be made by running HIRAS, which drives the MemSys5 (Gull & Skilling 1991) maximum entropy package. Herewith a resolution of order one arc-minute, instead of the usual five arc-minutes, can be obtained.

  4. High-resolution interferometric spectrophotopolarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L.

    1981-01-01

    Spectrophotopolarimetric capability can be added to a laboratory interferometer-spectrometer by use of a specially designed module described herein. With the instrument so augmented, high-resolution spectra can be obtained of the Stokes parameters of the reference beam and the beams diffusely reflected or transmitted by a sample medium of interest. For any such beam, the exponential Fourier transforms of the two interferograms obtained with a polarizer-analyzer oriented along the 0 deg and the 90 deg directions provide the spectra of I and Q, separately. Within experimental (and numerical) noise, this I spectrum should be the same as the one obtained with the polarizer removed. The remaining Stokes parameters U and V are obtained with a third interferogram recorded with the polarizer along the 45 deg direction. The complete theory of this instrument is described including the detailed analysis of the polarization-interferograms it provides.

  5. High Resolution Thermometry for EXACT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, J. S.; Nash, A. E.; Larson, M.; Mulders, N.

    2000-01-01

    High Resolution Thermometers (HRTs) based on SQUID detection of the magnetization of a paramagnetic salt or a metal alloy has been commonly used for sub-nano Kelvin temperature resolution in low temperature physics experiments. The main applications to date have been for temperature ranges near the lambda point of He-4 (2.177 K). These thermometers made use of materials such as Cu(NH4)2Br4 *2H2O, GdCl3, or PdFe. None of these materials are suitable for EXACT, which will explore the region of the He-3/He-4 tricritical point at 0.87 K. The experiment requirements and properties of several candidate paramagnetic materials will be presented, as well as preliminary test results.

  6. HRSC: High resolution stereo camera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neukum, G.; Jaumann, R.; Basilevsky, A.T.; Dumke, A.; Van Gasselt, S.; Giese, B.; Hauber, E.; Head, J. W.; Heipke, C.; Hoekzema, N.; Hoffmann, H.; Greeley, R.; Gwinner, K.; Kirk, R.; Markiewicz, W.; McCord, T.B.; Michael, G.; Muller, Jan-Peter; Murray, J.B.; Oberst, J.; Pinet, P.; Pischel, R.; Roatsch, T.; Scholten, F.; Willner, K.

    2009-01-01

    The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on Mars Express has delivered a wealth of image data, amounting to over 2.5 TB from the start of the mapping phase in January 2004 to September 2008. In that time, more than a third of Mars was covered at a resolution of 10-20 m/pixel in stereo and colour. After five years in orbit, HRSC is still in excellent shape, and it could continue to operate for many more years. HRSC has proven its ability to close the gap between the low-resolution Viking image data and the high-resolution Mars Orbiter Camera images, leading to a global picture of the geological evolution of Mars that is now much clearer than ever before. Derived highest-resolution terrain model data have closed major gaps and provided an unprecedented insight into the shape of the surface, which is paramount not only for surface analysis and geological interpretation, but also for combination with and analysis of data from other instruments, as well as in planning for future missions. This chapter presents the scientific output from data analysis and highlevel data processing, complemented by a summary of how the experiment is conducted by the HRSC team members working in geoscience, atmospheric science, photogrammetry and spectrophotometry. Many of these contributions have been or will be published in peer-reviewed journals and special issues. They form a cross-section of the scientific output, either by summarising the new geoscientific picture of Mars provided by HRSC or by detailing some of the topics of data analysis concerning photogrammetry, cartography and spectral data analysis.

  7. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  8. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  9. High resolution time interval counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Victor S.; Davis, Dick D.; Lombardi, Michael A.

    1995-01-01

    In recent years, we have developed two types of high resolution, multi-channel time interval counters. In the NIST two-way time transfer MODEM application, the counter is designed for operating primarily in the interrupt-driven mode, with 3 start channels and 3 stop channels. The intended start and stop signals are 1 PPS, although other frequencies can also be applied to start and stop the count. The time interval counters used in the NIST Frequency Measurement and Analysis System are implemented with 7 start channels and 7 stop channels. Four of the 7 start channels are devoted to the frequencies of 1 MHz, 5 MHz or 10 MHz, while triggering signals to all other start and stop channels can range from 1 PPS to 100 kHz. Time interval interpolation plays a key role in achieving the high resolution time interval measurements for both counters. With a 10 MHz time base, both counters demonstrate a single-shot resolution of better than 40 ps, and a stability of better than 5 x 10(exp -12) (sigma(sub chi)(tau)) after self test of 1000 seconds). The maximum rate of time interval measurements (with no dead time) is 1.0 kHz for the counter used in the MODEM application and is 2.0 kHz for the counter used in the Frequency Measurement and Analysis System. The counters are implemented as plug-in units for an AT-compatible personal computer. This configuration provides an efficient way of using a computer not only to control and operate the counters, but also to store and process measured data.

  10. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefitted greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  11. Design and testing of a unique active Compton-suppressed LaBr3(Ce) detector system for improved sensitivity assays of TRU in remote-handled TRU wastes

    SciTech Connect

    J. K. Hartwell; M. E. McIlwain; J. A. Kulisek

    2007-10-01

    The US Department of Energy’s transuranic (TRU) waste inventory includes about 4,500 m3 of remote-handled TRU (RH-TRU) wastes composed of a variety of containerized waste forms having a contact surface dose rate that exceeds 2 mSv/hr (200 mrem/hr) containing waste materials with a total TRU concentration greater than 3700 Bq/g (100 nCi/g). As part of a research project to investigate the use of active Compton-suppressed room-temperature gamma-ray detectors for direct non-destructive quantification of the TRU content of these RH-TRU wastes, we have designed and purchased a unique detector system using a LaBr3(Ce) primary detector and a NaI(Tl) suppression mantle. The LaBr3(Ce) primary detector is a cylindrical unit ~25 mm in diameter by 76 mm long viewed by a 38 mm diameter photomultiplier. The NaI(Tl) suppression mantle (secondary detector) is 175 mm by 175 mm with a center well that accommodates the primary detector. An important feature of this arrangement is the lack of any “can” between the primary and secondary detectors. These primary and secondary detectors are optically isolated by a thin layer (.003") of aluminized kapton, but the hermetic seal and thus the aluminum can surrounds the outer boundary of the detector system envelope. The hermetic seal at the primary detector PMT is at the PMT wall. This arrangement virtually eliminates the “dead” material between the primary and secondary detectors, a feature that preliminary modeling indicated would substantially improve the Compton suppression capability of this device. This paper presents both the expected performance of this unit determined from modeling with MCNPX, and the performance measured in our laboratory with radioactive sources.

  12. High resolution imaging at Palomar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.

    1992-01-01

    For the last two years we have embarked on a program of understanding the ultimate limits of ground-based optical imaging. We have designed and fabricated a camera specifically for high resolution imaging. This camera has now been pressed into service at the prime focus of the Hale 5 m telescope. We have concentrated on two techniques: the Non-Redundant Masking (NRM) and Weigelt's Fully Filled Aperture (FFA) method. The former is the optical analog of radio interferometry and the latter is a higher order extension of the Labeyrie autocorrelation method. As in radio Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), both these techniques essentially measure the closure phase and, hence, true image construction is possible. We have successfully imaged binary stars and asteroids with angular resolution approaching the diffraction limit of the telescope and image quality approaching that of a typical radio VLBI map. In addition, we have carried out analytical and simulation studies to determine the ultimate limits of ground-based optical imaging, the limits of space-based interferometric imaging, and investigated the details of imaging tradeoffs of beam combination in optical interferometers.

  13. High-resolution infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falco, Charles M.

    2010-08-01

    The hands and mind of an artist are intimately involved in the creative process of image formation, intrinsically making paintings significantly more complex than photographs to analyze. In spite of this difficulty, several years ago the artist David Hockney and I identified optical evidence within a number of paintings that demonstrated artists began using optical projections as early as c1425 - nearly 175 years before Galileo - as aids for producing portions of their images. In the course of our work, Hockney and I developed insights that I have been applying to a new approach to computerized image analysis. Recently I developed and characterized a portable high resolution infrared for capturing additional information from paintings. Because many pigments are semi-transparent in the IR, in a number of cases IR photographs ("reflectograms") have revealed marks made by the artists that had been hidden under paint ever since they were made. I have used this IR camera to capture photographs ("reflectograms") of hundreds of paintings in over a dozen museums on three continents and, in some cases, these reflectograms have provided new insights into decisions the artists made in creating the final images that we see in the visible.

  14. High resolution auditory perception system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Iftekhar; Ghatol, Ashok

    2005-04-01

    Blindness is a sensory disability which is difficult to treat but can to some extent be helped by artificial aids. The paper describes the design aspects of a high resolution auditory perception system, which is designed on the principle of air sonar with binaural perception. This system is a vision substitution aid for enabling blind persons. The blind person wears ultrasonic eyeglasses which has ultrasonic sensor array embedded on it. The system has been designed to operate in multiresolution modes. The ultrasonic sound from the transmitter array is reflected back by the objects, falling in the beam of the array and is received. The received signal is converted to a sound signal, which is presented stereophonically for auditory perception. A detailed study has been done as the background work required for the system implementation; the appropriate range analysis procedure, analysis of space-time signals, the acoustic sensors study, amplification methods and study of the removal of noise using filters. Finally the system implementation including both the hardware and the software part of it has been described. Experimental results on actual blind subjects and inferences obtained during the study have also been included.

  15. High resolution time interval counter

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, K.J.

    1994-07-26

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured. 3 figs.

  16. High resolution time interval counter

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, Kenneth J.

    1994-01-01

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured.

  17. High resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, Jim; Dinyari, Rostam; Huie, Phil; Butterwick, Alex; Peumans, Peter; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight in patients with retinal degeneration by delivering pulsed electric currents to retinal neurons via an array of microelectrodes. Most implants use inductive or optical transmission of information and power to an intraocular receiver, with decoded signals subsequently distributed to retinal electrodes through an intraocular cable. Surgical complexity could be minimized by an "integrated" prosthesis, in which both power and data are delivered directly to the stimulating array without any discrete components or cables. We present here an integrated retinal prosthesis system based on a photodiode array implant. Video frames are processed and imaged onto the retinal implant by a video goggle projection system operating at near-infrared wavelengths (~ 900 nm). Photodiodes convert light into pulsed electric current, with charge injection maximized by specially optimized series photodiode circuits. Prostheses of three different pixel densities (16 pix/mm2, 64 pix/mm2, and 256 pix/mm2) have been designed, simulated, and prototyped. Retinal tissue response to subretinal implants made of various materials has been investigated in RCS rats. The resulting prosthesis can provide sufficient charge injection for high resolution retinal stimulation without the need for implantation of any bulky discrete elements such as coils or tethers. In addition, since every pixel functions independently, pixel arrays may be placed separately in the subretinal space, providing visual stimulation to a larger field of view.

  18. High-Resolution Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Alan G.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.

    2008-07-01

    Over the past decade, mass spectrometry has been revolutionized by access to instruments of increasingly high mass-resolving power. For small molecules up to ˜400 Da (e.g., drugs, metabolites, and various natural organic mixtures ranging from foods to petroleum), it is possible to determine elemental compositions (CcHhNnOoSsPp…) of thousands of chemical components simultaneously from accurate mass measurements (the same can be done up to 1000 Da if additional information is included). At higher mass, it becomes possible to identify proteins (including posttranslational modifications) from proteolytic peptides, as well as lipids, glycoconjugates, and other biological components. At even higher mass (˜100,000 Da or higher), it is possible to characterize posttranslational modifications of intact proteins and to map the binding surfaces of large biomolecule complexes. Here we review the principles and techniques of the highest-resolution analytical mass spectrometers (time-of-flight and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and orbitrap mass analyzers) and describe some representative high-resolution applications.

  19. Evaluation of Advanced Bionics high resolution mode.

    PubMed

    Buechner, Andreas; Frohne-Buechner, Carolin; Gaertner, Lutz; Lesinski-Schiedat, Anke; Battmer, Rolf-Dieter; Lenarz, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the advantages of the Advanced Bionic high resolution mode for speech perception, through a retrospective analysis. Forty-five adult subjects were selected who had a minimum experience of three months' standard mode (mean of 10 months) before switching to high resolution mode. Speech perception was tested in standard mode immediately before fitting with high resolution mode, and again after a maximum of six months high resolution mode usage (mean of two months). A significant improvement was found, between 11 and 17%, depending on the test material. The standard mode preference does not give any indication about the improvement when switching to high resolution. Users who are converted within any study achieve a higher performance improvement than those converted in the clinical routine. This analysis proves the significant benefits of high resolution mode for users, and also indicates the need for guidelines for individual optimization of parameter settings in a high resolution mode program.

  20. Improved x-ray spectroscopy with room temperature CZT detectors.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Shannon G; Shikhaliev, Polad M; Matthews, Kenneth L

    2011-09-07

    Compact, room temperature x-ray spectroscopy detectors are of interest in many areas including diagnostic x-ray imaging, radiation protection and dosimetry. Room temperature cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) semiconductor detectors are promising candidates for these applications. One of the major problems for CZT detectors is low-energy tailing of the energy spectrum due to hole trapping. Spectral post-correction methods to correct the tailing effect do not work well for a number of reasons; thus it is advisable to eliminate the hole trapping effect in CZT using physical methods rather than correcting an already deteriorated energy spectrum. One method is using a CZT detector with an electrode configuration which modifies the electric field in the CZT volume to decrease low-energy tailing. Another method is to irradiate the CZT surface at a tilted angle, which modifies depth of interaction to decrease low-energy tailing. Neither method alone, however, eliminates the tailing effect. In this work, we have investigated the combination of modified electric field and tilted angle irradiation in a single detector to further decrease spectral tailing. A planar CZT detector with 10 × 10 × 3 mm³ size and CZT detector with 5 × 5 × 5 mm³ size and cap-shaped electrode were used in this study. The cap-shaped electrode (referred to as CAPture technology) modifies the electric field distribution in the CZT volume and decreases the spectral tailing effect. The detectors were investigated at 90° (normal) and 30° (tilted angle) irradiation modes. Two isotope sources with 59.6 and 122 keV photon energies were used for gamma-ray spectroscopy experiments. X-ray spectroscopy was performed using collimated beams at 60, 80 and 120 kVp tube voltages, in both normal and tilted angle irradiation. Measured x-ray spectra were corrected for K x-ray escape fractions that were calculated using Monte Carlo methods. The x-ray spectra measured with tilted angle CAPture detector at 60, 80 and 120

  1. Development of large-area CZT detector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Joergensen, Carl C.; Westergaard, Niels J.; Jonasson, Per; van Pamelen, Mike A.; Reglero, Victor; Eyles, Christopher J.; Neubert, Torsten

    1999-10-01

    DSRI has initiated a development program of CZT x-ray and gamma ray detectors employing strip readout techniques. A dramatic improvement of the energy response was found operating the detectors as so-called drift detectors. For the electronic readout, modern ASIC chips were investigated. Modular design and the low power electronics will make large area detectors using the drift strip method feasible. The performance of a prototype CZT system will be presented and discussed.

  2. Affordable CZT SPECT with dose-time minimization (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugg, James W.; Harris, Brian W.; Radley, Ian

    2017-03-01

    PURPOSE Pixelated CdZnTe (CZT) detector arrays are used in molecular imaging applications that can enable precision medicine, including small-animal SPECT, cardiac SPECT, molecular breast imaging (MBI), and general purpose SPECT. The interplay of gamma camera, collimator, gantry motion, and image reconstruction determines image quality and dose-time-FOV tradeoffs. Both dose and exam time can be minimized without compromising diagnostic content. METHODS Integration of pixelated CZT detectors with advanced ASICs and readout electronics improves system performance. Because historically CZT was expensive, the first clinical applications were limited to small FOV. Radiation doses were initially high and exam times long. Advances have significantly improved efficiency of CZT-based molecular imaging systems and the cost has steadily declined. We have built a general purpose SPECT system using our 40 cm x 53 cm CZT gamma camera with 2 mm pixel pitch and characterized system performance. RESULTS Compared to NaI scintillator gamma cameras: intrinsic spatial resolution improved from 3.8 mm to 2.0 mm; energy resolution improved from 9.8% to <4 % at 140 keV; maximum count rate is <1.5 times higher; non-detection camera edges are reduced 3-fold. Scattered photons are greatly reduced in the photopeak energy window; image contrast is improved; and the optimal FOV is increased to the entire camera area. CONCLUSION Continual improvements in CZT detector arrays for molecular imaging, coupled with optimal collimator and image reconstruction, result in minimized dose and exam time. With CZT cost improving, affordable whole-body CZT general purpose SPECT is expected to enable precision medicine applications.

  3. Position-sensitive CZT detector module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteson, James L.; Duttweiler, Fred; Huszar, George L.; Leblanc, Philippe C.; Skelton, Robert E.; Stephan, Edwin A.; Hink, Paul L.; Dowkontt, Paul F.; Slavis, Kimberly R.; Tumer, Tumay O.; Kravis, Scott D.

    1998-07-01

    Coded mask imagers for future high energy x-ray astronomy missions will require detector planes with areas of hundreds to thousands of cm(superscript 2) and position resolutions < 1 mm. Such detectors will enable coded mask imagers to discover and study thousands of high energy x-ray sources. The UCSD/WU/UCR/NOVA collaboration has been developing CZT detector systems with crossed-strip readout to meet these requirements. We report progress on a compact detector module with 41 cm(superscript 2) area and 0.5 mm spatial resolution. The design includes the bias network and ASIC readout electronics, and allows modules to be combined in large area arrays with very high live-area factors. Results from laboratory and balloon flight tests are presented.

  4. High-resolution slug testing.

    PubMed

    Zemansky, G M; McElwee, C D

    2005-01-01

    The hydraulic conductivity (K) variation has important ramifications for ground water flow and the transport of contaminants in ground water. The delineation of the nature of that variation can be critical to complete characterization of a site and the planning of effective and efficient remedial measures. Site-specific features (such as high-conductivity zones) need to be quantified. Our alluvial field site in the Kansas River valley exhibits spatial variability, very high conductivities, and nonlinear behavior for slug tests in the sand and gravel aquifer. High-resolution, multilevel slug tests have been performed in a number of wells that are fully screened. A general nonlinear model based on the Navier-Stokes equation, nonlinear frictional loss, non-Darcian flow, acceleration effects, radius changes in the wellbore, and a Hvorslev model for the aquifer has been used to analyze the data, employing an automated processing system that runs within the Excel spreadsheet program. It is concluded that slug tests can provide the necessary data to identify the nature of both horizontal and vertical K variation in an aquifer and that improved delineation or higher resolution of K structure is possible with shorter test intervals. The gradation into zones of higher conductivity is sharper than seen previously, and the maximum conductivity observed is greater than previously measured. However, data from this project indicate that well development, the presence of fines, and the antecedent history of the well are important interrelated factors in regard to slug-test response and can prevent obtaining consistent results in some cases.

  5. CZT Detector Development for Hard X-ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garson, Alfred, III; Li, Q.; Beilicke, M.; Bose, R.; Burger, A.; Dowkonnt, P.; Groza, M.; Simburger, G.; Krawczynski, H.

    2008-05-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) has proven itself as an excellent material for detection of hard X-rays. Advances in crystal growth have increased the quality and size of available single CZT crystals. We report on our ongoing development and characterization of CZT detector systems. With our dedicated class-100 cleanroom, we fabricate detectors using CZT crystals from different manufactures. Using photolithography and e-beam evaporation, we can produce detectors with different contact designs (pixellated, strip, monolithic, steering grid), contact dimensions (down to 50 microns), and contact materials (In, Ti, Au, etc.) . In addition, we develop ASIC readouts for various CZT detector applications, including our characterization of the detectors. We measure I-V and C-V curves for the detectors as well as their spectroscopic performance. We compare measured results with those from detailed modelling and simulations. The CZT detector systems can then be optimized for applications such as X-ray imaging and polarimetry with satellite or balloon-borne instruments.

  6. CZT Detector Development for Hard X-ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garson, A. B., III; Li, Q.; Beilicke, M.; Bose, R.; Burger, A.; Dowkonnt, P.; Groza, M.; Simburger, G.; Krawczynski, H.

    2008-04-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) has proven itself as an excellent material for detection of hard X-rays. Advances in crystal growth have increased the quality and size of available single CZT crystals. We report on our ongoing development and characterization of CZT detector systems. With our dedicated class-100 cleanroom, we fabricate detectors using CZT crystals from different manufactures. Using photolithography and e-beam evaporation, we can produce detectors with different contact designs (pixellated, strip, monolithic, steering grid), contact dimensions (down to 50 microns), and contact materials (In, Ti, Au, etc.) . In addition, we develop ASIC readouts for various CZT detector applications, including our characterization of the detectors. We measure I-V and C-V curves for the detectors as well as their spectroscopic performance. We compare measured results with those from detailed modelling and simulations. The CZT detector systems can then be optimized for applications such as X-ray imaging and polarimetry with satellite or balloon-borne instruments.

  7. High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI) for a Prototype 12U CubeSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, JaeSub; Allen, Branden; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Barthelmy, Scott Douglas; Harrison, Fiona

    2017-08-01

    Our High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI) program is developing an Engineering Model (EM) for a 12U CubeSat wide-field hard X-ray (3-200 keV) coded-aperture imaging telescope. HREXI employs an array of CdZnTe (CZT) detectors (each 2 x 2 x 0.3 cm) with a fine-pixellated Tungsten coded aperture mask. The detector assembly utilizes the new technology of Through-Silicon-Vias (TSVs) to control and readout signals from the ASIC bonded to each CZT. TSVs eliminate the need for conventional wire-bonds for electric connections between the ASIC and back end electronics, greatly lowering the assembly complexity and cost, and thus enabling close-tiling of HREXI detectors in a small form factor with comfortable margins. For HREXI EM, we have successfully implemented TSVs on NuSTAR ASICs, which can cover an energy range of 3-200 keV with a FWHM spectral resolution of 1-2 keV. The 12U CubeSat HREXI EM prototype with 64 CZT detectors would image 0.5 sr of sky with FWHM field of view with 11 arcmin resolution for the current generation of the TSV-ASIC and a 20 cm mask - detector plane separation. A flight test of this 12U-HREXI will be proposed after full development and environmental testing to enable a future proposed array of SmallSat-HREXI telescopes with ~2 arcmin resolution for simultaneous full-sky studies of high redshift GRBs and a wide range of transients in the post-Swift era. (This work is supported by NASA grant NNX17AE62G)

  8. CZT detectors for high-energy flare spectroscopy: the Room Temperature Semiconductor Spectrometer (RTeSS) on the JAWSAT satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestrand, Thomas W.; Cutlip, H. H.; Forrest, D. J.; Levenson, Ken A.; Marci, J. R.; Ryan, James M.

    1998-07-01

    We report on the design and construction of a solar flare spectrometer that will employ four 15 X 15 X 15 mm CZT detectors with coplanar electrodes. The compact spectrometer, which will provide measurements in the 40 - 800 keV energy range, is being constructed for flight on the Joint Air Force Academy/Weber State University Satellite (JAWSAT). JAWSAT is scheduled for a Minuteman II launch into a 650 km sun-synchronous orbit early during the next solar maximum. The terminator orbit will allow our Room Temperature Semiconductor Spectrometer (RTeSS) to monitor solar hard x-ray and gamma-ray emission nearly continuously during the 23rd solar sunspot maximum. The primary scientific objective of the RTeSS is measurement of the broad line complex near 450 keV that is generated in solar flare spectra by the interaction of energetic alpha particles with helium in the solar atmosphere. The RTeSS spectral resolution of approximately 4% FWHM at 662 keV is well matched to the line splitting expected for likely alpha particle angular distributions and should allow us to place important constraints on the acceleration and the transport of flare ions. The primary technological objective of the RTeSS program is to test the feasibility of using CZT detectors for the construction of solar flare spectrometers that are capable of high resolution observations when operating at room temperature. If successful in low earth orbit, CZT solar flare spectrometers could lead to significant savings in mass, volume, and power consumption over conventional high-resolution spectrometers.

  9. High Resolution TPM Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guohong

    1995-01-01

    studied several variations of Cold Dark Matter (CDM) type. The standard CDM model, although with many known problems, is treated to compare with the previous simulations. The low density models with and without a cosmological constant are of special interest because they give better fit to the large scale structure and much observational evidence implies that Omega_0 < 1.. With our high resolution simulations, we are specially interested to study the structure of the objects from different cosmological models. The slopes of the dark halo density profiles from different models are only slightly different from each other, with a broad distribution within each model. All the models can successfully produce flat rotation curves for dark halos. We find the biggest difference in the cluster structure among various models is the predicted X-ray core radius. The standard CDM model predicts bigger X-ray core radius than the low density models, but all the models predicts smaller core radius than that from X-ray observations. We find the low density models can produce significant substructures in X-ray clusters to be in agreement with observations, while the X-ray clusters in the standard CDM model are known to have abundant substructures.

  10. High resolution scintillation detector with semiconductor readout

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Craig S.; Hoffman, Edward J.

    2000-01-01

    A novel high resolution scintillation detector array for use in radiation imaging such as high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) which comprises one or more parallelepiped crystals with at least one long surface of each crystal being in intimate contact with a semiconductor photodetector such that photons generated within each crystal by gamma radiation passing therethrough is detected by the photodetector paired therewith.

  11. High Resolution PDF Measurements on Ag Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Tulio C. R.; Martin, Chris; Kycia, Stefan; Zanchet, Daniela

    2009-01-29

    The quantitative analysis of structural defects in Ag nanoparticles was addressed in this work. We performed atomic scale structural characterization by a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) using the Pair Distribution Function analysis (PDF) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The XRD measurements were performed using an innovative instrumentation setup to provide high resolution PDF patterns.

  12. Mean free paths of charge carriers in CZT crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Se-Hwan; Kim, Yong-Kyun; Jeon, Sung-Dae; Ha, Jang-Ho; Hong, Duk-Geun

    2007-08-01

    The asymmetrical distortion of the Cadmium Zinc Telluride ((CZT) energy spectrum is mainly caused by the hole trapping in the CZT crystal, and it can be characterized by the mean free path of hole. The mean free paths of the charge carriers in the CZT crystal can be extracted from fitting the peak shape of the measured energy spectrum. The energy spectra of γ-rays from 241Am, and that of α particles from 238Pu were measured with a CZT with 5×5×5 mm 3. The mean free path of the electron was determined from the bias dependence of α-particle response. The energy spectra of γ-ray were simulated with EGSnrc code, in which Hecht equation was included, and the mean free path of the hole was determined by comparing the measured spectrum with the simulated one. The energy spectrum of 662 keV γ-ray was measured with the CZT detector, and it was compared with the simulated spectrum, in which newly determined mean free paths of the electron and the hole were used.

  13. The Protoexist2 Advanced CZT Coded Aperture Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Branden; Hong, J.; Grindlay, J.; Barthelmy, S.; Baker, R.

    2011-09-01

    The ProtoEXIST program was conceived for the development of a scalable detector plane architecture utilizing pixilated CdZnTe (CZT) detectors for eventual deployment in a large scale (1-4 m2 active area) coded aperture X-ray telescope for use as a wide field ( 90° × 70° FOV) all sky monitor and survey instrument for the 5 up to 600 keV energy band. The first phase of the program recently concluded with the successful 6 hour high altitude (39 km) flight of ProtoEXIST1, which utilized a closely tiled 8 × 8 array of 20 mm × 20 mm, 5 mm thick Redlen CZT crystals each bonded to a RadNET asic via an interposer board. Each individual CZT crystal utilized a 8 × 8 pixilated anode for the creation of a position sensitive detector with 2.5 mm spatial resolution. Development of ProtoEXIST2, the second advanced CZT detector plane in this series, is currently under way. ProtoEXIST2 will be composed of a closely tiled 8 × 8 array of 20 mm × 20 mm, 5 mm thick Redlen CZT crystals, similar to ProtoEXIST1, but will now utilize the Nu-ASIC which accommodates the direct bonding of CZT detectors with a 32 × 32 pixilated anode with a 604.8 μm pixel pitch. Characterization and performance of the ProtoEXIST2 detectors is discussed as well as current progress in the integration of the ProtoEXIST2 detector plane.

  14. NOAA's Use of High-Resolution Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hund, Erik

    2007-01-01

    NOAA's use of high-resolution imagery consists of: a) Shoreline mapping and nautical chart revision; b) Coastal land cover mapping; c) Benthic habitat mapping; d) Disaster response; and e) Imagery collection and support for coastal programs.

  15. Characterization of secondary phases in modified vertical Bridgman growth CZT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, Martine C.; Lynn, Kelvin G.; Jones, Kelly; Dai, Zurong R.; Bradley, John P.; Teslich, Nick

    2009-08-01

    CdZnTe or "CZT" crystals are highly suitable for use as a room temperature based spectrometer for the detection and characterization of gamma radiation. Over the last decade, the methods for growing high quality CZT have improved the quality of the produced crystals however there are material features that can influence the performance of these materials as radiation detectors. For example, various structural heterogeneities within the CZT crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), and secondary phases (SP) can have a negative impact on the detector performance. In this study, a CZT material was grown by the modified vertical Bridgman growth (MVB) method with zone leveled growth without excess Te in the melt. Visual observations of material from the growth of this material revealed significant voids and SP. Samples from this material were analyzed using various analytical techniques to evaluate its electrical properties, purity and detector performance as radiation spectrometers and to determine the morphology, dimension and elemental /structural composition of one of the SP in this material. This material was found to have a high resistivity but poor radiation spectrometer performance. It had SP that were rich in polycrystalline aluminum oxide (Al2O3), metallic Te and polycrystalline CdZnTe and 15 to 50 μm in diameter. Bulk elemental analyses of sister material from elsewhere in the boule did not contain high levels of Al so there is considerable elemental impurity heterogeneity within the boule from this growth.

  16. Characterization of secondary phases in modified vertical bridgman growth czt

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, Martine

    2009-07-10

    CdZnTe or 'CZT' crystals are highly suitable for use as a room temperature based spectrometer for the detection and characterization of gamma radiation. Over the last decade, the methods for growing high quality CZT have improved the quality of the produced crystals however there are material features that can influence the performance of these materials as radiation detectors. For example, various structural heterogeneities within the CZT crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), and secondary phases (SP) can have a negative impact on the detector performance. In this study, a CZT material was grown by the modified vertical Bridgman growth (MVB) method with zone leveled growth without excess Te in the melt. Visual observations of material from the growth of this material revealed significant voids and SP. Three samples from this material was analyzed using various analytical techniques to evaluate its electrical properties, purity and detector performance as radiation spectrometers and to determine the morphology, dimension and elemental/structural composition of one of the SP in this material. This material was found to have a high resistivity but poor radiation spectrometer performance. It had SP that were rich in polycrystalline aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), metallic Te and polycrystalline CdZnTe and 15 to 50 {micro}m in diameter. Bulk elemental analyses of sister material from elsewhere in the boule did not contain high levels of Al so there is considerable elemental impurity heterogeneity within the boule from this growth.

  17. Background measurements from balloon-born imaging CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Jonathan A.; Narita, Tomohiko; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Bloser, Peter F.; Stahle, Carl M.; Parker, Bradford H.; Barthelmy, Scott D.

    2003-03-01

    We report detector characteristics and background measurements from two prototype imaging CdZnTe (CZT) detectors flown on a scientific balloon payload in May 2001. The detectors are both platinum-contact 10 mm × 10 mm × 5 mm CZT crystals, each with a 4 × 4 array of pixels tiling the anode. One is made from IMARAD horizontal Bridgman CZT, the other from eV Products high-pressure Bridgman CZT. Both detectors were mounted side-by-side in a flip-chip configuration and read out by a 32-channel IDE VA/TA ASIC preamp/shaper. We enclosed the detectors in the same 40o field-of-view collimator used in our previously-reported September 2000 flight. I-V curves for the detectors are diode-like, and we find that the platinum contacts adhere significantly better to the CZT surfaces than gold to previosu detectors. The detectors and instrumentation performed well in a 20-hour balloon flight on 23/24 May 2001. Although we discovered a significant instrumental background component in flight, it was possible to measure and subtract this component from the spectra. The resulting IMARAD detector background spectrum reaches ~5×10-3 counts cm-2s-1keV-1 at 100 keV and has a power-law index of ~2 at hgih energies. The eV Products detector has a similar spectrum, although there is more uncertainty in the enregy scale because of calibration complications.

  18. Practical aspects of high resolution esophageal manometry.

    PubMed

    Ruiz de León San Juan, Antonio; Ciriza de Los Ríos, Constanza; Pérez de la Serna Bueno, Julio; Canga Rodríguez-Valcárcel, Fernando; Estremera Arévalo, Fermín; García Sánchez, Raquel; Huamán Ríos, José Walter; Pérez Fernández, María Teresa; Santander Vaquero, Cecilio; Serra Pueyo, Jordi; Sevilla Mantilla, Concepción; Barba Orozco, Elisabeth; Bosque López, María José; Casabona Francés, Sergio; Carrión Bolorino, Silvia; Castillo Grau, Pilar; Delgado Aros, Silvia; Domínguez Carbajo, Ana Belén; Fernández Orcajo, Pilar; García-Lledó, Javier; Gigantó Tomé, Froilán; Iglesias Picazo, Rosa; Lacima Vidal, Gloria; López López, Pilar; Llabrés Rosselló, Magdalena; Mas Mercader, Pilar; Mego Silva, Marianela; Mendarte Barrenetxea, María Usua; Miliani Molina, Carlos; Oreja Arrayago, Milagros; Sánchez Ceballos, Francisco; Sánchez Prudencio, Sandra

    2017-02-01

    High resolution esophageal manometry (HRM) is currently under development as can be seen in the various Chicago classifications. In order to standardize criteria in certain practical aspects with limited scientific evidence, the First National Meeting for Consensus in High Resolution Manometry of the Spanish Digestive Motility Group took place, bringing together a wide group of experts. The proposals were based on a prior survey composed of 47 questions, an exhaustive review of the available literature and the experience of the participants. Methodological aspects relating to the poorly defined analysis criteria of certain new high resolution parameters were discussed, as well as other issues previously overlooked such as spontaneous activity or secondary waves. Final conclusions were drawn with practical applications.

  19. A high-resolution tungstate membrane label

    SciTech Connect

    Hainfeld, J.F.; Quaite, F.E. ); Lipka, J.J. )

    1990-01-01

    A new class of membrane labels was synthesized which contain a tungstate cluster (having 11 tungsten atoms) and an aliphatic organo-tin moiety with various chain lengths (C{sub 4}, C{sub 8}, C{sub 12}, C{sub 18}, C{sub 22}). These molecules were found to insert into synthetic phospholipid vesicles and biological membranes (human red blood cell membranes). The tungstate clusters can be individually visualized in the high resolution STEM or seen en mass in thin-sectioned labeled membranes in the CTEM. These new labels should provide a means for direct high-resolution imaging of lipid-phase systems.

  20. RAPID DAMAGE ASSESSMENT FROM HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGERY

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayaraj, Veeraraghavan; Bright, Eddie A; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2008-01-01

    Disaster impact modeling and analysis uses huge volumes of image data that are produced immediately following a natural or an anthropogenic disaster event. Rapid damage assessment is the key to time critical decision support in disaster management to better utilize available response resources and accelerate recovery and relief efforts. But exploiting huge volumes of high resolution image data for identifying damaged areas with robust consistency in near real time is a challenging task. In this paper, we present an automated image analysis technique to identify areas of structural damage from high resolution optical satellite data using features based on image content.

  1. High-resolution two dimensional advective transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, P.E.; Larock, B.E.

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes a two-dimensional high-resolution scheme for advective transport that is based on a Eulerian-Lagrangian method with a flux limiter. The scheme is applied to the problem of pure-advection of a rotated Gaussian hill and shown to preserve the monotonicity property of the governing conservation law.

  2. Titania High-Resolution Color Composite

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-29

    This high-resolution color composite of Titania was made from NASA Voyager 2 images taken Jan. 24, 1986, as the spacecraft neared its closest approach to Uranus. A large, trenchlike feature is seen near the terminator. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00036

  3. A High-Resolution Stopwatch for Cents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gingl, Z.; Kopasz, K.

    2011-01-01

    A very low-cost, easy-to-make stopwatch is presented to support various experiments in mechanics. The high-resolution stopwatch is based on two photodetectors connected directly to the microphone input of a sound card. Dedicated free open-source software has been developed and made available to download. The efficiency is demonstrated by a free…

  4. A High-Resolution Stopwatch for Cents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gingl, Z.; Kopasz, K.

    2011-01-01

    A very low-cost, easy-to-make stopwatch is presented to support various experiments in mechanics. The high-resolution stopwatch is based on two photodetectors connected directly to the microphone input of a sound card. Dedicated free open-source software has been developed and made available to download. The efficiency is demonstrated by a free…

  5. High-Resolution Global Soil Moisture Map

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-05-19

    High-resolution global soil moisture map from NASA SMAP combined radar and radiometer instruments, acquired between May 4 and May 11, 2015 during SMAP commissioning phase. The map has a resolution of 5.6 miles (9 kilometers). The data gap is due to turning the instruments on and off during testing. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19337

  6. New Position Algorithms for the 3-D CZT Drift Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Kuvvetli, I.

    2017-06-01

    The 3-D position sensitive CZT detector for high-energy astrophysics developed at DTU has been investigated with a digitizer readout system. The 3-D CZT detector is based on the CZT drift-strip detector principle and was fabricated using a REDLEN CZT crystal (20 mm × 20 mm × 5 mm). The detector contains 12 drift cells, each comprising one collecting anode strip with four drift strips, biased such that the electrons are focused and collected by the anode strips. Three-dimensional position determination is achieved using the anode strip signals, the drift-strip signals, and the signals from ten cathode strips. For the characterization work, we used a DAQ system with a 16 channels 250-MHz 14-b digitizer, SIS3316. It allowed us to analyze the pulse shapes of the signals from four detector cells at a time. The 3-D CZT setup was characterized with a finely collimated radioactive source of 137Cs at 662 keV. The analysis required development of novel position determination algorithms which are the subject of this paper. Using the digitizer readout, we demonstrate improved position determination compared to the previous read out system based on analog electronics. Position resolutions of 0.4-mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) in the x-, y-, and z-directions were achieved and the energy resolution was 7.2-keV FWHM at 662 keV. The timing information allows identification of multiple interaction events within one detector cell, e.g., Compton scattering followed by photoelectric absorption. These characteristics are very important for a high-energy spectral-imager suitable for use in advanced Compton telescopes, or as focal detector for new hard X-ray and soft γ-ray focusing telescopes or in polarimeter instrumentation. CZT detectors are attractive for these applications since they offer relatively high-quantum efficiency. From a technical point of view it is advantageous that their cooling requirements are modest.

  7. CZT detectors for a new generation of γ-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quadrini, Egidio M.; Conti, Giancarlo; D'Angelo, Sergio; Fiorini, Mauro; Uslenghi, Michela; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Ubertini, Pietro

    2005-08-01

    The outstanding scientific performances of IBIS, Imager on Board INTEGRAL, has encouraged preliminary feasibility studies on new Gamma Ray instruments. We considered both a Wide Field Camera for transient event detection and fast automatic sky localisation and a high resolution imager. According to the basic scientific requirements, i.e. to operate with good sensitivity (1mCrab/day) and spatial resolution (from arcmin to arcsec) on a wide energy range (5 to 500 keV), these studies consider large detector area (from 1 to several m2) and a high number (~50000) of thick (≥ 5mm) pixels. Recent achievements already obtained by INTEGRAL, and initially showed by SWIFT, have validated the CdTe/CZT detector performances in terms of good spatial resolution, detection efficiency, energy resolution and low noise at room temperature. We have started a study to solve peculiar problems affecting this kind of detectors (e.g. response dependent on the interaction depth and multiple hit events) using a digital approach to photon reconstruction. This also facilitates operations like pixel to pixel equalisation and background rejection. The detector electronic chain thus includes a minimal analog stage for charge pre-amplification, coupled to a flash ADC for waveform digitalisation at a high time resolution sampling, and a powerful, FPGA based digital processing unit, devoted to waveform elaboration. Such a design should also help in optimising the telemetry flux and allow polarimetry evaluation on multiple events.

  8. CZT Virtual Frisch-grid Detector: Principles and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cui,Y.; Bolotnikov, A.; Camarda, G.; Hossain, A.; James, R. B.

    2009-03-24

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) is a very attractive material for using as room-temperature semiconductor detectors, because it has a wide bandgap and a high atomic number. However, due to the material's poor hole mobility, several special techniques were developed to ensure its suitability for radiation detection. Among them, the virtual Frisch-grid CZT detector is an attractive option, having a simple configuration, yet delivering an outstanding spectral performance. The goal of our group in Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is to improve the performance of Frisch-ring CZT detectors; most recently, that effort focused on the non-contacting Frisch-ring detector, allowing us to build an inexpensive, large-volume detector array with high energy-resolution and a large effective area. In this paper, the principles of virtual Frisch-grid detectors are described, especially BNL's innovative improvements. The potential applications of virtual Frisch-grid detectors are discussed, and as an example, a hand-held gamma-ray spectrometer using a CZT virtual Frischgrid detector array is introduced, which is a self-contained device with a radiation detector, readout circuit, communication circuit, and high-voltage supply. It has good energy resolution of 1.4% (FWHM of 662-keV peak) with a total detection volume of {approx}20 cm{sup 3}. Such a portable inexpensive device can be used widely in nonproliferation applications, non-destructive detection, radiation imaging, and for homeland security. Extended systems based on the same technology have potential applications in industrial- and nuclear-medical-imaging.

  9. High Resolution Convective Heat Transfer Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-30

    ONR Thermal Materials Workshop 2001 1 HIGH RESOLUTION CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER MEASUREMENTS Peter Ireland and Terry Jones R-R UTC in Heat Transfer...temperatures. • Fluid dynamics correct through use of Reynolds number, Mach number and Prandtl number. Mach)Pr,(Re,fNu Dimensionless heat transfer...depends on local h su rf ac e te m p T s gas temperature Tg timestart of test hTc Calibration Test data ONR Thermal Materials Workshop 2001 10 Heat

  10. Use of High Resolution Simulations Training Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    observed data or subject matter expert ( SME ) data for development of training programs. Simulation derived data is neither observable nor viewed as...training developer has habitually relied on SMEs and questionaire data gathering techniques. The nature of current high resolution simulations allow for the...system. These task lists describe the individual and collective tasks to be performed by the operators of the new sem. Additionally, the SMEs on the new

  11. High resolution schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harten, A.

    1983-01-01

    A class of new explicit second order accurate finite difference schemes for the computation of weak solutions of hyperbolic conservation laws is presented. These highly nonlinear schemes are obtained by applying a nonoscillatory first order accurate scheme to an appropriately modified flux function. The so-derived second order accurate schemes achieve high resolution while preserving the robustness of the original nonoscillatory first order accurate scheme. Numerical experiments are presented to demonstrate the performance of these new schemes.

  12. A high-resolution anatomical rat atlas

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xueling; Yu, Li; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Jie; Li, Anan; Han, Dao; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the availability of a high-resolution atlas of the adult rat. The atlas is composed of 9475 cryosectional images captured in 4600 × 2580 × 24-bit TIFF format, constructed using serial cryosection-milling techniques. Cryosection images were segmented, labelled and reconstructed into three-dimensional (3D) computerized models. These images, 3D models, technical details, relevant software and further information are available at our website, http://vchibp.vicp.net/vch/mice/. PMID:17062027

  13. Stellar Tools for High Resolution Population Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chávez, M.; Bertone, E.; Rodríguez-Merino, L.; Buzzoni, A.

    2005-12-01

    We present preliminary results of the application of a new stellar library of high-resolution synthetic spectra (based upon ATLAS9 and SYNTHE codes developed by R. L. Kurucz) in the calculation of the ultraviolet-optical spectral energy distribution of simple stellar populations (SSPs). For this purpose, the library has been coupled with Buzzoni's population synthesis code. Part of this paper is also devoted to illustrate quantitatively the extent to which synthetic stellar libraries represent real stars.

  14. High-Resolution X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ODell, Stephen L.; Brissenden, Roger J.; Davis, William; Elsner, Ronald F.; Elvis, Martin; Freeman, Mark; Gaetz, Terry; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhail V.

    2010-01-01

    Fundamental needs for future x-ray telescopes: a) Sharp images => excellent angular resolution. b) High throughput => large aperture areas. Generation-X optics technical challenges: a) High resolution => precision mirrors & alignment. b) Large apertures => lots of lightweight mirrors. Innovation needed for technical readiness: a) 4 top-level error terms contribute to image size. b) There are approaches to controlling those errors. Innovation needed for manufacturing readiness. Programmatic issues are comparably challenging.

  15. A High Resolution Ammunition Resupply Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. HELAPS II is a stochastic, event sequenced simulation that is run on a CDC 6000 series machine with GASP IV simulation language ...high resolution, event sequenced, stochastic model of ground combat. The language used was SINSCRIPT 11.5. Since much of what was developed is still...simulation language . These critical descriptors and the information they convey are as follows: (a) Arcs: length of road segment; type of road

  16. The CZT X-ray Imager on AXO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Kuvvetli, I.; Westergaard, N. J.; Jonasson, P.; Reglero, V.; Eyles, C.; Neubert, T.

    2001-03-01

    DSRI has initiated a development program of CZT X-ray and gamma ray detectors employing strip readout techniques. A dramatic improvement of the energy response was found operating the detectors as so-called drift detectors. For the electronic readout, modern ASIC chips were investigated. Modular design and the low power electronics will make large area detectors using the drift strip method feasible. The performance of a prototype CZT system will be presented and discussed. One such detector system has been proposed for future space missions: The X-Ray Imager (XRI) on the Atmospheric X-ray Observatory (AXO), which is a mission proposed to the Danish Small Satellite Program and is dedicated to observations of X-ray generating processes in the Earth's atmosphere. Of special interest will be simultaneous optical and X-ray observations of sprites that are flashes appearing directly above an active thunderstorm system. Additional objective is a detailed mapping of the auroral X-ray and optical emission. XRI comprises a coded mask and a 20 cm × 40 cm CZT detector array covering an energy range from 5 to 200 keV.

  17. High-Resolution US of Rheumatologic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Taljanovic, Mihra S; Melville, David M; Gimber, Lana H; Scalcione, Luke R; Miller, Margaret D; Kwoh, C Kent; Klauser, Andrea S

    2015-01-01

    For the past 15 years, high-resolution ultrasonography (US) is being routinely and increasingly used for initial evaluation and treatment follow-up of rheumatologic diseases. This imaging technique is performed by using high-frequency linear transducers and has proved to be a powerful diagnostic tool in evaluation of articular erosions, simple and complex joint and bursal effusions, tendon sheath effusions, and synovitis, with results comparable to those of magnetic resonance imaging, excluding detection of bone marrow edema. Crystal deposition diseases including gouty arthropathy and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD) have characteristic appearances at US, enabling differentiation between these two diseases and from inflammatory arthropathies. Enthesopathy, which frequently accompanies psoriatic and reactive arthritis, also has a characteristic appearance at high-resolution US, distinguishing these two entities from other inflammatory and metabolic arthropathies. The presence of Doppler signal in examined joints, bursae, and tendon sheaths indicates active synovitis. Microbubble echo contrast agents augment detection of tissue vascularity and may act in the future as a drug delivery vehicle. Frequently, joint, tendon sheath, and bursal fluid aspirations and therapeutic injections are performed under US guidance. The authors describe the high-resolution US technique including gray-scale, color or power Doppler, and contrast agent-enhanced US that is used in evaluation of rheumatologic diseases of the wrist and hand and the ankle and foot in their routine clinical practice. This article demonstrates imaging findings of normal joints, rheumatoid arthritis, gouty arthritis, CPPD, psoriatic and reactive arthritis, and osteoarthritis.

  18. High-Resolution Traction Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Plotnikov, Sergey V.; Sabass, Benedikt; Schwarz, Ulrich S.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular forces generated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton and transmitted to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through discrete, integrin-based protein assemblies, that is, focal adhesions, are critical to developmental morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis, as well as disease progression in cancer. However, quantitative mapping of these forces has been difficult since there has been no experimental technique to visualize nanonewton forces at submicrometer spatial resolution. Here, we provide detailed protocols for measuring cellular forces exerted on two-dimensional elastic substrates with a high-resolution traction force microscopy (TFM) method. We describe fabrication of polyacrylamide substrates labeled with multiple colors of fiducial markers, functionalization of the substrates with ECM proteins, setting up the experiment, and imaging procedures. In addition, we provide the theoretical background of traction reconstruction and experimental considerations important to design a high-resolution TFM experiment. We describe the implementation of a new algorithm for processing of images of fiducial markers that are taken below the surface of the substrate, which significantly improves data quality. We demonstrate the application of the algorithm and explain how to choose a regularization parameter for suppression of the measurement error. A brief discussion of different ways to visualize and analyze the results serves to illustrate possible uses of high-resolution TFM in biomedical research. PMID:24974038

  19. High-resolution traction force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Plotnikov, Sergey V; Sabass, Benedikt; Schwarz, Ulrich S; Waterman, Clare M

    2014-01-01

    Cellular forces generated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton and transmitted to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through discrete, integrin-based protein assemblies, that is, focal adhesions, are critical to developmental morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis, as well as disease progression in cancer. However, quantitative mapping of these forces has been difficult since there has been no experimental technique to visualize nanonewton forces at submicrometer spatial resolution. Here, we provide detailed protocols for measuring cellular forces exerted on two-dimensional elastic substrates with a high-resolution traction force microscopy (TFM) method. We describe fabrication of polyacrylamide substrates labeled with multiple colors of fiducial markers, functionalization of the substrates with ECM proteins, setting up the experiment, and imaging procedures. In addition, we provide the theoretical background of traction reconstruction and experimental considerations important to design a high-resolution TFM experiment. We describe the implementation of a new algorithm for processing of images of fiducial markers that are taken below the surface of the substrate, which significantly improves data quality. We demonstrate the application of the algorithm and explain how to choose a regularization parameter for suppression of the measurement error. A brief discussion of different ways to visualize and analyze the results serves to illustrate possible uses of high-resolution TFM in biomedical research. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Design study of a high-resolution breast-dedicated PET system built from cadmium zinc telluride detectors

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hao; Levin, Craig S

    2013-01-01

    min imaging time. Furthermore, we observe that the degree of spatial resolution degradation along the direction orthogonal to the two panels that is typical of a limited angle tomography configuration is mitigated by having high-resolution DOI capabilities that enable more accurate positioning of oblique response lines. PMID:20400807

  1. Design study of a high-resolution breast-dedicated PET system built from cadmium zinc telluride detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hao; Levin, Craig S.

    2010-05-01

    imaging time. Furthermore, we observe that the degree of spatial resolution degradation along the direction orthogonal to the two panels that is typical of a limited angle tomography configuration is mitigated by having high-resolution DOI capabilities that enable more accurate positioning of oblique response lines.

  2. Design study of a high-resolution breast-dedicated PET system built from cadmium zinc telluride detectors.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hao; Levin, Craig S

    2010-05-07

    spheres with a 5:1 activity concentration ratio within roughly 7 min imaging time. Furthermore, we observe that the degree of spatial resolution degradation along the direction orthogonal to the two panels that is typical of a limited angle tomography configuration is mitigated by having high-resolution DOI capabilities that enable more accurate positioning of oblique response lines.

  3. High resolution SAR applications and instrument design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dionisio, C.; Torre, A.

    1993-01-01

    The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has viewed, in the last two years, a huge increment of interest from many preset and potential users. The good spatial resolution associated to the all weather capability lead to considering SAR not only a scientific instrument but a tool for verifying and controlling the daily human relationships with the Earth Environment. New missions were identified for SAR as spatial resolution became lower than three meters: disasters, pollution, ships traffic, volcanic eruptions, earthquake effect are only a few of the possible objects which can be effectively detected, controlled and monitored by SAR mounted on satellites. High resolution radar design constraints and dimensioning are discussed.

  4. High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph (HRTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R.

    1986-01-01

    The major objectives of the high resolution telescope and spectrograph (HRTS) are: (1) the investigation of the energy balance and mass balance of the temperature minimum, chromosphere, transition zone, and corona in quiet regions on the Sun as well as in plages, flares, and sunspots; (2) the investigation of the velocity field of the lower corona to study the origin of the solar wind; and (3) the investigation of preflare and flare phenomena. The HRTS instruments consists of a telescope, an ultraviolet spectrograph, an ultraviolet spectroheliograph, and an H alpha slit display system, all housed in a thermal control cannister mounted on an instrument pointing system.

  5. High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph (HRTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. L.

    The major objectives of the high resolution telescope and spectrograph (HRTS) are: (1) the investigation of the energy balance and mass balance of the temperature minimum, chromosphere, transition zone, and corona in quiet regions on the Sun as well as in plages, flares, and sunspots; (2) the investigation of the velocity field of the lower corona to study the origin of the solar wind; (3) the investigation of preflare and flare phenomena. The HRTS instruments consists of a telescope, an ultraviolet spectrograph, and ultraviolet spectroheliograph, and an H alpha slit display system, all housed in a thermal control canister mounted on an instrument pointing system.

  6. High resolution extremity CT for biomechanics modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, A.E.; Brand, H.; Hollerbach, K.; Logan, C.M.; Martz, H.E.

    1995-09-23

    With the advent of ever more powerful computing and finite element analysis (FEA) capabilities, the bone and joint geometry detail available from either commercial surface definitions or from medical CT scans is inadequate. For dynamic FEA modeling of joints, precise articular contours are necessary to get appropriate contact definition. In this project, a fresh cadaver extremity was suspended in parafin in a lucite cylinder and then scanned with an industrial CT system to generate a high resolution data set for use in biomechanics modeling.

  7. A Portable, High Resolution, Surface Measurement Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihlefeld, Curtis M.; Burns, Bradley M.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    A high resolution, portable, surface measurement device has been demonstrated to provide micron-resolution topographical plots. This device was specifically developed to allow in-situ measurements of defects on the Space Shuttle Orbiter windows, but is versatile enough to be used on a wide variety of surfaces. This paper discusses the choice of an optical sensor and then the decisions required to convert a lab bench optical measurement device into an ergonomic portable system. The necessary trade-offs between performance and portability are presented along with a description of the device developed to measure Orbiter window defects.

  8. Ultra-high resolution DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, A H; Robinson, H; Gao, Y G

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the progress in our efforts at producing ultra-high resolution (< 0.8 A) DNA structures using advanced cryo-crystallography and synchrotron. Our work is aimed at providing reliable geometric (bond length and bond angle), electronic and motional information of DNA molecules in different conformational contexts. These highly-reliable, new structures will be the basis for constructing better DNA force-field parameters, which will benefit the structural refinement of DNA, protein-DNA complexes, and ligand-DNA complexes.

  9. High resolution thermal denaturation of mammalian DNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Guttmann, T; Vítek, A; Pivec, L

    1977-01-01

    High resolution melting profiles of different mammalian DNAs are presented. Melting curves of various mammalian DNAs were compared with respect to the degree of asymmetry, first moment, transition breath and Tmi of individual subtransitions. Quantitative comparison of the shape of all melting curves was made. Correlation between phylogenetical relations among mammals and shape of the melting profiles of their DNAs was demonstrated. The difference between multi-component heterogeneity of mammalian DNAs found by optical melting analysis and sedimentation in CsCl-netropsin density gradient is also discussed. PMID:840642

  10. Biological organization: Macromolecular interactions at high resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, R.M.; Vogel, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    The main thrust of this book is to feature important current information on interactions of macromolecules themselves (rather than, say, enzyme-substrate interactions). Viruses, as paradigms of small biological systems, are covered as are the pivotal areas of DNA-protein and of antibody interactions. The treatment of the comparatively new field of membrane structure at high resolution includes the latest results on the photosynthetic reaction center, placed in perspective by contributions on light sensitivity of proteins. Finally, chapters on signal receptors highlight the importance of mechanisms for the control of the other systems presented.

  11. Single shot high resolution digital holography.

    PubMed

    Khare, Kedar; Ali, P T Samsheer; Joseph, Joby

    2013-02-11

    We demonstrate a novel computational method for high resolution image recovery from a single digital hologram frame. The complex object field is obtained from the recorded hologram by solving a constrained optimization problem. This approach which is unlike the physical hologram replay process is shown to provide high quality image recovery even when the dc and the cross terms in the hologram overlap in the Fourier domain. Experimental results are shown for a Fresnel zone hologram of a resolution chart, intentionally recorded with a small off-axis reference beam angle. Excellent image recovery is observed without the presence of dc or twin image terms and with minimal speckle noise.

  12. High resolution millimeter-wave imaging sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. J.; Howard, R. J.; Parks, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    A scanning 3-mm radiometer is described that has been built for use on a small aircraft to produce real time high resolution images of the ground when atmospheric conditions such as smoke, dust, and clouds make IR and visual sensors unusable. The sensor can be used for a variety of remote sensing applications such as measurements of snow cover and snow water equivalent, precipitation mapping, vegetation type and extent, surface moisture and temperature, and surface thermal inertia. The advantages of millimeter waves for cloud penetration and the ability to observe different physical phenomena make this system an attractive supplement to visible and IR remote sensing systems.

  13. A High Resolution Scale-of-four

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fitch, V.

    1949-08-25

    A high resolution scale-of-four has been developed to be used in conjunction with the nuclear particle detection devices in applications where the counting rate is unusually high. Specifically, it is intended to precede the commercially available medium resolution scaling circuits and so decrease the resolving time of the counting system. The circuit will function reliably on continuously recurring pulses separated by less than 0.1 microseconds. It will resolve two pulses (occurring at a moderate repetition rate) which are spaced at 0.04 microseconds. A five-volt input signal is sufficient to actuate the device.

  14. High-Resolution Scintimammography: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel F. Brem; Joelle M. Schoonjans; Douglas A. Kieper; Stan Majewski; Steven Goodman; Cahid Civelek

    2002-07-01

    This study evaluated a novel high-resolution breast-specific gamma camera (HRBGC) for the detection of suggestive breast lesions. Methods: Fifty patients (with 58 breast lesions) for whom a scintimammogram was clinically indicated were prospectively evaluated with a general-purpose gamma camera and a novel HRBGC prototype. The results of conventional and high-resolution nuclear studies were prospectively classified as negative (normal or benign) or positive (suggestive or malignant) by 2 radiologists who were unaware of the mammographic and histologic results. All of the included lesions were confirmed by pathology. Results: There were 30 benign and 28 malignant lesions. The sensitivity for detection of breast cancer was 64.3% (18/28) with the conventional camera and 78.6% (22/28) with the HRBGC. The specificity with both systems was 93.3% (28/30). For the 18 nonpalpable lesions, sensitivity was 55.5% (10/18) and 72.2% (13/18) with the general-purpose camera and the HRBGC, respectively. For lesions 1 cm, 7 of 15 were detected with the general-purpose camera and 10 of 15 with the HRBGC. Four lesions (median size, 8.5 mm) were detected only with the HRBGC and were missed by the conventional camera. Conclusion: Evaluation of indeterminate breast lesions with an HRBGC results in improved sensitivity for the detection of cancer, with greater improvement shown for nonpalpable and 1-cm lesions.

  15. High resolution guided wave pipe inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velichko, Alexander; Wilcox, Paul D.

    2009-03-01

    Commercial guided wave inspection systems provide rapid screening of pipes, but limited sizing capability for small defects. However, accurate detection and sizing of small defects is essential for assessing the integrity of inaccessible pipe regions where guided waves provide the only possible inspection mechanism. In this paper an array-based approach is presented that allows guided waves to be focused on both transmission and reception to produce a high resolution image of a length of pipe. In the image, it is shown that a signal to coherent noise ratio of over 40 dB with respect to the reflected signal from a free end of pipe can be obtained, even taking into account typical levels of experimental uncertainty in terms of transducer positioning, wave velocity etc. The combination of an image with high resolution and a 40 dB dynamic range enables the detection of very small defects. It also allows the in-plane shape of defects over a certain size to be observed directly. Simulations are used to estimate the detection and sizing capability of the system for crack-like defects. Results are presented from a prototype system that uses EMATs to fully focus pipe guided wave modes on both transmission and reception in a 12 inch diameter stainless steel pipe. The 40 dB signal to coherent noise ratio is obtained experimentally and a 2 mm diameter (0.08 wavelengths) half-thickness hole is shown to be detectable.

  16. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, D. Chris; Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2000-01-01

    The major research activities performed during the cooperative agreement enhanced our spectroscopic knowledge of molecules of atmospheric interest such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, ozone, methane, and carbon monoxide, to name a few. Measurements were made using the NASA Langley Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometer System (TDL) and several Fourier Transform Spectrometer Systems (FTS) around the globe. The results from these studies made remarkable improvements in the line positions and intensities for several molecules, particularly ozone and carbon dioxide in the 2 to 17-micrometer spectral region. Measurements of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients and the temperature dependence of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients for infrared transitions of ozone, methane, and water vapor were also performed. Results from these studies have been used for retrievals of stratospheric gas concentration profiles from data collected by several Upper Atmospheric Research satellite (UARS) infrared instruments as well as in the analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra such as those acquired by space-based, ground-based, and various balloon-and aircraft-borne experiments. Our results made significant contributions in several updates of the HITRAN (HIgh resolution TRANsmission) spectral line parameters database. This database enjoys worldwide recognition in research involving diversified scientific fields.

  17. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, D. Chris; Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2000-01-01

    The major research activities performed during the cooperative agreement enhanced our spectroscopic knowledge of molecules of atmospheric interest such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, ozone, methane, and carbon monoxide, to name a few. Measurements were made using the NASA Langley Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometer System (TDL) and several Fourier Transform Spectrometer Systems (FTS) around the globe. The results from these studies made remarkable improvements in the line positions and intensities for several molecules, particularly ozone and carbon dioxide in the 2 to 17-micrometer spectral region. Measurements of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients and the temperature dependence of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients for infrared transitions of ozone, methane, and water vapor were also performed. Results from these studies have been used for retrievals of stratospheric gas concentration profiles from data collected by several Upper Atmospheric Research satellite (UARS) infrared instruments as well as in the analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra such as those acquired by space-based, ground-based, and various balloon- and aircraft-borne experiments. Our results made significant contributions in several updates of the HITRAN (HIgh resolution TRANsmission) spectral line parameters database. This database enjoys worldwide recognition in research involving diversified scientific fields.

  18. High Resolution Laser Spectroscopy of Rhenium Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Allan G.; Hall, Ryan M.; Linton, Colan; Tokaryk, Dennis

    2014-06-01

    The first spectroscopic study of rhenium carbide, ReC, has been performed using both low and high resolution techniques to collect rotationally resolved electronic spectra from 420 to 500nm. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), and dispersed fluorescence (DF) techniques were employed. ReC was formed in our laser ablation molecular jet apparatus by ablating a rhenium target rod in the presence of 1% methane in helium. The low resolution spectrum identified four bands of an electronic system belonging to ReC, three of which have been studied so far. Extensive hyperfine structure composed of six hyperfine components was observed in the high resolution spectrum, as well as a clear distinction between the 187ReC and 185ReC isotopologues. The data seems consistent with a ^4Π - ^4Σ- transition, as was predicted before experimentation. Dispersed fluorescence spectra allowed us to determine the ground state vibrational frequency (ωe"=994.4 ± 0.3 wn), and to identify a low-lying electronically excited state at Te"=1118.4 ± 0.4 wn with a vibrational frequency of ωe"=984 ± 2 wn. Personal communication, F. Grein, University of New Brunswick

  19. Limiting liability via high resolution image processing

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwade, L.E.; Overlin, T.K.

    1996-12-31

    The utilization of high resolution image processing allows forensic analysts and visualization scientists to assist detectives by enhancing field photographs, and by providing the tools and training to increase the quality and usability of field photos. Through the use of digitized photographs and computerized enhancement software, field evidence can be obtained and processed as `evidence ready`, even in poor lighting and shadowed conditions or darkened rooms. These images, which are most often unusable when taken with standard camera equipment, can be shot in the worst of photographic condition and be processed as usable evidence. Visualization scientists have taken the use of digital photographic image processing and moved the process of crime scene photos into the technology age. The use of high resolution technology will assist law enforcement in making better use of crime scene photography and positive identification of prints. Valuable court room and investigation time can be saved and better served by this accurate, performance based process. Inconclusive evidence does not lead to convictions. Enhancement of the photographic capability helps solve one major problem with crime scene photos, that if taken with standard equipment and without the benefit of enhancement software would be inconclusive, thus allowing guilty parties to be set free due to lack of evidence.

  20. High-resolution SAR ATR performance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Joel; Burke, Monica; Ettinger, Gil J.

    2004-09-01

    High resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery (e.g., four inch or better resolution) contains features not seen in one foot or lower resolution imagery, due to the isolation of the scatterers into separate resolution cells. These features provide the potential for additional discrimination power for Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) systems. In this paper, we analyze the performance of the Real-Time MSTAR (RT-MSTAR) system as a function of image resolution. Performance is measured both in terms of the probability of correct identification on military targets, and also in terms of confuser rejection. The analysis demonstrates two factors that significantly enhance performance. First, use of the high resolution imagery results in much higher probability of correct identification, as demonstrated using Lynx SAR imagery at 4" and 12". Second, incorporating models of the confusers, when available, greatly reduces false alarms, even at higher resolutions. Several new areas of work emerge, including making use of higher-level feature information available in the imagery, and rapid creation of models for vehicles that pose particular confuser rejection challenges.

  1. High Resolution Camera for Mapping Titan Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, Bianca

    2011-01-01

    Titan, Saturn's largest moon, has a dense atmosphere and is the only object besides Earth to have stable liquids at its surface. The Cassini/Huygens mission has revealed the extraordinary breadth of geological processes shaping its surface. Further study requires high resolution imaging of the surface, which is restrained by light absorption by methane and scattering from aerosols. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft has demonstrated that Titan's surface can be observed within several windows in the near infrared, allowing us to process several regions in order to create a geological map and to determine the morphology. Specular reflections monitored on the lakes of the North Pole show little scattering at 5 microns, which, combined with the present study of Titan's northern pole area, refutes the paradigm that only radar can achieve high resolution mapping of the surface. The present data allowed us to monitor the evolution of lakes, to identify additional lakes at the Northern Pole, to examine Titan's hypothesis of non-synchronous rotation and to analyze the albedo of the North Pole surface. Future missions to Titan could carry a camera with 5 micron detectors and a carbon fiber radiator for weight reduction.

  2. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2003-01-01

    Spectroscopic parameters (such as line position, intensity, broadening and shifting coefficients and their temperature dependences, line mixing coefficients etc.) for various molecular species of atmospheric interest are determined. In order to achieve these results, infrared spectra of several molecular bands are obtained using high-resolution recording instruments such as tunable diode laser spectrometer and Fourier transform spectrometers. Using sophisticated analysis routines (Multispectrum nonlinear least squares technique) these high-resolution infrared spectra are processed to determine the various spectral line parameters that are cited above. Spectra were taken using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak, Arizona as well as the Bruker FTS at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at Richland, Washington. Most of the spectra are acquired not only at room temperature, but also at several different cold temperatures. This procedure is necessary to study the variation of the spectral line parameters as a function of temperature in order to simulate the Earth's and other planetary atmospheric environments. Depending upon the strength or weakness of the various bands recorded and analyzed, the length(s) of the absorption cells in which the gas samples under study are kept varied from a few centimeters up to several meters and the sample temperatures varied from approximately +30 C to -63 C. Research on several infrared bands of various molecular species and their isotopomers are undertaken. Those studies are briefly described.

  3. High-Resolution PET Detector. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karp, Joel

    2014-03-26

    The objective of this project was to develop an understanding of the limits of performance for a high resolution PET detector using an approach based on continuous scintillation crystals rather than pixelated crystals. The overall goal was to design a high-resolution detector, which requires both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity for 511 keV gammas. Continuous scintillation detectors (Anger cameras) have been used extensively for both single-photon and PET scanners, however, these instruments were based on NaI(Tl) scintillators using relatively large, individual photo-multipliers. In this project we investigated the potential of this type of detector technology to achieve higher spatial resolution through the use of improved scintillator materials and photo-sensors, and modification of the detector surface to optimize the light response function.We achieved an average spatial resolution of 3-mm for a 25-mm thick, LYSO continuous detector using a maximum likelihood position algorithm and shallow slots cut into the entrance surface.

  4. Characterisation of a CZT detector for dosimetry of molecular radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAreavey, L. H.; Harkness-Brennan, L. J.; Colosimo, S. J.; Judson, D. S.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Nolan, P. J.; Flux, G. D.; Denis-Bacelar, A. M.; Harris, B.; Radley, I.; Carroll, M.

    2017-03-01

    A pixelated cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector has been characterised for the purpose of developing a quantitative single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system for dosimetry of molecular radiotherapy (MRT). This is the aim of the Dosimetric Imaging with CZT (DEPICT) project, which is a collaboration between the University of Liverpool, The Royal Marsden Hospital, The Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospital, and the commercial partner Kromek. CZT is a direct band gap semiconductor with superior energy resolution and stopping power compared to scintillator detectors used in current SPECT systems. The inherent detector properties have been investigated and operational parameters such as bias voltage and peaking time have been selected to optimise the performance of the system. Good energy resolution is required to discriminate γ-rays that are scattered as they are emitted from the body and within the collimator, and high photon throughput is essential due to the high activities of isotopes administered in MRT. The system has an average measured electronic noise of 3.31 keV full width at half maximum (FWHM), determined through the use of an internal pulser. The energy response of the system was measured across the energy region of interest 59.5 keV to 364.5 keV and found to be linear. The reverse bias voltage and peaking time producing the optimum FWHM and maximum photon throughput were 600 V and 0.5 μs respectively. The average dead time of the system was measured as 4.84 μs and charge sharing was quantified to be 0.71 % at 59.5 keV . A pixel sensitivity calibration map was created and planar images of the medical imaging isotopes 99mTc and 123I were acquired by coupling the device to a prototype collimator, thereby demonstrating the suitability of the detector for the DEPICT project.

  5. Small pixel CZT detector for hard X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Matthew David; Cernik, Robert; Chen, Henry; Hansson, Conny; Iniewski, Kris; Jones, Lawrence L.; Seller, Paul; Veale, Matthew C.

    2011-10-01

    A new small pixel cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector has been developed for hard X-ray spectroscopy. The X-ray performance of four detectors is presented and the detectors are analysed in terms of the energy resolution of each pixel. The detectors were made from CZT crystals grown by the travelling heater method (THM) bonded to a 20×20 application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and data acquisition (DAQ) system. The detectors had an array of 20×20 pixels on a 250 μm pitch, with each pixel gold-stud bonded to an energy resolving circuit in the ASIC. The DAQ system digitised the ASIC output with 14 bit resolution, performing offset corrections and data storage to disc in real time at up to 40,000 frames per second. The detector geometry and ASIC design was optimised for X-ray spectroscopy up to 150 keV and made use of the small pixel effect to preferentially measure the electron signal. A 241Am source was used to measure the spectroscopic performance and uniformity of the detectors. The average energy resolution (FWHM at 59.54 keV) of each pixel ranged from 1.09±0.46 to 1.50±0.57 keV across the four detectors. The detectors showed good spectral performance and uniform response over almost all pixels in the 20×20 array. A large area 80×80 pixel detector will be built that will utilise the scalable design of the ASIC and the large areas of monolithic spectroscopic grade THM grown CZT that are now available. The large area detector will have the same performance as that demonstrated here.

  6. High-Resolution Photoelectron and Photoionization Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkt, F.

    2012-06-01

    Since its development in the late 1950s and early 1960s, photoelectron spectroscopy has established itself as an important method to study the electronic structure of molecules, their photoionization dynamics, and the structure and dynamics of molecular cations. In recent years, and particularly since the development of pulsed-field-ionization zero-kinetic-energy (PFI-ZEKE) photoelectron spectroscopy, considerable progress has been made in the resolution that can be achieved by photoelectron spectroscopy. This progress relies on the systematic exploitation of the unusual physical properties of high Rydberg states and enables one today to resolve the rotational structure in the photoelectron spectra of even large molecules and the hyperfine structure in the photoelectron spectra of small molecules. This talk will begin with a brief historical review of photoelectron spectroscopy. Then, the relationship between photoelectron spectroscopy, photoionization spectroscopy and the spectroscopy of high Rydberg states will be discussed. It will be explained how this relationship is currently exploited to improve the resolution achievable by PFI-ZEKE photoelectron spectroscopy. Then, the physical principles that are at the heart of the latest methods related to high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy will be described together with their fundamental limitations. Depending on the resolution and the spectral range needed to address a specific scientific problem, a choice can be made between several different methods with spectral resolutions ranging from 30 GHz to better than 1 MHz. The talk will summarize the current state of the art in gas-phase photoelectron spectroscopy and be illustrated by several examples, primarily taken from the research in my group, in which photoelectron spectroscopy has contributed to answer questions concerning the structure and dynamics of small-sized molecular cations. F. I. Vilesov, B. C. Kurbatov, and N. Terrenin, Soviet Phys. (Doklady) 6

  7. Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This report constitutes the final report for NASA Contract NASW-5054. This project processed Clementine I high resolution images of the Moon, mosaicked these images together, and created a 22-disk set of compact disk read-only memory (CD-ROM) volumes. The mosaics were produced through semi-automated registration and calibration of the high resolution (HiRes) camera's data against the geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic produced by the US Geological Survey (USGS). The HiRes mosaics were compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution nadir-looking observations. The images were spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel for sub-polar mosaics (below 80 deg. latitude) and using the stereographic projection at a scale of 30 m/pixel for polar mosaics. Only images with emission angles less than approximately 50 were used. Images from non-mapping cross-track slews, which tended to have large SPICE errors, were generally omitted. The locations of the resulting image population were found to be offset from the UV/Vis basemap by up to 13 km (0.4 deg.). Geometric control was taken from the 100 m/pixel global and 150 m/pixel polar USGS Clementine Basemap Mosaics compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Radiometric calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity dominated by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap, that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The sub-polar mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 deg. of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. Polar mosaics are tiled into squares 2250 pixels on a

  8. High Resolution Powder Diffraction and Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D. E.

    1999-04-23

    It is clear that high-resolution synchrotrons X-ray powder diffraction is a very powerful and convenient tool for material characterization and structure determination. Most investigations to date have been carried out under ambient conditions and have focused on structure solution and refinement. The application of high-resolution techniques to increasingly complex structures will certainly represent an important part of future studies, and it has been seen how ab initio solution of structures with perhaps 100 atoms in the asymmetric unit is within the realms of possibility. However, the ease with which temperature-dependence measurements can be made combined with improvements in the technology of position-sensitive detectors will undoubtedly stimulate precise in situ structural studies of phase transitions and related phenomena. One challenge in this area will be to develop high-resolution techniques for ultra-high pressure investigations in diamond anvil cells. This will require highly focused beams and very precise collimation in front of the cell down to dimensions of 50 {micro}m or less. Anomalous scattering offers many interesting possibilities as well. As a means of enhancing scattering contrast it has applications not only to the determination of cation distribution in mixed systems such as the superconducting oxides discussed in Section 9.5.3, but also to the location of specific cations in partially occupied sites, such as the extra-framework positions in zeolites, for example. Another possible application is to provide phasing information for ab initio structure solution. Finally, the precise determination of f as a function of energy through an absorption edge can provide useful information about cation oxidation states, particularly in conjunction with XANES data. In contrast to many experiments at a synchrotron facility, powder diffraction is a relatively simple and user-friendly technique, and most of the procedures and software for data analysis

  9. Simulating the Background Noise in the LEGRI CZT Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfect, C. L.; Bird, A. J.; Dean, A. J.; Ferguson, C.; Lei, F.; Lockley, J. J.

    2001-03-01

    A Monte-Carlo model of the MINISAT 01 satellite has been built. This model, based on the GEANT software suite, is used to study the background noise induced in the cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) in the LEGRI detector. We find that the background noise count rate at the poles is ~ 50% higher than at the equator. This increase is due to the effects of geomagnetic rigidity cut-off. We also simulate the effects of passages through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) with simulations showing an increase of ~ 0.5 counts cm^-2 sec^-1 after the SAA, in good agreement with observational data.

  10. Recent advances in CZT strip detectors and coded mask imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteson, J. L.; Gruber, D. E.; Heindl, W. A.; Pelling, M. R.; Peterson, L. E.; Rothschild, R. E.; Skelton, R. T.; Hink, P. L.; Slavis, K. R.; Binns, W. R.; Tumer, T.; Visser, G.

    1999-09-01

    The UCSD, WU, UCR and Nova collaboration has made significant progress on the necessary techniques for coded mask imaging of gamma-ray bursts: position sensitive CZT detectors with good energy resolution, ASIC readout, coded mask imaging, and background properties at balloon altitudes. Results on coded mask imaging techniques appropriate for wide field imaging and localization of gamma-ray bursts are presented, including a shadowgram and deconvolved image taken with a prototype detector/ASIC and MURA mask. This research was supported by NASA Grants NAG5-5111, NAG5-5114, and NGT5-50170.

  11. The High Resolution Infrared Spectrum of HCl().

    PubMed

    Doménech, J L; Drouin, B J; Cernicharo, J; Herrero, V J; Tanarro, I

    2016-12-20

    The chloroniumyl cation, HCl(+), has been recently identified in space from Herschel's spectra. A joint analysis of extensive vis-UV spectroscopy emission data together with a few high-resolution and high-accuracy millimiter-wave data provided the necessary rest frequencies to support the astronomical identification. Nevertheless, the analysis did not include any infrared (IR) vibration-rotation data. Furthermore, with the end of the Herschel mission, infrared observations from the ground may be one of the few available means to further study this ion in space. In this work, we provide a set of accurate rovibrational transition wavenumbers as well as a new and improved global fit of vis-UV, IR and millimiter-wave spectroscopy laboratory data, that will aid in future studies of this molecule.

  12. Computer synthesis of high resolution electron micrographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, R.

    1976-01-01

    Specimen damage, spherical aberration, low contrast and noisy sensors combine to prevent direct atomic viewing in a conventional electron microscope. The paper describes two methods for obtaining ultra-high resolution in biological specimens under the electron microscope. The first method assumes the physical limits of the electron objective lens and uses a series of dark field images of biological crystals to obtain direct information on the phases of the Fourier diffraction maxima; this information is used in an appropriate computer to synthesize a large aperture lens for a 1-A resolution. The second method assumes there is sufficient amplitude scatter from images recorded in focus which can be utilized with a sensitive densitometer and computer contrast stretching to yield fine structure image details. Cancer virus characterization is discussed as an illustrative example. Numerous photographs supplement the text.

  13. Constructing a WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, T. H.; Masci, F.; Tsai, C. W.; Petty, S.; Cluver, M.; Assef, Roberto J.; Benford, D.; Blain, A.; Bridge, C.; Donoso, E.; hide

    2012-01-01

    After eight months of continuous observations, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the entire sky at 3.4 micron, 4.6 micron, 12 micron, and 22 micron. We have begun a dedicated WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas project to fully characterize large, nearby galaxies and produce a legacy image atlas and source catalog. Here we summarize the deconvolution techniques used to significantly improve the spatial resolution of WISE imaging, specifically designed to study the internal anatomy of nearby galaxies. As a case study, we present results for the galaxy NGC 1566, comparing the WISE enhanced-resolution image processing to that of Spitzer, Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and ground-based imaging. This is the first paper in a two-part series; results for a larger sample of nearby galaxies are presented in the second paper.

  14. High-Resolution Anamorphic SPECT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Durko, Heather L.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a gamma-ray imaging system that combines a high-resolution silicon detector with two sets of movable, half-keel-edged copper-tungsten blades configured as crossed slits. These apertures can be positioned independently between the object and detector, producing an anamorphic image in which the axial and transaxial magnifications are not constrained to be equal. The detector is a 60 mm × 60 mm, one-millimeter-thick, one-megapixel silicon double-sided strip detector with a strip pitch of 59 μm. The flexible nature of this system allows the application of adaptive imaging techniques. We present system details; calibration, acquisition, and reconstruction methods; and imaging results. PMID:26160983

  15. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C/sub 44/H/sub 90/ paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol. 53 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  16. High-resolution MRI: in vivo histology?

    PubMed Central

    Bridge, Holly; Clare, Stuart

    2005-01-01

    For centuries scientists have been fascinated with the question of how the brain works. Investigators have looked at both where different functions are localized and how the anatomical microstructure varies across the brain surface. Here we discuss how advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have allowed in vivo visualization of the fine structure of the brain that was previously only visible in post-mortem brains. We present data showing the correspondence between definitions of the primary visual cortex defined anatomically using very high-resolution MRI and functionally using functional MRI. We consider how this technology can be applied to allow the investigation of brains that differ from normal, and what this ever-evolving technology may be able to reveal about in vivo brain structure in the next few years. PMID:16553313

  17. Novel high-resolution VGA QWIP detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataria, H.; Asplund, C.; Lindberg, A.; Smuk, S.; Alverbro, J.; Evans, D.; Sehlin, S.; Becanovic, S.; Tinghag, P.; Höglund, L.; Sjöström, F.; Costard, E.

    2017-02-01

    Continuing with its legacy of producing high performance infrared detectors, IRnova introduces its high resolution LWIR IDDCA (Integrated Detector Dewar Cooler assembly) based on QWIP (quantum well infrared photodetector) technology. The Focal Plane Array (FPA) has 640×512 pixels, with small (15μm) pixel pitch, and is based on the FLIRIndigo ISC0403 Readout Integrated Circuit (ROIC). The QWIP epitaxial structures are grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) at IRnova. Detector stability and response uniformity inherent to III/V based material will be demonstrated in terms of high performing detectors. Results showing low NETD at high frame rate will be presented. This makes it one of the first 15μm pitch QWIP based LWIR IDDCA commercially available on the market. High operability and stability of our other QWIP based products will also be shared.

  18. Ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging

    DOEpatents

    Paulus, Michael J.; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed; Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William; Gleason, Shaun S.; Thomas, Jr., Clarence E.

    2002-01-01

    A method for ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging, comprising the steps of: focusing a high energy particle beam, for example x-rays or gamma-rays, onto a target object; acquiring a 2-dimensional projection data set representative of the target object; generating a corrected projection data set by applying a deconvolution algorithm, having an experimentally determined a transfer function, to the 2-dimensional data set; storing the corrected projection data set; incrementally rotating the target object through an angle of approximately 180.degree., and after each the incremental rotation, repeating the radiating, acquiring, generating and storing steps; and, after the rotating step, applying a cone-beam algorithm, for example a modified tomographic reconstruction algorithm, to the corrected projection data sets to generate a 3-dimensional image. The size of the spot focus of the beam is reduced to not greater than approximately 1 micron, and even to not greater than approximately 0.5 microns.

  19. Cryogenic high resolution translation unit (CTU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, Javier; Moreno Raso, Javier; Pedrosa, Enrique; Moral, Andoni; San Juan, José Luis; Lecina, María; Díez, Lucía; Sanz, Alfonso; Belenguer, Tomás; Ramos, Gonzalo

    2008-07-01

    The CTU (Cryogenics Translation Unit) is a low range (+/-1 mm) high resolution (<50 nm) translation unit to be used at cryogenic temperature (20K). The unit is a multipurpose device capable of fine closed loop positioning. This device can be used as active element in IR Instrumentation for compensating thermo-elastic deformation moving optical elements or sensors. CTU motion system is based in thin flexures deformation to assure repeatability and moves in closed loop mode by means of a fine linear actuator and a calibrated non contact capacitive sensor. This paper describes main design features, how cryogenic testing of main requirements was carried out (including methodologies used for calibration and submicron verification), tested performances, and main lesson learned during the development.

  20. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C44H90 paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol.

  1. The High Resolution Infrared Spectrum of HCl+

    PubMed Central

    Drouin, B. J.; Cernicharo, J.; Herrero, V. J.; Tanarro, I.

    2017-01-01

    The chloroniumyl cation, HCl+, has been recently identified in space from Herschel’s spectra. A joint analysis of extensive vis-UV spectroscopy emission data together with a few high-resolution and high-accuracy millimiter-wave data provided the necessary rest frequencies to support the astronomical identification. Nevertheless, the analysis did not include any infrared (IR) vibration-rotation data. Furthermore, with the end of the Herschel mission, infrared observations from the ground may be one of the few available means to further study this ion in space. In this work, we provide a set of accurate rovibrational transition wavenumbers as well as a new and improved global fit of vis-UV, IR and millimiter-wave spectroscopy laboratory data, that will aid in future studies of this molecule. PMID:28261442

  2. High resolution analysis of satellite gradiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, O. L.

    1989-01-01

    Satellite gravity gradiometry is a technique now under development which, by the middle of the next decade, may be used for the high resolution charting from space of the gravity field of the earth and, afterwards, of other planets. Some data analysis schemes are reviewed for getting detailed gravity maps from gradiometry on both a global and a local basis. It also presents estimates of the likely accuracies of such maps, in terms of normalized spherical harmonics expansions, both using gradiometry alone and in combination with data from a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver carried on the same spacecraft. It compares these accuracies with those of current and future maps obtained from other data (conventional tracking, satellite-satellite tracking, etc.), and also with the spectra of various signals of geophysical interest.

  3. High resolution detection system of capillary electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Li Qiang; Shi, Yan; Zheng, Hua; Lu, Zu Kang

    2007-12-01

    The capillary electrophoresis (CE) with laser induced fluorescence detection (LIFD) system was founded according to confocal theory. The 3-D adjustment of the exciting and collecting optical paths was realized. The photomultiplier tube (PMT) is used and the signals are processed by a software designed by ourselves. Under computer control, high voltage is applied to appropriate reservoirs and to inject and separate DNA samples respectively. Two fluorescent dyes Thiazole Orange (TO) and SYBR Green I were contrasted. With both of the dyes, high signals-to-noise images were obtained with the CE-LIFD system. The single-bases can be distinguished from the electrophoretogram and high resolution of DNA sample separation was obtained.

  4. High-resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing.

    PubMed

    Park, Jang-Ung; Hardy, Matt; Kang, Seong Jun; Barton, Kira; Adair, Kurt; Mukhopadhyay, Deep Kishore; Lee, Chang Young; Strano, Michael S; Alleyne, Andrew G; Georgiadis, John G; Ferreira, Placid M; Rogers, John A

    2007-10-01

    Efforts to adapt and extend graphic arts printing techniques for demanding device applications in electronics, biotechnology and microelectromechanical systems have grown rapidly in recent years. Here, we describe the use of electrohydrodynamically induced fluid flows through fine microcapillary nozzles for jet printing of patterns and functional devices with submicrometre resolution. Key aspects of the physics of this approach, which has some features in common with related but comparatively low-resolution techniques for graphic arts, are revealed through direct high-speed imaging of the droplet formation processes. Printing of complex patterns of inks, ranging from insulating and conducting polymers, to solution suspensions of silicon nanoparticles and rods, to single-walled carbon nanotubes, using integrated computer-controlled printer systems illustrates some of the capabilities. High-resolution printed metal interconnects, electrodes and probing pads for representative circuit patterns and functional transistors with critical dimensions as small as 1 mum demonstrate potential applications in printed electronics.

  5. High Resolution, High Frame Rate Video Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Papers and working group summaries presented at the High Resolution, High Frame Rate Video (HHV) Workshop are compiled. HHV system is intended for future use on the Space Shuttle and Space Station Freedom. The Workshop was held for the dual purpose of: (1) allowing potential scientific users to assess the utility of the proposed system for monitoring microgravity science experiments; and (2) letting technical experts from industry recommend improvements to the proposed near-term HHV system. The following topics are covered: (1) State of the art in the video system performance; (2) Development plan for the HHV system; (3) Advanced technology for image gathering, coding, and processing; (4) Data compression applied to HHV; (5) Data transmission networks; and (6) Results of the users' requirements survey conducted by NASA.

  6. Speleothems as high-resolution paleoflood archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denniston, Rhawn F.; Luetscher, Marc

    2017-08-01

    Over the last two decades, speleothems have become widely utilized records of past environmental variability, typically through their stable isotopic and trace elemental chemistry. Numerous speleothem researchers have identified evidence of flooding recorded by detrital layers trapped within speleothems, but few studies have developed paleoflood reconstructions from such samples. Because they can be precisely dated, are generally immune to post-depositional distortion or erosion, and can be tied to a fixed elevational baseline, speleothems hold enormous potential as high-resolution archives of cave floods, and thus as proxies for extreme rainfall or other hydrologic drivers of cave flooding. Here we review speleothem-based paleoflood reconstruction methods, identify potential biases and pitfalls, and suggest standard practices for future studies.

  7. High-Resolution Broadband Spectral Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J; Edelstein, J

    2002-08-09

    We demonstrate solar spectra from a novel interferometric method for compact broadband high-resolution spectroscopy. The spectral interferometer (SI) is a hybrid instrument that uses a spectrometer to externally disperse the output of a fixed-delay interferometer. It also has been called an externally dispersed interferometer (EDI). The interferometer can be used with linear spectrometers for imaging spectroscopy or with echelle spectrometers for very broad-band coverage. EDI's heterodyning technique enhances the spectrometer's response to high spectral-density features, increasing the effective resolution by factors of several while retaining its bandwidth. The method is extremely robust to instrumental insults such as focal spot size or displacement. The EDI uses no moving parts, such as purely interferometric FTS spectrometers, and can cover a much wider simultaneous bandpass than other internally dispersed interferometers (e.g. HHS or SHS).

  8. High-resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jang-Ung; Hardy, Matt; Kang, Seong Jun; Barton, Kira; Adair, Kurt; Mukhopadhyay, Deep Kishore; Lee, Chang Young; Strano, Michael S.; Alleyne, Andrew G.; Georgiadis, John G.; Ferreira, Placid M.; Rogers, John A.

    2007-10-01

    Efforts to adapt and extend graphic arts printing techniques for demanding device applications in electronics, biotechnology and microelectromechanical systems have grown rapidly in recent years. Here, we describe the use of electrohydrodynamically induced fluid flows through fine microcapillary nozzles for jet printing of patterns and functional devices with submicrometre resolution. Key aspects of the physics of this approach, which has some features in common with related but comparatively low-resolution techniques for graphic arts, are revealed through direct high-speed imaging of the droplet formation processes. Printing of complex patterns of inks, ranging from insulating and conducting polymers, to solution suspensions of silicon nanoparticles and rods, to single-walled carbon nanotubes, using integrated computer-controlled printer systems illustrates some of the capabilities. High-resolution printed metal interconnects, electrodes and probing pads for representative circuit patterns and functional transistors with critical dimensions as small as 1μm demonstrate potential applications in printed electronics.

  9. A simple, high efficiency, high resolution spectropolarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barden, Samuel C.

    2012-09-01

    A simple concept is described that uses volume phase holographic gratings as polarizing dispersers for a high efficiency, high resolution spectropolarimeter. Although the idea has previously been mentioned in the literature as possible, such a concept has not been explored in detail. Performance analysis is presented for a VPHG spectropolarimeter concept that could be utilized for both solar and night-time astronomy. Instrumental peak efficiency can approach 100% with spectral dispersions permitting R~200,000 spectral resolution with diffraction limited telescopes. The instrument has 3-channels: two dispersed image planes with orthogonal polarization and an undispersed image plane. The concept has a range of versatility where it could be configured (with appropriate half-wave plates) for slit-fed spectroscopy or without slits for snapshot/hyperspectral/tomographic spectroscopic imaging. Multiplex gratings could also be used for the simultaneous recording of two separate spectral bands or multiple instruments could be daisy chained with beam splitters for further spectral coverage.

  10. Constructing a WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, T. H.; Masci, F.; Tsai, C. W.; Petty, S.; Cluver, M.; Assef, Roberto J.; Benford, D.; Blain, A.; Bridge, C.; Donoso, E.; Eisenhardt, P.; Fowler, J.; Koribalski, B.; Lake, S.; Neill, James D.; Seibert, M.; Stanford, S.; Wright, E.

    2012-01-01

    After eight months of continuous observations, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the entire sky at 3.4 micron, 4.6 micron, 12 micron, and 22 micron. We have begun a dedicated WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas project to fully characterize large, nearby galaxies and produce a legacy image atlas and source catalog. Here we summarize the deconvolution techniques used to significantly improve the spatial resolution of WISE imaging, specifically designed to study the internal anatomy of nearby galaxies. As a case study, we present results for the galaxy NGC 1566, comparing the WISE enhanced-resolution image processing to that of Spitzer, Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and ground-based imaging. This is the first paper in a two-part series; results for a larger sample of nearby galaxies are presented in the second paper.

  11. Constructing a WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrett, T. H.; Masci, F.; Tsai, C. W.; Petty, S.; Cluver, M.; Assef, Roberto J.; Benford, D.; Blain, A.; Bridge, C.; Donoso, E.; Eisenhardt, P.; Fowler, J.; Koribalski, B.; Lake, S.; Neill, James D.; Seibert, M.; Sheth, K.; Stanford, S.; Wright, E.

    2012-08-01

    After eight months of continuous observations, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the entire sky at 3.4 μm, 4.6 μm, 12 μm, and 22 μm. We have begun a dedicated WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas project to fully characterize large, nearby galaxies and produce a legacy image atlas and source catalog. Here we summarize the deconvolution techniques used to significantly improve the spatial resolution of WISE imaging, specifically designed to study the internal anatomy of nearby galaxies. As a case study, we present results for the galaxy NGC 1566, comparing the WISE enhanced-resolution image processing to that of Spitzer, Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and ground-based imaging. This is the first paper in a two-part series; results for a larger sample of nearby galaxies are presented in the second paper.

  12. High resolution wavefront measurement of aspheric optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erichsen, I.; Krey, S.; Heinisch, J.; Ruprecht, A.; Dumitrescu, E.

    2008-08-01

    With the recently emerged large volume production of miniature aspheric lenses for a wide range of applications, a new fast fully automatic high resolution wavefront measurement instrument has been developed. The Shack-Hartmann based system with reproducibility better than 0.05 waves is able to measure highly aspheric optics and allows for real time comparison with design data. Integrated advanced analysis tools such as calculation of Zernike coefficients, 2D-Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), Point Spread Function (PSF), Strehl-Ratio and the measurement of effective focal length (EFL) as well as flange focal length (FFL) allow for the direct verification of lens properties and can be used in a development as well as in a production environment.

  13. A high resolution ultraviolet Shuttle glow spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.

    1993-01-01

    The High Resolution Shuttle Glow Spectrograph-B (HRSGS-B) is a small payload being developed by the Naval Research Laboratory. It is intended for study of shuttle surface glow in the 180-400 nm near- and middle-ultraviolet wavelength range, with a spectral resolution of 0.2 nm. It will search for, among other possible features, the band systems of excited NO which result from surface-catalyzed combination of N and O. It may also detect O2 Hertzberg bands and N2 Vegard-Kaplan bands resulting from surface recombination. This wavelength range also includes possible N2+ and OH emissions. The HRSGS-B will be housed in a Get Away Special canister, mounted in the shuttle orbiter payload bay, and will observe the glow on the tail of the orbiter.

  14. Venus gravity - A high-resolution map

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasenberg, R. D.; Goldberg, Z. M.; Macneil, P. E.; Shapiro, I. I.

    1981-01-01

    The Doppler data from the radio tracking of the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) have been used in a two-stage analysis to develop a high-resolution map of the gravitational potential of Venus, represented by a central mass and a surface mass density. The two-stage procedure invokes a Kalman filter-smoother to determine the orbit of the spacecraft, and a stabilized linear inverter to estimate the surface mass density. The resultant gravity map is highly correlated with the topographic map derived from the PVO radar altimeter data. However, the magnitudes of the gravity variations are smaller than would be expected if the topography were uncompensated, indicating that at least partial compensation has taken place.

  15. High resolution CT of Meckel's cave.

    PubMed

    Chui, M; Tucker, W; Hudson, A; Bayer, N

    1985-01-01

    High resolution CT of the parasellar region was carried out in 50 patients studied for suspected pituitary microadenoma, but who showed normal pituitary gland or microadenoma on CT. This control group of patients all showed an ellipsoid low-density area in the posterior parasellar region. Knowledge of the gross anatomy and correlation with metrizamide cisternography suggest that the low density region represents Meckel's cave, rather than just the trigeminal ganglion alone. Though there is considerable variation in the size of Meckel's cave in different patients as well as the two sides of the same patient, the rather constant ellipsoid configuration of the cave in normal subjects will aid in diagnosing small pathological lesions, thereby obviating more invasive cisternography via the transovale or lumbar route. Patients with "idiopathic" tic douloureux do not show a Meckel's cave significantly different from the control group.

  16. High Resolution Image From Viking Lander 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-12-12

    NASA's Viking 1 took this high-resolution picture today, its third day on Mars. Distance from the camera to the nearfield (bottom) is about 4 meters (13 feet); to the horizon, about 3 kilometers (1.8 miles). The photo shows numerous angular blocks ranging in size from a few centimeters to several meters. The surface between the blocks is composed of fine-grained material. Accumulation of some fine-grained material behind blocks indicates wind deposition of dust and sand downwind of obstacles. The large block on the horizon is about 4 meters (13 feet) wide. Distance across the horizon is about 34 meters (110 feet). http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00385

  17. CONSTRUCTING A WISE HIGH RESOLUTION GALAXY ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrett, T. H.; Masci, F.; Tsai, C. W.; Fowler, J.; Petty, S.; Lake, S.; Wright, E.; Cluver, M.; Assef, Roberto J.; Eisenhardt, P.; Benford, D.; Blain, A.; Bridge, C.; Neill, James D.; Donoso, E.; Koribalski, B.; Seibert, M.; Sheth, K.; Stanford, S.

    2012-08-15

    After eight months of continuous observations, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the entire sky at 3.4 {mu}m, 4.6 {mu}m, 12 {mu}m, and 22 {mu}m. We have begun a dedicated WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas project to fully characterize large, nearby galaxies and produce a legacy image atlas and source catalog. Here we summarize the deconvolution techniques used to significantly improve the spatial resolution of WISE imaging, specifically designed to study the internal anatomy of nearby galaxies. As a case study, we present results for the galaxy NGC 1566, comparing the WISE enhanced-resolution image processing to that of Spitzer, Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and ground-based imaging. This is the first paper in a two-part series; results for a larger sample of nearby galaxies are presented in the second paper.

  18. Limits of simulation based high resolution EBSD.

    PubMed

    Alkorta, Jon

    2013-08-01

    High resolution electron backscattered diffraction (HREBSD) is a novel technique for a relative determination of both orientation and stress state in crystals through digital image correlation techniques. Recent works have tried to use simulated EBSD patterns as reference patterns to achieve the absolute orientation and stress state of crystals. However, a precise calibration of the pattern centre location is needed to avoid the occurrence of phantom stresses. A careful analysis of the projective transformation involved in the formation of EBSD patterns has permitted to understand these phantom stresses. This geometrical analysis has been confirmed by numerical simulations. The results indicate that certain combinations of crystal strain states and sample locations (pattern centre locations) lead to virtually identical EBSD patterns. This ambiguity makes the problem of solving the absolute stress state of a crystal unfeasible in a single-detector configuration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2006-01-01

    The major research activities performed during the cooperative agreement enhanced our spectroscopic knowledge of molecules of atmospheric interest such as H2O (water vapor), O3 (ozone), HCN (hydrogen cyanide), CH4 (methane), NO2 (nitrogen dioxide) and CO (carbon monoxide). The data required for the analyses were obtained from two different Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS); one of which is located at the National Solar Observatory (NSO) on Kitt Peak, Arizona and the other instrument is located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) at Richland, Washington. The data were analyzed using a modified multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting algorithm developed by Dr. D. Chris Benner of the College of William and Mary. The results from these studies made significant improvements in the line positons and intensities for these molecules. The measurements of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients and the temperature dependence of pressure broadening and pressure induced shift coefficients for hundreds of infrared transitions of HCN, CO3 CH4 and H2O were also performed during this period. Results from these studies have been used for retrievals of stratospheric gas concentration profiles from data collected by several Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) infrared instruments as well as in the analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra such as those acquired by space-based, ground-based, and various balloon- and aircraft-borne experiments. Our results made significant contributions in several updates of the HITRAN (HIgh resolution TRANsmission) spectral line parameters database. This database enjoys worldwide recognition in research involving diversified scientific fields. The research conducted during the period 2003-2006 has resulted in publications given in this paper. In addition to Journal publications, several oral and poster presentations were given at various Scientific conferences within the United States

  20. Pyramidal fractal dimension for high resolution images.

    PubMed

    Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, Michael; Ahammer, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Fractal analysis (FA) should be able to yield reliable and fast results for high-resolution digital images to be applicable in fields that require immediate outcomes. Triggered by an efficient implementation of FA for binary images, we present three new approaches for fractal dimension (D) estimation of images that utilize image pyramids, namely, the pyramid triangular prism, the pyramid gradient, and the pyramid differences method (PTPM, PGM, PDM). We evaluated the performance of the three new and five standard techniques when applied to images with sizes up to 8192 × 8192 pixels. By using artificial fractal images created by three different generator models as ground truth, we determined the scale ranges with minimum deviations between estimation and theory. All pyramidal methods (PM) resulted in reasonable D values for images of all generator models. Especially, for images with sizes ≥1024×1024 pixels, the PMs are superior to the investigated standard approaches in terms of accuracy and computation time. A measure for the possibility to differentiate images with different intrinsic D values did show not only that the PMs are well suited for all investigated image sizes, and preferable to standard methods especially for larger images, but also that results of standard D estimation techniques are strongly influenced by the image size. Fastest results were obtained with the PDM and PGM, followed by the PTPM. In terms of absolute D values best performing standard methods were magnitudes slower than the PMs. Concluding, the new PMs yield high quality results in short computation times and are therefore eligible methods for fast FA of high-resolution images.

  1. High resolution films for bone regeneration evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jammal, María V; Territoriale, Erika B; Abate, Carlos M; Missana, Liliana R

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging techniques (DIxT) seem to be a useful tool for evaluating bone formation in both human and animal models. There is little evidence on the use of Soft X-Rays (sXR) with high-resolution films for studying the healing process in critical bone size defects (CSD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of soft X-Ray - High Resolution Films (sXR) to distinguish bone regeneration in CSDs. A CSD was created in each of 16 Wistar rat calvariae. The animals were euthanized at 1, 3 and 6 weeks after surgery. The samples were submitted to cXR (conventional X-rays), sXR techniques and histological procedures (HP). Bone formation was observed at CSD edges at all periods of time. At 6 week there was also new bone in the central area. The CSD was not fully regenerated after any period of time. Histometric results were 0.16%; 0.75% and 0.89% new bone formed at weeks 1, 3 and 6 respectively; radiometric results at cXR were 0% in all samples. Evaluation of sXR shows 0.4%; 0.50% and 3.64% bone at weeks 1, 3 and 6. Mean and Standard Deviation were calculated. The data were submitted to statistical analysis using the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient test. The r value was 0.581. Under these experimental conditions, sXR was found to be a suitable method for detecting new bone formation, based on the positive correlation between sXR and HP during the bone healing process of CSDs in rat calvaria. Furthermore, the sXR technique allowed us to obtain samples with appropriate spatial orientation.

  2. High-Resolution Mapping in Manus Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, C. N.; Ferrini, V. L.

    2006-12-01

    Near-bottom seafloor mapping with precisely navigated deep submergence vehicles has become increasingly common in a range of oceanographic settings. Recent mapping efforts at deep-water hydrothermal vent sites have resulted in high-resolution (sub-meter) bathymetry datasets that can be used to identify morphological features associated with volcanic, tectonic, and hydrothermal processes. The resolution of these maps, and our ability to accurately quantify the complex morphologic details of hydrothermal structures has been limited by a number of variables including navigational accuracy, sonar settings (e.g. acoustic wavelength, sonar orientation, ping rate), survey parameters (e.g. altitude, speed), data density, and data processing techniques (e.g. gridding algorithms). We present the results of two near-bottom surveys conducted in August 2006 at the PACMANUS (Papua New Guinea-Australia-Canada Manus) hydrothermal field in the eastern Manus Basin of the Bismarck Sea, south of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea. Data were simultaneously acquired with two high-resolution multibeam sonar systems mounted on the Remote Operated Vehicle (ROV) Jason 2. A Simrad SM2000 (200 kHz) multibeam system was mounted in down-looking mode, and an Imagenex DeltaT (675 kHz) multibeam system was mounted on the brow of the vehicle in a forward-looking orientation. Surveys were conducted in parallel survey lines at 15 m altitude (15 m line spacing), and the can be used to generate sub-meter resolution maps of the seafloor. The maps were assembled using a terrain registration algorithm designed to minimize the affects of navigation error. Together, these sonars provide a complementary dataset that allows us to better quantify the 3-dimensional morphological characteristics of complex hydrothermal vent structures. This information can be used to more accurately estimate the volume of hydrothermal deposits, and render a more complete environmental picture that is less hindered by occlusions and

  3. High-resolution simulation of field emission

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B. ); Becker, R. ); Brodie, I.; Rosengreen, A.; Spindt, C.A. )

    1990-03-01

    High-resolution simulations of field emission electron sources have been made using the electron optics program EGN2. Electron emission distributions are made using the Fowler-Nordheim equation. Mesh resolution in the range of 1-5 {angstrom} is required to adequately model surface details that can result in emission currents in the range found experimentally. A typical problem starts with mechanical details with dimensions of about 1{mu}. To achieve high resolution a new boundary is defined by the tip, a nearby equipotential line, and a pair of field lines. The field lines (one of which is normally the axis of symmetry) define Neumann boundaries. This new boundary is then used by the boundary preprocessor POLYGON to create an enlarged version of the problem, typically by a factor of ten. This process can be repeated until adequate resolution is obtained to simulate surface details, such as microprotusion, that could sufficiently enhance the surface electric fields and cause field emission. When simulating experimental conditions under which emission of several microamperes per tip were observed, it was found that both a locally reduced work function and a surface protrusion were needed to duplicate the experimental results. If only a local region of reduced work function is used, the area involved and the extent of the reduction both need to be very large to reproduce the emission. If only a surface protrusion is used, it is possible to get the observed emission current with a reasonable protrusion of length a few times radius, but then the resulting beam spreads over a very large solid angle due to the strong local radial electric fields. 8 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Simultaneous CT and SPECT tomography using CZT detectors

    DOEpatents

    Paulus, Michael J.; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed; Simpson, Michael L.; Britton, Jr., Charles L.

    2002-01-01

    A method for simultaneous transmission x-ray computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) comprises the steps of: injecting a subject with a tracer compound tagged with a .gamma.-ray emitting nuclide; directing an x-ray source toward the subject; rotating the x-ray source around the subject; emitting x-rays during the rotating step; rotating a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) two-sided detector on an opposite side of the subject from the source; simultaneously detecting the position and energy of each pulsed x-ray and each emitted .gamma.-ray captured by the CZT detector; recording data for each position and each energy of each the captured x-ray and .gamma.-ray; and, creating CT and SPECT images from the recorded data. The transmitted energy levels of the x-rays lower are biased lower than energy levels of the .gamma.-rays. The x-ray source is operated in a continuous mode. The method can be implemented at ambient temperatures.

  5. Experimental measurements of charge carrier mobility: lifetime products for large sample of pixilated CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadawale, S. V.; Shanmugam, M.; Purohit, Shishir; Acharya, Y. B.; Sudhakar, Manju

    2012-07-01

    Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) is thought to be a primary work horse for hard X-ray astronomy in future. Due to the relatively large band-gap, it offers near room temperature operation while maintaining much better energy resolution then scintillator detectors operating in similar energy range. Further, CZT detectors are available in the form of pixilated detectors with area up to few cm2 and hence it is possible to realize very large detector area by having an array of such pixilated CZT detectors. However, it is well known that the energy spectrum of mono-energetic X-ray measured by CZT detectors does not have a Gaussian shape but has significant low-energy tail. This is mainly due to relatively poor mobility and small life time of the charge carriers, particularly of holes, in the CZT crystals. Thus, in order to understand spectral response for a large array of CZT detectors consisting of multiple elements / pixels, it is essential to characterize the mobility-lifetime products of charge carriers for each individual elements / pixels. Here we present experimental measurements of charge carrier mobility-lifetime products for large sample of multi-pixel CZT detectors. The mobility-lifetime products are measured by simultaneously fitting a ‘CZT line’ model to pixel wise spectra of 122 keV X-rays from 57Co at three different bias voltages. These were carried out as a part of selection of CZT detector modules for the “High Energy X-ray spectrometer (HEX)” onboard Indian moon mission - Chandrayaan-1.

  6. High Resolution Gamma Ray Analysis of Medical Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chillery, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Compton-suppressed high-purity Germanium detectors at the University of Massachusetts Lowell have been used to study medical radioisotopes produced at Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP), in particular isotopes such as Pt-191 used for cancer therapy in patients. The ability to precisely analyze the concentrations of such radio-isotopes is essential for both production facilities such as Brookhaven and consumer hospitals across the U.S. Without accurate knowledge of the quantities and strengths of these isotopes, it is possible for doctors to administer incorrect dosages to patients, thus leading to undesired results. Samples have been produced at Brookhaven and shipped to UML, and the advanced electronics and data acquisition capabilities at UML have been used to extract peak areas in the gamma decay spectra. Levels of Pt isotopes in diluted samples have been quantified, and reaction cross-sections deduced from the irradiation parameters. These provide both cross checks with published work, as well as a rigorous quantitative framework with high quality state-of-the-art detection apparatus in use in the experimental nuclear physics community.

  7. Efficient Compression of High Resolution Climate Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J.; Schuchardt, K. L.

    2011-12-01

    resolution climate data can be massive. Those data can consume a huge amount of disk space for storage, incur significant overhead for outputting data during simulation, introduce high latency for visualization and analysis, and may even make interactive visualization and analysis impossible given the limit of the data that a conventional cluster can handle. These problems can be alleviated by with effective and efficient data compression techniques. Even though HDF5 format supports compression, previous work has mainly focused on employ traditional general purpose compression schemes such as dictionary coder and block sorting based compression scheme. Those compression schemes mainly focus on encoding repeated byte sequences efficiently and are not well suitable for compressing climate data consist mainly of distinguished float point numbers. We plan to select and customize our compression schemes according to the characteristics of high-resolution climate data. One observation on high resolution climate data is that as the resolution become higher, values of various climate variables such as temperature and pressure, become closer in nearby cells. This provides excellent opportunities for predication-based compression schemes. We have performed a preliminary estimation of compression ratios of a very simple minded predication-based compression ratio in which we compute the difference between current float point number with previous float point number and then encoding the exponent and significance part of the float point number with entropy-based compression scheme. Our results show that we can achieve higher compression ratios between 2 and 3 in lossless compression, which is significantly higher than traditional compression algorithms. We have also developed lossy compression with our techniques. We can achive orders of magnitude data reduction while ensure error bounds. Moreover, our compression scheme is much more efficient and introduces much less overhead

  8. Superconducting High Resolution Fast-Neutron Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Hau, Ionel Dragos

    2006-01-01

    Superconducting high resolution fast-neutron calorimetric spectrometers based on 6LiF and TiB{sub 2} absorbers have been developed. These novel cryogenic spectrometers measure the temperature rise produced in exothermal (n, α) reactions with fast neutrons in 6Li and 10B-loaded materials with heat capacity C operating at temperatures T close to 0.1 K. Temperature variations on the order of 0.5 mK are measured with a Mo/Cu thin film multilayer operated in the transition region between its superconducting and its normal state. The advantage of calorimetry for high resolution spectroscopy is due to the small phonon excitation energies kBT on the order of μeV that serve as signal carriers, resulting in an energy resolution ΔE ~ (kBT2C)1/2, which can be well below 10 keV. An energy resolution of 5.5 keV has been obtained with a Mo/Cu superconducting sensor and a TiB2 absorber using thermal neutrons from a 252Cf neutron source. This resolution is sufficient to observe the effect of recoil nuclei broadening in neutron spectra, which has been related to the lifetime of the first excited state in 7Li. Fast-neutron spectra obtained with a 6Li-enriched LiF absorber show an energy resolution of 16 keV FWHM, and a response in agreement with the 6Li(n, α)3H reaction cross section and Monte Carlo simulations for energies up to several MeV. The energy resolution of order of a few keV makes this novel instrument applicable to fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy based on the unique elemental signature provided by the neutron absorption and scattering resonances. The optimization of the energy resolution based on analytical and numerical models of the detector response is discussed in the context of these applications.

  9. Integrated High Resolution Monitoring of Mediterranean vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaraccio, Carla; Piga, Alessandra; Ventura, Andrea; Arca, Angelo; Duce, Pierpaolo; Mereu, Simone

    2017-04-01

    The study of the vegetation features in a complex and highly vulnerable ecosystems, such as Mediterranean maquis, leads to the need of using continuous monitoring systems at high spatial and temporal resolution, for a better interpretation of the mechanisms of phenological and eco-physiological processes. Near-surface remote sensing techniques are used to quantify, at high temporal resolution, and with a certain degree of spatial integration, the seasonal variations of the surface optical and radiometric properties. In recent decades, the design and implementation of global monitoring networks involved the use of non-destructive and/or cheaper approaches such as (i) continuous surface fluxes measurement stations, (ii) phenological observation networks, and (iii) measurement of temporal and spatial variations of the vegetation spectral properties. In this work preliminary results from the ECO-SCALE (Integrated High Resolution Monitoring of Mediterranean vegetation) project are reported. The project was manly aimed to develop an integrated system for environmental monitoring based on digital photography, hyperspectral radiometry , and micrometeorological techniques during three years of experimentation (2013-2016) in a Mediterranean site of Italy (Capo Caccia, Alghero). The main results concerned the analysis of chromatic coordinates indices from digital images, to characterized the phenological patterns for typical shrubland species, determining start and duration of the growing season, and the physiological status in relation to different environmental drought conditions; then the seasonal patterns of canopy phenology, was compared to NEE (Net Ecosystem Exchange) patterns, showing similarities. However, maximum values of NEE and ER (Ecosystem respiration), and short term variation, seemed mainly tuned by inter annual pattern of meteorological variables, in particular of temperature recorded in the months preceding the vegetation green-up. Finally, green signals

  10. Balloon flight background measurement with actively-shielded planar and imaging CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloser, Peter F.; Narita, Tomohiko; Jenkins, Jonathan A.; Perrin, Marshall; Murray, Ruth; Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    2002-01-01

    We present results from the flight of two prototype CZT detectors on a scientific balloon payload in September 2000. The first detector, referred to as CZT1, consisted of a 10 mm x 10 mm x 2 mm CZT crystal with a single gold planar electrode readout. This detector was shielded by a combination of a passive collimator in the front, giving a 40 degree field of view and surrounded by plastic scintillator, and a thick BGO crystal in the rear. The second detector, CZT2, comprised two 10 mm x 10 mm x 5 mm CZT crystals, one made of eV Products high pressure Bridgman material and the other of IMARAD horizontal Bridgman material, each fashioned with a 4 x 4 array of gold pixels on a 2.5 mm pitch. The pixellated detectors were flip-chip-mounted side by side and read out by a 32-channel ASIC. This detector was also shielded by a passive/plastic collimator in the front, but used only additional passive/plastic shielding in the rear. Both experiments were flown from Ft. Sumner, NM on September 19, 2000 on a 24 hour balloon flight. Both instruments performed well. CZT1 recorded a non-vetoed background level at 100 keV of approximately 1 x 10-3 cm-2s-1keV-1. Raising the BGO threshold from 50 keV to approximately 1 MeV produced only an 18% increase in this level. CZT2 recorded a background at 100 keV of approximately 4 times 10-3 cts cm-2s-1keV-1 in the eV Products detector and approximately 6 x 10-3 cts cm-2s-1keV-1 in the IMARAD detector, a difference possibly due to our internal background subtracting procedure. Both CZT1 and CZT2 spectra were in basic agreement with Monte Carlo simulations, though both recorded systematically higher count rates at high energy than predicted. No lines were observed, indicating that neutron capture reactions, at least those producing decay lines at a few 100 keV, are not significant components of the CZT background. Comparison of the CZT1 and CZT2 spectra indicates that passive/plastic shielding may provide adequately low background levels for

  11. High Resolution BPM for Linear Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, C.; Chel, S.; Luong, M.; Napoly, O.; Novo, J.; Roudier, D.; Baboi, N.; Noelle, D.; Mildner, N.; Zapfe, K.; Rouvière, N.

    2006-11-01

    A high resolution Beam Position Monitor (BPM) is necessary for the beam-based alignment systems of high energy and low emittance electron linacs. Such a monitor is developed in the framework of the European CARE/SRF programme, in a close collaboration between DESY and CEA/DSM/DAPNIA. This monitor is a radiofrequency re-entrant cavity, which can be used either at room or cryogenic temperature, in an environment where dust particle contamination has to be avoided, such as superconducting cavities in a cryomodule. A first prototype of a re-entrant BPM has already delivered measurements at 2K. inside the first cryomodule (ACC1) on the TESLA Test Facility 2 (TTF2). The performances of this BPM are analyzed both experimentally and theoretically, and the limitations of this existing system clearly identified. A new cavity and new electronics have been designed in order to improve the position resolution down to 1 μm and the damping time down to 10 ns.

  12. High Resolution Measurement of the Glycolytic Rate

    PubMed Central

    Bittner, Carla X.; Loaiza, Anitsi; Ruminot, Iván; Larenas, Valeria; Sotelo-Hitschfeld, Tamara; Gutiérrez, Robin; Córdova, Alex; Valdebenito, Rocío; Frommer, Wolf B.; Barros, L. Felipe

    2010-01-01

    The glycolytic rate is sensitive to physiological activity, hormones, stress, aging, and malignant transformation. Standard techniques to measure the glycolytic rate are based on radioactive isotopes, are not able to resolve single cells and have poor temporal resolution, limitations that hamper the study of energy metabolism in the brain and other organs. A new method is described in this article, which makes use of a recently developed FRET glucose nanosensor to measure the rate of glycolysis in single cells with high temporal resolution. Used in cultured astrocytes, the method showed for the first time that glycolysis can be activated within seconds by a combination of glutamate and K+, supporting a role for astrocytes in neurometabolic and neurovascular coupling in the brain. It was also possible to make a direct comparison of metabolism in neurons and astrocytes lying in close proximity, paving the way to a high-resolution characterization of brain energy metabolism. Single-cell glycolytic rates were also measured in fibroblasts, adipocytes, myoblasts, and tumor cells, showing higher rates for undifferentiated cells and significant metabolic heterogeneity within cell types. This method should facilitate the investigation of tissue metabolism at the single-cell level and is readily adaptable for high-throughput analysis. PMID:20890447

  13. High resolution structure of bacterial cell sacculi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutcher, John; Touhami, Ahmed; Matias, Valerio; Clarke, Anthony; Jericho, Manfred; Beveridge, Terry

    2008-03-01

    The major structural component of bacterial cell walls is the peptidoglycan sacculus, which is one of nature's strongest and largest macromolecules that allows the cell to maintain a large internal pressure while allowing the transport of molecules into and out of the cell and cell growth. The three-dimensional structure of this unique biopolymer is controversial, and two models have been proposed: the planar model, in which the glycan strands lie in the plane of the cell surface, and the scaffold model, in which the glycan strands lie perpendicular to the cell surface. In this study we have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the high resolution structure of isolated, intact sacculi of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cells. We have observed a sponge-like structure for both types of sacculi with pore diameters between 5 to 15 nm. Our data for Gram-positive sacculi provide evidence for the validity of the scaffold model, whereas our data for Gram-negative sacculi indicate an orientation along the short axis of the cell which is consistent with the planar model. To further elucidate the structure, we have exposed sacculi to the tAmiB enzyme which cleaves peptide-peptide bonds.

  14. High resolution beamforming for small aperture arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Chris; Null, Tom; Wagstaff, Ronald A.

    2003-04-01

    Achieving fine resolution bearing estimates for multiple sources using acoustic arrays with small apertures, in number of wavelengths, is a difficult challenge. It requires both large signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gains and very narrow beam responses. High resolution beamforming for small aperture arrays is accomplished by exploiting acoustical fluctuations. Acoustical fluctuations in the atmosphere are caused by wind turbulence along the propagation path, air turbulence at the sensor, source/receiver motion, unsteady source level, and fine scale temperature variations. Similar environmental and source dependent phenomena cause fluctuations in other propagation media, e.g., undersea, optics, infrared. Amplitude fluctuations are exploited to deconvolve the beam response functions from the beamformed data of small arrays to achieve high spatial resolution, i.e., fine bearing resolution, and substantial SNR gain. Results are presented for a six microphone low-frequency array with an aperture of less than three wavelengths. [Work supported by U.S. Army Armament Research Development and Engineering Center.

  15. High-resolution imaging using endoscopic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1990-08-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help to their control. 1.

  16. Holographic high-resolution endoscopic image recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1991-03-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help

  17. High Resolution Radar Measurements of Snow Avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElwaine, Jim; Sovilla, Betty; Vriend, Nathalie; Brennan, Paul; Ash, Matt; Keylock, Chris

    2013-04-01

    Geophysical mass flows, such as snow avalanches, are a major hazard in mountainous areas and have a significant impact on the infrastructure, economy and tourism of such regions. Obtaining a thorough understanding of the dynamics of snow avalanches is crucial for risk assessment and the design of defensive structures. However, because the underlying physics is poorly understood there are significant uncertainties concerning current models, which are poorly validated due to a lack of high resolution data. Direct observations of the denser core of a large avalanche are particularly difficult, since it is frequently obscured by the dilute powder cloud. We have developed and installed a phased array FMCW radar system that penetrates the powder cloud and directly images the dense core with a resolution of around 1 m at 50 Hz over the entire slope. We present data from recent avalanches at Vallee de la Sionne that show a wealth of internal structure and allow the tracking of individual fronts, roll waves and surges down the slope for the first time. We also show good agreement between the radar results and existing measurement systems that record data at particular points on the avalanche track.

  18. High Resolution Radar Measurements of Snow Avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElwaine, J. N.; Vriend, N. M.; Sovilla, B.; Keylock, C. J.; Brennan, P.; Ash, M.

    2012-12-01

    Geophysical mass flows, such as snow avalanches, are a major hazard in mountainous areas and have a significant impact on the infrastructure, economy and tourism of such regions. Obtaining a thorough understanding of the dynamics of snow avalanches is crucial for risk assessment and the design of defensive structures. However, because the underlying physics is poorly understood there are significant uncertainties concerning current models, which are poorly validated due to a lack of high resolution data. Direct observations of the denser core of a large avalanche are particularly difficult, since it is frequently obscured by the dilute powder cloud. We have developed and installed a phased array FMCW radar system that penetrates the powder cloud and directly images the dense core with a resolution of around 1 m at 50 Hz over the entire slope. We present data from recent avalanches at Vallée de la Sionne that show a wealth of internal structure and allow the tracking of individual fronts, roll waves and surges down the slope for the first time. We also show good agreement between the radar results and existing measurement systems that record data at particular points on the avalanche track.

  19. Titania High-Resolution Color Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This high-resolution color composite of Titania was made from Voyager 2 images taken Jan. 24, 1986, as the spacecraft neared its closest approach to Uranus. Voyager's narrow-angle camera acquired this image of Titania, one of the large moons of Uranus, through the violet and clear filters. The spacecraft was about 500,000 kilometers (300,000 miles) away; the picture shows details about 9 km (6 mi) in size. Titania has a diameter of about 1,600 km (1,000 mi). In addition to many scars due to impacts, Titania displays evidence of other geologic activity at some point in its history. The large, trenchlike feature near the terminator (day-night boundary) at middle right suggests at least one episode of tectonic activity. Another, basinlike structure near the upper right is evidence of an ancient period of heavy impact activity. The neutral gray color of Titania is characteristic of the Uranian satellites as a whole. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  20. Supporting observation campaigns with high resolution modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klocke, Daniel; Brueck, Matthias; Voigt, Aiko

    2017-04-01

    High resolution simulation in support of measurement campaigns offers a promising and emerging way to create large-scale context for small-scale observations of clouds and precipitation processes. As these simulation include the coupling of measured small-scale processes with the circulation, they also help to integrate the research communities from modeling and observations and allow for detailed model evaluations against dedicated observations. In connection with the measurement campaign NARVAL (August 2016 and December 2013) simulations with a grid-spacing of 2.5 km for the tropical Atlantic region (9000x3300 km), with local refinement to 1.2 km for the western part of the domain, were performed using the icosahedral non-hydrostatic (ICON) general circulation model. These simulations are again used to drive large eddy resolving simulations with the same model for selected days in the high definition clouds and precipitation for advancing climate prediction (HD(CP)2) project. The simulations are presented with the focus on selected results showing the benefit for the scientific communities doing atmospheric measurements and numerical modeling of climate and weather. Additionally, an outlook will be given on how similar simulations will support the NAWDEX measurement campaign in the North Atlantic and AC3 measurement campaign in the Arctic.

  1. High Resolution Science with High Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windhorst, R.

    I will first review high resolution science that has been done with the Hubble Space Telescope on high redshift galaxies Next I will review the capabilities of the 6 5 meter James Webb Space Telescope JWST which is an optimized infrared telescope that can deploy automatically in space slated for launch to a halo L2 orbit in 2013 I will outline how the JWST can go about measuring First Light Reionization and Galaxy Assembly building on lessons learned from the Hubble Space Telescope I will show what more nearby galaxies observed in their restframe UV--optical light may look like to JWST at high redshifts Last I will summarize the Generation-X mission concept for an X-ray telescope designed to study the very early universe with 1000-times greater sensitivity than current facilities Gen-X will study the first generations of stars and black holes in the epoch z 10-20 the evolution of black holes and galaxies from high z to the present the chemical evolution of the universe and the properties of matter under extreme conditions This requires an effective area of 100 m 2 at 1 keV an angular resolution of 0 1 HPD over 0 1-10 keV

  2. High Resolution BPM for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, C.; Chel, S.; Luong, M.; Napoly, O.; Novo, J.; Roudier, D.; Rouviere, N.

    2006-11-20

    A high resolution Beam Position Monitor (BPM) is necessary for the beam-based alignment systems of high energy and low emittance electron linacs. Such a monitor is developed in the framework of the European CARE/SRF programme, in a close collaboration between DESY and CEA/DSM/DAPNIA. This monitor is a radiofrequency re-entrant cavity, which can be used either at room or cryogenic temperature, in an environment where dust particle contamination has to be avoided, such as superconducting cavities in a cryomodule. A first prototype of a re-entrant BPM has already delivered measurements at 2K. inside the first cryomodule (ACC1) on the TESLA Test Facility 2 (TTF2). The performances of this BPM are analyzed both experimentally and theoretically, and the limitations of this existing system clearly identified. A new cavity and new electronics have been designed in order to improve the position resolution down to 1 {mu}m and the damping time down to 10 ns.

  3. High resolution Fourier interferometer-spectrophotopolarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A high-resolution Fourier interferometer-spectrophotopolarimeter is provided using a single linear polarizer-analyzer the transmission axis azimuth of which is positioned successively in the three orientations of 0 deg, 45 deg, and 90 deg, in front of a detector; four flat mirrors, three of which are switchable to either of two positions to direct an incoming beam from an interferometer to the polarizer-analyzer around a sample cell transmitted through a medium in a cell and reflected by medium in the cell; and four fixed focussing lenses, all located in a sample chamber attached at the exit side of the interferometer. This arrangement can provide the distribution of energy and complete polarization state across the spectrum of the reference light entering from the interferometer; the same light after a fixed-angle reflection from the sample cell containing a medium to be analyzed; and the same light after direct transmission through the same sample cell, with the spectral resolution provided by the interferometer.

  4. High-resolution light microscopy of nanoforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodyanoy, Vitaly; Pustovyy, Oleg; Vainrub, Arnold

    2007-09-01

    We developed a high resolution light imaging system. Diffraction gratings with 100 nm width lines as well as less than 100 nm size features of different-shaped objects are clearly visible on a calibrated microscope test slide (Vainrub et al., Optics Letters, 2006, 31, 2855). The two-point resolution increase results from a known narrowing of the central diffraction peak for the annular aperture. Better visibility and advanced contrast of the smallest features in the image are due to enhancement of high spatial frequencies in the optical transfer function. The imaging system is portable, low energy, and battery operated. It has been adapted to use in both transmitting and reflecting light. It is particularly applicable for motile nanoform systems where structure and functions can be depicted in real time. We have isolated micrometer and submicrometer particles, termed proteons, from human and animal blood. Proteons form by reversible seeded aggregation of proteins around proteon nucleating centers (PNCs). PNCs are comprised of 1-2nm metallic nanoclusters containing 40-300 atoms. Proteons are capable of spontaneous assembling into higher nanoform systems assuming structure of complicated topology. The arrangement of complex proteon system mimics the structure of a small biological cell. It has structures that imitate membrane and nucleolus or nuclei. Some of these nanoforms are motile. They interact and divide. Complex nanoform systems can spontaneously reduce to simple proteons. The physical properties of these nanoforms could shed some light on the properties of early life forms or forms at extreme conditions.

  5. Structure Identification Using High Resolution Mass ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The iCSS CompTox Dashboard is a publicly accessible dashboard provided by the National Center for Computation Toxicology at the US-EPA. It serves a number of purposes, including providing a chemistry database underpinning many of our public-facing projects (e.g. ToxCast and ExpoCast). The available data and searches provide a valuable path to structure identification using mass spectrometry as the source data. With an underlying database of over 720,000 chemicals, the dashboard has already been used to assist in identifying chemicals present in house dust. This poster reviews the benefits of the EPA’s platform and underlying algorithms used for the purpose of compound identification using high-resolution mass spectrometry data. Standard approaches for both mass and formula lookup are available but the dashboard delivers a novel approach for hit ranking based on functional use of the chemicals. The focus on high-quality data, novel ranking approaches and integration to other resources of value to mass spectrometrists makes the CompTox Dashboard a valuable resource for the identification of environmental chemicals. This abstract does not reflect U.S. EPA policy poster presented at the Eastern Analytical Symposium (EAS) held in Somerset, NJ

  6. CrIS High Resolution Hyperspectral Radiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepplewhite, C. L.; Strow, L. L.; Motteler, H.; Desouza-Machado, S. G.; Tobin, D. C.; Martin, G.; Gumley, L.

    2014-12-01

    The CrIS hyperspectral sounder flying on Suomi-NPPpresently has reduced spectral resolution in the mid-wave andshort-wave spectral bands due to truncation of the interferograms inorbit. CrIS has occasionally downlinked full interferograms for thesebands (0.8 cm max path, or 0.625 cm-1 point spacing) for a feworbits up to a full day. Starting Oct.1, 2014 CrIS will be commandedto download full interferograms continuously for the remainder of themission, although NOAA will not immediately produce high-spectralresolution Sensor Data Records (SDRs). Although the originalmotivation for operating in high-resolution mode was improved spectralcalibration, these new data will also improve (1) vertical sensitivityto water vapor, and (2) greatly increase the CrIS sensitivity tocarbon monoxide. This should improve (1) NWP data assimilation ofwater vapor and (2) provide long-term continuity of carbon monoxideretrievals begun with MOPITT on EOS-TERRA and AIRS on EOS-AQUA. Wehave developed a SDR algorithm to produce calibrated high-spectralresolution radiances which includes several improvements to theexisting CrIS SDR algorithm, and will present validation of thesehigh-spectral resolution radiances using a variety of techniques,including bias evaluation versus NWP model data and inter-comparisonsto AIRS and IASI using simultaneous nadir overpasses (SNOs). Theauthors are presently working to implement this algorithm for NASASuomi NPP Program production of Earth System Data Records.

  7. Wavefront metrology for high resolution optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Ryan H.

    Next generation extreme ultraviolet (EUV) optical systems are moving to higher resolution optics to accommodate smaller length scales targeted by the semiconductor industry. As the numerical apertures (NA) of the optics become larger, it becomes increasingly difficult to characterize aberrations due to experimental challenges associated with high-resolution spatial filters and geometrical effects caused by large incident angles of the test wavefront. This dissertation focuses on two methods of wavefront metrology for high resolution optical systems. The first method, lateral shearing interferometry (LSI), is a self-referencing interferometry where the test wavefront is incident on a low spatial frequency grating, and the resulting interference between the diffracted orders is used to reconstruct the wavefront aberrations. LSI has many advantages over other interferometric tests such as phase-shifting point diffraction interferometry (PS/PDI) due to its experimental simplicity, stability, relaxed coherence requirements, and its ability to scale to high numerical apertures. While LSI has historically been a qualitative test, this dissertation presents a novel quantitative investigation of the LSI interferogram. The analysis reveals the existence of systematic aberrations due to the nonlinear angular response from the diffraction grating that compromises the accuracy of LSI at medium to high NAs. In the medium NA regime (0.15 < NA < 0.35), a holographic model is presented that derives the systematic aberrations in closed form, which demonstrates an astigmatism term that scales as the square of the grating defocus. In the high NA regime (0.35 < NA), a geometrical model is introduced that describes the aberrations as a system of transcendental equations that can be solved numerically. The characterization and removal of these systematic errors is a necessary step that unlocks LSI as a viable candidate for high NA EUV optical testing. The second method is a novel image

  8. Potential High Resolution Dosimeters For MRT

    SciTech Connect

    Braeuer-Krisch, E.; Brochard, T.; Prezado, Y.; Bravin, A.; Berkvens, P.; Rosenfeld, A.; Lerch, M.; Petasecca, M.; Akselrod, M.; Sykora, J.; Bartz, J.; Ptaszkiewicz, M.; Olko, P.; Berg, A.; Wieland, M.; Doran, S.; Kamlowski, A.; Cellere, G.

    2010-07-23

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) uses highly collimated, quasi-parallel arrays of X-ray microbeams of 50-600 keV, produced by 2nd and 3rd generation synchrotron sources, such as the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in the U.S., and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in France, respectively. High dose rates are necessary to deliver therapeutic doses in microscopic volumes, to avoid spreading of the microbeams by cardiosynchronous movement of the tissues. A small beam divergence and a filtered white beam spectrum in the energy range between 30 and 250 keV results in the advantage of steep dose gradients with a sharper penumbra than that produced in conventional radiotherapy. MRT research over the past 20 years has allowed a vast number of results from preclinical trials on different animal models, including mice, rats, piglets and rabbits. Microbeams in the range between 10 and 100 micron width show an unprecedented sparing of normal radiosensitive tissues as well as preferential damage to malignant tumor tissues. Typically, MRT uses arrays of narrow ({approx}25-100 micron-wide) microplanar beams separated by wider (100-400 microns centre-to-centre, c-t-c) microplanar spaces. We note that thicker microbeams of 0.1-0.68 mm used by investigators at the NSLS are still called microbeams, although some invesigators in the community prefer to call them minibeams. This report, however, limits it discussion to 25-100 {mu}m microbeams. Peak entrance doses of several hundreds of Gy are surprisingly well tolerated by normal tissues. High resolution dosimetry has been developed over the last two decades, but typical dose ranges are adapted to dose delivery in conventional Radiation Therapy (RT). Spatial resolution in the sub-millimetric range has been achieved, which is currently required for quality assurance measurements in Gamma-knife RT. Most typical commercially available detectors are not suitable for MRT applications at a dose rate of 16000 Gy

  9. Potential High Resolution Dosimeters For MRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bräuer-Krisch, E.; Rosenfeld, A.; Lerch, M.; Petasecca, M.; Akselrod, M.; Sykora, J.; Bartz, J.; Ptaszkiewicz, M.; Olko, P.; Berg, A.; Wieland, M.; Doran, S.; Brochard, T.; Kamlowski, A.; Cellere, G.; Paccagnella, A.; Siegbahn, E. A.; Prezado, Y.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Bravin, A.; Dusseau, L.; Berkvens, P.

    2010-07-01

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) uses highly collimated, quasi-parallel arrays of X-ray microbeams of 50-600 keV, produced by 2nd and 3rd generation synchrotron sources, such as the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in the U.S., and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in France, respectively. High dose rates are necessary to deliver therapeutic doses in microscopic volumes, to avoid spreading of the microbeams by cardiosynchronous movement of the tissues. A small beam divergence and a filtered white beam spectrum in the energy range between 30 and 250 keV results in the advantage of steep dose gradients with a sharper penumbra than that produced in conventional radiotherapy. MRT research over the past 20 years has allowed a vast number of results from preclinical trials on different animal models, including mice, rats, piglets and rabbits. Microbeams in the range between 10 and 100 micron width show an unprecedented sparing of normal radiosensitive tissues as well as preferential damage to malignant tumor tissues. Typically, MRT uses arrays of narrow (˜25-100 micron-wide) microplanar beams separated by wider (100-400 microns centre-to-centre, c-t-c) microplanar spaces. We note that thicker microbeams of 0.1-0.68 mm used by investigators at the NSLS are still called microbeams, although some invesigators in the community prefer to call them minibeams. This report, however, limits it discussion to 25-100 μm microbeams. Peak entrance doses of several hundreds of Gy are surprisingly well tolerated by normal tissues. High resolution dosimetry has been developed over the last two decades, but typical dose ranges are adapted to dose delivery in conventional Radiation Therapy (RT). Spatial resolution in the sub-millimetric range has been achieved, which is currently required for quality assurance measurements in Gamma-knife RT. Most typical commercially available detectors are not suitable for MRT applications at a dose rate of 16000 Gy/s, micron

  10. Large Scale, High Resolution, Mantle Dynamics Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geenen, T.; Berg, A. V.; Spakman, W.

    2007-12-01

    To model the geodynamic evolution of plate convergence, subduction and collision and to allow for a connection to various types of observational data, geophysical, geodetical and geological, we developed a 4D (space-time) numerical mantle convection code. The model is based on a spherical 3D Eulerian fem model, with quadratic elements, on top of which we constructed a 3D Lagrangian particle in cell(PIC) method. We use the PIC method to transport material properties and to incorporate a viscoelastic rheology. Since capturing small scale processes associated with localization phenomena require a high resolution, we spend a considerable effort on implementing solvers suitable to solve for models with over 100 million degrees of freedom. We implemented Additive Schwartz type ILU based methods in combination with a Krylov solver, GMRES. However we found that for problems with over 500 thousend degrees of freedom the convergence of the solver degraded severely. This observation is known from the literature [Saad, 2003] and results from the local character of the ILU preconditioner resulting in a poor approximation of the inverse of A for large A. The size of A for which ILU is no longer usable depends on the condition of A and on the amount of fill in allowed for the ILU preconditioner. We found that for our problems with over 5×105 degrees of freedom convergence became to slow to solve the system within an acceptable amount of walltime, one minute, even when allowing for considerable amount of fill in. We also implemented MUMPS and found good scaling results for problems up to 107 degrees of freedom for up to 32 CPU¡¯s. For problems with over 100 million degrees of freedom we implemented Algebraic Multigrid type methods (AMG) from the ML library [Sala, 2006]. Since multigrid methods are most effective for single parameter problems, we rebuild our model to use the SIMPLE method in the Stokes solver [Patankar, 1980]. We present scaling results from these solvers for 3D

  11. High-resolution phylogenetic microbial community profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Esther; Coleman-Derr, Devin; Bowman, Brett; Schwientek, Patrick; Clum, Alicia; Copeland, Alex; Ciobanu, Doina; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Gies, Esther; Hallam, Steve; Tringe, Susannah; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-03-17

    The representation of bacterial and archaeal genome sequences is strongly biased towards cultivated organisms, which belong to merely four phylogenetic groups. Functional information and inter-phylum level relationships are still largely underexplored for candidate phyla, which are often referred to as microbial dark matter. Furthermore, a large portion of the 16S rRNA gene records in the GenBank database are labeled as environmental samples and unclassified, which is in part due to low read accuracy, potential chimeric sequences produced during PCR amplifications and the low resolution of short amplicons. In order to improve the phylogenetic classification of novel species and advance our knowledge of the ecosystem function of uncultivated microorganisms, high-throughput full length 16S rRNA gene sequencing methodologies with reduced biases are needed. We evaluated the performance of PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing in high-resolution phylogenetic microbial community profiling. For this purpose, we compared PacBio and Illumina metagenomic shotgun and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of a mock community as well as of an environmental sample from Sakinaw Lake, British Columbia. Sakinaw Lake is known to contain a large age of microbial species from candidate phyla. Sequencing results show that community structure based on PacBio shotgun and 16S rRNA gene sequences is highly similar in both the mock and the environmental communities. Resolution power and community representation accuracy from SMRT sequencing data appeared to be independent of GC content of microbial genomes and was higher when compared to Illumina-based metagenome shotgun and 16S rRNA gene (iTag) sequences, e.g. full-length sequencing resolved all 23 OTUs in the mock community, while iTags did not resolve closely related species. SMRT sequencing hence offers various potential benefits when characterizing uncharted microbial communities.

  12. Toward high-resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, Daniel; Huie, Philip; Vankov, Alexander; Asher, Alon; Baccus, Steven

    2005-04-01

    It has been already demonstrated that electrical stimulation of retina can produce visual percepts in blind patients suffering from macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Current retinal implants provide very low resolution (just a few electrodes), while several thousand pixels are required for functional restoration of sight. We present a design of the optoelectronic retinal prosthetic system that can activate a retinal stimulating array with pixel density up to 2,500 pix/mm2 (geometrically corresponding to a visual acuity of 20/80), and allows for natural eye scanning rather than scanning with a head-mounted camera. The system operates similarly to "virtual reality" imaging devices used in military and medical applications. An image from a video camera is projected by a goggle-mounted infrared LED-LCD display onto the retina, activating an array of powered photodiodes in the retinal implant. Such a system provides a broad field of vision by allowing for natural eye scanning. The goggles are transparent to visible light, thus allowing for simultaneous utilization of remaining natural vision along with prosthetic stimulation. Optical control of the implant allows for simple adjustment of image processing algorithms and for learning. A major prerequisite for high resolution stimulation is the proximity of neural cells to the stimulation sites. This can be achieved with sub-retinal implants constructed in a manner that directs migration of retinal cells to target areas. Two basic implant geometries are described: perforated membranes and protruding electrode arrays. Possibility of the tactile neural stimulation is also examined.

  13. High-resolution downscaling for hydrological management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbrich, Uwe; Rust, Henning; Meredith, Edmund; Kpogo-Nuwoklo, Komlan; Vagenas, Christos

    2017-04-01

    Hydrological modellers and water managers require high-resolution climate data to model regional hydrologies and how these may respond to future changes in the large-scale climate. The ability to successfully model such changes and, by extension, critical infrastructure planning is often impeded by a lack of suitable climate data. This typically takes the form of too-coarse data from climate models, which are not sufficiently detailed in either space or time to be able to support water management decisions and hydrological research. BINGO (Bringing INnovation in onGOing water management; ) aims to bridge the gap between the needs of hydrological modellers and planners, and the currently available range of climate data, with the overarching aim of providing adaptation strategies for climate change-related challenges. Producing the kilometre- and sub-daily-scale climate data needed by hydrologists through continuous simulations is generally computationally infeasible. To circumvent this hurdle, we adopt a two-pronged approach involving (1) selective dynamical downscaling and (2) conditional stochastic weather generators, with the former presented here. We take an event-based approach to downscaling in order to achieve the kilometre-scale input needed by hydrological modellers. Computational expenses are minimized by identifying extremal weather patterns for each BINGO research site in lower-resolution simulations and then only downscaling to the kilometre-scale (convection permitting) those events during which such patterns occur. Here we (1) outline the methodology behind the selection of the events, and (2) compare the modelled precipitation distribution and variability (preconditioned on the extremal weather patterns) with that found in observations.

  14. Annealing as grown large volume CZT single crystals increased spectral resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Longxia Li

    2008-03-19

    The spectroscopic performance of current large-volume Cadmium 10% Zinc Telluride, Cd{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 0.1}Te, (CZT) detectors is impaired by cumulative effect of tellurium precipitates (secondary phases) presented in CZT single-crystal grown by low-pressure Bridgman techniques(1). This statistical effect may limit the energy resolution of large-volume CZT detectors (typically 2-5% at 662 keV for 12-mm thick devices). The stochastic nature of the interaction prevents the use of any electronic or digital charge correction techniques without a significant reduction in the detector efficiency. This volume constraint hampers the utility of CZT since the detectors are inefficient at detecting photons >1MeV and/or in low fluency situations. During the project, seven runs CZT ingots have been grown, in these ingots the indium dopant concentrations have been changed in the range between 0.5ppm to 6ppm. The I-R mapping imaging method has been employed to study the Te-precipitates. The Teprecipitates in as-grown CZT wafers, and after annealing wafers have been systematically studied by using I-R mapping system (home installed, resolution of 1.5 {micro}m). We employed our I-R standard annealing CZT (Zn=4%) procedure or two-steps annealing into radiation CZT (Zn=10%), we achieved the 'non'-Te precipitates (size < 1 {micro}m) CZT n+-type with resistivity > 10{sup 9-10} {Omega}-cm. We believe that the Te-precipitates are the p-type defects, its reducing number causes the CZT became n+-type, therefore we varied or reduced the indium dapant concentration during the growth and changed the Te-precipitates size and density by using different Cd-temperature and different annealing procedures. We have made the comparisons among Te-precipitates size, density and Indium dopant concentrations, and we found that the CZT with smaller size of Te-precipitates is suitable for radiation uses but non-Te precipitates is impossible to be used in the radiation detectors, because the CZT would became

  15. AstroSat CZT Imager Observations of GRB 151006A: Timing, Spectroscopy, and Polarization Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, A. R.; Chand, Vikas; Hingar, M. K.; Iyyani, S.; Khanna, Rakesh; Kutty, A. P. K.; Malkar, J. P.; Paul, D.; Bhalerao, V. B.; Bhattacharya, D.; Dewangan, G. C.; Pawar, Pramod; Vibhute, A. M.; Chattopadhyay, T.; Mithun, N. P. S.; Vadawale, S. V.; Vagshette, N.; Basak, R.; Pradeep, P.; Samuel, Essy; Sreekumar, S.; Vinod, P.; Navalgund, K. H.; Pandiyan, R.; Sarma, K. S.; Seetha, S.; Subbarao, K.

    2016-12-01

    AstroSat is a multi-wavelength satellite launched on 2015 September 28. The CZT Imager of AstroSat on its very first day of operation detected a long duration gamma-ray burst (GRB), namely GRB 151006A. Using the off-axis imaging and spectral response of the instrument, we demonstrate that the CZT Imager can localize this GRB correctly to about a few degrees, and it can provide, in conjunction with Swift, spectral parameters similar to those obtained from Fermi/GBM. Hence, the CZT Imager would be a useful addition to the currently operating GRB instruments (Swift and Fermi). Specifically, we argue that the CZT Imager will be most useful for the short hard GRBs by providing localization for those detected by Fermi and spectral information for those detected only by Swift. We also provide preliminary results on a new exciting capability of this instrument: the CZT Imager is able to identify Compton scattered events thereby providing polarization information for bright GRBs. GRB 151006A, in spite of being relatively faint, shows hints of a polarization signal at 100-300 keV (though at a low significance level). We point out that the CZT Imager should provide significant time resolved polarization measurements for GRBs that have fluence three times higher than that of GRB 151006A. We estimate that the number of such bright GRBs detectable by the CZT Imager is five to six per year. The CZT Imager can also act as a good hard X-ray monitoring device for possible electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave events.

  16. Epitaxial growth of CZT(S,Se) on silicon

    DOEpatents

    Bojarczuk, Nestor A.; Gershon, Talia S.; Guha, Supratik; Shin, Byungha; Zhu, Yu

    2016-03-15

    Techniques for epitaxial growth of CZT(S,Se) materials on Si are provided. In one aspect, a method of forming an epitaxial kesterite material is provided which includes the steps of: selecting a Si substrate based on a crystallographic orientation of the Si substrate; forming an epitaxial oxide interlayer on the Si substrate to enhance wettability of the epitaxial kesterite material on the Si substrate, wherein the epitaxial oxide interlayer is formed from a material that is lattice-matched to Si; and forming the epitaxial kesterite material on a side of the epitaxial oxide interlayer opposite the Si substrate, wherein the epitaxial kesterite material includes Cu, Zn, Sn, and at least one of S and Se, and wherein a crystallographic orientation of the epitaxial kesterite material is based on the crystallographic orientation of the Si substrate. A method of forming an epitaxial kesterite-based photovoltaic device and an epitaxial kesterite-based device are also provided.

  17. Design and development of the RT-2/CZT payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkar, J. P.; Tawde, Amit; Sreekumar, S.; Hingar, M. K.; Chakrabarti, S. K.; Nandi, Anuj

    The RT-2/CZT spectrometer is one of the satellite payloads to be flown onboard the Coronas-Photon satellite in 2008. It is a collaborative experiment between TIFR, CSP, ISRO (India) and MEPhI (Russia). It is designed to study the solar hard X-ray flare phenomena in the energy range 20 keV - 120 keV using pixilated (2.5 mm times 2.5 mm) cadmium zinc telluride detector array. These detectors along with an image coding device like coded aperture mask (CAM) or fresnel zone plate (FZP) helps in to snap images (in medium X-ray energy ranges) of the solar flares. The design characteristics of this payload are discussed.

  18. HEXITEC ASIC—a pixellated readout chip for CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Lawrence; Seller, Paul; Wilson, Matthew; Hardie, Alec

    2009-06-01

    HEXITEC is a collaborative project with the aim of developing a new range of detectors for high-energy X-ray imaging. High-energy X-ray imaging has major advantages over current lower energy imaging for the life and physical sciences, including improved phase-contrast images on larger, higher density samples and with lower accumulated doses. However, at these energies conventional silicon-based devices cannot be used, hence, the requirement for a new range of high Z-detector materials. Underpinning the HEXITEC programme are the development of a pixellated Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors and a pixellated readout ASIC which will be bump-bonded to the detector. The HEXITEC ASIC is required to have low noise (20 electrons rms) and tolerate detector leakage currents. A prototype 20×20 pixel ASIC has been developed and manufactured on a standard 0.35 μm CMOS process.

  19. High Resolution Airborne Shallow Water Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbacher, F.; Pfennigbauer, M.; Aufleger, M.; Ullrich, A.

    2012-07-01

    In order to meet the requirements of the European Water Framework Directive (EU-WFD), authorities face the problem of repeatedly performing area-wide surveying of all kinds of inland waters. Especially for mid-sized or small rivers this is a considerable challenge imposing insurmountable logistical efforts and costs. It is therefore investigated if large-scale surveying of a river system on an operational basis is feasible by employing airborne hydrographic laser scanning. In cooperation with the Bavarian Water Authority (WWA Weilheim) a pilot project was initiated by the Unit of Hydraulic Engineering at the University of Innsbruck and RIEGL Laser Measurement Systems exploiting the possibilities of a new LIDAR measurement system with high spatial resolution and high measurement rate to capture about 70 km of riverbed and foreland for the river Loisach in Bavaria/Germany and the estuary and parts of the shoreline (about 40km in length) of lake Ammersee. The entire area surveyed was referenced to classic terrestrial cross-section surveys with the aim to derive products for the monitoring and managing needs of the inland water bodies forced by the EU-WFD. The survey was performed in July 2011 by helicopter and airplane and took 3 days in total. In addition, high resolution areal images were taken to provide an optical reference, offering a wide range of possibilities on further research, monitoring, and managing responsibilities. The operating altitude was about 500 m to maintain eye-safety, even for the aided eye, the airspeed was about 55 kts for the helicopter and 75 kts for the aircraft. The helicopter was used in the alpine regions while the fixed wing aircraft was used in the plains and the urban area, using appropriate scan rates to receive evenly distributed point clouds. The resulting point density ranged from 10 to 25 points per square meter. By carefully selecting days with optimum water quality, satisfactory penetration down to the river bed was achieved

  20. High Resolution Velocity Structure in Eastern Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M; Gok, R; Zor, E; Walter, W

    2004-09-03

    We investigate the crustal and upper mantle structure of eastern Turkey where the Anatolian, Arabian and Eurasian Plates meet and form a complex tectonic structure. The Bitlis suture is a continental collision zone between the Anatolian plateau and the Arabian plate. Broadband data available through the Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment (ETSE) provided a unique opportunity for studying the high resolution velocity structure. Zor et al. found an average 46 km thick crust in Anatolian plateau using six-layered grid search inversion of the ETSE receiver functions. Receiver functions are sensitive to the velocity contrast of interfaces and the relative travel time of converted and reverberated waves between those interfaces. The interpretation of receiver function alone with many-layered parameterization may result in an apparent depth-velocity tradeoff. In order to improve previous velocity model, we employed the joint inversion method with many layered parameterization of Julia et al. (2000) to the ETSE receiver functions. In this technique, the receiver function and surface-wave observations are combined into a single algebraic equation and each data set is weighted by an estimate of the uncertainty in the observations. We consider azimuthal changes of receiver functions and have stacked them into different groups. We calculated the receiver functions using iterative time-domain deconvolution technique and surface wave group velocity dispersion curves between 10-100 sec. We are making surface wave dispersion measurements at the ETSE stations and have incorporated them into a regional group velocity model. Preliminary results indicate a strong trend in the long period group velocity in the northeast. This indicates slow upper mantle velocities in the region consistent with Pn, Sn and receiver function results. We started with both the 1-D model that is obtained with the 12 tones dam explosion shot data recorded by ETSE network and the existing receiver function

  1. High Resolution Velocity Structure in Eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasyanos, M. E.; Gok, R.; Zor, E.; Walter, W. R.

    2004-12-01

    We investigate the crust and upper mantle structure of eastern Turkey where the Anatolian, Arabian and Eurasian Plates meet, forming a complex tectonic regime. The Bitlis suture is a continental collision zone between the Anatolian plateau and the Arabian plate. Broadband data available through the Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment (ETSE) provide a unique opportunity for studying the high resolution velocity structure of the region. Zor et al. (2003) found an average 46 km thick crust in the Anatolian plateau using a six-layered grid search inversion of the ETSE receiver functions. Receiver functions are sensitive to the velocity contrast of interfaces and the relative travel time of converted and reverberated waves between those interfaces. The interpretation of receiver functions alone, however, may result in an apparent depth-velocity trade-off [Ammon et al., 1990]. In order to improve upon this velocity model, we have combined the receiver functions with surface wave data using the joint inversion method of Julia et al. (2000). In this technique, the two sets of observations are combined into a single algebraic equation and each data set is weighted by an estimate of the uncertainty in the observations. The receiver functions are calculated using an iterative time-domain deconvolution technique. We also consider azimuthal changes in the receiver functions and have stacked them into different groups accordingly. We are improving our surface wave model by making Love and Rayleigh dispersion measurements at the ETSE stations and incorporating them into a regional group velocity model for periods between 10 and 100 seconds. Preliminary results indicate a strong trend in the long period group velocities toward the northeast, indicating slow upper mantle velocities in the area consistent with Pn, Sn and receiver function results. Starting models used for the joint inversions include both a 1-D model from a 12-ton dam shot recorded by ETSE [Gurbuz et al., 2004] and

  2. High-resolution noncontact atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Rubén; García, Ricardo; Schwarz, Udo

    2009-07-01

    original papers authored by many of the leading groups in the field with the goal of providing a well-balanced overview on the state-of-the-art in this rapidly evolving field. These papers, many of which are based on notable presentations given during the Madrid conference, feature highlights such as (1) the development of sophisticated force spectroscopy procedures that are able to map the complete 3D tip-sample force field on different surfaces; (2) the considerable resolution improvement of Kelvin probe force microscopy (reaching, in some cases, the atomic scale), which is accompanied by a thorough, quantitative understanding of the contrast observed; (3) the perfecting of atomic resolution imaging on insulating substrates, which helps reshape our microscopic understanding of surface properties and chemical activity of these surfaces; (4) the description of instrumental and methodological developments that pave the way to the atomic-scale characterization of magnetic and electronic properties of nanostructures, and last but not least (5) the extension of dynamic imaging modes to high-resolution operation in liquids, ultimately achieving atomic resolution. The latter developments are already having a significant impact in the highly competitive field of biological imaging under physiological conditions. This special issue of Nanotechnology would not have been possible without the highly professional support from Nina Couzin, Amy Harvey, Alex Wotherspoon and the entire Nanotechnology team at IOP Publishing. We are thankful for their help in pushing this project forward. We also thank the authors who have contributed their excellent original articles to this issue, the referees whose comments have helped make the issue an accurate portrait of this rapidly moving field, and the entire NC-AFM community that continues to drive NC-AFM to new horizons.

  3. ALMA Debuts High-Resolution Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-07-01

    through space as it orbits the Sun. The resolution of these images — enough to study the shape and even some surface features of the asteroid! — are unprecedented for this wavelength. HL Tau is a young star surrounded by a protoplanetary disk. ALMA's detailed observations of this region revealed remarkable structure within the disk: a series of light and dark concentric rings indicative of planets caught in the act of forming. Studying this system will help us understand how multi-planet solar systems like our own form and evolve. The star-forming galaxy SDP.81 — located so far away that the light we see was emitted when the Universe was only 15% of its current age — is gravitationally-lensed into a cosmic arc, due to the convenient placement of a nearby foreground galaxy. The combination of the lucky alignment and ALMA's high resolution grant us a spectacularly detailed view of this distant galaxy, allowing us to study its actual shape and the motion within it. The observations from ALMA's first test of its long baseline demonstrate that ALMA is capable of doing the transformational science it promised. As we gear up for the next cycle of observations, it's clear that exciting times are ahead! Citation: ALMA ship et al. 2015 ApJ 808 L1, L2, L3 and L4. Focus on the ALMA Long Baseline Campaign

  4. Using high-resolution displays for high-resolution cardiac data.

    PubMed

    Goodyer, Christopher; Hodrien, John; Wood, Jason; Kohl, Peter; Brodlie, Ken

    2009-07-13

    The ability to perform fast, accurate, high-resolution visualization is fundamental to improving our understanding of anatomical data. As the volumes of data increase from improvements in scanning technology, the methods applied to visualization must evolve. In this paper, we address the interactive display of data from high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging scanning of a rabbit heart and subsequent histological imaging. We describe a visualization environment involving a tiled liquid crystal display panel display wall and associated software, which provides an interactive and intuitive user interface. The oView software is an OpenGL application that is written for the VR Juggler environment. This environment abstracts displays and devices away from the application itself, aiding portability between different systems, from desktop PCs to multi-tiled display walls. Portability between display walls has been demonstrated through its use on walls at the universities of both Leeds and Oxford. We discuss important factors to be considered for interactive two-dimensional display of large three-dimensional datasets, including the use of intuitive input devices and level of detail aspects.

  5. A broadband, high-resolution spatial heterodyne spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, J. E.; Harlander, J.; Roesler, F. L.; Labby, Z.

    2009-05-01

    Design and performance parameters of a broadband, high-resolution spatial heterodyne spectrometer (SHS) with a transmitting beamsplitter are described. This Mark 1 SHS achieves more than a factor of five in continuous wavenumber coverage with a resolving power in hundreds of thousands. Progress toward an all reflection, broadband, high-resolution Mark 2 SHS is reported.

  6. High-resolution ground-based spectroscopy: where and how ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallavicini, R.

    2002-07-01

    An overview is presented of high-resolution optical spectrographs in operation or under development at large telescopes, with emphasis on those facilities best suited for the study of late-type stars and stellar surface inhomogeneities. Plans for the development of new high-resolution spectroscopic instruments are discussed with emphasis on the ICE spectrograph for the PEPSI spectropolarimeter at the LBT.

  7. High-resolution Mueller matrix imaging polarimetry for understanding high-resolution optoelectronic modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzaniti, J. Larry; Chipman, Russell A.

    1994-09-01

    A high resolution Mueller matrix imaging polarimetry test bed has been constructed and calibrated that has unique capabilities for characterizing optoelectronic devices, such as liquid crystal modulators, PLZT modulators, quantum well modulators, and surface emitting lasers. Similarly, the instrument can perform end-to-end measurements on optoelectronic systems including optical computers, interconnects, and correlators. It addresses, at the systems level, the need for incorporating polarimetric analysis and measurement techniques into the design, alignment, and testing of photonics technologies. The polarimeter maps the polarization altering characteristics of optical devices and optical systems, producing means of the retardance, the diattenuation, and the depolarization. The polarization mappings may be obtained across individual pixels or across large pixel arrays. The data sets provide a wealth of information not otherwise accessible for characterizing device uniformity, operating parameters, angular bandwidth, as well as identifying non-ideal polarization characteristics.

  8. Cadium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) Gamma Ray Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    William Quam

    2001-09-01

    This report describes CZT crystals and their use in large arrays for generation of gamma ray spectra. Laboratory spectra will be shown together with spectra accumulated by various battery powered portable instruments (see Appendix A). One of these portable instruments was specifically constructed to minimize power consumption and yet provide reasonable isotope identification capability. Detailed data will be presented covering gamma energy resolution, gamma peak shapes, system background, and detector efficiency. Nearly all data were taken with very small crystals of CZT; cubes 5 mm on a side. A few spectra will be presented from cylindrical crystals of about the same size (see Appendix A). The small crystal size leads to low counting rates and extended counting times for reliable isotope identification. We have addressed this problem by using arrays of CZT crystals, initially two crystals and, at present, arrays of eight crystals. Data will be shown relating spectral parameters for these two arrays. System MDA is one way of combining resolution, efficiency, and background that will enable direct comparison of various detector types for individual isotope identification. We have calculated the MDA for an early dual crystal array and the current eight crystal array. Data derived from each array will be presented. In addition, it is possible to extrapolate the MDA methodology to much larger arrays. A 32-crystal array is under construction and extrapolations to 256 and 1024 crystals are considered possible. Estimated MDA values for these larger arrays are also presented. Several 8-crystal arrays have been constructed and versions have been incorporated into portable instruments. Descriptions of these small instruments are given covering physical size, weight, and general configuration. These instruments have been tested for shock and temperature effects and data will be presented on the results of these tests. The MDA concept will also allow extrapolation to large

  9. Tilted angle CZT detector for photon counting/energy weighting x-ray and CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2006-09-07

    X-ray imaging with a photon counting/energy weighting detector can provide the highest signal to noise ratio (SNR). Scanning slit/multi-slit x-ray image acquisition can provide a dose-efficient scatter rejection, which increases SNR. Use of a photon counting/energy weighting detector in a scanning slit/multi-slit acquisition geometry could provide highest possible dose efficiency in x-ray and CT imaging. Currently, the most advanced photon counting detector is the cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector, which, however, is suboptimal for energy resolved x-ray imaging. A tilted angle CZT detector is proposed in this work for applications in photon counting/energy weighting x-ray and CT imaging. In tilted angle configuration, the x-ray beam hits the surface of the linear array of CZT crystals at a small angle. This allows the use of CZT crystals of a small thickness while maintaining the high photon absorption. Small thickness CZT detectors allow for a significant decrease in the polarization effect in the CZT volume and an increase in count rate. The tilted angle CZT with a small thickness also provides higher spatial and energy resolution, and shorter charge collection time, which potentially enables fast energy resolving x-ray image acquisition. In this work, the major performance parameters of the tilted angle CZT detector, including its count rate, spatial resolution and energy resolution, were evaluated. It was shown that for a CZT detector with a 0.7 mm thickness and 13 degrees tilting angle, the maximum count rate can be increased by 10.7 times, while photon absorption remains >90% at photon energies up to 120 keV. Photon counting/energy weighting x-ray imaging using a tilted angle CZT detector was simulated. SNR improvement due to optimal photon energy weighting was 23% and 14% when adipose contrast element, inserted in soft tissue with 10 cm and 20 cm thickness, respectively, was imaged using 5 energy bins and weighting factors optimized for the adipose. SNR

  10. Tilted angle CZT detector for photon counting/energy weighting x-ray and CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2006-09-01

    X-ray imaging with a photon counting/energy weighting detector can provide the highest signal to noise ratio (SNR). Scanning slit/multi-slit x-ray image acquisition can provide a dose-efficient scatter rejection, which increases SNR. Use of a photon counting/energy weighting detector in a scanning slit/multi-slit acquisition geometry could provide highest possible dose efficiency in x-ray and CT imaging. Currently, the most advanced photon counting detector is the cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector, which, however, is suboptimal for energy resolved x-ray imaging. A tilted angle CZT detector is proposed in this work for applications in photon counting/energy weighting x-ray and CT imaging. In tilted angle configuration, the x-ray beam hits the surface of the linear array of CZT crystals at a small angle. This allows the use of CZT crystals of a small thickness while maintaining the high photon absorption. Small thickness CZT detectors allow for a significant decrease in the polarization effect in the CZT volume and an increase in count rate. The tilted angle CZT with a small thickness also provides higher spatial and energy resolution, and shorter charge collection time, which potentially enables fast energy resolving x-ray image acquisition. In this work, the major performance parameters of the tilted angle CZT detector, including its count rate, spatial resolution and energy resolution, were evaluated. It was shown that for a CZT detector with a 0.7 mm thickness and 13° tilting angle, the maximum count rate can be increased by 10.7 times, while photon absorption remains >90% at photon energies up to 120 keV. Photon counting/energy weighting x-ray imaging using a tilted angle CZT detector was simulated. SNR improvement due to optimal photon energy weighting was 23% and 14% when adipose contrast element, inserted in soft tissue with 10 cm and 20 cm thickness, respectively, was imaged using 5 energy bins and weighting factors optimized for the adipose. SNR

  11. Material properties limiting the performance of CZT gamma-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov,A.E.; Babalola, S.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Egarievwe, S. U.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.

    2009-03-16

    CdZnTe (CZT) nuclear radiation detectors are advanced sensors that utilize innovative technologies developed for wide band-gap semiconductor industry and microelectronics. They open opportunities for new types of room-temperature operating, field deployable instruments that provide accurate identification of potential radiological threats and timely awareness for both the civilian and military communities. Room-temperature radiation detectors are an emerging technology that relies on the use of high-quality CZT crystals whose availability is currently limited by material non-uniformities and the presence of extended defects. To address these issues, which are most critical to CZT sensor developments, we developed X-ray mapping and IR transmission microscopy systems to characterize both CZT crystals and devices. Since a customized system is required for such X-ray measurements, we use synchrotron radiation beams available at BNL's National Synchrotron Light Source. A highly-collimated and high-intensity X-ray beam supports measurements of areas as small as 10 x 10 {micro}m{sup 2}, and allowed us to see fluctuations in collected charge over the entire area of the detector in a reasonable time. The IR microscopy system allows for 3D visualization of Te inclusions and other extended defects. In this paper, we describe the experimental techniques used in our measurements and typical results obtained from CZT samples produced by different suppliers.

  12. Development of a CZT drift ring detector for X and γ ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alruhaili, A.; Sellin, P. J.; Lohstroh, A.; Boothman, V.; Veeramani, P.; Veale, M. C.; Sawhney, K. J. S.; Kachkanov, V.

    2015-04-01

    CdTe and CZT detectors are considered better choices for high energy γ and X-ray spectroscopy in comparison to Si and HPGe detectors due to their good quantum efficiency and room temperature operation. The performance limitations in CdTe and CZT detectors are mainly associated with poor hole transport and trapping phenomena. Among many techniques that can be used to eliminate the effect of the poor charge transport properties of holes in CdTe and CZT material, the drift ring technique shows promising results. In this work, the performance of a 2.3 mm thick CZT drift ring detector is investigated. Spatially resolved measurements were carried out with an X-ray microbeam (25 and 75 keV) at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron to study the response uniformity and extent of the active area. Higher energy photon irradiation was also carried out at up to 662 keV using different radioisotopes to complement the microbeam data. Different biasing schemes were investigated in terms of biasing the cathode rear electrode (bulk field) and the ring electrodes (lateral fields). The results show that increasing the bulk field with fixed-ratio ring biases and lateral fields with fixed bulk fields increase the active area of the device significantly, which contrasts with previous studies in CdTe, where only an increasing lateral field resulted in an improvement of device performance. This difference is attributed to the larger thickness of the CZT device reported here.

  13. Development of CZT detectors for x-ray and gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kuen; Martin, J. W.; Garson, A., III; Guo, Q.; Matteson, J.; Groza, M.; Beilicke, M.; Burger, A.; de Geronimo, G.; Krawczynski, H.

    2011-09-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) is the detector material of choice for the detection of X-rays in the 10 keV-1MeV energy band with excellent spatial and energy resolutions and without cryogenic cooling. In this contribution, we report on recent results of the CZT detector development program and several astrophysical experiments which make use of CZT detectors. In the first part of the paper, we discuss the performance of pixel and cross-strip CZT detectors read out with an ASIC developed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Our pixel detectors achieve some of the best energy resolutions reported in the literature. Cross-strip detectors are found to give an inferior performance and we investigate the reason for this performance difference. We also present results from a precision measurement of the effect of a steering grid on multi-pixel events obtained with a 200 micrometer collimator. In the second part of the paper, we describe the design and performance of the hard X-ray polarimeter X-Calibur. The polarimeter uses a 14 cm long scintillator scatterer, surrounded by an assembly of 32 2-5 mm thick CZT detectors. We discuss the sensitivity of the polarimeter to measure the linear polarization of 10 keV-80 keV X-rays on short and long balloon flights and results from testing the polarimeter in the laboratory.

  14. High resolution airborne geophysics at hazardous waste disposal sites

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, L.P.; Nyquist, J.E.; Doll, W.E.; Chong Foo, M.; Gamey, T.J.

    1995-06-01

    In 1994, a high resolution helicopter geophysical survey was conducted over portions of the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee. The 1800 line kilometer survey included multi-frequency electromagnetic and magnetic sensors. The areas covered by the high resolution portion of the survey were selected on the basis of their importance to the environmental restoration effort and on data obtained from the reconnaissance phase of the airborne survey in which electromagnetic, magnetic, and radiometric data were collected over the entire Oak Ridge Reservation in 1992--1993. The high resolution phase had lower sensor heights, more and higher EM frequencies, and tighter line spacings than did the reconnaissance survey. When flying over exceptionally clear areas, the high resolution bird came within a few meters of the ground surface. Unfortunately, even sparse trees and power or phone lines could prevent the bird from being towed safely at low altitude, and over such areas it was more usual for it to be flown at about the same altitude as the bird in the reconnaissance survey, about 30m. Even so, the magnetometers used in the high resolution phase were 20m closer to the ground than in the reconnaissance phase because they were mounted on the tail of the bird rather than on the tow cable above the bird. The EM frequencies used in the high resolution survey ranged from 7400Hz to 67000Hz. Only the horizontal coplanar loop configuration was used in the high resolution flyovers.

  15. Distributed MIMO Radar for Imaging and High Resolution Target Localization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-02

    28-2012 Final Report 04/15/2009 - 11/30/2011 Distributed MIMO Radar for Imaging and High Resolution Target Localization FA9550-09-1-0303 Alexander M...randomly placed sensors. MIMO radar, High-Resolution radar 19 Distributed MIMO Radar for Imaging and High Resolution Target Localization Air Force Office...configured with its antennas collocated [6] or distributed over an area [7, 8]. We refer to radio elements of a MIMO radar as nodes. Nodes may be equipped

  16. High-Resolution Array with Prony, MUSIC, and ESPRIT Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-25

    N avalI Research La bora tory AD-A255 514 Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/FR/5324-92-9397 High-resolution Array with Prony, music , and ESPRIT...unlimited t"orm n pprovoiREPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE OMB. o 0 104 0188 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS High-resolution Array with Prony. MUSIC . and...the array high-resolution properties of three algorithms: the Prony algo- rithm, the MUSIC algorithm, and the ESPRIT algorithm. MUSIC has been much

  17. Performance characteristics of pixelated CZT crystals used on the GammaTracker project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Eric M.; Seifert, Carolyn E.; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Erikson, Luke E.; Morris, Scott J.; Balvage, Duane T.; Lundy, Richard P.

    2011-09-01

    GammaTracker is a handheld radioisotope identification device in development at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory that uses eighteen pixelated Cadmium-Zinc Telluride (CZT) crystals to provide energy resolution approaching that of high-purity germanium without the need for cryogenic cooling. Additionally, these crystals can be used to provide directional and imaging capabilities that cannot be found in other handheld detectors. A significant number of CZT crystals have been procured during the development of the GammaTracker system; the majority of these were procured with the same set of specifications. Each of these detectors has been characterized in terms of key parameters, including current-voltage response and pixel-by-pixel energy resolution. The results of this testing indicate that the overall quality of CZT crystals is improving over time.

  18. Performance Characteristics of Pixelated CZT Crystals used on the GammaTracker Project

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Eric M.; Seifert, Carolyn E.; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Erikson, Luke E.; Morris, Scott J.; Balvage, Duane R.; Lundy, Richard P.

    2011-08-21

    GammaTracker is a handheld radioisotope identification device in development at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory that uses eighteen pixelated Cadmium-Zinc Telluride (CZT) crystals to provide energy resolution approaching that of high-purity germanium without the need for cryogenic cooling. Additionally, these crystals can be used to provide directional and imaging capabilities that cannot be found in other handheld detectors. A significant number of CZT crystals have been procured during the development of the GammaTracker system; the majority of these were procured with the same set of specifications. Each of these detectors has been characterized in terms of key parameters, including current-voltage response and pixel-by-pixel energy resolution. The results of this testing indicate that the overall quality of CZT crystals is improving over time.

  19. High resolution integral holography using Fourier ptychographic approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaohui; Zhang, Jianqi; Wang, Xiaorui; Liu, Delian

    2014-12-29

    An innovative approach is proposed for calculating high resolution computer generated integral holograms by using the Fourier Ptychographic (FP) algorithm. The approach initializes a high resolution complex hologram with a random guess, and then stitches together low resolution multi-view images, synthesized from the elemental images captured by integral imaging (II), to recover the high resolution hologram through an iterative retrieval with FP constrains. This paper begins with an analysis of the principle of hologram synthesis from multi-projections, followed by an accurate determination of the constrains required in the Fourier ptychographic integral-holography (FPIH). Next, the procedure of the approach is described in detail. Finally, optical reconstructions are performed and the results are demonstrated. Theoretical analysis and experiments show that our proposed approach can reconstruct 3D scenes with high resolution.

  20. Topological Data Analysis of High-Resolution Temporal Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carsteanu, Alin Andrei; Fernández Méndez, Félix; Vásquez Aguilar, Raciel

    2017-04-01

    This study applies topological data analysis (TDA) to the state space representations of high-resolution temporal rainfall intensity data from Iowa City (IIHR, U of Iowa). Using a sufficient embedding dimension, topological properties of the underlying manifold are depicted.

  1. High Resolution CryoFESEM of Microbial Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlandsen, Stanley; Lei, Ming; Martin-Lacave, Ines; Dunny, Gary; Wells, Carol

    2003-08-01

    The outer surfaces of three microorganisms, Giardia lamblia, Enterococcus faecalis, and Proteus mirabilis, were investigated by cryo-immobilization followed by sublimation of extracellular ice and cryocoating with either Pt alone or Pt plus carbon. Cryocoated samples were examined at [minus sign]125°C in either an in-lens field emission SEM or a below-the-lens field emission SEM. Cryocoating with Pt alone was sufficient for low magnification observation, but attempts to do high-resolution imaging resulted in radiolysis and cracking of the specimen surface. Double coating with Pt and carbon, in combination with high resolution backscatter electron detectors, enabled high-resolution imaging of the glycocalyx of bacteria, revealing a sponge-like network over the surface. High resolution examination of bacterial flagella also revealed a periodic substructure. Common artifacts included radiolysis leading to “cracking” of the surface, and insufficient deposition of Pt resulting in the absence of detectable surface topography.

  2. Methodology of high-resolution photography for mural condition database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, R.; Suzuki, T.; Shibata, M.; Taniguchi, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Digital documentation is one of the most useful techniques to record the condition of cultural heritage. Recently, high-resolution images become increasingly useful because it is possible to show general views of mural paintings and also detailed mural conditions in a single image. As mural paintings are damaged by environmental stresses, it is necessary to record the details of painting condition on high-resolution base maps. Unfortunately, the cost of high-resolution photography and the difficulty of operating its instruments and software have commonly been an impediment for researchers and conservators. However, the recent development of graphic software makes its operation simpler and less expensive. In this paper, we suggest a new approach to make digital heritage inventories without special instruments, based on our recent our research project in Üzümlü church in Cappadocia, Turkey. This method enables us to achieve a high-resolution image database with low costs, short time, and limited human resources.

  3. Comparison of high resolution real time ultrasonography and high resolution computed tomography in an infant with spinal dysraphism.

    PubMed

    James, H E; Scheible, W; Kerber, C; Hilton, S V

    1983-09-01

    An infant with a lumbosacral spinal subcutaneous and intraspinal lipoma involving the conus medullaris was studied with computed tomography and high resolution real time ultrasonography to determine the extent and location of the disease before operation. The high resolution ultrasonogram demonstrated the abnormality with good detail and the added advantage of real time display of the lack of pulsatile mobility of the neural elements, confirming spinal cord tethering. Spinal high resolution ultrasonography is a noninvasive diagnostic tool in infants with spinal abnormalities and should be an important part of a neurosurgeon's diagnostic support system.

  4. SPARTAN: An Instructional High Resolution Land Combat Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    AD-A248 1681111 1 1 1 11 1 I’Ii’ I! ! DTICELECTIED m APR,0 11992.S Oct-D SPARTAN: An Instructional High Rezolution Land Combat Model THESIS David...SPARTAN: An Instructional Accesion For - High Resolution Land Combat Model NTIS CRA&IDTIC TAB ., THESIS U. a,1:!ot%,ced U 1stilcatonl...developed an instructional high resolution land combat simulation model . The purpose of this model is to demonstrate common techniques of modeling used

  5. AVHRR/1-FM Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The advanced very high resolution radiometer is discussed. The program covers design, construction, and test of a breadboard model, engineering model, protoflight model, mechanical/structural model, and a life test model. Special bench test and calibration equipment was developed for use on the program. The flight model program objectives were to fabricate, assemble and test four of the advanced very high resolution radiometers along with a bench cooler and collimator.

  6. Evaluation of quantitative accuracy in CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT for various isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.-J.; Yu, A. R.; Kim, Y.-s.; Kang, W.-S.; Jin, S. S.; Kim, J.-S.; Son, T. J.; Kim, H.-J.

    2015-05-01

    In vivo pre-clinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a valuable tool for functional small animal imaging, but several physical factors, such as scatter radiation, limit the quantitative accuracy of conventional scintillation crystal-based SPECT. Semiconductor detectors such as CZT overcome these deficiencies through superior energy resolution. To our knowledge, little scientific information exists regarding the accuracy of quantitative analysis in CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT systems for different isotopes. The aim of this study was to assess the quantitative accuracy of CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT for four isotopes: 201Tl, 99mTc, 123I, and 111In. The quantitative accuracy of the CZT-based Triumph X-SPECT (Gamma-Medica Ideas, Northridge, CA, U.S.A.) was compared with that of a conventional SPECT using GATE simulation. Quantitative errors due to the attenuation and scatter effects were evaluated for all four isotopes with energy windows of 5%, 10%, and 20%. A spherical source containing the isotope was placed at the center of the air-or-water-filled mouse-sized cylinder phantom. The CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT was more accurate than the conventional SPECT. For example, in the conventional SPECT with an energy window of 10%, scatter effects degraded quantitative accuracy by up to 11.52%, 5.10%, 2.88%, and 1.84% for 201Tl, 99mTc, 123I, and 111In, respectively. However, with the CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT, the degradations were only 9.67%, 5.45%, 2.36%, and 1.24% for 201Tl, 99mTc, 123I, and 111In, respectively. As the energy window was increased, the quantitative errors increased in both SPECT systems. Additionally, the isotopes with lower energy of photon emissions had greater quantitative error. Our results demonstrated that the CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT had lower overall quantitative errors due to reduced scatter and high detection efficiency. Furthermore, the results of this systematic assessment quantifying the accuracy of these SPECT

  7. Spatially adaptive regularized iterative high-resolution image reconstruction algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Won Bae; Park, Min K.; Kang, Moon Gi

    2000-12-01

    High resolution images are often required in applications such as remote sensing, frame freeze in video, military and medical imaging. Digital image sensor arrays, which are used for image acquisition in many imaging systems, are not dense enough to prevent aliasing, so the acquired images will be degraded by aliasing effects. To prevent aliasing without loss of resolution, a dense detector array is required. But it may be very costly or unavailable, thus, many imaging systems are designed to allow some level of aliasing during image acquisition. The purpose of our work is to reconstruct an unaliased high resolution image from the acquired aliased image sequence. In this paper, we propose a spatially adaptive regularized iterative high resolution image reconstruction algorithm for blurred, noisy and down-sampled image sequences. The proposed approach is based on a Constrained Least Squares (CLS) high resolution reconstruction algorithm, with spatially adaptive regularization operators and parameters. These regularization terms are shown to improve the reconstructed image quality by forcing smoothness, while preserving edges in the reconstructed high resolution image. Accurate sub-pixel motion registration is the key of the success of the high resolution image reconstruction algorithm. However, sub-pixel motion registration may have some level of registration error. Therefore, a reconstruction algorithm which is robust against the registration error is required. The registration algorithm uses a gradient based sub-pixel motion estimator which provides shift information for each of the recorded frames. The proposed algorithm is based on a technique of high resolution image reconstruction, and it solves spatially adaptive regularized constrained least square minimization functionals. In this paper, we show that the reconstruction algorithm gives dramatic improvements in the resolution of the reconstructed image and is effective in handling the aliased information. The

  8. Design and implementation of spaceborne high resolution infrared touch screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tai-guo; Li, Wen-xin; Dong, Yi-peng; Ma, Wen; Xia, Jia-gao

    2015-10-01

    For the consideration of the special application environment of the electronic products used in aerospace and to further more improve the human-computer interaction of the manned aerospace area. The research is based on the design and implementation way of the high resolution spaceborne infrared touch screen on the basis of FPGA and DSP frame structure. Beside the introduction of the whole structure for the high resolution spaceborne infrared touch screen system, this essay also gives the detail information about design of hardware for the high resolution spaceborne infrared touch screen system, FPGA design, GUI design and DSP algorithm design based on Lagrange interpolation. What is more, the easy makes a comprehensive research of the reliability design for the high resolution spaceborne infrared touch screen for the special purpose of it. Besides, the system test is done after installation of spaceborne infrared touch screen. The test result shows that the system is simple and reliable enough, which has a stable running environment and high resolution, which certainly can meet the special requirement of the manned aerospace instrument products.

  9. EMODnet High Resolution Seabed Mapping - further developing a high resolution digital bathymetry for European seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaap, Dick M. A.; Schmitt, Thierry

    2017-04-01

    Access to marine data is a key issue for the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive and the EU Marine Knowledge 2020 agenda and includes the European Marine Observation and Data Network (EMODnet) initiative. EMODnet aims at assembling European marine data, data products and metadata from diverse sources in a uniform way. The EMODnet data infrastructure is developed through a stepwise approach in three major phases. Currently EMODnet is entering its 3rd phase with operational portals providing access to marine data for bathymetry, geology, physics, chemistry, biology, seabed habitats and human activities, complemented by checkpoint projects, analysing the fitness for purpose of data provision. The EMODnet Bathymetry project has developed Digital Terrain Models (DTM) for the European seas. These have been produced from survey and aggregated data sets that are indexed with metadata by adopting the SeaDataNet Catalogue services. SeaDataNet is a network of major oceanographic data centres around the European seas that manage, operate and further develop a pan-European infrastructure for marine and ocean data management. The latest EMODnet Bathymetry DTM release has a resolution of 1/8 arcminute * 1/8 arcminute and covers all European sea regions. Use has been made of circa 7800 gathered survey datasets and composite DTMs from 27 European data providers from 15 countries. For areas without coverage use has been made of the latest GEBCO DTM. The catalogue services and the generated EMODnet DTM have been published at the dedicated EMODnet Bathymetry portal which includes a versatile DTM viewing service that also supports downloading in various formats. End December 2016 the Bathymetry project has been succeeded by EMODnet High Resolution Seabed Mapping (HRSM) as part of the third phase of EMODnet. This new project will continue gathering of bathymetric in-situ data sets with extra efforts for near coastal waters and coastal zones. In addition Satellite Derived Bathymetry

  10. EDITORIAL: High-resolution noncontact atomic force microscopy High-resolution noncontact atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Rubén; García, Ricardo; Schwarz, Udo

    2009-06-01

    original papers authored by many of the leading groups in the field with the goal of providing a well-balanced overview on the state-of-the-art in this rapidly evolving field. These papers, many of which are based on notable presentations given during the Madrid conference, feature highlights such as (1) the development of sophisticated force spectroscopy procedures that are able to map the complete 3D tip-sample force field on different surfaces; (2) the considerable resolution improvement of Kelvin probe force microscopy (reaching, in some cases, the atomic scale), which is accompanied by a thorough, quantitative understanding of the contrast observed; (3) the perfecting of atomic resolution imaging on insulating substrates, which helps reshape our microscopic understanding of surface properties and chemical activity of these surfaces; (4) the description of instrumental and methodological developments that pave the way to the atomic-scale characterization of magnetic and electronic properties of nanostructures, and last but not least (5) the extension of dynamic imaging modes to high-resolution operation in liquids, ultimately achieving atomic resolution. The latter developments are already having a significant impact in the highly competitive field of biological imaging under physiological conditions. This special issue of Nanotechnology would not have been possible without the highly professional support from Nina Couzin, Amy Harvey, Alex Wotherspoon and the entire Nanotechnology team at IOP Publishing. We are thankful for their help in pushing this project forward. We also thank the authors who have contributed their excellent original articles to this issue, the referees whose comments have helped make the issue an accurate portrait of this rapidly moving field, and the entire NC-AFM community that continues to drive NC-AFM to new horizons.

  11. Conception and characterization of a virtual coplanar grid for a 11×11 pixelated CZT detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espagnet, Romain; Frezza, Andrea; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Hamel, Louis-André; Després, Philippe

    2017-07-01

    Due to the low mobility of holes in CZT, commercially available detectors with a relatively large volume typically use a pixelated anode structure. They are mostly used in imaging applications and often require a dense electronic readout scheme. These large volume detectors are also interesting for high-sensitivity applications and a CZT-based blood gamma counter was developed from a 20×20×15 mm3 crystal available commercially and having a 11×11 pixelated readout scheme. A method is proposed here to reduce the number of channels required to use the crystal in a high-sensitivity counting application, dedicated to pharmacokinetic modelling in PET and SPECT. Inspired by a classic coplanar anode, an implementation of a virtual coplanar grid was done by connecting the 121 pixels of the detector to form intercalated bands. The layout, the front-end electronics and the characterization of the detector in this 2-channel anode geometry is presented. The coefficients required to compensate for electron trapping in CZT were determined experimentally to improve the performance. The resulting virtual coplanar detector has an intrinsic efficiency of 34% and an energy resolution of 8% at 662 keV. The detector's response was linear between 80 keV and 1372 keV. This suggests that large CZT crystals offer an excellent alternative to scintillation detectors for some applications, especially those where high-sensitivity and compactness are required.

  12. CZT detector for dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wear, James; Buchholz, Michael; Payne, Randall K.; Gorsuch, Darrell; Bisek, Joseph; Ergun, David L.; Grosholz, Joe; Falk, Ron

    2000-12-01

    A cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detector has been developed for a bone densitometer that uses dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) to determine bone mineral density in vivo. A linear array of 16 discrete CZT detectors is used with a narrow fan-shaped x-ray beam to scan the patient. Each detector is 3 mm thick and 7 mm by 3 mm in area and has simple planar contacts. The x-ray beam has two broad energy lobes with effective energies of approximately 38 keV and approximately 65 keV. The energy sensitivity of the CZT detectors allows discrimination between low and high energy x-rays. Using DEXA, the relative difference in these two count rates permits a quantitative measurement of the real densities of bone mineral and soft tissue. The detectors demonstrate good performance characteristics and stable operation in a clinical environment. This paper discusses the suitability of CZT for use in DEXA applications and describes its successful implementation and performance in this bone densitometer.

  13. High-resolution Urban Image Classification Using Extended Features

    SciTech Connect

    Vatsavai, Raju

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution image classification poses several challenges because the typical object size is much larger than the pixel resolution. Any given pixel (spectral features at that location) by itself is not a good indicator of the object it belongs to without looking at the broader spatial footprint. Therefore most modern machine learning approaches that are based on per-pixel spectral features are not very effective in high- resolution urban image classification. One way to overcome this problem is to extract features that exploit spatial contextual information. In this study, we evaluated several features in- cluding edge density, texture, and morphology. Several machine learning schemes were tested on the features extracted from a very high-resolution remote sensing image and results were presented.

  14. In-Phase Ultra High-Resolution In Vivo NMR.

    PubMed

    Fugariu, Ioana; Bermel, Wolfgang; Lane, Daniel; Soong, Ronald; Simpson, Andre J

    2017-04-05

    Although current NMR techniques allow organisms to be studied in vivo, magnetic susceptibility distortions, which arise from inhomogeneous distributions of chemical moieties, prevent the acquisition of high-resolution NMR spectra. Intermolecular single quantum coherence (iSQC) is a technique that breaks the sample's spatial isotropy to form long range dipolar couplings, which can be exploited to extract chemical shift information free of perturbations. While this approach holds vast potential, present practical limitations include radiation damping, relaxation losses, and non-phase sensitive data. Herein, these drawbacks are addressed, and a new technique termed in-phase iSQC (IP-iSQC) is introduced. When applied to a living system, high-resolution NMR spectra, nearly identical to a buffer extract, are obtained. The ability to look inside an organism and extract a high-resolution metabolic profile is profound and should find applications in fields in which metabolism or in vivo processes are of interest.

  15. High-resolution, high-pressure NMR studies of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, J; Ballard, L; Nash, D

    1998-01-01

    Advanced high-resolution NMR spectroscopy, including two-dimensional NMR techniques, combined with high pressure capability, represents a powerful new tool in the study of proteins. This contribution is organized in the following way. First, the specialized instrumentation needed for high-pressure NMR experiments is discussed, with specific emphasis on the design features and performance characteristics of a high-sensitivity, high-resolution, variable-temperature NMR probe operating at 500 MHz and at pressures of up to 500 MPa. An overview of several recent studies using 1D and 2D high-resolution, high-pressure NMR spectroscopy to investigate the pressure-induced reversible unfolding and pressure-assisted cold denaturation of lysozyme, ribonuclease A, and ubiquitin is presented. Specifically, the relationship between the residual secondary structure of pressure-assisted, cold-denatured states and the structure of early folding intermediates is discussed. PMID:9649405

  16. Compact and high-resolution optical orbital angular momentum sorter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Chenhao; Chen, Jian; Zhan, Qiwen

    2017-03-01

    A compact and high-resolution optical orbital angular momentum (OAM) sorter is proposed and demonstrated. The sorter comprises a quadratic fan-out mapper and a dual-phase corrector positioned in the pupil plane and the Fourier plane, respectively. The optical system is greatly simplified compared to previous demonstrations of OAM sorting, and the performance in resolution and efficiency is maintained. A folded configuration is set up using a single reflective spatial light modulator (SLM) to demonstrate the validity of the scheme. The two phase elements are implemented on the left and right halves of the SLM and connected by a right-angle prism. Experimental results demonstrate the high resolution of the compact OAM sorter, and the current limit in efficiency can be overcome by replacing with transmissive SLMs and removing the beam splitters. This novel scheme paves the way for the miniaturization and integration of high-resolution OAM sorters.

  17. A high-resolution vehicle emission inventory for China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, B.; Zhang, Q.; He, K.; Huo, H.; Yao, Z.; Wang, X.

    2012-12-01

    Developing high resolution emission inventory is an essential task for air quality modeling and management. However, current vehicle emission inventories in China are usually developed at provincial level and then allocated to grids based on various spatial surrogates, which is difficult to get high spatial resolution. In this work, we developed a new approach to construct a high-resolution vehicle emission inventory for China. First, vehicle population at county level were estimated by using the relationship between per-capita GDP and vehicle ownership. Then the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model were used to drive the International Vehicle Emission (IVE) model to get monthly emission factors for each county. Finally, vehicle emissions by county were allocated to grids with 5-km horizon resolution by using high-resolution road network data. This work provides a better understanding of spatial representation of vehicle emissions in China and can benefit both air quality modeling and management with improved spatial accuracy.

  18. Retrieving high-resolution tropospheric gradients from multiconstellation GNSS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingxing; Zus, Florian; Lu, Cuixian; Ning, Tong; Dick, Galina; Ge, Maorong; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2015-05-01

    The developing multi-Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) constellations have the potential to provide accurate high-resolution tropospheric gradients. Such data, closely linked to strong humidity gradients accompanying severe weather phenomena, are considered a new important data source for meteorological studies, e.g., nowcasting of severe rainfall events. Here we describe the development of a multi-GNSS processing system for the precise retrieval of high-resolution tropospheric gradients. The retrieved products were validated by using independent water vapor radiometer (WVR) observations and numerical weather model (NWM) data. The multi-GNSS high-resolution gradients agree well with those, derived from NWM and WVR, especially for the fast-changing peaks which were mostly associated with synoptic fronts. Compared to GPS-only gradients, the correlations with the validation data are significantly improved up to 20-35%. The new data product has significant potential to improve numerical weather prediction and to advance meteorological studies.

  19. Horizontal gradient correction of the high resolution ocean climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Chang, Y. S.; Shin, H. R.

    2016-12-01

    National Oceanography Data Center (NODC) has developed high resolution (0.1° by 0.1°) regional climatologies. They provide reliable temperature and salinity mean fields comparing to those of previous 1°or 0.25° gridded data. However, Chang and Shin (2014) pointed a vertical gradient problem showing abnormal density inverse phenomena along the coastal areas in the East Asian Seas regional climatology. In this study, we additionally recognized abnormal geostrophic currents when we use same climatology. Geostrophic currents show repeated strong patterns at 1° intervals especially in the East Sea, which is related to horizontal temperature gradients at the same areas. It is due to employ new small radius of influence to generate high resolution climatology, meanwhile they still use 1° gridded background and sparse serial observations. Here, we reproduce high resolution climatology by using optimal interpolation method and seek possible horizontal gradient corrections to resolve this problem.

  20. Single sensor processing to obtain high resolution color component signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, William E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for generating color video signals representative of color images of a scene includes the following steps: focusing light from the scene on an electronic image sensor via a filter having a tri-color filter pattern; producing, from outputs of the sensor, first and second relatively low resolution luminance signals; producing, from outputs of the sensor, a relatively high resolution luminance signal; producing, from a ratio of the relatively high resolution luminance signal to the first relatively low resolution luminance signal, a high band luminance component signal; producing, from outputs of the sensor, relatively low resolution color component signals; and combining each of the relatively low resolution color component signals with the high band luminance component signal to obtain relatively high resolution color component signals.

  1. O-space with high resolution readouts outperforms radial imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haifeng; Tam, Leo; Kopanoglu, Emre; Peters, Dana C; Constable, R Todd; Galiana, Gigi

    2017-04-01

    While O-Space imaging is well known to accelerate image acquisition beyond traditional Cartesian sampling, its advantages compared to undersampled radial imaging, the linear trajectory most akin to O-Space imaging, have not been detailed. In addition, previous studies have focused on ultrafast imaging with very high acceleration factors and relatively low resolution. The purpose of this work is to directly compare O-Space and radial imaging in their potential to deliver highly undersampled images of high resolution and minimal artifacts, as needed for diagnostic applications. We report that the greatest advantages to O-Space imaging are observed with extended data acquisition readouts. A sampling strategy that uses high resolution readouts is presented and applied to compare the potential of radial and O-Space sequences to generate high resolution images at high undersampling factors. Simulations and phantom studies were performed to investigate whether use of extended readout windows in O-Space imaging would increase k-space sampling and improve image quality, compared to radial imaging. Experimental O-Space images acquired with high resolution readouts show fewer artifacts and greater sharpness than radial imaging with equivalent scan parameters. Radial images taken with longer readouts show stronger undersampling artifacts, which can cause small or subtle image features to disappear. These features are preserved in a comparable O-Space image. High resolution O-Space imaging yields highly undersampled images of high resolution and minimal artifacts. The additional nonlinear gradient field improves image quality beyond conventional radial imaging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Practical Applications Using A High Resolution Infrared Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraniak, David W.

    1981-01-01

    Infrared imaging systems can be classified into three general categories, low resolution, medium resolution and high resolution. It is the purpose of this paper to highlight specific applications best suited to high resolution, television capatable, infrared data acquisition techniques. The data was collected from both ground loped andoaerial based mobile positions where the temperature differentials varied from 15 C to 25 C. Specific applications include scanning building complexes from the exterior using a ground based moving vehicle, scanning buildings, concrete bridge decks and terrain from the air using a helicopter and scanning building interiors using a mobile hand truck.

  3. Theoretical Problems in High Resolution Solar Physics, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athay, G. (Editor); Spicer, D. S. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The Science Working Group for the High Resolution Solar Observatory (HRSO) laid plans beginning in 1984 for a series of workshops designed to stimulate a broadbased input from the scientific community to the HRSO mission. These workshops have the dual objectives of encouraging an early start on the difficult theoretical problems in radiative transfer, magnetohydrodynamics, and plasma physics that will be posed by the HRSO data, and maintaining current discussions of results in high resolution solar studies. This workshop was the second in the series. The workshop format presented invited review papers during the formal sessions and contributed poster papers for discussions during open periods. Both are presented.

  4. High Resolution 3d Modeling of the Behaim Globe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menna, F.; Rizzi, A.; Nocerino, E.; Remondino, F.; Gruen, A.

    2012-07-01

    The article describes the 3D surveying and modeling of the Behaim globe, the oldest still existing and intact globe of the earth, preserved at the German National Museum of Nuremberg, Germany. The work is primarily performed using high-resolution digital images and automatic photogrammetric techniques. Triangulation-based laser scanning is also employed to fill some gaps in the derived image-based 3D geometry and perform geometric comparisons. Major problems are encountered in texture mapping. The 3D modeling project and the creation of high-resolution map-projections is performed for scientific, conservation, visualization and education purposes.

  5. Wide swath and high resolution optical imaging satellite of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Haruyoshi; Kato, Eri; Imai, Hiroko; Sagisaka, Masakazu

    2016-05-01

    The "Advanced optical satellite" (tentative name) is a follow-on mission from ALOS. Mission objectives of the advanced optical satellite is to build upon the existing advanced techniques for global land observation using optical sensors, as well as to promote data utilization for social needs. Wide swath and high resolution optical imager onboard the advanced optical satellite will extend the capabilities of earlier ALOS missions. The optical imager will be able to collect high-resolution (< 1 m) and wide-swath (70 km) images with high geo-location accuracy. This paper introduces a conceptual design of the advanced optical satellite.

  6. On the application and extension of Harten's high resolution scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Warming, R. F.; Harten, A.

    1982-01-01

    Extensions of a second order high resolution explicit method for the numerical computation of weak solutions of one dimensonal hyperbolic conservation laws are discussed. The main objectives were (1) to examine the shock resoluton of Harten's method for a two dimensional shock reflection problem, (2) to study the use of a high resolution scheme as a post-processor to an approximate steady state solution, and (3) to construct an implicit in the delta-form using Harten's scheme for the explicit operator and a simplified iteration matrix for the implicit operator.

  7. Modified Noise Power Ratio testing of high resolution digitizers

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, T.S.

    1994-05-01

    A broadband, full signal range, side-by-side (tandem) test method for estimating the internal noise performance of high resolution digitizers is described and illustrated. The technique involves a re-definition of the traditional Noise Power Ratio (NPR) test, a change that not only makes this test applicable to higher resolution systems than was previously practical, but also enhances its value and flexibility. Since coherence analysis is the basis of this new definition, and since the application of coherence procedures to high resolution data poses several problems, this report discusses these problems and their resolution.

  8. High-resolution seismic studies applied to injected geothermal fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.T.; Kasameyer, P.

    1985-01-01

    The application of high-resolution microseismicity studies to the problem of monitoring injected fluids is one component of the Geothermal Injection Monitoring Project at LLNL. The evaluation of microseismicity includes the development of field techniques, and the acquisition and processing of events during the initial development of a geothermal field. To achieve a specific detection threshold and location precision, design criteria are presented for seismic networks. An analysis of a small swarm near Mammoth Lakes, California, demonstrates these relationships and the usefulness of high-resolution seismic studies. A small network is currently monitoring the Mammoth-Pacific geothermal power plant at Casa Diablo as it begins production.

  9. High Resolution EUV & FUV Spectroscopy of DA White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barstow, M. A.; Good, S. A.; Bannister, N. P.; Burleigh, M. R.; Holberg, J. B.; Bruhweiler, F. C.; Napiwotzki, R.; Cruddace, R. G.; Kowalski, M. P.

    We report on recent results from a high-resolution spectroscopic survey of hot DA white dwarfs, based on IUE, FUSE and HST observations. For the first time, we address the measurement of element abundances in a completely objective manner with a spectroscopic model fitting technique, which allows us to consider formally the limits that can be placed on abundances in stars where no heavy elements are detected. We also include our latest analysis of the high resolution EUV spectrum of G191-B2B recorded by J-PEX.

  10. High-resolution low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Buban, James P; Ramasse, Quentin; Gipson, Bryant; Browning, Nigel D; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades instrumentation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has pushed toward higher intensity electron probes to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of recorded images. While this is suitable for robust specimens, biological specimens require a much reduced electron dose for high-resolution imaging. We describe here protocols for low-dose STEM image recording with a conventional field-emission gun STEM, while maintaining the high-resolution capability of the instrument. Our findings show that a combination of reduced pixel dwell time and reduced gun current can achieve radiation doses comparable to low-dose TEM.

  11. Mapping Mexico's Forest Lands with Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer

    Treesearch

    David J. Evans; Zhiliang Zhu; Susan Eggen-McIntosh; Pedro García Mayoral; Jose Luis Ornelas de Anda

    1992-01-01

    Data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) were used in a program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, and the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization to help scientists from Mexico generate forest-cover maps of that country. Two near-cloud-free composite images were generated for December and March 1990 from...

  12. Evaluating high resolution SPOT 5 satellite imagery for crop identification

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High resolution satellite imagery offers new opportunities for crop monitoring and assessment. A SPOT 5 image with four spectral bands (green, red, near-infrared, and mid-infrared) and 10-m pixel size covering intensively cropped areas in south Texas was evaluated for crop identification. Two images...

  13. Reproducible high-resolution multispectral image acquisition in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duliu, Alexandru; Gardiazabal, José; Lasser, Tobias; Navab, Nassir

    2015-07-01

    Multispectral image acquisitions are increasingly popular in dermatology, due to their improved spectral resolution which enables better tissue discrimination. Most applications however focus on restricted regions of interest, imaging only small lesions. In this work we present and discuss an imaging framework for high-resolution multispectral imaging on large regions of interest.

  14. High-Resolution Land Use and Land Cover Mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    As the Nation?s population grows, quantifying, monitoring, and managing land use becomes increasingly important. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has a long heritage of leadership and innovation in land use and land cover (LULC) mapping that has been the model both nationally and internationally for over 20 years. At present, the USGS is producing high-resolution LULC data for several watershed and urban areas within the United States. This high-resolution LULC mapping is part of an ongoing USGS Land Cover Characterization Program (LCCP). The four components of the LCCP are global (1:2,000,000-scale), national (1:100,000-scale), urban (1:24,000-scale), and special projects (various scales and time periods). Within the urban and special project components, the USGS Rocky Mountain Mapping Center (RMMC) is collecting historical as well as contemporary high-resolution LULC data. RMMC?s high-resolution LULC mapping builds on the heritage and success of previous USGS LULC programs and provides LULC information to meet user requirements.

  15. A Large Scale, High Resolution Agent-Based Insurgency Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    2007). HSCB Models can be employed for simulating mission scenarios, determining optimal strategies for disrupting terrorist networks, or training and...High Resolution Agent-Based Insurgency Model ∑ = ⎜ ⎜ ⎝ ⎛ − −− = desired 1 move,desired, desired,,desired, desired,, N j ij jmoveij moveiD rp prp

  16. High resolution data base for use with MAP

    SciTech Connect

    Tapley, W.C.; Harris, D.B.

    1987-05-05

    A high resolution cartographic data base of thw World is available from the CIA. We obtained this data, extracted portions of the data, and produced cartographic files of varying resolutions. The resulting data files are of the proper format for use with MAP (2), our in-house cartographic plotting program.

  17. HIGH RESOLUTION RESISTIVITY LEAK DETECTION DATA PROCESSING & EVALUATION MEHTODS & REQUIREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    SCHOFIELD JS

    2007-10-04

    This document has two purposes: {sm_bullet} Describe how data generated by High Resolution REsistivity (HRR) leak detection (LD) systems deployed during single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval operations are processed and evaluated. {sm_bullet} Provide the basic review requirements for HRR data when Hrr is deployed as a leak detection method during SST waste retrievals.

  18. Persistence Diagrams of High-Resolution Temporal Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Méndez, F.; Carsteanu, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    This study applies Topological Data Analysis (TDA), by generating persistence diagrams to uncover patterns in the data of high-resolution temporal rainfall intensities from Iowa City (IIHR, U of Iowa). Persistence diagrams are a way to identify essential cycles in state-space representations of the data.

  19. Evacuee Compliance Behavior Analysis using High Resolution Demographic Information

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei; Han, Lee; Liu, Cheng; Tuttle, Mark A; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether evacuee compliance behavior with route assignments from different resolutions of demographic data would impact the evacuation performance. Most existing evacuation strategies assume that travelers will follow evacuation instructions, while in reality a certain percent of evacuees do not comply with prescribed instructions. In this paper, a comparison study of evacuation assignment based on Traffic Analysis Zones (TAZ) and high resolution LandScan USA Population Cells (LPC) were conducted for the detailed road network representing Alexandria, Virginia. A revised platform for evacuation modeling built on high resolution demographic data and activity-based microscopic traffic simulation is proposed. The results indicate that evacuee compliance behavior affects evacuation efficiency with traditional TAZ assignment, but it does not significantly compromise the efficiency with high resolution LPC assignment. The TAZ assignment also underestimates the real travel time during evacuation, especially for high compliance simulations. This suggests that conventional evacuation studies based on TAZ assignment might not be effective at providing efficient guidance to evacuees. From the high resolution data perspective, traveler compliance behavior is an important factor but it does not impact the system performance significantly. The highlight of evacuee compliance behavior analysis should be emphasized on individual evacuee level route/shelter assignments, rather than the whole system performance.

  20. High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Solids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maciel, Gary E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines recent developments in techniques for obtaining high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra on solid samples, discussing the kinds of applications for which these techniques are well suited. Also discusses the characteristics of NMR of solids and generating magnetization for NMR in solids. (JN)

  1. Texture analysis of high-resolution FLAIR images for TLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Elisevich, Kost

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents a study of the texture information of high-resolution FLAIR images of the brain with the aim of determining the abnormality and consequently the candidacy of the hippocampus for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) surgery. Intensity and volume features of the hippocampus from FLAIR images of the brain have been previously shown to be useful in detecting the abnormal hippocampus in TLE. However, the small size of the hippocampus may limit the texture information. High-resolution FLAIR images show more details of the abnormal intensity variations of the hippocampi and therefore are more suitable for texture analysis. We study and compare the low and high-resolution FLAIR images of six epileptic patients. The hippocampi are segmented manually by an expert from T1-weighted MR images. Then the segmented regions are mapped on the corresponding FLAIR images for texture analysis. The 2-D wavelet transforms of the hippocampi are employed for feature extraction. We compare the ability of the texture features from regular and high-resolution FLAIR images to distinguish normal and abnormal hippocampi. Intracranial EEG results as well as surgery outcome are used as gold standard. The results show that the intensity variations of the hippocampus are related to the abnormalities in the TLE.

  2. The investigation of classification methods of high-resolution imagery

    Treesearch

    Tracey S. Frescino; Gretchen G. Moisen; Larry DeBlander; Michel Guerin

    2007-01-01

    As remote-sensing technology advances, high-resolution imagery, such as Quickbird and photography from the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP), is becoming more readily available for use in forestry applications. Quickbird imagery is currently the highest resolution imagery commercially available. It consists of 2.44-m (8-ft) resolution multispectral bands...

  3. Tamarisk Mapping and Monitoring Using High Resolution Satellite Imagery

    Treesearch

    Jason W. San Souci; John T. Doyle

    2006-01-01

    QuickBird high resolution multispectral satellite imagery (60 cm GSD, 4 spectral bands) and calibrated products from DigitalGlobe’s AgroWatch program were used as inputs to Visual Learning System’s Feature Analyst automated feature extraction software to map localized occurrences of pervasive and aggressive Tamarisk (Tamarix ramosissima), an invasive...

  4. High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Solids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maciel, Gary E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines recent developments in techniques for obtaining high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra on solid samples, discussing the kinds of applications for which these techniques are well suited. Also discusses the characteristics of NMR of solids and generating magnetization for NMR in solids. (JN)

  5. High-resolution microscopy and early-stage precipitation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haasen, P.; Wagner, R.

    1992-07-01

    Experimental work by high-resolution microscopy is summarized to check nucleation kinetics in solid/solid phase transformations in alloys; in particular, the NiAl, CuCo, and CuTi systems are discussed. Recent theoretical work makes it possible to analyze decomposition kinetics also in the more general case that nucleation, growth, and Ostwald ripening are concomitant processes.

  6. Laser direct writing of rotationally symmetric high-resolution structures.

    PubMed

    Haefner, Matthias; Pruss, Christof; Osten, Wolfgang

    2011-11-01

    We present a laser direct writing system for the efficient fabrication of high-resolution axicon structures. The setup makes use of scanning beam interference lithography incorporated with a fringe locking scheme for tight fringe phase control and allows us to fabricate large area structures with a period down to 450 nm.

  7. A DVD Spectroscope: A Simple, High-Resolution Classroom Spectroscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka; Hamada, Kiyohito

    2006-01-01

    Digital versatile disks (DVDs) have successfully made up an inexpensive but high-resolution spectroscope suitable for classroom experiments that can easily be made with common material and gives clear and fine spectra of various light sources and colored material. The observed spectra can be photographed with a digital camera, and such images can…

  8. Plant respirometer enables high resolution of oxygen consumption rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, D. L.

    1966-01-01

    Plant respirometer permits high resolution of relatively small changes in the rate of oxygen consumed by plant organisms undergoing oxidative metabolism in a nonphotosynthetic state. The two stage supply and monitoring system operates by a differential pressure transducer and provides a calibrated output by digital or analog signals.

  9. High resolution bone mineral densitometry with a gamma camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.; Evans, H.; Jhingran, S.; Johnson, P.

    1983-01-01

    A technique by which the regional distribution of bone mineral can be determined in bone samples from small animals is described. The technique employs an Anger camera interfaced to a medical computer. High resolution imaging is possible by producing magnified images of the bone samples. Regional densitometry of femurs from oophorectomised and bone mineral loss.

  10. Application of Classification Models to Pharyngeal High-Resolution Manometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mielens, Jason D.; Hoffman, Matthew R.; Ciucci, Michelle R.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The authors present 3 methods of performing pattern recognition on spatiotemporal plots produced by pharyngeal high-resolution manometry (HRM). Method: Classification models, including the artificial neural networks (ANNs) multilayer perceptron (MLP) and learning vector quantization (LVQ), as well as support vector machines (SVM), were…

  11. High resolution SPM imaging of organic molecules with functionalized tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínek, Pavel

    2017-08-01

    One of the most remarkable and exciting achievements in the field of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) in the last years is the unprecedented sub-molecular resolution of both atomic and electronic structures of single molecules deposited on solid state surfaces. Despite its youth, the technique has already brought many new possibilities to perform different kinds of measurements, which cannot be accomplished by other techniques. This opens new perspectives in advanced characterization of physical and chemical processes and properties of molecular structures on surfaces. Here, we discuss the history and recent progress of the high resolution imaging with a functionalized probe by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). We describe the mechanisms responsible for the high-resolution AFM, STM and IETS-STM contrast. The complexity of this technique requires new theoretical approaches, where a relaxation of the functionalized probe is considered. We emphasise the similarities of the mechanism driving high-resolution SPM with other imaging methods. We also summarise briefly significant achievements and progress in different branches. Finally we provide brief perspectives and remaining challenges of the further refinement of these high-resolution methods.

  12. Workshop on high-resolution, large-acceptance spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeidman, B.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of the Workshop on High-Resolution, Large-Acceptance Spectrometers was to provide a means for exchange of information among those actively engaged in the design and construction of these new spectrometers. Thirty-seven papers were prepared for the data base.

  13. Ultrastable reference pulser for high-resolution spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, R.; Lenkszus, F. R.; Sifter, L. L.; Strauss, M. G.

    1970-01-01

    Solid-state double-pulse generator for a high resolution semiconductor detector meets specific requirements for resolution /0.05 percent/, amplitude range /0.1-13 MeV/, and repetition rate /0.1-1000 pulses per second/. A tag pulse is generated in coincidence with each reference pulse.

  14. Application of Classification Models to Pharyngeal High-Resolution Manometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mielens, Jason D.; Hoffman, Matthew R.; Ciucci, Michelle R.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The authors present 3 methods of performing pattern recognition on spatiotemporal plots produced by pharyngeal high-resolution manometry (HRM). Method: Classification models, including the artificial neural networks (ANNs) multilayer perceptron (MLP) and learning vector quantization (LVQ), as well as support vector machines (SVM), were…

  15. High Resolution Mass Spectra Analysis with a Programmable Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdsworth, David K.

    1980-01-01

    Highlighted are characteristics of programs written for a pocket-sized programmable calculator to analyze mass spectra data (such as displaying high resolution masses for formulas, predicting whether formulas are stable molecules or molecular ions, determining formulas by isotopic abundance measurement) in a laboratory or classroom. (CS)

  16. Large-field high-resolution mosaic movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerschlag, Robert H.; Sliepen, Guus; Bettonvil, Felix C. M.; Jägers, Aswin P. L.; Sütterlin, Peter; Lin, Yong; Martin, Sara F.; Panasenco, Olga; Romashets, Eugene P.

    2013-08-01

    Movies with fields-of-view larger than normal, for high-resolution telescopes, will give a better understanding of processes on the Sun such as filament and active region developments and their possible interactions. New active regions can serve as an igniter of the eruption of a nearby filament. A method to create a large field-of-view is to join several fields-of-view into a mosaic. Fields are imaged quickly, one after another, using fast telescope-pointing. Such a pointing cycle has been automated at the Dutch open telescope (DOT), a high-resolution solar telescope located on the Canary Island La Palma. The number and positions of the subfields are calculated automatically and represented by an array of bright points in the guider image which indicates the subfield centers inside the drawn rectangle of the total field on the computer screen with the whole-sun image. Automatic production of flats is also programmed. For the first time, mosaic movies were programmed from stored information on automated telescope motions. The mosaic movies show larger regions of the solar disk in high resolution and fill a gap between available whole-sun images with limited spatial resolution of synoptic telescopes including space instruments and small-field high-cadence movies of high-resolution solar telescopes.

  17. Vehicle Detection and Classification from High Resolution Satellite Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, L.; Sasikumar, M.

    2014-11-01

    In the past decades satellite imagery has been used successfully for weather forecasting, geographical and geological applications. Low resolution satellite images are sufficient for these sorts of applications. But the technological developments in the field of satellite imaging provide high resolution sensors which expands its field of application. Thus the High Resolution Satellite Imagery (HRSI) proved to be a suitable alternative to aerial photogrammetric data to provide a new data source for object detection. Since the traffic rates in developing countries are enormously increasing, vehicle detection from satellite data will be a better choice for automating such systems. In this work, a novel technique for vehicle detection from the images obtained from high resolution sensors is proposed. Though we are using high resolution images, vehicles are seen only as tiny spots, difficult to distinguish from the background. But we are able to obtain a detection rate not less than 0.9. Thereafter we classify the detected vehicles into cars and trucks and find the count of them.

  18. High-resolution airway morphometry from polyurethane casts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, Gordon R.; Vargas, John; Hoford, John D.; Craft, Jeanne; Shroff, Sunil; McRae, Karen M.

    1995-05-01

    An airway cast was made and imbedded in a solid polyurethane block of a contrasting color. The block was sequentially milled and photographed. The sequential photographs were scanned to create an image database which was analyzed on VIDA; a multidimensional image analysis software package. The technique shows promise as a semi-automated process for generating a high resolution morphometric database from airway casts.

  19. Human enamel structure studied by high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, S.L. )

    1989-01-01

    Human enamel structural features are characterized by high resolution electron microscopy. The human enamel consists of polycrystals with a structure similar to Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2. This article describes the structural features of human enamel crystal at atomic and nanometer level. Besides the structural description, a great number of high resolution images are included. Research into the carious process in human enamel is very important for human beings. This article firstly describes the initiation of caries in enamel crystal at atomic and unit-cell level and secondly describes the further steps of caries with structural and chemical demineralization. The demineralization in fact, is the origin of caries in human enamel. The remineralization of carious areas in human enamel has drawn more and more attention as its potential application is realized. This process has been revealed by high resolution electron microscopy in detail in this article. On the other hand, the radiation effects on the structure of human enamel are also characterized by high resolution electron microscopy. In order to reveal this phenomenon clearly, a great number of electron micrographs have been shown, and a physical mechanism is proposed. 26 references.

  20. High Resolution Rapid Revisits Insar Monitoring of Surface Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhroy, V.; Li, J.; Charbonneau, F.

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring surface deformation on strategic energy and transportation corridors requires high resolution spatial and temporal InSAR images for mitigation and safety purposes. High resolution air photos, lidar and other satellite images are very useful in areas where the landslides can be fatal. Recently, radar interferometry (InSAR) techniques using more rapid revisit images from several radar satellites are increasingly being used in active deformation monitoring. The Canadian RADARSAT Constellation (RCM) is a three-satellite mission that will provide rapid revisits of four days interferometric (InSAR) capabilities that will be very useful for complex deformation monitoring. For instance, the monitoring of surface deformation due to permafrost activity, complex rock slide motion and steam assisted oil extraction will benefit from this new rapid revisit capability. This paper provide examples of how the high resolution (1-3 m) rapid revisit InSAR capabilities will improve our monitoring of surface deformation and provide insights in understanding triggering mechanisms. We analysed over a hundred high resolution InSAR images over a two year period on three geologically different sites with various configurations of topography, geomorphology, and geology conditions. We show from our analysis that the more frequent InSAR acquisitions are providing more information in understanding the rates of movement and failure process of permafrost triggered retrogressive thaw flows; the complex motion of an asymmetrical wedge failure of an active rock slide and the identification of over pressure zones related to oil extraction using steam injection. Keywords: High resolution, InSAR, rapid revisits, triggering mechanisms, oil extraction.

  1. Multi-Material Decomposition using Low-Current X-Ray and a Photon-Counting CZT Detector

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangtaek; Hernandez, Andrew; Alhassen, Fares; Pivovaroff, Michael; Cho, Hyo-Min; Gould, Robert G.; Seo, Youngho

    2013-01-01

    We developed and evaluated an x-ray photon-counting imaging system using an energy-resolving cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector coupled with application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) readouts. This x-ray imaging system can be used to identify different materials inside the object. The CZT detector has a large active area (5×5 array of 25 CZT modules, each with 16×16 pixels, cover a total area of 200 mm × 200 mm), high stopping efficiency for x-ray photons (~ 100 % at 60 keV and 5 mm thickness). We explored the performance of this system by applying different energy windows around the absorption edges of target materials, silver and indium, in order to distinguish one material from another. The photon-counting CZT-based x-ray imaging system was able to distinguish between the materials, demonstrating its capability as a radiation-spectroscopic decomposition system. PMID:23503709

  2. Multi-Material Decomposition using Low-Current X-Ray and a Photon-Counting CZT Detector.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangtaek; Hernandez, Andrew; Alhassen, Fares; Pivovaroff, Michael; Cho, Hyo-Min; Gould, Robert G; Seo, Youngho

    2011-01-01

    We developed and evaluated an x-ray photon-counting imaging system using an energy-resolving cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector coupled with application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) readouts. This x-ray imaging system can be used to identify different materials inside the object. The CZT detector has a large active area (5×5 array of 25 CZT modules, each with 16×16 pixels, cover a total area of 200 mm × 200 mm), high stopping efficiency for x-ray photons (~ 100 % at 60 keV and 5 mm thickness). We explored the performance of this system by applying different energy windows around the absorption edges of target materials, silver and indium, in order to distinguish one material from another. The photon-counting CZT-based x-ray imaging system was able to distinguish between the materials, demonstrating its capability as a radiation-spectroscopic decomposition system.

  3. Effects of system geometry and other physical factors on photon sensitivity of high-resolution positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Foudray, A M K; Olcott, P D

    2013-01-01

    We are studying two new detector technologies that directly measure the three-dimensional coordinates of 511 keV photon interactions for high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) systems designed for small animal and breast imaging. These detectors are based on (1) lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillation crystal arrays coupled to position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPD) and (2) cadmium zinc telluride (CZT). The detectors have excellent measured 511 keV photon energy resolutions (≤12% FWHM for LSO-PSAPD and ≤3% for CZT) and good coincidence time resolutions (2 ns FWHM for LSO-PSAPD and 8 ns for CZT). The goal is to incorporate the detectors into systems that will achieve 1 mm3 spatial resolution (~1 mm3, uniform throughout the field of view (FOV)), with excellent contrast resolution as well. In order to realize 1 mm3 spatial resolution with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), it is necessary to significantly boost coincidence photon detection efficiency (referred to as photon sensitivity). To facilitate high photon sensitivity in the proposed PET system designs, the detector arrays are oriented ‘edge-on’ with respect to incoming 511 keV annihilation photons and arranged to form a compact FOV with detectors very close to, or in contact with, the subject tissues. In this paper, we used Monte Carlo simulation to study various factors that limit the photon sensitivity of a high-resolution PET system dedicated to small animal imaging. To optimize the photon sensitivity, we studied several possible system geometries for a fixed 8 cm transaxial and 8 cm axial FOV. We found that using rectangular-shaped detectors arranged into a cylindrical geometry does not yield the best photon sensitivity. This is due to the fact that forming rectangular-shaped detectors into a ring produces significant wedge-shaped inter-module gaps, through which Compton-scattered photons in the detector can escape. This effect limits the center point source photon

  4. Effects of system geometry and other physical factors on photon sensitivity of high-resolution positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Habte, F; Foudray, A M K; Olcott, P D; Levin, C S

    2007-07-07

    We are studying two new detector technologies that directly measure the three-dimensional coordinates of 511 keV photon interactions for high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) systems designed for small animal and breast imaging. These detectors are based on (1) lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillation crystal arrays coupled to position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPD) and (2) cadmium zinc telluride (CZT). The detectors have excellent measured 511 keV photon energy resolutions (CZT) and good coincidence time resolutions (2 ns FWHM for LSO-PSAPD and 8 ns for CZT). The goal is to incorporate the detectors into systems that will achieve 1 mm(3) spatial resolution ( approximately 1 mm(3), uniform throughout the field of view (FOV)), with excellent contrast resolution as well. In order to realize 1 mm(3) spatial resolution with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), it is necessary to significantly boost coincidence photon detection efficiency (referred to as photon sensitivity). To facilitate high photon sensitivity in the proposed PET system designs, the detector arrays are oriented 'edge-on' with respect to incoming 511 keV annihilation photons and arranged to form a compact FOV with detectors very close to, or in contact with, the subject tissues. In this paper, we used Monte Carlo simulation to study various factors that limit the photon sensitivity of a high-resolution PET system dedicated to small animal imaging. To optimize the photon sensitivity, we studied several possible system geometries for a fixed 8 cm transaxial and 8 cm axial FOV. We found that using rectangular-shaped detectors arranged into a cylindrical geometry does not yield the best photon sensitivity. This is due to the fact that forming rectangular-shaped detectors into a ring produces significant wedge-shaped inter-module gaps, through which Compton-scattered photons in the detector can escape. This effect limits the center point source

  5. Position-Sensitive CZT Detectors for High Energy X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteson, J.; Coburn, W.; Heindl, W.; Peterson, L.; Pelling, M.; Rothschild, R.; Skelton, R.; Hink, P.; Slavis, K.

    1998-05-01

    We report recent progress on CZT (Cadmium Zinc Telluride) detectors by the UCSD/WU collaboration. CZT, a room- temperature semiconductor, is a very promising detector material for high energy X-ray astronomy. It can operate from <10 keV to >200 keV, and give sub-keV energy resolution and sub-mm spatial resolution. We have developed an advanced CZT detector that uses two innovations to improve spectral response, give it 3-D localization of energy loss events, and reduce background at high altitudes and in space. The detector measures 12 x 12 x 2 mm(3) and was manufactured by eV Products. Each face has a strip readouts with 500 micron pitch electrodes. The 2 faces' strips are orthogonal, which provides x-y localization into 500 micron pixels. One innovation is "steering electrodes", which are located between the anode strips. They improve the anode charge collection and energy resolution, and tailing due to hole trapping is nearly totally eliminated. The energy resolution at 60 keV is 4 keV and the peak to valley ratio is 50. The other innovation is 3-D localization of energy losses. This is done by comparing the signals from the anode strips, cathode strips, and steering electrodes. There is a strong depth of interaction signature, which can be used to accept events which interact close to the cathode strips (where X-rays of interest are incident) and reject deeper interactions (which are likely to be background). The detector was tested in a balloon flight at 108,000 feet in October 1997. Background was reduced by passive shielding, consisting of lead graded with tin and copper. The lead thickness was changed by command during the flight, and was 7, 2, and 0 mm thick. With the 2 mm thickness the 20 - 40 keV background for the central 30 pixels was 8x10(-4) c/cm(2) -s-keV when the depth of interaction signature was used to reject background, and 7 times greater when this information was not used. The lower background is 12 times less than other workers have obtained

  6. High-resolution structure of the native histone octamer

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Christopher M.; Nicholson, James M.; Lambert, Stanley J.; Chantalat, Laurent; Reynolds, Colin D.; Baldwin, John P.

    2005-06-01

    The high-resolution (1.90 Å) model of the native histone octamer allows structural comparisons to be made with the nucleosome-core particle, along with an identification of a likely core-histone binding site. Crystals of native histone octamers (H2A–H2B)–(H4–H3)–(H3′–H4′)–(H2B′–H2A′) from chick erythrocytes in 2 M KCl, 1.35 M potassium phosphate pH 6.9 diffract X-rays to 1.90 Å resolution, yielding a structure with an R{sub work} value of 18.7% and an R{sub free} of 22.2%. The crystal space group is P6{sub 5}, the asymmetric unit of which contains one complete octamer. This high-resolution model of the histone-core octamer allows further insight into intermolecular interactions, including water molecules, that dock the histone dimers to the tetramer in the nucleosome-core particle and have relevance to nucleosome remodelling. The three key areas analysed are the H2A′–H3–H4 molecular cluster (also H2A–H3′–H4′), the H4–H2B′ interaction (also H4′–H2B) and the H2A′–H4 β-sheet interaction (also H2A–H4′). The latter of these three regions is important to nucleosome remodelling by RNA polymerase II, as it is shown to be a likely core-histone binding site, and its disruption creates an instability in the nucleosome-core particle. A majority of the water molecules in the high-resolution octamer have positions that correlate to similar positions in the high-resolution nucleosome-core particle structure, suggesting that the high-resolution octamer model can be used for comparative studies with the high-resolution nucleosome-core particle.

  7. High-resolution climate simulation of the last glacial maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson III, David J

    2008-01-01

    The climate of the last glacial maximum (LGM) is simulated with a high-resolution atmospheric general circulation model, the NCAR CCM3 at spectral truncation of T170, corresponding to a grid cell size of roughly 75 km. The purpose of the study is to assess whether there are significant benefits from the higher resolution simulation compared to the lower resolution simulation associated with the role of topography. The LGM simulations were forced with modified CLIMAP sea ice distribution and sea surface temperatures (SST) reduced by 1 C, ice sheet topography, reduced CO{sub 2}, and 21,000 BP orbital parameters. The high-resolution model captures modern climate reasonably well, in particular the distribution of heavy precipitation in the tropical Pacific. For the ice age case, surface temperature simulated by the high-resolution model agrees better with those of proxy estimates than does the low-resolution model. Despite the fact that tropical SSTs were only 2.1 C less than the control run, there are many lowland tropical land areas 4-6 C colder than present. Comparison of T170 model results with the best constrained proxy temperature estimates (noble gas concentrations in groundwater) now yield no significant differences between model and observations. There are also significant upland temperature changes in the best resolved tropical mountain belt (the Andes). We provisionally attribute this result in part as resulting from decreased lateral mixing between ocean and land in a model with more model grid cells. A longstanding model-data discrepancy therefore appears to be resolved without invoking any unusual model physics. The response of the Asian summer monsoon can also be more clearly linked to local geography in the high-resolution model than in the low-resolution model; this distinction should enable more confident validation of climate proxy data with the high-resolution model. Elsewhere, an inferred salinity increase in the subtropical North Atlantic may have

  8. Protein-DNA binding in high-resolution.

    PubMed

    Mahony, Shaun; Pugh, B Franklin

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental and computational methodologies are enabling ultra-high resolution genome-wide profiles of protein-DNA binding events. For example, the ChIP-exo protocol precisely characterizes protein-DNA cross-linking patterns by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with 5' → 3' exonuclease digestion. Similarly, deeply sequenced chromatin accessibility assays (e.g. DNase-seq and ATAC-seq) enable the detection of protected footprints at protein-DNA binding sites. With these techniques and others, we have the potential to characterize the individual nucleotides that interact with transcription factors, nucleosomes, RNA polymerases and other regulatory proteins in a particular cellular context. In this review, we explain the experimental assays and computational analysis methods that enable high-resolution profiling of protein-DNA binding events. We discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with such approaches.

  9. High-resolution observation by double-biprism electron holography

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Ken; Tonomura, Akira; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Akashi, Tetsuya; Togawa, Yoshihiko

    2004-12-01

    High-resolution electron holography has been achieved by using a double-biprism interferometer implemented on a 1 MV field emission electron microscope. The interferometer was installed behind the first magnifying lens to narrow carrier fringes and thus enabled complete separation of sideband Fourier spectrum from center band in reconstruction process. Holograms of Au fine particles and single-crystalline thin films with the finest fringe spacing of 4.2 pm were recorded and reconstructed. The overall holography system including the reconstruction process performed well for holograms in which carrier fringes had a spacing of around 10 pm. High-resolution lattice images of the amplitude and phase were clearly reconstructed without mixing of the center band and sideband information. Additionally, entire holograms were recorded without Fresnel fringes normally generated by the filament electrode of the biprism, and the holograms were thus reconstructed without the artifacts caused by Fresnel fringes.

  10. Application of spectral phase shaping to high resolution CARS spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Postma, S; van Rhijn, A C W; Korterik, J P; Gross, P; Herek, J L; Offerhaus, H L

    2008-05-26

    By spectral phase shaping of both the pump and probe pulses in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy we demonstrate the extraction of the frequencies, bandwidths and relative cross sections of vibrational lines. We employ a tunable broadband Ti:Sapphire laser synchronized to a ps-Nd:YVO mode locked laser. A high resolution spectral phase shaper allows for spectroscopy with a precision better than 1 cm(-1) in the high frequency region around 3000 cm(-1). We also demonstrate how new spectral phase shaping strategies can amplify the resonant features of isolated vibrations to such an extent that spectroscopy and microscopy can be done at high resolution, on the integrated spectral response without the need for a spectrograph.

  11. High resolution map of light pollution over Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netzel, Henryka; Netzel, Paweł

    2016-09-01

    In 1976 Berry introduced a simple mathematical equation to calculate artificial night sky brightness at zenith. In the original model cities, considered as points with given population, are only sources of light emission. In contrary to Berry's model, we assumed that all terrain surface can be a source of light. Emission of light depends on percent of built up area in a given cell. We based on Berry's model. Using field measurements and high-resolution data we obtained the map of night sky brightness over Poland in 100-m resolution. High resolution input data, combined with a very simple model, makes it possible to obtain detailed structures of the night sky brightness without complicating the calculations.

  12. High resolution computed tomography of advanced composite and ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yancey, R. N.; Klima, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced composite and ceramic materials are being developed for use in many new defense and commercial applications. In order to achieve the desired mechanical properties of these materials, the structural elements must be carefully analyzed and engineered. A study was conducted to evaluate the use of high resolution computed tomography (CT) as a macrostructural analysis tool for advanced composite and ceramic materials. Several samples were scanned using a laboratory high resolution CT scanner. Samples were also destructively analyzed at the locations of the scans and the nondestructive and destructive results were compared. The study provides useful information outlining the strengths and limitations of this technique and the prospects for further research in this area.

  13. Turbine component casting core with high resolution region

    DOEpatents

    Kamel, Ahmed; Merrill, Gary B.

    2014-08-26

    A hollow turbine engine component with complex internal features can include a first region and a second, high resolution region. The first region can be defined by a first ceramic core piece formed by any conventional process, such as by injection molding or transfer molding. The second region can be defined by a second ceramic core piece formed separately by a method effective to produce high resolution features, such as tomo lithographic molding. The first core piece and the second core piece can be joined by interlocking engagement that once subjected to an intermediate thermal heat treatment process thermally deform to form a three dimensional interlocking joint between the first and second core pieces by allowing thermal creep to irreversibly interlock the first and second core pieces together such that the joint becomes physically locked together providing joint stability through thermal processing.

  14. Strategies for Interpreting High Resolution Coherent Multidimensional Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Thresa A.; House, Zuri R.; Chen, Peter C.; Strangfeld, Benjamin R.

    2013-06-01

    The electronic spectra of certain molecules can be very complex and consist of a high density of peaks. The high density of peaks results in severe spectral congestion, making conventional data analysis techniques extremely difficult to use. One solution to this problem is to use high resolution coherent 2D spectroscopy (HRC2DS), which can improve resolution and sort peaks into recognizable clusters. This technique requires new data analysis techniques to accurately assign peaks. Even though HRC2DS can improve spectral resolution, some regions of the spectra may still remain congested. The ability to solve this problem using even higher dimensional techniques (e.g., high resolution coherent 3D spectroscopy) with 3D pattern recognition and data analysis techniques will be discussed.

  15. High Resolution Coherent Three-Dimensional Spectroscopy of Iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Zuri R.; Wells, Thresa A.; Chen, Peter C.; Strangfeld, Benjamin R.

    2013-06-01

    The heavy congestion found in many one-dimensional spectra can make it difficult to study many transitions. A new coherent three-dimensional spectroscopic technique has been developed to eliminate the kind of congestion commonly seen in high resolution electronic spectra. The molecule used for this test was Iodine. A well-characterized transition (X to B) was used to determine which four wave mixing process or processes were responsible for the peaks in the resulting multidimensional spectrum. The resolution of several peaks that overlap in a coherent 2D spectrum can be accomplished by using a higher dimensional (3D) spectroscopic method. This talk will discuss strategies for finding spectroscopic constants using this high resolution coherent 3D spectroscopic method.

  16. An Introduction to High Resolution Coherent Multidimensional Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Wells, Thresa A.; House, Zuri R.; Strangfeld, Benjamin R.

    2013-06-01

    High resolution coherent multidimensional spectroscopy is a technique that can be used to analyze and assign peaks for molecules that have resisted spectral analysis. Molecules that yield heavily congested and seemingly patternless spectra using conventional methods can yield 2D spectra that have recognizable patterns. The off-diagonal region of the coherent 2D plot shows only cross-peaks that are related by rotational selection rules. The resulting patterns facilitate peak assignment if they are sufficiently resolved. For systems that are not well-resolved, coherent 3D spectra may be generated to further improve resolution and provide selectivity. This presentation will provide an introduction to high resolution coherent 2D and 3D spectroscopies.

  17. High Resolution Coherent 3d Spectroscopy of Bromine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strangfeld, Benjamin R.; Wells, Thresa A.; House, Zuri R.; Chen, Peter C.

    2013-06-01

    The high resolution gas phase electronic spectrum of bromine is rather congested due to many overlapping vibrational and rotational transitions with similar transition frequencies, and also due to isotopomeric effects. Expansion into the second dimension will remove some of this congestion; however through the implementation of High Resolution Coherent 3D Spectroscopy, the density of peaks is further reduced by at least two orders of magnitude. This allows for the selective examination of a small number of spatially resolved multidimensional bands, separated by vibrational quantum number and by isotopomer, which facilitates the fitting of many rovibrational peaks in bromine. The ability to derive information about the molecular constants for the electronic states involved will be discussed.

  18. Effective Area of the AXAF High Resolution Camera (HRC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaude, Daniel; Pease, Deron; Donnelly, Hank; Juda, Mike; Jones, Christine; Murray, Steve; Zombeck, Martin; Kraft, Ralph; Kenter, Almus; Meehan, Gary; hide

    1998-01-01

    The AXAF High-Resolution Camera (HRC) was calibrated at NASA MSFC's X-Ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) during 1997 March and April. We have undertaken an analysis of the HRC effective area using all data presently available from the XRCF. We discuss our spectral fitting of the beam-normalization detectors (BNDs), our method of removing higher order contamination lines present in the spectra, and corrections for beam non-uniformities. We apply a model of photon absorption depth in order to fit a smooth curve to the quantum efficiency of the detector. This is then combined with the most recent model of the AXAF High-Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) to determine the ensemble effective area versus energy for the HRC. We also address future goals and concerns.

  19. Development of a high resolution and high dispersion Thomson parabola.

    PubMed

    Jung, D; Hörlein, R; Kiefer, D; Letzring, S; Gautier, D C; Schramm, U; Hübsch, C; Öhm, R; Albright, B J; Fernandez, J C; Habs, D; Hegelich, B M

    2011-01-01

    Here, we report on the development of a novel high resolution and high dispersion Thomson parabola for simultaneously resolving protons and low-Z ions of more than 100 MeV/nucleon necessary to explore novel laser ion acceleration schemes. High electric and magnetic fields enable energy resolutions of ΔE∕E < 5% at 100 MeV/nucleon and impede premature merging of different ion species at low energies on the detector plane. First results from laser driven ion acceleration experiments performed at the Trident Laser Facility demonstrate high resolution and superior species and charge state separation of this novel Thomson parabola for ion energies of more than 30 MeV/nucleon.

  20. Space to Think: Large, High-Resolution Displays for Sensemaking

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Christopher P.; Endert, Alexander; North, Chris

    2010-05-05

    Space supports human cognitive abilities in a myriad of ways. The note attached to the side of the monitor, the papers spread out on the desk, diagrams scrawled on a whiteboard, and even the keys left out on the counter are all examples of using space to recall, reveal relationships, and think. Technological advances have made it possible to construct large display environments in which space has real meaning. This paper examines how increased space affects the way displays are regarded and used within the context of the cognitively demanding task of sensemaking. A study was conducted observing analysts using a prototype large, high-resolution display to solve an analytic problem. This paper reports on the results of this study and suggests a number of potential design criteria for future sensemaking tools developed for large, high-resolution displays.

  1. A procedure for high resolution satellite imagery quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Crespi, Mattia; De Vendictis, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Data products generated from High Resolution Satellite Imagery (HRSI) are routinely evaluated during the so-called in-orbit test period, in order to verify if their quality fits the desired features and, if necessary, to obtain the image correction parameters to be used at the ground processing center. Nevertheless, it is often useful to have tools to evaluate image quality also at the final user level. Image quality is defined by some parameters, such as the radiometric resolution and its accuracy, represented by the noise level, and the geometric resolution and sharpness, described by the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). This paper proposes a procedure to evaluate these image quality parameters; the procedure was implemented in a suitable software and tested on high resolution imagery acquired by the QuickBird, WorldView-1 and Cartosat-1 satellites.

  2. High-resolution array processing using implicit eigenvector weighting techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, A.K. ); Byrne, C.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Many high-resolution bearing estimators require the explicit calculation of the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the cross-spectral matrix of the sensor outputs. Once the eigenvectors have been calculated, various different estimators can be derived by altering the eigenvalues to give a re-weighing of the eigenvectors. For example, in the MUSIC method the eigenvalues corresponding to those eigenvectors in the noise subspace are set to unity, while the eigenvalues corresponding to those eigenvectors in the signal subspace are set to zero. These weighing functions are reminiscent of ideal filter responses in analog filter theory, where practical filters are designed by using polynomial approximations to the ideal desired response. In this paper, the approximation theory developed for filter design is used to derive high-resolution bearing estimators that do not require explicit calculation of the eigenvectors.

  3. Temperature-dependent high resolution absorption cross sections of propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, Christopher A.; Hargreaves, Robert J.; Bernath, Peter F.

    2016-10-01

    High resolution (0.005 cm-1) absorption cross sections have been measured for pure propane (C3H8). These cross sections cover the 2550-3500 cm-1 region at five temperatures (from 296 to 700 K) and were measured using a Fourier transform spectrometer and a quartz cell heated by a tube furnace. Calibrations were made by comparison to the integrated cross sections of propane from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. These are the first high resolution absorption cross sections of propane for the 3 μm region at elevated temperatures. The cross sections provided may be used to monitor propane in combustion environments and in astronomical sources such as the auroral regions of Jupiter, brown dwarfs and exoplanets.

  4. High resolution imaging systems for spin-stabilized Probe spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, G. E.; Malin, M. C.; Delamere, W. A.

    1981-01-01

    A novel design for a high-resolution imaging system which includes on-board data editing and optical navigation, suggests high quality images can be acquired from spin-stabilized spacecraft oriented towards high velocity, short duration planetary missions ('Probes'). The approach to designing imaging systems requires that mission objectives be met within the physical and fiscal constraints imposed by the spacecraft and mission design. Severe constraints imposed on a Comet Halley probe (for example, 57 km/sec encounter velocity with a small, 10 km diameter, object) coupled with a great uncertainty in encounter time and distance, were overcome by innovative use of existing technology. Such designs suggest that 3-axis stabilization or nonspinning platforms are not necessary to acquire high resolution, high quality planetary images.

  5. Protein-DNA binding in high-resolution

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, Shaun; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental and computational methodologies are enabling ultra-high resolution genome-wide profiles of protein-DNA binding events. For example, the ChIP-exo protocol precisely characterizes protein-DNA crosslinking patterns by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with 5′ → 3′ exonuclease digestion. Similarly, deeply sequenced chromatin accessibility assays (e.g. DNase-seq and ATACseq) enable the detection of protected footprints at protein-DNA binding sites. With these techniques and others, we have the potential to characterize the individual nucleotides that interact with transcription factors, nucleosomes, RNA polymerases, and other regulatory proteins in a particular cellular context. In this review, we explain the experimental assays and computational analysis methods that enable high-resolution profiling of protein-DNA binding events. We discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with such approaches. PMID:26038153

  6. The theory and practice of high resolution scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, D.C. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in instrumentation have produced the first commercial examples of what can justifiably be called High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopes. The key components of such instruments are a cold field emission gun, a small-gap immersion probe-forming lens, and a clean dry-pumped vacuum. The performance of these microscopes is characterized by several major features including a spatial resolution, in secondary electron mode on solid specimens, which can exceed 1nm on a routine basis; an incident probe current density of the order of 10{sup 6} amps/cm{sup 2}; and the ability to maintain these levels of performance over an accelerating voltage range of from 1 to 30keV. This combination of high resolution, high probe current, low contamination and flexible electron-optical conditions provides many new opportunitites for the application of the SEM to materials science, physics, and the life sciences. 27 refs., 14 figs.

  7. High resolution seismic reflection test at the DOE Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Narbutovskih, S.M.; Michelsen, F.B.; Clark, J.C.; Christensen, E.W.

    1995-04-01

    A recent test was conducted to ascertain the benefits of swept source technology for use at the DOE Hanford Site. Previous high resolution seismic surveys suffered from coherent noise interference, poor signal transmission and lack of borehole velocity control. P-wave data were collected with the T-2500 Minivib produced by IVI, Inc. and Oyo Geospace`s DAS-1 acquisition system. Results showed a significant increase m signal-to-noise ratio, increased resolving power and better depth penetration of the signal. It is concluded that swept source technology as part of a total systems approach, significantly expands the capabilities of the shallow high resolution seismic reflection method for use at the DOE Hanford Site.

  8. High resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Changmin; Lin Kexiang; Liu Huaibo

    1997-08-01

    This is China`s first case study of high resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information. The key of the modelling process is to build a prototype model and using the model as a geological knowledge bank. Outcrop information used in geological modelling including seven aspects: (1) Determining the reservoir framework pattern by sedimentary depositional system and facies analysis; (2) Horizontal correlation based on the lower and higher stand duration of the paleo-lake level; (3) Determining the model`s direction based on the paleocurrent statistics; (4) Estimating the sandbody communication by photomosaic and profiles; (6) Estimating reservoir properties distribution within sandbody by lithofacies analysis; and (7) Building the reservoir model in sandbody scale by architectural element analysis and 3-D sampling. A high resolution reservoir geological model of Youshashan oil field has been built by using this method.

  9. A High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Devicm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehrig, Hans; Dallas, William J.; Ovitt, Theron W.; Lamoreaux, Richard D.; Vercillo, Richard; McNeill, Kevin M.

    1989-04-01

    This paper describes a high resolution x-ray imaging device, which is under development at the University of Arizona. It is sponsored by NIH for application in coronary angiography, but has also application in other x-ray imaging fields requi ing high spatial resolution, such as mammography and nondestructive tasting. It consists of a 6" diameter external modular sensor, coupled fiber optically to the input of a 6" proximity focussed image intensifier. The intensifier's output is coupled via 6 fiber optic tapers to 6 CCD's for readout. The tapers are joined at the large end to form a 6" by 6" coplanar fiber optic taper assembly. The electronics is designed to form a composite image out of the 6 individual images provided by the 6 CCD's and display the image in full resolution (1152 x 1152) on a high resolution physicians review console. The paper discusses the design considerations, the features, the major problems and some preliminary results.

  10. High resolution spectroscopy in the microwave and far infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, Herbert M.

    1990-01-01

    High resolution rotational spectroscopy has long been central to remote sensing techniques in atmospheric sciences and astronomy. As such, laboratory measurements must supply the required data to make direct interpretation of data for instruments which sense atmospheres using rotational spectra. Spectral measurements in the microwave and far infrared regions are also very powerful tools when combined with infrared measurements for characterizing the rotational structure of vibrational spectra. In the past decade new techniques were developed which have pushed high resolution spectroscopy into the wavelength region between 25 micrometers and 2 mm. Techniques to be described include: (1) harmonic generation of microwave sources, (2) infrared laser difference frequency generation, (3) laser sideband generation, and (4) ultrahigh resolution interferometers.

  11. Fabricating High-Resolution X-Ray Collimators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Michael; Atkinson, James E.; Fraser, Iain; Klinger, Jill

    2008-01-01

    A process and method for fabricating multi-grid, high-resolution rotating modulation collimators for arcsecond and sub-arcsecond x-ray and gamma-ray imaging involves photochemical machining and precision stack lamination. The special fixturing and etching techniques that have been developed are used for the fabrication of multiple high-resolution grids on a single array substrate. This technology has application in solar and astrophysics and in a number of medical imaging applications including mammography, computed tomography (CT), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and gamma cameras used in nuclear medicine. This collimator improvement can also be used in non-destructive testing, hydrodynamic weapons testing, and microbeam radiation therapy.

  12. Single-sided sensor for high-resolution NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlo, J.; Casanova, F.; Blümich, B.

    2006-06-01

    The unavoidable spatial inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field generated by open sensors has precluded their use for high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. In fact, this application was deemed impossible because these field variations are usually orders of magnitude larger than those created by the microscopic structure of the molecules to be detected. Recently, chemical shift resolved NMR spectra were observed for the first time outside a portable single-sided magnet by implementing a method that exploits inhomogeneities in the rf field designed to reproduce variations of the static magnetic field [J. Perlo, V. Demas, F. Casanova, C.A. Meriles, J. Reimer, A. Pines, B. Blümich, High-resolution spectroscopy with a portable single-sided sensor, Science 308 (2005) 1279]. In this communication, we describe in detail the magnet system built from permanent magnets as well as the rf coil geometry used to compensate the static field variations.

  13. Design of UAV high resolution image transmission system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qiang; Ji, Ming; Pang, Lan; Jiang, Wen-tao; Fan, Pengcheng; Zhang, Xingcheng

    2017-02-01

    In order to solve the problem of the bandwidth limitation of the image transmission system on UAV, a scheme with image compression technology for mini UAV is proposed, based on the requirements of High-definition image transmission system of UAV. The video codec standard H.264 coding module and key technology was analyzed and studied for UAV area video communication. Based on the research of high-resolution image encoding and decoding technique and wireless transmit method, The high-resolution image transmission system was designed on architecture of Android and video codec chip; the constructed system was confirmed by experimentation in laboratory, the bit-rate could be controlled easily, QoS is stable, the low latency could meets most applied requirement not only for military use but also for industrial applications.

  14. A Procedure for High Resolution Satellite Imagery Quality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Crespi, Mattia; De Vendictis, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Data products generated from High Resolution Satellite Imagery (HRSI) are routinely evaluated during the so-called in-orbit test period, in order to verify if their quality fits the desired features and, if necessary, to obtain the image correction parameters to be used at the ground processing center. Nevertheless, it is often useful to have tools to evaluate image quality also at the final user level. Image quality is defined by some parameters, such as the radiometric resolution and its accuracy, represented by the noise level, and the geometric resolution and sharpness, described by the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). This paper proposes a procedure to evaluate these image quality parameters; the procedure was implemented in a suitable software and tested on high resolution imagery acquired by the QuickBird, WorldView-1 and Cartosat-1 satellites. PMID:22412312

  15. High resolution irradiance tailoring using multiple freeform surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bruneton, Adrien; Bäuerle, Axel; Wester, Rolf; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Loosen, Peter

    2013-05-06

    More and more lighting applications require the design of dedicated optics to achieve a given radiant intensity or irradiance distribution. Freeform optics has the advantage of providing such a functionality with a compact design. It was previously demonstrated in [Bäuerle et al., Opt. Exp. 20, 14477-14485 (2012)] that the up-front computation of the light path through the optical system (ray mapping) provides a satisfactory approximation to the problem, and allows the design of multiple freeform surfaces in transmission or in reflection. This article presents one natural extension of this work by introducing an efficient optimization procedure based on the physics of the system. The procedure allows the design of multiple freeform surfaces and can render high resolution irradiance patterns, as demonstrated by several examples, in particular by a lens made of two freeform surfaces projecting a high resolution logo (530 × 160 pixels).

  16. High resolution nitrogen dioxide observations: retrieval, evaluation, and interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamsal, L. N.; Janz, S. J.; Krotkov, N. A.; Pickering, K. E.; Kowalewski, M. G.; Loughner, C.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Crawford, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    The Airborne Compact Atmospheric Mapper (ACAM) deployed during the DISCOVER-AQ Maryland field campaign made hyperspectral remote sensing measurements in the 304-910 nm range allowing observations of several tropospheric pollutants including nitrogen dioxide (NO2) at an unprecedented spatial resolution of 1.5x0.75 km2. We apply the DOAS method, include high resolution information for surface reflectivity and vertical distributions of NO2 and aerosols, and account for temporal variation in atmospheric NO2 to retrieve lower tropospheric NO2 column. We compare NO2 from ACAM with observations from in-situ aircraft, ground-based PANDORA, and space-based OMI, and NO2 simulation from air quality models. The high resolution ACAM measurements offer not only new insights into our understanding of atmospheric composition and chemistry through observation of sub-sampling variability in typical satellite and model resolutions, but also opportunities for algorithm improvements for upcoming geostationary air quality missions.

  17. High-resolution schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harten, A.

    1982-01-01

    A class of new explicit second order accurate finite difference schemes for the computation of weak solutions of hyperbolic conservation laws is presented. These highly nonlinear schemes are obtained by applying a nonoscillatory first order accurae scheme to an appropriately modified flux function. The so derived second order accurate schemes achieve high resolution while preserving the robustness of the original nonoscillatory first order accurate scheme.

  18. High resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS), volume 1, book 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The following topics are presented with respect to the high resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS) that is to be used as an instrument for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS): (1) an instrument overview; (2) an instrument description; (3) the instrument's conceptual design; (4) technical risks and offsets; (5) instrument reliability; (6) commands and telemetry; (7) mass and power budgets; (8) integration and test program; (9) program implementation; and (10) phase CD schedule.

  19. High resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS), volume 1, book 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The following topics are presented with respect to the high resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS) that is to be used as an instrument for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS): (1) preliminary program plans; (2) contract end item (CEI) specification; and (3) the instrument interface description document. Under the preliminary program plans section, plans dealing with the following subject areas are discussed: spares, performance assurance, configuration management, software implementation, contamination, calibration management, and verification.

  20. Applications of high-resolution remote sensing image data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strome, W. M.; Leckie, D.; Miller, J.; Buxton, R.

    1990-01-01

    There are many situations in which the image resolution of satellite data is insufficient to provide the detail required for resource management and environmental monitoring. This paper will focus on applications of high-resolution (0.4 to 10 m) airborne multispectral and imaging spectrometer data acquired in Canada using the MEIS II multispectral line imager and the PMI imaging spectrometer. Applications discussed will include forestry, mapping, and geobotany.

  1. High-resolution adaptive optics findings in talc retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Mohamed K; Sarwar, Salman; Hanout, Mostafa; Sadiq, Mohammad A; Agarwal, Aniruddha; Gulati, Vikas; Nguyen, Quan Dong; Sepah, Yasir J

    2015-01-01

    Talc retinopathy is a recognized ocular condition characterized by the presence of small, yellow, glistening crystals found inside small retinal vessels and within different retinal layers. These crystals can be associated with retinal vascular occlusion and ischemia. Different diagnostic modalities have been used previously to characterize the retinal lesions in talc retinopathy. Adaptive optics, a high resolution imaging technique, is used to evaluate the location, appearance and distribution of talc crystals in a case of talc retinopathy.

  2. High-Resolution Wind Measurements for Offshore Wind Energy Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, Son V.; Neumann, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical transform, called the Rosette Transform, together with a new method, called the Dense Sampling Method, have been developed. The Rosette Transform is invented to apply to both the mean part and the fluctuating part of a targeted radar signature using the Dense Sampling Method to construct the data in a high-resolution grid at 1-km posting for wind measurements over water surfaces such as oceans or lakes.

  3. Fusion Experiments of HSI and High Resolution Panchromatic Imagery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    map derived from the unsharpened HSI. The classification is performed with an unsupervised feature extraction using principal component analysis (PCA... Classification of Hyperspectral Data in Urban Area", P. 169-172, SPIE Vol.3502 8. R. C. Gonzalez, P. Wintz, Digital Image Processing, Addison-Wesley...MA 02420-9185 Abstract In this paper, the fusion of hyperspectral imaging (HSI) sensor data and high-resolution panchromatic imagery (HPI) is

  4. High-Resolution Optoelectronic Shaft-Angle Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    1994-01-01

    Improved optoelectronic encoder measures absolute angle to which shaft has been rotated. Costs little more than older, less capable encoders do, yet measures absolute angles at high resolution and does not lose absolute-angle data because generates those data anew with each reading at up to 1,000 times per second. It accumulates increments to measure total angular interval through which shaft has been turned (including unlimited number of complete turns), as long as power remains on.

  5. High resolution studies of atoms and small molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bushaw, B.A.; Tonkyn, R.G.; Miller, R.J.

    1992-10-01

    High resolution, continuous wave lasers have been utilized successfully in studies of small molecules. Examples of two-photon excitation schemes and of multiple resonance excitation sequences will be discussed within the framework of the spectroscopy and dynamics of selected Rydberg states of nitric oxide. Initial results on the circular dichroism of angular distributions in photoelectron spectra of individual hyperfine states of cesium will also be discussed, but no data given.

  6. High resolution, large area, high energy x-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Trebes, J.E.; Dolan, K.W.; Haddad, W.S.; Haskins, J.J.; Lerche, R.A.; Logan, C.M.; Perkins, D.E.; Schneberk, D.J.; Rikard, R.D.

    1997-08-01

    An x-ray tomography system is being developed for high resolution inspection of large objects. The goal is to achieve 25 micron resolution over object sizes that are tens of centimeters in extent. Typical objects will be metal in composition and therefore high energy, few MeV x-rays will be required. A proof-of-principle system with a limited field of view has been developed. Preliminary results are presented.

  7. High Resolution Wavenumber Standards for the Infrared. (IUPAC Recommendations 1995)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guelachvili, G.; Birk, M.; Bord, C.; Brault, J.; Brown, L.; Carli, B.; Cole, A.; Evenson, D.; Fayt, A.; Hausamann, D.; hide

    1995-01-01

    The calibration of high resolution infrared spectra is generally more precise than accurate even when they are recorded with Fourier interferometers. In order to improve the consistency of the spectral measurements, an IUPAC project has been undertaken. Its aim was to recommend a selection of spectral lines as wavenumber standards for absolute calibration in the infrared. This paper will report the final recommendations in the spectral range extending from about 4 to about 7000 cm(be).

  8. LandScan 2013 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    SciTech Connect

    2014-07-01

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30"x30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on land cover, slope, road proximity, high-resolution imagery, and other data sets. The LandScan data set was developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient populations at risk.

  9. New Challenges in High-Resolution Modeling of Hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. S.

    2006-12-01

    The extreme active Atlantic hurricane seasons in recent years have highlighted the urgent need for a better understanding of the factors that contribute to hurricane intensity and for development of the corresponding advanced hurricane prediction models to improve intensity forecasts. The lack of skill in present forecasts of hurricane structure and intensity may be attributed in part to deficiencies in the current prediction models: insufficient grid resolution, inadequate surface and boundary layer formulations, and the lack of full coupling to a dynamic ocean. The extreme high winds, intense rainfall, large ocean waves, and copious sea spray in hurricanes push the surface-exchange parameters for temperature, water vapor, and momentum into untested regimes. The recent modeling effort is to develop and test a fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean modeling system that is capable of resolving the eye and eyewall in a hurricane at ~1 km grid resolution. The new challenges for these very high resolution models are the corresponding physical representations at 1-km scale, including microphysics, sub-grid turbulence parameterization, atmospheric boundary layer, physical processes at the air-sea interface with surface waves among others. The lack of accurate initial conditions for high-resolution hurricane modeling presents another major challenge. Improvements in initial conditions rest on the use of more airborne and remotely sensed observations in high-resolution assimilation systems and on the application of advanced assimilation schemes to hurricanes. This study aimed to provide an overview of these new challenges using high-resolution model simulations of Hurricanes Isabel (2003), Frances (2004), Katrina and Rita (2005) that were observed extensively by two recent field programs, namely, the Coupled Boundary Layer Air-Sea Transfer (CBLAST)-Hurricane in 2003-2004 and the Hurricane Rainbands and Intensity Change Experiment (RAINEX) in 2005.

  10. High-resolution, cryogenic, side-entry type specimen stage

    DOEpatents

    King, Wayne E.; Merkle, Karl L.

    1979-01-01

    A high-resolution, cryogenic side-entry type specimen stage includes a copper block within which a specimen can be positioned in the electron beam of an electron microscope, one end of the copper block constituting a specimen heat exchanger, means for directing a flow of helium at cryogenic temperature into the heat exchanger, and electrical leads running from the specimen to the exterior of the microscope for four point D.C. electrical resistivity measurements.

  11. High resolution digital holography based on the point source scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minchao; Wang, Dayong; Rong, Lu; Wang, Yunxin; Wang, Fengpeng; Lin, Qiaowen

    2016-10-01

    Digital holographic microscopy has been widely used for the imaging of micro-objects and biological samples. Lensless in-line digital holographic microscopy is capable of wide field-of-view imaging. However the spatial resolution of the reconstructed images is limited by the pixel size of the detector. The relative position shift between the sample and the detector can effectively improve the resolution in the traditional sub-pixel shifting method, but it requires a high precision of translation stage. To overcome this problem, we propose a method based on the point source scanning to realize sub-pixel shifting. High precision sub-pixel shifting is achieved easily by using the geometric between point source and detector. Through moving the point source, multiple holograms with sub-pixel shifts are captured. These holograms are merged together to obtained a high resolution hologram by a synthesizing algorithm. Then, the high resolution reconstructed image of the object can be obtained by the angular spectrum algorithm. The feasibility of the proposed method is demonstrated by simulation and experiments. A USAF resolution test target was used as the object. Compared with the traditional digital holography, a higher resolution reconstructed image is obtained by our method. The proposed method has the advantages of simple recording setup and lower precision requirement of the translation stage. It can achieve the wide field-of-view and high resolution imaging.

  12. High resolution, MRI-based, segmented, computerized head phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Zubal, I.G.; Harrell, C.R.; Smith, E.O.; Smith, A.L.; Krischlunas, P.

    1999-01-01

    The authors have created a high-resolution software phantom of the human brain which is applicable to voxel-based radiation transport calculations yielding nuclear medicine simulated images and/or internal dose estimates. A software head phantom was created from 124 transverse MRI images of a healthy normal individual. The transverse T2 slices, recorded in a 256x256 matrix from a GE Signa 2 scanner, have isotropic voxel dimensions of 1.5 mm and were manually segmented by the clinical staff. Each voxel of the phantom contains one of 62 index numbers designating anatomical, neurological, and taxonomical structures. The result is stored as a 256x256x128 byte array. Internal volumes compare favorably to those described in the ICRP Reference Man. The computerized array represents a high resolution model of a typical human brain and serves as a voxel-based anthropomorphic head phantom suitable for computer-based modeling and simulation calculations. It offers an improved realism over previous mathematically described software brain phantoms, and creates a reference standard for comparing results of newly emerging voxel-based computations. Such voxel-based computations lead the way to developing diagnostic and dosimetry calculations which can utilize patient-specific diagnostic images. However, such individualized approaches lack fast, automatic segmentation schemes for routine use; therefore, the high resolution, typical head geometry gives the most realistic patient model currently available.

  13. Adaptive optics high resolution spectroscopy: present status and future direction

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, C; Angel, R; Ciarlo, D; Fugate, R O; Ge, J; Kuzmenko, P; Lloyd-Hart, M; Macintosh, B; Najita, J; Woolf, N

    1999-07-27

    High resolution spectroscopy experiments with visible adaptive optics (AO) telescopes at Starfire Optical Range and Mt. Wilson have demonstrated that spectral resolution can be routinely improved by a factor of - 10 over the seeing-limited case with no extra light losses at visible wavelengths. With large CCDs now available, a very wide wavelength range can be covered in a single exposure. In the near future, most large ground-based telescopes will be equipped with powerful A0 systems. Most of these systems are aimed primarily at diffraction-limited operation in the near IR. An exciting new opportunity will thus open up for high resolution IR spectroscopy. Immersion echelle gratings with much coarser grooves being developed by us at LLNL will play a critical role in achieving high spectral resolution with a compact and low cost IR cryogenically cooled spectrograph and simultaneous large wavelength coverage on relatively small IR detectors. We have constructed a new A0 optimized spectrograph at Steward Observatory to provide R = 200,000 in the optical, which is being commissioned at the Starfire Optical Range 3.5m telescope. We have completed the optical design of the LLNL IR Immersion Spectrograph (LISPEC) to take advantage of improved silicon etching technology. Key words: adaptive optics, spectroscopy, high resolution, immersion gratings

  14. Climatologies at high resolution for the earth's land surface areas.

    PubMed

    Karger, Dirk Nikolaus; Conrad, Olaf; Böhner, Jürgen; Kawohl, Tobias; Kreft, Holger; Soria-Auza, Rodrigo Wilber; Zimmermann, Niklaus E; Linder, H Peter; Kessler, Michael

    2017-09-05

    High-resolution information on climatic conditions is essential to many applications in environmental and ecological sciences. Here we present the CHELSA (Climatologies at high resolution for the earth's land surface areas) data of downscaled model output temperature and precipitation estimates of the ERA-Interim climatic reanalysis to a high resolution of 30 arc sec. The temperature algorithm is based on statistical downscaling of atmospheric temperatures. The precipitation algorithm incorporates orographic predictors including wind fields, valley exposition, and boundary layer height, with a subsequent bias correction. The resulting data consist of a monthly temperature and precipitation climatology for the years 1979-2013. We compare the data derived from the CHELSA algorithm with other standard gridded products and station data from the Global Historical Climate Network. We compare the performance of the new climatologies in species distribution modelling and show that we can increase the accuracy of species range predictions. We further show that CHELSA climatological data has a similar accuracy as other products for temperature, but that its predictions of precipitation patterns are better.

  15. Toward high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of microscopic liquid samples

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Mark C.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Chen, Ying; Reardon, Patrick N.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Khbeis, Michael; Irish, Duane; Mueller, Karl T.

    2017-01-01

    A longstanding limitation of high-resolution NMR spectroscopy is the requirement for samples to have macroscopic dimensions. Commercial probes, for example, are designed for volumes of at least 5 mL, in spite of decades of work directed toward the goal of miniaturization. Progress in miniaturizing inductive detectors has been limited by a perceived need to meet two technical requirements: (1) minimal separation between the sample and the detector, which is essential for sensitivity, and (2) near-perfect magnetic-field homogeneity at the sample, which is typically needed for spectral resolution. The first of these requirements is real, but the second can be relaxed, as we demonstrate here. By using pulse sequences that yield high-resolution spectra in an inhomogeneous field, we eliminate the need for near-perfect field homogeneity and the accompanying requirement for susceptibility matching of microfabricated detector components. With this requirement removed, typical imperfections in microfabricated components can be tolerated, and detector dimensions can be matched to those of the sample, even for samples of volume << 5 uL. Pulse sequences that are robust to field inhomogeneity thus enable small-volume detection with optimal sensitivity. We illustrate the potential of this approach to miniaturization by presenting spectra acquired with a flat-wire detector that can easily be scaled to subnanoliter volumes. In particular, we report high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of an alanine sample of volume 500 pL.

  16. Adaptive optics with pupil tracking for high resolution retinal imaging.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Betul; Lamory, Barbara; Levecq, Xavier; Harms, Fabrice; Dainty, Chris

    2012-02-01

    Adaptive optics, when integrated into retinal imaging systems, compensates for rapidly changing ocular aberrations in real time and results in improved high resolution images that reveal the photoreceptor mosaic. Imaging the retina at high resolution has numerous potential medical applications, and yet for the development of commercial products that can be used in the clinic, the complexity and high cost of the present research systems have to be addressed. We present a new method to control the deformable mirror in real time based on pupil tracking measurements which uses the default camera for the alignment of the eye in the retinal imaging system and requires no extra cost or hardware. We also present the first experiments done with a compact adaptive optics flood illumination fundus camera where it was possible to compensate for the higher order aberrations of a moving model eye and in vivo in real time based on pupil tracking measurements, without the real time contribution of a wavefront sensor. As an outcome of this research, we showed that pupil tracking can be effectively used as a low cost and practical adaptive optics tool for high resolution retinal imaging because eye movements constitute an important part of the ocular wavefront dynamics.

  17. Adaptive optics with pupil tracking for high resolution retinal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Betul; Lamory, Barbara; Levecq, Xavier; Harms, Fabrice; Dainty, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive optics, when integrated into retinal imaging systems, compensates for rapidly changing ocular aberrations in real time and results in improved high resolution images that reveal the photoreceptor mosaic. Imaging the retina at high resolution has numerous potential medical applications, and yet for the development of commercial products that can be used in the clinic, the complexity and high cost of the present research systems have to be addressed. We present a new method to control the deformable mirror in real time based on pupil tracking measurements which uses the default camera for the alignment of the eye in the retinal imaging system and requires no extra cost or hardware. We also present the first experiments done with a compact adaptive optics flood illumination fundus camera where it was possible to compensate for the higher order aberrations of a moving model eye and in vivo in real time based on pupil tracking measurements, without the real time contribution of a wavefront sensor. As an outcome of this research, we showed that pupil tracking can be effectively used as a low cost and practical adaptive optics tool for high resolution retinal imaging because eye movements constitute an important part of the ocular wavefront dynamics. PMID:22312577

  18. Machine Learning Based Road Detection from High Resolution Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Ye; Wang, Guofeng; Hu, Xiangyun

    2016-06-01

    At present, remote sensing technology is the best weapon to get information from the earth surface, and it is very useful in geo- information updating and related applications. Extracting road from remote sensing images is one of the biggest demand of rapid city development, therefore, it becomes a hot issue. Roads in high-resolution images are more complex, patterns of roads vary a lot, which becomes obstacles for road extraction. In this paper, a machine learning based strategy is presented. The strategy overall uses the geometry features, radiation features, topology features and texture features. In high resolution remote sensing images, the images cover a great scale of landscape, thus, the speed of extracting roads is slow. So, roads' ROIs are firstly detected by using Houghline detection and buffering method to narrow down the detecting area. As roads in high resolution images are normally in ribbon shape, mean-shift and watershed segmentation methods are used to extract road segments. Then, Real Adaboost supervised machine learning algorithm is used to pick out segments that contain roads' pattern. At last, geometric shape analysis and morphology methods are used to prune and restore the whole roads' area and to detect the centerline of roads.

  19. High Resolution Observations of Escaping Ions in the Martian Magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halekas, J. S.; Raman, C.; Brain, D.; DiBraccio, G. A.; Harada, Y.; McFadden, J. P.; Mitchell, D. L.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2016-12-01

    Ions escape from the Martian upper atmosphere via a number of channels, including the central plasmasheet of the magnetotail. Mars Express observations show that the heavy ions O+ and O2+ escaping through the central tail often have approximately the same energy, suggesting acceleration in a quasi-static electric field, which has been interpreted as a Hall electric field. The Solar Wind Ion Analyzer (SWIA) on MAVEN was designed to measure the upstream solar wind. However, during orbit segments with appropriate spacecraft attitude, SWIA can also make high resolution measurements of escaping ions in the tail. During the prime mission, these observations were only returned sporadically, during periods of intense escaping fluxes that fortuitously triggered a mode switch. Now, in the extended mission, we return high resolution observations from SWIA routinely. Some of these high resolution measurements reveal slight differences in both the direction and energy of escaping O+ and O2+ ions, which may help determine the acceleration process(es). We investigate the location and solar wind conditions for which the escaping ions separate in energy and angle and the systematics of their energies and flow vectors, and discuss the implications for ion acceleration and the overall picture of Martian atmospheric escape.

  20. High Resolution Modeling of Tropical Cyclones Using Rare Event Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotkin, D. A.; Abbot, D. S.; Weare, J.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) present a challenge to modeling using general circulation models (GCMs) because they involve processes and structures that are too fine for GCMs to resolve. TCs have fine structures - e.g. the eye, eyewall, and rain bands - with length scales on the order of 10 km, while GCMs have typical resolutions on the order of 50-100 km. High resolution GCM runs that are sufficiently long to exhibit multiple TCs can be prohibitively computationally expensive. Thus, while GCMs exhibit TC-like vortices with similar spatial and temporal frequencies to observed TCs, the ability of GCMs to reproduce fine TC structures remains largely untested. In this study, we use recently developed rare event analysis and simulation methods to selectively simulate TCs under GCMs at very high resolution. These rare event simulation methods have been developed mostly in the context of computational chemistry, but are broadly applicable. They allow (either by careful manipulation of the model or by selection of trajectories) direct and detailed interrogation of the event of interest without introducing error and without the need to simulated for long periods of time to see the event. By creating targeted, high resolution GCM simulations with many TCs, we hope to determine whether or not GCMs can capture fine TC structures such as eyewalls and individual rain bands.

  1. High resolution ultrasonic spectroscopy system for nondestructive evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. H.

    1991-01-01

    With increased demand for high resolution ultrasonic evaluation, computer based systems or work stations become essential. The ultrasonic spectroscopy method of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) was used to develop a high resolution ultrasonic inspection system supported by modern signal processing, pattern recognition, and neural network technologies. The basic system which was completed consists of a 386/20 MHz PC (IBM AT compatible), a pulser/receiver, a digital oscilloscope with serial and parallel communications to the computer, an immersion tank with motor control of X-Y axis movement, and the supporting software package, IUNDE, for interactive ultrasonic evaluation. Although the hardware components are commercially available, the software development is entirely original. By integrating signal processing, pattern recognition, maximum entropy spectral analysis, and artificial neural network functions into the system, many NDE tasks can be performed. The high resolution graphics capability provides visualization of complex NDE problems. The phase 3 efforts involve intensive marketing of the software package and collaborative work with industrial sectors.

  2. High resolution single particle refinement in EMAN2.1.

    PubMed

    Bell, James M; Chen, Muyuan; Baldwin, Philip R; Ludtke, Steven J

    2016-05-01

    EMAN2.1 is a complete image processing suite for quantitative analysis of grayscale images, with a primary focus on transmission electron microscopy, with complete workflows for performing high resolution single particle reconstruction, 2-D and 3-D heterogeneity analysis, random conical tilt reconstruction and subtomogram averaging, among other tasks. In this manuscript we provide the first detailed description of the high resolution single particle analysis pipeline and the philosophy behind its approach to the reconstruction problem. High resolution refinement is a fully automated process, and involves an advanced set of heuristics to select optimal algorithms for each specific refinement task. A gold standard FSC is produced automatically as part of refinement, providing a robust resolution estimate for the final map, and this is used to optimally filter the final CTF phase and amplitude corrected structure. Additional methods are in-place to reduce model bias during refinement, and to permit cross-validation using other computational methods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Environmental inversion using high-resolution matched-field processing.

    PubMed

    Soares, Cristiano; Jesus, Sérgio M; Coelho, Emanuel

    2007-12-01

    This paper considers the inversion of experimental field data collected with light receiving systems designed to meet operational requirements. Such operational requirements include system deployment in free drifting configurations and a limited number of acoustic receivers. A well-known consequence of a reduced spatial coverage is a poor sampling of the vertical structure of the acoustic field, leading to a severe ill-conditioning of the inverse problem and data to model cost function with a massive sidelobe structure having many local extrema. This causes difficulties to meta-heuristic global search methods, such as genetic algorithms, to converge to the true model parameters. In order to cope with this difficulty, broadband high-resolution processors are proposed for their ability to significantly attenuate sidelobes, as a contribution for improving convergence. A comparative study on simulated data shows that high-resolution methods did not outperform the conventional Bartlett processor for pinpointing the true environmental parameter when using exhaustive search. However, when a meta-heuristic technique is applied for exploring a large multidimensional search space, high-resolution methods clearly improved convergence, therefore reducing the inherent uncertainty on the final estimate. These findings are supported by the results obtained on experimental field data obtained during the Maritime Rapid Environmental Assessment 2003 sea trial.

  4. High-resolution 3D digital models of artworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Raffaella; Gambino, Maria Chiara; Greco, Marinella; Pampaloni, Enrico; Pezzati, Luca; Scopigno, Roberto

    2003-10-01

    The measurement of the shape of an artwork usually requires a high-resolution instrumentation, in order to catch small details such as chisel marks, sculptural relieves, surface cracks, etc. 3D scanning techniques, together with new modeling software tools, allow a high fidelity reproduction of an artwork: these can be applied either to support and document its repair or for the realization of 3D archives and virtual museums. Starting from a high-resolution digital model of an object, a further step could be its reproduction by means of fast-prototyping techniques like stereo-lithography or electro-erosion. This work is aimed at showing the performance of a high-resolution laser scanner devoted to Cultural Heritage applications. The device is portable and very versatile, in order to allow in situ applications, accurate and reliable, so to capture intricate details. This laser profilometer has been used in a few surveys, the most significant of which are the monitoring the various phases of the restoration process of an ellenistic bronze (the Minerva of Arezzo, Florence), the cataloguing of some archaeological findings (from the Grotta della Poesia, Lecce) and the documenting of wooden panels surface conditions (the "Madonna del Cardellino" by Raffaello and "La Tebaide" by Beato Angelico).

  5. High Resolution Aerosol Modeling: Decadal Changes in Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, D J; Chuang, C C; Govindasamy, B; Cameron-Smith, P J; Rotman, D A

    2005-02-01

    The Atmospheric Science Division of LLNL has performed high-resolution calculations of direct sulfate forcing using a DOE-provided computer resource at NERSC. We integrated our global chemistry-aerosol model (IMPACT) with the LLNL high-resolution global climate model (horizontal resolution as high as 100 km) to examine the temporal evolution of sulfate forcing since 1950. We note that all previous assessments of sulfate forcing reported in IPCC (2001) were based on global models with coarse spatial resolutions ({approx} 300 km or even coarser). However, the short lifetime of aerosols ({approx} days) results in large spatial and temporal variations of radiative forcing by sulfate. As a result, global climate models with coarse resolutions do not accurately simulate sulfate forcing on regional scales. It requires much finer spatial resolutions in order to address the effects of regional anthropogenic SO{sub 2} emissions on the global atmosphere as well as the effects of long-range transport of sulfate aerosols on the regional climate forcing. By taking advantage of the tera-scale computer resources at NERSC, we simulated the historic direct sulfate forcing at much finer spatial resolutions than ever attempted before. Furthermore, we performed high-resolution chemistry simulations and saved monthly averaged oxidant fields, which will be used in subsequent simulations of sulfate aerosol formation and their radiative impact.

  6. A high-resolution study of isotopic compositions of precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeonghoon; Kim, Songyi; Han, Yeongcheol; Oh, Yoon Seok; Kim, Young-Hee; Kim, Hyerin; Ham, Ji-Young; Choi, Hye-Bin; Na, Un-Sung; Koh, Dong-Chan

    2015-04-01

    Isotopic compositions of precipitation have been used to understand moisture transport in the atmosphere and interactions between precipitation and groundwater. Isotopic compositions of speleothems and ice cores, so called, "paleoarchives", can be utilized to interpret climate of the past and global circulation models (GCMs), which are able to explain the paleoarchives, can be validated by the precipitation isotopes. The developments of stable isotope analyzers make high-resolution isotopic studies feasible and a high-resolution study of precipitation isotopes is needed. For this study, precipitation samples were collected for every 5 to 15 minutes, depending on precipitation rates, using an auto-sampler for precipitation isotopes near coastal area. The isotopic compositions of precipitation range from -5.7‰ (-40.1‰)) to -10.8‰ (-74.3‰)) for oxygen (hydrogen). The slope of δ18O-δD diagram for the whole period is 6.8, but that of each storm is 5.1, 4.2, 7.9 and 7.7, respectively. It indicates that evaporation occurred during the first two storms, while the latter two storms did not experience any evaporation. The isotopic fractionations of precipitation has significant implications for the water cycle and high-resolution data of precipitation isotopes will be needed for the future studies related to the precipitation isotopes.

  7. Stars and their Environments at High-Resolution with IGRINS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mace, Gregory; Jaffe, Daniel; Kaplan, Kyle; Kidder, Benjamin; Oh, Heeyoung; Sneden, Christopher; Afşar, Melike

    2016-06-01

    TheImmersion Grating Infrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) is a revolutionary instrument that exploits broad spectral coverage at high-resolution in the near-infrared. There are no moving parts in IGRINS and its high-throughput white-pupil design maximizes sensitivity. IGRINS on the 2.7 meter Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory is nearly as sensitive as CRIRES at the 8 meter Very Large Telescope. However, IGRINS at R=45,000 has more than 30 times the spectral grasp of CRIRES. The use of an immersion grating facilitates a compact cryostat while providing simultaneous H and K band observations with complete wavelength coverage from 1.45 - 2.45 microns. Here we discuss details of instrument performance and summarize the application of IGRINS to stellar characterization, star formation in regions like Taurus and Ophiuchus, the interstellar medium, and photodissociation regions. IGRINS has the largest spectral grasp of any high-resolution, near-infrared spectrograph, allowing us to study star formation and evolution in unprecedented detail. With its fixed format and high sensitivity, IGRINS is a great survey instrument for star clusters, high signal-to-noise (SNR>300) studies of field stars, and for mapping the interstellar medium. As a prototype for GMTNIRS on the Giant Magellan Telescope, IGRINS represents the future of high-resolution spectroscopy. In the future IGRINS will be deployed to numerous facilities and will remain a versatile instrument for the community while producing a rich archive of uniform spectra.

  8. Progress in high-resolution x-ray holographic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Howells, M.; McQuaid, K.; Rothman, S.; Feder, R.; Sayre, D.

    1987-07-01

    Among the various types of x-ray microscopes that have been demonstrated, the holographic microscope has had the largest gap between promise and performance. The difficulties of fabricating x-ray optical elements have led some to view holography as the most attractive method for obtaining the ultimate in high resolution x-ray micrographs; however, we know of no investigations prior to 1987 that clearly demonstrated submicron resolution in reconstructed images. Previous efforts suffered from problems such as limited resolution and dynamic range in the recording media, low coherent x-ray flux, and aberrations and diffraction limits in visible light reconstruction. We have addressed the recording limitations through the use of an undulator x-ray source and high-resolution photoresist recording media. For improved results in the readout and reconstruction steps, we have employed metal shadowing and transmission electron microscopy, along with numerical reconstruction techniques. We believe that this approach will allow holography to emerge as a practical method of high-resolution x-ray microscopy. 30 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Te Inclusions in CZT Detectors: New Method for Correcting Their Adverse Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, A.E.; Babalola, S.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Egarievwe, S.U.; Hawrami, R.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; James, R.B.

    2009-10-25

    Both Te inclusions and point defects can trap the charge carriers generated by ionizing particles in CdZnTe (CZT) detectors. The amount of charge trapped by point defects is proportional to the carriers’ drift time and can be corrected electronically. In the case of Te inclusions, the charge loss depends upon their random locations with respect to the electron cloud. Consequently, inclusions introduce fluctuations in the charge signals, which cannot be easily corrected. In this paper, we describe direct measurements of the cumulative effect of Te inclusions and its influence on the response of CZT detectors of different thicknesses and different sizes and concentrations of Te inclusions. We also discuss a means of partially correcting their adverse effects.

  10. Characterization of Single-Sided Charge-Sharing CZT Strip Detectors for Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donmez, Burcin; Macri, John R.; Ryan, James M.; Legere, Jason S.; McConnell, Mark L.; Widholm, Mark; Narita, Tomohiko; Hamel, Louis-Andre

    2006-01-01

    We report progress in the study of thick single-sided charge-sharing cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) strip detector modules designed to perform spectroscopy and 3-D imaging of gamma-rays. We report laboratory measurements including spectroscopy, efficiency and 3-D imaging capability of prototype detectors (15 15 7.5 cu mm) with 11x11 unit cells. We also report on Monte Carlo simulations (GEANT4 v7.1) to investigate the effect of multihits on detector performance in both spectroscopy and imaging. We compare simulation results with data obtained from laboratory measurements and discuss the implications for future strip detector designs. Keywords: CZT, strip detectors, gamma-ray

  11. Characterization of Single-Sided Charge-Sharing CZT Strip Detectors for Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donmez, Burcin; Macri, John R.; Ryan, James M.; Legere, Jason S.; McConnell, Mark L.; Widholm, Mark; Narita, Tomohiko; Hamel, Louis-Andre

    2006-01-01

    We report progress in the study of thick single-sided charge-sharing cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) strip detector modules designed to perform spectroscopy and 3-D imaging of gamma-rays. We report laboratory measurements including spectroscopy, efficiency and 3-D imaging capability of prototype detectors (15 15 7.5 cu mm) with 11x11 unit cells. We also report on Monte Carlo simulations (GEANT4 v7.1) to investigate the effect of multihits on detector performance in both spectroscopy and imaging. We compare simulation results with data obtained from laboratory measurements and discuss the implications for future strip detector designs. Keywords: CZT, strip detectors, gamma-ray

  12. Studying Spatial Resolution of CZT Detectors Using Sub-Pixel Positioning for SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montémont, Guillaume; Lux, Silvère; Monnet, Olivier; Stanchina, Sylvain; Verger, Loïck

    2014-10-01

    CZT detectors are the basic building block of a variety of new SPECT systems. Their modularity allows adapting system architecture to specific applications such as cardiac, breast, brain or small animal imaging. In semiconductors, a high number of electron-hole pairs is produced by a single interaction. This direct conversion process allows better energy and spatial resolutions than usual scintillation detectors based on NaI(Tl). However, it remains often unclear if SPECT imaging can really benefit of that performance gain. We investigate the system performance of a detection module, which is based on 5 mm thick CZT with a segmented anode having a 2.5 mm pitch by simulation and experimentation. This pitch allows an easy assembly of the crystal on the readout board and limits the space occupied by electronics without significantly degrading energy and spatial resolution.

  13. THE EFFECT OF VARIOUS DETECTOR GEOMETRIES ON THE PERFORMANCE OF CZT USING ONE CRYSTAL

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, A.; Duff, M.; Teague, L.

    2011-06-21

    CdZnTe (CZT) continues to be a major thrust interest mainly due to its potential application as a room temperature radiation detector. The performance of CZT detectors is directly related to the charge collection ability which can be affected by the configuration of the electrical contact. The charge collection efficiency is determined in part by the specific geometry of the anode contact which serves as the readout electrode. In this report, contact geometries including single pixel, planar, coplanar, and dual anode will be systematically explored by comparing the performance efficiencies of the detector using both low and high energy gamma rays. To help eliminate the effect of crystal quality variations, the contact geometries were fabricated on the same crystal detector with minimal polishing between contact placements.

  14. Effects of H2 Atmosphere Annealing on the Properties of CZT:In Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, P. F.; Jie, W. Q.

    2013-12-01

    To improve crystal quality and detector performance, high-resistivity cadmium zinc telluride (CZT):In single crystals were annealed in H2. The concentration of Te inclusions did not change after annealing. Both the resistivity and infrared transmittance increased as the annealing time increased, indicating improvement of crystal quality. Because of the passivation by hydrogen, some interesting phenomena were observed in the photoluminescence spectra of as-grown and annealed CZT:In crystals. Moreover, the energy resolution was remarkably enhanced. After 4 h, 8 h, and 12 h of annealing, the energy resolution was improved 33%, 79%, and 49%, respectively. The crystal annealed for 8 h with energy resolution of 9.29% had the best detector performance.

  15. Annual Report: Property Improvement in CZT via Modeling and Processing Innovations

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Setyawan, Wahyu; Gao, Fei; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Bliss, Mary; Riley, Brian J.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Stave, Jean A.

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this project is to develop growth models of CZT crystals from the melt using vertical gradient freeze (VGF) or vertical Bridgman growth as a typical process. Further, the project will perform critical experiments including single crystal growth to validate the growth models and to provide detailed data for modeling and simulation. Ideally, the project will develop growth models that will provide, for the first time, choices for optimal CZT single crystal growth from the melt based on model input. The overarching goal that guides this research proposal is to produce large, single crystals of CZT with good yield and reproducible properties. In our view this depends on 1) understanding crystal growth processes, including annealing and cool-down processing, and 2) understanding the role of defects on detector response since it is not possible, yet, to produce defect-free materials. Models of defect structure and formation are addressed. Validated models and experiments on reducing defects in melt-grown crystals are used to guide our understanding of growth processes and in-furnace annealing plus cool-down.

  16. Investigation of the Electronic Properties of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) Detectors using a Nuclear Microprobe

    SciTech Connect

    BRUNETT,BRUCE A.; DOYLE,BARNEY L.; JAMES,RALPH B.; VIZKELETHY,GYORGY; WALSH,DAVID S.

    1999-10-18

    The electronic transport properties of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) determine the charge collection efficiency (i.e. the signal quality) of CZT detectors. These properties vary on both macroscopic and microscopic scale and depend on the presence of impurities and defects introduced during the crystal growth. Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) is a proven method to measure the charge collection efficiency. Using an ion microbeam, the charge collection efficiency can be mapped with submicron resolution, and the map of electronic properties (such as drift length) can be calculated from the measurement. A more sophisticated version of IBICC, the Time Resolved IBICC (TRIBICC) allows them to determine the mobility and the life time of the charge carriers by recording and analyzing the transient waveform of the detector signal. Furthermore, lateral IBICC and TRIBICC can provide information how the charge collection efficiency depends on the depth where the charge carriers are generated. This allows one to deduce information on the distribution of the electric field and transport properties of the charge carriers along the detector axis. IBICC and TRIBICC were used at the Sandia microbeam facility to image electronic properties of several CZT detectors. From the lateral TRIBICC measurement the electron and hole drift length profiles were calculated.

  17. The value of local normal limits in quantitative Thallium-201 CZT MPI SPECT.

    PubMed

    Gregoire, Bastien; Pina-Jomir, Géraldine; Bontemps, Laurence; Janier, Marc; Scheiber, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Considering the distinctive characteristics of CZT detectors, automatic quantification of ischemia using normal limits included with software package may deliver suboptimal results for CAD detection. The present study aims to evaluate the benefits of creating normal limits specific to a local population and laboratory protocol. Two groups were selected from patients who had undergone a CZT MPI. Normal limits were generated with the QPS application based on the population with low likelihood of CAD. Using the vendor-supplied and the population-specific normal limits i-TPD and vessel-specific SDS results obtained for patients who had subsequently undergone coronary angiography were compared with coronary angiography data. A weak correlation was observed for low i-TPD (stress TPD minus rest TPD) and SDS values. Both databases gave similar values for the area under the ROC curve concerning i-TPD (0.75 to 0.74) and SDS results (0.72 to 0.75 for the LAD, 0.62 to 0.64 for the LCx, and 0.63 to 0.67 for the RCA). Sensitivity (60%), specificity (78%), and predictive positive (84%) and negative (52%) values were also similar with a diagnostic and prognostic threshold value. The use of a population-specific created database did not influence the diagnostic value of thallium-201 MPI QPS results using a CZT camera.

  18. Value of attenuation correction in stress-only myocardial perfusion imaging using CZT-SPECT.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, J D; Mouden, M; Ottervanger, J P; van Dalen, J A; Knollema, S; Slump, C H; Jager, P L

    2017-04-01

    Attenuation correction (AC) improves the diagnostic outcome of stress-only myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using conventional SPECT. Our aim was to determine the value of AC using a cadmium zinc telluride-based (CZT)-SPECT camera. We retrospectively included 107 consecutive patients who underwent stress-optional rest MPI CZT-SPECT/CT. Next, we created three types of images for each patient; (1) only displaying reconstructed data without the CT-based AC (NC), (2) only displaying AC, and (3) with both NC and AC (NC + AC). Next, two experienced physicians visually interpreted these 321 randomized images as normal, equivocal, or abnormal. Image outcome was compared with all hard events over a mean follow-up time of 47.7 ± 9.8 months. The percentage of images interpreted as normal increased from 45% using the NC images to 72% using AC and to 67% using NC + AC images (P < .001). Hard event hazard ratios for images interpreted as normal were not different between using NC and AC (1.01, P = .99), or NC and NC + AC images (0.97, P = .97). AC lowers the need for additional rest imaging in stress-first MPI using CZT-SPECT, while long-term patient outcome remained identical. Use of AC reduces the need for additional rest imaging, decreasing the mean effective dose by up to 1.2 mSv.

  19. The High Energy Telescope on EXIST: The First Prototype of Advanced Imaging CZT Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, JaeSub; Allen, B.; Grindlay, J.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Skinner, G.; Finger, M.; Jernigan, G.; EXIST Team

    2009-12-01

    The High Energy Telescope (HET) on EXIST is a coded-aperture telescope using a large array of CZT detectors and hybrid tungsten mask. The HET will locate high red-shift Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and other rare elusive transients quickly (<10 sec) and accurately (<20") for rapid (<1-2 min) follow-up onboard optical/IR imaging and spectroscopy. The HET will also survey the highly variable transient hard X-ray sky on unprecedented time scales, scanning nearly the entire sky in every two orbits (3 hour). A key challenge of the HET is to develop a large array (4.5m2) of fine pixel imaging CZT detectors. We report the recent progress in the first prototype CZT detector module (16x16 cm2). We plan to test two of such modules in a near space environment through our balloon experiment - ProtoEXIST1. The first flight is scheduled in Fall 2009. ProtoEXIST1 is the first in a series of increasingly sophisticated detector development programs to fulfill the technology requirement for the HET on EXIST.

  20. Charge transport properties of as-grown CZT by traveling heater method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, U. N.; Weiler, S.; Stein, J.; Groza, M.; Buliga, V.; Burger, A.

    2011-10-01

    In this present work we have grown Cd 0.9Zn 0.1Te doped with indium by the traveling heater method (THM) technique. Large 2 in diameter CZT ingots of more than 1 kg each were successfully grown by the THM technique in vertical configuration. In order to evaluate our as-grown CZT samples, charge transport characteristics were studied at and below room temperature. The key parameter investigated for as-grown CZT samples was the mobility-trapping time product and its temperature variation. Mobility-trapping time values as high as 9×10 -3 cm 2/V at 30 °C were measured for samples exhibiting resistivities in the 1-2×10 10 Ω cm range. The as-grown samples showed moderately good resolution of 1.5-3.5% at 662 keV when fabricated. The variation of the internal electric field along the depth of the detector was studied for as-grown material to evaluate deformations inside the crystal due to the presence of residual stress or other defects.

  1. Direct observation of influence of secondary-phase defects on CZT detector response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, A.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Gul, R.; Roy, U. N.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.

    2017-07-01

    Commercial detector-grade cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) crystals still suffer from various types of extended defects, e.g., dislocations, micro-grains, grain boundaries, and Te-rich secondary phases. Most of these defects cannot readily be identified and characterized using conventional techniques, though they are believed to be the dominant factor causing non-uniformity in the detector response. In this work, we revealed and characterized these secondary-phase defects in CZT crystals by employing multiple advanced techniques, e.g. X-ray diffraction topography, micro-scale X-ray response mapping, chemical etching and infrared microscopy. We then evaluate the detector performance of the crystals by recording high spatial-resolution raster scans of the charge collection and spectral response. We directly correlated the influence of the secondary-phase defects on the performance of the detector responses. The experimental results exhibit clear evidence of the undesirable effects of extended defects on the performance of commercial CZT radiation detectors.

  2. Coincidence corrected efficiency calibration of Compton-suppressed HPGe detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Aucott, Timothy; Brand, Alexander; DiPrete, David

    2015-04-20

    The authors present a reliable method to calibrate the full-energy efficiency and the coincidence correction factors using a commonly-available mixed source gamma standard. This is accomplished by measuring the peak areas from both summing and non-summing decay schemes and simultaneously fitting both the full-energy efficiency, as well as the total efficiency, as functions of energy. By using known decay schemes, these functions can then be used to provide correction factors for other nuclides not included in the calibration standard.

  3. Analysis of CZT crystals and detectors grown in Russia and the Ukraine by high-pressure Bridgman methods

    SciTech Connect

    H. Hermon; M. Schieber; R. B. James; E. Y. Lee; N. Yang; A. J. Antolak; D. H. Morse; C. Hackett; E. Tarver; N. N. P. Kolesnikov; Yu N. Ivanov; V. Komar; M. S. Goorsky; H. Yoon

    2000-01-10

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is leading an effort to evaluate vertical high pressure Bridgman (VHPB) Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te (CZT) crystals grown in the former Soviet Union (FSU) (Ukraine and Russia), in order to study the parameters limiting the crystal quality and the radiation detector performance. The stoichiometry of the CZT crystals, with 0.04 < x < 0.25, has been determined by methods such as proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), X-ray diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis and laser ablation ICP mass spectroscopy (LA-ICP/MS). Other methods such as triaxial double crystal x-ray diffraction (TADXRD), infrared transmission spectroscopy (IR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), thermoelectric emission spectroscopy (TEES) and laser induced transient charge technique (TCT) were also used to evaluate the material properties. The authors have measured the zinc distribution in a CZT ingot along the axial direction and also its homogeneity. The (Cd+Zn)/Te average ratio measured on the Ukraine crystals was 1.2, compared to the ratio of 0.9-1.06 on the Russian ingots. The IR transmission showed highly decorated grain boundaries with precipitates and hollow bubbles. Microprobe elemental analysis and LA-ICP/MS showed carbon precipitates in the CZT bulk and carbon deposits along grain boundaries. The higher concentration of impurities and the imperfect crystallinity lead to shorter electron and hole lifetimes in the range of 0.5--2 {micro}s and 0.1 {micro}s respectively, compared to 3--20 {micro}s and 1--7 {micro}s measured on US spectrometer grade CZT detectors. These results are consistent with the lower resistivity and worse crystalline perfection of these crystals, compared to US grown CZT. However, recently grown CZT from FSU exhibited better detector performance and good response to alpha particles.

  4. High resolution solar observations from first principles to applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdoni, Angelo P.

    2009-10-01

    The expression "high-resolution observations" in Solar Physics refers to the spatial, temporal and spectral domains in their entirety. High-resolution observations of solar fine structure are a necessity to answer many of the intriguing questions related to solar activity. However, a researcher building instruments for high-resolution observations has to cope with the fact that these three domains often have diametrically opposed boundary conditions. Many factors have to be considered in the design of a successful instrument. Modern post-focus instruments are more closely linked with the solar telescopes that they serve than in past. In principle, the quest for high-resolution observations already starts with the selection of the observatory site. The site survey of the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) under the stewardship of the National Solar Observatory (NSO) has identified Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) as one of the best sites for solar observations. In a first step, the seeing characteristics at BBSO based on the data collected for the ATST site survey are described. The analysis will aid in the scheduling of high-resolution observations at BBSO as well as provide useful information concerning the design and implementation of a thermal control system for the New Solar Telescope (NST). NST is an off-axis open-structure Gregorian-style telescope with a 1.6 m aperture. NST will be housed in a newly constructed 5/8-sphere ventilated dome. With optics exposed to the surrounding air, NST's open-structure design makes it particularly vulnerable to the effects of enclosure-related seeing. In an effort to mitigate these effects, the initial design of a thermal control system for the NST dome is presented. The goal is to remediate thermal related seeing effects present within the dome interior. The THermal Control System (THCS) is an essential component for the open-telescope design of NST to work. Following these tasks, a calibration routine for the

  5. Large-field high-resolution mosaic movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerschlag, Robert H.; Sliepen, Guus; Bettonvil, Felix C. M.; Jägers, Aswin P. L.; Sütterlin, Peter; Martin, Sara F.

    2012-09-01

    Movies with fields-of-view larger than normal for high-resolution telescopes will give a better understanding of processes on the Sun, such as filament and active region developments and their possible interactions. New active regions can influence, by their emergence, their environment to the extent of possibly serving as an igniter of the eruption of a nearby filament. A method to create a large field-of-view is to join several fields-of-view into a mosaic. Fields are imaged quickly one after another using fast telescope-pointing. Such a pointing cycle has been automated at the Dutch Open Telescope (DOT), a high-resolution solar telescope located on the Canary Island La Palma. The observer can draw with the computer mouse the desired total field in the guider-telescope image of the whole Sun. The guider telescope is equipped with an H-alpha filter and electronic enhancement of contrast in the image for good visibility of filaments and prominences. The number and positions of the subfields are calculated automatically and represented by an array of bright points indicating the subfield centers inside the drawn rectangle of the total field on the computer screen with the whole-sun image. When the exposures start the telescope repeats automatically the sequence of subfields. Automatic production of flats is also programmed including defocusing and fast motion over the solar disk of the image field. For the first time mosaic movies were programmed from stored information on automated telescope motions from one field to the next. The mosaic movies fill the gap between whole-sun images with limited resolution of synoptic telescopes including space instruments and small-field high-cadence movies of high-resolution solar telescopes.

  6. Proceedings of the workshop on high resolution computed microtomography (CMT)

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to determine the status of the field, to define instrumental and computational requirements, and to establish minimum specifications required by possible users. The most important message sent by implementers was the remainder that CMT is a tool. It solves a wide spectrum of scientific problems and is complementary to other microscopy techniques, with certain important advantages that the other methods do not have. High-resolution CMT can be used non-invasively and non-destructively to study a variety of hierarchical three-dimensional microstructures, which in turn control body function. X-ray computed microtomography can also be used at the frontiers of physics, in the study of granular systems, for example. With high-resolution CMT, for example, three-dimensional pore geometries and topologies of soils and rocks can be obtained readily and implemented directly in transport models. In turn, these geometries can be used to calculate fundamental physical properties, such as permeability and electrical conductivity, from first principles. Clearly, use of the high-resolution CMT technique will contribute tremendously to the advancement of current R and D technologies in the production, transport, storage, and utilization of oil and natural gas. It can also be applied to problems related to environmental pollution, particularly to spilling and seepage of hazardous chemicals into the Earth's subsurface. Applications to energy and environmental problems will be far-ranging and may soon extend to disciplines such as materials science--where the method can be used in the manufacture of porous ceramics, filament-resin composites, and microelectronics components--and to biomedicine, where it could be used to design biocompatible materials such as artificial bones, contact lenses, or medication-releasing implants. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  7. High Resolution Thz and FIR Spectroscopy of SOCl_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Drumel, M. A.; Cuisset, A.; Sadovskii, D. A.; Mouret, G.; Hindle, F.; Pirali, O.

    2013-06-01

    Thionyl chloride (SOCl_2) is an extremely powerful oxidant widely used in industrial processes and playing a role in the chemistry of the atmosphere. In addition, it has a molecular configuration similar to that of phosgene (COCl_2), and is therefore of particular interest for security and defense applications. Low resolution vibrational spectra of gas phase SOCl_2 as well as high resolution pure rotational transitions up to 25 GHz have previously been investigated. To date no high resolution data are reported at frequencies higher than 25 GHz. We have investigated the THz absorption spectrum of SOCl_2 in the spectral region 70-650 GHz using a frequency multiplier chain coupled to a 1 m long single path cell containing a pressure of about 15 μbar. At the time of the writing, about 8000 pure rotational transitions of SO^{35}Cl_2 with highest J and K_a values of 110 and 50 respectively have been assigned on the spectrum. We have also recorded the high resolution FIR spectra of SOCl_2 in the spectral range 50-700 wn using synchrotron radiation at the AILES beamline of SOLEIL facility. A White-type cell aligned with an absorption path length of 150 m has been used to record, at a resolution of 0.001 wn, two spectra at pressures of 5 and 56 μbar of SOCl_2. On these spectra all FIR modes of SOCl_2 are observed (ν_2 to ν_6) and present a resolved rotational structure. Their analysis is in progress. T. J. Johnson et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 107, 6183 (2003) D. E. Martz and R. T. Lagemann, J. Chem. Phys. 22,1193 (1954) H. S. P. Müller and M. C. L. Gerry, J. Chem. Soc. Faraday Trans. 90, 3473 (1994)

  8. Metallicity determination of M dwarfs. High-resolution infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, Sara; Heiter, Ulrike; Seifahrt, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Context. Several new techniques to determine the metallicity of M dwarfs with better precision have been developed over the last decades. However, most of these studies were based on empirical methods. In order to enable detailed abundance analysis, standard methods established for warmer solar-like stars, i.e. model-dependent methods using fitting of synthetic spectra, still need to be used. Aims: In this work we continue the reliability confirmation and development of metallicity determinations of M dwarfs using high-resolution infrared spectra. The reliability was confirmed through analysis of M dwarfs in four binary systems with FGK dwarf companions and by comparison with previous optical studies of the FGK dwarfs. Methods: The metallicity determination was based on spectra taken in the J band (1.1-1.4 μm) with the CRIRES spectrograph. In this part of the infrared, the density of stellar molecular lines is limited, reducing the amount of blends with atomic lines enabling an accurate continuum placement. Lines of several atomic species were used to determine the stellar metallicity. Results: All binaries show excellent agreement between the derived metallicity of the M dwarf and its binary companion. Our results are also in good agreement with values found in the literature. Furthermore, we propose an alternative way to determine the effective temperature of M dwarfs of spectral types later than M2 through synthetic spectral fitting of the FeH lines in our observed spectra. Conclusions: We have confirmed that a reliable metallicity determination of M dwarfs can be achieved using high-resolution infrared spectroscopy. We also note that metallicites obtained with photometric metallicity calibrations available for M dwarfs only partly agree with the results we obtain from high-resolution spectroscopy. Based on data obtained at ESO-VLT, Paranal Observatory, Chile, Program ID 082.D-0838(A) and 084.D-1042(A).

  9. Theoretical performance analysis for CMOS based high resolution detectors.

    PubMed

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2013-03-06

    High resolution imaging capabilities are essential for accurately guiding successful endovascular interventional procedures. Present x-ray imaging detectors are not always adequate due to their inherent limitations. The newly-developed high-resolution micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF-CCD) detector has demonstrated excellent clinical image quality; however, further improvement in performance and physical design may be possible using CMOS sensors. We have thus calculated the theoretical performance of two proposed CMOS detectors which may be used as a successor to the MAF. The proposed detectors have a 300 μm thick HL-type CsI phosphor, a 50 μm-pixel CMOS sensor with and without a variable gain light image intensifier (LII), and are designated MAF-CMOS-LII and MAF-CMOS, respectively. For the performance evaluation, linear cascade modeling was used. The detector imaging chains were divided into individual stages characterized by one of the basic processes (quantum gain, binomial selection, stochastic and deterministic blurring, additive noise). Ranges of readout noise and exposure were used to calculate the detectors' MTF and DQE. The MAF-CMOS showed slightly better MTF than the MAF-CMOS-LII, but the MAF-CMOS-LII showed far better DQE, especially for lower exposures. The proposed detectors can have improved MTF and DQE compared with the present high resolution MAF detector. The performance of the MAF-CMOS is excellent for the angiography exposure range; however it is limited at fluoroscopic levels due to additive instrumentation noise. The MAF-CMOS-LII, having the advantage of the variable LII gain, can overcome the noise limitation and hence may perform exceptionally for the full range of required exposures; however, it is more complex and hence more expensive.

  10. (99m)Tc-MDP bone scintigraphy of the hand: comparing the use of novel cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) and routine NaI(Tl) detectors.

    PubMed

    Koulikov, Victoria; Lerman, Hedva; Kesler, Mikhail; Even-Sapir, Einat

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) solid-state detectors have been recently introduced in the field of nuclear medicine in cardiology and breast imaging. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the performance of the novel detectors (CZT) compared to that of the routine NaI(Tl) in bone scintigraphy. A dual-headed CZT-based camera dedicated originally to breast imaging has been used, and in view of the limited size of the detectors, the hands were chosen as the organ for assessment. This is a clinical study. Fifty-eight consecutive patients (total 116 hands) referred for bone scan for suspected hand pathology gave their informed consent to have two acquisitions, using the routine camera and the CZT-based camera. The latter was divided into full-dose full-acquisition time (FD CZT) and reduced-dose short-acquisition time (RD CZT) on CZT technology, so three image sets were available for analysis. Data analysis included comparing the detection of hot lesions and identification of the metacarpophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal, and distal interphalangeal joints. A total of 69 hot lesions were detected on the CZT image sets; of these, 61 were identified as focal sites of uptake on NaI(Tl) data. On FD CZT data, 385 joints were identified compared to 168 on NaI(Tl) data (p < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in delineation of joints between FD and RD CZT data as the latter identified 383 joints. Bone scintigraphy using a CZT-based gamma camera is associated with improved lesion detection and anatomic definition. The superior physical characteristics of this technique raised a potential reduction in administered dose and/or acquisition time without compromising image quality.

  11. Optimal energy window selection of a CZT-based small-animal SPECT for quantitative accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Su-Jin; Yu, A. Ram; Choi, Yun Young; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-05-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has desirable characteristics such as superior energy resolution, but data acquisition for SPECT imaging has been widely performed with a conventional energy window. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal energy window settings for technetium-99 m (99mTc) and thallium-201 (201Tl), the most commonly used isotopes in SPECT imaging, using CZT-based small-animal SPECT for quantitative accuracy. We experimentally investigated quantitative measurements with respect to primary count rate, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and scatter fraction (SF) within various energy window settings using Triumph X-SPECT. The two ways of energy window settings were considered: an on-peak window and an off-peak window. In the on-peak window setting, energy centers were set on the photopeaks. In the off-peak window setting, the ratios of energy differences between the photopeak from the lower- and higher-threshold varied from 4:6 to 3:7. In addition, the energy-window width for 99mTc varied from 5% to 20%, and that for 201Tl varied from 10% to 30%. The results of this study enabled us to determine the optimal energy windows for each isotope in terms of primary count rate, CNR, and SF. We selected the optimal energy window that increases the primary count rate and CNR while decreasing SF. For 99mTc SPECT imaging, the energy window of 138-145 keV with a 5% width and off-peak ratio of 3:7 was determined to be the optimal energy window. For 201Tl SPECT imaging, the energy window of 64-85 keV with a 30% width and off-peak ratio of 3:7 was selected as the optimal energy window. Our results demonstrated that the proper energy window should be carefully chosen based on quantitative measurements in order to take advantage of desirable characteristics of CZT-based small-animal SPECT. These results provided valuable reference information for the establishment of new protocol for CZT

  12. Reconfigurable Pointing Control for High Resolution Space Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.; Kia, Tooraj; Van Cleve, Jeffrey

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, a pointing control performance criteria is established to suppport high resolution space spectroscopy. Results indicate that these pointing control requirements are very stringent, and would typically be difficult to meet using standard 3-axis spacecraft control. To resolve this difficulty, it is shown that performance can be significantly improved using a reconfigurable control architecture that switches among a small bankof detuned Kalman filters. The effectiveness of the control reconfiguration approach is demonstrated by example on the Space Infra-Red Telescope Facility (SIRTF) pointing system, in support of the InfraRed Spectrograph (IRS) payload.

  13. Reconfigurable Pointing Control for High Resolution Space Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.; Kia, Tooraj; vanCleve, Jeffrey

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, a pointing control performance criteria is established to support high resolution space spectroscopy. Results indicate that these pointing requirements are very stringent, and would typically be difficult to meet using standard 3-axis spacecraft control. To resolve this difficulty, it is shown that performance can be significantly improved using a reconfigurable control architecture that switches among a small bank of detuned Kalman filters. The effectiveness of the control reconfiguration approach is demonstrated by example on the Space Infra, Red Telescope Facility (SIRTF) pointing system, in support of the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) payload.

  14. A high resolution spectrum reconstruction algorithm using compressive sensing theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhaoyu; Liang, Dakai; Liu, Shulin; Feng, Shuqing

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes a quick spectrum scanning and reconstruction method using compressive sensing in composite structure. The strain field of corrugated structure is simulated by finite element analysis. Then the reflect spectrum is calculated using an improved transfer matrix algorithm. The K-means singular value decomposition sparse dictionary is trained . In the test the spectrum with limited sample points can be obtained and the high resolution spectrum is reconstructed by solving sparse representation equation. Compared with the other conventional basis, the effect of this method is better. The match rate of the recovered spectrum and the original spectrum is over 95%.

  15. High resolution spectroscopy of six new extreme helium stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heber, U.; Jones, G.; Drilling, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    High resolution spectra of six newly discovered extreme helium stars are presented. LSS 5121 is shown to be a spectroscopical twin of the hot extreme helium star HD 160641. A preliminary LTE analysis of LSS 3184 yielded an effective temperature of 22,000 K and a surface gravity of log g = 3.2. Four stars form a new subgroup, classified by sharp-lined He I spectra and pronounced O II spectra, and it is conjectured that these lie close to the Eddington limit. The whole group of extreme helium stars apparently is inhomogeneous with respect to luminosity to mass ratio and chemical composition.

  16. Clickstream data yields high-resolution maps of science

    SciTech Connect

    Bollen, Johan; Van De Sompel, Herbert; Hagberg, Aric; Bettencourt, Luis; Chute, Ryan; Rodriguez, Marko A; Balakireva, Lyudmila

    2009-01-01

    Intricate maps of science have been created from citation data to visualize the structure of scientific activity. However, most scientific publications are now accessed online. Scholarly web portals record detailed log data at a scale that exceeds the number of all existing citations combined. Such log data is recorded immediately upon publication and keeps track of the sequences of user requests (clickstreams) that are issued by a variety of users across many different domains. Given these advantagees of log datasets over citation data, we investigate whether they can produce high-resolution, more current maps of science.

  17. Homology Groups of High-Resolution Temporal Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vásquez Aguilar, R.; Carsteanu, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Using high-resolution temporal rainfall intensities from Iowa City, IA (IIHR, U of Iowa), we perform an analysis of the homology groups generated by data connectivity in state space, and attempt a qualitative interpretation of the first and second homology groups. Let us note that homology groups are generated, in the context of topological data analysis (TDA), by representing the data in n-dimensional state space and building a connectivity diagram according to the respective distances between the data points. Subsequently, the topological invariants of the resulting connected structures are being analyzed.

  18. High-Resolution Protein Structure Determination by Serial Femtosecond Crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Boutet, Sébastien; Lomb, Lukas; Williams, Garth J.; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Aquila, Andrew; Doak, R. Bruce; Weierstall, Uwe; DePonte, Daniel P.; Steinbrener, Jan; Shoeman, Robert L.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Barty, Anton; White, Thomas A.; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Kirian, Richard A.; Seibert, M. Marvin; Montanez, Paul A.; Kenney, Chris; Herbst, Ryan; Hart, Philip; Pines, Jack; Haller, Gunther; Gruner, Sol M.; Philipp, Hugh T.; Tate, Mark W.; Hromalik, Marianne; Koerner, Lucas J.; van Bakel, Niels; Morse, John; Ghonsalves, Wilfred; Arnlund, David; Bogan, Michael J.; Caleman, Carl; Fromme, Raimund; Hampton, Christina Y.; Hunter, Mark S.; Johansson, Linda C.; Katona, Gergely; Kupitz, Christopher; Liang, Mengning; Martin, Andrew V.; Nass, Karol; Redecke, Lars; Stellato, Francesco; Timneanu, Nicusor; Wang, Dingjie; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Schafer, Donald; Defever, James; Neutze, Richard; Fromme, Petra; Spence, John C. H.; Chapman, Henry N.; Schlichting, Ilme

    2013-01-01

    Structure determination of proteins and other macromolecules has historically required the growth of high-quality crystals sufficiently large to diffract x-rays efficiently while withstanding radiation damage. We applied serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) to obtain high-resolution structural information from microcrystals (less than 1 micrometer by 1 micrometer by 3 micrometers) of the well-characterized model protein lysozyme. The agreement with synchrotron data demonstrates the immediate relevance of SFX for analyzing the structure of the large group of difficult-to-crystallize molecules. PMID:22653729

  19. High-resolution protein structure determination by serial femtosecond crystallography.

    PubMed

    Boutet, Sébastien; Lomb, Lukas; Williams, Garth J; Barends, Thomas R M; Aquila, Andrew; Doak, R Bruce; Weierstall, Uwe; DePonte, Daniel P; Steinbrener, Jan; Shoeman, Robert L; Messerschmidt, Marc; Barty, Anton; White, Thomas A; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Kirian, Richard A; Seibert, M Marvin; Montanez, Paul A; Kenney, Chris; Herbst, Ryan; Hart, Philip; Pines, Jack; Haller, Gunther; Gruner, Sol M; Philipp, Hugh T; Tate, Mark W; Hromalik, Marianne; Koerner, Lucas J; van Bakel, Niels; Morse, John; Ghonsalves, Wilfred; Arnlund, David; Bogan, Michael J; Caleman, Carl; Fromme, Raimund; Hampton, Christina Y; Hunter, Mark S; Johansson, Linda C; Katona, Gergely; Kupitz, Christopher; Liang, Mengning; Martin, Andrew V; Nass, Karol; Redecke, Lars; Stellato, Francesco; Timneanu, Nicusor; Wang, Dingjie; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Schafer, Donald; Defever, James; Neutze, Richard; Fromme, Petra; Spence, John C H; Chapman, Henry N; Schlichting, Ilme

    2012-07-20

    Structure determination of proteins and other macromolecules has historically required the growth of high-quality crystals sufficiently large to diffract x-rays efficiently while withstanding radiation damage. We applied serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) to obtain high-resolution structural information from microcrystals (less than 1 micrometer by 1 micrometer by 3 micrometers) of the well-characterized model protein lysozyme. The agreement with synchrotron data demonstrates the immediate relevance of SFX for analyzing the structure of the large group of difficult-to-crystallize molecules.

  20. High resolution collimator system for X-ray detector

    DOEpatents

    Eberhard, Jeffrey W.; Cain, Dallas E.

    1987-01-01

    High resolution in an X-ray computerized tomography (CT) inspection system is achieved by using a collimator/detector combination to limit the beam width of the X-ray beam incident on a detector element to the desired resolution width. In a detector such as a high pressure Xenon detector array, a narrow tapered collimator is provided above a wide detector element. The collimator slits have any desired width, as small as a few mils at the top, the slit width is easily controlled, and they are fabricated on standard machines. The slit length determines the slice thickness of the CT image.

  1. High-resolution threshold photoelectron spectroscopy by electron attachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, J. M.; Chutjian, A.

    1976-01-01

    A new technique for measuring high-resolution threshold photoelectron spectra of atoms, molecules, and radicals is described. It involves photoionization of a gaseous species, attachment of the threshold, or nearly zero electron to some trapping molecule (here SF6 or CFCl3), and mass detection of the attachment product (SF6/-/ or Cl/-/ respectively). This technique of threshold photoelectron spectroscopy by electron attachment was used to measure the spectra of argon and xenon at 11 meV (FWHM) resolution, and was also applied to CFCl3.

  2. Microcoil high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Hans; Brinkmann, Andreas; van Eck, Ernst R H; van Bentum, P Jan M; Kentgens, Arno P M

    2006-07-12

    We report the construction of a dual-channel microcoil nuclear magnetic resonance probehead allowing magic-angle spinning for mass-limited samples. With coils down to 235 mum inner diameter, this allows high-resolution solid-state NMR spectra to be obtained for amounts of materials of a few nanoliters. This is demonstrated by the carbon-13 spectrum of a tripeptide and a single silk rod, prepared from the silk gland of the Bombyx mori silkworm. Furthermore, the microcoil allows for radio frequency field strengths well beyond current probe technology, aiding in getting the highest possible resolution by efficiently decoupling the observed nuclei from the abundantly present proton nuclei.

  3. High resolution polar Kerr magnetometer for nanomagnetism and nanospintronics.

    PubMed

    Cormier, M; Ferré, J; Mougin, A; Cromières, J-P; Klein, V

    2008-03-01

    A new high resolution polar magneto-optical (MO) Kerr magnetometer, devoted to the study of nanometer sized elements with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, is described. The unique performances of this setup in terms of sensitivity (1.2x10(-15) emu), stability (lateral drift +/-35 nm over 3 h), and resolution (laser spot full width at half maximum down to 470 nm) are demonstrated, and illustrated by Kerr hysteresis loop measurements on a unique ultrathin magnetic nanodot, and over small segments of ultranarrow magnetic tracks. Large scanning MO Kerr microscopy images were also obtained with the same performances.

  4. HRTS -- NRL High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSherry, M.

    This guide is intended to be used in conjunction with the HRTS package, which was originally developed at N.R.L. by John Ewing & Ken Dere but has now been modified for general Starlink use. The guide details each program in the package, which has been divided up according to the categories: data analysis, data reduction and miscellaneous. These sections are also further divided according to language, either DCL+Fortran or IDL. HRTS is the The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph.

  5. High resolution X-ray spectroscopy of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.

    1990-01-01

    After a brief review of the principal problems of AGN research, selected potential high-resolution observations are discussed with a view toward assessing their scientific value and the degree of resolution they will require. Two classes of observations pertaining directly to AGNs are discussed. Fe K-alpha spectroscopy relevant to the dynamical and thermal character of the emission line zones; and measurement of resonance line absorption by highly-ionized species in BL Lac objects, which should provide information about entrainment of interstellar material by relativistic jets. A third class of potentially important observations uses AGNs as background light sources in order to directly measure the distance to clusters of galaxies.

  6. High-resolution microscopy coil MR-Eye.

    PubMed

    Georgouli, T; James, T; Tanner, S; Shelley, D; Nelson, M; Chang, B; Backhouse, O; McGonagle, D

    2008-08-01

    The eye is involved in several pathologies where precise identification of the underlying condition is essential for the optimal patient care. This preliminary report presents the potential of high-resolution microscopy coil magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI) to undertake this task being actively used in the clinical setting. We used a commercially available MRI scanner and a microscopy surface coil. Exquisite anatomic detail of the eye and orbit with depiction of previously unobserved structures and clear demonstration of the underlying pathology was achieved. This report supports the idea that orbital imaging can be revolutionized with the introduction of HR-MRI with broad clinical implications.

  7. High-Resolution, Wide-Field-of-View Scanning Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepulveda, Cesar; Wilson, Robert; Seshadri, Suresh

    2007-01-01

    A proposed telescope would afford high resolution over a narrow field of view (<0.10 ) while scanning over a total field of view nominally 16 wide without need to slew the entire massive telescope structure. The telescope design enables resolution of a 1-m-wide object in a 50- km-wide area of the surface of the Earth as part of a 200-km-wide area field of view monitored from an orbit at an altitude of 700 km. The conceptual design of this telescope could also be adapted to other applications both terrestrial and extraterrestrial in which there are requirements for telescopes that afford both wide- and narrow-field capabilities. In the proposed telescope, the scanning would be effected according to a principle similar to that of the Arecibo radio telescope, in which the primary mirror is stationary with respect to the ground and a receiver is moved across the focal surface of the primary mirror. The proposed telescope would comprise (1) a large spherical primary mirror that would afford high resolution over a narrow field of view and (2) a small displaceable optical relay segment that would be pivoted about the center of an aperture stop to effect the required scanning (see figure). Taken together, both comprise a scanning narrow-angle telescope that does not require slewing the telescope structure. In normal operation, the massive telescope structure would stare at a fixed location on the ground. The inner moveable relay optic would be pivoted to scan the narrower field of view over the wider one, making it possible to retain a fixed telescope orientation, while obtaining high-resolution images over multiple target areas during an interval of 3 to 4 minutes in the intended orbit. The pivoting relay segment of the narrow-angle telescope would include refractive and reflective optical elements, including two aspherical mirrors, to counteract the spherical aberration of the primary mirror. Overall, the combination of the primary mirror and the smaller relay optic

  8. Color enhancement of nimbus high resolution infrared radiometer data.

    PubMed

    Kreins, E R; Allison, L J

    1970-03-01

    Two examples of Nimbus high resolution infrared radiometer (HRIR) data processed by a color display enhancement system demonstrate possible meteorological, oceanographic, and geomorphological applications of this technique for geophysical research. A commonly used means of displaying radiation temperatures mapped by the HRIR has been a black and white photofacsimile film strip. However, the human eye can distinguish many more colors than shades of gray, and this characteristic permits an analyst to evaluate quantitatively radiation values mapped in color more readily than in black and white.

  9. Nowcasting for a high-resolution weather radar network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzanski, Evan

    Short-term prediction (nowcasting) of high-impact weather events can lead to significant improvement in warnings and advisories and is of great practical importance. Nowcasting using weather radar reflectivity data has been shown to be particularly useful. The Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) radar network provides high-resolution reflectivity data amenable to producing valuable nowcasts. The high-resolution nature of CASA data requires the use of an efficient nowcasting approach, which necessitated the development of the Dynamic Adaptive Radar Tracking of Storms (DARTS) and sinc kernel-based advection nowcasting methodology. This methodology was implemented operationally in the CASA Distributed Collaborative Adaptive Sensing (DCAS) system in a robust and efficient manner necessitated by the high-resolution nature of CASA data and distributed nature of the environment in which the nowcasting system operates. Nowcasts up to 10 min to support emergency manager decision-making and 1--5 min to steer the CASA radar nodes to better observe the advecting storm patterns for forecasters and researchers are currently provided by this system. Results of nowcasting performance during the 2009 CASA IP experiment are presented. Additionally, currently state-of-the-art scale-based filtering methods were adapted and evaluated for use in the CASA DCAS to provide a scale-based analysis of nowcasting. DARTS was also incorporated in the Weather Support to Deicing Decision Making system to provide more accurate and efficient snow water equivalent nowcasts for aircraft deicing decision support relative to the radar-based nowcasting method currently used in the operational system. Results of an evaluation using data collected from 2007--2008 by the Weather Service Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) located near Denver, Colorado, and the National Center for Atmospheric Research Marshall Test Site near Boulder, Colorado, are presented. DARTS was also used to study the

  10. High resolution near edge x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Haemaelaeinen, K.; Siddons, D.P.; Berman, L.E.; Kao, C.C.; Hastings, J.B.

    1992-12-01

    A technique to suppress the core-hole lifetime broadening in near- edge x-ray spectroscopy is presented. A simple theoretical explanation based on total energy conservation in the fluorescence process is given to explain the improved resolution. The experimental arrangement is shown together with an application to the L{sub III} edge of dysprosium. Furthermore, the application of high-resolution fluorescence spectroscopy in the study of magnetism is presented. The spin-resolved absorption spectra from MnF{sub 2} are shown as an example.

  11. High resolution near edge x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Haemaelaeinen, K.; Siddons, D.P.; Berman, L.E.; Kao, C.C.; Hastings, J.B.

    1992-01-01

    A technique to suppress the core-hole lifetime broadening in near- edge x-ray spectroscopy is presented. A simple theoretical explanation based on total energy conservation in the fluorescence process is given to explain the improved resolution. The experimental arrangement is shown together with an application to the L[sub III] edge of dysprosium. Furthermore, the application of high-resolution fluorescence spectroscopy in the study of magnetism is presented. The spin-resolved absorption spectra from MnF[sub 2] are shown as an example.

  12. High-resolution imaging of globular cluster cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weir, N.; Piotto, G.; Djorgovski, S.

    1990-01-01

    An approach based on the maximum entropy method aimed at increasing angular resolution to study globular cluster cores is presented. To perform the image restoration the Gull-Skilling (1989) MEMSYS-3 code for maximum entropy reconstruction of arbitrary data sets was used. This software was recently applied to restoration of ESO images of the R136 object in the core of the 30 Doradus nebula. It was demonstrated that the software made it possible to restore an image at subpixel spatial scales which facilitates the detection of very high-resolution structure in the restored image.

  13. High-resolution second harmonic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yi; Tomov, Ivan V.; Wang, Yimin; Chen, Zhongping

    2005-04-01

    A high-resolution Second Harmonic Optical Coherence Tomography (SH-OCT) system is demonstrated using a spectrum broadened femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser. An axial resolution of 4.2 μm at the second harmonic wave center wavelength of 400 nm has been achieved. Because the SH-OCT system uses the second harmonic generation signals that strongly depend on the orientation, polarization and local symmetry properties of chiral molecules, this technique provides unique contrast enhancement to conventional optical coherence tomography. The system is applied to image biological tissues like the rat-tail tendon. Images of highly organized collagen fibrils in the rat-tail tendon have been demonstrated.

  14. A High Resolution Microprobe Study of EETA79001 Lithology C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, Christian M.; Cohen, B. A.; Donovan, J. J.; Vicenzi, E. P.

    2010-01-01

    Antarctic meteorite EETA79001 has received substantial attention for possibly containing a component of Martian soil in its impact glass (Lithology C) [1]. The composition of Martian soil can illuminate near-surface processes such as impact gardening [2] and hydrothermal and volcanic activity [3,4]. Impact melts in meteorites represent our most direct samples of Martian regolith. We present the initial findings from a high-resolution electron microprobe study of Lithology C from Martian meteorite EETA79001. As this study develops we aim to extract details of a potential soil composition and to examine Martian surface processes using elemental ratios and correlations.

  15. High-Resolution Melt Curve Analysis in Cancer Mutation Screen.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Meenakshi; Patel, Keyur P

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis is a PCR-based assay that identifies sequence alterations based on subtle variations in the melting curves of mutated versus wild-type DNA sequences. HRM analysis is a high-throughput, sensitive, and efficient alternative to Sanger sequencing and is used to assess for mutations in clinically important genes involved in cancer diagnosis. The technique involves PCR amplification of a target sequence in the presence of a fluorescent double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) binding dye, melting of the fluorescent amplicons, and subsequent interpretation of melt curve profiles.

  16. Saturn - high-resolution filtered image of Enceladus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This high-resolution filtered image of Enceladus was made from several images obtained Aug. 25 by Voyager 2 from a range of 119,000 kilometers (74,000 miles). It shows further surface detail on this Saturnian moon (also viewed in the accompanying release P-23955C/BW, S-2-50, imaged about the same time). Enceladus is seen to resemble Jupiter's Galilean satellite Ganymede, which is, however, about 10 times larger. Faintly visible here in 'Saturnshine' is the hemisphere turned away from the sun. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

  17. Multispectral high-resolution hologram generation using orthographic projection images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muniraj, I.; Guo, C.; Sheridan, J. T.

    2016-08-01

    We present a new method of synthesizing a digital hologram of three-dimensional (3D) real-world objects from multiple orthographic projection images (OPI). A high-resolution multiple perspectives of 3D objects (i.e., two dimensional elemental image array) are captured under incoherent white light using synthetic aperture integral imaging (SAII) technique and their OPIs are obtained respectively. The reference beam is then multiplied with the corresponding OPI and integrated to form a Fourier hologram. Eventually, a modified phase retrieval algorithm (GS/HIO) is applied to reconstruct the hologram. The principle is validated experimentally and the results support the feasibility of the proposed method.

  18. Coregistration of high-resolution Mars orbital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2015-04-01

    The systematic orbital imaging of the Martian surface started 4 decades ago from NASA's Viking Orbiter 1 & 2 missions, which were launched in August 1975, and acquired orbital images of the planet between 1976 and 1980. The result of this reconnaissance was the first medium-resolution (i.e. ≤ 300m/pixel) global map of Mars, as well as a variety of high-resolution images (reaching up to 8m/pixel) of special regions of interest. Over the last two decades NASA has sent 3 more spacecraft with onboard instruments for high-resolution orbital imaging: Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) having onboard the Mars Orbital Camera - Narrow Angle (MOC-NA), Mars Odyssey having onboard the Thermal Emission Imaging System - Visual (THEMIS-VIS) and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) having on board two distinct high-resolution cameras, Context Camera (CTX) and High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE). Moreover, ESA has the multispectral High resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) onboard ESA's Mars Express with resolution up to 12.5m since 2004. Overall, this set of cameras have acquired more than 400,000 high-resolution images, i.e. with resolution better than 100m and as fine as 25 cm/pixel. Notwithstanding the high spatial resolution of the available NASA orbital products, their accuracy of areo-referencing is often very poor. As a matter of fact, due to pointing inconsistencies, usually form errors in roll attitude, the acquired products may actually image areas tens of kilometers far away from the point that they are supposed to be looking at. On the other hand, since 2004, the ESA Mars Express has been acquiring stereo images through the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC), with resolution that is usually 12.5-25 metres per pixel. The achieved coverage is more than 64% for images with resolution finer than 20 m/pixel, while for ~40% of Mars, Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) have been produced with are co-registered with MOLA [Gwinner et al., 2010]. The HRSC images and DTMs

  19. Applied high resolution geophysical methods: Offshore geoengineering hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Trabant, P.K.

    1984-01-01

    This book is an examination of the purpose, methodology, equipment, and data interpretation of high-resolution geophysical methods, which are used to assess geological and manmade engineering hazards at offshore construction locations. It is a state-of-the-art review. Contents: 1. Introduction. 2. Maring geophysics, an overview. 3. Marine geotechnique, an overview. 4. Echo sounders. 5. Side scan sonar. 6. Subbottom profilers. 7. Seismic sources. 8. Single-channel seismic reflection systems. 9. Multifold acquisition and digital processing. 10. Marine magnetometers. 11. Marine geoengineering hazards. 12. Survey organization, navigation, and future developments. Appendix. Glossary. References. Index.

  20. High-resolution ultrasonography in the assessment of meralgia paresthetica.

    PubMed

    Aravindakannan, Therimadasamy; Wilder-Smith, Einar P

    2012-03-01

    Meralgia paresthetica can be difficult to diagnose, as neurophysiological studies are often hard to interpret due to excess fatty tissue and the varying anatomy of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve. We retrospectively analyzed the use of high-resolution ultrasound (HRU) for confirming clinical meralgia paresthetica and compared results with nerve conduction studies. In all 6 patients evaluated, HRUs showed significantly enlarged nerve diameter and in 3 enlarged cross-sectional area, 4 had absent nerve potentials, and in 2 the potentials could not be recorded on either side. HRU seems promising for confirming meralgia paresthetica and can accurately localize nerve entrapment. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. High resolution projection micro stereolithography system and method

    SciTech Connect

    Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Farquar, George; Weisgraber, Todd; Gemberling, Steven; Fang, Nicholas; Xu, Jun; Alonso, Matthew; Lee, Howon

    2016-11-15

    A high-resolution P.mu.SL system and method incorporating one or more of the following features with a standard P.mu.SL system using a SLM projected digital image to form components in a stereolithographic bath: a far-field superlens for producing sub-diffraction-limited features, multiple spatial light modulators (SLM) to generate spatially-controlled three-dimensional interference holograms with nanoscale features, and the integration of microfluidic components into the resin bath of a P.mu.SL system to fabricate microstructures of different materials.

  2. Ground Truth Analysis Supporting the High Resolution Flyover.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    h -Ai2S 026 GROUND TRUTH ANALYSIS SUPPORTING THE NIGH RESOLUTIONJ 1/1 FLYOYER(U) NAYAL CORSTAL SYSTEMS CENTER PANAMA CITY FL D F LOTT MAR 83,NCSC-TM...378 83 SB1 AD-F208 051 UNCLR7SIFIED F/G 8/3 N 2. 11111=1.25 klf(RCP ,L- I(N , 011 0 0 0 TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM NCSC TM 370-83 MARCH 1983 GROUND TRUTH ...provided ground truth measurements in support of the High Resolution Flyover (NAVAIR Task No. A370370G/076B/lF590550-000). Ground truthing was provided

  3. High-resolution threshold photoionization of N2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedmann, R. T.; Grant, E. R.; Tonkyn, R. G.; White, M. G.

    1991-01-01

    Pulsed field ionization (PFI) has been used in conjunction with a coherent VUV source to obtain high-resolution threshold photoelectron spectra for the (000), (010), (020), and (100) vibrational states of the N2O(+) cation. Simulations for the rotational profiles of each vibronic level were obtained by fitting the Buckingham-Orr-Sichel equations using accurate spectroscopic constants for the ground states of the neutral and the ion. The relative branch intensities are interpreted in terms of the partial waves of the outgoing photoelectron to which the ionic core is coupled and in terms of the angular momentum transferred to the core.

  4. Saturn - high-resolution filtered image of Enceladus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This high-resolution filtered image of Enceladus was made from several images obtained Aug. 25 by Voyager 2 from a range of 119,000 kilometers (74,000 miles). It shows further surface detail on this Saturnian moon (also viewed in the accompanying release P-23955C/BW, S-2-50, imaged about the same time). Enceladus is seen to resemble Jupiter's Galilean satellite Ganymede, which is, however, about 10 times larger. Faintly visible here in 'Saturnshine' is the hemisphere turned away from the sun. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

  5. High-resolution AMLCD for the electronic library system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Russel A.; Middo, Kathy; Turner, William D.; Lewis, Alan; Thompson, Malcolm J.; Silverstein, Louis D.

    1994-06-01

    The Electronic Library System (ELS), is a proposed data resource for the cockpit which can provide the aircrew with a vast array of technical information on their aircraft and flight plan. This information includes, but is not limited to, approach plates, Jeppeson Charts, and aircraft technical manuals. Most of these data are appropriate for digitization at high resolution (300 spi). Xerox Corporation has developed a flat panel active matrix liquid crystal display, AMLCD, that is an excellent match to the ELS, due to its innovative and aggressive design.

  6. Arterial diameter measurement using high resolution ultrasonography: in vitro validation.

    PubMed

    Brum, Javier; Bia, Daniel; Benech, Nicolas; Balay, Guillermo; Armentano, Ricardo L; Negreira, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Simultaneous measurement of pressure and diameter in blood vessels or vascular prosthesis is of great importance in cardiovascular research. Knowledge of diameter changes as response to intravascular pressure is the basis to estimate the biomechanical properties of blood vessel. In this work a new method to quantify arterial diameter based in high resolution ultrasonography is proposed. Measurements on an arterial phantom placed on a cardiovascular simulator were performed. The results were compared to sonomicrometry measurements considered as gold standard technique. The obtained results indicate that the new method ensure an optimal diameter quantification. This method presents two main advantages respect to sonomicrometry: is noninvasive and the vessel wall strain can be measured directly.

  7. Design and test of a High-Resolution EUV Spectroheliometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Thomas E.; Timothy, J. G.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.; Kirby, Helen; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Jain, Surendra K.; Saxena, Ajay K.; Bhattacharyya, Jagadish C.; Huber, Martin C. E.; Tondello, Giuseppe

    1992-01-01

    The HiRES High-Resolution EUV Spectroheliometer is a sounding rocket instrument yielding very high spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution images of the solar outer atmosphere, on the basis of a 45-cm Gregorian telescope feeding a normal-incidence stigmatic EUV spectrometer with imaging multianode microchannel-array detector system, as well as an IR spectrometer with imaging CCD detector system. Attention is given to the expected performance of this system, including the effects of vibrational misalignments due to the sounding rocket flight environment.

  8. High-resolution light microscopy for interpretation of renal biopsies.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, E O

    1995-12-01

    Routine transmission electron microscopy is recommended for all renal biopsies. However, most of the diagnostic lesions in renal pathology are 0.2 micron or larger, and are therefore visible by light microscopy. These lesions are difficult to evaluate in paraffin sections due to problems inherent in the method itself. Full utilization of the resolving power of the light microscope or high-resolution light microscopy is possible with resin (plastic) histotechnology. The replacement of conventional histotechnology by epoxy histotechnology allows the visualization of most subcellular structures needed for accurate diagnosis in renal pathology. Electron microscopy remains a very helpful tool for selected morphological problems.

  9. Design of a High Resolution Hexapod Positioning Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, Jamie

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a high resolution, six-degree of freedom positioning mechanism. This mechanism, based on the Stewart platform concept, was designed for use with the Developmental Comparative Active Optics Telescope Testbed (DCATT), a ground-based technology testbed for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST). The mechanism provides active control to the DCATT telescope's segmented primary mirror. Emphasis is on design decisions and technical challenges. Significant issues include undesirable motion properties of PZT-inchworm actuators, testing difficulties, dimensional stability, and use of advanced composite materials. Supporting test data from prototype mechanisms is presented.

  10. Design of a High Resolution Hexapod Positioning Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, Jamie; Brodeur, Stephen J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a high resolution, six-degree of freedom positioning mechanism. This mechanism, based on the Stewart platform concept, was designed for use with the Developmental Comparative Active Optics Telescope Testbed (DCATT), a ground-based technology testbed for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST). The mechanism provides active control to the DCATT telescope's segmented primary mirror. Emphasis is on design decisions and technical challenges. Significant issues include undesirable motion properties of PZT-inchworm actuators, testing difficulties, dimensional stability and use of advanced composite materials. Supporting test data from prototype mechanisms is presented.

  11. High-resolution satellite imagery for mesoscale meteorological studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, David B.; Flament, Pierre; Bernstein, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    In this article high-resolution satellite imagery from a variety of meteorological and environmental satellites is compared. Digital datasets from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP), Landsat, and Satellite Pour l'Observation de la Terre (SPOT) satellites were archived as part of the 1990 Hawaiian Rainband Project (HaRP) and form the basis of the comparisons. During HaRP, GOES geostationary satellite coverage was marginal, so the main emphasis is on the polar-orbiting satellites.

  12. Laser ablated hydantoin: A high resolution rotational study.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Elena R; Kolesniková, Lucie; Alonso, José L

    2017-09-28

    Laser ablation techniques coupled with broadband and narrowband Fourier transform microwave spectroscopies have allowed the high resolution rotational study of solid hydantoin, an important target in astrochemistry as a possible precursor of glycine. The complicated hyperfine structure arising from the presence of two (14)N nuclei in non-equivalent positions has been resolved and interpreted in terms of the nuclear quadrupole coupling interactions. The results reported in this work provide a solid base for the interstellar searches of hydantoin in the astrophysical surveys. The values of the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants have been also discussed in terms of the electronic environment around the respective nitrogen atom.

  13. High-resolution Ground-based European Solar Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collados, M.

    2008-12-01

    This communication reviews some of the most challenging topics in high-resolution ground-based Solar Physics. The most powerful European facilities are described, together with their capabilities and skills gained in Europe using them. The reasons for a large-aperture solar telescope are outlined, based on present scientific needs, which have led to the joint project EST (European Solar Telescope), in which the most prestigious European Solar Physics research institutions participate. Some technical challenges of a such a large telescope are mentioned.

  14. High resolution electron microscopy study of amorphous calcium phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brès, E. F.; Moebus, G.; Kleebe, H.-J.; Pourroy, G.; Werkmann, J.; Ehret, G.

    1993-03-01

    "Amorphous" calcium phosphate (ACP) from human tooth enamel and different synthetic materials has been analysed by high resolution electron microscopy (HREM). All the materials studied showed, in addition to a "truly" amorphous phase, other calcium phosphate phases such as poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite (OHAP), well crystallized OHAP and poorly crystalline CaO type phase. Such structural heterogeneities have not been observed before in ACP, and are only possible to be detected by HREM as this is the only technique able to analyse nanometre size materials in the real space.

  15. High-resolution satellite imagery for mesoscale meteorological studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, David B.; Flament, Pierre; Bernstein, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    In this article high-resolution satellite imagery from a variety of meteorological and environmental satellites is compared. Digital datasets from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP), Landsat, and Satellite Pour l'Observation de la Terre (SPOT) satellites were archived as part of the 1990 Hawaiian Rainband Project (HaRP) and form the basis of the comparisons. During HaRP, GOES geostationary satellite coverage was marginal, so the main emphasis is on the polar-orbiting satellites.

  16. Measuring molecular flows with high-resolution stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    She, C. Y.; Fairbank, W. M., Jr.; Exton, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    It is proposed to use high-resolution stimulated Raman spectroscopy to directly measure high-speed molecular flow velocities in wind tunnels and in combustive chambers. A feasibility study indicates that flow speeds from Mach 0.04 up may be measured with the proposed method using available laser systems. It is pointed out that the success of the proposed technique will make it possible to measure all interesting flow parameters, i.e., species concentration, temperature, and velocity, in a time of less than 1 microsecond at a repetition rate of 10,000/s using a single experimental arrangement.

  17. High resolution upgrade of the ATF damping ring BPM system

    SciTech Connect

    Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; Frisch, J.; May, J.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Seryi, A.; Smith, T.; Woodley, M.; Briegel, C.; Dysert, R.; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    A beam position monitor (BPM) upgrade at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) damping ring has been accomplished in its first stage, carried out by a KEK/FNAL/SLAC collaboration under the umbrella of the global ILC R&D effort. The upgrade consists of a high resolution, high reproducibility read-out system, based on analog and digital downconversion techniques, digital signal processing, and also tests a new automatic gain error correction schema. The technical concept and realization, as well as preliminary results of beam studies are presented.

  18. Achieving High Resolution Timer Events in Virtualized Environment.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Blazej; Chydzinski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Virtual Machine Monitors (VMM) have become popular in different application areas. Some applications may require to generate the timer events with high resolution and precision. This however may be challenging due to the complexity of VMMs. In this paper we focus on the timer functionality provided by five different VMMs-Xen, KVM, Qemu, VirtualBox and VMWare. Firstly, we evaluate resolutions and precisions of their timer events. Apparently, provided resolutions and precisions are far too low for some applications (e.g. networking applications with the quality of service). Then, using Xen virtualization we demonstrate the improved timer design that greatly enhances both the resolution and precision of achieved timer events.

  19. High Resolution X-Band SAR Constallation for Risk Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    ADPO10816 thru ADPO10842 UNCLASSIFIED 36-1 High Resolution X-Band SAR Constellation for Risk Management C.C. Lin ESTEC (APP-FPE), PO Box 299, 2200 AG... Noordwijk , The Netherlands S. Ramongassii, M. Jer6me and L. Phalippou Alcatel, av. J.-F. Champollion 26, PO Box 1187, 31037 Toulouse Cedex 1, France...June 2000. called "transversal flyers". [2] ESTEC Contract No. 12948/98/NL/GD to Alcatel, The parameters of the reflector based SAR instrument

  20. High-resolution beam steering using microlens arrays.

    PubMed

    Akatay, Ata; Ataman, Caglar; Urey, Hakan

    2006-10-01

    Imaging or beam-steering systems employing a periodic array of microlenses or micromirrors suffer from diffraction problems resulting from the destructive interference of the beam segments produced by the array. Simple formulas are derived for beam steering with segmented apertures that do not suffer from diffraction problems because of the introduction of a moving linear phase shifter such as a prescan lens before the periodic structure. The technique substantially increases the resolution of imaging systems that employ microlens arrays or micromirror arrays. Theoretical, numerical, and experimental results demonstrating the high-resolution imaging concept using microlens arrays are presented.

  1. Digitizing Standard & High Resolution High Frame Rate Video Camera Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, David M.

    1988-03-01

    The digitizing of an analog video camera signal requires special techniques to accurately sample the signal. Careful attention must be paid to both amplitude and timing considerations. Specifications exist which define amplitude and timing parame-ters of so called "standard" cameras. Recent advances in CCD technology have lead to the development of high resolution line scan and area cameras. Unfortunately these cameras do not con-form to any published standard. Hardware designed to digitize these "non-standard" cameras must have a flexible architecture to allow for each cameras' particular interface requirements.

  2. High resolution study of magnetic ordering at absolute zero.

    PubMed

    Lee, M; Husmann, A; Rosenbaum, T F; Aeppli, G

    2004-05-07

    High resolution pressure measurements in the zero-temperature limit provide a unique opportunity to study the behavior of strongly interacting, itinerant electrons with coupled spin and charge degrees of freedom. Approaching the precision that has become the hallmark of experiments on classical critical phenomena, we characterize the quantum critical behavior of the model, elemental antiferromagnet chromium, lightly doped with vanadium. We resolve the sharp doubling of the Hall coefficient at the quantum critical point and trace the dominating effects of quantum fluctuations up to surprisingly high temperatures.

  3. Quantum electrodynamics, high-resolution spectroscopy and fundamental constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karshenboim, Savely G.; Ivanov, Vladimir G.

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in high-resolution spectroscopy has delivered us a variety of accurate optical results, which can be used for the determination of the atomic fundamental constants and for constraining their possible time variation. We present a brief overview of the results discussing in particular, the determination of the Rydberg constant, the relative atomic weight of the electron and proton, their mass ratio and the fine structure constant. Many individual results on those constants are obtained with use of quantum electrodynamics, and we discuss which sectors of QED are involved. We derive constraints on a possible time variation of the fine structure constants and me/mp.

  4. High-resolution continuum observations of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, Harold

    1987-01-01

    The aim of the PFI or photometric filtergraph instrument is to observe the Sun in the continuum with as high resolution as possible and utilizing the widest range of wavelengths. Because of financial and political problems the CCD was eliminated so that the highest photometric accuracy is only obtainable by comparison with the CFS images. Presently there is a limitation to wavelengths above 2200 A due to the lack of sensitivity of untreated film below 2200 A. Therefore the experiment at present consists of a film camera with 1000 feet of film and 12 filters. The PFI experiments are outlined using only two cameras. Some further problems of the experiment are addressed.

  5. A high resolution terahertz spectrometer for chemical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Alexander; Abreu, Rene; Wraback, Michael

    2007-04-01

    Goodrich has been developing a high resolution, broad band spectrometer that operates in the Terahertz (THz) region of the spectrum with the intent of performing chemical detection. THz spectroscopy exploits rotational resonances for detection of gas phase compounds. High resolution THz spectroscopy can improve detection and identification through increased probability of detection and reduced false alarms. The Goodrich THz spectrometer is based upon CW photomixer technology in a heterodyne configuration. The current Goodrich design offers continuous tunability across a 0.1 THz to 1.2 THz frequency range. One of the unique aspects of the Goodrich spectrometer is laser system control that has demonstrated difference frequency line widths on the order of 1.5 MHz with stability measured over long time scales. Absolute frequency accuracy is of the order of 4 MHz. The spectrometer design enables high THz energy densities with narrow line widths tunable over a broad spectrum. The system has demonstrated SNR better than a cryogenically cooled hot electron bolometer. This capability allows the Goodrich system to accurately determine absorption signatures of multiple chemicals with exceptional performance. Goodrich has completed initial system testing and verified performance. Initial tests were completed to determine SNR of the heterodyne photomixer transceiver. System performance was also verified for laser line width, stability, and repeatability. The spectrometer was tested against various toxic industrial chemicals. Preliminary data for HCN, HCl, NH 3, and SO II is presented.

  6. Performance Bound for Extended Target Tracking Using High Resolution Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zhiwen; Meng, Huadong; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Xiqin

    2010-01-01

    This article concerns the problem of the estimation bound for tracking an extended target observed by a high resolution sensor. Two types of commonly used models for extended targets and the corresponding posterior Cramer-Rao lower bound (PCRLB) are discussed. The first type is the equation-extension model which extends the state space to include parameters such as target size and shape. Thus, the extended state vector can be estimated through the measurements obtained by a high resolution sensor. The measurement vector is also an expansion of the conventional one, and the additional measurements such as target extent can provide extra information for the estimation. The second model is based on multiple target measurements, each of which is an independent random draw from a spatial probability distribution. As the number of measurements per frame is unknown and random, the general form of the measurement contribution to the Fisher information matrix (FIM) conditional on the number of measurements is presented, and an extended information reduction factor (EIRF) approach is proposed to calculate the overall FIM and, therefore, the PCRLB. The bound of the second extended target model is also less than that of the point model, on condition that the average number of measurements is greater than one. Illustrative simulation examples of the two models are discussed and demonstrated. PMID:22163546

  7. High-Resolution Mars Camera Test Image of Moon (Infrared)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This crescent view of Earth's Moon in infrared wavelengths comes from a camera test by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on its way to Mars. The mission's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera took the image on Sept. 8, 2005, while at a distance of about 10 million kilometers (6 million miles) from the Moon. The dark feature on the right is Mare Crisium. From that distance, the Moon would appear as a star-like point of light to the unaided eye. The test verified the camera's focusing capability and provided an opportunity for calibration. The spacecraft's Context Camera and Optical Navigation Camera also performed as expected during the test.

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, launched on Aug. 12, 2005, is on course to reach Mars on March 10, 2006. After gradually adjusting the shape of its orbit for half a year, it will begin its primary science phase in November 2006. From the mission's planned science orbit about 300 kilometers (186 miles) above the surface of Mars, the high resolution camera will be able to discern features as small as one meter or yard across.

  8. High-resolution ionization detector and array of such detectors

    DOEpatents

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Rojeski, Ronald A.

    2001-01-16

    A high-resolution ionization detector and an array of such detectors are described which utilize a reference pattern of conductive or semiconductive material to form interaction, pervious and measurement regions in an ionization substrate of, for example, CdZnTe material. The ionization detector is a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector. Various geometries of such a detector and an array of such detectors produce room temperature operated gamma ray spectrometers with relatively high resolution. For example, a 1 cm.sup.3 detector is capable of measuring .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays with room temperature energy resolution approaching 2% at FWHM. Two major types of such detectors include a parallel strip semiconductor Frisch grid detector and the geometrically weighted trapezoid prism semiconductor Frisch grid detector. The geometrically weighted detector records room temperature (24.degree. C.) energy resolutions of 2.68% FWHM for .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays and 2.45% FWHM for .sup.60 Co 1.332 MeV gamma rays. The detectors perform well without any electronic pulse rejection, correction or compensation techniques. The devices operate at room temperature with simple commercially available NIM bin electronics and do not require special preamplifiers or cooling stages for good spectroscopic results.

  9. Automated frame selection process for high-resolution microendoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ishijima, Ayumu; Schwarz, Richard A.; Shin, Dongsuk; Mondrik, Sharon; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. We developed an automated frame selection algorithm for high-resolution microendoscopy video sequences. The algorithm rapidly selects a representative frame with minimal motion artifact from a short video sequence, enabling fully automated image analysis at the point-of-care. The algorithm was evaluated by quantitative comparison of diagnostically relevant image features and diagnostic classification results obtained using automated frame selection versus manual frame selection. A data set consisting of video sequences collected in vivo from 100 oral sites and 167 esophageal sites was used in the analysis. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.78 (automated selection) versus 0.82 (manual selection) for oral sites, and 0.93 (automated selection) versus 0.92 (manual selection) for esophageal sites. The implementation of fully automated high-resolution microendoscopy at the point-of-care has the potential to reduce the number of biopsies needed for accurate diagnosis of precancer and cancer in low-resource settings where there may be limited infrastructure and personnel for standard histologic analysis. PMID:25919426

  10. High-resolution electron microscopy of advanced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, T.E.; Kung, H.H.; Sickafus, K.E.; Gray, G.T. III; Field, R.D.; Smith, J.F.

    1997-11-01

    This final report chronicles a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The High-Resolution Electron Microscopy Facility has doubled in size and tripled in quality since the beginning of the three-year period. The facility now includes a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a 100 kV field-emission scanning transmission electron microscope (FE-STEM), a 300 kV field-emission high-resolution transmission electron microscope (FE-HRTEM), and a 300 kV analytical transmission electron microscope. A new orientation imaging microscope is being installed. X-ray energy dispersive spectrometers for chemical analysis are available on all four microscopes; parallel electron energy loss spectrometers are operational on the FE-STEM and FE-HRTEM. These systems enable evaluation of local atomic bonding, as well as chemical composition in nanometer-scale regions. The FE-HRTEM has a point-to-point resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}, but the resolution can be pushed to its information limit of 1 {angstrom} by computer reconstruction of a focal series of images. HRTEM has been used to image the atomic structure of defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries, and interfaces in a variety of materials from superconductors and ferroelectrics to structural ceramics and intermetallics.

  11. High resolution 3D fluorescence tomography using ballistic photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jie; Nouizi, Farouk; Cho, Jaedu; Kwong, Jessica; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2015-03-01

    We are developing a ballistic-photon based approach for improving the spatial resolution of fluorescence tomography using time-domain measurements. This approach uses early photon information contained in measured time-of-fight distributions originating from fluorescence emission. The time point spread functions (TPSF) from both excitation light and emission light are acquired with gated single photon Avalanche detector (SPAD) and time-correlated single photon counting after a short laser pulse. To determine the ballistic photons for reconstruction, the lifetime of the fluorophore and the time gate from the excitation profiles will be used for calibration, and then the time gate of the fluorescence profile can be defined by a simple time convolution. By mimicking first generation CT data acquisition, the sourcedetector pair will translate across and also rotate around the subject. The measurement from each source-detector position will be reshaped into a histogram that can be used by a simple back-projection algorithm in order to reconstruct high resolution fluorescence images. Finally, from these 2D sectioning slides, a 3D inclusion can be reconstructed accurately. To validate the approach, simulation of light transport is performed for biological tissue-like media with embedded fluorescent inclusion by solving the diffusion equation with Finite Element Method using COMSOL Multiphysics simulation. The reconstruction results from simulation studies have confirmed that this approach drastically improves the spatial resolution of fluorescence tomography. Moreover, all the results have shown the feasibility of this technique for high resolution small animal imaging up to several centimeters.

  12. High resolution multiplexed functional imaging in live embryos (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dongli; Zhou, Weibin; Peng, Leilei

    2017-02-01

    Fourier multiplexed fluorescence lifetime imaging (FmFLIM) scanning laser optical tomography (FmFLIM-SLOT) combines FmFLIM and Scanning laser optical tomography (SLOT) to perform multiplexed 3D FLIM imaging of live embryos. The system had demonstrate multiplexed functional imaging of zebrafish embryos genetically express Foster Resonant Energy Transfer (FRET) sensors. However, previous system has a 20 micron resolution because the focused Gaussian beam diverges quickly from the focused plane, makes it difficult to achieve high resolution imaging over a long projection depth. Here, we present a high-resolution FmFLIM-SLOT system with achromatic Bessel beam, which achieves 3 micron resolution in 3D deep tissue imaging. In Bessel-FmFLIM-SLOT, multiple laser excitation lines are firstly intensity modulated by a Michelson interferometer with a spinning polygon mirror optical delay line, which enables Fourier multiplexed multi-channel lifetime measurements. Then, a spatial light modulator and a prism are used to transform the modulated Gaussian laser beam to an achromatic Bessel beam. The achromatic Bessel beam scans across the whole specimen with equal angular intervals as sample rotated. After tomography reconstruction and the frequency domain lifetime analysis method, both the 3D intensity and lifetime image of multiple excitation-emission can be obtained. Using Bessel-FmFLIM-SLOT system, we performed cellular-resolution FLIM tomography imaging of live zebrafish embryo. Genetically expressed FRET sensors in these embryo will allow non-invasive observation of multiple biochemical processes in vivo.

  13. High resolution thermal infrared mapping of Martian channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craddock, R. A.; Greeley, R.; Christensen, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) high resolution (2 to 5 km) data were compiled and compared to Viking Visual Imaging Subsystem (VIS) data and available 1:5M geologic maps for several Martian channels including Dao, Harmakhis, Mangala, Shalbatana, and Simud Valles in an effort to determine the surface characteristics and the processes active during and after the formation of these channels. Results show a dominance of aeolian processes active in and around the channels. These processes have left materials thick enough to mask any genuine channel deposits. Results also indicate that very comparable Martian channels and their surrounding terrain are blanketed by deposits which are homogeneous in their thermal inertia values. However, optimum IRTM data does not cover the entire Martian surface and because local deposits of high thermal inertia material may not be large enough in areal extent or may be in an unfavorable location on the planet, a high resolution data track may not always occur over these deposits. Therefore, aeolian processes may be even more active than the IRTM data tracts can always show.

  14. High-resolution mass spectrometric analysis of biomass pyrolysis vapors

    DOE PAGES

    Christensen, Earl; Evans, Robert J.; Carpenter, Daniel

    2017-01-19

    Vapors generated from the pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass are made up of a complex mixture of oxygenated compounds. Direct analysis of these vapors provides insight into the mechanisms of depolymerization of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin as well as insight into reactions that may occur during condensation of pyrolysis vapors into bio-oil. Studies utilizing pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry have provided valuable information regarding the chemical composition of pyrolysis vapors. Mass spectrometers generally employed with these instruments have low mass resolution of approximately a mass unit. The presence of chemical species with identical unit mass but differing elemental formulas cannot bemore » resolved with these instruments and are therefore detected as a single ion. In this study we analyzed the pyrolysis vapors of several biomass sources using a high-resolution double focusing mass spectrometer. High-resolution analysis of pyrolysis vapors allowed for speciation of several compounds that would be detected as a single ion with unit mass resolution. Lastly, these data not only provide greater detail into the composition of pyrolysis vapors but also highlight differences between vapors generated from multiple biomass feedstocks.« less

  15. Evaluation of a high resolution silicon PET insert module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grkovski, Milan; Brzezinski, Karol; Cindro, Vladimir; Clinthorne, Neal H.; Kagan, Harris; Lacasta, Carlos; Mikuž, Marko; Solaz, Carles; Studen, Andrej; Weilhammer, Peter; Žontar, Dejan

    2015-07-01

    Conventional PET systems can be augmented with additional detectors placed in close proximity of the region of interest. We developed a high resolution PET insert module to evaluate the added benefit of such a combination. The insert module consists of two back-to-back 1 mm thick silicon sensors, each segmented into 1040 1 mm2 pads arranged in a 40 by 26 array. A set of 16 VATAGP7.1 ASICs and a custom assembled data acquisition board were used to read out the signal from the insert module. Data were acquired in slice (2D) geometry with a Jaszczak phantom (rod diameters of 1.2-4.8 mm) filled with 18F-FDG and the images were reconstructed with ML-EM method. Both data with full and limited angular coverage from the insert module were considered and three types of coincidence events were combined. The ratio of high-resolution data that substantially improves quality of the reconstructed image for the region near the surface of the insert module was estimated to be about 4%. Results from our previous studies suggest that such ratio could be achieved at a moderate technological expense by using an equivalent of two insert modules (an effective sensor thickness of 4 mm).

  16. High-resolution electronic imaging system for schlieren recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honour, Joseph

    2001-04-01

    High speed Schlieren photography is a reliable means of visualizing small changes of refractive index resulting from density differences within a transparent media. Schlieren techniques are frequently used for investigating the aerodynamics of high velocity projectiles to confirm the formation of shock waves on leading edge surfaces so that optimum design performance can be achieved. Traditionally this type of investigation would have been undertaken using film cameras, however, improvements in image quality provided by the rapid development of intensified silicon based sensors and associated electronics has offered a reliable alternative, without the inherent difficulties in quantitative data extraction. The development of a high resolution sixteen image electronic camera system provides the researcher with versatile recording system that can be used to capture detailed image sequences at framing rates up to two hundred million pictures per second. The number of information points is maintained, irrespective of framing rate, making it ideal for recording the complexity of detail available from these sensitive Schlieren techniques. The high resolution images, which are displayed within twenty seconds of capture, flexibility of operation, and comprehensive analysis software provide fast reliable access to experimental data.

  17. High-resolution teleradiology applications within the hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jost, R. Gilbert; Blaine, G. James; Kocher, Thomas E.; Muka, Edward; Whiting, Bruce R.

    1991-07-01

    Many of the commercial applications for teleradiology have involved the transmission of reduced resolution x-ray images over modest bandwidth telecommunications lines for the purpose of making a preliminary diagnosis. In order to study the technical and operational requirements for future teleradiology applications, the authors have focused on the demanding requirements for teleradiology within the hospital and medical center. Applications within the hospital often require x-ray images of primary diagnostic quality transmitted with a minimum of delay. An experimental, high-resolution film scan/print system designed by Health Sciences Division, Eastman Kodak Company, has been developed for installation in a working clinical environment. Images scanned at a spatial resolution of 4K X 5K can be delivered over a fiber optic link to a laser film printer at a rate of two films per minute. Preliminary plans to install this device in a variety of clinical settings have led to rethinking the requirements for automatic film loading, film and patient identification, throughput requirements, and image display formats. As an initial implementation, and application is being developed which allows chest radiographs taken in the admission area to be interpreted at a remote site within the hospital. Images can be viewed on high resolution monitors, or film replicates can be produced on a nearby laser printer. Tight coupling with a radiology information system provides access to relevant diagnostic information including prior radiology reports, and prompt electronic reporting and signature can be accomplished.

  18. High-resolution time-frequency distributions for fall detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Moeness G.; Zhang, Yimin D.; Boashash, Boualem

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we examine the role of high-resolution time-frequency distributions (TFDs) of radar micro-Doppler signatures for fall detection. The work supports the recent and rising interest in using emerging radar technology for elderly care and assisted living. Spectrograms have been the de facto joint-variable signal representation, depicting the signal power in both time and frequency. Although there have been major advances in designing quadratic TFDs which are superior to spectrograms in terms of detailing the local signal behavior, the contributions of these distributions in the area of human motion classifications and their offerings in enhanced feature extractions have not yet been properly evaluated. The main purpose of this paper is to show the effect of using high-resolution TFD kernels, in lieu of spectrogram, on fall detection. We focus on the extended modified B-distribution (EMBD) and exploit the level of details it provides as compared with the coarse and smoothed time-frequency signatures offered by spectrograms.

  19. High-Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy of Ge_2C_3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorwirth, S.; Lutter, V.; Schlemmer, S.; Giesen, T. F.; Gauss, J.

    2013-06-01

    Carbon-rich systems are of great importance in diverse areas of research like material science as well as astro- and structural chemistry. Despite this relevance, our knowledge of smaller cluster units is still fragmentary, particularly with respect to investigations at high-spectral resolution in the gas phase. Unequivocal assignment of spectral features to their molecular carriers is critically dependent on predictions from high-level quantum-chemical calculations. In turn, high-resolution studies provide useful information to assess the predictive power of quantum-chemical methods. This is particularly interesting for cluster systems harboring heavy elements for which so far relatively little is known from experiment. With this contribution, we would like to present a recent gas-phase study of a polyatomic germanium-carbon cluster, linear Ge_2C_3 (Ge=C=C=C=Ge), which was previously studied in an Ar matrix. The cluster was produced through laser ablation of germanium-graphite sample rods and observed in a free jet at wavelengths around 5μm. Additionally, quantum-chemical calculations of Ge_2C_3 were performed at the CCSD(T) level of theory. The production and observation of Ge_2C_3 suggests that many more binary clusters should be amenable to high-resolution spectroscopic techniques not only in the infrared but also in the microwave region. D. L. Robbins, C. M. L. Rittby, and W. R. M. Graham, J. Chem. Phys. 114, 3570 (2001).

  20. High resolution multiplexed functional imaging in live embyros (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dongli; Peng, Leilei

    2016-03-01

    Optical projection tomography (OPT) creates isotropic 3D imaging of tissue. Two approaches exist today: Wide-field OPT illuminates the entire sample and acquires projection images with a camera; Scanning-laser optical tomography (SLOT) generates the projection with a moving laser beam and point detector. SLOT has superior light collecting efficiency than wide-field optical tomography, making it ideal for tissue fluorescence imaging. Regardless the approach, traditional OPT has to compromise between the resolution and the depth of view. In traditional SLOT, the focused Gaussian beam diverges quickly from the focused plane, making it impossible to achieve high resolution imaging through a large volume specimen. We report using Bessel beam instead of Gaussian beam to perform SLOT. By illuminating samples with a narrow Bessel beam throughout an extended depth, high-resolution projection images can be measured in large volume. Under Bessel illumination, the projection image contains signal from annular-rings of the Bessel beam. Traditional inverse Radon transform of these projections will result in ringing artifacts in reconstructed imaging. Thus a modified 3D filtered back projection algorithm is developed to perform tomography reconstructing of Bessel-illuminated projection images. The resulting 3D imaging is free of artifact and achieved cellular resolution in extended sample volume. The system is applied to in-vivo imaging of transgenic Zebrafish embryos. Results prove Bessel SLOT a promising imaging method in development biology research.

  1. High Resolution Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Human Nerves in Forearm

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuxiang; Narayana, Ponnada A; Kumaravel, Manickam; Athar, Parveen; Patel, Vipulkumar S; Sheikh, Kazim A

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To implement high resolution diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for visualization and quantification of peripheral nerves in human forearm. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant study was approved by our Institutional Review Board and written informed consent was obtained from all the study participants. Images were acquired with T1-and T2-weighted turbo spin echo with/without fat saturation, short tau inversion recovery (STIR). In addition, high spatial resolution (1.0 × 1.0 × 3.0 mm3) DTI sequence was optimized for clearly visualizing ulnar, superficial radial and median nerves in the forearm. Maps of the DTI derived indices, FA, mean diffusivity (MD), longitudinal diffusivity (λ//) and radial diffusivity (λ⊥) were generated. Results For the first time the three peripheral nerves, ulnar, superficial radial and median, were visualized unequivocally on high resolution DTI-derived maps. DTI delineated the forearm nerves more clearly than other sequences. Significant differences in the DTI-derived measures, FA, MD, λ// and λ⊥, were observed among the three nerves. A strong correlation between the nerve size derived from FA map and T2-weighted images was observed. Conclusions High spatial resolution DTI is superior in identifying and quantifying the median, ulnar and superficial radial nerves in human forearm. Consistent visualization of small nerves and nerve branches is possible with high spatial resolution DTI. These normative data could potentially help in identifying pathology in diseased nerves. PMID:24243801

  2. Mapping Crop Yield and Sow Date Using High Resolution Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royal, K.

    2015-12-01

    Keitasha Royal, Meha Jain, Ph.D., David Lobell, Ph.D Mapping Crop Yield and Sow Date Using High Resolution ImageryThe use of satellite imagery in agriculture is becoming increasingly more significant and valuable. Due to the emergence of new satellites, such as Skybox, these satellites provide higher resolution imagery (e.g 1m) therefore improving the ability to map smallholder agriculture. For the smallholder farm dominated area of northern India, Skybox high-resolution satellite imagery can aid in understanding how to improve farm yields. In particular, we are interested in mapping winter wheat in India, as this region produces approximately 80% of the country's wheat crop, which is important given that wheat is a staple crop that provides approximately 20% of household calories. In northeast India, the combination of increased heat stress, limited irrigation access, and the difficulty for farmers to access advanced farming technologies results in farmers only producing about 50% of their potential crop yield. The use of satellite imagery can aid in understanding wheat yields through time and help identify ways to increase crop yields in the wheat belt of India. To translate Skybox satellite data into meaningful information about wheat fields, we examine vegetation indices, such as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), to measure the "greenness" of plants to help determine the health of the crops. We test our ability to predict crop characteristics, like sow date and yield, using vegetation indices of 59 fields for which we have field data in Bihar, India.

  3. Gemini high-resolution optical spectrograph conceptual design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeto, Kei; McConnachie, Alan; Anthony, André; Bohlender, David; Crampton, David; Desaulniers, Pierre; Dunn, Jennifer; Hardy, Tim; Hill, Alexis; Monin, Dmitry; Pazder, John; Schwab, Christian; Spano, Paola; Starkenburg, Else; Thibault, Simon; Walker, Gordon; Venn, Kim; Zhang, Hu

    2012-09-01

    A multiplexed moderate resolution (R = 34,000) and a single object high resolution (R = 90,000) spectroscopic facility for the entire 340 - 950nm wavelength region has been designed for Gemini. The result is a high throughput, versatile instrument that will enable precision spectroscopy for decades to come. The extended wavelength coverage for these relatively high spectral resolutions is achieved by use of an Echelle grating with VPH cross-dispersers and for the R = 90,000 mode utilization of an image slicer. The design incorporates a fast, efficient, reliable system for acquiring targets over the7 arcmin field of Gemini. This paper outlines the science case development and requirements flow-down process that leads to the configuration of the HIA instrument and describes the overall GHOS conceptual design. In addition, this paper discusses design trades examined during the conceptual design study instrument group of the Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics has been commissioned by the Gemini Observatory as one of the three competing organizations to conduct a conceptual design study for a new Gemini High-Resolution Optical Spectrograph (GHOS). This paper outlines the science case development and requirements flow-down process that leads to the configuration of the HIA instrument and describes the overall GHOS conceptual design. In addition, this paper discusses design trades examined during the conceptual design study.

  4. SPIDER Progress Towards High Resolution Correlated Fission Product Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Dan; Meierbachtol, Krista; Tovesson, Fredrik; Arnold, Charles; Blackeley, Rick; Bredeweg, Todd; Devlin, Matt; Hecht, Adam; Jandel, Marian; Jorgenson, Justin; Nelson, Ron; White, Morgan; Spider Team

    2014-09-01

    The SPIDER detector (SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research) is under development with the goal of obtaining high-resolution, high-efficiency, correlated fission product data needed for many applications including the modeling of next generation nuclear reactors, stockpile stewardship, and the fundamental understanding of the fission process. SPIDER simultaneously measures velocity and energy of both fission products to calculate fission product yields (FPYs), neutron multiplicity (ν), and total kinetic energy (TKE). A detailed description of the prototype SPIDER detector components will be presented. Characterization measurements with alpha and spontaneous fission sources will also be discussed. LA-UR-14-24875. The SPIDER detector (SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research) is under development with the goal of obtaining high-resolution, high-efficiency, correlated fission product data needed for many applications including the modeling of next generation nuclear reactors, stockpile stewardship, and the fundamental understanding of the fission process. SPIDER simultaneously measures velocity and energy of both fission products to calculate fission product yields (FPYs), neutron multiplicity (ν), and total kinetic energy (TKE). A detailed description of the prototype SPIDER detector components will be presented. Characterization measurements with alpha and spontaneous fission sources will also be discussed. LA-UR-14-24875. This work is in part supported by LANL Laboratory Directed Research and Development Projects 20110037DR and 20120077DR.

  5. High resolution three-dimensional prostate ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinbo; Patil, Abhay; Hossack, John A.

    2006-03-01

    This work reports on the application of ultrasound elastography to prostate cancer detection using a high resolution three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound imaging system. The imaging was performed at a relatively high frequency (14 MHz), yielding very fine resolution that is optimal for prostate ultrasound imaging. The fine resolution achieved aids in locating smaller lesions than are normally detectable. Elasticity was measured with a quantitative and automatically controlled "Synthetic Digital Rectal Examination (SDRE)" wherein a smoothly increasing force was applied by injecting water, controlled by an electronic syringe pump, into a latex cover over the transrectal transducer. The lesion identified as stiffened tissue was visually enhanced by colorizing and superimposing it over the conventional B-mode image. Experimental results using a tissue-mimicking phantom demonstrated that the reconstruction accuracy of the I-Beam transducer resulted in less than 15% volumetric error. Thus, this high resolution 3D prostate elastography is possible and may provide reliable and accurate determination of the size and the location of cancers, which may result in improved specificity and sensitivity of cancer detection.

  6. Unsupervised Feature Learning for High-Resolution Satellite Image Classification

    SciTech Connect

    Cheriyadat, Anil M

    2013-01-01

    The rich data provided by high-resolution satellite imagery allow us to directly model geospatial neighborhoods by understanding their spatial and structural patterns. In this paper we explore an unsupervised feature learning approach to model geospatial neighborhoods for classification purposes. While pixel and object based classification approaches are widely used for satellite image analysis, often these approaches exploit the high-fidelity image data in a limited way. In this paper we extract low-level features to characterize the local neighborhood patterns. We exploit the unlabeled feature measurements in a novel way to learn a set of basis functions to derive new features. The derived sparse feature representation obtained by encoding the measured features in terms of the learned basis function set yields superior classification performance. We applied our technique on two challenging image datasets: ORNL dataset representing one-meter spatial resolution satellite imagery representing five land-use categories and, UCMERCED dataset consisting of 21 different categories representing sub-meter resolution overhead imagery. Our results are highly promising and, in the case of UCMERCED dataset we outperform the best results obtained for this dataset. We show that our feature extraction and learning methods are highly effective in developing a detection system that can be used to automatically scan large-scale high-resolution satellite imagery for detecting large-facility.

  7. A high resolution pneumatic stepping actuator for harsh reactor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Tippetts, T.B.; Evans, P.S.; Riffle, G.K. )

    1993-01-20

    A reactivity control actuator for a high-power density nuclear propulsion reactor must be installed in close proximity to the reactor core. The energy input from radiation to the actuator structure could exceed hundreds of W/cc unless low-cross section, low-absorptivity materials are chosen. Also, for post-test handling and subsequent storage, materials should not be used that are activated into long half-life isotopes. Pneumatic actuators can be constructed from various reactor-compatible materials, but conventional pneumatic piston actuators generally lack the stiffness required for high resolution reactivity control unless electrical position sensors and compensated electronic control systems are used. To overcome these limitations, a pneumatic actuator is under development that positions an output shaft in response to a series of pneumatic pulses, comprising a pneumatic analog of an electrical stepping motor. The pneumatic pulses are generated remotely, beyond the strong radiation environment, and transmitted to the actuator through tubing. The mechanically simple actuator uses a nutating gear harmonic drive to convert motion of small pistons directly to high-resolution angular motion of the output shaft. The digital nature of this actuator is suitable for various reactor control algorithms but is especially compatible with the three bean salad algorithm discussed by Ball [ital et] [ital al]. (1991).

  8. A high resolution pneumatic stepping actuator for harsh reactor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tippetts, Thomas B.; Evans, Paul S.; Riffle, George K.

    1993-01-01

    A reactivity control actuator for a high-power density nuclear propulsion reactor must be installed in close proximity to the reactor core. The energy input from radiation to the actuator structure could exceed hundreds of W/cc unless low-cross section, low-absorptivity materials are chosen. Also, for post-test handling and subsequent storage, materials should not be used that are activated into long half-life isotopes. Pneumatic actuators can be constructed from various reactor-compatible materials, but conventional pneumatic piston actuators generally lack the stiffness required for high resolution reactivity control unless electrical position sensors and compensated electronic control systems are used. To overcome these limitations, a pneumatic actuator is under development that positions an output shaft in response to a series of pneumatic pulses, comprising a pneumatic analog of an electrical stepping motor. The pneumatic pulses are generated remotely, beyond the strong radiation environment, and transmitted to the actuator through tubing. The mechanically simple actuator uses a nutating gear harmonic drive to convert motion of small pistons directly to high-resolution angular motion of the output shaft. The digital nature of this actuator is suitable for various reactor control algorithms but is especially compatible with the three bean salad algorithm discussed by Ball et al. (1991).

  9. Automated frame selection process for high-resolution microendoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishijima, Ayumu; Schwarz, Richard A.; Shin, Dongsuk; Mondrik, Sharon; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2015-04-01

    We developed an automated frame selection algorithm for high-resolution microendoscopy video sequences. The algorithm rapidly selects a representative frame with minimal motion artifact from a short video sequence, enabling fully automated image analysis at the point-of-care. The algorithm was evaluated by quantitative comparison of diagnostically relevant image features and diagnostic classification results obtained using automated frame selection versus manual frame selection. A data set consisting of video sequences collected in vivo from 100 oral sites and 167 esophageal sites was used in the analysis. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.78 (automated selection) versus 0.82 (manual selection) for oral sites, and 0.93 (automated selection) versus 0.92 (manual selection) for esophageal sites. The implementation of fully automated high-resolution microendoscopy at the point-of-care has the potential to reduce the number of biopsies needed for accurate diagnosis of precancer and cancer in low-resource settings where there may be limited infrastructure and personnel for standard histologic analysis.

  10. The Astrophysical Plasmadynamic Explorer (APEX): A High Resolution Spectroscopic Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Kent; Cruddace, Raymond; Kowalski, Michael; Yentis, Daryl; Gursky Barbee, Herb, Jr.; Goldstein, William; Kordas, Joseph; Fritz, Gilbert; Barstow, Martin; Bannister, Nigel; Lapington, John

    2002-04-01

    The dynamics and structure of stellar atmospheres and coronae are complex and strongly bound to the life cycle of stars, from their birth and descent to the main sequence, to their final stages in which the interstellar medium is enriched and stars proceed along various paths to a cooling compact object. Now EUVE, Chandra, and XMM-Newton have moved astronomical spectroscopy into the soft X-ray and EUV wavebands, where hot (105-108 K) plasmas radiate most strongly. High-resolution spectroscopy allows the identification of weak emission lines, the measurement of Doppler shifts and line profiles, and the detection of narrow absorption features. We present a mission concept for APEX (Astrophysical Plasmadynamic Explorer), a SMEX-class instrument that employs multilayer-grating spectrometers to achieve both high effective area and high spectral resolution at ultra-soft X-ray and EUV wavelengths. A prototype instrument has already been built and flown successfully on a sounding rocket. A high-resolution spectrum of the white dwarf G191-B2B was obtained.

  11. Application of high-resolution depositional modeling to reservoir characterisation

    SciTech Connect

    Keyu, L.; Paterson, L.

    1995-08-01

    As hydrocarbon producing basins and fields become more intensely developed, conventional stratigraphic analysis methods can sometimes no longer meet the resolution required by petroleum geologists and engineers. High-resolution depositional modeling provides a quantitative alternative to the conventional approach of sequence stratigraphic analysis. A computer program, SEDPAK, which was designed primarily according to the basic premise of the sequence stratigraphic concept, was here used to conduct high-resolution simulations for two sedimentary sequences. One is a Pliocene to Recent shelf margin sediment sequence of the offshore Sydney Basin continental shelf, Australia; the other is the Early Cretaceous (Aptian) Windalia Sand reservoir of the Barrow Island Field, North West Shelf, Australia. In both instances, the simulations have well mimicked the variations of the sedimentary facies temporally and spatially in fine detail with each time step representing 10 ka and a vertical resolution of one meter. The reservoir heterogeneities and the observed cyclicity in the Windalia Sand were particularly well documented by the SEDPAK simulation using a locally derived sealevel curve. The simulation result suggested that high-frequency sealevel variations ?associated with Milankovitch cyclicity were probably the primary cause that controlled the reservoir heterogeneities of the Windalia Sand. This finding provides a working model for the Cretaceous coeval reservoirs in the North West Shelf, Australia.

  12. Very High Resolution Simulations of Compressible, Turbulent Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, P R; Porter, D H; Sytine, I; Anderson, S E; Mirin, A A; Curtis, B C; Cohen, R H; Dannevik, W P; Dimits, A M; Eliason, D E; Winkler, K-H; Hodson, S W

    2001-04-26

    The steadily increasing power of supercomputing systems is enabling very high resolution simulations of compressible, turbulent flows in the high Reynolds number limit, which is of interest in astrophysics as well as in several other fluid dynamical applications. This paper discusses two such simulations, using grids of up to 8 billion cells. In each type of flow, convergence in a statistical sense is observed as the mesh is refined. The behavior of the convergent sequences indicates how a subgrid-scale model of turbulence could improve the treatment of these flows by high-resolution Euler schemes like PPM. The best resolved case, a simulation of a Richtmyer-Meshkov mixing layer in a shock tube experiment, also points the way toward such a subgrid-scale model. Analysis of the results of that simulation indicates a proportionality relationship between the energy transfer rate from large to small motions and the determinant of the deviatoric symmetric strain as well as the divergence of the velocity for the large-scale field.

  13. Towards Ultra-High Resolution Models of Climate and Weather

    SciTech Connect

    Wehner, Michael; Oliker, Leonid; Shalf, John

    2007-01-01

    We present a speculative extrapolation of the performance aspects of an atmospheric general circulation model to ultra-high resolution and describe alternative technological paths to realize integration of such a model in the relatively near future. Due to a superlinear scaling of the computational burden dictated by stability criterion, the solution of the equations of motion dominate the calculation at ultra-high resolutions. From this extrapolation, it is estimated that a credible kilometer scale atmospheric model would require at least a sustained ten petaflop computer to provide scientifically useful climate simulations. Our design study portends an alternate strategy for practical power-efficient implementations of petaflop scale systems. Embedded processor technology could be exploited to tailor a custom machine designed to ultra-high climate model specifications at relatively affordable cost and power considerations. The major conceptual changes required by a kilometer scale climate model are certain to be difficult to implement. Although the hardware, software, and algorithms are all equally critical in conducting ultra-high climate resolution studies, it is likely that the necessary petaflop computing technology will be available in advance of a credible kilometer scale climate model.

  14. Differentiation of Staphylococcus spp. by high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Slany, Michal; Vanerkova, Martina; Nemcova, Eva; Zaloudikova, Barbora; Ruzicka, Filip; Freiberger, Tomas

    2010-12-01

    High-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) is a fast (post-PCR) high-throughput method to scan for sequence variations in a target gene. The aim of this study was to test the potential of HRMA to distinguish particular bacterial species of the Staphylococcus genus even when using a broad-range PCR within the 16S rRNA gene where sequence differences are minimal. Genomic DNA samples isolated from 12 reference staphylococcal strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus capitis, Staphylococcus caprae, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Staphylococcus hominis, Staphylococcus intermedius, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Staphylococcus sciuri, Staphylococcus simulans, Staphylococcus warneri, and Staphylococcus xylosus) were subjected to a real-time PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene in the presence of fluorescent dye EvaGreen™, followed by HRMA. Melting profiles were used as molecular fingerprints for bacterial species differentiation. HRMA of S. saprophyticus and S. xylosus resulted in undistinguishable profiles because of their identical sequences in the analyzed 16S rRNA region. The remaining reference strains were fully differentiated either directly or via high-resolution plots obtained by heteroduplex formation between coamplified PCR products of the tested staphylococcal strain and phylogenetically unrelated strain.

  15. Motion compensation requirements for a high resolution spotlight SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepburn, J. S. A.; Haslam, G. E.; Liang, D. F.; Widnall, W. S.

    1986-07-01

    The Canadian Department of National Defence is developing a high resolution airborne spotlight synthetic aperture radar (SAR). To attain the high contrast, high resolution and low geometric distortion objectives of the project, it is essential that very accurate motion compensation be applied to the radar returns to minimize the effects on SAR image quality of spurious antenna phase center motion. The motion compensation system being developed for the project includes a gimballed master inertial navigation system (INS) located near the center of gravity of the host aircraft, a strapdown inertial measurement unit (IMU) comprising gyroscope and accelerometer triads mounted on the radar antenna, as well as Doppler velocity and barometric altitude sensors for damping the inertial systems. The role of the master INS is to enable high accuracy alignment of the strapdown IMU. The raw sensor data are integrated using a U-D factorized Kalman filter to obtain optimal estimates of the motion of the radar antenna phase center while the SAR window is open. The data are used to adjust both the radar pulse repetition frequency and the phase and displacement of the radar returns. An analysis of the motion compensation requirements was carried out, leading to the specification of the motion compensation sensor configuration and accuracy. The performance of the motion compensation system has been evaluated by detailed computer simulation. This evaluation accounted for all major system error sources, including errors associated with sensors, transfer alignment and computation, with the system operating in a moderately turbulent environment.

  16. Ensemble 3D PTV for high resolution turbulent statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agüera, Nereida; Cafiero, Gioacchino; Astarita, Tommaso; Discetti, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    A method to extract turbulent statistics from three-dimensional (3D) PIV measurements via ensemble averaging is presented. The proposed technique is a 3D extension of the ensemble particle tracking velocimetry methods, which consist in summing distributions of velocity vectors calculated on low image density samples and then extract the statistical moments from the velocity vectors within sub-volumes, with the size of the sub-volume depending on the desired number of particles and on the available number of snapshots. The extension to 3D measurements poses the additional difficulty of sparse velocity vectors distributions, thus requiring a large number of snapshots to achieve high resolution measurements with a sufficient degree of accuracy. At the current state, this hinders the achievement of single-voxel measurements, unless millions of samples are available. Consequently, one has to give up spatial resolution and live with still relatively large (if compared to the voxel) sub-volumes. This leads to the further problem of the possible occurrence of a residual mean velocity gradient within the sub-volumes, which significantly contaminates the computation of second order moments. In this work, we propose a method to reduce the residual gradient effect, allowing to reach high resolution even with relatively large interrogation spots, therefore still retrieving a large number of particles on which it is possible to calculate turbulent statistics. The method consists in applying a polynomial fit to the velocity distributions within each sub-volume trying to mimic the residual mean velocity gradient.

  17. Design of wide field and high resolution video lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ze-xin; Zhan, Binzhou; Han, Haimei

    2009-11-01

    Online detecting is increasingly used in industrial process for the requirement of product quality improving. It is a trend that the "machine detecting" with "machine version + computer intelligence" as new method replaces traditional manual "eye observation". The essential of "machine detecting" is that image of object being collected with high resolution video lens on sensor panel of photoelectric (CCD ,CMOS) and detecting result being automatically gained by computer after the image saved and processed. "Machine detecting" is developing rapidly with the universal reception by enterprises because of its fine accurateness, high efficiency and the real time. Video lens is one of the important components of machine version system. Requirements of wide field and high resolution enlarged the complexity of video lens design. In this paper a design case used in visible light with field diameter Φ32mm, β=-0.25× and NA'=0.15. We give design parameters of the video lens which obtained with theoretically calculating and Oslo software optimization: MTF>0.3 in full field and 215lp/mm, distortion <0.05%.This lens has an excellent optic performance to match with 1.3 million pixels 1/2"CCD, and a high performance price ratio for being consist of only 7 single lens in the way of 5 units.

  18. High-resolution diffraction grating interferometric transducer of linear displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Ping; Xia, Haojie; Fei, Yetai

    2016-01-01

    A high-resolution transducer of linear displacements is presented. The system is based on semiconductor laser illumination and a diffraction grating applied as a length master. The theory of the optical method is formulated using Doppler description. The relationship model among the interference strips, measurement errors, grating deflection around the X, Y and Z axes and translation along the Z axis is built. The grating interference strips' direction and space is not changed with movement along the X (direction of grating movement), Y (direction of grating line), Z axis, and the direction and space has a great effect when rotating around the X axis. Moreover the space is little affected by deflection around the Z axis however the direction is changed dramatically. In addition, the strips' position shifted rightward or downwards respectively for deflection around the X or Y axis. Because the emitted beams are separated on the grating plane, the tilt around the X axis error of the stage during motion will lead to the optical path difference of the two beams resulting in phase shift. This study investigates the influence of the tilt around the X axis error. Experiments show that after yaw error compensation, the high-resolution diffraction grating interferometric transducer readings can be significantly improved. The error can be reduced from +/-80 nm to +/-30 nm in maximum.

  19. Live CLEM imaging to analyze nuclear structures at high resolution.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Tokuko; Osakada, Hiroko; Koujin, Takako

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy (FM) and electron microscopy (EM) are powerful tools for observing molecular components in cells. FM can provide temporal information about cellular proteins and structures in living cells. EM provides nanometer resolution images of cellular structures in fixed cells. We have combined FM and EM to develop a new method of correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM), called "Live CLEM." In this method, the dynamic behavior of specific molecules of interest is first observed in living cells using fluorescence microscopy (FM) and then cellular structures in the same cell are observed using electron microscopy (EM). Following image acquisition, FM and EM images are compared to enable the fluorescent images to be correlated with the high-resolution images of cellular structures obtained using EM. As this method enables analysis of dynamic events involving specific molecules of interest in the context of specific cellular structures at high resolution, it is useful for the study of nuclear structures including nuclear bodies. Here we describe Live CLEM that can be applied to the study of nuclear structures in mammalian cells.

  20. Observing submesoscale currents from high resolution surface roughness images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rascle, N.; Chapron, B.; Nouguier, F.; Mouche, A.; Ponte, A.

    2015-12-01

    At times, high resolution sea surface roughness variations can provide stunning details of submesoscale upper ocean dynamics. As interpreted, transformations of short scale wind waves by horizontal current gradients are responsible for those spectacular observations. Here we present tow major advances towards the quantitative interpretation of those observations. First, we show that surface roughness variations mainly trace two particular characteristics of the current gradient tensor, the divergence and the strain in the wind direction. Local vorticity and shear in the wind direction should not affect short scale roughness distribution and would not be detectable. Second, we discuss the effect of the viewing direction using sets of quasi-simultaneous sun glitter images, taken from different satellites to provide different viewing configurations. We show that upwind and crosswind viewing observations can be markedly different. As further confirmed with idealized numerical simulations, this anisotropy well traces surface current strain area, while more isotropic contrasts likely trace areas dominated by surface divergence conditions. These findings suggest the potential to directly observe surface currents at submesoscale by using high resolution roughness observations at multiple azimuth viewing angles.

  1. Multifractal analysis of high resolution solar wind proton density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Carbone, Francesco; Leonardis, Ersilia; Chen, Christopher H. K.; Šafránková, Jana; Němeček, Zdenek

    2017-03-01

    The solar wind is a highly turbulent medium, with a high level of field fluctuations throughout a broad range of scales. These include an inertial range where a turbulent cascade is assumed to be active. The solar wind cascade shows intermittency, which however may depend on the wind conditions. Recent observations have shown that ion-scale magnetic turbulence is almost self-similar, rather than intermittent. A similar result was observed for the high resolution measurements of proton density provided by the spacecraft Spektr-R. Intermittency may be interpreted as the result of the multifractal properties of the turbulent cascade. In this perspective, this paper is devoted to the description of the multifractal properties of the high resolution density measurements. In particular, we have used the standard coarse-graining technique to evaluate the generalized dimensions Dq , and from these the multifractal spectrum f (α) , in two ranges of scale. A fit with the p-model for intermittency provided a quantitative measure of multifractality. Such indicator was then compared with alternative measures: the width of the multifractal spectrum, the peak of the kurtosis, and its scaling exponent. The results indicate that the small-scale fluctuations are multifractal, and suggest that different measures of intermittency are required to fully understand the small scale cascade.

  2. Wide-field, high-resolution Fourier ptychographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guoan; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we report an imaging method, termed Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM), which iteratively stitches together a number of variably illuminated, low-resolution intensity images in Fourier space to produce a wide-field, high-resolution complex sample image. By adopting a wavefront correction strategy, the FPM method can also correct for aberrations and digitally extend a microscope’s depth-of-focus beyond the physical limitations of its optics. As a demonstration, we built a microscope prototype with a resolution of 0.78 μm, a field-of-view of ~120 mm2, and a resolution-invariant depth-of-focus of 0.3 mm (characterized at 632 nm). Gigapixel colour images of histology slides verify FPM’s successful operation. The reported imaging procedure transforms the general challenge of high-throughput, high-resolution microscopy from one that is coupled to the physical limitations of the system’s optics to one that is solvable through computation. PMID:25243016

  3. Lidar determination of mixing layer height with high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martucci, Giovanni; Matthey, Renaud; Mitev, Valentin; Richner, Hans

    2005-10-01

    Ecological monitoring and analysis of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) dynamics require determination of the mixing layer height (MLH) on a continuous basis. In a number of cases it is necessary to determine the MLH with sufficiently high resolution - both altitude and temporal. The backscatter lidar provides a convenient tool for such determination, using the aerosol as tracer and determining its vertical profile and its time-evolution, with the capability for continuous measurements. Although methods already exist, based on the altitude derivative of the backscatter lidar signal (altitude Gradient method) and its time-variance (Variance method), the application of these methods with high resolution is limited by the background noise presence. We report here a further development of backscatter lidar gradient and variance methods for MLH determination, allowing higher resolutions. In it, the MLH determination from the gradient and the variance of the lidar signal is supported by a convenient filter technique. Time scale of increased temporal resolution allows the investigation of the fine atmospheric dynamic structures like convective motion. A number of examples in MLH retrieval are presented. The examples are based on backscatter lidar measurements performed in the PBL above Neuchatel, Switzerland (47.00°N, 6.95°S, 485m asl). The examples show the applicability and the usefulness of the reported technique in measurements of the daily cycle of the MLH dynamics.

  4. Precision glass molding of high-resolution diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, Karin; Dukwen, Julia; Scharf, Toralf; Herzig, Hans P.; Plöger, Sven; Hermerschmidt, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The demand of high resolution diffractive optical elements (DOE) is growing. Smaller critical dimensions allow higher deflection angles and can fulfill more demanding requirements, which can only be met by using electron-beam lithography. Replication techniques are more economical, since the high cost of the master can be distributed among a larger number of replicas. The lack of a suitable mold material for precision glass molding has so far prevented an industrial use. Glassy Carbon (GC) offers a high mechanical strength and high thermal strength. No anti-adhesion coatings are required in molding processes. This is clearly an advantage for high resolution, high aspect ratio microstructures, where a coating with a thickness between 10 nm and 200 nm would cause a noticeable rounding of the features. Electron-beam lithography was used to fabricate GC molds with highest precision and feature sizes from 250 nm to 2 μm. The master stamps were used for precision glass molding of a low Tg glass L-BAL42 from OHARA. The profile of the replicated glass is compared to the mold with the help of SEM images. This allows discussion of the max. aspect-ratio and min. feature size. To characterize optical performances, beamsplitting elements are fabricated and their characteristics were investigated, which are in excellent agreement to theory.

  5. High resolution coherence analysis between planetary and climate oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the existence of a multi-frequency spectral coherence between planetary and global surface temperature oscillations by using advanced techniques of coherence analysis and statistical significance tests. The performance of the standard Matlab mscohere algorithms is compared versus high resolution coherence analysis methodologies such as the canonical correlation analysis. The Matlab mscohere function highlights large coherence peaks at 20 and 60-year periods although, due to the shortness of the global surface temperature record (1850-2014), the statistical significance of the result depends on the specific window function adopted for pre-processing the data. In fact, window functions disrupt the low frequency component of the spectrum. On the contrary, using the canonical correlation analysis at least five coherent frequencies at the 95% significance level are found at the following periods: 6.6, 7.4, 14, 20 and 60 years. Thus, high resolution coherence analysis confirms that the climate system can be partially modulated by astronomical forces of gravitational, electromagnetic and solar origin. A possible chain of the physical causes explaining this coherence is briefly discussed.

  6. High resolution telescopes at the National Solar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, R. B.; Smartt, R. N.

    The principal high-resolution telescopes of the National Solar Observatory are its two evacuated telescopes of 61-cm aperture (Kitt Peak) and 75-cm aperture (Sac Peak). The 61-cm telescope is used for making full-disk magnetograms, spectromagnetograms and 10830-wave length maps that show coronal holes, and is dedicated to synoptic programs. The 75-cm telescope at Sac Peak is described. Upgrades that are under way include an adaptive mirror and fast mirror system that will feed several focal-plane instruments, including the Universal Spectrograph (a new spectrograph whose detectors are CCD cameras), and the Universal Birefringent Filter, (a Fabry-Perot Interferometer); an Advanced Stokes Polarimeter is being constructed at the High Altitude Observatory. Additional equipment planned for this telescope includes an improved temperature control subsystem for the entrance window, an instrument that continually measures Fried's parameter, and integrating more advanced data collection systems into a computer network. The observatory is also pursuing a mirror coronagraph, which should have high resolution and which could be built in apertures larger than a meter.

  7. Providing Internet Access to High-Resolution Lunar Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2008-01-01

    The OnMoon server is a computer program that provides Internet access to high-resolution Lunar images, maps, and elevation data, all suitable for use in geographical information system (GIS) software for generating images, maps, and computational models of the Moon. The OnMoon server implements the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) server protocol and supports Moon-specific extensions. Unlike other Internet map servers that provide Lunar data using an Earth coordinate system, the OnMoon server supports encoding of data in Moon-specific coordinate systems. The OnMoon server offers access to most of the available high-resolution Lunar image and elevation data. This server can generate image and map files in the tagged image file format (TIFF) or the Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), 8- or 16-bit Portable Network Graphics (PNG), or Keyhole Markup Language (KML) format. Image control is provided by use of the OGC Style Layer Descriptor (SLD) protocol. Full-precision spectral arithmetic processing is also available, by use of a custom SLD extension. This server can dynamically add shaded relief based on the Lunar elevation to any image layer. This server also implements tiled WMS protocol and super-overlay KML for high-performance client application programs.

  8. Providing Internet Access to High-Resolution Mars Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2008-01-01

    The OnMars server is a computer program that provides Internet access to high-resolution Mars images, maps, and elevation data, all suitable for use in geographical information system (GIS) software for generating images, maps, and computational models of Mars. The OnMars server is an implementation of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) server. Unlike other Mars Internet map servers that provide Martian data using an Earth coordinate system, the OnMars WMS server supports encoding of data in Mars-specific coordinate systems. The OnMars server offers access to most of the available high-resolution Martian image and elevation data, including an 8-meter-per-pixel uncontrolled mosaic of most of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Observer Camera Narrow Angle (MOCNA) image collection, which is not available elsewhere. This server can generate image and map files in the tagged image file format (TIFF), Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), 8- or 16-bit Portable Network Graphics (PNG), or Keyhole Markup Language (KML) format. Image control is provided by use of the OGC Style Layer Descriptor (SLD) protocol. The OnMars server also implements tiled WMS protocol and super-overlay KML for high-performance client application programs.

  9. Limiting liability via high-resolution image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwade, L. E.; Overlin, Trudy K.

    1997-01-01

    The utilization of high resolution image processing allows forensic analysts and visualization scientists to assist detectives by enhancing field photographs, and by providing the tools and training to increase the quality and usability of field photos. Through the use of digitized photographs and computerized enhancement software, field evidence can be obtained and processed as 'evidence ready,' even in poor lighting and shadowed conditions or darkened rooms. These images, which are most often unusable when taken with standard camera equipment, can be shot in the worst of photographic condition and be processed as usable evidence. Visualization scientists have taken the use of digital photographic image processing and moved the process of crime scene photos into the technology age. The use of high resolution technology will assist law enforcement in making better use of crime scene photography and positive identification of prints. Valuable court room and investigation time can be saved and better served by this accurate, performance based process. Inconclusive evidence does not lead to convictions. Enhancement of the photographic capability helps solve one major problem with crime scene photos, that if taken with standard equipment and without the benefit of enhancement software would be inconclusive, thus allowing guilty parties to be set free due to lack of evidence.

  10. Modeling Spatial Dependencies in High-Resolution Overhead Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Cheriyadat, Anil M; Bright, Eddie A; Vatsavai, Raju

    2011-01-01

    Human settlement regions with different physical and socio-economic attributes exhibit unique spatial characteristics that are often illustrated in high-resolution overhead imageries. For example- size, shape and spatial arrangements of man-made structures are key attributes that vary with respect to the socioeconomic profile of the neighborhood. Successfully modeling these attributes is crucial in developing advanced image understanding systems for interpreting complex aerial scenes. In this paper we present three different approaches to model the spatial context in the overhead imagery. First, we show that the frequency domain of the image can be used to model the spatial context [1]. The shape of the spectral energy contours characterize the scene context and can be exploited as global features. Secondly, we explore a discriminative framework based on the Conditional Random Fields (CRF) [2] to model the spatial context in the overhead imagery. The features derived from the edge orientation distribution calculated for a neighborhood and the associated class labels are used as input features to model the spatial context. Our third approach is based on grouping spatially connected pixels based on the low-level edge primitives to form support-regions [3]. The statistical parameters generated from the support-region feature distributions characterize different geospatial neighborhoods. We apply our approaches on high-resolution overhead imageries. We show that proposed approaches characterize the spatial context in overhead imageries.

  11. High-resolution optical fiber heterodyne interferometer for measuring displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Wang, Jia; Cao, Mang; Li, Dacheng

    1990-07-01

    Many Methods have been developed to .easure displace.ent with high accuracy, for exap1e, with a dual frequency laser interferometer (AC interferometer) and an classic interferoseter (DC interferoeter) which use a stabilized laser and fringe counter, and an AC interfero.eter has ore advantage over the DC one. An AC interfero.eter with a Zee.an laser can get a high resolution, in the order of nanoMeters, but its resolution extension liRited by nonlinear relation between phase and displace.ent which caused by the two-frequency coRponents in interferoaeter[1]. Because the fundaaental length scale of the interferometer is the wavelength of the light source in the air. The accuracy of an interferoeter is li.ited by the operating envireaent, teRperature, husidity, pressure, etc. because the aiRs of interferoseters expose in the air. A high resolution optical fiber heterodyne interfermeter is described in the paper.

  12. High-resolution three-dimensional imaging with compress sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingyi; Ke, Jun

    2016-10-01

    LIDAR three-dimensional imaging technology have been used in many fields, such as military detection. However, LIDAR require extremely fast data acquisition speed. This makes the manufacture of detector array for LIDAR system is very difficult. To solve this problem, we consider using compress sensing which can greatly decrease the data acquisition and relax the requirement of a detection device. To use the compressive sensing idea, a spatial light modulator will be used to modulate the pulsed light source. Then a photodetector is used to receive the reflected light. A convex optimization problem is solved to reconstruct the 2D depth map of the object. To improve the resolution in transversal direction, we use multiframe image restoration technology. For each 2D piecewise-planar scene, we move the SLM half-pixel each time. Then the position where the modulated light illuminates will changed accordingly. We repeat moving the SLM to four different directions. Then we can get four low-resolution depth maps with different details of the same plane scene. If we use all of the measurements obtained by the subpixel movements, we can reconstruct a high-resolution depth map of the sense. A linear minimum-mean-square error algorithm is used for the reconstruction. By combining compress sensing and multiframe image restoration technology, we reduce the burden on data analyze and improve the efficiency of detection. More importantly, we obtain high-resolution depth maps of a 3D scene.

  13. High resolution x-ray scattering and diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Moncton, D.

    1983-01-01

    In the general class of high resolution x-ray scattering studies experiments one analyzes the distribution of photon energies and wave vectors resulting from illumination of a sample with collimated monochromatic radiation. Applications abound in the field of structural physics, which may be described as the study of structures for their intrinsic physical interest. This includes studies of novel states of matter, phase transitions, and dynamics. As both the wave vector and the energy of scattered photons are of interest, one may conceptually divide high resolution experimental setups for this work into two classes: those with high Q-resolution (momemtum transfer analysis) and those with high E-resolution (energy transfer analysis). The former class is exemplified by the existing experimental station on SSRL wiggler experimental station VII-2 and the proposed high Q-resolution wiggler station for NSLS Phase II. The latter class is dependent on extremely high flux, as discussed more fully below, and the possibility of constructing a high E-resolution scattering station fed by an x-ray undulator is one of the exciting opportunities presented by the proposed construction of a 6 GeV storage ring.

  14. Thin polymer etalon arrays for high-resolution photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yang; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Ashkenazi, Shai; Witte, Russell; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Thin polymer etalons are demonstrated as high-frequency ultrasound sensors for three-dimensional (3-D) high-resolution photoacoustic imaging. The etalon, a Fabry-Perot optical resonator, consists of a thin polymer slab sandwiched between two gold layers. It is probed with a scanning continuous-wave (CW) laser for ultrasound array detection. Detection bandwidth of a 20-μm-diam array element exceeds 50 MHz, and the ultrasound sensitivity is comparable to polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) equivalents of similar size. In a typical photoacoustic imaging setup, a pulsed laser beam illuminates the imaging target, where optical energy is absorbed and acoustic waves are generated through the thermoelastic effect. An ultrasound detection array is formed by scanning the probing laser beam on the etalon surface in either a 1-D or a 2-D configuration, which produces 2-D or 3-D images, respectively. Axial and lateral resolutions have been demonstrated to be better than 20 μm. Detailed characterizations of the optical and acoustical properties of the etalon, as well as photoacoustic imaging results, suggest that thin polymer etalon arrays can be used as ultrasound detectors for 3-D high-resolution photoacoustic imaging applications. PMID:19123679

  15. High-Resolution Electronics: Spontaneous Patterning of High-Resolution Electronics via Parallel Vacuum Ultraviolet (Adv. Mater. 31/2016).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuying; Kanehara, Masayuki; Liu, Chuan; Sakamoto, Kenji; Yasuda, Takeshi; Takeya, Jun; Minari, Takeo

    2016-08-01

    On page 6568, T. Minari and co-workers describe spontaneous patterning based on the parallel vacuum ultraviolet (PVUV) technique, enabling the homogeneous integration of complex, high-resolution electronic circuits, even on large-scale, flexible, transparent substrates. Irradiation of PVUV to the hydrophobic polymer surface precisely renders the selected surface into highly wettable regions with sharply defined boundaries, which spontaneously guides a metal nanoparticle ink into a series of circuit lines and gaps with the widths down to a resolution of 1 μm. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Optical Histology: High-Resolution Visualization of Tissue Microvasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, Austin Jing-Ming

    Mammalian tissue requires the delivery of nutrients, growth factors, and the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide gases to maintain normal function. These elements are delivered by the blood, which travels through the connected network of blood vessels, known as the vascular system. The vascular system consists of large feeder blood vessels (arteries and veins) that are connected to the small blood vessels (arterioles and venules), which in turn are connected to the capillaries that are directly connected to the tissue and facilitate gas exchange and nutrient delivery. These small blood vessels and capillaries make up an intricate but organized network of blood vessels that exist in all mammalian tissues known as the microvasculature and are very important in maintaining the health and proper function of mammalian tissue. Due to the importance of the microvasculature in tissue survival, disruption of the microvasculature typically leads to tissue dysfunction and tissue death. The most prevalent method to study the microvasculature is visualization. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is the gold-standard method to visualize tissue microvasculature. IHC is very well-suited for highly detailed interrogation of the tissue microvasculature at the cellular level but is unwieldy and impractical for wide-field visualization of the tissue microvasculature. The objective my dissertation research was to develop a method to enable wide-field visualization of the microvasculature, while still retaining the high-resolution afforded by optical microscopy. My efforts led to the development of a technique dubbed "optical histology" that combines chemical and optical methods to enable high-resolution visualization of the microvasculature. The development of the technique first involved preliminary studies to quantify optical property changes in optically cleared tissues, followed by development and demonstration of the methodology. Using optical histology, I successfully obtained high

  17. High resolution urban morphology data for urban wind flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cionco, Ronald M.; Ellefsen, Richard

    The application of urban forestry methods and technologies to a number of practical problems can be further enhanced by the use and incorporation of localized, high resolution wind and temperature fields into their analysis methods. The numerical simulation of these micrometeorological fields will represent the interactions and influences of urban structures, vegetation elements, and variable terrain as an integral part of the dynamics of an urban domain. Detailed information of the natural and man-made components that make up the urban area is needed to more realistically model meteorological fields in urban domains. Simulating high resolution wind and temperatures over and through an urban domain utilizing detailed morphology data can also define and quantify local areas where urban forestry applications can contribute to better solutions. Applications such as the benefits of planting trees for shade purposes can be considered, planned, and evaluated for their impact on conserving energy and cooling costs as well as the possible reconfiguration or removal of trees and other barriers for improved airflow ventilation and similar processes. To generate these fields, a wind model must be provided, as a minimum, the location, type, height, structural silhouette, and surface roughness of these components, in order to account for the presence and effects of these land morphology features upon the ambient airflow. The morphology of Sacramento, CA has been characterized and quantified in considerable detail primarily for wind flow modeling, simulation, and analyses, but can also be used for improved meteorological analyses, urban forestry, urban planning, and other urban related activities. Morphology methods previously developed by Ellefsen are applied to the Sacramento scenario with a high resolution grid of 100 m × 100 m. The Urban Morphology Scheme defines Urban Terrain Zones (UTZ) according to how buildings and other urban elements are structured and placed with

  18. High resolution infrared acquisitions droning over the LUSI mud eruption.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Felice, Fabio; Romeo, Giovanni; Di Stefano, Giuseppe; Mazzini, Adriano

    2016-04-01

    The use of low-cost hand-held infrared (IR) thermal cameras based on uncooled micro-bolometer detector arrays became more widespread during the recent years. Thermal cameras have the ability to estimate temperature values without contact and therefore can be used in circumstances where objects are difficult or dangerous to reach such as volcanic eruptions. Since May 2006 the Indonesian LUSI mud eruption continues to spew boiling mud, water, aqueous vapor, CO2, CH4 and covers a surface of nearly 7 km2. At this locality we performed surveys over the unreachable erupting crater. In the framework of the LUSI Lab project (ERC grant n° 308126), in 2014 and 2015, we acquired high resolution infrared images using a specifically equipped remote-controlled drone flying at an altitude of m 100. The drone is equipped with GPS and an autopilot system that allows pre-programming the flying path or designing grids. The mounted thermal camera has peak spectral sensitivity in LW wavelength (μm 10) that is characterized by low water vapor and CO2 absorption. The low distance (high resolution) acquisitions have a temperature detail every cm 40, therefore it is possible to detect and observe physical phenomena such as thermodynamic behavior, hot mud and fluids emissions locations and their time shifts. Despite the harsh logistics and the continuously varying gas concentrations we managed to collect thermal images to estimate the crater zone spatial thermal variations. We applied atmosphere corrections to calculate infrared absorption by high concentration of water vapor. Thousands of images have been stitched together to obtain a mosaic of the crater zone. Regular monitoring with heat variation measurements collected, e.g. every six months, could give important information about the volcano activity estimating its evolution. A future data base of infrared high resolution and visible images stored in a web server could be a useful monitoring tool. An interesting development will be

  19. High resolution modelling of extreme precipitation events in urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemerink, Martijn; Volp, Nicolette; Schuurmans, Wytze; Deckers, Dave

    2015-04-01

    The present day society needs to adjust to the effects of climate change. More extreme weather conditions are expected, which can lead to longer periods of drought, but also to more extreme precipitation events. Urban water systems are not designed for such extreme events. Most sewer systems are not able to drain the excessive storm water, causing urban flooding. This leads to high economic damage. In order to take appropriate measures against extreme urban storms, detailed knowledge about the behaviour of the urban water system above and below the streets is required. To investigate the behaviour of urban water systems during extreme precipitation events new assessment tools are necessary. These tools should provide a detailed and integral description of the flow in the full domain of overland runoff, sewer flow, surface water flow and groundwater flow. We developed a new assessment tool, called 3Di, which provides detailed insight in the urban water system. This tool is based on a new numerical methodology that can accurately deal with the interaction between overland runoff, sewer flow and surface water flow. A one-dimensional model for the sewer system and open channel flow is fully coupled to a two-dimensional depth-averaged model that simulates the overland flow. The tool uses a subgrid-based approach in order to take high resolution information of the sewer system and of the terrain into account [1, 2]. The combination of using the high resolution information and the subgrid based approach results in an accurate and efficient modelling tool. It is now possible to simulate entire urban water systems using extreme high resolution (0.5m x 0.5m) terrain data in combination with a detailed sewer and surface water network representation. The new tool has been tested in several Dutch cities, such as Rotterdam, Amsterdam and The Hague. We will present the results of an extreme precipitation event in the city of Schiedam (The Netherlands). This city deals with

  20. A PICTORIAL PRESENTATION OF ESOPHAGEAL HIGH RESOLUTION MANOMETRY CURRENT PARAMETERS.

    PubMed

    Lafraia, Fernanda M; Herbella, Fernando A M; Kalluf, Julia R; Patti, Marco G

    2017-01-01

    High resolution manometry is the current technology used to the study of esophageal motility and is replacing conventional manometry in important centers for esophageal motility with parameters used on esophageal motility, following the Chicago Classification. This classification unifies high resolution manometry interpretation and classifies esophageal disorders. This review shows, in a pictorial presentation, the new parameters established by the Chicago Classification, version 3.0, aimed to allow an easy comprehension and interpretation of high resolution manometry. Esophageal manometries performed by the authors were reviewed to select illustrative tracings representing Chicago Classification parameters. The parameters are: Esophagogastric Morphology, that classifies this junction according to its physiology and anatomy; Integrated Relaxation Pressure, that measures the lower esophageal sphincter relaxation; Distal Contractile Integral, that evaluates the contraction vigor of each wave; and, Distal Latency, that measures the peristalsis velocity from the beginning of the swallow to the epiphrenic ampulla. Clinical applications of these new concepts is still under evaluation. Mostrar, de forma pictórica, os novos parâmetros compilados na versão 3.0 da Classificação de Chicago, buscando facilitar a compreensão e interpretação da manometria de alta resolução. Foram revistas as manometrias da casuística dos autores e selecionados os traçados representativos dos parâmetros da Classificação de Chicago. Entre os parâmetros apresentados foram considerados a Morfologia da Transição Gastroesofágica, que classifica o segmento de acordo com sua fisiologia e anatomia; a Integral da Pressão de Relaxamento, que mede o relaxamento do esfíncter esofagiano inferior; a Integral Contrátil Distal, que avalia o vigor contrátil da onda peristáltica; e, a Latência Distal, que mede o tempo da peristalse, desde o início da deglutição até a ampola epifr