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Sample records for high-resolution electron collision

  1. Computer synthesis of high resolution electron micrographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, R.

    1976-01-01

    Specimen damage, spherical aberration, low contrast and noisy sensors combine to prevent direct atomic viewing in a conventional electron microscope. The paper describes two methods for obtaining ultra-high resolution in biological specimens under the electron microscope. The first method assumes the physical limits of the electron objective lens and uses a series of dark field images of biological crystals to obtain direct information on the phases of the Fourier diffraction maxima; this information is used in an appropriate computer to synthesize a large aperture lens for a 1-A resolution. The second method assumes there is sufficient amplitude scatter from images recorded in focus which can be utilized with a sensitive densitometer and computer contrast stretching to yield fine structure image details. Cancer virus characterization is discussed as an illustrative example. Numerous photographs supplement the text.

  2. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C/sub 44/H/sub 90/ paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol. 53 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C44H90 paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol.

  4. Phase contrast in high resolution electron microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Rose, H.H.

    1975-09-23

    This patent relates to a device for developing a phase contrast signal for a scanning transmission electron microscope. The lens system of the microscope is operated in a condition of defocus so that predictable alternate concentric regions of high and low electron density exist in the cone of illumination. Two phase detectors are placed beneath the object inside the cone of illumination, with the first detector having the form of a zone plate, each of its rings covering alternate regions of either higher or lower electron density. The second detector is so configured that it covers the regions of electron density not covered by the first detector. Each detector measures the number of electrons incident thereon and the signal developed by the first detector is subtracted from the signal developed by the record detector to provide a phase contrast signal. (auth)

  5. Ultra-high resolution electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxley, Mark P.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2017-02-01

    The last two decades have seen dramatic advances in the resolution of the electron microscope brought about by the successful correction of lens aberrations that previously limited resolution for most of its history. We briefly review these advances, the achievement of sub-Ångstrom resolution and the ability to identify individual atoms, their bonding configurations and even their dynamics and diffusion pathways. We then present a review of the basic physics of electron scattering, lens aberrations and their correction, and an approximate imaging theory for thin crystals which provides physical insight into the various different imaging modes. Then we proceed to describe a more exact imaging theory starting from Yoshioka’s formulation and covering full image simulation methods using Bloch waves, the multislice formulation and the frozen phonon/quantum excitation of phonons models. Delocalization of inelastic scattering has become an important limiting factor at atomic resolution. We therefore discuss this issue extensively, showing how the full-width-half-maximum is the appropriate measure for predicting image contrast, but the diameter containing 50% of the excitation is an important measure of the range of the interaction. These two measures can differ by a factor of 5, are not a simple function of binding energy, and full image simulations are required to match to experiment. The Z-dependence of annular dark field images is also discussed extensively, both for single atoms and for crystals, and we show that temporal incoherence must be included accurately if atomic species are to be identified through matching experimental intensities to simulations. Finally we mention a few promising directions for future investigation.

  6. Ultra-high resolution electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Oxley, Mark P.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2016-12-23

    The last two decades have seen dramatic advances in the resolution of the electron microscope brought about by the successful correction of lens aberrations that previously limited resolution for most of its history. Here we briefly review these advances, the achievement of sub-Ångstrom resolution and the ability to identify individual atoms, their bonding configurations and even their dynamics and diffusion pathways. We then present a review of the basic physics of electron scattering, lens aberrations and their correction, and an approximate imaging theory for thin crystals which provides physical insight into the various different imaging modes. Then we proceed tomore » describe a more exact imaging theory starting from Yoshioka’s formulation and covering full image simulation methods using Bloch waves, the multislice formulation and the frozen phonon/quantum excitation of phonons models. Delocalization of inelastic scattering has become an important limiting factor at atomic resolution. We therefore discuss this issue extensively, showing how the full-width-half-maximum is the appropriate measure for predicting image contrast, but the diameter containing 50% of the excitation is an important measure of the range of the interaction. These two measures can differ by a factor of 5, are not a simple function of binding energy, and full image simulations are required to match to experiment. The Z-dependence of annular dark field images is also discussed extensively, both for single atoms and for crystals, and we show that temporal incoherence must be included accurately if atomic species are to be identified through matching experimental intensities to simulations. Finally we mention a few promising directions for future investigation.« less

  7. Ultra-high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Oxley, Mark P.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2016-12-23

    The last two decades have seen dramatic advances in the resolution of the electron microscope brought about by the successful correction of lens aberrations that previously limited resolution for most of its history. Here we briefly review these advances, the achievement of sub-Ångstrom resolution and the ability to identify individual atoms, their bonding configurations and even their dynamics and diffusion pathways. We then present a review of the basic physics of electron scattering, lens aberrations and their correction, and an approximate imaging theory for thin crystals which provides physical insight into the various different imaging modes. Then we proceed to describe a more exact imaging theory starting from Yoshioka’s formulation and covering full image simulation methods using Bloch waves, the multislice formulation and the frozen phonon/quantum excitation of phonons models. Delocalization of inelastic scattering has become an important limiting factor at atomic resolution. We therefore discuss this issue extensively, showing how the full-width-half-maximum is the appropriate measure for predicting image contrast, but the diameter containing 50% of the excitation is an important measure of the range of the interaction. These two measures can differ by a factor of 5, are not a simple function of binding energy, and full image simulations are required to match to experiment. The Z-dependence of annular dark field images is also discussed extensively, both for single atoms and for crystals, and we show that temporal incoherence must be included accurately if atomic species are to be identified through matching experimental intensities to simulations. Finally we mention a few promising directions for future investigation.

  8. Robust high-resolution cloth using parallelism, history-based collisions, and accurate friction.

    PubMed

    Selle, Andrew; Su, Jonathan; Irving, Geoffrey; Fedkiw, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we simulate high resolution cloth consisting of up to 2 million triangles which allows us to achieve highly detailed folds and wrinkles. Since the level of detail is also influenced by object collision and self collision, we propose a more accurate model for cloth-object friction. We also propose a robust history-based repulsion/collision framework where repulsions are treated accurately and efficiently on a per time step basis. Distributed memory parallelism is used for both time evolution and collisions and we specifically address Gauss-Seidel ordering of repulsion/collision response. This algorithm is demonstrated by several high resolution and high-fidelity simulations.

  9. High-resolution low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Buban, James P; Ramasse, Quentin; Gipson, Bryant; Browning, Nigel D; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades instrumentation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has pushed toward higher intensity electron probes to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of recorded images. While this is suitable for robust specimens, biological specimens require a much reduced electron dose for high-resolution imaging. We describe here protocols for low-dose STEM image recording with a conventional field-emission gun STEM, while maintaining the high-resolution capability of the instrument. Our findings show that a combination of reduced pixel dwell time and reduced gun current can achieve radiation doses comparable to low-dose TEM.

  10. High-resolution spectroscopic probes of collisions and half-collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G.E.

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program explores the dynamics of gas phase collisions and photodissociation by high-resolution laser spectroscopy. Simultaneous state and velocity detection frequently permits a determination of scalar or vector correlations among products. The correlated product distributions are always more informative, and often easier to interpret than the uncorrelated product state distributions. The authors have recently built an apparatus to record transient absorption spectra with 50 nS time resolution and 20 MHz frequency resolution using a single frequency Ti:sapphire laser. The photodissociation of NCCN and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}SCN at 193 nm is discussed.

  11. Human enamel structure studied by high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, S.L. )

    1989-01-01

    Human enamel structural features are characterized by high resolution electron microscopy. The human enamel consists of polycrystals with a structure similar to Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2. This article describes the structural features of human enamel crystal at atomic and nanometer level. Besides the structural description, a great number of high resolution images are included. Research into the carious process in human enamel is very important for human beings. This article firstly describes the initiation of caries in enamel crystal at atomic and unit-cell level and secondly describes the further steps of caries with structural and chemical demineralization. The demineralization in fact, is the origin of caries in human enamel. The remineralization of carious areas in human enamel has drawn more and more attention as its potential application is realized. This process has been revealed by high resolution electron microscopy in detail in this article. On the other hand, the radiation effects on the structure of human enamel are also characterized by high resolution electron microscopy. In order to reveal this phenomenon clearly, a great number of electron micrographs have been shown, and a physical mechanism is proposed. 26 references.

  12. Collision cross section measurements for biomolecules within a high-resolution FT-ICR cell: theory.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dan; Xin, Yi; Li, Dayu; Xu, Wei

    2015-04-14

    In this study, an energetic hard-sphere ion-neutral collision model was proposed to bridge-link ion collision cross section (CCS) with the image current collected from a high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) cell. By investigating the nonlinear effects induced by high-order electric fields and image charge forces, the energetic hard-sphere collision model was validated through experiments. Suitable application regions for the energetic hard-sphere collision model, as well as for the conventional Langevin and hard-sphere collision models, were also discussed. The energetic hard-sphere collision model was applied in the extraction of ion CCSs from high-resolution FT-ICR mass spectra. Discussions in the present study also apply to FT-Orbitraps and FT-quadrupole ion traps.

  13. Robust High-Resolution Cloth Using Parallelism, History-Based Collisions and Accurate Friction

    PubMed Central

    Selle, Andrew; Su, Jonathan; Irving, Geoffrey; Fedkiw, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we simulate high resolution cloth consisting of up to 2 million triangles which allows us to achieve highly detailed folds and wrinkles. Since the level of detail is also influenced by object collision and self collision, we propose a more accurate model for cloth-object friction. We also propose a robust history-based repulsion/collision framework where repulsions are treated accurately and efficiently on a per time step basis. Distributed memory parallelism is used for both time evolution and collisions and we specifically address Gauss-Seidel ordering of repulsion/collision response. This algorithm is demonstrated by several high-resolution and high-fidelity simulations. PMID:19147895

  14. High-resolution observation by double-biprism electron holography

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Ken; Tonomura, Akira; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Akashi, Tetsuya; Togawa, Yoshihiko

    2004-12-01

    High-resolution electron holography has been achieved by using a double-biprism interferometer implemented on a 1 MV field emission electron microscope. The interferometer was installed behind the first magnifying lens to narrow carrier fringes and thus enabled complete separation of sideband Fourier spectrum from center band in reconstruction process. Holograms of Au fine particles and single-crystalline thin films with the finest fringe spacing of 4.2 pm were recorded and reconstructed. The overall holography system including the reconstruction process performed well for holograms in which carrier fringes had a spacing of around 10 pm. High-resolution lattice images of the amplitude and phase were clearly reconstructed without mixing of the center band and sideband information. Additionally, entire holograms were recorded without Fresnel fringes normally generated by the filament electrode of the biprism, and the holograms were thus reconstructed without the artifacts caused by Fresnel fringes.

  15. High-resolution electron microscopy of advanced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, T.E.; Kung, H.H.; Sickafus, K.E.; Gray, G.T. III; Field, R.D.; Smith, J.F.

    1997-11-01

    This final report chronicles a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The High-Resolution Electron Microscopy Facility has doubled in size and tripled in quality since the beginning of the three-year period. The facility now includes a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a 100 kV field-emission scanning transmission electron microscope (FE-STEM), a 300 kV field-emission high-resolution transmission electron microscope (FE-HRTEM), and a 300 kV analytical transmission electron microscope. A new orientation imaging microscope is being installed. X-ray energy dispersive spectrometers for chemical analysis are available on all four microscopes; parallel electron energy loss spectrometers are operational on the FE-STEM and FE-HRTEM. These systems enable evaluation of local atomic bonding, as well as chemical composition in nanometer-scale regions. The FE-HRTEM has a point-to-point resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}, but the resolution can be pushed to its information limit of 1 {angstrom} by computer reconstruction of a focal series of images. HRTEM has been used to image the atomic structure of defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries, and interfaces in a variety of materials from superconductors and ferroelectrics to structural ceramics and intermetallics.

  16. High-resolution threshold photoelectron spectroscopy by electron attachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, J. M.; Chutjian, A.

    1976-01-01

    A new technique for measuring high-resolution threshold photoelectron spectra of atoms, molecules, and radicals is described. It involves photoionization of a gaseous species, attachment of the threshold, or nearly zero electron to some trapping molecule (here SF6 or CFCl3), and mass detection of the attachment product (SF6/-/ or Cl/-/ respectively). This technique of threshold photoelectron spectroscopy by electron attachment was used to measure the spectra of argon and xenon at 11 meV (FWHM) resolution, and was also applied to CFCl3.

  17. High-resolution AMLCD for the electronic library system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Russel A.; Middo, Kathy; Turner, William D.; Lewis, Alan; Thompson, Malcolm J.; Silverstein, Louis D.

    1994-06-01

    The Electronic Library System (ELS), is a proposed data resource for the cockpit which can provide the aircrew with a vast array of technical information on their aircraft and flight plan. This information includes, but is not limited to, approach plates, Jeppeson Charts, and aircraft technical manuals. Most of these data are appropriate for digitization at high resolution (300 spi). Xerox Corporation has developed a flat panel active matrix liquid crystal display, AMLCD, that is an excellent match to the ELS, due to its innovative and aggressive design.

  18. High resolution electron microscopy study of amorphous calcium phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brès, E. F.; Moebus, G.; Kleebe, H.-J.; Pourroy, G.; Werkmann, J.; Ehret, G.

    1993-03-01

    "Amorphous" calcium phosphate (ACP) from human tooth enamel and different synthetic materials has been analysed by high resolution electron microscopy (HREM). All the materials studied showed, in addition to a "truly" amorphous phase, other calcium phosphate phases such as poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite (OHAP), well crystallized OHAP and poorly crystalline CaO type phase. Such structural heterogeneities have not been observed before in ACP, and are only possible to be detected by HREM as this is the only technique able to analyse nanometre size materials in the real space.

  19. High resolution X-ray CT for advanced electronics packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppermann, M.; Zerna, T.

    2017-02-01

    Advanced electronics packaging is a challenge for non-destructive Testing (NDT). More, smaller and mostly hidden interconnects dominate modern electronics components and systems. To solve the demands of customers to get products with a high functionality by low volume, weight and price (e.g. mobile phones, personal medical monitoring systems) often the designers use System-in-Package solutions (SiP). The non-destructive testing of such devices is a big challenge. So our paper will impart fundamentals and applications for non-destructive evaluation of inner structures of electronics packaging for quality assurance and reliability investigations with a focus on X-ray methods, especially on high resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT).

  20. Quantitative high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of single atoms.

    PubMed

    Gamm, Björn; Blank, Holger; Popescu, Radian; Schneider, Reinhard; Beyer, André; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Gerthsen, Dagmar

    2012-02-01

    Single atoms can be considered as the most basic objects for electron microscopy to test the microscope performance and basic concepts for modeling image contrast. In this work high-resolution transmission electron microscopy was applied to image single platinum, molybdenum, and titanium atoms in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The atoms are deposited on a self-assembled monolayer substrate that induces only negligible contrast. Single-atom contrast simulations were performed on the basis of Weickenmeier-Kohl and Doyle-Turner form factors. Experimental and simulated image intensities are in quantitative agreement on an absolute intensity scale, which is provided by the vacuum image intensity. This demonstrates that direct testing of basic properties such as form factors becomes feasible.

  1. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy: the ultimate nanoanalytical technique.

    PubMed

    Thomas, John Meurig; Midgley, Paul A

    2004-06-07

    To be able to determine the elemental composition and morphology of individual nanoparticles consisting of no more than a dozen or so atoms that weigh a few zeptograms (10(-21) g) is but one of the attainments of modern electron microscopy. With slightly larger specimens (embracing a few unit cells of the structure) their symmetry, crystallographic phase, unit-cell dimension, chemical composition and often the valence state (from parallel electron spectroscopic measurements) of the constituent atoms may also be determined using a scanning beam of electrons of ca. 0.5 nm diameter. Nowadays electron crystallography, which treats the digital data of electron diffraction (ED) and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) images of minute (ca. 10(-18)g) specimens in a quantitatively rigorous manner, solves hitherto unknown structures just as X-ray diffraction does with bulk single crystals. In addition, electron tomography (see cover photograph and its animation) enables a three-dimensional picture of the internal structure of minute objects, such as nanocatalysts in a single pore, as well as structural faults such as micro-fissures, to be constructed with a resolution of 1 nm from an angular series of two-dimensional (projected) images. Very recently (since this article was first written) a new meaning has been given to electron crystallography as a result of the spatio-temporal resolution of surface phenomena achieved on a femtosecond timescale.

  2. High-Resolution Electronics: Spontaneous Patterning of High-Resolution Electronics via Parallel Vacuum Ultraviolet (Adv. Mater. 31/2016).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuying; Kanehara, Masayuki; Liu, Chuan; Sakamoto, Kenji; Yasuda, Takeshi; Takeya, Jun; Minari, Takeo

    2016-08-01

    On page 6568, T. Minari and co-workers describe spontaneous patterning based on the parallel vacuum ultraviolet (PVUV) technique, enabling the homogeneous integration of complex, high-resolution electronic circuits, even on large-scale, flexible, transparent substrates. Irradiation of PVUV to the hydrophobic polymer surface precisely renders the selected surface into highly wettable regions with sharply defined boundaries, which spontaneously guides a metal nanoparticle ink into a series of circuit lines and gaps with the widths down to a resolution of 1 μm.

  3. Multilayer Patterning of High Resolution Intrinsically Stretchable Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Tybrandt, Klas; Stauffer, Flurin; Vörös, Janos

    2016-01-01

    Stretchable electronics can bridge the gap between hard planar electronic circuits and the curved, soft and elastic objects of nature. This has led to applications like conformal displays, electronic skin and soft neuroprosthetics. A remaining challenge, however, is to match the dimensions of the interfaced systems, as all require feature sizes well below 100 μm. Intrinsically stretchable nanocomposites are attractive in this context as the mechanical deformations occur on the nanoscale, although methods for patterning high performance materials have been lacking. Here we address these issues by reporting on a multilayer additive patterning approach for high resolution fabrication of stretchable electronic devices. The method yields highly conductive 30 μm tracks with similar performance to their macroscopic counterparts. Further, we demonstrate a three layer micropatterned stretchable electroluminescent display with pixel sizes down to 70 μm. These presented findings pave the way towards future developments of high definition displays, electronic skins and dense multielectrode arrays. PMID:27157804

  4. Polystyrene negative resist for high-resolution electron beam lithography

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We studied the exposure behavior of low molecular weight polystyrene as a negative tone electron beam lithography (EBL) resist, with the goal of finding the ultimate achievable resolution. It demonstrated fairly well-defined patterning of a 20-nm period line array and a 15-nm period dot array, which are the densest patterns ever achieved using organic EBL resists. Such dense patterns can be achieved both at 20 and 5 keV beam energies using different developers. In addition to its ultra-high resolution capability, polystyrene is a simple and low-cost resist with easy process control and practically unlimited shelf life. It is also considerably more resistant to dry etching than PMMA. With a low sensitivity, it would find applications where negative resist is desired and throughput is not a major concern. PMID:21749679

  5. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall,G.E.; Sears, T.J.

    2009-04-03

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. High-resolution spectroscopy, augmented by theoretical and computational methods, is used to investigate the structure and collision dynamics of chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry. Applications and methods development are equally important experimental components of this work.

  6. High Resolution Studies of Electron Attachment to Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, M.; Ruf, M.-W.; Hotop, H.; Fabrikant, I. I.

    2009-05-02

    In this paper, we survey recent progress in studies of anion formation via (dissociative) electron attachment (DEA) to simple molecules, as measured with the laser photoelectron attachment (LPA) method at high resolution. The limiting (E{yields}0) threshold behavior of the cross sections is elucidated for s-wave and p-wave attachment. Cusps at onsets for vibrational excitation (VE), due to interaction of the DEA channnel with the VE channel, are clearly detected, and vibrational Feshbach resonances just below vibrational onsets are observed for molecules with sufficiently strong long-range attraction between the electron and the molecule. From the LPA anion yields, absolute DEA cross sections (energy range typically E = 0.001-2 eV) are determined with reference to rate coefficients for thermal electron attachment at the appropriate gas temperature (normally T{sub G} = 300 K). The experimental data are compared with theoretical cross sections, calculated within the framework of an R-matrix or an Effective Range theory approach.

  7. HIGH-RESOLUTION ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC ANALYSIS OF THE AMYLOID FIBRIL

    PubMed Central

    Shirahama, Tsuranobu; Cohen, Alan S.

    1967-01-01

    The ultrastructural organization of the fibrous component of amyloid has been analyzed by means of high resolution electron microscopy of negatively stained isolated amyloid fibrils and of positively stained amyloid fibrils in thin tissue sections. It was found that a number of subunits could be resolved according to their dimensions. The following structural organization is proposed. The amyloid fibril, the fibrous component of amyloid as seen in electron microscopy of thin tissue sections, consists of a number of filaments aggregated side-by-side. These amyloid filaments are approximately 75–80 A in diameter and consist of five (or less likely six) subunits (amyloid protofibrils) which are arranged parallel to each other, longitudinal or slightly oblique to the long axis of the filament. The filament has often seemed to disperse into several longitudinal rows. The amyloid protofibril is about 25–35 A wide and appears to consist of two or three subunit strands helically arranged with a 35–50-A repeat (or, less likely, is composed of globular subunits aggregated end-to-end). These amyloid subprotofibrillar strands measure approximately 10–15 A in diameter. PMID:6036530

  8. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) of nanophase ferric oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Iron oxide minerals are the prime candidates for Fe(III) signatures in remotely sensed Martian surface spectra. Magnetic, Mossbauer, and reflectance spectroscopy have been carried out in the laboratory in order to understand the mineralogical nature of Martian analog ferric oxide minerals of submicron or nanometer size range. Out of the iron oxide minerals studied, nanometer sized ferric oxides are promising candidates for possible Martian spectral analogs. 'Nanophase ferric oxide (np-Ox)' is a generic term for ferric oxide/oxihydroxide particles having nanoscale (less than 10 nm) particle dimensions. Ferrihydrite, superparamagnetic particles of hematite, maghemite and goethite, and nanometer sized particles of inherently paramagnetic lepidocrocite are all examples of nanophase ferric oxides. np-Ox particles in general do not give X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns with well defined peaks and would often be classified as X-ray amorphous. Therefore, different np-Oxs preparations should be characterized using a more sensitive technique e.g., high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The purpose of this study is to report the particle size, morphology and crystalline order, of five np-Ox samples by HRTEM imaging and electron diffraction (ED).

  9. Dose-dependent high-resolution electron ptychography

    SciTech Connect

    D'Alfonso, A. J.; Allen, L. J.; Sawada, H.; Kirkland, A. I.

    2016-02-07

    Recent reports of electron ptychography at atomic resolution have ushered in a new era of coherent diffractive imaging in the context of electron microscopy. We report and discuss electron ptychography under variable electron dose conditions, exploring the prospects of an approach which has considerable potential for imaging where low dose is needed.

  10. High-Resolution of Electron Microscopy of Montmorillonite and Montmorillonite/Epoxy Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    AFRL-ML-WP-TP-2006-464 HIGH-RESOLUTION OF ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF MONTMORILLONITE AND MONTMORILLONITE /EPOXY NANOCOMPOSITES Lawrence F...HIGH-RESOLUTION OF ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF MONTMORILLONITE AND MONTMORILLONITE /EPOXY NANOCOMPOSITES 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F 5d...transmission electron microscopy the structure and morphology of montmorillonite (MMT), a material of current interest for use in polymer nanocomposites, was

  11. High resolution dissociative electron attachment to gas phase adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, D.; Beikircher, M.; Denifl, S.; Zappa, F.; Matejcik, S.; Bacher, A.; Grill, V.; Maerk, T. D.; Scheier, P.

    2006-08-28

    The dissociative electron attachment to the gas phase nucleobase adenine is studied using two different experiments. A double focusing sector field mass spectrometer is utilized for measurements requiring high mass resolution, high sensitivity, and relative ion yields for all the fragment anions and a hemispherical electron monochromator instrument for high electron energy resolution. The negative ion mass spectra are discussed at two different electron energies of 2 and 6 eV. In contrast to previous gas phase studies a number of new negative ions are discovered in the mass spectra. The ion efficiency curves for the negative ions of adenine are measured for the electron energy range from about 0 to 15 eV with an electron energy resolution of about 100 meV. The total anion yield derived via the summation of all measured fragment anions is compared with the total cross section for negative ion formation measured recently without mass spectrometry. For adenine the shape of the two cross section curves agrees well, taking into account the different electron energy resolutions; however, for thymine some peculiar differences are observed.

  12. High resolution threshold photoelectron spectroscopy by electron attachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Ajello, J. M. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A system is provided for determining the stable energy levels of a species ion, of an atomic, molecular, or radical type, by application of ionizing energy of a predetermined level, such as through photoionization. The system adds a trapping gas to the gaseous species to provide a technique for detection of the energy levels. The electrons emitted from ionized species are captured by the trapping gas, only if the electrons have substantially zero kinetic energy. If the electrons have nearly zero energy, they are absorbed by the trapping gas to produce negative ions of the trapping gas that can be detected by a mass spectrometer. The applied energies (i.e. light frequencies) at which large quantities of trapping gas ions are detected, are the stable energy levels of the positive ion of the species. SF6 and CFCl3 have the narrowest acceptance bands, so that when they are used as the trapping gas, they bind electrons only when the electrons have very close to zero kinetic energy.

  13. Introduction to high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Czarnocki-Cieciura, Mariusz; Nowotny, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    For many years two techniques have dominated structural biology - X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy. Traditional cryo-electron microscopy of biological macromolecules produced macromolecular reconstructions at resolution limited to 6-10 Å. Recent development of transmission electron microscopes, in particular the development of direct electron detectors, and continuous improvements in the available software, have led to the "resolution revolution" in cryo-EM. It is now possible to routinely obtain near-atomic-resolution 3D maps of intact biological macromolecules as small as ~100 kDa. Thus, cryo-EM is now becoming the method of choice for structural analysis of many complex assemblies that are unsuitable for structure determination by other methods.

  14. Metals on BN Studied by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, U.; Zan, R.; Ramasse, Q.; Jalil, Rashid; Riaz, Ibstam; Novoselov, K. S.

    2012-07-01

    Metal impurities, gold and nickel, have been deliberately introduced into boron-nitride (BN) sheets. The structural and topographic properties of doped BN have been studied by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Analysis revealed that metal atoms cluster preferentially in/on contaminated areas. The metal coverage on BN is almost the same for the same evaporated amount of 1 Å.

  15. Copper Decoration of Carbon Nanotubes and High Resolution Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probst, Camille

    A new process of decorating carbon nanotubes with copper was developed for the fabrication of nanocomposite aluminum-nanotubes. The process consists of three stages: oxidation, activation and electroless copper plating on the nanotubes. The oxidation step was required to create chemical function on the nanotubes, essential for the activation step. Then, catalytic nanoparticles of tin-palladium were deposited on the tubes. Finally, during the electroless copper plating, copper particles with a size between 20 and 60 nm were uniformly deposited on the nanotubes surface. The reproducibility of the process was shown by using another type of carbon nanotube. The fabrication of nanocomposites aluminum-nanotubes was tested by aluminum vacuum infiltration. Although the infiltration of carbon nanotubes did not produce the expected results, an interesting electron microscopy sample was discovered during the process development: the activated carbon nanotubes. Secondly, scanning transmitted electron microscopy (STEM) imaging in SEM was analysed. The images were obtained with a new detector on the field emission scanning electron microscope (Hitachi S-4700). Various parameters were analysed with the use of two different samples: the activated carbon nanotubes (previously obtained) and gold-palladium nanodeposits. Influences of working distance, accelerating voltage or sample used on the spatial resolution of images obtained with SMART (Scanning Microscope Assessment and Resolution Testing) were analysed. An optimum working distance for the best spatial resolution related to the sample analysed was found for the imaging in STEM mode. Finally, relation between probe size and spatial resolution of backscattered electrons (BSE) images was studied. An image synthesis method was developed to generate the BSE images from backscattered electrons coefficients obtained with CASINO software. Spatial resolution of images was determined using SMART. The analysis shown that using a probe

  16. High Resolution Inelastic Electron Scattering from LEAD-208.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connelly, James Patrick

    Inclusive electron scattering differential cross sections from ^{208}Pb have been measured with energy resolutions better than 20 keV for over 120 discrete states with excitation energies less than 7.3 MeV. The momentum-transfer dependence of these cross sections has been mapped over a range of 0.5 to 2.8 fm^{-1} in the forward direction and 1.0 to 2.9 fm^{ -1} in the backward scattering direction. Over fifty excitations have been analyzed in the Distorted Wave Born Approximation to yield transition charge, current and magnetization densities. The nuclear structure of discrete excitations are interpreted in the framework of 1p-1h transition. The nuclear structure of levels in the excitation region below 4.8 MeV is studied in detail. Above 4.8 MeV, multiplets from single particle-hole configurations coupling to high spin states (J >=q 7) are investigated. Experimental transition densities are compared to Tamm-Dancoff calculations from a correlated ground state.

  17. High resolution parallel reaction monitoring with electron transfer dissociation for middle-down proteomics.

    PubMed

    Sweredoski, Michael J; Moradian, Annie; Raedle, Matthias; Franco, Catarina; Hess, Sonja

    2015-08-18

    In recent years, middle-down proteomics has emerged as a popular technique for the characterization and quantification of proteins not readily amenable to typical bottom-up approaches. So far, all high resolution middle-down approaches are done in data-dependent acquisition mode, using both collision-induced dissociation or electron capture/transfer dissociation techniques. Here, we explore middle-down proteomics with electron transfer dissociation using a targeted acquisition mode, parallel reaction monitoring (PRM), on an Orbitrap Fusion. As an example of a highly modified protein, we used histone H3 fractions from untreated and DMSO-treated Murine ErythroLeukemia (MEL) cells. We first determined optimized instrument parameters to obtain high sequence coverage using a synthetic standard peptide. We then setup a combined method of both MS1 scans and PRM scans of the 20 most abundant combinations of methylation and acetylation of the +10 charge state of the N-terminal tail of H3. Weak cation exchange hydrophilic interaction chromatography was used to separate the N-terminal H3 tail, primarily, by its acetylation and, to a secondary degree, by its methylation status, which aided in the interpretation of the results. After deconvolution of the highly charged ions, peaks were annotated to a minimum set of 254 H3 proteoforms in the untreated and treated samples. Upon DMSO treatment, global quantitation changes from the MS1 level show a relative decrease of 2, 3, 4, and 5 acetylations and an increase of 0 and 1 acetylations. A fragment ion map was developed to visualize specific differences between treated and untreated samples. Taken together, the data presented here show that middle-down proteomics with electron transfer dissociation using PRM is a novel, attractive method for the effective analysis and quantification of large and highly modified peptides.

  18. Electron Diffraction and High-Resolution Electron Microscopy of Mineral Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nord, Gordon L., Jr.

    This book is a well-written English translation of the original 1981 Russian edition, Strukturnoye issledovaniye mineralov metodami mikrodifraktsii i elechtronnoi mikroskopii vysokogo razresheniya. The 1987 English version has been extensively updated and includes references up to 1986. The book is essentially a text on the theoretical and experimental aspects of transmission electron microscopy and has chapters on the reciprocal lattice, electron diffraction (both kinematic and dynamic), and high-resolution electron microscopy.Electron diffraction is emphasized, especially its use for structure analysis of poorly crystalline and fine-grained phases not readily determined by the more exact X ray diffraction method. Two methods of electron diffraction are discussed: selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and oblique-texture electron diffraction (OTED); the latter technique is rarely used in the west and is never discussed in western electron microscopy texts. A SAED pattern is formed by isolating a small micrometer-size area with an aperture and obtaining single-crystal patterns from the diffracted beams. By tilting the sample and obtaining many patterns, a complete picture of the reciprocal lattice can be taken. An OTED pattern is formed when the incident electron beam passes through an inclined preparation consisting of a great number of thin platy crystals lying normal to the texture axis (axis normal to the support grid). To form an OTED pattern, the plates must all lie on a common face, such as a basal plane in phyllosilicates. Upon tilting the plates, an elliptical powder diffraction pattern is formed. Intensities measured from these patterns are used for a structural analysis of the platy minerals.

  19. High resolution simulation of beam dynamics in electron linacs for x-ray free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, J.; Ryne, R. D.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A. A.; Pogorelov, I. V.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we report on large-scale high resolution simulations of beam dynamics in electron linacs for the next-generation x-ray free electron lasers (FELs). We describe key features of a parallel macroparticle simulation code including three-dimensional (3D) space-charge effects, short-range structure wakefields, coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) wakefields, and treatment of radio-frequency (rf) accelerating cavities using maps obtained from axial field profiles. We present a study of the microbunching instability causing severe electron beam fragmentation in the longitudinal phase space which is a critical issue for future FELs. Using parameters for a proposed FEL linac at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we show that a large number of macroparticles (beyond 100 million) is generally needed to control the numerical macroparticle shot noise and avoid overestimating the microbunching instability. We explore the effect of the longitudinal grid on simulation results. We also study the effect of initial uncorrelated energy spread on the final uncorrelated energy spread of the beam for the FEL linac.

  20. High-resolution electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy of giant palladium clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleshko, V.; Volkov, V.; Gijbels, R.; Jacob, W.; Vargaftik, M.; Moiseev, I.; van Tendeloo, G.

    1995-12-01

    Combined structural and chemical characterization of cationic polynuclear palladium coordination compounds Pd561L60(OAc)180, where L=1,10-phenantroline or 2,2'-bipyridine has been carried out by high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) and analytical electron microscopy methods including electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), zero-loss electron spectroscopic imaging, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The cell structure of the cluster matter with almost completely uniform metal core size distributions centered around 2.3 ±0.5 nm was observed. Zero-loss energy filtering allowed to improve the image contrast and resolution. HREM images showed that most of the palladium clusters had a cubo-octahedral shape. Some of them had a distorted icosahedron structure exhibiting multiple twinning. The selected-area electron diffraction patterns confirmed the face centered cubic structure with lattice parameter close to that of metallic palladium. The energy-loss spectra of the populations of clusters contained several bands, which could be assigned to the delayed Pd M4, 5-edge at 362 eV, the Pd M3-edge at 533 eV and the Pd M2-edge at 561 eV, the NK-edge at about 400 eV, the O K-edge at 532 eV overlapping with the Pd M3-edge and the carbon C K-edge at 284 eV. Background subtraction was applied to reveal the exact positions and fine structure of low intensity elemental peaks. EELS evaluations have been confirmed by EDX. The recorded series of the Pd M-edges and the N K-edge in the spectra of the giant palladium clusters obviously were related to Pd-Pd- and Pd-ligand bonding.

  1. Electron Collisions with Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itikawa, Yukikazu

    2017-03-01

    Cross section data are reviewed for electron collisions with hydrogen fluoride. Collision processes considered are total scattering, elastic scattering, excitations of rotational, vibrational, and electronic states, ionization, and dissociative electron attachment. After a survey of the literature, recommended values of the cross sections are determined, as far as possible.

  2. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G.E.

    2011-05-31

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  3. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall G. E.; Goncharov, V.

    2012-05-29

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  4. On the optical stability of high-resolution transmission electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Barthel, J; Thust, A

    2013-11-01

    In the recent two decades the technique of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy experienced an unprecedented progress through the introduction of hardware aberration correctors and by the improvement of the achievable resolution to the sub-Ångström level. The important aspect that aberration correction at a given resolution requires also a well defined amount of optical stability has received little attention so far. Therefore we investigate the qualification of a variety of high-resolution electron microscopes to maintain an aberration corrected optical state in terms of an optical lifetime. We develop a comprehensive statistical framework for the estimation of the optical lifetime and find remarkably low values between tens of seconds and a couple of minutes. Probability curves are introduced, which inform the operator about the chance to work still in the fully aberration corrected state.

  5. High-Resolution Analytical Electron Microscopy Characterization of Corrosion and Cracking at Buried Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Thomas, Larry E.

    2001-07-01

    Recent results are presented demonstrating the application of cross-sectional analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM) to corrosion and cracking in high-temperature water environments. Microstructural, chemical and crystallographic characterization of buried interfaces at near-atomic resolutions is shown to reveal evidence for unexpected local environments, corrosion reactions and material transformations. Information obtained by a wide variety of high-resolution imaging and analysis methods indicates the processes occurring during crack advance and provides insights into the mechanisms controlling environmental degradation.

  6. The Potential for Bayesian Compressive Sensing to Significantly Reduce Electron Dose in High Resolution STEM Images

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Andrew J.; Yang, Hao; Carin, Lawrence; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D.

    2014-02-11

    The use of high resolution imaging methods in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is limited in many cases by the sensitivity of the sample to the beam and the onset of electron beam damage (for example in the study of organic systems, in tomography and during in-situ experiments). To demonstrate that alternative strategies for image acquisition can help alleviate this beam damage issue, here we apply compressive sensing via Bayesian dictionary learning to high resolution STEM images. These experiments successively reduce the number of pixels in the image (thereby reducing the overall dose while maintaining the high resolution information) and show promising results for reconstructing images from this reduced set of randomly collected measurements. We show that this approach is valid for both atomic resolution images and nanometer resolution studies, such as those that might be used in tomography datasets, by applying the method to images of strontium titanate and zeolites. As STEM images are acquired pixel by pixel while the beam is scanned over the surface of the sample, these post acquisition manipulations of the images can, in principle, be directly implemented as a low-dose acquisition method with no change in the electron optics or alignment of the microscope itself.

  7. 130 kV High-Resolution Electron Beam Lithography System for Sub-10-nm Nanofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okino, Teruaki; Kuba, Yukio; Shibata, Masahiro; Ohyi, Hideyuki

    2013-06-01

    An electron beam lithography (EBL) system, CABL-UH, with a 130 kV high acceleration voltage has been developed that succeeded in minimizing beam size by minimizing Coulomb blur. This system has a short single-stage electron beam (EB) gun with an alignment function of two extractor centers to minimize Coulomb blur. This gun has also succeeded in thoroughly avoiding microdischarges. By adopting this EB gun and many other techniques, high resolution and long-term high stability have been achieved and an extremely fine pattern (4 nm line) has been delineated.

  8. High-Resolution Infrared and Electron-Diffraction Studies of Trimethylenecyclopropane ([3]-Radialene)

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Corey; Holmes, Joshua; Nibler, Joseph W.; Hedberg, Kenneth; White, James D.; Hedberg, Lise; Weber, Alfons; Blake, Thomas A.

    2013-05-16

    Combined high-resolution spectroscopic, electron-diffraction, and quantum theoretical methods are particularly advantageous for small molecules of high symmetry and can yield accurate structures that reveal subtle effects of electron delocalization on molecular bonds. The smallest of the radialene compounds, trimethylenecyclopropane, [3]-radialene, has been synthesized and examined in the gas phase by these methods. The first high-resolution infrared spectra have been obtained for this molecule of D3h symmetry, leading to an accurate B0 rotational constant value of 0.1378629(8) cm-1, within 0.5% of the value obtained from electronic structure calculations (density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP/cc-pVTZ). This result is employed in an analysis of electron-diffraction data to obtain the rz bond lengths (in Å): C-H = 1.072 (17), C-C = 1.437 (4), and C=C = 1.330 (4). The analysis does not lead to an accurate value of the HCH angle; however, from comparisons of theoretical and experimental angles for similar compounds, the theoretical prediction of 117.5° is believed to be reliable to within 2°. The effect of electron delocalization in radialene is to reduce the single C-C bond length by 0.07 Å compared to that in cyclopropane.

  9. High-Resolution Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (HREELS) Using a Monochromated TEM/STEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sai, Z. R.; Bradley, J. P.; Erni, R.; Browning, N.

    2005-01-01

    A 200 keV FEI TF20 XT monochromated (scanning) transmission electron microscope funded by NASA's SRLIDAP program is undergoing installation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Instrument specifications in STEM mode are Cs =1.0 mm, Cc =1.2 mm, image resolution =0.18 nm, and in TEM mode Cs =1.3 mm, Cc =1.3 mm, information limit =0.14 nm. Key features of the instrument are a voltage-stabilized high tension (HT) supply, a monochromator, a high-resolution electron energy-loss spectrometer/energy filter, a high-resolution annular darkfield detector, and a solid-state x-ray energy-dispersive spectrometer. The high-tension tank contains additional sections for 60Hz and high frequency filtering, resulting in an operating voltage of 200 kV plus or minus 0.005V, a greater than 10-fold improvement over earlier systems. The monochromator is a single Wien filter design. The energy filter is a Gatan model 866 Tridiem-ERS high resolution GIF spec d for less than or equal to 0.15 eV energy resolution with 29 pA of current in a 2 nm diameter probe. 0.13 eV has already been achieved during early installation. The x-ray detector (EDAX/Genesis 4000) has a take-off angle of 20 degrees, an active area of 30 square millimeters, and a solid angle of 0.3 steradians. The higher solid angle is possible because the objective pole-piece allows the detector to be positioned as close as 9.47 mm from the specimen. The voltage-stabilized HT supply, monochromator and GIF enable high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS) with energy resolution comparable to synchrotron XANES, but with approximately 100X better spatial resolution. The region between 0 and 100 eV is called the low-loss or valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) region where features due to collective plasma oscillations and single electron transitions of valence electrons are observed. Most of the low-loss VEELS features we are detecting are being observed for the first time in IDPs. A major focus of

  10. Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9/Jupiter collision observed with a high resolution speckle imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Gravel, D.

    1994-11-15

    During the week of July 16, 1994, comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, broken into 20 plus pieces by tidal forces on its last orbit, smashed into the planet Jupiter, releasing the explosive energy of 500 thousand megatons. A team of observers from LLNL used the LLNL Speckle Imaging Camera mounted on the University of California`s Lick Observatory 3 Meter Telescope to capture continuous sequences of planet images during the comet encounter. Post processing with the bispectral phase reconstruction algorithm improves the resolution by removing much of the blurring due to atmospheric turbulence. High resolution images of the planet surface showing the aftermath of the impact are probably the best that were obtained from any ground-based telescope. We have been looking at the regions of the fragment impacts to try to discern any dynamic behavior of the spots left on Jupiter`s cloud tops. Such information can lead to conclusions about the nature of the comet and of Jupiter`s atmosphere. So far, the Hubble Space Telescope has observed expanding waves from the G impact whose mechanism is enigmatic since they appear to be too slow to be sound waves and too fast to be gravity waves, given the present knowledge of Jupiter`s atmosphere. Some of our data on the G and L impact region complements the Hubble observations but, so far, is inconclusive about spot dynamics.

  11. Accurate protein crystallography at ultra-high resolution: Valence electron distribution in crambin

    PubMed Central

    Jelsch, Christian; Teeter, Martha M.; Lamzin, Victor; Pichon-Pesme, Virginie; Blessing, Robert H.; Lecomte, Claude

    2000-01-01

    The charge density distribution of a protein has been refined experimentally. Diffraction data for a crambin crystal were measured to ultra-high resolution (0.54 Å) at low temperature by using short-wavelength synchrotron radiation. The crystal structure was refined with a model for charged, nonspherical, multipolar atoms to accurately describe the molecular electron density distribution. The refined parameters agree within 25% with our transferable electron density library derived from accurate single crystal diffraction analyses of several amino acids and small peptides. The resulting electron density maps of redistributed valence electrons (deformation maps) compare quantitatively well with a high-level quantum mechanical calculation performed on a monopeptide. This study provides validation for experimentally derived parameters and a window into charge density analysis of biological macromolecules. PMID:10737790

  12. Accurate protein crystallography at ultra-high resolution: valence electron distribution in crambin.

    PubMed

    Jelsch, C; Teeter, M M; Lamzin, V; Pichon-Pesme, V; Blessing, R H; Lecomte, C

    2000-03-28

    The charge density distribution of a protein has been refined experimentally. Diffraction data for a crambin crystal were measured to ultra-high resolution (0.54 A) at low temperature by using short-wavelength synchrotron radiation. The crystal structure was refined with a model for charged, nonspherical, multipolar atoms to accurately describe the molecular electron density distribution. The refined parameters agree within 25% with our transferable electron density library derived from accurate single crystal diffraction analyses of several amino acids and small peptides. The resulting electron density maps of redistributed valence electrons (deformation maps) compare quantitatively well with a high-level quantum mechanical calculation performed on a monopeptide. This study provides validation for experimentally derived parameters and a window into charge density analysis of biological macromolecules.

  13. Magnetic lens apparatus for a low-voltage high-resolution electron microscope

    DOEpatents

    Crewe, Albert V.

    1996-01-01

    A lens apparatus in which a beam of charged particles of low accelerating voltage is brought to a focus by a magnetic field, the lens being situated behind the target position. The lens comprises an electrically-conducting coil arranged around the axis of the beam and a magnetic pole piece extending along the axis of the beam at least within the space surrounded by the coil. The lens apparatus comprises the sole focusing lens for high-resolution imaging in a low-voltage scanning electron microscope.

  14. Soot Nanostructure: Using Fringe Analysis Software on High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy of Carbon Soot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, James D.

    2004-01-01

    Using high resolution transmission electron images of carbon nanotubes and carbon particles, we are able to use image analysis program to determine several carbon fringe properties, including length, separation, curvature and orientation. Results are shown in the form of histograms for each of those quantities. The combination of those measurements can give a better indication of the graphic structure within nanotubes and particles of carbon and can distinguish carbons based upon fringe properties. Carbon with longer, straighter and closer spaced fringes are considered graphite, while amorphous carbon contain shorter, less structured fringes.

  15. High Resolution UV Emission Spectroscopy of Molecules Excited by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, G. K.; Ajello, J. M.; Beegle, L.; Ciocca, M.; Dziczek, D.; Kanik, I.; Noren, C.; Jonin, C.; Hansen, D.

    1999-01-01

    Photodissociation via discrete line absorption into predissociating Rydberg and valence states is the dominant destruction mechanism of CO and other molecules in the interstellar medium and molecular clouds. Accurate values for the rovibronic oscillator strengths of these transitions and predissociation yields of the excited states are required for input into the photochemical models that attempt to reproduce observed abundances. We report here on our latest experimental results of the electron collisional properties of CO and N2 obtained using the 3-meter high resolution single-scattering spectroscopic facility at JPL.

  16. Crack tip shielding observed with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Adhika, Damar Rastri; Tanaka, Masaki; Daio, Takeshi; Higashida, Kenji

    2015-10-01

    The dislocation shielding field at a crack tip was experimentally proven at the atomic scale by measuring the local strain in front of the crack tip using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and geometric phase analysis (GPA). Single crystalline (110) silicon wafers were employed. Cracks were introduced using a Vickers indenter at room temperature. The crack tip region was observed using HRTEM followed by strain measurements using GPA. The measured strain field at the crack tip was compressive owing to dislocation shielding, which is in good agreement with the strain field calculated from elastic theory.

  17. Crack tip shielding observed with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Adhika, Damar Rastri; Tanaka, Masaki; Daio, Takeshi; Higashida, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    The dislocation shielding field at a crack tip was experimentally proven at the atomic scale by measuring the local strain in front of the crack tip using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and geometric phase analysis (GPA). Single crystalline (110) silicon wafers were employed. Cracks were introduced using a Vickers indenter at room temperature. The crack tip region was observed using HRTEM followed by strain measurements using GPA. The measured strain field at the crack tip was compressive owing to dislocation shielding, which is in good agreement with the strain field calculated from elastic theory. PMID:26115957

  18. High-resolution infrared detector and its electronic unit for space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, M.; Montmessin, F.; Korablev, O.; Trokhimovsky, A.; Poiet, G.; Bel, J.-B.

    2015-05-01

    High-resolution infrared detector is used extensively for military and civilian purposes. Military applications include target acquisition, surveillance, night vision, and tracking. Civilian applications include, among others, scientific observations. For our space systems, we want to use the products developed by SOFRADIR Company. Thus, we have developed a space electronic unit that is used to control the high-resolution SCORPIO-MW infrared detector, which has a format of 640×512 pixels with 15μm×15μm pixel pitch. The detector within microelectronics based on infrared mid-wave (MW) complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) uses a micro-cooler in order to keep its temperature around 100 K. The standard wavelength range (3 to 5μm) is adapted to the 2.2 to 4.3μm wavelength range thanks to adaptation of the optical interface of the detector and with an antireflection coating. With our electronic system, we can acquire 3 images per second. To increase the signal to noise ratio, we have the opportunity to make a summation of 15 frames per image. Through this article, we will describe the space electronic system that we have developed in order to achieve space observations (e.g. Atmospheric Chemistry Suite package for ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter).

  19. Structural and Physicochemical Characterization of Spirulina (Arthrospira maxima) Nanoparticles by High-Resolution Electron Microscopic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Neri-Torres, Elier Ekberg; Chanona-Pérez, Jorge J; Calderón, Hector A; Torres-Figueredo, Neil; Chamorro-Cevallos, German; Calderón-Domínguez, Georgina; Velasco-Bedrán, Hugo

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this work was to obtain Spirulina (Arthrospira maxima) nanoparticles (SNPs) by using high-impact mechanical milling and to characterize them by electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. The milling products were analyzed after various processing times (1-4 h), and particle size distribution and number mean size (NMS) were determined by analysis of high-resolution scanning electron microscopic images. The smallest particles are synthesized after 3 h of milling, had an NMS of 55.6±3.6 nm, with 95% of the particles being smaller than 100 nm. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed lattice spacing of ~0.27±0.015 nm for SNPs. The corresponding chemical composition was obtained by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and showed the presence of Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, and Zn. The powder flow properties showed that the powder density was higher when the average nanoparticle size is smaller. They showed free flowability and an increase in their specific surface area (6.89±0.23 m2/g) up to 12-14 times larger than the original material (0.45±0.02 m2/g). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy suggested that chemical damage related to the milling is not significant.

  20. Novel method of simultaneous multiple immunogold localization on resin sections in high resolution scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nebesarova, Jana; Wandrol, Petr; Vancova, Marie

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method of multiple immunolabeling that is suitable for a broad spectrum of biomedical applications. The general concept is to label both sides of the ultrathin section with the thickness of 70-80 nm with different antibodies conjugated to gold nanoparticles and to distinguish the labeled side by advanced imaging methods with high resolution scanning electron microscopy, such as by correlating images acquired at different energies of primary electrons using different signals. From the Clinical Editor: The use of transmission electron microscopy has become an indispensible tool in the detection of cellular proteins. In this short but interesting article, the authors described their new method of labeling and the identification of four different proteins simultaneously, which represents another advance in imaging technique.

  1. Nanoscale deformation analysis with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and digital image correlation

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xueju; Pan, Zhipeng; Fan, Feifei; ...

    2015-09-10

    We present an application of the digital image correlation (DIC) method to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images for nanoscale deformation analysis. The combination of DIC and HRTEM offers both the ultrahigh spatial resolution and high displacement detection sensitivity that are not possible with other microscope-based DIC techniques. We demonstrate the accuracy and utility of the HRTEM-DIC technique through displacement and strain analysis on amorphous silicon. Two types of error sources resulting from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image noise and electromagnetic-lens distortions are quantitatively investigated via rigid-body translation experiments. The local and global DIC approaches are applied for themore » analysis of diffusion- and reaction-induced deformation fields in electrochemically lithiated amorphous silicon. As a result, the DIC technique coupled with HRTEM provides a new avenue for the deformation analysis of materials at the nanometer length scales.« less

  2. Nanoscale deformation analysis with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and digital image correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xueju; Pan, Zhipeng; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Liu, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-10

    We present an application of the digital image correlation (DIC) method to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images for nanoscale deformation analysis. The combination of DIC and HRTEM offers both the ultrahigh spatial resolution and high displacement detection sensitivity that are not possible with other microscope-based DIC techniques. We demonstrate the accuracy and utility of the HRTEM-DIC technique through displacement and strain analysis on amorphous silicon. Two types of error sources resulting from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image noise and electromagnetic-lens distortions are quantitatively investigated via rigid-body translation experiments. The local and global DIC approaches are applied for the analysis of diffusion- and reaction-induced deformation fields in electrochemically lithiated amorphous silicon. As a result, the DIC technique coupled with HRTEM provides a new avenue for the deformation analysis of materials at the nanometer length scales.

  3. High-resolution electron spectroscopy of different adsorption states of ethylene on Pd(1 1 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sock, M.; Eichler, A.; Surnev, S.; Andersen, J. N.; Klötzer, B.; Hayek, K.; Ramsey, M. G.; Netzer, F. P.

    2003-11-01

    The adsorption of ethylene at 100 K on clean and oxygen precovered Pd(1 1 1) surfaces and the thermal evolution of the ethylene adsorbate layers have been investigated experimentally by high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation, thermal desorption spectroscopy and theoretically by ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations. On the clean Pd(1 1 1) surface at 100 K ethylene is adsorbed in a di-σ bonding state, whereas on the oxygen precovered Pd(1 1 1)2 × 2-O surface the π-bonded configuration is more stable; this has been established both experimentally and theoretically. Upon adsorption at room temperature ethylidyne adspecies are formed on both surfaces, but neither di-σ nor π-bonded ethylene transform into ethylidyne on heating from low temperature up to 450 K. Complete molecular desorption of ethylene is observed in both cases, with no signs of dehydrogenation. The spectroscopic data recorded during the thermal evolution of the low temperature adsorbate phase have been analysed with the help of DFT and indicate that π-bonded ethylene adsorption states may become populated upon heating the low temperature adlayer to 350 K.

  4. High resolution electron microscopy and spectroscopy of ferritin in thin window liquid cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Canhui; Qiao, Qiao; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Klie, Robert

    2014-03-01

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has seen a dramatic increase in interest in recent years with the commercial development of liquid and gas stages. High-resolution TEM characterization of samples in a liquid environment remains limited by radiation damage and loss of resolution due to the thick window-layers required by the in-situ stages. We introduce thin-window static-liquid cells that enable sample imaging with atomic resolution and electron energy-loss (EEL) spectroscopy with 1.3 nm resolution. Using this approach, atomic and electronic structures of biological samples such as ferritin is studied via in-situ transmission electron microscopy experiments. Ferritin in solution is encapsulated using the static liquid cells with reduced window thickness. The integrity of the thin window liquid cell is maintained by controlling the electron dose rate. Radiation damage of samples, such as liquid water and protein, is quantitatively studied to allow precision control of radiation damage level within the liquid cells. Biochemical reactions, such as valence change of the iron in a functioning ferritin, is observed and will be quantified. Relevant biochemical activity: the release and uptake of Fe atoms through the channels of ferritin protein shell is also imaged at atomic resolution. This work is funded by Michigan Technological University. The UIC JEOL JEM-ARM200CF is supported by an MRI-R2 grant from the National Science Foundation (Grant No. DMR-0959470).

  5. Detecting non-Maxwellian electron velocity distributions at JET by high resolution Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Beausang, K. V.; Prunty, S. L.; Scannell, R.; Beurskens, M. N.; Walsh, M. J.; Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2011-03-15

    The present work is motivated by a long standing discrepancy between the electron temperature measurements of Thomson scattering (TS) and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics for plasmas with strong auxiliary heating observed at both JET and TFTR above 6-7 keV, where in some cases the ECE electron temperature measurements can be 15%-20% higher than the TS measurements. Recent analysis based on ECE results at JET has shown evidence of distortions to the Maxwellian electron velocity distribution and a correlation with the TS and ECE discrepancies has been suggested. In this paper, a technique to determine the presence of non-Maxwellian behavior using TS diagnostics is outlined. The difficulties and limitations of modern TS system designs to determine the electron velocity distribution are also discussed. It is demonstrated that small deviations such as those suggested by previous ECE analysis could be potentially detected, depending on the spectral layout of the TS polychromators. The spectral layout of the JET high resolution Thomson scattering system is such that it could be used to determine these deviations between 1 and 6 keV, and the results presented here indicate that no evidence of non-Maxwellian behavior is observed in this range. In this paper, a modification to the current polychromator design is proposed, allowing non-Maxwellian distortions to be detected up to at least 10 keV.

  6. Detecting non-maxwellian electron velocity distributions at JET by high resolution Thomson scattering.

    PubMed

    Beausang, K V; Prunty, S L; Scannell, R; Beurskens, M N; Walsh, M J; de la Luna, E

    2011-03-01

    The present work is motivated by a long standing discrepancy between the electron temperature measurements of Thomson scattering (TS) and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics for plasmas with strong auxiliary heating observed at both JET and TFTR above 6–7 keV, where in some cases the ECE electron temperature measurements can be 15%–20% higher than the TS measurements. Recent analysis based on ECE results at JET has shown evidence of distortions to the Maxwellian electron velocity distribution and a correlation with the TS and ECE discrepancies has been suggested. In this paper, a technique to determine the presence of non-Maxwellian behavior using TS diagnostics is outlined. The difficulties and limitations of modern TS system designs to determine the electron velocity distribution are also discussed. It is demonstrated that small deviations such as those suggested by previous ECE analysis could be potentially detected, depending on the spectral layout of the TS polychromators. The spectral layout of the JET high resolution Thomson scattering system is such that it could be used to determine these deviations between 1 and 6 keV, and the results presented here indicate that no evidence of non-Maxwellian behavior is observed in this range. In this paper, a modification to the current polychromator design is proposed, allowing non-Maxwellian distortions to be detected up to at least 10 keV.

  7. Well-orientated cubic boron nitride nanocrystals as studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tsiaoussis, I; Frangis, N

    2006-09-01

    In a boron nitride thin film, grown on a Si (100) substrate by radio frequency magnetron sputtering, a striking nanostructure is observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It consists of cubic boron nitride nanocrystals with a rather good triangular shape, pointing always to the substrate. The nanocrystals are usually highly defected and present their own interesting internal structure. Texture formation is observed within a nanocrystal, with all the subgrains observed to have a common <011> axis, which is also approximately parallel to a <011> axis of the Si substrate, i.e. the nanocrystals are very well structurally orientated in relation to the Si substrate (self-organized). Dislocations and stacking faults are also found in the nanocrystals.

  8. Investigation of non-linear imaging in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yunjie; Wang, Yumei; Cui, Yanxiang; Ge, Binghui

    2016-12-01

    Transmission cross-coefficient theory and pseudo-weak-phase object approximation theory were combined to investigate the non-linear imaging in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The analytical expressions of linear and non-linear imaging components in diffractogram were obtained and changes of linear and non-linear components over sample thickness were analyzed. Moreover, the linear and non-linear components are found to be an odd and even-function of the defocus and Cs, respectively. Based on this, a method for separating the linear and non-linear contrasts in Cs-corrected (non-zero Cs conditions included) HRTEM images was proposed, and its effectiveness was confirmed by image simulations with AlN as an example.

  9. High-resolution electron microscopy in spin pumping NiFe/Pt interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ley Domínguez, D. Sáenz-Hernández, R. J.; Faudoa Arzate, A.; Arteaga Duran, A. I.; Ornelas Gutiérrez, C. E.; Solís Canto, O.; Botello-Zubiate, M. E.; Rivera-Gómez, F. J.; Matutes-Aquino, J. A.; Azevedo, A.; Silva, G. L. da; Rezende, S. M.

    2015-05-07

    In order to understand the effect of the interface on the spin pumping and magnetic proximity effects, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) were used to analyze Py/Pt bilayer and Pt/Py/Pt trilayer systems. The samples were deposited by dc magnetron sputtering at room temperature on Si (001) substrates. The Py layer thickness was fixed at 12 nm in all the samples and the Pt thickness was varied in a range of 0–23 nm. A diffusion zone of approximately 8 nm was found in the Py/Pt interfaces and confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The FMR measurements show an increase in the linewidth and a shift in the ferromagnetic resonance field, which reach saturation.

  10. High resolution transmission electron microscopic in-situ observations of plastic deformation of compressed nanocrystalline gold

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guoyong; Lian, Jianshe; Jiang, Qing; Sun, Sheng; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2014-09-14

    Nanocrystalline (nc) metals possess extremely high strength, while their capability to deform plastically has been debated for decades. Low ductility has hitherto been considered an intrinsic behavior for most nc metals, due to the lack of five independent slip systems actively operating during deformation in each nanograin. Here we report in situ high resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) observations of deformation process of nc gold under compression, showing the excellent ductility of individual and aggregate nanograins. Compression causes permanent change in the profile of individual nanograins, which is mediated by dislocation slip and grain rotation. The high rate of grain boundary sliding and large extent of widely exited grain rotation may meet the boundary compatibility requirements during plastic deformation. The in situ HRTEM observations suggest that nc gold is not intrinsically brittle under compressive loading.

  11. Nano features of Al/Au ultrasonic bond interface observed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Hongjun; Li Mingyu Kim, Jong-Myung; Kim, Dae-Won; Wang Chunqing

    2008-10-15

    Nano-scale interfacial details of ultrasonic AlSi1 wire wedge bonding to a Au/Ni/Cu pad were investigated using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The intermetallic phase Au{sub 8}Al{sub 3} formed locally due to diffusion and reaction activated by ultrasound at the Al/Au bond interface. Multilayer sub-interfaces roughly parallel to the wire/pad interface were observed among this phase, and interdiffusional features near the Au pad resembled interference patterns, alternately dark and bright bars. Solid-state diffusion theory cannot be used to explain why such a thick compound formed within milliseconds at room temperature. The major formation of metallurgical bonds was attributed to ultrasonic cyclic vibration.

  12. High resolution transmission electron microscope observation of zero-strain deformation twinning mechanisms in Ag.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Wang, J; Gong, S K; Mao, S X

    2011-04-29

    We have observed a new deformation-twinning mechanism using the high resolution transmission electron microscope in polycrystalline Ag films, zero-strain twinning via nucleation, and the migration of a Σ3{112} incoherent twin boundary (ITB). This twinning mechanism produces a near zero macroscopic strain because the net Burgers vectors either equal zero or are equivalent to a Shockley partial dislocation. This observation provides new insight into the understanding of deformation twinning and confirms a previous hypothesis: detwinning could be accomplished via the nucleation and migration of Σ3{112} ITBs. The zero-strain twinning mechanism may be unique to low staking fault energy metals with implications for their deformation behavior.

  13. THE HIGH-RESOLUTION EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRUM OF N{sub 2} BY ELECTRON IMPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Heays, A. N.; Ajello, J. M.; Aguilar, A.; Lewis, B. R.; Gibson, S. T.

    2014-04-01

    We have analyzed high-resolution (FWHM = 0.2 Å) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV, 800-1350 Å) laboratory emission spectra of molecular nitrogen excited by an electron impact at 20 and 100 eV under (mostly) optically thin, single-scattering experimental conditions. A total of 491 emission features were observed from N{sub 2} electronic-vibrational transitions and atomic N I and N II multiplets and their emission cross sections were measured. Molecular emission was observed at vibrationally excited ground-state levels as high as v'' = 17, from the a {sup 1}Π {sub g} , b {sup 1}Π {sub u} , and b'{sup 1}Σ {sub u} {sup +} excited valence states and the Rydberg series c'{sub n} {sub +1} {sup 1}Σ {sub u} {sup +}, c{sub n} {sup 1}Π {sub u} , and o{sub n} {sup 1}Π {sub u} for n between 3 and 9. The frequently blended molecular emission bands were disentangled with the aid of a sophisticated and predictive quantum-mechanical model of excited states that includes the strong coupling between valence and Rydberg electronic states and the effects of predissociation. Improved model parameters describing electronic transition moments were obtained from the experiment and allowed for a reliable prediction of the vibrationally summed electronic emission cross section, including an extrapolation to unobserved emission bands and those that are optically thick in the experimental spectra. Vibrationally dependent electronic excitation functions were inferred from a comparison of emission features following 20 and 100 eV electron-impact collisional excitation. The electron-impact-induced fluorescence measurements are compared with Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph observations of emissions from Titan's upper atmosphere.

  14. A High-resolution 3D Geodynamical Model of the Present-day India-Asia Collision System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaus, B.; Baumann, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present a high-resolution, 3D geodynamic model of the present-day India-Asia collision system. The model is separated into multiple tectonic blocks, for which we estimate the first order rheological properties and the impact on the dynamics of the collision system. This is done by performing systematic simulations with different rheologies to minimize the misfit to observational constraints such as the GPS-velocity field. The simulations are performed with the parallel staggered grid FD code LaMEM using a numerical resolution of at least 512x512x256 cells to resolve dynamically important shear zones reasonably well. A fundamental part of this study is the reconstruction of the 3D present-day geometry of Tibet and the adjacent regions. Our interpretations of crust and mantle lithosphere geometry are jointly based on a globally available shear wave tomography (Schaeffer and Lebedev, 2013) and the Crust 1.0 model (Laske et al. http://igppweb.ucsd.edu/~gabi/crust1.html). We regionally refined and modified our interpretations based on seismicity distributions and focal mechanisms and incorporated regional receiver function studies to improve the accuracy of the Moho in particular. Results suggest that we can identify at least one "best-fit" solution in terms of rheological model properties that reproduces the observed velocity field reasonably well, including the strong rotation of the GPS velocity around the eastern syntax of the Himalaya. We also present model co-variances to illustrate the trade-offs between the rheological model parameters, their respective uncertainties, and the model fit. Schaeffer, A.J., Lebedev, S., 2013. Global shear speed structure of the upper mantle and transition zone. Geophysical Journal International 194, 417-449. doi:10.1093/gji/ggt095

  15. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy with two-dimensional energy and momentum mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuetao; Cao, Yanwei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Jia, Xun; Guo, Qinlin; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Linfan; Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, E W; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-08-01

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful technique to probe vibrational and electronic excitations at surfaces. The dispersion relation of surface excitations, i.e., energy as a function of momentum, has in the past, been obtained by measuring the energy loss at a fixed angle (momentum) and then rotating sample, monochromator, or analyzer. Here, we introduce a new strategy for HREELS, utilizing a specially designed lens system with a double-cylindrical Ibach-type monochromator combined with a commercial VG Scienta hemispherical electron energy analyzer, which can simultaneously measure the energy and momentum of the scattered electrons. The new system possesses high angular resolution (<0.1°), detecting efficiency and sampling density. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated using Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(8+δ). The time required to obtain a complete dispersion spectrum is at least one order of magnitude shorter than conventional spectrometers, with improved momentum resolution and no loss in energy resolution.

  16. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy with two-dimensional energy and momentum mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xuetao; Cao, Yanwei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Jia, Xun; Guo, Qinlin; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Linfan; Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, E. W.; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-08-15

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful technique to probe vibrational and electronic excitations at surfaces. The dispersion relation of surface excitations, i.e., energy as a function of momentum, has in the past, been obtained by measuring the energy loss at a fixed angle (momentum) and then rotating sample, monochromator, or analyzer. Here, we introduce a new strategy for HREELS, utilizing a specially designed lens system with a double-cylindrical Ibach-type monochromator combined with a commercial VG Scienta hemispherical electron energy analyzer, which can simultaneously measure the energy and momentum of the scattered electrons. The new system possesses high angular resolution (<0.1°), detecting efficiency and sampling density. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated using Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ}. The time required to obtain a complete dispersion spectrum is at least one order of magnitude shorter than conventional spectrometers, with improved momentum resolution and no loss in energy resolution.

  17. Focused electron beam induced deposition of copper with high resolution and purity from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfandiarpour, Samaneh; Boehme, Lindsay; Hastings, J. Todd

    2017-03-01

    Electron-beam induced deposition of high-purity copper nanostructures is desirable for nanoscale rapid prototyping, interconnection of chemically synthesized structures, and integrated circuit editing. However, metalorganic, gas-phase precursors for copper introduce high levels of carbon contamination. Here we demonstrate electron beam induced deposition of high-purity copper nanostructures from aqueous solutions of copper sulfate. The addition of sulfuric acid eliminates oxygen contamination from the deposit and produces a deposit with ∼95 at% copper. The addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Triton X-100, or polyethylene glycole (PEG) improves pattern resolution and controls deposit morphology but leads to slightly reduced purity. High resolution nested lines with a 100 nm pitch are obtained from CuSO4–H2SO4–SDS–H2O. Higher aspect ratios (∼1:1) with reduced line edge roughness and unintended deposition are obtained from CuSO4–H2SO4–PEG–H2O. Evidence for radiation-chemical deposition mechanisms was observed, including deposition efficiency as high as 1.4 primary electrons/Cu atom.

  18. Focused electron beam induced deposition of copper with high resolution and purity from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Esfandiarpour, Samaneh; Boehme, Lindsay; Hastings, J Todd

    2017-03-24

    Electron-beam induced deposition of high-purity copper nanostructures is desirable for nanoscale rapid prototyping, interconnection of chemically synthesized structures, and integrated circuit editing. However, metalorganic, gas-phase precursors for copper introduce high levels of carbon contamination. Here we demonstrate electron beam induced deposition of high-purity copper nanostructures from aqueous solutions of copper sulfate. The addition of sulfuric acid eliminates oxygen contamination from the deposit and produces a deposit with ∼95 at% copper. The addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Triton X-100, or polyethylene glycole (PEG) improves pattern resolution and controls deposit morphology but leads to slightly reduced purity. High resolution nested lines with a 100 nm pitch are obtained from CuSO4-H2SO4-SDS-H2O. Higher aspect ratios (∼1:1) with reduced line edge roughness and unintended deposition are obtained from CuSO4-H2SO4-PEG-H2O. Evidence for radiation-chemical deposition mechanisms was observed, including deposition efficiency as high as 1.4 primary electrons/Cu atom.

  19. Magnetic lens apparatus for use in high-resolution scanning electron microscopes and lithographic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Crewe, A.V.

    2000-04-18

    Disclosed are lens apparatus in which a beam of charged particles is brought to a focus by means of a magnetic field, the lens being situated behind the target position. In illustrative embodiments, a lens apparatus is employed in a scanning electron microscope as the sole lens for high-resolution focusing of an electron beam, and in particular, an electron beam having an accelerating voltage of from about 10 to about 30,000 V. In one embodiment, the lens apparatus comprises an electrically-conducting coil arranged around the axis of the beam and a magnetic pole piece extending along the axis of the beam at least within the space surrounded by the coil. In other embodiments, the lens apparatus comprises a magnetic dipole or virtual magnetic monopole fabricated from a variety of materials, including permanent magnets, superconducting coils, and magnetizable spheres and needles contained within an energy-conducting coil. Multiple-array lens apparatus are also disclosed for simultaneous and/or consecutive imaging of multiple images on single or multiple specimens. The invention further provides apparatus, methods, and devices useful in focusing charged particle beams for lithographic processes.

  20. Magnetic lens apparatus for use in high-resolution scanning electron microscopes and lithographic processes

    DOEpatents

    Crewe, Albert V.

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed are lens apparatus in which a beam of charged particlesis brought to a focus by means of a magnetic field, the lens being situated behind the target position. In illustrative embodiments, a lens apparatus is employed in a scanning electron microscopeas the sole lens for high-resolution focusing of an electron beam, and in particular, an electron beam having an accelerating voltage of from about 10 to about 30,000 V. In one embodiment, the lens apparatus comprises an electrically-conducting coil arranged around the axis of the beam and a magnetic pole piece extending along the axis of the beam at least within the space surrounded by the coil. In other embodiments, the lens apparatus comprises a magnetic dipole or virtual magnetic monopole fabricated from a variety of materials, including permanent magnets, superconducting coils, and magnetizable spheres and needles contained within an energy-conducting coil. Multiple-array lens apparatus are also disclosed for simultaneous and/or consecutive imaging of multiple images on single or multiple specimens. The invention further provides apparatus, methods, and devices useful in focusing charged particle beams for lithographic processes.

  1. High resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy characterization of a milled oxide dispersion strengthened steel powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyer-Prost, M.; Merot, J.-S.; Ribis, J.; Le Bouar, Y.; Chaffron, L.; Legendre, F.

    2016-10-01

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels are promising materials for generation IV fuel claddings as their dense nano-oxide dispersion provides good creep and irradiation resistance. Even if they have been studied for years, the formation mechanism of these nano-oxides is still unclear. Here we report for the first time a High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy and Energy Filtered Transmission Electron Microscopy characterization of an ODS milled powder. It provides clear evidence of the presence of small crystalline nanoclusters (NCs) enriched in titanium directly after milling. Small NCs (<5 nm) have a crystalline structure and seem partly coherent with the matrix. They have an interplanar spacing close to the (011) bcc iron structure. They coexist with larger crystalline spherical precipitates of 15-20 nm in size. Their crystalline structure may be metastable as they are not consistent with any Y-Ti-O or Ti-O structure. Such detailed observations in the as-milled grain powder confirm a mechanism of Y, Ti, O dissolution in the ferritic matrix followed by a NC precipitation during the mechanical alloying process of ODS materials.

  2. Fluid mechanical proximity effects in high-resolution gravure printing for printed electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grau, Gerd; Scheideler, William J.; Subramanian, Vivek

    2016-11-01

    Gravure printing is a very promising method for printed electronics because it combines high throughput with high resolution. Recently, printed lines with 2 micrometer resolution have been demonstrated at printing speeds on the order of 1m/s. In order to build realistic circuits, the fluid dynamics of complex pattern formation needs to be studied. Recently, we showed that highly-scaled lines printed in close succession exhibit proximity effects that can either improve or deteriorate print quality depending on a number of parameters. It was found that this effect occurs if cells are connected by a thin fluid film. Here, we present further experimental and modeling results explaining the mechanism by which this thin fluid film affects pattern formation. During the transfer of ink from the roll to the substrate, ink can flow in between connected cells. Asymmetry in the fluid distribution created by the preceding doctor blade wiping process results in net fluid flow from cells that transfer first to cells that transfer subsequently. The proximity of these cells thus affects the final ink distribution on the substrate, which is critically important to understand and design optimally when printing highly-scaled patterns of electronic materials. This work is based upon work supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Cooperative Agreement No. EEC-1160494.

  3. Atom-counting in High Resolution Electron Microscopy:TEM or STEM - That's the question.

    PubMed

    Gonnissen, J; De Backer, A; den Dekker, A J; Sijbers, J; Van Aert, S

    2016-10-27

    In this work, a recently developed quantitative approach based on the principles of detection theory is used in order to determine the possibilities and limitations of High Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR STEM) and HR TEM for atom-counting. So far, HR STEM has been shown to be an appropriate imaging mode to count the number of atoms in a projected atomic column. Recently, it has been demonstrated that HR TEM, when using negative spherical aberration imaging, is suitable for atom-counting as well. The capabilities of both imaging techniques are investigated and compared using the probability of error as a criterion. It is shown that for the same incoming electron dose, HR STEM outperforms HR TEM under common practice standards, i.e. when the decision is based on the probability function of the peak intensities in HR TEM and of the scattering cross-sections in HR STEM. If the atom-counting decision is based on the joint probability function of the image pixel values, the dependence of all image pixel intensities as a function of thickness should be known accurately. Under this assumption, the probability of error may decrease significantly for atom-counting in HR TEM and may, in theory, become lower as compared to HR STEM under the predicted optimal experimental settings. However, the commonly used standard for atom-counting in HR STEM leads to a high performance and has been shown to work in practice.

  4. Transfer-printing of single DNA molecule arrays on graphene for high resolution electron imaging and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cerf, Aline; Alava, Thomas; Barton, Robert A.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2011-01-01

    Graphene represents the ultimate substrate for high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, but the deposition of biological samples on this highly hydrophobic material has until now been a challenge. We present a reliable method for depositing ordered arrays of individual elongated DNA molecules on single-layer graphene substrates for high resolution electron beam imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis. This method is a necessary step towards the observation of single elongated DNA molecules with single base spatial resolution to directly read genetic and epigenetic information. PMID:21919532

  5. High-resolution monochromated electron energy-loss spectroscopy of organic photovoltaic materials.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jessica A; Scheltens, Frank J; Drummy, Lawrence F; Durstock, Michael F; Hage, Fredrik S; Ramasse, Quentin M; McComb, David W

    2017-03-02

    Advances in electron monochromator technology are providing opportunities for high energy resolution (10 - 200meV) electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) to be performed in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The energy-loss near-edge structure in core-loss spectroscopy is often limited by core-hole lifetimes rather than the energy spread of the incident illumination. However, in the valence-loss region, the reduced width of the zero loss peak makes it possible to resolve clearly and unambiguously spectral features at very low energy-losses (<3eV). In this contribution, high-resolution EELS was used to investigate four materials commonly used in organic photovoltaics (OPVs): poly(3-hexlythiophene) (P3HT), [6,6] phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), copper phthalocyanine (CuPc), and fullerene (C60). Data was collected on two different monochromated instruments - a Nion UltraSTEM 100 MC 'HERMES' and a FEI Titan(3) 60-300 Image-Corrected S/TEM - using energy resolutions (as defined by the zero loss peak full-width at half-maximum) of 35meV and 175meV, respectively. The data was acquired to allow deconvolution of plural scattering, and Kramers-Kronig analysis was utilized to extract the complex dielectric functions. The real and imaginary parts of the complex dielectric functions obtained from the two instruments were compared to evaluate if the enhanced resolution in the Nion provides new opto-electronic information for these organic materials. The differences between the spectra are discussed, and the implications for STEM-EELS studies of advanced materials are considered.

  6. Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainstein, Pablo D.; Lima, Marco Aurelio P.; Miraglia, Jorge E.; Montenegro, Eduardo C.; Rivarola, Roberto D.

    2006-11-01

    Plenary. Electron collisions - past, present and future / J. W. McConkey. Collisions of slow highly charged ions with surfaces / J. Burgdörfer ... [et al.]. Atomic collisions studied with "reaction-microscopes" / R. Moshammer ... [et al.]. Rydberg atoms: a microscale laboratory for studying electron-molecule tnteractions / F. B. Dunning -- Collisions involvintg photons. Quantum control of photochemical reaction dynamics and molecular functions / M. Yamaki ... [et al.]. Manipulating and viewing Rydberg wavepackets / R. R. Jones. Angle-resolved photoelectrons as a probe of strong-field interactions / M. Vrakking. Ultracold Rydberg atoms in a structured environment / I. C. H. Liu and J. M. Rost. Synchrotron-radiation-based recoil ion momentum spectroscopy of laser cooled and trapped cesium atoms / L. H. Coutinho. Reconstruction of attosecond pulse trains / Y. Mairesse ... [et al.]. Selective excitation of metastable atomic states by Femto- and attosecond laser pulses / A. D. Kondorskiy. Accurate calculations of triple differential cross sections for double photoionization of the hygrogen molecule / W. Vanroose ... [et al.]. Double and triple photoionization of Li and Be / J. Colgan, M. S. Pindzola and F. Robicheaux. Few/many body dynamics in strong laser fields / J. Zanghellini and T. Brabec. Rescattering-induced effects in electron-atom scattering in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field / A. V. Flegel ... [et al.]. Multidimensional photoelectron spectroscopy / P. Lablanquie ... [et al.]. Few photon and strongly driven transitions in the XUV and beyond / P. Lambropoulos, L. A. A. Nikolopoulos and S. I. Themelis. Ionization dynamics of atomic clusters in intense laser pulses / U. Saalmann and J. M. Rost. On the second order autocorrelation of an XUV attosecond pulse train / E. P. Benis ... [et al.]. Evidence for rescattering in molecular dissociation / I. D. Williams ... [et al.]. Photoionizing ions using synchrotron radiation / R. Phaneuf. Photo double

  7. High-resolution electron momentum spectroscopy of valence satellites of carbon disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chengwu; Shan, Xu; Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Enliang; Li, Zhongjun; Chen, XiangJun

    2010-09-01

    The binding energy spectrum of carbon disulphide (CS2) in the energy range of 9-23 eV has been measured by a high-resolution (e,2e) spectrometer employing asymmetric noncoplanar kinematics at an impact energy of 2500 eV plus the binding energy. Taking the advantage of the high energy resolution of 0.54 eV, four main peaks and five satellites in the outer-valence region are resolved. The assignments and pole strengths for these satellite states are achieved by comparing the experimental electron momentum profiles with the corresponding theoretical ones calculated using Hartree-Fock and density functional theory methods. The results are also compared in detail with the recent SAC-CI general-R calculations. General agreement is satisfactory, while the present experiment suggests cooperative contributions from Π2u, Σg+2 states to satellite 2 and Σg+2, Π2g states to satellite 3. Besides, relatively low pole strength for X Π2g state is obtained which contradicts all the theoretical calculations [2ph-TDA, ADC(3), SAC-CI general-R, ADC(4)] so far.

  8. High-resolution electron microscopy study of synthetic carbonate and aluminum containing apatites.

    PubMed

    Layani, J D; Cuisinier, F J; Steuer, P; Cohen, H; Voegel, J C; Mayer, I

    2000-05-01

    Aluminum (Al)-containing calcium-deficient carbonated hydroxyapatites were produced by a precipitation method from aqueous solution with carbonate (0-6.1%) and aluminum (0.1-0.5%) concentrations close to those found in biological materials. Two series of apatites were prepared: one at pH 7.0 and another at pH 9. 0. High-resolution electron microscopy has shown that many of them possess structural defects such as screw dislocations, grain boundaries, and central defects. Samples with high carbonate content and high water and high Al(3+) content had a high amount of structural defects. Accordingly, a sample (7Al1) with a relatively high carbonate content (6.1%) and a sample (7Al6) without carbonate but with a relatively high water (2.0 mol) and Al(3+) content (0. 39%) presented the highest amount of structural defects, 54% and 47%, respectively. A sample (7Al13) with a low level of crystalline water (1 mol) and low carbonate (2.5%) showed a small amount of defects. The presence of water associated with Al(3+) induced a high number of crystals having a central defect with a great similarity to the so-called water layer of octacalcium phosphate (OCP). Observed images of all these crystals have shown good correspondence with the computer-simulated image based on the crystal structure of hydroxyapatite, indicating that the addition of Al(3+) and carbonate does not perturb the apatitic structure.

  9. Reversible structure transition in gap junction under Ca++ control seen by high-resolution electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wrigley, N G; Brown, E; Chillingworth, R K

    1984-01-01

    Deoxycholate-extracted rat liver gap junction was studied by high-resolution low-dose electron microscopy. Communicating channels between two adjoining cells supposedly form along the common axis of two apposed hexameric trans-membrane protein assemblies. These double hexamers are often arranged in large plaques on an ordered hexagonal net (8-9 nm lattice constant) and seem able to undergo structural alteration as a possible permeability control mechanism. Calcium is widely reported to uncouple gap junction, and we observed this alteration on exposure to Ca++ down to 10(-4) M concentration. When EGTA was added at matching concentrations, the alteration was reversible several times over one hour, but with considerable variability. It was imaged in the absence of any negative stain to avoid ionic and other complications. The resulting lack of contrast plus low-dose "shot" noise required digital Fourier filtering and reconstruction, but no detail was recovered below 1.8 nm. In other experiments with negative stain at neutral pH, gap junction connexons were apparently locked in the "closed" configuration and no transition could be induced. However, recovery of repeating detail to nearly 1.0 nm was possible, reproducibly showing a fine connective matrix between connexons . Whether this was formed by unfolded portions of the 28,000-dalton gap junction protein is not known, but its existence could explain the observed lattice invariance during the connexon structural transition.

  10. Visualizing taste papillae in vivo with scanning electron microscopy of a high resolution cast.

    PubMed

    Myers, W E; Hettinger, T P; D'Ambrosio, J A; Wendt, S L; Pearson, C B; Barry, M A; Frank, M E

    1995-02-01

    A method using polyvinylsiloxane (PVS), a high-resolution dental impression material, to obtain negative images of lingual surfaces is described. Epoxy-resin tongue replicas made from these impressions were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This method has been developed to visualize structural details of the tongue surface of living human beings and laboratory animals. The utility of the method is demonstrated with hamster tongues, which have well-defined fungiform papillae with single taste pores, and human tongues, which have more variable surface structures. Replicas made from PVS impressions of tongues of living hamsters were compared with the same tongues after fixation. The replicas contained much of the detail present in fixed tongues. With SEM, it was possible to identify individual fungiform papillae, which contained depressions with the size and the location of hamster taste pores. Individual papillae could also be recognized in human-tongue replicas, but taste pores could not be identified with certainty. These replicas provide permanent, three-dimensional records of tongue topography that could be used to document changes due to trauma, disease and aging.

  11. High resolution transmission electron microscopy study of diamond films grown from fullerene precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J.S.; Gruen, D.M.; Krauss, A.R.

    1995-07-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has been used to investigate the microstructure of diamond films grown by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition using fullerene precursors. HRTEM observations of as-grown films revealed an array of larger crystals (>200 nm) within a polycrystalline matrix of much smaller crystallites (<20 nm). The randomly oriented small crystallites were nearly free of structural imperfections such as stacking faults or twins, while the larger ones had preferred <110> orientations with respect to the Si (100) substrate and showed evidence of structural defects on the periphery of the crystals. The most common defects were V-shaped {Sigma}9 twin boundaries, which are generally believed to serve as re-entrant sites for diamond nucleation and growth. The observation of growth steps on both (111) and (110) surfaces seems to support a reaction model in which fragments of C{sub 60}, including C{sub 2}, are considered the growth species. In particular, the nanocrystallinity of the films is most likely due to a high carbon cluster density from C{sub 60} fragmentation at or near the diamond surface, which can serve as nucleation sites for the growth of new crystallites.

  12. In-Situ High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigation of Overheating of Cu Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chunlin; Hu, Ziyu; Li, Yanfen; Liu, Limin; Mori, Hirotaro; Wang, Zhangchang

    2016-01-01

    Synthesizing and functionalizing metal nanoparticles supported on substrates is currently the subject of intensive study owing to their outstanding catalytic performances for heterogeneous catalysis. Revealing the fundamental effect of the substrates on metal nanoparticles represents a key step in clarifying mechanisms of stability and catalytic properties of these heterogeneous systems. However, direct identification of these effects still poses a significant challenge due to the complicacy of interactions between substrates and nanoparticles and also for the technical difficulty, restraining our understanding of these heterogeneous systems. Here, we combine in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with molecular dynamics simulations to investigate Cu nanoparticles supported on graphite and Cu2O substrates, and demonstrate that melting behavior and thermal stability of Cu nanoparticles can be markedly influenced by substrates. The graphite-supported Cu nanoparticles do not melt during annealing at 1073 K until they vanish completely, i.e. only the sublimation occurs, while the Cu2O-supported Cu nanoparticles suffer melting during annealing at 973 K. Such selective superheating of the Cu nanoparticles can be attributed to the adsorption of a thin carbon layer on the surface of the Cu nanoparticles, which helps guide further stability enhancement of functional nanoparticles for realistic applications.

  13. Magnetic dynamics studied by high-resolution electron spectroscopy and time-resolved electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Rajeswari

    Future information technology requires an increased magnetically encoded data density and novel electromagnetic modes of data transfer. While to date magnetic properties are observed and characterized mostly statically, the need emerges to monitor and capture their fast dynamics. In this talk, I will focus on the spin dynamics i.e. spin wave excitations and the dynamics of a new topological distribution of spins termed ``skyrmions''. Wave packets of spin waves offer the unique capability to transport a quantum bit, the spin, without the transport of charge or mass. Here, large wave-vector spin waves are of particular interest as they admit spin localization within a few nanometers. By using our recently developed electron energy loss spectrometer, we could study such spin waves in ultrathin films with an unprecedented energy resolution of 4 meV. By virtue of the finite penetration depth of low energy electrons, spin waves localized at interfaces between a substrate and a thin capping layer can be been studied yielding information about the exchange coupling between atoms at the interface. The quantization of spin waves with wave vectors perpendicular to the film gives rise to standing modes to which EELS has likewise access. Such studies when carried out as function of the film thickness again yield information on the layer dependence of the exchange coupling. Magnetic skyrmions are promising candidates as information carriers in logic or storage devices. Currently, little is known about the influence of disorder, defects, or external stimuli on the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the skyrmion lattice. In this talk, I will describe the dynamical role of disorder in a large and flat thin film of Cu2OSeO3, exhibiting a skyrmion phase in an insulating material. We image up to 70,000 skyrmions by means of cryo-Lorentz Transmission Electron Microscopy as a function of the applied magnetic field. In the skyrmion phase, dislocations are shown to cause the

  14. High Resolution Simulation of Beam Dynamics in Electron Linacs for Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R.D.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.A.; Qiang, J.

    2009-01-05

    In this paper we report on large scale multi-physics simulation of beam dynamics in electron linacs for next generation free electron lasers (FELs). We describe key features of a parallel macroparticle simulation code including three-dimensional (3D) space-charge effects, short-range structure wake fields, longitudinal coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) wake fields, and treatment of radiofrequency (RF) accelerating cavities using maps obtained from axial field profiles. A macroparticle up-sampling scheme is described that reduces the shot noise from an initial distribution with a smaller number of macroparticles while maintaining the global properties of the original distribution. We present a study of the microbunching instability which is a critical issue for future FELs due to its impact on beam quality at the end of the linac. Using parameters of a planned FEL linac at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we show that a large number of macroparticles (beyond 100 million) is needed to control numerical shot noise that drives the microbunching instability. We also explore the effect of the longitudinal grid on simulation results. We show that acceptable results are obtained with around 2048 longitudinal grid points, and we discuss this in view of the spectral growth rate predicted from linear theory. As an application, we present results from simulations using one billion macroparticles of the FEL linac under design at LBNL. We show that the final uncorrelated energy spread of the beam depends not only on the initial uncorrelated energy spread but also depends strongly on the shape of the initial current profile. By using a parabolic initial current profile, 5 keV initial uncorrelated energy spread at 40 MeV injection energy, and improved linac design, those simulations demonstrate that a reasonable beam quality can be achieved at the end of the linac, with the final distribution having about 100 keV energy spread, 2.4 GeV energy, and 1.2 kA peak

  15. High resolution infrared ``vision'' of dynamic electron processes in semiconductor devices (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyutenko, V. K.

    2003-01-01

    Infrared cameras have been traditionally used in semiconductor industry for noncontact measurements of printed circuit boards (PCBs) local overheating. While an effective way to prevent defective PCB application in a "find-problems-before-your-customer-do" manner, this conventional static (25-50 frames/s) and small spatial resolution (>100 μm) approach is incapable, in principle, of explaining the physical reason for the PCB failure. What follows in this report is the demonstration of an IR camera based new approach in high-resolution dynamic study of electron processes responsible for single device performance. More specifically, time resolved two-dimensional visualization of current carrier drift and diffusion processes across the device base that happen in microsecond scale is of prime concern in the work. Thus, contrary to the conventional visualization-through-heating measurements, objective is mapping of electron processes in a device base through negative and positive luminescence (provoked by band-to-band electron transitions) and nonequilibrium thermal emission (provoked by intraband electron transitions) studies inside the region in which current flows. Therefore, the parameters of interest are not only a device thermal mass and thermal conductance, but also free carrier lifetime, surface recombination velocity, diffusion length, and contact properties. The micro-mapping system developed consists of reflective type IR microscope coaxially attached to calibrated scanning IR thermal imaging cameras (3-5 and 8-12 μm spectral ranges, HgCdTe cooled photodetectors, scene spatial resolution of some 20 μm, minimum time resolved interval of 10 μs, and temperature resolution of about 0.5 °C at 30 °C). Data acquisition and image processing (emissivity equalization, noise reduction by image averaging, and external triggering) are computer controlled. Parallel video channel equipped with a CCD camera permits easy positioning and focusing of <1×1 mm2 object

  16. Microstructure development in latex coatings: High-resolution cryo-scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Haiyan

    2005-07-01

    High-resolution cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (Cryo-SEM) was used to investigate microstructure development in drying latex coatings: from a colloidal stable suspension into a coherent strong film by drying. Useful sample preparation artifacts during the freeze-fracture, i.e., pullouts were documented and analyzed. Pullouts indicate both physical properties of latex particles and the drying stages in latex coatings. The mechanism of pullout formation was studied both theoretically and experimentally. Latex coatings must possess satisfactory freeze-thaw stability to avoid problems during transportation and storage in cold winter. The behavior of latex particles during freeze-thaw cycles was visualized by Cryo-SEM. The images indicated that high concentration of polymerizable surfactant in a latex suspension improved its freeze-thaw stability. In film formation, skinning was captured from edge in and top down in coatings of 80nm diameter styrene-butadiene latex particles with exceptional low Tg (-65°C). Effects on skinning of drying conditions and the way the latex was initially stabilized against flocculation were investigated. A skinned pocket was unexpectedly found in the coating. The cause of such a skin around the air bubble was explained by both simple models calculating the dissolution time and force analysis on the particles. The film formation processes in conventional and low volatile organic compound (VOC) latex coatings were compared by time-sectioning Cryo-SEM. Some low-VOC latex coatings were found to dry as fast as conventional ones without deteriorating final good film properties.

  17. New High Resolution Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometer Capable of Measurements of Collision Cross Sections from 150 to 520 K.

    PubMed

    Ujma, Jakub; Giles, Kevin; Morris, Michael; Barran, Perdita E

    2016-10-04

    We present a new variable temperature (VT), high resolution ion mobility (IM) drift tube coupled to a commercial mass spectrometer (MS). Ions are generated in an electrospray ion source with a sampling cone interface and two stacked ring RF guides which transfer ions into the mobility analyzer located prior to a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The drift cell can be operated over a pressure range of 0.5-3 Torr and a temperature range of 150-520 K with applied fields typically between 3 and 14 V cm(-1). This makes the instrument suitable for rotationally averaged collision cross section (CCS) measurements at low E/N ratios where ions are near thermal equilibrium with the buffer gas. Fundamental studies of the effective ion temperatures can be performed at high E/N ratios. An RF ion trap/buncher is located at the beginning of the drift region, which modulates the continuous ion beam into spatially narrow packets. Packets of ions then drift in a linear electric field, which is 50.5 cm long, and are separated according to their mobility in an inert buffer gas. Post-drift, an ion funnel focuses the radially spread pulses of ions into the inlet of a commercial MS platform (Micromass QToF2). We present the novel features of this instrument and results from VT-IM-MS experiments on a range of model systems-IMS CCS standards (Agilent ESI Tune Mix), the monomeric protein Ubiquitin (8.6 kDa), and the tetrameric protein complex Concanavalin A (103 kDa). We evaluate the performance of the instrument by comparing ambient (DT)CCSHe values of model compounds with those found in the literature. Several effects of temperature on collision cross sections and resolution are observed. For small rigid molecules, changes in resolution are consistent with anticipated thermal diffusion effects. Changes in measured (DT)CCSHe for these rigid systems at different temperatures are attributed primarily to the effect of temperature on the long-range attractive interaction. Similar

  18. High-resolution patterning of graphene by screen printing with a silicon stencil for highly flexible printed electronics.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Woo Jin; Secor, Ethan B; Hersam, Mark C; Frisbie, C Daniel; Francis, Lorraine F

    2015-01-07

    High-resolution screen printing of pristine graphene is introduced for the rapid fabrication of conductive lines on flexible substrates. Well-defined silicon stencils and viscosity-controlled inks facilitate the preparation of high-quality graphene patterns as narrow as 40 μm. This strategy provides an efficient method to produce highly flexible graphene electrodes for printed electronics.

  19. Experimentally characterizing the electronic structures of f-electron systems using advanced high resolution Fourier transform microwave spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, Stephen, A

    2013-02-03

    We aim to (i) provide data that directly addresses the fundamental roles of actinide valence electrons in chemical bonding, and (ii) serve to provide prototypical data for the heavy element computational chemistry community. These goals will be achieved through the first pure rotational spectroscopic measurements on prototypical systems at ultra-high resolution. These systems encompass low oxidation state uranium and thorium compounds including, but not limited to, UX and ThX, X = F, Cl, Br, I, and UY and ThY, Y = O, S, and other simple U and Th-containing compounds. Our primary experimental tools involve time-domain rotational spectroscopy achieving line widths and resolutions of a few kHz.

  20. Solid-gas reactions of complex oxides inside an environmental high-resolution transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Sayagués, M J; Krumeich, F; Hutchison, J L

    2001-07-01

    In a gas reaction cell (GRC), installed in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) (JEOL 4000EX), samples can be manipulated in an ambient atmosphere (p<50mbar). This experimental setup permits not only the observation of solid-gas reactions in situ at close to the atomic level but also the induction of structural modifications under the influence of a plasma, generated by the ionization of gas particles by an intense electron beam. Solid state reactions of non-stoichiometric niobium oxides and niobium tungsten oxides with different gases (O2, H2 and He) have been carried out inside this controlled environment transmission electron microscope (CETEM), and this has led to reaction products with novel structures which are not accessible by conventional solid state synthesis methods. Monoclinic and orthorhombic Nb(12)O(29) crystallize in block structures comprising [3x4] blocks. The oxidation of the monoclinic phase occurs via a three step mechanism: firstly, a lamellar defect of composition Nb(11)O(27) is formed. Empty rectangular channels in this defect provide the diffusion paths in the subsequent oxidation. In the second step, microdomains of the Nb(22)O(54) phase are generated as an intermediate state of the oxidation process. The structure of the final product Nb(10)O(25), which consists of [3x3] blocks and tetrahedral coordinated sites, is isostructural to PNb(9)O(25). Microdomains of this apparently metastable phase appear as a product of the Nb(22)O(54) oxidation. The oxidation reaction of Nb(12)O(29) was found to be a reversible process: the reduction of the oxidation product with H(2) results in the formation of the starting Nb(12)O(29) structure. On the other hand, the block structure of Nb(12)O(29) has been destroyed by a direct treatment of the sample with H(2) while NbO in a cubic rock salt structure is produced. This in situ technique has also been applied to niobium tungsten oxides which constitute the solid solution series Nb(8-n

  1. Extended-range grazing-incidence spectrometer for high-resolution extreme ultraviolet measurements on an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V.; Träbert, E.; Widmann, K.; Hell, N.

    2014-11-15

    A high-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for performing very high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Å to above 300 Å. The instrument operates without an entrance slit and focuses the light emitted by highly charged ions located in the roughly 50 μm wide electron beam onto a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The measured line widths are below 0.025 Å above 100 Å, and the resolving power appears to be limited by the source size and Doppler broadening of the trapped ions. Comparisons with spectra obtained with existing grating spectrometers show an order of magnitude improvement in spectral resolution.

  2. Extended-range grazing-incidence spectrometer for high-resolution extreme ultraviolet measurements on an electron beam ion trap.

    PubMed

    Beiersdorfer, P; Magee, E W; Brown, G V; Hell, N; Träbert, E; Widmann, K

    2014-11-01

    A high-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for performing very high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Å to above 300 Å. The instrument operates without an entrance slit and focuses the light emitted by highly charged ions located in the roughly 50 μm wide electron beam onto a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The measured line widths are below 0.025 Å above 100 Å, and the resolving power appears to be limited by the source size and Doppler broadening of the trapped ions. Comparisons with spectra obtained with existing grating spectrometers show an order of magnitude improvement in spectral resolution.

  3. Extended-range grazing-incidence spectrometer for high-resolution extreme ultraviolet measurements on an electron beam ion trapa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V.; Hell, N.; Träbert, E.; Widmann, K.

    2014-11-01

    A high-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for performing very high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Å to above 300 Å. The instrument operates without an entrance slit and focuses the light emitted by highly charged ions located in the roughly 50 μm wide electron beam onto a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The measured line widths are below 0.025 Å above 100 Å, and the resolving power appears to be limited by the source size and Doppler broadening of the trapped ions. Comparisons with spectra obtained with existing grating spectrometers show an order of magnitude improvement in spectral resolution.

  4. High Resolution Low Energy Electron Diffraction Studies of Thermal Instabilities in Lead Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongning

    1991-02-01

    Thermal instability in a crystal surface is one of the most fascinating phenomena that occur in surfaces. Recent advances in many surface analytical tools allow researchers to examine surface instabilities on the atomic scale. One outstanding example is the observation of surface melting in a Pb(110) surface 100 K below the bulk melting temperature, T_{m} (bulk) = 600.7 K, using medium-energy ion channeling techniques. Using the high-resolution low-energy electron diffraction (HRLEED) technique, we have observed several novel surface instabilities that occur below the Pb(110) surface melting temperature. First of all we found that Pb(110) surface melting is preceded by a surface roughening transition which begins at ~415 K, about 185 K below T_{m}. The value of the roughening temperature agrees very well with the prediction of the molecular dynamic calculation that a (110) surface should start to rough at 0.7 T _{m} (~420 K for Pb). This roughening transition is of the Korsterlitz -Thouless type and is an infinite order transition in which the height-height correlation diverges. We observed a critical line which extends from the roughening temperature to the surface melting temperature. Below the surface roughening temperature (at around 380 K), we have observed an extremely interesting disordered flat (DOF) phase in which positionally disordered steps are confined to two levels and the surface remains flat on the average. This DOF phase (sometimes called the preroughened phase), as predicted by K. Rommelse and M. den Nijs recently, is stabilized by entropy as a result of step interactions beyond the nearest neighbors. The energetics of the DOF phase are intimately related to that of the surface reconstruction. In fact, a reconstruction phase has been considered as a "condensate" of the DOF phase. In contrast, the more tightly packed Pb(100) surface behaves very differently. There is a non-conventional liquid-like disordering which occurs at 570 K. This disordering

  5. Virtually distortion-free imaging system for large field, high resolution lithography using electrons, ions or other particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Hawryluk, Andrew M.; Ceglio, Natale M.

    1993-01-01

    Virtually distortion free large field high resolution imaging is performed using an imaging system which contains large field distortion or field curvature. A reticle is imaged in one direction through the optical system to form an encoded mask. The encoded mask is then imaged back through the imaging system onto a wafer positioned at the reticle position. Particle beams, including electrons, ions and neutral particles, may be used as well as electromagnetic radiation.

  6. Virtually distortion-free imaging system for large field, high resolution lithography using electrons, ions or other particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Hawryluk, A.M.; Ceglio, N.M.

    1993-01-12

    Virtually distortion free large field high resolution imaging is performed using an imaging system which contains large field distortion or field curvature. A reticle is imaged in one direction through the optical system to form an encoded mask. The encoded mask is then imaged back through the imaging system onto a wafer positioned at the reticle position. Particle beams, including electrons, ions and neutral particles, may be used as well as electromagnetic radiation.

  7. High-resolution, high-throughput imaging with a multibeam scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Eberle, A L; Mikula, S; Schalek, R; Lichtman, J; Knothe Tate, M L; Zeidler, D

    2015-08-01

    Electron-electron interactions and detector bandwidth limit the maximal imaging speed of single-beam scanning electron microscopes. We use multiple electron beams in a single column and detect secondary electrons in parallel to increase the imaging speed by close to two orders of magnitude and demonstrate imaging for a variety of samples ranging from biological brain tissue to semiconductor wafers.

  8. High-resolution, label-free imaging of living cells with direct electron-beam-excitation-assisted optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu

    2015-06-01

    High spatial resolution microscope is desired for deep understanding of cellular functions, in order to develop medical technologies. We demonstrate high-resolution imaging of un-labelled organelles in living cells, in which live cells on a 50 nm thick silicon nitride membrane are imaged by autofluorescence excited with a focused electron beam through the membrane. Electron beam excitation enables ultrahigh spatial resolution imaging of organelles, such as mitochondria, nuclei, and various granules. Since the autofluorescence spectra represent molecular species, this microscopy allows fast and detailed investigations of cellular status in living cells.

  9. In situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy study of interfacial reactions of Cu thin films on amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung Bo; Choi, Duck-Kyun; Phillipp, Fritz; Jeon, Kyung-Sook; Kim, Chang Kyung

    2006-02-01

    Interfacial reactions of Cu with amorphous silicon (a-Si) in the Cu /a-Si/glass system are studied by in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy at 550°C. Various Cu silicides, such as η-Cu3Si, Cu15Si4, and Cu5Si, and Cu particles are observed. The formation of the Cu particles can be attributed to a heating effect from electron beam irradiation. Around the Cu silicides, crystallization of a-Si occurs. Around the Cu particles, however, crystallization does not occur. Crystallization appears to be enhanced by Cu dissolved in a-Si.

  10. Triggered O Star Formation in M20 via Cloud–Cloud Collision: Comparisons between High-resolution CO Observations and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, K.; Hattori, Y.; Hasegawa, K.; Ohama, A.; Haworth, T. J.; Shima, K.; Habe, A.; Tachihara, K.; Mizuno, N.; Onishi, T.; Mizuno, A.; Fukui, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Understanding high-mass star formation is one of the top-priority issues in astrophysics. Recent observational studies have revealed that cloud–cloud collisions may play a role in high-mass star formation in several places in the Milky Way and the Large Magellanic Cloud. The Trifid Nebula M20 is a well-known Galactic H ii region ionized by a single O7.5 star. In 2011, based on the CO observations with NANTEN2, we reported that the O star was formed by the collision between two molecular clouds ∼0.3 Myr ago. Those observations identified two molecular clouds toward M20, traveling at a relative velocity of 7.5 {km} {{{s}}}-1. This velocity separation implies that the clouds cannot be gravitationally bound to M20, but since the clouds show signs of heating by the stars there they must be spatially coincident with it. A collision is therefore highly possible. In this paper we present the new CO J = 1–0 and J = 3–2 observations of the colliding clouds in M20 performed with the Mopra and ASTE telescopes. The high-resolution observations revealed that the two molecular clouds have peculiar spatial and velocity structures, i.e., a spatially complementary distribution between the two clouds and a bridge feature that connects the two clouds in velocity space. Based on a new comparison with numerical models, we find that this complementary distribution is an expected outcome of cloud–cloud collisions, and that the bridge feature can be interpreted as the turbulent gas excited at the interface of the collision. Our results reinforce the cloud–cloud collision scenario in M20.

  11. Sixteenth International Conference on the physics of electronic and atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dalgarno, A.; Freund, R.S.; Lubell, M.S.; Lucatorto, T.B.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains abstracts of papers on the following topics: photons, electron-atom collisions; electron-molecule collisions; electron-ion collisions; collisions involving exotic species; ion- atom collisions, ion-molecule or atom-molecule collisions; atom-atom collisions; ion-ion collisions; collisions involving rydberg atoms; field assisted collisions; collisions involving clusters and collisions involving condensed matter.

  12. Imaging interactions of metal oxide nanoparticles with macrophage cells by ultra-high resolution scanning electron microscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Starr, Clarise R; Armstrong, Linda S; Ponce, Arturo; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2012-11-01

    Use of engineered metal oxide nanoparticles in a plethora of biological applications and custom products has warned about some possible dose-dependent cytotoxic effects. Macrophages are key components of the innate immune system used to study possible toxic effects and internalization of different nanoparticulate materials. In this work, ultra-high resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was used to offer new insights into the dynamical processes of interaction of nanomaterials with macrophage cells dosed with different concentrations of metal oxide nanoparticles (CeO(2), TiO(2) and ZnO). The versatility of FE-SEM has allowed obtaining a detailed characterization of processes of adsorption and endocytosis of nanoparticles, by using advanced analytical and imaging techniques on complete unstained uncoated cells, including secondary electron imaging, high-sensitive backscattered electron imaging, X-ray microanalysis and stereoimaging. Low voltage BF/DF-STEM confirmed nanoparticle adsorption and internalization into endosomes of CeO(2) and TiO(2), whereas ZnO develop apoptosis after 24 h of interaction caused by dissolution and invasion of cell nucleus. Ultra-high resolution scanning electron microscopy techniques provided new insights into interactions of inorganic nanoparticles with macrophage cells with high spatial resolution.

  13. High resolution transmission electron microscopy characterization of fcc --> 9R transformation in nanocrystalline palladium films due to hydriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin-Ahmadi, Behnam; Idrissi, Hosni; Delmelle, Renaud; Pardoen, Thomas; Proost, Joris; Schryvers, Dominique

    2013-02-01

    Sputtered nanocrystalline palladium thin films with nanoscale growth twins have been subjected to hydriding cycles. The evolution of the twin boundaries has been investigated using high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Surprisingly, the ∑3{112} incoherent twin boundaries dissociate after hydriding into two phase boundaries bounding a 9R phase. This phase which corresponds to single stacking faults located every three {111} planes in the fcc Pd structure was not expected because of the high stacking fault energy of Pd. This observation is connected to the influence of the Hydrogen on the stacking fault energy of palladium and the high compressive stresses building up during hydriding.

  14. Method and apparatus for a high-resolution three dimensional confocal scanning transmission electron microscope

    DOEpatents

    de Jonge, Niels [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-08-17

    A confocal scanning transmission electron microscope which includes an electron illumination device providing an incident electron beam propagating in a direction defining a propagation axis, and a precision specimen scanning stage positioned along the propagation axis and movable in at least one direction transverse to the propagation axis. The precision specimen scanning stage is configured for positioning a specimen relative to the incident electron beam. A projector lens receives a transmitted electron beam transmitted through at least part of the specimen and focuses this transmitted beam onto an image plane, where the transmitted beam results from the specimen being illuminated by the incident electron beam. A detection system is placed approximately in the image plane.

  15. Acquisition of a High Voltage/High resolution Transmission Electron Microscope.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-21

    Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) The EELS is the study of energy distribution of electrons ...or aggregates of small particles can be studied directly by transmission electron mi- croscopy techniques (Fig. 7).12 17 - .,’ L -. 𔃾 " ", , M. 1.5 "m...characterization of the ceramic producrs in terms of imaging at all levels of resolution (from optical to atomic 21 resolution) by direct

  16. The potential for Bayesian compressive sensing to significantly reduce electron dose in high-resolution STEM images.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Andrew; Yang, Hao; Carin, Lawrence; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D

    2014-02-01

    The use of high-resolution imaging methods in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is limited in many cases by the sensitivity of the sample to the beam and the onset of electron beam damage (for example, in the study of organic systems, in tomography and during in situ experiments). To demonstrate that alternative strategies for image acquisition can help alleviate this beam damage issue, here we apply compressive sensing via Bayesian dictionary learning to high-resolution STEM images. These computational algorithms have been applied to a set of images with a reduced number of sampled pixels in the image. For a reduction in the number of pixels down to 5% of the original image, the algorithms can recover the original image from the reduced data set. We show that this approach is valid for both atomic-resolution images and nanometer-resolution studies, such as those that might be used in tomography datasets, by applying the method to images of strontium titanate and zeolites. As STEM images are acquired pixel by pixel while the beam is scanned over the surface of the sample, these postacquisition manipulations of the images can, in principle, be directly implemented as a low-dose acquisition method with no change in the electron optics or the alignment of the microscope itself.

  17. High-resolution, high-throughput imaging with a multibeam scanning electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    EBERLE, AL; MIKULA, S; SCHALEK, R; LICHTMAN, J; TATE, ML KNOTHE; ZEIDLER, D

    2015-01-01

    Electron–electron interactions and detector bandwidth limit the maximal imaging speed of single-beam scanning electron microscopes. We use multiple electron beams in a single column and detect secondary electrons in parallel to increase the imaging speed by close to two orders of magnitude and demonstrate imaging for a variety of samples ranging from biological brain tissue to semiconductor wafers. Lay Description The composition of our world and our bodies on the very small scale has always fascinated people, making them search for ways to make this visible to the human eye. Where light microscopes reach their resolution limit at a certain magnification, electron microscopes can go beyond. But their capability of visualizing extremely small features comes at the cost of a very small field of view. Some of the questions researchers seek to answer today deal with the ultrafine structure of brains, bones or computer chips. Capturing these objects with electron microscopes takes a lot of time – maybe even exceeding the time span of a human being – or new tools that do the job much faster. A new type of scanning electron microscope scans with 61 electron beams in parallel, acquiring 61 adjacent images of the sample at the same time a conventional scanning electron microscope captures one of these images. In principle, the multibeam scanning electron microscope’s field of view is 61 times larger and therefore coverage of the sample surface can be accomplished in less time. This enables researchers to think about large-scale projects, for example in the rather new field of connectomics. A very good introduction to imaging a brain at nanometre resolution can be found within course material from Harvard University on http://www.mcb80x.org/# as featured media entitled ‘connectomics’. PMID:25627873

  18. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy of clean and hydrogen covered Si(001) surfaces: first principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Patterson, C H

    2012-09-07

    Surface phonons, conductivities, and loss functions are calculated for reconstructed (2×1), p(2×2) and c(4×2) clean Si(001) surfaces, and (2×1) H and D covered Si(001) surfaces. Surface conductivities perpendicular to the surface are significantly smaller than conductivities parallel to the surface. The surface loss function is compared to high resolution electron energy loss measurements. There is good agreement between calculated loss functions and experiment for H and D covered surfaces. However, agreement between experimental data from different groups and between theory and experiment is poor for clean Si(001) surfaces. Formalisms for calculating electron energy loss spectra are reviewed and the mechanism of electron energy losses to surface vibrations is discussed.

  19. High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy Studies of Chemisorbed Species on Metal Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-31

    vibrational modes at crystal surfaces, the first detection of projected bulk phonon modes by surface electron scattering and elucidation of novel properties associated with hydrogen interaction at Niobium surfaces. (jg)

  20. High-resolution imaging by scanning electron microscopy of semithin sections in correlation with light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Koga, Daisuke; Kusumi, Satoshi; Shodo, Ryusuke; Dan, Yukari; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we introduce scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of semithin resin sections. In this technique, semithin sections were adhered on glass slides, stained with both uranyl acetate and lead citrate, and observed with a backscattered electron detector at a low accelerating voltage. As the specimens are stained in the same manner as conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the contrast of SEM images of semithin sections was similar to TEM images of ultrathin sections. Using this technique, wide areas of semithin sections were also observed by SEM, without the obstruction of grids, which was inevitable for traditional TEM. This study also applied semithin section SEM to correlative light and electron microscopy. Correlative immunofluorescence microscopy and immune-SEM were performed in semithin sections of LR white resin-embedded specimens using a FluoroNanogold-labeled secondary antibody. Because LR white resin is hydrophilic and electron stable, this resin is suitable for immunostaining and SEM observation. Using correlative microscopy, the precise localization of the primary antibody was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy and SEM. This method has great potential for studies examining the precise localization of molecules, including Golgi- and ER-associated proteins, in correlation with LM and SEM.

  1. High resolution extreme ultraviolet spectrometer for an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, Hayato; Yatsurugi, Junji; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.

    2011-08-15

    An extreme ultraviolet spectrometer has been developed for spectroscopic studies of highly charged ions with an electron beam ion trap. It has a slit-less configuration with a spherical varied-line-spacing grating that provides a flat focal plane for grazing incidence light. Alternative use of two different gratings enables us to cover the wavelength range 1-25 nm. Test observations with the Tokyo electron beam ion trap demonstrate the high performance of the present spectrometer such as a resolving power of above 1000.

  2. Efficient creation of electron vortex beams for high resolution STEM imaging.

    PubMed

    Béché, A; Juchtmans, R; Verbeeck, J

    2016-05-10

    The recent discovery of electron vortex beams carrying quantised angular momentum in the TEM has led to an active field of research, exploring a variety of potential applications including the possibility of mapping magnetic states at the atomic scale. A prerequisite for this is the availability of atomic sized electron vortex beams at high beam current and mode purity. In this paper we present recent progress showing that by making use of the Aharonov-Bohm effect near the tip of a long single domain ferromagnetic Nickel needle, a very efficient aperture for the production of electron vortex beams can be realised. The aperture transmits more than 99% of all electrons and provides a vortex mode purity of up to 92%. Placing this aperture in the condenser plane of a state of the art Cs corrected microscope allows us to demonstrate atomic resolution HAADF STEM images with spatial resolution better than 1 Angström, in agreement with theoretical expectations and only slightly inferior to the performance of a non-vortex probe on the same instrument.

  3. Understanding the structure of nanocatalysts with high resolution scanning/transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, L. D.; Rivas, J.; José-Yacamán, M.

    2014-03-01

    Nanomaterials including nanoparticles, nanowires and nanotubes play an important role in heterogeneous catalysis. Thanks to the rapid improvement of the electron microscopic techniques and with the advent of aberration corrected electron microscopy as well as theoretical methodologies, the potential effects induced by nanocatalysts are better understood than before by unravelling their atomic structure. A brief introduction to advanced electron microscopic techniques namely aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM) is presented and subsequently two examples of nanocatalysts are considered in the present review. The first example will focus on the study of bimetallic/core-shell nanoalloys. In heterogeneous catalysis, catalysts containing two or more metals might show significantly different catalytic properties compared to the parent metals and thus are widely utilized in several catalytic reactions. Atom-by-atom insights of the nanoalloy based catalysts ex: Au-Pd will be described in the present review using a combination of advanced electron microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. A related example on the understanding of bimetallic clusters by HAADF-STEM will also be presented in addition to nanoparticles. In the second case understanding the structure of transition metal chalcogenide based nanocatalysts by HRTEM and aberration corrected STEM, for the case of MoS2 will be discussed. MoS2-based catalysts serve as model catalysts and are employed in the hydrodesulphurisations (HDS) reactions in the removal of sulphur from gasoline and related petrochemical products. They have been studied in various forms including nanowires, nanotubes and nanoplates. Their structure, atomic insights and as a consequence elucidation of their corresponding catalytic activity are thus important.

  4. Spontaneous Patterning of High-Resolution Electronics via Parallel Vacuum Ultraviolet.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuying; Kanehara, Masayuki; Liu, Chuan; Sakamoto, Kenji; Yasuda, Takeshi; Takeya, Jun; Minari, Takeo

    2016-08-01

    A spontaneous patterning technique via parallel vacuum ultraviolet is developed for fabricating large-scale, complex electronic circuits with 1 μm resolution. The prepared organic thin-film transistors exhibit a low contact resistance of 1.5 kΩ cm, and high mobilities of 0.3 and 1.5 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) in the devices with channel lengths of 1 and 5 μm, respectively.

  5. Using electrons as a high-resolution probe of optical modes in individual nanowires.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Ilke; Hyun, Jerome K; Erni, Rolf; Fairchild, Michael N; Hersee, Stephen D; Muller, David A

    2009-12-01

    While nanowires show increasing promise for optoelectronic applications, probing the subwavelength details of their optical modes has been a challenge with light-based techniques. Here we report the excitation of dielectric optical waveguide modes in a single GaN nanowire using transition radiation generated by a 1 nm diameter electron beam. This spatially resolved study opens important gateways to probing the optical modes of more complex nanostructures, fundamental for optimization of optoelectronic device performance.

  6. Acquisition of a High Resolution Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope for the Analysis of Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nittler, Larry R.

    2003-01-01

    This grant furnished funds to purchase a state-of-the-art scanning electron microscope (SEM) to support our analytical facilities for extraterrestrial samples. After evaluating several instruments, we purchased a JEOL 6500F thermal field emission SEM with the following analytical accessories: EDAX energy-dispersive x-ray analysis system with fully automated control of instrument and sample stage; EDAX LEXS wavelength-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for high sensitivity light-element analysis; EDAX/TSL electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) system with software for phase identification and crystal orientation mapping; Robinson backscatter electron detector; and an in situ micro-manipulator (Kleindiek). The total price was $550,000 (with $150,000 of the purchase supported by Carnegie institution matching funds). The microscope was delivered in October 2002, and most of the analytical accessories were installed by January 2003. With the exception of the wavelength spectrometer (which has been undergoing design changes) everything is working well and the SEM is in routine use in our laboratory.

  7. High-resolution in situ observations of electron precipitation-causing EMIC waves

    DOE PAGES

    Rodger, Craig J.; Hendry, Aaron T.; Clilverd, Mark A.; ...

    2015-11-21

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are thought to be important drivers of energetic electron losses from the outer radiation belt through precipitation into the atmosphere. While the theoretical possibility of pitch angle scattering-driven losses from these waves has been recognized for more than four decades, there have been limited experimental precipitation observations to support this concept. We have combined satellite-based observations of the characteristics of EMIC waves, with satellite and ground-based observations of the EMIC-induced electron precipitation. In a detailed case study, supplemented by an additional four examples, we are able to constrain for the first time the location, size,more » and energy range of EMIC-induced electron precipitation inferred from coincident precipitation data and relate them to the EMIC wave frequency, wave power, and ion band of the wave as measured in situ by the Van Allen Probes. As a result, these observations will better constrain modeling into the importance of EMIC wave-particle interactions.« less

  8. High-resolution in situ observations of electron precipitation-causing EMIC waves

    SciTech Connect

    Rodger, Craig J.; Hendry, Aaron T.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Kletzing, Craig A.; Brundell, James B.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.

    2015-11-21

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are thought to be important drivers of energetic electron losses from the outer radiation belt through precipitation into the atmosphere. While the theoretical possibility of pitch angle scattering-driven losses from these waves has been recognized for more than four decades, there have been limited experimental precipitation observations to support this concept. We have combined satellite-based observations of the characteristics of EMIC waves, with satellite and ground-based observations of the EMIC-induced electron precipitation. In a detailed case study, supplemented by an additional four examples, we are able to constrain for the first time the location, size, and energy range of EMIC-induced electron precipitation inferred from coincident precipitation data and relate them to the EMIC wave frequency, wave power, and ion band of the wave as measured in situ by the Van Allen Probes. As a result, these observations will better constrain modeling into the importance of EMIC wave-particle interactions.

  9. Development of an Apparatus for High-Resolution Auger Photoelectron Coincidence Spectroscopy (APECS) and Electron Ion Coincidence (EICO) Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakiuchi, Takuhiro; Hashimoto, Shogo; Fujita, Narihiko; Mase, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Okusawa, Makoto

    We have developed an electron electron ion coincidence (EEICO) apparatus for high-resolution Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy (APECS) and electron ion coincidence (EICO) spectroscopy. It consists of a coaxially symmetric mirror electron energy analyzer (ASMA), a miniature double-pass cylindrical mirror electron energy analyzer (DP-CMA), a miniature time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer (TOF-MS), a magnetic shield, an xyz stage, a tilt-adjustment mechanism, and a conflat flange with an outer diameter of 203 mm. A sample surface was irradiated by synchrotron radiation, and emitted electrons were energy-analyzed and detected by the ASMA and the DP-CMA, while desorbed ions were mass-analyzed and detected by the TOF-MS. The performance of the new EEICO analyzer was evaluated by measuring Si 2p photoelectron spectra of clean Si(001)-2×1 and Si(111)-7×7, and by measuring Si-L23VV-Si-2p Auger photoelectron coincidence spectra (Si-L23VV-Si-2p APECS) of clean Si(001)-2×1.

  10. High-Resolution {alpha} and Electron Spectroscopy of {sup 249}{sub 98}Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Greene, J. P.; Kondev, F. G.; Zhu, S.

    2015-04-13

    alpha-particle spectra of Cf-249 have been measured with a double-focusing magnetic spectrometer and with passivated implanted planar silicon (PIPS) detectors. The conversion-electron spectra of Cf-249 have been measured with a cooled Si(Li) detector and with a room-temperature PIPS detector. Precise energies of a groups in the decay of Cf-249 have been measured with respect to the known energy of Cf-250. In addition, alpha-electron, alpha-gamma, and gamma-gamma coincidence measurements were also performed to determine the spin-parity of the previously known 643.64-keV level. From electron intensities, conversion coefficients of transitions in the daughter Cm-245 have been determined. The measured L-3 conversion coefficients of the 333.4- and 388.2-keV transitions are found to be in agreement with the theoretical conversion coefficients for pure E1 multipolarity. On the other hand, the K, L-1 + L-2, M, and N conversion coefficients are approximately twice the theoretical values for pure E1 transitions. These measurements indicate anomalous E1 conversion coefficients for the 333.4- and 388.2-keV transitions, as has been pointed out in earlier measurements. The measured conversion coefficient of the 255.5-keV transition gives an M1 multipolarity for this transition which establishes a spin-parity of 7/2(-) and the 7/2(-)[743] single-particle assignment to the 643.64-keV level.

  11. High-Resolution Electron-Impact Study of the Far-Ultraviolet Emission Spectrum of Molecular Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xian-Ming; Ahmed, Syed M.; Multari, Rosalie A.; James, Geoffrey K.; Ajello, Joseph M.

    1995-01-01

    The emission spectrum of molecular hydrogen produced by electron-impact excitation at 100 eV has been measured in the wavelength range 1140-1690 A. High-resolution, optically thin spectra (delta(lambda) = 0.136 A) of the far-ultraviolet (FUV) Lyman and Werner band systems have been obtained with a newly constructed 3 m spectrometer. Synthetic spectral intensities based on the transition probabilities calculated by Abgrall et al. are in very good agreement with experimentally observed intensities. Previous modeling that utilized Allison & Daigarno band transition probabilities with Hoenl-London factors breaks down when the transition moment has significant J dependence or when ro-vibrational coupling is significant. Ro-vibrational perturbation between upsilon = 14 of the B(sup 1)Sigma(sup +, sub u) state and upsilon = 3 of the C(sup 1)Pi(sub u) state and the rotational dependence of the transition moment in the bands of the Lyman system are examined. Complete high-resolution experimental reference FUV spectra, together with the model synthetic spectra based on the Abgrall transition probabilities, are presented. An improved calibration standard is obtained, and an accurate calibration of the 3 m spectrometer has been achieved.

  12. Recent Developments of an Opto-Electronic THz Spectrometer for High-Resolution Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hindle, Francis; Yang, Chun; Mouret, Gael; Cuisset, Arnaud; Bocquet, Robin; Lampin, Jean-François; Blary, Karine; Peytavit, Emilien; Akalin, Tahsin; Ducournau, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    A review is provided of sources and detectors that can be employed in the THz range before the description of an opto-electronic source of monochromatic THz radiation. The realized spectrometer has been applied to gas phase spectroscopy. Air-broadening coefficients of HCN are determined and the insensitivity of this technique to aerosols is demonstrated by the analysis of cigarette smoke. A multiple pass sample cell has been used to obtain a sensitivity improvement allowing transitions of the volatile organic compounds to be observed. A solution to the frequency metrology is presented and promises to yield accurate molecular line center measurements. PMID:22291552

  13. Microstructure development in particulate coatings examined with high-resolution cryogenic scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, J.G.; Davis, H.T.; Scriven, L.E.; Takamura, Koichi

    1993-12-01

    The authors used cryogenic scanning electron microscopy to examine the early stages of latex film formation. They visualized the influence of ionic strength and extent of carboxylation in latex-calcium carbonate formulations and in latex-only formulations. Results demonstrated that latex particles deposited on calcium carbonate surfaces creating a suspension of carboxylic acid-stabilized calcium carbonate particles. Images of consolidation fronts showed that variation of ionic strength and extent of carboxylation dramatically changes the way latex particles consolidate and form films.

  14. High-resolution width-modulated pulse rebalance electronics for strapdown gyroscopes and accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, E. J.; Blalock, T. V.; Bryan, W. L.; Rush, K.

    1974-01-01

    Three different rebalance electronic loops were designed, implemented, and evaluated. The loops were width-modulated binary types using a 614.4 kHz keying signal; they were developed to accommodate the following three inertial sensors with the indicated resolution values: (1) Kearfott 2412 accelerometer - resolution = 260 micro-g/data pulse, (2) Honeywell GG334 gyroscope - resolution = 3.9 milli-arc-sec/data pulse, (3) Kearfott 2401-009 accelerometer - resolution = 144 milli-g/data pulse. Design theory, details of the design implementation, and experimental results for each loop are presented.

  15. Carbon Nanostructure Examined by Lattice Fringe Analysis of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Tomasek, Aaron J.; Street, Kenneth; Thompson, William K.

    2002-01-01

    The dimensions of graphitic layer planes directly affect the reactivity of soot towards oxidation and growth. Quantification of graphitic structure could be used to develop and test correlations between the soot nanostructure and its reactivity. Based upon transmission electron microscopy images, this paper provides a demonstration of the robustness of a fringe image analysis code for determining the level of graphitic structure within nanoscale carbon, i.e. soot. Results, in the form of histograms of graphitic layer plane lengths, are compared to their determination through Raman analysis.

  16. Carbon Nanostructure Examined by Lattice Fringe Analysis of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Tomasek, Aaron J.; Street, Kenneth; Thompson, William K.; Hull, David R.

    2003-01-01

    The dimensions of graphitic layer planes directly affect the reactivity of soot towards oxidation and growth. Quantification of graphitic structure could be used to develop and test correlations between the soot nanostructure and its reactivity. Based upon transmission electron microscopy images, this paper provides a demonstration of the robustness of a fringe image analysis code for determining the level of graphitic structure within nanoscale carbon, i.e., soot. Results, in the form of histograms of graphitic layer plane lengths, are compared to their determination through Raman analysis.

  17. High-resolution patterning electronic polymers using dopant induced solubility control (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moule, Adam J.; Jacobs, Ian E.; Li, Jun; Burg, Stephanie L.; Bilsky, David J.; Rotondo, Brandon T.; Stroeve, Pieter

    2015-08-01

    Organic electronics promise to provide flexible, large-area circuitry such as photovoltaics, displays, and light emitting diodes that can be fabricated inexpensively from solutions. A major obstacle to this vision is that most conjugated organic materials are miscible, making solution-based fabrication of multilayer or micro- to nanoscale patterned films problematic. Here we demonstrate that the solubility of prototypical conductive polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) can be reversibly "switched off" using high electron affinity molecular dopants, then later recovered with light or a suitable dedoping solution. Using this technique, we are able to stack mutually soluble materials and laterally pattern polymer films using evaporation of dopants through a shadow mask or with light, achieving sub-micrometer, optically limited feature sizes. After forming these structures, the films can be dedoped without disrupting the patterned features; dedoped films have identical optical characteristics, charge carrier mobilities, and NMR spectra as as-cast P3HT films. This method greatly simplifies solution-based device fabrication, is easily adaptable to current manufacturing workflows, and is potentially generalizable to other classes of materials.

  18. High resolution patterning for flexible electronics via roll-to-roll nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabik, Sami; de Riet, Joris; Yakimets, Iryna; Smits, Edsger

    2014-03-01

    Flexible electronics is a growing field and is currently maturing in applications such as displays, smart packaging, organic light-emitting diodes and organic photovoltaic cells. In order to process on flexible substrates at high throughput and large areas, novel patterning techniques will be essential. Conventional optical lithography is limited in throughput as well as resolution, and requires several alignment steps to generate multi-layered patterns, required for applications such as thin-film transistors. It therefore remains a complex and expensive process. Nanoimprint lithography is an emerging alternative to optical lithography, demonstrating patterning capabilities over a wide range of resolutions, from several microns down to a few nanometres. For display applications, nanoimprint lithography can be used to pattern various layers. Micron sized thin-film transistors for backplane can be fabricated where a self-aligned geometry is used to decrease the number of alignment steps, and increase the overlay accuracy. In addition, nano-structures can be used for optical applications such as anti-reflective surfaces and nano patterned transparent electrodes. Imprint lithography is a fully roll-to-roll compatible process and enables large area and high throughput fabrication for flexible electronics. In this paper we discuss the possibilities and the challenges of large area patterning by roll-to-roll nanoimprint lithography, reviewing micron and nano sized structures realized on our roll-to-roll equipment. Nano patterned transparent electrodes, moth-eye antireflective coatings, and multilevel structures will be covered.

  19. Algorithm for thorough background subtraction of high-resolution LC/MS data: application to obtain clean product ion spectra from nonselective collision-induced dissociation experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiying; Grubb, Mary; Wu, Wei; Josephs, Jonathan; Humphreys, William G

    2009-04-01

    Nonselective collision-induced dissociation (CID) is a technique for producing fragmentation products for all ions generated in an ion source. It is typical of liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis of complex samples that matrix-related components may contribute to the resulting product ion spectra and confound the usefulness of this technique for structure interpretation. In this proof-of-principle study, a high-resolution LC/MS-based background subtraction algorithm was used to process the nonselective CID data to obtain clean product ion spectra for metabolites in human plasma samples. With buspirone and clozapine metabolites in human plasma as examples, this approach allowed for not only facile detection of metabolites of interest but also generation of their respective product ion spectra that were clean and free of matrix-related interferences. This was demonstrated with both an MS(E) technique (where E represents collision energy) with a quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) instrument and an in-source fragmentation technique with an LTQ Orbitrap instrument. The combined nonselective CID and background subtraction approach should allow for detection and structural interpretation of other types of sample analyses where control samples are obtained.

  20. High resolution electronic spectroscopy of three n-alkylbenzenes: ethyl-, propyl-, and butylbenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borst, David R.; Joireman, Paul W.; Pratt, David W.; Robertson, Evan G.; Simons, John P.

    2002-04-01

    Rotationally resolved S1-S0 fluorescence excitation spectra of ethylbenzene, two conformers of n-propylbenzene, and two conformers of n-butylbenzene have been observed and assigned. The data obtained provide information about the equilibrium properties of each molecule, including their geometries in the S1-S0 states, their electronic distributions, and their dynamical behavior following the absorption of light. Trans structures are found to have S1 states that are 1Lb in character with relatively long fluorescence lifetimes. Gauche structures are found to have S1 states that are mixed (1Lb/1La) in character with relatively short fluorescence lifetimes. Possible reasons for these differences in properties are discussed.

  1. Preservation of high resolution protein structure by cryo-electron microscopy of vitreous sections.

    PubMed

    Sader, Kasim; Studer, Daniel; Zuber, Benoît; Gnaegi, Helmut; Trinick, John

    2009-12-01

    We have quantitated the degree of structural preservation in cryo-sections of a vitrified biological specimen. Previous studies have used sections of periodic specimens to assess the resolution present, but preservation before sectioning was not assessed and so the damage due particularly to cutting was not clear. In this study large single crystals of lysozyme were vitrified and from these X-ray diffraction patterns extending to better than 2.1A were obtained. The crystals were high pressure frozen in 30% dextran, and cryo-sectioned using a diamond knife. In the best case, preservation to a resolution of 7.9A was shown by electron diffraction, the first observation of sub-nanometre structural preservation in a vitreous section.

  2. Preparation of the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea for high-resolution histology and transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Brubacher, John L.; Vieira, Ana P.; Newmark, Phillip A.

    2014-01-01

    The flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea is an emerging model species in such fields as stem-cell biology, regeneration, and evolutionary biology. Excellent molecular tools have been developed for S. mediterranea, but ultrastructural techniques have received far less attention. Processing specimens for histology and transmission electron microscopy is notoriously idiosyncratic for particular species or specimen types. Unfortunately however, most methods for S. mediterranea described in the literature lack numerous essential details, and those few that do provide them rely on specialized equipment that may not be readily available. Here we present an optimized protocol for ultrastructural preparation of S. mediterranea. The protocol can be completed in six days, much of which is “hands-off” time. To aid with troubleshooting, we also illustrate the significant effects of seemingly minor variations in fixative, buffer concentration, and dehydration steps. This procedure will be useful for all planarian researchers, particularly those with relatively little experience in tissue processing. PMID:24556788

  3. Electronic and geometric structure of Pu metal: A high-resolution photoelectron spectromicroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, J.; Schulze, R. K.; Zocco, T.; Lashley, Jason; Farr, J. D.; Heinzelman, K.; Rotenberg, E.; Shuh, D. K.; Blau, M.; Tobin, J.

    2000-07-01

    Soft x-ray techniques (photon energy in the range of 10-1000 eV) such as photoelectron; x-ray emission; and near-edge, x-ray absorption spectroscopies have been used to determine the electronic structure of many (in fact most) materials. However, these techniques have not been fully utilized on the actinides. The safety issues involved in handling the actinides make it necessary to minimize the amount of radioactive materials used in the measurements. To our knowledge, the only synchrotron radiation source in the world where soft x-ray measurements have been performed on plutonium is the Spectromicroscopy Facility at Beam Line 7.0.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). We performed core-level photoemission, valence band photoemission, and near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy on both polycrystalline α-plutonium and δ-plutonium microcrystals.

  4. Extended Depth of Field for High-Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hovden, Robert; Xin, Huolin L.; Muller, David A.

    2010-12-02

    Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEMs) provide sub-Angstrom lateral resolution; however, the large convergence angle greatly reduces the depth of field. For microscopes with a small depth of field, information outside of the focal plane quickly becomes blurred and less defined. It may not be possible to image some samples entirely in focus. Extended depth-of-field techniques, however, allow a single image, with all areas in focus, to be extracted from a series of images focused at a range of depths. In recent years, a variety of algorithmic approaches have been employed for bright-field optical microscopy. Here, we demonstrate that some established optical microscopy methods can also be applied to extend the ~6 nm depth of focus of a 100 kV 5th-order aberration-corrected STEM (α{sub max} = 33 mrad) to image Pt-Co nanoparticles on a thick vulcanized carbon support. These techniques allow us to automatically obtain a single image with all the particles in focus as well as a complimentary topography map.

  5. Extended depth of field for high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hovden, Robert; Xin, Huolin L; Muller, David A

    2011-02-01

    Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEMs) provide sub-Angstrom lateral resolution; however, the large convergence angle greatly reduces the depth of field. For microscopes with a small depth of field, information outside of the focal plane quickly becomes blurred and less defined. It may not be possible to image some samples entirely in focus. Extended depth-of-field techniques, however, allow a single image, with all areas in focus, to be extracted from a series of images focused at a range of depths. In recent years, a variety of algorithmic approaches have been employed for bright-field optical microscopy. Here, we demonstrate that some established optical microscopy methods can also be applied to extend the ∼ 6 nm depth of focus of a 100 kV 5th-order aberration-corrected STEM (α max = 33 mrad) to image Pt-Co nanoparticles on a thick vulcanized carbon support. These techniques allow us to automatically obtain a single image with all the particles in focus as well as a complimentary topography map.

  6. Hard x-ray monochromator with milli-electron volt bandwidth for high-resolution diffraction studies of diamond crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvyd'ko, Yuri; Shu Deming; Khachatryan, Ruben; Xiao, Xianghui; DeCarlo, Francesco; Goetze, Kurt; Roberts, Timothy; Roehrig, Christian; Deriy, Alexey

    2012-02-15

    We report on design and performance of a high-resolution x-ray monochromator with a spectral bandwidth of {Delta}E{sub X}{approx_equal} 1.5 meV, which operates at x-ray energies in the vicinity of the backscattering (Bragg) energy E{sub H} = 13.903 keV of the (008) reflection in diamond. The monochromator is utilized for high-energy-resolution diffraction characterization of diamond crystals as elements of advanced x-ray crystal optics for synchrotrons and x-ray free-electron lasers. The monochromator and the related controls are made portable such that they can be installed and operated at any appropriate synchrotron beamline equipped with a pre-monochromator.

  7. Hard x-ray monochromator with milli-electron volt bandwidth for high-resolution diffraction studies of diamond crystals.

    PubMed

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvyd'ko, Yuri; Shu, Deming; Khachatryan, Ruben; Xiao, Xianghui; DeCarlo, Francesco; Goetze, Kurt; Roberts, Timothy; Roehrig, Christian; Deriy, Alexey

    2012-02-01

    We report on design and performance of a high-resolution x-ray monochromator with a spectral bandwidth of ΔE(X) ≃ 1.5 meV, which operates at x-ray energies in the vicinity of the backscattering (Bragg) energy E(H) = 13.903 keV of the (008) reflection in diamond. The monochromator is utilized for high-energy-resolution diffraction characterization of diamond crystals as elements of advanced x-ray crystal optics for synchrotrons and x-ray free-electron lasers. The monochromator and the related controls are made portable such that they can be installed and operated at any appropriate synchrotron beamline equipped with a pre-monochromator.

  8. Hard x-ray monochromator with milli-electron volt bandwidth for high-resolution diffraction studies of diamond crystals.

    SciTech Connect

    Stoupin, S.; Shvydko, Y.; Shu, D.; Khachatryan, R.; Xiao, X.

    2012-01-01

    We report on design and performance of a high-resolution x-ray monochromator with a spectral bandwidth of {Delta}E{sub x} {approx_equal} 1.5 meV, which operates at x-ray energies in the vicinity of the backscattering (Bragg) energy E{sub H} = 13.903 keV of the (008) reflection in diamond. The monochromator is utilized for high-energy-resolution diffraction characterization of diamond crystals as elements of advanced x-ray crystal optics for synchrotrons and x-ray free-electron lasers. The monochromator and the related controls are made portable such that they can be installed and operated at any appropriate synchrotron beamline equipped with a pre-monochromator.

  9. Excited electronic states of thiophene: high resolution photoabsorption Fourier transform spectroscopy and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Holland, D M P; Trofimov, A B; Seddon, E A; Gromov, E V; Korona, T; de Oliveira, N; Archer, L E; Joyeux, D; Nahon, L

    2014-10-21

    The recently introduced synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform spectroscopy has been employed to study the excited electronic states of thiophene. A highly resolved photoabsorption spectrum has been measured between ∼5 and 12.5 eV, providing a wealth of new data. High-level ab initio computations have been performed using the second-order algebraic-diagrammatic construction (ADC(2)) polarization propagator approach, and the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-CC) method at the CCSD and CC3 levels, to guide the assignment of the spectrum. The adiabatic energy corrections have been evaluated, thereby extending the theoretical study beyond the vertical excitation picture and leading to a significantly improved understanding of the spectrum. The low-lying π→π* and π→σ* transitions result in prominent broad absorption bands. Two strong Rydberg series converging onto the X(~)(2)A2 state limit have been assigned to the 1a2→npb1(1)B2 and the 1a2→nda2(1)A1 transitions. A second, and much weaker, d-type series has been assigned to the 1a2→ndb1(1)B2 transitions. Excitation into some of the Rydberg states belonging to the two strong series gives rise to vibrational structure, most of which has been interpreted in terms of excitations of the totally symmetric ν4 and ν8 modes. One Rydberg series, assigned to the 3b1→nsa1(1)B1 transitions, has been identified converging onto the Ã(2)B1 state limit, and at higher energies Rydberg states converging onto the B(~)(2)A1 state limit could be identified. The present spectra reveal highly irregular vibrational structure in certain low energy absorption bands, and thus provide a new source of information for the rapidly developing studies of excited state non-adiabatic dynamics and photochemistry.

  10. High resolution electron diffraction analysis of structural changes associated with the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. -G.

    1994-04-01

    Changes in protein structure that occur during the formation of the M photointermediate of bacteriorhodopsin can be directly visualized by electron diffraction techniques. Samples containing a high percentage of the M intermediate were trapped by rapidly cooling the crystals with liquid nitrogen following illumination with filtered green light at 240K and 260K respectively. Difference Fourier projection maps for M minus bR at two temperatures and for M{sub 260K} minus M{sub 240K} are presented. While it is likely that a unique M-substate is trapped when illuminated at 260K produces a mixture of the M{sub 240K} substate and a second M-substate which may have a protein structure similar to the N-intermediate. The diffraction data clearly show that statistically significant structural changes occur upon formation of the M{sub 240K} specimen and then further upon formation of the second substate which is present in the mixture that is produced at 260K. A preliminary 3-D difference map, based on data collected with samples tilted up to 30{degree}, has been constructed at a resolution of 3.5{angstrom} parallel to the membrane plane and a resolution of 8.5{angstrom} perpendicular to the membrane. The data have been analyzed by a number of different criteria to ensure that the differences seen reflect real conformation changes at a level which is significantly above the noise in the map. Furthermore, a comparison of the positions of specific backbone and side-chain groups relative to significant difference peaks suggests that it will be necessary to further refine the atomic resolution model before it will be possible to interpret the changes in chemical structure that occur in the protein at this stage of the photocycle.

  11. Electron-Atom Collisions in Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Electron-atom collisions in gases are an aspect of atomic physics. Three experiments in this field employing a thyratron are described: (i) the Ramsauer-Townsend effect, (ii) the excitation and ionization potentials of xenon and (iii) the ion-electron recombination after interrupting the electric discharge.

  12. Structure and chemistry of epitaxial ceria thin films on yttria-stabilized zirconia substrates, studied by high resolution electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Robert; Lee, Sang Chul; Shi, Yezhou; Chueh, William C

    2017-01-06

    We have applied aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to study the structure and chemistry of epitaxial ceria thin films, grown by pulsed laser deposition onto (001) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates. There are few observable defects apart from the expected mismatch interfacial dislocations and so the films would be expected to have good potential for applications. Under high electron beam dose rate (above about 6000 e(-)/Å(2)s) domains of an ordered structure appear and these are interpreted as being created by oxygen vacancy ordering. The ordered structure does not appear at lower lose rates (ca. 2600 e(-)/Å(2)s) and can be removed by imaging under 1 mbar oxygen gas in an environmental TEM. EELS confirms that there is both oxygen deficiency and the associated increase in Ce(3+) versus Ce(4+) cations in the ordered domains. In situ high resolution TEM recordings show the formation of the ordered domains as well as atomic migration along the ceria thin film (001) surface.

  13. High-Resolution Spectroscopy with a Free-Electron Laser: Vibrational Lifetimes of Hydrogen-related Defects in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luepke, Gunter

    2009-03-01

    Gunter Luepke, Department of Applied Science, The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 Vibrational lifetimes of hydrogen- and deuterium-related bending and stretching modes in crystalline silicon are measured by high-resolution infrared absorption spectroscopy and pump-probe transient bleaching technique using the Jefferson Lab. Free-Electron Laser. We find that the vibrational lifetimes of the bending modes follow a universal frequency-gap law, i.e., the decay time increases exponentially with increasing decay order, with values ranging from 1 ps for a one-phonon process to 265 ps for a four-phonon process. The temperature dependence of the lifetime shows that the bending mode decays by lowest-order multi-phonon process. In contrast, the lifetimes of the stretching modes are found to be extremely dependent on the defect structure, ranging from 2 to 295 ps. Against conventional wisdom, we find that lifetimes of Si-D stretch modes typically are longer than for the corresponding Si-H modes. Our results provide new insights into vibrational decay and the giant isotope effect of hydrogen in semiconductor systems. The potential implications of the results on the physics of electronic device degradation are discussed.

  14. Soot Structure and Reactivity Analysis by Raman Microspectroscopy, Temperature-Programmed Oxidation, and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauer, Markus; Schuster, Manfred E.; Su, Dangsheng; Schlögl, Robert; Niessner, Reinhard; Ivleva, Natalia P.

    2009-11-01

    Raman microspectroscopy (RM), temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were combined to get comprehensive information on the relationship between structure and reactivity of soot in samples of spark discharge (GfG), heavy duty engine diesel (EURO VI and IV) soot, and graphite powder upon oxidation by oxygen at increasing temperatures. GfG soot and graphite powder represent the higher and lower reactivity limits. Raman microspectroscopic analysis was conducted by determination of spectral parameters using a five band fitting procedure (G, D1-D4) as well as by evaluation of the dispersive character of the D mode. The analysis of spectral parameters shows a higher degree of disorder and a higher amount of molecular carbon for untreated GfG soot samples than for samples of untreated EURO VI and EURO IV soot. The structural analysis based on the dispersive character of the D mode revealed substantial differences in ordering descending from graphite powder, EURO IV, VI to GfG soot. HRTEM images and EELS analysis of EURO IV and VI samples indicated a different morphology and a higher structural order as compared to GfG soot in full agreement with the Raman analysis. These findings are also confirmed by the reactivity of soot during oxidation (TPO), where GfG soot was found to be the most reactive and EURO IV and VI soot samples exhibited a moderate reactivity.

  15. High-resolution electronic spectra of yttrium oxide (YO): The D2Σ+-X2Σ+ transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Deping; Zhang, Qiang; Zhu, Boxing; Gu, Jingwang; Suo, Bingbing; Chen, Yang; Zhao, Dongfeng

    2017-03-01

    The D2Σ+ -X2Σ+ electronic absorption spectrum of the astrophysically relevant yttrium oxide (YO) molecule has been recorded for the first time in the 400-440 nm region using laser induced fluorescence. YO molecules are produced by corona discharge of oxygen between the tips of two yttrium needles in a supersonic jet expansion. An unambiguous spectroscopic identification of the D2Σ+ -X2Σ+ transition becomes possible from a combined analysis of the moderate-resolution laser excitation spectrum and dispersed fluorescence spectrum. We have also performed multi-state complete active space second order perturbation theory calculations on the first six doublets of YO, and the results support our assignment of the D2Σ+ state. Accurate spectroscopic constants for D2Σ+ ν ' = 0 and 1 levels have been determined from a rotational analysis of the high resolution spectra that are recorded with a resolution of ˜0.018 cm-1. Severe perturbations are observed in the experimental spectra and are considered to originate from interactions with at least one nearby 2/4Π electronic state, e.g., the undetected C2Π state. We have also measured the radiative lifetimes of B2 Σ+ ν ' = 0, and D2 Σ+ ν ' = 0 and 1 states, based on which the B2Σ+ -X2Σ+ (0, 0) and D2Σ+ -X2Σ+ (0/1, 0) band oscillator strengths have been determined.

  16. Conformational ordering of biomolecules in the gas phase: nitrogen collision cross sections measured on a prototype high resolution drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    May, Jody C; Goodwin, Cody R; Lareau, Nichole M; Leaptrot, Katrina L; Morris, Caleb B; Kurulugama, Ruwan T; Mordehai, Alex; Klein, Christian; Barry, William; Darland, Ed; Overney, Gregor; Imatani, Kenneth; Stafford, George C; Fjeldsted, John C; McLean, John A

    2014-02-18

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry measurements which describe the gas-phase scaling of molecular size and mass are of both fundamental and pragmatic utility. Fundamentally, such measurements expand our understanding of intrinsic intramolecular folding forces in the absence of solvent. Practically, reproducible transport properties, such as gas-phase collision cross-section (CCS), are analytically useful metrics for identification and characterization purposes. Here, we report 594 CCS values obtained in nitrogen drift gas on an electrostatic drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) instrument. The instrument platform is a newly developed prototype incorporating a uniform-field drift tube bracketed by electrodynamic ion funnels and coupled to a high resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The CCS values reported here are of high experimental precision (±0.5% or better) and represent four chemically distinct classes of molecules (quaternary ammonium salts, lipids, peptides, and carbohydrates), which enables structural comparisons to be made between molecules of different chemical compositions for the rapid "omni-omic" characterization of complex biological samples. Comparisons made between helium and nitrogen-derived CCS measurements demonstrate that nitrogen CCS values are systematically larger than helium values; however, general separation trends between chemical classes are retained regardless of the drift gas. These results underscore that, for the highest CCS accuracy, care must be exercised when utilizing helium-derived CCS values to calibrate measurements obtained in nitrogen, as is the common practice in the field.

  17. Conformational Ordering of Biomolecules in the Gas Phase: Nitrogen Collision Cross Sections Measured on a Prototype High Resolution Drift Tube Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry measurements which describe the gas-phase scaling of molecular size and mass are of both fundamental and pragmatic utility. Fundamentally, such measurements expand our understanding of intrinsic intramolecular folding forces in the absence of solvent. Practically, reproducible transport properties, such as gas-phase collision cross-section (CCS), are analytically useful metrics for identification and characterization purposes. Here, we report 594 CCS values obtained in nitrogen drift gas on an electrostatic drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) instrument. The instrument platform is a newly developed prototype incorporating a uniform-field drift tube bracketed by electrodynamic ion funnels and coupled to a high resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The CCS values reported here are of high experimental precision (±0.5% or better) and represent four chemically distinct classes of molecules (quaternary ammonium salts, lipids, peptides, and carbohydrates), which enables structural comparisons to be made between molecules of different chemical compositions for the rapid “omni-omic” characterization of complex biological samples. Comparisons made between helium and nitrogen-derived CCS measurements demonstrate that nitrogen CCS values are systematically larger than helium values; however, general separation trends between chemical classes are retained regardless of the drift gas. These results underscore that, for the highest CCS accuracy, care must be exercised when utilizing helium-derived CCS values to calibrate measurements obtained in nitrogen, as is the common practice in the field. PMID:24446877

  18. Direct evidence of induction of interdigitated gel structure in large unilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine by ethanol: studies by excimer method and high-resolution electron cryomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, M; Miyazu, M; Asano, T; Yuba, A; Kume, N

    1994-03-01

    Interaction of large unilamellar vesicle (LUV) of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) with ethanol was investigated by the excimer method developed by Yamazaki et al. (Yamazaki, M., M. Miyazu, and T. Asano. 1992. Biochim. Biophys. Acta. 1106:94-98) and the high-resolution electron cryomicroscope with a new cryostage (top-entry superfluid stage) (HiRECM) developed by Fujiyoshi, Y. et al. (Fujiyoshi, Y., T. Mizusaki, K. Morikawa, H. Aoki, H. Kihara, and Y. Harada. 1991. Ultramicroscopy. 38:241-251). The excimer method is based on the fact that the ratio of excimer to monomer fluorescence intensity (E/M) of pyrene PC is lowered in the membrane in the interdigitated gel structure (L beta I), because structural restriction of L beta I structure largely decreases collisions of pyrene rings of the pyrene PCs in the membrane. E/M of pyrene PC in DPPC LUV decreased largely at high concentrations of ethanol, which indicated the induction of L beta I structures in DPPC LUV. Frozen-hydrated DPPC LUVs in a vitreous ice were observed at 4K with HiRECM, and these images were characterized by a pair of concentric circles. The membrane thickness of DPPC LUV which was estimated from the distance between the two concentric lines decreased largely at high concentration of ethanol. The mean value of membrane thickness of the LUV in the absence of ethanol was 3.8 nm, while at 15% (w/v) ethanol was 3.0 nm. These values were almost same as those obtained from the electron density profile of DPPC MLV by the x-ray diffraction analysis in each structures, L beta' and L beta I structures, respectively. These results indicated directly the induction of L beta 1 structure in DPPC LUV at high concentration of ethanol.

  19. Observation of the atomic structure of ß'-SiAlON using three generations of high resolution electron microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorel, A.; Ciston, J.; Bartel, T.; Song, C.-Y.; Dahmen, U.

    2013-04-01

    The structure of a ß‧-SiAlON (Si5.6Al0.4O0.4N7.6) has been observed using three generations of unique high resolution microscopes spanning over three decades of development in instrumentation - the Atomic Resolution Microscope (ARM), the One Angstrom Microscope (OAM) and the Transmission Electron Aberration-corrected Microscope (TEAM). The information limits of these microscopes are 0.16, 0.08 and 0.05 nm respectively. Observations along ⟨0 0 0 1⟩ at Scherzer defocus for each microscope demonstrate a drastic increase in structural information. Images taken on TEAM show clearly resolved atomic columns whereas the ARM images were only indirectly related to the structure. Nevertheless, the loss of the six-fold symmetry associated with the O/N and Al/Si substitutions was already visible on images taken on the ARM, and an associated ∼25 pm displacement of the O substituting for N in some of the 2c Wyckoff positions of the SiN unit cell was measured on exit wave reconstructions obtained from through focal series on the OAM. This paper illustrates how progress in instrumentation impacts our analysis and understanding of materials.

  20. Study of Explosive Electron Emission from a Pin Cathode Using High Resolution Point-Projection X-Ray Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Parkevich, E. V.; Tilikin, I. N.; Mingaleev, A. R.; Agafonov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Most studies of Explosive Electron Emission (EEE) are based on the idea of cathode flares developing after explosion of metal whiskers (micron scale pins) on the cathode surface. The physical state of the pin material, the spatial structure of the explosion and its origin are still a matter of conjecture. In this work we used high-resolution point projection x-ray radiography to observe micron scale pin explosion in a high-current diode. Pin cathodes made from 10-25 micron Cu or Mo wires were placed in gaps in return current circuits of hybrid X-pinches on the XP and BIN pulsers. Pin lengths were varied over a range 1-4 mm and pin-anode gaps within 0.05-3 mm. The diode current and voltage were measured. In experiments with small pin-anode gap (0.1 - 1 mm) development of an expanded dense core of the pin was observed except the pin tip with length 100-200 microns indicating significant energy deposition in the wire material. In experiments with bigger gaps there was no visible wire core expansion within the spatial resolution of the experimental technique. Work at Cornell was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration Stewardship Sciences Academic Programs under Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NA0001836 and at the Lebedev Institute by the RSF grant 142200273.

  1. Wide-band, high-resolution soft x-ray spectrometer for the Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Widmann, K.

    1999-01-01

    We have constructed two wide-band, high-resolution vacuum flat crystal spectrometers and implemented them on the Electron Beam Ion Trap located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Working in unison, these spectrometers can measure an x-ray bandwidth {le}9 {Angstrom} in the soft x-ray region below 21 {Angstrom}. In order to achieve this large bandwidth each spectrometer houses either two 125 mm {times} 13 mm {times} 2 mm RAP (rubidium acid phthalate, 2d=26.121 {Angstrom}), two 114 mm {times} 13 mm {times} 2 mm TlAP (thallium acid phthalate, 2d=25.75 {Angstrom}) crystals, or some combination thereof, for dispersion and two position sensitive proportional counters for detection of x rays. The spectrometers are used to measure wavelengths and relative intensities of the L-shell line emission from FethinspXVII{endash}XXIV for comparison with spectra obtained from astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. The wide wavelength coverage attainable by these spectrometers makes it possible to measure all the L-shell emission from a given iron ion species simultaneously. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. High resolution electron microscopy of Ag-clusters in crystalline and non-crystalline morphologies grown inside superfluid helium nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Volk, Alexander; Thaler, Philipp; Koch, Markus; Fisslthaler, Evelin; Grogger, Werner; Ernst, Wolfgang E

    2013-06-07

    We present a first investigation of structural properties of Ag clusters with a diameter of up to 5.5 nm grown inside superfluid helium nanodroplets (He(N)) and deposited on an amorphous C surface. With high resolution transmission electron microscope images we are able to show that in addition to the crystalline face centered cubic (fcc) structure, noncrystalline icosahedral (Ih), and decahedral (Dh) morphologies are grown. Relative abundances (56% fcc, 31% Dh, and 13% Ih) as well as the size distribution of each morphology (mean diameters d(fcc)=2.62(5) nm, d(Dh)=3.34(7) nm, and d(Ih)=3.93(2) nm) do not reflect the situation expected from pure energetic considerations, where small Ihs should be followed by medium sized Dhs and large fccs. Instead, kinetic factors seem to play an important role in the formation of these structures, as it appears to be the case for clusters formed by inert gas aggregation. Considering the low temperatures (0.37 K) and extremely high cooling rates, we discuss basic ideas that might lead to a qualitative picture of the cluster formation process inside He(N).

  3. Separating strain from composition in unit cell parameter maps obtained from aberration corrected high resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, T.; Remmele, T.; Korytov, M.; Markurt, T.; Albrecht, M.; Duff, A.; Lymperakis, L.; Neugebauer, J.; Chèze, C.

    2014-01-21

    Based on the evaluation of lattice parameter maps in aberration corrected high resolution transmission electron microscopy images, we propose a simple method that allows quantifying the composition and disorder of a semiconductor alloy at the unit cell scale with high accuracy. This is realized by considering, next to the out-of-plane, also the in-plane lattice parameter component allowing to separate the chemical composition from the strain field. Considering only the out-of-plane lattice parameter component not only yields large deviations from the true local alloy content but also carries the risk of identifying false ordering phenomena like formations of chains or platelets. Our method is demonstrated on image simulations of relaxed supercells, as well as on experimental images of an In{sub 0.20}Ga{sub 0.80}N quantum well. Principally, our approach is applicable to all epitaxially strained compounds in the form of quantum wells, free standing islands, quantum dots, or wires.

  4. Genesis of presolar diamonds: Comparative high-resolution transmission electron microscopy study of meteoritic and terrestrial nano-diamonds

    SciTech Connect

    Daulton, T.L. |; Eisenhour, D.D.; Buseck, P.R.

    1996-12-01

    Nano-diamonds isolated from acid dissolution residues of primitive carbonaceous meteorites (Allende and Murchison) were studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. To discriminate among their most likely formation mechanisms, high-pressure shock-induced metamorphism or low-pressure vapor condensation. the microstructures of presolar diamond crystallites were compared to those of (terrestrial) synthesized nano-diamonds. The synthesized diamonds used for comparison in this study were produced by high-pressure shock waves generated in controlled detonations and by direct nucleation and homoepitaxial growth from the vapor phase in low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-type processes. Microstructural features were identified that appear unique to shock metamorphism and to nucleation from the vapor phase, respectively. A comparison of these features to the microstructures found in presolar diamonds indicates that the predominant mechanism for presolar diamond formation is a vapor deposition process, suggesting a circumstellar condensation origin. A new presolar grain component has also been identified in the meteoritic residues, the (2H) hexagonal polytype of diamond (lonsdaleite). 93 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  5. High resolution transmission electron microscope Imaging and first-principles simulations of atomic-scale features in graphene membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Bhandari, Sagar; Yi, Wei; Bell, David; Westervelt, Robert; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2012-02-01

    Ultra-thin membranes such as graphene[1] are of great importance for basic science and technology applications. Graphene sets the ultimate limit of thinness, demonstrating that a free-standing single atomic layer not only exists but can be extremely stable and strong [2--4]. However, both theory [5, 6] and experiments [3, 7] suggest that the existence of graphene relies on intrinsic ripples that suppress the long-wavelength thermal fluctuations which otherwise spontaneously destroy long range order in a two dimensional system. Here we show direct imaging of the atomic features in graphene including the ripples resolved using monochromatic aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We compare the images observed in TEM with simulated images based on an accurate first-principles total potential. We show that these atomic scale features can be mapped through accurate first-principles simulations into high resolution TEM contrast. [1] Geim, A. K. & Novoselov, K. S. Nat. Mater. 6, 183-191, (2007). [2] Novoselov, K. S.et al. Science 306, 666-669, (2004). [3] Meyer, J. C. et al. Nature 446, 60-63, (2007). [4] Lee, C., Wei, X. D., Kysar, J. W. & Hone, J. Science 321, 385-388, (2008). [5] Nelson, D. R. & Peliti, L. J Phys-Paris 48, 1085-1092, (1987). [6] Fasolino, A., Los, J. H. & Katsnelson, M. I. Nat. Mater. 6, 858-861, (2007). [7] Meyer, J. C. et al. Solid State Commun. 143, 101-109, (2007).

  6. Characterization of Al2O3 in High-Strength Mo Alloy Sheets by High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yucheng; Gao, Yimin; Wei, Shizhong; Hu, Yajie

    2016-02-01

    A novel type of alumina (Al2O3)-doped molybdenum (Mo) alloy sheet was prepared by a hydrothermal method and a subsequent powder metallurgy process. Then the characterization of α-Al2O3 was investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy as the research focus. The tensile strength of the Al2O3-doped Mo sheet is 43-85% higher than that of the pure Mo sheet, a very obvious reinforcement effect. The sub-micron and nanometer-scale Al2O3 particles can increase the recrystallization temperature by hindering grain boundary migration and improve the tensile strength by effectively blocking the motion of the dislocations. The Al2O3 particles have a good bond with the Mo matrix and there exists an amorphous transition layer at the interface between Al2O3 particles and the Mo matrix in the as-rolled sheet. The sub-structure of α-Al2O3 is characterized by a number of nanograins in the $\\left[ {2\\bar{2}1} \\right]$ direction. Lastly, a new computer-based method for indexing diffraction patterns of the hexagonal system is introduced, with 16 types of diffraction patterns of α-Al2O3 indexed.

  7. Molecular Dissociation Induced by Electron Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Andreas

    2009-05-01

    Free electrons can efficiently break molecules or molecular ions in low-energy collisions by the processes of dissociative recombination or attachment. These processes make slow electrons efficient chemical agents in many environments. For dissociative recombination, in particular, studies of the underlying reaction paths and mechanisms have become possible on a uniquely elementary level in recent years both for theory and experiment. On the experimental side, collisions can be prepared at resolved collision energies down to the meV (10 Kelvin) level, increasingly gaining control also over the initial molecular quantum level, and individual events are detected and kinematically analyzed by fast-beam coincidence fragment imaging. Experiments are reported from the ion cooler ring TSR in Heidelberg. Stored beams of molecular ions cooled in their external and internal degrees of freedom are collinearly merged with intense and cold electron beams from cryogenic GaAs photocathodes, recently shown to yield fast cooling of the center-of-mass motion also for heavy and correspondingly slow molecular ion beams. To reconstruct the molecular fragmentation events multiparticle imaging can now be used systematically with collision energies set a wide range, especially aiming at specific electron capture resonances. Thus, for CF^+ it is found that the electronic state of the C fragment (^3P or ^1D) switches resonantly when the collision energy is changed by only a small fraction. As a new powerful tool, an energy-sensitive multi-strip surface-barrier detector (EMU) has been set up to measure with near-unity efficiency the masses of all fragments together with their hit positions in high-multiplicity events. Among many uses, this device allows internal molecular excitations to be derived for individual chemical channels in polyatomic fragmentation. New results will be presented in particular on the breakup of the hydronium ion (D3O^+).

  8. Direct Observation of the Outermost Surfaces of Mesoporous Silica Thin Films by High Resolution Ultralow Voltage Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Maho; Susuki, Kyoka; Otsuji, Haruo; Sakuda, Yusuke; Asahina, Shunsuke; Kikuchi, Naoki; Kanazawa, Toshiyuki; Kuroda, Yoshiyuki; Wada, Hiroaki; Shimojima, Atsushi; Kuroda, Kazuyuki

    2017-03-07

    The properties of the outermost surfaces of mesoporous silica thin films are critical in determining their functions. Obtaining information on the presence or absence of silica layers on the film surfaces and on the degree of mesopore opening is essential for applications of surface mesopores. In this study, the outermost surfaces of mesoporous silica thin films with 3-dimensional orthorhombic and 2-dimensional hexagonal structures were observed using ultralow voltage high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM) with decelerating optics. SEM images of the surfaces before and after etching with NH4F were taken at various landing voltages. Comparing the images taken under different conditions indicated that the outermost surfaces of the nonetched mesoporous silica thin films are coated with a thin layer of silica. The images taken at an ultralow landing voltage (i.e., 80 V) showed that the presence or absence of surface silica layers depends on whether the film was etched with an aqueous solution of NH4F. The mesostructures of both the etched and nonetched films were visible in images taken at a conventional landing voltage (2 kV); hence, the ultralow landing voltage was more suitable for analyzing the outermost surfaces. The SEM observations provided detailed information about the surfaces of mesoporous silica thin films, such as the degree of pore opening and their homogeneities. AFM images of nonetched 2-dimensional hexagonal mesoporous silica thin films show that the shape of the silica layer on the surface of the films reflects the curvature of the top surface of the cylindrical mesochannels. SEM images taken at various landing voltages are discussed, with respect to the electron penetration range at each voltage. This study increases our understanding of the surfaces of mesoporous silica thin films, which may lead to potential applications utilizing the periodically arranged mesopores on these surfaces.

  9. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy of manganese oxides: Application to Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Laffont, L.; Gibot, P.

    2010-11-15

    Manganese oxides particularly Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} Hausmannite are currently used in many industrial applications such as catalysis, magnetism, electrochemistry or air contamination. The downsizing of the particle size of such material permits an improvement of its intrinsic properties and a consequent increase in its performances compared to a classical micron-sized material. Here, we report a novel synthesis of hydrophilic nano-sized Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}, a bivalent oxide, for which a precise characterization is necessary and for which the determination of the valency proves to be essential. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and particularly High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (HREELS) allow us to perform these measurements on the nanometer scale. Well crystallized 10-20 nm sized Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles with sphere-shaped morphology were thus successfully synthesized. Meticulous EELS investigations allowed the determination of a Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 2+} ratio of 1.5, i.e. slightly lower than the theoretical value of 2 for the bulk Hausmannite manganese oxide. This result emphasizes the presence of vacancies on the tetrahedral sites in the structure of the as-synthesized nanomaterial. - Research Highlights: {yields}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} bulk and nano were studied by XRD, TEM and EELS. {yields}XRD and TEM determine the degree of crystallinity and the narrow grain size. {yields}HREELS gave access to the Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 2+} ratio. {yields}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nano have vacancies on the tetrahedral sites.

  10. In situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy synthesis observation of nanostructured carbon coated LiFePO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trudeau, M. L.; Laul, D.; Veillette, R.; Serventi, A. M.; Mauger, A.; Julien, C. M.; Zaghib, K.

    In situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) studies of the structural transformations that occur during the synthesis of carbon-coated LiFePO 4 (C-LiFePO 4) and heat treatment to elevated temperatures were conducted in two different electron microscopes. Both microscopes have sample holders that are capable of heating up to 1500 °C, with one working under high vacuum and the other capable of operating with the sample surrounded by a low gaseous environment. The C-LiFePO 4 samples were prepared using three different compositions of precursor materials with Fe(0), Fe(II) or Fe(III), a Li-containing salt and a polyethylene- block-poly(ethylene glycol)-50% ethylene oxide or lactose. The in situ TEM studies suggest that low-cost Fe(0) and a low-cost carbon-containing compound such as lactose are very attractive precursors for mass production of C-LiFePO 4, and that 700 °C is the optimum synthesis temperature. At temperatures higher than 800 °C, LiFePO 4 has a tendency to decompose. The same in situ measurements have been made on particles without carbon coat. The results show that the homogeneous deposit of the carbon deposit at 700 °C is the result of the annealing that cures the disorder of the surface layer of bare LiFePO 4. Electrochemical tests supported the conclusion that the C-LiFePO 4 derived from Fe(0) is the most attractive for mass production.

  11. Dinuclear osmium(II) probes for high-resolution visualisation of cellular DNA structure using electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wragg, Ashley; Gill, Martin R; Hill, Christopher J; Su, Xiaodi; Meijer, Anthony J H M; Smythe, Carl; Thomas, Jim A

    2014-12-04

    Two dinuclear osmium polypyridyl complexes function as convenient, easy to handle TEM contrast agents and facilitate the high-resolution visualisation of intracellular structure, particularly sub-nuclear detail.

  12. High-resolution electron spectroscopy of lanthanide (Ce, Pr, and Nd) complexes of cyclooctatetraene: The role of 4f electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kumari, Sudesh; Roudjane, Mourad; Hewage, Dilrukshi; Yang Dongsheng; Liu Yang

    2013-04-28

    Cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium complexes of 1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene (COT) complexes were produced in a laser-vaporization metal cluster source and studied by pulsed-field ionization zero electron kinetic energy spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The computations included the second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory, the coupled cluster method with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations, and the state-average complete active space self-consistent field method. The spectrum of each complex exhibits multiple band systems and is assigned to ionization of several low-energy electronic states of the neutral complex. This observation is different from previous studies of M(COT) (M = Sc, Y, La, and Gd), for which a single band system was observed. The presence of the multiple low-energy electronic states is caused by the splitting of the partially filled lanthanide 4f orbitals in the ligand field, and the number of the low-energy states increases rapidly with increasing number of the metal 4f electrons. On the other hand, the 4f electrons have a small effect on the geometries and vibrational frequencies of these lanthanide complexes.

  13. High-resolution electron spectroscopy of lanthanide (Ce, Pr, and Nd) complexes of cyclooctatetraene: the role of 4f electrons.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sudesh; Roudjane, Mourad; Hewage, Dilrukshi; Liu, Yang; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2013-04-28

    Cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium complexes of 1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene (COT) complexes were produced in a laser-vaporization metal cluster source and studied by pulsed-field ionization zero electron kinetic energy spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The computations included the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, the coupled cluster method with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations, and the state-average complete active space self-consistent field method. The spectrum of each complex exhibits multiple band systems and is assigned to ionization of several low-energy electronic states of the neutral complex. This observation is different from previous studies of M(COT) (M = Sc, Y, La, and Gd), for which a single band system was observed. The presence of the multiple low-energy electronic states is caused by the splitting of the partially filled lanthanide 4f orbitals in the ligand field, and the number of the low-energy states increases rapidly with increasing number of the metal 4f electrons. On the other hand, the 4f electrons have a small effect on the geometries and vibrational frequencies of these lanthanide complexes.

  14. High resolution IR diode laser study of collisional energy transfer between highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene and CO2: the effect of donor fluorination on strong collision energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kilyoung; Johnson, Alan M; Powell, Amber L; Mitchell, Deborah G; Sevy, Eric T

    2014-12-21

    Collisional energy transfer between vibrational ground state CO2 and highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene (MFB) was studied using narrow bandwidth (0.0003 cm(-1)) IR diode laser absorption spectroscopy. Highly vibrationally excited MFB with E' = ∼41,000 cm(-1) was prepared by 248 nm UV excitation followed by rapid radiationless internal conversion to the electronic ground state (S1→S0*). The amount of vibrational energy transferred from hot MFB into rotations and translations of CO2 via collisions was measured by probing the scattered CO2 using the IR diode laser. The absolute state specific energy transfer rate constants and scattering probabilities for single collisions between hot MFB and CO2 were measured and used to determine the energy transfer probability distribution function, P(E,E'), in the large ΔE region. P(E,E') was then fit to a bi-exponential function and extrapolated to the low ΔE region. P(E,E') and the biexponential fit data were used to determine the partitioning between weak and strong collisions as well as investigate molecular properties responsible for large collisional energy transfer events. Fermi's Golden rule was used to model the shape of P(E,E') and identify which donor vibrational motions are primarily responsible for energy transfer. In general, the results suggest that low-frequency MFB vibrational modes are primarily responsible for strong collisions, and govern the shape and magnitude of P(E,E'). Where deviations from this general trend occur, vibrational modes with large negative anharmonicity constants are more efficient energy gateways than modes with similar frequency, while vibrational modes with large positive anharmonicity constants are less efficient at energy transfer than modes of similar frequency.

  15. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Lange, E.; Limão-Vieira, P. E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J.; Brunger, M. J. E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au; and others

    2015-10-14

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5–10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range.

  16. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Ferreira da Silva, F; Lange, E; Limão-Vieira, P; Jones, N C; Hoffmann, S V; Hubin-Franskin, M-J; Delwiche, J; Brunger, M J; Neves, R F C; Lopes, M C A; de Oliveira, E M; da Costa, R F; Varella, M T do N; Bettega, M H F; Blanco, F; García, G; Lima, M A P; Jones, D B

    2015-10-14

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5-10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range.

  17. Electron-Electron Interaction in Ion-Atom Collisions Studied by Projectile State-Resolved Auger Electron Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Do-Hyung

    1990-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the problem of dynamic electron-electron interactions in fast ion-atom collisions using projectile Auger electron spectroscopy. The study was carried out by measuring high-resolution projectile KLL Auger electron spectra as a function of projectile energy for the various collision systems of 0.25-2 MeV/u O^{q+} and F^ {q+} incident on H_2 and He targets. The electrons were detected in the beam direction, where the kinematic broadening is minimized. A zero-degree tandem electron spectrometer system was developed and showed the versatility of zero-degree measurements of collisionally-produced atomic states. The zero-degree binary encounter electrons (BEe), quasifree target electrons ionized by the projectiles in head-on collisions, were observed as a strong background in the KLL Auger electron spectrum. They were studied by treating the target ionization as 180^circ Rutherford elastic scattering in the projectile frame, and resulted in a validity test of the impulse approximation (IA) and a way to determine the spectrometer efficiency. An anomalous q-dependence, in which the zero-degree BEe yields increase with decreasing projectile charge state (q), was observed. State-resolved KLL Auger cross sections were determined by using the BEe normalization and thus the cross sections of the electron -electron interactions such as resonant transfer-excitation (RTE), electron-electron excitation (eeE), and electron -electron ionization (eeI) were determined. Projectile 2l capture with 1s to 2p excitation by the captured target electron was observed as an RTE process with Li-like and He-like projectiles and the measured RTEA (RTE followed by Auger decay) cross sections showed good agreement with an RTE-IA treatment and RTE alignment theory. Projectile 1s to 2p excitation by a target electron was observed an an eeE process with Li-like projectiles. Projectile 1s ionization by a target electron was observed as an eeI process with Be-like projectiles

  18. Prominent conjugate processes in the PCI recapture of photoelectrons revealed by high resolution Auger electron measurements of Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Yoshiro; Kosugi, Satoshi; Suzuki, Norihiro; Shigemasa, Eiji; Iwayama, Hiroshi; Koike, Fumihiro

    2016-05-01

    The Xe (N5O2 , 3O2 , 3) Auger electron spectrum originating from 4d5/ 2 - 1 photoionization was measured with the photon energy tuned very close above the ionization threshold. As the photon energy approached the 4d5/ 2 - 1 photoionization threshold, Rydberg series structures including several angular momentum components were formed within the Auger profile by the recapture of the photoelectrons into high-lying final ion orbitals. Our spectrum with resolution much narrower than the lifetime width of the corresponding core excited state allowed us to resolve detailed structures due to the orbital angular momenta very clearly. Unexpectedly, conjugate peaks originating from the exchange of angular momentum between the photoelectron and the Auger electron through Post-Collision-Interaction were found to dominate the spectrum. The new assignments were in accord with the quantum defect values obtained for the high Rydberg series for singly charged ionic Xe + 5 p(1S0) ml. This work was supported by Japan Society for the Promotion of Science through Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research No. 23600009.

  19. Calibration of the OHREX high-resolution imaging crystal spectrometer at the Livermore electron beam ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hell, N.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V.

    2016-11-01

    We report the calibration of the Orion High-Resolution X-ray (OHREX) imaging crystal spectrometer at the EBIT-I electron beam ion trap at Livermore. Two such instruments, dubbed OHREX-1 and OHREX-2, are fielded for plasma diagnostics at the Orion laser facility in the United Kingdom. The OHREX spectrometer can simultaneously house two spherically bent crystals with a radius of curvature of r = 67.2 cm. The focusing properties of the spectrometer allow both for larger distance to the source due to the increase in collected light and for observation of extended sources. OHREX is designed to cover a 2.5°-3° spectral range at Bragg angles around 51.3°. The typically high resolving powers at these large Bragg angles are ideally suited for line shape diagnostics. For instance, the nominal resolving power of the instrument (>10 000) is much higher than the effective resolving power associated with the Doppler broadening due to the temperature of the trapped ions in EBIT-I. The effective resolving power is only around 3000 at typical EBIT-I conditions, which nevertheless is sufficient to set up and test the instrument's spectral characteristics. We have calibrated the spectral range for a number of crystals using well known reference lines in the first and second order and derived the ion temperatures from these lines. We have also made use of the 50 μm size of the EBIT-I source width to characterize the spatial focusing of the spectrometer.

  20. High-resolution spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation for surface structure determination and the study of correlated electron systems

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, Jr., Edward John

    1996-05-01

    The surface structure of three molecular adsorbate systems on transition metal surfaces, (√3 x √3)R30° and (1.5 x 1.5)R18° CO adsorbed on Cu(111), and c(2x2) N2/Ni(100), have been determined using Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS). The adsorption site and bond lengths are reported for the adsorbate-metal bond and the first two substrate layers. The ARPEFS diffraction pattern of the shake-up peak for c(2x2) N2/Ni(100) is also discussed. A unique method of experimentally determining the angular momentum and intrinsic/extrinsic origin of core-level satellites is presented. We show for the first time that satellite peaks not associated with chemically differentiated atomic species display an ARPEFS intensity oscillation. Specifically, we present data for the C 1s from (√3x√3)R30 CO/Cu(111) and p2mg(2x1)CO/Ni(110), N is from c(2x2) N2/Ni(100), and Ni 3p from clean nickel(111). The satellite peaks in all cases exhibit ARPEFS curves which indicate an angular momentum identical to the main peak and are of an intrinsic nature. A Fourier Transform Soft X-ray spectrometer (FF-SX) has been designed and is under construction for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The spectrometer is designed for ultra-high resolution theoretical resolving power E/ΔE≈-106 in the photon energy region of 60-120 eV. This instrument is expected to provide experimental results which sensitively test models of correlated electron processes in atomic and molecular physics. The design criteria and consequent technical challenges posed by the short wavelengths of x-rays and desired resolving power are discussed. The fundamental and practical aspects of soft x-ray interferometry are also explored.

  1. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, R.; Jones, A. N.; McDermott, L.; Marsden, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated 'D'peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of 'G' and 'D' in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure.

  2. High resolution analytical electron microscopy reveals cell culture media induced changes to the chemistry of silver nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shu; Theodorou, Ioannis G.; Goode, Angela E.; Gow, Andrew; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng (Jim); Chung, Kian Fan; Tetley, Teresa D.; Shaffer, Milo S.; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing concern about the potential adverse effects on human health upon exposure to engineered silver nanomaterials (particles, wires and plates). However, the majority of studies testing the toxicity of silver nanomaterials have examined nominally ‘as-synthesized’ materials without considering the fate of the materials in biologically relevant fluids. Here, in-house silver nanowires (AgNWs) were prepared by a modified polyol process and were incubated in three cell culture media (DMEM, RPMI-1640 and DCCM-1) to examine the impact of AgNW-medium interactions on the physicochemical properties of the AgNWs. High-resolution analytical transmission electron microscopy revealed that Ag2S crystals form on the surface of AgNWs within 1 hour of incubation in DCCM-1. In contrast, the incubation of AgNWs in RPMI-1640 or DMEM did not lead to sulfidation. When the DCCM-1 cell culture medium was separated into its small molecule solutes and salts and protein components, the AgNWs were found to sulfidize in the fraction containing small molecule solutes and salts, but not in the fraction containing the protein component of the media. Further investigation showed the AgNWs did not readily sulfidize in the presence of isolated sulfur containing amino acids or proteins, such as cysteine or bovine serum albumin (BSA). The results demonstrate that the AgNWs can be transformed by the media before and during the incubation with cells and therefore the effects of cell culture media must be considered in the analysis of toxicity assays. Appropriate media and material controls must be in place to allow accurate predictions about the toxicity, and ultimately, the health risk of this commercially relevant class of nanomaterial. PMID:24160871

  3. Identifying the crystallinity, phase, and arsenic uptake of the nanomineral schwertmannite using analytical high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, R. A.; Kim, B.; Murayama, M.; Hochella, M. F.

    2010-12-01

    Schwertmannite, an iron oxyhydroxide sulfate nanomineral, plays a significant role in the geochemistry of acid mine drainage (AMD) as a metastable phase with respect to goethite and by retaining toxic metals, e.g. arsenic [1]. Schwertmannite’s characteristic morphology is needles 100-300 nm long and only 5-10 nm in diameter extending from a dense aggregate. The poorly-and nano-crystalline nature of this mineral requires using high resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM) to be fully characterized. We used HRTEM to identify the polyphasic nature of natural samples of schwertmannite collected from the Iberian Pyrite Belt in Spain. In order to analyze the dense core, samples were prepared in thin section using an ultramicrotome. Data on a sample identified as pure schwertmannite through powder XRD shows the presence of 5-10 nm goethite nanocrystals making up a significant portion of one of the nanoneedle tips (Figure 1). These nanocrystals exhibit lattice fringes and faceted surfaces, both of which match that expected for goethite. The great majority of the nanoneedles are poorly-crystalline (no lattice fringes) with atomically rough surfaces which may be highly active in the uptake of As. The presence of a range of phases and crystallinities in this sample demonstrate incipient stages of the mechanism that results in transformation of schwertmannite to goethite. Further analytical TEM analyses will help us track sorption/desorption, as well as the specific locations of As within these materials upon initial formation, as well as during transformation. [1] Acero et al. (2006) GCA 70, 4130-4139. Figure 1. HRTEM image of 'schwertmannite' nanoneedle with FFT data (inset).

  4. Progress in Computational Electron-Molecule Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rescigno, Tn

    1997-10-01

    The past few years have witnessed tremendous progress in the development of sophisticated ab initio methods for treating collisions of slow electrons with isolated small molecules. Researchers in this area have benefited greatly from advances in computer technology; indeed, the advent of parallel computers has made it possible to carry out calculations at a level of sophistication inconceivable a decade ago. But bigger and faster computers are only part of the picture. Even with today's computers, the practical need to study electron collisions with the kinds of complex molecules and fragments encountered in real-world plasma processing environments is taxing present methods beyond their current capabilities. Since extrapolation of existing methods to handle increasingly larger targets will ultimately fail as it would require computational resources beyond any imagined, continued progress must also be linked to new theoretical developments. Some of the techniques recently introduced to address these problems will be discussed and illustrated with examples of electron-molecule collision calculations we have carried out on some fairly complex target gases encountered in processing plasmas. Electron-molecule scattering continues to pose many formidable theoretical and computational challenges. I will touch on some of the outstanding open questions.

  5. Time-Resolved High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Using a Piezo-Driving Specimen Holder for Atomic-Scale Mechanical Interaction.

    PubMed

    Kizuka; Tanaka; Deguchi; Naruse

    1998-05-01

    : Time-resolved high-resolution transmission electron microscopy at a spatial resolution of 0.2 nm and a time resolution of 1/60 sec using a piezo-driving specimen holder is reported here. Various types of atomic processes in mechanical interaction, such as contact, bonding, deformation, and fracture, in nanometer-sized gold crystallites and carbon nanotubes are demonstrated.

  6. Theory of Electron-Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Donald C

    2009-10-02

    Collisions of electrons with atoms and ions play a crucial role in the modeling and diagnostics of fusion plasmas. In the edge and divertor regions of magnetically confined plasmas, data for the collisions of electrons with neutral atoms and low charge-state ions are of particular importance, while in the inner region, data on highly ionized species are needed. Since experimental measurements for these collisional processes remain very limited, data for such processes depend primarily on the results of theoretical calculations. Over the period of the present grant (January 2006 - August 2009), we have made additional improvements in our parallel scattering programs, generated data of direct fusion interest and made these data available on The Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center Web site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In addition, we have employed these data to do collsional-radiative modeling studies in support of a variety of experiments with magnetically confined fusion plasmas.

  7. Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mi-Young; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Cho, Hyuck; Karwasz, Grzegorz P.; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2017-03-01

    Cross section data are compiled from the literature for electron collisions with the acetylene (HCCH) molecule. Cross sections are collected and reviewed for total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational and vibrational states, dissociation, ionization, and dissociative attachment. The data derived from swarm experiments are also considered. For each of these processes, the recommended values of the cross sections are presented. The literature has been surveyed through early 2016.

  8. Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Methane

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mi-Young Yoon, Jung-Sik; Cho, Hyuck; Itikawa, Yukikazu; Karwasz, Grzegorz P.; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2015-06-15

    Cross section data are compiled from the literature for electron collisions with methane (CH{sub 4}) molecules. Cross sections are collected and reviewed for total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational and vibrational states, dissociation, ionization, and dissociative attachment. The data derived from swarm experiments are also considered. For each of these processes, the recommended values of the cross sections are presented. The literature has been surveyed through early 2014.

  9. The contribution of electron collisions to rotational excitations of cometary water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Xingfa; Mumma, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    The e-H2O collisional rate for exciting rotational transitions in cometary water is evaluated for conditions found in comet Halley during the Giotto spacecraft encounter. In the case of the O(sub 00) yields 1(sub 11) rotational transition, the e-H2O collisional rate exceeds that for excitation by neutral-neutral collisions at distances exceeding 3000 km from the cometary nucleus. Thus, the rotational temperature of the water molecule in the intermediate coma may be controlled by collisions with electrons rather than with neutral collisions, and the rotational temperature retrieved from high resolution infrared spectra of water in comet Halley may reflect electron temperatures rather than neutral gas temperature in the intermediate coma.

  10. Evaluation of gas chromatography - electron ionization - full scan high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry for pesticide residue analysis.

    PubMed

    Mol, Hans G J; Tienstra, Marc; Zomer, Paul

    2016-09-07

    Gas chromatography with electron ionization and full scan high resolution mass spectrometry with an Orbitrap mass analyzer (GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS) was evaluated for residue analysis. Pesticides in fruit and vegetables were taken as an example application. The relevant aspects for GC-MS based residue analysis, including the resolving power (15,000 to 120,000 FWHM at m/z 200), scan rate, dynamic range, selectivity, sensitivity, analyte identification, and utility of existing EI-libraries, are assessed and discussed in detail. The optimum acquisition conditions in full scan mode (m/z 50-500) were a resolving power of 60,000 and an automatic-gain-control target value of 3E6. These conditions provided (i) an optimum mass accuracy: within 2 ppm over a wide concentration range, with/without matrix, enabling the use of ±5 ppm mass extraction windows (ii) adequate scan speed: minimum 12 scans/peak, (iii) an intra-scan dynamic range sufficient to achieve LOD/LOQs ≤0.5 pg in fruit/vegetable matrices (corresponding to ≤0.5 μg kg(-1)) for most pesticides. EI-Orbitrap spectra were consistent over a very wide concentration range (5 orders) with good match values against NIST (EI-quadrupole) spectra. The applicability for quantitative residue analysis was verified by validation of 54 pesticides in three matrices (tomato, leek, orange) at 10 and 50 μg/kg. The method involved a QuEChERS-based extraction with a solvent switch into iso-octane, and 1 μL hot splitless injection into the GC-HRMS system. A recovery between 70 and 120% and a repeatability RSD <10% was obtained in most cases. Linearity was demonstrated for the range ≤5-250 μg kg(-1). The pesticides could be identified according to the applicable EU criteria for GC-HRMS (SANTE/11945/2015). GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS was found to be highly suited for quantitative pesticide residue analysis. The potential of qualitative screening to extend the scope makes it an attractive alternative to GC

  11. Temperature-Induced Electronic Structure Evolution of ZrTe5 Revealed by High resolution & Laser Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Chenlu; Liu, Guodong; Chen, Genfu; Yu, Li; He, Shaolong; Zhao, Lin; Chen, Chuangtian; Xu, Zuyan; Zhou, Xingjiang

    The transition metal pentatellurides ZrTe5 have attracted consideration attention since the 70s, due to the unusual transport properties like resistivity peak at ~140K and the sign change of the Hall coefficient and thermopower. The origin of the most peculiar resistivity peak remains controversial. In this talk we will present high resolution angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) study on the Fermi surface and band structure of ZrTe5, by using our high resolution ARPES system equipped with the VUV laser and the time-of-flight (TOF) electron energy analyzer. Upon cooling down, we found a gradual transition from hole-like band into electron-like band around the Brillouin zone center. Such an electron state transition forms the underlying physics for the abnormal transport properties. We will also comment on the possibility of a Dirac semimetal in ZrTe5.

  12. Large-volume reconstruction of brain tissue from high-resolution serial section images acquired by SEM-based scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kuwajima, Masaaki; Mendenhall, John M; Harris, Kristen M

    2013-01-01

    With recent improvements in instrumentation and computational tools, serial section electron microscopy has become increasingly straightforward. A new method for imaging ultrathin serial sections is developed based on a field emission scanning electron microscope fitted with a transmitted electron detector. This method is capable of automatically acquiring high-resolution serial images with a large field size and very little optical and physical distortions. In this chapter, we describe the procedures leading to the generation and analyses of a large-volume stack of high-resolution images (64 μm × 64 μm × 10 μm, or larger, at 2 nm pixel size), including how to obtain large-area serial sections of uniform thickness from well-preserved brain tissue that is rapidly perfusion-fixed with mixed aldehydes, processed with a microwave-enhanced method, and embedded into epoxy resin.

  13. Direct observation of the intergrown {alpha}-phase in {beta}-TmAlB{sub 4} via high-resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yubuta, Kunio; Mori, Takao; Leithe-Jasper, Andreas; Grin, Yuri; Okada, Shigeru; Shishido, Toetsu

    2009-08-05

    A TmAlB{sub 4} crystal with a ThMoB{sub 4}-type ({beta}-type) structure phase related to a hexagonal AlB{sub 2}-type structure was studied by electron diffraction and high-resolution electron microscopy. A high-resolution image clearly exhibits an intergrown lamellar structure of a YCrB{sub 4}-type ({alpha}-type) phase in the matrix of the {beta}-type phase in TmAlB{sub 4} crystal. The lamellar structure can be characterized by a tiling of deformed hexagons, which are a common structure unit in the {alpha}-type and {beta}-type structures. The intergrown nanostructure is considered to be attributed to the origin of low temperature anomalies in physical properties.

  14. High-Resolution Electron Energy Loss Studies of Oxygen, Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Nitric Oxide, and Nitrous Oxide Adsorption on Germanium Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entringer, Anthony G.

    The first high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) studies of the oxidation and nitridation of germanium surfaces are reported. Both single crystal Ge(111) and disordered surfaces were studied. Surfaces were exposed to H, O_2, NO, N _2O, and N, after cleaning in ultra-high vacuum. The Ge surfaces were found to be non-reactive to molecular hydrogen (H_2) at room temperature. Exposure to atomic hydrogen (H) resulted hydrogen adsorption as demonstrated by the presence of Ge-H vibrational modes. The HREEL spectrum of the native oxide of Ge characteristic of nu -GeO_2 was obtained by heating the oxide to 200^circC. Three peaks were observed at 33, 62, and 106 meV for molecular oxygen (O_2) adsorbed on clean Ge(111) at room temperature. These peaks are indicative of dissociative bonding and a dominant Ge-O-Ge bridge structure. Subsequent hydrogen exposure resulted in a shift of the Ge-H stretch from its isolated value of 247 meV to 267 meV, indicative of a dominant +3 oxidation state. A high density of dangling bonds and defects and deeper oxygen penetration at the amorphous Ge surface result in a dilute bridge structure with a predominant +1 oxidation state for similar exposures. Molecules of N_2O decompose at the surfaces to desorbed N_2 molecules and chemisorbed oxygen atoms. In contrast, both oxygen and nitrogen are detected at the surfaces following exposure to NO molecules. Both NO and N_2O appear to dissociate and bond at the top surface layer. Molecular nitrogen (N_2) does not react with the Ge surfaces, however, a precursor Ge nitride is observed at room temperature following exposure to nitrogen atoms and ions. Removal of oxygen by heating of the NO-exposed surface to 550^circC enabled the identification of the Ge-N vibrational modes. These modes show a structure similar to that of germanium nitride. This spectrum is also identical to that of the N-exposed surface heated to 550^circC. Surface phonon modes of the narrow-gap semiconducting

  15. Nature of One- and Two-Phonon Mixed Symmetry States in 92Zr and 94Mo from High-Resolution Electron and Proton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Burda, O.; Kuhar, M.; Lenhardt, A.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Richter, A.; Wambach, J.; Botha, N. T.; Fearick, R. W.; Carter, J.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Foertsch, S. V.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Fransen, C.; Fujita, H.; Pietralla, N.

    2006-03-13

    High-resolution inelastic electron (performed at the S-DALINAC) and proton (performed at iThemba LABS) scattering experiments on 92Zr and 94Mo with emphasis on E2 transitions are presented The measured form factors and angular distributions provide a measure for the F-spin purity, respectively the isovector nature, of the proposed one-phonon mixed symmetry states and furthermore provide a sensitive test of a possible two-phonon character of excited 2+ states.

  16. Electron Collisions - Looking Back and Looking Forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConkey, J. William

    2004-05-01

    For almost a century, ever since the pioneering experiments of Franck and Hertz provided one of the foundation stones of the emerging quantum theory, electron scattering has been a versatile tool for diagnosing atomic and molecular structure and interactions. Electron collisions with a wide variety of targets have proved to be fundamental to our understanding of such diverse topics as planetary atmosphere processes, low and high temperature plasma physics, lasers and radiation chemistry. They undergird the efficient operation of a multitude of practical devices and industrial processes. This talk will provide a flavor of what has happened in this field, particularly over the past half-century. It will illustrate some of the current developments and and suggest what might be fruitful areas of research in the future.

  17. Observation of Odd Symmetry Surface Phonon Modes on NICKEL(100) and SILVER(100) Surfaces Using the New Multichannel High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Eue-Jin

    A multichannel detection high resolution electron analyzer has been constructed and tested. The capabilities of achieving out-of-plane scattering geometry, high resolution and high sensitivity has made it possible to detect for the first time the odd-symmetry surface phonon modes on Ni(100) and Ag(100) surfaces. Initial tests were performed to verify the performance of the spectrometer. The best instrumental resolution obtained was 3.5 meV and analyzer count rate could be maintained at 1000 Hz in large angle scattering geometry. This represents an improvement in performance of a factor of at least 50 compared to the existing conventional single channel spectrometers. Odd symmetry surface phonon modes found on Ag(100) surfaces have been measured to be 3.2 meV which agrees closely with available calculations. An additional interesting feature found to be interesting is that the background width of odd symmetry modes appear to be narrower than that of the even symmetry mode scattering data. This effect has not been predicted or explained by theory. As it stands now, the large angle high-resolution electron energy loss cross sections are not completely characterized by theory.

  18. Recent theoretical results on electron-polyatomic molecule collisions

    SciTech Connect

    McCurdy, C.W.

    1994-03-01

    Until recently, the principal barrier to the accurate theoretical description of electronic collisions with polyatomic molecules was the computational problem of scattering by a nonlocal, arbitrarily asymmetric potential. Effective numerical techniques capable of solving this variety of potential scattering problem for electronic collisions have now matured, and the first applications of methods for treating many-body aspects of collisions of electrons with polyatomic molecules have begun to appear in the literature. The past two years have seen the appearance of a large collection of calculations on electron-polyatomic collisions which compare favorably with experimental determinations. In addition to the dramatic developments in methods which explicitly exploit the methods of quantum chemistry to treat the effects of electron correlation, polarization, etc., parameter-free model potential methods for electronically elastic collisions have also evolved markedly in recent years. Progress in both electronically elastic and inelastic processes is reviewed briefly.

  19. High Resolution Emission Spectroscopy of the Alpha Pi-1 - Chi Sigma-1(+) Fourth Positive Band System of CO from Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beegle, Luther W.; Ajello, Joseph M.; James, Geoffrey K.; Alvarez, Marcos; Dziczek, Dariusz

    2000-01-01

    We report electron-impact induced fluorescence spectra [300 mA full width at half maximum (FWHM)] of CO for 20 and 100 eV impact energies of the spectral region of 1300 to 2050 A and high resolution spectra (FWHM) of the v'=5 to v"=l and the v'=3 to v"=O bands showing that the rotational structure of the band system are modeled accurately. The excitation function of the (0,1) band (1597 A) was measured from electron impact in the energy range from threshold to 750 eV and placed on an absolute scale from modem calibration standards.

  20. NORMA: a tool for flexible fitting of high-resolution protein structures into low-resolution electron-microscopy-derived density maps.

    PubMed

    Suhre, Karsten; Navaza, Jorge; Sanejouand, Yves Henri

    2006-09-01

    This paper describes a freely available software suite that allows the modelling of large conformational changes of high-resolution three-dimensional protein structures under the constraint of a low-resolution electron-density map. Typical applications are the interpretation of electron-microscopy data using atomic scale X-ray structural models. The software package provided should enable the interested user to perform flexible fitting on new cases without encountering major technical difficulties. The NORMA software suite including three fully executable reference cases and extensive user instructions are available at http://www.elnemo.org/NORMA/.

  1. Newly appreciated roles for electrons in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, I.A. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1990-01-01

    Since the previous Debrecen workshop on High-Energy Ion-Atom Collisions there have been numerous experiments and substantial theoretical developments in the fields of fast ion-atom and ion- solid collisions concerned with explicating the previously largely underappreciated role of electrons as ionizing and exciting agents in such collisions. Examples to be discussed include the double electron ionization problem in He; transfer ionization by protons in He; double excitation in He; backward scattering of electrons in He; the role of electron-electron interaction in determining beta parameters for ELC; projectile K ionization by target electrons; electron spin exchange in transfer excitation; electron impact ionization in crystal channels; resonant coherent excitation in crystal channels; excitation and dielectronic recombination in crystal channels; resonant transfer and excitation; the similarity of recoil ion spectra observed in coincidence with electron capture vs. electron loss; and new research on ion-atom collisions at relativistic energies.

  2. Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Carbon Monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Itikawa, Yukikazu

    2015-03-15

    Cross section data are collected and reviewed for electron collisions with carbon monoxide. Collision processes included are total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational, vibrational and electronic states, ionization, and dissociation. For each process, recommended values of the cross sections are presented, when possible. The literature has been surveyed through to the end of 2013.

  3. Morphometric, quantitative, and three-dimensional analysis of the heart muscle fibers of old rats: transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy methods.

    PubMed

    Cury, Diego Pulzatto; Dias, Fernando José; Sosthenes, Marcia Consentino Kronka; Dos Santos Haemmerle, Carlos Alexandre; Ogawa, Koichi; Da Silva, Marcelo Cavenaghi Pereira; Mardegan Issa, João Paulo; Iyomasa, Mamie Mizusaki; Watanabe, Ii-Sei

    2013-02-01

    This research investigated the morphological, morphometric, and ultrastructural cardiomyocyte characteristics of male Wistar rats at 18 months of age. The animals were euthanized using an overdose of anesthesia (ketamine and xylazine, 150/10 mg/kg) and perfused transcardially, after which samples were collected for light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that cardiomyocyte arrangement was disposed parallel between the mitochondria and the A-, I-, and H-bands and their M- and Z-lines from the sarcomere. The sarcomere junction areas had intercalated disks, a specific structure of heart muscle. The ultrastructural analysis revealed several mitochondria of various sizes and shapes intermingled between the blood capillaries and their endothelial cells; some red cells inside vessels are noted. The muscle cell sarcolemma could be observed associated with the described structures. The cardiomyocytes of old rats presented an average sarcomere length of 2.071 ± 0.09 μm, a mitochondrial volume density (Vv) of 0.3383, a mitochondrial average area of 0.537 ± 0.278 μm(2), a mitochondrial average length of 1.024 ± 0.352 μm, an average mitochondrial cristae thickness of 0.038 ± 0.09 μm and a ratio of mitochondrial greater length/lesser length of 1.929 ± 0.965. Of the observed mitochondrial shapes, 23.4% were rounded, 45.3% were elongated, and 31.1% had irregular profiles. In this study, we analyzed the morphology and morphometry of cardiomyocytes in old rats, focusing on mitochondria. These data are important for researchers who focus the changes in cardiac tissue, especially changes owing to pathologies and drug administration that may or may not be correlated with aging.

  4. Wavelet-based analysis and power law classification of C/NOFS high-resolution electron density data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rino, C. L.; Carrano, C. S.; Roddy, Patrick

    2014-08-01

    This paper applies new wavelet-based analysis procedures to low Earth-orbiting satellite measurements of equatorial ionospheric structure. The analysis was applied to high-resolution data from 285 Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite orbits sampling the postsunset period at geomagnetic equatorial latitudes. The data were acquired during a period of progressively intensifying equatorial structure. The sampled altitude range varied from 400 to 800 km. The varying scan velocity remained within 20° of the cross-field direction. Time-to-space interpolation generated uniform samples at approximately 8 m. A maximum segmentation length that supports stochastic structure characterization was identified. A two-component inverse power law model was fit to scale spectra derived from each segment together with a goodness-of-fit measure. Inverse power law parameters derived from the scale spectra were used to classify the scale spectra by type. The largest category was characterized by a single inverse power law with a mean spectral index somewhat larger than 2. No systematic departure from the inverse power law was observed to scales greater than 100 km. A small subset of the most highly disturbed passes at the lowest sampled altitudes could be categorized by two-component power law spectra with a range of break scales from less than 100 m to several kilometers. The results are discussed within the context of other analyses of in situ data and spectral characteristics used for scintillation analyses.

  5. In-Lens Cryo-High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy: Methodologies for Molecular Imaging of Self-Assembled Organic Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apkarian, Robert P.; Wright, Elizabeth R.; Seredyuk, Victor A.; Eustis, Susan; Lyon, L. Andrew; Conticello, Vincent P.; Menger, Fredric M.

    2003-08-01

    The micro- and nanoarchitectures of water-swollen hydrogels were routinely analyzed in three dimensions at very high resolution by two cryopreparation methods that provide stable low-temperature specimens for in-lens high magnification recordings. Gemini surfactants (gS), poly-N-isopropylacrylamides (p-NIP Am), and elastin-mimetic di- (db-E) and triblock (tb-E) copolymer proteins that form hydrogels have been routinely analyzed to the sub-10-nm level in a single day. After they were quench or high pressure frozen, samples in bulk planchets were subsequently chromium coated and observed at low temperature in an in-lens field emission SEM. Pre-equilibrated planchets (4 40°C) that hold 5 10 [mu]l of hydrogel facilitate dynamic morphological studies above and below their transition temperatures. Rapidly frozen samples were fractured under liquid nitrogen, low-temperature metal coated, and observed in-lens to assess the dispersion characteristics of micelles and fragile colloidal assemblies within bulk frozen water. Utilizing the same planchet freezing system, the cryoetch-HRSEM technique removed bulk frozen water from the hydrogel matrix by low-temperature, high-vacuum sublimation. The remaining frozen solid-state sample faithfully represented the hydrogel matrix. Cryo- and cryoetch-HRSEM provided vast vistas of hydrogels at low and intermediate magnifications whereas high magnification recordings and anaglyphs (stereo images) provided a three-dimensional prospective and measurements on a molecular level.

  6. The use of high resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy for refining the infrared optical constants of GaS, GaSe, and InSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Li-Ming; Thiry, P. A.; Degiovanni, A.; Conard, Th.; Leclerc, G.; Caudano, R.; Lambin, Ph.; Debever, J.-M.

    1994-06-01

    Cleaved surfaces of III-VI lamellar semiconducting compounds GaS, GaSe, and InSe have been studied by high resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS). The infrared optical constants of the materials were retrieved by using the dielectric theory taking account of the resonance frequencies published from infrared reflectivity (IRS) data. The limitations of the HREELS and IRS measurements in the case of these materials are discussed in detail. However, it is shown that, by combining the informations from both spectroscopies, it is possible to refine some of the oscillator strengths of these materials.

  7. High resolution respirometry analysis of polyethylenimine-mediated mitochondrial energy crisis and cellular stress: Mitochondrial proton leak and inhibition of the electron transport system.

    PubMed

    Hall, Arnaldur; Larsen, Anna K; Parhamifar, Ladan; Meyle, Kathrine D; Wu, Lin-Ping; Moghimi, S Moein

    2013-10-01

    Polyethylenimines (PEIs) are highly efficient non-viral transfectants, but can induce cell death through poorly understood necrotic and apoptotic processes as well as autophagy. Through high resolution respirometry studies in H1299 cells we demonstrate that the 25kDa branched polyethylenimine (25k-PEI-B), in a concentration and time-dependent manner, facilitates mitochondrial proton leak and inhibits the electron transport system. These events were associated with gradual reduction of the mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial ATP synthesis. The intracellular ATP levels further declined as a consequence of PEI-mediated plasma membrane damage and subsequent ATP leakage to the extracellular medium. Studies with freshly isolated mouse liver mitochondria corroborated with bioenergetic findings and demonstrated parallel polycation concentration- and time-dependent changes in state 2 and state 4o oxygen flux as well as lowered ADP phosphorylation (state 3) and mitochondrial ATP synthesis. Polycation-mediated reduction of electron transport system activity was further demonstrated in 'broken mitochondria' (freeze-thawed mitochondrial preparations). Moreover, by using both high-resolution respirometry and spectrophotometry analysis of cytochrome c oxidase activity we were able to identify complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) as a likely specific site of PEI mediated inhibition within the electron transport system. Unraveling the mechanisms of PEI-mediated mitochondrial energy crisis is central for combinatorial design of safer polymeric non-viral gene delivery systems.

  8. Determination of electron-nucleus collisions geometry with forward neutrons

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, L.; Aschenauer, E.; Lee, J. H.

    2014-12-29

    There are a large number of physics programs one can explore in electron-nucleus collisions at a future electron-ion collider. Collision geometry is very important in these studies, while the measurement for an event-by-event geometric control is rarely discussed in the prior deep-inelastic scattering experiments off a nucleus. This paper seeks to provide some detailed studies on the potential of tagging collision geometries through forward neutron multiplicity measurements with a zero degree calorimeter. As a result, this type of geometry handle, if achieved, can be extremely beneficial in constraining nuclear effects for the electron-nucleus program at an electron-ion collider.

  9. High-resolution analytical imaging and electron holography of magnetite particles in amyloid cores of Alzheimer’s disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ponce, Arturo; Collingwood, Joanna F.; Arellano-Jiménez, M. Josefina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Rogers, Jack T.; Betancourt, Israel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Perry, George

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal accumulation of brain metals is a key feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Formation of amyloid-β plaque cores (APC) is related to interactions with biometals, especially Fe, Cu and Zn, but their particular structural associations and roles remain unclear. Using an integrative set of advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, including spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM), nano-beam electron diffraction, electron holography and analytical spectroscopy techniques (EDX and EELS), we demonstrate that Fe in APC is present as iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetite nanoparticles. Here we show that Fe was accumulated primarily as nanostructured particles within APC, whereas Cu and Zn were distributed through the amyloid fibers. Remarkably, these highly organized crystalline magnetite nanostructures directly bound into fibrillar Aβ showed characteristic superparamagnetic responses with saturated magnetization with circular contours, as observed for the first time by off-axis electron holography of nanometer scale particles.

  10. High-resolution analytical imaging and electron holography of magnetite particles in amyloid cores of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ponce, Arturo; Collingwood, Joanna F.; Arellano-Jiménez, M. Josefina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Rogers, Jack T.; Betancourt, Israel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Perry, George

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of brain metals is a key feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Formation of amyloid-β plaque cores (APC) is related to interactions with biometals, especially Fe, Cu and Zn, but their particular structural associations and roles remain unclear. Using an integrative set of advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, including spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM), nano-beam electron diffraction, electron holography and analytical spectroscopy techniques (EDX and EELS), we demonstrate that Fe in APC is present as iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetite nanoparticles. Here we show that Fe was accumulated primarily as nanostructured particles within APC, whereas Cu and Zn were distributed through the amyloid fibers. Remarkably, these highly organized crystalline magnetite nanostructures directly bound into fibrillar Aβ showed characteristic superparamagnetic responses with saturated magnetization with circular contours, as observed for the first time by off-axis electron holography of nanometer scale particles. PMID:27121137

  11. Electronic Structure of AC-Clusters and High-Resolution X-ray Spectra of Actinides in Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Kulagin, Nicolay Alex

    2007-07-01

    Ab initio calculations using SCF approach for and analysis of results of investigation of the electronic structure of the clusters RAn+:[L]k with rare earths or actinides were carried out for the clusters in solids and liquids. Theoretical results for the electronic structure, radial integrals and energy of X- ray lines are presented for AC ions with unoccupied 5f-shell in the clusters in oxides, chlorides and fluorides environment. Possibility of collapse of nf-shell for the separate clusters and identification of electronic state of ions with unstable nuclei, are discussed, too. (author)

  12. Intense energetic electron flux enhancements in Mercury's magnetosphere: An integrated view with high-resolution observations from MESSENGER.

    PubMed

    Baker, Daniel N; Dewey, Ryan M; Lawrence, David J; Goldsten, John O; Peplowski, Patrick N; Korth, Haje; Slavin, James A; Krimigis, Stamatios M; Anderson, Brian J; Ho, George C; McNutt, Ralph L; Raines, Jim M; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C

    2016-03-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission to Mercury has provided a wealth of new data about energetic particle phenomena. With observations from MESSENGER's Energetic Particle Spectrometer, as well as data arising from energetic electrons recorded by the X-Ray Spectrometer and Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer (GRNS) instruments, recent work greatly extends our record of the acceleration, transport, and loss of energetic electrons at Mercury. The combined data sets include measurements from a few keV up to several hundred keV in electron kinetic energy and have permitted relatively good spatial and temporal resolution for many events. We focus here on the detailed nature of energetic electron bursts measured by the GRNS system, and we place these events in the context of solar wind and magnetospheric forcing at Mercury. Our examination of data at high temporal resolution (10 ms) during the period March 2013 through October 2014 supports strongly the view that energetic electrons are accelerated in the near-tail region of Mercury's magnetosphere and are subsequently "injected" onto closed magnetic field lines on the planetary nightside. The electrons populate the plasma sheet and drift rapidly eastward toward the dawn and prenoon sectors, at times executing multiple complete drifts around the planet to form "quasi-trapped" populations.

  13. Computation of electron diode characteristics by monte carlo method including effect of collisions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, C. M.

    1964-01-01

    Consistent field Monte Carlo method calculation for collision effect on electron-ion diode characteristics and for hard sphere electron- neutral collision effect for monoenergetic- thermionic emission

  14. Helium ion microscopy and ultra-high-resolution scanning electron microscopy analysis of membrane-extracted cells reveals novel characteristics of the cytoskeleton of Giardia intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Gadelha, Ana Paula Rocha; Benchimol, Marlene; de Souza, Wanderley

    2015-06-01

    Giardia intestinalis presents a complex microtubular cytoskeleton formed by specialized structures, such as the adhesive disk, four pairs of flagella, the funis and the median body. The ultrastructural organization of the Giardia cytoskeleton has been analyzed using different microscopic techniques, including high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. Recent advances in scanning microscopy technology have opened a new venue for the characterization of cellular structures and include scanning probe microscopy techniques such as ultra-high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (UHRSEM) and helium ion microscopy (HIM). Here, we studied the organization of the cytoskeleton of G. intestinalis trophozoites using UHRSEM and HIM in membrane-extracted cells. The results revealed a number of new cytoskeletal elements associated with the lateral crest and the dorsal surface of the parasite. The fine structure of the banded collar was also observed. The marginal plates were seen linked to a network of filaments, which were continuous with filaments parallel to the main cell axis. Cytoplasmic filaments that supported the internal structures were seen by the first time. Using anti-actin antibody, we observed a labeling in these filamentous structures. Taken together, these data revealed new surface characteristics of the cytoskeleton of G. intestinalis and may contribute to an improved understanding of the structural organization of trophozoites.

  15. A high-resolution field-emission-gun, scanning electron microscope investigation of anisotropic hydrogen decrepitation in Nd-Fe-B-based sintered magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderznik, Marko; McGuiness, Paul; Zuzek-Rozman, Kristina; Škulj, Irena; Yan, Gaolin; Kobe, Spomenka

    2010-05-01

    In this investigation commercial magnets based on (Nd,Dy)14(Fe,Co)79B7 were prepared by a conventional powder-metallurgy route with a degree of alignment equal to ˜90% and then exposed to hydrogen at a pressure of 1 bar. The magnets, in the form of cylinders, were observed to decrepitate exclusively from the ends. High-resolution electron microscopy was able to identify the presence of crack formation within the Nd2Fe14B grains, with the cracks running parallel to the c axis of these grains. Based on the concentration profile for hydrogen in a rare-earth transition-metal material, it is clear that the presence of hydrogen-induced cracks running perpendicular to the ends of the magnet provides for a much more rapidly progressing hydrogen front in this direction than from the sides of the magnet. This results in the magnet exhibiting a macroscopic tendency to decrepitate from the poles of the magnet toward the center. This combination of microstructural modification via particle alignment as part of the sintering process and direct observation via high-resolution electron microscopy has led to a satisfying explanation for the anisotropic hydrogen-decrepitation effect.

  16. High-resolution experiments and B-spline R-matrix calculations for elastic electron scattering from krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Zatsarinny, O.; Bartschat, K.; Allan, M.

    2011-03-15

    In a joint experimental and theoretical effort, we carried out a detailed study of elastic electron scattering from Kr atoms. Absolute angle-differential cross sections for elastic electron scattering were measured over the energy range 0.3-9.8 eV with an energy width of about 13 meV at scattering angles between 0 deg. and 180 deg. Excellent agreement is obtained between our experimental data and predictions from a fully relativistic Dirac B-spline R-matrix (close-coupling) model that accounts for the atomic dipole polarizability through a specially designed pseudostate.

  17. High resolution scanning electron microscopy of rabbit corneal endothelium to show effects of UV-visible irradiation in the presence of chlorpromazine

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, P.J.; Hollenberg, M.J.; Menon, I.A.; Temkin, R.J.; Persad, S.D.; Basu, P.K. )

    1989-01-01

    The ultrastructure of rabbit cornea endothelial cells was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in freeze-cleaved corneas using a Hitachi S-570 scanning electron microscope in the high resolution mode (HRSEM). In order to study phototoxic effects in vitro, rabbit corneas (experimental) were cultured as organ culture in the presence of 5 micrograms/ml chlorpromazine (CPZ) and irradiated. For comparison, control 1 corneas were not irradiated but incubated in the dark without CPZ in the medium; control 2 corneas were also kept in the dark but in the presence of CPZ; control 3 corneas were irradiated with no CPZ in the medium. Cellular damage was not seen in the three types of control corneas, but in the experimental corneas the endothelial cells showed extensive disruption of the cell membrane and some deterioration of the intracellular components. Our study confirmed that HRSEM is a satisfactory new technique for visualizing damage of the intracellular organelles of corneal endothelium.

  18. High-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy and photoelectron-diffraction studies of the geometric structure of adsorbates on single-crystal metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenblatt, D.H.

    1982-11-01

    Two techniques which have made important contributions to the understanding of surface phenomena are high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and photoelectron diffraction (PD). EELS is capable of directly measuring the vibrational modes of clean and adsorbate covered metal surfaces. In this work, the design, construction, and performance of a new EELS spectrometer are described. These results are discussed in terms of possible structures of the O-Cu(001) system. Recommendations for improvements in this EELS spectrometer and guidelines for future spectrometers are given. PD experiments provide accurate quantitative information about the geometry of atoms and molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. The technique has advantages when used to study disordered overlayers, molecular overlayers, multiple site systems, and adsorbates which are weak electron scatterers. Four experiments were carried out which exploit these advantages.

  19. Low-energy electron collisions with thiophene.

    PubMed

    da Costa, R F; Varella, M T do N; Lima, M A P; Bettega, M H F

    2013-05-21

    We report on elastic integral, momentum transfer, and differential cross sections for collisions of low-energy electrons with thiophene molecules. The scattering calculations presented here used the Schwinger multichannel method and were carried out in the static-exchange and static-exchange plus polarization approximations for energies ranging from 0.5 eV to 6 eV. We found shape resonances related to the formation of two long-lived π∗ anion states. These resonant structures are centered at the energies of 1.00 eV (2.85 eV) and 2.82 eV (5.00 eV) in the static-exchange plus polarization (static-exchange) approximation and belong to the B1 and A2 symmetries of the C2v point group, respectively. Our results also suggest the existence of a σ∗ shape resonance in the B2 symmetry with a strong d-wave character, located at around 2.78 eV (5.50 eV) as obtained in the static-exchange plus polarization (static-exchange) calculation. It is worth to mention that the results obtained at the static-exchange plus polarization level of approximation for the two π∗ resonances are in good agreement with the electron transmission spectroscopy results of 1.15 eV and 2.63 eV measured by Modelli and Burrow [J. Phys. Chem. A 108, 5721 (2004)]. The existence of the σ∗ shape resonance is in agreement with the observations of Dezarnaud-Dandiney et al. [J. Phys. B 31, L497 (1998)] based on the electron transmission spectra of dimethyl(poly)sulphides. A comparison among the resonances of thiophene with those of pyrrole and furan is also performed and, altogether, the resonance spectra obtained for these molecules point out that electron attachment to π∗ molecular orbitals is a general feature displayed by these five-membered heterocyclic compounds.

  20. Low-energy electron collisions with thiophene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, R. F.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Lima, M. A. P.; Bettega, M. H. F.

    2013-05-01

    We report on elastic integral, momentum transfer, and differential cross sections for collisions of low-energy electrons with thiophene molecules. The scattering calculations presented here used the Schwinger multichannel method and were carried out in the static-exchange and static-exchange plus polarization approximations for energies ranging from 0.5 eV to 6 eV. We found shape resonances related to the formation of two long-lived π* anion states. These resonant structures are centered at the energies of 1.00 eV (2.85 eV) and 2.82 eV (5.00 eV) in the static-exchange plus polarization (static-exchange) approximation and belong to the B1 and A2 symmetries of the C2v point group, respectively. Our results also suggest the existence of a σ* shape resonance in the B2 symmetry with a strong d-wave character, located at around 2.78 eV (5.50 eV) as obtained in the static-exchange plus polarization (static-exchange) calculation. It is worth to mention that the results obtained at the static-exchange plus polarization level of approximation for the two π* resonances are in good agreement with the electron transmission spectroscopy results of 1.15 eV and 2.63 eV measured by Modelli and Burrow [J. Phys. Chem. A 108, 5721 (2004), 10.1021/jp048759a]. The existence of the σ* shape resonance is in agreement with the observations of Dezarnaud-Dandiney et al. [J. Phys. B 31, L497 (1998), 10.1088/0953-4075/31/11/004] based on the electron transmission spectra of dimethyl(poly)sulphides. A comparison among the resonances of thiophene with those of pyrrole and furan is also performed and, altogether, the resonance spectra obtained for these molecules point out that electron attachment to π* molecular orbitals is a general feature displayed by these five-membered heterocyclic compounds.

  1. High Resolution Computed Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-31

    samples. 14. SUBJECTTERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 38 High Resolution, Microfocus , Characterization, X - Ray , Micrography, Computed Tomography (CT), Failure...high resolutions (50 g.tm feature sensitivity) when a small field of view (50 mm) is used [11]. Specially designed detectors and a microfocus X - ray ...Wright Laboratories. Feldkamp [14] at Ford used a microfocus X - ray source and an X - ray image intensifier to develop a system capable of 20 g.m

  2. High-resolution x-ray and γ-ray imaging using a scintillator-coupled electron-multiplying CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, David; Holland, Andrew

    2009-08-01

    Over the last decade the rapid advancements in CCD technology have lead to significant developments in the field of low-light-level, Electron-Multiplying CCDs (EM-CCDs). The addition of a gain register before output allows signal electrons to be multiplied without increasing the external noise. This low effective readout noise, which can be reduced to the sub-electron level, allows very small signal levels to be detected. Caesium iodide is one of the most popular scintillation materials due to its many desirable properties. Approximately 60 photons are produced per keV of incident X-ray or γ-ray with wavelengths peaking at 550 nm (dependent on doping), matching the peak in the quantum efficiency of the back-illuminated CCD97 of over 90%. Using a scintillator coupled to an EMCCD it is possible to resolve individual interactions inside the scintillator. Multiple frames can be taken in quick succession with hundreds of interactions per frame. These interactions can be analysed individually using sub-pixel centroiding and the data compiled to create an image of a much higher resolution than that achieved with a single integrated frame. The interaction mechanism inside the scintillator is discussed with relation to the spatial and spectral resolution of the camera system. Analysis of individual events opens up the possibility of energy discrimination through the profiling of each interaction.

  3. High-resolution and specific detection of bacteria on complex surfaces using nanoparticle probes and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jun; Nielsen, Shaun; Joseph, Stephen; Thomas, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    The study of the interaction of bacteria with surfaces requires the detection of specific bacterial groups with high spatial resolution. Here, we describe a method to rapidly and efficiently add nanogold particles to oligonucleotide probes, which target bacterial ribosomal RNA. These nanogold-labeled probes are then used in an in situ hybridization procedure that ensures both cellular integrity and high specificity. Electron microscopy subsequently enables the visualization of specific cells with high local precision on complex surface structures. This method will contribute to an increased understanding of how bacteria interact with surface structures on a sub-micron scale.

  4. High-Resolution and Specific Detection of Bacteria on Complex Surfaces Using Nanoparticle Probes and Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jun; Nielsen, Shaun; Joseph, Stephen; Thomas, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    The study of the interaction of bacteria with surfaces requires the detection of specific bacterial groups with high spatial resolution. Here, we describe a method to rapidly and efficiently add nanogold particles to oligonucleotide probes, which target bacterial ribosomal RNA. These nanogold-labeled probes are then used in an in situ hybridization procedure that ensures both cellular integrity and high specificity. Electron microscopy subsequently enables the visualization of specific cells with high local precision on complex surface structures. This method will contribute to an increased understanding of how bacteria interact with surface structures on a sub-micron scale. PMID:26018431

  5. High-resolution (e, 2e + ion) study of electron-impact ionization and fragmentation of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Xueguang Pflüger, Thomas; Weyland, Marvin; Baek, Woon Yong; Rabus, Hans; Ullrich, Joachim; Dorn, Alexander

    2015-05-07

    The ionization and fragmentation of methane induced by low-energy (E{sub 0} = 66 eV) electron-impact is investigated using a reaction microscope. The momentum vectors of all three charged final state particles, two outgoing electrons, and one fragment ion, are detected in coincidence. Compared to the earlier study [Xu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 138, 134307 (2013)], considerable improvements to the instrumental mass and energy resolutions have been achieved. The fragment products CH{sub 4}{sup +}, CH{sub 3}{sup +}, CH{sub 2}{sup +}, CH{sup +}, and C{sup +} are clearly resolved. The binding energy resolution of ΔE = 2.0 eV is a factor of three better than in the earlier measurements. The fragmentation channels are investigated by measuring the ion kinetic energy distributions and the binding energy spectra. While being mostly in consistence with existing photoionization studies the results show differences including missing fragmentation channels and previously unseen channels.

  6. Imaging crystal spectrometer for high-resolution x-ray measurements on electron beam ion traps and tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Hell, N.; Brown, G. V.

    2016-11-01

    We describe a crystal spectrometer implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps that employ two spherically bent quartz crystals and a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector to measure x rays with a nominal resolving power of λ/Δλ ≥ 10 000. Its focusing properties allow us to record x rays either with the plane of dispersion perpendicular or parallel to the electron beam and, thus, to preferentially select one of the two linear x-ray polarization components. Moreover, by choice of dispersion plane and focussing conditions, we use the instrument either to image the distribution of the ions within the 2 cm long trap region, or to concentrate x rays of a given energy to a point on the detector, which optimizes the signal-to-noise ratio. We demonstrate the operation and utility of the new instrument by presenting spectra of Mo34+, which prepares the instrument for use as a core impurity diagnostic on the NSTX-U spherical torus and other magnetic fusion devices that employ molybdenum as plasma facing components.

  7. Imaging crystal spectrometer for high-resolution x-ray measurements on electron beam ion traps and tokamaks.

    PubMed

    Beiersdorfer, P; Magee, E W; Hell, N; Brown, G V

    2016-11-01

    We describe a crystal spectrometer implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps that employ two spherically bent quartz crystals and a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector to measure x rays with a nominal resolving power of λ/Δλ ≥ 10 000. Its focusing properties allow us to record x rays either with the plane of dispersion perpendicular or parallel to the electron beam and, thus, to preferentially select one of the two linear x-ray polarization components. Moreover, by choice of dispersion plane and focussing conditions, we use the instrument either to image the distribution of the ions within the 2 cm long trap region, or to concentrate x rays of a given energy to a point on the detector, which optimizes the signal-to-noise ratio. We demonstrate the operation and utility of the new instrument by presenting spectra of Mo(34+), which prepares the instrument for use as a core impurity diagnostic on the NSTX-U spherical torus and other magnetic fusion devices that employ molybdenum as plasma facing components.

  8. Electron loss of fast projectiles in collisions with molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Matveev, V. I.; Makarov, D. N.; Rakhimov, Kh. Yu.

    2011-07-15

    The single- and multiple-electron loss of fast highly charged projectiles in collisions with neutral molecules is studied within the framework of a nonperturbative approach. The cross sections for single-, double-, and triple-electron losses are calculated for the collision system Fe{sup q+}{yields}N{sub 2} (q=24, 25, 26) at the collision energies 10, 100, and 1000 MeV/nucleon. The effects caused by the collision multiplicity and the orientation of the axis of the target molecule are treated. It is shown that the collision multiplicity effect leads to considerable differences for the cases of perpendicular and parallel orientations of the molecular axes with respect to the direction of the projectile motion, while for chaotic orientation such an effect is negligible.

  9. High-resolution single-shot spectral monitoring of hard x-ray free-electron laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Makita, M.; Karvinen, P.; Zhu, D.; Juranic, P. N.; Grünert, J.; Cartier, S.; Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Lemke, H. T.; Mozzanica, A.; Nelson, S.; Patthey, L.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Feng, Y.; David, C.

    2015-10-16

    We have developed an on-line spectrometer for hard x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) radiation based on a nanostructured diamond diffraction grating and a bent crystal analyzer. Our method provides high spectral resolution, interferes negligibly with the XFEL beam, and can withstand the intense hard x-ray pulses at high repetition rates of >100 Hz. The spectrometer is capable of providing shot-to-shot spectral information for the normalization of data obtained in scientific experiments and optimization of the accelerator operation parameters. We have demonstrated these capabilities of the setup at the Linac Coherent Light Source, in self-amplified spontaneous emission mode at full energy of >1 mJ with a 120 Hz repetition rate, obtaining a resolving power of Ε/δΕ > 3 × 104. In conclusion, the device was also used to monitor the effects of pulse duration down to 8 fs by analysis of the spectral spike width.

  10. Determining the Binding Sites of β-Cyclodextrin and Peptides by Electron-Capture Dissociation High Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yulin; Geib, Timon; Volmer, Dietrich A.

    2015-07-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are a group of cyclic oligosaccharides, which readily form inclusion complexes with hydrophobic compounds to increase bioavailability, thus making CDs ideal drug excipients. Recent studies have also shown that CDs exhibit a wide range of protective effects, preventing proteins from aggregation, degradation, and folding. These effects strongly depend on the binding sites on the protein surface. CDs only exhibit weak interactions with amino acids, however; conventional analytical techniques therefore usually fail to reveal the exact location of the binding sites. Moreover, some studies even suggest that CD inclusion complexes are merely electrostatic adducts. Here, electron capture dissociation (ECD) was applied in this proof-of-concept study to examine the exact nature of the CD/peptide complexes, and CD binding sites were unambiguously located for the first time via Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) tandem mass spectrometry.

  11. Optimal experimental design for the detection of light atoms from high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    SciTech Connect

    Gonnissen, J.; De Backer, A.; Martinez, G. T.; Van Aert, S.; Dekker, A. J. den; Rosenauer, A.; Sijbers, J.

    2014-08-11

    We report an innovative method to explore the optimal experimental settings to detect light atoms from scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. Since light elements play a key role in many technologically important materials, such as lithium-battery devices or hydrogen storage applications, much effort has been made to optimize the STEM technique in order to detect light elements. Therefore, classical performance criteria, such as contrast or signal-to-noise ratio, are often discussed hereby aiming at improvements of the direct visual interpretability. However, when images are interpreted quantitatively, one needs an alternative criterion, which we derive based on statistical detection theory. Using realistic simulations of technologically important materials, we demonstrate the benefits of the proposed method and compare the results with existing approaches.

  12. Determining the Binding Sites of β-Cyclodextrin and Peptides by Electron-Capture Dissociation High Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yulin; Geib, Timon; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2015-07-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are a group of cyclic oligosaccharides, which readily form inclusion complexes with hydrophobic compounds to increase bioavailability, thus making CDs ideal drug excipients. Recent studies have also shown that CDs exhibit a wide range of protective effects, preventing proteins from aggregation, degradation, and folding. These effects strongly depend on the binding sites on the protein surface. CDs only exhibit weak interactions with amino acids, however; conventional analytical techniques therefore usually fail to reveal the exact location of the binding sites. Moreover, some studies even suggest that CD inclusion complexes are merely electrostatic adducts. Here, electron capture dissociation (ECD) was applied in this proof-of-concept study to examine the exact nature of the CD/peptide complexes, and CD binding sites were unambiguously located for the first time via Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) tandem mass spectrometry.

  13. Intraligand Charge Transfer in Pt(qol)(2). Characterization of Electronic States by High-Resolution Shpol'skii Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Donges, Dirk; Nagle, Jeffrey K.; Yersin, Hartmut

    1997-07-02

    Pt(qol)(2) (qol(-) = 8-quinolinolato-O,N) is investigated in the Shpol'skii matrices n-heptane, n-octane-h(18), n-octane-d(18), n-nonane, and n-decane, respectively. For the first time, highly resolved triplet phosphorescence as well as triplet and singlet excitation spectra are obtained at T = 1.2 K by site-selective spectroscopy. This permits the detailed characterization of the low-lying singlet and triplet states which are assigned to result mainly from intraligand charge transfer (ILCT) transitions. The electronic origin corresponding to the (3)ILCT lies at 15 426 cm(-)(1) (FWHM approximately 3 cm(-)(1)) exhibiting a zero-field splitting smaller than 1 cm(-)(1), which shows that the metal d-orbital contribution to the (3)ILCT is small. At T = 1.2 K, the three triplet sublevels emit independently due to slow spin-lattice relaxation (slr) processes. Therefore, the phosphorescence decays triexponentially with components of 4.5, 13, and 60 &mgr;s. Interestingly, two of the sublevels can be excited selectively, which leads to a distinct spin polarization manifested by a biexponential decay. At T = 20 K, the decay becomes monoexponential with tau = 10 &mgr;s due to a fast slr between the triplet sublevels. From the Zeeman splitting of the (3)ILCT the g-factor is determined to be 2.0 as expected for a relatively pure spin triplet. The (1)ILCT has its electronic origin at 18 767 cm(-)(1) and exhibits a homogeneous line width of about 12 cm(-)(1). This feature allows us to estimate a singlet-triplet intersystem crossing rate of about 2 x 10(12) s(-)(1). This relatively large rate compared to values found for closed shell metal M(qol)(n)() compounds displays the importance of spin-orbit coupling induced by the heavy metal ion. Moreover, this small admixture leads to the relatively short emission decay times. All spectra show highly resolved vibrational satellite structures. These patterns provide information about vibrational energies (which are in good accordance with

  14. High-resolution structure of the presynaptic RAD51 filament on single-stranded DNA by electron cryo-microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Short, Judith M.; Liu, Yang; Chen, Shaoxia; Soni, Neelesh; Madhusudhan, Mallur S.; Shivji, Mahmud K.K.; Venkitaraman, Ashok R.

    2016-01-01

    Homologous DNA recombination (HR) by the RAD51 recombinase enables error-free DNA break repair. To execute HR, RAD51 first forms a presynaptic filament on single-stranded (ss) DNA, which catalyses pairing with homologous double-stranded (ds) DNA. Here, we report a structure for the presynaptic human RAD51 filament at 3.5–5.0Å resolution using electron cryo-microscopy. RAD51 encases ssDNA in a helical filament of 103Å pitch, comprising 6.4 protomers per turn, with a rise of 16.1Å and a twist of 56.2°. Inter-protomer distance correlates with rotation of an α-helical region in the core catalytic domain that is juxtaposed to ssDNA, suggesting how the RAD51–DNA interaction modulates protomer spacing and filament pitch. We map Fanconi anaemia-like disease-associated RAD51 mutations, clarifying potential phenotypes. We predict binding sites on the presynaptic filament for two modules present in each BRC repeat of the BRCA2 tumour suppressor, a critical HR mediator. Structural modelling suggests that changes in filament pitch mask or expose one binding site with filament-inhibitory potential, rationalizing the paradoxical ability of the BRC repeats to either stabilize or inhibit filament formation at different steps during HR. Collectively, our findings provide fresh insight into the structural mechanism of HR and its dysregulation in human disease. PMID:27596592

  15. Identification of local phase of nanoscale BaTiO₃ powders by high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sun-Min; Wang, Xiaohui; Cho, Nam-Hee

    2013-08-01

    The electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) technique was applied to investigate the local variation in the phase of barium titanate (BaTiO₃) ceramics. It was found that the fine structure of the titanium L₂,₃ edge and their satellite peaks were sensitively varied with the tetragonal-cubic phase transition. The peak splitting of Ti-L₃ edge of tetragonal-phased BaTiO₃ ceramics was widened because of the increased crystal field effect compared with that of cubic-phased BaTiO₃. In case of nanoscale BaTiO₃ powders, the L₃ edge splitting of the core region was found to be smaller than that of the shell region. The energy gap between peaks t₂g and eg varied from 2.36 to 1.94 eV with changing the probe position from 1 to 20 nm from the surface. These results suggest that the EELS technique can be used to identify the local phase of sintered BaTiO₃ ceramics.

  16. High-resolution single-shot spectral monitoring of hard x-ray free-electron laser radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Makita, M.; Karvinen, P.; Zhu, D.; ...

    2015-10-16

    We have developed an on-line spectrometer for hard x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) radiation based on a nanostructured diamond diffraction grating and a bent crystal analyzer. Our method provides high spectral resolution, interferes negligibly with the XFEL beam, and can withstand the intense hard x-ray pulses at high repetition rates of >100 Hz. The spectrometer is capable of providing shot-to-shot spectral information for the normalization of data obtained in scientific experiments and optimization of the accelerator operation parameters. We have demonstrated these capabilities of the setup at the Linac Coherent Light Source, in self-amplified spontaneous emission mode at full energy ofmore » >1 mJ with a 120 Hz repetition rate, obtaining a resolving power of Ε/δΕ > 3 × 104. In conclusion, the device was also used to monitor the effects of pulse duration down to 8 fs by analysis of the spectral spike width.« less

  17. Automated Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Electron Transfer Dissociation High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Measured at Single-Amide Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landgraf, Rachelle R.; Chalmers, Michael J.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is a well established method for the measurement of solution-phase deuterium incorporation into proteins, which can provide insight into protein conformational mobility. However, most HDX measurements are constrained to regions of the protein where pepsin proteolysis allows detection at peptide resolution. Recently, single-amide resolution deuterium incorporation has been achieved by limiting gas-phase scrambling in the mass spectrometer. This was accomplished by employing a combination of soft ionization and desolvation conditions coupled with the radical-driven fragmentation technique electron transfer dissociation (ETD). Here, a hybrid LTQ-Orbitrap XL is systematically evaluated for its utility in providing single-amide deuterium incorporation for differential HDX analysis of a nuclear receptor upon binding small molecule ligands. We are able to show that instrumental parameters can be optimized to minimize scrambling and can be incorporated into an established and fully automated HDX platform making differential single-amide HDX possible for bottom-up analysis of complex systems. We have applied this system to determine differential single amide resolution HDX data for the peroxizome proliferator activated receptor bound with two ligands of interest.

  18. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy study of 1.5 nm ultrathin tunnel oxides of metal-nitride-oxide-silicon nonvolatile memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamigaki, Yoshiaki; Minami, Shin-ichi; Shimotsu, Teruho

    1988-12-01

    Metal-nitride-oxide-silicon (MNOS) nonvolatile memory devices have an ultrathin tunnel oxide SiO2 layer and a signal-charge-stored nitride Si3N4 layer. Using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the cross-sectional structure of MNOS devices has been observed for the first time, including direct observation of tunnel SiO2. The following is revealed: (1) Tunnel SiO2 of 1.5 nm thickness is fabricated very uniformly on the surface of a Si substrate. (2) No mixing of tunnel SiO2 and Si3N4 is observed even though tunnel SiO2 is extremely thin. As a result, we can suggest that tunnel SiO2 in a MNOS device exhibits very stable morphology and stoichiometry characteristics.

  19. In situ fabrication and optoelectronic analysis of axial CdS/p-Si nanowire heterojunctions in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Xu, Zhi; Tian, Wei; Tang, Dai-Ming; Wang, Xi; Bando, Yoshio; Fukata, Naoki; Golberg, Dmitri

    2015-04-17

    A high-precision technique was utilized to construct and characterize axial nanowire heterojunctions inside a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). By an in-tandem technique using an ultra-sharp tungsten probe as the nanomanipulator and an optical fiber as the optical waveguide the nanoscale CdS/p-Si axial nanowire junctions were fabricated, and in situ photocurrents from them were successfully measured. Compared to a single constituting nanowire, the CdS/p-Si axial nanowire junctions possess a photocurrent saturation effect, which protects them from damage under high voltages. Furthermore, a set of experiments reveals the clear relationship between the saturation photocurrent values and the incident light intensities. The applied technique is expected to be valuable for bottom-up nanodevice fabrications, and the regarded photocurrent saturation feature may solve the Joule heating-induced failure problem in nanowire optoelectronic devices caused by a fluctuating bias.

  20. Opto-mechano-electrical tripling in ZnO nanowires probed by photocurrent spectroscopy in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C.; Golberg, D. E-mail: golberg.dmitri@nims.go.jp; Xu, Z. E-mail: golberg.dmitri@nims.go.jp; Kvashnin, D. G.; Tang, D.-M.; Xue, Y. M.; Bando, Y.; Sorokin, P. B.

    2015-08-31

    Photocurrent spectroscopy of individual free-standing ZnO nanowires inside a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) is reported. By using specially designed optical in situ TEM system capable of scanning tunneling microscopy probing paired with light illumination, opto-mechano-electrical tripling phenomenon in ZnO nanowires is demonstrated. Splitting of photocurrent spectra at around 3.3 eV under in situ TEM bending of ZnO nanowires directly corresponds to nanowire deformation and appearance of expanded and compressed nanowire sides. Theoretical simulation of a bent ZnO nanowire has an excellent agreement with the experimental data. The splitting effect could be explained by a change in the valence band structure of ZnO nanowires due to a lattice strain. The strain-induced splitting provides important clues for future flexible piezo-phototronics.

  1. In situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy observation of the phason-strain relaxation process in an Al-Cu-Co-Si decagonal quasicrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edagawa, Keiichi; Mandal, Pranabananda; Hosono, Kaoru; Suzuki, Kunio; Takeuchi, Shin

    2004-11-01

    Transition process from a rational approximant state, which is regarded as containing a uniform phason strain in a quasicrystalline state, to the quasicrystalline state in the Al-Cu-Co-Si system has been observed by in situ high-temperature high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The tiling pattern changing with lapse of time in the HRTEM image has been analyzed, and the spatial and temporal variations of the phason field have been deduced. The results show that two types of processes lead the phason-strain relaxation: one is the shrink of the area with the uniform strain by shifting the boundaries and the other a continuous strain-relaxation in the area outside of the boundary. Such processes arise from a combination of collective and successive phason flips like domino-toppling along different symmetry directions.

  2. Opto-mechano-electrical tripling in ZnO nanowires probed by photocurrent spectroscopy in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Xu, Z.; Kvashnin, D. G.; Tang, D.-M.; Xue, Y. M.; Bando, Y.; Sorokin, P. B.; Golberg, D.

    2015-08-01

    Photocurrent spectroscopy of individual free-standing ZnO nanowires inside a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) is reported. By using specially designed optical in situ TEM system capable of scanning tunneling microscopy probing paired with light illumination, opto-mechano-electrical tripling phenomenon in ZnO nanowires is demonstrated. Splitting of photocurrent spectra at around 3.3 eV under in situ TEM bending of ZnO nanowires directly corresponds to nanowire deformation and appearance of expanded and compressed nanowire sides. Theoretical simulation of a bent ZnO nanowire has an excellent agreement with the experimental data. The splitting effect could be explained by a change in the valence band structure of ZnO nanowires due to a lattice strain. The strain-induced splitting provides important clues for future flexible piezo-phototronics.

  3. In situ fabrication and optoelectronic analysis of axial CdS/p-Si nanowire heterojunctions in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Xu, Zhi; Tian, Wei; Tang, Dai-Ming; Wang, Xi; Bando, Yoshio; Fukata, Naoki; Golberg, Dmitri

    2015-04-01

    A high-precision technique was utilized to construct and characterize axial nanowire heterojunctions inside a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). By an in-tandem technique using an ultra-sharp tungsten probe as the nanomanipulator and an optical fiber as the optical waveguide the nanoscale CdS/p-Si axial nanowire junctions were fabricated, and in situ photocurrents from them were successfully measured. Compared to a single constituting nanowire, the CdS/p-Si axial nanowire junctions possess a photocurrent saturation effect, which protects them from damage under high voltages. Furthermore, a set of experiments reveals the clear relationship between the saturation photocurrent values and the incident light intensities. The applied technique is expected to be valuable for bottom-up nanodevice fabrications, and the regarded photocurrent saturation feature may solve the Joule heating-induced failure problem in nanowire optoelectronic devices caused by a fluctuating bias.

  4. High-resolution electron microscopy observation and dislocation reaction mechanism of fivefold twinning in a Cu-rich precipitate in a cold rolled ferritic steel containing copper

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Wei; Chen, Bolin; Zhou, Xiying; Li, Zhongwen; Zhou, Bangxin; Wang, Lumin

    2014-09-15

    Ferritic steels containing copper have been studied as model systems for clusters/precipitate formation in reactor pressure vessel steels. The samples were aged at 400 °C for 4000 h and subsequently cold rolled to 30% reduction at room temperature. The microstructural characteristics of the samples were analyzed using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Direct evidence was found that the fivefold twinning occurs via simultaneous emission of two Shockley partial dislocations from two particular α-Fe/Cu interfaces, and then the pileup tips of the twofold twin. - Highlights: • Fivefold twin is observed in a Cu-rich precipitate in cold rolled ferritic steels. • A dislocation reaction mechanism for the fivefold twin formation is proposed. • Two particular mismatching α-Fe/Cu-rich precipitate interfaces play a critical role.

  5. A Comparative High-Resolution Electron Microscope Study of Ag Clusters Produced by a Sputter-Gas Aggregation and Ion Cluster Beam Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohl, Georg-Friedrich; Hihara, Takehiko; Sakurai, Masaki; Oishi, Takashi; Wakoh, Kimio; Sumiyama, Kenji; Suzuki, Kenji

    1994-03-01

    Ag clusters were formed by a sputter-gas-aggregation process [H. Haberland et al..: J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 10 (1992) 3266] and the ionized cluster beam (ICB) [T. Takagi: Ionized-Cluster Beam Deposition and Epitaxy (Noyes, Park Ridge, 1988)] technique. The Ag clusters deposited on collodion-coated microgrids were investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The diameter of those clusters, d, ranges from 1 nm up to about 10 nm for specimens produced by the sputter-gas aggregation technique, depending on the sputter condition and the deposition time. Comparable times of the ICB deposition lead to a broader distribution up to d≈20 nm, suggesting the formation of islands with extremely flat shapes. High percentages of crystalline particles obtained by both techniques are either single crystals or multiple twins with clear lattice images.

  6. The Torsion-Inversion Energy Levels in the S1( n, π*) Electronic State of Acetaldehyde from High-Resolution Jet-Cooled Fluorescence Excitation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Lim, E. C.; Muñoz-Caro, C.; Niño, A.; Judge, R. H.; Moule, D. C.

    1996-01-01

    The laser-induced fluorescence excitation spectrum (LIF) of acetaldehyde that results from the emission from theS1(n, π*) electronic state has been observed under very high resolution with a CW pulse-amplified laser under jet-cooled conditions. The origins of seven bands were determined by rotational analyses with a rigid-rotor Hamiltonian. The origins were fitted to a set of levels that were obtained from a Hamiltonian that employed flexible torsion-wagging large amplitude coordinates. The potential surface derived from the fitting procedure yielded barriers to torsion and inversion of 721.43 and 585.13 cm-1, respectively. Minima in the potential hypersurface at θ = 58.6° and α = 35.7° defined the corresponding equilibrium positions for the torsion and wagging coordinates.

  7. Atomic arrangement at ZnTe/CdSe interfaces determined by high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bonef, Bastien; Rouvière, Jean-Luc; Jouneau, Pierre-Henri; Bellet-Amalric, Edith; Gérard, Lionel; Mariette, Henri; André, Régis; Bougerol, Catherine; Grenier, Adeline

    2015-02-02

    High resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography experiments reveal the presence of an intermediate layer at the interface between two binary compounds with no common atom, namely, ZnTe and CdSe for samples grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy under standard conditions. This thin transition layer, of the order of 1 to 3 atomic planes, contains typically one monolayer of ZnSe. Even if it occurs at each interface, the direct interface, i.e., ZnTe on CdSe, is sharper than the reverse one, where the ZnSe layer is likely surrounded by alloyed layers. On the other hand, a CdTe-like interface was never observed. This interface knowledge is crucial to properly design superlattices for optoelectronic applications and to master band-gap engineering.

  8. Three-Dimensional Analysis of Syncytial-Type Cell Plates during Endosperm Cellularization Visualized by High Resolution Electron Tomography W⃞

    PubMed Central

    Otegui, Marisa S.; Mastronarde, David N.; Kang, Byung-Ho; Bednarek, Sebastian Y.; Staehelin, L. Andrew

    2001-01-01

    The three-dimensional architecture of syncytial-type cell plates in the endosperm of Arabidopsis has been analyzed at ∼6-nm resolution by means of dual-axis high-voltage electron tomography of high-pressure frozen/freeze-substituted samples. Mini-phragmoplasts consisting of microtubule clusters assemble between sister and nonsister nuclei. Most Golgi-derived vesicles appear connected to these microtubules by two molecules that resemble kinesin-like motor proteins. These vesicles fuse with each other to form hourglass-shaped intermediates, which become wide (∼45 nm in diameter) tubules, the building blocks of wide tubular networks. New mini-phragmoplasts also are generated de novo around the margins of expanding wide tubular networks, giving rise to new foci of cell plate growth, which later become integrated into the main cell plate. Spiral-shaped rings of the dynamin-like protein ADL1A constrict but do not fission the wide tubules at irregular intervals. These rings appear to maintain the tubular geometry of the network. The wide tubular network matures into a convoluted fenestrated sheet in a process that involves increases of 45 and 130% in relative membrane surface area and volume, respectively. The proportionally larger increase in volume appears to reflect callose synthesis. Upon fusion with the parental plasma membrane, the convoluted fenestrated sheet is transformed into a planar fenestrated sheet. This transformation involves clathrin-coated vesicles that reduce the relative membrane surface area and volume by ∼70%. A ribosome-excluding matrix encompasses the cell plate membranes from the fusion of the first vesicles until the onset of the planar fenestrated sheet formation. We postulate that this matrix contains the molecules that mediate cell plate assembly. PMID:11549762

  9. A revolutionary rotatable electron energy analyzer for advanced high-resolution spin-polarized photoemission studies. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Waddill, G. D.; Willis, R. F.

    1999-10-01

    This report details the construction and testing of a unique analyzer for spin-polarized photoemission studies of magnetic materials. This report details the progress of this project for the period from 9/1/96 through 8/31/99. Progress can be divided into two distinct areas. These are the fabrication, construction, and initial testing of the instrumentation, and the concurrent program of preliminary investigations into materials and experiments appropriate for future studies using the instrumentation developed. The analyzer complete with special input electron optics and Mott detector has been assembled in a special design UHV chamber equipped with all the capabilities needed to perform the described programs of research. These include a sophisticated five motorized axis sample manipulator with low and high temperature capability and rapid temperature cycling (acquired in collaboration with Dr. J.G. Tobin of LLNL), vacuum leak detection and gauging, in situ thin film growth instrumentation, and sample cleaning and magnetizing capabilities, The initial testing of the analyzer has been completed with successful data acquisition using both the multichannel detector mode, and spin-dependent using the Mott detector channeltrons. The data collected using the Mott detector were not truly spin dependent (see below), but demonstrate the operation of the lens and detector design. Acquisition of truly spin-dependent data await use of the EPU. Preliminary indications suggest that the analyzer performs at or above the original design parameters. In the second area of progress, we have conducted a number of preliminary studies toward the ends of identifying appropriate initial systems for investigation, and to further explore new experiments that the new instrumentation will help to pioneer. More detailed descriptions of all of these advances are given.

  10. Permanent Electronic Storage of Angiographic Images in the Catheterization Laboratory: High-Resolution and Real-Time Acquisition on Optical Laserdiscs.

    PubMed

    Azancot; Krone; Eiferman; Guermonprez; Metzger; Le Dref O; Steg; Bonan; Lesperance; Hudon; Friolo; Beaufils

    1997-03-01

    The use of electronic ÒfilmlessÓ media for long-term archiving of coronary angiograms has been impeded by the problems of image storage and data transfer among institutions. Although long-term analogue storage of the images is presently feasible, and much less costly than digital storage, processing has been limited to a 625 lines video format, not optimal for high quality images. We developed a bi-directional 1249/625 lines converter, able to store and to replay high resolution (1249 lines) video images, from Component Record Video (CRV) Optical Laser (Analogue) Videodisks. Image quality and medical relevance were evaluated five ways: 1) Outside experts compared 593 static images stored on CRV discs to the same images stored in a high-resolution digital format blinded to source of image. The four experts found no visual or medical difference in 98% of evaluated images and minor differences in the remainder. The differences in the remaining images were not consistent among experts. 2) Two of the experts also compared the enhanced CRV optically stored image to the image obtained on simultaneously recorded 35mm cine film, and found the enhanced CRV stored image to be superior or similar, but never inferior to the film image. 3) 90 representatives from 63 outside institutions compared images from both a digital hard drive and the enhanced CRV optical (analogue) storage displayed at a Windows based digital workstation. During the test they were blinded as to the source of the images. The representatives found no difference in image resolution, quality, diagnostic accuracy, and medical relevance. 4) We evaluated quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) on standard coronary test phantoms using enhanced CRV stored images digitally processed. The correlation of the enhanced CRV image to the actual size of the phantom vessels was similar to the results obtained in the literature from digitally stored images. 5) 78 arterial measurements ranging 0.65 to 4.85 mm were

  11. High-resolution calcium mapping of the endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi-exocytic membrane system. Electron energy loss imaging analysis of quick frozen-freeze dried PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Pezzati, R; Bossi, M; Podini, P; Meldolesi, J; Grohovaz, F

    1997-08-01

    The calcium pools segregated within the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi complex, exocytic, and other organelles are believed to participate in the regulation of a variety of cell functions. Until now, however, the precise intracellular distribution of the element had not been established. Here, we report about the first high-resolution calcium mapping obtained in neurosecretory PC12 cells by the imaging mode of the electron energy loss spectroscopy technique. The preparation procedure used included quick freezing of cell monolayers, followed by freeze-drying, fixation with OSO4 vapors, resin embedding, and cutting of very thin sections. Conventional electron microscopy and high-resolution immunocytochemistry revealed a high degree of structural preservation, a condition in which inorganic elements are expected to maintain their native distribution. Within these cells, calcium signals of nucleus, cytosol, and most mitochondria remained below detection, whereas in other organelles specific patterns were identified. In the endoplasmic reticulum, the distribution was heterogeneous with strongly positive cisternae (more often the nuclear envelope and stacks of parallel elements that are frequent in quick frozen preparations) lying in the proximity of or even in direct continuity with other, apparently negative cisternae. The Golgi complexes were labeled strongly and uniformly in all cisternae and part of their vesicles, with no appreciable differences along the cis-trans axis. Weaker or negative signals were recorded from the trans-Golgi network elements and from scattered vesicles, whereas in contrast secretion granules were strongly positive for calcium. These results are discussed in relation to the existing knowledge about the mechanisms of calcium transport in the variations organelles, and about the processes and functions regulated by organelle lumenal calcium in eukaryotic cells.

  12. High Resolution PDF Measurements on Ag Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Tulio C. R.; Martin, Chris; Kycia, Stefan; Zanchet, Daniela

    2009-01-29

    The quantitative analysis of structural defects in Ag nanoparticles was addressed in this work. We performed atomic scale structural characterization by a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) using the Pair Distribution Function analysis (PDF) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The XRD measurements were performed using an innovative instrumentation setup to provide high resolution PDF patterns.

  13. Multiple-electron processes in fast ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, A.S.

    1989-03-01

    Research in atomic physics at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Super-HILAC and Bevalac accelerators on multiple-electron processes in fast ion-atom collisions is described. Experiments have studied various aspects of the charge-transfer, ionization, and excitation processes. Examples of processes in which electron correlation plays a role are resonant transfer and excitation and Auger-electron emission. Processes in which electron behavior can generally be described as uncorrelated include ionization and charge transfer in high-energy ion-atom collisions. A variety of experiments and results for energies from 1 MeV/u to 420 MeV/u are presented. 20 refs., 15 figs.

  14. M-shell resolved high-resolution X-ray spectroscopic study of transient matter evolution driven by hot electrons in kJ-laser produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condamine, F. P.; Šmíd, M.; Renner, O.; Dozières, M.; Thais, F.; Angelo, P.; Rosmej, F. B.

    2017-03-01

    Hot electrons represent a key subject for high intensity laser produced plasmas and atomic physics. Simulations of the radiative properties indicate a high sensitivity to hot electrons, that in turn provides the possibility for their detailed characterization by high-resolution spectroscopic methods. Of particular interest is X-ray spectroscopy due to reduced photo-absorption in dense matter and their efficient generation by hot electrons (inner-shell ionization/excitation). Here, we report on an experimental campaign conducted at the ns, kJ laser facility PALS at Prague in Czech Republic. Thin copper foils have been irradiated with 1ω pulses. Two spherically bent quartz Bragg crystal spectrometers with high spectral (λ/Δλ > 5000) and spatial resolutions (Δx = 30µm) have been set up simultaneously to achieve a high level of confidence for the complex Kα emission group. In particular, this group, which shows a strong overlap between lines, can be resolved in several substructures. Furthermore, an emission on the red wing of the Kα2 transition (λ = 1.5444A) could be identified with Hartree-Fock atomic structure calculations. We discuss possible implications for the analysis of non-equilibrium phenomena and present first simulations.

  15. On the excited state dynamics of vibronic transitions. High-resolution electronic spectra of acenaphthene and its argon van der Waals complex in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Valtierra, Leonardo; Plusquellic, David F; Yi, John T; Pratt, David W

    2011-09-01

    Rotationally resolved fluorescence excitation spectroscopy has been used to study the dynamics, electronic distribution, and the relative orientation of the transition moment vector in several vibronic transitions of acenaphthene (ACN) and in its Ar van der Waals (vdW) complex. The 0(0)(0) band of the S(1) ← S(0) transition of ACN exhibits a transition moment orientation parallel to its a-inertial axis. However, some of the vibronic bands exhibit a transition moment orientation parallel to the b-inertial axis, suggesting a Herzberg-Teller coupling with the S(2) state. Additionally, some other vibronic bands exhibit anomalous intensity patterns in several of their rotational transitions. A Fermi resonance involving two near degenerate vibrations has been proposed to explain this behavior. The high-resolution electronic spectrum of the ACN-Ar vdW complex has also been obtained and fully analyzed. The results indicate that the weakly attached argon atom is located on top of the plane of the bare molecule at ~3.48 Å away from its center of mass in the S(0) electronic state.

  16. Direct Observation of the Layer-by-Layer Growth of ZnO Nanopillar by In situ High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xing; Cheng, Shaobo; Deng, Shiqing; Wei, Xianlong; Zhu, Jing; Chen, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Catalyst-free methods are important for the fabrication of pure nanowires (NWs). However, the growth mechanism remains elusive due to the lack of crucial information on the growth dynamics at atomic level. Here, the noncatalytic growth process of ZnO NWs is studied through in situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy. We observe the layer-by-layer growth of ZnO nanopillars along the polar [0001] direction under electron beam irradiation, while no growth is observed along the radial directions, indicating an anisotropic growth mechanism. The source atoms are mainly from the electron beam induced damage of the sample and the growth is assisted by subsequent absorption and then diffusion of atoms along the side surface to the top (0002) surface. The different binding energy on different ZnO surface is the main origin for the anisotropic growth. Additionally, the coalescence of ZnO nanocrystals related to the nucleation stage is uncovered to realize through the rotational motions and recrystallization. Our in situ results provide atomic-level detailed information about the dynamic growth and coalescence processes in the noncatalytic synthesis of ZnO NW and are helpful for understanding the vapor-solid mechanism of catalyst-free NW growth. PMID:28098261

  17. High-resolution headlamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gut, Carsten; Cristea, Iulia; Neumann, Cornelius

    2016-04-01

    The following article shall describe how human vision by night can be influenced. At first, front lighting systems that are already available on the market will be described, followed by their analysis with respect to the positive effects on traffic safety. Furthermore, how traffic safety by night can be increased since the introduction of high resolution headlamps shall be discussed.

  18. Applications of cross sections for electron-molecule collision processes

    SciTech Connect

    Cartwright, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    The role of electron-molecule collision cross sections is discussed for the study of the ionospheric and auroral processes in planetary atmospheres and of discharge-pumped lasers. These two areas emphasize the importance of further theoretical and experimental studies concerning electron-impact processes. 13 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs. (WRF)

  19. The neural elements in the lining of the ventricular-subventricular zone: making an old story new by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Haemmerle, Carlos Alexandre Dos Santos; Nogueira, Maria Inês; Watanabe, Ii-Sei

    2015-01-01

    The classical description of the neural elements that compose the lining of brain ventricles introduces us to the single layer of ependymal cells. However, new findings, especially in the lateral ventricle (LV)-the major niche for the generation of new neurons in the adult brain-have provided information about additional cell elements that influence the organization of this part of the ventricular system and produce important contributions to neurogenesis. To complement the cell neurochemistry findings, we present a three-dimensional in situ description that demonstrates the anatomical details of the different types of ciliated cells and the innervation of these elements. After processing adult rat brains for ultrastructural analysis by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) and transmission electron microscopy, we observed a heterogeneous pattern of cilia distribution at the different poles of the LV surface. Furthermore, we describe the particular three-dimensional aspects of the ciliated cells of the LV, in addition the fiber bundles and varicose axons surrounding these cells. Therefore, we provide a unique ultrastructural description of the three-dimensional in situ organization of the LV surface, highlighting its innervation, to corroborate the available neurochemical and functional findings regarding the factors that regulate this neurogenic niche.

  20. An Examination of the Surface and Sub-Surface of Modern and Historical Platinum Photographic Prints Using Low Vacuum High-Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ravines, Patrick; Erdman, Natasha; McElroy, Rob

    2016-08-01

    Photographic prints of platinum metal on paper supports are some of the most exquisite and expressive in the world of fine art photography. Platinum prints were produced from about 1890 to 1920 in the USA and Europe. The chemical and material nature of these valuable prints is of great interest to many who are interested in their long-term preservation, in the intersection of science and art, and in the scientific and technical study of cultural heritage. This paper presents the results of a characterization study using newer electron microscopy techniques. In this study, a low vacuum high-resolution scanning electron microscope was used to study the surface and sub-surface of historic and modern platinum and/or palladium print samples. Using environmental SEM pressures allowed us to investigate the actual top surface and sub-surface with cross-sections without any preparation; no coatings of carbon or other material. Cross-sections were prepared using an argon plasma cross-polishing system. This study shows that the photographic image of platinum prints is composed of platinum nanoparticles embedded in the upper layers of the paper's cellulosic fibers.

  1. High-resolution photoelectron imaging of cold C{sub 60}{sup −} anions and accurate determination of the electron affinity of C{sub 60}

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Dao-Ling; Dau, Phuong Diem; Liu, Hong-Tao; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-06-14

    High-resolution photoelectron imaging and spectroscopy of cold C{sub 60}{sup −} anions are reported using a newly built photoelectron imaging apparatus coupled with an electrospray ionization source and a temperature-controlled cryogenic ion trap. Vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectra are obtained for the detachment transition from the ground state of C{sub 60}{sup −} to that of C{sub 60} at various detachment wavelengths from 354.84 nm to 461.35 nm. The electron affinity of C{sub 60} is accurately measured to be 2.6835 ± 0.0006 eV. Numerous unexpected vibrational excitations are observed in the photoelectron spectra due to the Jahn-Teller effect in C{sub 60}{sup −} and Hertzberg-Teller vibronic coupling in both C{sub 60}{sup −} and C{sub 60}. Both the relative intensities of vibrational peaks and their photoelectron angular distributions provide evidence for the vibronic couplings. The observed p-wave-like behavior in the angular distribution of the 0{sub 0}{sup 0} transition suggests that the electron is detached from an s-type orbital.

  2. High resolution data acquisition

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, G.W.; Fuller, K.R.

    1993-04-06

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock, pulse train, and analog circuitry for generating a triangular wave synchronously with the pulse train (as seen in diagram on patent). The triangular wave has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter counts the clock pulse train during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  3. High resolution data acquisition

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, Glenn W.; Fuller, Kenneth R.

    1993-01-01

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock (38) pulse train (37) and analog circuitry (44) for generating a triangular wave (46) synchronously with the pulse train (37). The triangular wave (46) has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter (18, 32) forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter (26) counts the clock pulse train (37) during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer (52) then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  4. High-Resolution Autoradiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towe, George C; Gomberg, Henry J; Freemen, J W

    1955-01-01

    This investigation was made to adapt wet-process autoradiography to metallurgical samples to obtain high resolution of segregated radioactive elements in microstructures. Results are confined to development of the technique, which was perfected to a resolution of less than 10 microns. The radioactive samples included carbon-14 carburized iron and steel, nickel-63 electroplated samples, a powder product containing nickel-63, and tungsten-185 in N-155 alloy.

  5. Ultra high resolution tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, W.S.

    1994-11-15

    Recent work and results on ultra high resolution three dimensional imaging with soft x-rays will be presented. This work is aimed at determining microscopic three dimensional structure of biological and material specimens. Three dimensional reconstructed images of a microscopic test object will be presented; the reconstruction has a resolution on the order of 1000 A in all three dimensions. Preliminary work with biological samples will also be shown, and the experimental and numerical methods used will be discussed.

  6. Electron-Ion collisions in relativistically strong laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Balakin, A. A.

    2008-04-15

    Electron-ion collisions in relativistically strong electromagnetic fields are considered. Analytical and numerical analyses both show that all qualitative effects characteristic of collisions in nonrelativistic strong fields [1-3] occur at relativistic intensities of an electromagnetic wave as well. Expressions for Joule plasma heating and for the energy distributions of fast particles are derived from simple analytic considerations and are confirmed by numerical simulations. It is found, in particular, that, due to the relativistic increase in the mass of a scattered electron, Joule heating in ultrarelativistic fields becomes more intense as the field amplitude grows.

  7. In situ investigation of ion-induced dewetting of a thin iron-oxide film on silicon by high resolution scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Amirthapandian, S.; Schuchart, F.; Garmatter, D.; Bolse, W.

    2012-11-15

    Using our new in situ high resolution scanning electron microscope, which is integrated into the UNILAC ion beamline at the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany, we investigated the swift heavy ion induced dewetting of a thin iron oxide layer on Si. Besides heterogeneous hole nucleation at defects and spontaneous (homogeneous) hole nucleation, we could clearly identify a dewetting mechanism, which is similar to the spinodal dewetting observed for liquid films. Instead of being due to capillary waves, it is based on a stress induced surface instability. The latter results in the formation of a wavy surface with constant dominant wave-length and increasing amplitude during ion irradiation. Dewetting sets in as soon as the wave-troughs reach the film-substrate interface. Inspection of the hole radii and rim shapes indicates that removal of the material from the hole area occurs mainly by plastic deformation at the inner boundary and ion induced viscous flow in the peripheral zone due to surface tension.

  8. Analysis of composition fluctuations on an atomic scale in Al0.25Ga0.75N by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, B.; Rosenauer, A.; Gerthsen, D.; Ambacher, O.; Stutzmann, M.

    1998-08-01

    Composition fluctuations in the Al0.25Ga0.75N layer of an AlGaN/GaN transistor structure grown by plasma induced molecular beam epitaxy on Al2O3(0001) at a growth temperature of 870 °C were studied by digital analysis of lattice images (DALI) of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) cross-section images. DALI exploits the linear dependence of the lattice parameters on the Al content by applying Vegard's law. Detecting the distances between intensity maxima positions in the micrograph which can be considered as a fingerprint of the local lattice parameters quantitatively derives composition profiles on an atomic scale. In the HRTEM cross-section image different areas were observed in the Al0.25Ga0.75N layer with either homogeneous or "striped" contrast. In the striped areas the analyses indicate a strong periodic decomposition with a period of 1 nm consisting of 1 ML Al0.8Ga0.2N and about 3 ML Al0.07Ga0.93N. The regions with homogeneous contrast do not exhibit significant composition fluctuations.

  9. Hydration effects on skin microstructure as probed by high-resolution cryo-scanning electron microscopy and mechanistic implications to enhanced transcutaneous delivery of biomacromolecules.

    PubMed

    Tan, Grace; Xu, Peng; Lawson, Louise B; He, Jibao; Freytag, Lucia C; Clements, John D; John, Vijay T

    2010-02-01

    Although hydration is long known to improve the permeability of skin, penetration of macromolecules such as proteins is limited and the understanding of enhanced transport is based on empirical observations. This study uses high-resolution cryo-scanning electron microscopy to visualize microstructural changes in the stratum corneum (SC) and enable a mechanistic interpretation of biomacromolecule penetration through highly hydrated porcine skin. Swollen corneocytes, separation of lipid bilayers in the SC intercellular space to form cisternae, and networks of spherical particulates are observed in porcine skin tissue hydrated for a period of 4-10 h. This is explained through compaction of skin lipids when hydrated, a reversal in the conformational transition from unilamellar liposomes in lamellar granules to lamellae between keratinocytes when the SC skin barrier is initially established. Confocal microscopy studies show distinct enhancement in penetration of fluorescein isothiocyanate-bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) through skin hydrated for 4-10 h, and limited penetration of FITC-BSA once skin is restored to its natively hydrated structure when exposed to the environment for 2-3 h. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of a 4-10 h hydration period to enhance transcutaneous penetration of large biomacromolecules without permanently damaging the skin.

  10. Hydrogen bonding configuration and thermal stability of ambient exposed and in situ hydrogenated polycrystalline diamond surfaces studied by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Michaelson, Sh; Akhvlediani, R; Hoffman, A

    2011-06-28

    In this work we report on an investigation of hydrogen bonding and thermal stability on the surface of poly-crystalline diamond by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HR-EELS). Diamond films were grown on silicon substrates from CH(4)/H(2) as well as from CD(4)/D(2) gas mixtures by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD). The impact of ex situ ambient exposure on hydrogen bonding and its thermal stability was examined for: (i) as deposited films from a CH(4)/H(2) gas mixture; (ii) the same sample treated ex situ in micro-wave activated hydrogen plasma; and (iii) as deposited films from a CD(4)/D(2) gas mixture. In order to clarify the changes in the hydrogen bonding configuration detected on the different surfaces as a function of thermal annealing in situ hydrogenation by thermally activated atomic hydrogen was performed and examined. This study provides direct evidence that the exposure to ambient conditions and low temperature vacuum annealing have a pronounced effect on the hydrogen-carbon bonding configuration onto the poly-crystalline diamond surfaces.

  11. Structural Evidence for Actin-like Filaments in Toxoplasma gondii Using High-Resolution Low-Voltage Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatten, Heide; Sibley, L. David; Ris, Hans

    2003-08-01

    The protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is representative of a large group of parasites within the phylum Apicomplexa, which share a highly unusual motility system that is crucial for locomotion and active host cell invasion. Despite the importance of motility in the pathology of these unicellular organisms, the motor mechanisms for locomotion remain uncertain, largely because only limited data exist about composition and organization of the cytoskeleton. By using cytoskeleton stabilizing protocols on membrane-extracted parasites and novel imaging with high-resolution low-voltage field emission scanning electron microscopy (LVFESEM), we were able to visualize for the first time a network of actin-sized filaments just below the cell membrane. A complex cytoskeletal network remained after removing the actin-sized fibers with cytochalasin D, revealing longitudinally arranged, subpellicular microtubules and intermediate-sized fibers of 10 nm, which, in stereo images, are seen both above and below the microtubules. These approaches open new possibilities to characterize more fully the largely unexplored and unconventional cytoskeletal motility complex in apicomplexan parasites.

  12. Two bonding configurations of acetylene on Si(001)-(2 x 1): a combined high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy and density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Mineva, T; Nathaniel, R; Kostov, K L; Widdra, W

    2006-11-21

    Two coexisting adsorption states of molecularly adsorbed acetylene on the Si(001)-(2 x 1) surface have been identified by a combined study based on the high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy and density functional computations. Seven possible adsorbate-substrate structures are considered theoretically including their full vibrational analysis. Based on a significantly enhanced experimental resolution, the assignment of 15 C2H2- and C2D2-derived vibrational modes identifies a dominant di-sigma bonded molecule adsorbed on top of a single Si-Si dimer. Additionally there is clear evidence for a second minority species which is di-sigma bonded between two Si-Si dimers within the same dimer row (end-bridge geometry). The possible symmetries of the adsorbate complexes are discussed based on the specular and off-specular vibrational measurements. They suggest lower than ideal C(2v) and C(s) symmetries for on-top and end-bridge species, respectively. At low coverages the symmetry reductions might be lifted.

  13. Probing optical band gaps at the nanoscale in NiFe₂O₄ and CoFe₂O₄ epitaxial films by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dileep, K.; Loukya, B.; Datta, R.; Pachauri, N.; Gupta, A.

    2014-09-14

    Nanoscale optical band gap variations in epitaxial thin films of two different spinel ferrites, i.e., NiFe₂O₄ (NFO) and CoFe₂O₄ (CFO), have been investigated by spatially resolved high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy. Experimentally, both NFO and CFO show indirect/direct band gaps around 1.52 eV/2.74 and 2.3 eV, and 1.3 eV/2.31 eV, respectively, for the ideal inverse spinel configuration with considerable standard deviation in the band gap values for CFO due to various levels of deviation from the ideal inverse spinel structure. Direct probing of the regions in both the systems with tetrahedral A site cation vacancy, which is distinct from the ideal inverse spinel configuration, shows significantly smaller band gap values. The experimental results are supported by the density functional theory based modified Becke-Johnson exchange correlation potential calculated band gap values for the different cation configurations.

  14. Single grain analysis on a nanoscale in ZrO2:Al2O3 nano-composites by means of high-resolution scanning transmission electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossmann, Ulrich; Albu, Mihaela; Hofer, Ferdinand; Würschum, Roland

    2016-12-01

    Nano-particulate powders of Al2O3:ZrO2 composites and the pure constituents were prepared by microwave plasma process synthesis and studied by high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. The ZrO2:Al2O3 nanocomposite samples showed a structure of randomly arranged, crystalline grains of both ZrO2 and Al2O3 with a size in the range of 3-5 nm. For each constituent, both cubic and monoclinic grains were observed. Similarly prepared, single phase Al2O3 nanoparticles were found to be completely amorphous. In the case of ZrO2, the crystallite size and the fraction of the monoclinic ZrO2 phase is noticeably reduced in the ZrO2:Al2O3 nanocomposite in comparison to single phase samples. The observation of ultra-small crystalline Al2O3 in the composite samples, is tentatively ascribed to a modification of the interface energy by the contact of Al2O3 and ZrO2 as well as a possible uptake of ZrO2 into the Al2O3 grains from the gas phase during synthesis.

  15. Visco-plasticity of polycrystalline olivine at high pressure and 900°C: fresh outcomes from high resolution EBSD and electron tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demouchy, S. A.; Mussi, A.; Barou, F.; Tommasi, A.; Cordier, P.

    2013-12-01

    The rheology of olivine-rich rocks at lithospheric temperatures (<1000°C) remains poorly constrained, in contrast to the extensive experimental dataset on creep of olivine single crystals and aggregates at high temperature (T > 1200°C). Consequently, we have performed tri-axial compression experiments (in a Paterson's press) on two fine-grained polycrystalline olivine (San Carlos olivine) specimens at 900°C, under a confining pressure of 300 MPa. Two dense samples were deformed at constant strain rates of 1.0 × 10-5 s-1 and 3.4 × 10-5 s-1. Mechanical curves show continuous hardening, with a decrease of hardening rate with increasing strain. Both samples failed just before 10% of finite strain and yield final differential stresses of 930 and 1076 MPa. Recovered samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). High resolution EBSD maps (step size 0.15 and 0.2 microns) permit to quantify accurately the microstructure (grain size, shape, aspect ratio, and angle distribution of the grain ellipse relative to the compression axis). Weak crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) developed in the deformed olivine aggregates, where [010] axes are mostly parallel to the compression axis; [100] and [001] axes are more dispersed, but tend to be oriented at high angle to the compression axis. Misorientations across grain boundaries and sub-grain boundaries were analyzed as well, evidencing common subgrain boundaries parallel to (100) and rotations dominantly around [001], that is an ';ideal' tilt boundary of the [100](010) system. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy, involving electron tomography of dislocations has identified dislocations with [100] and [001] Burgers vectors gliding on multiple planes, evidence for cross-slip, and dislocation entanglements. These data permit to better constrain the active deformation mechanisms and slip systems involved in the

  16. Unconventional Specimen Preparation Techniques Using High Resolution Low Voltage Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy to Study Cell Motility, Host Cell Invasion, and Internal Cell Structures in Toxoplasma gondii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatten, Heide; Ris, Hans

    2002-04-01

    Apicomplexan parasites employ complex and unconventional mechanisms for cell locomotion, host cell invasion, and cell division that are only poorly understood. While immunofluorescence and conventional transmission electron microscopy have been used to answer questions about the localization of some cytoskeletal proteins and cell organelles, many questions remain unanswered, partly because new methods are needed to study the complex interactions of cytoskeletal proteins and organelles that play a role in cell locomotion, host cell invasion, and cell division. The choice of fixation and preparation methods has proven critical for the analysis of cytoskeletal proteins because of the rapid turnover of actin filaments and the dense spatial organization of the cytoskeleton and its association with the complex membrane system. Here we introduce new methods to study structural aspects of cytoskeletal motility, host cell invasion, and cell division of Toxoplasma gondii, a most suitable laboratory model that is representative of apicomplexan parasites. The novel approach in our experiments is the use of high resolution low voltage field emission scanning electron microscopy (LVFESEM) combined with two new specimen preparation techniques. The first method uses LVFESEM after membrane extraction and stabilization of the cytoskeleton. This method allows viewing of actin filaments which had not been possible with any other method available so far. The second approach of imaging the parasite's ultrastructure and interactions with host cells uses semithick sections (200 nm) that are resin de-embedded (Ris and Malecki, 1993) and imaged with LVFESEM. This method allows analysis of structural detail in the parasite before and after host cell invasion and interactions with the membrane of the parasitophorous vacuole as well as parasite cell division.

  17. High-Resolution Faraday Rotation and Electron-Phonon Coupling in Surface States of the Bulk-Insulating Topological Insulator Cu_{0.02}Bi_{2}Se_{3}.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liang; Tse, Wang-Kong; Brahlek, M; Morris, C M; Aguilar, R Valdés; Koirala, N; Oh, S; Armitage, N P

    2015-11-20

    We have utilized time-domain magnetoterahertz spectroscopy to investigate the low-frequency optical response of the topological insulator Cu_{0.02}Bi_{2}Se_{3} and Bi_{2}Se_{3} films. With both field and frequency dependence, such experiments give sufficient information to measure the mobility and carrier density of multiple conduction channels simultaneously. We observe sharp cyclotron resonances (CRs) in both materials. The small amount of Cu incorporated into the Cu_{0.02}Bi_{2}Se_{3} induces a true bulk insulator with only a single type of conduction with a total sheet carrier density of ~4.9×10^{12}/cm^{2} and mobility as high as 4000 cm^{2}/V·s. This is consistent with conduction from two virtually identical topological surface states (TSSs) on the top and bottom of the film with a chemical potential ~145 meV above the Dirac point and in the bulk gap. The CR broadens at high fields, an effect that we attribute to an electron-phonon interaction. This assignment is supported by an extended Drude model analysis of the zero-field Drude conductance. In contrast, in normal Bi_{2}Se_{3} films, two conduction channels were observed, and we developed a self-consistent analysis method to distinguish the dominant TSSs and coexisting trivial bulk or two-dimensional electron gas states. Our high-resolution Faraday rotation spectroscopy on Cu_{0.02}Bi_{2}Se_{3} paves the way for the observation of quantized Faraday rotation under experimentally achievable conditions to push the chemical potential in the lowest Landau level.

  18. High resolution low dose transmission electron microscopy real-time imaging and manipulation of nano-scale objects in the electron beam

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Jr., R. Malcolm; Barnes, Zack; Sawatari, Chie; Kondo, Tetsuo

    2008-02-26

    The present invention includes a method, apparatus and system for nanofabrication in which one or more target molecules are identified for manipulation with an electron beam and the one or more target molecules are manipulated with the electron beam to produce new useful materials.

  19. Dynamics of electronically inelastic collisions from 3D Doppler measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Suits, A.G.; de Pujo, P.; Sublemontier, O.; Visticot, J.; Berlande, J.; Cuvellier, J.; Gustavsson, T.; Mestdagh, J.; Meynadier, P. ); Lee, Y.T. )

    1991-11-25

    Flux-velocity contour maps were obtained for the inelastic collision process Ba({sup 1}{ital P}{sub 1})+O{sub 2}N{sub 2}{r arrow}Ba({sup 3}{ital P}{sub 2})+O{sub 2}N{sub 2} from Doppler scans of scattered Ba({sup 3}{ital P}{sub 2}) taken over a range of probe laser directions in a crossed-beam experiment. Collision with O{sub 2} resulted in sharply forward scattered Ba({sup 3}{ital P}{sub 2}), with efficient conversion of inital electronic energy into O{sub 2} internal energy and little momentum transfer. Collision with N{sub 2} was dominated by wide-angle scattering with most of the available electronic energy appearing in product translation. The results suggest the importance of large-impact-parameter collisions and a near-resonant energy transfer in the case of O{sub 2}, while for N{sub 2} close collisions dominate despite the presence of an analogous near-resonant channel. The results represent the first direct experimental demonstration of a near-resonant quenching process.

  20. PREFACE: XXV International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Uwe; Moshammer, Robert; Mokler, Paul; Ullrich, Joachim

    2007-07-01

    The XXVth ICPEAC in Freiburg marked a notable anniversary in collision physics: half a century ago the first conference in the series of International Conferences on the Physics of Electronic and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC) was held in New York (1958). Since then, the development of electronic and atomic collision physics has seen tremendous progress. Starting during a time, when this field was regarded as somehow out-of-date, certainly not being in the main stream compared to particle and high-energy physics, it has expanded in a rather exceptional and unforeseen way. Over the years the original scope on electronic, atomic and heavy-ion collision physics was extended substantially to include upcoming expanding fields like synchrotron-radiation and strong-field laser-based atomic and molecular physics giving rise to a change of name to 'Photonic', Electronic and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC) being used for the first time for the ICPEAC in Santa Fee in 2001. Nowadays, the ICPEAC has opened its agenda even more widely to other fields of atomic and molecular physics, such as interactions with clusters, bio-molecules and surfaces, to cold collisions, coherent control, femto- and attosecond physics and, with the Freiburg conference, to the application of free-electron lasers in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray regime, a field of potentially huge future impact in essentially all areas of science. In this larger context the XXVth ICPEAC in Freiburg with more than 800 participants set new standards. Representatives from all fields of Atomic, Molecular and Photon-based science came together and had very fruitful, inter-disciplinary discussions. This new forum of collision-based AMP physics will serve as a showcase example of future conferences, bridging not only the gap between different fields of collision physics but also, equally important, between different continents and cultures. The next ICPEAC is going to take place in Kalamazoo in North America, the one after that

  1. Inelastic collisions of positrons with one-valence-electron targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdel-Raouf, Mohamed Assad

    1990-01-01

    The total elastic and positronium formation cross sections of the inelastic collisions between positrons and various one-valence-electron atoms, (namely hydrogen, lithium, sodium, potassium and rubidium), and one-valence-electron ions, (namely hydrogen-like, lithium-like and alkaline-earth positive ions) are determined using an elaborate modified coupled-static approximation. Special attention is devoted to the behavior of the Ps cross sections at the energy regions lying above the Ps formation thresholds.

  2. Electron transport in EBT in the low collision frequency limit

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, D.E.

    1984-06-01

    A variational principle formulation is used to calculate the electron neoclassical transport coefficients in a bumpy torus for the low collisionality regime. The electron radial drift is calculated as a function of the plasma position and the poloidal electric field which is determined self-consistently. A bounce-averaged differential collision operator is used and the results are compared to previous treatments using a BGK operator.

  3. High resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    F. Garibaldi

    2005-02-01

    Hypernuclear spectroscopy provides fundamental information for understanding the effective ?-Nucleon interaction. Jefferson Laboratory experiment E94-107 was designed to perform high resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy by electroproduction of strangeness in four 1p-shell nuclei: 12C, 9Be, 16O, and 7Li. The first part of the experiment on 12C and 9Be has been performed in January and April-May 2004 in Hall A at Jefferson Lab. Significant modifications were made to the standard Hall A apparatus for this challenging experiment: two septum magnets and a RICH detector have been added to get reasonable counting rates and excellent particle identification, as required for the experiment. A description of the apparatus and the preliminary analysis results are presented here.

  4. High resolution ultrasonic densitometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dress, W.B.

    1983-01-01

    The velocity of torsional stress pulses in an ultrasonic waveguide of non-circular cross section is affected by the temperature and density of the surrounding medium. Measurement of the transit times of acoustic echoes from the ends of a sensor section are interpreted as level, density, and temperature of the fluid environment surrounding that section. This paper examines methods of making these measurements to obtain high resolution, temperature-corrected absolute and relative density and level determinations of the fluid. Possible applications include on-line process monitoring, a hand-held density probe for battery charge state indication, and precise inventory control for such diverse fluids as uranium salt solutions in accountability storage and gasoline in service station storage tanks.

  5. Collision rates for electron excitation of Mg V lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayal, S. S.; Sossah, A. M.

    2015-02-01

    Aims: Transition probabilities and electron impact excitation collision strengths and rates for astrophysically important lines in Mg V are reported. The 86 fine-structure levels of the 2s22p4, 2s2p5, 2p6, 2s22p33s, 2s22p33p and 2s22p33d configurations are included in our calculations. The effective collision strengths are presented as a function of electron temperature for solar and other astrophysical applications. Methods: The collision strengths have been calculated using the B-splineBreit-Pauli R-matrixmethod for all fine-structure transitions among the 86 levels. The one-body mass, Darwin and spin-orbit relativistic effects are included in the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian in the scattering calculations. The one-body and two-body relativistic operators are included in the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock calculations of transition probabilities. Several sets of non-orthogonal spectroscopic and correlation radial orbitals are used to obtain accurate description of Mg V 86 levels and to represent the scattering functions. Results: The calculated excitation energies are in very good agreement with experiment and represents an improvement over the previous calculations. The present collision strengths show good agreement with the previously available R-matrix and distorted-wave calculations. The oscillator strengths for E1 transitions normally compare very well with previous calculations. The thermally averaged collision strengths are obtained by integrating total resonant and non-resonant collision strengths over a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies and these are presented over the temperature range log 10Te = 3.2-6.0 K. Tables 1-4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/574/A87

  6. Medical high-resolution image sharing and electronic whiteboard system: A pure-web-based system for accessing and discussing lossless original images in telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Liang; Li, Ying; Chen, Xin; Yang, Sheng; Gao, Peng; Liu, Hongjun; Feng, Zhengquan; Nian, Yongjian; Qiu, Mingguo

    2015-09-01

    There are various medical image sharing and electronic whiteboard systems available for diagnosis and discussion purposes. However, most of these systems ask clients to install special software tools or web plug-ins to support whiteboard discussion, special medical image format, and customized decoding algorithm of data transmission of HRIs (high-resolution images). This limits the accessibility of the software running on different devices and operating systems. In this paper, we propose a solution based on pure web pages for medical HRIs lossless sharing and e-whiteboard discussion, and have set up a medical HRI sharing and e-whiteboard system, which has four-layered design: (1) HRIs access layer: we improved an tile-pyramid model named unbalanced ratio pyramid structure (URPS), to rapidly share lossless HRIs and to adapt to the reading habits of users; (2) format conversion layer: we designed a format conversion engine (FCE) on server side to real time convert and cache DICOM tiles which clients requesting with window-level parameters, to make browsers compatible and keep response efficiency to server-client; (3) business logic layer: we built a XML behavior relationship storage structure to store and share users' behavior, to keep real time co-browsing and discussion between clients; (4) web-user-interface layer: AJAX technology and Raphael toolkit were used to combine HTML and JavaScript to build client RIA (rich Internet application), to meet clients' desktop-like interaction on any pure webpage. This system can be used to quickly browse lossless HRIs, and support discussing and co-browsing smoothly on any web browser in a diversified network environment. The proposal methods can provide a way to share HRIs safely, and may be used in the field of regional health, telemedicine and remote education at a low cost.

  7. High resolution electron microscopy of the Helicobacter pylori Cag type IV secretion system pili produced in varying conditions of iron availability.

    PubMed

    Haley, Kathryn Patricia; Blanz, Eric Joshua; Gaddy, Jennifer Angeline

    2014-11-21

    Helicobacter pylori is a helical-shaped, gram negative bacterium that colonizes the human gastric niche of half of the human population. H. pylori is the primary cause of gastric cancer, the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. One virulence factor that has been associated with increased risk of gastric disease is the Cag-pathogenicity island, a 40-kb region within the chromosome of H. pylori that encodes a type IV secretion system and the cognate effector molecule, CagA. The Cag-T4SS is responsible for translocating CagA and peptidoglycan into host epithelial cells. The activity of the Cag-T4SS results in numerous changes in host cell biology including upregulation of cytokine expression, activation of proinflammatory pathways, cytoskeletal remodeling, and induction of oncogenic cell-signaling networks. The Cag-T4SS is a macromolecular machine comprised of sub-assembly components spanning the inner and outer membrane and extending outward from the cell into the extracellular space. The extracellular portion of the Cag-T4SS is referred to as the "pilus". Numerous studies have demonstrated that the Cag-T4SS pili are formed at the host-pathogen interface(. However, the environmental features that regulate the biogenesis of this important organelle remain largely obscure. Recently, we reported that conditions of low iron availability increased the Cag-T4SS activity and pilus biogenesis. Here we present an optimized protocol to grow H. pylori in varying conditions of iron availability prior to co-culture with human gastric epithelial cells. Further, we present the comprehensive protocol for visualization of the hyper-piliated phenotype exhibited in iron restricted conditions by high resolution scanning electron microscopy analyses.

  8. Ion formation upon electron collisions with valine embedded in helium nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberger, Nikolaus; Ralser, Stefan; Renzler, Michael; Harnisch, Martina; Kaiser, Alexander; Denifl, Stefan; Böhme, Diethard K.; Scheier, Paul

    2016-04-01

    We report here experimental results for the electron ionization of large superfluid helium nanodroplets with sizes of about 105 atoms that are doped with valine and clusters of valine. Spectra of both cations and anions were monitored with high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (mass resolution >4000). Clear series of peaks with valine cluster sizes up to at least 40 and spaced by the mass of a valine molecule are visible in both the cation and anion spectra. Ion efficiency curves are presented for selected cations and anions at electron energies up to about 40 eV and these provide insight into the mode of ion formation. The measured onset of 24.59 eV for cations is indicative of valine ionization by He+ whereas broad resonances at 2, 10 and 22 eV (and beyond) in the formation of anions speak to the occurrence of various modes of dissociative electron attachment by collisions with electrons or He*- and the influence of droplet size on the relative importance of these processes. Comparisons are also made with gas phase results and these provide insight into a matrix effect within the superfluid helium nanodroplet. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  9. Crack nucleation using combined crystal plasticity modelling, high-resolution digital image correlation and high-resolution electron backscatter diffraction in a superalloy containing non-metallic inclusions under fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tiantian; Britton, Ben; Shollock, Barbara; Dunne, Fionn

    2016-01-01

    A crystal plasticity finite-element model, which explicitly and directly represents the complex microstructures of a non-metallic agglomerate inclusion within polycrystal nickel alloy, has been developed to study the mechanistic basis of fatigue crack nucleation. The methodology is to use the crystal plasticity model in conjunction with direct measurement at the microscale using high (angular) resolution-electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) and high (spatial) resolution-digital image correlation (HR-DIC) strain measurement techniques. Experimentally, this sample has been subjected to heat treatment leading to the establishment of residual (elastic) strains local to the agglomerate and subsequently loaded under conditions of low cyclic fatigue. The full thermal and mechanical loading history was reproduced within the model. HR-EBSD and HR-DIC elastic and total strain measurements demonstrate qualitative and quantitative agreement with crystal plasticity results. Crack nucleation by interfacial decohesion at the nickel matrix/agglomerate inclusion boundaries is observed experimentally, and systematic modelling studies enable the mechanistic basis of the nucleation to be established. A number of fatigue crack nucleation indicators are also assessed against the experimental results. Decohesion was found to be driven by interface tensile normal stress alone, and the interfacial strength was determined to be in the range of 1270–1480 MPa. PMID:27279765

  10. Crack nucleation using combined crystal plasticity modelling, high-resolution digital image correlation and high-resolution electron backscatter diffraction in a superalloy containing non-metallic inclusions under fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tiantian; Jiang, Jun; Britton, Ben; Shollock, Barbara; Dunne, Fionn

    2016-05-01

    A crystal plasticity finite-element model, which explicitly and directly represents the complex microstructures of a non-metallic agglomerate inclusion within polycrystal nickel alloy, has been developed to study the mechanistic basis of fatigue crack nucleation. The methodology is to use the crystal plasticity model in conjunction with direct measurement at the microscale using high (angular) resolution-electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) and high (spatial) resolution-digital image correlation (HR-DIC) strain measurement techniques. Experimentally, this sample has been subjected to heat treatment leading to the establishment of residual (elastic) strains local to the agglomerate and subsequently loaded under conditions of low cyclic fatigue. The full thermal and mechanical loading history was reproduced within the model. HR-EBSD and HR-DIC elastic and total strain measurements demonstrate qualitative and quantitative agreement with crystal plasticity results. Crack nucleation by interfacial decohesion at the nickel matrix/agglomerate inclusion boundaries is observed experimentally, and systematic modelling studies enable the mechanistic basis of the nucleation to be established. A number of fatigue crack nucleation indicators are also assessed against the experimental results. Decohesion was found to be driven by interface tensile normal stress alone, and the interfacial strength was determined to be in the range of 1270-1480 MPa.

  11. Electron-atom collisions in a laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Philip H. G.; Flannery, M. R.

    1991-05-01

    Cross sections tor the 1S-2S and 1S-2P 0 transitions in laser assisted e-H(1S) collisions are calculated in both the multichannel eikonal and the Born-wave treatments as a function of impact energy and laser field intensity and phase. The laser considered is a monotonic, plane polarized CO 2 laser (photon energy = 0.117 eV), with the polarization direction parallel to the initial projectile velocity. Floquet dressing of the hydrogen atom in the soft-photon weak-field limit reveals a concise description of the laser assisted electron-atom collision. This model also links the microscopic detail of the individual collisions with the macroscopic considerations of experimental analysis.

  12. Semiclassical theory of electronically nonadiabatic transitions in molecular collision processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, K. S.; George, T. F.

    1979-01-01

    An introductory account of the semiclassical theory of the S-matrix for molecular collision processes is presented, with special emphasis on electronically nonadiabatic transitions. This theory is based on the incorporation of classical mechanics with quantum superposition, and in practice makes use of the analytic continuation of classical mechanics into the complex space of time domain. The relevant concepts of molecular scattering theory and related dynamical models are described and the formalism is developed and illustrated with simple examples - collinear collision of the A+BC type. The theory is then extended to include the effects of laser-induced nonadiabatic transitions. Two bound continuum processes collisional ionization and collision-induced emission also amenable to the same general semiclassical treatment are discussed.

  13. Electron collisions with Fe-peak elements: Fe V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, B. M.; Norrington, P. H.; Hibbert, A.; Scott, M. P.; Burke, P. G.; Burke, V. M.; Noble, C. J.

    2006-05-01

    Lines of Fe^+ -- Fe^6+ ions appear in the UV spectra of O-type stars. Accurate assessments of the relevant abundances of heavy elements and their ions can be obtained from the comparison of the observed spectra with synthetic NLTE spectra, if the atomic data for electron and photon interaction processes are known with sufficient accuracy. Electron-impact excitation collision strengths for the Fe-peak element Fe^4+ are calculated in the close-coupling approximation using the R-matrix suite of codes PRMAT. Eighty LS - coupled states arising from the 3d^4, 3d^34s and 3d^34p configurations of Fe^4+ are retained in our calculations. Accurate multi-configuration interaction target and scattering wavefunctions are used with the aid of 3p^2 ->3d^2 two-electron promotions and a n=4 basis set. Effective collision strengths for optically forbidden transitions in the 3d^4 manifold, which are extremely important in the analysis of lines in the Fe^4+ spectra, are obtained by averaging the electron collision strengths over a Maxwellian distribution for the electron temperature. The present results when compared to previous investigations for temperatures below 100,000 Kelvin show an enhancement of a factor of two. Further details will be presented at the meeting.

  14. Electron collisions with Fe-peak elements: Fe IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, B. M.; Hibbert, A.; Scott, M. P.; Noble, C. J.; Burke, V. M.; Burke, P. G.

    2006-02-01

    Electron-impact excitation collision strengths of the Fe-peak element Fe IV are calculated in the close-coupling approximation using the parallel R-matrix program PRMAT. One hundred and eight LS - coupled states arising from the 3d^5, 3d^44s and 3d^44p configurations of Fe IV, are retained in the present calculations. Accurate multi-configuration target wavefunctions are employed with the aid of 3p2 → 3d2 electron promotions and a overline4d correlation orbital. The effective collision strengths required in the analysis of astrophysically important lines in the Fe IV spectra, are obtained by averaging the electron collision strengths for a wide range of incident electron energies, over a Maxwellian distribution of velocities. Results are tabulated for forbidden transitions between the 3d^5, 3d^44s and the 3d^44p manifolds for electron temperatures (Te in degrees Kelvin) in the range 3.3 ≤ Log Te ≤ 6.0 that are applicable to many laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. The present results provide new results for forbidden lines in the Fe IV spectrum studied here.

  15. HIGH-RESOLUTION ELECTRON-IMPACT EMISSION SPECTRA AND VIBRATIONAL EMISSION CROSS SECTIONS FROM 330-1100 nm FOR N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Mangina, Rao S.; Ajello, Joseph M.; West, Robert A.; Dziczek, Dariusz

    2011-09-01

    Electron-impact emission cross sections for N{sub 2} were measured in the wavelength range of 330-1100 nm at 25 eV and 100 eV impact energies. Cross sections of several molecular emission bands of the first positive band system B {sup 3}{Pi}{sub g} {sup +}({nu}') {yields} A {sup 3}{Sigma}{sub g} {sup +}({nu}'') and the second positive band system C {sup 3}{Pi}{sub u} ({nu}') {yields} B {sup 3}{Pi}{sub g} ({nu}'') of N{sub 2}, the first negative band (1NB) system B {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub u} {sup +}({nu}') {yields} X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g} {sup +}({nu}'') and Meinel band system A {sup 2}{Pi}{sub u} ({nu}') {yields} X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g} {sup +}({nu}'') of N{sub 2} {sup +} ions as well as line emissions of N (N I) and N{sup +} (N II) in the visible-optical-near-IR wavelength range reported in this work were measured for the first time in a single experimental setup at high spectral resolving power ({lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} {approx} 10000) under single-collision-scattering geometry and optically thin conditions. Rotational emission lines of N{sub 2} and N{sub 2} {sup +} were observed for strong emission bands at a gas temperature of about 300 K. The absolute cross section of the strongest (0,0) vibrational band at 391.43 nm of 1NB was determined using the standard H{sub {alpha}} emission cross sections of H{sub 2} by electron impact at both 25 eV and 100 eV electron-impact energies, and the cross sections for the remainder of the emissions were determined using (0,0) 1NB value. A comparison of the present emission cross sections with the earlier published data from both electron energy loss and electron-impact-induced fluorescence emission is discussed.

  16. Structural characterization and gas reactions of small metal particles by high resolution in-situ TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) and TED (Transmission Electron Diffraction)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.

    1987-01-01

    The detection and size analysis of small metal particles supported on amorphous substrates becomes increasingly difficult when the particle size approaches that of the phase contrast background structures of the support. An approach of digital image analysis, involving Fourier transformation of the original image, filtering, and image reconstruction was studied with respect to the likelihood of unambiguously detecting particles of less than 1 nm diameter on amorphous substrates from a single electron micrograph.

  17. High Resolution Laboratory Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brünken, S.; Schlemmer, S.

    2016-05-01

    In this short review we will highlight some of the recent advancements in the field of high-resolution laboratory spectroscopy that meet the needs dictated by the advent of highly sensitive and broadband telescopes like ALMA and SOFIA. Among these is the development of broadband techniques for the study of complex organic molecules, like fast scanning conventional absorption spectroscopy based on multiplier chains, chirped pulse instrumentation, or the use of synchrotron facilities. Of similar importance is the extension of the accessible frequency range to THz frequencies, where many light hydrides have their ground state rotational transitions. Another key experimental challenge is the production of sufficiently high number densities of refractory and transient species in the laboratory, where discharges have proven to be efficient sources that can also be coupled to molecular jets. For ionic molecular species sensitive action spectroscopic schemes have recently been developed to overcome some of the limitations of conventional absorption spectroscopy. Throughout this review examples demonstrating the strong interplay between laboratory and observational studies will be given.

  18. High Resolution Doppler Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Paul B.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) on UARS spacecraft during the period 4/l/96 - 3/31/99. During this period, HRDI operation, data processing, and data analysis continued, and there was a high level of vitality in the HRDI project. The HRDI has been collecting data from the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere since instrument activation on October 1, 1991. The HRDI team has stressed three areas since operations commenced: 1) operation of the instrument in a manner which maximizes the quality and versatility of the collected data; 2) algorithm development and validation to produce a high-quality data product; and 3) scientific studies, primarily of the dynamics of the middle atmosphere. There has been no significant degradation in the HRDI instrument since operations began nearly 8 years ago. HRDI operations are fairly routine, although we have continued to look for ways to improve the quality of the scientific product, either by improving existing modes, or by designing new ones. The HRDI instrument has been programmed to collect data for new scientific studies, such as measurements of fluorescence from plants, measuring cloud top heights, and lower atmosphere H2O.

  19. Collisions between low-energy electrons and small polyatomic targets of biological relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, Leigh

    2016-05-01

    Over the last decade, cross section measurements and calculations for DNA prototype molecules have received significant attention from the collisions community, due to the potential applications of this data in modelling electron transport through biological matter with a view to improving radiation dosimetry. Such data are additionally interesting from a fundamental aspect, as small carbon-based molecules are ideal targets for considering effects including target conformation, long-range dynamical interactions and coupling effects between the various degrees of freedom on the scattering properties of the target. At the California State University Fullerton, we have made a series of measurements of the elastic, vibrationally inelastic and electronically inelastic cross sections for a variety of small polyatomic targets, including water and the basic alcohols, ethylene, toluene and several fluorinated alkanes. These processes are important in a range of applications, primarily for modelling electron transport and thermalization, and energy deposition to a biological media. The data were obtained using a high resolution electron energy-loss spectrometer, operating in a crossed beam configuration with a moveable aperture gas source. The gas source design facilitates both an expedient and highly accurate method of removing background signal, and removes uncertainties from the data due to uncertainties in the beam profile. We have also performed scattering calculations employing the Schwinger Multichannel method, in collaboration with the California institute of technology, to compare with our measurements. In this talk, I will present an overview of our recent data and future research plans.

  20. Ionization and Electron Emission of Heavy Ion - Collisions: the Argon-Krypton Collision System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarcone, Michael Joseph, Jr.

    The Ar-Kr collision system has been studied by examining the charge states of the scattered ions together with the energies of the emitted electrons. The charge state data show that there are increases in the average scattered charge state at distances of closest approach that correspond well with internuclear distances for which the molecular orbital model^1 predicts electron promotions of krypton and argon electrons to occur. The electron data show a well resolved Auger peak between 150 -200 eV superimposed on an exponentially decreasing background of continuum electrons. Doppler shifts identify the Auger peak as originating from the argon collision partner. Ion -electron coincidence experiments exhibit the same peak and link it to a specific distance of closest approach. The threshold for this L-Auger electron production falls between 0.2 and 0.3 a.u., agreeing well with molecular orbital predictions. ftn^1Fano U. and W. Lichten, Phys. Rev. Lett., 14, 627 1965.

  1. Relativistic collision rate calculations for electron-air interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, G.; Roussel-Dupre, R.

    1992-12-16

    The most recent data available on differential cross sections for electron-air interactions are used to calculate the avalanche, momentum transfer, and energy loss rates that enter into the fluid equations. Data for the important elastic, inelastic, and ionizing processes are generally available out to electron energies of 1--10 kev. Prescriptions for extending these cross sections to the relativistic regime are presented. The angular dependence of the cross sections is included where data is available as is the doubly differential cross section for ionizing collisions. The collision rates are computed by taking moments of the Boltzmann collision integrals with the assumption that the electron momentum distribution function is given by the Juettner distribution function which satisfies the relativistic H- theorem and which reduces to the familiar Maxwellian velocity distribution in the nonrelativistic regime. The distribution function is parameterized in terms of the electron density, mean momentum, and thermal energy and the rates are therefore computed on a two-dimensional grid as a function of mean kinetic energy and thermal energy.

  2. Relativistic collision rate calculations for electron-air interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, G.; Roussel-Dupre, R.

    1993-12-01

    The most recent data available on differential cross sections for electron-air interactions are used to calculate the avalanche, momentum transfer, and energy loss rates that enter into the fluid equations. Data for the important elastic, inelastic, and ionizing processes are generally available out to electron energies of 1--10 keV. Prescriptions for extending these cross sections to the relativistic regime are presented. The angular dependence of the cross sections is included where data are available as is the doubly differential cross section for ionizing collisions. The collision rates are computed by taking moments of the Boltzmann collision integrals with the assumption that the electron momentum distribution function is given by the Juettner distribution function which satisfies the relativistic H- theorem and which reduces to the familiar Maxwellian velocity distribution in the nonrelativistic regime. The distribution function is parameterized in terms of the electron density, mean momentum, and thermal energy and the rates are therefore computed on a two dimensional grid as a function of mean kinetic energy and thermal energy.

  3. High resolution IR diode laser study of collisional energy transfer between highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene and CO{sub 2}: The effect of donor fluorination on strong collision energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kilyoung; Johnson, Alan M.; Powell, Amber L.; Mitchell, Deborah G.; Sevy, Eric T.

    2014-12-21

    Collisional energy transfer between vibrational ground state CO{sub 2} and highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene (MFB) was studied using narrow bandwidth (0.0003 cm{sup −1}) IR diode laser absorption spectroscopy. Highly vibrationally excited MFB with E′ = ∼41 000 cm{sup −1} was prepared by 248 nm UV excitation followed by rapid radiationless internal conversion to the electronic ground state (S{sub 1}→S{sub 0}*). The amount of vibrational energy transferred from hot MFB into rotations and translations of CO{sub 2} via collisions was measured by probing the scattered CO{sub 2} using the IR diode laser. The absolute state specific energy transfer rate constants and scattering probabilities for single collisions between hot MFB and CO{sub 2} were measured and used to determine the energy transfer probability distribution function, P(E,E′), in the large ΔE region. P(E,E′) was then fit to a bi-exponential function and extrapolated to the low ΔE region. P(E,E′) and the biexponential fit data were used to determine the partitioning between weak and strong collisions as well as investigate molecular properties responsible for large collisional energy transfer events. Fermi's Golden rule was used to model the shape of P(E,E′) and identify which donor vibrational motions are primarily responsible for energy transfer. In general, the results suggest that low-frequency MFB vibrational modes are primarily responsible for strong collisions, and govern the shape and magnitude of P(E,E′). Where deviations from this general trend occur, vibrational modes with large negative anharmonicity constants are more efficient energy gateways than modes with similar frequency, while vibrational modes with large positive anharmonicity constants are less efficient at energy transfer than modes of similar frequency.

  4. High-resolution seismic velocity structure beneath the Hokkaido corner, northern Japan: Arc-arc collision and origins of the 1970 M 6.7 Hidaka and 1982 M 7.1 Urakawa-oki earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Saeko; Hasegawa, Akira; Nakajima, Junichi; Okada, Tomomi; Matsuzawa, Toru; Katsumata, Kei

    2012-12-01

    Using travel time data from both a nationwide dense seismic network and a dense temporary seismic network, we obtain a high-resolution three-dimensional seismic velocity structure beneath the Hokkaido corner. Considerable inhomogeneity in the seismic velocity structure is clearly imaged above the subducting Pacific slab. Our results indicate that a broad low-velocity zone of P and S waves, with velocities consistent for crustal rocks, is observed west of the Hidaka main thrust at depths of 35-90 km. The images also indicate that several smaller-scale high-velocity zones are located at depths of 0-35 km, striking approximately north-south and inclined to the east-northeastward at 40°-60°. All of these anomalous high-velocity zones are located at the deeper extension of Neogene thrust faults. The clearest high-velocity zone is located beneath the Hidaka metamorphic belt and is in contact with the eastern edge of the broad low-velocity zone. Moreover, the boundary between the clearest high-velocity and the broad low-velocity zones corresponds to the fault plane of the 1970 Mj (magnitude determined by the Japan Meteorological Agency) 6.7 Hidaka earthquake. The western boundary of another small high-velocity zone, at depths of 20 to 30 km within the broad low-velocity zone, corresponds to the fault plane of the 1982 Mj 7.1 Urakawa-oki earthquake. These observations suggest that these two large and anomalously deep inland earthquakes occurred at sharp material boundaries under a northeast-southwest compressional stress field caused by ongoing arc-arc collision process.

  5. Stacking disorder in silicon carbide supported cobalt crystallites: an X-ray diffraction, electron diffraction and high resolution electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    du Plessis, H E; de Villiers, J P R; Tuling, A; Olivier, E J

    2016-11-21

    Supported cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts are characteristically nanoparticulate and the reduced SiC supported catalyst was found to contain both HCP and FCC polymorphs. This is reflected in the powder XRD patterns and generally there is a poor fit between the experimental and calculated diffractograms. This was ascribed to small crystallite sizes and the occurrence of disorder, manifested as peak broadening and peak shifts. Selected area electron diffraction data of suitably oriented cobalt catalyst grains on silicon carbide supports show non-periodic disorder in the zone axis orientations that contain the common (001) (HCP) and (111) (FCC) reciprocal lattice planes. Both FCC and HCP polymorphs are present in the same grains and these show disorder mainly in the HCP component. The disorder is further examined using high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy at atomic resolution and the stacking sequences elucidated. Random sequences of mainly FCC are interrupted by HCP sequences and twin surfaces with reverse stacking sequences are also present. This study highlights the presence of significant disorder in cobalt catalyst grains confirmed by HAADF microscopy.

  6. Structural Characterization and Gas Reactions of Small Metal Particles by High Resolution In-situ TEM and TED. [Transmission Electron Microscopy and Transmission Electron Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.

    1985-01-01

    A commercial electron microscope with flat-plate upper pole piece configuration of the objective lens and top entry specimen introduction was modified to obtain 5 x 10 to the minus 10th power mbar pressure at the site of the specimen while maintaining the convenience of a specimen airlock system that allows operation in the 10 to the 10th power mbar range within 15 minutes after specimen change. The specimen chamber contains three wire evaporation sources, a specimen heater, and facilities for oxygen or hydrogen plasma treatment to clean as-introduced specimens. Evacuation is achieved by dural differential pumping, with fine entrance and exit apertures for the electron beam. With the microscope operating at .000001 mbar, the first differential pumping stage features a high-speed cryopump operating in a stainless steel chamber that can be mildly baked and reaches 1 x 10 to the minus 8th power mbar. The second stage, containing the evaporation sources and a custom ionization gauge within 10 cm from the specimen, is a rigorously uncompromised all-metal uhv-system that is bakable to above 200 C throughout and is pumped with an 80-liter ion pump. Design operating pressures and image quality (resolution of metal particles smaller than 1 nm in size) was achieved.

  7. Evolution of titania nanotubes-supported WO{sub x} species by in situ thermo-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cortes-Jacome, M.A.; Angeles-Chavez, C.; Morales, M.; Lopez-Salinas, E.; Toledo-Antonio, J.A.

    2007-10-15

    Structural evolution of WO{sub x} species on the surface of titania nanotubes was followed by in situ thermo-Raman spectroscopy. A total of 15 wt% of W atoms were loaded on the surface of a hydroxylated titania nanotubes by impregnation with ammonium metatungstate solution and then, the sample was thermally treated in a Linkam cell at different temperatures in nitrogen flow. The band characteristic of the W=O bond was observed at 962 cm{sup -1} in the dried sample, which vanished between 300 and 700 deg. C, and reappear again after annealing at 800 deg. C, along with a broad band centered at 935 cm{sup -1}, attributed to the v{sub 1} vibration of W=O in tetrahedral coordination. At 900 and 1000 deg. C, the broad band decomposed into four bands at 923, 934, 940 and 950 cm{sup -1}, corresponding to the symmetric and asymmetric vibration of W=O bonds in Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}W{sub 2}O{sub 7} phases as determined by X-ray diffraction and High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The structure of the nanotubular support was kept at temperatures below 450 deg. C, thereafter, it transformed into anatase being stabilized at temperatures as high as 900 deg. C. At 1000 deg. C, anatase phase partially converted into rutile. After annealing at 1000 deg. C, a core-shell model material was obtained, with a shell of ca. 5 nm thickness, composed of sodium tungstate nanoclusters, and a core composed mainly of rutile TiO{sub 2} phase. - Graphical abstract: Titania nanotubes loaded with 15 wt% W atoms were characterized from room temperature (rt) to 1000 deg. C by thermo-Raman spectroscopy in N{sub 2}. At 1000 deg. C, a core-shell model material was obtained, with a shell thickness of ca. 5 nm composed by nanoclusters of sodium tungstate, and a core composed mainly of rutile TiO{sub 2} phase.

  8. Enhanced High Resolution RBS System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Thomas J.; Hass, James A.; Klody, George M.

    2011-06-01

    Improvements in full spectrum resolution with the second NEC high resolution RBS system are summarized. Results for 50 Å TiN/HfO films on Si yielding energy resolution on the order of 1 keV are also presented. Detector enhancements include improved pulse processing electronics, upgraded shielding for the MCP/RAE detector, and reduced noise generated from pumping. Energy resolution measurements on spectra front edge coupled with calculations using 0.4mStr solid angle show that beam energy spread at 400 KeV from the Pelletron® accelerator is less than 100 eV. To improve user throughput, magnet control has been added to the automatic data collection. Depth profiles derived from experimental data are discussed. For the thin films profiled, depth resolutions were on the Angstrom level with the non-linear energy/channel conversions ranging from 100 to 200 eV.

  9. Enhanced High Resolution RBS System

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Thomas J.; Hass, James A.; Klody, George M.

    2011-06-01

    Improvements in full spectrum resolution with the second NEC high resolution RBS system are summarized. Results for 50 A ring TiN/HfO films on Si yielding energy resolution on the order of 1 keV are also presented. Detector enhancements include improved pulse processing electronics, upgraded shielding for the MCP/RAE detector, and reduced noise generated from pumping. Energy resolution measurements on spectra front edge coupled with calculations using 0.4mStr solid angle show that beam energy spread at 400 KeV from the Pelletron registered accelerator is less than 100 eV. To improve user throughput, magnet control has been added to the automatic data collection. Depth profiles derived from experimental data are discussed. For the thin films profiled, depth resolutions were on the Angstrom level with the non-linear energy/channel conversions ranging from 100 to 200 eV.

  10. Influence of electron-ion collisions on Buneman instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostomyan, Eduard

    2016-07-01

    Buneman instability (BI) [1] has been found to play a role in many scenarios in space physics and geophysics. It has also been invoked to explain many phenomena in the earth ionosphere [2] and in the solar chromosphere [3]. In double-layer and collisionless shock physics the same instability has been found responsible in formation of nonlinear structures [4]. In situations where an electron beam enters plasma, like in the fast ignition scenario for inertial fusion [5], Buneman modes are excited and play essential role [6]. BI is caused by motion of plasma electrons against ions. However, up to now investigations on BI did not take into account influence collisions in plasma (for quantum case a paper has recently appeared [7]). Influence of collisions may be very important especially in dense fully ionized plasma with long distance character of interaction. Particularly collisions lead to energy dissipation with an array of ensuing effects e.g. change of the instability physical nature to that of dissipative type [8]. Due to role of BI in various processes in space (and laboratory) plasma necessity of the consideration is long overdue. Absence of investigations on a problem along with its importance may be explained by its complexity only. For given case correct consideration should be based on solution of transport equation with collisional term. In fully ionized plasma correct description of collisions is given by Landau collision integral (LCI) [9]. This is very complex formation. It greatly complicates transport equation and actually makes it intractable. Since its formulation in 1936, there is very little literature on solution of the transport equation with LCI. Almost all successful attempts to accommodate influence of collisions on various processes in plasma are based on BGK model [10]. This model is much simpler. However in fully ionized plasma usage LCI is more appropriate as it is designed for system with long distance character of particle interaction

  11. Reply to Origin of fast electrons' from slow atomic collisions''

    SciTech Connect

    Baragiola, R.A. ); Alonso, E.V. ); Oliva, A.; Bonanno, A.; Xu, F. )

    1993-08-01

    We show reasons why negative ions cannot contribute significantly to our observation of fast electrons in slow atomic collisions [Phys. Rev. 45, 5286 (1992)]. We point out that the opposite suggestion by Yasui [preceding Comment, Phys. Rev. A 48, 1711 (1993)] results from multiple errors in his analysis, including inadequate consideration of energy conservation, the use of nonapplicable data from the literature, neglect of decay in flight of metastable negative ions, nonconsideration of detection efficiency, and the inconsistent fit of experimental data.

  12. Vacuum birefringence in high-energy laser-electron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, B.; Elkina, N.

    2016-12-01

    Real photon-photon scattering is a long-predicted phenomenon that is being searched for in experiment in the form of a birefringent vacuum at optical and x-ray frequencies. We present results of calculations and numerical simulations for a scenario to measure this effect using multi-MeV photons generated in the collision of electrons with a laser pulse. We find that the birefringence of the vacuum should be measurable using experimental parameters attainable in the near future.

  13. Collisions of Electrons with Atomic Oxygen: Current Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. V.; Kanik, I.; Tayal, S. S.

    2005-01-01

    In 1990, two significant reviews of electron-atomic-oxygen collision processes were published. Since that time, a large volume of both experimental and theoretical research into these processes has occurred. These data are reviewed and recommendations regarding existing data sets and future research in this area are made. Attention is given to the challenges associated with handling atomic oxygen in terms of both experiment and theory.

  14. General theory of electron detachment in negative ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.S.

    1983-01-01

    In this thesis a general theory of electron detachment in slow collisions of negative ions with atoms is presented. The theory is based upon a semiclassical close-coupling framework, following the work of Taylor and Delos. The Schrodinger equation is reduced, under certain assumptions, to a non-denumerably infinite set of coupled equations. A new method for solving these equations is developed that is more general than the methods used by Taylor and Delos. A zero-order approximation of the solution is applied to the case of H-(D-) on Ne collisions, the results are compared with the experimental data, and good agreement between theory and experiment, particularly with regard to the isotope effect, is found. A first-order approximation of the solution is proved to be very close to the exact solution, and it is applied to the case of H-(D-) on He collisions. Quadratic and quartic approximations are used for the energy gap ..delta..(t) to calculate, among other things, the survival probability and electron energy spectrum. There are some interesting results of the electron energy spectrum which have not yet been observed in experiments.

  15. High Resolution Formaldehyde Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernest, C. T.; Bauer, D.; Hynes, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is the most abundant and most important organic carbonyl compound in the atmosphere. The sources of formaldehyde are the oxidation of methane, isoprene, acetone, and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); fossil fuel combustion; and biomass burning. The dominant loss mechanism for formaldehyde is photolysis which occurs via two pathways: (R1) HCHO + hv → HCO + H (R2) HCHO + hv → H2 + CO The first pathway (R1) is referred to as the radical channel, while the second pathway (R2) is referred to as the molecular channel. The products of both pathways play a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. The CO that is produced in the molecular channel undergoes further oxidation to produce CO2. Under atmospheric conditions, the H atom and formyl radical that are produced in the radical channel undergo rapid reactions with O2 to produce the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) via (R3) and (R4). (R3) HCO + O2 → HO2 + CO (R4) H + O2 → HO2 Thus, for every photon absorbed, the photolysis of formaldehyde can contribute one CO2 molecule to the global greenhouse budget or two HO2 radicals to the tropospheric HOx (OH + HO2) cycle. The HO2 radicals produced during formaldehyde photolysis have also been implicated in the formation of photochemical smog. The HO2 radicals act as radical chain carriers and convert NO to NO2, which ultimately results in the catalytic production of O3. Constraining the yield of HO2 produced via HCHO photolysis is essential for improving tropospheric chemistry models. In this study, both the absorption cross section and the quantum yield of the radical channel (R1) were measured at high resolution over the tropospherically relevant wavelength range 304-330 nm. For the cross section measurements a narrow linewidth Nd:YAG pumped dye laser was used with a multi-pass cell. Partial pressures of HCHO were kept below 0.3 torr. Simultaneous measurement of OH LIF in a flame allowed absolute calibration of the wavelength scale. Pressure

  16. High resolution time interval meter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

  17. Convoy electron production in heavy-ion-solid collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, I.A.; Breinig, M.; Brandt, W.; Laubert, R.

    1981-01-01

    The properties of the sharp v vector/sub e/ approx. = v vector cusps observed in the velocity spectrum of convoy electrons (v vector/sub e/) ejected in heavy ion-solid collisions in the ion velocity range (v vector) 6 to 18 au are compared to the properties of analogous cusps observed in binary electron capture to the continuum (ECC) and electron loss to the continuum (ELC) collisions in gases. Apart from a skew toward v vector/sub e/ > v vector, the v-independent convoy distributions observed are very similar to those for ELC and the cusp widths are the same in both cases. While the shape of convoy peaks is approximately independent of projectile Z, v, and of target material, yields in polycrystalline targets (C, Al, Ag, Au) exhibit a strong dependence on Z and v. Coincidence experiments in which convoy electrons are allocated according to emergent ion charge-state q/sub e/ show a surprising independence of q/sub e/, mirroring the unweighted statistical emergent charge-state fraction. Coincidence experiments of O/sup 6 +/ /sup 7 +/ /sup 8 +/ ions traversing < 110 > and < 100 > channels in Au show a strong yield suppression and a dependence of yield on the channel chosen. Interpretation of these observations, comparisons to convoy production studies using protons, and a discussion of remaining puzzles is given. The history of ECC, ELC, and wake-riding models of convoy electron production is also reviewed.

  18. Convergent Close-Coupling Approach to Electron-Atom Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, Igor; Stelbovics, Andris

    2007-01-01

    It was with great pleasure and honour to accept the invitation to make a presentation at the symposium celebrating the life-long work of Aaron Temkin and Richard Drachman. The work of Aaron Temkin was particularly influential on our own during the development of the CCC method for electron-atom collisions. There are a number of key problems that need to be dealt with when developing a general computational approach to such collisions. Traditionally, the electron energy range was subdivided into the low, intermediate, and high energies. At the low energies only a finite number of channels are open and variational or close-coupling techniques could be used to obtain accurate results. At high energies an infinite number of discrete channels and the target continuum are open, but perturbative techniques are able to yield accurate results. However, at the intermediate energies perturbative techniques fail and computational approaches need to be found for treating the infinite number of open channels. In addition, there are also problems associated with the identical nature of electrons and the difficulty of implementing the boundary conditions for ionization processes. The beauty of the Temkin-Poet model of electron-hydrogen scattering is that it simplifies the full computational problem by neglecting any non-zero orbital angular momenta in the partial-wave expansion, without loosing the complexity associated with the above-mentioned problems. The unique nature of the problem allowed for accurate solution leading to benchmark results which could then be used to test the much more general approaches to electron-atom collision problems. The immense value of the Temkin-Poet model is readily summarised by the fact that the initial papers of Temkin and Poet have been collectively cited around 250 times to date and are still being cited in present times. Many of the citations came from our own work during the course of the development of the CCC method, which we now describe.

  19. Electron emission in collisions between atoms and dressed projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, A.; Ghosh, T. K.; Mandal, C. R.; Purkait, M.

    2016-12-01

    We present theoretical results for electron emission in collisions between helium atoms and dressed projectiles at high energies. Double-differential cross sections (DDCSs) as a function of the emitted electron energies and angles are calculated. In our study we have applied the three-body formalism using the three-Coulomb wave (3CW-3B) model. The interaction between the dressed projectile and the active electron in the target has been approximated by a model potential having both a long-range Coulomb potential part and a short-range part. However, the active electron in the target has been treated as hydrogenic. We have also studied the projectile charge state dependence of the DDCS. Our theoretical results are compared with available experimental data as well as other theoretical calculations. The comparison shows a good agreement between the present calculations and the measurements. The obtained results are also compatible with other theoretical findings.

  20. Study On Electron Collisions With Zn-like W Ion

    SciTech Connect

    Mihailescu, A.; Pais, V.; Totolici, M. C.; Stancalie, V.

    2008-04-07

    The present work gives new refined results for electron impact excitation rates and collision strengths for transitions of type [Ar]3d{sup 10}4snl->[Ar]3d{sup 10}4sn';l', n, n' = 4,5, and {delta}J = 0,l in Zn-like W ion. We have examined the position and widths of the resonant states of type ls{sup 2}2s2p{sup 6}3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6}3d{sup 10}4s{sup 2}nl. Autoionizing states can radically alter the low temperature behavior of collision rates, and are a major contributor to opacity. Preliminary results for Auger rates are presented. Hartree-Fock calculations have been carried out followed by a configuration interaction (CI) in intermediate coupling using the suite of Cowan's codes.

  1. Evidence for anisotropic dielectric properties of monoclinic hafnia using valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and ab initio time-dependent density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedj, C.; Hung, L.; Zobelli, A.; Blaise, P.; Sottile, F.; Olevano, V.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of nanocrystal orientation on the energy loss spectra of monoclinic hafnia (m-HfO2) is measured by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and valence energy loss spectroscopy (VEELS) on high quality samples. For the same momentum-transfer directions, the dielectric properties are also calculated ab initio by time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT). Experiments and simulations evidence anisotropy in the dielectric properties of m-HfO2, most notably with the direction-dependent oscillator strength of the main bulk plasmon. The anisotropic nature of m-HfO2 may contribute to the differences among VEELS spectra reported in literature. The good agreement between the complex dielectric permittivity extracted from VEELS with nanometer spatial resolution, TDDFT modeling, and past literature demonstrates that the present HRTEM-VEELS device-oriented methodology is a possible solution to the difficult nanocharacterization challenges given in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors.

  2. Cross sections for electron collisions with dimethyl ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugohara, R. T.; Homem, M. G. P.; Iga, I.; de Souza, G. L. C.; Machado, L. E.; Ferraz, J. R.; dos Santos, A. S.; Brescansin, L. M.; Lucchese, R. R.; Lee, M. T.

    2013-08-01

    We report a joint theoretical-experimental investigation of electron collision with dimethyl ether (DME) in the low- and intermediate-energy ranges. Experimental absolute differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections for elastic e--DME scattering are reported in the 100-1000 eV energy range. Our measurements were performed using a crossed electron-beam-molecular-beam geometry. The angular distribution of the scattered electrons was converted to absolute cross section using the relative flow technique. Theoretically, elastic differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections, as well as the grand-total and total absorption cross sections for electron collision with DME are calculated in the 1-1000 eV energy range. A single-center-expansion technique combined with the Padé approximant method is used in our calculations. A comparison between the present experimental and theoretical data shows very good agreement. Moreover, comparison with theoretical and experimental data for e--ethanol (an isomer of DME) scattering shows interesting isomeric effects.

  3. Effects of target plasma electron-electron collisions on correlated motion of fragmented protons.

    PubMed

    Barriga-Carrasco, Manuel D

    2006-02-01

    The objective of the present work is to examined the effects of plasma target electron-electron collisions on H2 + protons traversing it. Specifically, the target is deuterium in a plasma state with temperature Te=10 eV and density n=10(23) cm(-3), and proton velocities are vp=vth, vp=2vth, and vp=3vth, where vth is the electron thermal velocity of the target plasma. Proton interactions with plasma electrons are treated by means of the dielectric formalism. The interactions among close protons through plasma electronic medium are called vicinage forces. It is checked that these forces always screen the Coulomb explosions of the two fragmented protons from the same H2 + ion decreasing their relative distance. They also align the interproton vector along the motion direction, and increase the energy loss of the two protons at early dwell times while for longer times the energy loss tends to the value of two isolated protons. Nevertheless, vicinage forces and effects are modified by the target electron collisions. These collisions enhance the calculated self-stopping and vicinage forces over the collisionless results. Regarding proton correlated motion, when these collisions are included, the interproton vector along the motion direction overaligns at slower proton velocities (vp=vth) and misaligns for faster ones (vp=2vth, vp=3vth). They also contribute to a great extend to increase the energy loss of the fragmented H2 + ion. This later effect is more significant in reducing projectile velocity.

  4. Single electrons from heavy-flavor decays in collisions at.

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L

    2006-01-27

    The invariant differential cross section for inclusive electron production in p+p collisions at [FORMULA: SEE TEXT] has been measured by the PHENIX experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider over the transverse momentum range 0.4electron spectrum from semileptonic decays of hadrons carrying heavy flavor, i.e., charm quarks or, at high , bottom quarks, is determined via three independent methods. The resulting electron spectrum from heavy-flavor decays is compared to recent leading and next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations. The total cross section of charm quark-antiquark pair production is determined to be [FORMULA: SEE TEXT].

  5. Electron Collisions with Fe-peak elements: Fe IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, B. M.; Hibbert, A.; Scott, M. P.; Burke, P. G.; Sunderland, A. G.; Noble, C. J.; Burke, V. M.; Pindzola, M.

    2004-05-01

    Highly correlated configuration interaction (CI) wavefunctions are being used in studies of electron impact excitation of Fe IV, using the close-coupling approximation with the R-matrix method. The PRMAT-II parallel code is used to perform the calculations. All 108 LS-coupled states from the 3d^5, 3d^44s and 3d^44p manifolds of Fe IV are included in our cross section calculations. Effective collision strengths are determined by averaging over a Maxwellian temperature distribution for the electrons. At low temperatures, preliminary results have indicated a further enhancement over those rates determined using the above basic configuration set. We attribute this to the use of elaborate correlated CI target wavefunctions determined by two-electron promotions from the 3p^63d^5 manifold and inclusion of a 4d correlation orbital. Converged calculations are in progress and rates will be presented for forbidden transitions within the 3d^5 manifold.

  6. Will Allis Prize Talk: Electron Collisions - Experiment, Theory and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartschat, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, and molecules represent one of the very early topics of quantum mechanics. In spite of the field's maturity, a number of recent developments in detector technology (e.g., the ``reaction microscope'' or the ``magnetic-angle changer'') and the rapid increase in computational resources have resulted in significant progress in the measurement, understanding, and theoretical/computational description of few-body Coulomb problems. Close collaborations between experimentalists and theorists worldwide continue to produce high-quality benchmark data, which allow for thoroughly testing and further developing a variety of theoretical approaches. As a result, it has now become possible to reliably calculate the vast amount of atomic data needed for detailed modelling of the physics and chemistry of planetary atmospheres, the interpretation of astrophysical data, optimizing the energy transport in reactive plasmas, and many other topics - including light-driven processes, in which electrons are produced by continuous or short-pulse ultra-intense electromagnetic radiation. In this talk, I will highlight some of the recent developments that have had a major impact on the field. This will be followed by showcasing examples, in which accurate electron collision data enabled applications in fields beyond traditional AMO physics. Finally, open problems and challenges for the future will be outlined. I am very grateful for fruitful scientific collaborations with many colleagues, and the long-term financial support by the NSF through the Theoretical AMO and Computational Physics programs, as well as supercomputer resources through TeraGrid and XSEDE.

  7. Electronic excitation of carbonyl sulphide (COS) by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption and electron-impact spectroscopy in the energy region from 4 to 11 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Limão-Vieira, P.; Ferreira da Silva, F.; Almeida, D.; Hoshino, M.; Tanaka, H.; Mogi, D.; Tanioka, T.; Mason, N. J.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J.

    2015-02-14

    The electronic state spectroscopy of carbonyl sulphide, COS, has been investigated using high resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy in the energy range of 4.0–10.8 eV. The spectrum reveals several new features not previously reported in the literature. Vibronic structure has been observed, notably in the low energy absorption dipole forbidden band assigned to the (4π←3π) ({sup 1}Δ←{sup 1}Σ{sup +}) transition, with a new weak transition assigned to ({sup 1}Σ{sup −}←{sup 1}Σ{sup +}) reported here for the first time. The absolute optical oscillator strengths are determined for ground state to {sup 1}Σ{sup +} and {sup 1}Π transitions. Based on our recent measurements of differential cross sections for the optically allowed ({sup 1}Σ{sup +} and {sup 1}Π) transitions of COS by electron impact, the optical oscillator strength f{sub 0} value and integral cross sections (ICSs) are derived by applying a generalized oscillator strength analysis. Subsequently, ICSs predicted by the scaling are confirmed down to 60 eV in the intermediate energy region. The measured absolute photoabsorption cross sections have been used to calculate the photolysis lifetime of carbonyl sulphide in the upper stratosphere (20–50 km)

  8. Electronic excitation of carbonyl sulphide (COS) by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption and electron-impact spectroscopy in the energy region from 4 to 11 eV.

    PubMed

    Limão-Vieira, P; Ferreira da Silva, F; Almeida, D; Hoshino, M; Tanaka, H; Mogi, D; Tanioka, T; Mason, N J; Hoffmann, S V; Hubin-Franskin, M-J; Delwiche, J

    2015-02-14

    The electronic state spectroscopy of carbonyl sulphide, COS, has been investigated using high resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy in the energy range of 4.0-10.8 eV. The spectrum reveals several new features not previously reported in the literature. Vibronic structure has been observed, notably in the low energy absorption dipole forbidden band assigned to the (4π←3π) ((1)Δ←(1)Σ(+)) transition, with a new weak transition assigned to ((1)Σ(-)←(1)Σ(+)) reported here for the first time. The absolute optical oscillator strengths are determined for ground state to (1)Σ(+) and (1)Π transitions. Based on our recent measurements of differential cross sections for the optically allowed ((1)Σ(+) and (1)Π) transitions of COS by electron impact, the optical oscillator strength f0 value and integral cross sections (ICSs) are derived by applying a generalized oscillator strength analysis. Subsequently, ICSs predicted by the scaling are confirmed down to 60 eV in the intermediate energy region. The measured absolute photoabsorption cross sections have been used to calculate the photolysis lifetime of carbonyl sulphide in the upper stratosphere (20-50 km).

  9. Nonlinear regime of electrostatic waves propagation in presence of electron-electron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzi, Oreste; Valentini, Francesco; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2015-04-01

    The effects are presented of including electron-electron collisions in self-consistent Eulerian simulations of electrostatic wave propagation in nonlinear regime. The electron-electron collisions are approximately modeled through the full three-dimensional Dougherty collisional operator [J. P. Dougherty, Phys. Fluids 7, 1788 (1964)]; this allows the elimination of unphysical byproducts due to reduced dimensionality in velocity space. The effects of non-zero collisionality are discussed in the nonlinear regime of the symmetric bump-on-tail instability and in the propagation of the so-called kinetic electrostatic electron nonlinear (KEEN) waves [T. W. Johnston et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 042105 (2009)]. For both cases, it is shown how collisions work to destroy the phase-space structures created by particle trapping effects and to damp the wave amplitude, as the system returns to the thermal equilibrium. In particular, for the case of the KEEN waves, once collisions have smoothed out the trapped particle population which sustains the KEEN fluctuations, additional oscillations at the Langmuir frequency are observed on the fundamental electric field spectral component, whose amplitude decays in time at the usual collisionless linear Landau damping rate.

  10. Vibrational and Electronic Energy Transfer and Dissociation of Diatomic Molecules by Electron Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    At high altitudes and velocities equal to or greater than the geosynchronous return velocity (10 kilometers per second), the shock layer of a hypersonic flight will be in thermochemical nonequilibrium and partially ionized. The amount of ionization is determined by the velocity. For a trans atmospheric flight of 10 kilometers per second and at an altitude of 80 kilometers, a maximum of 1% ionization is expected. At a velocity of 12 - 17 kilometer per second, such as a Mars return mission, up to 30% of the atoms and molecules in the flow field will be ionized. Under those circumstances, electrons play an important role in determining the internal states of atoms and molecules in the flow field and hence the amount of radiative heat load and the distance it takes for the flow field to re-establish equilibrium. Electron collisions provide an effective means of transferring energy even when the electron number density is as low as 1%. Because the mass of an electron is 12,760 times smaller than the reduced mass of N2, its average speed, and hence its average collision frequency, is more than 100 times larger. Even in the slightly ionized regime with only 1% electrons, the frequency of electron-molecule collisions is equal to or larger than that of molecule-molecule collisions, an important consideration in the low density part of the atmosphere. Three electron-molecule collision processes relevant to hypersonic flows will be considered: (1) vibrational excitation/de-excitation of a diatomic molecule by electron impact, (2) electronic excitation/de-excitation, and (3) dissociative recombination in electron-diatomic ion collisions. A review of available data, both theory and experiment, will be given. Particular attention will be paid to tailoring the molecular physics to the condition of hypersonic flows. For example, the high rotational temperatures in a hypersonic flow field means that most experimental data carried out under room temperatures are not applicable. Also

  11. High resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, Jim; Dinyari, Rostam; Huie, Phil; Butterwick, Alex; Peumans, Peter; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight in patients with retinal degeneration by delivering pulsed electric currents to retinal neurons via an array of microelectrodes. Most implants use inductive or optical transmission of information and power to an intraocular receiver, with decoded signals subsequently distributed to retinal electrodes through an intraocular cable. Surgical complexity could be minimized by an "integrated" prosthesis, in which both power and data are delivered directly to the stimulating array without any discrete components or cables. We present here an integrated retinal prosthesis system based on a photodiode array implant. Video frames are processed and imaged onto the retinal implant by a video goggle projection system operating at near-infrared wavelengths (~ 900 nm). Photodiodes convert light into pulsed electric current, with charge injection maximized by specially optimized series photodiode circuits. Prostheses of three different pixel densities (16 pix/mm2, 64 pix/mm2, and 256 pix/mm2) have been designed, simulated, and prototyped. Retinal tissue response to subretinal implants made of various materials has been investigated in RCS rats. The resulting prosthesis can provide sufficient charge injection for high resolution retinal stimulation without the need for implantation of any bulky discrete elements such as coils or tethers. In addition, since every pixel functions independently, pixel arrays may be placed separately in the subretinal space, providing visual stimulation to a larger field of view.

  12. Local atomic and electronic structure of oxide/GaAs and SiO2/Si interfaces using high-resolution XPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, F. J.; Grunthaner, P. J.; Vasquez, R. P.; Lewis, B. F.; Maserjian, J.; Madhukar, A.

    1979-01-01

    The chemical structures of thin SiO2 films, thin native oxides of GaAs (20-30 A), and the respective oxide-semiconductor interfaces, have been investigated using high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Depth profiles of these structures have been obtained using argon ion bombardment and wet chemical etching techniques. The chemical destruction induced by the ion profiling method is shown by direct comparison of these methods for identical samples. Fourier transform data-reduction methods based on linear prediction with maximum entropy constraints are used to analyze the discrete structure in oxides and substrates. This discrete structure is interpreted by means of a structure-induced charge-transfer model.

  13. Electron-impact excitation of Sc II: collision strengths and effective collision strengths for fine-structure transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieve, M. F. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.

    2012-08-01

    Accurate fine-structure atomic data for the Fe-peak elements are essential for interpreting astronomical spectra. There is a severe paucity of data available for Sc II, highlighted by the fact that no collision strengths are readily available for this ion. We present electron-impact excitation collision strengths and Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths for Sc II. The collision strengths were calculated for all 3916 transitions amongst 89 jj levels (arising from the 3d4s, 3d2, 4s2, 3d4p, 4s4p, 3d5s, 3d4d, 3d5p, 4p2 and 3d4f configurations), resulting in a 944 coupled channel problem. The R-matrix package RMATRXII was utilized, along with the transformation code FINE and the external region code PSTGF, to calculate the collision strengths for a range of incident electron energies in the 0 to 8.3 Rydberg region. Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths were then produced for 27 temperatures lying within the astrophysically significant range of 30 to 105 K. The collision strengths and effective collision strengths were produced for two different target models. The purpose was to systematically examine the effect of including open 3p correlation terms into the configuration interaction expansion for the wavefunction. The first model consisted of all 36 CI terms that could be generated with the 3p core closed. The second model incorporated an additional six configurations which allowed for single-electron excitations from within the 3p core. Comparisons are made between the two models and the results of Bautista et al., obtained by private communication. It is concluded that the first model produced the most reliable set of collision and effective collision strengths for use in astrophysical and plasma applications.

  14. Rotational And Rovibrational Energy Transfer In Electron Collisions With Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuemmel, Helmar T.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Air flows around a hypervelocity reentry vehicle undergo dissociation, rovibrational excitation and ionization. More specifically the air, initially 80% N2 and 20% O2, in the shock layer consists of species such as N, O, N2, O2, NO, N+, O+, N+, O+, NO+ and 2 free electrons. It was pointed out in multi temperature models'' that the temperature of the rotational energy modes and the gas-kinetic translational temperature are quickly equilibrated by a few collisions and rise rapidly to high temperatures as 50000K before falling off to equilibrium value of 10000K. Contrary, the electronic and vibrational temperatures state energy distributions remain low (less than 15000K) because of the slow equilibration. Electron vibrational energy transfer is thought to play a crucial role in such a ionizing flow regime since chemical reaction rates and dissociation depend strongly on the vibrational temperatures. Modeling of these flowfields in principle require the rovibrational excitation and de-excitation cross section data for average electron energies from threshold up to several eV (leV=11605.4 K). In this lecture we focus on theoretical description of rotational effects i.e. energy transfer of electrons to molecules such that the molecular rotational (vojo goes to voj) or vibrational and rotational (v(sub 0)j(sub 0) goes to vj) states are changed. Excitation and de-excitation of electronic states was discussed in a previous talk at this conference.

  15. Electron excitation after plasmon decay in proton-aluminum collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bocan, G.; Miraglia, J.E.

    2003-03-01

    When a projectile travels inside a metal, it interacts with the electron gas, producing both binary and collective excitations (plasmons). Within the nearly-free-electron-gas scheme, Roesler and co-workers showed that plasmons decay in first order and a conduction electron is emitted (interband transition). Working within the frame of atomic collisions, we develop a simple model to describe this decay. The first-order Born expansion is used to approximate the electron wave functions. The influence of the lattice potential on the excited electron is considered in the calculations in order to balance the momentum-conservation equation. It gives contributions associated with sites of the reciprocal lattice. The potential expansion coefficients are obtained following Animalu and co-workers [Philos. Mag. 9, 451 (1964)]. First- and second-differential spectra (in energy and angle) are analyzed discriminating contributions due to different lattice momenta. In all cases, contributions due to binary excitations of the valence electrons and inner-shell ionization are presented to establish a comparison.

  16. Electron collisions with the CH2O-H2O complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, T. C.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; Canuto, S.

    2009-11-01

    In this conference we will present cross sections for elastic electron collisions with the CH2O-H2O complex bonded through hydrogen bond. We will investigate electron collisions with different structures of this complex which were obtained by Classical Monte Carlo simulations. This work would help in understanding the hole of water in the dissociative electron attachment in biological molecules.

  17. Absorption effects in electron-sulfur-dioxide collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, L. E.; Sugohara, R. T.; Santos, A. S. dos; Lee, M.-T.; Iga, I.; Souza, G. L. C. de; Homem, M. G. P.; Michelin, S. E.; Brescansin, L. M.

    2011-09-15

    A joint experimental-theoretical study on electron-SO{sub 2} collisions in the low and intermediate energy range is reported. More specifically, experimental elastic differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections in absolute scale are measured in the 100-1000 eV energy range using the relative-flow technique. Calculated elastic differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections as well as grand-total and total absorption cross sections are also presented in the 1-1000 eV energy range. A complex optical potential is used to represent the electron-molecule interaction dynamics, whereas the Schwinger variational iterative method combined with the distorted-wave approximation is used to solve the scattering equations. Comparison of the present results is made with the theoretical and experimental results available in the literature.

  18. Fast electrons from electron-ion collisions in strong laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kull, H.-J.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2005-06-01

    Electron-ion collisions in the presence of a strong laser field lead to a distribution of fast electrons with maximum energy Emax=(k0+2v0)2/2(a.u.), where k0 is the impact and v0 the quiver velocity of the electron. The energy spectrum is calculated by two approaches: (1) The time-dependent Schrödinger equation is numerically solved for wave packet scattering from a one-dimensional softcore Coulomb potential. Multiphoton energy spectra are obtained demonstrating a separation of the energy spectrum into an exponential distribution for transmission and a plateau distribution for reflection. (2) The energy spectrum is analytically calculated in the framework of classical instantaneous Coulomb collisions with random impact parameters and random phases of the laser field. An exact solution for the energy spectrum is obtained from which the fraction of fast electrons in the plateau region can be estimated.

  19. Target electron ionization in Li2+-Li collisions: A multi-electron perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śpiewanowski, M. D.; Gulyás, L.; Horbatsch, M.; Kirchner, T.

    2015-05-01

    The recent development of the magneto-optical trap reaction-microscope has opened a new chapter for detailed investigations of charged-particle collisions from alkali atoms. It was shown that energy-differential cross sections for ionization from the outer-shell in O8+-Li collisions at 1500 keV/amu can be readily explained with the single-active-electron approximation. Understanding of K-shell ionization, however, requires incorporating many-electron effects. An ionization-excitation process was found to play an important role. We present a theoretical study of target electron removal in Li2+-Li collisions at 2290 keV/amu. The results indicate that in outer-shell ionization a single-electron process plays the dominant part. However, the K-shell ionization results are more difficult to interpret. On one hand, we find only weak contributions from multi-electron processes. On the other hand, a large discrepancy between experimental and single-particle theoretical results indicate that multi-electron processes involving ionization from the outer shell may be important for a complete understanding of the process. Work supported by NSERC, Canada and the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund.

  20. Ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition-rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers

    PubMed Central

    Chubar, Oleg; Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Madsen, Anders; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar; Shvyd’ko, Yuri; Sutter, John

    2016-01-01

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm−1 spectral and momentum-transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm−1 are required to close the gap in energy–momentum space between high- and low-frequency probes. It is shown that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a 100-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. Wave-optics calculations show that about 7 × 1012 photons s−1 in a 90 µeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. This will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS. PMID:26917127

  1. Ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition-rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Chubar, Oleg; Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Madsen, Anders; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar; Shvyd'ko, Yuri; Sutter, John

    2016-03-01

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm(-1) spectral and momentum-transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm(-1) are required to close the gap in energy-momentum space between high- and low-frequency probes. It is shown that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a 100-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. Wave-optics calculations show that about 7 × 10(12) photons s(-1) in a 90 µeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. This will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS.

  2. Direct band gap measurement of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} thin films using high-resolution reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Sung; Lee, Hyung-Ik; Park, Jong-Bong; Ko, Dong-Su; Chung, JaeGwan; Kim, KiHong; Kim, Seong Heon; Yun, Dong-Jin; Ham, YongNam; Park, Gyeong Su; Song, Taewon; Lee, Dongho Nam, Junggyu; Kang, Hee Jae; Choi, Pyung-Ho; Choi, Byoung-Deog

    2015-06-29

    To investigate the band gap profile of Cu(In{sub 1−x},Ga{sub x})(Se{sub 1−y}S{sub y}){sub 2} of various compositions, we measured the band gap profile directly as a function of in-depth using high-resolution reflection energy loss spectroscopy (HR-REELS), which was compared with the band gap profile calculated based on the auger depth profile. The band gap profile is a double-graded band gap as a function of in-depth. The calculated band gap obtained from the auger depth profile seems to be larger than that by HR-REELS. Calculated band gaps are to measure the average band gap of the spatially different varying compositions with respect to considering its void fraction. But, the results obtained using HR-REELS are to be affected by the low band gap (i.e., out of void) rather than large one (i.e., near void). Our findings suggest an analytical method to directly determine the band gap profile as function of in-depth.

  3. Ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition-rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chubar, Oleg; Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Madsen, Anders; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar; Shvyd'ko, Yuri; Sutter, John

    2016-03-01

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm₋1spectral and momentum-transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm₋1are required to close the gap in energy–momentum space between high- and low-frequency probes. It is shown that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a 100-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. Wave-optics calculations show that about 7 × 1012 photons s₋1in a 90 µeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. Ultimately, this will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS.

  4. Ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition-rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers

    DOE PAGES

    Chubar, Oleg; Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; ...

    2016-03-01

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm₋1spectral and momentum-transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm₋1are required to close the gap in energy–momentum space between high- and low-frequency probes. It is shown that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seedingmore » and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a 100-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. Wave-optics calculations show that about 7 × 1012 photons s₋1in a 90 µeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. Ultimately, this will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS.« less

  5. High-resolution electron microscopy observations of continuous precipitates with Pitsch-Schrader orientation relationship in an Mg-Al based alloy and interpretation with the O-lattice theory.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J P; Zhao, D S; Zheng, O; Wang, J B; Xiong, D X; Sun, Z F; Gui, J N; Wang, R H

    2009-12-01

    High-resolution electron microscopy was applied to analyze the continuous precipitated particles of the gamma-Mg(17)Al(12) phase with Pitsch-Schrader OR in the heat-treated AZ91 alloy at 473 K for 8 h. The existence of a continuous precipitated particle with the Pitsch-Schrader OR including the selection of the habit plane and the growth direction in Mg-Al system is rationalized by the constrained coincidence site lattice/constrained complete pattern shift lattice (CCSL/CDSCL) model and the O-lattice theory.

  6. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES: High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and bulk magnetometry study of LaFe11.5Si1.5 compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jun-Ding; Li, Wei; Shen, Bao-Gen

    2009-10-01

    This paper studies the microstructural and magnetic properties of LaFe11.5Si1.5 compound by means of high-resolution transmission electron microscope and bulk magnetometry measurements. The crystalline structure is accompanied with the noncrystalline and nanocrystalline structures. This characteristic is the reflection of the crystalline process held by quenching. The inverse susceptibilities diverge and deviate from Curie-Weiss law under low applied magnetic fields. This paper proposes the possible mechanism between the anomalous susceptibilities and microstructure, and offers a perspective on the magnetic properties of metastable intermetallic compounds.

  7. Probing the electronic and vibrational structure of Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2}{sup −} and Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2} using photoelectron spectroscopy and high resolution photoelectron imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Gary V.; Czekner, Joseph; Jian, Tian; Li, Wei-Li; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-12-14

    The electronic and vibrational structures of Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2}{sup −} and Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2} have been investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES), high-resolution photoelectron imaging, and theoretical calculations. Photoelectron spectra taken at high photon energies with a magnetic-bottle apparatus reveal numerous detachment transitions and a large energy gap for the neutral Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2}. Vibrationally resolved PE spectra are obtained using high-resolution photoelectron imaging for the ground state detachment transition of Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2}{sup −} at various photon energies (670.55−843.03 nm). An accurate electron affinity of 1.4438(8) eV is obtained for the Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2} neutral cluster, as well as two vibrational frequencies at 57 ± 8 and 305 ± 13 cm{sup −1}. Hot bands transitions yield two vibrational frequencies for Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2}{sup −} at 57 ± 10 and 144 ± 12 cm{sup −1}. The obtained vibrational and electronic structure information is compared with density functional calculations, unequivocally confirming that both Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2}{sup −} and Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2} possess C{sub 2v} tetrahedral structures.

  8. Progress in electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) based high-resolution high-sensitivity x-ray detector for fluoroscopy and radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhls, Andrew T.; Yadava, Girijesh; Patel, Vikas; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2007-03-01

    A new high-resolution, high-sensitivity, low-noise x-ray detector based on EMCCDs has been developed. The EMCCD detector module consists of a 1kx1k, 8μm pixel EMCCD camera coupled to a CsI(Tl) scintillating phosphor via a fiber optic taper (FOT). Multiple modules can be used to provide the desired field-of-view (FOV). The detector is capable of acquisitions over 30fps. The EMCCD's variable gain of up to 2000x for the pixel signal enables high sensitivity for fluoroscopic applications. With a 3:1 FOT, the detector can operate with a 144μm effective pixel size, comparable to current flat-panel detectors. Higher resolutions of 96 and 48μm pixel size can also be achieved with various binning modes. The detector MTFs and DQEs were calculated using a linear-systems analysis. The zero frequency DQE was calculated to be 59% at 74 kVp. The DQE for the 144μm pixel size was shown to exhibit quantum-noise limited behavior down to ~0.1μR using a conservative 30x gain. At this low exposure, gains above 30x showed limited improvements in DQE suggesting such increased gains may not be necessary. For operation down to 48µm pixel sizes, the detector instrumentation noise equivalent exposure (INEE), defined as the exposure where the instrumentation noise equals the quantum-noise, was <0.1μR for a 20x gain. This new technology may provide improvements over current flat-panel detectors for applications such as fluoroscopy and angiography requiring high frame rates, resolution, dynamic range and sensitivity while maintaining essentially no lag and very low INEE. Initial images from a prototype detector are also presented.

  9. Non-targeted analysis of electronics waste by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry: Using accurate mass information and mass defect analysis to explore the data.

    PubMed

    Ubukata, Masaaki; Jobst, Karl J; Reiner, Eric J; Reichenbach, Stephen E; Tao, Qingping; Hang, Jiliang; Wu, Zhanpin; Dane, A John; Cody, Robert B

    2015-05-22

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) offer the best possible separation of their respective techniques. Recent commercialization of combined GC×GC-HRMS systems offers new possibilities for the analysis of complex mixtures. However, such experiments yield enormous data sets that require new informatics tools to facilitate the interpretation of the rich information content. This study reports on the analysis of dust obtained from an electronics recycling facility by using GC×GC in combination with a new high-resolution time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. New software tools for (non-traditional) Kendrick mass defect analysis were developed in this research and greatly aided in the identification of compounds containing chlorine and bromine, elements that feature in most persistent organic pollutants (POPs). In essence, the mass defect plot serves as a visual aid from which halogenated compounds are recognizable on the basis of their mass defect and isotope patterns. Mass chromatograms were generated based on specific ions identified in the plots as well as region of the plot predominantly occupied by halogenated contaminants. Tentative identification was aided by database searches, complementary electron-capture negative ionization experiments and elemental composition determinations from the exact mass data. These included known and emerging flame retardants, such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromobenzene, tetrabromo bisphenol A and tris (1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP), as well as other legacy contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated terphenyls (PCTs).

  10. High resolution digital delay timer

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Albert D.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay (20) provides a first output signal (24) at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits (26, 28) latch the high resolution data (24) to form a first synchronizing data set (60). A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters (142, 146, 154) and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses (32, 34) count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an interval which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD (184) corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD (74) to generate a second set of synchronizing data (76) which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data (60) for presentation to logic circuits (64). The logic circuits (64) further delay the internal output signal (72) to obtain a proper phase relationship of an output signal (80) with the internal pulses (32, 34). The final delayed output signal (80) thereafter enables the output pulse generator (82) to produce the desired output pulse (84) at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse (10, 12).

  11. Advanced very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The advanced very high resolution radiometer development program is considered. The program covered the design, construction, and test of a breadboard model, engineering model, protoflight model, mechanical structural model, and a life test model. Special bench test and calibration equipment was also developed for use on the program.

  12. High Resolution Orientation Imaging Microscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-02

    Functions, ICCES 2010, Las Vegas. 17. David Fullwood, Brent Adams, Mike Miles, Stuart Rogers, Ali Khosravani, Raj Mishra, Design for Ductility : Defect... Pseudo -Symmetries by High Resolution EBSD Methods, MS&T. 2009: Pittsburgh. 27. Oliver Johnson, Calvin Gardner, David Fullwood, Brent Adams, George...applied to strain measurements ................................... 6 2.3 Recovery of Lattice Tetragonality and Pseudo -Symmetry Resolution

  13. Collisions of low-energy electrons with cyclohexane

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, Alessandra Souza; Bettega, Márcio H. F.

    2014-12-28

    We report calculated cross sections for elastic scattering of low-energy electrons by cyclohexane (c-C{sub 6}H{sub 12}). We employed the Schwinger multichannel method implemented with norm-conserving pseudopotentials in the static-exchange and static-exchange plus polarization approximations, for impact energies up to 30 eV. We compare our calculated integral cross section with experimental total cross sections available in the literature. We also compare our calculated differential cross sections (DCSs) with experimental results for benzene and experimental and theoretical results for 1,4-dioxane, in order to investigate the similarities between those molecules under electron collisions. Although benzene is a cyclic six-carbon molecule, as cyclohexane, we found that the differential cross sections of the latter are more similar to those of 1,4-dioxane than those of benzene. These similarities suggest that the geometry may play an important role in the behavior of the DCSs of these molecules. Our integral cross section displays a broad structure at around 8.5 eV, in agreement with the total cross section experimental data of 8 eV and vibrational excitation data of 7.5 eV. The present integral cross section also shows the presence of a Ramsauer-Townsend minimum at around 0.12 eV. In general, our integral cross section shows a qualitative agreement with the experimental total cross section.

  14. STEM Electron Diffraction and High Resolution Images Used in the Determination of the Crystal Structure of Au144(SR)60 Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Bahena, Daniel; Bhattarai, Nabraj; Santiago, Ulises; Tlahuice, Alfredo; Ponce, Arturo; Bach, Stephan B. H.; Yoon, Bokwon; Whetten, Robert L.; Landman, Uzi; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Determination of the total structure of molecular nanocrystals is an outstanding experimental challenge that has been met, in only a few cases, by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Described here is an alternative approach that is of most general applicability and does not require the fabrication of a single crystal. The method is based on rapid, time-resolved nanobeam electron diffraction (NBD) combined with high-angle annular dark field scanning/transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) images in a probe corrected STEM microscope, operated at reduced voltages. The results are compared with theoretical simulations of images and diffraction patterns obtained from atomistic structural models derived through first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The method is demonstrated by application to determination of the structure of the Au144(SCH2CH2Ph)60 cluster. PMID:23687562

  15. Relativistic electronic dressing in laser-assisted electron-hydrogen elastic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Attaourti, Y.; Manaut, B.; Makhoute, A.

    2004-06-01

    We study the effects of the relativistic electronic dressing in laser-assisted electron-hydrogen atom elastic collisions. We begin by considering the case when no radiation is present. This is necessary in order to check the consistency of our calculations and we then carry out the calculations using the relativistic Dirac-Volkov states. It turns out that a simple formal analogy links the analytical expressions of the unpolarized differential cross section without laser and the unpolarized differential cross section in the presence of a laser field.

  16. Study of the structure of a thin aluminum layer on the vicinal surface of a gallium arsenide substrate by high-resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lovygin, M. V. Borgardt, N. I.; Seibt, M.; Kazakov, I. P.; Tsikunov, A. V.

    2015-12-15

    The results of electron-microscopy studies of a thin epitaxial aluminum layer deposited onto a misoriented gallium-arsenide substrate are reported. It is established that the layer consists of differently oriented grains, whose crystal lattices are coherently conjugated with the substrate with the formation of misfit dislocations, as in the case of a layer on a singular substrate. Atomic steps on the substrate surface are visualized, and their influence on the growth of aluminum crystal grains is discussed.

  17. Structure analysis of OmpC, one of the major proteins in the outer membrane of E. coli, by high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.F.

    1983-07-01

    This dissertation is concerned with the structure analysis of a pore-forming membrane protein, OmpC, which is one of the major proteins in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. In order to obtain structural information it was necessary to develop a suitable technique for preparing two-dimensional crystalline arrays of this membrane protein in an unfixed, unstained and hydrated condition. Electron micrographs were recorded at exposures of less than 5 electrons/A/sup 2/ in order to avoid severe radiation damage. The resulting images were crystallographically averaged, in order to overcome the statistical limitations associated with the low electron exposures. The resulting images, which extend to a resolution of approx. 13.5 A, lend themselves to a natural interpretation that is consistent with the mass density of protein, water and lipid, prior data from 2-D and 3-D structure studies of negatively stained specimens at approx. = 20 A resolution, and published spectroscopic data on the peptide chain secondary structure.

  18. Femtosecond laser field induced modifications of electron-transfer processes in Ne{sup +}-He collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Zhenzhong; Chen Deying; Fan Rongwei; Xia Yuanqin

    2012-01-02

    We demonstrate the presence of femtosecond laser induced charge transfer in Ne{sup +}-He collisions. Electron transfer in ion-atom collisions is considerably modified when the collision is embedded in a strong laser field with the laser intensity of {approx}10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. The observed anisotropy of the He{sup +} angular distribution confirms the prediction of early work that the capture probability varies significantly with the laser polarization angle.

  19. High-resolution imaging of living mammalian cells bound by nanobeads-connected antibodies in a medium using scanning electron-assisted dielectric microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Tomoko; Ogura, Toshihiko

    2017-01-01

    Nanometre-scale-resolution imaging technologies for liquid-phase specimens are indispensable tools in various scientific fields. In biology, observing untreated living cells in a medium is essential for analysing cellular functions. However, nanoparticles that bind living cells in a medium are hard to detect directly using traditional optical or electron microscopy. Therefore, we previously developed a novel scanning electron-assisted dielectric microscope (SE-ADM) capable of nanoscale observations. This method enables observation of intact cells in aqueous conditions. Here, we use this SE-ADM system to clearly observe antibody-binding nanobeads in liquid-phase. We also report the successful direct detection of streptavidin-conjugated nanobeads binding to untreated cells in a medium via a biotin-conjugated anti-CD44 antibody. Our system is capable of obtaining clear images of cellular organelles and beads on the cells at the same time. The direct observation of living cells with nanoparticles in a medium allowed by our system may contribute the development of carriers for drug delivery systems (DDS). PMID:28230204

  20. High-resolution structure of the Shigella type-III secretion needle by solid-state NMR and cryo-electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demers, Jean-Philippe; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Kumar Vasa, Suresh; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Baker, David; Lange, Adam; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G.

    2014-09-01

    We introduce a general hybrid approach for determining the structures of supramolecular assemblies. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) data define the overall envelope of the assembly and rigid-body orientation of the subunits while solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) chemical shifts and distance constraints define the local secondary structure, protein fold and inter-subunit interactions. Finally, Rosetta structure calculations provide a general framework to integrate the different sources of structural information. Combining a 7.7-Å cryo-EM density map and 996 ssNMR distance constraints, the structure of the type-III secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri is determined to a precision of 0.4 Å. The calculated structures are cross-validated using an independent data set of 691 ssNMR constraints and scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements. The hybrid model resolves the conformation of the non-conserved N terminus, which occupies a protrusion in the cryo-EM density, and reveals conserved pore residues forming a continuous pattern of electrostatic interactions, thereby suggesting a mechanism for effector protein translocation.

  1. Periodic cation segregation in Cs0.44[Nb2.54W2.46O14] quantified by high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Heidelmann, Markus; Barthel, Juri; Cox, Gerhard; Weirich, Thomas E

    2014-10-01

    The atomic structure of Cs0.44[Nb2.54W2.46O14] closely resembles the structure of the most active catalyst for the synthesis of acrylic acid, the M1 phase of Mo10V2(4+)Nb2TeO42-x. Consistently with observations made for the latter compound, the high-angle electron scattering signal recorded by scanning transmission electron microscopy shows a significant intensity variation, which repeats periodically with the projected crystallographic unit cell. The occupation factors for the individual mixed Nb/W atomic columns are extracted from the observed intensity variations. For this purpose, experimental images and simulated images are compared on an identical intensity scale, which enables a quantification of the cation distribution. According to our analysis specific sites possess low tungsten concentrations of 25%, whereas other sites have tungsten concentrations above 70%. These findings allow us to refine the existing structure model of the target compound, which has until now described a uniform distribution of the niobium and tungsten atoms in the unit cell, showing that the similarity between Cs0.44[Nb2.54W2.46O14] and the related catalytic compounds also extends to the level of the cation segregation.

  2. High-resolution imaging of living mammalian cells bound by nanobeads-connected antibodies in a medium using scanning electron-assisted dielectric microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Tomoko; Ogura, Toshihiko

    2017-02-01

    Nanometre-scale-resolution imaging technologies for liquid-phase specimens are indispensable tools in various scientific fields. In biology, observing untreated living cells in a medium is essential for analysing cellular functions. However, nanoparticles that bind living cells in a medium are hard to detect directly using traditional optical or electron microscopy. Therefore, we previously developed a novel scanning electron-assisted dielectric microscope (SE-ADM) capable of nanoscale observations. This method enables observation of intact cells in aqueous conditions. Here, we use this SE-ADM system to clearly observe antibody-binding nanobeads in liquid-phase. We also report the successful direct detection of streptavidin-conjugated nanobeads binding to untreated cells in a medium via a biotin-conjugated anti-CD44 antibody. Our system is capable of obtaining clear images of cellular organelles and beads on the cells at the same time. The direct observation of living cells with nanoparticles in a medium allowed by our system may contribute the development of carriers for drug delivery systems (DDS).

  3. Spectral restoration in high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy based on iterative semi-blind Lucy-Richardson algorithm applied to rutile surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzari, Rémi Li, Jingfeng Jupille, Jacques

    2015-01-15

    A new spectral restoration algorithm of reflection electron energy loss spectra is proposed. It is based on the maximum likelihood principle as implemented in the iterative Lucy-Richardson approach. Resolution is enhanced and point spread function recovered in a semi-blind way by forcing cyclically the zero loss to converge towards a Dirac peak. Synthetic phonon spectra of TiO{sub 2} are used as a test bed to discuss resolution enhancement, convergence benefit, stability towards noise, and apparatus function recovery. Attention is focused on the interplay between spectral restoration and quasi-elastic broadening due to free carriers. A resolution enhancement by a factor up to 6 on the elastic peak width can be obtained on experimental spectra of TiO{sub 2}(110) and helps revealing mixed phonon/plasmon excitations.

  4. High resolution electronic spectroscopy of the A {sup 2}Σ{sup −} − X {sup 2}Π{sub 1/2} transition of PtN

    SciTech Connect

    Womack, Kaitlin; O’Brien, Leah C.; Whittemore, Sean; O’Brien, James J.; Le, Anh; Steimle, Timothy C.

    2014-08-28

    The (2,0) vibrational band of the A {sup 2}Σ{sup −} − X {sup 2}Π{sub 1/2} transition of platinum nitride, PtN, was recorded at Doppler-limited resolution using intracavity laser absorption spectroscopy (ILS) and at sub-Doppler resolution using molecular beam laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy. Isotopologue structure for {sup 194}PtN, {sup 195}PtN, and {sup 196}PtN, magnetic hyperfine splitting due to {sup 195}Pt (I = ½), and nuclear quadrupole splitting due to {sup 14}N (I = 1) were observed in the spectrum. Molecular constants for the ground and excited states are derived. The hyperfine interactions are used to illuminate the nature of the A {sup 2}Σ{sup −} excited electronic state.

  5. Oxidation products of the niobium tungsten oxide Nb{sub 4}W{sub 13}O{sub 47}: A high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Krumeich, Frank . E-mail: krumeich@inorg.chem.ethz.ch; Nesper, Reinhard

    2006-06-15

    Nb{sub 4}W{sub 13}O{sub 47}, a member of the solid solution series Nb{sub 8-n}W{sub 9+n}O{sub 47} (0=electron microscopy applying a high-angle annular dark field detector. At the selected imaging conditions (Z contrast), not only the metal positions are revealed by this technique but valuable additional information about the elemental distribution can be obtained simultaneously.

  6. High-resolution three-dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy characterization of oxide-nitride-oxide layer interfaces in Si-based semiconductors using computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Sadayama, Shoji; Sekiguchi, Hiromi; Bright, Alexander; Suzuki, Naohisa; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Kaneko, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Oxide-nitride-oxide (ONO) layer structures are widely used for charge storage in flash memory devices. The ONO layer interfaces should be as flat as possible, so measurement of the nanoscale roughness of those interfaces is needed. In this study, quantification of an ONO film from a commercially available flash memory device was carried out with a pillar-shaped specimen using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and computed tomography. The ONO area contained only low Z- and low STEM-contrast materials, which makes high-quality reconstruction difficult. The optimum three-dimensional reconstruction was achieved with an STEM annular dark-field detector inner collection angle of 32 mrad, a sample tilt range from -78° to +78° and 25 iterations for the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique.

  7. Comprehensive comparison of collision induced dissociation and electron transfer dissociation.

    PubMed

    Molina, Henrik; Matthiesen, Rune; Kandasamy, Kumaran; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2008-07-01

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) is a recently introduced mass spectrometric technique which has proven to be an excellent tool for the elucidation of labile post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation of serine and threonine residues. However, unlike collision induced dissociation (CID), which has been studied for decades, the intricacies of ETD-based fragmentation have not yet been firmly established or systematically addressed. In this analysis, we have systematically compared the CID and ETD fragmentation patterns for the large majority of the peptides that do not contain such labile modifications. Using a standard 48 protein mix, we were able to measure false-positive rates for the experiments and also assess a large number of peptides for a detailed comparison of CID and ETD fragmentation pattern. Analysis of approximately 19,000 peptides derived from both standard proteins and complex protein samples revealed that (i) CID identified 50% more peptides than ETD; (ii) ETD resulted in approximately 20% increase in amino acid sequence coverage over CID; and (iii) combining CID and ETD fragmentation increased the sequence coverage for an average tryptic peptide to 92%. Interestingly, our analysis revealed that nearly 60% of all ETD-identified peptides carried two positive charges, which is in sharp contrast to what has been generally accepted. We also present a novel strategy for automatic validation of peptide assignments based on identification of a peptide by consecutive CID and ETD fragmentation in an alternating mode.

  8. Fast electrons from electron-ion collisions in strong laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kull, H.-J.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.

    2005-06-15

    Electron-ion collisions in the presence of a strong laser field lead to a distribution of fast electrons with maximum energy E{sub max}=(k{sub 0}+2v{sub 0}){sup 2}/2(a.u.), where k{sub 0} is the impact and v{sub 0} the quiver velocity of the electron. The energy spectrum is calculated by two approaches: (1) The time-dependent Schroedinger equation is numerically solved for wave packet scattering from a one-dimensional softcore Coulomb potential. Multiphoton energy spectra are obtained demonstrating a separation of the energy spectrum into an exponential distribution for transmission and a plateau distribution for reflection. (2) The energy spectrum is analytically calculated in the framework of classical instantaneous Coulomb collisions with random impact parameters and random phases of the laser field. An exact solution for the energy spectrum is obtained from which the fraction of fast electrons in the plateau region can be estimated.

  9. Two active-electron classical trajectory Monte Carlo methods for ion-He collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman, F.; Errea, L. F.; Pons, B.

    2009-10-15

    We introduce two active-electron classical trajectory Monte Carlo models for ion-He collisions, in which the electron-electron force is smoothed using a Gaussian kernel approximation for the pointwise classical particles. A first model uses independent pairs of Gaussian electrons, while a second one employs time-dependent mean-field theory to define an averaged electron-electron repulsion force. These models are implemented for prototypical p+He collisions and the results are compared to available experimental and theoretical data.

  10. High-resolution studies of tropolone in the S0 and S1 electronic states: isotope driven dynamics in the zero-point energy levels.

    PubMed

    Keske, John C; Lin, Wei; Pringle, Wallace C; Novick, Stewart E; Blake, Thomas A; Plusquellic, David F

    2006-02-21

    Rotationally resolved microwave (MW) and ultraviolet (UV) spectra of jet-cooled tropolone have been obtained in S(0) and S(1) electronic states using Fourier-transform microwave and UV-laser/molecular-beam spectrometers. In the ground electronic state, the MW spectra of all heavy-atom isotopomers including one (18)O and four (13)C isotopomers were observed in natural abundance. The OD isotopomer was obtained from isotopically enriched samples. The two lowest tunneling states of each isotopomer except (18)O have been assigned. The observed inversion splitting for the OD isotopomer is 1523.227(5) MHz. For the asymmetric (13)C structures, the magnitudes of tunneling-rotation interactions are found to diminish with decreasing distance between the heavy atom and the tunneling proton. In the limit of closest approach, the 0(+) state of (18)O was well fitted to an asymmetric rotor Hamiltonian, reflecting significant changes in the tautomerization dynamics. Comparisons of the substituted atom coordinates with theoretical predictions at the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory suggest the localized 0(+) and 0(-) wave functions of the heavier isotopes favor the C-OH and C=O forms of tropolone, respectively. The only exception occurs for the (13)C-OH and (13)C[Double Bond]O structures which correlate to the 0(-) and 0(+) states, respectively. These preferences reflect kinetic isotope effects as quantitatively verified by the calculated zero-point energy differences between members of the asymmetric atom pairs. From rotationally resolved data of the 0(+) <--0(+) and 0(-) <--0(-) bands in S(1), line-shape fits have yielded Lorentzian linewidths that differ by 12.2(16) MHz over the 19.88(4) cm(-1) interval in S(1). The fluorescence decay rates together with previously reported quantum yield data give nonradiative decay rates of 7.7(5) x 10(8) and 8.5(5) x 10(8) s(-1) for the 0(+) and 0(-) levels of the S(1) state of tropolone.

  11. High-resolution structure of a Shigella type III secretion needle by solid-state NMR and cryo-electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Demers, Jean-Philippe; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Vasa, Suresh Kumar; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Baker, David; Lange, Adam; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a general hybrid approach for determining the structures of supramolecular assemblies. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) data define the overall envelope of the assembly and rigid-body orientation of the subunits while solid-state NMR (ssNMR) chemical shifts and distance constraints define the local secondary structure, protein fold and inter-subunit interactions. Finally, Rosetta structure calculations provide a general framework to integrate the different sources of structural information. Combining a 7.7-Å cryo-EM density map and 996 ssNMR distance constraints, the structure of the Type-III Secretion System (T3SS) needle of Shigella flexneri is determined to a precision of 0.4 Å. The calculated structures are cross-validated using an independent dataset of 691 ssNMR constraints and STEM measurements. The hybrid model resolves the conformation of the non-conserved N-terminus, that occupies a protrusion in the cryo-EM density, and reveals conserved pore residues forming a continuous pattern of electrostatic interactions, thereby suggesting a mechanism for effector protein translocation. PMID:25264107

  12. An experimental setup for high resolution 10.5 eV laser-based angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using a time-of-flight electron analyzer.

    PubMed

    Berntsen, M H; Götberg, O; Tjernberg, O

    2011-09-01

    We present an experimental setup for laser-based angle-resolved time-of-flight photoemission. Using a picosecond pulsed laser, photons of energy 10.5 eV are generated through higher harmonic generation in xenon. The high repetition rate of the light source, variable between 0.2 and 8 MHz, enables high photoelectron count rates and short acquisition times. By using a time-of-flight analyzer with angle-resolving capabilities, electrons emitted from the sample within a circular cone of up to ±15° can be collected. Hence, simultaneous acquisition of photoemission data for a complete area of the Brillouin zone is possible. The current photon energy enables bulk sensitive measurements, high angular resolution, and the resulting covered momentum space is large enough to enclose the entire Brillouin zone in cuprate high-T(c) superconductors. Fermi edge measurements on polycrystalline Au shows an energy resolution better than 5 meV. Data from a test measurement of the Au(111) surface state are presented along with measurements of the Fermi surface of the high-T(c) superconductor Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8 + δ) (Bi2212).

  13. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions. Progress report, June 15, 1992--June 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, T.G.; Alston, S.G.

    1995-08-01

    The research program of Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom, ion-ion, and ion-molecule collisions. Attention is focussed on one- and two-electron systems and, more recently, quasi-one-electron systems whose electron-target-core interaction can be accurately modeled by one-electron potentials. The basic computational approaches can then be taken with few, if any, approximations, and the underlying collisional mechanisms can be more clearly revealed. Winter has focussed on intermediate collision energies (e.g., proton energies for p-He{sup +} collisions on the order of 100 kilo-electron volts), in which many electron states are strongly coupled during the collision and a coupled-state approach, such as a coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach, is appropriate. Alston has concentrated on higher collision energies (million electron-volt energies), or asymmetric collision systems, for which the coupling of the projectile is weaker with, however, many more target states being coupled together so that high-order perturbation theory is essential. Several calculations by Winter and Alston are described, as set forth in the original proposal.

  14. Component analyses of urinary nanocrystallites of uric acid stone formers by combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, fast Fourier transformation, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin-Yuan; Xue, Jun-Fa; Xia, Zhi-Yue; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to analyse the components of nanocrystallites in urines of patients with uric acid (UA) stones. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), fast Fourier transformation (FFT) of HRTEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were performed to analyse the components of these nanocrystallites. XRD and FFT showed that the main component of urinary nanocrystallites was UA, which contains a small amount of calcium oxalate monohydrate and phosphates. EDS showed the characteristic absorption peaks of C, O, Ca and P. The formation of UA stones was closely related to a large number of UA nanocrystallites in urine. A combination of HRTEM, FFT, EDS and XRD analyses could be performed accurately to analyse the components of urinary nanocrystallites.

  15. High-resolution electron microscopy analysis of structural defects in a (2/1, 5/3)-type approximant of a decagonal quasicrystal of an Al-Pd-Mn alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, D.P.; Ren, G.; Zhang, Z.

    1996-10-01

    Structural defects were analyzed by means of high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) in a crystalline (2/1, 5/3)-type Fibonacci approximant of an Al-Pd-Mn alloy system. A kind of stacking fault is observed with a projected displacement vector R parallel to the [{minus}3 0 29] direction; its amplitude {vert_bar}R{vert_bar} = 2a sin 18 deg = 1.19 nm, and its habit plane lies in the (1 0 1) plane. Two kinds of domain boundaries have been found and the domains are related by a 180 deg rotation around the c-axis plus a displacement along the [3 0 {minus}29] or the [{minus}3 0 {minus}29] direction in a plane perpendicular to the b-axis. The domain boundary planes are the {l_brace}1 0 1{r_brace} planes.

  16. PREFACE: XXVIth International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orel, Ann; Starace, Anthony F.; Nikolić, Dragan; Berrah, Nora; Gorczyca, Thomas W.; Kamber, Emanuel Y.; Tanis, John A.

    2009-12-01

    The XXVIth International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions was held on the campus of Western Michigan University (WMU) in Kalamazoo during 22-28 July 2009. Kalamazoo, the home of a major state university amid pleasant surroundings, was a delightful place for the conference. The 473 scientific participants, 111 of whom were students, had many fruitful discussions and exchanges that contributed to the success of the conference. Participants from 43 countries made the conference truly international in scope. The 590 abstracts that were presented on the first four days formed the heart of the conference and provided ample opportunity for discussion. This change, allowing the conference to end with invited talks, was a departure from the format used at previous ICPEAC gatherings in which the conferences ended with a poster session. The abstracts were split almost equally between the three main conference areas, i.e., photonic, electronic, and atomic collisions, and the posters were distributed across the days of the conference so that approximately equal numbers of abstracts in the different areas were scheduled for each day. Of the total number of presented abstracts, 517 of these are included in this proceedings volume, the first time that abstracts have been published by ICPEAC. There were 5 plenary lectures covering the different areas of the conference: Paul Corkum (University of Ottawa) talked on attosecond physics with atoms and molecules, Serge Haroche (Collège de France) on non-destructive photon counting, Toshiyuki Azuma (Tokyo Metropolitan University) on resonant coherent excitation of highly-charged ions in crystals, Eva Lindroth (Stockholm University) on atomic structure effects, and Alfred Müller (Justus Liebig University) on resonance phenomena in electron- and photon-ion collisions. Two speakers gave very illuminating public lectures that drew many people from the local area, as well as conference participants: Patricia Dehmer

  17. Ultra-high resolution DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, A H; Robinson, H; Gao, Y G

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the progress in our efforts at producing ultra-high resolution (< 0.8 A) DNA structures using advanced cryo-crystallography and synchrotron. Our work is aimed at providing reliable geometric (bond length and bond angle), electronic and motional information of DNA molecules in different conformational contexts. These highly-reliable, new structures will be the basis for constructing better DNA force-field parameters, which will benefit the structural refinement of DNA, protein-DNA complexes, and ligand-DNA complexes.

  18. High Resolution Laser Spectroscopy of Rhenium Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Allan G.; Hall, Ryan M.; Linton, Colan; Tokaryk, Dennis

    2014-06-01

    The first spectroscopic study of rhenium carbide, ReC, has been performed using both low and high resolution techniques to collect rotationally resolved electronic spectra from 420 to 500nm. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), and dispersed fluorescence (DF) techniques were employed. ReC was formed in our laser ablation molecular jet apparatus by ablating a rhenium target rod in the presence of 1% methane in helium. The low resolution spectrum identified four bands of an electronic system belonging to ReC, three of which have been studied so far. Extensive hyperfine structure composed of six hyperfine components was observed in the high resolution spectrum, as well as a clear distinction between the 187ReC and 185ReC isotopologues. The data seems consistent with a ^4Π - ^4Σ- transition, as was predicted before experimentation. Dispersed fluorescence spectra allowed us to determine the ground state vibrational frequency (ωe"=994.4 ± 0.3 wn), and to identify a low-lying electronically excited state at Te"=1118.4 ± 0.4 wn with a vibrational frequency of ωe"=984 ± 2 wn. Personal communication, F. Grein, University of New Brunswick

  19. High Resolution Scanning Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R. (Inventor); Miranda, Felix A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a High Resolution Scanning Reflectarray Antenna (HRSRA) for the purpose of tracking ground terminals and space craft communication applications. The present invention provides an alternative to using gimbaled parabolic dish antennas and direct radiating phased arrays. When compared to a gimbaled parabolic dish, the HRSRA offers the advantages of vibration free steering without incurring appreciable cost or prime power penalties. In addition, it offers full beam steering at a fraction of the cost of direct radiating arrays and is more efficient.

  20. High-resolution multiphoton cryomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    König, Karsten; Uchugonova, Aisada; Breunig, Hans Georg

    2014-03-15

    An ultracompact high-resolution multiphoton cryomicroscope with a femtosecond near infrared fiber laser has been utilized to study the cellular autofluorescence during freezing and thawing of cells. Cooling resulted in an increase of the intracellular fluorescence intensity followed by morphological modifications at temperatures below -10 °C, depending on the application of the cryoprotectant DMSO and the cooling rate. Furthermore, fluorescence lifetime imaging revealed an increase of the mean lifetime with a decrease in temperature. Non-destructive, label-free optical biopsies of biomaterial in ice can be obtained with sub-20 mW mean powers.

  1. Theorectical Studies of Excitation in Low-Energy Electron-Polyatomic Molecule Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rescigno, T N; McCurdy, C W; Isaacs, W A; Orel, A E; Meyer, H D

    2001-08-13

    This paper focuses on the channeling of energy from electronic to nuclear degrees of freedom in electron-polyatomic molecule collisions. We examine the feasibility of attacking the full scattering problem, both the fixed-nuclei electronic problem and the post-collision nuclear dynamics, entirely from first principles. The electron-CO{sub 2} system is presented as an example. We study resonant vibrational excitation, showing how a6 initio, fixed-nuclei electronic cross sections can provide the necessary input for a multi-dimensional treatment of the nuclear vibrational dynamics.

  2. Collision Strengths for Electron Collisional Excitation of S II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    1997-01-01

    Electron collisional excitation strengths for inelastic transitions in S II are calculated using the R-matrix method in a 19-state (3s(sup 2)3p(sup 3)(sup 4)S(sup o), (sup 2)D(sup o), (sup 2)p(sup o), 3s3p(sup 4)(sup 4)P, (sup 2)D, (sup 2)S, 3S(sup 2)3p(sup 2)3d(sup 2)P, (sup 4)F, (sup 4)D, (sup 2)F, (sup 4)P, 3s(sup 2)3p(sup 2)4s(sup 4)P, (sup 2)P, 3s(sup 2)3p(sup 2)4p(sup 2)S(s o), (sup 4)D(sup o), (sup 4)P(sup o), (sup 2)D(sup o), (sup 4)S(sup o), (sup 2)P(sup o)) close-coupling approximation. These target states are represented by extensive configuration-interaction wave functions that give excitation energies and oscillator strengths that are usually in good agreement with the experimental values and the available accurate calculations. The present results for collision strengths are in very good agreement with the recent merged beams energy loss measurement of Liao et al. and agree reasonably well with the 18-state R-matrix calculation of Ramsbottom, Bell, & Stafford, but show significant differences from the 12-state R-matrix calculation of Cai & Pradhan.

  3. The determination of potential energy curve and dipole moment of the (5)0{sup +} electronic state of {sup 85}Rb{sup 133}Cs molecule by high resolution photoassociation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Jinpeng; Zhao, Yanting Ji, Zhonghua; Li, Zhonghao; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang; Kim, Jin-Tae

    2015-12-14

    We present the formation of ultracold {sup 85}Rb{sup 133}Cs molecules in the (5)0{sup +} electronic state by photoassociation and their detection via resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization. Up to v = 47 vibrational levels including the lowest v = 0 vibrational and lowest J = 0 levels are identified with rotationally resolved high resolution photoassociation spectra. Precise Dunham coefficients are determined for the (5)0{sup +} state with high accuracy, then the Rydberg-Klein-Rees potential energy curve is derived. The electric dipole moments with respect to the vibrational numbers of the (5)0{sup +} electronic state of {sup 85}Rb{sup 133}Cs molecule are also measured in the range between 1.9 and 4.8 D. These comprehensive studies on previously unobserved rovibrational levels of the (5)0{sup +} state are helpful to understand the molecular structure and discover suitable transition pathways for transferring ultracold atoms to deeply bound rovibrational levels of the electronic ground state.

  4. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of aluminophosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Ulan, J.G.; Gronsky, R. ); Szostak, R. ); Sorby, K. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1990-04-01

    VPI-5 transforms to AlPO{sub 4}-8 under mild thermal treatment (100{degree}C, 18 hrs). HRTEM micrographs, oriented normal to the c axis, show extensive defect-free regions in VPI-5, while slip planes normal to the c axis are found in AlPO{sub 4}-8. Analysis of the HRTEM data, in conjunction with infrared and thermal analysis, adsorption studies and x-ray powder diffraction, has lead to a proposed structure for AlPO{sub 4}-8. Though the sheets containing the 18 member rings which define the pores in VPI-5 remain intact in AlPO{sub 4}-8, reduction in the porosity is attributed to blockages created by the movement of these sheets relative to each other. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Momentum spectra for single and double electron ionization of He in relativistic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, C. J.; Olson, R. E.; Schmitt, W.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.

    1997-11-01

    The complete momentum spectra for single and double ionization of He by 1-GeV/u (β=0.88) U92+ have been investigated using a classical trajectory Monte Carlo method corrected for the relativistic projectile. The 1/r12 electron-electron interaction has been included in the post-collision region for double ionization to incorporate the effects of both the nuclear-electron and electron-electron ionizing interactions, and to access the effects of electron correlation in the electron spectra. Experimental measurements were able to determine the longitudinal momentum spectra for single ionization; these observations are in accordance with the theoretical predictions for the three-body momentum balance between projectile, recoil ion, and ionized electron. In particular, the Lorentz contraction of the Coulomb interaction of the projectile manifests itself in the decrease of the post-collision interaction of the projectile with the electron and recoil ion, causing them to recoil back-to-back as in the case for a short electromagnetic pulse. This feature is clearly displayed in both the theoretical and experimental longitudinal momentum spectra, and by comparing to calculations that are performed at the same collision speed but do not include the relativistic potentials. Moreover, collision plane spectra of the three particles demonstrate that the momenta of the recoil ion and ionized electron are preferentially equal, and opposite, to each other. The electron spectra for double ionization show that the inclusion of the electron-electron interaction in the post-collision regime partitions the combined ionization momentum of the electrons so that the electrons are preferentially emitted in opposite azimuthal angles to one another. This is in contrast to calculations made assuming independent electrons.

  6. Low-energy electron collisions with quasi-two electron atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartschat, Klaus; Bray, Igor; Fursa, Dmitry

    2003-10-01

    We have recently investigated elastic electron scattering from quasi-two electron targets such as Mg, Zn, and Hg. Accurate total and momentum-transfer cross sections for these processes are of interest both for modelling transport processes in various lighting applications [1] and for the fundamental understanding of collision processes in magneto-optical traps and Bose-Einstein condensates [2]. To our big surprise, we found that a convergent description of these collisions within the close-coupling formalism is by no means trivial, since the theoretical results for the scattering lengths and the low-energy p-wave shape resonances, studied experimentally a long time ago [3], depend in a very sensitive way on the details of the numerical model. [1] G.G. Lister, in Low Temperature Plasma Physics (eds. R. Hippler, S. Pfau, M. Schmidt and K.H. Schoenbach), Wiley (New York, 2002) [2] K. Bartschat and H.R. Sadeghpour, J. Phys. B. 36 (2003) L9 [3] P.D. Burrow, J.A. Michejda and J. Comer, J. Phys. B. 9 (1976) 3225

  7. Probing the electronic structure and Au–C chemical bonding in AuC{sub 2}{sup −} and AuC{sub 2} using high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    León, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-02-28

    We report photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and high-resolution PE imaging of AuC{sub 2}{sup −} at a wide range of photon energies. The ground state of AuC{sub 2}{sup −} is found to be linear (C{sub ∞v}, {sup 1}Σ{sup +}) with a …8π{sup 4}4δ{sup 4}17σ{sup 2}9π{sup 4}18σ{sup 2} valence configuration. Detachments from all the five valence orbitals of the ground state of AuC{sub 2}{sup −} are observed at 193 nm. High-resolution PE images are obtained in the energy range from 830 to 330 nm, revealing complicated vibronic structures from electron detachment of the 18σ, 9π, and 17σ orbitals. Detachment from the 18σ orbital results in the {sup 2}Σ{sup +} ground state of neutral AuC{sub 2}, which, however, is bent due to strong vibronic coupling with the nearby {sup 2}Π state from detachment of a 9π electron. The {sup 2}Σ{sup +}–{sup 2}Π vibronic and spin-orbit coupling results in complicated vibronic structures for the {sup 2}Σ{sup +} and {sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} states with extensive bending excitations. The electron affinity of AuC{sub 2} is measured accurately to be 3.2192(7) eV with a ground state bending frequency of 195(6) cm{sup −1}. The first excited state ({sup 2}A′) of AuC{sub 2}, corresponding to the {sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} state at the linear geometry, is only 0.0021 eV above the ground state ({sup 2}A′) and has a bending frequency of 207(6) cm{sup −1}. The {sup 2}Π{sub 1/2} state, 0.2291 eV above the ground state, is linear with little geometry change relative to the anion ground state. The detachment of the 17σ orbital also results in complicated vibronic structures, suggesting again a bent state due to possible vibronic coupling with the lower {sup 2}Π state. The spectrum at 193 nm shows the presence of a minor species with less than 2% intensity relative to the ground state of AuC{sub 2}{sup −}. High-resolution data of the minor species reveal several vibrational progressions in the Au–C stretching mode, which are assigned to

  8. High-resolution interferometric spectrophotopolarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L.

    1981-01-01

    Spectrophotopolarimetric capability can be added to a laboratory interferometer-spectrometer by use of a specially designed module described herein. With the instrument so augmented, high-resolution spectra can be obtained of the Stokes parameters of the reference beam and the beams diffusely reflected or transmitted by a sample medium of interest. For any such beam, the exponential Fourier transforms of the two interferograms obtained with a polarizer-analyzer oriented along the 0 deg and the 90 deg directions provide the spectra of I and Q, separately. Within experimental (and numerical) noise, this I spectrum should be the same as the one obtained with the polarizer removed. The remaining Stokes parameters U and V are obtained with a third interferogram recorded with the polarizer along the 45 deg direction. The complete theory of this instrument is described including the detailed analysis of the polarization-interferograms it provides.

  9. High-resolution land topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massonnet, Didier; Elachi, Charles

    2006-11-01

    After a description of the background, methods of production and some scientific uses of high-resolution land topography, we present the current status and the prospect of radar interferometry, regarded as one of the best techniques for obtaining the most global and the most accurate topographic maps. After introducing briefly the theoretical aspects of radar interferometry - principles, limits of operation and various capabilities -, we will focus on the topographic applications that resulted in an almost global topographic map of the earth: the SRTM map. After introducing the Interferometric Cartwheel system, we will build on its expected performances to discuss the scientific prospects of refining a global topographic map to sub-metric accuracy. We also show how other fields of sciences such as hydrology may benefit from the products generated by interferometric radar systems. To cite this article: D. Massonnet, C. Elachi, C. R. Geoscience 338 (2006).

  10. High Resolution Thermometry for EXACT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, J. S.; Nash, A. E.; Larson, M.; Mulders, N.

    2000-01-01

    High Resolution Thermometers (HRTs) based on SQUID detection of the magnetization of a paramagnetic salt or a metal alloy has been commonly used for sub-nano Kelvin temperature resolution in low temperature physics experiments. The main applications to date have been for temperature ranges near the lambda point of He-4 (2.177 K). These thermometers made use of materials such as Cu(NH4)2Br4 *2H2O, GdCl3, or PdFe. None of these materials are suitable for EXACT, which will explore the region of the He-3/He-4 tricritical point at 0.87 K. The experiment requirements and properties of several candidate paramagnetic materials will be presented, as well as preliminary test results.

  11. HRSC: High resolution stereo camera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neukum, G.; Jaumann, R.; Basilevsky, A.T.; Dumke, A.; Van Gasselt, S.; Giese, B.; Hauber, E.; Head, J. W.; Heipke, C.; Hoekzema, N.; Hoffmann, H.; Greeley, R.; Gwinner, K.; Kirk, R.; Markiewicz, W.; McCord, T.B.; Michael, G.; Muller, Jan-Peter; Murray, J.B.; Oberst, J.; Pinet, P.; Pischel, R.; Roatsch, T.; Scholten, F.; Willner, K.

    2009-01-01

    The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on Mars Express has delivered a wealth of image data, amounting to over 2.5 TB from the start of the mapping phase in January 2004 to September 2008. In that time, more than a third of Mars was covered at a resolution of 10-20 m/pixel in stereo and colour. After five years in orbit, HRSC is still in excellent shape, and it could continue to operate for many more years. HRSC has proven its ability to close the gap between the low-resolution Viking image data and the high-resolution Mars Orbiter Camera images, leading to a global picture of the geological evolution of Mars that is now much clearer than ever before. Derived highest-resolution terrain model data have closed major gaps and provided an unprecedented insight into the shape of the surface, which is paramount not only for surface analysis and geological interpretation, but also for combination with and analysis of data from other instruments, as well as in planning for future missions. This chapter presents the scientific output from data analysis and highlevel data processing, complemented by a summary of how the experiment is conducted by the HRSC team members working in geoscience, atmospheric science, photogrammetry and spectrophotometry. Many of these contributions have been or will be published in peer-reviewed journals and special issues. They form a cross-section of the scientific output, either by summarising the new geoscientific picture of Mars provided by HRSC or by detailing some of the topics of data analysis concerning photogrammetry, cartography and spectral data analysis.

  12. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  13. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  14. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefitted greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  15. High resolution time interval counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Victor S.; Davis, Dick D.; Lombardi, Michael A.

    1995-01-01

    In recent years, we have developed two types of high resolution, multi-channel time interval counters. In the NIST two-way time transfer MODEM application, the counter is designed for operating primarily in the interrupt-driven mode, with 3 start channels and 3 stop channels. The intended start and stop signals are 1 PPS, although other frequencies can also be applied to start and stop the count. The time interval counters used in the NIST Frequency Measurement and Analysis System are implemented with 7 start channels and 7 stop channels. Four of the 7 start channels are devoted to the frequencies of 1 MHz, 5 MHz or 10 MHz, while triggering signals to all other start and stop channels can range from 1 PPS to 100 kHz. Time interval interpolation plays a key role in achieving the high resolution time interval measurements for both counters. With a 10 MHz time base, both counters demonstrate a single-shot resolution of better than 40 ps, and a stability of better than 5 x 10(exp -12) (sigma(sub chi)(tau)) after self test of 1000 seconds). The maximum rate of time interval measurements (with no dead time) is 1.0 kHz for the counter used in the MODEM application and is 2.0 kHz for the counter used in the Frequency Measurement and Analysis System. The counters are implemented as plug-in units for an AT-compatible personal computer. This configuration provides an efficient way of using a computer not only to control and operate the counters, but also to store and process measured data.

  16. High-resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing.

    PubMed

    Park, Jang-Ung; Hardy, Matt; Kang, Seong Jun; Barton, Kira; Adair, Kurt; Mukhopadhyay, Deep Kishore; Lee, Chang Young; Strano, Michael S; Alleyne, Andrew G; Georgiadis, John G; Ferreira, Placid M; Rogers, John A

    2007-10-01

    Efforts to adapt and extend graphic arts printing techniques for demanding device applications in electronics, biotechnology and microelectromechanical systems have grown rapidly in recent years. Here, we describe the use of electrohydrodynamically induced fluid flows through fine microcapillary nozzles for jet printing of patterns and functional devices with submicrometre resolution. Key aspects of the physics of this approach, which has some features in common with related but comparatively low-resolution techniques for graphic arts, are revealed through direct high-speed imaging of the droplet formation processes. Printing of complex patterns of inks, ranging from insulating and conducting polymers, to solution suspensions of silicon nanoparticles and rods, to single-walled carbon nanotubes, using integrated computer-controlled printer systems illustrates some of the capabilities. High-resolution printed metal interconnects, electrodes and probing pads for representative circuit patterns and functional transistors with critical dimensions as small as 1 mum demonstrate potential applications in printed electronics.

  17. High-resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jang-Ung; Hardy, Matt; Kang, Seong Jun; Barton, Kira; Adair, Kurt; Mukhopadhyay, Deep Kishore; Lee, Chang Young; Strano, Michael S.; Alleyne, Andrew G.; Georgiadis, John G.; Ferreira, Placid M.; Rogers, John A.

    2007-10-01

    Efforts to adapt and extend graphic arts printing techniques for demanding device applications in electronics, biotechnology and microelectromechanical systems have grown rapidly in recent years. Here, we describe the use of electrohydrodynamically induced fluid flows through fine microcapillary nozzles for jet printing of patterns and functional devices with submicrometre resolution. Key aspects of the physics of this approach, which has some features in common with related but comparatively low-resolution techniques for graphic arts, are revealed through direct high-speed imaging of the droplet formation processes. Printing of complex patterns of inks, ranging from insulating and conducting polymers, to solution suspensions of silicon nanoparticles and rods, to single-walled carbon nanotubes, using integrated computer-controlled printer systems illustrates some of the capabilities. High-resolution printed metal interconnects, electrodes and probing pads for representative circuit patterns and functional transistors with critical dimensions as small as 1μm demonstrate potential applications in printed electronics.

  18. High resolution photoelectron imaging of UO{sup −} and UO{sub 2}{sup −} and the low-lying electronic states and vibrational frequencies of UO and UO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Czekner, Joseph; Lopez, Gary V.; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-12-28

    We report a study of the electronic and vibrational structures of the gaseous uranium monoxide and dioxide molecules using high-resolution photoelectron imaging. Vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectra are obtained for both UO{sup −} and UO{sub 2}{sup −}. The spectra for UO{sub 2}{sup −} are consistent with, but much better resolved than a recent study using a magnetic-bottle photoelectron analyzer [W. L. Li et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 094306 (2014)]. The electron affinity (EA) of UO is reported for the first time as 1.1407(7) eV, whereas a much more accurate EA is obtained for UO{sub 2} as 1.1688(6) eV. The symmetric stretching modes for the neutral and anionic ground states, and two neutral excited states for UO{sub 2} are observed, as well as the bending mode for the neutral ground state. These vibrational frequencies are consistent with previous experimental and theoretical results. The stretching vibrational modes for the ground state and one excited state are observed for UO. The current results for UO and UO{sub 2} are compared with previous theoretical calculations including relativistic effects and spin-orbit coupling. The accurate experimental data reported here provide more stringent tests for future theoretical methods for actinide-containing species.

  19. High-resolution neutron and X-ray diffraction room-temperature studies of an H-FABP-oleic acid complex: study of the internal water cluster and ligand binding by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution.

    PubMed

    Howard, E I; Guillot, B; Blakeley, M P; Haertlein, M; Moulin, M; Mitschler, A; Cousido-Siah, A; Fadel, F; Valsecchi, W M; Tomizaki, Takashi; Petrova, T; Claudot, J; Podjarny, A

    2016-03-01

    Crystal diffraction data of heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) in complex with oleic acid were measured at room temperature with high-resolution X-ray and neutron protein crystallography (0.98 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively). These data provided very detailed information about the cluster of water molecules and the bound oleic acid in the H-FABP large internal cavity. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of H-FABP was complemented by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution using the parameters of the ELMAMII library. The resulting electron density allowed a precise determination of the electrostatic potential in the fatty acid (FA) binding pocket. Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules was then used to study interactions involving the internal water molecules, the FA and the protein. This approach showed H⋯H contacts of the FA with highly conserved hydrophobic residues known to play a role in the stabilization of long-chain FAs in the binding cavity. The determination of water hydrogen (deuterium) positions allowed the analysis of the orientation and electrostatic properties of the water molecules in the very ordered cluster. As a result, a significant alignment of the permanent dipoles of the water molecules with the protein electrostatic field was observed. This can be related to the dielectric properties of hydration layers around proteins, where the shielding of electrostatic interactions depends directly on the rotational degrees of freedom of the water molecules in the interface.

  20. A split-step method to include electron-electron collisions via Monte Carlo in multiple rate equation simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huthmacher, Klaus; Molberg, Andreas K.; Rethfeld, Bärbel; Gulley, Jeremy R.

    2016-10-01

    A split-step numerical method for calculating ultrafast free-electron dynamics in dielectrics is introduced. The two split steps, independently programmed in C++11 and FORTRAN 2003, are interfaced via the presented open source wrapper. The first step solves a deterministic extended multi-rate equation for the ionization, electron-phonon collisions, and single photon absorption by free-carriers. The second step is stochastic and models electron-electron collisions using Monte-Carlo techniques. This combination of deterministic and stochastic approaches is a unique and efficient method of calculating the nonlinear dynamics of 3D materials exposed to high intensity ultrashort pulses. Results from simulations solving the proposed model demonstrate how electron-electron scattering relaxes the non-equilibrium electron distribution on the femtosecond time scale.

  1. High Resolution CryoFESEM of Microbial Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlandsen, Stanley; Lei, Ming; Martin-Lacave, Ines; Dunny, Gary; Wells, Carol

    2003-08-01

    The outer surfaces of three microorganisms, Giardia lamblia, Enterococcus faecalis, and Proteus mirabilis, were investigated by cryo-immobilization followed by sublimation of extracellular ice and cryocoating with either Pt alone or Pt plus carbon. Cryocoated samples were examined at [minus sign]125°C in either an in-lens field emission SEM or a below-the-lens field emission SEM. Cryocoating with Pt alone was sufficient for low magnification observation, but attempts to do high-resolution imaging resulted in radiolysis and cracking of the specimen surface. Double coating with Pt and carbon, in combination with high resolution backscatter electron detectors, enabled high-resolution imaging of the glycocalyx of bacteria, revealing a sponge-like network over the surface. High resolution examination of bacterial flagella also revealed a periodic substructure. Common artifacts included radiolysis leading to “cracking” of the surface, and insufficient deposition of Pt resulting in the absence of detectable surface topography.

  2. R-matrix calculations of electron molecule collision data for plasma models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennyson, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Models of low-pressure plasma require electron collision cross sections for many processes. For transient molecular species, almost none of these data are available from laboratory measurements so theory has to be the chosen means of providing the necessary information. The R-matrix method is a well-established fully quantal procedure for computing low-energy electron-collision cross sections. The R-matrix calculations using the UK Molecular R-matrix codes (UKRMol), which are run by the Quantemol-N expert system, are being employed to provide a wide range of collision cross sections. These are augmented by use of suitable high-energy approximations, such as BEB for ionisation, and a novel procedure to give branching ratios for the fragmentation pattern following electron impact ionisation and electron impact dissociation. Examples, such as recently generated complete cross section sets for the molecules NF, NF and NF, will be given at the meeting.

  3. High resolution time interval counter

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, K.J.

    1994-07-26

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured. 3 figs.

  4. High resolution time interval counter

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, Kenneth J.

    1994-01-01

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured.

  5. High resolution imaging at Palomar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.

    1992-01-01

    For the last two years we have embarked on a program of understanding the ultimate limits of ground-based optical imaging. We have designed and fabricated a camera specifically for high resolution imaging. This camera has now been pressed into service at the prime focus of the Hale 5 m telescope. We have concentrated on two techniques: the Non-Redundant Masking (NRM) and Weigelt's Fully Filled Aperture (FFA) method. The former is the optical analog of radio interferometry and the latter is a higher order extension of the Labeyrie autocorrelation method. As in radio Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), both these techniques essentially measure the closure phase and, hence, true image construction is possible. We have successfully imaged binary stars and asteroids with angular resolution approaching the diffraction limit of the telescope and image quality approaching that of a typical radio VLBI map. In addition, we have carried out analytical and simulation studies to determine the ultimate limits of ground-based optical imaging, the limits of space-based interferometric imaging, and investigated the details of imaging tradeoffs of beam combination in optical interferometers.

  6. High-resolution infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falco, Charles M.

    2010-08-01

    The hands and mind of an artist are intimately involved in the creative process of image formation, intrinsically making paintings significantly more complex than photographs to analyze. In spite of this difficulty, several years ago the artist David Hockney and I identified optical evidence within a number of paintings that demonstrated artists began using optical projections as early as c1425 - nearly 175 years before Galileo - as aids for producing portions of their images. In the course of our work, Hockney and I developed insights that I have been applying to a new approach to computerized image analysis. Recently I developed and characterized a portable high resolution infrared for capturing additional information from paintings. Because many pigments are semi-transparent in the IR, in a number of cases IR photographs ("reflectograms") have revealed marks made by the artists that had been hidden under paint ever since they were made. I have used this IR camera to capture photographs ("reflectograms") of hundreds of paintings in over a dozen museums on three continents and, in some cases, these reflectograms have provided new insights into decisions the artists made in creating the final images that we see in the visible.

  7. High resolution auditory perception system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Iftekhar; Ghatol, Ashok

    2005-04-01

    Blindness is a sensory disability which is difficult to treat but can to some extent be helped by artificial aids. The paper describes the design aspects of a high resolution auditory perception system, which is designed on the principle of air sonar with binaural perception. This system is a vision substitution aid for enabling blind persons. The blind person wears ultrasonic eyeglasses which has ultrasonic sensor array embedded on it. The system has been designed to operate in multiresolution modes. The ultrasonic sound from the transmitter array is reflected back by the objects, falling in the beam of the array and is received. The received signal is converted to a sound signal, which is presented stereophonically for auditory perception. A detailed study has been done as the background work required for the system implementation; the appropriate range analysis procedure, analysis of space-time signals, the acoustic sensors study, amplification methods and study of the removal of noise using filters. Finally the system implementation including both the hardware and the software part of it has been described. Experimental results on actual blind subjects and inferences obtained during the study have also been included.

  8. High-Resolution Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Alan G.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.

    2008-07-01

    Over the past decade, mass spectrometry has been revolutionized by access to instruments of increasingly high mass-resolving power. For small molecules up to ˜400 Da (e.g., drugs, metabolites, and various natural organic mixtures ranging from foods to petroleum), it is possible to determine elemental compositions (CcHhNnOoSsPp…) of thousands of chemical components simultaneously from accurate mass measurements (the same can be done up to 1000 Da if additional information is included). At higher mass, it becomes possible to identify proteins (including posttranslational modifications) from proteolytic peptides, as well as lipids, glycoconjugates, and other biological components. At even higher mass (˜100,000 Da or higher), it is possible to characterize posttranslational modifications of intact proteins and to map the binding surfaces of large biomolecule complexes. Here we review the principles and techniques of the highest-resolution analytical mass spectrometers (time-of-flight and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and orbitrap mass analyzers) and describe some representative high-resolution applications.

  9. Time-of-Flight Experiments in Molecular Motion and Electron-Atom Collision Kinematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, Denis P.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Describes a set of experiments for an undergraduate laboratory which demonstrates the relationship between velocity, mass, and temperature in a gas. The experimental method involves time-of-flight measurements on atoms excited to metastable states by electron impact. Effects resulting from recoil in the electron-atom collision can also be…

  10. Binding of an organo-osmium(II) anticancer complex to guanine and cytosine on DNA revealed by electron-based dissociations in high resolution Top-Down FT-ICR mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wootton, Christopher A; Sanchez-Cano, Carlos; Liu, Hong-Ke; Barrow, Mark P; Sadler, Peter J; O'Connor, Peter B

    2015-02-28

    The Os(II) arene anticancer complex [(η(6)-bip)Os(en)Cl](+) (Os1-Cl; where bip = biphenyl, and en = ethylenediamine) binds strongly to DNA. Here we investigate reactions between Os1-Cl and the self-complementary 12-mer oligonucleotide 5'-TAGTAATTACTA-3' (DNA12) using ultra high resolution Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). Identification of the specific sites of DNA osmiation with {(η(6)-bip)Os(en)}(2+) was made possible by the use of Electron Detachment Dissociation (EDD) which produced a wide range of assignable osmiated MS/MS fragments. In contrast, the more commonly used CAD and IRMPD techniques produced fragments which lose the bound osmium. These studies reveal that not only is guanine G3 a strong binding site for {(η(6)-bip)Os(en)}(2+) but, unexpectedly, so too is cytosine C10. Interestingly, the G3/C10 di-osmiated adduct of DNA12 also formed readily but did not undergo such facile fragmentation by EDD, perhaps due to folding induced by van der Waal's interactions of the bound osmium arene species. These new insights into osmium arene DNA adducts should prove valuable for the design of new organometallic drugs and contribute to understanding the lack of cross resistance of this organometallic anticancer complex with cisplatin.

  11. Quantitative characterization of endothelial cell morphologies depending on shear stress in different blood vessels of domestic pigs using a focused ion beam and high resolution scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM).

    PubMed

    Pham, Tam Thanh; Maenz, Stefan; Lüdecke, Claudia; Schmerbauch, Christoph; Settmacher, Utz; Jandt, Klaus D; Bossert, Jörg; Zanow, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Microstructured surfaces mimicking the endothelial cell (EC) morphology is a new approach to improve the blood compatibility of synthetic vascular grafts. The ECs are capable of changing their shapes depending on different shear conditions. However, the quantitative correlation between EC morphology and shear stress has not yet been investigated statistically. The aim of this study was to quantitatively investigate the morphology of ECs in dependence on the shear stress. Blood flow rates in different types of natural blood vessels (carotid, renal, hepatic and iliac arteries) originated from domestic pigs were first measured in vivo to calculate the shear stresses. The EC morphologies were quantitatively characterized ex vivo by imaging with high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cross-sectioning of the cells using a state-of-the-art focused ion beam (FIB). The relationships between EC geometrical parameters and shear stress were statistically analyzed and found to be exponential. ECs under high shear stress conditions had a longer length and narrower width, i.e. a higher aspect ratio, while the cell height was smaller compared to low shear conditions. Based on these results, suitable and valid geometrical parameters of microstructures mimicking EC can be derived for various shear conditions in synthetic vascular grafts to optimize blood compatibility.

  12. Morphometric and high resolution scanning electron microscopy analysis of low-level laser therapy and latex protein (Hevea brasiliensis) administration following a crush injury of the sciatic nerve in rats.

    PubMed

    Dias, Fernando J; Issa, João Paulo M; Coutinho-Netto, Joaquim; Fazan, Valéria P S; Sousa, Luiz Gustavo; Iyomasa, Mamie M; Papa, Paula C; Watanabe, Ii-Sei

    2015-02-15

    This study evaluated the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT; 15 J/cm(2)) and a latex protein (F1) on a crush injury of the sciatic (ischiadicus) nerve. Seventy-two rats (male, 250 g) were divided into 6 groups: CG, control; EG, exposed nerve; IG, injured nerve without treatment; LG, injured nerve with LLLT; HG, injured nerve with F1; and LHG, injured nerve with LLLT and F1. After 4 or 8 weeks, the animals were euthanized and samples of the sciatic nerve were collected for morphometric and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) analysis. After 4 weeks, the morphometry revealed improvements in the treated animals, and the HG appeared to be the most similar to the CG; after 8 weeks, the injured groups showed improvements compared to the previous period, and the results of the treatment groups were more similar to one another. At HRSEM after 4 weeks, the treated groups were similar and showed improvement compared to the IG; after 8 weeks, the LHG and HG had the best results. In conclusion, the treatments resulted in improvement after the nerve injury, and this recovery was time-dependent. In addition, the use of the F1 resulted in the best morphometric and ultrastructural findings.

  13. The Torsion-Inversion-Bending Energy Levels in the S1( n, π*) Electronic State of Acetaldehyde . A High-Resolution Study of the Bands #7 to #20 in the Jet-Cooled Fluorescence Excitation Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haisheng; Lim, Edward C.; Niño, Alfonso; Muñoz-Caro, Camelia; Judge, Richard H.; Moule, David C.

    1998-07-01

    The band assignments and analyses of the jet-cooled high-resolution laser-induced fluorescence excitation spectrum of acetaldehyde that results from theS1(n, π*) electronic state have been extended to +600 cm-1from the 000system origin. The new assignments start at Band #7 and finish at Band #21. Bands #8 and #9, originally assigned to 1420, have now been assigned to 1530. The assignments of the lower energy bands remain unaltered. The origins of the bands that involve the torsional modes ν15(v= 1 to 4) in combination with the wagging mode ν14(v= 1 and 2) and the ν10(v= 1) were determined by analyses with a rigid rotational Hamiltonian. These origins were fitted to a set of levels that were derived from a torsion-wagging-bending Hamiltonian that employed flexible large amplitude coordinates. The resulting potential surface was found to have barriers to torsion and inversion of 712.5 and 638.6 cm-1, respectively, with minima in the potential hypersurface at θ = 59.9° and α = 33.5° for the torsion and wagging coordinates.

  14. Few electron transitions in atomic collisions. Final report, September 1, 1992--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, J.

    1997-04-01

    During the past three years we have evaluated probabilities and cross sections for few and multiple electron transitions in atomic collisions. Our studies included interactions of atoms and molecules with incident protons, bare ions, electrons, positrons, anti-protons, ions carrying electrons and photons. We also: studied the inter-relation between collisions with charged particles and collisions involving various processes with photons. This work has complemented various studies of collisions of atoms with charged particles and with photons as well as more general efforts to understand the nature of multi-electron systems. Our aim has been to begin with relatively simple two electron systems and to focus on fast processes in which there is too little time for complicated processes to occur. We have used a variety of computational techniques, but we emphasize those appropriate for fast collisions in which we hope to obtain insight into the physical nature of the process itself. We generally considered systems in which experimental data was available.

  15. Evaluation of Advanced Bionics high resolution mode.

    PubMed

    Buechner, Andreas; Frohne-Buechner, Carolin; Gaertner, Lutz; Lesinski-Schiedat, Anke; Battmer, Rolf-Dieter; Lenarz, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the advantages of the Advanced Bionic high resolution mode for speech perception, through a retrospective analysis. Forty-five adult subjects were selected who had a minimum experience of three months' standard mode (mean of 10 months) before switching to high resolution mode. Speech perception was tested in standard mode immediately before fitting with high resolution mode, and again after a maximum of six months high resolution mode usage (mean of two months). A significant improvement was found, between 11 and 17%, depending on the test material. The standard mode preference does not give any indication about the improvement when switching to high resolution. Users who are converted within any study achieve a higher performance improvement than those converted in the clinical routine. This analysis proves the significant benefits of high resolution mode for users, and also indicates the need for guidelines for individual optimization of parameter settings in a high resolution mode program.

  16. Head on collision of multi-solitons in an electron-positron-ion plasma having superthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Kaushik; Chatterjee, Prasanta Roychoudhury, Rajkumar

    2014-10-15

    The head-on collision and overtaking collision of four solitons in a plasma comprising superthermal electrons, cold ions, and Boltzmann distributed positrons are investigated using the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) together with Hirota's method. PLK method yields two separate Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations where solitons obtained from any KdV equation move along a direction opposite to that of solitons obtained from the other KdV equation, While Hirota's method gives multi-soliton solution for each KdV equation all of which move along the same direction where the fastest moving soliton eventually overtakes the other ones. We have considered here two soliton solutions obtained from Hirota's method. Phase shifts acquired by each soliton due to both head-on collision and overtaking collision are calculated analytically.

  17. High-resolution slug testing.

    PubMed

    Zemansky, G M; McElwee, C D

    2005-01-01

    The hydraulic conductivity (K) variation has important ramifications for ground water flow and the transport of contaminants in ground water. The delineation of the nature of that variation can be critical to complete characterization of a site and the planning of effective and efficient remedial measures. Site-specific features (such as high-conductivity zones) need to be quantified. Our alluvial field site in the Kansas River valley exhibits spatial variability, very high conductivities, and nonlinear behavior for slug tests in the sand and gravel aquifer. High-resolution, multilevel slug tests have been performed in a number of wells that are fully screened. A general nonlinear model based on the Navier-Stokes equation, nonlinear frictional loss, non-Darcian flow, acceleration effects, radius changes in the wellbore, and a Hvorslev model for the aquifer has been used to analyze the data, employing an automated processing system that runs within the Excel spreadsheet program. It is concluded that slug tests can provide the necessary data to identify the nature of both horizontal and vertical K variation in an aquifer and that improved delineation or higher resolution of K structure is possible with shorter test intervals. The gradation into zones of higher conductivity is sharper than seen previously, and the maximum conductivity observed is greater than previously measured. However, data from this project indicate that well development, the presence of fines, and the antecedent history of the well are important interrelated factors in regard to slug-test response and can prevent obtaining consistent results in some cases.

  18. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; Ji, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Important swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. It is shown that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections.

  19. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    DOE PAGES

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; ...

    2015-08-04

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Importantmore » swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. We show that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections.« less

  20. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; Ji, Wei

    2015-08-04

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Important swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. We show that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections.

  1. High-resolution neutron and X-ray diffraction room-temperature studies of an H-FABP–oleic acid complex: study of the internal water cluster and ligand binding by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution

    PubMed Central

    Howard, E. I.; Guillot, B.; Blakeley, M. P.; Haertlein, M.; Moulin, M.; Mitschler, A.; Cousido-Siah, A.; Fadel, F.; Valsecchi, W. M.; Tomizaki, Takashi; Petrova, T.; Claudot, J.; Podjarny, A.

    2016-01-01

    Crystal diffraction data of heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) in complex with oleic acid were measured at room temperature with high-resolution X-ray and neutron protein crystallography (0.98 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively). These data provided very detailed information about the cluster of water molecules and the bound oleic acid in the H-FABP large internal cavity. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of H-FABP was complemented by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution using the parameters of the ELMAMII library. The resulting electron density allowed a precise determination of the electrostatic potential in the fatty acid (FA) binding pocket. Bader’s quantum theory of atoms in molecules was then used to study interactions involving the internal water molecules, the FA and the protein. This approach showed H⋯H contacts of the FA with highly conserved hydrophobic residues known to play a role in the stabilization of long-chain FAs in the binding cavity. The determination of water hydrogen (deuterium) positions allowed the analysis of the orientation and electrostatic properties of the water molecules in the very ordered cluster. As a result, a significant alignment of the permanent dipoles of the water molecules with the protein electrostatic field was observed. This can be related to the dielectric properties of hydration layers around proteins, where the shielding of electrostatic interactions depends directly on the rotational degrees of freedom of the water molecules in the interface. PMID:27006775

  2. On The Effect of Electron Collisions in the Excitation of Cometary HCN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, Amy J.; Kallivayalil, Nitya; Schloerb, F. Peter; Combi, Michael R.; Hansen, Kenneth C.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2004-01-01

    The electron-HCN collision rate for the excitation of rotational transitions of the HCN molecule is evaluated in comets C/1995 01 (Hale-Bopp) and C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake). Based on theoretical models of the cometary atmosphere, we show that collisions with electrons can provide a significant excitation mechanism for rotational transitions in the HCN molecule. Computed values of the cross section sigma(sub e-HCN) can be as high as 1.3 x cm2, more than 2 orders of magnitude greater than the commonly assumed HCN-H2O cross section. For the ground rotational transitions of HCN, the electron-HCN collision rate is found to exceed the HCN-H2O collision rate at distances greater than 3000 km from the cometary nucleus of Hale-Bopp and 1000 km from that of Hyakutake. Collisional excitation processes dominate over radiative excitation processes up to a distance of 160,000 km from the cometary nucleus of Hale-Bopp and 50,000 km from that of Hyakutake. Excitation models that neglect electron collisions can underestimate the HCN gas production rates by as much as a factor of 2.

  3. Electron impact excitation collision strengths for extreme ultraviolet lines of Fe VII

    SciTech Connect

    Tayal, S. S.; Zatsarinny, O. E-mail: oleg.zatsarinny@drake.edu

    2014-06-10

    Extensive calculations have been performed for electron impact excitation collision strengths and oscillator strengths for the Fe VII extreme ultraviolet lines of astrophysical importance. The collision strengths for fine-structure transitions are calculated in the B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix approach. The target wavefunctions have been calculated in the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method with term-dependent non-orthogonal orbitals. The close-coupling expansion includes 189 fine-structure levels of Fe VII belonging to terms of the ground 3p {sup 6}3d {sup 2} and excited 3p {sup 5}3d {sup 3}, 3p {sup 6}3d4l, 3p {sup 6}3d5s, and 3p {sup 6}3d5p configurations. The effective collision strengths are determined from the electron excitation collision strengths by integration over a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities. The effective collision strengths are provided for 17766 fine-structure transitions at electron temperatures from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 7} K. Our results normally agree with the previous R-matrix frame-transformation calculations by Witthoeft and Badnell. However, there are important differences for some transitions with the previous calculations. The corrections to the previous results are mainly due to more extensive expansions for the Fe VII target states.

  4. Electron Impact Excitation Collision Strengths for Extreme Ultraviolet Lines of Fe VII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayal, S. S.; Zatsarinny, O.

    2014-06-01

    Extensive calculations have been performed for electron impact excitation collision strengths and oscillator strengths for the Fe VII extreme ultraviolet lines of astrophysical importance. The collision strengths for fine-structure transitions are calculated in the B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix approach. The target wavefunctions have been calculated in the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method with term-dependent non-orthogonal orbitals. The close-coupling expansion includes 189 fine-structure levels of Fe VII belonging to terms of the ground 3p 63d 2 and excited 3p 53d 3, 3p 63d4l, 3p 63d5s, and 3p 63d5p configurations. The effective collision strengths are determined from the electron excitation collision strengths by integration over a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities. The effective collision strengths are provided for 17766 fine-structure transitions at electron temperatures from 104 to 107 K. Our results normally agree with the previous R-matrix frame-transformation calculations by Witthoeft & Badnell. However, there are important differences for some transitions with the previous calculations. The corrections to the previous results are mainly due to more extensive expansions for the Fe VII target states.

  5. A New Apparatus for Studies of Low Energy Electron Collisions with Nucleotide Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duron, Jessica; Hargreaves, Leigh

    Low-energy electrons, the most copiously produced by-product of radiation cancer therapy, have been shown to be a strong driver of DNA damage in living cells [1]. Quantitative data describing these collisions are presently rare due to technological challenges in performing electron scattering measurements from the nucleobases, e.g. uracil, thymine, guanine, etc. These challenges include the low-vapor pressure of commercial samples (which are powders at room temperature), and the difficulty in making accurate flow measurements from heated gas sources, required to establish the absolute scale of the measured data. Based on techniques pioneered in positron collision physics [2], a new apparatus is presently undergoing commissioning at the California State University Fullerton, which aims to address these issues. We will make the first cross-section measurements for slow (E0 < 30eV) electron collisions with nucleotides. We will report design parameters and ongoing progress in the commissioning of this new experiment.

  6. Exact analytical solutions of continuity equation for electron beams precipitating in Coulomb collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranskis, R. R.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2014-06-10

    The original continuity equation (CE) used for the interpretation of the power law energy spectra of beam electrons in flares was written and solved for an electron beam flux while ignoring an additional free term with an electron density. In order to remedy this omission, the original CE for electron flux, considering beam's energy losses in Coulomb collisions, was first differentiated by the two independent variables: depth and energy leading to partial differential equation for an electron beam density instead of flux with the additional free term. The analytical solution of this partial differential continuity equation (PDCE) is obtained by using the method of characteristics. This solution is further used to derive analytical expressions for mean electron spectra for Coulomb collisions and to carry out numeric calculations of hard X-ray (HXR) photon spectra for beams with different parameters. The solutions revealed a significant departure of electron densities at lower energies from the original results derived from the CE for the flux obtained for Coulomb collisions. This departure is caused by the additional exponential term that appeared in the updated solutions for electron differential density leading to its faster decrease at lower energies (below 100 keV) with every precipitation depth similar to the results obtained with numerical Fokker-Planck solutions. The effects of these updated solutions for electron densities on mean electron spectra and HXR photon spectra are also discussed.

  7. Cylindrical and spherical soliton collision of electron-acoustic waves in non-Maxwellian plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Labany, S. K.; Sabry, R.; Moslem, W. M.; Elghmaz, E. A.

    2014-02-01

    Generation of quasielastic electron-acoustic (EA) waves head-on collision are investigated in non-planar (cylindrical/spherical) plasma composed of cold electrons fluid, hot electrons obeying nonthermal distribution, and stationary ions. The cylindrical/spherical Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations describing two bidirectional EA waves are derived and solved analytically. Numerical investigation have shown that only positive electron-acoustic (EA) structures can propagate and collide. The analytical phase shift |Δ A | due to the non-Maxwellian (nonthermal) electrons is different from the Maxwellian case. Both the hot-to-cold electron number density ratio α and nonthermal parameter β have opposite effect on the phase shift behavior. The phase shift of the spherical EA waves is smaller than the cylindrical case, which indicates that the former is more stable for collision. The relevance of the present study to EA waves propagating in the Earth's auroral zone is highlighted.

  8. Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces: Fundamental science empowering advances in technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartschat, Klaus; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-06-01

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces are critically important to the understanding and modeling of low-temperature plasmas (LTPs), and so in the development of technologies based on LTPs. Recent progress in obtaining experimental benchmark data and the development of highly sophisticated computational methods is highlighted. With the cesium-based diode-pumped alkali laser and remote plasma etching of Si3N4 as examples, we demonstrate how accurate and comprehensive datasets for electron collisions enable complex modeling of plasma-using technologies that empower our high-technology-based society.

  9. Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces: Fundamental science empowering advances in technology.

    PubMed

    Bartschat, Klaus; Kushner, Mark J

    2016-06-28

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces are critically important to the understanding and modeling of low-temperature plasmas (LTPs), and so in the development of technologies based on LTPs. Recent progress in obtaining experimental benchmark data and the development of highly sophisticated computational methods is highlighted. With the cesium-based diode-pumped alkali laser and remote plasma etching of Si3N4 as examples, we demonstrate how accurate and comprehensive datasets for electron collisions enable complex modeling of plasma-using technologies that empower our high-technology-based society.

  10. Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces: Fundamental science empowering advances in technology

    PubMed Central

    Bartschat, Klaus; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces are critically important to the understanding and modeling of low-temperature plasmas (LTPs), and so in the development of technologies based on LTPs. Recent progress in obtaining experimental benchmark data and the development of highly sophisticated computational methods is highlighted. With the cesium-based diode-pumped alkali laser and remote plasma etching of Si3N4 as examples, we demonstrate how accurate and comprehensive datasets for electron collisions enable complex modeling of plasma-using technologies that empower our high-technology–based society. PMID:27317740

  11. Insights into complexation of dissolved organic matter and Al(III) and nanominerals formation in soils under contrasting fertilizations using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yongli; Li, Huan; Xiao, Jian; Wang, Chang; Shen, Qirong; Ran, Wei; He, Xinhua; Zhou, Quansuo; Yu, Guanghui

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the organomineral associations in soils is of great importance. Using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques, this study compared the binding characteristics of organic ligands to Al(III) in dissolved organic matter (DOM) from soils under short-term (3-years) and long-term (22-years) fertilizations. Three fertilization treatments were examined: (i) no fertilization (Control), (ii) chemical nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK), and (iii) NPK plus swine manure (NPKM). Soil spectra detected by the 2DCOS Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed that fertilization modified the binding characteristics of organic ligands to Al(III) in soil DOM at both short- and long- term location sites. The CH deformations in aliphatic groups played an important role in binding to Al(III) but with minor differences among the Control, NPK and NPKM at the short-term site. While at the long-term site both C-O stretching of polysaccharides or polysaccharide-like substances and aliphatic O-H were bound to Al(III) under the Control, whereas only aliphatic O-H, and only polysaccharides and silicates, were bound to Al(III) under NPK and NPKM, respectively. Images from HRTEM demonstrated that crystalline nanominerals, composed of Fe and O, were predominant in soil DOM under NPK, while amorphous nanominerals, predominant in Al, Si, and O, were dominant in soil DOM under Control and NPKM. In conclusion, fertilization strategies, especially under long-term, could affect the binding of organic ligands to Al(III) in soil DOM, which resulted in alterations in the turnover, reactivity, and bioavailability of soil organic matter. Our results demonstrated that the FTIR-2DCOS combined with HRTEM techniques could enhance our understanding in the binding characteristics of DOM to Al(III) and the resulted nanominerals in soils.

  12. High Resolution Frequency Swept Imaging.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-30

    recording configuration similar to that of a lensless Fourier transform hologram, the resolution and spacial sampling requirement from the recording...a lensless Fourier Transform hologram, the resolution requirements from the recording device are greatly !.4 + ’+:::,,,. :,;,,,,o...n X-Ray Crytallography and Electron Microscopy By Reduction to Two-Dimensional Holographic Implementation", Trans. Amr. Crytallographic Assoc., Vol

  13. Influence of quantum diffraction and shielding on electron-ion collision in two-component semiclassical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Woo-Pyo; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-01-15

    The influence of quantum diffraction and shielding on the electron-ion collision process is investigated in two-component semiclassical plasmas. The eikonal method and micropotential taking into account the quantum diffraction and shielding are used to obtain the eikonal scattering phase shift and the eikonal collision cross section as functions of the collision energy, density parameter, Debye length, electron de Broglie wavelength, and the impact parameter. The result shows that the quantum diffraction and shielding effects suppress the eikonal scattering phase shift as well as the differential eikonal collision cross section, especially, in small-impact parameter regions. It is also shown that the quantum shielding effect on the eikonal collision cross section is more important in low-collision energies. In addition, it is found that the eikonal collision cross section increases with an increase in the density parameter. The variations of the eikonal cross section due to the quantum diffraction and shielding effects are also discussed.

  14. Classical model for electronically non-adiabatic collision processes resonance effects in electronic-vibrational energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Orel, Ann E.; Ali, Dominic P.; Miller, William H.

    1981-02-01

    In this paper, a classical model for electronically non-adiabatic collision processes is applied to E → V energy transfer in a collinear system, A + BC (v = 1) → A* + BC (v = 0), resembling Br-H2. Finally, the model, which treats electronic as well as translational, rotational, and vibrational degrees of freedom by classical mechanics, describes the resonance features in this process reasonably well.

  15. Effects of external field on elastic electron-ion collision in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Sang-Chul; Jung, Young-Dae

    2008-12-01

    The field effects on elastic electron-ion collision are investigated in a plasma with the presence of the external field. The eikonal method and effective interaction potential including the far-field term caused by the external field is employed to obtain the eikonal phase shift and eikonal cross section as functions of the field strength, external frequency, impact parameter, collision energy, thermal energy and Debye length. The result shows that the effect of the external field on the eikonal cross section is given by the second-order eikonal phase. In addition, the external field effects suppress the eikonal cross section as well as eikonal phase for the elastic electron-ion collision. The eikonal phase and cross section are found to be increased with an increase of the frequency of the external field. It is also shown that the eikonal cross section increases with an increase of the thermal energy and Debye length.

  16. Electrostatic ion beam trap for electron collision studies

    SciTech Connect

    Heber, O.; Witte, P.D.; Diner, A.; Bhushan, K.G.; Strasser, D.; Toker, Y.; Rappaport, M.L.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Altstein, N.; Schwalm, D.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a system combining an ion beam trap and a low energy electron target in which the interaction between electrons and vibrationally cold molecular ions and clusters can be studied. The entire system uses only electrostatic fields for both trapping and focusing, thus being able to store particles without a mass limit. Preliminary results for the electron impact neutralization of C{sub 2}{sup -} ions and aluminum clusters are presented.

  17. Electron capture in collisions of S with H{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L.B.; Stancil, P.C.; Gu, J.-P.; Liebermann, H.-P.; Funke, P.; Buenker, R.J.; Kimura, M.

    2005-06-15

    Within the framework of a fully quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling (QMOCC) theory, charge transfer has been studied for collisions of S with H{sup +}. The multireference single- and double-excitation configuration-interaction method was utilized to evaluate the adiabatic potentials and nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements for the SH{sup +} system. Cross sections and rate coefficients are presented for S({sup 3}P,{sup 1}D)+H{sup +}{yields}S{sup +}({sup 4}S{sup 0},{sup 2}D{sup 0},{sup 2}P{sup 0})+H with relative collision energies between 0.1 meV/u and 10 keV/u and temperatures between 10 K and 2.0x10{sup 6} K. The investigation shows that the charge-transfer process is dominated by S({sup 3}P)+H{sup +}{yields}S{sup +}({sup 2}P{sup 0})+H and that the cross sections and rate coefficients vary by orders of magnitude over the energy and temperature range considered. The current rate coefficients are in disagreement with the often adopted value of 1.30x10{sup -9} cm{sup 3}/s at low temperatures, and two orders of magnitude smaller than a previous estimate at T=10{sup 4} K, for the process S({sup 3}P)+H{sup +}{yields}S{sup +}({sup 2}D{sup 0},{sup 2}P{sup 0})+H. We also performed semiclassical close-coupling calculations, which give cross sections in excellent agreement agreement with the QMOCC results for energies above 30 eV/u. Application of the results to astrophysical environments is briefly discussed.

  18. High Resolution BPM for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, C.; Chel, S.; Luong, M.; Napoly, O.; Novo, J.; Roudier, D.; Rouviere, N.

    2006-11-20

    A high resolution Beam Position Monitor (BPM) is necessary for the beam-based alignment systems of high energy and low emittance electron linacs. Such a monitor is developed in the framework of the European CARE/SRF programme, in a close collaboration between DESY and CEA/DSM/DAPNIA. This monitor is a radiofrequency re-entrant cavity, which can be used either at room or cryogenic temperature, in an environment where dust particle contamination has to be avoided, such as superconducting cavities in a cryomodule. A first prototype of a re-entrant BPM has already delivered measurements at 2K. inside the first cryomodule (ACC1) on the TESLA Test Facility 2 (TTF2). The performances of this BPM are analyzed both experimentally and theoretically, and the limitations of this existing system clearly identified. A new cavity and new electronics have been designed in order to improve the position resolution down to 1 {mu}m and the damping time down to 10 ns.

  19. Electronic excitation of ground state atoms by collision with heavy gas particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick

    1993-01-01

    Most of the important chemical reactions which occur in the very high temperature air produced around space vehicles as they enter the atmosphere were investigated both experimentally and theoretically, to some extent at least. One remaining reaction about which little is known, and which could be quite important at the extremely high temperatures that will be produced by the class of space vehicles now contemplated - such as the AOTV - is the excitation of bound electron states due to collisions between heavy gas particles. Rates of electronic excitation due to free electron collisions are known to be very rapid, but because these collisions quickly equilibrate the free and bound electron energy, the approach to full equilibrium with the heavy particle kinetic energy will depend primarily on the much slower process of bound electron excitation in heavy particle collisions and the subsequent rapid transfer to free electron energy. This may be the dominant mechanism leading to full equilibrium in the gas once the dissociation process has depleted the molecular states so the transfer between molecular vibrational energy and free electron energy is no longer available as a channel for equilibration of free electron and heavy particle kinetic energies. Two mechanisms seem probable in electronic excitation by heavy particle impact. One of these is the collision excitation and deexcitation of higher electronic states which are Rydberg like. A report, entitled 'Semi-Classical Theory of Electronic Excitation Rates', was submitted previously. This presented analytic expressions for the transition probabilities, assuming that the interaction potential is an exponential repulsion with a perturbation ripple due to the dipole-induced dipole effect in the case of neutral-neutral collisions, and to the ion-dipole interaction in the case of ion-neutral collisions. However the above may be, there is little doubt that excitation of ground state species by collision occurs at the

  20. High resolution scintillation detector with semiconductor readout

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Craig S.; Hoffman, Edward J.

    2000-01-01

    A novel high resolution scintillation detector array for use in radiation imaging such as high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) which comprises one or more parallelepiped crystals with at least one long surface of each crystal being in intimate contact with a semiconductor photodetector such that photons generated within each crystal by gamma radiation passing therethrough is detected by the photodetector paired therewith.

  1. a Study of Low Energy Electron-Molecule and Ion - Collisions Using Rydberg Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zollars, Byron George

    Low energy collisions between Rydberg atoms and neutral molecules have been investigated over a wide range of principal quantum numbers n, and for several different neutral targets. The results have been used to validate the free-electron, independent particle model of Rydberg atom collisions. Comparison between theory and experiment show that at large values of n, ionization of Rb(nS,nD) Rydberg atoms in the reaction: (UNFORMATTED TABLE FOLLOWS). Rb(nS,nD) + SF(,6) (--->) Rb('+) = SF(,6)('-) (1). (TABLE ENDS). proceeds by electron transfer from the Rydberg atom to the SF(,6) molecule. The rate constants measured for this reaction are much the same as for the attachment of free, low-energy electrons to SF(,6). Thus, Rydberg collision studies can provide information about low-energy free electron interactions. Studies of the rate constants for free ion production in the reaction: (UNFORMATTED TABLE FOLLOWS). K(nD) + SF(,6) (--->) K('+) + SF(,6)('-) (2). (TABLE ENDS). showed these to decrease sharply at smaller n, falling far below the value expected on the basis of Rydberg electron attachment to SF(,6). This behavior is attributed not to breakdown of the free-electron model, but to post -attachment electrostatic interactions between the product ions, which are formed closer to each other at lower n. Model calculations that take this electrostatic interaction into account confirm this prediction. Other Rydberg atom collision processes, such as: (UNFORMATTED TABLE FOLLOWS). K(nD) + O(,2) (--->) K('+) + O(,2)('-) (3). K(nD) + H(,2)O (--->) KH(,2)O('+) + e('-) (4). (TABLE ENDS). have been studied, as they require both the Rydberg ion core and electron to participate in the collision. Since O(,2)('-) ions formed by free electron attachment have short lifetimes against autodetachment, the observation of long-lived O(,2)('-) reaction product suggests that the K('+) core ion plays a role in stabilizing the excited O(,2)('-) ions formed by Rydberg electron attachment. Stable

  2. Inelastic collisions of the uracil molecules with electrons.

    PubMed

    Shafranyosh, I I; Sukhoviya, M I

    2012-11-14

    Ionization and excitation of the uracil molecules by electron impact is investigated. Production of positive ions of uracil molecules (nucleic acid base) was studied using a crossed electron and molecular beam technique. The method developed by the authors enabled the molecular beam intensity to be measured and the electron dependences and the absolute values of the total cross sections of production of both positive ions to be determined. It is shown that the total positive uracil ion production cross section reaches its maximal value of (1.0 ± 0.1) × 10(-15) cm(2) at the 95 eV electron energy. Dissociative ionization cross sections were also determined. The luminescence spectra of isolated uracil molecules in the wavelength range of 200-500 nm under the influence of slow electrons are obtained. In the spectrum, more than 20 spectral bands and lines at 100 eV electron energy are observed. It is shown that the uracil radiation spectrum is formed by the processes of molecules dissociative excitation, dissociative excitation with ionization, excitation of electronic levels of the initial molecule and molecular ion.

  3. Theoretical investigation of the electron capture and loss processes in the collisions of He2+ + Ne.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xuhai; Wang, Feng; Jiao, Yalong; Su, Wenyong; Wang, Jianguo; Gou, Bingcong

    2013-08-28

    Based on the time-dependent density functional theory, a method is developed to study ion-atom collision dynamics, which self-consistently couples the quantum mechanical description of electron dynamics with the classical treatment of the ion motion. Employing real-time and real-space method, the coordinate space translation technique is introduced to allow one to focus on the region of target or projectile depending on the actual concerned process. The benchmark calculations are performed for the collisions of He(2+) + Ne, and the time evolution of electron density distribution is monitored, which provides interesting details of the interaction dynamics between the electrons and ion cores. The cross sections of single and many electron capture and loss have been calculated in the energy range of 1-1000 keV/amu, and the results show a good agreement with the available experiments over a wide range of impact energies.

  4. Heavy-Rydberg ion-pair formation in Rydberg atom collisions: Probing dissociative electron attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Michael; Buathong, Sitti; Dunning, F. Barry

    2015-05-01

    While electron transfer in Rydberg atom collisions with attaching targets forms a valuable technique with which to create heavy-Rydberg ion pairs to examine their properties, we demonstrate here that measurements of their velocity distributions can also provide insights into the behavior of the excited intermediates formed through initial electron transfer. The experimental results are analyzed with the aid of a Monte Carlo collision code that models the details of electron transfer reactions. Results for a variety of targets are presented that demonstrate the use of this approach to examine the dynamics of dissociative electron attachment, the lifetimes of the intermediates created, and the channels by which they decay. Research supported by the Robert A. Welch Foundation under Grant C-0734.

  5. Quantum radiation reaction in laser-electron-beam collisions.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, T G; Ridgers, C P; Kirk, J G; Bell, A R

    2014-01-10

    It is possible using current high-intensity laser facilities to reach the quantum radiation reaction regime for energetic electrons. An experiment using a wakefield accelerator to drive GeV electrons into a counterpropagating laser pulse would demonstrate the increase in the yield of high-energy photons caused by the stochastic nature of quantum synchrotron emission: we show that a beam of 10(9) 1 GeV electrons colliding with a 30 fs laser pulse of intensity 10(22)  W cm(-2) will emit 6300 photons with energy greater than 700 MeV, 60× the number predicted by classical theory.

  6. Low energy electron collisions in SiF{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Nagpal, R.; Garscadden, A.; Liptak, D.

    1995-07-01

    Electron drift velocities in SiF{sub 4}-Ar mixtures have been measured using a pulsed-Townsend type drift tube. A set of momentum transfer, vibrational excitation, dissociation, attachment, and ionization cross sections of electron scattering in SiF{sub 4} from 0-50 eV is presented. The cross section set has been determined by the swarm analyses of electron transport data in pure SiF{sub 4}, in conjunction with the data in SiF{sub 4}-Ar mixtures.

  7. Laser Assisted Free-Free Transition in Electron - Atom Collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    Free-free transition is studied for electron-Hydrogen atom system in ground state at very low incident energies in presence of an external homogeneous, monochromatic and linearly polarized laser field. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser in a non perturbative manner by choosing the Volkov solutions in both the channels. The space part of the scattering wave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of electron exchange, short range as well as of the long range interactions. Laser assisted differential as well as elastic total cross sections are calculated for single photon absorption/emission in the soft photon limit, the laser intensity being much less than the atomic field intensity. A strong suppression is noted in the laser assisted cross sections as compared to the field free situations. Significant difference is noted in the singlet and the triplet cross sections.

  8. QED and electron collisions in the super strong fields of K-shell actinide ions

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P

    2006-01-25

    Atomic physics of high-Z, heavy ions is very different from that encountered in low-Z or medium-Z ions. The reason is the ultra strong nuclear field found only in the heaviest ions. The highest-Z atomic systems available to physical investigation, the actinides, therefore, offer rich new physics that cannot be studied any other way. This ranges from new dominating forces in electron-ion collisions to tests of fundamental theories. A measurement of the two-loop Lamb shift in uranium is by many considered to be the ''holy grail'' of high-field QED tests of atomic systems. Such measurements have been attempted at heavy-ion accelerator facilities but have yet to succeed because of the difficulty to make measurements with the required accuracy. Also, electron collisions behave very differently in such tightly bound systems. The magnetic interaction between the ion and the incoming free electron (the so-called generalized Breit interaction) is essentially non-existent in collisions involving low and medium-Z ions. This interaction is therefore missing in essentially all electron collision codes. But in heavy, highly charged ions like uranium, the generalized Breit interaction readily is the dominant force, changing electron collision cross sections by a factor of two. This has never been experimentally observed. In fact, no K-shell emission spectrum of any heavy high-Z ion higher than krypton (Z=36) has ever been recorded from a collisional source. By studying the heaviest actinides such fundamental science can be extended to regimes where the highest precision tests can be made.

  9. Single sensor processing to obtain high resolution color component signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, William E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for generating color video signals representative of color images of a scene includes the following steps: focusing light from the scene on an electronic image sensor via a filter having a tri-color filter pattern; producing, from outputs of the sensor, first and second relatively low resolution luminance signals; producing, from outputs of the sensor, a relatively high resolution luminance signal; producing, from a ratio of the relatively high resolution luminance signal to the first relatively low resolution luminance signal, a high band luminance component signal; producing, from outputs of the sensor, relatively low resolution color component signals; and combining each of the relatively low resolution color component signals with the high band luminance component signal to obtain relatively high resolution color component signals.

  10. Effect of electron collisions on transport coefficients induced by the inverse bremsstrahlung absorption in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bendib, A.; Tahraoui, A.; Bendib, K.; Mohammed El Hadj, K.; Hueller, S.

    2005-03-01

    The transport coefficients of fully ionized plasmas under the influence of a high-frequency electric field are derived solving numerically the electron Fokker-Planck equation using a perturbation method, parametrized as a function of the electron mean-free-path {lambda}{sub ei} compared to the spatial scales L. The isotropic and anisotropic contributions of the inverse bremsstrahlung heating are considered. Electron-electron collision terms are kept in the analysis, which allows us to consider with sufficient accuracy to describe plasmas with arbitrary atomic number Z. Practical numerical fits of the transport coefficients are proposed as functions of Z and the collisionality parameter {lambda}{sub ei}/L.

  11. Effects of target plasma electron-electron collisions on correlated motion of fragmented H{sub 2}{sup +} protons

    SciTech Connect

    Barriga-Carrasco, Manuel D.

    2006-02-15

    The objective of the present work is to examined the effects of plasma target electron-electron collisions on H{sub 2}{sup +} protons traversing it. Specifically, the target is deuterium in a plasma state with temperature T{sub e}=10 eV and density n=10{sup 23} cm{sup -3}, and proton velocities are v{sub p}=v{sub th}, v{sub p}=2v{sub th}, and v{sub p}=3v{sub th}, where v{sub th} is the electron thermal velocity of the target plasma. Proton interactions with plasma electrons are treated by means of the dielectric formalism. The interactions among close protons through plasma electronic medium are called vicinage forces. It is checked that these forces always screen the Coulomb explosions of the two fragmented protons from the same H{sub 2}{sup +} ion decreasing their relative distance. They also align the interproton vector along the motion direction, and increase the energy loss of the two protons at early dwell times while for longer times the energy loss tends to the value of two isolated protons. Nevertheless, vicinage forces and effects are modified by the target electron collisions. These collisions enhance the calculated self-stopping and vicinage forces over the collisionless results. Regarding proton correlated motion, when these collisions are included, the interproton vector along the motion direction overaligns at slower proton velocities (v{sub p}=v{sub th}) and misaligns for faster ones (v{sub p}=2v{sub th}, v{sub p}=3v{sub th}). They also contribute to a great extend to increase the energy loss of the fragmented H{sub 2}{sup +} ion. This later effect is more significant in reducing projectile velocity.

  12. Design and implementation of spaceborne high resolution infrared touch screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tai-guo; Li, Wen-xin; Dong, Yi-peng; Ma, Wen; Xia, Jia-gao

    2015-10-01

    For the consideration of the special application environment of the electronic products used in aerospace and to further more improve the human-computer interaction of the manned aerospace area. The research is based on the design and implementation way of the high resolution spaceborne infrared touch screen on the basis of FPGA and DSP frame structure. Beside the introduction of the whole structure for the high resolution spaceborne infrared touch screen system, this essay also gives the detail information about design of hardware for the high resolution spaceborne infrared touch screen system, FPGA design, GUI design and DSP algorithm design based on Lagrange interpolation. What is more, the easy makes a comprehensive research of the reliability design for the high resolution spaceborne infrared touch screen for the special purpose of it. Besides, the system test is done after installation of spaceborne infrared touch screen. The test result shows that the system is simple and reliable enough, which has a stable running environment and high resolution, which certainly can meet the special requirement of the manned aerospace instrument products.

  13. TRANSITION PROBABILITIES AND COLLISION STRENGTHS FOR ELECTRON-IMPACT EXCITATION OF Cl III

    SciTech Connect

    Sossah, A. M.; Tayal, S. S.

    2012-10-15

    We report transition probabilities and effective collision strengths for electron-impact excitation of the astrophysically important Cl III ion. The collision strengths are calculated in the close-coupling approximation using the B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix method. The multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method with term-dependent non-orthogonal orbitals is employed for an accurate description of the target wave functions. The 68 fine-structure levels belonging to the 32 LS states of 3s {sup 2}3p{sup 3}, 3s3p{sup 4}, 3s {sup 2}3p {sup 2}3d, 3s {sup 2}3p {sup 2}4s, and 3s {sup 2}3p {sup 2}4p configurations are included in the close-coupling expansion. The effective collision strengths are obtained by averaging the electron collision strengths over a Maxwellian distribution of velocities, and those are tabulated for all 2278 possible fine-structure transitions at electron temperatures in the range from 5000 to 1,000,000 K. Our results are compared with previous theoretical results and available experimental data. Overall, we reached a good agreement with the 23 state calculation of Ramsbottom et al., but some discrepancies are seen for some transitions.

  14. Effect of electron-nuclei interaction on internuclear motions in slow ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstikhina, Inga Yu.; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.

    2015-10-01

    The electron-nuclei interaction affects the internuclear motion in slow ion-atom collisions, which in turn affects theoretical results for the cross sections of various collision processes. The results are especially sensitive to the details of the internuclear dynamics in the presence of a strong isotope effect on the cross sections, as is the case, e.g., for the charge transfer in low-energy collisions of He2+ with H, D, and T. By considering this system as an example, we show that internuclear trajectories defined by the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) potential in the entrance collision channel, which effectively accounts for the electron-nuclei interaction, are in much better agreement with trajectories obtained in the ab initio electron-nuclear dynamics approach [R. Cabrera-Trujillo et al., Phys. Rev. A 83, 012715 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevA.83.012715] than the corresponding Coulomb trajectories. We also show that the use of the BO trajectory instead of the Coulomb trajectory in the calculations of the charge-transfer cross sections within the adiabatic approach improves the agreement of the results with ab initio calculations.

  15. Large Scale, High Resolution, Mantle Dynamics Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geenen, T.; Berg, A. V.; Spakman, W.

    2007-12-01

    To model the geodynamic evolution of plate convergence, subduction and collision and to allow for a connection to various types of observational data, geophysical, geodetical and geological, we developed a 4D (space-time) numerical mantle convection code. The model is based on a spherical 3D Eulerian fem model, with quadratic elements, on top of which we constructed a 3D Lagrangian particle in cell(PIC) method. We use the PIC method to transport material properties and to incorporate a viscoelastic rheology. Since capturing small scale processes associated with localization phenomena require a high resolution, we spend a considerable effort on implementing solvers suitable to solve for models with over 100 million degrees of freedom. We implemented Additive Schwartz type ILU based methods in combination with a Krylov solver, GMRES. However we found that for problems with over 500 thousend degrees of freedom the convergence of the solver degraded severely. This observation is known from the literature [Saad, 2003] and results from the local character of the ILU preconditioner resulting in a poor approximation of the inverse of A for large A. The size of A for which ILU is no longer usable depends on the condition of A and on the amount of fill in allowed for the ILU preconditioner. We found that for our problems with over 5×105 degrees of freedom convergence became to slow to solve the system within an acceptable amount of walltime, one minute, even when allowing for considerable amount of fill in. We also implemented MUMPS and found good scaling results for problems up to 107 degrees of freedom for up to 32 CPU¡¯s. For problems with over 100 million degrees of freedom we implemented Algebraic Multigrid type methods (AMG) from the ML library [Sala, 2006]. Since multigrid methods are most effective for single parameter problems, we rebuild our model to use the SIMPLE method in the Stokes solver [Patankar, 1980]. We present scaling results from these solvers for 3D

  16. Fluorescence of dissociating fragments from supersonic jet-electron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Thomas A.; Smilgys, Russell V.; Lobue, James M.; Schiffman, Aram P.; Novick, Stewart E.

    1985-05-01

    Supersonically cooled jets of nitrogen, methane, ethane, cyclopropane, and azomethane are crossed with collimated streams of electrons. The CH (B 2Σ - → X 2Π) spectra resulting from the electron-induced dissociation of CH 4, C 2H 6, and CH 2) 3 can be fit with rotation temperatures between 4000 and 6000 K for an electron energy of 100 eV. Flourescence spectra of N 2+ (B 2Σ w+ → X 2Π) from the dissociative ionization of azomethane yield a rotational temperature of =8×10 3 K; from ionization of molecular nitrogen the rotational temperature of B 2Σ w+ N 2+ is 45 K. Mechanisms for these various processes are discussed.

  17. Relevance of Electron-Molecule Collision Data for Engineering Purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Gorur Govinda

    Innumerable applications have resulted from the application of gaseous electronics to engineering purposes, from the mundane tube lights and neon signs to its rejuvenated version of compact fluorescent bulbs, gas lasers, plasma TV among others. Research data, both experimental and theoretical, from this area continue to be used for engineering purposes. Engineers often look for qualitative similarities in the various properties of interest as a function of electron energy or some other parameters which are easy to measure and relate to practical situations. These aspects are dealt with in the paper.

  18. High-resolution, cryogenic, side-entry type specimen stage

    DOEpatents

    King, Wayne E.; Merkle, Karl L.

    1979-01-01

    A high-resolution, cryogenic side-entry type specimen stage includes a copper block within which a specimen can be positioned in the electron beam of an electron microscope, one end of the copper block constituting a specimen heat exchanger, means for directing a flow of helium at cryogenic temperature into the heat exchanger, and electrical leads running from the specimen to the exterior of the microscope for four point D.C. electrical resistivity measurements.

  19. Collisions of low-energy electrons with formamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettega, Márcio H. F.

    2010-06-01

    We present integral and momentum transfer cross sections for elastic scattering of low-energy electrons by formamide (HCONH2) from 1 to 12 eV. To calculate the cross sections we employed the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials in the static-exchange and in the static-exchange-polarization approximations. We found a π* shape resonance belonging to the A″ symmetry which is located at around 4.5 eV in the static-exchange approximation, and at around 2.5 eV in the static-exchange-polarization approximation. This result is in close agreement with the observations of Seydou [Eur. Phys. J. DEPJDF61434-606010.1140/epjd/e2005-00089-5 35, 199 (2005)] which reported the value of 2.05 eV to the vertical electron attachment energy, and is lower than the value of 3.77 eV computed by Goumans [J. Chem. Theory Comp.JPCBFK1549-961810.1021/ct800379h 5, 217 (2009)]. We carried out additional minimal basis set electronic structure calculations to help in the interpretation of our results. Our results support the conclusions of Goumans , namely, that this resonance may initiate the indirect dissociation mechanism of formamide by electron impact.

  20. Electron Transfer-Induced Fragmentation in (Bio)Molecules by Atom-Molecule Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limão-Vieira, Paulo; da Silva, Filipe Ferreira; Gómez-Tejedor, Gustavo García

    Ion-pair formation to gas phase molecules induced by electron transfer has been studied by investigating the products of collisions between fast potassium atoms and target molecules using a crossed molecular-beam technique. The negative ions formed in such collisions are TOF mass analysed. As far as (bio)molecules are concerned, TOF mass spectra at different collision energies reveal interesting anionic patterns with reduced fragmentation at lower impact energies. In the unimolecular decomposition of the temporary negative ion (TNI), complex internal rearrangement may involve the cleavage and formation of new bonds. In this chapter we report some of the recent achievements in negative ion formation of some polyatomic molecules with the special attention to biological relevant targets.

  1. Exit charge state dependence of convoy electron production in heavy-ion solid collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Huelskoetter, H.P.; Burgdoerfer, J.; Sellin, I.A.

    1986-01-01

    The dependence of the yield of convoy electrons emitted near the forward direction in collisions involving fast ions and thin solid targets on the emergent projectile charge state is presented and described in terms of primary electron loss events in the solid. The data include a large array of projectiles, projectile energies and charge states, as well as targets ranging in thickness from the non-equilibrium well into the equilibrium thickness region. The description presented is consistent with other experimental and theoretical results indicating that the convoy electron production is closely linked to the ELC process observed in binary ion-atom collisions, with the dominant contribution to the convoy yield stemming from excited states of the projectiles. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Bound-free electron-positron pair production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şengül, M. Y.; Güçlü, M. C.; Fritzsche, S.

    2009-10-01

    The bound-free electron-positron pair production is considered for relativistic heavy ion collisions. In particular, cross sections are calculated for the pair production with the simultaneous capture of the electron into the 1s ground state of one of the ions and for energies that are relevant for the relativistic heavy ion collider and the large hadron colliders. In the framework of perturbation theory, we applied Monte Carlo integration techniques to compute the lowest-order Feynman diagrams amplitudes by using Darwin wave functions for the bound states of the electrons and Sommerfeld-Maue wave functions for the continuum states of the positrons. Calculations were performed especially for the collision of Au+Au at 100 GeV/nucleon and Pb+Pb at 3400 GeV/nucleon.

  3. Implementation of variable time step stochastic dynamics for electronically inelastic gas-surface collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Bruce C.; Swaminathan, P. K.; Murthy, C. S.; Redmon, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    A variable time step algorithm has been implemented for solving the stochastic equations of motion for gas-surface collisions. It has been tested for a simple model of electronically inelastic collisions with an insulator surface in which the phonon manifold acts as a heat bath and electronic states are localized. In addition to reproducing the accurate nuclear dynamics of the surface atoms, numerical calculations have shown the algorithm to yield accurate ensemble averages of physical observables such as electronic transition probabilities and total energy loss of the gas atom to the surface. This new algorithm offers a gain in efficieny of up to an order of magnitude compared to fixed time step integration.

  4. Excitation of hydrogen atoms in collisions with helium atoms: the role of electron–electron interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frémont, F.; Belyaev, A. K.

    2017-02-01

    Cross sections for producing H(nl) excited state atoms in H(1s) + He(1s2) collisions are calculated using the CTMC method, at impact energies ranging from 20 eV to 100 keV. The role of the electron correlation is studied. In the first step, the interactions between each pair of the three electrons are neglected. This leads to disagreement of the calculated total cross section for producing H(2l) atoms with previous experimental and theoretical results. In a second step, the electron–electron interaction is taken into account in a rigorous way, that is, in the form of the pure Coulomb potential. To make sure that the He target is stable before the collision, phenomenological potentials for the electron–helium-nucleus interactions that simulate the Heisenberg principle are included in addition to the Coulomb potential. The excitation cross section calculated in the frame of this model is in remarkable agreement with previous data in the range between 200 eV and 5 keV. At other energies, discrepancies are revealed, but only by a factor of less than 2 at high energies. The present results show the decisive role of the electron–electron interaction during collisions. In addition, they demonstrate the ability of classical mechanics to take into account the effects of the electron correlation.

  5. High Resolution Velocity Structure in Eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasyanos, M. E.; Gok, R.; Zor, E.; Walter, W. R.

    2004-12-01

    We investigate the crust and upper mantle structure of eastern Turkey where the Anatolian, Arabian and Eurasian Plates meet, forming a complex tectonic regime. The Bitlis suture is a continental collision zone between the Anatolian plateau and the Arabian plate. Broadband data available through the Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment (ETSE) provide a unique opportunity for studying the high resolution velocity structure of the region. Zor et al. (2003) found an average 46 km thick crust in the Anatolian plateau using a six-layered grid search inversion of the ETSE receiver functions. Receiver functions are sensitive to the velocity contrast of interfaces and the relative travel time of converted and reverberated waves between those interfaces. The interpretation of receiver functions alone, however, may result in an apparent depth-velocity trade-off [Ammon et al., 1990]. In order to improve upon this velocity model, we have combined the receiver functions with surface wave data using the joint inversion method of Julia et al. (2000). In this technique, the two sets of observations are combined into a single algebraic equation and each data set is weighted by an estimate of the uncertainty in the observations. The receiver functions are calculated using an iterative time-domain deconvolution technique. We also consider azimuthal changes in the receiver functions and have stacked them into different groups accordingly. We are improving our surface wave model by making Love and Rayleigh dispersion measurements at the ETSE stations and incorporating them into a regional group velocity model for periods between 10 and 100 seconds. Preliminary results indicate a strong trend in the long period group velocities toward the northeast, indicating slow upper mantle velocities in the area consistent with Pn, Sn and receiver function results. Starting models used for the joint inversions include both a 1-D model from a 12-ton dam shot recorded by ETSE [Gurbuz et al., 2004] and

  6. High Resolution Velocity Structure in Eastern Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M; Gok, R; Zor, E; Walter, W

    2004-09-03

    We investigate the crustal and upper mantle structure of eastern Turkey where the Anatolian, Arabian and Eurasian Plates meet and form a complex tectonic structure. The Bitlis suture is a continental collision zone between the Anatolian plateau and the Arabian plate. Broadband data available through the Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment (ETSE) provided a unique opportunity for studying the high resolution velocity structure. Zor et al. found an average 46 km thick crust in Anatolian plateau using six-layered grid search inversion of the ETSE receiver functions. Receiver functions are sensitive to the velocity contrast of interfaces and the relative travel time of converted and reverberated waves between those interfaces. The interpretation of receiver function alone with many-layered parameterization may result in an apparent depth-velocity tradeoff. In order to improve previous velocity model, we employed the joint inversion method with many layered parameterization of Julia et al. (2000) to the ETSE receiver functions. In this technique, the receiver function and surface-wave observations are combined into a single algebraic equation and each data set is weighted by an estimate of the uncertainty in the observations. We consider azimuthal changes of receiver functions and have stacked them into different groups. We calculated the receiver functions using iterative time-domain deconvolution technique and surface wave group velocity dispersion curves between 10-100 sec. We are making surface wave dispersion measurements at the ETSE stations and have incorporated them into a regional group velocity model. Preliminary results indicate a strong trend in the long period group velocity in the northeast. This indicates slow upper mantle velocities in the region consistent with Pn, Sn and receiver function results. We started with both the 1-D model that is obtained with the 12 tones dam explosion shot data recorded by ETSE network and the existing receiver function

  7. NOAA's Use of High-Resolution Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hund, Erik

    2007-01-01

    NOAA's use of high-resolution imagery consists of: a) Shoreline mapping and nautical chart revision; b) Coastal land cover mapping; c) Benthic habitat mapping; d) Disaster response; and e) Imagery collection and support for coastal programs.

  8. Long- and short-lived electrons with anomalously high collision rates in laser-ionized gases.

    PubMed

    Kampfrath, Tobias; Gericke, Dirk O; Perfetti, Luca; Tegeder, Petra; Wolf, Martin; Frischkorn, Christian

    2007-12-01

    Ultrashort broadband terahertz pulses are applied to probe the electron dynamics of gaseous Ar and O2 following ionization by an intense femtosecond laser pulse. The conductivity in the plasma center is extracted by a modified Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approach. It exhibits a nearly perfect Drude-like spectral shape and yields the temporal evolution of the free-electron density and collision rate. While the electron density in the Ar plasma remains nearly constant during the first 200ps after generation, it decays much faster in O2 due to dissociative recombination which is only possible in molecular plasmas. Adding a small amount of the electron scavenger SF6 to Ar reduces the electron lifetime in the plasma dramatically and allows us to determine the electron temperature to about 20,000K . Furthermore, anomalously high, metal-like electron collision rates of up to 25THz are found. Kinetic plasma theory substantially underestimates these rates pointing towards additional and more complex processes randomizing the total electronic momentum. Our results are relevant to both lightning control and generation of terahertz radiation by intense laser pulses in gases.

  9. Electron emission and energy loss in grazing collisions of protons with insulator surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gravielle, M. S.; Miraglia, J. E.; Aldazabal, I.; Aumayr, F.; Lederer, S.; Winter, H.

    2007-07-15

    Electron emission from LiF, KCl, and KI crystal surfaces during grazing collisions of swift protons is studied using a first-order distorted-wave formalism. Owing to the localized character of the electronic structure of these surfaces, we propose a model that allows us to describe the process as a sequence of atomic transitions from different target ions. Experimental results are presented for electron emission from LiF and KI and energy loss from KI surfaces. Calculations show reasonable agreement with these experimental data. The role played by the charge of the incident particle is also investigated.

  10. Complete data acquisition and analysis system for low-energy electron-molecule collision studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Pamir; Nandi, Dhananjay

    2015-09-01

    A complete data acquisition system has been developed that can work with any personal computer irrespective of the operating system installed on it. The software can be used in low and intermediate electron-energy collision studies with ground-state molecules in gas phase using a combination of RS-232, GPIB, and USB-interfaced devices. Various tabletop instruments and nuclear instrumentation module (NIM) -based electronics have been interfaced and have communicated with the software, which is based on LabVIEW. This is tested with dissociative electron attachment (DEA) and polar dissociation studies to oxygen molecule and successfully used in a DEA study of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide.

  11. Vlasov Simulation of the Effects of Collisions on the Damping of Electron Plasma Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Jeff; Berger, Richard; Chapman, Thomas; Brunner, Stephan; Tran, T.

    2015-11-01

    Kinetic simulation of two dimensional plasma waves through direct discretization of the Vlasov equation may be particularly attractive for situations where minimal numerical fluctuation levels are desired, such as when measuring growth rates of plasma wave instabilities. In many cases collisional effects can be important to the evolution of plasma waves because they both set a minimum damping rate for plasma waves and can scatter particles out of resonance through pitch angle scattering. Here we present Vlasov simulations of evolving electron plasma waves (EPWs) in plasmas of varying collisionality. We consider first the effects of electron-ion pitch angle collisions on the frequency and damping, Landau and collisional, of small-amplitude EPWs for a range of collision rates. In addition, the wave phase velocities are extracted from the simulation results and compared with theory. For this study we use the Eulerian-based kinetic code LOKI that evolves the Vlasov-Poisson system in 2+2-dimensional phase space. We then discuss extensions of the collision operator to include thermalization. Discretization of these collision operators using 4th order accurate conservative finite-differencing will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and funded by the LDRD program at LLNL under project tracking code 15-ERD-038.

  12. Electron removal from H0(n) in fast collisions with multiply charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. J.; Meyer, F. W.

    1982-09-01

    The cross sections for electron removal from highly excited (n=9-24) hydrogen atoms in fast collisions with multiply charged (q=1-5) N, O, and Ar ions were investigated in an ion-atom crossed-beams experiment. The ion-atom collisions occurred inside a deflector where a moderate electrostatic field of up to 1.8 kV/cm was applied. The range of collision velocity (vc) investigated is vc=1.0v1-2.0v1, where v1=2.2×108 cm/s is the Bohr velocity. The electron-removal cross section was found to be independent of ion species for a given q and vc, to increase as q2 for a given vc, and to decrease as v-2c for a given q. These q and vc dependences of the experimental cross section are in accord with classical Coulomb ionization theories. The experimental n dependence of the cross section differs significantly from the theoretically predicted dependence, but the difference can be accounted for if we assume the presence of the external electric field in the collision volume reduces the ionization energy.

  13. Recent measurements concerning uranium hexafluoride-electron collision processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, S.; Chutjian, A.; Srivastava, S.; Williams, W.; Cartwright, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    Scattering of electrons by UF6 molecules was studied at impact energies ranging from 5 to 100 eV and momentum transfer, elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections were determined. The measurements also yielded spectroscopic information which made possible to extend the optical absorption cross sections from 2000 angstroms to 435 angstroms. It was found that UF6 is a very strong absorber in the vacuum UV region. No transitions were found to lie below the onset of the optically detected 3.0 eV feature.

  14. Coincident excitation and radiative decay in electron-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubassa-Amundsen, D. H.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.

    2017-02-01

    The distorted-wave Born approximation formalism for the description of the (e ,e'γ ) reaction, in which emitted photons and scattered electrons are simultaneously detected, is outlined. Both the Coulomb and the magnetic scattering are fully taken into account. The influence of electron bremsstrahlung is estimated within the plane-wave Born approximation. Recoil effects are also discussed. The formalism is applied for the low-energy (e ,e'γ )92Zr reaction with excitation of the first collective (21+) and mixed-symmetry (22+) states. The corresponding transition charge and current densities are taken from a random-phase approximation (RPA) calculation within the quasiparticle phonon model. It is shown, by this example, in which way the magnetic subshell population of the excited state influences the angular distribution of the decay photon. For these quadrupole excitations the influence of magnetic scattering is only prominent at the backmost scattering angles, where a clear distinction of the photon pattern pertaining to the two states is predicted.

  15. Backscattered electron image of osmium-impregnated/macerated tissues as a novel technique for identifying the cis-face of the Golgi apparatus by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Koga, D; Bochimoto, H; Watanabe, T; Ushiki, T

    2016-07-01

    The osmium maceration method with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) enabled to demonstrate directly the three-dimensional (3D) structure of membranous cell organelles. However, the polarity of the Golgi apparatus (that is, the cis-trans axis) can hardly be determined by SEM alone, because there is no appropriate immunocytochemical method for specific labelling of its cis- or trans-faces. In the present study, we used the osmium impregnation method, which forms deposits of reduced osmium exclusively in the cis-Golgi elements, for preparation of specimens for SEM. The newly developed procedure combining osmium impregnation with subsequent osmium maceration specifically visualised the cis-elements of the Golgi apparatus, with osmium deposits that were clearly detected by backscattered electron-mode SEM. Prolonged osmication by osmium impregnation (2% OsO4 solution at 40°C for 40 h) and osmium maceration (0.1% OsO4 solution at 20°C for 24 h) did not significantly impair the 3D ultrastructure of the membranous cell organelles, including the Golgi apparatus. This novel preparation method enabled us to determine the polarity of the Golgi apparatus with enough information about the surrounding 3D ultrastructure by SEM, and will contribute to our understanding of the global organisation of the entire Golgi apparatus in various differentiated cells.

  16. Electron capture and single ionization in H+ + Ar collisions: classical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frémont, F.

    2016-03-01

    A classical model is used to study electron capture and single ionization (SI) following H+ + Ar collisions at projectile energies varying from 400 to 40 keV. In the present model, the Ar electrons are treated independently from each other, and only the 3s and 3p electrons are supposed to be captured by the projectile. In addition, a Coulombic potential with an effective charge Z eff = 6.75, derived from Slater rules, is used in the calculations to simulate the screening of the Ar nucleus due to the presence of the core and 2l electrons. Total cross sections for single electron capture and SI are calculated and compared with previous experiments and earlier calculations based on a semiclassical approach. The reasonable agreement we observed allows a preliminary study of double electron capture (DC). The total cross section for DC is found to be much larger than the experimental one. Possible reasons for this disagreement are discussed.

  17. Simultaneous collision induced dissociation of the charge reduced parent ion during electron capture dissociation.

    PubMed

    Bushey, Jared M; Baba, Takashi; Glish, Gary L

    2009-08-01

    A method of performing collision induced dissociation (CID) on the charge-reduced parent ion as it is formed during electron capture dissociation (ECD), called ECD+CID, is described. In ECD+CID, the charge-reduced parent ion is selectively activated using resonant excitation and collisions with the helium bath gas inside a linear quadrupole ion trap ECD device (ECD(LIT)). It has been observed that ECD+CID can improve the sequence coverage for beta-endorphin over performing ECD alone (i.e., from 72 to 97%). Perhaps just as important, ECD+CID can be used to reduce the extent of multiple electron capture events observed when performing ECD in the ECD(LIT). Consequently, the abundance of mass-to-charge ratios corresponding to ECD product ions that contain neutralized protons is decreased, simplifying the interpretation of the product ion spectrum.

  18. Propagation of terahertz electromagnetic waves in a magnetized plasma with inhomogeneous electron density and collision frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, LinJing; Guo, LiXin; Li, JiangTing

    2017-02-01

    This study theoretically analyzes the propagation properties of terahertz (THz) electromagnetic waves in a magnetized plasma that is inhomogeneous in both collision frequency and electron density. Three parabolic profiles are adopted to describe the inhomogeneity of these two parameters in the plasma slab. Numerical calculation results show that when a magnetic field is applied, an absorption valley appears near the middle of the absorption peak. The characteristics of the absorption spectra are affected by two factors: (1) the parameters in the plasma's first layer, which is the border between the air and the plasma and (2) the gradient of the parameters across the entire plasma. Specifically, a more substantial difference between the inhomogeneous plasma and the uniform plasma corresponds to a greater difference between the two absorption spectra. In addition, electron density, plasma thickness, and collision frequency also play important roles in the propagation.

  19. PHENIX Measurements of Single Electrons from Charm and Bottom Decays at Midrapidity in Au + Au Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlinchey, D.

    2016-12-01

    Heavy quarks are an ideal probe of the quark gluon plasma created in heavy ion collisions. They are produced in the initial hard scattering and therefore experience the full evolution of the medium. PHENIX has previously measured the modification of heavy quark production in Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV via electrons from semileptonic decays, which indicated substantial modifications of the parent hadron momentum distribution. The PHENIX barrel silicon vertex detector (VTX), installed in 2011, allows for the separation of electrons from charm and bottom hadron decays through the use of displaced vertex measurements. These proceedings present the results of the completed analysis of the 2011 data set using the VTX.

  20. A new semiclassical decoupling scheme for electronic transitions in molecular collisions - Application to vibrational-to-electronic energy transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H.-W.; Lam, K. S.; Devries, P. L.; George, T. F.

    1980-01-01

    A new semiclassical decoupling scheme (the trajectory-based decoupling scheme) is introduced in a computational study of vibrational-to-electronic energy transfer for a simple model system that simulates collinear atom-diatom collisions. The probability of energy transfer (P) is calculated quasiclassically using the new scheme as well as quantum mechanically as a function of the atomic electronic-energy separation (lambda), with overall good agreement between the two sets of results. Classical mechanics with the new decoupling scheme is found to be capable of predicting resonance behavior whereas an earlier decoupling scheme (the coordinate-based decoupling scheme) failed. Interference effects are not exhibited in P vs lambda results.

  1. Electron-ion collision-frequency for x-ray Thomson scattering in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Faussurier, Gérald Blancard, Christophe

    2016-01-15

    Two methods are presented to calculate the electron-ion collision-frequency in dense plasmas using an average-atom model. The first one is based on the Kubo-Greenwood approach. The second one uses the Born and Lenard-Balescu approximations. The two methods are used to calculate x-ray Thomson scattering spectra. Illustrations are shown for dense beryllium and aluminum plasmas. Comparisons with experiment are presented in the case of an x-ray Thomson scattering spectrum.

  2. Electron-ion collision-frequency for x-ray Thomson scattering in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faussurier, Gérald; Blancard, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Two methods are presented to calculate the electron-ion collision-frequency in dense plasmas using an average-atom model. The first one is based on the Kubo-Greenwood approach. The second one uses the Born and Lenard-Balescu approximations. The two methods are used to calculate x-ray Thomson scattering spectra. Illustrations are shown for dense beryllium and aluminum plasmas. Comparisons with experiment are presented in the case of an x-ray Thomson scattering spectrum.

  3. Report on the XXIV International Conference on Photonic, Electronic, and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivarola, Roberto D.

    2006-08-01

    The XXIV International Conference on Photonic, Electronic, and Atomic Collisions (XXIV ICPEAC) was held in Rosario, Argentina, on 20 26 July 2005, following ICPEAC in Santa Fe, USA, in 2001 and in Stockholm, Sweden, in 2003. This was the first ICPEAC in Latin America and the second one in the Southern Hemisphere, after ICPEAC in Brisbane, Australia, in 1991. The next ICPEAC (25th) will be held in Freiburg (Germany) in 2007.

  4. Report on the XXIII International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuch, Reinhold

    2004-01-01

    The XXIII International Conference on Photonic, Electronic, and Atomic Collisions (23rd ICPEAC) was held in Stockholm, Sweden, from July 23rd to 29th, 2003, following ICPEAC in Sendai, Japan in 1999 and in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA, in 2001. This was the first ICPEAC in Sweden and the second one in Scandinavia, after the 18th ICPEAC in Aarhus, Denmark in 1993. The next ICPEAC (24th) will be 2005 in Rosario, Argentina.

  5. On the continuous spectrum electromagnetic radiation in electron-fullerene collision

    SciTech Connect

    Amusia, M.Y.

    1995-08-01

    It is demonstrated that the electromagnetic radiation spectrum in electron-fullerene collisions is dominated by a huge maximum of multielectron nature, similar to that already predicted and observed in photoabsorption. Due to coherence, the intensity of this radiation is much stronger than the sum of the intensities of isolated atoms. Experimental detection of such radiation would be of great importance for understanding the mechanism of its formation and for investigating fullerene structures. A paper describing these results was published.

  6. Breit-Pauli oscillator strengths and electron excitation collision strengths for Si VIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    2012-05-01

    Aims: Oscillator strengths and electron impact excitation collision strengths for transitions between the 68 fine-structure levels of the 2s22p3, 2s2p4, 2p5, 2s22p23s, 2s22p23p, 2s22p23d and 2s2p33s configurations in Si VIII are calculated. Thermally averaged collision strengths are presented as a function of electron temperature for application to solar and other astrophysical plasmas. Methods: The collision strengths have been calculated using the B-splineBreit-Pauli R-matrixmethod for allowed and forbidden transitions in Si VIII. The relativistic effects have been incorporated through mass, Darwin and spin-orbit one-body operators in the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian in the scattering calculation, while in the calculation of oscillator strengths the one-body and two-body relativistic operators are included. Flexible non-orthogonal sets of spectroscopic and correlation radial functions are used to obtain accurate description of Si VIII levels and to represent the scattering functions. The 68 fine-structure levels of the 2s22p3, 2s2p4, 2p5, 2s22p23s, 2s22p23p, 2s22p23d and 2s2p33s configurations have been considered in both the radiative and scattering calculations. The present scattering calculations are more extensive than previous ones, leading to a total 2278 transitions between fine-structure levels. Results: The calculated excitation energies are in excellent agreement with experiment and represent an improvement over the previous calculations. The present collision strengths show reasonable agreement with the previously available R-matrix and distorted-wave calculations. The oscillator strengths for E1 transitions normally compare very well with previous calculations. The effective collision strengths are obtained by integrating total resonant and non-resonant collision strengths over a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies and these are presented over a wide temperature range from 104 to 4.0 × 106 K. Tables 1-4 are only available in electronic form at

  7. From high symmetry to high resolution in biological electron microscopy: a commentary on Crowther (1971) ‘Procedures for three-dimensional reconstruction of spherical viruses by Fourier synthesis from electron micrographs’

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Elucidation of the structure of biological macromolecules and larger assemblies has been essential to understanding the roles they play in living processes. Methods for three-dimensional structure determination of biological assemblies from images recorded in the electron microscope were therefore a key development. In his paper published in Philosophical Transactions B in 1971, Crowther described new computational procedures applied to the first three-dimensional reconstruction of an icosahedral virus from images of virus particles preserved in negative stain. The method for determining the relative orientation of randomly oriented particles and combining their images for reconstruction exploited the high symmetry of the virus particle. Computational methods for image analysis have since been extended to include biological assemblies without symmetry. Further experimental advances, combined with image analysis, have led to the method of cryomicroscopy, which is now used by structural biologists to study the structure and dynamics of biological machines and assemblies in atomic detail. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. PMID:25750240

  8. Electron impact collision strengths in Si IX, Si X, and Si XI

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Guiyun; Zhao Gang . E-mail: gzhao@bao.ac.cn; Zeng Jiaolong

    2007-05-15

    Electron impact collision strengths among 560 levels of Si IX, 320 levels of Si X, and 350 levels of Si XI have been calculated using the Flexible Atomic Code of Gu [M.F. Gu, Astrophys. J. 582 (2003) 1241]. Collision strengths {omega} at 10 scattered electron energies, namely 10, 50, 100, 200, 400, 600, 800, 1000, 1500, and 2000 eV, are reported. Assuming a Maxwellian energy distribution, effective collision strengths Y are obtained on a finer electron temperature grid of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0, and 6.0 MK, which covers the typical temperature range of astrophysical hot plasmas. Additionally, radiative rates A and weighted oscillator strengths gf are given for the more probable transitions among these levels. Comparisons of our results with available predictions reported in earlier literature are made and the accuracy of the data is assessed. Most transitions exhibit a good agreement, but large differences in gf appear for a few cases, which are due to the different configuration interactions included in different theoretical calculations. For excitations among levels of the ground and lower excited configurations, large discrepancies of Y may have resulted from the consideration of resonance effects in earlier works.

  9. Stationary electron velocity distribution function in crossed electric and magnetic fields with collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Shagayda, Andrey

    2012-08-15

    Analytical studies and numerical simulations show that the electron velocity distribution function in a Hall thruster discharge with crossed electric and magnetic fields is not Maxwellian. This is due to the fact that the mean free path between collisions is greater than both the Larmor radius and the characteristic dimensions of the discharge channel. However in numerical models of Hall thrusters, a hydrodynamic approach is often used to describe the electron dynamics, because discharge simulation in a fully kinetic approach requires large computing resources and is time consuming. A more accurate modeling of the electron flow in the hydrodynamic approximation requires taking into account the non-Maxwellian character of the distribution function and finding its moments, an approach that reflects the properties of electrons drifting in crossed electric and magnetic fields better than the commonly used Euler or Navier-Stokes approximations. In the present paper, an expression for the electron velocity distribution function in rarefied spatially homogeneous stationary plasma with crossed electric and magnetic fields and predominance of collisions with heavy particles is derived in the relaxation approximation. The main moments of the distribution function including longitudinal and transversal temperatures, the components of the viscous stress tensor, and of the heat flux vector are calculated. Distinctive features of the hydrodynamic description of electrons with a strongly non-equilibrium distribution function and the prospects for further development of the proposed approach for calculating the distribution function in spatially inhomogeneous plasma are discussed.

  10. High Resolution Coherent 3d Spectroscopy of Bromine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strangfeld, Benjamin R.; Wells, Thresa A.; House, Zuri R.; Chen, Peter C.

    2013-06-01

    The high resolution gas phase electronic spectrum of bromine is rather congested due to many overlapping vibrational and rotational transitions with similar transition frequencies, and also due to isotopomeric effects. Expansion into the second dimension will remove some of this congestion; however through the implementation of High Resolution Coherent 3D Spectroscopy, the density of peaks is further reduced by at least two orders of magnitude. This allows for the selective examination of a small number of spatially resolved multidimensional bands, separated by vibrational quantum number and by isotopomer, which facilitates the fitting of many rovibrational peaks in bromine. The ability to derive information about the molecular constants for the electronic states involved will be discussed.

  11. Single- and double-electron detachment from H- in collisions with He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Víkor, L.; Sarkadi, L.; Penent, F.; Báder, A.; Pálinkás, J.

    1996-09-01

    The single- and double-electron detachment processes have been studied for 85 keV H- on He collisions measuring the energy spectra of the electrons emitted in forward direction. In the spectrum belonging to the single-electron loss (SEL) the nonresonant part (cusp) has been resolved from the resonant part [lines from the (2s2p)1Po shape resonance of H-]. The ratio of the integrated yield of the double-electron loss (DEL) to that of SEL was found to be 0.36+/-0.02. The yield of the cusp in the SEL spectrum was found to be surprisingly small, only (70+/-20)% of the yield of the cusp in the DEL spectrum. The formation of the cusp in SEL is interpreted as a result of dipolar interaction between the electron and the outgoing H0 atom.

  12. Classical trajectory models for electronically nonadiabatic collision processes: A classical valence bond model for electronic degrees of freedom

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, William H.; Orel, Ann E.

    1981-06-01

    A classical interpretation of the Dirac–Van Vleck spin version of valence bond theory is used in this research to obtain a classical model for electronic degrees of freedom within the valence bond framework. The approach is illustrated by deriving the explicit forms of the classical Hamiltonians, involving electronic and heavy particle degrees of freedom, for the H–H2, F–H2, and O–H2 systems. It is also shown how the initial conditions for both electronic and heavy particle degrees of freedom are chosen to carry out a classical trajectory simulation of collision processes. In addition, the attractive feature of this model is that it is as easily applicable to electronically nonadiabatic processes as it is to adiabatic ones.

  13. Ionization Cross Sections and Dissociation Channels of DNA Bases by Electron Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Fletcher, Graham D.

    2004-01-01

    Free secondary electrons are the most abundant secondary species in ionizing radiation. Their role in DNA damage, both direct and indirect, is an active area of research. While indirect damage by free radicals, particularly by the hydroxyl radical generated by electron collision with water. is relatively well studied, damage by direct electron collision with DNA is less well understood. Only recently Boudaiffa et al. demonstrated that electrons at energies well below ionization thresholds can induce substantial yields of single- and double-strand breaks in DNA by a resonant, dissociative attachment process. This study attracted renewed interest in electron collisions with DNA, especially in the low energy region. At higher energies ionization becomes important. While Monte Carlo track simulations of radiation damage always include ionization, the probability of dissociative ionization, i.e., simultaneous ionization and dissociation, is ignored. Just like dissociative attachment, dissociative ionization may be an important contributor to double-strand breaks since the radicals and ions produced by dissociative ionization, located in the vicinity of the DNA coil, can readily interact with other parts of the DNA. Using the improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) formulation, we calculated the ionization cross sections of the four DNA bases, adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine, by electrons at energies from threshold to 1 KeV. The present calculation gives cross sections approximately 20% lower than the results by Bemhardt and Paretzke using the Deutsch-Mark and Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) formalisms. The difference is most likely due to the lack of a shielding term in the dipole potential used in the Deutsch-Mark and BEB formalisms. The dissociation channels of ionization for the bases are currently being studied.

  14. Forward electron production in heavy ion-atom and ion-solid collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, I.A.

    1984-01-01

    A sharp cusp in the velocity spectrum of electrons, ejected in ion-atom and ion-solid collisions, is observed when the ejected electron velocity vector v/sub e/ matches that of the emergent ion vector v/sub p/ in both speed and direction. In ion-atom collisions, the electrons originate from capture to low-lying, projectile-centered continuum states (ECC) for fast bare or nearly bare projectiles, and from loss to those low-lying continuum states (ELC) when loosely bound projectile electrons are available. Most investigators now agree that ECC cusps are strongly skewed toward lower velocities, and exhibit full widths half maxima roughly proportional to v/sub p/ (neglecting target-shell effects, which are sometimes strong). A close examination of recent ELC data shows that ELC cusps are instead nearly symmetric, with widths nearly independent on v/sub p/ in the velocity range 6 to 18 a.u., a result only recently predicted by theory. Convoy electron cusps produced in heavy ion-solid collisions at MeV/u energies exhibit approximately velocity-independent widths very similar to ELC cusp widths. While the shape of the convoy peaks is approximately independent of projectile Z, velocity, and of target material, it is found that the yields in polycrystalline targets exhibit a strong dependence on projectile Z and velocity. While attempts have been made to link convoy electron production to binary ECC or ELC processes, sometimes at the last layer, or alternatively to a solid-state wake-riding model, our measured dependences of cusp shape and yield on projectile charge state and energy are inconsistent with the predictions of available theories. 10 references, 8 figures, 1 table.

  15. R-MATRIX II Calculations for Electron Collisions with Ni II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Anil; Oelgoetz, Justin; Nahar, Sultana; Burke, V.; Burke, P.; Noble, C.

    2006-05-01

    The R-matrix II approach is especially designed to generate configuration-interaction expansions in a systematic manner, taking account of correlations due to one- two-, and three-electron excitations. The program package, PRMAT, is used to carry out heretofore the most elaborate electron scattering calculations for the astrophysically important ions Ni II and Fe II. Over 100 LS terms are included in the eigenfunction expansions, which yield good agreement with spectroscopically observed term energies. Large CI expansions are particularly important for accurate treatment of resonances that dominate the near-threshold behavior of collision strengths. Results are presented for a number transitions and compared with earlier works.

  16. Nonlinear dynamics of cold magnetized non-relativistic plasma in the presence of electron-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Biswajit; Sinha, Anjana; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar

    2015-09-15

    A numerical study is presented of the nonlinear dynamics of a magnetized, cold, non-relativistic plasma, in the presence of electron-ion collisions. The ions are considered to be immobile while the electrons move with non-relativistic velocities. The primary interest is to study the effects of the collision parameter, external magnetic field strength, and the initial electromagnetic polarization on the evolution of the plasma system.

  17. Influence of electron-neutral elastic collisions on the instability of an ion-contaminated cylindrical electron cloud: 2D3V PIC-with-MCC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2016-10-01

    This paper is a simulation based investigation of the effect of elastic collisions and effectively elastic-like excitation collisions between electrons and background neutrals on the dynamics of a cylindrically trapped electron cloud that also has an ion contaminant mixed in it. A cross section of the trapped non neutral cloud composed of electrons mixed uniformly with a fractional population of ions is loaded on a 2D PIC grid with the plasma in a state of unstable equilibrium due to differential rotation between the electron and the ion component. The electrons are also loaded with an axial velocity component, vz, that mimics their bouncing motion between the electrostatic end plugs of a Penning-Malmberg trap. This vz loading facilitates 3D elastic and excitation collisions of the electrons with background neutrals under a MCC scheme. In the present set of numerical experiments, the electrons do not ionize the neutrals. This helps in separating out only the effect of non-ionizing collisions of electrons on the dynamics of the cloud. Simulations reveal that these non-ionizing collisions indirectly influence the ensuing collisionless ion resonance instability of the contaminated electron cloud by a feedback process. The collisional relaxation reduces the average density of the electron cloud and thereby increases the fractional density of the ions mixed in it. The dynamically changing electron density and fractional density of ions feed back on the ongoing ion-resonance (two-stream) instability between the two components of the nonneutral cloud and produce deviations in the paths of progression of the instability that are uncorrelated at different background gas pressures. Effects of the collisions on the instability are evident from alteration in the growth rate and energetics of the instability caused by the presence of background neutrals as compared to a vacuum background. Further in order to understand if the non-ionizing collisions can independently be a cause

  18. Single and double electron capture in p-He and α-He collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaddar, S.; Halder, S.; Mondal, A.; Mandal, C. R.; Purkait, M.; Das, T. K.

    2017-03-01

    The differential and total cross sections for both single and double electron capture in collisions of {{{H}}}+ and He2+ with ground state helium atom have been studied by means of the four-body model of target continuum distorted wave (TCDW-4B) approximation in the energy range from 30 to 1000 keV amu–1. In this model, distortion in the final channel related to the Coulomb continuum states of the active electron(s) in the field of residual target ion are included. The calculations are based on the independent electron model. The present computed results are compared with the available experimental and other theoretical results. Total cross sections are found to be in good agreement with the measurements. We have also analysed differential cross sections (DCS) for both single and double electron capture in the collision of proton and α-particles with helium atoms at different projectile energies. The present DCS data exhibits the typical steeply decreasing dependence on the projectile scattering angles, but neither oscillating structures characteristic of interference effects nor peaks reminiscent of the Thomas peak are observed at different projectile energies. The obtained results for the DCS into the ground state are compared with the experimental data and overall a satisfactory agreement has been found. Finally we have also studied the variation of double to single capture differential cross-section ratios with projectile scattering angles at different impact energies.

  19. Electron capture in Ar++H2 collisions in the keV energy regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, M.; Chapman, S.; Lane, N. F.

    1986-03-01

    Electron capture in Ar+( 2P)+H2(X 1Σg) collisions in the keV energy regime has been studied theoretically. The molecular-orbital expansion method was used within a semiclassical formalism and an electron translation factor correction was incorporated to the first order in the magnitude of the relative velocity V. The molecular wave function and eigenenergy were obtained using the diatoms-in-molecules (DIM) method. We have examined the effect of the orientation of the target H2 molecule on the electron-capture mechanism within the sudden adiabatic approximation. Since π symmetry arising from the p orbital of the Ar+ ion is involved in this system, a strong influence on the probability of the molecular orientation was found in all energies studied. As the collision energy increases, the Π-symmetry state in the initial channel becomes more important through the rotational coupling to the electron-capture mechanism, while at lower energies the Σ-symmetry state in the initial channel is the dominant source for the electron capture through strong radial coupling. Agreement of the present theory with measurements is good, but marked disagreement is seen with the atomic-orbital calculation.

  20. Electron-impact excitation of Ni II. Collision strengths and effective collision strengths for low-lying fine-structure forbidden transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, C. M.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Scott, M. P.; Burke, P. G.

    2010-04-01

    Context. Considerable demand exists for electron excitation data for ion{Ni}{ii}, since lines from this abundant ion are observed in a wide variety of laboratory and astrophysical spectra. The accurate theoretical determination of these data can present a significant challenge however, due to complications arising from the presence of an open 3d-shell in the description of the target ion. Aims: In this work we present collision strengths and Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of ion{Ni}{ii}. Attention is concentrated on the 153 forbidden fine-structure transitions between the energetically lowest 18 levels of ion{Ni}{ii}. Effective collision strengths have been evaluated at 27 individual electron temperatures ranging from 30-100 000 K. To our knowledge this is the most extensive theoretical collisional study carried out on this ion to date. Methods: The parallel R-matrix package RMATRX II has recently been extended to allow for the inclusion of relativistic effects. This suite of codes has been utilised in the present work in conjunction with PSTGF to evaluate collision strengths and effective collision strengths for all of the low-lying forbidden fine-structure transitions. The following basis configurations were included in the target model - 3d9, 3d84s, 3d84p, 3d74s2 and 3d74s4p - giving rise to a sophisticated 295 jj-level, 1930 coupled channel scattering problem. Results: Comprehensive comparisons are made between the present collisional data and those obtained from earlier theoretical evaluations. While the effective collision strengths agree well for some transitions, significant discrepancies exist for others. Table 2 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/513/A55