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Sample records for high-resolution electron spectroscopy

  1. High Resolution Electron Spectroscopy with Time-of-Flight Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krässig, Bertold; Kanter, Elliot P.

    2015-05-01

    We have developed a parametrization based on ray-tracing calculations to convert electron time-of-flight (eTOF) to kinetic energy for the spectrometers of the LCLS-AMO end station at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. During the experiments the eTOF detector signals are recorded as digitized waveforms for every shot of the accelerator. With our parameterization we can analyze the waveforms on-line and convert detector hit times to kinetic energies. In this way we accumulate histograms with equally spaced bins in energy directly, rather than a posteriori converting an accumulated histogram of equally spaced flight times into a histogram of kinetic energies with unequal bin sizes. The parametrization is, of course, not a perfect replica of the ray tracing results, and the ray tracing is based on nominal dimensions, perfect alignment, detector response, and knowledge of time zero for the time-of-flight. In this presentation we will discuss causes, effects, and remedies for the observed deviations. We will present high-resolution results for the Ne KLL Auger spectrum that has been well studied and serves as a benchmark for our analysis algorithm. This work was supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, US Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  2. High Resolution Λ Hypernuclear Spectroscopy with Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogami, T.; Achenbach, P.; Ahmidouch, A.; Albayrak, I.; Androic, D.; Asaturyan, A.; Asaturyan, R.; Ates, O.; Baturin, P.; Badui, R.; Boeglin, W.; Bono, J.; Brash, E.; Carter, P.; Chen, C.; Chiba, A.; Christy, E.; Danagoulian, S.; De Leo, R.; Doi, D.; Elaasar, M.; Ent, R.; Fujii, Y.; Fujita, M.; Furic, M.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gan, L.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gasparian, A.; Hashimoto, O.; Horn, T.; Hu, B.; Hungerford, Ed. V.; Jones, M.; Kanda, H.; Kaneta, M.; Kato, S.; Kawai, M.; Kawama, D.; Khanal, H.; Kohl, M.; Liyanage, A.; Luo, W.; Maeda, K.; Margaryan, A.; Markowitz, P.; Maruta, T.; Matsumura, A.; Maxwell, V.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Nagao, S.; Nakamura, S. N.; Narayan, A.; Neville, C.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, M. I.; Nunez, A.; Nuruzzaman; Okayasu, Y.; Petkovic, T.; Pochodzalla, J.; Qiu, X.; Reinhold, J.; Rodriguez, V. M.; Samanta, C.; Sawatzky, B.; Seva, T.; Shichijo, A.; Tadevosyan, V.; Tang, L.; Taniya, N.; Tsukada, K.; Veilleux, M.; Vulcan, W.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Wood, S. A.; Yamamoto, T.; Ya, L.; Ye, Z.; Yokota, K.; Yuan, L.; Zhamkochyan, S.; Zhu, L.

    JLab E05-115 which is an experiment for Λ hypernuclear spectroscopy with electron beams was carried out at Jefferson Lab (JLab) in 2009. In the experiment, Λ 7He, Λ 9Li, Λ 10Be, Λ 12B and Λ 52V were measured by new magnetic spectrometer systems (SPL+HES+HKS) which were necessary for spectroscopy with high energy resolution of sub-MeV (FWHM). This is the first attempt to measure a Λ hypernucleus with up to medium-heavy mass region by the (e,e' K + ) reaction, overcoming high rate and high multiplicity conditions due to electromagnetic background particles. An overview of the hypernuclear experiments at JLab Hall-C and preliminary binding energy spectrum of Λ 10Be are shown.

  3. High-resolution α and electron spectroscopy of Cf24998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, I.; Greene, J. P.; Kondev, F. G.; Zhu, S.

    2015-04-01

    α -particle spectra of 249Cf have been measured with a double-focusing magnetic spectrometer and with passivated implanted planar silicon (PIPS) detectors. The conversion-electron spectra of 249Cf have been measured with a cooled Si(Li) detector and with a room-temperature PIPS detector. Precise energies of α groups in the decay of 249Cf have been measured with respect to the known energy of 250Cf. In addition, α -electron, α -γ , and γ -γ coincidence measurements were also performed to determine the spin-parity of the previously known 643.64-keV level. From electron intensities, conversion coefficients of transitions in the daughter 245Cm have been determined. The measured L3 conversion coefficients of the 333.4- and 388.2-keV transitions are found to be in agreement with the theoretical conversion coefficients for pure E 1 multipolarity. On the other hand, the K ,L1+L2 ,M , and N conversion coefficients are approximately twice the theoretical values for pure E 1 transitions. These measurements indicate anomalous E 1 conversion coefficients for the 333.4- and 388.2-keV transitions, as has been pointed out in earlier measurements. The measured conversion coefficient of the 255.5-keV transition gives an M 1 multipolarity for this transition which establishes a spin-parity of 7/2- and the 7/2-[743 ] single-particle assignment to the 643.64-keV level.

  4. {HIGH Resolution Electronic Spectroscopy of 2,6-DIAMINOPYRIDINE in the Gas PHASE}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Casey L.; Fleisher, Adam J.; Young, Justin W.; Thomas, Jessica A.; Pratt, David W.

    2009-06-01

    Ab initio calculations suggest that 2,6-diaminopyridine (26DAP) has several interesting low-frequency vibrations arising from motion of its amino groups. For this reason, 26DAP has been studied in the gas phase using both low resolution and high resolution electronic spectroscopy techniques. Presented here are the results of this study, which provide information about the structural and dynamical properties of 26DAP in both the ground and excited electronic states. The results will be discussed. footnote

  5. High Resolution Laboratory Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brünken, S.; Schlemmer, S.

    2016-05-01

    In this short review we will highlight some of the recent advancements in the field of high-resolution laboratory spectroscopy that meet the needs dictated by the advent of highly sensitive and broadband telescopes like ALMA and SOFIA. Among these is the development of broadband techniques for the study of complex organic molecules, like fast scanning conventional absorption spectroscopy based on multiplier chains, chirped pulse instrumentation, or the use of synchrotron facilities. Of similar importance is the extension of the accessible frequency range to THz frequencies, where many light hydrides have their ground state rotational transitions. Another key experimental challenge is the production of sufficiently high number densities of refractory and transient species in the laboratory, where discharges have proven to be efficient sources that can also be coupled to molecular jets. For ionic molecular species sensitive action spectroscopic schemes have recently been developed to overcome some of the limitations of conventional absorption spectroscopy. Throughout this review examples demonstrating the strong interplay between laboratory and observational studies will be given.

  6. High-Resolution Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (HREELS) Using a Monochromated TEM/STEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sai, Z. R.; Bradley, J. P.; Erni, R.; Browning, N.

    2005-01-01

    A 200 keV FEI TF20 XT monochromated (scanning) transmission electron microscope funded by NASA's SRLIDAP program is undergoing installation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Instrument specifications in STEM mode are Cs =1.0 mm, Cc =1.2 mm, image resolution =0.18 nm, and in TEM mode Cs =1.3 mm, Cc =1.3 mm, information limit =0.14 nm. Key features of the instrument are a voltage-stabilized high tension (HT) supply, a monochromator, a high-resolution electron energy-loss spectrometer/energy filter, a high-resolution annular darkfield detector, and a solid-state x-ray energy-dispersive spectrometer. The high-tension tank contains additional sections for 60Hz and high frequency filtering, resulting in an operating voltage of 200 kV plus or minus 0.005V, a greater than 10-fold improvement over earlier systems. The monochromator is a single Wien filter design. The energy filter is a Gatan model 866 Tridiem-ERS high resolution GIF spec d for less than or equal to 0.15 eV energy resolution with 29 pA of current in a 2 nm diameter probe. 0.13 eV has already been achieved during early installation. The x-ray detector (EDAX/Genesis 4000) has a take-off angle of 20 degrees, an active area of 30 square millimeters, and a solid angle of 0.3 steradians. The higher solid angle is possible because the objective pole-piece allows the detector to be positioned as close as 9.47 mm from the specimen. The voltage-stabilized HT supply, monochromator and GIF enable high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS) with energy resolution comparable to synchrotron XANES, but with approximately 100X better spatial resolution. The region between 0 and 100 eV is called the low-loss or valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) region where features due to collective plasma oscillations and single electron transitions of valence electrons are observed. Most of the low-loss VEELS features we are detecting are being observed for the first time in IDPs. A major focus of

  7. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy: A new probe of subgap absorption in amorphous solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lopinski, G.P.; Lannin, J.S.

    1996-10-01

    The use of high resolution electron energy spectroscopy (HREELS) as a new method for studies of subgap absorption in thin films of amorphous semiconductors is demonstrated. For a-Si films, the {alpha}({omega}) values extracted from the measured loss spectra are in quantitative agreement with previous optical measurements. The method is also applied to both threefold and diamond-like amorphous carbon films, yielding {alpha}({omega}) down to considerably lower energies ({approximately}50 meV) than previously reported. The HREELS method is shown to be complementary to existing techniques in that it can access the regime of low energies and ultrathin films which is difficult to investigate with the conventional methods. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Oxidation of diamond films by atomic oxygen: High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpilman, Z.; Gouzman, I.; Grossman, E.; Akhvlediani, R.; Hoffman, A.

    2007-12-01

    Diamond surface oxidation by atomic oxygen, annealing up to ˜700°C, and in situ exposure to thermally activated hydrogen were studied by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). After atomic oxygen (AO) exposure, HREELS revealed peaks associated with CHx groups, carbonyl, ether, and peroxide-type species and strong quenching of the diamond optical phonon and its overtones. Upon annealing of the oxidized surfaces, the diamond optical phonon overtones at 300 and 450meV emerge and carbonyl and peroxide species gradually desorb. The diamond surface was not completely regenerated after annealing to ˜700°C and in situ exposure to thermally activated hydrogen, probably due to the irreversible deterioration of the surface by AO.

  9. High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy with Simultaneous Energy and Momentum Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xuetao; Cao, Yanwei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Jia, Xun; Guo, Qinlin; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Linfan; Kesmodel, Larry; Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, Ward; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-03-01

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) has been demonstrated as a powerful technique to probe vibrational and electronic surface excitations of solids. The dispersion relation of the surface excitations, i.e. energy as a function of momentum, can be obtained via the angle resolved measurements by rotating the sample or the analyzer in a conventional HREELS measurement. The sampling density in the momentum space and the detecting efficiency are restricted by the mechanical rotation. Here we introduce a new design of the HREELS system, by combining the traditional Ibach-type electron source with the mainstream hemispherical electron energy analyzer, which could simultaneously measure the energy and momentum of the scattered electrons without any mechanical rotation. The new system possesses higher efficiency and sampling density of momentum-resolved measurements by at least one order of magnitude than conventional spectrometers without deteriorating the resolution of energy and momentum. Using Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ as an example, we show that an energy loss spectrum can be scanned throughout the first Brillouin zone and a momentum-dependent spectral intensity distribution could be obtained in one measurement.

  10. High resolution electron microscopy and spectroscopy of ferritin in thin window liquid cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Canhui; Qiao, Qiao; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Klie, Robert

    2014-03-01

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has seen a dramatic increase in interest in recent years with the commercial development of liquid and gas stages. High-resolution TEM characterization of samples in a liquid environment remains limited by radiation damage and loss of resolution due to the thick window-layers required by the in-situ stages. We introduce thin-window static-liquid cells that enable sample imaging with atomic resolution and electron energy-loss (EEL) spectroscopy with 1.3 nm resolution. Using this approach, atomic and electronic structures of biological samples such as ferritin is studied via in-situ transmission electron microscopy experiments. Ferritin in solution is encapsulated using the static liquid cells with reduced window thickness. The integrity of the thin window liquid cell is maintained by controlling the electron dose rate. Radiation damage of samples, such as liquid water and protein, is quantitatively studied to allow precision control of radiation damage level within the liquid cells. Biochemical reactions, such as valence change of the iron in a functioning ferritin, is observed and will be quantified. Relevant biochemical activity: the release and uptake of Fe atoms through the channels of ferritin protein shell is also imaged at atomic resolution. This work is funded by Michigan Technological University. The UIC JEOL JEM-ARM200CF is supported by an MRI-R2 grant from the National Science Foundation (Grant No. DMR-0959470).

  11. High-resolution spectroscopy of X-rays emitted from electron bombarded surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabłoński, Ł.; Banaś, D.; Jagodziński, P.; Kubala-Kukuś, A.; Sobota, D.; Pajek, M.

    2015-07-01

    The investigations of a compact 6-crystal Johann/Johansson diffraction X-ray spectrometer, covering a wide range (70 eV-15 keV) of photon energies, applied to observe the X-rays emitted from electron bombarded surfaces are discussed in terms of its focusing properties and achievable energy resolution. In the present study the X-ray spectra of Si-Kα1,2 and Al-Kα1,2 X-ray lines excited by 5 keV electron beam were measured using PET and TAP crystal, respectively, in the "out-of-focus" geometry which will be used to study the electron/ion surface interactions at the electron beam ion source (EBIS) facility. The measured X-ray spectra were interpreted in terms of the performed ray-tracing simulations which demonstrate the key features of the "out-of-focus" geometry. It was demonstrated that in this case the energy resolution in the range 1-3 eV for photon energy 1-2 keV can be achieved with an increased acceptance for the extension of X-ray source, of about 1 mm, which is important feature for practical applications. Additionally, a dependence of the X-ray intensity and energy resolution on slit opening was studied in details. The results are important for investigations of surfaces with electron and ion impact, in particular, for the future high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy experiments at the EBIS facility.

  12. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy with two-dimensional energy and momentum mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuetao; Cao, Yanwei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Jia, Xun; Guo, Qinlin; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Linfan; Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, E W; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-08-01

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful technique to probe vibrational and electronic excitations at surfaces. The dispersion relation of surface excitations, i.e., energy as a function of momentum, has in the past, been obtained by measuring the energy loss at a fixed angle (momentum) and then rotating sample, monochromator, or analyzer. Here, we introduce a new strategy for HREELS, utilizing a specially designed lens system with a double-cylindrical Ibach-type monochromator combined with a commercial VG Scienta hemispherical electron energy analyzer, which can simultaneously measure the energy and momentum of the scattered electrons. The new system possesses high angular resolution (<0.1°), detecting efficiency and sampling density. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated using Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(8+δ). The time required to obtain a complete dispersion spectrum is at least one order of magnitude shorter than conventional spectrometers, with improved momentum resolution and no loss in energy resolution. PMID:26329206

  13. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy with two-dimensional energy and momentum mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xuetao; Cao, Yanwei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Jia, Xun; Guo, Qinlin; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Linfan; Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, E. W.; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-08-01

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful technique to probe vibrational and electronic excitations at surfaces. The dispersion relation of surface excitations, i.e., energy as a function of momentum, has in the past, been obtained by measuring the energy loss at a fixed angle (momentum) and then rotating sample, monochromator, or analyzer. Here, we introduce a new strategy for HREELS, utilizing a specially designed lens system with a double-cylindrical Ibach-type monochromator combined with a commercial VG Scienta hemispherical electron energy analyzer, which can simultaneously measure the energy and momentum of the scattered electrons. The new system possesses high angular resolution (<0.1°), detecting efficiency and sampling density. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated using Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ. The time required to obtain a complete dispersion spectrum is at least one order of magnitude shorter than conventional spectrometers, with improved momentum resolution and no loss in energy resolution.

  14. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy with two-dimensional energy and momentum mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuetao; Cao, Yanwei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Jia, Xun; Guo, Qinlin; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Linfan; Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, E W; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-08-01

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful technique to probe vibrational and electronic excitations at surfaces. The dispersion relation of surface excitations, i.e., energy as a function of momentum, has in the past, been obtained by measuring the energy loss at a fixed angle (momentum) and then rotating sample, monochromator, or analyzer. Here, we introduce a new strategy for HREELS, utilizing a specially designed lens system with a double-cylindrical Ibach-type monochromator combined with a commercial VG Scienta hemispherical electron energy analyzer, which can simultaneously measure the energy and momentum of the scattered electrons. The new system possesses high angular resolution (<0.1°), detecting efficiency and sampling density. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated using Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(8+δ). The time required to obtain a complete dispersion spectrum is at least one order of magnitude shorter than conventional spectrometers, with improved momentum resolution and no loss in energy resolution.

  15. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy with two-dimensional energy and momentum mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xuetao; Cao, Yanwei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Jia, Xun; Guo, Qinlin; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Linfan; Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, E. W.; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-08-15

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful technique to probe vibrational and electronic excitations at surfaces. The dispersion relation of surface excitations, i.e., energy as a function of momentum, has in the past, been obtained by measuring the energy loss at a fixed angle (momentum) and then rotating sample, monochromator, or analyzer. Here, we introduce a new strategy for HREELS, utilizing a specially designed lens system with a double-cylindrical Ibach-type monochromator combined with a commercial VG Scienta hemispherical electron energy analyzer, which can simultaneously measure the energy and momentum of the scattered electrons. The new system possesses high angular resolution (<0.1°), detecting efficiency and sampling density. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated using Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ}. The time required to obtain a complete dispersion spectrum is at least one order of magnitude shorter than conventional spectrometers, with improved momentum resolution and no loss in energy resolution.

  16. Earle K. Plyler Prize Talk: Using High Resolution Electronic Spectroscopy to Probe Reactive Chemical Intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Terry

    2009-03-01

    Gas phase chemical reactions, such as occur in atmospheric chemistry, combustion, plasma processing, etc. are of great importance to our economy and society. These reactions are typically very complex involving up to 1000's of elementary steps with a corresponding number of reactive chemical intermediates. Spectrospic diagnostics, based upon well analyzed and well understood spectra of the intermediates, are crucial for monitoring such reactions and unraveling their mechanisms. These spectral analyses often benefit from the guidance provided by quantum chemical calculations and conversely the molecular parameters, experimentally determined from the spectra, serve as ``gold standards'' for benchmarking such calculations. Such standards are especially valuable for reactive intermediates whose electronic or geometric structure is particularly complex because of electron-spin interactions, Jahn-Teller effects or other vibronic interactions, hindered internal motions, large molecular size and weight, etc. The organic alkoxy, RO., and peroxy, RO2., (R=alkyl group) free radicals are excellent examples of such species. The talk will focus on our recent characterization of these radicals via their ``high-resolution,'' mostly rotationally resolved, electronic spectra utilizing the techniques of laser induced fluorescence, stimulated emission pumping, and cavity ringdown spectroscopy. Selected spectra, their analysis, and the molecular information resulting therefrom will be discussed.

  17. Development of an Apparatus for High-Resolution Auger Photoelectron Coincidence Spectroscopy (APECS) and Electron Ion Coincidence (EICO) Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakiuchi, Takuhiro; Hashimoto, Shogo; Fujita, Narihiko; Mase, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Okusawa, Makoto

    We have developed an electron electron ion coincidence (EEICO) apparatus for high-resolution Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy (APECS) and electron ion coincidence (EICO) spectroscopy. It consists of a coaxially symmetric mirror electron energy analyzer (ASMA), a miniature double-pass cylindrical mirror electron energy analyzer (DP-CMA), a miniature time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer (TOF-MS), a magnetic shield, an xyz stage, a tilt-adjustment mechanism, and a conflat flange with an outer diameter of 203 mm. A sample surface was irradiated by synchrotron radiation, and emitted electrons were energy-analyzed and detected by the ASMA and the DP-CMA, while desorbed ions were mass-analyzed and detected by the TOF-MS. The performance of the new EEICO analyzer was evaluated by measuring Si 2p photoelectron spectra of clean Si(001)-2×1 and Si(111)-7×7, and by measuring Si-L23VV-Si-2p Auger photoelectron coincidence spectra (Si-L23VV-Si-2p APECS) of clean Si(001)-2×1.

  18. Experimentally characterizing the electronic structures of f-electron systems using advanced high resolution Fourier transform microwave spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, Stephen, A

    2013-02-03

    We aim to (i) provide data that directly addresses the fundamental roles of actinide valence electrons in chemical bonding, and (ii) serve to provide prototypical data for the heavy element computational chemistry community. These goals will be achieved through the first pure rotational spectroscopic measurements on prototypical systems at ultra-high resolution. These systems encompass low oxidation state uranium and thorium compounds including, but not limited to, UX and ThX, X = F, Cl, Br, I, and UY and ThY, Y = O, S, and other simple U and Th-containing compounds. Our primary experimental tools involve time-domain rotational spectroscopy achieving line widths and resolutions of a few kHz.

  19. Magnetic dynamics studied by high-resolution electron spectroscopy and time-resolved electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Rajeswari

    Future information technology requires an increased magnetically encoded data density and novel electromagnetic modes of data transfer. While to date magnetic properties are observed and characterized mostly statically, the need emerges to monitor and capture their fast dynamics. In this talk, I will focus on the spin dynamics i.e. spin wave excitations and the dynamics of a new topological distribution of spins termed ``skyrmions''. Wave packets of spin waves offer the unique capability to transport a quantum bit, the spin, without the transport of charge or mass. Here, large wave-vector spin waves are of particular interest as they admit spin localization within a few nanometers. By using our recently developed electron energy loss spectrometer, we could study such spin waves in ultrathin films with an unprecedented energy resolution of 4 meV. By virtue of the finite penetration depth of low energy electrons, spin waves localized at interfaces between a substrate and a thin capping layer can be been studied yielding information about the exchange coupling between atoms at the interface. The quantization of spin waves with wave vectors perpendicular to the film gives rise to standing modes to which EELS has likewise access. Such studies when carried out as function of the film thickness again yield information on the layer dependence of the exchange coupling. Magnetic skyrmions are promising candidates as information carriers in logic or storage devices. Currently, little is known about the influence of disorder, defects, or external stimuli on the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the skyrmion lattice. In this talk, I will describe the dynamical role of disorder in a large and flat thin film of Cu2OSeO3, exhibiting a skyrmion phase in an insulating material. We image up to 70,000 skyrmions by means of cryo-Lorentz Transmission Electron Microscopy as a function of the applied magnetic field. In the skyrmion phase, dislocations are shown to cause the

  20. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Ferreira da Silva, F; Lange, E; Limão-Vieira, P; Jones, N C; Hoffmann, S V; Hubin-Franskin, M-J; Delwiche, J; Brunger, M J; Neves, R F C; Lopes, M C A; de Oliveira, E M; da Costa, R F; Varella, M T do N; Bettega, M H F; Blanco, F; García, G; Lima, M A P; Jones, D B

    2015-10-14

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5-10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range.

  1. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Lange, E.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J.; Brunger, M. J.; Neves, R. F. C.; Lopes, M. C. A.; de Oliveira, E. M.; da Costa, R. F.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Lima, M. A. P.; Jones, D. B.

    2015-10-01

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5-10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range.

  2. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Lange, E.; Limão-Vieira, P. E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J.; Brunger, M. J. E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au; and others

    2015-10-14

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5–10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range.

  3. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Ferreira da Silva, F; Lange, E; Limão-Vieira, P; Jones, N C; Hoffmann, S V; Hubin-Franskin, M-J; Delwiche, J; Brunger, M J; Neves, R F C; Lopes, M C A; de Oliveira, E M; da Costa, R F; Varella, M T do N; Bettega, M H F; Blanco, F; García, G; Lima, M A P; Jones, D B

    2015-10-14

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5-10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range. PMID:26472380

  4. High-resolution electron momentum spectroscopy of valence satellites of carbon disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chengwu; Shan, Xu; Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Enliang; Li, Zhongjun; Chen, XiangJun

    2010-09-01

    The binding energy spectrum of carbon disulphide (CS2) in the energy range of 9-23 eV has been measured by a high-resolution (e,2e) spectrometer employing asymmetric noncoplanar kinematics at an impact energy of 2500 eV plus the binding energy. Taking the advantage of the high energy resolution of 0.54 eV, four main peaks and five satellites in the outer-valence region are resolved. The assignments and pole strengths for these satellite states are achieved by comparing the experimental electron momentum profiles with the corresponding theoretical ones calculated using Hartree-Fock and density functional theory methods. The results are also compared in detail with the recent SAC-CI general-R calculations. General agreement is satisfactory, while the present experiment suggests cooperative contributions from Π2u, Σg+2 states to satellite 2 and Σg+2, Π2g states to satellite 3. Besides, relatively low pole strength for X Π2g state is obtained which contradicts all the theoretical calculations [2ph-TDA, ADC(3), SAC-CI general-R, ADC(4)] so far.

  5. THE APPLICATION OF HIGH RESOLUTION ELECTRON ENERGY LOSS SPECTROSCOPY TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF ADSORBED MOLECULES ON RHODIUM SINGLE CRYSTAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, L.H.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    The scattering of low energy electrons by metal surfaces has been studied for many years now. The electron's ease of generation and detection and high surface sensitivity (low penetration depth) make it an ideal probe for surface scientists. The impinging electron can interact with the surface in basically two ways: it can either elastically reflect (or diffract) from the surface without losing energy or lose a portion of it's incident energy and inelastically scatter. In this paper we will be concerned with only one of many possible inelastic scattering processes: the loss of the electron's energy to the vibrational modes of atoms and molecules chemisorbed on the surface. This technique is known as high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (or ELS, EELS, HRELS, HREELS, etc.).

  6. Recent Developments of an Opto-Electronic THz Spectrometer for High-Resolution Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hindle, Francis; Yang, Chun; Mouret, Gael; Cuisset, Arnaud; Bocquet, Robin; Lampin, Jean-François; Blary, Karine; Peytavit, Emilien; Akalin, Tahsin; Ducournau, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    A review is provided of sources and detectors that can be employed in the THz range before the description of an opto-electronic source of monochromatic THz radiation. The realized spectrometer has been applied to gas phase spectroscopy. Air-broadening coefficients of HCN are determined and the insensitivity of this technique to aerosols is demonstrated by the analysis of cigarette smoke. A multiple pass sample cell has been used to obtain a sensitivity improvement allowing transitions of the volatile organic compounds to be observed. A solution to the frequency metrology is presented and promises to yield accurate molecular line center measurements. PMID:22291552

  7. High-Resolution Hypernuclear Spectroscopy Electron Scattering at Jlab, Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    Franco Garibaldi

    2010-12-01

    Hypernuclear spectroscopy via electromagnetic induced reactions is a valuable and powerful way to study hypernuclei, hadronic systems with non-zero strangeness content, providing an alternative to the hadron induced reactions mainly studied so far. Electron-induced hypernuclear spectroscopy has been studied in Hall A at Jefferson Lab on three nuclei, 12C, 16O, and 9Be with unprecedented resolution and with an improved particle identification system, using a RICH detector, in order to unambiguously identify kaons, thus allowing the measurement of high-quality, almost background-free, hypernuclear spectra. Two superconducting septum magnets were added to the existing apparatus in order to permit particle detection at very forward angle providing a reasonable counting rate. These studies have provided the first quantitative information on, for instance, core-excited states in hypernuclei. In the case of oxygen, a waterfall target has been employed allowing for the simultaneous measurement of hypernuclear production on oxygen and of elementary kaon-Lambda electro-production on protons: a crucial measurement to disentangle the contribution of the elementary reaction from the measured hypernuclear production cross section, yielding direct access to the nucleus-hypernucleus transition structure. Final results for 12C and 16O as well as preliminary results on 9Be will be presented.

  8. High-resolution electronic spectroscopy of the doorway states to intramolecular charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Fleisher, Adam J; Bird, Ryan G; Zaleski, Daniel P; Pate, Brooks H; Pratt, David W

    2013-04-25

    Reported here are several of the ground, first, and second excited state structures and dipole moments of three benchmark intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) systems; 4-(1H-pyrrol-1-yl)benzonitrile (PBN), 4,4'-dimethylaminobenzonitrile (DMABN), and 4-(1-pyrrolidinyl)benzonitrile (PYRBN), isolated in the gas phase and probed by rotationally resolved spectroscopy in a molecular beam. The related molecules 1-phenylpyrrole (PP) and 4-aminobenzonitrile (ABN) also are discussed. We find that the S1 electronic state is of B symmetry in all five molecules. In PBN, a second excited state (S2) of A symmetry is found only ~400 cm(-1) above the presumed origin of the S1 state. The change in dipole moment upon excitation to the A state is measured to be Δμ ≈ 3.0 D, significantly smaller than the value predicted by theory and also smaller than that observed for the "anomalous" ICT band of PBN in solution. The B state dipole moments of DMABN and PYRBN are large, ~10.6 D, slightly larger than those attributed to "normal" LE fluorescence in solution. In addition, we find the unsaturated donor molecules (PP, PBN) to be twisted in their ground states and to become more planar upon excitation, even in the A state, whereas the saturated donor molecules (ABN, DMABN, PYRBN), initially planar, either remain planar or become more twisted in their excited states. It thus appears that the model that is appropriate for describing ICT in these systems depends on the geometry of the ground state.

  9. High-Resolution {alpha} and Electron Spectroscopy of {sup 249}{sub 98}Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Greene, J. P.; Kondev, F. G.; Zhu, S.

    2015-04-13

    alpha-particle spectra of Cf-249 have been measured with a double-focusing magnetic spectrometer and with passivated implanted planar silicon (PIPS) detectors. The conversion-electron spectra of Cf-249 have been measured with a cooled Si(Li) detector and with a room-temperature PIPS detector. Precise energies of a groups in the decay of Cf-249 have been measured with respect to the known energy of Cf-250. In addition, alpha-electron, alpha-gamma, and gamma-gamma coincidence measurements were also performed to determine the spin-parity of the previously known 643.64-keV level. From electron intensities, conversion coefficients of transitions in the daughter Cm-245 have been determined. The measured L-3 conversion coefficients of the 333.4- and 388.2-keV transitions are found to be in agreement with the theoretical conversion coefficients for pure E1 multipolarity. On the other hand, the K, L-1 + L-2, M, and N conversion coefficients are approximately twice the theoretical values for pure E1 transitions. These measurements indicate anomalous E1 conversion coefficients for the 333.4- and 388.2-keV transitions, as has been pointed out in earlier measurements. The measured conversion coefficient of the 255.5-keV transition gives an M1 multipolarity for this transition which establishes a spin-parity of 7/2(-) and the 7/2(-)[743] single-particle assignment to the 643.64-keV level.

  10. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, R.; Jones, A. N.; McDermott, L.; Marsden, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated 'D'peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of 'G' and 'D' in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure.

  11. High-resolution electron spectroscopy of lanthanide (Ce, Pr, and Nd) complexes of cyclooctatetraene: the role of 4f electrons.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sudesh; Roudjane, Mourad; Hewage, Dilrukshi; Liu, Yang; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2013-04-28

    Cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium complexes of 1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene (COT) complexes were produced in a laser-vaporization metal cluster source and studied by pulsed-field ionization zero electron kinetic energy spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The computations included the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, the coupled cluster method with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations, and the state-average complete active space self-consistent field method. The spectrum of each complex exhibits multiple band systems and is assigned to ionization of several low-energy electronic states of the neutral complex. This observation is different from previous studies of M(COT) (M = Sc, Y, La, and Gd), for which a single band system was observed. The presence of the multiple low-energy electronic states is caused by the splitting of the partially filled lanthanide 4f orbitals in the ligand field, and the number of the low-energy states increases rapidly with increasing number of the metal 4f electrons. On the other hand, the 4f electrons have a small effect on the geometries and vibrational frequencies of these lanthanide complexes.

  12. High-resolution electron spectroscopy of lanthanide (Ce, Pr, and Nd) complexes of cyclooctatetraene: The role of 4f electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kumari, Sudesh; Roudjane, Mourad; Hewage, Dilrukshi; Yang Dongsheng; Liu Yang

    2013-04-28

    Cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium complexes of 1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene (COT) complexes were produced in a laser-vaporization metal cluster source and studied by pulsed-field ionization zero electron kinetic energy spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The computations included the second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory, the coupled cluster method with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations, and the state-average complete active space self-consistent field method. The spectrum of each complex exhibits multiple band systems and is assigned to ionization of several low-energy electronic states of the neutral complex. This observation is different from previous studies of M(COT) (M = Sc, Y, La, and Gd), for which a single band system was observed. The presence of the multiple low-energy electronic states is caused by the splitting of the partially filled lanthanide 4f orbitals in the ligand field, and the number of the low-energy states increases rapidly with increasing number of the metal 4f electrons. On the other hand, the 4f electrons have a small effect on the geometries and vibrational frequencies of these lanthanide complexes.

  13. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy of clean and hydrogen covered Si(001) surfaces: first principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Patterson, C H

    2012-09-01

    Surface phonons, conductivities, and loss functions are calculated for reconstructed (2×1), p(2×2) and c(4×2) clean Si(001) surfaces, and (2×1) H and D covered Si(001) surfaces. Surface conductivities perpendicular to the surface are significantly smaller than conductivities parallel to the surface. The surface loss function is compared to high resolution electron energy loss measurements. There is good agreement between calculated loss functions and experiment for H and D covered surfaces. However, agreement between experimental data from different groups and between theory and experiment is poor for clean Si(001) surfaces. Formalisms for calculating electron energy loss spectra are reviewed and the mechanism of electron energy losses to surface vibrations is discussed.

  14. Experimental study of the (4)0- short-range electronic state of the 85Rb133Cs molecule by high resolution photoassociation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanting; Yuan, Jinpeng; Ji, Zhonghua; Li, Chuanliang; Li, Zhonghao; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2016-11-01

    We present the formation of ultracold 85Rb133Cs molecules in the (4)0- short-range electronic state and the measurement of the permanent electric dipole moment by high resolution photoassociation spectroscopy. With the rotationally resolved photoassociation spectra via resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization, spectral data have been extended to more vibrational levels compared to previous observations. Precise electric dipole moments are obtained by using the DC Stark effect of the photoassociation spectrum. These studies containing previously unobserved electronic states are important to understand the molecular structure and discover transition pathways for transferring ultracold atoms to deeply bound rovibrational levels of the electronic ground state.

  15. High Resolution Spectroscopy with Submillimeter-Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vinay; Dave, Hemant

    2003-03-01

    In order to explain the characteristic features of planetary atmosphere, detection and precise measurements of environmentally important gases such as CO, CIO, No becomes necessary. Since most of the polyatomic molecules have (ro-vibrational) transitions in submillimeter region 100 μ-1000μ), probing in this wavelength region is vital. The specific rotational and vibrational states are the result of interactions between different atoms in the molecule. Since each molecule has a unique arrangement of atoms, it has an exclusive submillimeter signature. We are developing a portable heterodyne receiver system at Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad to perform high-resolution spectroscopy in this wavelength region.

  16. Comparative Very-High-Resolution VUV Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. R.; Gibson, S. T.; Baldwin, K. G. H.; Dooley, P. M.; Waring, K.

    Despite their importance to the photochemistry of the terrestrial atmosphere, and many experimental studies, previous characterization of the Schumann-Runge (SR) bands of O2, B3 Σ u- <- X3 Σ_g^- (v, 0) (1750-2050 Å) has been limited by poor experimental resolution. In addition, our understanding of the SR spectrum is incomplete, many rovibrational transitions in the perturbed region of the spectrum [B(v > 15)] remaining unassigned. We review new very-high-resolution measurements of the O2 photoabsorption cross section in the SR bands. Tunable, narrow-bandwidth background vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) radiation for the measurements ( 7 × 105 resolving power) was generated by the two-photon-resonant difference-frequency four-wave mixing in Xe of excimer-pumped dye-laser radiation. With the aid of these cross-section measurements, rovibrational and line-shape analyses have led to new insights into the molecular structure and predissociation dynamics of O2. The current VUV laser-spectroscopic measurements are shown to compare favourably with results from two other very-high-resolution experimental techniques, namely laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and VUV Fourier-transform spectroscopy, the latter performed using a synchrotron source.

  17. High Resolution Laser Spectroscopy of Rhenium Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Allan G.; Hall, Ryan M.; Linton, Colan; Tokaryk, Dennis

    2014-06-01

    The first spectroscopic study of rhenium carbide, ReC, has been performed using both low and high resolution techniques to collect rotationally resolved electronic spectra from 420 to 500nm. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), and dispersed fluorescence (DF) techniques were employed. ReC was formed in our laser ablation molecular jet apparatus by ablating a rhenium target rod in the presence of 1% methane in helium. The low resolution spectrum identified four bands of an electronic system belonging to ReC, three of which have been studied so far. Extensive hyperfine structure composed of six hyperfine components was observed in the high resolution spectrum, as well as a clear distinction between the 187ReC and 185ReC isotopologues. The data seems consistent with a ^4Π - ^4Σ- transition, as was predicted before experimentation. Dispersed fluorescence spectra allowed us to determine the ground state vibrational frequency (ωe"=994.4 ± 0.3 wn), and to identify a low-lying electronically excited state at Te"=1118.4 ± 0.4 wn with a vibrational frequency of ωe"=984 ± 2 wn. Personal communication, F. Grein, University of New Brunswick

  18. High-resolution spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation for surface structure determination and the study of correlated electron systems

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J. Jr.

    1996-05-01

    The surface structure of three molecular adsorbate systems on transition metal surfaces, ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30{degrees} and (1.5 x 1.5)R18{degrees} CO adsorbed on Cu(111), and c(2x2) N2/Ni(100), have been determined using Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS). The adsorption site and bond lengths are reported for the adsorbate-metal bond and the first two substrate layers. The ARPEFS diffraction pattern of the shake-up peak for c(2x2) N2/Ni(100) is also discussed. A unique method of experimentally determining the angular momentum and intrinsic/extrinsic origin of core-level satellites is presented. We show for the first time that satellite peaks not associated with chemically differentiated atomic species display an ARPEFS intensity oscillation. Specifically, we present data for the C 1s from ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30 CO/Cu(111) and p2mg(2x1)CO/Ni(110), N is from c(2x2) N2/Ni(100), and Ni 3p from clean nickel(111). The satellite peaks in all cases exhibit ARPEFS curves which indicate an angular momentum identical to the main peak and are of an intrinsic nature. A Fourier Transform Soft X-ray spectrometer (FF-SX) has been designed and is under construction for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The spectrometer is designed for ultra-high resolution theoretical resolving power E/{Delta}E{approx}-10{sup 6} in the photon energy region of 60-120 eV. This instrument is expected to provide experimental results which sensitively test models of correlated electron processes in atomic and molecular physics. The design criteria and consequent technical challenges posed by the short wavelengths of x-rays and desired resolving power are discussed. The fundamental and practical aspects of soft x-ray interferometry are also explored.

  19. High-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy and photoelectron-diffraction studies of the geometric structure of adsorbates on single-crystal metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenblatt, D.H.

    1982-11-01

    Two techniques which have made important contributions to the understanding of surface phenomena are high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and photoelectron diffraction (PD). EELS is capable of directly measuring the vibrational modes of clean and adsorbate covered metal surfaces. In this work, the design, construction, and performance of a new EELS spectrometer are described. These results are discussed in terms of possible structures of the O-Cu(001) system. Recommendations for improvements in this EELS spectrometer and guidelines for future spectrometers are given. PD experiments provide accurate quantitative information about the geometry of atoms and molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. The technique has advantages when used to study disordered overlayers, molecular overlayers, multiple site systems, and adsorbates which are weak electron scatterers. Four experiments were carried out which exploit these advantages.

  20. Opto-mechano-electrical tripling in ZnO nanowires probed by photocurrent spectroscopy in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C.; Golberg, D. E-mail: golberg.dmitri@nims.go.jp; Xu, Z. E-mail: golberg.dmitri@nims.go.jp; Kvashnin, D. G.; Tang, D.-M.; Xue, Y. M.; Bando, Y.; Sorokin, P. B.

    2015-08-31

    Photocurrent spectroscopy of individual free-standing ZnO nanowires inside a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) is reported. By using specially designed optical in situ TEM system capable of scanning tunneling microscopy probing paired with light illumination, opto-mechano-electrical tripling phenomenon in ZnO nanowires is demonstrated. Splitting of photocurrent spectra at around 3.3 eV under in situ TEM bending of ZnO nanowires directly corresponds to nanowire deformation and appearance of expanded and compressed nanowire sides. Theoretical simulation of a bent ZnO nanowire has an excellent agreement with the experimental data. The splitting effect could be explained by a change in the valence band structure of ZnO nanowires due to a lattice strain. The strain-induced splitting provides important clues for future flexible piezo-phototronics.

  1. Computer synthesis of high resolution electron micrographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, R.

    1976-01-01

    Specimen damage, spherical aberration, low contrast and noisy sensors combine to prevent direct atomic viewing in a conventional electron microscope. The paper describes two methods for obtaining ultra-high resolution in biological specimens under the electron microscope. The first method assumes the physical limits of the electron objective lens and uses a series of dark field images of biological crystals to obtain direct information on the phases of the Fourier diffraction maxima; this information is used in an appropriate computer to synthesize a large aperture lens for a 1-A resolution. The second method assumes there is sufficient amplitude scatter from images recorded in focus which can be utilized with a sensitive densitometer and computer contrast stretching to yield fine structure image details. Cancer virus characterization is discussed as an illustrative example. Numerous photographs supplement the text.

  2. The extraction of gold nanoparticles from oat and wheat biomasses using sodium citrate and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, studied by x-ray absorption spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and UV-visible spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Armendariz, Veronica; Parsons, Jason G; Lopez, Martha L; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2009-03-11

    Gold (Au) nanoparticles can be produced through the interaction of Au(III) ions with oat and wheat biomasses. This paper describes a procedure to recover gold nanoparticles from oat and wheat biomasses using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide or sodium citrate. Extracts were analyzed using UV-visible spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The HRTEM data demonstrated that smaller nanoparticles are extracted first, followed by larger nanoparticles. In the fourth extraction, coating of chelating agents is visible on the extracted nanoparticles.

  3. The extraction of gold nanoparticles from oat and wheat biomasses using sodium citrate and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, studied by x-ray absorption spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and UV-visible spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armendariz, Veronica; Parsons, Jason G.; Lopez, Martha L.; Peralta-Videa, Jose R.; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L.

    2009-03-01

    Gold (Au) nanoparticles can be produced through the interaction of Au(III) ions with oat and wheat biomasses. This paper describes a procedure to recover gold nanoparticles from oat and wheat biomasses using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide or sodium citrate. Extracts were analyzed using UV-visible spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The HRTEM data demonstrated that smaller nanoparticles are extracted first, followed by larger nanoparticles. In the fourth extraction, coating of chelating agents is visible on the extracted nanoparticles.

  4. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2003-01-01

    Spectroscopic parameters (such as line position, intensity, broadening and shifting coefficients and their temperature dependences, line mixing coefficients etc.) for various molecular species of atmospheric interest are determined. In order to achieve these results, infrared spectra of several molecular bands are obtained using high-resolution recording instruments such as tunable diode laser spectrometer and Fourier transform spectrometers. Using sophisticated analysis routines (Multispectrum nonlinear least squares technique) these high-resolution infrared spectra are processed to determine the various spectral line parameters that are cited above. Spectra were taken using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak, Arizona as well as the Bruker FTS at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at Richland, Washington. Most of the spectra are acquired not only at room temperature, but also at several different cold temperatures. This procedure is necessary to study the variation of the spectral line parameters as a function of temperature in order to simulate the Earth's and other planetary atmospheric environments. Depending upon the strength or weakness of the various bands recorded and analyzed, the length(s) of the absorption cells in which the gas samples under study are kept varied from a few centimeters up to several meters and the sample temperatures varied from approximately +30 C to -63 C. Research on several infrared bands of various molecular species and their isotopomers are undertaken. Those studies are briefly described.

  5. Probing optical band gaps at the nanoscale in NiFe₂O₄ and CoFe₂O₄ epitaxial films by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dileep, K.; Loukya, B.; Datta, R.; Pachauri, N.; Gupta, A.

    2014-09-14

    Nanoscale optical band gap variations in epitaxial thin films of two different spinel ferrites, i.e., NiFe₂O₄ (NFO) and CoFe₂O₄ (CFO), have been investigated by spatially resolved high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy. Experimentally, both NFO and CFO show indirect/direct band gaps around 1.52 eV/2.74 and 2.3 eV, and 1.3 eV/2.31 eV, respectively, for the ideal inverse spinel configuration with considerable standard deviation in the band gap values for CFO due to various levels of deviation from the ideal inverse spinel structure. Direct probing of the regions in both the systems with tetrahedral A site cation vacancy, which is distinct from the ideal inverse spinel configuration, shows significantly smaller band gap values. The experimental results are supported by the density functional theory based modified Becke-Johnson exchange correlation potential calculated band gap values for the different cation configurations.

  6. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2006-01-01

    The major research activities performed during the cooperative agreement enhanced our spectroscopic knowledge of molecules of atmospheric interest such as H2O (water vapor), O3 (ozone), HCN (hydrogen cyanide), CH4 (methane), NO2 (nitrogen dioxide) and CO (carbon monoxide). The data required for the analyses were obtained from two different Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS); one of which is located at the National Solar Observatory (NSO) on Kitt Peak, Arizona and the other instrument is located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) at Richland, Washington. The data were analyzed using a modified multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting algorithm developed by Dr. D. Chris Benner of the College of William and Mary. The results from these studies made significant improvements in the line positons and intensities for these molecules. The measurements of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients and the temperature dependence of pressure broadening and pressure induced shift coefficients for hundreds of infrared transitions of HCN, CO3 CH4 and H2O were also performed during this period. Results from these studies have been used for retrievals of stratospheric gas concentration profiles from data collected by several Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) infrared instruments as well as in the analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra such as those acquired by space-based, ground-based, and various balloon- and aircraft-borne experiments. Our results made significant contributions in several updates of the HITRAN (HIgh resolution TRANsmission) spectral line parameters database. This database enjoys worldwide recognition in research involving diversified scientific fields. The research conducted during the period 2003-2006 has resulted in publications given in this paper. In addition to Journal publications, several oral and poster presentations were given at various Scientific conferences within the United States

  7. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C/sub 44/H/sub 90/ paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol. 53 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C44H90 paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol.

  9. High resolution scanning electron microscopy of plasmodesmata.

    PubMed

    Brecknock, Sarah; Dibbayawan, Teresa P; Vesk, Maret; Vesk, Peter A; Faulkner, Christine; Barton, Deborah A; Overall, Robyn L

    2011-10-01

    Symplastic transport occurs between neighbouring plant cells through functionally and structurally dynamic channels called plasmodesmata (PD). Relatively little is known about the composition of PD or the mechanisms that facilitate molecular transport into neighbouring cells. While transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides 2-dimensional information about the structural components of PD, 3-dimensional information is difficult to extract from ultrathin sections. This study has exploited high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) to reveal the 3-dimensional morphology of PD in the cell walls of algae, ferns and higher plants. Varied patterns of PD were observed in the walls, ranging from uniformly distributed individual PD to discrete clusters. Occasionally the thick walls of the giant alga Chara were fractured, revealing the surface morphology of PD within. External structures such as spokes, spirals and mesh were observed surrounding the PD. Enzymatic digestions of cell wall components indicate that cellulose or pectin either compose or stabilise the extracellular spokes. Occasionally, the PD were fractured open and desmotubule-like structures and other particles were observed in their central regions. Our observations add weight to the argument that Chara PD contain desmotubules and are morphologically similar to higher plant PD.

  10. High-resolution flurescence spectroscopy in immunoanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Grubor, Nenad M.

    2005-01-01

    The work presented in this dissertation combines highly sensitive and selective fluorescence line-narrowing spectroscopy (FLNS) detection with various modes of immunoanalytical techniques. It has been shown that FLNS is capable of directly probing molecules immunocomplexed with antibodies, eliminating analytical ambiguities that may arise from interferences that accompany traditional immunochemical techniques. Moreover, the utilization of highly cross-reactive antibodies for highly specific analyte determination has been demonstrated. Finally, they demonstrate the first example of the spectral resolution of diastereomeric analytes based on their interaction with a cross-reactive antibody.

  11. Experimental electronic structure and Fermi-surface instability of the correlated 3d sulphide BaVS3 : High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrovic, S.; Fazekas, P.; Søndergaard, C.; Ariosa, D.; Barišić, N.; Berger, H.; Cloëtta, D.; Forró, L.; Höchst, H.; Kupčić, I.; Pavuna, D.; Margaritondo, G.

    2007-04-01

    The correlated 3d sulphide BaVS3 exhibits an interesting coexistence of one-dimensional and three-dimensional properties. Our experiments determine the electronic band structure and shed light on this puzzle. High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements in a 4-eV -wide range below the Fermi energy level uncover and investigate the coexistence of a1g wide-band and eg narrow-band d electrons, which lead to the complicated electronic properties of this material. We explore the effects of strong correlations and the Fermi surface instability associated with the metal-insulator transition.

  12. Transformation of nanodiamond into carbon onions: A comparative study by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, small-angle x-ray scattering, and ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O.; Solonin, Yurii M.; Batchelder, David N.; Brydson, Rik

    2005-04-01

    The structural properties of both nanodiamond particles synthesized by detonation and the products of their transformation into carbon onions via vacuum annealing at 1000 and 1500°C have been studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), electron energy-loss spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD), small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), and Raman spectroscopy. The advantages of UV Raman spectroscopy over visible Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of these carbon nanomaterials are demonstrated. It was found that the synthesized nanodiamond particles have a composite core-shell structure comprising an ordered diamond core covered by a disordered (amorphous) outer shell formed by the mixed sp2/sp3 bonding of carbon atoms. The observed structure of the nanodiamond particles are comparable with the structure of the bucky diamond clusters comprising a diamond core and a reconstructed surface which stabilizes the cluster at the average diameter of ˜30Å, as predicted recently from theoretical studies. Assuming a spherical shape for the particles and employing a two-step boundary model of electron density distribution developed in this work to describe the SAXS patterns produced by the core-shell structure of the nanodiamond particles, it was evaluated that the average diameter of the core is ˜30Å and the average thickness of the shell is ˜8Å; values which are in agreement with results obtained from HRTEM and XRD measurements. A discrepancy between these results and average diamond crystallite size obtained from Raman spectra by applying the phonon confinement model (35-45Å ) is discussed. It is hypothesized from analysis of broadening of the XRD diamond peaks that at the nanoscale under influence of the particle shape, which is not strictly of a cubic (or spherical) symmetry, a slight hexagonal distortion of the cubic diamond structure appears in the nanodiamond particles. The transformation of the nanodiamond into carbon onions proceeds from

  13. Electronic state spectroscopy by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption, He(I) photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations of ethyl acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śmialek, Malgorzata A.; Łabuda, Marta; Guthmuller, Julien; Hubin-Franskin, Marie-Jeanne; Delwiche, Jacques; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Jones, Nykola C.; Mason, Nigel J.; Limão-Vieira, Paulo

    2016-06-01

    The high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption spectrum of ethyl acetate, C4H8O2, is presented over the energy range 4.5-10.7 eV (275.5-116.0 nm). Valence and Rydberg transitions and their associated vibronic series observed in the photoabsorption spectrum, have been assigned in accordance with new ab initio calculations of the vertical excitation energies and oscillator strengths. Also, the photoabsorption cross sections have been used to calculate the photolysis lifetime of this ester in the upper stratosphere (20-50 km). Calculations have also been carried out to determine the ionisation energies and fine structure of the lowest ionic state of ethyl acetate and are compared with a newly recorded photoelectron spectrum (from 9.5 to 16.7 eV). Vibrational structure is observed in the first photoelectron band of this molecule for the first time.

  14. Component analyses of urinary nanocrystallites of uric acid stone formers by combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, fast Fourier transformation, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin-Yuan; Xue, Jun-Fa; Xia, Zhi-Yue; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to analyse the components of nanocrystallites in urines of patients with uric acid (UA) stones. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), fast Fourier transformation (FFT) of HRTEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were performed to analyse the components of these nanocrystallites. XRD and FFT showed that the main component of urinary nanocrystallites was UA, which contains a small amount of calcium oxalate monohydrate and phosphates. EDS showed the characteristic absorption peaks of C, O, Ca and P. The formation of UA stones was closely related to a large number of UA nanocrystallites in urine. A combination of HRTEM, FFT, EDS and XRD analyses could be performed accurately to analyse the components of urinary nanocrystallites.

  15. The determination of potential energy curve and dipole moment of the (5)0+ electronic state of 85Rb133Cs molecule by high resolution photoassociation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jinpeng; Zhao, Yanting; Ji, Zhonghua; Li, Zhonghao; Kim, Jin-Tae; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2015-12-01

    We present the formation of ultracold 85Rb133Cs molecules in the (5)0+ electronic state by photoassociation and their detection via resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization. Up to v = 47 vibrational levels including the lowest v = 0 vibrational and lowest J = 0 levels are identified with rotationally resolved high resolution photoassociation spectra. Precise Dunham coefficients are determined for the (5)0+ state with high accuracy, then the Rydberg-Klein-Rees potential energy curve is derived. The electric dipole moments with respect to the vibrational numbers of the (5)0+ electronic state of 85Rb133Cs molecule are also measured in the range between 1.9 and 4.8 D. These comprehensive studies on previously unobserved rovibrational levels of the (5)0+ state are helpful to understand the molecular structure and discover suitable transition pathways for transferring ultracold atoms to deeply bound rovibrational levels of the electronic ground state.

  16. High-resolution tunnelling spectroscopy of a graphene quartet.

    PubMed

    Song, Young Jae; Otte, Alexander F; Kuk, Young; Hu, Yike; Torrance, David B; First, Phillip N; de Heer, Walt A; Min, Hongki; Adam, Shaffique; Stiles, Mark D; MacDonald, Allan H; Stroscio, Joseph A

    2010-09-01

    Electrons in a single sheet of graphene behave quite differently from those in traditional two-dimensional electron systems. Like massless relativistic particles, they have linear dispersion and chiral eigenstates. Furthermore, two sets of electrons centred at different points in reciprocal space ('valleys') have this dispersion, giving rise to valley degeneracy. The symmetry between valleys, together with spin symmetry, leads to a fourfold quartet degeneracy of the Landau levels, observed as peaks in the density of states produced by an applied magnetic field. Recent electron transport measurements have observed the lifting of the fourfold degeneracy in very large applied magnetic fields, separating the quartet into integer and, more recently, fractional levels. The exact nature of the broken-symmetry states that form within the Landau levels and lift these degeneracies is unclear at present and is a topic of intense theoretical debate. Here we study the detailed features of the four quantum states that make up a degenerate graphene Landau level. We use high-resolution scanning tunnelling spectroscopy at temperatures as low as 10 mK in an applied magnetic field to study the top layer of multilayer epitaxial graphene. When the Fermi level lies inside the fourfold Landau manifold, significant electron correlation effects result in an enhanced valley splitting for even filling factors, and an enhanced electron spin splitting for odd filling factors. Most unexpectedly, we observe states with Landau level filling factors of 7/2, 9/2 and 11/2, suggestive of new many-body states in graphene.

  17. Electronic excitation of carbonyl sulphide (COS) by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption and electron-impact spectroscopy in the energy region from 4 to 11 eV.

    PubMed

    Limão-Vieira, P; Ferreira da Silva, F; Almeida, D; Hoshino, M; Tanaka, H; Mogi, D; Tanioka, T; Mason, N J; Hoffmann, S V; Hubin-Franskin, M-J; Delwiche, J

    2015-02-14

    The electronic state spectroscopy of carbonyl sulphide, COS, has been investigated using high resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy in the energy range of 4.0-10.8 eV. The spectrum reveals several new features not previously reported in the literature. Vibronic structure has been observed, notably in the low energy absorption dipole forbidden band assigned to the (4π←3π) ((1)Δ←(1)Σ(+)) transition, with a new weak transition assigned to ((1)Σ(-)←(1)Σ(+)) reported here for the first time. The absolute optical oscillator strengths are determined for ground state to (1)Σ(+) and (1)Π transitions. Based on our recent measurements of differential cross sections for the optically allowed ((1)Σ(+) and (1)Π) transitions of COS by electron impact, the optical oscillator strength f0 value and integral cross sections (ICSs) are derived by applying a generalized oscillator strength analysis. Subsequently, ICSs predicted by the scaling are confirmed down to 60 eV in the intermediate energy region. The measured absolute photoabsorption cross sections have been used to calculate the photolysis lifetime of carbonyl sulphide in the upper stratosphere (20-50 km).

  18. Electronic excitation of carbonyl sulphide (COS) by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption and electron-impact spectroscopy in the energy region from 4 to 11 eV.

    PubMed

    Limão-Vieira, P; Ferreira da Silva, F; Almeida, D; Hoshino, M; Tanaka, H; Mogi, D; Tanioka, T; Mason, N J; Hoffmann, S V; Hubin-Franskin, M-J; Delwiche, J

    2015-02-14

    The electronic state spectroscopy of carbonyl sulphide, COS, has been investigated using high resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy in the energy range of 4.0-10.8 eV. The spectrum reveals several new features not previously reported in the literature. Vibronic structure has been observed, notably in the low energy absorption dipole forbidden band assigned to the (4π←3π) ((1)Δ←(1)Σ(+)) transition, with a new weak transition assigned to ((1)Σ(-)←(1)Σ(+)) reported here for the first time. The absolute optical oscillator strengths are determined for ground state to (1)Σ(+) and (1)Π transitions. Based on our recent measurements of differential cross sections for the optically allowed ((1)Σ(+) and (1)Π) transitions of COS by electron impact, the optical oscillator strength f0 value and integral cross sections (ICSs) are derived by applying a generalized oscillator strength analysis. Subsequently, ICSs predicted by the scaling are confirmed down to 60 eV in the intermediate energy region. The measured absolute photoabsorption cross sections have been used to calculate the photolysis lifetime of carbonyl sulphide in the upper stratosphere (20-50 km). PMID:25681902

  19. Electronic excitation of carbonyl sulphide (COS) by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption and electron-impact spectroscopy in the energy region from 4 to 11 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Limão-Vieira, P.; Ferreira da Silva, F.; Almeida, D.; Hoshino, M.; Tanaka, H.; Mogi, D.; Tanioka, T.; Mason, N. J.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J.

    2015-02-14

    The electronic state spectroscopy of carbonyl sulphide, COS, has been investigated using high resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy in the energy range of 4.0–10.8 eV. The spectrum reveals several new features not previously reported in the literature. Vibronic structure has been observed, notably in the low energy absorption dipole forbidden band assigned to the (4π←3π) ({sup 1}Δ←{sup 1}Σ{sup +}) transition, with a new weak transition assigned to ({sup 1}Σ{sup −}←{sup 1}Σ{sup +}) reported here for the first time. The absolute optical oscillator strengths are determined for ground state to {sup 1}Σ{sup +} and {sup 1}Π transitions. Based on our recent measurements of differential cross sections for the optically allowed ({sup 1}Σ{sup +} and {sup 1}Π) transitions of COS by electron impact, the optical oscillator strength f{sub 0} value and integral cross sections (ICSs) are derived by applying a generalized oscillator strength analysis. Subsequently, ICSs predicted by the scaling are confirmed down to 60 eV in the intermediate energy region. The measured absolute photoabsorption cross sections have been used to calculate the photolysis lifetime of carbonyl sulphide in the upper stratosphere (20–50 km)

  20. Improvement of sensitivity in high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, H.; Nakajima, K.; Suzuki, M.; Kimura, K.; Sasakawa, K.

    2011-06-15

    The sensitivity (limit of detection) of high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (HRBS) is mainly determined by the background noise of the spectrometer. There are two major origins of the background noise in HRBS, one is the stray ions scattered from the inner wall of the vacuum chamber of the spectrometer and the other is the dark noise of the microchannel plate (MCP) detector which is commonly used as a focal plane detector of the spectrometer in HRBS. In order to reject the stray ions, several barriers are installed inside the spectrometer and a thin Mylar foil is mounted in front of the detector. The dark noise of the MCP detector is rejected by the coincidence measurement with the secondary electrons emitted from the Mylar foil upon the ion passage. After these improvements, the background noise is reduced by a factor of 200 at a maximum. The detection limit can be improved down to 10 ppm for As in Si at a measurement time of 1 h under ideal conditions.

  1. Evidence for anisotropic dielectric properties of monoclinic hafnia using valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and ab initio time-dependent density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Guedj, C.; Hung, L.; Sottile, F.; Zobelli, A.; Blaise, P.; Olevano, V.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of nanocrystal orientation on the energy loss spectra of monoclinic hafnia (m-HfO{sub 2}) is measured by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and valence energy loss spectroscopy (VEELS) on high quality samples. For the same momentum-transfer directions, the dielectric properties are also calculated ab initio by time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT). Experiments and simulations evidence anisotropy in the dielectric properties of m-HfO{sub 2}, most notably with the direction-dependent oscillator strength of the main bulk plasmon. The anisotropic nature of m-HfO{sub 2} may contribute to the differences among VEELS spectra reported in literature. The good agreement between the complex dielectric permittivity extracted from VEELS with nanometer spatial resolution, TDDFT modeling, and past literature demonstrates that the present HRTEM-VEELS device-oriented methodology is a possible solution to the difficult nanocharacterization challenges given in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors.

  2. A quantitative study of Langmuir-Blodgett model systems by high resolution electron energy loss vibrational spectroscopy. Spectral analysis and information depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitzsacker, Cara L.; Gardella, Joseph A., Jr.; Gregoire, Chantal; Pireaux, Jean-Jacques

    1995-03-01

    Langmuir Blodgett monolayers of a series of anthroyl substituted alkanoic (fatty) acid derivatives are used as model systems to study the interaction of low energy electrons with organic polymers in high resolution electron energy loss spectrometry. The variation of structure in the series effectively places the anthroyl functionality at various depths from the monolayer vacuum surface. The HREELS analysis of these systems provides a means to probe the depth dependence of vibrational energy losses. Maximum likelihood spectral restoration was used to establish more precise and energies resulting from energy loss, with comparison to infrared and Raman spectroscopic results from the compounds. These band energies were then used as initial values for curve fitting of the original data. The results of curve resolution aided in the estimation of the relative intensity of vibrational bands specific to the functional groups in the anthroyl sidechain and the aliphatic hydrocarbon backbone of the molecules in the films. By comparing vibrational intensities normalized to the elastic peak, it is shown that bands due to CH vibrations from saturated aliphatic structures are more surface sensitive than those due to aromatic structures. The comparison of the series of samples shows how the signals from aromatic structures decrease relative to aliphatic over a range of 15 A from the vacuum surface.

  3. Phase contrast in high resolution electron microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Rose, H.H.

    1975-09-23

    This patent relates to a device for developing a phase contrast signal for a scanning transmission electron microscope. The lens system of the microscope is operated in a condition of defocus so that predictable alternate concentric regions of high and low electron density exist in the cone of illumination. Two phase detectors are placed beneath the object inside the cone of illumination, with the first detector having the form of a zone plate, each of its rings covering alternate regions of either higher or lower electron density. The second detector is so configured that it covers the regions of electron density not covered by the first detector. Each detector measures the number of electrons incident thereon and the signal developed by the first detector is subtracted from the signal developed by the record detector to provide a phase contrast signal. (auth)

  4. High resolution electronic spectroscopy of the A {sup 2}Σ{sup −} − X {sup 2}Π{sub 1/2} transition of PtN

    SciTech Connect

    Womack, Kaitlin; O’Brien, Leah C.; Whittemore, Sean; O’Brien, James J.; Le, Anh; Steimle, Timothy C.

    2014-08-28

    The (2,0) vibrational band of the A {sup 2}Σ{sup −} − X {sup 2}Π{sub 1/2} transition of platinum nitride, PtN, was recorded at Doppler-limited resolution using intracavity laser absorption spectroscopy (ILS) and at sub-Doppler resolution using molecular beam laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy. Isotopologue structure for {sup 194}PtN, {sup 195}PtN, and {sup 196}PtN, magnetic hyperfine splitting due to {sup 195}Pt (I = ½), and nuclear quadrupole splitting due to {sup 14}N (I = 1) were observed in the spectrum. Molecular constants for the ground and excited states are derived. The hyperfine interactions are used to illuminate the nature of the A {sup 2}Σ{sup −} excited electronic state.

  5. High resolution electron attachment to CO₂ clusters.

    PubMed

    Denifl, Stephan; Vizcaino, Violaine; Märk, Tilmann D; Illenberger, Eugen; Scheier, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Electron attachment to CO₂ clusters performed at high energy resolution (0.1 eV) is studied for the first time in the extended electron energy range from threshold (0 eV) to about 10 eV. Dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to single molecules yields O(-) as the only fragment ion arising from the well known (2)Π(u) shape resonance (ion yield centered at 4.4 eV) and a core excited resonance (at 8.2 eV). On proceeding to CO₂ clusters, non-dissociated complexes of the form (CO₂)(n)(-) including the monomer CO₂(-) are generated as well as solvated fragment ions of the form (CO₂)(n)O(-). The non-decomposed complexes appear already within a resonant feature near threshold (0 eV) and also within a broad contribution between 1 and 4 eV which is composed of two resonances observed for example for (CO₂)(4)(-) at 2.2 eV and 3.1 eV (peak maxima). While the complexes observed around 3.1 eV are generated via the (2)Π(u) resonance as precursor with subsequent intracluster relaxation, the contribution around 2.2 eV can be associated with a resonant scattering feature, recently discovered in single CO₂ in the selective excitation of the higher energy member of the well known Fermi dyad [M. Allan, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2001, 87, 0332012]. Formation of (CO₂)(n)(-) in the threshold region involves vibrational Feshbach resonances (VFRs) as previously discovered via an ultrahigh resolution (1 meV) laser photoelectron attachment method [E. Leber, S. Barsotti, I. I. Fabrikant, J. M. Weber, M.-W. Ruf and H. Hotop, Eur. Phys. J. D, 2000, 12, 125]. The complexes (CO₂)(n)O(-) clearly arise from DEA at an individual molecule within the cluster involving both the (2)Π(u) and the core excited resonance. PMID:21491691

  6. A high-resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometer for planetary spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Sinton, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    The employment of a high-resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) is described for planetary and other astronomical spectroscopy in conjunction with the 88-inch telescope at Mauna Kea Observatory. The FTS system is designed for a broad range of uses, including double-beam laboratory spectroscopy, infrared gas chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The data system is well-suited to astronomical applications because of its great speed in acquiring and transforming data, and because of the enormous storage capability of the magnetic tape unit supplied with the system. The basic instrument is outlined 2nd some of the initial results from the first attempted use on the Mauna Kea 88-inch telescope are reported.

  7. High resolution ultrasonic spectroscopy system for nondestructive evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. H.

    1991-01-01

    With increased demand for high resolution ultrasonic evaluation, computer based systems or work stations become essential. The ultrasonic spectroscopy method of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) was used to develop a high resolution ultrasonic inspection system supported by modern signal processing, pattern recognition, and neural network technologies. The basic system which was completed consists of a 386/20 MHz PC (IBM AT compatible), a pulser/receiver, a digital oscilloscope with serial and parallel communications to the computer, an immersion tank with motor control of X-Y axis movement, and the supporting software package, IUNDE, for interactive ultrasonic evaluation. Although the hardware components are commercially available, the software development is entirely original. By integrating signal processing, pattern recognition, maximum entropy spectral analysis, and artificial neural network functions into the system, many NDE tasks can be performed. The high resolution graphics capability provides visualization of complex NDE problems. The phase 3 efforts involve intensive marketing of the software package and collaborative work with industrial sectors.

  8. High Resolution Spectroscopy of the Quantum Hall Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dial, Oliver

    2008-03-01

    We present precise and unprecedentedly high resolution spectra of the tunneling density of states (TDOS) of a cold two dimensional electron system (2DES) in GaAs over an energy range from 15 meV above to 15 meV below the Fermi surface. The results provide the first direct measurements of the width of the single-particle exchange gap and lifetimes in the quantum Hall system. At higher energies, we show the first observations of exchange-induced spin-splittings in fully filled or unfilled Landau levels not at the Fermi energy. The results demonstrate a counter-intuitive fact: the high energy spectrum reflects correlations that only appear at very low temperatures. For instance, upon raising the temperature from 100 mK (0.01 meV) to 1 K (0.1 meV) changes are seen in the spectrum at 10 meV away from the Fermi energy. Along with measurements of exchange splittings and lifetimes, we observe an unpredicted new structure appearing only at high magnetic fields and low temperatures that appears to be a long lived quasi-particle. The results are made possible by a novel technique, time domain capacitance spectroscopy. It allows us to measure the TDOS of a 2DES with resolution only limited by temperature, even at large tunneling energies. In TDCS, sharp voltage pulses disequilibrate a 2DES from a nearby metallic contact inducing a tunnel current perpendicular to the plane of the 2DES. We detect this current by monitoring the image charge of the tunneling electrons on a distant electrode. No ohmic contact to the 2DES is required. The technique works even when the 2DES is empty or has vanishing in-plane conductivity, as frequently occurs in the quantum Hall effect. Importantly, we can eliminate the effects of ohmic heating in the experiment by using short duty cycle pulses, with currents flowing only 0.01% of the time. The obtained spectra reveal the beautiful and difficult to reach structure present far from the Fermi surface in the quantum Hall system.

  9. Metallicity determination of M dwarfs. High-resolution infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, Sara; Heiter, Ulrike; Seifahrt, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Context. Several new techniques to determine the metallicity of M dwarfs with better precision have been developed over the last decades. However, most of these studies were based on empirical methods. In order to enable detailed abundance analysis, standard methods established for warmer solar-like stars, i.e. model-dependent methods using fitting of synthetic spectra, still need to be used. Aims: In this work we continue the reliability confirmation and development of metallicity determinations of M dwarfs using high-resolution infrared spectra. The reliability was confirmed through analysis of M dwarfs in four binary systems with FGK dwarf companions and by comparison with previous optical studies of the FGK dwarfs. Methods: The metallicity determination was based on spectra taken in the J band (1.1-1.4 μm) with the CRIRES spectrograph. In this part of the infrared, the density of stellar molecular lines is limited, reducing the amount of blends with atomic lines enabling an accurate continuum placement. Lines of several atomic species were used to determine the stellar metallicity. Results: All binaries show excellent agreement between the derived metallicity of the M dwarf and its binary companion. Our results are also in good agreement with values found in the literature. Furthermore, we propose an alternative way to determine the effective temperature of M dwarfs of spectral types later than M2 through synthetic spectral fitting of the FeH lines in our observed spectra. Conclusions: We have confirmed that a reliable metallicity determination of M dwarfs can be achieved using high-resolution infrared spectroscopy. We also note that metallicites obtained with photometric metallicity calibrations available for M dwarfs only partly agree with the results we obtain from high-resolution spectroscopy. Based on data obtained at ESO-VLT, Paranal Observatory, Chile, Program ID 082.D-0838(A) and 084.D-1042(A).

  10. High-resolution low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Buban, James P.; Ramasse, Quentin; Gipson, Bryant; Browning, Nigel D.; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades instrumentation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has pushed toward higher intensity electron probes to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of recorded images. While this is suitable for robust specimens, biological specimens require a much reduced electron dose for high-resolution imaging. We describe here protocols for low-dose STEM image recording with a conventional field-emission gun STEM, while maintaining the high-resolution capability of the instrument. Our findings show that a combination of reduced pixel dwell time and reduced gun current can achieve radiation doses comparable to low-dose TEM. PMID:19915208

  11. High-resolution low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Buban, James P; Ramasse, Quentin; Gipson, Bryant; Browning, Nigel D; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades instrumentation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has pushed toward higher intensity electron probes to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of recorded images. While this is suitable for robust specimens, biological specimens require a much reduced electron dose for high-resolution imaging. We describe here protocols for low-dose STEM image recording with a conventional field-emission gun STEM, while maintaining the high-resolution capability of the instrument. Our findings show that a combination of reduced pixel dwell time and reduced gun current can achieve radiation doses comparable to low-dose TEM.

  12. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) of nanophase ferric oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Iron oxide minerals are the prime candidates for Fe(III) signatures in remotely sensed Martian surface spectra. Magnetic, Mossbauer, and reflectance spectroscopy have been carried out in the laboratory in order to understand the mineralogical nature of Martian analog ferric oxide minerals of submicron or nanometer size range. Out of the iron oxide minerals studied, nanometer sized ferric oxides are promising candidates for possible Martian spectral analogs. 'Nanophase ferric oxide (np-Ox)' is a generic term for ferric oxide/oxihydroxide particles having nanoscale (less than 10 nm) particle dimensions. Ferrihydrite, superparamagnetic particles of hematite, maghemite and goethite, and nanometer sized particles of inherently paramagnetic lepidocrocite are all examples of nanophase ferric oxides. np-Ox particles in general do not give X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns with well defined peaks and would often be classified as X-ray amorphous. Therefore, different np-Oxs preparations should be characterized using a more sensitive technique e.g., high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The purpose of this study is to report the particle size, morphology and crystalline order, of five np-Ox samples by HRTEM imaging and electron diffraction (ED).

  13. Probing the electronic and vibrational structure of Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2}{sup −} and Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2} using photoelectron spectroscopy and high resolution photoelectron imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Gary V.; Czekner, Joseph; Jian, Tian; Li, Wei-Li; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-12-14

    The electronic and vibrational structures of Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2}{sup −} and Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2} have been investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES), high-resolution photoelectron imaging, and theoretical calculations. Photoelectron spectra taken at high photon energies with a magnetic-bottle apparatus reveal numerous detachment transitions and a large energy gap for the neutral Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2}. Vibrationally resolved PE spectra are obtained using high-resolution photoelectron imaging for the ground state detachment transition of Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2}{sup −} at various photon energies (670.55−843.03 nm). An accurate electron affinity of 1.4438(8) eV is obtained for the Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2} neutral cluster, as well as two vibrational frequencies at 57 ± 8 and 305 ± 13 cm{sup −1}. Hot bands transitions yield two vibrational frequencies for Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2}{sup −} at 57 ± 10 and 144 ± 12 cm{sup −1}. The obtained vibrational and electronic structure information is compared with density functional calculations, unequivocally confirming that both Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2}{sup −} and Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2} possess C{sub 2v} tetrahedral structures.

  14. Recent Results in Quantum Chemical Kinetics from High Resolution Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Quack, Martin

    2007-12-26

    We outline the approach of our group to derive intramolecular kinetic primary processes from high resolution spectroscopy. We then review recent results on intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) and on tunneling processes. Examples are the quantum dynamics of the C-H-chromophore in organic molecules, hydrogen bond dynamics in (HF){sub 2} and stereomutation dynamics in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and related chiral molecules. We finally discuss the time scales for these and further processes which range from 10 fs to more than seconds in terms of successive symmetry breakings, leading to the question of nuclear spin symmetry and parity violation as well as the question of CPT symmetry.

  15. High Resolution Absorption Spectroscopy using Externally Dispersed Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Edelstein, J; Erskine, D J

    2005-07-06

    We describe the use of Externally Dispersed Interferometry (EDI) for high-resolution absorption spectroscopy. By adding a small fixed-delay interferometer to a dispersive spectrograph, a precise fiducial grid in wavelength is created over the entire spectrograph bandwidth. The fiducial grid interacts with narrow spectral features in the input spectrum to create a moire pattern. EDI uses the moire pattern to obtain new information about the spectra that is otherwise unavailable, thereby improving spectrograph performance. We describe the theory and practice of EDI instruments and demonstrate improvements in the spectral resolution of conventional spectrographs by a factor of 2 to 6. The improvement of spectral resolution offered by EDI can benefit space instruments by reducing spectrograph size or increasing instantaneous bandwidth.

  16. Quantum cascade laser linewidth investigations for high resolution photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Germer, Markus; Wolff, Marcus

    2009-02-01

    High detection selectivity is extremely important for gas analyzers in order to correctly identify the measured compound. Therefore, laser-based systems require a high optical resolution, which primarily depends on the spectral linewidth of the radiation source. This study examines the effective linewidth (chirp) of a pulsed distributed feedback (DFB) quantum cascade laser (QCL) in a photoacoustic (PA) gas detection system. The influence of the QCL operating parameters pulse duration and pulse current as well as the impact of the modulation technique are investigated. Effective QCL linewidths for pulse gate modulation, pulse frequency modulation, and chopper modulation are compared. The investigations are performed by measuring the PA spectra of nitrogen monoxide absorption lines. The results prove the strong influence of pulse duration and pulse current. They also demonstrate that the modulation technique has a considerable influence and, consequently, affects the detection selectivity of the PA analyzer. The aim of this research is to determine optimum operational parameters for high resolution PA spectroscopy.

  17. Human enamel structure studied by high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, S.L. )

    1989-01-01

    Human enamel structural features are characterized by high resolution electron microscopy. The human enamel consists of polycrystals with a structure similar to Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2. This article describes the structural features of human enamel crystal at atomic and nanometer level. Besides the structural description, a great number of high resolution images are included. Research into the carious process in human enamel is very important for human beings. This article firstly describes the initiation of caries in enamel crystal at atomic and unit-cell level and secondly describes the further steps of caries with structural and chemical demineralization. The demineralization in fact, is the origin of caries in human enamel. The remineralization of carious areas in human enamel has drawn more and more attention as its potential application is realized. This process has been revealed by high resolution electron microscopy in detail in this article. On the other hand, the radiation effects on the structure of human enamel are also characterized by high resolution electron microscopy. In order to reveal this phenomenon clearly, a great number of electron micrographs have been shown, and a physical mechanism is proposed. 26 references.

  18. High resolution analytical transmission electron microscopy of magnetic recording media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risner, Juliet Danielle

    Since the invention of the hard disk drive in 1954, the density of bits per disk has increased exponentially. This trend is partly due to improvements to the magnetic recording media. In current hard disks, each bit is approximately 0.04 mum in its smallest dimension and comprises ˜100 hexagonal close packed Co-alloy magnetic grains. These grains have magnetic "easy" axes oriented longitudinally, or parallel to the film plane. Future recording media have easy axes oriented perpendicular to the film plane. Perpendicular media are expected to provide continued increases in storage density above the limit of longitudinal media. Quantum-mechanical exchange coupling between magnetic grains degrades the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and limits storage density in both media types. Controlling exchange coupling is possible by creating nonmagnetic grain boundaries which compositionally isolate the magnetic grains. High-resolution analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is required to study these media because of their nano-scale grains and grain boundaries. Examining the microstructure and elemental distribution in these films at near atomic level is paramount to understanding their magnetic performance. The microstructure and elemental distribution in longitudinal and perpendicular media were examined using high resolution analytical TEM techniques, such as energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) using a 1.5 nm electron probe, and spectrum imaging with a scanning TEM. These techniques successfully determined how grain boundary Cr segregation varies with grain orientation in longitudinal media. Boundaries misoriented by 0° and 90° commonly occur and were found to have minimal Cr segregation, which limits storage density improvement in these media. Analytical TEM techniques applied to oxygen-enriched perpendicular media, fabricated using different deposition methods, effectively related microstructure and composition to magnetic

  19. High-Resolution Secondary Electron Microscopy and Scanning Reflection Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingyue

    1990-01-01

    High resolution secondary electron microscopy (HRSEM) utilizes the low energy electrons emitted from the sample to form images of the surface. By using a very small incident electron probe subnanometer resolution images of solid surfaces can be obtained by collecting secondary electrons. Surfaces of both electron beam transparent samples and bulk samples can be investigated by high resolution secondary electron (SE) imaging technique. The emission of secondary electrons is determined by three different processes: (1) the generation of secondary electrons inside the sample; (2) the transport of the excited electrons to the vacuum-sample interface and (3) the escape of secondary electrons over the surface potential barrier into vacuum. The total yield of the emitted secondary electrons is sensitive to sample surface conditions. Surface electronic and geometric modifications will influence the total yield of secondary electrons. The contrast in a SE image is determined by the change of the total SE yield. Therefore the knowledge of the origin of SE emission is essential for interpreting the experimental high resolution secondary electron images. The first part of this dissertation is to discuss the origins of the collected secondary electrons, to develop the theory of surface imaging by secondary electrons and to investigate the contrast mechanisms of high resolution SE images. By combining HRSEM with secondary electron spectroscopy information about the surface topographic and, to some extent, surface electronic structures can be obtained. Experimental results obtained in the ultra-high vacuum (UHV) scanning transmission electron microscope have yielded fruitful information about the electron emission processes. Scanning reflection electron microscopy (SREM) utilizes the high energy electrons reflected from a bulk crystal to form images of the crystal surface. At glancing incident angle specularlly Bragg diffracted beam satisfying surface resonance conditions can

  20. The theory and practice of high resolution scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, D.C. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in instrumentation have produced the first commercial examples of what can justifiably be called High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopes. The key components of such instruments are a cold field emission gun, a small-gap immersion probe-forming lens, and a clean dry-pumped vacuum. The performance of these microscopes is characterized by several major features including a spatial resolution, in secondary electron mode on solid specimens, which can exceed 1nm on a routine basis; an incident probe current density of the order of 10{sup 6} amps/cm{sup 2}; and the ability to maintain these levels of performance over an accelerating voltage range of from 1 to 30keV. This combination of high resolution, high probe current, low contamination and flexible electron-optical conditions provides many new opportunitites for the application of the SEM to materials science, physics, and the life sciences. 27 refs., 14 figs.

  1. High Resolution Velocity Map Imaging Photoelectron Spectroscopy of the Beryllium Oxide Anion, BeO-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermer, Amanda Reed; Mascaritolo, Kyle; Heaven, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The photodetachment spectrum of BeO- has been studied using high resolution velocity map imaging photoelectron spectroscopy. The vibrational contours were imaged and compared with Franck-Condon simulations for the ground and excited states of the neutral. The electron affinity of BeO was measured for the first time, and anisotropies of several transitions were determined. Experimental findings are compared to high level ab initio calculations.

  2. Beamline 9.0.1 - a high-resolution undulator beamline for gas-phase spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, J.D.; Heimann, P.A.; Mossessian, D.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.0.1 at the Advanced Light Source is an undulator beamline with a Spherical Grating Monochromator (SGM) which provides very high resolution and flux over the photon energy range 20-320eV. The beamline has been used primarily by the atomic and molecular science community to conduct spectroscopy experiments using electron, ion and fluorescence photon detection. A description of the beamline and its performance will be provided in this abstract.

  3. HIGH RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY IN THE GAS PHASE: Even Large Molecules Have Well-Defined Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, David W.

    1998-10-01

    A review of recent high-resolution microwave, infrared, and optical spectroscopy experiments demonstrates that remarkable progress has been made in the past 20 years in determining the equilibrium geometries of large polyatomic molecules and their clusters in the gas phase, and how these geometries change when the photon is absorbed. A special focus is on the dynamical information that can be obtained from such studies, particularly of electronically excited states.

  4. High resolution spectroscopy of sulfur trioxide and carbon suboxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiello, Tony

    High resolution spectroscopy was used to study the properties of two simple polyatomic molecules, sulfur trioxide, SO3, and carbon suboxide, C3O2. The fundamental modes and several hot bands of the 18O isotopic forms of SO3 (32S18O 3 and 34S18O3) have been investigated using both infrared spectroscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy (CARS). The Raman-active symmetric stretching mode, nu 1, shows complex Q-branch patterns due to indirect Coriolis couplings, l-resonances, and Fermi resonances with infrared inaccessible nu2, nu4 combination/overtone levels. 18O isotopic substitution changes the character of these interactions in such a way that their effect on the nu1 CARS spectrum is unique among the different isotopomers studied. Accurate rovibrational constants are determined for all of the mixed states for the first time, leading to deperturbed values for the nu1 band origin of 1004.661(24) and 1004.693(23) for 34S18O 3 and 32S18O3 respectively. The strong Coriolis coupling is very noticeable in these species due to the close proximity of the nu2 and nu4 fundamental vibrations. The effect that this and other interaction terms have on the nu1 CARS spectrum of 34S18O3 is examined by selectively turning off the coupling between the hot bands. A global force field analysis was performed with the fundamental frequency values of all of the isotopomers studied that revealed a counterintuitive trend in the bond lengths between sulfur oxide species. In addition, band center frequencies for all the mixed 16O-18O isotopic species are computed. High-resolution CARS Spectroscopy was also used to study the nu 1 symmetric CO stretching mode of the quasi-linear molecule carbon suboxide, C3O2. Q-branches are seen that originate from the ground state and from thermally-populated levels of the unusually low frequency nu7 bending mode. The intensity variation of these on cooling to about 110 K in a jet expansion requires reversal of the order of assignment

  5. Optical multichannel analyzer techniques for high resolution optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, J.L.

    1980-06-01

    The development of optical multichannel analyzer techniques for UV/VIS spectroscopy is presented. The research focuses on the development of spectroscopic techniques for measuring high resolution spectral lineshape functions from the exciton phosphorescence in H/sub 2/-1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene. It is found that the temperature dependent frequency shifts and widths confirm a theoretical model based on an exchange theory. The exchange of low energy phonon modes which couple with excited state exciton transitions is shown to display the proper temperature dependent behavior. In addition to the techniques for using the optical multichannel analyzer (OMA) to perform low light level target integration, the use of the OMA for capturing spectral information in transient pulsed laser applications is discussed. An OMP data acquisition system developed for real-time signal processng is described. Both hardware and software interfacing considerations for control and data acquisition by a microcomputer are described. The OMA detector is described in terms of the principles behind its photoelectron detection capabilities and its design is compared with other optoelectronic devices.

  6. Pluto's atmosphere in 2015 from high-resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, Henry G.; Cook, Jason C.; Mace, Gregory N.; Holler, Bryan J.; Young, Leslie A.; McLane, Jacob N.; Jaffe, Daniel T.

    2015-11-01

    Pluto's thin N2/CH4 atmosphere is in vapor-pressure equilibrium with ices on its surface. The atmosphere evolves seasonally with the varying insolation pattern on Pluto's heterogenous surface, perhaps even largely freezing out to the surface during the coldest portion of Pluto's year. We use high-resolution (R≈25,000-50,000) near-infrared spectroscopy to resolve atmospheric methane absorption lines from Pluto's continuum spectra, as well as separate Pluto's atmospheric lines from the telluric spectrum. In addition to measuring the abundance and temperature of Pluto's atmospheric CH4, with broad wavelength coverage we are able to search for the inevitable products of N2/CH4 photochemistry. In 2015 we are undertaking an intensive campaign using NIRSPEC at Keck Observatory and IGRINS (Immersion Grating INfrared Spectrometer) at McDonald Observatory to coincide with the New Horizons Pluto encounter. We will report initial results from this 2015 campaign and compare the state of Pluto's atmosphere at the time of the New Horizons encounter with earlier years.

  7. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of the Lunar Sodium Exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Oliversen, R. J.; Roesler, F. L.; Lupie, O. L.

    2014-01-01

    We have applied high-resolution Fabry-Perot spectroscopy to the study of the lunar sodium exosphere for the study of exospheric effective temperature and velocity variations. Observing from the National Solar Observatory McMath-Pierce Telescope, we used a dual-etalon Fabry-Perot spectrometer with a resolving power of 180,000 to measure line widths and Doppler shifts of the sodium D2 (5889.95 Å) emission line. Our field of view was 360 km, and measurements were made in equatorial and polar regions from 500 km to 3500 km off the limb. Data were obtained from full moon to 3 days following full moon (waning phase) in March 2009. Measured Doppler line widths within 1100 km of the sunlit east and south lunar limbs for observations between 5 and 40 deg lunar phase imply effective temperatures ranging between 3260 +/- 190 and 1000 +/- 135 K. Preliminary line center analysis indicates velocity displacements between different locations off the lunar limb ranging between 100 and 600 m/s from the lunar rest velocity with a precision of +/-20 to +/-50 m/s depending on brightness. Based on the success of these exploratory observations, an extensive program has been initiated that is expected to constrain lunar atmospheric and surface-process modeling and help quantify source and escape mechanisms.

  8. High Resolution Measurements and Electronic Structure Calculations of a Diazanaphthalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruet, Sébastien; Goubet, Manuel; Pirali, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) have long been suspected to be the carriers of so called Unidentified Infrared Bands (UIBs). Most of the results published in the literature report rotationally unresolved spectra of pure carbon as well as heteroatom-containing PAHs species. To date for this class of molecules, the principal source of rotational informations is ruled by microwave (MW) spectroscopy while high resolution measurements reporting rotational structure of the infrared (IR) vibrational bands are very scarce. Recently, some high resolution techniques provided interesting new results to rotationally resolve the IR and far-IR bands of these large carbonated molecules of astrophysical interest. One of them is to use the bright synchrotron radiation as IR continuum source of a high resolution Fourier transform (FTIR) spectrometer. We report the very complementary analysis of the [1,6] naphthyridine (a N-bearing PAH) for which we recorded the microwave spectrum at the PhLAM laboratory (Lille) and the high resolution far-infrared spectrum on the AILES beamline at synchrotron facility SOLEIL. MW spectroscopy provided highly accurate rotational constants in the ground state to perform Ground State Combinations Differences (GSCD) allowing the analysis of the two most intense FT-FIR bands in the 50-900 wn range. Moreover, during this presentation the negative value of the inertial defect in the GS of the molecule will be discussed. A. Leger, J. L. Puget, Astron. Astrophys. 137, L5-L8 (1984) L. J. Allamandola et al. Astrophys. J. 290, L25-L28 (1985). Z. Kisiel et al. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 217, 115 (2003) S. Thorwirth et al. Astrophys. J. 662, 1309 (2007) D. McNaughton et al. J. Chem. Phys. 124, 154305 (2011). S. Albert et al. Faraday Discuss. 150, 71-99 (2011) B. E. Brumfield et al. Phys. Chem. Lett. 3, 1985-1988 (2012) O. Pirali et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 15, 10141 (2013).

  9. High-resolution ground-based spectroscopy: where and how ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallavicini, R.

    2002-07-01

    An overview is presented of high-resolution optical spectrographs in operation or under development at large telescopes, with emphasis on those facilities best suited for the study of late-type stars and stellar surface inhomogeneities. Plans for the development of new high-resolution spectroscopic instruments are discussed with emphasis on the ICE spectrograph for the PEPSI spectropolarimeter at the LBT.

  10. Immersion Gratings for Infrared High-resolution Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarugaku, Yuki; Ikeda, Yuji; Kobayashi, Naoto; Kaji, Sayumi; Sukegawa, Takashi; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Nakagawa, Takao; Arasaki, Takayuki; Kondo, Sohei; Nakanishi, Kenshi; Yasui, Chikako; Kawakita, Hideyo

    2016-10-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy in the infrared wavelength range is essential for observations of minor isotopologues, such as HDO for water, and prebiotic organic molecules like hydrocarbons/P-bearing molecules because numerous vibrational molecular bands (including non-polar molecules) are located in this wavelength range. High spectral resolution enables us to detect weak lines without spectral line confusion. This technique has been widely used in planetary sciences, e.g., cometary coma (H2O, CO, and organic molecules), the martian atmosphere (CH4, CO2, H2O and HDO), and the upper atmosphere of gas giants (H3+ and organic molecules such as C2H6). Spectrographs with higher resolution (and higher sensitivity) still have a potential to provide a plenty of findings. However, because the size of spectrographs scales with the spectral resolution, it is difficult to realize it.Immersion grating (IG), which is a diffraction grating wherein the diffraction surface is immersed in a material with a high refractive index (n > 2), provides n times higher spectral resolution compared to a reflective grating of the same size. Because IG reduces the size of spectrograph to 1/n compared to the spectrograph with the same spectral resolution using a conventional reflective grating, it is widely acknowledged as a key optical device to realize compact spectrographs with high spectral resolution.Recently, we succeeded in fabricating a CdZnTe immersion grating with the theoretically predicted diffraction efficiency by machining process using an ultrahigh-precision five-axis processing machine developed by Canon Inc. Using the same technique, we completed a practical germanium (Ge) immersion grating with both a reflection coating on the grating surface and the an AR coating on the entrance surface. It is noteworthy that the wide wavelength range from 2 to 20 um can be covered by the two immersion gratings.In this paper, we present the performances and the applications of the immersion

  11. Probing the electronic structure and Au—C chemical bonding in AuCn- and AuCnH- (n = 2, 4, and 6) using high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, Iker; Ruipérez, Fernando; Ugalde, Jesus M.; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    We report a joint photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical study on AuC4-, AuC6-, and AuCnH- (n = 2, 4, and 6) using high-resolution photoelectron imaging and ab initio calculations. The ground state of AuC2H-, AuC4H-, and AuC6H- is found to be linear, while that of AuC4- and AuC6- is bent. All the species are found to be linear in their neutral ground states. The electron affinities (EAs) are measured to be 3.366(1) and 3.593(1) eV for AuC4 and AuC6, respectively. Both bending and stretching frequencies are resolved in the spectra of AuC4- and AuC6-. High-resolution data of AuCnH- reveal major vibrational progressions in the Au—C stretching and bending modes. AuC2H- has a ground state stretching frequency of 445(10) cm-1 and a bending frequency of 260(10) cm-1; AuC4H- has a ground state stretching frequency of 340(10) cm-1; AuC6H- has a ground state stretching frequency of 260(10) cm-1 and a bending frequency of 55(10) cm-1. The EAs are measured to be 1.475(1), 1.778(1), and 1.962(1) eV for AuC2H, AuC4H, and AuC6H, respectively. The strength of the Au—C bond decreases as the number of carbon atoms increases. The current study provides a wealth of electronic structure information about AuC4-, AuC6-, and AuCnH- (n = 2, 4, and 6) and their corresponding neutrals.

  12. High resolution photoionisation spectroscopy of vibrationally excited Ar · NO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, O. L. A.; Cruse, H. A.; Softley, T. P.; Mackenzie, S. R.

    2001-01-01

    Mass-analysed threshold ionisation (MATI) spectra of the Ar · NO complex have been obtained for the first time. These spectra have been used to determine unambiguously the nature of three bands detected by resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionisation (REMPI) spectroscopy via the à state of Ar · NO. The features are shown to originate from vibrationally excited states of Ar · NO in its electronic ground state. The assignment is in agreement with recent theoretical calculations.

  13. Spectral restoration in high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy based on iterative semi-blind Lucy-Richardson algorithm applied to rutile surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzari, Rémi Li, Jingfeng Jupille, Jacques

    2015-01-15

    A new spectral restoration algorithm of reflection electron energy loss spectra is proposed. It is based on the maximum likelihood principle as implemented in the iterative Lucy-Richardson approach. Resolution is enhanced and point spread function recovered in a semi-blind way by forcing cyclically the zero loss to converge towards a Dirac peak. Synthetic phonon spectra of TiO{sub 2} are used as a test bed to discuss resolution enhancement, convergence benefit, stability towards noise, and apparatus function recovery. Attention is focused on the interplay between spectral restoration and quasi-elastic broadening due to free carriers. A resolution enhancement by a factor up to 6 on the elastic peak width can be obtained on experimental spectra of TiO{sub 2}(110) and helps revealing mixed phonon/plasmon excitations.

  14. Johann Spectrometer for High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Machek, Pavel; Froeba, Michael; Welter, Edmund; Caliebe, Wolfgang; Brueggmann, Ulf; Draeger, Guenter

    2007-01-19

    A newly designed vacuum Johann spectrometer with a large focusing analyzer crystal for inelastic x-ray scattering and high resolution fluorescence spectroscopy has been installed at the DORIS III storage ring. Spherically bent crystals with a maximum diameter of 125 mm, and cylindrically bent crystals are employed as dispersive optical elements. Standard radius of curvature of the crystals is 1000 mm, however, the design of the mechanical components also facilitates measurements with smaller and larger bending radii. Up to four crystals are mounted on a revolving crystal changer which enables crystal changes without breaking the vacuum. The spectrometer works at fixed Bragg angle. It is preferably designed for the measurements in non-scanning mode with a broad beam spot, and offers a large flexibility to set the sample to the optimum position inside the Rowland circle. A deep depletion CCD camera is employed as a position sensitive detector to collect the energy-analyzed photons on the circumference of the Rowland circle. The vacuum in the spectrometer tank is typically 10-6 mbar. The sample chamber is separated from the tank either by 25 {mu}m thick Kapton windows, which allows samples to be measured under ambient conditions, or by two gate valves. The spectrometer is currently installed at wiggler beamline W1 whose working range is 4-10.5 keV with typical flux at the sample of 5x1010photons/s/mm2. The capabilities of the spectrometer are illustrated by resonant inelastic experiments on 3d transition metals and rare earth compounds, and by chemical shift measurements on chromium compounds.

  15. Johann Spectrometer for High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machek, Pavel; Welter, Edmund; Caliebe, Wolfgang; Brüggmann, Ulf; Dräger, Günter; Fröba, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A newly designed vacuum Johann spectrometer with a large focusing analyzer crystal for inelastic x-ray scattering and high resolution fluorescence spectroscopy has been installed at the DORIS III storage ring. Spherically bent crystals with a maximum diameter of 125 mm, and cylindrically bent crystals are employed as dispersive optical elements. Standard radius of curvature of the crystals is 1000 mm, however, the design of the mechanical components also facilitates measurements with smaller and larger bending radii. Up to four crystals are mounted on a revolving crystal changer which enables crystal changes without breaking the vacuum. The spectrometer works at fixed Bragg angle. It is preferably designed for the measurements in non-scanning mode with a broad beam spot, and offers a large flexibility to set the sample to the optimum position inside the Rowland circle. A deep depletion CCD camera is employed as a position sensitive detector to collect the energy-analyzed photons on the circumference of the Rowland circle. The vacuum in the spectrometer tank is typically 10-6 mbar. The sample chamber is separated from the tank either by 25 μm thick Kapton windows, which allows samples to be measured under ambient conditions, or by two gate valves. The spectrometer is currently installed at wiggler beamline W1 whose working range is 4-10.5 keV with typical flux at the sample of 5×1010photons/s/mm2. The capabilities of the spectrometer are illustrated by resonant inelastic experiments on 3d transition metals and rare earth compounds, and by chemical shift measurements on chromium compounds.

  16. Layer specific optical band gap measurement at nanoscale in MoS2 and ReS2 van der Waals compounds by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dileep, K.; Sahu, R.; Sarkar, Sumanta; Peter, Sebastian C.; Datta, R.

    2016-03-01

    Layer specific direct measurement of optical band gaps of two important van der Waals compounds, MoS2 and ReS2, is performed at nanoscale by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy. For monolayer MoS2, the twin excitons (1.8 and 1.95 eV) originating at the K point of the Brillouin zone are observed. An indirect band gap of 1.27 eV is obtained from the multilayer regions. Indirect to direct band gap crossover is observed which is consistent with the previously reported strong photoluminescence from the monolayer MoS2. For ReS2, the band gap is direct, and a value of 1.52 and 1.42 eV is obtained for the monolayer and multilayer, respectively. The energy loss function is dominated by features due to high density of states at both the valence and conduction band edges, and the difference in analyzing band gap with respect to ZnO is highlighted. Crystalline 1T ReS2 forms two dimensional chains like superstructure due to the clustering between four Re atoms. The results demonstrate the power of HREELS technique as a nanoscale optical absorption spectroscopy tool.

  17. High-resolution electron microscopy of advanced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, T.E.; Kung, H.H.; Sickafus, K.E.; Gray, G.T. III; Field, R.D.; Smith, J.F.

    1997-11-01

    This final report chronicles a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The High-Resolution Electron Microscopy Facility has doubled in size and tripled in quality since the beginning of the three-year period. The facility now includes a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a 100 kV field-emission scanning transmission electron microscope (FE-STEM), a 300 kV field-emission high-resolution transmission electron microscope (FE-HRTEM), and a 300 kV analytical transmission electron microscope. A new orientation imaging microscope is being installed. X-ray energy dispersive spectrometers for chemical analysis are available on all four microscopes; parallel electron energy loss spectrometers are operational on the FE-STEM and FE-HRTEM. These systems enable evaluation of local atomic bonding, as well as chemical composition in nanometer-scale regions. The FE-HRTEM has a point-to-point resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}, but the resolution can be pushed to its information limit of 1 {angstrom} by computer reconstruction of a focal series of images. HRTEM has been used to image the atomic structure of defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries, and interfaces in a variety of materials from superconductors and ferroelectrics to structural ceramics and intermetallics.

  18. High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy of Cells Using Dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shi-Yang; Zhang, Wei; Soffe, Rebecca; Nahavandi, Sofia; Shukla, Ravi; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2014-01-01

    Ultrastructural analysis of cells can reveal valuable information about their morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been widely used to provide high-resolution images from the surface of biological samples. However, samples need to be dehydrated and coated with conductive materials for SEM imaging. Besides, immobilizing non-adherent cells during processing and analysis is challenging and requires complex fixation protocols. In this work, we developed a novel dielectrophoresis based microfluidic platform for interfacing non-adherent cells with high-resolution SEM at low vacuum mode. The system enables rapid immobilization and dehydration of samples without deposition of chemical residues over the cell surface. Moreover, it enables the on-chip chemical stimulation and fixation of immobilized cells with minimum dislodgement. These advantages were demonstrated for comparing the morphological changes of non-budding and budding yeast cells following Lyticase treatment. PMID:25089528

  19. Multilayer Patterning of High Resolution Intrinsically Stretchable Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tybrandt, Klas; Stauffer, Flurin; Vörös, Janos

    2016-05-01

    Stretchable electronics can bridge the gap between hard planar electronic circuits and the curved, soft and elastic objects of nature. This has led to applications like conformal displays, electronic skin and soft neuroprosthetics. A remaining challenge, however, is to match the dimensions of the interfaced systems, as all require feature sizes well below 100 μm. Intrinsically stretchable nanocomposites are attractive in this context as the mechanical deformations occur on the nanoscale, although methods for patterning high performance materials have been lacking. Here we address these issues by reporting on a multilayer additive patterning approach for high resolution fabrication of stretchable electronic devices. The method yields highly conductive 30 μm tracks with similar performance to their macroscopic counterparts. Further, we demonstrate a three layer micropatterned stretchable electroluminescent display with pixel sizes down to 70 μm. These presented findings pave the way towards future developments of high definition displays, electronic skins and dense multielectrode arrays.

  20. High Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy of [1.1.1] Propellane

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, Robynne W.; Masiello, Tony; Jariyasopit, Narumol; Weber, Alfons; Nibler, Joseph W.; Maki, Arthur; Blake, Thomas A.; Hubler, Timothy L.

    2008-01-08

    The infrared spectrum of [1.1.1]propellane has been recorded at high resolution (0.002 cm-1) with individual rovibrational lines resolved for the first time. This initial report presents the ground state constants for this molecule determined from the analysis of five of the eight infrared-allowed fundamentals v9(e'), v10(e'), v12(e'), v14(a2''), v15(a2''), as well as of several combination bands. In nearly all cases it was found that the upper states of the transitions exhibit some degree of perturbation but, by use of the combination difference method, the assigned frequencies provided over 4000 consistent ground state difference values. Analysis of these gave for the parameters of the ground state the following values, in cm-1: B0 = 0.28755833(14), DJ = 1.1313(5)x10-7, DJK = -1.2633(7)x10-7, HJ = 0.72(4)x10-13, HJK = -2.24(13)x10-13, and HKJ = 2.25(15)x10-13, where the numbers in parentheses indicate twice the uncertainties in the last quoted digit(s) of the parameters. Gaussian ab initio calculations, especially with the computed anharmonic corrections to some of the spectroscopic parameters, assisted in the assignments of the bands and also provided information on the electron distribution in the bridge-head carbon-carbon bond.

  1. High-resolution optical spectroscopy of Plaskett's star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, N.; Rauw, G.; Martins, F.; Sana, H.; De Becker, M.; Gosset, E.

    2008-10-01

    Context: Plaskett's star (HD 47 129) is a very massive O + O binary that belongs to the Mon OB2 association. Previous work suggests that this system displays the Struve-Sahade effect although the measurements of the secondary radial velocities are very difficult and give controversial results. Both components have powerful stellar winds that collide and produce a strong X-ray emission. Aims: Our aim is to study the physical parameters of this system in detail and to investigate the relation between its spectral properties and its evolutionary status. Methods: We present here analysis of an extensive set of high-resolution optical spectra of HD 47 129. We used a disentangling method to separate the individual spectra of each star. We derived a new orbital solution and discuss the spectral classification of both components. A Doppler tomography technique applied to the emission lines Hα and He II λ 4686 yields a Doppler map that illustrates the wind interactions in the system. Finally, an atmosphere code is used to determine the different chemical abundances of the system components and the wind parameters. Results: HD 47 129 appears to be an O8 III/I + O7.5 III binary system in a post RLOF evolutionary stage, where matter has been transferred from the primary to the secondary star. The He overabundance of the secondary supports this scenario. In addition, the N overabundance and C underabundance of the primary component confirm previous results based on X-ray spectroscopy and indicate that the primary is an evolved massive star. We also determined a new orbital solution, with MP sin^3i = 45.4 ± 2.4 M⊙ and MS sin^3i = 47.3 ± 0.3 M⊙. Furthermore, the secondary star has a high rotational velocity (v sin i ˜ 300 km s-1) that deforms its surface, leading to a non-uniform distribution in effective temperature. This could explain the variations in the equivalent widths of the secondary lines with phase. We suggest that the wind of the secondary star is confined

  2. High resolution photoelectron spectroscopy and femtosecond intramolecular dynamics using supersonic molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, B.

    1992-09-01

    High resolution He I{alpha} photoelectron spectroscopy of formaldehyde and ketene and their deuterated compounds, are reported. The combination of a (H2CO) double-pass high-resolution electron-energy analyzer and effective rotational cooling of the sample by supersonic expansion enable the spectroscopy of these molecular cations. The vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated from the high-resolution photoelectron spectra, shedding light on the ultrafast intramolecular dynamics of the molecular cations. This study reveals much more vibrational structural detail in the first electronic excited state of H2CO cations. The first electronic excited state of H2CO cations may have nonplanar equilibrium geometry. Strong isotope effects on vibronic (vibrational) coupling are observed in the second electronic excited state of H2CO. Vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated for all four observed electronic states of H2CO. The correlation function of the first electronic excited state of H2CO shows a slow decay rate on the femtosecond time scale. The ultrafast decay of the H2CO cations in the third electronic excited state implies that dissociation and intramolecular processes are the main decay pathways. The present spectra of the ground states of ketene cations have more fine structure than before. The AIEs of the first and fifth excited states are determined unambiguously more accurately. The doublet-like fine structures present in the lint excited state of ketene implies the excitation of a ``soft`` mode not observed before. The vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated for 4 of the 6 observed electronic states. The dynamics of the ground states of the cations are characterized by a wave packet oscillating with small amplitude around the minimum on the upper PES. The decay dynamics of the first and the fifth excited states of ketene are characterized by ultra-fast intramolecular processes like predissociation.

  3. High resolution photoelectron spectroscopy and femtosecond intramolecular dynamics using supersonic molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, B.

    1992-09-01

    High resolution He I[alpha] photoelectron spectroscopy of formaldehyde and ketene and their deuterated compounds, are reported. The combination of a (H2CO) double-pass high-resolution electron-energy analyzer and effective rotational cooling of the sample by supersonic expansion enable the spectroscopy of these molecular cations. The vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated from the high-resolution photoelectron spectra, shedding light on the ultrafast intramolecular dynamics of the molecular cations. This study reveals much more vibrational structural detail in the first electronic excited state of H2CO cations. The first electronic excited state of H2CO cations may have nonplanar equilibrium geometry. Strong isotope effects on vibronic (vibrational) coupling are observed in the second electronic excited state of H2CO. Vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated for all four observed electronic states of H2CO. The correlation function of the first electronic excited state of H2CO shows a slow decay rate on the femtosecond time scale. The ultrafast decay of the H2CO cations in the third electronic excited state implies that dissociation and intramolecular processes are the main decay pathways. The present spectra of the ground states of ketene cations have more fine structure than before. The AIEs of the first and fifth excited states are determined unambiguously more accurately. The doublet-like fine structures present in the lint excited state of ketene implies the excitation of a soft'' mode not observed before. The vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated for 4 of the 6 observed electronic states. The dynamics of the ground states of the cations are characterized by a wave packet oscillating with small amplitude around the minimum on the upper PES. The decay dynamics of the first and the fifth excited states of ketene are characterized by ultra-fast intramolecular processes like predissociation.

  4. High Resolution EUV & FUV Spectroscopy of DA White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barstow, M. A.; Good, S. A.; Bannister, N. P.; Burleigh, M. R.; Holberg, J. B.; Bruhweiler, F. C.; Napiwotzki, R.; Cruddace, R. G.; Kowalski, M. P.

    We report on recent results from a high-resolution spectroscopic survey of hot DA white dwarfs, based on IUE, FUSE and HST observations. For the first time, we address the measurement of element abundances in a completely objective manner with a spectroscopic model fitting technique, which allows us to consider formally the limits that can be placed on abundances in stars where no heavy elements are detected. We also include our latest analysis of the high resolution EUV spectrum of G191-B2B recorded by J-PEX.

  5. High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Using Negative Spherical Aberration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Chun-Lin; Lentzen, Markus

    2004-04-01

    A novel imaging mode for high-resolution transmission electron microscopy is described. It is based on the adjustment of a negative value of the spherical aberration CS of the objective lens of a transmission electron microscope equipped with a multipole aberration corrector system. Negative spherical aberration applied together with an overfocus yields high-resolution images with bright-atom contrast. Compared to all kinds of images taken in conventional transmission electron microscopes, where the then unavoidable positive spherical aberration is combined with an underfocus, the contrast is dramatically increased. This effect can only be understood on the basis of a full nonlinear imaging theory. Calculations show that the nonlinear contrast contributions diminish the image contrast relative to the linear image for a positive-CS setting whereas they reinforce the image contrast relative to the linear image for a negative-CS setting. The application of the new mode to the imaging of oxygen in SrTiO3 and YBa2Cu3O7 demonstrates the benefit to materials science investigations. It allows us to image directly, without further image processing, strongly scattering heavy-atom columns together with weakly scattering light-atom columns.

  6. A miniature high-resolution accelerometer utilizing electron tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rockstad, Howard K.; Kenny, T. W.; Reynolds, J. K.; Kaiser, W. J.; Vanzandt, T. R.; Gabrielson, Thomas B.

    1992-01-01

    New methods have been developed to implement high-resolution position sensors based on electron tunneling. These methods allow miniaturization while utilizing the position sensitivity of electron tunneling to give high resolution. A single-element tunneling accelerometer giving a displacement resolution of 0.002 A/sq rt Hz at 10 Hz, corresponding to an acceleration resolution of 5 x 10 exp -8 g/sq rt Hz, is described. A new dual-element tunneling structure which overcomes the narrow bandwidth limitations of a single-element structure is described. A sensor with an operating range of 5 Hz to 10 kHz, which can have applications as an acoustic sensor, is discussed. Noise is analyzed for fundamental thermal vibration of the suspended masses and is compared to electronic noise. It is shown that miniature tunnel accelerometers can achieve resolution such that thermal noise in the suspended masses is the dominant cause of the resolution limit. With a proof mass of order 100 mg, noise analysis predicts limiting resolutions approaching 10 exp -9 g/sq rt Hz in a 300 Hz band and 10 exp -8 g/sq rt Hz at 1 kHz.

  7. Imaging plasmodesmata with high-resolution scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Barton, Deborah A; Overall, Robyn L

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) is an effective tool to investigate the distribution of plasmodesmata within plant cell walls as well as to probe their complex, three-dimensional architecture. It is a useful alternative to traditional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in which plasmodesmata are sectioned to reveal their internal substructures. Benefits of adopting an HRSEM approach to studies of plasmodesmata are that the specimen preparation methods are less complex and time consuming than for TEM, many plasmodesmata within a large region of tissue can be imaged in a single session, and three-dimensional information is readily available without the need for reconstructing TEM serial sections or employing transmission electron tomography, both of which are lengthy processes. Here we describe methods to prepare plant samples for HRSEM using pre- or postfixation extraction of cellular material in order to visualize plasmodesmata embedded within plant cell walls.

  8. High-resolution pulsed-field ionization photoelectron spectroscopy using multi-bunch synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.W.; Evans, M.; Ng, C.Y.; Heimann, P.

    1997-04-01

    BL9.0.2.2 is the newly constructed experimental End Station 2 at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline 9.0.2 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS). It is dedicated to the high resolution photoionization study of molecules of interest to atmospheric and combustion chemistry. This End Station is equipped with a high resolution scanning monochromator, which has been demonstrated to have a world record resolution of E/{delta}E=70,000. Taking the advantage of the high resolution ALS light, the authors have improved the energy resolution in threshold photoelectron spectroscopy (TPES) to 0.8 meV. The TPES is a popular technique for photoionization experiments at all synchrotron radiation facilities due to its high energy resolution as compared to that of traditional photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). TPES achieves higher energy resolution by preferentially detecting near zero kinetic energy photoelectrons resulting from threshold photoionization. However, the spectra obtained from the TPES technique generally are complicated by the simultaneous detection of electrons with nonzero kinetic energy, which are not fully discriminated against. On the other hand, the spectra obtained from pulsed field ionization photoelectron spectroscopy (PFI-PES) are completely free of the contamination from kinetic electrons. The PFI-PE technique basically involves the detection of the photoelectrons from field ionization of the very high-n Rydberg states, a few cm{sup {minus}1} below the ionization energy (IE), by applying a delayed pulsed electric field. Within a delay of a few microseconds, all the prompt electrons formed from direct ionization will escape from the photoionization region and will not be collected. The authors have recently overcome problems with energy resolution of an electron time-of-flight technique, and incorporated the PFI-PE technique with multi-bunch VUV synchrotron radiation.

  9. High resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy at Jefferson Lab Hall A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garibaldi, F.; Bydžovský, P.; Cisbani, E.; Cusanno, F.; De Leo, R.; Frullani, S.; Iodice, M.; LeRose, J. J.; Markowitz, P.; Millener, D. J.; Urciuoli, G. M.

    2013-09-01

    The characteristics of the Jefferson Lab electron beam, together with those of the experimental equipment, offer a unique opportunity to study hypernuclear spectroscopy via electromagnetic induced (e,e‧K+) reactions. Experiment 94-107 started a systematic study on 1p-shell targets, C12, Be9 and O16. For C12 for the first time measurable strength in the core-excited part of the spectrum between the ground state and the p state was shown in the BΛ12 spectrum. For O16 a high-quality NΛ16 spectrum was produced for the first time with sub-MeV energy resolution. A very precise Λ binding energy value for NΛ16, calibrated against the elementary (e,e‧K+) reaction on hydrogen, has also been obtained. Preliminary data on the LiΛ9 spectrum shows some disagreement in strength for the second and third doublet with respect to the theory.

  10. Probing the electronic structure and Au–C chemical bonding in AuC{sub 2}{sup −} and AuC{sub 2} using high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    León, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-02-28

    We report photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and high-resolution PE imaging of AuC{sub 2}{sup −} at a wide range of photon energies. The ground state of AuC{sub 2}{sup −} is found to be linear (C{sub ∞v}, {sup 1}Σ{sup +}) with a …8π{sup 4}4δ{sup 4}17σ{sup 2}9π{sup 4}18σ{sup 2} valence configuration. Detachments from all the five valence orbitals of the ground state of AuC{sub 2}{sup −} are observed at 193 nm. High-resolution PE images are obtained in the energy range from 830 to 330 nm, revealing complicated vibronic structures from electron detachment of the 18σ, 9π, and 17σ orbitals. Detachment from the 18σ orbital results in the {sup 2}Σ{sup +} ground state of neutral AuC{sub 2}, which, however, is bent due to strong vibronic coupling with the nearby {sup 2}Π state from detachment of a 9π electron. The {sup 2}Σ{sup +}–{sup 2}Π vibronic and spin-orbit coupling results in complicated vibronic structures for the {sup 2}Σ{sup +} and {sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} states with extensive bending excitations. The electron affinity of AuC{sub 2} is measured accurately to be 3.2192(7) eV with a ground state bending frequency of 195(6) cm{sup −1}. The first excited state ({sup 2}A′) of AuC{sub 2}, corresponding to the {sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} state at the linear geometry, is only 0.0021 eV above the ground state ({sup 2}A′) and has a bending frequency of 207(6) cm{sup −1}. The {sup 2}Π{sub 1/2} state, 0.2291 eV above the ground state, is linear with little geometry change relative to the anion ground state. The detachment of the 17σ orbital also results in complicated vibronic structures, suggesting again a bent state due to possible vibronic coupling with the lower {sup 2}Π state. The spectrum at 193 nm shows the presence of a minor species with less than 2% intensity relative to the ground state of AuC{sub 2}{sup −}. High-resolution data of the minor species reveal several vibrational progressions in the Au–C stretching mode, which are assigned to

  11. High-Resolution Electronics: Spontaneous Patterning of High-Resolution Electronics via Parallel Vacuum Ultraviolet (Adv. Mater. 31/2016).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuying; Kanehara, Masayuki; Liu, Chuan; Sakamoto, Kenji; Yasuda, Takeshi; Takeya, Jun; Minari, Takeo

    2016-08-01

    On page 6568, T. Minari and co-workers describe spontaneous patterning based on the parallel vacuum ultraviolet (PVUV) technique, enabling the homogeneous integration of complex, high-resolution electronic circuits, even on large-scale, flexible, transparent substrates. Irradiation of PVUV to the hydrophobic polymer surface precisely renders the selected surface into highly wettable regions with sharply defined boundaries, which spontaneously guides a metal nanoparticle ink into a series of circuit lines and gaps with the widths down to a resolution of 1 μm.

  12. High-Resolution Electronics: Spontaneous Patterning of High-Resolution Electronics via Parallel Vacuum Ultraviolet (Adv. Mater. 31/2016).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuying; Kanehara, Masayuki; Liu, Chuan; Sakamoto, Kenji; Yasuda, Takeshi; Takeya, Jun; Minari, Takeo

    2016-08-01

    On page 6568, T. Minari and co-workers describe spontaneous patterning based on the parallel vacuum ultraviolet (PVUV) technique, enabling the homogeneous integration of complex, high-resolution electronic circuits, even on large-scale, flexible, transparent substrates. Irradiation of PVUV to the hydrophobic polymer surface precisely renders the selected surface into highly wettable regions with sharply defined boundaries, which spontaneously guides a metal nanoparticle ink into a series of circuit lines and gaps with the widths down to a resolution of 1 μm. PMID:27511534

  13. Insights into complexation of dissolved organic matter and Al(III) and nanominerals formation in soils under contrasting fertilizations using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yongli; Li, Huan; Xiao, Jian; Wang, Chang; Shen, Qirong; Ran, Wei; He, Xinhua; Zhou, Quansuo; Yu, Guanghui

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the organomineral associations in soils is of great importance. Using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques, this study compared the binding characteristics of organic ligands to Al(III) in dissolved organic matter (DOM) from soils under short-term (3-years) and long-term (22-years) fertilizations. Three fertilization treatments were examined: (i) no fertilization (Control), (ii) chemical nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK), and (iii) NPK plus swine manure (NPKM). Soil spectra detected by the 2DCOS Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed that fertilization modified the binding characteristics of organic ligands to Al(III) in soil DOM at both short- and long- term location sites. The CH deformations in aliphatic groups played an important role in binding to Al(III) but with minor differences among the Control, NPK and NPKM at the short-term site. While at the long-term site both C-O stretching of polysaccharides or polysaccharide-like substances and aliphatic O-H were bound to Al(III) under the Control, whereas only aliphatic O-H, and only polysaccharides and silicates, were bound to Al(III) under NPK and NPKM, respectively. Images from HRTEM demonstrated that crystalline nanominerals, composed of Fe and O, were predominant in soil DOM under NPK, while amorphous nanominerals, predominant in Al, Si, and O, were dominant in soil DOM under Control and NPKM. In conclusion, fertilization strategies, especially under long-term, could affect the binding of organic ligands to Al(III) in soil DOM, which resulted in alterations in the turnover, reactivity, and bioavailability of soil organic matter. Our results demonstrated that the FTIR-2DCOS combined with HRTEM techniques could enhance our understanding in the binding characteristics of DOM to Al(III) and the resulted nanominerals in soils.

  14. Insights into complexation of dissolved organic matter and Al(III) and nanominerals formation in soils under contrasting fertilizations using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yongli; Li, Huan; Xiao, Jian; Wang, Chang; Shen, Qirong; Ran, Wei; He, Xinhua; Zhou, Quansuo; Yu, Guanghui

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the organomineral associations in soils is of great importance. Using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques, this study compared the binding characteristics of organic ligands to Al(III) in dissolved organic matter (DOM) from soils under short-term (3-years) and long-term (22-years) fertilizations. Three fertilization treatments were examined: (i) no fertilization (Control), (ii) chemical nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK), and (iii) NPK plus swine manure (NPKM). Soil spectra detected by the 2DCOS Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed that fertilization modified the binding characteristics of organic ligands to Al(III) in soil DOM at both short- and long- term location sites. The CH deformations in aliphatic groups played an important role in binding to Al(III) but with minor differences among the Control, NPK and NPKM at the short-term site. While at the long-term site both C-O stretching of polysaccharides or polysaccharide-like substances and aliphatic O-H were bound to Al(III) under the Control, whereas only aliphatic O-H, and only polysaccharides and silicates, were bound to Al(III) under NPK and NPKM, respectively. Images from HRTEM demonstrated that crystalline nanominerals, composed of Fe and O, were predominant in soil DOM under NPK, while amorphous nanominerals, predominant in Al, Si, and O, were dominant in soil DOM under Control and NPKM. In conclusion, fertilization strategies, especially under long-term, could affect the binding of organic ligands to Al(III) in soil DOM, which resulted in alterations in the turnover, reactivity, and bioavailability of soil organic matter. Our results demonstrated that the FTIR-2DCOS combined with HRTEM techniques could enhance our understanding in the binding characteristics of DOM to Al(III) and the resulted nanominerals in soils. PMID:24997950

  15. Multilayer Patterning of High Resolution Intrinsically Stretchable Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Tybrandt, Klas; Stauffer, Flurin; Vörös, Janos

    2016-01-01

    Stretchable electronics can bridge the gap between hard planar electronic circuits and the curved, soft and elastic objects of nature. This has led to applications like conformal displays, electronic skin and soft neuroprosthetics. A remaining challenge, however, is to match the dimensions of the interfaced systems, as all require feature sizes well below 100 μm. Intrinsically stretchable nanocomposites are attractive in this context as the mechanical deformations occur on the nanoscale, although methods for patterning high performance materials have been lacking. Here we address these issues by reporting on a multilayer additive patterning approach for high resolution fabrication of stretchable electronic devices. The method yields highly conductive 30 μm tracks with similar performance to their macroscopic counterparts. Further, we demonstrate a three layer micropatterned stretchable electroluminescent display with pixel sizes down to 70 μm. These presented findings pave the way towards future developments of high definition displays, electronic skins and dense multielectrode arrays. PMID:27157804

  16. High-resolution rotational spectroscopy of iminosilylene, HNSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, M. C.; Tamassia, F.; Thorwirth, S.

    2015-08-01

    By means of Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy of a supersonic beam, the fundamental rotational transition of isotopic and vibrationally excited iminosilylene, HNSi, has been detected. In addition to seven isotopic species, vibrational satellite transitions from more than 30 vibrationally excited states, including the three fundamental modes, have been detected. Those from ν2 are particularly intense, enabling detection of transitions from as high as (0,220,0) (i.e. ∼10,000 cm-1 above ground). At high spectral resolution, well-resolved nitrogen quadrupole structure has been observed in nearly every transition. Excitation of ν1 or ν3 changes eQq(N) little, but eQq(N) systematically decreases with increasing excitation of the ν2 bend, from a value of 0.376(5) MHz for (0,00,0) to -2.257(5) MHz for (0,200,0). With the large amount of new data in hand, it has also been possible to determine the leading vibration-rotation constants (αi and γi) for ν2 or ν3 to high precision, and derive a revised semi-empirical equilibrium structure for this fundamental triatomic molecule. Various electronic and molecular properties of iminosilylene have been calculated at the coupled cluster level of theory, and these generally agree well with experiment and previous calculations. An unsuccessful search for HSiN, a highly polar isomer calculated to lie nearly 3 eV above HNSi, is also reported.

  17. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Some Very Inactive Southern Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal, A.; King, J. R.; Soderblom, D. R.; Henry, T. J.

    2001-12-01

    We have obtained high-resolution echelle spectra of a few dozen solar-type stars that an earlier low resolution Ca II H & K survey suggested have modest evels of chromospheric activity. We present Hα -based chromospheric activity measures, binarity information, and Li abundances of the sample. As expected, our spectra: confirm the low levels of chromospheric activity; suggest that these objects are apparently single; indicate the stars have small projected rotational velocities; and yield low photospheric abundances of Li. This work was supported by NSF grant AST-0086576 to JRK.

  18. Measurement of stratospheric HBr using high resolution far infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlotti, M.; Ade, P. A. R.; Carli, B.; Ciarpallini, P.; Cortesi, U.; Griffin, M. J.; Lepri, G.; Mencaraglia, F.; Murray, A. G.; Nolt, I. G.; Park, J. H.; Radostitz, J. V.

    Far infrared spectral features of HBr have been observed in the stratospheric emission spectrum using a balloon borne high resolution Fourier transform spectrometer equipped with a high sensitivity detector specially designed for this purpose. The value of 1.6±0.6 parts per trillion in volume for the HBr mixing ratio has been retrieved, from the global-fit analysis of 121 spectra, in the 25-36.5 km altitude range. The result is briefly compared with models and previous assessments.

  19. High Resolution Spectroscopy and Imaging of Hot Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, M. P.; Cruddace, R. G.; Gursky, H.; Yentis, D. J.; Barbee, T. W., Jr.; Goldstein, W. H.; Kordas, J. F.; Fritz, G. G.; Barstow, M. A.; Bannister, N. P.; Lapington, J. S.

    2001-12-01

    Future X-ray and EUV missions should include high-resolution spectrometers, permitting use of the full range of spectroscopic diagnostics, in particular measurement of line profiles and Doppler shifts. We present a design for such an instrument (APEX), which would fly on a Small Explorer Satellite and which employs multilayer-coated ion-etched gratings in a normal-incidence configuration. We have already flown successfully a prototype spectrometer (J-PEX) on a NASA sounding rocket. The resulting EUV spectrum of the white dwarf G191-B2B will be presented.

  20. High-Resolution Molecular Spectroscopy in Tomsk: Establishment, Development, and Current Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matvienko, G. G.; Perevalov, V. I.; Ponomarev, Yu. N.; Sinitsa, L. N.; Cherepanov, V. N.

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents brief information about the establishment and development in Tomsk of high-resolution molecular spectroscopy - the field of science closely related to a study of the optical properties of the atmosphere. The methods and the current state of high-resolution laser spectroscopy and Fourier spectroscopy are described together with new results of mass measurements. The developed theoretical methods for a study of molecular spectra, including methods of their global analysis and information systems of spectral databases, are presented.

  1. High-Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy of Ge_2C_3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorwirth, S.; Lutter, V.; Schlemmer, S.; Giesen, T. F.; Gauss, J.

    2013-06-01

    Carbon-rich systems are of great importance in diverse areas of research like material science as well as astro- and structural chemistry. Despite this relevance, our knowledge of smaller cluster units is still fragmentary, particularly with respect to investigations at high-spectral resolution in the gas phase. Unequivocal assignment of spectral features to their molecular carriers is critically dependent on predictions from high-level quantum-chemical calculations. In turn, high-resolution studies provide useful information to assess the predictive power of quantum-chemical methods. This is particularly interesting for cluster systems harboring heavy elements for which so far relatively little is known from experiment. With this contribution, we would like to present a recent gas-phase study of a polyatomic germanium-carbon cluster, linear Ge_2C_3 (Ge=C=C=C=Ge), which was previously studied in an Ar matrix. The cluster was produced through laser ablation of germanium-graphite sample rods and observed in a free jet at wavelengths around 5μm. Additionally, quantum-chemical calculations of Ge_2C_3 were performed at the CCSD(T) level of theory. The production and observation of Ge_2C_3 suggests that many more binary clusters should be amenable to high-resolution spectroscopic techniques not only in the infrared but also in the microwave region. D. L. Robbins, C. M. L. Rittby, and W. R. M. Graham, J. Chem. Phys. 114, 3570 (2001).

  2. High Resolution Studies of Electron Attachment to Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, M.; Ruf, M.-W.; Hotop, H.; Fabrikant, I. I.

    2009-05-02

    In this paper, we survey recent progress in studies of anion formation via (dissociative) electron attachment (DEA) to simple molecules, as measured with the laser photoelectron attachment (LPA) method at high resolution. The limiting (E{yields}0) threshold behavior of the cross sections is elucidated for s-wave and p-wave attachment. Cusps at onsets for vibrational excitation (VE), due to interaction of the DEA channnel with the VE channel, are clearly detected, and vibrational Feshbach resonances just below vibrational onsets are observed for molecules with sufficiently strong long-range attraction between the electron and the molecule. From the LPA anion yields, absolute DEA cross sections (energy range typically E = 0.001-2 eV) are determined with reference to rate coefficients for thermal electron attachment at the appropriate gas temperature (normally T{sub G} = 300 K). The experimental data are compared with theoretical cross sections, calculated within the framework of an R-matrix or an Effective Range theory approach.

  3. CARMENES science preparation. High-resolution spectroscopy of M dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, D.; Caballero, J. A.; Jeffers, S.; Alonso-Floriano, F. J.; Mundt, R.; CARMENES Consortium

    2015-05-01

    To ensure an efficient use of CARMENES observing time, and the highest chances of success, it is necessary first to select the most promising targets. To achieve this, we are observing 500 M dwarfs at high-resolution (R = 30,000-48,000), from which we determine the projected rotational velocity vsin{i} with an accuracy better than 0.5-0.2 km/s and radial-velocity stability better than 0.2-0.1 km/s. Our aim is to have at least two spectra at different epochs of the final 300 CARMENES targets. Our observations with FEROS at ESO/MPG 2.2 m La Silla, CAFE at 2.2 m Calar Alto and HRS at Hobby Eberly Telescope allow us to identify single- and double-line spectroscopic binaries and, especially, fast rotators, which should be discarded from the target list for exoplanet searches. Here we present preliminary results.

  4. High-resolution spectroscopy of a giant solar filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuckein, Christoph; Denker, Carsten; Verma, Meetu

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of a giant solar quiescent filament were taken with the Echelle spectrograph at the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT; Tenerife, Spain). A mosaic of various spectroheliograms (Hα, Hα+/-0.5 Å and Na D2) were chosen to examine the filament at different heights in the solar atmosphere. In addition, full-disk images (He i 10830 Å and Ca ii K) of the Chromspheric Telescope and full-disk magnetograms of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager were used to complement the spectra. Preliminary results are shown of this filament, which had extremely large linear dimensions (~740'') and was observed in November 2011 while it traversed the northern solar hemisphere.

  5. High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy of SN 1006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vink, Jacco

    2005-06-01

    I discuss the high resolution XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) spectrum of SN 1006. SN 1006 is one of the best examples of a supernova remnant that is far out of ionization equilibrium. Moreover, optical, UV and X-ray data indicate that it is also out of temperature equilibrium. I discuss the X-ray evidence for this. In addition I discuss the lower resolution RGS spectrum of the eastern rim of SN 1006. Despite the lower resolution, the spectrum contains significant evidence for an asymmetric expansion velocity. Two likely solutions fit the O VII triplet. One with no significant thermal broadening and a shell velocity of ~ 6500 km s-1, and one with significant broadening and a shell velocity of 9500 km s -1. The first solution seems the most plausible, as it is consistent with radio expansion measurements, which suggests a decelerated shell.

  6. Quadrature phase interferometer for high resolution force spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Paolino, Pierdomenico; Aguilar Sandoval, Felipe A.; Bellon, Ludovic

    2013-09-15

    In this article, we present a deflection measurement setup for Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). It is based on a quadrature phase differential interferometer: we measure the optical path difference between a laser beam reflecting above the cantilever tip and a reference beam reflecting on the static base of the sensor. A design with very low environmental susceptibility and another allowing calibrated measurements on a wide spectral range are described. Both enable a very high resolution (down to 2.5×10{sup −15} m/√(Hz)), illustrated by thermal noise measurements on AFM cantilevers. They present an excellent long-term stability and a constant sensitivity independent of the optical phase of the interferometer. A quick review shows that our precision is equaling or out-performing the best results reported in the literature, but for a much larger deflection range, up to a few μm.

  7. High resolution spectroscopy from low altitude satellites. [gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakano, G. H.; Imhof, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    The P 78 1 satellite to be placed in a synchronous polar orbit at an altitude of 550-660 km will carry two identical high resolution spectrometers each consisting of a single (approximately 85 cc) intrinsic germanium IGE detector. The payload also includes a pair of phoswitch scintillators, an array of CdTe detectors and several particle detectors, all of which are mounted on the wheel of the satellite. The intrinsic high purity IGE detectors receive cooling from two Stirling cycle refrigerators and facilitate the assembly of large and complex detector arrays planned for the next generation of high sensitivity instruments such as those planned for the gamma ray observatory. The major subsystems of the spectrometer are discussed as well as its capabilities.

  8. High-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy of water dimer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Z. S.; Miller, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    High-resolution near-infrared spectra are reported for all of the O-H stretch vibrational bands of the water dimer. The four O-H vibrations are characterized as essentially independent proton-donor or proton-acceptor motions. In addition to the rotational and vibrational information contained in these spectra, details are obtained concerning the internal tunneling dynamics in both the ground and excited vibrational states. These results show that, for tunneling motions which involve the interchange of the proton donor and acceptor molecules, the associated frequencies decrease substantially due to vibrational excitation. The predissociation lifetimes for the various states of the dimer are determined from linewidth measurements. These results clearly show that the predissociation dynamics is strongly dependent on the tunneling states, as well as the Ka quantum number, indicating that the internal tunneling dynamics plays an important role in determining the dissociation rate in this complex.

  9. MAGELLAN: High resolution spectroscopy at FUV and EUV wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grewing, M.; Alighieri, S. D.; Burton, W.; Coleman, C. I.; Hoekstra, R.; Jamar, C.; Labeque, A.; Laurent, C.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Rafanelli, P.

    1982-01-01

    The aim of ESA's MAGELLAN mission is to provide high resolution spectra of celestial sources down to sixteenth magnitude over the extreme ultraviolet wavelength range (between 50 and 140 nm). This range extends from studies of interstellar matter in the disc and halo of this and other galaxies, to stellar envelopes, hot and evolved stars, clusters, intergalactic matter, nuclei of galaxies, quasars, and, finally, planets and satellites. The instrument has a nonconventional optical design using only one reflecting surface; a high groove density concave grating collects the star light, diffracts it and focuses its spectrum into a bidimensional windowless detector operated in a photon counting mode. The slitless configuration provides the spectra of all the sources (point like and extended) in the field of view of the grating. This field of view is limited by a grid collimator to reduce the diffuse background, the stray light and the probability of overlapping spectra in crowded fields.

  10. High-Resolution Photoelectron Spectroscopy of 2-BUTYNE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacovella, Ugo; Gans, Berenger; Merkt, Frederic

    2013-06-01

    Using a coherent narrow-band vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) laser source (bandwitdh of 0.008 cm^{-1}) coupled to a photoionization and pulse-field-ionization zero-kinetic-energy photoelectron (PFI-ZEKE) spectrometer, the threshold photoionization of polyatomic molecules can be studied at high resolution. We present a new measurement of the PFI-ZEKE photoelectron spectrum of the origin band of the X^+ ^2E_{2(d)} ← X ^1{A}_{1(s)} ionizing transition of 2-butyne at a resolution of 0.15 cm^{-1}. Despite this high resolution, the spectral congestion originating from the combined effects of the internal rotation, the spin-orbit coupling and the Jahn-Teller effect prevented the full resolution of the rotational structure of the photoelectron spectrum. Combined with the known structure of the X ^1A_{1(s)} ground state of 2-butyne, including the free internal rotation, the spectrum was used to derive information on the X^+ ^2E_{2(d)} ground state of the 2-butyne radical cation. The rotational branch structure of the spectrum points at a complex energy-level structure of the cation and at the importance of a shape resonance enhancing g photoelectron partial waves. U. Hollenstein, H. Palm, and F. Merkt, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 71, 4023 (2000). H. C. Longuet-Higgins Mol. Phys. 6, 445 (1963). J. T. Hougen J. Chem. Phys. 37, 1433 (1962). P. R. Bunker Mol. Phys. 8, 81 (1964). H. Xu, U. Jacovella, B. Ruscic, S. T. Pratt and R. R. Lucchese J. Chem. Phys. 136, 154303 (2012).

  11. High-resolution imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennycook, S. J.; Jesson, D. E.

    1992-03-01

    The high-resolution imaging of crystalline materials in the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is reviewed with particular emphasis on the conditions under which an incoherent image can be obtained. It is shown that a high-angle annular detector can be used to break the coherence of the imaging process, in the transverse plane through the geometry of the detector, or in three dimensions if multiphonon diffuse scattering is detected. In the latter case, each atom can be treated as a highly independent source of high-angle scattering. The most effective fast electron states are therefore tightly bound s-type Bloch states. Furthermore, they add constructively for each incident angle in the coherent STEM probe, so that s states are responsible for practically the entire image contrast. Dynamical effects are largely removed, and almost perfect incoherent imaging is achieved. S states are relatively insensitive to neighboring strings, so that incoherent imaging is maintained for superlattice and interfaces, and supercell calculations are unnecessary. With an optimum probe profile, the incoherent image represents a direct image of the crystal projection, with compositional sensitivity built in through the strong dependence of the scattering cross sections on atomic number Z.

  12. Understanding reconstructed Dante spectra using high resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, M. J.; Weaver, J.; Widmann, K.; Kemp, G. E.; Thorn, D.; Colvin, J. D.; Schneider, M. B.; Moore, A.; Blue, B. E.

    2016-11-01

    The Dante is an 18 channel filtered diode array used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux between 50 eV and 20 keV from various targets. The absolute flux is determined from the radiometric calibration of the x-ray diodes, filters, and mirrors and a reconstruction algorithm applied to the recorded voltages from each channel. The reconstructed spectra are very low resolution with features consistent with the instrument response and are not necessarily consistent with the spectral emission features from the plasma. Errors may exist between the reconstructed spectra and the actual emission features due to assumptions in the algorithm. Recently, a high resolution convex crystal spectrometer, VIRGIL, has been installed at NIF with the same line of sight as the Dante. Spectra from L-shell Ag and Xe have been recorded by both VIRGIL and Dante. Comparisons of these two spectroscopic measurements yield insights into the accuracy of the Dante reconstructions.

  13. High Resolution FIR and IR Spectroscopy of Methanol Isotopologues

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, R. M.; Xu, Li-Hong; Appadoo, D. R. T.; Billinghurst, B.

    2010-02-03

    New astronomical facilities such as HIFI on the Herschel Space Observatory, the SOFIA airborne IR telescope and the ALMA sub-mm telescope array will yield spectra from interstellar and protostellar sources with vastly increased sensitivity and frequency coverage. This creates the need for major enhancements to laboratory databases for the more prominent interstellar 'weed' species in order to model and account for their lines in observed spectra in the search for new and more exotic interstellar molecular 'flowers'. With its large-amplitude internal torsional motion, methanol has particularly rich spectra throughout the FIR and IR regions and, being very widely distributed throughout the galaxy, is perhaps the most notorious interstellar weed. Thus, we have recorded new spectra for a variety of methanol isotopic species on the high-resolution FTIR spectrometer on the CLS FIR beamline. The aim is to extend quantum number coverage of the data, improve our understanding of the energy level structure, and provide the astronomical community with better databases and models of the spectral patterns with greater predictive power for a range of astrophysical conditions.

  14. High Resolution γ-Ray Spectroscopy: the First 85 Years.

    PubMed

    Deslattes, R D

    2000-01-01

    This opening review attempts to follow the main trends in crystal diffraction spectrometry of nuclear γ rays from its 1914 beginning in Rutherford's laboratory to the ultra-high resolution instrumentation realized in the current generation of spectrometers at the Institute Laue Langeven (ILL). My perspective is that of an instrumentalist hoping to convey a sense of our intellectual debt to a number of predecessors, each of whom realized a certain elegance in making the tools that have enabled much good science, including that to which the remainder of this workshop is dedicated. This overview follows some of the main ideas along a trajectory toward higher resolution at higher energies, thereby enabling not only the disentangling of dense spectra, but also allowing detailed study of aspects of spectral profiles sensitive to excited state lifetimes and inter-atomic potentials. The parallel evolution toward increasing efficiency while preserving needed resolution is also an interesting story of artful compromise that should not be neglected. Finally, it is the robustness of the measurement chain connecting γ-ray wavelengths with optical wavelengths associated with the Rydberg constant that only recently has allowed γ-ray data to contribute to determination of particle masses and fundamental constants, as will be described in more detail in other papers from this workshop.

  15. Exploring conical intersections through high resolution photofragment translational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashfold, Michael

    2007-03-01

    High resolution measurements of the kinetic energies of H atom fragments formed during UV photolysis of gas phase imidazole, [1,2] pyrrole, [3] phenol [4] and thiophenol molecules show that: (i) X-H (X = N, O, S) bond fission is an important non-radiative decay process from the ^1πσ* excited states in each of these molecules, and (ii) that the respective co-fragments (imidazolyl, pyrrolyl, phenoxyl and thiophenoxyl) are formed in very limited sub-sets of their available vibrational states. Identification of these product states yields uniquely detailed insights into the vibronic couplings involved in the photo-induced evolution from parent molecule to ultimate fragments. [1] M.N.R. Ashfold, B. Cronin, A.L. Devine, R.N. Dixon and M.G.D. Nix, Science (2006), 312, 1637. [2] A.L. Devine, B. Cronin, M.G.D. Nix and M.N.R. Ashfold, J. Chem. Phys. (in press). [3] B. Cronin, M.G.D. Nix, R.H. Qadiri and M.N.R. Ashfold, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. (2004), 6, 5031. [4] M.G.D. Nix, A.L. Devine, B. Cronin, R.N. Dixon and M.N.R. Ashfold, J. Chem. Phys. (2006), 125, 133318.

  16. High Resolution Laser Spectroscopy of SrOCH_3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forthomme, D.; Linton, C.; Tokaryk, D. W.; Adam, A. G.; Granger, A. D.; Downie, L. E.; Hopkins, W. S.

    2011-06-01

    The tilde{A}2E-tilde{X}2A_1 transition of SrOCH_3 was first studied at high resolution by O'Brien et al.footnote{L. C. O'Brien, C. R. Brazier and P. F. Bernath, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 130 (1988) 33-45} using a Broida oven. However lines with typically J≤20 were not observed and congestion prevented them from resolving transitions from the Ω=1/2 component of the upper state. We have studied the tilde{B}2A_1-tilde{X}2A_1 and the tilde{A}2E-tilde{X}2A_1 transitions of SrOCH_3 in a laser ablation molecular jet source, where jet cooling and low Doppler widths greatly simplified the spectra. An optical-optical double resonance technique facilitated definite assignments in a number of the transitions observed. Our analysis of the tilde{A}2E-tilde{X}2A_1 transition was straightforward, but a perturbation was observed in the tilde{B}2A_1 K'=1 F_2 levels. A satisfactory fit was achieved for the tilde{B}2A_1-tilde{X}2A_1 transition when a separate B parameter was used to fit the perturbed levels.

  17. High resolution {gamma}-ray spectroscopy: The first 85 years

    SciTech Connect

    Deslattes, R.D.

    2000-02-01

    This opening review attempts to follow the main trends in crystal diffraction spectrometry of nuclear {gamma} rays from its 1914 beginning in Rutherford's laboratory to the ultra-high resolution instrumentation realized in the current generation of spectrometers at the Institute Laue Langeven (ILL). The authors perspective is that of an instrumentalist hoping to convey a sense of intellectual debt to a number of predecessors, each of whom realized a certain elegance in making the tools that have enabled much good science, including that to which the remainder of this workshop is dedicated. This overview follows some of the main ideas along a trajectory toward higher resolution at higher energies, thereby enabling not only the disentangling of dense spectra, but also allowing detailed study of aspects of spectral profiles sensitive to excited state lifetimes and interatomic potentials. The parallel evolution toward increasing efficiency while preserving needed resolution is also an interesting story of artful compromise that should not be neglected. Finally, it is the robustness of the measurement chain connecting {gamma}-ray wavelengths with optical wave-lengths associated with the Rydberg constant that only recently has allowed {gamma}-ray data to contribute to determine of particle masses and fundamental constants, as will be described in more detail in other papers from this workshop.

  18. High resolution photoelectron spectroscopy of clusters of Group V elements

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lai-sheng; Niu, B.; Lee, Y.T.; Shirley, D.A.

    1989-07-01

    High resolution HeI (580{angstrom}) photoelectron spectra of As{sub 2}, As{sub 4}, and P{sub 4} were obtained with a newly-built high temperature molecular beam source. Vibrational structure was resolved in the photoelectron spectra of the three cluster species. The Jahn-Teller effect is discussed for the {sup 2}E and {sup 2}T{sub 2} states of P{sub 4}{sup +} and As{sub 4}{sup +}. As a result of the Jahn-Teller effect, the {sup 2}E state splits into two bands, and the {sup 2}T{sub 2} state splits into three bands, in combination with the spin-orbit effect. It was observed that the {nu}{sub 2} normal vibrational mode was involved in the vibronic interaction of the {sup 2}E state, while both the {nu}{sub 2} and {nu}{sub 3} modes were active in the {sup 2}T{sub 2} state. 26 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. High-Resolution EUV Spectroscopy of White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Michael P.; Wood, K. S.; Barstow, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    We compare results of high-resolution EUV spectroscopic measurements of the isolated white dwarf G191-B2B and the binary system Feige 24 obtained with the J-PEX (Joint Plasmadynamic Experiment), which was sponsored jointly by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory and NASA. J-PEX delivers the world's highest resolution in EUV and does so at high effective area (e.g., more effective area in a sounding rocket than is available with Chandra at adjacent energies, but in a waveband Chandra cannot reach). The capability J-PEX represents is applicable to the astrophysics of hot plasmas in stellar coronae, white dwarfs and the ISM. G191-B2B and Feige 24 are quite distinct hot white dwarf systems having in common that they are bright in the portion of the EUV where He emission features and edges occur, hence they can be exploited to probe both the stellar atmosphere and the ISM, separating those components by model-fitting that sums over all relevant (He) spectral features in the band. There is evidence from these fits that atmospheric He is being detected but the result is more conservatively cast as a pair of upper limits. We discuss how longer duration satellite observations with the same instrumentation could increase exposure to detect atmospheric He in these and other nearby hot white dwarfs.

  20. Applications of high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy in food science.

    PubMed

    Bertocchi, Fabio; Paci, Maurizio

    2008-10-22

    The principal applications of high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy, in the field of food science, are reviewed, after a short general introduction, mainly focusing on the potential of these investigations, which are, today, routine tools for resolving technological problems. Selected examples of the applications in the field of food science of high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy both in (13)C and in (1)H NMR particularly illustrative of the results obtainable are reported in some detail.

  1. High-Resolution Laser Spectroscopy on the Negative Osmium Ion

    SciTech Connect

    Warring, U.; Amoretti, M.; Canali, C.; Fischer, A.; Heyne, R.; Meier, J. O.; Morhard, Ch.; Kellerbauer, A.

    2009-01-30

    We have applied a combination of laser excitation and electric-field detachment to negative atomic ions for the first time, resulting in an enhancement of the excited-state detection efficiency for spectroscopy by at least 2 orders of magnitude. Applying the new method, a measurement of the bound-bound electric-dipole transition frequency in {sup 192}Os{sup -} was performed using collinear spectroscopy with a narrow-bandwidth cw laser. The transition frequency was found to be 257.831 190(35) THz [wavelength 1162.747 06(16) nm, wave number 8600.3227(12) cm{sup -1}], in agreement with the only prior measurement, but with more than 100-fold higher precision.

  2. High-Resolution Structure of the Photosynthetic Mn4Ca Catalyst from X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko; Kern, Jan; Pushkar, Yulia; Sauer, Kenneth; Glatzel, Pieter; Bergmann, Uwe; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2007-08-01

    The application of high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy methods to study the photosynthetic water oxidizing complex, which contains a unique hetero-nuclear catalytic Mn4Ca cluster, are described. Issues of X-ray damage especially at the metal sites in the Mn4Ca cluster are discussed. The structure of the Mn4Ca catalyst at high-resolution which has so far eluded attempts of determination by X-ray diffraction, EXAFS and other spectroscopic techniques has been addressed using polarized EXAFS techniques applied to oriented PS II membrane preparations and PS II single crystals. A review of how the resolution of traditional EXAFS techniques can be improved, using methods such as range-extended EXAFS is presented, and the changes that occur in the structure of the cluster as it advances through the catalytic cycle are described. X-ray absorption and emission techniques (XANES and K? emission) have been used earlier to determine the oxidation states of the Mn4Ca cluster, and in this report we review the use of X-ray resonant Raman spectroscopy to understand the electronic structure of the Mn4Ca cluster as it cycles through the intermediate S-states.

  3. Giant quiescent solar filament observed with high-resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuckein, C.; Verma, M.; Denker, C.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: An extremely large filament was studied in various layers of the solar atmosphere. The inferred physical parameters and the morphological aspects are compared with smaller quiescent filaments. Methods: A giant quiet-Sun filament was observed with the high-resolution Echelle spectrograph at the Vacuum Tower Telescope at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain, on 2011 November 15. A mosaic of spectra (ten maps of 100″ × 182″) was recorded simultaneously in the chromospheric absorption lines Hα and Na i D2. Physical parameters of the filament plasma were derived using cloud model (CM) inversions and line core fits. The spectra were complemented with full-disk filtergrams (He i λ10830 Å, Hα, and Ca ii K) of the Chromospheric Telescope (ChroTel) and full-disk magnetograms of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). Results: The filament had extremely large linear dimensions (~817 arcsec), which corresponds to about 658 Mm along a great circle on the solar surface. A total amount of 175119 Hα contrast profiles were inverted using the CM approach. The inferred mean line-of-sight (LOS) velocity, Doppler width, and source function were similar to previous works of smaller quiescent filaments. However, the derived optical thickness was higher. LOS velocity trends inferred from the Hα line core fits were in accord but weaker than those obtained with CM inversions. Signatures of counter-streaming flows were detected in the filament. The largest brightening conglomerates in the line core of Na i D2 coincided well with small-scale magnetic fields as seen by HMI. Mixed magnetic polarities were detected close to the ends of barbs. The computation of photospheric horizontal flows based on HMI magnetograms revealed flow kernels with a size of 5-8 Mm and velocities of 0.30-0.45 km s-1 at the ends of the filament. Conclusions: The physical properties of extremely large filaments are similar to their smaller counterparts, except for the optical thickness, which in

  4. Molecular Chirality: Enantiomer Differentiation by High-Resolution Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Eizi

    2014-06-01

    I have demonstrated that triple resonance performed on a three-rotational-level system of a chiral molecule of C1 symmetry exhibits signals opposite in phase for different enantiomers, thereby making enantiomer differentiation possible by microwave spectroscopy This prediction was realized by Patterson et al. on 1,2-propanediol and 1,3-butanediol. We thus now add a powerful method: microwave spectroscopy to the study of chiral molecules, for which hitherto only the measurement of optical rotation has been employed. Although microwave spectroscopy is applied to molecules in the gaseous phase, it is unprecedentedly superior to the traditional method: polarimeter in resolution, accuracy, sensitivity, and so on, and I anticipate a new fascinating research area to be opened in the field of molecular chirality. More versatile and efficient systems should be invented and developed for microwave spectroscopy, in order to cope well with new applications expected for this method For C2 and Cn (n ≥ 3)chiral molecules, the three-rotational-level systems treated above for C1 molecules are no more available within one vibronic state. It should, however, be pointed out that, if we take into account an excited vibronic state in addition to the ground state, for example, we may encounter many three-level systems. Namely, either one rotational transition in the ground state is combined with two vibronic transitions, or such a rotational transition in an excited state may be connected through two vibronic transitions to a rotational level in the ground state manifold. The racemization obviously plays a crucial role in the study of molecular chirality. However, like many other terms employed in chemistry, this important process has been "defined" only in a vague way, in other words, it includes many kinds of processes, which are not well classified on a molecular basis. I shall mention an attempt to obviate these shortcomings in the definition of racemization and also to clarify the

  5. High-Resolution Waveguide THz Spectroscopy of Biological Molecules☆

    PubMed Central

    Laman, N.; Harsha, S. Sree; Grischkowsky, D.; Melinger, Joseph S.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Low-frequency vibrational modes of biological molecules consist of intramolecular modes, which are dependent on the molecule as a whole, as well as intermolecular modes, which arise from hydrogen-bonding interactions and van der Waals forces. Vibrational modes thus contain important information about conformation dynamics of biological molecules, and can also be used for identification purposes. However, conventional Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) often result in broad, overlapping features that are difficult to distinguish. The technique of waveguide THz-TDS has been recently developed, resulting in sharper features. For this technique, an ordered polycrystalline film of the molecule is formed on a metal sample plate. This plate is incorporated into a metal parallel-plate waveguide and probed via waveguide THz-TDS. The planar order of the film reduces the inhomogeneous broadening, and cooling of the samples to 77K reduces the homogenous broadening. This combination results in the line-narrowing of THz vibrational modes, in some cases to an unprecedented degree. Here, this technique has been demonstrated with seven small biological molecules, thymine, deoxycytidine, adenosine, D-glucose, tryptophan, glycine, and L-alanine. The successful demonstration of this technique shows the possibilities and promise for future studies of internal vibrational modes of large biological molecules. PMID:17933879

  6. High resolution ion Doppler spectroscopy at Prairie View Rotamak

    SciTech Connect

    Houshmandyar, Saeid; Yang Xiaokang; Magee, Richard

    2012-10-15

    A fast ion Doppler spectroscopy (IDS) diagnostic system is installed on the Prairie View Rotamak to measure ion temperature and plasma flow. The diagnostic employs a single channel photomultiplier tube and a Jarrell-Ash 50 monochromator with a diffraction grating line density of 1180 lines/mm, which allows for first order spectra of 200-600 nm. The motorized gear of the monochromator allows spectral resolution of 0.01 nm. Equal IDS measurements are observed for various impurity emission lines of which carbon lines exhibit stronger intensities. Furthermore, the diagnostics is examined in an experiment where plasma experiences sudden disruption and quick recovery. In this case, the IDS measurements show {approx}130% increase in ion temperature. Flow measurements are shown to be consistent with plasma rotation.

  7. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at GANIL

    SciTech Connect

    France, G. de

    2014-11-11

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy is intensively used at GANIL to measure low lying states in exotic nuclei on the neutron-rich as well as on the neutron-deficient side of the nuclear chart. On the neutron deficient border, gamma-rays have been observed for the first time in {sup 92}Pd. The level scheme which could be established points to the role of isoscalar pairing. On the neutron rich side, the lifetime of excited states in nuclei around {sup 68}Ni have been been measured using the plunger technique. This allows us to study the evolution of collectivity in a broad range of nuclei. In 2014 GANIL will host the AGATA array for a campaign of at least 2 years. This array is based on the gamma-ray tracking technique, which allows an impressive gain in resolving power.

  8. High resolution ion Doppler spectroscopy at Prairie View Rotamak.

    PubMed

    Houshmandyar, Saeid; Yang, Xiaokang; Magee, Richard

    2012-10-01

    A fast ion Doppler spectroscopy (IDS) diagnostic system is installed on the Prairie View Rotamak to measure ion temperature and plasma flow. The diagnostic employs a single channel photomultiplier tube and a Jarrell-Ash 50 monochromator with a diffraction grating line density of 1180 lines/mm, which allows for first order spectra of 200-600 nm. The motorized gear of the monochromator allows spectral resolution of 0.01 nm. Equal IDS measurements are observed for various impurity emission lines of which carbon lines exhibit stronger intensities. Furthermore, the diagnostics is examined in an experiment where plasma experiences sudden disruption and quick recovery. In this case, the IDS measurements show ~130% increase in ion temperature. Flow measurements are shown to be consistent with plasma rotation.

  9. Structural and Physicochemical Characterization of Spirulina (Arthrospira maxima) Nanoparticles by High-Resolution Electron Microscopic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Neri-Torres, Elier Ekberg; Chanona-Pérez, Jorge J; Calderón, Hector A; Torres-Figueredo, Neil; Chamorro-Cevallos, German; Calderón-Domínguez, Georgina; Velasco-Bedrán, Hugo

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this work was to obtain Spirulina (Arthrospira maxima) nanoparticles (SNPs) by using high-impact mechanical milling and to characterize them by electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. The milling products were analyzed after various processing times (1-4 h), and particle size distribution and number mean size (NMS) were determined by analysis of high-resolution scanning electron microscopic images. The smallest particles are synthesized after 3 h of milling, had an NMS of 55.6±3.6 nm, with 95% of the particles being smaller than 100 nm. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed lattice spacing of ~0.27±0.015 nm for SNPs. The corresponding chemical composition was obtained by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and showed the presence of Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, and Zn. The powder flow properties showed that the powder density was higher when the average nanoparticle size is smaller. They showed free flowability and an increase in their specific surface area (6.89±0.23 m2/g) up to 12-14 times larger than the original material (0.45±0.02 m2/g). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy suggested that chemical damage related to the milling is not significant.

  10. Structural and Physicochemical Characterization of Spirulina (Arthrospira maxima) Nanoparticles by High-Resolution Electron Microscopic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Neri-Torres, Elier Ekberg; Chanona-Pérez, Jorge J; Calderón, Hector A; Torres-Figueredo, Neil; Chamorro-Cevallos, German; Calderón-Domínguez, Georgina; Velasco-Bedrán, Hugo

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this work was to obtain Spirulina (Arthrospira maxima) nanoparticles (SNPs) by using high-impact mechanical milling and to characterize them by electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. The milling products were analyzed after various processing times (1-4 h), and particle size distribution and number mean size (NMS) were determined by analysis of high-resolution scanning electron microscopic images. The smallest particles are synthesized after 3 h of milling, had an NMS of 55.6±3.6 nm, with 95% of the particles being smaller than 100 nm. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed lattice spacing of ~0.27±0.015 nm for SNPs. The corresponding chemical composition was obtained by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and showed the presence of Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, and Zn. The powder flow properties showed that the powder density was higher when the average nanoparticle size is smaller. They showed free flowability and an increase in their specific surface area (6.89±0.23 m2/g) up to 12-14 times larger than the original material (0.45±0.02 m2/g). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy suggested that chemical damage related to the milling is not significant. PMID:27515227

  11. Ultra-high resolution spectroscopy of optical frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Thomas; Preußler, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    The precision, versatility and broad bandwidth of frequency combs are the basis of many different applications from the microwave via the millimeter and THz up to the optical range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Optical frequency combs can be used for the new definition of physical constants, for high-precision metrology and spectroscopy and for ultrahigh bitrate data communications, for instance. Besides the stability and the bandwidth, the most important parameters of a frequency comb are the free spectral range ,as well as the linewidth and amplitude of the single comb lines. A conventional grating based optical spectrometer can easily measure the bandwidth of the comb. However, it fails for the measurement of all other comb parameters, if the comb is generated by a mode-locked fiber laser for instance. Here we present a proof-of-concept setup for an optical spectrometer with a resolution in the kHz-range and first measurements of the free spectral range, linewidth and amplitude of a comb source. The spectrometer is based on the combination of optical heterodyning with the polarization pulling effect of stimulated Brillouin scattering. As we will discuss, the maximum possible resolution is only restricted by the linewidth and stability of the used reference laser. Thus due to the stability of our laser used as local oscillator, our setup has a maximum resolution of around 5 kHz or 40 attometer, corresponding to 11 orders of magnitude compared to the center frequency of the comb of around 190 THz.

  12. High resolution FTIR spectroscopy of the ClO radical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Valerie; Sander, Stanley P.; Friedl, Randy

    1988-01-01

    The chlorine monoxide radical, ClO, plays a significant role in the catalytic destruction of ozone in the Earth's stratosphere. Because of its atmospheric importance, ClO has been the subject of numerous observational attempts. In order to deduce ClO concentrations from stratospheric infrared measurements, the infrared spectroscopy of ClO must be well characterized. Approximately 830 individual lines were measured form ClO imfrared spectra with the ClO concentration between 1 x 10 to the 13th power and 6 x 10 to the 13th power molecules per cu cu. The lines were then averaged and fit to a function of m (where m = O, -J or J+1 for the Q,P and R branches respectively) to obtain the band strength, S sub v and the first Herman-Wallis coefficient, alpha. The total S sub v for the two main isotopmers was 13.11 plus or minus 1 cm(-2) atm(-1) while alpha was 0.00412 plus or minus .00062.

  13. High-resolution imaging and spectroscopy of multipolar plasmonic resonances in aluminum nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jérôme; Kociak, Mathieu; Mahfoud, Zackaria; Proust, Julien; Gérard, Davy; Plain, Jérôme

    2014-10-01

    We report on the high resolution imaging of multipolar plasmonic resonances in aluminum nanoantennas using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Plasmonic resonances ranging from near-infrared to ultraviolet (UV) are measured. The spatial distributions of the multipolar resonant modes are mapped and their energy dispersion is retrieved. The losses in the aluminum antennas are studied through the full width at half-maximum of the resonances, unveiling the weight of both interband and radiative damping mechanisms of the different multipolar resonances. In the blue-UV spectral range, high order resonant modes present a quality factor up to 8, two times higher than low order resonant modes at the same energy. This study demonstrates that near-infrared to ultraviolet tunable multipolar plasmonic resonances in aluminum nanoantennas with relatively high quality factors can be engineered. Aluminum nanoantennas are thus an appealing alternative to gold or silver ones in the visible and can be efficiently used for UV plasmonics.

  14. High resolution laser induced fluorescence Doppler velocimetry utilizing saturated absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Ogiwara, Kohei; Etoh, Shuzo; Yoshimura, Shinji; Tanaka, Masayoshi Y.

    2009-05-15

    A high resolution laser induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been developed to measure the flow velocity field of neutral particles in an electron-cyclotron-resonance argon plasma. The flow velocity has been determined by the Doppler shift of the LIF spectrum, which is proportional to the velocity distribution function. Very high accuracy in velocity determination has been achieved by installing a saturated absorption spectroscopy unit into the LIF system, where the absolute value and scale of laser wavelength are determined by using the Lamb dip and the fringes of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The minimum detectable flow velocity of a newly developed LIF system is {+-}2 m/s, and this performance remains unchanged in a long-time experiment. From the radial measurements of LIF spectra of argon metastable atoms, it is found that there exists an inward flow of neutral particles associated with neutral depletion.

  15. High-resolution imaging and spectroscopy of multipolar plasmonic resonances in aluminum nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jérôme; Kociak, Mathieu; Mahfoud, Zackaria; Proust, Julien; Gérard, Davy; Plain, Jérôme

    2014-10-01

    We report on the high resolution imaging of multipolar plasmonic resonances in aluminum nanoantennas using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Plasmonic resonances ranging from near-infrared to ultraviolet (UV) are measured. The spatial distributions of the multipolar resonant modes are mapped and their energy dispersion is retrieved. The losses in the aluminum antennas are studied through the full width at half-maximum of the resonances, unveiling the weight of both interband and radiative damping mechanisms of the different multipolar resonances. In the blue-UV spectral range, high order resonant modes present a quality factor up to 8, two times higher than low order resonant modes at the same energy. This study demonstrates that near-infrared to ultraviolet tunable multipolar plasmonic resonances in aluminum nanoantennas with relatively high quality factors can be engineered. Aluminum nanoantennas are thus an appealing alternative to gold or silver ones in the visible and can be efficiently used for UV plasmonics. PMID:25207386

  16. High-Resolution and Low-Temperature Photoemission Spectroscopy at the Hisor Helical-Undulator Beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Masashi; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki

    We report an experimental system dedicated for high-resolution and low-temperature photoemission spectroscopy installed on the helical-undulator beamline of a compact 700 MeV electron-storage ring (HiSOR) at Hiroshima University. A 3 m off-plane Eagle normal-incidence monochromator at the beamline covers the photon-energy range of hν = 4-40 eV. From the photoemission spectra near the Fermi edge of evaporated Au film, the total energy resolution was estimated to be 4.5 and 7.5 meV at hν = 7.1 and 22.6 eV, respectively. We have also performed photoemission measurements of Yb metal, which demonstrated highly bulk-sensitive spectra for the excitation by low energy photon. The high-resolution photoemission spectra of Y1 - xCaxTiO3 with x = 0.41 in the vicinity of the boundary between the metallic and insulating phases exhibited anomalous temperature dependence in comparison with those of normal metals.

  17. Exploring the High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Molecules that can Affect the Quality of your Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Terry A.

    2014-06-01

    Few things affect your quality of life more than the air you breathe and the temperature of your immediate environment. Since more than 80% of the energy used in the industrialized world today is still derived from fossil fuels, these two quantities are not unrelated. Most organic molecules injected into the troposphere are degraded via oxidative processes involving free radical intermediates, and many of these intermediates are the same as the ones involved in the combustion of fossil fuels. Key oxidizing intermediates are hydroxyl, OH (day), and nitrate, NO_3 (night), and early intermediates of oxidized organic compounds include the alkoxy (RO) and peroxy (RO_2) families of radicals. Recently we have explored the spectroscopy of RO, RO_2, and NO_3 radicals both for diagnostic purposes and to characterize their molecular properties and benchmark quantum chemistry calculations. We have utilized moderate resolution cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) to study ambient temperature radicals and high resolution CRDS and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) to study jet-cooled radicals. Peroxy radicals and NO_3 have weak tilde{A}-tilde{X} electronic transitions in the near infrared which we have studied with CRDS. Comparable LIF measurements have been made for the alkoxy species in the UV. Both vibrational and rotational resolution of the electronic spectra is observed. Data obtained from the spectral observations provide information about both the geometric and electronic structure of these radicals as well as their dynamics and also provide the capability for unambiguous diagnostics of their concentrations and reactions.

  18. a Thz Photomixing Synthesizer Based on a Fiber Frequency Comb for High Resolution Rotational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gael; Cuisset, Arnaud; Yang, Chun; Eliet, Sophie; Bocquet, Robin

    2010-06-01

    To date the principal application for photomixing sources has been for high resolution spectroscopy of gases due to the large tuning range and spectral purity. New Developments of the Opto-Electronic THz Spectrometer have been performed in order to obtain a powerful tool for High-Resolution Spectroscopy. The combination of two extended cavity laser diodes and fast charge carrier lifetime semiconductor materials has allowed a continuous-wave THz spectrometer to be constructed based on optical heterodyning. Unlike many THz sources, this instrument gives access to all frequencies in the range 0.3 to 3.5 THz with a resolution of 1 MHz. The main spectroscopic applications of this spectrometer were dedicated to line profile analysis of rotational transitions referenced in the spectroscopic databases. One limitation of the THz spectrometer was accuracy with which the generated frequency is known. Recently, this obstacle has been circled with the construction of a photomixing spectrometer where the two pump lasers are phase locked to two modes of a repetition rate stabilized frequency doubled fiber laser frequency comb. In order to achieve a tuning range in excess to 100 MHz a third cw laser was required in the new configuration of the THz spectrometer. To assess the performances of this instrument, the frequencies of the pure rotational transitions of OCS molecules have been measured between 0,8 to 1,2 THz. A rms inferior to 100 kHz, deduced from the frequencies measured, demonstrates that the THz photomixing synthesizer is now able to be competitive with microwave and submillimeter techniques. S. Matton, F. Rohart, R. Bocquet, D. Bigourd, A. Cuisset, F. Hindle, G. Mouret, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 2006, 239: 182. C. Yang, J. Buldyreva, I. E. Gordon, F. Rohart, A. Cuisset, G. Mouret, R. Bocquet, F. Hindle, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer, 2008, 109: 2857. G. Mouret, F. Hindle, A. Cuisset, C. Yang, R. Bocquet, M. Lours, D. Rovera, Opt. Express, 2009, 17: 22031.

  19. Ultra high resolution molecular beam cars spectroscopy with application to planetary atmospheric molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The measurement of high resolution pulsed and continuous wave (CW) coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements in pulsed and steady state supersonic expansions were demonstrated. Pulsed molecular beam sources were characterized, and saturation of a Raman transition and, for the first time, the Raman spectrum of a complex molecular cluster were observed. The observation of CW CARS spectra in a molecular expansion and the effects of transit time broadening is described. Supersonic expansion is established as a viable technique for high resolution Raman spectroscopy of cold molecules with resolutions of 100 MH2.

  20. The determination of potential energy curve and dipole moment of the (5)0{sup +} electronic state of {sup 85}Rb{sup 133}Cs molecule by high resolution photoassociation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Jinpeng; Zhao, Yanting Ji, Zhonghua; Li, Zhonghao; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang; Kim, Jin-Tae

    2015-12-14

    We present the formation of ultracold {sup 85}Rb{sup 133}Cs molecules in the (5)0{sup +} electronic state by photoassociation and their detection via resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization. Up to v = 47 vibrational levels including the lowest v = 0 vibrational and lowest J = 0 levels are identified with rotationally resolved high resolution photoassociation spectra. Precise Dunham coefficients are determined for the (5)0{sup +} state with high accuracy, then the Rydberg-Klein-Rees potential energy curve is derived. The electric dipole moments with respect to the vibrational numbers of the (5)0{sup +} electronic state of {sup 85}Rb{sup 133}Cs molecule are also measured in the range between 1.9 and 4.8 D. These comprehensive studies on previously unobserved rovibrational levels of the (5)0{sup +} state are helpful to understand the molecular structure and discover suitable transition pathways for transferring ultracold atoms to deeply bound rovibrational levels of the electronic ground state.

  1. High-Resolution Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Characterization of Polymorphism in Cimetidine, a Pharmaceutical Compound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacilio, Julia E.; Tokarski, John T.; Quiñones, Rosalynn; Iuliucci, Robbie J.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy has many advantages as a tool to characterize solid-phase material that finds applications in polymer chemistry, nanotechnology, materials science, biomolecular structure determination, and others, including the pharmaceutical industry. The technology associated with achieving high resolution…

  2. High resolution x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy - a new technique for site- and spin-selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin

    1996-12-01

    X-ray spectroscopy has long been used to elucidate electronic and structural information of molecules. One of the weaknesses of x-ray absorption is its sensitivity to all of the atoms of a particular element in a sample. Through out this thesis, a new technique for enhancing the site- and spin-selectivity of the x-ray absorption has been developed. By high resolution fluorescence detection, the chemical sensitivity of K emission spectra can be used to identify oxidation and spin states; it can also be used to facilitate site-selective X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and site-selective Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The spin polarization in K fluorescence could be used to generate spin selective XANES or spin-polarized EXAFS, which provides a new measure of the spin density, or the nature of magnetic neighboring atoms. Finally, dramatic line-sharpening effects by the combination of absorption and emission processes allow observation of structure that is normally unobservable. All these unique characters can enormously simplify a complex x-ray spectrum. Applications of this novel technique have generated information from various transition-metal model compounds to metalloproteins. The absorption and emission spectra by high resolution fluorescence detection are interdependent. The ligand field multiplet model has been used for the analysis of K{alpha} and K{beta} emission spectra. First demonstration on different chemical states of Fe compounds has shown the applicability of site selectivity and spin polarization. Different interatomic distances of the same element in different chemical forms have been detected using site-selective EXAFS.

  3. Very high resolution UV and X-ray spectroscopy and imagery of solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, M.; Brown, W. A.; Haisch, B. M.

    1987-01-01

    A scientific investigation of the physics of the solar atmosphere, which uses the techniques of high resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy and high resolution UV imagery, is described. The experiments were conducted during a series of three sounding rocket flights. All three flights yielded excellent images in the UV range, showing unprecedented spatial resolution. The second flight recorded the X-ray spectrum of a solar flare, and the third that of an active region. A normal incidence multi-layer mirror was used during the third flight to make the first astronomical X-ray observations using this new technique.

  4. High Resolution Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Au_2^- and Au_4^- by Photoelectron Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2013-06-01

    We report high resolution photoelectron spectra of Au_2^- and Au_4^- obtained with a newly-built photoelectron imaging apparatus. Gold anions are produced by laser vaporization and the desired specie is mass selected and focused into the collinear velocity-map imaging (VMI) lens assembly. The design of the imaging lens has allowed us to obtain less than 0.9% energy resolution for high kinetic energy electrons ( > 1eV) while maintaining wavenumber resolution for low kinetic energy electrons. Although gold dimer and tetramer have been studied in the past, we present spectroscopic results under high resolution. For Au_2^-, we report high resolution spectra with an accurate determination of the electron affinity together with a complete vibrational assignment, for both the anion and neutral ground states, while for Au_4^-, we are able to resolve a low frequency mode and obtain accurately the adiabatic detachment energy.

  5. The Collection of High-Resolution Electron Diffraction Data

    PubMed Central

    Gonen, Tamir

    2013-01-01

    A number of atomic-resolution structures of membrane proteins (better than 3Å resolution) have been determined recently by electron crystallography. While this technique was established more than 40 years ago, it is still in its infancy with regard to the two-dimensional (2D) crystallization, data collection, data analysis, and protein structure determination. In terms of data collection, electron crystallography encompasses both image acquisition and electron diffraction data collection. Other chapters in this volume outline protocols for image collection and analysis. This chapter, however, outlines detailed protocols for data collection by electron diffraction. These include microscope setup, electron diffraction data collection, and troubleshooting. PMID:23132060

  6. High-resolution heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy based on spatial encoding and coherence transfer in inhomogeneous fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kaiyu; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Hao; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-11-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been proven to be a powerful technique for chemical, biological, and medical studies. Heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) and heteronuclear multiple bond correlation (HMBC) are two frequently used 2D NMR methods. In combination with spatially encoded techniques, a heteronuclear 2D NMR spectrum can be acquired in several seconds and may be applied to monitoring chemical reactions. However, it is difficult to obtain high-resolution NMR spectra in inhomogeneous fields. Inspired by the idea of tracing the difference of precession frequencies between two different spins to yield high-resolution spectra, we propose a method with correlation acquisition option and J-resolved-like acquisition option to ultrafast obtain high-resolution HSQC/HMBC spectra and heteronuclear J-resolved-like spectra in inhomogeneous fields.

  7. [Measurement of OH radicals in flame with high resolution differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Liu, Wen-Qing; Kan, Rui-Feng; Si, Fu-Qi; Xu, Zhen-Yu; Hu, Ren-Zhi; Xie, Pin-Hua

    2011-10-01

    The present paper describes a new developed high resolution differential optical absorption spectroscopy instrument used for the measurement of OH radicals in flame. The instrument consists of a Xenon lamp for light source; a double pass high resolution echelle spectrometer with a resolution of 3.3 pm; a multiple-reflection cell of 20 meter base length, in which the light reflects in the cell for 176 times, so the whole path length of light can achieve 3 520 meters. The OH radicals'6 absorption lines around 308 nm were simultaneously observed in the experiment. By using high resolution DOAS technology, the OH radicals in candles, kerosene lamp, and alcohol burner flames were monitored, and their concentrations were also inverted. PMID:22250529

  8. Electronic Spectroscopy & Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Maroncelli, Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-06-08

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electronic Spectroscopy and Dynamics was held at Colby College, Waterville, NH from 07/19/2009 thru 07/24/2009. The Conference was well-attended with participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. The GRC on Electronic Spectroscopy & Dynamics showcases some of the most recent experimental and theoretical developments in electronic spectroscopy that probes the structure and dynamics of isolated molecules, molecules embedded in clusters and condensed phases, and bulk materials. Electronic spectroscopy is an important tool in many fields of research, and this GRC brings together experts having diverse backgrounds in physics, chemistry, biophysics, and materials science, making the meeting an excellent opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of ideas and techniques. Topics covered in this GRC include high-resolution spectroscopy, biological molecules in the gas phase, electronic structure theory for excited states, multi-chromophore and single-molecule spectroscopies, and excited state dynamics in chemical and biological systems.

  9. High-resolution inverse Raman and resonant-wave-mixing spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rahn, L.A.

    1993-12-01

    These research activities consist of high-resolution inverse Raman spectroscopy (IRS) and resonant wave-mixing spectroscopy to support the development of nonlinear-optical techniques for temperature and concentration measurements in combustion research. Objectives of this work include development of spectral models of important molecular species needed to perform coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements and the investigation of new nonlinear-optical processes as potential diagnostic techniques. Some of the techniques being investigated include frequency-degenerate and nearly frequency-degenerate resonant four-wave-mixing (DFWM and NDFWM), and resonant multi-wave mixing (RMWM).

  10. High resolution dissociative electron attachment to gas phase adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, D.; Beikircher, M.; Denifl, S.; Zappa, F.; Matejcik, S.; Bacher, A.; Grill, V.; Maerk, T. D.; Scheier, P.

    2006-08-28

    The dissociative electron attachment to the gas phase nucleobase adenine is studied using two different experiments. A double focusing sector field mass spectrometer is utilized for measurements requiring high mass resolution, high sensitivity, and relative ion yields for all the fragment anions and a hemispherical electron monochromator instrument for high electron energy resolution. The negative ion mass spectra are discussed at two different electron energies of 2 and 6 eV. In contrast to previous gas phase studies a number of new negative ions are discovered in the mass spectra. The ion efficiency curves for the negative ions of adenine are measured for the electron energy range from about 0 to 15 eV with an electron energy resolution of about 100 meV. The total anion yield derived via the summation of all measured fragment anions is compared with the total cross section for negative ion formation measured recently without mass spectrometry. For adenine the shape of the two cross section curves agrees well, taking into account the different electron energy resolutions; however, for thymine some peculiar differences are observed.

  11. High-resolution photoluminescence spectroscopy of Sn-doped ZnO single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, E. Senthil; Mohammadbeigi, F.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Watkins, S. P.

    2016-01-01

    Here, Group IV donors in ZnO are poorly understood, despite evidence that they are effective n-dopants. We present high-resolution photoluminescence spectroscopy studies of unintentionally doped and Sn doped ZnO single crystals grown by the chemical vapor transport method. Doped samples showed greatly increased emission from the I10 bound exciton transition which was recently proven to be related to the incorporation of Sn impurities based on radio-isotope studies. PL linewidths are exceptionally sharp for these samples, enabling clear identification of several donor species. Temperature dependent PL measurements of the I10 line emission energy and intensity dependence reveal a behavior similar to other shallow donors in ZnO. Ionized donor bound exciton and two electron satellite transitions of the I10 transition are unambiguously identified and yield a donor binding energy of 71 meV. In contrast to recent reports of Ge-related donors in ZnO, the spectroscopic binding energy for the Sn-related donor bound exciton follows a linear relationship with donor binding energy (Haynes rule), confirming the shallow nature of this defect center, which we attribute to a SnZn double donor compensated by an unknown single acceptor.

  12. High-resolution photoluminescence spectroscopy of Sn-doped ZnO single crystals

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kumar, E. Senthil; Mohammadbeigi, F.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Watkins, S. P.

    2016-01-01

    Here, Group IV donors in ZnO are poorly understood, despite evidence that they are effective n-dopants. We present high-resolution photoluminescence spectroscopy studies of unintentionally doped and Sn doped ZnO single crystals grown by the chemical vapor transport method. Doped samples showed greatly increased emission from the I10 bound exciton transition which was recently proven to be related to the incorporation of Sn impurities based on radio-isotope studies. PL linewidths are exceptionally sharp for these samples, enabling clear identification of several donor species. Temperature dependent PL measurements of the I10 line emission energy and intensity dependence reveal a behavior similar tomore » other shallow donors in ZnO. Ionized donor bound exciton and two electron satellite transitions of the I10 transition are unambiguously identified and yield a donor binding energy of 71 meV. In contrast to recent reports of Ge-related donors in ZnO, the spectroscopic binding energy for the Sn-related donor bound exciton follows a linear relationship with donor binding energy (Haynes rule), confirming the shallow nature of this defect center, which we attribute to a SnZn double donor compensated by an unknown single acceptor.« less

  13. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall,G.E.; Sears, T.J.

    2009-04-03

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. High-resolution spectroscopy, augmented by theoretical and computational methods, is used to investigate the structure and collision dynamics of chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry. Applications and methods development are equally important experimental components of this work.

  14. Update of High Resolution (e,e'K^+) Hypernuclear Spectroscopy at Jefferson Lab's Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    Cusanno, F; Bydzovsky, P; Chang, C C; Cisbani, E; De Jager, C W; De Leo, R; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Higinbotham, D W; Iodice, M; LeRose, J J; Markowitz, P; Marrone, S; Sotona, M; Urciuoli, G M

    2010-03-01

    Updated results of the experiment E94-107 hypernuclear spectroscopy in Hall A of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab), are presented. The experiment provides high resolution spectra of excitation energy for 12B_\\Lambda, 16N_\\Lambda, and 9Li_\\Lambda hypernuclei obtained by electroproduction of strangeness. A new theoretical calculation for 12B_\\Lambda, final results for 16N_\\Lambda, and discussion of the preliminary results of 9Li_\\Lambda are reported.

  15. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G.E.

    2011-05-31

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  16. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall G. E.; Goncharov, V.

    2012-05-29

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  17. Fabry-Pérot-multichannel spectrometer tandem for ultra-high resolution Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rozas, Guillermo; Jusserand, Bernard; Fainstein, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel ultra-high resolution Raman spectroscopy technique based in a Fabry-Pérot/triple spectrometer tandem with multichannel acquisition. We describe the system, detail the calibration process, and experimentally test the technique, showing that effective finesses in excess of 1000 are possible. The technique is specifically tailored for low intensity, complex and spectrally extended Raman spectra, providing shorter acquisition times with respect to similar tandem systems with monochannel detectors.

  18. High-resolution extreme-ultraviolet spectroscopy of potassium using anti-Stokes radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothenberg, J. E.; Young, J. F.; Harris, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    The use of a new extreme-ultraviolet radiation source based on spontaneous anti-Stokes scattering for high-resolution absorption spectroscopy of transition originating from the 3p6 shell of potassium is reported. The region from 546.6 to 536.8 A is scanned at a resolution of about 1.2 Kayser. Within this region, four previously unreported lines are observed.

  19. Single sideband imaging in high-resolution electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenstein, M.

    1992-06-01

    More then 20 years ago, Hanßen and Morgenstern [1] described the case of single sideband imaging in electron microscopy. Single sideband imaging allows to correct artifacts in the imaging process due to spherical aberration and defocus and to reconstruct the electron wave function at the exit surface of the sample from experimental micrographs. In the present work, optimized imaging parameters allowed us to obtain new experimental results, thus confirming the resolution limit of single sideband imaging (0.13 nm) to be close to the information limit of a JEOL 4000EX microscope. Furthermore, the reconstructed exit surface wave functions were throuroughly checked by using them to calculate a focus series, which was compared with an experimental focus series.

  20. Ultra-High-Resolution Electron Microscopy of Carbon Nanotube Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Cowley, J. M.; Winterton, Jamie

    2001-07-02

    The resolution in scanning transmission electron microscopy may be enhanced by taking advantage of the information contained in the nanodiffraction patterns recorded for each position of the scanning incident beam. We have demonstrated the first production of ultrahigh resolution, better than 0.1nm, by this method, in the imaging of an essentially one-dimensional object, the wall of a multiwalled carbon nanotube, using an instrument for which the resolution for normal imaging is about 0.3nm.

  1. High-resolution infrared spectroscopy of HCN-Agn (n = 1-4) complexes solvated in superfluid helium droplets.

    PubMed

    Stiles, Paul L; Miller, Roger E

    2007-08-01

    High-resolution infrared spectroscopy has been used to determine the structures, C-H stretching frequencies, and dipole moments of the HCN-Agn (n = 1-3) complexes formed in superfluid helium droplets. The HCN-Ag4 cluster was tentatively assigned based upon pick-up cell pressure dependencies and harmonic vibrational shift calculations. Ab initio and density functional theory calculations were used in conjunction with the high-resolution spectra to analyze the bonding nature of each cluster. All monoligated species reported here are bound through the nitrogen end of the HCN molecule. The HCN-Agn complexes are structurally similar to the previously reported HCN-Cun clusters, with the exception of the HCN-Ag binary complex. Although the interaction between the HCN and the Agn clusters follows the same trends as the HCN-Cun clusters, the more diffuse nature of the electrons surrounding the silver atoms results in a much weaker interaction.

  2. High-Resolution Pfi-Zeke Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Cl_2: the Ground (X^+ ^2π{g}) and First Excited (A^+ ^2π{u}) Electronic States of Cl_2^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollet, Sandro; Merkt, Frederic

    2012-06-01

    Recently, two studies have been devoted to the low-lying electronic states of Cl_2^+, one by PFI-ZEKE photoelectron (PE) spectroscopy of the {X}^+←{X} transition and one by laser-induced-fluorescence spectroscopy of the {A}^+→{X}^+ band system. To complement the information available on the X^+ and A^+ electronic states of Cl_2^+, we have recorded partially rotationally resolved single-photon PFI-ZEKE PE spectra of the {X}^+ ^2π{g,i}←{X} ^1Σg^+ and {A}^+ ^2π{u,i}←{X} ^1Σg^+ (i=3/2, 1/2) photoionizing transitions of Cl_2 in the wavenumber ranges 92 500-96 500 {cm}-1 and 106 750-115 500 {cm}-1. These regions correspond to transitions to low-lying vibrational levels of the X^+ state with v^+=0-5 and to transitions to vibrational levels of the X^+ state with v^+=25-45 and vibrational levels of the A^+ state with v^+≤ 7. The analysis of the rotational structure and the isotopic shifts of these spectra has enabled the derivation of an improved value of the first adiabatic ionization energy (92 647.7±0.3 {cm}-1 for 35Cl_2). In combination with measurements of ion-pair states with n≈ 1800 new values for the dissociation energies D_0 of Cl_2 and Cl_2^+ could also be derived. The potential energy function of the X^+ state of Cl_2^+ was determined in a least-squares fitting procedure. Spin-orbit splittings were derived for many vibrational levels of the X^+ and A^+ states. Combining our results with other resultsb, several low-lying vibrational levels of the upper spin-orbit component of the A^+ state could be assigned for the first time. The PFI-ZEKE PE spectra also contain a series of as yet unassigned lines and reveal numerous perturbations. J. Li, Y. Hao, J. Yang, C. Zhou, and Y. Mo}, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 104307 (2007). M. A. Gharaibeh, and D. J. Clouthier, 66th Int. Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, Book of Abstracts, p. 169 (2011). S. Mollet, and F. Merkt, Phys. Rev. A 82, 032510 (2010). R. P. Tuckett, and S. D. Peyerimhoff, Chem. Phys. 83, 203 (1984

  3. Applications of High Resolution Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy for Atmospheric and Environmental Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roscioli, Joseph R.; McManus, J. Barry; Nelson, David; Zahniser, Mark; Herndon, Scott C.; Shorter, Joanne; Yacovitch, Tara I.; Jervis, Dylan; Dyroff, Christoph; Kolb, Charles E.

    2016-06-01

    For the past 20 years, high resolution infrared spectroscopy has served as a valuable tool to measure gas-phase concentrations of ambient gas samples. We review recent advances in atmospheric sampling using direct absorption high resolution mid-infrared spectroscopy from the perspective of light sources, detectors, and optical designs. Developments in diode, quantum cascade and interband cascade laser technology have led to thermoelectrically-cooled single-mode laser sources capable of operation between 800 wn and 3100 wn, with <10 MHz resolution and >10 mW power. Advances in detector and preamplifier technology have yielded thermoelectriocally-cooled sensors capable of room-temperature operation with extremely high detectivities. Finally, novel spectrometer optical designs have led to robust multipass absorption cells capable of >400 m effective pathlength in a compact package. In combination with accurate spectroscopic databases, these developments have afforded dramatic improvements in measurement sensitivity, accuracy, precision, and selectivity. We will present several examples of the applications of high resolution mid-IR spectrometers in real-world field measurements at sampling towers and aboard mobile platforms such as vehicles and airplanes.

  4. High resolution transmission spectroscopy as a diagnostic for Jovian exoplanet atmospheres: constraints from theoretical models

    SciTech Connect

    Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; Perna, Rosalba; Heng, Kevin

    2014-11-01

    We present high resolution transmission spectra of giant planet atmospheres from a coupled three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric dynamics and transmission spectrum model that includes Doppler shifts which arise from winds and planetary motion. We model Jovian planets covering more than two orders of magnitude in incident flux, corresponding to planets with 0.9-55 day orbital periods around solar-type stars. The results of our 3D dynamical models reveal certain aspects of high resolution transmission spectra that are not present in simple one-dimensional (1D) models. We find that the hottest planets experience strong substellar to anti-stellar (SSAS) winds, resulting in transmission spectra with net blueshifts of up to 3 km s{sup –1}, whereas less irradiated planets show almost no net Doppler shifts. We find only minor differences between transmission spectra for atmospheres with temperature inversions and those without. Compared to 1D models, peak line strengths are significantly reduced for the hottest atmospheres owing to Doppler broadening from a combination of rotation (which is faster for close-in planets under the assumption of tidal locking) and atmospheric winds. Finally, high resolution transmission spectra may be useful in studying the atmospheres of exoplanets with optically thick clouds since line cores for very strong transitions should remain optically thick to very high altitude. High resolution transmission spectra are an excellent observational test for the validity of 3D atmospheric dynamics models, because they provide a direct probe of wind structures and heat circulation. Ground-based exoplanet spectroscopy is currently on the verge of being able to verify some of our modeling predictions, most notably the dependence of SSAS winds on insolation. We caution that interpretation of high resolution transmission spectra based on 1D atmospheric models may be inadequate, as 3D atmospheric motions can produce a noticeable effect on the absorption

  5. Fast acquisition of high-resolution 2D NMR spectroscopy in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liangjie; Wei, Zhiliang; Zeng, Qing; Yang, Jian; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy plays an important role in chemical and biological analyses. In this study, we combine the J-coupling coherence transfer module with the echo-train acquisition technique for fast acquisition of high-resolution 2D NMR spectra in magnetic fields with unknown spatial variations. The proposed method shows satisfactory performance on a 5 mM ethyl 3-bromopropionate sample, under a 5-kHz (10 ppm at 11.7 T) B0 inhomogeneous field, as well as under varying degrees of pulse-flip-angle deviations. Moreover, a simulative ex situ NMR measurement is also conducted to show the effectiveness of the proposed pulse sequence.

  6. High Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy of Molecules of Terrestrial and Planetary Interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Richard S.

    2001-01-01

    In collaboration with the laboratory spectroscopy group of the Ames Atmospheric Physics Research Branch (SGP), high resolution infrared spectra of molecules that are of importance for the dynamics of the earth's and other planets' atmospheres were acquired using the SGP high resolution Fourier transform spectrometer and gas handling apparatus. That data, along with data acquired using similar instrumentation at the Kitt Peak National Observatory was analyzed to determine the spectral parameters for each of the rotationally resolved transitions for each molecule. Those parameters were incorporated into existing international databases (e.g. HITRANS and GEISA) so that field measurements could be converted into quantitative information regarding the physical and chemical structures of earth and planetary atmospheres.

  7. High resolution coherent three dimensional spectroscopy of NO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Thresa A.; Muthike, Angelar K.; Robinson, Jessica E.; Chen, Peter C.

    2015-06-07

    Expansion from coherent 2D spectroscopy to coherent 3D spectroscopy can provide significant advantages when studying molecules that have heavily perturbed energy levels. This paper illustrates such advantages by demonstrating how high resolution coherent 3D (HRC3D) spectroscopy can be used to study a portion of the visible spectrum of nitrogen dioxide. High resolution coherent 2D spectra usually contain rotational and vibrational patterns that are easy to analyze, but severe congestion and complexity preclude its effective use for many parts of the NO{sub 2} spectrum. HRC3D spectroscopy appears to be much more effective; multidimensional rotational and vibrational patterns produced by this new technique are easy to identify even in the presence of strong perturbations. A method for assigning peaks, which is based upon analyzing the resulting multidimensional patterns, has been developed. The higher level of multidimensionality is useful for reducing uncertainty in peak assignments, improving spectral resolution, providing simultaneous information on multiple levels and states, and predicting, verifying, and categorizing peaks.

  8. Synchrotron-Based High Resolution Spectroscopy of N-Bearing Pahs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruet, Sébastien; Pirali, Olivier; Goubet, Manuel; Brechignac, Philippe

    2014-06-01

    For thirty years, the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been suspected to give rise to the numerous Unidentified Infrared Bands (UIBs) observed in most astrophysical objects. Pure carbon molecules as well as derivatives with nitrogen atom(s) incorporated into the carbon skeleton have been considered. These N-bearing molecules are interesting candidates for astronomical research since they possess a larger permanent dipole moment than purely carbon-based PAHs. Most of the data reported in the literature deal with rotationally unresolved data. During the last decade, high-resolution microwave spectroscopy initiated high resolution studies of this broad family of molecules. Recent advances in laboratory techniques permitted to provide interesting new results to rotationally resolve the IR/Far-IR vibrational bands of these relatively large C-bearing molecules, in particular, making use of synchrotron radiation as the IR continuum source of high resolution Fourier transform (FT) spectrometers. We will present an overview of the synchrotron-based high resolution FTIR spectroscopy of 5 aza-derivatives of naphthalene (isoquinoline, quinoline, quinoxaline, quinazoline, [1,5] naphthyridine) using a room temperature long path absorption cell at the French facility SOLEIL. In support to the rovibrational analysis of these FIR spectra, very accurate anharmonic DFT calculations were performed. A. Leger, J. L. Puget, Astron. Astrophys. 137, L5-L8 (1984) L. J. Allamandola et al. Astrophys. J. 290, L25-L28 (1985). Z. Kisiel et al. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 217, 115 (2003) S. Thorwirth et al. Astrophys. J. 662, 1309 (2007) D. McNaughton et al. J. Chem. Phys. 124, 154305 (2011). S. Albert et al. Faraday Discuss. 150, 71-99 (2011) B. E. Brumfield et al. Phys. Chem. Lett. 3, 1985-1988 (2012) O. Pirali et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 15, 10141 (2013) M. Goubet, O. Pirali, J. Chem. Phys., 140, 044322 (2014).

  9. High temperature and high resolution uv photoelectron spectroscopy using supersonic molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lai-Sheng; Reutt-Robey, J.E.; Niu, B.; Lee, Y.T.; Shirley, D.A.; Maryland Univ., College Park, MD . Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1989-07-01

    A high temperature molecular beam source with electron bombardment heating has been built for high resolution photoelectron spectroscopic studies of high temperature species and clusters. This source has the advantages of: producing an intense, continuous, seeded molecular beam, eliminating the interference of the heating mechanism from the photoelectron measurement. Coupling the source with our hemispherical electron energy analyzer, we can obtain very high resolution HeI{alpha} (584{angstrom}) photoelectron spectra of high temperature species. Vibrationally-resolved photoelectron spectra of PbSe, As{sub 2}, As{sub 4}, and ZnCl{sub 2} are shown to demonstrate the performance of the new source. 25 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Transient Thermometry and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Analysis of Filamentary Resistive Switches.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jonghan; Sharma, Abhishek A; Chen, Chao-Yang; Fantini, Andrea; Jurczak, Malgorzata; Herzing, Andrew A; Bain, James A; Picard, Yoosuf N; Skowronski, Marek

    2016-08-10

    We present data on the filament size and temperature distribution in Hf0.82Al0.18Ox-based Resistive Random Access Memory (RRAM) devices obtained by transient thermometry and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The thermometry shows that the temperature of the nonvolatile conducting filament can reach temperatures as high as 1600 K at the onset of RESET at voltage of 0.8 V and power of 40 μW. The size of the filament was estimated at about 1 nm in diameter. Hot filament increases the temperature of the surrounding high resistivity oxide, causing it to conduct and carry a significant fraction of the total current. The current spreading results in slowing down the filament temperature increase at higher power. The results of thermometry have been corroborated by HRTEM analysis of the as-fabricated and switched RRAM devices. The functional HfAlOx layer in as-fabricated devices is amorphous. In devices that were switched, we detected a small crystalline region of 10-15 nm in size. The crystallization temperature of the HfAlOx was determined to be 850 K in an independent annealing experiment. The size of the crystalline region agrees with thermal modeling based on the thermometry data. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coordinated with electron energy loss spectroscopy could not detect changes in the chemical makeup of the filament. PMID:27351065

  11. Method for local temperature measurement in a nanoreactor for in situ high-resolution electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vendelbo, S B; Kooyman, P J; Creemer, J F; Morana, B; Mele, L; Dona, P; Nelissen, B J; Helveg, S

    2013-10-01

    In situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of solids under reactive gas conditions can be facilitated by microelectromechanical system devices called nanoreactors. These nanoreactors are windowed cells containing nanoliter volumes of gas at ambient pressures and elevated temperatures. However, due to the high spatial confinement of the reaction environment, traditional methods for measuring process parameters, such as the local temperature, are difficult to apply. To address this issue, we devise an electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) method that probes the local temperature of the reaction volume under inspection by the electron beam. The local gas density, as measured using quantitative EELS, is combined with the inherent relation between gas density and temperature, as described by the ideal gas law, to obtain the local temperature. Using this method we determined the temperature gradient in a nanoreactor in situ, while the average, global temperature was monitored by a traditional measurement of the electrical resistivity of the heater. The local gas temperatures had a maximum of 56 °C deviation from the global heater values under the applied conditions. The local temperatures, obtained with the proposed method, are in good agreement with predictions from an analytical model. PMID:23831940

  12. High-Resolution Spectroscopy with the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    ScienceCinema

    Canizares, Claude R. [MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2016-07-12

    The capabilities of the Chandra X-ray Observatory and XMM-Newton for high-resolution spectroscopy have brought tradition plasma diagnostic techniques to the study of cosmic plasma. Observations have probed nearly every class of astronomical object, from young proto-starts through massive O starts and black hole binaries, supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei, and the intergalactic medium. Many of these sources show remarkable rich spectra that reveal new physical information, such as emission measure distributions, elemental abundances, accretion disk and wind signatures, and time variability. This talk will present an overview of the Chandra instrumentaton and selected examples of spectral observations of astrophysical and cosmological importance.

  13. Gas sensing with high-resolution localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bingham, Julia M; Anker, Jeffrey N; Kreno, Lauren E; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2010-12-15

    We report the first inert gas sensing and characterization studies based on high-resolution localized surface plasmon resonance (HR-LSPR) spectroscopy. HR-LSPR was used to detect the extremely small changes (<3 × 10(-4)) in bulk refractive index when the gas was switched between He(g) and Ar(g) or He(g) and N2(g). We also demonstrate submonolayer sensitivity to adsorbed water from exposure of the sensor to air (40% humidity) versus dry N2(g). These measurements significantly expand the applications space and characterization tools for plasmonic nanosensors.

  14. High-resolution detection system for time-of-flight electron spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Zahid; Tremsin, A.S.; Lebedev, G.V.; Siegmund, O.H.W.; Vallerga, J.V.; McPhate, J.B.; Hussain, Z.

    2007-08-12

    One of the key components of a time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer is the detection system. In addition to high timing resolution, accurate two-dimensional imaging substantially broadensthe areas of applications of TOF spectrometers; for example, add a new dimension to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). In this paper we report on the recent developments of a high spatial (<50 mm) and timing (<130 ps) resolution imaging system capable of selective detection of electrons, ions and/or photons. Relative to our previously reported results, we have substantially improved the counting rate capabilities of the system especially for cases where the energy range of interest represents a small fraction of the incoming flux at the detector plane. The new system ignores all the events outside of a tunable time window substantially decreasing the dead time required for the event processing. That allows high-resolution TOF measurements within a given energy or momentum range and also can be used for distinguishing (or disabling) detection of photons versus detection of charged particles. The counting rate within a given energy window can be as high as ~;;400KHz at 10percent dead time. The electron detection system reported in the paper was developed for the TOF ARPES experiments at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  15. Photodissociation of ozone at 276nm by photofragment imaging and high resolution photofragment translational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Blunt, D.A.; Suits, A.G.

    1996-11-01

    The photodissociation of ozone at 276 nm is investigated using both state resolved ion imaging and high-resolution photofragment translational spectroscopy. Ion images from both [3+1] and [2+1] resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization of the O({sup 1}D) photofragment are reported. All images show strong evidence of O({sup 1}D) orbital alignment. Photofragment translation spectroscopy time-of-flight spectra are reported for the O{sub 2} ({sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}) photofragment. Total kinetic energy release distributions determined form these spectra are generally consistent with those distributions determined from imaging data. Observed angular distributions are reported for both detection methods, pointing to some unresolved questions for ozone dissociation in this wavelength region.

  16. High-resolution multi-heterodyne spectroscopy based on Fabry-Perot quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yin; Wang, Wen; Wysocki, Gerard; Soskind, Michael G.

    2014-01-20

    In this Letter, we present a method of performing broadband mid-infrared spectroscopy with conventional, free-running, continuous wave Fabry-Perot quantum cascade lasers (FP-QCLs). The measurement method is based on multi-heterodyne down-conversion of optical signals. The sample transmission spectrum probed by one multi-mode FP-QCL is down-converted to the radio-frequency domain through an optical multi-heterodyne process using a second FP-QCL as the local oscillator. Both a broadband multi-mode spectral measurement as well as high-resolution (∼15 MHz) spectroscopy of molecular absorption are demonstrated and show great potential for development of high performance FP-laser-based spectrometers for chemical sensing.

  17. Forensic examination of electrical tapes using high resolution magic angle spinning ¹H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schoenberger, Torsten; Simmross, Ulrich; Poppe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The application of high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) (1)H NMR spectroscopy is ideally suited for the differentiation of plastics. In addition to the actual material composition, the different types of polymer architectures and tacticity provide characteristic signals in the fingerprint of the (1)H NMR spectra. The method facilitates forensic comparison, as even small amounts of insoluble but swellable plastic particles are utilized. The performance of HR-MAS NMR can be verified against other methods that were recently addressed in various articles about forensic tape comparison. In this study samples of the 90 electrical tapes already referenced by the FBI laboratory were used. The discrimination power of HR-MAS is demonstrated by the fact that more tape groups can be distinguished by NMR spectroscopy than by using the combined evaluation of several commonly used analytical techniques. An additional advantage of this robust and quick method is the very simple sample preparation. PMID:26558760

  18. High-resolution laser spectroscopy with the Collinear Resonance Ionisation Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at CERN-ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocolios, T. E.; de Groote, R. P.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Budinčević, I.; Day Goodacre, T.; Farooq-Smith, G. J.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Flanagan, K. T.; Franchoo, S.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Gins, W.; Heylen, H.; Kron, T.; Li, R.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Neyens, G.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Smith, A. J.; Stroke, H. H.; Wendt, K. D. A.; Wilkins, S. G.; Yang, X.

    2016-06-01

    The Collinear Resonance Ionisation Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at CERN has achieved high-resolution resonance ionisation laser spectroscopy with a full width at half maximum linewidth of 20(1) MHz for 219,221 Fr, and has measured isotopes as short lived as 5 ms with 214 Fr. This development allows for greater precision in the study of hyperfine structures and isotope shifts, as well as a higher selectivity of single-isotope, even single-isomer, beams. These achievements are linked with the development of a new laser laboratory and new data-acquisition systems.

  19. High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Observation of Colloidal Nanocrystal Growth Mechanisms using Graphene Liquid Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yuk, Jong Min; Park, Jungwon; Ercius, Peter; Kim, Kwanpyo; Hellebusch, Danny J.; Crommie, Michael F.; Lee, Jeong Yong; Zettl, A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2011-12-12

    We introduce a new type of liquid cell for in-situ electron microscopy based upon entrapment of a liquid film between layers of graphene. We employ this cell to achieve high-resolution imaging of colloidal platinum nanocrystal growth. The ability to directly image and resolve critical steps at atomic resolution provides new insights into nanocrystal coalescence and reshaping during growth.

  20. High-Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy of Colliding Wind Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henely, David B.

    2005-02-01

    Massive stars have powerful winds which have profound effects on their surroundings and the stars' own evolution. Most such stars reside in binaries, in which the two stars' winds collide highly supersonically. The winds are shock-heated and produce copious X-rays, the study of which can be used to address poorly understood aspects of massive star winds. In this thesis, high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy is used to study in detail the structure of wind-wind collisions. We develop a model for synthesizing X-ray emission line profiles from colliding wind binaries. We then present analyses of X-ray spectra of two colliding wind systems: gamma(2) Velorum and eta Carinae, part of which includes applying the line synthesis model to these systems. The application of the model to a third system (WR 140) is also discussed. In general, the high-resolution spectra reveal that the physics in these systems is more complicated than is usually assumed. Given this, we go on to discuss how the future development of this work can be used to further the study of the physics of massive star winds and strong collisionless shocks.

  1. Diamond-machined ZnSe immersion grating for NIR high-resolution spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Y; Kobayashi, N; Kuzmenko, P J; Little, S L; Yasui, C; Kondo, S; Minami, A; Motohara, K

    2008-07-25

    ZnSe immersion gratings (n {approx} 2.45) provide the possibility of high-resolution spectroscopy for the near-infrared (NIR) region. Since ZnSe has a lower internal attenuation than other NIR materials, it is most suitable for immersion grating, particularly in short NIR region (0.8-1.4 {micro}m). We are developing an extremely high-resolution spectrograph with {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} = 100,000, WINERED, customized for the short NIR region, using ZnSe (or ZnS) immersion grating. However, it had been very difficult to make fine grooves on ZnSe substrate with a small pitch of less than 50 {micro}m because ZnSe is a soft/brittle material. We have overcome this problem and successfully machined sharp grooves with fine pitch on ZnSe substrates by nano precision fly-cutting technique at LLNL. The optical testing of the sample grating with HeNe laser shows an excellent performance: the relative efficiency more than 87.4 % at 0.633 {micro}m for a classical grating configuration. The diffraction efficiency when used as an immersion grating is estimated to be more than 65 % at 1 {micro}m. Following this progress, we are about to start machining a grating on a large ZnSe prism with an entrance aperture of 23mm x 50mm and the blaze angle of 70{sup o}.

  2. Fragmentation and conformation study of ephedrine by low- and high-resolution mass selective UV spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chervenkov, S.; Wang, P. Q.; Braun, J. E.; Neusser, H. J.

    2004-10-01

    The neurotransmitter molecule, ephedrine, has been studied by mass-selective low- and high-resolution UV resonance enhanced two-photon ionization spectroscopy. Under all experimental conditions we observed an efficient fragmentation upon ionization. The detected vibronic peaks in the spectrum are classified according to the efficiency of the fragmentation, which leads to the conclusion that there exist three different species in the molecular beam: ephedrine-water cluster and two distinct conformers. The two-color two-photon ionization experiment with a decreased energy of the second photon leads to an upper limit of 8.3 eV for the ionization energy of ephedrine. The high-resolution (70 MHz) spectrum of the strongest vibronic peak in the spectrum measured at the fragment (m/z=58) mass channel displays a pronounced and rich rotational structure. Its analysis by the use of a specially designed computer-aided rotational fit process yields accurate rotational constants for the S0 and S1 states and the transition moment ratio, providing information on the respective conformational structure.

  3. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of four active galaxies - Probing the intercloud medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lum, Kenneth S. K.; Canizares, Claude R.; Markert, Thomas H.; Arnaud, Keith A.

    1990-07-01

    The focal plane crystal spectrometer (FPCS) on the Einstein Observatory has been used to perform a high-resolution spectroscopic search for oxygen X-ray line emission from four active galaxies: Fairall 9, Mrk 421, Mrk 501, and PKS 0548 - 322. Specifically, O VIII Ly-alpha and Ly-beta, whose unredshifted energies are 653 and 775 eV, respectively, were sought. No narrow-line emission was detected within the energy bands searched. Upper limits are calculated on the line flux from these sources of 30 eV equivalent width and use a photoionization model to place corresponding upper limits on the densities of diffuse gas surrounding the active nuclei. The upper limits on gas density range from about 0.02-50/cu cm and probe various radial distances from the central source. This is the first time high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy has been used to place constraints on the intercloud medium in active galaxies.

  4. Recent results on high resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy by electroproduction at Jefferson Lab, Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    F. Garibaldi; H. Breuer; P. Brindza; P. Bydzovski; G. Chang; E. Cisbani; S. Colilli; F. Cusanno; R. De Leo; G. De Cataldo; K. De Jager; R. Feuerbach; E. Folts; R. Fratoni; S. Frullani; F. Giuliani; M. Gricia; D. Higinbotham; M. Iodice; B. Kross; L. Lagamba; J.J.Le Rose; M. Lucentini; P. Markowitz; S. Marrone; R. Michaels; E. Nappi; Y. Qiang; B. Reitz; F. Santavenere; J. Segal; M. Sotona; G.M.Urciuoli; P. Veneroni; B.Wojtsekhowski; C. Zorn

    2005-12-01

    The first ''systematic'' study of 1 p shell hypernuclei with electromagnetic probes has started in Hall A at Jefferson Lab [?]. The aim is to perform hypernuclear high resolution spectroscopy by the electroproduction of strangeness on four 1p-shell targets: 12C, 9Be, 16O, 7Li. The first part of the experiment on 12C and 9Be has been performed in 2004, the second part (16O and 7Li) is scheduled for June 2005. To overcome the major experimental difficulties, namely the low counting rate and the challenging Particle IDentification (PID), two septum magnets and a Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector had to be added to the existing apparatus. After underlining the particular role the electroproduction reaction plays in hypernuclear physics we describe the challenging modifications of the Hall A apparatus. Preliminary results on 12C and 9Be are presented.

  5. Low energy nuclear spin excitations in Ho metal investigated by high resolution neutron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chatterji, Tapan; Jalarvo, Niina

    2013-04-17

    We have investigated the low energy excitations in metallic Ho by high resolution neutron spectroscopy. We found at T = 3 K clear inelastic peaks in the energy loss and energy gain sides, along with the central elastic peak. The energy of this low energy excitation, which is 26.59 ± 0.02 μeV at T = 3 K, decreased continuously and became zero at TN ≈ 130 K. By fitting the data in the temperature range 100-127.5 K with a power law we obtained the power-law exponent β = 0.37 ± 0.02, which agrees with the expected value β = 0.367 for a three-dimensional Heisenberg model. Thus the energy of the low energy excitations can be associated with the order parameter.

  6. High resolution absorption coefficients for Freon-12. [by using tunable diode laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, J. M.; Bair, C. H.; Williams, B.; Harward, C.

    1979-01-01

    The ultra high resolution absorption coefficients of the Q-branch of Freon-12 obtained with tunable diode laser spectroscopy are presented. Continuous spectra are presented from 1155/cm to 1163/cm, and absolute wavelength calibration was obtained using SO2 spectra as a standard and a 5 cm Ge etalon for relative calibration between SO2 lines. The Freon-12 data obtained at a pressure of 0.05 torr showed a rich and highly structured spectra, but with the exception of three isolated features, collisional broadening reduces the spectra to a structureless continuum for nitrogen pressures greater than 20 torr. The spectra at 1161/cm continue to exhibit structure at atmospheric pressure.

  7. Alkyl-terminated Si(111) surfaces: A high-resolution, core level photoelectron spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, J.; Linford, M.R.; Wigren, C.; Cao, R.; Pianetta, P.; Chidsey, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    The bonding of alkyl monolayers to Si(111) surfaces has been studied with high-resolution core level photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Two very different wet-chemical methods have been used to prepare the alkyl monolayers: (i) Olefin insertion into the H{endash}Si bond of the H{endash}Si(111) surface, and (ii) replacement of Cl on the Cl{endash}Si(111) surface by an alkyl group from an alkyllithium reagent. In both cases, PES has revealed a C 1s component shifted to lower binding energy and a Si 2p component shifted to higher binding energy. Both components are attributed to the presence of a C{endash}Si bond at the interface. Along with photoelectron diffraction data [Appl. Phys. Lett. {bold 71}, 1056, (1997)], these data are used to show that these two synthetic methods can be used to functionalize the Si(111) surface. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. High-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of sulfidation of brass at the rubber/brass interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Kenichi; Kakubo, Takashi; Shimizu, Katsunori; Amino, Naoya; Mase, Kazuhiko; Komatsu, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    High resolution photoelectron spectroscopy is utilized to investigate the chemical composition at the rubber/brass interface to elucidate the origin of strong adhesion as well as the degradation between rubber and brass. Special attention has been given to copper sulfides formed at the interface during the vulcanization reaction at 170 °C. At least five sulfur-containing species are identified in the adhesive interlayer including crystalline CuS and amorphous CuxS (x ≃ 2). These copper sulfide species are not uniformly distributed within the layer, but there exits the concentration gradation; the concentration of CuxS is high in the region on the rubber side and is diminished in the deeper region, while vice versa for that of CuS. Degradation of the interface adhesive strength by prolonged vulcanization arises from the decrease in the CuxS/CuS ratio accompanying desulfurization of the adhesive layer.

  9. Superconducting Detector System for High-Resolution Energy-Dispersive Soft X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Niedermayr, T; Drury, O; Funk, T; Frank, M; Labov, S E; Cramer, S

    2001-02-21

    Synchrotron-based soft x-ray spectroscopy is often limited by detector performance. Grating spectrometers have the resolution, but lack the efficiency for the analysis of dilute samples. Semiconducting Si(Li) or Ge detectors are efficient, but often lack the resolution to separate weak signals from strong nearby lines in multi-element samples. Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) operated at temperatures below 1 K can be used as high-resolution high-efficiency x-ray detectors. They combine high energy resolution around 10 eV FWHM with the broad band efficiency of energy-dispersive detectors. We have designed a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to operate STJ detectors in x-ray fluorescence measurements at beam line 4 of the ALS. We demonstrate the capabilities of such a detector system for fluorescence analysis of dilute metal sites in proteins and inorganic model compounds.

  10. High Resolution Spectroscopy of Naphthalene Calibrated by AN Optical Frequency Comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Akiko; Nakashima, Kazuki; Matsuba, Ayumi; Misono, Masatoshi

    2015-06-01

    In high-resolution molecular spectroscopy, the precise measure of the optical frequency is crucial to evaluate minute shifts and splittings of the energy levels. On the other hand, in such spectroscopy, thousands of spectral lines distributed over several wavenumbers have to be measured by a continuously scanning cw laser. Therefore, the continuously changing optical frequency of the scanning laser has to be determined with enough precision. To satisfy these contradictory requirements, we have been developed two types of high-resolution spectroscopic systems employing an optical frequency comb. One of the systems employs RF band-pass filters to generate equally spaced frequency markers for optical frequency calibration, and is appropriate for wide wavelength-range measurement with relatively high scanning rate.^a In the other system, the beat frequency between the optical frequency comb and the scanning laser is controlled by an acousto-optic frequency shifter. This system is suitable for more precise measurement, and enables detailed analyses of frequency characteristics of scanning laser.^b In the present study, we observe Doppler-free two-photon absorption spectra of A^1B1u (v_4 = 1) ← X^1A_g (v = 0) transition of naphthalene around 298 nm. The spectral lines are rotationally resolved and the resolution is about 100 kHz. For ^qQ transition, the rotational lines are assigned, and molecular constants in the excited state are determined. In addition, we analyze the origin of the measured linewidth and Coriolis interactions between energy levels. To determine molecular constants more precisely, we proceed to measure and analyze spectra of other transitions, such as ^sS transitions. ^a A. Nishiyama, D. Ishikawa, and M. Misono, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 30, 2107 (2013). ^b A. Nishiyama, A. Matsuba, and M. Misono, Opt. Lett. 39, 4923 (2014).

  11. The Volatile Chemistry Of Jupiter-family Comets Determined From High-resolution Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dello Russo, Neil; Vervack, R.; Weaver, H.; Kobayashi, H.; Kawakita, H.; Biver, N.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Crovisier, J.

    2009-09-01

    The chemistry of Jupiter-family comets (JFCs) has been extensively studied at optical wavelengths using spectroscopic and photometric techniques. However, the coma species detected at optical wavelengths are daughter and granddaughter photodissociation products that are often not easily related to species present in the nucleus. Because JFCs are generally of moderate productivity, studies of their parent volatile chemistries have lagged owing to sensitivity issues. Recently, studies at radio and infrared wavelengths have revealed the parent volatile chemistry in a small group of JFCs. Here, we report and compare recent results on the chemistry of JFCs using high-resolution infrared spectroscopy. The main goals of this research are to: (1) chemically characterize JFCs using high-resolution infrared spectroscopy in order to build a taxonomy based on parent volatile composition, (2) determine if the parent volatile chemistry of JFCs is consistent with formation conditions or evolutionary processing history, and (3) compare abundances of daughter fragments (e.g., C2, CN, NH, NH2) and their suspected parents (e.g., C2H2, C2H6, HCN, NH3) in JFCs whose chemistries were measured at both infrared and optical wavelengths. Understanding the parent sources of daughter fragments in comets not only provides information on the common infrared/optical database but may also give clues to the parent volatile chemistry in the large number of comets observed only at optical wavelengths. Because JFCs are the most practical mission targets, chemical composition can be one discriminator in determining desirable future targets. Furthermore, determining the range of chemical diversity within the JFC population can help put results of previous missions (e.g. Deep Impact, Stardust) in better context. This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Astronomy and Planetary Atmospheres Programs.

  12. High Resolution Rovibrational Spectroscopy of Large Molecules Using Infrared Frequency Combs and Buffer Gas Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changala, Bryan; Spaun, Ben; Patterson, David; Bjork, Bryce J.; Heckl, Oliver H.; Doyle, John M.; Ye, Jun

    2016-06-01

    We have recently demonstrated the integration of cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy with buffer gas cooling to acquire high resolution infrared spectra of translationally and rotationally cold (˜10 K) gas-phase molecules. Here, we extend this method to significantly larger systems, including naphthalene (C10H_8), a prototypical polyaromatic hydrocarbon, and adamantane (C10H_{16}), the fundamental building block of diamonoids. To the authors' knowledge, the latter molecule represents the largest system for which rotationally resolved spectra in the CH stretch region (3 μm) have been obtained. In addition to the measured spectra, we present several details of our experimental methods. These include introducing non-volatile species into the cold buffer gas cell and obtaining broadband spectra with single comb mode resolution. We also discuss recent modifications to the apparatus to improve its absorption sensitivity and time resolution, which facilitate the study of both larger molecular systems and cold chemical dynamics. B. Spaun, et al. Probing buffer-gas cooled molecules with direct frequency comb spectroscopy in the mid-infrared, WF02, 70th International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, Champaign-Urbana, IL, 2015.

  13. Partial-Homogeneity-Based Two-Dimensional High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy under Inhomogeneous Magnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wenqi; Wei, Zhiliang; Ding, Nan; Yang, Yu; Ye, Qimiao; Lin, Yulan; Chen, Zhong

    2016-05-18

    High-resolution multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy serves as an irreplaceable and versatile tool in various chemical investigations. In this study, a method based on the concept of partial homogeneity is developed to offer two-dimensional (2D) high-resolution NMR spectra under inhomogeneous fields. Oscillating gradients are exerted to encode the high-resolution information, and a field-inhomogeneity correction algorithm based on pattern recognition is designed to recover high-resolution spectra. Under fields where inhomogeneity primarily distributes along a single orientation, the proposed method will improve performances of 2D NMR spectroscopy without increasing the experimental duration or significant loss in sensitivity, and thus may open important perspectives for studies of inhomogeneous chemical systems.

  14. Tunable Microcavity-Stabilized Quantum Cascade Laser for Mid-IR High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Sensing.

    PubMed

    Borri, Simone; Siciliani de Cumis, Mario; Insero, Giacomo; Bartalini, Saverio; Cancio Pastor, Pablo; Mazzotti, Davide; Galli, Iacopo; Giusfredi, Giovanni; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Eliyahu, Danny; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Akikusa, Naota; Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute; De Natale, Paolo

    2016-02-17

    The need for highly performing and stable methods for mid-IR molecular sensing and metrology pushes towards the development of more and more compact and robust systems. Among the innovative solutions aimed at answering the need for stable mid-IR references are crystalline microresonators, which have recently shown excellent capabilities for frequency stabilization and linewidth narrowing of quantum cascade lasers with compact setups. In this work, we report on the first system for mid-IR high-resolution spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser locked to a CaF₂ microresonator. Electronic locking narrows the laser linewidth by one order of magnitude and guarantees good stability over long timescales, allowing, at the same time, an easy way for finely tuning the laser frequency over the molecular absorption line. Improvements in terms of resolution and frequency stability of the source are demonstrated by direct sub-Doppler recording of a molecular line.

  15. Tunable Microcavity-Stabilized Quantum Cascade Laser for Mid-IR High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Sensing.

    PubMed

    Borri, Simone; Siciliani de Cumis, Mario; Insero, Giacomo; Bartalini, Saverio; Cancio Pastor, Pablo; Mazzotti, Davide; Galli, Iacopo; Giusfredi, Giovanni; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Eliyahu, Danny; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Akikusa, Naota; Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute; De Natale, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The need for highly performing and stable methods for mid-IR molecular sensing and metrology pushes towards the development of more and more compact and robust systems. Among the innovative solutions aimed at answering the need for stable mid-IR references are crystalline microresonators, which have recently shown excellent capabilities for frequency stabilization and linewidth narrowing of quantum cascade lasers with compact setups. In this work, we report on the first system for mid-IR high-resolution spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser locked to a CaF₂ microresonator. Electronic locking narrows the laser linewidth by one order of magnitude and guarantees good stability over long timescales, allowing, at the same time, an easy way for finely tuning the laser frequency over the molecular absorption line. Improvements in terms of resolution and frequency stability of the source are demonstrated by direct sub-Doppler recording of a molecular line. PMID:26901199

  16. Design and performance of a soft-x-ray interferometer for ultra-high-resolution fourier transform spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J.; Hussain, Z.; Duarte, R.M.; Howells, M.R.

    1997-04-01

    A Fourier Transform Soft X-ray spectrometer (FT-SX) has been designed and is under construction for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as a branch of beamline 9.3.2. The spectrometer is a novel soft x-ray interferometer designed for ultra-high resolution (theoretical resolving power E/{delta}E{approximately}10{sup 6}) spectroscopy in the photon energy region of 60-120 eV. This instrument is expected to provide experimental results which sensitively test models of correlated electron processes in atomic and molecular physics. The design criteria and consequent technical challenges posed by the short wavelengths of x-rays and desired resolving power are discussed. The fundamental and practical aspects of soft x-ray interferometry are also explored.

  17. Tunable Microcavity-Stabilized Quantum Cascade Laser for Mid-IR High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Borri, Simone; Siciliani de Cumis, Mario; Insero, Giacomo; Bartalini, Saverio; Cancio Pastor, Pablo; Mazzotti, Davide; Galli, Iacopo; Giusfredi, Giovanni; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Eliyahu, Danny; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Akikusa, Naota; Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute; De Natale, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The need for highly performing and stable methods for mid-IR molecular sensing and metrology pushes towards the development of more and more compact and robust systems. Among the innovative solutions aimed at answering the need for stable mid-IR references are crystalline microresonators, which have recently shown excellent capabilities for frequency stabilization and linewidth narrowing of quantum cascade lasers with compact setups. In this work, we report on the first system for mid-IR high-resolution spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser locked to a CaF2 microresonator. Electronic locking narrows the laser linewidth by one order of magnitude and guarantees good stability over long timescales, allowing, at the same time, an easy way for finely tuning the laser frequency over the molecular absorption line. Improvements in terms of resolution and frequency stability of the source are demonstrated by direct sub-Doppler recording of a molecular line. PMID:26901199

  18. High-resolution electron spin resonance spectroscopy of XeF* in solid argon. The hyperfine structure constants as a probe of relativistic effects in the chemical bonding properties of a heavy noble gas atom.

    PubMed

    Misochko, Eugenii Ya; Akimov, Alexander V; Goldschleger, Ilya U; Tyurin, Danil A; Laikov, Dimitri N

    2005-01-15

    Xenon fluoride radicals were generated by solid-state chemical reactions of mobile fluorine atoms with xenon atoms trapped in Ar matrix. Highly resolved electron spin resonance spectra of XeF* were obtained in the temperature range of 5-25 K and the anisotropic hyperfine parameters were determined for magnetic nuclei 19F, 129Xe, and 131Xe using naturally occurring and isotopically enriched xenon. Signs of parallel and perpendicular hyperfine components were established from analysis of temperature changes in the spectra and from numerical solutions of the spin Hamiltonian for two nonequivalent magnetic nuclei. Thus, the complete set of components of hyperfine- and g-factor tensors of XeF* were obtained: 19F (Aiso=435, Adip=1249 MHz) and 129Xe (Aiso=-1340, Adip=-485 MHz); g(parallel)=1.9822 and g(perpendicular)=2.0570. Comparison of the measured hyperfine parameters with those predicted by density-functional theory (DFT) calculations indicates, that relativistic DFT gives true electron spin distribution in the 2Sigma+ ground-state, whereas nonrelativistic theory underestimates dramatically the electron-nuclear contact Fermi interaction (Aiso) on the Xe atom. Analysis of the obtained magnetic-dipole interaction constants (Adip) shows that fluorine 2p and xenon 5p atomic orbitals make a major contribution to the spin density distribution in XeF*. Both relativistic and nonrelativistic calculations give close magnetic-dipole interaction constants, which are in agreement with the measured values. The other relativistic feature is considerable anisotropy of g-tensor, which results from spin-orbit interaction. The orbital contribution appears due to mixing of the ionic 2Pi states with the 2Sigma+ ground state, and the spin-orbit interaction plays a significant role in the chemical bonding of XeF*.

  19. Electron spectrometer for gas-phase spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, J.D.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1997-04-01

    An electron spectrometer for high-resolution spectroscopy of gaseous samples using synchrotron radiation has been designed and constructed. The spectrometer consists of a gas cell, cylindrical electrostatic lens, spherical-sector electron energy analyzer, position-sensitive detector and associated power supplies, electronics and vacuum pumps. Details of the spectrometer design are presented together with some representative spectra.

  20. Diagnostics of the accretion plasma in magnetic CVs from high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burwitz, V.; Reinsch, K.; Haberl, F.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Predehl, P.

    2002-01-01

    High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy with the Chandra low energy transmission grating spectrometer (LETGS) provides an unprecedented diagnostic tool for the hot accretion plasma and the settling flow in the accretion column of magnetic cataclysmic variables (mCVs). We show first results from our analysis of spin-phase resolved X-ray spectroscopy of the two prototype magnetic CVs, AM Her and PQ Gem. The LETGS spectra cover the wavelength range 2--170Å with a spectral resolution λ/Δ λ = 200--3000. For the first time, absorption structures in the soft X-ray component of the heated white-dwarf atmosphere are revealed and individual emission lines of H- and He-like O and N ions including the density sensitive components of the He-like triplets are resolved in the hard X-ray component originating from the settling flow. In addition, phase dependent Doppler-shifts of the emission lines are detected providing detailed information on the geometry of the accretion funnel.

  1. High-resolution atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy of native membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bippes, Christian A.; Muller, Daniel J.

    2011-08-01

    Membranes confining cells and cellular compartments are essential for life. Membrane proteins are molecular machines that equip cell membranes with highly sophisticated functionality. Examples of such functions are signaling, ion pumping, energy conversion, molecular transport, specific ligand binding, cell adhesion and protein trafficking. However, it is not well understood how most membrane proteins work and how the living cell regulates their function. We review how atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be applied for structural and functional investigations of native membrane proteins. High-resolution time-lapse AFM imaging records membrane proteins at work, their oligomeric state and their dynamic assembly. The AFM stylus resembles a multifunctional toolbox that allows the measurement of several chemical and physical parameters at the nanoscale. In the single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) mode, AFM quantifies and localizes interactions in membrane proteins that stabilize their folding and modulate their functional state. Dynamic SMFS discloses fascinating insights into the free energy landscape of membrane proteins. Single-cell force spectroscopy quantifies the interactions of live cells with their environment to single-receptor resolution. In the future, technological progress in AFM-based approaches will enable us to study the physical nature of biological interactions in more detail and decipher how cells control basic processes.

  2. M31 GLOBULAR CLUSTER ABUNDANCES FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION, INTEGRATED-LIGHT SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Colucci, Janet E.; McWilliam, Andrew; Cohen, Judith G. E-mail: sacamero@umich.ed E-mail: andy@ociw.ed

    2009-10-10

    We report the first detailed chemical abundances for five globular clusters (GCs) in M31 from high-resolution (R approx 25,000) spectroscopy of their integrated light (IL). These GCs are the first in a larger set of clusters observed as part of an ongoing project to study the formation history of M31 and its GC population. The data presented here were obtained with the HIRES echelle spectrograph on the Keck I telescope and are analyzed using a new IL spectra analysis method that we have developed. In these clusters, we measure abundances for Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Y, and Ba, ages >=10 Gyr, and a range in [Fe/H] of -0.9 to -2.2. As is typical of Milky Way GCs, we find these M31 GCs to be enhanced in the alpha-elements Ca, Si, and Ti relative to Fe. We also find [Mg/Fe] to be low relative to other [alpha/Fe], and [Al/Fe] to be enhanced in the IL abundances. These results imply that abundances of Mg, Al (and likely O, Na) recovered from IL do display the inter- and intra-cluster abundance variations seen in individual Milky Way GC stars, and that special care should be taken in the future in interpreting low- or high-resolution IL abundances of GCs that are based on Mg-dominated absorption features. Fe-peak and the neutron-capture elements Ba and Y also follow Milky Way abundance trends. We also present high-precision velocity dispersion measurements for all five M31 GCs, as well as independent constraints on the reddening toward the clusters from our analysis.

  3. Far Infrared High Resolution Synchrotron FTIR Spectroscopy of the Low Frequency Bending Modes of Dmso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuisset, Arnaud; Smirnova, Irina; Bocquet, Robin; Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gael; Sadovskii, Dmitrii A.; Pirali, Olivier; Roy, Pascale

    2010-06-01

    In addition to its importance for industrial and environmental studies, the monitoring of DiMethylSulfOxyde (DMSO, (CH_3)_2SO) concentrations is of considerable interest for civil protection. The existing high resolution gas phase spectroscopic data of DMSO only concerned the pure rotational transitions in the ground state. In the Far-IR domain, the low-frequency rovibrational transitions have never previously resolved. The high brightness of the AILES beamline of the synchrotron SOLEIL and the instrumental sensitivity provided by the multipass cell allowed to measure for the first time these transitions. 1581 A-type and C-type transitions in the ν11 band have been assigned and 25 molecular constants of Watson's s-form hamiltonian developed to degree 8 have been fitted within the experimental accuracy. The use of then synchrotron radiation has opened many possibilities for new spectroscopic studies. Together with several other recent studies, our successful measurement and analysis of DMSO convincingly demonstrates the potential of the AILES beamline for high resolution FIR spectroscopy. Thus our present work is just at the beginning of unraveling the rovibrational structure of low frequency bending and torsional vibrational states of DMSO and yielding important comprehensive structural and spectroscopic information on this molecule. L. Margules, R. A. Motienko, E. A. Alekseev, J. Demaison, J. Molec. Spectrosc., 260(23),2009 V. Typke, M. Dakkouri, J. Molec. Struct., 599(177),2001 A. Cuisset, L. Nanobashvili, I. Smirnova, R. Bocquet, F. Hindle, G. Mouret, O. Pirali, P. Roy, D. Sadovskii, Chem. Phys. Lett., accepted for publication

  4. High-Resolution Two-Dimensional J-Resolved NMR Spectroscopy for Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuqing; Cai, Shuhui; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Zhong

    2014-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a principal tool in metabolomic studies and can, in theory, yield atom-level information critical for understanding biological systems. Nevertheless, NMR investigations on biological tissues generally have to contend with field inhomogeneities originating from variations in macroscopic magnetic susceptibility; these field inhomogeneities broaden spectral lines and thereby obscure metabolite signals. The congestion in one-dimensional NMR spectra of biological tissues often leads to ambiguities in metabolite identification and quantification. We propose an NMR approach based on intermolecular double-quantum coherences to recover high-resolution two-dimensional (2D) J-resolved spectra from inhomogeneous magnetic fields, such as those created by susceptibility variations in intact biological tissues. The proposed method makes it possible to acquire high-resolution 2D J-resolved spectra on intact biological samples without recourse to time-consuming shimming procedures or the use of specialized hardware, such as magic-angle-spinning probes. Separation of chemical shifts and J couplings along two distinct dimensions is achieved, which reduces spectral crowding and increases metabolite specificity. Moreover, the apparent J coupling constants observed are magnified by a factor of 3, facilitating the accurate measurement of small J couplings, which is useful in metabolic analyses. Dramatically improved spectral resolution is demonstrated in our applications of the technique on pig brain tissues. The resulting spectra contain a wealth of chemical shift and J-coupling information that is invaluable for metabolite analyses. A spatially localized experiment applied on an intact fish (Crossocheilus siamensis) reveals the promise of the proposed method in in vivo metabolite studies. Moreover, the proposed method makes few demands on spectrometer hardware and therefore constitutes a convenient and effective manner for metabonomics study of biological systems

  5. High Resolution and Low-Temperature Photoelectron Spectroscopy of an Oxygen-Linked Fullerene Dimer Dianion: C120O2-

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xue B.; Matheis, Katerina; Ioffe, Ilya N.; Goryunkov, Alexey A.; Yang, Jie; Kappes, Manfred M.; Wang, Lai S.

    2008-03-21

    C120O comprises two C60 cages linked by a furan ring and is formed by reactions of C60O and C60. We have produced doubly-charged anions of this fullerene dimer (C120O2–) and studied its electronic structure and stability using photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. High resolution and vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectra were obtained at 70 K and at several photon energies. The second electron affinity of C120O was measured to be 1.02 ± 0.03 eV and the intramolecular Coulomb repulsion was estimated to be about 0.8 eV in C120O2– on the basis of the observed repulsive Coulomb barrier. A low-lying excited state (2B1) was also observed for C120O– at 0.09 eV above the ground state (2A1). The C120O2– dianion can be viewed as a single electron on each C60 ball very weakly coupled. Theoretical calculations showed that the singlet and triplet states of C120O2– are nearly degenerate and can both be present in the experiment. The computed electron binding energies and excitation energies, as well as Franck-Condon factors, are used to help interpret the photoelectron spectra. A C-C bond-cleaved isomer, C60-O-C602–, was also observed with a higher electron binding energy of 1.54 eV.

  6. High resolution spectroscopy of SrOD radical by supersonic expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Hajigeorgiou, P.; Hepburn, J.W.; Bernath, P.F.

    1995-12-31

    The high resolution spectrum of gas phase SrOD has been recorded in a supersonic beam spectrometer. The B{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}-X{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} (000)-(000) and (100)-(000) bands have been rotationally analyzed. The accuracy of the rotational line positions was about 0.003 cm{sup -1}. The measured line positions together with the microwave data for the ground state have been fitted to give molecular constants for both electronic states. The Q branch of the (000)-(000) band was resolved for the first time and the ratio between the perpendicular and parallel transition dipole moments was estimated to be about 0.2.

  7. Contamination-free transmission electron microscopy for high-resolution carbon elemental mapping of polymers.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Shin; Hanada, Takeshi; Ebisawa, Masaharu; Matsuda, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Motoyasu; Takahara, Atsushi

    2009-05-26

    Specimen contamination induced by electron beam irradiation has long been a serious problem for high-resolution imaging and analysis by a transmission electron microscope (TEM). It creates a deposition of carbonaceous compounds on a region under study, causing the loss of resolution. We developed a method to reduce the beam-induced specimen contamination by cleaning a TEM with activated oxygen radicals. The hydrocarbon contaminants accumulated inside the microscope's chamber can be etched away by gentle chemical oxidation without causing any damage to the microscope. The "contamination-free TEM" can effectively suppress the deposition of carbon-rich products on a specimen and therefore enables us to perform high-resolution carbon elemental mapping by energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM). In this study, we investigated the structure of polymer brushes immobilized on a silica nanoparticle (SiNP), of which molecular weight, length, and density of the brushes had been characterized in detail. The isolated particle showed the stretched formations of the polymer chains growing from the surface, while the densely distributed particles showed the connection of the polymer chains between neighboring particles. Moreover, the polymer brush layer and the surface initiator could be differentiated from each other by the component-specific contrast achieved by electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI). The contamination-free TEM can allow us to perform high-resolution carbon mapping and is expected to provide deep insights of soft materials' nanostructures. PMID:19402650

  8. On the optical stability of high-resolution transmission electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Barthel, J; Thust, A

    2013-11-01

    In the recent two decades the technique of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy experienced an unprecedented progress through the introduction of hardware aberration correctors and by the improvement of the achievable resolution to the sub-Ångström level. The important aspect that aberration correction at a given resolution requires also a well defined amount of optical stability has received little attention so far. Therefore we investigate the qualification of a variety of high-resolution electron microscopes to maintain an aberration corrected optical state in terms of an optical lifetime. We develop a comprehensive statistical framework for the estimation of the optical lifetime and find remarkably low values between tens of seconds and a couple of minutes. Probability curves are introduced, which inform the operator about the chance to work still in the fully aberration corrected state.

  9. What can we Expect of High-Resolution Spectroscopies on Carbohydrates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocinero, Emilio J.; Ecija, Patricia; Uriarte, Iciar; Usabiaga, Imanol; Fernández, José A.; Basterretxea, Francisco J.; Lesarri, Alberto; Davis, Benjamin G.

    2015-06-01

    Carbohydrates are one of the most multifaceted building blocks, performing numerous roles in living organisms. We present several structural investigations on carbohydrates exploiting an experimental strategy which combines microwave (MW) and laser spectroscopies in high-resolution. Laser spectroscopy offers high sensitivity coupled to mass and conformer selectivity, making it ideal for polysaccharides studies. On the other hand, microwave spectroscopy provides much higher resolution and direct access to molecular structure of monosaccharides. This combined approach provides not only accurate chemical insight on conformation, structure and molecular properties, but also benchmarking standards guiding the development of theoretical calculations. In order to illustrate the possibilities of a combined MW-laser approach we present results on the conformational landscape and structural properties of several monosaccharides and oligosaccharides including microsolvation and molecular recognition processes of carbohydrates. E.J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. écija, F.J. Basterretxea, J.-U. Grabow, J.A. Fernández and F. Casta {n}o Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 51, 3119-3124, 2012. E.J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. écija, Á. Cimas, B.G. Davis, F.J. Basterretxea, J.A. Fernández and F. Casta {n}o J. Am. Chem. Soc. 135, 2845-2852, 2013. E.J. Cocinero, P. Çarçabal, T.D. Vaden, J.P. Simons and B.G. Davis Nature 469, 76-80, 2011. C.S. Barry, E.J. Cocinero, P. Çarçabal, D.P. Gamblin, E.C. Stanca-Kaposta, S. M. Fernández-Alonso, S. Rudić, J.P. Simons and B.G. Davis J. Am. Chem. Soc. 135, 16895-16903, 2013.

  10. The X+ 2Πg, A+ 2Πu, B+ 2Δu, and a^+ ^4Σ u^- electronic states of Cl_2^+ studied by high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollet, Sandro; Merkt, Frédéric

    2013-07-01

    Ω = 1/2 and Ω = 3/2, separated by 37.5 cm-1. The vibrational energy level structure of both components is regular, which indicates that the splitting results from the interaction with one or more distant ungerade Ω = 1/2 or Ω = 3/2 electronic states.

  11. High-Resolution Analytical Electron Microscopy Characterization of Corrosion and Cracking at Buried Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Thomas, Larry E.

    2001-07-01

    Recent results are presented demonstrating the application of cross-sectional analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM) to corrosion and cracking in high-temperature water environments. Microstructural, chemical and crystallographic characterization of buried interfaces at near-atomic resolutions is shown to reveal evidence for unexpected local environments, corrosion reactions and material transformations. Information obtained by a wide variety of high-resolution imaging and analysis methods indicates the processes occurring during crack advance and provides insights into the mechanisms controlling environmental degradation.

  12. The Potential for Bayesian Compressive Sensing to Significantly Reduce Electron Dose in High Resolution STEM Images

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Andrew J.; Yang, Hao; Carin, Lawrence; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D.

    2014-02-11

    The use of high resolution imaging methods in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is limited in many cases by the sensitivity of the sample to the beam and the onset of electron beam damage (for example in the study of organic systems, in tomography and during in-situ experiments). To demonstrate that alternative strategies for image acquisition can help alleviate this beam damage issue, here we apply compressive sensing via Bayesian dictionary learning to high resolution STEM images. These experiments successively reduce the number of pixels in the image (thereby reducing the overall dose while maintaining the high resolution information) and show promising results for reconstructing images from this reduced set of randomly collected measurements. We show that this approach is valid for both atomic resolution images and nanometer resolution studies, such as those that might be used in tomography datasets, by applying the method to images of strontium titanate and zeolites. As STEM images are acquired pixel by pixel while the beam is scanned over the surface of the sample, these post acquisition manipulations of the images can, in principle, be directly implemented as a low-dose acquisition method with no change in the electron optics or alignment of the microscope itself.

  13. High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission study of UN and USb; Dual character of 5f electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, T.; Kumigashira, H.; Souma, S.; Takahashi, T.; Suzuki, T.

    2001-05-01

    We have performed high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on UN and USb to study the electronic structure near the Fermi level ( EF) and the nature of U 5f electrons. We found that the pnictogen (N and Sb) p bands are fully occupied in contrast with Ce monopnictides and shows a good qualitative agreement with the band calculation by treating the U 5f states as bands. On the other hand, we have not observed dispersive U 5f bands near EF predicted by the band calculation, instead we found two non-dispersive bands near EF, which are assigned as the 5f 2-final-state multiplet indicative of localized U 5f states. The intensity of multiplet structure is stronger in USb than in UN. These results indicate the dual character of U 5f electrons and its difference between USb and UN.

  14. High-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of metal compounds in neurodegenerative brain tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Collingwood, J.F.; Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M.R.; Batich, C.; Streit, W.J.; Eskin, T.; Terry, J.; Barrea, R.; Underhill, R.S.; Dobson, J.

    2008-06-16

    Fluorescence mapping and microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy are used to detect, locate and identify iron biominerals and other inorganic metal accumulations in neurodegenerative brain tissue at sub-cellular resolution (< 5 microns). Recent progress in developing the technique is reviewed. Synchrotron X-rays are used to map tissue sections for metals of interest, and XANES and XAFS are used to characterize anomalous concentrations of the metals in-situ so that they can be correlated with tissue structures and disease pathology. Iron anomalies associated with biogenic magnetite, ferritin and haemoglobin are located and identified in an avian tissue model with a pixel resolution {approx} 5 microns. Subsequent studies include brain tissue sections from transgenic Huntington's mice, and the first high-resolution mapping and identification of iron biominerals in human Alzheimer's and control autopsy brain tissue. Technical developments include use of microfocus diffraction to obtain structural information about biominerals in-situ, and depositing sample location grids by lithography for the location of anomalies by conventional microscopy. The combined techniques provide a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds and related metals in tissue. The information to be gained from this approach has implications for future diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration, and for our understanding of the mechanisms involved.

  15. High-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of metal compounds in neurodegenerative brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collingwood, J. F.; Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M. R.; Batich, C.; Streit, W. J.; Eskin, T.; Terry, J.; Barrea, R.; Underhill, R. S.; Dobson, J.

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence mapping and microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy are used to detect, locate and identify iron biominerals and other inorganic metal accumulations in neurodegenerative brain tissue at sub-cellular resolution (<5 microns). Recent progress in developing the technique is reviewed. Synchrotron X-rays are used to map tissue sections for metals of interest, and XANES and XAFS are used to characterise anomalous concentrations of the metals in-situ so that they can be correlated with tissue structures and disease pathology. Iron anomalies associated with biogenic magnetite, ferritin and haemoglobin are located and identified in an avian tissue model with a pixel resolution ~5 microns. Subsequent studies include brain tissue sections from transgenic Huntington's mice, and the first high-resolution mapping and identification of iron biominerals in human Alzheimer's and control autopsy brain tissue. Technical developments include use of microfocus diffraction to obtain structural information about biominerals in-situ, and depositing sample location grids by lithography for the location of anomalies by conventional microscopy. The combined techniques provide a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds and related metals in tissue. The information to be gained from this approach has implications for future diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration, and for our understanding of the mechanisms involved.

  16. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy: the coming-of-age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaastra, J.

    2016-06-01

    Since the launch of Chandra and XMM-Newton, high-resolution X-ray spectra of cosmic sources of all kinds have become available. These spectra have resulted in major scientific breakthroughs. However, due to the techniques used, in general high-quality spectra can only be obtained for the brightest few sources of each class. Moreover, except for the most compact extended sources, like cool core clusters, grating spectra are limited to point sources. ASTRO-H makes another major step forward, in yielding for the first time high-quality spectra of extended sources, and improved spectral sensitivity in the Fe-K band. With the launch of Athena, X-ray spectroscopy will become mature. It allows us to extend the investigations from the few handful of brightest sources of each category to a large number of sources far away in space and time, or to get high time-resolution, high-spectral resolution spectra of bright time variable sources.

  17. Spectral characteristics of chlorites and Mg-serpentines using high- resolution reflectance spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, T.V.V.; Clark, R.N.

    1989-01-01

    The present laboratory study using high-resolution reflectance spectroscopy (0.25-2.7 ??m) focuses on two primary phyllosilicate groups, serpentines and chlorites. The results show that it is possible to spectrally distinguish between isochemical end-members of the Mg-rich serpentine group (chrysotile, antigorite, and lizardite) and to recognize spectral variations in chlorites as a function of Fe/Mg ratio (~8-38 wt% Fe). The position and relative strength of the 1.4-??m absorption feature in the trioctahedral chlorites appear to be correlated to the total iron content and/or the Mg/Si ratio and the loss on ignition values of the sample. Spectral differences in the 2.3-??m wavelength region can be attributed to differences in lattice environments and are characteristic for specific trioctahedral chlorites. The 1.4-??m feature in the isochemical Mg-rich serpentines (total iron content ~1.5-7.0 wt%) show marked spectral differences, apparently due to structural differences. -Authors

  18. Quantitative neuropathology by high resolution magic angle spinning proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, L. L.; Ma, M. J.; Becerra, L.; Ptak, T.; Tracey, I.; Lackner, A.; González, R. G.

    1997-01-01

    We describe a method that directly relates tissue neuropathological analysis to medical imaging. Presently, only indirect and often tenuous relationships are made between imaging (such as MRI or x-ray computed tomography) and neuropathology. We present a biochemistry-based, quantitative neuropathological method that can help to precisely quantify information provided by in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1HMRS), an emerging medical imaging technique. This method, high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) 1HMRS, is rapid and requires only small amounts of unprocessed samples. Unlike chemical extraction or other forms of tissue processing, this method analyzes tissue directly, thus minimizing artifacts. We demonstrate the utility of this method by assessing neuronal damage using multiple tissue samples from differently affected brain regions in a case of Pick disease, a human neurodegenerative disorder. Among different regions, we found an excellent correlation between neuronal loss shown by traditional neurohistopathology and decrease of the neuronal marker N-acetylaspartate measured by HRMAS 1HMRS. This result demonstrates for the first time, to our knowledge, a direct, quantitative link between a decrease in N-acetylaspartate and neuronal loss in a human neurodegenerative disease. As a quantitative method, HRMAS 1HMRS has potential applications in experimental and clinical neuropathologic investigations. It should also provide a rational basis for the interpretation of in vivo 1HMRS studies of human neurological disorders. PMID:9177231

  19. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Winds Associated with T Tauri Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, Naoto; Itoh, Yoichi

    2016-02-01

    We carried out optical high-resolution spectroscopy of T Tauri stars using the Subaru Telescope. Using archived data from the Keck Telescope and the Very Large Telescope, we detected forbidden lines of [S II] at 4069 Å, in addition to those of [O I] at 5577 Å and 6300 Å, for 13 T Tauri stars. We consider that low-velocity components of these forbidden lines emanate from the wind associated with T Tauri stars. Using two flux ratios of the three lines, we simultaneously determined the hydrogen density and temperature of the winds. The winds of T Tauri stars have a hydrogen density of 2.5 × 106 cm‑3 ‑ 2.5 × 109 cm‑3 and a temperature of 10800 –18 000 K. The mass loss rates by the wind are estimated to lie in the range from 2.0 × 10‑10 M⊙ yr‑1 to 1.4 × 10‑9 M⊙ yr‑1. The mass loss rates are found to increase with increasing mass accretion rates. The ratio of the mass loss rate to the mass accretion rate is 0.001–0.1 for classical T Tauri stars and 0.1–1 for transitional disk objects.

  20. High-resolution spectroscopy on the laser-cooling candidate La^{-}.

    PubMed

    Jordan, E; Cerchiari, G; Fritzsche, S; Kellerbauer, A

    2015-09-11

    The bound-bound transition from the 5d^{2}6s^{2} ^{3}F_{2}^{e} ground state to the 5d6s^{2}6p ^{3}D_{1}^{o} excited state in negative lanthanum has been proposed as a candidate for laser cooling, which has not yet been achieved for negative ions. Anion laser cooling holds the potential to allow the production of ultracold ensembles of any negatively charged species. We have studied the aforementioned transition in a beam of negative La ions by high-resolution laser spectroscopy. The center-of-gravity frequency was measured to be 96.592 80(10) THz. Seven of the nine expected hyperfine structure transitions were resolved. The observed peaks were unambiguously assigned to the predicted hyperfine transitions by a fit, confirmed by multiconfigurational self-consistent field calculations. From the determined hyperfine structure we conclude that La^{-} is a promising laser cooling candidate. Using this transition, only three laser beams would be required to repump all hyperfine levels of the ground state. PMID:26406825

  1. Quantifying many-body effects by high-resolution Fourier transform scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grothe, Stephanie; Johnston, Steve; Chi, Shun; Dosanjh, Pinder; Burke, Sarah A.; Pennec, Yan

    2014-03-01

    The properties of solids are influenced by many-body effects that arise from the interactions of the electrons with each other and with the multitude of collective lattice, spin or charge excitations. We apply the technique of Fourier transform scanning tunneling spectroscopy (FT-STS) to probe the many-body effects of the Ag(111) surface state. A renormalization of the otherwise parabolic dispersion induced by electron-phonon interactions is revealed that has not previously been resolved by any technique, allowing us to extract the real part of the self-energy. Furthermore, we show how variations in the intensity of the FT-STS signal are related to the imaginary part of the self-energy. We accurately modeled the experimental data with the T-matrix formalism for scattering from a single impurity, assuming that the surface electrons are dressed by electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions. A Debye energy of ℏΩD = 14 +/- 1 meV and an electron-phonon coupling strength of λ = 0 . 13 +/- 0 . 02 was extracted. Our results advance FT-STS as a tool to simultaneously extract real and imaginary parts of the self-energy for both occupied and unoccupied states with a momentum and energy resolution competitive with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

  2. Metabolomic Analysis of Rat Brain by High Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Tissue Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Norbert W.; Béraud, Evelyne; Cozzone, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of gene expression on the RNA and protein levels have long been used to explore biological processes underlying disease. More recently, genomics and proteomics have been complemented by comprehensive quantitative analysis of the metabolite pool present in biological systems. This strategy, termed metabolomics, strives to provide a global characterization of the small-molecule complement involved in metabolism. While the genome and the proteome define the tasks cells can perform, the metabolome is part of the actual phenotype. Among the methods currently used in metabolomics, spectroscopic techniques are of special interest because they allow one to simultaneously analyze a large number of metabolites without prior selection for specific biochemical pathways, thus enabling a broad unbiased approach. Here, an optimized experimental protocol for metabolomic analysis by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy is presented, which is the method of choice for efficient quantification of tissue metabolites. Important strengths of this method are (i) the use of crude extracts, without the need to purify the sample and/or separate metabolites; (ii) the intrinsically quantitative nature of NMR, permitting quantitation of all metabolites represented by an NMR spectrum with one reference compound only; and (iii) the nondestructive nature of NMR enabling repeated use of the same sample for multiple measurements. The dynamic range of metabolite concentrations that can be covered is considerable due to the linear response of NMR signals, although metabolites occurring at extremely low concentrations may be difficult to detect. For the least abundant compounds, the highly sensitive mass spectrometry method may be advantageous although this technique requires more intricate sample preparation and quantification procedures than NMR spectroscopy. We present here an NMR protocol adjusted to rat brain analysis; however, the same protocol can be applied to other tissues with minor

  3. Cassini UVIS Solar Zenith Angle Studies of Titan Dayglow Based on N2 High Resolution Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajello, Joseph; West, Robert; Holsclaw, Greg; Royer, Emilie; Heays, Alan; Bradley, Todd; Stevens, Michael

    2014-11-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed photon emissions of Titan’s day and night limb-airglow on multiple occasions, including during an eclipse observation. On one occasion the UVIS made a Solar Zenith Angle (SZA) study of the Titan limb dayglow (2011 DOY 171) from about 70 to 95 degrees SZA. The UV intensity variation observations of the N2 photoelectron excited spectral features from the EUV (563-118.2 nm) and FUV (111.5-191.2nm) sub-systems followed a Chapman function. For other observations at night on the limb, the emission features are much weaker in intensity. Beyond 120 deg SZA, when the upper atmosphere of Titan below 1200 km is in total XUV darkness, there is an indication of weak and sporadic night side UV airglow emission excited by magnetosphere plasma collisions with ambient thermosphere gas, with similar N2 excited features as above in the daylight or twilight glow over an extended altitude range. We have analyzed the UVIS airglow spectra with models based on high resolution laboratory electron impact induced fluorescence spectra. We have measured high-resolution (FWHM = 0.2 Å) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV, 800-1350 Å) laboratory emission spectra of molecular nitrogen excited by electron impact at 20 and 100 eV. Molecular emission was observed to vibrationally-excited ground state levels as high as v''=17, from the a 1Πg , b 1Πu, and b‧ 1Σu+ excited valence states and the Rydberg series c‧n+1 1Σu+, cn 1Πu and o 1Πu for n between 3 and 9. A total of 491 emission features were observed from N2 electronic-vibrational transitions and atomic N I and N II multiplets. Their emission cross sections were measured.The blended molecular emission bands were disentangled with the aid of a model which solves the coupled-Schroedinger equation

  4. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of T Tauri stars in the Taurus-Auriga complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telleschi, A.; Güdel, M.; Briggs, K. R.; Audard, M.; Scelsi, L.

    2007-06-01

    Context: Differences have been reported between the X-ray emission of accreting and non-accreting stars. Some observations have suggested that accretion shocks could be responsible for part of the X-ray emission in classical T Tauri stars (CTTS). Aims: We present high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy for nine pre-main sequence stars in order to test the proposed spectroscopic differences between accreting and non-accreting pre-main sequence stars. Methods: We used X-ray spectroscopy from the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometers and the EPIC instruments. We interpret the spectra using optically thin thermal models with variable abundances, together with an absorption column density. For BP Tau and AB Aur we derive electron densities from the O vii triplets. Results: Using the O vii/O viii count ratios as a diagnostic for cool plasma, we find that CTTS display a soft excess (with equivalent electron temperatures of ≈2.5{-}3 MK) when compared with WTTS or zero-age main-sequence stars. Although the O vii triplet in BP Tau is consistent with a high electron density (3.4 × 1011 cm-3), we find low density for the accreting Herbig star AB Aur (ne < 1010 cm-3). The element abundances of accreting and non-accreting stars are similar. The Ne abundance is found to be high (4-6 times the Fe abundance) in all K and M-type stars. In contrast, for the three G-type stars (SU Aur, HD 283572, and HP Tau/G2), we find an enhanced Fe abundance (0.4-0.8 times solar photospheric values) compared to later-type stars. Conclusions: Adding the results from our sample to former high-resolution studies of T Tauri stars, we find a soft excess in all accreting stars, but in none of the non-accretors. On the other hand, high electron density and high Ne/Fe abundance ratios do not seem to be present in all accreting pre-main sequence stars.

  5. Toward an image compression algorithm for the high-resolution electronic still camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nerheim, Rosalee

    1989-01-01

    Taking pictures with a camera that uses a digital recording medium instead of film has the advantage of recording and transmitting images without the use of a darkroom or a courier. However, high-resolution images contain an enormous amount of information and strain data-storage systems. Image compression will allow multiple images to be stored in the High-Resolution Electronic Still Camera. The camera is under development at Johnson Space Center. Fidelity of the reproduced image and compression speed are of tantamount importance. Lossless compression algorithms are fast and faithfully reproduce the image, but their compression ratios will be unacceptably low due to noise in the front end of the camera. Future efforts will include exploring methods that will reduce the noise in the image and increase the compression ratio.

  6. High-resolution photoelectron imaging spectroscopy of cryogenically cooled Fe4O- and Fe5O-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichman, Marissa L.; DeVine, Jessalyn A.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2016-08-01

    We report high-resolution photodetachment spectra of the cryogenically cooled iron monoxide clusters Fe4O- and Fe5O- obtained with slow photoelectron velocity-map imaging (cryo-SEVI). Well-resolved vibrational progressions are observed in both sets of spectra, and transitions to low-lying excited states of both species are seen. In order to identify the structural isomers, electronic states, and vibrational modes that contribute to the cryo-SEVI spectra of these clusters, experimental results are compared with density functional theory calculations and Franck-Condon simulations. The main bands observed in the SEVI spectra are assigned to the 15A2←16B2 photodetachment transition of Fe4O- and the 17A'←18A″ photodetachment transition of Fe5O-. We report electron affinities of 1.6980(3) eV for Fe4O and 1.8616(3) eV for Fe5O, although there is some uncertainty as to whether the 15A2 state is the true ground state of Fe4O. The iron atoms have a distorted tetrahedral geometry in Fe4O0/- and a distorted trigonal-bipyramidal arrangement in Fe5O0/-. For both neutral and anionic species, the oxygen atom preferably binds in a μ2-oxo configuration along the cluster edge. This finding is in contrast to prior predictions that Fe5O0/- exhibits a μ3 face-bound structure.

  7. High-resolution photoelectron imaging spectroscopy of cryogenically cooled Fe4O(-) and Fe5O(.).

    PubMed

    Weichman, Marissa L; DeVine, Jessalyn A; Neumark, Daniel M

    2016-08-01

    We report high-resolution photodetachment spectra of the cryogenically cooled iron monoxide clusters Fe4O(-) and Fe5O(-) obtained with slow photoelectron velocity-map imaging (cryo-SEVI). Well-resolved vibrational progressions are observed in both sets of spectra, and transitions to low-lying excited states of both species are seen. In order to identify the structural isomers, electronic states, and vibrational modes that contribute to the cryo-SEVI spectra of these clusters, experimental results are compared with density functional theory calculations and Franck-Condon simulations. The main bands observed in the SEVI spectra are assigned to the (15)A2←(16)B2 photodetachment transition of Fe4O(-) and the (17)A'←(18)A″ photodetachment transition of Fe5O(-). We report electron affinities of 1.6980(3) eV for Fe4O and 1.8616(3) eV for Fe5O, although there is some uncertainty as to whether the (15)A2 state is the true ground state of Fe4O. The iron atoms have a distorted tetrahedral geometry in Fe4O(0/-) and a distorted trigonal-bipyramidal arrangement in Fe5O(0/-). For both neutral and anionic species, the oxygen atom preferably binds in a μ2-oxo configuration along the cluster edge. This finding is in contrast to prior predictions that Fe5O(0/-) exhibits a μ3 face-bound structure. PMID:27497556

  8. Exploring semiconductor quantum dots and wires by high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Molina Rubio, Sergio I; Galindo, Pedro; Gonzalez, Luisa; Ripalda, JM; Varela del Arco, Maria; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    We review in this communication our contribution to the structural characterisation of semiconductor quantum dots and wires by high resolution electron microscopy, both in phase-contrast and Z-contrast modes. We show how these techniques contribute to predict the preferential sites of nucleation of these nanostructures, and also determine the compositional distribution in 1D and 0D nanostructures. The results presented here were produced in the framework of the European Network of Excellence entitled 'Self-Assembled semiconductor Nanostructures for new Devices in photonics and Electronics (SANDiE)'.

  9. High Resolution Imaging Spectroscopy for Characterizing Soil Properties over Large Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, D.; Kumar, P.

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative mapping of high resolution surface soil texture (percentage sand, silt and clay), soil organic matter and chemical constituents are important for understanding infiltration, runoff and other surficial hydrologic processes at different scales. The Visible Near Infrared Analysis (VNIRA) method, which is a combination of imaging spectroscopy and laboratory chemical analysis with an underlying statistical model, has been established for the quantification of soil properties from imaging spectrometer data. In this study we characterize the feasibility of quantifying soil properties over large areas with the aim that these methods may be extended to space-borne sensors such as HyspIRI. Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) is a space-borne NASA mission concept having 10nm contiguous bands in the VSWIR region (380nm to 2500nm) of the electromagnetic spectra. High resolution (7.6m) Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data collected by NASA immediately after the massive 2011 Mississippi River floods at the Birds Point New Madrid (BPNM) floodway, coupled with in situ samples obtained at the time of the flight, is used to generate HyspIRI like data at 60m resolution. The VNIRA method is applied in a data-mining framework for quantification of the different soil textural properties and chemical constituents. The empirical models are further used for creating quantitative maps of the soil properties for the entire BPNM floodway. These maps are compared with the fine resolution AVIRIS maps of the same area for the different legacy landscape features and spatial correlations with the underlying topography immediately disturbed by the flooding event. The scales of variation in the soil constituents captured by the fine resolution data are also compared to the scales of variation captured by coarser resolution data. This study further explores the issues of applicability, challenges (such as the sensitivity of NDVI from mixed neighborhood pixels

  10. High-Resolution Infrared and Electron-Diffraction Studies of Trimethylenecyclopropane ([3]-Radialene)

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Corey; Holmes, Joshua; Nibler, Joseph W.; Hedberg, Kenneth; White, James D.; Hedberg, Lise; Weber, Alfons; Blake, Thomas A.

    2013-05-16

    Combined high-resolution spectroscopic, electron-diffraction, and quantum theoretical methods are particularly advantageous for small molecules of high symmetry and can yield accurate structures that reveal subtle effects of electron delocalization on molecular bonds. The smallest of the radialene compounds, trimethylenecyclopropane, [3]-radialene, has been synthesized and examined in the gas phase by these methods. The first high-resolution infrared spectra have been obtained for this molecule of D3h symmetry, leading to an accurate B0 rotational constant value of 0.1378629(8) cm-1, within 0.5% of the value obtained from electronic structure calculations (density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP/cc-pVTZ). This result is employed in an analysis of electron-diffraction data to obtain the rz bond lengths (in Å): C-H = 1.072 (17), C-C = 1.437 (4), and C=C = 1.330 (4). The analysis does not lead to an accurate value of the HCH angle; however, from comparisons of theoretical and experimental angles for similar compounds, the theoretical prediction of 117.5° is believed to be reliable to within 2°. The effect of electron delocalization in radialene is to reduce the single C-C bond length by 0.07 Å compared to that in cyclopropane.

  11. Experiments with the High Resolution Kaon Spectrometer at JLab Hall C and the new spectroscopy of Λ12B hypernuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, L.; Chen, C.; Gogami, T.; Kawama, D.; Han, Y.; Yuan, L.; Matsumura, A.; Okayasu, Y.; Seva, T.; Rodriguez, V. M.; Baturin, P.; Acha, A.; Achenbach, P.; Ahmidouch, A.; Albayrak, I.; Androic, D.; Asaturyan, A.; Asaturyan, R.; Ates, O.; Badui, R.; Baker, O. K.; Benmokhtar, F.; Boeglin, W.; Bono, J.; Bosted, P.; Brash, E.; Carter, P.; Carlini, R.; Chiba, A.; Christy, M. E.; Cole, L.; Dalton, M. M.; Danagoulian, S.; Daniel, A.; De Leo, R.; Dharmawardane, V.; Doi, D.; Egiyan, K.; Elaasar, M.; Ent, R.; Fenker, H.; Fujii, Y.; Furic, M.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gan, L.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gasparian, A.; Gibson, E. F.; Gueye, P.; Hashimoto, O.; Honda, D.; Horn, T.; Hu, B.; Hungerford, Ed V.; Jayalath, C.; Jones, M.; Johnston, K.; Kalantarians, N.; Kanda, H.; Kaneta, M.; Kato, F.; Kato, S.; Kawai, M.; Keppel, C.; Khanal, H.; Kohl, M.; Kramer, L.; Lan, K. J.; Li, Y.; Liyanage, A.; Luo, W.; Mack, D.; Maeda, K.; Malace, S.; Margaryan, A.; Marikyan, G.; Markowitz, P.; Maruta, T.; Maruyama, N.; Maxwell, V.; Millener, D. J.; Miyoshi, T.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Motoba, T.; Nagao, S.; Nakamura, S. N.; Narayan, A.; Neville, C.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, M. I.; Nunez, A.; Nuruzzaman, Nomura, H.; Nonaka, K.; Ohtani, A.; Oyamada, M.; Perez, N.; Petkovic, T.; Pochodzalla, J.; Qiu, X.; Randeniya, S.; Raue, B.; Reinhold, J.; Rivera, R.; Roche, J.; Samanta, C.; Sato, Y.; Sawatzky, B.; Segbefia, E. K.; Schott, D.; Shichijo, A.; Simicevic, N.; Smith, G.; Song, Y.; Sumihama, M.; Tadevosyan, V.; Takahashi, T.; Taniya, N.; Tsukada, K.; Tvaskis, V.; Veilleux, M.; Vulcan, W.; Wells, S.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Wood, S. A.; Yamamoto, T.; Yan, C.; Ye, Z.; Yokota, K.; Zhamkochyan, S.; Zhu, L.; HKS JLab E05-115; E01-011 Collaborations

    2014-09-01

    Since the pioneering experiment E89-009 studying hypernuclear spectroscopy using the (e,e'K+) reaction was completed, two additional experiments, E01-011 and E05-115, were performed at Jefferson Lab. These later experiments used a modified experimental design, the "tilt method," to dramatically suppress the large electromagnetic background, and allowed for a substantial increase in luminosity. Additionally, a new kaon spectrometer, HKS (E01-011), a new electron spectrometer, HES, and a new splitting magnet (E05-115) were added to produce new data sets of precision, high-resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy. All three experiments obtained a spectrum for Λ12B, which is the most characteristic p-shell hypernucleus and is commonly used for calibration. Independent analyses of these different experiments demonstrate excellent consistency and provide the clearest level structure to date of this hypernucleus as produced by the (e,e'K+) reaction. This paper presents details of these experiments, and the extraction and analysis of the observed Λ12B spectrum.

  12. Experiments with the High Resolution Kaon Spectrometer at Jlab Hall C and the New Spectroscopy of ^12_Lambda B Hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Liguang; Chen, Chunhua; Gogami, Toshiyuki; Kawama, Daisuke; Han, Yuncheng; Yuan, Lulin; Matsumura, Akihiko; Okayasu, Yuichi; Seva, Tomislav; Rodriguez, Victor; Baturin, Pavlo; Acha Quimper, Armando; Achenbach, Carsten; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Albayrak, Ibrahim; Androic, Darko; Asaturyan, Arshak; Asaturyan, Razmik; Ates, Ozgur; Badui, Rafael; Baker, Oliver; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Boeglin, Werner; Bono, Jason; Bosted, Peter; Brash, Edward; Carter, Philip; Carlini, Roger; Chiba, Atsushi; Christy, Michael; Cole, Leon; Dalton, Mark; Danagoulian, Samuel; Daniel, Aji; De Leo, Raffaele; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Doi, Daisuke; Egiyan, Kim; Elaasar, Mostafa; Ent, Rolf; Fenker, Howard; Fujii, Yu; Furic, Miroslav; Gabrielyan, Marianna; Gan, Liping; Garibaldi, Franco; Gaskell, David; Gasparian, Ashot; Gibson, Edward; Gueye, Paul; Hashimoto, Osamu; Honda, D; Horn, Tanja; Hu, Bitao; Hungerford, Ed; Jayalath, Chandana; Jones, Mark; Johnston, Kathleen; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kanda, Hiroki; Kaneta, M; Kato, F; Kato, Seigo; Kawai, Masaharu; Keppel, Cynthia; Khanal, Hari; Kohl, M; Kramer, Laird; Lan, Kejian; Li, Ya; Habarakada Liyanage, Anusha; Luo, Wei; Mack, David; Maeda, Kazushige; Malace, Simona; Margaryan, Amur; Marikyan, Gagik; Markowitz, Pete; Maruta, Tomofumi; Maruyama, Nayuta; Maxwell, Victor; Millener, David; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Mkrtchyan, Arthur; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Motoba, Toshio; Nagao, Sho; Nakamura, Satoshi; Narayan, Amrendra; Neville, Casey; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria; Nunez, Angel; Nuruzzaman, nfn; Nomura, Hiroshi; Nonaka, Kenichi; Ohtani, Atsushi; Oyamada, Masamichi; Perez, Naipy; Petkovic, Tomislav; Pochodzalla, J; Qiu, Xiyu; Randeniya, Kapugodage; Raue, Brian; Reinhold, Joerg; Rivera, R; Roche, Julie; Samanta, Chhanda; Sato, Yoshinori; Sawatzky, Bradley; Segbefia, Edwin; Schott, Diane; Shichijo, Ayako; Simicevic, Neven; Smith, Gregory; Song, Yushou; Sumihama, Mizuki; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Taniya, Naotaka; Tsukada, Kyo; Tvaskis, Vladas; Veilleux, Micah; Vulcan, William; Wells, Steven; Wesselmann, Frank; Wood, Stephen; Yamamoto, Taku; Yan, Chen; Ye, Z; Yokota, Kosuke; Zhamkochyan, Simon; Zhu, Lingyan

    2014-09-01

    Since the pioneering experiment, E89-009 studying hypernuclear spectroscopy using the $(e,e^{\\prime}K^+)$ reaction was completed, two additional experiments, E01-011 and E05-115, were performed at Jefferson Lab. These later experiments used a modified experimental design, the "Tilt Method", to dramatically suppress the large electromagnetic background, and allowed for a substantial increase in luminosity. Additionally, a new kaon spectrometer, HKS (E01-011), a new electron spectrometer, HES, and a new splitting magnet were added to produce precision, high-resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy. These two experiments, E01-011 and E05-115, resulted in two new data sets, producing sub-MeV energy resolution in the spectra of ${}^{7}_{\\Lambda}\\text{He}$, ${}^{12}_{\\Lambda}\\text{B}$ and ${}^{28}_{\\Lambda} \\text{Al}$ and ${}^{7}_{\\Lambda}\\text{He}$, ${}^{10}_{\\Lambda}\\text{Be}$, ${}^{12}_{\\Lambda}\\text{B}$ and ${}^{52}_{\\Lambda}\\text{V}$. All three experiments obtained a ${}^{12}_{\\Lambda}\\text{B}$, spectrum, which is the most characteristic $p$-shell hypernucleus and is commonly used for calibration. Independent analyses of these different experiments demonstrate excellent consistency and provide the clearest level structure to date of this hypernucleus as produced by the $(e,e^{\\prime}K^+)$ reaction. This paper presents details of these experiments, and the extraction and analysis of the observed ${}^{12}_{\\Lambda}\\text{B}$ spectrum.

  13. Characterization of carbonaceous meteoritic fragments found in Antarctica by high-resolution Raman spectroscopy and SEM/EDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall Asen, Analia; Baer, Brandon; Mittelstaedt, Jake; Gerton, Jordan; Bromley, Benjamin; Kenyon, Scott

    2016-03-01

    Carbonaceous chondritic meteorites are composed mainly of chondrules (micro/millimeter-sized inclusions) surrounding by a matrix of microparticles, and are considered the most primitive surviving materials from the early Solar System. Understanding their properties and history may provide clues to the formation of planets from micron-size dust grains in the Solar nebula. Our approach is to study the structure and composition of carbonaceous chondrites with high-resolution micro-Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. These techniques enable us to capture details on a wide range of spatial scales, from micrometers to millimeters. Here we provide the first analysis of a set of meteorite fragments from Antarctica (MIL 07002 and ALH 84028), mapping elemental and molecular abundances, as well as large-scale morphological features. We present characterizations of individual chondrules and the surrounding matrix, and we consider on how our findings reflect physical processes believed to be operating during the early stages of planet formation.

  14. High-Resolution Imaging and Spectroscopy at High Pressure: A Novel Liquid Cell for the TEM

    PubMed Central

    Tanase, Mihaela; Winterstein, Jonathan; Sharma, Renu; Aksyuk, Vladimir; Holland, Glenn; Liddle, J. Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate quantitative core-loss electron energy-loss spectroscopy of iron oxide nanoparticles and imaging resolution of Ag nanoparticles in liquid down to 0.24 nm, in both transmission and scanning-transmission modes, in a novel, monolithic liquid cell developed for the transmission electron microscope (TEM). At typical SiN membrane thicknesses of 50 nm the liquid layer thickness has a maximum change of only 30 nm for the entire TEM viewing area of 200 μm × 200 μm. PMID:26650072

  15. Live correlative light-electron microscopy to observe molecular dynamics in high resolution.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shouhei; Iwamoto, Masaaki; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2016-08-01

    Fluorescence microscopy (FM) is a powerful tool for observing specific molecular components in living cells, but its spatial resolution is relatively low. In contrast, electron microscopy (EM) provides high-resolution information about cellular structures, but it cannot provide temporal information in living cells. To achieve molecular selectivity in imaging at high resolution, a method combining EM imaging with live-cell fluorescence imaging, known as live correlative light-EM (CLEM), has been developed. In this method, living cells are first observed by FM, fixed in situ during the live observation and then subjected to EM observation. Various fluorescence techniques and tools can be applied for FM, resulting in the generation of various modified methods that are useful for understanding cellular structure in high resolution. Here, we review the methods of CLEM and live-cell imaging associated with CLEM (live CLEM). Such methods can greatly advance the understanding of the function of cellular structures on a molecular level, and thus are useful for medical fields as well as for basic biology. PMID:27385786

  16. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of late-type stars with CHANDRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewe, R.; Raassen, A. J. J.; Kaastra, J. S.; van der Meer, R. L. J.; Brinkman, A. C.

    We have analyzed high-resolution (Δλ ≅ 0.06 Å) X-ray spectra in the region 6-180 Å of the coronae of the cool stars Capella, Procyon, and α Centauri. These stars were observed with the the CHANDRA Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (LETGS) between Sep. and Dec. 1999. Temperatures are derived from line ratios of helium-like lines and long-wavelength iron lines. Electron densities are obtained for the relatively cooler (few MK) and more tenuous (⪅ 10 11 cm -3) plasma components from the forbidden to intercombination line ratios in the helium-like triplets of O, N, and C and for the hotter (⪆ 5 MK) and denser (⪆ 10 12 cm -3) components (such as occur in Capella) from the helium-like triplets of Mg and Si and the ratios of Fe XIX-Fe XXII 2ℓ-2ℓ' lines above 90 Å. The implications of these results for the coronal structure are discussed.

  17. Lineshape spectroscopy with a very high resolution, very high signal-to-noise crystal spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Beiersdorfer, P; Magee, E W; Brown, G V; Chen, H; Emig, J; Hell, N; Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Allan, P; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Hoarty, D J; Hobbs, L M R; James, S F

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a high-resolution x-ray spectrometer for measuring the shapes of spectral lines produced from laser-irradiated targets on the Orion laser facility. The instrument utilizes a spherically bent crystal geometry to spatially focus and spectrally analyze photons from foil or microdot targets. The high photon collection efficiency resulting from its imaging properties allows the instrument to be mounted outside the Orion chamber, where it is far less sensitive to particles, hard x-rays, or electromagnetic pulses than instruments housed close to the target chamber center in ten-inch manipulators. Moreover, Bragg angles above 50° are possible, which provide greatly improved spectral resolution compared to radially viewing, near grazing-incidence crystal spectrometers. These properties make the new instrument an ideal lineshape diagnostic for determining plasma temperature and density. We describe its calibration on the Livermore electron beam ion trap facility and present spectral data of the K-shell emission from highly charged sulfur produced by long-pulse as well as short-pulse beams on the Orion laser in the United Kingdom. PMID:27370448

  18. Lineshape spectroscopy with a very high resolution, very high signal-to-noise crystal spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Beiersdorfer, P; Magee, E W; Brown, G V; Chen, H; Emig, J; Hell, N; Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Allan, P; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Hoarty, D J; Hobbs, L M R; James, S F

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a high-resolution x-ray spectrometer for measuring the shapes of spectral lines produced from laser-irradiated targets on the Orion laser facility. The instrument utilizes a spherically bent crystal geometry to spatially focus and spectrally analyze photons from foil or microdot targets. The high photon collection efficiency resulting from its imaging properties allows the instrument to be mounted outside the Orion chamber, where it is far less sensitive to particles, hard x-rays, or electromagnetic pulses than instruments housed close to the target chamber center in ten-inch manipulators. Moreover, Bragg angles above 50° are possible, which provide greatly improved spectral resolution compared to radially viewing, near grazing-incidence crystal spectrometers. These properties make the new instrument an ideal lineshape diagnostic for determining plasma temperature and density. We describe its calibration on the Livermore electron beam ion trap facility and present spectral data of the K-shell emission from highly charged sulfur produced by long-pulse as well as short-pulse beams on the Orion laser in the United Kingdom.

  19. Lineshape spectroscopy with a very high resolution, very high signal-to-noise crystal spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V.; Chen, H.; Emig, J.; Hell, N.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Allan, P.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Hoarty, D. J.; Hobbs, L. M. R.; James, S. F.

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a high-resolution x-ray spectrometer for measuring the shapes of spectral lines produced from laser-irradiated targets on the Orion laser facility. The instrument utilizes a spherically bent crystal geometry to spatially focus and spectrally analyze photons from foil or microdot targets. The high photon collection efficiency resulting from its imaging properties allows the instrument to be mounted outside the Orion chamber, where it is far less sensitive to particles, hard x-rays, or electromagnetic pulses than instruments housed close to the target chamber center in ten-inch manipulators. Moreover, Bragg angles above 50° are possible, which provide greatly improved spectral resolution compared to radially viewing, near grazing-incidence crystal spectrometers. These properties make the new instrument an ideal lineshape diagnostic for determining plasma temperature and density. We describe its calibration on the Livermore electron beam ion trap facility and present spectral data of the K-shell emission from highly charged sulfur produced by long-pulse as well as short-pulse beams on the Orion laser in the United Kingdom.

  20. A high-resolution compact Johann crystal spectrometer with the Livermore electron beam ion trap.

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, D L; Chen, H; Beiersdorfer, P; Faenov, A Y; Pikuz, T A; May, M J; Dunn, J; Smith, A J

    2004-04-14

    A compact high-resolution ({lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} {approx} 10000) spherically bent crystal spectrometer in the Johann geometry was recently installed and tested on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory SuperEBIT electron beam ion trap. The curvature of the mica (002) crystal grating allows for higher collection efficiency compared to the flat and cylindrically bent crystal spectrometers commonly used on the Livermore electron beam ion traps. The spectrometer's Johann configuration enables orientation of its dispersion plane to be parallel to the electron beam propagation. Used in concert with a crystal spectrometer, whose dispersion plane is perpendicular to the electron beam propagation, the polarization of x-ray emission lines can be measured.

  1. Imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy of the Planetary Nebula NGC 3242

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Muñoz, Marco Antonio; Wendolyn Blanco Cárdenas, Mónica; Vázquez, Roberto; Zavala, Saúl A.; Guillén, Pedro F.; Ayala, Sandra A.

    2015-08-01

    We present a high-resolution imaging and high-dispersion spectroscopy study of the complex morphological and kinematical structure of the planetary nebula NGC 3242. We analyze narrowband Hα, [O III] and [N II] images, addressing important morphological features: in the [O III] image we found one knot oriented to PA=-4°, in the [N II] image, three knots oriented at PA1=155°, PA2=+157°, and PA3=-45.5°, and in the Hα image, two bubbles in the internal region, one of them oriented toward SE and the other toward NW. Additionally we used the unsharp-masking technique and found faint structures in the halo that have not been studied before. These structures are presented in two pairs of arcs, one pair oriented toward PA=-35° and the other toward PA=140°. NGC 3242 is a morphologically rich PN with bubbles, asymmetrical outflows, and some knots in a double-shell nebular structure. Ground-based long-slit echelle spectra were obtained crossing NGC 3242 at twelve different positions to precisely determine kinematical features in the structure of the nebula. We obtain a systemic velocity of VLSR=-6.6 km/s. We have used the software SHAPE (Steffen et al. 2011, IEEE Trans. Vis. Comput. Graphics, 17, 454), to reconstruct a 3D model of NGC 3242 which fits all our observational data. Preliminary results (deprojected velocities and kinematical ages) of all these structures will be presented.This project has been supported by grant PAPIIT-DGAPA-UNAM IN107914. MWB is in grateful receipt of a DGAPA-UNAM postdoctoral scholarship. MAG acknowledges CONACYT for his graduate scholarship.

  2. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Stratospheric Ethane Following the Jupiter Impact of 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fast, Kelly; Kostiuk, Theodor; Livengood, Timothy A.; Hewagama, Tilak; Amen, John

    2010-01-01

    We report on high-resolution infrared spectroscopy of ethane (C2H6) performed at the latitude of an impact site on Jupiter discovered on 19 July 2009 by A. Wesley from a location in Murrumbateman, Australia. The observations used the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Heterodyne Instrument for Planetary Wind and Composition (HIPWAC) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. HIPWAC is a mid-infrared (9-12 microns) heterodyne spectrometer operating at the highest limit of spectral resolving power (lambda\\Delta\\lambda > l06), providing information on atmospheric constituent abundance and temperature through fully resolved tine shapes. Ethane is a stable trace product of methane photochemistry that is nearly uniformly mixed in Jupiter's stratosphere, providing an effective probe of that altitude region. Ethane emission line profiles near 11,74 microns in the Ug band were measured in Jupiter's stratosphere at 25 MHz (11.00083/cm) resolution. A sequence of spectra of ethane acquired over a range of longitude at the impact latitude (56S planetocentric) probes constituent abundance and temperature profile, both on and off the impact region. Near the site of the impact, ethane emission increased above levels measured well outside the impact region. Radiative transfer analysis indicates increased ethane mole fraction (30% greater). Variation in the measured continuum level and line intensities within 75deg of the impact longitude indicate the presence of an opacity source (haze) at altitudes near and above the tropopause and as high as the 10-mbar level near the impact site. The indication of possible haze opacity up to the 10-mbar level in the atmosphere is consistent with measurements made by HIPWAC's predecessor as part of the IRTF Shoemaker Levy-9 campaign in 1994.

  3. IGRINS Near-IR High-resolution Spectroscopy of Multiple Jets around LkHα 234

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Heeyoung; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Yuk, In-Soo; Park, Byeong-Gon; Park, Chan; Chun, Moo-Young; Pak, Soojong; Kim, Kang-Min; Sok Oh, Jae; Jeong, Ueejeong; Yu, Young Sam; Lee, Jae-Joon; Kim, Hwihyun; Hwang, Narae; Kaplan, Kyle; Pavel, Michael; Mace, Gregory; Lee, Hye-In; Nguyen Le, Huynh Anh; Lee, Sungho; Jaffe, Daniel T.

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of high-resolution near-IR spectroscopy toward the multiple outflows around the Herbig Be star LkHα 234 using the Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph. Previous studies indicate that the region around LkHα 234 is complex, with several embedded young stellar objects and the outflows associated with them. In simultaneous H- and K-band spectra from HH 167, we detected 5 [Fe ii] and 14 H2 emission lines. We revealed a new [Fe ii] jet driven by radio continuum source VLA 3B. Position-velocity diagrams of the H2 1-0 S(1) λ2.122 μm line show multiple velocity peaks. The kinematics may be explained by a geometrical bow shock model. We detected a component of H2 emission at the systemic velocity (VLSR = -10.2 km s-1) along the whole slit in all slit positions, which may arise from the ambient photodissociation region. Low-velocity gas dominates the molecular hydrogen emission from knots A and B in HH 167, which is close to the systemic velocity; [Fe ii] emission lines are detected farther from the systemic velocity, at VLSR = -100--130 km s-1. We infer that the H2 emission arises from shocked gas entrained by a high-velocity outflow. Population diagrams of H2 lines imply that the gas is thermalized at a temperature of 2500-3000 K and the emission results from shock excitation. This paper includes data taken at The McDonald Observatory of The University of Texas at Austin.

  4. Magnetic lens apparatus for a low-voltage high-resolution electron microscope

    DOEpatents

    Crewe, Albert V.

    1996-01-01

    A lens apparatus in which a beam of charged particles of low accelerating voltage is brought to a focus by a magnetic field, the lens being situated behind the target position. The lens comprises an electrically-conducting coil arranged around the axis of the beam and a magnetic pole piece extending along the axis of the beam at least within the space surrounded by the coil. The lens apparatus comprises the sole focusing lens for high-resolution imaging in a low-voltage scanning electron microscope.

  5. Soot Nanostructure: Using Fringe Analysis Software on High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy of Carbon Soot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, James D.

    2004-01-01

    Using high resolution transmission electron images of carbon nanotubes and carbon particles, we are able to use image analysis program to determine several carbon fringe properties, including length, separation, curvature and orientation. Results are shown in the form of histograms for each of those quantities. The combination of those measurements can give a better indication of the graphic structure within nanotubes and particles of carbon and can distinguish carbons based upon fringe properties. Carbon with longer, straighter and closer spaced fringes are considered graphite, while amorphous carbon contain shorter, less structured fringes.

  6. High resolution spectroscopy of B12L hypernuclei by the (e,e'K+) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarsour, Murad G.

    Jefferson Laboratory experiment E89-009 used the reaction (e,e 'K+) to produce B12L hypernuclei from a carbon target. The scattered electrons were tagged at 0° to take advantage of the increased virtual photon flux at forward angles, and the electroproduced kaons were also detected at small angles, ˜3°, to minimize the momentum transfer. To do this, a splitter magnet was used to bend the scattered electrons into an Enge split-pole spectrometer and the kaons into a short orbit spectrometer. In addition to increasing the production rate, tagging the scattered electrons at 0° minimizes the optical aberrations on the focal plane of the Enge split-pole spectrometer. In this experiment, the spectroscopy of the B12L hypernuclei was studied and excellent energy resolution was achieved, ˜918 keV. The differential cross section of the ground state doublet was also calculated.

  7. High Resolution Spectroscopy of 12B Hypernuclei by the (e,e'K) Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    M. Sarsour

    2002-05-01

    Jefferson Laboratory experiment E89-009 used the reaction (e,e' K+ ) to produce 12/{Lambda}B hypernuclei from a carbon target. The scattered electrons were tagged at 0 degrees to take advantage of the increased virtual photon flux at forward angles, and the electroproduced kaons were also detected at small angles, {approx}3 degrees, to minimize the momentum transfer. To do this, a splitter magnet was used to bend the scattered electrons into an Enge split-pole spectrometer and the kaons into a short orbit spectrometer. In addition to increasing the production rate, tagging the scattered electrons at 0 degrees minimizes the optical aberrations on the focal plane of the Enge split-pole spectrometer. In this experiment, the spectroscopy of the 12/{Lambda}B hypernuclei was studied and excellent energy resolution was achieved, {approx} 918 keV. The differential cross section of the ground state doublet was also calculated.

  8. Probing Chemical Dynamics with High Resolution Spectroscopy: Chirped-Pulse Fourier-Transform Microwave Spectroscopy Coupled with a Hyperthermal Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidwell, Nathanael M.; Vara, Vanesa Vaquero; Mehta-Hurt, Deepali N.; Korn, Joseph A.; Dian, Brian C.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2013-06-01

    Chirped-pulse Fourier-transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectroscopy has proven to be a well-suited technique for the rapid study and spectral identification of molecular species due to its ultra-broadband capability and excellent specificity to molecular structure from high-resolution rotational transitions. This talk will describe initial results from combining CP-FTMW detection with a hyperthermal nozzle source. This source has the advantage of producing traditionally high thermal product densities in a pulsed supersonic expansion with a short contact time compared to conventional pyrolysis. Used in tandem, CP-FTMW spectroscopy and the hyperthermal nozzle in a supersonic expansion is a powerful method that can produce and detect changes in conformation and isomer populations, and characterize important intermediates on the reaction surface of a precursor. In particular, we show its utility to provide insight into the unimolecular decomposition pathways of model lignin compounds and alternative biofuels. Preliminary results will be discussed including spectroscopic evidence for formation of cyclopentadienone in the pyrolysis of a lignin derivative guaiacol (o-methoxyphenol).

  9. High-resolution infrared detector and its electronic unit for space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, M.; Montmessin, F.; Korablev, O.; Trokhimovsky, A.; Poiet, G.; Bel, J.-B.

    2015-05-01

    High-resolution infrared detector is used extensively for military and civilian purposes. Military applications include target acquisition, surveillance, night vision, and tracking. Civilian applications include, among others, scientific observations. For our space systems, we want to use the products developed by SOFRADIR Company. Thus, we have developed a space electronic unit that is used to control the high-resolution SCORPIO-MW infrared detector, which has a format of 640×512 pixels with 15μm×15μm pixel pitch. The detector within microelectronics based on infrared mid-wave (MW) complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) uses a micro-cooler in order to keep its temperature around 100 K. The standard wavelength range (3 to 5μm) is adapted to the 2.2 to 4.3μm wavelength range thanks to adaptation of the optical interface of the detector and with an antireflection coating. With our electronic system, we can acquire 3 images per second. To increase the signal to noise ratio, we have the opportunity to make a summation of 15 frames per image. Through this article, we will describe the space electronic system that we have developed in order to achieve space observations (e.g. Atmospheric Chemistry Suite package for ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter).

  10. High-resolution photodetachment spectroscopy from the lowest threshold of O{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    Joiner, Anne; Mohr, Robert H.; Yukich, J. N.

    2011-03-15

    We conducted photodetachment spectroscopy near the lowest detachment threshold from O{sup -} in a 1-T field with sufficient resolution to observe a magnetic field structure similar to that observed in experiments conducted at the threshold of the electron affinity. These observations included not only cyclotron structure but also, to a smaller degree, individual Zeeman thresholds. The experiment was conducted in a Penning ion trap and with a single-mode, tunable, amplified diode laser. Finally, analysis of our results yielded a measurement of the lowest threshold energy.

  11. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Long-Range Molecular States of 85Rb_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carollo, Ryan; Eyler, Edward E.; Bruneau, Yoann; Gould, Phillip; Stwalley, W. C.

    2015-06-01

    We present analysis of low-n long-range molecular Rydberg states in 85Rb_2, based on high-resolution spectra. The weakly bound states are accessed by bound-bound transitions from high-v levels of the a ^3 σ _u^+ state, which are prepared by photoassociation of laser-cooled atoms. Single-photon transitions to target states near the 5s + 7p asymptote are excited by a frequency-doubled pulse-amplified CW laser with a narrow linewidth, under 200 MHz. The long-range portion of the bonding potential is dominated by the elastic scattering interaction of the Rydberg electron of a perturbed 7p atom and a nearby ground-state atom, in much the same manner as trilobite states. We use time of flight to selectively measure molecular ions, which are formed via autoionization. This technique gives a two orders-of-magnitude improvement in linewidth over our previous work, reported in Ref. [1]. We also present calculations of a proposed scheme for STIRAP transfer from the current v''=35 level of the a ^3 σ _u^+ state to the v''=39 level. The long-range states accessible to us are defined in large part by the Franck-Condon factors, which are dominated by the outer lobe of the wavefunction. Thus, choosing a v'' sets R, and determines the Franck-Condon window. The proposed v'' = 39 level has a classical outer turning point at ˜ 72 a_0, and will provide access to higher-n states with longer-range wells. This work is supported by the NSF and AFOSR. [1] M. A. Bellos et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 053001 (2013)

  12. Computer Simulation of High Resolution Transmission Electron Micrographs: Theory and Analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilaas, Roar

    Computer simulation of electron micrographs is an invaluable aid in their proper interpretation and in defining optimum conditions for obtaining images experimentally. Since modern instruments are capable of atomic resolution, simulation techniques employing high precision are required. This thesis makes contributions to four specific areas of this field. First, the validity of a new method for simulating high resolution electron microscope images has been critically examined. This method, which has been termed the real space method (RSP) since the entire calculation is performed without any Fourier transforms, offers a considerable reduction in computing time over the conventional multislice approach when identical sampling conditions are employed. However, for the same level of accuracy the real space method requires more sampling points and more computing time than the conventional multislice method. These characteristics are illustrated with calculated results using both methods to identify practical limitations. Second, three different methods for computing scattering amplitudes in High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) have been investigated as to their ability to include upper Laue layer (ULL) interaction. The conventional first order multislice method using fast Fourier transform (FFT) and the second order multislice (SOM) method are shown to yield calculated intensities of first order Laue reflections with the use of slice thicknesses smaller than the crystal periodicity along the incident electron beam direction. It is argued that the calculated intensities of ULL reflections approach the correct values in the limiting case of vanishing slice thickness and electron wavelength. The third method, the improved phasegrating method (IPG) does also in principle include ULL effects, but is severely limited as to choice of slice thickness and sampling interval. A practical way to use slice thicknesses less than the crystal periodicity along the

  13. High-resolution spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy (spin SEM).

    PubMed

    Kohashi, Teruo; Konoto, Makoto; Koike, Kazuyuki

    2010-01-01

    We have developed spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy (spin SEM) with a 5-nm resolution. The secondary electron optics is very important, as it needs to transfer a sufficient number of secondary electrons to the spin polarimeter, due to the low efficiency of the polarimeter. The optics was designed using a three-dimensional (3D) simulation program of the secondary electron trajectories, and it achieves highly efficient collection and transport of the secondary electrons even though the distance between the sample and the objective lens exit of the electron gun remains short. Moreover, the designed optics enables us to obtain clear SEM images in the spin SEM measurement and to precisely adjust the probe beam shape. These functions lead to images with high spatial resolution and sufficient signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios. This optics has been installed in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) spin SEM chamber with a Schottky-type electron gun for the probe electron beam. We observed recorded bits on a perpendicular magnetic recording medium and visualized small irregularities in the bit shapes around the track edges and bit boundaries. The high resolution of 5 nm was demonstrated by observing the smallest domain composed by a single grain in the recording medium. PMID:19840986

  14. Random vs realistic amorphous carbon models for high resolution microscopy and electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ricolleau, C. Alloyeau, D.; Le Bouar, Y.; Amara, H.; Landon-Cardinal, O.

    2013-12-07

    Amorphous carbon and amorphous materials in general are of particular importance for high resolution electron microscopy, either for bulk materials, generally covered with an amorphous layer when prepared by ion milling techniques, or for nanoscale objects deposited on amorphous substrates. In order to quantify the information of the high resolution images at the atomic scale, a structural modeling of the sample is necessary prior to the calculation of the electron wave function propagation. It is thus essential to be able to reproduce the carbon structure as close as possible to the real one. The approach we propose here is to simulate a realistic carbon from an energetic model based on the tight-binding approximation in order to reproduce the important structural properties of amorphous carbon. At first, we compare this carbon with the carbon obtained by randomly generating the carbon atom positions. In both cases, we discuss the limit thickness of the phase object approximation. In a second step, we show the influence of both carbons models on (i) the contrast of Cu, Ag, and Au single atoms deposited on carbon and (ii) the determination of the long-range order parameter in CoPt bimetallic nanoalloys.

  15. Emerging Trends on the Volatile Chemistry in Comets as Measured with High-Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dello Russo, Neil; Kawakita, Hideyo; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Weaver, Harold A.

    2016-10-01

    A systematic analysis of the mixing ratios with respect to H2O for eight species (CH3OH, HCN, NH3, H2CO, C2H2, C2H6, CH4, and CO) measured with high-resolution infrared spectroscopy is presented. Some trends are beginning to emerge when mixing ratios in individual comets are compared to average mixing ratios obtained for all species within the population. The variation in mixing ratios for all measured species is at least an order of magnitude. Overall, Jupiter-family comets are depleted in volatile species with respect to H2O compared to long-period Oort cloud comets, with the most volatile species showing the greatest relative depletion. There is a high positive correlation between the mixing ratios of HCN, C2H6, and CH4, whereas NH3, H2CO, and C2H2 are moderately correlated with each other but generally uncorrelated or show only weak correlation with other species. CO is generally uncorrelated with the other measured species possibly because it has the highest volatility and is therefore more susceptible to thermal evolutionary effects. Molecular mixing ratios for CH3OH, HCN, C2H6, and CH4 show an expected behavior with heliocentric distance suggesting a dominant ice source, whereas there is emerging evidence that the mixing ratios of NH3, H2CO, and C2H2 may increase at small heliocentric distances, suggesting the possibility of additional sources related to the thermal decomposition of organic dust. Although this provides information on the composition of the most volatile grains in comets, it presents an additional difficulty in classifying comet chemistry because most comets within this dataset were only observed over a limited range of heliocentric distance. Optical and infrared comparisons indicate that mixing ratios of daughter species and potential parents from cometary ices are sometimes but not always consistent with one another. This suggests that in many comets there are significant sources of C2 and/or CN from grains, and that the importance of these

  16. Triosmium clusters on a support: determination of structure by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and high-resolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mehraeen, Shareghe; Kulkarni, Apoorva; Chi, Miaofang; Reed, Bryan W; Okamoto, Norihiko L; Browning, Nigel D; Gates, Bruce C

    2011-01-17

    The structures of small, robust metal clusters on a solid support were determined by a combination of spectroscopic and microscopic methods: extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and aberration-corrected STEM. The samples were synthesized from [Os(3) (CO)(12) ] on MgO powder to provide supported clusters intended to be triosmium. The results demonstrate that the supported clusters are robust in the absence of oxidants. Conventional high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) STEM images demonstrate a high degree of uniformity of the clusters, with root-mean-square (rms) radii of 2.03±0.06 Å. The EXAFS OsOs coordination number of 2.1±0.4 confirms the presence of triosmium clusters on average and correspondingly determines an average rms cluster radius of 2.02±0.04 Å. The high-resolution STEM images show the individual Os atoms in the clusters, confirming the triangular structures of their frames and determining OsOs distances of 2.80±0.14 Å, matching the EXAFS value of 2.89±0.06 Å. IR and EXAFS spectra demonstrate the presence of CO ligands on the clusters. This set of techniques is recommended as optimal for detailed and reliable structural characterization of supported clusters. PMID:21226118

  17. Triosmium Clusters on a Support: Determination of Structure by X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy and High-Resolution Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shareghe, Mehraeen; Chi, Miaofang; Browning, Nigel D.

    2011-01-01

    The structures of small, robust metal clusters on a solid support were determined by a combination of spectroscopic and microscopic methods: extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and aberration-corrected STEM. The samples were synthesized from [Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 12}] on MgO powder to provide supported clusters intended to be triosmium. The results demonstrate that the supported clusters are robust in the absence of oxidants. Conventional high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) STEM images demonstrate a high degree of uniformity of the clusters, with root-mean-square (rms) radii of 2.03 {+-} 0.06 {angstrom}. The EXAFS OsOs coordination number of 2.1 {+-} 0.4 confirms the presence of triosmium clusters on average and correspondingly determines an average rms cluster radius of 2.02 {+-} 0.04 {angstrom}. The high-resolution STEM images show the individual Os atoms in the clusters, confirming the triangular structures of their frames and determining OsOs distances of 2.80 {+-} 0.14 {angstrom}, matching the EXAFS value of 2.89 {+-} 0.06 {angstrom}. IR and EXAFS spectra demonstrate the presence of CO ligands on the clusters. This set of techniques is recommended as optimal for detailed and reliable structural characterization of supported clusters.

  18. High resolution spectroscopy of the Cs2 D 1Sigma u + -X 1Sigma g + transition and hyperfine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tooru; Usui, Takashi; Kumauchi, Takahiro; Baba, Masaaki; Ishikawa, Kiyoshi; Katô, Hajime

    1993-02-01

    The Doppler-free high resolution laser spectroscopy of Cs2 D 1Σu+-X 1Σg+ transition is extended up to v'=65. By comparing the spectral linewidth and the time-resolved fluorescence intensity, the line broadening observed for transitions to the D 1Σu+(v'=63,J'≤70) levels is identified as the lifetime broadening originating from the predissociation. Line splittings are observed for the D 1Σu+(v'=46,J'≥95)-X 1Σg+(v`= 1,J`) transitions and are identified as the hyperfine splitting due to a magnetic dipole interaction between nuclear spin and electron. The hyperfine splitting is attributed to mixing of the (2) 3Πu state, whose wave function changes from Hund's case (a) to case (b) at large J. The dependence of the electric dipole transition moment on the internuclear distance for the D 1Σu+-X 1Σg+ transition is determined by comparing the observed and calculated line intensities of the dispersed fluorescence.

  19. High resolution cathodoluminescence spectroscopy of carbonate cementation in Khurmala Formation (Paleocene-L. Eocene) from Iraqi Kurdistan Region, Northern Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omer, Muhamed F.; Omer, Dilshad; Zebari, Bahroz Gh.

    2014-12-01

    A combination of high resolution cathodoluminsecnce-spectroscopy (HRS-CL) with spatial electron microprobe analysis and optical microscopy is used to determine paragenesis and history of cementation in the limestones and dolostones of Khurmala Formation which is exposed in many parts of Northern Iraq. Khurmala Formation was subjected to different diagenetic processes such as micritization, compaction, dissolution, neomorphism, pyritization and cementation that occurred during marine to shallow burial stages and culminated during intermediate to deep burial later stages. Five dolomite textures are recognized and classified according to crystal size distribution and crystal-boundary shape. Dolomitization is closely associated with the development of secondary porosity that pre-and postdates dissolution and corrosion; meanwhile such porosity was not noticed in the associated limestones. Microprobe analysis revealed three types of cement, calcite, dolomite and ankerite which range in their luminescence from dull to bright. Cathodoluminescence study indicated four main texture generations. These are (1) unzoned microdolomite of planar and subhedral shape, with syntaxial rim cement of echinoderm that show dull to red luminescence, (2) equant calcite cements filling interparticle pores which shows dull luminescence and weak zonal growth, (3.1) homogenous intrinsic blue stoichiometric calcite with dull luminescence and without activators, (3.2) coarse blocky calcite cement with strong oscillatory zoning and bright orange luminescence which postdates other calcite cements, (4) ankerite cement with red to orange, non-luminescence growth zonation which is the last formed cement.

  20. High Resolution Stark Spectroscopy of Model Donor-Acceptor Aminobenzonitriles in the Gas Phase.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleisher, Adam J.; Clements, Casey L.; Bird, Ryan G.; Pratt, David W.; Alvarez-Valtierra, Leonardo

    2011-06-01

    Electronic communication between donor-acceptor systems is prevalent in many chemical processes. Unfortunately, an accurate description of the changes in molecular geometry responsible for intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) is difficult to ascertain. Reported here are the S0, LA, and LB electronic state structures and dipole moments of two model ICT systems, 4-(1H-pyrrol-l-yl)benzonitrile (PBN) and 4-(1-pyrrolidinyl)benzonitrile (PDBN), as measured by rotationally resolved electronic spectroscopy. As was observed for phenylpyrrole, the unsaturted rings of PBN become collectively more planar following excitation with UV light, in support of the planar ICT model. However, in PDBN the twist/inversion angle between rings is nearly zero in both the ground and excited electronic states. The unperturbed dipole moments measured here, taken in conjunction with available solvatochromism data, provide an estimate for the polarization, dispersion, and charge transfer contributions to solvent-mediated excited state stabilization. J.A. Thomas, J.W. Young, A.J. Fleisher, L. Álvarez-Valtierra, and D.W. Pratt, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 1, 2017 (2010).

  1. Nanocrystal Phase Identification by Lattice Fringe Fingerprinting from High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorge, Ruben; Seipel, Bjoern; Moeck, Peter; Fraundorf, Philip

    2006-05-01

    Lattice fringe fingerprinting is a novel and powerful method of identifying and characterizing nanocrystalline structures or materials based on images from direct space high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We examine Fourier transformed HRTEM images of nanocrystals in certain orientations (i.e. lattice fringes and cross fringes) in order to obtain a lattice fringe fingerprint plot. Such plots are used to identify a crystalline nanoparticle by comparing the experimental data with data that are derived from a comprehensive database. A lattice fringe fingerprint plot is similar to a classical X-ray powder diffractogram, but an important advantage is that the intersection angles of lattice fringes give us additional information. When transmission electron microscope image acquisition and data interpretation are automated and connected to a comprehensive database (such as our Nano-Crystallography Database, http://nanocrystallography.research.pdx.edu/), fringe fingerprinting will be able to compete with powder X-ray diffraction in identifying unknown nanocrystals on a routine basis.

  2. Ultrastable gold substrates: Properties of a support for high-resolution electron cryomicroscopy of biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Russo, Christopher J; Passmore, Lori A

    2016-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) allows structure determination of a wide range of biological molecules and specimens. All-gold supports improve cryo-EM images by reducing radiation-induced motion and image blurring. Here we compare the mechanical and electrical properties of all-gold supports to amorphous carbon foils. Gold supports are more conductive, and have suspended foils that are not compressed by differential contraction when cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures. These measurements show how the choice of support material and geometry can reduce specimen movement by more than an order of magnitude during low-dose imaging. We provide methods for fabrication of all-gold supports and preparation of vitrified specimens. We also analyse illumination geometry for optimal collection of high resolution, low-dose data. Together, the support structures and methods herein can improve the resolution and quality of images from any electron cryomicroscope.

  3. Ultrastable gold substrates: Properties of a support for high-resolution electron cryomicroscopy of biological specimens

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Christopher J.; Passmore, Lori A.

    2016-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) allows structure determination of a wide range of biological molecules and specimens. All-gold supports improve cryo-EM images by reducing radiation-induced motion and image blurring. Here we compare the mechanical and electrical properties of all-gold supports to amorphous carbon foils. Gold supports are more conductive, and have suspended foils that are not compressed by differential contraction when cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures. These measurements show how the choice of support material and geometry can reduce specimen movement by more than an order of magnitude during low-dose imaging. We provide methods for fabrication of all-gold supports and preparation of vitrified specimens. We also analyse illumination geometry for optimal collection of high resolution, low-dose data. Together, the support structures and methods herein can improve the resolution and quality of images from any electron cryomicroscope. PMID:26592474

  4. Nanoscale deformation analysis with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and digital image correlation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Xueju; Pan, Zhipeng; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Liu, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-10

    We present an application of the digital image correlation (DIC) method to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images for nanoscale deformation analysis. The combination of DIC and HRTEM offers both the ultrahigh spatial resolution and high displacement detection sensitivity that are not possible with other microscope-based DIC techniques. We demonstrate the accuracy and utility of the HRTEM-DIC technique through displacement and strain analysis on amorphous silicon. Two types of error sources resulting from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image noise and electromagnetic-lens distortions are quantitatively investigated via rigid-body translation experiments. The local and global DIC approaches are applied for themore » analysis of diffusion- and reaction-induced deformation fields in electrochemically lithiated amorphous silicon. As a result, the DIC technique coupled with HRTEM provides a new avenue for the deformation analysis of materials at the nanometer length scales.« less

  5. Nanoscale deformation analysis with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and digital image correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xueju; Pan, Zhipeng; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Liu, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-10

    We present an application of the digital image correlation (DIC) method to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images for nanoscale deformation analysis. The combination of DIC and HRTEM offers both the ultrahigh spatial resolution and high displacement detection sensitivity that are not possible with other microscope-based DIC techniques. We demonstrate the accuracy and utility of the HRTEM-DIC technique through displacement and strain analysis on amorphous silicon. Two types of error sources resulting from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image noise and electromagnetic-lens distortions are quantitatively investigated via rigid-body translation experiments. The local and global DIC approaches are applied for the analysis of diffusion- and reaction-induced deformation fields in electrochemically lithiated amorphous silicon. As a result, the DIC technique coupled with HRTEM provides a new avenue for the deformation analysis of materials at the nanometer length scales.

  6. The molecular structure of silyl cyanide, determined in the gas phase by electron diffraction, microwave spectroscopy and high resolution infra-red spectroscopy, in solution in a nematic phase by NMR spectroscopy, and in the crystalline phase at 100 K by X-ray crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Peter D.; Blake, Alexander J.; Cockman, Russell W.; Cradock, Stephen; Ebsworth, E. A. V.; Rankin, David W. H.

    1989-02-01

    The molecular structure of silyl cyanide has been determined in the gas phase by analysis of electron diffraction data and rotation constants, both separately and together, in solution in a nematic liquid crystal by NMR spectroscopy, and in the crystalline phase at 100 K by X-ray crystallography. In the gas phase the parameters ( rav) are: SiC 184.96(4), CN 115.63(5), SiH 148.73(11) pm and ∠HSiC 107.25(4)°. In the crystalline phase the molecules lie on mirror planes, with near-linear chains of molecules ⋯SiCN⋯SiCN⋯. The non-bonded N⋯Si distance is 278.9(2) pm, and this fairly strong interaction is associated with lengthening of the SiC bondlength to 189.96(18) pm, and narrowing of the HSiC angles to 100.4(7)°. The CN distance is 114.28(23) pm. Angles in the chain are SiCN 179.04(15), N⋯SiC 177.62(6) and CN⋯Si 176.66(13)°. In solution in a liquid crystal solvent the structure ( rα°) also shows narrowing of the HSiC angles, to 104.84(14)°. Absolute values of bondlengths cannot be determined by this method, but the ratios r(SiH): r(CN) = 1.2762(24) and r(SiC): r(CN) = 1.6374(34) are consistent with a structure midway between those observed in the gaseous and crystalline phases. Interaction between cyanide groups in the solvent and silyl groups is postulated to account for this behaviour.

  7. A digitally configurable measurement platform using audio cards for high-resolution electronic transport studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopman, D. B.; Bedau, D.; Kent, A. D.

    2012-05-01

    We report on a software-defined digitally configurable measurement platform for determining electronic transport properties in nanostructures with small readout signals. By using a high-resolution audio analog-to-digital/digital-to-analog converter in a digitally compensated bridge configuration we significantly increase the measurement speed compared to established techniques and simultaneously acquire large and small signal characteristics. We characterize the performance (16 bit resolution, 100 dB dynamic range at 192 kS/s) and demonstrate the application of this measurement platform for studying the transport properties of spin-valve nanopillars, a two-terminal device that exhibits giant magnetoresistance and whose resistance can be switched between two levels by applied magnetic fields and by currents applied by the audio card. The high resolution and fast sampling capability permits rapid acquisition of deep statistics on the switching of a spin-valve nanopillar and reduces the time to acquire the basic properties of the device - a state-diagram showing the magnetic configurations as function of applied current and magnetic field - by orders of magnitude.

  8. High Resolution Electron Microscopy Of Dislocation Ribbons In A CMSX-4 Superalloy single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Vorontsov, V. A.; Kovarik, Libor; Mills, M. J.; Rae, Catherine

    2012-07-01

    High-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (HR STEM) has been used to study the structure of dislocations in single crystal superalloy samples that have been subjected to conditions that favour the primary creep regime. The study has revealed the detailed structure of extended a 2 h112i dislocations as they shear the 0 precipitates during creep. These dislocations dissociate in a manner that is consistent with the PFMD predictions made and also suggests the importance of the reordering process during their movement. The shearing done by the ah112i dislocationswas also found to distort the/ 0 interface, changing its appearance from linear to a 'saw tooth' pattern. Another important observation was the segregation of alloying element with high atomic mass to the stacking faults to reduce their energies during shear. Numerous a 2 h110i dissociated dislocations were also observed in the channels of the superalloy. The high resolution provided by the STEM imaging enables one to study the high energy faults that are usually di*cult to observe in conventional weak-beam TEM, such as CISF and CESF-1 in the 0 andthe ISF in the, and to make estimates of their energies. Key

  9. A digitally configurable measurement platform using audio cards for high-resolution electronic transport studies.

    PubMed

    Gopman, D B; Bedau, D; Kent, A D

    2012-05-01

    We report on a software-defined digitally configurable measurement platform for determining electronic transport properties in nanostructures with small readout signals. By using a high-resolution audio analog-to-digital/digital-to-analog converter in a digitally compensated bridge configuration we significantly increase the measurement speed compared to established techniques and simultaneously acquire large and small signal characteristics. We characterize the performance (16 bit resolution, 100 dB dynamic range at 192 kS/s) and demonstrate the application of this measurement platform for studying the transport properties of spin-valve nanopillars, a two-terminal device that exhibits giant magnetoresistance and whose resistance can be switched between two levels by applied magnetic fields and by currents applied by the audio card. The high resolution and fast sampling capability permits rapid acquisition of deep statistics on the switching of a spin-valve nanopillar and reduces the time to acquire the basic properties of the device - a state-diagram showing the magnetic configurations as function of applied current and magnetic field - by orders of magnitude. PMID:22667635

  10. High-Resolution Vibration-Rotation Spectroscopy of CO[subscript 2]: Understanding the Boltzmann Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Karen J.

    2007-01-01

    In this undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory experiment, students acquire a high-resolution infrared absorption spectrum of carbon dioxide and use their data to show that the rotational-vibrational state populations follow a Boltzmann distribution. Data are acquired with a mid-infrared laser source and infrared detector. Appropriate…

  11. Synchrotron-based rotationally resolved high-resolution FTIR spectroscopy of azulene and the unidentified infrared bands of astronomy.

    PubMed

    Albert, Sieghard; Lerch, Philippe; Quack, Martin

    2013-10-01

    Chasing the unidentified IR bands: The first rotationally resolved high-resolution infrared spectrum of azulene is reported using synchrotron Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy including a rovibrational analysis of the out-of-plane fundamental ν44. Comparison of azulene, naphthalene, indole, and biphenyl infrared bands leads to coincidences with UIR bands at 12.8 μm with naphthalene and at 13.55 and 14.6 μm with biphenyl bands, but excluding azulene as a strong absorber.

  12. Development of AN External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser Spectrometer for High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Jacob T.; Gibson, Bradley M.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2013-06-01

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have proven to be valuable tools for performing high-resolution infrared spectroscopy because of their high output powers and availability throughout the mid-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Despite their usefulness, typical QCLs can only be frequency tuned within a narrow window, requiring a specific laser to be used for measuring a specific molecular target. Recent advances in QCL technology have improved the tuning range of QCLs by creating lasers with broader gain profiles which can be used in an external cavity setup to produce widely-tunable, single-mode infrared radiation. In collaboration with the Wysocki research group at Princeton, we are developing a high-resolution infrared spectrometer based on an external cavity QCL (EC-QCL) system, which will allow us to perform spectroscopy from ˜1120 - 1250 cm^{-1}. We will present details of the development of the instrument, as well as preliminary spectroscopic results using the EC-QCL system. We will also outline future work we plan to perform with this spectrometer, particularly high-resolution spectroscopy of molecular ions.

  13. Detecting non-maxwellian electron velocity distributions at JET by high resolution Thomson scattering.

    PubMed

    Beausang, K V; Prunty, S L; Scannell, R; Beurskens, M N; Walsh, M J; de la Luna, E

    2011-03-01

    The present work is motivated by a long standing discrepancy between the electron temperature measurements of Thomson scattering (TS) and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics for plasmas with strong auxiliary heating observed at both JET and TFTR above 6–7 keV, where in some cases the ECE electron temperature measurements can be 15%–20% higher than the TS measurements. Recent analysis based on ECE results at JET has shown evidence of distortions to the Maxwellian electron velocity distribution and a correlation with the TS and ECE discrepancies has been suggested. In this paper, a technique to determine the presence of non-Maxwellian behavior using TS diagnostics is outlined. The difficulties and limitations of modern TS system designs to determine the electron velocity distribution are also discussed. It is demonstrated that small deviations such as those suggested by previous ECE analysis could be potentially detected, depending on the spectral layout of the TS polychromators. The spectral layout of the JET high resolution Thomson scattering system is such that it could be used to determine these deviations between 1 and 6 keV, and the results presented here indicate that no evidence of non-Maxwellian behavior is observed in this range. In this paper, a modification to the current polychromator design is proposed, allowing non-Maxwellian distortions to be detected up to at least 10 keV. PMID:21585113

  14. Detecting non-maxwellian electron velocity distributions at JET by high resolution Thomson scattering.

    PubMed

    Beausang, K V; Prunty, S L; Scannell, R; Beurskens, M N; Walsh, M J; de la Luna, E

    2011-03-01

    The present work is motivated by a long standing discrepancy between the electron temperature measurements of Thomson scattering (TS) and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics for plasmas with strong auxiliary heating observed at both JET and TFTR above 6–7 keV, where in some cases the ECE electron temperature measurements can be 15%–20% higher than the TS measurements. Recent analysis based on ECE results at JET has shown evidence of distortions to the Maxwellian electron velocity distribution and a correlation with the TS and ECE discrepancies has been suggested. In this paper, a technique to determine the presence of non-Maxwellian behavior using TS diagnostics is outlined. The difficulties and limitations of modern TS system designs to determine the electron velocity distribution are also discussed. It is demonstrated that small deviations such as those suggested by previous ECE analysis could be potentially detected, depending on the spectral layout of the TS polychromators. The spectral layout of the JET high resolution Thomson scattering system is such that it could be used to determine these deviations between 1 and 6 keV, and the results presented here indicate that no evidence of non-Maxwellian behavior is observed in this range. In this paper, a modification to the current polychromator design is proposed, allowing non-Maxwellian distortions to be detected up to at least 10 keV.

  15. The High-Resolution Extreme-Ultraviolet Spectrum of N_2 by Electron Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heays, Alan; Ajello, Joe M.; Aguilar, Alejandro; Lewis, Brenton R.; Gibson, Stephen

    2014-06-01

    We have recorded high-resolution (FWHM = 0.2 Å) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV, 800--1350 Å) laboratory emission spectra of molecular nitrogen excited by 20 and 100 eV electron impact under mostly optically thin conditions. From these, emission cross sections were determined for a total of 491 features arising from N_2 electronic-vibrational transitions and atomic N I and N II multiplets. Molecular emission was observed from those excited levels which are not completely predissociative and to ground-state vibrational levels as high as v=17. The frequently-blended molecular emission bands were disentangled with the aid of a coupled-channels model of excited N_2 states that includes the strong coupling between valence and Rydberg electronic states and the effects of predissociation. The observed emission bands probe a large range of vibrational motion so that internuclear-distance-dependent electronic transition moments could be deduced experimental. The coupled-channels model could then be used to predict the emission cross sections of unobserved bands and those that are optically thick in the experimental spectra. The electron-impact-induced fluorescence measurements and model were compared with Cassini UVIS observations of emissions from Titan's upper atmosphere.

  16. The high-resolution microchannel plate detector for FUV spectroscopy in the BepiColombo mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Go; Ezawa, Fukuhiro; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Chassefiere, Eric; Maria, Jean-Luc

    Mariner-10 UV measurements and telescopic spectroscopy from the Earth identified six elements (Ca, Na, K, H, He, and O) in the Mercury's exosphere. Other species are expected, e.g. H2 , OH, and some noble gasses (Ar, Ne, and Xe). All species representative of the surface composition, directly produced by impact vaporization driven by micrometeoroids, physical sputtering, photo-stimulated desorption, and thermal desorption from the regolith, should also be present. To determine the composition of the Mercury's exosphere, the PHEBUS (Probing of Hermean Exosphere By Ultraviolet Spectroscopy) instrument on Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) will measure the emission lines of the exosphere. PHEBUS is a dual FUV-EUV spectrometer working in the wavelength range from 55 to 315 nm. We are now developing the compact detector system sensitive to FUV airglow emissions of the Mercury. The FUV detector is required to have high spatial resolution (80 µm) so that the wavelength resolution of the PHEBUS instrument should be 2 nm at the FUV range. The FUV detector consists of a Cs2 Te photocathode, microchannel plates (MCPs), and a resistive anode encoder (RAE). In a position-sensitive system with an RAE, the spatial resolution is determined by the signal-to-noise ratios at the anode terminals. Therefore, a high and stable electron gain of MCPs allows the position determination of each photoelectron event with high spatial resolution. We studied a method for achieving a high and stable electron gain. We fabricated a test model of the FUV detector incorporating a clamped pair of MCPs (V-stack) followed by a gap and a clamped triplet of MCPs (Z-stack) in cascade. We have investigated the effect of the negative potential applied across the inter-stack (V-Z) gap on the PHD and the spatial resolution by means of calculation and experiments. The calculation with a simple ballistic model showed that the negative inter-stack potential reduced the size of the electron cloud by 70%. The result

  17. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy of grain-refining particles in amorphous aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, P.; Greer, A.L.

    1996-10-01

    The nucleation mechanism of Al-Ti-B grain refiners is studied in an Al-based amorphous alloy. The ability to limit growth of {alpha}-Al in the amorphous alloy permits the microscopical observation of nucleation events on boride particles. Earlier studies of this kind are extended by using high-resolution electron microscopy. This shows that the efficient nucleation {alpha}-Al depends on the TiB{sub 2} particles being coated with a thin layer of Al{sub 3}Ti, which can form only when there is some excess titanium in the melt. The aluminide layer, stabilized by adsorption effects, can be as little as a few monolayers thick, and is coherent with the boride. The nature of this layer, and its importance for the nucleation mechanism are discussed. The fading of the grain refinement action is also considered.

  18. High-resolution electron microscopy in spin pumping NiFe/Pt interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ley Domínguez, D. Sáenz-Hernández, R. J.; Faudoa Arzate, A.; Arteaga Duran, A. I.; Ornelas Gutiérrez, C. E.; Solís Canto, O.; Botello-Zubiate, M. E.; Rivera-Gómez, F. J.; Matutes-Aquino, J. A.; Azevedo, A.; Silva, G. L. da; Rezende, S. M.

    2015-05-07

    In order to understand the effect of the interface on the spin pumping and magnetic proximity effects, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) were used to analyze Py/Pt bilayer and Pt/Py/Pt trilayer systems. The samples were deposited by dc magnetron sputtering at room temperature on Si (001) substrates. The Py layer thickness was fixed at 12 nm in all the samples and the Pt thickness was varied in a range of 0–23 nm. A diffusion zone of approximately 8 nm was found in the Py/Pt interfaces and confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The FMR measurements show an increase in the linewidth and a shift in the ferromagnetic resonance field, which reach saturation.

  19. High resolution electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data from calcite biominerals in recent gastropod shells.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Dauphin, Yannicke; Cuif, Jean Pierre; Cusack, Maggie

    2011-04-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is a microscopy technique that reveals in situ crystallographic information. Currently, it is widely used for the characterization of geological materials and in studies of biomineralization. Here, we analyze high resolution EBSD data from biogenic calcite in two mollusk taxa, Concholepas and Haliotis, previously used in the understanding of complex biomineralization and paleoenvironmental studies. Results indicate that Concholepas has less ordered prisms than in Haliotis, and that in Concholepas the level of order is not homogenous in different areas of the shell. Overall, the usefulness of data integration obtained from diffraction intensity and crystallographic orientation maps, and corresponding pole figures, is discussed as well as its application to similar studies.

  20. High resolution transmission electron microscopic in-situ observations of plastic deformation of compressed nanocrystalline gold

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guoyong; Lian, Jianshe; Jiang, Qing; Sun, Sheng; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2014-09-14

    Nanocrystalline (nc) metals possess extremely high strength, while their capability to deform plastically has been debated for decades. Low ductility has hitherto been considered an intrinsic behavior for most nc metals, due to the lack of five independent slip systems actively operating during deformation in each nanograin. Here we report in situ high resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) observations of deformation process of nc gold under compression, showing the excellent ductility of individual and aggregate nanograins. Compression causes permanent change in the profile of individual nanograins, which is mediated by dislocation slip and grain rotation. The high rate of grain boundary sliding and large extent of widely exited grain rotation may meet the boundary compatibility requirements during plastic deformation. The in situ HRTEM observations suggest that nc gold is not intrinsically brittle under compressive loading.

  1. Nano features of Al/Au ultrasonic bond interface observed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Hongjun; Li Mingyu Kim, Jong-Myung; Kim, Dae-Won; Wang Chunqing

    2008-10-15

    Nano-scale interfacial details of ultrasonic AlSi1 wire wedge bonding to a Au/Ni/Cu pad were investigated using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The intermetallic phase Au{sub 8}Al{sub 3} formed locally due to diffusion and reaction activated by ultrasound at the Al/Au bond interface. Multilayer sub-interfaces roughly parallel to the wire/pad interface were observed among this phase, and interdiffusional features near the Au pad resembled interference patterns, alternately dark and bright bars. Solid-state diffusion theory cannot be used to explain why such a thick compound formed within milliseconds at room temperature. The major formation of metallurgical bonds was attributed to ultrasonic cyclic vibration.

  2. Electron-impact spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, S.

    1990-01-01

    The methods of electron impact spectroscopy and cross section measurements are discussed and compared to optical spectroscopy. A brief summary of the status of this field and the available data is given.

  3. The High-resolution Extreme-ultraviolet Spectrum of N2 by Electron Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heays, A. N.; Ajello, J. M.; Aguilar, A.; Lewis, B. R.; Gibson, S. T.

    2014-04-01

    We have analyzed high-resolution (FWHM = 0.2 Å) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV, 800-1350 Å) laboratory emission spectra of molecular nitrogen excited by an electron impact at 20 and 100 eV under (mostly) optically thin, single-scattering experimental conditions. A total of 491 emission features were observed from N2 electronic-vibrational transitions and atomic N I and N II multiplets and their emission cross sections were measured. Molecular emission was observed at vibrationally excited ground-state levels as high as v'' = 17, from the a 1Π g , b 1Π u , and b'1Σ u + excited valence states and the Rydberg series c'n +1 1Σ u +, cn 1Π u , and on 1Π u for n between 3 and 9. The frequently blended molecular emission bands were disentangled with the aid of a sophisticated and predictive quantum-mechanical model of excited states that includes the strong coupling between valence and Rydberg electronic states and the effects of predissociation. Improved model parameters describing electronic transition moments were obtained from the experiment and allowed for a reliable prediction of the vibrationally summed electronic emission cross section, including an extrapolation to unobserved emission bands and those that are optically thick in the experimental spectra. Vibrationally dependent electronic excitation functions were inferred from a comparison of emission features following 20 and 100 eV electron-impact collisional excitation. The electron-impact-induced fluorescence measurements are compared with Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph observations of emissions from Titan's upper atmosphere.

  4. Raman Under Nitrogen. The High-Resolution Raman Spectroscopy of Crystalline Uranocene, Thorocene, and Ferrocene

    SciTech Connect

    Hager, J S.; Zahardis, James; Pagni, Richard M.; Compton, Robert N.; Li, Jun

    2004-02-08

    The utility of recording Raman spectroscopy under liquid nitrogen, a technique we call Raman Under Nitrogen (RUN), is demonstrated for ferrocene, uranocene and thorocene. Using RUN, low temperature (liquid nitrogen cooled) Raman spectra for these compounds exhibit higher resolution than previous studies and new vibrational features are reported. The first Raman spectra of crystalline uranocene at 77 K are reported using excitation from argon (5145 ) and krypton (6764 ) ion lasers. The spectra obtained showed bands corresponding to vibrational transitions at 212, 236, 259, 379, 753, 897, 1500, and 3042 cm-1 , assigned to ring-metal-ring stretching, ring-metal tilting, out-of-plane CCC bending, in-plane CCC bending, ring-breathing, C-H bending, CC stretching and CH stretching, respectively. The assigned vibrational bands are compared to those of uranocene in THF and thorocene. All vibrational frequencies of the ligands, except the 259 cm-1 out-of-plane CCC bending mode, were found to increase upon coordination. A broad polarizable band centered about {approx}460 cm-1 was also observed. The 460 cm-1 band is greatly enhanced relative to the vibrational Raman transitions with excitation from the krypton ion laser, which is indicative of an electronic resonance Raman process as has been shown previously. The electronic resonance Raman band is observed to split into three distinct bands at 450, 461 and 474 cm-1 with 6764 excitation. Relativistic density functional theory (DFT) is used to provide theoretical interpretations of the measured spectra.

  5. Chemical speciation of chlorine in atmospheric aerosol samples by high-resolution proton induced X-ray emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Zsófia; Furu, Enikő; Kavčič, Matjaž

    2013-01-01

    Chlorine is a main elemental component of atmospheric particulate matter (APM). The knowledge of the chemical form of chlorine is of primary importance for source apportionment and for estimation of health effects of APM. In this work the applicability of high-resolution wavelength dispersive proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) spectroscopy for chemical speciation of chlorine in fine fraction atmospheric aerosols is studied. A Johansson-type crystal spectrometer with energy resolution below the natural linewidth of Cl K lines was used to record the high-resolution Kα and Kβ proton induced spectra of several reference Cl compounds and two atmospheric aerosol samples, which were collected for conventional PIXE analysis. The Kα spectra which refers to the oxidation state, showed very minor differences due to the high electronegativity of Cl. However, the Kβ spectra exhibited pronounced chemical effects which were significant enough to perform chemical speciation. The major chlorine component in two fine fraction aerosol samples collected during a 2010 winter campaign in Budapest was clearly identified as NaCl by comparing the high-resolution Cl Kβ spectra from the aerosol samples with the corresponding reference spectra. This work demonstrates the feasibility of high-resolution PIXE method for chemical speciation of Cl in aerosols.

  6. Differential high-resolution stimulated CW Raman spectroscopy of hydrogen in a hollow-core fiber.

    PubMed

    Westergaard, Philip G; Lassen, Mikael; Petersen, Jan C

    2015-06-15

    We demonstrate sensitive high-resolution stimulated Raman measurements of hydrogen using a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF). The Raman transition is pumped by a narrow linewidth (< 50 kHz) 1064 nm continuous-wave (CW) fiber laser. The probe light is produced by a homebuilt CW optical parametric oscillator (OPO), tunable from around 800 nm to 1300 nm (linewidth ∼ 5 MHz). These narrow linewidth lasers allow for an excellent spectral resolution of approximately 10(-4) cm(-1). The setup employs a differential measurement technique for noise rejection in the probe beam, which also eliminates background signals from the fiber. With the high sensitivity obtained, Raman signals were observed with only a few mW of optical power in both the pump and probe beams. This demonstration allows for high resolution Raman identification of molecules and quantification of Raman signal strengths. PMID:26193604

  7. High-resolution optical spectroscopy of RS Ophiuchi during 2008 - 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somero, A.; Hakala, P.; Wynn, G. A.

    2016-10-01

    RS Ophiuchi is a symbiotic variable and a recurrent nova. We have monitored it with the Nordic Optical Telescope and obtained 30 high resolution (R=46 000) optical spectra over one orbital cycle during quiescence. To our knowledge this is the best-sampled high resolution spectroscopic dataset of RS Oph over one orbital period. We do not detect any direct signatures of an accretion disc such as double peaked emission lines, but many line profiles are complex consisting of superimposed emission and absorption components. We measure the spin of the red giant and conclude that it is tidally locked to the binary orbit. We observe Na I absorption features, probably arising from the circumbinary medium, that has been shaped by previous recurrent nova outbursts. We do not detect any intrinsic polarisation in the optical wavelengths.

  8. High-resolution multiple quantum MAS NMR spectroscopy of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Gang; Rovnyank, David; Sun, Boqin; Griffin, Robert G.

    1996-02-01

    We demonstrate the utility of a two-pulse sequence in obtaining high-resolution solid state NMR spectra of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei with magic-angle-spinning (MAS). The experiment, which utilizes multiple/single-quantum correlation, was first described in a different form by Frydman and Harwood [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 117 (1995) 5367] and yields high-resolution isotropic NMR spectra where shifts are determined by the sum of resonance offset (chemical shift) and second-order quadrupolar effects. The two-pulse sequence described here is shown to provide a higher and more uniform excitation of multiple-quantum coherence than the three-pulse sequence used previously.

  9. SOLARNET: a UV, FUV, EUV, XUV high resolution imaging, spectro-imaging and spectroscopy mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damé, L.

    SOLARNET is a high resolution mission which encompass extremely high resolution in the UV and FUV to access process scales of magnetic reconnection dissipation emerging flux onset of Flares and CME s origin of solar wind The chromosphere to the low corona with emphasis on the transition zone where the magnetic confinement is expected to be maximum are at the heart of this mission which will open a whole new chapter of the physics of solar magnetic field structuring evolution and mapping from the photosphere to the heliosphere SOLARNET is an inexpensive and compact medium size high resolution solar physics mission that will bring together most of the best of SOHO and TRACE It is proposed to CNES and ESA for a new start in 2006 and a possible launch in 2011-2012 to fill the gap before the first results of the Solar Orbiter or Probe results in the late 2018 at best Partnerships with India and China are under discussion and several European contributions are considered SOLARNET instrumentation consists in a multiple instrument payload to achieve both the necessary global view of extended events and the detailed high resolution understanding of them The major instrument is a 3-telescope interferometer of 1 meter baseline capable to provide 50 times the best ever spatial resolution achieved in Space with previous current or even planned solar missions 20 mas -- 20 km on the Sun in the FUV The interferometer is associated to an on-axis Subtractive Double Monochromator coupled to an Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer itself capable of very high spectral

  10. New High Resolution Spectroscopy Studies of Methyl Nitrite CH_3ONO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironneau, V.; Chelin, P.; Tchana, F. Kwabia; Kleiner, I.; Orphal, J.; Pirali, O.; Guillemin, J.-C.; Margules, L.; Motiyenko, R.; Cooke, S.; Youngblood, W. J.; Agnew, A.; Dewberry, C. T.

    2010-06-01

    Methyl nitrite CH3ONO is an important species in atmospheric chemistry involved in photochemical oxidation of volatile organic compounds. The cis conformer (more stable by about 298 cm-1) has a high internal rotation potential barrier for the methyl group (731 cm-1) whereas for the trans conformer the barrier to internal rotation is extremely low (10 cm-1), leading to large internal rotation splittings. Only one high resolution infrared study was performed prior to this study. For the first time, high-resolution spectrum of CH3ONO was recorded in the far infrared region (30-500 cm-1) using the synchrotron SOLEIL far-infrared beamline (AILES) and a Fourier transform (FT) spectrometer. Some 987 lines were assigned for the cis isomer up to J=65 and combined with 66 previously recorded microwave lines. In addition, high-resolution spectrum of the ν9 band of the cis isomer around 627.9 cm-1 was also recorded using the FT spectrometer at LISA. New microwave data is currently recorded to improve the knowledge of both the cis and trans ground state parameters. P. N. Gosh, A. Bauder and Hs. H. Gunthard, Chem. Phys. 53, 39-60 (1980) P. H. Turner, M. J. Corkill, and A. P. Cox, J. Chem. Phys. 83, 1473-1482 1979) L. M. Goss, C. D. Mortensen and T. A. Blake, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 225, 182-188 (2004)

  11. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy of frozen-hydrated cells.

    PubMed

    Walther, P; Chen, Y; Pech, L L; Pawley, J B

    1992-11-01

    Cryo-fixed yeast Paramecia and sea urchin embryos were investigated with an in-lens type field-emission SEM using a cold stage. The goal was to further develop and investigate the processing of frozen samples for the low-temperature scanning electron microscope (LTSEM). Uncoated frozen-hydrated samples were imaged with the low-voltage backscattered electron signal (BSE). Resolution and contrast were sufficient to visualize cross-fractured membranes, nuclear pores and small vesicles in the cytoplasm. It is assumed that the resolution of this approach is limited by the extraction depth of the BSE which depends upon the accelerating voltage of the primary beam (V0). In this study, the lowest possible V0 was 2.6 kV because below this value the sensitivity of the BSE detector is insufficient. It is concluded that the resolution of the uncoated specimen could be improved if equipment were available for high-resolution BSE imaging at 0.5-2 kV. Higher resolution was obtained with platinum cryo-coated samples, on which intramembranous particles were easily imaged. These images even show the ring-like appearance of the hexagonally arranged intramembranous particles known from high-resolution replica studies. On fully hydrated samples at high magnification, the observation time for a particular area is limited by mass loss caused by electron irradiation. Other potential sources of artefacts are the deposition of water vapour contamination and shrinkage caused by the sublimation of ice. Imaging of partially dehydrated (partially freeze-dried) samples, e.g. high-pressure frozen Paramecium and sea urchin embryos, will probably become the main application in cell biology. In spite of possible shrinkage problems, this approach has a number of advantages compared with any other electron microscopy preparation method: no chemical fixation is necessary, eliminating this source of artefacts; due to partial removal of the water additional structures in the cytoplasm can be investigated

  12. Electron-beam-enhanced oxidation processes in II-VI compound semiconductors observed by high-resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Thangaraj, N.; Wessels, B.W.

    1990-02-01

    Enhanced oxidation of ZnS and ZnSe semiconductor surfaces has been observed in situ during electron irradiation in a high-resolution electron microscope. The phase present at the surface region has been identified as ZnO by optical diffractogram and selected area electron diffraction techniques. For ZnS oxidation, both hexagonal ZnO having a random orientation and cubic ZnO in perfect epitaxial relationship with the bulk ZnS were observed. Enhanced oxidation of ZnSe to ZnO has also been observed under electron beam irradiation. However, only the hexagonal form was observed. The oxidation rates for both ZnS and ZnSe depended on electron flux but was independent of orientation. A model in which the oxidation process is limited by diffusion through the oxide film is proposed. By electron irradiation the diffusion rate is enhanced presumably by a nonthermal process.

  13. Magnetic lens apparatus for use in high-resolution scanning electron microscopes and lithographic processes

    DOEpatents

    Crewe, Albert V.

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed are lens apparatus in which a beam of charged particlesis brought to a focus by means of a magnetic field, the lens being situated behind the target position. In illustrative embodiments, a lens apparatus is employed in a scanning electron microscopeas the sole lens for high-resolution focusing of an electron beam, and in particular, an electron beam having an accelerating voltage of from about 10 to about 30,000 V. In one embodiment, the lens apparatus comprises an electrically-conducting coil arranged around the axis of the beam and a magnetic pole piece extending along the axis of the beam at least within the space surrounded by the coil. In other embodiments, the lens apparatus comprises a magnetic dipole or virtual magnetic monopole fabricated from a variety of materials, including permanent magnets, superconducting coils, and magnetizable spheres and needles contained within an energy-conducting coil. Multiple-array lens apparatus are also disclosed for simultaneous and/or consecutive imaging of multiple images on single or multiple specimens. The invention further provides apparatus, methods, and devices useful in focusing charged particle beams for lithographic processes.

  14. High-resolution scanning-electron microscopy of stereocilia using the osmium-thiocarbohydrazide coating technique.

    PubMed

    Furness, D N; Hackney, C M

    1986-01-01

    Further observations on the detailed morphology of stereocilia have been made using high-resolution scanning-electron microscopy of osmium-thiocarbohydrazide-coated guinea pig cochleae. Three types of cross-link have been observed between stereocilia. Side-to-side and row-to-row linkages are composed of a filamentous network whilst upward-pointing links are a fine single strand, often with a terminal widening. The stereocilia have rough surfaces. These features are observed on both inner and outer hair cells despite reported sensitivity to long periods of osmium fixation. We suggest that osmium sensitivity may be altered by the buffering conditions used during preparation. The observations on osmium-coated material correspond more closely with those made using transmission-electron microscopy than those made using other scanning-electron microscopical preparation techniques, since gold-coating artefacts are absent and the degree of specimen collapse is less. This has enabled us to observe fine details of the links and their attachments which have not been reported previously in SEM.

  15. The design and construction of a high-resolution velocity-map imaging apparatus for photoelectron spectroscopy studies of size-selected clusters

    SciTech Connect

    León, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Liu, Hong-Tao; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-08-15

    A new velocity-map imaging apparatus equipped with a laser-vaporization supersonic cluster source and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described for high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies of size-selected cluster anions. Vibrationally cold anion clusters are produced using a laser-vaporization supersonic cluster source, size-selected by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and then focused co-linearly into the interaction zone of the high-resolution velocity-map imaging (VMI) system. The multilens VMI system is optimized via systematic simulations and can reach a resolution of 1.2 cm{sup −1} (FWHM) for near threshold electrons while maintaining photoelectron kinetic energy resolutions (ΔKE/KE) of ∼0.53% for higher energy electrons. The new VMI lens has superior focusing power over a large energy range, yielding highly circular images with distortions no larger than 1.0025 between the long and short radii. The detailed design, simulation, construction, testing, and performance of the high-resolution VMI apparatus are presented.

  16. The design and construction of a high-resolution velocity-map imaging apparatus for photoelectron spectroscopy studies of size-selected clusters.

    PubMed

    León, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Liu, Hong-Tao; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-08-01

    A new velocity-map imaging apparatus equipped with a laser-vaporization supersonic cluster source and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described for high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies of size-selected cluster anions. Vibrationally cold anion clusters are produced using a laser-vaporization supersonic cluster source, size-selected by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and then focused co-linearly into the interaction zone of the high-resolution velocity-map imaging (VMI) system. The multilens VMI system is optimized via systematic simulations and can reach a resolution of 1.2 cm(-1) (FWHM) for near threshold electrons while maintaining photoelectron kinetic energy resolutions (ΔKE/KE) of ~0.53% for higher energy electrons. The new VMI lens has superior focusing power over a large energy range, yielding highly circular images with distortions no larger than 1.0025 between the long and short radii. The detailed design, simulation, construction, testing, and performance of the high-resolution VMI apparatus are presented. PMID:25173245

  17. The design and construction of a high-resolution velocity-map imaging apparatus for photoelectron spectroscopy studies of size-selected clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Liu, Hong-Tao; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-08-01

    A new velocity-map imaging apparatus equipped with a laser-vaporization supersonic cluster source and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described for high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies of size-selected cluster anions. Vibrationally cold anion clusters are produced using a laser-vaporization supersonic cluster source, size-selected by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and then focused co-linearly into the interaction zone of the high-resolution velocity-map imaging (VMI) system. The multilens VMI system is optimized via systematic simulations and can reach a resolution of 1.2 cm-1 (FWHM) for near threshold electrons while maintaining photoelectron kinetic energy resolutions (ΔKE/KE) of ˜0.53% for higher energy electrons. The new VMI lens has superior focusing power over a large energy range, yielding highly circular images with distortions no larger than 1.0025 between the long and short radii. The detailed design, simulation, construction, testing, and performance of the high-resolution VMI apparatus are presented.

  18. Use of a Continuous Wave Laser and Pockels Cell for Sensitive High-Resolution Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groote, R. P.; Budinčević, I.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Cocolios, T. E.; Farooq-Smith, G. J.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Flanagan, K. T.; Franchoo, S.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Heylen, H.; Li, R.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Neyens, G.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Stroke, H. H.; Wendt, K. D. A.; Wilkins, S. G.; Yang, X.

    2015-09-01

    New technical developments have led to a 2 orders of magnitude improvement of the resolution of the collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at ISOLDE, CERN, without sacrificing the high efficiency of the CRIS technique. Experimental linewidths of 20(1) MHz were obtained on radioactive beams of francium, allowing us for the first time to determine the electric quadrupole moment of the short lived [t1 /2=22.0 (5 ) ms ] 219Fr Qs=-1.21 (2 ) eb , which would not have been possible without the advantages offered by the new method. This method relies on a continuous-wave laser and an external Pockels cell to produce narrow-band light pulses, required to reach the high resolution in two-step resonance ionization. Exotic nuclei produced at rates of a few hundred ions/s can now be studied with high resolution, allowing detailed studies of the anchor points for nuclear theories.

  19. Use of a Continuous Wave Laser and Pockels Cell for Sensitive High-Resolution Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Groote, R P; Budinčević, I; Billowes, J; Bissell, M L; Cocolios, T E; Farooq-Smith, G J; Fedosseev, V N; Flanagan, K T; Franchoo, S; Garcia Ruiz, R F; Heylen, H; Li, R; Lynch, K M; Marsh, B A; Neyens, G; Rossel, R E; Rothe, S; Stroke, H H; Wendt, K D A; Wilkins, S G; Yang, X

    2015-09-25

    New technical developments have led to a 2 orders of magnitude improvement of the resolution of the collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at ISOLDE, CERN, without sacrificing the high efficiency of the CRIS technique. Experimental linewidths of 20(1) MHz were obtained on radioactive beams of francium, allowing us for the first time to determine the electric quadrupole moment of the short lived [t_{1/2}=22.0(5) ms] ^{219}Fr Q_{s}=-1.21(2) eb, which would not have been possible without the advantages offered by the new method. This method relies on a continuous-wave laser and an external Pockels cell to produce narrow-band light pulses, required to reach the high resolution in two-step resonance ionization. Exotic nuclei produced at rates of a few hundred ions/s can now be studied with high resolution, allowing detailed studies of the anchor points for nuclear theories. PMID:26451548

  20. HIGH-RESOLUTION XMM-NEWTON SPECTROSCOPY OF THE COOLING FLOW CLUSTER A3112

    SciTech Connect

    Bulbul, G. Esra; Smith, Randall K.; Foster, Adam; Cottam, Jean; Loewenstein, Michael; Mushotzky, Richard; Shafer, Richard

    2012-03-01

    We examine high signal-to-noise XMM-Newton European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) and Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) observations to determine the physical characteristics of the gas in the cool core and outskirts of the nearby rich cluster A3112. The XMM-Newton Extended Source Analysis Software data reduction and background modeling methods were used to analyze the XMM-Newton EPIC data. From the EPIC data, we find that the iron and silicon abundance gradients show significant increase toward the center of the cluster while the oxygen abundance profile is centrally peaked but has a shallower distribution than that of iron. The X-ray mass modeling is based on the temperature and deprojected density distributions of the intracluster medium determined from EPIC observations. The total mass of A3112 obeys the M-T scaling relations found using XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of massive clusters at r{sub 500}. The gas mass fraction f{sub gas} = 0.149{sup +0.036}{sub -0.032} at r{sub 500} is consistent with the seven-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe results. The comparisons of line fluxes and flux limits on the Fe XVII and Fe XVIII lines obtained from high-resolution RGS spectra indicate that there is no spectral evidence for cooler gas associated with the cluster with temperature below 1.0 keV in the central <38'' ({approx}52 kpc) region of A3112. High-resolution RGS spectra also yield an upper limit to the turbulent motions in the compact core of A3112 (206 km s{sup -1}). We find that the contribution of turbulence to total energy is less than 6%. This upper limit is consistent with the energy contribution measured in recent high-resolution simulations of relaxed galaxy clusters.

  1. High resolution, low h{nu} photoelectron spectroscopy with the use of a microwave excited rare gas lamp and ionic crystal filters

    SciTech Connect

    Suga, S.; Sekiyama, A.; Funabashi, G.; Yamaguchi, J.; Kimura, M.; Tsujibayashi, M.; Uyama, T.; Sugiyama, H.; Tomida, Y.; Kuwahara, G.; Kitayama, S.; Fukushima, K.; Kimura, K.; Yokoi, T.; Murakami, K.; Fujiwara, H.; Saitoh, Y.; Plucinski, L.; Schneider, C. M.

    2010-10-15

    The need for not only bulk sensitive but also extremely high resolution photoelectron spectroscopy for studying detailed electronic structures of strongly correlated electron systems is growing rapidly. Moreover, easy access to such a capability in one's own laboratory is desirable. Demonstrated here is the performance of a microwave excited rare gas (Xe, Kr, and Ar) lamp combined with ionic crystal filters (sapphire, CaF{sub 2}, and LiF), which can supply three strong lines near the photon energy of hnyu h{nu}=8.4, 10.0, and 11.6 eV, with the h{nu} resolution of better than 600 {mu}eV for photoelectron spectroscopy. Its performance is demonstrated on some materials by means of both angle-integrated and angle-resolved measurements.

  2. High-resolution spectroscopy with the multi-anode microchannel array detector systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.; Joseph, C. L.; Wolf, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    The results of a series of high-resolution spectroscopic observations undertaken with a linear (1 x 1024)-pixel visible-light Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector on the Coudespectrograph of the 2.2-meter telescope at the Mauna Kea Observatory and on the vacuum spectrograph of the McMath Solar telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory are described. In addition, the two-dimensional MAMA detector systems with (16 x 1024)-pixel, (24 x 1024)-pixel, and (256 x 1024)-pixel formats which are now being readied for use in a series of ground-based, balloon, and sounding-rocket observing programs are briefly described.

  3. High resolution spectroscopy of the new FU Orionis object BBW 76

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisloeffel, J.; Hessman, F. V.; Mundt, R.

    1990-06-01

    High-resolution spectra of the new FU Orionis object BBW 76 are presented. Although the photometric outburst of this FU Orionis object could not be observed, its spectral characteristics clearly identify it as belonging to this class. BBW 76 shows Balmer line profiles typical for FU Orionis stars. Its absorption line spectrum and, in particular, the line widths are strikingly similar to that of FU Ori. Other similarities to FU Ori are the presence of an arclike nebula, and the FIR luminosities and color temperatures.

  4. From BASIS to MIRACLES: Benchmarking and perspectives for high-resolution neutron spectroscopy at the ESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsapatsaris, Nikolaos; Willendrup, Peter K.; Lechner, Ruep E.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2015-01-01

    Results based on virtual instrument models for the first high-flux, high-resolution, spallation based, backscattering spectrometer, BASIS are presented in this paper. These were verified using the Monte Carlo instrument simulation packages McStas and VITESS. Excellent agreement of the neutron count rate at the sample position between the virtual instrument simulation and experiments was found, in both time and energy distributions. This achievement was only possible after a new component for a bent single crystal analyser in McStas, using a Gaussian approximation, was developed. These findings are pivotal to the conceptual design of the next generation backscattering spectrometer, MIRACLES at the European Spallation Source.

  5. Detection and Identification of Bioanalytes with High Resolution LSPR Spectroscopy and MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Anker, Jeffrey N.; Hall, W. Paige; Lambert, Mary P.; Velasco, Pauline T.; Mrksich, Milan; Klein, William L.

    2009-01-01

    High resolution localized surface plasmon resonance (HR-LSPR) sensors were combined with matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) for the first time. LSPR sensors provide real-time label-free detection of molecular adsorption. Subsequent MALDI-MS analysis enables identification of the adsorbed molecules. This synergistic LSPR-MS approach was applied to the detection and identification of amyloid beta oligomers which play an important role in the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s Disease. PMID:20161175

  6. Inorganic WS2 nanotubes revealed atom by atom using ultra-high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar Sadan, Maya; Heidelmann, Markus; Houben, Lothar; Tenne, Reshef

    2009-08-01

    The characterization of nanostructures to the atomic dimensions becomes more important, as devices based on a single particle are being produced. In particular, inorganic nanotubes were shown to host interesting properties making them excellent candidates for various devices. The WS2 nanotubes outperform the bulk in their mechanical properties offering numerous applications especially as part of high strength nanocomposites. In contrast, their electrical properties are less remarkable. The structure-function relationship can be investigated by aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), which enables the insight into their atomic structure as well as performing spectroscopic measurements down to the atomic scale. In the present work, the deciphering of atomic structure and the chiral angle of the different shells in a multiwall WS2 nanotube is demonstrated. In certain cases, the helicity of the structure can also be deduced. Finally, first electron energy loss spectra (EELS) of a single tube are presented, acquired by a new acquisition technique that allows for high spatial resolution (denoted StripeSTEM). The measured band gap values correspond with the values found in literature for thin films, obtained by spectroscopic techniques, and are higher than the values resulting from STM measurements.

  7. High resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy characterization of a milled oxide dispersion strengthened steel powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyer-Prost, M.; Merot, J.-S.; Ribis, J.; Le Bouar, Y.; Chaffron, L.; Legendre, F.

    2016-10-01

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels are promising materials for generation IV fuel claddings as their dense nano-oxide dispersion provides good creep and irradiation resistance. Even if they have been studied for years, the formation mechanism of these nano-oxides is still unclear. Here we report for the first time a High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy and Energy Filtered Transmission Electron Microscopy characterization of an ODS milled powder. It provides clear evidence of the presence of small crystalline nanoclusters (NCs) enriched in titanium directly after milling. Small NCs (<5 nm) have a crystalline structure and seem partly coherent with the matrix. They have an interplanar spacing close to the (011) bcc iron structure. They coexist with larger crystalline spherical precipitates of 15-20 nm in size. Their crystalline structure may be metastable as they are not consistent with any Y-Ti-O or Ti-O structure. Such detailed observations in the as-milled grain powder confirm a mechanism of Y, Ti, O dissolution in the ferritic matrix followed by a NC precipitation during the mechanical alloying process of ODS materials.

  8. High resolution heteronuclear correlation NMR spectroscopy between quadrupolar nuclei and protons in the solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbourt, A.; Vinogradov, E.; Goobes, G.; Vega, S.

    2004-08-01

    A high resolution two-dimensional solid state NMR experiment is presented that correlates half-integer quadrupolar spins with protons. In this experiment the quadrupolar nuclei evolve during t1 under a split-t1, FAM-enhanced MQMAS pulse scheme. After each t1 period ending at the MQMAS echo position, single quantum magnetization is transferred, via a cross polarization process in the mixing time, from the quadrupolar nuclei to the protons. High-resolution proton signals are then detected in the t2 time domain during wPMLG5* homonuclear decoupling. The experiment has been demonstrated on a powder sample of sodium citrate and 23Na- 1H 2D correlation spectra have been obtained. From the HETCOR spectra and the regular MQMAS spectrum, the three crystallographically inequivalent Na + sites in the asymmetric unit were assigned. This MQMAS- wPMLG HETCOR pulse sequence can be used for spectral editing of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei coupled to protons.

  9. High resolution triple resonance micro magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy of nanoliter sample volumes.

    PubMed

    Brauckmann, J Ole; Janssen, J W G Hans; Kentgens, Arno P M

    2016-02-14

    To be able to study mass-limited samples and small single crystals, a triple resonance micro-magic angle spinning (μMAS) probehead for the application of high-resolution solid-state NMR of nanoliter samples was developed. Due to its excellent rf performance this allows us to explore the limits of proton NMR resolution in strongly coupled solids. Using homonuclear decoupling we obtain unprecedented (1)H linewidths for a single crystal of glycine (Δν(CH2) = 0.14 ppm) at high field (20 T) in a directly detected spectrum. The triple channel design allowed the recording of high-resolution μMAS (13)C-(15)N correlations of [U-(13)C-(15)N] arginine HCl and shows that the superior (1)H resolution opens the way for high-sensitivity inverse detection of heteronuclei even at moderate spinning speeds and rf-fields. Efficient decoupling leads to long coherence times which can be exploited in many correlation experiments.

  10. High Resolution Spectroscopy of C_2 and CN in the Cygnus OB2 Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, Benjamin J.; Oka, Takeshi

    2000-08-01

    The unexpected detection of a large column density of hhh along the lines of sight to Cygnus OB2 #12 and Cygnus OB2 #5 cannot be explained by the standard models of diffuse cloud chemistry, which imply unreasonably long absorption path lengths (hundreds of parsecs). In order to gather more information about the physical condition of the diffuse gas in these lines of sight, we propose to obtain high resolution (R 120 000) visible spectra of several stars in the Cygnus OB2 association, including #12 and #5. The observed rotational distribution of the diatomics çand CN will enable us to estimate the kinetic temperature and number density of the molecular gas. In addition, the high resolution of the HRS at HET will allow us to study the velocity distribution of both the atomic (K I) and molecular (çand CN) gas along these lines of sight. Together with our previous observations of hhh, the temperatures, number densities, and velocity distributions from the proposed observations will seriously constrain theoretical models of these sightlines, such as that recently proposed by Cecchi-Pestellini and Dalgarno.

  11. Abundances of Local Group Globular Clusters Using High Resolution Integrated Light Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakari, Charli; McWilliam, A.; Venn, K.; Shetrone, M. D.; Dotter, A. L.; Mackey, D.

    2014-01-01

    Abundances and kinematics of extragalactic globular clusters provide valuable clues about galaxy and globular cluster formation in a wide variety of environments. In order to obtain such information about distant, unresolved systems, specific observational techniques are required. An Integrated Light Spectrum (ILS) provides a single spectrum from an entire stellar population, and can therefore be used to determine integrated cluster abundances. This dissertation investigates the accuracy of high resolution ILS analysis methods, using ILS (taken with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope) of globular clusters associated with the Milky Way (47 Tuc, M3, M13, NGC 7006, and M15) and then applies the method to globular clusters in the outer halo of M31 (from the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey, or PAndAS). Results show that: a) as expected, the high resolution method reproduces individual stellar abundances for elements that do not vary within a cluster; b) the presence of multiple populations does affect the abundances of elements that vary within the cluster; c) certain abundance ratios are very sensitive to systematic effects, while others are not; and d) certain abundance ratios (e.g. [Ca/Fe]) can be accurately obtained from unresolved systems. Applications of ILABUNDS to the PAndAS clusters reveal that accretion may have played an important role in the formation of M31's outer halo.

  12. ALMA-backed NIR high resolution integral field spectroscopy of the NUGA galaxy NGC 1433

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smajić, Semir; Moser, Lydia; Eckart, Andreas; Valencia-S., Mónica; Combes, Françoise; Horrobin, Matthew; García-Burillo, Santiago; García-Marín, Macarena; Fischer, Sebastian; Zuther, Jens

    2014-07-01

    Aims: We present the results of near-infrared (NIR) H- and K-band European Southern Observatory SINFONI integral field spectroscopy (IFS) of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1433. We investigate the central 500 pc of this nearby galaxy, concentrating on excitation conditions, morphology, and stellar content. NGC 1433 was selected from our extended NUGA(-south) sample, which was additionally observed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). NGC 1433 is a ringed, spiral galaxy with a main stellar bar in roughly east-west direction (PA 94°) and a secondary bar in the nuclear region (PA 31°). Several dusty filaments are detected in the nuclear region with the Hubble Space Telescope. ALMA detects molecular CO emission coinciding with these filaments. The active galactic nucleus is not strong and the galaxy is also classified as a low-ionization emission-line region (LINER). Methods: The NIR is less affected by dust extinction than optical light and is sensitive to the mass-dominating stellar populations. SINFONI integral field spectroscopy combines NIR imaging and spectroscopy, allowing us to analyse several emission and absorption lines to investigate the stellar populations and ionization mechanisms over the 10″ × 10″ field of view (FOV). Results: We present emission and absorption line measurements in the central kpc of NGC 1433. We detect a narrow Balmer line and several H2 lines. We find that the stellar continuum peaks in the optical and NIR in the same position, indicating that there is no covering of the center by a nuclear dust lane. A strong velocity gradient is detected in all emission lines at that position. The position angle of this gradient is at 155° whereas the galactic rotation is at a position angle of 201°. Our measures of the molecular hydrogen lines, hydrogen recombination lines, and [Fe ii] indicate that the excitation at the nucleus is caused by thermal excitation, i.e., shocks that can be associated with active galactic

  13. [High resolution electron microscopy of the crystalline structure in remineralized enamel].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, N

    1989-09-01

    The present work was designed to elucidate crystallographic changes in enamel that had been demineralized in a 0.01 M acetate buffer (pH 4.0) for 2 days at 50 degrees C and then remineralized in a solution containing 1 mM Ca, 0.6 mM P, and 0.05 mM F for 1 or 2 weeks at 37 degrees C. The demineralized and remineralized enamel samples were observed by means of high-resolution electron microscopy, electron-probe analysis, and small area X-ray or electron diffraction. Before remineralization, demineralized enamel had been composed of sparsely arranged apatite crystals with either a central perforation or lateral surface defects or both. Measurements of crystalline (001) planes indicated that crystals in demineralized enamel were significantly larger than those in intact enamel, thus suggesting that crystal growth had taken place during demineralization. Small, newly formed, hexagonal crystals occurred in remineralized enamel. In some cases, precipitation of such small crystals together with localized enamel-crystal regrowth restored central perforations and lateral defects. A number of the small, newly formed crystals and preexisting enamel crystals aggregated to form a group with a roughly hexagonal outline. After the growth and fusion of these grouping crystals, a large, regular-hexagonal crystal formed. Such various kinds of lattice defects as edge dislocation, small-angle grain boundary, and lattice displacement were frequently detected in fusing crystal boundaries. Prolonging remineralization duration seemed to reinforce these lattice defects. Electron-probe and X-ray diffraction studies led to the assumption that the large hexagonal crystals were fluoroapatite. These results indicate that remineralization of demineralized enamel proceeds through several stages, including formation and growth of new crystals and regrowth of preexisting enamel crystals.

  14. Changes in plant defense chemistry (pyrrolizidine alkaloids) revealed through high-resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Sabrina; Macel, Mirka; Schlerf, Martin; Moghaddam, Fatemeh Eghbali; Mulder, Patrick P. J.; Skidmore, Andrew K.; van der Putten, Wim H.

    2013-06-01

    Plant toxic biochemicals play an important role in defense against natural enemies and often are toxic to humans and livestock. Hyperspectral reflectance is an established method for primary chemical detection and could be further used to determine plant toxicity in the field. In order to make a first step for pyrrolizidine alkaloids detection (toxic defense compound against mammals and many insects) we studied how such spectral data can estimate plant defense chemistry under controlled conditions. In a greenhouse, we grew three related plant species that defend against generalist herbivores through pyrrolizidine alkaloids: Jacobaea vulgaris, Jacobaea erucifolia and Senecio inaequidens, and analyzed the relation between spectral measurements and chemical concentrations using multivariate statistics. Nutrient addition enhanced tertiary-amine pyrrolizidine alkaloids contents of J. vulgaris and J. erucifolia and decreased N-oxide contents in S. inaequidens and J. vulgaris. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids could be predicted with a moderate accuracy. Pyrrolizidine alkaloid forms tertiary-amines and epoxides were predicted with 63% and 56% of the variation explained, respectively. The most relevant spectral regions selected for prediction were associated with electron transitions and Csbnd H, Osbnd H, and Nsbnd H bonds in the 1530 and 2100 nm regions. Given the relatively low concentration in pyrrolizidine alkaloids concentration (in the order of mg g-1) and resultant predictions, it is promising that pyrrolizidine alkaloids interact with incident light. Further studies should be considered to determine if such a non-destructive method may predict changes in PA concentration in relation to plant natural enemies. Spectroscopy may be used to study plant defenses in intact plant tissues, and may provide managers of toxic plants, food industry and multitrophic-interaction researchers with faster and larger monitoring possibilities.

  15. High-resolution subtyping of Staphylococcus aureus strains by means of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Johler, Sophia; Stephan, Roger; Althaus, Denise; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Grunert, Tom

    2016-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes a variety of serious illnesses in humans and animals. Subtyping of S. aureus isolates plays a crucial role in epidemiological investigations. Metabolic fingerprinting by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is commonly used to identify microbes at species as well as subspecies level. In this study, we aimed to assess the suitability of FTIR spectroscopy as a tool for S. aureus subtyping. To this end, we compared the subtyping performance of FTIR spectroscopy to other subtyping methods such as pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and spa typing in a blinded experimental setup and investigated the ability of FTIR spectroscopy for identifying S. aureus clonal complexes (CC). A total of 70 S. aureus strains from human, animal, and food sources were selected, for which clonal complexes and a unique virulence and resistance gene pattern had been determined by DNA microarray analysis. FTIR spectral analysis resulted in high discriminatory power similar as obtained by spa typing and PFGE. High directional concordance was found between FTIR spectroscopy based subtypes and capsular polysaccharide expression detected by FTIR spectroscopy and the cap specific locus, reflecting strain specific expression of capsular polysaccharides and/or other surface glycopolymers, such as wall teichoic acid, peptidoglycane, and lipoteichoic acid. Supervised chemometrics showed only limited possibilities for differentiation of S. aureus CC by FTIR spectroscopy with the exception of CC45 and CC705. In conclusion, FTIR spectroscopy represents a valuable tool for S. aureus subtyping, which complements current molecular and proteomic strain typing. PMID:27021524

  16. Generation of Tunable Coherent Radiation Below 1000 Angstroms Applied to High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Xenon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonin, Keith Donald

    This thesis involves the study of the problem of generating broadly tunable, narrowband, coherent extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation and using it to perform high -resolution spectroscopic studies of xenon. The coherent XUV radiation was efficiently generated by two-photon resonant four-wave mixing in krypton. The input laser beams to the nonlinear generation process were produced using a Nd:YAG driver laser at 1.064 (mu)m. This was doubled to 5320 (ANGSTROM) in order to pump a pulsed fluorescein dye laser at 5440 (ANGSTROM). The 5440 (ANGSTROM) radiation was doubled to 2720 (ANGSTROM) and this radiation was summed with the original 1.064 (mu)m beam to yield light at 2166.6 (ANGSTROM) (the 4p('6 1)S(,0) (--->) 5p 5/2 (,2) two-photon resonance in krypton). A second tunable dye laser produced laser pulses with wavelengths between 6100 (ANGSTROM) - 7250 (ANGSTROM). This laser system enabled us to produce XUV radiation at various regions between 921 (ANGSTROM) and 943 (ANGSTROM). Power efficiencies as high as 10(' -5) were achieved and the linewidth of the coherent XUV was (TURN)0.3 cm('-1). Since a two-photon resonance was used to enhance the XUV output efficiency, electric-dipole two-photon selection rules were derived for the most general case of two input photons with unequal frequencies. In order to perform high-resolution spectroscopic studies with this system, we utilized a Fizeau interferometer based wavemeter to measure the input wavelengths to the four-wave mixing process to an accuracy of 2 parts in 10('6). The Fizeau wavemeter and the coherent XUV radiation system enabled us to study the autoionization region of xenon between its two ionization limits at 1022.1 (ANGSTROM) and 922.76 (ANGSTROM) with extremely high resolution. Altogether a total of 12 autoionizing resonances were scanned in frequency. The results include a combination of photoabsorption and ionization measurements. The agreement between the coherent XUV results and the best available

  17. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low-viscosity fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucci, Nathaniel V.; Valentine, Kathleen G.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2014-04-01

    High-resolution multi-dimensional solution NMR is unique as a biophysical and biochemical tool in its ability to examine both the structure and dynamics of macromolecules at atomic resolution. Conventional solution NMR approaches, however, are largely limited to examinations of relatively small (<25 kDa) molecules, mostly due to the spectroscopic consequences of slow rotational diffusion. Encapsulation of macromolecules within the protective nanoscale aqueous interior of reverse micelles dissolved in low viscosity fluids has been developed as a means through which the ‘slow tumbling problem' can be overcome. This approach has been successfully applied to diverse proteins and nucleic acids ranging up to 100 kDa, considerably widening the range of biological macromolecules to which conventional solution NMR methodologies may be applied. Recent advances in methodology have significantly broadened the utility of this approach in structural biology and molecular biophysics.

  18. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low-viscosity fluids.

    PubMed

    Nucci, Nathaniel V; Valentine, Kathleen G; Wand, A Joshua

    2014-04-01

    High-resolution multi-dimensional solution NMR is unique as a biophysical and biochemical tool in its ability to examine both the structure and dynamics of macromolecules at atomic resolution. Conventional solution NMR approaches, however, are largely limited to examinations of relatively small (<25kDa) molecules, mostly due to the spectroscopic consequences of slow rotational diffusion. Encapsulation of macromolecules within the protective nanoscale aqueous interior of reverse micelles dissolved in low viscosity fluids has been developed as a means through which the 'slow tumbling problem' can be overcome. This approach has been successfully applied to diverse proteins and nucleic acids ranging up to 100kDa, considerably widening the range of biological macromolecules to which conventional solution NMR methodologies may be applied. Recent advances in methodology have significantly broadened the utility of this approach in structural biology and molecular biophysics. PMID:24656086

  19. High Resolution Far Infrared Spectroscopy of HFC-134a at Cold Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Andy; Medcraft, Chris; Thompson, Christopher; Robertson, Evan Gary; Appadoo, Dominique; McNaughton, Don

    2016-06-01

    Since the signing of the Montreal protocol, long-lived chlorofluorocarbons have been banned due to their high ozone depleting potential. In order to minimise the effect of such molecules, hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) were synthesized as replacement molecules to be used as refrigerants and foam blowing agents. HFC-134a, or 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane, is one of these molecules. Although HFCs do not cause ozone depletion, they are typically strong absorbers within the 10 micron atmospheric window, which lead to high global warming potentials. A high resolution FT-IR analysis of the νb{8} band (near 665 wn) of HFC-134a has been performed to help understand the intermode coupling between the νb{8} vibrational state and unobserved dark states.

  20. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of the Metal-Poor Star HD 187216

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzdis, A.; Začs, L.; Galazutdinov, G.

    Abundance analysis of the metal-poor, carbon-rich giant HD 187216 using high-resolution (R ≈ 45 000) spectrum was performed. An LTE abundance analysis was done for carefully selected clean atomic lines, using the Uppsala atmospheric model with Teff = 4000 K, log g = 0.75, ξt = 2.8 km s-1 and [Z] = --2.0. The mean metallicity [Fe/H] = --1.7 derived by using singly ionized iron lines is much higher than previously believed. It seems likely that Fe I lines, like many other neutral atomic lines, suffer from non-LTE effects that are significant at low metallicity and gravity. The abundances of the neutron capture elements are found to be enhanced by about 1.3 dex relative to the iron group elements. Possible causes of chemical peculiarities of HD 187216 are discussed.

  1. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low-viscosity fluids

    PubMed Central

    Nucci, Nathaniel V.; Valentine, Kathleen G.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution multi-dimensional solution NMR is unique as a biophysical and biochemical tool in its ability to examine both the structure and dynamics of macromolecules at atomic resolution. Conventional solution NMR approaches, however, are largely limited to examinations of relatively small (< 25 kDa) molecules, mostly due to the spectroscopic consequences of slow rotational diffusion. Encapsulation of macromolecules within the protective nanoscale aqueous interior of reverse micelles dissolved in low viscosity fluids has been developed as a means through which the ‘slow tumbling problem’ can be overcome. This approach has been successfully applied to diverse proteins and nucleic acids ranging up to 100 kDa, considerably widening the range of biological macromolecules to which conventional solution NMR methodologies may be applied. Recent advances in methodology have significantly broadened the utility of this approach in structural biology and molecular biophysics. PMID:24656086

  2. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of biological tissues usingprojected Magic Angle Spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Rachel W.; Jachmann, Rebecca C.; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Pines, Alexander

    2005-01-27

    High-resolution NMR spectra of materials subject toanisotropic broadening are usually obtained by rotating the sample aboutthe magic angle, which is 54.7 degrees to the static magnetic field. Inprojected Magic Angle Spinning (p-MAS), the sample is spun about twoangles, neither of which is the magic angle. This provides a method ofobtaining isotropic spectra while spinning at shallow angles. The p-MASexperiment may be used in situations where spinning the sample at themagic angle is not possible due to geometric or other constraints,allowing the choice of spinning angle to be determined by factors such asthe shape of the sample, rather than by the spin physics. The applicationof this technique to bovine tissue samples is demonstrated as a proof ofprinciple for future biological or medical applications.

  3. High-resolution spectroscopy of jet-cooled CH{sub 5}{sup +}: Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, C.; Dong, F.; Nesbitt, D. J.

    2015-01-22

    Protonated methane (CH{sub 5}{sup +}) is thought to be a highly abundant molecular ion in interstellar medium, as well as a potentially bright μwave- mm wave emitter that could serve as a tracer for methane. This paper describes progress and first successful efforts to obtain a high resolution, supersonically cooled spectrum of CH{sub 5}{sup +} in the 2900-3100 cm{sup −1} region, formed in a slit supersonic discharge at low jet temperatures and with sub-Doppler resolution. Short term precision in frequency measurement (< 5 MHz on an hour time scale) is obtained from a thermally controlled optical transfer cavity servoloop locked onto a frequency stabilized HeNe laser. Long term precision (< 20 MHz day-to-day) due to pressure, temperature and humidity dependent index of refraction effects in the optical transfer cavity is also present and discussed.

  4. High-resolution spectroscopy used to measure inertial confinement fusion neutron spectra on Omega (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, C. J.; Radha, P. B.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; Pruyne, A.; Romanofsky, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J. III; Stoeckl, C.; Casey, D. T.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Gardner, S.

    2012-10-15

    The areal density ({rho}R) of cryogenic DT implosions on Omega is inferred by measuring the spectrum of neutrons that elastically scatter off the dense deuterium (D) and tritium (T) fuel. Neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) techniques are used to measure the energy spectrum with high resolution. High signal-to-background data has been recorded on cryogenic DT implosions using a well-collimated 13.4-m line of sight and an nTOF detector with an advanced liquid scintillator compound. An innovative method to analyze the elastically scattered neutron spectra was developed using well-known cross sections of the DT nuclear reactions. The estimated areal densities are consistent with alternative {rho}R measurements and 1-D simulations.

  5. High-resolution spectroscopy and mode identification in non-radially pulsating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, K. R.; Wright, D. J.; Zima, W.; Cottrell, P. L.; De Cat, P.

    2008-12-01

    We have obtained high-resolution spectroscopic data of a sample of non-radially pulsating stars with the HERCULES spectrograph on the 1.0-m telescope at the Mt John University Observatory in New Zealand. We have developed and used a new technique which cross- correlates stellar spectra with scaled delta function templates to obtain high signal-to-noise representative spectral line profiles for further analysis. Using these profiles, and employing the Fourier Parameter Fit method, we have been able to place constraints on the degree, ℓ, and azimuthal order, m, of the non-radial pulsation modes in one β Cephei star, V2052 Oph and two γ Doradus stars, QW Pup and HD 139095.

  6. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy applied to bulk sample analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kosanke, K.L.; Koch, C.D.; Wilson, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    A high resolution Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectrometer has been installed and made operational for use in routine bulk sample analysis by the Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (BFEC) geochemical analysis department. The Ge(Li) spectrometer provides bulk sample analyses for potassium, uranium, and thorium that are superior to those obtained by the BFEC sodium iodide spectrometer. The near term analysis scheme permits a direct assay for uranium that corrects for bulk sample self-absorption effects and is independent of the uranium/radium disequilibrium condition of the sample. A more complete analysis scheme has been developed that fully utilizes the gamma-ray data provided by the Ge(Li) spectrometer and that more properly accounts for the sample self-absorption effect. This new analysis scheme should be implemented on the BFEC Ge(Li) spectrometer at the earliest date.

  7. The study of oxygen molecules on Pt (111) surface with high resolution x-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong Su; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli; Ross, Philip N.; Hong, Soon Cheol; Mun, Bongjin Simon

    2010-07-01

    By using high resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we show that inelastic scattering of photoelectron at low temperature (30-50 K) generates two kinds of oxygen species on Pt (111) surface. Intense synchrotron radiation source dissociates oxygen molecules into chemisorbed atomic oxygen and induces the formation of PtO on the surface. Estimated coverage of dissociated atomic oxygen is 0.5 ML, suggesting possible formation of p(2×1) surface structure, while PtO coverage shows saturation coverage of 0.5 ML. Molecular oxygen dosed at 30 K undergoes thermally activated transition from physisorbed to chemisorbed state at around 40 K.

  8. The study of oxygen molecules on Pt (111) surface with high resolution x-ray photoemission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Su; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli; Ross, Philip N; Hong, Soon Cheol; Mun, Bongjin Simon

    2010-07-21

    By using high resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we show that inelastic scattering of photoelectron at low temperature (30-50 K) generates two kinds of oxygen species on Pt (111) surface. Intense synchrotron radiation source dissociates oxygen molecules into chemisorbed atomic oxygen and induces the formation of PtO on the surface. Estimated coverage of dissociated atomic oxygen is 0.5 ML, suggesting possible formation of p(2 x 1) surface structure, while PtO coverage shows saturation coverage of 0.5 ML. Molecular oxygen dosed at 30 K undergoes thermally activated transition from physisorbed to chemisorbed state at around 40 K. PMID:20649331

  9. An atomic beam of 6Li — 7Li for high resolution spectroscopy from matrix isolation sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. N.; Sacramento, R. L.; Silva, B. A.; Uhlmann, F. O.; Wolff, W.; Cesar, C. L.

    2016-07-01

    We propose the Matrix Isolation Sublimation (MlSu) technique for generating cold lithium atoms for the measurement of the 6Li - 7Li isotope shift in D1 and D2 transitions. The technique is capable of generating cold 6Li and 7Li beams at 4 K with forward velocity of 125 m/s. Using this beam we offer a distinguished source of lithium atoms for transitions measurements, adding a new possibility to make high resolution spectroscopy towards improving the experimental checks of the theory.

  10. KiwiSpec - an advanced spectrograph for high resolution spectroscopy: optical design and variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Stuart I.; Gibson, Steve; Nield, Kathryn; Cochrane, Dave

    2012-09-01

    The KiwiSpec R4-100 is an advanced high resolution spectrograph developed by KiwiStar Optics, Industrial Research Ltd, New Zealand. The instrument is based around an R4 echelle grating and a 100mm collimated beam diameter. The optical design employs a highly asymmetric white pupil design, whereby the transfer collimator has a focal length only 1/3 that of the primary collimator. This allows the cross-dispersers (VPH gratings) and camera optics to be small and low cost while also ensuring a very compact instrument. The KiwiSpec instrument will be bre-fed and is designed to be contained in both thermal and/or vacuum enclosures. The instrument concept is highly exible in order to ensure that the same basic design can be used for a wide variety of science cases. Options include the possibility of splitting the wavelength coverage into 2 to 4 separate channels allowing each channel to be highly optimized for maximum eciency. CCDs ranging from smaller than 2K2K to larger than 4K4K can be accommodated. This allows good (3-4 pixel) sampling of resolving powers ranging from below 50,000 to greater than 100,000. Among the specic design options presented here will be a two-channel concept optimized for precision radial velocities, and a four-channel concept developed for the Gemini High- Resolution Optical Spectrograph (GHOST). The design and performance of a single-channel prototype will be presented elsewhere in these proceedings.

  11. KiwiSpec - an advanced spectrograph for high resolution spectroscopy: prototype design and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Steve; Barnes, Stuart I.; Hearnshaw, John; Nield, Kathryn; Cochrane, Dave; Grobler, Deon

    2012-09-01

    A new advanced high resolution spectrograph has been developed by Kiwistar Optics of Industrial Research Ltd., New Zealand. The instrument, KiwiSpec R4-100, is bench-mounted, bre-fed, compact (0.75m by 1.5m footprint), and is well-suited for small to medium-sized telescopes. The instrument makes use of several advanced concepts in high resolution spectrograph design. The basic design follows the classical white pupil concept in an asymmetric implementation and employs an R4 echelle grating illuminated by a 100mm diameter collimated beam for primary dispersion. A volume phase holographic grating (VPH) based grism is used for cross-dispersion. The design also allows for up to four camera and detector channels to allow for extended wavelength coverage at high eciency. A single channel prototype of the instrument has been built and successfully tested with a 1m telescope. Targets included various spectrophotometric standard stars and several radial velocity standard stars to measure the instrument's light throughput and radial velocity capabilities. The prototype uses a 725 lines/mm VPH grism, an off-the-shelf camera objective, and a 2k×2k CCD. As such, it covers the wavelength range from 420nm to 660nm and has a resolving power of R ≍ 40,000. Spectrophotometric and precision radial velocity results from the on-sky testing period will be reported, as well as results of laboratory-based measurements. The optical design of KiwiSpec, and the various multi-channel design options, will be presented elsewhere in these proceedings.

  12. Calibration of high-resolution electronic autocollimators with demanded low uncertainties using single reading head angle encoders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yandayan, Tanfer; Asli Akgoz, S.; Asar, Muharrem

    2014-01-01

    Calibration of high-resolution electronic autocollimators is carried out in TUBITAK UME using an angle comparator to ensure direct traceability to the SI unit of plane angle, radian (rad). The device is a specially designed air-bearing rotary table fitted with a commercially available angular encoder utilizing a single reading head. It is shown that high-resolution electronic autocollimators in the large measurement range (e.g. ±1000 arcsec) can be calibrated with an expanded uncertainty of 0.035 arcsec (k = 2) in conventional dimensional laboratory conditions, applying good measurement strategy for single reading head angle encoders and taking simple but smart precautions. Description of the angle comparator is presented with various test results derived using different high-precision autocollimators, and a detailed uncertainty budget is given for the calibration of a high-resolution electronic autocollimator.

  13. A high-resolution coherent transition radiation diagnostic for laser-produced electron transport studies (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Storm, M.; Begishev, I. A.; Brown, R. J.; Mileham, C.; Myatt, J. F.; Nilson, P. M.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Zuegel, J. D.; Guo, C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2008-10-15

    High-resolution images of the rear-surface optical emission from high-intensity (I{approx}10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser illuminated metal foils have been recorded using coherent transition radiation (CTR). CTR is generated as relativistic electrons, generated in high-intensity laser-plasma interactions, exit the target's rear surface and move into vacuum. A transition radiation diagnostic (TRD) records time-integrated images in a 24 nm bandwidth window around {lambda}=529 nm. The optical transmission at {lambda}=1053 nm, the laser wavelength, is 15 orders of magnitude lower than the transmission at the wavelength of interest, {lambda}=527 nm. The detector is a scientific grade charge-coupled device (CCD) camera that operates with a signal-to-noise ratio of 10{sup 3} and has a dynamic range of 10{sup 4}. The TRD has demonstrated a spatial resolution of 1.4 {mu}m over a 1 mm field of view, limited only by the CCD pixel size.

  14. In-Situ High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigation of Overheating of Cu Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunlin; Hu, Ziyu; Li, Yanfen; Liu, Limin; Mori, Hirotaro; Wang, Zhangchang

    2016-01-01

    Synthesizing and functionalizing metal nanoparticles supported on substrates is currently the subject of intensive study owing to their outstanding catalytic performances for heterogeneous catalysis. Revealing the fundamental effect of the substrates on metal nanoparticles represents a key step in clarifying mechanisms of stability and catalytic properties of these heterogeneous systems. However, direct identification of these effects still poses a significant challenge due to the complicacy of interactions between substrates and nanoparticles and also for the technical difficulty, restraining our understanding of these heterogeneous systems. Here, we combine in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with molecular dynamics simulations to investigate Cu nanoparticles supported on graphite and Cu2O substrates, and demonstrate that melting behavior and thermal stability of Cu nanoparticles can be markedly influenced by substrates. The graphite-supported Cu nanoparticles do not melt during annealing at 1073 K until they vanish completely, i.e. only the sublimation occurs, while the Cu2O-supported Cu nanoparticles suffer melting during annealing at 973 K. Such selective superheating of the Cu nanoparticles can be attributed to the adsorption of a thin carbon layer on the surface of the Cu nanoparticles, which helps guide further stability enhancement of functional nanoparticles for realistic applications. PMID:26785839

  15. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels and silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Ruben, G.C. . Dept. of Biological Sciences)

    1991-09-01

    The goal of the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was to image the structure of two tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) and two melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels at the single polymer chain level{sup 1,2}. With this level of structural resolution we hoped to interrelate each aerogel's structure with its physical properties and its method of synthesis. Conventional single-step base catalysed TMOS aerogels show strings of spheroidal particles linked together with minimal necking. The spheroidal particles range from 86--132 {Angstrom} and average 113{plus minus}10 {Angstrom} in diameter{sup 2}. In contrast the TMOS aerogels reported on here were made by a two step method. After extended silica chains are grown in solution under acidic conditions with a substoichiometric amount of water, the reaction is stopped and the methanol hydrolysed from TMOS is removed. Then base catalysis and additional water are added to cause gel formation is a nonalcoholic solvent. The MF aerogels were prepared for HRTEM by fracturing them on a stereo microscope stage with razor knife so that fractured pieces with smooth flat surfaces could be selected for platinum-carbon replication. The two silica (TMOS) aerogels were both transparent and difficult to see. These aerogels were fractured on a stereo microscope stage with tweezers. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  16. In-Situ High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigation of Overheating of Cu Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chunlin; Hu, Ziyu; Li, Yanfen; Liu, Limin; Mori, Hirotaro; Wang, Zhangchang

    2016-01-01

    Synthesizing and functionalizing metal nanoparticles supported on substrates is currently the subject of intensive study owing to their outstanding catalytic performances for heterogeneous catalysis. Revealing the fundamental effect of the substrates on metal nanoparticles represents a key step in clarifying mechanisms of stability and catalytic properties of these heterogeneous systems. However, direct identification of these effects still poses a significant challenge due to the complicacy of interactions between substrates and nanoparticles and also for the technical difficulty, restraining our understanding of these heterogeneous systems. Here, we combine in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with molecular dynamics simulations to investigate Cu nanoparticles supported on graphite and Cu2O substrates, and demonstrate that melting behavior and thermal stability of Cu nanoparticles can be markedly influenced by substrates. The graphite-supported Cu nanoparticles do not melt during annealing at 1073 K until they vanish completely, i.e. only the sublimation occurs, while the Cu2O-supported Cu nanoparticles suffer melting during annealing at 973 K. Such selective superheating of the Cu nanoparticles can be attributed to the adsorption of a thin carbon layer on the surface of the Cu nanoparticles, which helps guide further stability enhancement of functional nanoparticles for realistic applications.

  17. In-Situ High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigation of Overheating of Cu Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunlin; Hu, Ziyu; Li, Yanfen; Liu, Limin; Mori, Hirotaro; Wang, Zhangchang

    2016-01-01

    Synthesizing and functionalizing metal nanoparticles supported on substrates is currently the subject of intensive study owing to their outstanding catalytic performances for heterogeneous catalysis. Revealing the fundamental effect of the substrates on metal nanoparticles represents a key step in clarifying mechanisms of stability and catalytic properties of these heterogeneous systems. However, direct identification of these effects still poses a significant challenge due to the complicacy of interactions between substrates and nanoparticles and also for the technical difficulty, restraining our understanding of these heterogeneous systems. Here, we combine in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with molecular dynamics simulations to investigate Cu nanoparticles supported on graphite and Cu2O substrates, and demonstrate that melting behavior and thermal stability of Cu nanoparticles can be markedly influenced by substrates. The graphite-supported Cu nanoparticles do not melt during annealing at 1073 K until they vanish completely, i.e. only the sublimation occurs, while the Cu2O-supported Cu nanoparticles suffer melting during annealing at 973 K. Such selective superheating of the Cu nanoparticles can be attributed to the adsorption of a thin carbon layer on the surface of the Cu nanoparticles, which helps guide further stability enhancement of functional nanoparticles for realistic applications. PMID:26785839

  18. High resolution Raman spectroscopy of complexes and clusters in molecular beams. Performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, P.M.

    1991-12-31

    The DOE-sponsored project in this laboratory has two facets. The first is the development of methods of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy for application in studies of sparse samples. The second is the application of such methods to structural and dynamical studies of species in supersonic molecular beams. The progress we have made in both of these areas is described in this paper. The report is divided into five remaining sections. The first pertains to theoretical and experimental developments in Fourier transform stimulated emission spectroscopy and Fourier transform hole-burning spectroscopy. The second deals with progress in the development of ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies (IDSRS). The third describes results from the application of IDSRS methods to studies of jet-cooled benzene clusters. The fourth describes IDSRS results from studies of hydrogen-bonded complexes containing phenols. The fifth relates to studies of carbazole-(Ar){sub n} clusters.

  19. High resolution Raman spectroscopy of complexes and clusters in molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    The DOE-sponsored project in this laboratory has two facets. The first is the development of methods of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy for application in studies of sparse samples. The second is the application of such methods to structural and dynamical studies of species in supersonic molecular beams. The progress we have made in both of these areas is described in this paper. The report is divided into five remaining sections. The first pertains to theoretical and experimental developments in Fourier transform stimulated emission spectroscopy and Fourier transform hole-burning spectroscopy. The second deals with progress in the development of ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies (IDSRS). The third describes results from the application of IDSRS methods to studies of jet-cooled benzene clusters. The fourth describes IDSRS results from studies of hydrogen-bonded complexes containing phenols. The fifth relates to studies of carbazole-(Ar){sub n} clusters.

  20. Quantitative high-resolution on-line NMR spectroscopy in reaction and process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiwald, Michael; Fischer, Holger H.; Kim, Young-Kyu; Albert, Klaus; Hasse, Hans

    2004-02-01

    On-line nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (on-line NMR) is a powerful technique for reaction and process monitoring. Different set-ups for direct coupling of reaction and separation equipment with on-line NMR spectroscopy are described. NMR spectroscopy can be used to obtain both qualitative and quantitative information from complex reacting multicomponent mixtures for equilibrium or reaction kinetic studies. Commercial NMR probes can be used at pressures up to 35 MPa and temperatures up to 400 K. Applications are presented for studies of equilibria and kinetics of complex formaldehyde-containing mixtures as well as homogeneously and heterogeneously catalyzed esterification kinetics. Direct coupling of a thin-film evaporator is described as an example for the benefits of on-line NMR spectroscopy in process monitoring.

  1. Measuring stellar magnetic fields from high resolution spectroscopy of near-infrared lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, F.; Vacca, W. D.; Stift, M. J.

    2003-10-01

    Zeeman splitting of otherwise degenerate levels provides a straight-forward method of measuring stellar magnetic fields. In the optical, the relative displacements of the Zeeman components are quite small compared to the rotational line broadening, and therefore observations of Zeeman splitting are usually possible only for rather strong magnetic fields in very slowly rotating stars. However, the magnitude of the Zeeman splitting is proportional to the square of the wavelength, whereas rotational line broadening mechanisms are linear in wavelength; therefore, there is a clear advantage in using near-infrared spectral lines to measure surface stellar magnetic fields. We have obtained high resolution (R >= 25 000) spectra in the 15 625-15 665 Å region for two magnetic chemically peculiar stars, viz. HD 176232 and HD 201601, and for the suspected magnetic chemically peculiar star HD 180583, as part of a pilot study aimed at determining the accuracy with which we can measure stellar magnetic fields using the Zeeman splitting of near-infrared lines. We confirm that in principle the magnetic field strength can be estimated from the magnetic intensification of spectral lines, i.e. the increase in equivalent width of a line over the zero-field value. However, due to line blending as well as the dependence of this intensification on abundance and field geometry, accurate estimates of the magnetic field strengths can be obtained only by modelling the line profiles by means of spectral synthesis techniques. Using this approach, we find a 1.4 kG magnetic field modulus in HD 176132 and an upper limit of 0.2 kG in HD 180583. The very weak infrared lines in the spectrum of HD 201601 are consistent with a 3.9 kG field modulus estimated from the splitting of the Fe II 6149.258 Å line seen in an optical spectrum. Finally, we would like to draw attention to the fact that there are no sufficiently detailed and reliable atomic line lists available for the near-infrared region that

  2. On-chip near-infrared spectroscopy of CO2 using high resolution plasmonic filter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Xinyuan; Li, Erwen; Squire, Kenneth; Wang, Alan X.

    2016-05-01

    We report an ultra-compact, cost-effective on-chip near-infrared spectroscopy system for CO2 sensing using narrow-band optical filter array based on plasmonic gratings with a waveguide layer. By varying the periodicity of the gratings, the transmission spectra of the filters can be continuously tuned to cover the 2.0 μm sensing window with high spectral resolution around 10 nm. Our experimental results show that the on-chip spectroscopy system can resolve the two symmetric vibrational bands of CO2 at 2.0 μm wavelength, which proves its potential to replace the expensive commercial IR spectroscopy system for on-site gas sensing.

  3. High-resolution FTIR spectroscopy of chlorodifluoromethane: ν2 and ν7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Christopher D.; Robertson, Evan G.; McNaughton, Don

    2002-06-01

    High-resolution FTIR spectra of chlorodifluoromethane (R22) were measured both at room temperature and cooled to approximately -100 °C in a collisional cooling cell. A rovibrational analysis was performed for ν2, the a/c-hybrid band at 1313 cm-1 and ν7, the b-type band at 1351 cm-1. 7400 and 1700 lines were assigned to CH 35ClF 2 and CH 37ClF 2, respectively, with quantum numbers up to J=98 and Ka=46. Effective constants to the sextic level have been fitted using Watson's A-reduction Hamiltonian. More accurate spectroscopic constants were obtained by fitting the two states simultaneously, taking into account both first- and second-order c-axis Coriolis interactions between the two bands. The ν2 band is predominantly a-type, but weaker c-type transitions assigned for CH 35ClF 2 enable the a/c-hybrid character ( μa2/ μc2) to be determined as 5.76.

  4. High-resolution IR Absorption Spectroscopy of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: The Realm of Anharmonicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltseva, Elena; Petrignani, Annemieke; Candian, Alessandra; Mackie, Cameron J.; Huang, Xinchuan; Lee, Timothy J.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan

    2015-11-01

    We report on an experimental and theoretical investigation of the importance of anharmonicity in the 3-μm CH stretching region of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. We present mass-resolved, high-resolution spectra of the gas-phase cold (∼4 K) linear PAH molecules naphthalene, anthracene, and tetracene. The measured IR spectra show a surprisingly high number of strong vibrational bands. For naphthalene, the observed bands are well separated and limited by the rotational contour, revealing the band symmetries. Comparisons are made to the harmonic and anharmonic approaches of the widely used Gaussian software. We also present calculated spectra of these acenes using the computational program SPECTRO, providing anharmonic predictions with a Fermi-resonance treatment that utilizes intensity redistribution. We demonstrate that the anharmonicity of the investigated acenes is strong, dominated by Fermi resonances between the fundamental and double combination modes, with triple combination bands as possible candidates to resolve remaining discrepancies. The anharmonic spectra as calculated with SPECTRO lead to predictions of the main bands that fall within 0.5% of the experimental frequencies. The implications for the aromatic infrared bands, specifically the 3-μm band, are discussed.

  5. Applications of High Resolution Laser: Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Environmental and Biological Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Madhavi Z.; Labbe, Nicole; Wagner, Rebekah J.

    This chapter details the application of LIBS in a number of environmental areas of research such as carbon sequestration and climate change. LIBS has also been shown to be useful in other high resolution environmental applications for example, elemental mapping and detection of metals in plant materials. LIBS has also been used in phytoremediation applications. Other biological research involves a detailed understanding of wood chemistry response to precipitation variations and also to forest fires. A cross-section of Mountain pine (pinceae Pinus pungen Lamb.) was scanned using a translational stage to determine the differences in the chemical features both before and after a fire event. Consequently, by monitoring the elemental composition pattern of a tree and by looking for abrupt changes, one can reconstruct the disturbance history of a tree and a forest. Lastly we have shown that multivariate analysis of the LIBS data is necessary to standardize the analysis and correlate to other standard laboratory techniques. LIBS along with multivariate statistical analysis makes it a very powerful technology that can be transferred from laboratory to field applications with ease.

  6. Kaon Tagging at 0° Scattering Angle for High-Resolution Decay-Pion Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esser, Anselm; Achenbach, Patrick; Arai, Naoki; Ayerbe Gayoso, Carlos; Böhm, Ralph; Borodina, Olga; Bosnar, Damir; Bozkurt, Vakkas; Debenjak, Luka; Distler, Michael O.; Friščić, Ivica; Fujii, Yuu; Gogami, Toshiyuki; Gómez Rodríguez, Mar; Hashimoto, Osamu; Hirose, Satoshi; Kanda, Hiroki; Kaneta, Masashi; Kim, Eunhee; Kusaka, Junichiro; Maeda, Kazushige; Margaryan, Amur; Merkel, Harald; Müller, Ulrich; Nagao, Sho; Nakamura, Satoshi N.; Pochodzalla, Josef; Rappold, Christophe; Reinhold, Joerg; Saito, Takehiko R.; Sanchez Lorente, Alicia; Sánchez Majos, Salvador; Sören Schlimme, Björn; Schoth, Matthias; Schulz, Florian; Sfienti, Concettina; Širca, Simon; Tang, Liguang; Thiel, Michaela; Tsukada, Kyo

    2014-03-01

    At the Mainz Microtron hypernuclei can be studied by (e,e'K) reactions. By detecting the kaon which is emitted in forward direction, with the KAOS spectrometer placed at 0° scattering angle, reactions involving open strangeness production are tagged. High-resolution magnetic spectrometers are then used to coincidentally detect the monoenergetic decay-pions from mesonic two-body weak decays of light hypernuclei at rest. As a pioneering experiment has confirmed, the KAOS spectrometer is exposed to a large flux of background particles, mostly positrons from bremsstrahlung pair production. In order to increase the effciency of kaon identification the KAOS spectrometer was modified to suppress background particles at the cost of a high momentum resolution, which is less important for this experiment. This was achieved by placing up to 14 cm of lead absorbers in front of the detectors, in which positrons are blocked by forming electromagnetic showers while the effect on kaons is limited. An additional time-of-flight wall and a new threshold Čerenkov detector help to increase the detection effciency of kaons.

  7. HIGH-RESOLUTION FOURIER-TRANSFORM MICROWAVE SPECTROSCOPY OF METHYL- AND DIMETHYLNAPTHALENES

    SciTech Connect

    Schnitzler, Elijah G.; Zenchyzen, Brandi L. M.; Jäger, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    High-resolution pure rotational spectra of four alkylnaphthalenes were measured in the range of 6–15 GHz using a molecular-beam Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer. Both a- and b-type transitions were observed for 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MN), 1,2-dimethylnaphthalene (1,2-DMN), and 1,3-dimethylnaphthalene (1,3-DMN); only a-type transitions were observed for 2-methylnaphthalene (2-MN). Geometry optimization and vibrational analysis calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory aided in the assignments of the spectra and the characterization of the structures. Differences between the experimental and predicted rotational constants are small, and they can be attributed in part to low-lying out-of-plane vibrations, which distort the alkylnaphthalenes out of their equilibrium geometries. Splittings of rotational lines due to methyl internal rotation were observed in the spectra of 2-MN, 1,2-DMN, and 1,3-DMN, and allowed for the determination of the barriers to methyl internal rotation, which are compared to values from density functional theory calculations. All four species are moderately polar, so they are candidate species for detection by radio astronomy, by targeting the transition frequencies reported here.

  8. HIGH-RESOLUTION IR ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS: THE REALM OF ANHARMONICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Maltseva, Elena; Buma, Wybren Jan; Petrignani, Annemieke; Candian, Alessandra; Mackie, Cameron J.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Huang, Xinchuan; Lee, Timothy J.; Oomens, Jos E-mail: petrignani@strw.leidenuniv.nl

    2015-11-20

    We report on an experimental and theoretical investigation of the importance of anharmonicity in the 3-μm CH stretching region of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. We present mass-resolved, high-resolution spectra of the gas-phase cold (∼4 K) linear PAH molecules naphthalene, anthracene, and tetracene. The measured IR spectra show a surprisingly high number of strong vibrational bands. For naphthalene, the observed bands are well separated and limited by the rotational contour, revealing the band symmetries. Comparisons are made to the harmonic and anharmonic approaches of the widely used Gaussian software. We also present calculated spectra of these acenes using the computational program SPECTRO, providing anharmonic predictions with a Fermi-resonance treatment that utilizes intensity redistribution. We demonstrate that the anharmonicity of the investigated acenes is strong, dominated by Fermi resonances between the fundamental and double combination modes, with triple combination bands as possible candidates to resolve remaining discrepancies. The anharmonic spectra as calculated with SPECTRO lead to predictions of the main bands that fall within 0.5% of the experimental frequencies. The implications for the aromatic infrared bands, specifically the 3-μm band, are discussed.

  9. High-Resolution Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of CH2+ and Its Deuterated Isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiming; Neese, Christopher F.; Morong, Christopher P.; Kleshcheva, Maria; Oka, Takeshi

    2013-10-01

    Aiming to provide approximate rotational constants for millimeter wave spectroscopists to identify the corresponding species in space, we have recorded the near-infrared spectra of the methylene cation CH2+ and its deuterated isotopologues, CD2+ and CHD+, using a high resolution and high sensitivity spectrometer. Detection of CH2+ in space will shed light on interstellar chemistry as it is the intermediate between the abundant CH+ and yet to be observed CH3+, which is important in the formation of larger organic molecules. CH2+ and its deuterated isotopologues are also of special interest for theoretical studies because of their unique intramolecular dynamics, i.e., the Renner-Teller interaction and quasi-linearity. This paper will discuss several new bands of CH2+, the -(0,5[11],0)0 - X-(0,0[0],0)1 and -(0,4[11],0)2 - X-(0,0[0],0)1 bands of CD2+, which have been identified and analyzed, and the candidate lines for the -(0,4[10],0)1 - X-(0,0[1],0)0 band of CHD+, in comparison with the theoretical predictions by Bunker and colleagues.

  10. Applications of High Resolution Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Environmental and Biological Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Madhavi Z; Labbe, Nicole; Wagner, Rebekah J.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter details the application of LIBS in a number of environmental areas of research such as carbon sequestration and climate change. LIBS has also been shown to be useful in other high resolution environmental applications for example, elemental mapping and detection of metals in plant materials. LIBS has also been used in phytoremediation applications. Other biological research involves a detailed understanding of wood chemistry response to precipitation variations and also to forest fires. A cross-section of Mountain pine (pinceae Pinus pungen Lamb.) was scanned using a translational stage to determine the differences in the chemical features both before and after a fire event. Consequently, by monitoring the elemental composition pattern of a tree and by looking for abrupt changes, one can reconstruct the disturbance history of a tree and a forest. Lastly we have shown that multivariate analysis of the LIBS data is necessary to standardize the analysis and correlate to other standard laboratory techniques. LIBS along with multivariate statistical analysis makes it a very powerful technology that can be transferred from laboratory to field applications with ease.

  11. High-resolution spectroscopy of southern and equatorial Be stars: flux excess at λ4471 A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballereau, D.; Chauville, J.; Zorec, J.

    1995-06-01

    We present a catalogue of high-resolution He I 4471, Mg II 4481 and Hγ line profiles observed simultaneously for 37 southern and equatorial Be stars. In this paper we focus on the He I 4471 line, which is studied using non-LTE model line profiles. A systematic difference is found between the observed and the theoretical He I 4471 line equivalent widths. This difference strongly correlates with the Hγ emission and we interpret it as being due mainly to the veiling effect produced by the continuum emission excess originating in the circumstellar envelope. To determine the continuum flux excess we use two methods. One method enables us to obtain simultaneously the V sin i parameter. The flux excess we determined is overestimated by about 9% on average, because in the line profile analysis we neglected the gravity darkening effect due to stellar rotation. We find that 14 program stars present two possible solutions for V sin i. The second solution is, on average, 14% smaller and produces a small residual or emission-like difference between the observed He I 4471 line profile and the model profile.

  12. Slit-Jet Discharge Studies of Polyacetylenic Molecules: Synthesis and High Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy of Diacetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Roberts, Melanie A.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2013-06-01

    Polyacetylenic molecules play an important role in both combustion chemistry as well as chemistry of the interstellar medium. This talk presents first high resolution infrared spectroscopic efforts on the simplest jet-cooled polyacetylene, namely diacetylene (C_4H_2). Specifically, the fundamental anti-symmetric C-H stretching mode (near 3333 cm^{-1}) and several hot combination bands of diacetylene have been investigated under sub-Doppler, jet cooled conditions in a pulsed supersonic slit discharge. Local Coriolis perturbations in the fundamental anti-symmetric C-H stretch manifold are observed and analyzed. Six hot bands are observed, including the H-C-C bending mode (v_8) not observed in previous room temperature studies. The observation of these hot bands under rotationally jet cooled conditions (T_{rot}=15.7(4) K) indicate the presence of highly non-equilibrium relaxation processes between vibration and rotation. G. Guelachvili, A. M. Craig, and D. A. Ramsay, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 105, 156 (1984)

  13. High resolution 13C-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy of a deuterated protein

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ming; Comellas, Gemma; Mueller, Leonard J.

    2011-01-01

    High resolution 13C-detected solid-state NMR spectra of the deuterated beta-1 immunoglobulin binding domain of the protein G (GB1) have been collected to show that all 15N, 13C′, 13Cα and 13Cβ sites are resolved in 13C–13C and 15N–13C spectra, with significant improvement in T2 relaxation times and resolution at high magnetic field (750 MHz). The comparison of echo T2 values between deuterated and protonated GB1 at various spinning rates and under different decoupling schemes indicates that 13Cα T2′ times increase by almost a factor of two upon deuteration at all spinning rates and under moderate decoupling strength, and thus the deuteration enables application of scalar-based correlation experiments that are challenging from the standpoint of transverse relaxation, with moderate proton decoupling. Additionally, deuteration in large proteins is a useful strategy to selectively detect polar residues that are often important for protein function and protein–protein interactions. PMID:20803233

  14. Fully automated high-resolution spectroscopy at Swiss 1.2 m La Silla telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Luc; Blecha, Andre; Davignon, Geert; Maire, Charles; Queloz, Didier; Russiniello, Giovanni B.; Simond, Gilles

    2000-06-01

    A Ritchey-Chretien 1.2 m telescope (EULER) and the High- Resolution echelle Spectrograph (CORALIE), a new Swiss observing facility at ESO La Silla Observatory, are operational and since Summer 1998. The Observatory operation is fully automated and supports the unattended, attended and interactive mode of operation under local or remote control. The control hardware is based on Local Control Units (LCU) built from PC/RedHat Linux computers and a Unix Computing Server. The Operational Software is built around INTER, a command language interpreter featuring communication control, data access, image processing functions and easy access to external resources. The general SW architecture is a non-hierarchical tree of pairs made of hardware- independent interpreters running on the Observing Server and hardware dependent servers running on the LCU's. The Operational Software includes the full access (Creation/Modification/Retrieval) to the input/output databases, telescope, instrument and auxiliary set-up and control files as well as a full data-reduction pipeline. We describe briefly the system architecture, summarize the performances and the experience gained over 18 months of operation and we discuss some critical issues: use of standard components, parallel operation, real-time requirements, system upgrade and maintenance.

  15. High-Resolution IR Absorption Spectroscopy of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: The Realm of Anharmonicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maltseva, Elena; Petrignani, Annemieke; Candian, Alessandra; Mackie, Cameron J.; Huang, Xinchuan; Lee, Timothy J.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan

    2016-01-01

    We report on an experimental and theoretical investigation of the importance of anharmonicity in the 3 micrometers CH stretching region of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. We present mass-resolved, high-resolution spectra of the gas-phase cold ((is) approximately 4K) linear PAH molecules naphthalene, anthracene, and tetracene. The measured IR spectra show a surprisingly high number of strong vibrational bands. For naphthalene, the observed bands are well separated and limited by the rotational contour, revealing the band symmetries. Comparisons are made to the harmonic and anharmonic approaches of the widely used Gaussian software. We also present calculated spectra of these acenes using the computational program SPECTRO, providing anharmonic predictions enhanced with a Fermi-resonance treatment that utilizes intensity redistribution. We demonstrate that the anharmonicity of the investigated acenes is strong, dominated by Fermi resonances between the fundamental and double combination modes, with triple combination bands as possible candidates to resolve remaining discrepancies. The anharmonic spectra as calculated with SPECTRO lead to predictions of the main modes that fall within 0.5% of the experimental frequencies. The implications for the Aromatic Infrared Bands, specifically the 3-m band are discussed.

  16. High-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy of CH2(+) and its deuterated isotopologues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiming; Neese, Christopher F; Morong, Christopher P; Kleshcheva, Maria; Oka, Takeshi

    2013-10-01

    Aiming to provide approximate rotational constants for millimeter wave spectroscopists to identify the corresponding species in space, we have recorded the near-infrared spectra of the methylene cation CH2(+) and its deuterated isotopologues, CD2(+) and CHD+, using a high resolution and high sensitivity spectrometer. Detection of CH2(+) in space will shed light on interstellar chemistry as it is the intermediate between the abundant CH+ and yet to be observed CH3(+), which is important in the formation of larger organic molecules. CH2(+) and its deuterated isotopologues are also of special interest for theoretical studies because of their unique intramolecular dynamics, i.e., the Renner–Teller interaction and quasi-linearity. This paper will discuss several new bands of CH2(+), the Ã(0,5[11],0)0 ← X̃(0,0[0],0)1 and Ã(0,4[11],0)2 ← X̃(0,0[0],0)1 bands of CD2(+), which have been identified and analyzed, and the candidate lines for the Ã(0,4[10],0)1 ← X̃(0,0[1],0)0 band of CHD+, in comparison with the theoretical predictions by Bunker and colleagues.

  17. High-resolution spectrometer using combined dispersive and interferometric wavelength separation for raman and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    PubMed

    Riebe, Daniel; Beitz, Toralf; Dosche, Carsten; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd; Raab, Volker; Raab, Corinna; Unverzagt, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the concept of a compact high-resolution spectrometer based on the combination of dispersive and interferometric elements is presented. Dispersive elements are used to spectrally resolve the light in one direction with coarse resolution (Δλ < 0.5 nm), while perpendicular to that direction an etalon provides high spectral resolution (Δλ < 50 pm). This concept for two-dimensional spectroscopy has been implemented for the wavelength range λ = 350-650 nm. Appropriate algorithms for reconstructing spectra from the two-dimensional raw data and for wavelength calibration were established in an analysis software. Potential applications for this new spectrometer are Raman and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Resolutions down to 28 pm (routinely 54 pm) could be realized for these applications.

  18. High-resolution VUV spectroscopy: New results from the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, F.; Bozek, J.

    1996-06-01

    Third-generation synchrotron light sources are providing photon beams of unprecedented brightness for researchers in atomic and molecular physics. Beamline 9.0.1, an undulator beamline at the Advanced Light Source (ALS), produces a beam in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) region of the spectrum with exceptional flux and spectral resolution. Exciting new results from experiments in atomic and molecular VUV spectroscopy of doubly excited autoionizing states of helium, hollow lithium, and photoelectron spectroscopy of small molecules using Beamline 9.0.1 at the ALS are reported.

  19. HIGH-RESOLUTION INFRARED IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY OF THE Z CANIS MAJORIS SYSTEM DURING QUIESCENCE AND OUTBURST

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkley, Sasha; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Crepp, Justin R.; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Zimmerman, Neil; Brenner, Douglas; Rice, Emily L.; Pueyo, Laurent; Vasisht, Gautam; Roberts, Jennifer E.; Roberts, Lewis C. Jr.; Burruss, Rick; Wallace, J. Kent; Cady, Eric; Zhai, Chengxing; Kraus, Adam L.; Ireland, Michael J.; Beichman, Charles; Dekany, Richard; Parry, Ian R.; and others

    2013-01-20

    We present adaptive optics photometry and spectra in the JHKL bands along with high spectral resolution K-band spectroscopy for each component of the Z Canis Majoris system. Our high angular resolution photometry of this very young ({approx}<1 Myr) binary, comprised of an FU Ori object and a Herbig Ae/Be star, was gathered shortly after the 2008 outburst while our high-resolution spectroscopy was gathered during a quiescent phase. Our photometry conclusively determines that the outburst was due solely to the embedded Herbig Ae/Be member, supporting results from earlier works, and that the optically visible FU Ori component decreased slightly ({approx}30%) in luminosity during the same period, consistent with previous works on the variability of FU Ori type systems. Further, our high-resolution K-band spectra definitively demonstrate that the 2.294 {mu}m CO absorption feature seen in composite spectra of the system is due solely to the FU Ori component, while a prominent CO emission feature at the same wavelength, long suspected to be associated with the innermost regions of a circumstellar accretion disk, can be assigned to the Herbig Ae/Be member. These findings clarify previous analyses of the origin of the CO emission in this complex system.

  20. High-resolution spectroscopy using an acousto-optic tunable filter and a fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, D.P.; Zamzow, D.S.; DSilva, A.P.

    1996-04-01

    A compact, solid-state, high-resolution spectrometer consisting of an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) and a fiber-optic Fabry{endash}Perot (FFP) interferometer has been developed. The system has been designed for high-resolution inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) applications. A description of the AOTF-FFP and its performance is presented. The resolution of the AOTF-FFP was determined by measuring the physical widths of ICP emission lines using a 1.5-m-focal-length grating spectrometer and deconvoluting the physical line shapes from the acquired AOTF-FFP spectra. Over the optimum range of the FFP mirror coatings, the resolution is sufficient for the determination of isotopic and hyperfine emission features in ICP-AES experiments, and approaches that of the 1.5-m spectrometer. The application of the AOTF-FFP to the determination of uranium isotopes (U-235 and U-238) introduced into the ICP is presented. {copyright} {ital 1996 Society for Applied Spectroscopy.}

  1. High Resolution Simulation of Beam Dynamics in Electron Linacs for Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R.D.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.A.; Qiang, J.

    2009-01-05

    In this paper we report on large scale multi-physics simulation of beam dynamics in electron linacs for next generation free electron lasers (FELs). We describe key features of a parallel macroparticle simulation code including three-dimensional (3D) space-charge effects, short-range structure wake fields, longitudinal coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) wake fields, and treatment of radiofrequency (RF) accelerating cavities using maps obtained from axial field profiles. A macroparticle up-sampling scheme is described that reduces the shot noise from an initial distribution with a smaller number of macroparticles while maintaining the global properties of the original distribution. We present a study of the microbunching instability which is a critical issue for future FELs due to its impact on beam quality at the end of the linac. Using parameters of a planned FEL linac at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we show that a large number of macroparticles (beyond 100 million) is needed to control numerical shot noise that drives the microbunching instability. We also explore the effect of the longitudinal grid on simulation results. We show that acceptable results are obtained with around 2048 longitudinal grid points, and we discuss this in view of the spectral growth rate predicted from linear theory. As an application, we present results from simulations using one billion macroparticles of the FEL linac under design at LBNL. We show that the final uncorrelated energy spread of the beam depends not only on the initial uncorrelated energy spread but also depends strongly on the shape of the initial current profile. By using a parabolic initial current profile, 5 keV initial uncorrelated energy spread at 40 MeV injection energy, and improved linac design, those simulations demonstrate that a reasonable beam quality can be achieved at the end of the linac, with the final distribution having about 100 keV energy spread, 2.4 GeV energy, and 1.2 kA peak

  2. USING HIGH-RESOLUTION SOLUTION-STATE NMR SPECTROSCOPY TO INVESTIGATE PMDI REACTIONS WITH WOOD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solution-state NMR spectroscopy provides a powerful tool for understanding the formation of chemical bonds between wood components and adhesives. Finely ground cell wall (CW) material fully dissolves in a solvent system containing dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO-d6) and N-methyl¬imidazole (NMI-d6), keeping ...

  3. High resolution spectroscopy of six SOCl2 isotopologues from the microwave to the far-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Drumel, M. A.; Roucou, A.; Brown, G. G.; Thorwirth, S.; Pirali, O.; Mouret, G.; Hindle, F.; McCarthy, M. C.; Cuisset, A.

    2016-02-01

    Despite its potential role as an atmospheric pollutant, thionyl chloride, SOCl2, remains poorly characterized in the gas phase. In this study, the pure rotational and ro-vibrational spectra of six isotopologues of this molecule, all detected in natural abundance, have been extensively studied from the cm-wave band to the far-infrared region by means of three complementary techniques: chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy, sub-millimeter-wave spectroscopy using frequency multiplier chain, and synchrotron-based far-infrared spectroscopy. Owing to the complex line pattern which results from two nuclei with non-zero spins, new, high-level quantum-chemical calculations of the hyperfine structure played a crucial role in the spectroscopic analysis. From the combined experimental and theoretical work, an accurate semi-experimental equilibrium structure (reSE) of SOCl2 has been derived. With the present data, spectroscopy-based methods can now be applied with confidence to detect and monitor this species, either by remote sensing or in situ.

  4. Understanding AGB evolution in Galactic bulge stars from high-resolution infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uttenthaler, S.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Wood, P. R.; Lebzelter, T.; Aringer, B.; Schultheis, M.; Ryde, N.

    2015-08-01

    An analysis of high-resolution near-infrared spectra of a sample of 45 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars towards the Galactic bulge is presented. The sample consists of two subsamples, a larger one in the inner and intermediate bulge, and a smaller one in the outer bulge. The data are analysed with the help of hydrostatic model atmospheres and spectral synthesis. We derive the radial velocity of all stars, and the atmospheric chemical mix ([Fe/H], C/O, 12C/13C, Al, Si, Ti, and Y) where possible. Our ability to model the spectra is mainly limited by the (in)completeness of atomic and molecular line lists, at least for temperatures down to Teff ≈ 3100 K. We find that the subsample in the inner and intermediate bulge is quite homogeneous, with a slightly subsolar mean metallicity and only few stars with supersolar metallicity, in agreement with previous studies of non-variable M-type giants in the bulge. All sample stars are oxygen-rich, C/O < 1.0. The C/O and carbon isotopic ratios suggest that third dredge-up (3DUP) is absent among the sample stars, except for two stars in the outer bulge that are known to contain technetium. These stars are also more metal-poor than the stars in the intermediate or inner bulge. Current stellar masses are determined from linear pulsation models. The masses, metallicities and 3DUP behaviour are compared to AGB evolutionary models. We conclude that these models are partly in conflict with our observations. Furthermore, we conclude that the stars in the inner and intermediate bulge belong to a more metal-rich population that follows bar-like kinematics, whereas the stars in the outer bulge belong to the metal-poor, spheroidal bulge population.

  5. HIGH-RESOLUTION, DIFFERENTIAL, NEAR-INFRARED TRANSMISSION SPECTROSCOPY OF GJ 1214b

    SciTech Connect

    Crossfield, I. J. M.; Hansen, Brad M. S.; Barman, Travis

    2011-08-01

    The nearby star GJ 1214 hosts a planet intermediate in radius and mass between Earth and Neptune, resulting in some uncertainty as to its nature. We have observed this planet, GJ 1214b, during transit with the high-resolution, near-infrared NIRSPEC spectrograph on the Keck II telescope, in order to characterize the planet's atmosphere. By cross-correlating the spectral changes through transit with a suite of theoretical atmosphere models, we search for variations associated with absorption in the planet atmosphere. Our observations are sufficient to rule out tested model atmospheres with wavelength-dependent transit depth variations {approx}> 5 x 10{sup -4} over the wavelength range 2.1-2.4 {mu}m. Our sensitivity is limited by variable slit loss and telluric transmission effects. We find no positive signatures but successfully rule out a number of plausible atmospheric models, including the default assumption of a gaseous, H-dominated atmosphere in chemical equilibrium. Such an atmosphere can be made consistent if the absorption due to methane is reduced. Clouds can also render such an atmosphere consistent with our observations, but only if they lie higher in the atmosphere than indicated by recent optical and infrared measurements. When taken in concert with other observational constraints, our results support a model in which the atmosphere of GJ 1214b contains significant H and He, but where CH{sub 4} is depleted. If this depletion is the result of photochemical processes, it may also produce a haze that suppresses spectral features in the optical.

  6. High-resolution solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy of polymorphs of glycine.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Abil E; Mann, Sam E; Rahman, Aisha S; McMillan, Paul F; Corà, Furio; Iuga, Dinu; Hughes, Colan E; Harris, Kenneth D M

    2011-11-10

    High-resolution solid-state (2)H MAS NMR studies of the α and γ polymorphs of fully deuterated glycine (glycine-d(5)) are reported. Analysis of spinning sideband patterns is used to determine the (2)H quadrupole interaction parameters, and is shown to yield good agreement with the corresponding parameters determined from single-crystal (2)H NMR measurements (the maximum deviation in quadrupole coupling constants determined from these two approaches is only 1%). From analysis of simulated (2)H MAS NMR sideband patterns as a function of reorientational jump frequency (κ) for the -N(+)D(3) group in glycine-d(5), the experimentally observed differences in the (2)H MAS NMR spectrum for the -N(+)D(3) deutrons in the α and γ polymorphs is attributed to differences in the rate of reorientation of the -N(+)D(3) group. These simulations show severe broadening of the (2)H MAS NMR signal in the intermediate motion regime, suggesting that deuterons undergoing reorientational motions at rates in the range κ ≈ 10(4)-10(6) s(-1) are likely to be undetectable in (2)H MAS NMR measurements for materials with natural isotopic abundances. The (1)H NMR chemical shifts for the α and γ polymorphs of glycine have been determined from the (2)H MAS NMR results, taking into account the known second-order shift. Further quantum mechanical calculations of (2)H quadrupole interaction parameters and (1)H chemical shifts reveal the structural dependence of these parameters in the two polymorphs and suggest that the existence of two short intermolecular C-H···O contacts for one of the H atoms of the >CH(2) group in the α polymorph have a significant influence on the (2)H quadrupole coupling and (1)H chemical shift for this site. PMID:21939265

  7. SUBARU HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF STAR G IN THE TYCHO SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Kerzendorf, Wolfgang E.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Yong, David; Asplund, M.; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Podsiadlowski, Ph.; Frebel, Anna; Fesen, Robert A. E-mail: brian@mso.anu.edu.au E-mail: nomoto@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: anna@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2009-08-20

    It is widely believed that Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) originate in binary systems where a white dwarf accretes material from a companion star until its mass approaches the Chandrasekhar mass and carbon is ignited in the white dwarf's core. This scenario predicts that the donor star should survive the supernova (SNe) explosion, providing an opportunity to understand the progenitors of SNe Ia. In this paper, we argue that rotation is a generic signature expected of most nongiant donor stars that is easily measurable. Ruiz-Lapuente et al. examined stars in the center of the remnant of SN 1572 (Tycho SN) and showed evidence that a subgiant star (Star G by their naming convention) near the remnant's center was the system's donor star. We present high-resolution (R {approx_equal} 40, 000) spectra taken with the High Dispersion Spectrograph on Subaru of this candidate donor star and measure the star's radial velocity as 79 {+-} 2 km s{sup -1} with respect to the local standard of rest and put an upper limit on the star's rotation of 7.5 km s{sup -1}. In addition, by comparing images that were taken in 1970 and 2004, we measure the proper motion of Star G to be {mu} {sub l} = -1.6 {+-} 2.1 mas yr{sup -1} and {mu} {sub b} = -2.7 {+-} 1.6 mas yr{sup -1}. We demonstrate that all of the measured properties of Star G presented in this paper are consistent with those of a star in the direction of Tycho SN that is not associated with the SN event. However, we discuss an unlikely, but still viable scenario for Star G to be the donor star, and suggest further observations that might be able to confirm or refute it.

  8. A new method for correcting fibre barycentre displacements in high resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, G. J.; Allington-Smith, J. R.; Lemke, U.

    2012-09-01

    Unpredictable displacements in the photocentre of an optical feed at the entrance slit of a spectrograph produce corresponding barycentre offsets that impose limits to very high resolution schemes. These limitations not only apply to direct light from a science object, but also light relayed via an optical fibre or image slicer. Several mitigation strategies are in development or are currently in use, however these all have potentially restrictive idiosyncrasies. An alternative approach is proposed to remove displacement effects from the spectra by nulling barycentre offsets. Correction is achieved by time-integrating at the detector a sequence of multiple normal and 180-degree inverted images of the input aperture, thus eliminating optical asymmetries about the axis of inversion, which is aligned orthogonal to the spectral direction. The flip is generated with a path-length compensated, non-dispersive `reversion prism', driven on a high precision translation stage. The prism is periodically chopped in and out of the beam, and the resulting time-averaged image thus has an imposed central axis regardless of barycentre shifts. The method works regardless of the specifics of the spectrograph feed (fibre, multiple fibres, slit, slicer etc.) With a relatively simple and inexpensive scheme it should be possible to stabilise an image to better than one part in 104 potentially permitting detection down to cms-1 regimes. The concept is currently at a very early stage of development, so this paper outlines the basic principles and details a practical reversion component that is currently under development at Durham CfAI. There then follows a description of how the component will be implemented in a laboratory prototype scheme. The paper concludes with a proposed test plan and suggests the focus for future work.

  9. HIGH-RESOLUTION FOURIER TRANSFORM SPECTROSCOPY OF LANTHANUM IN Ar DISCHARGE IN THE NEAR-INFRARED

    SciTech Connect

    Güzelçimen, F.; Başar, Gö.; Tamanis, M.; Kruzins, A.; Ferber, R.; Windholz, L.; Kröger, S. E-mail: sophie.kroeger@htw-berlin.de

    2013-10-01

    A high-resolution spectrum of lanthanum has been recorded by a Fourier Transform spectrometer in the wavelength range from 833 nm to 1666 nm (6000 cm{sup –1} to 12,000 cm{sup –1}) using as light source a hollow cathode lamp operated with argon as the discharge carrier gas. In total, 2386 spectral lines were detected in this region, of which 555 lines could be classified as La I transitions and 10 lines as La II transitions. All La II transitions and 534 of these La I transitions were classified for the first time, and 6 of the La II transitions and 433 of the classified La I transitions appear to be new lines, which could not be found in the literature. The corresponding energy level data of classified lines are given. Additionally, 430 lines are assigned as Ar I lines and 394 as Ar II lines, of which 179 and 77, respectively, were classified for the first time. All 77 classified Ar II transitions as well as 159 of the classified Ar I transitions are new lines. Furthermore, the wavenumbers of 997 unclassified spectral lines were determined, 235 of which could be assigned as La lines, because of their hyperfine pattern. The remaining 762 lines may be either unclassified Ar lines or unresolved and unclassified La lines with only one symmetrical peak with an FWHM in the same order of magnitude as the Ar lines. The accuracy of the wavenumber for the classified lines with signal-to-noise-ratio higher than four is better than 0.006 cm{sup –1} which corresponds to an accuracy of 0.0004 nm at 830 nm and 0.0017 nm at 1660 nm, respectively.

  10. PREFACE: Pierre Jacquinot—pioneer in high-resolution spectroscopy and science statesman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Heer, F. J.; Linnartz, H.; Stroke, H. H.

    2007-10-01

    On several occasions this journal has documented the lives and contributions of prominent physicists who have made seminal contributions to atomic, molecular and optical physics. The occasion of the symposium `De l'atome au nano-objet' held in his honour provided an opportunity to gather personal recollections of Pierre Jacquinot and to present scientific papers in atomic and molecular physics, of which a selection is included here. The bibliography shows that Jacquinot's contributions were largely in atomic spectroscopy, experimental and theoretical, accompanied throughout his career by important developments in optical instrumentation designed for the improvement of resolution and sensitivity. Fourier spectroscopy was thus developed at the Laboratoire Aimé Cotton. Pierre Jacquinot's impact was certainly multiplied by the many-facetted avenues of modern atomic physics explored under his direction. He, and his successors, made the Laboratoire Aimé Cotton one of the world's great atomic physics centres. As will be apparent from several of the papers in this issue, Jacquinot has left his mark not only in the purely scientific arena, but also on the structure of the French scientific organization. While previously laboratories tended to obey some form of exclusion principle, Jacquinot was instrumental in initiating fruitful interactions between them, and, on a larger scale, between the university laboratories and the national research centres. One of us (HHS) had the privilege of having known Pierre Jacquinot since his visit to our MIT Spectroscopy Laboratory some fifty years ago. A subsequent sabbatical at the Laboratoire Aimé Cotton led to a collaboration over a period of many years in laser spectroscopy, starting with Jean-Louis Picqué, and work with radioactive beams at CERN, primarily with H T Duong and Jacques Pinard—an activity which continues to this day. HHS expresses here his personal homage to Pierre Jacquinot and his memory. We are grateful to Pierre

  11. The subgiant branch of ω Centauri seen through high-resolution spectroscopy. I. The first stellar generation in ω Cen?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancino, E.; Mucciarelli, A.; Sbordone, L.; Bellazzini, M.; Pasquini, L.; Monaco, L.; Ferraro, F. R.

    2011-03-01

    We analysed high-resolution UVES spectra of six stars belonging to the subgiant branch of ω Centauri, and derived abundance ratios of 19 chemical elements (namely Al, Ba, C, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, La, Mg, Mn, N, Na, Ni, Sc, Si, Sr, Ti, and Y). A comparison with previous abundance determinations for red giants provided remarkable agreement and allowed us to identify the sub-populations to which our targets belong. We found that three targets belong to a low-metallicity population at [Fe/H] ≃ -2.0 dex, [α/Fe] ≃ +0.4 dex and [s/Fe] ≃ 0 dex. Stars with similar characteristics were found in small amounts by past surveys of red giants. We discuss the possibility that they belong to a separate sub-population that we name VMP (very metal-poor, at most 5% of the total cluster population), which - in the self-enrichment hypothesis - is the best-candidate first stellar generation in ω Cen. Two of the remaining targets belong to the dominant metal-poor population (MP) at [Fe/H] ≃ -1.7 dex, and the last one to the metal-intermediate (MInt) one at [Fe/H] ≃ -1.2 dex. The existence of the newly defined VMP population could help to understand some puzzling results based on low-resolution spectroscopy for age differences determinations, because the metallicity resolution of these studies was probably not enough to detect the VMP population. The VMP could also correspond to some of the additional substructures of the subgiant-branch region found in the latest HST photometry. After trying to correlate chemical abundances with substructures in the subgiant branch of ω Cen, we found that the age difference between the VMP and MP populations should be small (0 ± 2 Gyr), while the difference between the MP and MInt populations could be slightly larger (2 ± 2 Gyr). Based on data collected at the ESO VLT in Chile, with UVES and FLAMES under programs 68.D-0332(A) and 079.D-0021. Also based on literature data from the ESO WFI, under programs 62.L-0354 and 63.L-0439, and on data

  12. High-resolution patterning of graphene by screen printing with a silicon stencil for highly flexible printed electronics.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Woo Jin; Secor, Ethan B; Hersam, Mark C; Frisbie, C Daniel; Francis, Lorraine F

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution screen printing of pristine graphene is introduced for the rapid fabrication of conductive lines on flexible substrates. Well-defined silicon stencils and viscosity-controlled inks facilitate the preparation of high-quality graphene patterns as narrow as 40 μm. This strategy provides an efficient method to produce highly flexible graphene electrodes for printed electronics. PMID:25377870

  13. The Application of High-Resolution Electron Microscopy to Problems in Solid State Chemistry: The Exploits of a Peeping TEM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyring, LeRoy

    1980-01-01

    Describes methods for using the high-resolution electron microscope in conjunction with other tools to reveal the identity and environment of atoms. Problems discussed include the ultimate structure of real crystalline solids including defect structure and the mechanisms of chemical reactions. (CS)

  14. The microtrabecular lattice and its relationships to other organelles in prokaryotes and eukaryotes--high resolution scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Epling, G P; Blixt, J A; Mahurin, R W; Rinaldi, M G

    1983-01-01

    High resolution scanning electron microscopy demonstrated the microtrabecular lattice in bacteria, fungi, plant and animal cells. It is attached to ribosomes and plasma membranes generally, but to other organelles and the nuclear envelope in eukaryotes. The eukaryotic organelle surface substructure is described. Differentiation of real structure from artifacts of fixation, critical point drying and sputter-coating, is discussed.

  15. Estimating photosynthesis with high resolution field spectroscopy in a Mediterranean grassland under different nutrient availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Priego, O.; Guan, J.; Fava, F.; Rossini, M.; Wutzler, T.; Moreno, G.; Carrara, A.; Kolle, O.; Schrumpf, M.; Reichstein, M.; Migliavacca, M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have shown how human induced N:P imbalances are affecting essential processes (e.g. photosynthesis, plant growth rate) that lead to important changes in ecosystem structure and function. In this regard, the accuracy of the approaches based on remotely-sensed data for monitoring and modeling gross primary production (GPP) relies on the ability of vegetation indices (VIs) to track the dynamics of vegetation physiological and biophysical properties/variables. Promising results have been recently obtained when Chlorophyll-sensitive VIs and Chlorophyll fluorescence are combined with structural indices in the framework of the Monteith's light use efficiency (LUE) model. However, further ground-based experiments are required to validate LUE model performances, and their capability to be generalized under different nutrient availability conditions. In this study, the overall objective was to investigate the sensitivity of VIs to track short- and long-term GPP variations in a Mediterranean grassland under different N and P fertilization treatments. Spectral VIs were acquired manually using high resolution spectrometers (HR4000, OceanOptics, USA) along a phenological cycle. The VIs examined included photochemical reflectance index (PRI), MERIS terrestrial-chlorophyll index (MTCI) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence calculated at the oxygen absorption band O2-A (F760) using spectral fitting methods was also used. Simultaneously, measurements of GPP and environmental variables were conducted using a transient-state canopy chamber. Overall, GPP, F760 and VIs showed a clear seasonal time-trend in all treatments, which was driven by the phenological development of the grassland. Results showed significant differences (p<0.05) in midday GPP values between N and without N addition plots, in particular at the peak of the growing season during the flowering stage and at the end of the season during senescence. While

  16. Discrimination of Basal Cell Carcinoma from Normal Skin Tissue Using High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Je-Ho; Lee, Heonho; Yoon, Dahye; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kim, Moon-Bum; Kim, Shukmann

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS NMR) spectroscopy is a useful tool for investigating the metabolism of various cancers. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer. However, to our knowledge, data on metabolic profiling of BCC have not been reported in the literature. The objective of the present study was to investigate the metabolic profiling of cutaneous BCC using HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy. HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to analyze the metabolite profile and metabolite intensity of histopathologically confirmed BCC tissues and normal skin tissue (NST) samples. The metabolic intensity normalized to the total spectral intensities in BCC and NST was compared, and multivariate analysis was performed with orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). P values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Univariate analysis revealed 9 metabolites that showed statistically significant difference between BCC and NST. In multivariate analysis, the OPLS-DA models built with the HR-MAS NMR metabolic profiles revealed a clear separation of BCC from NST. The receiver operating characteristic curve generated from the results revealed an excellent discrimination of BCC from NST with an area under the curve (AUC) value of 0.961. The present study demonstrated that the metabolite profile and metabolite intensity differ between BCC and NST, and that HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy can be a valuable tool in the diagnosis of BCC. PMID:26934749

  17. Discrimination of Basal Cell Carcinoma from Normal Skin Tissue Using High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mun, Je-Ho; Lee, Heonho; Yoon, Dahye; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kim, Moon-Bum; Kim, Shukmann

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS NMR) spectroscopy is a useful tool for investigating the metabolism of various cancers. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer. However, to our knowledge, data on metabolic profiling of BCC have not been reported in the literature. The objective of the present study was to investigate the metabolic profiling of cutaneous BCC using HR-MAS (1)H NMR spectroscopy. HR-MAS (1)H NMR spectroscopy was used to analyze the metabolite profile and metabolite intensity of histopathologically confirmed BCC tissues and normal skin tissue (NST) samples. The metabolic intensity normalized to the total spectral intensities in BCC and NST was compared, and multivariate analysis was performed with orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). P values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Univariate analysis revealed 9 metabolites that showed statistically significant difference between BCC and NST. In multivariate analysis, the OPLS-DA models built with the HR-MAS NMR metabolic profiles revealed a clear separation of BCC from NST. The receiver operating characteristic curve generated from the results revealed an excellent discrimination of BCC from NST with an area under the curve (AUC) value of 0.961. The present study demonstrated that the metabolite profile and metabolite intensity differ between BCC and NST, and that HR-MAS (1)H NMR spectroscopy can be a valuable tool in the diagnosis of BCC. PMID:26934749

  18. Activators of photoluminescence in calcite: evidence from high-resolution, laser-excited luminescence spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pedone, V.A.; Cercone, K.R.; Burruss, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Laser-excited luminescence spectroscopy of a red-algal, biogenic calcite and a synthetic Mn-calcite can make the distinction between organic and trace-element activators of photoluminescence. Organic-activated photoluminescence in biogenic calcite is characterized by significant peak shifts and increasing intensity with shorter-wavelength excitation and by significant decreases in intensity after heating to ??? 400??C. In contrast, Mn-activated photoluminescence shows no peak shift, greatest intensity under green excitation and limited changes after heating. Examination of samples with a high-sensitivity spectrometer using several wavelengths of exciting light is necessary for identification of photoluminescence activators. ?? 1990.

  19. High Resolution NMR Spectroscopy of Nanocrystalline Proteins at Ultra-High Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Lindsay J.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2010-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy of uniformly-13C,15N labeled protein samples provides insight into atomic-resolution chemistry and structure. Data collection efficiency has advanced remarkably in the last decade; however, the study of larger proteins is still challenged by relatively low resolution in comparison to solution NMR. In this study, we present a systematic analysis of SSNMR protein spectra acquired at 11.7, 17.6 and 21.1 Tesla (1H frequencies of 500, 750, and 900 MHz). For two protein systems—GB1, a 6 kDa nanocrystalline protein and DsbA, a 21 kDa nanocrystalline protein—line narrowing is demonstrated in all spectral regions with increasing field. Resolution enhancement is greatest in the aliphatic region, including methine, methylene and methyl sites. The resolution for GB1 increases markedly as a function of field, and for DsbA, resolution in the C-C region increases by 42%, according to the number of peaks that can be uniquely picked and integrated in the 900 MHz spectra when compared to the 500 MHz spectra. Additionally, chemical exchange is uniquely observed in the highest field spectra for at least two isoleucine Cδ1 sites in DsbA. These results further illustrate the benefits of high-field MAS SSNMR spectroscopy for protein structural studies. PMID:19953303

  20. High Resolution Spectroscopy of Post-AGB Stars: AGB Nucleosynthesis and Dredge-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyniers, Maarten

    2002-12-01

    The final evolutionary stage of a low mass stellar object is a complex phase which is still poorly understood. In this thesis we contribute to a better understanding of the nucleosynthesis and dredge-up phenomena that occur in such objects during their ascent on the AGB by means of a detailed study of high-resolution optical spectra of post-AGB objects. In the first four chapters we mainly focus on the photospheric abundances of eight carbon and s-process enriched post-AGB objects. The carbon enrichment clearly proves that products of the helium burning shell were brought to the surface in the so-called third dredge-up. Moreover, also products of the (slow) neutron nucleosynthesis (the s-process) are brought to the surface, which allows us to characterize this nucleosynthesis. A detailed study of the chemical pattern displayed by these elements, including a comparison with up-to-date nucleosynthetic AGB stellar models, reveals that the expected anti-correlation between metallicity and neutron nucleosynthesis efficiency is hardly seen (if at all). The anti-correlation is expected since in a lower metallicity object, more neutrons are available per iron seed and hence heavier nucleons can be built up, assuming a similar primary production rate of the neutrons. Instead, a large spread in efficiency is seen. On the other hand, a clear correlation was found between the total enrichment and the nucleosynthesis efficiency, indicating that the dredge-up efficiency is strongly linked to the neutron production. Furthermore, detailed abundances of elements beyond the Ba-peak (Gd, Yb, Lu and possibly W) were obtained for the first time in intrinsically enriched objects for three stars of the sample, a result which was possible due to the combination of the high quality VLT+UVES spectra and newly released atomic data in both VALD and DREAM (Database on Rare Earths At Mons University). Finally, a new identification was found for the line at 670.8 nm in the spectra of the

  1. High Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy of Propargyl Alcohol-Water Complex Embedded in Helium Nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Devendra; Pal, Nitish; Kaufmann, Matin; Schwaab, Gerhard; Havenith, Martina

    2016-06-01

    Propargyl alcohol (hereafter abbreviated as PA) is a molecule of astrophysical interest and has been probed extensively using microwave spectroscopy.1,2 It is a multifunctional molecule and offers multiple sites for hydrogen bonding interactions. Therefore, it has also attracted the attention of groups interested in weak intermolecular interactions. Recently, the Ar…PA complex3 and PA-dimer4 have been studied using microwave spectroscopy. More recently, there have been matrix-isolation infrared spectroscopic studies on PA-water5 and PA-acetylene6 complexes. In the present work, clusters of PA and water were formed in the helium nanodroplets and probed using a combination of infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Using ab-initio quantum mechanical calculations, PA-water clusters were optimised and five minimum structures were found on the potential energy hypersurface, which were used as a guidance to the experiments. We used D2O for the experiments since our laser sources at Bochum do not cover the IR spectral region of H2O. IR spectra of PA-D2O complex were recorded in the region of symmetric and antisymmetric stretches of the bound D2O. Multiple signals were found in these regions which were dependent on the concentration of PA as well as D2O. Using pickup curves most of these signals could be assigned to 1:1 PA:D2O clusters. The ab-initio calculations helped in a definitive assignment of the spectra to the different conformers of PA-D2O complex. The details will be presented in the talk. References: 1. E. Hirota, J. Mol. Spec. 26, 335 (1968). 2. J.C. Pearson and B.J. Drouin, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 234, 149 (2005). 3. D. Mani and E. Arunan, ChemPhysChem 14, 754 (2013). 4. D. Mani and E. Arunan, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 164311 (2014). 5. J. Saini, K.S. Vishwanathan, J. Mol. Struct. 1118, 147 (2016). 6. K. Sundararajan et al., J. Mol. Struct. 1121, 26 (2016).

  2. High-precision three-dimensional field mapping of a high resolution magnetic spectrometer for hypernuclear spectroscopy at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Yuu; Hashimoto, Osamu; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Nakamura, Satoshi N.; Ohtani, Atsushi; Okayasu, Yuichi; Oyamada, Masamichi; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Kato, Seigo; Matsui, Jumei; Sako, Katsuhisa; Brindza, Paul

    2015-09-01

    The High Resolution Kaon Spectrometer (HKS), which consists of two quadrupole magnets and one dipole magnet, was designed and constructed for high-resolution spectroscopy of hypernuclei using the (e,e'K+) reaction in Hall C, Jefferson Lab (JLab). It was used to analyze momenta of around 1.2 GeV/c K^+ s with a resolution of 2 ×10^-4 (FWHM). To achieve the target resolution, a full three-dimensional magnetic field measurement of each magnet was successfully performed, and a full three-dimensional magnetic field map of the HKS magnets was reconstructed. Using the measured field map, the initial reconstruction function was generated. The target resolution would be achieved via careful tuning of the reconstruction function of HKS with the p(e,e'K+)Lambda,Sigma^0 and C-12 (e,e'K+)12_Lambda B_g.s. reactions. After tuning of the initial reconstruction function generated from the measured map, the estimated HKS momentum resolution was 2.2×10^-4 (FWHM).

  3. Structural analysis of IPC zeolites and related materials using positron annihilation spectroscopy and high-resolution argon adsorption.

    PubMed

    Jagiello, J; Sterling, M; Eliášová, P; Opanasenko, M; Zukal, A; Morris, R E; Navaro, M; Mayoral, A; Crivelli, P; Warringham, R; Mitchell, S; Pérez-Ramírez, J; Čejka, J

    2016-06-01

    The advanced investigation of pore networks in isoreticular zeolites and mesoporous materials related to the IPC family was performed using high-resolution argon adsorption experiments coupled with the development of a state-of-the-art non-local density functional theory approach. The optimization of a kernel for model sorption isotherms for materials possessing the same layer structure, differing only in the interlayer connectivity (e.g. oxygen bridges, single- or double-four-ring building units, mesoscale pillars etc.) revealed remarkable differences in their porous systems. Using high-resolution adsorption data, the bimodal pore size distribution consistent with crystallographic data for IPC-6, IPC-7 and UTL samples is shown for the first time. A dynamic assessment by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) provided complementary insights, simply distinguishing the enhanced accessibility of the pore network in samples incorporating mesoscale pillars and revealing the presence of a certain fraction of micropores undetected by gas sorption. Nonetheless, subtle differences in the pore size could not be discriminated based on the widely-applied Tao-Eldrup model. The combination of both methods can be useful for the advanced characterization of microporous, mesoporous and hierarchical materials. PMID:27210107

  4. Structural analysis of IPC zeolites and related materials using positron annihilation spectroscopy and high-resolution argon adsorption.

    PubMed

    Jagiello, J; Sterling, M; Eliášová, P; Opanasenko, M; Zukal, A; Morris, R E; Navaro, M; Mayoral, A; Crivelli, P; Warringham, R; Mitchell, S; Pérez-Ramírez, J; Čejka, J

    2016-06-01

    The advanced investigation of pore networks in isoreticular zeolites and mesoporous materials related to the IPC family was performed using high-resolution argon adsorption experiments coupled with the development of a state-of-the-art non-local density functional theory approach. The optimization of a kernel for model sorption isotherms for materials possessing the same layer structure, differing only in the interlayer connectivity (e.g. oxygen bridges, single- or double-four-ring building units, mesoscale pillars etc.) revealed remarkable differences in their porous systems. Using high-resolution adsorption data, the bimodal pore size distribution consistent with crystallographic data for IPC-6, IPC-7 and UTL samples is shown for the first time. A dynamic assessment by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) provided complementary insights, simply distinguishing the enhanced accessibility of the pore network in samples incorporating mesoscale pillars and revealing the presence of a certain fraction of micropores undetected by gas sorption. Nonetheless, subtle differences in the pore size could not be discriminated based on the widely-applied Tao-Eldrup model. The combination of both methods can be useful for the advanced characterization of microporous, mesoporous and hierarchical materials.

  5. Multiresonant Spectroscopy and the High-Resolution Threshold Photoionization of Combustion Free Radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Edward R. Grant

    2005-09-07

    This report describes the results of a program of research on the thermochemistry, spectroscopy and intramolecular relaxation dynamics of the combustion intermediate, HCO. We prepare this radical from acetaldehyde as a photo-precursor in a differentially pumped laser-ionization source quadrupole mass spectrometer. Using a multiresonant spectroscopic technique established in our laboratory, we select individual rotational states and overcome Franck-Condon barriers associated with neutral-to-cation geometry changes to promote transitions to individual autoionizing series and state-resolved ionization thresholds. Systematic analysis of rotational structure and associated lineshapes provide experimental insight on autoionization dynamics as input for theoretical modeling. Extrapolation of series, combined with direct threshold-photoelectron detection, yield precise ionization potentials that constitute an important contribution to the thermochemical base of information on HCO.

  6. Method And Apparatus For High Resolution Ex-Situ Nmr Spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Meriles, Carlos A.; Heise, Henrike; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Moule, Adam

    2004-01-06

    A method and apparatus for ex-situ nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for use on samples outside the physical limits of the magnets in inhomogeneous static and radio-frequency fields. Chemical shift spectra can be resolved with the method using sequences of correlated, composite z-rotation pulses in the presence of spatially matched static and radio frequency field gradients producing nutation echoes. The amplitude of the echoes is modulated by the chemical shift interaction and an inhomogeneity free FID may be recovered by stroboscopically sampling the maxima of the echoes. In an alternative embodiment, full-passage adiabatic pulses are consecutively applied. One embodiment of the apparatus generates a static magnetic field that has a variable saddle point.

  7. High-resolution (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy pattern recognition of fish oil capsules.

    PubMed

    Aursand, Marit; Standal, Inger B; Axelson, David E

    2007-01-10

    13C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy, in conjunction with multivariate analysis of commercial fish oil-related health food products, have been used to provide discrimination concerning the nature, composition, refinement, and/or adulteration or authentication of the products. Supervised (probabilistic neural networks, PNN) and unsupervised (principal component analysis, PCA; Kohonen neural networks; generative topographic mapping, GTM) pattern recognition techniques were used to visualize and classify samples. Simple PCA score plots demonstrated excellent, but not totally unambiguous, class distinctions, whereas Kohonen and GTM visualization provided better results. Quantitative class predictions with accuracies >95% were achieved with PNN analysis. Trout, salmon, and cod oils were completely and correctly classified. Samples reported to be salmon oils and cod liver oils did not cluster with true salmon and cod liver oil samples, indicating mislabeling or adulteration.

  8. High resolution core level spectroscopy of hydrogen-terminated (1 0 0) diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, A. K.; Rietwyk, K. J.; Tadich, A.; Stacey, A.; Ley, L.; Pakes, C. I.

    2016-08-01

    Synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy experiments are presented that address a long standing inconsistency in the treatment of the C1s core level of hydrogen terminated (1 0 0) diamond. Through a comparison of surface and bulk sensitive measurements we show that there is a surface related core level component to lower binding energy of the bulk diamond component; this component has a chemical shift of -0.16+/- 0.05 eV which has been attributed to carbon atoms which are part of the hydrogen termination. Additionally, our results indicate that the asymmetry of the hydrogen terminated (1 0 0) diamond C1s core level is an intrinsic aspect of the bulk diamond peak which we have attributed to sub-surface carbon layers.

  9. High resolution kinetic energy by long time-delayed core-sampling photofragment translational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guosheng; Hwang, Hyun Jin; Jung, Hyun Chai

    2005-02-01

    A pulsed core-sampling photofragment translational spectroscopy (PTS) method with a long time-delay, which allows an extremely high kinetic energy resolution, is presented in this article. More commonly applying a short time delay between laser and pulsed acceleration electric field leads to a low kinetic energy resolution for the pulsed core-sampling method. This low kinetic energy resolution problem was overcome by applying a longer time delay. An absolute recoil velocity resolution of {delta}v=8 m/s and a relative kinetic energy resolution of {delta}E/E=3.6% were obtained in this experiment, by applying a time-delay of 8 {mu}s between the laser and the acceleration electric field. The vibrational distributions of the CH{sub 3} radical for the I* and I channel of CH{sub 3}I photodissociation at 266 nm were directly resolved for first time to presented an improvement of the kinetic energy resolution.

  10. High-resolution Surface Analysis by Microarea Auger Spectroscopy: Computerization and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browning, R.

    1986-01-01

    A custom scanning Auger electron microscope (SAM) capable of introducing a 3-5 keV electron beam of several nA into a 30 nm diameter sample area was fitted with a sample introduction system and was fully computerized to be used for materials science research. The method of multispectral Auger imaging was devised and implemented. The instrument was applied to various problems in materials science, including the study of the fiber/matrix interface in a SiC reinforced titanium alloy, the study of SiC whiskers in Al alloy 2124 (in cooperation with NASA-Langley), the study of NiCrAl superalloys (in collaboration with NASA-Lewis), the study of zircalloy specimens (in collaboration with Stanford University), and the microstructure of sintered SiC specimens (in collaboration with NASA-Lewis). The report contains a number of manuscripts submitted for publication on these subjects.

  11. Microcalorimeters for High Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, E.; Flowers, Bobby J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The proposal has three major objectives. The first focuses on advanced neutron-transmutation-doped (NTD)-based microcalorimeter development. Our goal is to develop an array of microcalorimeters with sub- 5 eV energy resolution that can operate with pile-up-free throughput of at least 100 Hz per pixel. The second objective is to establish our microcalorimeter as an essential x-ray diagnostic for laboratory astrophysics studies. We propose to develop a dedicated microcalorimeter spectrometer for the EBIT (electron beam ion trap). This instrument will incorporate the latest detector and cryogenic technology that we have available. The third objective is to investigate innovative ideas related to possible flight opportunities. These include compact, long lived cryo-systems, ultra-low temperature cold stages, low mass and low power electronics, and novel assemblies of thin windows with high x-ray transmission.

  12. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of K-shell Praseodymium with a High-Energy Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, D B; Brown, G V; Clementson, J T; Chen, H; Chen, M H; Beiersdorfer, P; Boyce, K R; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Kelley, R L

    2007-06-05

    We present a measurement of the K-shell spectrum of He-like through Be-like praseodymium ions trapped in the Livermore SuperEBIT electron beam ion trap using a bismuth absorber pixel on the XRS/EBIT microcalorimeter. This measurement is the first of its kind where the n=2 to n=1 transitions of the various charge states are spectroscopically resolved. The measured transition energies are compared with theoretical calculations from several atomic codes.

  13. High-resolution three-dimensional compositional imaging by double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavo, C.; Menichetti, L.; Grifoni, E.; Legnaioli, S.; Lorenzetti, G.; Poggialini, F.; Pagnotta, S.; Palleschi, V.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we present a new instrument specifically realized for high-resolution three-dimensional compositional analysis and mapping of materials. The instrument is based on the coupling of a Double-Pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument with an optical microscope. The compositional mapping of the samples is obtained by scanning the laser beam across the surface of the sample, while the in depth analysis is performed by sending multiple laser pulses on the same point. Depths of analysis of several tens of microns can be obtained. The instrument presented has definite advantages with respect to Laser Ablation-ICP Mass Spectrometry in many applications related to material analysis, biomedicine and environmental diagnostics. An application to the diagnostics of industrial ceramics is presented, demonstrating the feasibility of Double-Pulse LIBS Imaging and its advantages with respect to conventional single-pulse LIBS imaging.

  14. High-Resolution Rotational Spectroscopy Study of the Smallest Sugar Dimer: Interplay of Hydrogen Bonds in the Glycolaldehyde Dimer.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Sabrina; Medcraft, Chris; Betz, Thomas; Schnell, Melanie

    2016-05-10

    Molecular recognition of carbohydrates plays an important role in nature. The aggregation of the smallest sugar, glycolaldehyde, was studied in a conformer-selective manner using high-resolution rotational spectroscopy. Two different dimer structures were observed. The most stable conformer reveals C2 -symmetry by forming two intermolecular hydrogen bonds, giving up the strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds of the monomers and thus showing high hydrogen bond selectivity. By analyzing the spectra of the (13) C and (18) O isotopologues of the dimer in natural abundance, we could precisely determine the heavy backbone structure of the dimer. Comparison to the monomer structure and the complex with water provides insight into intermolecular interactions. Despite hydrogen bonding being the dominant interaction, precise predictions from quantum-chemical calculations highly rely on the consideration of dispersion.

  15. High-resolution synchrotron far infrared spectroscopy of thionyl chloride: Analysis of the ν3 and ν6 fundamental bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Mouret, Gaël; Pirali, Olivier; Cuisset, Arnaud

    2015-09-01

    Thionyl chloride (SOCl2) is a volatile inorganic compounds used extensively in industry. Its monitoring in gas phase is critical both for environmental and defense concerns. Previous high-resolution gas phase spectroscopic studies were focused on the microwave region (below 40 GHz) and no rotationally-resolved study of the IR spectrum has been reported to date. We present in this article a rovibrational analysis of the two lowest frequency infrared active bending modes ν3 and ν6 of SOCl2. By means of synchrotron based Fourier-Transform far-infrared spectroscopy on the AILES beamline of the SOLEIL facility, the spectra of the symmetric ν3 (346 cm-1) and asymmetric ν6 (283 cm-1) fundamental bands have been rotationally resolved and analyzed.

  16. High-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy study of degradation of rubber-to-brass adhesion by thermal aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Kenichi; Kakubo, Takashi; Shimizu, Katsunori; Amino, Naoya; Mase, Kazuhiko; Izumi, Yudai; Muro, Takayuki; Komatsu, Takayuki

    2013-03-01

    High resolution photoelectron spectroscopy is utilized to investigate degradation of rubber-to-brass adhesion by thermal aging. Special attention is given to the role of water in the environment surrounding brass-embedded rubber so that three aging processes are employed; hydrothermal aging, moist-heat aging and dry-heat aging. All aging processes lead to the decrease in the amount of S at the rubber/brass interface. This desulfurization accompanies the decrease in the ratio of CuxS (x ≃ 2) to CuS, i.e., CuxS/CuS, and the increase in the amount of ZnO, Zn(OH)2 and ZnS, all of which are key factors for degradation of adhesion. The changes in the chemical composition are enhanced by water in the surrounding environment during the aging treatments, indicating that the water molecules accelerate degradation of rubber-to-brass adhesion.

  17. Quantitative determination of fatty acid chain composition in pork meat products by high resolution 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, Carlo; Belsito, Emilia; De Marco, Rosaria; Di Gioia, Maria Luisa; Leggio, Antonella; Liguori, Angelo

    2013-01-15

    High resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy was proposed for the determination of the fatty acid chain profile of lipids in pork meat products during ripening. Two typical Mediterranean PDO salami produced in Calabria, a region in the Southern Italy, were chosen as a case of study. Quantitative NMR analysis provided the fatty acid chain profiles of total lipid extracts. The transesterification of total lipid extracts furnished FAME mixtures that enabled quantitation of fatty acid acyl chains in the acylglycerol and FFA portions. In all cases, oleyl chains were predominant, and high amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acid chains were observed. The proposed spectroscopic method allowed also the estimation of the most important nutritional parameters of dry fermented meat products.

  18. High-resolution emission spectroscopy of random lasing in GaN films pumped by UV-pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachoncinlle, C.; Millon, E.; Petit, A.

    2016-06-01

    We report on room temperature photoluminescence on GaN films grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). A NdYAG pulsed-laser at 266 nm illuminates the films. Two components, at 363 nm and 370 nm, are identified in the near band edge structure on the spectra. A laser threshold of 700±150 kW cm-2 is evidenced and corresponds to random lasing in the GaN film. A drastic narrowing of the spectral bandwidth from 5.2 to 1.8 nm is observed at 370 nm. High-resolution spectroscopy measurements show laser mode widths thinner than 50 pm leading to a high quality factor Q=7750. Low-resolution measurements show redshift from 370.0 to 373.1 nm for one component and from 363.1 nm to 363.9 nm for the other. Interpretation of this redshift is discussed.

  19. High-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy with a microwave-multiplexed transition-edge sensor array

    SciTech Connect

    Noroozian, Omid; Mates, John A. B.; Bennett, Douglas A.; Brevik, Justus A.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Gao, Jiansong; Hilton, Gene C.; Horansky, Robert D.; Irwin, Kent D.; Schmidt, Daniel R.; Vale, Leila R.; Ullom, Joel N.; Kang, Zhao

    2013-11-11

    We demonstrate very high resolution photon spectroscopy with a microwave-multiplexed two-pixel transition-edge sensor (TES) array. We measured a {sup 153}Gd photon source and achieved an energy resolution of 63 eV full-width-at-half-maximum at 97 keV and an equivalent readout system noise of 86 pA/√(Hz) at the TES. The readout circuit consists of superconducting microwave resonators coupled to radio-frequency superconducting-quantum-interference-devices and transduces changes in input current to changes in phase of a microwave signal. We use flux-ramp modulation to linearize the response and evade low-frequency noise. This demonstration establishes one path for the readout of cryogenic X-ray and gamma-ray sensor arrays with more than 10{sup 3} elements and spectral resolving powers R=λ/Δλ>10{sup 3}.

  20. High-Resolution Rotational Spectroscopy Study of the Smallest Sugar Dimer: Interplay of Hydrogen Bonds in the Glycolaldehyde Dimer.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Sabrina; Medcraft, Chris; Betz, Thomas; Schnell, Melanie

    2016-05-10

    Molecular recognition of carbohydrates plays an important role in nature. The aggregation of the smallest sugar, glycolaldehyde, was studied in a conformer-selective manner using high-resolution rotational spectroscopy. Two different dimer structures were observed. The most stable conformer reveals C2 -symmetry by forming two intermolecular hydrogen bonds, giving up the strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds of the monomers and thus showing high hydrogen bond selectivity. By analyzing the spectra of the (13) C and (18) O isotopologues of the dimer in natural abundance, we could precisely determine the heavy backbone structure of the dimer. Comparison to the monomer structure and the complex with water provides insight into intermolecular interactions. Despite hydrogen bonding being the dominant interaction, precise predictions from quantum-chemical calculations highly rely on the consideration of dispersion. PMID:27060475

  1. High-Resolution Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of Deuterated CH_2^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiming; Kleshcheva, Maria; Morong, Christopher P.; Oka, Takeshi

    2009-06-01

    Laboratory spectroscopy of deuterated molecular ions is essential in understanding deuterium ion chemistry-a significant area in astrochemistry since the discovery of many extraordinarily abundant deuterated species in prestellar cores and protostars in recent years. Aiming at providing approximate rotational constants for millimeter wave spectroscopists to identify the corresponding species in space, we are measuring the near-infrared spectrum of deuterated CH_2^+. CH_2^+ is the intermediate between the abundant CH^+ and yet to be observed but very important CH_3^+ in interstellar chemistry. Its abundance is expected in diffuse clouds although our search for interstellar CH_2^+ based on our infrared and near-infrared laboratory spectra has not been successful yet. CH_2^+ and its deuterated species are also of special interest for theoretical studies because of their unique intramolecular dynamics, i.e., the Renner-Teller interaction and quasi-linearity. Using He-dominated liquid-N_2 cooled plasmas (˜10 Torr) containing a small amount (˜0.1 Torr) of CD_4, we have measured the spectra of CD_2^+ in the near-infrared from 11,000 cm^{-1} to 12,500 cm^{-1} with our Ti:sapphire laser spectrometer that combines velocity modulation and phase modulation with heterodyne detection for near shot-noise-limited sensitivity. The tilde{A}(0,5,0)^1 ← tilde{X}(0,0,0)^0, tilde{A}(0,5,0)^0 ← tilde{X}(0,0,0)^1 and tilde{A}(0,4,0)^2 ← tilde{X}(0,0,0)^1 bands of CD_2^+ have been identified and analyzed so far Currently a scan for CHD^+ using CH_2D_2 gas is underway. The spectrum will be discussed in comparison with the theoretical predictions by Bunker and colleagues. M. Rösslein, C. M. Gabrys, M.-F. Jagod, and T. Oka, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 153, 738 (1992). J. L. Gottfried and T. Oka, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 11527 (2004). H.-M. Wang, C. P. Morong, and T. Oka, 62nd, 63rd OSU International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, MJ02 (2007) and WG04 (2008). P. R. Bunker, private

  2. High-Resolution Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy used in Homeland Security and Forensic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Madhavi Z; Wullschleger, Stan D; Vass, Arpad Alexander; Martin, Rodger Carl; Grissino-Mayer, Henri

    2006-01-01

    The technique of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to detect elements for a variety of homeland security applications such as nuclear materials identification and inventory,and forensic applications has been demonstrated. For nuclear materials applications, we detected and profiled metals in coatings that were used to encapsulate nuclear fuel. Multivariate analysis has been successfully employed in the quantification of elements present in treated wood and engineered wood composites. These examples demonstrate that LIBS-based techniques are inherently well suited for diverse environmental applications related to homeland security. Three key advantages are evident: (1) small samples (mg) are sufficient; (2) samples can be analyzed by LIBS very rapidly, and (3) biological materials such as human and animal bones and wood can be analyzed with minimal sample preparation. For forensic applications they have used LIBS to determine differences in animal and human bones. They have also applied this technique in the determination of counterfeit and non-counterfeit currency. They recently applied LIBS in helping to solve a murder case.

  3. Toroid cavity detectors for high-resolution NMR spectroscopy and rotating frame imaging: capabilities and limitations.

    PubMed

    Momot, K I; Binesh, N; Kohlmann, O; Johnson, C S

    2000-02-01

    The capabilities of toroid cavity detectors for simultaneous rotating frame imaging and NMR spectroscopy have been investigated by means of experiments and computer simulations. The following problems are described: (a) magnetic field inhomogeneity and subsequent loss of chemical shift resolution resulting from bulk magnetic susceptibility effects, (b) image distortions resulting from off-resonance excitation and saturation effects, and (c) distortion of lineshapes and images resulting from radiation damping. Also, special features of signal analysis including truncation effects and the propagation of noise are discussed. B(0) inhomogeneity resulting from susceptibility mismatch is a serious problem for applications requiring high spectral resolution. Image distortions resulting from off-resonance excitation are not serious within the rather narrow spectral range permitted by the RF pulse lengths required to read out the image. Incomplete relaxation effects are easily recognized and can be avoided. Also, radiation damping produces unexpectedly small effects because of self-cancellation of magnetization and short free induction decay times. The results are encouraging, but with present designs only modest spectral resolution can be achieved. PMID:10648153

  4. High-resolution imaging and spectroscopy of interfacial water at single bond limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ying

    Hydrogen bond is one of the most important weak interactions in nature and plays an essential role in a broad spectrum of physics, chemistry, biology, energy and material sciences. The conventional methods for studying hydrogen-bonding interaction are all based on spectroscopic or diffraction techniques. However, those techniques have poor spatial resolution and only measure the average properties of many hydrogen bonds, which are susceptible to the structural inhomogeneity and local environments, especially when interfacial systems are concerned. The spatial variation and inter-bond coupling of the hydrogen bonds leads to significant spectral broadening, which prohibits the accurate understanding of the experimental data. In this talk, I will present our recent progress on the development of new-generation scanning probe microscopy/spectroscopy (SPM/S) with unprecedentedly high sensitivity and resolution, for addressing weak inter- and intra-molecular interactions, such as hydrogen bonds and van der Waals force. Based on a qPlus sensor, we have succeeded to push the real-space study of a prototypical hydrogen-bonded system, i.e. water, down to single bond limit. Combined with state-of-the-arts quantum simulations, we have discovered exotic nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) in interfacial water and revealed the quantum nature of the hydrogen bond from a completely new perspective

  5. Synchrotron Based High Resolution Far-Ir Spectroscopy of 1,1-DICHLOROETHYLENE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, Rebecca A.; Elmuti, Lena F.; Peebles, Sean A.; Obenchain, Daniel A.

    2013-06-01

    Six vibrational bands of the ^{35}Cl_2C=CH_2 isotopologue of 1,1-dichloroethylene have been recorded in the 350 - 1150 cm^{-1} range using the 0.00096 cm^{-1} resolution far-infrared beamline of the Canadian Light Source synchrotron facility. Results from the analysis of one a-type (ν_9 = 796.01904(8) cm^{-1}, CCl asymmetric stretch) and one c-type (ν_{11} = 868.488626(26) cm^{-1}, CH_2 flap) band will be presented. Over 6000 transitions have now been fitted for these two bands, with ground state rotational and centrifugal distortion constants fixed to values determined by rotational spectroscopy, while the upper state constants have been varied. Anharmonic frequency calculations at the MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) level were instrumental in assigning the dense spectra. Assignment of additional bands around 603 cm^{-1} (b-type, CCl symmetric stretch, ν_4) and 456 cm^{-1} (c-type, CCl_2 flap, ν_{12}), as well as attempts at assigning the mixed ^{35}Cl^{37}Cl isotopologue spectra for ν_9 and ν_{11}, are in progress. Z. Kisiel, L. Pszczółkowski, Z. Naturforsch, {{50a}, (1995), 347-351.

  6. High Resolution Optical Spectroscopy of Rosetta Target 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko Using Keck HIRES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Adam; Cochran, Anita L.; Bodewits, Dennis; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Altwegg, Kathrin; Gulkis, Samuel; Snodgrass, Colin; de Val-Borro, Miguel; Kelley, Michael S.; Feaga, Lori M.; Wooden, Diane H.; Bauer, James M.; Kramer, Emily A.

    2016-10-01

    We present high spectral resolution optical spectroscopy of Rosetta target 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko obtained on UT Dec 26 and 27, 2015 using the HIRES instrument on Keck I when the comet was at a heliocentric distance of approximately 2 AU post-perihelion. The spectra cover a spectral range of 3500-10000 Angstroms at a spectral resolution of 67,000. These observations aim to provide high spectral resolution, large projected field of view context for the high spatial resolution and small projected field of view observations obtained from the Rosetta instrument suite. We report detections of CN, NH2, and [OI] emission. From the [OI]6300 emission we derive a water production rate of approximately 2 x 1027 mol/s. Production rates (or upper limits) for other species will be presented and placed in context with recent results from Rosetta. We will also present results pertaining to the [OI]5577 line, which combined with the [OI]6300 emission can be used as a proxy for CO2. We will compare our results to observations obtained by Rosetta as well as NEOWISE and Spitzer.

  7. Next generation techniques in the high resolution spectroscopy of biologically relevant molecules.

    PubMed

    Neill, Justin L; Douglass, Kevin O; Pate, Brooks H; Pratt, David W

    2011-04-28

    Recent advances in the technology of test and measurement equipment driven by the computer and telecommunications industries have made possible the development of a new broadband, Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer that operates on principles similar to FTNMR. This technique uses a high sample-rate arbitrary waveform generator to construct a phase-locked chirped microwave pulse that gives a linear frequency sweep over a wide frequency range in 1 μs. The chirped pulse efficiently polarizes the molecular sample at all frequencies lying within this band. The subsequent free induction decay of this polarization is measured with a high-speed digitizer and then fast Fourier-transformed to yield a broadband, frequency-resolved rotational spectrum, spanning up to 11.5 GHz and containing lines that are as narrow as 100 kHz. This new technique is called chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectroscopy. The technique offers the potential to determine the structural and dynamical properties of very large molecules solely from fully resolved pure rotational spectra. FTMW double resonance techniques employing a low-resolution UV laser facilitate an easy assignment of overlapping spectra produced by different conformers in the sample. Of particular interest are the energy landscapes of conformationally flexible molecules of biological importance, including studies of their interaction with solvent and/or other weakly bound molecules. An example is provided from the authors' work on p-methoxyphenethylamine, a neurotransmitter, and its complexes with water. PMID:21394332

  8. High resolution applications of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for environmental and forensic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Madhavi Z.; Labbé, Nicole; André, Nicolas; Harris, Ronny; Ebinger, Michael; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Vass, Arpad A.

    2007-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used in the elemental analysis for a variety of environmental samples and as a proof of concept for a host of forensic applications. In the first application, LIBS was used for the rapid detection of carbon from a number of different soil types. In this application, a major breakthrough was achieved by using a multivariate analytical approach that has brought us closer towards a "universal calibration curve". In a second application, it has been demonstrated that LIBS in combination with multivariate analysis can be employed to analyze the chemical composition of annual tree growth rings and correlate them to external parameters such as changes in climate, forest fires, and disturbances involving human activity. The objectives of using this technology in fire scar determinations are: 1) To determine the characteristic spectra of wood exposed to forest fires and 2) To examine the viability of this technique for detecting fire occurrences in stems that did not develop fire scars. These examples demonstrate that LIBS-based techniques are inherently well suited for diverse environmental applications. LIBS was also applied to a variety of proof of concept forensic applications such as the analysis of cremains (human cremation remains) and elemental composition analysis of prosthetic implants.

  9. High Resolution Applications of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Environmental and Forensic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Madhavi Z; Labbe, Nicole; Andre, Nicolas O; Harris, Ronny D; Ebinger, Michael H; Wullschleger, Stan D; Vass, Arpad Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used in the elemental analysis for a variety of environmental samples and as a proof of concept for a host of forensic applications. In the first application, LIBS was used for the rapid detection of carbon from a number of different soil types. In this application, a major breakthrough was achieved by using a multivariate analytical approach that has brought us closer towards a "universal calibration curve". In a second application, it has been demonstrated that LIBS in combination with multivariate analysis can be employed to analyze the chemical composition of annual tree growth rings and correlate them to external parameters such as changes in climate, forest fires, and disturbances involving human activity. The objectives of using this technology in fire scar determinations are: 1) To determine the characteristic spectra of wood exposed to forest fires and 2) To examine the viability of this technique for detecting fire occurrences in stems that did not develop fire scars. These examples demonstrate that LIBS-based techniques are inherently well suited for diverse environmental applications. LIBS was also applied to a variety of proof of concept forensic applications such as the analysis of cremains (human cremation remains) and elemental composition analysis of prosthetic implants.

  10. New Atomic Data for Doubly Ionized Iron Group Atoms by High Resolution UV Fourier Transform Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Peter L.; Pickering, Juliet C.; Thorne, A. P.

    2002-01-01

    Currently available laboratory spectroscopic data of doubly ionized iron-group element were obtained about 50 years ago using spectrographs of modest dispersion, photographic plates, and eye estimates of intensities. The accuracy of the older wavelength data is about 10 mAngstroms at best, whereas wavelengths are now needed to an accuracy of 1 part in 10(exp 6) to 10(exp 7) (0.2 to 2 mAngstroms at 2000 Angstroms). The Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopy group at Imperial College, London, and collaborators at the Harvard College Observatory have used a unique VUV FT spectrometer in a program focussed on improving knowledge of spectra of many neutral and singly and doubly ionized, astrophysically important, iron group elements. Spectra of Fe II and Fe III have been recorded at UV and VUV wavelengths with signal-to-noise ratios of several hundred for the stronger lines. Wavelengths and energy levels for Fe III are an order of magnitude more accurate than previous work; analysis is close to completion. f-values for Fe II have been published.

  11. High Resolution Photoacoustic Spectroscopy of the Oxygen A-Band to Support the OCO Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cich, M. J.; Lunny, E. M.; Bui, T. Q.; Drouin, B. J.; Okumura, M.; Stroscio, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory missions require spectroscopic parameterization of the Oxygen A-Band absorption (757-775 nm) with unprecedented detail to meet the objective of delivering space-based column CO2 measurements with an accuracy of better than 1 ppm. This requires spectroscopic parameters with accuracies at the 0.1% level. To achieve this it is necessary for line shape models to include deviations from the Voigt line shape, including the collisional effects of Dicke narrowing, speed-dependence, line mixing (LM), and collision-induced absorption (CIA). To measure these effects to high accuracy, new innovative lab measurements are required. LM and CIA in particular are difficult to measure using standard spectroscopic techniques because, while present at atmospheric temperatures, these effects are difficult to quantify. At pressures of several atmospheres these effects contribute several percent to the A-Band absorption. While the O2 A-band is too weak for direct absorption measurements via a diode laser, a very sensitive photoacoustic spectroscopy technique is being used to study the pressure- dependence of the spectral line shape up to pressures of 5 atm. This spectrometer has a high S/N of about 10,000 and an advantageous zero baseline. In addition, temperature effects on the line shape are studied using a newly developed temperature control scheme. The latest results are reported.

  12. High-resolution mass-selective UV spectroscopy of pseudoephedrine: evidence for conformer-specific fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Karaminkov, R; Chervenkov, S; Delchev, V; Neusser, H J

    2011-09-01

    Using resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization spectroscopy with mass resolution of jet-cooled molecules, a low-resolution S(1) ← S(0) vibronic spectrum of pseudoephedrine was recorded at the mass channels of three distinct fragments with m/z = 58, 71, and 85. Two of the fragments, with m/z = 71 and 85, are observed for the first time for this molecule. The vibronic spectra recorded at different mass channels feature different patterns, implying that they originate from different conformers in the cold molecular beam, following conformer-specific fragmentation pathways. Highly resolved spectra of all prominent vibronic features were measured, and from their analysis based on genetic algorithms, the molecular parameters of the conformers giving rise to the respective bands have been determined. Comparing the experimental results with those obtained from high-level ab initio quantum chemistry calculations, the observed prominent vibronic bands have been assigned to originate from four distinct conformers. The conformers are separated into two groups that have different fragmentation pathways determined by the different intramolecular interactions.

  13. Coupling parameters of many-body interactions for the Al(100) surface state: A high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J.; Shimada, K.; Hayashi, H.; Iwasawa, H.; Aiura, Y.; Namatame, H.; Taniguchi, M.

    2011-10-01

    We examined the dimensionless coupling parameters of many-body interactions for a free-electron-like surface-derived state in Al(100) by means of high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. A kink structure was found to exist in the energy-band dispersion near the Fermi level (EF), which was attributed to the electron-phonon interaction. At 50 K, the coupling parameters of the electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions were estimated as λep=0.67±0.05 and λee˜0.003, respectively, indicating that the effective mass enhancement was mainly derived from the electron-phonon interaction. The temperature dependence of the kink structure, as measured by λep(T), was consistent with a theoretical calculation based on the Eliashberg function. A quasiparticle peak with a width of 15-20 meV was found near EF, which was explained well by the simulated spectral function incorporating the self-energy evaluated in this study. We found that the electrons at the surface were strongly scattered by the defects at the surface and that the linewidth was significantly broadened (Γ0=0.238±0.006 eV).

  14. X-ray High-resolution Spectroscopy for Laser-produced Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbato, F.; Scarpellini, D.; Malizia, A.; Gaudio, P.; Richetta, M.; Antonelli, L.

    The study of the emission spectrum gives information about the material generating the spectrum itself and the condition in which this is generated. The wavelength spectra lines are linked to the specific element and plasma conditions (electron temperature, density), while their shape is influenced by several physical effects like Stark and Doppler ones. In this work we study the X-ray emission spectra of a copper laser-produced plasma by using a spherical bent crystal spectrometer to measure the electron temperature. The facility used is the laser TVLPS, at the Tor Vergata University in Rome. It consists of a Nd:Glass source (in first harmonic - 1064 nm) whose pulse parameters are: 8 J in energy, time duration of 15 ns and a focal spot diameter of 200 μm. The adopted spectrometer is based on a spherical bent crystal of muscovite. The device combines the focusing property of a spherical mirror with the Bragg's law. This allows to obtain a great power resolution but a limited range of analysis. In our case the resolution is on average 80 eV. As it is well-known, the position of the detector on the Rowland's circle is linked to the specific spectral range which has been studied. To select the area to be investigated, we acquired spectra by means of a flat spectrometer. The selected area is centered on 8.88 Å. To calibrate the spectrum we wrote a ray-tracing MATLAB code, which calculates the detector alignment parameters and calibration curve. We used the method of line ratio to measure the electron temperature. This is possible because we assumed the plasma to be in LTE condition. The temperature value was obtained comparing the experimental one, given by the line ratio, with the theoretical one, preceded by FLYCHK simulations.

  15. MULTI-EPOCH OBSERVATIONS OF HD 69830: HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY AND LIMITS TO VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Beichman, C. A.; Tanner, A. M.; Bryden, G.; Akeson, R. L.; Ciardi, D. R.; Lisse, C. M.; Boden, A. F.; Dodson-Robinson, S. E.; Salyk, C.; Wyatt, M. C.

    2011-12-10

    The main-sequence solar-type star HD 69830 has an unusually large amount of dusty debris orbiting close to three planets found via the radial velocity technique. In order to explore the dynamical interaction between the dust and planets, we have performed multi-epoch photometry and spectroscopy of the system over several orbits of the outer dust. We find no evidence for changes in either the dust amount or its composition, with upper limits of 5%-7% (1{sigma} per spectral element) on the variability of the dust spectrum over 1 year, 3.3% (1{sigma}) on the broadband disk emission over 4 years, and 33% (1{sigma}) on the broadband disk emission over 24 years. Detailed modeling of the spectrum of the emitting dust indicates that the dust is located outside of the orbits of the three planets and has a composition similar to main-belt, C-type asteroids in our solar system. Additionally, we find no evidence for a wide variety of gas species associated with the dust. Our new higher signal-to-noise spectra do not confirm our previously claimed detection of H{sub 2}O ice leading to a firm conclusion that the debris can be associated with the break-up of one or more C-type asteroids formed in the dry, inner regions of the protoplanetary disk of the HD 69830 system. The modeling of the spectral energy distribution and high spatial resolution observations in the mid-infrared are consistent with a {approx}1 AU location for the emitting material.

  16. Spectroscopy and high-resolution imaging of the gravitational lens SDSS J1206+4332

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnello, Adriano; Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Suyu, Sherry H.; Treu, Tommaso; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Mason, Charlotte; Bradač, Maruša; Auger, Matthew W.

    2016-06-01

    We present spectroscopy and laser guide star adaptive optics (LGSAO) images of the doubly imaged lensed quasar SDSS J1206+4332. We revise the deflector redshift proposed previously to zd = 0.745, and measure for the first time its velocity dispersion σ = (290 ± 30) km s-1. The LGSAO data show the lensed quasar host galaxy stretching over the astroid caustic thus forming an extra pair of merging images, which was previously thought to be an unrelated galaxy in seeing limited data. Owing to the peculiar geometry, the lens acts as a natural coronagraph on the broad-line region of the quasar so that only narrow C III]emission is found in the fold arc. We use the data to reconstruct the source structure and deflector potential, including nearby perturbers. We reconstruct the point-spread function (PSF) from the quasar images themselves, since no additional point source is present in the field of view. From gravitational lensing and stellar dynamics, we find the slope of the total mass density profile to be γ' = -log ρ/log r = 1.93 ± 0.09. We discuss the potential of SDSS J1206+4332 for measuring a time-delay distance (and thus H0 and other cosmological parameters), or as a standard ruler, in combination with the time-delay published by the COSMOGRAIL collaboration. We conclude that this system is very promising for cosmography. However, in order to achieve competitive precision and accuracy, an independent characterization of the PSF is needed. Spatially resolved kinematics of the deflector would reduce the uncertainties further. Both are within the reach of current observational facilities.

  17. High-resolution infrared spectroscopy of atomic bromine in solid parahydrogen and orthodeuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raston, Paul L.; Kettwich, Sharon C.; Anderson, David T.

    2013-10-01

    This work extends our earlier investigation of the near-infrared absorption spectroscopy of atomic bromine (Br) trapped in solid parahydrogen (pH2) and orthodeuterium (oD2) [S. C. Kettwich, L. O. Paulson, P. L. Raston, and D. T. Anderson, J. Phys. Chem. A 112, 11153 (2008)]. We report new spectroscopic observations on a series of double transitions involving excitation of the weak Br-atom spin-orbit (SO) transition (2P1/2 ← 2P3/2) in concert with phonon, rotational, vibrational, and rovibrational excitation of the solid molecular hydrogen host. Further, we utilize the rapid vapor deposition technique to produce pH2 crystals with a non-equilibrium mixture of face centered cubic (fcc) and hexagonal closed packed (hcp) crystal domains in the freshly deposited solid. Gentle annealing (T = 4.3 K) of the pH2 sample irreversibly converts the higher energy fcc crystal domains to the slightly more stable hcp structure. We follow the extent of this conversion process using the intensity of the U1(0) transition of solid pH2 and correlate crystal structure changes with changes in the integrated intensity of Br-atom absorption features. Annealing the pH2 solid causes the integrated intensity of the zero-phonon Br SO transition to increase approximately 45% to a value that is 8 times larger than the gas phase value. We show that the magnitude of the increase is strongly correlated to the fraction of hcp crystal domains within the solid. Theoretical calculations presented in Paper II show that these intensity differences are caused by the different symmetries of single substitution sites for these two crystal structures. For fully annealed Br-atom doped pH2 solids, where the crystal structure is nearly pure hcp, the Br-atom SO transition sharpens considerably and shows evidence for resolved hyperfine structure.

  18. A sensitive detection method for high resolution spectroscopy of trapped antihydrogen, hydrogen and other trapped species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz Cesar, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    A method for detection of the weak 1s-2s laser excitation of a few trapped antihydrogen atoms is described. It involves the typical antihydrogen trapping environment that combines a magnetic trap for the atoms as well as a Penning trap for its constituent particles. By photoionization of the excited state the photoion can be kept in a weak Penning trap and at a suitable time be ejected towards a charged particle detector such as a microchannel plate or a channel electron multiplier. Since it does not rely on annihilation, the method is also suitable for trapped hydrogen and may find application with other species when a weak transition to a metastable state is intended and only a few trapped atoms or molecules are available.

  19. High-Resolution Infrared Imaging and Spectroscopy of the Pistol Nebula: Evidence for Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figer, Donald F.; Morris, Mark; Geballe, T. R.; Rich, R. Michael; Serabyn, Eugene; McLean, Ian S.; Puetter, R. C.; Yahil, Amos

    1999-11-01

    We present new infrared images, obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Near-Infrared Camera and Multiobject Spectrometer (NICMOS), and Brα (4.05 μm) spectroscopy, obtained using CGS4 on UKIRT, of the Pistol Star and its associated nebula. We find strong evidence to support the hypothesis that the Pistol Nebula was ejected from the Pistol Star. The Paα (1.87 μm) NICMOS image shows that the nebula completely surrounds the Pistol Star, although the line intensity is much stronger on its northern and western edges. The Brα CGS4 spectra show the classical ringlike signature of quasi-spherical expansion. The blueshifted emission (Vmax~-60 km s-1) is much weaker than the redshifted emission (Vmax~+10 km s-1), where the velocities are with respect to the velocity of the Pistol Star; further, the redshifted emission spans a very narrow range of velocities, i.e., it appears ``flattened'' in the position-velocity diagram. These data suggest that the nebula was ejected from the star several thousand years ago, with a velocity between the current terminal velocity of the stellar wind (95 km s-1) and the present expansion velocity of gas in the outer shell of the nebula (60 km s-1). The Paα image reveals several emission-line stars in the region, including two newly identified emission-line stars north of the Pistol Star, both of which are likely to be the hottest known stars in the Galactic center with spectral types earlier than WC8 and Teff>50,000 K). The presence of these stars, the morphology of the Paα emission, and the velocity field in the gas suggest that the side of the nebula farthest from us is approaching, and being ionized by, the hot stars of the Quintuplet and that the highest velocity redshifted gas has been decelerated by winds from the Quintuplet stars. We also discuss the possibility that the nebular gas might be magnetically confined by the ambient magnetic field delineated by the nearby nonthermal filaments. Based on observations with the

  20. Development of the front end electronics for the ZEUS high resolution calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Sippach, W.; Caldwell, A.; Cunitz, H.; Kotz, U.; Moeschen, J.

    1989-02-01

    The development and design of the pipelined data acquisition system for the high resolution ZEUS calorimeter is described. Details of the front end analog card and its performance are given. A description of the custom pipeline and buffer multiplexer chips is given, along with test results for the pipeline chip. In addition, some results are presented for a CCD test system built to evaluate the pipeline principles using the ZEUS calorimeter prototype at the CERN PS.

  1. High-resolution imaging gamma-ray spectroscopy with externally segmented germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callas, J. L.; Mahoney, W. A.; Varnell, L. S.; Wheaton, W. A.

    1993-01-01

    Externally segmented germanium detectors promise a breakthrough in gamma-ray imaging capabilities while retaining the superb energy resolution of germanium spectrometers. An angular resolution of 0.2 deg becomes practical by combining position-sensitive germanium detectors having a segment thickness of a few millimeters with a one-dimensional coded aperture located about a meter from the detectors. Correspondingly higher angular resolutions are possible with larger separations between the detectors and the coded aperture. Two-dimensional images can be obtained by rotating the instrument. Although the basic concept is similar to optical or X-ray coded-aperture imaging techniques, several complicating effects arise because of the penetrating nature of gamma rays. The complications include partial transmission through the coded aperture elements, Compton scattering in the germanium detectors, and high background count rates. Extensive electron-photon Monte Carlo modeling of a realistic detector/coded-aperture/collimator system has been performed. Results show that these complicating effects can be characterized and accounted for with no significant loss in instrument sensitivity.

  2. Ultrasensitive high resolution laser spectroscopy and its application to optical frequency standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jun

    1997-09-01

    Advanced laser stabilization techniques now enable one to lock laser frequencies onto line centers of natural atomic/molecular resonances with unprecedented precision and accuracy. In this dissertation we discuss our effort in utilizing these techniques to establish visible optical frequency standards. By summarizing our earlier results on frequency measurements of the 87Rb D2 line at 780 nm 127I2 hyperfine transitions at 532 nm, we show the advantage of using a higher quality reference line, usually characterized by its narrower linewidth, higher attainable signal-to-noise ratio and lower sensitivity toward external perturbations. We then present a novel approach of cavity-enhanced frequency modulation spectroscopy for ultra-sensitive detections. The powerful utility of this new technique in the field of frequency standards is demonstrated by probing saturated molecular overtone transitions in the visible and near infrared. Weakly-absorbing gases such as C2H2 and C2HD are placed inside an external high-finesse resonator to enhance their detection sensitivities. A frequency modulation technique is employed to achieve a shot noise limited signal-to- noise ratio. The rf modulation frequency is chosen to match the cavity's free spectral range in order to avoid the cavity-induced conversion of laser frequency noise into amplitude noise. The molecular saturated dispersion signal is directly recovered after demodulation of the cavity transmitted light. A record high integrated absorption sensitivity of 5× 10-13/ (1× 10-14/cm) (at 1 second averaging time) has been obtained. Systematic studies on this new technique are presented on topics of detection sensitivity, signal line shape, signal size and slope, and pressure dependent linewidth broadening and linecenter shift. A Nd:YAG laser is stabilized on the P(5) transition in the (ν2+3/ ν3) overtone band of C2HD at 1.064 μm. Its absolute frequency is established. The excellent signal- to-noise ratio produces a frequency

  3. High-Resolution Laser Spectroscopy of the S1 ← S0 Transition of Cl-NAPHTHALENES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, Shunji; Yamamoto, Ryo

    2015-06-01

    High-resolution fluorescence excitation spectra of the S1 ← S0 electronic transition have been observed for 1-Cl naphthalene (1-ClN) and 2-Cl naphthalene (2-ClN). Sub-Doppler excitation spectra were measured by crossing a single-mode UV laser beam perpendicular to a collimated molecular beam. The absolute wavenumber was calibrated with accuracy 0.0002 cm-1 by measurement of the Doppler-free saturation spectrum of iodine molecule and fringe pattern of the stabilized etalon. For 2-ClN, the rotationally resolved high-resolution spectra were obtained for the 0^0_0 and 0^0_0+1042 cm-1 bands, and these molecular constants were determined in high accuracy. The obtained molecular constants of the 0^0_0 band are good agreement with the ones reported by Plusquellic et. al. For the 0^0_0+1042 cm-1 band, the local energy shifts were found. On the other hand, for 1-ClN, the rotational lines were not fully resolved because the fluorescence lifetime is shorter than the one of 2-ClN. Then we determined the molecular constants of 1-ClN from the comparison the observed spectrum with calculated one. D. F. Plusquellic, S. R. Davis, and F. Jahanmir, J. Chem. Phys., 115, 225 (2001).

  4. High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Post-T Tauri Star PZ Telescopii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argiroffi, C.; Drake, J. J.; Maggio, A.; Peres, G.; Sciortino, S.; Harnden, F. R.

    2004-07-01

    We present an analysis of the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer observation of the rapidly rotating (Prot=0.94days) post-T Tauri (~20 Myr old) star PZ Telescopii, in the Tucana association. Using two different methods, we have derived the coronal emission measure distribution EM(T) and chemical abundances. The EM(T) peaks at logT=6.9 and exhibits a significant emission measure at temperatures logT>7. The coronal abundances are generally ~0.5 times the solar photospheric values, which are presumed fairly representative of the composition of the underlying star. A minimum in abundance is seen at a first ionization potential (FIP) of 7-8 eV, with evidence for higher abundances at both lower and higher FIP, similar to patterns seen in other active stars. From an analysis of the He-like triplet of Mg XI, we have estimated electron densities of ~1012-1013 cm-3. All the coronal properties found for PZ Tel are much more similar to those of AB Dor, which is slightly older than PZ Tel, than to those of the younger T Tauri star TW Hya. These results support earlier conclusions that the soft X-ray emission of TW Hya is likely dominated by accretion activity rather than by a magnetically heated corona. Our results also suggest that the coronae of pre-main-sequence stars rapidly become similar to those of older active main-sequence stars soon after the accretion stage has ended.

  5. High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy with the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, F. Scott; Adams, Joseph S.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Gregory V.; Clementson, Joel; Frankel, Miriam; Kahn, Steven M.

    2009-12-16

    The EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS) is a production-class 36 pixel x-ray calorimeter spectrometer that has been continuously operating at the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for almost 2 years. The ECS was designed to be a long-lifetime, turn-key spectrometer that couples high performance with ease of operation and minimal operator intervention. To this end, a variant of the Suzaku/XRS spaceflight detector system has been coupled to a low-maintenance cryogenic system consisting of a long-lifetime liquid He cryostat, and a closed cycle, {sup 3}He pre-cooled adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. The ECS operates for almost 3 weeks between cryogenic servicing and the ADR operates at 0.05 K for more than 60 hours between automatic recycles under software control. Half of the ECS semiconductor detector array is populated with mid-band pixels that have a resolution of 4.5 eV FWHM, a bandpass from 0.05-12 keV, and a quantum efficiency of 95% at 6 keV. The other half of the array has thick HgTe absorbers that have a bandpass from 0.3 to over 100 keV, an energy resolution of 33 eV FWHM, and a quantum efficiency of 32% at 60 keV. In addition, the ECS uses a real-time, autonomous, data collection and analysis system developed for the Suzaku/XRS instrument and implemented in off-the-shelf hardware for the ECS. Here we will discuss the performance of the ECS instrument and its implementation as a turnkey cryogenic detector system.

  6. High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy with the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, F S; Adams, J S; Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Clementson, J; Frankel, M; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A

    2009-10-01

    The EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS) is a production-class 36 pixel x-ray calorimeter spectrometer that has been continuously operating at the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for almost 2 years. The ECS was designed to be a long-lifetime, turn-key spectrometer that couples high performance with ease of operation and minimal operator intervention. To this end, a variant of the Suzaku/XRS spaceflight detector system has been coupled to a low-maintenance cryogenic system consisting of a long-lifetime liquid He cryostat, and a closed cycle, {sup 3}He pre-cooled adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. The ECS operates for almost 3 weeks between cryogenic servicing and the ADR operates at 0.05 K for more than 60 hours between automatic recycles under software control. Half of the ECS semiconductor detector array is populated with mid-band pixels that have a resolution of 4.5 eV FWHM, a bandpass from 0.05-12 keV, and a quantum efficiency of 95% at 6 keV. The other half of the array has thick HgTe absorbers that have a bandpass from 0.3 to over 100 keV, an energy resolution of 33 eV FWHM, and a quantum efficiency of 32% at 60 keV. In addition, the ECS uses a real-time, autonomous, data collection and analysis system developed for the Suzaku/XRS instrument and implemented in off-the-shelf hardware for the ECS. Here we will discuss the performance of the ECS instrument and its implementation as a turnkey cryogenic detector system.

  7. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoaceticum metabolic profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G.; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrey V.; Sears, Jesse A.; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R.; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Majors, Paul D.

    2014-06-20

    An in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch-growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution, high sensitivity NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In-situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at an NMR frequency of 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600 MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in-situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process in real time, enabling identification of intermediate and end-point metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with the HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts.

  8. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoacetica metabolic profiles.

    PubMed

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrei V; Sears, Jesse A; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R; Ahring, Birgitte K; Majors, Paul D

    2014-10-01

    An in situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600-MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol, and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process, enabling identification of intermediate and endpoint metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts.

  9. High-resolution optical spectroscopy of V838 Monocerotis in 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tylenda, R.; Kamiński, T.; Schmidt, M.; Kurtev, R.; Tomov, T.

    2011-08-01

    Observatory under programme ID 382.D-0152(C).The spectrum is available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/532/A138

  10. Application of high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy: Vibrational resolved C 1s and O 1s spectra of CO adsorbed on Ni(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Foehlisch, A.; Nilsson, A.; Martensson, N.

    1997-04-01

    There are various effects which determine the line shape of a core-level electron spectrum. These are due to the finite life-time of the core hole, inelastic scattering of the outgoing photoelectron, electronic shake-up and shake-off processes and vibrational excitations. For free atoms and molecules the different contributions to the observed line shapes can often be well separated. For solids, surfaces and adsorbates the line shapes are in general much broader and it has in the past been assumed that no separation of the various contributions can be made. In the present report the authors will show that this is indeed not the case. Surprisingly, the vibrational fine structure of CO adsorbed on Ni(100) can be resolved in the C 1s and O 1s electron spectra. This was achieved by the combination of highly monochromatized soft X-rays from B18.0 with a high resolution Scienta 200 mm photoelectron spectrometer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with tunable excitation energy yields as a core level spectroscopy atomic and site-specific information. The presented measurements allow for a determination of internuclear distances and potential energy curves in corehole ionized adsorbed molecules. The authors analysis of the c(2x2) phase CO/Ni(100) on {open_quotes}top{close_quotes} yielded a vibrational splitting of 217 +/- 2 meV for C 1s ionization. For O 1s ionization a splitting of 173 +/- 8 meV was found.

  11. Electron nanodiffraction and high-resolution electron microscopy studies of the structure and composition of physiological and pathological ferritin.

    PubMed

    Quintana, C; Cowley, J M; Marhic, C

    2004-08-01

    Structures of core nanocrystals of physiological (horse spleen, human liver, and brain) and pathological human brain of patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) ferritin molecules were determined using electron nanodiffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The poly-phasic structure of the ferritin cores is confirmed. There are significant differences in the mineral composition between the physiological and pathological ferritins. The physiological ferritin cores mainly consist of single nanocrystals containing hexagonal ferrihydrite (Fh) and hematite (Hm) and some cubic magnetite/maghemite phase. In the pathological cores, Fh is present but only as a minor phase and Hm is absent. The major phases are a face-centered-cubic (fcc) structure with a = 0.43 nm and a high degree of disorder, related to wustite, and a cubic magnetite-like structure. These two cubic phases are also present in human aged normal brain. Evidence for the presence of hemosiderin together with ferritin in the pathological brains is deduced from the similarities of the diffraction patterns with those from patients with primary hemochromatosis, and differences in the shapes and protein composition of the protein shell. These findings suggest a disfunction of the ferritin associated with PSP and AD, associated with an increase in the concentration of brain ferrous toxic iron.

  12. Extended-range grazing-incidence spectrometer for high-resolution extreme ultraviolet measurements on an electron beam ion trap.

    PubMed

    Beiersdorfer, P; Magee, E W; Brown, G V; Hell, N; Träbert, E; Widmann, K

    2014-11-01

    A high-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for performing very high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Å to above 300 Å. The instrument operates without an entrance slit and focuses the light emitted by highly charged ions located in the roughly 50 μm wide electron beam onto a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The measured line widths are below 0.025 Å above 100 Å, and the resolving power appears to be limited by the source size and Doppler broadening of the trapped ions. Comparisons with spectra obtained with existing grating spectrometers show an order of magnitude improvement in spectral resolution.

  13. Extended-range grazing-incidence spectrometer for high-resolution extreme ultraviolet measurements on an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V.; Träbert, E.; Widmann, K.; Hell, N.

    2014-11-15

    A high-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for performing very high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Å to above 300 Å. The instrument operates without an entrance slit and focuses the light emitted by highly charged ions located in the roughly 50 μm wide electron beam onto a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The measured line widths are below 0.025 Å above 100 Å, and the resolving power appears to be limited by the source size and Doppler broadening of the trapped ions. Comparisons with spectra obtained with existing grating spectrometers show an order of magnitude improvement in spectral resolution.

  14. The SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline. III. Comparison with High-Resolution Spectroscopy of SDSS/SEGUE Field Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Allende Prieto, C.; Sivarani, T.; Beers, T.C.; Lee, Y.S.; Koesterke, L.; Shetrone, M.; Sneden, C.; Lambert, D.L.; Wilhelm, R.; Rockosi, C.M.; Lai, D.

    2007-10-01

    The authors report high-resolution spectroscopy of 125 field stars previously observed as part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and its program for Galactic studies, the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE). These spectra are used to measure radial velocities and to derive atmospheric parameters, which they compare with those reported by the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline (SSPP). The SSPP obtains estimates of these quantities based on SDSS ugriz photometry and low-resolution (R {approx} 2000) spectroscopy. For F- and G-type stars observed with high signal-to-noise ratios (S/N), they empirically determine the typical random uncertainties in the radial velocities, effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities delivered by the SSPP to be 2.4 km s{sup -1}, 130 K (2.2%), 0.21 dex, and 0.11 dex, respectively, with systematic uncertainties of a similar magnitude in the effective temperatures and metallicities. They estimate random errors for lower S/N spectra based on numerical simulations.

  15. Structural model of homogeneous As–S glasses derived from Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Golovchak, R.; Shpotyuk, O.; Mccloy, J. S.; Riley, B. J.; Windisch, C. F.; Sundaram, S. K.; Kovalskiy, A.; Jain, H.

    2010-11-28

    The structure of homogeneous bulk As x S100- x (25 ≤ x ≤ 42) glasses, prepared by the conventional rocking–melting–quenching method, was investigated using high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that the main building blocks of their glass networks are regular AsS3/2 pyramids and sulfur chains. In the S-rich domain, the existence of quasi-tetrahedral (QT) S = As(S1/2)3 units is deduced from XPS data, but with a concentration not exceeding ~3–5% of total atomic sites. Therefore, QT units do not appear as primary building blocks of the glass backbone in these materials, and an optimally-constrained network may not be an appropriate description for glasses when x < 40. Finally, it is shown that, in contrast to Se-based glasses, the ‘chain-crossing’ model is only partially applicable to sulfide glasses.

  16. Coronal Evolution of the Sun in Time: High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of Solar Analogs with Different Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telleschi, Alessandra; Güdel, Manuel; Briggs, Kevin; Audard, Marc; Ness, Jan-Uwe; Skinner, Stephen L.

    2005-03-01

    We investigate the long-term evolution of X-ray coronae of solar analogs based on high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy and photometry with XMM-Newton. Six nearby main-sequence G stars with ages between ~0.1 and ~1.6 Gyr and rotation periods between ~1 and 12.4 days have been observed. We use the X-ray spectra to derive coronal element abundances of C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Fe and the coronal emission measure distribution (EMD). We find that the abundances change from an inverse first ionization potential (FIP) distribution in stars with ages around 0.1 Gyr to a solar-type FIP distribution in stars at ages of 0.3 Gyr and beyond. This transformation is coincident with a steep decline of nonthermal radio emission. The results are in qualitative agreement with a simple model in which the stream of electrons in magnetic fields suppresses diffusion of low-FIP ions from the chromosphere into the corona. The coronal emission measure distributions show shapes characterized by power laws on each side of the EMD peak. The latter shifts from temperatures of about 10 MK in the most rapidly rotating, young stars to temperatures around 4 MK in the oldest target considered here. The power-law index on the cooler side of the EMD exceeds expected slopes for static loops, with typical values being 1.5-3. We interpret this slope with a model in which the coronal emission is due to a superposition of stochastically occurring flares, with an occurrence rate that is distributed in radiated energy E as a power law, dN/dE~E-α, as previously found for solar and stellar flares. We obtain the relevant power-law index α from the slope of the high-temperature tail of the EMD. Our EMDs indicate α~2.2-2.8, in excellent agreement with values previously derived from light curves of magnetically active stars. Modulation with timescales reminiscent of flares is found in the light curves of all our targets. Several strong flares are also observed. We use our α-values to simulate light curves and

  17. Virtually distortion-free imaging system for large field, high resolution lithography using electrons, ions or other particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Hawryluk, Andrew M.; Ceglio, Natale M.

    1993-01-01

    Virtually distortion free large field high resolution imaging is performed using an imaging system which contains large field distortion or field curvature. A reticle is imaged in one direction through the optical system to form an encoded mask. The encoded mask is then imaged back through the imaging system onto a wafer positioned at the reticle position. Particle beams, including electrons, ions and neutral particles, may be used as well as electromagnetic radiation.

  18. Virtually distortion-free imaging system for large field, high resolution lithography using electrons, ions or other particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Hawryluk, A.M.; Ceglio, N.M.

    1993-01-12

    Virtually distortion free large field high resolution imaging is performed using an imaging system which contains large field distortion or field curvature. A reticle is imaged in one direction through the optical system to form an encoded mask. The encoded mask is then imaged back through the imaging system onto a wafer positioned at the reticle position. Particle beams, including electrons, ions and neutral particles, may be used as well as electromagnetic radiation.

  19. Virtually distortion-free imaging system for large field, high resolution lithography using electrons, ions or other particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, A.M.; Ceglio, N.M.

    1991-04-10

    Virtually distortion free large field high resolution imaging is performed using an imaging system which contains large field distortion or field curvature. A reticle is imaged in one direction through the optical system to form an encoded mask. The encoded mask is then imaged back through the imaging system onto a wafer positioned at the reticle position. Particle beams, including electrons, ions and neutral particles, may be used as well as electromagnetic radiation.

  20. New frontiers of high-resolution spectroscopy: Probing the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and reflected light from exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkby, Jayne; Alonso, Roi; Brogi, Matteo; Charbonneau, David; Fortney, Jonathan; Hoyer, Sergio; Johnson, John Asher; de Kok, Remco; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Montet, Ben; Snellen, Ignas

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy (R>25,000) is a robust and powerful tool in the near-infrared characterization of exoplanet atmospheres. It has unambiguously revealed the presence of carbon monoxide and water in several hot Jupiters, measured the rotation rate of beta Pic b, and suggested the presence of fast day-to-night winds in one atmosphere. The method is applicable to transiting, non-transiting, and directly-imaged planets. It works by resolving broad molecular bands in the planetary spectrum into a dense, unique forest of individual lines and tracing them directly by their Doppler shift, while the star and tellurics remain essentially stationary. I will focus on two ongoing efforts to expand this technique. First, I will present new results on 51 Peg b revealing its infrared atmospheric compositional properties, then I will discuss an ongoing optical HARPS-N/TNG campaign (due mid October 2015) to obtain a detailed albedo spectrum of 51 Peg b at 387-691 nm in bins of 50nm. This spectrum would provide strong constraints on the previously claimed high albedo and potentially cloudy nature of this planet. Second, I will discuss preliminary results from Keck/NIRSPAO observations (due late September 2015) of LHS 6343 C, a 1000 K transiting brown dwarf with an M-dwarf host star. The high-resolution method converts this system into an eclipsing, double-lined spectroscopic binary, thus allowing dynamical mass and radius estimates of the components, free from astrophysical assumptions. Alongside probing the atmospheric composition of the brown dwarf, these data would provide the first model-independent study of the bulk properties of an old brown dwarf, with masses accurate to <5%, placing a crucial constraint on brown dwarf evolution models.

  1. GLOBULAR CLUSTER ABUNDANCES FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION, INTEGRATED-LIGHT SPECTROSCOPY. III. THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD: Fe AND AGES

    SciTech Connect

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; McWilliam, Andrew E-mail: rab@ucolick.org E-mail: andy@ociw.edu

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we refine our method for the abundance analysis of high-resolution spectroscopy of the integrated light of unresolved globular clusters (GCs). This method was previously demonstrated for the analysis of old (>10 Gyr) Milky Way (MW) GCs. Here, we extend the technique to young clusters using a training set of nine GCs in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Depending on the signal-to-noise ratio of the data, we use 20-100 Fe lines per cluster to successfully constrain the ages of old clusters to within a {approx}5 Gyr range, the ages of {approx}2 Gyr clusters to a 1-2 Gyr range, and the ages of the youngest clusters (0.05-1 Gyr) to a {approx}200 Myr range. We also demonstrate that we can measure [Fe/H] in clusters with any age less than 12 Gyr with similar or only slightly larger uncertainties (0.1-0.25 dex) than those obtained for old MW GCs (0.1 dex); the slightly larger uncertainties are due to the rapid evolution in stellar populations at these ages. In this paper, we present only Fe abundances and ages. In the next paper in this series, we present our complete analysis of {approx}20 elements for which we are able to measure abundances. For several of the clusters in this sample, there are no high-resolution abundances in the literature from individual member stars; our results are the first detailed chemical abundances available. The spectra used in this paper were obtained at Las Campanas with the echelle on the du Pont Telescope and with the MIKE spectrograph on the Magellan Clay Telescope.

  2. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Metal-rich Giants in ω Centauri: First Indication of Type Ia Supernova Enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancino, E.; Pasquini, L.; Hill, V.; Ferraro, F. R.; Bellazzini, M.

    2002-04-01

    We have obtained high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra for six red giants in ω Centauri: three belong to the recently discovered metal-rich red giant branch (RGB-a as defined by Pancino et al.) and three to the metal-intermediate population (RGB-MInt). Accurate iron, copper, and α-element (Ca and Si) abundances have been derived and discussed. In particular, we have obtained the first direct abundance determination based on high-resolution spectroscopy for the RGB-a population, <[Fe/H]>=-0.60+/-0.15. Although this value is lower than previous estimates based on calcium triplet measurements, we confirm that this population is the most metal-rich in ω Cen. In addition, we have found a significant difference in the α-element enhancement of the two populations. The three RGB-MInt stars have the expected overabundance, typical of halo and globular cluster stars: <[α/Fe]>=0.29+/-0.01. The three RGB-a stars show, instead, a significantly lower α-enhancement: <[α/Fe]>=0.10+/-0.04. We have also detected an increasing trend of [Cu/Fe] with metallicity, similar to the one observed for field stars by Sneden et al. The observational facts presented in this Letter, if confirmed by larger samples of giants, are the first indication that supernovae Type Ia ejecta have contaminated the medium from which the metal-rich RGB-a stars have formed. The implications for current scenarios on the formation and evolution of ω Cen are briefly discussed. Based on Ultraviolet-Visual Echelle Spectrograph observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile, within the observing program 165.L-0263. Also based on Wide-Field Imager observations collected at La Silla, Chile, within the observing programs 62.L-0354 and 64.L-0439.

  3. HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF EXTREMELY METAL-POOR STARS FROM SDSS/SEGUE. I. ATMOSPHERIC PARAMETERS AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Wako; Suda, Takuma; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun; Honda, Satoshi; Ito, Hiroko; Takada-Hidai, Masahide; Frebel, Anna; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.; Carollo, Daniela; Sivarani, Thirupathi E-mail: takuma.suda@nao.ac.jp E-mail: lee@pa.msu.edu E-mail: hidai@apus.rh.u-tokai.ac.jp E-mail: fujimoto@astro1.sci.hokudai.ac.jp E-mail: sivarani@iiap.res.in

    2013-01-01

    Chemical compositions are determined based on high-resolution spectroscopy for 137 candidate extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and its first stellar extension, the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE). High-resolution spectra with moderate signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios were obtained with the High Dispersion Spectrograph of the Subaru Telescope. Most of the sample (approximately 80%) are main-sequence turnoff stars, including dwarfs and subgiants. Four cool main-sequence stars, the most metal-deficient such stars known, are included in the remaining sample. Good agreement is found between effective temperatures estimated by the SEGUE stellar parameter pipeline, based on the SDSS/SEGUE medium-resolution spectra, and those estimated from the broadband (V - K){sub 0} and (g - r){sub 0} colors. Our abundance measurements reveal that 70 stars in our sample have [Fe/H] < -3, adding a significant number of EMP stars to the currently known sample. Our analyses determine the abundances of eight elements (C, Na, Mg, Ca, Ti, Cr, Sr, and Ba) in addition to Fe. The fraction of carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars ([C/Fe] > +0.7) among the 25 giants in our sample is as high as 36%, while only a lower limit on the fraction (9%) is estimated for turnoff stars. This paper is the first of a series of papers based on these observational results. The following papers in this series will discuss the higher-resolution and higher-S/N observations of a subset of this sample, the metallicity distribution function, binarity, and correlations between the chemical composition and kinematics of extremely metal-poor stars.

  4. Globular Cluster Abundances from High-resolution, Integrated-light Spectroscopy. III. The Large Magellanic Cloud: Fe and Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; Cameron, Scott A.; McWilliam, Andrew

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we refine our method for the abundance analysis of high-resolution spectroscopy of the integrated light of unresolved globular clusters (GCs). This method was previously demonstrated for the analysis of old (>10 Gyr) Milky Way (MW) GCs. Here, we extend the technique to young clusters using a training set of nine GCs in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Depending on the signal-to-noise ratio of the data, we use 20-100 Fe lines per cluster to successfully constrain the ages of old clusters to within a ~5 Gyr range, the ages of ~2 Gyr clusters to a 1-2 Gyr range, and the ages of the youngest clusters (0.05-1 Gyr) to a ~200 Myr range. We also demonstrate that we can measure [Fe/H] in clusters with any age less than 12 Gyr with similar or only slightly larger uncertainties (0.1-0.25 dex) than those obtained for old MW GCs (0.1 dex) the slightly larger uncertainties are due to the rapid evolution in stellar populations at these ages. In this paper, we present only Fe abundances and ages. In the next paper in this series, we present our complete analysis of ~20 elements for which we are able to measure abundances. For several of the clusters in this sample, there are no high-resolution abundances in the literature from individual member stars; our results are the first detailed chemical abundances available. The spectra used in this paper were obtained at Las Campanas with the echelle on the du Pont Telescope and with the MIKE spectrograph on the Magellan Clay Telescope. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  5. Properties of the Open Cluster Tombaugh 1 from High-resolution Spectroscopy and uvbyCaHβ Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sales Silva, João V.; Carraro, Giovanni; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J.; Moni Bidin, Christian; Costa, Edgardo; Twarog, Bruce A.

    2016-01-01

    Open clusters can be the key to deepening our knowledge on various issues involving the structure and evolution of the Galactic disk and details of stellar evolution because a cluster’s properties are applicable to all its members. However, the number of open clusters with detailed analysis from high-resolution spectroscopy or precision photometry imposes severe limitations on studies of these objects. To expand the number of open clusters with well-defined chemical abundances and fundamental parameters, we investigate the poorly studied, anticenter open cluster Tombaugh 1. Using precision uvbyCaHβ photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy, we derive the cluster’s reddening, obtain photometric metallicity estimates, and, for the first time, present a detailed abundance analysis of 10 potential cluster stars (nine clump stars and one Cepheid). Using the radial position from the cluster center and multiple color indices, we have isolated a sample of unevolved, probable single-star members of Tombaugh 1. From 51 stars, the cluster reddening is found to be E(b-y) = 0.221 ± 0.006 or E(B-V) = 0.303 ± 0.008, where the errors refer to the internal standard errors of the mean. The weighted photometric metallicity from m1 and hk is [Fe/H] = ‑0.10 ± 0.02, while a match to the Victoria-Regina Strömgren isochrones leads to an age of 0.95 ± 0.10 Gyr and an apparent modulus of (m-M) = 13.10 ± 0.10. Radial velocities identify six giants as probable cluster members, and the elemental abundances of Fe, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Ni, Y, Ba, Ce, and Nd have been derived for both the cluster and the field stars. Tombaugh 1 appears to be a typical inner thin disk, intermediate-age open cluster of slightly subsolar metallicity, located just beyond the solar circle, with solar elemental abundance ratios except for the heavy s-process elements, which are a factor of two above solar. Its metallicity is consistent with a steep metallicity gradient in the galactocentric region

  6. High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy to probe quantum dynamics in collisions of Ar17+,18+ ions with atoms and solids, towards clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamour, E.; Prigent, C.; Ramillon, J.-M.; Rozet, J.-P.; Steydli, S.; Trassinelli, M.; Vernhet, D.

    2015-07-01

    We report on studies of projectile excited states produced by electron capture in both low and high velocity regimes, and when highly charged ions (HCIs) collide either with dilute or dense matter. Quantum effects in the interaction dynamics are probed via high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy for Ar17+ at 7 keV u-1 and for Ar18+ at 13.6 MeV u-1 on Ar, N2 or CH4 gas targets and on carbon solid foils. Relevant comparison between those two collision velocity regimes, and between gaseous and solid targets reveal specific features. In particular, the effect of multiple capture process occurring within a single-collision with gaseous target can be compared with the consequence of multistep collisions arising at surfaces and in solid-bulk at low velocity. At high velocity, beside evidence for collective response of the target electrons due to the wake field induced by HCI passing through the solid-bulk, we demonstrate that excitation and ionization collision processes damp the populations of projectile excited states for long ion transit times. The evolution of the np population as a function of n in solid is at variance from the 1/n3 law found in gas, and the disagreement increases with solid target thickness. We have also tackled studies of HCIs in collision with clusters showing that x-ray spectroscopy provides a powerful tool to sign the presence of clusters in a supersonic gas jet.

  7. Sample preparation of biological macromolecular assemblies for the determination of high-resolution structures by cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Stark, Holger; Chari, Ashwin

    2016-02-01

    Single particle cryo-EM has recently developed into a powerful tool to determine the 3D structure of macromolecular complexes at near-atomic resolution, which allows structural biologists to build atomic models of proteins. All technical aspects of cryo-EM technology have been considerably improved over the last two decades, including electron microscopic hardware, image processing software and the ever growing speed of computers. This leads to a more widespread use of the technique, and it can be anticipated that further automation of electron microscopes and image processing tools will soon fully shift the focus away from the technological aspects, onto biological questions that can be answered. In single particle cryo-EM, no crystals of a macromolecule are required. In contrast to X-ray crystallography, this significantly facilitates structure determination by cryo-EM. Nevertheless, a relatively high level of biochemical control is still essential to obtain high-resolution structures by cryo-EM, and it can be anticipated that the success of the cryo-EM technology goes hand in hand with further developments of sample purification and preparation techniques. This will allow routine high-resolution structure determination of the many macromolecular complexes of the cell that until now represent evasive targets for X-ray crystallographers. Here we discuss the various biochemical tools that are currently available and the existing sample purification and preparation techniques for cryo-EM grid preparation that are needed to obtain high-resolution images for structure determination. PMID:26671943

  8. Sample preparation of biological macromolecular assemblies for the determination of high-resolution structures by cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Stark, Holger; Chari, Ashwin

    2016-02-01

    Single particle cryo-EM has recently developed into a powerful tool to determine the 3D structure of macromolecular complexes at near-atomic resolution, which allows structural biologists to build atomic models of proteins. All technical aspects of cryo-EM technology have been considerably improved over the last two decades, including electron microscopic hardware, image processing software and the ever growing speed of computers. This leads to a more widespread use of the technique, and it can be anticipated that further automation of electron microscopes and image processing tools will soon fully shift the focus away from the technological aspects, onto biological questions that can be answered. In single particle cryo-EM, no crystals of a macromolecule are required. In contrast to X-ray crystallography, this significantly facilitates structure determination by cryo-EM. Nevertheless, a relatively high level of biochemical control is still essential to obtain high-resolution structures by cryo-EM, and it can be anticipated that the success of the cryo-EM technology goes hand in hand with further developments of sample purification and preparation techniques. This will allow routine high-resolution structure determination of the many macromolecular complexes of the cell that until now represent evasive targets for X-ray crystallographers. Here we discuss the various biochemical tools that are currently available and the existing sample purification and preparation techniques for cryo-EM grid preparation that are needed to obtain high-resolution images for structure determination.

  9. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy of transformed magnesia-partially-stabilized zirconia precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Wauchope, C.J.; Kelly, P.M.

    1995-10-01

    Transformed Mg-PSZ precipitates consist of monoclinic bands that are twin-related across either (100){sub m} or (001){sub m} planes in an arrangement that leads to accommodation of the shear component of the transformation shape strain. High-resolution images of these variants reveal these twin relationships quite clearly. It is shown that complete compensation of shear does not always occur. This paper also shows observations of monoclinic variants related by a rotation of 90{degree} around the normal to (001){sub m}, in addition to those related by a 180{degree} rotation for the twin-related variants. These findings conform to the predictions of martensite theory and their implications are discussed in terms of shear compensation and reduction in overall strain energy.

  10. High resolution infrared spectroscopy from space: A preliminary report on the results of the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiment on Spacelab 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Crofton B.; Raper, Odell F.

    1987-01-01

    The ATMOS (Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy) experiment has the broad purpose of investigating the physical structure, chemistry, and dynamics of the upper atmosphere through the study of the distributions of the neutral minor and trace constituents and their seasonal and long-term variations. The technique used is high-resolution infrared absorption spectroscopy using the Sun as the radiation source, observing the changes in the transmission of the atmosphere as the line-of-sight from the Sun to the spacecraft penetrates the atmosphere close to the Earth's limb at sunrise and sunset. During these periods, interferograms are generated at the rate of one each second which yield, when transformed, high resolution spectra covering the 2.2 to 16 micron region of the infrared. Twenty such occultations were recorded during the Spacelab 3 flight, which have produced concentration profiles for a large number of minor and trace upper atmospheric species in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Several of these species have not previously been observed in spectroscopic data. The data reduction and analysis procedures used following the flight are discussed; a number of examples of the spectra obtained are shown, and a bar graph of the species detected thus far in the analysis is given which shows the altitude ranges for which concentration profiles were retrieved.

  11. Vibrational spectral signatures of crystalline cellulose using high resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Libing; Lu, Zhou; Velarde, Luis; Fu, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Arthur; Wang, Hong-Fei; Yang, Bin

    2015-03-03

    Both the C–H and O–H region spectra of crystalline cellulose were studied using the sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) for the first time. The resolution of HR-BB-SFG-VS is about 10-times better than conventional scanning SFG-VS and has the capability of measuring the intrinsic spectral lineshape and revealing many more spectral details. With HR-BB-SFG-VS, we found that in cellulose samples from different sources, including Avicel and cellulose crystals isolated from algae Valonia (Iα) and tunicates (Iβ), the spectral signatures in the O–H region were unique for the two allomorphs, i.e. Iα and Iβ, while the spectral signatures in the C–H regions varied in all samples examined. Even though the origin of the different spectral signatures of the crystalline cellulose in the O–H and C–H vibrational frequency regions are yet to be correlated to the structure of cellulose, these results lead to new spectroscopic methods and opportunities to classify and to understand the basic crystalline structures, as well as variations in polymorphism of the crystalline cellulose.

  12. Vibrational spectral signatures of crystalline cellulose using high resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Libing; Lu, Zhou; Velarde, Luis; Fu, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Arthur; Wang, Hong-Fei; Yang, Bin

    2015-03-03

    Both the C–H and O–H region spectra of crystalline cellulose were studied using the sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) for the first time. The resolution of HR-BB-SFG-VS is about 10-times better than conventional scanning SFG-VS and has the capability of measuring the intrinsic spectral lineshape and revealing many more spectral details. With HR-BB-SFG-VS, we found that in cellulose samples from different sources, including Avicel and cellulose crystals isolated from algae Valonia (Iα) and tunicates (Iβ), the spectral signatures in the O–H region were unique for the two allomorphs, i.e. Iα and Iβ, while the spectral signaturesmore » in the C–H regions varied in all samples examined. Even though the origin of the different spectral signatures of the crystalline cellulose in the O–H and C–H vibrational frequency regions are yet to be correlated to the structure of cellulose, these results lead to new spectroscopic methods and opportunities to classify and to understand the basic crystalline structures, as well as variations in polymorphism of the crystalline cellulose.« less

  13. High-resolution broadband spectroscopy using externally dispersed interferometry at the Hale telescope: Part 1, data analysis and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erskine, David J.; Edelstein, Jerry; Wishnow, Edward H.; Sirk, Martin; Muirhead, Philip S.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Lloyd, James P.; Ishikawa, Yuzo; McDonald, Eliza A.; Shourt, William V.; Vanderburg, Andrew M.

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution broadband spectroscopy at near-infrared wavelengths (950 to 2450 nm) has been performed using externally dispersed interferometry (EDI) at the Hale telescope at Mt. Palomar. Observations of stars were performed with the "TEDI" interferometer mounted within the central hole of the 200-in. primary mirror in series with the comounted TripleSpec near-infrared echelle spectrograph. These are the first multidelay EDI demonstrations on starlight, as earlier measurements used a single delay or laboratory sources. We demonstrate very high (10×) resolution boost, from original 2700 to 27,000 with current set of delays (up to 3 cm), well beyond the classical limits enforced by the slit width and detector pixel Nyquist limit. Significantly, the EDI used with multiple delays rather than a single delay as used previously yields an order of magnitude or more improvement in the stability against native spectrograph point spread function (PSF) drifts along the dispersion direction. We observe a dramatic (20×) reduction in sensitivity to PSF shift using our standard processing. A recently realized method of further reducing the PSF shift sensitivity to zero is described theoretically and demonstrated in a simple simulation which produces a 350× times reduction. We demonstrate superb rejection of fixed pattern noise due to bad detector pixels-EDI only responds to changes in pixel intensity synchronous to applied dithering. This part 1 describes data analysis, results, and instrument noise. A section on theoretical photon limited sensitivity is in a companion paper, part 2.

  14. High-resolution line-shape spectroscopy during a laser pulse based on Dual-Broad-Band-CARS interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vereschagin, Konstantin A; Vereschagin, Alexey K; Smirnov, Valery V; Stelmakh, O M; Fabelinskii, V I; Clauss, W; Klimenko, D N; Oschwald, M E-mail: Al_Vereshchagin@mail.r E-mail: stelmakh@kapella.gpi.r

    2006-07-31

    A high-resolution spectroscopic method is developed for recording Raman spectra of molecular transitions in transient objects during a laser pulse with a resolution of {approx}0.1 cm{sup -1}. The method is based on CARS spectroscopy using a Fabry-Perot interferometer for spectral analysis of the CARS signal and detecting a circular interferometric pattern on a two-dimensional multichannel photodetector. It is shown that the use of the Dual-Broad-Band-CARS configuration to obtain the CARS process provides the efficient averaging of the spectral-amplitude noise of the CARS signal generated by a laser pulse and, in combination with the angular integration of the two-dimensional interference pattern, considerably improves the quality of interferograms. The method was tested upon diagnostics of the transient oxygen-hydrogen flame where information on the shapes of spectral lines of the Q-branch of hydrogen molecules required for measuring temperature was simultaneously obtained and used. (special issue devoted to the 90th anniversary of a.m. prokhorov)

  15. Baseline restoration and pile-up correction based on bipolar cusp-like shaping for high-resolution radiation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafaee, Mahdi; Moussavi-Zarandi, Ali

    2016-04-01

    The baseline may shift in many radiation measurement systems. The shift is time variant and depends on the events. Also, with high count rates, pulses may overlap in random time intervals. These phenomena can affect the peak values of the pulses. Piled-up events are traditionally rejected, but this reduces the detection efficiency considerably. In other approaches, the corrupted events are reconstructed, and information about the single pulses is extracted. The peaks carry much of the basic information, so many shaping methods have been proposed so far. For pile-up mitigation, a narrow unipolar shaping is enough, but a baseline shift is eliminated by using bipolar shaping. However, the latter decreases the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which is critical for high-resolution spectroscopy. In this paper, we propose bipolar cusp-like shaping as a tradeoff between mitigating the baseline shift and pulse pile-up. A novel recursive algorithm, implementable on digital pulse processors (DPPs), is introduced and is then evaluated. Finally, the superior noise-reduction capability is studied by using Monte Carlo simulations, a real piled-up pulse stream shaped by using the algorithm, and the results show its advantages.

  16. Vibrational Spectral Signatures of Crystalline Cellulose Using High Resolution Broadband Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Libing; Lu, Zhou; Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Fu, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Art J.; Wang, Hongfei; Yang, Bin

    2015-03-03

    Here we reported the first sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) study on both the C-H and O-H region spectra of crystalline cellulose. HR-BB-SFG-VS has about 10 times better resolution than the conventional scanning SFG-VS and is known to be able to measure the intrinsic spectral lineshape and to resolve much more spectral details. With HR-BB-SFG-VS, we found that in cellulose from different sources, including Avicel and cellulose crystals isolated from algae Valonia (Iα) and tunicates (Iβ), the spectral signatures in the OH regions were unique for different allomorphs, i.e. Iα and Iβ, while the spectral signatures in the C-H regions varied in all samples examined. Even though the origin of the different behaviors of the crystalline cellulose in the O-H and C-H vibrational frequency regions is yet to be correlated to the structure of cellulose, these results provided new spectroscopic methods and opportunities to classify and understand the basic crystalline structure, as well as variations, in polymorphism of the crystalline cellulose structure.

  17. Biochemical correlates of thiazolidinedione-induced adipocyte differentiation by high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Hong; Enloe, Brian M; Weybright, Patrick; Campbell, Natalee; Dorfman, David; Fletcher, Christopher D; Cory, D G; Singer, Samuel

    2002-10-01

    Thiazolidinediones, a class of synthetic ligands to the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, induce terminal adipocyte differentiation of 3T3 F442A cells, and have already been used as alternative therapeutic agents for the treatment of liposarcoma in clinical trials. The biochemical changes occurring in the 3T3 F442A cell line and well-differentiated liposarcoma following induction of adipocyte differentiation with the thiazolidinedione troglitazone were measured using high-resolution magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. 3T3 F442A cell differentiation was characterized by a large accumulation of intracellular triglyceride and withdrawal from the cell cycle. Phosphatidylcholine (PTC), phosphocholine (PC), myo-inositol, and glycerol were found to be possible biochemical markers for adipocyte differentiation induced by thiazolidenediones. The molar ratio of PTC to PC increased fourfold in differentiated 3T3 F442A cells compared to undifferentiated cells, suggesting a substantial increase in CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase activity with differentiation. A 2.8-fold increase in the PTC:PC ratio was observed in the lipoma-like well-differentiated liposarcoma of three patients who were treated with troglitazone when compared to liposarcoma from patients not treated with this drug. Thus, this ratio may be an NMR-detectable marker of troglitazone efficacy and response to differentiation therapy for liposarcoma.

  18. Ground-state binding energy of H4Λ from high-resolution decay-pion spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, F.; Achenbach, P.; Aulenbacher, S.; Beričič, J.; Bleser, S.; Böhm, R.; Bosnar, D.; Correa, L.; Distler, M. O.; Esser, A.; Fonvieille, H.; Friščić, I.; Fujii, Y.; Fujita, M.; Gogami, T.; Kanda, H.; Kaneta, M.; Kegel, S.; Kohl, Y.; Kusaka, W.; Margaryan, A.; Merkel, H.; Mihovilovič, M.; Müller, U.; Nagao, S.; Nakamura, S. N.; Pochodzalla, J.; Sanchez Lorente, A.; Schlimme, B. S.; Schoth, M.; Sfienti, C.; Širca, S.; Steinen, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Tang, L.; Thiel, M.; Tsukada, K.; Tyukin, A.; Weber, A.

    2016-10-01

    A systematic study on the Λ ground state binding energy of hyperhydrogen H4Λ measured at the Mainz Microtron MAMI is presented. The energy was deduced from the spectroscopy of mono-energetic pions from the two-body decays of hyperfragments, which were produced and stopped in a 9Be target. First data, taken in the year 2012 with a high resolution magnetic spectrometer, demonstrated an almost one order of magnitude higher precision than emulsion data, while being limited by systematic uncertainties. In 2014 an extended measurement campaign was performed with improved control over systematic effects, increasing the yield of hypernuclei and confirming the observation with two independent spectrometers and two targets of different thicknesses. The analysis of these data is in agreement with the previously published value for the H4Λ binding energy as well as with a consistent re-analysis of the 2012 data. When compared to the He4Λ binding energy from emulsion data, a large charge symmetry breaking effect in the A = 4 hypernuclear system is confirmed.

  19. Evaluation of Cancer Metabolomics Using ex vivo High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HRMAS) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS).

    PubMed

    Fuss, Taylor L; Cheng, Leo L

    2016-03-22

    According to World Health Organization (WHO) estimates, cancer is responsible for more deaths than all coronary heart disease or stroke worldwide, serving as a major public health threat around the world. High resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has demonstrated its usefulness in the identification of cancer metabolic markers with the potential to improve diagnosis and prognosis for the oncology clinic, due partially to its ability to preserve tissue architecture for subsequent histological and molecular pathology analysis. Capable of the quantification of individual metabolites, ratios of metabolites, and entire metabolomic profiles, HRMAS MRS is one of the major techniques now used in cancer metabolomic research. This article reviews and discusses literature reports of HRMAS MRS studies of cancer metabolomics published between 2010 and 2015 according to anatomical origins, including brain, breast, prostate, lung, gastrointestinal, and neuroendocrine cancers. These studies focused on improving diagnosis and understanding patient prognostication, monitoring treatment effects, as well as correlating with the use of in vivo MRS in cancer clinics.

  20. Evaluation of Cancer Metabolomics Using ex vivo High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HRMAS) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS)

    PubMed Central

    Fuss, Taylor L.; Cheng, Leo L.

    2016-01-01

    According to World Health Organization (WHO) estimates, cancer is responsible for more deaths than all coronary heart disease or stroke worldwide, serving as a major public health threat around the world. High resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has demonstrated its usefulness in the identification of cancer metabolic markers with the potential to improve diagnosis and prognosis for the oncology clinic, due partially to its ability to preserve tissue architecture for subsequent histological and molecular pathology analysis. Capable of the quantification of individual metabolites, ratios of metabolites, and entire metabolomic profiles, HRMAS MRS is one of the major techniques now used in cancer metabolomic research. This article reviews and discusses literature reports of HRMAS MRS studies of cancer metabolomics published between 2010 and 2015 according to anatomical origins, including brain, breast, prostate, lung, gastrointestinal, and neuroendocrine cancers. These studies focused on improving diagnosis and understanding patient prognostication, monitoring treatment effects, as well as correlating with the use of in vivo MRS in cancer clinics. PMID:27011205

  1. High resolution spectroscopy and the first global analysis of the Tetradecad region of methane 12CH4.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, A V; Boudon, V; Wenger, Ch; Albert, S; Brown, L R; Bauerecker, S; Quack, M

    2013-07-01

    We present the first detailed analysis of the infrared spectrum of methane (12)CH4 in the so-called Tetradecad region from 2.1 to 1.6 μm (4760-6250 cm(-1)). New experimental high resolution FTIR spectra at 78 K and at room temperature combined with improved theoretical modeling have allowed quantum assignments to be greatly extended in this region. A global fit of all assigned lines of (12)CH4 in the 0-6200 cm(-1) region has been performed. In the end, 3012 line positions and 1387 intensities of 45 individual subbands of the Tetradecad were modeled up to J = 14. The root mean square deviations were 0.023 cm(-1) for line positions and 13.86% for line intensities in the Tetradecad region itself. Although this analysis is still preliminary, it is already sufficient to characterize the stronger bands throughout the whole of the Tetradecad. The calculated integrated intensity of the polyad is 1.399 × 10(-19) cm(-1)/(molecule cm(-2)) at 296 K. A "definitive" theoretical modeling of this spectral region of methane requires further work, but the present success substantially improves our understanding of methane spectroscopy as needed to interpret planetary atmospheres. Lines pertaining to three-fourths of the 60 sub-vibrational bands in this polyad have been assigned. PMID:23714852

  2. HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF EXTREMELY METAL-POOR STARS IN THE LEAST EVOLVED GALAXIES: LEO IV

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Joshua D.; McWilliam, Andrew; Thompson, Ian B.; Frebel, Anna; Kirby, Evan N. E-mail: andy@ociw.ed E-mail: afrebel@cfa.harvard.ed

    2010-06-10

    We present high-resolution Magellan/MIKE spectroscopy of the brightest star in the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Leo IV. We measure an iron abundance of [Fe/H] = -3.2, adding to the rapidly growing sample of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars being identified in Milky Way satellite galaxies. The star is enhanced in the {alpha} elements Mg, Ca, and Ti by {approx}0.3 dex, very similar to the typical Milky Way halo abundance pattern. All of the light and iron-peak elements follow the trends established by EMP halo stars, but the neutron-capture elements Ba and Sr are significantly underabundant. These results are quite similar to those found for stars in the ultra-faint dwarfs Ursa Major II, Coma Berenices, Booetes I, and Hercules, suggesting that the chemical evolution of the lowest-luminosity galaxies may be universal. The abundance pattern we observe is consistent with predictions for nucleosynthesis from a Population III supernova explosion. The extremely low metallicity of this star also supports the idea that a significant fraction ({approx}>10%) of the stars in the faintest dwarfs have metallicities below [Fe/H] = -3.0.

  3. AEGIS: An Astrophysics Experiment for Grating and Imaging Spectroscopy---a Soft X-ray, High-resolution Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huenemoerder, David; Bautz, M. W.; Davis, J. E.; Heilmann, R. K.; Houck, J. C.; Marshall, H. L.; Neilsen, J.; Nicastro, F.; Nowak, M. A.; Schattenburg, M. L.; Schulz, N. S.; Smith, R. K.; Wolk, S.; AEGIS Team

    2012-01-01

    AEGIS is a concept for a high-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopic observatory developed in response to NASA's request for definitions of the next X-ray astronomy mission. At a small fraction of the cost of the once-planned International X-ray Observatory (IXO), AEGIS has capabilities that surpass IXO grating spectrometer requirements, and which are far superior to those of existing soft X-ray spectrometers. AEGIS incorporates innovative technology in X-ray optics, diffraction gratings and detectors. The mirror uses high area-to-mass ratio segmented glass architecture developed for IXO, but with smaller aperture and larger graze angles optimized for high-throughput grating spectroscopy with low mass and cost. The unique Critical Angle Transmission gratings combine low mass and relaxed figure and alignment tolerances of Chandra transmission gratings but with high diffraction efficiency and resolving power of blazed reflection gratings. With more than an order of magnitude better performance over Chandra and XMM grating spectrometers, AEGIS can obtain high quality spectra of bright AGN in a few hours rather than 10 days. Such high resolving power allows detailed kinematic studies of galactic outflows, hot gas in galactic haloes, and stellar accretion flows. Absorption line spectroscopy will be used to study large scale structure, cosmic feedback, and growth of black holes in thousands of sources to great distances. AEGIS will enable powerful multi-wavelength investigations, for example with Hubble/COS in the UV to characterize the intergalactic medium. AEGIS will be the first observatory with sufficient resolution below 1 keV to resolve thermally-broadened lines in hot ( 10 MK) plasmas. Here we describe key science investigations enable by Aegis, its scientific payload and mission plan. Acknowledgements: Support was provided in part by: NASA SAO contract SV3-73016 to MIT for the Chandra X-ray Center and Science Instruments; NASA grant NNX08AI62G; and the MKI

  4. Probing the excited state properties of the highly phosphorescent Pt(dpyb)Cl compound by high-resolution optical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Andreas F; Murphy, Lisa; Williams, J A Gareth; Yersin, Hartmut

    2009-12-01

    Detailed photophysical studies of the emitting triplet state of the highly phosphorescent compound Pt(dpyb)Cl based on high-resolution optical spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures are presented {dpyb = N--C(2)--N-coordinated 1,3-di(pyridylbenzene)}. The results reveal a total zero-field splitting of the emitting triplet state T(1) of 10 cm(-1) and relatively short individual decay times for the two higher lying T(1) substates II and III, while the decay time of the lowest substate I is distinctly longer. Further evidence for the assignment of the T(1) substates is gained by emission measurements under high magnetic fields. Distinct differences are observed in the vibrational satellite structures of the emissions from the substates I and II, which are dominated by Herzberg-Teller and Franck-Condon activity, respectively. At T = 1.2 K, the individual spectra of these two substates can be separated by time-resolved spectroscopy. For the most prominent Franck-Condon active modes, Huang-Rhys parameters of S approximately 0.1 can be determined, which are characteristic of very small geometry rearrangements between the singlet ground state and the triplet state T(1). The similar geometries are ascribed to the high rigidity of the Pt(N--C--N) system which, unlike complexes incorporating bidentate phenylpyridine-type ligands and exhibiting similar metal-to-ligand charge transfer admixtures, cannot readily distort from planarity. The results provide new insight into strategies for optimizing the performance of platinum-based emitters for applications such as organic light-emitting diode (OLED) technology and imaging.

  5. R-matrix calculations of triplet gerade states of molecular hydrogen and their use for high-resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oueslati, H.; Argoubi, F.; Bezzaouia, S.; Telmini, M.; Jungen, Ch.

    2014-03-01

    A variational R-matrix approach combined with multichannel quantum defect theory is used for a computational study of triplet gerade states of H2. Electron-ion reaction (quantum defect) matrices are calculated as functions of internuclear distance and energy for the bound and continuum ranges including singly and doubly excited configurations built on the 1σg (X+2Σg+) and 1σu (A+2Σu+) core states of the H2+ ion. It is shown how these matrices can be reduced to effective quantum defect functions adapted to the analysis of high-resolution spectra in the bound range. These R-matrix effective quantum defects are finally adjusted to the available experimental data [Sprecher et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 117, 9462 (2013), 10.1021/jp311793t], producing agreement with experiment to within 0.5 cm-1, nearly as good as obtained by Sprecher et al. In addition, the R-matrix calculations predict the evolution of the quantum defects for higher energies, in a range extending far into the electronic continuum.

  6. HIGH-RESOLUTION OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY OF DY Cen: DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS IN A PROTO-FULLERENE CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVIRONMENT?

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Lambert, David L. E-mail: nkrao@iiap.res.in

    2012-11-01

    We search high-resolution and high-quality VLT/UVES optical spectra of the hot R Coronae Borealis star DY Cen for electronic transitions of the C{sub 60} molecule and diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). We report the non-detection of the strongest C{sub 60} electronic transitions (e.g., those at {approx}3760, 3980, and 4024 A). The absence of C{sub 60} absorption bands may support recent laboratory results, which show that the {approx}7.0, 8.5, 17.4, and 18.8 {mu}m emission features seen in DY Cen-and other similar objects with polycyclic-aromatic-hydrocarbon-like dominated IR spectra-are attributable to proto-fullerenes or fullerene precursors rather than to C{sub 60}. DIBs toward DY Cen are normal for its reddening; the only exception is the DIB at 6284 A (possibly also the 7223 A DIB) which is found to be unusually strong. We also report the detection of a new broad (FWHM {approx} 2 A) and unidentified feature centered at {approx}4000 A. We suggest that this new band may be related to the circumstellar proto-fullerenes seen at infrared wavelengths.

  7. Electron spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.

    1992-01-01

    The Surface Science Laboratories at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) are equipped with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS or ESCA) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) facilities. These techniques provide information from the uppermost atomic layers of a sample, and are thus truly surface sensitive. XPS provides both elemental and chemical state information without restriction on the type of material that can be analyzed. The sample is placed into an ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber and irradiated with x-rays which cause the ejection of photoelectrons from the sample surface. Since x-rays do not normally cause charging problems or beam damage, XPS is applicable to a wide range of samples including metals, polymers, catalysts, and fibers. AES uses a beam of high energy electrons as a surface probe. Following electronic rearrangements within excited atoms by this probe, Auger electrons characteristic of each element present are emitted from the sample. The main advantage of electron induced AES is that the electron beam can be focused down to a small diameter and localized analysis can be carried out. On the rastering of this beam synchronously with a video display using established scanning electron microscopy techniques, physical images and chemical distribution maps of the surface can be produced. Thus very small features, such as electronic circuit elements or corrosion pits in metals, can be investigated. Facilities are available on both XPS and AES instruments for depth-profiling of materials, using a beam of argon ions to sputter away consecutive layers of material to reveal sub-surface (and even semi-bulk) analyses.

  8. Imaging interactions of metal oxide nanoparticles with macrophage cells by ultra-high resolution scanning electron microscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Starr, Clarise R; Armstrong, Linda S; Ponce, Arturo; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2012-11-01

    Use of engineered metal oxide nanoparticles in a plethora of biological applications and custom products has warned about some possible dose-dependent cytotoxic effects. Macrophages are key components of the innate immune system used to study possible toxic effects and internalization of different nanoparticulate materials. In this work, ultra-high resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was used to offer new insights into the dynamical processes of interaction of nanomaterials with macrophage cells dosed with different concentrations of metal oxide nanoparticles (CeO(2), TiO(2) and ZnO). The versatility of FE-SEM has allowed obtaining a detailed characterization of processes of adsorption and endocytosis of nanoparticles, by using advanced analytical and imaging techniques on complete unstained uncoated cells, including secondary electron imaging, high-sensitive backscattered electron imaging, X-ray microanalysis and stereoimaging. Low voltage BF/DF-STEM confirmed nanoparticle adsorption and internalization into endosomes of CeO(2) and TiO(2), whereas ZnO develop apoptosis after 24 h of interaction caused by dissolution and invasion of cell nucleus. Ultra-high resolution scanning electron microscopy techniques provided new insights into interactions of inorganic nanoparticles with macrophage cells with high spatial resolution.

  9. Precision Spectroscopy in Cold Molecules: the First Rotational Intervals of He_2^+ by High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Rydberg-Series Extrapolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Paul; Semeria, Luca; Scheidegger, Simon; Merkt, Frederic

    2015-06-01

    Having only three electrons, He_2^+ represents a system for which highly accurate ab initio calculations are possible. The latest calculation of rovibrational energies in He_2^+ do not include relativistic or QED corrections but claim an accuracy of about 120 MHz The available experimental data on He_2^+, though accurate to 300 MHz, are not precise enough to rigorously test these calculations or reveal the magnitude of the relativistic and QED corrections. We have performed high-resolution Rydberg spectroscopy of metastable He_2 molecules and employed multichannel-quantum-defect-theory extrapolation techniques to determine the rotational energy-level structure in the He_2^+ ion. To this end we have produced samples of helium molecules in the a ^3σ_u^+ state in supersonic beams with velocities tunable down to 100 m/s by combining a cryogenic supersonic-beam source with a multistage Zeeman decelerator. The metastable He_2 molecules are excited to np Rydberg states using the frequency doubled output of a pulse-amplified ring dye laser. Although the bandwidth of the laser systems is too large to observe the reduction of the Doppler width resulting from deceleration, the deceleration greatly simplifies the spectral assignments because of its spin-rotational state selectivity. Our approach enabled us to determine the rotational structure of He_2^+ with unprecedented accuracy, to determine the size of the relativistic and QED corrections by comparison with the results of Ref.~a and to precisely measure the rotational structure of the metastable state for comparison with the results of Focsa~et al. W.-C. Tung, M. Pavanello, L. Adamowicz, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 104309 (2012). D. Sprecher, J. Liu, T. Krähenmann, M. Schäfer, and F. Merkt, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 064304 (2014). M. Motsch, P. Jansen, J. A. Agner, H. Schmutz, and F. Merkt, Phys. Rev. A 89, 043420 (2014). C. Focsa, P. F. Bernath, and R. Colin, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 191, 209 (1998).

  10. Method and apparatus for a high-resolution three dimensional confocal scanning transmission electron microscope

    DOEpatents

    de Jonge, Niels [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-08-17

    A confocal scanning transmission electron microscope which includes an electron illumination device providing an incident electron beam propagating in a direction defining a propagation axis, and a precision specimen scanning stage positioned along the propagation axis and movable in at least one direction transverse to the propagation axis. The precision specimen scanning stage is configured for positioning a specimen relative to the incident electron beam. A projector lens receives a transmitted electron beam transmitted through at least part of the specimen and focuses this transmitted beam onto an image plane, where the transmitted beam results from the specimen being illuminated by the incident electron beam. A detection system is placed approximately in the image plane.

  11. Preparation of 2D crystals of membrane proteins for high-resolution electron crystallography data collection.

    PubMed

    Abeyrathne, Priyanka D; Chami, Mohamed; Pantelic, Radosav S; Goldie, Kenneth N; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    Electron crystallography is a powerful technique for the structure determination of membrane proteins as well as soluble proteins. Sample preparation for 2D membrane protein crystals is a crucial step, as proteins have to be prepared for electron microscopy at close to native conditions. In this review, we discuss the factors of sample preparation that are key to elucidating the atomic structure of membrane proteins using electron crystallography.

  12. The potential for Bayesian compressive sensing to significantly reduce electron dose in high-resolution STEM images.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Andrew; Yang, Hao; Carin, Lawrence; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D

    2014-02-01

    The use of high-resolution imaging methods in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is limited in many cases by the sensitivity of the sample to the beam and the onset of electron beam damage (for example, in the study of organic systems, in tomography and during in situ experiments). To demonstrate that alternative strategies for image acquisition can help alleviate this beam damage issue, here we apply compressive sensing via Bayesian dictionary learning to high-resolution STEM images. These computational algorithms have been applied to a set of images with a reduced number of sampled pixels in the image. For a reduction in the number of pixels down to 5% of the original image, the algorithms can recover the original image from the reduced data set. We show that this approach is valid for both atomic-resolution images and nanometer-resolution studies, such as those that might be used in tomography datasets, by applying the method to images of strontium titanate and zeolites. As STEM images are acquired pixel by pixel while the beam is scanned over the surface of the sample, these postacquisition manipulations of the images can, in principle, be directly implemented as a low-dose acquisition method with no change in the electron optics or the alignment of the microscope itself.

  13. High Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of zeta Puppis with the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, S. M.; Leutenegger, M. A.; Cottam, J.; Rauw, G.; Vreux, J.-M.; denBoggende, A. J. F.; Mewe, R.; Guedel, M.

    2000-01-01

    We present the first high resolution X-ray spectrum of the bright O4Ief supergiant star Puppis, obtained with the Reflection Grating Spectrometer on- board XMM-Newton. The spectrum exhibits bright emission lines of hydrogen-like and helium-like ions of nitrogen, oxygen, neon, magnesium, and silicon, as well as neon-like ions of iron. The lines are all significantly resolved, with characteristic velocity widths of order 1000 - 1500 km/ s. The nitrogen lines are especially strong, and indicate that the shocked gas in the wind is mixed with CNO-burned material, as has been previously inferred for the atmosphere of this star from ultraviolet spectra. We find that the forbidden to intercombination line ratios within the helium-like triplets are anomalously low for N VI, O VII, and Ne IX. While this is sometimes indicative of high electron density, we show that in this case, it is instead caused by the intense ultraviolet radiation field of the star. We use this interpretation to derive constraints on the location of the X-ray emitting shocks within the wind that agree remarkably well with current theoretical models for this system.

  14. High-resolution molecular structure of a peptide in an amyloid fibril determined by magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaroniec, Christopher P.; Macphee, Cait E.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; McMahon, Michael T.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2004-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are self-assembled filamentous structures associated with protein deposition conditions including Alzheimer's disease and the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Despite the immense medical importance of amyloid fibrils, no atomic-resolution structures are available for these materials, because the intact fibrils are insoluble and do not form diffraction-quality 3D crystals. Here we report the high-resolution structure of a peptide fragment of the amyloidogenic protein transthyretin, TTR(105-115), in its fibrillar form, determined by magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy. The structure resolves not only the backbone fold but also the precise conformation of the side chains. Nearly complete 13C and 15N resonance assignments for TTR(105-115) formed the basis for the extraction of a set of distance and dihedral angle restraints. A total of 76 self-consistent experimental measurements, including 41 restraints on 19 backbone dihedral angles and 35 13C-15N distances between 3 and 6 Å were obtained from 2D and 3D NMR spectra recorded on three fibril samples uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled in consecutive stretches of four amino acids and used to calculate an ensemble of peptide structures. Our results indicate that TTR(105-115) adopts an extended -strand conformation in the amyloid fibrils such that both the main- and side-chain torsion angles are close to their optimal values. Moreover, the structure of this peptide in the fibrillar form has a degree of long-range order that is generally associated only with crystalline materials. These findings provide an explanation of the unusual stability and characteristic properties of this form of polypeptide assembly.

  15. HIGH RESOLUTION X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF THE LOCAL HOT GAS ALONG THE 3C 273 SIGHTLINE

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Taotao; Jiang, Xiaochuan

    2014-04-20

    X-ray observations of highly ionized metal absorption lines at z = 0 provide critical information on the hot gas distribution in and around the Milky Way. We present a study of more than 10 yr of Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of 3C 273, one of the brightest extragalactic X-ray sources. Compared with previous works, we obtain much tighter constraints on the physical properties of the X-ray absorber. We also find a large, non-thermal velocity at ∼100-150 km s{sup –1}, the main reason for the higher line equivalent width when compared with other sightlines. Using joint analysis with X-ray emission and ultraviolet observations, we derive a size of 5-15 kpc and a temperature of (1.5-1.8) × 10{sup 6} K for the X-ray absorber. The 3C 273 sightline passes through a number of Galactic structures, including radio loops I and IV, the North Polar Spur, and the neighborhood of the newly discovered ''Fermi bubbles''. We argue that the X-ray absorber is unlikely to be associated with the nearby radio loops I and IV; however, the non-thermal velocity can be naturally explained as the result of the expansion of the ''Fermi bubbles''. Our data imply a shock-expansion velocity of 200-300 km s{sup –1}. Our study indicates a likely complex environment for the production of the Galactic X-ray absorbers along different sightlines, and highlights the significance of probing galactic feedback with high resolution X-ray spectroscopy.

  16. Application of High-Resolution Magic-Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy to Define the Cell Uptake of MRI Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabi, Luisella; Alfieri, Goffredo; Biondi, Luca; De Miranda, Mario; Paleari, Lino; Ghelli, Stefano

    2002-06-01

    A new method, based on proton high-resolution magic-angle spinning ( 1H HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy, has been employed to study the cell uptake of magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents (MRI-CAs). The method was tested on human red blood cells (HRBC) and white blood cells (HWBC) by using three gadolinium complexes, widely used in diagnostics, Gd-BOPTA, Gd-DTPA, and Gd-DOTA, and the analogous complexes obtained by replacing Gd(III) with Dy(III), Nd(III), and Tb(III) (i.e., complexes isostructural to the ones of gadolinium but acting as shift agents). The method is based on the evaluation of the magnetic effects, line broadening, or induced lanthanide shift (LIS) caused by these complexes on NMR signals of intra- and extracellular water. Since magnetic effects are directly linked to permeability, this method is direct. In all the tests, these magnetic effects were detected for the extracellular water signal only, providing a direct proof that these complexes are not able to cross the cell membrane. Line broadening effects (i.e., the use of gadolinium complexes) only allow qualitative evaluations. On the contrary, LIS effects can be measured with high precision and they can be related to the concentration of the paramagnetic species in the cellular compartments. This is possible because the HR-MAS technique provides the complete elimination of bulk magnetic susceptibility (BMS) shift and the differentiation of extra- and intracellular water signals. Thus with this method, the rapid quantification of the MRI-CA amount inside and outside the cells is actually feasible.

  17. Two Decades of Advances in High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Large-Amplitude Motions in N-Fold Potential Wells, as Illustrated by Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Methanol is a simple and intensively studied organic molecule possessing one large-amplitude torsional motion. It has, for nearly a century, been a favorite of researchers in many fields, e.g., instrument builders, for whom methanol is often the first molecule chosen for testing an improved or a newly built instrument (including HIFI, the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared on board the Herschel space mission); theorists and/or dynamicists studying the challenging effects of a large-amplitude motion coupling with small-amplitude motions to enhance intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution; astronomers who have elevated methanol to their #1 interstellar weed because of its rich and omnipresent spectrum in the interstellar garden, where it serves as a unique probe for diagnosing conditions in star-forming regions; astrochemists studying isotopic ratios as clues to the chemical evolution of the universe; and fundamentalists seeking possible time variation of the proton/electron mass ratio in the standard model; just to name a few. From high-resolution to high-precision spectroscopy, the large-amplitude internal rotation of the methyl top against its OH framework in methanol has never failed to produce new surprises in spectral regions from the microwave all the way to the near IR. The very recent observation of completely unexpected large methanol hyperfine splittings is a vivid testimonial that the large-amplitude torsional motion can still lead us to unexplored landscapes. This talk will focus on the complicated vibration-torsion-rotation energy networks and interactions deduced from high resolution spectra; our efforts to understand some of them using ab-initio-assisted approaches and the modeling of torsion-rotation and torsionally mediated spin-rotation hyperfine splittings in methanol. These topics represent one part of the much larger fascinating world inhabited by methanolics.

  18. High-resolution, high-throughput imaging with a multibeam scanning electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    EBERLE, AL; MIKULA, S; SCHALEK, R; LICHTMAN, J; TATE, ML KNOTHE; ZEIDLER, D

    2015-01-01

    Electron–electron interactions and detector bandwidth limit the maximal imaging speed of single-beam scanning electron microscopes. We use multiple electron beams in a single column and detect secondary electrons in parallel to increase the imaging speed by close to two orders of magnitude and demonstrate imaging for a variety of samples ranging from biological brain tissue to semiconductor wafers. Lay Description The composition of our world and our bodies on the very small scale has always fascinated people, making them search for ways to make this visible to the human eye. Where light microscopes reach their resolution limit at a certain magnification, electron microscopes can go beyond. But their capability of visualizing extremely small features comes at the cost of a very small field of view. Some of the questions researchers seek to answer today deal with the ultrafine structure of brains, bones or computer chips. Capturing these objects with electron microscopes takes a lot of time – maybe even exceeding the time span of a human being – or new tools that do the job much faster. A new type of scanning electron microscope scans with 61 electron beams in parallel, acquiring 61 adjacent images of the sample at the same time a conventional scanning electron microscope captures one of these images. In principle, the multibeam scanning electron microscope’s field of view is 61 times larger and therefore coverage of the sample surface can be accomplished in less time. This enables researchers to think about large-scale projects, for example in the rather new field of connectomics. A very good introduction to imaging a brain at nanometre resolution can be found within course material from Harvard University on http://www.mcb80x.org/# as featured media entitled ‘connectomics’. PMID:25627873

  19. High Resolution Laboratory Spectroscopy in Support of Herschel and SOFIA: From Small Molecular Ions to PAHs and Fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, Benjamin

    The spectral lines of molecules serve as essential tools for astronomers, allowing them to probe the physical and chemical conditions of diverse environments, ranging from the diffuse interstellar medium to quiescent molecular clouds to star- and planet-forming regions to nebulae and circumstellar shells. This use of molecules as astronomical probes is only possible because of decades of work by laboratory spectroscopists, who have measured the frequencies of molecular spectral lines and determined the energy levels from which they originate. Ground-based astronomical spectroscopy has been mostly limited to frequencies below ~1 THz or above ~60 THz (below ~5 1/4m) due to the opacity of Earth s atmosphere, but new NASA missions (Herschel and SOFIA) are enabling high resolution spectroscopy in the no-man s land between 1-60 THz. However, comparatively little laboratory spectroscopy has been performed in this region, jeopardizing the scientific return from these missions. There is therefore a critical need to measure THz/far-IR spectral line frequencies of astrophysically important molecules. Two particularly important classes of such molecules are molecular ions and large neutral molecules. The objective of this particular proposal is to perform spectroscopy of astrophysically important molecular cations and large molecules with unprecedented precision and accuracy, to determine their transition frequencies in the THz/far-IR region. The rationale for the proposed research is that it will enable the study of these species with Herschel and SOFIA, thereby improving our understanding of interstellar clouds, star- forming regions, and other astronomical environments. The specific objectives of the proposed research is to measure high-precision infrared spectra of astrophysically important molecular cations, and determine their THz/far-IR frequencies to support Herschel and SOFIA. Using our newly discovered technique NICE-OHVMS (noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical

  20. Nanowire Electron Scattering Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Brian; Bronikowsky, Michael; Wong, Eric; VonAllmen, Paul; Oyafuso, Fablano

    2009-01-01

    Nanowire electron scattering spectroscopy (NESS) has been proposed as the basis of a class of ultra-small, ultralow-power sensors that could be used to detect and identify chemical compounds present in extremely small quantities. State-of-the-art nanowire chemical sensors have already been demonstrated to be capable of detecting a variety of compounds in femtomolar quantities. However, to date, chemically specific sensing of molecules using these sensors has required the use of chemically functionalized nanowires with receptors tailored to individual molecules of interest. While potentially effective, this functionalization requires labor-intensive treatment of many nanowires to sense a broad spectrum of molecules. In contrast, NESS would eliminate the need for chemical functionalization of nanowires and would enable the use of the same sensor to detect and identify multiple compounds. NESS is analogous to Raman spectroscopy, the main difference being that in NESS, one would utilize inelastic scattering of electrons instead of photons to determine molecular vibrational energy levels. More specifically, in NESS, one would exploit inelastic scattering of electrons by low-lying vibrational quantum states of molecules attached to a nanowire or nanotube.