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Sample records for high-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy

  1. High-Resolution Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (HREELS) Using a Monochromated TEM/STEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sai, Z. R.; Bradley, J. P.; Erni, R.; Browning, N.

    2005-01-01

    A 200 keV FEI TF20 XT monochromated (scanning) transmission electron microscope funded by NASA's SRLIDAP program is undergoing installation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Instrument specifications in STEM mode are Cs =1.0 mm, Cc =1.2 mm, image resolution =0.18 nm, and in TEM mode Cs =1.3 mm, Cc =1.3 mm, information limit =0.14 nm. Key features of the instrument are a voltage-stabilized high tension (HT) supply, a monochromator, a high-resolution electron energy-loss spectrometer/energy filter, a high-resolution annular darkfield detector, and a solid-state x-ray energy-dispersive spectrometer. The high-tension tank contains additional sections for 60Hz and high frequency filtering, resulting in an operating voltage of 200 kV plus or minus 0.005V, a greater than 10-fold improvement over earlier systems. The monochromator is a single Wien filter design. The energy filter is a Gatan model 866 Tridiem-ERS high resolution GIF spec d for less than or equal to 0.15 eV energy resolution with 29 pA of current in a 2 nm diameter probe. 0.13 eV has already been achieved during early installation. The x-ray detector (EDAX/Genesis 4000) has a take-off angle of 20 degrees, an active area of 30 square millimeters, and a solid angle of 0.3 steradians. The higher solid angle is possible because the objective pole-piece allows the detector to be positioned as close as 9.47 mm from the specimen. The voltage-stabilized HT supply, monochromator and GIF enable high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS) with energy resolution comparable to synchrotron XANES, but with approximately 100X better spatial resolution. The region between 0 and 100 eV is called the low-loss or valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) region where features due to collective plasma oscillations and single electron transitions of valence electrons are observed. Most of the low-loss VEELS features we are detecting are being observed for the first time in IDPs. A major focus of

  2. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy with two-dimensional energy and momentum mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuetao; Cao, Yanwei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Jia, Xun; Guo, Qinlin; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Linfan; Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, E W; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-08-01

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful technique to probe vibrational and electronic excitations at surfaces. The dispersion relation of surface excitations, i.e., energy as a function of momentum, has in the past, been obtained by measuring the energy loss at a fixed angle (momentum) and then rotating sample, monochromator, or analyzer. Here, we introduce a new strategy for HREELS, utilizing a specially designed lens system with a double-cylindrical Ibach-type monochromator combined with a commercial VG Scienta hemispherical electron energy analyzer, which can simultaneously measure the energy and momentum of the scattered electrons. The new system possesses high angular resolution (<0.1°), detecting efficiency and sampling density. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated using Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(8+δ). The time required to obtain a complete dispersion spectrum is at least one order of magnitude shorter than conventional spectrometers, with improved momentum resolution and no loss in energy resolution.

  3. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy with two-dimensional energy and momentum mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xuetao; Cao, Yanwei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Jia, Xun; Guo, Qinlin; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Linfan; Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, E. W.; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-08-15

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful technique to probe vibrational and electronic excitations at surfaces. The dispersion relation of surface excitations, i.e., energy as a function of momentum, has in the past, been obtained by measuring the energy loss at a fixed angle (momentum) and then rotating sample, monochromator, or analyzer. Here, we introduce a new strategy for HREELS, utilizing a specially designed lens system with a double-cylindrical Ibach-type monochromator combined with a commercial VG Scienta hemispherical electron energy analyzer, which can simultaneously measure the energy and momentum of the scattered electrons. The new system possesses high angular resolution (<0.1°), detecting efficiency and sampling density. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated using Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ}. The time required to obtain a complete dispersion spectrum is at least one order of magnitude shorter than conventional spectrometers, with improved momentum resolution and no loss in energy resolution.

  4. High-resolution monochromated electron energy-loss spectroscopy of organic photovoltaic materials.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jessica A; Scheltens, Frank J; Drummy, Lawrence F; Durstock, Michael F; Hage, Fredrik S; Ramasse, Quentin M; McComb, David W

    2017-09-01

    Advances in electron monochromator technology are providing opportunities for high energy resolution (10 - 200meV) electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) to be performed in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The energy-loss near-edge structure in core-loss spectroscopy is often limited by core-hole lifetimes rather than the energy spread of the incident illumination. However, in the valence-loss region, the reduced width of the zero loss peak makes it possible to resolve clearly and unambiguously spectral features at very low energy-losses (<3eV). In this contribution, high-resolution EELS was used to investigate four materials commonly used in organic photovoltaics (OPVs): poly(3-hexlythiophene) (P3HT), [6,6] phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), copper phthalocyanine (CuPc), and fullerene (C60). Data was collected on two different monochromated instruments - a Nion UltraSTEM 100 MC 'HERMES' and a FEI Titan(3) 60-300 Image-Corrected S/TEM - using energy resolutions (as defined by the zero loss peak full-width at half-maximum) of 35meV and 175meV, respectively. The data was acquired to allow deconvolution of plural scattering, and Kramers-Kronig analysis was utilized to extract the complex dielectric functions. The real and imaginary parts of the complex dielectric functions obtained from the two instruments were compared to evaluate if the enhanced resolution in the Nion provides new opto-electronic information for these organic materials. The differences between the spectra are discussed, and the implications for STEM-EELS studies of advanced materials are considered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. High-resolution electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy of giant palladium clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleshko, V.; Volkov, V.; Gijbels, R.; Jacob, W.; Vargaftik, M.; Moiseev, I.; van Tendeloo, G.

    1995-12-01

    Combined structural and chemical characterization of cationic polynuclear palladium coordination compounds Pd561L60(OAc)180, where L=1,10-phenantroline or 2,2'-bipyridine has been carried out by high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) and analytical electron microscopy methods including electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), zero-loss electron spectroscopic imaging, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The cell structure of the cluster matter with almost completely uniform metal core size distributions centered around 2.3 ±0.5 nm was observed. Zero-loss energy filtering allowed to improve the image contrast and resolution. HREM images showed that most of the palladium clusters had a cubo-octahedral shape. Some of them had a distorted icosahedron structure exhibiting multiple twinning. The selected-area electron diffraction patterns confirmed the face centered cubic structure with lattice parameter close to that of metallic palladium. The energy-loss spectra of the populations of clusters contained several bands, which could be assigned to the delayed Pd M4, 5-edge at 362 eV, the Pd M3-edge at 533 eV and the Pd M2-edge at 561 eV, the NK-edge at about 400 eV, the O K-edge at 532 eV overlapping with the Pd M3-edge and the carbon C K-edge at 284 eV. Background subtraction was applied to reveal the exact positions and fine structure of low intensity elemental peaks. EELS evaluations have been confirmed by EDX. The recorded series of the Pd M-edges and the N K-edge in the spectra of the giant palladium clusters obviously were related to Pd-Pd- and Pd-ligand bonding.

  6. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy of clean and hydrogen covered Si(001) surfaces: first principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Patterson, C H

    2012-09-07

    Surface phonons, conductivities, and loss functions are calculated for reconstructed (2×1), p(2×2) and c(4×2) clean Si(001) surfaces, and (2×1) H and D covered Si(001) surfaces. Surface conductivities perpendicular to the surface are significantly smaller than conductivities parallel to the surface. The surface loss function is compared to high resolution electron energy loss measurements. There is good agreement between calculated loss functions and experiment for H and D covered surfaces. However, agreement between experimental data from different groups and between theory and experiment is poor for clean Si(001) surfaces. Formalisms for calculating electron energy loss spectra are reviewed and the mechanism of electron energy losses to surface vibrations is discussed.

  7. Specular and off-specular high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy of acetylene and ethylene on tungsten (100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, J. C.; Swanson, N.; Waclawski, B. J.; Celotta, R. J.

    1981-04-01

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) in both specular and off-specular directions has been used to identify the vibrational modes of acetylene and ethylene on tungsten (100). The off-specular data were essential to this study since, at low coverages, some of the vibrational modes were detectable only for off-specular scattering. In addition, analysis of the relative intensities of the specular and off-specular loss peaks allows us to infer orientations of molecular dipole derivatives and bond directions for the adsorbed species. We find at 135 K that ethylene on tungsten (100) dissociates to acetylene and hydrogen for exposures less than 1 L. At saturation coverage molecular ethylene is also adsorbed. Warming of this adsorbed ethylene to 300 K causes dissociation to acetylene. Analysis of specular and off-specular loss intensities suggests a geometry with the C-H bonds lying parallel to the surface. Previous UPS data for this adsorption system can be reinterpreted giving a C-C bond length of 1.35 Å and a C-C-H bond angle of 180 °: This reinterpretation is consistent with the geometry suggested by our EELS measurements. We also present data for acetylene adsorption at room temperature and for ethylene physisorption at 82 K. Physisorbed ethylene shows vibrational losses identical to those seen in gas phase IR.

  8. Hydrogenated graphene on Ir(111): A high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy study of the vibrational spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyhl, Line; Balog, Richard; Angot, Thierry; Hornekær, Liv; Bisson, Régis

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen atom adsorption on high-quality graphene on Ir(111) [gr/Ir(111)] is investigated using high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy. The evolution of the vibrational spectrum, up to 400 meV, of gr/Ir(111) upon increasing hydrogen atom exposures is measured. The two dominant binding configurations of atomic hydrogen are identified as (1) graphanelike hydrogen clusters on the parts of the graphene more strongly interacting with the Ir(111) surface and (2) dimers bound more weakly to the freestanding parts of the graphene. The graphanelike surface structures lead to increased corrugation of the graphene sheet, yielding graphane-related phonon components. Additionally, a recent theoretical prediction of the existence of a bending character for a LO/TO graphane chair phonon mode is experimentally verified. No clear evidence was found for hydrogen bound on both sides of a high-quality graphene sheet and phonon features strongly suggest interactions between graphanelike hydrogen clusters and Ir atoms in the substrate.

  9. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy of manganese oxides: Application to Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Laffont, L.; Gibot, P.

    2010-11-15

    Manganese oxides particularly Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} Hausmannite are currently used in many industrial applications such as catalysis, magnetism, electrochemistry or air contamination. The downsizing of the particle size of such material permits an improvement of its intrinsic properties and a consequent increase in its performances compared to a classical micron-sized material. Here, we report a novel synthesis of hydrophilic nano-sized Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}, a bivalent oxide, for which a precise characterization is necessary and for which the determination of the valency proves to be essential. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and particularly High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (HREELS) allow us to perform these measurements on the nanometer scale. Well crystallized 10-20 nm sized Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles with sphere-shaped morphology were thus successfully synthesized. Meticulous EELS investigations allowed the determination of a Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 2+} ratio of 1.5, i.e. slightly lower than the theoretical value of 2 for the bulk Hausmannite manganese oxide. This result emphasizes the presence of vacancies on the tetrahedral sites in the structure of the as-synthesized nanomaterial. - Research Highlights: {yields}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} bulk and nano were studied by XRD, TEM and EELS. {yields}XRD and TEM determine the degree of crystallinity and the narrow grain size. {yields}HREELS gave access to the Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 2+} ratio. {yields}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nano have vacancies on the tetrahedral sites.

  10. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Ferreira da Silva, F; Lange, E; Limão-Vieira, P; Jones, N C; Hoffmann, S V; Hubin-Franskin, M-J; Delwiche, J; Brunger, M J; Neves, R F C; Lopes, M C A; de Oliveira, E M; da Costa, R F; Varella, M T do N; Bettega, M H F; Blanco, F; García, G; Lima, M A P; Jones, D B

    2015-10-14

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5-10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range.

  11. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Lange, E.; Limão-Vieira, P. E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J.; Brunger, M. J. E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au; and others

    2015-10-14

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5–10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range.

  12. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Lange, E.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J.; Brunger, M. J.; Neves, R. F. C.; Lopes, M. C. A.; de Oliveira, E. M.; da Costa, R. F.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Lima, M. A. P.; Jones, D. B.

    2015-10-01

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5-10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range.

  13. Identification of local phase of nanoscale BaTiO₃ powders by high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sun-Min; Wang, Xiaohui; Cho, Nam-Hee

    2013-08-01

    The electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) technique was applied to investigate the local variation in the phase of barium titanate (BaTiO₃) ceramics. It was found that the fine structure of the titanium L₂,₃ edge and their satellite peaks were sensitively varied with the tetragonal-cubic phase transition. The peak splitting of Ti-L₃ edge of tetragonal-phased BaTiO₃ ceramics was widened because of the increased crystal field effect compared with that of cubic-phased BaTiO₃. In case of nanoscale BaTiO₃ powders, the L₃ edge splitting of the core region was found to be smaller than that of the shell region. The energy gap between peaks t₂g and eg varied from 2.36 to 1.94 eV with changing the probe position from 1 to 20 nm from the surface. These results suggest that the EELS technique can be used to identify the local phase of sintered BaTiO₃ ceramics.

  14. The use of high resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy for refining the infrared optical constants of GaS, GaSe, and InSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Li-Ming; Thiry, P. A.; Degiovanni, A.; Conard, Th.; Leclerc, G.; Caudano, R.; Lambin, Ph.; Debever, J.-M.

    1994-06-01

    Cleaved surfaces of III-VI lamellar semiconducting compounds GaS, GaSe, and InSe have been studied by high resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS). The infrared optical constants of the materials were retrieved by using the dielectric theory taking account of the resonance frequencies published from infrared reflectivity (IRS) data. The limitations of the HREELS and IRS measurements in the case of these materials are discussed in detail. However, it is shown that, by combining the informations from both spectroscopies, it is possible to refine some of the oscillator strengths of these materials.

  15. Electronic transitions in α-oligothiophene thin films. Comparison of ultraviolet/visible absorption spectroscopy and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oeter, D.; Egelhaaf, H.-J.; Ziegler, Ch.; Oelkrug, D.; Göpel, W.

    1994-10-01

    Vapor deposited thin films of a series of α-oligothiophenes are investigated comparatively with polarized ultraviolet/visible absorption spectroscopy (UV/VIS) and by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) in specular reflection geometry. The complementary selection rules of these methods allow an assignment of the observed absorption and loss bands according to a Hückel molecular orbital model. By plotting the transition energies of corresponding bands of different members of the homologous series vs the reciprocal of the number of rings, the development of the one-dimensional ``π-band-structure'' with an increasing number of rings could be followed. The extrapolation to infinite chain length leads to the electronic properties of an ideal (defect free) polythiophene. Furthermore, characteristic differences were observed in the results obtained from the two methods. The orientation of the molecules in thin films is only detectable with UV/VIS spectroscopy. It is most pronounced for α-quinquethiophene. On the other hand, HREELS gives information about the position of optical parity forbidden electronic transitions.

  16. High-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy and photoelectron-diffraction studies of the geometric structure of adsorbates on single-crystal metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenblatt, D.H.

    1982-11-01

    Two techniques which have made important contributions to the understanding of surface phenomena are high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and photoelectron diffraction (PD). EELS is capable of directly measuring the vibrational modes of clean and adsorbate covered metal surfaces. In this work, the design, construction, and performance of a new EELS spectrometer are described. These results are discussed in terms of possible structures of the O-Cu(001) system. Recommendations for improvements in this EELS spectrometer and guidelines for future spectrometers are given. PD experiments provide accurate quantitative information about the geometry of atoms and molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. The technique has advantages when used to study disordered overlayers, molecular overlayers, multiple site systems, and adsorbates which are weak electron scatterers. Four experiments were carried out which exploit these advantages.

  17. Acetylene adsorption on the Si(111)-(7×7) surface: Ultraviolet photoemission and high-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Renzi, V.; Biagi, R.; del Pennino, U.

    2001-10-01

    The room temperature adsorption and the thermal reaction of acetylene on the Si(111)-(7×7) surface has been investigated by means of ultraviolet-photoemission spectroscopy and high-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS). In the first stage of the adsorption process, the evolution of the restatom- and adatom-related electronic states as a function of acetylene exposure is well described by a modified di-σ-bonding model, in which the metallic character of the (7×7) surface plays a fundamental role. For higher exposure, all the restatom dangling bonds are saturated and the adsorption process continues through saturation of the remaining adatoms. In this phase, a molecular tilting is observed, possibly accompanied by a surface atom rearrangement. Upon annealing to 600 °C, acetylene dehydrogenation and partial desorption occur, as demonstrated by the disappearance of the C-H modes in HREELS and the reappearance of the adatom and restatom dangling-bond states in valence-band spectra. At 700 °C the formation of a Si-C compound is observed. Atomic-force-microscopy topographic images taken ex situ after annealing to 800 °C show that the Si-C interface is constituted by islands with lateral dimension of ~300 Å, while the overall surface roughness is 10-20 Å.

  18. Hydrogen bonding configuration and thermal stability of ambient exposed and in situ hydrogenated polycrystalline diamond surfaces studied by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Michaelson, Sh; Akhvlediani, R; Hoffman, A

    2011-06-28

    In this work we report on an investigation of hydrogen bonding and thermal stability on the surface of poly-crystalline diamond by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HR-EELS). Diamond films were grown on silicon substrates from CH(4)/H(2) as well as from CD(4)/D(2) gas mixtures by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD). The impact of ex situ ambient exposure on hydrogen bonding and its thermal stability was examined for: (i) as deposited films from a CH(4)/H(2) gas mixture; (ii) the same sample treated ex situ in micro-wave activated hydrogen plasma; and (iii) as deposited films from a CD(4)/D(2) gas mixture. In order to clarify the changes in the hydrogen bonding configuration detected on the different surfaces as a function of thermal annealing in situ hydrogenation by thermally activated atomic hydrogen was performed and examined. This study provides direct evidence that the exposure to ambient conditions and low temperature vacuum annealing have a pronounced effect on the hydrogen-carbon bonding configuration onto the poly-crystalline diamond surfaces.

  19. Two bonding configurations of acetylene on Si(001)-(2 x 1): a combined high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy and density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Mineva, T; Nathaniel, R; Kostov, K L; Widdra, W

    2006-11-21

    Two coexisting adsorption states of molecularly adsorbed acetylene on the Si(001)-(2 x 1) surface have been identified by a combined study based on the high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy and density functional computations. Seven possible adsorbate-substrate structures are considered theoretically including their full vibrational analysis. Based on a significantly enhanced experimental resolution, the assignment of 15 C2H2- and C2D2-derived vibrational modes identifies a dominant di-sigma bonded molecule adsorbed on top of a single Si-Si dimer. Additionally there is clear evidence for a second minority species which is di-sigma bonded between two Si-Si dimers within the same dimer row (end-bridge geometry). The possible symmetries of the adsorbate complexes are discussed based on the specular and off-specular vibrational measurements. They suggest lower than ideal C(2v) and C(s) symmetries for on-top and end-bridge species, respectively. At low coverages the symmetry reductions might be lifted.

  20. Probing optical band gaps at the nanoscale in NiFe₂O₄ and CoFe₂O₄ epitaxial films by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dileep, K.; Loukya, B.; Datta, R.; Pachauri, N.; Gupta, A.

    2014-09-14

    Nanoscale optical band gap variations in epitaxial thin films of two different spinel ferrites, i.e., NiFe₂O₄ (NFO) and CoFe₂O₄ (CFO), have been investigated by spatially resolved high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy. Experimentally, both NFO and CFO show indirect/direct band gaps around 1.52 eV/2.74 and 2.3 eV, and 1.3 eV/2.31 eV, respectively, for the ideal inverse spinel configuration with considerable standard deviation in the band gap values for CFO due to various levels of deviation from the ideal inverse spinel structure. Direct probing of the regions in both the systems with tetrahedral A site cation vacancy, which is distinct from the ideal inverse spinel configuration, shows significantly smaller band gap values. The experimental results are supported by the density functional theory based modified Becke-Johnson exchange correlation potential calculated band gap values for the different cation configurations.

  1. Surface spin canting in F e3O4 and CoF e2O4 nanoparticles probed by high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negi, D. S.; Sharona, H.; Bhat, U.; Palchoudhury, S.; Gupta, A.; Datta, R.

    2017-05-01

    High-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HR-EELS) is utilized to probe the surface spin canting in nanoparticles of two technologically important magnetic materials, i.e. F e3O4 and CoF e2O4 (CFO). A soft experimental technique has been developed that is capable of extracting EELS spectra with single atomic plane resolution recorded in a single frame. The technique yields information at different depths of the nanoparticle from the surface to the core regions with high signal-to-noise ratio and without beam damage. This enables comparing the fine structures between the surface and core regions of the nanoparticles. The results confirm earlier observations of uniformly oriented spin canting structure for CFO and provide additional information regarding atom site-selective spin canting information. In the case of F e3O4 , preferred canting orientation forming core and shell structure is deduced. Unlike earlier reports based on polarized spin-flip neutron scattering measurement, it is possible from the experimental spectra combined with the first principle-based calculations considering noncollinear magnetism to narrow down the canting angles for F e3O4 (Td,Oh tilts 40°, 40°) and CFO (Td,Oh tilts 17°, 17°). In addition, the role of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction in stabilizing the spin canting at the nanoparticle surface is discussed. The results demonstrate that HR-EELS can be a powerful technique to probe the magnetic structure in nanodimensional systems and has advantages over neutron-based techniques in terms of superior spatial resolution, site-specific information, and ease of sample preparation.

  2. Image simulation for electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Oxley, Mark P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2007-10-22

    In this paper, aberration correction of the probe forming optics of the scanning transmission electron microscope has allowed the probe-forming aperture to be increased in size, resulting in probes of the order of 1 Å in diameter. The next generation of correctors promise even smaller probes. Improved spectrometer optics also offers the possibility of larger electron energy loss spectrometry detectors. The localization of images based on core-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy is examined as function of both probe-forming aperture and detector size. The effective ionization is nonlocal in nature, and two common local approximations are compared to full nonlocal calculations. Finally, the affect of the channelling of the electron probe within the sample is also discussed.

  3. Image simulation for electron energy loss spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Oxley, Mark P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2007-10-22

    In this paper, aberration correction of the probe forming optics of the scanning transmission electron microscope has allowed the probe-forming aperture to be increased in size, resulting in probes of the order of 1 Å in diameter. The next generation of correctors promise even smaller probes. Improved spectrometer optics also offers the possibility of larger electron energy loss spectrometry detectors. The localization of images based on core-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy is examined as function of both probe-forming aperture and detector size. The effective ionization is nonlocal in nature, and two common local approximations are compared to full nonlocal calculations.more » Finally, the affect of the channelling of the electron probe within the sample is also discussed.« less

  4. Spectral restoration in high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy based on iterative semi-blind Lucy-Richardson algorithm applied to rutile surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzari, Rémi Li, Jingfeng Jupille, Jacques

    2015-01-15

    A new spectral restoration algorithm of reflection electron energy loss spectra is proposed. It is based on the maximum likelihood principle as implemented in the iterative Lucy-Richardson approach. Resolution is enhanced and point spread function recovered in a semi-blind way by forcing cyclically the zero loss to converge towards a Dirac peak. Synthetic phonon spectra of TiO{sub 2} are used as a test bed to discuss resolution enhancement, convergence benefit, stability towards noise, and apparatus function recovery. Attention is focused on the interplay between spectral restoration and quasi-elastic broadening due to free carriers. A resolution enhancement by a factor up to 6 on the elastic peak width can be obtained on experimental spectra of TiO{sub 2}(110) and helps revealing mixed phonon/plasmon excitations.

  5. Spectral restoration in high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy based on iterative semi-blind Lucy-Richardson algorithm applied to rutile surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lazzari, Rémi; Li, Jingfeng; Jupille, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    A new spectral restoration algorithm of reflection electron energy loss spectra is proposed. It is based on the maximum likelihood principle as implemented in the iterative Lucy-Richardson approach. Resolution is enhanced and point spread function recovered in a semi-blind way by forcing cyclically the zero loss to converge towards a Dirac peak. Synthetic phonon spectra of TiO2 are used as a test bed to discuss resolution enhancement, convergence benefit, stability towards noise, and apparatus function recovery. Attention is focused on the interplay between spectral restoration and quasi-elastic broadening due to free carriers. A resolution enhancement by a factor up to 6 on the elastic peak width can be obtained on experimental spectra of TiO2(110) and helps revealing mixed phonon/plasmon excitations.

  6. Spectral restoration in high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy based on iterative semi-blind Lucy-Richardson algorithm applied to rutile surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzari, Rémi; Li, Jingfeng; Jupille, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    A new spectral restoration algorithm of reflection electron energy loss spectra is proposed. It is based on the maximum likelihood principle as implemented in the iterative Lucy-Richardson approach. Resolution is enhanced and point spread function recovered in a semi-blind way by forcing cyclically the zero loss to converge towards a Dirac peak. Synthetic phonon spectra of TiO2 are used as a test bed to discuss resolution enhancement, convergence benefit, stability towards noise, and apparatus function recovery. Attention is focused on the interplay between spectral restoration and quasi-elastic broadening due to free carriers. A resolution enhancement by a factor up to 6 on the elastic peak width can be obtained on experimental spectra of TiO2(110) and helps revealing mixed phonon/plasmon excitations.

  7. Direct band gap measurement of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} thin films using high-resolution reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Sung; Lee, Hyung-Ik; Park, Jong-Bong; Ko, Dong-Su; Chung, JaeGwan; Kim, KiHong; Kim, Seong Heon; Yun, Dong-Jin; Ham, YongNam; Park, Gyeong Su; Song, Taewon; Lee, Dongho Nam, Junggyu; Kang, Hee Jae; Choi, Pyung-Ho; Choi, Byoung-Deog

    2015-06-29

    To investigate the band gap profile of Cu(In{sub 1−x},Ga{sub x})(Se{sub 1−y}S{sub y}){sub 2} of various compositions, we measured the band gap profile directly as a function of in-depth using high-resolution reflection energy loss spectroscopy (HR-REELS), which was compared with the band gap profile calculated based on the auger depth profile. The band gap profile is a double-graded band gap as a function of in-depth. The calculated band gap obtained from the auger depth profile seems to be larger than that by HR-REELS. Calculated band gaps are to measure the average band gap of the spatially different varying compositions with respect to considering its void fraction. But, the results obtained using HR-REELS are to be affected by the low band gap (i.e., out of void) rather than large one (i.e., near void). Our findings suggest an analytical method to directly determine the band gap profile as function of in-depth.

  8. Layer specific optical band gap measurement at nanoscale in MoS{sub 2} and ReS{sub 2} van der Waals compounds by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dileep, K. E-mail: ranjan@jncasr.ac.in; Sahu, R.; Datta, R. E-mail: ranjan@jncasr.ac.in; Sarkar, Sumanta; Peter, Sebastian C.

    2016-03-21

    Layer specific direct measurement of optical band gaps of two important van der Waals compounds, MoS{sub 2} and ReS{sub 2}, is performed at nanoscale by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy. For monolayer MoS{sub 2}, the twin excitons (1.8 and 1.95 eV) originating at the K point of the Brillouin zone are observed. An indirect band gap of 1.27 eV is obtained from the multilayer regions. Indirect to direct band gap crossover is observed which is consistent with the previously reported strong photoluminescence from the monolayer MoS{sub 2}. For ReS{sub 2}, the band gap is direct, and a value of 1.52 and 1.42 eV is obtained for the monolayer and multilayer, respectively. The energy loss function is dominated by features due to high density of states at both the valence and conduction band edges, and the difference in analyzing band gap with respect to ZnO is highlighted. Crystalline 1T ReS{sub 2} forms two dimensional chains like superstructure due to the clustering between four Re atoms. The results demonstrate the power of HREELS technique as a nanoscale optical absorption spectroscopy tool.

  9. Probing battery chemistry with liquid cell electron energy loss spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M.; ...

    2015-01-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to determine the chemistry and oxidation state of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 thin film battery electrodes in liquid cells for in situ scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM). Using the L2,3 white line intensity ratio method we determine the oxidation state of Mn and Ti in a liquid electrolyte solvent and discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity.

  10. Simulating electron energy loss spectroscopy with the MNPBEM toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenester, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    Within the MNPBEM toolbox, we show how to simulate electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) of plasmonic nanoparticles using a boundary element method approach. The methodology underlying our approach closely follows the concepts developed by García de Abajo and coworkers (Garcia de Abajo, 2010). We introduce two classes eelsret and eelsstat that allow in combination with our recently developed MNPBEM toolbox for a simple, robust, and efficient computation of EEL spectra and maps. The classes are accompanied by a number of demo programs for EELS simulation of metallic nanospheres, nanodisks, and nanotriangles, and for electron trajectories passing by or penetrating through the metallic nanoparticles. We also discuss how to compute electric fields induced by the electron beam and cathodoluminescence. Catalogue identifier: AEKJ_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKJ_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 38886 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1222650 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Matlab 7.11.0 (R2010b). Computer: Any which supports Matlab 7.11.0 (R2010b). Operating system: Any which supports Matlab 7.11.0 (R2010b). RAM:≥1 GB Classification: 18. Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEKJ_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 183 (2012) 370 External routines: MESH2D available at www.mathworks.com Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Simulation of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) for plasmonic nanoparticles. Solution method: Boundary element method using electromagnetic potentials. Reasons for new version: The new version of the toolbox includes two additional classes for the simulation of electron energy

  11. Probing battery chemistry with liquid cell electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Sacci, Robert L.; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren Leslie; Aguiar, Jeffery A.

    2015-01-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to determine the chemistry and oxidation state of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 thin film battery electrodes in liquid cells for in situ scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM). Using the L2,3 white line intensity ratio method we determine the oxidation state of Mn and Ti in a liquid electrolyte solvent and discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity.

  12. Probing Battery Chemistry with Liquid Cell Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M.; Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Sacci, Robert L.; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren L.

    2015-11-25

    We demonstrate the ability to apply electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to follow the chemistry and oxidation states of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 battery electrodes within a battery solvent. The use and importance of in situ electrochemical cells coupled with a scanning/transmission electron microscope (S/TEM) has expanded and been applied to follow changes in battery chemistry during electrochemical cycling. Furthermore, we discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity and provide a framework to apply this important analytical method to future in situ electrochemical studies.

  13. Tomography of particle plasmon fields from electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hörl, Anton; Trügler, Andreas; Hohenester, Ulrich

    2013-08-16

    We theoretically investigate electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) of metallic nanoparticles in the optical frequency domain. Using a quasistatic approximation scheme together with a plasmon eigenmode expansion, we show that EELS can be rephrased in terms of a tomography problem. For selected single and coupled nanoparticles we extract the three-dimensional plasmon fields from a collection of rotated EELS maps. Our results pave the way for a fully three-dimensional plasmon-field tomography and establish EELS as a quantitative measurement device for plasmonics.

  14. Single-atom electron energy loss spectroscopy of light elements

    PubMed Central

    Senga, Ryosuke; Suenaga, Kazu

    2015-01-01

    Light elements such as alkali metal (lithium, sodium) or halogen (fluorine, chlorine) are present in various substances and indeed play significant roles in our life. Although atomic behaviours of these elements are often a key to resolve chemical or biological activities, they are hardly visible in transmission electron microscope because of their smaller scattering power and higher knock-on probability. Here we propose a concept for detecting light atoms encaged in a nanospace by means of electron energy loss spectroscopy using inelastically scattered electrons. In this method, we demonstrate the single-atom detection of lithium, fluorine, sodium and chlorine with near-atomic precision, which is limited by the incident probe size, signal delocalization and atomic movement in nanospace. Moreover, chemical shifts of lithium K-edge have been successfully identified with various atomic configurations in one-dimensional lithium compounds. PMID:26228378

  15. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of gold nanoparticles on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    DeJarnette, Drew; Roper, D. Keith

    2014-08-07

    Plasmon excitation decay by absorption, scattering, and hot electron transfer has been distinguished from effects induced by incident photons for gold nanoparticles on graphene monolayer using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Gold nano-ellipses were evaporated onto lithographed graphene, which was transferred onto a silicon nitride transmission electron microscopy grid. Plasmon decay from lithographed nanoparticles measured with EELS was compared in the absence and presence of the graphene monolayer. Measured decay values compared favorably with estimated radiative and non-radiative contributions to decay in the absence of graphene. Graphene significantly enhanced low-energy plasmon decay, increasing mode width 38%, but did not affect higher energy plasmon or dark mode decay. This decay beyond expected radiative and non-radiative mechanisms was attributed to hot electron transfer, and had quantum efficiency of 20%, consistent with previous reports.

  16. Development of Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy in the Biological Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Aronova, M.A.; Leapman, R.D.

    2012-01-01

    The high sensitivity of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) for detecting light elements at the nanoscale makes it a valuable technique for application to biological systems. In particular, EELS provides quantitative information about elemental distributions within subcellular compartments, specific atoms bound to individual macromolecular assemblies, and the composition of bionanoparticles. The EELS data can be acquired either in the fixed beam energy-filtered transmission electron microscope (EFTEM) or in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), and recent progress in the development of both approaches has greatly expanded the range of applications for EELS analysis. Near single atom sensitivity is now achievable for certain elements bound to isolated macromolecules, and it becomes possible to obtain three-dimensional compositional distributions from sectioned cells through EFTEM tomography. PMID:23049161

  17. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of branched gap plasmon resonators

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Søren; Esfandyarpour, Majid; Koh, Ai Leen; Mortensen, N. Asger; Brongersma, Mark L.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-01-01

    The miniaturization of integrated optical circuits below the diffraction limit for high-speed manipulation of information is one of the cornerstones in plasmonics research. By coupling to surface plasmons supported on nanostructured metallic surfaces, light can be confined to the nanoscale, enabling the potential interface to electronic circuits. In particular, gap surface plasmons propagating in an air gap sandwiched between metal layers have shown extraordinary mode confinement with significant propagation length. In this work, we unveil the optical properties of gap surface plasmons in silver nanoslot structures with widths of only 25 nm. We fabricate linear, branched and cross-shaped nanoslot waveguide components, which all support resonances due to interference of counter-propagating gap plasmons. By exploiting the superior spatial resolution of a scanning transmission electron microscope combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we experimentally show the propagation, bending and splitting of slot gap plasmons. PMID:27982030

  18. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of branched gap plasmon resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Søren; Esfandyarpour, Majid; Koh, Ai Leen; Mortensen, N. Asger; Brongersma, Mark L.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-12-01

    The miniaturization of integrated optical circuits below the diffraction limit for high-speed manipulation of information is one of the cornerstones in plasmonics research. By coupling to surface plasmons supported on nanostructured metallic surfaces, light can be confined to the nanoscale, enabling the potential interface to electronic circuits. In particular, gap surface plasmons propagating in an air gap sandwiched between metal layers have shown extraordinary mode confinement with significant propagation length. In this work, we unveil the optical properties of gap surface plasmons in silver nanoslot structures with widths of only 25 nm. We fabricate linear, branched and cross-shaped nanoslot waveguide components, which all support resonances due to interference of counter-propagating gap plasmons. By exploiting the superior spatial resolution of a scanning transmission electron microscope combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we experimentally show the propagation, bending and splitting of slot gap plasmons.

  19. Data processing for atomic resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cueva, Paul; Hovden, Robert; Mundy, Julia A; Xin, Huolin L; Muller, David A

    2012-08-01

    The high beam current and subangstrom resolution of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopes has enabled electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) mapping with atomic resolution. These spectral maps are often dose limited and spatially oversampled, leading to low counts/channel and are thus highly sensitive to errors in background estimation. However, by taking advantage of redundancy in the dataset map, one can improve background estimation and increase chemical sensitivity. We consider two such approaches--linear combination of power laws and local background averaging--that reduce background error and improve signal extraction. Principal component analysis (PCA) can also be used to analyze spectrum images, but the poor peak-to-background ratio in EELS can lead to serious artifacts if raw EELS data are PCA filtered. We identify common artifacts and discuss alternative approaches. These algorithms are implemented within the Cornell Spectrum Imager, an open source software package for spectroscopic analysis.

  20. Uranium trioxide behavior during electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, Claude; Alekseev, Evgeny V.

    2015-03-01

    A sample of uranium trioxide (UO3) was produced by focused ion beam (~10 μm×~10 μm×<0.5 μm) for transmission electron and electron energy loss (EEL) spectroscopy examinations in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The EEL spectra were recorded as a function of the thickness for the P and O edges in the low energy range 0-350 eV and were compared to spectra of UO3 small grains attached to a TEM grid. The EEL spectrum was studied through a range of thicknesses going from ~60 to ~260 nm. The EEL spectra recorded for UO3 are compared with those recorded for UO2. The reduction of UO3 into U4O9 and/or UO2 is readily observed apparently during the TEM investigations and as confirmed by electron diffraction (eD). This redox effect is similar to that known for other redox sensitive oxides. Recommendations are suggested to avoid sample decomposition.

  1. Reflection Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy of Iron Monosilicide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parshin, A. S.; Igumenov, A. Yu.; Mikhlin, Yu. L.; Pchelyakov, O. P.; Zhigalov, V. S.

    2017-02-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectra, reflection electron energy loss spectra, and inelastic electron scattering cross section spectra of iron monosilicide FeSi are investigated. It is shown that the spectra of inelastic electron scattering cross section have advantages over the reflection electron energy loss spectra in studying the processes of electron energy losses. An analysis of the fine structure of the inelastic electron scattering cross section spectra allows previously unresolved peaks to be identified and their energy, intensity, and nature to be determined. The difference between energies of fitting loss peaks in the spectra of inelastic electron scattering cross section of FeSi and pure Fe are more substantial than the chemical shifts in X-ray photoelectron spectra, which indicates the possibility of application of the fine structure of the spectra of inelastic electron scattering cross section for elemental analysis.

  2. Evidence for anisotropic dielectric properties of monoclinic hafnia using valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and ab initio time-dependent density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedj, C.; Hung, L.; Zobelli, A.; Blaise, P.; Sottile, F.; Olevano, V.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of nanocrystal orientation on the energy loss spectra of monoclinic hafnia (m-HfO2) is measured by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and valence energy loss spectroscopy (VEELS) on high quality samples. For the same momentum-transfer directions, the dielectric properties are also calculated ab initio by time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT). Experiments and simulations evidence anisotropy in the dielectric properties of m-HfO2, most notably with the direction-dependent oscillator strength of the main bulk plasmon. The anisotropic nature of m-HfO2 may contribute to the differences among VEELS spectra reported in literature. The good agreement between the complex dielectric permittivity extracted from VEELS with nanometer spatial resolution, TDDFT modeling, and past literature demonstrates that the present HRTEM-VEELS device-oriented methodology is a possible solution to the difficult nanocharacterization challenges given in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors.

  3. Evidence for anisotropic dielectric properties of monoclinic hafnia using valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and ab initio time-dependent density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Guedj, C.; Hung, L.; Sottile, F.; Zobelli, A.; Blaise, P.; Olevano, V.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of nanocrystal orientation on the energy loss spectra of monoclinic hafnia (m-HfO{sub 2}) is measured by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and valence energy loss spectroscopy (VEELS) on high quality samples. For the same momentum-transfer directions, the dielectric properties are also calculated ab initio by time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT). Experiments and simulations evidence anisotropy in the dielectric properties of m-HfO{sub 2}, most notably with the direction-dependent oscillator strength of the main bulk plasmon. The anisotropic nature of m-HfO{sub 2} may contribute to the differences among VEELS spectra reported in literature. The good agreement between the complex dielectric permittivity extracted from VEELS with nanometer spatial resolution, TDDFT modeling, and past literature demonstrates that the present HRTEM-VEELS device-oriented methodology is a possible solution to the difficult nanocharacterization challenges given in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors.

  4. Anisotropic plasmons, excitons, and electron energy loss spectroscopy of phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Barun; Kumar, Piyush; Thakur, Anmol; Chauhan, Yogesh Singh; Bhowmick, Somnath; Agarwal, Amit

    2017-07-01

    In this article, we explore the anisotropic electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) in monolayer phosphorene based on ab initio time-dependent density-functional-theory calculations. Similarly to black phosphorus, the EELS of undoped monolayer phosphorene is characterized by anisotropic excitonic peaks for energies in the vicinity of the band gap and by interband plasmon peaks for higher energies. On doping, an additional intraband plasmon peak also appears for energies within the band gap. Similarly to other two-dimensional systems, the intraband plasmon peak disperses as ωpl∝√{q } in both the zigzag and armchair directions in the long-wavelength limit and deviates for larger wave vectors. The anisotropy of the long-wavelength plasmon intraband dispersion is found to be inversely proportional to the square root of the ratio of the effective masses: ωpl(q y ̂) /ωpl(q x ̂) =√{mx/my } .

  5. Communication: Investigation of the electron momentum density distribution of nanodiamonds by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhenbao; Yang, Bing; Lin, Yangming; Su, Dangsheng

    2015-12-07

    The electron momentum distribution of detonation nanodiamonds (DND) was investigated by recording electron energy-loss spectra at large momentum transfer in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), which is known as electron Compton scattering from solid (ECOSS). Compton profile of diamond film obtained by ECOSS was found in good agreement with prior photon experimental measurement and theoretical calculation that for bulk diamond. Compared to the diamond film, the valence Compton profile of DND was found to be narrower, which indicates a more delocalization of the ground-state charge density for the latter. Combining with other TEM characterizations such as high-resolution transmission electron spectroscopy, diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements, ECOSS was shown to be a great potential technique to study ground-state electronic properties of nanomaterials.

  6. Role of the kinematics of probing electrons in electron energy-loss spectroscopy of solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, V. U.; Silkin, V. M.; Krasovskii, E. E.

    2016-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of electrons incident on a solid surface is determined by two properties: (i) electronic response of the target system and (ii) the detailed quantum-mechanical motion of the projectile electron inside and in the vicinity of the target. We emphasize the equal importance of the second ingredient, pointing out the fundamental limitations of the conventionally used theoretical description of the electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in terms of the "energy-loss functions." Our approach encompasses the dipole and impact scattering as specific cases, with the emphasis on the quantum-mechanical treatment of the probe electron. Applied to the high-resolution EELS of Ag surface, our theory largely agrees with recent experiments, while some instructive exceptions are rationalized.

  7. Quantification of ordering at a solid-liquid interface using plasmon electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gandman, Maria; Kauffmann, Yaron; Kaplan, Wayne D.

    2015-02-02

    We present an in situ electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) study of ordering of liquid Al at various Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interfaces. This technique utilizes precise measurements of the shifts in bulk plasmon resonance and their sensitivity to the valence electron density. Plasmon EELS combined with high resolution transmission electron microscopy provides information regarding the chemical composition in liquid Al at Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interfaces. Preferential oxygen segregation to the (0006) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} plane was verified, and the (101{sup ¯}2) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} plane was found to contain the lowest amount of segregated species.

  8. Angular-resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy on a split-ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Cube, F.; Niegemann, J.; Irsen, S.; Bell, D. C.; Linden, S.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the plasmonic near field of a lithographically defined split-ring resonator with angular-resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope. By tilting the sample, different electric field components of the plasmonic modes can be probed with the electron beam. The electron energy loss spectra recorded under oblique incidence can feature plasmonic resonances that are not observable under normal incidence. Our experimental findings are supported by full numerical calculations based on the discontinuous Galerkin time-domain method.

  9. Nanoscale mapping of optical band gaps using monochromated electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhan, W; Granerød, C S; Venkatachalapathy, V; Johansen, K M H; Jensen, I J T; Kuznetsov, A Yu; Prytz, Ø

    2017-03-10

    Using monochromated electron energy loss spectroscopy in a probe-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope we demonstrate band gap mapping in ZnO/ZnCdO thin films with a spatial resolution below 10 nm and spectral precision of 20 meV.

  10. Nanoscale mapping of optical band gaps using monochromated electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, W.; Granerød, C. S.; Venkatachalapathy, V.; Johansen, K. M. H.; Jensen, I. J. T.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu; Prytz, Ø.

    2017-03-01

    Using monochromated electron energy loss spectroscopy in a probe-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope we demonstrate band gap mapping in ZnO/ZnCdO thin films with a spatial resolution below 10 nm and spectral precision of 20 meV.

  11. Chemical Analysis of Individual Aerosols Particles by Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (EELS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Buseck, P. R.; Garvie, L. A.; Li, J.; Posfai, M.

    2001-12-01

    We use electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) to obtain chemical and bonding information on individual aerosol particles. EELS is ideally suited to this task because of its high spatial resolution and sensitivity to light elements such as C, N, and O. In addition, the spectral shapes provide information regarding bonding, atomic coordination and, for polyvalent elements, oxidation states. Our current focus is on carbonaceous aerosols both in the ambient air and emissions from biomass burning, with emphasis on the heterogeneous chemistry, particle structure, and chemical composition of soot particles. From the EELS spectra we were able to record for the first time, differences in composition between individual spherules within the same soot aggregate. We also found evidence of chemical variations even within individual soot spheres as small as 50 nm across. In the case of biomass burning, the most striking chemical differences are in the quantity of K, minor O and, in places, N. The quantity of elements associated with C decreases with the degree of graphitization of the soot spheres, as shown by the shapes of the C spectra and was corroborated by high-resolution TEM images of the analyzed particles. Knowledge of the degree of graphitization and quantity of associated elements is important for understanding and modeling their optical properties and in some case in source attributions.

  12. High-Resolution Electron Energy Loss Studies of Oxygen, Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Nitric Oxide, and Nitrous Oxide Adsorption on Germanium Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entringer, Anthony G.

    The first high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) studies of the oxidation and nitridation of germanium surfaces are reported. Both single crystal Ge(111) and disordered surfaces were studied. Surfaces were exposed to H, O_2, NO, N _2O, and N, after cleaning in ultra-high vacuum. The Ge surfaces were found to be non-reactive to molecular hydrogen (H_2) at room temperature. Exposure to atomic hydrogen (H) resulted hydrogen adsorption as demonstrated by the presence of Ge-H vibrational modes. The HREEL spectrum of the native oxide of Ge characteristic of nu -GeO_2 was obtained by heating the oxide to 200^circC. Three peaks were observed at 33, 62, and 106 meV for molecular oxygen (O_2) adsorbed on clean Ge(111) at room temperature. These peaks are indicative of dissociative bonding and a dominant Ge-O-Ge bridge structure. Subsequent hydrogen exposure resulted in a shift of the Ge-H stretch from its isolated value of 247 meV to 267 meV, indicative of a dominant +3 oxidation state. A high density of dangling bonds and defects and deeper oxygen penetration at the amorphous Ge surface result in a dilute bridge structure with a predominant +1 oxidation state for similar exposures. Molecules of N_2O decompose at the surfaces to desorbed N_2 molecules and chemisorbed oxygen atoms. In contrast, both oxygen and nitrogen are detected at the surfaces following exposure to NO molecules. Both NO and N_2O appear to dissociate and bond at the top surface layer. Molecular nitrogen (N_2) does not react with the Ge surfaces, however, a precursor Ge nitride is observed at room temperature following exposure to nitrogen atoms and ions. Removal of oxygen by heating of the NO-exposed surface to 550^circC enabled the identification of the Ge-N vibrational modes. These modes show a structure similar to that of germanium nitride. This spectrum is also identical to that of the N-exposed surface heated to 550^circC. Surface phonon modes of the narrow-gap semiconducting

  13. The electronic states of pyrimidine studied by VUV photoabsorption and electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    da Silva, F Ferreira; Almeida, D; Martins, G; Milosavljević, A R; Marinković, B P; Hoffmann, S V; Mason, N J; Nunes, Y; Garcia, G; Limão-Vieira, P

    2010-07-07

    The electronic state spectroscopy of pyrimidine C(4)H(4)N(2) has been investigated using both high resolution VUV photoabsorption in the energy range 3.7 to 10.8 eV (335 to 115 nm) and lower resolution electron energy loss in the range 2 to 15 eV. The low energy absorption band, assigned to the (pi*) <-- 7b(2)(n(N)) (1(1)B(1)<-- 1(1)A(1)) transition, at 3.85(4) eV and the vibrational progressions superimposed upon it have been observed for the first time, due to the availability of a high-resolution photon beam (0.075 nm), corresponding to 3 meV at the midpoint of the energy range studied. Vibronic coupling has been shown to play an important role dictating the nature of the observed excited states, especially for the lowest (1)B(1) state. The 2(1)B(1) state is proposed to have its origin at 7.026 eV according to the vibrational excitation reported in this energy region (7.8-8.4 eV). New experimental evidence of 4(1)A(1) state with a maximum cross section at 8.800 eV is supported by previous ab initio quantum chemical calculations. Rydberg series have been assigned converging to the three lowest ionisation energy limits, 9.32 eV ((2)B(2)), 10.41 eV ((2)B(1)) and 11.1 eV ((2)A(1) + (2)A(2)) with new members reported for the first time and classified according to the magnitude of the quantum defects (delta). Additionally, the absolute differential cross section for inelastic electron scattering has been measured for the most intense band from 6.9 to 7.8 eV assigned to (1)pipi* (3(1)A(1) + 2(1)B(2)).

  14. Chemical Distribution and Bonding of Lithium in Intercalated Graphite: Identification with Optimized Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Feng; Graetz, Jason; Moreno, M. Sergio; Ma, Chao; Wu, Lijun; Volkov, Vyacheslav; Zhu, Yimei

    2011-01-10

    Direct mapping of the lithium spatial distribution and the chemical state provides critical information on structure-correlated lithium transport in electrode materials for lithium batteries. Nevertheless, probing lithium, the lightest solid element in the periodic table, poses an extreme challenge with traditional X-ray or electron scattering techniques due to its weak scattering power and vulnerability to radiation damage. Here, we report nanoscale maps of the lithium spatial distribution in electrochemically lithiated graphite using electron energy loss spectroscopy in the transmission electron microscope under optimized experimental conditions. The electronic structure of the discharged graphite was obtained from the near-edge fine structure of the Li and C K-edges and ab initio calculations. A 2.7 eV chemical shift of the Li K-edge, along with changes in the density of states, reveals the ionic nature of the intercalated lithium with significant charge transfer to the graphene sheets. Direct mapping of lithium in graphite revealed nanoscale inhomogeneities (nonstoichiometric regions), which are correlated with local phase separation and structural disorder (i.e., lattice distortion and dislocations) as observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The surface solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer was also imaged and determined to have a thickness of 10-50 nm, covering both edge and basal planes with LiF as its primary inorganic component. The Li K-edge spectroscopy and mapping, combined with electron microscopy-based structural analysis provide a comprehensive view of the structure-correlated lithium intercalation in graphite and of the formation of the SEI layer.

  15. Chemical Distribution and Bonding of Lithium in Intercalated Graphite: Identification with Optimized Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.; Wang, F.; Graetz, J.; Moreno, M.S.; Ma, C.; Wu, L.; Volkov, V.

    2011-02-01

    Direct mapping of the lithium spatial distribution and the chemical state provides critical information on structure-correlated lithium transport in electrode materials for lithium batteries. Nevertheless, probing lithium, the lightest solid element in the periodic table, poses an extreme challenge with traditional X-ray or electron scattering techniques due to its weak scattering power and vulnerability to radiation damage. Here, we report nanoscale maps of the lithium spatial distribution in electrochemically lithiated graphite using electron energy loss spectroscopy in the transmission electron microscope under optimized experimental conditions. The electronic structure of the discharged graphite was obtained from the near-edge fine structure of the Li and C K-edges and ab initio calculations. A 2.7 eV chemical shift of the Li K-edge, along with changes in the density of states, reveals the ionic nature of the intercalated lithium with significant charge transfer to the graphene sheets. Direct mapping of lithium in graphite revealed nanoscale inhomogeneities (nonstoichiometric regions), which are correlated with local phase separation and structural disorder (i.e., lattice distortion and dislocations) as observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The surface solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer was also imaged and determined to have a thickness of 10-50 nm, covering both edge and basal planes with LiF as its primary inorganic component. The Li K-edge spectroscopy and mapping, combined with electron microscopy-based structural analysis provide a comprehensive view of the structure-correlated lithium intercalation in graphite and of the formation of the SEI layer.

  16. Real-space imaging of nanotip plasmons using electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Benjamin; Weber, Thorsten; Yalunin, Sergey V.; Kiel, Thomas; Matyssek, Christian; Sivis, Murat; Schäfer, Sascha; von Cube, Felix; Irsen, Stephan; Busch, Kurt; Ropers, Claus; Linden, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    We report the spatial mapping of surface plasmons on conical gold nanotips by electron energy loss spectroscopy. We observe standing-wave patterns resulting from reflections of the fundamental surface-plasmon mode at the nanotip apex. The experimental results are in very good agreement with numerical calculations using the discontinuous Galerkin time-domain method and analytical computations based on a cylindrical mode expansion.

  17. Optimization of monochromated TEM for ultimate resolution imaging and ultrahigh resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lopatin, Sergei; Cheng, Bin; Liu, Wei-Ting; Tsai, Meng-Lin; He, Jr-Hau; Chuvilin, Andrey

    2017-09-01

    The performance of a monochromated transmission electron microscope with Wien type monochromator is optimized to achieve an extremely narrow energy spread of electron beam and an ultrahigh energy resolution with spectroscopy. The energy spread in the beam is improved by almost an order of magnitude as compared to specified values. The optimization involves both the monochromator and the electron energy loss detection system. We demonstrate boosted capability of optimized systems with respect to ultra-low loss EELS and sub-angstrom resolution imaging (in a combination with spherical aberration correction). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Application of Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy for Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, N.; Jain, S.; Mittal, J.

    2015-03-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is among the few techniques that are available for the characterization of modified single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) having nanometer dimensions (~1-3 nm). CNTs can be modified either by surface functionalization or coating, between bundles of nanotubes by doping, intercalation and fully or partially filling the central core. EELS is an exclusive technique for the identification, composition analysis, and crystallization studies of the chemicals and materials used for the modification of SWCNTs. The present paper serves as a compendium of research work on the application of EELS for the characterization of modified SWCNTs.

  19. First-Principles Vibrational Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy of β -Guanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, G.; Taverna, D.; Lazzeri, M.; Balan, E.

    2017-07-01

    A general approach to model vibrational electron energy loss spectra obtained using an electron beam positioned away from the specimen is presented. The energy-loss probability of the fast electron is evaluated using first-principles quantum mechanical calculations (density functional theory) of the dielectric response of the specimen. The validity of the method is assessed using recently measured anhydrous β -guanine, an important molecular solid used by animals to produce structural colors. The good agreement between theory and experiments lays the basis for a quantitative interpretation of this spectroscopy in complex systems.

  20. The electronic properties of potassium doped copper-phthalocyanine studied by electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Flatz, K; Grobosch, M; Knupfer, M

    2007-06-07

    The authors have studied the electronic structure of potassium doped copper-phthalocyanine using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The evolution of the loss function indicates the formation of distinct KxCuPc phases. Taking into account the C1s and K2p core level excitations and recent results by Giovanelli et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 044709 (2007)], they conclude that these are K2CuPc and K4CuPc. They discuss the changes in the electronic excitations upon doping on the basis of the molecular electronic levels and the presence of electronic correlations.

  1. Precessed electron beam electron energy loss spectroscopy of graphene: Beyond channelling effects

    SciTech Connect

    Yedra, Ll.; Estradé, S.; Torruella, P.; Eljarrat, A.; Peiró, F.; Darbal, A. D.; Weiss, J. K.

    2014-08-04

    The effects of beam precession on the Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) signal of the carbon K edge in a 2 monolayer graphene sheet are studied. In a previous work, we demonstrated the use of precession to compensate for the channeling-induced reduction of EELS signal when in zone axis. In the case of graphene, no enhancement of EELS signal is found in the usual experimental conditions, as graphene is not thick enough to present channeling effects. Interestingly, though it is found that precession makes it possible to increase the collection angle, and, thus, the overall signal, without a loss of signal-to-background ratio.

  2. Investigation of the oxidation states of Cu additive in colored borosilicate glasses by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Guang Cheng, Shaodong; Li, Chao; Ma, Chuansheng; Zhong, Jiasong; Xiang, Weidong; Wang, Zhao

    2014-12-14

    Three optically transparent colorful (red, green, and blue) glasses were synthesized by the sol-gel method. Nano-sized precipitates were found in scanning electron microscopy images. The precipitates were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM. The measured lattice parameters of these precipitates were found to fit the metallic copper in red glass but deviate from single valenced Cu oxides in green and blue glasses. The chemistry of these nano-sized particles was confirmed by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). By fitting the EELS spectra obtained from the precipitates with the linear combination of reference spectra from Cu reference compounds, the oxidation states of Cu in the precipitates have been derived. First principle calculations suggested that the Cu nano-particles, which are in the similar oxidation states as our measurement, would show green color in the visible light range.

  3. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of coupled plasmonic systems: beyond the standard electron perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernasconi, G. D.; Flauraud, V.; Alexander, D. T. L.; Brugger, J.; Martin, O. J. F.; Butet, J.

    2016-09-01

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) has become an experimental method of choice for the investigation of localized surface plasmon resonances, allowing the simultaneous mapping of the associated field distributions and their resonant energies with a nanoscale spatial resolution. The experimental observations have been well-supported by numerical models based on the computation of the Lorentz force acting on the impinging electrons by the scattered field. However, in this framework, the influence of the intrinsic properties of the plasmonic nanostructures studied with the electron energy-loss (EEL) measurements is somehow hidden in the global response. To overcome this limitation, we propose to go beyond this standard, and well-established, electron perspective and instead to interpret the EELS data using directly the intrinsic properties of the nanostructures, without regard to the force acting on the electron. The proposed method is particularly well-suited for the description of coupled plasmonic systems, because the role played by each individual nanoparticle in the observed EEL spectrum can be clearly disentangled, enabling a more subtle understanding of the underlying physical processes. As examples, we consider different plasmonic geometries in order to emphasize the benefits of this new conceptual approach for interpreting experimental EELS data. In particular, we use it to describe results from samples made by traditional thin film patterning and by arranging colloidal nanostructures.

  4. Numerical simulations of interference effects in photon-assisted electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebi, Nahid; Sigle, Wilfried; Vogelgesang, Ralf; van Aken, Peter

    2013-05-01

    Although the electromagnetic resonances of individual nanostructures can be studied by electron or photon interactions alone, exciting new possibilities open up through the simultaneous use of both. In photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM), for example, single nanostructures are optically excited by short, intense pulses and concurrently imaged with high spatial resolution by fast electrons, which act as negligible probes of electric fields. Controlling their relative arrival time provides access to the dynamics of the electromagnetic response in the near field by recording images of the electron energy loss (or gain) spectra. In this paper, we investigate the transition from optically dominated PINEM to conventional, electron-dominated electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). During the systematic reduction of optical excitation intensity to zero, a novel electro-optical interference effect emerges. It reveals itself at those optical field strengths that lead to prominently visible constructive and destructive interference patterns of the optical and electron radiation fields which are scattered by a nanostructure. The interference patterns reported here allow one to achieve higher temporal, energy and spatial resolutions of the modal dynamics in electron microscopy.

  5. Toward 10 meV electron energy-loss spectroscopy resolution for plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Bellido, Edson P; Rossouw, David; Botton, Gianluigi A

    2014-06-01

    Energy resolution is one of the most important parameters in electron energy-loss spectroscopy. This is especially true for measurement of surface plasmon resonances, where high-energy resolution is crucial for resolving individual resonance peaks, in particular close to the zero-loss peak. In this work, we improve the energy resolution of electron energy-loss spectra of surface plasmon resonances, acquired with a monochromated beam in a scanning transmission electron microscope, by the use of the Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithm. We test the performance of the algorithm in a simulated spectrum and then apply it to experimental energy-loss spectra of a lithographically patterned silver nanorod. By reduction of the point spread function of the spectrum, we are able to identify low-energy surface plasmon peaks in spectra, more localized features, and higher contrast in surface plasmon energy-filtered maps. Thanks to the combination of a monochromated beam and the Richardson-Lucy algorithm, we improve the effective resolution down to 30 meV, and evidence of success up to 10 meV resolution for losses below 1 eV. We also propose, implement, and test two methods to limit the number of iterations in the algorithm. The first method is based on noise measurement and analysis, while in the second we monitor the change of slope in the deconvolved spectrum.

  6. Visualizing and identifying single atoms using electron energy-loss spectroscopy with low accelerating voltage.

    PubMed

    Suenaga, Kazu; Sato, Yuta; Liu, Zheng; Kataura, Hiromichi; Okazaki, Toshiya; Kimoto, Koji; Sawada, Hidetaka; Sasaki, Takeo; Omoto, Kazuya; Tomita, Takeshi; Kaneyama, Toshikatsu; Kondo, Yukihito

    2009-08-01

    Visualizing atoms and discriminating between those of different elements is a goal in many analytical techniques. The use of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in such single-atom analyses is hampered by an inherent difficulty related to the damage caused to specimens by incident electrons. Here, we demonstrate the successful EELS single-atom spectroscopy of various metallofullerene-doped single-wall nanotubes (known as peapods) without massive structural destruction. This is achieved by using an incident electron probe with a low accelerating voltage (60 kV). Single calcium atoms inside the peapods were unambiguously identified for the first time using EELS. Elemental analyses of lanthanum, cerium and erbium atoms were also demonstrated, which shows that single atoms with adjacent atomic numbers can be successfully discriminated with this technique.

  7. High-resolution calcium mapping of the endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi-exocytic membrane system. Electron energy loss imaging analysis of quick frozen-freeze dried PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Pezzati, R; Bossi, M; Podini, P; Meldolesi, J; Grohovaz, F

    1997-08-01

    The calcium pools segregated within the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi complex, exocytic, and other organelles are believed to participate in the regulation of a variety of cell functions. Until now, however, the precise intracellular distribution of the element had not been established. Here, we report about the first high-resolution calcium mapping obtained in neurosecretory PC12 cells by the imaging mode of the electron energy loss spectroscopy technique. The preparation procedure used included quick freezing of cell monolayers, followed by freeze-drying, fixation with OSO4 vapors, resin embedding, and cutting of very thin sections. Conventional electron microscopy and high-resolution immunocytochemistry revealed a high degree of structural preservation, a condition in which inorganic elements are expected to maintain their native distribution. Within these cells, calcium signals of nucleus, cytosol, and most mitochondria remained below detection, whereas in other organelles specific patterns were identified. In the endoplasmic reticulum, the distribution was heterogeneous with strongly positive cisternae (more often the nuclear envelope and stacks of parallel elements that are frequent in quick frozen preparations) lying in the proximity of or even in direct continuity with other, apparently negative cisternae. The Golgi complexes were labeled strongly and uniformly in all cisternae and part of their vesicles, with no appreciable differences along the cis-trans axis. Weaker or negative signals were recorded from the trans-Golgi network elements and from scattered vesicles, whereas in contrast secretion granules were strongly positive for calcium. These results are discussed in relation to the existing knowledge about the mechanisms of calcium transport in the variations organelles, and about the processes and functions regulated by organelle lumenal calcium in eukaryotic cells.

  8. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of plasmon resonances in titanium nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Herzing, Andrew A.; Guler, Urcan; Zhou, Xiuli; Norris, Theodore B.; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Shalaev, Vladimir

    2016-04-25

    The plasmon resonance characteristics of refractory TiN thin films were analyzed using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). A bulk plasmon resonance was observed at 2.81 eV and a weaker surface plasmon resonance peak was detected at 2.05 eV. These findings are compared to finite-difference time-domain simulations based on measured optical data. The calculated values for both the bulk and surface resonances (2.74 eV and 2.15 eV, respectively) show reasonable agreement with those measured via EELS. The amplitude of the experimentally observed surface resonance was weaker than that typically encountered in noble metal nanostructures, and this is discussed in the context of electron density and reduced spatial confinement of the resonance mode in the thin-film geometry.

  9. Electron energy loss spectroscopy techniques for the study of microbial chromium(VI) reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daulton, Tyrone L.; Little, Brenda J.; Lowe, Kristine; Jones-Meehan, Joanne

    2002-01-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques were used to determine oxidation state, at high spatial resolution, of chromium associated with the metal-reducing bacteria, Shewanella oneidensis, in anaerobic cultures containing Cr(VI)O4(2-). These techniques were applied to fixed cells examined in thin section by conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as unfixed, hydrated bacteria examined by environmental cell (EC)-TEM. Two distinct populations of bacteria were observed by TEM: bacteria exhibiting low image contrast and bacteria exhibiting high contrast in their cell membrane (or boundary) structure which was often encrusted with high-contrast precipitates. Measurements by EELS demonstrated that cell boundaries became saturated with low concentrations of Cr and the precipitates encrusting bacterial cells contained a reduced form of Cr in oxidation state + 3 or lower.

  10. Valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy in monochromated scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Erni, Rolf; Browning, Nigel D

    2005-10-01

    With the development of monochromators for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes, valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) is developing into a unique technique to study the band structure and optical properties of nanoscale materials. This article discusses practical aspects of spatially resolved VEELS performed in scanning transmission mode and the alignments necessary to achieve the current optimum performance of approximately 0.15 eV energy resolution with an electron probe size of approximately 1 nm. In particular, a collection of basic concepts concerning the acquisition process, the optimization of the energy resolution, the spatial resolution and the data processing are provided. A brief study of planar defects in a Y(1)Ba(2)Cu(3)O(7-)(delta) high-temperature superconductor illustrates these concepts and shows what kind of information can be accessed by VEELS.

  11. Detection of water and its derivatives on individual nanoparticles using vibrational electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Crozier, Peter A; Aoki, Toshihiro; Liu, Qianlang

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the role of water, hydrate and hydroxyl species on nanoparticle surfaces and interfaces is very important in both physical and life sciences. Detecting the presence of oxygen-hydrogen species with nanometer resolution is extremely challenging at present. Here we show that the recently developed vibrational electron energy-loss spectroscopy using subnanometer focused electron beams can be employed to spectroscopically identify the local presence and variation of OH species on nanoscale surfaces. The hydrogen-oxygen fingerprint can be correlated with highly localized structural and morphological information obtained from electron imaging. Moreover, the current approach exploits the aloof beam mode of spectral acquisition which does not require direct electron irradiation of the sample thus greatly reducing beam damage to the OH bond. These findings open the door for using electron microscopy to probe local hydroxyl and hydrate species on nanoscale organic and inorganic structures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Electron energy loss spectroscopy techniques for the study of microbial chromium(VI) reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daulton, Tyrone L.; Little, Brenda J.; Lowe, Kristine; Jones-Meehan, Joanne

    2002-01-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques were used to determine oxidation state, at high spatial resolution, of chromium associated with the metal-reducing bacteria, Shewanella oneidensis, in anaerobic cultures containing Cr(VI)O4(2-). These techniques were applied to fixed cells examined in thin section by conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as unfixed, hydrated bacteria examined by environmental cell (EC)-TEM. Two distinct populations of bacteria were observed by TEM: bacteria exhibiting low image contrast and bacteria exhibiting high contrast in their cell membrane (or boundary) structure which was often encrusted with high-contrast precipitates. Measurements by EELS demonstrated that cell boundaries became saturated with low concentrations of Cr and the precipitates encrusting bacterial cells contained a reduced form of Cr in oxidation state + 3 or lower.

  13. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of anomalous plutonium behavior in nuclear waste materials.

    PubMed

    Buck, Edgar C; Finn, Patricia A; Bates, John K

    2004-01-01

    Plutonium-enriched layer has been observed in corroded spent uranium oxide fuel (CSNF). These Pu-enriched regions were examined with analytical transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). The enriched region also contained U, Am, Ru, Zr, but only minor enrichment of rare earth elements. The Pu, possibly as Pu(V) according to EELS measurements, was dispersed within re-precipitated uranium oxide (identified as U3O8) nano-crystals between U(VI) secondary phases and the CSNF surface. The U, Pu, and Am enrichment was observed in the corrosion products with tests on different nuclear fuels. This may have implications for the long-term behavior of CSNF under storage in a geologic waste repository. Furthermore, there may be an increased potential for the generation of Pu-bearing colloids from this type of weathered CSNF.

  14. Electron energy loss spectroscopy techniques for the study of microbial chromium(VI) reduction.

    PubMed

    Daulton, Tyrone L; Little, Brenda J; Lowe, Kristine; Jones-Meehan, Joanne

    2002-06-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques were used to determine oxidation state, at high spatial resolution, of chromium associated with the metal-reducing bacteria, Shewanella oneidensis, in anaerobic cultures containing Cr(VI)O4(2-). These techniques were applied to fixed cells examined in thin section by conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as unfixed, hydrated bacteria examined by environmental cell (EC)-TEM. Two distinct populations of bacteria were observed by TEM: bacteria exhibiting low image contrast and bacteria exhibiting high contrast in their cell membrane (or boundary) structure which was often encrusted with high-contrast precipitates. Measurements by EELS demonstrated that cell boundaries became saturated with low concentrations of Cr and the precipitates encrusting bacterial cells contained a reduced form of Cr in oxidation state + 3 or lower.

  15. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of excitons in two-dimensional-semiconductors as a function of temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Tizei, Luiz H. G.; Lin, Yung-Chang; Suenaga, Kazu; Lu, Ang-Yu; Li, Lain-Jong

    2016-04-18

    We have explored the benefits of performing monochromated Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) in samples at cryogenic temperatures. As an example, we have observed the excitonic absorption peaks in single layer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides. These peaks appear separated by small energies due to spin orbit coupling. We have been able to distinguish the split for MoS{sub 2} below 300 K and for MoSe{sub 2} below 220 K. However, the distinction between peaks is only clear at 150 K. We have measured the change in absorption threshold between 150 K and 770 K for MoS{sub 2} and MoSe{sub 2}. We discuss the effect of carbon and ice contamination in EELS spectra. The increased spectral resolution available made possible with modern monochromators in electron microscopes will require the development of stable sample holders which reaches temperatures far below that of liquid nitrogen.

  16. Electron energy loss spectroscopy study of Sr2-xGdxTiMnO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biskup, Nevenko; Alvarez-Serrano, Inmaculada; Veiga, Maria Luisa; Garcia-Hernandez, Mar; Lopez, Maria Luisa; Varela, Maria

    2012-02-01

    The newly synthesized double perovskite family Sr2-xGdxTiMnO6 (0electron energy loss spectroscopy. We find that, is spite of some precipitations of Mn and Ti rich regions that exist in 0.25<=x<=0.75, the manganese and titanium ions are generally well intermixed in both interior of the grains and on the grain boundaries. We discuss these results in the frame of highly non-linear electrical conductivity found in these materials.

  17. Transition metal d -band occupancy in skutterudites studied by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prytz, Ø.; Taftø, J.; Ahn, C. C.; Fultz, B.

    2007-03-01

    The transition-metal 3d occupancy of a series of thermoelectric skutterudites is investigated using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. We find that bonding causes an emptying of the 3d states in the binary skutterudites CoP3 , CoAs3 , CoSb3 , and NiP3 , while compared to the pure Fe the 3d occupancy in LaFe4P12 is significantly increased, consistent with the idea that each interstitial La atom (rattler) donates three electrons to compensate for missing valence electron of Fe as compared to Co. These experimental results are in agreement with previous models suggesting a predominantly covalent bonding between transition metal and pnictogen atoms in skutterudites, and provide evidence of charge transfer from La to the Fe-P complex in LaFe4P12 .

  18. Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy Theory and Simulation Applied to Nanoparticle Plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Nicholas Walker

    In this dissertation, the capacity of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) to probe plasmons is examined in detail. EELS is shown to be able to detect both electric hot spots and Fano resonances in contrast to the prevailing knowledge prior to this work. The most detailed examination of magnetoplasmonic resonances in multi-ring structures to date and the utility of electron tomography to computational plasmonics is explored, and a new tomographic method for the reconstruction of a target is introduced. Since the observation of single-molecule surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SMSERS) in 1997, questions regarding the nature of the electromagnetic hot spots responsible for such observations still persist. A computational analysis of the electron- and photon-driven surface-plasmon resonances of monomer and dimer metal nanorods is presented to elucidate the differences and similarities between the two excitation mechanisms in a system with well understood optical properties. By correlating the nanostructure's simulated electron energy loss spectrum and loss-probability maps with its induced polarization and scattered electric field we discern how certain plasmon modes are selectively excited and how they funnel energy from the excitation source into the near- and far-field. Using a fully retarded electron-scattering theory capable of describing arbitrary three-dimensional nanoparticle geometries, aggregation schemes, and material compositions, we find that electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is able to indirectly probe the same electromagnetic hot spots that are generated by an optical excitation source. EELS is then employed in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to obtain maps of the localized surface plasmon modes of SMSERS-active nanostructures, which are resolved in both space and energy. Single-molecule character is confirmed by the bianalyte approach using two isotopologues of Rhodamine 6G. The origins of this observation are explored

  19. Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy: Fundamentals and applications in the characterization of minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, K.M.

    1989-04-01

    The combined use of an energy-loss spectrometer and an analytical electron microscope with fine probe forming capabilities provides a wealth of information about the sample at high spatial resolution. Fundamental principles governing the physics of the interaction between the fast electron and a thin foil sample, to account for the fine structure in the inelastically scattered fast electron distribution (Electron-Energy Loss Spectroscopy, EELS), will be reviewed. General application of EELS is in the area of low atomic number elements (Z < 11) microanalysis, where it significantly complements the more widely used Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDXS). However, a careful analysis of the low loss plasmon oscillations and the fine structure in the core-loss edges, can provide additional information related to the bonding and electronic structure of the sample. An illustration of this is presented from our study of Cdelta diamond residue from the Allende carbonaceous chondrite. Combination of EELS with channeling effects can provide specific site occupation/valence information in crystalline materials. Details of this novel crystallographic method will be outlined and illustrated with an example of the study of chromite spinels. Finally, some pertinent experimental details will be discussed. 7 figs.

  20. Time-of-flight electron energy loss spectroscopy using TM110 deflection cavities.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, W; van Rens, J F M; van Ninhuijs, M A W; Toonen, W F; Kieft, E R; Mutsaers, P H A; Luiten, O J

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the use of two TM110 resonant cavities to generate ultrashort electron pulses and subsequently measure electron energy losses in a time-of-flight type of setup. The method utilizes two synchronized microwave cavities separated by a drift space of 1.45 m. The setup has an energy resolution of 12 ± 2 eV FWHM at 30 keV, with an upper limit for the temporal resolution of 2.7 ± 0.4 ps. Both the time and energy resolution are currently limited by the brightness of the tungsten filament electron gun used. Through simulations, it is shown that an energy resolution of 0.95 eV and a temporal resolution of 110 fs can be achieved using an electron gun with a higher brightness. With this, a new method is provided for time-resolved electron spectroscopy without the need for elaborate laser setups or expensive magnetic spectrometers.

  1. Time-of-flight electron energy loss spectroscopy using TM110 deflection cavities

    PubMed Central

    Verhoeven, W.; van Rens, J. F. M.; van Ninhuijs, M. A. W.; Toonen, W. F.; Kieft, E. R.; Mutsaers, P. H. A.; Luiten, O. J.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of two TM110 resonant cavities to generate ultrashort electron pulses and subsequently measure electron energy losses in a time-of-flight type of setup. The method utilizes two synchronized microwave cavities separated by a drift space of 1.45 m. The setup has an energy resolution of 12 ± 2 eV FWHM at 30 keV, with an upper limit for the temporal resolution of 2.7 ± 0.4 ps. Both the time and energy resolution are currently limited by the brightness of the tungsten filament electron gun used. Through simulations, it is shown that an energy resolution of 0.95 eV and a temporal resolution of 110 fs can be achieved using an electron gun with a higher brightness. With this, a new method is provided for time-resolved electron spectroscopy without the need for elaborate laser setups or expensive magnetic spectrometers. PMID:27704035

  2. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of carbon in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Bradley, John P.; Thomas, Kathie L.; Mckay, David S.

    1994-01-01

    The nature of the carbon-bearing phases in IDP's provides information regarding the chemical and physical processes involved in the formation and evolution of the early solar system. Several carbon-bearing materials have been observed in IDP's, but details of their nature, abundance, and distribution are still poorly known. A knowledge of the abundance and nature of carbon in IDP's is useful in constraining the sources of IDP's and for comparisons with other chondritic materials. Estimates of carbon abundance in anhydrous and hydrated IDP's indicate that most of these particles have significantly higher carbon than the carbonaceous chondrites. Mineralogical analyses show that carbonates are only a minor component of most hydrated IDP's, and so the high carbon abundances in this group of IDP's indicates that other carbon-bearing phases are present in significant concentrations. Using the technique of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), we have identified two forms of carbon in a hydrated IDP, oxidized carbon (carbonates), and amorphous elemental carbon.

  3. Quantification of the boron speciation in alkali borosilicate glasses by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shaodong; Yang, Guang; Zhao, Yanqi; Peng, MingYing; Skibsted, Jørgen; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and related analytical techniques have been widely used to study the microstructure of different materials. However, few research works have been performed in the field of glasses, possibly due to the electron-beam irradiation damage. In this paper, we have developed a method based on electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data acquisition and analyses, which enables determination of the boron speciation in a series of ternary alkali borosilicate glasses with constant molar ratios. A script for the fast acquisition of EELS has been designed, from which the fraction of BO4 tetrahedra can be obtained by fitting the experimental data with linear combinations of the reference spectra. The BO4 fractions (N4) obtained by EELS are consistent with those from 11B MAS NMR spectra, suggesting that EELS can be an alternative and convenient way to determine the N4 fraction in glasses. In addition, the boron speciation of a CeO2 doped potassium borosilicate glass has been analyzed by using the time-resolved EELS spectra. The results clearly demonstrate that the BO4 to BO3 transformation induced by the electron beam irradiation can be efficiently suppressed by doping CeO2 to the borosilicate glasses. PMID:26643370

  4. From electron energy-loss spectroscopy to multi-dimensional and multi-signal electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Colliex, Christian

    2011-01-01

    This review intends to illustrate how electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques in the electron microscope column have evolved over the past 60 years. Beginning as a physicist tool to measure basic excitations in solid thin foils, EELS techniques have gradually become essential for analytical purposes, nowadays pushed to the identification of individual atoms and their bonding states. The intimate combination of highly performing techniques with quite efficient computational tools for data processing and ab initio modeling has opened the way to a broad range of novel imaging modes with potential impact on many different fields. The combination of Angström-level spatial resolution with an energy resolution down to a few tenths of an electron volt in the core-loss spectral domain has paved the way to atomic-resolved elemental and bonding maps across interfaces and nanostructures. In the low-energy range, improved energy resolution has been quite efficient in recording surface plasmon maps and from them electromagnetic maps across the visible electron microscopy (EM) domain, thus bringing a new view to nanophotonics studies. Recently, spectrum imaging of the emitted photons under the primary electron beam and the spectacular introduction of time-resolved techniques down to the femtosecond time domain, have become innovative keys for the development and use of a brand new multi-dimensional and multi-signal electron microscopy.

  5. Quasinormal mode theory and modelling of electron energy loss spectroscopy for plasmonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Rong-Chun; Hughes, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    Understanding light-matter interactions using localized surface plasmons (LSPs) is of fundamental interest in classical and quantum plasmonics and has a wide range of applications. In order to understand the spatial properties of LSPs, electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is a common and powerful method of spatially resolving the extreme localized fields that can be obtained with metal resonators. However, modelling EELS for general shaped resonators presents a major challenge in computational electrodynamics, requiring the full photon Green function as a function of two space points and frequency. Here we present an intuitive and computationally simple method for computing EELS maps of plasmonic resonators using a quasinormal mode (QNM) expansion technique. By separating the contribution of the QNM and the bulk material, we give closed-form analytical formulas for the plasmonic QNM contribution to the EELS maps. We exemplify our technique for a split ring resonator, a gold nanorod, and a nanorod dimer structure. The method is accurate, intuitive, and gives orders of magnitude improvements over direct dipole simulations that numerically solve the full 3D Maxwell equations. We also show how the same QNM Green function can be used to obtain the Purcell factor (and projected local density of optical states) from quantum dipole emitters or two level atoms, and we demonstrate how the spectral features differ in general to the EELS spectrum.

  6. The applications of in situ electron energy loss spectroscopy to the study of electron beam nanofabrication.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiahn J; Howitt, David G; Gierhart, Brian C; Smith, Rosemary L; Collins, Scott D

    2009-06-01

    An in situ electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) technique has been developed to investigate the dynamic processes associated with electron-beam nanofabrication on thin membranes. In this article, practical applications germane to e-beam nanofabrication are illustrated with a case study of the drilling of nanometer-sized pores in silicon nitride membranes. This technique involves successive acquisitions of the plasmon-loss and the core-level ionization-loss spectra in real time, both of which provide the information regarding the hole-drilling kinetics, including two respective rates for total mass loss, individual nitrogen and silicon element depletion, and the change of the atomic bonding environment. In addition, the in situ EELS also provides an alternative method for endpoint detection with a potentially higher time resolution than by imaging. On the basis of the time evolution of in situ EELS spectra, a qualitative working model combining knock-on sputtering, irradiation-induced mass transport, and phase separation can be proposed.

  7. Plasmons in layered nanospheres and nanotubes investigated by spatially resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kociak, M.; Henrard, L.; Stéphan, O.; Suenaga, K.; Colliex, C.

    2000-05-01

    We present an extensive electron energy loss spectroscopy study of the low-loss energy region, recorded on multishell carbon and boron-nitride nanotubes and carbon hyperfullerenes. Collections of spectra were recorded in a scanning transmission electron microscope by scanning a subnanometer probe from vacuum into the center of the nano-objects. This experimental technique provides the unique ability of disentangling and identifying the different excitation modes of a nanoparticle. We concentrate on the study of surface modes excited in a near-field geometry where the coupling distance between the electron beam and the surface of the nano-objects is accurately monitored. Similarities between surface collective excitations in the different layered nanostructures (cylindrical or spherical, boron nitride, or carbon constituted) are pointed out. Two surface modes at 12-13 eV and 17-18 eV are experimentally clearly evidenced. We show that these modes are accurately described by a classical continuum dielectric model taking fully into account the anisotropic character and the hollow geometry of the nanoparticles. These two modes are shown to be directly related to the in-plane and out-of-plane components of the dielectric tensor. The higher-energy mode (in-plane mode) is shown to shift to higher energy with decreasing impact parameter, as a result of an increase in the weights of the high-order multipolar modes while reaching the surface of the nano-objects.

  8. Valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy study of ZrSiO₄ and ZrO₂.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nan; Spence, John C H

    2013-11-01

    ZrSiO4 (zircon) and m-ZrO2 (zirconia) are fundamental and industrially important materials. This work reports the detailed valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) studies of these compounds. The dielectric response functions, as well as single-electron interband transition spectra, are derived from VEELS data for both ZrSiO4 and m-ZrO2, in the range 5-50 eV using the Kramers-Kronig analysis method. Our interpretation of the interband transitions is given with the aid of ab initio calculations of density of states. The bandgap energies for both materials are also measured using VEELS. The surface and bulk plasmons are identified: the surface plasmon peaks locate at around 12 eV, and two bulk plasmon peaks are ∼15-16 eV and ∼25-27 eV, respectively. Although similarities in the VEELS exist between ZrSiO4 and m-ZrO2, two major differences are also noticed and explained in terms of composition and structure differences. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Band gap widening at random CIGS grain boundary detected by valence electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Debora; Buecheler, Stephan; Reinhard, Patrick; Pianezzi, Fabian; Bissig, Benjamin; Carron, Romain; Hage, Fredrik; Ramasse, Quentin; Erni, Rolf; Tiwari, Ayodhya N.

    2016-10-01

    Cu(In,Ga) Se2 (CIGS) thin film solar cells have demonstrated very high efficiencies, but still the role of nanoscale inhomogeneities in CIGS and their impact on the solar cell performance are not yet clearly understood. Due to the polycrystalline structure of CIGS, grain boundaries are very common structural defects that are also accompanied by compositional variations. In this work, we apply valence electron energy loss spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy to study the local band gap energy at a grain boundary in the CIGS absorber layer. Based on this example, we demonstrate the capabilities of a 2nd generation monochromator that provides a very high energy resolution and allows for directly relating the chemical composition and the band gap energy across the grain boundary. A band gap widening of about 20 meV is observed at the grain boundary. Furthermore, the compositional analysis by core-loss EELS reveals an enrichment of In together with a Cu, Ga and Se depletion at the same area. The experimentally obtained results can therefore be well explained by the presence of a valence band barrier at the grain boundary.

  10. Mode Coupling in Plasmonic Heterodimers Probed with Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Flauraud, Valentin; Bernasconi, Gabriel D; Butet, Jérémy; Alexander, Duncan T L; Martin, Olivier J F; Brugger, Juergen

    2017-03-14

    While plasmonic antennas composed of building blocks made of the same material have been thoroughly studied, recent investigations have highlighted the unique opportunities enabled by making compositionally asymmetric plasmonic systems. So far, mainly heterostructures composed of nanospheres and nanodiscs have been investigated, revealing opportunities for the design of Fano resonant nanostructures, directional scattering, sensing and catalytic applications. In this article, an improved fabrication method is reported that enables precise tuning of the heterodimer geometry, with interparticle distances made down to a few nanometers between Au-Ag and Au-Al nanoparticles. A wide range of mode energy detuning and coupling conditions are observed by near field hyperspectral imaging performed with electron energy loss spectroscopy, supported by full wave analysis numerical simulations. These results provide direct insights into the mode hybridization of plasmonic heterodimers, pointing out the influence of each dimer constituent in the overall electromagnetic response. By relating the coupling of non-dipolar modes and plasmon-interband interaction with the dimer geometry, this work facilitates the development of plasmonic heterostructures with tailored responses, beyond the possibilities offered by homodimers.

  11. Oswald-Kasper-Gaukler model for reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvat-Pujol, F.; Werner, W. S. M.

    2011-05-01

    The Oswald-Kasper-Gaukler (OKG) model for elastic electron backscattering [J. Electr. Spectrosc. Rel. Phen.JESRAW0368-204810.1016/0368-2048(93)80019-I 61(1993)251] has been extended within the partial-intensity approach to take inelastic collisions into account. Analytical expressions have been derived for the path-length distribution and the partial intensities, achieving good agreement with results of Monte Carlo (MC) calculations of these quantities. A criterion is given to predict the validity of the model for a given material, geometry, and kinetic energy. Experimental reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) spectra have been compared with REELS spectra calculated using the modified OKG model, obtaining good agreement between them. The proposed model is also applied in a quantitative analysis of experimental REELS. In all investigated cases, the single-scattering loss distributions retrieved from this analysis agree with results from previous analyses—based on MC calculations—within 5%. The presented model can therefore be employed in quantitative analyses of REELS of semi-infinite solids, while it is both numerically simpler and conceptually clearer than related approaches.

  12. Practical spatial resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shah, A B; Ramasse, Q M; Wen, J G; Bhattacharya, A; Zuo, J M

    2011-08-01

    The resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is limited by delocalization of inelastic electron scattering rather than probe size in an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). In this study, we present an experimental quantification of EELS spatial resolution using chemically modulated 2×(LaMnO(3))/2×(SrTiO(3)) and 2×(SrVO(3))/2×(SrTiO(3)) superlattices by measuring the full width at half maxima (FWHM) of integrated Ti M(2,3), Ti L(2,3), V L(2,3), Mn L(2,3), La N(4,5), La N(2,3) La M(4,5) and Sr L(3) edges over the superlattices. The EELS signals recorded using large collection angles are peaked at atomic columns. The FWHM of the EELS profile, obtained by curve-fitting, reveals a systematic trend with the energy loss for the Ti, V, and Mn edges. However, the experimental FWHM of the Sr and La edges deviates significantly from the observed experimental tendency. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mapping bright and dark modes in gold nanoparticle chains using electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Barrow, Steven J; Rossouw, David; Funston, Alison M; Botton, Gianluigi A; Mulvaney, Paul

    2014-07-09

    We present a scanning transmission electron microscopy-electron energy loss spectroscopy (STEM-EELS) investigation of gold nanosphere chains with lengths varying from 1 to 5 particles. We show localized EELS signals from the chains and identify energy-loss peaks arising due to l = 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 plasmon modes through the use of EELS mapping. We also show the evolution of the energy of these modes as the length of a given chain increases, and we find that a chain containing N particles can accommodate at least N experimentally observable modes, in addition to the transverse mode. As the chain length is increased by the addition of one more gold particle to the chain, the new N + 1 mode becomes the highest energy mode, while the existing modes lower their energy and eventually asymptote as they delocalize along the chain. We also show that modes become increasingly difficult to detect with the EELS technique as l approaches N. The data are compared to numerical simulations.

  14. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of carbon in dissociated dislocations in tantalum carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Craig; Hoffman, Mark; Williams, Wendell S.

    1982-10-01

    The carbon concentration in individual stacking faults in dissociated dislocations in tantalum carbide (TaCx) was analyzed using electron energy loss spectroscopy. Although the faulted region is less than 10 nm wide, the small diameter electron beam (0.5 nm) of a dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope allowed the carbon K x-ray excitation edge from the faulted region to be distinguished from the corresponding signal from the unfaulted region. The 50-nm thick foil was prepared by grinding, polishing, and ion milling a specimen sawed from a single crystal of TaC0.78. The analysis showed a significantly lower value for the carbon concentration in the fault, in accordance with crystallographic and energy considerations. The stacking fault in NaCl-structure TaCx must exhibit hcp symmetry, but the appropriate hcp phase, Ta2C, contains less carbon. Hence diffusion of carbon away from the moving dislocation must accompany plastic deformation. However, in view of the high melting point and high activation energy for carbon migration, diffusion is slow below approximately 1600 °C. This temperature corresponds approximately with the brittle-ductile transition for TaC. The isomorphic compound TiC does not exhibit dissociated dislocations, and hence this form of Suzuki hardening should not occur. Indeed, gross plastic deformation in TiC can occur at temperatures as low as 800 °C.

  15. Challenging the nature of low-energy plasmon excitations in CaC6 using electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Friedrich; König, Andreas; Kramberger, Christian; Pichler, Thomas; Büchner, Bernd; Knupfer, Martin

    2013-04-01

    The nature of low-energy plasmon excitations plays an important role in understanding the low-energy electronic properties and coupling mechanism of different superconducting compounds such as CaC6. Recent ab initio studies predict a charge carrier intraband plasmon in keeping with a low-energy acoustic plasmon. Here, we have studied the low-energy electronic excitations of CaC6 using high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy in transmission at low temperatures. The analysis of the core level excitations leads to the conclusion that hybridization between graphite and calcium states plays an essential role in this graphite-intercalated compound. Regarding the low-energy plasmon excitation, we observe the formation of an intraband (charge carrier) plasmon with a negative dispersion at about 3.5 eV in sound agreement with the theory. Finally, a weak excitation around 1.2 eV with an almost linear dispersion relation can be observed as predicted for an acoustic plasmon that may mediate the superconducting coupling in CaC6. However its optical limit at ~1 eV challenges the theoretical predictions and safely rules out an electronic superconducting coupling mechanism in CaC6

  16. The beta-SiC(100) surface studied by low energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, and electron energy loss spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayan, M.

    1986-01-01

    The beta-SiC(100) surface has been studied by low energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, high resolution electron energy loss spectra (HREELS), and core level excitation EELS. Two new Si-terminated phases have been discovered, one with (3 x 2) symmetry, and the other with (2 x 1) symmetry. Models are presented to describe these phases. New results, for the C-rich surface, are presented and discussed. In addition, core level excitation EELS results are given and compared with theory.

  17. The beta-SiC(100) surface studied by low energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, and electron energy loss spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayan, M.

    1986-01-01

    The beta-SiC(100) surface has been studied by low energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, high resolution electron energy loss spectra (HREELS), and core level excitation EELS. Two new Si-terminated phases have been discovered, one with (3 x 2) symmetry, and the other with (2 x 1) symmetry. Models are presented to describe these phases. New results, for the C-rich surface, are presented and discussed. In addition, core level excitation EELS results are given and compared with theory.

  18. Electronic and optical properties of Fe, Pd, and Ti studied by reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tahir, Dahlang; Kraaer, Jens; Tougaard, Sven

    2014-06-28

    We have studied the electronic and optical properties of Fe, Pd, and Ti by reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS). REELS spectra recorded for primary energies in the range from 300 eV to 10 keV were corrected for multiple inelastically scattered electrons to determine the effective inelastic-scattering cross section. The dielectric functions and optical properties were determined by comparing the experimental inelastic-electron scattering cross section with a simulated cross section calculated within the semi-classical dielectric response model in which the only input is Im(−1/ε) by using the QUEELS-ε(k,ω)-REELS software package. The complex dielectric functions ε(k,ω), in the 0–100 eV energy range, for Fe, Pd, and Ti were determined from the derived Im(−1/ε) by Kramers-Kronig transformation and then the refractive index n and extinction coefficient k. The validity of the applied model was previously tested and found to give consistent results when applied to REELS spectra at energies between 300 and 1000 eV taken at widely different experimental geometries. In the present paper, we provide, for the first time, a further test on its validity and find that the model also gives consistent results when applied to REELS spectra in the full range of primary electron energies from 300 eV to 10000 eV. This gives confidence in the validity of the applied method.

  19. Reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy and imaging for surface studies in transmission electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z L; Bentley, J

    1992-02-15

    A review is given on the techniques and applications of high-energy reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS) and reflection electron microscopy (REM) for surface studies in scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEM) and conventional transmission electron microscopes (TEM). A diffraction method is introduced to identify a surface orientation in the geometry of REM. The surface dielectric response theory is presented and applied for studying alpha-alumina surfaces. Domains of the alpha-alumina (012) surface initially terminated with oxygen can be reduced by an intense electron beam to produce Al metal; the resistance to beam damage of surface domains initially terminated with Al+3 ions is attributed to the screening effect of adsorbed oxygen. Surface energy-loss near-edge structure (ELNES), extended energy-loss fine structure (EXELFS), and microanalysis using REELS are illustrated based on the studies of TiO2 and MgO. Effects of surface resonances (or channeling) on the REELS signal-to-background ratio are described. The REELS detection of a monolayer of oxygen adsorption on diamond (111) surfaces is reported. It is shown that phase contrast REM image content can be significantly increased with the use of a field emission gun (FEG). Phase contrast effects close to the core of a screw dislocation are discussed and the associated Fresnel fringes around a surface step are observed. Finally, an in situ REM experiment is described for studying atomic desorption and diffusion processes on alpha-alumina surfaces at temperatures of 1,300-1,400 degrees C.

  20. Excitonic, vibrational, and van der Waals interactions in electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, T; Miyata, T; Olovsson, W

    2017-09-01

    The pioneer, Ondrej L. Krivanek, and his collaborators have opened up many frontiers for the electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and they have demonstrated new potentials of the EELS method for investigating materials. Here, inspired by those achievements, we show further potentials of EELS based on the results of theoretical calculations, that is excitonic and van der Waals (vdW) interactions, as well as vibrational information of materials. Concerning the excitonic interactions, we highlight the importance of the two-particle calculation to reproduce the low energy-loss near-edge structure (ELNES), the Na-L2,3 edge of NaI and the Li-K edge of LiCl and LiFePO4. Furthermore, an unusually strong excitonic interaction at the O-K edge of perovskite oxides, SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, is shown. The effect of the vdW interaction in the ELNES is also investigated, and we observe that the magnitude of the vdW effect is approximately 0.1eV in the case of the ELNES from a solid and liquid, whereas its effect is almost negligible in the case of the ELNES from the gaseous phase owing to the long inter-molecular distance. In addition to the "static" information, the influence of the "dynamic" behavior of atoms in materials to EELS is also investigated. We show that measurements of the infrared spectrum are possible by using a modern monochromator system. Furthermore, an estimation of the atomic vibration in core-loss ELNES is also presented. We show the acquisition of vibrational information using the ELNES of liquid methanol and acetic acid, solid Al2O3, and oxygen gas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Study of the Dielectric Function of Graphene from Spectroscopic Ellipsometry and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Florence

    For more than 60 years, semiconductor research has been advancing up the periodic table. The first transistor was made from germanium. This later gave way to silicon-based devices due to the latter's ability to form an excellent interface with thermally-grown oxide. Now for the last ˜8 years, the focus has moved up one more row to carbon for post-CMOS devices in order to comply with the scaling limitations of Moore's law. However, for each of these, the measurements of film properties and dimensions have always been required for technological applications. These measurement methods often incorporate the use of light or electrons in order to take advantage of a wavelength that is on the order of, or smaller than, the feature sizes of interest. This thesis compares the dielectric function of graphene measured by an optical method to that obtained from an electron energy loss method in order to observe the effect of contamination and substrate on the optical properties of graphene exposed to the environment. Whether viewed in terms of how light affects a material (dielectric function) or how a material affects light (refractive index), the optical response is a quantity that may be used to obtain information about a film's thickness, energy structure, and the types of excitations that are responsible for energy loss. The three main experimental methods used in this thesis work are spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). SE is commonly used in clean-room environments for optical measurement over the energy range of ˜0-5 eV. This method is used to study graphene's dielectric function from the ultraviolet (UV) through infrared (IR) regions through use of an oscillator dispersion model. A nearly constant absorbance over the IR and into the visible region is observed due to vertical transitions between graphene's linearly dispersed pi-bands at the Dirac points. An exciton

  2. Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy imaging of surface plasmons at the nanometer scale.

    PubMed

    Colliex, Christian; Kociak, Mathieu; Stéphan, Odile

    2016-03-01

    Since their first realization, electron microscopes have demonstrated their unique ability to map with highest spatial resolution (sub-atomic in most recent instruments) the position of atoms as a consequence of the strong scattering of the incident high energy electrons by the nuclei of the material under investigation. When interacting with the electron clouds either on atomic orbitals or delocalized over the specimen, the associated energy transfer, measured and analyzed as an energy loss (Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy) gives access to analytical properties (atom identification, electron states symmetry and localization). In the moderate energy-loss domain (corresponding to an optical spectral domain from the infrared (IR) to the rather far ultra violet (UV), EELS spectra exhibit characteristic collective excitations of the rather-free electron gas, known as plasmons. Boundary conditions, such as surfaces and/or interfaces between metallic and dielectric media, generate localized surface charge oscillations, surface plasmons (SP), which are associated with confined electric fields. This domain of research has been extraordinarily revived over the past few years as a consequence of the burst of interest for structures and devices guiding, enhancing and controlling light at the sub-wavelength scale. The present review focuses on the study of these surface plasmons with an electron microscopy-based approach which associates spectroscopy and mapping at the level of a single and well-defined nano-object, typically at the nanometer scale i.e. much improved with respect to standard, and even near-field, optical techniques. After calling to mind some early studies, we will briefly mention a few basic aspects of the required instrumentation and associated theoretical tools to interpret the very rich data sets recorded with the latest generation of (Scanning)TEM microscopes. The following paragraphs will review in more detail the results obtained on simple planar and

  3. Observation of Odd Symmetry Surface Phonon Modes on NICKEL(100) and SILVER(100) Surfaces Using the New Multichannel High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Eue-Jin

    A multichannel detection high resolution electron analyzer has been constructed and tested. The capabilities of achieving out-of-plane scattering geometry, high resolution and high sensitivity has made it possible to detect for the first time the odd-symmetry surface phonon modes on Ni(100) and Ag(100) surfaces. Initial tests were performed to verify the performance of the spectrometer. The best instrumental resolution obtained was 3.5 meV and analyzer count rate could be maintained at 1000 Hz in large angle scattering geometry. This represents an improvement in performance of a factor of at least 50 compared to the existing conventional single channel spectrometers. Odd symmetry surface phonon modes found on Ag(100) surfaces have been measured to be 3.2 meV which agrees closely with available calculations. An additional interesting feature found to be interesting is that the background width of odd symmetry modes appear to be narrower than that of the even symmetry mode scattering data. This effect has not been predicted or explained by theory. As it stands now, the large angle high-resolution electron energy loss cross sections are not completely characterized by theory.

  4. Electronic and optical properties of selected polymers studied by reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Dahlang; Tougaard, Sven

    2012-03-01

    We have determined the electronic and optical properties of six polymers: Polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA), polyethylene (PE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyester (PET), polypyrrole (PPY), and polyamide (PA6) for energy losses from 0 to 70 eV by analysis of reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS) spectra. We found that the surface was easily damaged by the incident electron beam, in particular for energies above 500 eV. The damage results in new peaks in the bandgap region and the polymers become metallic. Great care was exerted to determine experimental conditions under which these effects are minimized. The REELS spectra were corrected for multiple inelastically scattered electrons with the QUASES-XS-REELS software to determine the effective inelastic-scattering cross sections. From these cross sections, we found that the band gaps for PMMA, PE, PVC, PET, PPY, and PA6 are 5.0 eV, 7.5 eV, 7.0 eV, 3.0 eV, 3.5 eV, and 5.1 eV, respectively. Quantitative analysis of the experimental cross sections was carried out by using the QUEELS-ɛ(k,ω)-REELS software to determine the dielectric function and optical properties. This is done by comparing the experimental REELS inelastic electron-scattering cross-section with a simulated cross section in which the only input is Im(-1/ɛ). The dielectric function is expressed as a sum of oscillators and the oscillator parameters are determined. Good agreement between the experimental and theoretical cross section is achieved for all polymers. From Im(-1/ɛ), the real and imaginary parts of ɛ (ω), the refractive index, and the extinction coefficient were determined for all polymers in the energy range ћω = 0 to 70 eV. An oscillator is clearly observed for PPY, PET, and PA6 at ˜ 6.7 eV, which corresponds to the π plasmon. This oscillator is not found for PMMA, PE, and PVC. A set of oscillators in the 20-30 eV energy range corresponding to the σ+π plasmon is found for all polymers.

  5. Electron energy-loss and soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of electronic structure of MgB4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yohei; Saito, Taiki; Tsuchiya, Kohei; Terauchi, Masami; Saito, Hiroki; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2017-09-01

    The electronic structure of MgB4, with the characteristic crystal structure comprising one-dimensional pentagonal B6 cluster chain, was investigated using electron energy-loss spectroscopy and soft X-ray emission spectroscopy based on transmission electron microscopy. The dielectric function and density of state of unoccupied and occupied states were clarified experimentally for the first time. Although theoretical calculations has predicted MgB4 to be a semiconductor, the electron energy-loss spectrum in this study show a plasmon peak at 0.4 eV, which might be due to carrier electrons. Theoretical calculations suggested that the electronic states near the Fermi energy are localized along the one dimensional B6 cluster chain. Therefore, one-dimensional electric conductivity is expected.

  6. Probing the bonding and electronic structure of single atom dopants in graphene with electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ramasse, Quentin M; Seabourne, Che R; Kepaptsoglou, Despoina-Maria; Zan, Recep; Bangert, Ursel; Scott, Andrew J

    2013-10-09

    A combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations reveal striking electronic structure differences between two distinct single substitutional Si defect geometries in graphene. Optimised acquisition conditions allow for exceptional signal-to-noise levels in the spectroscopic data. The near-edge fine structure can be compared with great accuracy to simulations and reveal either an sp(3)-like configuration for a trivalent Si or a more complicated hybridized structure for a tetravalent Si impurity.

  7. Implementation of subcellular water mapping by electron energy loss spectroscopy in a medium-voltage scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Terryn, C; Michel, J; Thomas, X; Laurent-Maquin, D; Balossier, G

    2004-07-01

    The water concentration in biological cells plays a predominant role in cellular life. Using electron energy loss spectroscopy, the feasibility to measure the water content in cells has already been demonstrated. In this paper, we present an upgrade of water measurement in hydrated cryosections by spectrum imaging mode in a medium-voltage scanning transmission electron microscope. The electron energy loss spectra are recorded in spectrum imaging mode in a 2(n)x2(n) pixels array. Each spectrum is processed in order to determine the water mass content in the corresponding pixel. Then a parametric image is obtained in which grey levels are related to water concentration. In this image, it is possible to recognize the different subcellular compartments. By averaging the water concentration over the relevant pixels, we can determine the water mass content in the concerned subcellular compartment. As an example, we present water mass content measurement at subcellular level in rat hepatocytes.

  8. Angle-resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy in hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossard, Frédéric; Sponza, Lorenzo; Schué, Léonard; Attaccalite, Claudio; Ducastelle, François; Barjon, Julien; Loiseau, Annick

    2017-09-01

    Electron energy loss spectra were measured on hexagonal boron nitride single crystals employing an electron energy loss spectroscopic setup composed of an electron microscope equipped with a monochromator and an in-column filter. This setup provides high-quality energy-loss spectra and allows also for the imaging of energy-filtered diffraction patterns. These two acquisition modes provide complementary pieces of information, offering a global view of excitations in reciprocal space. As an example of the capabilities of the method we show how easily the core loss spectra at the K edges of boron and nitrogen can be measured and imaged. Low losses associated with interband and/or plasmon excitations are also measured. This energy range allows us to illustrate that our method provides results whose quality is comparable to that obtained from nonresonant x-ray inelastic scattering but with advantageous specificities such as an enhanced sensitivity at low q and a much greater simplicity and versatility that make it well adapted to the study of two-dimensional materials and related heterostructures. Finally, by comparing theoretical calculations to our measures, we are able to relate the range of applicability of ab initio calculations to the anisotropy of the sample and assess the level of approximation required for a proper simulation of our acquisition method.

  9. Combined study of the ground and unoccupied electronic states of graphite by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhenbao; Löffler, Stefan; Eder, Franz; Meyer, Jannik C.; Su, Dangsheng; Schattschneider, Peter

    2013-11-14

    Both the unoccupied and ground electronic states of graphite have been studied by electron energy-loss spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscope. Electron energy-loss near-edge structures of the K-edge of carbon have been investigated in detail for scattering angles from 0 to 2.8 mrad. The π{sup *} and σ{sup *} components were separated. The angular and energy dependences of the π{sup *} and σ{sup *} structures were in fair agreement with theory. Electron energy loss Compton spectra of graphite were recorded at scattering angles from 45 to 68 mrad. One Compton scattering spectrum was obtained in 1 min compared with several hours or days using photons. The contributions of core electrons were calculated by the exact Hartree-Slater method in the Compton scattering region. The electron Compton profile for graphite is in good agreement with other conventional Compton profile measurements, as well as with theory, thus establishing the validity of the technique.

  10. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of excited states of the pyridine molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linert, Ireneusz; Zubek, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Electron energy-loss spectra of the pyridine, C5H5N, molecules in the gas phase have been measured to investigate electronic excitation in the energy range 3.5-10 eV. The applied wide range of residual electron energy and the scattering angle range from 10° to 180° enabled to differentiate between optically-allowed and -forbidden transitions. These measurements have allowed vertical excitation energies of the triplet excited states of pyridine to be determined and tentative assignments of these states to be proposed. Some of these states have not been identified in the previous works. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  11. Dehydriding process of α-AlH3 observed by transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, S.; Tatsumi, K.; Ikeda, K.; Orimo, S.

    2009-06-01

    The dehydriding reaction of α-AlH3 induced by high-energy electron irradiation was observed in situ by transmission electron microscopy and associated electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). An α-AlH3 crystal decomposed into fine aluminum particles while retaining its initial external shape because of a thin rigid surface layer that covered the entire particle. EELS revealed that the thin surface layer was amorphous aluminum oxide, which stabilizes α-AlH3 particles at ambient temperature.

  12. Microstructure of highly strained BiFeO3 thin films: Transmission electron microscopy and electron-energy loss spectroscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heon Kim, Young; Bhatnagar, Akash; Pippel, Eckhard; Alexe, Marin; Hesse, Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    Microstructure and electronic structure of highly strained bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) thin films grown on lanthanum aluminate substrates are studied using high-resolution transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopies and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Monoclinic and tetragonal phases were observed in films grown at different temperatures, and a mix of both phases was detected in a film grown at intermediate temperature. In this film, a smooth transition of the microstructure was found between the monoclinic and the tetragonal phases. A considerable increase in the c-axis parameters was observed in both phases compared with the rhombohedral bulk phase. The off-center displacement of iron (Fe) ions was increased in the monoclinic phase as compared with the tetragonal phase. EEL spectra show different electronic structures in the monoclinic and the tetragonal phases. These experimental observations are well consistent with the results of theoretical first-principle calculations performed.

  13. Microstructure of highly strained BiFeO{sub 3} thin films: Transmission electron microscopy and electron-energy loss spectroscopy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Heon Kim, Young; Bhatnagar, Akash; Pippel, Eckhard; Hesse, Dietrich; Alexe, Marin

    2014-01-28

    Microstructure and electronic structure of highly strained bismuth ferrite (BiFeO{sub 3}) thin films grown on lanthanum aluminate substrates are studied using high-resolution transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopies and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Monoclinic and tetragonal phases were observed in films grown at different temperatures, and a mix of both phases was detected in a film grown at intermediate temperature. In this film, a smooth transition of the microstructure was found between the monoclinic and the tetragonal phases. A considerable increase in the c-axis parameters was observed in both phases compared with the rhombohedral bulk phase. The off-center displacement of iron (Fe) ions was increased in the monoclinic phase as compared with the tetragonal phase. EEL spectra show different electronic structures in the monoclinic and the tetragonal phases. These experimental observations are well consistent with the results of theoretical first-principle calculations performed.

  14. A Complete Overhaul of the Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy and X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Database: eelsdb.eu.

    PubMed

    Ewels, Philip; Sikora, Thierry; Serin, Virginie; Ewels, Chris P; Lajaunie, Luc

    2016-06-01

    The electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) database has been completely rewritten, with an improved design, user interface, and a number of new tools. The database is accessible at https://eelsdb.eu/ and can now be used without registration. The submission process has been streamlined to encourage spectrum submissions and the new design gives greater emphasis on contributors' original work by highlighting their papers. With numerous new filters and a powerful search function, it is now simple to explore the database of several hundred EELS and XAS spectra. Interactive plots allow spectra to be overlaid, facilitating online comparison. An application-programming interface has been created, allowing external tools and software to easily access the information held within the database. In addition to the database itself, users can post and manage job adverts and read the latest news and events regarding the EELS and XAS communities. In accordance with the ongoing drive toward open access data increasingly demanded by funding bodies, the database will facilitate open access data sharing of EELS and XAS spectra.

  15. Low-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy: An atomic-resolution complement to optical spectroscopies and application to graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Kapetanakis, Myron; Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P.; ...

    2015-09-25

    Photon-based spectroscopies have played a central role in exploring the electronic properties of crystalline solids and thin films. They are a powerful tool for probing the electronic properties of nanostructures, but they are limited by lack of spatial resolution. On the other hand, electron-based spectroscopies, e.g., electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), are now capable of subangstrom spatial resolution. Core-loss EELS, a spatially resolved analog of x-ray absorption, has been used extensively in the study of inhomogeneous complex systems. In this paper, we demonstrate that low-loss EELS in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope, which probes low-energy excitations, combined with amore » theoretical framework for simulating and analyzing the spectra, is a powerful tool to probe low-energy electron excitations with atomic-scale resolution. The theoretical component of the method combines density functional theory–based calculations of the excitations with dynamical scattering theory for the electron beam. We apply the method to monolayer graphene in order to demonstrate that atomic-scale contrast is inherent in low-loss EELS even in a perfectly periodic structure. The method is a complement to optical spectroscopy as it probes transitions entailing momentum transfer. The theoretical analysis identifies the spatial and orbital origins of excitations, holding the promise of ultimately becoming a powerful probe of the structure and electronic properties of individual point and extended defects in both crystals and inhomogeneous complex nanostructures. The method can be extended to probe magnetic and vibrational properties with atomic resolution.« less

  16. Low-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy: An atomic-resolution complement to optical spectroscopies and application to graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Kapetanakis, Myron; Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P.; Lee, Jaekwang; Prange, Micah P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2015-09-25

    Photon-based spectroscopies have played a central role in exploring the electronic properties of crystalline solids and thin films. They are a powerful tool for probing the electronic properties of nanostructures, but they are limited by lack of spatial resolution. On the other hand, electron-based spectroscopies, e.g., electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), are now capable of subangstrom spatial resolution. Core-loss EELS, a spatially resolved analog of x-ray absorption, has been used extensively in the study of inhomogeneous complex systems. In this paper, we demonstrate that low-loss EELS in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope, which probes low-energy excitations, combined with a theoretical framework for simulating and analyzing the spectra, is a powerful tool to probe low-energy electron excitations with atomic-scale resolution. The theoretical component of the method combines density functional theory–based calculations of the excitations with dynamical scattering theory for the electron beam. We apply the method to monolayer graphene in order to demonstrate that atomic-scale contrast is inherent in low-loss EELS even in a perfectly periodic structure. The method is a complement to optical spectroscopy as it probes transitions entailing momentum transfer. The theoretical analysis identifies the spatial and orbital origins of excitations, holding the promise of ultimately becoming a powerful probe of the structure and electronic properties of individual point and extended defects in both crystals and inhomogeneous complex nanostructures. The method can be extended to probe magnetic and vibrational properties with atomic resolution.

  17. Electronic properties of Mn-phthalocyanine-C60 bulk heterojunctions: Combining photoemission and electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Friedrich; Herzig, Melanie; Lupulescu, Cosmin; Darlatt, Erik; Gottwald, Alexander; Knupfer, Martin; Eberhardt, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    The electronic properties of co-evaporated mixtures (blends) of manganese phthalocyanine and the fullerene C60 (MnPc:C60) have been studied as a function of the concentration of the two constituents using two supplementary electron spectroscopic methods, photoemission spectroscopy (PES) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in transmission. Our PES measurements provide a detailed picture of the electronic structure measured with different excitation energies as well as different mixing ratios between MnPc and C60. Besides a relative energy shift, the occupied electronic states of the two materials remain essentially unchanged. The observed energy level alignment is different compared to that of the related CuPc:C60 bulk heterojunction. Moreover, the results from our EELS investigations show that, despite the rather small interface interaction, the MnPc related electronic excitation spectrum changes significantly by admixing C60 to MnPc thin films.

  18. Electronic properties of Mn-phthalocyanine–C{sub 60} bulk heterojunctions: Combining photoemission and electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Friedrich; Lupulescu, Cosmin; Darlatt, Erik; Gottwald, Alexander; Eberhardt, Wolfgang

    2015-11-14

    The electronic properties of co-evaporated mixtures (blends) of manganese phthalocyanine and the fullerene C{sub 60} (MnPc:C{sub 60}) have been studied as a function of the concentration of the two constituents using two supplementary electron spectroscopic methods, photoemission spectroscopy (PES) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in transmission. Our PES measurements provide a detailed picture of the electronic structure measured with different excitation energies as well as different mixing ratios between MnPc and C{sub 60}. Besides a relative energy shift, the occupied electronic states of the two materials remain essentially unchanged. The observed energy level alignment is different compared to that of the related CuPc:C{sub 60} bulk heterojunction. Moreover, the results from our EELS investigations show that, despite the rather small interface interaction, the MnPc related electronic excitation spectrum changes significantly by admixing C{sub 60} to MnPc thin films.

  19. π-plasmon dispersion in free-standing graphene by momentum-resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, S. C.; Shie, C.-S.; Chen, C. H.; Breitwieser, R.; Pai, W. W.; Guo, G. Y.; Chu, M.-W.

    2015-01-01

    The π-plasmon dispersion in graphene was scrutinized by momentum-resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy with an improved momentum q resolution and was found to display the square root of the q dispersion characteristic of the collective excitation of two-dimensional electron systems, in contrast to previous experimental and theoretical studies which reported a linear q dispersion. Our theoretical elaborations on the q -dependent spectra affirm this square root of q relation and further unveil an in-plane electronic anisotropy. The physical property of the π plasmon is thoroughly compared to that of the two-dimensional plasmon due to carriers of the Dirac fermions. A clear distinction between the π plasmon and the two-dimensional Dirac plasmon is demonstrated, clarifying the common notion about correlating the linearly dispersed Dirac cones with the linear dispersion of the π plasmon previously reported.

  20. π-Plasmon Dispersion in Free-Standing Monolayer Graphene Investigated by Momentum-Resolved Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, S. C.; Breitwieser, R.; Chen, C. H.; Pai, W. W.; Guo, G. Y.; Chu, M. W.

    2014-08-01

    The {\\pi}-plasmon dispersion in graphene was scrutinized by momentum(q)-resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy with an improved q resolution and found to display the square root of q dispersion characteristic of the collective excitation of two-dimensional electron systems, in contrast with previous experimental and theoretical studies which reported a linear q dispersion. Our theoretical elaborations on the q-dependent spectra affirm this square root of q relation and further unveil an in-plane electronic anisotropy. The physical property of the {\\pi} plasmon is thoroughly compared to that of the two-dimensional plasmon due to carriers of the Dirac fermions. A clear distinction between the {\\pi} plasmon and the two-dimensional Dirac plasmon was demonstrated, clarifying the common notion on correlating the linearly-dispersed Dirac cones to the linear dispersion of the {\\pi} plasmon previously reported.

  1. Effect of multipole excitations in electron energy-loss spectroscopy of surface plasmon modes in silver nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiuli; Norris, Theodore B.; Hörl, Anton; Trügler, Andreas; Hohenester, Ulrich; Herzing, Andrew A.

    2014-12-14

    We have characterized the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in silver nanowires using spatially resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) in the scanning transmission electron microscope. Non-symmetric EELS spectra due to high-k SPR propagation along the nanowire and spectral shifts due to higher-order mode excitation are observed when the beam is positioned near the tip of the nanowire. When the beam is far from the tip region and on the side of nanowire, no spectral shifts are observed as the beam is scanned in the radial direction of the nanowire. The experimental spectra are compared with three different theoretical approaches: direct numerical calculation of the energy loss, analytical models for energy loss, and numerical simulations using an optical model. All three models reproduce the spectral shifts as the electron beam approaches the cap of the nanowire. The analytical model reveals the origin of the shifts in high-order plasmon mode excitation.

  2. Characterization of InGaN/GaN quantum well growth using monochromated valence electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Palisaitis, J. Birch, J.; Hultman, L.; Persson, P. O. Å.; Lundskog, A.; Forsberg, U.; Janzén, E.

    2014-01-21

    The early stages of InGaN/GaN quantum well growth for In-reduced conditions have been investigated for varying thickness and composition of the wells. The structures were studied by monochromated scanning transmission electron microscopy–valence electron energy loss spectroscopy spectrum imaging at high spatial resolution. It is found that beyond a critical well thickness and composition, quantum dots (width >20 nm) are formed inside the well. These are buried by compositionally graded InGaN, which is formed as GaN is grown while residual In is incorporated into the growing structure. It is proposed that these dots act as carrier localization centers inside the quantum wells.

  3. Si(111)(\\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3})-Al Surface Studied by Angle-Resolved Electron-Energy-Loss Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sung-Te; Hasegawa, Shigehiko; Nakamura, Shogo; Nakashima, Hisao

    1991-09-01

    The surface electronic structures of Si(111)(\\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3})-Al are investigated with the use of angle-resolved electron-energy-loss spectroscopy. Three new surface one-electron transitions (in specular reflection) are found at 1.8, 7.2, and 13.1 eV. Compared with the surface state band structures calculated by Northrup and STM results by Hamers and Demuth, the loss peak at 1.8 eV is ascribed to the one-electron transition between the occupied and unoccupied surface state bands which originate from the Al adatoms. The other two peaks are considered to be due to the Si-Si strained back bonds.

  4. Valence excitations and dopant distribution of Al doped ZnO nanowires analyzed by electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng-Yu; Kuo, Chien-Lin; Liu, Chuan-Pu; Wang, Ting-Yu; Zheng, Rong-Kun; Ringer, Simon P

    2011-11-01

    Valence electron energy loss spectroscopy (VEELS) with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has been employed to probe the valence excitations and dopant distribution of Al doped ZnO nanowires. The results reveal that while the typical Al concentration is on the order of 1020 1/cm3, Al tends to segregate at the surface leading to an Al-rich sheath. In VEEL spectra, O-2p, Zn-3d, Al-3p, O-2s, interband transitions as well as bulk plasmon have been identified. The bulk plasmon peak is blue-shifted, and the projected interband transition decreases from 2.14 to 1.88 eV as the doping concentration increases from 0.83 x 10(20) to 2.18 x 10(20) 1/cm3.

  5. Surface plasmon excitations in metal spheres: Direct comparison of light scattering and electron energy-loss spectroscopy by modal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Sean M.; Midgley, Paul A.

    2013-06-01

    In previous publications, qualitative agreement between studies of surface plasmon excitations in nanoparticles by near-field light scattering and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) has been found for experiments and simulations. Here, we present a quantitative method for the comparison of light scattering and EELS for surface plasmons in metal spheres. Defining the Fourier transform of the modal component of the scattered electric field along the equivalent electron trajectory enables a direct evaluation of the relative weighting factor for light- and electron-excited surface plasmon modes. This common quantity for light scattering and EELS is examined for size, composition, and trajectory dependencies, facilitating the analysis of key differences between light and electron excitation. A single functional dependence on Drude model plasmon energies is identified to explain the relative modal weighting factors for light scattering and EELS. This method represents an important step toward the complete spectral and spatial reconstruction of EELS maps from near-field light scattering calculations.

  6. High-energy-resolution monochromator for aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy/electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Ursin, Jonathan P; Bacon, Neil J; Corbin, George J; Dellby, Niklas; Hrncirik, Petr; Murfitt, Matthew F; Own, Christopher S; Szilagyi, Zoltan S

    2009-09-28

    An all-magnetic monochromator/spectrometer system for sub-30 meV energy-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy in the scanning transmission electron microscope is described. It will link the energy being selected by the monochromator to the energy being analysed by the spectrometer, without resorting to decelerating the electron beam. This will allow it to attain spectral energy stability comparable to systems using monochromators and spectrometers that are raised to near the high voltage of the instrument. It will also be able to correct the chromatic aberration of the probe-forming column. It should be able to provide variable energy resolution down to approximately 10 meV and spatial resolution less than 1 A.

  7. Comparison of theoretical and experimental dielectric functions: Electron energy-loss spectroscopy and density-functional calculations on skutterudites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prytz, Ø.; Løvvik, O. M.; Taftø, J.

    2006-12-01

    We explore the possibility of combining density functional theory (DFT) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to determine the dielectric function of materials. As model systems we use the skutterudites CoP3 , CoAs3 , and CoSb3 which are prototypes for thermoelectric materials. We achieve qualitative agreement between the theoretically and experimentally obtained low energy-loss spectra and dielectric function. Some of the remaining discrepancies may be caused by the challenge of refining the experimental spectra before Kramers-Kronig analysis. However, contrary to what is the case for some crystals with less complicated electronic structure, the DFT calculated plasmon energies deviate significantly from the experimental values. The great accuracy with which the plasmon energy can be determined by EELS, suggests that this technique may provide valuable inputs in further efforts to improve DFT calculations. The use of EELS as the experimental technique may become particularly powerful in studies of small volumes of materials.

  8. High resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    F. Garibaldi

    2005-02-01

    Hypernuclear spectroscopy provides fundamental information for understanding the effective ?-Nucleon interaction. Jefferson Laboratory experiment E94-107 was designed to perform high resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy by electroproduction of strangeness in four 1p-shell nuclei: 12C, 9Be, 16O, and 7Li. The first part of the experiment on 12C and 9Be has been performed in January and April-May 2004 in Hall A at Jefferson Lab. Significant modifications were made to the standard Hall A apparatus for this challenging experiment: two septum magnets and a RICH detector have been added to get reasonable counting rates and excellent particle identification, as required for the experiment. A description of the apparatus and the preliminary analysis results are presented here.

  9. Signatures of distinct impurity configurations in atomic-resolution valence electron-energy-loss spectroscopy: Application to graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Kapetanakis, Myron D.; Oxley, Mark P.; Zhou, Wu; ...

    2016-10-31

    The detection and identification of impurities and other point defects in materials is a challenging task. Signatures for point defects are typically obtained using spectroscopies without spatial resolution. Here in this paper, we demonstrate the power of valence electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission-electron microscope (STEM) to provide energy-resolved and atomically resolved maps of electronic excitations of individual impurities which, combined with theoretical simulations, yield unique signatures of distinct bonding configurations of impurities. We report VEELS maps for isolated Si impurities in graphene, which are known to exist in two distinct configurations. We also report simulations of themore » maps, based on density functional theory and dynamical scattering theory, which agree with and provide direct interpretation of observed features. We show that theoretical VEELS maps exhibit distinct and unambiguous signatures for the threefold- and fourfold-coordinated configurations of Si impurities in different energy-loss windows, corresponding to impurity-induced bound states, resonances, and antiresonances. With the advent of new monochromators and detectors with high energy resolution and low signal-to-noise ratio, the present work ushers an atomically resolved STEM-based spectroscopy of individual impurities as an alternative to conventional spectroscopies for probing impurities and defects.« less

  10. Signatures of distinct impurity configurations in atomic-resolution valence electron-energy-loss spectroscopy: Application to graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Kapetanakis, Myron D.; Oxley, Mark P.; Zhou, Wu; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2016-10-31

    The detection and identification of impurities and other point defects in materials is a challenging task. Signatures for point defects are typically obtained using spectroscopies without spatial resolution. Here in this paper, we demonstrate the power of valence electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission-electron microscope (STEM) to provide energy-resolved and atomically resolved maps of electronic excitations of individual impurities which, combined with theoretical simulations, yield unique signatures of distinct bonding configurations of impurities. We report VEELS maps for isolated Si impurities in graphene, which are known to exist in two distinct configurations. We also report simulations of the maps, based on density functional theory and dynamical scattering theory, which agree with and provide direct interpretation of observed features. We show that theoretical VEELS maps exhibit distinct and unambiguous signatures for the threefold- and fourfold-coordinated configurations of Si impurities in different energy-loss windows, corresponding to impurity-induced bound states, resonances, and antiresonances. With the advent of new monochromators and detectors with high energy resolution and low signal-to-noise ratio, the present work ushers an atomically resolved STEM-based spectroscopy of individual impurities as an alternative to conventional spectroscopies for probing impurities and defects.

  11. Signatures of distinct impurity configurations in atomic-resolution valence electron-energy-loss spectroscopy: Application to graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapetanakis, Myron D.; Oxley, Mark P.; Zhou, Wu; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2016-10-01

    The detection and identification of impurities and other point defects in materials is a challenging task. Signatures for point defects are typically obtained using spectroscopies without spatial resolution. Here we demonstrate the power of valence electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission-electron microscope (STEM) to provide energy-resolved and atomically resolved maps of electronic excitations of individual impurities which, combined with theoretical simulations, yield unique signatures of distinct bonding configurations of impurities. We report VEELS maps for isolated Si impurities in graphene, which are known to exist in two distinct configurations. We also report simulations of the maps, based on density functional theory and dynamical scattering theory, which agree with and provide direct interpretation of observed features. We show that theoretical VEELS maps exhibit distinct and unambiguous signatures for the threefold- and fourfold-coordinated configurations of Si impurities in different energy-loss windows, corresponding to impurity-induced bound states, resonances, and antiresonances. With the advent of new monochromators and detectors with high energy resolution and low signal-to-noise ratio, the present work ushers an atomically resolved STEM-based spectroscopy of individual impurities as an alternative to conventional spectroscopies for probing impurities and defects.

  12. High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy Studies of Chemisorbed Species on Metal Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-31

    vibrational modes at crystal surfaces, the first detection of projected bulk phonon modes by surface electron scattering and elucidation of novel properties associated with hydrogen interaction at Niobium surfaces. (jg)

  13. Signatures of Fano interferences in the electron energy loss spectroscopy and cathodoluminescence of symmetry-broken nanorod dimers.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Nicholas W; Vaschillo, Alex; Camden, Jon P; Masiello, David J

    2013-05-28

    Through numerical simulation, we predict the existence of the Fano interference effect in the electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and cathodoluminescence (CL) of symmetry-broken nanorod dimers that are heterogeneous in material composition and asymmetric in length. The differing selection rules of the electron probe in comparison to the photon of a plane wave allow for the simultaneous excitation of both optically bright and dark plasmons of each monomer unit, suggesting that Fano resonances will not arise in EELS and CL. Yet, interferences are manifested in the dimer's scattered near- and far-fields and are evident in EELS and CL due to the rapid π-phase offset in the polarizations between super-radiant and subradiant hybridized plasmon modes of the dimer as a function of the energy loss suffered by the impinging electron. Depending upon the location of the electron beam, we demonstrate the conditions under which Fano interferences will be present in both optical and electron spectroscopies (EELS and CL) as well as a new class of Fano interferences that are uniquely electron-driven and are absent in the optical response. Among other things, the knowledge gained from this work bears impact upon the design of some of the world's most sensitive sensors, which are currently based upon Fano resonances.

  14. Robust theoretical modelling of core ionisation edges for quantitative electron energy loss spectroscopy of B- and N-doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardcastle, T. P.; Seabourne, C. R.; Kepaptsoglou, D. M.; Susi, T.; Nicholls, R. J.; Brydson, R. M. D.; Scott, A. J.; Ramasse, Q. M.

    2017-06-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is a powerful tool for understanding the chemical structure of materials down to the atomic level, but challenges remain in accurately and quantitatively modelling the response. We compare comprehensive theoretical density functional theory (DFT) calculations of 1s core-level EEL K-edge spectra of pure, B-doped and N-doped graphene with and without a core-hole to previously published atomic-resolution experimental electron microscopy data. The ground state approximation is found in this specific system to perform consistently better than the frozen core-hole approximation. The impact of including or excluding a core-hole on the resultant theoretical band structures, densities of states, electron densities and EEL spectra were all thoroughly examined and compared. It is concluded that the frozen core-hole approximation exaggerates the effects of the core-hole in graphene and should be discarded in favour of the ground state approximation. These results are interpreted as an indicator of the overriding need for theorists to embrace many-body effects in the pursuit of accuracy in theoretical spectroscopy instead of a system-tailored approach whose approximations are selected empirically.

  15. Comprehensive studies of the electronic structure of pristine and potassium doped chrysene investigated by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Friedrich; Mahns, Benjamin; Schönfelder, Ronny; Hampel, Silke; Nohr, Markus; Büchner, Bernd; Knupfer, Martin

    2012-09-01

    We have performed electron energy-loss spectroscopy studies in order to investigate the electronic properties of chrysene molecular solids. The valence band electronic excitation spectra and the C 1s core level excitations have been measured for pristine and potassium doped chrysene. The core level studies show a fine structure which signals the presence of four close lying conduction bands close to the Fermi level. Upon potassium doping, these bands are filled with electrons, and we have reached a doping level of about K2.7chrysene. Furthermore, undoped chrysene is characterized by an optical gap of about 3.3 eV and five, relatively weak, excitonic features following the excitation onset. Doping induces major changes in the electronic excitation spectra, with a new, prominent low energy excitation at about 1.3 eV. The results of a Kramers-Kronig analysis indicate that this new feature can be assigned to a charge carrier plasmon in the doped material, and momentum dependent studies reveal a negative plasmon dispersion.

  16. Verifying the presence of low levels of neptunium in a uranium matrix with electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Buck, Edgar C; Douglas, Matt; Wittman, Rick S

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the problems associated with analysis of low levels of neptunium in a uranium matrix with electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) on the transmission electron microscope (TEM). The detection of neptunium in a matrix of uranium can be impeded by the occurrence of a plural scattering event from uranium (U-M(5)+U-O(4,5)) that results in severe overlap on the Np-M(5) edge at 3665 eV. Low levels of Np (1600-6300 ppm) can be detected in a uranium solid, uranophane [Ca(UO(2))(2)(SiO(3)OH)(2)(H(2)O)(5)], by confirming that the energy gap between the Np-M(5) and Np-M(4) edges is at 184 eV and showing that the M(4)/M(5) ratio for the neptunium is smaller than that for uranium. The Richardson-Lucy deconvolution method was applied to energy-loss spectral images and was shown to increase the signal to noise ratio.

  17. Verifying the Presence of Low Levels of Neptunium in a Uranium Matrix with Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, Edgar C.; Douglas, Matthew; Wittman, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the problems associated with the analysis of low levels of neptunium (Np) in a uranium (U) matrix with electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) on the transmission electron microscope (TEM). The detection of Np in a matrix of uranium (U) can be impeded by the occurrence of a plural scattering event from U (U-M5 + U-O4,5) that results in severe overlap on the Np-M5 edge at 3665 eV. Low levels (1600 - 6300 ppm) of Np can be detected in U solids by confirming the energy gap between the Np-M5 and Np-M4 edges is at 184 eV and showing that the M4/M5 ratio for the Np is smaller than that for U. The Richardson-Lucy deconvolution method was applied to energy-loss spectral images and was shown to increase the signal to noise. This method also improves the limits of detection for Np in a U matrix.

  18. A reverse Monte Carlo method for deriving optical constants of solids from reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Da, B.; Sun, Y.; Ding, Z. J.; Mao, S. F.; Zhang, Z. M.; Jin, H.; Yoshikawa, H.; Tanuma, S.

    2013-06-07

    A reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) method is developed to obtain the energy loss function (ELF) and optical constants from a measured reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS) spectrum by an iterative Monte Carlo (MC) simulation procedure. The method combines the simulated annealing method, i.e., a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling of oscillator parameters, surface and bulk excitation weighting factors, and band gap energy, with a conventional MC simulation of electron interaction with solids, which acts as a single step of MCMC sampling in this RMC method. To examine the reliability of this method, we have verified that the output data of the dielectric function are essentially independent of the initial values of the trial parameters, which is a basic property of a MCMC method. The optical constants derived for SiO{sub 2} in the energy loss range of 8-90 eV are in good agreement with other available data, and relevant bulk ELFs are checked by oscillator strength-sum and perfect-screening-sum rules. Our results show that the dielectric function can be obtained by the RMC method even with a wide range of initial trial parameters. The RMC method is thus a general and effective method for determining the optical properties of solids from REELS measurements.

  19. Band gap and defect states of MgO thin films investigated using reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Sung; Cho, Eunseog; Lee, Hyung-Ik; Park, Gyeong Su; Kang, Hee Jae; Nagatomi, T.; Choi, Pyungho; Choi, Byoung-Deog

    2015-07-15

    The band gap and defect states of MgO thin films were investigated by using reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) and high-energy resolution REELS (HR-REELS). HR-REELS with a primary electron energy of 0.3 keV revealed that the surface F center (FS) energy was located at approximately 4.2 eV above the valence band maximum (VBM) and the surface band gap width (E{sub g}{sup S}) was approximately 6.3 eV. The bulk F center (F{sub B}) energy was located approximately 4.9 eV above the VBM and the bulk band gap width was about 7.8 eV, when measured by REELS with 3 keV primary electrons. From a first-principles calculation, we confirmed that the 4.2 eV and 4.9 eV peaks were F{sub S} and F{sub B}, induced by oxygen vacancies. We also experimentally demonstrated that the HR-REELS peak height increases with increasing number of oxygen vacancies. Finally, we calculated the secondary electron emission yields (γ) for various noble gases. He and Ne were not influenced by the defect states owing to their higher ionization energies, but Ar, Kr, and Xe exhibited a stronger dependence on the defect states owing to their small ionization energies.

  20. A reverse Monte Carlo method for deriving optical constants of solids from reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da, B.; Sun, Y.; Mao, S. F.; Zhang, Z. M.; Jin, H.; Yoshikawa, H.; Tanuma, S.; Ding, Z. J.

    2013-06-01

    A reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) method is developed to obtain the energy loss function (ELF) and optical constants from a measured reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS) spectrum by an iterative Monte Carlo (MC) simulation procedure. The method combines the simulated annealing method, i.e., a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling of oscillator parameters, surface and bulk excitation weighting factors, and band gap energy, with a conventional MC simulation of electron interaction with solids, which acts as a single step of MCMC sampling in this RMC method. To examine the reliability of this method, we have verified that the output data of the dielectric function are essentially independent of the initial values of the trial parameters, which is a basic property of a MCMC method. The optical constants derived for SiO2 in the energy loss range of 8-90 eV are in good agreement with other available data, and relevant bulk ELFs are checked by oscillator strength-sum and perfect-screening-sum rules. Our results show that the dielectric function can be obtained by the RMC method even with a wide range of initial trial parameters. The RMC method is thus a general and effective method for determining the optical properties of solids from REELS measurements.

  1. Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (EELS)Calculation in Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) Package: EELS-FDTD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Large, Nicolas; Cao, Yang; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Nordlander, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is a unique tool that is extensively used to investigate the plasmonic response of metallic nanostructures since the early works in the '50s. To be able to interpret and theoretically investigate EELS results, a myriad of different numerical techniques have been developed for EELS simulations (BEM, DDA, FEM, GDTD, Green dyadic functions). Although these techniques are able to predict and reproduce experimental results, they possess significant drawbacks and are often limited to highly symmetrical geometries, non-penetrating trajectories, small nanostructures, and free standing nanostructures. We present here a novel approach for EELS calculations using the Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method: EELS-FDTD. We benchmark our approach by direct comparison with results from the well-established boundary element method (BEM) and published experimental results. In particular, we compute EELS spectra for spherical nanoparticles, nanoparticle dimers, nanodisks supported by various substrates, and gold bowtie antennas on a silicon nitride substrate. Our EELS-FDTD implementation can be easily extended to more complex geometries and configurations and can be directly implemented within other numerical methods. Work funded by the Welch Foundation (C-1222, L-C-004), and the NSF (CNS-0821727, OCI-0959097).

  2. Optical Dark-Field and Electron Energy Loss Imaging and Spectroscopy of Symmetry-Forbidden Modes in Loaded Nanogap Antennas.

    PubMed

    Brintlinger, Todd; Herzing, Andrew A; Long, James P; Vurgaftman, Igor; Stroud, Rhonda; Simpkins, B S

    2015-06-23

    We have produced large numbers of hybrid metal-semiconductor nanogap antennas using a scalable electrochemical approach and systematically characterized the spectral and spatial character of their plasmonic modes with optical dark-field scattering, electron energy loss spectroscopy with principal component analysis, and full wave simulations. The coordination of these techniques reveal that these nanostructures support degenerate transverse modes which split due to substrate interactions, a longitudinal mode which scales with antenna length, and a symmetry-forbidden gap-localized transverse mode. This gap-localized transverse mode arises from mode splitting of transverse resonances supported on both antenna arms and is confined to the gap load enabling (i) delivery of substantial energy to the gap material and (ii) the possibility of tuning the antenna resonance via active modulation of the gap material's optical properties. The resonant position of this symmetry-forbidden mode is sensitive to gap size, dielectric strength of the gap material, and is highly suppressed in air-gapped structures which may explain its absence from the literature to date. Understanding the complex modal structure supported on hybrid nanosystems is necessary to enable the multifunctional components many seek.

  3. Measurement of vibrational spectrum of liquid using monochromated scanning transmission electron microscopy-electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Tomohiro; Fukuyama, Mao; Hibara, Akihide; Okunishi, Eiji; Mukai, Masaki; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu

    2014-10-01

    Investigations on the dynamic behavior of molecules in liquids at high spatial resolution are greatly desired because localized regions, such as solid-liquid interfaces or sites of reacting molecules, have assumed increasing importance with respect to improving material performance. In application to liquids, electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a promising analytical technique with the appropriate resolutions. In this study, we obtained EELS spectra from an ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis (trifluoromethyl-sulfonyl) imide (C2mim-TFSI), chosen as the sampled liquid, using monochromated scanning TEM (STEM). The molecular vibrational spectrum and the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gap of the liquid were investigated. The HOMO-LUMO gap measurement coincided with that obtained from the ultraviolet-visible spectrum. A shoulder in the spectrum observed ∼0.4 eV is believed to originate from the molecular vibration. From a separately performed infrared observation and first-principles calculations, we found that this shoulder coincided with the vibrational peak attributed to the C-H stretching vibration of the [C2mim(+)] cation. This study demonstrates that a vibrational peak for a liquid can be observed using monochromated STEM-EELS, and leads one to expect observations of chemical reactions or aids in the analysis of the dynamic behavior of molecules in liquid.

  4. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of the L2,3 edge of phosphorus skutterudites and electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sæterli, Ragnhild; Flage-Larsen, Espen; Prytz, Øystein; Taftø, Johan; Marthinsen, Knut; Holmestad, Randi

    2009-08-01

    In this study we report the results of experiments and theoretical calculations on the phosphorus L2,3 edges of the skutterudites CoP3 , LaFe4P12 , NiP3 , RhP3 , and IrP3 . Phosphorus s and d density of states above the Fermi level was studied by transmission electron energy loss spectroscopy while theoretical calculations were performed using both a real-space multiple-scattering procedure and density-functional theory. Generally, there are good agreements between both types of calculations and the experimental results. The near-edge structure of all the examined compounds shows the same overall features, including the metallic NiP3 and the metallic filled skutterudite LaFeP12 , and is well explained by comparison to phosphorus density of states. We also discuss the similarities to previously reported results on SiL2,3 edges and interpret the differences of the various skutterudites in terms of the electronegativities of the involved atom species.

  5. Detection of local chemical states of lithium and their spatial mapping by scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron energy-loss spectroscopy and hyperspectral image analysis.

    PubMed

    Muto, Shunsuke; Tatsumi, Kazuyoshi

    2017-02-08

    Advancements in the field of renewable energy resources have led to a growing demand for the analysis of light elements at the nanometer scale. Detection of lithium is one of the key issues to be resolved for providing guiding principles for the synthesis of cathode active materials, and degradation analysis after repeated use of those materials. We have reviewed the different techniques currently used for the characterization of light elements such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). In the present study, we have introduced a methodology to detect lithium in solid materials, particularly for cathode active materials used in lithium-ion battery. The chemical states of lithium were isolated and analyzed from the overlapping multiple spectral profiles, using a suite of STEM, EELS and hyperspectral image analysis. The method was successfully applied in the chemical state analyses of hetero-phases near the surface and grain boundary regions of the active material particles formed by chemical reactions between the electrolyte and the active materials. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Using Plasmon Peaks in Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy to Determine the Physical and Mechanical Properties of Nanoscale Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, James M.

    2013-05-09

    In this program, we developed new theoretical and experimental insights into understanding the relationships among fundamental universality and scaling phenomena, the solid-state physical and mechanical properties of materials, and the volume plasmon energy as measured by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). Particular achievements in these areas are summarized as follows: (i) Using a previously proposed physical model based on the universal binding-energy relation (UBER), we established close phenomenological connections regarding the influence of the valence electrons in materials on the longitudinal plasma oscillations (plasmons) and various solid-state properties such as the optical constants (including absorption and dispersion), elastic constants, cohesive energy, etc. (ii) We found that carbon materials, e.g., diamond, graphite, diamond-like carbons, hydrogenated and amorphous carbon films, exhibit strong correlations in density vs. Ep (or maximum of the volume plasmon peak) and density vs. hardness, both from available experimental data and ab initio DFT calculations. This allowed us to derive a three-dimensional relationship between hardness and the plasmon energy, that can be used to determine experimentally both hardness and density of carbon materials based on measurements of the plasmon peak position. (iii) As major experimental accomplishments, we demonstrated the possibility of in-situ monitoring of changes in the physical properties of materials with conditions, e.g., temperature, and we also applied a new plasmon ratio-imaging technique to map multiple physical properties of materials, such as the elastic moduli, cohesive energy and bonding electron density, with a sub-nanometer lateral resolution. This presents new capability for understanding material behavior. (iv) Lastly, we demonstrated a new physical phenomenon - electron-beam trapping, or electron tweezers - of a solid metal nanoparticle inside a liquid metal. This phenomenon is

  7. Reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy as efficient technique for the determination of optical properties of polystyrene intermixed with gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deris, Jamileh; Hajati, Shaaker

    2017-01-01

    The electronic properties (electron inelastic cross section, energy loss function) of a nano-metalized polystyrene obtained by reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) in a previous study [J. Deris, S. Hajati, S. Tougaard, V. Zaporojtchenko, Appl. Surf. Sci. 377 (2016) 44-47], which relies on the Yubero-Tougaard method, were used in the complementary application of Kramers-Kronig transformation to determine its optical properties such as the real part (ε1) and imaginary part (ε2) of the dielectric function (ε), refractive index (n), coefficients of extinction (k), reflection (R) and absorption (μ). The degree of intermixing of polystyrene thin film and gold nanoparticles of sizes 5.5 nm was controlled by annealing the sample to achieve a morphology in which the nanoparticles were homogeneously distributed within polystyrene. It is worth noting that no data are available on the optical properties of metalized polymers such as gold nanoparticles intermixed with polystyrene. Therefore, this work is of high importance in terms of both the sample studied here and the method applied. The advantage of the method applied here is that no information on the lateral distribution of the nanocomposite sample is required. This means that the REELS technique has been presented here to suitably, efficiently and easily obtain the optical properties of such nano-metalized polymer in which the metal nanoparticles have been vertically well distributed (homogeneous in depth). Therefore, for vertically homogeneous and laterally inhomogeneous samples, it is possible to make REELS imaging by scanning the sample and thus to make an image of their optical properties.

  8. Density Functional Theory Modeling of Low-Loss Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy in Wurtzite III-Nitride Ternary Alloys.

    PubMed

    Eljarrat, Alberto; Sastre, Xavier; Peiró, Francesca; Estradé, Sónia

    2016-06-01

    In the present work, the dielectric response of III-nitride semiconductors is studied using density functional theory (DFT) band structure calculations. The aim of this study is to improve our understanding of the features in the low-loss electron energy-loss spectra of ternary alloys, but the results are also relevant to optical and UV spectroscopy results. In addition, the dependence of the most remarkable features with composition is tested, i.e. applying Vegard's law to band gap and plasmon energy. For this purpose, three wurtzite ternary alloys, from the combination of binaries AlN, GaN, and InN, were simulated through a wide compositional range (i.e., Al x Ga1-x N, In x Al1-x N, and In x Ga1-x N, with x=[0,1]). For this DFT calculations, the standard tools found in Wien2k software were used. In order to improve the band structure description of these semiconductor compounds, the modified Becke-Johnson exchange-correlation potential was also used. Results from these calculations are presented, including band structure, density of states, and complex dielectric function for the whole compositional range. Larger, closer to experimental values, band gap energies are predicted using the novel potential, when compared with standard generalized gradient approximation. Moreover, a detailed analysis of the collective excitation features in the dielectric response reveals their compositional dependence, which sometimes departs from a linear behavior (bowing). Finally, an advantageous method for measuring the plasmon energy dependence from these calculations is explained.

  9. Successful application of spatial difference technique to electron energy-loss spectroscopy studies of Mo/SrTiO3 interfaces.

    PubMed

    Gao, M; Scheu, C; Tchernychova, E; Rühle, M

    2003-04-01

    The electron energy-loss near-edge structure (ELNES) of Mo/SrTiO3 interfaces has been studied using high spatial resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in a dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope. Thin films of Mo with a thickness of 50 nm were grown on (001)-orientated SrTiO3 surfaces by molecular beam epitaxy at 600 degrees C. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed that the interfaces were atomically abrupt with the (110)Mo plane parallel to the substrate surface. Ti-L2,3 ( approximately 460 eV), O-K ( approximately 530 eV), Sr-L2,3 ( approximately 1950 eV) and Mo-L2,3 ( approximately 2500 eV) absorption edges were acquired by using the Gatan Enfina parallel EELS system with a CCD detector. The interface-specific components of the ELNES were extracted by employing the spatial difference method. The interfacial Ti-L2,3 edge shifted to lower energy values and the splitting due to crystal field became less pronounced compared to bulk SrTiO3, which indicated that the Ti atoms at the interface were in a reduced oxidation state and that the symmetry of the TiO6 octahedra was disturbed. No interfacial Sr-L2,3 edge was observed, which may demonstrate that Sr atoms do not participate in the interfacial bonding. An evident interface-specific O-K edge was found, which differs from that of the bulk in both position (0.8 +/- 0.2 eV positive shift) and shape. In addition, a positive shift (0.9 +/- 0.3 eV) occurred for the interfacial Mo-L2,3, revealing an oxidized state of Mo at the interface. Our results indicated that at the interface SrTiO3 was terminated with TiO2. The validity of the spatial difference technique is discussed and examined by introducing subchannel drift intentionally.

  10. Panoramic High Resolution Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    2008-10-01

    Stellar populations in galaxies are vast repositories of fossil information. In recent years it has become possible to consider high resolution spectroscopic surveys of millions of stars. New high resolution multi-object spectrographs on 4-8m class telescopes (HERMES, WFMOS) will allow us for the first time to make large and detailed chemical abundance surveys of stars in the Galactic disk, bulge and halo, and apply the techniques of chemical tagging to recovering the fossil information left over from galaxy assembly. These instruments will have strong synergies with the GAIA astrometric satellite due to launch in 2011. The level of detail made possible by these future facilities will be necessary if we are to fully understand the physical processes involved in galaxy formation.

  11. Microwave fixation and localization of calcium in synaptic terminals using x-ray microanalysis and electron energy loss spectroscopy imaging.

    PubMed

    Mizuhira, V; Hasegawa, H

    1997-01-01

    The distribution of calcium ions is demonstrated in synaptic terminals by means of a two-step chemical precipitation of calcium ions in the rat brain. K-oxalate/K-antimonate chemical replacement with simultaneous computerized microwave irradiation was used. This precipitate in nerve cell structures was investigated by computerized electron probe x-ray microanalysis (EDX) and electron energy loss spectroscopic (EELS) imaging. The values obtained by EDX agreed with those of the standard sample and theoretical values of Ca-antimonate. Typical EELS spectra of Ca:L, O:K, and Sb:M were obtained from nerve terminals in the same tissue block as that used for EDX analysis. Excellent net Ca:L and Sb:M EELS digital images were obtained after their background images were subtracted. Calcium ions were distributed in the nerve terminals, synaptic vesicles, mitochondria, and synaptic membranes.

  12. Study of semiconductor valence plasmon line shapes via electron energy-loss spectroscopy in the transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Kundmann, M.K.

    1988-11-01

    Electron energy-loss spectra of the semiconductors Si, AlAs, GaAs, InAs, InP, and Ge are examined in detail in the regime of outer-shell and plasmon energy losses (0--100eV). Particular emphasis is placed on modeling and analyzing the shapes of the bulk valence plasmon lines. A line shape model based on early work by Froehlich is derived and compared to single-scattering probability distributions extracted from the measured spectra. Model and data are found to be in excellent agreement, thus pointing the way to systematic characterization of the plasmon component of EELS spectra. The model is applied to three separate investigations. 82 refs.

  13. Study of the evolution of the atomic composition of thin NbN films under irradiation with mixed ion beams by methods of electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dement'eva, M. M.; Prikhod'ko, K. E.; Gurovich, B. A.; Kutuzov, L. V.; Komarov, D. A.

    2016-11-01

    The variation in the atomic composition of ultrathin NbN films under irradiation by mixed ion beams to a doze of 4 dpa (for nitrogen) is experimentally studied by methods of electron energy loss spectroscopy with a transmission electron microscope in the transmission scan mode on cross-cut samples. The behavior of the substitution of nitrogen atoms by oxygen atoms has been established; it is characterized by changing the composition of the conducting part of the film from NbN to NbNO.

  14. Blue and red shifts of interband transition energy in supported Au nanoclusters on SiO2 and HOPG investigated by reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Borisyuk, P V; Troyan, V I; Pushkin, M A; Borman, V D; Tronin, V N

    2012-11-01

    Gold nanoclusters supported on SiO2 and HOPG are experimentally investigated by the reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Two different trends in the size-dependence of the position of the energy-loss peak corresponding to the interband Au 5d --> 6s6p transition is observed: a blue shift for Au clusters on SiO2 and a red shift for Au clusters on HOPG. The different behaviors are qualitatively explained by the influence of the substrate on the spectrum of electronic states in Au nanoclusters.

  15. Direct characterization of the energy level alignments and molecular components in an organic hetero-junction by integrated photoemission spectroscopy and reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Dong-Jin; Shin, Weon-Ho; Bulliard, Xavier; Park, Jong Hwan; Kim, Seyun; Chung, Jae Gwan; Kim, Yongsu; Heo, Sung; Kim, Seong Heon

    2016-08-01

    A novel, direct method for the characterization of the energy level alignments at bulk-heterojunction (BHJ)/electrode interfaces on the basis of electronic spectroscopy measurements is proposed. The home-made in situ photoemission system is used to perform x-ray/ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (XPS/UPS), reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) and inverse photoemission spectroscopy of organic-semiconductors (OSCs) deposited onto a Au substrate. Through this analysis system, we are able to obtain the electronic structures of a boron subphthalocyanine chloride:fullerene (SubPC:C60) BHJ and those of the separate OSC/electrode structures (SubPC/Au and C60/Au). Morphology and chemical composition analyses confirm that the original SubPC and C60 electronic structures remain unchanged in the electrodes prepared. Using this technique, we ascertain that the position and area of the nearest peak to the Fermi energy (EF = 0 eV) in the UPS (REELS) spectra of SubPC:C60 BHJ provide information on the highest occupied molecular orbital level (optical band gap) and combination ratio of the materials, respectively. Thus, extracting the adjusted spectrum from the corresponding SubPC:C60 BHJ UPS (REELS) spectrum reveals its electronic structure, equivalent to that of the C60 materials. This novel analytical approach allows complete energy-level determination for each combination ratio by separating its electronic structure information from the BHJ spectrum.

  16. Doubly excited states of water as studied by electron energy loss spectroscopy in coincidence with detecting Lyman-α photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchida, Toshinori; Odagiri, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Lisa; Yachi, Kazufumi; Shigemura, Keisuke; Ohno, Naruhito; Hosaka, Kouichi; Kitajima, Masashi; Kouchi, Noriyuki

    2011-09-01

    The electron energy loss spectrum of H2O in coincidence with detecting Lyman-α photons (CoEELS) has been measured at the incident electron energy of 100 eV and electron scattering angle of 8° in the inner valence range in order to investigate the formation and decay of the doubly excited states. The present CoEELS has been compared with that at the infinite incident electron energy and 0° electron scattering angle, which was derived from the density of the dipole oscillator strength of H2O for the emission of the Lyman-α photons against the incident photon energy (Nakano et al 2010 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 43 215206). It is remarkable that there exists a large difference in shape between these CoEELSs. This difference has turned out to be attributed to the noticeable contribution of the forbidden doubly excited states at 100 eV incident electron energy and 8° scattering angle. They lie at 25.0 and 27.4 eV and have been found out in this study. The differential cross sections for the excitation to the superexcited states resulting in H(2p) formation have been obtained at 100 eV and 8° and compared with those at the infinite energy and 0°. The electron collisions at 100 eV and 8° enhance the dissociative double excitation against the dissociative single excitation as compared with the electron collision at the infinite energy and 0°.

  17. Beam damage suppression of low-kappa porous Si-O-C films by cryo-electron-energy loss spectroscopy (EELS).

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Yuji; Shimizu, Yumiko; Tanaka, Isao

    2009-04-01

    Porous Si-O-C films with lower dielectric constant (kappa) relative to silicon dioxide have been widely studied as inter-layer dielectrics in new-generation microelectronic devices. On the analysis of the film by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), it is susceptible of beam damage during both sample preparation by a focused ion beam (FIB) technique and TEM observation. We use electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to quantify the magnitude of the beam damage during these processes. The intensity of the 285-eV peak in C-K electron energy loss near edge structures (ELNES) is enhanced by the damage, which can be ascribed to the formation of the C=C double bonds as a result of the decomposition of the methyl groups by the beam. The use of cryo-holder for TEM at 100 K is found to be essential to reduce the damage of the low-kappa layers. The lowering of the acceleration voltage of FIB down to 5 keV does not change the spectra. Since the FIB damage is localized at the surface, the use of thick regions in the TEM foil such as 130 nm is preferred to reduce the superposition of EELS of the damaged region on those from the sample of interest.

  18. Martensitic transformation of Ni2FeGa ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy studied via transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. R.; Ma, C.; Tian, H. F.; Wu, G. H.; Li, J. Q.

    2008-06-01

    The structural properties of Ni2FeGa Heusler alloy synthesized by melt-spinning technique have been systematically studied by means of in situ heating and cooling transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the Ni2FeGa alloy was annealed into a well-defined L21 structure at around 980 K, and complex microstructural domains appeared along with lowering temperature. At room temperature (293 K), a rich variety of micromodulated domains were observed. The domain structures were aligned along the ⟨110⟩ or ⟨100⟩ directions resulting to complex tweed structures. Below martensitic transformation (MT) temperature (Ms,˜142K) , the cubic parent phase transformed into unmodulated martensitic variants and modulated martensitic variants. The variants were alternated along the ⟨100⟩ direction with various arrangements and steplike incommensurate boundaries. The modulated martensitic variants were composed of lamellar structures that have predominately a 5M modulation structure along the ⟨110⟩ directions. The electron energy-loss spectroscopy analysis of the low-loss region and the electron energy-loss near-edge fine structure revealed a visible change of the electronic structure along with MT, which can be well interpreted by means of intra-atomic or intraband charge redistribution due to spd orbital hybridization among the Ni-Fe-Ga atoms.

  19. Observability of localized magnetoplasmons in quantum dots: Scrutinizing the eligibility of far-infrared, Raman, and electron-energy-loss spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate a one-component, quasi-zero dimensional, quantum plasma exposed to a parabolic potential and an applied magnetic field in the symmetric gauge. If the size of such a system as can be realized in the semiconducting quantum dots is on the order of the de-Broglie wavelength, the electronic and optical properties become highly tunable. Then the quantum size effects challenge the observation of many-particle phenomena such as the magneto-optical absorption, Raman intensity, and electron energy-loss spectrum. An exact analytical solution of the problem leads us to infer that these many-particle phenomena are, in fact, dictated by the generalized Kohn's theorem (GKT) in the long-wavelength limit. Maneuvering the confinement and/or the magnetic field furnishes the resonance energies capable of being explored with the FIR, Raman, and/or electron-energy-loss spectroscopy. This implies that either of these probes is competent in observing the localized magnetoplasmons in the system. As an application of the rigorous analytical diagnosis of the system, we have presented various pertinent single-particle, such as Fock-Darwin spectrum, Fermi energy, zigzag excitation spectrum, and magneto-optical transitions, and the many-particle phenomena, such as magneto-optical absorption, Raman intensity, and electron energy-loss probability. In the latter, the energy position of the resonance peaks is observed to be independent of the electron-electron interactions and hence of the number of electrons in the quantum dot in compliance with the GKT. It is found that both confinement potential and magnetic field play a decisive role in influencing the aforementioned many-particle phenomena. Specifically, increasing (decreasing) the strength of the confining potential is found to be analogous to shrinking (expanding) the size of the quantum dots and results into a blue (red) shift in the respective spectra. Intensifying the magnetic field has two-fold effects in the resonance

  20. Observability of localized magnetoplasmons in quantum dots: Scrutinizing the eligibility of far-infrared, Raman, and electron-energy-loss spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    2016-03-15

    We investigate a one-component, quasi-zero dimensional, quantum plasma exposed to a parabolic potential and an applied magnetic field in the symmetric gauge. If the size of such a system as can be realized in the semiconducting quantum dots is on the order of the de-Broglie wavelength, the electronic and optical properties become highly tunable. Then the quantum size effects challenge the observation of many-particle phenomena such as the magneto-optical absorption, Raman intensity, and electron energy-loss spectrum. An exact analytical solution of the problem leads us to infer that these many-particle phenomena are, in fact, dictated by the generalized Kohn’s theorem (GKT) in the long-wavelength limit. Maneuvering the confinement and/or the magnetic field furnishes the resonance energies capable of being explored with the FIR, Raman, and/or electron-energy-loss spectroscopy. This implies that either of these probes is competent in observing the localized magnetoplasmons in the system. As an application of the rigorous analytical diagnosis of the system, we have presented various pertinent single-particle, such as Fock-Darwin spectrum, Fermi energy, zigzag excitation spectrum, and magneto-optical transitions, and the many-particle phenomena, such as magneto-optical absorption, Raman intensity, and electron energy-loss probability. In the latter, the energy position of the resonance peaks is observed to be independent of the electron-electron interactions and hence of the number of electrons in the quantum dot in compliance with the GKT. It is found that both confinement potential and magnetic field play a decisive role in influencing the aforementioned many-particle phenomena. Specifically, increasing (decreasing) the strength of the confining potential is found to be analogous to shrinking (expanding) the size of the quantum dots and results into a blue (red) shift in the respective spectra. Intensifying the magnetic field has two-fold effects in the resonance

  1. Distributions of hafnia and titania cores in EUV metal resists evaluated by scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriumi, Minoru; Sato, Yuta; Koshino, Masanori; Suenaga, Kazu; Itani, Toshiro

    2016-11-01

    The morphologies of hafnia (HfO x ) and titania (TiO x ) cores and their distributions in metal resists for EUV lithography were characterized at the atomic level by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The HfO x cores show a higher affinity to organic components, such as methacrylic acid and benzoic acid, than the TiO x cores, and the same core-shell state as in a solution is almost completely maintained in the HfO x resist film. Furthermore, it was found that the surface modification of the TiO x cores by silylation is effective for preventing their aggregation and improves the postcoating delay (PCD) of the resist.

  2. Measurement of the dielectric function of α-Al2O3 by transmission electron microscopy - Electron energy-loss spectroscopy without Cerenkov radiation effects.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Norihito; Tanda, Luka; Kunisada, Yuji

    2016-10-01

    The dielectric function of α-Al2O3 was measured by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) coupled with the difference method. The influence of Cerenkov radiation was significant in measurements using a 200kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) and the correct dielectric function could not be obtained using the conventional EELS procedure. However, a good agreement between the optical data and EELS for the dielectric functions was obtained via a 60kV TEM. Combining EELS and the difference method, however, provided an accurate measurement of the dielectric function for α-Al2O3 even at an accelerating voltage of 200kV. The combination of EELS and the difference method in the nano-beam diffraction mode could derive an accurate dielectric function with superior spatial resolution regardless of the occurrence of Cerenkov radiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. 2D atomic mapping of oxidation states in transition metal oxides by scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Haiyan; Turner, Stuart; Yücelen, Emrah; Verbeeck, Jo; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf

    2011-09-02

    Using a combination of high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy and atomically resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope we demonstrate the possibility of 2D atom by atom valence mapping in the mixed valence compound Mn3O4. The Mn L(2,3) energy-loss near-edge structures from Mn2+ and Mn3+ cation sites are similar to those of MnO and Mn2O3 references. Comparison with simulations shows that even though a local interpretation is valid here, intermixing of the inelastic signal plays a significant role. This type of experiment should be applicable to challenging topics in materials science, such as the investigation of charge ordering or single atom column oxidation states in, e.g., dislocations.

  4. Iron sources used by the nonpathogenic lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus sakei as revealed by electron energy loss spectroscopy and secondary-ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Duhutrel, Philippe; Bordat, Christian; Wu, Ting-Di; Zagorec, Monique; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine

    2010-01-01

    Lactobacillus sakei is a lactic acid bacterium naturally found on meat. Although it is generally acknowledged that lactic acid bacteria are rare species in the microbial world which do not have iron requirements, the genome sequence of L. sakei 23K has revealed quite complete genetic equipment dedicated to transport and use of this metal. Here, we aimed to investigate which iron sources could be used by this species as well as their role in the bacterium's physiology. Therefore, we developed a microscopy approach based on electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) analysis and nano-scale secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in order to analyze the iron content of L. sakei cells. This revealed that L. sakei can use iron sources found in its natural ecosystem, myoglobin, hemoglobin, hematin, and transferrin, to ensure long-term survival during stationary phase. This study reveals that analytical image methods (EELS and SIMS) are powerful complementary tools for investigation of metal utilization by bacteria.

  5. In Situ Environmental Cell-Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of Microbial Reduction of Chromium(VI) Using Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Daulton, Tyrone L.; Little, Brenda J.; Lowe, Kristine; Jones-Meehan, Joanne

    2001-11-01

    Reduction of Cr(VI) by the bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis (previously classified Shewanella putrefaciens strain MR-1), was studied by absorption spectrophotometry and in situ, environmental cell-transmission electron microscopy (EC-TEM) coupled with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Bacteria from rinsed cultures were placed directly in the environmental cell of the transmission electron microscope and examined under 100 Torr pressure. Bright field EC-TEM images show two distinct populations of S. oneidensis in incubated cultures containing Cr(VI)O2- 4: those that exhibit low image contrast and heavily precipitate-encrusted cells exhibiting high image contrast. Several EELS techniques were applied to determine the oxidation state of Cr associated with encrusted cells. The encrusted cells are shown to contain a reduced form of Cr in oxidation state +3 or lower. These results demonstrate the capability to determine the chemistry and valence state of reduction products associated with unfixed, hydrated bacteria in an environmental cell transmission electron microscope.

  6. Combination of electron energy-loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to determine indium concentration in InGaN thin film structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Chauvat, M. P.; Ruterana, P.; Walther, T.

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate a method to determine the indium concentration, x, of In x Ga1-x N thin films by combining plasmon excitation studies in electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) with a novel way of quantification of the intensity of x-ray lines in energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS). The plasmon peak in EELS of InGaN is relatively broad. We fitted a Lorentz function to the main plasmon peak to suppress noise and the influence from the neighboring Ga 3d transition in the spectrum, which improves the precision in the evaluation of the plasmon peak position. As the indium concentration of InGaN is difficult to control during high temperature growth due to partial In desorption, the nominal indium concentrations provided by the growers were not considered reliable. The indium concentration obtained from EDXS quantification using Oxford Instrument ISIS 300 x-ray standard quantification software often did not agree with the nominal indium concentration, and quantification using K and L lines was inconsistent. We therefore developed a self-consistent iterative procedure to determine the In content from thickness-dependent k-factors, as described in recent work submitted to Journal of Microscopy. When the plasmon peak position is plotted versus the indium concentration from EDXS we obtain a linear relationship over the whole compositional range, and the standard error from linear least-squares fitting shows that the indium concentration can be determined from the plasmon peak position to within Δx = ± 0.037 standard deviation.

  7. Isolated energy level in the band gap of Yb2Si2O7 identified by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Takafumi; Kobayashi, Shunsuke; Wada, Masashi; Fisher, Craig A. J.; Kuwabara, Akihide; Kato, Takeharu; Yoshiya, Masato; Kitaoka, Satoshi; Moriwake, Hiroki

    2016-05-01

    We report the detection of an isolated energy level in the band gap of crystalline Yb2Si2O7 in the low-energy-loss region of its electron energy-loss (EEL) spectrum, obtained using a monochromated scanning transmission electron microscope. The experimental results are corroborated by first-principles calculations of the theoretical EEL spectrum. The calculations reveal that unoccupied Yb 4 f orbitals constitute an isolated energy level about 1 eV below the conduction band minimum (CBM), resulting in a terrace about 1 eV wide at the band edge of the EEL spectrum. In the case of Yb2O3 , no band edge terrace is present because the unoccupied f level lies just below the CBM. We also examined optical absorption properties of Yb2Si2O7 using UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, which shows that the isolated energy level could not be detected in the band edge of the obtained absorbance spectrum. These findings demonstrate the utility of low-loss EEL spectroscopy with high energy resolution for probing semilocalized electronic features.

  8. A combined scanning tunneling microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy study on the formation of thin, well-ordered β-Ga2O3 films on CoGa(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, G.; Gassmann, P.; Franchy, R.

    1998-03-01

    The formation of thin, well-ordered β-Ga2O3 films on CoGa(001) was studied by means of high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), and Auger electron spectroscopy. The crystalline β-Ga2O3 films on CoGa(001) are prepared upon adsorption of O2 at 300 K and subsequent annealing at 700 K or by oxidation of the sample directly at 700 K, respectively. EEL spectra of these films exhibit Fuchs-Kliewer modes at 305, 455, 645, and 785 cm-1 in good agreement with calculated spectra using the IR parameters of Ga2O3. The band gap was determined to be 4.5±0.2 eV. In addition, a gap state at 3.3 eV was found. The observed LEED pattern of β-Ga2O3/CoGa(001) can be explained by a (2×1) structure in two perpendicularly oriented domains. STM images exhibit atomically flat and large oxide terraces (up to 2500×700 Å2) mainly of rectangular shape. STM pictures with atomic resolution confirm the (2×1) structure. In addition, a square substructure can be observed which is related to the closed-packed oxygen lattice of β-Ga2O3.

  9. Free electrons and ionic liquids: study of excited states by means of electron-energy loss spectroscopy and the density functional theory multireference configuration interaction method.

    PubMed

    Regeta, Khrystyna; Bannwarth, Christoph; Grimme, Stefan; Allan, Michael

    2015-06-28

    The technique of low energy (0-30 eV) electron impact spectroscopy, originally developed for gas phase molecules, is applied to room temperature ionic liquids (IL). Electron energy loss (EEL) spectra recorded near threshold, by collecting 0-2 eV electrons, are largely continuous, assigned to excitation of a quasi-continuum of high overtones and combination vibrations of low-frequency modes. EEL spectra recorded by collecting 10 eV electrons show predominantly discrete vibrational and electronic bands. The vibrational energy-loss spectra correspond well to IR spectra except for a broadening (∼0.04 eV) caused by the liquid surroundings, and enhanced overtone activity indicating a contribution from resonant excitation mechanism. The spectra of four representative ILs were recorded in the energy range of electronic excitations and compared to density functional theory multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI) calculations, with good agreement. The spectra up to about 8 eV are dominated by π-π* transitions of the aromatic cations. The lowest bands were identified as triplet states. The spectral region 2-8 eV was empty in the case of a cation without π orbitals. The EEL spectrum of a saturated solution of methylene green in an IL band showed the methylene green EEL band at 2 eV, indicating that ILs may be used as a host to study nonvolatile compounds by this technique in the future.

  10. High energy-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy study of the dielectric properties of bulk and nanoparticle LaB6 in the near-infrared region.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yohei; Terauchi, Masami; Mukai, Masaki; Kaneyama, Toshikatsu; Adachi, Kenji

    2011-07-01

    The dielectric properties of LaB(6) crystals and the plasmonic behavior of LaB(6) nanoparticles, which have been applied to solar heat-shielding filters, were studied by high energy-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HR-EELS). An EELS spectrum of a LaB(6) crystal showed a peak at 2.0 eV, which was attributed to volume plasmon excitation of carrier electrons. EELS spectra of single LaB(6) nanoparticles showed peaks at 1.1-1.4 eV depending on the dielectric effect from the substrates. The peaks were assigned to dipole oscillation excitations. These peak energies almost coincided with the peak energy of optical absorption of a heat-shielding filter with LaB(6) nanoparticles. On the other hand, those energies were a smaller than a dipole oscillation energy predicted using the dielectric function of bulk LaB(6) crystal. It is suggested that the lower energy than expected is due to an excitation at 1.2 eV, which was observed for oxidized LaB(6) area.

  11. Electron-energy-loss spectroscopy of YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 minus x Fe sub x O sub 7 minus y superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Vaishnava, P.P.; Taylor, C.A. II ); Foiles, C.L. )

    1990-03-01

    YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3{minus}{ital x}}Fe{sub {ital x}}O{sub 7{minus}{ital y}} ({ital x}=0.0, 0.05, 0.1) compounds have been studied using energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). X-ray diffraction data indicated the formation of structurally known superconducting compounds. Transition temperatures, as measured by a Faraday balance, showed a decrease as the iron concentration was increased. Using the spot mode in an analytical electron microscope, the EDX and EELS data were obtained for identifiable, well-defined small regions of the superconducting particles. EDX spectra have been used to analyze different components and phases present in the samples. Detailed EELS data for the O 1{ital s} excitation have been obtained, and a peak in the pre-edge continuum has been observed in all the samples. The intensity and the nature of this peak are found to depend upon the iron concentration. The results of this investigation suggest structural disorder and orthorhombic-to-tetragonal transition as major reasons for the decrease in transition temperature for the iron-doped superconductors.

  12. Assessing electron beam sensitivity for SrTiO3 and La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 using electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nord, Magnus; Vullum, Per Erik; Hallsteinsen, Ingrid; Tybell, Thomas; Holmestad, Randi

    2016-10-01

    Thresholds for beam damage have been assessed for La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 and SrTiO3 as a function of electron probe current and exposure time at 80 and 200kV acceleration voltage. The materials were exposed to an intense electron probe by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with simultaneous acquisition of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data. Electron beam damage was identified by changes of the core loss fine structure after quantification by a refined and improved model based approach. At 200kV acceleration voltage, damage in SrTiO3 was identified by changes both in the EEL fine structure and by contrast changes in the STEM images. However, the changes in the STEM image contrast as introduced by minor damage can be difficult to detect under several common experimental conditions. No damage was observed in SrTiO3 at 80kV acceleration voltage, independent of probe current and exposure time. In La0.7Sr0.3MnO3, beam damage was observed at both 80 and 200kV acceleration voltages. This damage was observed by large changes in the EEL fine structure, but not by any detectable changes in the STEM images. The typical method to validate if damage has been introduced during acquisitions is to compare STEM images prior to and after spectroscopy. Quantifications in this work show that this method possibly can result in misinterpretation of beam damage as changes of material properties.

  13. Electronic structure of metastable bcc Cu-Cr alloy thin films: Comparison of electron energy-loss spectroscopy and first-principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Liebscher, C H; Freysoldt, C; Dennenwaldt, T; Harzer, T P; Dehm, G

    2016-07-12

    Metastable Cu-Cr alloy thin films with nominal thickness of 300nm and composition of Cu67Cr33 (at%) are obtained by co-evaporation using molecular beam epitaxy. The microstructure, chemical phase separation and electronic structure are investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The thin film adopts the body-centered cubic crystal structure and consists of columnar grains with ~50nm diameter. Aberration-corrected scanning TEM in combination with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirms compositional fluctuations within the grains. Cu- and Cr-rich domains with composition of Cu85Cr15 (at%) and Cu42Cr58 (at%) and domain size of 1-5nm are observed. The alignment of the interface between the Cu- and Cr-rich domains shows a preference for {110}-type habit plane. The electronic structure of the Cu-Cr thin films is investigated by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and is contrasted to an fcc-Cu reference sample. The experimental EEL spectra are compared to spectra computed by density functional theory. The main differences between bcc-and fcc-Cu are related to differences in van Hove singularities in the electron density of states. In Cu-Cr solid solutions with bcc crystal structure a single peak after the L3-edge, corresponding to a van Hove singularity at the N-point of the first Brillouin zone is observed. Spectra computed for pure bcc-Cu and random Cu-Cr solid solutions with 10at% Cr confirm the experimental observations. The calculated spectrum for a perfect Cu50Cr50 (at%) random structure shows a shift in the van Hove singularity towards higher energy by developing a Cu-Cr d-band that lies between the delocalized d-bands of Cu and Cr.

  14. Dynamical observation of lithium insertion/extraction reaction during charge-discharge processes in Li-ion batteries by in situ spatially resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shimoyamada, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Yoshida, Ryuji; Kato, Takehisa; Iriyama, Yasutoshi; Hirayama, Tsukasa

    2015-12-01

    All-solid-state Li-ion batteries (LIBs) with solid electrolytes are expected to be the next generation devices to overcome serious issues facing conventional LIBs with liquid electrolytes. However, the large Li-ion transfer resistance at the electrode/solid-electrolyte interfaces causes low power density and prevents practical use. In-situ-formed negative electrodes prepared by decomposing the solid electrolyte Li(1+x+3z)Alx(Ti,Ge)(2-x)Si(3z)P(3-z)O12 (LASGTP) with an excess Li-ion insertion reaction are effective electrodes providing low Li-ion transfer resistance at the interfaces. Prior to our work, however, it had still been unclear how the negative electrodes were formed in the parent solid electrolytes. Here, we succeeded in dynamically visualizing the formation by in situ spatially resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscope mode (SR-TEM-EELS). The Li-ions were gradually inserted into the solid electrolyte region around 400 nm from the negative current-collector/solid-electrolyte interface in the charge process. Some of the ions were then extracted in the discharge process, and the rest were diffused such that the distribution was almost flat, resulting in the negative electrodes. The redox reaction of Ti(4+)/Ti(3+) in the solid electrolyte was also observed in situ during the Li insertion/extraction processes. The in situ SR-TEM-EELS revealed the mechanism of the electrochemical reaction in solid-state batteries. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. INTRACELLULAR METAL COMPARTMENTALIZATION IN THE GREEN ALGAL MODEL SYSTEM MICRASTERIAS DENTICULATA (STREPTOPHYTA) MEASURED BY TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY-COUPLED ELECTRON ENERGY LOSS SPECTROSCOPY(1).

    PubMed

    Volland, Stefanie; Andosch, Ancuela; Milla, Manuela; Stöger, Barbara; Lütz, Cornelius; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2011-06-01

    Entry of metals in form of aerosols into areas of high air humidity such as peat bogs represents a serious danger for inhabiting organisms such as the unicellular desmid Micrasterias denticulata Bréb. ex Ralfs (Desmidiaceae, Zynematophyceae, Streptophyta). To understand cellular detoxification and tolerance mechanisms, detailed intracellular localization of metal pollutants is required. This study localizes the metals aluminum (Al), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), and cadmium (Cd) in the green algal model system Micrasterias after experimental exposure to sulfate solutions by highly sensitive TEM-coupled electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Concentrations of the metals shown to induce inhibiting effects on cell development and cytomorphogenesis were chosen for these experiments. Long-term exposure to these metal concentrations led to a pronounced impact on cell physiology expressed by a general decrease in apparent photosynthesis. After long-term treatment, Zn, Al, and Cu were detected in the cell walls by EELS. Zn was additionally found in vacuoles and mucilage vesicles, and Cu in starch grains and also in mucilage vesicles. Elevated amounts of oxygen in areas where Zn, Al, and Cu were localized suggest sequestration of these metals as oxides. The study demonstrated that Micrasterias can cope differently with metal pollutants. In low doses and during a limited time period, the cells were able to compartmentalize Cu the best, followed by Zn and Al. Cu and Zn were taken up into intracellular compartments, whereas Al was only bound to the cell wall. Cd was not compartmentalized at all, which explains its strongest impact on growth, cell division rate, and photosynthesis in Micrasterias. © 2011 Phycological Society of America.

  16. An in ovo investigation into the hepatotoxicity of cadmium and chromium evaluated with light- and transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Venter, Chantelle; Oberholzer, Hester M; Taute, Helena; Cummings, Franscious R; Bester, Megan J

    2015-01-01

    Excessive agriculture, transport and mining often lead to the contamination of valuable water resources. Communities using this water for drinking, washing, bathing and the irrigation of crops are continuously being exposed to these heavy metals. The most vulnerable is the developing fetus. Cadmium (Cd) and chrome (Cr) were identified as two of the most prevalent heavy metal water contaminants in South Africa. In this study, chicken embryos at the stage of early organogenesis were exposed to a single dosage of 0.430 μM physiological dosage (PD) and 430 μM (×1000 PD) CdCl2, as well as 0.476 μM (PD) and 746 μM (×1000 PD) K2Cr2O7. At day 14, when all organ systems were completely developed, the embryos were terminated and the effect of these metals on liver tissue and cellular morphology was determined with light- and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The intracellular localization of these metals was determined using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). With light microscopy, the PD of both Cd and Cr had no effect on liver tissue or cellular morphology. At ×1000 PD both Cd and Cr caused sinusoid dilation and tissue necrosis. With TEM analysis, Cd exposed hepatocytes presented with irregular chromatin condensation, ruptured cellular membranes and damaged or absent organelles. In contrast Cr caused only slight mitochondrial damage. EELS revealed the bio-accumulation of Cd and Cr along the cristae of the mitochondria and chromatin of the nuclei.

  17. Spatially resolved chemical mapping of dry and hydrated polymer morphology by electron energy-loss spectroscopy in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Alioscka A. C. A.

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is a technique that allows compositional analysis to be performed at high spatial resolution in thin TEM specimens, and here we implement and apply this technique to quantitatively study the morphology of unstained dry and frozen-hydrated polymer films. While water can play a controlling role that determines many of the important properties of polymers, there has not yet been much experimental work performed to correlate water spatial distribution with variations in underlying polymer morphology. We show how a quantitative map of the nanoscale spatial distribution of water can be generated from frozen-hydrated polymer thin films using EELS in the STEM. We find that hydrated polymers are very sensitive to the incident electron irradiation, and there is a trade off between the spatial resolution that a compositional map can display and its signal-to-noise ratio. The identification of minor fluctuations in composition within small regions across a given water map is therefore challenging because one must distinguish the fluctuations that are significant from those within noise. We implement a methodology using scatter diagrams in combination with noise simulations to threshold water maps and separate real pixel-by-pixel compositional fluctuations from noise. We study a model system comprised of hydrophilic poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) and hydrophobic poly(styrene), and we show that the thresholding approach enables us to quantitatively identify statistically significant single-pixel fluctuations in water content. We also apply EELS in the STEM to characterize the morphology of a dry, solvent-cast thin-film biopolymer blend comprised of poly(caprolactone) and poly(DTE carbonate). We quantitatively show the effect that solvent evaporation rate has on the morphology development of this blend and how the underlying morphology can dramatically influence the spatial distribution of

  18. Interfacial phases in epitaxial growth of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} on MgO studied via combining electron energy-loss spectroscopy and real-space self-consistent full multiple scattering calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Pailloux, F.; Jublot, M.; Gaboriaud, R.J.; Jaouen, M.; Paumier, F.; Imhoff, D.

    2005-09-15

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and electron diffraction were used to investigate Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films epitaxially grown on (001) MgO substrate. In the vicinity of the film/substrate interface, HRTEM experiments evidenced the presence of grains with various crystallographic structures most of them crystallizing in the well-known Ia3 cubic phase. Some other grains, nanometric in size, and only observed in the vicinity of the film/substrate interface, have a different and unknown crystallographic structure. EELS spectra have been acquired close to the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MgO interface, to get a better knowledge of the phases nucleated close to the substrate surface. Spectra exhibiting different fine structures have been recorded and compared to multiple scattering calculations. The Ia3 phase has been detected as constituting the main component of the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film in agreement with previous observations. It is found that calculations performed in a real space self-consistent full multiple scattering scheme (SC-FMS) and experiments are in pretty good agreement even for small cluster sizes. The second family of spectra has also been compared to calculations performed for monoclinic C2/m yttrium oxide, with a little success. Another approach considering a local oxygen neighboring close to a distorted rock-salt-like structure led to a good match between experimental and calculated spectra. Our results emphasize how powerful is the combination of spectroscopic measurements at nanometer scale, as feasible with EELS and modern microscopes, with ab initio calculations for structure determination at such small scale lengths.

  19. New insights into the chemical structure of Y2Ti2O7-δ nanoparticles in oxide dispersion-strengthened steels designed for sodium fast reactors by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badjeck, V.; Walls, M. G.; Chaffron, L.; Malaplate, J.; March, K.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study by high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with electron energy-loss spectroscopy (STEM-EELS) an oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steel with the nominal composition Fe-14Cr-1W-0.3TiH2-0.3Y2O3 (wt.%) designed to withstand the extreme conditions met in Gen. IV nuclear reactors. After denoising via principal component analysis (PCA) the data are analyzed using independent component analysis (ICA) which is useful in the investigation of the physical properties and chemical structure of the material by separating the individual spectral responses. The Y-Ti-O nanoparticles are found to be homogeneously distributed in the ferritic matrix, sized from 1 to 20 nm and match a non-stoichiometric pyrochlore-Y2Ti2O7-δ structure for sizes greater than 5 nm. We show that they adopt a (Y-Ti-O)-Cr core-shell structure and that Cr also segregates at the matrix grain boundaries, which may slightly modify the corrosion properties of the steel. Using Ti-L2,3 and O-K fine structure (ELNES) the Ti oxidation state is shown to vary from the center of the nanoparticles to their periphery, from Ti4+ in distorted Oh symmetry to a valency often lower than 3+. The sensitivity of the Ti "white lines" ELNES to local symmetry distortions is also shown to be useful when investigating the strain induced in the nanoparticles by the surrounding matrix. The Cr-shell and the variation of the Ti valence state highlight a complex nanoparticle-matrix interface.

  20. Determination of atomic hydrogen in hydrocarbons by means of the reflected electron energy loss spectroscopy and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanas'ev, V. P.; Gryazev, A. S.; Efremenko, D. S.; Kaplya, P. S.; Ridzel, O. Y.

    2016-09-01

    Elastic peaks electron spectroscopy (EPES) is a perspective tool for measuring the hydrogen atomic density in hydrocarbons. It is known that hydrogen elastic peaks overlap inelastic energy loss spectra. This fact complicates the quantitative interpretation of EPES spectra. In this paper, a novel technique based on the joint use of EPES and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) is proposed. A key part of the method is the inelastic scattering background subtraction which is performed in two steps. At the first step, differential inelastic scattering cross-sections are retrieved from PES spectra, while at the second step, the retrieved cross-sections are used to remove the inelastic scattering signal from EPES spectra. Both REELS and PES spectra are described on the base of the invariant imbedding method forming a consistent framework for the surface state analysis. A good agreement is obtained between calculated spectra and experimental data.

  1. The electronic states of oxazole studied by VUV absorption and electron energy-loss (EEL) spectroscopies, and ab initio configuration interaction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Michael H.; Ganzenmüller, Georg; Walker, Isobel C.

    2007-04-01

    The oxazole VUV absorption spectrum over the range 5-12 eV shows intense bands centred near 6.3, 7.5, 8.3, 9.6 and 10.8 eV. The electron energy-loss (EEL) spectrum shows additional structure with a strong peak (˜1.4 eV) arising from resonant vibrational excitation of the molecule via a shape resonance, and a spin-forbidden 3ππ ∗ state at 4.6 eV. Electronic excitation energies for valence and Rydberg-type states have been computed using ab initio multi-reference multi-root CI methods. The CI studies used a triple zeta + polarisation basis set, augmented by diffuse (Rydberg) orbitals, to generate the theoretical singlet and triplet energy manifolds. The correlation of theory and experiment shows the nature of the more intense Rydberg state types, and identification of the main valence and Rydberg bands. Calculated energies for low-lying Rydberg states are relatively close (SD 0.38) to those expected, and there is generally a good correlation between the theoretical and experimental envelopes. Two of the three lowest electronic states arise from ππ ∗ excitation of the outer (3a″ and 2a″) π-orbitals, with one state (LP Nπ ∗) originating from the lone pair on nitrogen (15a') between them.

  2. The electronic states of buta-1,3-diene studied by ab initio configuration interaction and DFT methods, and electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H., Michael; | Isobel C., Palmer; Walker

    2010-08-01

    The electronic vertical excitation energies for singlet and triplet valence, and Rydberg states of trans-buta-1,3-diene have been computed using ab initio multi-reference multi-root CI procedures with a [4s3p3d3f] set of Rydberg functions. Close numerical agreement between theory and experiment was found for a number of low-lying electronic states. The present CI and CASSCF [8MO,8e] calculations suggest that both the vertical and adiabatic order of the valence (ππ∗) states is: A˜1Aelectron energy-loss spectrum, reported here, in which the incident electrons have near-threshold energies, supports this order. Adiabatic excitation energies and structures were obtained for several singlet and triplet states using CASSCF and B3LYP procedures; the results from these methods are generally in good agreement with each other. The C 1C 2 to C 2C 3 bond length ratio in the excited states varies widely, and is discussed.

  3. Examination of the electronic structure of crystalline and liquid Al versus temperature by in situ electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS).

    PubMed

    Palanisamy, Prakash; Jong, Maarten de; Asta, Mark; Howe, James M

    2015-09-01

    Electron energy-loss near-edge structure (ELNES) analysis using in situ heating in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) was performed to compare the electronic structure of crystalline and liquid Al versus temperature. It was found that the ELNES features in the L2,3 edges of crystalline and liquid Al are qualitatively similar, but that the edge threshold is modified and certain features in the energy range between 102 and 115eV vanish in the liquid, indicating that partial DOS is quantitatively different. Broadening of the L2,3 edge maximum for Al with temperature indicates a decay in the centrifugal barrier for the 2p electrons with increasing temperature. Comparison between the ELNES edge in supercooled liquid and crystalline Al at the same temperature of 600°C shows that the degree of order, i.e., crystallinity, plays an important role in determining the DOS. The ELNES edge of supercooled liquid Al closely resembles that of superheated liquid Al. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. High-Resolution Photoelectron and Photoionization Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkt, F.

    2012-06-01

    Since its development in the late 1950s and early 1960s, photoelectron spectroscopy has established itself as an important method to study the electronic structure of molecules, their photoionization dynamics, and the structure and dynamics of molecular cations. In recent years, and particularly since the development of pulsed-field-ionization zero-kinetic-energy (PFI-ZEKE) photoelectron spectroscopy, considerable progress has been made in the resolution that can be achieved by photoelectron spectroscopy. This progress relies on the systematic exploitation of the unusual physical properties of high Rydberg states and enables one today to resolve the rotational structure in the photoelectron spectra of even large molecules and the hyperfine structure in the photoelectron spectra of small molecules. This talk will begin with a brief historical review of photoelectron spectroscopy. Then, the relationship between photoelectron spectroscopy, photoionization spectroscopy and the spectroscopy of high Rydberg states will be discussed. It will be explained how this relationship is currently exploited to improve the resolution achievable by PFI-ZEKE photoelectron spectroscopy. Then, the physical principles that are at the heart of the latest methods related to high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy will be described together with their fundamental limitations. Depending on the resolution and the spectral range needed to address a specific scientific problem, a choice can be made between several different methods with spectral resolutions ranging from 30 GHz to better than 1 MHz. The talk will summarize the current state of the art in gas-phase photoelectron spectroscopy and be illustrated by several examples, primarily taken from the research in my group, in which photoelectron spectroscopy has contributed to answer questions concerning the structure and dynamics of small-sized molecular cations. F. I. Vilesov, B. C. Kurbatov, and N. Terrenin, Soviet Phys. (Doklady) 6

  5. Electron energy loss spectrometry of interstellar diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, Thomas J.; Gibbons, Patrick C.; Lewis, Roy S.

    1990-01-01

    The results are reported of electron energy loss spectra (EELS) measurements on diamond residues from carbonaceous meteorites designed to elucidate the structure and composition of interstellar diamonds. Dynamic effective medium theory is used to model the dielectric properties of the diamonds and in particular to synthesize the observed spectra as mixtures of diamond and various pi-bonded carbons. The results are shown to be quantitatively consistent with the idea that diamonds and their surfaces are the only contributors to the electron energy loss spectra of the diamond residues and that these peculiar spectra are the result of the exceptionally small grain size and large specific surface area of the interstellar diamonds.

  6. Electron energy loss spectrometry of interstellar diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, Thomas J.; Gibbons, Patrick C.; Lewis, Roy S.

    1990-01-01

    The results are reported of electron energy loss spectra (EELS) measurements on diamond residues from carbonaceous meteorites designed to elucidate the structure and composition of interstellar diamonds. Dynamic effective medium theory is used to model the dielectric properties of the diamonds and in particular to synthesize the observed spectra as mixtures of diamond and various pi-bonded carbons. The results are shown to be quantitatively consistent with the idea that diamonds and their surfaces are the only contributors to the electron energy loss spectra of the diamond residues and that these peculiar spectra are the result of the exceptionally small grain size and large specific surface area of the interstellar diamonds.

  7. High-resolution electron spectroscopy of different adsorption states of ethylene on Pd(1 1 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sock, M.; Eichler, A.; Surnev, S.; Andersen, J. N.; Klötzer, B.; Hayek, K.; Ramsey, M. G.; Netzer, F. P.

    2003-11-01

    The adsorption of ethylene at 100 K on clean and oxygen precovered Pd(1 1 1) surfaces and the thermal evolution of the ethylene adsorbate layers have been investigated experimentally by high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation, thermal desorption spectroscopy and theoretically by ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations. On the clean Pd(1 1 1) surface at 100 K ethylene is adsorbed in a di-σ bonding state, whereas on the oxygen precovered Pd(1 1 1)2 × 2-O surface the π-bonded configuration is more stable; this has been established both experimentally and theoretically. Upon adsorption at room temperature ethylidyne adspecies are formed on both surfaces, but neither di-σ nor π-bonded ethylene transform into ethylidyne on heating from low temperature up to 450 K. Complete molecular desorption of ethylene is observed in both cases, with no signs of dehydrogenation. The spectroscopic data recorded during the thermal evolution of the low temperature adsorbate phase have been analysed with the help of DFT and indicate that π-bonded ethylene adsorption states may become populated upon heating the low temperature adlayer to 350 K.

  8. Nano-scale simultaneous observation of Li-concentration profile and Ti-, O electronic structure changes in an all-solid-state Li-ion battery by spatially-resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuo; Yoshida, Ryuji; Sato, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Kurobe, Hisanori; Hamanaka, Tadashi; Kato, Takehisa; Iriyama, Yasutoshi; Hirayama, Tsukasa

    2014-11-01

    All-solid-state Li-ion batteries having incombustible solid electrolytes are expected to be promising candidates for safe next-generation energy storage devices that have a long lifetime and high energy density. However, it is essential to address the large resistance of Li-ion transfer at the electrode/solid-electrolyte interfaces. A new concept electrode that is formed in situ from the Li2O-Al2O3-TiO2-P2O5-based glass-ceramic solid electrolytes with Si and Ge doping (LASGTP) produces atomic scale connection at the interfaces, which provides extremely low interfacial resistance. However, the formation mechanism and the reason for the low resistance are still unclear. Here we applied spatially-resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscope mode (SR-TEM-EELS) to visualize the nanometer-scale Li distribution and its effects on the electronic structures of other important elements (Ti and O). Local electron diffraction showed that the in situ formed electrode was an amorphous phase caused by the Li insertion. Picometer-scale expansion of O-O distance due to the Li insertion was also visualized in the electrode. These electronic and crystal changes and gradual Li distribution contribute to the low resistance and stable battery cycles.

  9. Microscopic mechanism of path-dependence on charge-discharge history in lithium iron phosphate cathode analysis using scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Yoshitake; Muto, Shunsuke; Tatsumi, Kazuyoshi; Kondo, Hiroki; Horibuchi, Kayo; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Sasaki, Tsuyoshi

    2015-09-01

    We revisited the "path-dependence" problem, i.e., the differing polarization observed in LiFePO4 cathode charge/discharge curves depending on the electrochemical treatment history of the material. The phase distributions of the active material particles with different charge/discharge histories in the LiFePO4 cathode were investigated through spectral imaging (SI) using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). The STEM-EELS-SI experiments revealed that LiFePO4 (LFP) and FePO4 (FP) almost always coexist in the individual primary particles of Li0.5FePO4 (50% state of charge (SOC)) electrodes, forming core/shell structures. This is unlike the conventional domino-cascade model, in that LFP-inside/FP-outside is observed in the lithium-extracted Li0.5FePO4 particles, whereas FP-inside/LFP-outside is seen in the lithium-inserted Li0.5FePO4 particles. We examined the particle-size dependence of the core/total volume ratio of each Li0.5FePO4 particle, and the essential features of the path-dependent charge/discharge curves were semi-quantitatively reproduced by a simple static model that considered the ionic conductivity of the shell phase.

  10. Electron energy-loss spectra in molecular fluorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishimura, H.; Cartwright, D. C.; Trajmar, S.

    1979-01-01

    Electron energy-loss spectra in molecular fluorine, for energy losses from 0 to 17.0 eV, have been taken at incident electron energies of 30, 50, and 90 eV and scattering angles from 5 to 140 deg. Features in the spectra above 11.5 eV energy loss agree well with the assignments recently made from optical spectroscopy. Excitations of many of the eleven repulsive valence excited electronic states are observed and their location correlates reasonably well with recent theoretical results. Several of these excitations have been observed for the first time and four features, for which there are no identifications, appear in the spectra.

  11. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, D. Chris; Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2000-01-01

    The major research activities performed during the cooperative agreement enhanced our spectroscopic knowledge of molecules of atmospheric interest such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, ozone, methane, and carbon monoxide, to name a few. Measurements were made using the NASA Langley Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometer System (TDL) and several Fourier Transform Spectrometer Systems (FTS) around the globe. The results from these studies made remarkable improvements in the line positions and intensities for several molecules, particularly ozone and carbon dioxide in the 2 to 17-micrometer spectral region. Measurements of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients and the temperature dependence of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients for infrared transitions of ozone, methane, and water vapor were also performed. Results from these studies have been used for retrievals of stratospheric gas concentration profiles from data collected by several Upper Atmospheric Research satellite (UARS) infrared instruments as well as in the analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra such as those acquired by space-based, ground-based, and various balloon-and aircraft-borne experiments. Our results made significant contributions in several updates of the HITRAN (HIgh resolution TRANsmission) spectral line parameters database. This database enjoys worldwide recognition in research involving diversified scientific fields.

  12. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, D. Chris; Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2000-01-01

    The major research activities performed during the cooperative agreement enhanced our spectroscopic knowledge of molecules of atmospheric interest such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, ozone, methane, and carbon monoxide, to name a few. Measurements were made using the NASA Langley Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometer System (TDL) and several Fourier Transform Spectrometer Systems (FTS) around the globe. The results from these studies made remarkable improvements in the line positions and intensities for several molecules, particularly ozone and carbon dioxide in the 2 to 17-micrometer spectral region. Measurements of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients and the temperature dependence of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients for infrared transitions of ozone, methane, and water vapor were also performed. Results from these studies have been used for retrievals of stratospheric gas concentration profiles from data collected by several Upper Atmospheric Research satellite (UARS) infrared instruments as well as in the analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra such as those acquired by space-based, ground-based, and various balloon- and aircraft-borne experiments. Our results made significant contributions in several updates of the HITRAN (HIgh resolution TRANsmission) spectral line parameters database. This database enjoys worldwide recognition in research involving diversified scientific fields.

  13. High Resolution Laser Spectroscopy of Rhenium Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Allan G.; Hall, Ryan M.; Linton, Colan; Tokaryk, Dennis

    2014-06-01

    The first spectroscopic study of rhenium carbide, ReC, has been performed using both low and high resolution techniques to collect rotationally resolved electronic spectra from 420 to 500nm. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), and dispersed fluorescence (DF) techniques were employed. ReC was formed in our laser ablation molecular jet apparatus by ablating a rhenium target rod in the presence of 1% methane in helium. The low resolution spectrum identified four bands of an electronic system belonging to ReC, three of which have been studied so far. Extensive hyperfine structure composed of six hyperfine components was observed in the high resolution spectrum, as well as a clear distinction between the 187ReC and 185ReC isotopologues. The data seems consistent with a ^4Π - ^4Σ- transition, as was predicted before experimentation. Dispersed fluorescence spectra allowed us to determine the ground state vibrational frequency (ωe"=994.4 ± 0.3 wn), and to identify a low-lying electronically excited state at Te"=1118.4 ± 0.4 wn with a vibrational frequency of ωe"=984 ± 2 wn. Personal communication, F. Grein, University of New Brunswick

  14. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2003-01-01

    Spectroscopic parameters (such as line position, intensity, broadening and shifting coefficients and their temperature dependences, line mixing coefficients etc.) for various molecular species of atmospheric interest are determined. In order to achieve these results, infrared spectra of several molecular bands are obtained using high-resolution recording instruments such as tunable diode laser spectrometer and Fourier transform spectrometers. Using sophisticated analysis routines (Multispectrum nonlinear least squares technique) these high-resolution infrared spectra are processed to determine the various spectral line parameters that are cited above. Spectra were taken using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak, Arizona as well as the Bruker FTS at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at Richland, Washington. Most of the spectra are acquired not only at room temperature, but also at several different cold temperatures. This procedure is necessary to study the variation of the spectral line parameters as a function of temperature in order to simulate the Earth's and other planetary atmospheric environments. Depending upon the strength or weakness of the various bands recorded and analyzed, the length(s) of the absorption cells in which the gas samples under study are kept varied from a few centimeters up to several meters and the sample temperatures varied from approximately +30 C to -63 C. Research on several infrared bands of various molecular species and their isotopomers are undertaken. Those studies are briefly described.

  15. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2006-01-01

    The major research activities performed during the cooperative agreement enhanced our spectroscopic knowledge of molecules of atmospheric interest such as H2O (water vapor), O3 (ozone), HCN (hydrogen cyanide), CH4 (methane), NO2 (nitrogen dioxide) and CO (carbon monoxide). The data required for the analyses were obtained from two different Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS); one of which is located at the National Solar Observatory (NSO) on Kitt Peak, Arizona and the other instrument is located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) at Richland, Washington. The data were analyzed using a modified multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting algorithm developed by Dr. D. Chris Benner of the College of William and Mary. The results from these studies made significant improvements in the line positons and intensities for these molecules. The measurements of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients and the temperature dependence of pressure broadening and pressure induced shift coefficients for hundreds of infrared transitions of HCN, CO3 CH4 and H2O were also performed during this period. Results from these studies have been used for retrievals of stratospheric gas concentration profiles from data collected by several Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) infrared instruments as well as in the analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra such as those acquired by space-based, ground-based, and various balloon- and aircraft-borne experiments. Our results made significant contributions in several updates of the HITRAN (HIgh resolution TRANsmission) spectral line parameters database. This database enjoys worldwide recognition in research involving diversified scientific fields. The research conducted during the period 2003-2006 has resulted in publications given in this paper. In addition to Journal publications, several oral and poster presentations were given at various Scientific conferences within the United States

  16. High-resolution flurescence spectroscopy in immunoanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Grubor, Nenad M.

    2005-01-01

    The work presented in this dissertation combines highly sensitive and selective fluorescence line-narrowing spectroscopy (FLNS) detection with various modes of immunoanalytical techniques. It has been shown that FLNS is capable of directly probing molecules immunocomplexed with antibodies, eliminating analytical ambiguities that may arise from interferences that accompany traditional immunochemical techniques. Moreover, the utilization of highly cross-reactive antibodies for highly specific analyte determination has been demonstrated. Finally, they demonstrate the first example of the spectral resolution of diastereomeric analytes based on their interaction with a cross-reactive antibody.

  17. High resolution gamma spectroscopy well logging system

    SciTech Connect

    Giles, J.R.; Dooley, K.J.

    1997-05-01

    A Gamma Spectroscopy Logging System (GSLS) has been developed to study sub-surface radionuclide contamination. The absolute counting efficiencies of the GSLS detectors were determined using cylindrical reference sources. More complex borehole geometries were modeled using commercially available shielding software and correction factors were developed based on relative gamma-ray fluence rates. Examination of varying porosity and moisture content showed that as porosity increases, and as the formation saturation ratio decreases, relative gamma-ray fluence rates increase linearly for all energies. Correction factors for iron and water cylindrical shields were found to agree well with correction factors determined during previous studies allowing for the development of correction factors for type-304 stainless steel and low-carbon steel casings. Regression analyses of correction factor data produced equations for determining correction factors applicable to spectral gamma-ray well logs acquired under non-standard borehole conditions.

  18. High resolution electron microscopy and spectroscopy of ferritin in thin window liquid cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Canhui; Qiao, Qiao; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Klie, Robert

    2014-03-01

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has seen a dramatic increase in interest in recent years with the commercial development of liquid and gas stages. High-resolution TEM characterization of samples in a liquid environment remains limited by radiation damage and loss of resolution due to the thick window-layers required by the in-situ stages. We introduce thin-window static-liquid cells that enable sample imaging with atomic resolution and electron energy-loss (EEL) spectroscopy with 1.3 nm resolution. Using this approach, atomic and electronic structures of biological samples such as ferritin is studied via in-situ transmission electron microscopy experiments. Ferritin in solution is encapsulated using the static liquid cells with reduced window thickness. The integrity of the thin window liquid cell is maintained by controlling the electron dose rate. Radiation damage of samples, such as liquid water and protein, is quantitatively studied to allow precision control of radiation damage level within the liquid cells. Biochemical reactions, such as valence change of the iron in a functioning ferritin, is observed and will be quantified. Relevant biochemical activity: the release and uptake of Fe atoms through the channels of ferritin protein shell is also imaged at atomic resolution. This work is funded by Michigan Technological University. The UIC JEOL JEM-ARM200CF is supported by an MRI-R2 grant from the National Science Foundation (Grant No. DMR-0959470).

  19. Defect engineering in GaAs using high energy light ion irradiation: Role of electronic energy loss

    SciTech Connect

    Kabiraj, D.; Ghosh, Subhasis

    2011-02-01

    We report on the application of high energy light ions (Li and O) irradiation for modification of defects, in particular, for annihilation of point defects using electronic energy loss in GaAs to minimize the defects produced by nuclear collisions. The high resolution x-ray diffraction and micro-Raman spectroscopy have been used to monitor that no lattice damage or amorphization take place due to irradiating ions. The effects of irradiation on defects and their energy levels have been studied using thermally stimulated current spectroscopy. It has been observed that till an optimum irradiation fluence of 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} there is annihilation of native defects but further increase in irradiation fluence results in accumulation of defects, which scales with the nuclear energy loss process, indicating that the rate of defects produced by the binary collision process exceeds rate of defect annihilation. Defect annihilation due to electronic energy loss has been discussed on the basis of breaking of bonds and enhanced diffusivity of ionized native defects.

  20. Application of spectral phase shaping to high resolution CARS spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Postma, S; van Rhijn, A C W; Korterik, J P; Gross, P; Herek, J L; Offerhaus, H L

    2008-05-26

    By spectral phase shaping of both the pump and probe pulses in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy we demonstrate the extraction of the frequencies, bandwidths and relative cross sections of vibrational lines. We employ a tunable broadband Ti:Sapphire laser synchronized to a ps-Nd:YVO mode locked laser. A high resolution spectral phase shaper allows for spectroscopy with a precision better than 1 cm(-1) in the high frequency region around 3000 cm(-1). We also demonstrate how new spectral phase shaping strategies can amplify the resonant features of isolated vibrations to such an extent that spectroscopy and microscopy can be done at high resolution, on the integrated spectral response without the need for a spectrograph.

  1. The electron energy loss rate due to radiative recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Junjie; Kaastra, Jelle; Badnell, N. R.

    2017-02-01

    Context. For photoionized plasmas, electron energy loss rates due to radiative recombination (RR) are required for thermal equilibrium calculations, which assume a local balance between the energy gain and loss. While many calculations of total and/or partial RR rates are available from the literature, specific calculations of associated RR electron energy loss rates are lacking. Aims: Here we focus on electron energy loss rates due to radiative recombination of H-like to Ne-like ions for all the elements up to and including zinc (Z = 30), over a wide temperature range. Methods: We used the AUTOSTRUCTURE code to calculate the level-resolved photoionization cross section and modify the ADASRR code so that we can simultaneously obtain level-resolved RR rate coefficients and associated RR electron energy loss rate coefficients. We compared the total RR rates and electron energy loss rates of H i and He i with those found in the literature. Furthermore, we utilized and parameterized the weighted electron energy loss factors (dimensionless) to characterize total electron energy loss rates due to RR. Results: The RR electron energy loss data are archived according to the Atomic Data and Analysis Structure (ADAS) data class adf48. The RR electron energy loss data are also incorporated into the SPEX code for detailed modeling of photoionized plamsas. Full Tables 1 and 2 are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/599/A10

  2. An Introduction to High Resolution Coherent Multidimensional Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Wells, Thresa A.; House, Zuri R.; Strangfeld, Benjamin R.

    2013-06-01

    High resolution coherent multidimensional spectroscopy is a technique that can be used to analyze and assign peaks for molecules that have resisted spectral analysis. Molecules that yield heavily congested and seemingly patternless spectra using conventional methods can yield 2D spectra that have recognizable patterns. The off-diagonal region of the coherent 2D plot shows only cross-peaks that are related by rotational selection rules. The resulting patterns facilitate peak assignment if they are sufficiently resolved. For systems that are not well-resolved, coherent 3D spectra may be generated to further improve resolution and provide selectivity. This presentation will provide an introduction to high resolution coherent 2D and 3D spectroscopies.

  3. High resolution spectroscopy in the microwave and far infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, Herbert M.

    1990-01-01

    High resolution rotational spectroscopy has long been central to remote sensing techniques in atmospheric sciences and astronomy. As such, laboratory measurements must supply the required data to make direct interpretation of data for instruments which sense atmospheres using rotational spectra. Spectral measurements in the microwave and far infrared regions are also very powerful tools when combined with infrared measurements for characterizing the rotational structure of vibrational spectra. In the past decade new techniques were developed which have pushed high resolution spectroscopy into the wavelength region between 25 micrometers and 2 mm. Techniques to be described include: (1) harmonic generation of microwave sources, (2) infrared laser difference frequency generation, (3) laser sideband generation, and (4) ultrahigh resolution interferometers.

  4. Single-sided sensor for high-resolution NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlo, J.; Casanova, F.; Blümich, B.

    2006-06-01

    The unavoidable spatial inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field generated by open sensors has precluded their use for high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. In fact, this application was deemed impossible because these field variations are usually orders of magnitude larger than those created by the microscopic structure of the molecules to be detected. Recently, chemical shift resolved NMR spectra were observed for the first time outside a portable single-sided magnet by implementing a method that exploits inhomogeneities in the rf field designed to reproduce variations of the static magnetic field [J. Perlo, V. Demas, F. Casanova, C.A. Meriles, J. Reimer, A. Pines, B. Blümich, High-resolution spectroscopy with a portable single-sided sensor, Science 308 (2005) 1279]. In this communication, we describe in detail the magnet system built from permanent magnets as well as the rf coil geometry used to compensate the static field variations.

  5. Adaptive optics high resolution spectroscopy: present status and future direction

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, C; Angel, R; Ciarlo, D; Fugate, R O; Ge, J; Kuzmenko, P; Lloyd-Hart, M; Macintosh, B; Najita, J; Woolf, N

    1999-07-27

    High resolution spectroscopy experiments with visible adaptive optics (AO) telescopes at Starfire Optical Range and Mt. Wilson have demonstrated that spectral resolution can be routinely improved by a factor of - 10 over the seeing-limited case with no extra light losses at visible wavelengths. With large CCDs now available, a very wide wavelength range can be covered in a single exposure. In the near future, most large ground-based telescopes will be equipped with powerful A0 systems. Most of these systems are aimed primarily at diffraction-limited operation in the near IR. An exciting new opportunity will thus open up for high resolution IR spectroscopy. Immersion echelle gratings with much coarser grooves being developed by us at LLNL will play a critical role in achieving high spectral resolution with a compact and low cost IR cryogenically cooled spectrograph and simultaneous large wavelength coverage on relatively small IR detectors. We have constructed a new A0 optimized spectrograph at Steward Observatory to provide R = 200,000 in the optical, which is being commissioned at the Starfire Optical Range 3.5m telescope. We have completed the optical design of the LLNL IR Immersion Spectrograph (LISPEC) to take advantage of improved silicon etching technology. Key words: adaptive optics, spectroscopy, high resolution, immersion gratings

  6. High resolution near edge x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Haemaelaeinen, K.; Siddons, D.P.; Berman, L.E.; Kao, C.C.; Hastings, J.B.

    1992-12-01

    A technique to suppress the core-hole lifetime broadening in near- edge x-ray spectroscopy is presented. A simple theoretical explanation based on total energy conservation in the fluorescence process is given to explain the improved resolution. The experimental arrangement is shown together with an application to the L{sub III} edge of dysprosium. Furthermore, the application of high-resolution fluorescence spectroscopy in the study of magnetism is presented. The spin-resolved absorption spectra from MnF{sub 2} are shown as an example.

  7. High resolution near edge x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Haemaelaeinen, K.; Siddons, D.P.; Berman, L.E.; Kao, C.C.; Hastings, J.B.

    1992-01-01

    A technique to suppress the core-hole lifetime broadening in near- edge x-ray spectroscopy is presented. A simple theoretical explanation based on total energy conservation in the fluorescence process is given to explain the improved resolution. The experimental arrangement is shown together with an application to the L[sub III] edge of dysprosium. Furthermore, the application of high-resolution fluorescence spectroscopy in the study of magnetism is presented. The spin-resolved absorption spectra from MnF[sub 2] are shown as an example.

  8. Toward high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of microscopic liquid samples

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Mark C.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Chen, Ying; Reardon, Patrick N.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Khbeis, Michael; Irish, Duane; Mueller, Karl T.

    2017-01-01

    A longstanding limitation of high-resolution NMR spectroscopy is the requirement for samples to have macroscopic dimensions. Commercial probes, for example, are designed for volumes of at least 5 mL, in spite of decades of work directed toward the goal of miniaturization. Progress in miniaturizing inductive detectors has been limited by a perceived need to meet two technical requirements: (1) minimal separation between the sample and the detector, which is essential for sensitivity, and (2) near-perfect magnetic-field homogeneity at the sample, which is typically needed for spectral resolution. The first of these requirements is real, but the second can be relaxed, as we demonstrate here. By using pulse sequences that yield high-resolution spectra in an inhomogeneous field, we eliminate the need for near-perfect field homogeneity and the accompanying requirement for susceptibility matching of microfabricated detector components. With this requirement removed, typical imperfections in microfabricated components can be tolerated, and detector dimensions can be matched to those of the sample, even for samples of volume << 5 uL. Pulse sequences that are robust to field inhomogeneity thus enable small-volume detection with optimal sensitivity. We illustrate the potential of this approach to miniaturization by presenting spectra acquired with a flat-wire detector that can easily be scaled to subnanoliter volumes. In particular, we report high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of an alanine sample of volume 500 pL.

  9. High Resolution Coherent 3d Spectroscopy of Bromine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strangfeld, Benjamin R.; Wells, Thresa A.; House, Zuri R.; Chen, Peter C.

    2013-06-01

    The high resolution gas phase electronic spectrum of bromine is rather congested due to many overlapping vibrational and rotational transitions with similar transition frequencies, and also due to isotopomeric effects. Expansion into the second dimension will remove some of this congestion; however through the implementation of High Resolution Coherent 3D Spectroscopy, the density of peaks is further reduced by at least two orders of magnitude. This allows for the selective examination of a small number of spatially resolved multidimensional bands, separated by vibrational quantum number and by isotopomer, which facilitates the fitting of many rovibrational peaks in bromine. The ability to derive information about the molecular constants for the electronic states involved will be discussed.

  10. Reconfigurable Pointing Control for High Resolution Space Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.; Kia, Tooraj; Van Cleve, Jeffrey

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, a pointing control performance criteria is established to suppport high resolution space spectroscopy. Results indicate that these pointing control requirements are very stringent, and would typically be difficult to meet using standard 3-axis spacecraft control. To resolve this difficulty, it is shown that performance can be significantly improved using a reconfigurable control architecture that switches among a small bankof detuned Kalman filters. The effectiveness of the control reconfiguration approach is demonstrated by example on the Space Infra-Red Telescope Facility (SIRTF) pointing system, in support of the InfraRed Spectrograph (IRS) payload.

  11. Reconfigurable Pointing Control for High Resolution Space Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.; Kia, Tooraj; vanCleve, Jeffrey

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, a pointing control performance criteria is established to support high resolution space spectroscopy. Results indicate that these pointing requirements are very stringent, and would typically be difficult to meet using standard 3-axis spacecraft control. To resolve this difficulty, it is shown that performance can be significantly improved using a reconfigurable control architecture that switches among a small bank of detuned Kalman filters. The effectiveness of the control reconfiguration approach is demonstrated by example on the Space Infra, Red Telescope Facility (SIRTF) pointing system, in support of the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) payload.

  12. High-resolution threshold photoelectron spectroscopy by electron attachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, J. M.; Chutjian, A.

    1976-01-01

    A new technique for measuring high-resolution threshold photoelectron spectra of atoms, molecules, and radicals is described. It involves photoionization of a gaseous species, attachment of the threshold, or nearly zero electron to some trapping molecule (here SF6 or CFCl3), and mass detection of the attachment product (SF6/-/ or Cl/-/ respectively). This technique of threshold photoelectron spectroscopy by electron attachment was used to measure the spectra of argon and xenon at 11 meV (FWHM) resolution, and was also applied to CFCl3.

  13. High resolution X-ray spectroscopy of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.

    1990-01-01

    After a brief review of the principal problems of AGN research, selected potential high-resolution observations are discussed with a view toward assessing their scientific value and the degree of resolution they will require. Two classes of observations pertaining directly to AGNs are discussed. Fe K-alpha spectroscopy relevant to the dynamical and thermal character of the emission line zones; and measurement of resonance line absorption by highly-ionized species in BL Lac objects, which should provide information about entrainment of interstellar material by relativistic jets. A third class of potentially important observations uses AGNs as background light sources in order to directly measure the distance to clusters of galaxies.

  14. Measuring molecular flows with high-resolution stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    She, C. Y.; Fairbank, W. M., Jr.; Exton, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    It is proposed to use high-resolution stimulated Raman spectroscopy to directly measure high-speed molecular flow velocities in wind tunnels and in combustive chambers. A feasibility study indicates that flow speeds from Mach 0.04 up may be measured with the proposed method using available laser systems. It is pointed out that the success of the proposed technique will make it possible to measure all interesting flow parameters, i.e., species concentration, temperature, and velocity, in a time of less than 1 microsecond at a repetition rate of 10,000/s using a single experimental arrangement.

  15. Quantum electrodynamics, high-resolution spectroscopy and fundamental constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karshenboim, Savely G.; Ivanov, Vladimir G.

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in high-resolution spectroscopy has delivered us a variety of accurate optical results, which can be used for the determination of the atomic fundamental constants and for constraining their possible time variation. We present a brief overview of the results discussing in particular, the determination of the Rydberg constant, the relative atomic weight of the electron and proton, their mass ratio and the fine structure constant. Many individual results on those constants are obtained with use of quantum electrodynamics, and we discuss which sectors of QED are involved. We derive constraints on a possible time variation of the fine structure constants and me/mp.

  16. High resolution ultrasonic spectroscopy system for nondestructive evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. H.

    1991-01-01

    With increased demand for high resolution ultrasonic evaluation, computer based systems or work stations become essential. The ultrasonic spectroscopy method of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) was used to develop a high resolution ultrasonic inspection system supported by modern signal processing, pattern recognition, and neural network technologies. The basic system which was completed consists of a 386/20 MHz PC (IBM AT compatible), a pulser/receiver, a digital oscilloscope with serial and parallel communications to the computer, an immersion tank with motor control of X-Y axis movement, and the supporting software package, IUNDE, for interactive ultrasonic evaluation. Although the hardware components are commercially available, the software development is entirely original. By integrating signal processing, pattern recognition, maximum entropy spectral analysis, and artificial neural network functions into the system, many NDE tasks can be performed. The high resolution graphics capability provides visualization of complex NDE problems. The phase 3 efforts involve intensive marketing of the software package and collaborative work with industrial sectors.

  17. Simulation of electron energy loss spectra of nanomaterials with linear-scaling density functional theory

    DOE PAGES

    Tait, E. W.; Ratcliff, L. E.; Payne, M. C.; ...

    2016-04-20

    Experimental techniques for electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) combine high energy resolution with high spatial resolution. They are therefore powerful tools for investigating the local electronic structure of complex systems such as nanostructures, interfaces and even individual defects. Interpretation of experimental electron energy loss spectra is often challenging and can require theoretical modelling of candidate structures, which themselves may be large and complex, beyond the capabilities of traditional cubic-scaling density functional theory. In this work, we present functionality to compute electron energy loss spectra within the onetep linear-scaling density functional theory code. We first demonstrate that simulated spectra agree withmore » those computed using conventional plane wave pseudopotential methods to a high degree of precision. The ability of onetep to tackle large problems is then exploited to investigate convergence of spectra with respect to supercell size. As a result, we apply the novel functionality to a study of the electron energy loss spectra of defects on the (1 0 1) surface of an anatase slab and determine concentrations of defects which might be experimentally detectable.« less

  18. Simulation of electron energy loss spectra of nanomaterials with linear-scaling density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, E. W.; Ratcliff, L. E.; Payne, M. C.; Haynes, P. D.; Hine, N. D. M.

    2016-05-01

    Experimental techniques for electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) combine high energy resolution with high spatial resolution. They are therefore powerful tools for investigating the local electronic structure of complex systems such as nanostructures, interfaces and even individual defects. Interpretation of experimental electron energy loss spectra is often challenging and can require theoretical modelling of candidate structures, which themselves may be large and complex, beyond the capabilities of traditional cubic-scaling density functional theory. In this work, we present functionality to compute electron energy loss spectra within the onetep linear-scaling density functional theory code. We first demonstrate that simulated spectra agree with those computed using conventional plane wave pseudopotential methods to a high degree of precision. The ability of onetep to tackle large problems is then exploited to investigate convergence of spectra with respect to supercell size. Finally, we apply the novel functionality to a study of the electron energy loss spectra of defects on the (1 0 1) surface of an anatase slab and determine concentrations of defects which might be experimentally detectable.

  19. The molecular and electronic states of 1,2,4,5-tetrazine studied by VUV absorption, near-threshold electron energy-loss spectroscopy and ab initio multi-reference configuration interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Michael H.; McNab, Hamish; Reed, David; Pollacchi, Anne; Walker, Isobel C.; Guest, Martyn F.; Siggel, Michele R. F.

    1997-01-01

    The VUV electronic absorption spectrum of 1,2,4,5-tetrazine has been re-investigated, and together with electron energy-loss spectra has led to identification of a number of new excited states. The valence and Rydberg excited states have been studied by multi-reference multi-root configuration interaction studies using MRDCI techniques. Initial studies with the RPA and TDA methods gave almost identical results for the excitation energies, but there is a substantial energy-lowering in the MRDCI calculations, which improves agreement with experiment substantially; these differences are a result of the double, triple and quadruple excited reference configurations included in the reference set of the latter method. The 1ππ ∗ excitations are calculated rather higher than experiment, except for the lowest-lying (weak) 1B 2u state at 5.0 eV. The calculated order for the next three ππ ∗ states is 1B 1u (weak) followed by 1B 2u (strong) and 1B 1u (strong), the last two bands being responsible for the dominant absorption near 7.5 and 8.5 eV. All of this group of four bands involve excitations from the pair of MOs 1b 2g and 1b 1g into the 1a u∗ and 4b 3u∗ VMOs. The sequence of nπ ∗ stakes are in a similar order to the ππ ∗ excitations, with respect to the upper state, and the two lowest singlet states, 1B 3u and 1A u are reasonably well determined. The triplet states follow a similar order to the singlets, and again the dominance of the effect of the two lowest VMOs is demonstrated, but considerable differences between the weighting of leading configurations occurs between singlet and triplet manifolds. The non-diagonal TDA method has been used to reconsider the UV-photoelectron spectrum. The ionisation potentials for tetrazine are reinterpreted with the first three bands being regrouped into 1, 2, 2 ionisations respectively. The ground state properties of tetrazine suggest that the NQR spectrum will show a principal axis 14N quadrupole coupling constant

  20. Metallicity determination of M dwarfs. High-resolution infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, Sara; Heiter, Ulrike; Seifahrt, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Context. Several new techniques to determine the metallicity of M dwarfs with better precision have been developed over the last decades. However, most of these studies were based on empirical methods. In order to enable detailed abundance analysis, standard methods established for warmer solar-like stars, i.e. model-dependent methods using fitting of synthetic spectra, still need to be used. Aims: In this work we continue the reliability confirmation and development of metallicity determinations of M dwarfs using high-resolution infrared spectra. The reliability was confirmed through analysis of M dwarfs in four binary systems with FGK dwarf companions and by comparison with previous optical studies of the FGK dwarfs. Methods: The metallicity determination was based on spectra taken in the J band (1.1-1.4 μm) with the CRIRES spectrograph. In this part of the infrared, the density of stellar molecular lines is limited, reducing the amount of blends with atomic lines enabling an accurate continuum placement. Lines of several atomic species were used to determine the stellar metallicity. Results: All binaries show excellent agreement between the derived metallicity of the M dwarf and its binary companion. Our results are also in good agreement with values found in the literature. Furthermore, we propose an alternative way to determine the effective temperature of M dwarfs of spectral types later than M2 through synthetic spectral fitting of the FeH lines in our observed spectra. Conclusions: We have confirmed that a reliable metallicity determination of M dwarfs can be achieved using high-resolution infrared spectroscopy. We also note that metallicites obtained with photometric metallicity calibrations available for M dwarfs only partly agree with the results we obtain from high-resolution spectroscopy. Based on data obtained at ESO-VLT, Paranal Observatory, Chile, Program ID 082.D-0838(A) and 084.D-1042(A).

  1. Using High Resolution Force Spectroscopy to Study Haemocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rixman, Monica; Macias, Celia; Dean, Delphine; Ortiz, Christine

    2003-03-01

    A critical determinant of the biocompatibility of implanted blood-contacting devices is the initial noncovalent adsorption of blood plasma proteins onto the biomaterial surface. Using high resolution force spectroscopy, we have measured the intermolecular interaction forces between a probe tip covalently bound with human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant blood plasma protein in the human body, and various chemically modified surfaces that either already are, or may potentially be, used as biomaterial surface coatings. Statistical analysis and theoretical modeling enable us to interpret our experimental results in terms of electrostatic interactions, hydrogen bonding, and steric forces. We have expanded our initial studies on surfaces of poly(ethylene oxide) to explore a variety of experimental conditions, and then utilized our results in identifying and studying various oligosaccharides, which we hope may be useful in the discovery of novel materials for future biomaterial applications.

  2. Two simple image slicers for high resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tala, M.; Vanzi, L.; Avila, G.; Guirao, C.; Pecchioli, E.; Zapata, A.; Pieralli, F.

    2017-01-01

    We present the design, manufacturing, test and performance of two image slicers for high resolution spectroscopy. Based on the classical Bowen-Walraven concept, our slicers allow to make two slices of the image of the input fibre. We introduce the idea of a second fibre that can be cropped in half to reach the same width of the science target fibre and that can be used for simultaneous wavelength reference. The slicers presented are mirror and prism based, respectively. Both devices work within expectation, showing differences mainly in their efficiency. The prism based slicer is the solution that was adopted for the FIDEOS spectrograph, an instrument built by the AIUC for the ESO 1m telescope of La Silla. Test spectra obtained with this instrument are included as examples of a real application of the device.

  3. Recent Results in Quantum Chemical Kinetics from High Resolution Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Quack, Martin

    2007-12-26

    We outline the approach of our group to derive intramolecular kinetic primary processes from high resolution spectroscopy. We then review recent results on intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) and on tunneling processes. Examples are the quantum dynamics of the C-H-chromophore in organic molecules, hydrogen bond dynamics in (HF){sub 2} and stereomutation dynamics in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and related chiral molecules. We finally discuss the time scales for these and further processes which range from 10 fs to more than seconds in terms of successive symmetry breakings, leading to the question of nuclear spin symmetry and parity violation as well as the question of CPT symmetry.

  4. High Resolution Absorption Spectroscopy using Externally Dispersed Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Edelstein, J; Erskine, D J

    2005-07-06

    We describe the use of Externally Dispersed Interferometry (EDI) for high-resolution absorption spectroscopy. By adding a small fixed-delay interferometer to a dispersive spectrograph, a precise fiducial grid in wavelength is created over the entire spectrograph bandwidth. The fiducial grid interacts with narrow spectral features in the input spectrum to create a moire pattern. EDI uses the moire pattern to obtain new information about the spectra that is otherwise unavailable, thereby improving spectrograph performance. We describe the theory and practice of EDI instruments and demonstrate improvements in the spectral resolution of conventional spectrographs by a factor of 2 to 6. The improvement of spectral resolution offered by EDI can benefit space instruments by reducing spectrograph size or increasing instantaneous bandwidth.

  5. High resolution, temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rémi, Sebastian; Metzger, Constanze; Hubbard, Billy; Thomas, Claire; Goldberg, Bennett B.; Swan, Anna

    2008-03-01

    Single and bi-layer graphene are studied with high resolution, temperature dependent Raman scattering. The electron-phonon coupling in graphene depends sensitively on both the concentration of charge carriers and the temperature. Raman spectroscopy directly probes electron-phonon coupling, and has been used to examine the stiffening of the G-band, phonon damping [1] and spatial inhomogeneities in the carrier density [2]. Our measurements are performed between room temperature and 4K in a confocal scanning Raman system. The samples are back-gated, allowing us to tune the carrier density and spectroscopically map the Raman response. We will discuss our recent measurements. [1] J. Yan, Y. Zhang, P. Kim, and A. Pinczuk, Phys. Rev. Lett, 98, 166802 (2007) [2] C. Stampfer, et al. Arxiv, cond-mat 0709.4156v1

  6. Two simple image slicers for high resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tala, M.; Vanzi, L.; Avila, G.; Guirao, C.; Pecchioli, E.; Zapata, A.; Pieralli, F.

    2017-04-01

    We present the design, manufacturing, test and performance of two image slicers for high resolution spectroscopy. Based on the classical Bowen-Walraven concept, our slicers allow to make two slices of the image of the input fibre. We introduce the idea of a second fibre that can be cropped in half to reach the same width of the science target fibre and that can be used for simultaneous wavelength reference. The slicers presented are mirror and prism based, respectively. Both devices work within expectation, showing differences mainly in their efficiency. The prism based slicer is the solution that was adopted for the FIDEOS spectrograph, an instrument built by the AIUC for the ESO 1m telescope of La Silla. Test spectra obtained with this instrument are included as examples of a real application of the device.

  7. High-Resolution Imaging and Spectroscopy at High Pressure: A Novel Liquid Cell for the TEM

    PubMed Central

    Tanase, Mihaela; Winterstein, Jonathan; Sharma, Renu; Aksyuk, Vladimir; Holland, Glenn; Liddle, J. Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate quantitative core-loss electron energy-loss spectroscopy of iron oxide nanoparticles and imaging resolution of Ag nanoparticles in liquid down to 0.24 nm, in both transmission and scanning-transmission modes, in a novel, monolithic liquid cell developed for the transmission electron microscope (TEM). At typical SiN membrane thicknesses of 50 nm the liquid layer thickness has a maximum change of only 30 nm for the entire TEM viewing area of 200 μm × 200 μm. PMID:26650072

  8. High Resolution Rotational Spectroscopy of a Flexible Cyclic Ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gámez, F.; Martínez-Haya, B.; Blanco, S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2011-06-01

    Crown ethers stand as one cornerstone molecular class inhost-guest Supramolecular Chemistry and constitute building blocks for a broad range of modern materials. We report here the first high resolution rotational study of a crown ether: 1,4,7,10,13-pentaoxacyclopentadecane (15-crown-5 ether,15c5). Molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy has been employed. The liquid sample of 15c5 has been vaporized using heating methods. The considerable size of 15c5 and the broad range of conformations allowed by the flexibility of its backbone pose important challenges to spectroscopy approaches. In fact, the ab-initio computational study for isolated 15c5, yields at least six stable conformers with relative free energies within 2 kJ Mol-1 (167 Cm-1). Nevertheless, in this investigation it has been possible to identify and characterize in detail one stable rotamer of the 15c5 molecule and to challenge different quantum methods for the accurate description of this system. The results pave the ground for an extensive description of the conformational landscape of 15c5 and related cyclic ethers in the near term. J. L. Alonso, F. J. Lorenzo, J. C. López, A. Lesarri, S. Mata and H. Dreizler, Chem. Phys., 218, 267 (1997) S. Blanco, J.C López, J.L. Alonso, P. Ottaviani, W. Caminati, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 880 (2003) S.E. Hill, D. Feller, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 201, 41 (2000)

  9. High-resolution two-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cousin, Samuel F; Charlier, Cyril; Kadeřávek, Pavel; Marquardsen, Thorsten; Tyburn, Jean-Max; Bovier, Pierre-Alain; Ulzega, Simone; Speck, Thomas; Wilhelm, Dirk; Engelke, Frank; Maas, Werner; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Pelupessy, Philippe; Ferrage, Fabien

    2016-12-07

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a ubiquitous branch of spectroscopy that can explore matter at the scale of an atom. Significant improvements in sensitivity and resolution have been driven by a steady increase of static magnetic field strengths. However, some properties of nuclei may be more favourable at low magnetic fields. For example, transverse relaxation due to chemical shift anisotropy increases sharply at higher magnetic fields leading to line-broadening and inefficient coherence transfers. Here, we present a two-field NMR spectrometer that permits the application of rf-pulses and acquisition of NMR signals in two magnetic centres. Our prototype operates at 14.1 T and 0.33 T. The main features of this system are demonstrated by novel NMR experiments, in particular a proof-of-concept correlation between zero-quantum coherences at low magnetic field and single quantum coherences at high magnetic field, so that high resolution can be achieved in both dimensions, despite a ca. 10 ppm inhomogeneity of the low-field centre. Two-field NMR spectroscopy offers the possibility to circumvent the limits of high magnetic fields, while benefiting from their exceptional sensitivity and resolution. This approach opens new avenues for NMR above 1 GHz.

  10. Data Acquisition System for Electron Energy Loss Coincident Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Yu, Xiaoqi; Yang, Tao

    2005-12-01

    A Data Acquisition System (DAQ) for electron energy loss coincident spectrometers (EELCS) has been developed. The system is composed of a Multiplex Time-Digital Converter (TDC) that measures the flying time of positive and negative ions and a one-dimension position-sensitive detector that records the energy loss of scattering electrons. The experimental data are buffered in a first-in-first-out (FIFO) memory module, then transferred from the FIFO memory to PC by the USB interface. The DAQ system can record the flying time of several ions in one collision, and allows of different data collection modes. The system has been demonstrated at the Electron Energy Loss Coincident Spectrometers at the Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics, USTC. A detail description of the whole system is given and experimental results shown.

  11. Theoretical interpretation of electron energy-loss spectroscopic images

    DOE PAGES

    Allen, L. J.; D'Alfonso, Adrian J.; Findlay, Scott D.; ...

    2008-04-10

    In this paper, we discuss the theory of electron energy-loss spectroscopic images in scanning transmission electron microscopy. Three case studies are presented which have as common themes issues of inelastic scattering, coherence and image interpretation. The first is a state-by-state inelastic transitions analysis of a spectroscopic image which does not admit direct visual interpretation. The second compares theory and experiment for two-dimensional mapping. Finally, the third considers imaging in three dimensions via depth sectioning.

  12. High-resolution spectroscopy of the lunar sodium exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Oliversen, R. J.; Roesler, F. L.; Lupie, O. L.

    2014-06-01

    We have applied high-resolution Fabry-Perot spectroscopy to the study of the lunar sodium exosphere for the study of exospheric effective temperature and velocity variations. Observing from the National Solar Observatory McMath-Pierce Telescope, we used a dual-etalon Fabry-Perot spectrometer with a resolving power of 180,000 to measure line widths and Doppler shifts of the sodium D2 (5889.95 Å) emission line. Our field of view was 360 km, and measurements were made in equatorial and polar regions from 500 km to 3500 km off the limb. Data were obtained from full moon to 3 days following full moon (waning phase) in March 2009. Measured Doppler line widths within 1100 km of the sunlit east and south lunar limbs for observations between 5 and 40° lunar phase imply effective temperatures ranging between 3260 ± 190 and 1000 ± 135 K. Preliminary line center analysis indicates velocity displacements between different locations off the lunar limb ranging between 100 and 600 m/s from the lunar rest velocity with a precision of ±20 to ±50 m/s depending on brightness. Based on the success of these exploratory observations, an extensive program has been initiated that is expected to constrain lunar atmospheric and surface-process modeling and help quantify source and escape mechanisms.

  13. Improvement of sensitivity in high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, H.; Nakajima, K.; Suzuki, M.; Kimura, K.; Sasakawa, K.

    2011-06-15

    The sensitivity (limit of detection) of high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (HRBS) is mainly determined by the background noise of the spectrometer. There are two major origins of the background noise in HRBS, one is the stray ions scattered from the inner wall of the vacuum chamber of the spectrometer and the other is the dark noise of the microchannel plate (MCP) detector which is commonly used as a focal plane detector of the spectrometer in HRBS. In order to reject the stray ions, several barriers are installed inside the spectrometer and a thin Mylar foil is mounted in front of the detector. The dark noise of the MCP detector is rejected by the coincidence measurement with the secondary electrons emitted from the Mylar foil upon the ion passage. After these improvements, the background noise is reduced by a factor of 200 at a maximum. The detection limit can be improved down to 10 ppm for As in Si at a measurement time of 1 h under ideal conditions.

  14. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of the Lunar Sodium Exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Oliversen, R. J.; Roesler, F. L.; Lupie, O. L.

    2014-01-01

    We have applied high-resolution Fabry-Perot spectroscopy to the study of the lunar sodium exosphere for the study of exospheric effective temperature and velocity variations. Observing from the National Solar Observatory McMath-Pierce Telescope, we used a dual-etalon Fabry-Perot spectrometer with a resolving power of 180,000 to measure line widths and Doppler shifts of the sodium D2 (5889.95 Å) emission line. Our field of view was 360 km, and measurements were made in equatorial and polar regions from 500 km to 3500 km off the limb. Data were obtained from full moon to 3 days following full moon (waning phase) in March 2009. Measured Doppler line widths within 1100 km of the sunlit east and south lunar limbs for observations between 5 and 40 deg lunar phase imply effective temperatures ranging between 3260 +/- 190 and 1000 +/- 135 K. Preliminary line center analysis indicates velocity displacements between different locations off the lunar limb ranging between 100 and 600 m/s from the lunar rest velocity with a precision of +/-20 to +/-50 m/s depending on brightness. Based on the success of these exploratory observations, an extensive program has been initiated that is expected to constrain lunar atmospheric and surface-process modeling and help quantify source and escape mechanisms.

  15. High resolution spectroscopy from ground and space: Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, William E.

    In contrast to the broad brush approach often used for the sounding of atmospheric constituents, high resolution spectroscopy is a refined, efficient and often elegant tool which uses small spectral regions to probe specific phenomena. Application areas range from wind and temperature measurements in terrestrial and planetary atmospheres, to magnetic field measurements on the sun. In most cases, subtle changes in line shape or line position are used with a priori information to generate the geophysical information of interest. Use of this technique for space applications started in the 1960's and was a natural extension of the spectroscopic heritage which was started by Fabry and Perot and Michelson over 100 year ago. This field has evolved over the past 50 years in response to refinements in detector technologies, manufacturing techniques and the development of active techniques using lasers. This session will trace the evolution of these techniques over the past half-century and showcase the state-of-the-art today. Within Canada, Gordon Shepherd has played a hand in many of the developments in this technique. This introduction will briefly summarize this field and provide a short historical sketch of Shepherd's contributions as a lead into his keynote review of this topic.

  16. Optical multichannel analyzer techniques for high resolution optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, J.L.

    1980-06-01

    The development of optical multichannel analyzer techniques for UV/VIS spectroscopy is presented. The research focuses on the development of spectroscopic techniques for measuring high resolution spectral lineshape functions from the exciton phosphorescence in H/sub 2/-1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene. It is found that the temperature dependent frequency shifts and widths confirm a theoretical model based on an exchange theory. The exchange of low energy phonon modes which couple with excited state exciton transitions is shown to display the proper temperature dependent behavior. In addition to the techniques for using the optical multichannel analyzer (OMA) to perform low light level target integration, the use of the OMA for capturing spectral information in transient pulsed laser applications is discussed. An OMP data acquisition system developed for real-time signal processng is described. Both hardware and software interfacing considerations for control and data acquisition by a microcomputer are described. The OMA detector is described in terms of the principles behind its photoelectron detection capabilities and its design is compared with other optoelectronic devices.

  17. High-Resolution Rotational Spectroscopy of a Molecular Rotary Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingos, Sergio R.; Cnossen, Arjen; Perez, Cristobal; Buma, Wybren Jan; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.; Schnell, Melanie

    2017-06-01

    To develop synthetic molecular motors and machinery that can mimic their biological counterparts has become a stimulating quest in modern synthetic chemistry. Gas phase studies of these simpler synthetic model systems provide the necessary isolated conditions that facilitate the elucidation of their structural intricacies. We report the first high-resolution rotational study of a synthetic molecular rotary motor based on chiral overcrowded alkenes using chirp-pulsed Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Rotational constants and quartic centrifugal distortion constants were determined based on a fit using more than two hundred rotational transitions spanning 5≤J≤21 in the 2-4 GHz frequency range. Despite the lack of polar groups, the rotor's asymmetry produces strong a- and b-type rotational transitions arising from a single predominant conformer. Evidence for fragmentation of the rotor allows for unambiguous identification of the isolated rotor components. The experimental spectroscopic parameters of the rotor are compared and discussed against current high-level ab initio and density functional theory methods. Vicario et al. Chem. Commun., 5910-5912 (2005) Brown et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum., 79, 053103 (2008)

  18. Immersion Gratings for Infrared High-resolution Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarugaku, Yuki; Ikeda, Yuji; Kobayashi, Naoto; Kaji, Sayumi; Sukegawa, Takashi; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Nakagawa, Takao; Arasaki, Takayuki; Kondo, Sohei; Nakanishi, Kenshi; Yasui, Chikako; Kawakita, Hideyo

    2016-10-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy in the infrared wavelength range is essential for observations of minor isotopologues, such as HDO for water, and prebiotic organic molecules like hydrocarbons/P-bearing molecules because numerous vibrational molecular bands (including non-polar molecules) are located in this wavelength range. High spectral resolution enables us to detect weak lines without spectral line confusion. This technique has been widely used in planetary sciences, e.g., cometary coma (H2O, CO, and organic molecules), the martian atmosphere (CH4, CO2, H2O and HDO), and the upper atmosphere of gas giants (H3+ and organic molecules such as C2H6). Spectrographs with higher resolution (and higher sensitivity) still have a potential to provide a plenty of findings. However, because the size of spectrographs scales with the spectral resolution, it is difficult to realize it.Immersion grating (IG), which is a diffraction grating wherein the diffraction surface is immersed in a material with a high refractive index (n > 2), provides n times higher spectral resolution compared to a reflective grating of the same size. Because IG reduces the size of spectrograph to 1/n compared to the spectrograph with the same spectral resolution using a conventional reflective grating, it is widely acknowledged as a key optical device to realize compact spectrographs with high spectral resolution.Recently, we succeeded in fabricating a CdZnTe immersion grating with the theoretically predicted diffraction efficiency by machining process using an ultrahigh-precision five-axis processing machine developed by Canon Inc. Using the same technique, we completed a practical germanium (Ge) immersion grating with both a reflection coating on the grating surface and the an AR coating on the entrance surface. It is noteworthy that the wide wavelength range from 2 to 20 um can be covered by the two immersion gratings.In this paper, we present the performances and the applications of the immersion

  19. High-resolution ground-based spectroscopy: where and how ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallavicini, R.

    2002-07-01

    An overview is presented of high-resolution optical spectrographs in operation or under development at large telescopes, with emphasis on those facilities best suited for the study of late-type stars and stellar surface inhomogeneities. Plans for the development of new high-resolution spectroscopic instruments are discussed with emphasis on the ICE spectrograph for the PEPSI spectropolarimeter at the LBT.

  20. Perfluorocyclobutane electronic state spectroscopy by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption, electron impact, He I photoelectron spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Limao-Vieira, P.; Vasekova, E.; Mason, N. J.; Giuliani, A.; Lourenco, J. M. C.; Santos, P. M.; Duflot, D.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Delwiche, J.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.

    2007-09-15

    The electronic state spectroscopy of perfluorocyclobutane (c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8}) has been investigated using high resolution vacuum ultraviolet (vuv) photoabsorption spectroscopy in the energy range 6.0-11 eV. The electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) was also recorded in the nonelectric dipolar interaction mode (100 eV incident energy, 10 deg. scattering angle) over the 8-14 eV energy-loss range and the excited states in the 11-14 eV spectral region have been observed. An He I photoelectron spectrum recorded between 11.0 and 19.8 eV is compared with earlier lower resolution results. This has allowed us to derive a more precise value of 12.291{+-}0.002 eV for the ground neutral state vertical ionization energy. All spectra presented in this paper represent the highest resolution data yet reported for perfluorocyclobutane, to the best of our knowledge. Ab initio calculations have been performed for helping in the assignment of the spectral bands for both neutral excited states and ionic states.

  1. Johann Spectrometer for High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machek, Pavel; Welter, Edmund; Caliebe, Wolfgang; Brüggmann, Ulf; Dräger, Günter; Fröba, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A newly designed vacuum Johann spectrometer with a large focusing analyzer crystal for inelastic x-ray scattering and high resolution fluorescence spectroscopy has been installed at the DORIS III storage ring. Spherically bent crystals with a maximum diameter of 125 mm, and cylindrically bent crystals are employed as dispersive optical elements. Standard radius of curvature of the crystals is 1000 mm, however, the design of the mechanical components also facilitates measurements with smaller and larger bending radii. Up to four crystals are mounted on a revolving crystal changer which enables crystal changes without breaking the vacuum. The spectrometer works at fixed Bragg angle. It is preferably designed for the measurements in non-scanning mode with a broad beam spot, and offers a large flexibility to set the sample to the optimum position inside the Rowland circle. A deep depletion CCD camera is employed as a position sensitive detector to collect the energy-analyzed photons on the circumference of the Rowland circle. The vacuum in the spectrometer tank is typically 10-6 mbar. The sample chamber is separated from the tank either by 25 μm thick Kapton windows, which allows samples to be measured under ambient conditions, or by two gate valves. The spectrometer is currently installed at wiggler beamline W1 whose working range is 4-10.5 keV with typical flux at the sample of 5×1010photons/s/mm2. The capabilities of the spectrometer are illustrated by resonant inelastic experiments on 3d transition metals and rare earth compounds, and by chemical shift measurements on chromium compounds.

  2. Characterizing The Nearest Young Moving Groups Through High Resolution Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Kyle; Wilhelm, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed method for characterizing the nearest young moving groups via high resolution spectroscopy. This method has three diagnostics which classify a moving group: (1) Chemical Homogeneity, (2) Kinematic Traceback, and (3) Isochrone Fitting. We have applied this technique on 10 F- and G-type stars from the AB Doradus Moving Group (ABD) and found 8 stars share similar metal abundances with an average abundance for ABD of <[M/H]> = -0.03 ± 0.06; of the two outliers, one is metal rich and the other metal poor. Seven stars follow a common traceback and share a common origin around 125 Myr. One of the outlying traceback stars diverges around 90-100 Myr, and is the same star which is metal rich. Eight stars fall along the same isochrone of 100 Myr, which is synonymous with the main sequence. We further evaluated this technique on 5 members of the newly discovered Octans-Near Moving Group (ONMG). Two of these were listed as possible members with the other three being probable members. There is a large spread in the metal abundance with <[M/H]> = -0.17 ± 0.1 and no core group of stars that define the cluster in abundance space. ONMG is also enigmatic because several age indicators (e.g. lithium abundance, surface gravities, activity) indicate a much younger cluster; however, the traceback age shows these stars were closest around 150 Myr (though this age should be taken very lightly) and 4 of the 5 stars fall on the main sequence. We therefore conclude that while these stars do share present day velocities and positions, the group is not well defined in abundance, origin, or age, and should be concidered with caution.

  3. Multiple scattering calculations of relativistic electron energy loss spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorissen, K.; Rehr, J. J.; Verbeeck, J.

    2010-04-01

    A generalization of the real-space Green’s-function approach is presented for ab initio calculations of relativistic electron energy loss spectra (EELS) which are particularly important in anisotropic materials. The approach incorporates relativistic effects in terms of the transition tensor within the dipole-selection rule. In particular, the method accounts for relativistic corrections to the magic angle in orientation resolved EELS experiments. The approach is validated by a study of the graphite CK edge, for which we present an accurate magic angle measurement consistent with the predicted value.

  4. Low voltage TEM: influences on electron energy loss spectrometry experiments.

    PubMed

    Stöger-Pollach, M

    2010-08-01

    We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS) a transmission electron microscope (TEM) at different high tensions. Instrumental effects such as energy resolution, spatial resolution, and point spread function of the detecting system, as well as physical effects like inelastic (Coloumb) delocalization and Cerenkov losses are dealt with. It is found that the actually available equipment is suitable for performing low voltage experiments. The energy resolution of a thermo-ionic emitter can be tremendously improved at lower energies, and the detector also has advantageous behaviour. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Direct frequency comb spectroscopy and high-resolution coherent control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stowe, Matthew C.

    We present the first experiments demonstrating absolute frequency measurements of one- and two-photon transitions using direct frequency comb spectroscopy (DFCS). In particular we phase stabilized the inter-pulse period and optical phases of the pulses emitted from a mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser, creating a broad-bandwidth optical frequency comb. By referencing the optical comb directly to the cesium microwave frequency standard, we were able to measure absolute transition frequencies over greater than a 50 nm bandwidth, utilizing the phase coherence between wavelengths spanning from 741 nm to 795 nm. As an initial demonstration of DFCS we studied transitions from the 5S to 5P, 5D, and 7S states in Rb. To reduce Doppler broadening the atoms were laser cooled in a magneto-optical trap. We present an overview of several systematic error sources that perturb the natural transition frequencies, magnitudes, and linewidths. These include radiation pressure from the probe beam, AC-Stark shifts, Zeeman shifts, power-broadening, and incoherent optical pumping. After careful study and suppression of these systematic error sources, we measured transition linewidths as narrow as 1.1 MHz FWHM and 10 kHz linecenter uncertainties. Our measurements of the 5S to 7S two-photon transition frequency demonstrated the ability to determine the comb mode order numbers when the initial transition frequency is not known to better than the comb mode frequency spacing. By modifying the spectral phase of the pulses we demonstrated high-resolution coherent control. Our first coherent control experiment utilized a grating based pulse stretcher/compressor to apply a large chirp to the pulses. We measured the two-photon transition rate as a function of linear frequency chirp. The results illustrate the differences between similar classic coherent experiments done with a single femtosecond pulse and ours conducted with multiple pulses. Furthermore, we show that it is possible to reduce the two

  6. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Ultracool M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, I. Neill; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Liebert, James; Gizis, J. E.; Dahn, C. C.; Monet, D. G.

    2002-07-01

    We present high-resolution echelle spectroscopy of 39 dwarfs with spectral types between M6.5 and L0.5. With one exception, those dwarfs were selected from the Two Micron All Sky Survey database using photometric criteria, (J-KS)>=1.1 and KS<=12.0, and therefore should provide a sample free of the kinematic biases that can affect proper-motion-selected samples. Two of the stars, 2MASSI J0253202+271333 and 2MASSW J0952219-192431, are double-lined spectroscopic binaries. We have used our observations to search for Li I 6708 Å absorption, characteristic of substellar mass; estimate the level of chromospheric activity through measurement of Hα emission fluxes; measure rotational velocities via line broadening; and determine radial velocities and Galactic space motions. Two dwarfs have strong lithium absorption, the previously known brown dwarf LP 944-20 and 2MASSI J0335020+234235, which we identify as a probable 0.06 Msolar brown dwarf with an age of ~1 Gyr. We have investigated the prospect of using the observed frequency of lithium absorption among ultracool M dwarfs (M7 to M9.5) as a probe of the initial mass function, comparing the observed frequency against predictions based on recent theoretical models of low-mass dwarfs and an assumed star formation history. Our results show that the conclusions drawn are vulnerable both to systematic differences between the available models and to incomplete local sampling of the most recent star formation events (ages less than 108 yr). The latter consideration stems from the mass-dependent rate of evolution of brown dwarfs. Even given those caveats, however, the available observations are difficult to reconcile with Salpeter-like power-law mass functions (α>=2) for masses below 0.1 Msolar. A comparison between the rotational velocities and Hα fluxes shows no evidence for significant correlation. The mean activity level of the ultracool dwarfs lies almost a factor of 10 below that of early- and mid-type M dwarfs. The

  7. High Resolution EUV & FUV Spectroscopy of DA White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barstow, M. A.; Good, S. A.; Bannister, N. P.; Burleigh, M. R.; Holberg, J. B.; Bruhweiler, F. C.; Napiwotzki, R.; Cruddace, R. G.; Kowalski, M. P.

    We report on recent results from a high-resolution spectroscopic survey of hot DA white dwarfs, based on IUE, FUSE and HST observations. For the first time, we address the measurement of element abundances in a completely objective manner with a spectroscopic model fitting technique, which allows us to consider formally the limits that can be placed on abundances in stars where no heavy elements are detected. We also include our latest analysis of the high resolution EUV spectrum of G191-B2B recorded by J-PEX.

  8. An electron energy-loss study of picene and chrysene based charge transfer salts

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Eric; Mahns, Benjamin; Büchner, Bernd; Knupfer, Martin

    2015-05-14

    The electronic excitation spectra of charge transfer compounds built from the hydrocarbons picene and chrysene, and the strong electron acceptors F{sub 4}TCNQ (2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane) and TCNQ (7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethan) have been investigated using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The corresponding charge transfer compounds have been prepared by co-evaporation of the pristine constituents. We demonstrate that all investigated combinations support charge transfer, which results in new electronic excitation features at low energy. This might represent a way to synthesize low band gap organic semiconductors.

  9. High-Resolution Imaging and Spectroscopy at High Pressure: A Novel Liquid Cell for the Transmission Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Tanase, Mihaela; Winterstein, Jonathan; Sharma, Renu; Aksyuk, Vladimir; Holland, Glenn; Liddle, James A

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate quantitative core-loss electron energy-loss spectroscopy of iron oxide nanoparticles and imaging resolution of Ag nanoparticles in liquid down to 0.24 nm, in both transmission and scanning transmission modes, in a novel, monolithic liquid cell developed for the transmission electron microscope (TEM). At typical SiN membrane thicknesses of 50 nm the liquid-layer thickness has a maximum change of only 30 nm for the entire TEM viewing area of 200×200 µm.

  10. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of FU Orionis Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbig, G. H.; Petrov, P. P.; Duemmler, R.

    2003-09-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy was obtained of the FU orionis stars FU Ori and V1057 Cyg between 1995 and 2002 with the SOFIN spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope and with HIRES at Keck I. During these years FU Ori remained about 1 mag (in B) below its 1938-39 maximum brightness, but V1057 Cyg (B~10.5 at peak in 1970-1971) faded from about 13.5 to 14.9 and then recovered slightly. Their photospheric spectra resemble that of a rotationally broadened, slightly veiled supergiant of about type G0 Ib, with veqsini=70 km s-1 for FU Ori, and 55 km s-1 for V1057 Cyg. As V1057 Cyg faded, P Cyg structure in Hα and the IR Ca II lines strengthened and a complex shortward-displaced shell spectrum of low-excitation lines of the neutral metals (including Li I and Rb I) increased in strength, disappeared in 1999, and reappeared in 2001. Several SOFIN runs extended over a number of successive nights so that a search for rapid and cyclic changes in the spectra was possible. These spectra show rapid night-to-night changes in the wind structure of FU Ori at Hα, including clear evidence of sporadic infall. The equivalent width of the P Cyg absorption varied cyclically with a period of 14.8 days, with phase stability maintained over three seasons. This is believed to be the rotation period of FU Ori. The internal structure of its photospheric lines also varies cyclically, but with a period of 3.54 days. A similar variation may be present in V1057 Cyg, but the data are much noisier and that result uncertain. As V1057 Cyg has faded and the continuum level fallen, the emission lines of a preexisting low-excitation chromosphere have emerged. Therefore we believe that the ``line doubling'' in V1057 Cyg is produced by these central emission cores in the absorption lines, not by orbital motion in an inclined Keplerian disk. No convincing dependence of veqsini on wavelength or excitation potential was detected in either FU Ori or V1057 Cyg, again contrary to expectation for a self

  11. High Resolution Coherent Three-Dimensional Spectroscopy of Iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Zuri R.; Wells, Thresa A.; Chen, Peter C.; Strangfeld, Benjamin R.

    2013-06-01

    The heavy congestion found in many one-dimensional spectra can make it difficult to study many transitions. A new coherent three-dimensional spectroscopic technique has been developed to eliminate the kind of congestion commonly seen in high resolution electronic spectra. The molecule used for this test was Iodine. A well-characterized transition (X to B) was used to determine which four wave mixing process or processes were responsible for the peaks in the resulting multidimensional spectrum. The resolution of several peaks that overlap in a coherent 2D spectrum can be accomplished by using a higher dimensional (3D) spectroscopic method. This talk will discuss strategies for finding spectroscopic constants using this high resolution coherent 3D spectroscopic method.

  12. Electron-Energy-Loss Spectra of Free-Standing Silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priede, Luis; Meza-Montes, Lilia; Gomez-Barojas, E.

    2013-03-01

    Silicene, the silicon-based counterpart of graphene, is increasingly getting attention because it is a semi-metal material with Dirac cones and thus, in principle, has similar electronic properties. In this work we calculated the Electron Energy Loss Spectrum (EELS) of ideal free-standing silicene. Dielectric function is obtained by using a discretization method as suggested by Delerue, et al.. Tight-binding method is applied considering 2nd Nearest Neighbors with sp2 orbitals, the Slater-Koster parameterization and the Harrison's rule. This has been done for plane and buckled silicon sheets, in the latter case with a structure based on DFT calculations. The resulting dielectric function is compared to those of bulk silicon and graphene. Spectra of EEELS are contrasted for plane and buckled silicene, particularly the plasmon frequency as a function of the z displacement of buckled silicene. Partially supported by Grant CB/2009/133516 CONACyT, Mexico.

  13. High Resolution Thz and FIR Spectroscopy of SOCl_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Drumel, M. A.; Cuisset, A.; Sadovskii, D. A.; Mouret, G.; Hindle, F.; Pirali, O.

    2013-06-01

    Thionyl chloride (SOCl_2) is an extremely powerful oxidant widely used in industrial processes and playing a role in the chemistry of the atmosphere. In addition, it has a molecular configuration similar to that of phosgene (COCl_2), and is therefore of particular interest for security and defense applications. Low resolution vibrational spectra of gas phase SOCl_2 as well as high resolution pure rotational transitions up to 25 GHz have previously been investigated. To date no high resolution data are reported at frequencies higher than 25 GHz. We have investigated the THz absorption spectrum of SOCl_2 in the spectral region 70-650 GHz using a frequency multiplier chain coupled to a 1 m long single path cell containing a pressure of about 15 μbar. At the time of the writing, about 8000 pure rotational transitions of SO^{35}Cl_2 with highest J and K_a values of 110 and 50 respectively have been assigned on the spectrum. We have also recorded the high resolution FIR spectra of SOCl_2 in the spectral range 50-700 wn using synchrotron radiation at the AILES beamline of SOLEIL facility. A White-type cell aligned with an absorption path length of 150 m has been used to record, at a resolution of 0.001 wn, two spectra at pressures of 5 and 56 μbar of SOCl_2. On these spectra all FIR modes of SOCl_2 are observed (ν_2 to ν_6) and present a resolved rotational structure. Their analysis is in progress. T. J. Johnson et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 107, 6183 (2003) D. E. Martz and R. T. Lagemann, J. Chem. Phys. 22,1193 (1954) H. S. P. Müller and M. C. L. Gerry, J. Chem. Soc. Faraday Trans. 90, 3473 (1994)

  14. High resolution spectroscopy of six new extreme helium stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heber, U.; Jones, G.; Drilling, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    High resolution spectra of six newly discovered extreme helium stars are presented. LSS 5121 is shown to be a spectroscopical twin of the hot extreme helium star HD 160641. A preliminary LTE analysis of LSS 3184 yielded an effective temperature of 22,000 K and a surface gravity of log g = 3.2. Four stars form a new subgroup, classified by sharp-lined He I spectra and pronounced O II spectra, and it is conjectured that these lie close to the Eddington limit. The whole group of extreme helium stars apparently is inhomogeneous with respect to luminosity to mass ratio and chemical composition.

  15. Microcoil high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Hans; Brinkmann, Andreas; van Eck, Ernst R H; van Bentum, P Jan M; Kentgens, Arno P M

    2006-07-12

    We report the construction of a dual-channel microcoil nuclear magnetic resonance probehead allowing magic-angle spinning for mass-limited samples. With coils down to 235 mum inner diameter, this allows high-resolution solid-state NMR spectra to be obtained for amounts of materials of a few nanoliters. This is demonstrated by the carbon-13 spectrum of a tripeptide and a single silk rod, prepared from the silk gland of the Bombyx mori silkworm. Furthermore, the microcoil allows for radio frequency field strengths well beyond current probe technology, aiding in getting the highest possible resolution by efficiently decoupling the observed nuclei from the abundantly present proton nuclei.

  16. High-Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy of Ge_2C_3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorwirth, S.; Lutter, V.; Schlemmer, S.; Giesen, T. F.; Gauss, J.

    2013-06-01

    Carbon-rich systems are of great importance in diverse areas of research like material science as well as astro- and structural chemistry. Despite this relevance, our knowledge of smaller cluster units is still fragmentary, particularly with respect to investigations at high-spectral resolution in the gas phase. Unequivocal assignment of spectral features to their molecular carriers is critically dependent on predictions from high-level quantum-chemical calculations. In turn, high-resolution studies provide useful information to assess the predictive power of quantum-chemical methods. This is particularly interesting for cluster systems harboring heavy elements for which so far relatively little is known from experiment. With this contribution, we would like to present a recent gas-phase study of a polyatomic germanium-carbon cluster, linear Ge_2C_3 (Ge=C=C=C=Ge), which was previously studied in an Ar matrix. The cluster was produced through laser ablation of germanium-graphite sample rods and observed in a free jet at wavelengths around 5μm. Additionally, quantum-chemical calculations of Ge_2C_3 were performed at the CCSD(T) level of theory. The production and observation of Ge_2C_3 suggests that many more binary clusters should be amenable to high-resolution spectroscopic techniques not only in the infrared but also in the microwave region. D. L. Robbins, C. M. L. Rittby, and W. R. M. Graham, J. Chem. Phys. 114, 3570 (2001).

  17. CARMENES science preparation. High-resolution spectroscopy of M dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, D.; Caballero, J. A.; Jeffers, S.; Alonso-Floriano, F. J.; Mundt, R.; CARMENES Consortium

    2015-05-01

    To ensure an efficient use of CARMENES observing time, and the highest chances of success, it is necessary first to select the most promising targets. To achieve this, we are observing 500 M dwarfs at high-resolution (R = 30,000-48,000), from which we determine the projected rotational velocity vsin{i} with an accuracy better than 0.5-0.2 km/s and radial-velocity stability better than 0.2-0.1 km/s. Our aim is to have at least two spectra at different epochs of the final 300 CARMENES targets. Our observations with FEROS at ESO/MPG 2.2 m La Silla, CAFE at 2.2 m Calar Alto and HRS at Hobby Eberly Telescope allow us to identify single- and double-line spectroscopic binaries and, especially, fast rotators, which should be discarded from the target list for exoplanet searches. Here we present preliminary results.

  18. Characterising Exoplanet Atmospheres with High-resolution Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkby, J.; de Kok, R.; Brogi, M.; Schwarz, H.; Albrecht, S.; de Mooij, E.; Snellen, I.

    2013-12-01

    The search for signs of life elsewhere in the Universe requires the remote detection of molecules in the atmospheres of exoplanets. Recent progress with high-resolution infrared spectra obtained with CRIRES has led to the first ground-based detections of carbon monoxide and water in the atmospheres of hot giant exoplanets. This avenue of exoplanet characterisation has the potential to identify biomarkers in the atmospheres of Earth analogues with the European Extremely Large Telescope. The current detections not only provide evidence for how the composition of a hot giant planet atmosphere can affect its thermal structure and cloud formation processes, but also have the potential to constrain the universal mechanism for planet formation by pinpointing the birth location of the planet in its protoplanetary disc.

  19. High resolution spectroscopy from low altitude satellites. [gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakano, G. H.; Imhof, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    The P 78 1 satellite to be placed in a synchronous polar orbit at an altitude of 550-660 km will carry two identical high resolution spectrometers each consisting of a single (approximately 85 cc) intrinsic germanium IGE detector. The payload also includes a pair of phoswitch scintillators, an array of CdTe detectors and several particle detectors, all of which are mounted on the wheel of the satellite. The intrinsic high purity IGE detectors receive cooling from two Stirling cycle refrigerators and facilitate the assembly of large and complex detector arrays planned for the next generation of high sensitivity instruments such as those planned for the gamma ray observatory. The major subsystems of the spectrometer are discussed as well as its capabilities.

  20. Quadrature phase interferometer for high resolution force spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Paolino, Pierdomenico; Aguilar Sandoval, Felipe A.; Bellon, Ludovic

    2013-09-15

    In this article, we present a deflection measurement setup for Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). It is based on a quadrature phase differential interferometer: we measure the optical path difference between a laser beam reflecting above the cantilever tip and a reference beam reflecting on the static base of the sensor. A design with very low environmental susceptibility and another allowing calibrated measurements on a wide spectral range are described. Both enable a very high resolution (down to 2.5×10{sup −15} m/√(Hz)), illustrated by thermal noise measurements on AFM cantilevers. They present an excellent long-term stability and a constant sensitivity independent of the optical phase of the interferometer. A quick review shows that our precision is equaling or out-performing the best results reported in the literature, but for a much larger deflection range, up to a few μm.

  1. High-resolution spectroscopy of a giant solar filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuckein, Christoph; Denker, Carsten; Verma, Meetu

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of a giant solar quiescent filament were taken with the Echelle spectrograph at the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT; Tenerife, Spain). A mosaic of various spectroheliograms (Hα, Hα+/-0.5 Å and Na D2) were chosen to examine the filament at different heights in the solar atmosphere. In addition, full-disk images (He i 10830 Å and Ca ii K) of the Chromspheric Telescope and full-disk magnetograms of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager were used to complement the spectra. Preliminary results are shown of this filament, which had extremely large linear dimensions (~740'') and was observed in November 2011 while it traversed the northern solar hemisphere.

  2. High-Resolution Absorption Spectroscopy of NO2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-31

    identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Atmospheric propagation, Laser spectroscopy, Nitrogen dioxide , Spectroscopy 19. RACT (Continue on reverse if...pulsed dye laser having a 0.05-A"-bandwidth (FWHM). This represents an improvement of at least a factor of three over the resolution employed in...concise interpretation of the observed features has yet to be made. Actual state-to-state assignments in the visible and near UV have been possible only

  3. Understanding reconstructed Dante spectra using high resolution spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    May, M J; Weaver, J; Widmann, K; Kemp, G E; Thorn, D; Colvin, J D; Schneider, M B; Moore, A; Blue, B E

    2016-11-01

    The Dante is an 18 channel filtered diode array used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux between 50 eV and 20 keV from various targets. The absolute flux is determined from the radiometric calibration of the x-ray diodes, filters, and mirrors and a reconstruction algorithm applied to the recorded voltages from each channel. The reconstructed spectra are very low resolution with features consistent with the instrument response and are not necessarily consistent with the spectral emission features from the plasma. Errors may exist between the reconstructed spectra and the actual emission features due to assumptions in the algorithm. Recently, a high resolution convex crystal spectrometer, VIRGIL, has been installed at NIF with the same line of sight as the Dante. Spectra from L-shell Ag and Xe have been recorded by both VIRGIL and Dante. Comparisons of these two spectroscopic measurements yield insights into the accuracy of the Dante reconstructions.

  4. High Resolution FIR and IR Spectroscopy of Methanol Isotopologues

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, R. M.; Xu, Li-Hong; Appadoo, D. R. T.; Billinghurst, B.

    2010-02-03

    New astronomical facilities such as HIFI on the Herschel Space Observatory, the SOFIA airborne IR telescope and the ALMA sub-mm telescope array will yield spectra from interstellar and protostellar sources with vastly increased sensitivity and frequency coverage. This creates the need for major enhancements to laboratory databases for the more prominent interstellar 'weed' species in order to model and account for their lines in observed spectra in the search for new and more exotic interstellar molecular 'flowers'. With its large-amplitude internal torsional motion, methanol has particularly rich spectra throughout the FIR and IR regions and, being very widely distributed throughout the galaxy, is perhaps the most notorious interstellar weed. Thus, we have recorded new spectra for a variety of methanol isotopic species on the high-resolution FTIR spectrometer on the CLS FIR beamline. The aim is to extend quantum number coverage of the data, improve our understanding of the energy level structure, and provide the astronomical community with better databases and models of the spectral patterns with greater predictive power for a range of astrophysical conditions.

  5. High Resolution γ-Ray Spectroscopy: the First 85 Years

    PubMed Central

    Deslattes, Richard D.

    2000-01-01

    This opening review attempts to follow the main trends in crystal diffraction spectrometry of nuclear γ rays from its 1914 beginning in Rutherford’s laboratory to the ultra-high resolution instrumentation realized in the current generation of spectrometers at the Institute Laue Langeven (ILL). My perspective is that of an instrumentalist hoping to convey a sense of our intellectual debt to a number of predecessors, each of whom realized a certain elegance in making the tools that have enabled much good science, including that to which the remainder of this workshop is dedicated. This overview follows some of the main ideas along a trajectory toward higher resolution at higher energies, thereby enabling not only the disentangling of dense spectra, but also allowing detailed study of aspects of spectral profiles sensitive to excited state lifetimes and inter-atomic potentials. The parallel evolution toward increasing efficiency while preserving needed resolution is also an interesting story of artful compromise that should not be neglected. Finally, it is the robustness of the measurement chain connecting γ-ray wavelengths with optical wavelengths associated with the Rydberg constant that only recently has allowed γ-ray data to contribute to determination of particle masses and fundamental constants, as will be described in more detail in other papers from this workshop. PMID:27551582

  6. Understanding reconstructed Dante spectra using high resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, M. J.; Weaver, J.; Widmann, K.; Kemp, G. E.; Thorn, D.; Colvin, J. D.; Schneider, M. B.; Moore, A.; Blue, B. E.

    2016-11-01

    The Dante is an 18 channel filtered diode array used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux between 50 eV and 20 keV from various targets. The absolute flux is determined from the radiometric calibration of the x-ray diodes, filters, and mirrors and a reconstruction algorithm applied to the recorded voltages from each channel. The reconstructed spectra are very low resolution with features consistent with the instrument response and are not necessarily consistent with the spectral emission features from the plasma. Errors may exist between the reconstructed spectra and the actual emission features due to assumptions in the algorithm. Recently, a high resolution convex crystal spectrometer, VIRGIL, has been installed at NIF with the same line of sight as the Dante. Spectra from L-shell Ag and Xe have been recorded by both VIRGIL and Dante. Comparisons of these two spectroscopic measurements yield insights into the accuracy of the Dante reconstructions.

  7. Understanding reconstructed Dante spectra using high resolution spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    May, M. J. Widmann, K.; Kemp, G. E.; Thorn, D.; Colvin, J. D.; Schneider, M. B.; Moore, A.; Blue, B. E.; Weaver, J.

    2016-11-15

    The Dante is an 18 channel filtered diode array used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux between 50 eV and 20 keV from various targets. The absolute flux is determined from the radiometric calibration of the x-ray diodes, filters, and mirrors and a reconstruction algorithm applied to the recorded voltages from each channel. The reconstructed spectra are very low resolution with features consistent with the instrument response and are not necessarily consistent with the spectral emission features from the plasma. Errors may exist between the reconstructed spectra and the actual emission features due to assumptions in the algorithm. Recently, a high resolution convex crystal spectrometer, VIRGIL, has been installed at NIF with the same line of sight as the Dante. Spectra from L-shell Ag and Xe have been recorded by both VIRGIL and Dante. Comparisons of these two spectroscopic measurements yield insights into the accuracy of the Dante reconstructions.

  8. High-Resolution EUV Spectroscopy of White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Michael P.; Wood, K. S.; Barstow, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    We compare results of high-resolution EUV spectroscopic measurements of the isolated white dwarf G191-B2B and the binary system Feige 24 obtained with the J-PEX (Joint Plasmadynamic Experiment), which was sponsored jointly by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory and NASA. J-PEX delivers the world's highest resolution in EUV and does so at high effective area (e.g., more effective area in a sounding rocket than is available with Chandra at adjacent energies, but in a waveband Chandra cannot reach). The capability J-PEX represents is applicable to the astrophysics of hot plasmas in stellar coronae, white dwarfs and the ISM. G191-B2B and Feige 24 are quite distinct hot white dwarf systems having in common that they are bright in the portion of the EUV where He emission features and edges occur, hence they can be exploited to probe both the stellar atmosphere and the ISM, separating those components by model-fitting that sums over all relevant (He) spectral features in the band. There is evidence from these fits that atmospheric He is being detected but the result is more conservatively cast as a pair of upper limits. We discuss how longer duration satellite observations with the same instrumentation could increase exposure to detect atmospheric He in these and other nearby hot white dwarfs.

  9. High resolution infrared spectroscopy of [1.1.1]propellane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, Robynne; Masiello, Tony; Jariyasopit, Narumol; Weber, Alfons; Nibler, Joseph W.; Maki, Arthur; Blake, Thomas A.; Hubler, Timothy

    2008-04-01

    The infrared spectrum of [1.1.1]propellane has been recorded at high resolution (0.002 cm -1) with individual rovibrational lines resolved for the first time. This initial report presents the ground state constants for this molecule determined from the analysis of five of the eight infrared-allowed fundamentals ν9(e'), ν10(e'), ν12(e'), ν14(a2″),ν15(a2″), as well as of several combination bands. In nearly all cases it was found that the upper states of the transitions exhibit some degree of perturbation but, by use of the combination difference method, the assigned frequencies provided over 4000 consistent ground state difference values. Analysis of these gave for the parameters of the ground state the following values, in cm -1: B0 = 0.28755833(14), DJ = 1.1313(5) × 10 -7, DJK = -1.2633(7) × 10 -7, HJ = 0.72(4) × 10 -13, HJK = -2.24(13) × 10 -13, and HKJ = 2.25(15) × 10 -13, where the numbers in parentheses indicate twice the uncertainties in the last quoted digit(s) of the parameters. Gaussian ab initio calculations, especially with the computed anharmonic corrections to some of the spectroscopic parameters, assisted in the assignments of the bands and also provided information on the electron distribution in the bridge-head carbon-carbon bond.

  10. High Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy of Pyrazine and Naphthalene in a Molecular Bean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-26

    Infrared Spectroscopy of Pyrazine and Naphthalene in a Molecular Beamby Kevin B. Hewett, Meihua Shen, Christopher L. Brummel, and Laura A. Philips...public release and sale; its distribution is unlimited. 93-26699 HIGH RESOLUTION INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF PYRAZINE AND NAPHTHALENE IN A MOLECULAR BEAM...Abstract The high resolution infrared spectrum of pyrazine and naphthalene were measured in a molecular beam in the vicinity of the C-H stretching

  11. High-resolution Josephson spectroscopy with a scanning tunneling microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randeria, Mallika T.; Feldman, Benjamin E.; Drozdov, Ilya K.; Yazdani, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Conventional scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements use a normal metal tip to probe local quasi-particle density of states with atomic resolution. Using a superconducting tip to conduct spectroscopy significantly boosts the energy resolution of the measurements, thus expanding the STM capabilities. Moreover, superconducting tips make it possible to probe superconductivity via the Josephson effect, which provides a direct measure of the local superconducting order parameter. Therefore, scanning Josephson spectroscopy measurements have the potential to characterize of a wide variety of superconducting materials on the atomic scale. I will present superconducting Pb tip measurements performed at temperatures below 250mK in a dilution refrigerator STM. By controlling the junction resistance, we are able to explore a wide range of tunneling regimes. Josephson measurements on Pb samples exhibit features including multiple Andreev reflections, and I will discuss the extension of these techniques to study atomic scale variations in Josephson current.

  12. High-Resolution Laser Spectroscopy on the Negative Osmium Ion

    SciTech Connect

    Warring, U.; Amoretti, M.; Canali, C.; Fischer, A.; Heyne, R.; Meier, J. O.; Morhard, Ch.; Kellerbauer, A.

    2009-01-30

    We have applied a combination of laser excitation and electric-field detachment to negative atomic ions for the first time, resulting in an enhancement of the excited-state detection efficiency for spectroscopy by at least 2 orders of magnitude. Applying the new method, a measurement of the bound-bound electric-dipole transition frequency in {sup 192}Os{sup -} was performed using collinear spectroscopy with a narrow-bandwidth cw laser. The transition frequency was found to be 257.831 190(35) THz [wavelength 1162.747 06(16) nm, wave number 8600.3227(12) cm{sup -1}], in agreement with the only prior measurement, but with more than 100-fold higher precision.

  13. Giant quiescent solar filament observed with high-resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuckein, C.; Verma, M.; Denker, C.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: An extremely large filament was studied in various layers of the solar atmosphere. The inferred physical parameters and the morphological aspects are compared with smaller quiescent filaments. Methods: A giant quiet-Sun filament was observed with the high-resolution Echelle spectrograph at the Vacuum Tower Telescope at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain, on 2011 November 15. A mosaic of spectra (ten maps of 100″ × 182″) was recorded simultaneously in the chromospheric absorption lines Hα and Na i D2. Physical parameters of the filament plasma were derived using cloud model (CM) inversions and line core fits. The spectra were complemented with full-disk filtergrams (He i λ10830 Å, Hα, and Ca ii K) of the Chromospheric Telescope (ChroTel) and full-disk magnetograms of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). Results: The filament had extremely large linear dimensions (~817 arcsec), which corresponds to about 658 Mm along a great circle on the solar surface. A total amount of 175119 Hα contrast profiles were inverted using the CM approach. The inferred mean line-of-sight (LOS) velocity, Doppler width, and source function were similar to previous works of smaller quiescent filaments. However, the derived optical thickness was higher. LOS velocity trends inferred from the Hα line core fits were in accord but weaker than those obtained with CM inversions. Signatures of counter-streaming flows were detected in the filament. The largest brightening conglomerates in the line core of Na i D2 coincided well with small-scale magnetic fields as seen by HMI. Mixed magnetic polarities were detected close to the ends of barbs. The computation of photospheric horizontal flows based on HMI magnetograms revealed flow kernels with a size of 5-8 Mm and velocities of 0.30-0.45 km s-1 at the ends of the filament. Conclusions: The physical properties of extremely large filaments are similar to their smaller counterparts, except for the optical thickness, which in

  14. High-resolution spectroscopy with a femtosecond laser frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Gerginov, V; Tanner, C E; Diddams, S A; Bartels, A; Hollberg, L

    2005-07-01

    The output of a mode-locked femtosecond laser is used for precision single-photon spectroscopy of 133Cs in an atomic beam. By changing the laser's repetition rate, the cesium D1 (6s 2S(1/2)-->6p 2P(1/2)) and D2 (6s 2S(1/2)-->6p 2P(3/2)) transitions are detected and the optical frequencies are measured with accuracy similar to that obtained with a cw laser. Control of the femtosecond laser repetition rate by use of the atomic fluorescence is also implemented, thus realizing a simple cesium optical clock.

  15. Molecular Chirality: Enantiomer Differentiation by High-Resolution Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Eizi

    2014-06-01

    I have demonstrated that triple resonance performed on a three-rotational-level system of a chiral molecule of C1 symmetry exhibits signals opposite in phase for different enantiomers, thereby making enantiomer differentiation possible by microwave spectroscopy This prediction was realized by Patterson et al. on 1,2-propanediol and 1,3-butanediol. We thus now add a powerful method: microwave spectroscopy to the study of chiral molecules, for which hitherto only the measurement of optical rotation has been employed. Although microwave spectroscopy is applied to molecules in the gaseous phase, it is unprecedentedly superior to the traditional method: polarimeter in resolution, accuracy, sensitivity, and so on, and I anticipate a new fascinating research area to be opened in the field of molecular chirality. More versatile and efficient systems should be invented and developed for microwave spectroscopy, in order to cope well with new applications expected for this method For C2 and Cn (n ≥ 3)chiral molecules, the three-rotational-level systems treated above for C1 molecules are no more available within one vibronic state. It should, however, be pointed out that, if we take into account an excited vibronic state in addition to the ground state, for example, we may encounter many three-level systems. Namely, either one rotational transition in the ground state is combined with two vibronic transitions, or such a rotational transition in an excited state may be connected through two vibronic transitions to a rotational level in the ground state manifold. The racemization obviously plays a crucial role in the study of molecular chirality. However, like many other terms employed in chemistry, this important process has been "defined" only in a vague way, in other words, it includes many kinds of processes, which are not well classified on a molecular basis. I shall mention an attempt to obviate these shortcomings in the definition of racemization and also to clarify the

  16. High-resolution waveguide THz spectroscopy of biological molecules.

    PubMed

    Laman, N; Harsha, S Sree; Grischkowsky, D; Melinger, Joseph S

    2008-02-01

    Low-frequency vibrational modes of biological molecules consist of intramolecular modes, which are dependent on the molecule as a whole, as well as intermolecular modes, which arise from hydrogen-bonding interactions and van der Waals forces. Vibrational modes thus contain important information about conformation dynamics of biological molecules, and can also be used for identification purposes. However, conventional Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) often result in broad, overlapping features that are difficult to distinguish. The technique of waveguide THz-TDS has been recently developed, resulting in sharper features. For this technique, an ordered polycrystalline film of the molecule is formed on a metal sample plate. This plate is incorporated into a metal parallel-plate waveguide and probed via waveguide THz-TDS. The planar order of the film reduces the inhomogeneous broadening, and cooling of the samples to 77K reduces the homogenous broadening. This combination results in the line-narrowing of THz vibrational modes, in some cases to an unprecedented degree. Here, this technique has been demonstrated with seven small biological molecules, thymine, deoxycytidine, adenosine, D-glucose, tryptophan, glycine, and L-alanine. The successful demonstration of this technique shows the possibilities and promise for future studies of internal vibrational modes of large biological molecules.

  17. High resolution charge spectroscopy of heavy ions with FNTD technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartz, J. A.; Kodaira, S.; Kurano, M.; Yasuda, N.; Akselrod, M. S.

    2014-09-01

    This paper is focused on the improvement of the heavy charge particle charge resolution of Fluorescent Nuclear Track Detector (FNTD) technology. Fluorescent intensity of individual heavy charge particle tracks is used to construct the spectrum. Sources of spectroscopic line broadening were investigated and several fluorescent intensity correction procedures were introduced to improve the charge resolution down to δZ = 0.25 c.u. and enable FNTD technology to distinguish between all projectile fragments of 290 MeV carbon ions. The benefits of using FNTD technology for fragmentation study include large dynamic range and wide angular acceptance. While we describe these developments in the context of fragmentation studies, the same techniques are readily extended to FNTD LET spectroscopy in general.

  18. High resolution ion Doppler spectroscopy at Prairie View Rotamak

    SciTech Connect

    Houshmandyar, Saeid; Yang Xiaokang; Magee, Richard

    2012-10-15

    A fast ion Doppler spectroscopy (IDS) diagnostic system is installed on the Prairie View Rotamak to measure ion temperature and plasma flow. The diagnostic employs a single channel photomultiplier tube and a Jarrell-Ash 50 monochromator with a diffraction grating line density of 1180 lines/mm, which allows for first order spectra of 200-600 nm. The motorized gear of the monochromator allows spectral resolution of 0.01 nm. Equal IDS measurements are observed for various impurity emission lines of which carbon lines exhibit stronger intensities. Furthermore, the diagnostics is examined in an experiment where plasma experiences sudden disruption and quick recovery. In this case, the IDS measurements show {approx}130% increase in ion temperature. Flow measurements are shown to be consistent with plasma rotation.

  19. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at GANIL

    SciTech Connect

    France, G. de

    2014-11-11

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy is intensively used at GANIL to measure low lying states in exotic nuclei on the neutron-rich as well as on the neutron-deficient side of the nuclear chart. On the neutron deficient border, gamma-rays have been observed for the first time in {sup 92}Pd. The level scheme which could be established points to the role of isoscalar pairing. On the neutron rich side, the lifetime of excited states in nuclei around {sup 68}Ni have been been measured using the plunger technique. This allows us to study the evolution of collectivity in a broad range of nuclei. In 2014 GANIL will host the AGATA array for a campaign of at least 2 years. This array is based on the gamma-ray tracking technique, which allows an impressive gain in resolving power.

  20. High resolution spectroscopy reveals fibrillation inhibition pathways of insulin

    PubMed Central

    Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Deckert, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Fibril formation implies the conversion of a protein’s native secondary structure and is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. A better understanding of fibrillation inhibition and fibril dissection requires nanoscale molecular characterization of amyloid structures involved. Tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) has already been used to chemically analyze amyloid fibrils on a sub-protein unit basis. Here, TERS in combination with atomic force microscopy (AFM), and conventional Raman spectroscopy characterizes insulin assemblies generated during inhibition and dissection experiments in the presence of benzonitrile, dimethylsulfoxide, quercetin, and β-carotene. The AFM topography indicates formation of filamentous or bead-like insulin self-assemblies. Information on the secondary structure of bulk samples and of single aggregates is obtained from standard Raman and TERS measurements. In particular the high spatial resolution of TERS reveals the surface conformations associated with the specific agents. The insulin aggregates formed under different inhibition and dissection conditions can show a similar morphology but differ in their β-sheet structure content. This suggests different aggregation pathways where the prevention of the β-sheet stacking of the peptide chains plays a major role. The presented approach is not limited to amyloid-related reasearch but can be readily applied to systems requiring extremely surface-sensitive characterization without the need of labels. PMID:28008970

  1. High resolution FTIR spectroscopy of the ClO radical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Valerie; Sander, Stanley P.; Friedl, Randy

    1988-01-01

    The chlorine monoxide radical, ClO, plays a significant role in the catalytic destruction of ozone in the Earth's stratosphere. Because of its atmospheric importance, ClO has been the subject of numerous observational attempts. In order to deduce ClO concentrations from stratospheric infrared measurements, the infrared spectroscopy of ClO must be well characterized. Approximately 830 individual lines were measured form ClO imfrared spectra with the ClO concentration between 1 x 10 to the 13th power and 6 x 10 to the 13th power molecules per cu cu. The lines were then averaged and fit to a function of m (where m = O, -J or J+1 for the Q,P and R branches respectively) to obtain the band strength, S sub v and the first Herman-Wallis coefficient, alpha. The total S sub v for the two main isotopmers was 13.11 plus or minus 1 cm(-2) atm(-1) while alpha was 0.00412 plus or minus .00062.

  2. High resolution spectroscopy reveals fibrillation inhibition pathways of insulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Deckert, Volker

    2016-12-01

    Fibril formation implies the conversion of a protein’s native secondary structure and is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. A better understanding of fibrillation inhibition and fibril dissection requires nanoscale molecular characterization of amyloid structures involved. Tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) has already been used to chemically analyze amyloid fibrils on a sub-protein unit basis. Here, TERS in combination with atomic force microscopy (AFM), and conventional Raman spectroscopy characterizes insulin assemblies generated during inhibition and dissection experiments in the presence of benzonitrile, dimethylsulfoxide, quercetin, and β-carotene. The AFM topography indicates formation of filamentous or bead-like insulin self-assemblies. Information on the secondary structure of bulk samples and of single aggregates is obtained from standard Raman and TERS measurements. In particular the high spatial resolution of TERS reveals the surface conformations associated with the specific agents. The insulin aggregates formed under different inhibition and dissection conditions can show a similar morphology but differ in their β-sheet structure content. This suggests different aggregation pathways where the prevention of the β-sheet stacking of the peptide chains plays a major role. The presented approach is not limited to amyloid-related reasearch but can be readily applied to systems requiring extremely surface-sensitive characterization without the need of labels.

  3. Study of optical and electronic properties of nickel from reflection electron energy loss spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Yang, L. H.; Da, B.; Tóth, J.; Tőkési, K.; Ding, Z. J.

    2017-09-01

    We use the classical Monte Carlo transport model of electrons moving near the surface and inside solids to reproduce the measured reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS) spectra. With the combination of the classical transport model and the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling of oscillator parameters the so-called reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) method was developed, and used to obtain optical constants of Ni in this work. A systematic study of the electronic and optical properties of Ni has been performed in an energy loss range of 0-200 eV from the measured REELS spectra at primary energies of 1000 eV, 2000 eV and 3000 eV. The reliability of our method was tested by comparing our results with the previous data. Moreover, the accuracy of our optical data has been confirmed by applying oscillator strength-sum rule and perfect-screening-sum rule.

  4. Ultra high resolution molecular beam cars spectroscopy with application to planetary atmospheric molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The measurement of high resolution pulsed and continuous wave (CW) coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements in pulsed and steady state supersonic expansions were demonstrated. Pulsed molecular beam sources were characterized, and saturation of a Raman transition and, for the first time, the Raman spectrum of a complex molecular cluster were observed. The observation of CW CARS spectra in a molecular expansion and the effects of transit time broadening is described. Supersonic expansion is established as a viable technique for high resolution Raman spectroscopy of cold molecules with resolutions of 100 MH2.

  5. High-Resolution Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Characterization of Polymorphism in Cimetidine, a Pharmaceutical Compound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacilio, Julia E.; Tokarski, John T.; Quiñones, Rosalynn; Iuliucci, Robbie J.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy has many advantages as a tool to characterize solid-phase material that finds applications in polymer chemistry, nanotechnology, materials science, biomolecular structure determination, and others, including the pharmaceutical industry. The technology associated with achieving high resolution…

  6. High-Resolution Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Characterization of Polymorphism in Cimetidine, a Pharmaceutical Compound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacilio, Julia E.; Tokarski, John T.; Quiñones, Rosalynn; Iuliucci, Robbie J.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy has many advantages as a tool to characterize solid-phase material that finds applications in polymer chemistry, nanotechnology, materials science, biomolecular structure determination, and others, including the pharmaceutical industry. The technology associated with achieving high resolution…

  7. Very high resolution UV and X-ray spectroscopy and imagery of solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, M.; Brown, W. A.; Haisch, B. M.

    1987-01-01

    A scientific investigation of the physics of the solar atmosphere, which uses the techniques of high resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy and high resolution UV imagery, is described. The experiments were conducted during a series of three sounding rocket flights. All three flights yielded excellent images in the UV range, showing unprecedented spatial resolution. The second flight recorded the X-ray spectrum of a solar flare, and the third that of an active region. A normal incidence multi-layer mirror was used during the third flight to make the first astronomical X-ray observations using this new technique.

  8. High-resolution mirror temperature mapping in GaN-based diode lasers by thermoreflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierścińska, Dorota; Marona, Łucja; Pierściński, Kamil; Wiśniewski, Przemysław; Perlin, Piotr; Bugajski, Maciej

    2017-02-01

    In this paper accurate measurements of temperature distribution on the facet of GaN-based diode lasers are presented as well as development of the instrumentation for high-resolution thermal imaging based on thermoreflectance. It is shown that thermoreflectance can be successfully applied to provide information on heat dissipation in these devices. We demonstrate the quantitative measurements of the temperature profiles and high-resolution temperature maps on the front facet of nitride lasers and prove that thermoreflectance spectroscopy can be considered as the accurate and fast nondestructive tool for investigation of thermally induced degradation modes of GaN lasers.

  9. High Resolution FTIR Spectroscopy of Trisulfane Hsssh: a Candidate for Detecting Parity Violation in Chiral Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Sieghard; Bolotova, Irina; Chen, Ziqiu; Fábri, Csaba; Quack, Martin; Seyfang, Georg; Zindel, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    The measurement of the parity violating energy difference Δ_{pv}{E} between the enantiomers of chiral molecules is among the major current challenges in high resolution spectroscopy and physical-chemical stereochemistry. Theoretical predictions have recently identified dithiine^{b} and trisulfane as suitable candidates for such experiments. We report the first successful high-resolution analyses of the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of trisulfane. A band centered at 861.0292 cm^{-1} can be assigned unambiguously to the chiral trans conformer by means of ground state combination differences in comparison with known pure rotational spectra. A second band near 864.698 cm^{-1} is tentatively assigned to the cis conformer by comparison with theory. M. Quack , Fundamental Symmetries and Symmetry Violations from High-resolution Spectroscopy, Handbook of High Resolution Spectroscopy, M. Quack and F. Merkt eds.,John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester, New York, 2001, vol. 1, ch. 18, pp. 659-722. S. Albert, I. Bolotova, Z. Chen, C. Fábri, L. Horný, M. Quack, G. Seyfang and D. Zindel, Phys.Chem.Chem.Phys.18, 21976-21993 (2016). C. Fábri, L. Horný and M. Quack, ChemPhysChem16, 3584-3589 (2015). M. Liedtke, K. M. T. Yamada, G. Winnewisser and J. Hahn, J.Mol.Struct.413, 265-270 (1997).

  10. The role of electronic energy loss in ion beam modification of materials

    DOE PAGES

    Weber, William J.; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Thome, Lionel; ...

    2014-10-05

    The interaction of energetic ions with solids results in energy loss to both atomic nuclei and electrons in the solid. In this article, recent advances in understanding and modeling the additive and competitive effects of nuclear and electronic energy loss on the response of materials to ion irradiation are reviewed. Experimental methods and large-scale atomistic simulations are used to study the separate and combined effects of nuclear and electronic energy loss on ion beam modification of materials. The results demonstrate that nuclear and electronic energy loss can lead to additive effects on irradiation damage production in some materials; while inmore » other materials, the competitive effects of electronic energy loss leads to recovery of damage induced by elastic collision cascades. Lastly, these results have significant implications for ion beam modification of materials, non-thermal recovery of ion implantation damage, and the response of materials to extreme radiation environments.« less

  11. The role of electronic energy loss in ion beam modification of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, William J.; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Thome, Lionel; Zhang, Yanwen

    2014-10-05

    The interaction of energetic ions with solids results in energy loss to both atomic nuclei and electrons in the solid. In this article, recent advances in understanding and modeling the additive and competitive effects of nuclear and electronic energy loss on the response of materials to ion irradiation are reviewed. Experimental methods and large-scale atomistic simulations are used to study the separate and combined effects of nuclear and electronic energy loss on ion beam modification of materials. The results demonstrate that nuclear and electronic energy loss can lead to additive effects on irradiation damage production in some materials; while in other materials, the competitive effects of electronic energy loss leads to recovery of damage induced by elastic collision cascades. Lastly, these results have significant implications for ion beam modification of materials, non-thermal recovery of ion implantation damage, and the response of materials to extreme radiation environments.

  12. Experimental setup for high resolution x-ray spectroscopy of solids and liquid samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhong; Rajković, Ivan; Raiser, Dirk; Scholz, Mirko; Techert, Simone

    2013-09-01

    Here we present a next-generation experimental setup for high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of solid and liquid samples in the soft X-ray region to elucidate the complex molecular structures of (bio)chemical systems. The setup consists of a main target chamber, a target holder for either solid samples or a liquid jet delivery system, and a high-resolution soft X-ray grating spectrometer. This setup is in commissioning at PETRA III, presently one of the most brilliant storage ring based X-ray radiation sources in the world. The newly designed grazing incidence grating spectrometer is utilized for high-resolution measurement in the XUV range from 1 nm up to 6 nm.

  13. High-resolution inverse Raman and resonant-wave-mixing spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rahn, L.A.

    1993-12-01

    These research activities consist of high-resolution inverse Raman spectroscopy (IRS) and resonant wave-mixing spectroscopy to support the development of nonlinear-optical techniques for temperature and concentration measurements in combustion research. Objectives of this work include development of spectral models of important molecular species needed to perform coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements and the investigation of new nonlinear-optical processes as potential diagnostic techniques. Some of the techniques being investigated include frequency-degenerate and nearly frequency-degenerate resonant four-wave-mixing (DFWM and NDFWM), and resonant multi-wave mixing (RMWM).

  14. Update of High Resolution (e,e'K^+) Hypernuclear Spectroscopy at Jefferson Lab's Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    Cusanno, F; Bydzovsky, P; Chang, C C; Cisbani, E; De Jager, C W; De Leo, R; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Higinbotham, D W; Iodice, M; LeRose, J J; Markowitz, P; Marrone, S; Sotona, M; Urciuoli, G M

    2010-03-01

    Updated results of the experiment E94-107 hypernuclear spectroscopy in Hall A of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab), are presented. The experiment provides high resolution spectra of excitation energy for 12B_\\Lambda, 16N_\\Lambda, and 9Li_\\Lambda hypernuclei obtained by electroproduction of strangeness. A new theoretical calculation for 12B_\\Lambda, final results for 16N_\\Lambda, and discussion of the preliminary results of 9Li_\\Lambda are reported.

  15. High Resolution Velocity Map Imaging Photoelectron Spectroscopy of the Beryllium Oxide Anion, BeO-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermer, Amanda Reed; Mascaritolo, Kyle; Heaven, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The photodetachment spectrum of BeO- has been studied using high resolution velocity map imaging photoelectron spectroscopy. The vibrational contours were imaged and compared with Franck-Condon simulations for the ground and excited states of the neutral. The electron affinity of BeO was measured for the first time, and anisotropies of several transitions were determined. Experimental findings are compared to high level ab initio calculations.

  16. Beamline 9.0.1 - a high-resolution undulator beamline for gas-phase spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, J.D.; Heimann, P.A.; Mossessian, D.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.0.1 at the Advanced Light Source is an undulator beamline with a Spherical Grating Monochromator (SGM) which provides very high resolution and flux over the photon energy range 20-320eV. The beamline has been used primarily by the atomic and molecular science community to conduct spectroscopy experiments using electron, ion and fluorescence photon detection. A description of the beamline and its performance will be provided in this abstract.

  17. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G.E.

    2011-05-31

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  18. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall G. E.; Goncharov, V.

    2012-05-29

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  19. High-resolution extreme-ultraviolet spectroscopy of potassium using anti-Stokes radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothenberg, J. E.; Young, J. F.; Harris, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    The use of a new extreme-ultraviolet radiation source based on spontaneous anti-Stokes scattering for high-resolution absorption spectroscopy of transition originating from the 3p6 shell of potassium is reported. The region from 546.6 to 536.8 A is scanned at a resolution of about 1.2 Kayser. Within this region, four previously unreported lines are observed.

  20. Elimination of the Vacuum Pump Requirement for High-Resolution Rotational Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Jennifer; Daly, Ryan W.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2015-06-01

    It has been observed that with the advances being driven by the wireless communications industry, the microwave components for submillimeter wave spectrometers and sensors will become almost "free". Moreover, these electronic components will require little power. However, neither of these attributes applies to the vacuum requirements for high-resolution rotational spectroscopy. We will report on the design, construction, and operation of a simple spectroscopic cell that overcomes these problems.

  1. Adaptive optics high-resolution IR spectroscopy with silicon grisms and immersion gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jian; McDavitt, Daniel L.; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Bernecker, John L.; Miller, Shane

    2003-02-01

    The breakthrough of silicon immersion grating technology at Penn State has the ability to revolutionize high-resolution infrared spectroscopy when it is coupled with adaptive optics at large ground-based telescopes. Fabrication of high quality silicon grism and immersion gratings up to 2 inches in dimension, less than 1% integrated scattered light, and diffraction-limited performance becomes a routine process thanks to newly developed techniques. Silicon immersion gratings with etched dimensions of ~ 4 inches are being developed at Penn State. These immersion gratings will be able to provide a diffraction-limited spectral resolution of R = 300,000 at 2.2 micron, or 130,000 at 4.6 micron. Prototype silicon grisms have been successfully used in initial scientific observations at the Lick 3m telescope with adaptive optics. Complete K band spectra of a total of 6 T Tauri and Ae/Be stars and their close companions at a spectral resolution of R ~ 3000 were obtained. This resolving power was achieved by using a silicon echelle grism with a 5 mm pupil diameter in an IR camera. These results represent the first scientific observations conducted by the high-resolution silicon grisms, and demonstrate the extremely high dispersing power of silicon-based gratings. New discoveries from this high spatial and spectral resolution IR spectroscopy will be reported. The future of silicon-based grating applications in ground-based AO IR instruments is promising. Silicon immersion gratings will make very high-resolution spectroscopy (R > 100,000) feasible with compact instruments for implementation on large telescopes. Silicon grisms will offer an efficient way to implement low-cost medium to high resolution IR spectroscopy (R ~ 1000-50000) through the conversion of existing cameras into spectrometers by locating a grism in the instrument's pupil location.

  2. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall,G.E.; Sears, T.J.

    2009-04-03

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. High-resolution spectroscopy, augmented by theoretical and computational methods, is used to investigate the structure and collision dynamics of chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry. Applications and methods development are equally important experimental components of this work.

  3. Analytical Applications Of High-Resolution Molecular Fluorescence Spectroscopy In Low Temperature Solid Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstraat, Johannes W.; van Zeijl, W. J.; Smedes, F.; Ariese, Freek; Gooijer, Cees; Velthorst, Nel H.; Locher, R.; Renn, Alois; Wild, Urs P.

    1989-05-01

    High-resolution fluorescence spectroscopy may be used to obtain highly specific, vibrationally resolved spectral signatures of molecules. Two techniques are presented that both make use of low temperature, solid matrices. In Shpol'skii spectroscopy highly resolved spectra are obtained by employing n-alkanes as solvents that form neat crystalline matrices at low temperatures in which the guest molecules occupy well defined substitutional sites. Fluorescence line-narrowing spectroscopy is based on the application of selective (mostly laser-) excitation of the guest molecules. Principles and analytical applications of both techniques will be discussed. Specific attention will be paid to the determination of pyrene in bird meat by means of Shpol'skii spectroscopy and to the possibilities of applying two-dimensional fluorescence line-narrowing spectroscopy.

  4. Elemental electron energy loss mapping of a precipitate in a multi-component aluminium alloy.

    PubMed

    Mørtsell, Eva A; Wenner, Sigurd; Longo, Paolo; Andersen, Sigmund J; Marioara, Calin D; Holmestad, Randi

    2016-07-01

    The elemental distribution of a precipitate cross section, situated in a lean Al-Mg-Si-Cu-Ag-Ge alloy, has been investigated in detail by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and aberration corrected high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). A correlative analysis of the EELS data is connected to the results and discussed in detail. The energy loss maps for all relevant elements were recorded simultaneously. The good spatial resolution allows elemental distribution to be evaluated, such as by correlation functions, in addition to being compared with the HAADF image. The fcc-Al lattice and the hexagonal Si-network within the precipitates were resolved by EELS. The combination of EELS and HAADF-STEM demonstrated that some atomic columns consist of mixed elements, a result that would be very uncertain based on one of the techniques alone. EELS elemental mapping combined with a correlative analysis have great potential for identification and quantification of small amounts of elements at the atomic scale.

  5. High-resolution heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR spectroscopy in magnetic fields with unknown spatial variations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Huang, Yuqing; Smith, Pieter E S; Wang, Kaiyu; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2014-05-01

    Heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy is an extremely powerful tool for determining the structures of organic molecules and is of particular significance in the structural analysis of proteins. In order to leverage the method's potential for structural investigations, obtaining high-resolution NMR spectra is essential and this is generally accomplished by using very homogeneous magnetic fields. However, there are several situations where magnetic field distortions and thus line broadening is unavoidable, for example, the samples under investigation may be inherently heterogeneous, and the magnet's homogeneity may be poor. This line broadening can hinder resonance assignment or even render it impossible. We put forth a new class of pulse sequences for obtaining high-resolution heteronuclear spectra in magnetic fields with unknown spatial variations based on distant dipolar field modulations. This strategy's capabilities are demonstrated with the acquisition of high-resolution 2D gHSQC and gHMBC spectra. These sequences' performances are evaluated on the basis of their sensitivities and acquisition efficiencies. Moreover, we show that by encoding and decoding NMR observables spatially, as is done in ultrafast NMR, an extra dimension containing J-coupling information can be obtained without increasing the time necessary to acquire a heteronuclear correlation spectrum. Since the new sequences relax magnetic field homogeneity constraints imposed upon high-resolution NMR, they may be applied in portable NMR sensors and studies of heterogeneous chemical and biological materials.

  6. High-resolution monochromator for iron nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoda, Yoshitaka; Okada, Kyoko; Wang, Hongxin; Cramer, Stephen P.; Seto, Makoto

    2016-12-01

    A new high-resolution monochromator for 14.4-keV X-rays has been designed and developed for the Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy of biological samples. In addition to high resolution, higher flux and stability are especially important for measuring biological samples, because of the very weak signals produced due to the low concentrations of Fe-57. A 24% increase in flux while maintaining a high resolution better than 0.9 meV is achieved in the calculation by adopting an asymmetric reflection of Ge, which is used as the first crystal of the three-bounce high-resolution monochromator. A 20% increase of the exit beam size is acceptable to our biological applications. The higher throughput of the new design has been experimentally verified. A fine rotation mechanics that combines a weak-link hinge with a piezoelectric actuator was used for controlling the photon energy of the monochromatic beam. The resulting stability is sufficient to preserve the intrinsic resolution.

  7. Applications of High Resolution Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy for Atmospheric and Environmental Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roscioli, Joseph R.; McManus, J. Barry; Nelson, David; Zahniser, Mark; Herndon, Scott C.; Shorter, Joanne; Yacovitch, Tara I.; Jervis, Dylan; Dyroff, Christoph; Kolb, Charles E.

    2016-06-01

    For the past 20 years, high resolution infrared spectroscopy has served as a valuable tool to measure gas-phase concentrations of ambient gas samples. We review recent advances in atmospheric sampling using direct absorption high resolution mid-infrared spectroscopy from the perspective of light sources, detectors, and optical designs. Developments in diode, quantum cascade and interband cascade laser technology have led to thermoelectrically-cooled single-mode laser sources capable of operation between 800 wn and 3100 wn, with <10 MHz resolution and >10 mW power. Advances in detector and preamplifier technology have yielded thermoelectriocally-cooled sensors capable of room-temperature operation with extremely high detectivities. Finally, novel spectrometer optical designs have led to robust multipass absorption cells capable of >400 m effective pathlength in a compact package. In combination with accurate spectroscopic databases, these developments have afforded dramatic improvements in measurement sensitivity, accuracy, precision, and selectivity. We will present several examples of the applications of high resolution mid-IR spectrometers in real-world field measurements at sampling towers and aboard mobile platforms such as vehicles and airplanes.

  8. High resolution transmission spectroscopy as a diagnostic for Jovian exoplanet atmospheres: constraints from theoretical models

    SciTech Connect

    Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; Perna, Rosalba; Heng, Kevin

    2014-11-01

    We present high resolution transmission spectra of giant planet atmospheres from a coupled three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric dynamics and transmission spectrum model that includes Doppler shifts which arise from winds and planetary motion. We model Jovian planets covering more than two orders of magnitude in incident flux, corresponding to planets with 0.9-55 day orbital periods around solar-type stars. The results of our 3D dynamical models reveal certain aspects of high resolution transmission spectra that are not present in simple one-dimensional (1D) models. We find that the hottest planets experience strong substellar to anti-stellar (SSAS) winds, resulting in transmission spectra with net blueshifts of up to 3 km s{sup –1}, whereas less irradiated planets show almost no net Doppler shifts. We find only minor differences between transmission spectra for atmospheres with temperature inversions and those without. Compared to 1D models, peak line strengths are significantly reduced for the hottest atmospheres owing to Doppler broadening from a combination of rotation (which is faster for close-in planets under the assumption of tidal locking) and atmospheric winds. Finally, high resolution transmission spectra may be useful in studying the atmospheres of exoplanets with optically thick clouds since line cores for very strong transitions should remain optically thick to very high altitude. High resolution transmission spectra are an excellent observational test for the validity of 3D atmospheric dynamics models, because they provide a direct probe of wind structures and heat circulation. Ground-based exoplanet spectroscopy is currently on the verge of being able to verify some of our modeling predictions, most notably the dependence of SSAS winds on insolation. We caution that interpretation of high resolution transmission spectra based on 1D atmospheric models may be inadequate, as 3D atmospheric motions can produce a noticeable effect on the absorption

  9. High resolution coherent three dimensional spectroscopy of NO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Thresa A.; Muthike, Angelar K.; Robinson, Jessica E.; Chen, Peter C.

    2015-06-07

    Expansion from coherent 2D spectroscopy to coherent 3D spectroscopy can provide significant advantages when studying molecules that have heavily perturbed energy levels. This paper illustrates such advantages by demonstrating how high resolution coherent 3D (HRC3D) spectroscopy can be used to study a portion of the visible spectrum of nitrogen dioxide. High resolution coherent 2D spectra usually contain rotational and vibrational patterns that are easy to analyze, but severe congestion and complexity preclude its effective use for many parts of the NO{sub 2} spectrum. HRC3D spectroscopy appears to be much more effective; multidimensional rotational and vibrational patterns produced by this new technique are easy to identify even in the presence of strong perturbations. A method for assigning peaks, which is based upon analyzing the resulting multidimensional patterns, has been developed. The higher level of multidimensionality is useful for reducing uncertainty in peak assignments, improving spectral resolution, providing simultaneous information on multiple levels and states, and predicting, verifying, and categorizing peaks.

  10. Fast acquisition of high-resolution 2D NMR spectroscopy in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liangjie; Wei, Zhiliang; Zeng, Qing; Yang, Jian; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy plays an important role in chemical and biological analyses. In this study, we combine the J-coupling coherence transfer module with the echo-train acquisition technique for fast acquisition of high-resolution 2D NMR spectra in magnetic fields with unknown spatial variations. The proposed method shows satisfactory performance on a 5 mM ethyl 3-bromopropionate sample, under a 5-kHz (10 ppm at 11.7 T) B0 inhomogeneous field, as well as under varying degrees of pulse-flip-angle deviations. Moreover, a simulative ex situ NMR measurement is also conducted to show the effectiveness of the proposed pulse sequence.

  11. Performance of the AILES THz-Infrared beamline at SOLEIL for High resolution spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Rouzieres, Mathieu; Roy, Pascale; Manceron, Laurent; Pirali, Olivier; Balcon, Didier; Tchana, Fridolin Kwabia; Boudon, Vincent; Tudorie, M.; Huet, Therese; Cuisset, Arnaud

    2010-02-03

    The new THz beamline (AILES) located at the third generation Synchrotron Radiation source SOLEIL is now operating for applications in a wide variety of research themes. In particular, this source with its adapted optics allows high resolution spectroscopic measurements of molecules in the entire infrared and THz range. This presentation focuses on the performances concerning flux, spectral range and stability for molecular spectroscopy. Thanks to these performances, the coupling of synchrotron radiation from a highly stable third generation source with high resolution FTIR spectrometer and with a long path cell (150 m or more) can be particularly advantageous. This fact is related to the optics of the beamline permitting the entire source to be used without aperture stop (entrance iris), even for measurements at highest-resolution of approx0.1 mueV (10{sup -3} cm{sup -1}).

  12. High Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy of Molecules of Terrestrial and Planetary Interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Richard S.

    2001-01-01

    In collaboration with the laboratory spectroscopy group of the Ames Atmospheric Physics Research Branch (SGP), high resolution infrared spectra of molecules that are of importance for the dynamics of the earth's and other planets' atmospheres were acquired using the SGP high resolution Fourier transform spectrometer and gas handling apparatus. That data, along with data acquired using similar instrumentation at the Kitt Peak National Observatory was analyzed to determine the spectral parameters for each of the rotationally resolved transitions for each molecule. Those parameters were incorporated into existing international databases (e.g. HITRANS and GEISA) so that field measurements could be converted into quantitative information regarding the physical and chemical structures of earth and planetary atmospheres.

  13. High resolution energy loss research: Si compound ceramics and composites. [1990 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, R W; Lin, S H

    1990-12-31

    This report discusses proposed work on silicon compound ceramics and composites. High resolution composition and structure analysis of interfaces in ceramic and metal matrix composites and certain grain boundaries in silicon and its interfaces with oxides and nitrides is proposed. Composition and bonding analysis will be done with high spatial resolution (20 Angstroms or better) parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy using a field emission analytical electron microscope. Structural analysis will be done at the 1.8 Angstrom resolution level at 200kV by HREM. Theoretical electron energy loss cross section computations will be used to interpret electronic structure of these materials. Both self-consistent field MO and multiple scattering computational methods are being done and evaluated.

  14. Probing the Activity in High-Z ULIRGs: High Resolution Spectroscopy in Neon and Argon Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikola, Thomas; Farrah, Duncan; Hailey-Dunsheath, Steven; Higdon, Sarah; Stacey, Gordon

    2006-05-01

    We propose to investigate the nature of a sample of high luminosity infrared bright galaxies in the redshift range of 0.6 to 3 through complete IRS high resolution spectroscopy. Our sample focuses on systems that we will observe in March 2006 in their 158 micron [CII] line emission using Cornell's submm grating spectrometer, ZEUS on the CSO. The combined [CII] and Spitzer IRS spectroscopy will comprise the thesis work of Cornell student Steven Hailey-Dunsheath. The combined data sets will (1) Determine the hardness of the ambient interstellar radiation fields thereby tracing the most massive stars on the main sequence, or revealing the presence of an AGN. (2) Determine the total ionizing flux from stars, hence the relative importance of starformation to accretion in creating the IR luminosity of these sources. (3) Determine the strength of the ambient far-UV radiation fields, hence the physical sizes of the starforming regions. The sources proposed here are among the most distant, and most luminous sources known in the Universe. As such, they are heavily studied by many research groups. We propose deep IRS high resolution spectroscopy for these sources, for which we have built a scientific case coupled to research going on in our group at Cornell. It is clear that the spectra that we obtain will be invaluable for many other science programs including future programs involving Herschel, and JWST. We therefore welcome and encourage collaborations.

  15. High resolution λ spectroscopy in Jefferson Laboratory via (e,e'K^+) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baturin, Pavlo

    2010-02-01

    The E01-011* (HKS) experiment was conducted in the Fall 2005 at Jefferson Laboratory, Hall-C. It employed a 1.8 GeV, high intensity, quasi-continuous electron beam to produce high resolution spectroscopy of exotic neutron rich λ hypernuclei via associated K electroproduction mechanism, ^AZ(e,e'K^+)^A(Z-1)λ. The experiment utilized ^6,7Li, ^9Be, ^10B, ^28Si targets for spectroscopy analysis and ^51V, ^89Y, ^208Pb targets for rate studies. The newly introduced tilt method of the electron spectrometer (ENGE) in combination with a brand new high resolution hadron spectrometer (HKS) significantly increased kaon yield and reduced the background rates associated with Bremsstrahlung and Moller scattering. Such kinematics together with the low momentum transfer to λ and a forward angle of recoil electrons, allowed achieving high kaon rates, comparable with mesonic reactions. It also resulted in energy resolution of approximately 400-500 keV (FWHM), an unprecedented value in hypernuclear reaction spectroscopy. This presentation will give a general description of the experiment and will show preliminary results. * This work was in part supported by DoE ER41047 & ER41065 and MEXT, Japan. )

  16. High-resolution pulsed-field ionization photoelectron spectroscopy using multi-bunch synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.W.; Evans, M.; Ng, C.Y.; Heimann, P.

    1997-04-01

    BL9.0.2.2 is the newly constructed experimental End Station 2 at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline 9.0.2 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS). It is dedicated to the high resolution photoionization study of molecules of interest to atmospheric and combustion chemistry. This End Station is equipped with a high resolution scanning monochromator, which has been demonstrated to have a world record resolution of E/{delta}E=70,000. Taking the advantage of the high resolution ALS light, the authors have improved the energy resolution in threshold photoelectron spectroscopy (TPES) to 0.8 meV. The TPES is a popular technique for photoionization experiments at all synchrotron radiation facilities due to its high energy resolution as compared to that of traditional photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). TPES achieves higher energy resolution by preferentially detecting near zero kinetic energy photoelectrons resulting from threshold photoionization. However, the spectra obtained from the TPES technique generally are complicated by the simultaneous detection of electrons with nonzero kinetic energy, which are not fully discriminated against. On the other hand, the spectra obtained from pulsed field ionization photoelectron spectroscopy (PFI-PES) are completely free of the contamination from kinetic electrons. The PFI-PE technique basically involves the detection of the photoelectrons from field ionization of the very high-n Rydberg states, a few cm{sup {minus}1} below the ionization energy (IE), by applying a delayed pulsed electric field. Within a delay of a few microseconds, all the prompt electrons formed from direct ionization will escape from the photoionization region and will not be collected. The authors have recently overcome problems with energy resolution of an electron time-of-flight technique, and incorporated the PFI-PE technique with multi-bunch VUV synchrotron radiation.

  17. Negative electron energy loss and second-harmonic emission of nonlinear nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinying; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2011-11-07

    A fast and general technique to investigation the interaction between a fast electron and nonlinear materials consisting of centrosymmetric spheres is presented by means of multiple scattering of electromagnetic multipole fields. Two kinds of new effect, the negative electron energy loss caused by the second-harmonic field and the second-harmonic Smith-Purcell radiation using finite chain of nonlinear spheres, are predicted for the first time. It is shown that these new effects can be probed by the electron energy loss spectrum, suggesting their possible applications in tunable light sources for the second-harmonic generation.

  18. Mobile high resolution xenon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the earth's magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Appelt, Stephan; Häsing, F Wolfgang; Kühn, Holger; Perlo, Juan; Blümich, Bernhard

    2005-05-20

    Conventional high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra are usually measured in homogeneous, high magnetic fields (>1 T), which are produced by expensive and immobile superconducting magnets. We show that chemically resolved xenon (Xe) NMR spectroscopy of liquid samples can be measured in the Earth's magnetic field (5 x 10(-5) T) with a continuous flow of hyperpolarized Xe gas. It was found that the measured normalized Xe frequency shifts are significantly modified by the Xe polarization density, which causes different dipolar magnetic fields in the liquid and in the gas phases.

  19. High-Resolution Spectroscopy with the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    ScienceCinema

    Canizares, Claude R. [MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2016-07-12

    The capabilities of the Chandra X-ray Observatory and XMM-Newton for high-resolution spectroscopy have brought tradition plasma diagnostic techniques to the study of cosmic plasma. Observations have probed nearly every class of astronomical object, from young proto-starts through massive O starts and black hole binaries, supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei, and the intergalactic medium. Many of these sources show remarkable rich spectra that reveal new physical information, such as emission measure distributions, elemental abundances, accretion disk and wind signatures, and time variability. This talk will present an overview of the Chandra instrumentaton and selected examples of spectral observations of astrophysical and cosmological importance.

  20. High resolution optical spectroscopy of air-induced electrical instabilities in n-type polymer semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Riccardo; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2012-07-03

    We use high-resolution charge-accumulation optical spectroscopy to measure charge accumulation in the channel of an n-type organic field-effect transistor. We monitor the degradation of device performance in air, correlate the onset voltage shift with the reduction of charge accumulated in the polymer semiconductor, and explain the results in view of the redox reaction between the polymer, water and oxygen in the accumulation layer. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Electronic excitation of carbonyl sulphide (COS) by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption and electron-impact spectroscopy in the energy region from 4 to 11 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Limão-Vieira, P.; Ferreira da Silva, F.; Almeida, D.; Hoshino, M.; Tanaka, H.; Mogi, D.; Tanioka, T.; Mason, N. J.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J.

    2015-02-14

    The electronic state spectroscopy of carbonyl sulphide, COS, has been investigated using high resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy in the energy range of 4.0–10.8 eV. The spectrum reveals several new features not previously reported in the literature. Vibronic structure has been observed, notably in the low energy absorption dipole forbidden band assigned to the (4π←3π) ({sup 1}Δ←{sup 1}Σ{sup +}) transition, with a new weak transition assigned to ({sup 1}Σ{sup −}←{sup 1}Σ{sup +}) reported here for the first time. The absolute optical oscillator strengths are determined for ground state to {sup 1}Σ{sup +} and {sup 1}Π transitions. Based on our recent measurements of differential cross sections for the optically allowed ({sup 1}Σ{sup +} and {sup 1}Π) transitions of COS by electron impact, the optical oscillator strength f{sub 0} value and integral cross sections (ICSs) are derived by applying a generalized oscillator strength analysis. Subsequently, ICSs predicted by the scaling are confirmed down to 60 eV in the intermediate energy region. The measured absolute photoabsorption cross sections have been used to calculate the photolysis lifetime of carbonyl sulphide in the upper stratosphere (20–50 km)

  2. Electronic excitation of carbonyl sulphide (COS) by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption and electron-impact spectroscopy in the energy region from 4 to 11 eV.

    PubMed

    Limão-Vieira, P; Ferreira da Silva, F; Almeida, D; Hoshino, M; Tanaka, H; Mogi, D; Tanioka, T; Mason, N J; Hoffmann, S V; Hubin-Franskin, M-J; Delwiche, J

    2015-02-14

    The electronic state spectroscopy of carbonyl sulphide, COS, has been investigated using high resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy in the energy range of 4.0-10.8 eV. The spectrum reveals several new features not previously reported in the literature. Vibronic structure has been observed, notably in the low energy absorption dipole forbidden band assigned to the (4π←3π) ((1)Δ←(1)Σ(+)) transition, with a new weak transition assigned to ((1)Σ(-)←(1)Σ(+)) reported here for the first time. The absolute optical oscillator strengths are determined for ground state to (1)Σ(+) and (1)Π transitions. Based on our recent measurements of differential cross sections for the optically allowed ((1)Σ(+) and (1)Π) transitions of COS by electron impact, the optical oscillator strength f0 value and integral cross sections (ICSs) are derived by applying a generalized oscillator strength analysis. Subsequently, ICSs predicted by the scaling are confirmed down to 60 eV in the intermediate energy region. The measured absolute photoabsorption cross sections have been used to calculate the photolysis lifetime of carbonyl sulphide in the upper stratosphere (20-50 km).

  3. A Framework to Combine Low- and High-resolution Spectroscopy for the Atmospheres of Transiting Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogi, M.; Line, M.; Bean, J.; Désert, J.-M.; Schwarz, H.

    2017-04-01

    Current observations of the atmospheres of close-in exoplanets are predominantly obtained with two techniques: low-resolution spectroscopy with space telescopes and high-resolution spectroscopy from the ground. Although the observables delivered by the two methods are in principle highly complementary, no attempt has ever been made to combine them, perhaps due to the different modeling approaches that are typically used in their interpretation. Here, we present the first combined analysis of previously published dayside spectra of the exoplanet HD 209458 b obtained at low resolution with HST/Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and Spitzer/IRAC and at high resolution with VLT/CRIRES. By utilizing a novel retrieval algorithm capable of computing the joint probability distribution of low- and high-resolution spectra, we obtain tight constraints on the chemical composition of the planet’s atmosphere. In contrast to the WFC3 data, we do not confidently detect H2O at high spectral resolution. The retrieved water abundance from the combined analysis deviates by 1.9σ from the expectations for a solar-composition atmosphere in chemical equilibrium. Measured relative molecular abundances of CO and H2O strongly favor an oxygen-rich atmosphere (C/O < 1 at 3.5σ ) for the planet when compared to equilibrium calculations including O rainout. From the abundances of the seven molecular species included in this study we constrain the planet metallicity to 0.1–1.0× the stellar value (1σ). This study opens the way to coordinated exoplanet surveys between the flagship ground- and space-based facilities, which ultimately will be crucial for characterizing potentially habitable planets.

  4. High resolution photoelectron spectroscopy and femtosecond intramolecular dynamics using supersonic molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, B.

    1992-09-01

    High resolution He I[alpha] photoelectron spectroscopy of formaldehyde and ketene and their deuterated compounds, are reported. The combination of a (H2CO) double-pass high-resolution electron-energy analyzer and effective rotational cooling of the sample by supersonic expansion enable the spectroscopy of these molecular cations. The vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated from the high-resolution photoelectron spectra, shedding light on the ultrafast intramolecular dynamics of the molecular cations. This study reveals much more vibrational structural detail in the first electronic excited state of H2CO cations. The first electronic excited state of H2CO cations may have nonplanar equilibrium geometry. Strong isotope effects on vibronic (vibrational) coupling are observed in the second electronic excited state of H2CO. Vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated for all four observed electronic states of H2CO. The correlation function of the first electronic excited state of H2CO shows a slow decay rate on the femtosecond time scale. The ultrafast decay of the H2CO cations in the third electronic excited state implies that dissociation and intramolecular processes are the main decay pathways. The present spectra of the ground states of ketene cations have more fine structure than before. The AIEs of the first and fifth excited states are determined unambiguously more accurately. The doublet-like fine structures present in the lint excited state of ketene implies the excitation of a soft'' mode not observed before. The vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated for 4 of the 6 observed electronic states. The dynamics of the ground states of the cations are characterized by a wave packet oscillating with small amplitude around the minimum on the upper PES. The decay dynamics of the first and the fifth excited states of ketene are characterized by ultra-fast intramolecular processes like predissociation.

  5. High resolution photoelectron spectroscopy and femtosecond intramolecular dynamics using supersonic molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, B.

    1992-09-01

    High resolution He I{alpha} photoelectron spectroscopy of formaldehyde and ketene and their deuterated compounds, are reported. The combination of a (H2CO) double-pass high-resolution electron-energy analyzer and effective rotational cooling of the sample by supersonic expansion enable the spectroscopy of these molecular cations. The vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated from the high-resolution photoelectron spectra, shedding light on the ultrafast intramolecular dynamics of the molecular cations. This study reveals much more vibrational structural detail in the first electronic excited state of H2CO cations. The first electronic excited state of H2CO cations may have nonplanar equilibrium geometry. Strong isotope effects on vibronic (vibrational) coupling are observed in the second electronic excited state of H2CO. Vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated for all four observed electronic states of H2CO. The correlation function of the first electronic excited state of H2CO shows a slow decay rate on the femtosecond time scale. The ultrafast decay of the H2CO cations in the third electronic excited state implies that dissociation and intramolecular processes are the main decay pathways. The present spectra of the ground states of ketene cations have more fine structure than before. The AIEs of the first and fifth excited states are determined unambiguously more accurately. The doublet-like fine structures present in the lint excited state of ketene implies the excitation of a ``soft`` mode not observed before. The vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated for 4 of the 6 observed electronic states. The dynamics of the ground states of the cations are characterized by a wave packet oscillating with small amplitude around the minimum on the upper PES. The decay dynamics of the first and the fifth excited states of ketene are characterized by ultra-fast intramolecular processes like predissociation.

  6. High-resolution multi-heterodyne spectroscopy based on Fabry-Perot quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yin; Wang, Wen; Wysocki, Gerard; Soskind, Michael G.

    2014-01-20

    In this Letter, we present a method of performing broadband mid-infrared spectroscopy with conventional, free-running, continuous wave Fabry-Perot quantum cascade lasers (FP-QCLs). The measurement method is based on multi-heterodyne down-conversion of optical signals. The sample transmission spectrum probed by one multi-mode FP-QCL is down-converted to the radio-frequency domain through an optical multi-heterodyne process using a second FP-QCL as the local oscillator. Both a broadband multi-mode spectral measurement as well as high-resolution (∼15 MHz) spectroscopy of molecular absorption are demonstrated and show great potential for development of high performance FP-laser-based spectrometers for chemical sensing.

  7. High resolution Halpha spectroscopy and R-band photometry of Swift J1357.2-0933

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casares, Jorge; Torres, Manuel A. P.; Negueruela, Ignacio; Gonzalez-Fernandez, Carlos; Corral-Santana, Jesus M.; Zurita, Cristina; Llano, Sergio Rodriguez

    2011-03-01

    We report on high resolution Halpha spectroscopy and time-resolved photometry of the optical counterpart to the X-ray transient Swift J1357.2-0933 in outburst (Krimm et al. ATEL #3138). SPECTROSCOPY: Six 30-33 min spectra were obtained on the nights of 2011 Feb 25-27 using the IDS Spectrograph on the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) at the Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos. The observations were performed with the H1800V grating and a slit width 1.6 arcsec to yield a spectral coverage of 6270-7000 Angs with a 30 km/s FWHM spectral resolution at Halpha..

  8. Automatic pole-zero/zero-pole digital compensator for high-resolution spectroscopy: Design and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Geraci, A.; Pullia, A.; Ripamonti, G.

    1999-08-01

    In a high-resolution spectroscopy system the relatively long exponential decay due to the charge preamplifier is customarily canceled in an analogue fashion by means of a PZ (Pole-Zero) stage. The accurateness of such a compensation has a big impact on the energy resolution because it strongly affects the baseline-stability problems. The authors have automatically and on-line performed such a compensation in a digital way, while maintaining a spectroscopy performance and keeping at minimum both the ADC sampling frequency (thus power consumption) and its resolution (thus cost). This is done through an IIR filter, implemented within a FPGA by a DSP. The so-compensated waveform has, in excellent approximation, an all-pole shape. Starting from such a signal, the minimum-noise filters for energy and/or time measurements are then promptly synthesized and implemented for real time operation through the same DSP.

  9. Photodissociation of ozone at 276nm by photofragment imaging and high resolution photofragment translational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Blunt, D.A.; Suits, A.G.

    1996-11-01

    The photodissociation of ozone at 276 nm is investigated using both state resolved ion imaging and high-resolution photofragment translational spectroscopy. Ion images from both [3+1] and [2+1] resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization of the O({sup 1}D) photofragment are reported. All images show strong evidence of O({sup 1}D) orbital alignment. Photofragment translation spectroscopy time-of-flight spectra are reported for the O{sub 2} ({sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}) photofragment. Total kinetic energy release distributions determined form these spectra are generally consistent with those distributions determined from imaging data. Observed angular distributions are reported for both detection methods, pointing to some unresolved questions for ozone dissociation in this wavelength region.

  10. High-resolution structure of the photosynthetic Mn4Ca catalyst from X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yano, Junko; Kern, Jan; Pushkar, Yulia; Sauer, Kenneth; Glatzel, Pieter; Bergmann, Uwe; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yachandra, Vittal K

    2008-03-27

    The application of high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy methods to study the photosynthetic water oxidizing complex, which contains a unique hetero-nuclear catalytic Mn4Ca cluster, is described. Issues of X-ray damage, especially at the metal sites in the Mn4Ca cluster, are discussed. The structure of the Mn4Ca catalyst at high resolution, which has so far eluded attempts of determination by X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and other spectroscopic techniques, has been addressed using polarized EXAFS techniques applied to oriented photosystem II (PSII) membrane preparations and PSII single crystals. A review of how the resolution of traditional EXAFS techniques can be improved, using methods such as range-extended EXAFS, is presented, and the changes that occur in the structure of the cluster as it advances through the catalytic cycle are described. X-ray absorption and emission techniques (XANES and Kbeta emission) have been used earlier to determine the oxidation states of the Mn4Ca cluster, and in this report we review the use of X-ray resonant Raman spectroscopy to understand the electronic structure of the Mn4Ca cluster as it cycles through the intermediate S-states.

  11. High-Resolution Structure of the Photosynthetic Mn4Ca Catalyst from X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko; Kern, Jan; Pushkar, Yulia; Sauer, Kenneth; Glatzel, Pieter; Bergmann, Uwe; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2007-08-01

    The application of high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy methods to study the photosynthetic water oxidizing complex, which contains a unique hetero-nuclear catalytic Mn4Ca cluster, are described. Issues of X-ray damage especially at the metal sites in the Mn4Ca cluster are discussed. The structure of the Mn4Ca catalyst at high-resolution which has so far eluded attempts of determination by X-ray diffraction, EXAFS and other spectroscopic techniques has been addressed using polarized EXAFS techniques applied to oriented PS II membrane preparations and PS II single crystals. A review of how the resolution of traditional EXAFS techniques can be improved, using methods such as range-extended EXAFS is presented, and the changes that occur in the structure of the cluster as it advances through the catalytic cycle are described. X-ray absorption and emission techniques (XANES and K? emission) have been used earlier to determine the oxidation states of the Mn4Ca cluster, and in this report we review the use of X-ray resonant Raman spectroscopy to understand the electronic structure of the Mn4Ca cluster as it cycles through the intermediate S-states.

  12. High-resolution laser spectroscopy with the Collinear Resonance Ionisation Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at CERN-ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocolios, T. E.; de Groote, R. P.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Budinčević, I.; Day Goodacre, T.; Farooq-Smith, G. J.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Flanagan, K. T.; Franchoo, S.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Gins, W.; Heylen, H.; Kron, T.; Li, R.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Neyens, G.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Smith, A. J.; Stroke, H. H.; Wendt, K. D. A.; Wilkins, S. G.; Yang, X.

    2016-06-01

    The Collinear Resonance Ionisation Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at CERN has achieved high-resolution resonance ionisation laser spectroscopy with a full width at half maximum linewidth of 20(1) MHz for 219,221 Fr, and has measured isotopes as short lived as 5 ms with 214 Fr. This development allows for greater precision in the study of hyperfine structures and isotope shifts, as well as a higher selectivity of single-isotope, even single-isomer, beams. These achievements are linked with the development of a new laser laboratory and new data-acquisition systems.

  13. Transfer-printing of single DNA molecule arrays on graphene for high resolution electron imaging and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cerf, Aline; Alava, Thomas; Barton, Robert A.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2011-01-01

    Graphene represents the ultimate substrate for high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, but the deposition of biological samples on this highly hydrophobic material has until now been a challenge. We present a reliable method for depositing ordered arrays of individual elongated DNA molecules on single-layer graphene substrates for high resolution electron beam imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis. This method is a necessary step towards the observation of single elongated DNA molecules with single base spatial resolution to directly read genetic and epigenetic information. PMID:21919532

  14. A coupled effect of nuclear and electronic energy loss on ion irradiation damage in lithium niobate

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yanwen; Xue, Haizhou; ...

    2016-01-09

    Understanding irradiation effects induced by elastic energy loss to atomic nuclei and inelastic energy loss to electrons in a crystal, as well as the coupled effect between them, is a scientific challenge. Damage evolution in LiNbO3 irradiated by 0.9 and 21 MeV Si ions at 300 K has been studied utilizing Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling mode. During the low-energy ion irradiation process, damage accumulation produced due to elastic collisions is described utilizing a disorder accumulation model. Moreover, low electronic energy loss is shown to induce observable damage that increases with ion fluence. For the same electronic energy loss, themore » velocity of the incident ion could affect the energy and spatial distribution of excited electrons, and therefore effectively modify the diameter of the ion track. Furthermore, nonlinear additive phenomenon of irradiation damage induced by high electronic energy loss in pre-damaged LiNbO3 has been observed. The result indicates that pre-existing damage induced from nuclear energy loss interacts synergistically with inelastic electronic energy loss to promote the formation of amorphous tracks and lead to rapid phase transformation, much more efficient than what is observed in pristine crystal solely induced by electronic energy loss. As a result, this synergistic effect is attributed to the fundamental mechanism that the defects produced by the elastic collisions result in a decrease in thermal conductivity, increase in the electron-phonon coupling, and further lead to higher intensity in thermal spike from intense electronic energy deposition along high-energy ion trajectory.« less

  15. A coupled effect of nuclear and electronic energy loss on ion irradiation damage in lithium niobate

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yanwen; Xue, Haizhou; Jin, Ke; Crespillo, Miguel L.; Wang, Xuelin; Weber, William J.

    2016-01-09

    Understanding irradiation effects induced by elastic energy loss to atomic nuclei and inelastic energy loss to electrons in a crystal, as well as the coupled effect between them, is a scientific challenge. Damage evolution in LiNbO3 irradiated by 0.9 and 21 MeV Si ions at 300 K has been studied utilizing Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling mode. During the low-energy ion irradiation process, damage accumulation produced due to elastic collisions is described utilizing a disorder accumulation model. Moreover, low electronic energy loss is shown to induce observable damage that increases with ion fluence. For the same electronic energy loss, the velocity of the incident ion could affect the energy and spatial distribution of excited electrons, and therefore effectively modify the diameter of the ion track. Furthermore, nonlinear additive phenomenon of irradiation damage induced by high electronic energy loss in pre-damaged LiNbO3 has been observed. The result indicates that pre-existing damage induced from nuclear energy loss interacts synergistically with inelastic electronic energy loss to promote the formation of amorphous tracks and lead to rapid phase transformation, much more efficient than what is observed in pristine crystal solely induced by electronic energy loss. As a result, this synergistic effect is attributed to the fundamental mechanism that the defects produced by the elastic collisions result in a decrease in thermal conductivity, increase in the electron-phonon coupling, and further lead to higher intensity in thermal spike from intense electronic energy deposition along high-energy ion trajectory.

  16. High resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy for 3D spin vectorial analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, Taichi; Miyamoto, Koji; Kimura, Akio; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki

    2013-03-01

    Spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (SARPES) is the excellent tool which can directly observe the band structure of crystals with separating spin-up and -down states. Recent findings of new class of materials possessing strong spin orbit interaction such as Rashba spin splitting systems or topological insulators stimulate to develop new SARPES apparatuses and many sophisticated techniques have been reported recently. Here we report our newly developed a SARPES apparatus for spin vectorial analysis with high precision at Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center. Highly efficient spin polarimeter utilizing very low energy electron diffraction (VLEED) makes high resolution (ΔE < 10 meV, Δθ ~ +/- 0.2 °) compatible with the SARPES measurement. By placing two VLEED spin detectors orthogonally we have realized the polarization measurement of all spin components (x, y and z) with the high resolution. Some examples of the three-dimensional spin observation will be presented. This work is supported by KAKENHI (23244066), Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (A) of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

  17. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of four active galaxies - Probing the intercloud medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, Kenneth S. K.; Canizares, Claude R.; Markert, Thomas H.; Arnaud, Keith A.

    1990-01-01

    The focal plane crystal spectrometer (FPCS) on the Einstein Observatory has been used to perform a high-resolution spectroscopic search for oxygen X-ray line emission from four active galaxies: Fairall 9, Mrk 421, Mrk 501, and PKS 0548 - 322. Specifically, O VIII Ly-alpha and Ly-beta, whose unredshifted energies are 653 and 775 eV, respectively, were sought. No narrow-line emission was detected within the energy bands searched. Upper limits are calculated on the line flux from these sources of 30 eV equivalent width and use a photoionization model to place corresponding upper limits on the densities of diffuse gas surrounding the active nuclei. The upper limits on gas density range from about 0.02-50/cu cm and probe various radial distances from the central source. This is the first time high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy has been used to place constraints on the intercloud medium in active galaxies.

  18. High-resolution absorptive intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence NMR spectroscopy under inhomogeneous fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Meijin; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Xi; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence (iMQC) is capable of improving NMR spectral resolution using a 2D shearing manipulation method. A pulse sequence termed CT-iDH, which combines intermolecular double-quantum filter (iDQF) with a modified constant-time (CT) scheme, is designed to achieve fast acquisition of high-resolution intermolecular zero-quantum coherences (iZQCs) and intermolecular double-quantum coherences (iDQCs) spectra without strong coupling artifacts. Furthermore, double-absorption lineshapes are first realized in 2D intermolecular multi-quantum coherences (iMQCs) spectra under inhomogeneous fields through a combination of iZQC and iDQC signals to double the resolution without loss of sensitivity. Theoretically the spectral linewidth can be further reduced by half compared to original iMQC high-resolution spectra. Several experiments were performed to test the feasibility of the new method and the improvements are evaluated quantitatively. The study suggests potential applications for in vivo spectroscopy.

  19. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of four active galaxies - Probing the intercloud medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lum, Kenneth S. K.; Canizares, Claude R.; Markert, Thomas H.; Arnaud, Keith A.

    1990-07-01

    The focal plane crystal spectrometer (FPCS) on the Einstein Observatory has been used to perform a high-resolution spectroscopic search for oxygen X-ray line emission from four active galaxies: Fairall 9, Mrk 421, Mrk 501, and PKS 0548 - 322. Specifically, O VIII Ly-alpha and Ly-beta, whose unredshifted energies are 653 and 775 eV, respectively, were sought. No narrow-line emission was detected within the energy bands searched. Upper limits are calculated on the line flux from these sources of 30 eV equivalent width and use a photoionization model to place corresponding upper limits on the densities of diffuse gas surrounding the active nuclei. The upper limits on gas density range from about 0.02-50/cu cm and probe various radial distances from the central source. This is the first time high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy has been used to place constraints on the intercloud medium in active galaxies.

  20. Diamond-machined ZnSe immersion grating for NIR high-resolution spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Y; Kobayashi, N; Kuzmenko, P J; Little, S L; Yasui, C; Kondo, S; Minami, A; Motohara, K

    2008-07-25

    ZnSe immersion gratings (n {approx} 2.45) provide the possibility of high-resolution spectroscopy for the near-infrared (NIR) region. Since ZnSe has a lower internal attenuation than other NIR materials, it is most suitable for immersion grating, particularly in short NIR region (0.8-1.4 {micro}m). We are developing an extremely high-resolution spectrograph with {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} = 100,000, WINERED, customized for the short NIR region, using ZnSe (or ZnS) immersion grating. However, it had been very difficult to make fine grooves on ZnSe substrate with a small pitch of less than 50 {micro}m because ZnSe is a soft/brittle material. We have overcome this problem and successfully machined sharp grooves with fine pitch on ZnSe substrates by nano precision fly-cutting technique at LLNL. The optical testing of the sample grating with HeNe laser shows an excellent performance: the relative efficiency more than 87.4 % at 0.633 {micro}m for a classical grating configuration. The diffraction efficiency when used as an immersion grating is estimated to be more than 65 % at 1 {micro}m. Following this progress, we are about to start machining a grating on a large ZnSe prism with an entrance aperture of 23mm x 50mm and the blaze angle of 70{sup o}.

  1. Fragmentation and conformation study of ephedrine by low- and high-resolution mass selective UV spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chervenkov, S.; Wang, P. Q.; Braun, J. E.; Neusser, H. J.

    2004-10-01

    The neurotransmitter molecule, ephedrine, has been studied by mass-selective low- and high-resolution UV resonance enhanced two-photon ionization spectroscopy. Under all experimental conditions we observed an efficient fragmentation upon ionization. The detected vibronic peaks in the spectrum are classified according to the efficiency of the fragmentation, which leads to the conclusion that there exist three different species in the molecular beam: ephedrine-water cluster and two distinct conformers. The two-color two-photon ionization experiment with a decreased energy of the second photon leads to an upper limit of 8.3 eV for the ionization energy of ephedrine. The high-resolution (70 MHz) spectrum of the strongest vibronic peak in the spectrum measured at the fragment (m/z=58) mass channel displays a pronounced and rich rotational structure. Its analysis by the use of a specially designed computer-aided rotational fit process yields accurate rotational constants for the S0 and S1 states and the transition moment ratio, providing information on the respective conformational structure.

  2. Impact of potassium doping on the electronic structure of tetracene and pentacene: An electron energy-loss study

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Friedrich

    2015-10-21

    We report the doping induced changes of the electronic structure of tetracene and pentacene probed by electron energy-loss spectroscopy in transmission. A comparison between the dynamic response of undoped and potassium-intercalated tetracene and pentacene emphasizes the appearance of a new excitation feature in the former gap upon potassium addition. Interestingly, the momentum dependency of this new excitation shows a negative dispersion. Moreover, the analysis of the C 1s and K 2p core-level excitation results in a significantly lower doping level compared to potassium doped picene, a recently discovered superconductor. Therefore, the present electronic structure investigations open a new pathway to better understand the exceptional differences between acenes and phenacene and their divergent behavior upon alkali doping.

  3. Determining the Grain Composition of the Interstellar Medium with High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Julia C.; Ravel, B.

    2005-04-01

    We investigate the ability of high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy to directly probe the grain composition of the interstellar medium. Using iron K-edge experimental data of likely ISM dust candidates taken at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, we explore the prospects for determining the chemical composition of astrophysical dust and discuss a technique for doing so. Focusing on the capabilities of the Astro-E2 XRS microcalorimeters, we assess the limiting effects of spectral resolution and noise for detecting significant X-ray absorption fine structure signal in astrophysical environments containing dust. We find that given sufficient signal, the resolution of the XRS will allow us to definitively distinguish gas-phase from dust-phase absorption and certain chemical compositions.

  4. High-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of sulfidation of brass at the rubber/brass interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Kenichi; Kakubo, Takashi; Shimizu, Katsunori; Amino, Naoya; Mase, Kazuhiko; Komatsu, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    High resolution photoelectron spectroscopy is utilized to investigate the chemical composition at the rubber/brass interface to elucidate the origin of strong adhesion as well as the degradation between rubber and brass. Special attention has been given to copper sulfides formed at the interface during the vulcanization reaction at 170 °C. At least five sulfur-containing species are identified in the adhesive interlayer including crystalline CuS and amorphous CuxS (x ≃ 2). These copper sulfide species are not uniformly distributed within the layer, but there exits the concentration gradation; the concentration of CuxS is high in the region on the rubber side and is diminished in the deeper region, while vice versa for that of CuS. Degradation of the interface adhesive strength by prolonged vulcanization arises from the decrease in the CuxS/CuS ratio accompanying desulfurization of the adhesive layer.

  5. High resolution EUV spectroscopy of xenon ions with a compact electron beam ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Safdar; Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2017-09-01

    We performed high resolution extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectroscopy measurements of highly charged xenon ions with a compact electron beam ion trap. The spectra were recorded with a flat-field grazing incidence spectrometer while varying the electron beam energy between 200 and 890 eV. We measured the wavelengths for several lines of Rh-like Xe9+ - Cd-like Xe6+ and Cu-like Xe25+- Se-like Xe20+ in the range of 150-200 Å with an uncertainty of 0.05 Å. Previously, most of these lines have been reported from EBITs with a wavelength uncertainty of 0.2 Å. Additionally, based on the electron beam energy dependence of the observed spectra we tentatively identified three new lines, which were reported as unidentified lines in the previous studies.

  6. Superconducting Detector System for High-Resolution Energy-Dispersive Soft X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Niedermayr, T; Drury, O; Funk, T; Frank, M; Labov, S E; Cramer, S

    2001-02-21

    Synchrotron-based soft x-ray spectroscopy is often limited by detector performance. Grating spectrometers have the resolution, but lack the efficiency for the analysis of dilute samples. Semiconducting Si(Li) or Ge detectors are efficient, but often lack the resolution to separate weak signals from strong nearby lines in multi-element samples. Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) operated at temperatures below 1 K can be used as high-resolution high-efficiency x-ray detectors. They combine high energy resolution around 10 eV FWHM with the broad band efficiency of energy-dispersive detectors. We have designed a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to operate STJ detectors in x-ray fluorescence measurements at beam line 4 of the ALS. We demonstrate the capabilities of such a detector system for fluorescence analysis of dilute metal sites in proteins and inorganic model compounds.

  7. High resolution laser induced fluorescence Doppler velocimetry utilizing saturated absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Ogiwara, Kohei; Etoh, Shuzo; Yoshimura, Shinji; Tanaka, Masayoshi Y.

    2009-05-15

    A high resolution laser induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been developed to measure the flow velocity field of neutral particles in an electron-cyclotron-resonance argon plasma. The flow velocity has been determined by the Doppler shift of the LIF spectrum, which is proportional to the velocity distribution function. Very high accuracy in velocity determination has been achieved by installing a saturated absorption spectroscopy unit into the LIF system, where the absolute value and scale of laser wavelength are determined by using the Lamb dip and the fringes of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The minimum detectable flow velocity of a newly developed LIF system is {+-}2 m/s, and this performance remains unchanged in a long-time experiment. From the radial measurements of LIF spectra of argon metastable atoms, it is found that there exists an inward flow of neutral particles associated with neutral depletion.

  8. Low energy nuclear spin excitations in Ho metal investigated by high resolution neutron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chatterji, Tapan; Jalarvo, Niina

    2013-04-17

    We have investigated the low energy excitations in metallic Ho by high resolution neutron spectroscopy. We found at T = 3 K clear inelastic peaks in the energy loss and energy gain sides, along with the central elastic peak. The energy of this low energy excitation, which is 26.59 ± 0.02 μeV at T = 3 K, decreased continuously and became zero at TN ≈ 130 K. By fitting the data in the temperature range 100-127.5 K with a power law we obtained the power-law exponent β = 0.37 ± 0.02, which agrees with the expected value β = 0.367 for a three-dimensional Heisenberg model. Thus the energy of the low energy excitations can be associated with the order parameter.

  9. Multiple Populations in M31 Globular Clusters: Clues from Infrared High Resolution Integrated Light Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakari, Charli; APOGEE Team

    2017-01-01

    Abundance variations are a common feature of Milky Way globular clusters. The globular clusters in M31 are too distant for detailed abundance studies of their individual stars; however, cluster abundances can be determined through high resolution, integrated light (IL) spectroscopy. In this talk, I discuss how IL abundances can be interpreted in the context of multiple populations. In particular, I will present new infrared abudances of 25 M31 globular clusters, derived from IL spectra from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE). These H band spectra allow determinations of C, N, and O from molecular features, and Fe, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, and K from atomic features. The integrated abundance ratios are then investigated with cluster [Fe/H] and mass.

  10. High resolution absorption coefficients for Freon-12. [by using tunable diode laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, J. M.; Bair, C. H.; Williams, B.; Harward, C.

    1979-01-01

    The ultra high resolution absorption coefficients of the Q-branch of Freon-12 obtained with tunable diode laser spectroscopy are presented. Continuous spectra are presented from 1155/cm to 1163/cm, and absolute wavelength calibration was obtained using SO2 spectra as a standard and a 5 cm Ge etalon for relative calibration between SO2 lines. The Freon-12 data obtained at a pressure of 0.05 torr showed a rich and highly structured spectra, but with the exception of three isolated features, collisional broadening reduces the spectra to a structureless continuum for nitrogen pressures greater than 20 torr. The spectra at 1161/cm continue to exhibit structure at atmospheric pressure.

  11. Continuous-wave whispering-gallery optical parametric oscillator for high-resolution spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Werner, Christoph S; Buse, Karsten; Breunig, Ingo

    2015-03-01

    We achieve a continuous operation of a whispering gallery optical parametric oscillator by stabilizing the resonator temperature T on the mK level and simultaneously locking the pump frequency to a cavity resonance using the Pound-Drever-Hall technique. The millimeter-sized device converts several mW of a pump wave at 1040 nm wavelength to signal and idler waves around 2000 nm wavelength with more than 50% efficiency. Over 1 h, power and frequency of the signal wave vary by <±1% and by <±25  MHz, respectively. The latter can be tuned over 480 MHz without a mode hop by changing T over 120 mK. In order to prove the suitability for high-resolution spectroscopy, we scan the signal frequency across the resonance of a Fabry-Perot interferometer resolving nicely its 10 MHz linewidth.

  12. Past, Present and Future Prospects of High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy of Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaastra, J.

    2006-08-01

    The first high resolution X-ray spectra of clusters of galaxies have revolutionised the study of cooling flows. These excellent data have been obtained with an instrument (the RGS of XMM-Newton) that has not been optimised for spectroscopy of extended sources. I will present a few recent examples of what can be achieved further with the RGS in combination with the imaging EPIC cameras for the study of chemical enrichment of clusters. The new generation of high spectral resolution imaging TES arrays that is currently being studied for a variety of possible future X-ray observatories (such as XEUS, Constellation-X, DIOS, Estremo and NEW) offer exciting new opportunities to study the physics of clusters of galaxies. I will present examples of how these new instruments will achieve this.

  13. High-resolution vibrational and rotational spectroscopy of CD2H+ in a cryogenic ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusko, Pavol; Stoffels, Alexander; Thorwirth, Sven; Brünken, Sandra; Schlemmer, Stephan; Asvany, Oskar

    2017-02-01

    The low-lying rotational states (J = 0, … , 5) of CD2H+ have been probed by high-resolution ro-vibrational and pure rotational spectroscopy, applying several action spectroscopic methods in a cryogenic 22-pole ion trap. For this, the ν1 ro-vibrational band has been revisited, detecting 108 transitions, among which 36 are new. The use of a frequency comb system allowed us to measure the ro-vibrational transitions with high precision and accuracy, typically better than 1 MHz. The high precision has been confirmed by comparing equal combination differences in the ground and excited state. Moreover, precise predictions of pure rotational transitions were possible for the ground state. Twenty-five rotational transitions have been detected directly by a novel IR-mm-wave double resonance method, giving rise to highly accurate ground state spectroscopic parameters.

  14. High-resolution optical spectroscopy in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrella, C.; Light, P. S.; Stace, T. M.; Benabid, F.; Luiten, A. N.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present detailed high-resolution spectroscopy of rubidium (Rb) vapor confined within a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF). We find a very low level of additional frequency broadening associated with this confinement, with spectral features being only 1 MHz broader than the natural linewidth of the excited state. We show that this additional broadening is consistent solely with the atoms' transit across the fiber's optical mode. This low level of decoherence opens the door to a wide variety of applications including compact frequency standards and new types of quantum optical devices based on alkali-metal-loaded HC-PCFs. We highlight the low level of decoherence through observation of electromagnetically induced transparency in the confined vapor.

  15. A Study of the Conformational Isomerism of 1-Iodobutane by High Resolution Rotational Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Arsenault, Eric A.; Obenchain, Daniel A.; Blake, Thomas A.; ...

    2017-03-24

    The first microwave study of 1-iodobutane, performed by Steinmetz et al. in 1977, led to the determination of the B+C parameter for the anti-anti- and gauche-anti-conformers. Nearly 40 years later, in this paper this reinvestigation of 1-iodobutane, by high-resolution microwave spectroscopy, led to the determination of rotational constants, centrifugal distortion constants, nuclear quadrupole coupling constants (NQCCs), and nuclear-spin rotation constants belonging to both of the two previously mentioned conformers, in addition to the gauche-gauche-conformer, which was observed in this frequency regime for the first time. Finally, comparisons between the three conformers of 1-iodobutane and other iodo- and bromoalkanes are made,more » specifically through an analysis of the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants belonging to the iodine and bromine atoms in the respective chemical environments.« less

  16. Application of a continuously tunable, cw optical parametric oscillator for high-resolution spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gibson, G M; Dunn, M H; Padgett, M J

    1998-01-01

    We report the use of a smoothly tunable, single-frequency continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator (OPO) for high-resolution spectroscopy. The OPO is based on potassium titanyl phosphate and is resonant for both signal and idler fields, resulting in a device with a very low pump power threshold of 30 mW. The frequency-selective nature of the doubly resonant oscillator ensures that the signal and idler modes can be tuned across the entire phase-match bandwidth without the need for additional intracavity frequency-selective components. Smooth frequency tuning of the output of the OPO is obtained by tuning of the pump laser. To demonstrate the practicality of our OPO we recorded the absorption spectrum of cesium vapor in the 1-microm spectral region.

  17. High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Optical Photometry of MWC 349A and MWC 349B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manset, N.; Miroshnichenko, A. S.; Zharikov, S. V.; Kusakin, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    MWC 349A is a V ˜ 13 mag object with the B[e] phenomenon, a very strong optical emission-line spectrum, maser and laser line emission, and a radio-bright bipolar nebula, attenuated by ˜10 mag of interstellar extinction. MWC 349B is a visual companion of MWC 349A with no previously reported signs of emission. The physical connection of the pair has been the subject of debates toward revealing the evolutionary state of MWC 349A. Only low-resolution spectra reported for MWC 349B resulted in estimating its parameters with a large uncertainty. We report the results of high-resolution optical spectroscopy of both objects as well as their optical photometry.

  18. High resolution spectroscopy of comet C/2002 C1 Ikeya-Zhang with SARG at TNG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capria, M. T.; Cremonese, G.; Boattini, A.; de Sanctis, M. C.; D'Abramo, G.; Buzzoni, A.

    2002-11-01

    A program of high resolution spectroscopy of comets is being conducted at TNG in Canary Islands using the echelle spectrograph SARG. The aim of the program is to catalogue known and unknown emission lines, compare them with the lines already listed in existing catalogues and possibly identify unknown lines. In the visible range of the spectrum emission lines of daughter molecules and ions can be found, and many of them are still unidentified. The comet C/2002 C1 Ikeya-Zhang was observed with SARG during the night 19-20 of April and spectra with two different setups were taken. In the first case a narrow band filter was used to isolate the sodium emissions with a long slit and R = 43000. The data show very interesting cometary sodium emissions in the coma. The second setup used a short slit covering the spectral range of 4620-7920 Å with R = 57000.

  19. High Resolution Spectroscopy of Naphthalene Calibrated by AN Optical Frequency Comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Akiko; Nakashima, Kazuki; Matsuba, Ayumi; Misono, Masatoshi

    2015-06-01

    In high-resolution molecular spectroscopy, the precise measure of the optical frequency is crucial to evaluate minute shifts and splittings of the energy levels. On the other hand, in such spectroscopy, thousands of spectral lines distributed over several wavenumbers have to be measured by a continuously scanning cw laser. Therefore, the continuously changing optical frequency of the scanning laser has to be determined with enough precision. To satisfy these contradictory requirements, we have been developed two types of high-resolution spectroscopic systems employing an optical frequency comb. One of the systems employs RF band-pass filters to generate equally spaced frequency markers for optical frequency calibration, and is appropriate for wide wavelength-range measurement with relatively high scanning rate.^a In the other system, the beat frequency between the optical frequency comb and the scanning laser is controlled by an acousto-optic frequency shifter. This system is suitable for more precise measurement, and enables detailed analyses of frequency characteristics of scanning laser.^b In the present study, we observe Doppler-free two-photon absorption spectra of A^1B1u (v_4 = 1) ← X^1A_g (v = 0) transition of naphthalene around 298 nm. The spectral lines are rotationally resolved and the resolution is about 100 kHz. For ^qQ transition, the rotational lines are assigned, and molecular constants in the excited state are determined. In addition, we analyze the origin of the measured linewidth and Coriolis interactions between energy levels. To determine molecular constants more precisely, we proceed to measure and analyze spectra of other transitions, such as ^sS transitions. ^a A. Nishiyama, D. Ishikawa, and M. Misono, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 30, 2107 (2013). ^b A. Nishiyama, A. Matsuba, and M. Misono, Opt. Lett. 39, 4923 (2014).

  20. High-resolution laser spectroscopy of long-lived plutonium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, A.; Sonnenschein, V.; Campbell, P.; Cheal, B.; Kron, T.; Moore, I. D.; Pohjalainen, I.; Raeder, S.; Trautmann, N.; Wendt, K.

    2017-03-01

    Long-lived isotopes of plutonium were studied using two complementary techniques, high-resolution resonance ionization spectroscopy (HR-RIS) and collinear laser spectroscopy (CLS). Isotope shifts have been measured on the 5 f67 s27F0→5 f56 d27 s (J =1 ) and 5 f67 s27F1→5 f67 s 7 p (J =2 ) atomic transitions using the HR-RIS method and the hyperfine factors have been extracted for the odd mass nuclei Pu,241239. CLS was performed on the 5 f67 s 8F1 /2→J =1 /2 (27 523.61 cm-1) ionic transition with the hyperfine A factors measured for 239Pu. Changes in mean-squared charge radii have been extracted and show a good agreement with previous nonoptical methods, with an uncertainty improvement by approximately one order of magnitude. Plutonium represents the heaviest element studied to date using collinear laser spectroscopy.

  1. High Resolution Rovibrational Spectroscopy of Large Molecules Using Infrared Frequency Combs and Buffer Gas Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changala, Bryan; Spaun, Ben; Patterson, David; Bjork, Bryce J.; Heckl, Oliver H.; Doyle, John M.; Ye, Jun

    2016-06-01

    We have recently demonstrated the integration of cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy with buffer gas cooling to acquire high resolution infrared spectra of translationally and rotationally cold (˜10 K) gas-phase molecules. Here, we extend this method to significantly larger systems, including naphthalene (C10H_8), a prototypical polyaromatic hydrocarbon, and adamantane (C10H_{16}), the fundamental building block of diamonoids. To the authors' knowledge, the latter molecule represents the largest system for which rotationally resolved spectra in the CH stretch region (3 μm) have been obtained. In addition to the measured spectra, we present several details of our experimental methods. These include introducing non-volatile species into the cold buffer gas cell and obtaining broadband spectra with single comb mode resolution. We also discuss recent modifications to the apparatus to improve its absorption sensitivity and time resolution, which facilitate the study of both larger molecular systems and cold chemical dynamics. B. Spaun, et al. Probing buffer-gas cooled molecules with direct frequency comb spectroscopy in the mid-infrared, WF02, 70th International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, Champaign-Urbana, IL, 2015.

  2. Development of silicon grisms and immersion gratings for high-resolution infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jian; McDavitt, Daniel L.; Bernecker, John L.; Miller, Shane; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Kuzmenko, Paul J.

    2002-01-01

    silicon-based grating applications in ground and space-based IR instruments is promising. Silicon immersion gratings will make very high-resolution spectroscopy (R>100,000) feasible with compact instruments for implementation on large telescopes. Silicon grisms will offer an efficient way to implement low-cost medium to high resolution IR spectroscopy (R~ 1000-50000) through the conversion of existing cameras into spectrometers by locating a grism in the instrument's pupil location.

  3. Electron energy loss and Smith-Purcell radiation in two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, Tetsuyuki; Ohtaka, Kazuo

    2005-09-01

    A theoretical description of the electron energy loss and the Smith-Purcell radiation is presented for an electron moving near a two-dimensional photonic crystal slab and a three-dimensional woodpile photonic crystal. The electron energy loss and the Smith-Purcell radiation spectra are well correlated with the photonic band structures of these crystals and thus can be used as a probe of them. In particular, there is a selection rule concerning the symmetries of the photonic band modes to be excited when the electron moves in a mirror plane of the crystals. In the woodpile, a highly directional Smith-Purcell radiation is realized by using the planar defect mode inside the complete band gap.

  4. Electron energy loss and Smith-Purcell radiation in two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Tetsuyuki; Ohtaka, Kazuo

    2005-09-19

    A theoretical description of the electron energy loss and the Smith-Purcell radiation is presented for an electron moving near a two-dimensional photonic crystal slab and a three-dimensional woodpile photonic crystal. The electron energy loss and the Smith-Purcell radiation spectra are well correlated with the photonic band structures of these crystals and thus can be used as a probe of them. In particular, there is a selection rule concerning the symmetries of the photonic band modes to be excited when the electron moves in a mirror plane of the crystals. In the woodpile, a highly directional Smith-Purcell radiation is realized by using the planar defect mode inside the complete band gap.

  5. High-order multilayer coated blazed gratings for high resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Voronov, Dmitriy L.; Goray, Leonid I.; Warwick, Tony; ...

    2015-02-17

    A grand challenge in soft x-ray spectroscopy is to drive the resolving power of monochromators and spectrometers from the 104 achieved routinely today to well above 105. This need is driven mainly by the requirements of a new technique that is set to have enormous impact in condensed matter physics, Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS). Unlike x-ray absorption spectroscopy, RIXS is not limited by an energy resolution dictated by the core-hole lifetime in the excitation process. Using much higher resolving power than used for normal x-ray absorption spectroscopy enables access to the energy scale of soft excitations in matter. Thesemore » excitations such as magnons and phonons drive the collective phenomena seen in correlated electronic materials such as high temperature superconductors. RIXS opens a new path to study these excitations at a level of detail not formerly possible. However, as the process involves resonant excitation at an energy of around 1 keV, and the energy scale of the excitations one would like to see are at the meV level, to fully utilize the technique requires the development of monochromators and spectrometers with one to two orders of magnitude higher energy resolution than has been conventionally possible. Here we investigate the detailed diffraction characteristics of multilayer blazed gratings. These elements offer potentially revolutionary performance as the dispersive element in ultra-high resolution x-ray spectroscopy. In doing so, we have established a roadmap for the complete optimization of the grating design. Traditionally 1st order gratings are used in the soft x-ray region, but we show that as in the optical domain, one can work in very high spectral orders and thus dramatically improve resolution without significant loss in efficiency.« less

  6. High-order multilayer coated blazed gratings for high resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Voronov, Dmitriy L.; Goray, Leonid I.; Warwick, Tony; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Padmore, Howard A.

    2015-02-17

    A grand challenge in soft x-ray spectroscopy is to drive the resolving power of monochromators and spectrometers from the 104 achieved routinely today to well above 105. This need is driven mainly by the requirements of a new technique that is set to have enormous impact in condensed matter physics, Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS). Unlike x-ray absorption spectroscopy, RIXS is not limited by an energy resolution dictated by the core-hole lifetime in the excitation process. Using much higher resolving power than used for normal x-ray absorption spectroscopy enables access to the energy scale of soft excitations in matter. These excitations such as magnons and phonons drive the collective phenomena seen in correlated electronic materials such as high temperature superconductors. RIXS opens a new path to study these excitations at a level of detail not formerly possible. However, as the process involves resonant excitation at an energy of around 1 keV, and the energy scale of the excitations one would like to see are at the meV level, to fully utilize the technique requires the development of monochromators and spectrometers with one to two orders of magnitude higher energy resolution than has been conventionally possible. Here we investigate the detailed diffraction characteristics of multilayer blazed gratings. These elements offer potentially revolutionary performance as the dispersive element in ultra-high resolution x-ray spectroscopy. In doing so, we have established a roadmap for the complete optimization of the grating design. Traditionally 1st order gratings are used in the soft x-ray region, but we show that as in the optical domain, one can work in very high spectral orders and thus dramatically improve resolution without significant loss in efficiency.

  7. High-order multilayer coated blazed gratings for high resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Voronov, Dmitriy L; Goray, Leonid I; Warwick, Tony; Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Padmore, Howard A

    2015-02-23

    A grand challenge in soft x-ray spectroscopy is to drive the resolving power of monochromators and spectrometers from the 10(4) achieved routinely today to well above 10(5). This need is driven mainly by the requirements of a new technique that is set to have enormous impact in condensed matter physics, Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS). Unlike x-ray absorption spectroscopy, RIXS is not limited by an energy resolution dictated by the core-hole lifetime in the excitation process. Using much higher resolving power than used for normal x-ray absorption spectroscopy enables access to the energy scale of soft excitations in matter. These excitations such as magnons and phonons drive the collective phenomena seen in correlated electronic materials such as high temperature superconductors. RIXS opens a new path to study these excitations at a level of detail not formerly possible. However, as the process involves resonant excitation at an energy of around 1 keV, and the energy scale of the excitations one would like to see are at the meV level, to fully utilize the technique requires the development of monochromators and spectrometers with one to two orders of magnitude higher energy resolution than has been conventionally possible. Here we investigate the detailed diffraction characteristics of multilayer blazed gratings. These elements offer potentially revolutionary performance as the dispersive element in ultra-high resolution x-ray spectroscopy. In doing so, we have established a roadmap for the complete optimization of the grating design. Traditionally 1st order gratings are used in the soft x-ray region, but we show that as in the optical domain, one can work in very high spectral orders and thus dramatically improve resolution without significant loss in efficiency.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radiative recombination electron energy loss data (Mao+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Kaastra, J.; Badnell, N. R.

    2016-11-01

    The weighted electron energy loss factors (dimensionless) are defined by weighting the electron energy loss rate coefficients (per ion) with respect to the total radiative recombination rates. Both the unparameterized and parameterized weighted electron energy-loss factors for H-like to Ne-like ions from H (z=1) up to and including Zn (z=30), in a wide temperature range, are available here. For the unparameterized data set, the temperatures are set to the conventional ADAS temperature grid, i.e. c2*(10,20,50,100,200,...,2*106,5*106,107)K, where c is the ionic charge of the recombined ion. For the fitting parameters, the temperature should be in units of eV. We refer to the recombined ion when we speak of the radiative recombination of a certain ion, for example, for a bare oxygen ion capturing a free electron via radiative recombination to form H-like oxygen (O VIII, s=1, z=8). The fitting accuracies are better than 4%. (2 data files).

  9. Exploring the High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Molecules that can Affect the Quality of your Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Terry A.

    2014-06-01

    Few things affect your quality of life more than the air you breathe and the temperature of your immediate environment. Since more than 80% of the energy used in the industrialized world today is still derived from fossil fuels, these two quantities are not unrelated. Most organic molecules injected into the troposphere are degraded via oxidative processes involving free radical intermediates, and many of these intermediates are the same as the ones involved in the combustion of fossil fuels. Key oxidizing intermediates are hydroxyl, OH (day), and nitrate, NO_3 (night), and early intermediates of oxidized organic compounds include the alkoxy (RO) and peroxy (RO_2) families of radicals. Recently we have explored the spectroscopy of RO, RO_2, and NO_3 radicals both for diagnostic purposes and to characterize their molecular properties and benchmark quantum chemistry calculations. We have utilized moderate resolution cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) to study ambient temperature radicals and high resolution CRDS and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) to study jet-cooled radicals. Peroxy radicals and NO_3 have weak tilde{A}-tilde{X} electronic transitions in the near infrared which we have studied with CRDS. Comparable LIF measurements have been made for the alkoxy species in the UV. Both vibrational and rotational resolution of the electronic spectra is observed. Data obtained from the spectral observations provide information about both the geometric and electronic structure of these radicals as well as their dynamics and also provide the capability for unambiguous diagnostics of their concentrations and reactions.

  10. Millimeter and Sub-millimeter High Resolution Spectroscopy: New Frontiers with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    2016-06-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that new laboratory data will be critical for the next decade of observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). The high spatial resolution offered by ALMA will probe new regions of molecular complexity, including the inner envelopes of evolved stars, regions dominated by UV radiation, and the densest cores of molecular clouds. New molecular lines will be discovered in the wide wavelength range covered by the ALMA bands, and high resolution, gas-phase spectroscopy are needed to provide crucial “rest frequencies.” In particular, highly accurate methods that measure millimeter and sub-millimeter rotational transitions, such as direct absorption and Fourier transform mm-wave techniques, are important, especially when coupled to exotic molecular production schemes. Recent ALMA studies of SH+ and larger organic species have already demonstrated the need for laboratory measurements. New laboratory work will likely be required for circumstellar refractory molecules, radicals and ions generated near photon-dominated regions (PDRs), and large, organic-type species. This talk will give an overview of current contributions of laboratory spectroscopy to ALMA observations, summarize relevant spectroscopic techniques, and provide input into future prospects and directions.

  11. Far Infrared High Resolution Synchrotron FTIR Spectroscopy of the Low Frequency Bending Modes of Dmso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuisset, Arnaud; Smirnova, Irina; Bocquet, Robin; Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gael; Sadovskii, Dmitrii A.; Pirali, Olivier; Roy, Pascale

    2010-06-01

    In addition to its importance for industrial and environmental studies, the monitoring of DiMethylSulfOxyde (DMSO, (CH_3)_2SO) concentrations is of considerable interest for civil protection. The existing high resolution gas phase spectroscopic data of DMSO only concerned the pure rotational transitions in the ground state. In the Far-IR domain, the low-frequency rovibrational transitions have never previously resolved. The high brightness of the AILES beamline of the synchrotron SOLEIL and the instrumental sensitivity provided by the multipass cell allowed to measure for the first time these transitions. 1581 A-type and C-type transitions in the ν11 band have been assigned and 25 molecular constants of Watson's s-form hamiltonian developed to degree 8 have been fitted within the experimental accuracy. The use of then synchrotron radiation has opened many possibilities for new spectroscopic studies. Together with several other recent studies, our successful measurement and analysis of DMSO convincingly demonstrates the potential of the AILES beamline for high resolution FIR spectroscopy. Thus our present work is just at the beginning of unraveling the rovibrational structure of low frequency bending and torsional vibrational states of DMSO and yielding important comprehensive structural and spectroscopic information on this molecule. L. Margules, R. A. Motienko, E. A. Alekseev, J. Demaison, J. Molec. Spectrosc., 260(23),2009 V. Typke, M. Dakkouri, J. Molec. Struct., 599(177),2001 A. Cuisset, L. Nanobashvili, I. Smirnova, R. Bocquet, F. Hindle, G. Mouret, O. Pirali, P. Roy, D. Sadovskii, Chem. Phys. Lett., accepted for publication

  12. High resolution x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy - a new technique for site- and spin-selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin

    1996-12-01

    X-ray spectroscopy has long been used to elucidate electronic and structural information of molecules. One of the weaknesses of x-ray absorption is its sensitivity to all of the atoms of a particular element in a sample. Through out this thesis, a new technique for enhancing the site- and spin-selectivity of the x-ray absorption has been developed. By high resolution fluorescence detection, the chemical sensitivity of K emission spectra can be used to identify oxidation and spin states; it can also be used to facilitate site-selective X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and site-selective Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The spin polarization in K fluorescence could be used to generate spin selective XANES or spin-polarized EXAFS, which provides a new measure of the spin density, or the nature of magnetic neighboring atoms. Finally, dramatic line-sharpening effects by the combination of absorption and emission processes allow observation of structure that is normally unobservable. All these unique characters can enormously simplify a complex x-ray spectrum. Applications of this novel technique have generated information from various transition-metal model compounds to metalloproteins. The absorption and emission spectra by high resolution fluorescence detection are interdependent. The ligand field multiplet model has been used for the analysis of K{alpha} and K{beta} emission spectra. First demonstration on different chemical states of Fe compounds has shown the applicability of site selectivity and spin polarization. Different interatomic distances of the same element in different chemical forms have been detected using site-selective EXAFS.

  13. Developments in High-Resolution Spectroscopy (R 10000) in the EUV Waveband.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruddace, R. G.

    2002-05-01

    We describe a new and mature technology, with which it is possible to build astrophysical EUV spectrometers of high resolving power. Solar research has shown that high resolving power is important in applying a wide range of plasma diagnostics unambiguously, and in studying plasma dynamics through measurements of line profiles and Doppler shifts. The regime 100-300 Å is of special importance, as it contains many strong emission and absorption lines from plasmas at 5 104 to 2 107 K, and because in this band the interstellar medium opacity is low enough to permit not only extensive studies of the local galactic disk, but in some directions galactic halo and extragalactic observations. The instrument concept comprises a multilayer-coated diffraction grating of high ruling density, working at near normal incidence in a Wadsworth mount, which focusses a spectrum onto a microchannelplate focal-plane detector. We summarise the developments over the last decade which have made possible an efficient spectrometer of high resolving power, in particular EUV multilayers and diffraction gratings produced by ion-etching. This included extensive experimental studies of multilayer gratings at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven, and culminated in February 2001 in the successfull flight of a prototype spectrometer on a sounding rocket, which obtained a high-resolution spectrum of the white dwarf G191-B2B in the 225-245 Å band. Finally, to further an assessment of the impact of high-resolution spectroscopy on EUV astronomy, we present a strawman design for an orbiting instrument, capable of achieving a resolving power of ~ 10,000 and an effective area of ~ 20 cm2 over the band 100-300 Å. The work described has been supported by the Office of Naval Research and NRL, and by NASA Research Opportunities in Space Science (ROSS) grants.

  14. What can we Expect of High-Resolution Spectroscopies on Carbohydrates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocinero, Emilio J.; Ecija, Patricia; Uriarte, Iciar; Usabiaga, Imanol; Fernández, José A.; Basterretxea, Francisco J.; Lesarri, Alberto; Davis, Benjamin G.

    2015-06-01

    Carbohydrates are one of the most multifaceted building blocks, performing numerous roles in living organisms. We present several structural investigations on carbohydrates exploiting an experimental strategy which combines microwave (MW) and laser spectroscopies in high-resolution. Laser spectroscopy offers high sensitivity coupled to mass and conformer selectivity, making it ideal for polysaccharides studies. On the other hand, microwave spectroscopy provides much higher resolution and direct access to molecular structure of monosaccharides. This combined approach provides not only accurate chemical insight on conformation, structure and molecular properties, but also benchmarking standards guiding the development of theoretical calculations. In order to illustrate the possibilities of a combined MW-laser approach we present results on the conformational landscape and structural properties of several monosaccharides and oligosaccharides including microsolvation and molecular recognition processes of carbohydrates. E.J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. écija, F.J. Basterretxea, J.-U. Grabow, J.A. Fernández and F. Casta {n}o Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 51, 3119-3124, 2012. E.J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. écija, Á. Cimas, B.G. Davis, F.J. Basterretxea, J.A. Fernández and F. Casta {n}o J. Am. Chem. Soc. 135, 2845-2852, 2013. E.J. Cocinero, P. Çarçabal, T.D. Vaden, J.P. Simons and B.G. Davis Nature 469, 76-80, 2011. C.S. Barry, E.J. Cocinero, P. Çarçabal, D.P. Gamblin, E.C. Stanca-Kaposta, S. M. Fernández-Alonso, S. Rudić, J.P. Simons and B.G. Davis J. Am. Chem. Soc. 135, 16895-16903, 2013.

  15. Effect of the van der Waals interaction on the electron energy-loss near edge structure theoretical calculation.

    PubMed

    Katsukura, Hirotaka; Miyata, Tomohiro; Tomita, Kota; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu

    2017-07-01

    The effect of the van der Waals (vdW) interaction on the simulation of the electron energy-loss near edge structure (ELNES) by a first-principles band-structure calculation is reported. The effect of the vdW interaction is considered by the Tkatchenko-Scheffler scheme, and the change of the spectrum profile and the energy shift are discussed. We perform calculations on systems in the solid, liquid and gaseous states. The transition energy shifts to lower energy by approximately 0.1eV in the condensed (solid and liquid) systems by introducing the vdW effect into the calculation, whereas the energy shift in the gaseous models is negligible owing to the long intermolecular distance. We reveal that the vdW interaction exhibits a larger effect on the excited state than the ground state owing to the presence of an excited electron in the unoccupied band. Moreover, the vdW effect is found to depend on the local electron density and the molecular coordination. In addition, this study suggests that the detection of the vdW interactions exhibited within materials is possible by a very stable and high resolution observation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Mars: Recent Results and Implications for Atmospheric Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasnopolsky, V. A.; Owen, T. C.; Maillard, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    It is believed that Earth, Venus, and Mars were formed by the same rocky and icy planetesimals, which resembled meteorites and comets in their composition, respectively. These planets are thus expected to have initially had the same chemical and isotope composition. Scaling the mass of the terrestrial ocean by the planetary mass ratio, the expected initial H2O abundance on Mars is a layer of about 1 km thick. Scaling the abundance of CO2 on Venus, the expected initial CO2 abundance on Mars is 15 bars. Evidently, significant parts of the initial H2O and CO2 abundances have been lost. Intense meteorite impact erosion and hydrodynamic escape of hydrogen (which could drag to escape more heavy species) were dominant loss processes in the first 0.8 Byr. Later, atmospheric sputtering by O+ ions resulted in the dissociation of CO2 and massive losses of O, C, and H. Formation of carbonates also reduced CO2 to its present abundance which currently exists in the atmosphere, on the polar caps, and is absorbed by regolith. Water loss is currently due to thermal escape of H and nonthermal escape of O, both formed by photodissociation of H2O. All loss processes resulted in fractionation of the H, O, and C isotopes. Therefore, the current isotope ratios in H2O and CO2 are clues to the history of volatiles on Mars. There are three tools to study H2O and CO2 isotopes in the martian atmosphere: (i) mass spectrometry from landing probes, (ii) analyses of Mars' gases trapped in the SNC meteorites which were ejected from Mars, and (iii) high-resolution spectroscopy of the H2O andCO2 bands. Method (i) is the best but is the most expensive. Mass spectrometers to be used should be designed for high-precision isotope measurements. Method (ii) makes it possible to reach an uncertainty +/- 0.1%. However, the obtained results are affected by some uncontrolled interactions: isotope fractionations of (1) trapped gases and (2) those released in pyrolysis, (3) contribution of the impactor, isotope

  17. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Mars: Recent Results and Implications for Atmospheric Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasnopolsky, V. A.; Owen, T. C.; Maillard, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    It is believed that Earth, Venus, and Mars were formed by the same rocky and icy planetesimals, which resembled meteorites and comets in their composition, respectively. These planets are thus expected to have initially had the same chemical and isotope composition. Scaling the mass of the terrestrial ocean by the planetary mass ratio, the expected initial H2O abundance on Mars is a layer of about 1 km thick. Scaling the abundance of CO2 on Venus, the expected initial CO2 abundance on Mars is 15 bars. Evidently, significant parts of the initial H2O and CO2 abundances have been lost. Intense meteorite impact erosion and hydrodynamic escape of hydrogen (which could drag to escape more heavy species) were dominant loss processes in the first 0.8 Byr. Later, atmospheric sputtering by O+ ions resulted in the dissociation of CO2 and massive losses of O, C, and H. Formation of carbonates also reduced CO2 to its present abundance which currently exists in the atmosphere, on the polar caps, and is absorbed by regolith. Water loss is currently due to thermal escape of H and nonthermal escape of O, both formed by photodissociation of H2O. All loss processes resulted in fractionation of the H, O, and C isotopes. Therefore, the current isotope ratios in H2O and CO2 are clues to the history of volatiles on Mars. There are three tools to study H2O and CO2 isotopes in the martian atmosphere: (i) mass spectrometry from landing probes, (ii) analyses of Mars' gases trapped in the SNC meteorites which were ejected from Mars, and (iii) high-resolution spectroscopy of the H2O andCO2 bands. Method (i) is the best but is the most expensive. Mass spectrometers to be used should be designed for high-precision isotope measurements. Method (ii) makes it possible to reach an uncertainty +/- 0.1%. However, the obtained results are affected by some uncontrolled interactions: isotope fractionations of (1) trapped gases and (2) those released in pyrolysis, (3) contribution of the impactor, isotope

  18. High resolution 4-D spectroscopy with sparse concentric shell sampling and FFT-CLEAN.

    PubMed

    Coggins, Brian E; Zhou, Pei

    2008-12-01

    Recent efforts to reduce the measurement time for multidimensional NMR experiments have fostered the development of a variety of new procedures for sampling and data processing. We recently described concentric ring sampling for 3-D NMR experiments, which is superior to radial sampling as input for processing by a multidimensional discrete Fourier transform. Here, we report the extension of this approach to 4-D spectroscopy as Randomized Concentric Shell Sampling (RCSS), where sampling points for the indirect dimensions are positioned on concentric shells, and where random rotations in the angular space are used to avoid coherent artifacts. With simulations, we show that RCSS produces a very low level of artifacts, even with a very limited number of sampling points. The RCSS sampling patterns can be adapted to fine rectangular grids to permit use of the Fast Fourier Transform in data processing, without an apparent increase in the artifact level. These artifacts can be further reduced to the noise level using the iterative CLEAN algorithm developed in radioastronomy. We demonstrate these methods on the high resolution 4-D HCCH-TOCSY spectrum of protein G's B1 domain, using only 1.2% of the sampling that would be needed conventionally for this resolution. The use of a multidimensional FFT instead of the slow DFT for initial data processing and for subsequent CLEAN significantly reduces the calculation time, yielding an artifact level that is on par with the level of the true spectral noise.

  19. High-Resolution K-Band Spectroscopy of MWC 480 and V1331 Cyg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najita, Joan R.; Doppmann, Greg W.; Carr, John S.; Graham, James R.; Eisner, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    We present high-resolution (R = 25,000-35,000) K-band spectroscopy of two young stars, MWC 480 and V1331 Cyg. Earlier spectrally dispersed (R = 230) interferometric observations of MWC 480 indicated the presence of an excess continuum emission interior to the dust sublimation radius, with a spectral shape that was interpreted as evidence for hot water emission from the inner disk of MWC 480. Our spectrum of V1331 Cyg reveals strong emission from CO and hot water vapor, likely arising in a circumstellar disk. In comparison, our spectrum of MWC 480 appears mostly featureless. We discuss possible ways in which strong water emission from MWC 480 might go undetected in our data. If strong water emission is in fact absent from the inner disk, as our data suggest, the continuum excess interior to the dust sublimation radius that is detected in the interferometric data must have another origin. We discuss possible physical origins for the continuum excess. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, in part from telescope time allocated to NASA through the agency's scientific partnership with the California Institute of Technology and the University of California. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  20. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy and the fascinating angular momentum realm of the atomic nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, M. A.; Simpson, J.; Paul, E. S.

    2016-12-01

    In 1974 Aage Bohr and Ben Mottelson predicted the different ‘phases’ that may be expected in deformed nuclei as a function of increasing angular momentum and excitation energy all the way up to the fission limit. While admitting their picture was highly conjectural they confidently stated ‘...with the ingenious experimental approaches that are being developed, we may look forward with excitement to the detailed spectroscopic studies that will illuminate the behaviour of the spinning quantised nucleus’. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy has indeed been a major tool in studying the structure of atomic nuclei and has witnessed numerous significant advances over the last four decades. This article will select highlights from investigations at the Niels Bohr Institute, Denmark, and Daresbury Laboratory, UK, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, some of which have continued at other national laboratories in Europe and the USA to the present day. These studies illustrate the remarkable diversity of phenomena and symmetries exhibited by nuclei in the angular momentum-excitation energy plane that continue to surprise and fascinate scientists.

  1. High resolution molecular spectroscopy in the wavelength region from 1 MM to 0.1 MM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wattenbach, R.; Nowak, R.; Densing, R.; Roeser, H.-P.; Salito, S. A.

    The main design goals toward developing a millimeter- and submillimeter-wave laboratory spectrometer are described. The source-modulation spectrometer is basically used to provide rest frequencies of rotational transitions of astrophysically interesting molecules in the frequency range from 68 to 520 GHz. As phase-locked radiation sources, millimeter-wave reflex klystrons and tunable Gunn oscillators are used. The absorption signals are detected with a new digital lock-in amplifier. The smallest peak-absorption coefficient that could be observed is 8 x 10 to the -8th inverse centimeters at 150 GHz and 2 x 10 to the -7th inverse centimeters at 225 GHz in a 400-cm free-space cell. For high-resolution spectroscopy, saturation techniques have been applied to resolve overlapping line profiles. The spectrometer is also used for testing new waveguide and quasi-optical components and complete subsystems for the Cologne 3-m radio telescope, now located at Gornergrat near Zermatt in the Swiss Alps.

  2. Surface structure of an ionic liquid with high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, K.; Ohno, A.; Suzuki, M.; Kimura, K.

    2009-02-01

    The surface of an ionic liquid, trimethylpropylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([TMPA] [TFSI]), is observed by high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (HRBS). The composition depth profiles are derived from the observed HRBS spectra through spectrum simulation. The observed composition is in good agreement with the stoichiometric composition at depths larger than ∼1 nm. The observed composition profiles, however, show pronounced structures at the surface. Fluorine profile has a sharp peak at ∼0.1 nm and a broad peak at ∼1.0 nm. The sulfur profile also has a peak at ∼0.35 nm. These results indicate that the molecules show preferred orientations at the surface. From the observed profiles, it was concluded that the C1 conformer of the [TFSI] anion is dominant over the C2 conformer at the surface in contrast to bulk, where the C2 conformer is known to be dominant. It was also found that C1 conformers are oriented with their CF3 groups pointing toward the vacuum in the outermost molecular layer.

  3. High-resolution photoluminescence spectroscopy of Sn-doped ZnO single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, E. Senthil; Mohammadbeigi, F.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Watkins, S. P.

    2016-01-01

    Here, Group IV donors in ZnO are poorly understood, despite evidence that they are effective n-dopants. We present high-resolution photoluminescence spectroscopy studies of unintentionally doped and Sn doped ZnO single crystals grown by the chemical vapor transport method. Doped samples showed greatly increased emission from the I10 bound exciton transition which was recently proven to be related to the incorporation of Sn impurities based on radio-isotope studies. PL linewidths are exceptionally sharp for these samples, enabling clear identification of several donor species. Temperature dependent PL measurements of the I10 line emission energy and intensity dependence reveal a behavior similar to other shallow donors in ZnO. Ionized donor bound exciton and two electron satellite transitions of the I10 transition are unambiguously identified and yield a donor binding energy of 71 meV. In contrast to recent reports of Ge-related donors in ZnO, the spectroscopic binding energy for the Sn-related donor bound exciton follows a linear relationship with donor binding energy (Haynes rule), confirming the shallow nature of this defect center, which we attribute to a SnZn double donor compensated by an unknown single acceptor.

  4. High-resolution photoluminescence spectroscopy of Sn-doped ZnO single crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Kumar, E. Senthil; Mohammadbeigi, F.; Boatner, Lynn A.; ...

    2016-01-01

    Here, Group IV donors in ZnO are poorly understood, despite evidence that they are effective n-dopants. We present high-resolution photoluminescence spectroscopy studies of unintentionally doped and Sn doped ZnO single crystals grown by the chemical vapor transport method. Doped samples showed greatly increased emission from the I10 bound exciton transition which was recently proven to be related to the incorporation of Sn impurities based on radio-isotope studies. PL linewidths are exceptionally sharp for these samples, enabling clear identification of several donor species. Temperature dependent PL measurements of the I10 line emission energy and intensity dependence reveal a behavior similar tomore » other shallow donors in ZnO. Ionized donor bound exciton and two electron satellite transitions of the I10 transition are unambiguously identified and yield a donor binding energy of 71 meV. In contrast to recent reports of Ge-related donors in ZnO, the spectroscopic binding energy for the Sn-related donor bound exciton follows a linear relationship with donor binding energy (Haynes rule), confirming the shallow nature of this defect center, which we attribute to a SnZn double donor compensated by an unknown single acceptor.« less

  5. Hitomi X-ray Astronomy Satellite: Power of High-Resolution Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odaka, Hirokazu

    2017-01-01

    Hitomi (ASTRO-H) is an X-ray observatory developed by an international collaboration led by JAXA. An X-ray microcalorimeter onboard this satellite has opened a new window of high-resolution spectroscopy with an unprecedented energy resolution of 5 eV (FWHM) at 6 keV. The spacecraft was launched on February 17, 2016 from Tanegashima Island, Japan, and we completed initial operations including deployment of the hard X-ray imagers on the extensible optical bench. All scientific instruments had successfully worked until the sudden loss of the mission on March 26. We have obtained a spectrum showing fully resolved emission lines through the first-light observation of the Perseus Cluster. The line-of-sight velocity dispersion of 164 +/- 10 km s-1 reveals the quiescent environment of intracluster medium at the cluster core, implying that measured cluster mass requires little correction for the turbulent pressure. We also discuss observations to the Galactic Center which could be performed with Hitomi.

  6. High-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of metal compounds in neurodegenerative brain tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Collingwood, J.F.; Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M.R.; Batich, C.; Streit, W.J.; Eskin, T.; Terry, J.; Barrea, R.; Underhill, R.S.; Dobson, J.

    2008-06-16

    Fluorescence mapping and microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy are used to detect, locate and identify iron biominerals and other inorganic metal accumulations in neurodegenerative brain tissue at sub-cellular resolution (< 5 microns). Recent progress in developing the technique is reviewed. Synchrotron X-rays are used to map tissue sections for metals of interest, and XANES and XAFS are used to characterize anomalous concentrations of the metals in-situ so that they can be correlated with tissue structures and disease pathology. Iron anomalies associated with biogenic magnetite, ferritin and haemoglobin are located and identified in an avian tissue model with a pixel resolution {approx} 5 microns. Subsequent studies include brain tissue sections from transgenic Huntington's mice, and the first high-resolution mapping and identification of iron biominerals in human Alzheimer's and control autopsy brain tissue. Technical developments include use of microfocus diffraction to obtain structural information about biominerals in-situ, and depositing sample location grids by lithography for the location of anomalies by conventional microscopy. The combined techniques provide a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds and related metals in tissue. The information to be gained from this approach has implications for future diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration, and for our understanding of the mechanisms involved.

  7. Tracing Supernova Enrichment of the Nearest Young Star Forming Complex with High Resolution Stellar Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubar, Eric Joseph; Mamajek, Eric E.; Pecaut, Mark

    2010-02-01

    The chemical evolution of the galaxy can be examined on a small scale locally by searching for evidence of enrichment by core collapse (type II) supernova explosions among stars belonging to the same star- forming complex. We propose to obtain high resolution spectroscopy of a sample of slowly rotating members of nearby, young stellar groups associated with the nearest star-forming complex: Scorpius-Centaurus. These spectra will be used to perform a precise spectroscopic abundance analysis to test for enrichment of the ~5 Myr-old Upper Scorpius region and neighboring regions by supernova explosions in the neighboring ~ 15 Myr-old Upper Centaurus Lupus and Lower Centaurus Crux subgroups. Enrichment by core-collapse supernovae can be traced by enhancements in oxygen and other alpha- element abundances compared to Fe-peak elements. These abundances can also be used for constraining the chemical homogeneity of members of Upper-Sco. This study will allow us to explore the processes of Galactic chemical evolution and SN enrichment on a small scale (< 0.1 kpc, <10-20 SN) in a complex with a relatively well constrained star formation history and high mass stellar membership.

  8. High-contrast imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy observation of exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji; Mawet, Dimitri; Hu, Renyu; Benneke, Björn

    2016-08-01

    Detection and characterization of exoplanets faces challenges of smaller angular separation and high contrast between exoplanets and their host stars. High contrast imaging (HCI) instruments equipped with coronagraphs are built to meet these challenges, providing a way of spatially suppressing and separating stellar flux from that of a planet. Another way of separating stellar flux can be achieved by high-resolution spectroscopy (HRS), exploiting the fact that spectral features are different between a star and a planet. Observing exoplanets with HCI+HRS will achieve a higher contrast than the spatial or the spectroscopic method alone, improving the sensitivity to planet detection and enabling the study of the physical and chemical processes. Here, we simulate the performance of a HCI+HRS instrument (i.e., the upgrade Keck NIRSPEC and the fiber injection unit) to study its potential in detecting and characterizing currently known directly imaged planets. The simulation considers the spectral information content of an exoplanet, telescope and instrument specifications and realistic noise sources. The result of the simulation helps to set system requirement and informs designs at system-level. We also perform a trade study for a HCI+HRS instrument for a space mission to study an Earth-like planet orbiting a Sun-like star at 10 pc.

  9. HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF [Ne II] EMISSION FROM AA Tau AND GM Aur

    SciTech Connect

    Najita, Joan R.; Doppmann, Greg W.; Bitner, Martin A.; Richter, Matthew J.; Lacy, John H.; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Carr, John S.; Meijerink, Rowin; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Glassgold, Alfred E.

    2009-05-20

    We present high-resolution (R = 80,000) spectroscopy of [Ne II] emission from two young stars, GM Aur and AA Tau, which have moderate to high inclinations. The emission from both sources appears centered near the stellar velocity and is broader than the [Ne II] emission measured previously for the face-on disk system TW Hya. These properties are consistent with a disk origin for the [Ne II] emission we detect, with disk rotation (rather than photoevaporation or turbulence in a hot disk atmosphere) playing the dominant role in the origin of the line width. In the non-face-on systems, the [Ne II] emission is narrower than the CO fundamental emission from the same sources. If the widths of both diagnostics are dominated by Keplerian rotation, this suggests that the [Ne II] emission arises from larger disk radii on average than does the CO emission. The equivalent width of the [Ne II] emission we detect is less than that of the spectrally unresolved [Ne II] feature in the Spitzer spectra of the same sources. Variability in the [Ne II] emission or the mid-infrared continuum, a spatially extended [Ne II] component, or a very (spectrally) broad [Ne II] component might account for the difference in the equivalent widths.

  10. High-resolution laser spectroscopy of ultracold ytterbium atoms using spin-forbidden electric quadrupole transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uetake, S.; Yamaguchi, A.; Hashimoto, D.; Takahashi, Y.

    2008-11-01

    We have successfully observed high-resolution spectra of spin-forbidden electric quadrupole transition (1 S 0→3 D 2) in ytterbium (174Yb) atoms. The differential light shifts between the 1 S 0 and the 3 D 2 states in a far-off resonant trap at 532 nm are also measured. For the spectroscopy, we developed simple, narrow-linewidth, and long-term frequency stabilized violet diode laser systems. Long-term drifts of the excitation laser (404 nm) is suppressed by locking the laser to a length stabilized optical cavity. The optical path length of the cavity is stabilized to another diode laser whose frequency is locked to a strong 1 S 0→1 P 1 transition (399 nm) of Yb. Both lasers are standard extended-cavity diode lasers (ECDLs) in the Littrow configuration. Since the linewidth of a violet ECDL (˜10 MHz) is broader than a typical value of a red or near infra-red ECDL (<1 MHz), we employ optical feedback from a narrow-band Fabry-Perot cavity to reduce the linewidth. The linewidth is expected to be <20 kHz for 1 ms averaging time, and the long-term frequency stability is estimated to be ˜200 kHz/h.

  11. Triplet states in isotopically mixed anthracene crystals: High resolution optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Port, H.; Rund, D.; Wolf, H. C.

    1981-08-01

    The triplet O,O transitions of guest and host in isotopically mixed anthracene crystals of various compositions (A- h10, 13C-monosubstituted A- h10, A- d1h9, A- d2hg in A- d10 and A- d10 in A- h10) have been investigated using high resolution laser excitation spectroscopy. The guest aggregate spectra have been studied in polarized light as a function of guest concentration up to 15%. The analyses allow us to identify the monomer, dimer and trimer lines. From the dimer splittings the dominant resonance pair interactions are dedu The comparison of different mixed crystal systems with guest levels below and above the host exciton band reveals that quasiresonance and superexchange corrections are of minor importance. The experimental resonance pair interactions are used to calculate the triplet exciton band structure of anthracen and the observed guest polarization behaviour is interpreted quantitatively by the Rashba effect. Finally, the lower Davydov component of the host is s and broadened with increasing guest concentration. The shift is discussed using a theoretical model of Lifshitz.

  12. High-resolution Spectroscopy and Spectropolarimetry of Selected δ-Sct Pulsating Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Santosh; Semenko, Eugene; Moiseeva, A.; Sharma, Kaushal; Joshi, Y. C.; Sachkov, M.; Singh, Harinder P.; Yerra, Bharat Kumar

    2017-05-01

    The combination of photometry, spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry of the chemically peculiar stars often aims to study the complex physical phenomena such as stellar pulsation, chemical inhomogeneity, magnetic field and their interplay with stellar atmosphere and circumstellar environment. The prime objective of this study is to determine the atmospheric parameters of a set of Am stars to understand their evolutionary status. Atmospheric abundances and basic parameters are determined using full spectrum fitting technique by comparing the high-resolution spectra to the synthetic spectra. To know the evolutionary status, we derive the effective temperature and luminosity from different methods and compare them with the literature. The location of these stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram demonstrates that all the sample stars are evolved from the zero-age main sequence towards terminal-age main sequence and occupy the region of δ Sct instability strip. The abundance analysis shows that the light elements e.g. Ca and Sc are underabundant while iron peak elements such as Ba, Ce, etc. are overabundant and these chemical properties are typical for Am stars. The results obtained from the spectropolarimetric analysis of our studied stars show that the longitudinal magnetic field is negligible in all of them, which further support to their Am class of peculiarity.

  13. High-resolution spectroscopy of the extremely iron-poor post-AGB star CC Lyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Wako; Matsuno, Tadafumi; Honda, Satoshi; Parthasarathy, Mudumba; Li, Haining; Suda, Takuma

    2017-04-01

    High-resolution optical spectroscopy was conducted for the metal-poor post-AGB star CC Lyr to determine its chemical abundances and spectral line profiles. Our standard abundance analysis confirms its extremely low metallicity ([Fe/H] < -3.5) and a clear correlation between abundance ratios and the condensation temperature for 11 elements, indicating that dust depletion is the cause of the abundance anomaly of this object. The very low abundances of Sr and Ba, which are detected for the first time for this object, suggest that heavy neutron-capture elements are not significantly enhanced in this object by the s-process during its evolution through the AGB phase. The radial velocity of this object and profiles of some atomic absorption lines show variations depending on pulsation phases, which could be formed by dynamics of the atmosphere rather than by binarity or contributions of circumstellar absorption. On the other hand, the Hα emission with double peaks shows no evident velocity shift, suggesting that the emission is originating from the circumstellar matter, presumably the rotating disk around the object.

  14. High-resolution spectroscopy on the laser-cooling candidate La^{-}.

    PubMed

    Jordan, E; Cerchiari, G; Fritzsche, S; Kellerbauer, A

    2015-09-11

    The bound-bound transition from the 5d^{2}6s^{2} ^{3}F_{2}^{e} ground state to the 5d6s^{2}6p ^{3}D_{1}^{o} excited state in negative lanthanum has been proposed as a candidate for laser cooling, which has not yet been achieved for negative ions. Anion laser cooling holds the potential to allow the production of ultracold ensembles of any negatively charged species. We have studied the aforementioned transition in a beam of negative La ions by high-resolution laser spectroscopy. The center-of-gravity frequency was measured to be 96.592 80(10) THz. Seven of the nine expected hyperfine structure transitions were resolved. The observed peaks were unambiguously assigned to the predicted hyperfine transitions by a fit, confirmed by multiconfigurational self-consistent field calculations. From the determined hyperfine structure we conclude that La^{-} is a promising laser cooling candidate. Using this transition, only three laser beams would be required to repump all hyperfine levels of the ground state.

  15. High-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of metal compounds in neurodegenerative brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collingwood, J. F.; Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M. R.; Batich, C.; Streit, W. J.; Eskin, T.; Terry, J.; Barrea, R.; Underhill, R. S.; Dobson, J.

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence mapping and microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy are used to detect, locate and identify iron biominerals and other inorganic metal accumulations in neurodegenerative brain tissue at sub-cellular resolution (<5 microns). Recent progress in developing the technique is reviewed. Synchrotron X-rays are used to map tissue sections for metals of interest, and XANES and XAFS are used to characterise anomalous concentrations of the metals in-situ so that they can be correlated with tissue structures and disease pathology. Iron anomalies associated with biogenic magnetite, ferritin and haemoglobin are located and identified in an avian tissue model with a pixel resolution ~5 microns. Subsequent studies include brain tissue sections from transgenic Huntington's mice, and the first high-resolution mapping and identification of iron biominerals in human Alzheimer's and control autopsy brain tissue. Technical developments include use of microfocus diffraction to obtain structural information about biominerals in-situ, and depositing sample location grids by lithography for the location of anomalies by conventional microscopy. The combined techniques provide a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds and related metals in tissue. The information to be gained from this approach has implications for future diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration, and for our understanding of the mechanisms involved.

  16. Spectral characteristics of chlorites and Mg-serpentines using high- resolution reflectance spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, T.V.V.; Clark, R.N.

    1989-01-01

    The present laboratory study using high-resolution reflectance spectroscopy (0.25-2.7 ??m) focuses on two primary phyllosilicate groups, serpentines and chlorites. The results show that it is possible to spectrally distinguish between isochemical end-members of the Mg-rich serpentine group (chrysotile, antigorite, and lizardite) and to recognize spectral variations in chlorites as a function of Fe/Mg ratio (~8-38 wt% Fe). The position and relative strength of the 1.4-??m absorption feature in the trioctahedral chlorites appear to be correlated to the total iron content and/or the Mg/Si ratio and the loss on ignition values of the sample. Spectral differences in the 2.3-??m wavelength region can be attributed to differences in lattice environments and are characteristic for specific trioctahedral chlorites. The 1.4-??m feature in the isochemical Mg-rich serpentines (total iron content ~1.5-7.0 wt%) show marked spectral differences, apparently due to structural differences. -Authors

  17. Practical high resolution detection method for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew J. Effenberger Jr; Jill R. Scott

    2012-02-01

    A Fabry-Perot etalon was coupled to a Czerny-Turner spectrometer to acquire high-resolution measurements in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The spectrometer was built using an inexpensive etalon coupled to a standard 0.5-m imaging spectrometer. The Hg emission doublet at 313.2 nm was used to evaluate instrument performance because it has a splitting of 29 pm. The 313.2 nm doublet was chosen due to the similar splitting seen in isotope splitting from uranium at 424.437 nm, which is 25 pm. The Hg doublet was easily resolved from a continuous source Hg-lamp with a 2 s acquisition. The doublet was also resolved in LIBS spectra of cinnabar (HgS) from the accumulation of 600 laser shots at rate of 10 Hz, or 1 min, under a helium atmosphere. In addition to observed spitting of the 313.2 nm Hg doublet, the FWHM of the 313.1844 nm line from the doublet is reported at varying He atmospheric pressures. The high performance, low cost, and compact footprint makes this system highly competitive with 2-m double pass Czerny-Turner spectrometers.

  18. High-resolution Spectroscopy and Spectropolarimetry of Selected δ-Sct Pulsating Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Santosh; Semenko, Eugene; Moiseeva, A.; Sharma, Kaushal; Joshi, Y. C.; Sachkov, M.; Singh, Harinder P.; Kumar, Yerra Bharat

    2017-01-01

    The combination of photometry, spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry of the chemically peculiar stars often aims to study the complex physical phenomena such as stellar pulsation, chemical inhomogeneity, magnetic field and their interplay with stellar atmosphere and circumstellar environment. The prime objective of the present study is to determine the atmospheric parameters of a set of Am stars to understand their evolutionary status. Atmospheric abundances and basic parameters are determined using full spectrum fitting technique by comparing the high-resolution spectra to the synthetic spectra. To know the evolutionary status we derive the effective temperature and luminosity from different methods and compare them with the literature. The location of these stars in the H-R diagram demonstrate that all the sample stars are evolved from the Zero-Age-Main-Sequence towards Terminal-Age-Main-Sequence and occupy the region of δ Sct instability strip. The abundance analysis shows that the light elements e.g. Ca and Sc are underabundant while iron peak elements such as Ba, Ce etc. are overabundant and these chemical properties are typical for Am stars. The results obtained from the spectropolarimetric analysis shows that the longitudinal magnetic fields in all the studied stars are negligible that gives further support their Am class of peculiarity.

  19. Quantitative neuropathology by high resolution magic angle spinning proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, L. L.; Ma, M. J.; Becerra, L.; Ptak, T.; Tracey, I.; Lackner, A.; González, R. G.

    1997-01-01

    We describe a method that directly relates tissue neuropathological analysis to medical imaging. Presently, only indirect and often tenuous relationships are made between imaging (such as MRI or x-ray computed tomography) and neuropathology. We present a biochemistry-based, quantitative neuropathological method that can help to precisely quantify information provided by in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1HMRS), an emerging medical imaging technique. This method, high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) 1HMRS, is rapid and requires only small amounts of unprocessed samples. Unlike chemical extraction or other forms of tissue processing, this method analyzes tissue directly, thus minimizing artifacts. We demonstrate the utility of this method by assessing neuronal damage using multiple tissue samples from differently affected brain regions in a case of Pick disease, a human neurodegenerative disorder. Among different regions, we found an excellent correlation between neuronal loss shown by traditional neurohistopathology and decrease of the neuronal marker N-acetylaspartate measured by HRMAS 1HMRS. This result demonstrates for the first time, to our knowledge, a direct, quantitative link between a decrease in N-acetylaspartate and neuronal loss in a human neurodegenerative disease. As a quantitative method, HRMAS 1HMRS has potential applications in experimental and clinical neuropathologic investigations. It should also provide a rational basis for the interpretation of in vivo 1HMRS studies of human neurological disorders. PMID:9177231

  20. Differentiating brown and white adipose tissues by high-resolution diffusion NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sanjay Kumar; Nagashima, Kaz; Yaligar, Jadegoud; Michael, Navin; Lee, Swee Shean; Xianfeng, Tian; Gopalan, Venkatesh; Sadananthan, Suresh Anand; Anantharaj, Rengaraj; Velan, S Sendhil

    2017-01-01

    There are two types of fat tissues, white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT), which essentially perform opposite functions in whole body energy metabolism. There is a large interest in identifying novel biophysical properties of WAT and BAT by a quantitative and easy-to-run technique. In this work, we used high-resolution pulsed field gradient diffusion NMR spectroscopy to study the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of fat molecules in rat BAT and WAT samples. The ADC of fat in BAT and WAT from rats fed with a chow diet was compared with that of rats fed with a high-fat diet to monitor how the diffusion properties change due to obesity-associated parameters such as lipid droplet size, fatty acid chain length, and saturation. Feeding a high-fat diet resulted in increased saturation, increased chain lengths, and reduced ADC of fat in WAT. The ADC of fat was lower in BAT relative to WAT in rats fed both chow and high-fat diets. Diffusion of fat was restricted in BAT due to the presence of small multilocular lipid droplets. Our findings indicate that in vivo diffusion might be a potential way for better delineation of BAT and WAT in both lean and obese states.

  1. High-efficiency blazed transmission gratings for high-resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Bruccoleri, Alexander R.; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2015-09-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy of astrophysical sources is the key to gaining a quantitative understanding of the history, dynamics, and current conditions of the cosmos. A large-area (> 1,000 cm2), high resolving power (R = λ/Δλ> 3000) soft x-ray grating spectrometer (XGS) that covers the lines of C, N, O, Ne and Fe ions is the ideal tool to address a number of high-priority science questions from the 2010 Decadal Survey, such as the connection between super-massive black holes and large-scale structure via cosmic feedback, the evolution of large- scale structure, the behavior of matter at high densities, and the conditions close to black holes. While no grating missions or instruments are currently approved, an XGS aboard a potential future X-ray Surveyor could easily surpass the above performance metrics. To improve the chances for future soft x-ray grating spectroscopy missions or instruments, grating technology has to progress and advance to higher Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs). To that end we have developed Critical-Angle Transmission (CAT) gratings that combine the advantages of blazed reflection gratings (high efficiency, use of higher diffraction orders) with those of conventional transmission gratings (low mass, relaxed alignment tolerances and temperature requirements, high transparency at higher energies). A CAT grating-based spectrometer can provide performance 1-2 orders of magnitude better than current grating instruments on Chandra and Newton-XMM with minimal resource requirements. At present we have fabricated large-area freestanding CAT gratings with narrow integrated support structures from silicon-on- insulator wafers using advanced lithography and a combination of deep reactive-ion and wet etching. Our latest x-ray test results show record high absolute diffraction efficiencies in blazed orders in excess of 30% with room for improvement.

  2. Metabolomic Analysis of Rat Brain by High Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Tissue Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Norbert W.; Béraud, Evelyne; Cozzone, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of gene expression on the RNA and protein levels have long been used to explore biological processes underlying disease. More recently, genomics and proteomics have been complemented by comprehensive quantitative analysis of the metabolite pool present in biological systems. This strategy, termed metabolomics, strives to provide a global characterization of the small-molecule complement involved in metabolism. While the genome and the proteome define the tasks cells can perform, the metabolome is part of the actual phenotype. Among the methods currently used in metabolomics, spectroscopic techniques are of special interest because they allow one to simultaneously analyze a large number of metabolites without prior selection for specific biochemical pathways, thus enabling a broad unbiased approach. Here, an optimized experimental protocol for metabolomic analysis by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy is presented, which is the method of choice for efficient quantification of tissue metabolites. Important strengths of this method are (i) the use of crude extracts, without the need to purify the sample and/or separate metabolites; (ii) the intrinsically quantitative nature of NMR, permitting quantitation of all metabolites represented by an NMR spectrum with one reference compound only; and (iii) the nondestructive nature of NMR enabling repeated use of the same sample for multiple measurements. The dynamic range of metabolite concentrations that can be covered is considerable due to the linear response of NMR signals, although metabolites occurring at extremely low concentrations may be difficult to detect. For the least abundant compounds, the highly sensitive mass spectrometry method may be advantageous although this technique requires more intricate sample preparation and quantification procedures than NMR spectroscopy. We present here an NMR protocol adjusted to rat brain analysis; however, the same protocol can be applied to other tissues with minor

  3. High-efficiency blazed transmission gratings for high-resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Bruccoleri, Alexander R.; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy of astrophysical sources is the key to gaining a quantitative understanding of the history, dynamics, and current conditions of the cosmos. A large-area (> 1,000 cm2), high resolving power (R = λ/Δλ > 3,000) soft x-ray spectrometer that covers the lines of C, N, O, Ne and Fe ions is the ideal tool to address a number of high-priority sciences questions from the 2010 Decadal Survey, such as the connection between super-massive black holes and large-scale structure via cosmic feedback, the evolution of large-scale structure, the behavior of matter at high densities, and the conditions close to black holes. Numerous mission concepts that meet these requirements have been studied and proposed over the last few years, including grating instruments for the International X-ray Observatory. Nevertheless, no grating missions are currently approved. To improve the chances for future soft x-ray grating spectroscopy missions, grating technology has to progress and be advanced to higher TRLs. We have developed Critical-Angle Transmission (CAT) gratings that combine the advantages of blazed reflection gratings (high efficiency, use of higher diffraction orders) with those of conventional transmission gratings (low mass, relaxed alignment tolerances and temperature requirements, transparent at higher energies). A CAT grating-based spectrometer can provide performance 1-2 orders of magnitude better than current grating instruments on Chandra and Newton-XMM with minimal resource requirements. We have fabricated large-area free-standing CAT gratings with minimal integrated support structures from silicon-on-insulator wafers using advanced lithography and a combination of deep reactive-ion and wet etching, and will present our latest x-ray test results showing record high diffraction efficiencies in blazed orders.

  4. High-Resolution Dual-Comb Spectroscopy with Ultra-Low Noise Frequency Combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänsel, Wolfgang; Giunta, Michele; Beha, Katja; Perry, Adam J.; Holzwarth, R.

    2017-06-01

    Dual-comb spectroscopy is a powerful tool for fast broad-band spectroscopy due to the parallel interrogation of thousands of spectral lines. Here we report on the spectroscopic analysis of acetylene vapor in a pressurized gas cell using two ultra-low noise frequency combs with a repetition rate around 250 MHz. Optical referencing to a high-finesse cavity yields a sub-Hertz stability of all individual comb lines (including the virtual comb lines between 0 Hz and the carrier) and permits one to pick a small difference of repetition rate for the two frequency combs on the order of 300 Hz, thus representing an optical spectrum of 100 THz (˜3300 \\wn) within half the free spectral range (125 MHz). The transmission signal is derived straight from a photodetector and recorded with a high-resolution spectrum analyzer or digitized with a computer-controlled AD converter. The figure to the right shows a schematic of the experimental setup which is all fiber-coupled with polarization-maintaining fiber except for the spectroscopic cell. The graph on the lower right reveals a portion of the recorded radio-frequency spectrum which has been scaled to the optical domain. The location of the measured absorption coincides well with data taken from the HITRAN data base. Due to the intrinsic linewidth of all contributing comb lines, each sampling point in the transmission graph corresponds to the probing at an optical frequency with sub-Hertz resolution. This resolution is maintained in coherent wavelength conversion processes such as difference-frequency generation (DFG), sum-frequency generation (SFG) or non-linear broadening (self-phase modulation), and is therefore easily transferred to a wide spectral range from the mid infrared up to the visible spectrum.

  5. High Resolution Imaging Spectroscopy for Characterizing Soil Properties over Large Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, D.; Kumar, P.

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative mapping of high resolution surface soil texture (percentage sand, silt and clay), soil organic matter and chemical constituents are important for understanding infiltration, runoff and other surficial hydrologic processes at different scales. The Visible Near Infrared Analysis (VNIRA) method, which is a combination of imaging spectroscopy and laboratory chemical analysis with an underlying statistical model, has been established for the quantification of soil properties from imaging spectrometer data. In this study we characterize the feasibility of quantifying soil properties over large areas with the aim that these methods may be extended to space-borne sensors such as HyspIRI. Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) is a space-borne NASA mission concept having 10nm contiguous bands in the VSWIR region (380nm to 2500nm) of the electromagnetic spectra. High resolution (7.6m) Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data collected by NASA immediately after the massive 2011 Mississippi River floods at the Birds Point New Madrid (BPNM) floodway, coupled with in situ samples obtained at the time of the flight, is used to generate HyspIRI like data at 60m resolution. The VNIRA method is applied in a data-mining framework for quantification of the different soil textural properties and chemical constituents. The empirical models are further used for creating quantitative maps of the soil properties for the entire BPNM floodway. These maps are compared with the fine resolution AVIRIS maps of the same area for the different legacy landscape features and spatial correlations with the underlying topography immediately disturbed by the flooding event. The scales of variation in the soil constituents captured by the fine resolution data are also compared to the scales of variation captured by coarser resolution data. This study further explores the issues of applicability, challenges (such as the sensitivity of NDVI from mixed neighborhood pixels

  6. Synergistic effects of nuclear and electronic energy loss in KTaO3 under ion irradiation

    DOE PAGES

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Jin, Ke; Zhang, Yanwen; ...

    2017-01-09

    In this paper, we use the inelastic thermal spike model for insulators and molecular dynamic simulations to investigate the effects of pre-existing damage on the energy dissipation and structural alterations in KTaO3 under irradiation with 21 MeV Ni ions. Our results reveal a synergy between the pre-existing defects and the electronic energy loss, indicating that the defects play an important role on the energy deposition in the system. Our findings highlight the need for better understanding on the role of defects in electronic energy dissipation and the coupling of the electronic and atomic subsystems.

  7. Vanishing Electronic Energy Loss of Very Slow Light Ions in Insulators with Large Band Gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Markin, S. N.; Primetzhofer, D.; Bauer, P.

    2009-09-11

    Electronic energy loss of light ions in nanometer films of materials with large band gaps has been studied for very low velocities. For LiF, a threshold velocity is observed at 0.1 a.u. (250 eV/u), below which the ions move without transferring energy to the electronic system. For KCl, a lower (extrapolated) threshold velocity is found, identical for H and He ions. For SiO{sub 2}, no clear velocity threshold is observed for He particles. For protons and deuterons, electronic stopping is found to perfectly fulfill velocity scaling, as expected for binary ion-electron interaction.

  8. The relation between the electron energy loss spectra of hafnia and its dielectric function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vos, Maarten; Grande, Pedro Luis

    2014-12-01

    Recently two papers have been published deriving the dielectric function from hafnia from electron energy loss data (Jin et al. Applied Physics Letters 100 083713 (2006), Behar et al. Phys. Rev A. 80 062901 (2009)). The obtained dielectric functions are compared in their optical limit and differ considerably. Here we try to clarify the situation by presenting new experimental data and review the analysis procedure used in the earlier work. We conclude that the discrepancy is most likely caused by a shortcoming in the way that the momentum-dependence of the dielectric function is modelled.

  9. Effects of inverse degree on electronic structure and electron energy-loss spectrum in zinc ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, D.; Wang, M. X.; Zhang, Z. H.; Tao, H. L.; He, M.; Song, B.; Li, Q.

    2015-12-01

    First-principles calculations were performed to study the effects of inverse degree in zinc ferrite on electronic structure and properties. The electron energy-loss near-edge fine structure (ELNES) were simulated, and the splitting of peak and intensities of the oxygen K-edges can be used to identify the inversion of zinc ferrite. More Fe3+ transferring from the octahedral sites to the tetrahedral sites lead to the changing of the ligand shells surrounding the absorbing atom, accounting for the observed changing in ELNES. The standard criterion for determining the reversal extent of the cations in zinc ferrite by ELNES was given.

  10. Electronic energy loss spectra from mono-layer to few layers of phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Brij; Thakur, Rajesh; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    Using first principles calculations, electronic and optical properties of few-layers phosphorene has been investigated. Electronic band structure show a moderate band gap of 0.9 eV in monolayer phosphorene which decreases with increasing number of layers. Optical properties of few-layers of phosphorene in infrared and visible region shows tunability with number of layers. Electron energy loss function has been plotted and huge red shift in plasmonic behaviours is found. These tunable electronic and optical properties of few-layers of phosphorene can be useful for the applications of optoelectronic devices.

  11. Electronic energy loss spectra from mono-layer to few layers of phosphorene

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, Brij Thakur, Rajesh; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2016-05-23

    Using first principles calculations, electronic and optical properties of few-layers phosphorene has been investigated. Electronic band structure show a moderate band gap of 0.9 eV in monolayer phosphorene which decreases with increasing number of layers. Optical properties of few-layers of phosphorene in infrared and visible region shows tunability with number of layers. Electron energy loss function has been plotted and huge red shift in plasmonic behaviours is found. These tunable electronic and optical properties of few-layers of phosphorene can be useful for the applications of optoelectronic devices.

  12. High-resolution infrared spectroscopy of ethane in Titan's stratosphere in the Huygens epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livengood, T. A.; Kostiuk, T.; Sonnabend, G.; Annen, J. N.; Fast, K. E.; Tokunaga, A.; Murakawa, K.; Hewagama, T.; Schmülling, F.; Schieder, R.

    2006-11-01

    High-resolution infrared spectroscopy of ethane (C2H6) emission features formed in the stratosphere of Titan was collected on disc center at 11.74 μm wavelength (851 cm-1) on 15 January 2005 UT. The observations were obtained at the Subaru 8.2 m telescope of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, using the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Heterodyne Instrument for Planetary Winds and Composition (HIPWAC). Fully resolved rotational-vibrational transitions of C2H6 were measured with resolving power λ/Δλ >= 106 by infrared heterodyne spectroscopy (IRHS). The spectrum is reproduced most effectively by vertical profiles of ethane abundance that are uniform through the stratosphere and enhanced within the mesosphere. Profiles in which there is a significant gradient within the stratosphere are not favored. The retrieved stratospheric ethane mole fraction depends weakly on the form invoked for the mesospheric enhancement. Two forms of the ethane mole fraction profile are found to reproduce the observed spectrum effectively: the best fitting results are obtained with a profile in which the mesospheric ethane concentration increases logarithmically versus decreasing pressure, retrieving a stratospheric ethane concentration of 8.2 +/- 2.1 × 10-6 (1σ), increasing proportional to p-1.2 from the stratopause through the mesosphere (p is pressure). A second form of profile, in which the mesospheric ethane concentration is enhanced uniformly by a factor of 9.5, retrieves a stratospheric concentration of 9.7 +/- 4.9 × 10-6 (1σ), with the enhancement discontinuity at about one scale height above the stratopause. The retrieved stratospheric mole fraction is consistent with earlier retrievals from IRHS and is somewhat less than contemporaneous retrievals from infrared spectroscopy at lower resolution by the Cassini spacecraft. The retrieved mesospheric concentration is consistent with in situ measurements in Titan's thermosphere made by the

  13. Imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy of the Planetary Nebula NGC 3242

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Muñoz, Marco Antonio; Wendolyn Blanco Cárdenas, Mónica; Vázquez, Roberto; Zavala, Saúl A.; Guillén, Pedro F.; Ayala, Sandra A.

    2015-08-01

    We present a high-resolution imaging and high-dispersion spectroscopy study of the complex morphological and kinematical structure of the planetary nebula NGC 3242. We analyze narrowband Hα, [O III] and [N II] images, addressing important morphological features: in the [O III] image we found one knot oriented to PA=-4°, in the [N II] image, three knots oriented at PA1=155°, PA2=+157°, and PA3=-45.5°, and in the Hα image, two bubbles in the internal region, one of them oriented toward SE and the other toward NW. Additionally we used the unsharp-masking technique and found faint structures in the halo that have not been studied before. These structures are presented in two pairs of arcs, one pair oriented toward PA=-35° and the other toward PA=140°. NGC 3242 is a morphologically rich PN with bubbles, asymmetrical outflows, and some knots in a double-shell nebular structure. Ground-based long-slit echelle spectra were obtained crossing NGC 3242 at twelve different positions to precisely determine kinematical features in the structure of the nebula. We obtain a systemic velocity of VLSR=-6.6 km/s. We have used the software SHAPE (Steffen et al. 2011, IEEE Trans. Vis. Comput. Graphics, 17, 454), to reconstruct a 3D model of NGC 3242 which fits all our observational data. Preliminary results (deprojected velocities and kinematical ages) of all these structures will be presented.This project has been supported by grant PAPIIT-DGAPA-UNAM IN107914. MWB is in grateful receipt of a DGAPA-UNAM postdoctoral scholarship. MAG acknowledges CONACYT for his graduate scholarship.

  14. High Resolution Far Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy of the NH_2 Radical.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Drumel, M. A.; Pirali, O.; Balcon, D.; Vervloet, M.

    2011-06-01

    First identified toward Sgr B2, the NH_2 radical has recently been detected in the interstellar medium by the HIFI instrument on board of Herschel. Despite the fact that this radical has not been detected in brown dwarfs and exoplanets yet, it is already included in physical and chemical models of those environments (temperature higher than 2000 K expected in several objects). Its detection in those objects will depend on the existence of a reliable high temperature and high resolution spectroscopic database on the NH_2 radical.The absorption spectrum of NH_2 has been recorded between 15 and 700 Cm-1 at the highest resolution available using the Bruker IFS125HR Fourier transform interferometer connected to the far infrared AILES beamline at SOLEIL (R=0.001 Cm-1). The radical was produced by an electrical discharge (DC) through a continuous flow of NH_3 and He using the White-type discharge cell developped on the beamline (optical path: 24m). Thanks to the brilliance of the synchrotron radiation, more than 700 pure rotational transitions of NH_2 have been identified with high N values (NMax=25) in its fundamental and first excited vibrational modes. By comparison to the previous FT spectroscopic study on that radical in the FIR spectral range, asymmetric splitting as well as fine and hyperfine structure have been resolved for several transitions. E. F. Van Dishoeck, D. J. Jansen, P. Schilke, T. G. Phillips The Astrophysical Journal 416, L83-L86 (1993) C. M. Persson, J. H. Black, J. Cernicharo et al. Astronomy and Astrophysics 521, L45 (2010) K. Lodders and B. Fegley, Jr Icarus 155, 393-424 (2002) I. Morino and K. Kawaguchi Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy 182, 428-438 (1997)

  15. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Stratospheric Ethane Following the Jupiter Impact of 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fast, Kelly; Kostiuk, Theodor; Livengood, Timothy A.; Hewagama, Tilak; Amen, John

    2010-01-01

    We report on high-resolution infrared spectroscopy of ethane (C2H6) performed at the latitude of an impact site on Jupiter discovered on 19 July 2009 by A. Wesley from a location in Murrumbateman, Australia. The observations used the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Heterodyne Instrument for Planetary Wind and Composition (HIPWAC) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. HIPWAC is a mid-infrared (9-12 microns) heterodyne spectrometer operating at the highest limit of spectral resolving power (lambda\\Delta\\lambda > l06), providing information on atmospheric constituent abundance and temperature through fully resolved tine shapes. Ethane is a stable trace product of methane photochemistry that is nearly uniformly mixed in Jupiter's stratosphere, providing an effective probe of that altitude region. Ethane emission line profiles near 11,74 microns in the Ug band were measured in Jupiter's stratosphere at 25 MHz (11.00083/cm) resolution. A sequence of spectra of ethane acquired over a range of longitude at the impact latitude (56S planetocentric) probes constituent abundance and temperature profile, both on and off the impact region. Near the site of the impact, ethane emission increased above levels measured well outside the impact region. Radiative transfer analysis indicates increased ethane mole fraction (30% greater). Variation in the measured continuum level and line intensities within 75deg of the impact longitude indicate the presence of an opacity source (haze) at altitudes near and above the tropopause and as high as the 10-mbar level near the impact site. The indication of possible haze opacity up to the 10-mbar level in the atmosphere is consistent with measurements made by HIPWAC's predecessor as part of the IRTF Shoemaker Levy-9 campaign in 1994.

  16. IGRINS Near-IR High-resolution Spectroscopy of Multiple Jets around LkHα 234

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Heeyoung; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Yuk, In-Soo; Park, Byeong-Gon; Park, Chan; Chun, Moo-Young; Pak, Soojong; Kim, Kang-Min; Sok Oh, Jae; Jeong, Ueejeong; Yu, Young Sam; Lee, Jae-Joon; Kim, Hwihyun; Hwang, Narae; Kaplan, Kyle; Pavel, Michael; Mace, Gregory; Lee, Hye-In; Nguyen Le, Huynh Anh; Lee, Sungho; Jaffe, Daniel T.

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of high-resolution near-IR spectroscopy toward the multiple outflows around the Herbig Be star LkHα 234 using the Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph. Previous studies indicate that the region around LkHα 234 is complex, with several embedded young stellar objects and the outflows associated with them. In simultaneous H- and K-band spectra from HH 167, we detected 5 [Fe ii] and 14 H2 emission lines. We revealed a new [Fe ii] jet driven by radio continuum source VLA 3B. Position-velocity diagrams of the H2 1-0 S(1) λ2.122 μm line show multiple velocity peaks. The kinematics may be explained by a geometrical bow shock model. We detected a component of H2 emission at the systemic velocity (VLSR = -10.2 km s-1) along the whole slit in all slit positions, which may arise from the ambient photodissociation region. Low-velocity gas dominates the molecular hydrogen emission from knots A and B in HH 167, which is close to the systemic velocity; [Fe ii] emission lines are detected farther from the systemic velocity, at VLSR = -100--130 km s-1. We infer that the H2 emission arises from shocked gas entrained by a high-velocity outflow. Population diagrams of H2 lines imply that the gas is thermalized at a temperature of 2500-3000 K and the emission results from shock excitation. This paper includes data taken at The McDonald Observatory of The University of Texas at Austin.

  17. IGRINS NEAR-IR HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF MULTIPLE JETS AROUND LkHα 234

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Heeyoung; Yuk, In-Soo; Park, Byeong-Gon; Park, Chan; Chun, Moo-Young; Kim, Kang-Min; Oh, Jae Sok; Jeong, Ueejeong; Yu, Young Sam; Lee, Jae-Joon; Kim, Hwihyun; Hwang, Narae; Lee, Sungho; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Pak, Soojong; Lee, Hye-In; Le, Huynh Anh Nguyen; Kaplan, Kyle; Pavel, Michael; Mace, Gregory; and others

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of high-resolution near-IR spectroscopy toward the multiple outflows around the Herbig Be star LkHα 234 using the Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph. Previous studies indicate that the region around LkHα 234 is complex, with several embedded young stellar objects and the outflows associated with them. In simultaneous H- and K-band spectra from HH 167, we detected 5 [Fe ii] and 14 H{sub 2} emission lines. We revealed a new [Fe ii] jet driven by radio continuum source VLA 3B. Position–velocity diagrams of the H{sub 2} 1−0 S(1) λ2.122 μm line show multiple velocity peaks. The kinematics may be explained by a geometrical bow shock model. We detected a component of H{sub 2} emission at the systemic velocity (V{sub LSR} = −10.2 km s{sup −1}) along the whole slit in all slit positions, which may arise from the ambient photodissociation region. Low-velocity gas dominates the molecular hydrogen emission from knots A and B in HH 167, which is close to the systemic velocity; [Fe ii] emission lines are detected farther from the systemic velocity, at V{sub LSR} = −100–−130 km s{sup −1}. We infer that the H{sub 2} emission arises from shocked gas entrained by a high-velocity outflow. Population diagrams of H{sub 2} lines imply that the gas is thermalized at a temperature of 2500–3000 K and the emission results from shock excitation.

  18. Development of an Apparatus for High-Resolution Auger Photoelectron Coincidence Spectroscopy (APECS) and Electron Ion Coincidence (EICO) Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakiuchi, Takuhiro; Hashimoto, Shogo; Fujita, Narihiko; Mase, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Okusawa, Makoto

    We have developed an electron electron ion coincidence (EEICO) apparatus for high-resolution Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy (APECS) and electron ion coincidence (EICO) spectroscopy. It consists of a coaxially symmetric mirror electron energy analyzer (ASMA), a miniature double-pass cylindrical mirror electron energy analyzer (DP-CMA), a miniature time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer (TOF-MS), a magnetic shield, an xyz stage, a tilt-adjustment mechanism, and a conflat flange with an outer diameter of 203 mm. A sample surface was irradiated by synchrotron radiation, and emitted electrons were energy-analyzed and detected by the ASMA and the DP-CMA, while desorbed ions were mass-analyzed and detected by the TOF-MS. The performance of the new EEICO analyzer was evaluated by measuring Si 2p photoelectron spectra of clean Si(001)-2×1 and Si(111)-7×7, and by measuring Si-L23VV-Si-2p Auger photoelectron coincidence spectra (Si-L23VV-Si-2p APECS) of clean Si(001)-2×1.

  19. Probing Chemical Dynamics with High Resolution Spectroscopy: Chirped-Pulse Fourier-Transform Microwave Spectroscopy Coupled with a Hyperthermal Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidwell, Nathanael M.; Vara, Vanesa Vaquero; Mehta-Hurt, Deepali N.; Korn, Joseph A.; Dian, Brian C.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2013-06-01

    Chirped-pulse Fourier-transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectroscopy has proven to be a well-suited technique for the rapid study and spectral identification of molecular species due to its ultra-broadband capability and excellent specificity to molecular structure from high-resolution rotational transitions. This talk will describe initial results from combining CP-FTMW detection with a hyperthermal nozzle source. This source has the advantage of producing traditionally high thermal product densities in a pulsed supersonic expansion with a short contact time compared to conventional pyrolysis. Used in tandem, CP-FTMW spectroscopy and the hyperthermal nozzle in a supersonic expansion is a powerful method that can produce and detect changes in conformation and isomer populations, and characterize important intermediates on the reaction surface of a precursor. In particular, we show its utility to provide insight into the unimolecular decomposition pathways of model lignin compounds and alternative biofuels. Preliminary results will be discussed including spectroscopic evidence for formation of cyclopentadienone in the pyrolysis of a lignin derivative guaiacol (o-methoxyphenol).

  20. Valence electron energy loss study of Fe-doped SrTiO3 and a sigma13 boundary: electronic structure and dispersion forces.

    PubMed

    van Benthem, K; French, R H; Sigle, W; Elsässer, C; Rühle, M

    2001-02-01

    Valence electron energy loss spectroscopy in a dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope has been used to obtain the interband transition strength of a sigma13 tilt grain boundary in SrTiO3. In a first step the electronic structure of bulk SrTiO3 has been analysed quantitatively by comparing VEELS spectra with vacuum ultraviolet spectra and with ab initio density of states calculations. The electronic structure of a near sigma13 grain boundary and the corresponding dispersion forces were then determined by spatially resolved VEELS. Also the effects of delocalization of the inelastic scattering processes were estimated and compared with results from the literature.

  1. Chemical Bonding of AlH3 Hydride by Al-L2,3 Electron Energy-Loss Spectra and First-Principles Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Tatsumi, Kazuyoshi; Muto, Shunsuke; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Orimo, Shin-Ichi

    2012-01-01

    In a previous study, we used transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss (EEL) spectroscopy to investigate dehydrogenation of AlH3 particles. In the present study, we systematically examine differences in the chemical bonding states of Al-containing compounds (including AlH3) by comparing their Al-L2,3 EEL spectra. The spectral chemical shift and the fine peak structure of the spectra were consistent with the degree of covalent bonding of Al. This finding will be useful for future nanoscale analysis of AlH3 dehydrogenation toward the cell. PMID:28816996

  2. Chemical Bonding of AlH₃ Hydride by Al-L2,3 Electron Energy-Loss Spectra and First-Principles Calculations.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Kazuyoshi; Muto, Shunsuke; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Orimo, Shin-Ichi

    2012-03-30

    In a previous study, we used transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss (EEL) spectroscopy to investigate dehydrogenation of AlH₃ particles. In the present study, we systematically examine differences in the chemical bonding states of Al-containing compounds (including AlH₃) by comparing their Al-L2,3 EEL spectra. The spectral chemical shift and the fine peak structure of the spectra were consistent with the degree of covalent bonding of Al. This finding will be useful for future nanoscale analysis of AlH₃ dehydrogenation toward the cell.

  3. Exploiting high resolution Fourier transform spectroscopy to inform the development of a quantum cascade laser based explosives detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlysle, Felicity; Nic Daeid, Niamh; Normand, Erwan; McCulloch, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) is regularly used in forensic analysis, however the application of high resolution Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy for the detection of explosive materials and explosive precursors has not been fully explored. This project aimed to develop systematically a protocol for the analysis of explosives and precursors using Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy and basic data analysis to enable the further development of a quantum cascade laser (QCL) based airport detection system. This paper details the development of the protocol and results of the initial analysis of compounds of interest.

  4. A search for inversion layers in hot Jupiters with high-resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, Callie; Birkby, Jayne; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes

    2017-01-01

    At present, the existence of thermal inversion layers in hot Jupiter atmospheres is uncertain due to conflicting results on their detection. However, understanding the thermal structure of exoplanet atmospheres is crucial to measuring their chemical compositions because the two quantities are highly interdependent. Here, we present high-resolution infrared spectroscopy of a hot Jupiter taken at 3.5 μm with CRIRES (R~100,000) on the Very Large Telescope. We directly detect the spectrum of the planet by tracing the radial-velocity shift of water features in its atmosphere during approximately one tenth of its orbit. We removed telluric contamination effects and the lines of the host star from our observed combined light spectra using singular value decomposition, then cross-correlated these processed spectra with a grid of high spectral resolution molecular templates containing features from water, methane, and carbon dioxide. The templates included atmospheric profiles with and without thermal inversion i.e. emission and absorption lines, respectively. We find evidence of water emission features in the planet’s dayside spectrum at a signal-to-noise of 4.7, indicative of a thermal inversion in the planet's atmosphere within the pressures ranges probed by our observations. The direct detection of emission lines at high spectral resolution in the planet spectrum make it one of the most unambiguous detections of a thermal inversion layer in an exoplanet atmosphere to date. However, we are carrying out further data analysis to ensure the robustness of the signal. Future observations of other molecules that could cause inversion layers, e.g. titanium oxide, would provide strong additional evidence of the inversion and help further our understanding of the behavior of highly irradiated giant planet atmospheres.The SAO REU program is funded in part by the National Science Foundation REU and Department of Defense ASSURE programs under NSF Grant no. 1262851, and by the

  5. Emerging Trends on the Volatile Chemistry in Comets as Measured with High-Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dello Russo, Neil; Kawakita, Hideyo; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Weaver, Harold A.

    2016-10-01

    A systematic analysis of the mixing ratios with respect to H2O for eight species (CH3OH, HCN, NH3, H2CO, C2H2, C2H6, CH4, and CO) measured with high-resolution infrared spectroscopy is presented. Some trends are beginning to emerge when mixing ratios in individual comets are compared to average mixing ratios obtained for all species within the population. The variation in mixing ratios for all measured species is at least an order of magnitude. Overall, Jupiter-family comets are depleted in volatile species with respect to H2O compared to long-period Oort cloud comets, with the most volatile species showing the greatest relative depletion. There is a high positive correlation between the mixing ratios of HCN, C2H6, and CH4, whereas NH3, H2CO, and C2H2 are moderately correlated with each other but generally uncorrelated or show only weak correlation with other species. CO is generally uncorrelated with the other measured species possibly because it has the highest volatility and is therefore more susceptible to thermal evolutionary effects. Molecular mixing ratios for CH3OH, HCN, C2H6, and CH4 show an expected behavior with heliocentric distance suggesting a dominant ice source, whereas there is emerging evidence that the mixing ratios of NH3, H2CO, and C2H2 may increase at small heliocentric distances, suggesting the possibility of additional sources related to the thermal decomposition of organic dust. Although this provides information on the composition of the most volatile grains in comets, it presents an additional difficulty in classifying comet chemistry because most comets within this dataset were only observed over a limited range of heliocentric distance. Optical and infrared comparisons indicate that mixing ratios of daughter species and potential parents from cometary ices are sometimes but not always consistent with one another. This suggests that in many comets there are significant sources of C2 and/or CN from grains, and that the importance of these

  6. High Resolution Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Au_2^- and Au_4^- by Photoelectron Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2013-06-01

    We report high resolution photoelectron spectra of Au_2^- and Au_4^- obtained with a newly-built photoelectron imaging apparatus. Gold anions are produced by laser vaporization and the desired specie is mass selected and focused into the collinear velocity-map imaging (VMI) lens assembly. The design of the imaging lens has allowed us to obtain less than 0.9% energy resolution for high kinetic energy electrons ( > 1eV) while maintaining wavenumber resolution for low kinetic energy electrons. Although gold dimer and tetramer have been studied in the past, we present spectroscopic results under high resolution. For Au_2^-, we report high resolution spectra with an accurate determination of the electron affinity together with a complete vibrational assignment, for both the anion and neutral ground states, while for Au_4^-, we are able to resolve a low frequency mode and obtain accurately the adiabatic detachment energy.

  7. Single particle plasmon spectroscopy of silver nanowires and gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    N'Gom, Moussa; Ringnalda, Jan; Mansfield, John F; Agarwal, Ashish; Kotov, Nicholas; Zaluzec, Nestor J; Norris, Theodore B

    2008-10-01

    The excitation of surface plasmons in individual silver nanowires and gold nanorods is investigated by means of high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscope. The transverse and longitudinal modes of these nanostructures are resolved, and the size variation of the plasmon peaks is studied. The effect of electromagnetic coupling between closely spaced nanoparticles is also observed. Finally, the relation between energy-loss measurements and optical spectroscopy of nanoparticle plasmon modes is discussed.

  8. Measurement of Absolute Excitation Cross Sections in Highly-Charged Ions Using Electron Energy Loss and Merged Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Smith, Steven J.; Lozano, J.

    2002-01-01

    There is increasing emphasis during this decade on understanding energy balance and phenomena observed in high electron temperature plasmas. The UV spectral return from FUSE, the X-ray spectral return from the HETG on Chandra and the LETGS 011 XMM-Newton are just beginning. Line emissions are almost entirely from highly-charged ions (HCIs) of C, N, 0, Ne, Mg, S, Si, Ca, and Fe. The Constellation-X mission will provide X-ray spectroscopy up to photon energies of 0.12 nm (10 keV) where primary line emitters will be HCIs. A variety of atomic parameters are required to model the stellar and solar plasma. These include cross sections for excitation, ionization, charge-exchange, X-ray emission, direct and indirect recombination, lifetimes and branching ratios, and dependences on l, m mixing by external E and B fields. In almost all cases the atomic quantities are calculated, and few comparisons to experiment have been carried out. Collision strengths and Einstein A-values are required to convert the observed spectral intensities to electron temperatures and densities in the stellar plasma. The JPL electron energy-loss and merged beam approach has been used to measure absolute collision strengths in a number of ions, with critical comparison made to the best available theories.

  9. Quantitative analysis of electron energy loss spectra and modelling of optical properties of multilayer systems for extreme ultraviolet radiation regime

    SciTech Connect

    Gusenleitner, S.; Hauschild, D.; Reinert, F.; Handick, E.

    2014-03-28

    Ruthenium capped multilayer coatings for use in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation regime have manifold applications in science and industry. Although the Ru cap shall protect the reflecting multilayers, the surface of the heterostructures suffers from contamination issues and surface degradation. In order to get a better understanding of the effects of these impurities on the optical parameters, reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) measurements of contaminated and H cleaned Ru multilayer coatings were taken at various primary electron beam energies. Experiments conducted at low primary beam energies between 100 eV and 1000 eV are very surface sensitive due to the short inelastic mean free path of the electrons in this energy range. Therefore, influences of the surface condition on the above mentioned characteristics can be appraised. In this paper, it can be shown that carbon and oxide impurities on the mirror surface decrease the transmission of the Ru cap by about 0.75% and the overall reflectance of the device is impaired as the main share of the non-transmitted EUV light is absorbed in the contamination layer.

  10. Detecting single atoms of calcium and iron in biological structures by electron energy-loss spectrum-imaging.

    PubMed

    Leapman, R D

    2003-04-01

    As techniques for electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) reach a higher degree of optimization, experimental detection limits for analysing biological structures are approaching values predicted by the physics of the electron scattering. Theory indicates that it should be possible to detect a single atom of certain elements like calcium and iron contained in a macromolecular assembly using a finely focused probe in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). To test this prediction, EELS elemental maps have been recorded with the spectrum-imaging technique in a VG Microscopes HB501 STEM coupled to a Gatan Enfina spectrometer, which is equipped with an efficient charge-coupled device (CCD) array detector. By recording spectrum-images of haemoglobin adsorbed onto a thin carbon film, it is shown that the four heme groups in a single molecule can be detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 10 : 1. Other measurements demonstrate that calcium adsorbed onto a thin carbon film can be imaged at single atom sensitivity with a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 5 : 1. Despite radiation damage due to the necessarily high electron dose, it is anticipated that mapping single atoms of metals and other bound elements will find useful applications in characterizing large protein assemblies.

  11. Magnetic dynamics studied by high-resolution electron spectroscopy and time-resolved electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Rajeswari

    Future information technology requires an increased magnetically encoded data density and novel electromagnetic modes of data transfer. While to date magnetic properties are observed and characterized mostly statically, the need emerges to monitor and capture their fast dynamics. In this talk, I will focus on the spin dynamics i.e. spin wave excitations and the dynamics of a new topological distribution of spins termed ``skyrmions''. Wave packets of spin waves offer the unique capability to transport a quantum bit, the spin, without the transport of charge or mass. Here, large wave-vector spin waves are of particular interest as they admit spin localization within a few nanometers. By using our recently developed electron energy loss spectrometer, we could study such spin waves in ultrathin films with an unprecedented energy resolution of 4 meV. By virtue of the finite penetration depth of low energy electrons, spin waves localized at interfaces between a substrate and a thin capping layer can be been studied yielding information about the exchange coupling between atoms at the interface. The quantization of spin waves with wave vectors perpendicular to the film gives rise to standing modes to which EELS has likewise access. Such studies when carried out as function of the film thickness again yield information on the layer dependence of the exchange coupling. Magnetic skyrmions are promising candidates as information carriers in logic or storage devices. Currently, little is known about the influence of disorder, defects, or external stimuli on the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the skyrmion lattice. In this talk, I will describe the dynamical role of disorder in a large and flat thin film of Cu2OSeO3, exhibiting a skyrmion phase in an insulating material. We image up to 70,000 skyrmions by means of cryo-Lorentz Transmission Electron Microscopy as a function of the applied magnetic field. In the skyrmion phase, dislocations are shown to cause the

  12. Simulation of Probe Position-Dependent Electron Energy-Loss Fine Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Oxley, M. P.; Kapetanakis, M. D.; Prange, Micah P.; Varela, M.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2014-03-31

    We present a theoretical framework for calculating probe-position-dependent electron energy-loss near-edge structure for the scanning transmission electron microscope by combining density functional theory with dynamical scattering theory. We show how simpler approaches to calculating near-edge structure fail to include the fundamental physics needed to understand the evolution of near-edge structure as a function of probe position and investigate the dependence of near-edge structure on probe size. It is within this framework that density functional theory should be presented, in order to ensure that variations of near-edge structure are truly due to local electronic structure and how much from the diffraction and focusing of the electron beam.

  13. The effect of electronic energy loss on irradiation-induced grain growth in nanocrystalline oxides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanwen; Aidhy, Dilpuneet S; Varga, Tamas; Moll, Sandra; Edmondson, Philip D; Namavar, Fereydoon; Jin, Ke; Ostrouchov, Christopher N; Weber, William J

    2014-05-07

    Grain growth of nanocrystalline materials is generally thermally activated, but can also be driven by irradiation at much lower temperature. In nanocrystalline ceria and zirconia, energetic ions deposit their energy to both atomic nuclei and electrons. Our experimental results have shown that irradiation-induced grain growth is dependent on the total energy deposited, where electronic energy loss and elastic collisions between atomic nuclei both contribute to the production of disorder and grain growth. Our atomistic simulations reveal that a high density of disorder near grain boundaries leads to locally rapid grain movement. The additive effect from both electronic excitation and atomic collision cascades on grain growth demonstrated in this work opens up new possibilities for controlling grain sizes to improve functionality of nanocrystalline materials.

  14. Reflection electron energy loss spectrum of single layer graphene measured on a graphite substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Wolfgang S. M.; Bellissimo, Alessandra; Leber, Roland; Ashraf, Afshan; Segui, Silvina

    2015-05-01

    Reflection electron energy loss spectra (REELS) have been measured on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) sample. Two spectra were measured for different energies, 1600 eV, being more sensitive to the bulk and 500 eV being more sensitive to the surface. The energy loss distributions for a single surface and bulk excitation were extracted from the two spectra using a simple decomposition procedure. These single scattering loss distributions correspond to electron trajectories with significantly different penetration depths and agree with energy loss spectra measured on free standing single layer graphene and multilayer graphene (i.e. graphite). This result implies that for a layered electron gas (LEG) material, the number of layers which responds in a correlated fashion to an external perturbation is determined by the depth range penetrated by the external perturbation, and not by the number of layers actually present in the specimen.

  15. An electron energy loss spectrometer based streak camera for time resolved TEM measurements.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hasan; Eriksson, Johan; Li, Hu; Jafri, S Hassan M; Kumar, M S Sharath; Ögren, Jim; Ziemann, Volker; Leifer, Klaus

    2017-05-01

    We propose an experimental setup based on a streak camera approach inside an energy filter to measure time resolved properties of materials in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). In order to put in place the streak camera, a beam sweeper was built inside an energy filter. After exciting the TEM sample, the beam is swept across the CCD camera of the filter. We describe different parts of the setup at the example of a magnetic measurement. This setup is capable to acquire time resolved diffraction patterns, electron energy loss spectra (EELS) and images with total streaking times in the range between 100ns and 10μs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison between Monte Carlo and experimental aluminum and silicon electron energy loss spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dapor, Maurizio; Calliari, Lucia; Scarduelli, Giorgina

    2011-07-01

    A Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is described and used to calculate the energy distribution spectra of backscattered electrons from Al and Si. For the simulations, elastic scattering cross sections are calculated by numerically solving the Dirac equation in a central field. Inelastic scattering cross sections are computed within the dielectric response theory developed by Ritchie, and by Tung et al. Extension from the optical case to non-zero momentum transfer is done according to Ritchie and Howie. To evaluate surface and bulk contributions to the spectra, the Monte Carlo model treats the surface excitations according to the Werner differential surface and volume excitation probability theory. The Monte Carlo calculations are compared with the experimental reflection electron energy loss (REEL) spectra acquired in our laboratory.

  17. Design and performance of a spin-polarized electron energy loss spectrometer with high momentum resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilyev, D.; Kirschner, J.

    2016-08-15

    We describe a new “complete” spin-polarized electron energy loss spectrometer comprising a spin-polarized primary electron source, an imaging electron analyzer, and a spin analyzer of the “spin-polarizing mirror” type. Unlike previous instruments, we have a high momentum resolution of less than 0.04 Å{sup −1}, at an energy resolution of 90-130 meV. Unlike all previous studies which reported rather broad featureless data in both energy and angle dependence, we find richly structured spectra depending sensitively on small changes of the primary energy, the kinetic energy after scattering, and of the angle of incidence. The key factor is the momentum resolution.

  18. Coordination defects in bismuth-modified arsenic selenide glasses: High-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Golovchak, Roman; Shpotyuk, Oleh

    2008-05-01

    The possibility of coordination defects formation in Bi-modified chalcogenide glasses is examined by high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results provide evidence for the formation of positively charged fourfold coordinated defects on As and Bi sites in glasses with low Bi concentration. At high Bi concentration, mixed As{sub 2}Se{sub 3}-Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanocrystallites are formed in the investigated Se-rich As-Se glasses.

  19. Tunneling and tunneling switching dynamics in phenol and its isotopomers from high-resolution FTIR spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Albert, Sieghard; Lerch, Philippe; Prentner, Robert; Quack, Martin

    2013-01-02

    Tunneling and chemical reactions by tunneling switching are reported for phenol and ortho-deuterophenol on the basis of high-resolution FTIR spectroscopy. Tunneling splittings are measured for the torsional motion in the ground and several vibrationally excited states of phenol. Tunneling times range from 10 ns to 1 ps, depending on excitation. For more-highly excited torsional levels in ortho-deuterophenol, delocalization and chemical reaction by tunneling switching is found.

  20. Synchrotron-based rotationally resolved high-resolution FTIR spectroscopy of azulene and the unidentified infrared bands of astronomy.

    PubMed

    Albert, Sieghard; Lerch, Philippe; Quack, Martin

    2013-10-07

    Chasing the unidentified IR bands: The first rotationally resolved high-resolution infrared spectrum of azulene is reported using synchrotron Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy including a rovibrational analysis of the out-of-plane fundamental ν44. Comparison of azulene, naphthalene, indole, and biphenyl infrared bands leads to coincidences with UIR bands at 12.8 μm with naphthalene and at 13.55 and 14.6 μm with biphenyl bands, but excluding azulene as a strong absorber.

  1. High-Resolution Vibration-Rotation Spectroscopy of CO[subscript 2]: Understanding the Boltzmann Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Karen J.

    2007-01-01

    In this undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory experiment, students acquire a high-resolution infrared absorption spectrum of carbon dioxide and use their data to show that the rotational-vibrational state populations follow a Boltzmann distribution. Data are acquired with a mid-infrared laser source and infrared detector. Appropriate…

  2. High-Resolution Vibration-Rotation Spectroscopy of CO[subscript 2]: Understanding the Boltzmann Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Karen J.

    2007-01-01

    In this undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory experiment, students acquire a high-resolution infrared absorption spectrum of carbon dioxide and use their data to show that the rotational-vibrational state populations follow a Boltzmann distribution. Data are acquired with a mid-infrared laser source and infrared detector. Appropriate…

  3. High-resolution visible spectroscopy of the jet-driving star Th 28

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comerón, F.; Fernández, M.

    2010-02-01

    Context. We present a study of the extreme T Tauri star Th 28, a young stellar object in the Lupus 3 cloud whose spectrum displays all the varieties of signposts associated with early stellar activity. Th 28 is the driving source of a fast jet, making it a very promising target to study the disk-jet connection. Aims: We try to identify and investigate the different structural components that contribute to the different emission lines in the spectrum of the Th 28 central source. Methods: We obtained high-resolution visible spectroscopy with the UVES spectrograph at the VLT, using the resolved profiles of both permitted and forbidden lines as tracers of gas with different kinematic and physical properties, complemented with other observations from the literature. Results: We identify four distinct structural components that contribute to the visible emission-line spectrum of Th 28. The first one, dominating most of the permitted and forbidden lines, is probably associated with the origin of the outflow that in the past produced the Herbig-Haro objects seen to the west of Th 28. The second one is an uncollimated stellar wind characterized by high excitation and temperature, as shown by the broad profile of the intense [OIII] lines. The third component, traced only by permitted lines, appears as a redshifted tail extending up to radial velocities of +450 km s-1, which we attribute to magnetospheric accretion. From the latter component we obtain a rough estimate of 0.6-0.9 M_⊙ for the mass of the central object. Using published equivalent widths of the CaII triplet lines, we estimate an accretion rate of 4.2-6.3 × 10-8M_⊙ yr-1, comparable to the values inferred for other T Tauri stars of similar mass. The last component, which appears most clearly in the [SII] lines and is hardly seen in any lines other than those of [OI], displays signatures that we interpret as coming from rotation, perhaps formed in a disk atmosphere. Following this interpretation, we estimate a

  4. Differential high-resolution stimulated CW Raman spectroscopy of hydrogen in a hollow-core fiber.

    PubMed

    Westergaard, Philip G; Lassen, Mikael; Petersen, Jan C

    2015-06-15

    We demonstrate sensitive high-resolution stimulated Raman measurements of hydrogen using a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF). The Raman transition is pumped by a narrow linewidth (< 50 kHz) 1064 nm continuous-wave (CW) fiber laser. The probe light is produced by a homebuilt CW optical parametric oscillator (OPO), tunable from around 800 nm to 1300 nm (linewidth ∼ 5 MHz). These narrow linewidth lasers allow for an excellent spectral resolution of approximately 10(-4) cm(-1). The setup employs a differential measurement technique for noise rejection in the probe beam, which also eliminates background signals from the fiber. With the high sensitivity obtained, Raman signals were observed with only a few mW of optical power in both the pump and probe beams. This demonstration allows for high resolution Raman identification of molecules and quantification of Raman signal strengths.

  5. High-resolution optical spectroscopy of RS Ophiuchi during 2008-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somero, A.; Hakala, P.; Wynn, G. A.

    2017-01-01

    RS Ophiuchi (RS Oph) is a symbiotic variable and a recurrent nova (RN). We have monitored it with the Nordic Optical Telescope and obtained 30 high-resolution (R = 46 000) optical spectra over one orbital cycle during quiescence. To our knowledge, this is the best-sampled high-resolution spectroscopic data set of RS Oph over one orbital period. We do not detect any direct signatures of an accretion disc such as double peaked emission lines, but many line profiles are complex consisting of superimposed emission and absorption components. We measure the spin of the red giant and conclude that it is tidally locked to the binary orbit. We observe Na I absorption features, probably arising from the circumbinary medium, that has been shaped by previous RN outbursts. We do not detect any intrinsic polarization in the optical wavelengths.

  6. Detector arrays for high resolution spectroscopy from 5-28 microns (Contributed)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, G.; Jennings, D. E.; Moseley, S. H.; Lamb, G.

    A linear Si:As BIB detector array (Rockwell International) is being implemented in a postdispersion detection system for ground based Fourier transform spectrometers. The array version can be used as a multichannel narrow band filter for extended spectral coverage or for imaging with a narrow bandpass. A Si:As solid state photomultiplier array (Rockwell) is evaluated for use in high resolution infrared spectrometers. Test results and applications are discussed.

  7. High resolution X- and gamma-ray spectroscopy of cosmic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1983-01-01

    A high resolution X-ray spectrometer and large area phoswich detector were designed and co-aligned in a common elevation mounting in order to measure solar and cosmic X-ray and gamma ray emission in the 13 to 600 KeV energy range from a balloon. The instrument is described and results obtained for the Crab Nebula, the supernova remnant Cas A, and the Sun are discussed and analyzed.

  8. Characterization of nonderivatized plant cell walls using high-resolution solution-state NMR spectroscopy

    Treesearch

    Daniel J. Yelle; John Ralph; Charles R. Frihart

    2008-01-01

    A recently described plant cell wall dissolution system has been modified to use perdeuterated solvents to allow direct in-NMR-tube dissolution and high-resolution solution-state NMR of the whole cell wall without derivatization. Finely ground cell wall material dissolves in a solvent system containing dimethylsulfoxide-d6 and 1-methylimidazole-d6 in a ratio of 4:1 (v/...

  9. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of human body fluids and tissues in relation to prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Virendra; Dwivedi, Durgesh K; Jagannathan, Naranamangalam R

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution NMR spectroscopic studies of prostate tissue extracts, prostatic fluid, seminal fluid, serum and urine can be used for the detection of prostate cancer, based on the differences in their metabolic profiles. Useful diagnostic information is obtained by the detection or quantification of as many metabolites as possible and comparison with normal samples. Only a few studies have shown the potential of high-resolution in vitro NMR of prostate tissues. A survey of the literature has revealed that studies on body fluids, such as urine and serum, in relation to prostate cancer are rare. In addition, the potential of NMR of nuclei other than (1)H, such as (13)C and (31)P, has not been exploited fully. The metabolomic analysis of metabolites, detected by high-resolution NMR, may help to identify metabolites which could serve as useful biomarkers for prostate cancer detection. Such NMR-derived biomarkers would not only help in prostate cancer detection and in understanding the in vivo MRS metabolic profile, but also to investigate the biochemical and metabolic changes associated with cancer. Here, we review the published research work on body fluids in relation to prostate and prostate tissue extracts, and highlight the potential of such studies for future work. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) of Fe-bearing Sheet Silicates in CM Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zega, Thomas J.; Garvie, Laurence A. J.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2003-01-01

    The primitive character and hydrated mineralogy of the CM chondrites offers insight into some of the earliest reactions between solids and water. Such reactions profoundly affected the matrices and fine-grained rims (FGRs) [1-4], two of the most significant components of these meteorites [5]. We are using EELS combined with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) to investigate the compositions of Fe-bearing minerals, with emphasis on determining oxidation states and quantification of oxidation-state ratios. Iron is among the most abundant elements in the solar system and it can occur naturally in three oxidation states: Fe0, Fe2+, and Fe3+. Determination of oxidation- state ratios is useful because they can be used to infer the redox conditions under which the minerals formed or were last equilibrated [6, 7]. We are particularly interested in understanding how the oxidation state of Fe was affected by the aqueous reactions of the CM chondrites.

  11. Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy study of surface plasmon resonances in noble metal nanostructures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloni, Shaul

    2007-03-01

    Nobel metal nanostructures are of great interest because of their unique optical properties. Their optical properties are determined by the surface plasmon resonance of conduction electrons, the frequency of which is determined not only by the nature of the metal or alloy of which the particle is made but also by the particle's size and shape. Moreover, the properties can be further tailored by forming nanoparticle assemblies and by controlling the surrounding dielectric medium We focus on study of the shape effects of the plasmonic excitation in silver and gold nanostructures.The silver and gold nanostructures were synthesized by solution phase synthesis yielding highly faceted nanocrystals including cubes triangular plates bi-pyramids and rods of aspect rations up to 1:20. The results show that the optical properties of individual metallic nanoparticles, as extracted from the low-loss spectrum, can be correlated with the properties predicted based on the particle size, shape and composition. .

  12. Chemical effects of lanthanides and actinides in glasses determined with electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fortner, J.A.; Buck, E.C.; Ellison, A.J.G.; Bates, J.K.

    1996-07-01

    Chemical and structural environments of f-electron elements in glasses are the origin of many of the important properties of materials with these elements; thus oxidation state and chemical coordination of lanthanides and actinides in host materials is an important design consideration in optically active glasses, magnetic materials, perovskite superconductors, and nuclear waste materials. We have made use of the line shapes of Ce to determine its oxidation state in alkali borosilicate glasses being developed for immobilization of Pu. Examination of several prototype waste glass compositions with EELS shows that the redox state of Ce doped to 7 wt% could be varied by suitable choice of alkali elements. EELS for a Pu-doped glass illustrate the small actinide N{sub 4}/N{sub 5} intensity ratio and show that the Pu-N{sub 4,5} white line cross section is comparable to that of Gd M{sub 4,5}.

  13. Extended electron energy loss fine structure simulation of the local boron environment in sodium aluminoborosilicate glasses containing gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Morris; Li, Hong; Li, Liyu ); Strachan, Denis M. )

    2003-12-01

    Phase separation in sodium-aluminoborosilicate glasses was systematically studied as a function of Gd2O3 concentration with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) methods. Gadolinium-induced phase separation in the three systems can be consistently explained by proposing that Gd cations partition to the borate-rich environments and subsequent agglomeration of the Gd-borate moieties, or short-range ordered structural groups, in the glass. Agglomeration of the Gd-borate rich environments is further discussed within the context of excess metal oxides,[Na2O]ex or[Al2O3]ex=|Na2O - Al2O3|, and excess B2O3,[B2O3]ex, available for incorporating Gd cations. Results showed that agglomeration of the Gd-borate rich environments occurred at a much lower Gd2O3 concentration in the glass without[Na2O]ex or[Al2O3]ex and at a significantly higher Gd2O3 concentration in the glass with either[Na2O]ex or[Al2O3]ex. Assuming 1BO4 : 1Gd : 2BO3 (based on literature-reported Gd-metaborate structure) as a local Gd-borate environment in glass, we introduced the saturation index of boron, SI[B]= Gd2O3/(1/3[B2O3]ex), to examine the glass susceptibility to Gd-induced phase separation for all three alkali-aluminoborosilicate systems. While our results have provided some insight to the glass structure, they also provide insight to the mechanism by which the metal oxide is dissolved into the melt. This appears to occur predominantly through boron complexation of the metal oxide.

  14. Coherent Vibrational Dynamics and High-Resolution Nonlinear Spectroscopy: A Comparison with the Air/DMSO Liquid Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Lu, Zhou; Wang, Hongfei

    2013-12-27

    In this report we present a comparative study on the C-H stretching vibrations at air/DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide) interface with both the free-induction decay (FID) coherent vibrational dynamics and sub-wavenumber high resolution sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy measurements. In principle the frequency-domain and time-domain spectroscopic measurements should generate identical information for a given molecular system. However, when the molecular systems are with several coupled or overlapping vibrational modes, to obtain detailed spectroscopic and coherent dynamics information is not as straightforward and rather difficult from either the time-domain or the frequency domain measurements. For the case of air/DMSO interface that is with moderately complex vibrational spectra, we show that the frequency-domain measurement with sub-wavenumber high-resolution SFGVS is probably more advantageous than the time-domain measurement in obtaining quantitative understanding of the structure and coherent dynamics of the molecular interface.

  15. High-resolution optical spectroscopy with a buffer-gas-cooled beam of BaH molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, G. Z.; McNally, R. L.; Zelevinsky, T.

    2017-08-01

    Barium monohydride (BaH) is an attractive candidate for extending laser cooling and trapping techniques to diatomic hydrides. The apparatus and high-resolution optical spectroscopy presented here demonstrate progress toward this goal. A cryogenic buffer-gas-cooled molecular beam of BaH was constructed and characterized. Pulsed laser ablation into cryogenic helium buffer gas delivers ˜1 ×1010 molecules/sr/pulse in the X +2Σ (v''=0 ,N''=1 ) state of primary interest. More than 1 ×107 of these molecules per pulse enter the downstream science region with forward velocities below 100 m/s and transverse temperature of 0.1 K. This molecular beam enabled high-resolution optical spectra of BaH in quantum states relevant to laser slowing and cooling. The reported measurements include hyperfine structure and magnetic g factors in the X +2Σ , B +2Σ , and A 1/2 2Π states.

  16. Use of a Continuous Wave Laser and Pockels Cell for Sensitive High-Resolution Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Groote, R P; Budinčević, I; Billowes, J; Bissell, M L; Cocolios, T E; Farooq-Smith, G J; Fedosseev, V N; Flanagan, K T; Franchoo, S; Garcia Ruiz, R F; Heylen, H; Li, R; Lynch, K M; Marsh, B A; Neyens, G; Rossel, R E; Rothe, S; Stroke, H H; Wendt, K D A; Wilkins, S G; Yang, X

    2015-09-25

    New technical developments have led to a 2 orders of magnitude improvement of the resolution of the collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at ISOLDE, CERN, without sacrificing the high efficiency of the CRIS technique. Experimental linewidths of 20(1) MHz were obtained on radioactive beams of francium, allowing us for the first time to determine the electric quadrupole moment of the short lived [t_{1/2}=22.0(5) ms] ^{219}Fr Q_{s}=-1.21(2) eb, which would not have been possible without the advantages offered by the new method. This method relies on a continuous-wave laser and an external Pockels cell to produce narrow-band light pulses, required to reach the high resolution in two-step resonance ionization. Exotic nuclei produced at rates of a few hundred ions/s can now be studied with high resolution, allowing detailed studies of the anchor points for nuclear theories.

  17. Use of a Continuous Wave Laser and Pockels Cell for Sensitive High-Resolution Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groote, R. P.; Budinčević, I.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Cocolios, T. E.; Farooq-Smith, G. J.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Flanagan, K. T.; Franchoo, S.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Heylen, H.; Li, R.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Neyens, G.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Stroke, H. H.; Wendt, K. D. A.; Wilkins, S. G.; Yang, X.

    2015-09-01

    New technical developments have led to a 2 orders of magnitude improvement of the resolution of the collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at ISOLDE, CERN, without sacrificing the high efficiency of the CRIS technique. Experimental linewidths of 20(1) MHz were obtained on radioactive beams of francium, allowing us for the first time to determine the electric quadrupole moment of the short lived [t1 /2=22.0 (5 ) ms ] 219Fr Qs=-1.21 (2 ) eb , which would not have been possible without the advantages offered by the new method. This method relies on a continuous-wave laser and an external Pockels cell to produce narrow-band light pulses, required to reach the high resolution in two-step resonance ionization. Exotic nuclei produced at rates of a few hundred ions/s can now be studied with high resolution, allowing detailed studies of the anchor points for nuclear theories.

  18. High Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy of Slit-Jet Cooled Radicals and Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Melanie A.

    This thesis presents high-resolution spectra of supersonically-cooled organic radicals in the mid-infrared, the details and design of the instruments necessary to obtain the spectra, and the theory to understand the spectra and the larger context of the results. Specifically, four organic radicals are studied: singly-deuterated methyl radical (CH2D), phenyl radical (C6H5), hydroxymethyl radical (CH2OH), and ethynyl radical (C2H). All of the spectroscopic studies presented use an existing mid-infrared high-resolution spectrometer with a frequency precision of better than 10 MHz. The radicals are generated using a discharge to dissociate a neutral precursor and form the radicals. The discharge is localized at the orifice of a slit supersonic expansion, which cools the radicals to around 20 K and allows for sub-Doppler spectral resolution. In addition to the description of the existing spectrometer, the design, construction, and successful testing of a new, automated mid-infrared spectrometer is presented. The new spectrometer is based upon difference frequency generation of a scanning Ti:Sapphire laser and a single-frequency Nd:YAG laser to create high-resolution mid-infrared radiation. The new system speeds up data-taking by fully automating the scanning process. The four radicals studied in this thesis are all intermediates in combustion processes of hydrocarbon fuels. First, the out-of-phase symmetric stretch of phenyl radical is presented. As the first high-resolution infrared study of phenyl, it paves the way for future studies of this and other aromatic radicals. Second, the two fundamental CH stretches in CH2D are studied with full rotational resolution. The narrow linewidth of the transitions reveals resolved fine structure and partially resolved hyperfine structure. This resolution yields additional information regarding the distribution of electrons in the radical. With this study of CH2D, a nearly complete set of vibrational frequencies is present in the

  19. HIGH-RESOLUTION XMM-NEWTON SPECTROSCOPY OF THE COOLING FLOW CLUSTER A3112

    SciTech Connect

    Bulbul, G. Esra; Smith, Randall K.; Foster, Adam; Cottam, Jean; Loewenstein, Michael; Mushotzky, Richard; Shafer, Richard

    2012-03-01

    We examine high signal-to-noise XMM-Newton European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) and Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) observations to determine the physical characteristics of the gas in the cool core and outskirts of the nearby rich cluster A3112. The XMM-Newton Extended Source Analysis Software data reduction and background modeling methods were used to analyze the XMM-Newton EPIC data. From the EPIC data, we find that the iron and silicon abundance gradients show significant increase toward the center of the cluster while the oxygen abundance profile is centrally peaked but has a shallower distribution than that of iron. The X-ray mass modeling is based on the temperature and deprojected density distributions of the intracluster medium determined from EPIC observations. The total mass of A3112 obeys the M-T scaling relations found using XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of massive clusters at r{sub 500}. The gas mass fraction f{sub gas} = 0.149{sup +0.036}{sub -0.032} at r{sub 500} is consistent with the seven-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe results. The comparisons of line fluxes and flux limits on the Fe XVII and Fe XVIII lines obtained from high-resolution RGS spectra indicate that there is no spectral evidence for cooler gas associated with the cluster with temperature below 1.0 keV in the central <38'' ({approx}52 kpc) region of A3112. High-resolution RGS spectra also yield an upper limit to the turbulent motions in the compact core of A3112 (206 km s{sup -1}). We find that the contribution of turbulence to total energy is less than 6%. This upper limit is consistent with the energy contribution measured in recent high-resolution simulations of relaxed galaxy clusters.

  20. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy in unstable and inhomogeneous fields via stroboscopic acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Meijin; Chen, Xi; Cai, Congbo; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we demonstrated that despite the insensitivity of intermolecular zero-quantum coherences (iZQCs) to B0 variations, the influence of unstable fields on the observable single-quantum coherence signals causes strong t1 noises in the high-resolution iZQC projection spectra. Stroboscopic acquisition was then proposed for noise suppression. The feasibility of the modified sequences with the proposed acquisition scheme was verified by computer simulations and experiments in different unstable fields generated by the Z0 and Z1 coil current oscillations, which mimic the unstable fields of NMR using externally powered magnets and MRS in the presence of physiological motions, respectively.

  1. High-resolution FTIR spectroscopy of the ν3 band of methyl acetylene-d

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Ayan Kumar; Kshirsagar, R. J.

    2014-04-01

    The high-resolution Fourier transform spectrum of methyl acetylene-d1 (CH3CCD) at room temperature has been recorded in the region of the ν3 band (1980-2035 cm-1) at an apodized resolution of 0.004 cm-1. About 600 vibration-rotation transitions have been assigned, with J upto 36 and K upto 6. The spectrum shows the presence of several perturbations. The observed minus calculated deviation of the fit for K = 4 subband is much more than the expected, shows the presence of Fermi resonance with the nearby vibrational state.

  2. From BASIS to MIRACLES: Benchmarking and perspectives for high-resolution neutron spectroscopy at the ESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsapatsaris, Nikolaos; Willendrup, Peter K.; Lechner, Ruep E.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2015-01-01

    Results based on virtual instrument models for the first high-flux, high-resolution, spallation based, backscattering spectrometer, BASIS are presented in this paper. These were verified using the Monte Carlo instrument simulation packages McStas and VITESS. Excellent agreement of the neutron count rate at the sample position between the virtual instrument simulation and experiments was found, in both time and energy distributions. This achievement was only possible after a new component for a bent single crystal analyser in McStas, using a Gaussian approximation, was developed. These findings are pivotal to the conceptual design of the next generation backscattering spectrometer, MIRACLES at the European Spallation Source.

  3. High Resolution UV Emission Spectroscopy of Molecules Excited by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, G. K.; Ajello, J. M.; Beegle, L.; Ciocca, M.; Dziczek, D.; Kanik, I.; Noren, C.; Jonin, C.; Hansen, D.

    1999-01-01

    Photodissociation via discrete line absorption into predissociating Rydberg and valence states is the dominant destruction mechanism of CO and other molecules in the interstellar medium and molecular clouds. Accurate values for the rovibronic oscillator strengths of these transitions and predissociation yields of the excited states are required for input into the photochemical models that attempt to reproduce observed abundances. We report here on our latest experimental results of the electron collisional properties of CO and N2 obtained using the 3-meter high resolution single-scattering spectroscopic facility at JPL.

  4. Holmium iron borate: high-resolution spectroscopy and crystal-field parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erofeev, D. A.; Chukalina, E. P.; Popova, M. N.; Malkin, B. Z.; Bezmaternykh, L. N.; Gudim, I. A.

    2016-12-01

    High-resolution transmission spectra of HoFe3(BO3)4 single crystals were measured in broad spectral (5000-23000 cm-1) and temperature (1.7-300 K) ranges. Crystal-field energies of the Ho3+ ions were determined for a paramagnetic and easy-axis antiferromagnetic phases of the compound. On the basis of these data and of preliminary crystal-field calculations in the frame of the exchange-charge model, crystal-field parameters were found. A parameter of the isotropic Ho-Fe exchange interaction was estimated.

  5. High-resolution spectroscopy with the multi-anode microchannel array detector systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.; Joseph, C. L.; Wolf, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    The results of a series of high-resolution spectroscopic observations undertaken with a linear (1 x 1024)-pixel visible-light Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector on the Coudespectrograph of the 2.2-meter telescope at the Mauna Kea Observatory and on the vacuum spectrograph of the McMath Solar telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory are described. In addition, the two-dimensional MAMA detector systems with (16 x 1024)-pixel, (24 x 1024)-pixel, and (256 x 1024)-pixel formats which are now being readied for use in a series of ground-based, balloon, and sounding-rocket observing programs are briefly described.

  6. Probing Conditions at Ionized/Molecular Gas Interfaces With High Resolution Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Kyle Franklin

    2017-08-01

    Regions of star formation and star death in our Galaxy trace the cycle of gas and dust in the interstellar medium (ISM). Gas in dense molecular clouds collapses to form stars, and stars at the end of their lives return the gas that made up their outer layers back out into the Galaxy. Hot stars generate copious amounts of ultraviolet photons which interact with the surrounding medium and dominate the energetics, ionization state, and chemistry of the gas. The interface where molecular gas is being dissociated into neutral atomic gas by far-UV photons from a nearby hot source is called a photodissociation or photon-dominated region (PDR). PDRs are found primarily in star forming regions where O and B stars serve as the source of UV photons, and in planetary nebulae where the hot core of the dying star acts as the UV source. The main target of this dissertation is molecular hydrogen (H2), the most abundant molecule in the Universe, made from hydrogen formed during the Big Bang. H2 makes up the overwhelming majority of molecules found in the ISM and in PDRs. Far-UV radiation absorbed by H2 will excite an electron in the molecule. The molecule then either dissociates ( 10% of the time; Field et al. 1966) or decays into excited rotational and vibrational ("rovibrational") levels of the electronic ground state. These excited rovibrational levels then decay via a radiative cascade to the ground rovibrational state (v = 0, J = 0), giving rise to a large number of transitions observable in emission from the mid-IR to the optical (Black & van Dishoeck, 1987). These transitions provide an excellent probe of the excitation and conditions within the gas. These transitions are also observed in warm H2, such as in shocks, where collisions excite H2 to higher rovibrational levels. High resolution near-infrared spectroscopy, with its ability to see through dust, and avoid telluric absorption and emission, serves as an effective tool to detect emission from ions, atoms, and molecules

  7. Synthesis, High-Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy, and Vibrational Structure of Cubane, C8H8.

    PubMed

    Boudon, V; Lamy, M; Dugue-Boyé, F; Pirali, O; Gruet, S; D'Accolti, L; Fusco, C; Annese, C; Alikhani, M E

    2016-06-30

    Carbon-cage molecules have generated a considerable interest from both experimental and theoretical points of view. We recently performed a high-resolution study of adamantane (C10H16), the smallest hydrocarbon cage belonging to the diamandoid family ( Pirali , O. ; et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2012 , 136 , 024310 ). There exist another family of hydrocarbon cages with additional interesting chemical properties: the so-called platonic hydrocarbons that comprise dodecahedrane (C20H20) and cubane (C8H8). Both possess C-C bond angles that deviate from the tetrahedral angle (109.8°) of the sp(3) hybridized form of carbon. This generates a considerable strain in the molecule. We report a new wide-range high-resolution study of the infrared spectrum of cubane. The sample was synthesized in Bari upon decarboxylation of 1,4-cubanedicarboxylic acid thanks to the improved synthesis of literature. Several spectra have been recorded at the AILES beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron facility. They cover the 600-3200 cm(-1) region. Besides the three infrared-active fundamentals (ν10, ν11, and ν12), we could record many combination bands, all of them displaying a well-resolved octahedral rotational structure. We present here a preliminary analysis of some of the recorded bands, performed thanks the SPVIEW and XTDS software, based on the tensorial formalism developed in the Dijon group. A comparison with ab initio calculations, allowing to identify some combination bands, is also presented.

  8. High resolution photoelectron spectroscopy and femtosecond intramolecular dynamics of H2CCO + and D2CCO +

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Baohua; Bai, Ying; Shirley, David A.

    1993-08-01

    High resolution helium Iα (584 Å) photoelectron spectra of H2CCO and D2CCO are reported. The present spectra of the ground states of ketene cations show more vibrational fine structure than previously reported. The adiabatic ionization energies (AIEs) of the cations' first, second, and fifth excited states are determined unambiguously. The doubletlike fine structures present in the first excited states of ketene cations imply the excitation of a ``soft'' mode that was not observed before. It was assigned to the ν5 mode, which is characterized by the CH2 (CD2) group out-of-plane wagging motion. The complexity of the photoelectron spectra obtained for the ionic first excited states is attributed to the possible dissociation and predissociation of this state. Strong isotope effects are observed in the vibronic (vibrational) couplings in most of the ionic states. Vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated from the high-resolution photoelectron spectra for four of the six ionic states observed. The dynamics of the ground states of the cations are characterized by a wave packet oscillating with small amplitude around the minimum of the upper potential energy surfaces (PES). The decay dynamics of the ionic first and fifth excited states of ketene are characterized by ultrafast intramolecular processes such as dissociation and predissociation.

  9. Sample-Induced RF Perturbations in High-Field, High-Resolution NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crozier, Stuart; Brereton, Ian M.; Zelaya, Fernando O.; Roffmann, Wolfgang U.; Doddrell, David M.

    1997-05-01

    Conducting dielectric samples are often used in high-resolution experiments at high field. It is shown that significant amplitude and phase distortions of the RF magnetic field may result from perturbations caused by such samples. Theoretical analyses demonstrate the spatial variation of the RF field amplitude and phase across the sample, and comparisons of the effect are made for a variety of sample properties and operating field strengths. Although the effect is highly nonlinear, it tends to increase with increasing field strength, permittivity, conductivity, and sample size. There are cases, however, in which increasing the conductivity of the sample improves the homogeneity of the amplitude of the RF field across the sample at the expense of distorted RF phase. It is important that the perturbation effects be calculated for the experimental conditions used, as they have the potential to reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of NMR experiments and may increase the generation of spurious coherences. The effect of RF-coil geometry on the coherences is also modeled, with the use of homogeneous resonators such as the birdcage design being preferred. Recommendations are made concerning methods of reducing sample-induced perturbations. Experimental high-field imaging and high-resolution studies demonstrate the effect.

  10. Spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectroscopy for magnetically confined fusion plasmas (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Ince-Cushman, A.; Rice, J. E.; Reinke, M. L.; Podpaly, Y.; Marmar, E. S.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Scott, S.; Gu, M. F.; Eikenberry, E.; Broennimann, Ch.; Lee, S. G.

    2008-10-15

    The use of high resolution x-ray crystal spectrometers to diagnose fusion plasmas has been limited by the poor spatial localization associated with chord integrated measurements. Taking advantage of a new x-ray imaging spectrometer concept [M. Bitter et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 3660 (2004)], and improvements in x-ray detector technology [Ch. Broennimann et al., J. Synchrotron Radiat. 13, 120 (2006)], a spatially resolving high resolution x-ray spectrometer has been built and installed on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. This instrument utilizes a spherically bent quartz crystal and a set of two dimensional x-ray detectors arranged in the Johann configuration [H. H. Johann, Z. Phys. 69, 185 (1931)] to image the entire plasma cross section with a spatial resolution of about 1 cm. The spectrometer was designed to measure line emission from H-like and He-like argon in the wavelength range 3.7 and 4.0 A with a resolving power of approximately 10 000 at frame rates up to 200 Hz. Using spectral tomographic techniques [I. Condrea, Phys. Plasmas 11, 2427 (2004)] the line integrated spectra can be inverted to infer profiles of impurity emissivity, velocity, and temperature. From these quantities it is then possible to calculate impurity density and electron temperature profiles. An overview of the instrument, analysis techniques, and example profiles are presented.

  11. Abundances of Local Group Globular Clusters Using High Resolution Integrated Light Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakari, Charli; McWilliam, A.; Venn, K.; Shetrone, M. D.; Dotter, A. L.; Mackey, D.

    2014-01-01

    Abundances and kinematics of extragalactic globular clusters provide valuable clues about galaxy and globular cluster formation in a wide variety of environments. In order to obtain such information about distant, unresolved systems, specific observational techniques are required. An Integrated Light Spectrum (ILS) provides a single spectrum from an entire stellar population, and can therefore be used to determine integrated cluster abundances. This dissertation investigates the accuracy of high resolution ILS analysis methods, using ILS (taken with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope) of globular clusters associated with the Milky Way (47 Tuc, M3, M13, NGC 7006, and M15) and then applies the method to globular clusters in the outer halo of M31 (from the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey, or PAndAS). Results show that: a) as expected, the high resolution method reproduces individual stellar abundances for elements that do not vary within a cluster; b) the presence of multiple populations does affect the abundances of elements that vary within the cluster; c) certain abundance ratios are very sensitive to systematic effects, while others are not; and d) certain abundance ratios (e.g. [Ca/Fe]) can be accurately obtained from unresolved systems. Applications of ILABUNDS to the PAndAS clusters reveal that accretion may have played an important role in the formation of M31's outer halo.

  12. High Resolution Spectroscopy of C_2 and CN in the Cygnus OB2 Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, Benjamin J.; Oka, Takeshi

    2000-08-01

    The unexpected detection of a large column density of hhh along the lines of sight to Cygnus OB2 #12 and Cygnus OB2 #5 cannot be explained by the standard models of diffuse cloud chemistry, which imply unreasonably long absorption path lengths (hundreds of parsecs). In order to gather more information about the physical condition of the diffuse gas in these lines of sight, we propose to obtain high resolution (R 120 000) visible spectra of several stars in the Cygnus OB2 association, including #12 and #5. The observed rotational distribution of the diatomics çand CN will enable us to estimate the kinetic temperature and number density of the molecular gas. In addition, the high resolution of the HRS at HET will allow us to study the velocity distribution of both the atomic (K I) and molecular (çand CN) gas along these lines of sight. Together with our previous observations of hhh, the temperatures, number densities, and velocity distributions from the proposed observations will seriously constrain theoretical models of these sightlines, such as that recently proposed by Cecchi-Pestellini and Dalgarno.

  13. High-resolution subtyping of Staphylococcus aureus strains by means of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Johler, Sophia; Stephan, Roger; Althaus, Denise; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Grunert, Tom

    2016-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes a variety of serious illnesses in humans and animals. Subtyping of S. aureus isolates plays a crucial role in epidemiological investigations. Metabolic fingerprinting by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is commonly used to identify microbes at species as well as subspecies level. In this study, we aimed to assess the suitability of FTIR spectroscopy as a tool for S. aureus subtyping. To this end, we compared the subtyping performance of FTIR spectroscopy to other subtyping methods such as pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and spa typing in a blinded experimental setup and investigated the ability of FTIR spectroscopy for identifying S. aureus clonal complexes (CC). A total of 70 S. aureus strains from human, animal, and food sources were selected, for which clonal complexes and a unique virulence and resistance gene pattern had been determined by DNA microarray analysis. FTIR spectral analysis resulted in high discriminatory power similar as obtained by spa typing and PFGE. High directional concordance was found between FTIR spectroscopy based subtypes and capsular polysaccharide expression detected by FTIR spectroscopy and the cap specific locus, reflecting strain specific expression of capsular polysaccharides and/or other surface glycopolymers, such as wall teichoic acid, peptidoglycane, and lipoteichoic acid. Supervised chemometrics showed only limited possibilities for differentiation of S. aureus CC by FTIR spectroscopy with the exception of CC45 and CC705. In conclusion, FTIR spectroscopy represents a valuable tool for S. aureus subtyping, which complements current molecular and proteomic strain typing.

  14. Compositions and chemical bonding in ceramics by quantitative electron energy-loss spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, J.; Horton, L.L.; McHargue, C.J.; McKernan, S.; Carter, C.B.; Revcolevschi, A.; Tanaka, S.; Davis, R.F.

    1993-12-31

    Quantitative electron energy-loss spectrometry was applied to a range of ceramic materials at a spatial resolution of <5 nm. Analysis of Fe L{sub 23} white lines indicated a low-spin state with a charge transfer of {approximately}1.5 electrons/atom onto the Fe atoms implanted into (amorphized) silicon carbide. Gradients of 2 to 5% in the Co:O stoichiometry were measured across 100-nm-thick Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} layers in an oxidized directionally solidified CoO-ZrO{sub 2} eutectic, with the highest O levels near the ZrO{sub 2}. The energy-loss near-edge structures were dramatically different for the two cobalt oxides; those for CO{sub 3}O{sub 4} have been incorrectly ascribed to CoO in the published literature. Kinetically stabilized solid solubility occurred in an AlN-SiC film grown by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on {alpha}(6H)-SiC, and no detectable interdiffusion occurred in couples of MBE-grown AlN on SiC following annealing at up to 1750C. In diffusion couples of polycrystalline AlN on SiC, interfacial 8H sialon (aluminum oxy-nitride) and pockets of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rich {beta}{prime} sialon in the SiC were detected.

  15. Electron energy loss modelling in small volumes: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaoui, Zine-El-Abidine

    2008-12-01

    In thin target and sub-volumes, electronic energy losses in single collisions vary considerably for individual charged particles. These fluctuations resulting from the stochastic nature of the interactions can be described through a simulation with Monte Carlo calculations. Models used in the present simulations to describe the electron scattering processes are derived from quantum mechanics. The resulting cross sections for energies up to 200 keV are shown for both processes, i.e. elastic and inelastic interactions. Influence of the Monte Carlo strategy adopted to calculate energy loss spectra (straggling functions) is discussed. Straggling functions calculated from the general purpose Monte Carlo code Penelope and the convolution method of Bichsel are included for comparisons. The results are new. In fact, disagreements have been found in the calculated energy spectra when using different strategies. These deviations are explained in the present study by investigating the thickness dependence on the electron energy. As a central result, energy deposition in silicon detectors can be described accurately when event by event Monte Carlo strategy is used.

  16. Detailed Monte Carlo Simulation of electron transport and electron energy loss spectra.

    PubMed

    Attarian Shandiz, M; Salvat, F; Gauvin, R

    2016-11-01

    A computer program for detailed Monte Carlo simulation of the transport of electrons with kinetic energies in the range between about 0.1 and about 500 keV in bulk materials and in thin solid films is presented. Elastic scattering is described from differential cross sections calculated by the relativistic (Dirac) partial-wave expansion method with different models of the scattering potential. Inelastic interactions are simulated from an optical-data model based on an empirical optical oscillator strength that combines optical functions of the solid with atomic photoelectric data. The generalized oscillator strength is built from the adopted optical oscillator strength by using an extension algorithm derived from Lindhard's dielectric function for a free-electron gas. It is shown that simulated backscattering fractions of electron beams from bulk (semi-infinite) specimens are in good agreement with experimental data for beam energies from 0.1 keV up to about 100 keV. Simulations also yield transmitted and backscattered fractions of electron beams on thin solid films that agree closely with measurements for different film thicknesses and incidence angles. Simulated most probable deflection angles and depth-dose distributions also agree satisfactorily with measurements. Finally, electron energy loss spectra of several elemental solids are simulated and the effects of the beam energy and the foil thickness on the signal to background and signal to noise ratios are investigated. SCANNING 38:475-491, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A multichannel electron energy loss spectrometer for low-temperature condensed films

    SciTech Connect

    David, Donald E.; Popovic, Duska B.; Antic, Dean; Michl, Josef

    2004-12-01

    We describe a wide-gap multichannel cylindrical deflection electron energy analyzer suitable for measuring the weak signals characteristic of electronically inelastic electron energy loss spectra. The analyzer has nearly ideal fringing field termination, and its resolution and energy dispersion were characterized as a function of energy by solving numerically the equation of motion of electrons in an ideal cylindrical electric field. The numerical results for the radial location of the electrons at the detector as a function of the entrance location, angle, and energy are closely approximated by a second order polynomial, and match closely with those observed. The detection efficiency of the analyzer is 100-150 times better than that of an equivalent single-channel instrument, but limited energy transmission of the zoom lens system used in our case reduced it by a factor of about 2. The performance of the new instrument was demonstrated by measuring the {sup 3}E{sub 1u} electronic spectrum of benzene in only 2 min and the spectrum of endo-benzotricyclo[4.2.1.0{sup 2.5}]nonane.

  18. High resolution infrared spectroscopy: Some new approaches and applications to planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    The principles of spectral line formation and of techniques for retrieval of atmospheric temperature and constituent profiles are discussed. Applications to the atmospheres of Earth, Mars, Venus, and Jupiter are illustrated by results obtained with Fourier transform and infrared heterodyne spectrometers at resolving powers (lambda/delta hyperon lambda of approximately 10,000 and approximately 10 to the seventh power), respectively, showing the high complementarity of spectroscopy at these two widely different resolving powers. The principles of heterodyne spectroscopy are presented and its applications to atmospheric probing and to laboratory spectroscopy are discussed. Direct absorption spectroscopy with tuneable semiconductor lasers is discussed in terms of precision frequency-and line strength-measurements, showing substantial advances in laboratory infrared spectroscopy.

  19. High resolution far-infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy of radicals at the AILES beamline of SOLEIL synchrotron facility.

    PubMed

    Martin-Drumel, M A; Pirali, O; Balcon, D; Bréchignac, Ph; Roy, P; Vervloet, M

    2011-11-01

    Experimental far-infrared (FIR) spectroscopy of transient species (unstable molecules, free radicals, and ions) has been limited so far in both emission and absorption (mainly by the low probability of spontaneous emission in that spectral range and the low brightness of continuum sources used for absorption measurements, respectively). Nevertheless, the FIR spectral range recently became of high astrophysical relevance thanks to several new observational platforms (HERSCHEL, ALMA...) dedicated to the study of this region suitable for the detection of the emission from cold objects of the interstellar medium. In order to complete the experimental dataset concerning transient species, three discharge experiments dedicated to the recording of high resolution FIR spectra of radicals have been developed at the Advanced Infrared Line Exploited for Spectroscopy (AILES) which extracts the bright FIR synchrotron continuum of the synchrotron facility SOLEIL. These experiments make use of a high resolution (R = 0.001 cm(-1)) Bruker IFS125 Fourier transform (FT) spectrometer. An emission setup (allowing to record spectra of radicals excited at high rotational and vibrational temperatures) and two absorption setups (exploiting the bright synchrotron source at the highest resolution available on the FT) are alternatively connected to the FT. The advantages and limitations of these techniques are discussed on the basis of the recent results obtained on OH and CH radicals. These results constitute the first FIR spectra of radicals using synchrotron radiation, and the first FIR spectrum of a C-bearing radical using FT-spectroscopy.

  20. High-Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy of Cubane, C_8H_8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudon, Vincent; Pirali, Olivier; Gruet, Sébastien; D'accolti, Lucia; Fusco, Caterina; Annese, Cosimo

    2014-06-01

    Carbon-cage molecules have generated a considerable interest from both experimental and theoretical point of views. We recently performed a high-resolution study of adamantane (C10H16), the smallest hydrocarbon cage belonging to the diamandoid family. There exist another family of hydrocarbon cages with additional interesting chemical properties: the so-called Platonic hydrocarbons that comprise dodecahedrane (C20H20) and cubane (C_8H_8). Both possess C-C bond angles that deviate from the tetrahedral angle (109.8°) of the sp^3 hybridized form of carbon. This generates a considerable strain in the molecule. Cubane itself has the highest density of all hydrocarbons (1.29 g/cm^3). This makes it able to store larges amounts of energy, although the molecule is fully stable. Up to now, only one high-resolution study of cubane has been performed on a few bands [2]. We report here a new wide-range high-resolution study of the infrared spectrum of cubane. The sample was synthesized in Bari upon decarboxylation of 1,4-cubanedicarboxylic acid thanks to the improved synthesis of literature [3]; its {}1H and 13C NMR, FTIR, and mass spectrometry agreed with reported data [4]. Several spectra have been recorded at the AILES beamline of the SOLEIL French synchrotron facility. They cover the 800 to 3100 cm-1 region. Besides the three infrared-active fundamentals (ν10, ν11 and ν12), we could record many combination bands, all of them displaying a well-resolved octahedral rotational structure. We present here a preliminary analysis of some of the recorded bands, performed thanks the SPVIEW and XTDS software, based on the tensrorial formalism developed in the Dijon group [5]. [1] O. Pirali, V. Boudon, J. Oomens, M. Vervloet, J. Chem. Phys., 136, 024310 (2012). [2] A. S. Pine, A. G. Maki, A. G. Robiette, B. J. Krohn, J. K. G. Watson, Th. Urbanek, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 106, 891-897 (1984). [3] P. E. Eaton, N. Nordari, J. Tsanaktsidis, P. S. Upadhyaya, Synthesis, 1, 501, (1995). [4] E

  1. Measurement of Absolute Excitation Cross Sections in Highly-Charged Ions Using Electron Energy Loss and Merged Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chutjian, A.; Smith, Steven J.; Lozano, J. A.

    2002-11-01

    There is increasing emphasis within this decade on understanding energy balance and new phenomena observed in high electron temperature plasmas. The UV spectral return from FUSE, and the X-ray spectral return from the HETG on Chandra and the LETGS on XMM-Newton are just beginning. The line emissions are almost entirely from highly-charged ions (HCIs) of C, N, O, Ne, Mg, S, Si, Ca, and Fe. In addition, the Constellation-X mission, currently in the planning stages, will provide high-throughput X-ray spectroscopy up to photon energies of 0.12 nm (10 keV), where the primary line emitters will again be the HCIs. This array of space instruments is providing an overwhelming return of HCI spectral data from a variety of astrophysical objects. Collision strengths and Einstein A-values are required to convert the observed spectral intensities to electron temperatures and densities in the stellar plasma [1]. The JPL electron energy-loss and merged-beams approach [2] has been used to measure absolute collision strengths in a number of ions, with critical comparisons to the best available theories. Experimental methods will be reviewed, and results presented on experimental comparisons to R-Matrix and Breit-Pauli theoretical results in C3+[3], O2+[4], O5+[5], S2+[6], and Fe9+ [7]. Work is planned for comparisons in Mgq+, and higher charge states Fe(10-15)+. J. Lozano thanks the National Research Council for a fellowship though the NASA- NRC program. This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, and was supported under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  2. Ab initio study of the electron energy loss function in a graphene-sapphire-graphene composite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despoja, Vito; Djordjević, Tijana; Karbunar, Lazar; Radović, Ivan; Mišković, Zoran L.

    2017-08-01

    The propagator of a dynamically screened Coulomb interaction W in a sandwichlike structure consisting of two graphene layers separated by a slab of Al2O3 (or vacuum) is derived from single-layer graphene response functions and by using a local dielectric function for the bulk Al2O3 . The response function of graphene is obtained using two approaches within the random phase approximation (RPA): an ab initio method that includes all electronic bands in graphene and a computationally less demanding method based on the massless Dirac fermion (MDF) approximation for the low-energy excitations of electrons in the π bands. The propagator W is used to derive an expression for the effective dielectric function of our sandwich structure, which is relevant for the reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy of its surface. Focusing on the range of frequencies from THz to mid-infrared, special attention is paid to finding an accurate optical limit in the ab initio method, where the response function is expressed in terms of a frequency-dependent conductivity of graphene. It was shown that the optical limit suffices for describing hybridization between the Dirac plasmons in graphene layers and the Fuchs-Kliewer phonons in both surfaces of the Al2O3 slab, and that the spectra obtained from both the ab initio method and the MDF approximation in the optical limit agree perfectly well for wave numbers up to about 0.1 nm-1. Going beyond the optical limit, the agreement between the full ab initio method and the MDF approximation was found to extend to wave numbers up to about 0.3 nm-1 for doped graphene layers with the Fermi energy of 0.2 eV.

  3. Observation of molecular ordering at the surface of trimethylpropylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide using high-resolution rutherford backscattering spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kaoru; Ohno, Atsushi; Suzuki, Motofumi; Kimura, Kenji

    2008-05-06

    The surface structure of trimethylpropylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([TMPA] [TFSI]) is studied by high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy at room temperature. The results provide direct evidence of the molecular ordering at the surface. The C1 conformer of the [TFSI] anion is dominant among two stable conformers, and the anions are oriented with their CF3 groups pointing toward the vacuum in the outermost molecular layer. The anions in the second molecular layer also show preferred orientation although it is rather weak.

  4. An atomic beam of 6Li — 7Li for high resolution spectroscopy from matrix isolation sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. N.; Sacramento, R. L.; Silva, B. A.; Uhlmann, F. O.; Wolff, W.; Cesar, C. L.

    2016-07-01

    We propose the Matrix Isolation Sublimation (MlSu) technique for generating cold lithium atoms for the measurement of the 6Li - 7Li isotope shift in D1 and D2 transitions. The technique is capable of generating cold 6Li and 7Li beams at 4 K with forward velocity of 125 m/s. Using this beam we offer a distinguished source of lithium atoms for transitions measurements, adding a new possibility to make high resolution spectroscopy towards improving the experimental checks of the theory.

  5. A "magic sandwich" pulse sequence with reduced offset dependence for high-resolution separated local field spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nevzorov, Alexander A; Opella, Stanley J

    2003-09-01

    A pulse sequence for high resolution separated local field spectroscopy based on "magic sandwich" elements is demonstrated on a single crystal sample. Simulations and experimental results show that this pulse sequence has a reduced frequency offset dependence compared to PISEMA (polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle). As a result, it has a larger effective range of homonuclear decoupling, reduced zero-frequency spectral distortions, and more reliable scale factors for individual resonances. In addition, it is easier to setup on commercial spectrometers.

  6. High Resolution Far Infrared Spectroscopy of HFC-134a at Cold Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Andy; Medcraft, Chris; Thompson, Christopher; Robertson, Evan Gary; Appadoo, Dominique; McNaughton, Don

    2016-06-01

    Since the signing of the Montreal protocol, long-lived chlorofluorocarbons have been banned due to their high ozone depleting potential. In order to minimise the effect of such molecules, hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) were synthesized as replacement molecules to be used as refrigerants and foam blowing agents. HFC-134a, or 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane, is one of these molecules. Although HFCs do not cause ozone depletion, they are typically strong absorbers within the 10 micron atmospheric window, which lead to high global warming potentials. A high resolution FT-IR analysis of the νb{8} band (near 665 wn) of HFC-134a has been performed to help understand the intermode coupling between the νb{8} vibrational state and unobserved dark states.

  7. Tissue differentiation by means of high resolution optical emission spectroscopy during electrosurgical intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürger, Ines; Scharpf, Marcus; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Nüßle, Daniela; Spether, Dominik; Neugebauer, Alexander; Bibinov, Nikita; Stenzl, Arnulf; Fend, Falko; Enderle, Markus; Awakowicz, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Electrosurgery is the use of radio-frequency electric current for the cutting of biological tissue e.g. for resection of tumour tissue. In this work, the optical emission of plasma being generated during the electrosurgical procedure is investigated with a high resolution echelle spectrometer to find differences between tumour tissue and normal renal tissue in a pre-clinical ex vivo study. Trace elements like zinc, iron, copper and cadmium are present in the tissue spectra as well as the electrolytes magnesium, calcium, sodium and potassium and some diatomic molecules such as hydroxyl radical, cyano radical, dicarbon, nitrogen monohydride and molecular nitrogen which are mainly dissociated from polyatomic molecules. With the atomic emission line of cadmium at 228.8 nm the treated tissue can be differentiated in tumorous and healthy tissue with correct assignment of 95% for tumour tissue and 92% for normal renal tissue.

  8. High-resolution spectroscopy used to measure inertial confinement fusion neutron spectra on Omega (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, C. J.; Radha, P. B.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; Pruyne, A.; Romanofsky, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J. III; Stoeckl, C.; Casey, D. T.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Gardner, S.

    2012-10-15

    The areal density ({rho}R) of cryogenic DT implosions on Omega is inferred by measuring the spectrum of neutrons that elastically scatter off the dense deuterium (D) and tritium (T) fuel. Neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) techniques are used to measure the energy spectrum with high resolution. High signal-to-background data has been recorded on cryogenic DT implosions using a well-collimated 13.4-m line of sight and an nTOF detector with an advanced liquid scintillator compound. An innovative method to analyze the elastically scattered neutron spectra was developed using well-known cross sections of the DT nuclear reactions. The estimated areal densities are consistent with alternative {rho}R measurements and 1-D simulations.

  9. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low-viscosity fluids

    PubMed Central

    Nucci, Nathaniel V.; Valentine, Kathleen G.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution multi-dimensional solution NMR is unique as a biophysical and biochemical tool in its ability to examine both the structure and dynamics of macromolecules at atomic resolution. Conventional solution NMR approaches, however, are largely limited to examinations of relatively small (< 25 kDa) molecules, mostly due to the spectroscopic consequences of slow rotational diffusion. Encapsulation of macromolecules within the protective nanoscale aqueous interior of reverse micelles dissolved in low viscosity fluids has been developed as a means through which the ‘slow tumbling problem’ can be overcome. This approach has been successfully applied to diverse proteins and nucleic acids ranging up to 100 kDa, considerably widening the range of biological macromolecules to which conventional solution NMR methodologies may be applied. Recent advances in methodology have significantly broadened the utility of this approach in structural biology and molecular biophysics. PMID:24656086

  10. High-resolution spectroscopy of jet-cooled CH{sub 5}{sup +}: Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, C.; Dong, F.; Nesbitt, D. J.

    2015-01-22

    Protonated methane (CH{sub 5}{sup +}) is thought to be a highly abundant molecular ion in interstellar medium, as well as a potentially bright μwave- mm wave emitter that could serve as a tracer for methane. This paper describes progress and first successful efforts to obtain a high resolution, supersonically cooled spectrum of CH{sub 5}{sup +} in the 2900-3100 cm{sup −1} region, formed in a slit supersonic discharge at low jet temperatures and with sub-Doppler resolution. Short term precision in frequency measurement (< 5 MHz on an hour time scale) is obtained from a thermally controlled optical transfer cavity servoloop locked onto a frequency stabilized HeNe laser. Long term precision (< 20 MHz day-to-day) due to pressure, temperature and humidity dependent index of refraction effects in the optical transfer cavity is also present and discussed.

  11. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy in unstable and inhomogeneous fields via stroboscopic acquisition.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meijin; Chen, Xi; Cai, Congbo; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we demonstrated that despite the insensitivity of intermolecular zero-quantum coherences (iZQCs) to B(0) variations, the influence of unstable fields on the observable single-quantum coherence signals causes strong t(1) noises in the high-resolution iZQC projection spectra. Stroboscopic acquisition was then proposed for noise suppression. The feasibility of the modified sequences with the proposed acquisition scheme was verified by computer simulations and experiments in different unstable fields generated by the Z0 and Z1 coil current oscillations, which mimic the unstable fields of NMR using externally powered magnets and MRS in the presence of physiological motions, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. High-resolution spectroscopy and mode identification in non-radially pulsating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, K. R.; Wright, D. J.; Zima, W.; Cottrell, P. L.; De Cat, P.

    2008-12-01

    We have obtained high-resolution spectroscopic data of a sample of non-radially pulsating stars with the HERCULES spectrograph on the 1.0-m telescope at the Mt John University Observatory in New Zealand. We have developed and used a new technique which cross- correlates stellar spectra with scaled delta function templates to obtain high signal-to-noise representative spectral line profiles for further analysis. Using these profiles, and employing the Fourier Parameter Fit method, we have been able to place constraints on the degree, ℓ, and azimuthal order, m, of the non-radial pulsation modes in one β Cephei star, V2052 Oph and two γ Doradus stars, QW Pup and HD 139095.

  13. High Resolution Spectroscopy for the Amateur: Experiences with the LHIRES III Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorodenski, Stanley A.

    2012-05-01

    This paper describes the author's experience with the high resolution LHIRES III spectrograph and other equipment used. It discusses mechanical improvements made that may have increased the calibration accuracy of the spectrograph, problems with guiding, and the need to take flat fields. It also briefly mentions the freeware software used and the types of computer programs written by the author to aid in the reduction and analysis of the spectra. An assessment is made of the method for determining equivalent width the author described in the 2011 issue of the SAS News. It finishes by illustrating the ability to study binary stars, such as V1143 Cyg, with the LHIRES III, and discusses some interesting results that were obtained on Epsilon Aurigae. The evolution of a split line centered at around 5853 Angstroms is mentioned, as well as other aspects of the Sodium D Lines region, such as the constancy of separation between the two lines.

  14. High-resolution laser spectroscopy on H2 at 97 98 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinnen, P. C.; Hogervorst, W.; Stolte, S.; Ubachs, W.

    1994-09-01

    A narrowband tunable eXtreme UltraViolet (XUV) laser source is used for a high resolution study of the Lyman ( B 1 Σ {/u +} ™ X 1 Σ {/g +}) band system of molecular hydrogen. Seven rotational transitions of two vibrational bands, (10,0) and (11,0), in the wavelength range from 97.2 98.3 nm have been investigated for the first time under sub-Doppler molecular beam conditions. A calibration procedure using the I2 standard in the visible yielded an absolute frequency accuracy of 0.02 cm-1. The obtained H2 transition frequencies provide a calibration standard in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength region.

  15. High resolution spectroscopy and spectral simulation of C2 using degenerate four-wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, G. M.; Ewart, P.

    1999-01-01

    Degenerate four-wave mixing in the sub-Doppler phase conjugate geometry was used to record high resolution spectra of the d 3Πg-a3Πu (0-0) Swan band of C2 produced in an oxy-acetylene flame. The line positions of isolated transitions were measured to an accuracy of ˜3×10-3 cm-1 and calibrated using a Fizeau interferometer system. The data obtained from these spectra was used to calculate rotational constants and lambda doubling parameters for the 3Π states from which the line positions for the whole band were calculated. Noticeable improvements between experimental and calculated line positions are seen when compared to previously published values. The effect of inaccuracies in line positions on the simulation of degenerate four-wave mixing spectra is discussed and some examples of the improvement in simulation using the newly calculated line positions are presented.

  16. High Resolution Near-IR Spectroscopy of Protostars With Large Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Tom; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    It is now possible to measure absorption spectra of Class I protostars using D greater than or = 8m telescopes equipped with sensitive cryogenic IR spectrographs. Our latest high-resolution (R approx. 20,000) Keck data reveal that Class I protostars are indeed low-mass stars with dwarf-like features. However, they differ from T Tauri stars in that Class I protostars have much higher IR veilings (tau(sub k) greater than or = 1 - 3+) and they are rotating quickly, v sin i greater than 20 km/s. Interestingly, the vast majority of protostellar absorption spectra show stellar - not disk - absorption features. A preliminary H-R diagram suggests that protostellar photospheres may have different physical structures than T Tauri stars, perhaps due to their higher accretion rates.

  17. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of biological tissues usingprojected Magic Angle Spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Rachel W.; Jachmann, Rebecca C.; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Pines, Alexander

    2005-01-27

    High-resolution NMR spectra of materials subject toanisotropic broadening are usually obtained by rotating the sample aboutthe magic angle, which is 54.7 degrees to the static magnetic field. Inprojected Magic Angle Spinning (p-MAS), the sample is spun about twoangles, neither of which is the magic angle. This provides a method ofobtaining isotropic spectra while spinning at shallow angles. The p-MASexperiment may be used in situations where spinning the sample at themagic angle is not possible due to geometric or other constraints,allowing the choice of spinning angle to be determined by factors such asthe shape of the sample, rather than by the spin physics. The applicationof this technique to bovine tissue samples is demonstrated as a proof ofprinciple for future biological or medical applications.

  18. High-resolution spectroscopy of 31 Pegasi. The Hγ and He I 4471 line variations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorec, J.; Israelian, G.; Ballereau, D.; Chauville, J.

    1996-04-01

    We present high-resolution He I 4471, Mg II 4481 and Hγ line profiles of the Be star 31 Peg obtained simultaneously at four observing dates. In this paper we focus on the He I 4471 line and on the absorption wings of the Hγ line which showed important variations. Models of static stellar atmospheres were calculated to determine the photospheric parameters of the underlying star. However, non-static and out of radiative equilibrium models are needed to better understand the structure of the atmosphere of 31 Peg and the characteristics of the observed He I 4471 and Hγ lines. The implication of deep atmospheric layers in the mass-loss phenomena of Be stars is suggested.

  19. High resolution diode laser spectroscopy of H2O spectra broadened by nitrogen and noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapitanov, Venedikt A.; Osipov, Konstantin Yu.; Protasevich, Alexander E.; Ponurovskiy, Yakov Ya.

    2014-11-01

    The absorption spectra of pure H2O with mixtures of broadening gases N2, Ar, Xe, He, Ar and air have been measured in 1.39 mμ spectral region by high resolution spectrometer based on diode laser (DFB NEL, Japan). For the processing of pure water spectra and it's mixtures with a different broadening gases in a wide pressure range we used a multispectrum fitting procedure developed at IAO. The program is based on a relatively simple Rautian-Sobel'man line profile and linear pressure dependence of the line profile parameters. H2O measured spectra bulk processing results in the retrieving of such line parameters: zero-pressure line center positions, intensities, self-broadening and self-shift coefficients of pure water, broadening and shift coefficients for other gases which are describes the experiment with the minimum residuals in a wide pressure range.

  20. CARMENES at PPVI. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of M Dwarfs with FEROS, CAFE and HRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Floriano, F. J.; Montes, D.; Jeffers, S.; Caballero, J. A.; Zechmeister, M.; Mundt, R.; Reiners, A.; Amado, P. J.; Casal, E.; Cortés-Contreras, M.; Modroño, Z.; Ribas, I.; Rodríguez-López, C.; Quirrenbach, A.

    2013-07-01

    To ensure an efficient use of CARMENES observing time, and the highest chances of success, it is necessary first to select the most promising targets. To achieve this, we are observing ~500 M dwarfs at high-resolution (R = 30,000-48,000), from which we determine the projected rotational velocity vsini with an accuracy better than 0.5-0.2 km/s and radial-velocity stability better than 0.2-0.1 km/s. Our aim is to have at least two spectra at different epochs of the final 300 CARMENES targets. Our observations with FEROS at ESO/MPG 2.2m La Silla , CAFE at 2.2m Calar Alto and HRS at Hobby Eberly Telescope allow us to identify single- and double-line spectroscopic binaries and, especially, fast rotators, which should be discarded from the target list for exoplanet searches. Here we present preliminary results.