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Sample records for high-resolution lyso detectors

  1. A Lower-Cost High-Resolution LYSO Detector Development for Positron Emission Mammography (PEM)

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Rocio A.; Zhang, Yuxuan; Liu, Shitao; Li, Hongdi; Baghaei, Hossain; An, Shaohui; Wang, Chao; Jan, Meei-Ling; Wong, Wai-Hoi

    2010-01-01

    In photomultiplier-quadrant-sharing (PQS) geometry for positron emission tomography applications, each PMT is shared by four blocks and each detector block is optically coupled to four round PMTs. Although this design reduces the cost of high-resolution PET systems, when the camera consists of detector panels that are made up of square blocks, half of the PMT’s sensitive window remains unused at the detector panel edge. Our goal was to develop a LYSO detector panel which minimizes the unused portion of the PMTs for a low-cost, high-resolution, and high-sensitivity positron emission mammography (PEM) camera. We modified the PQS design by using elongated blocks at panel edges and square blocks in the inner area. For elongated blocks, symmetric and asymmetrical reflector patterns were developed and PQS and PMT-half-sharing (PHS) arrangements were implemented in order to obtain a suitable decoding. The packing fraction was 96.3% for asymmetric block and 95.5% for symmetric block. Both of the blocks have excellent decoding capability with all crystals clearly identified, 156 for asymmetric and 144 for symmetric and peak-to-valley ratio of 3.0 and 2.3 respectively. The average energy resolution was 14.2% for the asymmetric block and 13.1% for the symmetric block. Using a modified PQS geometry and asymmetric block design, we reduced the unused PMT region at detector panel edges, thereby increased the field-of-view and the overall detection sensitivity and minimized the undetected breast region near the chest wall. This detector design and using regular round PMT allowed building a lower-cost, high-resolution and high-sensitivity PEM camera. PMID:20485510

  2. HIGH-RESOLUTION L(Y)SO DETECTORS USING PMT-QUADRANT-SHARING FOR HUMAN & ANIMAL PET CAMERAS.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Rocio A; Liu, Shitao; Liu, Jiguo; Zhang, Yuxuan; Kim, Soonseok; Baghaei, Hossain; Li, Hongdi; Wang, Yu; Wong, Wai-Hoi

    2008-06-01

    We developed high resolution L(Y)SO detectors for human and animal PET applications using Photomultiplier-quadrant-sharing (PQS) technology. The crystal sizes were 1.27 × 1.27 × 10 mm(3) for the animal PQS-blocks and 3.25 × 3.25 × 20 mm(3) for human ones. Polymer mirror film patterns (PMR) were placed between crystals as reflector. The blocks were assembled together using optical grease and wrapped by Teflon tape. The blocks were coupled to regular round PMT's of 19/51 mm in PQS configuration. List-mode data of Ga-68 source (511 KeV) were acquired with our high yield pileup-event recovery (HYPER) electronics and data acquisition software. The high voltage bias was 1100V. Crystal decoding maps and individual crystal energy resolutions were extracted from the data. To investigate the potential imaging resolution of the PET cameras with these blocks, we used GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission) simulation package. GATE is a GEANT4 based software toolkit for realistic simulation of PET and SPECT systems. The packing fractions of these blocks were found to be 95.6% and 98.2%. From the decoding maps, all 196 and 225 crystals were clearly identified. The average energy resolutions were 14.0% and 15.6%. For small animal PET systems, the detector ring diameter was 16.5 cm with an axial field of view (AFOV) of 11.8 cm. The simulation data suggests that a reconstructed radial (tangential) spatial resolution of 1.24 (1.25) mm near the center is potentially achievable. For the wholebody human PET systems, the detector ring diameter was 86 cm. The simulation data suggests that a reconstructed radial (tangential) spatial resolution of 3.09(3.38) mm near the center is potentially achievable. From this study we can conclude that PQS design could achieve high spatial resolutions and excellent energy resolutions on human and animal PET systems with substantially lower production costs and inexpensive readout devices.

  3. High-Resolution PET Detector. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karp, Joel

    2014-03-26

    The objective of this project was to develop an understanding of the limits of performance for a high resolution PET detector using an approach based on continuous scintillation crystals rather than pixelated crystals. The overall goal was to design a high-resolution detector, which requires both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity for 511 keV gammas. Continuous scintillation detectors (Anger cameras) have been used extensively for both single-photon and PET scanners, however, these instruments were based on NaI(Tl) scintillators using relatively large, individual photo-multipliers. In this project we investigated the potential of this type of detector technology to achieve higher spatial resolution through the use of improved scintillator materials and photo-sensors, and modification of the detector surface to optimize the light response function.We achieved an average spatial resolution of 3-mm for a 25-mm thick, LYSO continuous detector using a maximum likelihood position algorithm and shallow slots cut into the entrance surface.

  4. Requirements on high resolution detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, A.

    1997-02-01

    For a number of microtomography applications X-ray detectors with a spatial resolution of 1 {mu}m are required. This high spatial resolution will influence and degrade other parameters of secondary importance like detective quantum efficiency (DQE), dynamic range, linearity and frame rate. This note summarizes the most important arguments, for and against those detector systems which could be considered. This article discusses the mutual dependencies between the various figures which characterize a detector, and tries to give some ideas on how to proceed in order to improve present technology.

  5. High resolution scintillation detector with semiconductor readout

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Craig S.; Hoffman, Edward J.

    2000-01-01

    A novel high resolution scintillation detector array for use in radiation imaging such as high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) which comprises one or more parallelepiped crystals with at least one long surface of each crystal being in intimate contact with a semiconductor photodetector such that photons generated within each crystal by gamma radiation passing therethrough is detected by the photodetector paired therewith.

  6. Performance characterization of a new high resolution PET scintillation detector

    PubMed Central

    Foudray, A M K; Olcott, P D

    2013-01-01

    Performance of a new high resolution PET detection concept is presented. In this new concept, annihilation radiation enters the scintillator detectors edge-on. Each detector module comprises two 8 × 8 LYSO scintillator arrays of 0.91 × 0.91 × 1 mm3 crystals coupled to two position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs) mounted on a flex circuit. Appropriate crystal segmentation allows the recording of all three spatial coordinates of the interaction(s) simultaneously with submillimeter resolution. We report an average energy resolution of 14.6 ± 1.7% for 511 keV photons at FWHM. Coincident time resolution was determined to be 2.98 ± 0.13 ns FWHM on average. The coincidence point spread function (PSF) has an average FWHM of 0.837 ± 0.049 mm (using a 500 μm spherical source) and is uniform across the arrays. Both PSF and coincident time resolution degrade when Compton interactions are included in the data. Different blurring factors were evaluated theoretically, resulting in a calculated PSF of 0.793 mm, in good agreement with the measured value. PMID:20844332

  7. High-resolution ionization detector and array of such detectors

    DOEpatents

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Rojeski, Ronald A.

    2001-01-16

    A high-resolution ionization detector and an array of such detectors are described which utilize a reference pattern of conductive or semiconductive material to form interaction, pervious and measurement regions in an ionization substrate of, for example, CdZnTe material. The ionization detector is a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector. Various geometries of such a detector and an array of such detectors produce room temperature operated gamma ray spectrometers with relatively high resolution. For example, a 1 cm.sup.3 detector is capable of measuring .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays with room temperature energy resolution approaching 2% at FWHM. Two major types of such detectors include a parallel strip semiconductor Frisch grid detector and the geometrically weighted trapezoid prism semiconductor Frisch grid detector. The geometrically weighted detector records room temperature (24.degree. C.) energy resolutions of 2.68% FWHM for .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays and 2.45% FWHM for .sup.60 Co 1.332 MeV gamma rays. The detectors perform well without any electronic pulse rejection, correction or compensation techniques. The devices operate at room temperature with simple commercially available NIM bin electronics and do not require special preamplifiers or cooling stages for good spectroscopic results.

  8. Performance evaluation of the ECAT HRRT: an LSO-LYSO double layer high resolution, high sensitivity scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Hugo W. A. M.; van Velden, Floris H. P.; Kloet, Reina W.; Buijs, Fred L.; Boellaard, Ronald; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.

    2007-03-01

    The ECAT high resolution research tomograph (HRRT) is a dedicated brain and small animal PET scanner, with design features that enable high image spatial resolution combined with high sensitivity. The HRRT is the first commercially available scanner that utilizes a double layer of LSO/LYSO crystals to achieve photon detection with depth-of-interaction information. In this study, the performance of the commercial LSO/LYSO HRRT was characterized, using the NEMA protocol as a guideline. Besides measurement of spatial resolution, energy resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, count rate performance, correction for attenuation and scatter, hot spot recovery and image quality, a clinical evaluation was performed by means of a HR+/HRRT human brain comparison study. Point source resolution varied across the field of view from approximately 2.3 to 3.2 mm (FWHM) in the transaxial direction and from 2.5 to 3.4 mm in the axial direction. Absolute line-source sensitivity ranged from 2.5 to 3.3% and the NEMA-2001 scatter fraction equalled 45%. Maximum NECR was 45 kcps and 148 kcps according to the NEMA-2001 and 1994 protocols, respectively. Attenuation and scatter correction led to a volume uniformity of 6.3% and a system uniformity of 3.1%. Reconstructed values deviated up to 15 and 8% in regions with high and low densities, respectively, which can possibly be assigned to inaccuracies in scatter estimation. Hot spot recovery ranged from 60 to 94% for spheres with diameters of 1 to 2.2 cm. A high quantitative agreement was met between HR+ and HRRT clinical data. In conclusion, the ECAT HRRT has excellent resolution and sensitivity properties, which is a crucial advantage in many research studies.

  9. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Kaplan, Selig N.; Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1992-01-01

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n type, intrinsic, p type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography.

  10. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-05-26

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n-type, intrinsic, p-type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography. 18 figs.

  11. High resolution collimator system for X-ray detector

    DOEpatents

    Eberhard, Jeffrey W.; Cain, Dallas E.

    1987-01-01

    High resolution in an X-ray computerized tomography (CT) inspection system is achieved by using a collimator/detector combination to limit the beam width of the X-ray beam incident on a detector element to the desired resolution width. In a detector such as a high pressure Xenon detector array, a narrow tapered collimator is provided above a wide detector element. The collimator slits have any desired width, as small as a few mils at the top, the slit width is easily controlled, and they are fabricated on standard machines. The slit length determines the slice thickness of the CT image.

  12. Theoretical performance analysis for CMOS based high resolution detectors.

    PubMed

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2013-03-06

    High resolution imaging capabilities are essential for accurately guiding successful endovascular interventional procedures. Present x-ray imaging detectors are not always adequate due to their inherent limitations. The newly-developed high-resolution micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF-CCD) detector has demonstrated excellent clinical image quality; however, further improvement in performance and physical design may be possible using CMOS sensors. We have thus calculated the theoretical performance of two proposed CMOS detectors which may be used as a successor to the MAF. The proposed detectors have a 300 μm thick HL-type CsI phosphor, a 50 μm-pixel CMOS sensor with and without a variable gain light image intensifier (LII), and are designated MAF-CMOS-LII and MAF-CMOS, respectively. For the performance evaluation, linear cascade modeling was used. The detector imaging chains were divided into individual stages characterized by one of the basic processes (quantum gain, binomial selection, stochastic and deterministic blurring, additive noise). Ranges of readout noise and exposure were used to calculate the detectors' MTF and DQE. The MAF-CMOS showed slightly better MTF than the MAF-CMOS-LII, but the MAF-CMOS-LII showed far better DQE, especially for lower exposures. The proposed detectors can have improved MTF and DQE compared with the present high resolution MAF detector. The performance of the MAF-CMOS is excellent for the angiography exposure range; however it is limited at fluoroscopic levels due to additive instrumentation noise. The MAF-CMOS-LII, having the advantage of the variable LII gain, can overcome the noise limitation and hence may perform exceptionally for the full range of required exposures; however, it is more complex and hence more expensive.

  13. Portable electro-mechanically cooled high-resolution germanium detector

    SciTech Connect

    Neufeld, K.W.; Ruhter, W.D.

    1995-05-01

    We have integrated a small, highly-reliable, electro-mechanical cryo-cooler with a high-resolution germanium detector for portable/field applications. The system weighs 6.8 kg and requires 40 watts of power to operate once the detector is cooled to its operating temperature. the detector is a 500 mm{sup 2} by 20-mm thick low-energy configuration that gives a full-width at half maximum (FWHM) energy resolution of 523 eV at 122 keV, when cooled with liquid nitrogen. The energy resolution of the detector, when cooled with the electro-mechanical cooler, is 570 eV at 122 keV. We have field tested this system in measurements of plutonium and uranium for isotopic and enrichment information using the MGA and MGAU analysis programs without any noticeable effects on the results.

  14. High-Resolution Mammography Detector Employing Optical Switching Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irisawa, Kaku; Kaneko, Yasuhisa; Yamane, Katsutoshi; Sendai, Tomonari; Hosoi, Yuichi

    Conceiving a new detector structure, FUJIFILM Corporation has successfully put its invention of an X-ray detector employing "Optical Switching" into practical use. Since Optical Switching Technology allows an electrode structure to be easily designed, both high resolution of pixel pitch and low electrical noise readout have been achieved, which have consequently realized the world's smallest pixel size of 50×50 μm2 from a Direct-conversion FPD system as well as high DQE. The digital mammography system equipped with this detector enables to acquire high definition images while maintaining granularity. Its outstanding feature is to be able to acquire high-precision images of microcalcifications which is an important index in breast examination.

  15. Development of high-resolution detector module with depth of interaction identification for positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niknejad, Tahereh; Pizzichemi, Marco; Stringhini, Gianluca; Auffray, Etiennette; Bugalho, Ricardo; Da Silva, Jose Carlos; Di Francesco, Agostino; Ferramacho, Luis; Lecoq, Paul; Leong, Carlos; Paganoni, Marco; Rolo, Manuel; Silva, Rui; Silveira, Miguel; Tavernier, Stefaan; Varela, Joao; Zorraquino, Carlos

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a Time-of-flight high resolution and commercially viable detector module for the application in small PET scanners. A new approach to depth of interaction (DOI) encoding with low complexity for a pixelated crystal array using a single side readout and 4-to-1 coupling between scintillators and photodetectors was investigated. In this method the DOI information is estimated using the light sharing technique. The detector module is a 1.53×1.53×15 mm3 matrix of 8×8 LYSO scintillator with lateral surfaces optically depolished separated by reflective foils. The crystal array is optically coupled to 4×4 silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) array and readout by a high performance front-end ASIC with TDC capability (50 ps time binning). The results show an excellent crystal identification for all the scintillators in the matrix, a timing resolution of 530 ps, an average DOI resolution of 5.17 mm FWHM and an average energy resolution of 18.29% FWHM.

  16. Sub-millimetre DOI detector based on monolithic LYSO and digital SiPM for a dedicated small-animal PET system.

    PubMed

    Marcinkowski, Radosław; Mollet, Pieter; Van Holen, Roel; Vandenberghe, Stefaan

    2016-03-07

    The mouse model is widely used in a vast range of biomedical and preclinical studies. Thanks to the ability to detect and quantify biological processes at the molecular level in vivo, PET has become a well-established tool in these investigations. However, the need to visualize and quantify radiopharmaceuticals in anatomic structures of millimetre or less requires good spatial resolution and sensitivity from small-animal PET imaging systems.In previous work we have presented a proof-of-concept of a dedicated high-resolution small-animal PET scanner based on thin monolithic scintillator crystals and Digital Photon Counter photosensor. The combination of thin monolithic crystals and MLE positioning algorithm resulted in an excellent spatial resolution of 0.7 mm uniform in the entire field of view (FOV). However, the limitation of the scanner was its low sensitivity due to small thickness of the lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystals (2 mm).Here we present an improved detector design for a small-animal PET system that simultaneously achieves higher sensitivity and sustains a sub-millimetre spatial resolution. The proposed detector consists of a 5 mm thick monolithic LYSO crystal optically coupled to a Digital Photon Counter. Mean nearest neighbour (MNN) positioning combined with depth of interaction (DOI) decoding was employed to achieve sub-millimetre spatial resolution. To evaluate detector performance the intrinsic spatial resolution, energy resolution and coincidence resolving time (CRT) were measured. The average intrinsic spatial resolution of the detector was 0.60 mm full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM). A DOI resolution of 1.66 mm was achieved. The energy resolution was 23% FWHM at 511 keV and CRT of 529 ps were measured. The improved detector design overcomes the sensitivity limitation of the previous design by increasing the nominal sensitivity of the detector block and retains an excellent intrinsic spatial resolution.

  17. Two-dimensional Detector for High Resolution Soft X-ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ejima, Takeo; Ogasawara, Shodo; Hatano, Tadashi; Yanagihara, Mihiro; Yamamoto, Masaki

    2010-06-23

    A new two-dimensional (2D) detector for detecting soft X-ray (SX) images was developed. The detector has a scintillator plate to convert a SX image into a visible (VI) one, and a relay optics to magnify and detect the converted VI image. In advance of the fabrication of the detector, quantum efficiencies of scintillators were investigated. As a result, a Ce:LYSO single crystal on which Zr thin film was deposited was used as an image conversion plate. The spatial resolution of fabricated detector is 3.0 {mu}m, and the wavelength range which the detector has sensitivity is 30-6 nm region.

  18. Investigation of crystal surface finish and geometry on single LYSO scintillator detector performance for depth-of-interaction measurement with silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bircher, Chad; Shao, Yiping

    2012-11-01

    Depth of Interaction (DOI) information can improve quality of reconstructed images acquired from Positron Emission Tomography (PET), especially in high resolution and compact scanners dedicated for breast, brain, or small animal imaging applications. Additionally, clinical scanners with time of flight capability can also benefit from DOI information. One of the most promising methods of determining DOI in a crystal involves reading the signal from two ends of a scintillation crystal, and calculating the signal ratio between the two detectors. This method is known to deliver a better DOI resolution with rough crystals compared to highly polished crystals. However, what is still not well studied is how much of a tradeoff is involved between spatial, energy, temporal, and DOI resolutions as a function of the crystal surface treatment and geometry with the use of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) as the photo detectors. This study investigates the effects of different crystal surface finishes and geometries on energy, timing and DOI resolutions at different crystal depths. The results show that for LYSO scintillators of 1.5×1.5×20 mm3 and 2×2×20 mm3 with their surfaces finished from 0.5 to 30 μm roughness, almost the same energy and coincidence timing resolutions were maintained, around 15% and 2.4 ns, respectively across different crystal depths, while the DOI resolutions were steadily improved from worse than 5 mm to better than 2 mm. They demonstrate that crystal roughness, with proper surface preparing, does not have a significant effect on the energy and coincidence timing resolutions in the crystals examined, and there does not appear to be a tradeoff between improving DOI resolution and degrading other detector performances. These results will be valuable to guide the selection of crystal surface conditions for developing a DOI measurable PET detector with a full array of LYSO scintillators coupled to SiPM arrays.

  19. Investigation of Crystal Surface Finish and Geometry on Single LYSO Scintillator Detector Performance for Depth-of-Interaction Measurement with Silicon Photomultipliers.

    PubMed

    Bircher, Chad; Shao, Yiping

    2012-11-21

    Depth of Interaction (DOI) information can improve quality of reconstructed images acquired from Positron Emission Tomography (PET), especially in high resolution and compact scanners dedicated for breast, brain, or small animal imaging applications. Additionally, clinical scanners with time of flight capability can also benefit from DOI information. One of the most promising methods of determining DOI in a crystal involves reading the signal from two ends of a scintillation crystal, and calculating the signal ratio between the two detectors. This method is known to deliver a better DOI resolution with rough crystals compared to highly polished crystals. However, what is still not well studied is how much of a tradeoff is involved between spatial, energy, temporal, and DOI resolutions as a function of the crystal surface treatment and geometry with the use of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) as the photo detectors. This study investigates the effects of different crystal surface finishes and geometries on energy, timing and DOI resolutions at different crystal depths. The results show that for LYSO scintillators of 1.5×1.5×20 mm(3) and 2×2×20 mm(3) with their surfaces finished from 0.5 to 30 micron roughness, almost the same energy and coincidence timing resolutions were maintained, around 15% and 2.4 ns respectively across different crystal depths, while the DOI resolutions were steadily improved from worse than 5 mm to better than 2 mm. They demonstrate that crystal roughness, with proper surface preparing, does not have a significant effect on the energy and coincidence timing resolutions in the crystals examined, and there does not appear to be a tradeoff between improving DOI resolution and degrading other detector performances. These results will be valuable to guide the selection of crystal surface conditions for developing a DOI measurable PET detector with a full array of LYSO scintillators coupled to SiPM arrays.

  20. High resolution gamma detector for small-animal positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Tao

    In this study, the performance of continuous miniature crystal element (cMiCE) detectors with LYSO crystals of different thickness were investigated. Potential designs of a cMiCE small animal positron emission tomography scanner were also evaluated by an analytical simulation approach. The cMiCE detector was proposed as a high sensitivity, low cost alternative to the prevailing discrete crystal detectors. A statistics based positioning (SBP) algorithm was developed to solve the scintillation position estimation problem and proved to be successful on a cMiCE detector with a 4 mm thick crystal. By assuming a Gaussian distribution, the distributions of the photomultiplier signals could be characterized by mean and variance, which are functions of scintillation position. After calibrating the detector on a grid of locations, a 2D table of the mean and variance can be built. The SBP algorithm searches the tables to find the location that maximizes the likelihood between the mean and variance of known positions and the incoming scintillation event. In this work, the performance of the SBP algorithm on cMiCE detectors with thicker crystals (6 and 8 mm) was studied. The stopping power of a cMiCE detector is 40% and 49% for 6 and 8 mm thick crystals respectively. The intrinsic spatial resolution is 1.2 mm and 1.4 mm FWHM for the center and corner sections of a 6 mm thick crystal detector, and 1.3 mm and 1.6 mm for center and corner of an 8 mm thick crystal detector. These results demonstrate that the cMiCE detector is a promising candidate for high resolution, high sensitivity PET applications. A maximum-likelihood (ML) clustering method was developed to empirically separate the experimental data set into two to four subgroups according to the depth-of-interaction of the detected photons. This method enabled us to build 2-DOI lookup tables (LUT) (mean and variance lookup tables for front group and back group). Using the 2-DOI SBP LUTs, the scintillation position and DOI

  1. A compact high resolution flat panel PET detector based on the new 4-side buttable MPPC for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Wen, Jie; Ravindranath, Bosky; O`Sullivan, Andrew W.; Catherall, David; Li, Ke; Wei, Shouyi; Komarov, Sergey; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2015-09-01

    Compact high-resolution panel detectors using virtual pinhole (VP) PET geometry can be inserted into existing clinical or pre-clinical PET systems to improve regional spatial resolution and sensitivity. Here we describe a compact panel PET detector built using the new Though Silicon Via (TSV) multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) detector. This insert provides high spatial resolution and good timing performance for multiple bio-medical applications. Because the TSV MPPC design eliminates wire bonding and has a package dimension which is very close to the MPPC's active area, it is 4-side buttable. The custom designed MPPC array (based on Hamamatsu S12641-PA-50(x)) used in the prototype is composed of 4×4 TSV-MPPC cells with a 4.46 mm pitch in both directions. The detector module has 16×16 lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal array, with each crystal measuring 0.92×0.92×3 mm3 with 1.0 mm pitch. The outer diameter of the detector block is 16.8×16.8 mm2. Thirty-two such blocks will be arranged in a 4×8 array with 1 mm gaps to form a panel detector with detection area around 7 cm×14 cm in the full-size detector. The flood histogram acquired with 68Ge source showed excellent crystal separation capability with all 256 crystals clearly resolved. The detector module's mean, standard deviation, minimum (best) and maximum (worst) energy resolution were 10.19%, ±0.68%, 8.36% and 13.45% FWHM, respectively. The measured coincidence time resolution between the block detector and a fast reference detector (around 200 ps single photon timing resolution) was 0.95 ns. When tested with Siemens Cardinal electronics the performance of the detector blocks remain consistent. These results demonstrate that the TSV-MPPC is a promising photon sensor for use in a flat panel PET insert composed of many high resolution compact detector modules.

  2. A compact high resolution flat panel PET detector based on the new 4-side buttable MPPC for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang; Wen, Jie; Ravindranath, Bosky; O’Sullivan, Andrew W.; Catherall, David; Li, Ke; Wei, Shouyi; Komarov, Sergey; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Compact high-resolution panel detectors using virtual pinhole (VP) PET geometry can be inserted into existing clinical or pre-clinical PET systems to improve regional spatial resolution and sensitivity. Here we describe a compact panel PET detector built using the new Though Silicon Via (TSV) multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) detector. This insert provides high spatial resolution and good timing performance for multiple bio-medical applications. Because the TSV MPPC design eliminates wire bonding and has a package dimension which is very close to the MPPC’s active area, it is 4-side buttable. The custom designed MPPC array (based on Hamamatsu S12641-PA-50(x)) used in the prototype is composed of 4 × 4 TSV-MPPC cells with a 4.46 mm pitch in both directions. The detector module has 16 × 16 lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal array, with each crystal measuring 0.92 × 0.92 × 3 mm3 with 1.0 mm pitch. The outer diameter of the detector block is 16.8 × 16.8 mm2. Thirty-two such blocks will be arranged in a 4 × 8 array with 1 mm gaps to form a panel detector with detection area around 7 cm × 14 cm in the full-size detector. The flood histogram acquired with Ge-68 source showed excellent crystal separation capability with all 256 crystals clearly resolved. The detector module’s mean, standard deviation, minimum (best) and maximum (worst) energy resolution were 10.19%, +/−0.68%, 8.36% and 13.45% FWHM, respectively. The measured coincidence time resolution between the block detector and a fast reference detector (around 200 ps single photon timing resolution) was 0.95 ns. When tested with Siemens Cardinal electronics the performance of the detector blocks remain consistent. These results demonstrate that the TSV-MPPC is a promising photon sensor for use in a flat panel PET insert composed of many high resolution compact detector modules. PMID:26085702

  3. Recipes for high resolution time-of-flight detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Anz, S.J. |; Felter, T.E.; Hess, B.V.; Daley, R.S.; Roberts, M.L.; Williams, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    The authors discuss the dynamics, construction, implementation and benefits of a time-of-flight (TOF) detector with count rates an order of magnitude higher and resolution three to four times better than that obtainable with a surface barrier detector. The propose use of design criteria for a time-of-flight detector is outlined, and the determination of a TOF detector`s total relative timing error and how this value determines the mass resolution are illustrated using a graphical analysis. They present simulation and experimental examples employing light ions and discuss advantages and pitfalls of medium-energy heavy ion TOF spectrometry.

  4. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOEpatents

    Bonanos, Peter

    1992-01-01

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity.

  5. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOEpatents

    Bonanos, P.

    1992-01-07

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity. 4 figs.

  6. A High-resolution TOF Detector _ A Possible Way to Compete with a RICH Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J; Ertley, C.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Ratcliff, B.; Schwiening, J.; /SLAC

    2008-07-25

    Using two identical 64-pixel Burle/Photonis MCP-PMTs to provide start and stop signals, they have achieved a timing resolution of {sigma}{sub Single{_}detector} {approx} 7.2 ps for N{sub pe} {approx} 50 photoelectrons (N{sub pe}) with a laser diode providing a 1 mm spot on the MCP window. The limiting resolution achieved was {sigma}{sub Single{_}detector} {approx} 5.0 ps for N{sub pe} {approx} 180, for which they estimate the MCP-PMT contribution of {sigma}{sub MCP-PMT} {approx} 4.5 ps. The electronics contribution is estimated as {sigma}{sub Electrons} = 3.42 ps. These results suggest that an ultra-high resolution TOF detector may become a reality at future experiments one day.

  7. A High Resolution Monolithic Crystal, DOI, MR Compatible, PET Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S Miyaoka

    2012-03-06

    The principle objective of this proposal is to develop a positron emission tomography (PET) detector with depth-of-interaction (DOI) positioning capability that will achieve state of the art spatial resolution and sensitivity performance for small animal PET imaging. When arranged in a ring or box detector geometry, the proposed detector module will support <1 mm3 image resolution and >15% absolute detection efficiency. The detector will also be compatible with operation in a MR scanner to support simultaneous multi-modality imaging. The detector design will utilize a thick, monolithic crystal scintillator readout by a two-dimensional array of silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) devices using a novel sensor on the entrance surface (SES) design. Our hypothesis is that our single-ended readout SES design will provide an effective DOI positioning performance equivalent to more expensive dual-ended readout techniques and at a significantly lower cost. Our monolithic crystal design will also lead to a significantly lower cost system. It is our goal to design a detector with state of the art performance but at a price point that is affordable so the technology can be disseminated to many laboratories. A second hypothesis is that using SiPM arrays, the detector will be able to operate in a MR scanner without any degradation in performance to support simultaneous PET/MR imaging. Having a co-registered MR image will assist in radiotracer localization and may also be used for partial volume corrections to improve radiotracer uptake quantitation. The far reaching goal of this research is to develop technology for medical research that will lead to improvements in human health care.

  8. High resolution decoding of Multi-Anode Microchannel Array detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasle, David B.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.

    1991-01-01

    The Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) is a photon counting detector which utilizes a photocathode for photon to electron conversion, a microchannel plate (MCP) for signal amplification and a proximity focused anode array for position sensitivity. The detector electronics decode the position of an event through coincidence discrimination. The decoding algorithm which associates a given event with the appropriate pixel is determined by the geometry of the array. A new algorithm incorporated into a CMOS Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) decoder which improves the pixel spatial resolution is described. The new algorithm does not degrade the detector throughput and does not require any modifications to the detector tube. The standard MAMA detector has a pixel size of 25 x 25 square microns, but with the new decoder circuit the pixel size is reduced to 12.5 x 12.5 square microns. We have built the first set of decode electronics utilizing the new ASIC chips and report here on the first imaging tests of this system.

  9. Digital Signal Processors for Cryogenic High-Resolution X-Ray Detector Readout

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Drury, O; Bechstein, S; Henning, W; Momayezi, M

    2003-01-01

    The authors are developing fast digital signal processors (DSPs) to read out superconducting high-resolution X-ray detectors with on-line pulse processing. For superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detector read-out, the DSPs offer on-line filtering, rise time discrimination and pile-up rejection. Compared to analog pulse processing, DSP readout somewhat degrades the detector resolution, but improves the spectral purity of the detector response. They discuss DSP performance with the 9-channel STJ array for synchrotron-based high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy.

  10. Development of high resolution imaging detectors for x ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, S. S.; Schwartz, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    This final report summarizes our past activities and discusses the work performed over the period of 1 April 1990 through 1 April 1991 on x-ray optics, soft x-ray (0.1 - 10 KeV) imaging detectors, and hard x-ray (10 - 300 KeV) imaging detectors. If microchannel plates (MCPs) can be used to focus x-rays with a high efficiency and good angular resolution, they will revolutionize the field of x-ray optics. An x-ray image of a point source through an array of square MCP pores compared favorably with our ray tracing model for the MCP. Initial analysis of this image demonstrates the feasibility of MCPs for soft x-rays. Our work continues with optimizing the performance of our soft x-ray MCP imaging detectors. This work involves readout technology that should provide improved MCP readout devices (thin film crossed grid, curved, and resistive sheets), defect removal in MCPs, and photocathode optimization. In the area of hard x-ray detector development we have developed two different techniques for producing a CsI photocathode thickness of 10 to 100 microns, such that it is thick enough to absorb the high energy x-rays and still allow the photoelectrons to escape to the top MCP of a modified soft x-ray imaging detector. The methods involve vacuum depositing a thick film of CsI on a strong back, and producing a converter device that takes the place of the photocathode.

  11. High resolution, low energy avalanche photodiode X-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, R.; Vanderpuye, K.; Entine, G.; Squillante, M. R.

    1991-01-01

    Silicon avalanche photodiodes have been fabricated, and their performance as X-ray detectors has been measured. Photon sensitivity and energy resolution were measured as a function of size and operating parameters. Noise thresholds as low as 212 eV were obtained at room temperature, and backscatter X-ray fluorescence data were obtained for aluminum and other light elements. It is concluded that the results with the X-ray detector are extremely encouraging, and the performance is challenging the best available proportional counters. While not at the performance level of either cryogenic silicon or HgI2, these device operate at room temperature and can be reproduced in large numbers and with much larger areas than typically achieved with HgI2. In addition, they are rugged and appear to be indefinitely stable.

  12. A new, sensitive, high resolution Raman detector based on ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B. W.; Omenetto, N.; Winefordner, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    A novel detection method for weak pulsed or cw Raman fluxes is described. The detector is based upon the production of Raman scatter with a tunable pulsed or cw dye laser, collecting a large fraction of the Raman scatter and transferring it efficiently into an ionization detector containing a metal (M) vapor, such as Li. The resonance ionization detector (RID) is simultaneously illuminated by a second dye laser. When the second laser is tuned to an excited state transition of the metal vapor M and when the first laser is at such a wavelength that the Raman scatter appears at the ground state absorption transition of the metal, then a current will be produced in the RID which is proportional to the Raman scatter intensity. Both the production and collection of this current can be made very efficient (approaching 100%) and should result in improved sensitivity compared to conventional dispersive or FT Raman techniques. The new approach should be much less sensitive to scatter, should have a spectral resolution better than 0.1 cm -1 and should allow Raman scatter measurements to be made at wavenumbers below 100 cm -1 and under certain conditions to 0.01 cm -1. The approach should be especially useful in highly scattering environments like Ag-sols in surface enhanced Raman and should be useful for detection of ultratrace levels of drugs and metabolites in biological fluids. The Raman-RID approach should also be useful for resonance Raman since laser scatter and molecular fluorescence should have minimal effects.

  13. High Resolution Emission and Transmission Imaging Using the Same Detector.

    PubMed

    Panse, Ashish S; Jain, A; Wang, W; Yao, R; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2010-10-30

    We demonstrate the capability of one detector, the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector, to image for two types of applications: nuclear medicine imaging and radiography. The MAF has 1024 × 1024 pixels with an effective pixel size of 35 microns and is capable of real-time imaging at 30 fps. It has a CCD camera coupled by a fiber-optic taper to a light image intensifier (LII) viewing a 300-micron thick CsI phosphor. The large variable gain of the LII provides quantum-limited operation with little additive instrumentation noise and enables operation in both energy-integrating (EI) and sensitive low-exposure single photon counting (SPC) modes. We used the EI mode to take a radiograph, and the SPC mode to image a custom phantom filled with 1 mCi of I-125. The phantom is made of hot rods with diameters ranging from 0.9 mm to 2.3 mm. A 1 mm diameter parallel hole, medium energy gamma camera collimator was placed between the phantom and the MAF and was moved multiple times at equal intervals in random directions to eliminate the grid pattern corresponding to the collimator septa. Data was acquired at 20 fps. Two algorithms to localize the events were used: 1) simple threshold and 2) a weighted centroid method. Although all the hot rods could be clearly identified, the image generated with the simple threshold method shows more blurring than that with the weighted centroid method. With the diffuse cluster of pixels from each single detection event localized to a single pixel, the weighted centroid method shows improved spatial resolution. A radiograph of the phantom was taken with the same MAF in EI mode without the collimator. It shows clear structural details of the rods. Compared to the radiograph, the sharpness of the emission image is limited by the collimator resolution and could be improved by optimized collimator design. This study demonstrated that the same MAF detector can be used in both radioisotope and x-ray imaging, combining the benefits of each.

  14. Performance of high resolution decoding with Multi-Anode Microchannel Array detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasle, David B.; Horch, Elliott P.

    1993-01-01

    The Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) is a microchannel plate based photon counting detector with applications in ground-based and space-based astronomy. The detector electronics decode the position of each photon event, and the decoding algorithm that associates a given event with the appropriate pixel is determined by the geometry of the anode array. The standard MAMA detector has a spatial resolution set by the anode array of 25 microns, but the MCP pore resolution exceeds this. The performance of a new algorithm that halves the pixel spacing and improves the pixel spatial resolution is described. The new algorithm does not degrade the pulse-pair resolution of the detector and does not require any modifications to the detector tube. Measurements of the detector's response demonstrate that high resolution decoding yields a 60 percent enhancement in spatial resolution. Measurements of the performance of the high resolution algorithm with a 14 micron MAMA detector are also described. The parameters that control high resolution performance are discussed. Results of the application of high resolution decoding to speckle interferometry are presented.

  15. Cryogenic, high-resolution x-ray detector with high count rate capability

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Matthias; Mears, Carl A.; Labov, Simon E.; Hiller, Larry J.; Barfknecht, Andrew T.

    2003-03-04

    A cryogenic, high-resolution X-ray detector with high count rate capability has been invented. The new X-ray detector is based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), and operates without thermal stabilization at or below 500 mK. The X-ray detector exhibits good resolution (.about.5-20 eV FWHM) for soft X-rays in the keV region, and is capable of counting at count rates of more than 20,000 counts per second (cps). Simple, FET-based charge amplifiers, current amplifiers, or conventional spectroscopy shaping amplifiers can provide the electronic readout of this X-ray detector.

  16. High Resolution PET with 250 micrometer LSO Detectors and Adaptive Zoom

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, Simon R.; Qi, Jinyi

    2012-01-08

    There have been impressive improvements in the performance of small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) systems since their first development in the mid 1990s, both in terms of spatial resolution and sensitivity, which have directly contributed to the increasing adoption of this technology for a wide range of biomedical applications. Nonetheless, current systems still are largely dominated by the size of the scintillator elements used in the detector. Our research predicts that developing scintillator arrays with an element size of 250 {micro}m or smaller will lead to an image resolution of 500 {micro}m when using 18F- or 64Cu-labeled radiotracers, giving a factor of 4-8 improvement in volumetric resolution over the highest resolution research systems currently in existence. This proposal had two main objectives: (i) To develop and evaluate much higher resolution and efficiency scintillator arrays that can be used in the future as the basis for detectors in a small-animal PET scanner where the spatial resolution is dominated by decay and interaction physics rather than detector size. (ii) To optimize one such high resolution, high sensitivity detector and adaptively integrate it into the existing microPET II small animal PET scanner as a 'zoom-in' detector that provides higher spatial resolution and sensitivity in a limited region close to the detector face. The knowledge gained from this project will provide valuable information for building future PET systems with a complete ring of very high-resolution detector arrays and also lay the foundations for utilizing high-resolution detectors in combination with existing PET systems for localized high-resolution imaging.

  17. Circuit for high resolution decoding of multi-anode microchannel array detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasle, David B. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A circuit for high resolution decoding of multi-anode microchannel array detectors consisting of input registers accepting transient inputs from the anode array; anode encoding logic circuits connected to the input registers; midpoint pipeline registers connected to the anode encoding logic circuits; and pixel decoding logic circuits connected to the midpoint pipeline registers is described. A high resolution algorithm circuit operates in parallel with the pixel decoding logic circuit and computes a high resolution least significant bit to enhance the multianode microchannel array detector's spatial resolution by halving the pixel size and doubling the number of pixels in each axis of the anode array. A multiplexer is connected to the pixel decoding logic circuit and allows a user selectable pixel address output according to the actual multi-anode microchannel array detector anode array size. An output register concatenates the high resolution least significant bit onto the standard ten bit pixel address location to provide an eleven bit pixel address, and also stores the full eleven bit pixel address. A timing and control state machine is connected to the input registers, the anode encoding logic circuits, and the output register for managing the overall operation of the circuit.

  18. Reproducibility and calibration of MMC-based high-resolution gamma detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, C. R.; Pies, C.; Kempf, S.; Hengstler, D.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Enss, C.; Friedrich, S.

    2016-07-15

    Here, we describe a prototype γ-ray detector based on a metallic magnetic calorimeter with an energy resolution of 46 eV at 60 keV and a reproducible response function that follows a simple second-order polynomial. The simple detector calibration allows adding high-resolution spectra from different pixels and different cool-downs without loss in energy resolution to determine γ-ray centroids with high accuracy. As an example of an application in nuclear safeguards enabled by such a γ-ray detector, we discuss the non-destructive assay of 242Pu in a mixed-isotope Pu sample.

  19. Reproducibility and calibration of MMC-based high-resolution gamma detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, C. R.; Pies, C.; Kempf, S.; Hengstler, D.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Enss, C.; Friedrich, S.

    2016-07-01

    We describe a prototype γ-ray detector based on a metallic magnetic calorimeter with an energy resolution of 46 eV at 60 keV and a reproducible response function that follows a simple second-order polynomial. The simple detector calibration allows adding high-resolution spectra from different pixels and different cool-downs without loss in energy resolution to determine γ-ray centroids with high accuracy. As an example of an application in nuclear safeguards enabled by such a γ-ray detector, we discuss the non-destructive assay of 242Pu in a mixed-isotope Pu sample.

  20. Reproducibility and calibration of MMC-based high-resolution gamma detectors

    DOE PAGES

    Bates, C. R.; Pies, C.; Kempf, S.; ...

    2016-07-15

    Here, we describe a prototype γ-ray detector based on a metallic magnetic calorimeter with an energy resolution of 46 eV at 60 keV and a reproducible response function that follows a simple second-order polynomial. The simple detector calibration allows adding high-resolution spectra from different pixels and different cool-downs without loss in energy resolution to determine γ-ray centroids with high accuracy. As an example of an application in nuclear safeguards enabled by such a γ-ray detector, we discuss the non-destructive assay of 242Pu in a mixed-isotope Pu sample.

  1. CeBr3 as a Room-Temperature, High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Guss, Michael Reed, Ding Yuan, Alexis Reed, and Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay

    2009-09-01

    Cerium bromide (CeBr3) has become a material of interest in the race for high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at room temperature. This investigation quantified the potential of CeBr3 as a room temperature, high-resolution gamma-ray detector. The performance of CeBr3 crystals was compared to other scintillation crystals of similar dimensions and detection environments. Comparison of self-activity of CeBr3 to cerium-doped lanthanum tribromide (LaBr3:Ce) was performed. Energy resolution and relative intrinsic efficiency were measured and are presented.

  2. Characterization of a PET detector head based on continuous LYSO crystals and monolithic, 64-pixel silicon photomultiplier matrices.

    PubMed

    Llosá, G; Barrio, J; Lacasta, C; Bisogni, M G; Del Guerra, A; Marcatili, S; Barrillon, P; Bondil-Blin, S; de la Taille, C; Piemonte, C

    2010-12-07

    The characterization of a PET detector head based on continuous LYSO crystals and silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays as photodetectors has been carried out for its use in the development of a small animal PET prototype. The detector heads are composed of a continuous crystal and a SiPM matrix with 64 pixels in a common substrate, fabricated specifically for this project. Three crystals of 12 mm × 12 mm × 5 mm size with different types of painting have been tested: white, black and black on the sides but white on the back of the crystal. The best energy resolution, obtained with the white crystal, is 16% FWHM. The detector response is linear up to 1275 keV. Tests with different position determination algorithms have been carried out with the three crystals. The spatial resolution obtained with the center of gravity algorithm is around 0.9 mm FWHM for the three crystals. As expected, the use of this algorithm results in the displacement of the reconstructed position toward the center of the crystal, more pronounced in the case of the white crystal. A maximum likelihood algorithm has been tested that can reconstruct correctly the interaction position of the photons also in the case of the white crystal.

  3. High-resolution gamma-ray measurement systems using a compact electro- mechanically cooled detector system and intelligent software

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, W.M.; Carlson, J.B.; Neufeld, K.W.

    1995-09-27

    Obtaining high-resolution gamma-ray measurements using high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors in the field has been of limited practicality due to the need to use and maintain a supply of liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}). This same constraint limits high-resolution gamma measurements in unattended safeguards or treaty Verification applications. We are developing detectors and software to greatly extend the applicability of high-resolution germanium-based measurements for these situations.

  4. High-resolution VUV spectrometer/detector investigations of rare-earth pulsed plasma source (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J. R.; Cromer, C. L.; Bridges, J. M.; Lucatorto, T. B.

    1985-05-01

    A 1.5-m grazing incidence spectrometer with a channel electron multiplier (CEMA) and electronic readout detector has been incorporated with a rare-earth target, pulsed plasma, continuum source. The spectrometer is compact and portable while maintaining high resolution. The CEMA detector consists of a single multichannel plate (MCP) with coned-shaped input pores which are cut at a 15-degree bias to improve efficiency at grazing angles. The source is a rare-earth plasma generated by a 10-J ruby laser producing intense continuum emission for wavelengths from 170 to 5 nm. This system will be used for both stationary and transient high-resolution atomic photoabsorption spectroscopy. The pulsed plasma source itself will be investigated for suitability as a radiometric transfer standard source. Preliminary results obtained with this integrated system will be discussed.

  5. Gas scintillation glass GEM detector for high-resolution X-ray imaging and CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, T.; Mitsuya, Y.; Fushie, T.; Murata, K.; Kawamura, A.; Koishikawa, A.; Toyokawa, H.; Takahashi, H.

    2017-04-01

    A high-spatial-resolution X-ray-imaging gaseous detector has been developed with a single high-gas-gain glass gas electron multiplier (G-GEM), scintillation gas, and optical camera. High-resolution X-ray imaging of soft elements is performed with a spatial resolution of 281 μm rms and an effective area of 100×100 mm. In addition, high-resolution X-ray 3D computed tomography (CT) is successfully demonstrated with the gaseous detector. It shows high sensitivity to low-energy X-rays, which results in high-contrast radiographs of objects containing elements with low atomic numbers. In addition, the high yield of scintillation light enables fast X-ray imaging, which is an advantage for constructing CT images with low-energy X-rays.

  6. Detector arrays for high resolution spectroscopy from 5-28 microns (Contributed)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, G.; Jennings, D. E.; Moseley, S. H.; Lamb, G.

    A linear Si:As BIB detector array (Rockwell International) is being implemented in a postdispersion detection system for ground based Fourier transform spectrometers. The array version can be used as a multichannel narrow band filter for extended spectral coverage or for imaging with a narrow bandpass. A Si:As solid state photomultiplier array (Rockwell) is evaluated for use in high resolution infrared spectrometers. Test results and applications are discussed.

  7. Limitations of anti-scatter grids when used with high resolution image detectors

    PubMed Central

    Singh, V.; Jain, A.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2014-01-01

    Anti-scatter grids are used in fluoroscopic systems to improve image quality by absorbing scattered radiation. A stationary Smit Rontgen X-ray grid (line density: 70 lines/cm, grid ratio: 13:1) was used with a flat panel detector (FPD) of pixel size 194 micron and a high-resolution CMOS detector, the Dexela 1207 with pixel size of 75 microns. To investigate the effectiveness of the grid, a simulated artery block was placed in a modified uniform frontal head phantom and imaged with both the FPD and the Dexela for an approximately 15 × 15 cm field of view (FOV). The contrast improved for both detectors with the grid. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) does not increase as much in the case of the Dexela as it improves in the case of the FPD. Since the total noise in a single frame increases substantially for the Dexela compared to the FPD when the grid is used, the CNR is degraded. The increase in the quantum noise per frame would be similar for both detectors when the grid is used due to the attenuation of radiation, but the fixed pattern noise caused by the grid was substantially higher for the Dexela compared to the FPD and hence caused a severe reduction of CNR. Without further corrective methods this grid should not be used with high-resolution fluoroscopic detectors because the CNR does not improve significantly and the visibility of low contrast details may be reduced. Either an anti-scatter grid of different design or an additional image processing step when using a similar grid would be required to deal with the problem of scatter for high resolution detectors and the structured noise of the grid pattern. PMID:25309101

  8. Limitations of anti-scatter grids when used with high resolution image detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, V.; Jain, A.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2014-03-01

    Anti-scatter grids are used in fluoroscopic systems to improve image quality by absorbing scattered radiation. A stationary Smit Rontgen X-ray grid (line density: 70 lines/cm, grid ratio: 13:1) was used with a flat panel detector (FPD) of pixel size 194 micron and a high-resolution CMOS detector, the Dexela 1207 with pixel size of 75 microns. To investigate the effectiveness of the grid, a simulated artery block was placed in a modified uniform frontal head phantom and imaged with both the FPD and the Dexela for an approximately 15 x 15 cm field of view (FOV). The contrast improved for both detectors with the grid. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) does not increase as much in the case of the Dexela as it improves in the case of the FPD. Since the total noise in a single frame increases substantially for the Dexela compared to the FPD when the grid is used, the CNR is degraded. The increase in the quantum noise per frame would be similar for both detectors when the grid is used due to the attenuation of radiation, but the fixed pattern noise caused by the grid was substantially higher for the Dexela compared to the FPD and hence caused a severe reduction of CNR. Without further corrective methods this grid should not be used with high-resolution fluoroscopic detectors because the CNR does not improve significantly and the visibility of low contrast details may be reduced. Either an anti-scatter grid of different design or an additional image processing step when using a similar grid would be required to deal with the problem of scatter for high resolution detectors and the structured noise of the grid pattern.

  9. A superconducting detector endstation for high-resolution energy-dispersive SR-XRF

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Drury, O; Niedermayr, T; Cunningham, M F; van den Berg, M L; Ullom, J N; Loshak, A; Cramer, S P; Batteux, J D; See, E; Frank, M; Labov, S E

    2000-09-15

    We have built a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to operate cryogenic high-resolution x-ray detectors in synchrotron-based fluorescence applications. The detector is held at the end of a 40 cm cold finger that extends into a UHV sample chamber. The ADR attains a base temperature below 100 mK with about 24 hours hold time below 400 mK, and does not require pumping on the liquid He bath. We will discuss cryostat design and performance.

  10. High-resolution infrared detector and its electronic unit for space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, M.; Montmessin, F.; Korablev, O.; Trokhimovsky, A.; Poiet, G.; Bel, J.-B.

    2015-05-01

    High-resolution infrared detector is used extensively for military and civilian purposes. Military applications include target acquisition, surveillance, night vision, and tracking. Civilian applications include, among others, scientific observations. For our space systems, we want to use the products developed by SOFRADIR Company. Thus, we have developed a space electronic unit that is used to control the high-resolution SCORPIO-MW infrared detector, which has a format of 640×512 pixels with 15μm×15μm pixel pitch. The detector within microelectronics based on infrared mid-wave (MW) complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) uses a micro-cooler in order to keep its temperature around 100 K. The standard wavelength range (3 to 5μm) is adapted to the 2.2 to 4.3μm wavelength range thanks to adaptation of the optical interface of the detector and with an antireflection coating. With our electronic system, we can acquire 3 images per second. To increase the signal to noise ratio, we have the opportunity to make a summation of 15 frames per image. Through this article, we will describe the space electronic system that we have developed in order to achieve space observations (e.g. Atmospheric Chemistry Suite package for ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter).

  11. Implementation of digital multiplexing for high resolution X-ray detector arrays.

    PubMed

    Sharma, P; Swetadri Vasan, S N; Titus, A H; Cartwright, A N; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2012-01-01

    We describe and demonstrate for the first time the use of the novel Multiple Module Multiplexer (MMMIC) for a 2×2 array of new electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) based x-ray detectors. It is highly desirable for x-ray imaging systems to have larger fields of view (FOV) extensible in two directions yet to still be capable of doing high resolution imaging over regions-of-interest (ROI). The MMMIC achieves these goals by acquiring and multiplexing data from an array of imaging modules thereby enabling a larger FOV, and at the same time allowing high resolution ROI imaging through selection of a subset of modules in the array. MMMIC also supports different binning modes. This paper describes how a specific two stage configuration connecting three identical MMMICs is used to acquire and multiplex data from a 2×2 array of EMCCD based detectors. The first stage contains two MMMICs wherein each MMMIC is getting data from two EMCCD detectors. The multiplexed data from these MMMICs is then forwarded to the second stage MMMIC in the similar fashion. The second stage that has only one MMMIC gives the final 12 bit multiplexed data from four modules. This data is then sent over a high speed Camera Link interface to the image processing computer. X-ray images taken through the 2×2 array of EMCCD based detectors using this two stage configuration of MMMICs are shown successfully demonstrating the concept.

  12. High resolution, two-dimensional imaging, microchannel plate detector for use on a sounding rocket experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Brett C.; Cotton, Daniel M.; Siegmund, Oswald H.; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Harris, Walter; Clarke, John

    1991-01-01

    We discuss a high resolution microchannel plate (MCP) imaging detector to be used in measurements of Doppler-shifted hydrogen Lyman-alpha line emission from Jupiter and the interplanetary medium. The detector is housed in a vacuum-tight stainless steel cylinder (to provide shielding from magnetic fields) with a MgF2 window. Operating at nominal voltage, the four plate configuration provides a gain of 1.2 x 10 exp 7 electrons per incident photon. The wedge-and-strip anode has two-dimensional imaging capabilities, with a resolution of 40 microns FWHM over a one centimeter diameter area. The detector has a high quantum efficiency while retaining a low background rate. A KBr photocathode is used to enhance the quantum efficiency of the bare MCPs to a value of 35 percent at Lyman-alpha.

  13. Focal spot deblurring for high resolution direct conversion x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Rana, R.; Russ, M.; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2016-03-01

    Small pixel high resolution direct x-ray detectors have the advantage of higher spatial sampling and decreased blurring characteristic. The limiting factors for such systems becomes the degradation due to the focal spot size. One solution is a smaller focal spot; however, this can limit the output of the x-ray tube. Here a software solution of deconvolving with an estimated focal spot blur is presented. To simulate images from a direct detector affected with focal-spot blur, first a set of high-resolution stent images (FRED from Microvention, Inc., Tustin, CA) were acquired using a 75μm pixel size Dexela-Perkin-Elmer detector and frame averaged to reduce quantum noise. Then the averaged image was blurred with a known Gaussian blur. To add noise to the blurred image a flat-field image was multiplied with the blurred image. Both the ideal and the noisy-blurred images were then deconvolved with the known Gaussian function using either threshold-based inverse filtering or Weiner deconvolution. The blur in the ideal image was removed and the details were recovered successfully. However, the inverse filtering deconvolution process is extremely susceptible to noise. The Weiner deconvolution process was able to recover more of the details of the stent from the noisy-blurred image, but for noisier images, stent details are still lost in the recovery process.

  14. Computed tomography dosimetry with high-resolution detectors commonly used in radiotherapy - an energy dependence study.

    PubMed

    Liebmann, Mario; Poppe, Bjoern; von Boetticher, Heiner

    2015-09-08

    New methods of dosimetry in computed tomography (CT) X-ray fields require the use of high-resolution detectors instead of pencil-type ionization chambers typically used for CT dose index (CTDI) measurements. This paper presents a study on the suitability of a wide range of ionization chambers, diodes, and a two-dimensional detector array, used primarily in radiation therapy, for CT and cone-beam CT dosimetry. Specifically, the energy dependence of these detectors from 50 kVp up to 125 kVp is reported. All measurements were performed in reference to a calibrated diode for use in this energy region. The radiation quality correction factors provided by the manufacturer were used, depending on the measured half-value layer (HVL) for the particular X-ray beam. Our study demonstrated the general usability of thimble ionization chambers. These thimble ionization chambers showed a maximum variation in energy response of 5%. Ionization chambers with even smaller sensitive volume, and which exhibit similar variation in energy dependence, can be used if higher spatial resolution is required. Furthermore, the investigated detectors are better suited for dosimetry at CT and CBCT units than conventional large volume or flat detectors, due to their rotational symmetry. Nevertheless, a flat detector can be used for certain measurement tasks, such as the acquisition of percent depth-dose curves or beam profiles for nonrotating beams, which are important for beam characterization.

  15. A Curved Image-Plate Detector System for High-Resolution Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, P.; Haggerty, R; Yoon, W; Knapp, M; Berghaeuser, A; Zschack, P; Karapetrova, E; Yang, N; Kriven, W

    2009-01-01

    The developed curved image plate (CIP) is a one-dimensional detector which simultaneously records high-resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns over a 38.7 2{theta} range. In addition, an on-site reader enables rapid extraction, transfer and storage of X-ray intensity information in {le}30 s, and further qualifies this detector to study kinetic processes in materials science. The CIP detector can detect and store X-ray intensity information linearly proportional to the incident photon flux over a dynamical range of about five orders of magnitude. The linearity and uniformity of the CIP detector response is not compromised in the unsaturated regions of the image plate, regardless of saturation in another region. The speed of XRD data acquisition together with excellent resolution afforded by the CIP detector is unique and opens up wide possibilities in materials research accessible through X-ray diffraction. This article presents details of the basic features, operation and performance of the CIP detector along with some examples of applications, including high-temperature XRD.

  16. Region-of-interest cone beam computed tomography (ROI CBCT) with a high resolution CMOS detector

    PubMed Central

    Jain, A; Takemoto, H; Silver, M D; Nagesh, S V S; Ionita, C N; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems with rotational gantries that have standard flat panel detectors (FPD) are widely used for the 3D rendering of vascular structures using Feldkamp cone beam reconstruction algorithms. One of the inherent limitations of these systems is limited resolution (<3 lp/mm). There are systems available with higher resolution but their small FOV limits them to small animal imaging only. In this work, we report on region-of-interest (ROI) CBCT with a high resolution CMOS detector (75 μm pixels, 600 μm HR-CsI) mounted with motorized detector changer on a commercial FPD-based C-arm angiography gantry (194 μm pixels, 600 μm HL-CsI). A cylindrical CT phantom and neuro stents were imaged with both detectors. For each detector a total of 209 images were acquired in a rotational protocol. The technique parameters chosen for the FPD by the imaging system were used for the CMOS detector. The anti-scatter grid was removed and the incident scatter was kept the same for both detectors with identical collimator settings. The FPD images were reconstructed for the 10 cm x10 cm FOV and the CMOS images were reconstructed for a 3.84 cm × 3.84 cm FOV. Although the reconstructed images from the CMOS detector demonstrated comparable contrast to the FPD images, the reconstructed 3D images of the neuro stent clearly showed that the CMOS detector improved delineation of smaller objects such as the stent struts (~70 μm) compared to the FPD. Further development and the potential for substantial clinical impact are suggested. PMID:26877577

  17. Region-of-interest cone beam computed tomography (ROI CBCT) with a high resolution CMOS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, A.; Takemoto, H.; Silver, M. D.; Nagesh, S. V. S.; Ionita, C. N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2015-03-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems with rotational gantries that have standard flat panel detectors (FPD) are widely used for the 3D rendering of vascular structures using Feldkamp cone beam reconstruction algorithms. One of the inherent limitations of these systems is limited resolution (<3 lp/mm). There are systems available with higher resolution but their small FOV limits them to small animal imaging only. In this work, we report on region-of-interest (ROI) CBCT with a high resolution CMOS detector (75 μm pixels, 600 μm HR-CsI) mounted with motorized detector changer on a commercial FPD-based C-arm angiography gantry (194 μm pixels, 600 μm HL-CsI). A cylindrical CT phantom and neuro stents were imaged with both detectors. For each detector a total of 209 images were acquired in a rotational protocol. The technique parameters chosen for the FPD by the imaging system were used for the CMOS detector. The anti-scatter grid was removed and the incident scatter was kept the same for both detectors with identical collimator settings. The FPD images were reconstructed for the 10 cm x10 cm FOV and the CMOS images were reconstructed for a 3.84 cm x 3.84 cm FOV. Although the reconstructed images from the CMOS detector demonstrated comparable contrast to the FPD images, the reconstructed 3D images of the neuro stent clearly showed that the CMOS detector improved delineation of smaller objects such as the stent struts (~70 μm) compared to the FPD. Further development and the potential for substantial clinical impact are suggested.

  18. Region-of-interest cone beam computed tomography (ROI CBCT) with a high resolution CMOS detector.

    PubMed

    Jain, A; Takemoto, H; Silver, M D; Nagesh, S V S; Ionita, C N; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems with rotational gantries that have standard flat panel detectors (FPD) are widely used for the 3D rendering of vascular structures using Feldkamp cone beam reconstruction algorithms. One of the inherent limitations of these systems is limited resolution (<3 lp/mm). There are systems available with higher resolution but their small FOV limits them to small animal imaging only. In this work, we report on region-of-interest (ROI) CBCT with a high resolution CMOS detector (75 μm pixels, 600 μm HR-CsI) mounted with motorized detector changer on a commercial FPD-based C-arm angiography gantry (194 μm pixels, 600 μm HL-CsI). A cylindrical CT phantom and neuro stents were imaged with both detectors. For each detector a total of 209 images were acquired in a rotational protocol. The technique parameters chosen for the FPD by the imaging system were used for the CMOS detector. The anti-scatter grid was removed and the incident scatter was kept the same for both detectors with identical collimator settings. The FPD images were reconstructed for the 10 cm x10 cm FOV and the CMOS images were reconstructed for a 3.84 cm × 3.84 cm FOV. Although the reconstructed images from the CMOS detector demonstrated comparable contrast to the FPD images, the reconstructed 3D images of the neuro stent clearly showed that the CMOS detector improved delineation of smaller objects such as the stent struts (~70 μm) compared to the FPD. Further development and the potential for substantial clinical impact are suggested.

  19. Workflow for the use of a high-resolution image detector in endovascular interventional procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, R.; Loughran, B.; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Pope, L.; Ionita, C. N.; Siddiqui, A.; Lin, N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2014-03-01

    Endovascular image-guided intervention (EIGI) has become the primary interventional therapy for the most widespread vascular diseases. These procedures involve the insertion of a catheter into the femoral artery, which is then threaded under fluoroscopic guidance to the site of the pathology to be treated. Flat Panel Detectors (FPDs) are normally used for EIGIs; however, once the catheter is guided to the pathological site, high-resolution imaging capabilities can be used for accurately guiding a successful endovascular treatment. The Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector provides needed high-resolution, high-sensitivity, and real-time imaging capabilities. An experimental MAF enabled with a Control, Acquisition, Processing, Image Display and Storage (CAPIDS) system was installed and aligned on a detector changer attached to the C-arm of a clinical angiographic unit. The CAPIDS system was developed and implemented using LabVIEW software and provides a user-friendly interface that enables control of several clinical radiographic imaging modes of the MAF including: fluoroscopy, roadmap, radiography, and digital-subtraction-angiography (DSA). Using the automatic controls, the MAF detector can be moved to the deployed position, in front of a standard FPD, whenever higher resolution is needed during angiographic or interventional vascular imaging procedures. To minimize any possible negative impact to image guidance with the two detector systems, it is essential to have a well-designed workflow that enables smooth deployment of the MAF at critical stages of clinical procedures. For the ultimate success of this new imaging capability, a clear understanding of the workflow design is essential. This presentation provides a detailed description and demonstration of such a workflow design.

  20. Workflow for the use of a high-resolution image detector in endovascular interventional procedures

    PubMed Central

    Rana, R.; Loughran, B.; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Pope, L.; Ionita, C. N.; Siddiqui, A.; Lin, N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2014-01-01

    Endovascular image-guided intervention (EIGI) has become the primary interventional therapy for the most widespread vascular diseases. These procedures involve the insertion of a catheter into the femoral artery, which is then threaded under fluoroscopic guidance to the site of the pathology to be treated. Flat Panel Detectors (FPDs) are normally used for EIGIs; however, once the catheter is guided to the pathological site, high-resolution imaging capabilities can be used for accurately guiding a successful endovascular treatment. The Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector provides needed high-resolution, high-sensitivity, and real-time imaging capabilities. An experimental MAF enabled with a Control, Acquisition, Processing, Image Display and Storage (CAPIDS) system was installed and aligned on a detector changer attached to the C-arm of a clinical angiographic unit. The CAPIDS system was developed and implemented using LabVIEW software and provides a user-friendly interface that enables control of several clinical radiographic imaging modes of the MAF including: fluoroscopy, roadmap, radiography, and digital-subtraction-angiography (DSA). Using the automatic controls, the MAF detector can be moved to the deployed position, in front of a standard FPD, whenever higher resolution is needed during angiographic or interventional vascular imaging procedures. To minimize any possible negative impact to image guidance with the two detector systems, it is essential to have a well-designed workflow that enables smooth deployment of the MAF at critical stages of clinical procedures. For the ultimate success of this new imaging capability, a clear understanding of the workflow design is essential. This presentation provides a detailed description and demonstration of such a workflow design. PMID:25302003

  1. Design, construction, and evaluation of new high resolution medical imaging detector/systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Amit

    Increasing need of minimally invasive endovascular image guided interventional procedures (EIGI) for accurate and successful treatment of vascular disease has set a quest for better image quality. Current state of the art detectors are not up to the mark for these complex procedures due to their inherent limitations. Our group has been actively working on the design and construction of a high resolution, region of interest CCD-based X-ray imager for some time. As a part of that endeavor, a Micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF) was developed to serve as a high resolution, ROI X-ray imaging detector in conjunction with large lower resolution full field of view (FOV) state-of-the-art x-ray detectors. The newly developed MAF is an indirect x-ray imaging detector capable of providing real-time images with high resolution, high sensitivity, no lag and low instrumentation noise. It consists of a CCD camera coupled to a light image intensifier (LII) through a fiber optic taper. The CsI(Tl) phosphor serving as the front end is coupled to the LII. For this work, the MAF was designed and constructed. The linear system cascade theory was used to evaluate the performance theoretically. Linear system metrics such as MTF and DQE were used to gauge the detector performance experimentally. The capabilities of the MAF as a complete system were tested using generalized linear system metrics. With generalized linear system metrics the effects of finite size focal spot, geometric magnification and the presence of scatter are included in the analysis and study. To minimize the effect of scatter, an anti-scatter grid specially designed for the MAF was also studied. The MAF was compared with the flat panel detector using signal-to-noise ratio and the two dimensional linear system metrics. The signal-to-noise comparison was carried out to point out the effect of pixel size and Point Spread Function of the detector. The two dimensional linear system metrics were used to investigate the

  2. Bayesian reconstruction of photon interaction sequences for high-resolution PET detectors.

    PubMed

    Pratx, Guillem; Levin, Craig S

    2009-09-07

    Realizing the full potential of high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) systems involves accurately positioning events in which the annihilation photon deposits all its energy across multiple detector elements. Reconstructing the complete sequence of interactions of each photon provides a reliable way to select the earliest interaction because it ensures that all the interactions are consistent with one another. Bayesian estimation forms a natural framework to maximize the consistency of the sequence with the measurements while taking into account the physics of gamma-ray transport. An inherently statistical method, it accounts for the uncertainty in the measured energy and position of each interaction. An algorithm based on maximum a posteriori (MAP) was evaluated for computer simulations. For a high-resolution PET system based on cadmium zinc telluride detectors, 93.8% of the recorded coincidences involved at least one photon multiple-interactions event (PMIE). The MAP estimate of the first interaction was accurate for 85.2% of the single photons. This represents a two-fold reduction in the number of mispositioned events compared to minimum pair distance, a simpler yet efficient positioning method. The point-spread function of the system presented lower tails and higher peak value when MAP was used. This translated into improved image quality, which we quantified by studying contrast and spatial resolution gains.

  3. Bayesian reconstruction of photon interaction sequences for high-resolution PET detectors

    PubMed Central

    Pratx, Guillem

    2013-01-01

    Realizing the full potential of high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) systems involves accurately positioning events in which the annihilation photon deposits all its energy across multiple detector elements. Reconstructing the complete sequence of interactions of each photon provides a reliable way to select the earliest interaction because it ensures that all the interactions are consistent with one another. Bayesian estimation forms a natural framework to maximize the consistency of the sequence with the measurements while taking into account the physics of γ-ray transport. An inherently statistical method, it accounts for the uncertainty in the measured energy and position of each interaction. An algorithm based on maximum a posteriori (MAP) was evaluated for computer simulations. For a high-resolution PET system based on cadmium zinc telluride detectors, 93.8% of the recorded coincidences involved at least one photon multiple-interactions event (PMIE). The MAP estimate of the first interaction was accurate for 85.2% of the single photons. This represents a two-fold reduction in the number of mispositioned events compared to minimum pair distance, a simpler yet efficient positioning method. The point-spread function of the system presented lower tails and higher peak value when MAP was used. This translated into improved image quality, which we quantified by studying contrast and spatial resolution gains. PMID:19652293

  4. Low-noise small-size microring ultrasonic detectors for high-resolution photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sung-Liang; Ling, Tao; Guo, L. Jay

    2011-01-01

    Small size polymer microring resonators have been exploited for photoacoustic (PA) imaging. To demonstrate the advantages of the wide acceptance angle of ultrasound detection of small size microrings, photoacoustic tomography (PAT), and delay-and-sum beamforming PA imaging was conducted. In PAT, we compared the imaging quality using different sizes of detectors with similar noise-equivalent pressures and the same wideband response: 500 μm hydrophone and 100, 60, and 40 μm microrings. The results show significantly improved imaging contrast and high resolution over the whole imaging region using smaller size detectors. The uniform high resolution in PAT imaging using 40 μm microrings indicates the potential to resolve microvasculature over a large imaging region. The improved lateral resolution of two-dimensional and three-dimensional delay-and-sum beamforming PA imaging using a synthetic array demonstrate another advantageous application of small microrings. The small microrings can also be applied to other ultrasound-related imaging applications. PMID:21639569

  5. A novel long-wave infrared high resolution continuous zoom lens with uncooled thermal detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jiaqi; Yu, Kan; Ji, Zijuan

    2016-09-01

    Infrared imaging lens is one of the key components of a video security camera. A novel long-wave infrared continuous zoom lens is developed based on the 640×512 high resolution uncooled infrared thermal detector which can substitute the high cost cooled infrared detector. The zoom lens contains five germanium lens and one chalcogenide glass lens, which working in the wavelength range of 8 12 μm. Its F number range is in 1 1.1 while the focus length is changing from 20 to 120 mm. Based on the zoom lens design theory, the positive lens mechanical compensation structure is used to calculate the optical parameters and optimize the cam zoom curve, which can have a smooth continuous zoom in the range of all focus lengths. The image analysis show that the system has achieved the modulation transfer function (MTF) value above 0.45 which spatial frequency is 30 lp/mm. The spot diagrams RMS radius is less than 6.3μm which is near the diffraction limit. The real test photos indicate that the lens has the advantages of high resolution, large aperture, smooth zoom and stable image plane. Due to the high image quality and low cost, the continuous zoom lens is easily to be fabricated.

  6. Study of a high-resolution, 3D positioning cadmium zinc telluride detector for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y.; Matteson, J. L.; Skelton, R. T.; Deal, A. C.; Stephan, E. A.; Duttweiler, F.; Gasaway, T. M.; Levin, C. S.

    2011-03-01

    This paper investigates the performance of 1 mm resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors for positron emission tomography (PET) capable of positioning the 3D coordinates of individual 511 keV photon interactions. The detectors comprise 40 mm × 40 mm × 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals that employ a novel cross-strip readout with interspersed steering electrodes to obtain high spatial and energy resolution. The study found a single anode FWHM energy resolution of 3.06 ± 0.39% at 511 keV throughout most of the detector volume. Improved resolution is expected with properly shielded front-end electronics. Measurements made using a collimated beam established the efficacy of the steering electrodes in facilitating enhanced charge collection across anodes, as well as a spatial resolution of 0.44 ± 0.07 mm in the direction orthogonal to the electrode planes. Finally, measurements based on coincidence electronic collimation yielded a point spread function with 0.78 ± 0.10 mm FWHM, demonstrating 1 mm spatial resolution capability transverse to the anodes—as expected from the 1 mm anode pitch. These findings indicate that the CZT-based detector concept has excellent performance and shows great promise for a high-resolution PET system.

  7. Study of a high-resolution, 3D positioning cadmium zinc telluride detector for PET.

    PubMed

    Gu, Y; Matteson, J L; Skelton, R T; Deal, A C; Stephan, E A; Duttweiler, F; Gasaway, T M; Levin, C S

    2011-03-21

    This paper investigates the performance of 1 mm resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors for positron emission tomography (PET) capable of positioning the 3D coordinates of individual 511 keV photon interactions. The detectors comprise 40 mm × 40 mm × 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals that employ a novel cross-strip readout with interspersed steering electrodes to obtain high spatial and energy resolution. The study found a single anode FWHM energy resolution of 3.06 ± 0.39% at 511 keV throughout most of the detector volume. Improved resolution is expected with properly shielded front-end electronics. Measurements made using a collimated beam established the efficacy of the steering electrodes in facilitating enhanced charge collection across anodes, as well as a spatial resolution of 0.44 ± 0.07 mm in the direction orthogonal to the electrode planes. Finally, measurements based on coincidence electronic collimation yielded a point spread function with 0.78 ± 0.10 mm FWHM, demonstrating 1 mm spatial resolution capability transverse to the anodes-as expected from the 1 mm anode pitch. These findings indicate that the CZT-based detector concept has excellent performance and shows great promise for a high-resolution PET system.

  8. Study of a high-resolution, 3-D positioning cadmium zinc telluride detector for PET

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Y; Matteson, J L; Skelton, R T; Deal, A C; Stephan, E A; Duttweiler, F; Gasaway, T M; Levin, C S

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the performance of 1 mm resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors for positron emission tomography (PET) capable of positioning the 3-D coordinates of individual 511 keV photon interactions. The detectors comprise 40 mm × 40 mm × 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals that employ a novel cross-strip readout with interspersed steering electrodes to obtain high spatial and energy resolution. The study found a single anode FWHM energy resolution of 3.06±0.39% at 511 keV throughout most the detector volume. Improved resolution is expected with properly shielded front-end electronics. Measurements made using a collimated beam established the efficacy of the steering electrodes in facilitating enhanced charge collection across anodes, as well as a spatial resolution of 0.44±0.07 mm in the direction orthogonal to the electrode planes. Finally, measurements based on coincidence electronic collimation yielded a point spread function with 0.78±0.10 mm FWHM, demonstrating 1 mm spatial resolution capability transverse to the anodes – as expected from the 1 mm anode pitch. These findings indicate that the CZT-based detector concept has excellent performance and shows great promise for a high-resolution PET system. PMID:21335649

  9. Performance evaluation of a very high resolution small animal PET imager using silicon scatter detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang-June; Rogers, W. Leslie; Huh, Sam; Kagan, Harris; Honscheid, Klaus; Burdette, Don; Chesi, Enrico; Lacasta, Carlos; Llosa, Gabriela; Mikuz, Marko; Studen, Andrej; Weilhammer, Peter; Clinthorne, Neal H.

    2007-05-01

    A very high resolution positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for small animal imaging based on the idea of inserting a ring of high-granularity solid-state detectors into a conventional PET scanner is under investigation. A particularly interesting configuration of this concept, which takes the form of a degenerate Compton camera, is shown capable of providing sub-millimeter resolution with good sensitivity. We present a Compton PET system and estimate its performance using a proof-of-concept prototype. A prototype single-slice imaging instrument was constructed with two silicon detectors 1 mm thick, each having 512 1.4 mm × 1.4 mm pads arranged in a 32 × 16 array. The silicon detectors were located edgewise on opposite sides and flanked by two non-position sensitive BGO detectors. The scanner performance was measured for its sensitivity, energy, timing, spatial resolution and resolution uniformity. Using the experimental scanner, energy resolution for the silicon detectors is 1%. However, system energy resolution is dominated by the 23% FWHM BGO resolution. Timing resolution for silicon is 82.1 ns FWHM due to time-walk in trigger devices. Using the scattered photons, time resolution between the BGO detectors is 19.4 ns FWHM. Image resolution of 980 µm FWHM at the center of the field-of-view (FOV) is obtained from a 1D profile of a 0.254 mm diameter 18F line source image reconstructed using the conventional 2D filtered back-projection (FBP). The 0.4 mm gap between two line sources is resolved in the image reconstructed with both FBP and the maximum likelihood expectation maximization (ML-EM) algorithm. The experimental instrument demonstrates sub-millimeter resolution. A prototype having sensitivity high enough for initial small animal images can be used for in vivo studies of small animal models of metabolism, molecular mechanism and the development of new radiotracers.

  10. A prototype of very high resolution small animal PET scanner using silicon pad detectors

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-June; Leslie Rogers, W.; Huh, Sam; Kagan, Harris; Honscheid, Klaus; Burdette, Don; Chesi, Enrico; Lacasta, Carlos; Llosa, Gabriela; Mikuz, Marko; Studen, Andrej; Weilhammer, Peter; Clinthorne, Neal H.

    2007-01-01

    A very high resolution small animal positron emission tomograph (PET) which can achieve sub-millimeter spatial resolution is being developed using silicon pad detectors. The prototype PET for a single slice instrument consists of two 1 mm thick silicon pad detectors, each containing a 32 × 16 array of 1.4 mm × 1.4 mm pads read out with four VATAGP3 chips which have 128 channels low-noise self triggering ASIC in each chip, coincidence units, a source turntable and tungsten slice collimator. The silicon detectors were located edgewise on opposite sides of a 4 cm field-of-view to maximize efficiency. Energy resolution is dominated by electronic noise, which is 0.98% (1.38 keV) FWHM at 140.5 keV. Coincidence timing resolution is 82.1 ns FWHM and coincidence efficiency was measured to be 1.04 × 10-3 % from two silicon detectors with annihilation photons of 18F source Image data were acquired and reconstructed using conventional 2-D filtered-back projection (FBP) and a maximum likelihood expectation maximization (ML-EM) method. Image resolution of approximately 1.45 mm FWHM is obtained from 1-D profile of 1.1 mm diameter 18F line source image. Even better resolution can be obtained with smaller detector element sizes. While many challenges remain in scaling up the instrument to useful efficiency including densely packed detectors and significantly improved timing resolution, performance of the test setup in terms of easily achieving submillimeter resolution is compelling. PMID:18084629

  11. Lutetium oxyorthosilicate block detector readout by avalanche photodiode arrays for high resolution animal PET.

    PubMed

    Pichler, B J; Swann, B K; Rochelle, J; Nutt, R E; Cherry, S R; Siegel, S B

    2004-09-21

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) have proven to be useful as light detectors for high resolution positron emission tomography (PET). Their compactness makes these devices excellent candidates for replacing bulky photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) in PET systems where space limitations are an issue. The readout of densely packed, 10 x 10 lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) block detectors (crystal size 2.0 x 2.0 x 12 mm3) with custom-built monolithic 3 x 3 APD arrays was investigated. The APDs had a 5 x 5 mm2 active surface and were arranged on a 6.25 mm pitch. The dead space on the edges of the array was 1.25 mm. The APDs were operated at a bias voltage of approximately 380 V for a gain of 100 and a dark current of 10 nA per APD. The standard deviation in gain between the APDs in the array ranged from 1.8 to 6.5% as the gain was varied from 50 to 108. A fast, low-noise, multi-channel charge sensitive preamplifier application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) was developed for the APD readout. The amplifier had a rise time of 8 ns, a noise floor of 515 e- rms and a 9 e- pF(-1) noise slope. An acquired flood image showed that all 100 crystals from the block detector could be resolved. Timing measurements with single-channel LSO-APD detectors, as well as with the array, against a plastic scintillator and PMT assembly showed a time resolution of 1.2 ns and 2.5 ns, respectively. The energy resolution measured with a single 4.0 x 4.0 x 10 mm3 LSO crystal, wrapped in four-layer polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tape and coupled with optical grease on a single APD of the array, yielded 15% (full width at half maximum, FWHM) at 511 keV. Stability tests over 9 months of operation showed that the APD arrays do not degrade appreciably. These results demonstrate the ability to decode densely packed LSO scintillation blocks with compact APD arrays. The good timing and energy resolution makes these detectors suitable for high resolution PET.

  12. High resolution Cerenkov and range detectors for balloon-borne cosmic-ray experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlen, S. P.; Cartwright, B. G.; Tarle, G.

    1975-01-01

    A combination of an active Cerenkov detector and passive range detectors is proposed for the high resolution measurement of isotopic composition in the neighborhood of iron in the galactic cosmic rays. A large area (4,300 sq cm) Cerenkov counter and passive range detectors were tested. Tests with heavy ions (2.1 GeV/amu C-12, 289 MeV/amu Ar-40, and 594 MeV/amu Ne-20) revealed the spatial uniformity of response of the Cerenkov counter to be better than 1% peak-to-peak. Light collection efficiency is independent of projectile energy and incidence angle to within at least 0.5%. Passive Lexan track recorders to measure range in the presence of the nuclear interaction background which results from stopping particles through 0.9 interaction lengths of matter were also tested. It was found that nuclear interactions produce an effective range straggling distribution only approximately 75% wider than that expected from range straggling alone. The combination of these tested techniques makes possible high mass resolution in the neighborhood of iron.

  13. A full range detector for the HIRRBS high resolution RBS magnetic spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Skala, Wayne G.; Haberl, Arthur W.; Bakhru, Hassaram; Lanford, William

    2013-04-19

    The UAlbany HIRRBS (High Resolution RBS) system has been updated for better use in rapid analysis. The focal plane detector now covers the full range from U down to O using a linear stepper motor to translate the 1-cm detector across the 30-cm range. Input is implemented with zero-back-angle operation in all cases. The chamber has been modified to allow for quick swapping of sample holders, including a channeling goniometer. A fixed standard surface-barrier detector allows for normal RBS simultaneously with use of the magnetic spectrometer. The user can select a region on the standard spectrum or can select an element edge or an energy point for collection of the expanded spectrum portion. The best resolution currently obtained is about 2-to-3 keV, probably representing the energy width of the incoming beam. Calibration is maintained automatically for any spectrum portion and any beam energy from 1.0 to 3.5 MeV. Element resolving power, sensitivity and depth resolution are shown using several examples. Examples also show the value of simultaneous conventional RBS.

  14. Line-splitting in high-resolution superconducting tunnel junction EUV detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Hiller, L J; Cunningham, M F; Labov, S E

    2000-09-18

    We have developed high-resolution Nb-Al-AlOx-Al-Nb tunnel junction extreme ultra-violet (EUV) detectors. In the energy range between 25 and 70 eV, we have measured an energy resolution of 2.2 eV full-width at half maximum (FWHM). The energy resolution degrades significantly in the energy range between {approx}80 and {approx}230 eV where the Nb absorber is partially transparent and some of the photons are absorbed in the Al trap layers. We have for the first time observed a distinctly different response for photons absorbed in the Nb and the Al layer of the same junction electrode. We have modeled this effect with Monte-Carlo simulations of the charge generation process in superconducting multilayers.

  15. Anti-scatter grid artifact elimination for high resolution x-ray imaging CMOS detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, R.; Singh, V.; Jain, A.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2015-03-01

    Higher resolution in dynamic radiological imaging such as angiography is increasingly being demanded by clinicians; however, when standard anti-scatter grids are used with such new high resolution detectors, grid-line artifacts become more apparent resulting in increased structured noise that may overcome the contrast signal improvement benefits of the scatter-reducing grid. Although grid-lines may in theory be eliminated by dividing the image of a patient taken with the grid by a flat-field image taken with the grid obtained prior to the clinical image, unless the remaining additive scatter contribution is subtracted in real-time from the dynamic clinical image sequence before the division by the reference image, severe grid-line artifacts may remain. To investigate grid-line elimination, a stationary Smit Röntgen X-ray grid (line density: 70 lines/cm, grid ratio 13:1) was used with both a 75 micron-pixel CMOS detector and a standard 194 micron-pixel flat panel detector (FPD) to image an artery block insert placed in a modified uniform frontal head phantom for a 20 x 20cm FOV (approximately). Contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured with and without scatter subtraction prior to grid-line correction. The fixed pattern noise caused by the grid was substantially higher for the CMOS detector compared to the FPD and caused a severe reduction of CNR. However, when the scatter subtraction corrective method was used, the removal of the fixed pattern noise (grid artifacts) became evident resulting in images with improved CNR.

  16. Anti-scatter grid artifact elimination for high resolution x-ray imaging CMOS detectors

    PubMed Central

    Rana, R.; Singh, V.; Jain, A.; Bednarek, D.R.; Rudin, S.

    2015-01-01

    Higher resolution in dynamic radiological imaging such as angiography is increasingly being demanded by clinicians; however, when standard anti-scatter grids are used with such new high resolution detectors, grid-line artifacts become more apparent resulting in increased structured noise that may overcome the contrast signal improvement benefits of the scatter-reducing grid. Although grid-lines may in theory be eliminated by dividing the image of a patient taken with the grid by a flat-field image taken with the grid obtained prior to the clinical image, unless the remaining additive scatter contribution is subtracted in real-time from the dynamic clinical image sequence before the division by the reference image, severe grid-line artifacts may remain. To investigate grid-line elimination, a stationary Smit Röntgen X-ray grid (line density: 70 lines/cm, grid ratio 13:1) was used with both a 75 micron-pixel CMOS detector and a standard 194 micron-pixel flat panel detector (FPD) to image an artery block insert placed in a modified uniform frontal head phantom for a 20 × 20cm FOV (approximately). Contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured with and without scatter subtraction prior to grid-line correction. The fixed pattern noise caused by the grid was substantially higher for the CMOS detector compared to the FPD and caused a severe reduction of CNR. However, when the scatter subtraction corrective method was used, the removal of the fixed pattern noise (grid artifacts) became evident resulting in images with improved CNR. PMID:26877578

  17. Anti-scatter grid artifact elimination for high resolution x-ray imaging CMOS detectors.

    PubMed

    Rana, R; Singh, V; Jain, A; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    Higher resolution in dynamic radiological imaging such as angiography is increasingly being demanded by clinicians; however, when standard anti-scatter grids are used with such new high resolution detectors, grid-line artifacts become more apparent resulting in increased structured noise that may overcome the contrast signal improvement benefits of the scatter-reducing grid. Although grid-lines may in theory be eliminated by dividing the image of a patient taken with the grid by a flat-field image taken with the grid obtained prior to the clinical image, unless the remaining additive scatter contribution is subtracted in real-time from the dynamic clinical image sequence before the division by the reference image, severe grid-line artifacts may remain. To investigate grid-line elimination, a stationary Smit Röntgen X-ray grid (line density: 70 lines/cm, grid ratio 13:1) was used with both a 75 micron-pixel CMOS detector and a standard 194 micron-pixel flat panel detector (FPD) to image an artery block insert placed in a modified uniform frontal head phantom for a 20 × 20cm FOV (approximately). Contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured with and without scatter subtraction prior to grid-line correction. The fixed pattern noise caused by the grid was substantially higher for the CMOS detector compared to the FPD and caused a severe reduction of CNR. However, when the scatter subtraction corrective method was used, the removal of the fixed pattern noise (grid artifacts) became evident resulting in images with improved CNR.

  18. A novel high resolution, high sensitivity SPECT detector for molecular imaging of cardiovascular diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusanno, F.; Argentieri, A.; Baiocchi, M.; Colilli, S.; Cisbani, E.; De Vincentis, G.; Fratoni, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M.; Magliozzi, M. L.; Majewski, S.; Marano, G.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Santavenere, F.; Torrioli, S.; Tsui, B. M. W.; Vitelli, L.; Wang, Y.

    2010-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in western countries. Understanding the rupture of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques and monitoring the effect of innovative therapies of heart failure is of fundamental importance. A flexible, high resolution, high sensitivity detector system for molecular imaging with radionuclides on small animal models has been designed for this aim. A prototype has been built using tungsten pinhole and LaBr3(Ce) scintillator coupled to Hamamatsu Flat Panel PMTs. Compact individual-channel readout has been designed, built and tested. Measurements with phantoms as well as pilot studies on mice have been performed, the results show that the myocardial perfusion in mice can be determined with sufficient precision. The detector will be improved replacing the Hamamatsu Flat Panel with Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) to allow integration of the system with MRI scanners. Application of LaBr3(Ce) scintillator coupled to photosensor with high photon detection efficiency and excellent energy resolution will allow dual-label imaging to monitor simultaneously the cardiac perfusion and the molecular targets under investigation during the heart therapy.

  19. A high resolution animal PET scanner using compact PS-PMT detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, M.; Okada, H.; Shimizu, K.; Omura, T.

    1996-12-31

    A new high resolution PET scanner dedicated to animal studies has been designed, built and tested. The system utilizes 240 block detectors, each of which consists of a new compact position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PS-PMT) and an 8 x 4 BGO array. A total number of 7,680 crystals (480 per ring) are positioned to form a 508 mm diameter of 16 detector rings with 7.2 mm pitch and 114 mm axial field of view (FOV). The system is designed to perform activation studies using a monkey in a sitting position. The data can be acquired in either 2D or 3D mode, where the slice collimators are retracted in 3D mode. The transaxial resolution is 2.6 mm FWHM at the center of the FOV, and the average axial resolution on the axis of the ring is 3.3 mm FWHM in the direct slice and 3.2 mm FWHM in the cross slice. The scatter fraction, sensitivity and count rate performance were evaluated for a 10 cm diameter cylindrical phantom. The total system sensitivity is 2.3 kcps/kBq/ml in 2D mode and 22.8 kcps/kBq/ml in 3D mode. The noise equivalent count rate with 3D mode is equivalent to that with 2D mode at five times higher radioactivity level. The applicable imaging capabilities of the scanner was demonstrated by animal studies with a monkey.

  20. Performance of LYSO and CeBr3 crystals readout by silicon photomultiplier arrays as compact detectors for space based applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryemadhi, A.; Barner, L.; Grove, A.; Mohler, J.; Sisson, C.; Roth, A.

    2017-02-01

    Space based MeV range gamma rays have been largely unexplored due to the difficulty associated with the measurements; however they address a broad range of astrophysical questions, including indirect searches for dark matter. To address these challenges and yet have compact instruments, the next generation experiments would need detectors with high efficiency, high stopping power, excellent energy resolution, and excellent angular resolution. Fast and bright crystal scintillators coupled to compact photo-detectors are an ideal option. In this work we have investigated the LYSO and CeBr3 crystal scintillators because of their high light yield, fast decay time, and small radiation length. We have used the silicon photomultiplier arrays as photo-detectors because of their small size, simple readout, low voltage operation, and immunity to magnetic fields. We studied the gamma rays response for the 1.6 cm × 1.6 cm × 4.0 cm LYSO crystals and a 1.3 cm × 1.3 cm × 1.3 cm CeBr3 crystal readout by 4 × 4 SensL arrays (ArrayC30035). The crystal self-absorption and timing resolution have been examined along with linearity and energy resolution. The DRS4 evaluation board was used for acquisition of the events.

  1. Scatter reduction for high resolution image detectors with a region of interest attenuator

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Compton scatter is the main interaction of x-rays with objects undergoing radiographic and fluoroscopic imaging procedures. Such scatter is responsible for reducing image signal to noise ratio which can negatively impact object detection especially for low contrast objects. To reduce scatter, possible methods are smaller fields-of-view, larger air gaps and the use of an anti-scatter grid. Smaller fields of view may not be acceptable and scanned-beam radiography is not practical for real-time imaging. Air gaps can increase geometric unsharpness and thus degrade image resolution. Deployment of an anti-scatter grid is not well suited for high resolution imagers due to the unavailability of high line density grids needed to prevent grid-line artifacts. However, region of interest (ROI) imaging can be used not only for dose reduction but also for scatter reduction in the ROI. The ROI region receives unattenuated x-rays while the peripheral region receives x-rays reduced in intensity by an ROI attenuator. The scatter within the ROI part of the image originates from both the unattenuated ROI and the attenuated peripheral region. The scatter contribution from the periphery is reduced in intensity because of the reduced primary x-rays in that region and the scatter fraction in the ROI is thus reduced. In this study, the scatter fraction for various kVp’s, air-gaps and field sizes was measured for a uniform head equivalent phantom. The scatter fraction in the ROI was calculated using a derived scatter fraction formula, which was validated with experimental measurements. It is shown that use of a ROI attenuator can be an effective way to reduce both scatter and patient dose while maintaining the superior image quality of high resolution detectors. PMID:25302000

  2. Scatter reduction for high resolution image detectors with a region of interest attenuator.

    PubMed

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-19

    Compton scatter is the main interaction of x-rays with objects undergoing radiographic and fluoroscopic imaging procedures. Such scatter is responsible for reducing image signal to noise ratio which can negatively impact object detection especially for low contrast objects. To reduce scatter, possible methods are smaller fields-of-view, larger air gaps and the use of an anti-scatter grid. Smaller fields of view may not be acceptable and scanned-beam radiography is not practical for real-time imaging. Air gaps can increase geometric unsharpness and thus degrade image resolution. Deployment of an anti-scatter grid is not well suited for high resolution imagers due to the unavailability of high line density grids needed to prevent grid-line artifacts. However, region of interest (ROI) imaging can be used not only for dose reduction but also for scatter reduction in the ROI. The ROI region receives unattenuated x-rays while the peripheral region receives x-rays reduced in intensity by an ROI attenuator. The scatter within the ROI part of the image originates from both the unattenuated ROI and the attenuated peripheral region. The scatter contribution from the periphery is reduced in intensity because of the reduced primary x-rays in that region and the scatter fraction in the ROI is thus reduced. In this study, the scatter fraction for various kVp's, air-gaps and field sizes was measured for a uniform head equivalent phantom. The scatter fraction in the ROI was calculated using a derived scatter fraction formula, which was validated with experimental measurements. It is shown that use of a ROI attenuator can be an effective way to reduce both scatter and patient dose while maintaining the superior image quality of high resolution detectors.

  3. Scatter reduction for high resolution image detectors with a region of interest attenuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Compton scatter is the main interaction of x-rays with objects undergoing radiographic and fluoroscopic imaging procedures. Such scatter is responsible for reducing image signal to noise ratio which can negatively impact object detection especially for low contrast objects. To reduce scatter, possible methods are smaller fields-of-view, larger air gaps and the use of an anti-scatter grid. Smaller fields of view may not be acceptable and scanned-beam radiography is not practical for real-time imaging. Air gaps can increase geometric unsharpness and thus degrade image resolution. Deployment of an anti-scatter grid is not well suited for high resolution imagers due to the unavailability of high line density grids needed to prevent grid-line artifacts. However, region of interest (ROI) imaging can be used not only for dose reduction but also for scatter reduction in the ROI. The ROI region receives unattenuated x-rays while the peripheral region receives x-rays reduced in intensity by an ROI attenuator. The scatter within the ROI part of the image originates from both the unattenuated ROI and the attenuated peripheral region. The scatter contribution from the periphery is reduced in intensity because of the reduced primary x-rays in that region and the scatter fraction in the ROI is thus reduced. In this study, the scatter fraction for various kVp's, air-gaps and field sizes was measured for a uniform head equivalent phantom. The scatter fraction in the ROI was calculated using a derived scatter fraction formula, which was validated with experimental measurements. It is shown that use of a ROI attenuator can be an effective way to reduce both scatter and patient dose while maintaining the superior image quality of high resolution detectors.

  4. An optimised detector for in-situ high-resolution NMR in microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finch, Graeme; Yilmaz, Ali; Utz, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Integration of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices is challenging due to limited sensitivity and line broadening caused by magnetic susceptibility inhomogeneities. We present a novel double-stripline NMR probe head that accommodates planar microfluidic devices, and obtains the NMR spectrum from a rectangular sample chamber on the chip with a volume of 2 μ l. Finite element analysis was used to jointly optimise the detector and sample volume geometry for sensitivity and RF homogeneity. A prototype of the optimised design has been built, and its properties have been characterised experimentally. The performance in terms of sensitivity and RF homogeneity closely agrees with the numerical predictions. The system reaches a mass limit of detection of 1.57 nmol √{ s } , comparing very favourably with other micro-NMR systems. The spectral resolution of this chip/probe system is better than 1.75 Hz at a magnetic field of 7 T, with excellent line shape.

  5. Study of a high-resolution PET system using a Silicon detector probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzeziński, K.; Oliver, J. F.; Gillam, J.; Rafecas, M.

    2014-10-01

    A high-resolution silicon detector probe, in coincidence with a conventional PET scanner, is expected to provide images of higher quality than those achievable using the scanner alone. Spatial resolution should improve due to the finer pixelization of the probe detector, while increased sensitivity in the probe vicinity is expected to decrease noise. A PET-probe prototype is being developed utilizing this principle. The system includes a probe consisting of ten layers of silicon detectors, each a 80 × 52 array of 1 × 1 × 1 mm3 pixels, to be operated in coincidence with a modern clinical PET scanner. Detailed simulation studies of this system have been performed to assess the effect of the additional probe information on the quality of the reconstructed images. A grid of point sources was simulated to study the contribution of the probe to the system resolution at different locations over the field of view (FOV). A resolution phantom was used to demonstrate the effect on image resolution for two probe positions. A homogeneous source distribution with hot and cold regions was used to demonstrate that the localized improvement in resolution does not come at the expense of the overall quality of the image. Since the improvement is constrained to an area close to the probe, breast imaging is proposed as a potential application for the novel geometry. In this sense, a simplified breast phantom, adjacent to heart and torso compartments, was simulated and the effect of the probe on lesion detectability, through measurements of the local contrast recovery coefficient-to-noise ratio (CNR), was observed. The list-mode ML-EM algorithm was used for image reconstruction in all cases. As expected, the point spread function of the PET-probe system was found to be non-isotropic and vary with position, offering improvement in specific regions. Increase in resolution, of factors of up to 2, was observed in the region close to the probe. Images of the resolution phantom showed

  6. Small-size, high-resolution angular displacement measurement technology based on an imaging detector.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai; Wan, Qiuhua; Lu, Xinran; Du, Yingcai; Yang, Shouwang

    2017-01-20

    It is challenging to design a photoelectric encoder that is small in size while ensuring it has sufficiently high resolution and accuracy. Traditional displacement measurement via the moiré fringe signal does not facilitate high resolution at small grate sizes; photoelectric and digital photo processing can significantly improve the angle measurement resolution over traditional techniques. The primary focus of this paper includes grating displacement coding and decoding, as well as the corresponding high-resolution subdivision and measurement error factors. A small-size absolute photographic encoder was designed (50 mm diameter) that exhibits resolution of 1.24'' (20 bit) with a standard deviation of error of 14.3''. The results presented here may provide a theoretical and technological foundation for further research on small-size, high-resolution photographic rotary encoders.

  7. SU-E-I-40: New Method for Measurement of Task-Specific, High-Resolution Detector System Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Loughran, B; Singh, V; Jain, A; Bednarek, D; Rudin, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Although generalized linear system analytic metrics such as GMTF and GDQE can evaluate performance of the whole imaging system including detector, scatter and focal-spot, a simplified task-specific measured metric may help to better compare detector systems. Methods: Low quantum-noise images of a neuro-vascular stent with a modified ANSI head phantom were obtained from the average of many exposures taken with the high-resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) and with a Flat Panel Detector (FPD). The square of the Fourier Transform of each averaged image, equivalent to the measured product of the system GMTF and the object function in spatial-frequency space, was then divided by the normalized noise power spectra (NNPS) for each respective system to obtain a task-specific generalized signal-to-noise ratio. A generalized measured relative object detectability (GM-ROD) was obtained by taking the ratio of the integral of the resulting expressions for each detector system to give an overall metric that enables a realistic systems comparison for the given detection task. Results: The GM-ROD provides comparison of relative performance of detector systems from actual measurements of the object function as imaged by those detector systems. This metric includes noise correlations and spatial frequencies relevant to the specific object. Additionally, the integration bounds for the GM-ROD can be selected to emphasis the higher frequency band of each detector if high-resolution image details are to be evaluated. Examples of this new metric are discussed with a comparison of the MAF to the FPD for neuro-vascular interventional imaging. Conclusion: The GM-ROD is a new direct-measured task-specific metric that can provide clinically relevant comparison of the relative performance of imaging systems. Supported by NIH Grant: 2R01EB002873 and an equipment grant from Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation.

  8. Characterization of high resolution CMOS monolithic active pixel detector in SOI technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. I.; Arai, Y.; Glab, S.; Idzik, M.; Kapusta, P.; Miyoshi, T.; Takeda, A.; Turala, M.

    2015-05-01

    Novel CMOS monolithic pixel detectors designed at KEK and fabricated at Lapis Semiconductor in 0.2 μm Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) technology are presented. A thin layer of silicon oxide separates high and low resistivity silicon layers, allowing for optimization of design of detector and readout parts. Shallow wells buried under the oxide in the detector part screen the entire pixel electronics from electrical field applied to the detector. Several integration type SOI pixel detectors have been developed with pixel sizes 8-20 μm. The general features of 14 × 14 μm2 detectors designed on different wafers (CZ-n, FZ-n and FZ-p) were measured and compared. The detector performance was studied under irradiation with visible and infra-red laser, and also X-ray ionizing source. Using X-rays from an Am-241 source the noise of readout electronics was measured at different working conditions, showing the ENC in the range of 88-120 e-. The pixel current was calculated from average DC pedestal shift while varying the pixel integration time. The operation of the detector was studied under partial and full depletion conditions. The effects of temperature and detector bias voltage on noise and leakage current were studied. Characteristics of an ADC integrated in the front-end chip are also presented.

  9. High resolution, multiple-energy linear sweep detector for x-ray imaging

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, Victor; Goodman, Claude A.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus for generating plural electrical signals in a single scan in response to incident X-rays received from an object. Each electrical signal represents an image of the object at a different range of energies of the incident X-rays. The apparatus comprises a first X-ray detector, a second X-ray detector stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector, and an X-ray absorber stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector. The X-ray absorber provides an energy-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the first X-ray detector, but provides no absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the second X-ray detector. The first X-ray detector includes a linear array of first pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a first range of energies. The first X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a first electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the first pixels. The second X-ray detector includes a linear array of second pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a second range of energies, broader than the first range of energies. The second X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a second electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the second pixels.

  10. Experimental and theoretical performance analysis for a CMOS-based high resolution image detector

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Increasing complexity of endovascular interventional procedures requires superior x-ray imaging quality. Present state-of-the-art x-ray imaging detectors may not be adequate due to their inherent noise and resolution limitations. With recent developments, CMOS based detectors are presenting an option to fulfill the need for better image quality. For this work, a new CMOS detector has been analyzed experimentally and theoretically in terms of sensitivity, MTF and DQE. The detector (Dexela Model 1207, Perkin-Elmer Co., London, UK) features 14-bit image acquisition, a CsI phosphor, 75 µm pixels and an active area of 12 cm × 7 cm with over 30 fps frame rate. This detector has two modes of operations with two different full-well capacities: high and low sensitivity. The sensitivity and instrumentation noise equivalent exposure (INEE) were calculated for both modes. The detector modulation-transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectra (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were measured using an RQA5 spectrum. For the theoretical performance evaluation, a linear cascade model with an added aliasing stage was used. The detector showed excellent linearity in both modes. The sensitivity and the INEE of the detector were found to be 31.55 DN/µR and 0.55 µR in high sensitivity mode, while they were 9.87 DN/µR and 2.77 µR in low sensitivity mode. The theoretical and experimental values for the MTF and DQE showed close agreement with good DQE even at fluoroscopic exposure levels. In summary, the Dexela detector's imaging performance in terms of sensitivity, linear system metrics, and INEE demonstrates that it can overcome the noise and resolution limitations of present state-of-the-art x-ray detectors. PMID:25300571

  11. Experimental and theoretical performance analysis for a CMOS-based high resolution image detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Increasing complexity of endovascular interventional procedures requires superior x-ray imaging quality. Present stateof- the-art x-ray imaging detectors may not be adequate due to their inherent noise and resolution limitations. With recent developments, CMOS based detectors are presenting an option to fulfill the need for better image quality. For this work, a new CMOS detector has been analyzed experimentally and theoretically in terms of sensitivity, MTF and DQE. The detector (Dexela Model 1207, Perkin-Elmer Co., London, UK) features 14-bit image acquisition, a CsI phosphor, 75 μm pixels and an active area of 12 cm x 7 cm with over 30 fps frame rate. This detector has two modes of operations with two different full-well capacities: high and low sensitivity. The sensitivity and instrumentation noise equivalent exposure (INEE) were calculated for both modes. The detector modulation-transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectra (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were measured using an RQA5 spectrum. For the theoretical performance evaluation, a linear cascade model with an added aliasing stage was used. The detector showed excellent linearity in both modes. The sensitivity and the INEE of the detector were found to be 31.55 DN/μR and 0.55 μR in high sensitivity mode, while they were 9.87 DN/μR and 2.77 μR in low sensitivity mode. The theoretical and experimental values for the MTF and DQE showed close agreement with good DQE even at fluoroscopic exposure levels. In summary, the Dexela detector's imaging performance in terms of sensitivity, linear system metrics, and INEE demonstrates that it can overcome the noise and resolution limitations of present state-of-the-art x-ray detectors.

  12. High resolution, multiple-energy linear sweep detector for x-ray imaging

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Goodman, C.A.

    1996-08-20

    Apparatus is disclosed for generating plural electrical signals in a single scan in response to incident X-rays received from an object. Each electrical signal represents an image of the object at a different range of energies of the incident X-rays. The apparatus comprises a first X-ray detector, a second X-ray detector stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector, and an X-ray absorber stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector. The X-ray absorber provides an energy-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the first X-ray detector, but provides no absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the second X-ray detector. The first X-ray detector includes a linear array of first pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a first range of energies. The first X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a first electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the first pixels. The second X-ray detector includes a linear array of second pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a second range of energies, broader than the first range of energies. The second X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a second electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the second pixels. 12 figs.

  13. Experimental and theoretical performance analysis for a CMOS-based high resolution image detector.

    PubMed

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-19

    Increasing complexity of endovascular interventional procedures requires superior x-ray imaging quality. Present state-of-the-art x-ray imaging detectors may not be adequate due to their inherent noise and resolution limitations. With recent developments, CMOS based detectors are presenting an option to fulfill the need for better image quality. For this work, a new CMOS detector has been analyzed experimentally and theoretically in terms of sensitivity, MTF and DQE. The detector (Dexela Model 1207, Perkin-Elmer Co., London, UK) features 14-bit image acquisition, a CsI phosphor, 75 µm pixels and an active area of 12 cm × 7 cm with over 30 fps frame rate. This detector has two modes of operations with two different full-well capacities: high and low sensitivity. The sensitivity and instrumentation noise equivalent exposure (INEE) were calculated for both modes. The detector modulation-transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectra (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were measured using an RQA5 spectrum. For the theoretical performance evaluation, a linear cascade model with an added aliasing stage was used. The detector showed excellent linearity in both modes. The sensitivity and the INEE of the detector were found to be 31.55 DN/µR and 0.55 µR in high sensitivity mode, while they were 9.87 DN/µR and 2.77 µR in low sensitivity mode. The theoretical and experimental values for the MTF and DQE showed close agreement with good DQE even at fluoroscopic exposure levels. In summary, the Dexela detector's imaging performance in terms of sensitivity, linear system metrics, and INEE demonstrates that it can overcome the noise and resolution limitations of present state-of-the-art x-ray detectors.

  14. High resolution micro-CT of low attenuating organic materials using large area photon-counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumpová, I.; Vavřík, D.; Fíla, T.; Koudelka, P.; Jandejsek, I.; Jakůbek, J.; Kytýř, D.; Zlámal, P.; Vopálenský, M.; Gantar, A.

    2016-02-01

    To overcome certain limitations of contemporary materials used for bone tissue engineering, such as inflammatory response after implantation, a whole new class of materials based on polysaccharide compounds is being developed. Here, nanoparticulate bioactive glass reinforced gelan-gum (GG-BAG) has recently been proposed for the production of bone scaffolds. This material offers promising biocompatibility properties, including bioactivity and biodegradability, with the possibility of producing scaffolds with directly controlled microgeometry. However, to utilize such a scaffold with application-optimized properties, large sets of complex numerical simulations using the real microgeometry of the material have to be carried out during the development process. Because the GG-BAG is a material with intrinsically very low attenuation to X-rays, its radiographical imaging, including tomographical scanning and reconstructions, with resolution required by numerical simulations might be a very challenging task. In this paper, we present a study on X-ray imaging of GG-BAG samples. High-resolution volumetric images of investigated specimens were generated on the basis of micro-CT measurements using a large area flat-panel detector and a large area photon-counting detector. The photon-counting detector was composed of a 010× 1 matrix of Timepix edgeless silicon pixelated detectors with tiling based on overlaying rows (i.e. assembled so that no gap is present between individual rows of detectors). We compare the results from both detectors with the scanning electron microscopy on selected slices in transversal plane. It has been shown that the photon counting detector can provide approx. 3× better resolution of the details in low-attenuating materials than the integrating flat panel detectors. We demonstrate that employment of a large area photon counting detector is a good choice for imaging of low attenuating materials with the resolution sufficient for numerical simulations.

  15. Commissioning and Characterization of a Dedicated High-Resolution Breast PET Camera

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    project consists of many detector modules formed by coupling pairs of high resolution scintillation crystal arrays to position sensitive avalanche ...modules that each contain 2 position sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs) coupled to 8×8 array of 1×1×1 mm3 LYSO crystals. The two PSAPDs are...evaluation of a large area posi- tion sensitive avalanche photodiode coupled to an LSO crystal array as a function of temper- ature and bias voltage J. Inst 7

  16. The high resolution X-ray imaging detector planes for the MIRAX mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, B. H. G.; Grindlay, J. E.; Allen, B.; Hong, J.; Barthelmy, S.; Braga, J.; D'Amico, F.; Rothschild, R. E.

    2013-09-01

    The MIRAX X-ray observatory, the first Brazilian-led astrophysics space mission, is designed to perform an unprecedented wide-field, wide-band hard X-ray (5-200 keV) survey of Galactic X-ray transient sources. In the current configuration, MIRAX will carry a set of four coded-masks telescopes with high spatial resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detector planes, each one consisting of an array of 64 closely tiled CZT pixelated detectors. Taken together, the four telescopes will have a total detection area of 959 cm2, a large field of view (60° × 60° FWHM), high angular resolution for this energy range (6 arcmin) and very good spectral resolution ( ~ 2 keV @ 60 keV). A stratospheric balloon-borne prototype of one of the MIRAX telescopes has been developed, tested and flown by the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) as part of the ProtoEXIST program. In this paper we show results of validation and calibration tests with individual CZT detectors of the ProtoEXIST second generation experiment (P2). Each one of 64 detector units of the P2 detector plane consists of an ASIC, developed by Caltech for the NuSTAR telescope, hybridized to a CZT crystal with 0.6 mm pixel size. The performance of each detector was evaluated using radioactive sources in the laboratory. The calibration results show that the P2 detectors have average energy resolution of ~ 2.1 keV @ 60 keV and 2.3 @ 122 keV. P2 was also successfully tested on near-space environment on a balloon flight, demonstrating the detector unit readiness for integration on a space mission telescope, as well as satisfying all MIRAX mission requirements.

  17. A Prototype Detector for a Novel High-Resolution PET System: BazookaPET.

    PubMed

    Park, Ryeojin; Miller, Brian W; Jha, Abhinav K; Furenlid, Lars R; Hunter, William C J; Barrett, Harrison H

    2012-01-01

    We have designed and are developing a novel proof-of-concept PET system called BazookaPET. In order to complete the PET configuration, at least two detector elements are required to detect positron-electron annihilation events. Each detector element of the BazookaPET has two independent data acquisition channels. One side of the scintillation crystal is optically coupled to a 4×4 silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) array and the other side is a CCD-based gamma camera. Using these two separate channels, we can obtain data with high energy, temporal and spatial resolution data by associating the data outputs via several maximum-likelihood estimation (MLE) steps. In this work, we present the concept of the system and the prototype detector element. We focus on characterizing individual detector channels, and initial experimental calibration results are shown along with preliminary performance-evaluation results. We measured energy resolution and the integrated traces of the slit-beam images from both detector channel outputs. A photo-peak energy resolution of ~5.3% FWHM was obtained from the SiPM and ~48% FWHM from the CCD at 662 keV. We assumed SiPM signals follow Gaussian statistics and estimated the 2D interaction position using MLE. Based on our the calibration experiments, we computed the Cramér-Rao bound (CRB) for the SiPM detector channel and found that the CRB resolution is better than 1 mm in the center of the crystal.

  18. Novel Large Area High Resolution Neutron Detector for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Jeffrey L

    2009-05-22

    Neutron scattering is a powerful technique that is critically important for materials science and structural biology applications. The knowledge gained from past developments has resulted in far-reaching advances in engineering, pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, to name a few. New facilities for neutron generation at much higher flux, such as the SNS at Oak Ridge, TN, will greatly enhance the capabilities of neutron scattering, with benefits that extend to many fields and include, for example, development of improved drug therapies and materials that are stronger, longer-lasting, and more impact-resistant. In order to fully realize this enhanced potential, however, higher neutron rates must be met with improved detection capabilities, particularly higher count rate capability in large size detectors, while maintaining practicality. We have developed a neutron detector with the technical and economic advantages to accomplish this goal. This new detector has a large sensitive area, offers 3D spatial resolution, high sensitivity and high count rate capability, and it is economical and practical to produce. The proposed detector technology is based on B-10 thin film conversion of neutrons in long straw-like gas detectors. A stack of many such detectors, each 1 meter in length, and 4 mm in diameter, has a stopping power that exceeds that of He-3 gas, contained at practical pressures within an area detector. With simple electronic readout methods, straw detector arrays can provide spatial resolution of 4 mm FWHM or better, and since an array detector of such form consists of several thousand individual elements per square meter, count rates in a 1 m^2 detector can reach 2?10^7 cps. Moreover, each individual event can be timetagged with a time resolution of less than 0.1 ?sec, allowing accurate identification of neutron energy by time of flight. Considering basic elemental cost, this novel neutron imaging detector can be commercially produced economically

  19. High-resolution CdTe detectors with application to various fields (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Orita, Tadashi; Arai, Yasuo; Sugawara, Hirotaka; Tomaru, Ryota; Katsuragawa, Miho; Sato, Goro; Watanabe, Shin; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Furenlid, Lars R.; Barber, H. Bradford

    2016-10-01

    High-quality CdTe semiconductor detectors with both fine position resolution and high energy resolution hold great promise to improve measurement in various hard X-ray and gamma-ray imaging fields. ISAS/JAXA has been developing CdTe imaging detectors to meet scientific demands in latest celestial observation and severe environmental limitation (power consumption, vibration, radiation) in space for over 15 years. The energy resolution of imaging detectors with a CdTe Schottky diode of In/CdTe/Pt or Al/CdTe/Pt contact is a highlight of our development. We can extremely reduce a leakage current of devises, meaning it allows us to supply higher bias voltage to collect charges. The 3.2cm-wide and 0.75mm-thick CdTe double-sided strip detector with a strip pitch of 250 µm has been successfully established and was mounted in the latest Japanese X-ray satellite. The energy resolution measured in the test on ground was 2.1 keV (FWHM) at 59.5 keV. The detector with much finer resolution of 60 µm is ready, and it was actually used in the FOXSI rocket mission to observe hard X-ray from the sun. In this talk, we will focus on our research activities to apply space sensor technologies to such various imaging fields as medical imaging. Recent development of CdTe detectors, imaging module with pinhole and coded-mask collimators, and experimental study of response to hard X-rays and gamma-rays are presented. The talk also includes research of the Compton camera which has a configuration of accumulated Si and CdTe imaging detectors.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of a very high resolution thermal neutron detector composed of glass scintillator microfibers.

    PubMed

    Song, Yushou; Conner, Joseph; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hayward, Jason P

    2016-02-01

    In order to develop a high spatial resolution (micron level) thermal neutron detector, a detector assembly composed of cerium doped lithium glass microfibers, each with a diameter of 1 μm, is proposed, where the neutron absorption location is reconstructed from the observed charged particle products that result from neutron absorption. To suppress the cross talk of the scintillation light, each scintillating fiber is surrounded by air-filled glass capillaries with the same diameter as the fiber. This pattern is repeated to form a bulk microfiber detector. On one end, the surface of the detector is painted with a thin optical reflector to increase the light collection efficiency at the other end. Then the scintillation light emitted by any neutron interaction is transmitted to one end, magnified, and recorded by an intensified CCD camera. A simulation based on the Geant4 toolkit was developed to model this detector. All the relevant physics processes including neutron interaction, scintillation, and optical boundary behaviors are simulated. This simulation was first validated through measurements of neutron response from lithium glass cylinders. With good expected light collection, an algorithm based upon the features inherent to alpha and triton particle tracks is proposed to reconstruct the neutron reaction position in the glass fiber array. Given a 1 μm fiber diameter and 0.1mm detector thickness, the neutron spatial resolution is expected to reach σ∼1 μm with a Gaussian fit in each lateral dimension. The detection efficiency was estimated to be 3.7% for a glass fiber assembly with thickness of 0.1mm. When the detector thickness increases from 0.1mm to 1mm, the position resolution is not expected to vary much, while the detection efficiency is expected to increase by about a factor of ten.

  1. A high-resolution CMOS imaging detector for the search of neutrinoless double β decay in 82Se

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavarria, A. E.; Galbiati, C.; Li, X.; Rowlands, J. A.

    2017-03-01

    We introduce high-resolution solid-state imaging detectors for the search of neutrinoless double β decay. Based on the present literature, imaging devices from amorphous 82Se evaporated on a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel array could have the energy and spatial resolution to produce two-dimensional images of ionizing tracks of utmost quality, effectively akin to an electronic bubble chamber in the double β decay energy regime. Still to be experimentally demonstrated, a detector consisting of a large array of these devices could have very low backgrounds, possibly reaching 1 × 10‑7/(kgy) in the neutrinoless decay region of interest (ROI), as it may be required for the full exploration of the neutrinoless double β decay parameter space in the most unfavorable condition of a strongly quenched nucleon axial coupling constant.

  2. First measurements with new high-resolution gadolinium-GEM neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, D.; Resnati, F.; Birch, J.; Etxegarai, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Höglund, C.; Hultman, L.; Llamas-Jansa, I.; Oliveri, E.; Oksanen, E.; Robinson, L.; Ropelewski, L.; Schmidt, S.; Streli, C.; Thuiner, P.

    2016-05-01

    European Spallation Source instruments like the macromolecular diffractometer (NMX) require an excellent neutron detection efficiency, high-rate capabilities, time resolution, and an unprecedented spatial resolution in the order of a few hundred micrometers over a wide angular range of the incoming neutrons. For these instruments solid converters in combination with Micro Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGDs) are a promising option. A GEM detector with gadolinium converter was tested on a cold neutron beam at the IFE research reactor in Norway. The μTPC analysis, proven to improve the spatial resolution in the case of 10B converters, is extended to gadolinium based detectors. For the first time, a Gd-GEM was successfully operated to detect neutrons with a measured efficiency of 11.8% at a wavelength of 2 Åand a position resolution better than 250 μm.

  3. Performance improvements of wavelength-shifting-fiber neutron detectors using high-resolution positioning algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C. L.

    2016-05-17

    On the basis of FluoroBancroft linear-algebraic method [S.B. Andersson, Opt. Exp. 16, 18714 (2008)] three highly-resolved positioning methods were proposed for wavelength-shifting fiber (WLSF) neutron detectors. Using a Gaussian or exponential-decay light-response function (LRF), the non-linear relation of photon-number profiles vs. x-pixels was linearized and neutron positions were determined. The proposed algorithms give an average 0.03-0.08 pixel position error, much smaller than that (0.29 pixel) from a traditional maximum photon algorithm (MPA). The new algorithms result in better detector uniformity, less position misassignment (ghosting), better spatial resolution, and an equivalent or better instrument resolution in powder diffraction than the MPA. Moreover, these characters will facilitate broader applications of WLSF detectors at time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction beamlines, including single-crystal diffraction and texture analysis.

  4. Performance improvements of wavelength-shifting-fiber neutron detectors using high-resolution positioning algorithms

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, C. L.

    2016-05-17

    On the basis of FluoroBancroft linear-algebraic method [S.B. Andersson, Opt. Exp. 16, 18714 (2008)] three highly-resolved positioning methods were proposed for wavelength-shifting fiber (WLSF) neutron detectors. Using a Gaussian or exponential-decay light-response function (LRF), the non-linear relation of photon-number profiles vs. x-pixels was linearized and neutron positions were determined. The proposed algorithms give an average 0.03-0.08 pixel position error, much smaller than that (0.29 pixel) from a traditional maximum photon algorithm (MPA). The new algorithms result in better detector uniformity, less position misassignment (ghosting), better spatial resolution, and an equivalent or better instrument resolution in powder diffraction than the MPA.more » Moreover, these characters will facilitate broader applications of WLSF detectors at time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction beamlines, including single-crystal diffraction and texture analysis.« less

  5. High resolution alpha particle detectors based on 4H-SiC epitaxial layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zat'ko, B.; Dubecký, F.; Šagátová, A.; Sedlačová, K.; Ryć, L.

    2015-04-01

    We fabricated and characterized 4H-SiC Schottky diodes as a spectrometric detector of alpha particles. A thin blocking contact of Ni/Au (15 nm) was used to minimize the influence on alpha particles energy. Current-voltage characteristics of the detector were measured and a low current density below 0.3 nAcm-2 was observed at room temperature. 239Pu241Am244Cm was used as a source of alpha particles within the energy range between 5.1 MeV and 5.8 MeV for detector testing. The charge collection efficiency close to 100 % at reverse bias exceeding 50 V was determined. The best spectrometric performance shows a pulse height spectrum at a reverse bias of 200 V giving an energy resolution of 0.25 % in the full width and half maximum for 5.486 MeV of 241Am.

  6. Large-format high resolution microchannel plate detectors for ultraviolet astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Christopher

    1995-01-01

    This report includes work on two types of two-dimensional position-sensitive detectors that were developed in this lab under this award. We worked to develop and optimize the wire-wound helical delay line detector (HDL) in the first and second years. Some early work on the HDL is contained in a paper included as Appendix A. In the second and third years we developed the concept for, then successfully designed and tested, both a lab prototype, and a flight prototype of the first, crossed delay line detector based on two orthogonal serpentine delay lines (SDL). Some of the work on the SDL is contained in a paper included as Appendix B. Appendix C contains copies of the invention report and record.

  7. Quantitative comparison using generalized relative object detectability (G-ROD) metrics of an amorphous selenium detector with high resolution microangiographic fluoroscopes (MAF) and standard flat panel detectors (FPD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, M.; Shankar, A.; Jain, A.; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Ionita, C. N.; Scott, C.; Karim, K. S.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2016-03-01

    A novel amorphous selenium (a-Se) direct detector with CMOS readout has been designed, and relative detector performance investigated. The detector features include a 25μm pixel pitch, and 1000μm thick a-Se layer operating at 10V/μm bias field. A simulated detector DQE was determined, and used in comparative calculations of the Relative Object Detectability (ROD) family of prewhitening matched-filter (PWMF) observer and non-pre-whitening matched filter (NPWMF) observer model metrics to gauge a-Se detector performance against existing high resolution micro-angiographic fluoroscopic (MAF) detectors and a standard flat panel detector (FPD). The PWMF-ROD or ROD metric compares two x-ray imaging detectors in their relative abilities in imaging a given object by taking the integral over spatial frequencies of the Fourier transform of the detector DQE weighted by an object function, divided by the comparable integral for a different detector. The generalized-ROD (G-ROD) metric incorporates clinically relevant parameters (focal- spot size, magnification, and scatter) to show the degradation in imaging performance for detectors that are part of an imaging chain. Preliminary ROD calculations using simulated spheres as the object predicted superior imaging performance by the a-Se detector as compared to existing detectors. New PWMF-G-ROD and NPWMF-G-ROD results still indicate better performance by the a-Se detector in an imaging chain over all sphere sizes for various focal spot sizes and magnifications, although a-Se performance advantages were degraded by focal spot blurring. Nevertheless, the a-Se technology has great potential to provide break- through abilities such as visualization of fine details including of neuro-vascular perforator vessels and of small vascular devices.

  8. Single-crystal CVD diamond detector for high-resolution particle spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Y.; Murakami, H.; Shimaoka, T.; Tsubota, M.; Kaneko, J. H.

    2014-11-01

    The performance of a single-crystal diamond detector, grown by chemical vapour deposition, as an energy spectrometer for charged particles was studied. The detector was able to identify four different energies of 241\\text{Am} α -particles (5.389, 5.443, 5.486, and 5.545 MeV) thanks to a superior intrinsic energy resolution of ˜0.4{%} (full width at half maximum). The electrode configuration, specifically the electric field configuration inside the diamond crystal, and the electrode materials, strongly affect the energy resolution for charged particles. The charge collection efficiency inside the diamond crystal was ˜97{%} for both electrons and holes.

  9. A high-resolution imaging technique using a whole-body, research photon counting detector CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, S.; Yu, Z.; Halaweish, A.; Kappler, S.; Hahn, K.; Henning, A.; Li, Z.; Lane, J.; Levin, D. L.; Jorgensen, S.; Ritman, E.; McCollough, C.

    2016-03-01

    A high-resolution (HR) data collection mode has been introduced to a whole-body, research photon-counting-detector CT system installed in our laboratory. In this mode, 64 rows of 0.45 mm x 0.45 mm detector pixels were used, which corresponded to a pixel size of 0.25 mm x 0.25 mm at the iso-center. Spatial resolution of this HR mode was quantified by measuring the MTF from a scan of a 50 micron wire phantom. An anthropomorphic lung phantom, cadaveric swine lung, temporal bone and heart specimens were scanned using the HR mode, and image quality was subjectively assessed by two experienced radiologists. High spatial resolution of the HR mode was evidenced by the MTF measurement, with 15 lp/cm and 20 lp/cm at 10% and 2% modulation. Images from anthropomorphic phantom and cadaveric specimens showed clear delineation of small structures, such as lung vessels, lung nodules, temporal bone structures, and coronary arteries. Temporal bone images showed critical anatomy (i.e. stapes superstructure) that was clearly visible in the PCD system. These results demonstrated the potential application of this imaging mode in lung, temporal bone, and vascular imaging. Other clinical applications that require high spatial resolution, such as musculoskeletal imaging, may also benefit from this high resolution mode.

  10. A new linear array detector for high resolution and low dose digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettuzzi, Matteo; Cornacchia, Samantha; Rossi, Massimo; Paltrinieri, Enrica; Morigi, Maria Pia; Brancaccio, Rosa; Romani, Davide; Casali, Franco

    2004-01-01

    At the Department of Physics of the University of Bologna a new intensified linear array detector is under development. The core of the system is a digital intensified CCD camera, the electron bombarded charge coupled device (EBCCD). The main innovation is a coherent rectangular-to-linear fiber optics adapter coupling the 1 in. diameter photocathode of the camera with a linear 129 mm × 1.45 mm strip of Gd 2O 2S:Tb. In this way a high spatial resolution over an extended length is obtained. The detector works as an X-ray scanner by means of a high-precision translation mechanical device to inspect a 13 cm × 18 cm area. A complete characterisation of the system has been made in terms of linearity, dynamic range, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). At last, radiographic tests on a set of samples have been made and will be presented.

  11. Anamorphic preclinical SPECT imaging with high-resolution silicon double-sided strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durko, Heather L.

    Preclinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is an essential tool for studying progression, response to treatment, and physiological changes in small animal models of human disease. The wide range of imaging applications is often limited by the static design of many preclinical SPECT systems. We have developed a prototype imaging system that replaces the standard static pinhole aperture with two sets of movable, keel-edged copper-tungsten blades configured as crossed (skewed) slits. These apertures can be positioned independently between the object and detector, producing an anamorphic image in which the axial and transaxial magnications are not constrained to be equal. We incorporated a 60 mm x 60 mm, millimeter-thick megapixel silicon double-sided strip detector that permits ultrahigh-resolution imaging. While the stopping power of silicon is low for many common clinical radioisotopes, its performance is sufficient in the range of 20-60 keV to allow practical imaging experiments. The low-energy emissions of 125I fall within this energy window, and the 60-day half life provides an advantage for longitudinal studies. The flexible nature of this system allows the future application of adaptive imaging techniques. We have demonstrated ˜225-mum axial and ˜175-mum transaxial resolution across a 2.65 cm3 cylindrical field of view, as well as the capability for simultaneous multi-isotope acquisitions. We describe the key advancements that have made this system operational, including bringing up a new detector readout ASIC, development of detector control software and data-processing algorithms, and characterization of operating characteristics. We describe design and fabrication of the adjustable slit aperture platform, as well as the development of an accurate imaging forward model and its application in a novel geometric calibration technique and a GPU-based ultrahigh-resolution reconstruction code.

  12. Initial characterization of a BGO-photodiode detector for high resolution positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Derenzo, S.E.

    1983-11-01

    Spatial resolution in positron emission tomography is currently limited by the resolution of the detectors. This work presents the initial characterization of a detector design using small bismuth germanate (BGO) crystals individually coupled to silicon photodiodes (SPDs) for crystal identification, and coupled in groups to phototubes (PMTs) for coincidence timing. A 3 mm x 3 mm x 3 mm BGO crystal coupled only to an SPD can achieve a 511 keV photopeak resolution of 8.7% FWHM at -150/sup 0/C, using a pulse peaking time of 10 ..mu..s. When two 3 mm x 3 mm x 15 mm BGO crystals are coupled individually to SPDs and also coupled to a common 14 mm diam PMT, the SPDs detect the 511 keV photopeak with a resolution of 30% FWHM at -76/sup 0/C. In coincidence with an opposing 3 mm wide BGO crystal, the SPDs are able to identify the crystal of interaction with good signal-to-noise ratio, and the detector pair resolution is 2 mm FWHM. 32 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

  13. High-resolution microcalorimeter detectors as a tool in the future of nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Hoteling, Nathan J; Hoover, Andrew S

    2010-01-01

    New measurements are presented from the LANL-NIST microcalorimeter array for two standard plutonium sources. The results demonstrate substantially smaller error bars obtained from the spectral analysis program FRAM. Some areas of improvement to the analysis technique have been identified, indicating that the micro calorimeter results can be improved upon. These results support the viability of a device for performing real nuclear safeguards measurements in the near future. The challenge of providing reliably accurate and precise data is a critical component of any safeguards initiative. In the realm of nuclear safeguards, this is an especially daunting task since inaccurate and/or imprecise data could have very serious international consequences. As such, there is a constant drive within the community to establish better measurement and analysis techniques in order to further reduce the associated errors and uncertainties. Even with todays state of the art equipment, measurement uncertainties can extend to several significant quantities worth of material over a relatively modest period of time. Furthermore, there is a strong desire for improved nondestructive analysis techniques in order to reduce both the cost, turnover rate, and inconvenience of destructive analyses. One promising new technology that may help to realize these goals is that of gamma-ray microcalorimeter detectors. The hallmark quality of this new technique is the ability to achieve energy resolution nearly an order of magnitude better than typical planar high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. Such an improvement may help reduce uncertainties associated with, for instance, plutonium isotopics or uranium enrichment measurements. This may, in turn, help to reduce uncertainties in total plutonium and/or uranium content in a given sample without the need for destructive analysis. In this paper, we will describe this new detector technology as well as some recent measurements carried out with the LANL

  14. Bismuth Passivation Technique for High-Resolution X-Ray Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chervenak, James; Hess, Larry

    2013-01-01

    The Athena-plus team requires X-ray sensors with energy resolution of better than one part in 3,000 at 6 keV X-rays. While bismuth is an excellent material for high X-ray stopping power and low heat capacity (for large signal when an X-ray is stopped by the absorber), oxidation of the bismuth surface can lead to electron traps and other effects that degrade the energy resolution. Bismuth oxide reduction and nitride passivation techniques analogous to those used in indium passivation are being applied in a new technique. The technique will enable improved energy resolution and resistance to aging in bismuth-absorber-coupled X-ray sensors. Elemental bismuth is lithographically integrated into X-ray detector circuits. It encounters several steps where the Bi oxidizes. The technology discussed here will remove oxide from the surface of the Bi and replace it with nitridized surface. Removal of the native oxide and passivating to prevent the growth of the oxide will improve detector performance and insulate the detector against future degradation from oxide growth. Placing the Bi coated sensor in a vacuum system, a reduction chemistry in a plasma (nitrogen/hydrogen (N2/H2) + argon) is used to remove the oxide and promote nitridization of the cleaned Bi surface. Once passivated, the Bi will perform as a better X-ray thermalizer since energy will not be trapped in the bismuth oxides on the surface. A simple additional step, which can be added at various stages of the current fabrication process, can then be applied to encapsulate the Bi film. After plasma passivation, the Bi can be capped with a non-diffusive layer of metal or dielectric. A non-superconducting layer is required such as tungsten or tungsten nitride (WNx).

  15. Combinatorial Screening of Advanced Scintillators for High Resolution X-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Shifan; Tao, Dejie; Lynch, Michael; Yuan, Xianglong; Li, Yiqun

    2008-05-12

    The lack of efficient scintillators is a major problem for developing powerful x-ray detectors that are widely used in homeland security, industrial and scientific research. Intematix has developed and applied a high throughput screening process and corresponding crystal growth technology to significantly speed up the discovery process for new efficient scintillators. As a result, Intematix has invented and fabricated three new scintillators both in powder and bulk forms, which possess promising properties such as better radiation hardness and better matching for silicon diode.

  16. Reconstruction of high resolution MLC leaf positions using a low resolution detector for accurate 3D dose reconstruction in IMRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, R.; Godart, J.; Wauben, D. J. L.; Langendijk, J. A.; van't Veld, A. A.; Korevaar, E. W.

    2016-12-01

    In pre-treatment dose verification, low resolution detector systems are unable to identify shifts of individual leafs of high resolution multi leaf collimator (MLC) systems from detected changes in the dose deposition. The goal of this study was to introduce an alternative approach (the shutter technique) combined with a previous described iterative reconstruction method to accurately reconstruct high resolution MLC leaf positions based on low resolution measurements. For the shutter technique, two additional radiotherapy treatment plans (RT-plans) were generated in addition to the original RT-plan; one with even MLC leafs closed for reconstructing uneven leaf positions and one with uneven MLC leafs closed for reconstructing even leaf positions. Reconstructed leaf positions were then implemented in the original RT-plan for 3D dose reconstruction. The shutter technique was evaluated for a 6 MV Elekta SLi linac with 5 mm MLC leafs (Agility™) in combination with the MatriXX Evolution detector with detector spacing of 7.62 mm. Dose reconstruction was performed with the COMPASS system (v2.0). The measurement setup allowed one row of ionization chambers to be affected by two adjacent leaf pairs. Measurements were obtained for various field sizes with MLC leaf position errors ranging from 1.0 mm to 10.0 mm. Furthermore, one clinical head and neck IMRT treatment beam with MLC introduced leaf position errors of 5.0 mm was evaluated to illustrate the impact of the shutter technique on 3D dose reconstruction. Without the shutter technique, MLC leaf position reconstruction showed reconstruction errors up to 6.0 mm. Introduction of the shutter technique allowed MLC leaf position reconstruction for the majority of leafs with sub-millimeter accuracy resulting in a reduction of dose reconstruction errors. The shutter technique in combination with the iterative reconstruction method allows high resolution MLC leaf position reconstruction using low resolution

  17. WE-G-204-06: Grid-Line Artifact Minimization for High Resolution Detectors Using Iterative Residual Scatter Correction

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, R; Bednarek, D; Rudin, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Anti-scatter grid-line artifacts are more prominent for high-resolution x-ray detectors since the fraction of a pixel blocked by the grid septa is large. Direct logarithmic subtraction of the artifact pattern is limited by residual scattered radiation and we investigate an iterative method for scatter correction. Methods: A stationary Smit-Rοntgen anti-scatter grid was used with a high resolution Dexela 1207 CMOS X-ray detector (75 µm pixel size) to image an artery block (Nuclear Associates, Model 76-705) placed within a uniform head equivalent phantom as the scattering source. The image of the phantom was divided by a flat-field image obtained without scatter but with the grid to eliminate grid-line artifacts. Constant scatter values were subtracted from the phantom image before dividing by the averaged flat-field-with-grid image. The standard deviation of pixel values for a fixed region of the resultant images with different subtracted scatter values provided a measure of the remaining grid-line artifacts. Results: A plot of the standard deviation of image pixel values versus the subtracted scatter value shows that the image structure noise reaches a minimum before going up again as the scatter value is increased. This minimum corresponds to a minimization of the grid-line artifacts as demonstrated in line profile plots obtained through each of the images perpendicular to the grid lines. Artifact-free images of the artery block were obtained with the optimal scatter value obtained by this iterative approach. Conclusion: Residual scatter subtraction can provide improved grid-line artifact elimination when using the flat-field with grid “subtraction” technique. The standard deviation of image pixel values can be used to determine the optimal scatter value to subtract to obtain a minimization of grid line artifacts with high resolution x-ray imaging detectors. This study was supported by NIH Grant R01EB002873 and an equipment grant from Toshiba

  18. Quantitative carbon detector (QCD) for calibration-free, high-resolution characterization of complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Maduskar, Saurabh; Teixeira, Andrew R; Paulsen, Alex D; Krumm, Christoph; Mountziaris, T J; Fan, Wei; Dauenhauer, Paul J

    2015-01-21

    Current research of complex chemical systems, including biomass pyrolysis, petroleum refining, and wastewater remediation requires analysis of large analyte mixtures (>100 compounds). Quantification of each carbon-containing analyte by existing methods (flame ionization detection) requires extensive identification and calibration. In this work, we describe an integrated microreactor system called the Quantitative Carbon Detector (QCD) for use with current gas chromatography techniques for calibration-free quantitation of analyte mixtures. Combined heating, catalytic combustion, methanation and gas co-reactant mixing within a single modular reactor fully converts all analytes to methane (>99.9%) within a thermodynamic operable regime. Residence time distribution of the QCD reveals negligible loss in chromatographic resolution consistent with fine separation of complex mixtures including cellulose pyrolysis products.

  19. A new design for a high resolution, high efficiency CZT gamma camera detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestais, C.; Baffert, N.; Bonnefoy, J. P.; Chapuis, A.; Koenig, A.; Monnet, O.; Ouvrier Buffet, P.; Rostaing, J. P.; Sauvage, F.; Verger, L.

    2001-02-01

    We have designed a CZT gamma camera detector that provides an array of CZT pixels and associated front-end electronics - including an ASIC - and permits gamma camera measurements using the method patented by CEA-LETI and reported by Verger et al. [1]. Electron response in each CZT pixel is registered by correcting pulse height for position of interaction based on fast rise-time information. This method brings advantages of high scatter rejection while allowing high detection efficiency. These techniques and the systems approach have been developed at CEA-LETI in an exclusive joint development with BICRON and CRISMATEC who in turn are commercializing the technology. The initial system is implemented in an array framework with 1920 pixels, approximately 180×215 mm 2 in dimension, but the system architecture expands readily to 4096 pixels, and these arrays can be ganged into groups of up to 8 for pixel planes totaling over 32 000 pixels without architecture changes. The overall system design is described and brain phantom images are presented that were obtained by scanning with a small number of pixels.

  20. Single-shot positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy with LYSO scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, A. M.; Cooper, B. S.; Deller, A.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2016-08-01

    We have evaluated the application of a lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) based detector to single-shot positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. We compare this detector directly with a similarly configured PbWO4 scintillator, which is the usual choice for such measurements. We find that the signal to noise ratio obtained using LYSO is around three times higher than that obtained using PbWO4 for measurements of Ps excited to longer-lived (Rydberg) levels, or when they are ionized soon after production. This is due to the much higher light output for LYSO (75% and 1% of NaI for LYSO and PbWO4 respectively). We conclude that LYSO is an ideal scintillator for single-shot measurements of positronium production and excitation performed using a low-intensity pulsed positron beam.

  1. Development of High Resolution Mirrors and Cd-Zn-Te Detectors for Hard X-ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Brian D.; Speegle, Chet O.; Gaskin, Jessica; Sharma, Dharma; Engelhaupt, Darell; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We describe the fabrication and implementation of a high-resolution conical, grazing- incidence, hard X-ray (20-70 keV) telescope. When flown aboard stratospheric balloons, these mirrors are used to image cosmic sources such as supernovae, neutron stars, and quasars. The fabrication process involves generating super-polished mandrels, mirror shell electroforming, and mirror testing. The cylindrical mandrels consist of two conical segments; each segment is approximately 305 mm long. These mandrels are first, precision ground to within approx. 1.0 micron straightness along each conical segment and then lapped and polished to less than 0.5 micron straightness. Each mandrel segment is the super-polished to an average surface roughness of approx. 3.25 angstrom rms. By mirror shell replication, this combination of good figure and low surface roughness has enabled us to achieve 15 arcsec, confirmed by X-ray measurements in the Marshall Space Flight Center 102 meter test facility. To image the focused X-rays requires a focal plane detector with appropriate spatial resolution. For 15 arcsec optics of 6 meter focal length, this resolution must be around 200 microns. In addition, the detector must have a high efficiency, relatively high energy resolution, and low background. We are currently developing Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride fine-pixel detectors for this purpose. The detectors under study consist of a 16x16 pixel array with a pixel pitch of 300 microns and are 1 mm and 2 mm thick. At 60 keV, the measured energy resolution is around 2%.

  2. Design and image-quality performance of high resolution CMOS-based X-ray imaging detectors for digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, B. K.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Y. J.; Yun, S.; Cho, G.; Kim, H. K.; Seo, C.-W.; Jeon, S.; Huh, Y.

    2012-04-01

    In digital X-ray imaging systems, X-ray imaging detectors based on scintillating screens with electronic devices such as charge-coupled devices (CCDs), thin-film transistors (TFT), complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) flat panel imagers have been introduced for general radiography, dental, mammography and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications. Recently, a large-area CMOS active-pixel sensor (APS) in combination with scintillation films has been widely used in a variety of digital X-ray imaging applications. We employed a scintillator-based CMOS APS image sensor for high-resolution mammography. In this work, both powder-type Gd2O2S:Tb and a columnar structured CsI:Tl scintillation screens with various thicknesses were fabricated and used as materials to convert X-ray into visible light. These scintillating screens were directly coupled to a CMOS flat panel imager with a 25 × 50 mm2 active area and a 48 μm pixel pitch for high spatial resolution acquisition. We used a W/Al mammographic X-ray source with a 30 kVp energy condition. The imaging characterization of the X-ray detector was measured and analyzed in terms of linearity in incident X-ray dose, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE).

  3. High-resolution STEM imaging with a quadrant detector--conditions for differential phase contrast microscopy in the weak phase object approximation.

    PubMed

    Majert, S; Kohl, H

    2015-01-01

    Differential phase contrast is a contrast mechanism that can be utilized in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to determine the distribution of magnetic or electric fields. In practice, several different detector geometries can be used to obtain differential phase contrast. As recent high resolution differential phase contrast experiments with the STEM are focused on ring quadrant detectors, we evaluate the contrast transfer characteristics of different quadrant detector geometries, namely two ring quadrant detectors with different inner detector angles and a conventional quadrant detector, by calculating the corresponding phase gradient transfer functions. For an ideal microscope and a weak phase object, this can be done analytically. The calculated phase gradient transfer functions indicate that the barely illuminated ring quadrant detector setup used for imaging magnetic fields in the specimen reduces the resolution limit to about 2.5Å for an aberration corrected STEM. Our results show that the resolution can be drastically improved by using a conventional quadrant detector instead.

  4. Design study of a high-resolution breast-dedicated PET system built from cadmium zinc telluride detectors

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hao; Levin, Craig S

    2013-01-01

    min imaging time. Furthermore, we observe that the degree of spatial resolution degradation along the direction orthogonal to the two panels that is typical of a limited angle tomography configuration is mitigated by having high-resolution DOI capabilities that enable more accurate positioning of oblique response lines. PMID:20400807

  5. High Resolution Computed Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-31

    samples. 14. SUBJECTTERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 38 High Resolution, Microfocus , Characterization, X - Ray , Micrography, Computed Tomography (CT), Failure...high resolutions (50 g.tm feature sensitivity) when a small field of view (50 mm) is used [11]. Specially designed detectors and a microfocus X - ray ...Wright Laboratories. Feldkamp [14] at Ford used a microfocus X - ray source and an X - ray image intensifier to develop a system capable of 20 g.m

  6. High-resolution liquid- and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance of nanoliter sample volumes using microcoil detectors.

    PubMed

    Kentgens, A P M; Bart, J; van Bentum, P J M; Brinkmann, A; van Eck, E R H; Gardeniers, J G E; Janssen, J W G; Knijn, P; Vasa, S; Verkuijlen, M H W

    2008-02-07

    The predominant means to detect nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is to monitor the voltage induced in a radiofrequency coil by the precessing magnetization. To address the sensitivity of NMR for mass-limited samples it is worthwhile to miniaturize this detector coil. Although making smaller coils seems a trivial step, the challenges in the design of microcoil probeheads are to get the highest possible sensitivity while maintaining high resolution and keeping the versatility to apply all known NMR experiments. This means that the coils have to be optimized for a given sample geometry, circuit losses should be avoided, susceptibility broadening due to probe materials has to be minimized, and finally the B(1)-fields generated by the rf coils should be homogeneous over the sample volume. This contribution compares three designs that have been miniaturized for NMR detection: solenoid coils, flat helical coils, and the novel stripline and microslot designs. So far most emphasis in microcoil research was in liquid-state NMR. This contribution gives an overview of the state of the art of microcoil solid-state NMR by reviewing literature data and showing the latest results in the development of static and micro magic angle spinning (microMAS) solenoid-based probeheads. Besides their mass sensitivity, microcoils can also generate tremendously high rf fields which are very useful in various solid-state NMR experiments. The benefits of the stripline geometry for studying thin films are shown. This geometry also proves to be a superior solution for microfluidic NMR implementations in terms of sensitivity and resolution.

  7. High-resolution liquid- and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance of nanoliter sample volumes using microcoil detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kentgens, A. P. M.; Bart, J.; van Bentum, P. J. M.; Brinkmann, A.; van Eck, E. R. H.; Gardeniers, J. G. E.; Janssen, J. W. G.; Knijn, P.; Vasa, S.; Verkuijlen, M. H. W.

    2008-02-01

    The predominant means to detect nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is to monitor the voltage induced in a radiofrequency coil by the precessing magnetization. To address the sensitivity of NMR for mass-limited samples it is worthwhile to miniaturize this detector coil. Although making smaller coils seems a trivial step, the challenges in the design of microcoil probeheads are to get the highest possible sensitivity while maintaining high resolution and keeping the versatility to apply all known NMR experiments. This means that the coils have to be optimized for a given sample geometry, circuit losses should be avoided, susceptibility broadening due to probe materials has to be minimized, and finally the B1-fields generated by the rf coils should be homogeneous over the sample volume. This contribution compares three designs that have been miniaturized for NMR detection: solenoid coils, flat helical coils, and the novel stripline and microslot designs. So far most emphasis in microcoil research was in liquid-state NMR. This contribution gives an overview of the state of the art of microcoil solid-state NMR by reviewing literature data and showing the latest results in the development of static and micro magic angle spinning (microMAS) solenoid-based probeheads. Besides their mass sensitivity, microcoils can also generate tremendously high rf fields which are very useful in various solid-state NMR experiments. The benefits of the stripline geometry for studying thin films are shown. This geometry also proves to be a superior solution for microfluidic NMR implementations in terms of sensitivity and resolution.

  8. Design for a high-resolution small-animal spect system usingpixellated Si(Li) detectors for in vivo Iodine-125 imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.; Tindall, Craig S.; Luke,Paul N.

    2004-08-01

    We propose a design for a high-resolution single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system for in vivo {sup 125}I imaging in small animal using pixellated lithium-drifted silicon (Si(Li)) detectors. The proposed detectors are expected to have high interaction probability (>90%), good energy resolution (<15% FWHM), and good intrinsic spatial resolution ({approx}1 mm FWHM). The SPECT system will consist of a dual head detector geometry with the distance between the detectors ranging 30-50 mm to minimize the imaging distance between the mouse and the detectors. The detectors, each with an active area of 64 mm x 40 mm (64 x 40 array of 1 mm{sup 2} pixels and a 6 mm thick Si(Li) detector), will be mounted on a rotating gantry with an axial field-of-view of 64 mm. The detector signals will be read out by custom application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs). Using a high-resolution parallel-hole collimator, the expected spatial resolution is 1.6 mm FWHM at an imaging distance of 20 mm, and sensitivity is 6.7 cps/{micro}Ci. {sup 125}I is a readily available radioisotope with a long half-life of 59.4 days and it is commonly used to label biological compounds in molecular biology. Conventional gamma cameras are not optimized to detect the low emission energies (27 to 35 keV) of {sup 125}I. However, Si(Li) detector provides an ideal solution for detecting the low-energy emissions of {sup 125}I. In addition to presenting the design of the system, this paper presents a feasibility study of using Si(Li) detectors to detect the emissions of {sup 125}I.

  9. A novel gamma-ray detector with submillimeter resolutions using a monolithic MPPC array with pixelized Ce:LYSO and Ce:GGAG crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, T.; Kataoka, J.; Nakamori, T.; Miura, T.; Matsuda, H.; Kishimoto, A.; Sato, K.; Ishikawa, Y.; Yamamura, K.; Nakamura, S.; Kawabata, N.; Ikeda, H.; Yamamoto, S.; Kamada, K.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a large-area monolithic Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) array consisting of 4×4 channels with a three-side buttable package. Each channel has a photosensitive area of 3×3 mm2 and 3600 Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes (APDs). For typical operational gain of 7.5×105 at +20 °C, gain fluctuation over the entire MPPC device is only ±5.6%, and dark count rates (as measured at the 1 p.e. level) amount to ≤400 kcps per channel. We first fabricated a gamma-ray camera consisting of the MPPC array with one-to-one coupling to a Ce-doped (Lu, Y)2(SiO4)O (Ce:LYSO) crystal array (4×4 array of 3×3×10 mm3 crystals). Energy and time resolutions of 11.5±0.5% (FWHM at 662 keV) and 493±22 ps were obtained, respectively. When using the charge division resistor network, which compiles signals into four position-encoded analog outputs, the ultimate positional resolution is estimated as 0.19 mm in both X and Y directions, while energy resolution of 10.2±0.4% (FWHM) was obtained. Finally, we fabricated submillimeter Ce:LYSO and Ce-doped Gd3Ga3Al2O12 (Ce:GGAG) scintillator matrices each consisting of 1.0×1.0, 0.7×0.7 and 0.5×0.5 mm2 pixels, to further improve the spatial resolution. In all types of Ce:LYSO and Ce:GGAG matrices, each crystal was clearly resolved in the position histograms when irradiated by a 137Cs source. The energy resolutions for 662 keV gamma-rays for each Ce:LYSO and Ce:GGAG scintillator matrix were ≤14.3%. These results suggest excellent potential for its use as a high spatial medical imaging device, particularly in positron emission tomography (PET).

  10. Effects of multiple-interaction photon events in a high-resolution PET system that uses 3-D positioning detectors

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yi; Pratx, Guillem; Lau, Frances W. Y.; Levin, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    .7% for coincidence) was noted for a uniform phantom when MIPEs with summed-energy falling within a ±12% window around the photopeak were also included. Both experimental and simulation data demonstrate that <0.4% of the events whose summed-energy deposition falling within that energy window interacted with both crystal arrays within the same dual-LSO-PSAPD module. This result establishes the feasibility of a proposed multiplexed readout of analog output signals of the two PSAPDs within each module. Using MIPEs with summed-energy deposition within the 511 keV±12% photopeak window and a new method for estimating the location of the first photon interaction in MIPEs, the corresponding reconstructed image exhibited a peak CNR of 7.23 for the 8 mm diameter phantom spheres versus a CNR of 6.69 from images based solely on single LSO array interaction events. The improved system photon sensitivity could be exploited to reduce the scan time by up to approximately 10%, while still maintaining image quality comparable to that achieved if MIPEs were excluded. Conclusions: MIPE distribution in the detectors allows the proposed photodetector multiplexing arrangement without significant information loss. Furthermore, acquiring MIPEs can enhance system photon sensitivity and improve PET image CNR and CRC. The system under development can therefore competently acquire and analyze MIPEs and produce high-resolution PET images. PMID:21089785

  11. Spectroscopic analysis of LYSO:Ce crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, A. F.; Carreira, J. F. C.; Rodrigues, J.; Sedrine, N. Ben; Castro, I. F. C.; Correia, P. M. M.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Rino, L.; Monteiro, T.

    2017-02-01

    Rare earth orthosilicates are among the most widely used scintillator materials in the last decades. Particularly, lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) is known to exhibit great potentialities in the field of radiation detectors for medical imaging. Consequently, an in-depth knowledge of the material properties is of utmost interest for the mentioned applications. In this work the spectroscopic properties of commercial cerium doped lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate crystals (LYSO:Ce) were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, steady state photoluminescence, photoluminescence excitation and time resolved photoluminescence. Site selective excitation was used under steady state (325 nm) and pulsed (266 nm) conditions to separately investigate the temperature dependence of the 5d → 4f Ce1 and Ce2 luminescence, allowing to establish the thermal quenching dependence of the Ce2 optical center. In the case of the Ce1 optical center, a luminescence quantum efficiency of 78% was obtained from 14 K to room temperature with 266 nm photon excitation.

  12. WE-G-204-04: Focal Spot Deblurring For High Resolution Amorphous Selenium (aSe) Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) X-Ray Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Nagesh, S Setlur; Rana, R; Russ, M; Ionita, C; Bednarek, D; Rudin, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: CMOS-based aSe detectors compared to CsI-TFT-based flat panels have the advantages of higher spatial sampling due to smaller pixel size and decreased blurring characteristic of direct rather than indirect detection. For systems with such detectors, the limiting factor degrading image resolution then becomes the focal-spot geometric unsharpness. This effect can seriously limit the use of such detectors in areas such as cone beam computed tomography, clinical fluoroscopy and angiography. In this work a technique to remove the effect of focal-spot blur is presented for a simulated aSe detector. Method: To simulate images from an aSe detector affected with focal-spot blur, first a set of high-resolution images of a stent (FRED from Microvention, Inc.) were acquired using a 75µm pixel size Dexela-Perkin-Elmer detector and averaged to reduce quantum noise. Then the averaged image was blurred with a known Gaussian blur at two different magnifications to simulate an idealized focal spot. The blurred images were then deconvolved with a set of different Gaussian blurs to remove the effect of focal-spot blurring using a threshold-based, inverse-filtering method. Results: The blur was removed by deconvolving the images using a set of Gaussian functions for both magnifications. Selecting the correct function resulted in an image close to the original; however, selection of too wide a function would cause severe artifacts. Conclusion: Experimentally, focal-spot blur at different magnifications can be measured using a pin hole with a high resolution detector. This spread function can be used to deblur the input images that are acquired at corresponding magnifications to correct for the focal spot blur. For CBCT applications, the magnification of specific objects can be obtained using initial reconstructions then corrected for focal-spot blurring to improve resolution. Similarly, if object magnification can be determined such correction may be applied in fluoroscopy and

  13. TandemPET- A High Resolution, Small Animal, Virtual Pinhole-Based PET Scanner: Initial Design Study

    PubMed Central

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Stolin, Alexander V.; Martone, Peter F.; Smith, Mark F.

    2016-01-01

    Mice are the perhaps the most common species of rodents used in biomedical research, but many of the current generation of small animal PET scanners are non-optimal for imaging these small rodents due to their relatively low resolution. Consequently, a number of researchers have investigated the development of high-resolution scanners to address this need. In this investigation, the design of a novel, high-resolution system based on the dual-detector, virtual-pinhole PET concept was explored via Monte Carlo simulations. Specifically, this system, called TandemPET, consists of a 5 cm × 5 cm high-resolution detector made-up of a 90 × 90 array of 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm × 10 mm (pitch= 0.55 mm) LYSO detector elements in coincidence with a lower resolution detector consisting of a 68 × 68 array of 1.5 mm × 1.5 mm × 10 mm LYSO detector elements (total size= 10.5 cm × 10.5 cm). Analyses indicated that TandemPET’s optimal geometry is to position the high-resolution detector 3 cm from the center-of-rotation, with the lower resolution detector positioned 9 cm from center. Measurements using modified NEMA NU4-2008-based protocols revealed that the spatial resolution of the system is ~0.5 mm FWHM, after correction of positron range effects. Peak sensitivity is 2.1%, which is comparable to current small animal PET scanners. Images from a digital mouse brain phantom demonstrated the potential of the system for identifying important neurological structures. PMID:27041767

  14. Progress in electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) based high-resolution high-sensitivity x-ray detector for fluoroscopy and radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhls, Andrew T.; Yadava, Girijesh; Patel, Vikas; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2007-03-01

    A new high-resolution, high-sensitivity, low-noise x-ray detector based on EMCCDs has been developed. The EMCCD detector module consists of a 1kx1k, 8μm pixel EMCCD camera coupled to a CsI(Tl) scintillating phosphor via a fiber optic taper (FOT). Multiple modules can be used to provide the desired field-of-view (FOV). The detector is capable of acquisitions over 30fps. The EMCCD's variable gain of up to 2000x for the pixel signal enables high sensitivity for fluoroscopic applications. With a 3:1 FOT, the detector can operate with a 144μm effective pixel size, comparable to current flat-panel detectors. Higher resolutions of 96 and 48μm pixel size can also be achieved with various binning modes. The detector MTFs and DQEs were calculated using a linear-systems analysis. The zero frequency DQE was calculated to be 59% at 74 kVp. The DQE for the 144μm pixel size was shown to exhibit quantum-noise limited behavior down to ~0.1μR using a conservative 30x gain. At this low exposure, gains above 30x showed limited improvements in DQE suggesting such increased gains may not be necessary. For operation down to 48µm pixel sizes, the detector instrumentation noise equivalent exposure (INEE), defined as the exposure where the instrumentation noise equals the quantum-noise, was <0.1μR for a 20x gain. This new technology may provide improvements over current flat-panel detectors for applications such as fluoroscopy and angiography requiring high frame rates, resolution, dynamic range and sensitivity while maintaining essentially no lag and very low INEE. Initial images from a prototype detector are also presented.

  15. A Low-Cost and High-Resolution Droplet Position Detector for an Intelligent Electrowetting on Dielectric Device.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiyan; Li, Hongzhong; Baker, R Jacob

    2015-12-01

    A low-cost and high-resolution capacitive-to-digital converter integrated circuit is used for droplet position detection in a digital microfluidic system. A field-programmable gate array FPGA is used as the integrated logic hub of the system for a highly reliable and efficient control of the circuit. A fast-fabricating PCB (printed circuit board) substrate microfluidic system is proposed. Smaller actuation threshold voltages than those previously reported are obtained. Droplets (3 µL) are actuated by using a 200 V, 500 Hz modulating pulsed voltage. Droplet positions can be detected and displayed on a PC-based 3D animation in real time. The actuators and the capacitance sensing circuits are implemented on one PCB to reduce the size of the system. With the capacitive droplet position detection system, the PCB-based electrowetting on dielectric device (EWOD) reported in this work has promise in automating immunohistochemistry experiments.

  16. Field-portable high-resolution EDXRF analysis with HgI[sub 2]-detector-based instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, P.F.; Little, S.R.; Voots, G.R. )

    1992-01-01

    Energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) analysis is well known for its efficient use of x-ray detector technology for simultaneous multielement determination. Low-intensity excitation, such as from a radioisotope source, can thus be employed and has enabled the design of many types of truly portable EDXRF instrumentation. Portable design, however, has not been without significant compromise in analytical performance because of the limited x-ray resolving power of prior detection methods, except by the use of a cryogenically operated detector. The developments we refer to stem from the use of a comparatively new x-ray detection device fabricated from mercuric iodide (HgI[sub 2]). For this detector, only a modest degree of cooling is required to achieve an energy resolution of > 300 eV. Two field-portable instrument designs of different hand-held measurement probe configurations are available that have applications for industrial quality assurance and environmental screening.

  17. Development of Small-Pixel CZT Detectors for Future High-Resolution Hard X-ray Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilicke, Matthias

    Owing to recent breakthroughs in grazing incidence mirror technology, next-generation hard X-ray telescopes will achieve angular resolutions of between 5 and 10 arc seconds - about an order of magnitude better than that of the NuSTAR hard X-ray telescope. As a consequence, the next generation of hard X-ray telescopes will require pixelated hard X- ray detectors with pixels on a grid with a lattice constant of between 120 and 240 um. Additional detector requirements include a low energy threshold of less than 5 keV and an energy resolution of less than 1 keV. The science drivers for a high angular-resolution hard X-ray mission include studies and measurements of black hole spins, the cosmic evolution of super-massive black holes, AGN feedback, and the behavior of matter at very high densities. We propose a R&D research program to develop, optimize and study the performance of 100-200 um pixel pitch CdTe and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors of 1-2 mm thickness. Our program aims at a comparison of the performance achieved with CdTe and CZT detectors, and the optimization of the pixel, steering grid, and guard ring anode patterns. Although these studies will use existing ASICs (Application Specific Integrated Circuits), our program also includes modest funds for the development of an ultra-low noise ASIC with a 2-D grid of readout pads that can be directly bonded to the 100-200 um pixel pitch CdTe and CZT detectors. The team includes the Washington University group (Prof. M. Beilicke and Co-I Prof. H.S.W. Krawczynski et al.), and co-investigator G. De Geronimo at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The Washington University group has a 10 year track record of innovative CZT detector R&D sponsored by the NASA Astronomy and Physics Research and Analysis (APRA) program. The accomplishments to date include the development of CZT detectors with pixel pitches between 350 um and 2.5 mm for the ProtoExist, EXIST, and X-Calibur hard X-ray missions with some of the best

  18. Scatter estimation and removal of anti-scatter grid-line artifacts from anthropomorphic head phantom images taken with a high resolution image detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, R.; Jain, A.; Shankar, A.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2016-03-01

    In radiography, one of the best methods to eliminate image-degrading scatter radiation is the use of anti-scatter grids. However, with high-resolution dynamic imaging detectors, stationary anti-scatter grids can leave grid-line shadows and moiré patterns on the image, depending upon the line density of the grid and the sampling frequency of the x-ray detector. Such artifacts degrade the image quality and may mask small but important details such as small vessels and interventional device features. Appearance of these artifacts becomes increasingly severe as the detector spatial resolution is improved. We have previously demonstrated that, to remove these artifacts by dividing out a reference grid image, one must first subtract the residual scatter that penetrates the grid; however, for objects with anatomic structure, scatter varies throughout the FOV and a spatially differing amount of scatter must be subtracted. In this study, a standard stationary Smit-Rontgen X-ray grid (line density - 70 lines/cm, grid ratio - 13:1) was used with a high-resolution CMOS detector, the Dexela 1207 (pixel size - 75 micron) to image anthropomorphic head phantoms. For a 15 x 15cm FOV, scatter profiles of the anthropomorphic head phantoms were estimated then iteratively modified to minimize the structured noise due to the varying grid-line artifacts across the FOV. Images of the anthropomorphic head phantoms taken with the grid, before and after the corrections, were compared demonstrating almost total elimination of the artifact over the full FOV. Hence, with proper computational tools, antiscatter grid artifacts can be corrected, even during dynamic sequences.

  19. An indirect flat-panel detector with avalanche gain for low dose x-ray imaging: SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Li, Dan; Rowlands, J. A.; Egami, N.; Takiguchi, Y.; Nanba, M.; Honda, Y.; Ohkawa, Y.; Kubota, M.; Tanioka, K.; Suzuki, K.; Kawai, T.

    2008-03-01

    An indirect flat-imager with programmable avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated for low-dose x-ray imaging with high resolution. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator CsI (Tl) to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called HARP (high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor). The charge image created by HARP is read out by electron beams generated by the FEA. The proposed detector is called SAPHIRE (Scintillator Avalanche Photoconductor with HIgh Resolution Emitter readout). The avalanche gain of HARP depends on both a-Se thickness and applied electric field E Se. At E Se of > 80 V/μm, the avalanche gain can enhance the signal at low dose (e.g. fluoroscopy) and make the detector x-ray quantum noise limited down to a single x-ray photon. At high exposure (e.g. radiography), the avalanche gain can be turned off by decreasing E Se to < 70 V/μm. In this paper the imaging characteristics of the FEA readout method, including the spatial resolution and noise, were investigated experimentally using a prototype optical HARP-FEA image sensor. The potential x-ray imaging performance of SAPHIRE, especially the aspect of programmable gain to ensure wide dynamic range and x-ray quantum noise limited performance at the lowest exposure in fluoroscopy, was investigated.

  20. A High Resolution Phoswich Detector: LaBr3(Ce) Coupled With LaCl3(Ce)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona-Gallardo, M.; Borge, M. J. G.; Briz, J. A.; Gugliermina, V.; Perea, A.; Tengblad, O.; Turrión, M.

    2010-04-01

    An innovative solution for the forward end-cap CALIFA calorimeter of R3B is under investigation consisting of two scintillation crystals, LaBr3 and LaCl3, stacked together in a phoswich configuration with one readout only. This dispositive should be capable of a good determination of the energy of protons and gamma radiation. This composite detector allows to deduce the initial energy of charged particles by ΔE1+ΔE2 identification. For gammas, the simulations show that there is a high probability that the first interaction occurs inside the scintillator at few centimeters, with a second layer, the rest of the energy is absorbed, or it can be used as veto event in case of no deposition in the first layer. One such a detector has been tested at the Centro de MicroAnálisis de Materiales (CMAM) in Madrid. Good resolution and time signal separation have been achieved.

  1. Development of 36M-pixel x-ray detector for large field of view and high-resolution micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, Keiji; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru

    2016-10-01

    A high-resolution and large field-of-view micro-CT system is indispensable for the visualization of fine threedimensional (3-D) structures of a large specimen. Such a system drastically increases the overall number of effective sensor pixels. At SPring-8 over a decade ago, a micro-CT system based on a 10M-pixel CCD camera was developed for 3-D specimen imaging of centimeter-sized objects with approximately 7 μm spatial resolution. Subsequently, more recent studies have required systems with higher spatial resolution and a wider field-of-view. Detectors with spatial resolution of around 5 μm can visualize capillaries. However, such detectors make it extremely expensive to develop a new x-ray detector with several tens of megapixels in a conventional manner. Fortunately, dizzying advances in image sensor technology for consumer appliances have enabled the development of x-ray detectors with spatial resolution of around 5 μm using a commercial digital single-lens reflex camera fitted with a 36M-pixel CMOS image sensor for the visualization of fine 3-D structures of large human lung specimens. This paper describes a comparison of the performance offered by the new 36M-pixel micro-CT system and the 10M-pixel system.

  2. SAPHIRE: A New Flat-Panel Digital Mammography Detector With Avalanche Photoconductor and High-Resolution Field Emitter Readout

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    array of TFTs, simi- lar to that in existing AMFPI. The proposed detector is named SHARP-AMFPI scintillator-HARP active matrix flat-panel imager...the wavelength of the incident photon. It was found by Pai and Enck that the ESe and dependence of photogeneration in a-Se follow the Onsager ...mechanism.25 Onsager theory states that every absorbed photon creates a pair of thermalized carriers bound by their Coulombic attrac- tion. The initial

  3. Design of a high-resolution small-animal SPECT-CT system sharing a CdTe semiconductor detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Young-Jin; Lee, Seung-Wan; Cho, Hyo-Min; Choi, Yu-Na; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2012-07-01

    A single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system with a co-registered X-y computed tomography (CT) system allows the convergence of functional information and morphologic information. The localization of radiopharmaceuticals on a SPECT can be enhanced by combining the SPECT with an anatomical modality, such as X-ray CT. Gamma-ray imaging for nuclear medicine devices and X-ray imaging systems for diagnostics has recently been developed based on semiconductor detectors, and semiconductor detector materials such as cadmium telluride (CdTe) or cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) are available for both X-ray and gamma-ray systems for small-animal imaging. CdTe or CZT detectors provide strong absorption and high detection efficiency of high energy X-ray and gamma-ray photons because of their large atomic numbers. In this study, a pinhole collimator SPECT system sharing a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with a CT was designed. The GEANT4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) v.6.1 was used for the simulation. The pinhole collimator was designed to obtain a high spatial resolution of the SPECT system. The acquisition time for each projection was 40 seconds, and 60 projections were obtained for tomographic image acquisition. The reconstruction was performed using ordered subset expectation maximization (OS-EM) algorithms. The sensitivity and the spatial resolution were measured on the GATE simulation to evaluate the system characteristics. The spatial resolution of the system calculated from the FWHM of Gaussian fitted PSF curve was 0.69 mm, and the sensitivity of the system was measured to be 0.354 cps/kBq by using a Tc-99m point source of 1 MBq for 800 seconds. A phantom study was performed to verify the design of the dual imaging modality system. The system will be built as designed, and it can be applied as a pre-clinical imaging system.

  4. Detector design for high-resolution MeV photon imaging of cargo containers using spectral information

    SciTech Connect

    Descalle, M A; Vetter, K; Hansen, A; Daniels, J; Prussin, S G

    2010-02-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of a pixelated detector array of inorganic scintillators for high spatial resolution imaging of 1-9 MeV photons are presented. The results suggest that a detector array of 0.5 cm x 0.5 cm x 5 cm pixels of bismuth germanate may provide sufficient efficiency and spatial resolution to permit imaging of an object with uncertainties in dimension of several mm. The cross talk between pixels is found to be in the range of a few percent when pixels are shielded by {approx} 1mm of lead or tungsten. The contrast at the edge of an object is greatly improved by rejection of events depositing less than {approx} 1 MeV. Given the relatively short decay time of BGO, the simulations suggest that such a detector may prove adequate for the purpose of rapid scanning of highly-shielded cargos for possible presence of high atomic number (including clandestine fissionable) materials when used with low current high duty factor x-ray sources.

  5. SU-E-CAMPUS-I-04: Automatic Skin-Dose Mapping for An Angiographic System with a Region-Of-Interest, High-Resolution Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayan, S; Rana, V; Setlur Nagesh, S; Ionita, C; Rudin, S; Bednarek, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Our real-time skin dose tracking system (DTS) has been upgraded to monitor dose for the micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF), a high-resolution, small field-of-view x-ray detector. Methods: The MAF has been mounted on a changer on a clinical C-Arm gantry so it can be used interchangeably with the standard flat-panel detector (FPD) during neuro-interventional procedures when high resolution is needed in a region-of-interest. To monitor patient skin dose when using the MAF, our DTS has been modified to automatically account for the change in scatter for the very small MAF FOV and to provide separated dose distributions for each detector. The DTS is able to provide a color-coded mapping of the cumulative skin dose on a 3D graphic model of the patient. To determine the correct entrance skin exposure to be applied by the DTS, a correction factor was determined by measuring the exposure at the entrance surface of a skull phantom with an ionization chamber as a function of entrance beam size for various beam filters and kVps. Entrance exposure measurements included primary radiation, patient backscatter and table forward scatter. To allow separation of the dose from each detector, a parameter log is kept that allows a replay of the procedure exposure events and recalculation of the dose components.The graphic display can then be constructed showing the dose distribution from the MAF and FPD separately or together. Results: The DTS is able to provide separate displays of dose for the MAF and FPD with field-size specific scatter corrections. These measured corrections change from about 49% down to 10% when changing from the FPD to the MAF. Conclusion: The upgraded DTS allows identification of the patient skin dose delivered when using each detector in order to achieve improved dose management as well as to facilitate peak skin-dose reduction through dose spreading. Research supported in part by Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation and NIH Grants R43FD0158401, R44FD

  6. An X-ray Absorption Edge Detector for High-Resolution Measurement of Undulator Effective K-Parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, B.; Galayda, J.N.; /SLAC

    2007-03-07

    The spectrum of angle-integrated undulator radiation displays a sharp edge at every harmonic photon energy. A technique utilizing this feature to measure minute changes in K-parameters of an undulator in a free-electron laser has been proposed. To date, this technique requires the use of crystal monochromators as bandpass filters whose energy centroid depends on the incident angle of the x-ray beam. In this work we propose to use the absorption edge of an appropriate element as an energy-selective detector whose response is truly independent of the angle of the x-ray beam, and hence independent of electron beam direction and emittance. We will discuss the basic design concept of the detection system and illustrate its projected performance with computer simulations.

  7. [Comparative radiography of the respiratory tract of snakes using conventional high-resolution film-screen-system and a digital detector system].

    PubMed

    Pees, Michael; Bochmann, Monika; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth; Schmidt, Volker; Ludewig, Eberhard

    2010-01-01

    A conventional high-resolution screen-film-system (film Kodak MIN-R S, screen Kodak MIN-R 2000) was compared to a digital detector system (Varian PaxScan 4030E) for the evaluation of the respiratory tract in snakes. Digital radiographs were taken with the same dose as well as with half the dose used for the conventional radiographs. A total of 20 Burmese pythons (Python molurus) were examined in dorsoventral and lateral projection. Four criteria (three features, one overall assessment) were defined for each of the anatomical structures lung, trachea and spinal column and assessed by five veterinarians in a semi-blinded study using a score system. Comparison of the ratings between the techniques used was done using a visual grading analysis. For the lung, two of the three features as well as the overall assessment were rated significantly superior using the digital system. The trachea was rated significantly superior using the conventional system for the overall assessment as well as for one feature. For the spinal column, the overall assessment was significantly superior using the digital system with the full dose. Conventional radiography as well as digital radiography using half the dose was rated significantly inferior for one feature each. The of the relatively low-contrast respiratory tract. A limiting factor is the demonstration of particularly small structures. Generally, a dose reduction (compared to a conventional high-resolution film-screen-system) is possible for the evaluation of the respiratory system.

  8. Comparison of the image quality of a high-resolution screen-film system and a digital flat panel detector system in avian radiography.

    PubMed

    Bochmann, Monika; Ludewig, Eberhard; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth; Pees, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A conventional high-resolution screen-film system was compared with a digital detector system. A total of 20 birds (14 pigeons and six psittacine birds) with an average body mass of 533g were examined in dorsoventral as well as lateral projections. Digital radiographs were acquired with the same mAs as well as half the mAs used for the conventional radiographs. Three criteria and one overall assessment were defined for each of four anatomic regions and assessed by five veterinarians using a score system. Comparison of the ratings was done by visual grading analysis. For the majority of criteria, there was no significant difference regarding image quality between the digital and screen-film projections. However, for certain criteria the quality of the digital images was significantly superior. Using the same mAs as for the conventional radiographs, the humeral joint surfaces and the honeycomb structure of the lung were assessed as superior with the digital imaging system. The tracheal rings and the delineation of the trachea from the surrounding tissue were also superior with the digital system. Assessment of the trabecular structure of the humerus was superior when the full mAs was used compared with the reduced mAs. In conclusion the digital technique is equal or superior to the conventional screen-film high-resolution system for pet birds of a medium size. With some limitations, a dose reduction is possible with the digital system.

  9. Lung Nodule Volume Quantification and Shape Differentiation with an Ultra-High Resolution Technique on a Photon Counting Detector CT System

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, W.; Montoya, J.; Gutjahr, R.; Ferrero, A.; Halaweish, A.; Kappler, S.; McCollough, C.; Leng, S.

    2017-01-01

    A new ultra high-resolution (UHR) mode has been implemented on a whole body photon counting-detector (PCD) CT system. The UHR mode has a pixel size of 0.25 mm by 0.25 mm at the iso-center, while the conventional (macro) mode is limited to 0.5 mm by 0.5 mm. A set of synthetic lung nodules (two shapes, five sizes, and two radio-densities) was scanned using both the UHR and macro modes and reconstructed with 2 reconstruction kernels (4 sets of images in total). Linear regression analysis was performed to compare measured nodule volumes from CT images to reference volumes. Surface curvature was calculated for each nodule and the full width half maximum (FWHM) of the curvature histogram was used as a shape index to differentiate sphere and star shape nodules. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed and area under the ROC curve (AUC) was used as a figure of merit for the differentiation task. Results showed strong linear relationship between measured nodule volume and reference standard for both UHR and macro mode. For all nodules, volume estimation was more accurate using UHR mode with sharp kernel (S80f), with lower mean absolute percent error (MAPE) (6.5%) compared with macro mode (11.1% to 12.9%). The improvement of volume measurement from UHR mode was more evident particularly for small nodule size (3mm, 5mm), or star-shape nodules. Images from UHR mode with sharp kernel (S80f) consistently demonstrated the best performance (AUC = 0.85) when separating star from sphere shape nodules among all acquisition and reconstruction modes. Our results showed the advantages of UHR mode on a PCD CT scanner in lung nodule characterization. Various clinical applications, including quantitative imaging, can benefit substantially from this high resolution mode. PMID:28392613

  10. High resolution 1280×1024, 15 μm pitch compact InSb IR detector with on-chip ADC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesher, O.; Pivnik, I.; Ilan, E.; Calalhorra, Z.; Koifman, A.; Vaserman, I.; Oiknine Schlesinger, J.; Gazit, R.; Hirsh, I.

    2009-05-01

    designed with a stiffened detector support to withstand harsh environmental conditions with a minimal contribution to the heat load of the detector. The combination of the 0.18μm-based low power CMOS technology for the ROIC and the stiffening of the detector support within the Dewar has enabled the use of the Ricor K508 cryo-cooler (0.5 W). This has created a high-resolution detector in a very compact package. In this paper we present the basic concept of the new detector. We will describe its construction and will present electrical and radiometric characterization results.

  11. Development of a high resolution module for PET scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stringhini, G.; Pizzichemi, M.; Ghezzi, A.; Stojkovic, A.; Tavernier, S.; Niknejad, T.; Varela, J.; Paganoni, M.; Auffray, E.

    2017-02-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanners require high performances in term of spatial resolution and sensitivity to allow early detection of cancer masses. In small animal and organ dedicated PET scanners the Depth of Interaction (DOI) information has to be obtained to avoid parallax errors and to reconstruct high resolution images. In the whole body PET, the DOI information can be useful to correct for the time jitter of the optical photons along the main axis of the scintillator, improving the time performances. In this work we present the development of PET module designed to reach high performance as compared to the current scanners while keeping the complexity of the system reasonably low. The module presented is based on a 64 LYSO (Lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate) crystals matrix and on a 4×4 MPPC (Multi Pixels Photon Counter) array as detector in a 4 to 1 coupling between the crystals and the detector and a single side readout. The lateral surfaces of the crystals are optically treated to be unpolished. The DOI and the energy resolution of the PET module are presented and a fast method to obtain the DOI calibration is discussed.

  12. High resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    F. Garibaldi

    2005-02-01

    Hypernuclear spectroscopy provides fundamental information for understanding the effective ?-Nucleon interaction. Jefferson Laboratory experiment E94-107 was designed to perform high resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy by electroproduction of strangeness in four 1p-shell nuclei: 12C, 9Be, 16O, and 7Li. The first part of the experiment on 12C and 9Be has been performed in January and April-May 2004 in Hall A at Jefferson Lab. Significant modifications were made to the standard Hall A apparatus for this challenging experiment: two septum magnets and a RICH detector have been added to get reasonable counting rates and excellent particle identification, as required for the experiment. A description of the apparatus and the preliminary analysis results are presented here.

  13. SU-D-204-05: Quantitative Comparison of a High Resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscopic (MAF) Detector with a Standard Flat Panel Detector (FPD) Using the New Metric of Generalized Measured Relative Object Detectability (GM-ROD)

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, M; Ionita, C; Bednarek, D; Rudin, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In endovascular image-guided neuro-interventions, visualization of fine detail is paramount. For example, the ability of the interventionist to visualize the stent struts depends heavily on the x-ray imaging detector performance. Methods: A study to examine the relative performance of the high resolution MAF-CMOS (pixel size 75µm, Nyquist frequency 6.6 cycles/mm) and a standard Flat Panel Detector (pixel size 194µm, Nyquist frequency 2.5 cycles/mm) detectors in imaging a neuro stent was done using the Generalized Measured Relative Object Detectability (GM-ROD) metric. Low quantum noise images of a deployed stent were obtained by averaging 95 frames obtained by both detectors without changing other exposure or geometric parameters. The square of the Fourier transform of each image is taken and divided by the generalized normalized noise power spectrum to give an effective measured task-specific signal-to-noise ratio. This expression is then integrated from 0 to each of the detector’s Nyquist frequencies, and the GM-ROD value is determined by taking a ratio of the integrals for the MAF-CMOS to that of the FPD. The lower bound of integration can be varied to emphasize high frequencies in the detector comparisons. Results: The MAF-CMOS detector exhibits vastly superior performance over the FPD when integrating over all frequencies, yielding a GM-ROD value of 63.1. The lower bound of integration was stepped up in increments of 0.5 cycles/mm for higher frequency comparisons. As the lower bound increased, the GM-ROD value was augmented, reflecting the superior performance of the MAF-CMOS in the high frequency regime. Conclusion: GM-ROD is a versatile metric that can provide quantitative detector and task dependent comparisons that can be used as a basis for detector selection. Supported by NIH Grant: 2R01EB002873 and an equipment grant from Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation.

  14. Position-sensitive detector system OBI for High Resolution X-Ray Powder Diffraction using on-site readable image plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, M.; Joco, V.; Baehtz, C.; Brecht, H. H.; Berghaeuser, A.; Ehrenberg, H.; von Seggern, H.; Fuess, H.

    2004-04-01

    A one-dimensional detector system has been developed using image plates. The detector is working in transmission mode or Debye-Scherrer geometry and is on-site readable which reduces the effort for calibration. It covers a wide angular range up to 110° and shows narrow reflection half-widths depending on the capillary diameter. The acquisition time is in the range of minutes and the data quality allows for reliable Rietveld refinement of complicated structures, even in multi-phase samples. The detector opens a wide field of new applications in kinetics and temperature resolved measurements.

  15. Enhanced High Resolution RBS System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Thomas J.; Hass, James A.; Klody, George M.

    2011-06-01

    Improvements in full spectrum resolution with the second NEC high resolution RBS system are summarized. Results for 50 Å TiN/HfO films on Si yielding energy resolution on the order of 1 keV are also presented. Detector enhancements include improved pulse processing electronics, upgraded shielding for the MCP/RAE detector, and reduced noise generated from pumping. Energy resolution measurements on spectra front edge coupled with calculations using 0.4mStr solid angle show that beam energy spread at 400 KeV from the Pelletron® accelerator is less than 100 eV. To improve user throughput, magnet control has been added to the automatic data collection. Depth profiles derived from experimental data are discussed. For the thin films profiled, depth resolutions were on the Angstrom level with the non-linear energy/channel conversions ranging from 100 to 200 eV.

  16. Enhanced High Resolution RBS System

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Thomas J.; Hass, James A.; Klody, George M.

    2011-06-01

    Improvements in full spectrum resolution with the second NEC high resolution RBS system are summarized. Results for 50 A ring TiN/HfO films on Si yielding energy resolution on the order of 1 keV are also presented. Detector enhancements include improved pulse processing electronics, upgraded shielding for the MCP/RAE detector, and reduced noise generated from pumping. Energy resolution measurements on spectra front edge coupled with calculations using 0.4mStr solid angle show that beam energy spread at 400 KeV from the Pelletron registered accelerator is less than 100 eV. To improve user throughput, magnet control has been added to the automatic data collection. Depth profiles derived from experimental data are discussed. For the thin films profiled, depth resolutions were on the Angstrom level with the non-linear energy/channel conversions ranging from 100 to 200 eV.

  17. Developing fine-pixel CdTe detectors for the next generation of high-resolution hard x-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, Steven

    Over the past decade, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been improving the angular resolution of hard X-ray (HXR; 20 "70 keV) optics to the point that we now routinely manufacture optics modules with an angular resolution of 20 arcsec Half Power Diameter (HDP), almost three times the performance of NuSTAR optics (Ramsey et al. 2013; Gubarev et al. 2013a; Atkins et al. 2013). New techniques are currently being developed to provide even higher angular resolution. High angular resolution HXR optics require detectors with a large number of fine pixels in order to adequately sample the telescope point spread function (PSF) over the entire field of view. Excessively over-sampling the PSF will increase readout noise and require more processing with no appreciable increase in image quality. An appropriate level of over-sampling is to have 3 pixels within the HPD. For the HERO mirrors, where the HPD is 26 arcsec over a 6-m focal length converts to 750 μm, the optimum pixel size is around 250 μm. At a 10-m focal length these detectors can support a 16 arcsec HPD. Of course, the detectors must also have high efficiency in the HXR region, good energy resolution, low background, low power requirements, and low sensitivity to radiation damage (Ramsey 2001). The ability to handle high counting rates is also desirable for efficient calibration. A collaboration between Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), MSFC, and Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK is developing precisely such detectors under an ongoing, funded APRA program (FY2015 to FY2017). The detectors use the RALdeveloped Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) dubbed HEXITEC, for High Energy X-Ray Imaging Technology. These HEXITEC ASICs can be bonded to 1- or 2- mm-thick Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) or Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) to create a fine (250 μm pitch) HXR detector (Jones et al. 2009; Seller et al. 2011). The objectives of this funded effort are to develop and test a HEXITEC

  18. High-resolution water window X-ray imaging of in vivo cells and their products using LiF crystal detectors.

    PubMed

    Bonfigli, Francesca; Faenov, Anatoly; Flora, Francesco; Francucci, Massimo; Gaudio, Pasqualino; Lai, Antonia; Martellucci, Sergio; Montereali, Rosa Maria; Pikuz, Tania; Reale, Lucia; Richetta, Maria; Vincenti, Maria Aurora; Baldacchini, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    High contrast imaging of in vivo Chlorella sorokiniana cells with submicron spatial resolution was obtained with a contact water window X-ray microscopy technique using a point-like, laser-plasma produced, water-window X-ray radiation source, and LiF crystals as detectors. This novel type of X-ray imaging detectors is based on photoluminescence of stable electronic point defects, characterized by high intrinsic resolution. The fluorescence images obtained on LiF crystals exposed in single-shot experiments demonstrate the high sensitivity and dynamic range of this new detector. The powerful performances of LiF crystals allowed us to detect the exudates of Chlorella cells in their living medium and their spatial distribution in situ, without any special sample preparation.

  19. High-resolution headlamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gut, Carsten; Cristea, Iulia; Neumann, Cornelius

    2016-04-01

    The following article shall describe how human vision by night can be influenced. At first, front lighting systems that are already available on the market will be described, followed by their analysis with respect to the positive effects on traffic safety. Furthermore, how traffic safety by night can be increased since the introduction of high resolution headlamps shall be discussed.

  20. Study the performance of LYSO and CeBr3 crystals using Silicon Photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryemadhi, Abaz

    2016-03-01

    The Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) are novel photon-detectors which have been progressively found their use in particle physics. Their small size, good single photon resolution, simple readout, and immunity to magnetic fields offers advantages compared to traditional photomultipliers. LYSO and CeBr3 crystals are relatively new scintillators with high light yield and fast decay time. The response of these detectors to low energy gamma rays and cosmic ray muons will be presented. Messiah College Workload Reallocation Program.

  1. High resolution data acquisition

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, G.W.; Fuller, K.R.

    1993-04-06

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock, pulse train, and analog circuitry for generating a triangular wave synchronously with the pulse train (as seen in diagram on patent). The triangular wave has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter counts the clock pulse train during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  2. High resolution data acquisition

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, Glenn W.; Fuller, Kenneth R.

    1993-01-01

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock (38) pulse train (37) and analog circuitry (44) for generating a triangular wave (46) synchronously with the pulse train (37). The triangular wave (46) has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter (18, 32) forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter (26) counts the clock pulse train (37) during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer (52) then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  3. High-Resolution Autoradiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towe, George C; Gomberg, Henry J; Freemen, J W

    1955-01-01

    This investigation was made to adapt wet-process autoradiography to metallurgical samples to obtain high resolution of segregated radioactive elements in microstructures. Results are confined to development of the technique, which was perfected to a resolution of less than 10 microns. The radioactive samples included carbon-14 carburized iron and steel, nickel-63 electroplated samples, a powder product containing nickel-63, and tungsten-185 in N-155 alloy.

  4. Ultra high resolution tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, W.S.

    1994-11-15

    Recent work and results on ultra high resolution three dimensional imaging with soft x-rays will be presented. This work is aimed at determining microscopic three dimensional structure of biological and material specimens. Three dimensional reconstructed images of a microscopic test object will be presented; the reconstruction has a resolution on the order of 1000 A in all three dimensions. Preliminary work with biological samples will also be shown, and the experimental and numerical methods used will be discussed.

  5. WE-G-204-05: Relative Object Detectability Evaluation of a New High Resolution A-Se Direct Detection System Compared to Indirect Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscopic (MAF) Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, M; Nagesh, S Setlur; Ionita, C; Bednarek, D; Rudin, S; Scott, C; Karim, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the task specific imaging performance of a new 25µm pixel pitch, 1000µm thick amorphous selenium direct detection system with CMOS readout for typical angiographic exposure parameters using the relative object detectability (ROD) metric. Methods: The ROD metric uses a simulated object function weighted at each spatial frequency by the detectors’ detective quantum efficiency (DQE), which is an intrinsic performance metric. For this study, the simulated objects were aluminum spheres of varying diameter (0.05–0.6mm). The weighted object function is then integrated over the full range of detectable frequencies inherent to each detector, and a ratio is taken of the resulting value for two detectors. The DQE for the 25µm detector was obtained from a simulation of a proposed a-Se detector using an exposure of 200µR for a 50keV x-ray beam. This a-Se detector was compared to two microangiographic fluoroscope (MAF) detectors [the MAF-CCD with pixel size of 35µm and Nyquist frequency of 14.2 cycles/mm and the MAF-CMOS with pixel size of 75µm and Nyquist frequency of 6.6 cycles/mm] and a standard flat-panel detector (FPD with pixel size of 194µm and Nyquist frequency of 2.5cycles/mm). Results: ROD calculations indicated vastly superior performance by the a-Se detector in imaging small aluminum spheres. For the 50µm diameter sphere, the ROD values for the a-Se detector compared to the MAF-CCD, the MAF-CMOS, and the FPD were 7.3, 9.3 and 58, respectively. Detector performance in the low frequency regime was dictated by each detector’s DQE(0) value. Conclusion: The a-Se with CMOS readout is unique and appears to have distinctive advantages of incomparable high resolution, low noise, no readout lag, and expandable design. The a-Se direct detection system will be a powerful imaging tool in angiography, with potential break-through applications in diagnosis and treatment of neuro-vascular disease. Supported by NIH Grant: 2R01EB002873 and an

  6. Achieving high-resolution soft-tissue imaging with cone-beam CT: a two-pronged approach for modulation of x-ray fluence and detector gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, S. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Moseley, D. J.; Keller, H.; Shkumat, N. A.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2005-04-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) presents a highly promising and challenging advanced application of flat-panel detectors (FPDs). The great advantage of this adaptable technology is in the potential for sub-mm 3D spatial resolution in combination with soft-tissue detectability. While the former is achieved naturally by CBCT systems incorporating modern FPD designs (e.g., 200 - 400 um pixel pitch), the latter presents a significant challenge due to limitations in FPD dynamic range, large field of view, and elevated levels of x-ray scatter in typical CBCT configurations. We are investigating a two-pronged strategy to maximizing soft-tissue detectability in CBCT: 1) front-end solutions, including novel beam modulation designs (viz., spatially varying compensators) that alleviate detector dynamic range requirements, reduce x-ray scatter, and better distribute imaging dose in a manner suited to soft-tissue visualization throughout the field of view; and 2) back-end solutions, including implementation of an advanced FPD design (Varian PaxScan 4030CB) that features dual-gain and dynamic gain switching that effectively extends detector dynamic range to 18 bits. These strategies are explored quantitatively on CBCT imaging platforms developed in our laboratory, including a dedicated CBCT bench and a mobile isocentric C-arm (Siemens PowerMobil). Pre-clinical evaluation of improved soft-tissue visibility was carried out in phantom and patient imaging with the C-arm device. Incorporation of these strategies begin to reveal the full potential of CBCT for soft-tissue visualization, an essential step in realizing broad utility of this adaptable technology for diagnostic and image-guided procedures.

  7. State of the art timing in TOF-PET detectors with LuAG, GAGG and L(Y)SO scintillators of various sizes coupled to FBK-SiPMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundacker, S.; Acerbi, F.; Auffray, E.; Ferri, A.; Gola, A.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Paternoster, G.; Piemonte, C.; Lecoq, P.

    2016-08-01

    Time of flight (TOF) in positron emission tomography (PET) has experienced a revival of interest after its first introduction in the eighties. This is due to a significant progress in solid state photodetectors (SiPMs) and newly developed scintillators (LSO and its derivatives). Latest developments at Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK) lead to the NUV-HD SiPM with a very high photon detection efficiency of around 55%. Despite the large area of 4×4 mm2 it achieves a good single photon time resolution (SPTR) of 180±5ps FWHM. Coincidence time resolution (CTR) measurements using LSO:Ce codoped with Ca scintillators yield best values of 73±2ps FWHM for 2×2×3 mm3 and 117±3ps for 2×2×20 mm3 crystal sizes. Increasing the crystal cross-section from 2×2 mm2 to 3×3 mm2 a non negligible CTR deterioration of approximately 7ps FWHM is observed. Measurements with LSO:Ce codoped Ca and LYSO:Ce scintillators with various cross-sections (1×1 mm2 - 4×4 mm2) and lengths (3mm - 30mm) will be a basis for discussing on how the crystal geometry affects timing in TOF-PET. Special attention is given to SiPM parameters, e.g. SPTR and optical crosstalk, and their measured dependency on the crystal cross-section. Additionally, CTR measurements with LuAG:Ce, LuAG:Pr and GGAG:Ce samples are presented and the results are interpreted in terms of their scintillation properties, e.g. rise time, decay time, light yield and emission spectra.

  8. High resolution ultrasonic densitometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dress, W.B.

    1983-01-01

    The velocity of torsional stress pulses in an ultrasonic waveguide of non-circular cross section is affected by the temperature and density of the surrounding medium. Measurement of the transit times of acoustic echoes from the ends of a sensor section are interpreted as level, density, and temperature of the fluid environment surrounding that section. This paper examines methods of making these measurements to obtain high resolution, temperature-corrected absolute and relative density and level determinations of the fluid. Possible applications include on-line process monitoring, a hand-held density probe for battery charge state indication, and precise inventory control for such diverse fluids as uranium salt solutions in accountability storage and gasoline in service station storage tanks.

  9. Characterization of a high resolution and high sensitivity pre-clinical PET scanner with 3D event reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissi, M.; Bolle, E.; Völgyes, D.; Bjaalie, J. G.; Dorholt, O.; Hines, K. E.; Røhne, O.; Skretting, A.; Stapnes, S.

    2012-12-01

    COMPET is a preclinical PET scanner aiming towards a high sensitivity, a high resolution and MRI compatibility by implementing a novel detector geometry. In this approach, long scintillating LYSO crystals are used to absorb the γ-rays. To determine the point of interaction (POI) between γ-ray and crystal, the light exiting the crystals on one of the long sides is collected with wavelength shifters (WLS) perpendicularly arranged to the crystals. This concept has two main advantages: (1) The parallax error is reduced to a minimum and is equal for the whole field of view (FOV). (2) The POI and its energy deposit is known in all three dimension with a high resolution, allowing for the reconstruction of Compton scattered γ-rays. Point (1) leads to a uniform point source resolution (PSR) distribution over the whole FOV, and also allows to place the detector close to the object being imaged. Both points (1) and (2) lead to an increased sensitivity and allow for both high resolution and sensitivity at the same time, while keeping a low number of readout channels. In total, COMPET incorporates 1080 readout channels (600 crystals, 480 WLS). It has an axial FOV of 80 mm and adjustable bore opening between 30 mm and 80 mm. It consists of four modules with five layers each. Simulations show a PSR of below 1 mm in the transaxial plane and a sensitivity of up to 16% in the center of the FOV. The readout is based on time over threshold signals, sampled with an FPGA, which allows for the measurement of high event rates at the order of mega-counts per seconds. Its compact design and compatibility to high magnetic fields will allow to use it as an insert for an already existing MRI scanner. A first semi-layer with 12 WLS and 10 LYSO crystal was built and connected to the COMPET readout system. Coincidence data between this module and a tagger crystal using a small Ge-68 and a 60 MBq F-18 source was taken.

  10. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  11. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  12. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefitted greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  13. Performance characterization of high quantum efficiency metal package photomultiplier tubes for time-of-flight and high-resolution PET applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Guen Bae; Lee, Jae Sung

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Metal package photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) with a metal channel dynode structure have several advanced features for devising such time-of-flight (TOF) and high spatial resolution positron emission tomography (PET) detectors, thanks to their high packing density, large effective area ratio, fast time response, and position encoding capability. Here, we report on an investigation of new metal package PMTs with high quantum efficiency (QE) for high-resolution PET and TOF PET detector modules. Methods: The latest metal package PMT, the Hamamatsu R11265 series, is served with two kinds of photocathodes that have higher quantum efficiency than normal bialkali (typical QE ≈ 25%), super bialkali (SBA; QE ≈ 35%), and ultra bialkali (UBA; QE ≈ 43%). In this study, the authors evaluated the performance of the new PMTs with SBA and UBA photocathodes as a PET detector by coupling various crystal arrays. They also investigated the performance improvements of high QE, focusing in particular on a block detector coupled with a lutetium-based scintillator. A single 4 × 4 × 10 mm{sup 3} LYSO, a 7 × 7 array of 3 × 3 × 20 mm{sup 3} LGSO, a 9 × 9 array of 1.2 × 1.2 × 10 mm{sup 3} LYSO, and a 6 × 6 array of 1.5 × 1.5 × 7 mm{sup 3} LuYAP were used for evaluation. All coincidence data were acquired with a DRS4 based fast digitizer. Results: This new PMT shows promising crystal positioning accuracy, energy and time discrimination performance for TOF, and high-resolution PET applications. The authors also found that a metal channel PMT with SBA was enough for both TOF and high-resolution application, although UBA gave a minor improvement to time resolution. However, significant performance improvement was observed in relative low light output crystals (LuYAP) coupled with UBA. Conclusions: The results of this study will be of value as a useful reference to select PMTs for high-performance PET detectors.

  14. High Resolution Laboratory Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brünken, S.; Schlemmer, S.

    2016-05-01

    In this short review we will highlight some of the recent advancements in the field of high-resolution laboratory spectroscopy that meet the needs dictated by the advent of highly sensitive and broadband telescopes like ALMA and SOFIA. Among these is the development of broadband techniques for the study of complex organic molecules, like fast scanning conventional absorption spectroscopy based on multiplier chains, chirped pulse instrumentation, or the use of synchrotron facilities. Of similar importance is the extension of the accessible frequency range to THz frequencies, where many light hydrides have their ground state rotational transitions. Another key experimental challenge is the production of sufficiently high number densities of refractory and transient species in the laboratory, where discharges have proven to be efficient sources that can also be coupled to molecular jets. For ionic molecular species sensitive action spectroscopic schemes have recently been developed to overcome some of the limitations of conventional absorption spectroscopy. Throughout this review examples demonstrating the strong interplay between laboratory and observational studies will be given.

  15. High Resolution Doppler Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Paul B.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) on UARS spacecraft during the period 4/l/96 - 3/31/99. During this period, HRDI operation, data processing, and data analysis continued, and there was a high level of vitality in the HRDI project. The HRDI has been collecting data from the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere since instrument activation on October 1, 1991. The HRDI team has stressed three areas since operations commenced: 1) operation of the instrument in a manner which maximizes the quality and versatility of the collected data; 2) algorithm development and validation to produce a high-quality data product; and 3) scientific studies, primarily of the dynamics of the middle atmosphere. There has been no significant degradation in the HRDI instrument since operations began nearly 8 years ago. HRDI operations are fairly routine, although we have continued to look for ways to improve the quality of the scientific product, either by improving existing modes, or by designing new ones. The HRDI instrument has been programmed to collect data for new scientific studies, such as measurements of fluorescence from plants, measuring cloud top heights, and lower atmosphere H2O.

  16. Pilot Study on the Detection of Simulated Lesions Using a 2D and 3D Digital Full-Field Mammography System with a Newly Developed High Resolution Detector Based on Two Shifts of a-Se.

    PubMed

    Schulz-Wendtland, R; Bani, M; Lux, M P; Schwab, S; Loehberg, C R; Jud, S M; Rauh, C; Bayer, C M; Beckmann, M W; Uder, M; Fasching, P A; Adamietz, B; Meier-Meitinger, M

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Experimental study of a new system for digital 2D and 3D full-field mammography (FFDM) using a high resolution detector based on two shifts of a-Se. Material and Methods: Images were acquired using the new FFDM system Amulet® (FujiFilm, Tokio, Japan), an a-Se detector (receptor 24 × 30 cm(2), pixel size 50 µm, memory depth 12 bit, spatial resolution 10 lp/mm, DQE > 0.50). Integrated in the detector is a new method for data transfer, based on optical switch technology. The object of investigation was the Wisconsin Mammographic Random Phantom, Model 152A (Radiation Measurement Inc., Middleton, WI, USA) and the same parameters and exposure data (Tungsten, 100 mAs, 30 kV) were consistently used. We acquired 3 different pairs of images in the c-c and ml planes (2D) and in the c-c and c-c planes with an angle of 4 degrees (3D). Five radiologists experienced in mammography (experience ranging from 3 months to more than 5 years) analyzed the images (monitoring) which had been randomly encoded (random generator) with regard to the recognition of details such as specks of aluminum oxide (200-740 µm), nylon fibers (0.4-1.6 mm) and round lesions/masses (diameters 5-14 mm), using special linear glasses for 3D visualization, and compared the results. Results: A total of 225 correct positive decisions could be detected: we found 222 (98.7 %) correct positive results for 2D and 3D visualization in each case. Conclusion: The results of this phantom study showed the same detection rates for both 2D and 3D imaging using full field digital mammography. Our results must be confirmed in further clinical trials.

  17. Detectors for high resolution dynamic pet

    SciTech Connect

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.; Huesman, R.H.

    1983-05-01

    This report reviews the motivation for high spatial resolution in dynamic positron emission tomography of the head and the technical problems in realizing this objective. We present recent progress in using small silicon photodiodes to measure the energy deposited by 511 keV photons in small BGO crystals with an energy resolution of 9.4% full-width at half-maximum. In conjunction with a suitable phototube coupled to a group of crystals, the photodiode signal to noise ratio is sufficient for the identification of individual crystals both for conventional and time-of-flight positron tomography.

  18. High Resolution Formaldehyde Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernest, C. T.; Bauer, D.; Hynes, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is the most abundant and most important organic carbonyl compound in the atmosphere. The sources of formaldehyde are the oxidation of methane, isoprene, acetone, and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); fossil fuel combustion; and biomass burning. The dominant loss mechanism for formaldehyde is photolysis which occurs via two pathways: (R1) HCHO + hv → HCO + H (R2) HCHO + hv → H2 + CO The first pathway (R1) is referred to as the radical channel, while the second pathway (R2) is referred to as the molecular channel. The products of both pathways play a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. The CO that is produced in the molecular channel undergoes further oxidation to produce CO2. Under atmospheric conditions, the H atom and formyl radical that are produced in the radical channel undergo rapid reactions with O2 to produce the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) via (R3) and (R4). (R3) HCO + O2 → HO2 + CO (R4) H + O2 → HO2 Thus, for every photon absorbed, the photolysis of formaldehyde can contribute one CO2 molecule to the global greenhouse budget or two HO2 radicals to the tropospheric HOx (OH + HO2) cycle. The HO2 radicals produced during formaldehyde photolysis have also been implicated in the formation of photochemical smog. The HO2 radicals act as radical chain carriers and convert NO to NO2, which ultimately results in the catalytic production of O3. Constraining the yield of HO2 produced via HCHO photolysis is essential for improving tropospheric chemistry models. In this study, both the absorption cross section and the quantum yield of the radical channel (R1) were measured at high resolution over the tropospherically relevant wavelength range 304-330 nm. For the cross section measurements a narrow linewidth Nd:YAG pumped dye laser was used with a multi-pass cell. Partial pressures of HCHO were kept below 0.3 torr. Simultaneous measurement of OH LIF in a flame allowed absolute calibration of the wavelength scale. Pressure

  19. High resolution time interval meter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

  20. A 32 mm  ×  32 mm  ×  22 mm monolithic LYSO:Ce detector with dual-sided digital photon counter readout for ultrahigh-performance TOF-PET and TOF-PET/MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, Giacomo; Peet, Bart Jan; Tabacchini, Valerio; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2016-07-01

    New applications for positron emission tomography (PET) and combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are currently emerging, for example in the fields of neurological, breast, and pediatric imaging. Such applications require improved image quality, reduced dose, shorter scanning times, and more precise quantification. This can be achieved by means of dedicated scanners based on ultrahigh-performance detectors, which should provide excellent spatial resolution, precise depth-of-interaction (DOI) estimation, outstanding time-of-flight (TOF) capability, and high detection efficiency. Here, we introduce such an ultrahigh-performance TOF/DOI PET detector, based on a 32 mm  ×  32 mm  ×  22 mm monolithic LYSO:Ce crystal. The 32 mm  ×  32 mm front and back faces of the crystal are coupled to a digital photon counter (DPC) array, in so-called dual-sided readout (DSR) configuration. The fully digital detector offers a spatial resolution of ~1.1 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM)/~1.2 mm mean absolute error, together with a DOI resolution of ~2.4 mm FWHM, an energy resolution of 10.2% FWHM, and a coincidence resolving time of 147 ps FWHM. The time resolution closely approaches the best results (135 ps FWHM) obtained to date with small crystals made from the same material coupled to the same DPC arrays, illustrating the excellent correction for optical and electronic transit time spreads that can be achieved in monolithic scintillators using maximum-likelihood techniques for estimating the time of interaction. The performance barely degrades for events with missing data (up to 6 out of 32 DPC dies missing), permitting the use of almost all events registered under realistic acquisition conditions. Moreover, the calibration procedures and computational methods used for position and time estimation follow recently made improvements that make them fast and practical, opening up realistic perspectives for using DSR monolithic

  1. High-Resolution Anamorphic SPECT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Durko, Heather L.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a gamma-ray imaging system that combines a high-resolution silicon detector with two sets of movable, half-keel-edged copper-tungsten blades configured as crossed slits. These apertures can be positioned independently between the object and detector, producing an anamorphic image in which the axial and transaxial magnifications are not constrained to be equal. The detector is a 60 mm × 60 mm, one-millimeter-thick, one-megapixel silicon double-sided strip detector with a strip pitch of 59 μm. The flexible nature of this system allows the application of adaptive imaging techniques. We present system details; calibration, acquisition, and reconstruction methods; and imaging results. PMID:26160983

  2. High Resolution Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This Grant supported the development of an incoherent lidar system to measure winds and aerosols in the lower atmosphere. During this period the following activities occurred: (1) an active feedback system was developed to improve the laser frequency stability; (2) a detailed forward model of the instrument was developed to take into account many subtle effects, such as detector non-linearity; (3) a non-linear least squares inversion method was developed to recover the Doppler shift and aerosol backscatter without requiring assumptions about the molecular component of the signal; (4) a study was done of the effects of systematic errors due to multiple etalon misalignment. It was discovered that even for small offsets and high aerosol loadings, the wind determination can be biased by as much as 1 m/s. The forward model and inversion process were modified to account for this effect; and (5) the lidar measurements were validated using rawinsonde balloon measurements. The measurements were found to be in agreement within 1-2 m/s.

  3. Simulation and evaluation of a high resolution VIP PEM system with a dedicated LM-OSEM algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzun, D.; De Lorenzo, G.; Kolstein, M.; Chmeissani, M.

    2014-05-01

    Over the last two decades there have been a growing number of designs for positron emission tomography (PET) cameras optimized to image the breast. These devices, commonly known as positron emission mammography (PEM) cameras allow much more spatial resolution by putting the photon detectors directly on the breast. PEM cameras have a compact geometry with a restricted field of view (FOV) thus exhibiting higher performance and lower cost than large whole body PET scanners. Typical PEM designs are based on scintillators such as bismuth germanate (BGO), lutetium oxorthosilicate (LSO) or lutetium yttrium orthosicilate (LYSO), and characterized by large parallax error due to deficiency of the depth of interaction (DOI) information from crystals. In the case of parallel geometry PEM, large parallax error results in poor image resolution along the vertical axis. In the framework of the Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) pathfinder project, we propose a high resolution PEM scanner based on pixelated solid-state CdTe detectors. The pixel PEM device with a millimeter-size pixel pitch provides an excellent spatial resolution in all directions 8 times better than standard commercial devices with a point spread function (PSF) of 1 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) and excellent energy resolution of down to 1.6% FWHM at 511 keV photons at room temperature. The system is capable to detect down to 1 mm diameter hot spheres in warm background.

  4. Simulation and evaluation of a high resolution VIP PEM system with a dedicated LM-OSEM algorithm.

    PubMed

    Uzun, D; De Lorenzo, G; Kolstein, M; Chmeissani, M

    2014-05-12

    Over the last two decades there have been a growing number of designs for positron emission tomography (PET) cameras optimized to image the breast. These devices, commonly known as positron emission mammography (PEM) cameras allow much more spatial resolution by putting the photon detectors directly on the breast. PEM cameras have a compact geometry with a restricted field of view (FOV) thus exhibiting higher performance and lower cost than large whole body PET scanners. Typical PEM designs are based on scintillators such as bismuth germanate (BGO), lutetium oxorthosilicate (LSO) or lutetium yttrium orthosicilate (LYSO), and characterized by large parallax error due to deficiency of the depth of interaction (DOI) information from crystals. In the case of parallel geometry PEM, large parallax error results in poor image resolution along the vertical axis. In the framework of the Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) pathfinder project, we propose a high resolution PEM scanner based on pixelated solid-state CdTe detectors. The pixel PEM device with a millimeter-size pixel pitch provides an excellent spatial resolution in all directions 8 times better than standard commercial devices with a point spread function (PSF) of 1 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) and excellent energy resolution of down to 1.6% FWHM at 511 keV photons at room temperature. The system is capable to detect down to 1 mm diameter hot spheres in warm background.

  5. Simulation and evaluation of a high resolution VIP PEM system with a dedicated LM-OSEM algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Uzun, D.; De Lorenzo, G.; Kolstein, M.; Chmeissani, M.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades there have been a growing number of designs for positron emission tomography (PET) cameras optimized to image the breast. These devices, commonly known as positron emission mammography (PEM) cameras allow much more spatial resolution by putting the photon detectors directly on the breast. PEM cameras have a compact geometry with a restricted field of view (FOV) thus exhibiting higher performance and lower cost than large whole body PET scanners. Typical PEM designs are based on scintillators such as bismuth germanate (BGO), lutetium oxorthosilicate (LSO) or lutetium yttrium orthosicilate (LYSO), and characterized by large parallax error due to deficiency of the depth of interaction (DOI) information from crystals. In the case of parallel geometry PEM, large parallax error results in poor image resolution along the vertical axis. In the framework of the Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) pathfinder project, we propose a high resolution PEM scanner based on pixelated solid-state CdTe detectors. The pixel PEM device with a millimeter-size pixel pitch provides an excellent spatial resolution in all directions 8 times better than standard commercial devices with a point spread function (PSF) of 1 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) and excellent energy resolution of down to 1.6% FWHM at 511 keV photons at room temperature. The system is capable to detect down to 1 mm diameter hot spheres in warm background. PMID:24883078

  6. Investigation of an alternating current plasma as an element selective atomic emission detector for high-resolution capillary gas chromatography and as a source for atomic absorption and atomic emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ombaba, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis deals with the construction and evaluation of an alternating current plasma (ACP) as an element-selective detector for high resolution capillary gas chromatography (GC) and as an excitation source for atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic emission spectrometry (AES). The plasma, constrained in a quartz discharge tube at atmospheric pressure, is generated between two copper electrodes and utilizes helium as the plasma supporting gas. The alternating current plasma power source consists of a step-up transformer with a secondary output voltage of 14,000 V at a current of 23 mA. The chromatographic applications studied included the following: (1) the separation and selective detection of the organotin species, tributyltin chloride (TBT) and tetrabutyltin (TEBT), in environmental matrices including mussels (mytilus edullus) and sediment from Boston Harbor, industrial waste water and industrial sludge, and (2) the detection of methylcyclopentadienylmanganesetricarbonyl (MMT) and similar compounds used as gasoline additives. An ultrasonic nebulizer was utilized as a sample introduction device for aqueous solutions when the ACP was employed as an atomization source for atomic absorption spectrometry and as an excitation source for atomic emission spectrometry. Plasma diagnostic parameters studied include spatial electron number density across the discharge tube, electronic, excitation and ionization temperatures. Interference studies both in absorption and emission modes were considered. The evaluation of a computer-aided optimization program, Drylab GC, using spearmint oil and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard mixture as probes is discussed. The program is used for separation optimization and prediction of gas chromatographic parameters. The program produces a relative resolution map (RRM) which guides the analyst in selecting the most favorable temperature programming rate for the separation.

  7. Investigation of an alternating current plasma as an element selective atomic emission detector for high-resolution capillary gas chromatography and as a source for atomic absorption and atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ombaba, Jackson M.

    This thesis deals with the construction and evaluation of an alternating current plasma (ACP) as an element-selective detector for high resolution capillary gas chromatography (GC) and as an excitation source for atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic emission spectrometry (AES). The plasma, constrained in a quartz discharge tube at atmospheric pressure, is generated between two copper electrodes and utilizes helium as the plasma supporting gas. The alternating current plasma power source consists of a step-up transformer with a secondary output voltage of 14,000 V at a current of 23 mA. The device exhibits a stable signal because the plasma is self-seeding and reignites itself every half cycle. A tesla coil is not required to commence generation of the plasma if the ac voltage applied is greater than the breakdown voltage of the plasma-supporting gas. The chromatographic applications studied included the following: (1) the separation and selective detection of the organotin species, tributyltin chloride (TBT) and tetrabutyltin (TEBT), in environmental matrices including mussels (Mvutilus edullus) and sediment from Boston Harbor, industrial waste water and industrial sludge, and (2) the detection of methylcyclopentadienyl manganesetricarbonyl (MMT) and similar compounds used as gasoline additives. An ultrasonic nebulizer (common room humidifier) was utilized as a sample introduction device for aqueous solutions when the ACP was employed as an atomization source for atomic absorption spectrometry and as an excitation source for atomic emission spectrometry. Plasma diagnostic parameters studied include spatial electron number density across the discharge tube, electronic, excitation and ionization temperatures. Interference studies both in absorption and emission modes were also considered. Figures of merits of selected elements both in absorption and emission modes are reported. The evaluation of a computer-aided optimization program, Drylab GC, using

  8. High resolution track etch autoradiography

    DOEpatents

    Solares, G.; Zamenhof, R.G.

    1994-12-27

    A detector assembly is disclosed for use in obtaining alpha-track autoradiographs, the detector assembly including a substantially boron-free substrate; a detector layer deposited on the substantially boron-free substrate, the detector layer being capable of recording alpha particle tracks and exhibiting evidence of the alpha tracks in response to being exposed to an etchant, the detector layer being less than about 2 microns thick; and a protective layer deposited on the detector layer, the protective layer being resistant to the etchant and having a thickness of about 0.5 to 1 microns. 13 figures.

  9. High resolution track etch autoradiography

    DOEpatents

    Solares, Guido; Zamenhof, Robert G.

    1994-01-01

    A detector assembly for use in obtaining alpha-track autoradiographs, the detector assembly including a substantially boron-free substrate; a detector layer deposited on the substantially boron-free substrate, the detector layer being capable of recording alpha particle tracks and exhibiting evidence of the alpha tracks in response to being exposed to an etchant, the detector layer being less than about 2 microns thick; and a protective layer deposited on the detector layer, the protective layer being resistant to the etchant and having a thickness of about 0.5 to 1 microns.

  10. High resolution digital delay timer

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Albert D.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay (20) provides a first output signal (24) at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits (26, 28) latch the high resolution data (24) to form a first synchronizing data set (60). A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters (142, 146, 154) and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses (32, 34) count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an interval which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD (184) corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD (74) to generate a second set of synchronizing data (76) which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data (60) for presentation to logic circuits (64). The logic circuits (64) further delay the internal output signal (72) to obtain a proper phase relationship of an output signal (80) with the internal pulses (32, 34). The final delayed output signal (80) thereafter enables the output pulse generator (82) to produce the desired output pulse (84) at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse (10, 12).

  11. Advanced very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The advanced very high resolution radiometer development program is considered. The program covered the design, construction, and test of a breadboard model, engineering model, protoflight model, mechanical structural model, and a life test model. Special bench test and calibration equipment was also developed for use on the program.

  12. High Resolution Orientation Imaging Microscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-02

    Functions, ICCES 2010, Las Vegas. 17. David Fullwood, Brent Adams, Mike Miles, Stuart Rogers, Ali Khosravani, Raj Mishra, Design for Ductility : Defect... Pseudo -Symmetries by High Resolution EBSD Methods, MS&T. 2009: Pittsburgh. 27. Oliver Johnson, Calvin Gardner, David Fullwood, Brent Adams, George...applied to strain measurements ................................... 6 2.3 Recovery of Lattice Tetragonality and Pseudo -Symmetry Resolution

  13. Electrical delay line multiplexing for pulsed mode radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinke, Ruud; Yeom, Jung Yeol; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-04-01

    Medical imaging systems are composed of a large number of position sensitive radiation detectors to provide high resolution imaging. For example, whole-body Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems are typically composed of thousands of scintillation crystal elements, which are coupled to photosensors. Thus, PET systems greatly benefit from methods to reduce the number of data acquisition channels, in order to reduce the system development cost and complexity. In this paper we present an electrical delay line multiplexing scheme that can significantly reduce the number of readout channels, while preserving the signal integrity required for good time resolution performance. We experimented with two 4 × 4 LYSO crystal arrays, with crystal elements having 3 mm × 3 mm × 5 mm and 3 mm × 3 mm × 20 mm dimensions, coupled to 16 Hamamatsu MPPC S10931-050P SiPM elements. Results show that each crystal could be accurately identified, even in the presence of scintillation light sharing and inter-crystal Compton scatter among neighboring crystal elements. The multiplexing configuration degraded the coincidence timing resolution from ∼243 ps FWHM to ∼272 ps FWHM when 16 SiPM signals were combined into a single channel for the 4 × 4 LYSO crystal array with 3 mm × 3 mm × 20 mm crystal element dimensions, in coincidence with a 3 mm × 3 mm × 5 mm LYSO crystal pixel. The method is flexible to allow multiplexing configurations across different block detectors, and is scalable to an entire ring of detectors.

  14. Electrical delay line multiplexing for pulsed mode radiation detectors.

    PubMed

    Vinke, Ruud; Yeom, Jung Yeol; Levin, Craig S

    2015-04-07

    Medical imaging systems are composed of a large number of position sensitive radiation detectors to provide high resolution imaging. For example, whole-body Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems are typically composed of thousands of scintillation crystal elements, which are coupled to photosensors. Thus, PET systems greatly benefit from methods to reduce the number of data acquisition channels, in order to reduce the system development cost and complexity. In this paper we present an electrical delay line multiplexing scheme that can significantly reduce the number of readout channels, while preserving the signal integrity required for good time resolution performance. We experimented with two 4 × 4 LYSO crystal arrays, with crystal elements having 3 mm × 3 mm × 5 mm and 3 mm × 3 mm × 20 mm dimensions, coupled to 16 Hamamatsu MPPC S10931-050P SiPM elements. Results show that each crystal could be accurately identified, even in the presence of scintillation light sharing and inter-crystal Compton scatter among neighboring crystal elements. The multiplexing configuration degraded the coincidence timing resolution from ∼243 ps FWHM to ∼272 ps FWHM when 16 SiPM signals were combined into a single channel for the 4 × 4 LYSO crystal array with 3 mm × 3 mm × 20 mm crystal element dimensions, in coincidence with a 3 mm × 3 mm × 5 mm LYSO crystal pixel. The method is flexible to allow multiplexing configurations across different block detectors, and is scalable to an entire ring of detectors.

  15. Electrical delay line multiplexing for pulsed mode radiation detectors

    PubMed Central

    Vinke, Ruud; Yeom, Jung Yeol; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    Medical imaging systems are composed of a large number of position sensitive radiation detectors to provide high resolution imaging. For example, whole-body Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems are typically composed of thousands of scintillation crystal elements, which are coupled to photosensors. Thus, PET systems greatly benefit from methods to reduce the number of data acquisition channels, in order to reduce the system development cost and complexity. In this paper we present an electrical delay line multiplexing scheme that can significantly reduce the number of readout channels, while preserving the signal integrity required for good time resolution performance. We experimented with two 4 × 4 LYSO crystal arrays, with crystal elements having 3 mm × 3 mm × 5 mm and 3 mm × 3 mm × 20 mm dimensions, coupled to 16 Hamamatsu MPPC S10931-050P SiPM elements. Results show that each crystal could be accurately identified, even in the presence of scintillation light sharing and inter-crystal Compton scatter among neighboring crystal elements. The multiplexing configuration degraded the coincidence timing resolution from ~ 243 ps FWHM to ~272 ps FWHM when 16 SiPM signals were combined into a single channel for the 4 × 4 LYSO crystal array with 3 mm × 3 mm × 20 mm crystal element dimensions, in coincidence with a 3 mm × 3 mm × 5 mm LYSO crystal pixel. The method is exible to allow multiplexing configurations across different block detectors, and is scalable to an entire ring of detectors. PMID:25768002

  16. High Resolution CryoFESEM of Microbial Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlandsen, Stanley; Lei, Ming; Martin-Lacave, Ines; Dunny, Gary; Wells, Carol

    2003-08-01

    The outer surfaces of three microorganisms, Giardia lamblia, Enterococcus faecalis, and Proteus mirabilis, were investigated by cryo-immobilization followed by sublimation of extracellular ice and cryocoating with either Pt alone or Pt plus carbon. Cryocoated samples were examined at [minus sign]125°C in either an in-lens field emission SEM or a below-the-lens field emission SEM. Cryocoating with Pt alone was sufficient for low magnification observation, but attempts to do high-resolution imaging resulted in radiolysis and cracking of the specimen surface. Double coating with Pt and carbon, in combination with high resolution backscatter electron detectors, enabled high-resolution imaging of the glycocalyx of bacteria, revealing a sponge-like network over the surface. High resolution examination of bacterial flagella also revealed a periodic substructure. Common artifacts included radiolysis leading to “cracking” of the surface, and insufficient deposition of Pt resulting in the absence of detectable surface topography.

  17. A depth-of-interaction PET detector using mutual gain-equalized silicon photomultiplier

    SciTech Connect

    W. Xi, A.G, Weisenberger, H. Dong, Brian Kross, S. Lee, J. McKisson, Carl Zorn

    2012-02-01

    We developed a prototype high resolution, high efficiency depth-encoding detector for PET applications based on dual-ended readout of LYSO array with two silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). Flood images, energy resolution, and depth-of-interaction (DOI) resolution were measured for a LYSO array - 0.7 mm in crystal pitch and 10 mm in thickness - with four unpolished parallel sides. Flood images were obtained such that individual crystal element in the array is resolved. The energy resolution of the entire array was measured to be 33%, while individual crystal pixel elements utilizing the signal from both sides ranged from 23.3% to 27%. By applying a mutual-gain equalization method, a DOI resolution of 2 mm for the crystal array was obtained in the experiments while simulations indicate {approx}1 mm DOI resolution could possibly be achieved. The experimental DOI resolution can be further improved by obtaining revised detector supporting electronics with better energy resolutions. This study provides a detailed detector calibration and DOI response characterization of the dual-ended readout SiPM-based PET detectors, which will be important in the design and calibration of a PET scanner in the future.

  18. High Resolution Camera for Mapping Titan Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, Bianca

    2011-01-01

    Titan, Saturn's largest moon, has a dense atmosphere and is the only object besides Earth to have stable liquids at its surface. The Cassini/Huygens mission has revealed the extraordinary breadth of geological processes shaping its surface. Further study requires high resolution imaging of the surface, which is restrained by light absorption by methane and scattering from aerosols. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft has demonstrated that Titan's surface can be observed within several windows in the near infrared, allowing us to process several regions in order to create a geological map and to determine the morphology. Specular reflections monitored on the lakes of the North Pole show little scattering at 5 microns, which, combined with the present study of Titan's northern pole area, refutes the paradigm that only radar can achieve high resolution mapping of the surface. The present data allowed us to monitor the evolution of lakes, to identify additional lakes at the Northern Pole, to examine Titan's hypothesis of non-synchronous rotation and to analyze the albedo of the North Pole surface. Future missions to Titan could carry a camera with 5 micron detectors and a carbon fiber radiator for weight reduction.

  19. Ultrastable reference pulser for high-resolution spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, R.; Lenkszus, F. R.; Sifter, L. L.; Strauss, M. G.

    1970-01-01

    Solid-state double-pulse generator for a high resolution semiconductor detector meets specific requirements for resolution /0.05 percent/, amplitude range /0.1-13 MeV/, and repetition rate /0.1-1000 pulses per second/. A tag pulse is generated in coincidence with each reference pulse.

  20. High Resolution Scanning Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R. (Inventor); Miranda, Felix A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a High Resolution Scanning Reflectarray Antenna (HRSRA) for the purpose of tracking ground terminals and space craft communication applications. The present invention provides an alternative to using gimbaled parabolic dish antennas and direct radiating phased arrays. When compared to a gimbaled parabolic dish, the HRSRA offers the advantages of vibration free steering without incurring appreciable cost or prime power penalties. In addition, it offers full beam steering at a fraction of the cost of direct radiating arrays and is more efficient.

  1. High-resolution multiphoton cryomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    König, Karsten; Uchugonova, Aisada; Breunig, Hans Georg

    2014-03-15

    An ultracompact high-resolution multiphoton cryomicroscope with a femtosecond near infrared fiber laser has been utilized to study the cellular autofluorescence during freezing and thawing of cells. Cooling resulted in an increase of the intracellular fluorescence intensity followed by morphological modifications at temperatures below -10 °C, depending on the application of the cryoprotectant DMSO and the cooling rate. Furthermore, fluorescence lifetime imaging revealed an increase of the mean lifetime with a decrease in temperature. Non-destructive, label-free optical biopsies of biomaterial in ice can be obtained with sub-20 mW mean powers.

  2. Semiconductor crystal high resolution imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Craig S. (Inventor); Matteson, James (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A radiation imaging device (10). The radiation image device (10) comprises a subject radiation station (12) producing photon emissions (14), and at least one semiconductor crystal detector (16) arranged in an edge-on orientation with respect to the emitted photons (14) to directly receive the emitted photons (14) and produce a signal. The semiconductor crystal detector (16) comprises at least one anode and at least one cathode that produces the signal in response to the emitted photons (14).

  3. Potential High Resolution Dosimeters For MRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bräuer-Krisch, E.; Rosenfeld, A.; Lerch, M.; Petasecca, M.; Akselrod, M.; Sykora, J.; Bartz, J.; Ptaszkiewicz, M.; Olko, P.; Berg, A.; Wieland, M.; Doran, S.; Brochard, T.; Kamlowski, A.; Cellere, G.; Paccagnella, A.; Siegbahn, E. A.; Prezado, Y.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Bravin, A.; Dusseau, L.; Berkvens, P.

    2010-07-01

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) uses highly collimated, quasi-parallel arrays of X-ray microbeams of 50-600 keV, produced by 2nd and 3rd generation synchrotron sources, such as the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in the U.S., and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in France, respectively. High dose rates are necessary to deliver therapeutic doses in microscopic volumes, to avoid spreading of the microbeams by cardiosynchronous movement of the tissues. A small beam divergence and a filtered white beam spectrum in the energy range between 30 and 250 keV results in the advantage of steep dose gradients with a sharper penumbra than that produced in conventional radiotherapy. MRT research over the past 20 years has allowed a vast number of results from preclinical trials on different animal models, including mice, rats, piglets and rabbits. Microbeams in the range between 10 and 100 micron width show an unprecedented sparing of normal radiosensitive tissues as well as preferential damage to malignant tumor tissues. Typically, MRT uses arrays of narrow (˜25-100 micron-wide) microplanar beams separated by wider (100-400 microns centre-to-centre, c-t-c) microplanar spaces. We note that thicker microbeams of 0.1-0.68 mm used by investigators at the NSLS are still called microbeams, although some invesigators in the community prefer to call them minibeams. This report, however, limits it discussion to 25-100 μm microbeams. Peak entrance doses of several hundreds of Gy are surprisingly well tolerated by normal tissues. High resolution dosimetry has been developed over the last two decades, but typical dose ranges are adapted to dose delivery in conventional Radiation Therapy (RT). Spatial resolution in the sub-millimetric range has been achieved, which is currently required for quality assurance measurements in Gamma-knife RT. Most typical commercially available detectors are not suitable for MRT applications at a dose rate of 16000 Gy/s, micron

  4. Potential High Resolution Dosimeters For MRT

    SciTech Connect

    Braeuer-Krisch, E.; Brochard, T.; Prezado, Y.; Bravin, A.; Berkvens, P.; Rosenfeld, A.; Lerch, M.; Petasecca, M.; Akselrod, M.; Sykora, J.; Bartz, J.; Ptaszkiewicz, M.; Olko, P.; Berg, A.; Wieland, M.; Doran, S.; Kamlowski, A.; Cellere, G.

    2010-07-23

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) uses highly collimated, quasi-parallel arrays of X-ray microbeams of 50-600 keV, produced by 2nd and 3rd generation synchrotron sources, such as the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in the U.S., and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in France, respectively. High dose rates are necessary to deliver therapeutic doses in microscopic volumes, to avoid spreading of the microbeams by cardiosynchronous movement of the tissues. A small beam divergence and a filtered white beam spectrum in the energy range between 30 and 250 keV results in the advantage of steep dose gradients with a sharper penumbra than that produced in conventional radiotherapy. MRT research over the past 20 years has allowed a vast number of results from preclinical trials on different animal models, including mice, rats, piglets and rabbits. Microbeams in the range between 10 and 100 micron width show an unprecedented sparing of normal radiosensitive tissues as well as preferential damage to malignant tumor tissues. Typically, MRT uses arrays of narrow ({approx}25-100 micron-wide) microplanar beams separated by wider (100-400 microns centre-to-centre, c-t-c) microplanar spaces. We note that thicker microbeams of 0.1-0.68 mm used by investigators at the NSLS are still called microbeams, although some invesigators in the community prefer to call them minibeams. This report, however, limits it discussion to 25-100 {mu}m microbeams. Peak entrance doses of several hundreds of Gy are surprisingly well tolerated by normal tissues. High resolution dosimetry has been developed over the last two decades, but typical dose ranges are adapted to dose delivery in conventional Radiation Therapy (RT). Spatial resolution in the sub-millimetric range has been achieved, which is currently required for quality assurance measurements in Gamma-knife RT. Most typical commercially available detectors are not suitable for MRT applications at a dose rate of 16000 Gy

  5. High-resolution interferometric spectrophotopolarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L.

    1981-01-01

    Spectrophotopolarimetric capability can be added to a laboratory interferometer-spectrometer by use of a specially designed module described herein. With the instrument so augmented, high-resolution spectra can be obtained of the Stokes parameters of the reference beam and the beams diffusely reflected or transmitted by a sample medium of interest. For any such beam, the exponential Fourier transforms of the two interferograms obtained with a polarizer-analyzer oriented along the 0 deg and the 90 deg directions provide the spectra of I and Q, separately. Within experimental (and numerical) noise, this I spectrum should be the same as the one obtained with the polarizer removed. The remaining Stokes parameters U and V are obtained with a third interferogram recorded with the polarizer along the 45 deg direction. The complete theory of this instrument is described including the detailed analysis of the polarization-interferograms it provides.

  6. High-resolution land topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massonnet, Didier; Elachi, Charles

    2006-11-01

    After a description of the background, methods of production and some scientific uses of high-resolution land topography, we present the current status and the prospect of radar interferometry, regarded as one of the best techniques for obtaining the most global and the most accurate topographic maps. After introducing briefly the theoretical aspects of radar interferometry - principles, limits of operation and various capabilities -, we will focus on the topographic applications that resulted in an almost global topographic map of the earth: the SRTM map. After introducing the Interferometric Cartwheel system, we will build on its expected performances to discuss the scientific prospects of refining a global topographic map to sub-metric accuracy. We also show how other fields of sciences such as hydrology may benefit from the products generated by interferometric radar systems. To cite this article: D. Massonnet, C. Elachi, C. R. Geoscience 338 (2006).

  7. High Resolution Thermometry for EXACT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, J. S.; Nash, A. E.; Larson, M.; Mulders, N.

    2000-01-01

    High Resolution Thermometers (HRTs) based on SQUID detection of the magnetization of a paramagnetic salt or a metal alloy has been commonly used for sub-nano Kelvin temperature resolution in low temperature physics experiments. The main applications to date have been for temperature ranges near the lambda point of He-4 (2.177 K). These thermometers made use of materials such as Cu(NH4)2Br4 *2H2O, GdCl3, or PdFe. None of these materials are suitable for EXACT, which will explore the region of the He-3/He-4 tricritical point at 0.87 K. The experiment requirements and properties of several candidate paramagnetic materials will be presented, as well as preliminary test results.

  8. HRSC: High resolution stereo camera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neukum, G.; Jaumann, R.; Basilevsky, A.T.; Dumke, A.; Van Gasselt, S.; Giese, B.; Hauber, E.; Head, J. W.; Heipke, C.; Hoekzema, N.; Hoffmann, H.; Greeley, R.; Gwinner, K.; Kirk, R.; Markiewicz, W.; McCord, T.B.; Michael, G.; Muller, Jan-Peter; Murray, J.B.; Oberst, J.; Pinet, P.; Pischel, R.; Roatsch, T.; Scholten, F.; Willner, K.

    2009-01-01

    The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on Mars Express has delivered a wealth of image data, amounting to over 2.5 TB from the start of the mapping phase in January 2004 to September 2008. In that time, more than a third of Mars was covered at a resolution of 10-20 m/pixel in stereo and colour. After five years in orbit, HRSC is still in excellent shape, and it could continue to operate for many more years. HRSC has proven its ability to close the gap between the low-resolution Viking image data and the high-resolution Mars Orbiter Camera images, leading to a global picture of the geological evolution of Mars that is now much clearer than ever before. Derived highest-resolution terrain model data have closed major gaps and provided an unprecedented insight into the shape of the surface, which is paramount not only for surface analysis and geological interpretation, but also for combination with and analysis of data from other instruments, as well as in planning for future missions. This chapter presents the scientific output from data analysis and highlevel data processing, complemented by a summary of how the experiment is conducted by the HRSC team members working in geoscience, atmospheric science, photogrammetry and spectrophotometry. Many of these contributions have been or will be published in peer-reviewed journals and special issues. They form a cross-section of the scientific output, either by summarising the new geoscientific picture of Mars provided by HRSC or by detailing some of the topics of data analysis concerning photogrammetry, cartography and spectral data analysis.

  9. High resolution time interval counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Victor S.; Davis, Dick D.; Lombardi, Michael A.

    1995-01-01

    In recent years, we have developed two types of high resolution, multi-channel time interval counters. In the NIST two-way time transfer MODEM application, the counter is designed for operating primarily in the interrupt-driven mode, with 3 start channels and 3 stop channels. The intended start and stop signals are 1 PPS, although other frequencies can also be applied to start and stop the count. The time interval counters used in the NIST Frequency Measurement and Analysis System are implemented with 7 start channels and 7 stop channels. Four of the 7 start channels are devoted to the frequencies of 1 MHz, 5 MHz or 10 MHz, while triggering signals to all other start and stop channels can range from 1 PPS to 100 kHz. Time interval interpolation plays a key role in achieving the high resolution time interval measurements for both counters. With a 10 MHz time base, both counters demonstrate a single-shot resolution of better than 40 ps, and a stability of better than 5 x 10(exp -12) (sigma(sub chi)(tau)) after self test of 1000 seconds). The maximum rate of time interval measurements (with no dead time) is 1.0 kHz for the counter used in the MODEM application and is 2.0 kHz for the counter used in the Frequency Measurement and Analysis System. The counters are implemented as plug-in units for an AT-compatible personal computer. This configuration provides an efficient way of using a computer not only to control and operate the counters, but also to store and process measured data.

  10. High Resolution Powder Diffraction and Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D. E.

    1999-04-23

    It is clear that high-resolution synchrotrons X-ray powder diffraction is a very powerful and convenient tool for material characterization and structure determination. Most investigations to date have been carried out under ambient conditions and have focused on structure solution and refinement. The application of high-resolution techniques to increasingly complex structures will certainly represent an important part of future studies, and it has been seen how ab initio solution of structures with perhaps 100 atoms in the asymmetric unit is within the realms of possibility. However, the ease with which temperature-dependence measurements can be made combined with improvements in the technology of position-sensitive detectors will undoubtedly stimulate precise in situ structural studies of phase transitions and related phenomena. One challenge in this area will be to develop high-resolution techniques for ultra-high pressure investigations in diamond anvil cells. This will require highly focused beams and very precise collimation in front of the cell down to dimensions of 50 {micro}m or less. Anomalous scattering offers many interesting possibilities as well. As a means of enhancing scattering contrast it has applications not only to the determination of cation distribution in mixed systems such as the superconducting oxides discussed in Section 9.5.3, but also to the location of specific cations in partially occupied sites, such as the extra-framework positions in zeolites, for example. Another possible application is to provide phasing information for ab initio structure solution. Finally, the precise determination of f as a function of energy through an absorption edge can provide useful information about cation oxidation states, particularly in conjunction with XANES data. In contrast to many experiments at a synchrotron facility, powder diffraction is a relatively simple and user-friendly technique, and most of the procedures and software for data analysis

  11. A polychromator-type near-infrared spectrometer with a high-sensitivity and high-resolution photodiode array detector for pharmaceutical process monitoring on the millisecond time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, Kodai; Genkawa, Takuma; Ishikawa, Daitaro; Komiyama, Makoto; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2013-02-01

    In the fine chemicals industry, particularly in the pharmaceutical industry, advanced sensing technologies have recently begun being incorporated into the process line in order to improve safety and quality in accordance with process analytical technology. For estimating the quality of powders without preparation during drug formulation, near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has been considered the most promising sensing approach. In this study, we have developed a compact polychromator-type NIR spectrometer equipped with a photodiode (PD) array detector. This detector is consisting of 640 InGaAs-PD elements with 20-μm pitch. Some high-specification spectrometers, which use InGaAs-PD with 512 elements, have a wavelength resolution of about 1.56 nm when covering 900-1700 nm range. On the other hand, the newly developed detector, having the PD with one of the world's highest density, enables wavelength resolution of below 1.25 nm. Moreover, thanks to the combination with a highly integrated charge amplifier array circuit, measurement speed of the detector is higher by two orders than that of existing PD array detectors. The developed spectrometer is small (120 mm × 220 mm × 200 mm) and light (6 kg), and it contains various key devices including the high-density and high-sensitivity PD array detector, NIR technology, and spectroscopy technology for a spectroscopic analyzer that has the required detection mechanism and high sensitivity for powder measurement, as well as a high-speed measuring function for blenders. Moreover, we have evaluated the characteristics of the developed NIR spectrometer, and the measurement of powder samples confirmed that it has high functionality.

  12. Lyso-GM2 ganglioside: a possible biomarker of Tay-Sachs disease and Sandhoff disease.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Takashi; Togawa, Tadayasu; Tsukimura, Takahiro; Kawashima, Ikuo; Matsuoka, Kazuhiko; Kitakaze, Keisuke; Tsuji, Daisuke; Itoh, Kohji; Ishida, Yo-Ichi; Suzuki, Minoru; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    To find a new biomarker of Tay-Sachs disease and Sandhoff disease. The lyso-GM2 ganglioside (lyso-GM2) levels in the brain and plasma in Sandhoff mice were measured by means of high performance liquid chromatography and the effect of a modified hexosaminidase (Hex) B exhibiting Hex A-like activity was examined. Then, the lyso-GM2 concentrations in human plasma samples were determined. The lyso-GM2 levels in the brain and plasma in Sandhoff mice were apparently increased compared with those in wild-type mice, and they decreased on intracerebroventricular administration of the modified Hex B. The lyso-GM2 levels in plasma of patients with Tay-Sachs disease and Sandhoff disease were increased, and the increase in lyso-GM2 was associated with a decrease in Hex A activity. Lyso-GM2 is expected to be a potential biomarker of Tay-Sachs disease and Sandhoff disease.

  13. High resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, Jim; Dinyari, Rostam; Huie, Phil; Butterwick, Alex; Peumans, Peter; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight in patients with retinal degeneration by delivering pulsed electric currents to retinal neurons via an array of microelectrodes. Most implants use inductive or optical transmission of information and power to an intraocular receiver, with decoded signals subsequently distributed to retinal electrodes through an intraocular cable. Surgical complexity could be minimized by an "integrated" prosthesis, in which both power and data are delivered directly to the stimulating array without any discrete components or cables. We present here an integrated retinal prosthesis system based on a photodiode array implant. Video frames are processed and imaged onto the retinal implant by a video goggle projection system operating at near-infrared wavelengths (~ 900 nm). Photodiodes convert light into pulsed electric current, with charge injection maximized by specially optimized series photodiode circuits. Prostheses of three different pixel densities (16 pix/mm2, 64 pix/mm2, and 256 pix/mm2) have been designed, simulated, and prototyped. Retinal tissue response to subretinal implants made of various materials has been investigated in RCS rats. The resulting prosthesis can provide sufficient charge injection for high resolution retinal stimulation without the need for implantation of any bulky discrete elements such as coils or tethers. In addition, since every pixel functions independently, pixel arrays may be placed separately in the subretinal space, providing visual stimulation to a larger field of view.

  14. High resolution time interval counter

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, K.J.

    1994-07-26

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured. 3 figs.

  15. High resolution time interval counter

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, Kenneth J.

    1994-01-01

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured.

  16. High resolution imaging at Palomar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.

    1992-01-01

    For the last two years we have embarked on a program of understanding the ultimate limits of ground-based optical imaging. We have designed and fabricated a camera specifically for high resolution imaging. This camera has now been pressed into service at the prime focus of the Hale 5 m telescope. We have concentrated on two techniques: the Non-Redundant Masking (NRM) and Weigelt's Fully Filled Aperture (FFA) method. The former is the optical analog of radio interferometry and the latter is a higher order extension of the Labeyrie autocorrelation method. As in radio Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), both these techniques essentially measure the closure phase and, hence, true image construction is possible. We have successfully imaged binary stars and asteroids with angular resolution approaching the diffraction limit of the telescope and image quality approaching that of a typical radio VLBI map. In addition, we have carried out analytical and simulation studies to determine the ultimate limits of ground-based optical imaging, the limits of space-based interferometric imaging, and investigated the details of imaging tradeoffs of beam combination in optical interferometers.

  17. High-resolution infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falco, Charles M.

    2010-08-01

    The hands and mind of an artist are intimately involved in the creative process of image formation, intrinsically making paintings significantly more complex than photographs to analyze. In spite of this difficulty, several years ago the artist David Hockney and I identified optical evidence within a number of paintings that demonstrated artists began using optical projections as early as c1425 - nearly 175 years before Galileo - as aids for producing portions of their images. In the course of our work, Hockney and I developed insights that I have been applying to a new approach to computerized image analysis. Recently I developed and characterized a portable high resolution infrared for capturing additional information from paintings. Because many pigments are semi-transparent in the IR, in a number of cases IR photographs ("reflectograms") have revealed marks made by the artists that had been hidden under paint ever since they were made. I have used this IR camera to capture photographs ("reflectograms") of hundreds of paintings in over a dozen museums on three continents and, in some cases, these reflectograms have provided new insights into decisions the artists made in creating the final images that we see in the visible.

  18. High resolution auditory perception system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Iftekhar; Ghatol, Ashok

    2005-04-01

    Blindness is a sensory disability which is difficult to treat but can to some extent be helped by artificial aids. The paper describes the design aspects of a high resolution auditory perception system, which is designed on the principle of air sonar with binaural perception. This system is a vision substitution aid for enabling blind persons. The blind person wears ultrasonic eyeglasses which has ultrasonic sensor array embedded on it. The system has been designed to operate in multiresolution modes. The ultrasonic sound from the transmitter array is reflected back by the objects, falling in the beam of the array and is received. The received signal is converted to a sound signal, which is presented stereophonically for auditory perception. A detailed study has been done as the background work required for the system implementation; the appropriate range analysis procedure, analysis of space-time signals, the acoustic sensors study, amplification methods and study of the removal of noise using filters. Finally the system implementation including both the hardware and the software part of it has been described. Experimental results on actual blind subjects and inferences obtained during the study have also been included.

  19. High-Resolution Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Alan G.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.

    2008-07-01

    Over the past decade, mass spectrometry has been revolutionized by access to instruments of increasingly high mass-resolving power. For small molecules up to ˜400 Da (e.g., drugs, metabolites, and various natural organic mixtures ranging from foods to petroleum), it is possible to determine elemental compositions (CcHhNnOoSsPp…) of thousands of chemical components simultaneously from accurate mass measurements (the same can be done up to 1000 Da if additional information is included). At higher mass, it becomes possible to identify proteins (including posttranslational modifications) from proteolytic peptides, as well as lipids, glycoconjugates, and other biological components. At even higher mass (˜100,000 Da or higher), it is possible to characterize posttranslational modifications of intact proteins and to map the binding surfaces of large biomolecule complexes. Here we review the principles and techniques of the highest-resolution analytical mass spectrometers (time-of-flight and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and orbitrap mass analyzers) and describe some representative high-resolution applications.

  20. High resolution spectroscopy from low altitude satellites. [gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakano, G. H.; Imhof, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    The P 78 1 satellite to be placed in a synchronous polar orbit at an altitude of 550-660 km will carry two identical high resolution spectrometers each consisting of a single (approximately 85 cc) intrinsic germanium IGE detector. The payload also includes a pair of phoswitch scintillators, an array of CdTe detectors and several particle detectors, all of which are mounted on the wheel of the satellite. The intrinsic high purity IGE detectors receive cooling from two Stirling cycle refrigerators and facilitate the assembly of large and complex detector arrays planned for the next generation of high sensitivity instruments such as those planned for the gamma ray observatory. The major subsystems of the spectrometer are discussed as well as its capabilities.

  1. Evaluation of Advanced Bionics high resolution mode.

    PubMed

    Buechner, Andreas; Frohne-Buechner, Carolin; Gaertner, Lutz; Lesinski-Schiedat, Anke; Battmer, Rolf-Dieter; Lenarz, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the advantages of the Advanced Bionic high resolution mode for speech perception, through a retrospective analysis. Forty-five adult subjects were selected who had a minimum experience of three months' standard mode (mean of 10 months) before switching to high resolution mode. Speech perception was tested in standard mode immediately before fitting with high resolution mode, and again after a maximum of six months high resolution mode usage (mean of two months). A significant improvement was found, between 11 and 17%, depending on the test material. The standard mode preference does not give any indication about the improvement when switching to high resolution. Users who are converted within any study achieve a higher performance improvement than those converted in the clinical routine. This analysis proves the significant benefits of high resolution mode for users, and also indicates the need for guidelines for individual optimization of parameter settings in a high resolution mode program.

  2. On timing properties of LYSO-based calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Duarte, J.; Pena, C.; Ronzhin, A.; Spiropulu, M.; Trevor, J.; Xie, S.

    2015-04-23

    We present test beam studies and results on the timing performance and characterization of the time resolution of Lutetium–Yttrium Orthosilicate (LYSO)-based calorimeters. We also demonstrate that a time resolution of 30 ps is achievable for a particular design. Additionally, we discuss precision timing calorimetry as a tool for the mitigation of physics object performance degradation effects due to the large number of simultaneous interactions in the high luminosity environment foreseen at the Large Hadron Collider.

  3. Spatially adaptive regularized iterative high-resolution image reconstruction algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Won Bae; Park, Min K.; Kang, Moon Gi

    2000-12-01

    High resolution images are often required in applications such as remote sensing, frame freeze in video, military and medical imaging. Digital image sensor arrays, which are used for image acquisition in many imaging systems, are not dense enough to prevent aliasing, so the acquired images will be degraded by aliasing effects. To prevent aliasing without loss of resolution, a dense detector array is required. But it may be very costly or unavailable, thus, many imaging systems are designed to allow some level of aliasing during image acquisition. The purpose of our work is to reconstruct an unaliased high resolution image from the acquired aliased image sequence. In this paper, we propose a spatially adaptive regularized iterative high resolution image reconstruction algorithm for blurred, noisy and down-sampled image sequences. The proposed approach is based on a Constrained Least Squares (CLS) high resolution reconstruction algorithm, with spatially adaptive regularization operators and parameters. These regularization terms are shown to improve the reconstructed image quality by forcing smoothness, while preserving edges in the reconstructed high resolution image. Accurate sub-pixel motion registration is the key of the success of the high resolution image reconstruction algorithm. However, sub-pixel motion registration may have some level of registration error. Therefore, a reconstruction algorithm which is robust against the registration error is required. The registration algorithm uses a gradient based sub-pixel motion estimator which provides shift information for each of the recorded frames. The proposed algorithm is based on a technique of high resolution image reconstruction, and it solves spatially adaptive regularized constrained least square minimization functionals. In this paper, we show that the reconstruction algorithm gives dramatic improvements in the resolution of the reconstructed image and is effective in handling the aliased information. The

  4. High-resolution slug testing.

    PubMed

    Zemansky, G M; McElwee, C D

    2005-01-01

    The hydraulic conductivity (K) variation has important ramifications for ground water flow and the transport of contaminants in ground water. The delineation of the nature of that variation can be critical to complete characterization of a site and the planning of effective and efficient remedial measures. Site-specific features (such as high-conductivity zones) need to be quantified. Our alluvial field site in the Kansas River valley exhibits spatial variability, very high conductivities, and nonlinear behavior for slug tests in the sand and gravel aquifer. High-resolution, multilevel slug tests have been performed in a number of wells that are fully screened. A general nonlinear model based on the Navier-Stokes equation, nonlinear frictional loss, non-Darcian flow, acceleration effects, radius changes in the wellbore, and a Hvorslev model for the aquifer has been used to analyze the data, employing an automated processing system that runs within the Excel spreadsheet program. It is concluded that slug tests can provide the necessary data to identify the nature of both horizontal and vertical K variation in an aquifer and that improved delineation or higher resolution of K structure is possible with shorter test intervals. The gradation into zones of higher conductivity is sharper than seen previously, and the maximum conductivity observed is greater than previously measured. However, data from this project indicate that well development, the presence of fines, and the antecedent history of the well are important interrelated factors in regard to slug-test response and can prevent obtaining consistent results in some cases.

  5. Effective Area of the AXAF High Resolution Camera (HRC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaude, Daniel; Pease, Deron; Donnelly, Hank; Juda, Mike; Jones, Christine; Murray, Steve; Zombeck, Martin; Kraft, Ralph; Kenter, Almus; Meehan, Gary; Meehan, Gary; Swartz, Doug; Elsner, Ron

    1998-01-01

    The AXAF High-Resolution Camera (HRC) was calibrated at NASA MSFC's X-Ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) during 1997 March and April. We have undertaken an analysis of the HRC effective area using all data presently available from the XRCF. We discuss our spectral fitting of the beam-normalization detectors (BNDs), our method of removing higher order contamination lines present in the spectra, and corrections for beam non-uniformities. We apply a model of photon absorption depth in order to fit a smooth curve to the quantum efficiency of the detector. This is then combined with the most recent model of the AXAF High-Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) to determine the ensemble effective area versus energy for the HRC. We also address future goals and concerns.

  6. High resolution digital holography based on the point source scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minchao; Wang, Dayong; Rong, Lu; Wang, Yunxin; Wang, Fengpeng; Lin, Qiaowen

    2016-10-01

    Digital holographic microscopy has been widely used for the imaging of micro-objects and biological samples. Lensless in-line digital holographic microscopy is capable of wide field-of-view imaging. However the spatial resolution of the reconstructed images is limited by the pixel size of the detector. The relative position shift between the sample and the detector can effectively improve the resolution in the traditional sub-pixel shifting method, but it requires a high precision of translation stage. To overcome this problem, we propose a method based on the point source scanning to realize sub-pixel shifting. High precision sub-pixel shifting is achieved easily by using the geometric between point source and detector. Through moving the point source, multiple holograms with sub-pixel shifts are captured. These holograms are merged together to obtained a high resolution hologram by a synthesizing algorithm. Then, the high resolution reconstructed image of the object can be obtained by the angular spectrum algorithm. The feasibility of the proposed method is demonstrated by simulation and experiments. A USAF resolution test target was used as the object. Compared with the traditional digital holography, a higher resolution reconstructed image is obtained by our method. The proposed method has the advantages of simple recording setup and lower precision requirement of the translation stage. It can achieve the wide field-of-view and high resolution imaging.

  7. The High Resolution Imaging Instrument for HEAO-B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubierschky, K.; Austin, G. K.; Harrison, D. C.; Roy, A. G.

    1978-01-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Instrument for the HEAO-B X-ray Telescope satellite is designed to reproduce images of celestial X-ray sources in the range of 0.2 to 4.0 keV. It provides both imaging and temporal data. The basic detector is a two-stage microchannel plate with a crossed-grid charge detector. Preamplifiers, detector bias supplies, and some processing circuits are colocated with the detector. The remaining electronic circuits are located in a remote central electronic assembly. The processing system is designed for single-photon processing. The imaging data rate is limited to 100 data points per second. Non-imaging total-field count rate is acquired with a maximum dead time of 14 microseconds per event.

  8. High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan

    We propose to design and build the first imaging hard X-ray detector system that incorporates 3D stacking of closely packed detector readouts in finely-spaced imaging arrays with their required data processing and control electronics. In virtually all imaging astronomical detectors, detector readout is done with flex connectors or connections that are not vertical but rather horizontal , requiring loss of focal plane area. For high resolution pixel detectors needed for high speed event-based X-ray imaging, from low energy applications (CMOS) with focusing X-ray telescopes, to hard X-ray applications with pixelated CZT for large area coded aperture telescopes, this new detector development offers great promise. We propose to extend our previous and current APRA supported ProtoEXIST program that has developed the first large area imaging CZT detectors and demonstrated their astrophysical capabilities on two successful balloon flight to a next generation High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI), which would incorporate microvia technology for the first time to connect the readout ASIC on each CZT crystal directly to its control and data processing system. This 3-dimensional stacking of detector and readout/control system means that large area (>2m2) imaging detector planes for a High Resolution Wide-field hard X-ray telescope can be built with initially greatly reduced detector gaps and ultimately with no gaps. This increases detector area, efficiency, and simplicity of detector integration. Thus higher sensitivity wide-field imagers will be possible at lower cost. HREXI will enable a post-Swift NASA mission such as the EREXS concept proposed to PCOS to be conducted as a future MIDEX mission. This mission would conduct a high resolution (<2 arcmin) , broad band (5 200 keV) hard X-ray survey of black holes on all scales with ~10X higher sensitivity than Swift. In the current era of Time Domain Astrophysics, such a survey capability, in conjunction with a n

  9. Superconducting High Resolution Fast-Neutron Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Hau, Ionel Dragos

    2006-01-01

    Superconducting high resolution fast-neutron calorimetric spectrometers based on 6LiF and TiB{sub 2} absorbers have been developed. These novel cryogenic spectrometers measure the temperature rise produced in exothermal (n, α) reactions with fast neutrons in 6Li and 10B-loaded materials with heat capacity C operating at temperatures T close to 0.1 K. Temperature variations on the order of 0.5 mK are measured with a Mo/Cu thin film multilayer operated in the transition region between its superconducting and its normal state. The advantage of calorimetry for high resolution spectroscopy is due to the small phonon excitation energies kBT on the order of μeV that serve as signal carriers, resulting in an energy resolution ΔE ~ (kBT2C)1/2, which can be well below 10 keV. An energy resolution of 5.5 keV has been obtained with a Mo/Cu superconducting sensor and a TiB2 absorber using thermal neutrons from a 252Cf neutron source. This resolution is sufficient to observe the effect of recoil nuclei broadening in neutron spectra, which has been related to the lifetime of the first excited state in 7Li. Fast-neutron spectra obtained with a 6Li-enriched LiF absorber show an energy resolution of 16 keV FWHM, and a response in agreement with the 6Li(n, α)3H reaction cross section and Monte Carlo simulations for energies up to several MeV. The energy resolution of order of a few keV makes this novel instrument applicable to fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy based on the unique elemental signature provided by the neutron absorption and scattering resonances. The optimization of the energy resolution based on analytical and numerical models of the detector response is discussed in the context of these applications.

  10. High Resolution PDF Measurements on Ag Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Tulio C. R.; Martin, Chris; Kycia, Stefan; Zanchet, Daniela

    2009-01-29

    The quantitative analysis of structural defects in Ag nanoparticles was addressed in this work. We performed atomic scale structural characterization by a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) using the Pair Distribution Function analysis (PDF) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The XRD measurements were performed using an innovative instrumentation setup to provide high resolution PDF patterns.

  11. Simulation of scintillation light output in LYSO scintillators through a full factorial design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loignon-Houle, Francis; Bergeron, Mélanie; Pepin, Catherine M.; Charlebois, Serge A.; Lecomte, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Individually coupled scintillation detectors used in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging suffer from important signal losses due to the suboptimal light collection from crystals. As only a fraction of the light is generally extracted from long and thin scintillators, it is important to identify and understand the predominant causes of signal loss in order to eventually recover it. This simulation study investigates the multiple factors affecting the light transport in high-aspect ratio LYSO scintillators wrapped in specular reflectors through a full factorial design. By exploring various combinations of crystal geometry, readout conditions and wrapping conditions, it was found that an optimum light output can only be achieved through a careful selection of highly reflective material along with high-transmittance optical adhesive used to bond the reflector. Decreasing the adhesive thickness was also found to have a positive outcome in most explored configurations, however to a much lesser extent. Suboptimal reflectivity and adhesive transmittance also lead to an asymmetric light output distribution dependent on the depth of interaction of the radiation, potentially degrading energy resolution. By identifying the factors causing the most significant scintillation light losses through a factorial design, the most promising detector configurations have been identified in the quest for optimal light collection from scintillators.

  12. NOAA's Use of High-Resolution Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hund, Erik

    2007-01-01

    NOAA's use of high-resolution imagery consists of: a) Shoreline mapping and nautical chart revision; b) Coastal land cover mapping; c) Benthic habitat mapping; d) Disaster response; and e) Imagery collection and support for coastal programs.

  13. Detectors

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Allander, Krag

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  14. Adaptive optics high resolution spectroscopy: present status and future direction

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, C; Angel, R; Ciarlo, D; Fugate, R O; Ge, J; Kuzmenko, P; Lloyd-Hart, M; Macintosh, B; Najita, J; Woolf, N

    1999-07-27

    High resolution spectroscopy experiments with visible adaptive optics (AO) telescopes at Starfire Optical Range and Mt. Wilson have demonstrated that spectral resolution can be routinely improved by a factor of - 10 over the seeing-limited case with no extra light losses at visible wavelengths. With large CCDs now available, a very wide wavelength range can be covered in a single exposure. In the near future, most large ground-based telescopes will be equipped with powerful A0 systems. Most of these systems are aimed primarily at diffraction-limited operation in the near IR. An exciting new opportunity will thus open up for high resolution IR spectroscopy. Immersion echelle gratings with much coarser grooves being developed by us at LLNL will play a critical role in achieving high spectral resolution with a compact and low cost IR cryogenically cooled spectrograph and simultaneous large wavelength coverage on relatively small IR detectors. We have constructed a new A0 optimized spectrograph at Steward Observatory to provide R = 200,000 in the optical, which is being commissioned at the Starfire Optical Range 3.5m telescope. We have completed the optical design of the LLNL IR Immersion Spectrograph (LISPEC) to take advantage of improved silicon etching technology. Key words: adaptive optics, spectroscopy, high resolution, immersion gratings

  15. High resolution resonance ionization imaging detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Winefordner, James D.; Matveev, Oleg I.; Smith, Benjamin W.

    1999-01-01

    A resonance ionization imaging device (RIID) and method for imaging objects using the RIID are provided, the RIID system including a RIID cell containing an ionizable vapor including monoisotopic atoms or molecules, the cell being positioned to intercept scattered radiation of a resonance wavelength .lambda..sub.1 from the object which is to be detected or imaged, a laser source disposed to illuminate the RIID cell with laser radiation having a wavelength .lambda..sub.2 or wavelengths .lambda..sub.2, .lambda..sub.3 selected to ionize atoms in the cell that are in an excited state by virtue of having absorbed the scattered resonance laser radiation, and a luminescent screen at the back surface of the RIID cell which presents an image of the number and position of charged particles present in the RIID cell as a result of the ionization of the excited state atoms. The method of the invention further includes the step of initially illuminating the object to be detected or imaged with a laser having a wavelength selected such that the object will scatter laser radiation having the resonance wavelength .lambda..sub.1.

  16. High resolution cross strip anodes for photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Tremsin, A. S.; Vallerga, J. V.; Abiad, R.; Hull, J.

    2003-05-01

    A new photon counting, imaging readout for microchannel plate sensors, the cross strip (XS) anode, has been investigated. Charge centroiding of signals detected on two orthogonal layers of sense strip sets are used to derive photon locations. The XS anode spatial resolution (<3 μm FWHM) exceeds the spatial resolution of most direct charge sensing anodes, and does so at low gain (<2×10 6). The image linearity and fidelity are high enough to resolve and map 7 μm MCP pores, offering new possibilities for astronomical and other applications.

  17. THz holography in reflection using a high resolution microbolometer array.

    PubMed

    Zolliker, Peter; Hack, Erwin

    2015-05-04

    We demonstrate a digital holographic setup for Terahertz imaging of surfaces in reflection. The set-up is based on a high-power continuous wave (CW) THz laser and a high-resolution (640 × 480 pixel) bolometer detector array. Wave propagation to non-parallel planes is used to reconstruct the object surface that is rotated relative to the detector plane. In addition we implement synthetic aperture methods for resolution enhancement and compare Fourier transform phase retrieval to phase stepping methods. A lateral resolution of 200 μm and a relative phase sensitivity of about 0.4 rad corresponding to a depth resolution of 6 μm are estimated from reconstructed images of two specially prepared test targets, respectively. We highlight the use of digital THz holography for surface profilometry as well as its potential for video-rate imaging.

  18. A high-resolution tungstate membrane label

    SciTech Connect

    Hainfeld, J.F.; Quaite, F.E. ); Lipka, J.J. )

    1990-01-01

    A new class of membrane labels was synthesized which contain a tungstate cluster (having 11 tungsten atoms) and an aliphatic organo-tin moiety with various chain lengths (C{sub 4}, C{sub 8}, C{sub 12}, C{sub 18}, C{sub 22}). These molecules were found to insert into synthetic phospholipid vesicles and biological membranes (human red blood cell membranes). The tungstate clusters can be individually visualized in the high resolution STEM or seen en mass in thin-sectioned labeled membranes in the CTEM. These new labels should provide a means for direct high-resolution imaging of lipid-phase systems.

  19. High resolution 3D fluorescence tomography using ballistic photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jie; Nouizi, Farouk; Cho, Jaedu; Kwong, Jessica; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2015-03-01

    We are developing a ballistic-photon based approach for improving the spatial resolution of fluorescence tomography using time-domain measurements. This approach uses early photon information contained in measured time-of-fight distributions originating from fluorescence emission. The time point spread functions (TPSF) from both excitation light and emission light are acquired with gated single photon Avalanche detector (SPAD) and time-correlated single photon counting after a short laser pulse. To determine the ballistic photons for reconstruction, the lifetime of the fluorophore and the time gate from the excitation profiles will be used for calibration, and then the time gate of the fluorescence profile can be defined by a simple time convolution. By mimicking first generation CT data acquisition, the sourcedetector pair will translate across and also rotate around the subject. The measurement from each source-detector position will be reshaped into a histogram that can be used by a simple back-projection algorithm in order to reconstruct high resolution fluorescence images. Finally, from these 2D sectioning slides, a 3D inclusion can be reconstructed accurately. To validate the approach, simulation of light transport is performed for biological tissue-like media with embedded fluorescent inclusion by solving the diffusion equation with Finite Element Method using COMSOL Multiphysics simulation. The reconstruction results from simulation studies have confirmed that this approach drastically improves the spatial resolution of fluorescence tomography. Moreover, all the results have shown the feasibility of this technique for high resolution small animal imaging up to several centimeters.

  20. High-resolution two dimensional advective transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, P.E.; Larock, B.E.

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes a two-dimensional high-resolution scheme for advective transport that is based on a Eulerian-Lagrangian method with a flux limiter. The scheme is applied to the problem of pure-advection of a rotated Gaussian hill and shown to preserve the monotonicity property of the governing conservation law.

  1. A High-Resolution Stopwatch for Cents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gingl, Z.; Kopasz, K.

    2011-01-01

    A very low-cost, easy-to-make stopwatch is presented to support various experiments in mechanics. The high-resolution stopwatch is based on two photodetectors connected directly to the microphone input of a sound card. Dedicated free open-source software has been developed and made available to download. The efficiency is demonstrated by a free…

  2. A GUINIER CAMERA FOR SR POWDER DIFFRACTION: HIGH RESOLUTION AND HIGH THROUGHPUT.

    SciTech Connect

    SIDDONS,D.P.; HULBERT, S.L.; STEPHENS, P.W.

    2006-05-28

    The paper describe a new powder diffraction instrument for synchrotron radiation sources which combines the high throughput of a position-sensitive detector system with the high resolution normally only provided by a crystal analyzer. It uses the Guinier geometry which is traditionally used with an x-ray tube source. This geometry adapts well to the synchrotron source, provided proper beam conditioning is applied. The high brightness of the SR source allows a high resolution to be achieved. When combined with a photon-counting silicon microstrip detector array, the system becomes a powerful instrument for radiation-sensitive samples or time-dependent phase transition studies.

  3. Improvement of sensitivity in high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, H.; Nakajima, K.; Suzuki, M.; Kimura, K.; Sasakawa, K.

    2011-06-15

    The sensitivity (limit of detection) of high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (HRBS) is mainly determined by the background noise of the spectrometer. There are two major origins of the background noise in HRBS, one is the stray ions scattered from the inner wall of the vacuum chamber of the spectrometer and the other is the dark noise of the microchannel plate (MCP) detector which is commonly used as a focal plane detector of the spectrometer in HRBS. In order to reject the stray ions, several barriers are installed inside the spectrometer and a thin Mylar foil is mounted in front of the detector. The dark noise of the MCP detector is rejected by the coincidence measurement with the secondary electrons emitted from the Mylar foil upon the ion passage. After these improvements, the background noise is reduced by a factor of 200 at a maximum. The detection limit can be improved down to 10 ppm for As in Si at a measurement time of 1 h under ideal conditions.

  4. Phase contrast in high resolution electron microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Rose, H.H.

    1975-09-23

    This patent relates to a device for developing a phase contrast signal for a scanning transmission electron microscope. The lens system of the microscope is operated in a condition of defocus so that predictable alternate concentric regions of high and low electron density exist in the cone of illumination. Two phase detectors are placed beneath the object inside the cone of illumination, with the first detector having the form of a zone plate, each of its rings covering alternate regions of either higher or lower electron density. The second detector is so configured that it covers the regions of electron density not covered by the first detector. Each detector measures the number of electrons incident thereon and the signal developed by the first detector is subtracted from the signal developed by the record detector to provide a phase contrast signal. (auth)

  5. High-Resolution X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ODell, Stephen L.; Brissenden, Roger J.; Davis, William; Elsner, Ronald F.; Elvis, Martin; Freeman, Mark; Gaetz, Terry; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhail V.

    2010-01-01

    Fundamental needs for future x-ray telescopes: a) Sharp images => excellent angular resolution. b) High throughput => large aperture areas. Generation-X optics technical challenges: a) High resolution => precision mirrors & alignment. b) Large apertures => lots of lightweight mirrors. Innovation needed for technical readiness: a) 4 top-level error terms contribute to image size. b) There are approaches to controlling those errors. Innovation needed for manufacturing readiness. Programmatic issues are comparably challenging.

  6. A high-resolution anatomical rat atlas

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xueling; Yu, Li; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Jie; Li, Anan; Han, Dao; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the availability of a high-resolution atlas of the adult rat. The atlas is composed of 9475 cryosectional images captured in 4600 × 2580 × 24-bit TIFF format, constructed using serial cryosection-milling techniques. Cryosection images were segmented, labelled and reconstructed into three-dimensional (3D) computerized models. These images, 3D models, technical details, relevant software and further information are available at our website, http://vchibp.vicp.net/vch/mice/. PMID:17062027

  7. High resolution schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harten, A.

    1983-01-01

    A class of new explicit second order accurate finite difference schemes for the computation of weak solutions of hyperbolic conservation laws is presented. These highly nonlinear schemes are obtained by applying a nonoscillatory first order accurate scheme to an appropriately modified flux function. The so-derived second order accurate schemes achieve high resolution while preserving the robustness of the original nonoscillatory first order accurate scheme. Numerical experiments are presented to demonstrate the performance of these new schemes.

  8. Stellar Tools for High Resolution Population Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chávez, M.; Bertone, E.; Rodríguez-Merino, L.; Buzzoni, A.

    2005-12-01

    We present preliminary results of the application of a new stellar library of high-resolution synthetic spectra (based upon ATLAS9 and SYNTHE codes developed by R. L. Kurucz) in the calculation of the ultraviolet-optical spectral energy distribution of simple stellar populations (SSPs). For this purpose, the library has been coupled with Buzzoni's population synthesis code. Part of this paper is also devoted to illustrate quantitatively the extent to which synthetic stellar libraries represent real stars.

  9. A High Resolution Ammunition Resupply Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    Transportation Assets .. . . . . . . . 111 b. Maximization of Shipping Space . . . . . 112 c. Adjustments Due to Priority Requisitions. 112 3. RESUPPLY...planned logistics module was expanded to a full stand-alone, high resolution model. Supplementary objectives were established in order to achieve the...each variable, and replication of the process described by these variables in order to achieve an expected value outcome. Using this technique, the

  10. High-Resolution Traction Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Plotnikov, Sergey V.; Sabass, Benedikt; Schwarz, Ulrich S.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular forces generated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton and transmitted to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through discrete, integrin-based protein assemblies, that is, focal adhesions, are critical to developmental morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis, as well as disease progression in cancer. However, quantitative mapping of these forces has been difficult since there has been no experimental technique to visualize nanonewton forces at submicrometer spatial resolution. Here, we provide detailed protocols for measuring cellular forces exerted on two-dimensional elastic substrates with a high-resolution traction force microscopy (TFM) method. We describe fabrication of polyacrylamide substrates labeled with multiple colors of fiducial markers, functionalization of the substrates with ECM proteins, setting up the experiment, and imaging procedures. In addition, we provide the theoretical background of traction reconstruction and experimental considerations important to design a high-resolution TFM experiment. We describe the implementation of a new algorithm for processing of images of fiducial markers that are taken below the surface of the substrate, which significantly improves data quality. We demonstrate the application of the algorithm and explain how to choose a regularization parameter for suppression of the measurement error. A brief discussion of different ways to visualize and analyze the results serves to illustrate possible uses of high-resolution TFM in biomedical research. PMID:24974038

  11. High-Resolution US of Rheumatologic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Taljanovic, Mihra S; Melville, David M; Gimber, Lana H; Scalcione, Luke R; Miller, Margaret D; Kwoh, C Kent; Klauser, Andrea S

    2015-01-01

    For the past 15 years, high-resolution ultrasonography (US) is being routinely and increasingly used for initial evaluation and treatment follow-up of rheumatologic diseases. This imaging technique is performed by using high-frequency linear transducers and has proved to be a powerful diagnostic tool in evaluation of articular erosions, simple and complex joint and bursal effusions, tendon sheath effusions, and synovitis, with results comparable to those of magnetic resonance imaging, excluding detection of bone marrow edema. Crystal deposition diseases including gouty arthropathy and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD) have characteristic appearances at US, enabling differentiation between these two diseases and from inflammatory arthropathies. Enthesopathy, which frequently accompanies psoriatic and reactive arthritis, also has a characteristic appearance at high-resolution US, distinguishing these two entities from other inflammatory and metabolic arthropathies. The presence of Doppler signal in examined joints, bursae, and tendon sheaths indicates active synovitis. Microbubble echo contrast agents augment detection of tissue vascularity and may act in the future as a drug delivery vehicle. Frequently, joint, tendon sheath, and bursal fluid aspirations and therapeutic injections are performed under US guidance. The authors describe the high-resolution US technique including gray-scale, color or power Doppler, and contrast agent-enhanced US that is used in evaluation of rheumatologic diseases of the wrist and hand and the ankle and foot in their routine clinical practice. This article demonstrates imaging findings of normal joints, rheumatoid arthritis, gouty arthritis, CPPD, psoriatic and reactive arthritis, and osteoarthritis.

  12. Sparse and accurate high resolution SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Duc; Zhao, Kexin; Rowe, William; Li, Jian

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the usage of an adaptive method, the Iterative Adaptive Approach (IAA), in combination with a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate to reconstruct high resolution SAR images that are both sparse and accurate. IAA is a nonparametric weighted least squares algorithm that is robust and user parameter-free. IAA has been shown to reconstruct SAR images with excellent side lobes suppression and high resolution enhancement. We first reconstruct the SAR images using IAA, and then we enforce sparsity by using MAP with a sparsity inducing prior. By coupling these two methods, we can produce a sparse and accurate high resolution image that are conducive for feature extractions and target classification applications. In addition, we show how IAA can be made computationally efficient without sacrificing accuracies, a desirable property for SAR applications where the size of the problems is quite large. We demonstrate the success of our approach using the Air Force Research Lab's "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set Version 1.0" challenge dataset. Via the widely used FFT, individual vehicles contained in the scene are barely recognizable due to the poor resolution and high side lobe nature of FFT. However with our approach clear edges, boundaries, and textures of the vehicles are obtained.

  13. Radiation length imaging with high-resolution telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenberg, U.; Frey, A.; Schwenker, B.; Wieduwilt, P.; Marinas, C.; Lütticke, F.

    2017-02-01

    The construction of low mass vertex detectors with a high level of system integration is of great interest for next generation collider experiments. Radiation length images with a sufficient spatial resolution can be used to measure and disentangle complex radiation length X/X0 profiles and contribute to the understanding of vertex detector systems. Test beam experiments with multi GeV particle beams and high-resolution tracking telescopes provide an opportunity to obtain precise 2D images of the radiation length of thin planar objects. At the heart of the X/X0 imaging is a spatially resolved measurement of the scattering angles of particles traversing the object under study. The main challenges are the alignment of the reference telescope and the calibration of its angular resolution. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of X/X0 imaging, a test beam experiment has been conducted. The devices under test were two mechanical prototype modules of the Belle II vertex detector. A data sample of 100 million tracks at 4 GeV has been collected, which is sufficient to resolve complex material profiles on the 30 μm scale.

  14. High resolution multiplexed functional imaging in live embyros (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dongli; Peng, Leilei

    2016-03-01

    Optical projection tomography (OPT) creates isotropic 3D imaging of tissue. Two approaches exist today: Wide-field OPT illuminates the entire sample and acquires projection images with a camera; Scanning-laser optical tomography (SLOT) generates the projection with a moving laser beam and point detector. SLOT has superior light collecting efficiency than wide-field optical tomography, making it ideal for tissue fluorescence imaging. Regardless the approach, traditional OPT has to compromise between the resolution and the depth of view. In traditional SLOT, the focused Gaussian beam diverges quickly from the focused plane, making it impossible to achieve high resolution imaging through a large volume specimen. We report using Bessel beam instead of Gaussian beam to perform SLOT. By illuminating samples with a narrow Bessel beam throughout an extended depth, high-resolution projection images can be measured in large volume. Under Bessel illumination, the projection image contains signal from annular-rings of the Bessel beam. Traditional inverse Radon transform of these projections will result in ringing artifacts in reconstructed imaging. Thus a modified 3D filtered back projection algorithm is developed to perform tomography reconstructing of Bessel-illuminated projection images. The resulting 3D imaging is free of artifact and achieved cellular resolution in extended sample volume. The system is applied to in-vivo imaging of transgenic Zebrafish embryos. Results prove Bessel SLOT a promising imaging method in development biology research.

  15. Evaluation of a high resolution silicon PET insert module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grkovski, Milan; Brzezinski, Karol; Cindro, Vladimir; Clinthorne, Neal H.; Kagan, Harris; Lacasta, Carlos; Mikuž, Marko; Solaz, Carles; Studen, Andrej; Weilhammer, Peter; Žontar, Dejan

    2015-07-01

    Conventional PET systems can be augmented with additional detectors placed in close proximity of the region of interest. We developed a high resolution PET insert module to evaluate the added benefit of such a combination. The insert module consists of two back-to-back 1 mm thick silicon sensors, each segmented into 1040 1 mm2 pads arranged in a 40 by 26 array. A set of 16 VATAGP7.1 ASICs and a custom assembled data acquisition board were used to read out the signal from the insert module. Data were acquired in slice (2D) geometry with a Jaszczak phantom (rod diameters of 1.2-4.8 mm) filled with 18F-FDG and the images were reconstructed with ML-EM method. Both data with full and limited angular coverage from the insert module were considered and three types of coincidence events were combined. The ratio of high-resolution data that substantially improves quality of the reconstructed image for the region near the surface of the insert module was estimated to be about 4%. Results from our previous studies suggest that such ratio could be achieved at a moderate technological expense by using an equivalent of two insert modules (an effective sensor thickness of 4 mm).

  16. High-resolution three-dimensional imaging with compress sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingyi; Ke, Jun

    2016-10-01

    LIDAR three-dimensional imaging technology have been used in many fields, such as military detection. However, LIDAR require extremely fast data acquisition speed. This makes the manufacture of detector array for LIDAR system is very difficult. To solve this problem, we consider using compress sensing which can greatly decrease the data acquisition and relax the requirement of a detection device. To use the compressive sensing idea, a spatial light modulator will be used to modulate the pulsed light source. Then a photodetector is used to receive the reflected light. A convex optimization problem is solved to reconstruct the 2D depth map of the object. To improve the resolution in transversal direction, we use multiframe image restoration technology. For each 2D piecewise-planar scene, we move the SLM half-pixel each time. Then the position where the modulated light illuminates will changed accordingly. We repeat moving the SLM to four different directions. Then we can get four low-resolution depth maps with different details of the same plane scene. If we use all of the measurements obtained by the subpixel movements, we can reconstruct a high-resolution depth map of the sense. A linear minimum-mean-square error algorithm is used for the reconstruction. By combining compress sensing and multiframe image restoration technology, we reduce the burden on data analyze and improve the efficiency of detection. More importantly, we obtain high-resolution depth maps of a 3D scene.

  17. High resolution telescopes at the National Solar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, R. B.; Smartt, R. N.

    The principal high-resolution telescopes of the National Solar Observatory are its two evacuated telescopes of 61-cm aperture (Kitt Peak) and 75-cm aperture (Sac Peak). The 61-cm telescope is used for making full-disk magnetograms, spectromagnetograms and 10830-wave length maps that show coronal holes, and is dedicated to synoptic programs. The 75-cm telescope at Sac Peak is described. Upgrades that are under way include an adaptive mirror and fast mirror system that will feed several focal-plane instruments, including the Universal Spectrograph (a new spectrograph whose detectors are CCD cameras), and the Universal Birefringent Filter, (a Fabry-Perot Interferometer); an Advanced Stokes Polarimeter is being constructed at the High Altitude Observatory. Additional equipment planned for this telescope includes an improved temperature control subsystem for the entrance window, an instrument that continually measures Fried's parameter, and integrating more advanced data collection systems into a computer network. The observatory is also pursuing a mirror coronagraph, which should have high resolution and which could be built in apertures larger than a meter.

  18. Thin polymer etalon arrays for high-resolution photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yang; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Ashkenazi, Shai; Witte, Russell; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Thin polymer etalons are demonstrated as high-frequency ultrasound sensors for three-dimensional (3-D) high-resolution photoacoustic imaging. The etalon, a Fabry-Perot optical resonator, consists of a thin polymer slab sandwiched between two gold layers. It is probed with a scanning continuous-wave (CW) laser for ultrasound array detection. Detection bandwidth of a 20-μm-diam array element exceeds 50 MHz, and the ultrasound sensitivity is comparable to polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) equivalents of similar size. In a typical photoacoustic imaging setup, a pulsed laser beam illuminates the imaging target, where optical energy is absorbed and acoustic waves are generated through the thermoelastic effect. An ultrasound detection array is formed by scanning the probing laser beam on the etalon surface in either a 1-D or a 2-D configuration, which produces 2-D or 3-D images, respectively. Axial and lateral resolutions have been demonstrated to be better than 20 μm. Detailed characterizations of the optical and acoustical properties of the etalon, as well as photoacoustic imaging results, suggest that thin polymer etalon arrays can be used as ultrasound detectors for 3-D high-resolution photoacoustic imaging applications. PMID:19123679

  19. Results from the High Resolution Fly's Eye Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Jui, C. C. H.

    2011-09-22

    The High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) Experiment operated two fluorescence detector sites in the western Utah desert between 1997 and 2006. The HiRes results on the cosmic ray spectrum are consistent with the GZK Suppression predicted at 10{sup 19.8} eV and observe an ankle structure at 10{sup 18.5} eV. These spectral features are consistent with a proton-dominated composition for cosmic rays at the highest energies. The HiRes composition studies of both the mean and the variance of the shower maximum depth (X{sub max}) also give results that are completely consistent with a predominately protonic composition, and inconsistent with heavy nuclei such as iron. We also report on the result of anisotropy studies.

  20. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Silver, Eric H.; Legros, Mark; Madden, Norm W.; Goulding, Fred; Landis, Don

    1998-01-01

    A broad bandwidth high resolution x-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces x-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available x-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for x-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical x-ray and particle spectroscopy.

  1. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Silver, E.H.; Legros, M.; Madden, N.W.; Goulding, F.; Landis, D.

    1998-07-07

    A broad bandwidth high resolution X-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces X-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available X-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for X-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical X-ray and particle spectroscopy. 6 figs.

  2. High-Resolution Vibration-Rotation Spectroscopy of CO[subscript 2]: Understanding the Boltzmann Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Karen J.

    2007-01-01

    In this undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory experiment, students acquire a high-resolution infrared absorption spectrum of carbon dioxide and use their data to show that the rotational-vibrational state populations follow a Boltzmann distribution. Data are acquired with a mid-infrared laser source and infrared detector. Appropriate…

  3. Ultra-high resolution DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, A H; Robinson, H; Gao, Y G

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the progress in our efforts at producing ultra-high resolution (< 0.8 A) DNA structures using advanced cryo-crystallography and synchrotron. Our work is aimed at providing reliable geometric (bond length and bond angle), electronic and motional information of DNA molecules in different conformational contexts. These highly-reliable, new structures will be the basis for constructing better DNA force-field parameters, which will benefit the structural refinement of DNA, protein-DNA complexes, and ligand-DNA complexes.

  4. A Portable, High Resolution, Surface Measurement Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihlefeld, Curtis M.; Burns, Bradley M.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    A high resolution, portable, surface measurement device has been demonstrated to provide micron-resolution topographical plots. This device was specifically developed to allow in-situ measurements of defects on the Space Shuttle Orbiter windows, but is versatile enough to be used on a wide variety of surfaces. This paper discusses the choice of an optical sensor and then the decisions required to convert a lab bench optical measurement device into an ergonomic portable system. The necessary trade-offs between performance and portability are presented along with a description of the device developed to measure Orbiter window defects.

  5. High resolution SAR applications and instrument design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dionisio, C.; Torre, A.

    1993-01-01

    The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has viewed, in the last two years, a huge increment of interest from many preset and potential users. The good spatial resolution associated to the all weather capability lead to considering SAR not only a scientific instrument but a tool for verifying and controlling the daily human relationships with the Earth Environment. New missions were identified for SAR as spatial resolution became lower than three meters: disasters, pollution, ships traffic, volcanic eruptions, earthquake effect are only a few of the possible objects which can be effectively detected, controlled and monitored by SAR mounted on satellites. High resolution radar design constraints and dimensioning are discussed.

  6. High resolution thermal denaturation of mammalian DNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Guttmann, T; Vítek, A; Pivec, L

    1977-01-01

    High resolution melting profiles of different mammalian DNAs are presented. Melting curves of various mammalian DNAs were compared with respect to the degree of asymmetry, first moment, transition breath and Tmi of individual subtransitions. Quantitative comparison of the shape of all melting curves was made. Correlation between phylogenetical relations among mammals and shape of the melting profiles of their DNAs was demonstrated. The difference between multi-component heterogeneity of mammalian DNAs found by optical melting analysis and sedimentation in CsCl-netropsin density gradient is also discussed. PMID:840642

  7. High resolution extremity CT for biomechanics modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, A.E.; Brand, H.; Hollerbach, K.; Logan, C.M.; Martz, H.E.

    1995-09-23

    With the advent of ever more powerful computing and finite element analysis (FEA) capabilities, the bone and joint geometry detail available from either commercial surface definitions or from medical CT scans is inadequate. For dynamic FEA modeling of joints, precise articular contours are necessary to get appropriate contact definition. In this project, a fresh cadaver extremity was suspended in parafin in a lucite cylinder and then scanned with an industrial CT system to generate a high resolution data set for use in biomechanics modeling.

  8. A High Resolution Scale-of-four

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fitch, V.

    1949-08-25

    A high resolution scale-of-four has been developed to be used in conjunction with the nuclear particle detection devices in applications where the counting rate is unusually high. Specifically, it is intended to precede the commercially available medium resolution scaling circuits and so decrease the resolving time of the counting system. The circuit will function reliably on continuously recurring pulses separated by less than 0.1 microseconds. It will resolve two pulses (occurring at a moderate repetition rate) which are spaced at 0.04 microseconds. A five-volt input signal is sufficient to actuate the device.

  9. High resolution millimeter-wave imaging sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. J.; Howard, R. J.; Parks, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    A scanning 3-mm radiometer is described that has been built for use on a small aircraft to produce real time high resolution images of the ground when atmospheric conditions such as smoke, dust, and clouds make IR and visual sensors unusable. The sensor can be used for a variety of remote sensing applications such as measurements of snow cover and snow water equivalent, precipitation mapping, vegetation type and extent, surface moisture and temperature, and surface thermal inertia. The advantages of millimeter waves for cloud penetration and the ability to observe different physical phenomena make this system an attractive supplement to visible and IR remote sensing systems.

  10. a High-Resolution Study of the SILICON-29

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Paul Matthew

    The gamma-decays of 25 resonances in the ^{29}Si(p, gamma) reaction have been measured in the energy range E_{p} = 1.74 -2.50 MeV. This work was performed at the High Resolution Laboratory at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory and represents a major step toward the goal of the determination of the complete level scheme of ^{30 }P from the ground state to 8820 keV. Previous and concurrent experiments have measured the ^ {29}Si(p.p) cross section as well as gamma-ray yields from the ^{29}Si(p,gamma), ^{29}Si(p,p_1 gamma) and ^{29} Si(p,p_2gamma) reactions in the range E_{p} = 1.04 -3.33 MeV. Future angular distribution experiments are planned. Spectral fluctuation properties are believed to give insight into the dynamics of quantum systems. This work was motivated by results from the study of the fluctuation properties of the nuclide ^{26} Al which indicates dynamics that fall between regular and chaotic. A high-resolution (~220 eV) proton beam is produced by the 4 MeV KN Van de Graaff accelerator housed in the High Resolution Laboratory. This beam is directed onto thin films of ^{29 }Si of thickness 1.5-3.0mug/cm ^2. Two high-purity germanium detectors are used to collect detailed gamma -ray spectra; one detector is surrounded by a bismuth germanate anti-Compton shield. These spectra have been analyzed and branching ratios for the resonances have been deduced. Once the branching ratios were determined, Jpi selection rules and recommended upper limits for reduced transition rates were used to reduce the range of possible quantum number (Jpi ; T ) assignments. Of the 25 resonances, sixteen had previous assignments which were confirmed by this work. The allowed ranges were reduced for seven resonances and two resonances had assignments which were changed outright. In addition, a level at E_{x} = 6006.1 keV was discovered; its branching ratios were determined and Jpi ;T assignment restricted.

  11. Limiting liability via high resolution image processing

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwade, L.E.; Overlin, T.K.

    1996-12-31

    The utilization of high resolution image processing allows forensic analysts and visualization scientists to assist detectives by enhancing field photographs, and by providing the tools and training to increase the quality and usability of field photos. Through the use of digitized photographs and computerized enhancement software, field evidence can be obtained and processed as `evidence ready`, even in poor lighting and shadowed conditions or darkened rooms. These images, which are most often unusable when taken with standard camera equipment, can be shot in the worst of photographic condition and be processed as usable evidence. Visualization scientists have taken the use of digital photographic image processing and moved the process of crime scene photos into the technology age. The use of high resolution technology will assist law enforcement in making better use of crime scene photography and positive identification of prints. Valuable court room and investigation time can be saved and better served by this accurate, performance based process. Inconclusive evidence does not lead to convictions. Enhancement of the photographic capability helps solve one major problem with crime scene photos, that if taken with standard equipment and without the benefit of enhancement software would be inconclusive, thus allowing guilty parties to be set free due to lack of evidence.

  12. High resolution guided wave pipe inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velichko, Alexander; Wilcox, Paul D.

    2009-03-01

    Commercial guided wave inspection systems provide rapid screening of pipes, but limited sizing capability for small defects. However, accurate detection and sizing of small defects is essential for assessing the integrity of inaccessible pipe regions where guided waves provide the only possible inspection mechanism. In this paper an array-based approach is presented that allows guided waves to be focused on both transmission and reception to produce a high resolution image of a length of pipe. In the image, it is shown that a signal to coherent noise ratio of over 40 dB with respect to the reflected signal from a free end of pipe can be obtained, even taking into account typical levels of experimental uncertainty in terms of transducer positioning, wave velocity etc. The combination of an image with high resolution and a 40 dB dynamic range enables the detection of very small defects. It also allows the in-plane shape of defects over a certain size to be observed directly. Simulations are used to estimate the detection and sizing capability of the system for crack-like defects. Results are presented from a prototype system that uses EMATs to fully focus pipe guided wave modes on both transmission and reception in a 12 inch diameter stainless steel pipe. The 40 dB signal to coherent noise ratio is obtained experimentally and a 2 mm diameter (0.08 wavelengths) half-thickness hole is shown to be detectable.

  13. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, D. Chris; Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2000-01-01

    The major research activities performed during the cooperative agreement enhanced our spectroscopic knowledge of molecules of atmospheric interest such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, ozone, methane, and carbon monoxide, to name a few. Measurements were made using the NASA Langley Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometer System (TDL) and several Fourier Transform Spectrometer Systems (FTS) around the globe. The results from these studies made remarkable improvements in the line positions and intensities for several molecules, particularly ozone and carbon dioxide in the 2 to 17-micrometer spectral region. Measurements of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients and the temperature dependence of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients for infrared transitions of ozone, methane, and water vapor were also performed. Results from these studies have been used for retrievals of stratospheric gas concentration profiles from data collected by several Upper Atmospheric Research satellite (UARS) infrared instruments as well as in the analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra such as those acquired by space-based, ground-based, and various balloon-and aircraft-borne experiments. Our results made significant contributions in several updates of the HITRAN (HIgh resolution TRANsmission) spectral line parameters database. This database enjoys worldwide recognition in research involving diversified scientific fields.

  14. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, D. Chris; Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2000-01-01

    The major research activities performed during the cooperative agreement enhanced our spectroscopic knowledge of molecules of atmospheric interest such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, ozone, methane, and carbon monoxide, to name a few. Measurements were made using the NASA Langley Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometer System (TDL) and several Fourier Transform Spectrometer Systems (FTS) around the globe. The results from these studies made remarkable improvements in the line positions and intensities for several molecules, particularly ozone and carbon dioxide in the 2 to 17-micrometer spectral region. Measurements of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients and the temperature dependence of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients for infrared transitions of ozone, methane, and water vapor were also performed. Results from these studies have been used for retrievals of stratospheric gas concentration profiles from data collected by several Upper Atmospheric Research satellite (UARS) infrared instruments as well as in the analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra such as those acquired by space-based, ground-based, and various balloon- and aircraft-borne experiments. Our results made significant contributions in several updates of the HITRAN (HIgh resolution TRANsmission) spectral line parameters database. This database enjoys worldwide recognition in research involving diversified scientific fields.

  15. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2003-01-01

    Spectroscopic parameters (such as line position, intensity, broadening and shifting coefficients and their temperature dependences, line mixing coefficients etc.) for various molecular species of atmospheric interest are determined. In order to achieve these results, infrared spectra of several molecular bands are obtained using high-resolution recording instruments such as tunable diode laser spectrometer and Fourier transform spectrometers. Using sophisticated analysis routines (Multispectrum nonlinear least squares technique) these high-resolution infrared spectra are processed to determine the various spectral line parameters that are cited above. Spectra were taken using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak, Arizona as well as the Bruker FTS at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at Richland, Washington. Most of the spectra are acquired not only at room temperature, but also at several different cold temperatures. This procedure is necessary to study the variation of the spectral line parameters as a function of temperature in order to simulate the Earth's and other planetary atmospheric environments. Depending upon the strength or weakness of the various bands recorded and analyzed, the length(s) of the absorption cells in which the gas samples under study are kept varied from a few centimeters up to several meters and the sample temperatures varied from approximately +30 C to -63 C. Research on several infrared bands of various molecular species and their isotopomers are undertaken. Those studies are briefly described.

  16. High Resolution Laser Spectroscopy of Rhenium Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Allan G.; Hall, Ryan M.; Linton, Colan; Tokaryk, Dennis

    2014-06-01

    The first spectroscopic study of rhenium carbide, ReC, has been performed using both low and high resolution techniques to collect rotationally resolved electronic spectra from 420 to 500nm. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), and dispersed fluorescence (DF) techniques were employed. ReC was formed in our laser ablation molecular jet apparatus by ablating a rhenium target rod in the presence of 1% methane in helium. The low resolution spectrum identified four bands of an electronic system belonging to ReC, three of which have been studied so far. Extensive hyperfine structure composed of six hyperfine components was observed in the high resolution spectrum, as well as a clear distinction between the 187ReC and 185ReC isotopologues. The data seems consistent with a ^4Π - ^4Σ- transition, as was predicted before experimentation. Dispersed fluorescence spectra allowed us to determine the ground state vibrational frequency (ωe"=994.4 ± 0.3 wn), and to identify a low-lying electronically excited state at Te"=1118.4 ± 0.4 wn with a vibrational frequency of ωe"=984 ± 2 wn. Personal communication, F. Grein, University of New Brunswick

  17. High-Resolution Scintimammography: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel F. Brem; Joelle M. Schoonjans; Douglas A. Kieper; Stan Majewski; Steven Goodman; Cahid Civelek

    2002-07-01

    This study evaluated a novel high-resolution breast-specific gamma camera (HRBGC) for the detection of suggestive breast lesions. Methods: Fifty patients (with 58 breast lesions) for whom a scintimammogram was clinically indicated were prospectively evaluated with a general-purpose gamma camera and a novel HRBGC prototype. The results of conventional and high-resolution nuclear studies were prospectively classified as negative (normal or benign) or positive (suggestive or malignant) by 2 radiologists who were unaware of the mammographic and histologic results. All of the included lesions were confirmed by pathology. Results: There were 30 benign and 28 malignant lesions. The sensitivity for detection of breast cancer was 64.3% (18/28) with the conventional camera and 78.6% (22/28) with the HRBGC. The specificity with both systems was 93.3% (28/30). For the 18 nonpalpable lesions, sensitivity was 55.5% (10/18) and 72.2% (13/18) with the general-purpose camera and the HRBGC, respectively. For lesions 1 cm, 7 of 15 were detected with the general-purpose camera and 10 of 15 with the HRBGC. Four lesions (median size, 8.5 mm) were detected only with the HRBGC and were missed by the conventional camera. Conclusion: Evaluation of indeterminate breast lesions with an HRBGC results in improved sensitivity for the detection of cancer, with greater improvement shown for nonpalpable and 1-cm lesions.

  18. Improved image quality using monolithic scintillator detectors with dual-sided readout in a whole-body TOF-PET ring: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabacchini, Valerio; Surti, Suleman; Borghi, Giacomo; Karp, Joel S.; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2017-03-01

    We have recently built and characterized the performance of a monolithic scintillator detector based on a 32 mm  ×  32 mm  ×  22 mm LYSO:Ce crystal read out by digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM) arrays coupled to the crystal front and back surfaces in a dual-sided readout (DSR) configuration. The detector spatial resolution appeared to be markedly better than that of a detector consisting of the same crystal with conventional back-sided readout (BSR). Here, we aim to evaluate the influence of this difference in the detector spatial response on the quality of reconstructed images, so as to quantify the potential benefit of the DSR approach for high-resolution, whole-body time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) applications. We perform Monte Carlo simulations of clinical PET systems based on BSR and DSR detectors, using the results of our detector characterization experiments to model the detector spatial responses. We subsequently quantify the improvement in image quality obtained with DSR compared to BSR, using clinically relevant metrics such as the contrast recovery coefficient (CRC) and the area under the localized receiver operating characteristic curve (ALROC). Finally, we compare the results with simulated rings of pixelated detectors with DOI capability. Our results show that the DSR detector produces significantly higher CRC and increased ALROC values than the BSR detector. The comparison with pixelated systems indicates that one would need to choose a crystal size of 3.2 mm with three DOI layers to match the performance of the BSR detector, while a pixel size of 1.3 mm with three DOI layers would be required to get on par with the DSR detector.

  19. Improved image quality using monolithic scintillator detectors with dual-sided readout in a whole-body TOF-PET ring: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Tabacchini, Valerio; Surti, Suleman; Borghi, Giacomo; Karp, Joel S; Schaart, Dennis R

    2017-02-13

    We have recently built and characterized the performance of a monolithic scintillator detector based on a 32 mm  ×  32 mm  ×  22 mm LYSO:Ce crystal read out by digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM) arrays coupled to the crystal front and back surfaces in a dual-sided readout (DSR) configuration. The detector spatial resolution appeared to be markedly better than that of a detector consisting of the same crystal with conventional back-sided readout (BSR). Here, we aim to evaluate the influence of this difference in the detector spatial response on the quality of reconstructed images, so as to quantify the potential benefit of the DSR approach for high-resolution, whole-body time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) applications. We perform Monte Carlo simulations of clinical PET systems based on BSR and DSR detectors, using the results of our detector characterization experiments to model the detector spatial responses. We subsequently quantify the improvement in image quality obtained with DSR compared to BSR, using clinically relevant metrics such as the contrast recovery coefficient (CRC) and the area under the localized receiver operating characteristic curve (ALROC). Finally, we compare the results with simulated rings of pixelated detectors with DOI capability. Our results show that the DSR detector produces significantly higher CRC and increased ALROC values than the BSR detector. The comparison with pixelated systems indicates that one would need to choose a crystal size of 3.2 mm with three DOI layers to match the performance of the BSR detector, while a pixel size of 1.3 mm with three DOI layers would be required to get on par with the DSR detector.

  20. Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This report constitutes the final report for NASA Contract NASW-5054. This project processed Clementine I high resolution images of the Moon, mosaicked these images together, and created a 22-disk set of compact disk read-only memory (CD-ROM) volumes. The mosaics were produced through semi-automated registration and calibration of the high resolution (HiRes) camera's data against the geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic produced by the US Geological Survey (USGS). The HiRes mosaics were compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution nadir-looking observations. The images were spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel for sub-polar mosaics (below 80 deg. latitude) and using the stereographic projection at a scale of 30 m/pixel for polar mosaics. Only images with emission angles less than approximately 50 were used. Images from non-mapping cross-track slews, which tended to have large SPICE errors, were generally omitted. The locations of the resulting image population were found to be offset from the UV/Vis basemap by up to 13 km (0.4 deg.). Geometric control was taken from the 100 m/pixel global and 150 m/pixel polar USGS Clementine Basemap Mosaics compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Radiometric calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity dominated by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap, that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The sub-polar mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 deg. of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. Polar mosaics are tiled into squares 2250 pixels on a

  1. Development of a high resolution alpha spectrometer using a magnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, W. S.; Kang, C. S.; Kim, S. R.; Kim, G. B.; Lee, H. J.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, J. H.; So, J. H.; Kim, Y. H.

    2015-06-01

    We have developed a high resolution alpha spectrometer with a magnetic calorimeter. The operating principle of the detector is the calorimetric measurement of the temperature increase from particle absorption in a gold foil absorber at milli-Kelvin temperatures. A magnetic calorimeter made of gold doped with erbium on a superconducting meander pickup coil was used to accurately measure the temperature change, thereby acting as an ultra-sensitive thermometer. The detector demonstrated 1.2 keV FWHM equivalent resolution in alpha particle detection with an 241Am source. Many peaks were observed in the low-energy region from the absorption of low-energy X-rays, gamma rays, and conversion electrons. An energy resolution of 400 eV FWHM was achieved for 60 keV gamma rays that were measured with the alpha particles. Possible applications of such high resolution detectors are discussed.

  2. Study of multispectral convolution scatter correction in high resolution PET

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, R.; Lecomte, R.; Bentourkia, M.

    1996-12-31

    PET images acquired with a high resolution scanner based on arrays of small discrete detectors are obtained at the cost of low sensitivity and increased detector scatter. It has been postulated that these limitations can be overcome by using enlarged discrimination windows to include more low energy events and by developing more efficient energy-dependent methods to correct for scatter. In this work, we investigate one such method based on the frame-by-frame scatter correction of multispectral data. Images acquired in the conventional, broad and multispectral window modes were processed by the stationary and nonstationary consecutive convolution scatter correction methods. Broad and multispectral window acquisition with a low energy threshold of 129 keV improved system sensitivity by up to 75% relative to conventional window with a {approximately}350 keV threshold. The degradation of image quality due to the added scatter events can almost be fully recovered by the subtraction-restoration scatter correction. The multispectral method was found to be more sensitive to the nonstationarity of scatter and its performance was not as good as that of the broad window. It is concluded that new scatter degradation models and correction methods need to be established to fully take advantage of multispectral data.

  3. The TIROS-N high resolution infrared radiation sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, E. W.

    1979-01-01

    The high-resolution infrared radiation sounder (HIRS/2) was developed and flown on the Television and Infrared Observation Satellite, N Series (TIROS-N) as one means of obtaining atmospheric vertical profile information. The HIRS/2 receives visible and infrared spectrum radiation through a single telescope and selects 20 narrow spectral channels by means of a rotating filter wheel. A passive radiant cooler provides an operating temperature of 106.7K for the HgCdTe and InSb detectors while the visible detector operates at instrument frame temperature. Low noise amplifiers and digital processing provide 13 bit data for spacecraft data multiplexing and transmission. The qualities of system performance that determine sounding capability are the dynamic range of data collection, the noise equivalent radiance of the system, the registration of the air columns sampled in each channel, and the ability to upgrade the calibration of the instrument to maintain the performance standard throughout life. The basic performance of the instrument in test is described. Early orbital information from the TIROS-N launched on October 13, 1978 are given and some observations on system quality are made.

  4. High resolution x-ray and gamma ray imaging using diffraction lenses with mechanically bent crystals

    DOEpatents

    Smither, Robert K.

    2008-12-23

    A method for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation is provided. High quality mechanically bent diffracting crystals of 0.1 mm radial width are used for focusing the radiation and directing the radiation to an array of detectors which is used for analyzing their addition to collect data as to the location of the source of radiation. A computer is used for converting the data to an image. The invention also provides for the use of a multi-component high resolution detector array and for narrow source and detector apertures.

  5. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C/sub 44/H/sub 90/ paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol. 53 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging

    DOEpatents

    Paulus, Michael J.; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed; Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William; Gleason, Shaun S.; Thomas, Jr., Clarence E.

    2002-01-01

    A method for ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging, comprising the steps of: focusing a high energy particle beam, for example x-rays or gamma-rays, onto a target object; acquiring a 2-dimensional projection data set representative of the target object; generating a corrected projection data set by applying a deconvolution algorithm, having an experimentally determined a transfer function, to the 2-dimensional data set; storing the corrected projection data set; incrementally rotating the target object through an angle of approximately 180.degree., and after each the incremental rotation, repeating the radiating, acquiring, generating and storing steps; and, after the rotating step, applying a cone-beam algorithm, for example a modified tomographic reconstruction algorithm, to the corrected projection data sets to generate a 3-dimensional image. The size of the spot focus of the beam is reduced to not greater than approximately 1 micron, and even to not greater than approximately 0.5 microns.

  7. A high resolution ultraviolet Shuttle glow spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.

    1993-01-01

    The High Resolution Shuttle Glow Spectrograph-B (HRSGS-B) is a small payload being developed by the Naval Research Laboratory. It is intended for study of shuttle surface glow in the 180-400 nm near- and middle-ultraviolet wavelength range, with a spectral resolution of 0.2 nm. It will search for, among other possible features, the band systems of excited NO which result from surface-catalyzed combination of N and O. It may also detect O2 Hertzberg bands and N2 Vegard-Kaplan bands resulting from surface recombination. This wavelength range also includes possible N2+ and OH emissions. The HRSGS-B will be housed in a Get Away Special canister, mounted in the shuttle orbiter payload bay, and will observe the glow on the tail of the orbiter.

  8. High resolution wavefront measurement of aspheric optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erichsen, I.; Krey, S.; Heinisch, J.; Ruprecht, A.; Dumitrescu, E.

    2008-08-01

    With the recently emerged large volume production of miniature aspheric lenses for a wide range of applications, a new fast fully automatic high resolution wavefront measurement instrument has been developed. The Shack-Hartmann based system with reproducibility better than 0.05 waves is able to measure highly aspheric optics and allows for real time comparison with design data. Integrated advanced analysis tools such as calculation of Zernike coefficients, 2D-Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), Point Spread Function (PSF), Strehl-Ratio and the measurement of effective focal length (EFL) as well as flange focal length (FFL) allow for the direct verification of lens properties and can be used in a development as well as in a production environment.

  9. High-Resolution Broadband Spectral Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J; Edelstein, J

    2002-08-09

    We demonstrate solar spectra from a novel interferometric method for compact broadband high-resolution spectroscopy. The spectral interferometer (SI) is a hybrid instrument that uses a spectrometer to externally disperse the output of a fixed-delay interferometer. It also has been called an externally dispersed interferometer (EDI). The interferometer can be used with linear spectrometers for imaging spectroscopy or with echelle spectrometers for very broad-band coverage. EDI's heterodyning technique enhances the spectrometer's response to high spectral-density features, increasing the effective resolution by factors of several while retaining its bandwidth. The method is extremely robust to instrumental insults such as focal spot size or displacement. The EDI uses no moving parts, such as purely interferometric FTS spectrometers, and can cover a much wider simultaneous bandpass than other internally dispersed interferometers (e.g. HHS or SHS).

  10. High resolution detection system of capillary electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Li Qiang; Shi, Yan; Zheng, Hua; Lu, Zu Kang

    2007-12-01

    The capillary electrophoresis (CE) with laser induced fluorescence detection (LIFD) system was founded according to confocal theory. The 3-D adjustment of the exciting and collecting optical paths was realized. The photomultiplier tube (PMT) is used and the signals are processed by a software designed by ourselves. Under computer control, high voltage is applied to appropriate reservoirs and to inject and separate DNA samples respectively. Two fluorescent dyes Thiazole Orange (TO) and SYBR Green I were contrasted. With both of the dyes, high signals-to-noise images were obtained with the CE-LIFD system. The single-bases can be distinguished from the electrophoretogram and high resolution of DNA sample separation was obtained.

  11. High-resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing.

    PubMed

    Park, Jang-Ung; Hardy, Matt; Kang, Seong Jun; Barton, Kira; Adair, Kurt; Mukhopadhyay, Deep Kishore; Lee, Chang Young; Strano, Michael S; Alleyne, Andrew G; Georgiadis, John G; Ferreira, Placid M; Rogers, John A

    2007-10-01

    Efforts to adapt and extend graphic arts printing techniques for demanding device applications in electronics, biotechnology and microelectromechanical systems have grown rapidly in recent years. Here, we describe the use of electrohydrodynamically induced fluid flows through fine microcapillary nozzles for jet printing of patterns and functional devices with submicrometre resolution. Key aspects of the physics of this approach, which has some features in common with related but comparatively low-resolution techniques for graphic arts, are revealed through direct high-speed imaging of the droplet formation processes. Printing of complex patterns of inks, ranging from insulating and conducting polymers, to solution suspensions of silicon nanoparticles and rods, to single-walled carbon nanotubes, using integrated computer-controlled printer systems illustrates some of the capabilities. High-resolution printed metal interconnects, electrodes and probing pads for representative circuit patterns and functional transistors with critical dimensions as small as 1 mum demonstrate potential applications in printed electronics.

  12. Computer synthesis of high resolution electron micrographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, R.

    1976-01-01

    Specimen damage, spherical aberration, low contrast and noisy sensors combine to prevent direct atomic viewing in a conventional electron microscope. The paper describes two methods for obtaining ultra-high resolution in biological specimens under the electron microscope. The first method assumes the physical limits of the electron objective lens and uses a series of dark field images of biological crystals to obtain direct information on the phases of the Fourier diffraction maxima; this information is used in an appropriate computer to synthesize a large aperture lens for a 1-A resolution. The second method assumes there is sufficient amplitude scatter from images recorded in focus which can be utilized with a sensitive densitometer and computer contrast stretching to yield fine structure image details. Cancer virus characterization is discussed as an illustrative example. Numerous photographs supplement the text.

  13. Venus gravity - A high-resolution map

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasenberg, R. D.; Goldberg, Z. M.; Macneil, P. E.; Shapiro, I. I.

    1981-01-01

    The Doppler data from the radio tracking of the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) have been used in a two-stage analysis to develop a high-resolution map of the gravitational potential of Venus, represented by a central mass and a surface mass density. The two-stage procedure invokes a Kalman filter-smoother to determine the orbit of the spacecraft, and a stabilized linear inverter to estimate the surface mass density. The resultant gravity map is highly correlated with the topographic map derived from the PVO radar altimeter data. However, the magnitudes of the gravity variations are smaller than would be expected if the topography were uncompensated, indicating that at least partial compensation has taken place.

  14. The High Resolution Infrared Spectrum of HCl().

    PubMed

    Doménech, J L; Drouin, B J; Cernicharo, J; Herrero, V J; Tanarro, I

    2016-12-20

    The chloroniumyl cation, HCl(+), has been recently identified in space from Herschel's spectra. A joint analysis of extensive vis-UV spectroscopy emission data together with a few high-resolution and high-accuracy millimiter-wave data provided the necessary rest frequencies to support the astronomical identification. Nevertheless, the analysis did not include any infrared (IR) vibration-rotation data. Furthermore, with the end of the Herschel mission, infrared observations from the ground may be one of the few available means to further study this ion in space. In this work, we provide a set of accurate rovibrational transition wavenumbers as well as a new and improved global fit of vis-UV, IR and millimiter-wave spectroscopy laboratory data, that will aid in future studies of this molecule.

  15. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C44H90 paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol.

  16. Constructing a WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, T. H.; Masci, F.; Tsai, C. W.; Petty, S.; Cluver, M.; Assef, Roberto J.; Benford, D.; Blain, A.; Bridge, C.; Donoso, E.; Eisenhardt, P.; Fowler, J.; Koribalski, B.; Lake, S.; Neill, James D.; Seibert, M.; Stanford, S.; Wright, E.

    2012-01-01

    After eight months of continuous observations, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the entire sky at 3.4 micron, 4.6 micron, 12 micron, and 22 micron. We have begun a dedicated WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas project to fully characterize large, nearby galaxies and produce a legacy image atlas and source catalog. Here we summarize the deconvolution techniques used to significantly improve the spatial resolution of WISE imaging, specifically designed to study the internal anatomy of nearby galaxies. As a case study, we present results for the galaxy NGC 1566, comparing the WISE enhanced-resolution image processing to that of Spitzer, Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and ground-based imaging. This is the first paper in a two-part series; results for a larger sample of nearby galaxies are presented in the second paper.

  17. Constructing a WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrett, T. H.; Masci, F.; Tsai, C. W.; Petty, S.; Cluver, M.; Assef, Roberto J.; Benford, D.; Blain, A.; Bridge, C.; Donoso, E.; Eisenhardt, P.; Fowler, J.; Koribalski, B.; Lake, S.; Neill, James D.; Seibert, M.; Sheth, K.; Stanford, S.; Wright, E.

    2012-08-01

    After eight months of continuous observations, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the entire sky at 3.4 μm, 4.6 μm, 12 μm, and 22 μm. We have begun a dedicated WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas project to fully characterize large, nearby galaxies and produce a legacy image atlas and source catalog. Here we summarize the deconvolution techniques used to significantly improve the spatial resolution of WISE imaging, specifically designed to study the internal anatomy of nearby galaxies. As a case study, we present results for the galaxy NGC 1566, comparing the WISE enhanced-resolution image processing to that of Spitzer, Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and ground-based imaging. This is the first paper in a two-part series; results for a larger sample of nearby galaxies are presented in the second paper.

  18. A simple, high efficiency, high resolution spectropolarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barden, Samuel C.

    2012-09-01

    A simple concept is described that uses volume phase holographic gratings as polarizing dispersers for a high efficiency, high resolution spectropolarimeter. Although the idea has previously been mentioned in the literature as possible, such a concept has not been explored in detail. Performance analysis is presented for a VPHG spectropolarimeter concept that could be utilized for both solar and night-time astronomy. Instrumental peak efficiency can approach 100% with spectral dispersions permitting R~200,000 spectral resolution with diffraction limited telescopes. The instrument has 3-channels: two dispersed image planes with orthogonal polarization and an undispersed image plane. The concept has a range of versatility where it could be configured (with appropriate half-wave plates) for slit-fed spectroscopy or without slits for snapshot/hyperspectral/tomographic spectroscopic imaging. Multiplex gratings could also be used for the simultaneous recording of two separate spectral bands or multiple instruments could be daisy chained with beam splitters for further spectral coverage.

  19. High Resolution, High Frame Rate Video Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Papers and working group summaries presented at the High Resolution, High Frame Rate Video (HHV) Workshop are compiled. HHV system is intended for future use on the Space Shuttle and Space Station Freedom. The Workshop was held for the dual purpose of: (1) allowing potential scientific users to assess the utility of the proposed system for monitoring microgravity science experiments; and (2) letting technical experts from industry recommend improvements to the proposed near-term HHV system. The following topics are covered: (1) State of the art in the video system performance; (2) Development plan for the HHV system; (3) Advanced technology for image gathering, coding, and processing; (4) Data compression applied to HHV; (5) Data transmission networks; and (6) Results of the users' requirements survey conducted by NASA.

  20. High-resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jang-Ung; Hardy, Matt; Kang, Seong Jun; Barton, Kira; Adair, Kurt; Mukhopadhyay, Deep Kishore; Lee, Chang Young; Strano, Michael S.; Alleyne, Andrew G.; Georgiadis, John G.; Ferreira, Placid M.; Rogers, John A.

    2007-10-01

    Efforts to adapt and extend graphic arts printing techniques for demanding device applications in electronics, biotechnology and microelectromechanical systems have grown rapidly in recent years. Here, we describe the use of electrohydrodynamically induced fluid flows through fine microcapillary nozzles for jet printing of patterns and functional devices with submicrometre resolution. Key aspects of the physics of this approach, which has some features in common with related but comparatively low-resolution techniques for graphic arts, are revealed through direct high-speed imaging of the droplet formation processes. Printing of complex patterns of inks, ranging from insulating and conducting polymers, to solution suspensions of silicon nanoparticles and rods, to single-walled carbon nanotubes, using integrated computer-controlled printer systems illustrates some of the capabilities. High-resolution printed metal interconnects, electrodes and probing pads for representative circuit patterns and functional transistors with critical dimensions as small as 1μm demonstrate potential applications in printed electronics.

  1. The High Resolution Infrared Spectrum of HCl+

    PubMed Central

    Drouin, B. J.; Cernicharo, J.; Herrero, V. J.; Tanarro, I.

    2017-01-01

    The chloroniumyl cation, HCl+, has been recently identified in space from Herschel’s spectra. A joint analysis of extensive vis-UV spectroscopy emission data together with a few high-resolution and high-accuracy millimiter-wave data provided the necessary rest frequencies to support the astronomical identification. Nevertheless, the analysis did not include any infrared (IR) vibration-rotation data. Furthermore, with the end of the Herschel mission, infrared observations from the ground may be one of the few available means to further study this ion in space. In this work, we provide a set of accurate rovibrational transition wavenumbers as well as a new and improved global fit of vis-UV, IR and millimiter-wave spectroscopy laboratory data, that will aid in future studies of this molecule. PMID:28261442

  2. High resolution CT of Meckel's cave.

    PubMed

    Chui, M; Tucker, W; Hudson, A; Bayer, N

    1985-01-01

    High resolution CT of the parasellar region was carried out in 50 patients studied for suspected pituitary microadenoma, but who showed normal pituitary gland or microadenoma on CT. This control group of patients all showed an ellipsoid low-density area in the posterior parasellar region. Knowledge of the gross anatomy and correlation with metrizamide cisternography suggest that the low density region represents Meckel's cave, rather than just the trigeminal ganglion alone. Though there is considerable variation in the size of Meckel's cave in different patients as well as the two sides of the same patient, the rather constant ellipsoid configuration of the cave in normal subjects will aid in diagnosing small pathological lesions, thereby obviating more invasive cisternography via the transovale or lumbar route. Patients with "idiopathic" tic douloureux do not show a Meckel's cave significantly different from the control group.

  3. Results on damage induced by high-energy protons in LYSO calorimeter crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dissertori, G.; Luckey, D.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pauss, F.; Quittnat, M.; Wallny, R.; Glaser, M.

    2014-05-01

    Lutetium-Yttrium Orthosilicate doped with Cerium (LYSO), as a bright scintillating crystal, is a candidate for calorimetry applications in strong ionising-radiation fields and large high-energy hadron fluences are expected at the CERN Large Hadron Collider after the planned High-Luminosity upgrade. There, proton-proton collisions will produce fast hadron fluences up to ~ 5 ×1014cm-2 in the large-rapidity regions of the calorimeters. The performance of LYSO has been investigated, after exposure to different fluences of 24 GeV c-1 protons. Measured changes in optical transmission as a function of proton fluence are presented, and the evolution over time due to spontaneous recovery at room temperature is studied. The activation of materials will also be an issue in the described environment. Studies of the ambient dose induced by LYSO and its evolution with time, in comparison with other scintillating crystals, have also been performed through measurements and FLUKA simulations.

  4. High-Resolution Mapping in Manus Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, C. N.; Ferrini, V. L.

    2006-12-01

    Near-bottom seafloor mapping with precisely navigated deep submergence vehicles has become increasingly common in a range of oceanographic settings. Recent mapping efforts at deep-water hydrothermal vent sites have resulted in high-resolution (sub-meter) bathymetry datasets that can be used to identify morphological features associated with volcanic, tectonic, and hydrothermal processes. The resolution of these maps, and our ability to accurately quantify the complex morphologic details of hydrothermal structures has been limited by a number of variables including navigational accuracy, sonar settings (e.g. acoustic wavelength, sonar orientation, ping rate), survey parameters (e.g. altitude, speed), data density, and data processing techniques (e.g. gridding algorithms). We present the results of two near-bottom surveys conducted in August 2006 at the PACMANUS (Papua New Guinea-Australia-Canada Manus) hydrothermal field in the eastern Manus Basin of the Bismarck Sea, south of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea. Data were simultaneously acquired with two high-resolution multibeam sonar systems mounted on the Remote Operated Vehicle (ROV) Jason 2. A Simrad SM2000 (200 kHz) multibeam system was mounted in down-looking mode, and an Imagenex DeltaT (675 kHz) multibeam system was mounted on the brow of the vehicle in a forward-looking orientation. Surveys were conducted in parallel survey lines at 15 m altitude (15 m line spacing), and the can be used to generate sub-meter resolution maps of the seafloor. The maps were assembled using a terrain registration algorithm designed to minimize the affects of navigation error. Together, these sonars provide a complementary dataset that allows us to better quantify the 3-dimensional morphological characteristics of complex hydrothermal vent structures. This information can be used to more accurately estimate the volume of hydrothermal deposits, and render a more complete environmental picture that is less hindered by occlusions and

  5. High resolution films for bone regeneration evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jammal, María V; Territoriale, Erika B; Abate, Carlos M; Missana, Liliana R

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging techniques (DIxT) seem to be a useful tool for evaluating bone formation in both human and animal models. There is little evidence on the use of Soft X-Rays (sXR) with high-resolution films for studying the healing process in critical bone size defects (CSD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of soft X-Ray - High Resolution Films (sXR) to distinguish bone regeneration in CSDs. A CSD was created in each of 16 Wistar rat calvariae. The animals were euthanized at 1, 3 and 6 weeks after surgery. The samples were submitted to cXR (conventional X-rays), sXR techniques and histological procedures (HP). Bone formation was observed at CSD edges at all periods of time. At 6 week there was also new bone in the central area. The CSD was not fully regenerated after any period of time. Histometric results were 0.16%; 0.75% and 0.89% new bone formed at weeks 1, 3 and 6 respectively; radiometric results at cXR were 0% in all samples. Evaluation of sXR shows 0.4%; 0.50% and 3.64% bone at weeks 1, 3 and 6. Mean and Standard Deviation were calculated. The data were submitted to statistical analysis using the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient test. The r value was 0.581. Under these experimental conditions, sXR was found to be a suitable method for detecting new bone formation, based on the positive correlation between sXR and HP during the bone healing process of CSDs in rat calvaria. Furthermore, the sXR technique allowed us to obtain samples with appropriate spatial orientation.

  6. Pyramidal fractal dimension for high resolution images.

    PubMed

    Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, Michael; Ahammer, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Fractal analysis (FA) should be able to yield reliable and fast results for high-resolution digital images to be applicable in fields that require immediate outcomes. Triggered by an efficient implementation of FA for binary images, we present three new approaches for fractal dimension (D) estimation of images that utilize image pyramids, namely, the pyramid triangular prism, the pyramid gradient, and the pyramid differences method (PTPM, PGM, PDM). We evaluated the performance of the three new and five standard techniques when applied to images with sizes up to 8192 × 8192 pixels. By using artificial fractal images created by three different generator models as ground truth, we determined the scale ranges with minimum deviations between estimation and theory. All pyramidal methods (PM) resulted in reasonable D values for images of all generator models. Especially, for images with sizes ≥1024×1024 pixels, the PMs are superior to the investigated standard approaches in terms of accuracy and computation time. A measure for the possibility to differentiate images with different intrinsic D values did show not only that the PMs are well suited for all investigated image sizes, and preferable to standard methods especially for larger images, but also that results of standard D estimation techniques are strongly influenced by the image size. Fastest results were obtained with the PDM and PGM, followed by the PTPM. In terms of absolute D values best performing standard methods were magnitudes slower than the PMs. Concluding, the new PMs yield high quality results in short computation times and are therefore eligible methods for fast FA of high-resolution images.

  7. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2006-01-01

    The major research activities performed during the cooperative agreement enhanced our spectroscopic knowledge of molecules of atmospheric interest such as H2O (water vapor), O3 (ozone), HCN (hydrogen cyanide), CH4 (methane), NO2 (nitrogen dioxide) and CO (carbon monoxide). The data required for the analyses were obtained from two different Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS); one of which is located at the National Solar Observatory (NSO) on Kitt Peak, Arizona and the other instrument is located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) at Richland, Washington. The data were analyzed using a modified multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting algorithm developed by Dr. D. Chris Benner of the College of William and Mary. The results from these studies made significant improvements in the line positons and intensities for these molecules. The measurements of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients and the temperature dependence of pressure broadening and pressure induced shift coefficients for hundreds of infrared transitions of HCN, CO3 CH4 and H2O were also performed during this period. Results from these studies have been used for retrievals of stratospheric gas concentration profiles from data collected by several Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) infrared instruments as well as in the analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra such as those acquired by space-based, ground-based, and various balloon- and aircraft-borne experiments. Our results made significant contributions in several updates of the HITRAN (HIgh resolution TRANsmission) spectral line parameters database. This database enjoys worldwide recognition in research involving diversified scientific fields. The research conducted during the period 2003-2006 has resulted in publications given in this paper. In addition to Journal publications, several oral and poster presentations were given at various Scientific conferences within the United States

  8. Parametric positioning of a continuous crystal PET detector with depth of interaction decoding.

    PubMed

    Ling, T; Burnett, T H; Lewellen, T K; Miyaoka, R S

    2008-04-07

    Here we demonstrate a parametric positioning method on a continuous crystal detector. Three different models for the light distribution were tested. Diagnosis of the residues showed that the parametric model fits the experimental data better than Gaussian and Cauchy models in our particular experimental setup. Based on the correlation between the spread and the peak value of the light distribution model with the depth of interaction (DOI), we were able to estimate the three-dimensional position of a scintillation event. On our continuous miniature crystal element (cMiCE) detector module with 8 mm thick LYSO crystal, the intrinsic spatial resolution is 1.06 mm at the center and 1.27 mm at the corner using a maximum-likelihood estimation (MLE) method and the parametric model. The DOI resolution (full width at half maximum) is estimated to be approximately 3.24 mm. The positioning method using the parametric model outperformed the Gaussian and Cauchy models, in both MLE and weighted least-squares (WLS) fitting methods. The key feature of this technique is that it requires very little calibration of the detector, but still retains high resolution and high sensitivity.

  9. Fabricating High Resolution Mirrors for Hand X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speegle, Chet O.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Engelhaupt, Darell; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We describe the fabrication process for producing high-resolution conical mirrors for hard x-ray astronomy. When flown aboard stratospheric balloons, these high-resolution reflective mirrors focus hard x-rays (10-70 keV) emitted from cosmic sources such as supernovae, neutron stars, and quasars onto imaging focal plane detectors. Focused hard x-ray images allow scientists to determine the elemental compositions, temperatures, magnetic fields, velocities, and gravitational fields of these celestial bodies. The fabrication process involves generating super-polished mandrels, mandrel metrology, mirror shell nickel electroforming, and mirror testing. Each mandrel is a cylinder consisting of two conical segments; each segment is approximately 305-mm long. Through precision grinding these mandrels before super polishing, we have achieved 30 arc seconds, half power diameter replicated mirrors. During a May 2001 high atmosphere balloon flight, these mirrors focused high energy x-rays from three different celestial sources. However, we seek to improve the angular resolutions of future mirror shells by a factor of two. To achieve this goal, we have begun single point diamond turning the mandrels before super polishing. This has allowed greater precision tolerances on mandrel surface roughness and axial figure errors before super polishing. Surface roughnesses before polishing have been reduced from approximately 60 nm to approximately 15 nm. The peak to valley axial figure profile errors have been reduced from approximately 1.0 micrometers to approximately 0.4 micrometers. We are currently in Phase 2 of the HERO (high energy replicated optics) program which entails the production of sixteen 6-m-focal-length mirror modules, each containing a nested array of 15 mirror shells of diameters ranging from 50-mm to 94-mm. This flight is slated for the fall of 2003.

  10. High resolution infrared acquisitions droning over the LUSI mud eruption.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Felice, Fabio; Romeo, Giovanni; Di Stefano, Giuseppe; Mazzini, Adriano

    2016-04-01

    The use of low-cost hand-held infrared (IR) thermal cameras based on uncooled micro-bolometer detector arrays became more widespread during the recent years. Thermal cameras have the ability to estimate temperature values without contact and therefore can be used in circumstances where objects are difficult or dangerous to reach such as volcanic eruptions. Since May 2006 the Indonesian LUSI mud eruption continues to spew boiling mud, water, aqueous vapor, CO2, CH4 and covers a surface of nearly 7 km2. At this locality we performed surveys over the unreachable erupting crater. In the framework of the LUSI Lab project (ERC grant n° 308126), in 2014 and 2015, we acquired high resolution infrared images using a specifically equipped remote-controlled drone flying at an altitude of m 100. The drone is equipped with GPS and an autopilot system that allows pre-programming the flying path or designing grids. The mounted thermal camera has peak spectral sensitivity in LW wavelength (μm 10) that is characterized by low water vapor and CO2 absorption. The low distance (high resolution) acquisitions have a temperature detail every cm 40, therefore it is possible to detect and observe physical phenomena such as thermodynamic behavior, hot mud and fluids emissions locations and their time shifts. Despite the harsh logistics and the continuously varying gas concentrations we managed to collect thermal images to estimate the crater zone spatial thermal variations. We applied atmosphere corrections to calculate infrared absorption by high concentration of water vapor. Thousands of images have been stitched together to obtain a mosaic of the crater zone. Regular monitoring with heat variation measurements collected, e.g. every six months, could give important information about the volcano activity estimating its evolution. A future data base of infrared high resolution and visible images stored in a web server could be a useful monitoring tool. An interesting development will be

  11. Two-Dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Determination Module for Introductory Biochemistry: Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Lyso-Glycerophospholipids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Teresa A.; Rose, Rebecca L.; Bell, Sidney M.

    2013-01-01

    In this laboratory module, introductory biochemistry students are exposed to two-dimensional [superscript 1]H-nuclear magnetic resonance of glycerophospholipids (GPLs). Working in groups of three, students enzymatically synthesized and purified a variety of 2-acyl lyso GPLs. The structure of the 2-acyl lyso GPL was verified using [superscript…

  12. Efficient Compression of High Resolution Climate Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J.; Schuchardt, K. L.

    2011-12-01

    resolution climate data can be massive. Those data can consume a huge amount of disk space for storage, incur significant overhead for outputting data during simulation, introduce high latency for visualization and analysis, and may even make interactive visualization and analysis impossible given the limit of the data that a conventional cluster can handle. These problems can be alleviated by with effective and efficient data compression techniques. Even though HDF5 format supports compression, previous work has mainly focused on employ traditional general purpose compression schemes such as dictionary coder and block sorting based compression scheme. Those compression schemes mainly focus on encoding repeated byte sequences efficiently and are not well suitable for compressing climate data consist mainly of distinguished float point numbers. We plan to select and customize our compression schemes according to the characteristics of high-resolution climate data. One observation on high resolution climate data is that as the resolution become higher, values of various climate variables such as temperature and pressure, become closer in nearby cells. This provides excellent opportunities for predication-based compression schemes. We have performed a preliminary estimation of compression ratios of a very simple minded predication-based compression ratio in which we compute the difference between current float point number with previous float point number and then encoding the exponent and significance part of the float point number with entropy-based compression scheme. Our results show that we can achieve higher compression ratios between 2 and 3 in lossless compression, which is significantly higher than traditional compression algorithms. We have also developed lossy compression with our techniques. We can achive orders of magnitude data reduction while ensure error bounds. Moreover, our compression scheme is much more efficient and introduces much less overhead

  13. Performance evaluation of a PET demonstrator for PET-MR imaging based on monolithic LYSO:Ce scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarasola, I.; Cuerdo, R.; Navarrete, J.; García de Acilu, P.; Rato Mendes, P.; Cela, J. M.; Oller, J. C.; Romero, L.; Willmott, C.

    2011-12-01

    We are developing a positron emission tomography (PET) insert based on avalanche photodiode (APD) arrays and monolithic LYSO:Ce scintillators for human brain functional studies to be used inside a clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment. In a previous work [1], we demonstrated the performance of our detectors by implementing an experimental setup consisting of two monolithic blocks working in coincidence, which were read out by the first version of an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC), VATA240, followed by external coincidence and digitalization modules. This preliminary demonstrator showed good spatial resolution at detector level on the order of 2.2 mm full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) and good imaging qualities, which achieved reconstructed images of 22Na point sources with spatial resolutions of 2.1 mm FWHM. Nevertheless, we detected image distortions and compressions due to the non-linearities close to the edge of the crystals and the simplicity of that demonstrator with the absence of neighbor blocks [1]. In this work we have implemented a larger scale PET demonstrator, which is based on the new updated ASIC (VATA241) [2] and is formed by two sectors of four monolithic detector blocks placed face-to-face. This new prototype demonstrator has been built for validating the data readout architecture, the coincidence processing implemented in a Xilinx Virtex 5 field programmable gate array (FPGA), as well as the continuous neural networks (NN) training method required to determine the points of entrance over the surface of our monolithic detector blocks.

  14. Dedicated mobile high resolution prostate PET imager with an insertable transrectal probe

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Proffitt, James

    2010-12-28

    A dedicated mobile PET imaging system to image the prostate and surrounding organs. The imaging system includes an outside high resolution PET imager placed close to the patient's torso and an insertable and compact transrectal probe that is placed in close proximity to the prostate and operates in conjunction with the outside imager. The two detector systems are spatially co-registered to each other. The outside imager is mounted on an open rotating gantry to provide torso-wide 3D images of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs. The insertable probe provides closer imaging, high sensitivity, and very high resolution predominately 2D view of the prostate and immediate surroundings. The probe is operated in conjunction with the outside imager and a fast data acquisition system to provide very high resolution reconstruction of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs.

  15. HiJaK: the high-resolution J, H and K spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muirhead, Philip S.; Hall, Zachary J.; Veyette, Mark J.

    2014-08-01

    We present the science drivers, design requirements and a preliminary design for a high-resolution, broad- bandwidth, slit-fed cross-dispersed near-infrared spectrometer for 5-meter-class telescopes. Our concept, called the High-Resolution J, H and K Spectrometer, or HiJaK, utilizes an R6 echelle in a white-pupil design to achieve high resolution in a compact configuration with a 2048 x 2048 pixel infrared detector. We present a preliminary ray-traced optical design matched to the new 4.3-meter Discovery Channel Telescope in Happy Jack, Arizona. We also discuss mechanical and cryogenic options to house our optical design.

  16. High Resolution Astrophysical Observations Using Speckle Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-11

    Ebstein A new 2-D photon-counting camera, the PAPA (precision analg photon address) detector has been built, tested, and used successfully for the...later with an intensified video camera (an ISIT). Both Planetary Physics; and S. Ebstein is in the Division of Applied Sci- cameras were only...15 January 1985 APPENDIX B Digital recording on video cassette Steven Ebstein Division of Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge

  17. High resolution image measurements of nuclear tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirk, E. K.; Price, P. B.

    1980-01-01

    The striking clarity and high contrast of the mouths of tracks etched in CR-39 plastic detectors allow automatic measurement of track parameters to be made with simple image-recognition equipment. Using a commercially available Vidicon camera system with a microprocessor-controlled digitizer, resolution for normally incident C-12 and N-14 ions at 32 MeV/amu equivalent to a 14sigma separation of adjacent charges was demonstrated.

  18. High-resolution imaging using endoscopic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1990-08-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help to their control. 1.

  19. Holographic high-resolution endoscopic image recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1991-03-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help

  20. High Resolution BPM for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, C.; Chel, S.; Luong, M.; Napoly, O.; Novo, J.; Roudier, D.; Rouviere, N.

    2006-11-20

    A high resolution Beam Position Monitor (BPM) is necessary for the beam-based alignment systems of high energy and low emittance electron linacs. Such a monitor is developed in the framework of the European CARE/SRF programme, in a close collaboration between DESY and CEA/DSM/DAPNIA. This monitor is a radiofrequency re-entrant cavity, which can be used either at room or cryogenic temperature, in an environment where dust particle contamination has to be avoided, such as superconducting cavities in a cryomodule. A first prototype of a re-entrant BPM has already delivered measurements at 2K. inside the first cryomodule (ACC1) on the TESLA Test Facility 2 (TTF2). The performances of this BPM are analyzed both experimentally and theoretically, and the limitations of this existing system clearly identified. A new cavity and new electronics have been designed in order to improve the position resolution down to 1 {mu}m and the damping time down to 10 ns.

  1. High-resolution light microscopy of nanoforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodyanoy, Vitaly; Pustovyy, Oleg; Vainrub, Arnold

    2007-09-01

    We developed a high resolution light imaging system. Diffraction gratings with 100 nm width lines as well as less than 100 nm size features of different-shaped objects are clearly visible on a calibrated microscope test slide (Vainrub et al., Optics Letters, 2006, 31, 2855). The two-point resolution increase results from a known narrowing of the central diffraction peak for the annular aperture. Better visibility and advanced contrast of the smallest features in the image are due to enhancement of high spatial frequencies in the optical transfer function. The imaging system is portable, low energy, and battery operated. It has been adapted to use in both transmitting and reflecting light. It is particularly applicable for motile nanoform systems where structure and functions can be depicted in real time. We have isolated micrometer and submicrometer particles, termed proteons, from human and animal blood. Proteons form by reversible seeded aggregation of proteins around proteon nucleating centers (PNCs). PNCs are comprised of 1-2nm metallic nanoclusters containing 40-300 atoms. Proteons are capable of spontaneous assembling into higher nanoform systems assuming structure of complicated topology. The arrangement of complex proteon system mimics the structure of a small biological cell. It has structures that imitate membrane and nucleolus or nuclei. Some of these nanoforms are motile. They interact and divide. Complex nanoform systems can spontaneously reduce to simple proteons. The physical properties of these nanoforms could shed some light on the properties of early life forms or forms at extreme conditions.

  2. High Resolution Science with High Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windhorst, R.

    I will first review high resolution science that has been done with the Hubble Space Telescope on high redshift galaxies Next I will review the capabilities of the 6 5 meter James Webb Space Telescope JWST which is an optimized infrared telescope that can deploy automatically in space slated for launch to a halo L2 orbit in 2013 I will outline how the JWST can go about measuring First Light Reionization and Galaxy Assembly building on lessons learned from the Hubble Space Telescope I will show what more nearby galaxies observed in their restframe UV--optical light may look like to JWST at high redshifts Last I will summarize the Generation-X mission concept for an X-ray telescope designed to study the very early universe with 1000-times greater sensitivity than current facilities Gen-X will study the first generations of stars and black holes in the epoch z 10-20 the evolution of black holes and galaxies from high z to the present the chemical evolution of the universe and the properties of matter under extreme conditions This requires an effective area of 100 m 2 at 1 keV an angular resolution of 0 1 HPD over 0 1-10 keV

  3. Titania High-Resolution Color Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This high-resolution color composite of Titania was made from Voyager 2 images taken Jan. 24, 1986, as the spacecraft neared its closest approach to Uranus. Voyager's narrow-angle camera acquired this image of Titania, one of the large moons of Uranus, through the violet and clear filters. The spacecraft was about 500,000 kilometers (300,000 miles) away; the picture shows details about 9 km (6 mi) in size. Titania has a diameter of about 1,600 km (1,000 mi). In addition to many scars due to impacts, Titania displays evidence of other geologic activity at some point in its history. The large, trenchlike feature near the terminator (day-night boundary) at middle right suggests at least one episode of tectonic activity. Another, basinlike structure near the upper right is evidence of an ancient period of heavy impact activity. The neutral gray color of Titania is characteristic of the Uranian satellites as a whole. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  4. High Resolution Radar Measurements of Snow Avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElwaine, Jim; Sovilla, Betty; Vriend, Nathalie; Brennan, Paul; Ash, Matt; Keylock, Chris

    2013-04-01

    Geophysical mass flows, such as snow avalanches, are a major hazard in mountainous areas and have a significant impact on the infrastructure, economy and tourism of such regions. Obtaining a thorough understanding of the dynamics of snow avalanches is crucial for risk assessment and the design of defensive structures. However, because the underlying physics is poorly understood there are significant uncertainties concerning current models, which are poorly validated due to a lack of high resolution data. Direct observations of the denser core of a large avalanche are particularly difficult, since it is frequently obscured by the dilute powder cloud. We have developed and installed a phased array FMCW radar system that penetrates the powder cloud and directly images the dense core with a resolution of around 1 m at 50 Hz over the entire slope. We present data from recent avalanches at Vallee de la Sionne that show a wealth of internal structure and allow the tracking of individual fronts, roll waves and surges down the slope for the first time. We also show good agreement between the radar results and existing measurement systems that record data at particular points on the avalanche track.

  5. High Resolution Radar Measurements of Snow Avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElwaine, J. N.; Vriend, N. M.; Sovilla, B.; Keylock, C. J.; Brennan, P.; Ash, M.

    2012-12-01

    Geophysical mass flows, such as snow avalanches, are a major hazard in mountainous areas and have a significant impact on the infrastructure, economy and tourism of such regions. Obtaining a thorough understanding of the dynamics of snow avalanches is crucial for risk assessment and the design of defensive structures. However, because the underlying physics is poorly understood there are significant uncertainties concerning current models, which are poorly validated due to a lack of high resolution data. Direct observations of the denser core of a large avalanche are particularly difficult, since it is frequently obscured by the dilute powder cloud. We have developed and installed a phased array FMCW radar system that penetrates the powder cloud and directly images the dense core with a resolution of around 1 m at 50 Hz over the entire slope. We present data from recent avalanches at Vallée de la Sionne that show a wealth of internal structure and allow the tracking of individual fronts, roll waves and surges down the slope for the first time. We also show good agreement between the radar results and existing measurement systems that record data at particular points on the avalanche track.

  6. High Resolution Measurement of the Glycolytic Rate

    PubMed Central

    Bittner, Carla X.; Loaiza, Anitsi; Ruminot, Iván; Larenas, Valeria; Sotelo-Hitschfeld, Tamara; Gutiérrez, Robin; Córdova, Alex; Valdebenito, Rocío; Frommer, Wolf B.; Barros, L. Felipe

    2010-01-01

    The glycolytic rate is sensitive to physiological activity, hormones, stress, aging, and malignant transformation. Standard techniques to measure the glycolytic rate are based on radioactive isotopes, are not able to resolve single cells and have poor temporal resolution, limitations that hamper the study of energy metabolism in the brain and other organs. A new method is described in this article, which makes use of a recently developed FRET glucose nanosensor to measure the rate of glycolysis in single cells with high temporal resolution. Used in cultured astrocytes, the method showed for the first time that glycolysis can be activated within seconds by a combination of glutamate and K+, supporting a role for astrocytes in neurometabolic and neurovascular coupling in the brain. It was also possible to make a direct comparison of metabolism in neurons and astrocytes lying in close proximity, paving the way to a high-resolution characterization of brain energy metabolism. Single-cell glycolytic rates were also measured in fibroblasts, adipocytes, myoblasts, and tumor cells, showing higher rates for undifferentiated cells and significant metabolic heterogeneity within cell types. This method should facilitate the investigation of tissue metabolism at the single-cell level and is readily adaptable for high-throughput analysis. PMID:20890447

  7. High resolution beamforming for small aperture arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Chris; Null, Tom; Wagstaff, Ronald A.

    2003-04-01

    Achieving fine resolution bearing estimates for multiple sources using acoustic arrays with small apertures, in number of wavelengths, is a difficult challenge. It requires both large signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gains and very narrow beam responses. High resolution beamforming for small aperture arrays is accomplished by exploiting acoustical fluctuations. Acoustical fluctuations in the atmosphere are caused by wind turbulence along the propagation path, air turbulence at the sensor, source/receiver motion, unsteady source level, and fine scale temperature variations. Similar environmental and source dependent phenomena cause fluctuations in other propagation media, e.g., undersea, optics, infrared. Amplitude fluctuations are exploited to deconvolve the beam response functions from the beamformed data of small arrays to achieve high spatial resolution, i.e., fine bearing resolution, and substantial SNR gain. Results are presented for a six microphone low-frequency array with an aperture of less than three wavelengths. [Work supported by U.S. Army Armament Research Development and Engineering Center.

  8. CrIS High Resolution Hyperspectral Radiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepplewhite, C. L.; Strow, L. L.; Motteler, H.; Desouza-Machado, S. G.; Tobin, D. C.; Martin, G.; Gumley, L.

    2014-12-01

    The CrIS hyperspectral sounder flying on Suomi-NPPpresently has reduced spectral resolution in the mid-wave andshort-wave spectral bands due to truncation of the interferograms inorbit. CrIS has occasionally downlinked full interferograms for thesebands (0.8 cm max path, or 0.625 cm-1 point spacing) for a feworbits up to a full day. Starting Oct.1, 2014 CrIS will be commandedto download full interferograms continuously for the remainder of themission, although NOAA will not immediately produce high-spectralresolution Sensor Data Records (SDRs). Although the originalmotivation for operating in high-resolution mode was improved spectralcalibration, these new data will also improve (1) vertical sensitivityto water vapor, and (2) greatly increase the CrIS sensitivity tocarbon monoxide. This should improve (1) NWP data assimilation ofwater vapor and (2) provide long-term continuity of carbon monoxideretrievals begun with MOPITT on EOS-TERRA and AIRS on EOS-AQUA. Wehave developed a SDR algorithm to produce calibrated high-spectralresolution radiances which includes several improvements to theexisting CrIS SDR algorithm, and will present validation of thesehigh-spectral resolution radiances using a variety of techniques,including bias evaluation versus NWP model data and inter-comparisonsto AIRS and IASI using simultaneous nadir overpasses (SNOs). Theauthors are presently working to implement this algorithm for NASASuomi NPP Program production of Earth System Data Records.

  9. Ultra-high-resolution alpha spectrometry for nuclear forensics and safeguards applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bacrania, Minesh K; Croce, Mark; Bond, Evelyn; Dry, Donald; Moody, W. Allen; Lamont, Stephen; Rabin, Michael; Rim, Jung; Smith, Audrey; Beall, James; Bennett, Douglas; Kotsubo, Vincent; Horansky, Robert; Hilton, Gene; Schmidt, Daniel; Ullom, Joel; Cantor, Robin

    2010-01-01

    We will present our work on the development of ultra-high-resolution detectors for alpha particle spectrometry. These detectors, based on superconducting transition-edge sensors, offer energy resolution that is five to ten times better than conventional silicon detectors. Using these microcalorimeter detectors, the isotopic composition of mixed-actinide samples can be determined rapidly without the need for actinide separation chemistry to isolate each element, or mass spectrometry to separate isotopic signatures that can not be resolved using traditional alpha spectrometry (e.g. Pu-239/Pu-240, or Pu-238/Am-241). This paper will cover the detector and measurement system, actinide source preparation, and the quantitative isotopic analysis of a number of forensics- and safeguards-relevant radioactive sources.

  10. High resolution phoswich gamma-ray imager utilizing monolithic MPPC arrays with submillimeter pixelized crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, T.; Kataoka, J.; Nakamori, T.; Kishimoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Sato, K.; Ishikawa, Y.; Yamamura, K.; Kawabata, N.; Ikeda, H.; Kamada, K.

    2013-05-01

    We report the development of a high spatial resolution tweezers-type coincidence gamma-ray camera for medical imaging. This application consists of large-area monolithic Multi-Pixel Photon Counters (MPPCs) and submillimeter pixelized scintillator matrices. The MPPC array has 4 × 4 channels with a three-side buttable, very compact package. For typical operational gain of 7.5 × 105 at + 20 °C, gain fluctuation over the entire MPPC device is only ± 5.6%, and dark count rates (as measured at the 1 p.e. level) amount to <= 400 kcps per channel. We selected Ce-doped (Lu,Y)2(SiO4)O (Ce:LYSO) and a brand-new scintillator, Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (Ce:GAGG) due to their high light yield and density. To improve the spatial resolution, these scintillators were fabricated into 15 × 15 matrices of 0.5 × 0.5 mm2 pixels. The Ce:LYSO and Ce:GAGG scintillator matrices were assembled into phosphor sandwich (phoswich) detectors, and then coupled to the MPPC array along with an acrylic light guide measuring 1 mm thick, and with summing operational amplifiers that compile the signals into four position-encoded analog outputs being used for signal readout. Spatial resolution of 1.1 mm was achieved with the coincidence imaging system using a 22Na point source. These results suggest that the gamma-ray imagers offer excellent potential for applications in high spatial medical imaging.

  11. Cerium Doped LSO/LYSO Crystal Development for future High Energy Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ren-Yuan Zhu

    2012-03-25

    Because of their high stopping power and fast and bright scintillation, cerium doped LSO and LYSO crystals have attracted a broad interest in the physics community pursuing precision electromagnetic calorimeter for future high energy physics experiments. Their excellent radiation hardness against gamma-rays, neutrons and charged hadrons also makes them a preferred material for calorimeters to be operated in a severe radiation environment, such as the HL-LHC. An effort was made at SIPAT to grow 25 X{sub 0} (28 cm) long LYSO crystals for high energy physics applications. In this paper, the optical and scintillation properties and its radiation hardness against gamma-ray irradiations up to 1 Mrad are presented for the first 2.5 X 2.5 X 28 cm LYSO sample. An absorption band was found at the seed end of this sample and three other 20 cm long samples, which was traced back to a bad seed crystal used in the corresponding crystal growth process. Significant progresses in optical and scintillation properties were achieved for large size LYSO crystals after eliminating this absorption band.

  12. Energy and time resolution of a LYSO matrix prototype for the Mu2e experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Atanov, N.; Baranov, V.; Colao, F.; ...

    2015-09-28

    We have measured the performances of a LYSO crystal matrix prototype tested with electron and photon beams in the energy range 60–450 MeV. Furthermore, this study has been carried out to determine the achievable energy and time resolutions for the calorimeter of the Mu2e experiment.

  13. Large Scale, High Resolution, Mantle Dynamics Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geenen, T.; Berg, A. V.; Spakman, W.

    2007-12-01

    To model the geodynamic evolution of plate convergence, subduction and collision and to allow for a connection to various types of observational data, geophysical, geodetical and geological, we developed a 4D (space-time) numerical mantle convection code. The model is based on a spherical 3D Eulerian fem model, with quadratic elements, on top of which we constructed a 3D Lagrangian particle in cell(PIC) method. We use the PIC method to transport material properties and to incorporate a viscoelastic rheology. Since capturing small scale processes associated with localization phenomena require a high resolution, we spend a considerable effort on implementing solvers suitable to solve for models with over 100 million degrees of freedom. We implemented Additive Schwartz type ILU based methods in combination with a Krylov solver, GMRES. However we found that for problems with over 500 thousend degrees of freedom the convergence of the solver degraded severely. This observation is known from the literature [Saad, 2003] and results from the local character of the ILU preconditioner resulting in a poor approximation of the inverse of A for large A. The size of A for which ILU is no longer usable depends on the condition of A and on the amount of fill in allowed for the ILU preconditioner. We found that for our problems with over 5×105 degrees of freedom convergence became to slow to solve the system within an acceptable amount of walltime, one minute, even when allowing for considerable amount of fill in. We also implemented MUMPS and found good scaling results for problems up to 107 degrees of freedom for up to 32 CPU¡¯s. For problems with over 100 million degrees of freedom we implemented Algebraic Multigrid type methods (AMG) from the ML library [Sala, 2006]. Since multigrid methods are most effective for single parameter problems, we rebuild our model to use the SIMPLE method in the Stokes solver [Patankar, 1980]. We present scaling results from these solvers for 3D

  14. Wavefront metrology for high resolution optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Ryan H.

    Next generation extreme ultraviolet (EUV) optical systems are moving to higher resolution optics to accommodate smaller length scales targeted by the semiconductor industry. As the numerical apertures (NA) of the optics become larger, it becomes increasingly difficult to characterize aberrations due to experimental challenges associated with high-resolution spatial filters and geometrical effects caused by large incident angles of the test wavefront. This dissertation focuses on two methods of wavefront metrology for high resolution optical systems. The first method, lateral shearing interferometry (LSI), is a self-referencing interferometry where the test wavefront is incident on a low spatial frequency grating, and the resulting interference between the diffracted orders is used to reconstruct the wavefront aberrations. LSI has many advantages over other interferometric tests such as phase-shifting point diffraction interferometry (PS/PDI) due to its experimental simplicity, stability, relaxed coherence requirements, and its ability to scale to high numerical apertures. While LSI has historically been a qualitative test, this dissertation presents a novel quantitative investigation of the LSI interferogram. The analysis reveals the existence of systematic aberrations due to the nonlinear angular response from the diffraction grating that compromises the accuracy of LSI at medium to high NAs. In the medium NA regime (0.15 < NA < 0.35), a holographic model is presented that derives the systematic aberrations in closed form, which demonstrates an astigmatism term that scales as the square of the grating defocus. In the high NA regime (0.35 < NA), a geometrical model is introduced that describes the aberrations as a system of transcendental equations that can be solved numerically. The characterization and removal of these systematic errors is a necessary step that unlocks LSI as a viable candidate for high NA EUV optical testing. The second method is a novel image

  15. Toward high-resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, Daniel; Huie, Philip; Vankov, Alexander; Asher, Alon; Baccus, Steven

    2005-04-01

    It has been already demonstrated that electrical stimulation of retina can produce visual percepts in blind patients suffering from macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Current retinal implants provide very low resolution (just a few electrodes), while several thousand pixels are required for functional restoration of sight. We present a design of the optoelectronic retinal prosthetic system that can activate a retinal stimulating array with pixel density up to 2,500 pix/mm2 (geometrically corresponding to a visual acuity of 20/80), and allows for natural eye scanning rather than scanning with a head-mounted camera. The system operates similarly to "virtual reality" imaging devices used in military and medical applications. An image from a video camera is projected by a goggle-mounted infrared LED-LCD display onto the retina, activating an array of powered photodiodes in the retinal implant. Such a system provides a broad field of vision by allowing for natural eye scanning. The goggles are transparent to visible light, thus allowing for simultaneous utilization of remaining natural vision along with prosthetic stimulation. Optical control of the implant allows for simple adjustment of image processing algorithms and for learning. A major prerequisite for high resolution stimulation is the proximity of neural cells to the stimulation sites. This can be achieved with sub-retinal implants constructed in a manner that directs migration of retinal cells to target areas. Two basic implant geometries are described: perforated membranes and protruding electrode arrays. Possibility of the tactile neural stimulation is also examined.

  16. High-resolution phylogenetic microbial community profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Esther; Coleman-Derr, Devin; Bowman, Brett; Schwientek, Patrick; Clum, Alicia; Copeland, Alex; Ciobanu, Doina; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Gies, Esther; Hallam, Steve; Tringe, Susannah; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-03-17

    The representation of bacterial and archaeal genome sequences is strongly biased towards cultivated organisms, which belong to merely four phylogenetic groups. Functional information and inter-phylum level relationships are still largely underexplored for candidate phyla, which are often referred to as microbial dark matter. Furthermore, a large portion of the 16S rRNA gene records in the GenBank database are labeled as environmental samples and unclassified, which is in part due to low read accuracy, potential chimeric sequences produced during PCR amplifications and the low resolution of short amplicons. In order to improve the phylogenetic classification of novel species and advance our knowledge of the ecosystem function of uncultivated microorganisms, high-throughput full length 16S rRNA gene sequencing methodologies with reduced biases are needed. We evaluated the performance of PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing in high-resolution phylogenetic microbial community profiling. For this purpose, we compared PacBio and Illumina metagenomic shotgun and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of a mock community as well as of an environmental sample from Sakinaw Lake, British Columbia. Sakinaw Lake is known to contain a large age of microbial species from candidate phyla. Sequencing results show that community structure based on PacBio shotgun and 16S rRNA gene sequences is highly similar in both the mock and the environmental communities. Resolution power and community representation accuracy from SMRT sequencing data appeared to be independent of GC content of microbial genomes and was higher when compared to Illumina-based metagenome shotgun and 16S rRNA gene (iTag) sequences, e.g. full-length sequencing resolved all 23 OTUs in the mock community, while iTags did not resolve closely related species. SMRT sequencing hence offers various potential benefits when characterizing uncharted microbial communities.

  17. Compact high-resolution gamma-ray computed tomography system for multiphase flow studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bieberle, A.; Nehring, H.; Berger, R.; Arlit, M.; Haerting, H.-U.; Schubert, M.; Hampel, U.

    2013-03-15

    In this paper, a compact high-resolution gamma-ray Computed Tomography (CompaCT) measurement system for multiphase flow studies and tomographic imaging of technical objects is presented. Its compact and robust design makes it particularly suitable for studies on industrial facilities and outdoor applications. Special care has been given to thermal ruggedness, shock resistance, and radiation protection. Main components of the system are a collimated {sup 137}Cs isotopic source, a thermally stabilised modular high-resolution gamma-ray detector arc with 112 scintillation detector elements, and a transportable rotary unit. The CompaCT allows full CT scans of objects with a diameter of up to 130 mm and can be operated with any tilting angle from 0 Degree-Sign (horizontal) to 90 Degree-Sign (vertical).

  18. 3D high resolution pure optical photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhixing; Chen, Sung-Liang; Ling, Tao; Guo, L. Jay; Carson, Paul L.; Wang, Xueding

    2012-02-01

    The concept of pure optical photoacoustic microscopy(POPAM) was proposed based on optical rastering of a focused excitation beam and optically sensing the photoacoustic signal using a microring resonator fabricated by a nanoimprinting technique. After some refinedment of in the resonator structure and mold fabrication, an ultrahigh Q factor of 3.0×105 was achieved which provided high sensitivity with a noise equivalent detectable pressure(NEDP) value of 29Pa. This NEDP is much lower than the hundreds of Pascals achieved with existing optical resonant structures such as etalons, fiber gratings and dielectric multilayer interference filters available for acoustic measurement. The featured high sensitivity allowed the microring resonator to detect the weak photoacoustic signals from micro- or submicroscale objects. The inherent superbroad bandwidth of the optical microring resonator combined with an optically focused scanning beam provided POPAM of high resolution in the axial as well as both lateral directions while the axial resolution of conventional photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) suffers from the limited bandwidth of PZT detectors. Furthermore, the broadband microring resonator showed similar sensitivity to that of our most sensitive PZT detector. The current POPAM system provides a lateral resolution of 5μm and an axial resolution of 8μm, comparable to that achieved by optical microscopy while presenting the unique contrast of optical absorption and functional information complementing other optical modalities. The 3D structure of microvasculature, including capillary networks, and even individual red blood cells have been discerned successfully in the proof-of-concept experiments on mouse bladders ex vivo and mouse ears in vivo. The potential of approximately GHz bandwidth of the microring resonator also might allow much higher resolution than shown here in microscopy of optical absorption and acoustic propagation properties at depths in unfrozen tissue

  19. High-resolution radon monitoring and hydrodynamics at Mount Vesuvius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigolini, Corrado; Salierno, Francesco; Gervino, Gianpiero; Bergese, Paolo; Marino, Ciro; Russo, Massimo; Prati, Paolo; Ariola, Vincenzo; Bonetti, Roberto; Begnini, Stefania

    A yearlong high-resolution radon survey has been carried on at Mount Vesuvius, starting in May 1998. Radon activities were acquired by exposing charcoal canisters and track-etch detectors. Sampling stations were deployed along two major summit faults and around the caldera bottom. Volcanically-related earthquakes, with MD ≥ 2.5, may be discriminated from regional seismic events since their cumulative radon anomalies are recorded from stations located along all the above structural features. On the contrary, radon anomalies correlated to regional earthquakes, with MD ≥ 4, are essentially recorded by the sampling sites located along the two summit faults (whose roots extend deeper into the Tertiary basement rocks that underlay the volcano). Radon migration to the surface is ruled by convection within a porous medium of relatively low porosity (ϕ ≈ 10-5), suggesting that fluid motion is strongly localised along fractures. It is suggested that fluid pressure build up, followed by fluid release and migration during incipient fracturing of the porous medium, precede the onset of volcanically-induced earthquakes.

  20. High resolution spectroscopy from ground and space: Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, William E.

    In contrast to the broad brush approach often used for the sounding of atmospheric constituents, high resolution spectroscopy is a refined, efficient and often elegant tool which uses small spectral regions to probe specific phenomena. Application areas range from wind and temperature measurements in terrestrial and planetary atmospheres, to magnetic field measurements on the sun. In most cases, subtle changes in line shape or line position are used with a priori information to generate the geophysical information of interest. Use of this technique for space applications started in the 1960's and was a natural extension of the spectroscopic heritage which was started by Fabry and Perot and Michelson over 100 year ago. This field has evolved over the past 50 years in response to refinements in detector technologies, manufacturing techniques and the development of active techniques using lasers. This session will trace the evolution of these techniques over the past half-century and showcase the state-of-the-art today. Within Canada, Gordon Shepherd has played a hand in many of the developments in this technique. This introduction will briefly summarize this field and provide a short historical sketch of Shepherd's contributions as a lead into his keynote review of this topic.

  1. Optical multichannel analyzer techniques for high resolution optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, J.L.

    1980-06-01

    The development of optical multichannel analyzer techniques for UV/VIS spectroscopy is presented. The research focuses on the development of spectroscopic techniques for measuring high resolution spectral lineshape functions from the exciton phosphorescence in H/sub 2/-1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene. It is found that the temperature dependent frequency shifts and widths confirm a theoretical model based on an exchange theory. The exchange of low energy phonon modes which couple with excited state exciton transitions is shown to display the proper temperature dependent behavior. In addition to the techniques for using the optical multichannel analyzer (OMA) to perform low light level target integration, the use of the OMA for capturing spectral information in transient pulsed laser applications is discussed. An OMP data acquisition system developed for real-time signal processng is described. Both hardware and software interfacing considerations for control and data acquisition by a microcomputer are described. The OMA detector is described in terms of the principles behind its photoelectron detection capabilities and its design is compared with other optoelectronic devices.

  2. A high resolution Timing Counter for the MEG II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gerone, M.; Bevilacqua, A.; Biasotti, M.; Boca, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Gatti, F.; Nishimura, M.; Ootani, W.; Pizzigoni, G.; Rossella, M.; Shibata, N.; Siccardi, F.; Simonetta, M.; Uchiyama, Y.; Yoshida, K.

    2016-07-01

    The development of a Timing Counter detector designed for the MEGII upgrade of the MEG experiment, which strives to improve the sensitivity on the μ+ →e+ γ decay of an order of magnitude, is presented. It is based on two sets of counters (sectors) arranged on a semi-cylindrical structure; each sector consists of 256 counters. Each counter consists of tile of fast scintillator with a dual-side read-out based on SiPM arrays in series connection. The high granularity has two advantages: optimized size for achieving high resolution (75 ps) for the single counter, and a signal e+ crosses several counters, so that resolution improves by averaging multiple time measurements. A prototype has been built and tested both in BTF and PSI facilities in order to prove the multi-hit scheme in MEG-like beam conditions. A 35 ps resolution with eight hits has been obtained with a e+ beam at 100 kHz. The first sector will be tested in the MEG II pre-engineering run planned at the end of 2015.

  3. Specimen preparation for high-resolution cryo-EM

    PubMed Central

    Passmore, Lori A.; Russo, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging a material with electrons at near-atomic resolution requires a thin specimen that is stable in the vacuum of the transmission electron microscope. For biological samples, this comprises a thin layer of frozen aqueous solution containing the biomolecular complex of interest. The process of preparing a high-quality specimen is often the limiting step in the determination of structures by single-particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM). Here we describe a systematic approach for going from a purified biomolecular complex in aqueous solution to high-resolution electron micrographs that are suitable for 3D structure determination. This includes a series of protocols for the preparation of vitrified specimens on various specimen supports, including all-gold and graphene. We also describe techniques for troubleshooting when a preparation fails to yield suitable specimens, and common mistakes to avoid during each part of the process. Finally, we include recommendations for obtaining the highest quality micrographs from prepared specimens with current microscope, detector and support technology. PMID:27572723

  4. Dielectric resistive plate chamber—the first step in new high-resolution TOF technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akindinov, A.; Golovine, V.; Martemianov, A.; Petrov, V.; Smirnitski, A.; Voloshin, K.

    2002-11-01

    Modern high-energy nuclear physics experiments, in which many thousands of particles are produced, require qualitatively new detectors for particle identification (PID). Dielectric Resistive Plate Chamber (DRPC) is one of the first options of a new high-resolution time-measuring technology. It was invented and studied during the initial stage of R&D for the ALICE/LHC PID system based on Time-of-Flight measurements. In this article, the main DRPC features are described.

  5. A multi-DSP system for the neutron high resolution Fourier diffractometer

    SciTech Connect

    Drozdov, V.A.; Butenko, V.A.; Prikhodko, V.I.

    1998-08-01

    The multi-DSP data acquisition system for neutron time-of-flight spectrum measurements requiring fast real-time data processing is designed and is operated at the neutron High Resolution Fourier Diffractometer (HRFD). The use of high performance DSPs and front-end electronics based on flexible PLDs allows increasing of the efficiency of neutron diffractometers with a Fourier chopper and a multi-element detector system by the method of electronic time-focusing.

  6. High Resolution Imager (HRI) for the Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT) definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The design of the high resolution imager (HRI) on HEAO 2 was modified for use in the instrument complement of the Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT). Mechanical models of the front end assembly, central electronics assembly, and detector assembly were used to accurately represent the HRI envelope for both fit checks and focal plane configuration studies. The mechanical and electrical interfaces were defined and the requirements for electrical ground support equipment were established. A summary description of the ROSAT telescope and mission is included.

  7. High Resolution Airborne Shallow Water Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbacher, F.; Pfennigbauer, M.; Aufleger, M.; Ullrich, A.

    2012-07-01

    In order to meet the requirements of the European Water Framework Directive (EU-WFD), authorities face the problem of repeatedly performing area-wide surveying of all kinds of inland waters. Especially for mid-sized or small rivers this is a considerable challenge imposing insurmountable logistical efforts and costs. It is therefore investigated if large-scale surveying of a river system on an operational basis is feasible by employing airborne hydrographic laser scanning. In cooperation with the Bavarian Water Authority (WWA Weilheim) a pilot project was initiated by the Unit of Hydraulic Engineering at the University of Innsbruck and RIEGL Laser Measurement Systems exploiting the possibilities of a new LIDAR measurement system with high spatial resolution and high measurement rate to capture about 70 km of riverbed and foreland for the river Loisach in Bavaria/Germany and the estuary and parts of the shoreline (about 40km in length) of lake Ammersee. The entire area surveyed was referenced to classic terrestrial cross-section surveys with the aim to derive products for the monitoring and managing needs of the inland water bodies forced by the EU-WFD. The survey was performed in July 2011 by helicopter and airplane and took 3 days in total. In addition, high resolution areal images were taken to provide an optical reference, offering a wide range of possibilities on further research, monitoring, and managing responsibilities. The operating altitude was about 500 m to maintain eye-safety, even for the aided eye, the airspeed was about 55 kts for the helicopter and 75 kts for the aircraft. The helicopter was used in the alpine regions while the fixed wing aircraft was used in the plains and the urban area, using appropriate scan rates to receive evenly distributed point clouds. The resulting point density ranged from 10 to 25 points per square meter. By carefully selecting days with optimum water quality, satisfactory penetration down to the river bed was achieved

  8. High Resolution Velocity Structure in Eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasyanos, M. E.; Gok, R.; Zor, E.; Walter, W. R.

    2004-12-01

    We investigate the crust and upper mantle structure of eastern Turkey where the Anatolian, Arabian and Eurasian Plates meet, forming a complex tectonic regime. The Bitlis suture is a continental collision zone between the Anatolian plateau and the Arabian plate. Broadband data available through the Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment (ETSE) provide a unique opportunity for studying the high resolution velocity structure of the region. Zor et al. (2003) found an average 46 km thick crust in the Anatolian plateau using a six-layered grid search inversion of the ETSE receiver functions. Receiver functions are sensitive to the velocity contrast of interfaces and the relative travel time of converted and reverberated waves between those interfaces. The interpretation of receiver functions alone, however, may result in an apparent depth-velocity trade-off [Ammon et al., 1990]. In order to improve upon this velocity model, we have combined the receiver functions with surface wave data using the joint inversion method of Julia et al. (2000). In this technique, the two sets of observations are combined into a single algebraic equation and each data set is weighted by an estimate of the uncertainty in the observations. The receiver functions are calculated using an iterative time-domain deconvolution technique. We also consider azimuthal changes in the receiver functions and have stacked them into different groups accordingly. We are improving our surface wave model by making Love and Rayleigh dispersion measurements at the ETSE stations and incorporating them into a regional group velocity model for periods between 10 and 100 seconds. Preliminary results indicate a strong trend in the long period group velocities toward the northeast, indicating slow upper mantle velocities in the area consistent with Pn, Sn and receiver function results. Starting models used for the joint inversions include both a 1-D model from a 12-ton dam shot recorded by ETSE [Gurbuz et al., 2004] and

  9. High Resolution Velocity Structure in Eastern Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M; Gok, R; Zor, E; Walter, W

    2004-09-03

    We investigate the crustal and upper mantle structure of eastern Turkey where the Anatolian, Arabian and Eurasian Plates meet and form a complex tectonic structure. The Bitlis suture is a continental collision zone between the Anatolian plateau and the Arabian plate. Broadband data available through the Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment (ETSE) provided a unique opportunity for studying the high resolution velocity structure. Zor et al. found an average 46 km thick crust in Anatolian plateau using six-layered grid search inversion of the ETSE receiver functions. Receiver functions are sensitive to the velocity contrast of interfaces and the relative travel time of converted and reverberated waves between those interfaces. The interpretation of receiver function alone with many-layered parameterization may result in an apparent depth-velocity tradeoff. In order to improve previous velocity model, we employed the joint inversion method with many layered parameterization of Julia et al. (2000) to the ETSE receiver functions. In this technique, the receiver function and surface-wave observations are combined into a single algebraic equation and each data set is weighted by an estimate of the uncertainty in the observations. We consider azimuthal changes of receiver functions and have stacked them into different groups. We calculated the receiver functions using iterative time-domain deconvolution technique and surface wave group velocity dispersion curves between 10-100 sec. We are making surface wave dispersion measurements at the ETSE stations and have incorporated them into a regional group velocity model. Preliminary results indicate a strong trend in the long period group velocity in the northeast. This indicates slow upper mantle velocities in the region consistent with Pn, Sn and receiver function results. We started with both the 1-D model that is obtained with the 12 tones dam explosion shot data recorded by ETSE network and the existing receiver function

  10. High resolution gamma spectroscopy well logging system

    SciTech Connect

    Giles, J.R.; Dooley, K.J.

    1997-05-01

    A Gamma Spectroscopy Logging System (GSLS) has been developed to study sub-surface radionuclide contamination. The absolute counting efficiencies of the GSLS detectors were determined using cylindrical reference sources. More complex borehole geometries were modeled using commercially available shielding software and correction factors were developed based on relative gamma-ray fluence rates. Examination of varying porosity and moisture content showed that as porosity increases, and as the formation saturation ratio decreases, relative gamma-ray fluence rates increase linearly for all energies. Correction factors for iron and water cylindrical shields were found to agree well with correction factors determined during previous studies allowing for the development of correction factors for type-304 stainless steel and low-carbon steel casings. Regression analyses of correction factor data produced equations for determining correction factors applicable to spectral gamma-ray well logs acquired under non-standard borehole conditions.

  11. Development of High-Resolution Scintillator Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Larry A. Franks; Warnick J. Kernan

    2007-09-01

    Mercuric iodide (HgI2) is a well known material for the direct detection of gamma-rays; however, the largest volume achievable is limited by the thickness of the detector which needs to be a small fraction of the average trapping length for electrons. We report results of using HgI2 crystals to fabricate photocells used in the readout of scintillators. The optical spectral response and efficiency of these photocells were measured and will be reported. Nuclear response from an HgI2 photocell that was optically matched to a cerium-activated scintillator is presented and discussed. Further improvements can be expected by optimizing the transparent contact technology.

  12. High resolution diffraction imaging of crystals grown in microgravity and closely related terrestrial crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiner, B.; Dobbyn, R.; Black, D.; Burdette, H.; Kuriyama, M.; Spal, R.; Vandenberg, L.; Fripp, A.; Simchick, R.; Lal, R.

    1991-01-01

    Irregularities found in three crystals grown in space, in four crystals grown entirely on the ground were examined and compared. Irregularities were observed in mercuric iodide, lead tin telluride, triglycine sulfate, and gallium arsenide by high resolution synchrotron x radiation diffraction imaging. Radiation detectors made from mercuric iodide crystals grown in microgravity were reported to perform far better than conventional detectors grown from the same material under full gravity. Effort is now underway to reproduce these 'space' crystals, optimize their properties, and extend comparable superiority to other types of materials.

  13. The LYSO crystal calorimeter for the Mu2e experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzullo, G.; Budagov, J.; Carosi, R.; Cervelli, F.; Cheng, C.; Cordelli, M.; Corradi, G.; Davydov, Yu; Echenard, B.; Giovannella, S.; Glagolev, V.; Happacher, F.; Hitlin, D.; Luca, A.; Martini, M.; Miscetti, S.; Murat, P.; Ongmonkolkul, P.; Porter, F.; Saputi, A.; Sarra, I.; Spinella, F.; Stomaci, V.; Tassielli, G.

    2014-03-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab searches the neutrino-less conversion of the muon into electron in the field of an Aluminum nucleus. If such a process will be observed, it will be a proof of the charged-lepton-flavor-violation (cLFV), otherwise Mu2e will set an upper limit of Rμe < 6 × 10-17 @ 90% C.L. (which represents an improvement by 3-4 order of magnitude over the existing limit). The Mu2e detector apparatus consists of a magnetic spectrometer, devoted to the measurement of the electrons momentum, and an electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC) which provides an independent measurement of the electron energy, time and position, used for validating or rejecting candidate tracks selected by the tracking system. In this paper, we describe the baseline project of the EMC and present results in terms of performances and R&D.

  14. A high-resolution x-ray spectrometer for a kaon mass measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelan, Kevin; Suzuki, Ken; Zmeskal, Johann; Tortorella, Daniele; Bühler, Matthias; Hertrich, Theo

    2017-02-01

    The ASPECT consortium (Adaptable Spectrometer Enabled by Cryogenic Technology) is currently constructing a generalised cryogenic platform for cryogenic detector work which will be able to accommodate a wide range of sensors. The cryogenics system is based on a small mechanical cooler with a further adiabatic demagnetisation stage and will work with cryogenic detectors at sub-Kelvin temperatures. The commercial aim of the consortium is to produce a compact, user-friendly device with an emphasis on reliability and portability which can easily be transported for specialised on-site work, such as beam-lines or telescope facilities. The cryogenic detector platform will accommodate a specially developed cryogenic sensor, either a metallic magnetic calorimeter or a magnetic penetration-depth thermometer. The detectors will be designed to work in various temperatures regions with an emphasis on optimising the various detector resolutions for specific temperatures. One resolution target is of about 10 eV at the energies range typically created in kaonic atoms experiments (soft x-ray energies). A following step will see the introduction of continuous, high-power, sub-Kelvin cooling which will bring the cryogenic basis for a high resolution spectrometer system to the market. The scientific goal of the project will produce an experimental set-up optimised for kaon-mass measurements performing high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy on a beam-line provided foreseeably by the J-PARC (Tokai, Japan) or DAΦNE (Frascati, Italy) facilities.

  15. ALMA Debuts High-Resolution Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-07-01

    through space as it orbits the Sun. The resolution of these images — enough to study the shape and even some surface features of the asteroid! — are unprecedented for this wavelength. HL Tau is a young star surrounded by a protoplanetary disk. ALMA's detailed observations of this region revealed remarkable structure within the disk: a series of light and dark concentric rings indicative of planets caught in the act of forming. Studying this system will help us understand how multi-planet solar systems like our own form and evolve. The star-forming galaxy SDP.81 — located so far away that the light we see was emitted when the Universe was only 15% of its current age — is gravitationally-lensed into a cosmic arc, due to the convenient placement of a nearby foreground galaxy. The combination of the lucky alignment and ALMA's high resolution grant us a spectacularly detailed view of this distant galaxy, allowing us to study its actual shape and the motion within it. The observations from ALMA's first test of its long baseline demonstrate that ALMA is capable of doing the transformational science it promised. As we gear up for the next cycle of observations, it's clear that exciting times are ahead! Citation: ALMA ship et al. 2015 ApJ 808 L1, L2, L3 and L4. Focus on the ALMA Long Baseline Campaign

  16. High-resolution noncontact atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Rubén; García, Ricardo; Schwarz, Udo

    2009-07-01

    original papers authored by many of the leading groups in the field with the goal of providing a well-balanced overview on the state-of-the-art in this rapidly evolving field. These papers, many of which are based on notable presentations given during the Madrid conference, feature highlights such as (1) the development of sophisticated force spectroscopy procedures that are able to map the complete 3D tip-sample force field on different surfaces; (2) the considerable resolution improvement of Kelvin probe force microscopy (reaching, in some cases, the atomic scale), which is accompanied by a thorough, quantitative understanding of the contrast observed; (3) the perfecting of atomic resolution imaging on insulating substrates, which helps reshape our microscopic understanding of surface properties and chemical activity of these surfaces; (4) the description of instrumental and methodological developments that pave the way to the atomic-scale characterization of magnetic and electronic properties of nanostructures, and last but not least (5) the extension of dynamic imaging modes to high-resolution operation in liquids, ultimately achieving atomic resolution. The latter developments are already having a significant impact in the highly competitive field of biological imaging under physiological conditions. This special issue of Nanotechnology would not have been possible without the highly professional support from Nina Couzin, Amy Harvey, Alex Wotherspoon and the entire Nanotechnology team at IOP Publishing. We are thankful for their help in pushing this project forward. We also thank the authors who have contributed their excellent original articles to this issue, the referees whose comments have helped make the issue an accurate portrait of this rapidly moving field, and the entire NC-AFM community that continues to drive NC-AFM to new horizons.

  17. Using high-resolution displays for high-resolution cardiac data.

    PubMed

    Goodyer, Christopher; Hodrien, John; Wood, Jason; Kohl, Peter; Brodlie, Ken

    2009-07-13

    The ability to perform fast, accurate, high-resolution visualization is fundamental to improving our understanding of anatomical data. As the volumes of data increase from improvements in scanning technology, the methods applied to visualization must evolve. In this paper, we address the interactive display of data from high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging scanning of a rabbit heart and subsequent histological imaging. We describe a visualization environment involving a tiled liquid crystal display panel display wall and associated software, which provides an interactive and intuitive user interface. The oView software is an OpenGL application that is written for the VR Juggler environment. This environment abstracts displays and devices away from the application itself, aiding portability between different systems, from desktop PCs to multi-tiled display walls. Portability between display walls has been demonstrated through its use on walls at the universities of both Leeds and Oxford. We discuss important factors to be considered for interactive two-dimensional display of large three-dimensional datasets, including the use of intuitive input devices and level of detail aspects.

  18. High Resolution Chemical Study of ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, Pamela G.; Douglas, Susanne; Kuhlman, Kimberly R.

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the chemistry of a sample of the SNC meteorite ALH84001 using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) with an energy dispersive chemical analytical detector and a focused ion beam secondary ion mass spectrometer (FIB-SIMS). Here we present the chemical data, both spectra and images, from two techniques that do not require sample preparation with a conductive coating, thus eliminating the possibility of preparation-induced textural artifacts. The FIB-SIMS instrument includes a column optimized for SEM with a quadrupole type mass spectrometer. Its spatial and spectral resolution are 20 nm and 0.4 AMU, respectively. The spatial resolution of the ESEM for chemical analysis is about 100 nm. Limits of detection for both instruments are mass dependent. Both the ESEM and the FIB-SIMS instrument revealed contrasting surficial features; crumbled, weathered appearance of the matrix in some regions as well as a rather ubiquitous presence of euhedral halite crystals, often associated with cracks or holes in the surface of the rock. Other halogen elements present in the vicinity of the NaCl crystals include K and Br. In this report, elemental inventories are shown as mass spectra and as X-ray maps.

  19. High Resolution X-ray Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, Webster

    2002-01-01

    NAG5-5020 covered a period of 7.5 years during which a great deal of progress was made in x-ray optical techniques under this grant. We survived peer review numerous times during the effort to keep the grant going. In 1994, when the grant started we were actively pursuing the application of spherical mirrors to improving x-ray telescopes. We had found that x-ray detectors were becoming rapidly more sophisticated and affordable, but that x-ray telescopes were only being improved through the intense application of money within the AXAF program. Clearly new techniques for the future were needed. We were successful in developing and testing at the HELSTF facility in New Mexico a four reflection coma-corrected telescope made from spheres. We were able to demonstrate 0.3 arcsecond resolution, almost to the diffraction limit of the system. The community as a whole was, at that time, not particularly interested in looking past AXAF (Chandra) and the effort needed to evolve. Since we had reached the diffraction limit using non-Wolter optics we then decided to see if we could build an x-ray interferometer in the laboratory. In the lab the potential for improved resolution was substantial. If synthetic aperture telescopes could be built in space, then orders of magnitude improvement would become feasible. In 1998 NASA, under the direction of Dr. Nick White of Goddard, started a study to assess the potential and feasibility of x-ray interferometry in space. My work became of central interest to the committee because it indicated that such was possible. In early 1999 we had the breakthrough that allowed us build a practical interferometer. By using flats and hooking up with the Marshall Space Flight Center facilities we were able to demonstrate fringes at 1.25keV on a one millimeter baseline. This actual laboratory demonstration provided the solid proof of concept that NASA needed.

  20. High resolution mapping of martian neutron albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanin, A.

    It is known from data of High Energy Neutron Detector (HEND) on Mars Odyssey that there is very large regional variation of leakage flux of epithermal neutrons on the surface of Mars. The factor of regional variations is about 10 for mapping with linear resolution of about 200-300 km. Two circumpolar depressions of epithermal neutrons emission were found above latitudes of 50 - 60, which correspond to Northern and Southern permafrost regions with very high (up to 50 wt%) content of water ice. Also, according to the HEND mapping data, there are two opposite equatorial regions Arabia Terra and Memnonia, which contain about 10 wt% of water under the top layer of dry soil with a column density of about 30 g/cm2. The surface resolution of orbital data about 300 km is determined by natural collimation of neutrons in the subsurface and in the atmosphere. For a territory larger than this size, the average content of water could be estimated by the large area approximation. In this case the comparison is performed between the average counts of neutrons over the territory and predicted counts for the planet with the same model of the entire surface. The content of water is found, as the best fitting parameter of this model. For local spots of depression with much smaller sizes this procedure underestimates the content of water. Thus, according this approximation, the spot with largest depression in the Arabia Terra at 10-12 N and 30-32 E contains at least 16 wt% of water, but in reality this value could be much larger. The content of water at this spot will be obtained with better spatial resolution by so-called inverse projection procedure. This model-dependent procedure allows to test water content for areas much smaller than the size of HEND surface resolution. The results of water content according to this procedure will be presented for the Arabia spot with the greatest depression of epithermal neutrons.

  1. Measurement of Time Resolution of the Mu2e LYSO Calorimeter Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Atanov, N.

    2015-09-16

    In this paper we present the time resolution measurements of the LutetiumYttrium Oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) calorimeter prototype for the Mu2e experiment. The measurements have been performed using the e- beam of the Beam Test Facility (BTF) in Frascati, Italy in the energy range from 100 to 400 MeV. The calorimeter prototype consisted of twenty five 30x30x130 mm3, LYSO crystals read out by 10x10 mm2 Hamamatsu Avalanche Photodiodes (APDs). The energy dependence of the measured time resolution can be parametrized as σt(E) = a/pE/GeV⊕b, with the stochastic and constant terms a = (51±1) ps and b = (14 ± 1) ps, respectively. This corresponds to the time resolution of (162 ± 3) ps at 100 MeV.

  2. High-resolution ground-based spectroscopy: where and how ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallavicini, R.

    2002-07-01

    An overview is presented of high-resolution optical spectrographs in operation or under development at large telescopes, with emphasis on those facilities best suited for the study of late-type stars and stellar surface inhomogeneities. Plans for the development of new high-resolution spectroscopic instruments are discussed with emphasis on the ICE spectrograph for the PEPSI spectropolarimeter at the LBT.

  3. Development of a high resolution gamma camera system using finely grooved GAGG scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Kataoka, Jun; Oshima, Tsubasa; Ogata, Yoshimune; Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu; Hatazawa, Jun

    2016-06-01

    High resolution gamma cameras require small pixel scintillator blocks with high light output. However, manufacturing a small pixel scintillator block is difficult when the pixel size becomes small. To solve this limitation, we developed a high resolution gamma camera system using a finely grooved Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (GAGG) plate. Our gamma camera's detector consists of a 1-mm-thick finely grooved GAGG plate that is optically coupled to a 1-in. position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The grooved GAGG plate has 0.2×0.2 mm pixels with 0.05-mm wide slits (between the pixels) that were manufactured using a dicing saw. We used a Hamamatsu PSPMT with a 1-in. square high quantum efficiency (HQE) PSPMT (R8900-100-C12). The energy resolution for the Co-57 gamma photons (122 keV) was 18.5% FWHM. The intrinsic spatial resolution was estimated to be 0.7-mm FWHM. With a 0.5-mm diameter pinhole collimator mounted to its front, we achieved a high resolution, small field-of-view gamma camera. The system spatial resolution for the Co-57 gamma photons was 1.0-mm FWHM, and the sensitivity was 0.0025%, 10 mm from the collimator surface. The Tc-99m HMDP administered mouse images showed the fine structures of the mouse body's parts. Our developed high resolution small pixel GAGG gamma camera is promising for such small animal imaging.

  4. Detection of high energy muons with sub-20 ps timing resolution using L(Y)SO crystals and SiPM readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benaglia, A.; Gundacker, S.; Lecoq, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Para, A.; Pauwels, K.; Auffray, E.

    2016-09-01

    Precise timing capability will be a key aspect of particle detectors at future high energy colliders, as the time information can help in the reconstruction of physics events at the high collision rate expected there. Other than being used in detectors for PET, fast scintillating crystals coupled to compact Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) constitute a versatile system that can be exploited to realize an ad-hoc timing device to be hosted in a larger high energy physics detector. In this paper, we present the timing performance of LYSO:Ce and LSO:Ce codoped 0.4% Ca crystals coupled to SiPMs, as measured with 150 GeV muons at the CERN SPS H2 extraction line. Small crystals, with lengths ranging from 5 mm up to 30 mm and transverse size of 2 × 2mm2 or 3 × 3mm2 , were exposed to a 150 GeV muon beam. SiPMs from two different companies (Hamamatsu and FBK) were used to detect the light produced in the crystals. The best coincidence time resolution value of (14.5 ± 0.5) ps , corresponding to a single-detector time resolution of about 10 ps, is demonstrated for 5 mm long LSO:Ce,Ca crystals coupled to FBK SiPMs, when time walk corrections are applied.

  5. Development and Characterization of a High Resolution Portable Gamma Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Muhammad

    The recent disaster of Fukushima in Japan combined with the high demand to enhance nuclear safety and to minimize personal exposure to radioactive materials has a significant impact on research and development of radiation detection instrumentation. Currently, there is ample effort worldwide in the pursuit of radiation detection to maximize the accuracy and meet international standards in terms of size and specifications to enable radiation protection decision making. Among the requirements is the development of a portable, light-weight gamma-ray isotope identifier to be used by first responders in nuclear accidents as well as for radiation security and identification of illicit material isotopes. From nuclear security perspective, research into advanced screening technologies has become a high priority in all aspects, while for occupational safety, and environmental radiation protection, the regulatory authorities are requiring specific performance of radiation detection and measuring devices. At the applied radiation laboratory of the University of Ontario Institute of Technology, UOIT, the development of a high resolution spectrometer for medium and high energy gamma ray has been conducted. The spectrometer used a newly developed scintillator based on a LaBr3(Ce) crystal. The detector has been modeled using advanced Monte Carlo code (MCNP/X code) for the response function simulation and parameter characterization. The simulation results have been validated by experimental investigations using a wide range of gamma radiation energies. The developed spectrometer has been characterized in terms of resolution and response in different fields. It has also been compared with other crystals such as NaI(TI) and LiI(Eu).

  6. Accelerated high-resolution photoacoustic tomography via compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arridge, Simon; Beard, Paul; Betcke, Marta; Cox, Ben; Huynh, Nam; Lucka, Felix; Ogunlade, Olumide; Zhang, Edward

    2016-12-01

    Current 3D photoacoustic tomography (PAT) systems offer either high image quality or high frame rates but are not able to deliver high spatial and temporal resolution simultaneously, which limits their ability to image dynamic processes in living tissue (4D PAT). A particular example is the planar Fabry-Pérot (FP) photoacoustic scanner, which yields high-resolution 3D images but takes several minutes to sequentially map the incident photoacoustic field on the 2D sensor plane, point-by-point. However, as the spatio-temporal complexity of many absorbing tissue structures is rather low, the data recorded in such a conventional, regularly sampled fashion is often highly redundant. We demonstrate that combining model-based, variational image reconstruction methods using spatial sparsity constraints with the development of novel PAT acquisition systems capable of sub-sampling the acoustic wave field can dramatically increase the acquisition speed while maintaining a good spatial resolution: first, we describe and model two general spatial sub-sampling schemes. Then, we discuss how to implement them using the FP interferometer and demonstrate the potential of these novel compressed sensing PAT devices through simulated data from a realistic numerical phantom and through measured data from a dynamic experimental phantom as well as from in vivo experiments. Our results show that images with good spatial resolution and contrast can be obtained from highly sub-sampled PAT data if variational image reconstruction techniques that describe the tissues structures with suitable sparsity-constraints are used. In particular, we examine the use of total variation (TV) regularization enhanced by Bregman iterations. These novel reconstruction strategies offer new opportunities to dramatically increase the acquisition speed of photoacoustic scanners that employ point-by-point sequential scanning as well as reducing the channel count of parallelized schemes that use detector arrays.

  7. High Resolution X-ray Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, Webster

    2002-01-01

    NAG5-5020 covered a period of 7.5 years during which a great deal of progress was made in x-ray optical techniques under this grant. We survived peer review numerous times during the effort to keep the grant going. In 1994, when the grant started we were actively pursuing the application of spherical mirrors to improving x-ray telescopes. We had found that x-ray detectors were becoming rapidly more sophisticated and affordable, but that x-ray telescopes were only being improved through the intense application of money within the AXAF program. Clearly new techniques for the future were needed. We were successful in developing and testing at the HELSTF facility in New Mexico a four reflection coma-corrected telescope made from spheres. We were able to demonstrate 0.3 arcsecond resolution, almost to the diffraction limit of the system. The community as a whole was, at that time, not particularly interested in looking past AXAF (Chandra) and the effort needed to evolve. Since we had reached the diffraction limit using non-Wolter optics we then decided to see if we could build an x-ray interferometer in the laboratory. In the lab the potential for improved resolution was substantial. If synthetic aperture telescopes could be built in space, then orders of magnitude improvement would become feasible. In 1998 NASA, under the direction of Dr Nick White of Goddard, started a study to assess the potential and feasibility of x-ray interferometry in space. My work became of central interest to the committee because it indicated that such was possible. In early 1999 we had the breakthrough that allowed us build a practical interferometer. By using flats and hooking up with the Marshall Space Flight Center facilities we were able to demonstrate fringes at 1.25keV on a one millimeter baseline. This actual laboratory demonstration provided the solid proof of concept that NASA needed. As the year progressed the future of x-ray astronomy jelled around the Maxim program. Maxim is a

  8. Vertical drift chambers for the Hall A high-resolution spectrometers at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Fissum; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; Craig Leathers; Daniel Dale; Edmond Offermann; Howard Fenker; John Segal; Jeffrey Templon; Jian-Ping Chen; Jianguo Zhao; Juncai Gao; Alan Gavalya; Nilanga Liyanage; Risa Wechsler; Robert Michaels; Shalev Gilad; William Bertozzi

    2001-12-01

    The High Resolution Spectrometers in Hall A at Jefferson Laboratory have been instrumented with state-of-the-art Vertical Drift Chambers designed and constructed by the Nuclear Interactions Group at MITLNS in conjunction with the Physics Division at Jefferson Lab. These chambers rely on a unique, high cell-density design made possible by the absence of field-shaping wires. Each chamber has an inert per-plane resolution for 5-cell cosmic ray track of 145 mu-m FWHM when operated on the bench at -4.8 kV with argon-isobutane gas, and 225 mu-m FWHM for 5-cell electron tracks when operated in the High Resolution Spectrometer detector stack at -4.0 kV with argon-ethane gas. The design and construction facilities wire placement and replacement to 50 mu-m, very low dark current, and no crosswalk. The detectors have been in almost continuous use since April 1996, providing reliable, high-resolution charged-particles tracking data for the hall A physics program.

  9. Design and performance evaluation of a high resolution IRI-microPET preclinical scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islami rad, S. Z.; Peyvandi, R. Gholipour; lehdarboni, M. Askari; Ghafari, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    PET for small animal, IRI-microPET, was designed and built at the NSTRI. The scanner is made of four detectors positioned on a rotating gantry at a distance 50 mm from the center. Each detector consists of a 10×10 crystal matrix of 2×2×10 mm3 directly coupled to a PS-PMT. A position encoding circuit for specific PS-PMT has been designed, built and tested with a PD-MFS-2MS/s-8/14 data acquisition board. After implementing reconstruction algorithms (FBP, MLEM and SART) on sinograms, images quality and system performance were evaluated by energy resolution, timing resolution, spatial resolution, scatter fraction, sensitivity, RMS contrast and SNR parameters. The energy spectra were obtained for the crystals with an energy window of 300-700 keV. The energy resolution in 511 keV averaged over all modules, detectors, and crystals, was 23.5%. A timing resolution of 2.4 ns FWHM obtained by coincidence timing spectrum was measured with crystal LYSO. The radial and tangential resolutions for 18F (1.15-mm inner diameter) at the center of the field of view were 1.81 mm and 1.90 mm, respectively. At a radial offset of 5 mm, the FWHM values were 1.96 and 2.06 mm. The system scatter fraction was 7.1% for the mouse phantom. The sensitivity was measured for different energy windows, leading to a sensitivity of 1.74% at the center of FOV. Also, images quality was evaluated by RMS contrast and SNR factors, and the results show that the reconstructed images by MLEM algorithm have the best RMS contrast, and SNR. The IRI-microPET presents high image resolution, low scatter fraction values and improved SNR for animal studies.

  10. Aircraft Detection in High-Resolution SAR Images Based on a Gradient Textural Saliency Map

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yihua; Li, Qingyun; Li, Yansheng; Tian, Jinwen

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a new automatic and adaptive aircraft target detection algorithm in high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of airport. The proposed method is based on gradient textural saliency map under the contextual cues of apron area. Firstly, the candidate regions with the possible existence of airport are detected from the apron area. Secondly, directional local gradient distribution detector is used to obtain a gradient textural saliency map in the favor of the candidate regions. In addition, the final targets will be detected by segmenting the saliency map using CFAR-type algorithm. The real high-resolution airborne SAR image data is used to verify the proposed algorithm. The results demonstrate that this algorithm can detect aircraft targets quickly and accurately, and decrease the false alarm rate. PMID:26378543

  11. Wide-aperture aspherical lens for high-resolution terahertz imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernomyrdin, Nikita V.; Frolov, Maxim E.; Lebedev, Sergey P.; Reshetov, Igor V.; Spektor, Igor E.; Tolstoguzov, Viktor L.; Karasik, Valeriy E.; Khorokhorov, Alexei M.; Koshelev, Kirill I.; Schadko, Aleksander O.; Yurchenko, Stanislav O.; Zaytsev, Kirill I.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce wide-aperture aspherical lens for high-resolution terahertz (THz) imaging. The lens has been designed and analyzed by numerical methods of geometrical optics and electrodynamics. It has been made of high-density polyethylene by shaping at computer-controlled lathe and characterized using a continuous-wave THz imaging setup based on a backward-wave oscillator and Golay detector. The concept of image contrast has been implemented to estimate image quality. According to the experimental data, the lens allows resolving two points spaced at 0.95λ distance with a contrast of 15%. To highlight high resolution in the THz images, the wide-aperture lens has been employed for studying printed electronic circuit board containing sub-wavelength-scale elements. The observed results justify the high efficiency of the proposed lens design.

  12. High-resolution far-field ghost imaging via sparsity constraint

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Wenlin; Han, Shensheng

    2015-01-01

    Ghost imaging (GI) is a method to nonlocally image an object with a single-pixel detector. However, the speckle's transverse size at the object plane limits the system's imaging resolution for conventional GI linear reconstruction algorithm. By combining the sparsity constraint of imaging object with ghost imaging method, we demonstrate experimentally that ghost imaging via sparsity constraint (GISC) can dramatically enhance the imaging resolution even using the random measurements far below the Nyquist limit. The image reconstruction algorithm of GISC is based on compressive sensing. Factors affecting the reconstruction quality of high-resolution GISC, such as the receiving system's numerical aperture and the object's sparse representation basis, are also investigated experimentally. This high-resolution imaging technique will have great applications in the microscopy and remote-sensing areas. PMID:25787897

  13. High resolution multidetector CT aided tissue analysis and quantification of lung fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavaletta, Vanessa A.; Karwoski, Ronald A.; Bartholmai, Brian; Robb, Richard A.

    2006-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, also known as Idiopathic Usual Interstitial Pneumontis, pathologically) is a progressive diffuse lung disease which has a median survival rate of less than four years with a prevalence of 15-20/100,000 in the United States. Global function changes are measured by pulmonary function tests and the diagnosis and extent of pulmonary structural changes are typically assessed by acquiring two-dimensional high resolution CT (HRCT) images. The acquisition and analysis of volumetric high resolution Multi-Detector CT (MDCT) images with nearly isotropic pixels offers the potential to measure both lung function and structure. This paper presents a new approach to three dimensional lung image analysis and classification of normal and abnormal structures in lungs with IPF.

  14. High-Resolution Array with Prony, MUSIC, and ESPRIT Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-25

    N avalI Research La bora tory AD-A255 514 Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/FR/5324-92-9397 High-resolution Array with Prony, music , and ESPRIT...unlimited t"orm n pprovoiREPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE OMB. o 0 104 0188 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS High-resolution Array with Prony. MUSIC . and...the array high-resolution properties of three algorithms: the Prony algo- rithm, the MUSIC algorithm, and the ESPRIT algorithm. MUSIC has been much

  15. Distributed MIMO Radar for Imaging and High Resolution Target Localization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-02

    28-2012 Final Report 04/15/2009 - 11/30/2011 Distributed MIMO Radar for Imaging and High Resolution Target Localization FA9550-09-1-0303 Alexander M...randomly placed sensors. MIMO radar, High-Resolution radar 19 Distributed MIMO Radar for Imaging and High Resolution Target Localization Air Force Office...configured with its antennas collocated [6] or distributed over an area [7, 8]. We refer to radio elements of a MIMO radar as nodes. Nodes may be equipped

  16. Collimator selection for SPECT brain imaging: the advantage of high resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, S.P.; Polak, J.F.; Kijewski, M.F.; Holman, B.L.

    1986-11-01

    We compared a prototype long-bore (LB) high-resolution collimator with a low-energy, general-purpose collimator (LEGP) using 99mTc and /sup 123/I. The LB collimator provided a 56% improvement in tomographic resolution (autocorrelation width) over the LEGP for 99mTc; for /sup 123/I, the gain was 79%, providing substantially improved contrast for small structures. The sensitivity of the LB collimator, however, is only 32% of that of the LEGP. The imaging tasks to be performed on (/sup 123/I)IMP brain scans involve localization and discrimination of small, high-contrast brain structures and detection of abnormalities in shape, size, or uptake, rather than simple detection of lesions. Observer performance in such higher-order imaging tasks is known to depend on high spatial resolution, even at the cost of sensitivity. Patient studies confirmed that, for resolution-limited tasks, the increase in resolution outweighs the increased noise due to a loss in sensitivity. When the tomographic resolution of the LB collimator was degraded by smoothing to that of the LEGP, the noise in the LB images was lower than that of the LEGP by a factor of 2.9 for the same imaging time, demonstrating the advantage of high-resolution detectors and a smooth reconstruction filter over low-resolution detectors without smoothing. Therefore, collimators designed for high resolution, even at substantial cost in sensitivity, are expected to yield significant improvements for brain SPECT. Geometric calculations show that commercially available low-energy, high-resolution cast collimators promise to meet these requirements.

  17. Methodology of high-resolution photography for mural condition database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, R.; Suzuki, T.; Shibata, M.; Taniguchi, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Digital documentation is one of the most useful techniques to record the condition of cultural heritage. Recently, high-resolution images become increasingly useful because it is possible to show general views of mural paintings and also detailed mural conditions in a single image. As mural paintings are damaged by environmental stresses, it is necessary to record the details of painting condition on high-resolution base maps. Unfortunately, the cost of high-resolution photography and the difficulty of operating its instruments and software have commonly been an impediment for researchers and conservators. However, the recent development of graphic software makes its operation simpler and less expensive. In this paper, we suggest a new approach to make digital heritage inventories without special instruments, based on our recent our research project in Üzümlü church in Cappadocia, Turkey. This method enables us to achieve a high-resolution image database with low costs, short time, and limited human resources.

  18. AVHRR/1-FM Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The advanced very high resolution radiometer is discussed. The program covers design, construction, and test of a breadboard model, engineering model, protoflight model, mechanical/structural model, and a life test model. Special bench test and calibration equipment was developed for use on the program. The flight model program objectives were to fabricate, assemble and test four of the advanced very high resolution radiometers along with a bench cooler and collimator.

  19. SPARTAN: An Instructional High Resolution Land Combat Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    AD-A248 1681111 1 1 1 11 1 I’Ii’ I! ! DTICELECTIED m APR,0 11992.S Oct-D SPARTAN: An Instructional High Rezolution Land Combat Model THESIS David...SPARTAN: An Instructional Accesion For - High Resolution Land Combat Model NTIS CRA&IDTIC TAB ., THESIS U. a,1:!ot%,ced U 1stilcatonl...developed an instructional high resolution land combat simulation model . The purpose of this model is to demonstrate common techniques of modeling used

  20. Improved yield of high resolution mercuric iodide gamma-ray spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Gerrish, V.; van den Berg, L.

    1990-01-01

    Mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) exhibits properties which make it attractive for use as a solid state nuclear radiation detector. The wide bandgap (E{sub g} = 2.1 eV) and low dark current allow room temperature operation, while the high atomic number provides a large gamma-ray cross section. However, poor hole transport has been a major limitation in the routine fabrication of high-resolution spectrometers using this material. This paper presents the results of gamma-ray response and charge transport parameter measurements conducted during the past year at EG G/EM on 96 HgI{sub 2} spectrometers. The gamma-ray response measurements reveal that detector quality is correlated with the starting material used in the crystal growth. In particular, an increased yield of high-resolution spectrometers was obtained from HgI{sub 2} which was synthesized by precipitation from an aqueous solution, as opposed to using material from commercial vendors. Data are also presented which suggest that better spectrometer performance is tied to improved hole transport. Finally, some initial results on a study of detector uniformity reveal spatial variations which may explain why the correlation between hole transport parameters and spectrometer performance is sometimes violated. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  1. MR-compatibility of a high-resolution small animal PET insert operating inside a 7 T MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiessen, J. D.; Shams, E.; Stortz, G.; Schellenberg, G.; Bishop, D.; Khan, M. S.; Kozlowski, P.; Retière, F.; Sossi, V.; Thompson, C. J.; Goertzen, A. L.

    2016-11-01

    A full-ring PET insert consisting of 16 PET detector modules was designed and constructed to fit within the 114 mm diameter gradient bore of a Bruker 7 T MRI. The individual detector modules contain two silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays, dual-layer offset LYSO crystal arrays, and high-definition multimedia interface (HDMI) cables for both signal and power transmission. Several different RF shielding configurations were assessed prior to construction of a fully assembled PET insert using a combination of carbon fibre and copper foil for RF shielding. MR-compatibility measurements included field mapping of the static magnetic field (B 0) and the time-varying excitation field (B 1) as well as acquisitions with multiple pulse sequences: spin echo (SE), rapid imaging with refocused echoes (RARE), fast low angle shot (FLASH) gradient echo, and echo planar imaging (EPI). B 0 field maps revealed a small degradation in the mean homogeneity (+0.1 ppm) when the PET insert was installed and operating. No significant change was observed in the B 1 field maps or the image homogeneity of various MR images, with a 9% decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) observed only in EPI images acquired with the PET insert installed and operating. PET detector flood histograms, photopeak amplitudes, and energy resolutions were unchanged in individual PET detector modules when acquired during MRI operation. There was a small baseline shift on the PET detector signals due to the switching amplifiers used to power MRI gradient pulses. This baseline shift was observable when measured with an oscilloscope and varied as a function of the gradient duty cycle, but had no noticeable effect on the performance of the PET detector modules. Compact front-end electronics and effective RF shielding led to minimal cross-interference between the PET and MRI systems. Both PET detector and MRI performance was excellent, whether operating as a standalone system or a hybrid PET/MRI.

  2. MR-compatibility of a high-resolution small animal PET insert operating inside a 7 T MRI.

    PubMed

    Thiessen, J D; Shams, E; Stortz, G; Schellenberg, G; Bishop, D; Khan, M S; Kozlowski, P; Retière, F; Sossi, V; Thompson, C J; Goertzen, A L

    2016-11-21

    A full-ring PET insert consisting of 16 PET detector modules was designed and constructed to fit within the 114 mm diameter gradient bore of a Bruker 7 T MRI. The individual detector modules contain two silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays, dual-layer offset LYSO crystal arrays, and high-definition multimedia interface (HDMI) cables for both signal and power transmission. Several different RF shielding configurations were assessed prior to construction of a fully assembled PET insert using a combination of carbon fibre and copper foil for RF shielding. MR-compatibility measurements included field mapping of the static magnetic field (B 0) and the time-varying excitation field (B 1) as well as acquisitions with multiple pulse sequences: spin echo (SE), rapid imaging with refocused echoes (RARE), fast low angle shot (FLASH) gradient echo, and echo planar imaging (EPI). B 0 field maps revealed a small degradation in the mean homogeneity (+0.1 ppm) when the PET insert was installed and operating. No significant change was observed in the B 1 field maps or the image homogeneity of various MR images, with a 9% decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) observed only in EPI images acquired with the PET insert installed and operating. PET detector flood histograms, photopeak amplitudes, and energy resolutions were unchanged in individual PET detector modules when acquired during MRI operation. There was a small baseline shift on the PET detector signals due to the switching amplifiers used to power MRI gradient pulses. This baseline shift was observable when measured with an oscilloscope and varied as a function of the gradient duty cycle, but had no noticeable effect on the performance of the PET detector modules. Compact front-end electronics and effective RF shielding led to minimal cross-interference between the PET and MRI systems. Both PET detector and MRI performance was excellent, whether operating as a standalone system or a hybrid PET/MRI.

  3. Characterization of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectrometers for high energy density physics and light source experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K. W. Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparacio, L.; Efthimion, P.; Pablant, N. A.; Lu, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Magee, E.

    2014-11-15

    A high resolution 1D imaging x-ray spectrometer concept comprising a spherically bent crystal and a 2D pixelated detector is being optimized for diagnostics of small sources such as high energy density physics (HEDP) and synchrotron radiation or x-ray free electron laser experiments. This instrument is used on tokamak experiments for Doppler measurements of ion temperature and plasma flow velocity profiles. Laboratory measurements demonstrate a resolving power, E/ΔE of order 10 000 and spatial resolution better than 10 μm. Initial tests of the high resolution instrument on HEDP plasmas are being performed.

  4. Development of a large-area monolithic 4×4 MPPC array for a future PET scanner employing pixelized Ce:LYSO and Pr:LuAG crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, T.; Kataoka, J.; Nakamori, T.; Miura, T.; Matsuda, H.; Sato, K.; Ishikawa, Y.; Yamamura, K.; Kawabata, N.; Ikeda, H.; Sato, G.; Kamada, K.

    2011-05-01

    We have developed a new type of large-area monolithic Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) array consisting of a 4×4 matrix of 3×3 mm 2 pixels. Each pixel comprises 3600 Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes (APDs) that achieve an average gain of 9.68×10 5 at 71.9 V at 0 °C with variations of only ±7.2% over 4×4 pixels. Excellent uniformity was also obtained for photon detection efficiencies (PDE) of ±6.4%, whilst dark count rates at the single photoelectron (1 p.e.) level amounted to ≃2 Mcps/pixel, measured at 0 °C. As the first step toward using the device in scintillation photon detectors, we fabricated a prototype gamma-ray camera consisting of an MPPC array optically coupled with a scintillator matrix, namely a 4×4 array of 3×3 ×10 mm 3 crystals. Specifically, we tested the performance with Ce-doped (Lu, Y) 2(SiO 4)O (Ce:LYSO), Pr-doped Lu 3Al 5O 12 (Pr:LuAG) and "surface coated" Pr:LuAG (Pr:LuAG (WLS)) matrices whereby the emission peak of Pr:LuAG was shifted from 310 to 420 nm via a wavelength shifter (WLS). Average energy resolutions of 13.83%, 14.70% and 13.96% (FWHM) were obtained for 662 keV gamma-rays, as measured at 0 °C with Ce:LYSO, Pr:LuAG and Pr:LuAG (WLS) scintillator matrices, respectively. We confirmed that the effective PDE for Pr:LuAG (WLS) had improved by more than 30% compared to original, non-coated Pr:LuAG matrix. These results suggest that a large-area monolithic MPPC array developed here could be promising for future medical imaging, particularly in positron emission tomography (PET).

  5. Development of high-resolution x-ray CT system using parallel beam geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneyama, Akio; Baba, Rika; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Takeda, Tohoru; Nakano, Haruhisa; Maki, Koutaro; Sumitani, Kazushi; Hirai, Yasuharu

    2016-01-01

    For fine three-dimensional observations of large biomedical and organic material samples, we developed a high-resolution X-ray CT system. The system consists of a sample positioner, a 5-μm scintillator, microscopy lenses, and a water-cooled sCMOS detector. Parallel beam geometry was adopted to attain a field of view of a few mm square. A fine three-dimensional image of birch branch was obtained using a 9-keV X-ray at BL16XU of SPring-8 in Japan. The spatial resolution estimated from the line profile of a sectional image was about 3 μm.

  6. Beamline I11 at Diamond: a new instrument for high resolution powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Thompson, S P; Parker, J E; Potter, J; Hill, T P; Birt, A; Cobb, T M; Yuan, F; Tang, C C

    2009-07-01

    The performance characteristics of a new synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction beamline (I11) at the Diamond Light Source are presented. Using an in-vacuum undulator for photon production and deploying simple x-ray optics centered around a double-crystal monochromator and a pair of harmonic rejection mirrors, a high brightness and low bandpass x-ray beam is delivered at the sample. To provide fast data collection, 45 Si(111) analyzing crystals and detectors are installed onto a large and high precision diffractometer. High resolution powder diffraction data from standard reference materials of Si, alpha-quartz, and LaB6 are used to characterize instrumental performance.

  7. Development of high-resolution x-ray CT system using parallel beam geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneyama, Akio Baba, Rika; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Takeda, Tohoru; Nakano, Haruhisa; Maki, Koutaro; Sumitani, Kazushi; Hirai, Yasuharu

    2016-01-28

    For fine three-dimensional observations of large biomedical and organic material samples, we developed a high-resolution X-ray CT system. The system consists of a sample positioner, a 5-μm scintillator, microscopy lenses, and a water-cooled sCMOS detector. Parallel beam geometry was adopted to attain a field of view of a few mm square. A fine three-dimensional image of birch branch was obtained using a 9-keV X-ray at BL16XU of SPring-8 in Japan. The spatial resolution estimated from the line profile of a sectional image was about 3 μm.

  8. The Dynamic Range of Ultra-High Resolution Cryogenic Gamma-ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, S; Terracol, S F; Drury, O B; Friedrich, S

    2005-08-10

    We are developing high-resolution cryogenic gamma-ray spectrometers for nuclear science and non-proliferation applications. The gamma-ray detectors are composed of a bulk superconducting Sn foil absorber attached to multilayer Mo/Cu transition-edge sensors (TES). The energy resolution achieved with a 1 x 1 x 0.25 mm{sup 3} Sn absorber is 50 -90eV for {gamma}-rays up to 100 keV and it decreases for large absorber sizes. We discuss the trade-offs between energy resolution and dynamic range, as well as development of TES arrays for higher count rates and better sensitivity.

  9. A novel approach: high resolution inspection with wafer plane defect detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Carl; Wihl, Mark; Shi, Rui-fang; Xiong, Yalin; Pang, Song

    2008-05-01

    High Resolution reticle inspection is well-established as a proven, effective, and efficient means of detecting yield-limiting mask defects as well as defects which are not immediately yield-limiting yet can enable manufacturing process improvements. Historically, RAPID products have enabled detection of both classes of these defects. The newly-developed Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) detector technology meets the needs of some advanced mask manufacturers to identify the lithographically-significant defects while ignoring the other non-lithographically-significant defects. Wafer Plane Inspection accomplishes this goal by performing defect detection based on a modeled image of how the mask features would actually print in the photoresist. This has the effect of reducing sensitivity to non-printing defects while enabling higher sensitivity focused in high MEEF areas where small reticle defects still yield significant printing defects on wafers. WPI is a new inspection mode that has been developed by KLA-Tencor and is currently under test with multiple customers. It employs the same transmitted and reflected-light high-resolution images as the industry-standard high-resolution inspections, but with much more sophisticated processing involved. A rigorous mask pattern recovery algorithm is used to convert the transmitted and reflected light images into a modeled representation of the reticle. Lithographic modeling of the scanner is then used to generate an aerial image of the mask. This is followed by resist modeling to determine the exposure of the photoresist. The defect detectors are then applied on this photoresist plane so that only printing defects are detected. Note that no hardware modifications to the inspection system are required to enable this detector. The same tool will be able to perform both our standard High Resolution inspections and the Wafer Plane Inspection detector. This approach has several important features. The ability to ignore non

  10. High-resolution imaging and target designation through clouds or smoke

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Michael D.

    2003-01-01

    A method and system of combining gated intensifiers and advances in solid-state, short-pulse laser technology, compact systems capable of producing high resolution (i.e., approximately less than 20 centimeters) optical images through a scattering medium such as dense clouds, fog, smoke, etc. may be achieved from air or ground based platforms. Laser target designation through a scattering medium is also enabled by utilizing a short pulse illumination laser and a relatively minor change to the detectors on laser guided munitions.

  11. Calibration of a high resolution grating soft x-ray spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Magee, E W; Dunn, J; Brown, G V; Cone, K V; Park, J; Porter, F S; Kilbourne, C A; Kelley, R L; Beiersdorfer, P

    2010-10-01

    The calibration of the soft x-ray spectral response of a large radius of curvature, high resolution grating spectrometer (HRGS) with a back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector is reported. The instrument is cross-calibrated for the 10-50 Å waveband at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron beam ion trap (EBIT) x-ray source with the EBIT calorimeter spectrometer. The HRGS instrument is designed for laser-produced plasma experiments and is important for making high dynamic range measurements of line intensities, line shapes, and x-ray sources.

  12. High-resolution surface temperature measurements on rotating turbine blades with an infrared pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uguccini, O. W.; Pollack, F. G.

    1976-01-01

    A high-resolution pyrometer was developed and tested on a modified turbine engine. The pyrometer was used to obtain temperature profiles of the viewed surface of turbine blades in the engine at tip speeds up to 366 meters per second. The combination of coherent fiber optics, a silicon avalanche detector, and high-speed electronics enabled surface resolution of a spot diameter of 0.05 centimeter. The data, in the form of temperature profiles, was obtained in near real time as a hard copy output from a computer display terminal. Temperatures measured with the pyrometer and with thermocouples agreed within 2 percent at temperatures between 977 to 1144 K.

  13. High resolution hard X-ray spectra of solar and cosmic sources. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    High resolution hard X-ray observations of a large solar flare and the Crab Nebula were obtained during balloon flights using an array of cooled germanium planar detectors. In addition, high time resolution high sensitivity measurements were obtained with a 300 square cm NaI/CsI phoswich scintillator. The Crab spectrum from both flights was searched without finding evidence of line emission below 200 keV. In particular, for the 73 keV line previously reported a 3 sigma upper limit for a narrow (1 keV FWHM) line .0019 and .0014 ph square cm/sec for the 1979 and 1980 flights, respectively was obtained.

  14. Highly efficient and high-power diode-pumped femtosecond Yb:LYSO laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Wenlong; Wang, Zhaohua; Zhu, Jiangfeng; Zheng, Lihe; Xu, Jun; Wei, Zhiyi

    2017-04-01

    A diode-pumped high-power femtosecond Yb:LYSO laser with high efficiency is demonstrated. With a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror for passive mode-locking and a Gires–Tournois interferometer mirror for intracavity dispersion compensation, stable mode-locking pulses of 297 fs duration at 1042 nm were obtained. The maximum average power of 3.07 W was realized under 5.17 W absorbed pump power, corresponding to as high as 59.4% opt–opt efficiency. The single pulse energy and peak power are about 35.5 nJ and 119.5 kW, respectively.

  15. Development of compact particle detectors for space based instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barner, Lindsey; Grove, Andrew; Mohler, Jacob; Sisson, Caleb; Roth, Alex; Kryemadhi, Abaz

    2017-01-01

    The Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) are new photon-detectors which have been increasingly used in particle physics. Their small size, good single photon resolution, simple readout, and immunity to magnetic fields offers benefits compared to traditional photomultipliers. LYSO and CeBr3 crystals are relatively new scintillators with high stopping power, very good light yield and fast decay time. The response of these detectors to low energy gamma rays will be presented. NASA Pennsylvania Space Grant Consortium.

  16. High-resolution remotely sensed small target detection by imitating fly visual perception mechanism.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fengchen; Xu, Lizhong; Li, Min; Tang, Min

    2012-01-01

    The difficulty and limitation of small target detection methods for high-resolution remote sensing data have been a recent research hot spot. Inspired by the information capture and processing theory of fly visual system, this paper endeavors to construct a characterized model of information perception and make use of the advantages of fast and accurate small target detection under complex varied nature environment. The proposed model forms a theoretical basis of small target detection for high-resolution remote sensing data. After the comparison of prevailing simulation mechanism behind fly visual systems, we propose a fly-imitated visual system method of information processing for high-resolution remote sensing data. A small target detector and corresponding detection algorithm are designed by simulating the mechanism of information acquisition, compression, and fusion of fly visual system and the function of pool cell and the character of nonlinear self-adaption. Experiments verify the feasibility and rationality of the proposed small target detection model and fly-imitated visual perception method.

  17. High-resolution setup for measuring wavelength sensitivity of photoyellowing of translucent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vaskuri, Anna Kärhä, Petri; Heikkilä, Anu

    2015-10-15

    Polystyrene and many other materials turn yellow when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. All photodegradation mechanisms including photoyellowing are functions of the exposure wavelength, which can be described with an action spectrum. In this work, a new high-resolution transmittance measurement setup based on lasers has been developed for measuring color changes, such as the photoyellowing of translucent materials aged with a spectrograph. The measurement setup includes 14 power-stabilized laser lines between 325 nm and 933 nm wavelengths, of which one at a time is directed on to the aged sample. The power transmitted through the sample is measured with a silicon detector utilizing an integrating sphere. The sample is mounted on a high-resolution XY translation stage. Measurement at various locations aged with different wavelengths of exposure radiation gives the transmittance data required for acquiring the action spectrum. The combination of a UV spectrograph and the new high-resolution transmittance measurement setup enables a novel method for studying the UV-induced ageing of translucent materials with a spectral resolution of 3–8 nm, limited by the adjustable spectral bandwidth range of the spectrograph. These achievements form a significant improvement over earlier methods.

  18. High-resolution setup for measuring wavelength sensitivity of photoyellowing of translucent materials.

    PubMed

    Vaskuri, Anna; Kärhä, Petri; Heikkilä, Anu; Ikonen, Erkki

    2015-10-01

    Polystyrene and many other materials turn yellow when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. All photodegradation mechanisms including photoyellowing are functions of the exposure wavelength, which can be described with an action spectrum. In this work, a new high-resolution transmittance measurement setup based on lasers has been developed for measuring color changes, such as the photoyellowing of translucent materials aged with a spectrograph. The measurement setup includes 14 power-stabilized laser lines between 325 nm and 933 nm wavelengths, of which one at a time is directed on to the aged sample. The power transmitted through the sample is measured with a silicon detector utilizing an integrating sphere. The sample is mounted on a high-resolution XY translation stage. Measurement at various locations aged with different wavelengths of exposure radiation gives the transmittance data required for acquiring the action spectrum. The combination of a UV spectrograph and the new high-resolution transmittance measurement setup enables a novel method for studying the UV-induced ageing of translucent materials with a spectral resolution of 3-8 nm, limited by the adjustable spectral bandwidth range of the spectrograph. These achievements form a significant improvement over earlier methods.

  19. High-resolution setup for measuring wavelength sensitivity of photoyellowing of translucent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaskuri, Anna; Kärhä, Petri; Heikkilä, Anu; Ikonen, Erkki

    2015-10-01

    Polystyrene and many other materials turn yellow when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. All photodegradation mechanisms including photoyellowing are functions of the exposure wavelength, which can be described with an action spectrum. In this work, a new high-resolution transmittance measurement setup based on lasers has been developed for measuring color changes, such as the photoyellowing of translucent materials aged with a spectrograph. The measurement setup includes 14 power-stabilized laser lines between 325 nm and 933 nm wavelengths, of which one at a time is directed on to the aged sample. The power transmitted through the sample is measured with a silicon detector utilizing an integrating sphere. The sample is mounted on a high-resolution XY translation stage. Measurement at various locations aged with different wavelengths of exposure radiation gives the transmittance data required for acquiring the action spectrum. The combination of a UV spectrograph and the new high-resolution transmittance measurement setup enables a novel method for studying the UV-induced ageing of translucent materials with a spectral resolution of 3-8 nm, limited by the adjustable spectral bandwidth range of the spectrograph. These achievements form a significant improvement over earlier methods.

  20. Design and implementation of spaceborne high resolution infrared touch screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tai-guo; Li, Wen-xin; Dong, Yi-peng; Ma, Wen; Xia, Jia-gao

    2015-10-01

    For the consideration of the special application environment of the electronic products used in aerospace and to further more improve the human-computer interaction of the manned aerospace area. The research is based on the design and implementation way of the high resolution spaceborne infrared touch screen on the basis of FPGA and DSP frame structure. Beside the introduction of the whole structure for the high resolution spaceborne infrared touch screen system, this essay also gives the detail information about design of hardware for the high resolution spaceborne infrared touch screen system, FPGA design, GUI design and DSP algorithm design based on Lagrange interpolation. What is more, the easy makes a comprehensive research of the reliability design for the high resolution spaceborne infrared touch screen for the special purpose of it. Besides, the system test is done after installation of spaceborne infrared touch screen. The test result shows that the system is simple and reliable enough, which has a stable running environment and high resolution, which certainly can meet the special requirement of the manned aerospace instrument products.

  1. A feasibility study of PETiPIX: an ultra high resolution small animal PET scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K.; Safavi-Naeini, M.; Franklin, D. R.; Petasecca, M.; Guatelli, S.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Hutton, B. F.; Lerch, M. L. F.

    2013-12-01

    PETiPIX is an ultra high spatial resolution positron emission tomography (PET) scanner designed for imaging mice brains. Four Timepix pixellated silicon detector modules are placed in an edge-on configuration to form a scanner with a field of view (FoV) 15 mm in diameter. Each detector module consists of 256 × 256 pixels with dimensions of 55 × 55 × 300 μm3. Monte Carlo simulations using GEANT4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) were performed to evaluate the feasibility of the PETiPIX design, including estimation of system sensitivity, angular dependence, spatial resolution (point source, hot and cold phantom studies) and evaluation of potential detector shield designs. Initial experimental work also established that scattered photons and recoil electrons could be detected using a single edge-on Timepix detector with a positron source. Simulation results estimate a spatial resolution of 0.26 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) at the centre of FoV and 0.29 mm FWHM overall spatial resolution with sensitivity of 0.01%, and indicate that a 1.5 mm thick tungsten shield parallel to the detectors will absorb the majority of non-coplanar annihilation photons, significantly reducing the rates of randoms. Results from the simulated phantom studies demonstrate that PETiPIX is a promising design for studies demanding high resolution images of mice brains.

  2. Experimental characterization of the 192 channel Clear-PEM frontend ASIC coupled to a multi-pixel APD readout of LYSO:Ce crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, Edgar; Bexiga, Vasco; Bugalho, Ricardo; Carriço, Bruno; Ferreira, Cláudia S.; Ferreira, Miguel; Godinho, Joaquim; Gonçalves, Fernando; Leong, Carlos; Lousã, Pedro; Machado, Pedro; Moura, Rui; Neves, Pedro; Ortigão, Catarina; Piedade, Fernando; Pinheiro, João F.; Rego, Joel; Rivetti, Angelo; Rodrigues, Pedro; Silva, José C.; Silva, Manuel M.; Teixeira, Isabel C.; Teixeira, João P.; Trindade, Andreia; Varela, João

    2009-01-01

    In the framework of the Clear-PEM project for the construction of a high-resolution scanner for breast cancer imaging, a very compact and dense frontend electronics system has been developed for readout of multi-pixel S8550 Hamamatsu APDs. The frontend electronics are instrumented with a mixed-signal Application-Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC), which incorporates 192 low-noise charge pre-amplifiers, shapers, analog memory cells and digital control blocks. Pulses are continuously stored in memory cells at clock frequency. Channels above a common threshold voltage are readout for digitization by off-chip free-sampling ADCs. The ASIC has a size of 7.3×9.8 mm2 and was implemented in a AMS 0.35 μm CMOS technology. In this paper the experimental characterization of the Clear-PEM frontend ASIC, reading out multi-pixel APDs coupled to LYSO:Ce crystal matrices, is presented. The chips were mounted on a custom test board connected to six APD arrays and to the data acquisition system. Six 32-pixel LYSO:Ce crystal matrices coupled on both sides to APD arrays were readout by two test boards. All 384 channels were operational. The chip power consumption is 660 mW (3.4 mW per channel). A very stable behavior of the chip was observed, with an estimated ENC of 1200-1300e- at APD gain 100. The inter-channel noise dispersion and mean baseline variation is less than 8% and 0.5%, respectively. The spread in the gain between different channels is found to be 1.5%. Energy resolution of 16.5% at 511 keV and 12.8% at 662 keV has been measured. Timing measurements between the two APDs that readout the same crystal is extracted and compared with detailed Monte Carlo simulations. At 511 keV the measured single photon time RMS resolution is 1.30 ns, in very good agreement with the expected value of 1.34 ns.

  3. Continuous-wave and passively Q-switched Nd:LYSO lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, S. D.; Xu, X. D.; Wang, Z. P.; Li, D. Z.; Yu, H. H.; Xu, J.; Guo, L.; Chen, L. J.; Zhao, Y. G.; Xu, X. G.

    2011-04-01

    Continuous-wave (CW) and passively Q-switched performance of a Nd-doped oyorthosilicate mixing crystal, (Nd0.005Lu0.4975Y0.4975)2SiO5 (Nd:LYSO), were reported. As a result, new dual-wavelength all-solid-state lasers at 1075 and 1079 nm were achieved. When the absorbed pump power was 3.87 W, the CW laser produced 1.1 W output, corresponding to an optical conversion efficiency of 28.4% and a slope efficiency of 32.4%. By using a Cr4+:YAG wafer as the saturable absorber, we achieved Q-switching operation of Nd:LYSO crystal. The maximal average output power, shortest pulse width, largest pulse energy and highest peak power were measured to be 294 mW, 27.5 ns, 34.3 μJ and 1.18 kW, respectively. By difference frequency, these dual-wavelength lasers have potential applications for the generation of a broadband coherent radiation from 0.7-1.3 THz.

  4. Isotopic composition analysis and age dating of uranium samples by high resolution gamma ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, A. I.; Pantelica, A.; Sima, O.; Fugaru, V.

    2016-09-01

    Non-destructive methods were applied to determine the isotopic composition and the time elapsed since last chemical purification of nine uranium samples. The applied methods are based on measuring gamma and X radiations of uranium samples by high resolution low energy gamma spectrometric system with planar high purity germanium detector and low background gamma spectrometric system with coaxial high purity germanium detector. The ;Multigroup γ-ray Analysis Method for Uranium; (MGAU) code was used for the precise determination of samples' isotopic composition. The age of the samples was determined from the isotopic ratio 214Bi/234U. This ratio was calculated from the analyzed spectra of each uranium sample, using relative detection efficiency. Special attention is paid to the coincidence summing corrections that have to be taken into account when performing this type of analysis. In addition, an alternative approach for the age determination using full energy peak efficiencies obtained by Monte Carlo simulations with the GESPECOR code is described.

  5. Design of POSICAM: A high resolution multislice whole body positron camera

    SciTech Connect

    Mullani, N.A.; Wong, W.H.; Hartz, R.K.; Bristow, D.; Gaeta, J.M.; Yerian, K.; Adler, S.; Gould, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    A high resolution (6mm), multislice (21) whole body positron camera has been designed with innovative detector and septa arrangement for 3-D imaging and tracer quantitation. An object of interest such as the brain and the heart is optimally imaged by the 21 simultaneous image planes which have 12 mm resolution and are separated by 5.5 mm to provide adequate sampling in the axial direction. The detector geometry and the electronics are flexible enough to allow BaF/sub 2/, BGO, GSO or time of flight BaF/sub 2/ scintillators. The mechanical gantry has been designed for clinical applications and incorporates several features for patient handling and comfort. A large patient opening of 58 cm diameter with a tilt of +-30/sup 0/ and rotation of +-20/sup 0/ permit imaging from different positions without moving the patient. Multiprocessor computing systems and user-friendly software make the POSICAM a powerful 3-D imaging device. 7 figs.

  6. Optimal experimental design for nano-particle atom-counting from high-resolution STEM images.

    PubMed

    De Backer, A; De Wael, A; Gonnissen, J; Van Aert, S

    2015-04-01

    In the present paper, the principles of detection theory are used to quantify the probability of error for atom-counting from high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (HR STEM) images. Binary and multiple hypothesis testing have been investigated in order to determine the limits to the precision with which the number of atoms in a projected atomic column can be estimated. The probability of error has been calculated when using STEM images, scattering cross-sections or peak intensities as a criterion to count atoms. Based on this analysis, we conclude that scattering cross-sections perform almost equally well as images and perform better than peak intensities. Furthermore, the optimal STEM detector design can be derived for atom-counting using the expression for the probability of error. We show that for very thin objects LAADF is optimal and that for thicker objects the optimal inner detector angle increases.

  7. Research relative to high resolution camera on the advanced X-ray astrophysics facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The HRC (High Resolution Camera) is a photon counting instrument to be flown on the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). It is a large field of view, high angular resolution, detector for the x-ray telescope. The HRC consists of a CsI coated microchannel plate (MCP) acting as a soft x-ray photocathode, followed by a second MCP for high electronic gain. The MCPs are readout by a crossed grid of resistively coupled wires to provide high spatial resolution along with timing and pulse height data. The instrument will be used in two modes, as a direct imaging detector with a limiting sensitivity of 10 to the -15 ergs sq cm sec in a 10 to the 5th second exposure, and as a readout for an objective transmission grating providing spectral resolution of several hundreds to thousands.

  8. Single sensor processing to obtain high resolution color component signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, William E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for generating color video signals representative of color images of a scene includes the following steps: focusing light from the scene on an electronic image sensor via a filter having a tri-color filter pattern; producing, from outputs of the sensor, first and second relatively low resolution luminance signals; producing, from outputs of the sensor, a relatively high resolution luminance signal; producing, from a ratio of the relatively high resolution luminance signal to the first relatively low resolution luminance signal, a high band luminance component signal; producing, from outputs of the sensor, relatively low resolution color component signals; and combining each of the relatively low resolution color component signals with the high band luminance component signal to obtain relatively high resolution color component signals.

  9. High-resolution, high-pressure NMR studies of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, J; Ballard, L; Nash, D

    1998-01-01

    Advanced high-resolution NMR spectroscopy, including two-dimensional NMR techniques, combined with high pressure capability, represents a powerful new tool in the study of proteins. This contribution is organized in the following way. First, the specialized instrumentation needed for high-pressure NMR experiments is discussed, with specific emphasis on the design features and performance characteristics of a high-sensitivity, high-resolution, variable-temperature NMR probe operating at 500 MHz and at pressures of up to 500 MPa. An overview of several recent studies using 1D and 2D high-resolution, high-pressure NMR spectroscopy to investigate the pressure-induced reversible unfolding and pressure-assisted cold denaturation of lysozyme, ribonuclease A, and ubiquitin is presented. Specifically, the relationship between the residual secondary structure of pressure-assisted, cold-denatured states and the structure of early folding intermediates is discussed. PMID:9649405

  10. A high-resolution vehicle emission inventory for China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, B.; Zhang, Q.; He, K.; Huo, H.; Yao, Z.; Wang, X.

    2012-12-01

    Developing high resolution emission inventory is an essential task for air quality modeling and management. However, current vehicle emission inventories in China are usually developed at provincial level and then allocated to grids based on various spatial surrogates, which is difficult to get high spatial resolution. In this work, we developed a new approach to construct a high-resolution vehicle emission inventory for China. First, vehicle population at county level were estimated by using the relationship between per-capita GDP and vehicle ownership. Then the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model were used to drive the International Vehicle Emission (IVE) model to get monthly emission factors for each county. Finally, vehicle emissions by county were allocated to grids with 5-km horizon resolution by using high-resolution road network data. This work provides a better understanding of spatial representation of vehicle emissions in China and can benefit both air quality modeling and management with improved spatial accuracy.

  11. Compact and high-resolution optical orbital angular momentum sorter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Chenhao; Chen, Jian; Zhan, Qiwen

    2017-03-01

    A compact and high-resolution optical orbital angular momentum (OAM) sorter is proposed and demonstrated. The sorter comprises a quadratic fan-out mapper and a dual-phase corrector positioned in the pupil plane and the Fourier plane, respectively. The optical system is greatly simplified compared to previous demonstrations of OAM sorting, and the performance in resolution and efficiency is maintained. A folded configuration is set up using a single reflective spatial light modulator (SLM) to demonstrate the validity of the scheme. The two phase elements are implemented on the left and right halves of the SLM and connected by a right-angle prism. Experimental results demonstrate the high resolution of the compact OAM sorter, and the current limit in efficiency can be overcome by replacing with transmissive SLMs and removing the beam splitters. This novel scheme paves the way for the miniaturization and integration of high-resolution OAM sorters.

  12. High-resolution Urban Image Classification Using Extended Features

    SciTech Connect

    Vatsavai, Raju

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution image classification poses several challenges because the typical object size is much larger than the pixel resolution. Any given pixel (spectral features at that location) by itself is not a good indicator of the object it belongs to without looking at the broader spatial footprint. Therefore most modern machine learning approaches that are based on per-pixel spectral features are not very effective in high- resolution urban image classification. One way to overcome this problem is to extract features that exploit spatial contextual information. In this study, we evaluated several features in- cluding edge density, texture, and morphology. Several machine learning schemes were tested on the features extracted from a very high-resolution remote sensing image and results were presented.

  13. In-Phase Ultra High-Resolution In Vivo NMR.

    PubMed

    Fugariu, Ioana; Bermel, Wolfgang; Lane, Daniel; Soong, Ronald; Simpson, Andre J

    2017-04-05

    Although current NMR techniques allow organisms to be studied in vivo, magnetic susceptibility distortions, which arise from inhomogeneous distributions of chemical moieties, prevent the acquisition of high-resolution NMR spectra. Intermolecular single quantum coherence (iSQC) is a technique that breaks the sample's spatial isotropy to form long range dipolar couplings, which can be exploited to extract chemical shift information free of perturbations. While this approach holds vast potential, present practical limitations include radiation damping, relaxation losses, and non-phase sensitive data. Herein, these drawbacks are addressed, and a new technique termed in-phase iSQC (IP-iSQC) is introduced. When applied to a living system, high-resolution NMR spectra, nearly identical to a buffer extract, are obtained. The ability to look inside an organism and extract a high-resolution metabolic profile is profound and should find applications in fields in which metabolism or in vivo processes are of interest.

  14. High-Resolution Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (HREELS) Using a Monochromated TEM/STEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sai, Z. R.; Bradley, J. P.; Erni, R.; Browning, N.

    2005-01-01

    A 200 keV FEI TF20 XT monochromated (scanning) transmission electron microscope funded by NASA's SRLIDAP program is undergoing installation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Instrument specifications in STEM mode are Cs =1.0 mm, Cc =1.2 mm, image resolution =0.18 nm, and in TEM mode Cs =1.3 mm, Cc =1.3 mm, information limit =0.14 nm. Key features of the instrument are a voltage-stabilized high tension (HT) supply, a monochromator, a high-resolution electron energy-loss spectrometer/energy filter, a high-resolution annular darkfield detector, and a solid-state x-ray energy-dispersive spectrometer. The high-tension tank contains additional sections for 60Hz and high frequency filtering, resulting in an operating voltage of 200 kV plus or minus 0.005V, a greater than 10-fold improvement over earlier systems. The monochromator is a single Wien filter design. The energy filter is a Gatan model 866 Tridiem-ERS high resolution GIF spec d for less than or equal to 0.15 eV energy resolution with 29 pA of current in a 2 nm diameter probe. 0.13 eV has already been achieved during early installation. The x-ray detector (EDAX/Genesis 4000) has a take-off angle of 20 degrees, an active area of 30 square millimeters, and a solid angle of 0.3 steradians. The higher solid angle is possible because the objective pole-piece allows the detector to be positioned as close as 9.47 mm from the specimen. The voltage-stabilized HT supply, monochromator and GIF enable high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS) with energy resolution comparable to synchrotron XANES, but with approximately 100X better spatial resolution. The region between 0 and 100 eV is called the low-loss or valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) region where features due to collective plasma oscillations and single electron transitions of valence electrons are observed. Most of the low-loss VEELS features we are detecting are being observed for the first time in IDPs. A major focus of

  15. Modified Noise Power Ratio testing of high resolution digitizers

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, T.S.

    1994-05-01

    A broadband, full signal range, side-by-side (tandem) test method for estimating the internal noise performance of high resolution digitizers is described and illustrated. The technique involves a re-definition of the traditional Noise Power Ratio (NPR) test, a change that not only makes this test applicable to higher resolution systems than was previously practical, but also enhances its value and flexibility. Since coherence analysis is the basis of this new definition, and since the application of coherence procedures to high resolution data poses several problems, this report discusses these problems and their resolution.

  16. Theoretical Problems in High Resolution Solar Physics, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athay, G. (Editor); Spicer, D. S. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The Science Working Group for the High Resolution Solar Observatory (HRSO) laid plans beginning in 1984 for a series of workshops designed to stimulate a broadbased input from the scientific community to the HRSO mission. These workshops have the dual objectives of encouraging an early start on the difficult theoretical problems in radiative transfer, magnetohydrodynamics, and plasma physics that will be posed by the HRSO data, and maintaining current discussions of results in high resolution solar studies. This workshop was the second in the series. The workshop format presented invited review papers during the formal sessions and contributed poster papers for discussions during open periods. Both are presented.

  17. Wide swath and high resolution optical imaging satellite of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Haruyoshi; Kato, Eri; Imai, Hiroko; Sagisaka, Masakazu

    2016-05-01

    The "Advanced optical satellite" (tentative name) is a follow-on mission from ALOS. Mission objectives of the advanced optical satellite is to build upon the existing advanced techniques for global land observation using optical sensors, as well as to promote data utilization for social needs. Wide swath and high resolution optical imager onboard the advanced optical satellite will extend the capabilities of earlier ALOS missions. The optical imager will be able to collect high-resolution (< 1 m) and wide-swath (70 km) images with high geo-location accuracy. This paper introduces a conceptual design of the advanced optical satellite.

  18. High-resolution seismic studies applied to injected geothermal fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.T.; Kasameyer, P.

    1985-01-01

    The application of high-resolution microseismicity studies to the problem of monitoring injected fluids is one component of the Geothermal Injection Monitoring Project at LLNL. The evaluation of microseismicity includes the development of field techniques, and the acquisition and processing of events during the initial development of a geothermal field. To achieve a specific detection threshold and location precision, design criteria are presented for seismic networks. An analysis of a small swarm near Mammoth Lakes, California, demonstrates these relationships and the usefulness of high-resolution seismic studies. A small network is currently monitoring the Mammoth-Pacific geothermal power plant at Casa Diablo as it begins production.

  19. High Resolution 3d Modeling of the Behaim Globe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menna, F.; Rizzi, A.; Nocerino, E.; Remondino, F.; Gruen, A.

    2012-07-01

    The article describes the 3D surveying and modeling of the Behaim globe, the oldest still existing and intact globe of the earth, preserved at the German National Museum of Nuremberg, Germany. The work is primarily performed using high-resolution digital images and automatic photogrammetric techniques. Triangulation-based laser scanning is also employed to fill some gaps in the derived image-based 3D geometry and perform geometric comparisons. Major problems are encountered in texture mapping. The 3D modeling project and the creation of high-resolution map-projections is performed for scientific, conservation, visualization and education purposes.

  20. On the application and extension of Harten's high resolution scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Warming, R. F.; Harten, A.

    1982-01-01

    Extensions of a second order high resolution explicit method for the numerical computation of weak solutions of one dimensonal hyperbolic conservation laws are discussed. The main objectives were (1) to examine the shock resoluton of Harten's method for a two dimensional shock reflection problem, (2) to study the use of a high resolution scheme as a post-processor to an approximate steady state solution, and (3) to construct an implicit in the delta-form using Harten's scheme for the explicit operator and a simplified iteration matrix for the implicit operator.

  1. Practical Applications Using A High Resolution Infrared Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraniak, David W.

    1981-01-01

    Infrared imaging systems can be classified into three general categories, low resolution, medium resolution and high resolution. It is the purpose of this paper to highlight specific applications best suited to high resolution, television capatable, infrared data acquisition techniques. The data was collected from both ground loped andoaerial based mobile positions where the temperature differentials varied from 15 C to 25 C. Specific applications include scanning building complexes from the exterior using a ground based moving vehicle, scanning buildings, concrete bridge decks and terrain from the air using a helicopter and scanning building interiors using a mobile hand truck.

  2. High-resolution low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Buban, James P; Ramasse, Quentin; Gipson, Bryant; Browning, Nigel D; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades instrumentation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has pushed toward higher intensity electron probes to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of recorded images. While this is suitable for robust specimens, biological specimens require a much reduced electron dose for high-resolution imaging. We describe here protocols for low-dose STEM image recording with a conventional field-emission gun STEM, while maintaining the high-resolution capability of the instrument. Our findings show that a combination of reduced pixel dwell time and reduced gun current can achieve radiation doses comparable to low-dose TEM.

  3. Diode-pumped Kerr-lens mode-locked Yb:LYSO laser with 61fs pulse duration.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wenlong; Wang, Zhaohua; Wei, Long; Peng, Yingnan; Zhang, Jinwei; Zhu, Zheng; Zhu, Jiangfeng; Han, Hainian; Jia, Yulei; Zheng, Lihe; Xu, Jun; Wei, Zhiyi

    2014-08-11

    A stable diode pumped Kerr-lens mode-locked (KLM) Yb:LuYSiO5 (Yb:LYSO) laser of generating 61 fs pulses at a central wavelength of 1055.4 nm is experimentally demonstrated. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first demonstration of femtosecond KLM operation in Yb:LYSO laser, and it is believed that 61 fs is the shortest pulse duration ever produced from an Yb-doped orthosilicate laser. The average output power of the mode-locked laser is 40 mW and the repetition rate is 113 MHz.

  4. Acceleration and motion-correction techniques for high-resolution intravascular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Shashank Sathyanarayana; Zhang, Yi; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose High-resolution intravascular (IV) MRI is susceptible to degradation from physiological motion and requires high frame-rates for true endoscopy. Traditional cardiac-gating techniques compromise efficiency by reducing the effective scan rate. Here we test whether compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction and ungated motion-compensation employing projection shifting, could provide faster motion-suppressed, IVMRI. Theory and Methods CS reconstruction is developed for under-sampled Cartesian and radial imaging using a new IVMRI-specific cost function to effectively increase imaging speed. A new motion correction method is presented wherein individual IVMRI projections are shifted based on the IVMRI detector's intrinsic amplitude and phase properties. The methods are tested at 3T in fruit, human vessel specimens, and a rabbit aorta in vivo. Images are compared using Structural-Similarity and ‘Spokal-Variation’ indices. Results Although some residual artifacts persisted, CS acceleration and radial motion compensation strategies reduced motion artefact in vitro and in vivo, allowing effective accelerations of up to eightfold at 200-300μm resolution. Conclusion 3T IVMRI detectors are well-suited to CS and motion correction strategies based on their intrinsic radially-sparse sensitivity profiles and high signal-to-noise ratios. While benefits of faster free-breathing high-resolution IVMRI and reduced motion sensitivity are realized, there are costs to spatial resolution, and some motion artifacts may persist. PMID:25163750

  5. Loki: a ground-layer adaptive optics high-resolution near-infrared survey camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Lloyd-Hart, Michael; Meyer, Michael

    2007-09-01

    We present the design of a new high-resolution near-infrared survey camera that will take advantage of the wide corrected field afforded by the 6.5 m MMT's new multi-laser ground-layer adaptive optics (GLAO) system. GLAO technology will correct for turbulence close to the telescope aperture where typically 1/2 to 2/3 of the total atmospheric turbulence lies and is expected to deliver image widths of 0.1-0.2 arc seconds in the near-infrared across a wide range of seeing conditions. The new camera will use a 2 by 2 mosaic of JWST NIRCam detectors, 2048 x 2048 arrays sensitive from 0.6 - 2.5 μm based on Teledyne's HgCdTe HAWAII-2RG detector technology. The camera has a 4 arc minute square field, giving a plate scale of approximately 0.06 arc seconds/pixel, critically sampling the GLAO PSF. In addition, high resolution (0.25 arc seconds or better) multi-object spectroscopy can be supported with cold slit masks inside the dewar; allowing potentially hundreds of spectra to be obtained at once with resolutions of up to 10,000.

  6. High resolution TE&TM near infrared compact spectrometer based on waveguide grating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G.; Thomas, F.; Heidmann, S.; de Mengin, M.; Courjal, N.; Ulliac, G.; Morand, A.; Benech, P.; Kern, P.; Le Coarer, E...

    2015-05-01

    Integrated optics spectrometers can be essentially classified into two main families: based on Fourier transform or dispersed modes. In the first case, an interferogram generated inside an optical waveguide is sampled using nanodetectors, these scatter light into the detector that is in contact with the waveguide. A dedicated FFT processing is needed in order to recover the spectrum with high resolution but limited spectral range. Another way is to extract the optical signal confined in a waveguide using a surface grating and directly obtain the spectrum by means of a relay optics that generates the spectrum on the Fourier plane of the lens, where the detector is placed. Following this second approach, we present a high-resolution compact dispersive spectrometer (δλ =1.5nm at λ=1050nm) based on guided optics technology. The propagating signal is dispersed out of a waveguide thanks to a surface grating that lays along it. Focused Ion Beam technique is used to etch nano-grooves that act as individual scattering centers and constitute the surface grating along the waveguide. The waveguide is realized using X-cut, Ypropagating Lithium Niobate substrate, where the effective index for TE and TM guided modes is different. This results in a strong angular separation of TE and TM diffracted modes, allowing simultaneous detection of spectra for both polarizations. A simple relay optics, with limited optical aberrations, reimages the diffracted signal on the focal plane array, leading to a robust, easy to align instrument.

  7. High-resolution neutron crystallographic studies of the hydration of the coenzyme cob(II)alamin

    SciTech Connect

    Jogl, Gerwald; Wang, Xiaoping; Mason, Sax A.; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Mustyakimov, Marat; Fisher, Zöe; Hoffman, Christina; Kratky, Christoph; Langan, Paul

    2011-06-01

    High-resolution crystallographic studies of the hydration of the coenzyme cob(II)alamin have provided hydrogen-bond parameters of unprecedented accuracy for a biomacromolecule. The hydration of the coenzyme cob(II)alamin has been studied using high-resolution monochromatic neutron crystallographic data collected at room temperature to a resolution of 0.92 Å on the original D19 diffractometer with a prototype 4° × 64° detector at the high-flux reactor neutron source run by the Institute Laue–Langevin. The resulting structure provides hydrogen-bonding parameters for the hydration of biomacromolecules to unprecedented accuracy. These experimental parameters will be used to define more accurate force fields for biomacromolecular structure refinement. The presence of a hydrophobic bowl motif surrounded by flexible side chains with terminal functional groups may be significant for the efficient scavenging of ligands. The feasibility of extending the resolution of this structure to ultrahigh resolution was investigated by collecting time-of-flight neutron crystallographic data during commissioning of the TOPAZ diffractometer with a prototype array of 14 modular 2° × 21° detectors at the Spallation Neutron Source run by Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  8. High resolution neutron crystallographic studies of the hydration of coenzyme cob(II)alamin

    SciTech Connect

    Jogl, Gerwald; Wang, Xiaoping; Mason, Sax; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Mustyakimov, Marat; Fisher, Zoe; Hoffmann, Christina; Kratky, Christoph; Langan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The hydration of coenzyme cob(II)alamin has been studied using high resolution monochromatic neutron crystallographic data collected at room temperature to a resolution of surrounded by flexible side chains with terminal functional groups may be significant for 0.92 on the original diffractometer D19 with a prototype 4o x 64o detector at the high-flux reactor neutron source run by the Institute Laue Langevin. The resulting structure provides H bonding parameters for the hydration of biomacromolecules to unprecedented accuracy. These experimental parameters will be used to define more accurate force-fields for biomacromolecular structure refinement. The presence of a hydrophobic bowl motif efficient scavenging of ligands. The feasibility of extending the resolution of this structure to ultra high resolution was investigated by collecting time-of-flight neutron crystallographic data on diffractometer TOPAZ with a prototype array of 14 modular 21o x 21o detectors at the Spallation Neutron Source run by Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  9. A transportable high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer and analysis system applicable to mobile, autonomous or unattended applications

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, W.M.; Neufeld, K.W.

    1995-07-01

    The Safeguards Technology Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is developing systems based on a compact electro-mechanically cooled high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. This detector system broadens the practicality of performing high- resolution gamma-ray spectrometry in the field. Utilizing portable computers, multi-channel analyzers and software these systems greatly improve the ease of performing mobile high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. Using industrial computers, we can construct systems that will run autonomously for extended periods of time without operator input or maintenance. These systems can start or make decisions based on sensor inputs rather than operator interactions. Such systems can provide greater capability for wider domain of safeguards, treaty verification application, and other unattended, autonomous or in-situ applications.

  10. Reproducible high-resolution multispectral image acquisition in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duliu, Alexandru; Gardiazabal, José; Lasser, Tobias; Navab, Nassir

    2015-07-01

    Multispectral image acquisitions are increasingly popular in dermatology, due to their improved spectral resolution which enables better tissue discrimination. Most applications however focus on restricted regions of interest, imaging only small lesions. In this work we present and discuss an imaging framework for high-resolution multispectral imaging on large regions of interest.

  11. Workshop on high-resolution, large-acceptance spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeidman, B.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of the Workshop on High-Resolution, Large-Acceptance Spectrometers was to provide a means for exchange of information among those actively engaged in the design and construction of these new spectrometers. Thirty-seven papers were prepared for the data base.

  12. A DVD Spectroscope: A Simple, High-Resolution Classroom Spectroscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka; Hamada, Kiyohito

    2006-01-01

    Digital versatile disks (DVDs) have successfully made up an inexpensive but high-resolution spectroscope suitable for classroom experiments that can easily be made with common material and gives clear and fine spectra of various light sources and colored material. The observed spectra can be photographed with a digital camera, and such images can…

  13. Persistence Diagrams of High-Resolution Temporal Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Méndez, F.; Carsteanu, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    This study applies Topological Data Analysis (TDA), by generating persistence diagrams to uncover patterns in the data of high-resolution temporal rainfall intensities from Iowa City (IIHR, U of Iowa). Persistence diagrams are a way to identify essential cycles in state-space representations of the data.

  14. Application of Classification Models to Pharyngeal High-Resolution Manometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mielens, Jason D.; Hoffman, Matthew R.; Ciucci, Michelle R.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The authors present 3 methods of performing pattern recognition on spatiotemporal plots produced by pharyngeal high-resolution manometry (HRM). Method: Classification models, including the artificial neural networks (ANNs) multilayer perceptron (MLP) and learning vector quantization (LVQ), as well as support vector machines (SVM), were…

  15. Laser direct writing of rotationally symmetric high-resolution structures.

    PubMed

    Haefner, Matthias; Pruss, Christof; Osten, Wolfgang

    2011-11-01

    We present a laser direct writing system for the efficient fabrication of high-resolution axicon structures. The setup makes use of scanning beam interference lithography incorporated with a fringe locking scheme for tight fringe phase control and allows us to fabricate large area structures with a period down to 450 nm.

  16. High-resolution airway morphometry from polyurethane casts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, Gordon R.; Vargas, John; Hoford, John D.; Craft, Jeanne; Shroff, Sunil; McRae, Karen M.

    1995-05-01

    An airway cast was made and imbedded in a solid polyurethane block of a contrasting color. The block was sequentially milled and photographed. The sequential photographs were scanned to create an image database which was analyzed on VIDA; a multidimensional image analysis software package. The technique shows promise as a semi-automated process for generating a high resolution morphometric database from airway casts.

  17. Plant respirometer enables high resolution of oxygen consumption rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, D. L.

    1966-01-01

    Plant respirometer permits high resolution of relatively small changes in the rate of oxygen consumed by plant organisms undergoing oxidative metabolism in a nonphotosynthetic state. The two stage supply and monitoring system operates by a differential pressure transducer and provides a calibrated output by digital or analog signals.

  18. High resolution bone mineral densitometry with a gamma camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.; Evans, H.; Jhingran, S.; Johnson, P.

    1983-01-01

    A technique by which the regional distribution of bone mineral can be determined in bone samples from small animals is described. The technique employs an Anger camera interfaced to a medical computer. High resolution imaging is possible by producing magnified images of the bone samples. Regional densitometry of femurs from oophorectomised and bone mineral loss.

  19. High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Solids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maciel, Gary E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines recent developments in techniques for obtaining high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra on solid samples, discussing the kinds of applications for which these techniques are well suited. Also discusses the characteristics of NMR of solids and generating magnetization for NMR in solids. (JN)

  20. Evacuee Compliance Behavior Analysis using High Resolution Demographic Information

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei; Han, Lee; Liu, Cheng; Tuttle, Mark A; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether evacuee compliance behavior with route assignments from different resolutions of demographic data would impact the evacuation performance. Most existing evacuation strategies assume that travelers will follow evacuation instructions, while in reality a certain percent of evacuees do not comply with prescribed instructions. In this paper, a comparison study of evacuation assignment based on Traffic Analysis Zones (TAZ) and high resolution LandScan USA Population Cells (LPC) were conducted for the detailed road network representing Alexandria, Virginia. A revised platform for evacuation modeling built on high resolution demographic data and activity-based microscopic traffic simulation is proposed. The results indicate that evacuee compliance behavior affects evacuation efficiency with traditional TAZ assignment, but it does not significantly compromise the efficiency with high resolution LPC assignment. The TAZ assignment also underestimates the real travel time during evacuation, especially for high compliance simulations. This suggests that conventional evacuation studies based on TAZ assignment might not be effective at providing efficient guidance to evacuees. From the high resolution data perspective, traveler compliance behavior is an important factor but it does not impact the system performance significantly. The highlight of evacuee compliance behavior analysis should be emphasized on individual evacuee level route/shelter assignments, rather than the whole system performance.

  1. Texture analysis of high-resolution FLAIR images for TLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Elisevich, Kost

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents a study of the texture information of high-resolution FLAIR images of the brain with the aim of determining the abnormality and consequently the candidacy of the hippocampus for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) surgery. Intensity and volume features of the hippocampus from FLAIR images of the brain have been previously shown to be useful in detecting the abnormal hippocampus in TLE. However, the small size of the hippocampus may limit the texture information. High-resolution FLAIR images show more details of the abnormal intensity variations of the hippocampi and therefore are more suitable for texture analysis. We study and compare the low and high-resolution FLAIR images of six epileptic patients. The hippocampi are segmented manually by an expert from T1-weighted MR images. Then the segmented regions are mapped on the corresponding FLAIR images for texture analysis. The 2-D wavelet transforms of the hippocampi are employed for feature extraction. We compare the ability of the texture features from regular and high-resolution FLAIR images to distinguish normal and abnormal hippocampi. Intracranial EEG results as well as surgery outcome are used as gold standard. The results show that the intensity variations of the hippocampus are related to the abnormalities in the TLE.

  2. Human enamel structure studied by high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, S.L. )

    1989-01-01

    Human enamel structural features are characterized by high resolution electron microscopy. The human enamel consists of polycrystals with a structure similar to Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2. This article describes the structural features of human enamel crystal at atomic and nanometer level. Besides the structural description, a great number of high resolution images are included. Research into the carious process in human enamel is very important for human beings. This article firstly describes the initiation of caries in enamel crystal at atomic and unit-cell level and secondly describes the further steps of caries with structural and chemical demineralization. The demineralization in fact, is the origin of caries in human enamel. The remineralization of carious areas in human enamel has drawn more and more attention as its potential application is realized. This process has been revealed by high resolution electron microscopy in detail in this article. On the other hand, the radiation effects on the structure of human enamel are also characterized by high resolution electron microscopy. In order to reveal this phenomenon clearly, a great number of electron micrographs have been shown, and a physical mechanism is proposed. 26 references.

  3. High resolution data base for use with MAP

    SciTech Connect

    Tapley, W.C.; Harris, D.B.

    1987-05-05

    A high resolution cartographic data base of thw World is available from the CIA. We obtained this data, extracted portions of the data, and produced cartographic files of varying resolutions. The resulting data files are of the proper format for use with MAP (2), our in-house cartographic plotting program.

  4. High-Resolution Land Use and Land Cover Mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    As the Nation?s population grows, quantifying, monitoring, and managing land use becomes increasingly important. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has a long heritage of leadership and innovation in land use and land cover (LULC) mapping that has been the model both nationally and internationally for over 20 years. At present, the USGS is producing high-resolution LULC data for several watershed and urban areas within the United States. This high-resolution LULC mapping is part of an ongoing USGS Land Cover Characterization Program (LCCP). The four components of the LCCP are global (1:2,000,000-scale), national (1:100,000-scale), urban (1:24,000-scale), and special projects (various scales and time periods). Within the urban and special project components, the USGS Rocky Mountain Mapping Center (RMMC) is collecting historical as well as contemporary high-resolution LULC data. RMMC?s high-resolution LULC mapping builds on the heritage and success of previous USGS LULC programs and provides LULC information to meet user requirements.

  5. HIGH RESOLUTION RESISTIVITY LEAK DETECTION DATA PROCESSING & EVALUATION MEHTODS & REQUIREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    SCHOFIELD JS

    2007-10-04

    This document has two purposes: {sm_bullet} Describe how data generated by High Resolution REsistivity (HRR) leak detection (LD) systems deployed during single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval operations are processed and evaluated. {sm_bullet} Provide the basic review requirements for HRR data when Hrr is deployed as a leak detection method during SST waste retrievals.

  6. Vehicle Detection and Classification from High Resolution Satellite Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, L.; Sasikumar, M.

    2014-11-01

    In the past decades satellite imagery has been used successfully for weather forecasting, geographical and geological applications. Low resolution satellite images are sufficient for these sorts of applications. But the technological developments in the field of satellite imaging provide high resolution sensors which expands its field of application. Thus the High Resolution Satellite Imagery (HRSI) proved to be a suitable alternative to aerial photogrammetric data to provide a new data source for object detection. Since the traffic rates in developing countries are enormously increasing, vehicle detection from satellite data will be a better choice for automating such systems. In this work, a novel technique for vehicle detection from the images obtained from high resolution sensors is proposed. Though we are using high resolution images, vehicles are seen only as tiny spots, difficult to distinguish from the background. But we are able to obtain a detection rate not less than 0.9. Thereafter we classify the detected vehicles into cars and trucks and find the count of them.

  7. High Resolution Mass Spectra Analysis with a Programmable Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdsworth, David K.

    1980-01-01

    Highlighted are characteristics of programs written for a pocket-sized programmable calculator to analyze mass spectra data (such as displaying high resolution masses for formulas, predicting whether formulas are stable molecules or molecular ions, determining formulas by isotopic abundance measurement) in a laboratory or classroom. (CS)

  8. High resolution energy-sensitive digital X-ray

    DOEpatents

    Nygren, D.R.

    1995-07-18

    An apparatus and method for detecting an x-ray and for determining the depth of penetration of an x-ray into a semiconductor strip detector. In one embodiment, a semiconductor strip detector formed of semiconductor material is disposed in an edge-on orientation towards an x-ray source such that x-rays from the x-ray source are incident upon and substantially perpendicular to the front edge of the semiconductor strip detector. The semiconductor strip detector is formed of a plurality of segments. The segments are coupled together in a collinear arrangement such that the semiconductor strip detector has a length great enough such that substantially all of the x-rays incident on the front edge of the semiconductor strip detector interact with the semiconductor material which forms the semiconductor strip detector. A plurality of electrodes are connected to the semiconductor strip detector such that each one of the semiconductor strip detector segments has at least one of the of electrodes coupled thereto. A signal processor is also coupled to each one of the electrodes. The present detector detects an interaction within the semiconductor strip detector, between an x-ray and the semiconductor material, and also indicates the depth of penetration of the x-ray into the semiconductor strip detector at the time of the interaction. 5 figs.

  9. High Resolution Rapid Revisits Insar Monitoring of Surface Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhroy, V.; Li, J.; Charbonneau, F.

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring surface deformation on strategic energy and transportation corridors requires high resolution spatial and temporal InSAR images for mitigation and safety purposes. High resolution air photos, lidar and other satellite images are very useful in areas where the landslides can be fatal. Recently, radar interferometry (InSAR) techniques using more rapid revisit images from several radar satellites are increasingly being used in active deformation monitoring. The Canadian RADARSAT Constellation (RCM) is a three-satellite mission that will provide rapid revisits of four days interferometric (InSAR) capabilities that will be very useful for complex deformation monitoring. For instance, the monitoring of surface deformation due to permafrost activity, complex rock slide motion and steam assisted oil extraction will benefit from this new rapid revisit capability. This paper provide examples of how the high resolution (1-3 m) rapid revisit InSAR capabilities will improve our monitoring of surface deformation and provide insights in understanding triggering mechanisms. We analysed over a hundred high resolution InSAR images over a two year period on three geologically different sites with various configurations of topography, geomorphology, and geology conditions. We show from our analysis that the more frequent InSAR acquisitions are providing more information in understanding the rates of movement and failure process of permafrost triggered retrogressive thaw flows; the complex motion of an asymmetrical wedge failure of an active rock slide and the identification of over pressure zones related to oil extraction using steam injection. Keywords: High resolution, InSAR, rapid revisits, triggering mechanisms, oil extraction.

  10. Temperature gradient analyzers for compact high-resolution X-ray spectrometers

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, D.; Baron, A. Q. R.

    2010-01-01

    Compact high-resolution X-ray spectrometers with a one-dimensional temperature gradient at the analyzer crystal are considered. This gradient, combined with the use of a position-sensitive detector, makes it possible to relax the usual Rowland-circle condition, allowing increased space at the sample position for a given energy resolution or arm radius. Thus, for example, it is estimated that ∼meV resolution is possible with a 3 m analyzer arm and 200 mm clearance between the sample and detector. Simple analytic formulae are provided, supported by excellent agreement with ray-tracing simulations. One variation of this method also allows the detector position sensitivity to be used to determine momentum transfer, effectively improving momentum resolution without reducing (slitting down) the analyzer size. Application to medium-resolution (∼10–100 meV) inelastic X-ray scattering spectrometers with large angular acceptance is discussed, where this method also allows increased space at the sample. In some cases the application of a temperature gradient can improve the energy resolution even with a single-element detector. PMID:20029107

  11. Design and engineering aspects of a high resolution positron tomograph for small animal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lecomte, R.; Cadorette, J.; Richard, P.; Rodrique, S.; Rouleau, D. . Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Radiobiology)

    1994-08-01

    The authors describe the Sherbrooke positron emission tomograph, a very high resolution device dedicated to dynamic imaging of small laboratory animals. Its distinctive features are: small discrete scintillation detectors based on avalanche photodiodes (APD) to achieve uniform, isotropic, very high spatial resolution; parallel processing for low deadtime and high count rate capability; multispectral data acquisition hardware to improve sensitivity and scatter correction; modularity to allow design flexibility and upgradability. The system implements the clam-shell'' sampling scheme and a rotating rod transmission source. All acquisition parameters can be adjusted under computer control. Temperature stability at the detector site is ensured by the use of thermoelectric modules. The initial system consists of one layer of 256 modules (two rings of detectors) defining 3 image slices in a 118 mm diameter by 10.5 mm thick field. The axial field can be extended to 50 mm using 4 layers of modules (8 rings of detectors). The design constraints and engineering aspects of an APD-based PET scanner are reviewed and preliminary results are reported.

  12. High resolution energy-sensitive digital X-ray

    DOEpatents

    Nygren, David R.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting an x-ray and for determining the depth of penetration of an x-ray into a semiconductor strip detector. In one embodiment, a semiconductor strip detector formed of semiconductor material is disposed in an edge-on orientation towards an x-ray source such that x-rays From the x-ray source are incident upon and substantially perpendicular to the front edge of the semiconductor strip detector. The semiconductor strip detector is formed of a plurality of segments. The segments are coupled together in a collinear arrangement such that the semiconductor strip detector has a length great enough such that substantially all of the x-rays incident on the front edge of the semiconductor strip detector interact with the semiconductor material which forms the semiconductor strip detector. A plurality of electrodes are connected to the semiconductor strip detect or such that each one of the of semiconductor strip detector segments has at least one of the of electrodes coupled thereto. A signal processor is also coupled to each one of the electrodes. The present detector detects an interaction within the semiconductor strip detector, between an x-ray and the semiconductor material, and also indicates the depth of penetration of the x-ray into the semiconductor strip detector at the time of the interaction.

  13. Hydrophilic interaction and reversed phase mixed-mode liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution tandem mass spectrometry for polar lipids analysis.

    PubMed

    Granafei, Sara; Azzone, Pietro; Spinelli, Vito Alessandro; Losito, Ilario; Palmisano, Francesco; Cataldi, Tommaso R I

    2016-12-16

    A hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) fused-core column (150×2.1mm ID, 2.7μm particle size) and a short reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) column (20mm×2.1mm ID, 1.9μm) were serially coupled to perform mixed-mode chromatography (MMC) on complex mixtures of phospholipids (PL). Mobile phase composition and gradient elution program were, preliminarily, optimized using a mixture of phosphatidylcholines (PC), phosphatidylethanolamines (PE), their corresponding lyso-forms (LPC and LPE), and sphingomyelins (SM). Thus a mixture of PC extracted from soybean was characterized by MMC coupled to electrospray ionization (ESI) high-resolution Fourier-transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) using an orbital trap analyzer. Several previously undiscovered PC, including positional isomers (i.e. 16:0/19:1 and 19:1/16:0) of PC 35:1 and skeletal isomers (i.e. 18:1/18:2 and 18:0/18:3) of PC 36:3 were identified. Therefore, high-resolution MS/MS spectra unveiled the occurrence of isomers for several overall side chain compositions. The proposed MMC-ESI-FTMS/MS approach revealed an unprecedented capability in disclosing complexity of an actual lipid extract, thus representing a very promising approach to lipidomics.

  14. Gamma induced atom displacements in LYSO and LuYAP crystals as used in medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñera, Ibrahin; Cruz, Carlos M.; Abreu, Yamiel; Leyva, Antonio; Van Espen, Piet; Díaz, Angelina; Cabal, Ana E.; Van Remortel, Nick

    2015-08-01

    The radiation damage, in terms of atom displacements, induced by gamma irradiation in LYSO and LuYAP crystals is presented. 44Sc, 22Na and 48V are used as gamma sources for this study. The energy of gammas from the electron-positron annihilation processes (511 keV) is also included in the study. The atom displacements distributions inside each material are calculated following the Monte Carlo assisted Classical Method introduced by the authors. This procedure also allows to study the atom displacements in-depth distributions inside each crystal. The atom displacements damage in LYSO crystals is found to be higher than in LuYAP crystals, mainly provoked by the displacements of silicon and oxygen atoms. But the difference between atom displacements produced in LYSO and LuYAP decreases when more energetic sources are used. On the other hand, the correlation between the atom displacements and energy deposition in-depth distributions is excellent. The atom displacements to energy deposition ratio is found to increases with more energetic photon sources. LYSO crystals are then more liable to the atom displacements damage than LuYAP crystals.

  15. Estimation of red-light running frequency using high-resolution traffic and signal data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Yu, Guizhen; Wu, Xinkai; Ren, Yilong; Li, Yueguang

    2017-03-23

    Red-light-running (RLR) emerges as a major cause that may lead to intersection-related crashes and endanger intersection safety. To reduce RLR violations, it's critical to identify the influential factors associated with RLR and estimate RLR frequency. Without resorting to video camera recordings, this study investigates this important issue by utilizing high-resolution traffic and signal event data collected from loop detectors at five intersections on Trunk Highway 55, Minneapolis, MN. First, a simple method is proposed to identify RLR by fully utilizing the information obtained from stop bar detectors, downstream entrance detectors and advance detectors. Using 12 months of event data, a total of 6550 RLR cases were identified. According to a definition of RLR frequency as the conditional probability of RLR on a certain traffic or signal condition (veh/1000veh), the relationships between RLR frequency and some influential factors including arriving time at advance detector, approaching speed, headway, gap to the preceding vehicle on adjacent lane, cycle length, geometric characteristics and even snowing weather were empirically investigated. Statistical analysis shows good agreement with the traffic engineering practice, e.g., RLR is most likely to occur on weekdays during peak periods under large traffic demands and longer signal cycles, and a total of 95.24% RLR events occurred within the first 1.5s after the onset of red phase. The findings confirmed that vehicles tend to run the red light when they are close to intersection during phase transition, and the vehicles following the leading vehicle with short headways also likely run the red light. Last, a simplified nonlinear regression model is proposed to estimate RLR frequency based on the data from advance detector. The study is expected to helpbetter understand RLR occurrence and further contribute to the future improvement of intersection safety.

  16. High-resolution structure of the native histone octamer

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Christopher M.; Nicholson, James M.; Lambert, Stanley J.; Chantalat, Laurent; Reynolds, Colin D.; Baldwin, John P.

    2005-06-01

    The high-resolution (1.90 Å) model of the native histone octamer allows structural comparisons to be made with the nucleosome-core particle, along with an identification of a likely core-histone binding site. Crystals of native histone octamers (H2A–H2B)–(H4–H3)–(H3′–H4′)–(H2B′–H2A′) from chick erythrocytes in 2 M KCl, 1.35 M potassium phosphate pH 6.9 diffract X-rays to 1.90 Å resolution, yielding a structure with an R{sub work} value of 18.7% and an R{sub free} of 22.2%. The crystal space group is P6{sub 5}, the asymmetric unit of which contains one complete octamer. This high-resolution model of the histone-core octamer allows further insight into intermolecular interactions, including water molecules, that dock the histone dimers to the tetramer in the nucleosome-core particle and have relevance to nucleosome remodelling. The three key areas analysed are the H2A′–H3–H4 molecular cluster (also H2A–H3′–H4′), the H4–H2B′ interaction (also H4′–H2B) and the H2A′–H4 β-sheet interaction (also H2A–H4′). The latter of these three regions is important to nucleosome remodelling by RNA polymerase II, as it is shown to be a likely core-histone binding site, and its disruption creates an instability in the nucleosome-core particle. A majority of the water molecules in the high-resolution octamer have positions that correlate to similar positions in the high-resolution nucleosome-core particle structure, suggesting that the high-resolution octamer model can be used for comparative studies with the high-resolution nucleosome-core particle.

  17. Nano-LC-MS/MS for Quantification of Lyso-Gb3 and Its Analogues Reveals a Useful Biomarker for Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Sueoka, Hideaki; Ichihara, Junji; Tsukimura, Takahiro; Togawa, Tadayasu; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers useful for diagnosis and evaluation of treatment for patients with Fabry disease are urgently needed. Recently, plasma globotriaosylsphingosine (lyso-Gb3) and lyso-Gb3-related analogues have attracted attention as promising biomarkers of Fabry disease. However, the plasma concentrations of lyso-Gb3 and its analogues are extremely low or below the detection limits in some Fabry patients as well as in healthy subjects. In this paper, we introduce the novel application of a nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nano-LC-MS/MS) system to the measurement of lyso-Gb3 and its analogues in plasma. Nano-LC-MS/MS requires smaller amounts of samples and is more sensitive than conventional techniques. Using this method, we measured the plasma concentrations of lyso-Gb3 and its analogues in 40 healthy subjects, 5 functional variants (males with E66Q), and various Fabry patients (9 classic Fabry males/9 mutations; 7 later-onset Fabry males/5 mutations; and 10 Fabry females/9 mutations). The results revealed that the mean lyso-Gb3 and lyso-Gb3(-2) concentrations in all the Fabry patient subgroups were statistically higher, especially in the classic Fabry males, than those in the functional variants and healthy subjects. The plasma concentrations of lyso-Gb3 and its analogues in healthy subjects, functional variants, and some Fabry patients with specific mutations (R112H and M296I) that cannot be established by conventional techniques were successfully determined by means of nano-LC-MS/MS. The lyso-Gb3 and lyso-Gb3(-2) concentrations in male patients with these mutations were lower than those in most Fabry patients having other mutations, but higher than those in the functional variants and healthy subjects. This new method is expected to be useful for sensitive determination of the plasma concentrations of lyso-Gb3 and its analogues. This study also revealed that not only lyso-Gb3 but also lyso-Gb3(-2) in plasma is a useful biomarker for the diagnosis of

  18. High resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Changmin; Lin Kexiang; Liu Huaibo

    1997-08-01

    This is China`s first case study of high resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information. The key of the modelling process is to build a prototype model and using the model as a geological knowledge bank. Outcrop information used in geological modelling including seven aspects: (1) Determining the reservoir framework pattern by sedimentary depositional system and facies analysis; (2) Horizontal correlation based on the lower and higher stand duration of the paleo-lake level; (3) Determining the model`s direction based on the paleocurrent statistics; (4) Estimating the sandbody communication by photomosaic and profiles; (6) Estimating reservoir properties distribution within sandbody by lithofacies analysis; and (7) Building the reservoir model in sandbody scale by architectural element analysis and 3-D sampling. A high resolution reservoir geological model of Youshashan oil field has been built by using this method.

  19. Protein-DNA binding in high-resolution

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, Shaun; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental and computational methodologies are enabling ultra-high resolution genome-wide profiles of protein-DNA binding events. For example, the ChIP-exo protocol precisely characterizes protein-DNA crosslinking patterns by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with 5′ → 3′ exonuclease digestion. Similarly, deeply sequenced chromatin accessibility assays (e.g. DNase-seq and ATACseq) enable the detection of protected footprints at protein-DNA binding sites. With these techniques and others, we have the potential to characterize the individual nucleotides that interact with transcription factors, nucleosomes, RNA polymerases, and other regulatory proteins in a particular cellular context. In this review, we explain the experimental assays and computational analysis methods that enable high-resolution profiling of protein-DNA binding events. We discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with such approaches. PMID:26038153

  20. High resolution seismic reflection test at the DOE Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Narbutovskih, S.M.; Michelsen, F.B.; Clark, J.C.; Christensen, E.W.

    1995-04-01

    A recent test was conducted to ascertain the benefits of swept source technology for use at the DOE Hanford Site. Previous high resolution seismic surveys suffered from coherent noise interference, poor signal transmission and lack of borehole velocity control. P-wave data were collected with the T-2500 Minivib produced by IVI, Inc. and Oyo Geospace`s DAS-1 acquisition system. Results showed a significant increase m signal-to-noise ratio, increased resolving power and better depth penetration of the signal. It is concluded that swept source technology as part of a total systems approach, significantly expands the capabilities of the shallow high resolution seismic reflection method for use at the DOE Hanford Site.

  1. Temperature-dependent high resolution absorption cross sections of propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, Christopher A.; Hargreaves, Robert J.; Bernath, Peter F.

    2016-10-01

    High resolution (0.005 cm-1) absorption cross sections have been measured for pure propane (C3H8). These cross sections cover the 2550-3500 cm-1 region at five temperatures (from 296 to 700 K) and were measured using a Fourier transform spectrometer and a quartz cell heated by a tube furnace. Calibrations were made by comparison to the integrated cross sections of propane from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. These are the first high resolution absorption cross sections of propane for the 3 μm region at elevated temperatures. The cross sections provided may be used to monitor propane in combustion environments and in astronomical sources such as the auroral regions of Jupiter, brown dwarfs and exoplanets.

  2. Strategies for Interpreting High Resolution Coherent Multidimensional Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Thresa A.; House, Zuri R.; Chen, Peter C.; Strangfeld, Benjamin R.

    2013-06-01

    The electronic spectra of certain molecules can be very complex and consist of a high density of peaks. The high density of peaks results in severe spectral congestion, making conventional data analysis techniques extremely difficult to use. One solution to this problem is to use high resolution coherent 2D spectroscopy (HRC2DS), which can improve resolution and sort peaks into recognizable clusters. This technique requires new data analysis techniques to accurately assign peaks. Even though HRC2DS can improve spectral resolution, some regions of the spectra may still remain congested. The ability to solve this problem using even higher dimensional techniques (e.g., high resolution coherent 3D spectroscopy) with 3D pattern recognition and data analysis techniques will be discussed.

  3. High Resolution Coherent Three-Dimensional Spectroscopy of Iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Zuri R.; Wells, Thresa A.; Chen, Peter C.; Strangfeld, Benjamin R.

    2013-06-01

    The heavy congestion found in many one-dimensional spectra can make it difficult to study many transitions. A new coherent three-dimensional spectroscopic technique has been developed to eliminate the kind of congestion commonly seen in high resolution electronic spectra. The molecule used for this test was Iodine. A well-characterized transition (X to B) was used to determine which four wave mixing process or processes were responsible for the peaks in the resulting multidimensional spectrum. The resolution of several peaks that overlap in a coherent 2D spectrum can be accomplished by using a higher dimensional (3D) spectroscopic method. This talk will discuss strategies for finding spectroscopic constants using this high resolution coherent 3D spectroscopic method.

  4. An Introduction to High Resolution Coherent Multidimensional Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Wells, Thresa A.; House, Zuri R.; Strangfeld, Benjamin R.

    2013-06-01

    High resolution coherent multidimensional spectroscopy is a technique that can be used to analyze and assign peaks for molecules that have resisted spectral analysis. Molecules that yield heavily congested and seemingly patternless spectra using conventional methods can yield 2D spectra that have recognizable patterns. The off-diagonal region of the coherent 2D plot shows only cross-peaks that are related by rotational selection rules. The resulting patterns facilitate peak assignment if they are sufficiently resolved. For systems that are not well-resolved, coherent 3D spectra may be generated to further improve resolution and provide selectivity. This presentation will provide an introduction to high resolution coherent 2D and 3D spectroscopies.

  5. High Resolution Coherent 3d Spectroscopy of Bromine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strangfeld, Benjamin R.; Wells, Thresa A.; House, Zuri R.; Chen, Peter C.

    2013-06-01

    The high resolution gas phase electronic spectrum of bromine is rather congested due to many overlapping vibrational and rotational transitions with similar transition frequencies, and also due to isotopomeric effects. Expansion into the second dimension will remove some of this congestion; however through the implementation of High Resolution Coherent 3D Spectroscopy, the density of peaks is further reduced by at least two orders of magnitude. This allows for the selective examination of a small number of spatially resolved multidimensional bands, separated by vibrational quantum number and by isotopomer, which facilitates the fitting of many rovibrational peaks in bromine. The ability to derive information about the molecular constants for the electronic states involved will be discussed.

  6. High resolution computed tomography of advanced composite and ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yancey, R. N.; Klima, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced composite and ceramic materials are being developed for use in many new defense and commercial applications. In order to achieve the desired mechanical properties of these materials, the structural elements must be carefully analyzed and engineered. A study was conducted to evaluate the use of high resolution computed tomography (CT) as a macrostructural analysis tool for advanced composite and ceramic materials. Several samples were scanned using a laboratory high resolution CT scanner. Samples were also destructively analyzed at the locations of the scans and the nondestructive and destructive results were compared. The study provides useful information outlining the strengths and limitations of this technique and the prospects for further research in this area.

  7. High resolution map of light pollution over Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netzel, Henryka; Netzel, Paweł

    2016-09-01

    In 1976 Berry introduced a simple mathematical equation to calculate artificial night sky brightness at zenith. In the original model cities, considered as points with given population, are only sources of light emission. In contrary to Berry's model, we assumed that all terrain surface can be a source of light. Emission of light depends on percent of built up area in a given cell. We based on Berry's model. Using field measurements and high-resolution data we obtained the map of night sky brightness over Poland in 100-m resolution. High resolution input data, combined with a very simple model, makes it possible to obtain detailed structures of the night sky brightness without complicating the calculations.

  8. Fabricating High-Resolution X-Ray Collimators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Michael; Atkinson, James E.; Fraser, Iain; Klinger, Jill

    2008-01-01

    A process and method for fabricating multi-grid, high-resolution rotating modulation collimators for arcsecond and sub-arcsecond x-ray and gamma-ray imaging involves photochemical machining and precision stack lamination. The special fixturing and etching techniques that have been developed are used for the fabrication of multiple high-resolution grids on a single array substrate. This technology has application in solar and astrophysics and in a number of medical imaging applications including mammography, computed tomography (CT), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and gamma cameras used in nuclear medicine. This collimator improvement can also be used in non-destructive testing, hydrodynamic weapons testing, and microbeam radiation therapy.

  9. Turbine component casting core with high resolution region

    DOEpatents

    Kamel, Ahmed; Merrill, Gary B.

    2014-08-26

    A hollow turbine engine component with complex internal features can include a first region and a second, high resolution region. The first region can be defined by a first ceramic core piece formed by any conventional process, such as by injection molding or transfer molding. The second region can be defined by a second ceramic core piece formed separately by a method effective to produce high resolution features, such as tomo lithographic molding. The first core piece and the second core piece can be joined by interlocking engagement that once subjected to an intermediate thermal heat treatment process thermally deform to form a three dimensional interlocking joint between the first and second core pieces by allowing thermal creep to irreversibly interlock the first and second core pieces together such that the joint becomes physically locked together providing joint stability through thermal processing.

  10. A procedure for high resolution satellite imagery quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Crespi, Mattia; De Vendictis, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Data products generated from High Resolution Satellite Imagery (HRSI) are routinely evaluated during the so-called in-orbit test period, in order to verify if their quality fits the desired features and, if necessary, to obtain the image correction parameters to be used at the ground processing center. Nevertheless, it is often useful to have tools to evaluate image quality also at the final user level. Image quality is defined by some parameters, such as the radiometric resolution and its accuracy, represented by the noise level, and the geometric resolution and sharpness, described by the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). This paper proposes a procedure to evaluate these image quality parameters; the procedure was implemented in a suitable software and tested on high resolution imagery acquired by the QuickBird, WorldView-1 and Cartosat-1 satellites.

  11. Application of spectral phase shaping to high resolution CARS spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Postma, S; van Rhijn, A C W; Korterik, J P; Gross, P; Herek, J L; Offerhaus, H L

    2008-05-26

    By spectral phase shaping of both the pump and probe pulses in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy we demonstrate the extraction of the frequencies, bandwidths and relative cross sections of vibrational lines. We employ a tunable broadband Ti:Sapphire laser synchronized to a ps-Nd:YVO mode locked laser. A high resolution spectral phase shaper allows for spectroscopy with a precision better than 1 cm(-1) in the high frequency region around 3000 cm(-1). We also demonstrate how new spectral phase shaping strategies can amplify the resonant features of isolated vibrations to such an extent that spectroscopy and microscopy can be done at high resolution, on the integrated spectral response without the need for a spectrograph.

  12. High-resolution observation by double-biprism electron holography

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Ken; Tonomura, Akira; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Akashi, Tetsuya; Togawa, Yoshihiko

    2004-12-01

    High-resolution electron holography has been achieved by using a double-biprism interferometer implemented on a 1 MV field emission electron microscope. The interferometer was installed behind the first magnifying lens to narrow carrier fringes and thus enabled complete separation of sideband Fourier spectrum from center band in reconstruction process. Holograms of Au fine particles and single-crystalline thin films with the finest fringe spacing of 4.2 pm were recorded and reconstructed. The overall holography system including the reconstruction process performed well for holograms in which carrier fringes had a spacing of around 10 pm. High-resolution lattice images of the amplitude and phase were clearly reconstructed without mixing of the center band and sideband information. Additionally, entire holograms were recorded without Fresnel fringes normally generated by the filament electrode of the biprism, and the holograms were thus reconstructed without the artifacts caused by Fresnel fringes.

  13. A Procedure for High Resolution Satellite Imagery Quality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Crespi, Mattia; De Vendictis, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Data products generated from High Resolution Satellite Imagery (HRSI) are routinely evaluated during the so-called in-orbit test period, in order to verify if their quality fits the desired features and, if necessary, to obtain the image correction parameters to be used at the ground processing center. Nevertheless, it is often useful to have tools to evaluate image quality also at the final user level. Image quality is defined by some parameters, such as the radiometric resolution and its accuracy, represented by the noise level, and the geometric resolution and sharpness, described by the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). This paper proposes a procedure to evaluate these image quality parameters; the procedure was implemented in a suitable software and tested on high resolution imagery acquired by the QuickBird, WorldView-1 and Cartosat-1 satellites. PMID:22412312

  14. High resolution irradiance tailoring using multiple freeform surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bruneton, Adrien; Bäuerle, Axel; Wester, Rolf; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Loosen, Peter

    2013-05-06

    More and more lighting applications require the design of dedicated optics to achieve a given radiant intensity or irradiance distribution. Freeform optics has the advantage of providing such a functionality with a compact design. It was previously demonstrated in [Bäuerle et al., Opt. Exp. 20, 14477-14485 (2012)] that the up-front computation of the light path through the optical system (ray mapping) provides a satisfactory approximation to the problem, and allows the design of multiple freeform surfaces in transmission or in reflection. This article presents one natural extension of this work by introducing an efficient optimization procedure based on the physics of the system. The procedure allows the design of multiple freeform surfaces and can render high resolution irradiance patterns, as demonstrated by several examples, in particular by a lens made of two freeform surfaces projecting a high resolution logo (530 × 160 pixels).

  15. The Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph: Instrument, goals, and science results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, J. C.; Heap, S. R.; Beaver, E. A.; Boggess, A.; Carpenter, K. G.; Ebbets, D. C.; Hutchings, J. B.; Jura, M.; Leckrone, D. S.; Linsky, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS), currently in Earth orbit on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), operates in the wavelength range 1150-3200 A with spectral resolutions (lambda/delta lambda) of approximately 2 x 10(exp 3), 2 x 10(exp 4), and 1 x 10(exp 3). The instrument and its development from inception, its current status, the approach to operations, representative results in the major areas of the scientific goals, and prospects for the future are described.

  16. High-resolution solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Michael D.; Smith, Karen A.; Kinsey, Robert A.; Rothgeb, T. Michael; Skarjune, Robert P.; Oldfield, Eric

    1982-01-01

    We report the observation of high-resolution solid-state NMR spectra of 23Na (I = [unk]), 27Al (I = [unk]) and 51V (I = [unk]) in various inorganic systems. We show that, contrary to popular belief, relatively high-resolution (≈10 ppm linewidth) spectra may be obtained from quadrupolar systems, in which electric quadrupole coupling constants (e2qQ/h) are in the range ≈1-5 MHz, by means of observation of the (½, -½) spin transition. The (½, -½) transition for all nonintegral spin quadrupolar nuclei (I = [unk], [unk], [unk], or [unk]) is only normally broadened by dipolar, chemical shift (or Knight shift) anisotropy or second-order quadrupolar effects, all of which are to a greater or lesser extent averaged under fast magic-angle sample rotation. In the case of 23Na and 27Al, high-resolution spectra of 23NaNO3 (e2qQ/h ≈300 kHz) and α-27Al2O3 (e2qQ/h ≈2-3 MHz) are presented; in the case of 51V2O5 (e2qQ/h ≈800 kHz), rotational echo decays are observed due to the presence of a ≈103-ppm chemical shift anisotropy. The observation of high-resolution solid-state spectra of systems having spins I = [unk], [unk], and [unk] in asymmetric environments opens up the possibility of examining about two out of three nuclei by solid-state NMR that were previously thought of as “inaccessible” due to the presence of large (a few megahertz) quadrupole coupling constants. Preliminary results for an I = [unk] system, 93Nb, having e2qQ/h ≈19.5 MHz, are also reported. PMID:16593165

  17. High resolution studies of atoms and small molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bushaw, B.A.; Tonkyn, R.G.; Miller, R.J.

    1992-10-01

    High resolution, continuous wave lasers have been utilized successfully in studies of small molecules. Examples of two-photon excitation schemes and of multiple resonance excitation sequences will be discussed within the framework of the spectroscopy and dynamics of selected Rydberg states of nitric oxide. Initial results on the circular dichroism of angular distributions in photoelectron spectra of individual hyperfine states of cesium will also be discussed, but no data given.

  18. LandScan 2013 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    SciTech Connect

    2014-07-01

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30"x30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on land cover, slope, road proximity, high-resolution imagery, and other data sets. The LandScan data set was developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient populations at risk.

  19. High-Resolution Wind Measurements for Offshore Wind Energy Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, Son V.; Neumann, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical transform, called the Rosette Transform, together with a new method, called the Dense Sampling Method, have been developed. The Rosette Transform is invented to apply to both the mean part and the fluctuating part of a targeted radar signature using the Dense Sampling Method to construct the data in a high-resolution grid at 1-km posting for wind measurements over water surfaces such as oceans or lakes.

  20. High resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS), volume 1, book 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The following topics are presented with respect to the high resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS) that is to be used as an instrument for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS): (1) preliminary program plans; (2) contract end item (CEI) specification; and (3) the instrument interface description document. Under the preliminary program plans section, plans dealing with the following subject areas are discussed: spares, performance assurance, configuration management, software implementation, contamination, calibration management, and verification.

  1. High-resolution, cryogenic, side-entry type specimen stage

    DOEpatents

    King, Wayne E.; Merkle, Karl L.

    1979-01-01

    A high-resolution, cryogenic side-entry type specimen stage includes a copper block within which a specimen can be positioned in the electron beam of an electron microscope, one end of the copper block constituting a specimen heat exchanger, means for directing a flow of helium at cryogenic temperature into the heat exchanger, and electrical leads running from the specimen to the exterior of the microscope for four point D.C. electrical resistivity measurements.

  2. High-Resolution Optoelectronic Shaft-Angle Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    1994-01-01

    Improved optoelectronic encoder measures absolute angle to which shaft has been rotated. Costs little more than older, less capable encoders do, yet measures absolute angles at high resolution and does not lose absolute-angle data because generates those data anew with each reading at up to 1,000 times per second. It accumulates increments to measure total angular interval through which shaft has been turned (including unlimited number of complete turns), as long as power remains on.

  3. Fusion Experiments of HSI and High Resolution Panchromatic Imagery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    map derived from the unsharpened HSI. The classification is performed with an unsupervised feature extraction using principal component analysis (PCA... Classification of Hyperspectral Data in Urban Area", P. 169-172, SPIE Vol.3502 8. R. C. Gonzalez, P. Wintz, Digital Image Processing, Addison-Wesley...MA 02420-9185 Abstract In this paper, the fusion of hyperspectral imaging (HSI) sensor data and high-resolution panchromatic imagery (HPI) is

  4. High-resolution schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harten, A.

    1982-01-01

    A class of new explicit second order accurate finite difference schemes for the computation of weak solutions of hyperbolic conservation laws is presented. These highly nonlinear schemes are obtained by applying a nonoscillatory first order accurae scheme to an appropriately modified flux function. The so derived second order accurate schemes achieve high resolution while preserving the robustness of the original nonoscillatory first order accurate scheme.

  5. High resolution, large area, high energy x-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Trebes, J.E.; Dolan, K.W.; Haddad, W.S.; Haskins, J.J.; Lerche, R.A.; Logan, C.M.; Perkins, D.E.; Schneberk, D.J.; Rikard, R.D.

    1997-08-01

    An x-ray tomography system is being developed for high resolution inspection of large objects. The goal is to achieve 25 micron resolution over object sizes that are tens of centimeters in extent. Typical objects will be metal in composition and therefore high energy, few MeV x-rays will be required. A proof-of-principle system with a limited field of view has been developed. Preliminary results are presented.

  6. High-resolution adaptive optics findings in talc retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Mohamed K; Sarwar, Salman; Hanout, Mostafa; Sadiq, Mohammad A; Agarwal, Aniruddha; Gulati, Vikas; Nguyen, Quan Dong; Sepah, Yasir J

    2015-01-01

    Talc retinopathy is a recognized ocular condition characterized by the presence of small, yellow, glistening crystals found inside small retinal vessels and within different retinal layers. These crystals can be associated with retinal vascular occlusion and ischemia. Different diagnostic modalities have been used previously to characterize the retinal lesions in talc retinopathy. Adaptive optics, a high resolution imaging technique, is used to evaluate the location, appearance and distribution of talc crystals in a case of talc retinopathy.

  7. High resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS), volume 1, book 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The following topics are presented with respect to the high resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS) that is to be used as an instrument for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS): (1) an instrument overview; (2) an instrument description; (3) the instrument's conceptual design; (4) technical risks and offsets; (5) instrument reliability; (6) commands and telemetry; (7) mass and power budgets; (8) integration and test program; (9) program implementation; and (10) phase CD schedule.

  8. New Challenges in High-Resolution Modeling of Hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. S.

    2006-12-01

    The extreme active Atlantic hurricane seasons in recent years have highlighted the urgent need for a better understanding of the factors that contribute to hurricane intensity and for development of the corresponding advanced hurricane prediction models to improve intensity forecasts. The lack of skill in present forecasts of hurricane structure and intensity may be attributed in part to deficiencies in the current prediction models: insufficient grid resolution, inadequate surface and boundary layer formulations, and the lack of full coupling to a dynamic ocean. The extreme high winds, intense rainfall, large ocean waves, and copious sea spray in hurricanes push the surface-exchange parameters for temperature, water vapor, and momentum into untested regimes. The recent modeling effort is to develop and test a fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean modeling system that is capable of resolving the eye and eyewall in a hurricane at ~1 km grid resolution. The new challenges for these very high resolution models are the corresponding physical representations at 1-km scale, including microphysics, sub-grid turbulence parameterization, atmospheric boundary layer, physical processes at the air-sea interface with surface waves among others. The lack of accurate initial conditions for high-resolution hurricane modeling presents another major challenge. Improvements in initial conditions rest on the use of more airborne and remotely sensed observations in high-resolution assimilation systems and on the application of advanced assimilation schemes to hurricanes. This study aimed to provide an overview of these new challenges using high-resolution model simulations of Hurricanes Isabel (2003), Frances (2004), Katrina and Rita (2005) that were observed extensively by two recent field programs, namely, the Coupled Boundary Layer Air-Sea Transfer (CBLAST)-Hurricane in 2003-2004 and the Hurricane Rainbands and Intensity Change Experiment (RAINEX) in 2005.

  9. Adaptive optics with pupil tracking for high resolution retinal imaging.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Betul; Lamory, Barbara; Levecq, Xavier; Harms, Fabrice; Dainty, Chris

    2012-02-01

    Adaptive optics, when integrated into retinal imaging systems, compensates for rapidly changing ocular aberrations in real time and results in improved high resolution images that reveal the photoreceptor mosaic. Imaging the retina at high resolution has numerous potential medical applications, and yet for the development of commercial products that can be used in the clinic, the complexity and high cost of the present research systems have to be addressed. We present a new method to control the deformable mirror in real time based on pupil tracking measurements which uses the default camera for the alignment of the eye in the retinal imaging system and requires no extra cost or hardware. We also present the first experiments done with a compact adaptive optics flood illumination fundus camera where it was possible to compensate for the higher order aberrations of a moving model eye and in vivo in real time based on pupil tracking measurements, without the real time contribution of a wavefront sensor. As an outcome of this research, we showed that pupil tracking can be effectively used as a low cost and practical adaptive optics tool for high resolution retinal imaging because eye movements constitute an important part of the ocular wavefront dynamics.

  10. High Resolution Aerosol Modeling: Decadal Changes in Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, D J; Chuang, C C; Govindasamy, B; Cameron-Smith, P J; Rotman, D A

    2005-02-01

    The Atmospheric Science Division of LLNL has performed high-resolution calculations of direct sulfate forcing using a DOE-provided computer resource at NERSC. We integrated our global chemistry-aerosol model (IMPACT) with the LLNL high-resolution global climate model (horizontal resolution as high as 100 km) to examine the temporal evolution of sulfate forcing since 1950. We note that all previous assessments of sulfate forcing reported in IPCC (2001) were based on global models with coarse spatial resolutions ({approx} 300 km or even coarser). However, the short lifetime of aerosols ({approx} days) results in large spatial and temporal variations of radiative forcing by sulfate. As a result, global climate models with coarse resolutions do not accurately simulate sulfate forcing on regional scales. It requires much finer spatial resolutions in order to address the effects of regional anthropogenic SO{sub 2} emissions on the global atmosphere as well as the effects of long-range transport of sulfate aerosols on the regional climate forcing. By taking advantage of the tera-scale computer resources at NERSC, we simulated the historic direct sulfate forcing at much finer spatial resolutions than ever attempted before. Furthermore, we performed high-resolution chemistry simulations and saved monthly averaged oxidant fields, which will be used in subsequent simulations of sulfate aerosol formation and their radiative impact.

  11. Environmental inversion using high-resolution matched-field processing.

    PubMed

    Soares, Cristiano; Jesus, Sérgio M; Coelho, Emanuel

    2007-12-01

    This paper considers the inversion of experimental field data collected with light receiving systems designed to meet operational requirements. Such operational requirements include system deployment in free drifting configurations and a limited number of acoustic receivers. A well-known consequence of a reduced spatial coverage is a poor sampling of the vertical structure of the acoustic field, leading to a severe ill-conditioning of the inverse problem and data to model cost function with a massive sidelobe structure having many local extrema. This causes difficulties to meta-heuristic global search methods, such as genetic algorithms, to converge to the true model parameters. In order to cope with this difficulty, broadband high-resolution processors are proposed for their ability to significantly attenuate sidelobes, as a contribution for improving convergence. A comparative study on simulated data shows that high-resolution methods did not outperform the conventional Bartlett processor for pinpointing the true environmental parameter when using exhaustive search. However, when a meta-heuristic technique is applied for exploring a large multidimensional search space, high-resolution methods clearly improved convergence, therefore reducing the inherent uncertainty on the final estimate. These findings are supported by the results obtained on experimental field data obtained during the Maritime Rapid Environmental Assessment 2003 sea trial.

  12. A high-resolution study of isotopic compositions of precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeonghoon; Kim, Songyi; Han, Yeongcheol; Oh, Yoon Seok; Kim, Young-Hee; Kim, Hyerin; Ham, Ji-Young; Choi, Hye-Bin; Na, Un-Sung; Koh, Dong-Chan

    2015-04-01

    Isotopic compositions of precipitation have been used to understand moisture transport in the atmosphere and interactions between precipitation and groundwater. Isotopic compositions of speleothems and ice cores, so called, "paleoarchives", can be utilized to interpret climate of the past and global circulation models (GCMs), which are able to explain the paleoarchives, can be validated by the precipitation isotopes. The developments of stable isotope analyzers make high-resolution isotopic studies feasible and a high-resolution study of precipitation isotopes is needed. For this study, precipitation samples were collected for every 5 to 15 minutes, depending on precipitation rates, using an auto-sampler for precipitation isotopes near coastal area. The isotopic compositions of precipitation range from -5.7‰ (-40.1‰)) to -10.8‰ (-74.3‰)) for oxygen (hydrogen). The slope of δ18O-δD diagram for the whole period is 6.8, but that of each storm is 5.1, 4.2, 7.9 and 7.7, respectively. It indicates that evaporation occurred during the first two storms, while the latter two storms did not experience any evaporation. The isotopic fractionations of precipitation has significant implications for the water cycle and high-resolution data of precipitation isotopes will be needed for the future studies related to the precipitation isotopes.

  13. High resolution ultrasonic spectroscopy system for nondestructive evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. H.

    1991-01-01

    With increased demand for high resolution ultrasonic evaluation, computer based systems or work stations become essential. The ultrasonic spectroscopy method of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) was used to develop a high resolution ultrasonic inspection system supported by modern signal processing, pattern recognition, and neural network technologies. The basic system which was completed consists of a 386/20 MHz PC (IBM AT compatible), a pulser/receiver, a digital oscilloscope with serial and parallel communications to the computer, an immersion tank with motor control of X-Y axis movement, and the supporting software package, IUNDE, for interactive ultrasonic evaluation. Although the hardware components are commercially available, the software development is entirely original. By integrating signal processing, pattern recognition, maximum entropy spectral analysis, and artificial neural network functions into the system, many NDE tasks can be performed. The high resolution graphics capability provides visualization of complex NDE problems. The phase 3 efforts involve intensive marketing of the software package and collaborative work with industrial sectors.

  14. High-resolution 3D digital models of artworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Raffaella; Gambino, Maria Chiara; Greco, Marinella; Pampaloni, Enrico; Pezzati, Luca; Scopigno, Roberto

    2003-10-01

    The measurement of the shape of an artwork usually requires a high-resolution instrumentation, in order to catch small details such as chisel marks, sculptural relieves, surface cracks, etc. 3D scanning techniques, together with new modeling software tools, allow a high fidelity reproduction of an artwork: these can be applied either to support and document its repair or for the realization of 3D archives and virtual museums. Starting from a high-resolution digital model of an object, a further step could be its reproduction by means of fast-prototyping techniques like stereo-lithography or electro-erosion. This work is aimed at showing the performance of a high-resolution laser scanner devoted to Cultural Heritage applications. The device is portable and very versatile, in order to allow in situ applications, accurate and reliable, so to capture intricate details. This laser profilometer has been used in a few surveys, the most significant of which are the monitoring the various phases of the restoration process of an ellenistic bronze (the Minerva of Arezzo, Florence), the cataloguing of some archaeological findings (from the Grotta della Poesia, Lecce) and the documenting of wooden panels surface conditions (the "Madonna del Cardellino" by Raffaello and "La Tebaide" by Beato Angelico).

  15. Adaptive optics with pupil tracking for high resolution retinal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Betul; Lamory, Barbara; Levecq, Xavier; Harms, Fabrice; Dainty, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive optics, when integrated into retinal imaging systems, compensates for rapidly changing ocular aberrations in real time and results in improved high resolution images that reveal the photoreceptor mosaic. Imaging the retina at high resolution has numerous potential medical applications, and yet for the development of commercial products that can be used in the clinic, the complexity and high cost of the present research systems have to be addressed. We present a new method to control the deformable mirror in real time based on pupil tracking measurements which uses the default camera for the alignment of the eye in the retinal imaging system and requires no extra cost or hardware. We also present the first experiments done with a compact adaptive optics flood illumination fundus camera where it was possible to compensate for the higher order aberrations of a moving model eye and in vivo in real time based on pupil tracking measurements, without the real time contribution of a wavefront sensor. As an outcome of this research, we showed that pupil tracking can be effectively used as a low cost and practical adaptive optics tool for high resolution retinal imaging because eye movements constitute an important part of the ocular wavefront dynamics. PMID:22312577

  16. High Resolution Modeling of Tropical Cyclones Using Rare Event Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotkin, D. A.; Abbot, D. S.; Weare, J.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) present a challenge to modeling using general circulation models (GCMs) because they involve processes and structures that are too fine for GCMs to resolve. TCs have fine structures - e.g. the eye, eyewall, and rain bands - with length scales on the order of 10 km, while GCMs have typical resolutions on the order of 50-100 km. High resolution GCM runs that are sufficiently long to exhibit multiple TCs can be prohibitively computationally expensive. Thus, while GCMs exhibit TC-like vortices with similar spatial and temporal frequencies to observed TCs, the ability of GCMs to reproduce fine TC structures remains largely untested. In this study, we use recently developed rare event analysis and simulation methods to selectively simulate TCs under GCMs at very high resolution. These rare event simulation methods have been developed mostly in the context of computational chemistry, but are broadly applicable. They allow (either by careful manipulation of the model or by selection of trajectories) direct and detailed interrogation of the event of interest without introducing error and without the need to simulated for long periods of time to see the event. By creating targeted, high resolution GCM simulations with many TCs, we hope to determine whether or not GCMs can capture fine TC structures such as eyewalls and individual rain bands.

  17. Machine Learning Based Road Detection from High Resolution Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Ye; Wang, Guofeng; Hu, Xiangyun

    2016-06-01

    At present, remote sensing technology is the best weapon to get information from the earth surface, and it is very useful in geo- information updating and related applications. Extracting road from remote sensing images is one of the biggest demand of rapid city development, therefore, it becomes a hot issue. Roads in high-resolution images are more complex, patterns of roads vary a lot, which becomes obstacles for road extraction. In this paper, a machine learning based strategy is presented. The strategy overall uses the geometry features, radiation features, topology features and texture features. In high resolution remote sensing images, the images cover a great scale of landscape, thus, the speed of extracting roads is slow. So, roads' ROIs are firstly detected by using Houghline detection and buffering method to narrow down the detecting area. As roads in high resolution images are normally in ribbon shape, mean-shift and watershed segmentation methods are used to extract road segments. Then, Real Adaboost supervised machine learning algorithm is used to pick out segments that contain roads' pattern. At last, geometric shape analysis and morphology methods are used to prune and restore the whole roads' area and to detect the centerline of roads.

  18. Stars and their Environments at High-Resolution with IGRINS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mace, Gregory; Jaffe, Daniel; Kaplan, Kyle; Kidder, Benjamin; Oh, Heeyoung; Sneden, Christopher; Afşar, Melike

    2016-06-01

    TheImmersion Grating Infrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) is a revolutionary instrument that exploits broad spectral coverage at high-resolution in the near-infrared. There are no moving parts in IGRINS and its high-throughput white-pupil design maximizes sensitivity. IGRINS on the 2.7 meter Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory is nearly as sensitive as CRIRES at the 8 meter Very Large Telescope. However, IGRINS at R=45,000 has more than 30 times the spectral grasp of CRIRES. The use of an immersion grating facilitates a compact cryostat while providing simultaneous H and K band observations with complete wavelength coverage from 1.45 - 2.45 microns. Here we discuss details of instrument performance and summarize the application of IGRINS to stellar characterization, star formation in regions like Taurus and Ophiuchus, the interstellar medium, and photodissociation regions. IGRINS has the largest spectral grasp of any high-resolution, near-infrared spectrograph, allowing us to study star formation and evolution in unprecedented detail. With its fixed format and high sensitivity, IGRINS is a great survey instrument for star clusters, high signal-to-noise (SNR>300) studies of field stars, and for mapping the interstellar medium. As a prototype for GMTNIRS on the Giant Magellan Telescope, IGRINS represents the future of high-resolution spectroscopy. In the future IGRINS will be deployed to numerous facilities and will remain a versatile instrument for the community while producing a rich archive of uniform spectra.

  19. High resolution, MRI-based, segmented, computerized head phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Zubal, I.G.; Harrell, C.R.; Smith, E.O.; Smith, A.L.; Krischlunas, P.

    1999-01-01

    The authors have created a high-resolution software phantom of the human brain which is applicable to voxel-based radiation transport calculations yielding nuclear medicine simulated images and/or internal dose estimates. A software head phantom was created from 124 transverse MRI images of a healthy normal individual. The transverse T2 slices, recorded in a 256x256 matrix from a GE Signa 2 scanner, have isotropic voxel dimensions of 1.5 mm and were manually segmented by the clinical staff. Each voxel of the phantom contains one of 62 index numbers designating anatomical, neurological, and taxonomical structures. The result is stored as a 256x256x128 byte array. Internal volumes compare favorably to those described in the ICRP Reference Man. The computerized array represents a high resolution model of a typical human brain and serves as a voxel-based anthropomorphic head phantom suitable for computer-based modeling and simulation calculations. It offers an improved realism over previous mathematically described software brain phantoms, and creates a reference standard for comparing results of newly emerging voxel-based computations. Such voxel-based computations lead the way to developing diagnostic and dosimetry calculations which can utilize patient-specific diagnostic images. However, such individualized approaches lack fast, automatic segmentation schemes for routine use; therefore, the high resolution, typical head geometry gives the most realistic patient model currently available.

  20. High-resolution laser radar for 3D imaging in artwork cataloging, reproduction, and restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Roberto; Fantoni, Roberta; Ferri de Collibus, Mario; Fornetti, Giorgio G.; Guarneri, Massimiliano; Poggi, Claudio

    2003-10-01

    A high resolution Amplitude Modulated Laser Radar (AM-LR) sensor has recently been developed, aimed at accurately reconstructing 3D digital models of real targets, either single objects or complex scenes. The sensor sounding beam can be swept linearly across the object or circularly around it, by placing the object on a controlled rotating platform, enabling to obtain respectively linear and cylindrical range maps. Both amplitude and phase shift of the modulating wave of back-scattered light are collected and processed, providing respectively a shade-free, high resolution, photographic-like picture and accurate range data in the form of a range image. The resolution of range measurements depends mainly on the laser modulation frequency, provided that the power of the backscattered light reaching the detector is at least a few nW (current best performances are ~100 μm). The complete object surface can be reconstructed from the sampled points by using specifically developed software tools. The system has been successfully applied to scan different types of real surfaces (stone, wood, alloys, bones), with relevant applications in different fields, ranging from industrial machining to medical diagnostics, to vision in hostile environments. Examples of artwork reconstructed models (pottery, marble statues) are presented and the relevance of this technology for reverse engineering applied to cultural heritage conservation and restoration are discussed. Final 3D models can be passed to numeric control machines for rapid-prototyping, exported in standard formats for CAD/CAM purposes and made available on the Internet by adopting a virtual museum paradigm, thus possibly enabling specialists to perform remote inspections on high resolution digital reproductions of hardly accessible masterpieces.