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Sample records for high-resolution magnetic tweezer

  1. Quantitative High-Resolution Sensing of DNA Hybridization Using Magnetic Tweezers with Evanescent Illumination

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Piercen M.; Park, Jin Seon; Vezenov, Dmitri

    2012-01-01

    We applied the combined approach of evanescent nanometry and force spectroscopy using magnetic tweezers to quantify the degree of hybridization of a single synthetic single-stranded DNA oligomer to a resolution approaching a single-base. In this setup, the 200 nucleotide long DNA was covalently attached to the surface of an optically transparent solid support at one end and to the surface of a superparamagnetic fluorescent microsphere (force probe) at the other end. The force was applied to the probes using an electromagnet. The end-to-end molecular distance (i.e. out-of-image-plane position of the force probe) was determined from the intensity of the probe fluorescent image observed with total-internal reflectance microscopy. An equation of state for single stranded DNA molecules under tension (extensible freely jointed chain) was used to derive the penetration depth of the evanescent field and to calibrate the magnetic properties of the force probes. The parameters of the magnetic response of the force probes obtained from the equation of state remained constant when changing the penetration depth, indicating a robust calibration procedure. The results of such a calibration were also confirmed using independently measured probe-surface distances for probes mounted onto cantilevers of an atomic force microscope. Upon hybridization of the complementary 50 nucleotide-long oligomer to the surface-bound 200-mer, the changes in the force-distance curves were consistent with the quantitative conversion of 25% of the original single-stranded DNA to its double-stranded form, which was modeled as an elastic rod. The method presented here for quantifying the hybridization state of the single DNA molecules has potential for determining the degree of hybridization of individual molecules in a single molecule array with high accuracy. PMID:21103547

  2. Magnetic tweezers for intracellular applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosu, Basarab G.; Jakab, Károly; Bánki, Péter; Tóth, Ferenc I.; Forgacs, Gabor

    2003-09-01

    We have designed and constructed a versatile magnetic tweezer primarily for intracellular investigations. The micromanipulator uses only two coils to simultaneously magnetize to saturation micron-size superparamagnetic particles and generate high magnitude constant field gradients over cellular dimensions. The apparatus resembles a miniaturized Faraday balance, an industrial device used to measure magnetic susceptibility. The device operates in both continuous and pulse modes. Due to its compact size, the tweezers can conveniently be mounted on the stage of an inverted microscope and used for intracellular manipulations. A built-in temperature control unit maintains the sample at physiological temperatures. The operation of the tweezers was tested by moving 1.28 μm diameter magnetic beads inside macrophages with forces near 500 pN.

  3. Magnetic Tweezers for the Measurement of Twist and Torque

    PubMed Central

    Lipfert, Jan; Lee, Mina; Ordu, Orkide; Kerssemakers, Jacob W. J.; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques make it possible to investigate the behavior of individual biological molecules in solution in real time. These techniques include so-called force spectroscopy approaches such as atomic force microscopy, optical tweezers, flow stretching, and magnetic tweezers. Amongst these approaches, magnetic tweezers have distinguished themselves by their ability to apply torque while maintaining a constant stretching force. Here, it is illustrated how such a “conventional” magnetic tweezers experimental configuration can, through a straightforward modification of its field configuration to minimize the magnitude of the transverse field, be adapted to measure the degree of twist in a biological molecule. The resulting configuration is termed the freely-orbiting magnetic tweezers. Additionally, it is shown how further modification of the field configuration can yield a transverse field with a magnitude intermediate between that of the “conventional” magnetic tweezers and the freely-orbiting magnetic tweezers, which makes it possible to directly measure the torque stored in a biological molecule. This configuration is termed the magnetic torque tweezers. The accompanying video explains in detail how the conversion of conventional magnetic tweezers into freely-orbiting magnetic tweezers and magnetic torque tweezers can be accomplished, and demonstrates the use of these techniques. These adaptations maintain all the strengths of conventional magnetic tweezers while greatly expanding the versatility of this powerful instrument. PMID:24894412

  4. A force calibration standard for magnetic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhongbo; Dulin, David; Cnossen, Jelmer; Köber, Mariana; van Oene, Maarten M.; Ordu, Orkide; Berghuis, Bojk A.; Hensgens, Toivo; Lipfert, Jan; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2014-12-01

    To study the behavior of biological macromolecules and enzymatic reactions under force, advances in single-molecule force spectroscopy have proven instrumental. Magnetic tweezers form one of the most powerful of these techniques, due to their overall simplicity, non-invasive character, potential for high throughput measurements, and large force range. Drawbacks of magnetic tweezers, however, are that accurate determination of the applied forces can be challenging for short biomolecules at high forces and very time-consuming for long tethers at low forces below ˜1 piconewton. Here, we address these drawbacks by presenting a calibration standard for magnetic tweezers consisting of measured forces for four magnet configurations. Each such configuration is calibrated for two commonly employed commercially available magnetic microspheres. We calculate forces in both time and spectral domains by analyzing bead fluctuations. The resulting calibration curves, validated through the use of different algorithms that yield close agreement in their determination of the applied forces, span a range from 100 piconewtons down to tens of femtonewtons. These generalized force calibrations will serve as a convenient resource for magnetic tweezers users and diminish variations between different experimental configurations or laboratories.

  5. Single molecule studies of helicases with magnetic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Hodeib, Samar; Raj, Saurabh; Manosas, M; Zhang, Weiting; Bagchi, Debjani; Ducos, Bertrand; Allemand, Jean-François; Bensimon, David; Croquette, Vincent

    2016-08-01

    Helicases are a broad family of enzymes that perform crucial functions in DNA replication and in the maintenance of DNA and RNA integrity. A detailed mechanical study of helicases on DNA and RNA is possible using single molecule manipulation methods. Among those, magnetic tweezers (or traps) present a convenient, moderate throughput assay (tens of enzymes can be monitored simultaneously) that allow for high resolution (single base-pair) studies of these enzymes in various conditions and on various substrates (double and single stranded DNA and RNA). Here we discuss various implementation of the basic assay relevant for these studies. PMID:27371121

  6. Single molecule studies of helicases with magnetic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Hodeib, Samar; Raj, Saurabh; Manosas, M; Zhang, Weiting; Bagchi, Debjani; Ducos, Bertrand; Allemand, Jean-François; Bensimon, David; Croquette, Vincent

    2016-08-01

    Helicases are a broad family of enzymes that perform crucial functions in DNA replication and in the maintenance of DNA and RNA integrity. A detailed mechanical study of helicases on DNA and RNA is possible using single molecule manipulation methods. Among those, magnetic tweezers (or traps) present a convenient, moderate throughput assay (tens of enzymes can be monitored simultaneously) that allow for high resolution (single base-pair) studies of these enzymes in various conditions and on various substrates (double and single stranded DNA and RNA). Here we discuss various implementation of the basic assay relevant for these studies.

  7. New approaches in the design of magnetic tweezers-current magnetic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessalova, Valentina; Perov, Nikolai; Rodionova, Valeria

    2016-10-01

    The main advantages of the magnetic tweezers are the low price and simplicity of use. However the range of their application is reduced due to shortcomings like, for example, the remanent induction of the core and interaction between ferromagnetic cores. We present the new design of magnetic tweezers-Current Magnetic Tweezers (CMT) that allow particle manipulation by means of the magnetic field generated by the electric currents flowing through the non-magnetic wires. Arranging wires in different geometric shapes allows the particle movement either in two or three dimensions. Forces acting on the magnetic particles with the magnetic moment of 2·10-11 A m2 at distances up to 1 mm had been experimentally measured. It is established that a current of about 1 A at a 1 mm distance generates force of (approximately) 3 pN which is consistent with theoretical estimates.

  8. Quantitative Modeling and Optimization of Magnetic Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Lipfert, Jan; Hao, Xiaomin; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Magnetic tweezers are a powerful tool to manipulate single DNA or RNA molecules and to study nucleic acid-protein interactions in real time. Here, we have modeled the magnetic fields of permanent magnets in magnetic tweezers and computed the forces exerted on superparamagnetic beads from first principles. For simple, symmetric geometries the magnetic fields can be calculated semianalytically using the Biot-Savart law. For complicated geometries and in the presence of an iron yoke, we employ a finite-element three-dimensional PDE solver to numerically solve the magnetostatic problem. The theoretical predictions are in quantitative agreement with direct Hall-probe measurements of the magnetic field and with measurements of the force exerted on DNA-tethered beads. Using these predictive theories, we systematically explore the effects of magnet alignment, magnet spacing, magnet size, and of adding an iron yoke to the magnets on the forces that can be exerted on tethered particles. We find that the optimal configuration for maximal stretching forces is a vertically aligned pair of magnets, with a minimal gap between the magnets and minimal flow cell thickness. Following these principles, we present a configuration that allows one to apply ≥40 pN stretching forces on ≈1-μm tethered beads. PMID:19527664

  9. Quantitative modeling and optimization of magnetic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Lipfert, Jan; Hao, Xiaomin; Dekker, Nynke H

    2009-06-17

    Magnetic tweezers are a powerful tool to manipulate single DNA or RNA molecules and to study nucleic acid-protein interactions in real time. Here, we have modeled the magnetic fields of permanent magnets in magnetic tweezers and computed the forces exerted on superparamagnetic beads from first principles. For simple, symmetric geometries the magnetic fields can be calculated semianalytically using the Biot-Savart law. For complicated geometries and in the presence of an iron yoke, we employ a finite-element three-dimensional PDE solver to numerically solve the magnetostatic problem. The theoretical predictions are in quantitative agreement with direct Hall-probe measurements of the magnetic field and with measurements of the force exerted on DNA-tethered beads. Using these predictive theories, we systematically explore the effects of magnet alignment, magnet spacing, magnet size, and of adding an iron yoke to the magnets on the forces that can be exerted on tethered particles. We find that the optimal configuration for maximal stretching forces is a vertically aligned pair of magnets, with a minimal gap between the magnets and minimal flow cell thickness. Following these principles, we present a configuration that allows one to apply > or = 40 pN stretching forces on approximately 1-microm tethered beads. PMID:19527664

  10. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  11. Magnetic tweezers for manipulation of magnetic particles in single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimian, H.; Giesguth, M.; Dietz, K.-J.; Reiss, G.; Herth, S.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic tweezers gain increasing interest for applications in biology. Here, a setup of magnetic tweezers is introduced using micropatterned conducting lines on transparent glass slides. Magnetic particles of 1 μm diameter were injected in barley cell vacuoles using a microinject system under microscopic control. Time dependent tracking of the particles after application of a magnetic field was used to determine the viscosity of vacuolar sap in vivo relative to water and isolated vacuolar fluid. The viscosity of vacuolar sap in cells was about 2-fold higher than that of extracted vacuolar fluid and 5 times higher than that of water.

  12. High resolution magnetic spectrometer SHARAQ in RIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoura, S.

    2007-05-22

    For a new spectroscopy of nuclei using intense RI beams at RIBF, we started the SHARAQ project where a high-resolution SHARAQ spectrometer is being constructed together with a high-resolution secondary beam line. Physics motivation and the specification of the spectrometer are presented.

  13. Modular magnetic tweezers for single-molecule characterizations of helicases.

    PubMed

    Kemmerich, Felix E; Kasaciunaite, Kristina; Seidel, Ralf

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic tweezers provide a versatile toolkit supporting the mechanistic investigation of helicases. In the present article, we show that custom magnetic tweezers setups are straightforward to construct and can easily be extended to provide adaptable platforms, capable of addressing a multitude of enquiries regarding the functions of these fascinating molecular machines. We first address the fundamental components of a basic magnetic tweezers scheme and review some previous results to demonstrate the versatility of this instrument. We then elaborate on several extensions to the basic magnetic tweezers scheme, and demonstrate their applications with data from ongoing research. As our methodological overview illustrates, magnetic tweezers are an extremely useful tool for the characterization of helicases and a custom built instrument can be specifically tailored to suit the experimenter's needs.

  14. Extending the Range for Force Calibration in Magnetic Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Daldrop, Peter; Brutzer, Hergen; Huhle, Alexander; Kauert, Dominik J.; Seidel, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers are a wide-spread tool used to study the mechanics and the function of a large variety of biomolecules and biomolecular machines. This tool uses a magnetic particle and a strong magnetic field gradient to apply defined forces to the molecule of interest. Forces are typically quantified by analyzing the lateral fluctuations of the biomolecule-tethered particle in the direction perpendicular to the applied force. Since the magnetic field pins the anisotropy axis of the particle, the lateral fluctuations follow the geometry of a pendulum with a short pendulum length along and a long pendulum length perpendicular to the field lines. Typically, the short pendulum geometry is used for force calibration by power-spectral-density (PSD) analysis, because the movement of the bead in this direction can be approximated by a simple translational motion. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the fluctuations according to the long pendulum geometry and show that for this direction, both the translational and the rotational motions of the particle have to be considered. We provide analytical formulas for the PSD of this coupled system that agree well with PSDs obtained in experiments and simulations and that finally allow a faithful quantification of the magnetic force for the long pendulum geometry. We furthermore demonstrate that this methodology allows the calibration of much larger forces than the short pendulum geometry in a tether-length-dependent manner. In addition, the accuracy of determination of the absolute force is improved. Our force calibration based on the long pendulum geometry will facilitate high-resolution magnetic-tweezers experiments that rely on short molecules and large forces, as well as highly parallelized measurements that use low frame rates. PMID:25992733

  15. Extending the range for force calibration in magnetic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Daldrop, Peter; Brutzer, Hergen; Huhle, Alexander; Kauert, Dominik J; Seidel, Ralf

    2015-05-19

    Magnetic tweezers are a wide-spread tool used to study the mechanics and the function of a large variety of biomolecules and biomolecular machines. This tool uses a magnetic particle and a strong magnetic field gradient to apply defined forces to the molecule of interest. Forces are typically quantified by analyzing the lateral fluctuations of the biomolecule-tethered particle in the direction perpendicular to the applied force. Since the magnetic field pins the anisotropy axis of the particle, the lateral fluctuations follow the geometry of a pendulum with a short pendulum length along and a long pendulum length perpendicular to the field lines. Typically, the short pendulum geometry is used for force calibration by power-spectral-density (PSD) analysis, because the movement of the bead in this direction can be approximated by a simple translational motion. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the fluctuations according to the long pendulum geometry and show that for this direction, both the translational and the rotational motions of the particle have to be considered. We provide analytical formulas for the PSD of this coupled system that agree well with PSDs obtained in experiments and simulations and that finally allow a faithful quantification of the magnetic force for the long pendulum geometry. We furthermore demonstrate that this methodology allows the calibration of much larger forces than the short pendulum geometry in a tether-length-dependent manner. In addition, the accuracy of determination of the absolute force is improved. Our force calibration based on the long pendulum geometry will facilitate high-resolution magnetic-tweezers experiments that rely on short molecules and large forces, as well as highly parallelized measurements that use low frame rates.

  16. Magnetic Forces and DNA Mechanics in Multiplexed Magnetic Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    van Loenhout, Marijn T. J.; Burnham, Daniel R.; Dekker, Cees

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers (MT) are a powerful tool for the study of DNA-enzyme interactions. Both the magnet-based manipulation and the camera-based detection used in MT are well suited for multiplexed measurements. Here, we systematically address challenges related to scaling of multiplexed magnetic tweezers (MMT) towards high levels of parallelization where large numbers of molecules (say 103) are addressed in the same amount of time required by a single-molecule measurement. We apply offline analysis of recorded images and show that this approach provides a scalable solution for parallel tracking of the xyz-positions of many beads simultaneously. We employ a large field-of-view imaging system to address many DNA-bead tethers in parallel. We model the 3D magnetic field generated by the magnets and derive the magnetic force experienced by DNA-bead tethers across the large field of view from first principles. We furthermore experimentally demonstrate that a DNA-bead tether subject to a rotating magnetic field describes a bicircular, Limaçon rotation pattern and that an analysis of this pattern simultaneously yields information about the force angle and the position of attachment of the DNA on the bead. Finally, we apply MMT in the high-throughput investigation of the distribution of the induced magnetic moment, the position of attachment of DNA on the beads, and DNA flexibility. The methods described herein pave the way to kilo-molecule level magnetic tweezers experiments. PMID:22870220

  17. Eukaryotic membrane tethers revisited using magnetic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosu, Basarab G.; Sun, Mingzhai; Marga, Françoise; Grandbois, Michel; Forgacs, Gabor

    2007-06-01

    Membrane nanotubes, under physiological conditions, typically form en masse. We employed magnetic tweezers (MTW) to extract tethers from human brain tumor cells and compared their biophysical properties with tethers extracted after disruption of the cytoskeleton and from a strongly differing cell type, Chinese hamster ovary cells. In this method, the constant force produced with the MTW is transduced to cells through super-paramagnetic beads attached to the cell membrane. Multiple sudden jumps in bead velocity were manifest in the recorded bead displacement-time profiles. These discrete events were interpreted as successive ruptures of individual tethers. Observation with scanning electron microscopy supported the simultaneous existence of multiple tethers. The physical characteristics, in particular, the number and viscoelastic properties of the extracted tethers were determined from the analytic fit to bead trajectories, provided by a standard model of viscoelasticity. Comparison of tethers formed with MTW and atomic force microscopy (AFM), a technique where the cantilever-force transducer is moved at constant velocity, revealed significant differences in the two methods of tether formation. Our findings imply that extreme care must be used to interpret the outcome of tether pulling experiments performed with single molecular techniques (MTW, AFM, optical tweezers, etc). First, the different methods may be testing distinct membrane structures with distinct properties. Second, as soon as a true cell membrane (as opposed to that of a vesicle) can attach to a substrate, upon pulling on it, multiple nonspecific membrane tethers may be generated. Therefore, under physiological conditions, distinguishing between tethers formed through specific and nonspecific interactions is highly nontrivial if at all possible.

  18. Eukaryotic membrane tethers revisited using magnetic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Hosu, Basarab G; Sun, Mingzhai; Marga, Françoise; Grandbois, Michel; Forgacs, Gabor

    2007-04-19

    Membrane nanotubes, under physiological conditions, typically form en masse. We employed magnetic tweezers (MTW) to extract tethers from human brain tumor cells and compared their biophysical properties with tethers extracted after disruption of the cytoskeleton and from a strongly differing cell type, Chinese hamster ovary cells. In this method, the constant force produced with the MTW is transduced to cells through super-paramagnetic beads attached to the cell membrane. Multiple sudden jumps in bead velocity were manifest in the recorded bead displacement-time profiles. These discrete events were interpreted as successive ruptures of individual tethers. Observation with scanning electron microscopy supported the simultaneous existence of multiple tethers. The physical characteristics, in particular, the number and viscoelastic properties of the extracted tethers were determined from the analytic fit to bead trajectories, provided by a standard model of viscoelasticity. Comparison of tethers formed with MTW and atomic force microscopy (AFM), a technique where the cantilever-force transducer is moved at constant velocity, revealed significant differences in the two methods of tether formation. Our findings imply that extreme care must be used to interpret the outcome of tether pulling experiments performed with single molecular techniques (MTW, AFM, optical tweezers, etc). First, the different methods may be testing distinct membrane structures with distinct properties. Second, as soon as a true cell membrane (as opposed to that of a vesicle) can attach to a substrate, upon pulling on it, multiple nonspecific membrane tethers may be generated. Therefore, under physiological conditions, distinguishing between tethers formed through specific and nonspecific interactions is highly nontrivial if at all possible.

  19. Magnetic tweezers force calibration for molecules that exhibit conformational switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, David R.; Saleh, Omar A.

    2016-09-01

    High spatial and temporal resolution magnetic tweezers experiments allow for the direct calibration of pulling forces applied to short biomolecules. In one class of experiments, a force is applied to a structured RNA or protein to induce an unfolding transition; when the force is maintained at particular values, the molecule can exhibit conformational switching between the folded and unfolded states or between intermediate states. Here, we analyze the degree to which common force calibration approaches, involving the fitting of model functions to the Allan variance or power spectral density of the bead trajectory, are biased by this conformational switching. We find significant effects in two limits: that of large molecular extension changes between the two states, in which alternative fitting functions must be used, and that of very fast switching kinetics, in which the force calibration cannot be recovered due to the slow diffusion time of the magnetic bead. We use simulations and high-resolution RNA hairpin data to show that most biophysical experiments do not occur in either of these limits.

  20. High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Solids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maciel, Gary E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines recent developments in techniques for obtaining high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra on solid samples, discussing the kinds of applications for which these techniques are well suited. Also discusses the characteristics of NMR of solids and generating magnetization for NMR in solids. (JN)

  1. Unraveling chromatin structure using magnetic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Noort, John

    2010-03-01

    The compact, yet dynamic organization of chromatin plays an essential role in regulating gene expression. Although the static structure of chromatin fibers has been studied extensively, the controversy about the higher order folding remains. The compaction of eukaryotic DNA into chromatin has been implicated in the regulation of all DNA processes. To understand the relation between gene regulation and chromatin structure it is essential to uncover the mechanisms by which chromatin fibers fold and unfold. We used magnetic tweezers to probe the mechanical properties of individual nucleosomes and chromatin fibers consisting of a single, well-defined array of 25 nucleosomes. From these studies five major features appeared upon forced extension of chromatin fibers: the elastic stretching of chromatin's higher order structure, the breaking of internucleosomal contacts, unwrapping of the first turn of DNA, unwrapping of the second turn of DNA, and the dissociation of histone octamers. These events occur sequentially at the increasing force. Neighboring nucleosomes stabilize DNA folding into a nucleosome relative to isolated nucleosomes. When an array of nucleosomes is folded into a 30 nm fiber, representing the first level of chromatin condensation, the fiber stretched like a Hookian spring at forces up to 4 pN. Together with a nucleosome-nucleosome stacking energy of 14 kT this points to a solenoid as the underlying topology of the 30 nm fiber. Surprisingly, linker histones do not affect the length or stiffness of the fibers, but stabilize fiber folding up to forces of 7 pN. The stiffness of the folded chromatin fiber points at histone tails that mediate nucleosome stacking. Fibers with a nucleosome repeat length of 167 bp instead of 197 bp are significantly stiffer, consistent with a two-start helical arrangement. The extensive thermal breathing of the chromatin fiber that is a consequence of the observed high compliance provides a structural basis for understanding the

  2. Magnetic tweezers: micromanipulation and force measurement at the molecular level.

    PubMed Central

    Gosse, Charlie; Croquette, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    Cantilevers and optical tweezers are widely used for micromanipulating cells or biomolecules for measuring their mechanical properties. However, they do not allow easy rotary motion and can sometimes damage the handled material. We present here a system of magnetic tweezers that overcomes those drawbacks while retaining most of the previous dynamometers properties. Electromagnets are coupled to a microscope-based particle tracking system through a digital feedback loop. Magnetic beads are first trapped in a potential well of stiffness approximately 10(-7) N/m. Thus, they can be manipulated in three dimensions at a speed of approximately 10 microm/s and rotated along the optical axis at a frequency of 10 Hz. In addition, our apparatus can work as a dynamometer relying on either usual calibration against the viscous drag or complete calibration using Brownian fluctuations. By stretching a DNA molecule between a magnetic particle and a glass surface, we applied and measured vertical forces ranging from 50 fN to 20 pN. Similarly, nearly horizontal forces up to 5 pN were obtained. From those experiments, we conclude that magnetic tweezers represent a low-cost and biocompatible setup that could become a suitable alternative to the other available micromanipulators. PMID:12023254

  3. High resolution analytical transmission electron microscopy of magnetic recording media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risner, Juliet Danielle

    Since the invention of the hard disk drive in 1954, the density of bits per disk has increased exponentially. This trend is partly due to improvements to the magnetic recording media. In current hard disks, each bit is approximately 0.04 mum in its smallest dimension and comprises ˜100 hexagonal close packed Co-alloy magnetic grains. These grains have magnetic "easy" axes oriented longitudinally, or parallel to the film plane. Future recording media have easy axes oriented perpendicular to the film plane. Perpendicular media are expected to provide continued increases in storage density above the limit of longitudinal media. Quantum-mechanical exchange coupling between magnetic grains degrades the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and limits storage density in both media types. Controlling exchange coupling is possible by creating nonmagnetic grain boundaries which compositionally isolate the magnetic grains. High-resolution analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is required to study these media because of their nano-scale grains and grain boundaries. Examining the microstructure and elemental distribution in these films at near atomic level is paramount to understanding their magnetic performance. The microstructure and elemental distribution in longitudinal and perpendicular media were examined using high resolution analytical TEM techniques, such as energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) using a 1.5 nm electron probe, and spectrum imaging with a scanning TEM. These techniques successfully determined how grain boundary Cr segregation varies with grain orientation in longitudinal media. Boundaries misoriented by 0° and 90° commonly occur and were found to have minimal Cr segregation, which limits storage density improvement in these media. Analytical TEM techniques applied to oxygen-enriched perpendicular media, fabricated using different deposition methods, effectively related microstructure and composition to magnetic

  4. Partial homogeneity based high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra under inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Zhiliang; Lin, Liangjie; Lin, Yanqin E-mail: chenz@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Zhong E-mail: chenz@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Youhe

    2014-09-29

    In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, it is of great necessity and importance to obtain high-resolution spectra, especially under inhomogeneous magnetic fields. In this study, a method based on partial homogeneity is proposed for retrieving high-resolution one-dimensional NMR spectra under inhomogeneous fields. Signals from series of small voxels, which characterize high resolution due to small sizes, are recorded simultaneously. Then, an inhomogeneity correction algorithm is developed based on pattern recognition to correct the influence brought by field inhomogeneity automatically, thus yielding high-resolution information. Experiments on chemical solutions and fish spawn were carried out to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method. The proposed method serves as a single radiofrequency pulse high-resolution NMR spectroscopy under inhomogeneous fields and may provide an alternative of obtaining high-resolution spectra of in vivo living systems or chemical-reaction systems, where performances of conventional techniques are usually degenerated by field inhomogeneity.

  5. High-resolution breath-hold cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yu.

    1993-01-01

    This dissertation work is composed of investigations of three methods for fast cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These methods include (1) 2D breath-hold magnetization prepared gradient echo and fast spin-echo (FSE) cardiac imaging, (2) 3D breath-hold magnetization prepared gradient echo cardiac imaging, and (3) real-time monitoring, feedback, and triggering for breath-hold MRI. The hypothesis of this work is that high resolution 2D and 3D magnetic resonance data sets for the heart can be acquired with the combination of magnetization prepared blood suppression for gradient echo techniques and accurate breath-holding methods. The 2D method included development of magnetic resonance data acquisition for cardiac imaging. The acquisition time is within a single breath-hold of 16 seconds (assuming heart 60/min). The data acquisition is synchronized with the electrocardiogram signal. Based on consistent observations of specific small cardiac structures like the papillary muscle, trabeculae, moderator band, and coronary vessels in studies of normal volunteers, the image quality represents a significant improvement over that obtained with fast imaging methods previously. To further improve the image quality provided by the 2D method, the first 3D cardiac MRI technique was developed. This method provides even better spatial resolution for cardiac images, with a voxel size of 1.09 [times] 2.19 [times] 4 mm[sup 3]. A 3D acquisition is completed in 8 breath-holds. The data acquisition for 3D cardiac imaging requires a consistent breath-hold position to avoid respiratory artifacts. To improve the reliability of the 3DFT acquisition, a new technique called MR breath-hold feedback was developed to provide reproducible breathholding. The diaphragm location is used as the index for breath-hold reproducibility measurement. The range of the diaphragm displacement in different breath-hold is reduced from 8.3 mm without the technique, to 1.3 mm with the technique.

  6. Calibration of optical tweezers with non-spherical probes via high-resolution detection of Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butykai, A.; Mor, F. M.; Gaál, R.; Domínguez-García, P.; Forró, L.; Jeney, S.

    2015-11-01

    Optical tweezers are commonly used and powerful tools to perform force measurements on the piconewton scale and to detect nanometer-scaled displacements. However, the precision of these instruments relies to a great extent on the accuracy of the calibration method. A well-known calibration procedure is to record the stochastic motion of the trapped particle and compare its statistical behavior with the theory of the Brownian motion in a harmonic potential. Here we present an interactive calibration software which allows for the simultaneous fitting of three different statistical observables (power spectral density, mean square displacement and velocity autocorrelation function) calculated from the trajectory of the probe to enhance fitting accuracy. The fitted theory involves the hydrodynamic interactions experimentally observable at high sampling rates. Furthermore, a qualitative extension is included in our model to handle the thermal fluctuations in the orientation of optically trapped asymmetric objects. The presented calibration methodology requires no prior knowledge of the bead size and can be applied to non-spherical probes as well. The software was validated on synthetic and experimental data.

  7. Line broadening interference for high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra under inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Zhiliang; Yang, Jian; Lin, Yanqin E-mail: chenz@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Zhong E-mail: chenz@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Youhe

    2015-04-07

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy serves as an important tool for analyzing chemicals and biological metabolites. However, its performance is subject to the magnetic-field homogeneity. Under inhomogeneous fields, peaks are broadened to overlap each other, introducing difficulties for assignments. Here, we propose a method termed as line broadening interference (LBI) to provide high-resolution information under inhomogeneous magnetic fields by employing certain gradients in the indirect dimension to interfere the magnetic-field inhomogeneity. The conventional spectral-line broadening is thus interfered to be non-diagonal, avoiding the overlapping among adjacent resonances. Furthermore, an inhomogeneity correction algorithm is developed based on pattern recognition to recover the high-resolution information from LBI spectra. Theoretical deductions are performed to offer systematic and detailed analyses on the proposed method. Moreover, experiments are conducted to prove the feasibility of the proposed method for yielding high-resolution spectra in inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

  8. Line broadening interference for high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra under inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhiliang; Yang, Jian; Chen, Youhe; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy serves as an important tool for analyzing chemicals and biological metabolites. However, its performance is subject to the magnetic-field homogeneity. Under inhomogeneous fields, peaks are broadened to overlap each other, introducing difficulties for assignments. Here, we propose a method termed as line broadening interference (LBI) to provide high-resolution information under inhomogeneous magnetic fields by employing certain gradients in the indirect dimension to interfere the magnetic-field inhomogeneity. The conventional spectral-line broadening is thus interfered to be non-diagonal, avoiding the overlapping among adjacent resonances. Furthermore, an inhomogeneity correction algorithm is developed based on pattern recognition to recover the high-resolution information from LBI spectra. Theoretical deductions are performed to offer systematic and detailed analyses on the proposed method. Moreover, experiments are conducted to prove the feasibility of the proposed method for yielding high-resolution spectra in inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

  9. Skewed Brownian Fluctuations in Single-Molecule Magnetic Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, Daniel R.; De Vlaminck, Iwijn; Henighan, Thomas; Dekker, Cees

    2014-01-01

    Measurements in magnetic tweezers rely upon precise determination of the position of a magnetic microsphere. Fluctuations in the position due to Brownian motion allows calculation of the applied force, enabling deduction of the force-extension response function for a single DNA molecule that is attached to the microsphere. The standard approach relies upon using the mean of position fluctuations, which is valid when the microsphere axial position fluctuations obey a normal distribution. However, here we demonstrate that nearby surfaces and the non-linear elasticity of DNA can skew the distribution. Through experiment and simulations, we show that such a skewing leads to inaccurate position measurements which significantly affect the extracted DNA extension and mechanical properties, leading to up to two-fold errors in measured DNA persistence length. We develop a simple, robust and easily implemented method to correct for such mismeasurements. PMID:25265383

  10. Structure and dynamics of single DNA molecules manipulated by magnetic tweezers and or flow

    PubMed Central

    Leuba, Sanford H.; Wheeler, Travis B.; Cheng, Chao-Min; LeDuc, Philip R.; Fernández-Sierra, Mónica; Quiñones, Edwin

    2009-01-01

    Here we describe experiments which employ magnetic tweezers and or microfluidics to manipulate single DNA molecules. We describe the use of magnetic tweezers coupled to an inverted microscope as well as the use of a magnetic tweezers setup with an upright microscope. Using a chamber prepared via soft lithography, we also describe a microfluidic device for the manipulation of individual DNA molecules. Finally, we present some past successful examples of using these approaches to elucidate unique information about protein-nucleic acid interactions. PMID:19015032

  11. Design and optimization of arrays of neodymium iron boron-based magnets for magnetic tweezers applications.

    PubMed

    Zacchia, Nicholas A; Valentine, Megan T

    2015-05-01

    We present the design methodology for arrays of neodymium iron boron (NdFeB)-based magnets for use in magnetic tweezers devices. Using finite element analysis (FEA), we optimized the geometry of the NdFeB magnet as well as the geometry of iron yokes designed to focus the magnetic fields toward the sample plane. Together, the magnets and yokes form a magnetic array which is the basis of the magnetic tweezers device. By systematically varying 15 distinct shape parameters, we determined those features that maximize the magnitude of the magnetic field gradient as well as the length scale over which the magnetic force operates. Additionally, we demonstrated that magnetic saturation of the yoke material leads to intrinsic limitations in any geometric design. Using this approach, we generated a compact and light-weight magnetic tweezers device that produces a high field gradient at the image plane in order to apply large forces to magnetic beads. We then fabricated the optimized yoke and validated the FEA by experimentally mapping the magnetic field of the device. The optimization data and iterative FEA approach outlined here will enable the streamlined design and construction of specialized instrumentation for force-sensitive microscopy. PMID:26026529

  12. Design and optimization of arrays of neodymium iron boron-based magnets for magnetic tweezers applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zacchia, Nicholas A.; Valentine, Megan T.

    2015-05-15

    We present the design methodology for arrays of neodymium iron boron (NdFeB)-based magnets for use in magnetic tweezers devices. Using finite element analysis (FEA), we optimized the geometry of the NdFeB magnet as well as the geometry of iron yokes designed to focus the magnetic fields toward the sample plane. Together, the magnets and yokes form a magnetic array which is the basis of the magnetic tweezers device. By systematically varying 15 distinct shape parameters, we determined those features that maximize the magnitude of the magnetic field gradient as well as the length scale over which the magnetic force operates. Additionally, we demonstrated that magnetic saturation of the yoke material leads to intrinsic limitations in any geometric design. Using this approach, we generated a compact and light-weight magnetic tweezers device that produces a high field gradient at the image plane in order to apply large forces to magnetic beads. We then fabricated the optimized yoke and validated the FEA by experimentally mapping the magnetic field of the device. The optimization data and iterative FEA approach outlined here will enable the streamlined design and construction of specialized instrumentation for force-sensitive microscopy.

  13. Design and optimization of arrays of neodymium iron boron-based magnets for magnetic tweezers applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacchia, Nicholas A.; Valentine, Megan T.

    2015-05-01

    We present the design methodology for arrays of neodymium iron boron (NdFeB)-based magnets for use in magnetic tweezers devices. Using finite element analysis (FEA), we optimized the geometry of the NdFeB magnet as well as the geometry of iron yokes designed to focus the magnetic fields toward the sample plane. Together, the magnets and yokes form a magnetic array which is the basis of the magnetic tweezers device. By systematically varying 15 distinct shape parameters, we determined those features that maximize the magnitude of the magnetic field gradient as well as the length scale over which the magnetic force operates. Additionally, we demonstrated that magnetic saturation of the yoke material leads to intrinsic limitations in any geometric design. Using this approach, we generated a compact and light-weight magnetic tweezers device that produces a high field gradient at the image plane in order to apply large forces to magnetic beads. We then fabricated the optimized yoke and validated the FEA by experimentally mapping the magnetic field of the device. The optimization data and iterative FEA approach outlined here will enable the streamlined design and construction of specialized instrumentation for force-sensitive microscopy.

  14. High-Resolution Vertical Observation of Intracellular Structure Using Magnetically Responsive Microplates.

    PubMed

    Teshima, Tetsuhiko; Onoe, Hiroaki; Tottori, Soichiro; Aonuma, Hiroka; Mizutani, Takeomi; Kamiya, Koki; Ishihara, Hirotaka; Kanuka, Hirotaka; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2016-07-01

    A vertical confocal observation system capable of high-resolution observation of intracellular structure is demonstrated. The system consists of magnet-active microplates to rotate, incline, and translate single adherent cells in the applied magnetic field. Appended to conventional confocal microscopes, this system enables high-resolution cross-sectional imaging with single-molecule sensitivity in single scanning. PMID:27185344

  15. Simple horizontal magnetic tweezers for micromanipulation of single DNA molecules and DNA–protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    McAndrew, Christopher P.; Tyson, Christopher; Zischkau, Joseph; Mehl, Patrick; Tuma, Pamela L.; Pegg, Ian L.; Sarkar, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    We report the development of a simple-to-implement magnetic force transducer that can apply a wide range of piconewton (pN) scale forces on single DNA molecules and DNA–protein complexes in the horizontal plane. The resulting low-noise force-extension data enable very high-resolution detection of changes in the DNA tether’s extension: ~0.05 pN in force and <10 nm change in extension. We have also verified that we can manipulate DNA in near equilibrium conditions through the wide range of forces by ramping the force from low to high and back again, and observing minimal hysteresis in the molecule’s force response. Using a calibration technique based on Stokes’ drag law, we have confirmed our force measurements from DNA force-extension experiments obtained using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem applied to transverse fluctuations of the magnetic microsphere. We present data on the force-distance characteristics of a DNA molecule complexed with histones. The results illustrate how the tweezers can be used to study DNA binding proteins at the single molecule level. PMID:26757808

  16. Simple horizontal magnetic tweezers for micromanipulation of single DNA molecules and DNA-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    McAndrew, Christopher P; Tyson, Christopher; Zischkau, Joseph; Mehl, Patrick; Tuma, Pamela L; Pegg, Ian L; Sarkar, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    We report the development of a simple-to-implement magnetic force transducer that can apply a wide range of piconewton (pN) scale forces on single DNA molecules and DNA-protein complexes in the horizontal plane. The resulting low-noise force-extension data enable very high-resolution detection of changes in the DNA tether's extension: ~0.05 pN in force and <10 nm change in extension. We have also verified that we can manipulate DNA in near equilibrium conditions through the wide range of forces by ramping the force from low to high and back again, and observing minimal hysteresis in the molecule's force response. Using a calibration technique based on Stokes' drag law, we have confirmed our force measurements from DNA force-extension experiments obtained using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem applied to transverse fluctuations of the magnetic microsphere. We present data on the force-distance characteristics of a DNA molecule complexed with histones. The results illustrate how the tweezers can be used to study DNA binding proteins at the single molecule level.

  17. High resolution imaging of tunnels by magnetic resonance neurography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kenneth C.; Thawait, Shrey K.; Williams, Eric H.; Hashemi, Shahreyar Shar; Machado, Antonio J.; Carrino, John A.; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral nerves often traverse confined fibro-osseous and fibro-muscular tunnels in the extremities, where they are particularly vulnerable to entrapment and compressive neuropathy. This gives rise to various tunnel syndromes, characterized by distinct patterns of muscular weakness and sensory deficits. This article focuses on several upper and lower extremity tunnels, in which direct visualization of the normal and abnormal nerve in question is possible with high resolution 3T MR neurography (MRN). MRN can also serve as a useful adjunct to clinical and electrophysiologic exams by discriminating adhesive lesions (perineural scar) from compressive lesions (such as tumor, ganglion, hypertrophic callous, or anomalous muscles) responsible for symptoms, thereby guiding appropriate treatment. PMID:21479520

  18. Parallel lipoplex folding pathways revealed using magnetic tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhiqiang; Tikhonova, Elena B.; Zgurskaya, Helen I.; Rybenkov, Valentin V.

    2012-01-01

    Lipid-coated DNA nanoparticles (lipoplexes) are a powerful gene delivery tool with promising therapeutic applications. The mechanism of lipoplex assembly remains poorly understood. We explored DNA packing by a cationic lipid DSTAP (distearoyl trimethylammonium-propane) using magnetic tweezers. DSTAP-induced DNA condensation occurred as a series of bursts with the mean step size of 60 nm to 80 nm. The pause time preceding the steps could be approximated as a bimodal distribution, which reveals at least two distinct condensation pathways. The rapidly condensed DNA was more resilient to force-induced decondensation. The proportion of the stable, fast-formed complexes decreased at high salt concentrations. A similar trend was observed in bulk experiments. Lipoplexes assembled at low salt concentration more efficiently shielded DNA from fluorescent dyes and DNase even after transfer to the high salt conditions. These data reveal that lipoplex folding occurs via two parallel pathways even at the single molecule level. The progress through the two pathways can be monitored in real time using single DNA manipulations. The relative efficiency of the two pathways can be varied by external conditions. PMID:22988939

  19. MOURA Martian magnetometer potential for high resolution magnetic mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Michelena, Marina; Kilian, Rolf

    2013-04-01

    Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission mapped the magnetic signature all along the Martian globe during its operation between 1996 and 2006. These data shows that Mars does not present an active global magnetic field as the Earth. However, the Martian crust has an overall magnetic signature stronger than the Earth which was inherited from the active magnetic field of the Martian core during its early cooling history. The MGS survey shows plenty of magnetic anomalies located in particular within high lands of its Southern Hemisphere. Several magnetic models have been derived to explain the MGS data considering magnetic dipoles distribution in the Martian crust with moderate to high magnetic intensities and pronounced regional anomalies. However, the origin of major magnetic anomalies remains highly disputed [1]. From the magnetic investigation point of view it would be of major importance to perform near-surface magnetic measurements [2] to compare both surface and in orbit (between 100 and 440 km) data. This would help to comprehend not only the distribution of the magnetic dipoles but also to make progress in the identification of different rock types and understanding of their degree of alteration which could have modified superficial magnetic signatures. In the frame of Finnish-Russian and Spanish MetNet mission, to perform meteorological studies on Martian surface, a miniaturized magnetometer and gradiometer named MOURA was developed with the objective to improve the interpretation of the magnetic anomalies and their origin. In order to test this magnetometer, comparative on Earth magnetic measurements were performed with MOURA and a reference absolute scalar magnetometer (Geometrics 853) in areas with a representative and large variation of magmatic rocks compositions. The final goal is to test the appropriateness of the developed magnetometer for the in situ measurements on Mars. The active continental margin of the Patagonian Andes was used for this case study

  20. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOEpatents

    Bonanos, P.

    1992-01-07

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity. 4 figs.

  1. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOEpatents

    Bonanos, Peter

    1992-01-01

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity.

  2. High Resolution Marine Magnetic Survey of Shallow Water Littoral Area

    PubMed Central

    Ginzburg, Boris; Cohen, Tsuriel Ram; Zafrir, Hovav; Alimi, Roger; Salomonski, Nizan; Sharvit, Jacob

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a system developed for detection and accurate mapping of ferro-metallic objects buried below the seabed in shallow waters. The system comprises a precise magnetic gradiometer and navigation subsystem, both installed on a non-magnetic catamaran towed by a low-magnetic interfering boat. In addition we present the results of a marine survey of a near-shore area in the vicinity of Atlit, a town situated on the Mediterranean coast of Israel, about 15 km south of Haifa. The primary purpose of the survey was to search for a Harvard airplane that crashed into the sea in 1960. A magnetic map of the survey area (3.5 km2 on a 0.5 m grid) was created revealing the anomalies at sub-meter accuracy. For each investigated target location a corresponding ferro-metallic item was dug out, one of which turned to be very similar to a part of the crashed airplane. The accuracy of location was confirmed by matching the position of the actual dug artifacts with the magnetic map within a range of ± 1 m, in a water depth of 9 m.

  3. Magnetic tweezers with high permeability electromagnets for fast actuation of magnetic beads

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, La; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-15

    As a powerful and versatile scientific instrument, magnetic tweezers have been widely used in biophysical research areas, such as mechanical cell properties and single molecule manipulation. If one wants to steer bead position, the nonlinearity of magnetic properties and the strong position dependence of the magnetic field in most magnetic tweezers lead to quite a challenge in their control. In this article, we report multi-pole electromagnetic tweezers with high permeability cores yielding high force output, good maneuverability, and flexible design. For modeling, we adopted a piece-wise linear dependence of magnetization on field to characterize the magnetic beads. We implemented a bi-linear interpolation of magnetic field in the work space, based on a lookup table obtained from finite element simulation. The electronics and software were custom-made to achieve high performance. In addition, the effects of dimension and defect on structure of magnetic tips also were inspected. In a workspace with size of 0.1 × 0.1 mm{sup 2}, a force of up to 400 pN can be applied on a 2.8 μm superparamagnetic bead in any direction within the plane. Because the magnetic particle is always pulled towards a tip, the pulling forces from the pole tips have to be well balanced in order to achieve control of the particle’s position. Active video tracking based feedback control is implemented, which is able to work at a speed of up to 1 kHz, yielding good maneuverability of the magnetic beads.

  4. Magnetic tweezers with high permeability electromagnets for fast actuation of magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Chen, La; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-01

    As a powerful and versatile scientific instrument, magnetic tweezers have been widely used in biophysical research areas, such as mechanical cell properties and single molecule manipulation. If one wants to steer bead position, the nonlinearity of magnetic properties and the strong position dependence of the magnetic field in most magnetic tweezers lead to quite a challenge in their control. In this article, we report multi-pole electromagnetic tweezers with high permeability cores yielding high force output, good maneuverability, and flexible design. For modeling, we adopted a piece-wise linear dependence of magnetization on field to characterize the magnetic beads. We implemented a bi-linear interpolation of magnetic field in the work space, based on a lookup table obtained from finite element simulation. The electronics and software were custom-made to achieve high performance. In addition, the effects of dimension and defect on structure of magnetic tips also were inspected. In a workspace with size of 0.1 × 0.1 mm(2), a force of up to 400 pN can be applied on a 2.8 μm superparamagnetic bead in any direction within the plane. Because the magnetic particle is always pulled towards a tip, the pulling forces from the pole tips have to be well balanced in order to achieve control of the particle's position. Active video tracking based feedback control is implemented, which is able to work at a speed of up to 1 kHz, yielding good maneuverability of the magnetic beads.

  5. Magnetic tweezers with high permeability electromagnets for fast actuation of magnetic beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, La; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-01

    As a powerful and versatile scientific instrument, magnetic tweezers have been widely used in biophysical research areas, such as mechanical cell properties and single molecule manipulation. If one wants to steer bead position, the nonlinearity of magnetic properties and the strong position dependence of the magnetic field in most magnetic tweezers lead to quite a challenge in their control. In this article, we report multi-pole electromagnetic tweezers with high permeability cores yielding high force output, good maneuverability, and flexible design. For modeling, we adopted a piece-wise linear dependence of magnetization on field to characterize the magnetic beads. We implemented a bi-linear interpolation of magnetic field in the work space, based on a lookup table obtained from finite element simulation. The electronics and software were custom-made to achieve high performance. In addition, the effects of dimension and defect on structure of magnetic tips also were inspected. In a workspace with size of 0.1 × 0.1 mm2, a force of up to 400 pN can be applied on a 2.8 μm superparamagnetic bead in any direction within the plane. Because the magnetic particle is always pulled towards a tip, the pulling forces from the pole tips have to be well balanced in order to achieve control of the particle's position. Active video tracking based feedback control is implemented, which is able to work at a speed of up to 1 kHz, yielding good maneuverability of the magnetic beads.

  6. High-Resolution and Frequency, Printed Miniature Magnetic Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prager, James; Ziemba, Timothy; Miller, Kenneth; Picard, Julian

    2013-10-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies, Inc. (EHT) is developing a technique to significantly reduce the cost and development time of producing magnetic field diagnostics. EHT is designing probes that can be printed on flexible PCBs thereby allowing for extremely small coils to be produced while essentially eliminating the time to wind the coils. The coil size can be extremely small when coupled with the EHT Hybrid Integrator, which is capable of high bandwidth measurements over short and long pulse durations. This integrator is currently being commercialized with the support of a DOE SBIR. Additionally, the flexible PCBs allow probes to be attached to complex surface and/or probes that have a complex 3D structure to be designed and fabricated. During the Phase I, EHT will design and construct magnetic field probes on flexible PCBs, which will be tested at the University of Washington's HIT-SI experiment and in EHT's material science plasma reactor. Funding provided by DOE SBIR/STTR Program.

  7. High-Resolution Vessel Wall Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Varicella-Zoster Virus Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Lachanis, Stefanos; Magoufis, Georgios; Safouris, Apostolos; Kargiotis, Odysseas; Stamboulis, Elefterios

    2016-06-01

    Varicella-zoster virus vasculopathy is a rare but potentially treatable condition. Diagnosis has been based on angiography, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. High-resolution vessel wall MRI may aid to the diagnosis by differentiating inflammation from other vessel wall pathologies. We present the characteristic MRI findings of this condition in a young patient presenting with ischemic stroke.

  8. Scanning magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) microscopy: High-resolution magnetic imaging of geologic samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascu, I.; Harrison, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    characterised by spatial heterogeneity. In addition, the high-resolution capability of the MTJ microscope makes it extremely useful for investigating sedimentary archives formed under low accumulation conditions (e.g., speleothems, stromatolites, Fe-Mn nodules) that hold a detectable environmental magnetic signal.

  9. Fast acquisition of high-resolution 2D NMR spectroscopy in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liangjie; Wei, Zhiliang; Zeng, Qing; Yang, Jian; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy plays an important role in chemical and biological analyses. In this study, we combine the J-coupling coherence transfer module with the echo-train acquisition technique for fast acquisition of high-resolution 2D NMR spectra in magnetic fields with unknown spatial variations. The proposed method shows satisfactory performance on a 5 mM ethyl 3-bromopropionate sample, under a 5-kHz (10 ppm at 11.7 T) B0 inhomogeneous field, as well as under varying degrees of pulse-flip-angle deviations. Moreover, a simulative ex situ NMR measurement is also conducted to show the effectiveness of the proposed pulse sequence.

  10. Partial-Homogeneity-Based Two-Dimensional High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy under Inhomogeneous Magnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wenqi; Wei, Zhiliang; Ding, Nan; Yang, Yu; Ye, Qimiao; Lin, Yulan; Chen, Zhong

    2016-05-18

    High-resolution multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy serves as an irreplaceable and versatile tool in various chemical investigations. In this study, a method based on the concept of partial homogeneity is developed to offer two-dimensional (2D) high-resolution NMR spectra under inhomogeneous fields. Oscillating gradients are exerted to encode the high-resolution information, and a field-inhomogeneity correction algorithm based on pattern recognition is designed to recover high-resolution spectra. Under fields where inhomogeneity primarily distributes along a single orientation, the proposed method will improve performances of 2D NMR spectroscopy without increasing the experimental duration or significant loss in sensitivity, and thus may open important perspectives for studies of inhomogeneous chemical systems.

  11. High resolution detection and excitation of resonant magnetic perturbations in a wall-stabilized tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Maurer, David A.; Shiraki, Daisuke; Levesque, Jeffrey P.; Bialek, James; Angelini, Sarah; Byrne, Patrick; DeBono, Bryan; Hughes, Paul; Mauel, Michael E.; Navratil, Gerald A.; Peng Qian; Rhodes, Dov; Rath, Nickolaus; Stoafer, Christopher

    2012-05-15

    We report high-resolution detection of the 3D plasma magnetic response of wall-stabilized tokamak discharges in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse [T. H. Ivers et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 1926 (1996)] device. A new adjustable conducting wall has been installed on HBT-EP made up of 20 independent, movable, wall segments instrumented with three distinct sets of 40 modular coils that can be independently driven to generate a wide variety of magnetic perturbations. High-resolution detection of the plasma response is made with 216 poloidal and radial magnetic sensors that have been located and calibrated with high-accuracy. Static and dynamic plasma responses to resonant and non-resonant magnetic perturbations are observed through measurement of the step-response following a rapid change in the toroidal phase of the applied perturbations. Biorthogonal decomposition of the full set of magnetic sensors clearly defines the structures of naturally occurring external kinks as being composed of independent m/n = 3/1 and 6/2 modes. Resonant magnetic perturbations were applied to discharges with pre-existing, saturated m/n = 3/1 external kink mode activity. This m/n = 3/1 kink mode was observed to lock to the applied perturbation field. During this kink mode locked period, the plasma resonant response is characterized by a linear, a saturated, and a disruptive plasma regime dependent on the magnitude of the applied field and value of the edge safety factor and plasma rotation.

  12. Magnetic torque tweezers: measuring torsional stiffness in DNA and RecA-DNA filaments.

    PubMed

    Lipfert, Jan; Kerssemakers, Jacob W J; Jager, Tessa; Dekker, Nynke H

    2010-12-01

    We introduce magnetic torque tweezers, which enable direct single-molecule measurements of torque. Our measurements of the effective torsional stiffness C of dsDNA indicated a substantial force dependence, with C = approximately 40 nm at low forces up to C = approximately 100 nm at high forces. The initial torsional stiffness of RecA filaments was nearly twofold larger than that for dsDNA, yet at moderate torques further build-up of torsional strain was prevented. PMID:20953173

  13. Magnetic lens apparatus for a low-voltage high-resolution electron microscope

    DOEpatents

    Crewe, Albert V.

    1996-01-01

    A lens apparatus in which a beam of charged particles of low accelerating voltage is brought to a focus by a magnetic field, the lens being situated behind the target position. The lens comprises an electrically-conducting coil arranged around the axis of the beam and a magnetic pole piece extending along the axis of the beam at least within the space surrounded by the coil. The lens apparatus comprises the sole focusing lens for high-resolution imaging in a low-voltage scanning electron microscope.

  14. An Analytical Approach towards Passive Ferromagnetic Shimming Design for a High-Resolution NMR Magnet

    PubMed Central

    Li, Frank X.; Voccio, John P.; Cheol Ahn, Min; Hahn, Seungyong; Bascuñán, Juan; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a warm bore ferromagnetic shimming design for a high resolution NMR magnet based on spherical harmonic coefficient reduction techniques. The passive ferromagnetic shimming along with the active shimming is a critically important step to improve magnetic field homogeneity for an NMR Magnet. Here, the technique is applied to an NMR magnet already designed and built at the MIT's Francis Bitter Magnet Lab. Based on the actual magnetic field measurement data, a total of twenty-two low order spherical harmonic coefficients is derived. Another set of spherical harmonic coefficients was calculated for iron pieces attached to a 54 mm diameter and 72 mm high tube. To improve the homogeneity of the magnet, a multiple objective linear programming method was applied to minimize unwanted spherical harmonic coefficients. A ferromagnetic shimming set with seventy-four iron pieces was presented. Analytical comparisons are made for the expected magnetic field after Ferromagnetic shimming. The theoretically reconstructed magnetic field plot after ferromagnetic shimming has shown that the magnetic field homogeneity was significantly improved. PMID:26516300

  15. Observation of thermomagnetically recorded domains with high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunashima, S.; Takagi, Nayuki; Yamaguchi, Atushi; Kume, Minoru; Fischer, P.; Kumazawa, M.

    2003-04-01

    Magnetic domains were thermomagnetically recorded on TbFeCo films using laser pulsed magnetic field modulation (LP-MFM) and light intensity modulation (LIM). The domains were observed with high resolution magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy (M-TXM) before and after the heat treatment in order to clarify the recording characteristics and the thermal stability of recorded domains. From the results of M-TXM images, it was found that isolated single marks whose lengths are much smaller than 100 nm can be recorded by LP-MFM but their mark lengths become often longer than designed. It was further confirmed that the heat treatment at 120 degree C for 50 hours does not influence significantly the crescent-shaped magnetic domains of 100 nm in width recorded using LP-MFM method and circular domains of 150 nm in diameter recorded using LIM method.

  16. High Resolution Observations and Modeling of Small-Scale Solar Magnetic Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Thomas E.

    2001-01-01

    This research contract investigating the radiative transfer and dynamic physics of the smallest observable magnetic structures in the solar photosphere. Due to the lack of a high-resolution visible light satellite instrument for solar studies, all data were acquired using ground-based instrumentation. The primary goal of the investigation was to understand the formation and evolution of "G-band bright points" in relation to the associated magnetic elements. G-band bright points are small (on the order of 100 kin or less in diameter) bright signatures associated with magnetic flux elements in the photosphere. They are seen in the A2A-X2 4308 A molecular bandhead of the CH radical ill the solar spectrum and offer the highest spatial resolution and highest contrast "tracers" of small magnetic structure on the Sun.

  17. The Need for High-Resolution Crustal Magnetic Field Data on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.; Purucker, M. E.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetometer observations from the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft (MAG/ER on MGS) have confirmed that Mars does not presently have an internally-generated dipole magnetic field, and have also revealed intense remanent magnetism in the Martian crust. The remanent magnetic anomalies, most prevalent in the southern highlands region, are a record of the past history of the internal Mars dipole field. The MAG/ER data constitute a valuable data set for constraining the early thermal evolution of Mars and the history of the planetary magnetic field. However, the data lack the resolution needed to draw definite conclusions regarding the time history of the field. High-resolution magnetometer observations, obtained at low-altitude, are needed to complement and extend the MGS/ER data set and allow a definitive time history of the internal Mars dynamo to be constructed.

  18. High resolution in-operando microimaging of solar cells with pulsed electrically-detected magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Katz, Itai; Fehr, Matthias; Schnegg, Alexander; Lips, Klaus; Blank, Aharon

    2015-02-01

    The in-operando detection and high resolution spatial imaging of paramagnetic defects, impurities, and states becomes increasingly important for understanding loss mechanisms in solid-state electronic devices. Electron spin resonance (ESR), commonly employed for observing these species, cannot meet this challenge since it suffers from limited sensitivity and spatial resolution. An alternative and much more sensitive method, called electrically-detected magnetic resonance (EDMR), detects the species through their magnetic fingerprint, which can be traced in the device's electrical current. However, until now it could not obtain high resolution images in operating electronic devices. In this work, the first spatially-resolved electrically-detected magnetic resonance images (EDMRI) of paramagnetic states in an operating real-world electronic device are provided. The presented method is based on a novel microwave pulse sequence allowing for the coherent electrical detection of spin echoes in combination with powerful pulsed magnetic-field gradients. The applicability of the method is demonstrated on a device-grade 1-μm-thick amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cell and an identical device that was degraded locally by an electron beam. The degraded areas with increased concentrations of paramagnetic defects lead to a local increase in recombination that is mapped by EDMRI with ∼20-μm-scale pixel resolution. The novel approach presented here can be widely used in the nondestructive in-operando three-dimensional characterization of solid-state electronic devices with a resolution potential of less than 100 nm.

  19. Distribution of buried hydrothermal alteration deduced from high-resolution magnetic surveys in Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouligand, Claire; Glen, Jonathan M. G.; Blakely, Richard J.

    2014-04-01

    Yellowstone National Park (YNP) displays numerous and extensive hydrothermal features. Although hydrothermal alteration in YNP has been extensively studied, the volume, geometry, and type of rock alteration at depth remain poorly constrained. In this study, we use high-resolution airborne and ground magnetic surveys and measurements of remanent and induced magnetization of field and drill core samples to provide constraints on the geometry of hydrothermal alteration within the subsurface of three thermal areas in YNP (Firehole River, Smoke Jumper Hot Springs, and Norris Geyser Basin). We observe that hydrothermal zones from both liquid- and vapor-dominated systems coincide with magnetic lows observed in aeromagnetic surveys and with a decrease of the amplitude of short-wavelength anomalies seen in ground magnetic surveys. This suggests a strong demagnetization of both the shallow and deep substratum within these areas associated with the removal of magnetic minerals by hydrothermal alteration processes. Such demagnetization is confirmed by measurements of rock samples from hydrothermal areas which display significantly decreased total magnetization. A pronounced negative anomaly is observed over the Lone Star Geyser and suggests a significant demagnetization of the substratum associated with areas displaying large-scale fluid flow. The ground and airborne magnetic surveys are used to evaluate the distribution of magnetization in the subsurface. This study shows that significant demagnetization occurs over a thickness of at least a few hundred meters in hydrothermal areas at YNP and that the maximum degree or maximum thickness of demagnetization correlates closely with the location of hydrothermal activity and mapped alteration.

  20. High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of seminolipid from bovine spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, J G; Storey, B T; Hemling, M L; Grob, R L

    1990-06-01

    The high-resolution one- and two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) characterization of seminolipid from bovine spermatozoa is presented. The 1H-NMR data was confirmed by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of the partially methylated alditol acetates of the sugar unit, mild alkaline methanolysis of the glyceryl ester, mobility on normal phase and diphasic thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC), and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS). The structure of the molecule corresponds to 1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-hexadecanoyl-3-O-beta-D-(3'-sulfo)-galactopyranosyl- sn-glycerol. PMID:2373957

  1. High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of seminolipid from bovine spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, J G; Storey, B T; Hemling, M L; Grob, R L

    1990-06-01

    The high-resolution one- and two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) characterization of seminolipid from bovine spermatozoa is presented. The 1H-NMR data was confirmed by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of the partially methylated alditol acetates of the sugar unit, mild alkaline methanolysis of the glyceryl ester, mobility on normal phase and diphasic thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC), and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS). The structure of the molecule corresponds to 1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-hexadecanoyl-3-O-beta-D-(3'-sulfo)-galactopyranosyl- sn-glycerol.

  2. High resolution magnetostriction measurements in pulsed magnetic fields using fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daou, Ramzy; Weickert, Franziska; Nicklas, Michael; Steglich, Frank; Haase, Ariane; Doerr, Mathias

    2010-03-01

    We report on a new high resolution apparatus for measuring magnetostriction suitable for use at cryogenic temperatures in pulsed high magnetic fields which we have developed at the Hochfeld-Magnetlabor Dresden. Optical fiber strain gauges based on fiber Bragg gratings are used to measure the strain in small (˜1 mm) samples. We describe the implementation of a fast measurement system capable of resolving strains in the order of 10-7 with a full bandwidth of 47 kHz, and demonstrate its use on single crystal samples of GdSb and GdSi.

  3. First high-resolution near-seafloor survey of magnetic anomalies of the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Xu, X.; Li, C.; Sun, Z.; Zhu, J.; Zhou, Z.; Qiu, N.

    2013-12-01

    We successfully conducted the first high-resolution near-seafloor magnetic survey of the Central, Southwest, and Northern Central Basins of the South China Sea (SCS) during two cruises on board Chinese R/V HaiYangLiuHao in October-November 2012 and March-April 2013, respectively. Measurements of magnetic field were made along four long survey lines, including (1) a NW-SE across-isochron profile transecting the Southwest Basin and covering all ages of the oceanic crust (Line CD); (2) a N-S across-isochron profile transecting the Central Basin (Line AB); and (3) two sub-parallel NE-SW across-isochron profiles transecting the Northern Central Basin of the SCS (Lines D and E). A three-axis magnetometer was mounted on a deep-tow vehicle, flying within 0.6 km above the seafloor. The position of the tow vehicle was provided by an ultra-short baseline navigation system along Lines D and E, while was estimated using shipboard GPS along Lines AB and CD. To investigate crustal magnetization, we first removed the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) of 2010 from the measured magnetic data, and then downward continued the resultant magnetic field data to a horizontal plane at a water depth of 4.5 km to correct for variation due to the fishing depth of the deep-tow vehicle. Finally, we calculated magnetic anomalies at various water depths after reduction-to-the-pole corrections. We also constructed polarity reversal block (PRB) models of crustal magnetization by matching peaks and troughs of the observed magnetic field anomaly. Our analysis yielded the following results: (1) The near-bottom magnetic anomaly showed peak-to-trough amplitudes of more than 2,500 nT, which are several times of the anomaly amplitudes at the sea surface, illustrating that deep-tow measurements acquired much higher spatial resolutions. (2) The deep-tow data revealed several distinctive magnetic anomalies with wavelengths of 5-15 km and amplitudes of several hundred nT. These short

  4. Determining the structure-mechanics relationships of dense microtubule networks with confocal microscopy and magnetic tweezers-based microrheology.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yali; Valentine, Megan T

    2013-01-01

    The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton is essential in maintaining the shape, strength, and organization of cells. Its spatiotemporal organization is fundamental for numerous dynamic biological processes, and mechanical stress within the MT cytoskeleton provides an important signaling mechanism in mitosis and neural development. This raises important questions about the relationships between structure and mechanics in complex MT structures. In vitro, reconstituted cytoskeletal networks provide a minimal model of cell mechanics while also providing a testing ground for the fundamental polymer physics of stiff polymer gels. Here, we describe our development and implementation of a broad tool kit to study structure-mechanics relationships in reconstituted MT networks, including protocols for the assembly of entangled and cross-linked MT networks, fluorescence imaging, microstructure characterization, construction and calibration of magnetic tweezers devices, and mechanical data collection and analysis. In particular, we present the design and assembly of three neodymium iron boron (NdFeB)-based magnetic tweezers devices optimized for use with MT networks: (1) high-force magnetic tweezers devices that enable the application of nano-Newton forces and possible meso- to macroscale materials characterization; (2) ring-shaped NdFeB-based magnetic tweezers devices that enable oscillatory microrheology measurements; and (3) portable magnetic tweezers devices that enable direct visualization of microscale deformation in soft materials under applied force.

  5. Measuring stellar magnetic fields from high resolution spectroscopy of near-infrared lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, F.; Vacca, W. D.; Stift, M. J.

    2003-10-01

    Zeeman splitting of otherwise degenerate levels provides a straight-forward method of measuring stellar magnetic fields. In the optical, the relative displacements of the Zeeman components are quite small compared to the rotational line broadening, and therefore observations of Zeeman splitting are usually possible only for rather strong magnetic fields in very slowly rotating stars. However, the magnitude of the Zeeman splitting is proportional to the square of the wavelength, whereas rotational line broadening mechanisms are linear in wavelength; therefore, there is a clear advantage in using near-infrared spectral lines to measure surface stellar magnetic fields. We have obtained high resolution (R >= 25 000) spectra in the 15 625-15 665 Å region for two magnetic chemically peculiar stars, viz. HD 176232 and HD 201601, and for the suspected magnetic chemically peculiar star HD 180583, as part of a pilot study aimed at determining the accuracy with which we can measure stellar magnetic fields using the Zeeman splitting of near-infrared lines. We confirm that in principle the magnetic field strength can be estimated from the magnetic intensification of spectral lines, i.e. the increase in equivalent width of a line over the zero-field value. However, due to line blending as well as the dependence of this intensification on abundance and field geometry, accurate estimates of the magnetic field strengths can be obtained only by modelling the line profiles by means of spectral synthesis techniques. Using this approach, we find a 1.4 kG magnetic field modulus in HD 176132 and an upper limit of 0.2 kG in HD 180583. The very weak infrared lines in the spectrum of HD 201601 are consistent with a 3.9 kG field modulus estimated from the splitting of the Fe II 6149.258 Å line seen in an optical spectrum. Finally, we would like to draw attention to the fact that there are no sufficiently detailed and reliable atomic line lists available for the near-infrared region that

  6. High-resolution Magnetic Resonance Vessel Wall Imaging for Intracranial Arterial Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xian-Jin; Wang, Wu; Liu, Zun-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the feasibility and clinical value of high-resolution magnetic resonance vessel wall imaging (HRMR VWI) for intracranial arterial stenosis. Date Sources: We retrieved information from PubMed database up to December 2015, using various search terms including vessel wall imaging (VWI), high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, intracranial arterial stenosis, black blood, and intracranial atherosclerosis. Study Selection: We reviewed peer-reviewed articles printed in English on imaging technique of VWI and characteristic findings of various intracranial vasculopathies on VWI. We organized this data to explain the value of VWI in clinical application. Results: VWI with black blood technique could provide high-quality images with submillimeter voxel size, and display both the vessel wall and lumen of intracranial artery simultaneously. Various intracranial vasculopathies (atherosclerotic or nonatherosclerotic) had differentiating features including pattern of wall thickening, enhancement, and vessel remodeling on VWI. This technique could be used for determining causes of stenosis, identification of stroke mechanism, risk-stratifying patients, and directing therapeutic management in clinical practice. In addition, a new morphological classification based on VWI could be established for predicting the efficacy of endovascular therapy. Conclusions: This review highlights the value of HRMR VWI for discrimination of different intracranial vasculopathies and directing therapeutic management. PMID:27231176

  7. High-Resolution Observations of Flare Precursors and Their Relationship with Magnetic Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haimin; Xu, Yan; Ahn, Kwangsu; Jing, Ju; Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Huang, Nengyi; Gary, Dale E.; Cao, Wenda

    2016-05-01

    The study of precursors of flares is important for understanding the basic magnetic instability leading to solar flares, which can aid the forecasting of eruptions potentially related to severe space weather effects. Although literatures reported many important clues, high-resolution observations of pre-flare activities before a well-observed solar flare have been rare. Even rarely, the associated magnetic structures in fine scale (below 1") were also observed. In this study we take advantage of multiwavelength high-resolution observations completely covering the 2015 June 22 M6.6 flare, which were obtained under excellent seeing condition with the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) at Big Bear Solar Observatory. The NST data includes observations of the H-alpha line in five spectral positions at a spatial resolution of 0.1" and magnetograms at a resolution of 0.25". These are complemented by IRIS UV observations with a resolution of 0.25". We find that there are two episodes of pre-flare brightenings (precursors), which are spatially associated with magnetic channels, i.e., elongated structures comprising alternating magnetic polarity inversion lines (Zirin & Wang, 1993, Nature, 363, 426). The pre-flare chromospheric and coronal features reflect an extremely sheared magnetic topology, while the initiation of main flare brightenings correspond to a much less sheared configuration. RHESSI HXR observations reveal that the precursors have both thermal and nonthermal components, and the latter is further evidenced by the microwave observations of the newly expanded Solar Radio Array at Owens Valley.We further investigate the electric current system above the magnetic channels using NLFFF extrapolations, which show strong current sheets above the channel structure. This is consistent with the MHD modeling of Kusano et al (2012, Ap.J., 760, 31), who noted the importance of localized small-scale magnetic structure in triggering the eruption of the whole active region. We

  8. High resolution neurography of the brachial plexus by 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cejas, C; Rollán, C; Michelin, G; Nogués, M

    2016-01-01

    The study of the structures that make up the brachial plexus has benefited particularly from the high resolution images provided by 3T magnetic resonance scanners. The brachial plexus can have mononeuropathies or polyneuropathies. The mononeuropathies include traumatic injuries and trapping, such as occurs in thoracic outlet syndrome due to cervical ribs, prominent transverse apophyses, or tumors. The polyneuropathies include inflammatory processes, in particular chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome, granulomatous diseases, and radiation neuropathy. Vascular processes affecting the brachial plexus include diabetic polyneuropathy and the vasculitides. This article reviews the anatomy of the brachial plexus and describes the technique for magnetic resonance neurography and the most common pathologic conditions that can affect the brachial plexus. PMID:26860655

  9. High resolution neurography of the brachial plexus by 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cejas, C; Rollán, C; Michelin, G; Nogués, M

    2016-01-01

    The study of the structures that make up the brachial plexus has benefited particularly from the high resolution images provided by 3T magnetic resonance scanners. The brachial plexus can have mononeuropathies or polyneuropathies. The mononeuropathies include traumatic injuries and trapping, such as occurs in thoracic outlet syndrome due to cervical ribs, prominent transverse apophyses, or tumors. The polyneuropathies include inflammatory processes, in particular chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome, granulomatous diseases, and radiation neuropathy. Vascular processes affecting the brachial plexus include diabetic polyneuropathy and the vasculitides. This article reviews the anatomy of the brachial plexus and describes the technique for magnetic resonance neurography and the most common pathologic conditions that can affect the brachial plexus.

  10. High-resolution observations of the polar magnetic fields of the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, H.; Varsik, J.; Zirin, H.

    1994-01-01

    High-resolution magnetograms of the solar polar region were used for the study of the polar magnetic field. In contrast to low-resolution magnetograph observations which measure the polar magnetic field averaged over a large area, we focused our efforts on the properties of the small magnetic elements in the polar region. Evolution of the filling factor (the ratio of the area occupied by the magnetic elements to the total area) of these magnetic elements, as well as the average magnetic field strength, were studied during the maximum and declining phase of solar cycle 22, from early 1991 to mid-1993. We found that during the sunspot maximum period, the polar regions were occupied by about equal numbers of positive and negative magnetic elements, with equal average field strength. As the solar cycle progresses toward sunspot minimum, the magnetic field elements in the polar region become predominantly of one polarity. The average magnetic field of the dominant polarity elements also increases with the filling factor. In the meanwhile, both the filling factor and the average field strength of the non-dominant polarity elements decrease. The combined effects of the changing filling factors and average field strength produce the observed evolution of the integrated polar flux over the solar cycle. We compared the evolutionary histories of both filling factor and average field strength, for regions of high (70-80 deg) and low (60-70 deg) latitudes. For the south pole, we found no significant evidence of difference in the time of reversal. However, the low-latitude region of the north pole did reverse polarity much earlier than the high-latitude region. It later showed an oscillatory behavior. We suggest this may be caused by the poleward migration of flux from a large active region in 1989 with highly imbalanced flux.

  11. Magnetic lens apparatus for use in high-resolution scanning electron microscopes and lithographic processes

    DOEpatents

    Crewe, Albert V.

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed are lens apparatus in which a beam of charged particlesis brought to a focus by means of a magnetic field, the lens being situated behind the target position. In illustrative embodiments, a lens apparatus is employed in a scanning electron microscopeas the sole lens for high-resolution focusing of an electron beam, and in particular, an electron beam having an accelerating voltage of from about 10 to about 30,000 V. In one embodiment, the lens apparatus comprises an electrically-conducting coil arranged around the axis of the beam and a magnetic pole piece extending along the axis of the beam at least within the space surrounded by the coil. In other embodiments, the lens apparatus comprises a magnetic dipole or virtual magnetic monopole fabricated from a variety of materials, including permanent magnets, superconducting coils, and magnetizable spheres and needles contained within an energy-conducting coil. Multiple-array lens apparatus are also disclosed for simultaneous and/or consecutive imaging of multiple images on single or multiple specimens. The invention further provides apparatus, methods, and devices useful in focusing charged particle beams for lithographic processes.

  12. High resolution dating of young magmatic oceanic crust using near-seafloor magnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyment, J.; Kitazawa, M.; Hemond, C.; Guillou, H.; Chauvin, A.; Ravilly, M.; Honsho, C.

    2015-12-01

    We compare two independent dating methods on a section of oceanic crust created within the last million year on the Central Indian Ridge axis at 19°10'S, an area affected by the Reunion hotspot. First, near-seafloor magnetic anomalies display characteristic sequences of magnetic intensity variations that we confidently identified by comparison with published paleointensity curves for the Brunhes period and used as a dating tool. This approach is further confirmed by the linear trend relating the NRM (Natural Remanent Magnetization) and paleointensity measured on rock samples along the same section. Second, valid K-Ar and Ar-Ar ages are determined on enriched basalt samples collected by deep-sea submersible. They show an excellent coincidence with the magnetic ages and support the use of high-resolution, near-seafloor marine magnetic anomalies as an efficient tool to date the young magmatic oceanic crust, where radiometric methods are generally unpractical, with unprecedented resolution. The ages obtained on the CIR reveal a 150-200 kyr cyclicity in the magmatic and tectonic processes of seafloor formation, two ridge jumps of 2.5 km and 1.2 km, respectively, and a systematic spreading asymmetry in favor to the Indian flank which may result from the interaction of the CIR with the Reunion hotspot.

  13. MAGNETIC TWEEZERS FOR THE STUDY OF DNA TRACKING MOTORS

    PubMed Central

    Manosas, Maria; Meglio, Adrien; Spiering, Michelle M.; Ding, Fangyuan; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Barre, François-Xavier; Saleh, Omar A.; Allemand, Jean François; Bensimon, David; Croquette, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Single-molecule manipulation methods have opened a new vista on the study of molecular motors. Here we describe the use of magnetic traps for the investigation of the mechanism of DNA based motors, in particular helicases and translocases. PMID:20627163

  14. High Resolution Observations of Magnetic Elements in the Visible and the Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimmele, T.; Lin, H.

    1997-05-01

    High resolution observations of magnetic elements in the visible and infrared. We report on multi-wavelength observations of plage regions obtained at the Vacuum Tower Telescope at NSO/Sac-Peak . The data set includes high resolution images in the G-band (0.43 mu ), the visible (0.69 mu ) continuum and the infrared (1.6 mu ) continuum. In addition, deep integration full Stokes vector measurements in the FeI 1.56 mu lines, as well as, Ca-K slit jaw images were obtained. G-band bright points, which are observed mostly in supergranular lanes, are also visible as bright points in the visible continuum. Although the infrared observations are limited in spatial resolution to about 0."4 (the diffraction limit of the VTT/SP), the data indicates that G-band bright points are also bright in the infrared (1.6 mu ). We also discuss and compare properties of magnetic knots and small pores. Magnetic knots, which recently also have been referred to as azimuth centers (Lites et al. 1994), by definition show no darkening in individual continuum images. However, in the time-averaged imaging data, and in particular in the infrared, azimuth centers appear as dark features, which are clearly distinguishable from the quiet sun background. In the infrared most azimuth centers are visible as dark features even in individual snapshots. Many azimuth centers as well as some small pores are surrounded by a highly structured bright ring, which becomes more apparent with increasing height of formation. Results of the polarization analysis in the FeI 1.56 mu lines, including measurements of weak fields, are presented as well.

  15. HIGH-RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS OF SIPHON FLOWS IN A SOLAR MAGNETIC PORE

    SciTech Connect

    Guglielmino, Salvo L.

    2011-12-10

    We investigate signatures of siphon flows in a region around a solar magnetic pore, observed in the photosphere at {mu} = 0.6, during its decay phase. We analyze high-resolution Stokes spectra acquired by Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope along the Fe I pair at 630.2 nm. We determine the vector magnetic field and the line-of-sight velocity by an inversion of the full Stokes vector using the SIR code. We also analyze photospheric G-band filtergrams. We find evidence of a transient siphon (counter)flow at the edge of the pore. An arch-shaped structure is found to have upflow motions of 4 km s{sup -1} in the footpoint with a stronger magnetic field and positive polarity, and downflows of the same order of magnitude in the footpoint with opposite polarity and a weaker magnetic field. The event is different from those reported in previous observations of the Sun's atmosphere and may represent a physical constraint for numerical models.

  16. Plasma Diagnostics in High Resolution X-Ray Spectra of Magnetic Cataclysmic Variables

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C W

    2001-10-02

    Using the Chandra HETG spectrum of EX Hya as an example, we discuss some of the plasma diagnostics available in high-resolution X-ray spectra of magnetic cataclysmic variables. Specifically, for conditions appropriate to collisional ionization equilibrium plasmas, we discuss the temperature dependence of the H- to He-like line intensity ratios and the density and photoexcitation dependence of the He-like R line ratios and the Fe XVII I(17.10 {angstrom})/I(17.05 {angstrom}) line ratio. We show that the plasma temperature in EX Hya spans the range from {approx}0.5 to {approx}10 keV and that the plasma density n {ge} 2 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}, orders of magnitude greater than that observed in the Sun or other late-type stars.

  17. Controlled Source Magnetics: A Method for Imaging High-resolution Near-surface Magnetic Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, K.; Lee, K. H.; Oh, S.; Seol, S. J.; Byun, J.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic property in subsurface has been a target of the magnetic method for a wide variety of geophysical applications in mineral, hydrocarbon, groundwater, and environmental arenas. Anomalous magnetic property also affects controlled source electromagnetic (EM) data due to source-driven induced magnetization. At very low frequencies, a few to tens of hertz, the EM response predominantly consists of static-like magnetic field due to induced magnetization. Taking advantage of this property we have developed a numerical procedure to image subsurface magnetic heterogeneity with much improved resolutions. Incidentally, sensitivities of commercially available sensors and geomagnetic noise spectra at these frequencies are reasonably manageable compared to the anticipated magnetic field strength generated by numerical modeling. We, in this study, show that the resolution of three-dimensional inversion result(s) of controlled source magnetic data (fig. 1(a)) is better than that of geomagnetic data (fig. 1(b)). This is because use of EM excitations from different directions reduces non-uniqueness of inverse problem. These results show that a controlled source magnetic method can be a useful exploration tool when higher resolution of magnetic property is needed or strong remnant magnetization hinders the interpretation of magnetic method.

  18. Crocus sativus Petals: Waste or Valuable Resource? The Answer of High-Resolution and High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Righi, Valeria; Parenti, Francesca; Tugnoli, Vitaliano; Schenetti, Luisa; Mucci, Adele

    2015-09-30

    Intact Crocus sativus petals were studied for the first time by high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS NMR) spectroscopy, revealing the presence of kinsenoside (2) and goodyeroside A (3), together with 3-hydroxy-γ-butyrolactone (4). These findings were confirmed by HR-NMR analysis of the ethanol extract of fresh petals and showed that, even though carried out rapidly, partial hydrolysis of glucopyranosyloxybutanolides occurs during extraction. On the other hand, kaempferol 3-O-sophoroside (1), which is "NMR-silent" in intact petals, is present in extracts. These results suggest to evaluate the utilization of saffron petals for phytopharmaceutical and nutraceutical purposes to exploit a waste product of massive production of commercial saffron and point to the application of HR-MAS NMR for monitoring bioactive compounds directly on intact petals, avoiding the extraction procedure and the consequent hydrolysis reaction.

  19. Analysis of cell mechanics in single vinculin-deficient cells using a magnetic tweezer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alenghat, F. J.; Fabry, B.; Tsai, K. Y.; Goldmann, W. H.; Ingber, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    A magnetic tweezer was constructed to apply controlled tensional forces (10 pN to greater than 1 nN) to transmembrane receptors via bound ligand-coated microbeadswhile optically measuring lateral bead displacements within individual cells. Use of this system with wild-type F9 embryonic carcinoma cells and cells from a vinculin knockout mouse F9 Vin (-/-) revealed much larger differences in the stiffness of the transmembrane integrin linkages to the cytoskeleton than previously reported using related techniques that measured average mechanical properties of large cell populations. The mechanical properties measured varied widely among cells, exhibiting an approximately log-normal distribution. The median lateral bead displacement was 2-fold larger in F9 Vin (-/-) cells compared to wild-type cells whereas the arithmetic mean displacement only increased by 37%. We conclude that vinculin serves a greater mechanical role in cells than previously reported and that this magnetic tweezer device may be useful for probing the molecular basis of cell mechanics within single cells. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  20. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of mouse brain using high-resolution anatomical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, L. J.; Hadimani, R. L.; Kanthasamy, A. G.; Jiles, D. C.

    2014-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) offers the possibility of non-invasive treatment of brain disorders in humans. Studies on animals can allow rapid progress of the research including exploring a variety of different treatment conditions. Numerical calculations using animal models are needed to help design suitable TMS coils for use in animal experiments, in particular, to estimate the electric field induced in animal brains. In this paper, we have implemented a high-resolution anatomical MRI-derived mouse model consisting of 50 tissue types to accurately calculate induced electric field in the mouse brain. Magnetic field measurements have been performed on the surface of the coil and compared with the calculations in order to validate the calculated magnetic and induced electric fields in the brain. Results show how the induced electric field is distributed in a mouse brain and allow investigation of how this could be improved for TMS studies using mice. The findings have important implications in further preclinical development of TMS for treatment of human diseases.

  1. Semi-automated structural analysis of high resolution magnetic and gamma-ray spectrometry airborne surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debeglia, N.; Martelet, G.; Perrin, J.; Truffert, C.; Ledru, P.; Tourlière, B.

    2005-08-01

    A user-controlled procedure was implemented for the structural analysis of geophysical maps. Local edge segments are first extracted using a suitable edge detector function, then linked into straight discontinuities and, finally, organised in complex boundary lines best delineating geophysical features. Final boundary lines may be attributed by a geologist to lithological contacts and/or structural geological features. Tests of some edge detectors, (i) horizontal gradient magnitude (HGM), (ii) various orders of the analytic signal ( An), reduced to the pole or not, (iii) enhanced horizontal derivative (EHD), (iv) composite analytic signal (CAS), were performed on synthetic magnetic data (with and without noise). As a result of these comparisons, the horizontal gradient appears to remain the best operator for the analysis of magnetic data. Computation of gradients in the frequency domain, including filtering and upward continuation of noisy data, is well-suited to the extraction of magnetic gradients associated to deep sources, while space-domain smoothing and differentiation techniques is generally preferable in the case of shallow magnetic sources, or for gamma-ray spectrometry analysis. Algorithms for edge extraction, segment linking, and line following can be controlled by choosing adequate edge detector and processing parameters which allows adaptation to a desired scale of interpretation. Tests on synthetic and real case data demonstrate the adaptability of the procedure and its ability to produce basic layer for multi-data analysis. The method was applied to the interpretation of high-resolution airborne magnetic and gamma-ray spectrometry data collected in northern Namibia. It allowed the delineation of dyke networks concealed by superficial weathering and demonstrated the presence of lithological variations in alluvial flows. The output from the structural analysis procedure are compatible with standard GIS softwares and enable the geologist to (i) compare

  2. A consensus embedding approach for segmentation of high resolution in vivo prostate magnetic resonance imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanath, Satish; Rosen, Mark; Madabhushi, Anant

    2008-03-01

    Current techniques for localization of prostatic adenocarcinoma (CaP) via blinded trans-rectal ultrasound biopsy are associated with a high false negative detection rate. While high resolution endorectal in vivo Magnetic Resonance (MR) prostate imaging has been shown to have improved contrast and resolution for CaP detection over ultrasound, similarity in intensity characteristics between benign and cancerous regions on MR images contribute to a high false positive detection rate. In this paper, we present a novel unsupervised segmentation method that employs manifold learning via consensus schemes for detection of cancerous regions from high resolution 1.5 Tesla (T) endorectal in vivo prostate MRI. A significant contribution of this paper is a method to combine multiple weak, lower-dimensional representations of high dimensional feature data in a way analogous to classifier ensemble schemes, and hence create a stable and accurate reduced dimensional representation. After correcting for MR image intensity artifacts, such as bias field inhomogeneity and intensity non-standardness, our algorithm extracts over 350 3D texture features at every spatial location in the MR scene at multiple scales and orientations. Non-linear dimensionality reduction schemes such as Locally Linear Embedding (LLE) and Graph Embedding (GE) are employed to create multiple low dimensional data representations of this high dimensional texture feature space. Our novel consensus embedding method is used to average object adjacencies from within the multiple low dimensional projections so that class relationships are preserved. Unsupervised consensus clustering is then used to partition the objects in this consensus embedding space into distinct classes. Quantitative evaluation on 18 1.5 T prostate MR data against corresponding histology obtained from the multi-site ACRIN trials show a sensitivity of 92.65% and a specificity of 82.06%, which suggests that our method is successfully able to detect

  3. High-resolution dichroic imaging of magnetic flux distributions in superconductors with scanning x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ruoß, S. Stahl, C.; Weigand, M.; Schütz, G.; Albrecht, J.

    2015-01-12

    The penetration of magnetic flux into high-temperature superconductors has been observed using a high-resolution technique based on x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Superconductors coated with thin soft-magnetic layers are observed in a scanning x-ray microscope under the influence of external magnetic fields. Resulting electric currents in the superconductor create an inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution above the superconductor and lead to a local reorientation of the ferromagnetic layer. Measuring the local magnetization of the ferromagnet by x-ray absorption microscopy with circular-polarized radiation allows the analysis of the magnetic flux distribution in the superconductor with a spatial resolution on the nanoscale.

  4. Diagnostics of the accretion plasma in magnetic CVs from high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burwitz, V.; Reinsch, K.; Haberl, F.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Predehl, P.

    2002-01-01

    High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy with the Chandra low energy transmission grating spectrometer (LETGS) provides an unprecedented diagnostic tool for the hot accretion plasma and the settling flow in the accretion column of magnetic cataclysmic variables (mCVs). We show first results from our analysis of spin-phase resolved X-ray spectroscopy of the two prototype magnetic CVs, AM Her and PQ Gem. The LETGS spectra cover the wavelength range 2--170Å with a spectral resolution λ/Δ λ = 200--3000. For the first time, absorption structures in the soft X-ray component of the heated white-dwarf atmosphere are revealed and individual emission lines of H- and He-like O and N ions including the density sensitive components of the He-like triplets are resolved in the hard X-ray component originating from the settling flow. In addition, phase dependent Doppler-shifts of the emission lines are detected providing detailed information on the geometry of the accretion funnel.

  5. High-Resolution Mechanical Imaging of Glioblastoma by Multifrequency Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Freimann, Florian Baptist; Bayerl, Simon; Guo, Jing; Arlt, Felix; Wuerfel, Jens; Braun, Jürgen; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus; Sack, Ingolf

    2014-01-01

    Objective To generate high-resolution maps of the viscoelastic properties of human brain parenchyma for presurgical quantitative assessment in glioblastoma (GB). Methods Twenty-two GB patients underwent routine presurgical work-up supplemented by additional multifrequency magnetic resonance elastography. Two three-dimensional viscoelastic parameter maps, magnitude |G*|, and phase angle φ of the complex shear modulus were reconstructed by inversion of full wave field data in 2-mm isotropic resolution at seven harmonic drive frequencies ranging from 30 to 60 Hz. Results Mechanical brain maps confirmed that GB are composed of stiff and soft compartments, resulting in high intratumor heterogeneity. GB could be easily differentiated from healthy reference tissue by their reduced viscous behavior quantified by φ (0.37±0.08 vs. 0.58±0.07). |G*|, which in solids more relates to the material's stiffness, was significantly reduced in GB with a mean value of 1.32±0.26 kPa compared to 1.54±0.27 kPa in healthy tissue (P = 0.001). However, some GB (5 of 22) showed increased stiffness. Conclusion GB are generally less viscous and softer than healthy brain parenchyma. Unrelated to the morphology-based contrast of standard magnetic resonance imaging, elastography provides an entirely new neuroradiological marker and contrast related to the biomechanical properties of tumors. PMID:25338072

  6. Scanning magnetic tunnel junction microscope for high-resolution imaging of remanent magnetization fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, E. A.; Bruno, A. C.; Carvalho, H. R.; Weiss, B. P.

    2014-10-01

    Scanning magnetic microscopy is a new methodology for mapping magnetic fields with high spatial resolution and field sensitivity. An important goal has been to develop high-performance instruments that do not require cryogenic technology due to its high cost, complexity, and limitation on sensor-to-sample distance. Here we report the development of a low-cost scanning magnetic microscope based on commercial room-temperature magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) sensors that typically achieves spatial resolution better than 7 µm. By comparing different bias and detection schemes, optimal performance was obtained when biasing the MTJ sensor with a modulated current at 1.0 kHz in a Wheatstone bridge configuration while using a lock-in amplifier in conjunction with a low-noise custom-made preamplifier. A precision horizontal (x-y) scanning stage comprising two coupled nanopositioners controls the position of the sample and a linear actuator adjusts the sensor-to-sample distance. We obtained magnetic field sensitivities better than 150 nT/Hz1/2 between 0.1 and 10 Hz, which is a critical frequency range for scanning magnetic microscopy. This corresponds to a magnetic moment sensitivity of 10-14 A m2, a factor of 100 better than achievable with typical commercial superconducting moment magnetometers. It also represents an improvement in sensitivity by a factor between 10 and 30 compared to similar scanning MTJ microscopes based on conventional bias-detection schemes. To demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument, two polished thin sections of representative geological samples were scanned along with a synthetic sample containing magnetic microparticles. The instrument is usable for a diversity of applications that require mapping of samples at room temperature to preserve magnetic properties or viability, including paleomagnetism and rock magnetism, nondestructive evaluation of materials, and biological assays.

  7. Characterization of the mechanical properties of HL-1 cardiomyocytes with high throughput magnetic tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, La; Maybeck, Vanessa; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2015-08-03

    We characterized the mechanical properties of cardiomyocyte-like HL-1 cells using our recently developed multi-pole magnetic tweezers. With the optimized design, both high force and high throughput are achieved at the same time. Force up to 100 pN can be applied on a 1 μm diameter superparamagnetic bead in a workspace with 60 μm radius, which is encircled symmetrically by 3 sharp magnetic tips. By adjusting the coil currents, both the strength and direction of force can be controlled. The result shows that both viscosity and shear elastic modulus of HL-1 cells exhibit an approximately log-normal distribution. The cells became stiffer as they matured, consistent with a transition from proliferating cells to contractile muscle tissue. Moreover, the mechanical properties of HL-1 cells show high heterogeneity, which agrees well with their physiological structure.

  8. Freely orbiting magnetic tweezers to directly monitor changes in the twist of nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Lipfert, Jan; Wiggin, Matthew; Kerssemakers, Jacob W.J.; Pedaci, Francesco; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2011-01-01

    The double-stranded nature of DNA links its replication, transcription and repair to rotational motion and torsional strain. Magnetic tweezers (MT) are a powerful single-molecule technique to apply both forces and torques to individual DNA or RNA molecules. However, conventional MT do not track rotational motion directly and constrain the free rotation of the nucleic acid tether. Here we present freely orbiting MT (FOMT) that allow the measurement of equilibrium fluctuations and changes in the twist of tethered nucleic acid molecules. Using a precisely aligned vertically oriented magnetic field, FOMT enable tracking of the rotation angle from straight forward (x,y)-position tracking and permits the application of calibrated stretching forces, without biasing the tether's free rotation. We utilize FOMT to measure the force-dependent torsional stiffness of DNA from equilibrium rotational fluctuations and to follow the assembly of recombination protein A filaments on DNA. PMID:21863006

  9. Characterization of the mechanical properties of HL-1 cardiomyocytes with high throughput magnetic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, La; Maybeck, Vanessa; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2015-08-01

    We characterized the mechanical properties of cardiomyocyte-like HL-1 cells using our recently developed multi-pole magnetic tweezers. With the optimized design, both high force and high throughput are achieved at the same time. Force up to 100 pN can be applied on a 1 μm diameter superparamagnetic bead in a workspace with 60 μm radius, which is encircled symmetrically by 3 sharp magnetic tips. By adjusting the coil currents, both the strength and direction of force can be controlled. The result shows that both viscosity and shear elastic modulus of HL-1 cells exhibit an approximately log-normal distribution. The cells became stiffer as they matured, consistent with a transition from proliferating cells to contractile muscle tissue. Moreover, the mechanical properties of HL-1 cells show high heterogeneity, which agrees well with their physiological structure.

  10. Nucleosome assembly depends on the torsion in the DNA molecule: a magnetic tweezers study.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pooja; Zlatanova, Jordanka; Tomschik, Miroslav

    2009-12-16

    We have used magnetic tweezers to study nucleosome assembly on topologically constrained DNA molecules. Assembly was achieved using chicken erythrocyte core histones and histone chaperone protein Nap1 under constant low force. We have observed only partial assembly when the DNA was topologically constrained and much more complete assembly on unconstrained (nicked) DNA tethers. To verify our hypothesis that the lack of full nucleosome assembly on topologically constrained tethers was due to compensatory accumulation of positive supercoiling in the rest of the template, we carried out experiments in which we mechanically relieved the positive supercoiling by rotating the external magnetic field at certain time points of the assembly process. Indeed, such rotation did lead to the same nucleosome saturation level as in the case of nicked tethers. We conclude that levels of positive supercoiling in the range of 0.025-0.051 (most probably in the form of twist) stall the nucleosome assembly process.

  11. High Resolution Environmental Magnetic Study of a Holocene Sedimentary Record from Zaca Lake, Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platzman, E. S.; Lund, S.; Kirby, M. E.; Feakins, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic studies of Holocene lake sediments recovered from Zaca lake have yielded a 3000-year high resolution record of environmental variability and paleolimnology. Zaca lake is a small oligomictic lake ~12m deep situated 730 m above sea level in the steep canyons of the San Rafael mountains, NW of Santa Barbara. Throughout much of the year Zaca lake is anaerobic below 7m. Hydrogen sulfide, fed into the lake via runoff and local sulphur springs, is present throughout the hypolimnion with concentrations sometime exceeding 30 mg/ l. During the summer months when the lake is stratified, light colored carbonate rich microlaminae are formed; and often during the winter months when the lake overturns, killing the anaerobic bacteria, black microlamina rich in iron sulfide are deposited on the lake floor, creating a stratigraphy reflecting patterns of environmental variability on annual to millennial scales. Samples for magnetic analysis were obtained from 8.5 m of core recovered from the central region of Zaca lake. Ages, constrained using radiocarbon chronostratigraphy, yielded sedimentation rates of 2-10 mm/yr with an average rate of 3 mm per yr over the 3000 yr interval. Parameters reflecting decadal scale variability in magnetic concentration (susceptibility, ARM, SIRM) and grainsize (ARM/Chi) were measured every 2 cm. Additional rock magnetic tests, including thermal demagnetization of three component IRM, were applied at selected intervals to constrain the magnetic mineralogy. These data were combined with analyses of clastic grain size, % calcium carbonate and % organics to create a multiproxy record of environmental variability. Results show that Zaca lake has had a complex depositional history. Anthropogenic effects associated with European colonization are present in the upper meters. Most notable, however, is a dramatic shift in the magnetic parameters and mineralogy between the upper and lower half of the core (circa 1300 ybp) indicating a shift in regime

  12. Design of High Resolution Soft X-Ray Microcalorimeters Using Magnetic Penetration Thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busch. Sarah; Balvin, Manuel; Bandler, Simon; Denis, Kevin; Finkbeiner, Fred; Porst, Jan-Patrick; Sadlier, Jack; Smith, Stephen; Stevenson, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We have designed high-resolution soft x-ray microcalorimeters using magnetic penetration thermometers (MPTs) in an array of pixels covering a total of 2 square centimeters to have a resolving power of 300 at energies around 300 eV. This performance is desirable for studying the soft x-ray background from the warm hot intergalactic medium. MPT devices have small sensor heat capacity and high responsivities, which makes them excellent detector technology for attempting to attain sub-eV resolution. We are investigating the feasibility of pixels with absorbers that are 625 x 625 square micrometers, up to 1 x 1 square millimeters in area and 0.35 micrometer thick and thinner. Our tests have shown that suspended gold absorbers 0.35 micrometers thick (RRR = 6.7) are feasible to fabricate. We modeled the thermal diffusion from such thin gold over the size of a 625 x 625 square micrometer absorber, and conclude that the effect of the thermalization on the resolution of a 300 eV photon is an additional approximately 0.2 eV FWHM of broadening. We discuss the thermal effects of small absorber attachment sterns on solid substrate, as well as considerations for multiplexed readout. We will present the progress we have made towards building and testing this soft x-ray detector.

  13. Relating speech production to tongue muscle compressions using tagged and high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Fangxu; Ye, Chuyang; Woo, Jonghye; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry

    2015-03-01

    The human tongue is composed of multiple internal muscles that work collaboratively during the production of speech. Assessment of muscle mechanics can help understand the creation of tongue motion, interpret clinical observations, and predict surgical outcomes. Although various methods have been proposed for computing the tongue's motion, associating motion with muscle activity in an interdigitated fiber framework has not been studied. In this work, we aim to develop a method that reveals different tongue muscles' activities in different time phases during speech. We use fourdimensional tagged magnetic resonance (MR) images and static high-resolution MR images to obtain tongue motion and muscle anatomy, respectively. Then we compute strain tensors and local tissue compression along the muscle fiber directions in order to reveal their shortening pattern. This process relies on the support from multiple image analysis methods, including super-resolution volume reconstruction from MR image slices, segmentation of internal muscles, tracking the incompressible motion of tissue points using tagged images, propagation of muscle fiber directions over time, and calculation of strain in the line of action, etc. We evaluated the method on a control subject and two postglossectomy patients in a controlled speech task. The normal subject's tongue muscle activity shows high correspondence with the production of speech in different time instants, while both patients' muscle activities show different patterns from the control due to their resected tongues. This method shows potential for relating overall tongue motion to particular muscle activity, which may provide novel information for future clinical and scientific studies.

  14. A full range detector for the HIRRBS high resolution RBS magnetic spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Skala, Wayne G.; Haberl, Arthur W.; Bakhru, Hassaram; Lanford, William

    2013-04-19

    The UAlbany HIRRBS (High Resolution RBS) system has been updated for better use in rapid analysis. The focal plane detector now covers the full range from U down to O using a linear stepper motor to translate the 1-cm detector across the 30-cm range. Input is implemented with zero-back-angle operation in all cases. The chamber has been modified to allow for quick swapping of sample holders, including a channeling goniometer. A fixed standard surface-barrier detector allows for normal RBS simultaneously with use of the magnetic spectrometer. The user can select a region on the standard spectrum or can select an element edge or an energy point for collection of the expanded spectrum portion. The best resolution currently obtained is about 2-to-3 keV, probably representing the energy width of the incoming beam. Calibration is maintained automatically for any spectrum portion and any beam energy from 1.0 to 3.5 MeV. Element resolving power, sensitivity and depth resolution are shown using several examples. Examples also show the value of simultaneous conventional RBS.

  15. Surface-based analysis methods for high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Rez; Zhang, Qin; Darayan, Shayan; Dhandapani, Sankari; Katyal, Sucharit; Greene, Clint; Bajaj, Chandra; Ress, David

    2011-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become a popular technique for studies of human brain activity. Typically, fMRI is performed with >3-mm sampling, so that the imaging data can be regarded as two-dimensional samples that average through the 1.5—4-mm thickness of cerebral cortex. The increasing use of higher spatial resolutions, <1.5-mm sampling, complicates the analysis of fMRI, as one must now consider activity variations within the depth of the brain tissue. We present a set of surface-based methods to exploit the use of high-resolution fMRI for depth analysis. These methods utilize white-matter segmentations coupled with deformable-surface algorithms to create a smooth surface representation at the gray-white interface and pial membrane. These surfaces provide vertex positions and normals for depth calculations, enabling averaging schemes that can increase contrast-to-noise ratio, as well as permitting the direct analysis of depth profiles of functional activity in the human brain. PMID:22125419

  16. High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging Enhanced With Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles Measures Macrophage Burden in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Morishige, Kunio; Kacher, Daniel F.; Libby, Peter; Josephson, Lee; Ganz, Peter; Weissleder, Ralph; Aikawa, Masanori

    2010-01-01

    Background Macrophages contribute to the progression and acute complications of atherosclerosis. Macrophage imaging may serve as a biomarker to identify subclinical inflamed lesions, to predict future risk, and to aid in the assessment of novel therapies. Methods and Results To test the hypothesis that nanoparticle-enhanced, high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can measure plaque macrophage accumulation, we used 3-T MRI with a macrophage-targeted superparamagnetic nanoparticle preparation (monocrystalline iron oxide nanoparticles-47 [MION-47]) in cholesterol-fed New Zealand White rabbits 6 months after balloon injury. In vivo MRI visualized thickened abdominal aortas on both T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo images (T1 spin echo, 20 axial slices per animal; T2 spin echo, 28 slices per animal). Seventy-two hours after MION-47 injection, aortas exhibited lower T2 signal intensity compared with before contrast imaging (signal intensity ratio, aortic wall/muscle: before, 1.44±0.26 versus after, 0.95±0.22; 164 slices; P<0.01), whereas T1 spin echo images showed no significant change. MRI on ex vivo specimens provided similar results. Histological studies colocalized iron accumulation with immunoreactive macrophages in atheromata. The magnitude of signal intensity reduction on T2 spin echo in vivo images further correlated with macrophage areas in situ (150 slices; r=0.73). Treatment with rosuvastatin for 3 months yielded diminished macrophage content (P<0.05) and reversed T2 signal intensity changes (P<0.005). Signal changes in rosuvastatin-treated rabbits correlated with reduced macrophage burden (r=0.73). In vitro validation studies showed concentration-dependent MION-47 uptake by human primary macrophages. Conclusion The magnitude of T2 signal intensity reduction in high-resolution MRI after administration of superparamagnetic phagocytosable nanoparticles can assess macrophage burden in atheromata, providing a clinically translatable tool to identify

  17. Microfluidic platform combining droplets and magnetic tweezers: application to HER2 expression in cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Davide; Champ, Jérôme; Teste, Bruno; Serra, Marco; Malaquin, Laurent; Viovy, Jean-Louis; de Cremoux, Patricia; Descroix, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    The development of precision medicine, together with the multiplication of targeted therapies and associated molecular biomarkers, call for major progress in genetic analysis methods, allowing increased multiplexing and the implementation of more complex decision trees, without cost increase or loss of robustness. We present a platform combining droplet microfluidics and magnetic tweezers, performing RNA purification, reverse transcription and amplification in a fully automated and programmable way, in droplets of 250nL directly sampled from a microtiter-plate. This platform decreases sample consumption about 100 fold as compared to current robotized platforms and it reduces human manipulations and contamination risk. The platform’s performance was first evaluated on cell lines, showing robust operation on RNA quantities corresponding to less than one cell, and then clinically validated with a cohort of 21 breast cancer samples, for the determination of their HER2 expression status, in a blind comparison with an established routine clinical analysis. PMID:27157697

  18. Microfluidic platform combining droplets and magnetic tweezers: application to HER2 expression in cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Davide; Champ, Jérôme; Teste, Bruno; Serra, Marco; Malaquin, Laurent; Viovy, Jean-Louis; de Cremoux, Patricia; Descroix, Stephanie

    2016-05-01

    The development of precision medicine, together with the multiplication of targeted therapies and associated molecular biomarkers, call for major progress in genetic analysis methods, allowing increased multiplexing and the implementation of more complex decision trees, without cost increase or loss of robustness. We present a platform combining droplet microfluidics and magnetic tweezers, performing RNA purification, reverse transcription and amplification in a fully automated and programmable way, in droplets of 250nL directly sampled from a microtiter-plate. This platform decreases sample consumption about 100 fold as compared to current robotized platforms and it reduces human manipulations and contamination risk. The platform’s performance was first evaluated on cell lines, showing robust operation on RNA quantities corresponding to less than one cell, and then clinically validated with a cohort of 21 breast cancer samples, for the determination of their HER2 expression status, in a blind comparison with an established routine clinical analysis.

  19. High-resolution Measurement Of Magnetic Anomalies With An Unmanned Airship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzke, M.; Hofmeister, P.; Auster, H.; Hoerdt, A.; Glassmeier, K.

    2011-12-01

    High-resolution magnetic mapping of areas is a suitable way to determine location, geometry and physical parameters of disturbing objects that cause magnetic anomalies. Areas are often difficult to walk and handheld measurements can become costly. It can also be dangerous to enter areas where ordnance is suspected. In these cases it may be advantageous to use an aircraft to perform the measurement. We use a 6.5 m long unmanned airship. Compared to helicopters or gyrocopters, an advantage is that the damage in case of hazards is almost negligible. We made considerable efforts to construct a system that is easy to control without intense training under moderate wind conditions (up to 2 m/s wind speed). The airship has a mass of 10 kg and is powered by four electric motors with a maximum total power of 4.8 kW. Two of the rotors are used to control the altitude of the ship; the other two can be used to control direction and speed. The required energy is provided by four 4S1P Lithium-Polymer battery packs. Batteries are designed to provide a maximum of 125 A at 14.8 V. They have a capacity of 0.3 kWh and can be recharged in 20 minutes. The airship carries a differential GPS receiver that measures the position of the airship at 100 Hz with a precision of 10 cm. The distance to the ground is measured with ultrasonic sensors. A fluxgate magnetometer measures the magnetic field with an accuracy of 1 nT, also at 100 Hz. The flight path does not follow a rigid measuring grid but is a random walk, with roughly constant altitude to achieve a mean sensor position of 2 m above the ground. Thus, near-surface disturbing bodies are well resolved if their distance from each other is greater than 4 m. First measurements demonstrate the feasibility of the system. Future applications will be mid-scale measurements which are too large or too cumbersome for handheld measurements, and too small to justify the use of a manned helicopter.

  20. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance measurements in inhomogeneous magnetic fields: A fast two-dimensional J-resolved experiment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuqing; Lin, Yung-Ya; Cai, Shuhui; Yang, Yu; Sun, Huijun; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-03-14

    High spectral resolution in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a prerequisite for achieving accurate information relevant to molecular structures and composition assignments. The continuous development of superconducting magnets guarantees strong and homogeneous static magnetic fields for satisfactory spectral resolution. However, there exist circumstances, such as measurements on biological tissues and heterogeneous chemical samples, where the field homogeneity is degraded and spectral line broadening seems inevitable. Here we propose an NMR method, named intermolecular zero-quantum coherence J-resolved spectroscopy (iZQC-JRES), to face the challenge of field inhomogeneity and obtain desired high-resolution two-dimensional J-resolved spectra with fast acquisition. Theoretical analyses for this method are given according to the intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence treatment. Experiments on (a) a simple chemical solution and (b) an aqueous solution of mixed metabolites under externally deshimmed fields, and on (c) a table grape sample with intrinsic field inhomogeneity from magnetic susceptibility variations demonstrate the feasibility and applicability of the iZQC-JRES method. The application of this method to inhomogeneous chemical and biological samples, maybe in vivo samples, appears promising. PMID:26979686

  1. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance measurements in inhomogeneous magnetic fields: A fast two-dimensional J-resolved experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuqing; Lin, Yung-Ya; Cai, Shuhui; Yang, Yu; Sun, Huijun; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-03-01

    High spectral resolution in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a prerequisite for achieving accurate information relevant to molecular structures and composition assignments. The continuous development of superconducting magnets guarantees strong and homogeneous static magnetic fields for satisfactory spectral resolution. However, there exist circumstances, such as measurements on biological tissues and heterogeneous chemical samples, where the field homogeneity is degraded and spectral line broadening seems inevitable. Here we propose an NMR method, named intermolecular zero-quantum coherence J-resolved spectroscopy (iZQC-JRES), to face the challenge of field inhomogeneity and obtain desired high-resolution two-dimensional J-resolved spectra with fast acquisition. Theoretical analyses for this method are given according to the intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence treatment. Experiments on (a) a simple chemical solution and (b) an aqueous solution of mixed metabolites under externally deshimmed fields, and on (c) a table grape sample with intrinsic field inhomogeneity from magnetic susceptibility variations demonstrate the feasibility and applicability of the iZQC-JRES method. The application of this method to inhomogeneous chemical and biological samples, maybe in vivo samples, appears promising.

  2. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance measurements in inhomogeneous magnetic fields: A fast two-dimensional J-resolved experiment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuqing; Lin, Yung-Ya; Cai, Shuhui; Yang, Yu; Sun, Huijun; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-03-14

    High spectral resolution in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a prerequisite for achieving accurate information relevant to molecular structures and composition assignments. The continuous development of superconducting magnets guarantees strong and homogeneous static magnetic fields for satisfactory spectral resolution. However, there exist circumstances, such as measurements on biological tissues and heterogeneous chemical samples, where the field homogeneity is degraded and spectral line broadening seems inevitable. Here we propose an NMR method, named intermolecular zero-quantum coherence J-resolved spectroscopy (iZQC-JRES), to face the challenge of field inhomogeneity and obtain desired high-resolution two-dimensional J-resolved spectra with fast acquisition. Theoretical analyses for this method are given according to the intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence treatment. Experiments on (a) a simple chemical solution and (b) an aqueous solution of mixed metabolites under externally deshimmed fields, and on (c) a table grape sample with intrinsic field inhomogeneity from magnetic susceptibility variations demonstrate the feasibility and applicability of the iZQC-JRES method. The application of this method to inhomogeneous chemical and biological samples, maybe in vivo samples, appears promising.

  3. High resolution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance of a transmembrane peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J. H.; Auger, M.; Hodges, R. S.

    1995-01-01

    Although the strong 1H-1H dipolar interaction is known to result in severe homogeneous broadening of the 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of ordered systems, in the fluid phase of biological and model membranes the rapid, axially symmetric reorientation of the molecules about the local bilayer normal projects the dipolar interaction onto the motional symmetry axis. Because the linewidth then scales as (3 cos2 theta-1)/2, where theta is the angle between the local bilayer normal and the magnetic field, the dipolar broadening has been reduced to an "inhomogeneous" broadening by the rapid axial reorientation. It is then possible to obtain high resolution 1H-NMR spectra of membrane components by using magic angle spinning (MAS). Although the rapid axial reorientation effectively eliminates the homogeneous dipolar broadening, including that due to n = 0 rotational resonances, the linewidths observed in both lipids and peptides are dominated by low frequency motions. For small peptides the most likely slow motions are either a "wobble" or reorientation of the molecular diffusion axis relative to the local bilayer normal, or the reorientation of the local bilayer normal itself through surface undulations or lateral diffusion over the curved surface. These motions render the peptide 1H-NMR lines too broad to be observed at low spinning speeds. However, the linewidths due to these slow motions are very sensitive to spinning rate, so that at higher speeds the lines become readily visible. The synthetic amphiphilic peptide K2GL20K2A-amide (peptide-20) has been incorporated into bilayers of 1,2-di-d 27-myristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC-d54) and studied by high speed 1H-MAS-NMR. The linewidths observed for this transbilayer peptide, although too broad to be observable at spinning rates below -5 kHz, are reduced to 68 Hz at a spinning speed of 14 kHz (at 500C). Further improvements in spinning speed and modifications in sample composition designed to reduce

  4. Portable magnetic tweezers device enables visualization of the three-dimensional microscale deformation of soft biological materials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yali; Lin, Jun; Meschewski, Ryan; Watson, Erin; Valentine, Megan T

    2011-07-01

    We have designed and built a magnetic tweezers device that enables the application of calibrated stresses to soft materials while simultaneously measuring their microscale deformation using confocal microscopy. Unlike previous magnetic tweezers designs, our device is entirely portable, allowing easy use on microscopes in core imaging facilities or in collaborators' laboratories. The imaging capabilities of the microscope are unimpaired, enabling the 3-D structures of fluorescently labeled materials to be precisely determined under applied load. With this device, we can apply a large range of forces (~1-1200 pN) over micron-scale contact areas to beads that are either embedded within 3-D matrices or attached to the surface of thin slab gels. To demonstrate the usefulness of this instrument, we have studied two important and biologically relevant materials: polyacrylamide-based hydrogel films typical of those used in cell traction force microscopy, and reconstituted networks of microtubules, essential cytoskeletal filaments.

  5. Portable magnetic tweezers device enables visualization of the three-dimensional microscale deformation of soft biological materials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yali; Lin, Jun; Meschewski, Ryan; Watson, Erin; Valentine, Megan T

    2011-07-01

    We have designed and built a magnetic tweezers device that enables the application of calibrated stresses to soft materials while simultaneously measuring their microscale deformation using confocal microscopy. Unlike previous magnetic tweezers designs, our device is entirely portable, allowing easy use on microscopes in core imaging facilities or in collaborators' laboratories. The imaging capabilities of the microscope are unimpaired, enabling the 3-D structures of fluorescently labeled materials to be precisely determined under applied load. With this device, we can apply a large range of forces (~1-1200 pN) over micron-scale contact areas to beads that are either embedded within 3-D matrices or attached to the surface of thin slab gels. To demonstrate the usefulness of this instrument, we have studied two important and biologically relevant materials: polyacrylamide-based hydrogel films typical of those used in cell traction force microscopy, and reconstituted networks of microtubules, essential cytoskeletal filaments. PMID:21781050

  6. High-resolution magnetic field imaging with a nitrogen-vacancy diamond sensor integrated with a photonic-crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Fedotov, I V; Blakley, S M; Serebryannikov, E E; Hemmer, P; Scully, M O; Zheltikov, A M

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate high-resolution magnetic field imaging with a scanning fiber-optic probe which couples nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond to a high-numerical-aperture photonic-crystal fiber integrated with a two-wire microwave transmission line. Magnetic resonance excitation of NV centers driven by the microwave field is read out through optical interrogation through the photonic-crystal fiber to enable high-speed, high-sensitivity magnetic field imaging with sub 30 μm spatial resolution. PMID:26907400

  7. High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Angiography of the Mouse Brain: Application to Murine Focal Cerebral Ischemia Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Nicolau; Stirnimann, Roger; Bochelen, Damien

    1999-10-01

    Three-dimensional time-of-flight high-resolution magnetic resonance angiography was applied to visualize the cerebral vasculature of the mouse brain. In normal mice, angiograms of good quality, showing the essential details of the arterial cerebrovascular anatomy, could be obtained in only 2.5 min without the use of contrast agents. Signals from slowly flowing blood, e.g., in veins, could also be detected after administration of a blood pool contrast agent. The technique was applied to mouse models of permanent and transient brain ischemia, involving the occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. High-resolution magnetic resonance angiography proved to be a very useful tool for verifying the success of the occlusion in these models.

  8. Grooved multi-pole magnetic gratings for high-resolution positioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhi-Hao; Tseng, Bin-Hui; Chang, Ching; Wang, Sheng-Ching; Chin, Tsung-Shune; Sung, Cheng-Kuo

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic encoders are much advantageous for precision positioning specifically under harsh environments. The finer the magnetic pole-pitches of the magnetic scale in a magnetic encoder the higher the resolution of the encoder. In this paper, a grooved multi-pole magnetic grating (MPMG) is substituted for conventional non-structured magnetic scale. A MPMG with pole-pitch of 200 µm was prepared by photo-lithography and electro-deposition. Simulation was first done to attain the relationship among magnetic flux density, magnetic properties of electrodeposited alloy layers, magnetizing directions and the grating dimensions. The MPMG can be fully magnetized for use by just a single pulse in a solenoid coil. Magnetic properties were investigated in which CoNiP layers were electrodeposited under various current densities. Measured magnetic flux densities versus grating heights, magnetizing directions and detection gaps on magnetized MPMG validate the applicability of ultra-fine pitched MPMG.

  9. High-precision three-dimensional field mapping of a high resolution magnetic spectrometer for hypernuclear spectroscopy at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Yuu; Hashimoto, Osamu; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Nakamura, Satoshi N.; Ohtani, Atsushi; Okayasu, Yuichi; Oyamada, Masamichi; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Kato, Seigo; Matsui, Jumei; Sako, Katsuhisa; Brindza, Paul

    2015-09-01

    The High Resolution Kaon Spectrometer (HKS), which consists of two quadrupole magnets and one dipole magnet, was designed and constructed for high-resolution spectroscopy of hypernuclei using the (e,e'K+) reaction in Hall C, Jefferson Lab (JLab). It was used to analyze momenta of around 1.2 GeV/c K^+ s with a resolution of 2 ×10^-4 (FWHM). To achieve the target resolution, a full three-dimensional magnetic field measurement of each magnet was successfully performed, and a full three-dimensional magnetic field map of the HKS magnets was reconstructed. Using the measured field map, the initial reconstruction function was generated. The target resolution would be achieved via careful tuning of the reconstruction function of HKS with the p(e,e'K+)Lambda,Sigma^0 and C-12 (e,e'K+)12_Lambda B_g.s. reactions. After tuning of the initial reconstruction function generated from the measured map, the estimated HKS momentum resolution was 2.2×10^-4 (FWHM).

  10. High resolution T2(*)-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 3 Tesla using PROPELLER-EPI.

    PubMed

    Krämer, Martin; Reichenbach, Jürgen R

    2014-05-01

    We report the application of PROPELLER-EPI for high resolution T2(*)-weighted imaging with sub-millimeter in-plane resolution on a clinical 3 Tesla scanner. Periodically rotated blades of a long-axis PROPELLER-EPI sequence were acquired with fast gradient echo readout and acquisition matrix of 320 × 50 per blade. Images were reconstructed by using 2D-gridding, phase and geometric distortion correction and compensation of resonance frequency drifts that occurred during extended measurements. To characterize these resonance frequency offsets, short FID calibration measurements were added to the PROPELLER-EPI sequence. Functional PROPELLER-EPI was performed with volunteers using a simple block design of right handed finger tapping. Results indicate that PROPELLER-EPI can be employed for fast, high resolution T2(*)-weighted imaging provided geometric distortions and possible resonance frequency drifts are properly corrected. Even small resonance frequency drifts below 10 Hz as well as non-corrected geometric distortions degraded image quality substantially. In the initial fMRI experiment image quality and signal-to-noise ratio was sufficient for obtaining high resolution functional activation maps.

  11. Disturbance-free rapid solution exchange for magnetic tweezers single-molecule studies

    PubMed Central

    Le, Shimin; Yao, Mingxi; Chen, Jin; Efremov, Artem K.; Azimi, Sara; Yan, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule manipulation technologies have been extensively applied to studies of the structures and interactions of DNA and proteins. An important aspect of such studies is to obtain the dynamics of interactions; however the initial binding is often difficult to obtain due to large mechanical perturbation during solution introduction. Here, we report a simple disturbance-free rapid solution exchange method for magnetic tweezers single-molecule manipulation experiments, which is achieved by tethering the molecules inside microwells (typical dimensions–diameter (D): 40–50 μm, height (H): 100 μm; H:D∼2:1). Our simulations and experiments show that the flow speed can be reduced by several orders of magnitude near the bottom of the microwells from that in the flow chamber, effectively eliminating the flow disturbance to molecules tethered in the microwells. We demonstrate a wide scope of applications of this method by measuring the force dependent DNA structural transitions in response to solution condition change, and polymerization dynamics of RecA on ssDNA/SSB-coated ssDNA/dsDNA of various tether lengths under constant forces, as well as the dynamics of vinculin binding to α-catenin at a constant force (< 5 pN) applied to the α-catenin protein. PMID:26007651

  12. High-resolution local magnetic field models for the Martian South Pole from Mars Global Surveyor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plattner, A.; Simons, F. J.

    2015-09-01

    We present two high-resolution local models for the crustal magnetic field of the Martian south polar region. Models SP130 and SP130M were derived from three-component measurements made by Mars Global Surveyor at nighttime and at low altitude (<200 km). The availability area for these data covers the annulus between latitudes -76° and -87° and contains a strongly magnetized region (southern parts of Terra Sirenum) adjacent to weakly magnetized terrains (such as Prometheus Planum). Our localized field inversions take into account the region of data availability, a finite spectral bandlimit (spherical harmonic degree L = 130), and the varying satellite altitude at each observation point. We downward continue the local field solutions to a sphere of Martian polar radius 3376 km. While weakly magnetized areas in model SP130 contain inversion artifacts caused by strongly magnetized crust nearby, these artifacts are largely avoided in model SP130M, a mosaic of inversion results obtained by independently solving for the fields over individual subregions. Robust features of both models are magnetic stripes of alternating polarity in southern Terra Sirenum that end abruptly at the rim of Prometheus Planum, an impact crater with a weak or undetectable magnetic field. From a prominent and isolated dipole-like magnetic feature close to Australe Montes, we estimate a paleopole with a best fit location at longitude 207° and latitude 48°. From the abruptly ending magnetic field stripes, we estimate average magnetization values of up to 15 A/m.

  13. Specialized probes with nanowhisker structures for high resolution magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, M. V.; Belousov, K. I.; Mozharov, A. M.; Mukhin, I. S.; Golubok, A. O.

    2015-11-01

    Creation and study of specialized nanowhisker probes with magnetic coating are performed for high-precision imaging of various objects by means of atomic force and magnetic force microscopy. Thin layers of Ni and Co are deposited on the surface of nanowhisker structures to perform visualization of magnetic fields on the sample surface, in particular, structure of pits on a hard disk drive (HDD). It is revealed that probes with nanowhisker structures covered with magnetic coating due to their high aspect ratio demonstrate a higher spatial resolution and contrast of magnetic fields visualization in comparison with standard magnetic probes.

  14. Radiation-Induced Damage to Microstructure of Parotid Gland: Evaluation Using High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, Tomoko; Kodani, Kazuhiko; Michimoto, Koichi; Fujii, Shinya; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To elucidate the radiation-induced damage to the microstructure of the parotid gland using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Methods and Materials: High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the parotid gland was performed before radiotherapy (RT) and during the RT period or {<=}3 weeks after RT completion for 12 head-and-neck cancer patients using a 1.5-T scanner with a microscopy coil. The maximal cross-sectional area of the gland was evaluated, and changes in the internal architecture of the gland were assessed both visually and quantitatively. Results: Magnetic resonance images were obtained at a median parotid gland dose of 36 Gy (range, 11-64). According to the quantitative analysis, the maximal cross-sectional area of the gland was reduced, the width of the main duct was narrowed, and the intensity ratio of the main duct lumen to background was significantly decreased after RT (p <.0001). According to the visual assessment, the width of the main duct tended to narrow and the contrast of the duct lumen tended to be decreased, but no significant differences were noted. The visibility of the duct branches was unclear in 10 patients (p = .039), and the septum became dense in 11 patients (p = .006) after RT. Conclusion: High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive method of evaluating radiation-induced changes to the internal architecture of the parotid gland. Morphologic changes in the irradiated parotid gland were demonstrated during the RT course even when a relatively small dose was delivered to the gland.

  15. High-resolution hard x-ray magnetic imaging with dichroic ptychography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Claire; Scagnoli, Valerio; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Holler, Mirko; Wilhelm, Fabrice; Guillou, Francois; Rogalev, Andrei; Detlefs, Carsten; Menzel, Andreas; Raabe, Jörg; Heyderman, Laura J.

    2016-08-01

    Imaging the magnetic structure of a material is essential to understanding the influence of the physical and chemical microstructure on its magnetic properties. Magnetic imaging techniques, however, have been unable to probe three-dimensional micrometer-size systems with nanoscale resolution. Here we present the imaging of the magnetic domain configuration of a micrometer-thick FeGd multilayer with hard x-ray dichroic ptychography at energies spanning both the Gd L3 edge and the Fe K edge, providing a high spatial resolution spectroscopic analysis of the complex x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. With a spatial resolution reaching 45 nm , this advance in hard x-ray magnetic imaging is a first step towards the investigation of buried magnetic structures and extended three-dimensional magnetic systems at the nanoscale.

  16. High-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance experiments on highly radioactive ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnan, Ian; Cho, Herman; Weber, William J.; Scheele, Randall D.; Johnson, Nigel R.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

    2004-12-01

    A triple-containment magic-angle spinning rotor insert system has been developed and a sample handling procedure formulated for safely analyzing highly radioactive solids by high-resolution solid-state NMR. The protocol and containment system have been demonstrated for magic-angle spinning (MAS) experiments on ceramic samples containing 5-10 wt % 239Pu and 238Pu at rotation speeds of 3500 Hz. The technique has been used to demonstrate that MAS NMR experiments can be used to measure amorphous atomic number fractions produced by accelerated internal radiation damage. This will allow incorporated α-emitters with short half-lives to be used to model the long-term radiation tolerance of potential ceramic radioactive waste forms. This is an example of MAS NMR spectroscopy on samples containing fissionable isotopes.

  17. Plasma-assisted synthesis and high-resolution characterization of anisotropic elemental and bimetallic core–shell magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lotnyk, A

    2014-01-01

    Summary Magnetically anisotropic as well as magnetic core–shell nanoparticles (CS-NPs) with controllable properties are highly desirable in a broad range of applications. With this background, a setup for the synthesis of heterostructured magnetic core–shell nanoparticles, which relies on (optionally pulsed) DC plasma gas condensation has been developed. We demonstrate the synthesis of elemental nickel nanoparticles with highly tunable sizes and shapes and Ni@Cu CS-NPs with an average shell thickness of 10 nm as determined with scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements. An analytical model that relies on classical kinetic gas theory is used to describe the deposition of Cu shell atoms on top of existing Ni cores. Its predictive power and possible implications for the growth of heterostructured NP in gas condensation processes are discussed. PMID:24778973

  18. Simulation of High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Images on the IBM Blue Gene/L Supercomputer Using SIMRI

    DOE PAGES

    Baum, K. G.; Menezes, G.; Helguera, M.

    2011-01-01

    Medical imaging system simulators are tools that provide a means to evaluate system architecture and create artificial image sets that are appropriate for specific applications. We have modified SIMRI, a Bloch equation-based magnetic resonance image simulator, in order to successfully generate high-resolution 3D MR images of the Montreal brain phantom using Blue Gene/L systems. Results show that redistribution of the workload allows an anatomically accurate 256 3 voxel spin-echo simulation in less than 5 hours when executed on an 8192-node partition of a Blue Gene/L system.

  19. High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning 1H-NMR Metabolic Profiling of Nanoliter Biological Tissues at High Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Ju; Hu, Jian Z.; Burton, Sarah D.; Hoyt, David W.

    2013-03-05

    It is demonstrated that a high resolution magic angle spinning 1H-NMR spectrum of biological tissue samples with volumes as small as 150 nanoliters, or 0.15 mg in weight, can be acquired in a few minutes at 21.1 T magnetic field using a commercial 1.6 mm fast-MAS probe with minor modification of the MAS rotor. The strategies of sealing the samples inside the MAS rotor to avoid fluid leakage as well as the ways of optimizing the signal to noise are discussed.

  20. The Spokane fault, Washington, Imaged with High-Resolution Airborne Magnetic Data—Implications for the 2001 Spokane Earthquake Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakely, R. J.; Sherrod, B. L.; Weaver, C. S.; Stephenson, W. J.

    2015-12-01

    A newly acquired, high-resolution aeromagnetic survey provides insights into the near-surface lithology and tectonic structure throughout the greater Spokane area of northeastern Washington and northwestern Idaho. The region has a diverse array of magnetic lithologies, ranging from highly magnetic flood basalts of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) to weakly magnetic Mesozoic plutonic and metamorphic rocks. Faults within these magnetic lithologies produce linear magnetic anomalies that permit mapping of geologic structures over tens of kilometers. A high-amplitude, linear magnetic anomaly overlies the NW- striking Cheney fracture zone 37 km southwest of Spokane and is interpreted as a basaltic dike swarm intruded during the extensional event that opened the fractures, possibly feeder dikes for overlying CRBG flows. A sub-parallel anomaly near the town of Cheney reflects another dike swarm, likely formed during the same extensional event. The Latah fault is seen as a discontinuous alignment of magnetic anomalies extending north-northwestward from south of Spokane to the northern edge of the magnetic survey, a distance of 44 km. An arcuate, north-striking magnetic lineament ~20 km northeast of Spokane may mark the Newport fault, the detachment that promoted exhumation of the Priest River metamorphic complex. A subtle northeast-striking magnetic lineament passes through downtown Spokane and may indicate the trace of the Spokane fault, suspected of producing more than 105 small (M≤4), shallow earthquakes within Spokane city limits in 2001, accompanied by 15 mm of vertical uplift. This magnetic lineament extends 22 km and, to the northwest, merges with the lineament interpreted as the Newport fault. The Spokane fault may represent a reactivated section of the Newport fault that otherwise is not known to be active today. New LiDAR data from the Spokane area does not show distinct fault scarps associated with these magnetic anomalies, but a more comprehensive

  1. Experimental phase diagram of negatively supercoiled DNA measured by magnetic tweezers and fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Vlijm, Rifka; Mashaghi, Alireza; Bernard, Stéphanie; Modesti, Mauro; Dekker, Cees

    2015-02-21

    The most common form of DNA is the well-known B-structure of double-helix DNA. Many processes in the cell, however, exert force and torque, inducing structural changes to the DNA that are vital to biological function. Virtually all DNA in cells is in a state of negative supercoiling, with a DNA structure that is complex. Using magnetic tweezers combined with fluorescence imaging, we here study DNA structure as a function of negative supercoiling at the single-molecule level. We classify DNA phases based on DNA length as a function of supercoiling, down to a very high negative supercoiling density σ of -2.5, and forces up to 4.5 pN. We characterize plectonemes using fluorescence imaging. DNA bubbles are visualized by the binding of fluorescently labelled RPA, a eukaryotic single-strand-binding protein. The presence of Z-DNA, a left-handed form of DNA, is probed by the binding of Zα77, the minimal binding domain of a Z-DNA-binding protein. Without supercoiling, DNA is in the relaxed B-form. Upon going toward negative supercoiling, plectonemic B-DNA is being formed below 0.6 pN. At higher forces and supercoiling densities down to about -1.9, a mixed state occurs with plectonemes, multiple bubbles and left-handed L-DNA. Around σ = -1.9, a buckling transition occurs after which the DNA end-to-end length linearly decreases when applying more negative turns, into a state that we interpret as plectonemic L-DNA. By measuring DNA length, Zα77 binding, plectoneme and ssDNA visualisation, we thus have mapped the co-existence of many DNA structures and experimentally determined the DNA phase diagram at (extreme) negative supercoiling.

  2. High-Resolution Local Crustal Magnetic Field Modeling of the Martian South Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plattner, A.; Simons, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) satellite mission has brought us a wealth of information about the Martian magnetic field. Besides determining that Mars currently does not possess an active core field, MGS revealed that Mars contains an unexpectedly wide crustal magnetic field intensity range. In its orbit insertion, MGS performed a series of low altitude passes down to around 100 km above surface. During this mission phase the magnetic field measurements were active. In particular the nighttime low-altitude data are of high interest because they contain minimal noise from solar wind. Since these data only cover a small portion of the planet's surface, to date all Martian crustal magnetic field models blend the highest-quality data with lower quality measurements collected either at higher satellite altitudes or during daytime. In this contribution we present a locally inverted crustal magnetic field model for the Martian South Polar region calculated from only the highest-quality MGS data using locally constructed altitude vector Slepian functions. The South Polar region of Mars contains the southern part of the strongly magnetized Terra Sirenum and the area south of the Tharsis volcanic highland. Besides parts of planetary scale features our area of data coverage also contains local features such as the presumably volcanic Australe Montes and the Prometheus impact crater. These ingredients compose a highly heterogeneous crustal magnetic field. We show that even for our dense low-altitude low-noise data set the inversion for the crustal magnetic field of a weakly magnetized region adjacent to a region containing a strong magnetic field leads to artifacts in the weak region. With our local method we can avoid these artifacts by selecting subregions of roughly homogeneous field intensity and individually invert for crustal magnetic fields from data within only these subregions. This regional and subregional modeling allows us to reveal previously obscured crustal

  3. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOEpatents

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2004-12-28

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

  4. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOEpatents

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2003-12-30

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

  5. Assessment of mechanical properties of adherent living cells by bead micromanipulation: comparison of magnetic twisting cytometry vs optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Valérie M; Hénon, Sylvie; Planus, Emmanuelle; Fodil, Redouane; Balland, Martial; Isabey, Daniel; Gallet, François

    2002-08-01

    We compare the measurements of viscoelastic properties of adherent alveolar epithelial cells by two micromanipulation techniques: (i) magnetic twisting cytometry and (ii) optical tweezers, using microbeads of same size and similarly attached to F-actin. The values of equivalent Young modulus E, derived from linear viscoelasticity theory, become consistent when the degree of bead immersion in the cell is taken into account. E-values are smaller in (i) than in (ii): approximately 34-58 Pa vs approximately 29-258 Pa, probably because higher stress in (i) reinforces nonlinearity and cellular plasticity. Otherwise, similar relaxation time constants, around 2 s, suggest similar dissipative mechanisms.

  6. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOEpatents

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2003-11-25

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the biological object in a main magnetic field and in a radio frequency field, the main magnetic field having a static field direction; rotating the biological object at a rotational frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. According to another embodiment, the radio frequency is pulsed to provide a sequence capable of producing a spectrum that is substantially free of spinning sideband peaks.

  7. Ultra-High-Resolution Observations of MHD Waves in Photospheric Magnetic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jess, D. B.; Verth, G.

    2016-02-01

    This chapter reviews the recent observations of waves and oscillations manifesting in fine-scale magnetic structures in the solar photosphere, which are often interpreted as the "building blocks' of the magnetic Sun. The authors found, through phase relationships between the various waveforms, that small-scale magnetic bright points (MBPs) in the photosphere demonstrated signatures of specific magnetoacoustic waves, in particular the sausage and kink modes. Modern magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the lower solar atmosphere clearly show how torsional motions can easily be induced in magnetic elements in the photosphere through the processes of vortical motions and/or buffeting by neighboring granules. The authors detected significant power associated with high-frequency horizontal motions, and suggested that these cases may be especially important in the creation of a turbulent environment that efficiently promotes Alfvén wave dissipation.

  8. High-Resolution Seismic-Reflection and Marine Magnetic Data Along the Hosgri Fault Zone, Central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sliter, Ray W.; Triezenberg, Peter J.; Hart, Patrick E.; Watt, Janet T.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Scheirer, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected high-resolution shallow seismic-reflection and marine magnetic data in June 2008 in the offshore areas between the towns of Cayucos and Pismo Beach, Calif., from the nearshore (~6-m depth) to just west of the Hosgri Fault Zone (~200-m depth). These data are in support of the California State Waters Mapping Program and the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the Pacific Gas & Electric Co. and the U.S. Geological Survey. Seismic-reflection and marine magnetic data were acquired aboard the R/V Parke Snavely, using a SIG 2Mille minisparker seismic source and a Geometrics G882 cesium-vapor marine magnetometer. More than 550 km of seismic and marine magnetic data was collected simultaneously along shore-perpendicular transects spaced 800 m apart, with an additional 220 km of marine magnetometer data collected across the Hosgri Fault Zone, resulting in spacing locally as smallas 400 m. This report includes maps of the seismic-survey sections, linked to Google Earth software, and digital data files showing images of each transect in SEG-Y, JPEG, and TIFF formats, as well as preliminary gridded marine-magnetic-anomaly and residual-magnetic-anomaly (shallow magnetic source) maps.

  9. High-Resolution B Dot Probe for Measuring 3D Magnetic Fields in the MOCHI Labjet Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuara Rosales, Manuel; von der Linden, Jens; You, Setthivoine

    2014-10-01

    The MOCHI Labjet experiment will use a triple electrode planar plasma gun to explore canonical helicity transport in laboratory astrophysical jets. Canonical helicity transport suggests that destabilizing magnetic energy can be converted into stabilizing shear flows at two-fluid spatial scales li ~c/wpi . A high-resolution . B probe array, capable of measuring magnetic field dynamics at length and time scales important to canonical helicity transport is being built. The probe array consists of three tridents, made of 5 . 13 mm OD and 4 . 32 mm ID stainless steel tubes of 102 cm length, enclosing a total of 1215 commercial inductor chips with a three axis spatial resolution of 11 mm. The average value for the effective NA of each inductor chip is 1 . 21 .10-4 m2. The probe array lays in a plane perpendicular to the jet, and is axially translatable. This work is supported by US DOE Grant DE-SC0010340.

  10. Local high-resolution crustal magnetic field analysis from satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plattner, Alain; Simons, Frederik J.

    2016-04-01

    Planetary crustal magnetic fields are key to understanding a planet or moon's structure and history. Due to satellite orbit parameters such as aerobraking (Mars) or only partial coverage (Mercury), or simply because of the strongly heterogeneous crustal field strength, satellite data of planetary magnetic fields vary regionally in their signal-to noise ratio and data coverage. To take full advantage of data quality within one region of a planet or moon without diluting the data with lower quality measurements outside of that region we resort to local methods. Slepian functions are linear combinations of spherical harmonics that provide local sensitivity to structure. Here we present a selection of crustal magnetic field models obtained from vector-valued variable-altitude satellite observations using an altitude-cognizant gradient-vector Slepian approach. This method is based on locally maximizing energy concentration within the region of data availability while simultaneously bandlimiting the model in terms of its spherical-harmonic degree and minimizing noise amplification due to downward continuation. For simple regions such as spherical caps, our method is computationally efficient and allows us to calculate local crustal magnetic field solutions beyond spherical harmonic degree 800, if the data permit. We furthermore discuss extensions of the method that are optimized for the analysis and separation of internal and external magnetic fields.

  11. High-resolution paleomagnetic and rock magnetic study from Kveithola trough mouth fans, North-western Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caricchi, Chiara; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Macrì, Patrizia; Giulia Lucchi, Renata

    2016-04-01

    In the last decades, several geomagnetic paleosecular variation (PSV) for the past millennia, have been reconstructed from paleomagnetic and archeomagnetic data, in order to understand the variability of the geomagnetic field. PSV data from the Artic region could be of critical importance for geomagnetic field models. In particular, sedimentary sequences with suitable lithological character and good paleomagnetic properties may provide valuable empirical inputs for the reconstruction of the geomagnetic field variability over geological times. In this work, we present a preliminary analysis of high-resolution paleomagnetic and rock magnetic measurements carried out on 4 sediment cores collected in glaciomarine silty-clay sequences from the continental shelf and slope of the Kveithola trough-mouth fan, on the continental margin of northwestern Barents Sea. This investigation has been conducted in the framework of the project CORIBAR, with the general aim of defining the timing and the paleoenvironmental changes linked to the last deglaciation. The analyzed sediments are characterized by good palaeomagnetic properties, carry a well-defined characteristic remanent magnetization and have a valuable potential to reconstruct the paleosecular variation (PSV) of the geomagnetic field, including relative paleointensity (RPI) variations. Moreover, the palaeomagnetic and rock magnetic trends have been correlated at high resolution with the previous data obtained from other cores collected in the same area and analyzed in the former SVAIS and EGLACOM projects. The new paleomagnetic and rock magnetic data allowed to refine reconstructions of geomagnetic field variation at high northern latitudes during the last 20 ka and provided a chronological framework to reconstruct the sedimentological and the paleoenvironmental evolutions for the continental margin of the NW Barents Sea during the main pulses of glaciers fusion and retreat.

  12. Metabolomic Analysis of Rat Brain by High Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Tissue Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Norbert W.; Béraud, Evelyne; Cozzone, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of gene expression on the RNA and protein levels have long been used to explore biological processes underlying disease. More recently, genomics and proteomics have been complemented by comprehensive quantitative analysis of the metabolite pool present in biological systems. This strategy, termed metabolomics, strives to provide a global characterization of the small-molecule complement involved in metabolism. While the genome and the proteome define the tasks cells can perform, the metabolome is part of the actual phenotype. Among the methods currently used in metabolomics, spectroscopic techniques are of special interest because they allow one to simultaneously analyze a large number of metabolites without prior selection for specific biochemical pathways, thus enabling a broad unbiased approach. Here, an optimized experimental protocol for metabolomic analysis by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy is presented, which is the method of choice for efficient quantification of tissue metabolites. Important strengths of this method are (i) the use of crude extracts, without the need to purify the sample and/or separate metabolites; (ii) the intrinsically quantitative nature of NMR, permitting quantitation of all metabolites represented by an NMR spectrum with one reference compound only; and (iii) the nondestructive nature of NMR enabling repeated use of the same sample for multiple measurements. The dynamic range of metabolite concentrations that can be covered is considerable due to the linear response of NMR signals, although metabolites occurring at extremely low concentrations may be difficult to detect. For the least abundant compounds, the highly sensitive mass spectrometry method may be advantageous although this technique requires more intricate sample preparation and quantification procedures than NMR spectroscopy. We present here an NMR protocol adjusted to rat brain analysis; however, the same protocol can be applied to other tissues with minor

  13. High Resolution Phase-Sensitive Magnetomotive Optical Coherence Microscopy for Tracking Magnetic Microbeads and Cellular Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Crecea, Vasilica; Graf, Benedikt W.; Kim, Taewoo; Popescu, Gabriel; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a real-time multimodal near-infrared imaging technology that tracks externally induced axial motion of magnetic microbeads in single cells in culture. The integrated multimodal imaging technique consists of phase-sensitive magnetomotive optical coherence microscopy (MM-OCM) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM).MPMis utilized for the visualization of multifunctional fluorescent and magnetic microbeads, while MM-OCM detects, with nanometer-scale sensitivity, periodic displacements of the microbeads induced by the modulation of an external magnetic field. Magnetomotive signals are measured from mouse macrophages, human breast primary ductal carcinoma cells, and human breast epithelial cells in culture, and validated with full-field phase-sensitive microscopy. This methodology demonstrates the capability for imaging controlled cell dynamics and has the potential for measuring cell biomechanical properties, which are important in assessing the health and pathological state of cells. PMID:25400496

  14. High Resolution Phase-Sensitive Magnetomotive Optical Coherence Microscopy for Tracking Magnetic Microbeads and Cellular Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Crecea, Vasilica; Graf, Benedikt W; Kim, Taewoo; Popescu, Gabriel; Boppart, Stephen A

    2014-03-01

    We present a real-time multimodal near-infrared imaging technology that tracks externally induced axial motion of magnetic microbeads in single cells in culture. The integrated multimodal imaging technique consists of phase-sensitive magnetomotive optical coherence microscopy (MM-OCM) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM).MPMis utilized for the visualization of multifunctional fluorescent and magnetic microbeads, while MM-OCM detects, with nanometer-scale sensitivity, periodic displacements of the microbeads induced by the modulation of an external magnetic field. Magnetomotive signals are measured from mouse macrophages, human breast primary ductal carcinoma cells, and human breast epithelial cells in culture, and validated with full-field phase-sensitive microscopy. This methodology demonstrates the capability for imaging controlled cell dynamics and has the potential for measuring cell biomechanical properties, which are important in assessing the health and pathological state of cells.

  15. High-Resolution Magnetic Analysis of the Nussloch Loess-Palaeosol Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. N.; Lagroix, F.

    2012-12-01

    By performing a detailed rock magnetic analysis of loess-palaeosol sequences, it is possible to identify pedogenic, diagenetic and depositional processes while constraining climate variations (both local and regional). The Nussloch loess-palaeosol sequences are located on the Odenwald plateau near the right bank of the Rhine Valley in Germany (49°18'59''N; 8°43'54''E). This study uses a 13m section of the P4 sequence which has an age range of approximately 18kyrs to 33kyrs; with a tephra layer (Eltviller Tuff) marked at ~21kyrs. Using a 2cm sub-sampling resolution, the subsequent rock magnetic study of the P4 sequence includes on all samples hysteresis properties, their derived parameters, IRMs and ARMs and low-temperature magnetic properties on representative samples. The sequence divides magnetically into a series of 7 minor zones, identified from the hysteresis parameters, underlying 3 major zones from which also the stratigraphy shows: 1. fine-grained homogeneous loess from 0-8m, 2. coarser-grained homogeneous loess from 8-11m, 3. prominent interbedded gleys from 11-13m. High-coercivity grains dominate a fairly constant mineralogy in Zone 1 whereas in Zone 2 there is a transition into softer magnetic minerals. Zone 3 has a wide range of magnetic properties, a consequence of rapid changes in the stratigraphy. The bulk magnetic signal is fairly weak (χferri ranges from 5.19×10-8 to 1.55×10-7 m3kg-1 with the higher mean in Zone 2) and has a significant contribution of hard magnetic minerals with an absence of SP particles. Even though the signal from iron-bearing minerals dominates, the paramagnetic signal increases with depth, especially below 11m. In terms of the deposited material, the marked gleys generally show lower values of χ, MRS, MS and S-ratios and higher values of coercivity with respect to the unaltered loess. Not only is there a greater abundance of magnetic minerals in the loess but also the minerals are magnetically softer compared to those

  16. High-resolution near-bottom vector magnetic anomalies over Raven Hydrothermal Field, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivey, Maurice A.; Johnson, H. Paul; Salmi, Marie S.; Hutnak, Michael

    2014-10-01

    High-resolution, near-bottom vector magnetic data were collected by remotely operated vehicle Jason over the Raven hydrothermal vent field (47°57.3'N 129°5.75'W) located north of Main Endeavour vent field on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The survey was part of a comprehensive heat flow study of the Raven site using innovative thermal blanket technology to map the heat flux and crustal fluid pathways around a solitary hydrothermal vent field. Raven hydrothermal activity is presently located along the western axial valley wall, while additional inactive hydrothermal deposits are found to the NW on the upper rift valley wall. Magnetic inversion results show discrete areas of reduced magnetization associated with both active and inactive hydrothermal vent deposits that also show high conductive heat flow. Higher spatial variability in the heat flow patterns compared to the magnetization is consistent with the heat flow reflecting the currently active but ephemeral thermal environment of fluid flow, while crustal magnetization is representative of the static time-averaged effect of hydrothermal alteration. A general NW to SE trend in reduced magnetization across the Raven area correlates closely with the distribution of hydrothermal deposits and heat flux patterns and suggests that the fluid circulation system at depth is likely controlled by local crustal structure and magma chamber geometry. Magnetic gradient tensor components computed from vector magnetic data improve the resolution of the magnetic anomaly source and indicate that the hydrothermally altered zone directly beneath the Raven site is approximately 15 × 106 m3 in volume.

  17. Recognition of magnetic anomalies in Ground Conductivity Meter soil surveys: a high-resolution field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Søe, Niels Emil; Bjergsted Pedersen, Jesper; Auken, Esben; Humlekrog Greve, Mogens; Nørgaard, Henrik; Tjelldén, Anna K. E.; Munch Kristiansen, Søren

    2013-04-01

    Ground conductivity measurements are widely used in soil surveys, where the objective is to map an element or property, which gives a strong conductive signal compared to the surroundings. It can be used in mapping of soil contamination, mineral exploration and soil mapping, where properties like porosity, clay-content and salinity of groundwater are explored. However, interpretations get poor, when too many variables, e.g. metals, affect the measurements. To improve interpretation of the GCM dataset, we investigated confounding signals from buried metals as magnetic anomalies by a magnetometer. The small field test site in Illerup Ådal, Denmark (2 ha) was situated on peat and clayey soil, where buried metal was expected due to previous archaeological investigations. Both GCM and magnetometer measurements were on-the-go behind an ATV and logged together with DGPS positioning. Instruments were a DUALEM-21 and a Geometrics G-858 Caesium magnetometer. Data were collected in separately runs, since close proximity of the instruments can affect the magnetometer data. Data were collected on 12 lines, which were spaced 5 m apart. The frequency of readings was 4 times s-1 at a speed of approximately 12 km h-1. A 1D multi-layer model was used for the inversion of EM data, providing detailed information of the resistivity structure in the upper 2-3 m of the soil. All 12 lines were driven in both directions during sampling of magnetic data, to check if measurements are influenced by the direction of the magnetometer. Time for collecting both datasets was 90 minutes. The combined dataset showed one area (200 m2) with a magnetic anomaly, which correlated with a relatively low apparent resistivity (approximately 27 Ohm m), while the adjacent areas had a higher apparent resistivity (>50 Ohm m). The inversion model showed that a relatively low resistivity (20-30 Ohm m) was present at all depths in the area with the magnetic anomaly. However, the model showed even lower resistivity

  18. Molecular motions in supercooled and glassy ibuprofen: deuteron magnetic resonance and high-resolution rheology study.

    PubMed

    Bauer, S; Storek, M; Gainaru, C; Zimmermann, H; Böhmer, R

    2015-04-16

    Using deuteron nuclear magnetic resonance, the molecular motions of specifically isotope-labeled ibuprofen were probed at the carboxylic group and at the methin group next to it. Spin relaxometry revealed slight differences between the molecular motions of the two isotopomers that are rationalized with reference to the hydrogen bonding of the COOH moiety. In the glassy state, a small-angle jump process among about four sites, related to the so-called γ-process, was identified using stimulated-echo spectroscopy. Indications for a Debye-like process, previously found to leave a weak signature in the dielectric loss, could not unambiguously be detected in magnetic resonance or shear mechanical experiments carried out for supercooled liquid ibuprofen.

  19. Concept for a high-resolution thermometer utilizing the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, P. J.; Dipirro, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    A thermometer using the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth in superconductors is described which has the potential for temperature resolution, when using a dc SQUID readout, on the order of 1 pK. One such device has been fabricated and characterized to demonstrate proof of concept. It consists of primary and secondary coils of NbTi wire wound on a copper toroidal core on which a thin layer of In (Tc = 3.4 K) has been deposited. The temperature dependence of the mutual inductance, M(T), or self-inductance, is used to detect changes in temperature. Measurements of M(T) have been made with an ac excitation of the primary for various frequencies and peak magnetic field strengths. Estimates of ultimate temperature resolution are given.

  20. High resolution neurography of the lumbosacral plexus on 3T magneteic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cejas, C; Escobar, I; Serra, M; Barroso, F

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance neurography is a technique that complements clinical and electrophysiological study of the peripheral nerves and brachial and lumbosacral plexuses. Numerous focal processes (inflammatory, traumatic, primary tumors, secondary tumors) and diffuse processes (diabetic polyneuropathy, chronic idiopathic demyelinating polyneuropathy due to amyloidosis or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease) can involve the lumbosacral plexus. This article reviews the anatomy of the lumbosacral plexus, describes the technique for neurography of the plexus at our institution, and shows the diverse diseases that affect it.

  1. New Developments at the XMaS Beamline For Magnetic and High Resolution Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, P.B.J.; Bouchenoire, L.; Brown, S.D.; Mannix, D.; Paul, D.F.; Lucas, C.; Kervin, J.; Cooper, M.J.; Arakawa, P.; Laughon, G.

    2004-05-12

    We report here on a number of developments that include enhancements of the sample environment on the XMaS beamline and the flux available at low energy. A 4 Tesla superconducting magnet has been designed to fit within the Euler cradle of a six circle Huber diffractometer, allowing scattering in both horizontal and vertical planes. The geometry of the magnet allows the application of longitudinal, transverse horizontal, and vertical fields. A further conventional magnet ({approx} 0.1 T) to minimize air absorption at low energies ({approx} 3KeV) has been designed for two circle applications, such as reflectivity. A novel in-vacuum slit screen has been developed, also minimizing absorption at low energies. New equipment for performing in-situ studies of surfaces in the electrochemical environment has been developed to allow control of the solution and sample temperature over the region of -5C to 80C. Preliminary experiments on the surface reconstructions of Au(111) in an electrolyte have been performed, whilst commissioning at the same time a MAR CCD detector for the beamline.

  2. CONNECTING THE SUN'S HIGH-RESOLUTION MAGNETIC CARPET TO THE TURBULENT HELIOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Cranmer, Steven R.; Van Ballegooijen, Adriaan A.; Woolsey, Lauren N.

    2013-04-20

    The solar wind is connected to the Sun's atmosphere by flux tubes that are rooted in an ever-changing pattern of positive and negative magnetic polarities on the surface. Observations indicate that the magnetic field is filamentary and intermittent across a wide range of spatial scales. However, we do not know to what extent the complex flux-tube topology seen near the Sun survives as the wind expands into interplanetary space. In order to study the possible long-distance connections between the corona and the heliosphere, we developed new models of turbulence-driven solar wind acceleration along empirically constrained field lines. We used a potential field model of the quiet Sun to trace field lines into the ecliptic plane with unprecedented spatial resolution at their footpoints. For each flux tube, a one-dimensional model was created with an existing wave/turbulence code that solves equations of mass, momentum, and energy conservation from the photosphere to 4 AU. To take account of stream-stream interactions between flux tubes, we used those models as inner boundary conditions for a time-steady magnetohydrodynamic description of radial and longitudinal structure in the ecliptic. Corotating stream interactions smear out much of the smallest-scale variability, making it difficult to see how individual flux tubes on granular or supergranular scales can survive out to 1 AU. However, our models help clarify the level of ''background'' variability with which waves and turbulent eddies should be expected to interact. Also, the modeled fluctuations in magnetic field magnitude were seen to match measured power spectra quite well.

  3. High-resolution magnetic penetration depth and inhomogeneities in locally noncentrosymmetric SrPtAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landaeta, J. F.; Taylor, S. V.; Bonalde, I.; Rojas, C.; Nishikubo, Y.; Kudo, K.; Nohara, M.

    2016-02-01

    We present a magnetic-penetration-depth study on polycrystalline and granular samples of SrPtAs, a pnictide superconductor with a hexagonal structure containing PtAs layers that individually break inversion symmetry (local noncentrosymmetry). Compact samples show a clear-cut s -wave-type BCS behavior, which we consider to be the intrinsic penetration depth of SrPtAs. Granular samples display a sample-dependent second diamagnetic drop, attributed to the intergrain coupling. Our experimental results point to a nodeless isotropic superconducting energy gap in SrPtAs, which puts strong constraints on the driven mechanism for superconductivity and the order parameter symmetry of this compound.

  4. Magnetic dynamics studied by high-resolution electron spectroscopy and time-resolved electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Rajeswari

    Future information technology requires an increased magnetically encoded data density and novel electromagnetic modes of data transfer. While to date magnetic properties are observed and characterized mostly statically, the need emerges to monitor and capture their fast dynamics. In this talk, I will focus on the spin dynamics i.e. spin wave excitations and the dynamics of a new topological distribution of spins termed ``skyrmions''. Wave packets of spin waves offer the unique capability to transport a quantum bit, the spin, without the transport of charge or mass. Here, large wave-vector spin waves are of particular interest as they admit spin localization within a few nanometers. By using our recently developed electron energy loss spectrometer, we could study such spin waves in ultrathin films with an unprecedented energy resolution of 4 meV. By virtue of the finite penetration depth of low energy electrons, spin waves localized at interfaces between a substrate and a thin capping layer can be been studied yielding information about the exchange coupling between atoms at the interface. The quantization of spin waves with wave vectors perpendicular to the film gives rise to standing modes to which EELS has likewise access. Such studies when carried out as function of the film thickness again yield information on the layer dependence of the exchange coupling. Magnetic skyrmions are promising candidates as information carriers in logic or storage devices. Currently, little is known about the influence of disorder, defects, or external stimuli on the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the skyrmion lattice. In this talk, I will describe the dynamical role of disorder in a large and flat thin film of Cu2OSeO3, exhibiting a skyrmion phase in an insulating material. We image up to 70,000 skyrmions by means of cryo-Lorentz Transmission Electron Microscopy as a function of the applied magnetic field. In the skyrmion phase, dislocations are shown to cause the

  5. [High resolution (3 T) magnetic resonance neurography of the sciatic nerve].

    PubMed

    Cejas, C; Aguilar, M; Falcón, L; Caneo, N; Acuña, M C

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) neurography refers to a set of techniques that enable the structure of the peripheral nerves and nerve plexuses to be evaluated optimally. New two-dimensional and three-dimensional neurographic sequences, in particular in 3T scanners, achieve excellent contrast between the nerve and perineural structures. MR neurography makes it possible to distinguish between the normal fascicular pattern of the nerve and anomalies like inflammation, trauma, and tumor that can affect nerves. In this article, we describe the structure of the sciatic nerve, its characteristics on MR neurography, and the most common diseases that affect it.

  6. A scanning Hall probe microscope for high resolution magnetic imaging down to 300 mK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khotkevych, V. V.; Milošević, M. V.; Bending, S. J.

    2008-12-01

    We present the design, construction, and performance of a low-temperature scanning Hall probe microscope with submicron lateral resolution and a large scanning range. The detachable microscope head is mounted on the cold flange of a commercial H3e-refrigerator (Oxford Instruments, Heliox VT-50) and operates between room temperature and 300 mK. It is fitted with a three-axis slip-stick nanopositioner that enables precise in situ adjustment of the probe location within a 6×6×7 mm3 space. The local magnetic induction at the sample surface is mapped with an easily changeable microfabricated Hall probe [typically GsAs/AlGaAs or AlGaAs/InGaAs/GaAs Hall sensors with integrated scanning tunnel microscopy (STM) tunneling tips] and can achieve minimum detectable fields ⩾10 mG/Hz1/2. The Hall probe is brought into very close proximity to the sample surface by sensing and controlling tunnel currents at the integrated STM tip. The instrument is capable of simultaneous tunneling and Hall signal acquisition in surface-tracking mode. We illustrate the potential of the system with images of superconducting vortices at the surface of a Nb thin film down to 372 mK, and also of labyrinth magnetic-domain patterns of an yttrium iron garnet film captured at room temperature.

  7. SOLAR MAGNETIC TRACKING. III. APPARENT UNIPOLAR FLUX EMERGENCE IN HIGH-RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, D. A.; DeForest, C. E.; Hagenaar, H. J.; Parnell, C. E.; Welsch, B. T.

    2010-09-10

    Understanding the behavior of weak magnetic fields near the detection limit of current instrumentation is important for determining the flux budget of the solar photosphere at small spatial scales. Using 0.''3-resolution magnetograms from the Solar Optical Telescope's Narrowband Filter Imager (NFI) on the Hinode spacecraft, we confirm that the previously reported apparent unipolar magnetic flux emergence seen in intermediate-resolution magnetograms is indeed the coalescence of previously existing flux. We demonstrate that similar but smaller events seen in NFI magnetograms are also likely to correspond to the coalescence of previously existing weak fields. The uncoalesced flux, detectable only in the ensemble average of hundreds of these events, accounts for 50% of the total flux within 3 Mm of the detected features. The spatial scale at which apparent unipolar emergence can be directly observed as coalescence remains unknown. The polarity of the coalescing flux is more balanced than would be expected given the imbalance of the data set, however without further study we cannot speculate whether this implies that the flux in the apparent unipolar emergence events is produced by a granulation-scale dynamo or is recycled from existing field.

  8. A high resolution electrostatic time-of-flight spectrometer with adiabatic magnetic collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonn, J.; Bornschein, L.; Degen, B.; Otten, E. W.; Weinheimer, Ch

    1999-01-01

    A new type of spectrometer for low energy charged particles is presented. It consists of an adiabatic magnetic collimation and two filters: an electrostatic retarding potential to set a lower limit (high pass) and a time-of-flight analysis to reject high energy charged particles (low pass). Both filters are only limited in their resolution by the efficiency of the adiabatic magnetic collimation. The proof of this principle is demonstrated by a pilot measurement on the K conversion line of 83mKr. Possible applications to pulsed and continuous electron sources are discussed with the emphasis on the investigation of the β spectrum of T 2 to deduce information on the mass of the electron antineutrino and possible anomalies in the β spectrum. In this context design parameters of a spectrometer with a resolving power of E/ ΔE=20 000 and a luminosity of A ΔΩ/4 π=4 cm2 for 20 keV electrons are given.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging and high-resolution computed tomography in tumors of the lung and the mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Casamassima, F; Villari, N; Fargnoli, R; Di Lollo, S; Cellerini, A; Ruggiero, C

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and high resolution computed tomography (CT) have been compared in 37 patients who had expansive processes of the lung and the mediastinum. MR imaging and CT scanning gave identical results in 32 patients; in 5 patients, CT scanning has proved more useful in evaluating the stag e of primary lung tumors. MR imaging often gives more information about the actual size of the tumor, and the involvement of close structures, although it does not modify staging of the tumor. MR imaging has the advantage to differentiate hilar adenopathy from blood vessel structures. Evaluation of T2 relaxing time (that we have performed in the same location of thin-needle biopsy aspiration), however, did not prove to be of diagnostic significance; this indicates that MR imaging at the moment is not suitable for tissue typification. PMID:3344352

  10. High-resolution (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy pattern recognition of fish oil capsules.

    PubMed

    Aursand, Marit; Standal, Inger B; Axelson, David E

    2007-01-10

    13C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy, in conjunction with multivariate analysis of commercial fish oil-related health food products, have been used to provide discrimination concerning the nature, composition, refinement, and/or adulteration or authentication of the products. Supervised (probabilistic neural networks, PNN) and unsupervised (principal component analysis, PCA; Kohonen neural networks; generative topographic mapping, GTM) pattern recognition techniques were used to visualize and classify samples. Simple PCA score plots demonstrated excellent, but not totally unambiguous, class distinctions, whereas Kohonen and GTM visualization provided better results. Quantitative class predictions with accuracies >95% were achieved with PNN analysis. Trout, salmon, and cod oils were completely and correctly classified. Samples reported to be salmon oils and cod liver oils did not cluster with true salmon and cod liver oil samples, indicating mislabeling or adulteration.

  11. [High resolution 3T magnetic resonance neurography of the peroneal nerve].

    PubMed

    Pineda, D; Barroso, F; Cháves, H; Cejas, C

    2014-01-01

    Peroneal neuropathy is the most common mononeuropathy of the lower limbs. The causes of peroneal neuropathy include trauma, tumors of the nerve and nerve sheath, entrapment, and others like perineurioma, fibromatosis, lymphoma, and intraneural and externeural ganglia. The diagnosis is based on clinical manifestations and electrophysiological studies. Nowadays, however, magnetic resonance (MR) neurography is a complementary diagnostic technique that can help determine the location and cause of peroneal neuropathy. In this article, we describe the MR anatomy of the peroneal nerve, its relations, and the muscles it innervates. We also discuss the clinical and electrophysiological manifestations of peroneal neuropathy, describe the technical parameters used at our institution, and illustrate the MR appearance of various diseases that involve the peroneal nerve.

  12. Study of hydrogen in coals, polymers, oxides, and muscle water by nuclear magnetic resonance; extension of solid-state high-resolution techniques. [Hydrogen molybdenum bronze

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, L.M.

    1981-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been an important analytical and physical research tool for several decades. One area of NMR which has undergone considerable development in recent years is high resolution NMR of solids. In particular, high resolution solid state /sup 13/C NMR spectra exhibiting features similar to those observed in liquids are currently achievable using sophisticated pulse techniques. The work described in this thesis develops analogous methods for high resolution /sup 1/H NMR of rigid solids. Applications include characterization of hydrogen aromaticities in fossil fuels, and studies of hydrogen in oxides and bound water in muscle.

  13. Monitoring gold nanoparticle distribution with high resolution using photo-magnetic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luk, Alex T.; Nouizi, Farouk; Marks, Michael; Kart, Turkay; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2016-03-01

    One major advantage of using gold nanoparticles is the possibility of tuning their absorption peak by modifying their surface plasma resonance. They are proven to be a promising multi-functional platform that can be used for many imaging and therapeutic applications. As a true multi-modality imaging technique, Photo-Magnetic Imaging (PMI) has a great potential to monitor the distribution of gold nanoparticles non-invasively with MR resolution. With a simple addon of a continuous wave laser to an MRI system, PMI uses the laser induced temperature increase, measured by MR Thermometry (MRT), to provide tissue optical absorption maps at MR resolution. PMI utilizes a Finite Element Method (FEM) based algorithm to solve the combined diffusion and bio-heat equations. This system of combined equations models the photon distribution in the tissue and heat generation due to the absorption of the light and consequent heat diffusion. The key characteristic of PMI is that its spatial resolution is preserved at any depth as long as the temperature change within the imaged medium is detectable by MRT. Agar phantoms containing gold nanoparticles are used to validate the ability of PMI in monitoring their distribution. To make PMI suitable for diagnostic purposes, the laser powers has been kept under the American National Standard Institute maximum skin exposure limits in this study.

  14. A moving hum filter to suppress rotor noise in high-resolution airborne magnetic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Doll, W.E.; Miller, R.D.; Gamey, T.J.; Emond, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    A unique filtering approach is developed to eliminate helicopter rotor noise. It is designed to suppress harmonic noise from a rotor that varies slightly in amplitude, phase, and frequency and that contaminates aero-magnetic data. The filter provides a powerful harmonic noise-suppression tool for data acquired with modern large-dynamic-range recording systems. This three-step approach - polynomial fitting, bandpass filtering, and rotor-noise synthesis - significantly reduces rotor noise without altering the spectra of signals of interest. Two steps before hum filtering - polynomial fitting and bandpass filtering - are critical to accurately model the weak rotor noise. During rotor-noise synthesis, amplitude, phase, and frequency are determined. Data are processed segment by segment so that there is no limit on the length of data. The segment length changes dynamically along a line based on modeling results. Modeling the rotor noise is stable and efficient. Real-world data examples demonstrate that this method can suppress rotor noise by more than 95% when implemented in an aeromagnetic data-processing flow. ?? 2005 Society of Exploration Geophysicists. All rights reserved.

  15. High Resolution Numerical Model of Optically Heated Float-Zone Crystal Growth with Applied Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yue; Houchens, Brent

    2008-11-01

    During optically heated float-zone crystal growth processing, thermocapillary forces drive a flow in the melt. This steady, axisymmetric base flow is susceptible to instabilities, resulting in defects as the final crystal is solidified from the melt. To damp these instabilities, a magnetic field is employed. The stability of this flow, neglecting buoyancy, is studied with a full-zone model. The velocity and temperature fields are calculated by a spectral collocation method using Chebyshev polynomials as basis functions. Obtaining accurate base flows is crucial to the success of the subsequent stability analysis. A 2nd order vorticity transport representation is compared with a 4th order stream function representation. At low Hartmann numbers, the results are in good agreement. However, as resolution demands increase, the 2nd order vorticity transport formulation yields a better numerical representation by avoiding large computational errors caused by 4th and 3rd derivatives of Chebyshev terms in the 4th order stream function representation. This allows the stability analysis to be carried out at larger Hartmann numbers, where the critical thermocapillary Reynolds number is much greater.

  16. Global Twist of Sunspot Magnetic Fields Obtained from High-Resolution Vector Magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Venkatakrishnan, P.; Sankarasubramanian, K.

    2009-09-01

    The presence of fine structures in sunspot vector magnetic fields has been confirmed from Hinode as well as other earlier observations. We studied 43 sunspots based on the data sets taken from ASP/DLSP, Hinode (SOT/SP), and SVM (USO). In this Letter, (1) we introduce the concept of signed shear angle (SSA) for sunspots and establish its importance for non-force-free fields. (2) We find that the sign of global α (force-free parameter) is well correlated with that of the global SSA and the photospheric chirality of sunspots. (3) Local α patches of opposite signs are present in the umbra of each sunspot. The amplitude of the spatial variation of local α in the umbra is typically of the order of the global α of the sunspot. (4) We find that the local α is distributed as alternately positive and negative filaments in the penumbra. The amplitude of azimuthal variation of the local α in the penumbra is approximately an order of magnitude larger than that in the umbra. The contributions of the local positive and negative currents and α in the penumbra cancel each other giving almost no contribution for their global values for the whole sunspot. (5) Arc-like structures (partial rings) with a sign opposite to that of the dominant sign of α of the umbral region are seen at the umbral-penumbral boundaries of some sunspots. (6) Most of the sunspots studied belong to the minimum epoch of the 23rd solar cycle and do not follow the so-called hemispheric helicity rule.

  17. GLOBAL TWIST OF SUNSPOT MAGNETIC FIELDS OBTAINED FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION VECTOR MAGNETOGRAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Venkatakrishnan, P.; Sankarasubramanian, K. E-mail: pvk@prl.res.in

    2009-09-10

    The presence of fine structures in sunspot vector magnetic fields has been confirmed from Hinode as well as other earlier observations. We studied 43 sunspots based on the data sets taken from ASP/DLSP, Hinode (SOT/SP), and SVM (USO). In this Letter, (1) we introduce the concept of signed shear angle (SSA) for sunspots and establish its importance for non-force-free fields. (2) We find that the sign of global {alpha} (force-free parameter) is well correlated with that of the global SSA and the photospheric chirality of sunspots. (3) Local {alpha} patches of opposite signs are present in the umbra of each sunspot. The amplitude of the spatial variation of local {alpha} in the umbra is typically of the order of the global {alpha} of the sunspot. (4) We find that the local {alpha} is distributed as alternately positive and negative filaments in the penumbra. The amplitude of azimuthal variation of the local {alpha} in the penumbra is approximately an order of magnitude larger than that in the umbra. The contributions of the local positive and negative currents and {alpha} in the penumbra cancel each other giving almost no contribution for their global values for the whole sunspot. (5) Arc-like structures (partial rings) with a sign opposite to that of the dominant sign of {alpha} of the umbral region are seen at the umbral-penumbral boundaries of some sunspots. (6) Most of the sunspots studied belong to the minimum epoch of the 23rd solar cycle and do not follow the so-called hemispheric helicity rule.

  18. High-Resolution Ground-Based Magnetic Survey of a Buried Volcano: Anomaly B, Amargosa Desert, NV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIlrath, J.; George, O.; Farrell, A. K.; Gallant, E.; Tavarez, S.; Downs, C. M.; Njoroge, M. W.; Wilson, J. A.; Connor, C.; Connor, L.; Kruse, S.

    2015-12-01

    Aeromagnetic surveys over the Amargosa Desert, Nevada, have revealed the presence of several magnetic anomalies that have been interpreted to be caused by buried volcanoes; many of these anomalies have been confirmed by drilling. We present data collected from a high-resolution, ground-based magnetic survey over Anomaly B, the largest of these anomalies, that reveal details about a buried crater and its associated lava flow, not previously observed in the aeromagnetic surveys. These details provide insight into the nature of the eruption and the volume of this buried volcano. Results from non-linear inversion demarcate a crater with a diameter of approximately 700 m and a base approximately 150 m below the ground surface. Coupled with well log data, the inversion results suggest a total volume for the Anomaly B crater area and associated lava flows of approximately 1.0 ± 0.4 km3, based on an estimated lava flow field area of 24 km2 and a lava thickness of 42 ± 15 m.

  19. Beamline 9.3.2 - a high-resolution, bend-magnet beamline with circular polarization capability

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J.; Hussain, Z.; Howells, M.R.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.2 is a high resolution, SGM beamline on an ALS bending magnet with access to photon energies from 30-1500 eV. Features include circular polarization capability, a rotating chamber platform that allows switching between experiments without breaking vacuum, an active feedback system that keeps the beam centered on the entrance slit of the monochromator, and a bendable refocusing mirror. The beamline optics consist of horizontally and vertically focussing mirrors, a Spherical Grating Monochromator (SGM) with movable entrance and exit slits, and a bendable refocussing mirror. In addition, a movable aperature has been installed just upstream of the vertically focussing mirror which can select the x-rays above or below the plane of the synchrotron storage ring, allowing the user to select circularly or linearly polarized light. Circularly polarized x-rays are used to study the magnetic properties of materials. Beamline 9.3.2 can supply left and right circularly polarized x-rays by a computer controlled aperture which may be placed above or below the plane of the synchrotron storage ring. The degree of linear and circular polarization has been measured and calibrated.

  20. Very-high-resolution seismic and magnetic investigations of a chemical munition dumpsite in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missiaen, Tine; Feller, Pascal

    2008-09-01

    Very-high-resolution (VHR) seismic and magnetic investigations were carried out over a chemical munition dumpsite in the Bornholm Basin, south-western Baltic Sea. The main goal of the investigations was to image the shallow internal structure of the dumpsite and to map the lateral and vertical distribution of the dumped war material. The shallow geology was imaged in great detail on the seismic data. Seven seismic-stratigraphic units were identified, related to different stages in the Holocene and late-glacial history. A large number of diapir-like features were observed that most likely represent fluid expulsion phenomena. Four shipwrecks were identified in the dumpsite area. The wrecks have partly sunk into the soft upper sediments, their height above the sea floor reaching no more than 2 m. Seismic and magnetic data indicate the presence of a large number of buried objects. In most cases there is a good correlation between the seismic and magnetic data sets. The objects are generally buried no deeper than 1 to 2 m. Their size varies between 1.5 and 5 m, occasionally up to 10 m. Shallow pits in the sea bed are likely due to the impact of dumping. The data confirm the wide variety of dumped war material ranging from bombs and shells to encasements and containers. The distribution of the buried objects seems rather heterogeneous, with locally high object concentrations surrounded by areas of lower object density. The results of this case study demonstrate the benefit of complementary, concurrent geophysical investigations for munition dumpsite research. Finally this will yield a better assessment of the current status of the dumpsite and the possible ecological risks related to the dumped war material.

  1. High-resolution magnetic stratigraphy at Bosso Stirpeto (Marche, Italy): Anomalous geomagnetic field behaviour during early Pliensbachian (early Jurassic) times?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speranza, Fabio; Parisi, Guido

    2007-04-01

    We report on a high-resolution magnetostratigraphic analysis of a continuous 97.5 m thick upper Sinemurian-Pliensbachian pelagic limestone section ("Corniola" formation) exposed at Bosso Stirpeto (Marche, Italy), where detailed ammonite and calcareous nannofossil biozonation is available. The early Pliensbachian (Carixian) is notably expanded (74.35 m excluding few slumps), implying an average sedimentation rate of 28.6 m/Myr. Both the Carixian boundaries and three additional intra-Carixian ammonite zone boundaries are tied up with polarity magnetozones. We find that a normal polarity characterizes the latest Sinemurian and Sinemurian/Carixian boundary, while a reverse polarity (punctuated by three short normal polarity magnetozones) dominates the Carixian. In the lower Carixian sediments, two 3.39-4.65 m thick (excluding the slumps) intervals are characterized by persistent transitional (between 45°N and 45°S) virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) latitudes, but this seems not to be the result of mineral magnetic artefacts, antipodal polarity averaging, or sedimentary layer disturbance. Thus we suggest that in two ˜ 120 and 160 kyr-long time intervals during the early Carixian, the VGPs were predominantly confined at tropical-equatorial latitudes of the Earth. Such geomagnetic feature has never been documented before elsewhere in other time intervals, and requires further paleomagnetic investigation of other expanded Carixian section to be confirmed. The magnetic polarity profile (including the transitional direction intervals) of Bosso Stirpeto may compare with that from similarly expanded Carixian sections (Breggia, Switzerland), and cores (Montcornet, Paris basin). However, the matching of magnetic polarity zones requires a significant aging of some parts of the magnetostratigraphic profile at both Breggia and Montcornet.

  2. High-resolution AUV-based near bottom magnetic surveys at Palinuro volcanic complex (Southern Tyrrhenian Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocchi, L.; Plunkett, S.; Augustin, N.; Petersen, S.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we present the preliminary results of new near bottom magnetic datasets collected during the recent POS442 cruise using the autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) Abyss. The Southern Tyrrhenian basin is characterized by deep seafloor interspersed with huge volcanic seamounts (e.g Vavilov and Marsili and those associated to the Aeolian volcanic arc), which were formed during eastward roll back of the Apennine subduction system. These submarine edifices often are affected by significant hydrothermal activity and associated mineral deposits such as those observed at Marsili, Palinuro and Panarea. The western part of the Palinuro volcanic complex is characterized by a half rim of a caldera-like structure and hosts hydrothermal barite-pyrite deposits. Until recently, the full extent of the hydrothermal system remained poorly defined, as exploration has been limited to a few specific sites. In November 2012, a set of high resolution near seafloor geophysical surveys were carried out using GEOMAR's AUV Abyss to attempt to better define the hydrothermal mineralization at Palinuro. Five AUV dives were performed, mapping a total area of 3.7 km2 over the western part of Palinuro. Geomar's Abyss AUV (a Remus6000 class vehicle) was equipped with an Applied Physics Systems flux gate magnetometer, writing to a stand alone data logger, powered by the AUV's main batteries. The 5 dives were performed within the same area but with different primary geophysical sensors (multibeam, sidescan sonar, subbottom profiler), survey altitudes above seafloor (100m, 40m) and line spacing (150m, 100m, 20m). Magnetic data was collect on all five dives. At the beginning of each dive, the AUV performed a set of calibration manoeuvres, involving a 360 degree heading variation, a set of three upwards/downwards pitches, and three port and starboard yaws. This magnetic data reveals the magnetization features of the seafloor in unprecedented detail, highlighting a complex pattern mostly due to

  3. High resolution 23Na-nuclear magnetic resonance study of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kwan, C Y; Seo, Y; Ito, H; Murakami, M; Watari, H

    1987-06-01

    The intracellular Na+ content of washed erythrocytes from stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) and Wistar-Kyoto normotensive rats (WKY) was measured by a high resolution 23Na-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique using a non-permeant aqueous shift reagent, dysprosium triethylenetetramine hexaacetic acid, Dy(TTHA)3-. The initial intracellular Na+ of freshly isolated and washed erythrocytes was very low (approximately 5 mmol/l) and increased progressively with prolonged incubation in isotonic salt solution at 37 degrees C. There was no significant difference in the erythrocyte Na+ concentration between SHRSP and WKY over the entire period of measurement, nor was any difference detected in their osmotic fragility or total cellular volume, although the osmotic fragility decreased with incubation time. The high energy phosphate metabolites were also studied in the same erythrocytes by 31P-NMR. The level of intracellular ATP decreased with incubation at 37 degrees C but showed no difference between the SHRSP and WKY samples. Inclusion of 1 mmol/l ouabain in the incubation medium substantially retarded the breakdown of intracellular ATP and resulted in a concomitant increase in intracellular Na+. However, neither the ouabain-sensitive nor the ouabain-insensitive component of Na+ influx altered in SHRSP erythrocytes compared with WKY erythrocytes in paired experiments. Our results do not support the hypothesis that altered Na+ transport, resulting in an increase in erythrocyte Na+ concentration, is associated with spontaneous hypertension. PMID:3611783

  4. Evaluation of Cancer Metabolomics Using ex vivo High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HRMAS) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS).

    PubMed

    Fuss, Taylor L; Cheng, Leo L

    2016-03-22

    According to World Health Organization (WHO) estimates, cancer is responsible for more deaths than all coronary heart disease or stroke worldwide, serving as a major public health threat around the world. High resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has demonstrated its usefulness in the identification of cancer metabolic markers with the potential to improve diagnosis and prognosis for the oncology clinic, due partially to its ability to preserve tissue architecture for subsequent histological and molecular pathology analysis. Capable of the quantification of individual metabolites, ratios of metabolites, and entire metabolomic profiles, HRMAS MRS is one of the major techniques now used in cancer metabolomic research. This article reviews and discusses literature reports of HRMAS MRS studies of cancer metabolomics published between 2010 and 2015 according to anatomical origins, including brain, breast, prostate, lung, gastrointestinal, and neuroendocrine cancers. These studies focused on improving diagnosis and understanding patient prognostication, monitoring treatment effects, as well as correlating with the use of in vivo MRS in cancer clinics.

  5. Evaluation of Cancer Metabolomics Using ex vivo High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HRMAS) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS)

    PubMed Central

    Fuss, Taylor L.; Cheng, Leo L.

    2016-01-01

    According to World Health Organization (WHO) estimates, cancer is responsible for more deaths than all coronary heart disease or stroke worldwide, serving as a major public health threat around the world. High resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has demonstrated its usefulness in the identification of cancer metabolic markers with the potential to improve diagnosis and prognosis for the oncology clinic, due partially to its ability to preserve tissue architecture for subsequent histological and molecular pathology analysis. Capable of the quantification of individual metabolites, ratios of metabolites, and entire metabolomic profiles, HRMAS MRS is one of the major techniques now used in cancer metabolomic research. This article reviews and discusses literature reports of HRMAS MRS studies of cancer metabolomics published between 2010 and 2015 according to anatomical origins, including brain, breast, prostate, lung, gastrointestinal, and neuroendocrine cancers. These studies focused on improving diagnosis and understanding patient prognostication, monitoring treatment effects, as well as correlating with the use of in vivo MRS in cancer clinics. PMID:27011205

  6. Combined use of high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition profiling and high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for investigation of antidiabetic principles in crude plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Kongstad, Kenneth T; Özdemir, Ceylan; Barzak, Asmah; Wubshet, Sileshi G; Staerk, Dan

    2015-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder affecting millions of people worldwide, and new drug leads or functional foods containing selective α-glucosidase inhibitors are needed. Crude extract of 24 plants were assessed for α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Methanol extracts of Cinnamomum zeylanicum bark, Rheum rhabarbarum peel, and Rheum palmatum root and ethyl acetate extracts of C. zeylanicum bark, Allium ascalonicum peel, and R. palmatum root showed IC50 values below 20 μg/mL. Subsequently, high-resolution α-glucosidase profiling was used in combination with high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for identification of metabolites responsible for the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Quercetin (1) and its dimer (2), trimer (3), and tetramer (4) were identified as main α-glucosidase inhibitors in A. ascalonicum peel, whereas (E)-piceatannol 3'-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (5), (E)-rhapontigenin 3'-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (6), (E)-piceatannol (8), and emodin (12) were identified as main α-glucosidase inhibitors in R. palmatum root.

  7. Combined use of high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition profiling and high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for investigation of antidiabetic principles in crude plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Kongstad, Kenneth T; Özdemir, Ceylan; Barzak, Asmah; Wubshet, Sileshi G; Staerk, Dan

    2015-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder affecting millions of people worldwide, and new drug leads or functional foods containing selective α-glucosidase inhibitors are needed. Crude extract of 24 plants were assessed for α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Methanol extracts of Cinnamomum zeylanicum bark, Rheum rhabarbarum peel, and Rheum palmatum root and ethyl acetate extracts of C. zeylanicum bark, Allium ascalonicum peel, and R. palmatum root showed IC50 values below 20 μg/mL. Subsequently, high-resolution α-glucosidase profiling was used in combination with high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for identification of metabolites responsible for the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Quercetin (1) and its dimer (2), trimer (3), and tetramer (4) were identified as main α-glucosidase inhibitors in A. ascalonicum peel, whereas (E)-piceatannol 3'-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (5), (E)-rhapontigenin 3'-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (6), (E)-piceatannol (8), and emodin (12) were identified as main α-glucosidase inhibitors in R. palmatum root. PMID:25652946

  8. Rectal cancer staging: focus on the prognostic significance of the findings described by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Dieguez, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution (HR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an indispensable tool for multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) addressing rectal cancer. It provides anatomic information for surgical planning and allows patients to be stratified into different groups according to the risk of local and distant recurrence. One of the objectives of the MDT is the preoperative identification of high-risk patients who will benefit from neoadjuvant treatment. For this reason, the correct evaluation of the circumferential resection margin (CRM), the depth of tumor spread beyond the muscularis propria, extramural vascular invasion and nodal status is of the utmost importance. Low rectal tumors represent a special challenge for the MDT, because decisions seek a balance between oncologic safety, in the pursuit of free resection margins, and the patient's quality of life, in order to preserve sphincter function. At present, the exchange of information between the different specialties involved in dealing with patients with rectal cancer can rank the contribution of colleagues, auditing their work and incorporating knowledge that will lead to a better understanding of the pathology. Thus, beyond the anatomic description of the images, the radiologist's role in the MDT makes it necessary to know the prognostic value of the findings that we describe, in terms of recurrence and survival, because these findings affect decision making and, therefore, the patients' life. In this review, the usefulness of HR MRI in the initial staging of rectal cancer and in the evaluation of neoadjuvant treatment, with a focus on the prognostic value of the findings, is described as well as the contribution of HR MRI in assessing patients with suspected or confirmed recurrence of rectal cancer. PMID:23876415

  9. Cryogenic phased-array for high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); assessment of clinical and research applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Flora S.

    Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging is one of the most powerful tools in diagnostic medicine for soft tissue imaging. Image acquisition techniques and hardware receivers are very important in achieving high contrast and high resolution MR images. An aim of this dissertation is to design single and multi-element room and cryogenic temperature arrays and make assessments of their signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and SNR gain. In this dissertation, four sets of MR receiver coils are built. They are the receiver-only cryo-coils that are not commercially available. A tuning and matching circuit is attached to each coil. The tuning and matching circuits are simple; however, each device component has to operate at a high magnetic field and cryogenic temperature environment. Remote DC bias of the varactor controls the tuning and matching outside the scanner room. Active detuning of the resonator is done by two p-i-n junction (PIN) diodes. Cooling of the receiver is done by a customized liquid nitrogen cryostat. The first application is to build a 3-Tesla 2x1 horseshoe counter-rotating current (CRC) cryogenic array to image the tibia in a human body. With significant increase in SNR, the surface coil should deliver high contrast and resolution images that can show the trabecular bone and bone marrow structure. This structural image will be used to model the mechanical strength of the bone as well as bone density and chance of fracture. The planar CRC is a unique design of this surface array. The second application is to modify the coil design to 7-Tesla to study the growth of infant rhesus monkey eyes. Fast scan MR images of the infant monkey heads are taken for monitoring shapes of their eyeballs. The monkeys are induced with shortsightedness by eye lenses, and they are scanned periodically to get images of their eyeballs. The field-of-view (FOV) of these images is about five centimeters and the area of interest is two centimeters deep from the surface. Because of these reasons

  10. Magnetic Tweezers-based 3D Microchannel Electroporation for High-Throughput Gene Transfection in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wei-Ching; Chiang, Chi-Ling; Gallego-Perez, Daniel; Yang, Zhaogang; Lu, Wu; Byrd, John C.; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Lee, L. James.; Sooryakumar, Ratnasingham

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel, high throughput magnetic-tweezers based 3D microchannel electroporation system capable of transfecting 40,000 cells/cm2 on a single-chip for gene therapy, regenerative medicine and intracellular detection of target mRNA for screening cellular heterogeneity. A single cell or an ordered array of individual cells are remotely guided by programmable magnetic fields to poration sites with high (> 90%) cell alignment efficiency to enable various transfection reagents to be delivered simultaneously into the cells. The present technique, in contrast to the conventional vacuum based approach, is significantly gentler on the cellular membrane yielding > 90% cell viability and, moreover, allows transfected cells to be transported for further analysis. Illustrating the versatility of the system, the GATA2 molecular beacon was delivered into leukemia cells to detect the regulation level of the GATA2 gene that is associated with the initiation of leukemia. The uniform delivery and a sharp contrast of fluorescence intensity between GATA2 positive and negative cells demonstrate key aspects of the platform for gene transfer, screening and detection of targeted intracellular markers in living cells. PMID:25469659

  11. NAP1-assisted nucleosome assembly on DNA measured in real time by single-molecule magnetic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Vlijm, Rifka; Smitshuijzen, Jeremy S J; Lusser, Alexandra; Dekker, Cees

    2012-01-01

    While many proteins are involved in the assembly and (re)positioning of nucleosomes, the dynamics of protein-assisted nucleosome formation are not well understood. We study NAP1 (nucleosome assembly protein 1) assisted nucleosome formation at the single-molecule level using magnetic tweezers. This method allows to apply a well-defined stretching force and supercoiling density to a single DNA molecule, and to study in real time the change in linking number, stiffness and length of the DNA during nucleosome formation. We observe a decrease in end-to-end length when NAP1 and core histones (CH) are added to the dsDNA. We characterize the formation of complete nucleosomes by measuring the change in linking number of DNA, which is induced by the NAP1-assisted nucleosome assembly, and which does not occur for non-nucleosomal bound histones H3 and H4. By rotating the magnets, the supercoils formed upon nucleosome assembly are removed and the number of assembled nucleosomes can be counted. We find that the compaction of DNA at low force is about 56 nm per assembled nucleosome. The number of compaction steps and associated change in linking number indicate that NAP1-assisted nucleosome assembly is a two-step process. PMID:23050009

  12. Magnetic tweezers-based 3D microchannel electroporation for high-throughput gene transfection in living cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Lingqian; Howdyshell, Marci; Liao, Wei-Ching; Chiang, Chi-Ling; Gallego-Perez, Daniel; Yang, Zhaogang; Lu, Wu; Byrd, John C; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Lee, L James; Sooryakumar, Ratnasingham

    2015-04-17

    A novel high-throughput magnetic tweezers-based 3D microchannel electroporation system capable of transfecting 40 000 cells/cm(2) on a single chip for gene therapy, regenerative medicine, and intracellular detection of target mRNA for screening cellular heterogeneity is reported. A single cell or an ordered array of individual cells are remotely guided by programmable magnetic fields to poration sites with high (>90%) cell alignment efficiency to enable various transfection reagents to be delivered simultaneously into the cells. The present technique, in contrast to the conventional vacuum-based approach, is significantly gentler on the cellular membrane yielding >90% cell viability and, moreover, allows transfected cells to be transported for further analysis. Illustrating the versatility of the system, the GATA2 molecular beacon is delivered into leukemia cells to detect the regulation level of the GATA2 gene that is associated with the initiation of leukemia. The uniform delivery and a sharp contrast of fluorescence intensity between GATA2 positive and negative cells demonstrate key aspects of the platform for gene transfer, screening and detection of targeted intracellular markers in living cells.

  13. High-Resolution Mapping of Lunar Crustal Magnetic Fields: Correlations with Albedo Markings of the Reiner Gamma Class

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.; Yingst, A.; Mitchell, D. L.; Lin, R. P.; Acuna, M.; Binder, A.

    1999-01-01

    During the last eight months of the Lunar Prospector mission (December 1999-July 1999), the spacecraft was placed in a relatively low-altitude (15-30-km perapsis), near-polar orbit that allowed high-resolution mapping of crustal magnetic fields. We report here initial studies of the correlation of locally strong magnetic anomalies with unusual, swirl-like albedo markings of the Reiner Gamma class. Based on this correlation, which is known from earlier studies of Apollo subsatellite magnetometer data, it has been proposed that the swirls represent regions whose higher albedos have been preserved via deflection of the solar-wind ion bombardment by strong crustal fields. This model in turn depends on the hypothesis that solar-wind implanted H is at least one component of the process that optically matures exposed silicate surfaces in the inner solar system . Specifically, it is hypothesized that implanted H acts as an effective reducing agent to enhance the rate of production of nanophase metallic Fe particles from preexisting silicates during micrometeoroid impacts. According to the model, the curvilinear shapes of these albedo markings are caused, at least in part, by the geometry of ion deflections in a magnetic field. The improved resolution and coverage of the Prospector data allow more detailed mapping of the fields, especially on the lunar farside. This permits a more quantitative test of whether all albedo markings of this class are associated with strong local magnetic fields.Only if the latter condition is met can the solar-wind deflection hypothesis he valid. The basic procedure for mapping crustal magnetic fields using Lunar Prospector magnetometer data follows that developed for analysis of Apollo subsatellite magnetometer data. The specific mapping steps are (1) selection of mission time intervals suitable for mapping crustal fields; these are limited essentially either to times when the Moon is in a lobe of the geomagnetic tail or to times when the Moon

  14. Triple aldose reductase/α-glucosidase/radical scavenging high-resolution profiling combined with high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for identification of antidiabetic constituents in crude extract of Radix Scutellariae.

    PubMed

    Tahtah, Yousof; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Wubshet, Sileshi G; Nyberg, Nils T; Jønsson, Louise H; Jäger, Anna K; Qinglei, Sun; Staerk, Dan

    2015-08-21

    In this work, development of a new microplate-based high-resolution profiling assay using recombinant human aldose reductase is presented. Used together with high-resolution radical scavenging and high-resolution α-glucosidase assays, it provided the first report of a triple aldose reductase/α-glucosidase/radical scavenging high-resolution inhibition profile - allowing proof of concept with Radix Scutellariae crude extract as a polypharmacological herbal drug. The triple bioactivity high-resolution profiles were used to pinpoint bioactive compounds, and subsequent structure elucidation was performed with hyphenated high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The only α-glucosidase inhibitor was baicalein, whereas main aldose reductase inhibitors in the crude extract were baicalein and skullcapflavone II, and main radical scavengers were ganhuangemin, viscidulin III, baicalin, oroxylin A 7-O-glucuronide, wogonoside, baicalein, wogonin, and skullcapflavone II.

  15. Observing dynamics of chromatin fibers in Xenopus egg extracts by single DNA manipulation using a transverse magnetic tweezer setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jie; Skoko, Dunja; Marko, John; Maresca, Tom; Heald, Rebecca

    2005-03-01

    We have studied assembly of chromatin on single DNAs using Xenopus egg extracts and a specially designed magnetic tweezer setup which generates controlled force in the focal plane of the objective, allowing us to visualize and measure DNA extension under a wide range of constant tensions. We found, in the absence of ATP, interphase extracts assembled nucleosomes against DNA tensions of up to 3.5 piconewtons (pN). We observed force-induced disassembly and opening-closing fluctuations indicating our experiments were in mechano-chemical equilibrium. We found that the ATP-depleted reaction can do mechanical work of 27 kcal/mol per nucleosome, providing a measurement of the free energy difference between core histone octamers on and off DNA. Addition of ATP leads to highly dynamic behavior: time courses show processive runs of assembly and disassembly of not observed in the -ATP case, with forces of 2 pN leading to nearly complete fiber disassembly. Our study shows that ATP hydrolysis plays a major role in nucleosome rearrangement and removal, and suggests that chromatin in vivo may be subject to continual assembly and disassembly.

  16. Mechanical unfolding of human telomere G-quadruplex DNA probed by integrated fluorescence and magnetic tweezers spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Long, Xi; Parks, Joseph W; Bagshaw, Clive R; Stone, Michael D

    2013-02-01

    Single-molecule techniques facilitate analysis of mechanical transitions within nucleic acids and proteins. Here, we describe an integrated fluorescence and magnetic tweezers instrument that permits detection of nanometer-scale DNA structural rearrangements together with the application of a wide range of stretching forces to individual DNA molecules. We have analyzed the force-dependent equilibrium and rate constants for telomere DNA G-quadruplex (GQ) folding and unfolding, and have determined the location of the transition state barrier along the well-defined DNA-stretching reaction coordinate. Our results reveal the mechanical unfolding pathway of the telomere DNA GQ is characterized by a short distance (<1 nm) to the transition state for the unfolding reaction. This mechanical unfolding response reflects a critical contribution of long-range interactions to the global stability of the GQ fold, and suggests that telomere-associated proteins need only disrupt a few base pairs to destabilize GQ structures. Comparison of the GQ unfolded state with a single-stranded polyT DNA revealed the unfolded GQ exhibits a compacted non-native conformation reminiscent of the protein molten globule. We expect the capacity to interrogate macromolecular structural transitions with high spatial resolution under conditions of low forces will have broad application in analyses of nucleic acid and protein folding. PMID:23303789

  17. Detection of tannins in modern and fossil barks and in plant residues by high-resolution solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, M.A.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Bark samples isolated from brown coal deposits in Victoria, Australia, and buried wood from Rhizophora mangle have been studies by high-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. Dipolar dephasing 13C NMR appears to be a useful method of detecting the presence of tannins in geochemical samples including barks, buried woods, peats and leaf litter. It is shown that tannins are selectively preserved in bark during coalification to the brown coal stage. ?? 1988.

  18. A high-resolution field-emission-gun, scanning electron microscope investigation of anisotropic hydrogen decrepitation in Nd-Fe-B-based sintered magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Soderznik, Marko; McGuiness, Paul; Zuzek-Rozman, Kristina; Kobe, Spomenka; Skulj, Irena; Yan Gaolin

    2010-05-15

    In this investigation commercial magnets based on (Nd,Dy){sub 14}(Fe,Co){sub 79}B{sub 7} were prepared by a conventional powder-metallurgy route with a degree of alignment equal to {approx}90% and then exposed to hydrogen at a pressure of 1 bar. The magnets, in the form of cylinders, were observed to decrepitate exclusively from the ends. High-resolution electron microscopy was able to identify the presence of crack formation within the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B grains, with the cracks running parallel to the c axis of these grains. Based on the concentration profile for hydrogen in a rare-earth transition-metal material, it is clear that the presence of hydrogen-induced cracks running perpendicular to the ends of the magnet provides for a much more rapidly progressing hydrogen front in this direction than from the sides of the magnet. This results in the magnet exhibiting a macroscopic tendency to decrepitate from the poles of the magnet toward the center. This combination of microstructural modification via particle alignment as part of the sintering process and direct observation via high-resolution electron microscopy has led to a satisfying explanation for the anisotropic hydrogen-decrepitation effect.

  19. High-resolution magnetic signature of active hydrothermal systems in the back-arc spreading region of the southern Mariana Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Masakazu; Okino, Kyoko; Honsho, Chie; Dyment, Jerome; Szitkar, Florent; Mochizuki, Nobutatsu; Asada, Miho

    2015-05-01

    High-resolution vector magnetic measurements were performed on five hydrothermal vent fields of the back-arc spreading region of the southern Mariana Trough using Shinkai 6500, a deep-sea manned submersible. A new 3-D forward scheme was applied that exploits the surrounding bathymetry and varying altitudes of the submersible to estimate absolute crustal magnetization. The results revealed that magnetic-anomaly-derived absolute magnetizations show a reasonable correlation with natural remanent magnetizations of rock samples collected from the seafloor of the same region. The distribution of magnetic-anomaly-derived absolute magnetization suggests that all five andesite-hosted hydrothermal fields are associated with a lack of magnetization, as is generally observed at basalt-hosted hydrothermal sites. Furthermore, both the Pika and Urashima sites were found to have their own distinct low-magnetization zones, which could not be distinguished in magnetic anomaly data collected at higher altitudes by autonomous underwater vehicle due to their limited extension. The spatial extent of the resulting low magnetization is approximately 10 times wider at off-axis sites than at on-axis sites, possibly reflecting larger accumulations of nonmagnetic sulfides, stockwork zones, and/or alteration zones at the off-axis sites.

  20. Experimental Fusion of Contrast Enhanced High-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging and High-Resolution Micro-Computed Tomography in Imaging the Mouse Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Counter, S. Allen; Damberg, Peter; Aski, Sahar Nikkhou; Nagy, Kálmán; Berglin, Cecilia Engmér; Laurell, Göran

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Imaging cochlear, vestibular, and 8th cranial nerve abnormalities remains a challenge. In this study, the membranous and osseous labyrinths of the wild type mouse inner ear were examined using volumetric data from ultra high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium contrast at 9.4 Tesla and high-resolution micro-computed tomography (µCT) to visualize the scalae and vestibular apparatus, and to establish imaging protocols and parameters for comparative analysis of the normal and mutant mouse inner ear. Methods: For in vivo MRI acquisition, animals were placed in a Milleped coil situated in the isocenter of a horizontal 9.4 T Varian magnet. For µCT examination, cone beam scans were performed ex vivo following MRI using the µCT component of a nanoScan PET/CT in vivo scanner. Results: The fusion of Gd enhanced high field MRI and high-resolution µCT scans revealed the dynamic membranous labyrinth of the perilymphatic fluid filled scala tympani and scala vestibule of the cochlea, and semicircular canals of the vestibular apparatus, within the µCT visualized contours of the contiguous osseous labyrinth. The ex vivo µCT segmentation revealed the surface contours and structural morphology of each cochlea turn and the semicircular canals in 3 planes. Conclusions: The fusion of ultra high-field MRI and high-resolution µCT imaging techniques were complementary, and provided high-resolution dynamic and static visualization of the complex morphological features of the normal mouse inner ear structures, which may offer a valuable approach for the investigation of cochlear and vestibular abnormalities that are associated with birth defects related to genetic inner ear disorders in humans. PMID:26401173

  1. ANL high-resolution injector

    SciTech Connect

    Minehara, E.; Kutschera, W.; Hartog, P.D.; Billquist, P.; Liu, Z.

    1986-05-01

    The ANL (Argonne National Laboratory) high-resolution injector has been installed to obtain higher mass resolution and higher preacceleration, and to utilize effectively the full mass range of ATLAS (Argonne tandem linac accelerator system). Preliminary results of the first beam test are reported briefly. The design and performance, in particular a high-mass-resolution magnet with aberration compensation, are discussed.

  2. High-resolution magnetics reveal the deep structure of a volcanic-arc-related basalt-hosted hydrothermal site (Palinuro, Tyrrhenian Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szitkar, Florent; Petersen, Sven; Caratori Tontini, Fabio; Cocchi, Luca

    2015-06-01

    High-resolution magnetic surveys have been acquired over the partially sedimented Palinuro massive sulfide deposits in the Aeolian volcanic arc, Tyrrhenian Sea. Surveys flown close to the seafloor using an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) show that the volcanic-arc-related basalt-hosted hydrothermal site is associated with zones of lower magnetization. This observation reflects the alteration of basalt affected by hydrothermal circulation and/or the progressive accumulation of a nonmagnetic deposit made of hydrothermal and volcaniclastic material and/or a thermal demagnetization of titanomagnetite due to the upwelling of hot fluids. To discriminate among these inferences, estimate the shape of the nonmagnetic deposit and the characteristics of the underlying altered area—the stockwork—we use high-resolution vector magnetic data acquired by the AUV Abyss (GEOMAR) above a crater-shaped depression hosting a weakly active hydrothermal site. Our study unveils a relatively small nonmagnetic deposit accumulated at the bottom of the depression and locked between the surrounding volcanic cones. Thermal demagnetization is unlikely but the stockwork extends beyond the limits of the nonmagnetic deposit, forming lobe-shaped zones believed to be a consequence of older volcanic episodes having contributed in generating the cones.

  3. High-Resolution Geophysical 3D Imaging for Archaeology by Magnetic and EM data: The Case of the Iron Age Settlement of Torre Galli, Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cella, Federico; Fedi, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic and electromagnetic surveying are effective techniques frequently used in archaeology because the susceptibility and the electric resistivity contrast between the cover soil and several buried finds often lead to detectable anomalies. Significant advances were recently achieved by 3D imaging methods of potential field data that provide an estimate of the magnetization distribution within the subsurface. They provide a high-resolution image of the source distribution, thanks to the differentiation of the field and to the stability of the process. These techniques are fast and quite effective in the case of a compact, isolated, and depth-limited source, i.e., just the kind of source generally occurring in archaeological investigations. We illustrate the high-resolution imaging process for a geophysical study carried out at Torre Galli ( Vibo Valentia, Calabria, Italy), one of the most significant sites of the early Iron Age in Italy. Multi-scale derivative analysis of magnetic data revealed the trends of anomalies shaped and aligned with a regular geometry. This allowed us to make an outline of the buried structures, and then to characterize them in terms of size, shape, and depth by means of the imaging technique. Targeted excavations were therefore addressed to the locations selected by our analysis, revealing structures showing exactly the predicted features and confirming the archaeological hypothesis concerning the settlement organization partitioned in terms of functional differentiation: an intermediate area occupied mostly by defensive structures placed between the village, westward, and the necropolis, eastward.

  4. High resolution NMR study of T{sub 1} magnetic relaxation dispersion. IV. Proton relaxation in amino acids and Met-enkephalin pentapeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2014-10-21

    Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) of protons was studied in the pentapeptide Met-enkephalin and the amino acids, which constitute it. Experiments were run by using high-resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) in combination with fast field-cycling, thus enabling measuring NMRD curves for all individual protons. As in earlier works, Papers I–III, pronounced effects of intramolecular scalar spin-spin interactions, J-couplings, on spin relaxation were found. Notably, at low fields J-couplings tend to equalize the apparent relaxation rates within networks of coupled protons. In Met-enkephalin, in contrast to the free amino acids, there is a sharp increase in the proton T{sub 1}-relaxation times at high fields due to the changes in the regime of molecular motion. The experimental data are in good agreement with theory. From modelling the relaxation experiments we were able to determine motional correlation times of different residues in Met-enkephalin with atomic resolution. This allows us to draw conclusions about preferential conformation of the pentapeptide in solution, which is also in agreement with data from two-dimensional NMR experiments (rotating frame Overhauser effect spectroscopy). Altogether, our study demonstrates that high-resolution NMR studies of magnetic field-dependent relaxation allow one to probe molecular mobility in biomolecules with atomic resolution.

  5. High-resolution {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance evidence of phase transition of Rb,Cs-intercalated single-walled nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhrara, M.; Saih, Y.; Waagberg, T.; Goze-Bac, C.; Abou-Hamad, E.

    2011-09-01

    We present 13 C high-resolution magic-angle-turning (MAT) and magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance data of Cs and Rb intercalated single walled carbon nanotubes. We find two distinct phases at different intercalation levels. A simple charge transfer is applicable at low intercalation level. The new phase at high intercalation level is accompanied by a hybridization of alkali (s) orbitals with the carbon (sp2) orbitals of the single walled nanotubes, which indicate bundle surface sites is the most probable alkali site.

  6. Echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging (EPI) with high-resolution matrix in intra-axial brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Brüning, R; Seelos, K; Yousry, T; Scheidler, J; Exner, H; Porn, U; Reiser, M; Rosen, B R

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential of high-speed interleaved echo-planar imaging (EPI) to achieve diagnostic image quality comparable to T2-weighted imaging in patients with brain tumors. Seventeen patients with intra-axial, supratentorial tumors (10 untreated gliomas, 7 radiated gliomas) were investigated on a 1. 5-T scanner. The conventional scan (SE, TR/TE = 2200/80 ms, 18 slices) was acquired in 8 min, 4 s, and EPI (TR/TE = 3000/80 ms, 18 slices) was completed in 25 s. The films were compared in a blinded trail by three radiologists. On the general impression and anatomic display, both sequences were rated to be of similar quality. Artifacts were slightly more pronounced at the skull base and around surgical clips using EPI. Tumor delineation was nearly equivalent using EPI, compared with the T2-weighted sequence. Echo-planar imaging reached diagnostic quality in all patients. Interleaved high-resolution EPI yielded sufficient quality to depict intra-axial, supratentorial brain tumors. Since EPI can be obtained in a small fraction of the time needed for conventional spin echo, in addition to other indications it could be considered to study patients unable to cooperate.

  7. Volumetric analysis of medial temporal lobe subregions in developmental amnesia using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Rosanna K; Palombo, Daniela J; Rabin, Jennifer S; Levine, Brian; Ryan, Jennifer D; Rosenbaum, R Shayna

    2013-10-01

    There is great interest in the cognitive consequences of hippocampal volume loss in developmental amnesia (DA). In many DA cases, volume loss occurs before the hippocampus is fully developed, and yet little is known about the locus, extent, and distribution of damage in these cases. We used high-resolution MRI to manually segment the medial temporal lobe (MTL) subregions in H.C., an adult with DA, and a group of sex-, age- and education-matched control participants (n = 10). The hippocampus was defined and divided into anterior (head) and posterior (body and tail) segments. Within the body of the hippocampus, the subregions (CA1 , DG/CA2/3 , and subiculum) were defined. Finally, the entorhinal (ERC), perirhinal (PRC), and parahippocampal (PHC) cortices were segmented. Anterior hippocampus was reduced bilaterally and posterior hippocampus was significantly reduced on the right. In the body of the hippocampus, all three subregions were reduced in the left hemisphere, whereas CA1 and subiculum were reduced in the right hemisphere. No group differences were observed in the PRC and ERC, whereas left PHC volume was marginally increased in H.C. compared to controls. These results can be used to inform patterns of spared and impaired cognitive abilities in DA and perhaps in amnesia more generally.

  8. Echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging (EPI) with high-resolution matrix in intra-axial brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Brüning, R; Seelos, K; Yousry, T; Scheidler, J; Exner, H; Porn, U; Reiser, M; Rosen, B R

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential of high-speed interleaved echo-planar imaging (EPI) to achieve diagnostic image quality comparable to T2-weighted imaging in patients with brain tumors. Seventeen patients with intra-axial, supratentorial tumors (10 untreated gliomas, 7 radiated gliomas) were investigated on a 1. 5-T scanner. The conventional scan (SE, TR/TE = 2200/80 ms, 18 slices) was acquired in 8 min, 4 s, and EPI (TR/TE = 3000/80 ms, 18 slices) was completed in 25 s. The films were compared in a blinded trail by three radiologists. On the general impression and anatomic display, both sequences were rated to be of similar quality. Artifacts were slightly more pronounced at the skull base and around surgical clips using EPI. Tumor delineation was nearly equivalent using EPI, compared with the T2-weighted sequence. Echo-planar imaging reached diagnostic quality in all patients. Interleaved high-resolution EPI yielded sufficient quality to depict intra-axial, supratentorial brain tumors. Since EPI can be obtained in a small fraction of the time needed for conventional spin echo, in addition to other indications it could be considered to study patients unable to cooperate. PMID:10460380

  9. The Potential of High Resolution Magnetic Resonance Microscopy in the Pathologic Analysis of Resected Breast and Lymph Tissue.

    PubMed

    Dashevsky, Brittany Z; D'Alfonso, Timothy; Sutton, Elizabeth J; Giambrone, Ashley; Aronowitz, Eric; Morris, Elizabeth A; Juluru, Krishna; Ballon, Douglas J

    2015-01-01

    Pathologic evaluation of breast specimens requires a fixation and staining procedure of at least 12 hours duration, delaying diagnosis and post-operative planning. Here we introduce an MRI technique with a custom-designed radiofrequency resonator for imaging breast and lymph tissue with sufficient spatial resolution and speed to guide pathologic interpretation and offer value in clinical decision making. In this study, we demonstrate the ability to image breast and lymphatic tissue using 7.0 Tesla MRI, achieving a spatial resolution of 59 × 59 × 94 μm(3) with a signal-to-noise ratio of 15-20, in an imaging time of 56 to 70 minutes. These are the first MR images to reveal characteristic pathologic features of both benign and malignant breast and lymph tissue, some of which were discernible by blinded pathologists who had no prior training in high resolution MRI interpretation. PMID:26639673

  10. Magnetic investigations along selected high-resolution seismic traverses in the central block of Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Ponce, D.A.; Sikora, R.F.; Roberts, C.W.; Morin, R.L.; Halvorson, P.F.

    1995-12-31

    Ground magnetic data collected along several traverses across the central block of Yucca Mountain in southwest Nevada are interpreted. These data were collected as part of an effort to evaluate faulting in the vicinity of a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Magnetic data and models along traverses across the central block of Yucca Mountain reveal anomalies associated with known faults and indicate a number of possible concealed faults beneath the eastern flank of Yucca Mountain. The central part of the eastern flank of Yucca Mountain is characterized by numerous small-amplitude anomalies that probably reflect small-scale faulting. Magnetic modeling of the terrain along the eastern flank of Yucca Mountain indicates that terrain induced magnetic anomalies of about 100 to 150 nT are present along some profiles where steep terrain exists above the magnetometer.

  11. Ultra-wide bore 900 MHz high-resolution NMR at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, R.; Brey, W. W.; Shetty, K.; Gor'kov, P.; Saha, S.; Long, J. R.; Grant, S. C.; Chekmenev, E. Y.; Hu, J.; Gan, Z.; Sharma, M.; Zhang, F.; Logan, T. M.; Brüschweller, R.; Edison, A.; Blue, A.; Dixon, I. R.; Markiewicz, W. D.; Cross, T. A.

    2005-11-01

    Access to an ultra-wide bore (105 mm) 21.1 T magnet makes possible numerous advances in NMR spectroscopy and MR imaging, as well as novel applications. This magnet was developed, designed, manufactured and tested at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory and on July 21, 2004 it was energized to 21.1 T. Commercial and unique homebuilt probes, along with a standard commercial NMR console have been installed and tested with many science applications to develop this spectrometer as a user facility. Solution NMR of membrane proteins with enhanced resolution, new pulse sequences for solid state NMR taking advantage of narrowed proton linewidths, and enhanced spatial resolution and contrast leading to improved animal imaging have been documented. In addition, it is demonstrated that spectroscopy of single site 17O labeled macromolecules in a hydrated lipid bilayer environment can be recorded in a remarkably short period of time. 17O spectra of aligned samples show the potential for using this data for orientational restraints and for characterizing unique details of cation binding properties to ion channels. The success of this NHMFL magnet illustrates the potential for using a similar magnet design as an outsert for high temperature superconducting insert coils to achieve an NMR magnet with a field >25 T.

  12. Slow magic angle sample spinning: a non- or minimally invasive method for high-resolution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolic profiling.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian Zhi

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution (1)H magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), using a sample spinning rate of several kilohertz or more (i.e., high-resolution magic angle spinning (hr-MAS)), is a well-established method for metabolic profiling in intact tissues without the need for sample extraction. The only shortcoming with hr-MAS is that it is invasive and is thus unusable for non-destructive detections. Recently, a method called slow MAS, using the concept of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, has emerged as an alternative method for non- or minimally invasive metabolomics in intact tissues, including live animals, due to the slow or ultra-slow sample spinning used. Although slow MAS is a powerful method, its applications are hindered by experimental challenges. Correctly designing the experiment and choosing the appropriate slow MAS method both require a fundamental understanding of the operation principles, in particular the details of line narrowing due to the presence of molecular diffusion. However, these fundamental principles have not yet been fully disclosed in previous publications. The goal of this chapter is to provide an in-depth evaluation of the principles associated with slow MAS techniques by emphasizing the challenges associated with a phantom sample consisting of glass beads and H(2)O, where an unusually large magnetic susceptibility field gradient is obtained.

  13. Slow Magic Angle Sample Spinning: A Non- or Minimally Invasive Method for High- Resolution 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Metabolic Profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Z.

    2011-05-01

    High resolution 1H magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), using a sample spinning rate of several kHz or more (i.e., high resolution-magic angle spinning (hr-MAS)), is a well established method for metabolic profiling in intact tissues without the need for sample extraction. The only shortcoming with hr-MAS is that it is invasive and is thus unusable for non-destructive detections. Recently, a method called slow-MAS, using the concept of two dimensional NMR spectroscopy, has emerged as an alternative method for non- or minimal invasive metabolomics in intact tissues, including live animals, due to the slow or ultra-slow-sample spinning used. Although slow-MAS is a powerful method, its applications are hindered by experimental challenges. Correctly designing the experiment and choosing the appropriate slow-MAS method both require a fundamental understanding of the operation principles, in particular the details of line narrowing due to the presence of molecular diffusion. However, these fundamental principles have not yet been fully disclosed in previous publications. The goal of this chapter is to provide an in depth evaluation of the principles associated with slow-MAS techniques by emphasizing the challenges associated with a phantom sample consisting of glass beads and H2O, where an unusually large magnetic susceptibility field gradient is obtained.

  14. Computer-assisted superimposition of magnetic resonance and high-resolution technetium-99m-HMPAO and thallium-201 SPECT images of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, B.L.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Johnson, K.A.; Carvalho, P.A.; Schwartz, R.B.; Loeffler, J.S.; Alexander, E.; Pelizzari, C.A.; Chen, G.T. )

    1991-08-01

    A method for registering three-dimensional CT, MR, and PET data sets that require no special patient immobilization or other precise positioning measures was adapted to high-resolution SPECT and MRI and was applied in 14 subjects (five normal volunteers, four patients with dementia (Alzheimer's disease), two patients with recurrent glioblastoma, and three patients with focal lesions (stroke, arachnoid cyst and head trauma)). T2-weighted axial magnetic resonance images and transaxial 99mTc-HMPAO and 201Tl images acquired with an annular gamma camera were merged using an objective registration (translation, rotation and rescaling) program. In the normal subjects and patients with dementia and focal lesions, focal areas of high uptake corresponded to gray matter structures. Focal lesions observed on MRI corresponded to perfusion defects on SPECT. In the patients who had undergone surgical resection of glioblastoma followed by interstitial brachytherapy, increased 201Tl corresponding to recurrent tumor could be localized from the superimposed images. The method was evaluated by measuring the residuals in all subjects and translational errors due to superimposition of deep structures in the 12 subjects with normal thalamic anatomy and 99mTc-HMPAO uptake. This method for superimposing magnetic resonance and high-resolution SPECT images of the brain is a useful technique for correlating regional function with brain anatomy.

  15. The use of high resolution ground and airborne magnetic surveys to evaluate the geometry of hydrothermal alteration zones over volcanic provinces (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouligand, C.; Glen, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Geophysical methods can provide critical constraints on the distribution and volume of hydrothermal alteration, important parameters in understanding the evolution of geothermal systems. Because hydrothermal alteration modifies the magnetic properties of the volcanic substratum, magnetic surveys can be used to provide constraints on the distribution of hydrothermal alteration at depth. Using Yellowstone caldera as an example, we show that both ground and airborne magnetic surveys can be used to map and assess the volume of hydrothermal alteration. Ground magnetic surveys over unaltered volcanic terranes display high-amplitude, short-wavelength anomalies, in contrast to smooth, subdued magnetic anomalies over volcanic substrata demagnetized by hydrothermal alteration. We use this contrast to map areas of hydrothermal alteration in detail. Inverse methods applied to high-resolution airborne and ground magnetic data can be used to create three-dimensional models of the distribution of magnetization and thus illuminate the geometry of hydrothermal alteration. Because of the non-uniqueness of potential fields, the construction of inverse models requires simplifying assumptions on the distribution of magnetization, knowledge of induced and remanent magnetization of fresh and altered geological units, and detailed geological and geophysical data. Within the three hydrothermal sites that we investigated in Yellowstone National Park, subdued short-wavelength signal indicates pervasive demagnetization (alteration) of the shallow substratum that extends over larger areas than initially mapped by geology. These data also reveal that the largest degree of demagnetization (alteration) and maximum thicknesses of demagnetized (altered) substratum, reaching a few hundred meters, are associated with hydrothermal vents and with superficial hydrothermal alteration. Our three dimensional models of magnetization provide estimates of the volume of buried hydrothermal alteration ranging

  16. Unilateral symptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis and myopathy in an adolescent with Graves disease: a case report of an high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jia; Zhu, Jiajia; Huang, Dongling; Shi, Changzheng; Guan, Yuqing; Zhou, Liang; Pan, Suyue

    2015-01-01

    Vascular and muscular involvements in Graves disease (GD) are rare. Here, we report a case of a 17-year-old patient with unilateral symptomatic middle cerebral artery stenosis concurrent with GD and myopathy. He presented with a 1-day history of acute severe right-sided hemiparesis and aphasia and a 3-week history of high metabolic syndrome. The pathogenesis of the stenosis is most likely vasculitis rather than atherosclerosis, based on contrast-enhanced high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging showing concentric wall enhancement. We suggest that lipid storage myopathy is secondary to GD, and it is likely mitochondrial dysfunction or immune dysfunction induced by GD responsible for the myopathy and that magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is capable of establishing the diagnosis of myopathy. Thus, MRS can be used for follow-up evaluations of the myopathy along with the pathology biopsy.

  17. Estimation of Basal Depth of Magnetic Sources from High Resolution Aeromagnetic Data of Middle Niger Basin, Nigeria using Adapted Centroid Technique for Fractal Distribution of Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwankwo, L.

    2015-12-01

    An estimate of depths to the bottom of magnetic sources in the Middle Niger Basin, north-central Nigeria has been made from a recently acquired high-resolution aeromagnetic data using adapted centroid technique for fractal distribution of sources. The result shows that the depth varies between 11.71 and 26.53 km. Deeper values are found in northern and central regions while values as low as 12 km were observed in the southern part. The shallower depths to the bottom of magnetic sources may be representing the thermal/petrological boundaries in the basin. This study is therefore crucial for quantitative understanding of the geo-processes and geothermal parameters in the study area.

  18. Witnessing magnetic twist with high-resolution observation from the 1.6-m New Solar Telescope

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haimin; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Liu, Rui; Zeng, Zhicheng; Chae, Jongchul; Ji, Haisheng

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic flux ropes are highly twisted, current-carrying magnetic fields. They are crucial for the instability of plasma involved in solar eruptions, which may lead to adverse space weather effects. Here we present observations of a flaring using the highest resolution chromospheric images from the 1.6-m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory, supplemented by a magnetic field extrapolation model. A set of loops initially appear to peel off from an overall inverse S-shaped flux bundle, and then develop into a multi-stranded twisted flux rope, producing a two-ribbon flare. We show evidence that the flux rope is embedded in sheared arcades and becomes unstable following the enhancement of its twists. The subsequent motion of the flux rope is confined due to the strong strapping effect of the overlying field. These results provide a first opportunity to witness the detailed structure and evolution of flux ropes in the low solar atmosphere. PMID:25919706

  19. Identification of unknown microcontaminants in Dutch river water by liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    van Leerdam, J A; Vervoort, J; Stroomberg, G; de Voogt, P

    2014-11-01

    In the past decade during automated surface water monitoring in the river Meuse at border station Eijsden in The Netherlands, a set of unknown compounds were repeatedly detected by online liquid chromatography-diode-array detection in a relatively high signal intensity. Because of the unknown nature of the compounds, the consequently unknown fate of this mixture in water treatment processes, the location being close to the water inlet of a drinking water supply company and their possible adverse public health effects, it was deemed necessary to elucidate the identity of the compounds. No data are available for the occurrence of these unknowns at downstream locations. After concentration and fractionation of a sample by preparative Liquid Chromatography, identification experiments were performed using Liquid Chromatography-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (LC-HR-MS) combined with High Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (HR-NMR). Accurate mass determination of the unknown parent compound and its fragments obtained in MS/MS provided relevant information on the elemental composition of the unknown compounds. With the use of NMR techniques and the information about the elemental composition, the identity of the compounds in the different sample fractions was determined. Beside some regularly detected compounds in surface water, like caffeine and bisphenol-S, five dihydroxydiphenylmethane isomers were identified. The major unknown compound was identified as 4,4'-dihydroxy-3,5,3',5'-tetra(hydroxymethyl)diphenylmethane. This compound was confirmed by analysis of the pure reference compound. This is one of the first studies that employs the combination of high resolution MS with NMR for identification of truly unknown compounds in surface waters at the μg/L level. Five of the seven identified compounds are unexpected and not contained in the CAS database, while they can be presumed to be products generated during the production of resins. PMID:25296128

  20. Identification of unknown microcontaminants in Dutch river water by liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    van Leerdam, J A; Vervoort, J; Stroomberg, G; de Voogt, P

    2014-11-01

    In the past decade during automated surface water monitoring in the river Meuse at border station Eijsden in The Netherlands, a set of unknown compounds were repeatedly detected by online liquid chromatography-diode-array detection in a relatively high signal intensity. Because of the unknown nature of the compounds, the consequently unknown fate of this mixture in water treatment processes, the location being close to the water inlet of a drinking water supply company and their possible adverse public health effects, it was deemed necessary to elucidate the identity of the compounds. No data are available for the occurrence of these unknowns at downstream locations. After concentration and fractionation of a sample by preparative Liquid Chromatography, identification experiments were performed using Liquid Chromatography-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (LC-HR-MS) combined with High Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (HR-NMR). Accurate mass determination of the unknown parent compound and its fragments obtained in MS/MS provided relevant information on the elemental composition of the unknown compounds. With the use of NMR techniques and the information about the elemental composition, the identity of the compounds in the different sample fractions was determined. Beside some regularly detected compounds in surface water, like caffeine and bisphenol-S, five dihydroxydiphenylmethane isomers were identified. The major unknown compound was identified as 4,4'-dihydroxy-3,5,3',5'-tetra(hydroxymethyl)diphenylmethane. This compound was confirmed by analysis of the pure reference compound. This is one of the first studies that employs the combination of high resolution MS with NMR for identification of truly unknown compounds in surface waters at the μg/L level. Five of the seven identified compounds are unexpected and not contained in the CAS database, while they can be presumed to be products generated during the production of resins.

  1. Interpenetration and deflection phenomena in collisions between supersonic, magnetized, tungsten plasma flows diagnosed using high resolution optical Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Swadling, G. F.; Lebedev, S. V.; Burdiak, G.; Suttle, L.; Patankar, S.; Smith, R. A.; Bennett, M.; Hall, G. N.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Bland, S.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Rozmus, W.; Yuan, J.

    2015-07-15

    An optical Thomson scattering diagnostic has been used to investigate collisions between supersonic, magnetized plasma flows, in particular the transition from collisionless to collisional interaction dynamics. These flows were produced using tungsten wire array z-pinches, driven by the 1.4 MA 240 ns Magpie generator at Imperial College London. Measurements of the collective-mode Thomson scattering ion-feature clearly indicate that the ablation flows are interpenetrating at 100 ns (after current start), and this interpenetration continues until at least 140 ns. The Thomson spectrum at 150 ns shows a clear change in the dynamics of the stream interactions, transitioning towards a collisional, shock-like interaction of the streams near the axis. The Thomson scattering data also provide indirect evidence of the presence of a significant toroidal magnetic field embedded in the “precursor” plasma near the axis of the array over the period 100–140 ns; these observations are in agreement with previous measurements [Swadling et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 035003 (2014)]. The Thomson scattering measurements at 150 ns suggest that this magnetic field must collapse at around the time the dense precursor column begins to form.

  2. Feasibility of high-resolution one-dimensional relaxation imaging at low magnetic field using a single-sided NMR scanner applied to articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rössler, Erik; Mattea, Carlos; Stapf, Siegfried

    2015-02-01

    Low field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance increases the contrast of the longitudinal relaxation rate in many biological tissues; one prominent example is hyaline articular cartilage. In order to take advantage of this increased contrast and to profile the depth-dependent variations, high resolution parameter measurements are carried out which can be of critical importance in an early diagnosis of cartilage diseases such as osteoarthritis. However, the maximum achievable spatial resolution of parameter profiles is limited by factors such as sensor geometry, sample curvature, and diffusion limitation. In this work, we report on high-resolution single-sided NMR scanner measurements with a commercial device, and quantify these limitations. The highest achievable spatial resolution on the used profiler, and the lateral dimension of the sensitive volume were determined. Since articular cartilage samples are usually bent, we also focus on averaging effects inside the horizontally aligned sensitive volume and their impact on the relaxation profiles. Taking these critical parameters into consideration, depth-dependent relaxation time profiles with the maximum achievable vertical resolution of 20 μm are discussed, and are correlated with diffusion coefficient profiles in hyaline articular cartilage in order to reconstruct T2 maps from the diffusion-weighted CPMG decays of apparent relaxation rates.

  3. Effects of Sandimmune Neoral on Collagen-Induced Arthritis in DA Rats: Characterization by High Resolution Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and by Histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Nicolau; Bruttel, Konrad; Schuurman, Henk; Mir, Anis

    1998-03-01

    In the present work the time course of collagen-induced arthritis and the effect of Sandimmune Neoral in this model of arthritis were followed in the rat over an extended period of time (70 days) using high resolution three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). High resolution 3D gradient-echo (TR = 100 ms; TE = 3.8 ms) images with a voxel size of 94 × 81 × 60 μm3were acquired from the hind paw of DA rats (n= 21) at various time points after injection of type II bovine collagen into the tail. Eleven rats were treated with Neoral (15 mg/kg/day p.o. together with vehicle) for 42 days starting at day 14 after collagen injection. The remaining controls received vehicle. Pathomorphological changes associated with the collagen-induced arthritic process, e.g., increase of joint space and cartilage and bone erosion, could be observedin vivoin the control group. In contrast, no changes in the joint architecture were detected in Neoral-treated animals. Indeed, Neoral showed strong anti-inflammatory effects and marked protection against cartilage and bone destruction in this model. Qualitative information derived from the MR images correlated significantly with histological findings.

  4. The DYNAMO Orbiter Project: High Resolution Mapping of Gravity/Magnetic Fields and In Situ Investigation of Mars Atmospheric Escape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smrekar, S.; Chassefiere, E.; Forget, F.; Reme, H.; Mazelle, C.; Blelly, P. -L.; Acuna, M.; Connerney, J.; Purucker, M.; Lin, R.

    2000-01-01

    Dynamo is a small Mars orbiter planned to be launched in 2005 or 2007, in the frame of the NASA/CNES Mars exploration program. It is aimed at improving gravity and magnetic field resolution, in order to better understand the magnetic, geologic and thermal history of Mars, and at characterizing current atmospheric escape, which is still poorly constrained. These objectives are achieved by using a low periapsis orbit, similar to the one used by the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft during its aerobraking phases. The proposed periapsis altitude for Dynamo of 120-130 km, coupled with the global distribution of periapses to be obtained during one Martian year of operation, through about 5000 low passes, will produce a magnetic/gravity field data set with approximately five times the spatial resolution of MGS. Low periapsis provides a unique opportunity to investigate the chemical and dynamical properties of the deep ionosphere, thermosphere, and the interaction between the atmosphere and the solar wind, therefore atmospheric escape, which may have played a crucial role in removing atmosphere, and water, from the planet. There is much room for debate on the importance of current atmosphere escape processes in the evolution of the Martian atmosphere, as early "exotic" processes including hydrodynamic escape and impact erosion are traditionally invoked to explain the apparent sparse inventory of present-day volatiles. Yet, the combination of low surface gravity and the absence of a substantial internally generated magnetic field have undeniable effects on what we observe today. In addition to the current losses in the forms of Jeans and photochemical escape of neutrals, there are solar wind interaction-related erosion mechanisms because the upper atmosphere is directly exposed to the solar wind. The solar wind related loss rates, while now comparable to those of a modest comet, nonetheless occur continuously, with the intriguing possibility of important cumulative and

  5. Coronal extension of flaring region magnetic fields inferred from high-resolution microwave and type III burst observations

    SciTech Connect

    Lantos, P.; Pick, M.; Kundu, M.R.

    1984-08-15

    Observations of three solar radio bursts, obtained with the Very Large Array of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory at 6 cm wavelength, have been combined with meter observationss from the Mark III Nancay Radioheliograph. There is a good correlation between solar activity observed at the two wavelength domains. A small change by about 10'' in the centimetric burst location corresponds to a large change, by about 0.5 R/sub sun/, in the related metric type III burst location. This indicates discrete injection/acceleration regions and the presence of very divergent magnetic fields.

  6. High-resolution imaging of normal anatomy, and neural and adrenal malformations in mouse embryos using magnetic resonance microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Jürgen E; Bamforth, Simon D; Farthing, Cassandra R; Clarke, Kieran; Neubauer, Stefan; Bhattacharya, Shoumo

    2003-01-01

    An efficient investigation of the effects of genetic or environmental manipulation on mouse development relies on the rapid and accurate screening of a substantial number of embryos for congenital malformations. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to examine normal organ development and identify malformations in mouse embryos by magnetic resonance microscopy in a substantially shorter time than by conventional histology. We imaged embryos in overnight runs of under 9 h, with an operator time of less than 1 h. In normal embryos we visualized the brain, spinal cord, ganglia, eyes, inner ear, pituitary, thyroid, thymus, trachea, bronchi, lungs, heart, kidneys, gonads, adrenals, oesophagus, stomach, intestines, spleen, liver and pancreas. Examination of the brain in embryos lacking the transcriptional coactivator Cited2 showed cerebellar and midbrain roof agenesis, in addition to exencephaly. In these embryos we were also able to detect agenesis of the adrenal gland. We confirmed all malformations by histological sectioning. Thus magnetic resonance microscopy can be used to rapidly identify developmental and organ malformations in mutant mouse embryos generated by transgenic techniques, in high-throughput mutagenesis screens, or in screens to identify teratogenic compounds and environmental factors contributing to developmental malformations. PMID:12647873

  7. Domain wall transformations and hopping in La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO(3) nanostructures imaged with high resolution x-ray magnetic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Finizio, S; Foerster, M; Krüger, B; Vaz, C A F; Miyawaki, T; Mawass, M A; Peña, L; Méchin, L; Hühn, S; Moshnyaga, V; Büttner, F; Bisig, A; Le Guyader, L; El Moussaoui, S; Valencia, S; Kronast, F; Eisebitt, S; Kläui, M

    2014-11-12

    We investigate the effect of electric current pulse injection on domain walls in La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO(3) (LSMO) half-ring nanostructures by high resolution x-ray magnetic microscopy at room temperature. Due to the easily accessible Curie temperature of LSMO, we can employ reasonable current densities to induce the Joule heating necessary to observe effects such as hopping of the domain walls between different pinning sites and nucleation/annihilation events. Such effects are the dominant features close to the Curie temperature, while spin torque is found to play a small role close to room temperature. We are also able to observe thermally activated domain wall transformations and we find that, for the analyzed geometries, the vortex domain wall configuration is energetically favored, in agreement with micromagnetic simulations. PMID:25336527

  8. Towards real-time metabolic profiling of a biopsy specimen during a surgical operation by 1H high resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Providing information on cancerous tissue samples during a surgical operation can help surgeons delineate the limits of a tumoral invasion more reliably. Here, we describe the use of metabolic profiling of a colon biopsy specimen by high resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to evaluate tumoral invasion during a simulated surgical operation. Case presentation Biopsy specimens (n = 9) originating from the excised right colon of a 66-year-old Caucasian women with an adenocarcinoma were automatically analyzed using a previously built statistical model. Conclusions Metabolic profiling results were in full agreement with those of a histopathological analysis. The time-response of the technique is sufficiently fast for it to be used effectively during a real operation (17 min/sample). Metabolic profiling has the potential to become a method to rapidly characterize cancerous biopsies in the operation theater. PMID:22257563

  9. Large-scale synthesis of uniform and extremely small-sized iron oxide nanoparticles for high-resolution T1 magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Hyo; Lee, Nohyun; Kim, Hyoungsu; An, Kwangjin; Park, Yong Il; Choi, Yoonseok; Shin, Kwangsoo; Lee, Youjin; Kwon, Soon Gu; Na, Hyon Bin; Park, Je-Geun; Ahn, Tae-Young; Kim, Young-Woon; Moon, Woo Kyung; Choi, Seung Hong; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2011-08-17

    Uniform and extremely small-sized iron oxide nanoparticles (ESIONs) of < 4 nm were synthesized via the thermal decomposition of iron-oleate complex in the presence of oleyl alcohol. Oleyl alcohol lowered the reaction temperature by reducing iron-oleate complex, resulting in the production of small-sized nanoparticles. XRD pattern of 3 nm-sized nanoparticles revealed maghemite crystal structure. These nanoparticles exhibited very low magnetization derived from the spin-canting effect. The hydrophobic nanoparticles can be easily transformed to water-dispersible and biocompatible nanoparticles by capping with the poly(ethylene glycol)-derivatized phosphine oxide (PO-PEG) ligands. Toxic response was not observed with Fe concentration up to 100 μg/mL in MTT cell proliferation assay of POPEG-capped 3 nm-sized iron oxide nanoparticles. The 3 nm-sized nanoparticles exhibited a high r(1) relaxivity of 4.78 mM(-1) s(-1) and low r(2)/r(1) ratio of 6.12, demonstrating that ESIONs can be efficient T(1) contrast agents. The high r(1) relaxivities of ESIONs can be attributed to the large number of surface Fe(3+) ions with 5 unpaired valence electrons. In the in vivo T(1)-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ESIONs showed longer circulation time than the clinically used gadolinium complex-based contrast agent, enabling high-resolution imaging. High-resolution blood pool MR imaging using ESIONs enabled clear observation of various blood vessels with sizes down to 0.2 mm. These results demonstrate the potential of ESIONs as T(1) MRI contrast agents in clinical settings.

  10. Crustal architecture of the Faroe-Shetland Margin: insights from a newly merged high resolution gravity and magnetic dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rippington, Stephen; Mazur, Stan; Anderson, Chris

    2014-05-01

    The Faroe-Shetland region is geologically complex; it has undergone several phases of extension and rifting since the middle Palaeozoic (Ritchie et al., 2011; Coward et al., 2003), culminating in the Eocene with continental breakup between Northwest Europe and Greenland (Gernigon et al., 2012). Final breakup may have been facilitated by the presence of the Iceland Plume and was accompanied by the emplacement of voluminous basaltic rocks, attributed to the North Atlantic Igneous Province (White and McKenzie, 1989). It is difficult to image beneath the thick Paleogene basalts in the region using conventional seismic methods, because the high impedance contrast between the sediments and shallow basalts causes strong reflections. These mask deeper and weaker reflections and cause prominent inter-bed multiples (White et al., 1999). Consequently, determining the location and shape of basins and basement highs, and elucidating the timing and manner of their formation, remains a major cause of uncertainty in the appraisal of the hydrocarbon potential of the region. Gravity and magnetic data record variations in the density and susceptibility of the entire crust. Consequently, the thick basalt piles that are shallow in the section do not hinder the ability to detect deeper features. Instead, the principal challenge is distinguishing superposed bodies, with different densities and susceptibilities, from the combined gravity and magnetic anomalies. In this study, seismic data and horizons from the shallow section are used in combination with gravity and magnetic data to produce map view interpretations, and 2D and 3D models of the crust in the Faroe-Shetland region. These models help distinguish important variations in timing of rifting in different basins, and reveal the crustal architecture of the Faroe-Shetland Basin from the seabed to the Moho. We present a new structural and kinematic interpretation of the geology of the region, and propose an asymmetric simple shear

  11. Multi-wavelength high-resolution observations of a small-scale emerging magnetic flux event and the chromospheric and coronal response

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas Domínguez, Santiago; Kosovichev, Alexander; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl

    2014-10-20

    State-of-the-art solar instrumentation is now revealing magnetic activity of the Sun with unprecedented temporal and spatial resolutions. Observations with the 1.6 m aperture New Solar Telescope (NST) of the Big Bear Solar Observatory are making next steps in our understanding of the solar surface structure. Granular-scale magnetic flux emergence and the response of the solar atmosphere are among the key research topics of high-resolution solar physics. As part of a joint observing program with NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission on 2013 August 7, the NST observed active region NOAA 11,810 in the photospheric TiO 7057 Å band with a resolution of pixel size of 0.''034 and chromospheric He I 10830 Å and Hα 6563 Å wavelengths. Complementary data are provided by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Hinode space-based telescopes. The region displayed a group of solar pores, in the vicinity of which we detect a small-scale buoyant horizontal magnetic flux tube causing granular alignments and interacting with the preexisting ambient field in the upper atmospheric layers. Following the expansion of distorted granules at the emergence site, we observed a sudden appearance of an extended surge in the He I 10830 Å data (bandpass of 0.05 Å). The IRIS transition region imaging caught ejection of a hot plasma jet associated with the He I surge. The SDO/HMI data used to study the evolution of the magnetic and Doppler velocity fields reveal emerging magnetic loop-like structures. Hinode/Ca II H and IRIS filtergrams detail the connectivities of the newly emerged magnetic field in the lower solar chromosphere. From these data, we find that the orientation of the emerging magnetic field lines from a twisted flux tube formed an angle of ∼45° with the overlying ambient field. Nevertheless, the interaction of emerging magnetic field lines with the pre-existing overlying field generates high-temperature emission regions and boosts the surge

  12. Multi-wavelength High-resolution Observations of a Small-scale Emerging Magnetic Flux Event and the Chromospheric and Coronal Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Domínguez, Santiago; Kosovichev, Alexander; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl

    2014-10-01

    State-of-the-art solar instrumentation is now revealing magnetic activity of the Sun with unprecedented temporal and spatial resolutions. Observations with the 1.6 m aperture New Solar Telescope (NST) of the Big Bear Solar Observatory are making next steps in our understanding of the solar surface structure. Granular-scale magnetic flux emergence and the response of the solar atmosphere are among the key research topics of high-resolution solar physics. As part of a joint observing program with NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission on 2013 August 7, the NST observed active region NOAA 11,810 in the photospheric TiO 7057 Å band with a resolution of pixel size of 0.''034 and chromospheric He I 10830 Å and Hα 6563 Å wavelengths. Complementary data are provided by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Hinode space-based telescopes. The region displayed a group of solar pores, in the vicinity of which we detect a small-scale buoyant horizontal magnetic flux tube causing granular alignments and interacting with the preexisting ambient field in the upper atmospheric layers. Following the expansion of distorted granules at the emergence site, we observed a sudden appearance of an extended surge in the He I 10830 Å data (bandpass of 0.05 Å). The IRIS transition region imaging caught ejection of a hot plasma jet associated with the He I surge. The SDO/HMI data used to study the evolution of the magnetic and Doppler velocity fields reveal emerging magnetic loop-like structures. Hinode/Ca II H and IRIS filtergrams detail the connectivities of the newly emerged magnetic field in the lower solar chromosphere. From these data, we find that the orientation of the emerging magnetic field lines from a twisted flux tube formed an angle of ~45° with the overlying ambient field. Nevertheless, the interaction of emerging magnetic field lines with the pre-existing overlying field generates high-temperature emission regions and boosts the surge

  13. High-resolution optical spectroscopy and magnetic properties of Yb3 + in Y2SiO5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welinski, Sacha; Ferrier, Alban; Afzelius, Mikael; Goldner, Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Rare-earth doped crystals are promising systems for quantum information processing. In particular, paramagnetic rare earths could be used to build coherent interfaces with optical and microwave photons. In addition, isotopes with nonzero nuclear spins could provide long-lived states for quantum state storage and processing. Yb3 + is particularly interesting in this respect since it is the only paramagnetic rare earth with a spin-1/2 isotope, which corresponds to the simplest possible level structure. In this paper, we report on the optical and magnetic properties of Yb3 + in the two sites of Y2SiO5 , a commonly used crystal for quantum applications. We measured optical inhomogeneous linewidths, peak absorption coefficients, oscillator strengths, and excited-state lifetimes. The Zeeman tensors were also determined in the ground and excited states, as well as the ground-state hyperfine tensor for the 3+171Yb (I =1/2 ) isotope. These results suggest that Yb3 +:Y2SiO5 is a promising material for applications like solid-state optical and microwave quantum memories.

  14. The effects of magnetic fields exposure on relative permittivity of saline solutions measured by a high resolution SPR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li; Zhao, Xinyuan; Fei, Yue; Yu, Dongdong; Qian, Jun; Tong, Jinguang; Chen, Guangdi; He, Sailing

    2016-04-01

    A measurement system for the relative permittivity of a physiological solution under 50 Hz magnetic fields (MF) is presented. It is based on a phase-sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR) system. Relative permittivity was analyzed for different solute concentrations of sodium chloride under various MF exposure parameters. We found that MF exposure at 0.2–4.0 mT step-wise decreased significantly the SPR phase signal of a 0.9% sodium chloride solution while 0.1 mT of MF exposure did not. The decreases in the SPR phase signal depended on the duration of MF exposure, and the signal reached a plateau after 15 min of exposure. Interestingly, the decreased SPR phase signal showed a gradual increase and approached the background level when the exposure was drawn off. In addition, we found that the response of the sodium chloride solution to MF also depended on its concentration. In brief, the relative permittivity of sodium chloride in solutions appears to be practically affected by 50 Hz MF exposure. Our data indicates that the relative permittivity of the saline solution influenced by MF exposure should be considered when investigating the biological effects of MF exposure on organisms in experimental study.

  15. The effects of magnetic fields exposure on relative permittivity of saline solutions measured by a high resolution SPR system

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Li; Zhao, Xinyuan; Fei, Yue; Yu, Dongdong; Qian, Jun; Tong, Jinguang; Chen, Guangdi; He, Sailing

    2016-01-01

    A measurement system for the relative permittivity of a physiological solution under 50 Hz magnetic fields (MF) is presented. It is based on a phase-sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR) system. Relative permittivity was analyzed for different solute concentrations of sodium chloride under various MF exposure parameters. We found that MF exposure at 0.2–4.0 mT step-wise decreased significantly the SPR phase signal of a 0.9% sodium chloride solution while 0.1 mT of MF exposure did not. The decreases in the SPR phase signal depended on the duration of MF exposure, and the signal reached a plateau after 15 min of exposure. Interestingly, the decreased SPR phase signal showed a gradual increase and approached the background level when the exposure was drawn off. In addition, we found that the response of the sodium chloride solution to MF also depended on its concentration. In brief, the relative permittivity of sodium chloride in solutions appears to be practically affected by 50 Hz MF exposure. Our data indicates that the relative permittivity of the saline solution influenced by MF exposure should be considered when investigating the biological effects of MF exposure on organisms in experimental study. PMID:27121618

  16. Low- and high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) characterisation of hyaluronan-based native and sulfated hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Barbucci, Rolando; Leone, Gemma; Chiumiento, Antonio; Di Cocco, Maria Enrica; D'Orazio, Giovanni; Gianferri, Raffaella; Delfini, Maurizio

    2006-08-14

    Hyaluronan-based hydrogels were synthesised using different crosslinking agents, such as 1,3-diaminopropane (1,3-DAP) and 1,6-diaminohexane (1,6-DAE). The hydrogels were sulfated to provide materials (Hyal-1,3-DAP, Hyal-1,6-DAE, HyalS-1,3-DAP and HyalS-1,6-DAE) that were characterised by both high- and low-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The (13)C NMR spectra of the materials were analysed to identify, characterise and study the crosslinking degree of the hydrogels. The crosslinking degree was also determined by potentiometric titration and the effectiveness of the two techniques was compared. Measurements of longitudinal relaxation times (spin-lattice) and of NOE enhancement were used to study the mobility of the hydrogels. Low-resolution NMR studies allowed the determination of the water transport properties in the hydrogels. In addition, the swelling degree for the various hydrogels was calculated as a function of the longitudinal and transversal relaxation times of the water molecules. Lastly, the self-diffusion coefficients of the water in interaction with the four polysaccharides were measured by the pulsed field gradient spin echo (PFGSE) sequence.

  17. A high-resolution global Vlasov simulation of a small dielectric body with a weak intrinsic magnetic field on the K computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Takayuki; Fukazawa, Keiichiro

    2015-04-01

    The interaction between the solar wind and solar system bodies, such as planets, satellites, and asteroids, is one of the fundamental global-scale phenomena in space plasma physics. In the present study, the electromagnetic environment around a small dielectric body with a weak intrinsic magnetic field is studied by means of a first-principle kinetic plasma simulation, which is a challenging task in space plasma physics as well as high-performance computing. Due to several computational limitations, five-dimensional full electromagnetic Vlasov simulations with two configuration space and three velocity space coordinates are performed with two different spatial resolutions. The Debye-scale charge separation is not solved correctly in the simulation run with a low spatial resolution, while all the physical processes in collisionless plasma are included in the simulation run with a high spatial resolution. The direction comparison of electromagnetic fields between the two runs shows that there is small difference in the structure of magnetic field lines. On the other hand, small-scale fine structures of electrostatic fields are enhanced by the electric charge separation and the charge accumulation on the surface of the body in the high-resolution run, while these structures are absent in the low-resolution runs. These results are consistent with the conventional understanding of plasma physics that the structure and dynamics of global magnetic fields, which are generally described by the magneto-hydro-dynamics (MHD) equations, are not affected by electron-scale microphysics.

  18. High-resolution In Vivo Manual Segmentation Protocol for Human Hippocampal Subfields Using 3T Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Winterburn, Julie; Pruessner, Jens C; Sofia, Chavez; Schira, Mark M; Lobaugh, Nancy J; Voineskos, Aristotle N; Chakravarty, M Mallar

    2015-01-01

    The human hippocampus has been broadly studied in the context of memory and normal brain function and its role in different neuropsychiatric disorders has been heavily studied. While many imaging studies treat the hippocampus as a single unitary neuroanatomical structure, it is, in fact, composed of several subfields that have a complex three-dimensional geometry. As such, it is known that these subfields perform specialized functions and are differentially affected through the course of different disease states. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be used as a powerful tool to interrogate the morphology of the hippocampus and its subfields. Many groups use advanced imaging software and hardware (>3T) to image the subfields; however this type of technology may not be readily available in most research and clinical imaging centers. To address this need, this manuscript provides a detailed step-by-step protocol for segmenting the full anterior-posterior length of the hippocampus and its subfields: cornu ammonis (CA) 1, CA2/CA3, CA4/dentate gyrus (DG), strata radiatum/lacunosum/moleculare (SR/SL/SM), and subiculum. This protocol has been applied to five subjects (3F, 2M; age 29-57, avg. 37). Protocol reliability is assessed by resegmenting either the right or left hippocampus of each subject and computing the overlap using the Dice's kappa metric. Mean Dice's kappa (range) across the five subjects are: whole hippocampus, 0.91 (0.90-0.92); CA1, 0.78 (0.77-0.79); CA2/CA3, 0.64 (0.56-0.73); CA4/dentate gyrus, 0.83 (0.81-0.85); strata radiatum/lacunosum/moleculare, 0.71 (0.68-0.73); and subiculum 0.75 (0.72-0.78). The segmentation protocol presented here provides other laboratories with a reliable method to study the hippocampus and hippocampal subfields in vivo using commonly available MR tools.

  19. High-resolution In Vivo Manual Segmentation Protocol for Human Hippocampal Subfields Using 3T Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Winterburn, Julie; Pruessner, Jens C; Sofia, Chavez; Schira, Mark M; Lobaugh, Nancy J; Voineskos, Aristotle N; Chakravarty, M Mallar

    2015-01-01

    The human hippocampus has been broadly studied in the context of memory and normal brain function and its role in different neuropsychiatric disorders has been heavily studied. While many imaging studies treat the hippocampus as a single unitary neuroanatomical structure, it is, in fact, composed of several subfields that have a complex three-dimensional geometry. As such, it is known that these subfields perform specialized functions and are differentially affected through the course of different disease states. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be used as a powerful tool to interrogate the morphology of the hippocampus and its subfields. Many groups use advanced imaging software and hardware (>3T) to image the subfields; however this type of technology may not be readily available in most research and clinical imaging centers. To address this need, this manuscript provides a detailed step-by-step protocol for segmenting the full anterior-posterior length of the hippocampus and its subfields: cornu ammonis (CA) 1, CA2/CA3, CA4/dentate gyrus (DG), strata radiatum/lacunosum/moleculare (SR/SL/SM), and subiculum. This protocol has been applied to five subjects (3F, 2M; age 29-57, avg. 37). Protocol reliability is assessed by resegmenting either the right or left hippocampus of each subject and computing the overlap using the Dice's kappa metric. Mean Dice's kappa (range) across the five subjects are: whole hippocampus, 0.91 (0.90-0.92); CA1, 0.78 (0.77-0.79); CA2/CA3, 0.64 (0.56-0.73); CA4/dentate gyrus, 0.83 (0.81-0.85); strata radiatum/lacunosum/moleculare, 0.71 (0.68-0.73); and subiculum 0.75 (0.72-0.78). The segmentation protocol presented here provides other laboratories with a reliable method to study the hippocampus and hippocampal subfields in vivo using commonly available MR tools. PMID:26575133

  20. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic study of IODP Site U1408 in the Northwest Atlantic - toward the high-resolution relative paleointensity estimate during the middle Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Yamazaki, T.; Oda, H.

    2015-12-01

    We have conducted paleomagnetic and rock magnetic measurements on the sedimentary sections recovered from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site U1408 in the Northwest Atlantic, off Newfoundland. The measurements were done on u-channel samples using a pass-through superconducting rock magnetometer in a manner that remanent magnetizations (natural, anhysteretic and isothermal remanent magnetizations: NRM, ARM and IRM) were subjected to stepwise alternating field (AF) demagnetizations up to 80 mT and are measured with 1 cm spacing at each step.The characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) was resolved after AF demagnetization of 20-30 mT for most of the studied interval. As a result, we could identify several polarity reversals which were able to be correlated with the geomagnetic polarity time scale by Gradstein et al. (2012) (Geologic Time Scale 2012), with referring the shipboard biostratigraphy (Norris et al., 2014). The interval at ~ 33-157 mcd (meter composite depth) was interpreted to cover the Chrons C18n.1n to C20n with missing Chron C19n because of the somewhat ambiguous magnetic signals at the interval at ~ 70-110 mcd. The correlation provided an age model inferring sedimentation rate of about 2-4 cm/kyr during these chrons.There is the interval that shows relatively constant ARM and IRM intensities as well as ratios of ARM to IRM (ARM/IRM): the interval at ~ 37-90 mcd resulted in ARM intensity of 0.2-0.4 A/m, IRM intensity of 1-2 A/m and ARM/IRM of 0.17-0.20. This interval corresponds to the Chron C18 and the estimated sedimentation rate of the interval is ~ 2 cm/kyr. It is expected that high-resolution relative paleointensity estimate during the middle Eocene is potentially possible. We will report a preliminary estimate.

  1. Iron in the Fire: Searching for Fire's Magnetic Fingerprint using Controlled Heating Experiments, High-Resolution FORCs, IRM Coercivity Spectra, and Low-Temperature Remanence Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippert, P. C.; Reiners, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    Evidence for recent climate-wildfire linkages underscores the need for better understanding of relationships between wildfire and major climate shifts in Earth history, which in turn offers the potential for prognoses for wildfire and human adaptations to it. In particular, what are the links between seasonality and wildfire frequency and severity, and what are the feedbacks between wildfire, landscape evolution, and biogeochemical cycles, particularly the carbon and iron cycles? A key first step in addressing these questions is recovering well-described wildfire records from a variety of paleolandscapes and paleoclimate regimes. Although charcoal and organic biomarkers are commonly used indicators of fire, taphonomic processes and time-consuming analytical preparations often preclude their routine use in some environments and in high-stratigraphic resolution paleowildfire surveying. The phenomenological relationship between fire and magnetic susceptibility can make it a useful surveying tool, but increased magnetic susceptibility in sediments is not unique to fire, and thus limits its diagnostic power. Here we utilize component-specific rock magnetic methods and analytical techniques to identify the rock magnetic fingerprint of wildfire. We use a custom-designed air furnace, a series of iron-free laboratory soils, natural saprolites and soils, and fuels from Arizona Ponderosa pine forests and grasslands to simulate wildfire in a controlled and monitored environment. Soil-ash residues and soil and fuel controls were then characterized using First Order Reversal Curve (FORC) patterns, DC backfield IRM coercivity spectra, low-temperature SIRM demagnetization behavior, and low-temperature cycling of room-temperature SIRM behavior. We will complement these magnetic analyses with high-resolution TEM of magnetic extracts. Here we summarize the systematic changes to sediment magnetism as pyrolitized organic matter is incorporated into artificial and natural soils. These

  2. Rock magnetic characterization and potential use as a high-resolution paleomagnetic recorder of fossil Porites corals in Ishigaki Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Y.; Nakamura, N.; Sato, T.

    2015-12-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) is produced by the cosmic rays in the upper atmosphere and is utilized for reconstructing the past solar activity using tree rings. This 14C production is also controlled by the geomagnetic field, and the short-term (at the ~ 10-100 yr duration) movement of the geomagnetic pole to the low latitude, like geomagnetic jerks, might leads to a higher 14C production rate. In order to reconstruct the past solar activity from the 14C concentration, we should know the movement of geomagnetic pole position and the field intensity in a decadal to centennial time series. Previous reconstructions of geomagnetic paleosecular variation lack to reconstruct the short-term variation of geomagnetic field in a decadal or centennial scale. Annual banded skeletons of hermatipic corals (e.g., Porites) might possess an enormous potential as a high-resolution paleomagnetic recorder due to their continuous growths through hundreds of years at a rapid rate (up to 2 cm/yr), although usual corals show an extremely weak intensity of remanence and its low stability. Here we found that recently-ceased Porites coral skeletons thrown up on beach of the Ishigaki Island (SW Japan) possess measurable natural remanence intensities and conducted thermal and AF demagnetization of coral skeletons. The characteristic remanence directions of almost all samples are relatively stable with some fluctuations. However, some samples exhibit obviously different remanence directions from its average with calcite peaks of X-ray diffraction analysis. It is indicated that the magnetic mineral assemblage consists of a dominant biogenic-origin single-domain magnetite and a minor detrital component from FORC measurement, FMR measurement and petrological observations by FE-SEM of acid-treated residuals of our corals. Our findings suggest that Porites coral framework samples have a potential use as a high-resolution paleomagnetic recorder with careful examination of calcite content.

  3. High resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the calcaneus: age-related changes in trabecular structure and comparison with dual X-ray absorptiometry measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouyang, X.; Selby, K.; Lang, P.; Engelke, K.; Klifa, C.; Fan, B.; Zucconi, F.; Hottya, G.; Chen, M.; Majumdar, S.; Genant, H. K.

    1997-01-01

    A high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol, together with specialized image processing techniques, was applied to the quantitative measurement of age-related changes in calcaneal trabecular structure. The reproducibility of the technique was assessed and the annual rates of change for several trabecular structure parameters were measured. The MR-derived trabecular parameters were compared with calcaneal bone mineral density (BMD), measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in the same subjects. Sagittal MR images were acquired at 1.5 T in 23 healthy women (mean age: 49.3 +/- 16.6 [SD]), using a three-dimensional gradient echo sequence. Image analysis procedures included internal gray-scale calibration, bone and marrow segmentation, and run-length methods. Three trabecular structure parameters, apparent bone volume (ABV/TV), intercept thickness (I.Th), and intercept separation (I.Sp) were calculated from the MR images. The short- and long-term precision errors (mean %CV) of these measured parameters were in the ranges 1-2% and 3-6%, respectively. Linear regression of the trabecular structure parameters vs. age showed significant correlation: ABV/TV (r2 = 33.7%, P < 0.0037), I.Th (r2 = 26.6%, P < 0.0118), I.Sp (r2 = 28.9%, P < 0.0081). These trends with age were also expressed as annual rates of change: ABV/TV (-0.52%/year), I.Th (-0.33%/year), and I.Sp (0.59%/year). Linear regression analysis also showed significant correlation between the MR-derived trabecular structure parameters and calcaneal BMD values. Although a larger group of subjects is needed to better define the age-related changes in trabecular structure parameters and their relation to BMD, these preliminary results demonstrate that high-resolution MRI may potentially be useful for the quantitative assessment of trabecular structure.

  4. High-resolution headlamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gut, Carsten; Cristea, Iulia; Neumann, Cornelius

    2016-04-01

    The following article shall describe how human vision by night can be influenced. At first, front lighting systems that are already available on the market will be described, followed by their analysis with respect to the positive effects on traffic safety. Furthermore, how traffic safety by night can be increased since the introduction of high resolution headlamps shall be discussed.

  5. High resolution data acquisition

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, Glenn W.; Fuller, Kenneth R.

    1993-01-01

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock (38) pulse train (37) and analog circuitry (44) for generating a triangular wave (46) synchronously with the pulse train (37). The triangular wave (46) has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter (18, 32) forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter (26) counts the clock pulse train (37) during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer (52) then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  6. High resolution data acquisition

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, G.W.; Fuller, K.R.

    1993-04-06

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock, pulse train, and analog circuitry for generating a triangular wave synchronously with the pulse train (as seen in diagram on patent). The triangular wave has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter counts the clock pulse train during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  7. High-Resolution Autoradiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towe, George C; Gomberg, Henry J; Freemen, J W

    1955-01-01

    This investigation was made to adapt wet-process autoradiography to metallurgical samples to obtain high resolution of segregated radioactive elements in microstructures. Results are confined to development of the technique, which was perfected to a resolution of less than 10 microns. The radioactive samples included carbon-14 carburized iron and steel, nickel-63 electroplated samples, a powder product containing nickel-63, and tungsten-185 in N-155 alloy.

  8. Ultra high resolution tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, W.S.

    1994-11-15

    Recent work and results on ultra high resolution three dimensional imaging with soft x-rays will be presented. This work is aimed at determining microscopic three dimensional structure of biological and material specimens. Three dimensional reconstructed images of a microscopic test object will be presented; the reconstruction has a resolution on the order of 1000 A in all three dimensions. Preliminary work with biological samples will also be shown, and the experimental and numerical methods used will be discussed.

  9. The Precambrian Singo Igneous Complex (SIC), Uganda Revealed As a Mineralized Nested Ring Complex Using High Resolution Airborne Radiometric and Magnetic Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atekwana, E. A.; LePera, A.; Abdelsalam, M. G.; Katumwehe, A. B.; Achang, M.

    2014-12-01

    We used high-resolution radiometrics and aeromagnetic data to investigate the Precambrian Singo Igneous Complex (SIC) in Uganda. The SIC covers an area of about 700 km² and is host to hydrothermally formed economic minerals such as Gold and Tungsten. The distribution of the ore deposits is not well known and current mine workings are limited to the western margins of the complex. Our objectives were to (1) provide a detailed geological map of the SIC and surrounding, (2) investigate relationships between preserved intrusive bodies and Precambrian tectonic structures to provide insight into emplacement of the complex, (3) examine links between magma emplacement, discontinuities and hydrothermal alteration (4) generate two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) models of the complex to understand its subsurface geometry, (5) investigate the relationship between the structure of the SIC and mineral occurrences as an aid to future exploration programs. Edge enhancement filters such as the analytical signal, vertical and tilt derivatives were applied to the magnetic data. In addition, 2-D and 3-D models were produced using Geosoft's GM-SYS 2-D and Voxi modules. The filtered data provided unprecedented structural details of the complex and revealed the following: (1) the edge of the SIC is characterized by higher magnetic susceptibility and Thorium content than its interior, (2) the SIC is characterized by eight to nine nested ring complexes with diameters ranging from 2.5 to 14 km, (3) the 3-D inversion suggests near vertical walls for the ring complexes extending to a depth of about 7 km, (4) the SIC was emplaced within a Precambrian folded basement and was traversed by numerous NW-trending dykes and (5) present day mining activities are concentrated within the folded basement units although occurrences of Tungsten and Gold are found associated with the highly magnetized edge of the ring complexes. We interpret the highly magnetized edges of the nested ring

  10. Analysis of the Thermal Degradation of the Individual Anthocyanin Compounds of Black Carrot (Daucus carota L.): A New Approach Using High-Resolution Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Iliopoulou, Ioanna; Thaeron, Delphine; Baker, Ashley; Jones, Anita; Robertson, Neil

    2015-08-12

    The black carrot dye is a mixture of cyanidin molecules, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of which shows a highly overlapped aromatic region. In this study, the (1)H NMR (800 MHz) aromatic chemical shifts of the mixture were fully assigned by overlaying them with the characterized (1)H NMR chemical shifts of the separated compounds. The latter were isolated using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), and their chemical shifts were identified using (1)H and two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy (COSY) NMR spectroscopy. The stability of the black carrot mixture to heat exposure was investigated at pH 3.6, 6.8, and 8.0 by heat-treating aqueous solutions at 100 °C and the powdered material at 180 °C. From integration of high-resolution (1)H NMR spectra, it was possible to follow the relative degradation of each compound, offering advantages over the commonly used ultraviolet/visible (UV/vis) and HPLC approaches. UV/vis spectroscopy and CIE color measurements were used to determine thermally induced color changes, under normal cooking conditions.

  11. Characterization of metabolic profile of intact non-tumor and tumor breast cells by high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maria, Roberta M; Altei, Wanessa F; Andricopulo, Adriano D; Becceneri, Amanda B; Cominetti, Márcia R; Venâncio, Tiago; Colnago, Luiz A

    2015-11-01

    (1)H high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H HR-MAS NMR) spectroscopy was used to analyze the metabolic profile of an intact non-tumor breast cell line (MCF-10A) and intact breast tumor cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). In the spectra of MCF-10A cells, six metabolites were assigned, with glucose and ethanol in higher concentrations. Fifteen metabolites were assigned in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 (1)H HR-MAS NMR spectra. They did not show glucose and ethanol, and the major component in both tumor cells was phosphocholine (higher in MDA-MB-231 than in MCF-7), which can be considered as a tumor biomarker of breast cancer malignant transformation. These tumor cells also show acetone signal that was higher in MDA-MB-231 cells than in MCF-7 cells. The high acetone level may be an indication of high demand for energy in MDA-MB-231 to maintain cell proliferation. The higher acetone and phosphocholine levels in MDA-MB-231 cells indicate the higher malignance of the cell line. Therefore, HR-MAS is a rapid reproducible method to study the metabolic profile of intact breast cells, with minimal sample preparation and contamination, which are critical in the analyses of slow-growth cells. PMID:26247715

  12. Characterization of metabolic profile of intact non-tumor and tumor breast cells by high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maria, Roberta M; Altei, Wanessa F; Andricopulo, Adriano D; Becceneri, Amanda B; Cominetti, Márcia R; Venâncio, Tiago; Colnago, Luiz A

    2015-11-01

    (1)H high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H HR-MAS NMR) spectroscopy was used to analyze the metabolic profile of an intact non-tumor breast cell line (MCF-10A) and intact breast tumor cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). In the spectra of MCF-10A cells, six metabolites were assigned, with glucose and ethanol in higher concentrations. Fifteen metabolites were assigned in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 (1)H HR-MAS NMR spectra. They did not show glucose and ethanol, and the major component in both tumor cells was phosphocholine (higher in MDA-MB-231 than in MCF-7), which can be considered as a tumor biomarker of breast cancer malignant transformation. These tumor cells also show acetone signal that was higher in MDA-MB-231 cells than in MCF-7 cells. The high acetone level may be an indication of high demand for energy in MDA-MB-231 to maintain cell proliferation. The higher acetone and phosphocholine levels in MDA-MB-231 cells indicate the higher malignance of the cell line. Therefore, HR-MAS is a rapid reproducible method to study the metabolic profile of intact breast cells, with minimal sample preparation and contamination, which are critical in the analyses of slow-growth cells.

  13. Metabolomics by Proton High-Resolution Magic-Angle-Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Tomato Plants Treated with Two Secondary Metabolites Isolated from Trichoderma.

    PubMed

    Mazzei, Pierluigi; Vinale, Francesco; Woo, Sheridan Lois; Pascale, Alberto; Lorito, Matteo; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2016-05-11

    Trichoderma fungi release 6-pentyl-2H-pyran-2-one (1) and harzianic acid (2) secondary metabolites to improve plant growth and health protection. We isolated metabolites 1 and 2 from Trichoderma strains, whose different concentrations were used to treat seeds of Solanum lycopersicum. The metabolic profile in the resulting 15 day old tomato leaves was studied by high-resolution magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HRMAS NMR) spectroscopy directly on the whole samples without any preliminary extraction. Principal component analysis (PCA) of HRMAS NMR showed significantly enhanced acetylcholine and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content accompanied by variable amount of amino acids in samples treated with both Trichoderma secondary metabolites. Seed germination rates, seedling fresh weight, and the metabolome of tomato leaves were also dependent upon doses of metabolites 1 and 2 treatments. HRMAS NMR spectroscopy was proven to represent a rapid and reliable technique for evaluating specific changes in the metabolome of plant leaves and calibrating the best concentration of bioactive compounds required to stimulate plant growth. PMID:27088924

  14. Metabolomics by Proton High-Resolution Magic-Angle-Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Tomato Plants Treated with Two Secondary Metabolites Isolated from Trichoderma.

    PubMed

    Mazzei, Pierluigi; Vinale, Francesco; Woo, Sheridan Lois; Pascale, Alberto; Lorito, Matteo; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2016-05-11

    Trichoderma fungi release 6-pentyl-2H-pyran-2-one (1) and harzianic acid (2) secondary metabolites to improve plant growth and health protection. We isolated metabolites 1 and 2 from Trichoderma strains, whose different concentrations were used to treat seeds of Solanum lycopersicum. The metabolic profile in the resulting 15 day old tomato leaves was studied by high-resolution magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HRMAS NMR) spectroscopy directly on the whole samples without any preliminary extraction. Principal component analysis (PCA) of HRMAS NMR showed significantly enhanced acetylcholine and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content accompanied by variable amount of amino acids in samples treated with both Trichoderma secondary metabolites. Seed germination rates, seedling fresh weight, and the metabolome of tomato leaves were also dependent upon doses of metabolites 1 and 2 treatments. HRMAS NMR spectroscopy was proven to represent a rapid and reliable technique for evaluating specific changes in the metabolome of plant leaves and calibrating the best concentration of bioactive compounds required to stimulate plant growth.

  15. High resolution magnetic resonance imaging for characterization of the neuroligin-3 knock-in mouse model associated with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Duda, Jeffery T; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Kenworthy, Charles; Ittyerah, Ranjit; Pickup, Stephen; Brodkin, Edward S; Gee, James C; Abel, Ted; Poptani, Harish

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) comprise an etiologically heterogeneous set of neurodevelopmental disorders. Neuroligin-3 (NL-3) is a cell adhesion protein that mediates synapse development and has been implicated in ASD. We performed ex-vivo high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and behavioral (social approach and zero maze) tests at 3 different time points (30, 50 and 70 days-of-age) on NL-3 and wild-type littermates to assess developmental brain abnormalities in NL-3 mice. MRI data were segmented in 39 different gray and white matter regions. Volumetric measurements, along with DTI indices from these segmented regions were also performed. After controlling for age and gender, the NL-3 knock-in animals demonstrated significantly reduced sociability and lower anxiety-related behavior in comparison to their wild type littermates. Significantly reduced volume of several white and gray matter regions in the NL-3 knock-in mice were also observed after considering age, gender and time point as covariates. These findings suggest that structural changes in the brain of NL-3 mice are induced by the mutation in the NL-3 gene. No significant differences in DTI indices were observed, which suggests that the NL-3 mutation may not have a profound effect on water diffusion as detected by DTI. The volumetric and DTI studies aid in understanding the biology of disrupting function on an ASD risk model and may assist in the development of imaging biomarkers for ASD.

  16. High resolution soft x-ray bending magnet beamline 9.3.2 with circularly polarized radiation capability at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Z.; Heimann, P.A.; McKinney, W.; Padmore, H.A.; Huff, W.R.A.; Kellar, S.A.; Moler, E.J. |; Fadley, C.S. |; Shirley, D.A.

    1995-08-01

    Bending magnet beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) was designed for high resolution spectroscopy in the soft x-ray energy region, covering a range from 30 eV to 1500 eV with three gratings. The monochromator itself is a standard fixed included angle 55 m spherical grating monochromator and was originally used at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) as a prototype for later insertion device based monochromators for the ALS. For operations at the ALS, the toroidal pre-mirror used at SSRL to vertically focus onto the entrance slit and horizontally focus onto the exit slit was replaced by two separate crossed mirrors (Kirkpatrick-Baez configuration). Circularly polarized radiation is obtained by inserting a water-cooled movable aperture in front of the vertically focusing mirror to allow selecting the beam either above or below the horizontal plane. To maintain a stable beam intensity through the entrance slit, the photocurrent signals from the upper and lower jaws of the entrance slit are utilized to set a feedback loop with the vertically deflecting mirror Piezoelectric drive. The beamline end station has a rotatable platform (through 60{degree}) that accommodates two experimental chambers, enabling the synchrotron radiation to be directed to either one without breaking vacuum.

  17. Quantification of microheterogeneity in glioblastoma multiforme with ex vivo high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HRMAS) proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, L. L.; Anthony, D. C.; Comite, A. R.; Black, P. M.; Tzika, A. A.; Gonzalez, R. G.

    2000-01-01

    Microheterogeneity is a routinely observed neuropathologic characteristic in brain tumor pathology. Although microheterogeneity is readily documented by routine histologic techniques, these techniques only measure tumor status at the time of biopsy or surgery and do not indicate likely tumor progression. A biochemical screening technique calibrated against pathologic standards would greatly assist in predicting tumor progression from its biological activity. Here we demonstrate for the first time that proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) with high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HRMAS), a technique introduced in 1997, can preserve tissue histopathologic features while producing well-resolved spectra of cellular metabolites in the identical intact tissue specimens. Observed biochemical alterations and tumor histopathologic characteristics can thus be correlated for the same surgical specimen, obviating the problems caused by tumor microheterogeneity. We analyzed multiple specimens of a single human glioblastoma multiforme surgically removed from a 44-year-old patient. Each specimen was first measured with HRMAS 1H MRS to determine tumor metabolites, then evaluated by quantitative histopathology. The concentrations of lactate and mobile lipids measured with HRMAS linearly reflected the percentage of tumor necrosis. Moreover, metabolic ratios of phosphorylcholine to choline correlated linearly with the percentage of the highly cellular malignant glioma. The quantification of tumor metabolic changes with HRMAS 1H MRS, in conjunction with subsequent histopathology of the same tumor specimen, has the potential to further our knowledge of the biochemistry of tumor heterogeneity during development, and thus ultimately to improve our accuracy in diagnosing, characterizing, and evaluating tumor progression. PMID:11303625

  18. Analysis of the Thermal Degradation of the Individual Anthocyanin Compounds of Black Carrot (Daucus carota L.): A New Approach Using High-Resolution Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Iliopoulou, Ioanna; Thaeron, Delphine; Baker, Ashley; Jones, Anita; Robertson, Neil

    2015-08-12

    The black carrot dye is a mixture of cyanidin molecules, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of which shows a highly overlapped aromatic region. In this study, the (1)H NMR (800 MHz) aromatic chemical shifts of the mixture were fully assigned by overlaying them with the characterized (1)H NMR chemical shifts of the separated compounds. The latter were isolated using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), and their chemical shifts were identified using (1)H and two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy (COSY) NMR spectroscopy. The stability of the black carrot mixture to heat exposure was investigated at pH 3.6, 6.8, and 8.0 by heat-treating aqueous solutions at 100 °C and the powdered material at 180 °C. From integration of high-resolution (1)H NMR spectra, it was possible to follow the relative degradation of each compound, offering advantages over the commonly used ultraviolet/visible (UV/vis) and HPLC approaches. UV/vis spectroscopy and CIE color measurements were used to determine thermally induced color changes, under normal cooking conditions. PMID:26160425

  19. High-resolution seismic-reflection and marine-magnetic data from offshore central California--San Gregorio to Point Sur

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sliter, Ray W.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Watt, Janet T.; Scheirer, Daniel S.; Allwardt, Parker; Triezenberg, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey collected high-resolution seismic-reflection data on four surveys (S-N1-09-MB, S-15-10-NC, S-06-11-MB, and S-04-12-MB) and marine-magnetic data on one survey (S-06-11-MB) between 2009 and 2012, offshore of central California between San Gregorio and Point Sur. This work was supported in part by the California Seafloor Mapping Program. The survey areas span about 120 km of California's coast (including Monterey Bay). Most data were collected aboard the U.S. Geological Survey R/V Parke Snavely. Cumulatively, approximately 1,410 km of single-channel seismic-reflection data were acquired, mainly using a SIG 2mille minisparker. About 44 km of data were collected simultaneously using an EdgeTech Chirp 512. Subbottom acoustic penetration spanned tens to several hundreds of meters, variable by location. Marine magnetic data were collected on approximately 460 km of track lines (mainly in southern Monterey Bay) using a Geometrics G882 cesium-vapor marine magnetometer. This report includes maps and navigation files of the surveyed transects, linked to Google Earth™ software, as well as digital data files showing images of each transect in SEG-Y and JPEG formats. The images of bedrock, sediment deposits, and tectonic structure provide geologic information that is essential to hazard assessment, regional sediment management, and coastal and marine spatial planning at Federal, State and local levels, as well as to future research on the geomorphic, sedimentary, tectonic, and climatic record of central California.

  20. High Resolution Neutral Atom Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucay, Igal; Castillo-Garza, Rodrigo; Stratis, Georgios; Raizen, Mark

    2015-03-01

    We are developing a high resolution neutral atom microscope based on metastable atom electron spectroscopy (MAES). When a metastable atom of a noble gas is near a solid, a surface electron will tunnel to an empty energy level of the metastable atom, thereby ejecting the excited electron from the atom. The emitted electrons carry information regarding the local topography and electronic, magnetic, and chemical structures of most hard materials. Furthermore, using a chromatic aberration corrected magnetic hexapole lens we expect to attain a spatial resolution below 10 nm. We will use this microscope to investigate how local phenomena can give rise to macroscopic effects in materials that cannot be probed using a scanning tunneling microscope, namely insulating transition metal oxides.

  1. High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Intact Zebrafish Embryos Detects Metabolic Changes Following Exposure to Teratogenic Polymethoxyalkenes from Algae.

    PubMed

    Berry, John P; Roy, Upasana; Jaja-Chimedza, Asha; Sanchez, Kristel; Matysik, Joerg; Alia, A

    2016-10-01

    Techniques based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for imaging and chemical analyses of in vivo, or otherwise intact, biological systems are rapidly emerging and finding diverse applications within a wide range of fields. Very recently, several NMR-based techniques have been developed for the zebrafish as a model animal system. In the current study, the novel application of high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR is presented as a means of metabolic profiling of intact zebrafish embryos. Toward investigating the utility of HR-MAS NMR as a toxicological tool, these studies specifically examined metabolic changes of embryos exposed to polymethoxy-1-alkenes (PMAs)-a recently identified family of teratogenic compounds from freshwater algae-as emerging environmental contaminants. One-dimensional and two-dimensional HR-MAS NMR analyses were able to effectively identify and quantify diverse metabolites in early-stage (≤36 h postfertilization) embryos. Subsequent comparison of the metabolic profiles between PMA-exposed and control embryos identified several statistically significant metabolic changes associated with subacute exposure to the teratogen, including (1) elevated inositol as a recognized component of signaling pathways involved in embryo development; (2) increases in several metabolites, including inositol, phosphoryl choline, fatty acids, and cholesterol, which are associated with lipid composition of cell membranes; (3) concomitant increase in glucose and decrease in lactate; and (4) decreases in several biochemically related metabolites associated with central nervous system development and function, including γ-aminobutyric acid, glycine, glutamate, and glutamine. A potentially unifying model/hypothesis of PMA teratogenicity based on the data is presented. These findings, taken together, demonstrate that HR-MAS NMR is a promising tool for metabolic profiling in the zebrafish embryo, including toxicological applications.

  2. Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction for high-resolution bioimepedance imaging through vector source reconstruction under the static field of MRI magnet

    PubMed Central

    Mariappan, Leo; Hu, Gang; He, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is an imaging modality to reconstruct the electrical conductivity of biological tissue based on the acoustic measurements of Lorentz force induced tissue vibration. This study presents the feasibility of the authors' new MAT-MI system and vector source imaging algorithm to perform a complete reconstruction of the conductivity distribution of real biological tissues with ultrasound spatial resolution. Methods: In the present study, using ultrasound beamformation, imaging point spread functions are designed to reconstruct the induced vector source in the object which is used to estimate the object conductivity distribution. Both numerical studies and phantom experiments are performed to demonstrate the merits of the proposed method. Also, through the numerical simulations, the full width half maximum of the imaging point spread function is calculated to estimate of the spatial resolution. The tissue phantom experiments are performed with a MAT-MI imaging system in the static field of a 9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging magnet. Results: The image reconstruction through vector beamformation in the numerical and experimental studies gives a reliable estimate of the conductivity distribution in the object with a ∼1.5 mm spatial resolution corresponding to the imaging system frequency of 500 kHz ultrasound. In addition, the experiment results suggest that MAT-MI under high static magnetic field environment is able to reconstruct images of tissue-mimicking gel phantoms and real tissue samples with reliable conductivity contrast. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that MAT-MI is able to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues with better than 2 mm spatial resolution at 500 kHz, and the imaging with MAT-MI under a high static magnetic field environment is able to provide improved imaging contrast for biological tissue conductivity reconstruction. PMID:24506649

  3. Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction for high-resolution bioimepedance imaging through vector source reconstruction under the static field of MRI magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Mariappan, Leo; Hu, Gang; He, Bin

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is an imaging modality to reconstruct the electrical conductivity of biological tissue based on the acoustic measurements of Lorentz force induced tissue vibration. This study presents the feasibility of the authors' new MAT-MI system and vector source imaging algorithm to perform a complete reconstruction of the conductivity distribution of real biological tissues with ultrasound spatial resolution. Methods: In the present study, using ultrasound beamformation, imaging point spread functions are designed to reconstruct the induced vector source in the object which is used to estimate the object conductivity distribution. Both numerical studies and phantom experiments are performed to demonstrate the merits of the proposed method. Also, through the numerical simulations, the full width half maximum of the imaging point spread function is calculated to estimate of the spatial resolution. The tissue phantom experiments are performed with a MAT-MI imaging system in the static field of a 9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging magnet. Results: The image reconstruction through vector beamformation in the numerical and experimental studies gives a reliable estimate of the conductivity distribution in the object with a ∼1.5 mm spatial resolution corresponding to the imaging system frequency of 500 kHz ultrasound. In addition, the experiment results suggest that MAT-MI under high static magnetic field environment is able to reconstruct images of tissue-mimicking gel phantoms and real tissue samples with reliable conductivity contrast. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that MAT-MI is able to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues with better than 2 mm spatial resolution at 500 kHz, and the imaging with MAT-MI under a high static magnetic field environment is able to provide improved imaging contrast for biological tissue conductivity reconstruction.

  4. Enhanced High Resolution RBS System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Thomas J.; Hass, James A.; Klody, George M.

    2011-06-01

    Improvements in full spectrum resolution with the second NEC high resolution RBS system are summarized. Results for 50 Å TiN/HfO films on Si yielding energy resolution on the order of 1 keV are also presented. Detector enhancements include improved pulse processing electronics, upgraded shielding for the MCP/RAE detector, and reduced noise generated from pumping. Energy resolution measurements on spectra front edge coupled with calculations using 0.4mStr solid angle show that beam energy spread at 400 KeV from the Pelletron® accelerator is less than 100 eV. To improve user throughput, magnet control has been added to the automatic data collection. Depth profiles derived from experimental data are discussed. For the thin films profiled, depth resolutions were on the Angstrom level with the non-linear energy/channel conversions ranging from 100 to 200 eV.

  5. Linking contemporary high resolution magnetic resonance imaging to the von Economo legacy: A study on the comparison of MRI cortical thickness and histological measurements of cortical structure.

    PubMed

    Scholtens, Lianne H; de Reus, Marcel A; van den Heuvel, Martijn P

    2015-08-01

    The cerebral cortex is a distinctive part of the mammalian nervous system, displaying a spatial variety in cyto-, chemico-, and myelinoarchitecture. As part of a rich history of histological findings, pioneering anatomists von Economo and Koskinas provided detailed mappings on the cellular structure of the human cortex, reporting on quantitative aspects of cytoarchitecture of cortical areas. Current day investigations into the structure of human cortex have embraced technological advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to assess macroscale thickness and organization of the cortical mantle in vivo. However, direct comparisons between current day MRI estimates and the quantitative measurements of early anatomists have been limited. Here, we report on a simple, but nevertheless important cross-analysis between the histological reports of von Economo and Koskinas on variation in thickness of the cortical mantle and MRI derived measurements of cortical thickness. We translated the von Economo cortical atlas to a subdivision of the commonly used Desikan-Killiany atlas (as part of the FreeSurfer Software package and a commonly used parcellation atlas in studies examining MRI cortical thickness). Next, values of "width of the cortical mantle" as provided by the measurements of von Economo and Koskinas were correlated to cortical thickness measurements derived from high-resolution anatomical MRI T1 data of 200+ subjects of the Human Connectome Project (HCP). Cross-correlation revealed a significant association between group-averaged MRI measurements of cortical thickness and histological recordings (r = 0.54, P < 0.001). Further validating such a correlation, we manually segmented the von Economo parcellation atlas on the standardized Colin27 brain dataset and applied the obtained three-dimensional von Economo segmentation atlas to the T1 data of each of the HCP subjects. Highly consistent with our findings for the mapping to the Desikan-Killiany regions, cross

  6. Novel insight into the detailed myocardial motion and deformation of the rodent heart using high-resolution phase contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    .89%strain and −0.71 ± 1.67%strain, for intra- and interstudy, respectively). Conclusion We demonstrate, for the first time, that PC-CMR enables high-resolution evaluation of in vivo circumferential strain in addition to myocardial motion of the rat heart. In combination with the superior geometric robustness of CMR, this ultimately provides a tool for longitudinal studies of regional function in rodents with high level of detail. PMID:24034168

  7. High Resolution Laboratory Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brünken, S.; Schlemmer, S.

    2016-05-01

    In this short review we will highlight some of the recent advancements in the field of high-resolution laboratory spectroscopy that meet the needs dictated by the advent of highly sensitive and broadband telescopes like ALMA and SOFIA. Among these is the development of broadband techniques for the study of complex organic molecules, like fast scanning conventional absorption spectroscopy based on multiplier chains, chirped pulse instrumentation, or the use of synchrotron facilities. Of similar importance is the extension of the accessible frequency range to THz frequencies, where many light hydrides have their ground state rotational transitions. Another key experimental challenge is the production of sufficiently high number densities of refractory and transient species in the laboratory, where discharges have proven to be efficient sources that can also be coupled to molecular jets. For ionic molecular species sensitive action spectroscopic schemes have recently been developed to overcome some of the limitations of conventional absorption spectroscopy. Throughout this review examples demonstrating the strong interplay between laboratory and observational studies will be given.

  8. High Resolution Doppler Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Paul B.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) on UARS spacecraft during the period 4/l/96 - 3/31/99. During this period, HRDI operation, data processing, and data analysis continued, and there was a high level of vitality in the HRDI project. The HRDI has been collecting data from the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere since instrument activation on October 1, 1991. The HRDI team has stressed three areas since operations commenced: 1) operation of the instrument in a manner which maximizes the quality and versatility of the collected data; 2) algorithm development and validation to produce a high-quality data product; and 3) scientific studies, primarily of the dynamics of the middle atmosphere. There has been no significant degradation in the HRDI instrument since operations began nearly 8 years ago. HRDI operations are fairly routine, although we have continued to look for ways to improve the quality of the scientific product, either by improving existing modes, or by designing new ones. The HRDI instrument has been programmed to collect data for new scientific studies, such as measurements of fluorescence from plants, measuring cloud top heights, and lower atmosphere H2O.

  9. High Resolution Formaldehyde Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernest, C. T.; Bauer, D.; Hynes, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is the most abundant and most important organic carbonyl compound in the atmosphere. The sources of formaldehyde are the oxidation of methane, isoprene, acetone, and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); fossil fuel combustion; and biomass burning. The dominant loss mechanism for formaldehyde is photolysis which occurs via two pathways: (R1) HCHO + hv → HCO + H (R2) HCHO + hv → H2 + CO The first pathway (R1) is referred to as the radical channel, while the second pathway (R2) is referred to as the molecular channel. The products of both pathways play a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. The CO that is produced in the molecular channel undergoes further oxidation to produce CO2. Under atmospheric conditions, the H atom and formyl radical that are produced in the radical channel undergo rapid reactions with O2 to produce the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) via (R3) and (R4). (R3) HCO + O2 → HO2 + CO (R4) H + O2 → HO2 Thus, for every photon absorbed, the photolysis of formaldehyde can contribute one CO2 molecule to the global greenhouse budget or two HO2 radicals to the tropospheric HOx (OH + HO2) cycle. The HO2 radicals produced during formaldehyde photolysis have also been implicated in the formation of photochemical smog. The HO2 radicals act as radical chain carriers and convert NO to NO2, which ultimately results in the catalytic production of O3. Constraining the yield of HO2 produced via HCHO photolysis is essential for improving tropospheric chemistry models. In this study, both the absorption cross section and the quantum yield of the radical channel (R1) were measured at high resolution over the tropospherically relevant wavelength range 304-330 nm. For the cross section measurements a narrow linewidth Nd:YAG pumped dye laser was used with a multi-pass cell. Partial pressures of HCHO were kept below 0.3 torr. Simultaneous measurement of OH LIF in a flame allowed absolute calibration of the wavelength scale. Pressure

  10. High resolution time interval meter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

  11. High-resolution PTP1B inhibition profiling combined with high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: Proof-of-concept and antidiabetic constituents in crude extract of Eremophila lucida.

    PubMed

    Tahtah, Yousof; Wubshet, Sileshi G; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Heskes, Allison Maree; Pateraki, Irini; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Jäger, Anna K; Staerk, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) constituted 90% of the global 387 million diabetes cases in 2014. The enzyme protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been recognized as a therapeutic target for treatment of T2D and its adverse complications. With the aim of accelerating the investigation of complex natural sources, such as crude plant extracts, for potential PTP1B inhibitors, we have developed a bio-analytical platform combining high-resolution PTP1B inhibition profiling and high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, i.e., HR-bioassay/HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR. Human recombinant PTP1B enzyme was used for the microplate-based PTP1B inhibition assay, which was optimized for pH and substrate concentration to be compatible with rate measurements within the 10 min incubation time. Subsequently, analytical-scale HPLC-based microfractionation followed by colorimetric microplate-based PTP1B bioassaying enabled construction of a high-resolution inhibition profile corresponding to the HPLC profile. The high-resolution PTP1B inhibition profiling was validated using an artificial mixture of known PTP1B inhibitors and non-inhibiting compounds as negative controls. Finally, a proof-of-concept study with a real sample was performed using crude ethyl acetate extract of the phytochemically hitherto unexplored plant Eremophila lucida. This led to the identification of the first viscidane type diterpene, i.e., 5-hydroxyviscida-3,14-dien-20-oic acid (9) as PTP1B inhibitor with an IC50 value of 42.0 ± 5.9 μM. In addition, a series of flavonoids, i.e., luteolin (1), dinatin (3a), tricin (3b), 3,6-dimethoxyapigenin (4), jaceidin (5), and cirsimaritin (6) as well as a cembrene diterpene, (3Z, 7E, 11Z)-15-hydroxycembra-3,7,11-trien-19-oic acid (8), were also identified for the first time from E. lucida.

  12. High-resolution PTP1B inhibition profiling combined with high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: Proof-of-concept and antidiabetic constituents in crude extract of Eremophila lucida.

    PubMed

    Tahtah, Yousof; Wubshet, Sileshi G; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Heskes, Allison Maree; Pateraki, Irini; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Jäger, Anna K; Staerk, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) constituted 90% of the global 387 million diabetes cases in 2014. The enzyme protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been recognized as a therapeutic target for treatment of T2D and its adverse complications. With the aim of accelerating the investigation of complex natural sources, such as crude plant extracts, for potential PTP1B inhibitors, we have developed a bio-analytical platform combining high-resolution PTP1B inhibition profiling and high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, i.e., HR-bioassay/HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR. Human recombinant PTP1B enzyme was used for the microplate-based PTP1B inhibition assay, which was optimized for pH and substrate concentration to be compatible with rate measurements within the 10 min incubation time. Subsequently, analytical-scale HPLC-based microfractionation followed by colorimetric microplate-based PTP1B bioassaying enabled construction of a high-resolution inhibition profile corresponding to the HPLC profile. The high-resolution PTP1B inhibition profiling was validated using an artificial mixture of known PTP1B inhibitors and non-inhibiting compounds as negative controls. Finally, a proof-of-concept study with a real sample was performed using crude ethyl acetate extract of the phytochemically hitherto unexplored plant Eremophila lucida. This led to the identification of the first viscidane type diterpene, i.e., 5-hydroxyviscida-3,14-dien-20-oic acid (9) as PTP1B inhibitor with an IC50 value of 42.0 ± 5.9 μM. In addition, a series of flavonoids, i.e., luteolin (1), dinatin (3a), tricin (3b), 3,6-dimethoxyapigenin (4), jaceidin (5), and cirsimaritin (6) as well as a cembrene diterpene, (3Z, 7E, 11Z)-15-hydroxycembra-3,7,11-trien-19-oic acid (8), were also identified for the first time from E. lucida. PMID:26882973

  13. Endoluminal ultrasound applicator with an integrated RF coil for high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity contact ultrasound thermotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rata, Mihaela; Salomir, Rares; Umathum, Reiner; Jenne, Jürgen; Lafon, Cyril; Cotton, François; Bock, Michael

    2008-11-01

    High-intensity contact ultrasound (HICU) under MRI guidance may provide minimally invasive treatment of endocavitary digestive tumors in the esophagus, colon or rectum. In this study, a miniature receive-only coil was integrated into an endoscopic ultrasound applicator to offer high-resolution MRI guidance of thermotherapy. A cylindrical plastic support with an incorporated single element flat transducer (9.45 MHz, water cooling tip) was made and equipped with a rectangular RF loop coil surrounding the active element. The integrated coil provided significantly higher sensitivity than a four-element extracorporeal phased array coil, and the standard deviation of the MR thermometry (SDT) improved up to a factor of 7 at 10 mm depth in tissue. High-resolution morphological images (T1w-TFE and IR-T1w-TSE with a voxel size of 0.25 × 0.25 × 3 mm3) and accurate thermometry data (the PRFS method with a voxel size of 0.5 × 0.5 × 5 mm3, 2.2 s/image, 0.3 °C voxel-wise SDT) were acquired in an ex vivo esophagus sample, on a clinical 1.5T scanner. The endoscopic device was actively operated under automatic temperature control, demonstrating a high level of accuracy (1.7% standard deviation, 1.1% error of mean value), which indicates that this technology may be suitable for HICU therapy of endoluminal cancer.

  14. Relationship between preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and surgical findings: aneurysm wall thickness on high-resolution T1-weighted imaging and contact with surrounding tissue on steady-state free precession imaging.

    PubMed

    Tenjin, Hiroshi; Tanigawa, Seisuke; Takadou, Michiko; Ogawa, Takahiro; Mandai, Ayako; Nanto, Masataka; Osaka, Yasuhiko; Nakahara, Yoshikazu; Umeda, Masahiro; Higuchi, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the aneurysm wall thickness by high-resolution T1-weighted imaging and the contact between the aneurysm and surrounding tissue by steady-state free precession (SSFP) imaging. The surgical findings were prospectively compared with these preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings in 35 consecutive patients with 37 unruptured cerebral aneurysms (UCAs). The aneurysm wall was not visible in 13 UCAs, but was visible in 23. Subarachnoid space between the aneurysm and surrounding tissue was visible in 16 UCAs, a visible layer of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) between the aneurysm and surrounding tissue in 12, and no visible layer in 7. MR imaging predicted the surgical findings in 29 UCAs (78%), showed different findings in six UCAs (16%), and two (5%) could not be evaluated due to insufficient quality of preoperative MR images. Among the UCAs with different findings, five UCAs had a partially thin wall even though high-resolution T1-weighted imaging had shown a visible wall, and one UCA showed less contact with the surrounding tissue even though the SSFP imaging had shown no visible CSF layer. In conclusion, high-resolution T1-weighted imaging and SSFP imaging provided significant additional preoperative information regarding UCAs and the surrounding tissue.

  15. Effect of magnetism on lattice dynamics in SrFe2As2 using high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, N.; Fukuda, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nakajima, M.; Uchiyama, H.; Ishikawa, D.; Tsutsui, S.; Nakamura, H.; Machida, M.; Miyasaka, S.; Tajima, S.; Baron, A. Q. R.

    2016-01-01

    Phonon spectra of detwinned SrFe2As2 crystals, as measured by inelastic x-ray scattering, show clear anisotropy accompanying the magnetostructural transition at 200 K. We model the mode splitting using magnetic DFT calculations, including a phenomenological reduction in force-constant anisotropy that can be attributed to magnetic fluctuations. This serves as a starting point for a general model of phonons in this material applicable to both the antiferromagnetically ordered phase and the paramagnetic phase. Using this model, the measured splitting in the magnetic phase below TN, and the measured phonon linewidth, we set a lower bound on the mean magnetic fluctuation frequency above TN at 210 K.

  16. Magnetic studies of archaeological obsidian: Variability of eruptive conditions within obsidian flows is key to high-resolution artifact sourcing (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, J. M.; Frahm, E.; Muth, M.

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have endeavored to use petrophysical traits of obsidian, particularly its magnetic properties, as an alternative to conventional geochemical sourcing, one of the greatest successes in archaeological science. Magnetic approaches, however, have not seen widespread application due to their mixed success. In a time when geochemical analyses can be conducted non-destructively, in the field, and in a minute or two, magnetic measurements of obsidian must offer novel archaeological insights to be worthwhile, not merely act as a less successful version of geochemistry. To this end, we report the findings of a large-scale study of obsidian magnetism, which includes 912 geological obsidian specimens and 97 artifacts measured for six simple magnetic parameters. Based on these results, we propose, rather than using magnetic properties to source artifacts to a particular obsidian flow (inter-flow sourcing), these properties are best used to differentiate quarrying sites within an individual flow (intra-flow sourcing). The magnetic properties within an individual flow are highly variable, due to the fact that a single flow experiences a wide array of cooling rates, absolute temperatures, viscosities, deformation, and oxidation. These conditions affect the concentrations, compositions, size distributions, shapes, and spatial arrangements of magnetic grains within an obsidian specimen and, thus, its intrinsic magnetic properties. This variability decreases dramatically at spatial scales of individual outcrops, and decreases even further at scales of hand samples. Thus, magnetic data appear to shift the scale of obsidian sourcing from flows to quarries and, in turn, enable new insights into raw-material procurement strategies, group mobility, lithic technology, and the organization of space and production. From a geologic perspective, the magnetic variability of obsidian can be broadly interpreted within the context of the igneous processes that were active during

  17. Comparison of semi-automated scar quantification techniques using high-resolution, 3-dimensional late-gadolinium-enhancement magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Rajchl, Martin; Stirrat, John; Goubran, Maged; Yu, Jeff; Scholl, David; Peters, Terry M; White, James A

    2015-02-01

    The quantification and modeling of myocardial scar is of expanding interest for image-guided therapy, particularly in the field of arrhythmia management. Migration towards high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) MRI techniques for spatial mapping of myocardial scar provides superior spatial registration. However, to date no systematic comparison of available approaches to 3D scar quantification have been performed. In this study we compare the reproducibility of six 3D scar segmentation algorithms for determination of left ventricular scar volume. Additionally, comparison to two-dimensional (2D) scar quantification and 3D manual segmentation is performed. Thirty-five consecutive patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy were recruited and underwent conventional 2D late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and 3D isotropic LGE imaging (voxel size 1.3 mm(3)) using a 3 T scanner. 3D LGE datasets were analyzed using six semi-automated segmentation techniques, including the signal threshold versus reference mean (STRM) technique at >2, >3, >5 and >6 standard deviations (SD) above reference myocardium, the full width at half maximum (FWHM) technique, and an optimization-based technique called hierarchical max flow (HMF). The mean ejection fraction was 32.1 ± 12.7 %. Reproducibility was greatest for HMF and FWHM techniques with intra-class correlation coefficient values ≥0.95. 3D scar quantification and modeling is clinically feasible in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. While several approaches show acceptable reproducibility, HMF appears superior due to maintenance of accuracy towards manual segmentations.

  18. A quantitative high resolution voxel-wise assessment of myocardial blood flow from contrast-enhanced first-pass magnetic resonance perfusion imaging: microsphere validation in a magnetic resonance compatible free beating explanted pig heart model

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Andreas; Sinclair, Matthew; Zarinabad, Niloufar; Ishida, Masaki; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P.H.M.; Paul, Matthias; van Horssen, Pepijn; Hussain, Shazia T.; Perera, Divaka; Schaeffter, Tobias; Spaan, Jos A.E.; Siebes, Maria; Nagel, Eike; Chiribiri, Amedeo

    2015-01-01

    Aims To assess the feasibility of high-resolution quantitative cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) voxel-wise perfusion imaging using clinical 1.5 and 3 T sequences and to validate it using fluorescently labelled microspheres in combination with a state of the art imaging cryomicrotome in a novel, isolated blood-perfused MR-compatible free beating pig heart model without respiratory motion. Methods and results MR perfusion imaging was performed in pig hearts at 1.5 (n = 4) and 3 T (n = 4). Images were acquired at physiological flow (‘rest’), reduced flow (‘ischaemia’), and during adenosine-induced hyperaemia (‘stress’) in control and coronary occlusion conditions. Fluorescently labelled microspheres and known coronary myocardial blood flow represented the reference standards for quantitative perfusion validation. For the comparison with microspheres, the LV was divided into 48 segments based on a subdivision of the 16 AHA segments into subendocardial, midmyocardial, and subepicardial subsegments. Perfusion quantification of the time-signal intensity curves was performed using a Fermi function deconvolution. High-resolution quantitative voxel-wise perfusion assessment was able to distinguish between occluded and remote myocardium (P < 0.001) and between rest, ischaemia, and stress perfusion conditions at 1.5 T (P < 0.001) and at 3 T (P < 0.001). CMR-MBF estimates correlated well with the microspheres at the AHA segmental level at 1.5 T (r = 0.94, P < 0.001) and at 3 T (r = 0.96, P < 0.001) and at the subendocardial, midmyocardial, and subepicardial level at 1.5 T (r = 0.93, r = 0.9, r = 0.88, P < 0.001, respectively) and at 3 T (r = 0.91, r = 0.95, r = 0.84, P < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion CMR-derived voxel-wise quantitative blood flow assessment is feasible and very accurate compared with microspheres. This technique is suitable for both clinically used field strengths and may provide the tools to assess extent and severity of myocardial

  19. Are electron tweezers possible?

    PubMed

    Oleshko, Vladimir P; Howe, James M

    2011-11-01

    Positively answering the question in the title, we demonstrate in this work single electron beam trapping and steering of 20-300nm solid Al nanoparticles generated inside opaque submicron-sized molten Al-Si eutectic alloy spheres. Imaging of solid nanoparticles and liquid alloy in real time was performed using energy filtering in an analytical transmission electron microscope (TEM). Energy-filtering TEM combined with valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy enabled us to investigate in situ nanoscale transformations of the internal structure, temperature dependence of plasmon losses, and local electronic and optical properties under melting and crystallization of individual binary alloy particles. For particles below 20nm in size, enhanced vibrations of the dynamic solid-liquid interface due to instabilities near the critical threshold were observed just before melting. The obtained results indicate that focused electron beams can act as a tool for manipulation of metal nanoparticles by transferring linear and angular mechanical momenta. Such thermally assisted electron tweezers can be utilized for touchless manipulation and processing of individual nano-objects and potentially for fabrication of assembled nanodevices with atomic level sensitivity and lateral resolution provided by modern electron optical systems. This is by three orders of magnitude better than for light microscopy utilized in conventional optical tweezers. New research directions and potential applications of trapping and tracking of nano-objects by focused electron beams are outlined.

  20. High-resolution measurements of the spatial and temporal evolution of megagauss magnetic fields created in intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Gourab Singh, Prashant Kumar; Adak, Amitava; Lad, Amit D.; Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2014-01-15

    A pump-probe polarimetric technique is demonstrated, which provides a complete, temporally and spatially resolved mapping of the megagauss magnetic fields generated in intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions. A normally incident time-delayed probe pulse reflected from its critical surface undergoes a change in its ellipticity according to the magneto-optic Cotton-Mouton effect due to the azimuthal nature of the ambient self-generated megagauss magnetic fields. The temporal resolution of the magnetic field mapping is typically of the order of the pulsewidth, limited by the laser intensity contrast, whereas a spatial resolution of a few μm is achieved by this optical technique. High-harmonics of the probe can be employed to penetrate deeper into the plasma to even near-solid densities. The spatial and temporal evolution of the megagauss magnetic fields at the target front as well as at the target rear are presented. The μm-scale resolution of the magnetic field mapping provides valuable information on the filamentary instabilities at the target front, whereas probing the target rear mirrors the highly complex fast electron transport in intense laser-plasma interactions.

  1. High-resolution 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging for pituitary adenoma detection in Cushing disease

    PubMed Central

    Chittiboina, Prashant; Montgomery, Blake K.; Millo, Corina; Herscovitch, Peter; Lonser, Russell R.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT High-resolution PET (hrPET) performed using a high-resolution research tomograph is reported as having a resolution of 2 mm and could be used to detect corticotroph adenomas through uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG). To determine the sensitivity of this imaging modality, the authors compared 18F-FDG hrPET and MRI detection of pituitary adenomas in Cushing disease (CD). METHODS Consecutive patients with CD who underwent preoperative 18F-FDG hrPET and MRI (spin echo [SE] and spoiled gradient recalled [SPGR] sequences) were prospectively analyzed. Standardized uptake values (SUVs) were calculated from hrPET and were compared with MRI findings. Imaging findings were correlated to operative and histological findings. RESULTS Ten patients (7 females and 3 males) were included (mean age 30.8 ± 19.3 years; range 11–59 years). MRI revealed a pituitary adenoma in 4 patients (40% of patients) on SE and 7 patients (70%) on SPGR sequences. 18F-FDG hrPET demonstrated increased 18F-FDG uptake consistent with an adenoma in 4 patients (40%; adenoma size range 3–14 mm). Maximum SUV was significantly higher for 18F-FDG hrPET–positive tumors (difference = 5.1, 95% CI 2.1–8.1; p = 0.004) than for 18F-FDG hrPET–negative tumors. 18F-FDG hrPET positivity was not associated with tumor volume (p = 0.2) or dural invasion (p = 0.5). Midnight and morning ACTH levels were associated with 18F-FDG hrPET positivity (p = 0.01 and 0.04, respectively) and correlated with the maximum SUV (R = 0.9; p = 0.001) and average SUV (R = 0.8; p = 0.01). All 18F-FDG hrPET–positive adenomas had a less than a 180% ACTH increase and 18F-FDG hrPET–negative adenomas had a greater than 180% ACTH increase after CRH stimulation (p = 0.03). Three adenomas were detected on SPGR MRI sequences that were not detected by 18F-FDG hrPET imaging. Two adenomas not detected on SE (but no adenomas not detected on SPGR) were detected on 18F-FDG hrPET. CONCLUSIONS While 18F-FDG hrPET imaging can detect

  2. High-resolution laser spectroscopy and magnetic effect of the B̃2E' ← X̃2A2' transition of 14NO3 radical.

    PubMed

    Tada, Kohei; Kashihara, Wataru; Baba, Masaaki; Ishiwata, Takashi; Hirota, Eizi; Kasahara, Shunji

    2014-11-14

    Rotationally resolved high-resolution fluorescence excitation spectra of (14)NO3 radical have been observed for the 662 nm band, which is assigned as the 0-0 band of the B̃(2)E' ←X̃(2)A2' transition, by crossing a single-mode laser beam perpendicularly to a collimated molecular beam. More than 3000 rotational lines were detected in 15,070-15,145 cm(-1) region, but it is difficult to find the rotational line series. Remarkable rotational line pairs, whose interval is about 0.0246 cm(-1), were found in the observed spectrum. This interval is the same amount with the spin-rotation splitting of the X̃(2)A2' (υ = 0, k = 0, N = 1) level. From this interval and the observed Zeeman splitting up to 360 G, seven line pairs were assigned as the transitions to the (2)E'(3/2) (J' = 1.5) levels and 15 line pairs were assigned as the transitions to the (2)E'(1/2) (J' = 0.5) levels. From the rotational analysis, we recognized that the (2)E' state splits into (2)E'(3/2) and (2)E'(1/2) by the spin-orbit interaction and the effective spin-orbit interaction constant was roughly estimated as -21 cm(-1). From the number of the rotational line pairs, we concluded that the complicated rotational structure of this 662 nm band of (14)NO3 mainly owes to the vibronic interaction between the B̃(2)E' state and the dark Ã(2)E″ state through the a2″ symmetry vibrational mode. PMID:25399147

  3. Real-time high-resolution magnetic resonance tracking of macrophage subpopulations in a murine inflammation model: a pilot study with a commercially available cryogenic probe.

    PubMed

    Al Faraj, Achraf; Luciani, Nathalie; Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Mattar, Essam; Clement, Olivier; Wilhelm, Claire; Gazeau, Florence

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages present different polarization states exhibiting distinct functions in response to environmental stimuli. However, the dynamic of their migration to sites of inflammation is not fully elucidated. Here we propose a real-time in vivo cell tracking approach, using high-resolution (HR)-MRI obtained with a commercially available cryogenic probe (Cryoprobe™), to monitor trafficking of differently polarized macrophages after systemic injection into mice. Murine bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells were differentiated ex vivo into nonpolarized M0, pro-inflammatory M1 and immunomodulator M2 macrophage subsets and labeled with citrate-coated anionic iron oxide nanoparticles (AMNP). These cells were subsequently intravenously injected to mice bearing calf muscle inflammation. Whole body migration dynamics of macrophage subsets was monitored by MRI at 4.7 T with a volume transmission/reception radiofrequency coil and macrophage infiltration to the inflamed paw was monitored with the cryogenic probe, allowing 3D spatial resolution of 50 µm with a scan time of only 10 min. Capture of AMNP was rapid and efficient regardless of macrophage polarization, with the highest uptake in M2 macrophages. Flow cytometry confirmed that macrophages preserved their polarization hallmarks after labeling. Migration kinetics of labeled cells differed from that of free AMNP. A preferential homing of M2-polarized macrophages to inflammation sites was observed. Our in vivo HR-MRI protocol highlights the extent of macrophage infiltration to the inflammation site. Coupled to whole body imaging, HR-MRI provides quantitative information on the time course of migration of ex vivo-polarized intravenously injected macrophages.

  4. High-resolution three-dimensional 19F-magnetic resonance imaging of rat lung in situ: evaluation of airway strain in the perfluorocarbon-filled lung.

    PubMed

    Weigel, Julia K; Steinmann, Daniel; Emerich, Philipp; Stahl, Claudius A; v Elverfeldt, Dominik; Guttmann, Josef

    2011-02-01

    Perfluorocarbons (PFC) are biologically and chemically inert fluids with high oxygen and CO(2) carrying capacities. Their use as liquid intrapulmonary gas carriers during liquid ventilation has been investigated. We established a method of high resolution 3D-(19)F-MRI of the totally PFC-filled lung. The goal of this study was to investigate longitudinal and circumferential airway strain in the setting of increasing airway pressures on 3D-(19)F-MR images of the PFC-filled lung. Sixteen female Wistar rats were euthanized and the liquid perfluorocarbon FC-84 instilled into their lungs. 3D-(19)F-MRI was performed at various intrapulmonary pressures. Measurements of bronchial length and cross-sectional area were obtained from transversal 2D images for each pressure range. Changes in bronchial area were used to determine circumferential strain, while longitudinal strain was calculated from changes in bronchial length. Our method of 3D-(19)F-MRI allowed clear visualization of the great bronchi. Longitudinal strain increased significantly up to 31.1 cmH(2)O. The greatest strain could be found in the range of low airway pressures. Circumferential strain increased strongly with the initial pressure rise, but showed no significant changes above 10.4 cmH(2)O. Longitudinal strain was generally higher in distal airways, while circumferential strain showed no difference. Analysis of mechanical characteristics showed that longitudinal and circumferential airway expansion occurred in an anisotropic fashion. Whereas longitudinal strain still increased with higher pressures, circumferential strain quickly reached a 'strain limit'. Longitudinal strain was higher in distal bronchi, as dense PFCs gravitate to dependent, in this case to dorso-basal parts of the lung, acting as liquid positive end expiratory pressure. PMID:21193813

  5. High-resolution laser spectroscopy and magnetic effect of the B̃(2)E(')←X̃(2)A2(') transition of the (15)N substituted nitrate radical.

    PubMed

    Tada, Kohei; Teramoto, Kanon; Ishiwata, Takashi; Hirota, Eizi; Kasahara, Shunji

    2015-03-21

    Rotationally resolved high-resolution fluorescence excitation spectra of the 0-0 band of the B̃(2)E(')←X̃(2)A2(') transition of the (15)N substituted nitrate radical were observed for the first time, by crossing a jet-cooled molecular beam and a single-mode dye laser beam at right angles. Several thousand rotational lines were detected in the 15 080-15 103 cm(-1) region. We observed the Zeeman splitting of intense lines up to 360 G in order to obtain secure rotational assignment. Two, nine, and seven rotational line pairs with 0.0248 cm(-1) spacing were assigned to the transitions from the X̃(2)A2(') (υ″ = 0, k″ = 0, N″ = 1, J″ = 0.5 and 1.5) to the (2)E3/2(') (J' = 1.5), (2)E1/2(') (J' = 0.5), and (2)E1/2(') (J' = 1.5) levels, respectively, based on the ground state combination differences and the Zeeman splitting patterns. The observed spectrum was complicated due to the vibronic coupling between the bright B̃(2)E(') (υ = 0) state and surrounding dark vibronic states. Some series of rotational lines other than those from the X̃(2)A2(') (J = 0.5 and 1.5) levels were also assigned by the ground state combination differences and the observed Zeeman splitting. The rotational branch structures were identified, and the molecular constants of the B̃(2)E1/2(') (υ = 0) state were estimated by a deperturbed analysis to be T0 = 15 098.20(4) cm(-1), B = 0.4282(7) cm(-1), and DJ = 4 × 10(-4) cm(-1). In the observed region, both the (2)E1/2(') and (2)E3/2(') spin-orbit components were identified, and the spin-orbit interaction constant of the B̃(2)E(') (υ = 0) state was estimated to be -12 cm(-1) as the lower limit. PMID:25796244

  6. High-resolution laser spectroscopy and magnetic effect of the B̃(2)E(')←X̃(2)A2(') transition of the (15)N substituted nitrate radical.

    PubMed

    Tada, Kohei; Teramoto, Kanon; Ishiwata, Takashi; Hirota, Eizi; Kasahara, Shunji

    2015-03-21

    Rotationally resolved high-resolution fluorescence excitation spectra of the 0-0 band of the B̃(2)E(')←X̃(2)A2(') transition of the (15)N substituted nitrate radical were observed for the first time, by crossing a jet-cooled molecular beam and a single-mode dye laser beam at right angles. Several thousand rotational lines were detected in the 15 080-15 103 cm(-1) region. We observed the Zeeman splitting of intense lines up to 360 G in order to obtain secure rotational assignment. Two, nine, and seven rotational line pairs with 0.0248 cm(-1) spacing were assigned to the transitions from the X̃(2)A2(') (υ″ = 0, k″ = 0, N″ = 1, J″ = 0.5 and 1.5) to the (2)E3/2(') (J' = 1.5), (2)E1/2(') (J' = 0.5), and (2)E1/2(') (J' = 1.5) levels, respectively, based on the ground state combination differences and the Zeeman splitting patterns. The observed spectrum was complicated due to the vibronic coupling between the bright B̃(2)E(') (υ = 0) state and surrounding dark vibronic states. Some series of rotational lines other than those from the X̃(2)A2(') (J = 0.5 and 1.5) levels were also assigned by the ground state combination differences and the observed Zeeman splitting. The rotational branch structures were identified, and the molecular constants of the B̃(2)E1/2(') (υ = 0) state were estimated by a deperturbed analysis to be T0 = 15 098.20(4) cm(-1), B = 0.4282(7) cm(-1), and DJ = 4 × 10(-4) cm(-1). In the observed region, both the (2)E1/2(') and (2)E3/2(') spin-orbit components were identified, and the spin-orbit interaction constant of the B̃(2)E(') (υ = 0) state was estimated to be -12 cm(-1) as the lower limit.

  7. On chip shapeable optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaut, C.; Cluzel, B.; Dellinger, J.; Lalouat, L.; Picard, E.; Peyrade, D.; Hadji, E.; de Fornel, F.

    2013-07-01

    Particles manipulation with optical forces is known as optical tweezing. While tweezing in free space with laser beams was established in the 1980s, integrating the optical tweezers on a chip is a challenging task. Recent experiments with plasmonic nanoantennas, microring resonators, and photonic crystal nanocavities have demonstrated optical trapping. However, the optical field of a tweezer made of a single microscopic resonator cannot be shaped. So far, this prevents from optically driven micromanipulations. Here we propose an alternative approach where the shape of the optical trap can be tuned by the wavelength in coupled nanobeam cavities. Using these shapeable tweezers, we present micromanipulation of polystyrene microspheres trapped on a silicon chip. These results show that coupled nanobeam cavities are versatile building blocks for optical near-field engineering. They open the way to much complex integrated tweezers using networks of coupled nanobeam cavities for particles or bio-objects manipulation at a larger scale.

  8. High resolution digital delay timer

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Albert D.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay (20) provides a first output signal (24) at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits (26, 28) latch the high resolution data (24) to form a first synchronizing data set (60). A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters (142, 146, 154) and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses (32, 34) count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an interval which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD (184) corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD (74) to generate a second set of synchronizing data (76) which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data (60) for presentation to logic circuits (64). The logic circuits (64) further delay the internal output signal (72) to obtain a proper phase relationship of an output signal (80) with the internal pulses (32, 34). The final delayed output signal (80) thereafter enables the output pulse generator (82) to produce the desired output pulse (84) at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse (10, 12).

  9. Advanced very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The advanced very high resolution radiometer development program is considered. The program covered the design, construction, and test of a breadboard model, engineering model, protoflight model, mechanical structural model, and a life test model. Special bench test and calibration equipment was also developed for use on the program.

  10. Cluster formation in ferrofluids induced by holographic optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Masajada, Jan; Bacia, Marcin; Drobczyński, Sławomir

    2013-10-01

    Holographic optical tweezers were used to show the interaction between a strongly focused laser beam and magnetic nanoparticles in ferrofluid. When the light intensity was high enough, magnetic nanoparticles were removed from the beam center and formed a dark ring. The same behavior was observed when focusing vortex or Bessel beams. The interactions between two or more separated rings of magnetic nanoparticles created by independent optical traps were also observed. PMID:24081086

  11. High-Resolution US of Rheumatologic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Taljanovic, Mihra S; Melville, David M; Gimber, Lana H; Scalcione, Luke R; Miller, Margaret D; Kwoh, C Kent; Klauser, Andrea S

    2015-01-01

    For the past 15 years, high-resolution ultrasonography (US) is being routinely and increasingly used for initial evaluation and treatment follow-up of rheumatologic diseases. This imaging technique is performed by using high-frequency linear transducers and has proved to be a powerful diagnostic tool in evaluation of articular erosions, simple and complex joint and bursal effusions, tendon sheath effusions, and synovitis, with results comparable to those of magnetic resonance imaging, excluding detection of bone marrow edema. Crystal deposition diseases including gouty arthropathy and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD) have characteristic appearances at US, enabling differentiation between these two diseases and from inflammatory arthropathies. Enthesopathy, which frequently accompanies psoriatic and reactive arthritis, also has a characteristic appearance at high-resolution US, distinguishing these two entities from other inflammatory and metabolic arthropathies. The presence of Doppler signal in examined joints, bursae, and tendon sheaths indicates active synovitis. Microbubble echo contrast agents augment detection of tissue vascularity and may act in the future as a drug delivery vehicle. Frequently, joint, tendon sheath, and bursal fluid aspirations and therapeutic injections are performed under US guidance. The authors describe the high-resolution US technique including gray-scale, color or power Doppler, and contrast agent-enhanced US that is used in evaluation of rheumatologic diseases of the wrist and hand and the ankle and foot in their routine clinical practice. This article demonstrates imaging findings of normal joints, rheumatoid arthritis, gouty arthritis, CPPD, psoriatic and reactive arthritis, and osteoarthritis.

  12. High-resolution measurements of the DT neutron spectrum using new CD foils in the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Eckart, M. J.; Farrell, M. P.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoppe, M.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Reynolds, H. G.; Sayre, D. B.; Schoff, M. E.; Séguin, F. H.; Skulina, K.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2016-11-01

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility measures the DT neutron spectrum from cryogenically layered inertial confinement fusion implosions. Yield, areal density, apparent ion temperature, and directional fluid flow are inferred from the MRS data. This paper describes recent advances in MRS measurements of the primary peak using new, thinner, reduced-area deuterated plastic (CD) conversion foils. The new foils allow operation of MRS at yields 2 orders of magnitude higher than previously possible, at a resolution down to ˜200 keV FWHM.

  13. High-resolution measurements of the DT neutron spectrum using new CD foils in the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Eckart, M. J.; Farrell, M. P.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoppe, M.; et al

    2016-08-09

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility measures the DT neutron spectrum from cryogenically layered inertial confinement fusion implosions. Yield, areal density, apparent ion temperature, and directional fluid flow are inferred from the MRS data. Here, this paper describes recent advances in MRS measurements of the primary peak using new, thinner, reduced-area deuterated plastic (CD) conversion foils. The new foils allow operation of MRS at yields 2 orders of magnitude higher than previously possible, at a resolution down to ~200 keV FWHM.

  14. Cerebral metabolic changes in a depression-like rat model of chronic forced swimming studied by ex vivo high resolution 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Xia; Wang, Yaqiang; Gao, Hongchang; Pan, Wen-Ju; Xiang, Yun; Huang, Mingming; Lei, Hao

    2008-11-01

    Many previous in vivo (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies have shown that patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) are associated with perturbations of cerebral metabolism of neurotransmitters glutamate (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In this study, we investigated the changes of cerebral metabolism in a depression-like rat model of chronic forced swimming stress (CFSS). The aims are to further understand the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying CFSS treatment, and to further establish the face and predictive validity of the CFSS model. The results showed that, relative to control, the CFSS rats had significantly reduced Glu, taurine and glutamate + glutamine (Glx) levels in the PFC, and significantly reduced N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) level, Glu level and Glu/GABA ratio in the hippocampus. Taking together, these results suggest that CFSS treatment can induce region-specific changes in the metabolism of Glu. The CFSS model might be used to study antidepressants specifically targeting the central glutamatergic system. PMID:18473166

  15. Characterization of skin abnormalities in a mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging and Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Canuto, H C; Fishbein, K W; Huang, A; Doty, S B; Herbert, R A; Peckham, J; Pleshko, N; Spencer, R G

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of the skin phenotype in osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) typically involves biochemical measurements, such as histologic or biochemical assessment of the collagen produced from biopsy-derived dermal fibroblasts. As an alternative, the current study utilized non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) microscopy and optical spectroscopy to define biophysical characteristics of skin in an animal model of OI. MRI of skin harvested from control, homozygous oim/oim and heterozygous oim/+ mice demonstrated several differences in anatomic and biophysical properties. Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS) was used to interpret observed MRI signal characteristics in terms of chemical composition. Differences between wild-type and OI mouse skin included the appearance of a collagen-depleted lower dermal layer containing prominent hair follicles in the oim/oim mice, accounting for 55% of skin thickness in these. The MRI magnetization transfer rate was lower by 50% in this layer as compared to the upper dermis, consistent with lower collagen content. The MRI transverse relaxation time, T2, was greater by 30% in the dermis of the oim/oim mice compared to controls, consistent with a more highly hydrated collagen network. Similarly, an FT-IRIS-defined measure of collagen integrity was 30% lower in the oim/oim mice. We conclude that characterization of phenotypic differences between the skin of OI and wild-type mice by MRI and FT-IRIS is feasible, and that these techniques provide powerful complementary approaches for the analysis of the skin phenotype in animal models of disease. PMID:21845737

  16. Characterization of skin abnormalities in a mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging and Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Canuto, H C; Fishbein, K W; Huang, A; Doty, S B; Herbert, R A; Peckham, J; Pleshko, N; Spencer, R G

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of the skin phenotype in osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) typically involves biochemical measurements, such as histologic or biochemical assessment of the collagen produced from biopsy-derived dermal fibroblasts. As an alternative, the current study utilized non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) microscopy and optical spectroscopy to define biophysical characteristics of skin in an animal model of OI. MRI of skin harvested from control, homozygous oim/oim and heterozygous oim/+ mice demonstrated several differences in anatomic and biophysical properties. Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS) was used to interpret observed MRI signal characteristics in terms of chemical composition. Differences between wild-type and OI mouse skin included the appearance of a collagen-depleted lower dermal layer containing prominent hair follicles in the oim/oim mice, accounting for 55% of skin thickness in these. The MRI magnetization transfer rate was lower by 50% in this layer as compared to the upper dermis, consistent with lower collagen content. The MRI transverse relaxation time, T2, was greater by 30% in the dermis of the oim/oim mice compared to controls, consistent with a more highly hydrated collagen network. Similarly, an FT-IRIS-defined measure of collagen integrity was 30% lower in the oim/oim mice. We conclude that characterization of phenotypic differences between the skin of OI and wild-type mice by MRI and FT-IRIS is feasible, and that these techniques provide powerful complementary approaches for the analysis of the skin phenotype in animal models of disease.

  17. High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (HIRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, Joseph M.; Herring, Mark; Norris, David D.

    1988-01-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (HIRIS), related data system, orbit, and mission operations are described. The pushbroom instrument simultaneously images the terrestrial surface in 192 spectral bands from 0.4 to 2.5 microns. The swath width is 30 km and spatial resolution is 30 m. It is planned to be launched with the Earth Observing System aboard the Space Station Polar Platform in 1995. Array detectors allow concurrent integration of the signals at 192,000 detector elements.

  18. High resolution airborne geophysics at hazardous waste disposal sites

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, L.P.; Nyquist, J.E.; Doll, W.E.; Chong Foo, M.; Gamey, T.J.

    1995-06-01

    In 1994, a high resolution helicopter geophysical survey was conducted over portions of the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee. The 1800 line kilometer survey included multi-frequency electromagnetic and magnetic sensors. The areas covered by the high resolution portion of the survey were selected on the basis of their importance to the environmental restoration effort and on data obtained from the reconnaissance phase of the airborne survey in which electromagnetic, magnetic, and radiometric data were collected over the entire Oak Ridge Reservation in 1992--1993. The high resolution phase had lower sensor heights, more and higher EM frequencies, and tighter line spacings than did the reconnaissance survey. When flying over exceptionally clear areas, the high resolution bird came within a few meters of the ground surface. Unfortunately, even sparse trees and power or phone lines could prevent the bird from being towed safely at low altitude, and over such areas it was more usual for it to be flown at about the same altitude as the bird in the reconnaissance survey, about 30m. Even so, the magnetometers used in the high resolution phase were 20m closer to the ground than in the reconnaissance phase because they were mounted on the tail of the bird rather than on the tow cable above the bird. The EM frequencies used in the high resolution survey ranged from 7400Hz to 67000Hz. Only the horizontal coplanar loop configuration was used in the high resolution flyovers.

  19. Preoperative Chemotherapy in Patients With Intermediate-Risk Rectal Adenocarcinoma Selected by High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The GEMCAD 0801 Phase II Multicenter Trial

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Gina; Estevan, Rafael; Salud, Antonieta; Montagut, Clara; Maurel, Joan; Safont, Maria Jose; Aparicio, Jorge; Feliu, Jaime; Vera, Ruth; Alonso, Vicente; Gallego, Javier; Martin, Marta; Pera, Miguel; Sierra, Enrique; Serra, Javier; Delgado, Salvadora; Roig, Jose V.; Santos, Jesus; Pericay, Carles

    2014-01-01

    Background. The need for preoperative chemoradiation or short-course radiation in all T3 rectal tumors is a controversial issue. A multicenter phase II trial was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy and safety of neoadjuvant capecitabine and oxaliplatin combined with bevacizumab in patients with intermediate-risk rectal adenocarcinoma. Methods. We recruited 46 patients with T3 rectal adenocarcinoma selected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) who were candidates for (R0) resection located in the middle third with clear mesorectal fascia and who were selected by pelvic MRI. Patients received four cycles of neoadjuvant capecitabine and oxaliplatin combined with bevacizumab (final cycle without bevacizumab) before total mesorectal excision (TME). In case of progression, preoperative chemoradiation was planned. The primary endpoint was overall response rate (ORR). Results. On an intent-to-treat analysis, the ORR was 78% (n = 36; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 63%–89%) and no progression was detected. Pathologic complete response was observed in nine patients (20%; 95% CI: 9–33), and T downstaging was observed in 48%. Forty-four patients proceeded to TME, and all had R0 resection. During preoperative therapy, two deaths occurred as a result of pulmonary embolism and diarrhea, respectively, and one patient died after surgery as a result of peritonitis secondary to an anastomotic leak (AL). A 13% rate of AL was higher than expected. The 24-month disease-free survival rate was 75% (95% CI: 60%–85%), and the 2-year local relapse rate was 2% (95% CI: 0%–11%). Conclusion. In this selected population, initial chemotherapy results in promising activity, but the observed toxicity does not support further investigation of this specific regimen. Nevertheless, these early results warrant further testing of this strategy in an enriched population and in randomized trials. PMID:25209376

  20. High-resolution structural studies of ultra-thin magnetic, transition metal overlayers and two-dimensional transition metal oxides using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, S.A. |

    1997-05-01

    This thesis report the surface-structure determination of three, ultra-thin magnetic transition-metal films, Fe/Au(100), Mn/Ni(100), and Mn/Cu(100) using Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) and photoelectron holography. These structural studies are the first to use non-s initial states in the ARPEFS procedure. This thesis also reports an ARPEFS surface-structure determination of a two-dimensional transition-metal oxide, [(1 x 1)O/W(110)] x 12. The authors have analyzed the ARPFES signal from the Au 4f{sub 7/5} core level of the Au(1 ML)/Fe(15 ML)/Au(100) system. The analysis shows that the Fe grows layer by layer with one monolayer of gold, acting as a surfactant, remaining on top of the growing Fe layers. These surface gold atoms sit in the four-fold hollow site, 1.67 {+-} 0.02 A above the iron surface. The grown Fe layer is very much like the bulk, bcc iron, with an interlayer spacing of 1.43 {+-} 0.03 A. Analysis of the Mn 3p ARPEFS signals from c(2 x 2)Mn/Ni(100) and c(2 x 2)Mn/Cu(100) shows that the Mn forms highly corrugated surface alloys. The corrugation of the Mn/Ni(100) and Mn/Cu(100) systems are 0.24 {+-} 0.02 A and 0.30 {+-} 0.04 A respectively. In both cases the Mn is sticking above the plane of the surface substrate atoms. For the Mn/Ni(100) system the first layer Ni is contracted 4% from the bulk value. The Mn/Cu(100) system shows bulk spacing for the substrate Cu. Photoelectron holography shows that the Mn/Ni interface is very abrupt with very little Mn leaking into the second layer, while the Mn/Cu(100) case has a significant amount of Mn leaking into the second layer. A new, five-element electrostatic electron lens was developed for hemispherical electron-energy analyzers. This lens system can be operated at constant transverse or constants angular magnification, and has been optimized for use with the very small photon-spot sizes. Improvements to the hemispherical electron-energy analyzer are also discussed.

  1. Undergraduate Construction of Optical Tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbell, Lawrence

    2012-10-01

    I will present a poster on the construction of optical tweezers. This will demonstrate the full process one must go through when working on a research project. First I sifted through the internet for papers and information pertaining to the tweezers. Afterwards I discussed the budget with the lab manager. Next I made purchases, however some items, such as the sample mount, needed to be custom made. These I built in the machine shop. Once the tweezers were operational I spent some time ensuring that the mirrors and lenses were adjusted just right, so that the trap performed at full strength. Finally, I used video data of the Brownian motion of trapped silica microspheres to get a reasonable estimate of the trapping stiffness with such particles. As a general note, all of this was done with the intent of leaving the tweezers for future use by other undergraduates. Because of this extra effort was taken to ensure the tweezers were as safe to use as possible. For this reason a visible LASER was chosen over an infrared LASER, in addition, the LASER was oriented parallel to the surface of the table in order to avoid stray upwards beams.

  2. Use of a Novel High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Neurography Protocol to Detect Abnormal Dorsal Root Ganglia in Sjögren Patients With Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, Julius; Duncan, Trisha; Owoyemi, Kristie; Wang, Kenneth C.; Carrino, John; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The diagnosis and treatment of patients with Sjögren syndrome (SS) with neuropathic pain pose several challenges. Patients with SS may experience unorthodox patterns of burning pain not conforming to a traditional “stocking-and-glove” distribution, which can affect the face, torso, and proximal extremities. This distribution of neuropathic pain may reflect mechanisms targeting the proximal-most element of the peripheral nervous system—the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Skin biopsy can diagnose such a small-fiber neuropathy and is a surrogate marker of DRG neuronal cell loss. However, SS patients have been reported who have similar patterns of proximal neuropathic pain, despite having normal skin biopsy studies. In such cases, DRGs may be targeted by mechanisms not associated with neuronal cell loss. Therefore, alternative approaches are warranted to help characterize abnormal DRGs in SS patients with proximal neuropathic pain. We performed a systematic review of the literature to define the frequency and spectrum of SS peripheral neuropathies, and to better understand the attribution of SS neuropathic pain to peripheral neuropathies. We found that the frequency of SS neuropathic pain exceeded the prevalence of peripheral neuropathies, and that painful peripheral neuropathies occurred less frequently than neuropathies not always associated with pain. We developed a novel magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) protocol to evaluate DRG abnormalities. Ten SS patients with proximal neuropathic pain were evaluated by this MRN protocol, as well as by punch skin biopsies evaluating for intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) of unmyelinated nerves. Five patients had radiographic evidence of DRG abnormalities. Patients with MRN DRG abnormalities had increased IENFD of unmyelinated nerves compared to patients without MRN DRG abnormalities (30.2 [interquartile range, 4.4] fibers/mm vs. 11.0 [4.1] fibers/mm, respectively; p = 0.03). Two of these 5 SS patients

  3. DARPA high resolution display technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slusarczuk, Marko

    1990-11-01

    Much of the information of interest to pilots in flight is display-limited, and is undergoing substantial expansion due to improved sensor output and signal processing; attention is accordingly given to digitally-based instrument display imaging in the present evaluation of high-resolution cockpit display technologies. Also noted are the advantages of digitally transmitted sensor data in cases where the airborne reconnaissance user may be able to analyze telemetered airborne data in real time and respond with requests to the pilot for more detailed information of specific battlefield sites.

  4. High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, Jeff; Goetz, Alexander F. H.

    1990-01-01

    Earth resources observed in greater detail. High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer, undergoing development for use in NASA's Earth Observing System, measures reflectance of Earth's surface in visible and near-infrared wavelengths. From an orbit around Earth, instrument scans surface of Earth in 200 wavelength bands simultaneously. Produces images enabling identification of minerals in rocks and soils, important algal pigments in oceans and inland waters, changes in spectra associated with biochemistry of plant canopies, compositions of atmospheric aerosols, sizes of grains in snow, and contamination of snow by impurities that absorb visible light.

  5. High Resolution Scanning Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R. (Inventor); Miranda, Felix A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a High Resolution Scanning Reflectarray Antenna (HRSRA) for the purpose of tracking ground terminals and space craft communication applications. The present invention provides an alternative to using gimbaled parabolic dish antennas and direct radiating phased arrays. When compared to a gimbaled parabolic dish, the HRSRA offers the advantages of vibration free steering without incurring appreciable cost or prime power penalties. In addition, it offers full beam steering at a fraction of the cost of direct radiating arrays and is more efficient.

  6. Principal component analysis for the comparison of metabolic profiles from human rectal cancer biopsies and colorectal xenografts using high-resolution magic angle spinning 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Seierstad, Therese; Røe, Kathrine; Sitter, Beathe; Halgunset, Jostein; Flatmark, Kjersti; Ree, Anne H; Olsen, Dag Rune; Gribbestad, Ingrid S; Bathen, Tone F

    2008-01-01

    Background This study was conducted in order to elucidate metabolic differences between human rectal cancer biopsies and colorectal HT29, HCT116 and SW620 xenografts by using high-resolution magnetic angle spinning (MAS) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and for determination of the most appropriate human rectal xenograft model for preclinical MR spectroscopy studies. A further aim was to investigate metabolic changes following irradiation of HT29 xenografts. Methods HR MAS MRS of tissue samples from xenografts and rectal biopsies were obtained with a Bruker Avance DRX600 spectrometer and analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square (PLS) regression analysis. Results and conclusion HR MAS MRS enabled assignment of 27 metabolites. Score plots from PCA of spin-echo and single-pulse spectra revealed separate clusters of the different xenografts and rectal biopsies, reflecting underlying differences in metabolite composition. The loading profile indicated that clustering was mainly based on differences in relative amounts of lipids, lactate and choline-containing compounds, with HT29 exhibiting the metabolic profile most similar to human rectal cancers tissue. Due to high necrotic fractions in the HT29 xenografts, radiation-induced changes were not detected when comparing spectra from untreated and irradiated HT29 xenografts. However, PLS calibration relating spectral data to the necrotic fraction revealed a significant correlation, indicating that necrotic fraction can be assessed from the MR spectra. PMID:18439252

  7. High Resolution Thermography In Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. P.; Goff, M. R.; Culley, J. E.

    1988-10-01

    A high resolution medical thermal imaging system using an 8 element SPRI1E detector is described. Image processing is by an Intellect 100 processor and is controlled by a DEC LSI 11/23 minicomputer. Image storage is with a 170 Mbyte winchester disc together with archival storage on 12 inch diameter optical discs having a capacity of 1 Gbyte per side. The system is currently being evaluated for use in physiology and medicine. Applications outlined include the potential of thermographic screening to identify genetic carriers in X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XED), detailed vas-cular perfusion studies in health and disease and the relation-ship between cutaneous blood flow, neurological peripheral function and skin surface temperature.

  8. High resolution spectrograph. [for LST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peacock, K.

    1975-01-01

    The high resolution spectrograph (HRS) is designed to be used with the Large Space Telescope (LST) for the study of spectra of point and extended targets in the spectral range 110 to 410 nm. It has spectral resolutions of 1,000; 30,000; and 100,000 and has a field of view as large as 10 arc sec. The spectral range and resolution are selectable using interchangeable optical components and an echelle spectrograph is used to display a cross dispersed spectrum on the photocathode of either of 2 SEC orthicon image tubes. Provisions are included for wavelength calibration, target identification and acquisition and thermal control. The system considerations of the instrument are described.

  9. High-resolution imaging ellipsometer.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Qiwen; Leger, James R

    2002-08-01

    We report on a novel imaging ellipsometer using a high-numerical-aperture (NA) objective lens capable of measuring a two-dimensional ellipsometric signal with high resolution. Two-dimensional ellipsometric imaging is made possible by spatial filtering at the pupil plane of the objective. A Richards-Wolf vectorial diffraction model and geometrical optics model are developed to simulate the system. The thickness profile of patterned polymethyl methacrylate is measured for calibration purposes. Our instrument has a sensitivity of 5 A and provides spatial resolution of approximately 0.5 microm with 632.8-nm illumination. Its capability of measuring refractive-index variations with high spatial resolution is also demonstrated.

  10. A high resolution TDC subsystem

    SciTech Connect

    Geiges, R.; Merle, K. )

    1994-02-01

    A high resolution TDC subsystem was developed at the Institute for Nuclear Physics in Mainz. The TDC chip offers a time resolution of less than 300 ps and a programmable measurement range from 0 to 16 [mu]sec. The time measurement is done with a new, purely digital counting method. The chip can be operated in common start or common stop mode. In common start mode the chip is able to store up to 4 multiple hits per channel. The chip is used to build a transputer controlled subsystem for the measurement of the drift times of a vertical drift chamber. The design of the subsystem will be described and the first results from the tests of the prototype system will be presented.

  11. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  12. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  13. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefitted greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  14. Mars high-resolution mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batson, R. M.; Thomas, P. K.

    1991-06-01

    A series of photomosaics of high-resolution Viking Orbiter images of Mars is being prepared and published to support the Mars 1:500,000 scale geologic mapping program. More than 100 of these photomosaics were made manually, but for the last several years they have all been made digitally. The digital mosaics are published on the Mars Transverse Mercator (MTM) system, and they are also available to the appropriate principal investigators as digital files in the mosaicked digital image model (MDIM) format. The mosaics contain Viking Orbiter images with the highest available resolution: in some areas as high as 10 m/pixel. This resolution, where it exists, will support a 1:100,000 map scale. The full resolution of a mosaic is preserved in a digital file, but conventional lithographic publication of such large-scale inset maps will be done only if required by the geologic map author. When high-resolution images do not fill the neat lines of an MTM quadrangle, the medium-resolution (1/256 degrees/pixel, or 231 m/pixel) MDIM is used. The mosaics are tied by image-matching to the planetwide MDIM, in which random errors as large as 5 km (10 mm at 1:500,000 scale) are common; a few much larger, worst-case errors also occur. Because of the distribution of the errors, many large discrepancies appear along the cutlines between frames with very different resolutions. Furthermore, each block of quadrangles is compiled on its own local control system, and adjacent blocks, compiled later, are unlikely to match. Selection of areas to be mapped is based on geologic mapping proposals reviewed and recommended by the Mars 1:500,000 scale geologic mapping review panel. There is no intention to map the entire planet at this scale.

  15. HRSC: High resolution stereo camera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neukum, G.; Jaumann, R.; Basilevsky, A.T.; Dumke, A.; Van Gasselt, S.; Giese, B.; Hauber, E.; Head, J. W.; Heipke, C.; Hoekzema, N.; Hoffmann, H.; Greeley, R.; Gwinner, K.; Kirk, R.; Markiewicz, W.; McCord, T.B.; Michael, G.; Muller, Jan-Peter; Murray, J.B.; Oberst, J.; Pinet, P.; Pischel, R.; Roatsch, T.; Scholten, F.; Willner, K.

    2009-01-01

    The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on Mars Express has delivered a wealth of image data, amounting to over 2.5 TB from the start of the mapping phase in January 2004 to September 2008. In that time, more than a third of Mars was covered at a resolution of 10-20 m/pixel in stereo and colour. After five years in orbit, HRSC is still in excellent shape, and it could continue to operate for many more years. HRSC has proven its ability to close the gap between the low-resolution Viking image data and the high-resolution Mars Orbiter Camera images, leading to a global picture of the geological evolution of Mars that is now much clearer than ever before. Derived highest-resolution terrain model data have closed major gaps and provided an unprecedented insight into the shape of the surface, which is paramount not only for surface analysis and geological interpretation, but also for combination with and analysis of data from other instruments, as well as in planning for future missions. This chapter presents the scientific output from data analysis and highlevel data processing, complemented by a summary of how the experiment is conducted by the HRSC team members working in geoscience, atmospheric science, photogrammetry and spectrophotometry. Many of these contributions have been or will be published in peer-reviewed journals and special issues. They form a cross-section of the scientific output, either by summarising the new geoscientific picture of Mars provided by HRSC or by detailing some of the topics of data analysis concerning photogrammetry, cartography and spectral data analysis.

  16. Achievement of a 920-MHz High Resolution NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashi, Kenjiro; Shimizu, Tadashi; Goto, Atsushi; Kiyoshi, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Shinji; Wada, Hitoshi; Fujito, Teruaki; Hasegawa, Ken-ichi; Yoshikawa, Masatoshi; Miki, Takashi; Ito, Satoshi; Hamada, Mamoru; Hayashi, Seiji

    2002-06-01

    We have developed a 920-MHz NMR system and performed the proton NMR measurement of H 2O and ethylbenzene using the superconducting magnet operating at 21.6 T (920 MHz for proton), which is the highest field produced by a superconducting NMR magnet in the persistent mode. From the NMR measurements, it is verified that both homogeneity and stability of the magnet have a specification sufficient for a high resolution NMR.

  17. High-resolution MRI: in vivo histology?

    PubMed Central

    Bridge, Holly; Clare, Stuart

    2005-01-01

    For centuries scientists have been fascinated with the question of how the brain works. Investigators have looked at both where different functions are localized and how the anatomical microstructure varies across the brain surface. Here we discuss how advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have allowed in vivo visualization of the fine structure of the brain that was previously only visible in post-mortem brains. We present data showing the correspondence between definitions of the primary visual cortex defined anatomically using very high-resolution MRI and functionally using functional MRI. We consider how this technology can be applied to allow the investigation of brains that differ from normal, and what this ever-evolving technology may be able to reveal about in vivo brain structure in the next few years. PMID:16553313

  18. In vivo high-resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy of Drosophila melanogaster at 14.1 T shows trauma in aging and in innate immune-deficiency is linked to reduced insulin signaling

    PubMed Central

    RIGHI, VALERIA; APIDIANAKIS, YIORGOS; MINTZOPOULOS, DIONYSSIOS; ASTRAKAS, LOUKAS; RAHME, LAURENCE G.; TZIKA, A. ARIA

    2010-01-01

    In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), a non-destructive biochemical tool for investigating live organisms, has yet to be used in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, a useful model organism for investigating genetics and physiology. We developed and implemented a high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HRMAS) MRS method to investigate live Drosophila at 14.1 T. We demonstrated, for the first time, the feasibility of using HRMAS MRS for molecular characterization of Drosophila with a conventional MR spectrometer equipped with an HRMAS probe. We showed that the metabolic HRMAS MRS profiles of injured, aged wild-type (wt) flies and of immune deficient (imd) flies were more similar to chico flies mutated at the chico gene in the insulin signaling pathway, which is analogous to insulin receptor substrate 1–4 (IRS1–4) in mammals and less to those of adipokinetic hormone receptor (akhr) mutant flies, which have an obese phenotype. We thus provide evidence for the hypothesis that trauma in aging and in innate immune-deficiency is linked to insulin signaling. This link may explain the mitochondrial dysfunction that accompanies insulin resistance and muscle wasting that occurs in trauma, aging and immune system deficiencies, leading to higher susceptibility to infection. Our approach advances the development of novel in vivo non-destructive research approaches in Drosophila, suggests biomarkers for investigation of biomedical paradigms, and thus may contribute to novel therapeutic development. PMID:20596596

  19. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and single photon emission computerized tomography--cerebral blood flow in a case of pure sensory stroke and mild dementia owing to subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (Binswanger's disease)

    SciTech Connect

    De Chiara, S.; Lassen, N.A.; Andersen, A.R.; Gade, A.; Lester, J.; Thomsen, C.; Henriksen, O.

    1987-01-01

    Pure sensory stroke (PSS) is typically caused by a lacunar infarct located in the ventral-posterior (VP) thalamic nucleus contralateral to the paresthetic symptoms. The lesion is usually so small that it cannot be seen on computerized tomography (CT), as illustrated by our case. In our moderately hypertensive, 72-year-old patient with PSS, CT scanning and conventional nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) scanning using a 7-mm-thick slice on a 1.5 Tesla instrument all failed to visualize the thalamic infarct. Using the high-resolution mode with 2-mm slice thickness it was, however, clearly seen. In addition, NMRI unexpectedly showed diffuse periventricular demyelinization as well as three other lacunar infarcts, i.e., findings characteristic of subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (SAE). This prompted psychometric testing, which revealed signs of mild (subclinical) dementia, in particular involving visiospatial apraxia; this pointed to decreased function of the right parietal cortex, which was structurally intact on CT and NMRI. Single photon emission computerized tomography by Xenon-133 injection and by hexamethyl-propyleneamine-oxim labeled with Technetium-99m showed asymmetric distribution of cerebral blood flow (CBF), with an 18% lower value in the right parietal cortex compared to the left side; this indicated asymmetric disconnection of the cortex by the SAE. Thus, the tomograms of the functional parameter, CBF, correlated better with the deficits revealed by neuropsychological testing than by CT or NMRI.

  20. High resolution time interval counter

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, Kenneth J.

    1994-01-01

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured.

  1. High resolution time interval counter

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, K.J.

    1994-07-26

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured. 3 figs.

  2. High resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, Jim; Dinyari, Rostam; Huie, Phil; Butterwick, Alex; Peumans, Peter; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight in patients with retinal degeneration by delivering pulsed electric currents to retinal neurons via an array of microelectrodes. Most implants use inductive or optical transmission of information and power to an intraocular receiver, with decoded signals subsequently distributed to retinal electrodes through an intraocular cable. Surgical complexity could be minimized by an "integrated" prosthesis, in which both power and data are delivered directly to the stimulating array without any discrete components or cables. We present here an integrated retinal prosthesis system based on a photodiode array implant. Video frames are processed and imaged onto the retinal implant by a video goggle projection system operating at near-infrared wavelengths (~ 900 nm). Photodiodes convert light into pulsed electric current, with charge injection maximized by specially optimized series photodiode circuits. Prostheses of three different pixel densities (16 pix/mm2, 64 pix/mm2, and 256 pix/mm2) have been designed, simulated, and prototyped. Retinal tissue response to subretinal implants made of various materials has been investigated in RCS rats. The resulting prosthesis can provide sufficient charge injection for high resolution retinal stimulation without the need for implantation of any bulky discrete elements such as coils or tethers. In addition, since every pixel functions independently, pixel arrays may be placed separately in the subretinal space, providing visual stimulation to a larger field of view.

  3. High resolution imaging at Palomar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.

    1992-01-01

    For the last two years we have embarked on a program of understanding the ultimate limits of ground-based optical imaging. We have designed and fabricated a camera specifically for high resolution imaging. This camera has now been pressed into service at the prime focus of the Hale 5 m telescope. We have concentrated on two techniques: the Non-Redundant Masking (NRM) and Weigelt's Fully Filled Aperture (FFA) method. The former is the optical analog of radio interferometry and the latter is a higher order extension of the Labeyrie autocorrelation method. As in radio Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), both these techniques essentially measure the closure phase and, hence, true image construction is possible. We have successfully imaged binary stars and asteroids with angular resolution approaching the diffraction limit of the telescope and image quality approaching that of a typical radio VLBI map. In addition, we have carried out analytical and simulation studies to determine the ultimate limits of ground-based optical imaging, the limits of space-based interferometric imaging, and investigated the details of imaging tradeoffs of beam combination in optical interferometers.

  4. Evaluation of Advanced Bionics high resolution mode.

    PubMed

    Buechner, Andreas; Frohne-Buechner, Carolin; Gaertner, Lutz; Lesinski-Schiedat, Anke; Battmer, Rolf-Dieter; Lenarz, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the advantages of the Advanced Bionic high resolution mode for speech perception, through a retrospective analysis. Forty-five adult subjects were selected who had a minimum experience of three months' standard mode (mean of 10 months) before switching to high resolution mode. Speech perception was tested in standard mode immediately before fitting with high resolution mode, and again after a maximum of six months high resolution mode usage (mean of two months). A significant improvement was found, between 11 and 17%, depending on the test material. The standard mode preference does not give any indication about the improvement when switching to high resolution. Users who are converted within any study achieve a higher performance improvement than those converted in the clinical routine. This analysis proves the significant benefits of high resolution mode for users, and also indicates the need for guidelines for individual optimization of parameter settings in a high resolution mode program.

  5. High-resolution slug testing.

    PubMed

    Zemansky, G M; McElwee, C D

    2005-01-01

    The hydraulic conductivity (K) variation has important ramifications for ground water flow and the transport of contaminants in ground water. The delineation of the nature of that variation can be critical to complete characterization of a site and the planning of effective and efficient remedial measures. Site-specific features (such as high-conductivity zones) need to be quantified. Our alluvial field site in the Kansas River valley exhibits spatial variability, very high conductivities, and nonlinear behavior for slug tests in the sand and gravel aquifer. High-resolution, multilevel slug tests have been performed in a number of wells that are fully screened. A general nonlinear model based on the Navier-Stokes equation, nonlinear frictional loss, non-Darcian flow, acceleration effects, radius changes in the wellbore, and a Hvorslev model for the aquifer has been used to analyze the data, employing an automated processing system that runs within the Excel spreadsheet program. It is concluded that slug tests can provide the necessary data to identify the nature of both horizontal and vertical K variation in an aquifer and that improved delineation or higher resolution of K structure is possible with shorter test intervals. The gradation into zones of higher conductivity is sharper than seen previously, and the maximum conductivity observed is greater than previously measured. However, data from this project indicate that well development, the presence of fines, and the antecedent history of the well are important interrelated factors in regard to slug-test response and can prevent obtaining consistent results in some cases.

  6. Optical tweezers technique and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, HongLian; Li, ZhiYuan

    2013-12-01

    Since their advent in the 1980s, optical tweezers have attracted more and more attention due to their unique non-contact and non-invasion characteristics and their wide applications in physics, biology, chemistry, medical science and nanoscience. In this paper, we introduce the basic principle, the history and typical applications of optical tweezers and review our recent experimental works on the development and application of optical tweezers technique. We will discuss in detail several technological issues, including high precision displacement and force measurement in single-trap and dual-trap optical tweezers, multi-trap optical tweezers with each trap independently and freely controlled by means of space light modulator, and incorporation of cylindrical vector optical beams to build diversified optical tweezers beyond the conventional Gaussian-beam optical tweezers. We will address the application of these optical tweezers techniques to study biophysical problems such as mechanical deformation of cell membrane and binding energy between plant microtubule and microtubule associated proteins. Finally we present application of the optical tweezers technique for trapping, transporting, and patterning of metallic nanoparticles, which can be harnessed to manipulate surface plasmon resonance properties of these nanoparticles.

  7. Structure elucidation and quantification of impurities formed between 6-aminocaproic acid and the excipients citric acid and sorbitol in an oral solution using high-resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie V; Cornett, Claus; Nyberg, Nils; Østergaard, Jesper; Hansen, Steen Honoré

    2015-03-25

    Concentrated solutions containing 6-aminocaproic acid and the excipients citric acid and sorbitol have been studied at temperatures of 50°C, 60°C, 70°C and 80°C as well as at 20°C. It has previously been reported that the commonly employed citric acid is a reactive excipient, and it is therefore important to thoroughly investigate a possible reaction between 6-aminocaproic acid and citric acid. The current study revealed the formation of 3-hydroxy-3,4-dicarboxy-butanamide-N-hexanoic acid between 6-aminocaproic acid and citric acid by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Less than 0.03% of 6-aminocaproic acid was converted to 3-hydroxy-3,4-dicarboxy-butanamide-N-hexanoic acid after 30 days of storage at 80°C. Degradation products of 6-aminocaproic acid were also observed after storage at the applied temperatures, e.g., dimer, trimer and cyclized 6-aminocaproic acid, i.e., caprolactam. No reaction products between D-sorbitol and 6-aminocaproic acid could be observed. 3-Hydroxy-3,4-dicarboxy-butanamide-N-hexanoic acid, dimer and caprolactam were also observed after storage at 20°C for 3 months. The findings imply that an oral solution of 6-aminocaproic acid is relatively stable at 20°C at the pH values 4.00 and 5.00 as suggested in the USP for oral formulations. Compliance with the ICH guideline Q3B is expected.

  8. The Role of High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Predicting the Invasive Component in Patients with Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Diagnosed on Preoperative Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Chae, Eun Young; Shin, Hee Jung; Kim, Suhkmann; Baek, Hyeon-Man; Yoon, Dahye; Kim, Siwon; Shim, Ye Eun; Kim, Hak Hee; Cha, Joo Hee; Choi, Woo Jung; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Shin, Ji Hoon; Lee, Hee Jin; Gong, Gyungyub

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) diagnosed on preoperative biopsy. We investigated whether the metabolic profiling of tissue samples using HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy could be used to distinguish between DCIS lesions with or without an invasive component. Our institutional review board approved this combined retrospective and prospective study. Tissue samples were collected from 30 patients with pure DCIS and from 30 with DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma. All patients were diagnosed with DCIS by preoperative core-needle biopsy and underwent surgical resection. The metabolic profiling of tissue samples was performed by HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy. All observable metabolite signals were identified and quantified in all tissue samples. Metabolite intensity normalized by total spectral intensities was compared according to the tumor type using the Mann-Whitney test. Multivariate analysis was performed with orthogonal projections to latent structure-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). By univariate analysis, the metabolite concentrations of choline-containing compounds obtained with HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy did not differ significantly between the pure DCIS and DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma groups. However, the GPC/PC ratio was higher in the pure DCIS group than in the DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma group (p = 0.004, Bonferroni-corrected p = 0.064), as well as the concentration of myo-inositol and succinate. By multivariate analysis, the OPLS-DA models built with HR-MAS MR metabolic profiles could clearly discriminate between pure DCIS and DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma. Our preliminary results suggest that HR-MAS MR metabolomics on breast tissue may be able to distinguish between DCIS lesions with or without an invasive component. PMID:27560937

  9. The Role of High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Predicting the Invasive Component in Patients with Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Diagnosed on Preoperative Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Eun Young; Kim, Suhkmann; Baek, Hyeon-Man; Yoon, Dahye; Kim, Siwon; Shim, Ye Eun; Kim, Hak Hee; Cha, Joo Hee; Choi, Woo Jung; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Shin, Ji Hoon; Lee, Hee Jin; Gong, Gyungyub

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) diagnosed on preoperative biopsy. We investigated whether the metabolic profiling of tissue samples using HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy could be used to distinguish between DCIS lesions with or without an invasive component. Our institutional review board approved this combined retrospective and prospective study. Tissue samples were collected from 30 patients with pure DCIS and from 30 with DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma. All patients were diagnosed with DCIS by preoperative core-needle biopsy and underwent surgical resection. The metabolic profiling of tissue samples was performed by HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy. All observable metabolite signals were identified and quantified in all tissue samples. Metabolite intensity normalized by total spectral intensities was compared according to the tumor type using the Mann-Whitney test. Multivariate analysis was performed with orthogonal projections to latent structure-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). By univariate analysis, the metabolite concentrations of choline-containing compounds obtained with HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy did not differ significantly between the pure DCIS and DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma groups. However, the GPC/PC ratio was higher in the pure DCIS group than in the DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma group (p = 0.004, Bonferroni-corrected p = 0.064), as well as the concentration of myo-inositol and succinate. By multivariate analysis, the OPLS-DA models built with HR-MAS MR metabolic profiles could clearly discriminate between pure DCIS and DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma. Our preliminary results suggest that HR-MAS MR metabolomics on breast tissue may be able to distinguish between DCIS lesions with or without an invasive component. PMID:27560937

  10. High-resolution calculations of the solar global convection with the reduced speed of sound technique. I. The structure of the convection and the magnetic field without the rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Hotta, H.; Yokoyama, T.; Rempel, M.

    2014-05-01

    We carry out non-rotating high-resolution calculations of the solar global convection, which resolve convective scales of less than 10 Mm. To cope with the low Mach number conditions in the lower convection zone, we use the reduced speed of sound technique (RSST), which is simple to implement and requires only local communication in the parallel computation. In addition, the RSST allows us to expand the computational domain upward to about 0.99 R {sub ☉}, as it can also handle compressible flows. Using this approach, we study the solar convection zone on the global scale, including small-scale near-surface convection. In particular, we investigate the influence of the top boundary condition on the convective structure throughout the convection zone as well as on small-scale dynamo action. Our main conclusions are as follows. (1) The small-scale downflows generated in the near-surface layer penetrate into deeper layers to some extent and excite small-scale turbulence in the region >0.9 R {sub ☉}, where R {sub ☉} is the solar radius. (2) In the deeper convection zone (<0.9 R {sub ☉}), the convection is not influenced by the location of the upper boundary. (3) Using a large eddy simulation approach, we can achieve small-scale dynamo action and maintain a field of about 0.15B {sub eq}-0.25B {sub eq} throughout the convection zone, where B {sub eq} is the equipartition magnetic field to the kinetic energy. (4) The overall dynamo efficiency varies significantly in the convection zone as a consequence of the downward directed Poynting flux and the depth variation of the intrinsic convective scales.

  11. Biomechanical factors and physical examination findings in osteoarthritis of the knee: associations with tissue abnormalities assessed by conventional radiography and high-resolution 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to explore the associations between knee osteoarthritis (OA)-related tissue abnormalities assessed by conventional radiography (CR) and by high-resolution 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as biomechanical factors and findings from physical examination in patients with knee OA. Methods This was an explorative cross-sectional study of 105 patients with knee OA. Index knees were imaged using CR and MRI. Multiple features from CR and MRI (cartilage, osteophytes, bone marrow lesions, effusion and synovitis) were related to biomechanical factors (quadriceps and hamstrings muscle strength, proprioceptive accuracy and varus-valgus laxity) and physical examination findings (bony tenderness, crepitus, bony enlargement and palpable warmth), using multivariable regression analyses. Results Quadriceps weakness was associated with cartilage integrity, effusion, synovitis (all detected by MRI) and CR-detected joint space narrowing. Knee joint laxity was associated with MRI-detected cartilage integrity, CR-detected joint space narrowing and osteophyte formation. Multiple tissue abnormalities including cartilage integrity, osteophytes and effusion, but only those detected by MRI, were found to be associated with physical examination findings such as crepitus. Conclusion We observed clinically relevant findings, including a significant association between quadriceps weakness and both effusion and synovitis, detected by MRI. Inflammation was detected in over one-third of the participants, emphasizing the inflammatory component of OA and a possible important role for anti-inflammatory therapies in knee OA. In general, OA-related tissue abnormalities of the knee, even those detected by MRI, were found to be discordant with biomechanical and physical examination features. PMID:23039323

  12. Real-time high-resolution X-ray imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance study of the hydration of pure and Na-doped C3A in the presence of sulfates

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchheim,, A. P.; Dal Molin, D.C.; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid; Provis, J.L.; Fischer, P.; Monteiro, P.J.M.

    2010-12-01

    This study details the differences in real-time hydration between pure tricalcium aluminate (cubic C{sub 3}A or 3CaO {center_dot} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and Na-doped tricalcium aluminate (orthorhombic C{sub 3}A or Na{sub 2}Ca{sub 8}Al{sub 6}O{sub 18}), in aqueous solutions containing sulfate ions. Pure phases were synthesized in the laboratory to develop an independent benchmark for the reactions, meaning that their reactions during hydration in a simulated early age cement pore solution (saturated with respect to gypsum and lime) were able to be isolated. Because the rate of this reaction is extremely rapid, most microscopy methods are not adequate to study the early phases of the reactions in the early stages. Here, a high-resolution full-field soft X-ray imaging technique operating in the X-ray water window, combined with solution analysis by {sup 27}Al nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, was used to capture information regarding the mechanism of C{sub 3}A hydration during the early stages. There are differences in the hydration mechanism between the two types of C{sub 3}A, which are also dependent on the concentration of sulfate ions in the solution. The reactions with cubic C{sub 3}A (pure) seem to be more influenced by higher concentrations of sulfate ions, forming smaller ettringite needles at a slower pace than the orthorhombic C{sub 3}A (Na-doped) sample. The rate of release of aluminate species into the solution phase is also accelerated by Na doping.

  13. Electromagnetic tweezers with independent force and torque control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chang; Lionberger, Troy A.; Wiener, Diane M.; Meyhofer, Edgar

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic tweezers are powerful tools to manipulate and study the mechanical properties of biological molecules and living cells. In this paper we present a novel, bona fide electromagnetic tweezer (EMT) setup that allows independent control of the force and torque applied via micrometer-sized magnetic beads to a molecule under study. We implemented this EMT by combining a single solenoid that generates force (f-EMT) with a set of four solenoids arranged into a symmetric quadrupole to generate torque (τ-EMT). To demonstrate the capability of the tweezers, we attached optically asymmetric Janus beads to single, tethered DNA molecules. We show that tension in the piconewton force range can be applied to single DNA molecules and the molecule can simultaneously be twisted with torques in the piconewton-nanometer range. Furthermore, the EMT allows the two components to be independently controlled. At various force levels applied to the Janus bead, the trap torsional stiffness can be continuously changed simply by varying the current magnitude applied to the τ-EMT. The flexible and independent control of force and torque by the EMT makes it an ideal tool for a range of measurements where tensional and torsional properties need to be studied simultaneously on a molecular or cellular level.

  14. Electromagnetic tweezers with independent force and torque control.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chang; Lionberger, Troy A; Wiener, Diane M; Meyhofer, Edgar

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic tweezers are powerful tools to manipulate and study the mechanical properties of biological molecules and living cells. In this paper we present a novel, bona fide electromagnetic tweezer (EMT) setup that allows independent control of the force and torque applied via micrometer-sized magnetic beads to a molecule under study. We implemented this EMT by combining a single solenoid that generates force (f-EMT) with a set of four solenoids arranged into a symmetric quadrupole to generate torque (τ-EMT). To demonstrate the capability of the tweezers, we attached optically asymmetric Janus beads to single, tethered DNA molecules. We show that tension in the piconewton force range can be applied to single DNA molecules and the molecule can simultaneously be twisted with torques in the piconewton-nanometer range. Furthermore, the EMT allows the two components to be independently controlled. At various force levels applied to the Janus bead, the trap torsional stiffness can be continuously changed simply by varying the current magnitude applied to the τ-EMT. The flexible and independent control of force and torque by the EMT makes it an ideal tool for a range of measurements where tensional and torsional properties need to be studied simultaneously on a molecular or cellular level. PMID:27587135

  15. Making light work with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, Steven M.

    1992-12-01

    Microscopic objects, including biological material, can be remotely manipulated with tightly focused beams of infrared laser light. The use of optical traps, or 'optical tweezers', holds great promise for noninvasive micromanipulation and mechanical measurement in cell biology. Optical tweezers are the 'tractor beams' of today's technology.

  16. High resolution scintillation detector with semiconductor readout

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Craig S.; Hoffman, Edward J.

    2000-01-01

    A novel high resolution scintillation detector array for use in radiation imaging such as high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) which comprises one or more parallelepiped crystals with at least one long surface of each crystal being in intimate contact with a semiconductor photodetector such that photons generated within each crystal by gamma radiation passing therethrough is detected by the photodetector paired therewith.

  17. High Resolution PDF Measurements on Ag Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Tulio C. R.; Martin, Chris; Kycia, Stefan; Zanchet, Daniela

    2009-01-29

    The quantitative analysis of structural defects in Ag nanoparticles was addressed in this work. We performed atomic scale structural characterization by a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) using the Pair Distribution Function analysis (PDF) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The XRD measurements were performed using an innovative instrumentation setup to provide high resolution PDF patterns.

  18. Metabolomics of Breast Cancer Using High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Correlations with 18F-FDG Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging MRI

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Haesung; Yoon, Dahye; Yun, Mijin; Choi, Ji Soo; Park, Vivian Youngjean; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Jeong, Joon; Koo, Ja Seung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Moon, Hee Jung; Kim, Suhkmann; Kim, Min Jung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Our goal in this study was to find correlations between breast cancer metabolites and conventional quantitative imaging parameters using high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and to find breast cancer subgroups that show high correlations between metabolites and imaging parameters. Materials and methods Between August 2010 and December 2013, we included 53 female patients (mean age 49.6 years; age range 32–75 years) with a total of 53 breast lesions assessed by the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. They were enrolled under the following criteria: breast lesions larger than 1 cm in diameter which 1) were suspicious for malignancy on mammography or ultrasound (US), 2) were pathologically confirmed to be breast cancer with US-guided core-needle biopsy (CNB) 3) underwent 3 Tesla MRI with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), and 4) had an attainable immunohistochemistry profile from CNB. We acquired spectral data by HR-MAS MRS with CNB specimens and expressed the data as relative metabolite concentrations. We compared the metabolites with the signal enhancement ratio (SER), maximum standardized FDG uptake value (SUV max), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and histopathologic prognostic factors for correlation. We calculated Spearman correlations and performed a partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) to further classify patient groups into subgroups to find correlation differences between HR-MAS spectroscopic values and conventional imaging parameters. Results In a multivariate analysis, the PLS-DA models built with HR-MAS MRS metabolic profiles showed visible discrimination between high and low SER, SUV, and ADC. In luminal subtype breast cancer, compared to all cases, high SER, ADV, and SUV were more closely clustered by visual assessment. Multiple metabolites were correlated with SER and SUV in

  19. Fuzzy logic structure analysis of trabecular bone of the calcaneus to estimate proximal femur fracture load and discriminate subjects with and without vertebral fractures using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 T and 3 T.

    PubMed

    Patel, Priyesh V; Eckstein, Felix; Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Phan, Catherine; Matsuura, Maiko; Lochmüller, Eva-Maria; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M

    2007-10-01

    Newly developed fuzzy logic-derived structural parameters were used to characterize trabecular bone architecture in high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI) of human cadaver calcaneus specimens. These parameters were compared to standard histomorphological structural measures and analyzed concerning performance in discriminating vertebral fracture status and estimating proximal femur fracture load. Sets of 60 sagittal 1.5 T and 3.0 T HR-MRI images of the calcaneus were obtained in 39 cadavers using a fast gradient recalled echo sequence. Structural parameters equivalent to bone histomorphometry and fuzzy logic-derived parameters were calculated using two chosen regions of interest. Calcaneal, spine, and hip bone mineral density (BMD) measurements were also obtained. Fracture status of the thoracic and lumbar spine was assessed on lateral radiographs. Finally, mechanical strength testing of the proximal femur was performed. Diagnostic performance in discriminating vertebral fracture status and estimating femoral fracture load was calculated using regression analyses, two-tailed t-tests of significance, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses. Significant correlations were obtained at both field strengths between all structural and fuzzy logic parameters (r up to 0.92). Correlations between histomorphological or fuzzy logic parameters and calcaneal BMD were mostly significant (r up to 0.78). ROC analyses demonstrated that standard structural parameters were able to differentiate persons with and without vertebral fractures (area under the curve [A(Z)] up to 0.73). However, none of the parameters obtained in the 1.5-T images and none of the fuzzy logic parameters discriminated persons with and without vertebral fractures. Significant correlations were found between fuzzy or structural parameters and femoral fracture load. Using multiple regression analysis, none of the structural or fuzzy parameters were found to add discriminative value to BMD

  20. Structural characterization, magnetic behavior and high-resolution EELS study of new perovskites Sr{sub 2}Ru{sub 2-} {sub x} Co {sub x} O{sub 6-} {sub {delta}} (0.5{<=}x{<=}1.5)

    SciTech Connect

    Lozano-Gorrin, A.D. Greedan, J.E.; Nunez, P.; Gonzalez-Silgo, C.; Botton, G.A.; Radtke, G.

    2007-04-15

    New oxides of general formula Sr{sub 2}Ru{sub 2-} {sub x} Co {sub x} O{sub 6-} {sub {delta}} (0.5{<=}x{<=}1.5) have been synthesized as polycrystalline materials and characterized structurally by X-ray diffraction. For 0.5{<=}x<0.67 the orthorhombic, Pnma, perovskite structure of the end member, SrRuO{sub 3}, is found. At x=0.67 a phase separation into an Ru-rich Pnma phase and a Co-rich I2/c phase occurs. The I2/c form is also found for x=1.0 but another orthorhombic phase, Imma, obtains for x=1.33 and 1.5. Reductive weight losses indicate negligible oxygen non-stoichiometry, i.e., {delta}{approx}0, for all compositions even those rich in Co. High-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) indicates that cobalt is high-spin Co{sup 3+} or high-spin Co{sup 4+} for all x. Appropriate combinations of Ru{sup 4+}, Ru{sup 5+}, HS Co{sup 3+} and HS Co{sup 4+} are proposed for each x which are consistent with the observed Ru(Co)-O distances. Significant amounts of Co{sup 4+} must be present for large x values to explain the short observed distances. Broad maxima in the d.c. susceptibilities are found between 78 and 97 K with increasing x, along with zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and field-cooled (FC) divergences suggesting glassy magnetic freezing. A feature near 155 K for all samples indicates a residual amount of ferromagnetic SrRuO{sub 3} not detected by X-ray diffraction. - Graphical abstract: Correlation between the average B-site radius, the Goldschmidt tolerance factor and the sequence of space groups and Glazer tilt systems found for the perovskite solid solution Sr{sub 2}Ru{sub 2-} {sub x} Co {sub x} O{sub 6}.

  1. Optoelectronic tweezers for medical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Clemens; Neale, Steven; Menachery, Anoop; Barrett, Mike; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) allows the spatial patterning of electric fields through selected illumination of a photoconductive surface. This enables the manipulation of micro particles and cells by creating non-uniform electrical fields that then produce dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces. The DEP responses of cells differ and can produce negative or positive (repelled or attracted to areas of high electric field) forces. Therefore OET can be used to manipulate individual cells and separate different cell types from each other. Thus OET has many applications for medical diagnostics, demonstrated here with work towards diagnosing Human African Trypanosomiasis, also known as sleeping sickness.

  2. Cell rotation using optoelectronic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuan-Li; Huang, Yuan-Peng; Lu, Yen-Sheng; Hou, Max T; Yeh, J Andrew

    2010-01-01

    A cell rotation method by using optoelectronic tweezers (OET) is reported. The binary image of a typical OET device, whose light and dark sides act as two sets of parallel plates with different ac voltages, was used to create a rotating electric field. Its feasibility for application to electrorotation of cells was demonstrated by rotating Ramos and yeast cells in their pitch axes. The electrorotation by using OET devices is dependent on the medium and cells' electrical properties, the cells' positions, and the OET device's geometrical dimension, as well as the frequency of the electric field. PMID:21267435

  3. High-resolution color images of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, A. S.; Soderblom, L. A.

    1984-01-01

    Color versions of the highest resolution Voyager images of Io were produced by combining the low resolution color images with the high resolution, clear filter images. High resolution versions of the orange, blue, and violet filter images are produced by: orange = high-res clear * low-res orange / low-res clear blue = high-res clear * low-res blue / low-res clear violet = high-res clear * low-res violet / low-res clear. The spectral responses of the high and low resolution clear filter images cancel, leaving the color, while the spatial frequencies of the two low resolution images cancel, leaving the high resolution.

  4. Microcrystal manipulation with laser tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Armin; Duman, Ramona; Stevens, Bob; Ward, Andy

    2013-01-01

    X-ray crystallography is the method of choice to deduce atomic resolution structural information from macromolecules. In recent years, significant investments in structural genomics initiatives have been undertaken to automate all steps in X-ray crystallography from protein expression to structure solution. Robotic systems are widely used to prepare crystallization screens and change samples on synchrotron beamlines for macromolecular crystallography. The only remaining manual handling step is the transfer of the crystal from the mother liquor onto the crystal holder. Manual mounting is relatively straightforward for crystals with dimensions of >25 µm; however, this step is nontrivial for smaller crystals. The mounting of microcrystals is becoming increasingly important as advances in microfocus synchrotron beamlines now allow data collection from crystals with dimensions of only a few micrometres. To make optimal usage of these beamlines, new approaches have to be taken to facilitate and automate this last manual handling step. Optical tweezers, which are routinely used for the manipulation of micrometre-sized objects, have successfully been applied to sort and mount macromolecular crystals on newly designed crystal holders. Diffraction data from CPV type 1 polyhedrin microcrystals mounted with laser tweezers are presented. PMID:23793156

  5. NOAA's Use of High-Resolution Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hund, Erik

    2007-01-01

    NOAA's use of high-resolution imagery consists of: a) Shoreline mapping and nautical chart revision; b) Coastal land cover mapping; c) Benthic habitat mapping; d) Disaster response; and e) Imagery collection and support for coastal programs.

  6. Quantum limited particle sensing in optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, J.W.; Hsu, Magnus T. L.; Bowen, Warwick P.

    2009-12-15

    Particle sensing in optical tweezers systems provides information on the position, velocity, and force of the specimen particles. The conventional quadrant detection scheme is applied ubiquitously in optical tweezers experiments to quantify these parameters. In this paper, we show that quadrant detection is nonoptimal for particle sensing in optical tweezers and propose an alternative optimal particle sensing scheme based on spatial homodyne detection. A formalism for particle sensing in terms of transverse spatial modes is developed and numerical simulations of the efficacies of both quadrant and spatial homodyne detection are shown. We demonstrate that 1 order of magnitude improvement in particle sensing sensitivity can be achieved using spatial homodyne over quadrant detection.

  7. High Resolution Global View of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Io, the most volcanic body in the solar system is seen in the highest resolution obtained to date by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The smallest features that can be discerned are 2.5 kilometers in size. There are rugged mountains several kilometers high, layered materials forming plateaus, and many irregular depressions called volcanic calderas. Several of the dark, flow-like features correspond to hot spots, and may be active lava flows. There are no landforms resembling impact craters, as the volcanism covers the surface with new deposits much more rapidly than the flux of comets and asteroids can create large impact craters. The picture is centered on the side of Io that always faces away from Jupiter; north is to the top.

    Color images acquired on September 7, 1996 have been merged with higher resolution images acquired on November 6, 1996 by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The color is composed of data taken, at a range of 487,000 kilometers, in the near-infrared, green, and violet filters and has been enhanced to emphasize the extraordinary variations in color and brightness that characterize Io's face. The high resolution images were obtained at ranges which varied from 245,719 kilometers to 403,100 kilometers.

    Launched in October 1989, Galileo entered orbit around Jupiter on December 7, 1995. The spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  8. Probing the structural dynamics of proteins and nucleic acids with optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Dustin B; Woodside, Michael T

    2015-10-01

    Conformational changes are an essential feature of most molecular processes in biology. Optical tweezers have emerged as a powerful tool for probing conformational dynamics at the single-molecule level because of their high resolution and sensitivity, opening new windows on phenomena ranging from folding and ligand binding to enzyme function, molecular machines, and protein aggregation. By measuring conformational changes induced in a molecule by forces applied by optical tweezers, new insight has been gained into the relationship between dynamics and function. We discuss recent advances from studies of how structure forms in proteins and RNA, including non-native structures, fluctuations in disordered proteins, and interactions with chaperones assisting native folding. We also review the development of assays probing the dynamics of complex protein-nucleic acid and protein-protein assemblies that reveal the dynamic interactions between biomolecular machines and their substrates.

  9. A DNA tweezer-actuated enzyme nanoreactor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minghui; Fu, Jinglin; Hejesen, Christian; Yang, Yuhe; Woodbury, Neal W; Gothelf, Kurt; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2013-01-01

    The functions of regulatory enzymes are essential to modulating cellular pathways. Here we report a tweezer-like DNA nanodevice to actuate the activity of an enzyme/cofactor pair. A dehydrogenase and NAD(+) cofactor are attached to different arms of the DNA tweezer structure and actuation of enzymatic function is achieved by switching the tweezers between open and closed states. The enzyme/cofactor pair is spatially separated in the open state with inhibited enzyme function, whereas in the closed state, enzyme is activated by the close proximity of the two molecules. The conformational state of the DNA tweezer is controlled by the addition of specific oligonucleotides that serve as the thermodynamic driver (fuel) to trigger the change. Using this approach, several cycles of externally controlled enzyme inhibition and activation are successfully demonstrated. This principle of responsive enzyme nanodevices may be used to regulate other types of enzymes and to introduce feedback or feed-forward control loops.

  10. Steerable optical tweezers for ultracold atom studies.

    PubMed

    Roberts, K O; McKellar, T; Fekete, J; Rakonjac, A; Deb, A B; Kjærgaard, N

    2014-04-01

    We report on the implementation of an optical tweezer system for controlled transport of ultracold atoms along a narrow, static confinement channel. The tweezer system is based on high-efficiency acousto-optic deflectors and offers two-dimensional control over beam position. This opens up the possibility for tracking the transport channel when shuttling atomic clouds along it, forestalling atom spilling. Multiple clouds can be tracked independently by time-shared tweezer beams addressing individual sites in the channel. The deflectors are controlled using a multichannel direct digital synthesizer, which receives instructions on a submicrosecond time scale from a field-programmable gate array. Using the tweezer system, we demonstrate sequential binary splitting of an ultracold 87Rb cloud into 2(5) clouds.

  11. Characterizing conical refraction optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    McDonald, C; McDougall, C; Rafailov, E; McGloin, D

    2014-12-01

    Conical refraction occurs when a beam of light travels through an appropriately cut biaxial crystal. By focusing the conically refracted beam through a high numerical aperture microscope objective, conical refraction optical tweezers can be created, allowing for particle manipulation in both Raman spots, and in the Lloyd/Poggendorff rings. We present a thorough quantification of the trapping properties of such a beam, focusing on the trap stiffness, and how this varies with trap power and trapped particle location. We show that the lower Raman spot can be thought of as a single-beam optical gradient force trap, while radiation pressure dominates in the upper Raman spot, leading to optical levitation rather than trapping. Particles in the Lloyd/Poggendorff rings experience a lower trap stiffness than particles in the lower Raman spot, but benefit from rotational control. PMID:25490654

  12. Diarylferrocene tweezers for cation binding.

    PubMed

    Lima, Carlos F R A C; Fernandes, Ana M; Melo, André; Gonçalves, Luís M; Silva, Artur M S; Santos, Luís M N B F

    2015-10-01

    The host-guest chemistry of ferrocene derivatives was explored by a combined experimental and theoretical study. Several 1-arylferrocenes and 1,1'-diarylferrocenes were synthesized by the Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction. The ability of these compounds to bind small cations in the gas phase was investigated experimentally by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The results evidenced a noticeable ability of all 1,1'-diarylferrocenes studied to bind cations, while the same was not observed for the corresponding 1-arylferrocenes nor ferrocene. The 1,1'-diarylferrocenecation relative interaction energies were evaluated by ESI-MS and quantum chemical calculations and showed that cation binding in these systems follows electrostatic trends. It was found that, due to their unique molecular shape and smooth torsional potentials, 1,1'-diarylferrocenes can act as molecular tweezers of small-sized cations in the gas phase. PMID:26309143

  13. Mapping force of interaction between PLGA nanoparticle with cell membrane using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhajed, Suyash; Gu, Ling; Homayoni, Homa; Nguyen, Kytai; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2011-03-01

    Drug delivery using magnetic (Fe 3 O4) Poly Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid (PLGA) nanoparticles is finding increasing usage in therapeutic applications due to its biodegradability, biocompatibility and targeted localization. Since optical tweezers allow non-contact, highly sensitive force measurement, we utilized optical tweezers for studying interaction forces between the Fe 3 O4 -PLGA nanoparticles with prostate cancer PC3 cells. Presence of Fe 3 O4 within the PLGA shell allowed efficient trapping of these nanoparticles in near-IR optical tweezers. The conglomerated PLGA nanoparticles could be dispersed by use of the optical tweezers. Calibration of trapping stiffness as a function of laser beam power was carried out using equipartition theorem method, where the mean square displacement was measured with high precision using time-lapse fluorescence imaging of the nanoparticles. After the trapped PLGA nanoparticle was brought in close vicinity of the PC3 cell membrane, displacement of the nanoparticle from trap center was measured as a function of time. In short time scale (30 sec) , whiletheforceofinteractionwaswithin 0.2 pN , theforceincreasedbeyond 1 pNatlongertimescales (~ 10 min). We will present the results of the time-varying force of interactions between PLGA nanoparticles with PC3 cells using optical tweezers.

  14. RAPID DAMAGE ASSESSMENT FROM HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGERY

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayaraj, Veeraraghavan; Bright, Eddie A; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2008-01-01

    Disaster impact modeling and analysis uses huge volumes of image data that are produced immediately following a natural or an anthropogenic disaster event. Rapid damage assessment is the key to time critical decision support in disaster management to better utilize available response resources and accelerate recovery and relief efforts. But exploiting huge volumes of high resolution image data for identifying damaged areas with robust consistency in near real time is a challenging task. In this paper, we present an automated image analysis technique to identify areas of structural damage from high resolution optical satellite data using features based on image content.

  15. The sun and nearby stars: microwave observations at high resolution.

    PubMed

    Kundu, M R; Lang, K R

    1985-04-01

    High-resolution microwave observations are providing new insights into the nature of active regions and eruptions on the sun and nearby stars. The strength, evolution, and structure of magnetic fields in coronal loops can be determined by multiple-wavelength observations with the Very Large Array. Flare models can be tested with Very Large Array snapshot maps, which have angular resolutions of better than 1 second of arc in time periods as short as 10 seconds. Magnetic changes that precede solar eruptions on time scales of tens of minutes involve primarily emerging coronal loops and the interactions of two or more loops. Magnetic reconnection at the interface of two closed loops may accelerate electrons and trigger the release of microwave energy in the coronal parts of the magnetic loops. Nearby main-sequence stars of late spectral type emit slowly varying microwave radiation and stellar microwave bursts that show striking similarities to those of the sun. PMID:17811548

  16. The sun and nearby stars - Microwave observations at high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, M. R.; Lang, K. R.

    1985-04-01

    High-resolution microwave observations are providing new insights into the nature of active regions and eruptions on the sun and nearby stars. The strength, evolution, and structure of magnetic fields in coronal loops can be determined by multiple-wavelength observations with the Very Large Array. Flare models ccan be tested with Very Large Array snapshot maps, which have angular resolutions of better than 1 second of arc in time periods as short as 10 seconds. Magnetic changes that precede solar eruptions on time scales of tens of minutes involve primarily emerging coronal loops and the interactions of two or more loops. Magnetic reconnection at the interface of two closed loops may accelerate electrons and trigger the release of microwave energy in the coronal parts of the magnetic loops. Nearby main-sequence stars of late spectral type emit slowly varying microwave radiation and stellar microwave bursts that show striking similarities to those of the sun.

  17. A High-Resolution Stopwatch for Cents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gingl, Z.; Kopasz, K.

    2011-01-01

    A very low-cost, easy-to-make stopwatch is presented to support various experiments in mechanics. The high-resolution stopwatch is based on two photodetectors connected directly to the microphone input of a sound card. Dedicated free open-source software has been developed and made available to download. The efficiency is demonstrated by a free…

  18. High-resolution two dimensional advective transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, P.E.; Larock, B.E.

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes a two-dimensional high-resolution scheme for advective transport that is based on a Eulerian-Lagrangian method with a flux limiter. The scheme is applied to the problem of pure-advection of a rotated Gaussian hill and shown to preserve the monotonicity property of the governing conservation law.

  19. High Resolution Spectroscopy in the Divertor and Edge Regions of Alcator-C Mode and Measurement of Radiative Transfer in Vacuum-UV Line Emission from Magnetic Fusion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Griem, Hans R.

    2005-03-01

    Spectroscopic diagnostics were carried out both at MIT and at the University of Maryland. At MIT, measurements were made of toroidal flow velocities in the mid-plane of the inner and outer scrape-off layers (SOL) of Alcator C-Mod plasmas, using a high-resolution spectrograph. Subsequently, the MIT/Alcator procedures based upon visible spectroscopy were transferred to the new Maryland centrifugal experiment (MCX). In a further effort towards data refinement, we expanded the hydrogen measurements from the n approaches to 2 Balmer series in the visible to the n approaches to 1 Lyman series in the vacuum-ultraviolet (vuv) spectral region. Recent results were presented at APS Division of Plasma Physics meetings and published in Physics of Plasmas in 2004 and 2005. Further details can be found in the annual progress reports to the Department of Energy.

  20. Comprehensive analysis of commercial willow bark extracts by new technology platform: combined use of metabolomics, high-performance liquid chromatography-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and high-resolution radical scavenging assay.

    PubMed

    Agnolet, Sara; Wiese, Stefanie; Verpoorte, Robert; Staerk, Dan

    2012-11-01

    Here, proof-of-concept of a new analytical platform used for the comprehensive analysis of a small set of commercial willow bark products is presented, and compared with a traditional standardization solely based on analysis of salicin and salicin derivatives. The platform combines principal component analysis (PCA) of two chemical fingerprints, i.e., HPLC and (1)H NMR data, and a pharmacological fingerprint, i.e., high-resolution 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) radical cation (ABTS(+)) reduction profile, with targeted identification of constituents of interest by hyphenated HPLC-solid-phase extraction-tube transfer NMR, i.e., HPLC-SPE-ttNMR. Score plots from PCA of HPLC and (1)H NMR fingerprints showed the same distinct grouping of preparations formulated as capsules of Salix alba bark and separation of S. alba cortex. Loading plots revealed this to be due to high amount of salicin in capsules and ampelopsin, taxifolin, 7-O-methyltaxifolin-3'-O-glucoside, and 7-O-methyltaxifolin in S. alba cortex, respectively. PCA of high-resolution radical scavenging profiles revealed clear separation of preparations along principal component 1 due to the major radical scavengers (+)-catechin and ampelopsin. The new analytical platform allowed identification of 16 compounds in commercial willow bark extracts, and identification of ampelopsin, taxifolin, 7-O-methyltaxifolin-3'-O-glucoside, and 7-O-methyltaxifolin in S. alba bark extract is reported for the first time. The detection of the novel compound, ethyl 1-hydroxy-6-oxocyclohex-2-enecarboxylate, is also described.

  1. High-Resolution Polarimetry of Supernova Remnant Kesteven 69

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, C. A.; Mufson, S. L.; Dickel, J. R.

    2008-06-01

    Reported here are high-resolution 6 cm measurements of the adolescent supernova remnant (SNR) Kesteven 69 made with the hybrid BnC configuration of the Very Large Array. Several three-field mosaics of the polarized and total intensity have been used to study this SNR. These investigations lead to a coherent picture of this region. The expanding shock defines an outer rim of high total intensity, suggesting the front is running into large dense clouds with random magnetic field directions. The SNR consists of predominantly of two types of regions, those with high total and relatively weak polarized emission and those with relatively weak total and strong polarized emission. This morphology can be generally explained by the number of clouds with organized magnetic field along the line of sight. Within this SNR there are regions where the field is varying from radial to tangential. As the SN shock encounters clouds, magnetic fields within clouds will strongly affect cloud dynamics.

  2. High-resolution MR neurography of diffuse peripheral nerve lesions.

    PubMed

    Thawait, S K; Chaudhry, V; Thawait, G K; Wang, K C; Belzberg, A; Carrino, J A; Chhabra, A

    2011-09-01

    High-resolution MR imaging of peripheral nerves is becoming more common and practical with the increasing availability of 3T magnets. There are multiple reports of MR imaging of peripheral nerves in compression and entrapment neuropathies. However, there is a relative paucity of literature on MRN appearance of diffuse peripheral nerve lesions. We attempted to highlight the salient imaging features of myriad diffuse peripheral nerve disorders and imaging techniques for MRN. Using clinical and pathologically proved relevant examples, we present the MRN appearance of various types of diffuse peripheral nerve lesions, such as traumatic, inflammatory, infectious, hereditary, radiation-induced, neoplastic, and tumor variants. PMID:20966057

  3. Designing single-beam multitrapping acoustical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Silva, Glauber T; Baggio, André L

    2015-02-01

    The concept of a single-beam acoustical tweezer device which can simultaneously trap microparticles at different points is proposed and demonstrated through computational simulations. The device employs an ultrasound beam produced by a circular focused transducer operating at 1 MHz in water medium. The ultrasound beam exerts a radiation force that may tweeze suspended microparticles in the medium. Simulations show that the acoustical tweezer can simultaneously trap microparticles in the pre-focal zone along the beam axis, i.e. between the transducer surface and its geometric focus. As acoustical tweezers are fast becoming a key instrument in microparticle handling, the development of acoustic multitrapping concept may turn into a useful tool in engineering these devices.

  4. Designing single-beam multitrapping acoustical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Silva, Glauber T; Baggio, André L

    2015-02-01

    The concept of a single-beam acoustical tweezer device which can simultaneously trap microparticles at different points is proposed and demonstrated through computational simulations. The device employs an ultrasound beam produced by a circular focused transducer operating at 1 MHz in water medium. The ultrasound beam exerts a radiation force that may tweeze suspended microparticles in the medium. Simulations show that the acoustical tweezer can simultaneously trap microparticles in the pre-focal zone along the beam axis, i.e. between the transducer surface and its geometric focus. As acoustical tweezers are fast becoming a key instrument in microparticle handling, the development of acoustic multitrapping concept may turn into a useful tool in engineering these devices. PMID:25304994

  5. High resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Wang, Xuben; Li, Zhirong; Li, Qiong; Li, Zhengwen

    2009-06-01

    The high resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion method is based on nonlinear theory. Under layer control, the log data from several wells (or all wells) in the study area and seismic trace data adjacent to the wells are input to a network with multiple inputs and outputs and are integratedly trained to obtain an adaptive weight function of the entire study area. Integrated nonlinear mapping relationships are built and updated by the lateral and vertical geologic variations of the reservoirs. Therefore, the inversion process and its inversion results can be constrained and controlled and a stable seismic inversion section with high resolution with velocity inversion, impedance inversion, and density inversion sections, can be gained. Good geologic effects have been obtained in model computation tests and real data processing, which verified that this method has high precision, good practicality, and can be used for quantitative reservoir analysis.

  6. High-Resolution X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ODell, Stephen L.; Brissenden, Roger J.; Davis, William; Elsner, Ronald F.; Elvis, Martin; Freeman, Mark; Gaetz, Terry; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhail V.

    2010-01-01

    Fundamental needs for future x-ray telescopes: a) Sharp images => excellent angular resolution. b) High throughput => large aperture areas. Generation-X optics technical challenges: a) High resolution => precision mirrors & alignment. b) Large apertures => lots of lightweight mirrors. Innovation needed for technical readiness: a) 4 top-level error terms contribute to image size. b) There are approaches to controlling those errors. Innovation needed for manufacturing readiness. Programmatic issues are comparably challenging.

  7. High resolution schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harten, A.

    1983-01-01

    A class of new explicit second order accurate finite difference schemes for the computation of weak solutions of hyperbolic conservation laws is presented. These highly nonlinear schemes are obtained by applying a nonoscillatory first order accurate scheme to an appropriately modified flux function. The so-derived second order accurate schemes achieve high resolution while preserving the robustness of the original nonoscillatory first order accurate scheme. Numerical experiments are presented to demonstrate the performance of these new schemes.

  8. High-Resolution Traction Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Plotnikov, Sergey V.; Sabass, Benedikt; Schwarz, Ulrich S.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular forces generated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton and transmitted to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through discrete, integrin-based protein assemblies, that is, focal adhesions, are critical to developmental morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis, as well as disease progression in cancer. However, quantitative mapping of these forces has been difficult since there has been no experimental technique to visualize nanonewton forces at submicrometer spatial resolution. Here, we provide detailed protocols for measuring cellular forces exerted on two-dimensional elastic substrates with a high-resolution traction force microscopy (TFM) method. We describe fabrication of polyacrylamide substrates labeled with multiple colors of fiducial markers, functionalization of the substrates with ECM proteins, setting up the experiment, and imaging procedures. In addition, we provide the theoretical background of traction reconstruction and experimental considerations important to design a high-resolution TFM experiment. We describe the implementation of a new algorithm for processing of images of fiducial markers that are taken below the surface of the substrate, which significantly improves data quality. We demonstrate the application of the algorithm and explain how to choose a regularization parameter for suppression of the measurement error. A brief discussion of different ways to visualize and analyze the results serves to illustrate possible uses of high-resolution TFM in biomedical research. PMID:24974038

  9. High-resolution fully vectorial scanning Kerr magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Flajšman, Lukáš; Urbánek, Michal; Křižáková, Viola; Vaňatka, Marek; Turčan, Igor; Šikola, Tomáš

    2016-05-01

    We report on the development of a high-resolution scanning magnetometer, which fully exploits the vectorial nature of the magneto-optical Kerr effect. The three-dimensional nature of magnetization is at the basis of many micromagnetic phenomena and from these data, we can fully characterize magnetization processes of nanostructures in static and dynamic regimes. Our scanning Kerr magnetometer uses a high numerical aperture microscope objective where the incident light beam can be deterministically deviated from the objective symmetry axis, therefore, both in-plane (via the longitudinal Kerr effect) and out-of-plane (via the polar Kerr effect) components of the magnetization vector may be detected. These components are then separated by exploiting the symmetries of the polar and longitudinal Kerr effects. From four consecutive measurements, we are able to directly obtain the three orthogonal components of the magnetization vector with a resolution of 600 nm. Performance of the apparatus is demonstrated by a measurement of 3D magnetization vector maps showing out-of-plane domains and in-plane domain walls in an yttrium-iron-garnet film and on a study of magnetization reversal in a 4-μm-wide magnetic disk. PMID:27250432

  10. High-resolution fully vectorial scanning Kerr magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flajšman, Lukáš; Urbánek, Michal; Křižáková, Viola; VaÅatka, Marek; Turčan, Igor; Šikola, Tomáš

    2016-05-01

    We report on the development of a high-resolution scanning magnetometer, which fully exploits the vectorial nature of the magneto-optical Kerr effect. The three-dimensional nature of magnetization is at the basis of many micromagnetic phenomena and from these data, we can fully characterize magnetization processes of nanostructures in static and dynamic regimes. Our scanning Kerr magnetometer uses a high numerical aperture microscope objective where the incident light beam can be deterministically deviated from the objective symmetry axis, therefore, both in-plane (via the longitudinal Kerr effect) and out-of-plane (via the polar Kerr effect) components of the magnetization vector may be detected. These components are then separated by exploiting the symmetries of the polar and longitudinal Kerr effects. From four consecutive measurements, we are able to directly obtain the three orthogonal components of the magnetization vector with a resolution of 600 nm. Performance of the apparatus is demonstrated by a measurement of 3D magnetization vector maps showing out-of-plane domains and in-plane domain walls in an yttrium-iron-garnet film and on a study of magnetization reversal in a 4-μm-wide magnetic disk.

  11. High-resolution fully vectorial scanning Kerr magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Flajšman, Lukáš; Urbánek, Michal; Křižáková, Viola; Vaňatka, Marek; Turčan, Igor; Šikola, Tomáš

    2016-05-01

    We report on the development of a high-resolution scanning magnetometer, which fully exploits the vectorial nature of the magneto-optical Kerr effect. The three-dimensional nature of magnetization is at the basis of many micromagnetic phenomena and from these data, we can fully characterize magnetization processes of nanostructures in static and dynamic regimes. Our scanning Kerr magnetometer uses a high numerical aperture microscope objective where the incident light beam can be deterministically deviated from the objective symmetry axis, therefore, both in-plane (via the longitudinal Kerr effect) and out-of-plane (via the polar Kerr effect) components of the magnetization vector may be detected. These components are then separated by exploiting the symmetries of the polar and longitudinal Kerr effects. From four consecutive measurements, we are able to directly obtain the three orthogonal components of the magnetization vector with a resolution of 600 nm. Performance of the apparatus is demonstrated by a measurement of 3D magnetization vector maps showing out-of-plane domains and in-plane domain walls in an yttrium-iron-garnet film and on a study of magnetization reversal in a 4-μm-wide magnetic disk.

  12. Micro-objective manipulated with optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, M.; Kurosawa, T.; Hane, K.

    1997-02-01

    A microscope is described that uses a {mu}m-sized ball lens, which is here termed micro-objective, manipulated with optical tweezers to image the side view of the arbitrary region of a sample. Since this micro-objective is small in size, it can go into a concave region to produce a local image of the inside which the conventional microscope cannot observe. Preliminary results show good lens performance from the micro-objective when combined with optical tweezers. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Molecular tweezers targeting transthyretin amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Nelson; Pereira-Henriques, Alda; Attar, Aida; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Schrader, Thomas; Bitan, Gal; Gales, Luís; Saraiva, Maria João; Almeida, Maria Rosário

    2014-04-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) amyloidoses comprise a wide spectrum of acquired and hereditary diseases triggered by extracellular deposition of toxic TTR aggregates in various organs. Despite recent advances regarding the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying TTR misfolding and pathogenic self-assembly, there is still no effective therapy for treatment of these fatal disorders. Recently, the "molecular tweezers", CLR01, has been reported to inhibit self-assembly and toxicity of different amyloidogenic proteins in vitro, including TTR, by interfering with hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions known to play an important role in the aggregation process. In addition, CLR01 showed therapeutic effects in animal models of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Here, we assessed the ability of CLR01 to modulate TTR misfolding and aggregation in cell culture and in an animal model. In cell culture assays we found that CLR01 inhibited TTR oligomerization in the conditioned medium and alleviated TTR-induced neurotoxicity by redirecting TTR aggregation into the formation of innocuous assemblies. To determine whether CLR01 was effective in vivo, we tested the compound in mice expressing TTR V30M, a model of familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy, which recapitulates the main pathological features of the human disease. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses showed a significant decrease in TTR burden in the gastrointestinal tract and the peripheral nervous system in mice treated with CLR01, with a concomitant reduction in aggregate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress response, protein oxidation, and apoptosis. Taken together, our preclinical data suggest that CLR01 is a promising lead compound for development of innovative, disease-modifying therapy for TTR amyloidosis.

  14. Separate effects of sex hormones and sex chromosomes on brain structure and function revealed by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and spatial navigation assessment of the Four Core Genotype mouse model.

    PubMed

    Corre, Christina; Friedel, Miriam; Vousden, Dulcie A; Metcalf, Ariane; Spring, Shoshana; Qiu, Lily R; Lerch, Jason P; Palmert, Mark R

    2016-03-01

    Males and females exhibit several differences in brain structure and function. To examine the basis for these sex differences, we investigated the influences of sex hormones and sex chromosomes on brain structure and function in mice. We used the Four Core Genotype (4CG) mice, which can generate both male and female mice with XX or XY sex chromosome complement, allowing the decoupling of sex chromosomes from hormonal milieu. To examine whole brain structure, high-resolution ex vivo MRI was performed, and to assess differences in cognitive function, mice were trained on a radial arm maze. Voxel-wise and volumetric analyses of MRI data uncovered a striking independence of hormonal versus chromosomal influences in 30 sexually dimorphic brain regions. For example, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the parieto-temporal lobe of the cerebral cortex displayed steroid-dependence while the cerebellar cortex, corpus callosum, and olfactory bulbs were influenced by sex chromosomes. Spatial learning and memory demonstrated strict hormone-dependency with no apparent influence of sex chromosomes. Understanding the influences of chromosomes and hormones on brain structure and function is important for understanding sex differences in brain structure and function, an endeavor that has eventual implications for understanding sex biases observed in the prevalence of psychiatric disorders.

  15. High-resolution 2D NMR spectra in inhomogeneous fields via 3D acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yanqin; Wei, Zhiliang; Zhang, Liandi; Lin, Liangjie; Chen, Zhong

    2014-04-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy plays an important role in chemical studies. Here, a pulse sequence, based on coherence transfer module of tracking differences of precession frequencies of two spins and spin echo module, is proposed to obtain two dimension (2D) high-resolution NMR spectra via 3D acquisition under large field inhomogeneity. The proposed scheme composes of simple hard pulses and rectangle gradients. Resulting 2D spectra exhibit chemical shift differences and J coupling splittings in two orthogonal dimensions. The method developed here may offer a promising way for in situ high-resolution NMR studies on combinatorial chemistry.

  16. High-resolution laser spectroscopy and magnetic effect of the B{sup ~2}E′ ← X{sup ~2}A{sub 2}′ transition of {sup 14}NO{sub 3} radical

    SciTech Connect

    Tada, Kohei; Kashihara, Wataru; Baba, Masaaki; Ishiwata, Takashi; Hirota, Eizi; Kasahara, Shunji

    2014-11-14

    Rotationally resolved high-resolution fluorescence excitation spectra of {sup 14}NO{sub 3} radical have been observed for the 662 nm band, which is assigned as the 0–0 band of the B{sup ~2}E′ ←X{sup ~2}A{sub 2}′ transition, by crossing a single-mode laser beam perpendicularly to a collimated molecular beam. More than 3000 rotational lines were detected in 15 070–15 145 cm{sup −1} region, but it is difficult to find the rotational line series. Remarkable rotational line pairs, whose interval is about 0.0246 cm{sup −1}, were found in the observed spectrum. This interval is the same amount with the spin-rotation splitting of the X{sup ~2}A{sub 2}′ (υ = 0, k = 0, N = 1) level. From this interval and the observed Zeeman splitting up to 360 G, seven line pairs were assigned as the transitions to the {sup 2}E′{sub 3/2} (J′ = 1.5) levels and 15 line pairs were assigned as the transitions to the {sup 2}E′{sub 1/2} (J′ = 0.5) levels. From the rotational analysis, we recognized that the {sup 2}E′ state splits into {sup 2}E′{sub 3/2} and {sup 2}E′{sub 1/2} by the spin-orbit interaction and the effective spin-orbit interaction constant was roughly estimated as –21 cm{sup −1}. From the number of the rotational line pairs, we concluded that the complicated rotational structure of this 662 nm band of {sup 14}NO{sub 3} mainly owes to the vibronic interaction between the B{sup ~2}E′ state and the dark A{sup ~2}E″ state through the a{sub 2}″ symmetry vibrational mode.

  17. A high-resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometer for planetary spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Sinton, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    The employment of a high-resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) is described for planetary and other astronomical spectroscopy in conjunction with the 88-inch telescope at Mauna Kea Observatory. The FTS system is designed for a broad range of uses, including double-beam laboratory spectroscopy, infrared gas chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The data system is well-suited to astronomical applications because of its great speed in acquiring and transforming data, and because of the enormous storage capability of the magnetic tape unit supplied with the system. The basic instrument is outlined 2nd some of the initial results from the first attempted use on the Mauna Kea 88-inch telescope are reported.

  18. A Portable, High Resolution, Surface Measurement Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihlefeld, Curtis M.; Burns, Bradley M.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    A high resolution, portable, surface measurement device has been demonstrated to provide micron-resolution topographical plots. This device was specifically developed to allow in-situ measurements of defects on the Space Shuttle Orbiter windows, but is versatile enough to be used on a wide variety of surfaces. This paper discusses the choice of an optical sensor and then the decisions required to convert a lab bench optical measurement device into an ergonomic portable system. The necessary trade-offs between performance and portability are presented along with a description of the device developed to measure Orbiter window defects.

  19. High resolution SAR applications and instrument design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dionisio, C.; Torre, A.

    1993-01-01

    The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has viewed, in the last two years, a huge increment of interest from many preset and potential users. The good spatial resolution associated to the all weather capability lead to considering SAR not only a scientific instrument but a tool for verifying and controlling the daily human relationships with the Earth Environment. New missions were identified for SAR as spatial resolution became lower than three meters: disasters, pollution, ships traffic, volcanic eruptions, earthquake effect are only a few of the possible objects which can be effectively detected, controlled and monitored by SAR mounted on satellites. High resolution radar design constraints and dimensioning are discussed.

  20. High resolution millimeter-wave imaging sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. J.; Howard, R. J.; Parks, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    A scanning 3-mm radiometer is described that has been built for use on a small aircraft to produce real time high resolution images of the ground when atmospheric conditions such as smoke, dust, and clouds make IR and visual sensors unusable. The sensor can be used for a variety of remote sensing applications such as measurements of snow cover and snow water equivalent, precipitation mapping, vegetation type and extent, surface moisture and temperature, and surface thermal inertia. The advantages of millimeter waves for cloud penetration and the ability to observe different physical phenomena make this system an attractive supplement to visible and IR remote sensing systems.

  1. High resolution extremity CT for biomechanics modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, A.E.; Brand, H.; Hollerbach, K.; Logan, C.M.; Martz, H.E.

    1995-09-23

    With the advent of ever more powerful computing and finite element analysis (FEA) capabilities, the bone and joint geometry detail available from either commercial surface definitions or from medical CT scans is inadequate. For dynamic FEA modeling of joints, precise articular contours are necessary to get appropriate contact definition. In this project, a fresh cadaver extremity was suspended in parafin in a lucite cylinder and then scanned with an industrial CT system to generate a high resolution data set for use in biomechanics modeling.

  2. A High Resolution Scale-of-four

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fitch, V.

    1949-08-25

    A high resolution scale-of-four has been developed to be used in conjunction with the nuclear particle detection devices in applications where the counting rate is unusually high. Specifically, it is intended to precede the commercially available medium resolution scaling circuits and so decrease the resolving time of the counting system. The circuit will function reliably on continuously recurring pulses separated by less than 0.1 microseconds. It will resolve two pulses (occurring at a moderate repetition rate) which are spaced at 0.04 microseconds. A five-volt input signal is sufficient to actuate the device.

  3. High Resolution Image From Viking Lander 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Viking 1 took this high-resolution picture today, its third day on Mars. Distance from the camera to the nearfield (bottom) is about 4 meters (13 feet); to the horizon, about 3 kilometers (1.8 miles). The photo shows numerous angular blocks ranging in size from a few centimeters to several meters. The surface between the blocks is composed of fine-grained material. Accumulation of some fine-grained material behind blocks indicates wind deposition of dust and sand downwind of obstacles. The large block on the horizon is about 4 meters (13 feet) wide. Distance across the horizon is about 34 meters (110 feet).

  4. High Resolution Spectroscopy with Submillimeter-Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vinay; Dave, Hemant

    2003-03-01

    In order to explain the characteristic features of planetary atmosphere, detection and precise measurements of environmentally important gases such as CO, CIO, No becomes necessary. Since most of the polyatomic molecules have (ro-vibrational) transitions in submillimeter region 100 μ-1000μ), probing in this wavelength region is vital. The specific rotational and vibrational states are the result of interactions between different atoms in the molecule. Since each molecule has a unique arrangement of atoms, it has an exclusive submillimeter signature. We are developing a portable heterodyne receiver system at Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad to perform high-resolution spectroscopy in this wavelength region.

  5. An optical tweezer for complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schablinski, Jan; Wieben, Frank; Block, Dietmar

    2015-04-15

    This paper describes the experimental realization of an optical trap for microparticles levitating in the plasma sheath. Single particles can be trapped in a laser beam comparable to optical tweezers known from colloidal suspensions. The trapping mechanism is discussed and two applications of the system are shown.

  6. Adhesion of nanoparticles to polymer brushes studied with the ghost tweezers method.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jianli; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Neimark, Alexander V

    2015-01-21

    Mechanisms of interactions between nanoparticles (NPs) and polymer brushes (PBs) are explored using dissipative particle dynamics simulations and an original "ghost tweezers" method that emulates lab experiments performed with optical or magnetic tweezers. The ghost tweezers method is employed to calculate the free energy of adhesion. Ghost tweezers represents a virtual harmonic potential, which tethers NP with a spring to a given anchor point. The average spring force represents the effective force of NP-PB interaction as a function of the NP coordinate. The free energy landscape of NP-PB interactions is calculated as the mechanical work needed to transfer NP from the solvent bulk to a particular distance from the substrate surface. With this technique, we explore the adhesion of bare and ligand-functionalized spherical NPs to polyisoprene natural rubber brush in acetone-benzene binary solvent. We examine two basic mechanisms of NP-PB interactions, NP adhesion at PB exterior and NP immersion into PB, which are governed by interplay between entropic repulsive forces and enthalpic attractive forces caused by polymer adsorption at the NP surface and ligand adsorption at the substrate. The relative free energies of the equilibrium adhesion states and the potential barriers separating these states are calculated at varying grafting density, NP size, and solvent composition. PMID:25612723

  7. Triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry: A real alternative to high resolution magnetic sector instrument for the analysis of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, furans and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    García-Bermejo, Ángel; Ábalos, Manuela; Sauló, Jordi; Abad, Esteban; González, María José; Gómara, Belén

    2015-08-19

    This paper reports on the optimisation, characterisation, validation and applicability of gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry in its tandem operation mode (GC-QqQ(MS/MS) for the quantification of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs, dioxins) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (DL-PCBs) in environmental and food matrices. MS/MS parameters were selected to achieve the high sensitivity and selectivity required for the analysis of this type of compounds and samples. Good repeatability for areas (RSD = 1-10%, for PCDD/Fs and DL-PCBs) and for ion transition ratios (RSD = 0.3-10%, for PCDD/Fs, and 0.2-15%, for DL-PCBs) and low instrumental limits of detection, 0.07-0.75 pg μL(-1) (for dioxins) and 0.05-0.63 pg μL(-1) (for DL-PCBs), were obtained. A comparative study of the congener specific determination using both GC-QqQ(MS/MS) and gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS) was also performed by analysing several fortified samples and certified reference materials (CRMs) with low (feed and foodstuffs), median (sewage sludge) and high (fly ash) toxic equivalency (TEQ) concentration levels, i.e. 0.60, 1.83, 72.9 and 3609 pg WHO-TEQ(PCDD/Fs) g(-1). The agreement between the results obtained for the total TEQs (dioxins) on GC-QqQ(MS/MS) and GC-HRMS in all the investigated samples were within the range of ±4%, and that of DL-PCBs at concentration levels of 0.84 pg WHO-TEQs (DL-PCBs) g(-1), in the case of feedstuffs, was 0.11%. Both instrumental methods have similar and comparable linearity, precision and accuracy. The GC-QqQ(MS/MS) sensitivity, lower than that of GC-HRMS, is good enough (iLODs in the down to low pg levels) to detect the normal concentrations of these compounds in food and environmental samples. These results make GC-QqQ(MS/MS) suitable for the quantitative analysis of dioxins and DL-PCBs and a real alternative tool to the reference sector HRMS instruments.

  8. High-resolution laser spectroscopy and magnetic effect of the B{sup ~2}E{sup ′}←X{sup ~2}A{sub 2}{sup ′} transition of the {sup 15}N substituted nitrate radical

    SciTech Connect

    Tada, Kohei; Teramoto, Kanon; Ishiwata, Takashi; Hirota, Eizi; Kasahara, Shunji

    2015-03-21

    Rotationally resolved high-resolution fluorescence excitation spectra of the 0–0 band of the B{sup ~2}E{sup ′}←X{sup ~2}A{sub 2}{sup ′} transition of the {sup 15}N substituted nitrate radical were observed for the first time, by crossing a jet-cooled molecular beam and a single-mode dye laser beam at right angles. Several thousand rotational lines were detected in the 15 080–15 103 cm{sup −1} region. We observed the Zeeman splitting of intense lines up to 360 G in order to obtain secure rotational assignment. Two, nine, and seven rotational line pairs with 0.0248 cm{sup −1} spacing were assigned to the transitions from the X{sup ~2}A{sub 2}{sup ′} (υ″ = 0, k″ = 0, N″ = 1, J″ = 0.5 and 1.5) to the {sup 2}E{sub 3/2}{sup ′} (J′ = 1.5), {sup 2}E{sub 1/2}{sup ′} (J′ = 0.5), and {sup 2}E{sub 1/2}{sup ′} (J′ = 1.5) levels, respectively, based on the ground state combination differences and the Zeeman splitting patterns. The observed spectrum was complicated due to the vibronic coupling between the bright B{sup ~2}E{sup ′} (υ = 0) state and surrounding dark vibronic states. Some series of rotational lines other than those from the X{sup ~2}A{sub 2}{sup ′} (J = 0.5 and 1.5) levels were also assigned by the ground state combination differences and the observed Zeeman splitting. The rotational branch structures were identified, and the molecular constants of the B{sup ~2}E{sub 1/2}{sup ′} (υ = 0) state were estimated by a deperturbed analysis to be T{sub 0} = 15 098.20(4) cm{sup −1}, B = 0.4282(7) cm{sup −1}, and D{sub J} = 4 × 10{sup −4} cm{sup −1}. In the observed region, both the {sup 2}E{sub 1/2}{sup ′} and {sup 2}E{sub 3/2}{sup ′} spin-orbit components were identified, and the spin-orbit interaction constant of the B{sup ~2}E{sup ′} (υ = 0) state was estimated to be −12 cm{sup −1} as the lower limit.

  9. Triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry: A real alternative to high resolution magnetic sector instrument for the analysis of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, furans and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    García-Bermejo, Ángel; Ábalos, Manuela; Sauló, Jordi; Abad, Esteban; González, María José; Gómara, Belén

    2015-08-19

    This paper reports on the optimisation, characterisation, validation and applicability of gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry in its tandem operation mode (GC-QqQ(MS/MS) for the quantification of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs, dioxins) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (DL-PCBs) in environmental and food matrices. MS/MS parameters were selected to achieve the high sensitivity and selectivity required for the analysis of this type of compounds and samples. Good repeatability for areas (RSD = 1-10%, for PCDD/Fs and DL-PCBs) and for ion transition ratios (RSD = 0.3-10%, for PCDD/Fs, and 0.2-15%, for DL-PCBs) and low instrumental limits of detection, 0.07-0.75 pg μL(-1) (for dioxins) and 0.05-0.63 pg μL(-1) (for DL-PCBs), were obtained. A comparative study of the congener specific determination using both GC-QqQ(MS/MS) and gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS) was also performed by analysing several fortified samples and certified reference materials (CRMs) with low (feed and foodstuffs), median (sewage sludge) and high (fly ash) toxic equivalency (TEQ) concentration levels, i.e. 0.60, 1.83, 72.9 and 3609 pg WHO-TEQ(PCDD/Fs) g(-1). The agreement between the results obtained for the total TEQs (dioxins) on GC-QqQ(MS/MS) and GC-HRMS in all the investigated samples were within the range of ±4%, and that of DL-PCBs at concentration levels of 0.84 pg WHO-TEQs (DL-PCBs) g(-1), in the case of feedstuffs, was 0.11%. Both instrumental methods have similar and comparable linearity, precision and accuracy. The GC-QqQ(MS/MS) sensitivity, lower than that of GC-HRMS, is good enough (iLODs in the down to low pg levels) to detect the normal concentrations of these compounds in food and environmental samples. These results make GC-QqQ(MS/MS) suitable for the quantitative analysis of dioxins and DL-PCBs and a real alternative tool to the reference sector HRMS instruments. PMID:26343438

  10. High-Resolution Scintimammography: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel F. Brem; Joelle M. Schoonjans; Douglas A. Kieper; Stan Majewski; Steven Goodman; Cahid Civelek

    2002-07-01

    This study evaluated a novel high-resolution breast-specific gamma camera (HRBGC) for the detection of suggestive breast lesions. Methods: Fifty patients (with 58 breast lesions) for whom a scintimammogram was clinically indicated were prospectively evaluated with a general-purpose gamma camera and a novel HRBGC prototype. The results of conventional and high-resolution nuclear studies were prospectively classified as negative (normal or benign) or positive (suggestive or malignant) by 2 radiologists who were unaware of the mammographic and histologic results. All of the included lesions were confirmed by pathology. Results: There were 30 benign and 28 malignant lesions. The sensitivity for detection of breast cancer was 64.3% (18/28) with the conventional camera and 78.6% (22/28) with the HRBGC. The specificity with both systems was 93.3% (28/30). For the 18 nonpalpable lesions, sensitivity was 55.5% (10/18) and 72.2% (13/18) with the general-purpose camera and the HRBGC, respectively. For lesions 1 cm, 7 of 15 were detected with the general-purpose camera and 10 of 15 with the HRBGC. Four lesions (median size, 8.5 mm) were detected only with the HRBGC and were missed by the conventional camera. Conclusion: Evaluation of indeterminate breast lesions with an HRBGC results in improved sensitivity for the detection of cancer, with greater improvement shown for nonpalpable and 1-cm lesions.

  11. High Resolution Camera for Mapping Titan Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, Bianca

    2011-01-01

    Titan, Saturn's largest moon, has a dense atmosphere and is the only object besides Earth to have stable liquids at its surface. The Cassini/Huygens mission has revealed the extraordinary breadth of geological processes shaping its surface. Further study requires high resolution imaging of the surface, which is restrained by light absorption by methane and scattering from aerosols. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft has demonstrated that Titan's surface can be observed within several windows in the near infrared, allowing us to process several regions in order to create a geological map and to determine the morphology. Specular reflections monitored on the lakes of the North Pole show little scattering at 5 microns, which, combined with the present study of Titan's northern pole area, refutes the paradigm that only radar can achieve high resolution mapping of the surface. The present data allowed us to monitor the evolution of lakes, to identify additional lakes at the Northern Pole, to examine Titan's hypothesis of non-synchronous rotation and to analyze the albedo of the North Pole surface. Future missions to Titan could carry a camera with 5 micron detectors and a carbon fiber radiator for weight reduction.

  12. High Resolution Laser Spectroscopy of Rhenium Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Allan G.; Hall, Ryan M.; Linton, Colan; Tokaryk, Dennis

    2014-06-01

    The first spectroscopic study of rhenium carbide, ReC, has been performed using both low and high resolution techniques to collect rotationally resolved electronic spectra from 420 to 500nm. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), and dispersed fluorescence (DF) techniques were employed. ReC was formed in our laser ablation molecular jet apparatus by ablating a rhenium target rod in the presence of 1% methane in helium. The low resolution spectrum identified four bands of an electronic system belonging to ReC, three of which have been studied so far. Extensive hyperfine structure composed of six hyperfine components was observed in the high resolution spectrum, as well as a clear distinction between the 187ReC and 185ReC isotopologues. The data seems consistent with a ^4Π - ^4Σ- transition, as was predicted before experimentation. Dispersed fluorescence spectra allowed us to determine the ground state vibrational frequency (ωe"=994.4 ± 0.3 wn), and to identify a low-lying electronically excited state at Te"=1118.4 ± 0.4 wn with a vibrational frequency of ωe"=984 ± 2 wn. Personal communication, F. Grein, University of New Brunswick

  13. Common high-resolution MMW scene generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saylor, Annie V.; McPherson, Dwight A.; Satterfield, H. DeWayne; Sholes, William J.; Mobley, Scott B.

    2001-08-01

    The development of a modularized millimeter wave (MMW) target and background high resolution scene generator is reported. The scene generator's underlying algorithms are applicable to both digital and real-time hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulations. The scene generator will be configurable for a variety of MMW and multi-mode sensors employing state of the art signal processing techniques. At present, digital simulations for MMW and multi-mode sensor development and testing are custom-designed by the seeker vendor and are verified, validated, and operated by both the vendor and government in simulation-based acquisition. A typical competition may involve several vendors, each requiring high resolution target and background models for proper exercise of seeker algorithms. There is a need and desire by both the government and sensor vendors to eliminate costly re-design and re-development of digital simulations. Additional efficiencies are realized by assuring commonality between digital and HWIL simulation MMW scene generators, eliminating duplication of verification and validation efforts.

  14. High-Resolution PET Detector. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karp, Joel

    2014-03-26

    The objective of this project was to develop an understanding of the limits of performance for a high resolution PET detector using an approach based on continuous scintillation crystals rather than pixelated crystals. The overall goal was to design a high-resolution detector, which requires both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity for 511 keV gammas. Continuous scintillation detectors (Anger cameras) have been used extensively for both single-photon and PET scanners, however, these instruments were based on NaI(Tl) scintillators using relatively large, individual photo-multipliers. In this project we investigated the potential of this type of detector technology to achieve higher spatial resolution through the use of improved scintillator materials and photo-sensors, and modification of the detector surface to optimize the light response function.We achieved an average spatial resolution of 3-mm for a 25-mm thick, LYSO continuous detector using a maximum likelihood position algorithm and shallow slots cut into the entrance surface.

  15. Comparative Very-High-Resolution VUV Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. R.; Gibson, S. T.; Baldwin, K. G. H.; Dooley, P. M.; Waring, K.

    Despite their importance to the photochemistry of the terrestrial atmosphere, and many experimental studies, previous characterization of the Schumann-Runge (SR) bands of O2, B3 Σ u- <- X3 Σ_g^- (v, 0) (1750-2050 Å) has been limited by poor experimental resolution. In addition, our understanding of the SR spectrum is incomplete, many rovibrational transitions in the perturbed region of the spectrum [B(v > 15)] remaining unassigned. We review new very-high-resolution measurements of the O2 photoabsorption cross section in the SR bands. Tunable, narrow-bandwidth background vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) radiation for the measurements ( 7 × 105 resolving power) was generated by the two-photon-resonant difference-frequency four-wave mixing in Xe of excimer-pumped dye-laser radiation. With the aid of these cross-section measurements, rovibrational and line-shape analyses have led to new insights into the molecular structure and predissociation dynamics of O2. The current VUV laser-spectroscopic measurements are shown to compare favourably with results from two other very-high-resolution experimental techniques, namely laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and VUV Fourier-transform spectroscopy, the latter performed using a synchrotron source.

  16. Limiting liability via high resolution image processing

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwade, L.E.; Overlin, T.K.

    1996-12-31

    The utilization of high resolution image processing allows forensic analysts and visualization scientists to assist detectives by enhancing field photographs, and by providing the tools and training to increase the quality and usability of field photos. Through the use of digitized photographs and computerized enhancement software, field evidence can be obtained and processed as `evidence ready`, even in poor lighting and shadowed conditions or darkened rooms. These images, which are most often unusable when taken with standard camera equipment, can be shot in the worst of photographic condition and be processed as usable evidence. Visualization scientists have taken the use of digital photographic image processing and moved the process of crime scene photos into the technology age. The use of high resolution technology will assist law enforcement in making better use of crime scene photography and positive identification of prints. Valuable court room and investigation time can be saved and better served by this accurate, performance based process. Inconclusive evidence does not lead to convictions. Enhancement of the photographic capability helps solve one major problem with crime scene photos, that if taken with standard equipment and without the benefit of enhancement software would be inconclusive, thus allowing guilty parties to be set free due to lack of evidence.

  17. High-Resolution Shadowing of Transfer RNA

    PubMed Central

    Abermann, Reinhard J.; Yoshikami, Doju

    1972-01-01

    High-resolution shadowing with metals that melt at high temperatures was used to study macromolecules. Molecules of transfer RNA shadowed with tantalum-tungsten are readily visualized in an electron microscope. Mounting procedures for tRNA were perfected that reproducibly gave uniform distributions of both monomeric and dimeric tRNA particles, and allowed a statistical assessment of their gross shapes and sizes. Monomeric tRNA yielded a fairly homogeneous population of rod-shaped particles, with axial dimensions of about 40 × 85 Å. Dimers of yeast alanine tRNA held together by hydrogen bonds and dimers constructed by covalent linkage of the amino-acid acceptor (3′-) termini of monomers both gave slightly more heterogeneous populations of particles. Yet, their structures were also basically rod shaped, with their lengths ranging to about twice that of the monomer; this result indicates an end-to-end arrangement of the monomeric units within both dimers. These results suggest that the amino-acid acceptor terminus and the anticodon region are at the ends of the rod-shaped, dehydrated tRNA monomer visible by electron microscopy, consistent with the generally accepted view of tRNA structure in solution suggested by other workers using other methods. This study demonstrates that high-resolution shadowing with tantalum-tungsten provides a means to examine the three-dimensional structures of relatively small biological macromolecules. Images PMID:4504373

  18. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2003-01-01

    Spectroscopic parameters (such as line position, intensity, broadening and shifting coefficients and their temperature dependences, line mixing coefficients etc.) for various molecular species of atmospheric interest are determined. In order to achieve these results, infrared spectra of several molecular bands are obtained using high-resolution recording instruments such as tunable diode laser spectrometer and Fourier transform spectrometers. Using sophisticated analysis routines (Multispectrum nonlinear least squares technique) these high-resolution infrared spectra are processed to determine the various spectral line parameters that are cited above. Spectra were taken using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak, Arizona as well as the Bruker FTS at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at Richland, Washington. Most of the spectra are acquired not only at room temperature, but also at several different cold temperatures. This procedure is necessary to study the variation of the spectral line parameters as a function of temperature in order to simulate the Earth's and other planetary atmospheric environments. Depending upon the strength or weakness of the various bands recorded and analyzed, the length(s) of the absorption cells in which the gas samples under study are kept varied from a few centimeters up to several meters and the sample temperatures varied from approximately +30 C to -63 C. Research on several infrared bands of various molecular species and their isotopomers are undertaken. Those studies are briefly described.

  19. Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This report constitutes the final report for NASA Contract NASW-5054. This project processed Clementine I high resolution images of the Moon, mosaicked these images together, and created a 22-disk set of compact disk read-only memory (CD-ROM) volumes. The mosaics were produced through semi-automated registration and calibration of the high resolution (HiRes) camera's data against the geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic produced by the US Geological Survey (USGS). The HiRes mosaics were compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution nadir-looking observations. The images were spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel for sub-polar mosaics (below 80 deg. latitude) and using the stereographic projection at a scale of 30 m/pixel for polar mosaics. Only images with emission angles less than approximately 50 were used. Images from non-mapping cross-track slews, which tended to have large SPICE errors, were generally omitted. The locations of the resulting image population were found to be offset from the UV/Vis basemap by up to 13 km (0.4 deg.). Geometric control was taken from the 100 m/pixel global and 150 m/pixel polar USGS Clementine Basemap Mosaics compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Radiometric calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity dominated by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap, that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The sub-polar mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 deg. of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. Polar mosaics are tiled into squares 2250 pixels on a

  20. High Resolution Powder Diffraction and Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D. E.

    1999-04-23

    It is clear that high-resolution synchrotrons X-ray powder diffraction is a very powerful and convenient tool for material characterization and structure determination. Most investigations to date have been carried out under ambient conditions and have focused on structure solution and refinement. The application of high-resolution techniques to increasingly complex structures will certainly represent an important part of future studies, and it has been seen how ab initio solution of structures with perhaps 100 atoms in the asymmetric unit is within the realms of possibility. However, the ease with which temperature-dependence measurements can be made combined with improvements in the technology of position-sensitive detectors will undoubtedly stimulate precise in situ structural studies of phase transitions and related phenomena. One challenge in this area will be to develop high-resolution techniques for ultra-high pressure investigations in diamond anvil cells. This will require highly focused beams and very precise collimation in front of the cell down to dimensions of 50 {micro}m or less. Anomalous scattering offers many interesting possibilities as well. As a means of enhancing scattering contrast it has applications not only to the determination of cation distribution in mixed systems such as the superconducting oxides discussed in Section 9.5.3, but also to the location of specific cations in partially occupied sites, such as the extra-framework positions in zeolites, for example. Another possible application is to provide phasing information for ab initio structure solution. Finally, the precise determination of f as a function of energy through an absorption edge can provide useful information about cation oxidation states, particularly in conjunction with XANES data. In contrast to many experiments at a synchrotron facility, powder diffraction is a relatively simple and user-friendly technique, and most of the procedures and software for data analysis

  1. Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-10-01

    This report constitutes the final report for NASA Contract NASW-5054. This project processed Clementine I high resolution images of the Moon, mosaicked these images together, and created a 22-disk set of compact disk read-only memory (CD-ROM) volumes. The mosaics were produced through semi-automated registration and calibration of the high resolution (HiRes) camera's data against the geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic produced by the US Geological Survey (USGS). The HiRes mosaics were compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution nadir-looking observations. The images were spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel for sub-polar mosaics (below 80 deg. latitude) and using the stereographic projection at a scale of 30 m/pixel for polar mosaics. Only images with emission angles less than approximately 50 were used. Images from non-mapping cross-track slews, which tended to have large SPICE errors, were generally omitted. The locations of the resulting image population were found to be offset from the UV/Vis basemap by up to 13 km (0.4 deg.). Geometric control was taken from the 100 m/pixel global and 150 m/pixel polar USGS Clementine Basemap Mosaics compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Radiometric calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity dominated by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap, that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The sub-polar mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 deg. of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. Polar mosaics are tiled into squares 2250 pixels on a

  2. High Resolution, High Frame Rate Video Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Papers and working group summaries presented at the High Resolution, High Frame Rate Video (HHV) Workshop are compiled. HHV system is intended for future use on the Space Shuttle and Space Station Freedom. The Workshop was held for the dual purpose of: (1) allowing potential scientific users to assess the utility of the proposed system for monitoring microgravity science experiments; and (2) letting technical experts from industry recommend improvements to the proposed near-term HHV system. The following topics are covered: (1) State of the art in the video system performance; (2) Development plan for the HHV system; (3) Advanced technology for image gathering, coding, and processing; (4) Data compression applied to HHV; (5) Data transmission networks; and (6) Results of the users' requirements survey conducted by NASA.

  3. High-Resolution Broadband Spectral Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J; Edelstein, J

    2002-08-09

    We demonstrate solar spectra from a novel interferometric method for compact broadband high-resolution spectroscopy. The spectral interferometer (SI) is a hybrid instrument that uses a spectrometer to externally disperse the output of a fixed-delay interferometer. It also has been called an externally dispersed interferometer (EDI). The interferometer can be used with linear spectrometers for imaging spectroscopy or with echelle spectrometers for very broad-band coverage. EDI's heterodyning technique enhances the spectrometer's response to high spectral-density features, increasing the effective resolution by factors of several while retaining its bandwidth. The method is extremely robust to instrumental insults such as focal spot size or displacement. The EDI uses no moving parts, such as purely interferometric FTS spectrometers, and can cover a much wider simultaneous bandpass than other internally dispersed interferometers (e.g. HHS or SHS).

  4. High resolution wavefront measurement of aspheric optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erichsen, I.; Krey, S.; Heinisch, J.; Ruprecht, A.; Dumitrescu, E.

    2008-08-01

    With the recently emerged large volume production of miniature aspheric lenses for a wide range of applications, a new fast fully automatic high resolution wavefront measurement instrument has been developed. The Shack-Hartmann based system with reproducibility better than 0.05 waves is able to measure highly aspheric optics and allows for real time comparison with design data. Integrated advanced analysis tools such as calculation of Zernike coefficients, 2D-Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), Point Spread Function (PSF), Strehl-Ratio and the measurement of effective focal length (EFL) as well as flange focal length (FFL) allow for the direct verification of lens properties and can be used in a development as well as in a production environment.

  5. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C/sub 44/H/sub 90/ paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol. 53 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  6. High-resolution climate simulation using CAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacmeister, J.; Neale, R. B.; Hannay, C.; Lauritzen, P. H.; Wehner, M. F.

    2012-12-01

    Thanks to the development of highly scalable dynamical cores that can exploit massively parallel computer architectures, we expect that global climate models in the next decade will run routinely at horizontal resolutions of 25 km or finer. Early results at these resolutions show clear improvements in simulating climatologically and societally-important mesoscale meteorology such as tropical cyclones. Improvements in regional circulations likely associated with topography are also obtained. Nevertheless many long-standing biases in climate simulations, e.g., the "double ITCZ" bias in precipitation, remain remarkably insensitive to increased resolution. This talk will present high-resolution global simulations using the community atmosphere model. Sensitivity of tropical cyclone climatology and precipitation statistics to model physics suites will be shown

  7. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C44H90 paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol.

  8. Ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging

    DOEpatents

    Paulus, Michael J.; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed; Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William; Gleason, Shaun S.; Thomas, Jr., Clarence E.

    2002-01-01

    A method for ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging, comprising the steps of: focusing a high energy particle beam, for example x-rays or gamma-rays, onto a target object; acquiring a 2-dimensional projection data set representative of the target object; generating a corrected projection data set by applying a deconvolution algorithm, having an experimentally determined a transfer function, to the 2-dimensional data set; storing the corrected projection data set; incrementally rotating the target object through an angle of approximately 180.degree., and after each the incremental rotation, repeating the radiating, acquiring, generating and storing steps; and, after the rotating step, applying a cone-beam algorithm, for example a modified tomographic reconstruction algorithm, to the corrected projection data sets to generate a 3-dimensional image. The size of the spot focus of the beam is reduced to not greater than approximately 1 micron, and even to not greater than approximately 0.5 microns.

  9. Low noise and high resolution microchannel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shulin; Pan, Jingsheng; Deng, Guangxu; Su, Detan; Xu, Zhiqing; Zhang, Yanyun

    2008-02-01

    To improve the Figure of Merit (FOM) and reduce the Equivalent Background Input (EBI) and Fixed-Pattern-Noise (FPN) in image intensifier, NVT (North Night Vision Technology Co., Ltd) has been researching and developing a low noise and high resolution Micro Channel Plate (MCP). The density of dark current of this new MCP is less than 0.5PA/cm2 (when MCP voltage at 1000V). The FPN and scintillation noise are reduced remarkably. Channel diameter is 6 μm and open area ratio is 60%~70%. The vacuum bakeout temperature could be as high as 500°C. This new kind of MCP will be extensively used in the supper generation and the third generation image intensifiers.

  10. High resolution analysis of satellite gradiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, O. L.

    1989-01-01

    Satellite gravity gradiometry is a technique now under development which, by the middle of the next decade, may be used for the high resolution charting from space of the gravity field of the earth and, afterwards, of other planets. Some data analysis schemes are reviewed for getting detailed gravity maps from gradiometry on both a global and a local basis. It also presents estimates of the likely accuracies of such maps, in terms of normalized spherical harmonics expansions, both using gradiometry alone and in combination with data from a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver carried on the same spacecraft. It compares these accuracies with those of current and future maps obtained from other data (conventional tracking, satellite-satellite tracking, etc.), and also with the spectra of various signals of geophysical interest.

  11. A high resolution ultraviolet Shuttle glow spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.

    1993-01-01

    The High Resolution Shuttle Glow Spectrograph-B (HRSGS-B) is a small payload being developed by the Naval Research Laboratory. It is intended for study of shuttle surface glow in the 180-400 nm near- and middle-ultraviolet wavelength range, with a spectral resolution of 0.2 nm. It will search for, among other possible features, the band systems of excited NO which result from surface-catalyzed combination of N and O. It may also detect O2 Hertzberg bands and N2 Vegard-Kaplan bands resulting from surface recombination. This wavelength range also includes possible N2+ and OH emissions. The HRSGS-B will be housed in a Get Away Special canister, mounted in the shuttle orbiter payload bay, and will observe the glow on the tail of the orbiter.

  12. High-resolution reconstruction for terahertz imaging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Min; Fan, Wen-Hui; Liu, Jia

    2014-11-20

    We present a high-resolution (HR) reconstruction model and algorithms for terahertz imaging, taking advantage of super-resolution methodology and algorithms. The algorithms used include projection onto a convex sets approach, iterative backprojection approach, Lucy-Richardson iteration, and 2D wavelet decomposition reconstruction. Using the first two HR reconstruction methods, we successfully obtain HR terahertz images with improved definition and lower noise from four low-resolution (LR) 22×24 terahertz images taken from our homemade THz-TDS system at the same experimental conditions with 1.0 mm pixel. Using the last two HR reconstruction methods, we transform one relatively LR terahertz image to a HR terahertz image with decreased noise. This indicates potential application of HR reconstruction methods in terahertz imaging with pulsed and continuous wave terahertz sources.

  13. HIRIS - The High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, Jeff

    1988-01-01

    The High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (HIRIS) is a JPL facility instrument designed for NASA's Earth Observing System (Eos).It will have 10-nm wide spectral bands from 0.4-2.5 microns at 30 m spatial resolution over a 30 km swath. The spectral resolution allows identification of many minerals in rocks and soils, important algal pigments in oceans and inland waters, spectral changes associated with plant canopy biochemistry, composition of atmospheric aerosols, and grain size of snow and its contamination by absorbing impurities. The bands wil have 12-bit quantization over a dynamic range suitable for bright targets, such as snow. For targets of low brightness, such as water bodies, image-motion compensation will allow gains up to a factor of eight to increase signal-to-noise ratios. In the 824-km orbit altitude proposed for Eos, the crosstrack pointing capability will allow 4-5 views during a 16-day revisit cycle.

  14. Constructing a WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrett, T. H.; Masci, F.; Tsai, C. W.; Petty, S.; Cluver, M.; Assef, Roberto J.; Benford, D.; Blain, A.; Bridge, C.; Donoso, E.; Eisenhardt, P.; Fowler, J.; Koribalski, B.; Lake, S.; Neill, James D.; Seibert, M.; Sheth, K.; Stanford, S.; Wright, E.

    2012-08-01

    After eight months of continuous observations, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the entire sky at 3.4 μm, 4.6 μm, 12 μm, and 22 μm. We have begun a dedicated WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas project to fully characterize large, nearby galaxies and produce a legacy image atlas and source catalog. Here we summarize the deconvolution techniques used to significantly improve the spatial resolution of WISE imaging, specifically designed to study the internal anatomy of nearby galaxies. As a case study, we present results for the galaxy NGC 1566, comparing the WISE enhanced-resolution image processing to that of Spitzer, Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and ground-based imaging. This is the first paper in a two-part series; results for a larger sample of nearby galaxies are presented in the second paper.

  15. Computer synthesis of high resolution electron micrographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, R.

    1976-01-01

    Specimen damage, spherical aberration, low contrast and noisy sensors combine to prevent direct atomic viewing in a conventional electron microscope. The paper describes two methods for obtaining ultra-high resolution in biological specimens under the electron microscope. The first method assumes the physical limits of the electron objective lens and uses a series of dark field images of biological crystals to obtain direct information on the phases of the Fourier diffraction maxima; this information is used in an appropriate computer to synthesize a large aperture lens for a 1-A resolution. The second method assumes there is sufficient amplitude scatter from images recorded in focus which can be utilized with a sensitive densitometer and computer contrast stretching to yield fine structure image details. Cancer virus characterization is discussed as an illustrative example. Numerous photographs supplement the text.

  16. High resolution detection system of capillary electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Li Qiang; Shi, Yan; Zheng, Hua; Lu, Zu Kang

    2007-12-01

    The capillary electrophoresis (CE) with laser induced fluorescence detection (LIFD) system was founded according to confocal theory. The 3-D adjustment of the exciting and collecting optical paths was realized. The photomultiplier tube (PMT) is used and the signals are processed by a software designed by ourselves. Under computer control, high voltage is applied to appropriate reservoirs and to inject and separate DNA samples respectively. Two fluorescent dyes Thiazole Orange (TO) and SYBR Green I were contrasted. With both of the dyes, high signals-to-noise images were obtained with the CE-LIFD system. The single-bases can be distinguished from the electrophoretogram and high resolution of DNA sample separation was obtained.

  17. High-resolution adaptive spiking sonar.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Fernando J; Kuc, Roman

    2009-05-01

    A new sonar system based on the conventional 6500 ranging module is presented that generates a sequence of spikes whose temporal density is related to the strength of the received echo. This system notably improves the resolution of a previous system by shortening the discharge cycle of the integrator included in the module. The operation is controlled by a PIC18F452 device, which can adapt the duration of the discharge to changing features of the echo, providing the system with a novel adaptive behavior. The performance of the new sensor is characterized and compared with that of the previous system by performing rotational scans of simple objects with different reflecting strengths. Some applications are suggested that exploit the high resolution and adaptability of this sensor.

  18. Constructing a WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, T. H.; Masci, F.; Tsai, C. W.; Petty, S.; Cluver, M.; Assef, Roberto J.; Benford, D.; Blain, A.; Bridge, C.; Donoso, E.; Eisenhardt, P.; Fowler, J.; Koribalski, B.; Lake, S.; Neill, James D.; Seibert, M.; Stanford, S.; Wright, E.

    2012-01-01

    After eight months of continuous observations, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the entire sky at 3.4 micron, 4.6 micron, 12 micron, and 22 micron. We have begun a dedicated WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas project to fully characterize large, nearby galaxies and produce a legacy image atlas and source catalog. Here we summarize the deconvolution techniques used to significantly improve the spatial resolution of WISE imaging, specifically designed to study the internal anatomy of nearby galaxies. As a case study, we present results for the galaxy NGC 1566, comparing the WISE enhanced-resolution image processing to that of Spitzer, Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and ground-based imaging. This is the first paper in a two-part series; results for a larger sample of nearby galaxies are presented in the second paper.

  19. Limits of simulation based high resolution EBSD.

    PubMed

    Alkorta, Jon

    2013-08-01

    High resolution electron backscattered diffraction (HREBSD) is a novel technique for a relative determination of both orientation and stress state in crystals through digital image correlation techniques. Recent works have tried to use simulated EBSD patterns as reference patterns to achieve the absolute orientation and stress state of crystals. However, a precise calibration of the pattern centre location is needed to avoid the occurrence of phantom stresses. A careful analysis of the projective transformation involved in the formation of EBSD patterns has permitted to understand these phantom stresses. This geometrical analysis has been confirmed by numerical simulations. The results indicate that certain combinations of crystal strain states and sample locations (pattern centre locations) lead to virtually identical EBSD patterns. This ambiguity makes the problem of solving the absolute stress state of a crystal unfeasible in a single-detector configuration. PMID:23676453

  20. High-Resolution Anamorphic SPECT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Durko, Heather L.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a gamma-ray imaging system that combines a high-resolution silicon detector with two sets of movable, half-keel-edged copper-tungsten blades configured as crossed slits. These apertures can be positioned independently between the object and detector, producing an anamorphic image in which the axial and transaxial magnifications are not constrained to be equal. The detector is a 60 mm × 60 mm, one-millimeter-thick, one-megapixel silicon double-sided strip detector with a strip pitch of 59 μm. The flexible nature of this system allows the application of adaptive imaging techniques. We present system details; calibration, acquisition, and reconstruction methods; and imaging results. PMID:26160983

  1. High resolution solar X-ray studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Two high resolution solar X-ray payloads and their launches on Aerobee rockets with pointing system are described. The payloads included 5 to 25A X-ray spectrometers, multiaperture X-ray cameras, and command box attitude control inflight by means of a television image radioed to ground. Spatial resolution ranged from five arc minutes to ten arc seconds and spectral resolution ranged from 500 to 3000. Several laboratory tasks were completed in order to achieve the desired resolution. These included (1) development of techniques to align grid collimators, (2) studies of the spectrometric properties of crystals, (3) measurements of the absorption coefficients of various materials used in X-ray spectrometers, (4) evaluation of the performance of multiaperture cameras, and (5) development of facilities.

  2. A simple, high efficiency, high resolution spectropolarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barden, Samuel C.

    2012-09-01

    A simple concept is described that uses volume phase holographic gratings as polarizing dispersers for a high efficiency, high resolution spectropolarimeter. Although the idea has previously been mentioned in the literature as possible, such a concept has not been explored in detail. Performance analysis is presented for a VPHG spectropolarimeter concept that could be utilized for both solar and night-time astronomy. Instrumental peak efficiency can approach 100% with spectral dispersions permitting R~200,000 spectral resolution with diffraction limited telescopes. The instrument has 3-channels: two dispersed image planes with orthogonal polarization and an undispersed image plane. The concept has a range of versatility where it could be configured (with appropriate half-wave plates) for slit-fed spectroscopy or without slits for snapshot/hyperspectral/tomographic spectroscopic imaging. Multiplex gratings could also be used for the simultaneous recording of two separate spectral bands or multiple instruments could be daisy chained with beam splitters for further spectral coverage.

  3. High-resolution Imaging Techniques for the Assessment of Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Krug, Roland; Burghardt, Andrew J.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis The importance of assessing the bone’s microarchitectural make-up in addition to its mineral density in the context of osteoporosis has been emphasized in a number of publications. The high spatial resolution required to resolve the bone’s microstructure in a clinically feasible scan time is challenging. Currently, the best suited modalities meeting these requirements in vivo are high-resolution peripheral quantitative imaging (HR-pQCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Whereas HR-pQCT is limited to peripheral skeleton regions like the wrist and ankle, MRI can also image other sites like the proximal femur but usually with lower spatial resolution. In addition Multidetector-CT has been used for high-resolution imaging of trabecular bone structure, however, the radiation dose is a limiting factor. This article provides an overview of the different modalities, technical requirements and recent developments in this emerging field. Details regarding imaging protocols as well as image post-processing methods for bone structure quantification are discussed. PMID:20609895

  4. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2006-01-01

    The major research activities performed during the cooperative agreement enhanced our spectroscopic knowledge of molecules of atmospheric interest such as H2O (water vapor), O3 (ozone), HCN (hydrogen cyanide), CH4 (methane), NO2 (nitrogen dioxide) and CO (carbon monoxide). The data required for the analyses were obtained from two different Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS); one of which is located at the National Solar Observatory (NSO) on Kitt Peak, Arizona and the other instrument is located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) at Richland, Washington. The data were analyzed using a modified multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting algorithm developed by Dr. D. Chris Benner of the College of William and Mary. The results from these studies made significant improvements in the line positons and intensities for these molecules. The measurements of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients and the temperature dependence of pressure broadening and pressure induced shift coefficients for hundreds of infrared transitions of HCN, CO3 CH4 and H2O were also performed during this period. Results from these studies have been used for retrievals of stratospheric gas concentration profiles from data collected by several Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) infrared instruments as well as in the analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra such as those acquired by space-based, ground-based, and various balloon- and aircraft-borne experiments. Our results made significant contributions in several updates of the HITRAN (HIgh resolution TRANsmission) spectral line parameters database. This database enjoys worldwide recognition in research involving diversified scientific fields. The research conducted during the period 2003-2006 has resulted in publications given in this paper. In addition to Journal publications, several oral and poster presentations were given at various Scientific conferences within the United States

  5. High resolution multimodal clinical ophthalmic imaging system.

    PubMed

    Mujat, Mircea; Ferguson, R Daniel; Patel, Ankit H; Iftimia, Nicusor; Lue, Niyom; Hammer, Daniel X

    2010-05-24

    We developed a multimodal adaptive optics (AO) retinal imager which is the first to combine high performance AO-corrected scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and swept source Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) imaging modes in a single compact clinical prototype platform. Such systems are becoming ever more essential to vision research and are expected to prove their clinical value for diagnosis of retinal diseases, including glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR), age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and retinitis pigmentosa. The SSOCT channel operates at a wavelength of 1 microm for increased penetration and visualization of the choriocapillaris and choroid, sites of major disease activity for DR and wet AMD. This AO system is designed for use in clinical populations; a dual deformable mirror (DM) configuration allows simultaneous low- and high-order aberration correction over a large range of refractions and ocular media quality. The system also includes a wide field (33 deg.) line scanning ophthalmoscope (LSO) for initial screening, target identification, and global orientation, an integrated retinal tracker (RT) to stabilize the SLO, OCT, and LSO imaging fields in the presence of lateral eye motion, and a high-resolution LCD-based fixation target for presentation of visual cues. The system was tested in human subjects without retinal disease for performance optimization and validation. We were able to resolve and quantify cone photoreceptors across the macula to within approximately 0.5 deg (approximately 100-150 microm) of the fovea, image and delineate ten retinal layers, and penetrate to resolve features deep into the choroid. The prototype presented here is the first of a new class of powerful flexible imaging platforms that will provide clinicians and researchers with high-resolution, high performance adaptive optics imaging to help guide therapies, develop new drugs, and improve patient outcomes.

  6. Ecological applications of high resolution spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, William T.

    1989-01-01

    Future directions of NASA's space program plans include a significant effort at studying the Earth as a system of interrelated ecosystems. As part of NASA's Earth Observing System (Eos) Program a series of space platforms will be launched and operated to study the Earth with a variety of active and passive instruments. Several of the Eos instruments will be capable of imaging the planet's surface reflectance on a large number of very narrow portions of the solar spectrum. After the development of appropriate algorithms, this reflectance information will be used to determine key parameters about the structure and function of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and the pattern and processes of those systems across large areas of the globe. Algorithm development applicable to terrestrial systems will permit the inference of ecological processes from high resolution spectrometry data, similar to that to be forthcoming from the Eos mission. The first summer was spent working with tropical soils and relating their reflectance characteristics to particle size, iron content, and color. This summer the emphasis is on vegetation and work was begun with the Forest Ecosystems Dynamics Project in the Earth Resources Branch where both optical and radar characteristics of a mixed conifer/hardwood forest in Maine are being studied for use in a ecological modeling effort. A major series of aircraft overflights will take place throughout the summer. Laboratory and field spectrometers are used to measure the spectral reflectance of a hierarchy of vegetation from individual leaves to whole canopies for eventual modeling of their nutrient content using reflectance data. Key leaf/canopy parameters are being approximated including chlorophyll, nitrogen, phosphorus, water content, and leaf specific weight using high resolution spectrometry alone. Measurements are made of carbon exchange across the landscape for input to a spatial modeling effort to gauge production within the forest. A

  7. Pyramidal fractal dimension for high resolution images.

    PubMed

    Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, Michael; Ahammer, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Fractal analysis (FA) should be able to yield reliable and fast results for high-resolution digital images to be applicable in fields that require immediate outcomes. Triggered by an efficient implementation of FA for binary images, we present three new approaches for fractal dimension (D) estimation of images that utilize image pyramids, namely, the pyramid triangular prism, the pyramid gradient, and the pyramid differences method (PTPM, PGM, PDM). We evaluated the performance of the three new and five standard techniques when applied to images with sizes up to 8192 × 8192 pixels. By using artificial fractal images created by three different generator models as ground truth, we determined the scale ranges with minimum deviations between estimation and theory. All pyramidal methods (PM) resulted in reasonable D values for images of all generator models. Especially, for images with sizes ≥1024×1024 pixels, the PMs are superior to the investigated standard approaches in terms of accuracy and computation time. A measure for the possibility to differentiate images with different intrinsic D values did show not only that the PMs are well suited for all investigated image sizes, and preferable to standard methods especially for larger images, but also that results of standard D estimation techniques are strongly influenced by the image size. Fastest results were obtained with the PDM and PGM, followed by the PTPM. In terms of absolute D values best performing standard methods were magnitudes slower than the PMs. Concluding, the new PMs yield high quality results in short computation times and are therefore eligible methods for fast FA of high-resolution images.

  8. Pyramidal fractal dimension for high resolution images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, Michael; Ahammer, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Fractal analysis (FA) should be able to yield reliable and fast results for high-resolution digital images to be applicable in fields that require immediate outcomes. Triggered by an efficient implementation of FA for binary images, we present three new approaches for fractal dimension (D) estimation of images that utilize image pyramids, namely, the pyramid triangular prism, the pyramid gradient, and the pyramid differences method (PTPM, PGM, PDM). We evaluated the performance of the three new and five standard techniques when applied to images with sizes up to 8192 × 8192 pixels. By using artificial fractal images created by three different generator models as ground truth, we determined the scale ranges with minimum deviations between estimation and theory. All pyramidal methods (PM) resulted in reasonable D values for images of all generator models. Especially, for images with sizes ≥1024 ×1024 pixels, the PMs are superior to the investigated standard approaches in terms of accuracy and computation time. A measure for the possibility to differentiate images with different intrinsic D values did show not only that the PMs are well suited for all investigated image sizes, and preferable to standard methods especially for larger images, but also that results of standard D estimation techniques are strongly influenced by the image size. Fastest results were obtained with the PDM and PGM, followed by the PTPM. In terms of absolute D values best performing standard methods were magnitudes slower than the PMs. Concluding, the new PMs yield high quality results in short computation times and are therefore eligible methods for fast FA of high-resolution images.

  9. Pyramidal fractal dimension for high resolution images.

    PubMed

    Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, Michael; Ahammer, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Fractal analysis (FA) should be able to yield reliable and fast results for high-resolution digital images to be applicable in fields that require immediate outcomes. Triggered by an efficient implementation of FA for binary images, we present three new approaches for fractal dimension (D) estimation of images that utilize image pyramids, namely, the pyramid triangular prism, the pyramid gradient, and the pyramid differences method (PTPM, PGM, PDM). We evaluated the performance of the three new and five standard techniques when applied to images with sizes up to 8192 × 8192 pixels. By using artificial fractal images created by three different generator models as ground truth, we determined the scale ranges with minimum deviations between estimation and theory. All pyramidal methods (PM) resulted in reasonable D values for images of all generator models. Especially, for images with sizes ≥1024×1024 pixels, the PMs are superior to the investigated standard approaches in terms of accuracy and computation time. A measure for the possibility to differentiate images with different intrinsic D values did show not only that the PMs are well suited for all investigated image sizes, and preferable to standard methods especially for larger images, but also that results of standard D estimation techniques are strongly influenced by the image size. Fastest results were obtained with the PDM and PGM, followed by the PTPM. In terms of absolute D values best performing standard methods were magnitudes slower than the PMs. Concluding, the new PMs yield high quality results in short computation times and are therefore eligible methods for fast FA of high-resolution images. PMID:27475069

  10. High-Resolution He I Spectropolarimetry of Chromospheric Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, Thomas A.; Penn, M. J.

    2011-05-01

    Of spectral diagnostics for the magnetic field in the solar chromosphere, the He I triplet at 1083 nm offers a comparatively simple means to determine both the magnitude and direction of the field vector. The triplet forms over a narrow range of heights when compared to strong optical lines, and recently the mechanisms that influence its polarization have been well characterized, thus allowing inversions of the magnetic field from observed Stokes profiles. We discuss recent work with the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter (FIRS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST), New Mexico, USA to measure and infer the magnetic field vector of chromospheric fibrils. FIRS is designed to perform fast diffraction-limited dual-beam spectropolarimetry simultaneously at visible and infrared wavelengths through the use of multiple slits and narrowband filters. It can be operated in congress with the High Order Adaptive Optics (HOAO) system of the DST as well as with the Interferometric BiDimensional Spectropolarimeter (IBIS). Here we present high-resolution FIRS observations of chromospheric fibrils which employ the HOAO system under great seeing. We calibrate these observations for the full effect of the FIRS-DST combined analysis system on the Stokes vector which allow us to define the observed Stokes geometry with respect to solar coordinates. Full inversions of our measurements incorporating the effects of atomic polarization, the Hanle effect, and the Zeeman effect will be presented showing support for chromospheric fibrils that are aligned with the magnetic field direction.

  11. Diagnostics of Ellerman bombs with high-resolution spectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Fang, Cheng; Guo, Yang; Chen, Peng-Fei; Xu, Zhi; Cao, Wen-Da

    2015-09-01

    Ellerman bombs (EBs) are tiny brightenings often observed near sunspots. The most impressive characteristic of EB spectra is the two emission bumps in both wings of the Hα and Ca II 8542Å lines. High-resolution spectral data of three small EBs were obtained on 2013 June 6 with the largest solar telescope, the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. The characteristics of these EBs are analyzed. The sizes of the EBs are in the range of 0.3‧ - 0.8‧ and their durations are only 3-5 min. Our semi-empirical atmospheric models indicate that the heating occurs around the temperature minimum region with a temperature increase of 2700-3000 K, which is surprisingly higher than previously thought. The radiative and kinetic energies are estimated to be as high as 5 × 1025 - 3.0 × 1026 erg despite the small size of these EBs. Observations of the magnetic field show that the EBs just appeared in a parasitic region with mixed polarities and were accompanied by mass motions. Nonlinear force-free field extrapolation reveals that the three EBs are connected with a series of magnetic field lines associated with bald patches, which strongly implies that these EBs should be produced by magnetic reconnection in the solar lower atmosphere. According to the lightcurves and the estimated magnetic reconnection rate, we propose that there is a three phase process in EBs: pre-heating, flaring and cooling phases.

  12. Highly efficient D/H scrambling and highly selective chlorination in /gamma/-irradiated D- and H-octane mixture in freon 113: Trace back of transient processes by the observation of D/H scrambling with high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Okazaki, M.; Toriyama, K.; Nunome, K.

    1989-08-15

    A high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study on the /gamma/-irradiated isotopic mixture of protiated and deuteriated octanes in freon 113 revealed that the protons and the deuterons are scrambled very efficiently (/ital G//gt/2000) at all the positions. While the solvent freon was substituted selectively with a proton and chlorination of protiated octane occurred selectively at the secondary position. These observations, coexistence of the random D/H scrambling and the selective substitution reactions, are the evidence that: (1) in the ''hot'' period rapid intermolecular radical migration occurs among the solute alkanes, the solvent freons, and the product chloroalkanes, (2) on the other hand, in the following ''thermalized'' period, chemical bonds within which radical site migration occurs are limited to those with smaller bonding energies, i.e., the secondary position of (protiated) alkane, the C--Cl bonds of freon, and the C--Cl bond of chloroalkanes.

  13. High-resolution spectroscopy of a giant solar filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuckein, Christoph; Denker, Carsten; Verma, Meetu

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of a giant solar quiescent filament were taken with the Echelle spectrograph at the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT; Tenerife, Spain). A mosaic of various spectroheliograms (Hα, Hα+/-0.5 Å and Na D2) were chosen to examine the filament at different heights in the solar atmosphere. In addition, full-disk images (He i 10830 Å and Ca ii K) of the Chromspheric Telescope and full-disk magnetograms of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager were used to complement the spectra. Preliminary results are shown of this filament, which had extremely large linear dimensions (~740'') and was observed in November 2011 while it traversed the northern solar hemisphere.

  14. High resolution spectroscopic study of Be10Lambda;

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogami, T.; Chen, C.; Kawama, D.; Achenbach, P.; Ahmidouch, A.; Albayrak, I.; Androic, D.; Asaturyan, A.; Asaturyan, R.; Ates, O.; Baturin, P.; Badui, R.; Boeglin, W.; Bono, J.; Brash, E.; Carter, P.; Chiba, A.; Christy, E.; Danagoulian, S.; de Leo, R.; Doi, D.; Elaasar, M.; Ent, R.; Fujii, Y.; Fujita, M.; Furic, M.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gan, L.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gasparian, A.; Han, Y.; Hashimoto, O.; Horn, T.; Hu, B.; Hungerford, Ed. V.; Jones, M.; Kanda, H.; Kaneta, M.; Kato, S.; Kawai, M.; Khanal, H.; Kohl, M.; Liyanage, A.; Luo, W.; Maeda, K.; Margaryan, A.; Markowitz, P.; Maruta, T.; Matsumura, A.; Maxwell, V.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Nagao, S.; Nakamura, S. N.; Narayan, A.; Neville, C.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, M. I.; Nunez, A.; Nuruzzaman, Okayasu, Y.; Petkovic, T.; Pochodzalla, J.; Qiu, X.; Reinhold, J.; Rodriguez, V. M.; Samanta, C.; Sawatzky, B.; Seva, T.; Shichijo, A.; Tadevosyan, V.; Tang, L.; Taniya, N.; Tsukada, K.; Veilleux, M.; Vulcan, W.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Wood, S. A.; Yamamoto, T.; Ya, L.; Ye, Z.; Yokota, K.; Yuan, L.; Zhamkochyan, S.; Zhu, L.; Hksjlab E05-115 Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Spectroscopy of a Be10Lambda; hypernucleus was carried out at JLab Hall C using the (e ,e'K+) reaction. A new magnetic spectrometer system (SPL+HES+HKS), specifically designed for high resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy, was used to obtain an energy spectrum with a resolution of ˜0.78 MeV (FWHM). The well-calibrated spectrometer system of the present experiment using p (e ,e'K+)Λ ,Σ0 reactions allowed us to determine the energy levels; and the binding energy of the ground-state peak (mixture of 1- and 2- states) was found to be BΛ=8.55 ±0.07 (stat . ) ±0.11 (sys . ) MeV. The result indicates that the ground-state energy is shallower than that of an emulsion study by about 0.5 MeV which provides valuable experimental information on the charge symmetry breaking effect in the Λ N interaction.

  15. High-resolution dynamic speech imaging with deformation estimation.

    PubMed

    Maojing Fu; Barlaz, Marissa S; Shosted, Ryan K; Zhi-Pei Liang; Sutton, Bradley P

    2015-08-01

    Dynamic speech magnetic resonance imaging (DSMRI) is a promising technique for visualizing articulatory motion in real time. However, many existing applications of DSMRI have been limited by slow imaging speed and the lack of quantitative motion analysis. In this paper, we present a novel DS-MRI technique to simultaneously estimate dynamic image sequence of speech and the associated deformation field. Extending on our previous Partial Separability (PS) model-based methods, the proposed technique visualizes both speech motion and deformation with a spatial resolution of 2.2 × 2.2 mm(2) and a nominal frame rate of 100 fps. Also, the technique enables direct analysis of articulatory motion through the deformation fields. Effectiveness of the method is systematically examined via in vivo experiments. Utilizing the obtained high-resolution images and deformation fields, we also performed a phonetics study on Brazilian Portuguese to show the method's practical utility. PMID:26736572

  16. Optoelectronic Tweezers for Microparticle and Cell Manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Ming Chiang (Inventor); Chiou, Pei-Yu (Inventor); Ohta, Aaron T. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An optical image-driven light induced dielectrophoresis (DEP) apparatus and method are described which provide for the manipulation of particles or cells with a diameter on the order of 100 micromillimeters or less. The apparatus is referred to as optoelectric tweezers (OET) and provides a number of advantages over conventional optical tweezers, in particular the ability to perform operations in parallel and over a large area without damage to living cells. The OET device generally comprises a planar liquid-filled structure having one or more portions which are photoconductive to convert incoming light to a change in the electric field pattern. The light patterns are dynamically generated to provide a number of manipulation structures that can manipulate single particles and cells or group of particles/cells. The OET preferably includes a microscopic imaging means to provide feedback for the optical manipulation, such as detecting position and characteristics wherein the light patterns are modulated accordingly.

  17. Optoelectronic tweezers for microparticle and cell manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Ming Chiang (Inventor); Chiou, Pei Yu (Inventor); Ohta, Aaron T. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An optical image-driven light induced dielectrophoresis (DEP) apparatus and method are described which provide for the manipulation of particles or cells with a diameter on the order of 100 .mu.m or less. The apparatus is referred to as optoelectric tweezers (OET) and provides a number of advantages over conventional optical tweezers, in particular the ability to perform operations in parallel and over a large area without damage to living cells. The OET device generally comprises a planar liquid-filled structure having one or more portions which are photoconductive to convert incoming light to a change in the electric field pattern. The light patterns are dynamically generated to provide a number of manipulation structures that can manipulate single particles and cells or groups of particles/cells. The OET preferably includes a microscopic imaging means to provide feedback for the optical manipulation, such as detecting position and characteristics wherein the light patterns are modulated accordingly.

  18. Exploring unconventional capabilities of holographic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, R. J.; Pagliusi, P.; Provenzano, C.; Cipparrone, G.

    2011-06-01

    We report an investigation of manipulation and trapping capabilities of polarization holographic tweezers. A polarization gradient connected with a modulation of the ellipticity shows an optical force related to the polarization of the light that can influence optically isotropic particles. While in the case of birefringent particles an unconventional trapping in circularly polarized fringes is observed. A liquid crystal emulsion has been adopted to investigate the capabilities of the holographic tweezers. The unusual trapping observed for rotating bipolar nematic droplets has suggested the involvement of the lift hydrodynamic force responsible of the Magnus effect, originating from the peculiar optical force field. We show that the Magnus force which is ignored in the common approach can contribute to unconventional optohydrodynamic trapping and manipulation.

  19. Independent trapping and manipulation of microparticles using dexterous acoustic tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Courtney, Charles R. P.; Demore, Christine E. M.; Wu, Hongxiao; Cochran, Sandy; Grinenko, Alon; Wilcox, Paul D.; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2014-04-14

    An electronically controlled acoustic tweezer was used to demonstrate two acoustic manipulation phenomena: superposition of Bessel functions to allow independent manipulation of multiple particles and the use of higher-order Bessel functions to trap particles in larger regions than is possible with first-order traps. The acoustic tweezers consist of a circular 64-element ultrasonic array operating at 2.35 MHz which generates ultrasonic pressure fields in a millimeter-scale fluid-filled chamber. The manipulation capabilities were demonstrated experimentally with 45 and 90-μm-diameter polystyrene spheres. These capabilities bring the dexterity of acoustic tweezers substantially closer to that of optical tweezers.

  20. Tweezers for Chimeras in Small Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omelchenko, Iryna; Omel'chenko, Oleh E.; Zakharova, Anna; Wolfrum, Matthias; Schöll, Eckehard

    2016-03-01

    We propose a control scheme which can stabilize and fix the position of chimera states in small networks. Chimeras consist of coexisting domains of spatially coherent and incoherent dynamics in systems of nonlocally coupled identical oscillators. Chimera states are generally difficult to observe in small networks due to their short lifetime and erratic drifting of the spatial position of the incoherent domain. The control scheme, like a tweezer, might be useful in experiments, where usually only small networks can be realized.

  1. Fractal zone plate beam based optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shubo; Zhang, Xinyu; Ma, Wenzhuo; Tao, Shaohua

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate optical manipulation with an optical beam generated by a fractral zone plate (FZP). The experimental results show that the FZP beam can simultaneously trap multiple particles positioned in different focal planes of the FZP beam, owing to the multiple foci and self-reconstruction property of the FZP beam. The FZP beam can also be used to construct three-dimensional optical tweezers for potential applications.

  2. The Smallest Tweezers in the World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewalle, Alexandre

    2008-01-01

    A pair of fine tweezers and a steady hand may well be enough to pick up a grain of sand, but what would you use to hold something hundreds of times smaller still, the size of only one micron? The answer is to use a device that is not mechanical in nature but that relies instead on the tiny forces that light exerts on small particles: "optical…

  3. Interactive approach to optical tweezers control

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, Jonathan; Wulff, Kurt; Sinclair, Gavin; Jordan, Pamela; Courtial, Johannes; Thomson, Laura; Gibson, Graham; Karunwi, Kayode; Cooper, Jon; Laczik, Zsolt John; Padgett, Miles

    2006-02-10

    We have developed software with an interactive user interface that can be used to generate phase holograms for use with spatial light modulators. The program utilizes different hologram design techniques, allowing the user to select an appropriate algorithm. The program can be used to generate multiple beams and can be used for beam steering. We see a major application of the program to be in optical tweezers to control the position, number, and type of optical traps.

  4. Fractal zone plate beam based optical tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shubo; Zhang, Xinyu; Ma, Wenzhuo; Tao, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate optical manipulation with an optical beam generated by a fractral zone plate (FZP). The experimental results show that the FZP beam can simultaneously trap multiple particles positioned in different focal planes of the FZP beam, owing to the multiple foci and self-reconstruction property of the FZP beam. The FZP beam can also be used to construct three-dimensional optical tweezers for potential applications. PMID:27678305

  5. Crusta: Visualizing High-resolution Global Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardin, T. S.; Kreylos, O.; Bowles, C. J.; Cowgill, E.; Hamann, B.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2009-12-01

    Virtual globes have become indispensable tools for visualizing, understanding and presenting data from Earth and other planetary bodies. The scientific community has invested much effort into exploiting existing globes to their fullest potential by refining and adapting their capabilities to better satisfy specific needs. For example, Google Earth provides users with the ability to view hillshade images derived from airborne LiDAR data such as the 2007 Northern California GeoEarthScope data. However, because most available globes were not designed with the specific needs of geoscientists in mind, shortcomings are becoming increasingly evident in geoscience applications such as terrain visualization. In particular, earth scientists struggle to visualize digital elevation models with both high spatial resolution (0.5 - 1 square meters per sample) and large extent (>2000 square kilometers), such as those obtained with airborne LiDAR. To address the specific earth science need of real-time terrain visualization of LiDAR data, we are developing Crusta as part of a close collaboration involving earth and computer scientists. Crusta is a new virtual globe that differs from widely used globes by both providing accurate global data representation and the ability to easily visualize custom topographic and image data. As a result, Crusta enables real-time, interactive visualization of high resolution digital elevation data spanning thousands of square kilometers, such as the complete 2007 Northern California GeoEarthScope airborne LiDAR data set. To implement an accurate data representation and avoid distortion of the display at the poles, where other projections have singularities, Crusta represents the globe as a thirty-sided polyhedron. Each side of this polyhedron can be subdivided to an arbitrarily fine grid on the surface of the globe, which allows Crusta to accommodate input data of arbitrary resolution ranging from global (e.g., Blue Marble) to local (e.g., a tripod

  6. Superconducting High Resolution Fast-Neutron Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Hau, Ionel Dragos

    2006-01-01

    Superconducting high resolution fast-neutron calorimetric spectrometers based on 6LiF and TiB{sub 2} absorbers have been developed. These novel cryogenic spectrometers measure the temperature rise produced in exothermal (n, α) reactions with fast neutrons in 6Li and 10B-loaded materials with heat capacity C operating at temperatures T close to 0.1 K. Temperature variations on the order of 0.5 mK are measured with a Mo/Cu thin film multilayer operated in the transition region between its superconducting and its normal state. The advantage of calorimetry for high resolution spectroscopy is due to the small phonon excitation energies kBT on the order of μeV that serve as signal carriers, resulting in an energy resolution ΔE ~ (kBT2C)1/2, which can be well below 10 keV. An energy resolution of 5.5 keV has been obtained with a Mo/Cu superconducting sensor and a TiB2 absorber using thermal neutrons from a 252Cf neutron source. This resolution is sufficient to observe the effect of recoil nuclei broadening in neutron spectra, which has been related to the lifetime of the first excited state in 7Li. Fast-neutron spectra obtained with a 6Li-enriched LiF absorber show an energy resolution of 16 keV FWHM, and a response in agreement with the 6Li(n, α)3H reaction cross section and Monte Carlo simulations for energies up to several MeV. The energy resolution of order of a few keV makes this novel instrument applicable to fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy based on the unique elemental signature provided by the neutron absorption and scattering resonances. The optimization of the energy resolution based on analytical and numerical models of the detector response is discussed in the context of these applications.

  7. High resolution scanning electron microscopy of plasmodesmata.

    PubMed

    Brecknock, Sarah; Dibbayawan, Teresa P; Vesk, Maret; Vesk, Peter A; Faulkner, Christine; Barton, Deborah A; Overall, Robyn L

    2011-10-01

    Symplastic transport occurs between neighbouring plant cells through functionally and structurally dynamic channels called plasmodesmata (PD). Relatively little is known about the composition of PD or the mechanisms that facilitate molecular transport into neighbouring cells. While transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides 2-dimensional information about the structural components of PD, 3-dimensional information is difficult to extract from ultrathin sections. This study has exploited high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) to reveal the 3-dimensional morphology of PD in the cell walls of algae, ferns and higher plants. Varied patterns of PD were observed in the walls, ranging from uniformly distributed individual PD to discrete clusters. Occasionally the thick walls of the giant alga Chara were fractured, revealing the surface morphology of PD within. External structures such as spokes, spirals and mesh were observed surrounding the PD. Enzymatic digestions of cell wall components indicate that cellulose or pectin either compose or stabilise the extracellular spokes. Occasionally, the PD were fractured open and desmotubule-like structures and other particles were observed in their central regions. Our observations add weight to the argument that Chara PD contain desmotubules and are morphologically similar to higher plant PD.

  8. High-resolution imaging using endoscopic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1990-08-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help to their control. 1.

  9. Holographic high-resolution endoscopic image recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1991-03-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help

  10. High-resolution light microscopy of nanoforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodyanoy, Vitaly; Pustovyy, Oleg; Vainrub, Arnold

    2007-09-01

    We developed a high resolution light imaging system. Diffraction gratings with 100 nm width lines as well as less than 100 nm size features of different-shaped objects are clearly visible on a calibrated microscope test slide (Vainrub et al., Optics Letters, 2006, 31, 2855). The two-point resolution increase results from a known narrowing of the central diffraction peak for the annular aperture. Better visibility and advanced contrast of the smallest features in the image are due to enhancement of high spatial frequencies in the optical transfer function. The imaging system is portable, low energy, and battery operated. It has been adapted to use in both transmitting and reflecting light. It is particularly applicable for motile nanoform systems where structure and functions can be depicted in real time. We have isolated micrometer and submicrometer particles, termed proteons, from human and animal blood. Proteons form by reversible seeded aggregation of proteins around proteon nucleating centers (PNCs). PNCs are comprised of 1-2nm metallic nanoclusters containing 40-300 atoms. Proteons are capable of spontaneous assembling into higher nanoform systems assuming structure of complicated topology. The arrangement of complex proteon system mimics the structure of a small biological cell. It has structures that imitate membrane and nucleolus or nuclei. Some of these nanoforms are motile. They interact and divide. Complex nanoform systems can spontaneously reduce to simple proteons. The physical properties of these nanoforms could shed some light on the properties of early life forms or forms at extreme conditions.

  11. High-resolution CCD imaging alternatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. L.; Acker, D. E.

    1992-08-01

    High resolution CCD color cameras have recently stimulated the interest of a large number of potential end-users for a wide range of practical applications. Real-time High Definition Television (HDTV) systems are now being used or considered for use in applications ranging from entertainment program origination through digital image storage to medical and scientific research. HDTV generation of electronic images offers significant cost and time-saving advantages over the use of film in such applications. Further in still image systems electronic image capture is faster and more efficient than conventional image scanners. The CCD still camera can capture 3-dimensional objects into the computing environment directly without having to shoot a picture on film develop it and then scan the image into a computer. 2. EXTENDING CCD TECHNOLOGY BEYOND BROADCAST Most standard production CCD sensor chips are made for broadcast-compatible systems. One popular CCD and the basis for this discussion offers arrays of roughly 750 x 580 picture elements (pixels) or a total array of approximately 435 pixels (see Fig. 1). FOR. A has developed a technique to increase the number of available pixels for a given image compared to that produced by the standard CCD itself. Using an inter-lined CCD with an overall spatial structure several times larger than the photo-sensitive sensor areas each of the CCD sensors is shifted in two dimensions in order to fill in spatial gaps between adjacent sensors.

  12. High resolution animated scenes from stills.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhouchen; Wang, Lifeng; Wang, Yunbo; Kang, Sing Bing; Fang, Tian

    2007-01-01

    Current techniques for generating animated scenes involve either videos (whose resolution is limited) or a single image (which requires a significant amount of user interaction). In this paper, we describe a system that allows the user to quickly and easily produce a compelling-looking animation from a small collection of high resolution stills. Our system has two unique features. First, it applies an automatic partial temporal order recovery algorithm to the stills in order to approximate the original scene dynamics. The output sequence is subsequently extracted using a second-order Markov Chain model. Second, a region with large motion variation can be automatically decomposed into semiautonomous regions such that their temporal orderings are softly constrained. This is to ensure motion smoothness throughout the original region. The final animation is obtained by frame interpolation and feathering. Our system also provides a simple-to-use interface to help the user to fine-tune the motion of the animated scene. Using our system, an animated scene can be generated in minutes. We show results for a variety of scenes. PMID:17356221

  13. High-resolution microwave images of Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, A. W.; Muhleman, D. O.; Berge, G. L.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of high-resolution microwave images of Saturn and Saturn's individual rings is presented. Radio interferometric observations of Saturn taken at the Very Large Array in New Mexico at wavelengths of 2 and 6 centimeters reveal interesting new features in both the atmosphere and rings. The resulting maps show an increase in brightness temperature of about 3 K from equator to pole at both wavelengths, while the 6-centimeter map shows a bright band at northern midlatitudes. The data are consistent with a radiative transfer model of the atmosphere that constrains the well-mixed, fully saturated, NH3 mixing ratio to be 0.00012 in a region just below the NH3 clouds, while the observed bright band indicates a 25 percent relative decrease of NH3 in northern midlatitudes. Brightness temperatures for the classical rings are presented. Ring brightness shows a variation with azimuth and is linearly polarized at an average value of about 5 percent. The variations in ring polarization suggest that at least 20 percent of the ring brightness is the result of a single scattering process.

  14. Laser wavelength comparison by high resolution interferometry.

    PubMed

    Layer, H P; Deslattes, R D; Schweitzer, W G

    1976-03-01

    High resolution interferometry has been used to determine the wavelength ratio between two molecularly stabilized He-Ne lasers, one locked to a methane absorption at 3.39 microm and the other locked to the k peak of (129)I(2) at 633 nm. An optical beat frequency technique gave fractional orders while a microwave sideband method yielded the integer parts. Conventional (third derivative) peak seeking servoes stabilized both laser and cavity lengths. Reproducibility of the electronic control system and optics was a few parts in 10(12), while systematic errors associated with curvature of the cavity mirrors limited the accuracy of the wavelength ratio measurement to 2 parts in 10(10). The measured wavelength ratio of the methane stabilized He-Ne laser at 3.39 microm [P(7) line, nu(3) band] to the (129)I(2) (k peak) stabilized He-Ne laser at 633 nm was 5.359 049 260 6 (0.000 2 ppm). This ratio agrees with that calculated from the (lower accuracy) results of earlier wavelength measurements made relative to the (86)Kr standard. Its higher accuracy thus permits a provisional extension of the frequency scale based on the cesium oscillator into the visible spectrum.

  15. High-resolution microwave images of saturn.

    PubMed

    Grossman, A W; Muhleman, D O; Berge, G L

    1989-09-15

    An analysis of high-resolution microwave images of Saturn and Saturn's individual rings is presented. Radio interferometric observations of Saturn taken at the Very Large Array in New Mexico at wavelengths of 2 and 6 centimeters reveal interesting new features in both the atmosphere and rings. The resulting maps show an increase in brightness temperature of about 3 K from equator to pole at both wavelengths, while the 6-centimeter map shows a bright band at northern mid-latitudes. The data are consistent with a radiative transfer model of the atmosphere that constrains the well-mixed, fully saturated, NH(3) mixing ratio to be 1.2 x 10(-4) in a region just below the NH(3) clouds, while the observed bright band indicates a 25 percent relative decrease of NH(3) in northern mid-latitudes. Brightness temperatures for the classical rings are presented. Ring brightness shows a variation with azimuth and is linearly polarized at an average value of about 5 percent. The variations in ring polarization suggest that at least 20 percent of the ring brightness is the result of a single scattering process.

  16. High-Resolution Observations of Sympathetic Filament Eruptions by NVST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yingna; Li, Shangwei; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the sympathetic eruptions of two solar filaments side by side as observed by the New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) on 2015 October 15. These two filaments start from the complex active region NOAA 12434 (north) and end in a large quiescent region (south). The corresponding SDO/HMI magnetic field observations suggest that the two small filaments are located above two different polarity inversion lines in the northern part. The SDO/AIA observations of the eruption show that these two filaments appear to merge into one in the southern quiescent region. The north-eastern filament starts eruption firstly, which is followed by the north-western filament eruption about 20 minutes later. Clear untwisting motions (i.e., signature of flux ropes) are observed in both filaments during the eruption. After the lifts off of the north-western filament, mini filaments are observed to emerge from the surface and rise up multiple times. The high-resolution observations reveal the fact that the filament is composed of multiple sections and multiple layers. The filament in the lower layer can merge into the upper layer, which leads to the increase of non-potentiality of the upper layer. Magnetic field models using the flux rope insertion method are also constructed in order to understand the complex magnetic configuration as well as the initiation and dynamics of the eruptions.

  17. New design studies for TRIUMF's ARIEL High Resolution Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, J. A.; Baartman, R.; Marchetto, M.

    2016-06-01

    As part of its new Advanced Rare IsotopE Laboratory (ARIEL), TRIUMF is designing a novel High Resolution Separator (HRS) (Maloney et al., 2015) to separate rare isotopes. The HRS has a 180° bend, separated into two 90° magnetic dipoles, bend radius 1.2 m, with an electrostatic multipole corrector between them. Second order correction comes mainly from the dipole edge curvatures, but is intended to be fine-tuned with a sextupole component and a small octupole component in the multipole. This combination is designed to achieve 1:20,000 resolution for a 3 μm (horizontal) and 6 μm (vertical) emittance. A design for the HRS dipole magnets achieves both radial and integral flatness goals of <10-5. A review of the optical design for the HRS is presented, including the study of limiting factors affecting separation, matching and aberration correction. Field simulations from the OPERA-3D (OPERA) [2] models of the dipole magnets are used in COSY Infinity (COSY) (Berz and Makino, 2005) [3] to find and optimize the transfer maps to 3rd order and study residual nonlinearities to 8th order.

  18. The dynamic solar chromosphere: recent advances from high resolution telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziotziou, Konstantinos; Tsiropoula, Georgia

    This review focuses on the solar chromosphere, a very inhomogeneous and dynamic layer that exhibits phenomena on a large range of spatial and temporal scales. High-resolution observa-tions from existing telescopes (DST, SST, DOT), as well as long-duration observations with Hinode's SOT employing lines such as the Ca II infrared lines, the Ca II HK and above all the Hα line reveal an incredibly rich, dynamic and highly structured environment, both in quiet and active regions. The fine-structure chromosphere, is mainly constituted by fibrilar features that connect various parts of active regions or span across network cell interiors. We discuss this highly dynamical solar chromosphere, especially below the magnetic canopy, which is gov-erned by flows reflecting both the complex geometry and dynamics of the magnetic field and the propagation and dissipation of waves in the different atmospheric layers. A comprehensive view of the fine-structure chromosphere requires deep understanding of the physical processes involved, investigation of the intricate link with structures/processes at lower photospheric lev-els and analysis of its impact on the mass and energy transport to higher atmospheric layers through flows resulting from different physical processes such as magnetic reconnection and waves. Furthermore, we assess the challenges facing theory and numerical modelling which require the inclusion of several physical ingredients, such as non-LTE and three-dimensional numerical simulations.

  19. EDITORIAL: High-resolution noncontact atomic force microscopy High-resolution noncontact atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Rubén; García, Ricardo; Schwarz, Udo

    2009-06-01

    original papers authored by many of the leading groups in the field with the goal of providing a well-balanced overview on the state-of-the-art in this rapidly evolving field. These papers, many of which are based on notable presentations given during the Madrid conference, feature highlights such as (1) the development of sophisticated force spectroscopy procedures that are able to map the complete 3D tip-sample force field on different surfaces; (2) the considerable resolution improvement of Kelvin probe force microscopy (reaching, in some cases, the atomic scale), which is accompanied by a thorough, quantitative understanding of the contrast observed; (3) the perfecting of atomic resolution imaging on insulating substrates, which helps reshape our microscopic understanding of surface properties and chemical activity of these surfaces; (4) the description of instrumental and methodological developments that pave the way to the atomic-scale characterization of magnetic and electronic properties of nanostructures, and last but not least (5) the extension of dynamic imaging modes to high-resolution operation in liquids, ultimately achieving atomic resolution. The latter developments are already having a significant impact in the highly competitive field of biological imaging under physiological conditions. This special issue of Nanotechnology would not have been possible without the highly professional support from Nina Couzin, Amy Harvey, Alex Wotherspoon and the entire Nanotechnology team at IOP Publishing. We are thankful for their help in pushing this project forward. We also thank the authors who have contributed their excellent original articles to this issue, the referees whose comments have helped make the issue an accurate portrait of this rapidly moving field, and the entire NC-AFM community that continues to drive NC-AFM to new horizons.

  20. Potential High Resolution Dosimeters For MRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bräuer-Krisch, E.; Rosenfeld, A.; Lerch, M.; Petasecca, M.; Akselrod, M.; Sykora, J.; Bartz, J.; Ptaszkiewicz, M.; Olko, P.; Berg, A.; Wieland, M.; Doran, S.; Brochard, T.; Kamlowski, A.; Cellere, G.; Paccagnella, A.; Siegbahn, E. A.; Prezado, Y.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Bravin, A.; Dusseau, L.; Berkvens, P.

    2010-07-01

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) uses highly collimated, quasi-parallel arrays of X-ray microbeams of 50-600 keV, produced by 2nd and 3rd generation synchrotron sources, such as the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in the U.S., and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in France, respectively. High dose rates are necessary to deliver therapeutic doses in microscopic volumes, to avoid spreading of the microbeams by cardiosynchronous movement of the tissues. A small beam divergence and a filtered white beam spectrum in the energy range between 30 and 250 keV results in the advantage of steep dose gradients with a sharper penumbra than that produced in conventional radiotherapy. MRT research over the past 20 years has allowed a vast number of results from preclinical trials on different animal models, including mice, rats, piglets and rabbits. Microbeams in the range between 10 and 100 micron width show an unprecedented sparing of normal radiosensitive tissues as well as preferential damage to malignant tumor tissues. Typically, MRT uses arrays of narrow (˜25-100 micron-wide) microplanar beams separated by wider (100-400 microns centre-to-centre, c-t-c) microplanar spaces. We note that thicker microbeams of 0.1-0.68 mm used by investigators at the NSLS are still called microbeams, although some invesigators in the community prefer to call them minibeams. This report, however, limits it discussion to 25-100 μm microbeams. Peak entrance doses of several hundreds of Gy are surprisingly well tolerated by normal tissues. High resolution dosimetry has been developed over the last two decades, but typical dose ranges are adapted to dose delivery in conventional Radiation Therapy (RT). Spatial resolution in the sub-millimetric range has been achieved, which is currently required for quality assurance measurements in Gamma-knife RT. Most typical commercially available detectors are not suitable for MRT applications at a dose rate of 16000 Gy/s, micron

  1. Large Scale, High Resolution, Mantle Dynamics Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geenen, T.; Berg, A. V.; Spakman, W.

    2007-12-01

    To model the geodynamic evolution of plate convergence, subduction and collision and to allow for a connection to various types of observational data, geophysical, geodetical and geological, we developed a 4D (space-time) numerical mantle convection code. The model is based on a spherical 3D Eulerian fem model, with quadratic elements, on top of which we constructed a 3D Lagrangian particle in cell(PIC) method. We use the PIC method to transport material properties and to incorporate a viscoelastic rheology. Since capturing small scale processes associated with localization phenomena require a high resolution, we spend a considerable effort on implementing solvers suitable to solve for models with over 100 million degrees of freedom. We implemented Additive Schwartz type ILU based methods in combination with a Krylov solver, GMRES. However we found that for problems with over 500 thousend degrees of freedom the convergence of the solver degraded severely. This observation is known from the literature [Saad, 2003] and results from the local character of the ILU preconditioner resulting in a poor approximation of the inverse of A for large A. The size of A for which ILU is no longer usable depends on the condition of A and on the amount of fill in allowed for the ILU preconditioner. We found that for our problems with over 5×105 degrees of freedom convergence became to slow to solve the system within an acceptable amount of walltime, one minute, even when allowing for considerable amount of fill in. We also implemented MUMPS and found good scaling results for problems up to 107 degrees of freedom for up to 32 CPU¡¯s. For problems with over 100 million degrees of freedom we implemented Algebraic Multigrid type methods (AMG) from the ML library [Sala, 2006]. Since multigrid methods are most effective for single parameter problems, we rebuild our model to use the SIMPLE method in the Stokes solver [Patankar, 1980]. We present scaling results from these solvers for 3D

  2. Potential High Resolution Dosimeters For MRT

    SciTech Connect

    Braeuer-Krisch, E.; Brochard, T.; Prezado, Y.; Bravin, A.; Berkvens, P.; Rosenfeld, A.; Lerch, M.; Petasecca, M.; Akselrod, M.; Sykora, J.; Bartz, J.; Ptaszkiewicz, M.; Olko, P.; Berg, A.; Wieland, M.; Doran, S.; Kamlowski, A.; Cellere, G.

    2010-07-23

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) uses highly collimated, quasi-parallel arrays of X-ray microbeams of 50-600 keV, produced by 2nd and 3rd generation synchrotron sources, such as the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in the U.S., and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in France, respectively. High dose rates are necessary to deliver therapeutic doses in microscopic volumes, to avoid spreading of the microbeams by cardiosynchronous movement of the tissues. A small beam divergence and a filtered white beam spectrum in the energy range between 30 and 250 keV results in the advantage of steep dose gradients with a sharper penumbra than that produced in conventional radiotherapy. MRT research over the past 20 years has allowed a vast number of results from preclinical trials on different animal models, including mice, rats, piglets and rabbits. Microbeams in the range between 10 and 100 micron width show an unprecedented sparing of normal radiosensitive tissues as well as preferential damage to malignant tumor tissues. Typically, MRT uses arrays of narrow ({approx}25-100 micron-wide) microplanar beams separated by wider (100-400 microns centre-to-centre, c-t-c) microplanar spaces. We note that thicker microbeams of 0.1-0.68 mm used by investigators at the NSLS are still called microbeams, although some invesigators in the community prefer to call them minibeams. This report, however, limits it discussion to 25-100 {mu}m microbeams. Peak entrance doses of several hundreds of Gy are surprisingly well tolerated by normal tissues. High resolution dosimetry has been developed over the last two decades, but typical dose ranges are adapted to dose delivery in conventional Radiation Therapy (RT). Spatial resolution in the sub-millimetric range has been achieved, which is currently required for quality assurance measurements in Gamma-knife RT. Most typical commercially available detectors are not suitable for MRT applications at a dose rate of 16000 Gy

  3. High-Resolution Radar Imagery of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, John K.; Nolan, M. C.

    2009-09-01

    We present high-resolution radar images of Mars obtained during the 2005 and 2007 oppositions. The images were constructed from long-code delay-Doppler observations made with the Arecibo S-band (13-cm) radar. The average image resolution of 3 km represented a better than order-of-magnitude improvement over pre-upgrade Arecibo imagery of the planet. Images of depolarized reflectivity (an indicator primarily of wavelength-scale surface roughness) show the same bright volcanic flow features seen in earlier imagery, but with much finer detail. A new image of the Elysium region shows fine detail in the radar-bright channels of Athabasca Vallis, Marte Vallis, and Grjota Vallis. The new images of Tharsis and Olympus Mons also show a complex array of radar-bright and radar-dark features. Southern Amazonis exhibits some of the most complex and puzzling radar-bright structure on the planet. Another curiosity is the Chryse/Xanthe/Channels region, where we find some radar-bright features in or adjacent to fluvial chaos structures. Chryse/Xanthe is also the only region of Mars showing radar-bright craters (which are rare on Mars but common on the Moon and Mercury). We also obtained the first delay-Doppler image showing the enhanced backscatter from the residual south polar ice cap. In addition to the depolarized imagery, we were able to make the first delay-Doppler images of the circular polarization ratio (an important diagnostic for surface roughness texture). We find that vast areas of the radar-bright volcanic regions have polarization ratios close to unity. Such high ratios are rare for terrestrial lava flows and only seen for extremely blocky surfaces giving high levels of multiple scattering.

  4. Toward high-resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, Daniel; Huie, Philip; Vankov, Alexander; Asher, Alon; Baccus, Steven

    2005-04-01

    It has been already demonstrated that electrical stimulation of retina can produce visual percepts in blind patients suffering from macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Current retinal implants provide very low resolution (just a few electrodes), while several thousand pixels are required for functional restoration of sight. We present a design of the optoelectronic retinal prosthetic system that can activate a retinal stimulating array with pixel density up to 2,500 pix/mm2 (geometrically corresponding to a visual acuity of 20/80), and allows for natural eye scanning rather than scanning with a head-mounted camera. The system operates similarly to "virtual reality" imaging devices used in military and medical applications. An image from a video camera is projected by a goggle-mounted infrared LED-LCD display onto the retina, activating an array of powered photodiodes in the retinal implant. Such a system provides a broad field of vision by allowing for natural eye scanning. The goggles are transparent to visible light, thus allowing for simultaneous utilization of remaining natural vision along with prosthetic stimulation. Optical control of the implant allows for simple adjustment of image processing algorithms and for learning. A major prerequisite for high resolution stimulation is the proximity of neural cells to the stimulation sites. This can be achieved with sub-retinal implants constructed in a manner that directs migration of retinal cells to target areas. Two basic implant geometries are described: perforated membranes and protruding electrode arrays. Possibility of the tactile neural stimulation is also examined.

  5. Decadal prediction with a high resolution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monerie, Paul-Arthur; Valcke, Sophie; Terray, Laurent; Moine, Marie-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The ability of a high resolution coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (with a horizontal resolution of the quarter degree in the ocean and of about 50 km in the atmosphere) to predict the annual means of temperature, precipitation, sea-ice volume and extent is assessed. Reasonable skill in predicting sea surface temperatures and surface air temperature is obtained, especially over the North Atlantic, the tropical Atlantic and the Indian Ocean. The skill in predicting precipitations is weaker and not significant. The Sea Ice Extent and volume are also reasonably predicted in winter (March) and summer (September). It is however argued that the skill is mainly due to the atmosphere feeding in well-mixed GHGs. The mid-90's subpolar gyre warming is assessed. The model simulates a warming of the North Atlantic Ocean, associated with an increase of the meridional heat transport, a strengthening of the North Atlantic current and a deepening of the mixed layer over the Labrador Sea. The atmosphere plays a role in the warming through a modulation of the North Atlantic Oscillation and a shrinking of the subpolar gyre. At the 3-8 years lead-time, a negative anomaly of pressure, located south of the subpolar gyre is associated with the wind speed decrease over the subpolar gyre. It prevents oceanic heat-loss and favors the northward move, from the subtropical to the subpolar gyre, of anomalously warm and salty water, leading to its warming. We finally argued that the subpolar gyre warming is triggered by the ocean dynamic but the atmosphere can contributes to its sustaining. This work is realised in the framework of the EU FP7 SPECS Project.

  6. High-resolution phylogenetic microbial community profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Esther; Coleman-Derr, Devin; Bowman, Brett; Schwientek, Patrick; Clum, Alicia; Copeland, Alex; Ciobanu, Doina; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Gies, Esther; Hallam, Steve; Tringe, Susannah; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-03-17

    The representation of bacterial and archaeal genome sequences is strongly biased towards cultivated organisms, which belong to merely four phylogenetic groups. Functional information and inter-phylum level relationships are still largely underexplored for candidate phyla, which are often referred to as microbial dark matter. Furthermore, a large portion of the 16S rRNA gene records in the GenBank database are labeled as environmental samples and unclassified, which is in part due to low read accuracy, potential chimeric sequences produced during PCR amplifications and the low resolution of short amplicons. In order to improve the phylogenetic classification of novel species and advance our knowledge of the ecosystem function of uncultivated microorganisms, high-throughput full length 16S rRNA gene sequencing methodologies with reduced biases are needed. We evaluated the performance of PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing in high-resolution phylogenetic microbial community profiling. For this purpose, we compared PacBio and Illumina metagenomic shotgun and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of a mock community as well as of an environmental sample from Sakinaw Lake, British Columbia. Sakinaw Lake is known to contain a large age of microbial species from candidate phyla. Sequencing results show that community structure based on PacBio shotgun and 16S rRNA gene sequences is highly similar in both the mock and the environmental communities. Resolution power and community representation accuracy from SMRT sequencing data appeared to be independent of GC content of microbial genomes and was higher when compared to Illumina-based metagenome shotgun and 16S rRNA gene (iTag) sequences, e.g. full-length sequencing resolved all 23 OTUs in the mock community, while iTags did not resolve closely related species. SMRT sequencing hence offers various potential benefits when characterizing uncharted microbial communities.

  7. A High-Resolution Thermometer for the Range 0.75-1.0 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, J.; Nash, A.; Larson, M.; Mulders, N.

    1999-01-01

    We report on a new high-resolution thermometer (HRT) for use near the tricritical point in 3He-4He mixtures. It is based on an existing HRT design that uses a DC-SQUID to detect the magnetization of a paramagnetic sensing element.

  8. 21 CFR 878.5360 - Tweezer-type epilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tweezer-type epilator. 878.5360 Section 878.5360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 878.5360 Tweezer-type...

  9. 21 CFR 878.5360 - Tweezer-type epilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tweezer-type epilator. 878.5360 Section 878.5360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 878.5360 Tweezer-type...

  10. 21 CFR 878.5360 - Tweezer-type epilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tweezer-type epilator. 878.5360 Section 878.5360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 878.5360 Tweezer-type...

  11. 21 CFR 878.5360 - Tweezer-type epilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tweezer-type epilator. 878.5360 Section 878.5360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 878.5360 Tweezer-type...

  12. 21 CFR 878.5360 - Tweezer-type epilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

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  13. High-resolution mechanical imaging of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Streitberger, Kaspar-Josche; Guo, Jing; Tzschätzsch, Heiko; Hirsch, Sebastian; Fischer, Thomas; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to test the feasibility and reproducibility of in vivo high-resolution mechanical imaging of the asymptomatic human kidney. Hereby nine volunteers were examined at three different physiological states of urinary bladder filling (a normal state, urinary urgency, and immediately after urinary relief). Mechanical imaging was performed of the in vivo kidney using three-dimensional multifrequency magnetic resonance elastography combined with multifrequency dual elastovisco inversion. Other than in classical elastography, where the storage and loss shear moduli are evaluated, we analyzed the magnitude |G(⁎)| and the phase angle φ of the complex shear modulus reconstructed by simultaneous inversion of full wave field data corresponding to 7 harmonic drive frequencies from 30 to 60Hz and a resolution of 2.5mm cubic voxel size. Mechanical parameter maps were derived with a spatial resolution superior to that in previous work. The group-averaged values of |G(⁎)| were 2.67±0.52kPa in the renal medulla, 1.64±0.17kPa in the cortex, and 1.17±0.21kPa in the hilus. The phase angle φ (in radians) was 0.89±0.12 in the medulla, 0.83±0.09 in the cortex, and 0.72±0.06 in the hilus. All regional differences were significant (P<0.001), while no significant variation was found in relation to different stages of bladder filling. In summary our study provides first high-resolution maps of viscoelastic parameters of the three anatomical regions of the kidney. |G(⁎)| and φ provide novel information on the viscoelastic properties of the kidney, which is potentially useful for the detection of renal lesions or fibrosis.

  14. High-resolution mechanical imaging of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Streitberger, Kaspar-Josche; Guo, Jing; Tzschätzsch, Heiko; Hirsch, Sebastian; Fischer, Thomas; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to test the feasibility and reproducibility of in vivo high-resolution mechanical imaging of the asymptomatic human kidney. Hereby nine volunteers were examined at three different physiological states of urinary bladder filling (a normal state, urinary urgency, and immediately after urinary relief). Mechanical imaging was performed of the in vivo kidney using three-dimensional multifrequency magnetic resonance elastography combined with multifrequency dual elastovisco inversion. Other than in classical elastography, where the storage and loss shear moduli are evaluated, we analyzed the magnitude |G(⁎)| and the phase angle φ of the complex shear modulus reconstructed by simultaneous inversion of full wave field data corresponding to 7 harmonic drive frequencies from 30 to 60Hz and a resolution of 2.5mm cubic voxel size. Mechanical parameter maps were derived with a spatial resolution superior to that in previous work. The group-averaged values of |G(⁎)| were 2.67±0.52kPa in the renal medulla, 1.64±0.17kPa in the cortex, and 1.17±0.21kPa in the hilus. The phase angle φ (in radians) was 0.89±0.12 in the medulla, 0.83±0.09 in the cortex, and 0.72±0.06 in the hilus. All regional differences were significant (P<0.001), while no significant variation was found in relation to different stages of bladder filling. In summary our study provides first high-resolution maps of viscoelastic parameters of the three anatomical regions of the kidney. |G(⁎)| and φ provide novel information on the viscoelastic properties of the kidney, which is potentially useful for the detection of renal lesions or fibrosis. PMID:24355382

  15. The Astrophysical Plasmadynamic Explorer (APEX): A High Resolution Spectroscopic Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, M. P.; Cruddace, R. G.; Wood, K. S.; Yentis, D. J.; Gursky, H.; Barbee, T. W., Jr.; Goldstein, W. H.; Kordas, J. F.; Fritz, G. G.; Barstow, M. A.; Bannister, N. P.; Lapington, J. S.

    2002-05-01

    EUVE and the ROSAT WFC have left a tremendous legacy in astrophysics at EUV wavelengths. More recently, Chandra and XMM-Newton have demonstrated at X-ray wavelengths the power of high-resolution astronomical spectroscopy, which allows the identification of weak emission lines, the measurement of Doppler shifts and line profiles, and the detection of narrow absorption features. This leads to a complete understanding of the density, temperature, abundance, magnetic, and dynamic structure of astrophysical plasmas. However, the termination of the EUVE mission has left a gaping hole in spectral coverage at crucial EUV wavelengths ( 100-300 Angstroms), where hot (105-108 K) plasmas radiate most strongly and produce critical spectral diagnostics. CHIPS will fill this hole only partially as it is optimized for diffuse emission and has only moderate resolution (R 150). For discrete sources, we have successfully flown a follow-on instrument to the EUVE spectrometer (Aeff 1 cm2, R 400), the high-resolution spectrometer J-PEX (Aeff 3 cm2, R 3000). In this paper we build on the J-PEX prototype and present a strawman design for an orbiting spectroscopic observatory, APEX, a SMEX-class instrument containing a suite of spectrometers that together achieve both high effective area (>20 cm2) and high spectral resolution ( 10000) over the range 100-300 Angstroms. We discuss in depth the optical design, the wavelength coverage, and the effective area. This work is supported by the Office of Naval Research and NRL, and by NASA Space Astrophysics and Research Analysis grants

  16. High Resolution LTS-SQUID Microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudenbacher, Franz; Peters, Nicholas; Wikswo, John

    2000-03-01

    We have developed a scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope for imaging magnetic fields of room-temperature samples with sub-millimeter resolution. In our design, hand wound niobium pickup coils were coupled to commercially available low-temperature SQUID sensors. The SQUID sensor and the pickup coil are in the vacuum space of the cryostat separated typically less than 50μm by a thin sapphire window from the room-temperature sample. A computerized non-magnetic scanning stage with sub-micron resolution in combination with a tripod leveling system allows samples to be scanned within 10μm of the sapphire window. For a 20-turn 500μm diameter pickup coil, we achieved a field sensitivity of 350fT\\cdotHz-1/2 for frequencies above 1 Hz, and 1pT\\cdotHz-1/2 for a 10-turn 250mm coil. The SQUID microscope was used to image the distribution of time-dependent stimulus and action currents in anisotropic cardiac tissue, the remanent magnetization of the Martian meteorite ALH84001 during thermal demagnetisation, and the magnetic susceptibility of biogenic magnetite in the beak of homing pigeons.

  17. High-resolution airborne magnetometry for hydrocarbon exploration: A case study, Wilson County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, T.J.; Phillips, J.D.

    1994-12-31

    Aeromagnetic anomaly surveying has been used extensively for geophysical exploration since just before World War II. Its primary value in hydrocarbon exploration has been for mapping the strong magnetic anomalies of the crystalline magnetic basement rocks to estimate the regional thickness of overlying, potential oil and gas bearing sediments. These basement responses are typically in the amplitude range of 2--200 nanotesla (nT) or gammas. In contrast, High Resolution Aeromagnetic (HRA) surveys specifically target the sedimentary stack where response amplitudes generated are typically in the range of 0.2-2.0 nT. These low intensity anomalies generated within the sediments are related to changes in the magnetic composition of rocks. This will occur when rocks of differing magnetic intensities are juxtaposed across a fault, or at a stratigraphic truncation. With this objective in mind a new high resolution, high sensitivity aeromagnetic survey was conducted over parts of Wilson and Karnes counties in Texas.

  18. High Resolution Airborne Shallow Water Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbacher, F.; Pfennigbauer, M.; Aufleger, M.; Ullrich, A.

    2012-07-01

    In order to meet the requirements of the European Water Framework Directive (EU-WFD), authorities face the problem of repeatedly performing area-wide surveying of all kinds of inland waters. Especially for mid-sized or small rivers this is a considerable challenge imposing insurmountable logistical efforts and costs. It is therefore investigated if large-scale surveying of a river system on an operational basis is feasible by employing airborne hydrographic laser scanning. In cooperation with the Bavarian Water Authority (WWA Weilheim) a pilot project was initiated by the Unit of Hydraulic Engineering at the University of Innsbruck and RIEGL Laser Measurement Systems exploiting the possibilities of a new LIDAR measurement system with high spatial resolution and high measurement rate to capture about 70 km of riverbed and foreland for the river Loisach in Bavaria/Germany and the estuary and parts of the shoreline (about 40km in length) of lake Ammersee. The entire area surveyed was referenced to classic terrestrial cross-section surveys with the aim to derive products for the monitoring and managing needs of the inland water bodies forced by the EU-WFD. The survey was performed in July 2011 by helicopter and airplane and took 3 days in total. In addition, high resolution areal images were taken to provide an optical reference, offering a wide range of possibilities on further research, monitoring, and managing responsibilities. The operating altitude was about 500 m to maintain eye-safety, even for the aided eye, the airspeed was about 55 kts for the helicopter and 75 kts for the aircraft. The helicopter was used in the alpine regions while the fixed wing aircraft was used in the plains and the urban area, using appropriate scan rates to receive evenly distributed point clouds. The resulting point density ranged from 10 to 25 points per square meter. By carefully selecting days with optimum water quality, satisfactory penetration down to the river bed was achieved

  19. High Resolution Velocity Structure in Eastern Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M; Gok, R; Zor, E; Walter, W

    2004-09-03

    We investigate the crustal and upper mantle structure of eastern Turkey where the Anatolian, Arabian and Eurasian Plates meet and form a complex tectonic structure. The Bitlis suture is a continental collision zone between the Anatolian plateau and the Arabian plate. Broadband data available through the Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment (ETSE) provided a unique opportunity for studying the high resolution velocity structure. Zor et al. found an average 46 km thick crust in Anatolian plateau using six-layered grid search inversion of the ETSE receiver functions. Receiver functions are sensitive to the velocity contrast of interfaces and the relative travel time of converted and reverberated waves between those interfaces. The interpretation of receiver function alone with many-layered parameterization may result in an apparent depth-velocity tradeoff. In order to improve previous velocity model, we employed the joint inversion method with many layered parameterization of Julia et al. (2000) to the ETSE receiver functions. In this technique, the receiver function and surface-wave observations are combined into a single algebraic equation and each data set is weighted by an estimate of the uncertainty in the observations. We consider azimuthal changes of receiver functions and have stacked them into different groups. We calculated the receiver functions using iterative time-domain deconvolution technique and surface wave group velocity dispersion curves between 10-100 sec. We are making surface wave dispersion measurements at the ETSE stations and have incorporated them into a regional group velocity model. Preliminary results indicate a strong trend in the long period group velocity in the northeast. This indicates slow upper mantle velocities in the region consistent with Pn, Sn and receiver function results. We started with both the 1-D model that is obtained with the 12 tones dam explosion shot data recorded by ETSE network and the existing receiver function

  20. The HFIP High Resolution Hurricane Forecast Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nance, L. B.; Bernardet, L.; Bao, S.; Brown, B.; Carson, L.; Fowler, T.; Halley Gotway, J.; Harrop, C.; Szoke, E.; Tollerud, E. I.; Wolff, J.; Yuan, H.

    2010-12-01

    Tropical cyclones are a serious concern for the nation, causing significant risk to life, property and economic vitality. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service has a mission of issuing tropical cyclone forecasts and warnings, aimed at protecting life and property and enhancing the national economy. In the last 10 years, the errors in hurricane track forecasts have been reduced by about 50% through improved model guidance, enhanced observations, and forecaster expertise. However, little progress has been made during this period toward reducing forecasted intensity errors. To address this shortcoming, NOAA established the Hurricane Forecast Improvement Project (HFIP) in 2007. HFIP is a 10-year plan to improve one to five day tropical cyclone forecasts, with a focus on rapid intensity change. Recent research suggests that prediction models with grid spacing less than 1 km in the inner core of the hurricane may provide a substantial improvement in intensity forecasts. The 2008-09 staging of the High Resolution Hurricane (HRH) Test focused on quantifying the impact of increased horizontal resolution in numerical models on hurricane intensity forecasts. The primary goal of this test was an evaluation of the effect of increasing horizontal resolution within a given model across a variety of storms with different intensity, location and structure. The test focused on 69 retrospectives cases from the 2005 and 2007 hurricane seasons. Six modeling groups participated in the HRH test utilizing a variety of models, including three configurations of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, the operational GFDL model, the Navy’s tropical cyclone model, and a model developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UWM). The Development Testbed Center (DTC) was tasked with providing objective verification statistics for a variety of metrics. This presentation provides an overview of the HRH Test and a summary of the standard

  1. Counter-propagating dual-trap optical tweezers based on linear momentum conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Ribezzi-Crivellari, M.; Huguet, J. M.; Ritort, F.

    2013-04-15

    We present a dual-trap optical tweezers setup which directly measures forces using linear momentum conservation. The setup uses a counter-propagating geometry, which allows momentum measurement on each beam separately. The experimental advantages of this setup include low drift due to all-optical manipulation, and a robust calibration (independent of the features of the trapped object or buffer medium) due to the force measurement method. Although this design does not attain the high-resolution of some co-propagating setups, we show that it can be used to perform different single molecule measurements: fluctuation-based molecular stiffness characterization at different forces and hopping experiments on molecular hairpins. Remarkably, in our setup it is possible to manipulate very short tethers (such as molecular hairpins with short handles) down to the limit where beads are almost in contact. The setup is used to illustrate a novel method for measuring the stiffness of optical traps and tethers on the basis of equilibrium force fluctuations, i.e., without the need of measuring the force vs molecular extension curve. This method is of general interest for dual trap optical tweezers setups and can be extended to setups which do not directly measure forces.

  2. NMR high-resolution magic angle spinning rotor design for quantification of metabolic concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holly, R.; Damyanovich, A.; Peemoeller, H.

    2006-05-01

    A new high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance technique is presented to obtain absolute metabolite concentrations of solutions. The magnetic resonance spectrum of the sample under investigation and an internal reference are acquired simultaneously, ensuring both spectra are obtained under the same experimental conditions. The robustness of the technique is demonstrated using a solution of creatine, and it is shown that the technique can obtain solution concentrations to within 7% or better.

  3. Optical Tweezers Array and Nimble Tweezers Probe Generated by Spatial- Light Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Jassemnejad, Baha; Seibel, Robin E.; Weiland, Kenneth E.

    2003-01-01

    An optical tweezers is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center as a visiblelight interface between ubiquitous laser technologies and the interrogation, visualization, manufacture, control, and energization of nanostructures such as silicon carbide (SiC) nanotubes. The tweezers uses one or more focused laser beams to hold micrometer-sized particles called tools (sometimes called tips in atomic-force-microscope terminology). A strongly focused laser beam has an associated light-pressure gradient that is strong enough to pull small particles to the focus, in spite of the oppositely directed scattering force; "optical tweezers" is the common term for this effect. The objective is to use the tools to create carefully shaped secondary traps to hold and assemble nanostructures that may contain from tens to hundreds of atoms. The interaction between a tool and the nanostructures is to be monitored optically as is done with scanning probe microscopes. One of the initial efforts has been to create, shape, and control multiple tweezers beams. To this end, a programmable spatial-light modulator (SLM) has been used to modify the phase of a laser beam at up to 480 by 480 points. One program creates multiple, independently controllable tweezer beams whose shapes can be tailored by making the SLM an adaptive mirror in an interferometer (ref. 1). The beams leave the SLM at different angles, and an optical Fourier transform maps these beams to different positions in the focal plane of a microscope objective. The following figure shows two arrays of multiple beams created in this manner. The patterns displayed above the beam array control the intensity-to-phase transformation required in programming the SLM. Three of the seven beams displayed can be used as independently controllable beams.

  4. Reusable acoustic tweezers for disposable devices.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Xie, Yuliang; Li, Sixing; Lata, James; Ren, Liqiang; Mao, Zhangming; Ren, Baiyang; Wu, Mengxi; Ozcelik, Adem; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-12-21

    We demonstrate acoustic tweezers used for disposable devices. Rather than forming an acoustic resonance, we locally transmitted standing surface acoustic waves into a removable, independent polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-glass hybridized microfluidic superstrate device for micromanipulation. By configuring and regulating the displacement nodes on a piezoelectric substrate, cells and particles were effectively patterned and transported into said superstrate, accordingly. With the label-free and contactless nature of acoustic waves, the presented technology could offer a simple, accurate, low-cost, biocompatible, and disposable method for applications in the fields of point-of-care diagnostics and fundamental biomedical studies.

  5. Active laser tweezers microrheometry of microbial biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, N.; Slapar, V.; Boric, M.; Stopar, D.; Babič, D.; Poberaj, I.

    2010-08-01

    Microbial biofilms are present on biotic and abiotic surfaces and have a significant impact on many fields in industry, health care and technology. Thus, a better understanding of processes that lead to development of biofilms and their chemical and mechanical properties is needed. In the following paper we report the results of active laser tweezers microrheology study of optically inhomogeneous extracellular matrix secreted by Visbrio sp. bacteria. One particle and two particle active microrheology were used in experiments. Both methods exhibited high enough sensitivity to detect viscosity changes at early stages of bacterial growth. We also showed that both methods can be used in mature samples where optical inhomogeneity becomes significant.

  6. Reusable acoustic tweezers for disposable devices

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Feng; Xie, Yuliang; Li, Sixing; Lata, James; Ren, Liqiang; Mao, Zhangming; Ren, Baiyang; Wu, Mengxi; Ozcelik, Adem

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate acoustic tweezers used for disposable devices. Rather than forming an acoustic resonance, we locally transmitted standing surface acoustic waves into a removable, independent polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-glass hybridized microfluidic superstrate device for micromanipulation. By configuring and regulating the displacement nodes on a piezoelectric substrate, cells and particles were effectively patterned and transported into said superstrate, accordingly. With the label-free and contactless nature of acoustic waves, the presented technology could offer a simple, accurate, low-cost, biocompatible, and disposable method for applications in the fields of point-of-care diagnostics and fundamental biomedical studies. PMID:26507411

  7. A new high-resolution electromagnetic method for subsurface imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wanjie

    For most electromagnetic (EM) geophysical systems, the contamination of primary fields on secondary fields ultimately limits the capability of the controlled-source EM methods. Null coupling techniques were proposed to solve this problem. However, the small orientation errors in the null coupling systems greatly restrict the applications of these systems. Another problem encountered by most EM systems is the surface interference and geologic noise, which sometimes make the geophysical survey impossible to carry out. In order to solve these problems, the alternating target antenna coupling (ATAC) method was introduced, which greatly removed the influence of the primary field and reduced the surface interference. But this system has limitations on the maximum transmitter moment that can be used. The differential target antenna coupling (DTAC) method was proposed to allow much larger transmitter moments and at the same time maintain the advantages of the ATAC method. In this dissertation, first, the theoretical DTAC calculations were derived mathematically using Born and Wolf's complex magnetic vector. 1D layered and 2D blocked earth models were used to demonstrate that the DTAC method has no responses for 1D and 2D structures. Analytical studies of the plate model influenced by conductive and resistive backgrounds were presented to explain the physical phenomenology behind the DTAC method, which is the magnetic fields of the subsurface targets are required to be frequency dependent. Then, the advantages of the DTAC method, e.g., high-resolution, reducing the geologic noise and insensitive to surface interference, were analyzed using surface and subsurface numerical examples in the EMGIMA software. Next, the theoretical advantages, such as high resolution and insensitive to surface interference, were verified by designing and developing a low-power (moment of 50 Am 2) vertical-array DTAC system and testing it on controlled targets and scaled target coils. At last, a

  8. Acoustic force mapping in a hybrid acoustic-optical micromanipulation device supporting high resolution optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Thalhammer, Gregor; McDougall, Craig; MacDonald, Michael Peter; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2016-04-21

    Many applications in the life-sciences demand non-contact manipulation tools for forceful but nevertheless delicate handling of various types of sample. Moreover, the system should support high-resolution optical imaging. Here we present a hybrid acoustic/optical manipulation system which utilizes a transparent transducer, making it compatible with high-NA imaging in a microfluidic environment. The powerful acoustic trapping within a layered resonator, which is suitable for highly parallel particle handling, is complemented by the flexibility and selectivity of holographic optical tweezers, with the specimens being under high quality optical monitoring at all times. The dual acoustic/optical nature of the system lends itself to optically measure the exact acoustic force map, by means of direct force measurements on an optically trapped particle. For applications with (ultra-)high demand on the precision of the force measurements, the position of the objective used for the high-NA imaging may have significant influence on the acoustic force map in the probe chamber. We have characterized this influence experimentally and the findings were confirmed by model simulations. We show that it is possible to design the chamber and to choose the operating point in such a way as to avoid perturbations due to the objective lens. Moreover, we found that measuring the electrical impedance of the transducer provides an easy indicator for the acoustic resonances. PMID:27025398

  9. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels and silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Ruben, G.C. . Dept. of Biological Sciences)

    1991-09-01

    The goal of the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was to image the structure of two tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) and two melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels at the single polymer chain level{sup 1,2}. With this level of structural resolution we hoped to interrelate each aerogel's structure with its physical properties and its method of synthesis. Conventional single-step base catalysed TMOS aerogels show strings of spheroidal particles linked together with minimal necking. The spheroidal particles range from 86--132 {Angstrom} and average 113{plus minus}10 {Angstrom} in diameter{sup 2}. In contrast the TMOS aerogels reported on here were made by a two step method. After extended silica chains are grown in solution under acidic conditions with a substoichiometric amount of water, the reaction is stopped and the methanol hydrolysed from TMOS is removed. Then base catalysis and additional water are added to cause gel formation is a nonalcoholic solvent. The MF aerogels were prepared for HRTEM by fracturing them on a stereo microscope stage with razor knife so that fractured pieces with smooth flat surfaces could be selected for platinum-carbon replication. The two silica (TMOS) aerogels were both transparent and difficult to see. These aerogels were fractured on a stereo microscope stage with tweezers. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  10. SOLARNET: a high resolution mission to complement the ILWS programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dame, L.; Clade, S.; Malherbe, J. M.

    SOLARNET is a medium size high resolution solar physics mission proposed to CNES for a new start in 2006 and a possible launch in 2010. Partnerships with Germany, Belgium, China and India are under discussion. At the center of the SOLARNET mission is a 3-telescopes interferometer of 1 meter baseline capable to provide 50 times the best ever spatial resolution achieved in Space with previous, current or even planned solar missions: 20 mas - 20 km on the Sun in the FUV. The interferometer is associated to an on-axis subtractive double monochromator (imaging spectrograph) capable of high spectral (0.01 nm) and high temporal resolutions (50 ms) on a field of view of 40 arcsec and over the FUV and UV spectral domains (from 117.5 to 400 nm). This will allow to access process scales of magnetic reconnection, dissipation, emerging flux and much more, from the high chromosphere to the low corona with emphasis on the transition zone where the magnetic confinement is expected to be maximum. A whole new chapter of the physics of solar magnetic field structuring and evolution will be opened. The interferometer is complemented by several other instruments providing larger field of view and higher temperature (EUV-XUV coronal imaging) to define the context and extension of the solar phenomena. Helioseismology, a strong asset of SOHO, is also intended with both velocity and diameter measures, allowed by a non-eclipsing Sun synchronous orbit. The SOLARNET interferometer design results of an extensive laboratory demonstration program of interferometric imaging of extended objects. It started 10 years ago and culminates this year with the first interferometric observations (images) of the Sun at Meudon Observatory at the "Grand Siderostat de Foucault" with a complete 3 telescopes cophased interferometer representative of SOLARNET. We will review the scientific program of SOLARNET, describe the interferometer concept and design, present the first solar imaging results of the

  11. High-resolution tunnelling spectroscopy of a graphene quartet.

    PubMed

    Song, Young Jae; Otte, Alexander F; Kuk, Young; Hu, Yike; Torrance, David B; First, Phillip N; de Heer, Walt A; Min, Hongki; Adam, Shaffique; Stiles, Mark D; MacDonald, Allan H; Stroscio, Joseph A

    2010-09-01

    Electrons in a single sheet of graphene behave quite differently from those in traditional two-dimensional electron systems. Like massless relativistic particles, they have linear dispersion and chiral eigenstates. Furthermore, two sets of electrons centred at different points in reciprocal space ('valleys') have this dispersion, giving rise to valley degeneracy. The symmetry between valleys, together with spin symmetry, leads to a fourfold quartet degeneracy of the Landau levels, observed as peaks in the density of states produced by an applied magnetic field. Recent electron transport measurements have observed the lifting of the fourfold degeneracy in very large applied magnetic fields, separating the quartet into integer and, more recently, fractional levels. The exact nature of the broken-symmetry states that form within the Landau levels and lift these degeneracies is unclear at present and is a topic of intense theoretical debate. Here we study the detailed features of the four quantum states that make up a degenerate graphene Landau level. We use high-resolution scanning tunnelling spectroscopy at temperatures as low as 10 mK in an applied magnetic field to study the top layer of multilayer epitaxial graphene. When the Fermi level lies inside the fourfold Landau manifold, significant electron correlation effects result in an enhanced valley splitting for even filling factors, and an enhanced electron spin splitting for odd filling factors. Most unexpectedly, we observe states with Landau level filling factors of 7/2, 9/2 and 11/2, suggestive of new many-body states in graphene.

  12. Tensorially consistent microleveling of high resolution full tensor gradiometry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffler, M.; Queitsch, M.; Schneider, M.; Stolz, R.; Krech, W.; Meyer, H.; Kukowski, N.

    2013-12-01

    Full Tensor Magnetic Gradiometry (FTMG) data obtained with Superconductive Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) sensors offer high resolution and a low signal-to-noise ratio. In airborne operation, processing steps for leveling of flight lines using tie-lines and subsequent micro-leveling become important. Airborne SQUID-FTMG surveys show that in magnetically calm regions the overall measurement system noise level of ≈10pT/m RMS is the main contribution to the magnetograms and line-dependent artifacts become visible. Both tie-line and micro-leveling are used to remove these artifacts (corrugations). But, in the application of these standard leveling routines - originally designed for total magnetic intensity measurements - to the tensor components independently, the tracelessness and the symmetry of the resulting corrected tensor is not preserved. We show that tie-line leveling for airborne SQUID-FTMG data can be surpassed using the presented micro-leveling algorithm and discuss how it is designed to preserve the tensor properties. The micro-leveling process is performed via a moving median filter using a geometric median which preserves the properties of the tensor either to the entire tensor at once or to its structural part (eigenvalues) and rotational part (eigenvectors or idempotences) independently. We discuss the impact on data quality for the different micro-leveling methods. At each observation point, the median along the distance of the flight line is subtracted and the median in a specific footprint radius is added. For application of this filter to the rotational states, we use quaternions and quaternion interpolation. Examples of the new processing methods on data acquired with the FTMG system will be presented in this work.

  13. High-resolution heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy based on spatial encoding and coherence transfer in inhomogeneous fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kaiyu; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Hao; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-11-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been proven to be a powerful technique for chemical, biological, and medical studies. Heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) and heteronuclear multiple bond correlation (HMBC) are two frequently used 2D NMR methods. In combination with spatially encoded techniques, a heteronuclear 2D NMR spectrum can be acquired in several seconds and may be applied to monitoring chemical reactions. However, it is difficult to obtain high-resolution NMR spectra in inhomogeneous fields. Inspired by the idea of tracing the difference of precession frequencies between two different spins to yield high-resolution spectra, we propose a method with correlation acquisition option and J-resolved-like acquisition option to ultrafast obtain high-resolution HSQC/HMBC spectra and heteronuclear J-resolved-like spectra in inhomogeneous fields.

  14. A compact holographic optical tweezers instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, G. M.; Bowman, R. W.; Linnenberger, A.; Dienerowitz, M.; Phillips, D. B.; Carberry, D. M.; Miles, M. J.; Padgett, M. J.

    2012-11-01

    Holographic optical tweezers have found many applications including the construction of complex micron-scale 3D structures and the control of tools and probes for position, force, and viscosity measurement. We have developed a compact, stable, holographic optical tweezers instrument which can be easily transported and is compatible with a wide range of microscopy techniques, making it a valuable tool for collaborative research. The instrument measures approximately 30×30×35 cm and is designed around a custom inverted microscope, incorporating a fibre laser operating at 1070 nm. We designed the control software to be easily accessible for the non-specialist, and have further improved its ease of use with a multi-touch iPad interface. A high-speed camera allows multiple trapped objects to be tracked simultaneously. We demonstrate that the compact instrument is stable to 0.5 nm for a 10 s measurement time by plotting the Allan variance of the measured position of a trapped 2 μm silica bead. We also present a range of objects that have been successfully manipulated.

  15. High Resolution non-Markovianity in NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes, Nadja K.; Peterson, John P. S.; Sarthour, Roberto S.; Souza, Alexandre M.; Monken, C. H.; Roditi, Itzhak; Oliveira, Ivan S.; Santos, Marcelo F.

    2016-01-01

    Memoryless time evolutions are ubiquitous in nature but often correspond to a resolution-induced approximation, i.e. there are correlations in time whose effects are undetectable. Recent advances in the dynamical control of small quantum systems provide the ideal scenario to probe some of these effects. Here we experimentally demonstrate the precise induction of memory effects on the evolution of a quantum coin (qubit) by correlations engineered in its environment. In particular, we design a collisional model in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and precisely control the strength of the effects by changing the degree of correlation in the environment and its time of interaction with the qubit. We also show how these effects can be hidden by the limited resolution of the measurements performed on the qubit. The experiment reinforces NMR as a test bed for the study of open quantum systems and the simulation of their classical counterparts. PMID:27669652

  16. High-resolution ground-based spectroscopy: where and how ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallavicini, R.

    2002-07-01

    An overview is presented of high-resolution optical spectrographs in operation or under development at large telescopes, with emphasis on those facilities best suited for the study of late-type stars and stellar surface inhomogeneities. Plans for the development of new high-resolution spectroscopic instruments are discussed with emphasis on the ICE spectrograph for the PEPSI spectropolarimeter at the LBT.

  17. High resolution spectroscopic study of BeΛ10

    DOE PAGES

    Gogami, T.; Chen, C.; Kawama, D.; Achenbach, P.; Ahmidouch, A.; Albayrak, I.; Androic, D.; Asaturyan, A.; Asaturyan, R.; Ates, O.; et al

    2016-03-10

    Spectroscopy of amore » $$^{10}_{\\Lambda}$$Be hypernucleus was carried out at JLab Hall C using the $$(e,e^{\\prime}K^{+})$$ reaction. A new magnetic spectrometer system (SPL+HES+HKS), specifically designed for high resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy, was used to obtain an energy spectrum with a resolution of 0.78 MeV (FWHM). The well-calibrated spectrometer system of the present experiment using the $$p(e,e^{\\prime}K^{+})\\Lambda,\\Sigma^{0}$$ reactions allowed us to determine the energy levels, and the binding energy of the ground state peak (mixture of 1$$^{-}$$ and 2$$^{-}$$ states) was obtained to be B$$_{\\Lambda}$$=8.55$$\\pm$$0.07(stat.)$$\\pm$$0.11(sys.) MeV. Furthermore, the result indicates that the ground state energy is shallower than that of an emulsion study by about 0.5 MeV which provides valuable experimental information on charge symmetry breaking effect in the $$\\Lambda N$$ interaction.« less

  18. The High Resolution Powder Diffraction Beam Line at ESRF

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, A. N.

    2004-01-01

    The optical design and performance of the high-resolution powder diffraction beam line BM16 at ESRF are discussed and illustrated. Some recent studies carried out on BM16 are described, including crystal structure solution and refinement, anomalous scattering, in situ measurements, residual strain in engineering components, investigation of microstructure, and grazing-incidence diffraction from surface layers. The beam line is built on a bending magnet, and operates in the energy range from 5 keV to 40 keV. After the move to an undulator source in 2002, it will benefit from an extented energy range up to 60 keV and increased flux and resolution. It is anticipated that enhancements to the data quality will be achieved, leading to the solution of larger crystal structures, and improvements in the accuracy of refined structures. The systematic exploitation of anisotropic thermal expansion will help reduce the effects of peak overlap in the analysis of powder diffraction data. PMID:27366602

  19. High-resolution EEG (HR-EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG).

    PubMed

    Gavaret, M; Maillard, L; Jung, J

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution EEG (HR-EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) allow the recording of spontaneous or evoked electromagnetic brain activity with excellent temporal resolution. Data must be recorded with high temporal resolution (sampling rate) and high spatial resolution (number of channels). Data analyses are based on several steps with selection of electromagnetic signals, elaboration of a head model and use of algorithms in order to solve the inverse problem. Due to considerable technical advances in spatial resolution, these tools now represent real methods of ElectroMagnetic Source Imaging. HR-EEG and MEG constitute non-invasive and complementary examinations, characterized by distinct sensitivities according to the location and orientation of intracerebral generators. In the presurgical assessment of drug-resistant partial epilepsies, HR-EEG and MEG can characterize and localize interictal activities and thus the irritative zone. HR-EEG and MEG often yield significant additional data that are complementary to other presurgical investigations and particularly relevant in MRI-negative cases. Currently, the determination of the epileptogenic zone and functional brain mapping remain rather less well-validated indications. In France, in 2014, HR-EEG is now part of standard clinical investigation of epilepsy, while MEG remains a research technique.

  20. High-Resolution Analysis and Modeling of GRACE Accelerometer Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flury, J.; Bettadpur, S.; Tapley, B. D.

    2007-12-01

    A better understanding and modeling of high-resolution GRACE accelerometer data serves three purposes: (1) to ensure that the best possible data are used in the GRACE gravity field processing, (2) to obtain precise and clean non-gravitational accelerations for aeronomy research, and (3) to understand and quantify disturbances which may play a role for future space-borne accelerometry. The external non-gravitational forces acting on the twin GRACE satellites are superimposed by a complex signal pattern of satellite-induced effects, originating from switching events in electrical circuits of on-board heaters and magnetic torquers, from vibrations and thruster accelerations. For each of these processes, we compared and averaged 10 Hz acceleration signals from a large number of events from long accelerometer time series. The analysis results provide constraints, e.g., on thrust accuracy, misalignments, and vibration frequencies. These constraints may help to understand the underlying physics. We modeled and reduced acceleration signals due to thrusters and heater switching and obtained considerably smoother and cleaner signals of external non-gravitational accelerations which may be useful for applications in aeronomy research.

  1. Calibration of the high resolution spectrometer barrel calorimeter at PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Loos, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    The High-Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) is a general-purpose detector for the study of high-energy electron-positron collisions. The HRS has been in data-taking operation since early 1982. This report covers the calibration of the barrel shower counter system. The barrel system consists of 40 modules placed in a circular arch having a mean radius of 2.1 m. Each module covers an azimuthal wedge of 9 degrees and has an active length of 3.0 m. There are three independent sections: (1) an inner sandwich of Pb and scintillator (NE110) of thickness 3 r.1., (2) a plane of 14 proportional wire cells equipped with charge-division read-out, and (3) an outer sandwich of Pb and scintillator (NE114) of thickness 8. r. 1. The light from the sandwich section is collected at both ends and is passed through long acrylic pipes (5 cm diameter, 162 cm long) to photomultipliers (Amperex XP2230) mounted outside the magnet steel.

  2. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) of nanophase ferric oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Iron oxide minerals are the prime candidates for Fe(III) signatures in remotely sensed Martian surface spectra. Magnetic, Mossbauer, and reflectance spectroscopy have been carried out in the laboratory in order to understand the mineralogical nature of Martian analog ferric oxide minerals of submicron or nanometer size range. Out of the iron oxide minerals studied, nanometer sized ferric oxides are promising candidates for possible Martian spectral analogs. 'Nanophase ferric oxide (np-Ox)' is a generic term for ferric oxide/oxihydroxide particles having nanoscale (less than 10 nm) particle dimensions. Ferrihydrite, superparamagnetic particles of hematite, maghemite and goethite, and nanometer sized particles of inherently paramagnetic lepidocrocite are all examples of nanophase ferric oxides. np-Ox particles in general do not give X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns with well defined peaks and would often be classified as X-ray amorphous. Therefore, different np-Oxs preparations should be characterized using a more sensitive technique e.g., high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The purpose of this study is to report the particle size, morphology and crystalline order, of five np-Ox samples by HRTEM imaging and electron diffraction (ED).

  3. High-resolution characterization of individual flood deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Støren, Eivind; Paasche, Øyvind; Hirt, Ann

    2014-05-01

    In most fluvial landscapes rivers transport sediments within and across catchments throughout the year. During flood events the capacity and competence of the river manifolds, and consequently more sediment are eroded and transported within the catchment. Whenever such sediment-laden rivers reach lakes, sediments are deposited at rate much faster than background sedimentation. For this reason alone, lakes can provide exceptionally rich archives of paleofloods. Flood sediments carry information not only about frequency variability through time, but also about source area(s), the time of the deposit (on a seasonal scale), as well as the evolution of the flood. In order to scrutinize the information that can be extracted from such pristine lake records we have developed an approach where high-resolution data are compared to high-precision measurements of selected samples. More specifically, data from high-resolution X-ray fluorescence (XRF) scanning (Itrax) and magnetic susceptibility (Bartington MS2 point sensor) can potentially provide information on annual to decadal resolution. These fast and effective surface scanning methods are subjected to well-known uncertainties, which can impact the interpretation of individual layers. To overcome this challenge - and obtain the highest possible precision and resolution - precise quantitative analysis of discrete flood layers using magnetic hysteresis measurements and First-order reversal curves (FORCs) as well as conventional X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (Philips PW1404) have been conducted. FORCs are obtained with an Alternating Gradient Force Magnetometer and have exceptional high sensitivity (1 x 10-11 A m2) that allows samples smaller than 200 milligrams to be measured. This means that sediments representing a band of less than a couple of millimeters in the lake sediment cores can be sampled without notable contamination from adjacent non-flood sediments, and analyzed with a high degree of precision (analytical

  4. High Resolution Global Electrical Conductivity Variations in the Earth's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelbert, A.; Sun, J.; Egbert, G. D.

    2013-12-01

    Electrical conductivity of the Earth's mantle is a valuable constraint on the water content and melting processes. In Kelbert et al. (2009), we obtained the first global inverse model of electrical conductivity in the mantle capable of providing constraints on the lateral variations in mantle water content. However, in doing so we had to compromise on the problem complexity by using the historically very primitive ionospheric and magnetospheric source assumptions. In particular, possible model contamination by the auroral current systems had greatly restricted our use of available data. We have now addressed this problem by inverting for the external sources along with the electrical conductivity variations. In this study, we still focus primarily on long period data that are dominated by quasi-zonal source fields. The improved understanding of the ionospheric sources allows us to invert the magnetic fields directly, without a correction for the source and/or the use of transfer functions. It allows us to extend the period range of available data to 1.2 days - 102 days, achieving better sensitivity to the upper mantle and transition zone structures. Finally, once the source effects in the data are accounted for, a much larger subset of observatories may be used in the electrical conductivity inversion. Here, we use full magnetic fields at 207 geomagnetic observatories, which include mid-latitude, equatorial and high latitude data. Observatory hourly means from the years 1958-2010 are employed. The improved quality and spatial distribution of the data set, as well as the high resolution modeling and inversion using degree and order 40 spherical harmonics mapped to a 2x2 degree lateral grid, all contribute to the much improved resolution of our models, representing a conceptual step forward in global electromagnetic sounding. We present a fully three-dimensional, global electrical conductivity model of the Earth's mantle as inferred from ground geomagnetic

  5. High-resolution MRI encoding using radiofrequency phase gradients.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Jonathan C; King, Scott B; Deng, Qunli; Volotovskyy, Vyacheslav; Tomanek, Boguslaw

    2013-11-01

    Although MRI offers highly diagnostic medical imagery, patient access to this modality worldwide is very limited when compared with X-ray or ultrasound. One reason for this is the expense and complexity of the equipment used to generate the switched magnetic fields necessary for MRI encoding. These field gradients are also responsible for intense acoustic noise and have the potential to induce nerve stimulation. We present results with a new MRI encoding principle which operates entirely without the use of conventional B0 field gradients. This new approach--'Transmit Array Spatial Encoding' (TRASE)--uses only the resonant radiofrequency (RF) field to produce Fourier spatial encoding equivalent to conventional MRI. k-space traversal (image encoding) is achieved by spin refocusing with phase gradient transmit fields in spin echo trains. A transmit coil array, driven by just a single transmitter channel, was constructed to produce four phase gradient fields, which allows the encoding of two orthogonal spatial axes. High-resolution two-dimensional-encoded in vivo MR images of hand and wrist were obtained at 0.2 T. TRASE exploits RF field phase gradients, and offers the possibility of very low-cost diagnostics and novel experiments exploiting unique capabilities, such as imaging without disturbance of the main B0 magnetic field. Lower field imaging (<1 T) and micro-imaging are favorable application domains as, in both cases, it is technically easier to achieve the short RF pulses desirable for long echo trains, and also to limit RF power deposition. As TRASE is simply an alternative mechanism (and technology) of moving through k space, there are many close analogies between it and conventional B0 -encoded techniques. TRASE is compatible with both B0 gradient encoding and parallel imaging, and so hybrid sequences containing all three spatial encoding approaches are possible.

  6. High-resolution geomagnetic field modeling and forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukhovitskaya, Veronika

    2010-12-01

    We use geomagnetic observatory data, survey data and satellite data from the CHAMP, Oersted, MAGSAT, DE-2 and POGO missions to derive two time-dependent spherical harmonic models of Earth's magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary: one for the years 1957-2009 and the other for the years 2001-2009 (in order to investigate the limits of core field resolution with the most recent, highly accurate data). We pay particular attention to observatory and satellite data analysis and to spatial and temporal data distributions in order to separate external and internal fields. Our approach is to produce models with varying spatial roughness and to examine them with respect to correlations with known structures of core and crustal fields. The final models are consistent with other main field models in their general structure, but show differences predominantly in places where main field features are known to be complex (e.g. the South Atlantic Anomaly). Thus, the models reveal a more detailed spatial and temporal structure of the magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary. Such high-resolution models can be used to infer small-scale core surface flows and core dynamics. We use the 1957-2009 geomagnetic field model to derive time-dependent core flow models and produce hindcasts of the Earth's main magnetic field. The goal of this study is to explore whether we can accurately forecast changes in geomagnetic secular variation by advecting core-surface flows forward in time and accounting for torsional oscillations. We compare hindcasts produced over different time intervals and computed from steady and time-varying core flow models, and also consider differently parametrized core flows (such as steady flow, steadily accelerated flow and steadily accelerated flow with torsional oscillations). We find that the steadily accelerated flow plus torsional oscillations is able to accurately reproduce changes in the Earth's magnetic field for short-term (5 years) and medium-term (13

  7. Investigating the potential applications of a Raman tweezer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wray, John Casey

    This thesis describes the construction of an Optical Tweezer apparatus to be used in conjunction with a confocal Raman spectrometer. The tweezer utilizes an infrared (e=1064 nm) laser directed into an inverted microscope with NA=1.4 oil immersion 100x objective lens that strongly focuses the laser light into a sample to function as a single-beam gradient force trap. The long term goal of this research program is to develop a single molecule Raman tweezers apparatus that allows one to control the position of a Raman nanoplasmonic amplifier. This thesis describes the construction of the Raman tweezer apparatus along with several Raman spectra obtained from optically trapped samples of polystyrene fluorescent orange, amine-modified latex beads. In addition, I explored the Raman spectra of bulk cytochrome c mixed with or injected onto Ag aggregates for SERs enhancement.

  8. Optical tweezers for studying taxis in parasites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Fontes, A.; Stahl, C. V.; Pozzo, L. Y.; Ayres, D. C.; Almeida, D. B.; Farias, P. M. A.; Santos, B. S.; Santos-Mallet, J.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Giorgio, S.; Feder, D.; Cesar, C. L.

    2011-04-01

    In this work we present a methodology to measure force strengths and directions of living parasites with an optical tweezers setup. These measurements were used to study the parasites chemotaxis in real time. We observed behavior and measured the force of: (i) Leishmania amazonensis in the presence of two glucose gradients; (ii) Trypanosoma cruzi in the vicinity of the digestive system walls, and (iii) Trypanosoma rangeli in the vicinity of salivary glands as a function of distance. Our results clearly show a chemotactic behavior in every case. This methodology can be used to study any type of taxis, such as chemotaxis, osmotaxis, thermotaxis, phototaxis, of any kind of living microorganisms. These studies can help us to understand the microorganism sensory systems and their response function to these gradients.

  9. Optical manipulation of lipid and polymer nanotubes with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, Joseph E.; Kishore, Rani; Pfefferkorn, Candace; Wells, Jeffrey; Helmerson, Kristian; Howell, Peter; Vreeland, Wyatt; Forry, Samuel; Locascio, Laurie; Reyes-Hernandez, Darwin; Gaitan, Michael

    2004-10-01

    Using optical tweezers and microfluidics, we stretch either the lipid or polymer membranes of liposomes or polymersomes, respectively, into long nanotubes. The membranes can be grabbed directly with the optical tweezers to produce sub-micron diameter tubes that are several hundred microns in length. We can stretch tubes up to a centimeter in length, limited only by the travel of our microscope stage. We also demonstrate the cross linking of a pulled polymer nanotube.

  10. Development of eddy current microscopy for high resolution electrical conductivity imaging using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalladega, V.; Sathish, S.; Jata, K. V.; Blodgett, M. P.

    2008-07-01

    We present a high resolution electrical conductivity imaging technique based on the principles of eddy current and atomic force microscopy (AFM). An electromagnetic coil is used to generate eddy currents in an electrically conducting material. The eddy currents generated in the conducting sample are detected and measured with a magnetic tip attached to a flexible cantilever of an AFM. The eddy current generation and its interaction with the magnetic tip cantilever are theoretically modeled using monopole approximation. The model is used to estimate the eddy current force between the magnetic tip and the electrically conducting sample. The theoretical model is also used to choose a magnetic tip-cantilever system with appropriate magnetic field and spring constant to facilitate the design of a high resolution electrical conductivity imaging system. The force between the tip and the sample due to eddy currents is measured as a function of the separation distance and compared to the model in a single crystal copper. Images of electrical conductivity variations in a polycrystalline dual phase titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) sample are obtained by scanning the magnetic tip-cantilever held at a standoff distance from the sample surface. The contrast in the image is explained based on the electrical conductivity and eddy current force between the magnetic tip and the sample. The spatial resolution of the eddy current imaging system is determined by imaging carbon nanofibers in a polymer matrix. The advantages, limitations, and applications of the technique are discussed.

  11. Giant quiescent solar filament observed with high-resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuckein, C.; Verma, M.; Denker, C.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: An extremely large filament was studied in various layers of the solar atmosphere. The inferred physical parameters and the morphological aspects are compared with smaller quiescent filaments. Methods: A giant quiet-Sun filament was observed with the high-resolution Echelle spectrograph at the Vacuum Tower Telescope at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain, on 2011 November 15. A mosaic of spectra (ten maps of 100″ × 182″) was recorded simultaneously in the chromospheric absorption lines Hα and Na i D2. Physical parameters of the filament plasma were derived using cloud model (CM) inversions and line core fits. The spectra were complemented with full-disk filtergrams (He i λ10830 Å, Hα, and Ca ii K) of the Chromospheric Telescope (ChroTel) and full-disk magnetograms of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). Results: The filament had extremely large linear dimensions (~817 arcsec), which corresponds to about 658 Mm along a great circle on the solar surface. A total amount of 175119 Hα contrast profiles were inverted using the CM approach. The inferred mean line-of-sight (LOS) velocity, Doppler width, and source function were similar to previous works of smaller quiescent filaments. However, the derived optical thickness was higher. LOS velocity trends inferred from the Hα line core fits were in accord but weaker than those obtained with CM inversions. Signatures of counter-streaming flows were detected in the filament. The largest brightening conglomerates in the line core of Na i D2 coincided well with small-scale magnetic fields as seen by HMI. Mixed magnetic polarities were detected close to the ends of barbs. The computation of photospheric horizontal flows based on HMI magnetograms revealed flow kernels with a size of 5-8 Mm and velocities of 0.30-0.45 km s-1 at the ends of the filament. Conclusions: The physical properties of extremely large filaments are similar to their smaller counterparts, except for the optical thickness, which in

  12. High resolution integral holography using Fourier ptychographic approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaohui; Zhang, Jianqi; Wang, Xiaorui; Liu, Delian

    2014-12-29

    An innovative approach is proposed for calculating high resolution computer generated integral holograms by using the Fourier Ptychographic (FP) algorithm. The approach initializes a high resolution complex hologram with a random guess, and then stitches together low resolution multi-view images, synthesized from the elemental images captured by integral imaging (II), to recover the high resolution hologram through an iterative retrieval with FP constrains. This paper begins with an analysis of the principle of hologram synthesis from multi-projections, followed by an accurate determination of the constrains required in the Fourier ptychographic integral-holography (FPIH). Next, the procedure of the approach is described in detail. Finally, optical reconstructions are performed and the results are demonstrated. Theoretical analysis and experiments show that our proposed approach can reconstruct 3D scenes with high resolution.

  13. Update on High-Resolution Geodetically Controlled LROC Polar Mosaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archinal, B.; Lee, E.; Weller, L.; Richie, J.; Edmundson, K.; Laura, J.; Robinson, M.; Speyerer, E.; Boyd, A.; Bowman-Cisneros, E.; Wagner, R.; Nefian, A.

    2015-10-01

    We describe progress on high-resolution (1 m/pixel) geodetically controlled LROC mosaics of the lunar poles, which can be used for locating illumination resources (for solar power or cold traps) or landing site and surface operations planning.

  14. High Resolution CryoFESEM of Microbial Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlandsen, Stanley; Lei, Ming; Martin-Lacave, Ines; Dunny, Gary; Wells, Carol

    2003-08-01

    The outer surfaces of three microorganisms, Giardia lamblia, Enterococcus faecalis, and Proteus mirabilis, were investigated by cryo-immobilization followed by sublimation of extracellular ice and cryocoating with either Pt alone or Pt plus carbon. Cryocoated samples were examined at [minus sign]125°C in either an in-lens field emission SEM or a below-the-lens field emission SEM. Cryocoating with Pt alone was sufficient for low magnification observation, but attempts to do high-resolution imaging resulted in radiolysis and cracking of the specimen surface. Double coating with Pt and carbon, in combination with high resolution backscatter electron detectors, enabled high-resolution imaging of the glycocalyx of bacteria, revealing a sponge-like network over the surface. High resolution examination of bacterial flagella also revealed a periodic substructure. Common artifacts included radiolysis leading to “cracking” of the surface, and insufficient deposition of Pt resulting in the absence of detectable surface topography.

  15. High resolution difference schemes for compressible gas dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, P.; Colella, P.

    1980-07-30

    The advantages and disadvantages of four new high-resolution difference schemes, namely the von Neumann-Richtmyer, Godunovs, MUSCL and Glimms, for mathematically representing physical conditions in compressible gas flows are compared. (LCL)

  16. Methodology of high-resolution photography for mural condition database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, R.; Suzuki, T.; Shibata, M.; Taniguchi, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Digital documentation is one of the most useful techniques to record the condition of cultural heritage. Recently, high-resolution images become increasingly useful because it is possible to show general views of mural paintings and also detailed mural conditions in a single image. As mural paintings are damaged by environmental stresses, it is necessary to record the details of painting condition on high-resolution base maps. Unfortunately, the cost of high-resolution photography and the difficulty of operating its instruments and software have commonly been an impediment for researchers and conservators. However, the recent development of graphic software makes its operation simpler and less expensive. In this paper, we suggest a new approach to make digital heritage inventories without special instruments, based on our recent our research project in Üzümlü church in Cappadocia, Turkey. This method enables us to achieve a high-resolution image database with low costs, short time, and limited human resources.

  17. AVHRR/1-FM Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The advanced very high resolution radiometer is discussed. The program covers design, construction, and test of a breadboard model, engineering model, protoflight model, mechanical/structural model, and a life test model. Special bench test and calibration equipment was developed for use on the program. The flight model program objectives were to fabricate, assemble and test four of the advanced very high resolution radiometers along with a bench cooler and collimator.

  18. Volumetric expiratory high-resolution CT of the lung.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Mizuki; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2004-11-01

    We developed a volumetric expiratory high-resolution CT (HRCT) protocol that provides combined inspiratory and expiratory volumetric imaging of the lung without increasing radiation exposure, and conducted a preliminary feasibility assessment of this protocol to evaluate diffuse lung disease with small airway abnormalities. The volumetric expiratory high-resolution CT increased the detectability of the conducting airway to the areas of air trapping (P<0.0001), and added significant information about extent and distribution of air trapping (P<0.0001).

  19. High-resolution MRI of spinal cords by compressive sensing parallel imaging.

    PubMed

    Peng Li; Xiangdong Yu; Griffin, Jay; Levine, Jonathan M; Jim Ji

    2015-08-01

    Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) is a common injury due to diseases or accidents. Noninvasive imaging methods play a critical role in diagnosing SCI and monitoring the response to therapy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), by the virtue of providing excellent soft tissue contrast, is the most promising imaging method for this application. However, spinal cord has a very small cross-section, which needs high-resolution images for better visualization and diagnosis. Acquiring high-resolution spinal cord MRI images requires long acquisition time due to the physical and physiological constraints. Moreover, long acquisition time makes MRI more susceptible to motion artifacts. In this paper, we studied the application of compressive sensing (CS) and parallel imaging to achieve high-resolution imaging from sparsely sampled and reduced k-space data acquired by parallel receive arrays. In particular, the studies are limited to the effects of 2D Cartesian sampling with different subsampling schemes and reduction factors. The results show that compressive sensing parallel MRI has the potential to provide high-resolution images of the spinal cord in 1/3 of the acquisition time required by the conventional methods.

  20. High resolution squid magnetometry for non-destructive evaluation. Final report, 1 September 1987-30 April 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Wikswo, J.P.

    1993-04-30

    Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers offer promise as multi-mode instruments capable of obtaining high resolution images of extremely low frequency injected currents or eddy currents, and they can be configured to image the magnetic susceptibility of titanium, aluminum and nonmetallic composites. While high resolution SQUID magnetometers will generally be noisier than conventional SQUIDs, the small coils and reduced coil-to-source spacing more than compensate to provide low-noise, high-resolution images. The high spatial resolution which can be obtained with SQUID magnetometers, the unparalleled sensitivity of SQUIDs at low frequencies, the ability to measure weak perturbations in strong applied magnetic fields, and the ability to discriminate against external sources of noise should make SQUID magnetometers well suited for NDE of deep flaws in aluminum and titanium aerostructures. To explore SQUID NDE, the authors have developed research facilities that include the high-resolution MicroSQUID magnetometer, a magnetic shield, a scanning stage, and a computer-based control and data acquisition system. Using this instrumentation, they have imaged magnetic fields produced by sources as varied as intrinsic currents due to corrosion or Johnson noise, remanent magnetization from ferromagnetic contamination, flaw-induced perturbations in either injected current or eddy currents induced by an AC field, Johnson noise currents in a copper ring, persistent currents in high transition-temperature superconductors, distributions of dia- or paramagnetism in an AC or DC magnetic field, and surface flaws decorated with a paramagnetic tracer.