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Sample records for high-resolution x-ray computed

  1. Mechanisms of Porphyroblast Crystallization: Results from High-Resolution Computed X-ray Tomography.

    PubMed

    Carlson, W D; Denison, C

    1992-08-28

    Quantitative three-dimensional analysis of rock textures is now possible with the use of high-resolution computed x-ray tomography. When applied to metamorphic rocks, this technique provides data on the sizes and positions of minerals that allow mechanisms of porphyroblast crystallization to be identified. Statistical analysis of the sizes and spatial disposition of thousands of garnet crystals in three regionally metamorphosed rocks with diverse mineralogies, in conjunction with simple numerical models for crystallization, reveals in all cases the dominance of crystallization mechanisms whose kinetics are governed by rates of intergranular diffusion of nutrients. PMID:17742755

  2. Mechanisms of Porphyroblast Crystallization: Results from High-Resolution Computed X-ray Tomography.

    PubMed

    Carlson, W D; Denison, C

    1992-08-28

    Quantitative three-dimensional analysis of rock textures is now possible with the use of high-resolution computed x-ray tomography. When applied to metamorphic rocks, this technique provides data on the sizes and positions of minerals that allow mechanisms of porphyroblast crystallization to be identified. Statistical analysis of the sizes and spatial disposition of thousands of garnet crystals in three regionally metamorphosed rocks with diverse mineralogies, in conjunction with simple numerical models for crystallization, reveals in all cases the dominance of crystallization mechanisms whose kinetics are governed by rates of intergranular diffusion of nutrients.

  3. High-resolution x-ray computed tomography to understand ruminant phylogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costeur, Loic; Schulz, Georg; Müller, Bert

    2014-09-01

    High-resolution X-ray computed tomography has become a vital technique to study fossils down to the true micrometer level. Paleontological research requires the non-destructive analysis of internal structures of fossil specimens. We show how X-ray computed tomography enables us to visualize the inner ear of extinct and extant ruminants without skull destruction. The inner ear, a sensory organ for hearing and balance has a rather complex three-dimensional morphology and thus provides relevant phylogenetical information what has been to date essentially shown in primates. We made visible the inner ears of a set of living and fossil ruminants using the phoenix x-ray nanotom®m (GE Sensing and Inspection Technologies GmbH). Because of the high absorbing objects a tungsten target was used and the experiments were performed with maximum accelerating voltage of 180 kV and a beam current of 30 μA. Possible stem ruminants of the living families are known in the fossil record but extreme morphological convergences in external structures such as teeth is a strong limitation to our understanding of the evolutionary history of this economically important group of animals. We thus investigate the inner ear to assess its phylogenetical potential for ruminants and our first results show strong family-level morphological differences.

  4. Breast tumor segmentation in high resolution x-ray phase contrast analyzer based computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Brun, E.; Grandl, S.; Sztrókay-Gaul, A.; Gasilov, S.; Barbone, G.; Mittone, A.; Coan, P.; Bravin, A.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Phase contrast computed tomography has emerged as an imaging method, which is able to outperform present day clinical mammography in breast tumor visualization while maintaining an equivalent average dose. To this day, no segmentation technique takes into account the specificity of the phase contrast signal. In this study, the authors propose a new mathematical framework for human-guided breast tumor segmentation. This method has been applied to high-resolution images of excised human organs, each of several gigabytes. Methods: The authors present a segmentation procedure based on the viscous watershed transform and demonstrate the efficacy of this method on analyzer based phase contrast images. The segmentation of tumors inside two full human breasts is then shown as an example of this procedure’s possible applications. Results: A correct and precise identification of the tumor boundaries was obtained and confirmed by manual contouring performed independently by four experienced radiologists. Conclusions: The authors demonstrate that applying the watershed viscous transform allows them to perform the segmentation of tumors in high-resolution x-ray analyzer based phase contrast breast computed tomography images. Combining the additional information provided by the segmentation procedure with the already high definition of morphological details and tissue boundaries offered by phase contrast imaging techniques, will represent a valuable multistep procedure to be used in future medical diagnostic applications.

  5. High-resolution X-ray computed tomography scanning of primate copulatory plugs.

    PubMed

    Parga, Joyce A; Maga, Murat; Overdorff, Deborah J

    2006-04-01

    In this study, high-resolution computed tomography X-ray scanning was used to scan ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) copulatory plugs. This method produced accurate measures of plug volume and surface area, but was not useful for visualizing plug internal structure. Copulatory plug size was of interest because it may relate to male fertilization success. Copulatory plugs form from coagulated ejaculate, and are routinely displaced in this species by the penis of a subsequent mate during copulation (Parga [2003] Int. J. Primatol. 24:889-899). Because one potential function of these plugs may be to preclude or delay other males' successful insemination of females, we tested the hypothesis that larger plugs are more difficult for subsequent males to displace. Plugs were collected opportunistically upon displacement during data collection on L. catta mating behavior on St. Catherines Island, Georgia (USA) during two subsequent breeding seasons. Copulatory plugs exhibited a wide range of volumes: 1,758-5,013.6 mm3 (n = 9). Intraindividual differences in plug volume were sometimes greater than interindividual differences. Contrary to predictions, larger plugs were not more time-consuming for males to displace via penile intromission during copulation. Nor were plugs with longer vaginal residence times notably smaller than plugs with shorter residence times, as might be expected if plugs disintegrate while releasing sperm (Asdell [1946] Patterns of Mammalian Reproduction; Ithaca: Comstock). We found a significant inverse correlation between number of copulatory mounts leading to ejaculation and copulatory plug volume. This may indicate that if males are sufficiently sexually aroused to reach ejaculation in fewer mounts, they tend to produce ejaculates of greater volume. PMID:16345065

  6. High Resolution X-ray Computed Tomography: An Emerging Tool for Small Animal Cancer Research1

    PubMed Central

    Paulus, Michael J; Gleason, Shaun S; Kennel, Stephen J; Hunsicker, Patricia R; Johnson, Dabney K

    2000-01-01

    Abstract Dedicated high-resolution small animal imaging systems have recently emerged as important new tools for cancer research. These new imaging systems permit researchers to noninvasively screen animals for mutations or pathologies and to monitor disease progression and response to therapy. One imaging modality, X-ray microcomputed tomography (microCT) shows promise as a cost-effective means for detecting and characterizing soft-tissue structures, skeletal abnormalities, and tumors in live animals. MicroCT systems provide high-resolution images (typically 50 microns or less), rapid data acquisition (typically 5 to 30 minutes), excellent sensitivity to skeletal tissue and good sensitivity to soft tissue, particularly when contrast-enhancing media are employed. The development of microCT technology for small animal imaging is reviewed, and key considerations for designing small animal microCT imaging protocols are summarized. Recent studies on mouse prostate, lung and bone tumor models are overviewed. PMID:10933069

  7. Structural analysis of advanced polymeric foams by means of high resolution X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacucchi, M.; De Pascalis, F.; Scatto, M.; Capodieci, L.; Albertoni, R.

    2016-06-01

    Advanced polymeric foams with enhanced thermal insulation and mechanical properties are used in a wide range of industrial applications. The properties of a foam strongly depend upon its cell structure. Traditionally, their microstructure has been studied using 2D imaging systems based on optical or electron microscopy, with the obvious disadvantage that only the surface of the sample can be analysed. To overcome this shortcoming, the adoption of X-ray micro-tomography imaging is here suggested to allow for a complete 3D, non-destructive analysis of advanced polymeric foams. Unlike metallic foams, the resolution of the reconstructed structural features is hampered by the low contrast in the images due to weak X-ray absorption in the polymer. In this work an advanced methodology based on high-resolution and low-contrast techniques is used to perform quantitative analyses on both closed and open cells foams. Local structural features of individual cells such as equivalent diameter, sphericity, anisotropy and orientation are statistically evaluated. In addition, thickness and length of the struts are determined, underlining the key role played by the achieved resolution. In perspective, the quantitative description of these structural features will be used to evaluate the results of in situ mechanical and thermal test on foam samples.

  8. Reciprocal Grids: A Hierarchical Algorithm for Computing Solution X-ray Scattering Curves from Supramolecular Complexes at High Resolution.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Avi; Ben-Nun, Tal; Asor, Roi; Shemesh, Asaf; Ringel, Israel; Raviv, Uri

    2016-08-22

    In many biochemical processes large biomolecular assemblies play important roles. X-ray scattering is a label-free bulk method that can probe the structure of large self-assembled complexes in solution. As we demonstrate in this paper, solution X-ray scattering can measure complex supramolecular assemblies at high sensitivity and resolution. At high resolution, however, data analysis of larger complexes is computationally demanding. We present an efficient method to compute the scattering curves from complex structures over a wide range of scattering angles. In our computational method, structures are defined as hierarchical trees in which repeating subunits are docked into their assembly symmetries, describing the manner subunits repeat in the structure (in other words, the locations and orientations of the repeating subunits). The amplitude of the assembly is calculated by computing the amplitudes of the basic subunits on 3D reciprocal-space grids, moving up in the hierarchy, calculating the grids of larger structures, and repeating this process for all the leaves and nodes of the tree. For very large structures, we developed a hybrid method that sums grids of smaller subunits in order to avoid numerical artifacts. We developed protocols for obtaining high-resolution solution X-ray scattering data from taxol-free microtubules at a wide range of scattering angles. We then validated our method by adequately modeling these high-resolution data. The higher speed and accuracy of our method, over existing methods, is demonstrated for smaller structures: short microtubule and tobacco mosaic virus. Our algorithm may be integrated into various structure prediction computational tools, simulations, and theoretical models, and provide means for testing their predicted structural model, by calculating the expected X-ray scattering curve and comparing with experimental data. PMID:27410762

  9. High resolution solar X-ray studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Two high resolution solar X-ray payloads and their launches on Aerobee rockets with pointing system are described. The payloads included 5 to 25A X-ray spectrometers, multiaperture X-ray cameras, and command box attitude control inflight by means of a television image radioed to ground. Spatial resolution ranged from five arc minutes to ten arc seconds and spectral resolution ranged from 500 to 3000. Several laboratory tasks were completed in order to achieve the desired resolution. These included (1) development of techniques to align grid collimators, (2) studies of the spectrometric properties of crystals, (3) measurements of the absorption coefficients of various materials used in X-ray spectrometers, (4) evaluation of the performance of multiaperture cameras, and (5) development of facilities.

  10. Analysis of intraindividual and intraspecific variation in semicircular canal dimensions using high-resolution x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Welker, Kelli L; Orkin, Joseph D; Ryan, Timothy M

    2009-10-01

    The semicircular canal system tracks head rotation and provides sensory input for the reflexive stabilization of gaze and posture. The purpose of this study was to investigate the intraspecific and intraindividual variation in the size of the three semicircular canals. The right and left temporal bones were extracted from 31 individuals of the short-tailed shrew (Blarina brevicauda) and scanned on a high-resolution x-ray computed tomography system. The radius of curvature was calculated for each of the three semicircular canals for each side. Paired t-tests and independent sample t-tests indicated no significant differences in canal size between the right and left canals of the same individuals or between those of males and females of the same species. Pearson product moment correlation analyses demonstrated that there was no significant correlation between canal size and body mass in this sample. PMID:19619167

  11. Petrophysical analysis of limestone rocks by nuclear logging and 3D high-resolution X-ray computed microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, M. F. S.; Lima, I.; Ferrucio, P. L.; Abreu, C. J.; Borghi, L.; Lopes, R. T.

    2011-10-01

    This study presents the pore-space system analysis of the 2-ITAB-1-RJ well cores, which were drilled in the São José do Itaboraí Basin, in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. The analysis presented herein has been developed based on two techniques: nuclear logging and 3D high-resolution X-ray computed microtomography. Nuclear logging has been proven to be the technique that provides better quality and more quantitative information about the porosity using radioactive sources. The Density Gamma Probe and the Neutron Sonde used in this work provide qualitative information about bulk density variations and compensated porosity of the geological formation. The samples obtained from the well cores were analyzed by microtomography. The use of this technique in sedimentary rocks allows quantitative evaluation of pore system and generates high-resolution 3D images (˜microns order). The images and data obtained by microtomography were integrated with the response obtained by nuclear logging. The results obtained by these two techniques allow the understanding of the pore-size distribution and connectivity, as well as the porosity values. Both techniques are important and they complement each other.

  12. High-Resolution X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ODell, Stephen L.; Brissenden, Roger J.; Davis, William; Elsner, Ronald F.; Elvis, Martin; Freeman, Mark; Gaetz, Terry; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhail V.

    2010-01-01

    Fundamental needs for future x-ray telescopes: a) Sharp images => excellent angular resolution. b) High throughput => large aperture areas. Generation-X optics technical challenges: a) High resolution => precision mirrors & alignment. b) Large apertures => lots of lightweight mirrors. Innovation needed for technical readiness: a) 4 top-level error terms contribute to image size. b) There are approaches to controlling those errors. Innovation needed for manufacturing readiness. Programmatic issues are comparably challenging.

  13. High resolution X-ray computed tomography studies of Grasberg porphyry Cu-Au ores, Papua, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyle, J. Richard; Mote, Alison S.; Ketcham, Richard A.

    2008-07-01

    High-resolution X-ray computed tomography (HRXCT) provides unique information of the geological and metallurgical significance for gold and related ore minerals in the supergiant Grasberg porphyry Cu-Au deposit. Digital radiographs have proved to be an effective means of screening samples for the presence of gold for HRXCT studies. Digital radiograph effectiveness is limited by the thickness of samples (typically to ≤2 cm), as well as the associated minerals. Thus, preselecting samples for gold studies using HRXCT is most effective using digital radiographs combined with assay information. Differentiating between metallic mineral grains with relatively small differences in density, e.g., bornite (5.1 g/cm3) from chalcopyrite (4.2 g/cm3), is relatively straightforward for isolated monominerallic grains or composites in a similar lower-density matrix, but difficulties are encountered with the interpretation of typical intergrown ore minerals. X-ray beam-hardening artifacts lead to inconsistency in attenuation determination, both within and among slice images, complicating quantitative processing. However, differentiation of chalcopyrite and bornite has been successful in smaller-diameter (≤22-mm) cores of Grasberg ores. Small-diameter (≤10 mm) cores of the Grasberg stockwork Cu-Au ore were analyzed using HRXCT methods scanned at the minimum spacing currently available (7.5 μm), and data reduction protocols using the Blob3D program were modified to improve the quantification of grain sizes and shapes. Grains as small as 6.5 μm have been identified. All of these grains are in direct contact with chalcopyrite, providing support for gold distribution in porphyry copper systems being a result of exsolution from copper sulfides. HRXCT scanning (±digital radiography) precisely defines the in situ location of mineral grains of interest within a sample, which then can be studied in conventional petrographic sections, and other types of analytical studies conducted, e

  14. Changes in bone macro- and microstructure in diabetic obese mice revealed by high resolution microfocus X-ray computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kerckhofs, G.; Durand, M.; Vangoitsenhoven, R.; Marin, C.; Van der Schueren, B.; Carmeliet, G.; Luyten, F. P.; Geris, L.; Vandamme, K.

    2016-01-01

    High resolution microfocus X-ray computed tomography (HR-microCT) was employed to characterize the structural alterations of the cortical and trabecular bone in a mouse model of obesity-driven type 2 diabetes (T2DM). C57Bl/6J mice were randomly assigned for 14 weeks to either a control diet-fed (CTRL) or a high fat diet (HFD)-fed group developing obesity, hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance. The HFD group showed an increased trabecular thickness and a decreased trabecular number compared to CTRL animals. Midshaft tibia intracortical porosity was assessed at two spatial image resolutions. At 2 μm scale, no change was observed in the intracortical structure. At 1 μm scale, a decrease in the cortical vascular porosity of the HFD bone was evidenced. The study of a group of 8 week old animals corresponding to animals at the start of the diet challenge revealed that the decreased vascular porosity was T2DM-dependant and not related to the ageing process. Our results offer an unprecedented ultra-characterization of the T2DM compromised skeletal micro-architecture and highlight an unrevealed T2DM-related decrease in the cortical vascular porosity, potentially affecting the bone health and fragility. Additionally, it provides some insights into the technical challenge facing the assessment of the rodent bone structure using HR-microCT imaging. PMID:27759061

  15. Precise 3D dimensional metrology using high-resolution x-ray computed tomography (μCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunke, Oliver; Santillan, Javier; Suppes, Alexander

    2010-09-01

    Over the past decade computed tomography (CT) with conventional x-ray sources has evolved from an imaging method in medicine to a well established technology for industrial applications in fields such as material science, light metals and plastics processing, microelectronics and geology. By using modern microfocus and nanofocus X-ray tubes, parts can be scanned with sub-micrometer resolutions. Currently, micro-CT is a technology increasingly used for metrology applications in the automotive industry. CT offers big advantages compared with conventional tactile or optical coordinate measuring machines (CMMs). This is of greater importance if complex parts with hidden or difficult accessible surfaces have to be measured. In these cases, CT offers the advantage of a high density of measurement points and a non-destructive and fast capturing of the sample's complete geometry. When using this growing technology the question arises how precise a μCT based CMM can measure as compared to conventional and established methods for coordinate measurements. For characterizing the metrological capabilities of a tactile or optical CMM, internationally standardized parameters like length measurement error and probing error are defined and used. To increase the acceptance of CT as a metrological method, our work seeks to clarify the definition and usage of parameters used in the field of metrology as these apply to CT. In this paper, an overview of the process chain in CT based metrology will be given and metrological characteristics will be described. For the potential user of CT as 3D metrology tool it is important to show the measurement accuracy and repeatability on realistic samples. Following a discussion of CT metrology techniques, two samples are discussed. The first compares a measured CT Data set to CAD data using CMM data as a standard for comparison of results. The second data second realistic data set will compare the results of applying both the CMM method of

  16. High resolution cone beam X-ray computed tomography of 3D-microstructures of cast Al-alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kastner, Johann; Harrer, Bernhard; Degischer, H. Peter

    2011-01-15

    X-ray computed tomography (XCT) has become a very important method for non-destructive 3D-characterisation of materials. XCT systems with cone beam geometry, micro- or nano-focus tubes and matrix detectors are increasingly used in research and non-destructive testing. Spatial resolutions down to 1 {mu}m can be reached with such XCT-systems for heterogeneities in metals with high absorption contrast. High resolution cone beam XCT is applied to five different Al-alloys: AlMg5Si7, AlCu4Mg1, AlZn6Mg2Cu2, AlZn8Mg2Cu2 and AlSi12Ni1. Up to four different types of inhomogeneities are segmented in one alloy using voxel sizes between (0.4 {mu}m){sup 3} and (2.3 {mu}m){sup 3}. Target metallography and elemental analysis by energy dispersive X-ray analysis are used to identify the inhomogeneities. The possibilities and restrictions of XCT applied to Al-alloys are discussed. AlMg5Si7 XCT-data with a voxel size of (0.4 {mu}m){sup 3} show inhomogeneities with brighter grey-values than the Al-matrix identified as elongated Fe-aluminides, and those with lower grey-values identified as pores and Mg{sub 2}Si-particles with a 'Chinese script-like' structure. Higher-absorbing interdendritic Al-Al{sub 2}Cu-eutectic regions appear brighter than the Al-dendrites in the CT-data of AlCu4Mg1 with (1.1 {mu}m){sup 3}/voxel, whereas pores > 4 {mu}m appear darker than the Al-matrix. The size and the 3D-structure of the {alpha}-Al dendrite arms with a diameter of 50-100 {mu}m are determined in samples from chill cast billets of AlCu4Mg1 and AlZn6Mg2Cu2 alloys. The irregular interdendritic regions containing eutectic segregations with Cu- and Zn-rich phases are > 5 {mu}m wide. Equally absorbing primary equi-axed Al{sub 3}(Sc, Zr) particles > 5 {mu}m are distinguished in the centres of the dendrites by the level of sphericity values. The distribution of Ni- and Fe-aluminides in a squeeze cast AlSi12Ni1-alloy is imaged with (0.4 {mu}m){sup 3}/voxel, but the Si-phase cannot be segmented.

  17. Development of a lab-scale, high-resolution, tube-generated X-ray computed-tomography system for three-dimensional (3D) materials characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Mertens, J.C.E. Williams, J.J. Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2014-06-01

    The design and construction of a modular high resolution X-ray computed tomography (XCT) system is highlighted in this paper. The design approach is detailed for meeting a specified set of instrument performance goals tailored towards experimental versatility and high resolution imaging. The XCT tool is unique in the detector and X-ray source design configuration, enabling control in the balance between detection efficiency and spatial resolution. The system package is also unique: The sample manipulation approach implemented enables a wide gamut of in situ experimentation to analyze structure evolution under applied stimulus, by optimizing scan conditions through a high degree of controllability. The component selection and design process is detailed: Incorporated components are specified, custom designs are shared, and the approach for their integration into a fully functional XCT scanner is provided. Custom designs discussed include the dual-target X-ray source cradle which maintains position and trajectory of the beam between the two X-ray target configurations with respect to a scintillator mounting and positioning assembly and the imaging sensor, as well as a novel large-format X-ray detector with enhanced adaptability. The instrument is discussed from an operational point of view, including the details of data acquisition and processing implemented for 3D imaging via micro-CT. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated on a silica-glass particle/hydroxyl-terminated-polybutadiene (HTPB) matrix binder PBX simulant. Post-scan data processing, specifically segmentation of the sample's relevant microstructure from the 3D reconstruction, is provided to demonstrate the utility of the instrument. - Highlights: • Custom built X-ray tomography system for microstructural characterization • Detector design for maximizing polychromatic X-ray detection efficiency • X-ray design offered for maximizing X-ray flux with respect to imaging resolution • Novel lab

  18. The skull of the Round Island boa, Casarea dussumieri Schlegel, based on high-resolution X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Maisano, Jessica Anderson; Rieppel, Olivier

    2007-05-01

    The skull of the rare bolyeriid snake Casarea dussumieri is described in detail based on high-resolution X-ray CT data. Bolyeriids are unique in their possession of a separate suborbital ossification and a maxilla subdivided into two movably jointed parts, which may be the result of paedomorphic truncation of the development of the maxilla from multiple ossification centers. Comparison of the skull of C. dussumieri to that of larger booids suggests additional paedomorphic features including reduction of the dorsal lamina of the nasal and prefrontal and reduction of their contacts with the frontal, limited posterior extent of the posterior free process of the supratemporal, and reduction of the coronoid and splenial. The observations herein do not resolve competing phylogenetic hypotheses based on morphology, which either place tropidophiids as the sister-taxon of bolyeriids, Acrochordus and colubroids, or place bolyeriids as the sister-taxon of the other three. But these observations provide no support whatsoever for the heterodox placement of tropidophiids at the base of alethinophidian snakes, as obtained recently with molecular data.

  19. The skull of the Round Island boa, Casarea dussumieri Schlegel, based on high-resolution X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Maisano, Jessica Anderson; Rieppel, Olivier

    2007-05-01

    The skull of the rare bolyeriid snake Casarea dussumieri is described in detail based on high-resolution X-ray CT data. Bolyeriids are unique in their possession of a separate suborbital ossification and a maxilla subdivided into two movably jointed parts, which may be the result of paedomorphic truncation of the development of the maxilla from multiple ossification centers. Comparison of the skull of C. dussumieri to that of larger booids suggests additional paedomorphic features including reduction of the dorsal lamina of the nasal and prefrontal and reduction of their contacts with the frontal, limited posterior extent of the posterior free process of the supratemporal, and reduction of the coronoid and splenial. The observations herein do not resolve competing phylogenetic hypotheses based on morphology, which either place tropidophiids as the sister-taxon of bolyeriids, Acrochordus and colubroids, or place bolyeriids as the sister-taxon of the other three. But these observations provide no support whatsoever for the heterodox placement of tropidophiids at the base of alethinophidian snakes, as obtained recently with molecular data. PMID:17309080

  20. High resolution x-ray microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, C. K.; Park, H.; Lombardo, L. W.; Piestrup, M. A.; Cremer, J. T.; Pantell, R. H.; Dudchik, Y. I.

    2007-04-30

    The authors present x-ray images of grid meshes and biological material obtained using a microspot x-ray tube with a multilayer optic and a 92-element parabolic compound refractive lens (CRL) made of a plastic containing only hydrogen and carbon. Images obtained using this apparatus are compared with those using an area source with a spherical lens and a spherical lens with multilayer condenser. The authors found the best image quality using the multilayer condenser with a parabolic lens, compared to images with a spherical lens and without the multilayer optics. The resolution was measured using a 155-element parabolic CRL and a multilayer condenser with the microspot tube. The experiment demonstrates about 1.1 {mu}m resolution.

  1. Fabricating High-Resolution X-Ray Collimators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Michael; Atkinson, James E.; Fraser, Iain; Klinger, Jill

    2008-01-01

    A process and method for fabricating multi-grid, high-resolution rotating modulation collimators for arcsecond and sub-arcsecond x-ray and gamma-ray imaging involves photochemical machining and precision stack lamination. The special fixturing and etching techniques that have been developed are used for the fabrication of multiple high-resolution grids on a single array substrate. This technology has application in solar and astrophysics and in a number of medical imaging applications including mammography, computed tomography (CT), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and gamma cameras used in nuclear medicine. This collimator improvement can also be used in non-destructive testing, hydrodynamic weapons testing, and microbeam radiation therapy.

  2. High-resolution X-ray Multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Martynov, V.V.; Platonov, Yu.; Kazimirov, A.; Bilderback, D.H.

    2004-05-12

    Two new approaches are taken in multilayer fabrication to help bridge the gap in bandwidth between traditional multilayers (1 to 2%) and perfect crystals (0.01%). The first approach is based on creating many layers of low-contrast Al2O3/ B4C materials. The second approach is based on using multilayer structures with a small d-spacing using traditional W/B4C and Mo/B4C materials. With 8 keV x-rays on the Chess A2 beamline, we measured a bandwidth of 0.27% with a reflectivity of 40% and a Darwin width of 17 arc seconds from a 26 A d-spacing multilayer with 800 bi-layers of Al2O3/B4C using the low-contrast approach. On the other hand, the short period approach with a W/B4C multilayer and a 14.8 A d-spacing showed a resolution of 0.5 % and a reflectivity of 58.5%. Two more Mo/B4C samples with d-spacings of 15 A and 20 A showed energy resolutions of 0.25% and 0.52% with corresponding reflectivities of 39% and 66%. Thus we observe that both methods can produce useful x-ray optical components.

  3. Microbeam X-Ray Standing Wave and High Resolution Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kazimirov, A.; Bilderback, D.H.; Huang, R.; Sirenko, A.

    2004-05-12

    Post-focusing collimating optics are introduced as a tool to condition X-ray microbeams for the use in high-resolution X-ray diffraction and scattering techniques. As an example, a one-bounce imaging capillary and miniature Si(004) channel-cut crystal were used to produce a microbeam with 10 {mu}m size and an ultimate angular resolution of 2.5 arc sec. This beam was used to measure the strain in semiconductor microstructures by using X-ray high resolution diffraction and standing wave techniques to {delta}d/d < 5x10-4.

  4. High Resolution X-Ray Explorer (HIREX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1999-01-01

    SAO has carried out a study to determine the feasibility of building an orbiting telescope capable of resolving 7 km structure on the Sun. In order to achieve the required imaging the telescope must have a resolution 0.01 arcsec. This fact challenges the state of the art of orbiting telescopes in several areas: mirror figuring; optical metrology; optical mounting; mirror figure control; system alignment; optical stability; observatory pointing; and image stability image stability. The telescope design concept is based on a 0.6m Cassegrain-style telescope with a 240 meter effective focal length. This is achieved with 2 mirrors supported at opposite ends of a 27 m space-deployable boom. The telescope mirrors are coated with multilayers designed to reflect a broad XUV passband. A third, small mirror, near the focal plane performs the function of selecting the narrow band that is finally imaged. Image stabilization to the 0.005 a,rcsec level is achieved by active control of the secondary mirror. The primary mirror is held unadjustably to the spacecraft, its pointing set by the space- craft orientation. The secondary mirror is mounted on a 6-axis stage that permits its position to be changed to align the telescope in space. The stage is intended for intermittent adjustment, both because of its speed of travel, and the TBD alignment procedure. The third mirror is called the TXI (Tuneable X-ray Imager). It is mounted on a gimbal that permits it to be tipped over a 60 degree range, selecting between the individual wavelengths in the initial bandpass. It can also rotated completely out of the way to allow the full, broadband EUV flux to strike the focal plane.

  5. High Resolution X-Ray Explorer (HIREX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goulb, Leon

    1997-01-01

    SAO is involved in a study to determine the feasibility of building an orbiting telescope capable of resolving 7 km structure on the Sun. In order to achieve the required imaging the telescope must have a resolution 0.01 arcsec. This fact challenges the state of the art of orbiting telescopes in several areas: Mirror Figuring; Optical Metrology; Optical Mounting; Mirror Figure Control; System Alignment; Optical Stability; Observatory Pointing; and Image Stability. The telescope design concept is based on a 0.6 m Gregorian-style telescope with a 240 meter effective focal length. This is achieved with 2 mirrors supported at opposite ends of a 35 m space-deployable boom. The telescope mirrors are coated with multilayers designed to reflect a broad XUV passband. A third, small mirror, near the focal plane performs the function of selecting the narrow band that is finally imaged. Image stabilization to the 0.005 arcsec level is achieved by active control of the secondary mirror. The primary mirror is held unadjustably to the spacecraft, its pointing set by the spacecraft orientation. The secondary mirror is mounted on a 6-axis stage that permits its position to be changed to align the telescope in space. The stage is intended for intermittent adjustment, both because of its speed of travel, and the TBD alignment procedure. The third mirror is called the TXI (Tuneable X-ray Imager). It is mounted on a gimbal that permits it to be tipped over a 60 degree range, selecting between the individual wavelengths in the initial bandpass. It can also rotated completely out of the way to allow the full, broadband EUV flux to strike the focal plane. Finally, the focal plane assembly is designed to rotate on the outer edge of a circle centered on the TXI mirror rotation axis. This permits the focal plane to move to the location that the TXI redirects the light once it has been set to a given wavelength response. The Engineering Study is divided into the following areas: Mirror

  6. Chandra X-Ray Observatory High Resolution Mirror Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This is a photograph of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO), formerly Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) integration at the X-Ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The AXAF was renamed CXO in 1999. The CXO is the most sophisticated and the world's most powerful x-ray telescope ever built. It observes x-rays from high-energy regions of the universe, such as hot gas in the remnants of exploded stars. The HRMA, the heart of the telescope system, is contained in the cylindrical 'telescope' portion of the observatory. Since high-energy x-rays would penetrate a normal mirror, special cylindrical mirrors were created. The two sets of four nested mirrors resemble tubes within tubes. Incoming x-rays graze off the highly polished mirror surface and are furneled to the instrument section for detection and study. MSFC's XRCF is the world's largest, most advanced laboratory for simulating x-ray emissions from distant celestial objects. It produces a space-like environment in which components related to x-ray telescope imaging are tested and the quality of their performances in space is predicted. TRW, Inc. was the prime contractor for the development of the CXO and NASA's MSFC was responsible for its project management. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations of the CXO for NASA from Cambridge, Massachusetts. The CXO was launched July 22, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-93).

  7. Chandra X-Ray Observatory High Resolution Mirror Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This is a photograph of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO), formerly Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) integration at the X-Ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The AXAF was renamed CXO in 1999. The CXO is the most sophisticated and the world's most powerful x-ray telescope ever built. It observes x-rays from high-energy regions of the universe, such as hot gas in the remnants of exploded stars. The HRMA, the heart of the telescope system, is contained in the cylindrical 'telescope' portion of the observatory. Since high-energy x-rays would penetrate a normal mirror, special cylindrical mirrors were created. The two sets of four nested mirrors resemble tubes within tubes. Incoming x-rays graze off the highly polished mirror surface and are furneled to the instrument section for detection and study. MSFC's XRCF is the world's largest, most advanced laboratory for simulating x-ray emissions from distant celestial objects. It produces a space-like environment in which components related to x-ray telescope imaging are tested and the quality of their performances in space is predicted. TRW, Inc. was the prime contractor for the development of the CXO and NASA's MSCF was responsible for its project management. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations of the CXO for NASA from Cambridge, Massachusetts. The CXO was launched July 22, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-93).

  8. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Silver, E.H.; Legros, M.; Madden, N.W.; Goulding, F.; Landis, D.

    1998-07-07

    A broad bandwidth high resolution X-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces X-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available X-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for X-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical X-ray and particle spectroscopy. 6 figs.

  9. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Silver, Eric H.; Legros, Mark; Madden, Norm W.; Goulding, Fred; Landis, Don

    1998-01-01

    A broad bandwidth high resolution x-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces x-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available x-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for x-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical x-ray and particle spectroscopy.

  10. Progress in high-resolution x-ray holographic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Howells, M.; McQuaid, K.; Rothman, S.; Feder, R.; Sayre, D.

    1987-07-01

    Among the various types of x-ray microscopes that have been demonstrated, the holographic microscope has had the largest gap between promise and performance. The difficulties of fabricating x-ray optical elements have led some to view holography as the most attractive method for obtaining the ultimate in high resolution x-ray micrographs; however, we know of no investigations prior to 1987 that clearly demonstrated submicron resolution in reconstructed images. Previous efforts suffered from problems such as limited resolution and dynamic range in the recording media, low coherent x-ray flux, and aberrations and diffraction limits in visible light reconstruction. We have addressed the recording limitations through the use of an undulator x-ray source and high-resolution photoresist recording media. For improved results in the readout and reconstruction steps, we have employed metal shadowing and transmission electron microscopy, along with numerical reconstruction techniques. We believe that this approach will allow holography to emerge as a practical method of high-resolution x-ray microscopy. 30 refs., 4 figs.

  11. High-resolution x-ray phase tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peele, Andrew G.; Thomas, C. David L.; Clement, John G.; Arhatari, Benedicta D.; Hannah, Kevin M.; Doshi, Chandni; Putkunz, Corey T.; Clark, Jesse N.

    2010-09-01

    X-ray tomography is a workhorse tool of non-destructive imaging. It is used to probe three-dimensional structures across a wide range of length scales for objects that offer good absorption contrast to x-rays. In recent years extremely high resolution imaging (on the order of tens of nanometres) has become possible due to technological advances in x-ray optics. At the same time the requirement for strong absorption contrast has been relaxed thanks to the advent of new experimental and algorithmic techniques in phase imaging. Advances in both resolution and phase imaging can be combined to image biological samples at the sub-cellular level. I will report on recent advances in our work including improvements to the current approaches in extracting phase information at high resolution from measurements of the diffracted intensity from a sample. I will also discuss our current experimental status.

  12. Three-Dimensional Imaging and Numerical Reconstruction of Graphite/Epoxy Composite Microstructure Based on Ultra-High Resolution X-Ray Computed Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czabaj, M. W.; Riccio, M. L.; Whitacre, W. W.

    2014-01-01

    A combined experimental and computational study aimed at high-resolution 3D imaging, visualization, and numerical reconstruction of fiber-reinforced polymer microstructures at the fiber length scale is presented. To this end, a sample of graphite/epoxy composite was imaged at sub-micron resolution using a 3D X-ray computed tomography microscope. Next, a novel segmentation algorithm was developed, based on concepts adopted from computer vision and multi-target tracking, to detect and estimate, with high accuracy, the position of individual fibers in a volume of the imaged composite. In the current implementation, the segmentation algorithm was based on Global Nearest Neighbor data-association architecture, a Kalman filter estimator, and several novel algorithms for virtualfiber stitching, smoothing, and overlap removal. The segmentation algorithm was used on a sub-volume of the imaged composite, detecting 508 individual fibers. The segmentation data were qualitatively compared to the tomographic data, demonstrating high accuracy of the numerical reconstruction. Moreover, the data were used to quantify a) the relative distribution of individual-fiber cross sections within the imaged sub-volume, and b) the local fiber misorientation relative to the global fiber axis. Finally, the segmentation data were converted using commercially available finite element (FE) software to generate a detailed FE mesh of the composite volume. The methodology described herein demonstrates the feasibility of realizing an FE-based, virtual-testing framework for graphite/fiber composites at the constituent level.

  13. Chandra X-Ray Observatory High Resolution Mirror Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This photograph shows the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO), formerly Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) being removed from the test structure in the X-Ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The AXAF was renamed CXO in 1999. The CXO is the most sophisticated and the world's most powerful x-ray telescope ever built. It observes x-rays from high-energy regions of the universe, such as hot gas in the remnants of exploded stars. The HRMA, the heart of the telescope system, is contained in the cylindrical 'telescope' portion of the observatory. Since high-energy x-rays would penetrate a normal mirror, special cylindrical mirrors were created. The two sets of four nested mirrors resemble tubes within tubes. Incoming x-rays graze off the highly polished mirror surface and are furneled to the instrument section for detection and study. MSFC's XRCF is the world's largest, most advanced laboratory for simulating x-ray emissions from distant celestial objects. It produces a space-like environment in which components related to x-ray telescope imaging are tested and the quality of their performances in space is predicted. TRW, Inc. was the prime contractor for the development of the CXO and NASA's MSFC was responsible for its project management. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations of the CXO for NASA from Cambridge, Massachusetts. The CXO was launched July 22, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-93).

  14. Chandra X-Ray Observatory High Resolution Mirror Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This photograph shows the Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO), formerly Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) being removed from the test structure in the X-Ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The AXAF was renamed CXO in 1999. The CXO is the most sophisticated and the world's most powerful x-ray telescope ever built. It observes x-rays from high-energy regions of the universe, such as hot gas in the remnants of exploded stars. The HRMA, the heart of the telescope system, is contained in the cylindrical 'telescope' portion of the observatory. Since high-energy x-rays would penetrate a normal mirror, special cylindrical mirrors were created. The two sets of four nested mirrors resemble tubes within tubes. Incoming x-rays graze off the highly polished mirror surface and are furneled to the instrument section for detection and study. MSFC's XRCF is the world's largest, most advanced laboratory for simulating x-ray emissions from distant celestial objects. It produces a space-like environment in which components related to x-ray telescope imaging are tested and the quality of their performances in space is predicted. TRW, Inc. was the prime contractor for the development of the CXO and NASA's MSFC was responsible for its project management. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations of the CXO for NASA from Cambridge, Massachusetts. The CXO was launched July 22, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-93).

  15. Note: Design and construction of a multi-scale, high-resolution, tube-generated X-Ray computed-tomography system for three-dimensional (3D) imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mertens, J. C. E.; Williams, J. J.; Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2014-01-15

    The design and construction of a high resolution modular x-ray computed tomography (XCT) system is described. The approach for meeting a specified set of performance goals tailored toward experimental versatility is highlighted. The instrument is unique in its detector and x-ray source configuration, both of which enable elevated optimization of spatial and temporal resolution. The process for component selection is provided. The selected components are specified, the custom component design discussed, and the integration of both into a fully functional XCT instrument is outlined. The novelty of this design is a new lab-scale detector and imaging optimization through x-ray source and detector modularity.

  16. High resolution collimator system for X-ray detector

    DOEpatents

    Eberhard, Jeffrey W.; Cain, Dallas E.

    1987-01-01

    High resolution in an X-ray computerized tomography (CT) inspection system is achieved by using a collimator/detector combination to limit the beam width of the X-ray beam incident on a detector element to the desired resolution width. In a detector such as a high pressure Xenon detector array, a narrow tapered collimator is provided above a wide detector element. The collimator slits have any desired width, as small as a few mils at the top, the slit width is easily controlled, and they are fabricated on standard machines. The slit length determines the slice thickness of the CT image.

  17. Chandra X-Ray Observatory High Resolution Mirror Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This photograph shows the mirrors of the High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) for the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO), formerly Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), being assembled in the Eastman Kodak Company in Rochester, New York. The AXAF was renamed CXO in 1999. The CXO is the most sophisticated and the world's most powerful x-ray telescope ever built. It observes x-rays from high-energy regions of the universe, such as hot gas in the remnants of exploded stars. The HRMA, the heart of the telescope system, is contained in the cylindrical 'telescope' portion of the observatory. Since high-energy x-rays would penetrate a normal mirror, special cylindrical mirrors were created. The two sets of four nested mirrors resemble tubes within tubes. Incoming x-rays graze off the highly polished mirror surface and are furneled to the instrument section for detection and study. TRW, Inc. was the prime contractor for the development of the CXO and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center was responsible for its project management. The Observatory was launched July 22, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, STS-93 mission.

  18. Robust phase retrieval for high resolution edge illumination x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography in non-ideal environments

    PubMed Central

    Zamir, Anna; Endrizzi, Marco; Hagen, Charlotte K.; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Urbani, Luca; De Coppi, Paolo; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Edge illumination x-ray phase contrast tomography is a recently developed imaging technique which enables three-dimensional visualisation of low-absorbing materials. Dedicated phase retrieval algorithms can provide separate computed tomography (CT) maps of sample absorption, refraction and scattering properties. In this paper we propose a novel “modified local retrieval” method which is capable of accurately retrieving sample properties in a range of realistic, non-ideal imaging environments. These include system misalignment, defects in the used optical elements and system geometry variations over time due to vibrations or temperature fluctuations. System instabilities were analysed, modelled and incorporated into a simulation study. As a result, an additional modification was introduced to the retrieval procedure to account for changes in the imaging system over time, as well as local variations over the field of view. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated in comparison to a previously used “global retrieval” method by applying both approaches to experimental CT data of a rat’s heart acquired in a non-ideal environment. The use of the proposed method resulted in the removal of major artefacts, leading to a significant improvement in image quality. This method will therefore enable acquiring high-resolution, reliable CT data of large samples in realistic settings. PMID:27502296

  19. Robust phase retrieval for high resolution edge illumination x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography in non-ideal environments.

    PubMed

    Zamir, Anna; Endrizzi, Marco; Hagen, Charlotte K; Vittoria, Fabio A; Urbani, Luca; De Coppi, Paolo; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Edge illumination x-ray phase contrast tomography is a recently developed imaging technique which enables three-dimensional visualisation of low-absorbing materials. Dedicated phase retrieval algorithms can provide separate computed tomography (CT) maps of sample absorption, refraction and scattering properties. In this paper we propose a novel "modified local retrieval" method which is capable of accurately retrieving sample properties in a range of realistic, non-ideal imaging environments. These include system misalignment, defects in the used optical elements and system geometry variations over time due to vibrations or temperature fluctuations. System instabilities were analysed, modelled and incorporated into a simulation study. As a result, an additional modification was introduced to the retrieval procedure to account for changes in the imaging system over time, as well as local variations over the field of view. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated in comparison to a previously used "global retrieval" method by applying both approaches to experimental CT data of a rat's heart acquired in a non-ideal environment. The use of the proposed method resulted in the removal of major artefacts, leading to a significant improvement in image quality. This method will therefore enable acquiring high-resolution, reliable CT data of large samples in realistic settings. PMID:27502296

  20. Robust phase retrieval for high resolution edge illumination x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography in non-ideal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamir, Anna; Endrizzi, Marco; Hagen, Charlotte K.; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Urbani, Luca; de Coppi, Paolo; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    Edge illumination x-ray phase contrast tomography is a recently developed imaging technique which enables three-dimensional visualisation of low-absorbing materials. Dedicated phase retrieval algorithms can provide separate computed tomography (CT) maps of sample absorption, refraction and scattering properties. In this paper we propose a novel “modified local retrieval” method which is capable of accurately retrieving sample properties in a range of realistic, non-ideal imaging environments. These include system misalignment, defects in the used optical elements and system geometry variations over time due to vibrations or temperature fluctuations. System instabilities were analysed, modelled and incorporated into a simulation study. As a result, an additional modification was introduced to the retrieval procedure to account for changes in the imaging system over time, as well as local variations over the field of view. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated in comparison to a previously used “global retrieval” method by applying both approaches to experimental CT data of a rat’s heart acquired in a non-ideal environment. The use of the proposed method resulted in the removal of major artefacts, leading to a significant improvement in image quality. This method will therefore enable acquiring high-resolution, reliable CT data of large samples in realistic settings.

  1. UT-CT: A National Resource for Applications of High-Resolution X-ray Computed Tomography in the Geological Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, W. D.; Ketcham, R. A.; Rowe, T. B.

    2002-12-01

    An NSF-sponsored (EAR-IF) shared multi-user facility dedicated to research applications of high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT) in the geological sciences has been in operation since 1997 at the University of Texas at Austin. The centerpiece of the facility is an industrial CT scanner custom-designed for geological applications. Because the instrument can optimize trade-offs among penetrating ability, spatial resolution, density discrimination, imaging modes, and scan times, it can image a very broad range of geological specimens and materials, and thus offers significant advantages over medical scanners and desktop microtomographs. Two tungsten-target X-ray sources (200-kV microfocal and 420-kV) and three X-ray detectors (image-intensifier, high-sensitivity cadmium tungstate linear array, and high-resolution gadolinium-oxysulfide radiographic line scanner) can be used in various combinations to meet specific imaging goals. Further flexibility is provided by multiple imaging modes: second-generation (translate-rotate), third-generation (rotate-only; centered and variably offset), and cone-beam (volume CT). The instrument can accommodate specimens as small as about 1 mm on a side, and as large as 0.5 m in diameter and 1.5 m tall. Applications in petrology and structural geology include measuring crystal sizes and locations to identify mechanisms governing the kinetics of metamorphic reactions; visualizing relationships between alteration zones and abundant macrodiamonds in Siberian eclogites to elucidate metasomatic processes in the mantle; characterizing morphologies of spiral inclusion trails in garnet to test hypotheses of porphyroblast rotation during growth; measuring vesicle size distributions in basaltic flows for determination of elevation at the time of eruption to constrain timing and rates of continental uplift; analysis of the geometry, connectivity, and tortuosity of migmatite leucosomes to define the topology of melt flow paths, for numerical

  2. The Astro-E High Resolution X-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Richard L.; Audley, Michael D.; Boyce, Kevin R.; Breon, Susan R.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Gendreau, Keith C.; Holt, Stephen S.; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; McCammon, Dan; Mihara, Tatehiro

    1999-01-01

    The Astro-E High Resolution X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) was developed jointly by the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science in Japan. The instrument is based on a new approach to spectroscopy, the X-ray microcalorimeter. This device senses the energies of individual X-ray photons as heat with extreme precision. A 32 channel array of microcalorimeters is being employed, each with an energy resolution of about 12 eV at 6 keV (the Fe-K region). This will provide spectral resolving power 10 times higher than any other non-dispersive X-ray spectrometer. The instrument incorporates a three stage cooling system capable of operating the array at 60 mK for about two years in orbit. The array sits at the focus of a grazing incidence conical mirror. The quantum efficiency of the microcalorimeters and the reflectivity of the X-ray mirror system combine to give high throughput over the 0.3-12 keV energy band. This new capability will enable the study of a wide range of high-energy astrophysical sources with unprecedented spectral sensitivity. This paper presents the basic design requirements and implementation of the XRS, and also describes the instrument parameters and performance.

  3. Experimental Study of High-Temperature Fracture Propagation in Anthracite and Destruction of Mudstone from Coalfield Using High-Resolution Microfocus X-ray Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yang; Lu, Jun-Hui; Wang, Cai-Ping; Deng, Jun

    2016-09-01

    The coalfield fire is determined by fractures of coal and rock that provide tunnel for gases and heat exchange. To study fracture propagation at high temperatures, high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to scan anthracite and mudstone samples collected from the Qinshui coalfield, Shanxi Province, northern China. The samples were scanned at 100 °C intervals as they were subjected to temperatures of up to 500 °C. Three-dimensional images were reconstructed by the CT software to analyze changes in the fractures and pores in the samples. The experimental results show that fracturing of anthracite began at 200 °C. The generation rate of fractures in the coal samples increases slowly below 300 °C, but above 300 °C there is a sharp increase in fracture development. This indicates that the thermal fracturing temperature threshold for anthracite is 300 °C. During the experiment, it was found that preexisting fractures, voids, and regenerative fractures formed around the hard portions of anthracite particles or along the weak boundaries between particles. Some regenerative fractures developed along the fabric of the relatively crystalline particles within the particle and terminate at the edge of the particle or where the fracture encounters a harder portion of coal. Some fractures even expanded enough to be transformed into voids as temperatures rose. In the mudstone, the porosity changed suddenly at 300 °C. This indicated that there was a void generated at 200 °C, but the void expanded when the temperature was increased. However, changes in the void were not obvious from 200 to 300 °C.

  4. Technical note: a landmark-based approach to the study of the ear ossicles using ultra-high-resolution X-ray computed tomography data.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jodi L; Cole, Theodore M; Silcox, Mary T

    2011-08-01

    Previous study of the ear ossicles in Primates has demonstrated that they vary on both functional and phylogenetic bases. Such studies have generally employed two-dimensional linear measurements rather than three-dimensional data. The availability of Ultra- high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (UhrCT) has made it possible to accurately image the ossicles so that broadly accepted methodologies for acquiring and studying morphometric data can be applied. Using UhrCT data also allows for the ossicular chain to be studied in anatomical position, so that it is possible to consider the spatial and size relationships of all three bones. One issue impeding the morphometric study of the ear ossicles is a lack of broadly recognized landmarks. Distinguishing landmarks on the ossicles is difficult in part because there are only two areas of articulation in the ossicular chain, one of which (the malleus/incus articulation) has a complex three-dimensional form. A measurement error study is presented demonstrating that a suite of 16 landmarks can be precisely located on reconstructions of the ossicles from UhrCT data. Estimates of measurement error showed that most landmarks were highly replicable, with an average CV for associated interlandmark distances of less than 3%. The positions of these landmarks are chosen to reflect not only the overall shape of the bones in the chain and their relative positions, but also functional parameters. This study should provide a basis for further examination of the smallest bones in the body in three dimensions. PMID:21732321

  5. High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy of SN 1006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vink, Jacco

    2005-06-01

    I discuss the high resolution XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) spectrum of SN 1006. SN 1006 is one of the best examples of a supernova remnant that is far out of ionization equilibrium. Moreover, optical, UV and X-ray data indicate that it is also out of temperature equilibrium. I discuss the X-ray evidence for this. In addition I discuss the lower resolution RGS spectrum of the eastern rim of SN 1006. Despite the lower resolution, the spectrum contains significant evidence for an asymmetric expansion velocity. Two likely solutions fit the O VII triplet. One with no significant thermal broadening and a shell velocity of ~ 6500 km s-1, and one with significant broadening and a shell velocity of 9500 km s -1. The first solution seems the most plausible, as it is consistent with radio expansion measurements, which suggests a decelerated shell.

  6. High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan

    We propose to design and build the first imaging hard X-ray detector system that incorporates 3D stacking of closely packed detector readouts in finely-spaced imaging arrays with their required data processing and control electronics. In virtually all imaging astronomical detectors, detector readout is done with flex connectors or connections that are not vertical but rather horizontal , requiring loss of focal plane area. For high resolution pixel detectors needed for high speed event-based X-ray imaging, from low energy applications (CMOS) with focusing X-ray telescopes, to hard X-ray applications with pixelated CZT for large area coded aperture telescopes, this new detector development offers great promise. We propose to extend our previous and current APRA supported ProtoEXIST program that has developed the first large area imaging CZT detectors and demonstrated their astrophysical capabilities on two successful balloon flight to a next generation High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI), which would incorporate microvia technology for the first time to connect the readout ASIC on each CZT crystal directly to its control and data processing system. This 3-dimensional stacking of detector and readout/control system means that large area (>2m2) imaging detector planes for a High Resolution Wide-field hard X-ray telescope can be built with initially greatly reduced detector gaps and ultimately with no gaps. This increases detector area, efficiency, and simplicity of detector integration. Thus higher sensitivity wide-field imagers will be possible at lower cost. HREXI will enable a post-Swift NASA mission such as the EREXS concept proposed to PCOS to be conducted as a future MIDEX mission. This mission would conduct a high resolution (<2 arcmin) , broad band (5 200 keV) hard X-ray survey of black holes on all scales with ~10X higher sensitivity than Swift. In the current era of Time Domain Astrophysics, such a survey capability, in conjunction with a n

  7. Johann Spectrometer for High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Machek, Pavel; Froeba, Michael; Welter, Edmund; Caliebe, Wolfgang; Brueggmann, Ulf; Draeger, Guenter

    2007-01-19

    A newly designed vacuum Johann spectrometer with a large focusing analyzer crystal for inelastic x-ray scattering and high resolution fluorescence spectroscopy has been installed at the DORIS III storage ring. Spherically bent crystals with a maximum diameter of 125 mm, and cylindrically bent crystals are employed as dispersive optical elements. Standard radius of curvature of the crystals is 1000 mm, however, the design of the mechanical components also facilitates measurements with smaller and larger bending radii. Up to four crystals are mounted on a revolving crystal changer which enables crystal changes without breaking the vacuum. The spectrometer works at fixed Bragg angle. It is preferably designed for the measurements in non-scanning mode with a broad beam spot, and offers a large flexibility to set the sample to the optimum position inside the Rowland circle. A deep depletion CCD camera is employed as a position sensitive detector to collect the energy-analyzed photons on the circumference of the Rowland circle. The vacuum in the spectrometer tank is typically 10-6 mbar. The sample chamber is separated from the tank either by 25 {mu}m thick Kapton windows, which allows samples to be measured under ambient conditions, or by two gate valves. The spectrometer is currently installed at wiggler beamline W1 whose working range is 4-10.5 keV with typical flux at the sample of 5x1010photons/s/mm2. The capabilities of the spectrometer are illustrated by resonant inelastic experiments on 3d transition metals and rare earth compounds, and by chemical shift measurements on chromium compounds.

  8. Johann Spectrometer for High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machek, Pavel; Welter, Edmund; Caliebe, Wolfgang; Brüggmann, Ulf; Dräger, Günter; Fröba, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A newly designed vacuum Johann spectrometer with a large focusing analyzer crystal for inelastic x-ray scattering and high resolution fluorescence spectroscopy has been installed at the DORIS III storage ring. Spherically bent crystals with a maximum diameter of 125 mm, and cylindrically bent crystals are employed as dispersive optical elements. Standard radius of curvature of the crystals is 1000 mm, however, the design of the mechanical components also facilitates measurements with smaller and larger bending radii. Up to four crystals are mounted on a revolving crystal changer which enables crystal changes without breaking the vacuum. The spectrometer works at fixed Bragg angle. It is preferably designed for the measurements in non-scanning mode with a broad beam spot, and offers a large flexibility to set the sample to the optimum position inside the Rowland circle. A deep depletion CCD camera is employed as a position sensitive detector to collect the energy-analyzed photons on the circumference of the Rowland circle. The vacuum in the spectrometer tank is typically 10-6 mbar. The sample chamber is separated from the tank either by 25 μm thick Kapton windows, which allows samples to be measured under ambient conditions, or by two gate valves. The spectrometer is currently installed at wiggler beamline W1 whose working range is 4-10.5 keV with typical flux at the sample of 5×1010photons/s/mm2. The capabilities of the spectrometer are illustrated by resonant inelastic experiments on 3d transition metals and rare earth compounds, and by chemical shift measurements on chromium compounds.

  9. Development of high resolution imaging detectors for x ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, S. S.; Schwartz, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    This final report summarizes our past activities and discusses the work performed over the period of 1 April 1990 through 1 April 1991 on x-ray optics, soft x-ray (0.1 - 10 KeV) imaging detectors, and hard x-ray (10 - 300 KeV) imaging detectors. If microchannel plates (MCPs) can be used to focus x-rays with a high efficiency and good angular resolution, they will revolutionize the field of x-ray optics. An x-ray image of a point source through an array of square MCP pores compared favorably with our ray tracing model for the MCP. Initial analysis of this image demonstrates the feasibility of MCPs for soft x-rays. Our work continues with optimizing the performance of our soft x-ray MCP imaging detectors. This work involves readout technology that should provide improved MCP readout devices (thin film crossed grid, curved, and resistive sheets), defect removal in MCPs, and photocathode optimization. In the area of hard x-ray detector development we have developed two different techniques for producing a CsI photocathode thickness of 10 to 100 microns, such that it is thick enough to absorb the high energy x-rays and still allow the photoelectrons to escape to the top MCP of a modified soft x-ray imaging detector. The methods involve vacuum depositing a thick film of CsI on a strong back, and producing a converter device that takes the place of the photocathode.

  10. High resolution energy-sensitive digital X-ray

    DOEpatents

    Nygren, David R.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting an x-ray and for determining the depth of penetration of an x-ray into a semiconductor strip detector. In one embodiment, a semiconductor strip detector formed of semiconductor material is disposed in an edge-on orientation towards an x-ray source such that x-rays From the x-ray source are incident upon and substantially perpendicular to the front edge of the semiconductor strip detector. The semiconductor strip detector is formed of a plurality of segments. The segments are coupled together in a collinear arrangement such that the semiconductor strip detector has a length great enough such that substantially all of the x-rays incident on the front edge of the semiconductor strip detector interact with the semiconductor material which forms the semiconductor strip detector. A plurality of electrodes are connected to the semiconductor strip detect or such that each one of the of semiconductor strip detector segments has at least one of the of electrodes coupled thereto. A signal processor is also coupled to each one of the electrodes. The present detector detects an interaction within the semiconductor strip detector, between an x-ray and the semiconductor material, and also indicates the depth of penetration of the x-ray into the semiconductor strip detector at the time of the interaction.

  11. High resolution energy-sensitive digital X-ray

    DOEpatents

    Nygren, D.R.

    1995-07-18

    An apparatus and method for detecting an x-ray and for determining the depth of penetration of an x-ray into a semiconductor strip detector. In one embodiment, a semiconductor strip detector formed of semiconductor material is disposed in an edge-on orientation towards an x-ray source such that x-rays from the x-ray source are incident upon and substantially perpendicular to the front edge of the semiconductor strip detector. The semiconductor strip detector is formed of a plurality of segments. The segments are coupled together in a collinear arrangement such that the semiconductor strip detector has a length great enough such that substantially all of the x-rays incident on the front edge of the semiconductor strip detector interact with the semiconductor material which forms the semiconductor strip detector. A plurality of electrodes are connected to the semiconductor strip detector such that each one of the semiconductor strip detector segments has at least one of the of electrodes coupled thereto. A signal processor is also coupled to each one of the electrodes. The present detector detects an interaction within the semiconductor strip detector, between an x-ray and the semiconductor material, and also indicates the depth of penetration of the x-ray into the semiconductor strip detector at the time of the interaction. 5 figs.

  12. A ROSAT high resolution x ray image of NGC 1068

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, J.

    1993-01-01

    The soft x ray properties of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 are a crucial test of the 'hidden Seyfert 1' model. It is important to determine whether the soft x rays come from the nucleus, or from a number of other possible regions in the circumnuclear starburst disk. We present preliminary results of a ROSAT HRI observation of NGC 1068 obtained during the verification phase. The fraction of x rays that can be attributed to the nucleus is about 70 percent so the 'soft x ray problem' remains. There is also significant diffuse x ray flux on arcminute scales, which may be related to the 'diffuse ionized medium' seen in optical emission lines, and the highly ionized Fe K(alpha) emission seen by BBXRT.

  13. High Resolution X-ray-Induced Acoustic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Tang, Shanshan; Ahmad, Moiz; Xing, Lei

    2016-05-01

    Absorption based CT imaging has been an invaluable tool in medical diagnosis, biology, and materials science. However, CT requires a large set of projection data and high radiation dose to achieve superior image quality. In this letter, we report a new imaging modality, X-ray Induced Acoustic Tomography (XACT), which takes advantages of high sensitivity to X-ray absorption and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. A single projection X-ray exposure is sufficient to generate acoustic signals in 3D space because the X-ray generated acoustic waves are of a spherical nature and propagate in all directions from their point of generation. We demonstrate the successful reconstruction of gold fiducial markers with a spatial resolution of about 350 μm. XACT reveals a new imaging mechanism and provides uncharted opportunities for structural determination with X-ray.

  14. High Resolution X-ray-Induced Acoustic Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Tang, Shanshan; Ahmad, Moiz; Xing, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Absorption based CT imaging has been an invaluable tool in medical diagnosis, biology, and materials science. However, CT requires a large set of projection data and high radiation dose to achieve superior image quality. In this letter, we report a new imaging modality, X-ray Induced Acoustic Tomography (XACT), which takes advantages of high sensitivity to X-ray absorption and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. A single projection X-ray exposure is sufficient to generate acoustic signals in 3D space because the X-ray generated acoustic waves are of a spherical nature and propagate in all directions from their point of generation. We demonstrate the successful reconstruction of gold fiducial markers with a spatial resolution of about 350 μm. XACT reveals a new imaging mechanism and provides uncharted opportunities for structural determination with X-ray. PMID:27189746

  15. High Resolution Adjustable Mirror Control for X-ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    The goal of the proposed program is to enable increased angular resolution and collection areas for future major X-ray observatories by incorporating control of the mirror surfaces after fab-rication and mounting. We propose to develop and implement a method for preparing adjustable optics with integrated control elements on curved mirror segments for future X-ray space telescopes. Development of such mirror elements will provide a major advance to the field of X-ray astronomy, by enabling mirrors with half an arcsecond angular resolution using thin, lightweight glass to significantly increase the collection area. This is an enabling technology for mission concepts such as the X-ray Surveyor. This proposal supports NASA's goals of technical advancement of technologies suitable for future missions, and training of graduate students.

  16. Proceedings of the workshop on X-ray computed microtomography

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This report consists of vugraphs from the nine presentations at the conference. Titles of the presentations are: CMT: Applications and Techniques; Computer Microtomography Using X-rays from Third Generation Synchrotron X-ray; Approaches to Soft-X-ray Nanotomography; Diffraction Enhanced Tomography; X-ray Computed Microtomography Applications at the NSLS; XCMT Applications in Forestry and Forest Products; 3DMA: Investigating Three Dimensional Pore Geometry from High Resolution Images; X-ray Computed Microtomography Studies of Volcanic Rock; and 3-D Visualization of Tomographic Volumes.

  17. High resolution, low energy avalanche photodiode X-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, R.; Vanderpuye, K.; Entine, G.; Squillante, M. R.

    1991-01-01

    Silicon avalanche photodiodes have been fabricated, and their performance as X-ray detectors has been measured. Photon sensitivity and energy resolution were measured as a function of size and operating parameters. Noise thresholds as low as 212 eV were obtained at room temperature, and backscatter X-ray fluorescence data were obtained for aluminum and other light elements. It is concluded that the results with the X-ray detector are extremely encouraging, and the performance is challenging the best available proportional counters. While not at the performance level of either cryogenic silicon or HgI2, these device operate at room temperature and can be reproduced in large numbers and with much larger areas than typically achieved with HgI2. In addition, they are rugged and appear to be indefinitely stable.

  18. Future prospects for high resolution X-ray spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canizares, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    Capabilities of the X-ray spectroscopy payloads were compared. Comparison of capabilities of AXAF in the context of the science to be achieved is reported. The Einstein demonstrated the tremendous scientific power of spectroscopy to probe deeply the astrophysics of all types of celestial X-ray source. However, it has limitations in sensitivity and resolution. Each of the straw man instruments has a sensitivity that is at least an order of magnitude better than that of the Einstein FPSC. The AXAF promises powerful spectral capability.

  19. High energy, high resolution X-ray optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Joy, Marshall; Kahn, Steven

    1990-01-01

    The scientific goals of X-ray astronomy are considered to evaluate the relative advantages of using classical Wolter-1 optics or using a different approach. The portion of the X-ray band over 10 keV is unexploited in the present X-ray optics technology, and focussing in this portion of the band is crucial because nonfocussed experiments are background limited. The basic design of 'hard' X-ray optics is described theoretically emphasizing the very small angles of incidence in the grazing-incidence optics. Optimization of the signal-to-noise ratio is found to occur at a finite angular resolution. In real applications, the effective area reduced by the efficiency of the two reflections is 80 percent at energies up to 40 keV, and the quality of the reflecting surface can be monitored to minimize scattering. Focussing optics are found to offer improvements in signal-to-noise as well as more effective scientific return because microelectronic focal-plane technology is employed.

  20. Bendable X-ray Optics for High Resolution Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; Kilaru, K.; Atkins, C.; Broadway, D.

    2014-01-01

    Current state-of the-art for x-ray optics fabrication calls for either the polishing of massive substrates into high-angular-resolution mirrors or the replication of thin, lower-resolution, mirrors from perfectly figured mandrels. Future X-ray Missions will require a change in this optics fabrication paradigm in order to achieve sub-arcsecond resolution in light-weight optics. One possible approach to this is to start with perfectly flat, light-weight surface, bend it into a perfect cone, form the desired mirror figure by material deposition, and insert the resulting mirror into a telescope structure. Such an approach is currently being investigated at MSFC, and a status report will be presented detailing the results of finite element analyses, bending tests and differential deposition experiments.

  1. High Resolution X-Ray Spectra of WR 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huenemoerder, D.; Gayley, K.; Hamann, W.-R.; Ignace, R.; Nichols, J.; Oskinova, L. M.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Schulz, N.

    As WR 6 is a putatively single WN4 star, and is relatively bright (V = 6.9), it is an ideal case for studying the wind mechanisms in these extremely luminous stars. To obtain higher resolution spectra at higher energy (above 1 keV) than previously obtained with the XMM/Newton RGS, we have observed WR 6 with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer for 450 ks. We have resolved emission lines of S, Si, Mg, Ne, and Fe, which all show a “fin"-shaped prole, characteristic of a self-absorbed uniformly expanding shell. Steep blue edges gives robust maximal expansion velocities of about 2000 km/s, somewhat larger than the 1700km/s derived from UV lines. The He-like lines all indicate that X-ray emitting plasmas are far from the photosphere - even at the higher energies where opacity is lowest { as was also the case for the longer wavelength lines observed with XMM-Newton/RGS. Abundances determined from X-ray spectral modeling indicate enhancements consistent with nucleosynthesis. The star was also variable in X-rays and in simultaneous optical photometry obtained with Chandra aspect camera, but not coherently with the optically known period of 3.765 days.

  2. Cryogenic, high-resolution x-ray detector with high count rate capability

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Matthias; Mears, Carl A.; Labov, Simon E.; Hiller, Larry J.; Barfknecht, Andrew T.

    2003-03-04

    A cryogenic, high-resolution X-ray detector with high count rate capability has been invented. The new X-ray detector is based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), and operates without thermal stabilization at or below 500 mK. The X-ray detector exhibits good resolution (.about.5-20 eV FWHM) for soft X-rays in the keV region, and is capable of counting at count rates of more than 20,000 counts per second (cps). Simple, FET-based charge amplifiers, current amplifiers, or conventional spectroscopy shaping amplifiers can provide the electronic readout of this X-ray detector.

  3. High Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy with a Microcalorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Norrell, J.; Anderson, I.

    2005-01-01

    Energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) is often the preferred choice for X-ray microanalysis, but there are still many disadvantages associated with EDS, the most significant of which is the relatively poor energy resolution, which limits detection sensitivity and the ability to distinguish among closely spaced spectral features, limiting even qualitative analysis. A new type of EDS detector that operates on the principle of microcalorimetry has the potential to eliminate this shortcoming, reaching resolutions an order of magnitude better. The detector consists of an absorber in thermal contact with a transition edge sensor (TES). An X-ray from the specimen hits the absorber and manifests itself as a change in temperature. Because the system is kept at 80 mK, the heat capacity is low and the temperature spike is observable. The TES responds to the increase in temperature by transitioning from its superconducting to its normal conducting state, thus sharply raising the overall resistance of the circuit. The circuit is kept at a constant voltage, so the increase in resistance is manifested as a decrease in current flow. This decrease in current is measured by a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), and by integrating the current over time, the energy of the incident X-ray is determined. The prototype microcalorimeter was developed by NIST, and this technology is now available commercially through a partnership between Vericold Technologies and EDAX International. ORNL has received the first of these commercial microcalorimeters in the United States. The absorber in this detector is gold, and the TES consists of a gold-iridium bilayer. It is designed to offer spectral resolution of 10-15 eV at a count rate of ~150 s-1. The goal of this project was to analyze and document the performance of the detector, with particular attention given to the effects of an X-ray optic used to improve collection efficiency, the multiple window system and any other sources

  4. High resolution x-ray and gamma ray imaging using diffraction lenses with mechanically bent crystals

    DOEpatents

    Smither, Robert K.

    2008-12-23

    A method for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation is provided. High quality mechanically bent diffracting crystals of 0.1 mm radial width are used for focusing the radiation and directing the radiation to an array of detectors which is used for analyzing their addition to collect data as to the location of the source of radiation. A computer is used for converting the data to an image. The invention also provides for the use of a multi-component high resolution detector array and for narrow source and detector apertures.

  5. High Resolution X-Ray Diffraction of Macromolecules with Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stojanoff, Vivian; Boggon, Titus; Helliwell, John R.; Judge, Russell; Olczak, Alex; Snell, Edward H.; Siddons, D. Peter; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We recently combined synchrotron-based monochromatic X-ray diffraction topography methods with triple axis diffractometry and rocking curve measurements: high resolution X-ray diffraction imaging techniques, to better understand the quality of protein crystals. We discuss these methods in the light of results obtained on crystals grown under different conditions. These non destructive techniques are powerful tools in the characterization of the protein crystals and ultimately will allow to improve, develop, and understand protein crystal growth. High resolution X-ray diffraction imaging methods will be discussed in detail in light of recent results obtained on Hen Egg White Lysozyme crystals and other proteins.

  6. Very high resolution UV and X-ray spectroscopy and imagery of solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, M.; Brown, W. A.; Haisch, B. M.

    1987-01-01

    A scientific investigation of the physics of the solar atmosphere, which uses the techniques of high resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy and high resolution UV imagery, is described. The experiments were conducted during a series of three sounding rocket flights. All three flights yielded excellent images in the UV range, showing unprecedented spatial resolution. The second flight recorded the X-ray spectrum of a solar flare, and the third that of an active region. A normal incidence multi-layer mirror was used during the third flight to make the first astronomical X-ray observations using this new technique.

  7. A compact high-resolution X-ray powder diffractometer

    PubMed Central

    Fewster, Paul F.; Trout, David R. D.

    2013-01-01

    A new powder diffractometer operating in transmission mode is described. It can work as a rapid very compact instrument or as a high-resolution instrument, and the sample preparation is simplified. The incident beam optics create pure Cu Kα1 radiation, giving rise to peak widths of ∼0.1° in 2θ in compact form with a sample-to-detector minimum radius of 55 mm, reducing to peak widths of <0.05° in high-resolution mode by increasing the detector radius to 240 mm. The resolution of the diffractometer is shown to be governed by a complex mixture of angular divergence, sample size, diffraction effects and the dimensions of the detector pixels. The data can be collected instantaneously, which combined with trivial sample preparation and no sample alignment, makes it a suitable method for very rapid phase identification. As the detector is moved further from the sample, the angular step from the pixel dimension is reduced and the resolution improves significantly for very detailed studies, including structure determination and analysis of the microstructure. The advantage of this geometry is that the resolution of the diffractometer can be calculated precisely and the instrumental artefacts can be analysed easily without a sample present. The performance is demonstrated with LaB6 and paracetamol, and a critical appraisal of the uncertainties in the measurements is presented. The instantaneous data collection offers possibilities in dynamic experiments. PMID:24282331

  8. High resolution, high rate X-ray spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, Frederick S.; Landis, Donald A.

    1987-01-01

    A pulse processing system (10) for use in an X-ray spectrometer in which a ain channel pulse shaper (12) and a fast channel pulse shaper (13) each produce a substantially symmetrical triangular pulse (f, p) for each event detected by the spectrometer, with the pulse width of the pulses being substantially independent of the magnitude of the detected event and with the pulse width of the fast pulses (p) being substantially shorter than the pulse width of the main channel pulses (f). A pile-up rejector circuit (19) allows output pulses to be generated, with amplitudes linearly related to the magnitude of the detected events, whenever the peak of a main channel pulse (f) is not affected by a preceding or succeeding main channel pulse, while inhibiting output pulses wherein peak magnitudes of main channel pulses are affected by adjacent pulses. The substantially symmetrical triangular main channel pulses (f) are generated by the weighted addition (27-31) of successive RC integrations (24, 25, 26) of an RC differentiated step wave (23). The substantially symmetrical triangular fast channel pulses (p) are generated by the RC integration ( 43) of a bipolar pulse (o) in which the amplitude of the second half is 1/e that of the first half, with the RC time constant of integration being equal to one-half the width of the bipolar pulse.

  9. An advanced high resolution x-ray imager for laser-plasma interaction observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennetiere, D.; Troussel, Ph.; Courtois, C.; Wrobel, R.; Audebert, P.

    2013-11-01

    We present here the latest results obtained with our high resolution broadband X-ray microscope. These results, both spatial and spectral, were obtained in several facilities such as Berlin's synchrotron Bessy II and LULI's laser ELFIE 100TW. The results show clearly the opportunity in high resolution microscopy that offer mirror based diagnostics.

  10. High Resolution Temporal and Spectral Monitoring of Eta Carinae's X-Ray Emission the June Eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Henley, D.; Pittard, J. M.; Gull, T. R.; Davidson, K.; Swank, J. H.; Petre, R.; Ishibashi, K.

    2004-01-01

    The supermassive and luminous star Eta Carinae undergoes strong X-ray variations every 5.5 years when its 2-10 keV X-ray emission brightens rapidly with wild fluctuations before dropping by a factor of 100 to a minimum lasting 3 months. The most recent X-ray "eclipse" began in June 2003 and during this time Eta Carinae was intensely observed throughout the electromagnetic spectrum. Here we report the first results of frequent monitoring of the 2-10 keV band X-ray emission by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer along wit high resolution X-ray spectra obtained with the transmission gratings on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We compare these observations to those results obtained during the previous X-ray eclipse in 1998, and interpret the variations in the X-ray brightness, in the amount of absorption, in the X-ray emission measure and in the K-shell emission lines in terms of a colliding wind binary model.

  11. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R.; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C. H.; et al

    2006-01-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatialmore » resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.« less

  12. High-resolution ab initio Three-dimensional X-ray Diffraction Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Marchesini, S; Noy, A; Cui, C; Howells, M R; Rosen, R; He, H; Spence, J H; Weierstall, U; Beetz, T; Jacobsen, C; Shapiro, D

    2005-08-19

    Coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging non-periodic isolated objects at resolutions only limited, in principle, by the largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate X-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the 3D diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a non-periodic object. We also construct 2D images of thick objects with infinite depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution using X-ray undulator radiation, and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at X-ray free-electron laser sources.

  13. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R.; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C. H.; Weierstall, Uwe; Beetz, Tobias; Jacobsen, Chris; Shapiro, David

    2006-01-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.

  14. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Henry N; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C H; Weierstall, Uwe; Beetz, Tobias; Jacobsen, Chris; Shapiro, David

    2006-05-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.

  15. High resolution x-ray CMT: Reconstruction methods

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.K.

    1997-02-01

    This paper qualitatively discusses the primary characteristics of methods for reconstructing tomographic images from a set of projections. These reconstruction methods can be categorized as either {open_quotes}analytic{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}iterative{close_quotes} techniques. Analytic algorithms are derived from the formal inversion of equations describing the imaging process, while iterative algorithms incorporate a model of the imaging process and provide a mechanism to iteratively improve image estimates. Analytic reconstruction algorithms are typically computationally more efficient than iterative methods; however, analytic algorithms are available for a relatively limited set of imaging geometries and situations. Thus, the framework of iterative reconstruction methods is better suited for high accuracy, tomographic reconstruction codes.

  16. AXAF-1 High Resolution Assembly Image Model and Comparison with X-Ray Ground Test Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zissa, David E.

    1999-01-01

    The x-ray ground test of the AXAF-I High Resolution Mirror Assembly was completed in 1997 at the X-ray Calibration Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center. Mirror surface measurements by HDOS, alignment results from Kodak, and predicted gravity distortion in the horizontal test configuration are being used to model the x-ray test image. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) image modeling serves as a cross check with Smithsonian Astrophysical observatory modeling. The MSFC image prediction software has evolved from the MSFC model of the x-ray test of the largest AXAF-I mirror pair in 1991. The MSFC image modeling software development is being assisted by the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The modeling process, modeling software, and image prediction will be discussed. The image prediction will be compared with the x-ray test results.

  17. Calibration of a high resolution grating soft x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, E. W.; Dunn, J.; Brown, G. V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Cone, K. V.; Park, J.; Porter, F. S.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Kelley, R. L.

    2010-10-15

    The calibration of the soft x-ray spectral response of a large radius of curvature, high resolution grating spectrometer (HRGS) with a back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector is reported. The instrument is cross-calibrated for the 10-50 A waveband at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron beam ion trap (EBIT) x-ray source with the EBIT calorimeter spectrometer. The HRGS instrument is designed for laser-produced plasma experiments and is important for making high dynamic range measurements of line intensities, line shapes, and x-ray sources.

  18. Calibration of a high resolution grating soft x-ray spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Magee, E W; Dunn, J; Brown, G V; Cone, K V; Park, J; Porter, F S; Kilbourne, C A; Kelley, R L; Beiersdorfer, P

    2010-10-01

    The calibration of the soft x-ray spectral response of a large radius of curvature, high resolution grating spectrometer (HRGS) with a back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector is reported. The instrument is cross-calibrated for the 10-50 Å waveband at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron beam ion trap (EBIT) x-ray source with the EBIT calorimeter spectrometer. The HRGS instrument is designed for laser-produced plasma experiments and is important for making high dynamic range measurements of line intensities, line shapes, and x-ray sources. PMID:21034013

  19. High Resolution X-Ray Micro-CT of Ultra-Thin Wall Space Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Rauser, R. W.; Bowman, Randy R.; Bonacuse, Peter; Martin, Richard E.; Locci, I. E.; Kelley, M.

    2012-01-01

    A high resolution micro-CT system has been assembled and is being used to provide optimal characterization for ultra-thin wall space components. The Glenn Research Center NDE Sciences Team, using this CT system, has assumed the role of inspection vendor for the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) project at NASA. This article will discuss many aspects of the development of the CT scanning for this type of component, including CT system overview; inspection requirements; process development, software utilized and developed to visualize, process, and analyze results; calibration sample development; results on actual samples; correlation with optical/SEM characterization; CT modeling; and development of automatic flaw recognition software. Keywords: Nondestructive Evaluation, NDE, Computed Tomography, Imaging, X-ray, Metallic Components, Thin Wall Inspection

  20. High-resolution spectroscopy of X-rays emitted from electron bombarded surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabłoński, Ł.; Banaś, D.; Jagodziński, P.; Kubala-Kukuś, A.; Sobota, D.; Pajek, M.

    2015-07-01

    The investigations of a compact 6-crystal Johann/Johansson diffraction X-ray spectrometer, covering a wide range (70 eV-15 keV) of photon energies, applied to observe the X-rays emitted from electron bombarded surfaces are discussed in terms of its focusing properties and achievable energy resolution. In the present study the X-ray spectra of Si-Kα1,2 and Al-Kα1,2 X-ray lines excited by 5 keV electron beam were measured using PET and TAP crystal, respectively, in the "out-of-focus" geometry which will be used to study the electron/ion surface interactions at the electron beam ion source (EBIS) facility. The measured X-ray spectra were interpreted in terms of the performed ray-tracing simulations which demonstrate the key features of the "out-of-focus" geometry. It was demonstrated that in this case the energy resolution in the range 1-3 eV for photon energy 1-2 keV can be achieved with an increased acceptance for the extension of X-ray source, of about 1 mm, which is important feature for practical applications. Additionally, a dependence of the X-ray intensity and energy resolution on slit opening was studied in details. The results are important for investigations of surfaces with electron and ion impact, in particular, for the future high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy experiments at the EBIS facility.

  1. High Resolution Higher Energy X-ray Microscope for Mesoscopic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snigireva, I.; Snigirev, A.

    2013-10-01

    We developed a novel X-ray microscopy technique to study mesoscopically structured materials, employing compound refractive lenses. The easily seen advantage of lens-based methodology is the possibility to retrieve high resolution diffraction pattern and real-space images in the same experimental setup. Methodologically the proposed approach is similar to the studies of crystals by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The proposed microscope was applied for studying of mesoscopic materials such as natural and synthetic opals, inverted photonic crystals.

  2. High resolution, large field of view x-ray differential phase contrast imaging on a compact setup

    SciTech Connect

    Thuering, T.; Stampanoni, M.; Modregger, P.; Grund, T.; Kenntner, J.; David, C.

    2011-07-25

    X-ray grating interferometry is a well established technique to perform differential phase contrast imaging on conventional x-ray tubes. So far, the application of this technique in commercial micro computed tomography scanners has remained a major challenge due to the compact setup geometry. In this letter, we report on the design of a compact imaging setup using a microfocus source. Due to the extreme wave front curvature, the gratings are fabricated on a flexible substrate, enabling precise cylindrical shaping. A laboratory setup and a modified SCANCO {mu}CT100 scanner have been built, allowing high resolution and large field of view imaging.

  3. Interstellar dust grain composition from high-resolution X-ray absorption edge structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrales, Lia

    2016-06-01

    X-ray light is sufficient to excite electrons from n=1 (K-shell) and n=2 (L-shell) energy levels of neutral interstellar metals, causing a sharp increase in the absorption cross-section. Near the ionization energy, the shape of the photoelectric absorption edge depends strongly on whether the atom is isolated or bound in molecules or minerals (dust). With high resolution X-ray spectroscopy, we can directly measure the state of metals and the mineral composition of dust in the interstellar medium. In addition, the scattering contribution to the X-ray extinction cross-section can be used to gauge grain size, shape, and filling factor. In order to fully take advantage of major advances in high resolution X-ray spectroscopy, lab measurements of X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) from suspected interstellar minerals are required. Optical constants derived from the absorption measurements can be used with Mie scattering or anomalous diffraction theory in order to model the full extinction cross-sections from the interstellar medium. Much like quasar spectra are used to probe other intergalactic gas, absorption spectroscopy of Galactic X-ray binaries and bright stars will yield key insights to the mineralogy and evolution of dust grains in the Milky Way.

  4. A normal incidence, high resolution X-ray telescope for solar coronal observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.

    1984-01-01

    A Normal Incidence high resolution X-ray Telescope is reported. The design of a telescope assembly which, after fabrication, will be integrated with the mirror fabrication process is described. The assembly is engineered to fit into the Black Brant rocket skin to survive sounding rocket launch conditions. A flight ready camera is modified and tested.

  5. The effects of dust scattering on high-resolution X-ray absorption edge structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrales, Lia; Garcia, Javier; Wilms, Joern; Baganoff, Frederick K.

    2016-04-01

    In high resolution X-ray spectroscopy, dust scattering significantly enhances the total extinction optical depth and alters the shape of photoelectric absorption edges. This effect is modulated by the dust grain size distribution, spatial location along the line of sight, and the imaging resolution of the X-ray telescope. We focus in particular on the Fe L-edge at 0.7 keV, fitting a template for the total extinction to the high resolution spectrum of three X-ray binaries from the Chandra archive: GX 9+9, XTE J1817-330, and Cyg X-1. In cases where dust is intrinsic to the source, a covering factor based on the angular extent of the dusty material must be applied to the extinction curve, regardless of imaging resolution. We discuss the various astrophysical cases in which scattering effects need to be taken into account.

  6. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Marchesini, Stephano; Neiman, Aaron M.; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-04-20

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the α-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane andmore » freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.« less

  7. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Marchesini, Stephano; Neiman, Aaron M.; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-04-20

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the α-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane and freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.

  8. High-Resolution Structure of the Photosynthetic Mn4Ca Catalyst from X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko; Kern, Jan; Pushkar, Yulia; Sauer, Kenneth; Glatzel, Pieter; Bergmann, Uwe; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2007-08-01

    The application of high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy methods to study the photosynthetic water oxidizing complex, which contains a unique hetero-nuclear catalytic Mn4Ca cluster, are described. Issues of X-ray damage especially at the metal sites in the Mn4Ca cluster are discussed. The structure of the Mn4Ca catalyst at high-resolution which has so far eluded attempts of determination by X-ray diffraction, EXAFS and other spectroscopic techniques has been addressed using polarized EXAFS techniques applied to oriented PS II membrane preparations and PS II single crystals. A review of how the resolution of traditional EXAFS techniques can be improved, using methods such as range-extended EXAFS is presented, and the changes that occur in the structure of the cluster as it advances through the catalytic cycle are described. X-ray absorption and emission techniques (XANES and K? emission) have been used earlier to determine the oxidation states of the Mn4Ca cluster, and in this report we review the use of X-ray resonant Raman spectroscopy to understand the electronic structure of the Mn4Ca cluster as it cycles through the intermediate S-states.

  9. High Resolution Triple Axis X-Ray Diffraction Analysis of II-VI Semiconductor Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, H. M.; Matyi, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this research program is to develop methods of structural analysis based on high resolution triple axis X-ray diffractometry (HRTXD) and to carry out detailed studies of defect distributions in crystals grown in both microgravity and ground-based environments. HRTXD represents a modification of the widely used double axis X-ray rocking curve method for the characterization of grown-in defects in nearly perfect crystals. In a double axis rocking curve experiment, the sample is illuminated by a monochromatic X-ray beam and the diffracted intensity is recorded by a fixed, wide-open detector. The intensity diffracted by the sample is then monitored as the sample is rotated through the Bragg reflection condition. The breadth of the peak, which is often reported as the full angular width at half the maximum intensity (FWHM), is used as an indicator of the amount of defects in the sample. This work has shown that high resolution triple axis X-ray diffraction is an effective tool for characterizing the defect structure in semiconductor crystals, particularly at high defect densities. Additionally, the technique is complimentary to X-ray topography for defect characterization in crystals.

  10. Quantifying the Sensitivity of Superconducting High-Resolution X-Ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, O; Friedrich, S

    2004-10-04

    Superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) X-ray spectrometers have been developed for synchrotron-based high-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy. We are quantifying the improvements in sensitivity that STJ spectrometers can offer for the analysis of dilute specimens over conventional semiconductor and grating spectrometers. We present analytical equations to quantify the improvements in terms of spectrometer resolution, detection efficiency and count rate capabilities as a function of line separation and spectral background. We discuss the implications of this analysis for L-edge spectroscopy of first-row transition metals.

  11. Simulation of high-resolution X-ray microscopic images for improved alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiangxia; Zhang, Xiaobo; Liu, Gang; Cheng, Xianchao; Li, Wenjie; Guan, Yong; Liu, Ying; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Yangchao

    2011-12-01

    The introduction of precision optical elements to X-ray microscopes necessitates fine realignment to achieve optimal high-resolution imaging. In this paper, we demonstrate a numerical method for simulating image formation that facilitates alignment of the source, condenser, objective lens, and CCD camera. This algorithm, based on ray-tracing and Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction theory, is applied to simulate the X-ray microscope beamline U7A of National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The simulations and imaging experiments show that the algorithm is useful for guiding experimental adjustments. Our alignment simulation method is an essential tool for the transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) with optical elements and may also be useful for the alignment of optical components in other modes of microscopy.

  12. Compact high-resolution differential interference contrast soft x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bertilson, Michael C.; Hofsten, Olov von; Lindblom, Magnus; Hertz, Hans M.; Vogt, Ulrich

    2008-02-11

    We demonstrate high-resolution x-ray differential interference contrast (DIC) in a compact soft x-ray microscope. Phase contrast imaging is enabled by the use of a diffractive optical element objective which is matched to the coherence conditions in the microscope setup. The performance of the diffractive optical element objective is evaluated in comparison with a normal zone plate by imaging of a nickel siemens star pattern and linear grating test objects. Images obtained with the DIC optic exhibit typical DIC enhancement in addition to the normal absorption contrast. Contrast transfer functions based on modulation measurements in the obtained images show that the DIC optic gives a significant increase in contrast without reducing the spatial resolution. The phase contrast operation mode now available for our compact soft x-ray microscope will be a useful tool for future studies of samples with low absorption contrast.

  13. Superconducting Detector System for High-Resolution Energy-Dispersive Soft X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Niedermayr, T; Drury, O; Funk, T; Frank, M; Labov, S E; Cramer, S

    2001-02-21

    Synchrotron-based soft x-ray spectroscopy is often limited by detector performance. Grating spectrometers have the resolution, but lack the efficiency for the analysis of dilute samples. Semiconducting Si(Li) or Ge detectors are efficient, but often lack the resolution to separate weak signals from strong nearby lines in multi-element samples. Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) operated at temperatures below 1 K can be used as high-resolution high-efficiency x-ray detectors. They combine high energy resolution around 10 eV FWHM with the broad band efficiency of energy-dispersive detectors. We have designed a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to operate STJ detectors in x-ray fluorescence measurements at beam line 4 of the ALS. We demonstrate the capabilities of such a detector system for fluorescence analysis of dilute metal sites in proteins and inorganic model compounds.

  14. High resolution x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy - a new technique for site- and spin-selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin

    1996-12-01

    X-ray spectroscopy has long been used to elucidate electronic and structural information of molecules. One of the weaknesses of x-ray absorption is its sensitivity to all of the atoms of a particular element in a sample. Through out this thesis, a new technique for enhancing the site- and spin-selectivity of the x-ray absorption has been developed. By high resolution fluorescence detection, the chemical sensitivity of K emission spectra can be used to identify oxidation and spin states; it can also be used to facilitate site-selective X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and site-selective Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The spin polarization in K fluorescence could be used to generate spin selective XANES or spin-polarized EXAFS, which provides a new measure of the spin density, or the nature of magnetic neighboring atoms. Finally, dramatic line-sharpening effects by the combination of absorption and emission processes allow observation of structure that is normally unobservable. All these unique characters can enormously simplify a complex x-ray spectrum. Applications of this novel technique have generated information from various transition-metal model compounds to metalloproteins. The absorption and emission spectra by high resolution fluorescence detection are interdependent. The ligand field multiplet model has been used for the analysis of K{alpha} and K{beta} emission spectra. First demonstration on different chemical states of Fe compounds has shown the applicability of site selectivity and spin polarization. Different interatomic distances of the same element in different chemical forms have been detected using site-selective EXAFS.

  15. High-Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy of Colliding Wind Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henely, David B.

    2005-02-01

    Massive stars have powerful winds which have profound effects on their surroundings and the stars' own evolution. Most such stars reside in binaries, in which the two stars' winds collide highly supersonically. The winds are shock-heated and produce copious X-rays, the study of which can be used to address poorly understood aspects of massive star winds. In this thesis, high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy is used to study in detail the structure of wind-wind collisions. We develop a model for synthesizing X-ray emission line profiles from colliding wind binaries. We then present analyses of X-ray spectra of two colliding wind systems: gamma(2) Velorum and eta Carinae, part of which includes applying the line synthesis model to these systems. The application of the model to a third system (WR 140) is also discussed. In general, the high-resolution spectra reveal that the physics in these systems is more complicated than is usually assumed. Given this, we go on to discuss how the future development of this work can be used to further the study of the physics of massive star winds and strong collisionless shocks.

  16. High resolution x-ray microtomography of biological samples: Requirements and strategies for satisfying them

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, B.W. Jr. ||; Rothman, S.S. |

    1997-02-01

    High resolution x-ray microscopy has been made possible in recent years primarily by two new technologies: microfabricated diffractive lenses for soft x-rays with about 30-50 nm resolution, and high brightness synchrotron x-ray sources. X-ray microscopy occupies a special niche in the array of biological microscopic imaging methods. It extends the capabilities of existing techniques mainly in two areas: a previously unachievable combination of sub-visible resolution and multi-micrometer sample size, and new contrast mechanisms. Because of the soft x-ray wavelengths used in biological imaging (about 1-4 nm), XM is intermediate in resolution between visible light and electron microscopies. Similarly, the penetration depth of soft x-rays in biological materials is such that the ideal sample thickness for XM falls in the range of 0.25 - 10 {mu}m, between that of VLM and EM. XM is therefore valuable for imaging of intermediate level ultrastructure, requiring sub-visible resolutions, in intact cells and subcellular organelles, without artifacts produced by thin sectioning. Many of the contrast producing and sample preparation techniques developed for VLM and EM also work well with XM. These include, for example, molecule specific staining by antibodies with heavy metal or fluorescent labels attached, and sectioning of both frozen and plastic embedded tissue. However, there is also a contrast mechanism unique to XM that exists naturally because a number of elemental absorption edges lie in the wavelength range used. In particular, between the oxygen and carbon absorption edges (2.3 and 4.4 nm wavelength), organic molecules absorb photons much more strongly than does water, permitting element-specific imaging of cellular structure in aqueous media, with no artifically introduced contrast agents. For three-dimensional imaging applications requiring the capabilities of XM, an obvious extension of the technique would therefore be computerized x-ray microtomography (XMT).

  17. The first high-resolution X-ray spectrum of a Herbig star: AB Aurigae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telleschi, A.; Güdel, M.; Briggs, K. R.; Skinner, S. L.; Audard, M.; Franciosini, E.

    2007-06-01

    Context: The X-ray emission from Herbig Ae/Be stars remains to be explained. In later-type T Tauri stars, X-rays are thought to be produced by magnetically trapped coronal plasma, although accretion-shock induced X-rays have also been suggested. In earlier-type (OB) stars, shocks in unstable winds are thought to produce X-rays. Aims: We present the first high-resolution X-ray spectrum of a prototypical Herbig star AB Aurigae), measure and interpret various spectral features, and compare our results with model predictions. Methods: We use X-ray spectroscopy data from the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometers and the EPIC instruments. The spectra are interpreted using thermal, optically thin emission models with variable element abundances and a photoelectric absorption component. We interpret line flux ratios in the He-like triplet of O vii as a function of electron density and the UV radiation field. We use the nearby co-eval classical T Tauri star SU Aur as a comparison. Results: AB Aurigae reveals a soft X-ray spectrum, most plasma being concentrated at 1-6 MK. The He-like triplet reveals no signs of increased densities as reported for some accreting T Tau stars in the literature. There are also no clear indications of strong abundance anomalies in the emitting plasma. The light curve displays modulated variability, with a period of ≈42 h. Conclusions: It is unlikely that a nearby, undetected lower-mass companion is the source of the X-rays. Accretion shocks close to the star would be expected to be irradiated by the photosphere, leading to alteration in the He-like triplet fluxes of O vii, which we do not measure. Also, no indications for high densities are found, although the mass accretion rate is presently unknown. Emission from wind shocks is unlikely, given the weak radiation pressure. A possible explanation would be a solar-like magnetic corona. Magnetically confined winds are a very promising alternative. The X-ray period is indeed close to

  18. Very High Resolution Solar X-ray Imaging Using Diffractive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Skinner, G. K.; Li, M. J.; Shih, A. Y.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development of X-ray diffractive optics for imaging solar flares with better than 0.1 arcsec angular resolution. X-ray images with this resolution of the greater than or equal to 10 MK plasma in solar active regions and solar flares would allow the cross-sectional area of magnetic loops to be resolved and the coronal flare energy release region itself to be probed. The objective of this work is to obtain X-ray images in the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV observed during solar flares with an angular resolution as fine as 0.1 arcsec - over an order of magnitude finer than is now possible. This line emission is from highly ionized iron atoms, primarily Fe xxv, in the hottest flare plasma at temperatures in excess of approximately equal to 10 MK. It provides information on the flare morphology, the iron abundance, and the distribution of the hot plasma. Studying how this plasma is heated to such high temperatures in such short times during solar flares is of critical importance in understanding these powerful transient events, one of the major objectives of solar physics.We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of phase zone plate X-ray lenses with focal lengths of approximately equal to 100 m at these energies that would be capable of achieving these objectives. We show how such lenses could be included on a two-spacecraft formation-flying mission with the lenses on the spacecraft closest to the Sun and an X-ray imaging array on the second spacecraft in the focal plane approximately equal to 100 m away. High resolution X-ray images could be obtained when the two spacecraft are aligned with the region of interest on the Sun. Requirements and constraints for the control of the two spacecraft are discussed together with the overall feasibility of such a formation-flying mission.

  19. The effects of dust scattering on high-resolution X-ray absorption edge structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrales, L.; García, J.; Wilms, J.; Baganoff, F.

    2016-06-01

    High energy studies of astrophysical dust complement observations of dusty interstellar gas at other wavelengths. With high resolution X-ray spectroscopy, dust scattering significantly enhances the total extinction optical depth and alters the shape of photoelectric absorption edges. This effect is modulated by the dust grain size distribution, spatial location along the line of sight, and the imaging resolution of the X-ray telescope. At soft energies, the spectrum of scattered light is likely to have significant features at the 0.3 keV (C-K), 0.5 keV (O-K), and 0.7 keV (Fe-L) photoelectric absorption edges. This direct probe of ISM dust grain elements will be important for (i) understanding the relative abundances of graphitic grains or PAHs versus silicates, and (ii) measuring the depletion of gas phase elements into solid form. We focus in particular on the Fe-L edge, fitting a template for the total extinction to the high resolution spectrum of three X-ray binaries from the Chandra archive: GX 9+9, XTE J1817-330, and Cyg X-1. We discuss ways in which spectroscopy with XMM can yield insight into dust obscured objects such as stars, binaries, AGN, and foreground quasar absorption line systems.

  20. Diagnostics of the accretion plasma in magnetic CVs from high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burwitz, V.; Reinsch, K.; Haberl, F.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Predehl, P.

    2002-01-01

    High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy with the Chandra low energy transmission grating spectrometer (LETGS) provides an unprecedented diagnostic tool for the hot accretion plasma and the settling flow in the accretion column of magnetic cataclysmic variables (mCVs). We show first results from our analysis of spin-phase resolved X-ray spectroscopy of the two prototype magnetic CVs, AM Her and PQ Gem. The LETGS spectra cover the wavelength range 2--170Å with a spectral resolution λ/Δ λ = 200--3000. For the first time, absorption structures in the soft X-ray component of the heated white-dwarf atmosphere are revealed and individual emission lines of H- and He-like O and N ions including the density sensitive components of the He-like triplets are resolved in the hard X-ray component originating from the settling flow. In addition, phase dependent Doppler-shifts of the emission lines are detected providing detailed information on the geometry of the accretion funnel.

  1. Multiphase Flow Characterization Using Simultaneous High Resolution Neutron and X-Ray Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaManna, J.; Anovitz, L. M.; Hussey, D. S.; Jacobson, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Multiphase flow in geologic materials is an important area of research for hydrology and oil recovery. A valuable tool for determining how liquid water and/or hydrocarbons transport through soils and rocks is neutron tomography due to its high sensitivity to hydrogen. This technique allows for the 3D reconstruction of the liquid phase in the sample. In order to resolve the solid phase structure of the sample it is necessary to perform x-ray tomography which often must be conducted at a separate facility from the neutron imaging. When imaging deformable samples or stochastic flow this delay in imaging modes ruins the analysis as the sample is no longer in an identical state. To address this issue and bring a unique capability to NIST, an instrument has been commissioned for the simultaneous imaging with neutrons and x-rays. The new system orients a micro-focus 90 kV x-ray beam 90° to the neutron beam which facilitates rapid dual-mode tomography of samples. Current highest spatial resolutions are 20 μm and 10 μm for the neutron and x-ray detectors, respectively, with upcoming improvements. This presentation will focus on introducing the new system and demonstrating its ability with several cases. Examples of high resolution water uptake and high speed imaging of uptake dynamics will be given.

  2. High resolution x-ray lensless imaging by differential holographic encoding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, D.; Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Wu, B.; Scherz, A.; Acremann, Y.; Tylisczcak, T.; Fischer, P.; Friedenberger, N.; Ollefs, K.; Farle, M.; Fienup, J. R.; Stohr, J.

    2009-11-02

    X-ray free electron lasers (X-FEL{sub s}) will soon offer femtosecond pulses of laterally coherent x-rays with sufficient intensity to record single-shot coherent scattering patterns for nanoscale imaging. Pulse trains created by splitand-delay techniques even open the door for cinematography on unprecedented nanometer length and femtosecond time scales. A key to real space ultrafast motion pictures is fast and reliable inversion of the recorded reciprocal space scattering patterns. Here we for the first time demonstrate in the x-ray regime the power of a novel technique for lensless high resolution imaging, previously suggested by Guizar-Sicairos and Fienup termed holography with extended reference by autocorrelation linear differential operation, HERALD0. We have achieved superior resolution over conventional x-ray Fourier transform holography (FTH) without sacrifices in SNR or significant increase in algorithmic complexity. By combining images obtained from individual sharp features on an extended reference, we further show that the resolution can be even extended beyond the reference fabrication limits. Direct comparison to iterative phase retrieval image reconstruction and images recorded with stateof- the-art zone plate microscopes is presented. Our results demonstrate the power of HERALDO as a favorable candidate for robust inversion of single-shot coherent scattering patterns.

  3. Interlaced X-ray diffraction computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vamvakeros, Antonios; Jacques, Simon D. M.; Di Michiel, Marco; Senecal, Pierre; Middelkoop, Vesna; Cernik, Robert J.; Beale, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction computed tomography data-collection strategy that allows, post experiment, a choice between temporal and spatial resolution is reported. This strategy enables time-resolved studies on comparatively short timescales, or alternatively allows for improved spatial resolution if the system under study, or components within it, appear to be unchanging. The application of the method for studying an Mn–Na–W/SiO2 fixed-bed reactor in situ is demonstrated. Additionally, the opportunities to improve the data-collection strategy further, enabling post-collection tuning between statistical, temporal and spatial resolutions, are discussed. In principle, the interlaced scanning approach can also be applied to other pencil-beam tomographic techniques, like X-ray fluorescence computed tomography, X-ray absorption fine structure computed tomography, pair distribution function computed tomography and tomographic scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. PMID:27047305

  4. Highly efficient beamline and spectrometer for inelastic soft X-ray scattering at high resolution.

    PubMed

    Lai, C H; Fung, H S; Wu, W B; Huang, H Y; Fu, H W; Lin, S W; Huang, S W; Chiu, C C; Wang, D J; Huang, L J; Tseng, T C; Chung, S C; Chen, C T; Huang, D J

    2014-03-01

    The design, construction and commissioning of a beamline and spectrometer for inelastic soft X-ray scattering at high resolution in a highly efficient system are presented. Based on the energy-compensation principle of grating dispersion, the design of the monochromator-spectrometer system greatly enhances the efficiency of measurement of inelastic soft X-rays scattering. Comprising two bendable gratings, the set-up effectively diminishes the defocus and coma aberrations. At commissioning, this system showed results of spin-flip, d-d and charge-transfer excitations of NiO. These results are consistent with published results but exhibit improved spectral resolution and increased efficiency of measurement. The best energy resolution of the set-up in terms of full width at half-maximum is 108 meV at an incident photon energy tuned about the Ni L3-edge.

  5. Hiresmon: A Fast High Resolution Beam Position Monitor for Medium Hard and Hard X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Menk, Ralf Hendrik; Giuressi, Dario; Arfelli, Fulvia; Rigon, Luigi

    2007-01-19

    The high-resolution x-ray beam position monitor (XBPM) is based on the principle of a segmented longitudinal ionization chamber with integrated readout and USB2 link. In contrast to traditional transversal ionization chambers here the incident x-rays are parallel to the collecting field which allows absolute intensity measurements with a precision better than 0.3 %. Simultaneously the beam position in vertical and horizontal direction can be measured with a frame rate of one kHz. The precision of position encoding depends only on the SNR of the synchrotron radiation and is in the order of micro meters at one kHz frame rate and 108 photon /sec at 9 KeV.

  6. Elucidation of Advanced Function by Combined High-Resolution Neutron and X-ray Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamada, Taro; Kuroki, Ryota; Kinoshita, Takayoshi; Tada, Toshiji

    To help resolve long-standing questions regarding the catalytic activity of the serine proteases the structure of porcine pancreatic elastase has been analyzed by high-resolution neutron (1.65 Å resolution) and X-ray (0.94 Å resolution) crystallography. In order to mimic the tetrahedral transition intermediate, a peptidic inhibitor was used. The neutron and X-ray data show that the hydrogen bond between His57 and Asp102 is not consistent with a low-barrier hydrogen which is predicted to have the hydrogen midway between the donor and acceptor atom. The neutron analysis also shows that the oxygen of the oxopropyl group of the inhibitor is present as an oxygen anion rather than a hydroxyl group, supporting the role of the “oxyanion hole” in stabilizing the tetrahedral intermediate in catalysis.

  7. High-Resolution Study of X-Ray Resonant Raman Scattering at the K Edge of Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Szlachetko, J.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Berset, M.; Fennane, K.; Szlachetko, M.; Hoszowska, J.; Barrett, R.; Pajek, M.; Kubala-Kukus, A.

    2006-08-18

    We report on the first high-resolution measurements of the K x-ray resonant Raman scattering (RRS) in Si. The measured x-ray RRS spectra, interpreted using the Kramers-Heisenberg approach, revealed spectral features corresponding to electronic excitations to the conduction and valence bands in silicon. The total cross sections for the x-ray RRS at the 1s absorption edge and the 1s-3p excitation were derived. The Kramers-Heisenberg formalism was found to reproduce quite well the x-ray RRS spectra, which is of prime importance for applications of the total-reflection x-ray fluorescence technique.

  8. An Elliptical Crystal Spectrometer Suitable for EXAFS Studies of Laser Compressed Materials and for High Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ridgeley, A; Goodman, D; Hall, T A

    1995-01-01

    Using an x-ray spectrometer with an elliptically curved crystal it is possible to study absorption spectra from a target placed at one focus of the ellipse using a backlighting source placed at the other focus. This principle has been used to develop a spectrometer for EXAFS studies of laser compressed materials. The backlighting source is placed at one focus of the ellipse and the laser compressed EXAFS sample at the other. Using this technique a small area of the EXAFS target can be probed, thereby minimizing any spatial variations in the compressed plasma due to nonuniformities in the laser beams. Also, the dispersive nature of the crystal ensures that it acts as a bandpass filter, so that the EXAFS sample is not probed by other x-ray wavelengths which may cause unwanted heating. Another advantage is that compressed and uncompressed EXAFS spectra can be compared on a single shot. The optical properties of the spectrometer are discussed analytically and using a computer ray-tracing program. The development and alignment of the elliptical spectrometer are discussed, and its performance using both x-ray film and a CCD detector is evaluated. The use of the elliptical spectrometer as a high-resolution x-ray instrument is presented. PMID:21307480

  9. High resolution X-ray diffraction imaging of lead tin telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiner, Bruce; Dobbyn, Ronald C.; Black, David; Burdette, Harold; Kuriyama, Masao; Spal, Richard; Simchick, Richard; Fripp, Archibald

    1991-01-01

    High resolution X-ray diffraction images of two directly comparable crystals of lead tin telluride, one Bridgman-grown on Space Shuttle STS 61A and the other terrestrially Bridgman-grown under similar conditions from identical material, present different subgrain structure. In the terrestrial, sample 1 the appearance of an elaborate array of subgrains is closely associated with the intrusion of regions that are out of diffraction in all of the various images. The formation of this elaborate subgrain structure is inhibited by growth in microgravity.

  10. Coordinated Observations of X-ray and High-resolution EUV Active Region Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    The recently-launched High-resolution Coronal imager (Hi-C) sounding rocket provided the highest resolution images of coronal loops and other small-scale structures in the 193 Angstrom passband to date. With just 5 minutes of observations, the instrument recorded a variety of dynamic coronal events -- including even a small B-class flare. We will present our results comparing these extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) observations with X-ray imaging from Hinode/XRT as well as EUV AIA data to identify sources of hot plasma rooted in the photosphere and track their affect on the overall topology and dynamics of the active region.

  11. Coordinated Observations of X-ray and High-Resolution EUV Active Region Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    The recently-launched High-resolution Coronal imager (Hi-C) sounding rocket provided the highest resolution images of coronal loops and other small-scale structures in the 193 Angstrom passband to date. With just 5 minutes of observations, the instrument recorded a variety of dynamic coronal events -- including even a small B-class flare. We will present our results comparing these extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) observations with X-ray imaging from Hinode/XRT as well as EUV AIA data to identify sources of hot plasma rooted in the photosphere and track their affect on the overall topology and dynamics of the active region.

  12. High resolution hard X-ray spectra of solar and cosmic sources. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    High resolution hard X-ray observations of a large solar flare and the Crab Nebula were obtained during balloon flights using an array of cooled germanium planar detectors. In addition, high time resolution high sensitivity measurements were obtained with a 300 square cm NaI/CsI phoswich scintillator. The Crab spectrum from both flights was searched without finding evidence of line emission below 200 keV. In particular, for the 73 keV line previously reported a 3 sigma upper limit for a narrow (1 keV FWHM) line .0019 and .0014 ph square cm/sec for the 1979 and 1980 flights, respectively was obtained.

  13. High-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements of SiGe/Si structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan-Sweet, J.L.; Mooney, P.M.; Stephenson, G.B.

    1995-09-01

    High-resolution x-ray diffraction is an excellent probe of strain relaxation in complex SiGe structures. The high flux provided by synchrotron sources enables one to make extensive reciprocal space map measurements and evaluate many samples. The diffraction peak positions of each layer in a step-graded structure, measured for two different reflections, yield quantitative values for the relaxation and alloy composition in the layer. Grazing-incidence diffraction allows one to determine the in-plane structure of very thin layers, which have thickness-broadened peaks at conventional diffraction geometries. They demonstrate the power of these techniques with two examples.

  14. High-Resolution Spectroscopy with the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    ScienceCinema

    Canizares, Claude R. [MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2016-07-12

    The capabilities of the Chandra X-ray Observatory and XMM-Newton for high-resolution spectroscopy have brought tradition plasma diagnostic techniques to the study of cosmic plasma. Observations have probed nearly every class of astronomical object, from young proto-starts through massive O starts and black hole binaries, supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei, and the intergalactic medium. Many of these sources show remarkable rich spectra that reveal new physical information, such as emission measure distributions, elemental abundances, accretion disk and wind signatures, and time variability. This talk will present an overview of the Chandra instrumentaton and selected examples of spectral observations of astrophysical and cosmological importance.

  15. APEX/J-PEX: A High-Resolution Spectrometer for EUV/X-ray Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, M. P.; Cruddace, R. G.; Gursky, H.; Yentis, D. J.

    2001-09-01

    Future X-ray and EUV missions should include high-resolution spectrometers, permitting use of the full range of spectroscopic diagnostics, in particular measurement of line profiles and Doppler shifts. We present a design for such an instrument (APEX), which would fly on a Small Explorer Satellite and which employs multilayer-coated ion-etched gratings in a normal-incidence configuration. We have already flown successfully a prototype spectrometer (J-PEX) on a NASA sounding rocket. The resulting EUV spectrum of the white dwarf G191-B2B will be presented.

  16. High Resolution, Non-Dispersive X-Ray Calorimeter Spectrometers on EBITs and Orbiting Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Frederick S.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopy is the primary tool for performing atomic physics with Electron beam ion trap (EBITs). X-ray instruments have generally fallen into two general categories, 1) dispersive instruments with very high spectral resolving powers but limited spectral range, limited count rates, and require an entrance slit, generally, for EBITs, defined by the electron beam itself, and 2) non-dispersive solid-state detectors with much lower spectral resolving powers but that have a broad dynamic range, high count rate ability and do not require a slit. Both of these approaches have compromises that limit the type and efficiency of measurements that can be performed. In 1984 NASA initiated a program to produce a non-dispersive instrument with high spectral resolving power for x-ray astrophysics based on the cryogenic x-ray calorimeter. This program produced the XRS non-dispersive spectrometers on the Astro-E, Astro-E2 (Suzaku) orbiting observatories, the SXS instrument on the Astro-H observatory, and the planned XMS instrument on the International X-ray Observatory. Complimenting these spaceflight programs, a permanent high-resolution x-ray calorimeter spectrometer, the XRS/EBIT, was installed on the LLNL EBIT in 2000. This unique instrument was upgraded to a spectral resolving power of 1000 at 6 keV in 2003 and replaced by a nearly autonomous production-class spectrometer, the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS), in 2007. The ECS spectrometer has a simultaneous bandpass from 0.07 to over 100 keV with a spectral resolving power of 1300 at 6 keV with unit quantum efficiency, and 1900 at 60 keV with a quantum efficiency of 30%. X-ray calorimeters are event based, single photon spectrometers with event time tagging to better than 10 us. We are currently developing a follow-on instrument based on a newer generation of x-ray calorimeters with a spectral resolving power of 3000 at 6 keV, and improved timing and measurement cadence. The unique capabilities of the x-ray

  17. High resolution two-dimensional near field images of neon-like soft x- ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.C.; Nilsen, J.; Li, Y; Lu, P.; Fill, E.E.

    1996-06-01

    We discuss high resolution two-dimensional near-field images of the neon-like nickel and germanium X-ray laser. The Asterix iodine laser, using a prepulse 5.23 ns before the main pulse, was used to irradiate slab targets. Our imaging diagnostic consisted of a concave multilayer mirror that imaged the X-ray laser line (with a magnification of ten) onto a backside illuminated X-ray CCD detector. A great deal of structure was observed in the near field images, particularly in the J=0-1 emission. We observed a large difference in the spatial dependence of the J=0-1 and J=2-1 lines of germanium, with the J=2-1 emission peaking farther away from the original target surface. The prepulse level was varied and observed to have a significant effect on the spatial dependence of the germanium and nickel laser lines. A larger prepulse moved the peak emission farther away from the target surface. These measurements are generally consistent with hydrodynamic simulations coupled with atomic kinetics.

  18. Narrow Line X-Ray Calibration Source for High Resolution Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hokin, M.S.; McCammon, D.; Morgan, K.M.; Bandler, Simon Richard; Lee, S.J.; Moseley, S.H.; Smith, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    We are developing a narrow line calibration source for use with X-ray microcalorimeters. At energies below 300 electronvolts fluorescent lines are intrinsically broad, making calibration of high resolution detectors difficult. This source consists of a 405 nanometers (3 electronvolts) laser diode coupled to an optical fiber. The diode is pulsed to create approximately one hundred photons in a few microseconds. If the pulses are short compared to the rise time of the detector, they will be detected as single events with a total energy in the soft X-ray range. Poisson fluctuations in photon number per pulse create a comb of X-ray lines with 3 electronvolts spacing, so detectors with energy resolution better than 2 electronvolts are required to resolve the individual lines. Our currently unstabilized diode has a multimode width less than 1 nanometer, giving a 300 electronvolt event a Full width at half maximum (FWHM) less than 0.1 electronvolts. By varying the driving voltage, or pulse width, the source can produce a comb centered on a wide range of energies. The calibration events are produced at precisely known times. This allows continuous calibration of a flight mission without contaminating the observed spectrum and with minimal deadtime.

  19. Design of High Resolution Soft X-Ray Microcalorimeters Using Magnetic Penetration Thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busch. Sarah; Balvin, Manuel; Bandler, Simon; Denis, Kevin; Finkbeiner, Fred; Porst, Jan-Patrick; Sadlier, Jack; Smith, Stephen; Stevenson, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We have designed high-resolution soft x-ray microcalorimeters using magnetic penetration thermometers (MPTs) in an array of pixels covering a total of 2 square centimeters to have a resolving power of 300 at energies around 300 eV. This performance is desirable for studying the soft x-ray background from the warm hot intergalactic medium. MPT devices have small sensor heat capacity and high responsivities, which makes them excellent detector technology for attempting to attain sub-eV resolution. We are investigating the feasibility of pixels with absorbers that are 625 x 625 square micrometers, up to 1 x 1 square millimeters in area and 0.35 micrometer thick and thinner. Our tests have shown that suspended gold absorbers 0.35 micrometers thick (RRR = 6.7) are feasible to fabricate. We modeled the thermal diffusion from such thin gold over the size of a 625 x 625 square micrometer absorber, and conclude that the effect of the thermalization on the resolution of a 300 eV photon is an additional approximately 0.2 eV FWHM of broadening. We discuss the thermal effects of small absorber attachment sterns on solid substrate, as well as considerations for multiplexed readout. We will present the progress we have made towards building and testing this soft x-ray detector.

  20. A compact high-resolution X-ray ion mobility spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Reinecke, T; Kirk, A T; Heptner, A; Niebuhr, D; Böttger, S; Zimmermann, S

    2016-05-01

    For the ionization of gaseous samples, most ion mobility spectrometers employ radioactive ionization sources, e.g., containing (63)Ni or (3)H. Besides legal restrictions, radioactive materials have the disadvantage of a constant radiation with predetermined intensity. In this work, we replaced the (3)H source of our previously described high-resolution ion mobility spectrometer with 75 mm drift tube length with a commercially available X-ray source. It is shown that the current configuration maintains the resolving power of R = 100 which was reported for the original setup containing a (3)H source. The main advantage of an X-ray source is that the intensity of the radiation can be adjusted by varying its operating parameters, i.e., filament current and acceleration voltage. At the expense of reduced resolving power, the sensitivity of the setup can be increased by increasing the activity of the source. Therefore, the performance of the setup can be adjusted to the specific requirements of any application. To investigate the relation between operating parameters of the X-Ray source and the performance of the ion mobility spectrometer, parametric studies of filament current and acceleration voltage are performed and the influence on resolving power, peak height, and noise is analyzed.

  1. High-resolution, near-real-time x-ray video imaging without image intensification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengers, Paul

    1993-12-01

    This paper discusses a type of x-ray camera designed to generate standard RS-170 video output that does not use x-ray or optical image intensifiers. Instead, it employs a very sensitive, very high resolution CCD sensor which views an x-ray-to-light conversion screen directly through a high speed imaging lens. This new solid state TV camera, which is described later, has very low readout noise plus unusually high gain which enables it to generate real-time video with incident flux levels typical of many inspection applications. Perhaps more important is an ability to integrate for multiple frame intervals on the chip followed by the output of a standard, RS-170 format video frame containing two balanced interlaced fields. In this integrating mode excellent quality images of low contrast objects can be obtained with only a few tenths of a second integration intervals. The basic elements of this type of camera are described and applications discussed where this approach appears to have important advantages over other methods in common use.

  2. Final report: high resolution lensless 3D imaging of nanostructures with coherent x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, Chris

    2011-04-14

    This project helped pioneer the core capabilities of coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) using X rays at synchrotron light source facilities. We developed an apparatus that was used for CDI at the Advanced Light Source, and applied it to 2D and 3D imaging of nanostructures. We also explored a number of conceptual and computational issues on the reconstruction of CDI data.

  3. A High Resolution Full Field Transmission X-ray Microscope at SSRL

    SciTech Connect

    Luening, Katharina; Pianetta, Piero; Yun Wenbing; Almeida, Eduardo; Meulen, Marjolein van der

    2007-01-19

    The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) in collaboration with Xradia Inc., the NASA Ames Research Center and Cornell University is implementing a commercial hard x-ray full field imaging microscope based on zone plate optics on a wiggler beam line on SPEAR3. This facility will provide unprecedented analytical capabilities for a broad range of scientific areas and will enable research on nanoscale phenomena and structures in biology as well as materials science and environmental science. This instrument will provide high resolution x-ray microscopy, tomography, and spectromicroscopy capabilities in a photon energy range between 5-14 keV. The spatial resolution of the TXM microscope is specified as 20 nm exploiting imaging in third diffraction order. This imaging facility will optimally combine the latest imaging technology developed by Xradia Inc. with the wiggler source characteristics at beam line 6-2 at SSRL. This will result in an instrument capable of high speed and high resolution imaging with spectral tunability for spectromicroscopy, element specific and Zernike phase contrast imaging. Furthermore, a scanning microprobe capability will be integral to the system thus allowing elemental mapping and fluorescence yield XANES to be performed with a spatial resolution of about 1 {mu}m without introducing any changes to the optical configuration of the instrument.

  4. A High Resolution Full Field Transmission X-ray Microscope at SSRL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüning, Katharina; Pianetta, Piero; Yun, Wenbing; Almeida, Eduardo; van der Meulen, Marjolein

    2007-01-01

    The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) in collaboration with Xradia Inc., the NASA Ames Research Center and Cornell University is implementing a commercial hard x-ray full field imaging microscope based on zone plate optics on a wiggler beam line on SPEAR3. This facility will provide unprecedented analytical capabilities for a broad range of scientific areas and will enable research on nanoscale phenomena and structures in biology as well as materials science and environmental science. This instrument will provide high resolution x-ray microscopy, tomography, and spectromicroscopy capabilities in a photon energy range between 5-14 keV. The spatial resolution of the TXM microscope is specified as 20 nm exploiting imaging in third diffraction order. This imaging facility will optimally combine the latest imaging technology developed by Xradia Inc. with the wiggler source characteristics at beam line 6-2 at SSRL. This will result in an instrument capable of high speed and high resolution imaging with spectral tunability for spectromicroscopy, element specific and Zernike phase contrast imaging. Furthermore, a scanning microprobe capability will be integral to the system thus allowing elemental mapping and fluorescence yield XANES to be performed with a spatial resolution of about 1 μm without introducing any changes to the optical configuration of the instrument.

  5. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of four active galaxies - Probing the intercloud medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lum, Kenneth S. K.; Canizares, Claude R.; Markert, Thomas H.; Arnaud, Keith A.

    1990-07-01

    The focal plane crystal spectrometer (FPCS) on the Einstein Observatory has been used to perform a high-resolution spectroscopic search for oxygen X-ray line emission from four active galaxies: Fairall 9, Mrk 421, Mrk 501, and PKS 0548 - 322. Specifically, O VIII Ly-alpha and Ly-beta, whose unredshifted energies are 653 and 775 eV, respectively, were sought. No narrow-line emission was detected within the energy bands searched. Upper limits are calculated on the line flux from these sources of 30 eV equivalent width and use a photoionization model to place corresponding upper limits on the densities of diffuse gas surrounding the active nuclei. The upper limits on gas density range from about 0.02-50/cu cm and probe various radial distances from the central source. This is the first time high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy has been used to place constraints on the intercloud medium in active galaxies.

  6. Focal spot deblurring for high resolution direct conversion x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Rana, R.; Russ, M.; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2016-03-01

    Small pixel high resolution direct x-ray detectors have the advantage of higher spatial sampling and decreased blurring characteristic. The limiting factors for such systems becomes the degradation due to the focal spot size. One solution is a smaller focal spot; however, this can limit the output of the x-ray tube. Here a software solution of deconvolving with an estimated focal spot blur is presented. To simulate images from a direct detector affected with focal-spot blur, first a set of high-resolution stent images (FRED from Microvention, Inc., Tustin, CA) were acquired using a 75μm pixel size Dexela-Perkin-Elmer detector and frame averaged to reduce quantum noise. Then the averaged image was blurred with a known Gaussian blur. To add noise to the blurred image a flat-field image was multiplied with the blurred image. Both the ideal and the noisy-blurred images were then deconvolved with the known Gaussian function using either threshold-based inverse filtering or Weiner deconvolution. The blur in the ideal image was removed and the details were recovered successfully. However, the inverse filtering deconvolution process is extremely susceptible to noise. The Weiner deconvolution process was able to recover more of the details of the stent from the noisy-blurred image, but for noisier images, stent details are still lost in the recovery process.

  7. Development of high resolution x-ray spectrometers for the investigation of bioinorganic chemistry in metalloproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drury, Owen Byron

    We have built an X-ray spectrometer for synchrotron-based high-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy. The spectrometer uses four 9-pixel arrays of superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) as sensors. They infer the energy of an absorbed X-ray from a temporary increase in tunneling current. The STJs are operated in a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) that uses liquid nitrogen and helium for precooling to 77 K and 4.2 K, and gallium gadolinium garnet and iron ammonium sulfate to attain a base temperature below 0.1 K. The sensors are held at the end of a 40-cm-long cold finger within ˜1 cm of a sample located inside the vacuum chamber of a synchrotron beam line end station. The spectrometer has an energy resolution between 10 eV and 20 eV FWHM below 1 keV, can be operated at rates up to ˜106 counts/s. STJ spectrometers are suited for chemical analysis of dilute samples by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in cases where conventional germanium detectors do not have enough energy resolution. We have used this STJ spectrometer at the Advanced Light Source synchrotron for spectroscopy on the lower energy X-ray absorption edges of the elements Mo, S, Fe and N. These elements play an important role in biological nitrogen fixation at the metalloprotein nitrogenase, and we have examined if STJ spectrometers can be used to provide new insights into some of the open questions regarding the reaction mechanism of this protein. We have taken X-ray absorption near-edge spectra (XANES) and extended fine structure spectra (EXAFS) of an Fe 6N(CO)15-compound containing a single N atom inside a cluster of six Fe atoms, as postulated to exist inside the Fe-S cluster of the FeMo-cofactor (FeMo-co) in nitrogenase. The STJ detector has enabled the first-ever extended range EXAFS scans on nitrogen through the oxygen K-edge, enabling a comparison with N EXAFS on FeMo-co. We have taken iron L23-edge spectra of the Fe-S cluster in FeMo-co, which can be

  8. Laboratory Astrophysics in Support of High-Resolution X-ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, Peter

    2016-06-01

    X-ray astronomy entered a new era with the advent of high-spectral resolution grating spectrometers aboard the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories and, very recently, with the launch of the high-resolution calorimeter (SXS) aboard the Hitomi mission. The ability to perform spectrally resolved observations has necessitated increasing accuracies in the spectral models used to analyze astrophysical data. Our laboratory measurements have responded to that need by assessing the fidelity of the atomic data used in the models and by calibrating specific spectral diagnostics. Our spectroscopy measurements are mostly carried out at the electron beam ion trap facility at Livermore, which produces the relevant ions in a density and temperature environment similar to those of astrophysical plasmas. Recent measurements include the identification of lines seen with Chandra's LETGS in astrophysical spectra but missing in the models; wavelength determinations of K-shell transitions in L-shell ions and of L-shell transitions in M-shell ions needed for the interpretation of absorption line features; and the calibration of the line emission of key spectroscopic diagnostics, such as the L-shell lines of Fe XVII. Observations with Hitomi's SXS will be sensitive to X-ray line formation by charge exchange, which has already been associated with the X-ray emission from comets and which has been suggested as an alternative explanation of the 3.55 keV line, both so far only observed with CCD resolution. Line formation by charge exchange has been another area of our laboratory astrophysics work, and we have recently uncovered that a large fraction of double charge exchange events decay unexpectedly by double X-ray emission. Moreover, we have shown that electron rearrangement following double charge exchange can lead to X-ray energies well in excess of those predicted by current charge exchange models.This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL

  9. A directly converting high-resolution intra-oral X-ray imaging sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spartiotis, Konstantinos; Pyyhtiä, Jouni; Schulman, Tom; Puhakka, Kimmo; Muukkonen, Kari

    2003-04-01

    A digital intra-oral X-ray imaging sensor with an active area of 3.6×2.9 cm 2 and consisting of six charge-integrating CMOS signal readout circuits bump bonded to one high-resistivity silicon pixel detector has been developed and tested. The pixel size is 35 μm. The X-rays entering the sensor window are converted directly to electrical charge in the depleted detector material yielding minimum lateral signal spread and maximum image sharpness. The signal charge is collected on the gates of the input field effect transistors of the CMOS signal readout circuits. The analog signal readout is performed by multiplexing in the current mode independent of the signal charge collection enabling multiple readout cycles with negligible dead time and thus imaging with wide dynamic range. Since no intermediate conversion material of X-rays to visible light is needed, the sensor structure is very compact. The analog image signals are guided from the sensor output through a thin cable to signal processing, AD conversion and memory circuitry, which is realized as an intermediate electronic unit between the sensor and the computer. This unit controls the sensor, collects the data and transfers it via one of the standard computer buses for image processing, display and storage. The overall sensor design and operation are described and experimental MTF, SNR and DQE data are presented together with X-ray images.

  10. High-resolution bent-crystal spectrometer for the ultra-soft x-ray region

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; von Goeler, S.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.W.; Hulse, R.A.; Walling, R.S.

    1988-10-01

    A multichannel vacuum Brag-crystal spectrometer has been developed for high-resolution measurements of the line emission from tokamak plasmas in the wavelength region between 4 and 25 /angstrom/. The spectrometer employs a bent crystal in Johann geometry and a microchannel-plate intensified photodiode array. The instrument is capable of measuring high-resolution spectra (lambda/..delta..lambda approx. 3000) with fast time resolution (4 msec per spectrum) and good spatial resolution (3 cm). The spectral bandwidth is ..delta..lambda/lambda/sub 0/ = 8/angstrom/. A simple tilt mechanism allows access to different wavelength intervals. In order to illustrate the utility of the new spectrometer, time- and space-resolved measurements of the n = 3 to n = 2 spectrum of selenium from the Princeton Large Torus tokamak plasmas are presented. The data are used to determine the plasma transport parameters and to infer the radial distribution of fluorinelike, neonlike, and sodiumlike ions of selenium in the plasma. The new ultra-soft x-ray spectrometer has thus enabled us to demonstrate the utility of high-resolution L-shell spectroscopy of neonlike ions as a fusion diagnostic. 43 refs., 23 figs.

  11. High-resolution Bent-crystal Spectrometer for the Ultra-soft X-ray Region

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Beiersdorfer, P.; von Goeler, S.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Hulse, R. A.; Walling, R. S.

    1988-10-01

    A multichannel vacuum Brag-crystal spectrometer has been developed for high-resolution measurements of the line emission from tokamak plasmas in the wavelength region between 4 and 25 angstrom. The spectrometer employs a bent crystal in Johann geometry and a microchannel-plate intensified photodiode array. The instrument is capable of measuring high-resolution spectra (lambda/..delta..lambda approx. 3000) with fast time resolution (4 msec per spectrum) and good spatial resolution (3 cm). The spectral bandwidth is ..delta..lambda/lambda{sub 0} = 8 angstrom. A simple tilt mechanism allows access to different wavelength intervals. In order to illustrate the utility of the new spectrometer, time- and space-resolved measurements of the n = 3 to n = 2 spectrum of selenium from the Princeton Large Torus tokamak plasmas are presented. The data are used to determine the plasma transport parameters and to infer the radial distribution of fluorinelike, neonlike, and sodiumlike ions of selenium in the plasma. The new ultra-soft x-ray spectrometer has thus enabled us to demonstrate the utility of high-resolution L-shell spectroscopy of neonlike ions as a fusion diagnostic.

  12. Direct and quantitative comparison of pixelated density profiles to high resolution X-ray reflectivity data.

    SciTech Connect

    Fenter, Paul; Lee, S. S.; Skelton, A A; Cummings, Peter T

    2011-01-01

    A method for comparing pixelated density profiles (e.g. obtained from molecular dynamics or other computational techniques) with experimental X-ray reflectivity data both directly and quantitatively is described. The conditions under which such a comparison can be made quantitatively (e.g. with errors <1%) are determined theoretically by comparing calculated structure factors for an intrinsic continuous density profile with those obtained from density profiles that have been binned into regular spatial increments. The accuracy of the X-ray reflectivity calculations for binned density profiles is defined in terms of the inter-relationships between resolution of the X-ray reflectivity data (i.e. its range in momentum transfer), the chosen bin size and the width of the intrinsic density profile. These factors play a similar role in the application of any structure-factor calculations that involve the use of pixelated density profiles, such as those obtained from iterative phasing algorithms for inverting structures from X-ray reflectivity and coherent diffraction imaging data. Finally, it is shown how simulations of a quartz water interface can be embedded into an exact description of the bulk phases (including the substrate crystal and the fluid water, below and above the actual interface) to quantitatively reproduce the experimental reflectivity data of a solid liquid interface.

  13. Ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging

    DOEpatents

    Paulus, Michael J.; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed; Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William; Gleason, Shaun S.; Thomas, Jr., Clarence E.

    2002-01-01

    A method for ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging, comprising the steps of: focusing a high energy particle beam, for example x-rays or gamma-rays, onto a target object; acquiring a 2-dimensional projection data set representative of the target object; generating a corrected projection data set by applying a deconvolution algorithm, having an experimentally determined a transfer function, to the 2-dimensional data set; storing the corrected projection data set; incrementally rotating the target object through an angle of approximately 180.degree., and after each the incremental rotation, repeating the radiating, acquiring, generating and storing steps; and, after the rotating step, applying a cone-beam algorithm, for example a modified tomographic reconstruction algorithm, to the corrected projection data sets to generate a 3-dimensional image. The size of the spot focus of the beam is reduced to not greater than approximately 1 micron, and even to not greater than approximately 0.5 microns.

  14. X-ray Computed Tomography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Greg

    2001-01-01

    Describes computed tomography (CT), a medical imaging technique that produces images of transaxial planes through the human body. A CT image is reconstructed mathematically from a large number of one-dimensional projections of a plane. The technique is used in radiological examinations and radiotherapy treatment planning. (Author/MM)

  15. Novel Hybrid CMOS X-ray Detector Developments for Future Large Area and High Resolution X-ray Astronomy Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcone, Abe

    In the coming years, X-ray astronomy will require new soft X-ray detectors that can be read very quickly with low noise and can achieve small pixel sizes over a moderately large focal plane area. These requirements will be present for a variety of X-ray missions that will attempt to address science that was highly ranked by the Decadal Review, including missions with science that over-laps with that of IXO and ATHENA, as well as other missions addressing science topics beyond those of IXO and ATHENA. An X-ray Surveyor mission was recently endorsed by the NASA long term planning document entitled "Enduring Quests, Daring Visions," and a detailed description of one possible realization of such a mission has been referred to as SMART-X, which was described in a recent NASA RFI response. This provides an example of a future mission concept with these requirements since it has high X-ray throughput and excellent spatial resolution. We propose to continue to modify current active pixel sensor designs, in particular the hybrid CMOS detectors that we have been working with for several years, and implement new in-pixel technologies that will allow us to achieve these ambitious and realistic requirements on a timeline that will make them available to upcoming X-ray missions. This proposal is a continuation of our program that has been working on these developments for the past several years.

  16. Observation of thermomagnetically recorded domains with high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunashima, S.; Takagi, Nayuki; Yamaguchi, Atushi; Kume, Minoru; Fischer, P.; Kumazawa, M.

    2003-04-01

    Magnetic domains were thermomagnetically recorded on TbFeCo films using laser pulsed magnetic field modulation (LP-MFM) and light intensity modulation (LIM). The domains were observed with high resolution magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy (M-TXM) before and after the heat treatment in order to clarify the recording characteristics and the thermal stability of recorded domains. From the results of M-TXM images, it was found that isolated single marks whose lengths are much smaller than 100 nm can be recorded by LP-MFM but their mark lengths become often longer than designed. It was further confirmed that the heat treatment at 120 degree C for 50 hours does not influence significantly the crescent-shaped magnetic domains of 100 nm in width recorded using LP-MFM method and circular domains of 150 nm in diameter recorded using LIM method.

  17. Plasma Diagnostics in High Resolution X-Ray Spectra of Magnetic Cataclysmic Variables

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C W

    2001-10-02

    Using the Chandra HETG spectrum of EX Hya as an example, we discuss some of the plasma diagnostics available in high-resolution X-ray spectra of magnetic cataclysmic variables. Specifically, for conditions appropriate to collisional ionization equilibrium plasmas, we discuss the temperature dependence of the H- to He-like line intensity ratios and the density and photoexcitation dependence of the He-like R line ratios and the Fe XVII I(17.10 {angstrom})/I(17.05 {angstrom}) line ratio. We show that the plasma temperature in EX Hya spans the range from {approx}0.5 to {approx}10 keV and that the plasma density n {ge} 2 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}, orders of magnitude greater than that observed in the Sun or other late-type stars.

  18. EMCCD-Based High Resolution Dynamic X-Ray Detector for Neurovascular Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, P.; Vasan, S.N. Swetadri; Jain, A.; Panse, A.; Titus, A.H.; Cartwright, A. N.; Bednarek, D. R; Rudin, S.

    2012-01-01

    We have designed and developed from the discrete component level a high resolution dynamic detector for neurovascular interventions. The heart of the detector is a 1024 × 1024 pixel electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) with a pixel size of 13 × 13 μm2, bonded to a fiber optic plate (FOP), and optically coupled to a 350 μm micro-columnar CsI(TI) scintillator via a 3.3:1 fiber optic taper (FOT). The detector provides x-ray images of 9 cycles/mm resolution at 15 frames/sec and real time live video at 30 frames/sec with binning at a lower resolution, both independent of gain applied to EMCCD, as needed for region-of-interest (ROI) image guidance during neurovascular interventions. PMID:22256144

  19. Characterisation of LSO:Tb scintillator films for high resolution X-ray imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecilia, A.; Rack, A.; Douissard, P.-A.; Martin, T.; Dos Santos Rolo, T.; Vagovič, P.; Pelliccia, D.; Couchaud, M.; Dupré, K.; Baumbach, T.

    2011-05-01

    Within the framework of an FP6 project (SCINTAX)1The Project SCINTAX is funded by the European Community (STRP 033 427), . we developed a new thin film single crystal scintillator for high resolution X-ray imaging based on a layer of modified LSO (Lu2SiO5) grown by liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) on a dedicated substrate. In this work we present the characterisation of the scintillating LSO films in terms of optical and scintillation properties as well as spatial resolution performances. The obtained results are discussed and compared with the performances of the thin scintillating films commonly used in synchrotron-based micro-imaging applications.

  20. A high resolution spectrum of the diffuse soft X-ray background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowder, S. Gwynne

    Galactic contributions to the diffuse X-ray background were believed to largely come from thermal emission of hot gas and models of the Galactic neighborhood within ˜ 100 pc reflected this belief. However, recent observations led to the realization that emission from charge exchange within the Solar System might produce comparable intensities to that of thermal emission. A high resolution spectrum of the diffuse X-ray background from 0.1 to 1 keV was obtained for a ˜ 1 sr region of the sky centered at l = 90°, b = +60° in May 2008 using a 36 pixel array of microcalorimeters flown on a sounding rocket. With an energy resolution of 11 eV FWHM below 1 keV, the spectrum can be used to separate charge exchange contributions originating within the heliosphere from thermal emission of hot gas in the interstellar medium. The X-ray sensitivity below 1 keV was reduced about a factor of four by contamination that occurred early in the flight, limiting the significance of the results. The observed ratio of helium-like O VII forbidden plus intercombination to resonance lines is 1.2 +/- 1.2 at 90% confidence. This indicates that at least 67% of the emission is thermal. On the other hand, the observed ratio of C VI Lygamma to Lyalpha is 0.3+0.3-0.2 , requiring at least a 33% contribution from charge exchange. In addition to these astrophysical results, I present experimental improvements from the addition of a gold coating to the detector array substrate which greatly reduces extraneous signals and from the use of silicon support meshes which improves blocking filter robustness. I also detail a new optimal filtering analysis technique that preserves spectral resolution and live time in the presence of pulse overlap.

  1. High-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of metal compounds in neurodegenerative brain tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Collingwood, J.F.; Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M.R.; Batich, C.; Streit, W.J.; Eskin, T.; Terry, J.; Barrea, R.; Underhill, R.S.; Dobson, J.

    2008-06-16

    Fluorescence mapping and microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy are used to detect, locate and identify iron biominerals and other inorganic metal accumulations in neurodegenerative brain tissue at sub-cellular resolution (< 5 microns). Recent progress in developing the technique is reviewed. Synchrotron X-rays are used to map tissue sections for metals of interest, and XANES and XAFS are used to characterize anomalous concentrations of the metals in-situ so that they can be correlated with tissue structures and disease pathology. Iron anomalies associated with biogenic magnetite, ferritin and haemoglobin are located and identified in an avian tissue model with a pixel resolution {approx} 5 microns. Subsequent studies include brain tissue sections from transgenic Huntington's mice, and the first high-resolution mapping and identification of iron biominerals in human Alzheimer's and control autopsy brain tissue. Technical developments include use of microfocus diffraction to obtain structural information about biominerals in-situ, and depositing sample location grids by lithography for the location of anomalies by conventional microscopy. The combined techniques provide a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds and related metals in tissue. The information to be gained from this approach has implications for future diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration, and for our understanding of the mechanisms involved.

  2. High-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of metal compounds in neurodegenerative brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collingwood, J. F.; Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M. R.; Batich, C.; Streit, W. J.; Eskin, T.; Terry, J.; Barrea, R.; Underhill, R. S.; Dobson, J.

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence mapping and microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy are used to detect, locate and identify iron biominerals and other inorganic metal accumulations in neurodegenerative brain tissue at sub-cellular resolution (<5 microns). Recent progress in developing the technique is reviewed. Synchrotron X-rays are used to map tissue sections for metals of interest, and XANES and XAFS are used to characterise anomalous concentrations of the metals in-situ so that they can be correlated with tissue structures and disease pathology. Iron anomalies associated with biogenic magnetite, ferritin and haemoglobin are located and identified in an avian tissue model with a pixel resolution ~5 microns. Subsequent studies include brain tissue sections from transgenic Huntington's mice, and the first high-resolution mapping and identification of iron biominerals in human Alzheimer's and control autopsy brain tissue. Technical developments include use of microfocus diffraction to obtain structural information about biominerals in-situ, and depositing sample location grids by lithography for the location of anomalies by conventional microscopy. The combined techniques provide a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds and related metals in tissue. The information to be gained from this approach has implications for future diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration, and for our understanding of the mechanisms involved.

  3. High-resolution and large-volume tomography reconstruction for x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chang-Chieh; Hwu, Yeukuang; Ching, Yu-Tai

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a method of X-ray image acquisition for the high-resolution tomography reconstruction that uses a light source of synchrotron radiation to reconstruct a three-dimensional tomographic volume dataset for a nanoscale object. For large objects, because of the limited field-of-view, a projection image of an object should to be taken by several shots from different locations, and using an image stitching method to combine these image blocks together. In this study, the overlap of image blocks should be small because our light source is the synchrotron radiation and the X-ray dosage should be minimized as possible. We use the properties of synchrotron radiation to enable the image stitching and alignment success when the overlaps between adjacent image blocks are small. In this study, the size of overlaps can reach to 15% of the size of each image block. During the reconstruction, the mechanical stability should be considered because it leads the misalignment problem in tomography. We adopt the feature-based alignment

  4. Design and performance of AERHA, a high acceptance high resolution soft x-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiuzbǎian, Sorin G.; Hague, Coryn F.; Avila, Antoine; Delaunay, Renaud; Jaouen, Nicolas; Sacchi, Maurizio; Polack, François; Thomasset, Muriel; Lagarde, Bruno; Nicolaou, Alessandro; Brignolo, Stefania; Baumier, Cédric; Lüning, Jan; Mariot, Jean-Michel

    2014-04-01

    A soft x-ray spectrometer based on the use of an elliptical focusing mirror and a plane varied line spacing grating is described. It achieves both high resolution and high overall efficiency while remaining relatively compact. The instrument is dedicated to resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies. We set out how this optical arrangement was judged best able to guarantee performance for the 50 - 1000 eV range within achievable fabrication targets. The AERHA (adjustable energy resolution high acceptance) spectrometer operates with an effective angular acceptance between 100 and 250 μsr (energy dependent) and a resolving power well in excess of 5000 according to the Rayleigh criterion. The high angular acceptance is obtained by means of a collecting pre-mirror. Three scattering geometries are available to enable momentum dependent measurements with 135°, 90°, and 50° scattering angles. The instrument operates on the Synchrotron SOLEIL SEXTANTS beamline which serves as a high photon flux 2 × 200 μm2 focal spot source with full polarization control.

  5. Determination of plutonium in spent nuclear fuel using high resolution X-ray

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Kathryn G.; Reilly, Sean D.; Havrilla, George J.

    2015-05-30

    Characterization of Pu is an essential aspect of safeguards operations at nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. A novel analysis technique called hiRX (high resolution X-ray) has been developed for the direct measurement of Pu in spent nuclear fuel dissolver solutions. hiRX is based on monochromatic wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (MWDXRF), which provides enhanced sensitivity and specificity compared with conventional XRF techniques. A breadboard setup of the hiRX instrument was calibrated using spiked surrogate spent fuel (SSF) standards prepared as dried residues. Samples of actual spent fuel were utilized to evaluate the performance of the hiRX. The direct detection of just 39 ng of Pu is demonstrated. Initial quantitative results, with error of 4–27% and precision of 2% relative standard deviation (RSD), were obtained for spent fuel samples. The limit of detection for Pu (100 s) within an excitation spot of 200 μm diameter was 375 pg. This study demonstrates the potential for the hiRX technique to be utilized for the rapid, accurate, and precise determination of Pu. Moreover, the results highlight the analytical capability of hiRX for other applications requiring sensitive and selective nondestructive analyses.

  6. Development of a high resolution x-ray spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Efthimion, P. C.; Ellis, R.; Gao, L.; Maddox, J.; Pablant, N. A.; Schneider, M. B.; Chen, H.; Ayers, S.; Kauffman, R. L.; MacPhee, A. G.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bettencourt, R.; Ma, T.; Nora, R. C.; Scott, H. A.; Thorn, D. B.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nelson, D.; Shoup, M.; Maron, Y.

    2016-11-01

    A high resolution (E/ΔE = 1200-1800) Bragg crystal x-ray spectrometer is being developed to measure plasma parameters in National Ignition Facility experiments. The instrument will be a diagnostic instrument manipulator positioned cassette designed mainly to infer electron density in compressed capsules from Stark broadening of the helium-β (1s2-1s3p) lines of krypton and electron temperature from the relative intensities of dielectronic satellites. Two conically shaped crystals will diffract and focus (1) the Kr Heβ complex and (2) the Heα (1s2-1s2p) and Lyα (1s-2p) complexes onto a streak camera photocathode for time resolved measurement, and a third cylindrical or conical crystal will focus the full Heα to Heβ spectral range onto an image plate to provide a time integrated calibration spectrum. Calculations of source x-ray intensity, spectrometer throughput, and spectral resolution are presented. Details of the conical-crystal focusing properties as well as the status of the instrumental design are also presented.

  7. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy: the coming-of-age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaastra, J.

    2016-06-01

    Since the launch of Chandra and XMM-Newton, high-resolution X-ray spectra of cosmic sources of all kinds have become available. These spectra have resulted in major scientific breakthroughs. However, due to the techniques used, in general high-quality spectra can only be obtained for the brightest few sources of each class. Moreover, except for the most compact extended sources, like cool core clusters, grating spectra are limited to point sources. ASTRO-H makes another major step forward, in yielding for the first time high-quality spectra of extended sources, and improved spectral sensitivity in the Fe-K band. With the launch of Athena, X-ray spectroscopy will become mature. It allows us to extend the investigations from the few handful of brightest sources of each category to a large number of sources far away in space and time, or to get high time-resolution, high-spectral resolution spectra of bright time variable sources.

  8. Design and performance of AERHA, a high acceptance high resolution soft x-ray spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Chiuzbăian, Sorin G; Hague, Coryn F; Avila, Antoine; Delaunay, Renaud; Jaouen, Nicolas; Sacchi, Maurizio; Polack, François; Thomasset, Muriel; Lagarde, Bruno; Nicolaou, Alessandro; Brignolo, Stefania; Baumier, Cédric; Lüning, Jan; Mariot, Jean-Michel

    2014-04-01

    A soft x-ray spectrometer based on the use of an elliptical focusing mirror and a plane varied line spacing grating is described. It achieves both high resolution and high overall efficiency while remaining relatively compact. The instrument is dedicated to resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies. We set out how this optical arrangement was judged best able to guarantee performance for the 50 - 1000 eV range within achievable fabrication targets. The AERHA (adjustable energy resolution high acceptance) spectrometer operates with an effective angular acceptance between 100 and 250 μsr (energy dependent) and a resolving power well in excess of 5000 according to the Rayleigh criterion. The high angular acceptance is obtained by means of a collecting pre-mirror. Three scattering geometries are available to enable momentum dependent measurements with 135°, 90°, and 50° scattering angles. The instrument operates on the Synchrotron SOLEIL SEXTANTS beamline which serves as a high photon flux 2 × 200 μm(2) focal spot source with full polarization control.

  9. Design and performance of AERHA, a high acceptance high resolution soft x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Chiuzbăian, Sorin G. Hague, Coryn F.; Brignolo, Stefania; Baumier, Cédric; Lüning, Jan; Avila, Antoine; Delaunay, Renaud; Mariot, Jean-Michel; Jaouen, Nicolas; Polack, François; Thomasset, Muriel; Lagarde, Bruno; Nicolaou, Alessandro; Sacchi, Maurizio

    2014-04-15

    A soft x-ray spectrometer based on the use of an elliptical focusing mirror and a plane varied line spacing grating is described. It achieves both high resolution and high overall efficiency while remaining relatively compact. The instrument is dedicated to resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies. We set out how this optical arrangement was judged best able to guarantee performance for the 50 − 1000 eV range within achievable fabrication targets. The AERHA (adjustable energy resolution high acceptance) spectrometer operates with an effective angular acceptance between 100 and 250 μsr (energy dependent) and a resolving power well in excess of 5000 according to the Rayleigh criterion. The high angular acceptance is obtained by means of a collecting pre-mirror. Three scattering geometries are available to enable momentum dependent measurements with 135°, 90°, and 50° scattering angles. The instrument operates on the Synchrotron SOLEIL SEXTANTS beamline which serves as a high photon flux 2 × 200 μm{sup 2} focal spot source with full polarization control.

  10. Determination of plutonium in spent nuclear fuel using high resolution X-ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Kathryn G.; Reilly, Sean D.; Havrilla, George J.

    2015-08-01

    Characterization of Pu is an essential aspect of safeguards operations at nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. A novel analysis technique called hiRX (high resolution X-ray) has been developed for the direct measurement of Pu in spent nuclear fuel dissolver solutions. hiRX is based on monochromatic wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (MWDXRF), which provides enhanced sensitivity and specificity compared with conventional XRF techniques. A breadboard setup of the hiRX instrument was calibrated using spiked surrogate spent fuel (SSF) standards prepared as dried residues. Samples of actual spent fuel were utilized to evaluate the performance of the hiRX. The direct detection of just 39 ng of Pu is demonstrated. Initial quantitative results, with error of 4-27% and precision of 2% relative standard deviation (RSD), were obtained for spent fuel samples. The limit of detection for Pu (100 s) within an excitation spot of 200 μm diameter was 375 pg. This study demonstrates the potential for the hiRX technique to be utilized for the rapid, accurate, and precise determination of Pu. The results highlight the analytical capability of hiRX for other applications requiring sensitive and selective nondestructive analyses.

  11. Determination of plutonium in spent nuclear fuel using high resolution X-ray

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McIntosh, Kathryn G.; Reilly, Sean D.; Havrilla, George J.

    2015-05-30

    Characterization of Pu is an essential aspect of safeguards operations at nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. A novel analysis technique called hiRX (high resolution X-ray) has been developed for the direct measurement of Pu in spent nuclear fuel dissolver solutions. hiRX is based on monochromatic wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (MWDXRF), which provides enhanced sensitivity and specificity compared with conventional XRF techniques. A breadboard setup of the hiRX instrument was calibrated using spiked surrogate spent fuel (SSF) standards prepared as dried residues. Samples of actual spent fuel were utilized to evaluate the performance of the hiRX. The direct detection of just 39more » ng of Pu is demonstrated. Initial quantitative results, with error of 4–27% and precision of 2% relative standard deviation (RSD), were obtained for spent fuel samples. The limit of detection for Pu (100 s) within an excitation spot of 200 μm diameter was 375 pg. This study demonstrates the potential for the hiRX technique to be utilized for the rapid, accurate, and precise determination of Pu. Moreover, the results highlight the analytical capability of hiRX for other applications requiring sensitive and selective nondestructive analyses.« less

  12. HIGH-RESOLUTION X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY REVEALS THE SPECIAL NATURE OF WOLF-RAYET STAR WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Oskinova, L. M.; Hamann, W.-R.; Gayley, K. G.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Ignace, R.; Pollock, A. M. T.

    2012-03-10

    We present the first high-resolution X-ray spectrum of a putatively single Wolf-Rayet (WR) star. 400 ks observations of WR 6 by the XMM-Newton telescope resulted in a superb quality high-resolution X-ray spectrum. Spectral analysis reveals that the X-rays originate far out in the stellar wind, more than 30 stellar radii from the photosphere, and thus outside the wind acceleration zone where the line-driving instability (LDI) could create shocks. The X-ray emitting plasma reaches temperatures up to 50 MK and is embedded within the unshocked, 'cool' stellar wind as revealed by characteristic spectral signatures. We detect a fluorescent Fe line at Almost-Equal-To 6.4 keV. The presence of fluorescence is consistent with a two-component medium, where the cool wind is permeated with the hot X-ray emitting plasma. The wind must have a very porous structure to allow the observed amount of X-rays to escape. We find that neither the LDI nor any alternative binary scenario can explain the data. We suggest a scenario where X-rays are produced when the fast wind rams into slow 'sticky clumps' that resist acceleration. Our new data show that the X-rays in single WR star are generated by some special mechanism different from the one operating in the O-star winds.

  13. So Many Rockets - The Road to High Resolution Imaging in X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Stephen S.

    2013-01-01

    When I first begin to work on new imaging detectors for X-ray Astronomy I was at AS&E and I worked with Leon Van Speybroeck and Ed Kellogg on a sounding rocket project. We starting by using a microchannel plate image intensifier to detect X-ray photons and convert them to flashes of light that were recorded on 35 mm film frames. Simultaneously there was a 16 mm star camera taking frames so we could tell where the X-rays were coming from. I spent about 6 years working on this payload, eventually becoming the PI and evolving the detector from a film readout to an electronic readout (the crossed grid charge detector) that was the basis for the Einstein, ROSAT and Chandra High Resolution Imagers and Cameras. We had a series of about 6 or so rocket flights culminating in the 1978 flight that actually worked. We detected three photons from Sco X1, and background data from that flight allowed us to set the detector front bias voltage to minimize non-X-ray background for the Einstein HRI. Just about everything that could go wrong on those rockets did go wrong, from a switch not closing to a rocket misfire, to pointing 180 degrees off target. But we learned something each flight and kept coming back to try again. The worse thing for me was having to stay up all night at White Sands in a small darkroom where I could avoid the night crawlers and scorpions that frightened me to death. Not to mention the daredevil helicopter pilots who flew us to the recovery site hugging the ground at top speed all the way there! None-the-less, in the end we succeeded in our goals, and there is nothing so exciting as watching your payload being launched at night (even it did mean sneaking out from the bunker to do it!). Thanks to NASA and the US Navy's White Sands USS Desert Ship (LLS-1; Land Locked Ship - 1) for all the support.

  14. Real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements on shocked crystals at a synchrotron facility.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Y M; Turneaure, Stefan J; Perkins, K; Zimmerman, K; Arganbright, N; Shen, G; Chow, P

    2012-12-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory was used to obtain real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements to determine the microscopic response of shock-compressed single crystals. Disk shaped samples were subjected to plane shock wave compression by impacting them with half-inch diameter, flat-faced projectiles. The projectiles were accelerated to velocities ranging between 300 and 1200 m/s using a compact powder gun designed specifically for use at a synchrotron facility. The experiments were designed to keep the sample probed volume under uniaxial strain and constant stress for a duration longer than the 153.4 ns spacing between x-ray bunches. X-rays from a single pulse (<100 ps duration) out of the periodic x-ray pulses emitted by the synchrotron were used for the diffraction measurements. A synchronization and x-ray detection technique was developed to ensure that the measured signal was obtained unambiguously from the desired x-ray pulse incident on the sample while the sample was in a constant uniaxial strain state. The synchronization and x-ray detection techniques described can be used for a variety of x-ray measurements on shock compressed solids and liquids at the APS. Detailed procedures for applying the Bragg-Brentano parafocusing approach to single crystals at the APS are presented. Analytic developments to determine the effects of crystal substructure and non-ideal geometry on the diffraction pattern position and shape are presented. Representative real-time x-ray diffraction data, indicating shock-induced microstructural changes, are presented for a shock-compressed Al(111) sample. The experimental developments presented here provided, in part, the impetus for the Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) currently under development at the APS. Both the synchronization∕x-ray detection methods and the analysis equations for high-resolution single crystal x-ray diffraction can be used at the DCS.

  15. Real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements on shocked crystals at a synchrotron facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Y. M.; Turneaure, Stefan J.; Perkins, K.; Zimmerman, K.; Arganbright, N.; Shen, G.; Chow, P.

    2012-12-15

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory was used to obtain real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements to determine the microscopic response of shock-compressed single crystals. Disk shaped samples were subjected to plane shock wave compression by impacting them with half-inch diameter, flat-faced projectiles. The projectiles were accelerated to velocities ranging between 300 and 1200 m/s using a compact powder gun designed specifically for use at a synchrotron facility. The experiments were designed to keep the sample probed volume under uniaxial strain and constant stress for a duration longer than the 153.4 ns spacing between x-ray bunches. X-rays from a single pulse (<100 ps duration) out of the periodic x-ray pulses emitted by the synchrotron were used for the diffraction measurements. A synchronization and x-ray detection technique was developed to ensure that the measured signal was obtained unambiguously from the desired x-ray pulse incident on the sample while the sample was in a constant uniaxial strain state. The synchronization and x-ray detection techniques described can be used for a variety of x-ray measurements on shock compressed solids and liquids at the APS. Detailed procedures for applying the Bragg-Brentano parafocusing approach to single crystals at the APS are presented. Analytic developments to determine the effects of crystal substructure and non-ideal geometry on the diffraction pattern position and shape are presented. Representative real-time x-ray diffraction data, indicating shock-induced microstructural changes, are presented for a shock-compressed Al(111) sample. The experimental developments presented here provided, in part, the impetus for the Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) currently under development at the APS. Both the synchronization/x-ray detection methods and the analysis equations for high-resolution single crystal x-ray diffraction can be used at the DCS.

  16. A laboratory-based hard x-ray monochromator for high-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Seidler, G. T. Mortensen, D. R.; Remesnik, A. J.; Pacold, J. I.; Ball, N. A.; Barry, N.; Styczinski, M.; Hoidn, O. R.

    2014-11-15

    We report the development of a laboratory-based Rowland-circle monochromator that incorporates a low power x-ray (bremsstrahlung) tube source, a spherically bent crystal analyzer, and an energy-resolving solid-state detector. This relatively inexpensive, introductory level instrument achieves 1-eV energy resolution for photon energies of ∼5 keV to ∼10 keV while also demonstrating a net efficiency previously seen only in laboratory monochromators having much coarser energy resolution. Despite the use of only a compact, air-cooled 10 W x-ray tube, we find count rates for nonresonant x-ray emission spectroscopy comparable to those achieved at monochromatized spectroscopy beamlines at synchrotron light sources. For x-ray absorption near edge structure, the monochromatized flux is small (due to the use of a low-powered x-ray generator) but still useful for routine transmission-mode studies of concentrated samples. These results indicate that upgrading to a standard commercial high-power line-focused x-ray tube or rotating anode x-ray generator would result in monochromatized fluxes of order 10{sup 6}–10{sup 7} photons/s with no loss in energy resolution. This work establishes core technical capabilities for a rejuvenation of laboratory-based hard x-ray spectroscopies that could have special relevance for contemporary research on catalytic or electrical energy storage systems using transition-metal, lanthanide, or noble-metal active species.

  17. A laboratory-based hard x-ray monochromator for high-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidler, G. T.; Mortensen, D. R.; Remesnik, A. J.; Pacold, J. I.; Ball, N. A.; Barry, N.; Styczinski, M.; Hoidn, O. R.

    2014-11-01

    We report the development of a laboratory-based Rowland-circle monochromator that incorporates a low power x-ray (bremsstrahlung) tube source, a spherically bent crystal analyzer, and an energy-resolving solid-state detector. This relatively inexpensive, introductory level instrument achieves 1-eV energy resolution for photon energies of ˜5 keV to ˜10 keV while also demonstrating a net efficiency previously seen only in laboratory monochromators having much coarser energy resolution. Despite the use of only a compact, air-cooled 10 W x-ray tube, we find count rates for nonresonant x-ray emission spectroscopy comparable to those achieved at monochromatized spectroscopy beamlines at synchrotron light sources. For x-ray absorption near edge structure, the monochromatized flux is small (due to the use of a low-powered x-ray generator) but still useful for routine transmission-mode studies of concentrated samples. These results indicate that upgrading to a standard commercial high-power line-focused x-ray tube or rotating anode x-ray generator would result in monochromatized fluxes of order 106-107 photons/s with no loss in energy resolution. This work establishes core technical capabilities for a rejuvenation of laboratory-based hard x-ray spectroscopies that could have special relevance for contemporary research on catalytic or electrical energy storage systems using transition-metal, lanthanide, or noble-metal active species.

  18. Ab initio simulation of diffractometer instrumental function for high-resolution X-ray diffraction1

    PubMed Central

    Mikhalychev, Alexander; Benediktovitch, Andrei; Ulyanenkova, Tatjana; Ulyanenkov, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Modeling of the X-ray diffractometer instrumental function for a given optics configuration is important both for planning experiments and for the analysis of measured data. A fast and universal method for instrumental function simulation, suitable for fully automated computer realization and describing both coplanar and noncoplanar measurement geometries for any combination of X-ray optical elements, is proposed. The method can be identified as semi-analytical backward ray tracing and is based on the calculation of a detected signal as an integral of X-ray intensities for all the rays reaching the detector. The high speed of calculation is provided by the expressions for analytical integration over the spatial coordinates that describe the detection point. Consideration of the three-dimensional propagation of rays without restriction to the diffraction plane provides the applicability of the method for noncoplanar geometry and the accuracy for characterization of the signal from a two-dimensional detector. The correctness of the simulation algorithm is checked in the following two ways: by verifying the consistency of the calculated data with the patterns expected for certain simple limiting cases and by comparing measured reciprocal-space maps with the corresponding maps simulated by the proposed method for the same diffractometer configurations. Both kinds of tests demonstrate the agreement of the simulated instrumental function shape with the measured data. PMID:26089760

  19. High-resolution dichroic imaging of magnetic flux distributions in superconductors with scanning x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ruoß, S. Stahl, C.; Weigand, M.; Schütz, G.; Albrecht, J.

    2015-01-12

    The penetration of magnetic flux into high-temperature superconductors has been observed using a high-resolution technique based on x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Superconductors coated with thin soft-magnetic layers are observed in a scanning x-ray microscope under the influence of external magnetic fields. Resulting electric currents in the superconductor create an inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution above the superconductor and lead to a local reorientation of the ferromagnetic layer. Measuring the local magnetization of the ferromagnet by x-ray absorption microscopy with circular-polarized radiation allows the analysis of the magnetic flux distribution in the superconductor with a spatial resolution on the nanoscale.

  20. Achromatic and high-resolution full-field X-ray microscopy based on total-reflection mirrors.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Emi, Yoji; Kino, Hidetoshi; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2015-04-20

    We developed an achromatic and high-resolution full-field X-ray microscope based on advanced Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror optics that comprises two pairs of elliptical mirrors and hyperbolic mirrors utilizing the total reflection of X-rays. Performance tests to investigate the spatial resolution and chromatic aberration were performed at SPring-8. The microscope clearly resolved the pattern with ~100-nm feature size. Imaging the pattern by changing the X-ray energy revealed achromatism in the wide energy range of 8-11 keV.

  1. High resolution X-ray fluorescence imaging for a microbeam radiation therapy treatment planning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chtcheprov, Pavel; Inscoe, Christina; Burk, Laurel; Ger, Rachel; Yuan, Hong; Lu, Jianping; Chang, Sha; Zhou, Otto

    2014-03-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) uses an array of high-dose, narrow (~100 μm) beams separated by a fraction of a millimeter to treat various radio-resistant, deep-seated tumors. MRT has been shown to spare normal tissue up to 1000 Gy of entrance dose while still being highly tumoricidal. Current methods of tumor localization for our MRT treatments require MRI and X-ray imaging with subject motion and image registration that contribute to the measurement error. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel form of imaging to quickly and accurately assist in high resolution target positioning for MRT treatments using X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The key to this method is using the microbeam to both treat and image. High Z contrast media is injected into the phantom or blood pool of the subject prior to imaging. Using a collimated spectrum analyzer, the region of interest is scanned through the MRT beam and the fluorescence signal is recorded for each slice. The signal can be processed to show vascular differences in the tissue and isolate tumor regions. Using the radiation therapy source as the imaging source, repositioning and registration errors are eliminated. A phantom study showed that a spatial resolution of a fraction of microbeam width can be achieved by precision translation of the mouse stage. Preliminary results from an animal study showed accurate iodine profusion, confirmed by CT. The proposed image guidance method, using XRF to locate and ablate tumors, can be used as a fast and accurate MRT treatment planning system.

  2. High resolution, multiple-energy linear sweep detector for x-ray imaging

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, Victor; Goodman, Claude A.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus for generating plural electrical signals in a single scan in response to incident X-rays received from an object. Each electrical signal represents an image of the object at a different range of energies of the incident X-rays. The apparatus comprises a first X-ray detector, a second X-ray detector stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector, and an X-ray absorber stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector. The X-ray absorber provides an energy-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the first X-ray detector, but provides no absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the second X-ray detector. The first X-ray detector includes a linear array of first pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a first range of energies. The first X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a first electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the first pixels. The second X-ray detector includes a linear array of second pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a second range of energies, broader than the first range of energies. The second X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a second electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the second pixels.

  3. High resolution, multiple-energy linear sweep detector for x-ray imaging

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Goodman, C.A.

    1996-08-20

    Apparatus is disclosed for generating plural electrical signals in a single scan in response to incident X-rays received from an object. Each electrical signal represents an image of the object at a different range of energies of the incident X-rays. The apparatus comprises a first X-ray detector, a second X-ray detector stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector, and an X-ray absorber stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector. The X-ray absorber provides an energy-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the first X-ray detector, but provides no absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the second X-ray detector. The first X-ray detector includes a linear array of first pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a first range of energies. The first X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a first electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the first pixels. The second X-ray detector includes a linear array of second pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a second range of energies, broader than the first range of energies. The second X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a second electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the second pixels. 12 figs.

  4. High-Resolution X-Ray and Light Beam Induced Current (LBIC) Measurements of Multcrystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Budai, John D; Bennett, Charlee J C; Tischler, Jonathan Zachary; Duty, Chad E; Yelundur, V.; Rohatgi, A.

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution, spatially-resolved x-ray Laue patterns and high-resolution light beam induced current (LBIC) measurements are combined to study two multicrystalline solar cells made from the Heat Exchanger Method (HEM) and the Sting Ribbon Growth technique. The LBIC measurements were made at 4 different wavelengths (488, 633, 780, and 980 nm), resulting in penetration depths ranging from <1 {mu}m to >100 {mu}m. There is a strong correlation between the x-ray and LBIC measurements, showing that some twins and grain boundaries are effective in the reduction of local quantum efficiency, while others are benign.

  5. Characterization of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectrometers for high energy density physics and light source experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K. W. Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparacio, L.; Efthimion, P.; Pablant, N. A.; Lu, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Magee, E.

    2014-11-15

    A high resolution 1D imaging x-ray spectrometer concept comprising a spherically bent crystal and a 2D pixelated detector is being optimized for diagnostics of small sources such as high energy density physics (HEDP) and synchrotron radiation or x-ray free electron laser experiments. This instrument is used on tokamak experiments for Doppler measurements of ion temperature and plasma flow velocity profiles. Laboratory measurements demonstrate a resolving power, E/ΔE of order 10 000 and spatial resolution better than 10 μm. Initial tests of the high resolution instrument on HEDP plasmas are being performed.

  6. High resolution transmission soft X-ray microscopy of deterioration products developed in large concrete dams

    PubMed

    Kurtis; Monteiro; Brown; Meyer-Ilse

    1999-12-01

    In concrete structures, the reaction of certain siliceous aggregates with the highly alkaline concrete pore solution produces an alkali-silicate gel that can absorb water and expand. This reaction can lead to expansion, cracking, increased permeability, and decreased strength of the concrete. Massive concrete structures, such as dams, are particularly susceptible to the damage caused by the alkali-silica reaction because of the availability of water and because massive gravity dams usually do not contain steel reinforcement to restrain the expansion. Both the cement hydration products and alkali-silica reaction products are extremely sensitive to humidity. Consequently, characterization techniques that require high vacuum or drying, as many existing techniques do, are not particularly appropriate for the study of the alkali-silica reaction because artefacts are introduced. Environmental scanning electron micrographs and scanning electron micrographs with energy dispersive X-ray analysis results demonstrate the effect of drying on the morphology and chemical composition of the alkali-silicate reaction gel. Thus, the impetus for this research was the need to observe and characterize the alkali-silica reaction and its gel product on a microscopic level in a wet environment (i.e. without introducing artefacts due to drying). Only soft X-ray transmission microscopy provides the required high spatial resolution needed to observe the reaction process in situ. The alkali-silica reaction can be observed over time, in a wet condition, and at normal pressures, features unavailable with most other high resolution techniques. Soft X-rays also reveal information on the internal structure of the sample. The purpose of this paper is to present research, obtained using transmission soft X-ray microscopy, on the effect of concrete pore solution cations, namely sodium and calcium, on the product formed as a result of alkali attack. Alkali-silicate reaction (ASR) gel was obtained from

  7. X-ray rocking curve measurements of bent crystals. [used in High Resolution Spectrometer in Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakim, M. B.; Muney, W. S.; Fowler, W. B.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1988-01-01

    A three-crystal laboratory X-ray spectrometer is used to measure the Bragg reflection from concave cylindrically curved crystals to be used in the high-resolution X-ray spectrometer of the NASA Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). The first two crystals, in the dispersive (1.1) arrangement, select a narrow collimated monochromatic beam in the Cu K-alpha(1) line at 1.5 A (8.1 keV), which illuminates the test crystal. The angular centroids of rocking curves measured along the surface provide a measure of the conformity of the crystal to the desired radius of curvature. Individual and combined rocking-curve widths and areas provide a measure of the resolution and efficiency at 1.54 A. The crystals analyzed included LiF(200), PET, and acid phthalates such as TAP.

  8. A normal incidence, high resolution X-ray telescope for solar coronal observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.

    1984-01-01

    Efforts directed toward the completion of an X-ray telescope assembly design, the procurement of major components, and the coordination of optical fabrication and X-ray multilayer testing are reported.

  9. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of late-type stars with CHANDRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewe, R.; Raassen, A. J. J.; Kaastra, J. S.; van der Meer, R. L. J.; Brinkman, A. C.

    We have analyzed high-resolution (Δλ ≅ 0.06 Å) X-ray spectra in the region 6-180 Å of the coronae of the cool stars Capella, Procyon, and α Centauri. These stars were observed with the the CHANDRA Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (LETGS) between Sep. and Dec. 1999. Temperatures are derived from line ratios of helium-like lines and long-wavelength iron lines. Electron densities are obtained for the relatively cooler (few MK) and more tenuous (⪅ 10 11 cm -3) plasma components from the forbidden to intercombination line ratios in the helium-like triplets of O, N, and C and for the hotter (⪆ 5 MK) and denser (⪆ 10 12 cm -3) components (such as occur in Capella) from the helium-like triplets of Mg and Si and the ratios of Fe XIX-Fe XXII 2ℓ-2ℓ' lines above 90 Å. The implications of these results for the coronal structure are discussed.

  10. FRONT-END ASIC FOR HIGH RESOLUTION X-RAY SPECTROMETERS.

    SciTech Connect

    DE GERONIMO,G.; CHEN, W.; FRIED, J.; LI, Z.; PINELLI, D.A.; REHAK, P.; VERNON, E.; GASKIN, J.A.; RAMSEY, B.D.; ANELLI, G.

    2007-10-27

    We present an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for high-resolution x-ray spectrometers. The ASIC is designed to read out signals from a pixelated silicon drift detector (SDD). Each hexagonal pixel has an area of 15 mmz and an anode capacitance of less than 100 fF. There is no integrated Field Effect transistor (FET) in the pixel, rather, the readout is done by wirebonding the anodes to the inputs of the ASIC. The ASIC provides 14 channels of low-noise charge amplification, high-order shaping with baseline stabilization, and peak detection with analog memory. The readout is sparse and based on low voltage differential signaling. An interposer provides all the interconnections required to bias and operate the system. The channel dissipates 1.6 mW. The complete 14-pixel unit covers an area of 210 mm{sup 2}, dissipates 12 mW cm{sup -2}, and can be tiled to cover an arbitrarily large detection area. We measured a preliminary resolution of 172 eV at -35 C on the 6 keV peak of a {sup 55}Fe source.

  11. Ultra-high resolution water window x ray microscope optics design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, David L.; Wang, C.

    1993-01-01

    This project has been focused on the design and analysis of an ultra-high resolution water window soft-x-ray microscope. These activities have been accomplished by completing two tasks contained in the statement of work of this contract. The new results from this work confirm: (1) that in order to achieve resolutions greater than three times the wavelength of the incident radiation, it will be necessary to use spherical mirror surfaces and to use graded multilayer coatings on the secondary in order to accommodate the large variations of the angle of incidence over the secondary when operating the microscope at numerical apertures of 0.35 or greater; (2) that surface contour errors will have a significant effect on the optical performance of the microscope and must be controlled to a peak-to-valley variation of 50-100 A and a frequency of 8 periods over the surface of a mirror; and (3) that tolerance analysis of the spherical Schwarzschild microscope has been shown that the water window operations will require 2-3 times tighter tolerances to achieve a similar performance of operations with 130 A radiation. These results have been included in a manuscript included in the appendix.

  12. Early Tumor Development Captured Through Nondestructive, High Resolution Differential Phase Contrast X-ray Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Beheshti, A.; Pinzer, B. R.; McDonald, J. T.; Stampanoni, M.; Hlatky, L.

    2014-01-01

    Although a considerable amount is known about molecular dysregulations in later stages of tumor progression, much less is known about the regulated processes supporting initial tumor growth. Insight into such processes can provide a fuller understanding of carcinogenesis, with implications for cancer treatment and risk assessment. Work from our laboratory suggests that organized substructure emerges during tumor formation. The goal here was to examine the feasibility of using state-of-the-art differential phase contrast X-ray imaging to investigate density differentials that evolve during early tumor development. To this end the beamline for TOmographic Microscopy and Coherent rAdiology experimenTs (TOMCAT) at the Swiss Light Source was used to examine the time-dependent assembly of substructure in developing tumors. Differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging based on grating interferometry as implemented with TOMCAT, offers sensitivity to density differentials within soft tissues and a unique combination of high resolution coupled with a large field of view that permits the accommodation of larger tissue sizes (1 cm in diameter), difficult with other imaging modalities. PMID:24125488

  13. Application of a high-resolution x-ray fluorescence analyzer.

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B. W.; Attenkofer, K.; Experimental Facilities Division

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a high resolution x-ray fluorescence analyzer based on the principle of active optics. It combines a resolution of ca. 5 eV with a tunability over several keV and a wide solid-angle coverage (ca. 2 by 5 degrees). To date, this analyzer has been used in near-edge spectroscopy of gallium in GaAs, and for the detection and chemical speciation of trace amounts platinum in soot from an diesel engine. The latter application illustrates the use of the analyzer to enhance the signal-to-background ratio in trace-element x-ray fluorescence analysis. The analyzer is shown schematically in Fig. 1. In it, a strip of silicon is bent by an axial force from two pushers at its ends, and eight correctors act from above to bring the shape of the bent crystal to approximate a logarithmic spiral. A more detailed description of the device, its underlying theory, and adjustment procedures may be found elsewhere. The sample consisted of soot collected from the exhaust of a diesel engine burning a fuel with a platinum-based additive that was tested for the purpose of facilitating clean combustion. The concentration of platinum in the soot was about 100 ppm, and the chemical speciation (oxidation state, dispersed or in the form of nanoparticles, etc.) was unknown. A small speck of this soot containing 10{sup 12} to 10{sup 13} atoms was placed into the x-ray beam of the 11-ID-D station of the APS. The incident photon energy was scanned over the Pt L{sub 3} edge, and the Pt L{sub {alpha}1} fluorescence was detected using two silicon drift detectors (Vortex), one directly and one with the analyzer. The purpose of the analyzer in this application was to enhance the energy resolution by a factor of about 50 (250 eV for the drift detector, 5 eV for the analyzer), and thus reduce the background of elastically or Compton-scattered photons, while keeping the fluorescent line. Whereas the detector with the analyzer recorded a clear signature of platinum in the form of an absorption

  14. Bronnikov-aided correction for x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    De Witte, Yoni; Boone, Matthieu; Vlassenbroeck, Jelle; Dierick, Manuel; Van Hoorebeke, Luc

    2009-04-01

    When a very-low-absorbing sample is scanned at an x-ray computed tomography setup with a microfocus x-ray tube and a high-resolution detector, the obtained projection images contain not only absorption contrast but also phase contrast. While images without a phase signal can be reconstructed very well, such mixed phase and absorption images give rise to severe artifacts in the reconstructed slices. A method is described that applies a correction to these mixed projections to remove the phase signal. These corrected images can then be processed using a standard filtered backprojection algorithm to obtain reconstructions with only few or no phase artifacts. This new method, which we call the Bronnikov-aided correction (BAC), can be used in a broad variety of applications and without much additional effort. It is tested on a biological and a pharmaceutical sample, and results are evaluated and discussed by comparing them with those of conventional reconstruction methods. PMID:19340263

  15. High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy of multicharged argon and krypton ions using a laser-produced x-ray source with a gas-puff target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartnik, Andrzej; Dyakin, Vladimir M.; Faenov, Anatoly Y.; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Jarocki, Roman; Nilsen, Joseph; Osterheld, Albert L.; Skobelev, Igor Y.; Szczurek, Miroslaw

    1997-10-01

    A hot and dense plasma can be produced by high-power laser irradiation of a high-pressure gas puff target. The plasma emits strong x-ray radiation in low photon-energy range (soft x-rays and XUV radiation) and is considered to be used as a debrisless laser-produced x-ray source. It was shown that the laser-irradiated gas puff plasma is an ideal source for the high-resolution spectroscopic studies of complex spectra of the multicharged ions. This paper reports our investigations of x-ray spectra of heliumlike argon and neonlike krypton ions. The gas puff targets were created with the use of a specially designed high-pressure solenoid valve operating at a backing pressure up to 15 at and quipped with a sonic-type circular nozzle of 0.5 mm in diameter. Parameters of the gas puff targets were measured using x-ray shadowgraphy and laser interferometry. To irradiate the gas puff targets we have used a Nd:glass laser, which generates 10 J pulses in 1 ns FWHM. The laser beam was focused onto the gas puff target perpendicularly in respect to the flow of gas using an aspherical lens. The diameter of a laser beam in the focus were about 100 micrometers , what ensured the radiation power density to be of order of 1014 W/cm2. To measure x-ray spectra emitted by a laser-irradiated gas puff target we have used a simple focusing crystal spectrographs with a mica crystal curved into a spherical surface of radius R equals 100 mm. The spectra were recorded on Kodak RAR 2495 x-ray commercial film. The high resolving power of the spectrograph of about (lambda) /(Delta) (lambda) equals 10000 permitted high-precision wavelength spectral measurements. The measured x-ray spectra have the small spectra width of the observed lines associated with the low expansion velocity of the laser- irradiated gas puff plasma. Dielectronic sodiumlike satellites to neonlike krypton resonance lines have measured for the first time. High-resolution spectra of heliumlike argon were also obtained. The

  16. Design and performance of a soft-x-ray interferometer for ultra-high-resolution fourier transform spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J.; Hussain, Z.; Duarte, R.M.; Howells, M.R.

    1997-04-01

    A Fourier Transform Soft X-ray spectrometer (FT-SX) has been designed and is under construction for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as a branch of beamline 9.3.2. The spectrometer is a novel soft x-ray interferometer designed for ultra-high resolution (theoretical resolving power E/{delta}E{approximately}10{sup 6}) spectroscopy in the photon energy region of 60-120 eV. This instrument is expected to provide experimental results which sensitively test models of correlated electron processes in atomic and molecular physics. The design criteria and consequent technical challenges posed by the short wavelengths of x-rays and desired resolving power are discussed. The fundamental and practical aspects of soft x-ray interferometry are also explored.

  17. Experimental analysis of high-resolution soft x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Weilun; Anderson, Erik H.; Denbeaux, Gregory; Harteneck, Bruce; Pearson, Angelic L.; Olynick, Deirdre; Schneider, Gerd; Attwood, David

    2001-09-06

    The soft x-ray, full-field microscope XM-1 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (LBNL) Advanced Light Source has already demonstrated its capability to resolve 25-nm features. This was accomplished using a micro zone plate (MZP) with an outer zone width of 25 nm. Limited by the aspect ratio of the resist used in the fabrication, the gold-plating thickness of that zone plate is around 40 nm. However, some applications, in particular, biological imaging, prefer improved efficiency, which can be achieved by high-aspect-ratio zone plates. We accomplish this by using a bilayer-resist process in the zone plate fabrication. As our first attempt, a 40-nm-outer-zone-width MZP with a nickel-plating thickness of 150 nm (aspect ratio of 4:1) was successfully fabricated. Relative to the 25-nm MZP, this zone plate is ten times more efficient. Using this high-efficiency MZP, a line test pattern with half period of 30 nm is resolved by the microscope at photon energy of 500 eV. Furthermore, with a new multilayer mirror, the XM-1 can now perform imaging up to 1.8 keV. An image of a line test pattern with half period of 40 nm has a measured modulation of 90%. The image was taken at 1.77 keV with the high-efficiency MZP with an outer zone width of 35 nm and a nickel-plating thickness of 180 nm (aspect ratio of 5:1). XM-1 provides a gateway to high-resolution imaging at high energy. To measure frequency response of the XM-1, a partially annealed gold ''island'' pattern was chosen as a test object. After comparison with the SEM image of the pattern, the microscope has the measured cutoff of 19 nm, close to the theoretical one of 17 nm. The normalized frequency response, which is the ratio of the power density of the soft x-ray image to that of the SEM image, is shown in this paper.

  18. Design and image-quality performance of high resolution CMOS-based X-ray imaging detectors for digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, B. K.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Y. J.; Yun, S.; Cho, G.; Kim, H. K.; Seo, C.-W.; Jeon, S.; Huh, Y.

    2012-04-01

    In digital X-ray imaging systems, X-ray imaging detectors based on scintillating screens with electronic devices such as charge-coupled devices (CCDs), thin-film transistors (TFT), complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) flat panel imagers have been introduced for general radiography, dental, mammography and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications. Recently, a large-area CMOS active-pixel sensor (APS) in combination with scintillation films has been widely used in a variety of digital X-ray imaging applications. We employed a scintillator-based CMOS APS image sensor for high-resolution mammography. In this work, both powder-type Gd2O2S:Tb and a columnar structured CsI:Tl scintillation screens with various thicknesses were fabricated and used as materials to convert X-ray into visible light. These scintillating screens were directly coupled to a CMOS flat panel imager with a 25 × 50 mm2 active area and a 48 μm pixel pitch for high spatial resolution acquisition. We used a W/Al mammographic X-ray source with a 30 kVp energy condition. The imaging characterization of the X-ray detector was measured and analyzed in terms of linearity in incident X-ray dose, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE).

  19. Application of the high-resolution grazing-emission x-ray fluorescence method for impurities control in semiconductor nanotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Szlachetko, J.; Banas, D.; Kubala-Kukus, A.; Pajek, M.; Cao, W.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Hoszowska, J.; Kayser, Y.; Szlachetko, M.; Kavcic, M.; Salome, M.; Susini, J.

    2009-04-15

    We report on the application of synchrotron radiation based high-resolution grazing-emission x-ray fluorescence (GEXRF) method to measure low-level impurities on silicon wafers. The presented high-resolution GEXRF technique leads to direct detection limits of about 10{sup 12} atoms/cm{sup 2}. The latter can be presumably further improved down to 10{sup 7} atoms/cm{sup 2} by combining the synchrotron radiation-based GEXRF method with the vapor phase decomposition preconcentration technique. The capability of the high-resolution GEXRF method to perform surface-sensitive elemental mappings with a lateral resolution of several tens of micrometers was probed.

  20. High-resolution soft x-ray photoionization studies of selected molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, E.A.

    1993-08-01

    Near-edge soft x-ray photoionization spectra were measured for CO, SF{sub 6}, H{sub 2}S, and D{sub 2}S in the gas phase, using the Free University of Berlin plane-grating SX-700-II monochromator at the synchrotron radiation source BESSY. Photoionization spectra of carbon monoxide were measured near the carbon and oxygen K edges. Vibrational spacings and bond lengths are derived for several resonances. Results are consistent with equivalent-core model and indicate the different influences of the carbon and oxygen Is core holes. Corresponding spectra of H{sub 2}CO and D{sub 2}CO were also measured. Assignment of complex vibrational structure in valence-shell and Rydberg resonances is facilitated by comparison of spectra for the two isotopic species. Geometric and vibrational parameters are derived for several carbon 1s core-excited states. Isotopic shifts are observed in the energies and linewidths of some core-excited states. Sulfur hexafluoride photoionization spectra, measured near the sulfur L{sub 2,3} edges, show several series of weak, narrow Rydberg resonances. High resolution and good counting statistics allow a complete assignment of these states. Lineshapes of the broad inner-well resonances are analyzed to establish the magnitudes of vibrational and lifetime broadening in these states. Spectra of the H{sub 2}S and D{sub 2}S molecules were also measured near the sulfur L{sub 2,3} edges. Besides lower-energy transitions to inner-well states, a complex manifold of overlapping Rydberg resonances is observed. The rich fine structure of these states arises mainly from removal of orbital degeneracies in molecular field. Additional structure due to vibrational excitations in the final state is identified by comparison of the spectra for the two isotopic species.

  1. Feasibility study of high-resolution coherent diffraction microscopy using synchrotron x rays focused by Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yukio; Nishino, Yoshinori; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Mimura, Hidekazu; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Kubo, Hideto; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2009-04-15

    High-flux coherent x rays are necessary for the improvement of the spatial resolution in coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy (CXDM). In this study, high-resolution CXDM using Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors is proposed, and the mirrors are designed for experiments of the transmission scheme at SPring-8. Both the photon density and spatial coherence of synchrotron x rays focused by the KB mirrors are investigated by wave optical simulation. The KB mirrors can produce nearly diffraction-limited two-dimensional focusing x rays of approx1 mum in size at 8 keV. When the sample size is less than approx1 mum, the sample can be illuminated with full coherent x rays by adjusting the cross-slit size set between the source and the mirrors. From the estimated photon density at the sample position, the feasibility of CXDM with a sub-1-nm spatial resolution is suggested. The present ultraprecise figuring process enables us to fabricate mirrors for carrying out high-resolution CXDM experiments.

  2. High-resolution x-ray imaging of a globular cluster core: compact binaries in 47Tuc.

    PubMed

    Grindlay, J E; Heinke, C; Edmonds, P D; Murray, S S

    2001-06-22

    We have obtained high-resolution (approximately 1") deep x-ray images of the globular cluster 47Tucanae (NGC 104) with the Chandra X-ray Observatory to study the population of compact binaries in the high stellar density core. A 70-kilosecond exposure of the cluster reveals a centrally concentrated population of faint (Lx approximately 10(30-33) ergs per second) x-ray sources, with at least 108 located within the central 2' x 2.5' and greater, similar half with Lx approximately 10(30.5) ergs per second. All 15 millisecond pulsars (MSPs) recently located precisely by radio observations are identified, though 2 are unresolved by Chandra. The x-ray spectral and temporal characteristics, as well as initial optical identifications with the Hubble Space Telescope, suggest that greater, similar50 percent are MSPs, about 30 percent are accreting white dwarfs, about 15 percent are main-sequence binaries in flare outbursts, and only two to three are quiescent low-mass x-ray binaries containing neutron stars, the conventional progenitors of MSPs. An upper limit of about 470 times the mass of the sun is derived for the mass of an accreting central black hole in the cluster. These observations provide the first x-ray "color-magnitude" diagram for a globular cluster and census of its compact object and binary population. PMID:11358997

  3. Superconducting High-Resolution X-Ray Spectrometers For Chemical State Analysis Of Dilute Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Stephan; Drury, Owen B.; Funk, Tobias; Sherrell, Darren; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Labov, Simon E.; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2004-05-01

    Cryogenic X-ray spectrometers operating at temperatures below 1 K combine high energy resolution with broadband efficiency for X-ray energies up to 10 keV. They offer advantages for chemical state analysis of dilute samples by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in cases where conventional Ge or Si(Li) detectors lack energy resolution and grating spectrometers lack detection efficiency. We are developing soft X-ray spectrometers based on superconducting Nb-Al-AlOx-Al-Nb tunnel junction (STJ) technology. X-rays absorbed in one of the superconducting electrodes generate excess charge carriers in proportion to their energy, thereby producing a measurable temporary increase in tunneling current. For STJ operation at the synchrotron, we have designed a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) with a cold finger that holds a 3 × 3 array of STJs inside the UHV sample chamber at a temperature of ˜0.1 K within ˜15 mm of a room temperature sample. Our STJ spectrometer can have an energy resolution below 10 eV FWHM for X-ray energies up to 1 keV, and has total count rate capabilities above 100,000 counts/s. We will describe detector performance in synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence experiments and demonstrate its use for XAS on a dilute metal site in a metalloprotein.

  4. HIGH RESOLUTION X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF THE LOCAL HOT GAS ALONG THE 3C 273 SIGHTLINE

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Taotao; Jiang, Xiaochuan

    2014-04-20

    X-ray observations of highly ionized metal absorption lines at z = 0 provide critical information on the hot gas distribution in and around the Milky Way. We present a study of more than 10 yr of Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of 3C 273, one of the brightest extragalactic X-ray sources. Compared with previous works, we obtain much tighter constraints on the physical properties of the X-ray absorber. We also find a large, non-thermal velocity at ∼100-150 km s{sup –1}, the main reason for the higher line equivalent width when compared with other sightlines. Using joint analysis with X-ray emission and ultraviolet observations, we derive a size of 5-15 kpc and a temperature of (1.5-1.8) × 10{sup 6} K for the X-ray absorber. The 3C 273 sightline passes through a number of Galactic structures, including radio loops I and IV, the North Polar Spur, and the neighborhood of the newly discovered ''Fermi bubbles''. We argue that the X-ray absorber is unlikely to be associated with the nearby radio loops I and IV; however, the non-thermal velocity can be naturally explained as the result of the expansion of the ''Fermi bubbles''. Our data imply a shock-expansion velocity of 200-300 km s{sup –1}. Our study indicates a likely complex environment for the production of the Galactic X-ray absorbers along different sightlines, and highlights the significance of probing galactic feedback with high resolution X-ray spectroscopy.

  5. Plant tissues in 3D via X-ray tomography: simple contrasting methods allow high resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Staedler, Yannick M; Masson, David; Schönenberger, Jürg

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomography remains strongly underused in plant sciences despite its high potential in delivering detailed 3D phenotypical information because of the low X-ray absorption of most plant tissues. Existing protocols to study soft tissues display poor performance, especially when compared to those used on animals. More efficient protocols to study plant material are therefore needed. Flowers of Arabidopsis thaliana and Marcgravia caudata were immersed in a selection of contrasting agents used to treat samples for transmission electron microscopy. Grayscale values for floral tissues and background were measured as a function of time. Contrast was quantified via a contrast index. The thick buds of Marcgravia were scanned to determine which contrasting agents best penetrate thick tissues. The highest contrast increase with cytoplasm-rich tissues was obtained with phosphotungstate, whereas osmium tetroxide and bismuth tatrate displayed the highest contrast increase with vacuolated tissues. Phosphotungstate also displayed the best sample penetration. Furthermore, infiltration with phosphotungstate allowed imaging of all plants parts at a high resolution of 3 µm, which approaches the maximum resolution of our equipment: 1.5 µm. The high affinity of phosphotungstate for vasculature, cytoplasm-rich tissue, and pollen causes these tissues to absorb more X-rays than the surrounding tissues, which, in turn, makes these tissues appear brighter on the scan data. Tissues with different brightness can then be virtually dissected from each other by selecting the bracket of grayscale to be visualized. Promising directions for the future include in silico phenotyping and developmental studies of plant inner parts (e.g., ovules, vasculature, pollen, and cell nuclei) via virtual dissection as well as correlations of quantitative phenotypes with omics datasets. Therefore, this work represents a crucial improvement of previous methods, allowing new directions of research to be

  6. Dark-field X-ray ptychography: Towards high-resolution imaging of thick and unstained biological specimens

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Shimomura, Kei; Hirose, Makoto; Burdet, Nicolas; Takahashi, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    The phase shift of light or electrons in objects is now necessary for probing weak-phase objects such as unstained biological specimens. Optical microscopy (OM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used to observe weak-phase objects. However, conventional OM has low spatial resolution and TEM is limited to thin specimens. Here, we report on the development of dark-field X-ray ptychography, which combines X-ray ptychography and X-ray in-line holography, to observe weak-phase objects with a phase resolution better than 0.01 rad, a spatial resolution better than 15 nm, and a field of view larger than 5 μm. We apply this method to the observation of both the outline and magnetosomes of the magnetotactic bacteria MO-1. Observation of thick samples with high resolution is expected to find broad applications in not only biology but also materials science. PMID:27734961

  7. Dark-field X-ray ptychography: Towards high-resolution imaging of thick and unstained biological specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Shimomura, Kei; Hirose, Makoto; Burdet, Nicolas; Takahashi, Yukio

    2016-10-01

    The phase shift of light or electrons in objects is now necessary for probing weak-phase objects such as unstained biological specimens. Optical microscopy (OM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used to observe weak-phase objects. However, conventional OM has low spatial resolution and TEM is limited to thin specimens. Here, we report on the development of dark-field X-ray ptychography, which combines X-ray ptychography and X-ray in-line holography, to observe weak-phase objects with a phase resolution better than 0.01 rad, a spatial resolution better than 15 nm, and a field of view larger than 5 μm. We apply this method to the observation of both the outline and magnetosomes of the magnetotactic bacteria MO-1. Observation of thick samples with high resolution is expected to find broad applications in not only biology but also materials science.

  8. Development of High Resolution Hard X-Ray Telescope with Multilayer Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinton, John C. (Technical Monitor); Gorenstein, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The major objective of this program is the development of a focusing hard X-ray telescope with moderately high angular resolution, i .e. comparable to the telescopes of XMM-Newton. The key ingredients of the telescope are a depth graded multilayer coatings and electroformed nickel substrates that are considerably lighter weight than those of previous missions such as XMM-Newton, which have had conventional single metal layer reflective coatings and have operated at much lower energy X-rays. The ultimate target mission for this technology is the Hard X-Ray Telescope (HXT) of the Constellation X-Ray Mission. However, it is applicable to potential SMEX and MIDEX programs as well.

  9. Prototype high resolution multienergy soft x-ray array for NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Tritz, K.; Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Kaita, R.; Roquemore, L.

    2010-10-15

    A novel diagnostic design seeks to enhance the capability of multienergy soft x-ray (SXR) detection by using an image intensifier to amplify the signals from a larger set of filtered x-ray profiles. The increased number of profiles and simplified detection system provides a compact diagnostic device for measuring T{sub e} in addition to contributions from density and impurities. A single-energy prototype system has been implemented on NSTX, comprised of a filtered x-ray pinhole camera, which converts the x-rays to visible light using a CsI:Tl phosphor. SXR profiles have been measured in high performance plasmas at frame rates of up to 10 kHz, and comparisons to the toroidally displaced tangential multi-energy SXR have been made.

  10. Acoustically Mounted Microcrystals Yield High Resolution X-ray Structures†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Alexei S.; Engel, Matthew A.; Stearns, Richard; Datwani, Sammy; Olechno, Joe; Ellson, Richard; Skinner, John M.; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a general strategy to determine structures from showers of microcrystals. It uses acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) to transfer 2.5 nanoliter droplets from the surface of microcrystal slurries, through the air, and onto mounting micromesh pins. Individual microcrystals are located by raster-scanning a several micron X-ray beam across the cryocooled micromeshes. X-ray diffraction datasets merged from several micron-sized crystals are used to solve 1.8 Å resolution crystal structures. PMID:21542590

  11. Competing orbital ordering in RVO{sub 3} compounds: High-resolution x-ray diffraction and thermal expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Sage, M. H.; Blake, G. R.; Palstra, T. T. M.; Marquina, C.

    2007-11-15

    We report evidence for the phase coexistence of orbital orderings of different symmetry in RVO{sub 3} compounds with intermediate-size rare earths. Through a study by high-resolution x-ray powder diffraction and thermal expansion, we show that the competing orbital orderings are associated with the magnitude of the VO{sub 6} octahedral tilting and magnetic exchange striction in these compounds and that the phase-separated state is stabilized by lattice strains.

  12. Ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition-rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Chubar, Oleg; Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Madsen, Anders; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar; Shvyd'ko, Yuri; Sutter, John

    2016-03-01

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm(-1) spectral and momentum-transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm(-1) are required to close the gap in energy-momentum space between high- and low-frequency probes. It is shown that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a 100-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. Wave-optics calculations show that about 7 × 10(12) photons s(-1) in a 90 µeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. This will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS. PMID:26917127

  13. Ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition-rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Chubar, Oleg; Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Madsen, Anders; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar; Shvyd'ko, Yuri; Sutter, John

    2016-03-01

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm(-1) spectral and momentum-transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm(-1) are required to close the gap in energy-momentum space between high- and low-frequency probes. It is shown that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a 100-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. Wave-optics calculations show that about 7 × 10(12) photons s(-1) in a 90 µeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. This will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS.

  14. Ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition-rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers

    PubMed Central

    Chubar, Oleg; Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Madsen, Anders; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar; Shvyd’ko, Yuri; Sutter, John

    2016-01-01

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm−1 spectral and momentum-transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm−1 are required to close the gap in energy–momentum space between high- and low-frequency probes. It is shown that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a 100-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. Wave-optics calculations show that about 7 × 1012 photons s−1 in a 90 µeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. This will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS. PMID:26917127

  15. Ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition-rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chubar, Oleg; Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Madsen, Anders; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar; Shvyd'ko, Yuri; Sutter, John

    2016-02-12

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm₋1spectral and momentum-transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm₋1are required to close the gap in energy–momentum space between high- and low-frequency probes. It is shown that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seedingmore » and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a 100-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. Wave-optics calculations show that about 7 × 1012 photons s₋1in a 90 µeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. Ultimately, this will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS.« less

  16. Characteristics of the on-orbit background of the Chandra x-ray observatory high-resolution camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juda, Michael; Donnelly, R. H.; Hole, K. T.; Kenter, Almus T.; Kraft, Ralph P.; Murray, Stephen S.; Pease, Deron O.; Wilton, Charles R.; Zombeck, Martin V.

    2003-03-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) High Resolution Camera (HRC) is a microchannel plate (MCP) based X-ray detector with heritage from similar detectors flown on the Einstein and ROSAT missions. The HRC consists of two detectors in a common housing. Improvements from the previous instruments include: fabricating the MCP from 'low-noise' glass (glass that contains a reduced level of radioactive isotopes) and surrounding the detector housing on five sides with an active coincidence detector. Both of these improvements help to maximize the X-ray signal to background noise ratio. The on-orbit background is dominated by cosmic ray and solar-wind particles. The temporal behavior of the background has two parts: a quiescent level and a flaring component. The quiescent level slowly changes with time and is correlated with the high-energy particle flux as measured by the Electron Proton Helium Instrument (EPHIN), the CXO radiation detector. The flaring component is associated with times of elevated low-energy particle flux, primarily from the Sun. A combination of on-board vetoing and filtering during ground processing provides a substantial rejection of the non-X-ray background. This work was supported by NASA contract NAS8-39073 to the Chandra X-ray Center.

  17. Bismuth Passivation Technique for High-Resolution X-Ray Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chervenak, James; Hess, Larry

    2013-01-01

    The Athena-plus team requires X-ray sensors with energy resolution of better than one part in 3,000 at 6 keV X-rays. While bismuth is an excellent material for high X-ray stopping power and low heat capacity (for large signal when an X-ray is stopped by the absorber), oxidation of the bismuth surface can lead to electron traps and other effects that degrade the energy resolution. Bismuth oxide reduction and nitride passivation techniques analogous to those used in indium passivation are being applied in a new technique. The technique will enable improved energy resolution and resistance to aging in bismuth-absorber-coupled X-ray sensors. Elemental bismuth is lithographically integrated into X-ray detector circuits. It encounters several steps where the Bi oxidizes. The technology discussed here will remove oxide from the surface of the Bi and replace it with nitridized surface. Removal of the native oxide and passivating to prevent the growth of the oxide will improve detector performance and insulate the detector against future degradation from oxide growth. Placing the Bi coated sensor in a vacuum system, a reduction chemistry in a plasma (nitrogen/hydrogen (N2/H2) + argon) is used to remove the oxide and promote nitridization of the cleaned Bi surface. Once passivated, the Bi will perform as a better X-ray thermalizer since energy will not be trapped in the bismuth oxides on the surface. A simple additional step, which can be added at various stages of the current fabrication process, can then be applied to encapsulate the Bi film. After plasma passivation, the Bi can be capped with a non-diffusive layer of metal or dielectric. A non-superconducting layer is required such as tungsten or tungsten nitride (WNx).

  18. Validation of the 4D NCAT simulation tools for use in high-resolution x-ray CT research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segars, W. P.; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Beck, T.; Frey, E. C.; Tsui, B. M. W.

    2005-04-01

    We validate the computer-based simulation tools developed in our laboratory for use in high-resolution CT research. The 4D NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom was developed to provide a realistic and flexible model of the human anatomy and physiology. Unlike current phantoms in CT, the 4D NCAT has the advantage, due to its design, that its organ shapes can be changed to realistically model anatomical variations and patient motion. To efficiently simulate high-resolution CT images, we developed a unique analytic projection algorithm (including scatter and quantum noise) to accurately calculate projections directly from the surface definition of the phantom given parameters defining the CT scanner and geometry. The projection data are reconstructed into CT images using algorithms developed in our laboratory. The 4D NCAT phantom contains a level of detail that is close to impossible to produce in a physical test object. We, therefore, validate our CT simulation tools and methods through a series of direct comparisons with data obtained experimentally using existing, simple physical phantoms at different doses and using different x-ray energy spectra. In each case, the first-order simulations were found to produce comparable results (<12%). We reason that since the simulations produced equivalent results using simple test objects, they should be able to do the same in more anatomically realistic conditions. We conclude that, with the ability to provide realistic simulated CT image data close to that from actual patients, the simulation tools developed in this work will have applications in a broad range of CT imaging research.

  19. Development of a High-Resolution, Single-Photon X-Ray Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, George M.

    1996-01-01

    Research on the development of a low-temperature, magnetic bolometer for x-ray detection is reported. The principal accomplishments during the first phase of this research are as follows. (1) We have constructed SQUID magnetometers and detected both 122 keV and 6 keV x-rays in relatively larger metallic samples with high quantum efficiency. (2) The magnetic properties of a metal sample with localized paramagnetic spins have been measured and found to agree with theoretical expectations. (3) The size of the magnetic response of the sample to x-rays is in agreement with predictions based on the properties of the sample and sensitivity of the magnetometer, supporting the prediction that a resolution of 1 eV at 10 keV should be achievable.

  20. High resolution energy-angle correlation measurement of hard x rays from laser-Thomson backscattering.

    PubMed

    Jochmann, A; Irman, A; Bussmann, M; Couperus, J P; Cowan, T E; Debus, A D; Kuntzsch, M; Ledingham, K W D; Lehnert, U; Sauerbrey, R; Schlenvoigt, H P; Seipt, D; Stöhlker, Th; Thorn, D B; Trotsenko, S; Wagner, A; Schramm, U

    2013-09-13

    Thomson backscattering of intense laser pulses from relativistic electrons not only allows for the generation of bright x-ray pulses but also for the investigation of the complex particle dynamics at the interaction point. For this purpose a complete spectral characterization of a Thomson source powered by a compact linear electron accelerator is performed with unprecedented angular and energy resolution. A rigorous statistical analysis comparing experimental data to 3D simulations enables, e.g., the extraction of the angular distribution of electrons with 1.5% accuracy and, in total, provides predictive capability for the future high brightness hard x-ray source PHOENIX (photon electron collider for narrow bandwidth intense x rays) and potential gamma-ray sources.

  1. High-resolution hard x-ray magnetic imaging with dichroic ptychography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Claire; Scagnoli, Valerio; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Holler, Mirko; Wilhelm, Fabrice; Guillou, Francois; Rogalev, Andrei; Detlefs, Carsten; Menzel, Andreas; Raabe, Jörg; Heyderman, Laura J.

    2016-08-01

    Imaging the magnetic structure of a material is essential to understanding the influence of the physical and chemical microstructure on its magnetic properties. Magnetic imaging techniques, however, have been unable to probe three-dimensional micrometer-size systems with nanoscale resolution. Here we present the imaging of the magnetic domain configuration of a micrometer-thick FeGd multilayer with hard x-ray dichroic ptychography at energies spanning both the Gd L3 edge and the Fe K edge, providing a high spatial resolution spectroscopic analysis of the complex x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. With a spatial resolution reaching 45 nm , this advance in hard x-ray magnetic imaging is a first step towards the investigation of buried magnetic structures and extended three-dimensional magnetic systems at the nanoscale.

  2. Affordable and Lightweight High-Resolution X-ray Optics for Astronomical Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, W. W.; Biskach, M. P.; Bly, V. T.; Carter, J. M.; Chan, K. W.; Gaskin, J. A.; Hong, M.; Hohl, B. R.; Jones, W. D.; Kolodziejczak, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Future x-ray astronomical missions require x-ray mirror assemblies that provide both high angular resolution and large photon collecting area. In addition, as x-ray astronomy undertakes more sensitive sky surveys, a large field of view is becoming increasingly important as well. Since implementation of these requirements must be carried out in broad political and economical contexts, any technology that meets these performance requirements must also be financially affordable and can be implemented on a reasonable schedule. In this paper we report on progress of an x-ray optics development program that has been designed to address all of these requirements. The program adopts the segmented optical design, thereby is capable of making both small and large mirror assemblies for missions of any size. This program has five technical elements: (1) fabrication of mirror substrates, (2) coating, (3) alignment, (4) bonding, and (5) mirror module systems engineering and testing. In the past year we have made progress in each of these five areas, advancing the angular resolution of mirror modules from 10.8 arc-seconds half-power diameter reported (HPD) a year ago to 8.3 arc-seconds now. These mirror modules have been subjected to and passed all environmental tests, including vibration, acoustic, and thermal vacuum. As such this technology is ready for implementing a mission that requires a 10-arc-second mirror assembly. Further development in the next two years would make it ready for a mission requiring a 5-arc-second mirror assembly. We expect that, by the end of this decade, this technology would enable the x-ray astrophysical community to compete effectively for a major x-ray mission in the 2020s that would require one or more 1-arc-second mirror assemblies for imaging, spectroscopic, timing, and survey studies.

  3. A CHANDRA SURVEY OF FLUORESCENCE Fe LINES IN X-RAY BINARIES AT HIGH RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Torrejon, J. M.; Schulz, N. S.; Nowak, M. A.; Kallman, T. R.

    2010-06-01

    Fe K line fluorescence is commonly observed in the X-ray spectra of many X-ray binaries (XRBs) and represents a fundamental tool to investigate the material surrounding the X-ray source. In this paper, we present a comprehensive survey of 41 XRBs (10 HMXBs and 31 LMXBs) with Chandra with specific emphasis on the Fe K region and the narrow Fe K{alpha} line, at the highest resolution possible. We find that (1) the Fe K{alpha} line is always centered at {lambda} = 1.9387 {+-} 0.0016 A, compatible with Fe I up to Fe X; we detect no shifts to higher ionization states nor any difference between high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) and low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). (2) The line is very narrow, with FWHM {<=} 5 mA, normally not resolved by Chandra which means that the reprocessing material is not rotating at high speeds. (3) Fe K{alpha} fluorescence is present in all the HMXBs in the survey. In contrast, such emissions are astonishingly rare ({approx}10%) among LMXBs where only a few out of a large number showed Fe K fluorescence. However, the line and edge properties of these few are very similar to their high mass cousins. (4) The lack of Fe line emission is always accompanied by the lack of any detectable K edge. (5) We obtain the empirical curve of growth of the equivalent width of the Fe K{alpha} line versus the density column of the reprocessing material, i.e., EW{sub K{alpha}} versus N {sub H}, and show that it is consistent with a reprocessing region spherically distributed around the compact object. (6) We show that fluorescence in XRBs follows the X-ray Baldwin effect as previously only found in the X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei. We interpret this finding as evidence of decreasing neutral Fe abundance with increasing X-ray illumination and use it to explain some spectral states of Cyg X-1 as a possible cause of the lack of narrow Fe line emission in LMXBs. (7) Finally, we study anomalous morphologies such as Compton shoulders and asymmetric line profiles

  4. Energy calibration of a high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeni, Roberto; D'Astuto, Matteo; Krisch, Michael; Lorenzen, Maren; Mermet, Alain; Monaco, Giulio; Requardt, Herwig; Sette, Francesco

    2008-08-15

    The energy scale of a triple-axis x-ray spectrometer with meV energy resolution based on perfect silicon crystal optics is calibrated, utilizing the most recent determination of the silicon lattice parameter and its thermal expansion coefficient and recording the dispersion of longitudinal acoustic and optical phonons in a diamond single crystal and the molecular vibration mode in liquid nitrogen. Comparison of the x-ray results with previous inelastic neutron and Raman scattering results as well as with ab initio phonon dispersion calculations yields an overall agreement better than 2%.

  5. High resolution stationary digital breast tomosynthesis using distributed carbon nanotube x-ray source array

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xin; Tucker, Andrew; Gidcumb, Emily; Shan, Jing; Yang, Guang; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Spronk, Derrek; Sprenger, Frank; Zhang, Yiheng; Kennedy, Don; Farbizio, Tom; Jing, Zhenxue

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of increasing the system spatial resolution and scanning speed of Hologic Selenia Dimensions digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) scanner by replacing the rotating mammography x-ray tube with a specially designed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, which generates all the projection images needed for tomosynthesis reconstruction by electronically activating individual x-ray sources without any mechanical motion. The stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) design aims to (i) increase the system spatial resolution by eliminating image blurring due to x-ray tube motion and (ii) reduce the scanning time. Low spatial resolution and long scanning time are the two main technical limitations of current DBT technology. Methods: A CNT x-ray source array was designed and evaluated against a set of targeted system performance parameters. Simulations were performed to determine the maximum anode heat load at the desired focal spot size and to design the electron focusing optics. Field emission current from CNT cathode was measured for an extended period of time to determine the stable life time of CNT cathode for an expected clinical operation scenario. The source array was manufactured, tested, and integrated with a Selenia scanner. An electronic control unit was developed to interface the source array with the detection system and to scan and regulate x-ray beams. The performance of the s-DBT system was evaluated using physical phantoms. Results: The spatially distributed CNT x-ray source array comprised 31 individually addressable x-ray sources covering a 30 angular span with 1 pitch and an isotropic focal spot size of 0.6 mm at full width at half-maximum. Stable operation at 28 kV(peak) anode voltage and 38 mA tube current was demonstrated with extended lifetime and good source-to-source consistency. For the standard imaging protocol of 15 views over 14, 100 mAs dose, and 2 × 2 detector

  6. High resolution stationary digital breast tomosynthesis using distributed carbon nanotube x-ray source array

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Xin; Tucker, Andrew; Gidcumb, Emily; Shan Jing; Yang Guang; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Spronk, Derrek; Sprenger, Frank; Zhang Yiheng; Kennedy, Don; Farbizio, Tom; Jing Zhenxue

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of increasing the system spatial resolution and scanning speed of Hologic Selenia Dimensions digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) scanner by replacing the rotating mammography x-ray tube with a specially designed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, which generates all the projection images needed for tomosynthesis reconstruction by electronically activating individual x-ray sources without any mechanical motion. The stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) design aims to (i) increase the system spatial resolution by eliminating image blurring due to x-ray tube motion and (ii) reduce the scanning time. Low spatial resolution and long scanning time are the two main technical limitations of current DBT technology. Methods: A CNT x-ray source array was designed and evaluated against a set of targeted system performance parameters. Simulations were performed to determine the maximum anode heat load at the desired focal spot size and to design the electron focusing optics. Field emission current from CNT cathode was measured for an extended period of time to determine the stable life time of CNT cathode for an expected clinical operation scenario. The source array was manufactured, tested, and integrated with a Selenia scanner. An electronic control unit was developed to interface the source array with the detection system and to scan and regulate x-ray beams. The performance of the s-DBT system was evaluated using physical phantoms. Results: The spatially distributed CNT x-ray source array comprised 31 individually addressable x-ray sources covering a 30 angular span with 1 pitch and an isotropic focal spot size of 0.6 mm at full width at half-maximum. Stable operation at 28 kV(peak) anode voltage and 38 mA tube current was demonstrated with extended lifetime and good source-to-source consistency. For the standard imaging protocol of 15 views over 14, 100 mAs dose, and 2 x 2 detector binning

  7. High-resolution multiwire proportional soft x-ray diagnostic measurements on TCV

    SciTech Connect

    Sushkov, A.; Andreev, V.; Camenen, Y.; Pochelon, A.; Klimanov, I.; Scarabosio, A.; Weisen, H.

    2008-02-15

    A multiwire proportional x-ray (MPX) detector is used on the TCV tokamak (Tokamak a configuration variable) as a high spatial and temporal resolution soft x-ray emissivity imaging diagnostic. The MPX system consists of 64 vertically viewing channels and has been designed to complement the existing TCV soft x-ray tomography system by enhancing the spatial resolution. The MPX detector is suitable for the measurement of fast and localized phenomena and can be used, for instance, for the observation of magnetohydrodynamic activity, for the characterization of transport barriers or for an improved determination of the electron cyclotron heating power deposition profile. The MPX detector operates in continuous-current mode and measures the plasma soft x-ray emission in the 3-30 keV range with a radial resolution of about 5 mm - 1% of plasma diameter - and a frequency bandwidth of 50 kHz. A detailed description of the MPX detector construction and the principle of its operation are given. The properties of the detector in photon-counting and continuous-current operation modes are studied. The implementation of the system on TCV and experimental results illustrating the potential of the diagnostic are also presented.

  8. High resolution hard x-ray microscope on a second generation synchrotron source

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Yangchao; Li Wenjie; Chen Jie; Liu Longhua; Liu Gang; Tian Jinping; Xiong Ying; Tkachuk, Andrei; Gelb, Jeff; Hsu, George; Yun Wenbing

    2008-10-15

    A full-field, transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) operating in the energy range of 7-11 keV has been installed at the U7A beamline at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, a second generation synchrotron source operating at 0.8 GeV. Although the photon flux at sample position in the operating energy range is significantly low due to its relatively large emittance, the TXM can get high quality x-ray images with a spatial resolution down to 50 nm with acceptable exposure time. This TXM operates in either absorption or Zernike phase contrast mode with similar resolution. This TXM is a powerful analytical tool for a wide range of scientific areas, especially studies on nanoscale phenomena and structural imaging in biology, materials science, and environmental science. We present here the property of the x-ray source, beamline design, and the operation and key optical components of the x-ray TXM. Plans to improve the throughput of the TXM will be discussed.

  9. High resolution hard x-ray microscope on a second generation synchrotron source.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yangchao; Li, Wenjie; Chen, Jie; Liu, Longhua; Liu, Gang; Tkachuk, Andrei; Tian, Jinping; Xiong, Ying; Gelb, Jeff; Hsu, George; Yun, Wenbing

    2008-10-01

    A full-field, transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) operating in the energy range of 7-11 keV has been installed at the U7A beamline at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, a second generation synchrotron source operating at 0.8 GeV. Although the photon flux at sample position in the operating energy range is significantly low due to its relatively large emittance, the TXM can get high quality x-ray images with a spatial resolution down to 50 nm with acceptable exposure time. This TXM operates in either absorption or Zernike phase contrast mode with similar resolution. This TXM is a powerful analytical tool for a wide range of scientific areas, especially studies on nanoscale phenomena and structural imaging in biology, materials science, and environmental science. We present here the property of the x-ray source, beamline design, and the operation and key optical components of the x-ray TXM. Plans to improve the throughput of the TXM will be discussed. PMID:19044720

  10. High resolution hard x-ray microscope on a second generation synchrotron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yangchao; Li, Wenjie; Chen, Jie; Liu, Longhua; Liu, Gang; Tkachuk, Andrei; Tian, Jinping; Xiong, Ying; Gelb, Jeff; Hsu, George; Yun, Wenbing

    2008-10-01

    A full-field, transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) operating in the energy range of 7-11 keV has been installed at the U7A beamline at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, a second generation synchrotron source operating at 0.8 GeV. Although the photon flux at sample position in the operating energy range is significantly low due to its relatively large emittance, the TXM can get high quality x-ray images with a spatial resolution down to 50 nm with acceptable exposure time. This TXM operates in either absorption or Zernike phase contrast mode with similar resolution. This TXM is a powerful analytical tool for a wide range of scientific areas, especially studies on nanoscale phenomena and structural imaging in biology, materials science, and environmental science. We present here the property of the x-ray source, beamline design, and the operation and key optical components of the x-ray TXM. Plans to improve the throughput of the TXM will be discussed.

  11. Fabrication of high resolution and lightweight monocrystalline silicon x-ray mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveros, Raul E.; Kolos, Linette D.; Mazzarella, James R.; McKeon, Kevin P.; Zhang, William W.

    2015-09-01

    Monocrystalline silicon as an x-ray mirror substrate material promises significant improvements over the x- ray mirror technologies used to date, since it is mechanically stiff, stress-free, highly thermally conductive, and widely commercially available. Producing highly accurate and lightweight x-ray mirrors from monocrystalline silicon requires a unique and specialized manufacturing process capable of producing mirrors quickly and cost effectively. The identification, development, and testing of this process is the focus of the work described in this proceeding. Monocrystalline silicon blocks were obtained, and a variety of processes (wire electro-discharge machining, etching, polishing) were applied to generate an accurate and stress-free cylindrical or Wolter-I mirror surface. The mirror surface is then sliced off at a thickness of <1 mm and further processed to yield a mirror segment with <1 arcsecond RMS slope errors. Furthermore, our experiments suggest that this mirror production process requires ~2 days to produce a mirror segment and is easily integrated into a cost-reducing parallel processing scheme. Presently, there is strong evidence that the mirror production process described in this paper will meet the stringent requirements of future x-ray missions.

  12. The High-Resolution X-Ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer, SXS, on Astro-H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Kelley, Richard L.; Boyce, Kevin R.; Brown, Gregory V.; Costantini, Elisa; DiPirro, Michael J.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Gendreau, Keith C.; denHerder, Jan-Willem; Hoshino, Akio; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Kitamoto, Shunji; McCammon, Dan; Murakami, Masahide; Murakami, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Mina; Ohashi, Takaya; Okamoto, Atsushi; Paltani, Stephane; Pohl, Martin; Porter, F. Scott; Sato, Yoichi; Shinozaki, Keisuke

    2012-01-01

    The science and an overview of the Soft X-ray Spectrometer onboard the STRO-H mission are presented. The SXS consists of X-ray focusing mirrors and a microcalorimeter array and is developed by international collaboration lead by JAXA and NASA with European participation. The detector is a 6 x 6 format microcalorimeter array operated at a cryogenic temperature of 50 mK and covers a 3' x 3' field of view of the X-ray telescope of 5.6 m focal length. We expect an energy resolution better than 7 eV (FWHM, requirement) with a goal of 4 eV. The effective area of the instrument will be 225 square centimeters at 7 keV; by a factor of about two larger than that of the X-ray microcalorimeter on board Suzaku. One of the main scientific objectives of the SXS is to investigate turbulent and/or macroscopic motions of hot gas in clusters of galaxies.

  13. A multiplexed high-resolution imaging spectrometer for resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Warwick, Tony; Chuang, Yi De; Voronov, Dmitriy L; Padmore, Howard A

    2014-07-01

    The optical design of a two-dimensional imaging soft X-ray spectrometer is described. A monochromator will produce a dispersed spectrum in a narrow vertical illuminated stripe (∼2 µm wide by ∼2 mm tall) on a sample. The spectrometer will use inelastically scattered X-rays to image the extended field on the sample in the incident photon energy direction (vertical), resolving the incident photon energy. At the same time it will image and disperse the scattered photons in the orthogonal (horizontal) direction, resolving the scattered photon energy. The principal challenge is to design a system that images from the flat-field illumination of the sample to the flat field of the detector and to achieve sufficiently high spectral resolution. This spectrometer provides a completely parallel resonant inelastic X-ray scattering measurement at high spectral resolution (∼30,000) over the energy bandwidth (∼5 eV) of a soft X-ray absorption resonance.

  14. AEGIS: An Astrophysics Experiment for Grating and Imaging Spectroscopy---a Soft X-ray, High-resolution Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huenemoerder, David; Bautz, M. W.; Davis, J. E.; Heilmann, R. K.; Houck, J. C.; Marshall, H. L.; Neilsen, J.; Nicastro, F.; Nowak, M. A.; Schattenburg, M. L.; Schulz, N. S.; Smith, R. K.; Wolk, S.; AEGIS Team

    2012-01-01

    AEGIS is a concept for a high-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopic observatory developed in response to NASA's request for definitions of the next X-ray astronomy mission. At a small fraction of the cost of the once-planned International X-ray Observatory (IXO), AEGIS has capabilities that surpass IXO grating spectrometer requirements, and which are far superior to those of existing soft X-ray spectrometers. AEGIS incorporates innovative technology in X-ray optics, diffraction gratings and detectors. The mirror uses high area-to-mass ratio segmented glass architecture developed for IXO, but with smaller aperture and larger graze angles optimized for high-throughput grating spectroscopy with low mass and cost. The unique Critical Angle Transmission gratings combine low mass and relaxed figure and alignment tolerances of Chandra transmission gratings but with high diffraction efficiency and resolving power of blazed reflection gratings. With more than an order of magnitude better performance over Chandra and XMM grating spectrometers, AEGIS can obtain high quality spectra of bright AGN in a few hours rather than 10 days. Such high resolving power allows detailed kinematic studies of galactic outflows, hot gas in galactic haloes, and stellar accretion flows. Absorption line spectroscopy will be used to study large scale structure, cosmic feedback, and growth of black holes in thousands of sources to great distances. AEGIS will enable powerful multi-wavelength investigations, for example with Hubble/COS in the UV to characterize the intergalactic medium. AEGIS will be the first observatory with sufficient resolution below 1 keV to resolve thermally-broadened lines in hot ( 10 MK) plasmas. Here we describe key science investigations enable by Aegis, its scientific payload and mission plan. Acknowledgements: Support was provided in part by: NASA SAO contract SV3-73016 to MIT for the Chandra X-ray Center and Science Instruments; NASA grant NNX08AI62G; and the MKI

  15. Ultraluminous X-Ray Sources in Nearby Galaxies from ROSAT High Resolution Imager Observations I. Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ji-Feng; Bregman, Joel N.

    2005-03-01

    X-ray observations have revealed in other galaxies a class of extranuclear X-ray point sources with X-ray luminosities of 1039-1041 ergs s-1, exceeding the Eddington luminosity for stellar mass X-ray binaries. These ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) may be powered by intermediate-mass black holes of a few thousand Msolar or stellar mass black holes with special radiation processes. In this paper, we present a survey of ULXs in 313 nearby galaxies with D25>1' within 40 Mpc with 467 ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI) archival observations. The HRI observations are reduced with uniform procedures, refined by simulations that help define the point source detection algorithm employed in this survey. A sample of 562 extragalactic X-ray point sources with LX=1038-1043 ergs s-1 is extracted from 173 survey galaxies, including 106 ULX candidates within the D25 isophotes of 63 galaxies and 110 ULX candidates between 1D25 and 2D25 of 64 galaxies, from which a clean sample of 109 ULXs is constructed to minimize the contamination from foreground or background objects. The strong connection between ULXs and star formation is confirmed based on the striking preference of ULXs to occur in late-type galaxies, especially in star-forming regions such as spiral arms. ULXs are variable on timescales over days to years and exhibit a variety of long term variability patterns. The identifications of ULXs in the clean sample show some ULXs identified as supernovae (remnants), H II regions/nebulae, or young massive stars in star-forming regions, and a few other ULXs identified as old globular clusters. In a subsequent paper, the statistic properties of the survey will be studied to calculate the occurrence frequencies and luminosity functions for ULXs in different types of galaxies to shed light on the nature of these enigmatic sources.

  16. Development of High Resolution Hard X-Ray Telescope with Multi-Layer Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, Paul; Brinton, John C. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    This is the annual report for the third year of a three-year program. Previous annual reports have described progress achieved in the first and second years. The major objective of this program is the development of a focusing hard X-ray telescope with moderately high angular resolution, i.e. comparable to the telescopes of XMM-Newton. The key ingredients of the telescope are a depth graded multilayer coatings and electroformed nickel substrates that are considerably lighter weight than those of previous missions such as XMM-Newton, which have had conventional single metal layer reflective coatings and have operated at much lower energy X-rays. The ultimate target mission for this technology is the Hard X-Ray Telescope (HXT) of the Constellation X-Ray Mission. However, it is applicable to potential SMEX and MIDEX programs as well. We are building upon technology that has proven to be successful in the XMM-Newton and SWIFT missions. The improvements that we are adding are a significant reduction in mass without much loss of angular resolution and an order of magnitude extension of the bandwidth through the use of multilayer coatings. The distinctive feature of this approach compared to those of other hard X-ray telescope programs is that we expect the angular resolution to be superior than telescopes made by other methods thanks to the structural integrity of the substrates. They are thin walled complete cylinders of revolution with a Wolter Type 1 figure; the front half is a parabola, the rear half a hyperbola.

  17. HIGH-RESOLUTION X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF THE BURSTING PULSAR GRO J1744-28

    SciTech Connect

    Degenaar, N.; Miller, J. M.; Harrison, F. A.; Kennea, J. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Younes, G.

    2014-11-20

    The bursting pulsar GRO J1744-28 is a Galactic low-mass X-ray binary that distinguishes itself by displaying type-II X-ray bursts: brief, bright flashes of X-ray emission that likely arise from spasmodic accretion. Combined with its coherent 2.1 Hz X-ray pulsations and relatively high estimated magnetic field, it is a particularly interesting source to study the physics of accretion flows around neutron stars. Here we report on Chandra/High Energy Transmission Grating observations obtained near the peak of its bright 2014 accretion outburst. Spectral analysis suggests the presence of a broad iron emission line centered at E {sub l} ≅ 6.7 keV. Fits with a disk reflection model yield an inclination angle of i ≅ 52° and an inner disk radius of R {sub in} ≅ 85 GM/c {sup 2}, which is much further out than typically found for neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. Assuming that the disk is truncated at the magnetospheric radius of the neutron star, we estimate a magnetic field strength of B ≅ (2-6) × 10{sup 10} G. Furthermore, we identify an absorption feature near ≅ 6.85 keV that could correspond to blue-shifted Fe XXV and point to a fast disk wind with an outflow velocity of v {sub out} ≅ (7.5-8.2) × 10{sup 3} km s{sup –1} (≅ 0.025c-0.027c). If the covering fraction and filling factor are large, this wind could be energetically important and perhaps account for the fact that the companion star lost significant mass while the magnetic field of the neutron star remained strong.

  18. High Resolution Deep X-ray Surveys: A Unique Probe of the High-Z Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civano, Francesca

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the origin and growth of the supermassive black holes SMBHs that lie at the centers of most, if not all, galaxies at all redshifts is crucial for obtaining the full picture of both BH and galaxy evolution. Enormous progress has been made in the understanding of the galaxy population in the Universes first few Gyrs. On the contrary, there is still the puzzle that giant SMBHs already exist at z=6-7, implying massive seed black holes or highly super-Eddington accretion at the earliest times. This is because the search for z6 Active Galactic Nuclei i.e., accreting SMBHs is still limited to the optically selected sources from the SDSS or CFHQS surveys, which probe the unobscured accretion. Instead, X-ray surveys can probe the obscured high-z, low mass population, which represent the bulk of rapid early SMBH growth, and are therefore essential for obtain an unbiased sample of the accreting SMBHs. I will present the most recent results on the high redshift Universe as we know it from the current Chandra X-ray surveys and discuss what we can expect from planned and proposed future X-ray observatories. High spatial resolution is crucial to locate faint X-ray sources and identify their counterpart in future deep optical images. Increasing the surveys sensitivity to the limits allowed by the X-ray Surveyor, we will be able to collect sizable samples of z6 low luminosity and low mass AGN to study their early growth. Comparison with galaxy formation and evolution at similar redshift will provide the means to understand the SMBH-galaxy relation at the earliest epochs.

  19. High-resolution X-ray study of the multiple ionization of Pd atoms by fast oxygen ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnota, M.; Banaś, D.; Berset, M.; Chmielewska, D.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Hoszowska, J.; Maillard, Y.-P.; Mauron, O.; Pajek, M.; Polasik, M.; Raboud, P. A.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Słabkowska, K.; Sujkowski, Z.

    2010-04-01

    The multiple ionization of the L- and M-shells of Pd by fast oxygen ions has been studied by measuring with high-resolution the satellite structures of the Lα1,2 X-ray transitions. Relativistic multi-configuration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) calculations were used to interpret the complex X-ray spectrum, allowing to derive the number of L- and M-shell spectator vacancies at the moment of the X-ray emission. After correcting these numbers for the atomic vacancy rearrangement processes that take place prior to the X-ray emission, the ionization probabilities corresponding to the collision time were obtained. The latter were compared to predictions of the semiclassical approximation (SCA) and the geometrical model. The SCA calculations were performed using relativistic hydrogenic and self-consistent Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) electronic wave functions. It was found that the use of the more realistic DHF wave functions in the SCA calculations leads to a much better description of the measured ionization probabilities for both the L- and M-shells.

  20. Testing of High-Resolution SI and GE Analyzers for X-Ray Raman Scattering and X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, K.W.; Bergmann, U.

    2005-01-01

    A project at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is currently underway for the building of a new multi-crystal x-ray spectrometer that will be used to probe the fundamental structures of light elements, including water, as well as 3d transition metals, such as metalloproteins, in dilute systems. Experimentation for determining the focal lengths for the prospective high-resolution, spherically-curved silicon (Si) and germanium (Ge) analyzers for the instrument and the energy resolutions at their respective focal points is described. The focal lengths of the Si and Ge analyzers being sampled were found by minimizing the focal size made from a diffused helium-neon (HeNe) gas laser operating at 632 nm (0.95 meV). Afterwards, the energy resolutions were determined by using synchrotron radiation (SR), in the range from 6-16 keV energies. The experiments were performed at Beamline 10-2 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL), a division of SLAC. This data, along with the energies of the incident beams, was used to determine which samples are most effective at focusing x-rays to the highest spatial and energy resolution. Sample Si (440)A, with a focal length of 1015.2 mm, had the best energy resolution. Furthermore, a new multi-crystal goniometer was tested and commissioned. As part of this work, the device was prealigned into Rowland geometry, in order to facilitate the process of finding a single high-energy resolution x-ray focus for all 7 analyzers.

  1. A high resolution echelle spectrometer for soft X-ray and EUV astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, James; Bowyer, Stuart

    A new design is presented for high resolution spectroscopy from 80 to 400 A. This design employs grazing incidence optics and variable line-spaced gratings to achieve high resolution. Unlike some previously proposed EUV echelles, this design employs straight groove planar gratings, which are a well-proven, easily manufactured design. The instrument delivers a peak resolution of 7500 and a peak effective area of 3 sq cm.

  2. A high resolution echelle spectrometer for soft X-ray and EUV astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James; Bowyer, Stuart

    1990-01-01

    A new design is presented for high resolution spectroscopy from 80 to 400 A. This design employs grazing incidence optics and variable line-spaced gratings to achieve high resolution. Unlike some previously proposed EUV echelles, this design employs straight groove planar gratings, which are a well-proven, easily manufactured design. The instrument delivers a peak resolution of 7500 and a peak effective area of 3 sq cm.

  3. Single-crystal sapphire microstructure for high-resolution synchrotron X-ray monochromators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Asadchikov, Victor E.; Butashin, Andrey V.; Buzmakov, Alexey V.; Deryabin, Alexander N.; Kanevsky, Vladimir M.; Prokhorov, Igor A.; Roshchin, Boris S.; Volkov, Yuri O.; Zolotov, Dennis A.; Jafari, Atefeh; et al

    2016-03-22

    We report on the growth and characterization of several sapphire single crystals for the purpose of x-ray optics applications. Structural defects were studied by means of laboratory double-crystal X-ray diffractometry and white beam synchrotron-radiation topography. The investigations confirmed that the main defect types are dislocations. The best quality crystal was grown using the Kyropoulos technique with a dislocation density of 102-103 cm-2 and a small area with approximately 2*2 mm2 did not show dislocation contrast in many reflections and has suitable quality for application as a backscattering monochromator. As a result, a clear correlation between growth rate and dislocation densitymore » is observed, though growth rate is not the only parameter impacting the quality.« less

  4. A high resolution gas scintillation proportional counter for studying low energy cosmic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, T. T.; Hailey, C. J.; Ku, W. H.-M.; Novick, R.

    1980-01-01

    In recent years much effort has been devoted to the development of large area gas scintillation proportional counters (GSPCs) suitable for use in X-ray astronomy. The paper deals with a low-energy GSPC for use in detecting sub-keV X-rays from cosmic sources. This instrument has a measured energy resolution of 85 eV (FWHM) at 149 eV over a sensitive area of 5 sq cm. The development of imaging capability for this instrument is discussed. Tests are performed on the feasibility of using an arrangement of several phototubes placed adjacent to one another to determine event locations in a large flat counter. A simple prototype has been constructed and successfully operated.

  5. A high-resolution X-ray image of Puppis A - Inhomogeneities in the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre, R.; Kriss, G. A.; Winkler, P. F.; Canizares, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Eleven HRI exposures from the Einstein Observatory are assembled into an 0.1-4 keV image of the Puppis A supernova remnant which displays a complex morphology that may reflect the structure of the shocked interstellar medium. In addition to showing a density gradient of a factor greater than four across the approximately 30 pc diameter of the remnant perpendicular to the galactic plane, a shell of X-ray emission is seen surrounding the northern half of Puppis A, coincident with the radio shell, whose edge brightness profile indicates direct hot plasma heating by the blast wave rather than evaporation from clouds. The interior structure of the supernova remnant suggests inhomogeneities whose sizes range over 0.1-5 pc, but with moderate density contrast. Although isolated clouds of 10-30/cu cm density are responsible for the two brightest X-ray features, they represent only a small fraction of the Puppis A mass.

  6. Depth Probing Soft X-ray Microprobe (DPSXRM) for High Resolution Probing of Earth's Microstructural Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikedi, P. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Cambrian explosion; occurrence of landslides in very dry weather conditions; rockslides; dead, shriveled-up and crumbled leaves possessing fossil records with the semblance of well preserved, flat leaves; abundance of trilobite tracks in lower and higher rock layers; and sailing stones are enigmas demanding demystifications. These enigmas could be elucidated when data on soil structure, texture and strength are provided by some device with submicrometre accuracy; for these and other reasons, the design of a Depth Probing Soft X-ray Microprobe (DPSXRM), is being proposed; it is expected to deliver soft X-rays, at spatial resolution, ϛ≥600nm and to probe at the depth of 0.5m in 17s. The microprobe is portable compared to a synchrotron radiation facility (Diamond Light Source has land size of 43,300m2); spatial resolution,ϛ , of the DPSXRM surpasses those of the X-ray Fluorescence microanalysis (10µm), electron microprobe (1-3µm) and ion microprobe (5->30µm); the DPSXRM has allowance for multiple targets. Vanadium and Manganese membranes are proposed owing to respective 4.952KeV VKα1 and 5.899KeV MnKα1 X-rays emitted, which best suits micro-probing of Earth's microstructural samples. Compound systems like the Kirk-Patrick and Baez and Wolter optics, aspheric mirrors like elliptical and parabolic optics, small apertures and Abbe sine condition are employed to reduce or remove astigmatism, obliquity, comatic and spherical aberrations—leading to good image quality. Results show that 5.899KeV MnKα1 and 4.952KeV VKα1 soft X-rays will travel a distance of 2.75mm to form circular patches of radii 2.2mm and 2.95mm respectively. Zone plate with nth zone radius of 1.5mm must be positioned 1.5mm and 2mm from the electron gun if circular patches must be formed from 4.952KeV VKα1 and 5.899KeV MnKα1 soft X-rays respectively. The focal lengths of 0.25μm≤ƒ≤1.50μm and 0.04μm≤ƒ≤0.2μm covered by 4.952KeV VKα1 and 5.899KeV Mn Kα1 soft X-Rays, will

  7. Measuring Curved Crystal Performance for a High Resolution, Imaging X-ray Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Haugh and Richard Stewart

    2010-06-07

    This paper describes the design, crystal selection, and crystal testing for a vertical Johann spectrometer operating in the 13 keV range to measure ion Doppler broadening in inertial confinement plasmas. The spectrometer is designed to use thin, curved, mica crystals to achieve a resolving power of E/ΔE>2000. A number of natural mica crystals were screened for flatness and X-ray diffraction width to find samples of sufficient perfection for use in the instrument. Procedures to select and mount high quality mica samples are discussed. A diode-type X-ray source coupled to a dual goniometer arrangement was used to measure the crystal reflectivity curve. A procedure was developed for evaluating the goniometer performance using a set of diffraction grade Si crystals. This goniometer system was invaluable for identifying the best original crystals for further use and developing the techniques to select satisfactory curved crystals for the spectrometer.

  8. Acoustic phonons in chrysotile asbestos probed by high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; Vakhrushev, S. B.; Kumzerov, Yu. A,; Alatas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic phonons in an individual, oriented fiber of chrysotile asbestos (chemical formula Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}) were observed at room temperature in the inelastic x-ray measurement with a very high (meV) resolution. The x-ray scattering vector was aligned along [1 0 0] direction of the reciprocal lattice, nearly parallel to the long axis of the fiber. The latter coincides with [1 0 0] direction of the direct lattice and the axes of the nano-channels. The data were analyzed using a damped harmonic oscillator model. Analysis of the phonon dispersion in the first Brillouin zone yielded the longitudinal sound velocity of (9200 {+-} 600) m/s.

  9. Microcalorimeters for High Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, E.; Flowers, Bobby J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The proposal has three major objectives. The first focuses on advanced neutron-transmutation-doped (NTD)-based microcalorimeter development. Our goal is to develop an array of microcalorimeters with sub- 5 eV energy resolution that can operate with pile-up-free throughput of at least 100 Hz per pixel. The second objective is to establish our microcalorimeter as an essential x-ray diagnostic for laboratory astrophysics studies. We propose to develop a dedicated microcalorimeter spectrometer for the EBIT (electron beam ion trap). This instrument will incorporate the latest detector and cryogenic technology that we have available. The third objective is to investigate innovative ideas related to possible flight opportunities. These include compact, long lived cryo-systems, ultra-low temperature cold stages, low mass and low power electronics, and novel assemblies of thin windows with high x-ray transmission.

  10. High-resolution X-ray imaging—a powerful nondestructive technique for applications in semiconductor industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zschech, Ehrenfried; Yun, Wenbing; Schneider, Gerd

    2008-08-01

    The availability of high-brilliance X-ray sources, high-precision X-ray focusing optics and very efficient CCD area detectors has contributed essentially to the development of transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) and X-ray computed tomography (XCT) with sub-50 nm resolution. Particularly, the fabrication of high aspect ratio Fresnel zone plates with zone widths approaching 15 nm has contributed to the enormous improvement in spatial resolution during the previous years. Currently, Fresnel zone plates give the ability to reach spatial resolutions of 15 to 20 nm in the soft and of about 30 to 50 nm in the hard X-ray energy range. X-ray microscopes with rotating anode X-ray sources that can be installed in an analytical lab next to a semiconductor fab have been developed recently. These unique TXM/XCT systems provide an important new capability of nondestructive 3D imaging of internal circuit structures without destructive sample preparation such as cross sectioning. These lab systems can be used for failure localization in micro- and nanoelectronic structures and devices, e.g., to visualize voids and residuals in on-chip metal interconnects without physical modification of the chip. Synchrotron radiation experiments have been used to study new processes and materials that have to be introduced into the semiconductor industry. The potential of TXM using synchrotron radiation in the soft X-ray energy range is shown for the nondestructive in situ imaging of void evolution in embedded on-chip copper interconnect structures during electromigration and for the imaging of different types of insulating thin films between the on-chip interconnects (spectromicroscopy).

  11. High-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS at the Swiss Light Source for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    Strocov, V. N.; Schmitt, T.; Flechsig, U.; Schmidt, T.; Imhof, A.; Chen, Q.; Raabe, J.; Betemps, R.; Zimoch, D.; Krempasky, J.; Wang, X.; Grioni, M.; Piazzalunga, A.; Patthey, L.

    2010-01-01

    The concepts and technical realisation of the high-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS operating in the energy range from 300 to 1600 eV and intended for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) are described. The photon source is an undulator of novel fixed-gap design where longitudinal movement of permanent magnetic arrays controls not only the light polarization (including circular and 0–180° rotatable linear polarizations) but also the energy without changing the gap. The beamline optics is based on the well established scheme of plane-grating monochromator operating in collimated light. The ultimate resolving power E/ΔE is above 33000 at 1 keV photon energy. The choice of blazed versus lamellar gratings and optimization of their profile parameters is described. Owing to glancing angles on the mirrors as well as optimized groove densities and profiles of the gratings, the beamline is capable of delivering high photon flux up to 1 × 1013 photons s−1 (0.01% BW)−1 at 1 keV. Ellipsoidal refocusing optics used for the RIXS endstation demagnifies the vertical spot size down to 4 µm, which allows slitless operation and thus maximal transmission of the high-resolution RIXS spectrometer delivering E/ΔE > 11000 at 1 keV photon energy. Apart from the beamline optics, an overview of the control system is given, the diagnostics and software tools are described, and strategies used for the optical alignment are discussed. An introduction to the concepts and instrumental realisation of the ARPES and RIXS endstations is given. PMID:20724785

  12. High-resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Galactic Supernova Remnant Puppis A with XMM-Newton/RGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Mori, Koji; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Petre, Robert; Yamada, Shin'ya; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Konami, Saori; Tamagawa, Toru

    2012-09-01

    We present high-resolution X-ray spectra of cloud-shock interaction regions in the eastern and northern rims of the Galactic supernova remnant Puppis A, using the Reflection Grating Spectrometer on board the XMM-Newton satellite. A number of emission lines including Kα triplets of He-like N, O, and Ne are clearly resolved for the first time. Intensity ratios of forbidden to resonance lines in the triplets are found to be higher than predictions by thermal emission models having plausible plasma parameters. The anomalous line ratios cannot be reproduced by effects of resonance scattering, recombination, or inner-shell ionization processes, but could be explained by charge-exchange emission that should arise at interfaces between the cold/warm clouds and the hot plasma. Our observations thus provide observational support for charge-exchange X-ray emission in supernova remnants.

  13. High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Galactic Supernova Remnant Puppis A with the XMM-Newton RGS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Mori, Koji; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Petre, Robert; Yamada, Shinya; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Konami, Saori; Tamagawa, Toru

    2012-01-01

    We present high-resolution X-ray spectra of cloud-shock interaction regions in the eastern and northern rims of the Galactic supernova remnant Puppis A, using the Reflection Grating Spectrometer onboard the XMM-Newton satellite. A number of emission lines including K(alpha) triplets of He-like N, O , and Ne are clearly resolved for the first time. Intensity ratios of forbidden to resonance lines in the triplets are found to be higher than predictions by thermal emission models having plausible plasma parameters. The anomalous line ratios cannot be reproduced by effects of resonance scattering, recombination, or inner-shell ionization processes, but could be explained by charge-exchange emission that should arise at interfaces between the cold/warm clouds and the hot plasma. Our observations thus provide observational support for charge-exchange X-ray emission in supernova remnants.

  14. Ultra-precise characterization of LCLS hard X-ray focusing mirrors by high resolution slope measuring deflectometry.

    PubMed

    Siewert, Frank; Buchheim, Jana; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J; Montanez, Paul A; Krzywinski, Jacek; Signorato, Riccardo

    2012-02-13

    We present recent results on the inspection of a first diffraction-limited hard X-ray Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirror pair for the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The full KB system - mirrors and holders - was under inspection by use of high resolution slope measuring deflectometry. The tests confirmed that KB mirrors of 350mm aperture length characterized by an outstanding residual figure error of <1 nm rms has been realized. This corresponds to the residual figure slope error of about 0.05µrad rms, unprecedented on such long elliptical mirrors. Additional measurements show the clamping of the mirrors to be a critical step for the final - shape preserving installation of such outstanding optics.

  15. LPE grown LSO:Tb scintillator films for high-resolution X-ray imaging applications at synchrotron light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecilia, A.; Rack, A.; Douissard, P.-A.; Martin, T.; Dos Santos Rolo, T.; Vagovič, P.; Hamann, E.; van de Kamp, T.; Riedel, A.; Fiederle, M.; Baumbach, T.

    2011-08-01

    Within the project ScinTAX of the 6th framework program (FP6) of the European Commission (SCINTAX—STRP 033 427) we have developed a new thin single crystal scintillator for high-resolution X-ray imaging. The scintillator is based on a Tb-doped Lu2SiO5 (LSO) film epitaxially grown on an adapted substrate. The high density, effective atomic number and light yield of the scintillating LSO significantly improves the efficiency of the X-ray imaging detectors currently used in synchrotron micro-imaging applications. In this work we present the characterization of the scintillating LSO films in terms of their spatial resolution performance and we provide two examples of high spatial and high temporal resolution applications.

  16. The MIT high resolution X-ray spectroscopy instruments on AXAF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canizares, C. R.; Dewey, D.; Galton, E. B.; Markert, T. H.; Smith, Henry I.; Schattenburg, M. L.; Woodgate, B. E.; Jordan, S.

    1992-03-01

    The general design and performance characteristics of MIT's two dispersive spectrometers, the Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) and the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETG), now being developed for the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), are described. Particular attention is given to the development of the critical technologies incorporated into these instruments, including BCS diffractors, imaging gas flow proportional counters, and grating elements for the HETG. The principal stages and the current status of the developments are reviewed.

  17. Chandra High Resolution Spectroscopy of the Be X-Ray binary A0535+262

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Mark

    2008-09-01

    We propose to observe the Be X-ray pulsar binary 1A 0535+262 with Chandra HETGS for 20 ks. This observations will allow us to investigate: 1) High M_dot accretion onto a NS: These observations will allow us to probe accretion at a high fraction of the Eddington luminosity onto a neutron star with an accurately constrained B-field (4e12 -- Cyclotron lines) and spin period (X-ray pulsations). 2) Disk winds from accreting compact objects: Miller et al. (2008) have previously obtained HETGS spectra of the black hole transient GRO J1655-40; while Ueda et al. (2004) have obtained HETGS spectra of the Z-source GX13+1. In both cases numerous wind absorption lines are observed. 3) Relativistic accretion disk emission lines: Cackett et al. (2009) have observed relativistic Fe emission from a sample of accreting neutron star LMXBs (Z, Atoll, MSP) providing constraints on the radius of the neutron star. This will be the definitive Chandra observation of a Be X-ray binary.

  18. REVIEW: X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalender, Willi A.

    2006-07-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT), introduced into clinical practice in 1972, was the first of the modern slice-imaging modalities. To reconstruct images mathematically from measured data and to display and to archive them in digital form was a novelty then and is commonplace today. CT has shown a steady upward trend with respect to technology, performance and clinical use independent of predictions and expert assessments which forecast in the 1980s that it would be completely replaced by magnetic resonance imaging. CT not only survived but exhibited a true renaissance due to the introduction of spiral scanning which meant the transition from slice-by-slice imaging to true volume imaging. Complemented by the introduction of array detector technology in the 1990s, CT today allows imaging of whole organs or the whole body in 5 to 20 s with sub-millimetre isotropic resolution. This review of CT will proceed in chronological order focussing on technology, image quality and clinical applications. In its final part it will also briefly allude to novel uses of CT such as dual-source CT, C-arm flat-panel-detector CT and micro-CT. At present CT possibly exhibits a higher innovation rate than ever before. In consequence the topical and most recent developments will receive the greatest attention.

  19. The study of oxygen molecules on Pt (111) surface with high resolution x-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong Su; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli; Ross, Philip N.; Hong, Soon Cheol; Mun, Bongjin Simon

    2010-07-01

    By using high resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we show that inelastic scattering of photoelectron at low temperature (30-50 K) generates two kinds of oxygen species on Pt (111) surface. Intense synchrotron radiation source dissociates oxygen molecules into chemisorbed atomic oxygen and induces the formation of PtO on the surface. Estimated coverage of dissociated atomic oxygen is 0.5 ML, suggesting possible formation of p(2×1) surface structure, while PtO coverage shows saturation coverage of 0.5 ML. Molecular oxygen dosed at 30 K undergoes thermally activated transition from physisorbed to chemisorbed state at around 40 K.

  20. The study of oxygen molecules on Pt (111) surface with high resolution x-ray photoemission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Su; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli; Ross, Philip N; Hong, Soon Cheol; Mun, Bongjin Simon

    2010-07-21

    By using high resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we show that inelastic scattering of photoelectron at low temperature (30-50 K) generates two kinds of oxygen species on Pt (111) surface. Intense synchrotron radiation source dissociates oxygen molecules into chemisorbed atomic oxygen and induces the formation of PtO on the surface. Estimated coverage of dissociated atomic oxygen is 0.5 ML, suggesting possible formation of p(2 x 1) surface structure, while PtO coverage shows saturation coverage of 0.5 ML. Molecular oxygen dosed at 30 K undergoes thermally activated transition from physisorbed to chemisorbed state at around 40 K. PMID:20649331

  1. Objectives and Layout of a High-Resolution X-ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for the Large Helical Device (LHD)

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, M; Gates, D; Monticello, D; Neilson, H; Reiman, A; Roquemore, A L; Morita, S; Goto, M; Yamada, H

    2010-07-29

    A high-resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, whose concept was tested on NSTX and Alcator C-Mod, is being designed for LHD. This instrument will record spatially resolved spectra of helium-like Ar16+ and provide ion temperature profiles with spatial and temporal resolutions of < 2 cm and ≥ 10 ms. The stellarator equilibrium reconstruction codes, STELLOPT and PIES, will be used for the tomographic inversion of the spectral data. The spectrometer layout and instrumental features are largely determined by the magnetic field structure of LHD.

  2. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of hollow atoms created in plasma heated by subpicosecond laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Faenov, A.Ya.; Magunov, A.I.; Pikuz, T.A.

    1997-10-01

    The investigations of ultrashort (0.4-0.6 ps) laser pulse radiation interaction with solid targets have been carried out. The Trident subpicosecond laser system was used for plasma creation. The X-ray plasma emission was investigated with the help of high-resolution spectrographs with spherically bent mica crystals. It is shown that when high contrast ultrashort laser pulses were used for plasma heating its emission spectra could not be explained in terms of commonly used theoretical models, and transitions in so called {open_quotes}hollow atoms{close_quotes} must be taken into account for adequate description of plasma radiation.

  3. Direct Polishing of Full-Shell, High-Resolution X-Ray Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roche, Jacqueline M.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Smith, W. Scott; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey J.; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Elsner, Ronald F.

    2014-01-01

    Future x-ray telescopes will likely require lightweight mirrors to attain the large collecting areas needed to accomplish the science objectives. Understanding and demonstrating processes now is critical to achieving sub-arcsecond performance in the future. Consequently, designs not only of the mirrors but of fixtures for supporting them during fabrication, metrology, handling, assembly, and testing must be adequately modeled and verified. To this end, MSFC is using finite-element modeling to study the effects of mounting on thin, full-shell grazing-incidence mirrors, during all processes leading to a flight.

  4. Two-dimensional Detector for High Resolution Soft X-ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ejima, Takeo; Ogasawara, Shodo; Hatano, Tadashi; Yanagihara, Mihiro; Yamamoto, Masaki

    2010-06-23

    A new two-dimensional (2D) detector for detecting soft X-ray (SX) images was developed. The detector has a scintillator plate to convert a SX image into a visible (VI) one, and a relay optics to magnify and detect the converted VI image. In advance of the fabrication of the detector, quantum efficiencies of scintillators were investigated. As a result, a Ce:LYSO single crystal on which Zr thin film was deposited was used as an image conversion plate. The spatial resolution of fabricated detector is 3.0 {mu}m, and the wavelength range which the detector has sensitivity is 30-6 nm region.

  5. High resolution X-ray images of Puppis A and IC 443

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre, R.; Winkler, P. F.; Seward, F. D.; Willingale, R.; Rolf, D.; Woods, N.; Canizares, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Soft X-ray photomosaic images of two supernova remnants, Puppis A and IC 443, constructed from a series of exposures by the Einstein imaging instruments, are presented. The complex morphologies displayed in these images reflect the interaction between 'middle-aged' supernova remnants and various components of the interstellar medium. Surface brightness variations across Puppis A suggest that inhomogeneities on scales from 0.2 to 30 pc are present in the interstellar medium, while the structure of IC 443 is apparently dominated by the interaction between the remnant and a giant molecular cloud.

  6. Combinatorial Screening of Advanced Scintillators for High Resolution X-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Shifan; Tao, Dejie; Lynch, Michael; Yuan, Xianglong; Li, Yiqun

    2008-05-12

    The lack of efficient scintillators is a major problem for developing powerful x-ray detectors that are widely used in homeland security, industrial and scientific research. Intematix has developed and applied a high throughput screening process and corresponding crystal growth technology to significantly speed up the discovery process for new efficient scintillators. As a result, Intematix has invented and fabricated three new scintillators both in powder and bulk forms, which possess promising properties such as better radiation hardness and better matching for silicon diode.

  7. Three-Dimensional High-Resolution Optical/X-Ray Stereoscopic Tracking Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cha, Soyoung S.; Ramachandran, Naryanan

    2005-01-01

    Measurement of three-dimensional (3-D) three-component velocity fields is of great importance in a variety of research and industrial applications for understanding materials processing, fluid physics, and strain/displacement measurements. The 3-D experiments in these fields most likely inhibit the use of conventional techniques, which are based only on planar and optically-transparent-field observation. Here, we briefly review the current status of 3-D diagnostics for motion/velocity detection, for both optical and x-ray systems. As an initial step for providing 3-D capabilities, we have developed stereoscopic tracking velocimetry (STV) to measure 3-D flow/deformation through optical observation. The STV is advantageous in system simplicity, for continually observing 3-D phenomena in near real-time. In an effort to enhance the data processing through automation and to avoid the confusion in tracking numerous markers or particles, artificial neural networks are employed to incorporate human intelligence. Our initial optical investigations have proven the STV to be a very viable candidate for reliably measuring 3-D flow motions. With previous activities focused on improving the processing efficiency, overall accuracy, and automation based on the optical system, the current efforts is directed to the concurrent expansion to the x-ray system for broader experimental applications.

  8. Three-Dimensional High-Resolution Optical/X-Ray Stereoscopic Tracking Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cha, Soyoung S.; Ramachandran, Narayanan

    2004-01-01

    Measurement of three-dimensional (3-D) three-component velocity fields is of great importance in a variety of research and industrial applications for understanding materials processing, fluid physics, and strain/displacement measurements. The 3-D experiments in these fields most likely inhibit the use of conventional techniques, which are based only on planar and optically-transparent-field observation. Here, we briefly review the current status of 3-D diagnostics for motion/velocity detection, for both optical and x-ray systems. As an initial step for providing 3-D capabilities, we nave developed stereoscopic tracking velocimetry (STV) to measure 3-D flow/deformation through optical observation. The STV is advantageous in system simplicity, for continually observing 3- D phenomena in near real-time. In an effort to enhance the data processing through automation and to avoid the confusion in tracking numerous markers or particles, artificial neural networks are employed to incorporate human intelligence. Our initial optical investigations have proven the STV to be a very viable candidate for reliably measuring 3-D flow motions. With previous activities are focused on improving the processing efficiency, overall accuracy, and automation based on the optical system, the current efforts is directed to the concurrent expansion to the x-ray system for broader experimental applications.

  9. Performance of a high-resolution x-ray microprobe at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Z.; Lai, B.; Yun, W.; McNulty, I.; Khounsary, A.; Maser, J.; Ilinski, P.; Legnini, D.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Xu, S.; Tieman, B.; Wiemerslage, G.; Gluskin, E.

    1999-12-20

    The authors have developed a x-ray microprobe in the energy region from 6 to 20 keV using undulator radiation and zone-plate optics for microfocusing-based techniques and applications at a beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The performance of the beamline was shown to meet the design objectives, including preservation of the source brilliance and coherence, selectable transverse coherence length and energy bandwidth, high angular stability, and harmonic suppression of the beam. These objectives were achieved by careful thermal management and use of a novel mirror and crystal monochromator cooling geometry. All beamline optical components are water cooled, and the x-ray beam in the experiment station is stable in beam intensity, energy, and position over many days with no active feedback. Using a double-crystal Si(111) monochromator, they have obtained a focal spot size (FWHM) of 0.15 {micro}m (v) x 1.0 {micro}m (h), and a photon flux of 4 x 10{sup 9} photons/sec at the focal spot, and thus a photon flux density gain of 15,000. A circular beam spot of 0.15 {micro}m in diameter can be achieved by reducing the horizontal source size using a white beam slit located 43.5 meters upstream of the zone plate, with an order of magnitude less flux in the focal spot.

  10. Dose in x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalender, Willi A.

    2014-02-01

    Radiation dose in x-ray computed tomography (CT) has become a topic of high interest due to the increasing numbers of CT examinations performed worldwide. This review aims to present an overview of current concepts for both scanner output metrics and for patient dosimetry and will comment on their strengths and weaknesses. Controversial issues such as the appropriateness of the CT dose index (CTDI) are discussed in detail. A review of approaches to patient dose assessment presently in practice, of the dose levels encountered and options for further dose optimization are also given and discussed. Patient dose assessment remains a topic for further improvement and for international consensus. All approaches presently in use are based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Estimates for effective dose are established, but they are crude and not patient-specific; organ dose estimates are rarely available. Patient- and organ-specific dose estimates can be provided with adequate accuracy and independent of CTDI phantom measurements by fast MC simulations. Such information, in particular on 3D dose distributions, is important and helpful in optimization efforts. Dose optimization has been performed very successfully in recent years and even resulted in applications with effective dose values of below 1 mSv. In general, a trend towards lower dose values based on technical innovations has to be acknowledged. Effective dose values are down to clearly below 10 mSv on average, and there are a number of applications such as cardiac and pediatric CT which are performed routinely below 1 mSv on modern equipment.

  11. Calorimetric Low Temperature Detectors for High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy on Stored Highly Stripped Heavy Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bleile, A.; Egelhof, P.; Kluge, H.J.; Liebisch, U.; McCammon, D.; Meier, H.J.; Sebastian, O.; Stahle, C.K.; Stoehlker, T.; Weber, M.

    2000-12-31

    The precise determination of the Lamb shift in heavy hydrogen-like ions provides a sensitive test of QED in very strong Coulomb fields, not accessible otherwise, and has also the potential to deduce nuclear charge radii. A brief overview on the present status of such experiments, performed at the storage ring ESR at GSI Darmstadt, is given. For the investigation of the Lyman-{alpha} transitions in Au{sup 78+} or U{sup 91+} ions with improved accuracy, a high-resolution calorimetric low-temperature detector for hard x-rays (E {le} 100 keV) has been recently developed. The detector modules consist of arrays of silicon thermistors and of x-ray absorbers made of high-Z material to optimize the absorption efficiency. The detectors are housed in a specially designed {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He dilution refrigerator which fits to the geometry of the ESR target. The detector performance presently achieved is already close to fulfilling the demands of the Lamb shift experiment. For a prototype detector an energy resolution of {Delta}E{sub FWHM} = 75 eV is obtained for 60-keV x-rays.

  12. Warm Absorbers in X-rays (WAX), a comprehensive high resolution grating spectral study of a sample of Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, S.; Guainazzi, M.; Dewangan, G.; Chakravorty, S.; Kembhavi, A.

    2014-07-01

    We present results from a homogeneous analysis of the broadband 0.3-10 keV CCD resolution as well as of soft X-ray high-resolution grating spectra of a hard X-ray flux-limited sample of 26 Seyfert galaxies observed with XMM-Newton. We could put a strict lower limit on the detection fraction of 50%. We find a gap in the distribution of the ionisation parameter in the range 0.5X-rays. The WA parameters show no correlation among themselves, except for one case. The shallow slope of the logξ versus logv_{out} linear regression (0.12± 0.03) is inconsistent with the scaling laws predicted by radiation or magneto-hydrodynamic-driven winds. Our results suggest also that WA and Ultra Fast Outflows (UFOs) do not represent extreme manifestation of the same astrophysical system.

  13. Wide-band, high-resolution soft x-ray spectrometer for the Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Widmann, K.

    1999-01-01

    We have constructed two wide-band, high-resolution vacuum flat crystal spectrometers and implemented them on the Electron Beam Ion Trap located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Working in unison, these spectrometers can measure an x-ray bandwidth {le}9 {Angstrom} in the soft x-ray region below 21 {Angstrom}. In order to achieve this large bandwidth each spectrometer houses either two 125 mm {times} 13 mm {times} 2 mm RAP (rubidium acid phthalate, 2d=26.121 {Angstrom}), two 114 mm {times} 13 mm {times} 2 mm TlAP (thallium acid phthalate, 2d=25.75 {Angstrom}) crystals, or some combination thereof, for dispersion and two position sensitive proportional counters for detection of x rays. The spectrometers are used to measure wavelengths and relative intensities of the L-shell line emission from FethinspXVII{endash}XXIV for comparison with spectra obtained from astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. The wide wavelength coverage attainable by these spectrometers makes it possible to measure all the L-shell emission from a given iron ion species simultaneously. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. High-throughput, high-resolution X-ray phase contrast tomographic microscopy for visualisation of soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, S. A.; Marone, F.; Hintermüller, C.; Bensadoun, J.-C.; Aebischer, P.; Stampanoni, M.

    2009-09-01

    The use of conventional absorption based X-ray microtomography can become limited for samples showing only very weak absorption contrast. However, a wide range of samples studied in biology and materials science can produce significant phase shifts of the X-ray beam, and thus the use of the phase signal can provide substantially increased contrast and therefore new and otherwise inaccessible information. The application of two approaches for high-throughput, high-resolution X-ray phase contrast tomography, both available on the TOMCAT beamline of the SLS, is illustrated. Differential Phase Contrast (DPC) imaging uses a grating interferometer and a phase-stepping technique. It has been integrated into the beamline environment on TOMCAT in terms of the fast acquisition and reconstruction of data and the availability to scan samples within an aqueous environment. The second phase contrast approach is a modified transfer of intensity approach that can yield the 3D distribution of the phase (refractive index) of a weakly absorbing object from a single tomographic dataset. These methods are being used for the evaluation of cell integrity in 3D, with the specific aim of following and analyzing progressive cell degeneration to increase knowledge of the mechanistic events of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease.

  15. To get the most out of high resolution X-ray tomography: A review of the post-reconstruction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yijin; Kiss, Andrew M.; Larsson, Daniel H.; Yang, Feifei; Pianetta, Piero

    2016-03-01

    X-ray microscopy has been well-recognized as one of the most important techniques for research in a wide range of scientific disciplines including materials science, geoscience, and bio-medical science. Advances in X-ray sources, optics, detectors, and imaging methodologies have made significant improvements to non-destructive reconstructions of the three dimensional (3D) structure of specimens over a wide range of length scales with different contrast mechanisms. A strength of 3D imaging is a "seeing is believing" way of reporting and analyzing data to better understand the structure/function characteristics of a sample. In addition to the excellent visualization capability, X-ray computed tomography has a lot more to offer. In this article, we review some of the experimental and analytical methods that enrich and extract scientifically relevant information from tomographic data. Several scientific cases are discussed along with how they enhance the tomographic dataset.

  16. Chemical speciation of chlorine in atmospheric aerosol samples by high-resolution proton induced X-ray emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Zsófia; Furu, Enikő; Kavčič, Matjaž

    2013-01-01

    Chlorine is a main elemental component of atmospheric particulate matter (APM). The knowledge of the chemical form of chlorine is of primary importance for source apportionment and for estimation of health effects of APM. In this work the applicability of high-resolution wavelength dispersive proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) spectroscopy for chemical speciation of chlorine in fine fraction atmospheric aerosols is studied. A Johansson-type crystal spectrometer with energy resolution below the natural linewidth of Cl K lines was used to record the high-resolution Kα and Kβ proton induced spectra of several reference Cl compounds and two atmospheric aerosol samples, which were collected for conventional PIXE analysis. The Kα spectra which refers to the oxidation state, showed very minor differences due to the high electronegativity of Cl. However, the Kβ spectra exhibited pronounced chemical effects which were significant enough to perform chemical speciation. The major chlorine component in two fine fraction aerosol samples collected during a 2010 winter campaign in Budapest was clearly identified as NaCl by comparing the high-resolution Cl Kβ spectra from the aerosol samples with the corresponding reference spectra. This work demonstrates the feasibility of high-resolution PIXE method for chemical speciation of Cl in aerosols.

  17. High-resolution spectroscopic diagnostics of very high-temperature plasmas in the hard x-ray regime

    SciTech Connect

    Widmann, K

    1999-12-06

    Motivated by the need for establishing a reliable database useful for the application of x-ray spectroscopic tools for the diagnostic of very high temperature plasmas, high-resolution crystal spectrometer measurements have been performed investigating the characteristic K-shell radiation of highly charged krypton and xenon. The measurements, which have been performed at the Electron-Beam-Ion-Trap (EBIT) facility of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, include the investigation of the n = 2 {yields} 1 transitions in heliumlike krypton (Kr{sup 34+}) and innershell excited lithiumlike krypton (Kr{sup 33+}) utilizing a conventional reflection-type crystal spectrometer of von Hamos geometry. The electron-excitation-energy selective measurements map the contribution of the dielectronic recombination lines providing the means of accurate interpretation of the line profiles of the characteristic K{alpha} x-ray emission of plasmas. The high-resolution measurements of the n = 2 {yields} 1 transitions in heliumlike xenon (Xe{sup 52+}) and hydrogenlike xenon (Xe{sup 53+}) were based on a new transmission-type crystal spectrometer of DuMond geometry. The resolving power of the developed spectrometer was sufficient for charge state specific observation allowing the determination of the electron-impact excitation cross section for the hydrogen- and heliumlike K{alpha} transitions. The disagreement with theoretically predicted values is a measure of the magnitude of the Breit interaction for the highly charged high-Z ions.

  18. High Resolution X-Ray Microangiography of 4T1 Tumor in Mouse Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Jianqi; Liu Ping; Gu Xiang; Liu Xiaoxia; Zhao Jun; Xiao Tiqiao; Xu, Lisa X.

    2010-07-23

    Angiogenesis is very important in tumor growth and metastasis. But in clinic, only vessels lager than 200 {mu}m in diameter, can be observed using conventional medical imaging. Synchrotron radiation (SR) phase contrast imaging, whose spatial resolution can reach as high as 1 {mu}m, has great advantages in imaging soft tissue structures, such as blood vessels and tumor tissues. In this paper, the morphology of newly formed micro-vessels in the mouse 4T1 tumor samples was firstly studied with contrast agent. Then, the angiogenesis in nude mice tumor window model was observed without contrast agent using the SR phase contrast imaging at the beamline for X-ray imaging and biomedical applications, Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). The images of tumors showed dense, irregular and tortuous tumor micro-vessels with the smallest size of 20-30 {mu}m in diameter.

  19. X-ray optics. II - A technique for high resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, Webster C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A novel combination of optical elements and properties is combined to achieve high-spectral resolution using grazing incidence optics of modest quality. Analysis and ray tracing of examples show that using radial groove gratings at high blaze angles in the manner of an echelle spectrograph can provide high spectral resolution. This arrangement is compared to the conventional in-plane designs to show that the off-plane is superior in nearly every respect. Cross dispersion can be provided by the energy resolution of a CCD detector. Additional resolution can be squeezed from the system by strategic placement of gratings to take advantage of the azimuthal response of a Wolter X-ray optic.

  20. Integrated reflectivity measurements of hydrogen phthalate crystals for high-resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zastrau, U.; Förster, E.

    2014-09-01

    The integrated x-ray reflectivity of Potassium Hydrogen Phthalate (KAP) and Rubidium Hydrogen Phthalate (RAP) crystals is studied at a photon energy of (1740±14) eV using a double-crystal setup. The absolute measured reflectivities are in < 5% agreement with the values predicted by the dynamic diffraction theory for perfect crystals when absorption is included. Within 4% experimental error margins, specimen that were exposed to ambient conditions over many years show identical reflectivity as specimen that were cleaved just before the measurement. No differences are observed between cleaving off a 10 μm surface layer and splitting the entire crystal bulk of 2 mm thickness. We conclude that at 1.7 keV photon energy the penetration depth of ~ 1 μm is large compared to a potentially deteriorated surface layer of a few 10 nm.

  1. Optimizing Transition Edge Sensors for High-Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Saab, Tarek; Bandler, Simon R.; Boyce, Kevin; Chervenak, James A.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Porter, Frederick S.; Sadleir, John E

    2006-09-07

    Transition Edge Sensors (TES) have found applications as astronomical detectors ranging from the microwave to the gamma ray energy bands. Each energy band, however, imposes a different set of requirements on the TES such as energy and timing resolution, focal plane coverage, and the mechanisms by which the signal is coupled to the detector. This paper focuses on the development of TESs optimized for the 0.1-10 keV energy range at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Such detectors are suitable candidates for some of the upcoming X-ray observatories such as NeXT and Constellation-X. Ongoing efforts at producing, characterizing, and modeling such devices, as well as the latest results, are discussed.

  2. Imaging of pore networks and related interfaces in soil systems by using high resolution X-ray micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacher, Gerhard; Eickhorst, Thilo; Schmidt, Hannes; Halisch, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Today's high-resolution X-ray CT with its powerful tubes and great detail detectability lends itself naturally to geological and pedological applications. Those include the non-destructive interior examination and textural analysis of rock and soil samples and their permeability and porosity - to name only a few. Especially spatial distribution and geometry of pores, mineral phases and fractures are important for the evaluation of hydrologic and aeration properties in soils as well as for root development in the soil matrix. The possibility to visualize a whole soil aggregate or root tissue in a non-destructive way is undoubtedly the most valuable feature of this type of analysis and is a new area for routine application of high resolution X-ray micro-CT. The paper outlines recent developments in hard- and software requirements for high resolution CT. It highlights several pedological applications which were performed with the phoenix nanotom m, the first 180 kV nanofocus CT system tailored specifically for extremely high-resolution scans of variable sized samples with voxel-resolutions down to < 300 nm. In addition very good contrast resolution can be obtained as well which is necessary to distinguish biogenic material in soil aggregates amongst others. We will address visualization and quantification of porous networks in 3D in different environmental samples ranging from clastic sedimentary rock to soil cores and individual soil aggregates. As several processes and habitat functions are related to various pore sizes imaging of the intact soil matrix will be presented on different scales of interest - from the mm-scale representing the connectivity of macro-pores down to the micro-scale representing the space of microbial habitats. Therefore, soils were impregnated with resin and scanned via X-ray CT. Scans at higher resolution were obtained from sub-volumes cut from the entire resin impregnated block and from crop roots surrounded by rhizosphere soil. Within the

  3. SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout) for low dose x-ray imaging: Spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Li Dan; Zhao Wei

    2008-07-15

    An indirect flat panel imager (FPI) with programmable avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated for low-dose and high resolution x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator, e.g., thallium (Tl) doped cesium iodide (CsI), to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor (HARP). The charge image created by the scintillator/HARP (SHARP) combination is read out by the electron beams emitted from the FEA. The proposed detector is called scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout (SAPHIRE). The programmable avalanche gain of HARP can improve the low dose performance of indirect FPI while the FEA can be made with pixel sizes down to 50 {mu}m. Because of the avalanche gain, a high resolution type of CsI (Tl), which has not been widely used in indirect FPI due to its lower light output, can be used to improve the high spatial frequency performance. The purpose of the present article is to investigate the factors affecting the spatial resolution of SAPHIRE. Since the resolution performance of the SHARP combination has been well studied, the focus of the present work is on the inherent resolution of the FEA readout method. The lateral spread of the electron beam emitted from a 50 {mu}mx50 {mu}m pixel FEA was investigated with two different electron-optical designs: mesh-electrode-only and electrostatic focusing. Our results showed that electrostatic focusing can limit the lateral spread of electron beams to within the pixel size of down to 50 {mu}m. Since electrostatic focusing is essentially independent of signal intensity, it will provide excellent spatial uniformity.

  4. Quantitative cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography/X-ray computed tomography imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping Chen, Xueli; Chao, Tiantian; Cao, Xu; Zhao, Fengjun; Huang, Liyu; Liang, Jimin

    2014-11-10

    X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) is an imaging technology based on X-ray-excitable materials. The main purpose of this paper is to obtain quantitative luminescence concentration using the structural information of the X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in the hybrid cone beam XLT/XCT system. A multi-wavelength luminescence cone beam XLT method with the structural a priori information is presented to relieve the severe ill-posedness problem in the cone beam XLT. The nanophosphors and phantom experiments were undertaken to access the linear relationship of the system response. Then, an in vivo mouse experiment was conducted. The in vivo experimental results show that the recovered concentration error as low as 6.67% with the location error of 0.85 mm can be achieved. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately recover the nanophosphor inclusion and realize the quantitative imaging.

  5. High-resolution X-ray structure of isoaspartyl dipeptidase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Thoden, James B; Marti-Arbona, Ricardo; Raushel, Frank M; Holden, Hazel M

    2003-05-01

    Isoaspartyl dipeptidase from Escherichia coli functions in protein degradation by catalyzing the hydrolysis of beta-L-isoaspartyl linkages in dipeptides. The best substrate for the enzyme reported thus far is iso-Asp-Leu. Here we report the X-ray analysis of the enzyme in its resting state and complexed with aspartate to 1.65 and 2.1 A resolution, respectively. The quaternary structure of the enzyme is octameric and can be aptly described as a tetramer of dimers. Each subunit folds into two distinct domains: the N-terminal region containing eight strands of mixed beta-sheet and the C-terminal motif that is dominated by a (beta,alpha)(8)-barrel. A binuclear zinc center is located in each subunit at the C-terminal end of the (beta,alpha)(8)-barrel. Ligands to the binuclear metal center include His 68, His 70, His 201, His 230, and Asp 285. The two zincs are bridged by a carboxylated lysine residue (Lys 162) and a solvent molecule, most likely a hydroxide ion. The product of the reaction, aspartate, binds to the enzyme by displacing the bridging solvent with its side chain functional group. From this investigation it is proposed that the reaction mechanism of the enzyme proceeds through a tetrahedral intermediate and that the bridging solvent attacks the re face of the carbonyl carbon of the scissile peptide bond. This structural analysis confirms the placement of isoaspartyl dipeptidase into the urease-related amidohydrolase superfamily.

  6. Upgrades of the high resolution imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, B.; Wang, F.; Fu, J.; Li, Y.; Wan, B.; Shi, Y.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Lee, S. G.

    2012-10-15

    Two imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers, the so-called 'poloidal' and 'tangential' spectrometers, were recently implemented on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) to provide spatially and temporally resolved impurity ion temperature (T{sub i}), electron temperature (T{sub e}) and rotation velocity profiles. They are derived from Doppler width of W line for Ti, the intensity ratio of Li-like satellites to W line for Te, and Doppler shift of W line for rotation. Each spectrometer originally consisted of a spherically curved crystal and a two-dimensional multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC) detector. Both spectrometers have now been upgraded. The layout of the tangential spectrometer was modified, since it had to be moved to a different port, and the spectrometer was equipped with two high count rate Pilatus detectors (Model 100 K) to overcome the count rate limitation of the MWPC and to improve its time resolution. The poloidal spectrometer was equipped with two spherically bent crystals to record the spectra of He-like and H-like argon simultaneously and side by side on the original MWPC. These upgrades are described, and new results from the latest EAST experimental campaign are presented.

  7. High Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy and Imaging of Supernova Remnant N132D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Ehud; Rasmussen, Andrew; Griffiths, R. Gareth; Dennerl, Konrad; Audard, Marc; Aschenbach, Bernd

    2000-01-01

    The observation of the supernova remnant N132D by the scientific instruments on board the XMM-Newton satellite is presented. The X-rays from N132D are dispersed into a detailed line-rich spectrum using the Reflection Grating Spectrometers. Spectral lines of C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Fe are identified. Images of the remnant, in narrow wavelength bands, produced by the European Photon Imaging Cameras reveal a complex spatial structure of the ionic distribution. While K - shell Fe seems to originate near the centre, all of the other ions are observed along the shell. An emission excess of O(6+) over O(7+) is detected on the northeastern edge of the remnant. This can be a sign of hot ionising conditions, or it can reflect a relatively cool region. Spectral fitting of the CCD spectrum suggests high temperatures in this region, but a detailed analysis of the atomic processes involved in producing the O(6+) spectral lines leads to the conclusion that the intensities of these lines alone cannot provide a conclusive distinction between the two scenarios.

  8. Crystal Dynamics of (delta) fcc Pu-Ga by High Resolution Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J; Krisch, M; Farber, D; Occelli, F; Xu, R; Chiang, T C; Clatterbuck, D; Schwartz, A J; Wall, M; Boro, C

    2004-09-28

    We have used a microbeam on large grain sample concept to carry out an inelastic x-ray scattering experiment to map the full phonon dispersion curves of an fcc {delta}-phase Pu-Ga alloy. This approach obviates experimental difficulties with conventional inelastic neutron scattering due to the high absorption cross section of the common {sup 239}Pu isotope and the non-availability of large (mm size) single crystal materials for Pu and its alloys. A classical Born von-Karman force constant model was used to model the experimental results, and no less than 4th nearest neighbor interactions had to be included to account for the observation. Several unusual features including, a large elastic anisotropy, a small shear elastic modulus, (C{sub 11}-C{sub 12})/2, a Kohn-like anomaly in the T{sub 1}[011] branch, and a pronounced softening of the T[111] branch towards the L point in the Brillouin are found. These features can be related to the phase transitions of plutonium and to strong coupling between the crystal structure and the 5f valence instabilities. Our results represent the first full phonon dispersions ever obtained for any Pu-bearing material, thus ending a 40-year quest for this fundamental data. The phonon data also provide a critical test for theoretical treatments of highly correlated 5f electron systems as exemplified by recent dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) calculations for {delta}-plutonium.

  9. High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Seyfert 2 Galaxy Circinus with Chandra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambruna, Rita M.; Netzer, Hagai; Kaspi, Shai; Brandt, W. N.; Chartas, G.; Garmire, G. P.; Nousek, John A.; Weaver, K. A.

    2000-01-01

    Results from a 60 ks Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) observation of the nearby Seyfert 2 Circinus are presented. The spectrum shows a wealth of emission lines at both soft and hard X-rays, including lines of Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe, and a prominent Fe K(alpha) line at 6.4 keV. We identify several of the He-like components and measure several of the Lyman lines of the N-like ions. The lines' profiles are unresolved at the limited signal-to-noise ratio of the data. Our analysis of the zeroth-order image in a companion paper constrains the size of the emission region to be 20-60 pc, suggesting that emission within this volume is almost entirely due to the reprocessing of the obscured central source. Here we show that a model containing two distinct components can reproduce almost all the observed properties of this gas. The ionized component can explain the observed intensities of the ionized species, assuming twice-solar composition and an N is proportional r(exp -1.5) density distribution. The neutral component is highly concentrated, well within the 0.8" point source, and is responsible for almost all of the observed K(alpha) (6.4 keV) emission. Circinus seems to be different than Mkn 3 in terms of its gas distribution.

  10. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of T Tauri stars in the Taurus-Auriga complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telleschi, A.; Güdel, M.; Briggs, K. R.; Audard, M.; Scelsi, L.

    2007-06-01

    Context: Differences have been reported between the X-ray emission of accreting and non-accreting stars. Some observations have suggested that accretion shocks could be responsible for part of the X-ray emission in classical T Tauri stars (CTTS). Aims: We present high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy for nine pre-main sequence stars in order to test the proposed spectroscopic differences between accreting and non-accreting pre-main sequence stars. Methods: We used X-ray spectroscopy from the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometers and the EPIC instruments. We interpret the spectra using optically thin thermal models with variable abundances, together with an absorption column density. For BP Tau and AB Aur we derive electron densities from the O vii triplets. Results: Using the O vii/O viii count ratios as a diagnostic for cool plasma, we find that CTTS display a soft excess (with equivalent electron temperatures of ≈2.5{-}3 MK) when compared with WTTS or zero-age main-sequence stars. Although the O vii triplet in BP Tau is consistent with a high electron density (3.4 × 1011 cm-3), we find low density for the accreting Herbig star AB Aur (ne < 1010 cm-3). The element abundances of accreting and non-accreting stars are similar. The Ne abundance is found to be high (4-6 times the Fe abundance) in all K and M-type stars. In contrast, for the three G-type stars (SU Aur, HD 283572, and HP Tau/G2), we find an enhanced Fe abundance (0.4-0.8 times solar photospheric values) compared to later-type stars. Conclusions: Adding the results from our sample to former high-resolution studies of T Tauri stars, we find a soft excess in all accreting stars, but in none of the non-accretors. On the other hand, high electron density and high Ne/Fe abundance ratios do not seem to be present in all accreting pre-main sequence stars.

  11. TU-A-9A-07: X-Ray Acoustic Computed Tomography (XACT): 100% Sensitivity to X-Ray Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, L; Ahmad, M; Nikoozadeh, A; Pratx, G; Khuri-Yakub, B; Xing, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To assess whether X-ray acoustic computed tomography (XACT) is more sensitive to X-ray absorption than that of the conventional X-ray imaging. Methods: First, a theoretical model was built to analyze the X-ray absorption sensitivity of XACT imaging and conventional X-ray imaging. Second, an XACT imaging system was developed to evaluate the X-ray induced acoustic signal generation as well as the sensitivity improvement over transmission x-ray imaging. Ultra-short x-ray pulses (60-nanosecond) were generated from an X-ray source operated at the energy of 150 kVp with a 10-Hz repetition rate. The X-ray pulse was synchronized with the acoustic detection via a x-ray scintillation triggering to acquire the X-ray induced acoustic signal. Results: Theoretical analysis shows that X-ray induced acoustic signal is sensitive only to the X-ray absorption, while completely insensitive to out the X-ray scattering and fluorescence. XACT has reduced background and increased contrast-to-noise ratio, and therefore has increased sensitivity compared to transmission x-ray imaging. For a 50-μm size, gadolinium insertion in tissue exposed to 40 keV X-rays; the sensitivity of XACT imaging is about 28.9 times higher than that of conventional X-ray imaging. Conclusion: X-ray acoustic computer tomography (XACT) as a new imaging modality combines X-ray absorption contrast and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. It is feasible to improve the imaging sensitivity with XACT imaging compared with conventional X-ray imaging. Taking advantage of the high ultrasonic resolution, it is possible to perform 3-D imaging with a single x-ray pulse with arrays of transducers without any mechanical motion of the imaging system. This single-shot capability offers the potential of reducing radiation dose by a factor of 1000, and imaging 100 times faster when compared to the conventional X-ray CT, and thus revolutionizing x-ray imaging applications in medicine and biology. The authors

  12. Study of Stent Deployment Mechanics Using a High-Resolution X-ray Imaging Detector

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiyuan; Ionita, Ciprian N; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    To treat or prevent some of the 795,000 annual strokes in the U.S., self-expanding endo-vascular stents deployed under fluoroscopic image guidance are often used. Neuro-interventionalists need to know the deployment behavior of each stent in order to place them in the correct position. Using the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) which has about 3 times higher resolution than commercially available flat panel detectors (FPD) we studied the deployment mechanics of two of the most important commercially available nitinol stents: the Pipeline embolization device (EV3), and the Enterprise stent (Codman). The Pipeline stent's length extends to about 3 times that of its deployed length when it is contained inside a catheter. From the high-resolution images with the MAF we found that upon the sudden release of the distal end of the Pipeline from a helical wire cap, the stent expands radially but retracts to about 30% (larger than for patient deployments) of its length. When released from the catheter proximally, it retracts additionally about 50% contributing to large uncertainty in the final deployed location. In contrast, the MAF images clearly show that the Enterprise stent self expands with minimal length retraction during deployment from its catheter and can be retrieved and repositioned until the proximal markers are released from clasping structures on its guide-wire thus enabling more accurate placement at the center of an aneurysm or stenosis. The high-resolution imaging demonstrated in this study should help neurointerventionalists understand and control endovascular stent deployment mechanisms and hence perform more precise treatments. PMID:21804747

  13. High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Post-T Tauri Star PZ Telescopii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argiroffi, C.; Drake, J. J.; Maggio, A.; Peres, G.; Sciortino, S.; Harnden, F. R.

    2004-07-01

    We present an analysis of the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer observation of the rapidly rotating (Prot=0.94days) post-T Tauri (~20 Myr old) star PZ Telescopii, in the Tucana association. Using two different methods, we have derived the coronal emission measure distribution EM(T) and chemical abundances. The EM(T) peaks at logT=6.9 and exhibits a significant emission measure at temperatures logT>7. The coronal abundances are generally ~0.5 times the solar photospheric values, which are presumed fairly representative of the composition of the underlying star. A minimum in abundance is seen at a first ionization potential (FIP) of 7-8 eV, with evidence for higher abundances at both lower and higher FIP, similar to patterns seen in other active stars. From an analysis of the He-like triplet of Mg XI, we have estimated electron densities of ~1012-1013 cm-3. All the coronal properties found for PZ Tel are much more similar to those of AB Dor, which is slightly older than PZ Tel, than to those of the younger T Tauri star TW Hya. These results support earlier conclusions that the soft X-ray emission of TW Hya is likely dominated by accretion activity rather than by a magnetically heated corona. Our results also suggest that the coronae of pre-main-sequence stars rapidly become similar to those of older active main-sequence stars soon after the accretion stage has ended.

  14. X-ray High-resolution Spectroscopy for Laser-produced Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbato, F.; Scarpellini, D.; Malizia, A.; Gaudio, P.; Richetta, M.; Antonelli, L.

    The study of the emission spectrum gives information about the material generating the spectrum itself and the condition in which this is generated. The wavelength spectra lines are linked to the specific element and plasma conditions (electron temperature, density), while their shape is influenced by several physical effects like Stark and Doppler ones. In this work we study the X-ray emission spectra of a copper laser-produced plasma by using a spherical bent crystal spectrometer to measure the electron temperature. The facility used is the laser TVLPS, at the Tor Vergata University in Rome. It consists of a Nd:Glass source (in first harmonic - 1064 nm) whose pulse parameters are: 8 J in energy, time duration of 15 ns and a focal spot diameter of 200 μm. The adopted spectrometer is based on a spherical bent crystal of muscovite. The device combines the focusing property of a spherical mirror with the Bragg's law. This allows to obtain a great power resolution but a limited range of analysis. In our case the resolution is on average 80 eV. As it is well-known, the position of the detector on the Rowland's circle is linked to the specific spectral range which has been studied. To select the area to be investigated, we acquired spectra by means of a flat spectrometer. The selected area is centered on 8.88 Å. To calibrate the spectrum we wrote a ray-tracing MATLAB code, which calculates the detector alignment parameters and calibration curve. We used the method of line ratio to measure the electron temperature. This is possible because we assumed the plasma to be in LTE condition. The temperature value was obtained comparing the experimental one, given by the line ratio, with the theoretical one, preceded by FLYCHK simulations.

  15. High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy with the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, F. Scott; Adams, Joseph S.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Gregory V.; Clementson, Joel; Frankel, Miriam; Kahn, Steven M.

    2009-12-16

    The EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS) is a production-class 36 pixel x-ray calorimeter spectrometer that has been continuously operating at the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for almost 2 years. The ECS was designed to be a long-lifetime, turn-key spectrometer that couples high performance with ease of operation and minimal operator intervention. To this end, a variant of the Suzaku/XRS spaceflight detector system has been coupled to a low-maintenance cryogenic system consisting of a long-lifetime liquid He cryostat, and a closed cycle, {sup 3}He pre-cooled adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. The ECS operates for almost 3 weeks between cryogenic servicing and the ADR operates at 0.05 K for more than 60 hours between automatic recycles under software control. Half of the ECS semiconductor detector array is populated with mid-band pixels that have a resolution of 4.5 eV FWHM, a bandpass from 0.05-12 keV, and a quantum efficiency of 95% at 6 keV. The other half of the array has thick HgTe absorbers that have a bandpass from 0.3 to over 100 keV, an energy resolution of 33 eV FWHM, and a quantum efficiency of 32% at 60 keV. In addition, the ECS uses a real-time, autonomous, data collection and analysis system developed for the Suzaku/XRS instrument and implemented in off-the-shelf hardware for the ECS. Here we will discuss the performance of the ECS instrument and its implementation as a turnkey cryogenic detector system.

  16. High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy with the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, F S; Adams, J S; Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Clementson, J; Frankel, M; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A

    2009-10-01

    The EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS) is a production-class 36 pixel x-ray calorimeter spectrometer that has been continuously operating at the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for almost 2 years. The ECS was designed to be a long-lifetime, turn-key spectrometer that couples high performance with ease of operation and minimal operator intervention. To this end, a variant of the Suzaku/XRS spaceflight detector system has been coupled to a low-maintenance cryogenic system consisting of a long-lifetime liquid He cryostat, and a closed cycle, {sup 3}He pre-cooled adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. The ECS operates for almost 3 weeks between cryogenic servicing and the ADR operates at 0.05 K for more than 60 hours between automatic recycles under software control. Half of the ECS semiconductor detector array is populated with mid-band pixels that have a resolution of 4.5 eV FWHM, a bandpass from 0.05-12 keV, and a quantum efficiency of 95% at 6 keV. The other half of the array has thick HgTe absorbers that have a bandpass from 0.3 to over 100 keV, an energy resolution of 33 eV FWHM, and a quantum efficiency of 32% at 60 keV. In addition, the ECS uses a real-time, autonomous, data collection and analysis system developed for the Suzaku/XRS instrument and implemented in off-the-shelf hardware for the ECS. Here we will discuss the performance of the ECS instrument and its implementation as a turnkey cryogenic detector system.

  17. Perspectives on heterococcolith geochemical proxies based on high-resolution X-ray fluorescence mapping.

    PubMed

    Suchéras-Marx, B; Giraud, F; Simionovici, A; Daniel, I; Tucoulou, R

    2016-07-01

    Heterococcoliths are micron-scale calcite platelets produced by coccolithophores. They have been the most abundant and continuous fossil record over the last 215 million years (Myr), offering great potential for geochemical studies, although the heterococcolith fossil record remains underutilised in this domain. We have mapped heterococcoliths' composition using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) with a 100-nm resolution beam to decipher element distributions in heterococcoliths and to investigate the potential development of geochemical proxies for palaeoceanography. The study presents two Middle Jurassic Watznaueria britannica heterococcoliths from Cabo Mondego, Portugal. XRF analysis was performed with a 17 keV incident energy beam at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility ID22NI beamline to study elements from Sr down to S. Ca, Sr and Mn are distributed following the heterococcolith crystalline arrangement. Cl, Br and S display an homogeneous distribution, whereas K, Fe, Cu, Zn and Rb are concentrated at the edges and in the central area of the heterococcoliths. Distributions of K, Fe, Ti, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb and to a lesser extent V and Cr are highly influenced by clay contamination and peripheral diagenetic overgrowth. Mn is related to diagenetic Mn-rich CaCO3 overgrowth on top of or between heterococcoliths shields. Cl and Br are likely to be present in heterococcoliths inside interstitial nano-domains. We assume that the cytoplasm [Cl(-) ] and [Br(-) ] are mediated and constant during heterococcolithogenesis. Assuming a linear correlation between cytoplasm [Cl(-) ] and sea water [Cl(-) ], heterococcolith Cl may have potential as a salinity proxy. As S is incorporated into heterococcoliths by sulphated polysaccharides, our study suggests a role for such polysaccharides in heterococcolithogenesis for at least 170 Myr. The low Sr/Ca in the W. britannica specimens studied here may either highlight an unusual cellular physiology of Mesozoic coccolithophores or result

  18. High-resolution X-ray CT for 3D petrography of ferruginous sandstone for an investigation of building stone decay.

    PubMed

    Cnudde, Veerle; Dewanckele, Jan; Boone, Matthieu; de Kock, Tim; Boone, Marijn; Brabant, Loes; Dusar, Michiel; de Ceukelaire, Marleen; de Clercq, Hilde; Hayen, Roald; Jacobs, Patric

    2011-11-01

    Diestian ferruginous sandstone has been used as the dominant building stone for monuments in the Hageland, a natural landscape in east-central Belgium. Like all rocks, this stone type is sensitive to weathering. Case hardening was observed in combination with blackening of the exterior parts of the dressed stones. To determine the 3D petrography and to identify the structural differences between the exterior and interior parts, X-ray computed tomography was used in combination with more traditional research techniques like optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The 3D characterization of the ferruginous sandstone was performed with a high-resolution X-ray CT scanner (www.ugct.ugent.be) in combination with the flexible 3D analysis software Morpho+, which provides the necessary petrophysical parameters of the scanned samples in 3D. Besides providing the required 3D parameters like porosity, pore-size distribution, grain size, grain orientation, and surface analysis, the results of the 3D analysis can also be visualized, which enables to understand and interpret the analysis results in a straightforward way. The complementarities between high-quality X-ray CT images and flexible 3D software and its relation with the more traditional microscopical research techniques are opening up new gateways in the study of weathering processes of natural building stones.

  19. The High-Resolution X-Ray Spectrum of SS 433 Using the Chandra HETGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Herman L.; Canizares, Claude R.; Schulz, Norbert S.

    2002-01-01

    We present observations of SS 433 using the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer. Many emission lines of highly ionized elements are detected with relativistic blue and red Doppler shifts. The lines are measurably broadened to 1700 km s-1 (FWHM), and the widths do not depend significantly on the characteristic emission temperature, suggesting that the emission occurs in a freely expanding region of constant collimation with an opening angle of 1.23d+/-0.06d. The blueshifts of lines from low-temperature gas are the same as those of high-temperature gas within the uncertainties, again indicating that the hottest gas we observe to emit emission lines is already at terminal velocity. This velocity is 0.2699+/-0.0007c, which is larger than the velocity inferred from optical emission lines by 2920+/-440 km s-1. Fits to the emission-line fluxes give a range of temperatures in the jet from 5×106 to 1×108 K. We derive the emission measure as a function of temperature for a four-component model that fits the line flux data. Using the density-sensitive Si XIII triplet, the characteristic electron density is 1014 cm-3, where the gas temperature is about 1.3×107 K. Based on an adiabatic expansion model of the jet and a distance of 4.85 kpc, the electron densities drop from ~2×1015 to 4×1013 cm-3 at distances of (2-20)×1010 cm from the apex of the cone that bounds the flow. The radius of the base of the visible jet is estimated to be ~108 cm, and the mass outflow rate is 1.5×10-7 Msolar yr-1. The kinetic power is 3.2×1038 ergs s-1, which is 1000 times larger than the unabsorbed 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity. The bremsstrahlung emission associated with the lines can account for the entire continuum; we see no direct evidence for an accretion disk. The image from zeroth order shows extended emission at a scale of ~2", aligned in the general direction of the radio jets.

  20. New room temperature high resolution solid-state detector (CdZnTe) for hard x rays and gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Amyelizabeth C.; Desai, Upendra D.

    1993-01-01

    The new CdZnTe high 'Z' material represents a significant improvement in detectors for high energy photons. With the thicknesses available, photons up to 100 keV can be efficiently detected. This material has a wide band gap of 1.5 - 2.2 eV which allows it to operate at room temperature while providing high spectral resolution. Results of resolution evaluations are presented. This detector can be used for high resolution spectral measurements of photons in x-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, offering a significant reduction in the weight, power, and volume of the detector system compared to more conventional detector types such as scintillation counters. In addition, the detector will have the simplicity and reliability of solid-state construction. The CdZnTe detector, as a new development, has not yet been evaluated in space. The Get Away Special program can provide this opportunity.

  1. Vibronic fine structure in high-resolution x-ray absorption spectra from ion-bombarded boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Petravic, Mladen; Peter, Robert; Varasanec, Marijana; Li Luhua; Chen Ying; Cowie, Bruce C. C.

    2013-05-15

    The authors have applied high-resolution near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure measurements around the nitrogen K-edge to study the effects of ion-bombardment on near-surface properties of boron nitride nanotubes. A notable difference has been observed between surface sensitive partial electron yield (PEY) and bulk sensitive total electron yield (TEY) fine-structure measurements. The authors assign the PEY fine structure to the coupling of excited molecular vibrational modes to electronic transitions in NO molecules trapped just below the surface. Oxidation resistance of the boron nitride nanotubes is significantly reduced by low energy ion bombardment, as broken B-N bonds are replaced by N-O bonds involving oxygen present in the surface region. In contrast to the PEY spectra, the bulk sensitive TEY measurements on as-grown samples do not exhibit any fine structure while the ion-bombarded samples show a clear vibronic signature of molecular nitrogen.

  2. Visualisation by high resolution synchrotron X-ray phase contrast micro-tomography of gas films on submerged superhydrophobic leaves.

    PubMed

    Lauridsen, Torsten; Glavina, Kyriaki; Colmer, Timothy David; Winkel, Anders; Irvine, Sarah; Lefmann, Kim; Feidenhans'l, Robert; Pedersen, Ole

    2014-10-01

    Floods can completely submerge terrestrial plants but some wetland species can sustain O2 and CO2 exchange with the environment via gas films forming on superhydrophobic leaf surfaces. We used high resolution synchrotron X-ray phase contrast micro-tomography in a novel approach to visualise gas films on submerged leaves of common cordgrass (Spartina anglica). 3D tomograms enabled a hitherto unmatched level of detail regarding the micro-topography of leaf gas films. Gas films formed only on the superhydrophobic adaxial leaf side (water droplet contact angle, Φ=162°) but not on the abaxial side (Φ=135°). The adaxial side of the leaves of common cordgrass is plicate with a longitudinal system of parallel grooves and ridges and the vast majority of the gas film volume was found in large ∼180μm deep elongated triangular volumes in the grooves and these volumes were connected to each neighbouring groove via a fine network of gas tubules (∼1.7μm diameter) across the ridges. In addition to the gas film retained on the leaf exterior, the X-ray phase contrast micro-tomography also successfully distinguished gas spaces internally in the leaf tissues, and the tissue porosity (gas volume per unit tissue volume) ranged from 6.3% to 20.3% in tip and base leaf segments, respectively. We conclude that X-ray phase contrast micro-tomography is a powerful tool to obtain quantitative data of exterior gas features on biological samples because of the significant difference in electron density between air, biological tissues and water. PMID:25175398

  3. High-resolution analysis of Zn(2+) coordination in the alkaline phosphatase superfamily by EXAFS and x-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Bobyr, Elena; Lassila, Jonathan K; Wiersma-Koch, Helen I; Fenn, Timothy D; Lee, Jason J; Nikolic-Hughes, Ivana; Hodgson, Keith O; Rees, Douglas C; Hedman, Britt; Herschlag, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Comparisons among evolutionarily related enzymes offer opportunities to reveal how structural differences produce different catalytic activities. Two structurally related enzymes, Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (AP) and Xanthomonas axonopodis nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase (NPP), have nearly identical binuclear Zn(2+) catalytic centers but show tremendous differential specificity for hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters or phosphate diesters. To determine if there are differences in Zn(2+) coordination in the two enzymes that might contribute to catalytic specificity, we analyzed both x-ray absorption spectroscopic and x-ray crystallographic data. We report a 1.29-Å crystal structure of AP with bound phosphate, allowing evaluation of interactions at the AP metal site with high resolution. To make systematic comparisons between AP and NPP, we measured zinc extended x-ray absorption fine structure for AP and NPP in the free-enzyme forms, with AMP and inorganic phosphate ground-state analogs and with vanadate transition-state analogs. These studies yielded average zinc-ligand distances in AP and NPP free-enzyme forms and ground-state analog forms that were identical within error, suggesting little difference in metal ion coordination among these forms. Upon binding of vanadate to both enzymes, small increases in average metal-ligand distances were observed, consistent with an increased coordination number. Slightly longer increases were observed in NPP relative to AP, which could arise from subtle rearrangements of the active site or differences in the geometry of the bound vanadyl species. Overall, the results suggest that the binuclear Zn(2+) catalytic site remains very similar between AP and NPP during the course of a reaction cycle. PMID:22056344

  4. Semi-transparent central stop in high-resolution X-ray ptychography using Kirkpatrick–Baez focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke, R. N. Vassholz, M.; Salditt, T.

    2013-09-01

    A semi-transparent central stop has been used for ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging to increase the effective dynamic range in the recording of the far-field diffraction patterns. In this way, the high flux density provided by nano-focusing Kirkpatrick–Baez mirrors can be fully exploited for high resolution and quantitative phase reconstructions. A ptychographic coherent X-ray diffractive imaging (PCDI) experiment has been carried out using 7.9 keV X-rays and Kirkpatrick–Baez focusing mirrors. By introducing a semi-transparent central stop in front of the detector the dynamic range on the detector is increased by about four orders of magnitude. The feasibility of this experimental scheme is demonstrated for PCDI applications with a resolution below 10 nm. The results are compared with reference data and an increase of resolution by a factor of two is obtained, while the deviation of the reconstructed phase map from the reference is below 1%.

  5. Neutron and high-resolution room-temperature X-ray data collection from crystallized lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Bacik, John Paul; Mekasha, Sophanit; Forsberg, Zarah; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Nix, Jay C; Cuneo, Matthew J; Coates, Leighton; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Chen, Julian C H; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Unkefer, Clifford J

    2015-11-01

    Bacteria and fungi express lytic polysaccharide monooxgyenase (LPMO) enzymes that act in conjunction with canonical hydrolytic sugar-processing enzymes to rapidly convert polysaccharides such as chitin, cellulose and starch to single monosaccharide products. In order to gain a better understanding of the structure and oxidative mechanism of these enzymes, large crystals (1-3 mm(3)) of a chitin-processing LPMO from the Gram-positive soil bacterium Jonesia denitrificans were grown and screened for their ability to diffract neutrons. In addition to the collection of neutron diffraction data, which were processed to 2.1 Å resolution, a high-resolution room-temperature X-ray diffraction data set was collected and processed to 1.1 Å resolution in space group P212121. To our knowledge, this work marks the first successful neutron crystallographic experiment on an LPMO. Joint X-ray/neutron refinement of the resulting data will reveal new details of the structure and mechanism of this recently discovered class of enzymes. PMID:26527275

  6. High Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of zeta Puppis with the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, S. M.; Leutenegger, M. A.; Cottam, J.; Rauw, G.; Vreux, J.-M.; denBoggende, A. J. F.; Mewe, R.; Guedel, M.

    2000-01-01

    We present the first high resolution X-ray spectrum of the bright O4Ief supergiant star Puppis, obtained with the Reflection Grating Spectrometer on- board XMM-Newton. The spectrum exhibits bright emission lines of hydrogen-like and helium-like ions of nitrogen, oxygen, neon, magnesium, and silicon, as well as neon-like ions of iron. The lines are all significantly resolved, with characteristic velocity widths of order 1000 - 1500 km/ s. The nitrogen lines are especially strong, and indicate that the shocked gas in the wind is mixed with CNO-burned material, as has been previously inferred for the atmosphere of this star from ultraviolet spectra. We find that the forbidden to intercombination line ratios within the helium-like triplets are anomalously low for N VI, O VII, and Ne IX. While this is sometimes indicative of high electron density, we show that in this case, it is instead caused by the intense ultraviolet radiation field of the star. We use this interpretation to derive constraints on the location of the X-ray emitting shocks within the wind that agree remarkably well with current theoretical models for this system.

  7. High resolution imaging of the ultrastructure of living algal cells using soft x-ray contact microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, T.W.; Cotton, R.A.; Page, A.M.; Tomie, T.; Majima, T.; Stead, A.D.

    1995-12-31

    Soft x-ray contact microscopy provides the biologist with a technique for examining the ultrastructure of living cells at a much higher resolution than that possible by various forms of light microscopy. Readout of the developed photoresist using atomic force microscopy (AFM) produces a detailed map of the carbon densities generated in the resist following exposure of the specimen to water-window soft x-rays (2--4nm) produced by impact of a high energy laser onto a suitable target. The established high resolution imaging method of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has inherent problems in the chemical pre-treatment required for producing the ultrathin sections necessary for this technique. Using the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas the ultrastructural appearance of the cells following SXCM and TEM has been compared. While SXCM confirms the basic structural organization of the cell as seen by TEM (e.g., the organization of the thylakoid membranes within the chloroplast; flagellar insertion into the cytoplasm), there are important differences. These are in the appearance of the cell covering and the presence of carbon-dense spherical cellular inclusions.

  8. Bulk crystal growth, and high-resolution x-ray diffraction results of LiZnP semiconductor material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montag, Benjamin W.; Reichenberger, Michael A.; Sunder, Madhana; Ugorowski, Philip B.; Nelson, Kyle A.; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2015-06-01

    Nowotny-Juza compounds continue to be explored as a candidate for solid-state neutron detectors. Such a device would have greater efficiency, in a compact form, than present day gas-filled 3He and 10BF3 detectors. The 6Li(n,t)4He reaction yields a total Q-value of 4.78 MeV, larger than 10B, an energy easily identified above background radiations. Hence, devices fabricated from semiconducting compounds containing either natural Li (nominally 7.5% 6Li) or enriched 6Li (usually 95% 6Li) may provide a semiconductor material for compact high efficiency neutron detectors. Starting material was synthesized by preparing equimolar portions of Li, Zn, and P sealed under vacuum (10-6 Torr) in quartz ampoules lined with boron nitride and subsequently reacted in a compounding furnace [1]. The synthesized material showed signs of high impurity levels from material and electrical property characterizations. A static vacuum sublimation in quartz was performed to help purify the synthesized material [2]. Bulk crystalline samples were grown from the purified material. An ingot 9.6 mm in diameter and 4.0 mm in length was harvested. Individual samples were characterized for crystallinity on a Bruker AXS Inc. D2 CRYSO, energy dispersive x-ray diffractometer, and a Bruker AXS D8 DISCOVER, high-resolution x-ray diffractometer with a 0.004° beam divergence. The (220) orientation was characterized as the main orientation with the D2 CRYSO, and confirmed with the D8 DISCOVER. An out-of-plane high-resolution rocking curve yielded a 0.417° full width at half maximum (FWHM) for the (220) LiZnP. In-plane ordering was confirmed by observation of the (311) orientation, where a rocking curve was collected with a FWHM of 0.294°.

  9. Determination of lattice parameters, strain state and composition in semipolar III-nitrides using high resolution X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Frentrup, Martin Wernicke, Tim; Stellmach, Joachim; Kneissl, Michael; Hatui, Nirupam; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2013-12-07

    In group-III-nitride heterostructures with semipolar or nonpolar crystal orientation, anisotropic lattice and thermal mismatch with the buffer or substrate lead to a complex distortion of the unit cells, e.g., by shearing of the lattice. This makes an accurate determination of lattice parameters, composition, and strain state under assumption of the hexagonal symmetry impossible. In this work, we present a procedure to accurately determine the lattice constants, strain state, and composition of semipolar heterostructures using high resolution X-ray diffraction. An analysis of the unit cell distortion shows that four independent lattice parameters are sufficient to describe this distortion. Assuming only small deviations from an ideal hexagonal structure, a linear expression for the interplanar distances d{sub hkl} is derived. It is used to determine the lattice parameters from high resolution X-ray diffraction 2ϑ-ω-scans of multiple on- and off-axis reflections via a weighted least-square fit. The strain and composition of ternary alloys are then evaluated by transforming the elastic parameters (using Hooke's law) from the natural crystal-fixed coordinate system to a layer-based system, given by the in-plane directions and the growth direction. We illustrate our procedure taking an example of (112{sup ¯}2) Al{sub κ}Ga{sub 1−κ}N epilayers with Al-contents over the entire composition range. We separately identify the in-plane and out-of-plane strains and discuss origins for the observed anisotropy.

  10. Double conical crystal x-ray spectrometer for high resolution ultrafast x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy of Al K edge

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, A.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Harmand, M.; Hulin, S.; Santos, J. J.; Descamps, D.; Petit, S.; Bouillaud, R.

    2010-06-15

    An x-ray spectrometer devoted to dynamical studies of transient systems using the x-ray absorption fine spectroscopy technique is presented in this article. Using an ultrafast laser-induced x-ray source, this optical device based on a set of two potassium acid phthalate conical crystals allows the extraction of x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy structures following the Al absorption K edge. The proposed experimental protocol leads to a measurement of the absorption spectra free from any crystal reflectivity defaults and shot-to-shot x-ray spectral fluctuation. According to the detailed analysis of the experimental results, a spectral resolution of 0.7 eV rms and relative fluctuation lower than 1% rms are achieved, demonstrated to be limited by the statistics of photon counting on the x-ray detector.

  11. A detailed analysis of the high-resolution X-ray spectra of NGC 3516: variability of the ionized absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Huerta, E. M.; Krongold, Y.; Jimenez-Bailon, E.; Nicastro, F.; Mathur, S.; Longinotti, A. L.

    2014-09-20

    The 1.5 Seyfert galaxy NGC 3516 presents a strong time variability in X-rays. We re-analyzed the nine observations performed in 2006 October by XMM-Newton and Chandra in the 0.3 to 10 keV energy band. An acceptable model was found for the XMM-Newton data fitting the EPIC-PN and RGS spectra simultaneously; later, this model was successfully applied to the contemporary Chandra high-resolution data. The model consists of a continuum emission component (power law + blackbody) absorbed by four ionized components (warm absorbers), and 10 narrow emission lines. Three absorbing components are warm, producing features only in the soft X-ray band. The fourth ionization component produces Fe XXV and Fe XXVI in the hard-energy band. We study the time response of the absorbing components to the well-detected changes in the X-ray luminosity of this source and find that the two components with the lower ionization state show clear opacity changes consistent with gas close to photoionization equilibrium. These changes are supported by the models and by differences in the spectral features among the nine observations. On the other hand, the two components with higher ionization state do not seem to respond to continuum variations. The response time of the ionized absorbers allows us to constrain their electron density and location. We find that one component (with intermediate ionization) must be located within the obscuring torus at a distance 2.7 × 10{sup 17} cm from the central engine. This outflowing component likely originated in the accretion disk. The three remaining components are at distances larger than 10{sup 16}-10{sup 17} cm. Two of the absorbing components in the soft X-rays have similar outflow velocities and locations. These components may be in pressure equilibrium, forming a multi-phase medium, if the gas has metallicity larger than the solar one (≳ 5 Z {sub ☉}). We also search for variations in the covering factor of the ionized absorbers (although partial

  12. X-ray fluorescence computed tomography system for biomedical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Sato, Eiichi; Abderyim, Purkhet; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Osawa, Akihiro; Watanabe, Manabu; Nagao, Jiro; Nomiya, Seiichiro; Hitomi, Keitro; Izumisawa, Mitsuru; Ogawa, Akira; Sato, Shigehiro

    2008-08-01

    An x-ray fluorescence (XRF) computed tomography (CT) system utilizing a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector is described. The CT system is of the first generation type and consists of a cerium x-ray generator, a turn table, a translation stage, a two-stage controller, a CdTe spectrometer, a multichannel analyzer (MCA), a counter board (CB), and a personal computer (PC). When an object is exposed by the x-ray generator, iodine K-series fluorescences are produced and are detected from vertical direction to x-ray axis using the spectrometer. Fluorescent photons are selected out using the MCA and are counted by the PC via CB, and XRF CT is performed by repeating translation and rotation of an object.

  13. Fast prototyping of high-aspect ratio, high-resolution x-ray masks by gas-assisted focused ion beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, F.; Malek, C.; Neogi, J.

    2001-01-01

    The capacity of chemically-assisted focused ion beam (fib) etching systems to undertake direct and highly anisotropic erosion of thin and thick gold (or other high atomic number [Z])coatings on x-ray mask membranes/substrates provides new levels of precision, flexibility, simplification and rapidity in the manufacture of mask absorber patterns, allowing the fast prototyping of high aspect ratio, high-resolution masks for deep x-ray lithography.

  14. Magnification error of digital x rays on the computer screen.

    PubMed

    Ranjitkar, S; Prakash, D; Prakash, R

    2014-12-01

    Templating x-rays of total hip and knee replacements pre-operatively are important to plan surgery. This is usually done using acetate templates of the prosthesis on hard copies of the x-ray. With the change in practice, to use digital x-rays on computer screens instead of hard copies, it is important to assess if acetate templates can be used for digital x-rays on the computer screen. This is a retrospective x-ray study of 19 hip replacements and 30 knee replacements to assess their magnification using the Patient Archiving Computerised System (PACS) software. This study was done to assess the accuracy of magnification, using acetate templates over a computer screen. In total hip replacement, the outer cup diameter was also measured using the digital measurement scale. The mean magnification was 0.59 for the acetabular cup and the femoral stem in total hip replacement and 0.48 for the femoral and tibial implant in total knee replacement. The mean difference in cup diameter comparing to the real size was an excess of 10.21 mm. The study showed over-magnified hip and knee x-rays thus suggesting that acetate templates and measurement scales on PACS was not reliable.

  15. Multiple pinhole collimator based X-ray luminescence computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Lun, Michael; Li, Changqing

    2016-07-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) is an emerging hybrid imaging modality, which is able to improve the spatial resolution of optical imaging to hundreds of micrometers for deep targets by using superfine X-ray pencil beams. However, due to the low X-ray photon utilization efficiency in a single pinhole collimator based XLCT, it takes a long time to acquire measurement data. Herein, we propose a multiple pinhole collimator based XLCT, in which multiple X-ray beams are generated to scan a sample at multiple positions simultaneously. Compared with the single pinhole based XLCT, the multiple X-ray beam scanning method requires much less measurement time. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments have been performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the multiple X-ray beam scanning method. In one numerical simulation, we used four X-ray beams to scan a cylindrical object with 6 deeply embedded targets. With measurements from 6 angular projections, all 6 targets have been reconstructed successfully. In the phantom experiment, we generated two X-ray pencil beams with a collimator manufactured in-house. Two capillary targets with 0.6 mm edge-to-edge distance embedded in a cylindrical phantom have been reconstructed successfully. With the two beam scanning, we reduced the data acquisition time by 50%. From the reconstructed XLCT images, we found that the Dice similarity of targets is 85.11% and the distance error between two targets is less than 3%. We have measured the radiation dose during XLCT scan and found that the radiation dose, 1.475 mSv, is in the range of a typical CT scan. We have measured the changes of the collimated X-ray beam size and intensity at different distances from the collimator. We have also studied the effects of beam size and intensity in the reconstruction of XLCT.

  16. Multiple pinhole collimator based X-ray luminescence computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Lun, Michael; Li, Changqing

    2016-07-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) is an emerging hybrid imaging modality, which is able to improve the spatial resolution of optical imaging to hundreds of micrometers for deep targets by using superfine X-ray pencil beams. However, due to the low X-ray photon utilization efficiency in a single pinhole collimator based XLCT, it takes a long time to acquire measurement data. Herein, we propose a multiple pinhole collimator based XLCT, in which multiple X-ray beams are generated to scan a sample at multiple positions simultaneously. Compared with the single pinhole based XLCT, the multiple X-ray beam scanning method requires much less measurement time. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments have been performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the multiple X-ray beam scanning method. In one numerical simulation, we used four X-ray beams to scan a cylindrical object with 6 deeply embedded targets. With measurements from 6 angular projections, all 6 targets have been reconstructed successfully. In the phantom experiment, we generated two X-ray pencil beams with a collimator manufactured in-house. Two capillary targets with 0.6 mm edge-to-edge distance embedded in a cylindrical phantom have been reconstructed successfully. With the two beam scanning, we reduced the data acquisition time by 50%. From the reconstructed XLCT images, we found that the Dice similarity of targets is 85.11% and the distance error between two targets is less than 3%. We have measured the radiation dose during XLCT scan and found that the radiation dose, 1.475 mSv, is in the range of a typical CT scan. We have measured the changes of the collimated X-ray beam size and intensity at different distances from the collimator. We have also studied the effects of beam size and intensity in the reconstruction of XLCT. PMID:27446686

  17. Multiple pinhole collimator based X-ray luminescence computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Lun, Michael; Li, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) is an emerging hybrid imaging modality, which is able to improve the spatial resolution of optical imaging to hundreds of micrometers for deep targets by using superfine X-ray pencil beams. However, due to the low X-ray photon utilization efficiency in a single pinhole collimator based XLCT, it takes a long time to acquire measurement data. Herein, we propose a multiple pinhole collimator based XLCT, in which multiple X-ray beams are generated to scan a sample at multiple positions simultaneously. Compared with the single pinhole based XLCT, the multiple X-ray beam scanning method requires much less measurement time. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments have been performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the multiple X-ray beam scanning method. In one numerical simulation, we used four X-ray beams to scan a cylindrical object with 6 deeply embedded targets. With measurements from 6 angular projections, all 6 targets have been reconstructed successfully. In the phantom experiment, we generated two X-ray pencil beams with a collimator manufactured in-house. Two capillary targets with 0.6 mm edge-to-edge distance embedded in a cylindrical phantom have been reconstructed successfully. With the two beam scanning, we reduced the data acquisition time by 50%. From the reconstructed XLCT images, we found that the Dice similarity of targets is 85.11% and the distance error between two targets is less than 3%. We have measured the radiation dose during XLCT scan and found that the radiation dose, 1.475 mSv, is in the range of a typical CT scan. We have measured the changes of the collimated X-ray beam size and intensity at different distances from the collimator. We have also studied the effects of beam size and intensity in the reconstruction of XLCT. PMID:27446686

  18. The analysis of high spatial resolution UV and X-ray images by computational modeling. [coronagraphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vesecky, J. F.; Antiochos, S. K.; Underwood, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Very high resolution stereoscopic images of high temperature loop structures observed at UV and X-ray wavelengths in the solar corona can be used to understand physical processes in the corona. An existing computational model is described and sample results are given to demonstrate that computational modeling of coronal structures can indeed take advantage of very high resolution images. The sample results include the run of temperature and number density along a typical loop and the variation of the differential emission measure with temperature. The integration of the differential emission measure with temperature along a column commensurate with an instrument's spatial resolution is the relevant parameter obtained from UV and X-ray observations. The effects of loop geometry and energy input are examined.

  19. High-Resolution Soft X-Ray Spectral Analysis in the CK Region of Titanium Carbide (TiC) using the DV-X alpha Molecular Orbital Method

    SciTech Connect

    Shimomura, Kenta; Muramatsu, Yasuji; Denlinger, Jonathan D.; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2008-10-31

    We used the DV-X alpha method to analyze the high-resolution soft X-ray emission and absorption spectra in the CK region of titanium carbide (TiC). The spectral profiles of the X-ray emission and absorption can be ssuscfucelly reproduced by the occupied and unoccupied density of states (DOS ), respectively, in the C2p orbitals of the center carbon atoms in a Ti62C63 cluster model, suggesting that the center carbon atom in a large cluster model expanded to the cubic-structured 53 (= 125) atoms provides sufficient DOS for the X-ray spectral analysis of rock-salt structured metal carbides.

  20. Opportunities for X-ray Science in Future Computing Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, Ian

    2011-02-09

    The world of computing continues to evolve rapidly. In just the past 10 years, we have seen the emergence of petascale supercomputing, cloud computing that provides on-demand computing and storage with considerable economies of scale, software-as-a-service methods that permit outsourcing of complex processes, and grid computing that enables federation of resources across institutional boundaries. These trends show no sign of slowing down. The next 10 years will surely see exascale, new cloud offerings, and other terabit networks. This talk reviews various of these developments and discusses their potential implications for x-ray science and x-ray facilities.

  1. Metal-ligand Covalency of Iron Complexes from High-Resolution Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Marcus; Kroll, Thomas; DeBeer, Serena; Bergmann, Uwe; Wilson, Samuel A.; Glatzel, Pieter; Nordlund, Dennis; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2013-01-01

    Data from Kα resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) have been used to extract electronic structure information, i.e., the covalency of metal-ligand bonds, for four iron complexes using an experimentally based theoretical model. Kα RIXS involves resonant 1s → 3d excitation and detection of the 2p → 1s (Kα) emission. This two-photon process reaches similar final states as single-photon L-edge (2p → 3d) X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), but involves only hard X-rays and can therefore be used to get high-resolution L-edge-like spectra for metal proteins, solution catalysts and their intermediates. To analyze the information content of Kα RIXS spectra, data have been collected for four characteristic σ-donor and π-backdonation complexes; ferrous tacn [FeII(tacn)2]Br2, ferrocyanide [FeII(CN)6]K4, ferric tacn [FeIII(tacn)2]Br3 and ferricyanide [FeIII(CN)6]K3. From these spectra metal-ligand covalencies can be extracted using a charge-transfer multiplet model, without previous information from the L-edge XAS experiment. A direct comparison of L-edge XAS and Kα RIXS spectra show that the latter reaches additional final states, e.g., when exciting into the eg (σ*) orbitals, and the splitting between final states of different symmetry provides an extra dimension that makes Kα RIXS a more sensitive probe of σ-bonding. Another key difference between L-edge XAS and Kα RIXS is the π-backbonding features in ferro- and ferricyanide that are significantly more intense in L-edge XAS compared to Kα RIXS. This shows that two methods are complimentary in assigning electronic structure. The Kα RIXS approach can thus be used as a stand-alone method, in combination with L-edge XAS for strongly covalent systems that are difficult to probe by UV/Vis spectroscopy, or as an extension to conventional absorption spectroscopy for a wide range of transition metal enzymes and catalysts. PMID:24131028

  2. High-resolution KMM radiative Auger x-ray emission spectra of calcium induced by synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, W.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Berset, M.; Fennane, K.; Hoszowska, J.; Maillard, Y.-P.; Szlachetko, M.; Kavcic, M.; Bucar, K.; Budnar, M.; Zitnik, M.; Szlachetko, J.

    2011-04-15

    The KMM radiative Auger (RA) x-ray spectra of solid Ca were induced by monochromatic synchrotron radiation and measured with a high-resolution von Hamos bent crystal spectrometer. Two excitation energies were employed, one in the near K threshold region and the second well above the K absorption edge. The KMM RA spectral structure and relative intensity with respect to the diagram K{beta}{sub 1,3} (K-M{sub 3,2}) line are found to be independent of the excitation energy. The overall RA structure resembles the density of unoccupied s, p, and d states. Due to solid-state effects, however, spectral features resulting from the major discrete shake-up transitions could not be resolved. For the total KMM RA to K{beta}{sub 1,3} yield ratio, a value of 0.053(3) is obtained. The latter is compared to theoretical predictions and available experimental data obtained by various types of target excitation.

  3. Triosmium clusters on a support: determination of structure by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and high-resolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mehraeen, Shareghe; Kulkarni, Apoorva; Chi, Miaofang; Reed, Bryan W; Okamoto, Norihiko L; Browning, Nigel D; Gates, Bruce C

    2011-01-17

    The structures of small, robust metal clusters on a solid support were determined by a combination of spectroscopic and microscopic methods: extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and aberration-corrected STEM. The samples were synthesized from [Os(3) (CO)(12) ] on MgO powder to provide supported clusters intended to be triosmium. The results demonstrate that the supported clusters are robust in the absence of oxidants. Conventional high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) STEM images demonstrate a high degree of uniformity of the clusters, with root-mean-square (rms) radii of 2.03±0.06 Å. The EXAFS OsOs coordination number of 2.1±0.4 confirms the presence of triosmium clusters on average and correspondingly determines an average rms cluster radius of 2.02±0.04 Å. The high-resolution STEM images show the individual Os atoms in the clusters, confirming the triangular structures of their frames and determining OsOs distances of 2.80±0.14 Å, matching the EXAFS value of 2.89±0.06 Å. IR and EXAFS spectra demonstrate the presence of CO ligands on the clusters. This set of techniques is recommended as optimal for detailed and reliable structural characterization of supported clusters. PMID:21226118

  4. Triosmium Clusters on a Support: Determination of Structure by X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy and High-Resolution Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shareghe, Mehraeen; Chi, Miaofang; Browning, Nigel D.

    2011-01-01

    The structures of small, robust metal clusters on a solid support were determined by a combination of spectroscopic and microscopic methods: extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and aberration-corrected STEM. The samples were synthesized from [Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 12}] on MgO powder to provide supported clusters intended to be triosmium. The results demonstrate that the supported clusters are robust in the absence of oxidants. Conventional high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) STEM images demonstrate a high degree of uniformity of the clusters, with root-mean-square (rms) radii of 2.03 {+-} 0.06 {angstrom}. The EXAFS OsOs coordination number of 2.1 {+-} 0.4 confirms the presence of triosmium clusters on average and correspondingly determines an average rms cluster radius of 2.02 {+-} 0.04 {angstrom}. The high-resolution STEM images show the individual Os atoms in the clusters, confirming the triangular structures of their frames and determining OsOs distances of 2.80 {+-} 0.14 {angstrom}, matching the EXAFS value of 2.89 {+-} 0.06 {angstrom}. IR and EXAFS spectra demonstrate the presence of CO ligands on the clusters. This set of techniques is recommended as optimal for detailed and reliable structural characterization of supported clusters.

  5. The effect of substrate topology on smectic liquid crystal alignment: A high-resolution x-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Smela, E.

    1992-01-01

    Surface topography is theoretically predicted to affect liquid crystal alignment through mechanical interactions: elastic deformations of the director are energetically unfavorable, causing the molecules to realign to minimize the distortion energy. Octylcyanobiphenyl (8CB), a bilayer smecticA liquid crystal at room temperature, was deposited on gratings, grids, and flat surfaces, and was studied using high resolution x-ray diffraction at shallow angles of incidence. One surface of the film was in contact with air and the other was in contact with a treated glass or silicon substrate. At the air interface, surface tension forces caused the liquid crystal molecules to align perpendicularly with respect to the plane of the substrate. Competing with the LC-air interface, which is a strong aligner, a grating at the LC-substrate interface produced distortions in the smectic layering which resulted in excess elastic energy and favored alignment parallel to the substrate and the grooves. The results show that in films less than approximately 30 [mu]m thick, the homeotropic orientation was maintained throughout the film due to the constraint of perpendicular alignment at the air interface. However, for thicker films on gratings, Bragg scattering from molecules lying parallel to the grooves was observed. The free air surface was thus the strongest aligning force, followed by the surface topology, while surface anchoring was not found to play a role.

  6. [Build and Demonstrate a X-Ray Interferometer and Build and Fly a High Resolution Telescope on a Sounding Rocket}

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This report is written with eight months still go on the 36 month period of the grant. This grant, as originally proposed three years ago, was two pronged - to build and demonstrate a practical x-ray interferometer, and to build and fly a high resolution telescope on a sounding rocket. As we started into these projects, we received community feedback that led to our giving priority to the interferometer., The rocket would achieve O.2-arcsecond resolution that, while better, than that of Chandra, would, because of the limited signal of a sub-orbital flight, not be of substantially greater scientific use. The interferometry, on the other hand, shows the potential for many orders of magnitude improvement. For this reason we gave priority to the lab interferometry, and the building of the telescope lagged behind. With our new understanding (and practical demonstration) of how to build an interferometer, we changed the telescope design from spherical surfaces in the Kirkpatrick-Baez configuration, to an interferometer with resolution between .005 and .05 arcseconds.

  7. Study of Explosive Electron Emission from a Pin Cathode Using High Resolution Point-Projection X-Ray Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Parkevich, E. V.; Tilikin, I. N.; Mingaleev, A. R.; Agafonov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Most studies of Explosive Electron Emission (EEE) are based on the idea of cathode flares developing after explosion of metal whiskers (micron scale pins) on the cathode surface. The physical state of the pin material, the spatial structure of the explosion and its origin are still a matter of conjecture. In this work we used high-resolution point projection x-ray radiography to observe micron scale pin explosion in a high-current diode. Pin cathodes made from 10-25 micron Cu or Mo wires were placed in gaps in return current circuits of hybrid X-pinches on the XP and BIN pulsers. Pin lengths were varied over a range 1-4 mm and pin-anode gaps within 0.05-3 mm. The diode current and voltage were measured. In experiments with small pin-anode gap (0.1 - 1 mm) development of an expanded dense core of the pin was observed except the pin tip with length 100-200 microns indicating significant energy deposition in the wire material. In experiments with bigger gaps there was no visible wire core expansion within the spatial resolution of the experimental technique. Work at Cornell was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration Stewardship Sciences Academic Programs under Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NA0001836 and at the Lebedev Institute by the RSF grant 142200273.

  8. Coronal Evolution of the Sun in Time: High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of Solar Analogs with Different Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telleschi, Alessandra; Güdel, Manuel; Briggs, Kevin; Audard, Marc; Ness, Jan-Uwe; Skinner, Stephen L.

    2005-03-01

    We investigate the long-term evolution of X-ray coronae of solar analogs based on high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy and photometry with XMM-Newton. Six nearby main-sequence G stars with ages between ~0.1 and ~1.6 Gyr and rotation periods between ~1 and 12.4 days have been observed. We use the X-ray spectra to derive coronal element abundances of C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Fe and the coronal emission measure distribution (EMD). We find that the abundances change from an inverse first ionization potential (FIP) distribution in stars with ages around 0.1 Gyr to a solar-type FIP distribution in stars at ages of 0.3 Gyr and beyond. This transformation is coincident with a steep decline of nonthermal radio emission. The results are in qualitative agreement with a simple model in which the stream of electrons in magnetic fields suppresses diffusion of low-FIP ions from the chromosphere into the corona. The coronal emission measure distributions show shapes characterized by power laws on each side of the EMD peak. The latter shifts from temperatures of about 10 MK in the most rapidly rotating, young stars to temperatures around 4 MK in the oldest target considered here. The power-law index on the cooler side of the EMD exceeds expected slopes for static loops, with typical values being 1.5-3. We interpret this slope with a model in which the coronal emission is due to a superposition of stochastically occurring flares, with an occurrence rate that is distributed in radiated energy E as a power law, dN/dE~E-α, as previously found for solar and stellar flares. We obtain the relevant power-law index α from the slope of the high-temperature tail of the EMD. Our EMDs indicate α~2.2-2.8, in excellent agreement with values previously derived from light curves of magnetically active stars. Modulation with timescales reminiscent of flares is found in the light curves of all our targets. Several strong flares are also observed. We use our α-values to simulate light curves and

  9. Computer synthesis of high resolution electron micrographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, R.

    1976-01-01

    Specimen damage, spherical aberration, low contrast and noisy sensors combine to prevent direct atomic viewing in a conventional electron microscope. The paper describes two methods for obtaining ultra-high resolution in biological specimens under the electron microscope. The first method assumes the physical limits of the electron objective lens and uses a series of dark field images of biological crystals to obtain direct information on the phases of the Fourier diffraction maxima; this information is used in an appropriate computer to synthesize a large aperture lens for a 1-A resolution. The second method assumes there is sufficient amplitude scatter from images recorded in focus which can be utilized with a sensitive densitometer and computer contrast stretching to yield fine structure image details. Cancer virus characterization is discussed as an illustrative example. Numerous photographs supplement the text.

  10. High Resolution Spectroscopy of X-ray Quasars: Searching for the X-ray Absorption from the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Taotao; Canizares, Claude R.; Marshall, Herman L.

    2004-01-01

    We present a survey of six low to moderate redshift quasars with Chandra and XMM-Newton. The primary goal is to search for the narrow X-ray absorption lines produced by highly ionized metals in the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium. All the X-ray spectra can be well fitted by a power law with neutral hydrogen absorption. Only one feature is detected at above 3-sigma level in all the spectra, which is consistent with statistic fluctuation. We discuss the implications in our understanding of the baryon content of the universe. We also discuss the implication of the non-detection of the local (z approx. 0) X-ray absorption.

  11. X-ray clusters from a high-resolution hydrodynamic PPM simulation of the cold dark matter universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Greg L.; Cen, Renyue; Norman, Michael L.; Ostriker, Jermemiah P.; Stone, James M.

    1994-01-01

    A new three-dimensional hydrodynamic code based on the piecewise parabolic method (PPM) is utilized to compute the distribution of hot gas in the standard Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)-normalized cold dark matter (CDM) universe. Utilizing periodic boundary conditions, a box with size 85 h(exp-1) Mpc, having cell size 0.31 h(exp-1) Mpc, is followed in a simulation with 270(exp 3)=10(exp 7.3) cells. Adopting standard parameters determined from COBE and light-element nucleosynthesis, Sigma(sub 8)=1.05, Omega(sub b)=0.06, we find the X-ray-emitting clusters, compute the luminosity function at several wavelengths, the temperature distribution, and estimated sizes, as well as the evolution of these quantities with redshift. The results, which are compared with those obtained in the preceding paper (Kang et al. 1994a), may be used in conjuction with ROSAT and other observational data sets. Overall, the results of the two computations are qualitatively very similar with regard to the trends of cluster properties, i.e., how the number density, radius, and temeprature depend on luminosity and redshift. The total luminosity from clusters is approximately a factor of 2 higher using the PPM code (as compared to the 'total variation diminishing' (TVD) code used in the previous paper) with the number of bright clusters higher by a similar factor. The primary conclusions of the prior paper, with regard to the power spectrum of the primeval density perturbations, are strengthened: the standard CDM model, normalized to the COBE microwave detection, predicts too many bright X-ray emitting clusters, by a factor probably in excess of 5. The comparison between observations and theoretical predictions for the evolution of cluster properties, luminosity functions, and size and temperature distributions should provide an important discriminator among competing scenarios for the development of structure in the universe.

  12. Proceedings of the workshop on high resolution computed microtomography (CMT)

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to determine the status of the field, to define instrumental and computational requirements, and to establish minimum specifications required by possible users. The most important message sent by implementers was the remainder that CMT is a tool. It solves a wide spectrum of scientific problems and is complementary to other microscopy techniques, with certain important advantages that the other methods do not have. High-resolution CMT can be used non-invasively and non-destructively to study a variety of hierarchical three-dimensional microstructures, which in turn control body function. X-ray computed microtomography can also be used at the frontiers of physics, in the study of granular systems, for example. With high-resolution CMT, for example, three-dimensional pore geometries and topologies of soils and rocks can be obtained readily and implemented directly in transport models. In turn, these geometries can be used to calculate fundamental physical properties, such as permeability and electrical conductivity, from first principles. Clearly, use of the high-resolution CMT technique will contribute tremendously to the advancement of current R and D technologies in the production, transport, storage, and utilization of oil and natural gas. It can also be applied to problems related to environmental pollution, particularly to spilling and seepage of hazardous chemicals into the Earth's subsurface. Applications to energy and environmental problems will be far-ranging and may soon extend to disciplines such as materials science--where the method can be used in the manufacture of porous ceramics, filament-resin composites, and microelectronics components--and to biomedicine, where it could be used to design biocompatible materials such as artificial bones, contact lenses, or medication-releasing implants. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  13. 21 CFR 892.1750 - Computed tomography x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Computed tomography x-ray system. 892.1750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1750 Computed tomography x-ray system. (a) Identification. A computed tomography x-ray system is a diagnostic x-ray system intended...

  14. 21 CFR 892.1750 - Computed tomography x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Computed tomography x-ray system. 892.1750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1750 Computed tomography x-ray system. (a) Identification. A computed tomography x-ray system is a diagnostic x-ray system intended...

  15. 21 CFR 892.1750 - Computed tomography x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computed tomography x-ray system. 892.1750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1750 Computed tomography x-ray system. (a) Identification. A computed tomography x-ray system is a diagnostic x-ray system intended...

  16. 21 CFR 892.1750 - Computed tomography x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Computed tomography x-ray system. 892.1750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1750 Computed tomography x-ray system. (a) Identification. A computed tomography x-ray system is a diagnostic x-ray system intended...

  17. 21 CFR 892.1750 - Computed tomography x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Computed tomography x-ray system. 892.1750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1750 Computed tomography x-ray system. (a) Identification. A computed tomography x-ray system is a diagnostic x-ray system intended...

  18. Data fusion in neutron and X-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Schrapp, Michael J.; Goldammer, Matthias; Schulz, Michael; Issani, Siraj; Bhamidipati, Suryanarayana; Böni, Peter

    2014-10-28

    We present a fusion methodology between neutron and X-ray computed tomography (CT). On the one hand, the inspection by X-ray CT of a wide class of multimaterials in non-destructive testing applications suffers from limited information of object features. On the other hand, neutron imaging can provide complementary data in such a way that the combination of both data sets fully characterizes the object. In this contribution, a novel data fusion procedure, called Fusion Regularized Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique, is developed where the X-ray reconstruction is modified to fulfill the available data from the imaging with neutrons. The experiments, which were obtained from an aluminum profile containing a steel screw, and attached carbon fiber plates demonstrate that the image quality in CT can be significantly improved when the proposed fusion method is used.

  19. X-ray Crystallographic Computations Using a Programmable Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attard, Alfred E.; Lee, Henry C.

    1979-01-01

    Describes six crystallographic programs which have been developed to illustrate the range of usefulness of programmable calculators in providing computational assistance in chemical analysis. These programs are suitable for the analysis of x-ray diffraction data in the laboratory by students. (HM)

  20. [X-ray computed tomography in the diagnosis of mediastinitis].

    PubMed

    Abakumov, M M; Barmina, T G; Ishmukhametov, A I

    2001-01-01

    Results of X-ray computed tomography (RCT) use in 21 patients treated for acute mediastinitis in N.V. Sklifosovsky Emergency Care Research Institute have been analyzed retrospectively. RCT proved able to defect accurate location, spreading and sizes of inflammatory disorders in the mediastinum are demonstrated. Semiotics of mediastinitis depending on location, spreading and phase of inflammatory process is presented.

  1. 3D tissue-engineered construct analysis via conventional high-resolution microcomputed tomography without X-ray contrast.

    PubMed

    Voronov, Roman S; VanGordon, Samuel B; Shambaugh, Robert L; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V; Sikavitsas, Vassilios I

    2013-05-01

    As the field of tissue engineering develops, researchers are faced with a large number of degrees of freedom regarding the choice of material, architecture, seeding, and culturing. To evaluate the effectiveness of a tissue-engineered strategy, histology is typically done by physically slicing and staining a construct (crude, time-consuming, and unreliable). However, due to recent advances in high-resolution biomedical imaging, microcomputed tomography (μCT) has arisen as a quick and effective way to evaluate samples, while preserving their structure in the original state. However, a major barrier for using μCT to do histology has been its inability to differentiate between materials with similar X-ray attenuation. Various contrasting strategies (hardware and chemical staining agents) have been proposed to address this problem, but at a cost of additional complexity and limited access. Instead, here we suggest a strategy for how virtual 3D histology in silico can be conducted using conventional μCT, and we provide an illustrative example from bone tissue engineering. The key to our methodology is an implementation of scaffold surface architecture that is ordered in relation to cells and tissue, in concert with straightforward image-processing techniques, to minimize the reliance on contrasting for material segmentation. In the case study reported, μCT was used to image and segment porous poly(lactic acid) nonwoven fiber mesh scaffolds that were seeded dynamically with mesenchymal stem cells and cultured to produce soft tissue and mineralized tissue in a flow perfusion bioreactor using an osteogenic medium. The methodology presented herein paves a new way for tissue engineers to identify and distinguish components of cell/tissue/scaffold constructs to easily and effectively evaluate the tissue-engineering strategies that generate them.

  2. High-resolution x-ray diffraction study of the heavy-fermion compound YbBiPt

    SciTech Connect

    Ueland, B. G.; Saunders, S. M.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Schmiedeshoff, G. M.; Canfield, P. C.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A. I.

    2015-11-30

    In this study, YbBiPt is a heavy-fermion compound possessing significant short-range antiferromagnetic correlations below a temperature of T*=0.7K, fragile antiferromagnetic order below TN = 0.4K, a Kondo temperature of TK ≈ 1K, and crystalline-electric-field splitting on the order of E/kB = 1 – 10K. Whereas the compound has a face-centered-cubic lattice at ambient temperature, certain experimental data, particularly those from studies aimed at determining its crystalline-electric-field scheme, suggest that the lattice distorts at lower temperature. Here, we present results from high-resolution, high-energy x-ray diffraction experiments which show that, within our experimental resolution of ≈ 6 – 10 × 10–5 Å, no structural phase transition occurs between T = 1.5 and 50 K. In combination with results from dilatometry measurements, we further show that the compound's thermal expansion has a minimum at ≈ 18 K and a region of negative thermal expansion for 9 ≲ T ≲ 18 K. Despite diffraction patterns taken at 1.6 K which indicate that the lattice is face-centered cubic and that the Yb resides on a crystallographic site with cubic point symmetry, we demonstrate that the linear thermal expansion may be modeled using crystalline-electric-field level schemes appropriate for Yb3+ residing on a site with either cubic or less than cubic point symmetry.

  3. A high-resolution gamma-ray and hard X-ray spectrometer for solar flare observations in Max 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Curtis, D. W.; Harvey, P.; Hurley, K.; Primbsch, J. H.; Smith, D. M.; Pelling, R. M.; Duttweiler, F.

    1988-01-01

    A long duration balloon flight instrument for Max 1991 designed to study the acceleration of greater than 10 MeV ions and greater than 15 keV electrons in solar flares through high resolution spectroscopy of the gamma ray lines and hard X-ray and gamma ray continuum is described. The instrument, HIREGS, consists of an array of high-purity, n-type coaxial germanium detectors (HPGe) cooled to less than 90 K and surrounded by a bismuth germanate (BGO) anticoincidence shield. It will cover the energy range 15 keV to 20 MeV with keV spectral resolution, sufficient for accurate measurement of all parameters of the expected gamma ray lines with the exception of the neutron capture deuterium line. Electrical segmentation of the HPGe detector into a thin front segment and a thick rear segment, together with pulse-shape discrimination, provides optimal dynamic range and signal-to-background characteristics for flare measurements. Neutrons and gamma rays up to approximately 0.1 to 1 GeV can be detected and identified with the combination of the HPGe detectors and rear BGO shield. The HIREGS is planned for long duration balloon flights (LDBF) for solar flare studies during Max 1991. The two exploratory LDBFs carried out at mid-latitudes in 1987 to 1988 are described, and the LDBFs in Antarctica, which could in principle provide 24 hour/day solar coverage and very long flight durations (20 to 30 days) because of minimal ballast requirements are discussed.

  4. High-resolution x-ray diffraction study of the heavy-fermion compound YbBiPt

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ueland, B. G.; Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA; Saunders, S. M.; Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA; Bud'ko, S. L.; Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA; Schmiedeshoff, G. M.; Canfield, P. C.; Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA; Kreyssig, A.; et al

    2015-11-30

    In this study, YbBiPt is a heavy-fermion compound possessing significant short-range antiferromagnetic correlations below a temperature of T*=0.7K, fragile antiferromagnetic order below TN = 0.4K, a Kondo temperature of TK ≈ 1K, and crystalline-electric-field splitting on the order of E/kB = 1 – 10K. Whereas the compound has a face-centered-cubic lattice at ambient temperature, certain experimental data, particularly those from studies aimed at determining its crystalline-electric-field scheme, suggest that the lattice distorts at lower temperature. Here, we present results from high-resolution, high-energy x-ray diffraction experiments which show that, within our experimental resolution of ≈ 6 – 10 × 10–5 Å,more » no structural phase transition occurs between T = 1.5 and 50 K. In combination with results from dilatometry measurements, we further show that the compound's thermal expansion has a minimum at ≈ 18 K and a region of negative thermal expansion for 9 ≲ T ≲ 18 K. Despite diffraction patterns taken at 1.6 K which indicate that the lattice is face-centered cubic and that the Yb resides on a crystallographic site with cubic point symmetry, we demonstrate that the linear thermal expansion may be modeled using crystalline-electric-field level schemes appropriate for Yb3+ residing on a site with either cubic or less than cubic point symmetry.« less

  5. High resolution biomedical imaging system with direct detection of x-rays via a charge coupled device

    DOEpatents

    Atac, M.; McKay, T.A.

    1998-04-21

    An imaging system is provided for direct detection of x-rays from an irradiated biological tissue. The imaging system includes an energy source for emitting x-rays toward the biological tissue and a charge coupled device (CCD) located immediately adjacent the biological tissue and arranged transverse to the direction of irradiation along which the x-rays travel. The CCD directly receives and detects the x-rays after passing through the biological tissue. The CCD is divided into a matrix of cells, each of which individually stores a count of x-rays directly detected by the cell. The imaging system further includes a pattern generator electrically coupled to the CCD for reading a count from each cell. A display device is provided for displaying an image representative of the count read by the pattern generator from the cells of the CCD. 13 figs.

  6. High resolution biomedical imaging system with direct detection of x-rays via a charge coupled device

    DOEpatents

    Atac, Muzaffer; McKay, Timothy A.

    1998-01-01

    An imaging system is provided for direct detection of x-rays from an irradiated biological tissue. The imaging system includes an energy source for emitting x-rays toward the biological tissue and a charge coupled device (CCD) located immediately adjacent the biological tissue and arranged transverse to the direction of irradiation along which the x-rays travel. The CCD directly receives and detects the x-rays after passing through the biological tissue. The CCD is divided into a matrix of cells, each of which individually stores a count of x-rays directly detected by the cell. The imaging system further includes a pattern generator electrically coupled to the CCD for reading a count from each cell. A display device is provided for displaying an image representative of the count read by the pattern generator from the cells of the CCD.

  7. Spatially resolved high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy of high-current plasma-focus discharges

    SciTech Connect

    ZajaPc, S.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Scholz, M.; Paduch, M.; Zielinska, E.; Rosmej, O.; Yongtao, Zhao; Gojska, A.

    2010-10-15

    Soft x-ray emission from a Mather-type plasma-focus device (PF-1000) operated at {approx}400 kJ was measured. The high density and temperature plasma were generated by the discharge in the deuterium-argon gas mixture in the modified (high-current) plasma-focus configuration. A spherically bent mica crystal spectrograph viewing the axial output of the pinch region was used to measure the x-ray spectra. Spatially resolved spectra including the characteristic x-ray lines of highly ionized Ar and continua were recorded by means of an x-ray film. The x-ray emission of PF-1000 device was studied at different areas of the pinch.

  8. X-Ray Computed Tomography Monitors Damage in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, George Y.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center recently codeveloped a state-of-the-art x-ray CT facility (designated SMS SMARTSCAN model 100-112 CITA by Scientific Measurement Systems, Inc., Austin, Texas). This multipurpose, modularized, digital x-ray facility includes an imaging system for digital radiography, CT, and computed laminography. The system consists of a 160-kV microfocus x-ray source, a solid-state charge-coupled device (CCD) area detector, a five-axis object-positioning subassembly, and a Sun SPARCstation-based computer system that controls data acquisition and image processing. The x-ray source provides a beam spot size down to 3 microns. The area detector system consists of a 50- by 50- by 3-mm-thick terbium-doped glass fiber-optic scintillation screen, a right-angle mirror, and a scientific-grade, digital CCD camera with a resolution of 1000 by 1018 pixels and 10-bit digitization at ambient cooling. The digital output is recorded with a high-speed, 16-bit frame grabber that allows data to be binned. The detector can be configured to provide a small field-of-view, approximately 45 by 45 mm in cross section, or a larger field-of-view, approximately 60 by 60 mm in cross section. Whenever the highest spatial resolution is desired, the small field-of-view is used, and for larger samples with some reduction in spatial resolution, the larger field-of-view is used.

  9. High-resolution application of YAG:Ce and LuAG:Ce imaging detectors with a CCD X-ray camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touš, Jan; Horváth, Martin; Pína, Ladislav; Blažek, Karel; Sopko, Bruno

    2008-06-01

    A high-resolution CCD X-ray camera based on YAG:Ce or LuAG:Ce thin scintillators is presented. High-resolution in low-energy X-ray radiation is proved with several objects. The spatial resolution achieved in the images is about 1 μm. The high-resolution imaging system is a combination of a high-sensitivity digital CCD camera and an optical system with a thin scintillator-imaging screen. The screen can consist of YAG:Ce or LuAG:Ce inorganic scintillator [J.A. Mares, Radiat. Meas. 38 (2004) 353]. These materials have the advantages of mechanical and chemical stability and non-hygroscopicity. The high-resolution imaging system can be used with different types of radiation (X-ray, electrons, UV, and VUV [M. Nikl, Meas. Sci. Technol. 17 (2006) R37]). The objects used for the imaging tests are grids and small animals with features of several microns in size. The resolution capabilities were tested using different types of CCD cameras and scintillation imaging screens.

  10. High-resolution thermal imaging with a combination of nano-focus X-ray diffraction and ultra-fast chip calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Martin; Doblas, David; Hernandez, Jaime J; Odarchenko, Yaroslav I; Burghammer, Manfred; Di Cola, Emanuela; Spitzer, Denis; Antipov, A E; Aldoshin, L S; Ivanov, Dimitri A

    2014-01-01

    A microelectromechanical-systems-based calorimeter designed for use on a synchrotron nano-focused X-ray beamline is described. This instrument allows quantitative DC and AC calorimetric measurements over a broad range of heating/cooling rates (≤100000 K s(-1)) and temperature modulation frequencies (≤1 kHz). The calorimeter was used for high-resolution thermal imaging of nanogram-sized samples subjected to X-ray-induced heating. For a 46 ng indium particle, the measured temperature rise reaches ∼0.2 K, and is directly correlated to the X-ray absorption. Thermal imaging can be useful for studies of heterogeneous materials exhibiting physical and/or chemical transformations. Moreover, the technique can be extended to three-dimensional thermal nanotomography. PMID:24365940

  11. Observation of ultralow-level Al impurities on a silicon surface by high-resolution grazing emission x-ray fluorescence excited by synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kubala-Kukus, A.; Banas, D.; Pajek, M.; Cao, W.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Hoszowska, J.; Kayser, Y.; Szlachetko, M.; Salome, M.; Susini, J.; Szlachetko, J.

    2009-09-15

    We demonstrate that ultralow-level Al impurities on a silicon surface can be measured by using the high-resolution grazing emission x-ray fluorescence (GEXRF) technique combined with synchrotron-radiation excitation. An Al-impurity level of about 10{sup 12} atoms/cm{sup 2} was reached by observing the Al K{alpha} x-ray fluorescence in the resonant Raman-scattering background-''free'' regime by choosing an appropriate beam energy below the Si K absorption edge. Present results show that by combining the GEXRF method with the vapor phase decomposition technique the 10{sup 7} atoms/cm{sup 2} level can be reached for Al detection on silicon. Finally, we found that the high-resolution GEXRF technique is a sensitive tool to study the morphology of surface nanostructures.

  12. High-resolution time-resolved x-ray microscope for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target dynamics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.J.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Levesque, R.A.; Phillion, D.W.; Deane, D.J.

    1987-10-01

    A versatile x-ray microscope diagnostic has been built to perform target dynamics experiments on the Nova Ten Beam target irradiation facility. This system is based on Wolter's axisymmetric focusing scheme. An alignment system is described which provides for both quick and accurate alignment of the x-ray optic. Results are presented showing the system resolution and accuracy of alignment. Images from target dynamics experiments are also presented. 9 refs.

  13. High-resolution multi-MeV x-ray radiography using relativistic laser-solid interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Courtois, C.; Compant La Fontaine, A.; Barbotin, M.; Bazzoli, S.; Brebion, D.; Bourgade, J. L.; Gazave, J.; Lagrange, J. M.; Landoas, O.; Le Dain, L.; Lefebvre, E.; Pichoff, N.; Edwards, R.; Aedy, C.; Biddle, L.; Drew, D.; Gardner, M.; Ramsay, M.; Simons, A.; Sircombe, N.

    2011-02-15

    When high intensity ({>=}10{sup 19} W cm{sup -2}) laser light interacts with matter, multi-MeV electrons are produced. These electrons can be utilized to generate a MeV bremsstrahlung x-ray emission spectrum as they propagate into a high-Z solid target positioned behind the interaction area. The short duration (<10 ps) and the small diameter (<500 {mu}m) of the x-ray pulse combined with the MeV x-ray spectrum offers an interesting alternative to conventional bremsstrahlung x-ray sources based on an electron accelerator used to radiograph dense, rapidly moving objects. In experiments at the Omega EP laser, a multi-MeV x-ray source is characterized consistently with number of independent diagnostics. An unfiltered x-ray dose of approximately 2 rad in air at 1 m and a source diameter of less than 350 {mu}m are inferred. Radiography of a complex and high area density (up to 61 g/cm{sup 2}) object is then performed with few hundred microns spatial resolution.

  14. Some results from the exploration of the solar atmosphere with high-resolution x-ray-EUV spectroscopy at the Naval Research Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Doschek, G A

    2015-11-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory has been one of the world leaders in high-resolution UV-x-ray solar spectroscopy. Much has been learned about the morphology and physical conditions in the atmosphere from spectroscopic instrumentation flown on orbiting spacecraft. In this short summary I discuss the solar atmosphere and our current knowledge of it, and show some of the results obtained by spectroscopic investigations at the Naval Research Laboratory. PMID:26560622

  15. Heterogeneous computing for vertebra detection and segmentation in x-ray images.

    PubMed

    Lecron, Fabian; Mahmoudi, Sidi Ahmed; Benjelloun, Mohammed; Mahmoudi, Saïd; Manneback, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The context of this work is related to the vertebra segmentation. The method we propose is based on the active shape model (ASM). An original approach taking advantage of the edge polygonal approximation was developed to locate the vertebra positions in a X-ray image. Despite the fact that segmentation results show good efficiency, the time is a key variable that has always to be optimized in a medical context. Therefore, we present how vertebra extraction can efficiently be performed in exploiting the full computing power of parallel (GPU) and heterogeneous (multi-CPU/multi-GPU) architectures. We propose a parallel hybrid implementation of the most intensive steps enabling to boost performance. Experimentations have been conducted using a set of high-resolution X-ray medical images, showing a global speedup ranging from 3 to 22, by comparison with the CPU implementation. Data transfer times between CPU and GPU memories were included in the execution times of our proposed implementation.

  16. Three steps to the CIELO: VO and high-resolution spectroscopy chase the origin of soft X-rays in obscured AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guainazzi, M.; Bianchi, S.

    The origin of the soft X-ray emission in obscured Active Galactic Nuclei AGN is still largely unknown despite important progress made possible by recent measurements with Chandra and XMM-Newton Our understanding of the evolution of accretion onto supermassive black holes and of its interaction with gas and stars in the dense nuclear environment would receive a dramatic burst by the solution of this mystery In this paper we will a show why high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy is crucial to the solution of this issue b present CIELO the first catalogue of soft X-ray emission lines in obscured AGN 80 sources built from observations of the Reflection Grating Spectrometer RGS on-board XMM-Newton c discuss the implementation of the IVOA Line Data Model in VO tools such as the SED builder VOSpec and its application to CIELO The combination of the unprecedented RGS sensitivity in the soft X-ray regime and of the VO protocols power leads us to be closer than ever to unveiling the nature of soft X-ray emission in obscured AGN

  17. High-resolution study of the x-ray resonant Raman scattering process around the 1s absorption edge for aluminium, silicon, and their oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Szlachetko, J.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Berset, M.; Fennane, K.; Szlachetko, M.; Hoszowska, J.; Barrett, R.; Pajek, M.; Kubala-Kukus, A.

    2007-02-15

    X-ray resonant Raman scattering (RRS) spectra of Al, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Si, and SiO{sub 2} were measured at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, using a high-resolution Bragg-type curved crystal spectrometer. The x-ray RRS spectra were collected at several beam energies tuned below the 1s absorption thresholds of Al and Si. Differences in the spectral features between the elemental samples and the oxide ones were clearly observed. The data were interpreted using the second-order perturbation theory within the Kramers-Heisenberg (KH) approach. It is shown that, using the KH formalism, oscillator strengths that are similar to the ones deduced from x-ray absorption measurements can be extracted from emission x-ray RRS spectra. The total cross sections for the x-ray RRS process were derived for the different photon beam energies and compared with theoretical predictions. For elemental silicon, the weak 1s-3p excitation was observed and found to be consistent with results of density of states calculations.

  18. Hot gas in the cold dark matter scenario: X-ray clusters from a high-resolution numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Ryu, Dongsu

    1994-01-01

    A new, three-dimensional, shock-capturing hydrodynamic code is utilized to determine the distribution of hot gas in a standard cold dark matter (CDM) model of the universe. Periodic boundary conditions are assumed: a box with size 85 h(exp -1) Mpc having cell size 0.31 h(exp -1) Mpc is followed in a simulation with 270(exp 3) = 10(exp 7.3) cells. Adopting standard parameters determined from COBE and light-element nucleosynthesis, sigma(sub 8) = 1.05, omega(sub b) = 0.06, and assuming h = 0.5, we find the X-ray-emitting clusters and compute the luminosity function at several wavelengths, the temperature distribution, and estimated sizes, as well as the evolution of these quantities with redshift. We find that most of the total X-ray emissivity in our box originates in a relatively small number of identifiable clusters which occupy approximately 10(exp -3) of the box volume. This standard CDM model, normalized to COBE, produces approximately 5 times too much emission from clusters having L(sub x) is greater than 10(exp 43) ergs/s, a not-unexpected result. If all other parameters were unchanged, we would expect adequate agreement for sigma(sub 8) = 0.6. This provides a new and independent argument for lower small-scale power than standard CDM at the 8 h(exp -1) Mpc scale. The background radiation field at 1 keV due to clusters in this model is approximately one-third of the observed background, which, after correction for numerical effects, again indicates approximately 5 times too much emission and the appropriateness of sigma(sub 8) = 0.6. If we have used the observed ratio of gas to total mass in clusters, rather than basing the mean density on light-element nucleosynthesis, then the computed luminosity of each cluster would have increased still further, by a factor of approximately 10. The number density of clusters increases to z approximately 1, but the luminosity per typical cluster decreases, with the result that evolution in the number density of bright

  19. X-ray energy optimisation in computed microtomography.

    PubMed

    Spanne, P

    1989-06-01

    Expressions describing the absorbed dose and the number of incident photons necessary for the detection of a contrasting detail in x-ray transmission CT imaging of a circular phantom are derived as functions of the linear attenuation coefficients of the materials comprising the object and the detail. A shell of a different material can be included to allow simulation of CT imaging of the skulls of small laboratory animals. The equations are used to estimate the optimum photon energy in x-ray transmission computed microtomography. The optimum energy depends on whether the number of incident photons or the absorbed dose at a point in the object is minimised. For a water object of 300 mm diameter the two optimisation criteria yield optimum photon energies differing by an order of magnitude.

  20. High-resolution x-ray crystal structures of the villin headpiece subdomain, an ultrafast folding protein

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Thang K.; Kubelka, Jan; Herbst-Irmer, Regine; Eaton, William A.; Hofrichter, James; Davies, David R.

    2005-01-01

    The 35-residue subdomain of the villin headpiece (HP35) is a small ultrafast folding protein that is being intensely studied by experiments, theory, and simulations. We have solved the x-ray structures of HP35 and its fastest folding mutant [K24 norleucine (nL)] to atomic resolution and compared their experimentally measured folding kinetics by using laser temperature jump. The structures, which are in different space groups, are almost identical to each other but differ significantly from previously solved NMR structures. Hence, the differences between the x-ray and NMR structures are probably not caused by lattice contacts or crystal/solution differences, but reflect the higher accuracy of the x-ray structures. The x-ray structures reveal important details of packing of the hydrophobic core and some additional features, such as cross-helical H bonds. Comparison of the x-ray structures indicates that the nL substitution produces only local perturbations. Consequently, the finding that the small stabilization by the mutation is completely reflected in an increased folding rate suggests that this region of the protein is as structured in the transition state as in the folded structure. It is therefore a target for engineering to increase the folding rate of the subdomain from ≈0.5 μs–1 for the nL mutant to the estimated theoretical speed limit of ≈3 μs–1. PMID:15894611

  1. Accurate flexible fitting of high-resolution protein structures to small-angle x-ray scattering data using a coarse-grained model with implicit hydration shell.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjun; Tekpinar, Mustafa

    2011-12-21

    Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) is a powerful technique widely used to explore conformational states and transitions of biomolecular assemblies in solution. For accurate model reconstruction from SAXS data, one promising approach is to flexibly fit a known high-resolution protein structure to low-resolution SAXS data by computer simulations. This is a highly challenging task due to low information content in SAXS data. To meet this challenge, we have developed what we believe to be a novel method based on a coarse-grained (one-bead-per-residue) protein representation and a modified form of the elastic network model that allows large-scale conformational changes while maintaining pseudobonds and secondary structures. Our method optimizes a pseudoenergy that combines the modified elastic-network model energy with a SAXS-fitting score and a collision energy that penalizes steric collisions. Our method uses what we consider a new implicit hydration shell model that accounts for the contribution of hydration shell to SAXS data accurately without explicitly adding waters to the system. We have rigorously validated our method using five test cases with simulated SAXS data and three test cases with experimental SAXS data. Our method has successfully generated high-quality structural models with root mean-squared deviation of 1 ∼ 3 Å from the target structures.

  2. High resolution x-ray Thomson scattering measurements from cryogenic hydrogen jets using the linac coherent light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, L. B.; Zastrau, U.; Galtier, E.; Gamboa, E. J.; Goede, S.; Schumaker, W.; Ravasio, A.; Gauthier, M.; MacDonald, M. J.; Chen, Z.; Granados, E.; Lee, H. J.; Fry, A.; Kim, J. B.; Roedel, C.; Mishra, R.; Pelka, A.; Kraus, D.; Barbrel, B.; Döppner, T.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    We present the first spectrally resolved measurements of x-rays scattered from cryogenic hydrogen jets in the single photon counting limit. The 120 Hz capabilities of the LCLS, together with a novel hydrogen jet design [J. B. Kim et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. (these proceedings)], allow for the ability to record a near background free spectrum. Such high-dynamic-range x-ray scattering measurements enable a platform to study ultra-fast, laser-driven, heating dynamics of hydrogen plasmas. This measurement has been achieved using two highly annealed pyrolytic graphite crystal spectrometers to spectrally resolve 5.5 keV x-rays elastically and inelastically scattered from cryogenic hydrogen and focused on Cornell-SLAC pixel array detectors [S. Herrmann et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 718, 550 (2013)].

  3. Simultaneous High-Resolution 2-Dimensional Spatial and 1-Dimensional Picosecond Streaked X-ray Pinhole Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Steel, A B; Nagel, S R; Dunn, J; Baldis, H A

    2012-05-03

    A Kentech x-ray streak camera was run at the LLNL Compact Multipulse Terawatt (COMET) laser to record simultaneous space- and time-resolved measurements of picosecond laser-produced plasmas. Four different x-ray energy channels were monitored using broad-band filters to record the time history of Cu targets heated at irradiances of 10{sup 16} - 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Through the Cu filter channel, a time-resolution below 3ps was obtained. Additionally, an array of 10 {micro}m diameter pinholes was placed in front of the camera to produce multiple time-resolved x-ray images on the photocathode and time-integrated images on the phosphor with 10 and 15 times magnification, respectively, with spatial resolution of <13 {micro}m.

  4. Simultaneous high-resolution two-dimensional spatial and one-dimensional picosecond streaked x-ray pinhole imaging.

    PubMed

    Steel, A B; Nagel, S R; Dunn, J; Baldis, H A

    2012-10-01

    A Kentech x-ray streak camera was run at the LLNL compact multipulse terawatt (COMET) laser to record simultaneous space- and time-resolved measurements of picosecond laser-produced plasmas. Four different x-ray energy channels were monitored using broadband filters to record the time history of Cu targets heated at irradiances of 10(16)-10(19) W∕cm(2). Through the Cu filter channel, a time-resolution below 3 ps was obtained. Additionally, an array of 10 μm diameter pinholes was placed in front of the camera to produce multiple time-resolved x-ray images on the photocathode and time-integrated images on the phosphor with 10 and 15 times magnification, respectively, with spatial resolution of < 13 μm.

  5. Optimizing the operation of a high resolution vertical Johann spectrometer using a high energy fluorescer x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, Michael; Stewart, Richard

    2010-10-15

    This paper describes the operation and testing for a vertical Johann spectrometer (VJS) operating in the 13 keV range. The spectrometer is designed to use thin curved mica crystals or thick germanium crystals. The VJS must have a resolution of E/{Delta}E=3000 or better to measure the Doppler broadening of highly ionized krypton and operate at a small x-ray angle in order to be used as a diagnostic in a laser plasma target chamber. The VJS was aligned, tested, and optimized using a fluorescer type high energy x-ray (HEX) source located at National Security Technologies (NSTec), LLC, in Livermore, CA. The HEX uses a 160 kV x-ray tube to excite fluorescence from various targets. Both rubidium and bismuth fluorescers were used for this effort. This presentation describes the NSTec HEX system and the methods used to optimize and characterize the VJS performance.

  6. High-resolution X-ray focusing concave (elliptical) curved crystal spectrograph for laser-produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Shali; Pan, Yingjun; Zhong, Xianxin; Xiong, Xiancai; Yang, Guohong; Liu, Zongli; Ding, Yongkun

    2004-08-01

    The X-ray spectrum emitted from laser-produced plasma contains plentiful information. X-ray spectrometer is a powerful tool for plasma diagnosis and studying the information and evolution of the plasma. X-ray concave (elliptical) curved crystals analyzer was designed and manufactured to investigate the properties of laser-produced plasma. The experiment was carried out on Mianyang Xingguang-II Facility and aimed at investigating the characteristics of a high density iron plasma. Experimental results using KAP, LIF, PET, and MICA curved crystal analyzers are described, and the spectra of Au, Ti laser-produced plasma are shown. The focusing crystal analyzer clearly gave an increase in sensitivity over a flat crystal.

  7. Zone-doubled Fresnel zone plates for high-resolution hard X-ray full-field transmission microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Comamala, Joan; Pan, Yongsheng; Lombardo, Jeffrey J.; Harris, William M.; Chiu, Wilson K. S.; David, Christian; Wang, Yuxin

    2012-01-01

    Full-field transmission X-ray microscopy is a unique non-destructive technique for three-dimensional imaging of specimens at the nanometer scale. Here, the use of zone-doubled Fresnel zone plates to achieve a spatial resolution better than 20 nm in the hard X-ray regime (8–10 keV) is reported. By obtaining a tomographic reconstruction of a Ni/YSZ solid-oxide fuel cell, the feasibility of performing three-dimensional imaging of scientifically relevant samples using such high-spatial-resolution Fresnel zone plates is demonstrated. PMID:22898949

  8. Multi-Mounted X-Ray Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Liu, Zhenzhong; Wang, Jingzheng

    2016-01-01

    Most existing X-ray computed tomography (CT) techniques work in single-mounted mode and need to scan the inspected objects one by one. It is time-consuming and not acceptable for the inspection in a large scale. In this paper, we report a multi-mounted CT method and its first engineering implementation. It consists of a multi-mounted scanning geometry and the corresponding algebraic iterative reconstruction algorithm. This approach permits the CT rotation scanning of multiple objects simultaneously without the increase of penetration thickness and the signal crosstalk. Compared with the conventional single-mounted methods, it has the potential to improve the imaging efficiency and suppress the artifacts from the beam hardening and the scatter. This work comprises a numerical study of the method and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a developed multi-mounted X-ray CT prototype system. We believe that this technique is of particular interest for pushing the engineering applications of X-ray CT. PMID:27073911

  9. Multi-Mounted X-Ray Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jian; Liu, Zhenzhong; Wang, Jingzheng

    2016-01-01

    Most existing X-ray computed tomography (CT) techniques work in single-mounted mode and need to scan the inspected objects one by one. It is time-consuming and not acceptable for the inspection in a large scale. In this paper, we report a multi-mounted CT method and its first engineering implementation. It consists of a multi-mounted scanning geometry and the corresponding algebraic iterative reconstruction algorithm. This approach permits the CT rotation scanning of multiple objects simultaneously without the increase of penetration thickness and the signal crosstalk. Compared with the conventional single-mounted methods, it has the potential to improve the imaging efficiency and suppress the artifacts from the beam hardening and the scatter. This work comprises a numerical study of the method and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a developed multi-mounted X-ray CT prototype system. We believe that this technique is of particular interest for pushing the engineering applications of X-ray CT. PMID:27073911

  10. Component analyses of urinary nanocrystallites of uric acid stone formers by combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, fast Fourier transformation, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin-Yuan; Xue, Jun-Fa; Xia, Zhi-Yue; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to analyse the components of nanocrystallites in urines of patients with uric acid (UA) stones. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), fast Fourier transformation (FFT) of HRTEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were performed to analyse the components of these nanocrystallites. XRD and FFT showed that the main component of urinary nanocrystallites was UA, which contains a small amount of calcium oxalate monohydrate and phosphates. EDS showed the characteristic absorption peaks of C, O, Ca and P. The formation of UA stones was closely related to a large number of UA nanocrystallites in urine. A combination of HRTEM, FFT, EDS and XRD analyses could be performed accurately to analyse the components of urinary nanocrystallites.

  11. Imaging crystal spectrometer for high-resolution x-ray measurements on electron beam ion traps and tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Hell, N.; Brown, G. V.

    2016-11-01

    We describe a crystal spectrometer implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps that employ two spherically bent quartz crystals and a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector to measure x rays with a nominal resolving power of λ/Δλ ≥ 10 000. Its focusing properties allow us to record x rays either with the plane of dispersion perpendicular or parallel to the electron beam and, thus, to preferentially select one of the two linear x-ray polarization components. Moreover, by choice of dispersion plane and focussing conditions, we use the instrument either to image the distribution of the ions within the 2 cm long trap region, or to concentrate x rays of a given energy to a point on the detector, which optimizes the signal-to-noise ratio. We demonstrate the operation and utility of the new instrument by presenting spectra of Mo34+, which prepares the instrument for use as a core impurity diagnostic on the NSTX-U spherical torus and other magnetic fusion devices that employ molybdenum as plasma facing components.

  12. Applications of non-periodic multilayer optics for high-resolution x-ray microscopes below 30 keVa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troussel, Ph.; Dennetiere, D.; Rousseau, A.; Darbon, S.; Høghøj, P.; Hedacq, S.; Krumrey, M.

    2012-10-01

    Multilayer mirrors with enhanced bandwidth were developed with special performances for dense plasma diagnostics and mainly for high spatial resolution x-ray imaging. The multilayer coatings are designed to provide broadband x-ray reflectance at low grazing incidence angles. They are deposited onto toroidal mirror substrates. Our research is directed at the development of non-periodic (depth graded) W/Si multilayer specifically designed for use in the 1 to 30 keV photon energy band. First, we present a study for a 5 to 22 keV x-ray spectral window at 0.45° grazing angle. The goal is to obtain a high and constant reflectivity. Second, we have modeled a broadband mirror coating for harder x-rays in the range from 10 to 30 keV, with a non-periodic structure containing 300 W/SiC layers with periods in the range from 0.8 to 4 nm, designed for 0.35° grazing incidence angle.

  13. Applications of non-periodic multilayer optics for high-resolution x-ray microscopes below 30 keV.

    PubMed

    Troussel, Ph; Dennetiere, D; Rousseau, A; Darbon, S; Høghøj, P; Hedacq, S; Krumrey, M

    2012-10-01

    Multilayer mirrors with enhanced bandwidth were developed with special performances for dense plasma diagnostics and mainly for high spatial resolution x-ray imaging. The multilayer coatings are designed to provide broadband x-ray reflectance at low grazing incidence angles. They are deposited onto toroidal mirror substrates. Our research is directed at the development of non-periodic (depth graded) W∕Si multilayer specifically designed for use in the 1 to 30 keV photon energy band. First, we present a study for a 5 to 22 keV x-ray spectral window at 0.45° grazing angle. The goal is to obtain a high and constant reflectivity. Second, we have modeled a broadband mirror coating for harder x-rays in the range from 10 to 30 keV, with a non-periodic structure containing 300 W∕SiC layers with periods in the range from 0.8 to 4 nm, designed for 0.35° grazing incidence angle.

  14. High-Resolution X-ray Microprobe Using a Spatial Filter and Its Application to Micro-XAFS Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Terada, Y.; Tanida, H.; Uruga, T.; Takeuchi, A.; Suzuki, Y.; Goto, S.

    2011-09-09

    An x-ray microprobe system with total-reflection mirror optics for trace element analysis has been developed at beamline 37XU of SPring-8. To achieve sub-microprobe, a spatial filter has been installed downstream of a monochromator. Focusing tests have been performed in the x-ray energy range of 6-14 keV. A focused beam size of 0.83 {mu}m(V)x1.35 {mu}m(H) has been obtained at an x-ray energy of 10 keV, and using a spatial filter in the horizontal direction, the beam size is down to 0.84 {mu}m. Micro-x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy of submicrometer particles has been done by utilizing the total-reflection mirror optics. It was clearly observed from the nickel K-edge XAFS spectra that the oxidation state of nickel was a mixture of metal and oxide even in the single submicrometer particle.

  15. The X-Ray Spectrum of a Planetary Nebula at High Resolution: Chandra Gratings Spectroscopy of BD +30°3639

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Young Sam; Nordon, Raanan; Kastner, Joel H.; Houck, John; Behar, Ehud; Soker, Noam

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of the first X-ray gratings spectroscopy observations of a planetary nebula (PN)—the X-ray-bright, young BD +30°3639. We observed BD +30°3639 for a total of ~300 ks with the Chandra X-ray Observatory's Low Energy Transmission Gratings in combination with its Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (LETG/ACIS-S). The LETG/ACIS-S spectrum of BD +30°3639 is dominated by H-like resonance lines of O VIII and C VI and the He-like triplet line complexes of Ne IX and O VII. Other H-like resonance lines, such as N VII, and lines of highly-ionized Fe are weak or absent. Continuum emission is evident over the range 6-18 Å. Spectral modeling indicates the presence of a range of plasma temperatures from Tx ~ 1.7 × 106 K to 2.9 × 106 K and an intervening absorbing column NH ~ 2.4 × 1021 cm-2. The same modeling conclusively demonstrates that C and Ne are highly enhanced, with abundance ratios of C/O ~ 15-45 and Ne/O ~ 3.3-5.0 (90% confidence ranges, relative to the solar ratios), while N and Fe are depleted, with abundances N/O ~ 0.0-1.0 and Fe/O ~ 0.1-0.4, respectively. The intrinsic luminosity of the X-ray source determined from the modeling and the measured flux (FX = 4.1 × 10-13 ergs cm-2 s-1) is LX ~ 8.6 × 1032 erg s-1 (assuming D = 1.2 kpc). These gratings spectroscopy results are generally consistent with earlier results obtained from X-ray CCD imaging spectroscopy of BD +30°3639, but are far more precise. Hence, the Chandra/LETG-S results for BD +30°3639 place severe new constraints on models of PN wind-wind interactions in which X-ray emitting gas within PNs is generated via shocks and the plasma temperature is moderated by effects such as heat conduction or rapid evolution of the fast wind. The tight constraints placed on the (nonsolar) abundances directly implicate the present-day central star—hence, ultimately, the intershell region of the progenitor asymptotic giant branch star—as the origin of the shocked plasma now emitting in X-rays.

  16. High-resolution hard x-ray spectroscopy of high-temperature plasmas using an array of quantum microcalorimeters.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Daniel B; Gu, Ming F; Brown, Greg V; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Porter, F Scott; Kilbourne, Caroline A; Kelley, Richard L

    2008-10-01

    Quantum microcalorimeters show promise in being able to fully resolve x-ray spectra from heavy highly charged ions, such as would be found in hot plasmas with temperatures in excess of 50 keV. Quantum microcalorimeter arrays are able to achieve this as they have a high-resolving power and good effective quantum efficiency for hard x-ray photons up to 60 keV. To demonstrate this, we present a measurement using an array of thin HgTe quantum microcalorimeters to measure the K-shell spectrum of hydrogenlike through carbonlike praseodymium (Z=57). With this device we are able to attain a resolving power, E/DeltaE, of 1000 at a photon energy of 37 keV.

  17. An alternative scheme of angular-dispersion analyzers for high-resolution medium-energy inelastic X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xian Rong

    2011-11-01

    The development of medium-energy inelastic X-ray scattering optics with meV and sub-meV resolution has attracted considerable efforts in recent years. Meanwhile, there are also concerns or debates about the fundamental and feasibility of the involved schemes. Here the central optical component, the back-reflection angular-dispersion monochromator or analyzer, is analyzed. The results show that the multiple-beam diffraction effect together with transmission-induced absorption can noticeably reduce the diffraction efficiency, although it may not be a fatal threat. In order to improve the efficiency, a simple four-bounce analyzer is proposed that completely avoids these two adverse effects. The new scheme is illustrated to be a feasible alternative approach for developing meV- to sub-meV-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy.

  18. High-resolution, high-transmission soft x-ray spectrometer for the study of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, O.; Weinhardt, L.; Blum, M.; Weigand, M.; Umbach, E.; Bär, M.; Heske, C.; Denlinger, J.; Chuang, Y.-D.; McKinney, W.; Hussain, Z.; Gullikson, E.; Jones, M.; Batson, P.; Nelles, B.; Follath, R.

    2009-06-01

    We present a variable line-space grating spectrometer for soft x-rays that covers the photon energy range between 130 and 650 eV. The optical design is based on the Hettrick-Underwood principle and tailored to synchrotron-based studies of radiation-sensitive biological samples. The spectrometer is able to record the entire spectral range in one shot, i.e., without any mechanical motion, at a resolving power of 1200 or better. Despite its slitless design, such a resolving power can be achieved for a source spot as large as (30×3000) μm2, which is important for keeping beam damage effects in radiation-sensitive samples low. The high spectrometer efficiency allows recording of comprehensive two-dimensional resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS) maps with good statistics within several minutes. This is exemplarily demonstrated for a RIXS map of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite, which was taken within 10 min.

  19. High-resolution, high-transmission soft x-ray spectrometer for the study of biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, Oliver; Weinhardt, L.; Blum, M.; Weigand, M.; Umbach, E.; Bar, M.; Heske, Clemens; Denlinger, Jonathan; Chuang, Y.-D.; McKinney, Wayne; Hussain, Zahid; Gullikson, Eric; Jones, M.; Batson, Phil; Nelles, B.; Follath, R.

    2009-03-09

    We present a variable line-space grating spectrometer for soft x-rays that covers the photon energy range between 130 and 650 eV. The optical design is based on the Hettrick-Underwood principle and tailored to synchrotron-based studies of radiation-sensitive biological samples. The spectrometer is able to record the entire spectral range in one shot, i.e., without any mechanical motion, at a resolving power of 1200 or better. Despite its slitless design, such a resolving power can be achieved for a source spot as large as 30x3000 mu m2, which is important for keeping beam damage effects in radiation-sensitive samples low. The high spectrometer efficiency allows recording of comprehensive two-dimensional resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS) maps with good statistics within several minutes. This is exemplarily demonstrated for a RIXS map of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite, which was taken within 10 min.

  20. First Results From The New High Resolution Imaging X-ray Crystal Spectrometer On Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ince-Cushman, Alexander; Rice, John; Bitter, Manfred; Reinke, Mathew; Hill, Kenneth; Scott, Steven

    2007-11-01

    In an effort to improve the diagnostic capabilities for measuring plasma rotation on Alcator C-Mod, an imaging x-ray spectrometer has been designed and installed. This instrument utilizes a spherically bent quartz crystal and a set of 2D x-ray detectors to image the entire plasma cross section with a spectral resolving power of approximately 10,000 with vertical spatial resolution of about 1cm. Line emission from highly ionized states of argon and molybdenum are measured at frame rates up to 200Hz. Using spectral tomographic techniques the line integrated spectra can be inverted to determine impurity density, velocity and temperature profiles. An overview of the instrument, analysis and example profiles are presented. Work supported by USDoE Coop. Agree. No. DE-FC02-99ER54512 & DE-AC02-76CH03073.

  1. High-resolution single-shot spectral monitoring of hard x-ray free-electron laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Makita, M.; Karvinen, P.; Zhu, D.; Juranic, P. N.; Grünert, J.; Cartier, S.; Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Lemke, H. T.; Mozzanica, A.; Nelson, S.; Patthey, L.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Feng, Y.; David, C.

    2015-10-16

    We have developed an on-line spectrometer for hard x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) radiation based on a nanostructured diamond diffraction grating and a bent crystal analyzer. Our method provides high spectral resolution, interferes negligibly with the XFEL beam, and can withstand the intense hard x-ray pulses at high repetition rates of >100 Hz. The spectrometer is capable of providing shot-to-shot spectral information for the normalization of data obtained in scientific experiments and optimization of the accelerator operation parameters. We have demonstrated these capabilities of the setup at the Linac Coherent Light Source, in self-amplified spontaneous emission mode at full energy of >1 mJ with a 120 Hz repetition rate, obtaining a resolving power of Ε/δΕ > 3 × 104. In conclusion, the device was also used to monitor the effects of pulse duration down to 8 fs by analysis of the spectral spike width.

  2. High-resolution X-ray and radio images of the galactic SNR G39.2-0.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Helfand, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Images of the galactic supernova remnant G39.2-0.3 at radio, infrared, and X-ray wavelengths are presented. The 6 and 20 cm VLA maps reveal a shell-brightened source with substantial emission in the central regions and a rather high degree of linear polarization throughout; no significant spectral variations over the face of the remnant are apparent. The Einstein X-ray image also shows emission from both the limb and the central region, while the IRAS data show no flux that can be unambiguously associated with the remnant, although an uncataloged small H II region is seen adjacent to the shell. It is concluded that, contrary to previous suggestions, there is no evidence for a Crab-like component in G39.2-0.3, and that the central emission plateau is most likely simply a shell filament which happens to fall across the center of the remnant.

  3. Large scale telescopes for high resolution X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy. [using widely separated satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Lin, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    This paper shows that angular-resolution, energy-range, and structural constraints on image-modulated X-ray telescopes are not fundamental and that the limits on angular resolution can be overcome by constructing such telescopes on a very large spatial scale. It is proposed that widely separated satellites be used for the modulating mask and detector array. Implementation of this concept is discussed in terms of a simple system consisting of a pinhole camera (i.e., a hole in an opaque mask on one subsatellite and a detector array on another). Advantages and problems of such systems are briefly discussed, and a solar X-ray telescope intended for deployment from a Shuttle orbiter is described. It is noted that such large-scale telescopes can be constructed to image gamma rays and even energetic neutrons as well.

  4. A broadband high-resolution elliptical crystal x-ray spectrometer for high energy density physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S G; Heeter, R F; Booth, R; Emig, J; Fulkerson, S; McCarville, T; Norman, D; Young, B F

    2006-03-31

    Spectroscopic investigation of high temperature laser produced plasmas in general, and x-ray opacity experiments in particular, often requires instruments with both a broad coverage of x-ray energies and high spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution. We analyze the design, model the response, and report the commissioning of a spectrometer using elliptical crystals in conjunction with a large format, gated microchannel plate detector. Measurements taken with this instrument at the JANUS laser facilities demonstrate the designed spectral range of 0.24 to 5.8 keV, and spectral resolution E/{Delta}E > 500, resulting in 2 to 3 times more spectral data than achieved by previous spectrometer designs. The observed 100 picosecond temporal resolution and 35 {micro}m spatial resolution are consistent with the requirements of high energy density opacity experiments.

  5. High-resolution hard x-ray spectroscopy of high-temperature plasmas using an array of quantum microcalorimeters.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Daniel B; Gu, Ming F; Brown, Greg V; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Porter, F Scott; Kilbourne, Caroline A; Kelley, Richard L

    2008-10-01

    Quantum microcalorimeters show promise in being able to fully resolve x-ray spectra from heavy highly charged ions, such as would be found in hot plasmas with temperatures in excess of 50 keV. Quantum microcalorimeter arrays are able to achieve this as they have a high-resolving power and good effective quantum efficiency for hard x-ray photons up to 60 keV. To demonstrate this, we present a measurement using an array of thin HgTe quantum microcalorimeters to measure the K-shell spectrum of hydrogenlike through carbonlike praseodymium (Z=57). With this device we are able to attain a resolving power, E/DeltaE, of 1000 at a photon energy of 37 keV. PMID:19044485

  6. High-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering to study the high-frequency atomic dynamics of disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Giulio

    2008-06-01

    The use of momentum-resolved inelastic x-ray scattering with meV energy resolution to study the high-frequency atomic dynamics in disordered systems is here reviewed. The typical realization of this experiment is described together with some common models used to interpret the measured spectra and to extract parameters of interest for the investigation of disordered systems. With the help of some selected examples, the present status of the field is discussed. Particular attention is given to those results which are still open for discussion or controversial, and which will require further development of the technique to be fully solved. Such an instrumental development seems nowadays possible at the light of recently proposed schemes for advanced inelastic x-ray scattering spectrometers. To cite this article: G. Monaco, C. R. Physique 9 (2008).

  7. High-resolution x-ray diffraction investigation of relaxation and dislocations in SiGe layers grown on (001), (011), and (111) Si substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhylik, A.; Benediktovich, A.; Ulyanenkov, A.; Guerault, H.; Myronov, M.; Dobbie, A.; Leadley, D. R.; Ulyanenkova, T.

    2011-06-15

    This work presents a detailed characterization, using high-resolution x-ray diffraction, of multilayered Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} heterostructures grown on (001), (011), and (111) Si substrates by reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition. Reciprocal space mapping has been used to determine both the strain and Ge concentration depth profiles within each layer of the heterostructures after initially determining the crystallographic tilt of all the layers. Both symmetric and asymmetric reciprocal space maps were measured on each sample, and the evaluation was performed simultaneously for the whole data set. The ratio of misfit to threading dislocation densities has been estimated for each individual layer based on an analysis of diffuse x-ray scattering from the defects.

  8. Development of a High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Measurement of Ion-Temperature and Rotation-Velocity Profiles in Fusion Energy Research Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K W; Broennimann, Ch; Eikenberry, E F; Ince-Cushman, A; Lee, S G; Rice, J E; Scott, S

    2008-02-27

    A new imaging high resolution x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) has been developed to measure continuous profiles of ion temperature and rotation velocity in fusion plasmas. Following proof-of-principle tests on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak and the NSTX spherical tokamak, and successful testing of a new silicon, pixilated detector with 1MHz count rate capability per pixel, an imaging XCS is being designed to measure full profiles of Ti and vφ on C-Mod. The imaging XCS design has also been adopted for ITER. Ion-temperature uncertainty and minimum measurable rotation velocity are calculated for the C-Mod spectrometer. The affects of x-ray and nuclear-radiation background on the measurement uncertainties are calculated to predict performance on ITER.

  9. High-resolution X-ray projection radiography of a pin cathode in a high-current vacuum diode using X-pinch radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkevich, E. V.; Tilikin, I. N.; Agafonov, A. V.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Romanova, V. M.; Mingaleev, A. R.; Savinov, S. Yu.; Mesyats, G. A.; Pikuz, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    To study processes in a high-current vacuum diode with a cathode in the form of a single pin made of a metallic wire 20-30 μm in diameter, the method of high-resolution projection X-ray radiography with an X-pinch as a source has been used. A strong inhomogeneity of the energy contribution to the wire has been revealed. The smallest energy release has been observed near the end of the pin, where the electric field strength is maximal. Hard X rays, as well as the ejection of matter from the anode, have been observed, indicating the generation of an electron beam with the parameters characteristic of explosive electron emission in the diode with this configuration. The data obtained indicate complex processes occurring in the diode. Possible scenarios of their development have been considered.

  10. Upgrades of imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers for high-resolution and high-temperature plasma diagnostics on EAST.

    PubMed

    Lyu, B; Wang, F D; Pan, X Y; Chen, J; Fu, J; Li, Y Y; Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Delgado-Aparicio, L F; Pablant, N; Lee, S G; Shi, Y J; Ye, M Y; Wan, B N

    2014-11-01

    Upgrade of the imaging X-ray crystal spectrometers continues in order to fulfill the high-performance diagnostics requirements on EAST. For the tangential spectrometer, a new large pixelated two-dimensional detector was deployed on tokamaks for time-resolved X-ray imaging. This vacuum-compatible detector has an area of 83.8 × 325.3 mm(2), a framing rate over 150 Hz, and water-cooling capability for long-pulse discharges. To effectively extend the temperature limit, a double-crystal assembly was designed to replace the previous single crystals for He-like argon line measurement. The tangential spectrometer employed two crystal slices attached to a common substrate and part of He- and H-like Ar spectra could be recorded on the same detector when crystals were chosen to have similar Bragg angles. This setup cannot only extend the measurable Te up to 10 keV in the core region, but also extend the spatial coverage since He-like argon ions will be present in the outer plasma region. Similarly, crystal slices for He-like iron and argon spectra were adopted on the poloidal spectrometer. Wavelength calibration for absolute rotation velocity measurement will be studied using cadmium characteristic L-shell X-ray lines excited by plasma radiation. A Cd foil is placed before the crystal and can be inserted and retracted for in situ wavelength calibration. The Geant4 code was used to estimate X-ray fluorescence yield and optimize the thickness of the foil.

  11. Upgrades of imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers for high-resolution and high-temperature plasma diagnostics on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Lyu, B. Wang, F. D.; Fu, J.; Li, Y. Y.; Pan, X. Y.; Chen, J.; Wan, B. N.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Pablant, N.; Lee, S. G.; Shi, Y. J.; Ye, M. Y.

    2014-11-15

    Upgrade of the imaging X-ray crystal spectrometers continues in order to fulfill the high-performance diagnostics requirements on EAST. For the tangential spectrometer, a new large pixelated two-dimensional detector was deployed on tokamaks for time-resolved X-ray imaging. This vacuum-compatible detector has an area of 83.8 × 325.3 mm{sup 2}, a framing rate over 150 Hz, and water-cooling capability for long-pulse discharges. To effectively extend the temperature limit, a double-crystal assembly was designed to replace the previous single crystals for He-like argon line measurement. The tangential spectrometer employed two crystal slices attached to a common substrate and part of He- and H-like Ar spectra could be recorded on the same detector when crystals were chosen to have similar Bragg angles. This setup cannot only extend the measurable Te up to 10 keV in the core region, but also extend the spatial coverage since He-like argon ions will be present in the outer plasma region. Similarly, crystal slices for He-like iron and argon spectra were adopted on the poloidal spectrometer. Wavelength calibration for absolute rotation velocity measurement will be studied using cadmium characteristic L-shell X-ray lines excited by plasma radiation. A Cd foil is placed before the crystal and can be inserted and retracted for in situ wavelength calibration. The Geant4 code was used to estimate X-ray fluorescence yield and optimize the thickness of the foil.

  12. High-resolution x-ray imaging of planar foils irradiated by the Nike KrF laser

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.; Obenschain, S.; Bodner, S.; Pawley, C.; Gerber, K.; Sethian, J.; Mostovych, A.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Lehecka, T.; Holland, G.

    1997-05-01

    Thin plastic (CH) foils were irradiated by the Naval Research Laboratory Nike [Obenschain {ital et al.}, Phys. Plasmas {bold 3}, 2098 (1996)] KrF laser and were imaged in the x-ray and extreme ultraviolet regions with two-dimensional spatial resolution in the 3{endash}10 {mu}m range. The CH foils were backlit by a silicon plasma. A spherically curved quartz crystal produced monochromatic images of the Si{sup +12} resonance line radiation with energy 1865 eV that was transmitted by the CH foils. Instabilities that were seeded by linear ripple patterns on the irradiated sides of CH foils were observed. The ripple patterns had periods in the 31{endash}125 {mu}m range and amplitudes in the 0.25{endash}5.0 {mu}m range. The silicon backlighter emission was recorded by an x-ray spectrometer, and the 1865 eV resonance line emission was recorded by a fast x-ray diode. The multilayer mirror telescope recorded images of the C{sup +3} 1550 {Angstrom} emission (energy 8.0 eV) from the backside of the CH foils. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. In Situ Ptychography of Heterogeneous Catalysts using Hard X-Rays: High Resolution Imaging at Ambient Pressure and Elevated Temperature.

    PubMed

    Baier, Sina; Damsgaard, Christian D; Scholz, Maria; Benzi, Federico; Rochet, Amélie; Hoppe, Robert; Scherer, Torsten; Shi, Junjie; Wittstock, Arne; Weinhausen, Britta; Wagner, Jakob B; Schroer, Christian G; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk

    2016-02-01

    A new closed cell is presented for in situ X-ray ptychography which allows studies under gas flow and at elevated temperature. In order to gain complementary information by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, the cell makes use of a Protochips E-chipTM which contains a small, thin electron transparent window and allows heating. Two gold-based systems, 50 nm gold particles and nanoporous gold as a relevant catalyst sample, were used for studying the feasibility of the cell. Measurements showing a resolution around 40 nm have been achieved under a flow of synthetic air and during heating up to temperatures of 933 K. An elevated temperature exhibited little influence on image quality and resolution. With this study, the potential of in situ hard X-ray ptychography for investigating annealing processes of real catalyst samples is demonstrated. Furthermore, the possibility to use the same sample holder for ex situ electron microscopy before and after the in situ study underlines the unique possibilities available with this combination of electron microscopy and X-ray microscopy on the same sample.

  14. Improvement of the radiation hardness of a directly converting high resolution intra-oral X-ray imaging sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spartiotis, Konstantinos; Pyyhtiä, Jouni; Schulman, Tom

    2003-11-01

    The radiation tolerance of a directly converting digital intra-oral X-ray imaging sensor reported in Spartiotis et al. [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 501 (2003) 594] has been tested using a typical dental X-ray beam spectrum. Radiation induced degradation in the performance of the sensor which consists of CMOS signal readout circuits bump bonded to a high resistivity silicon pixel detector was observed already before a dose (in air) of 1 krad. Both increase in the leakage current of the pixel detector manufactured by Sintef, Norway and signal leakage to ground from the gate of the pixel input MOSFETs of the readout circuit were observed and measured. The sensitive part of the CMOS circuit was identified as the protection diode of the gate of the input MOSFET. After removing the gate protection diode no signal leakage was observed up to a dose of 5 krad (air) which approximately corresponds to 125.000 typical dental X-ray exposures. The radiation hardness of the silicon pixel detector was improved by using a modified oxidation process supplied by Colibrys, Switzerland. The improved pixel detectors showed no increase in the leakage current at dental doses.

  15. Investigation of high-resolution superconducting tunnel junction detectors for low-energy X-ray fluorescence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckhoff, B.; Fliegauf, R.; Ulm, G.

    2003-04-01

    The energy resolution of conventional semiconductor detectors is insufficient for simultaneously separating the leading fluorescence lines of low Z and medium Z materials in the soft X-ray regime. It is therefore important to investigate alternative detection instruments offering higher energy resolution and evaluate their applicability to soft X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis. In this paper, various results of the characterization and evaluation of a cryogenic superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detector, which was provided to the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, are given with respect to both detector response functions and XRF. For this investigation, monochromatized undulator radiation of high spectral purity, available to the PTB X-ray radiometry laboratory at the electron storage ring BESSY II, was employed, by which it was possible to record the STJ response functions at various photon energies of interest ranging from 180 to 1600 eV. By scanning the effective detector area and the adjacent substrate and leads, relevant artefacts of the detector response were identified.

  16. X-ray computed tomography using curvelet sparse regularization

    SciTech Connect

    Wieczorek, Matthias Vogel, Jakob; Lasser, Tobias; Frikel, Jürgen; Demaret, Laurent; Eggl, Elena; Pfeiffer, Franz; Kopp, Felix; Noël, Peter B.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Reconstruction of x-ray computed tomography (CT) data remains a mathematically challenging problem in medical imaging. Complementing the standard analytical reconstruction methods, sparse regularization is growing in importance, as it allows inclusion of prior knowledge. The paper presents a method for sparse regularization based on the curvelet frame for the application to iterative reconstruction in x-ray computed tomography. Methods: In this work, the authors present an iterative reconstruction approach based on the alternating direction method of multipliers using curvelet sparse regularization. Results: Evaluation of the method is performed on a specifically crafted numerical phantom dataset to highlight the method’s strengths. Additional evaluation is performed on two real datasets from commercial scanners with different noise characteristics, a clinical bone sample acquired in a micro-CT and a human abdomen scanned in a diagnostic CT. The results clearly illustrate that curvelet sparse regularization has characteristic strengths. In particular, it improves the restoration and resolution of highly directional, high contrast features with smooth contrast variations. The authors also compare this approach to the popular technique of total variation and to traditional filtered backprojection. Conclusions: The authors conclude that curvelet sparse regularization is able to improve reconstruction quality by reducing noise while preserving highly directional features.

  17. Utilization of high resolution computed tomography to visualize the three dimensional structure and function of plant vasculature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High resolution x-ray computed tomography (HRCT) is a non-destructive diagnostic imaging technique with sub-micron resolution capability that is now being used to evaluate the structure and function of plant xylem network in three dimensions (3D). HRCT imaging is based on the same principles as medi...

  18. A multiresolution approach to iterative reconstruction algorithms in X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    De Witte, Yoni; Vlassenbroeck, Jelle; Van Hoorebeke, Luc

    2010-09-01

    In computed tomography, the application of iterative reconstruction methods in practical situations is impeded by their high computational demands. Especially in high resolution X-ray computed tomography, where reconstruction volumes contain a high number of volume elements (several giga voxels), this computational burden prevents their actual breakthrough. Besides the large amount of calculations, iterative algorithms require the entire volume to be kept in memory during reconstruction, which quickly becomes cumbersome for large data sets. To overcome this obstacle, we present a novel multiresolution reconstruction, which greatly reduces the required amount of memory without significantly affecting the reconstructed image quality. It is shown that, combined with an efficient implementation on a graphical processing unit, the multiresolution approach enables the application of iterative algorithms in the reconstruction of large volumes at an acceptable speed using only limited resources. PMID:20350850

  19. Interface characterization of XUV multilayer reflectors using HRTEM (high-resolution transmission electron microscopy) and x-ray and XUV reflectance

    SciTech Connect

    Windt, D.L.; Hull, R.; Waskiewicz, W.K.; Kortright, J.B.

    1990-07-01

    We have examined the structure of XUV multilayer coatings using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Using a variety of techniques, we have measured the interface widths and the interface topography from the digitized TEM images, and have compared these results to x-ray and XUV reflectance measurements. We find that the structural parameters measured from the TEM images and those deduced from reflectance are consistent in light of the probable systematic errors associated with the measurement and interpretation techniques. 14 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Flat-field grating spectrometer for high-resolution soft x-ray and EUV measurements on an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P; Magee, E; Trabert, E; Chen, H; Lepson, J K; Gu, M F; Schmidt, M

    2004-03-27

    A R = 44.3 m grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Angstrom up to 50 Angstrom. The instrument uses a grating with variable line spacing (about 2400 l/mm) for a flat field of view. Spectra are recorded with a back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The new instrument greatly improves upon the resolution achieved with existing grating spectrometers and complements crystal spectrometers at the shorter wavelengths both in terms of wavelength coverage and polarization independent reflectivity response.

  1. Development of a portable x-ray computed tomographic imaging system for drill-site investigation of recovered core

    SciTech Connect

    Freifeld, Barry M.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Pruess, Jacob

    2003-05-01

    A portable x-ray computed tomography (CT) system was constructed for imaging core at drill sites. Performing drill-site-based x-ray scanning and CT analysis permits rapid evaluation of core properties (such as density, lithologic structure, and macroporosity distribution) and allows for real-time decision making for additional core-handling procedures. Because of the speed with which scanning is performed, systematic imaging and electronic cataloging of all retrieved core is feasible. Innovations (such as a novel clamshell shielding arrangement integrated with system interlocks) permit safe operation of the x-ray system in a busy core handling area. The minimization of the volume encapsulated with shielding reduces the overall system weight and facilitates instrument portability. The x-ray system as originally fabricated had a 110 kV x-ray source with a fixed 300-micron focal spot size. A 15 cm image intensifier with a cesium iodide phosphor input screen was coupled to a CCD for image capture. The CT system has since been modified with a 130 kV micro-focal x-ray source. With the x-ray system's variable focal spot size, high-resolution studies (10-micron resolution) can be performed on core plugs and coarser (100-micron resolution) images can be acquired of whole drill cores. The development of an aluminum compensator has significantly improved the dynamic range and accuracy of the system. An x-ray filter has also been incorporated, permitting rapid acquisition of multi-energy scans for more quantitative analysis of sample mineralogy. The x-ray CT system has operated reliably under extreme field conditions, which have varied from shipboard to arctic.

  2. Grating-based X-ray Dark-field Computed Tomography of Living Mice

    PubMed Central

    Velroyen, A.; Yaroshenko, A.; Hahn, D.; Fehringer, A.; Tapfer, A.; Müller, M.; Noël, P.B.; Pauwels, B.; Sasov, A.; Yildirim, A.Ö.; Eickelberg, O.; Hellbach, K.; Auweter, S.D.; Meinel, F.G.; Reiser, M.F.; Bech, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in x-ray attenuating tissue caused by lung disorders like emphysema or fibrosis are subtle and thus only resolved by high-resolution computed tomography (CT). The structural reorganization, however, is of strong influence for lung function. Dark-field CT (DFCT), based on small-angle scattering of x-rays, reveals such structural changes even at resolutions coarser than the pulmonary network and thus provides access to their anatomical distribution. In this proof-of-concept study we present x-ray in vivo DFCTs of lungs of a healthy, an emphysematous and a fibrotic mouse. The tomographies show excellent depiction of the distribution of structural – and thus indirectly functional – changes in lung parenchyma, on single-modality slices in dark field as well as on multimodal fusion images. Therefore, we anticipate numerous applications of DFCT in diagnostic lung imaging. We introduce a scatter-based Hounsfield Unit (sHU) scale to facilitate comparability of scans. In this newly defined sHU scale, the pathophysiological changes by emphysema and fibrosis cause a shift towards lower numbers, compared to healthy lung tissue. PMID:26629545

  3. Demonstrating Enabling Technologies for the High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer of the Next NASA X-ray Astronomy Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilbourne, Caroline; Adams, J. S.; Bandler, S.; Chervenak, J.; Chiao, M.; Doriese, R.; Eckart, M.; Finkbeiner, F.; Fowler, J. W.; Hilton, G.; Irwin, K.; Kelley, R. L.; Moseley, S. J.; Porter, F. S.; Reintsema, C.; Sadleir, J.; Smith, S. J.; Swetz, D.; Ullom, J.

    2014-01-01

    NASA/GSFC and NIST-Boulder are collaborating on a program to advance superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter technology toward Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6. The technology development for a TES imaging X-ray microcalorimeter spectrometer (TES microcalorimeter arrays and time-division multiplexed SQUID readout) is now at TRL 4, as evaluated by both NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) during mission formulation for the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). We will present the status of the development program. The primary goal of the current project is to advance the core X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer (XMS) detector-system technologies to a demonstration of TRL 5 in 2014. Additional objectives are to develop and demonstrate two important related technologies to at least TRL 4: position-sensitive TES devices and code-division multiplexing (CDM). These technologies have the potential to expand significantly the range of possible instrument optimizations; together they allow an expanded focal plane and higher per-pixel count rates without greatly increasing mission resources. The project also includes development of a design concept and critical technologies needed for the thermal, electrical, and mechanical integration of the detector and readout components into the focal-plane assembly. A verified design concept for the packaging of the focal-plane components will be needed for the detector system eventually to advance to TRL 6. Thus, the current project is a targeted development and demonstration program designed to make significant progress in advancing the XMS detector system toward TRL 6, establishing its readiness for a range of possible mission implementations.

  4. High-resolution soft x-ray spectrometry using the electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EM-CCD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, David J.; Tutt, James H.; Soman, Matthew R.; Holland, Andrew D.; Murray, Neil J.; Schmitt, Bernd; Schmitt, Thorsten

    2013-09-01

    The Electron-Multiplying Charge-Coupled Device (EM-CCD) shares a similar structure to the CCD except for the inclusion of a gain register that multiplies signal before the addition of read-noise, offering sub-electron effective readnoise at high frame-rates. EM-CCDs were proposed for the dispersive spectrometer on the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) to bring sub-300 eV X-rays above the noise, increasing the science yield. The high-speed, low-noise performance of the EMCCD brought added advantages of reduced dark current and stray-light per frame, reducing cooling and filtering requirements. To increase grating efficiency, several diffracted spectral orders were co-located so the inherent energy resolution of the detector was required for order separation. Although the spectral resolution of the EM-CCD is degraded by the gain process, it was shown that the EM-CCD could achieve the required separation. The RIXS spectrometer at the Advanced Resonant Spectroscopy beamline (ADRESS) of the Swiss Light Source (SLS) at the Paul Scherrer Institute currently uses a CCD, with charge spreading between pixels limiting the spatial resolution to 24 μm (FWHM). Through improving the spatial resolution below 5 μm alongside upgrading the grating, a factor of two energy resolution improvement could theoretically be made. With the high-speed, low-noise performance of the EM-CCD, photon-counting modes could allow the use of centroiding techniques to improve the resolution. Using various centroiding techniques, a spatial resolution of 2 μm (FWHM) has been achieved experimentally, demonstrating the benefits of this detector technology for soft X-ray spectrometry. This paper summarises the use of EM-CCDs from our first investigations for IXO through to our latest developments in ground-based testing for synchrotron-research and looks beyond to future possibilities.

  5. High-Resolution X-ray Diffraction Studies of ZnSnAs2 Epitaxial Films Nearly Lattice-matched to InP Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asubar, Joel T.; Agatsuma, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Shin`Ichi; Jinbo, Yoshio; Uchitomi, Naotaka

    2010-01-01

    ZnSnAs2 epitaxial films were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on nearly lattice matched InP substrates. Four samples namely samples A, B, C, and D were prepared at different growth times of 15, 30, 50, and 83 mins, respectively, using the optimum growth conditions earlier reported to obtain samples of different values of thickness for the purpose of structural characterization using High-Resolution X-ray Diffraction (HR-XRD). HR-XRD investigations revealed unrelaxed lattice constant a⊥ values along the growth direction of 5.8991 Å, 5.8991 Å, 5.8886 Å, and 5.8928 Åfor samples A, B, C, and D, respectively. Reciprocal Space Mapping on one of the samples indicates pseudomorphic growth with respect to the InP substrate. The absence of full-width at half maximum (FWHM) broadening of the of the HR-XRD rocking curves with increasing thickness of the samples suggests that all the epitaxial films in this work are pseudomorphic with the InP substrate. Assuming a Poisson ratio ν of 1/3, the corrected values of the lattice constant, i.e. values of the free-standing lattice constant afs, were calculated to be 5.8840 Å, 5.8840 Å, 5.8788 Å, and 5.8809 Åfor samples A, B, C, and D. These results suggest that the elongation due to the pseudomorphic growth is substantial in the computation of the true lattice constant of ZnSnAs2 epitaxial films.

  6. Design of the high-resolution soft X-ray imaging system on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianchao; Ding, Yonghua Zhang, Xiaoqing; Xiao, Zhengyu; Zhuang, Ge

    2014-11-15

    A new soft X-ray diagnostic system has been designed on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT) aiming to observe and survey the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activities. The system consists of five cameras located at the same toroidal position. Each camera has 16 photodiode elements. Three imaging cameras view the internal plasma region (r/a < 0.7) with a spatial resolution about 2 cm. By tomographic method, heat transport outside from the 1/1 mode X-point during the sawtooth collapse is found. The other two cameras with a higher spatial resolution 1 cm are designed for monitoring local MHD activities respectively in plasma core and boundary.

  7. Electronic Structure of AC-Clusters and High-Resolution X-ray Spectra of Actinides in Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Kulagin, Nicolay Alex

    2007-07-01

    Ab initio calculations using SCF approach for and analysis of results of investigation of the electronic structure of the clusters RAn+:[L]k with rare earths or actinides were carried out for the clusters in solids and liquids. Theoretical results for the electronic structure, radial integrals and energy of X- ray lines are presented for AC ions with unoccupied 5f-shell in the clusters in oxides, chlorides and fluorides environment. Possibility of collapse of nf-shell for the separate clusters and identification of electronic state of ions with unstable nuclei, are discussed, too. (author)

  8. Chemical and Physical Parameters from X-Ray High-resolution Spectra of the Galactic Nova V959 Mon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peretz, U.; Orio, M.; Behar, E.; Bianchini, A.; Gallagher, J.; Rauch, T.; Tofflemire, B.; Zemko, P.

    2016-09-01

    Two observations of V959 Mon done using the Chandra X-ray gratings during the late outburst phases (2012 September and December) offer extraordinary insight into the physics and chemistry of this Galactic ONe nova. The X-ray flux was 1.7 × 10-11 erg cm-2 s-1 and 8.6 × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1, respectively, at the two epochs. The first result, coupled with electron density diagnostics and compared with published optical and ultraviolet observations, indicates that most likely in 2012 September, the X-rays originated from a very small fraction of the ejecta, concentrated in very dense clumps. We obtained a fairly good fit to the September spectrum with a model of plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium with two components; one at a temperature of 0.78 keV, associated with flat-topped and asymmetrical emission lines, blueshifted by ≃710-930 km s-1 the other one at a temperature of 4.5 keV, mostly contributing to the high-energy continuum. However, we cannot rule out a range of plasma temperatures between these two extremes; we also modeled the spectrum as a static cooling flow, but the available models and the data quality are not adequate yet to differentiate between the two-component fit and a smoothly varying temperature structure. In December, the central white dwarf (WD) became visible in X-rays. We estimate an effective temperature of ≃680,000 K, consistent with a WD mass ≥slant 1.1 M ⊙. The WD flux is modulated with the orbital period, indicating high inclination, and two quasi-periodic modulations with hour timescales were also observed. No hot plasma component with a temperature above 0.5 keV was observed in December, and the blueshifted component cooled to kT ≃ 0.45 keV. Additionally, new emission lines due to a much cooler plasma appeared, which were not observed two months earlier. We estimate abundances and yields of elements in the nova wind that cannot be measured in the optical spectra and confirm the high Ne abundance previously derived

  9. Design of the high-resolution soft X-ray imaging system on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianchao; Ding, Yonghua; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Xiao, Zhengyu; Zhuang, Ge

    2014-11-01

    A new soft X-ray diagnostic system has been designed on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT) aiming to observe and survey the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activities. The system consists of five cameras located at the same toroidal position. Each camera has 16 photodiode elements. Three imaging cameras view the internal plasma region (r/a < 0.7) with a spatial resolution about 2 cm. By tomographic method, heat transport outside from the 1/1 mode X-point during the sawtooth collapse is found. The other two cameras with a higher spatial resolution 1 cm are designed for monitoring local MHD activities respectively in plasma core and boundary.

  10. High-intensity x-ray holography: an approach to high-resolution snapshot imaging of biological specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Solem, J.C.

    1982-08-01

    The crucial physical and technological issues pertaining to the holographic imaging of biological structures with a short-pulse, high-intensity, high-quantum-energy laser were examined. The limitations of x-ray optics are discussed. Alternative holographic techniques were considered, and it was concluded that far-field Fresnel transform holography (Fraunhofer holography) using a photoresist recording surface is most tractable with near term technology. The hydrodynamic expansion of inhomogeneities within the specimen is discussed. It is shown that expansion is the major source of image blurring. Analytic expressions were derived for the explosion of protein concentrations in an x-ray transparent cytoplasm, compared with numerical calculations, and corrections derived to account for the competitive transport processes by which these inhomogeneities lose energy. It is concluded that for the near term Fresnel transform holography, particularly, far-field or Fraunhofer holography, is more practical than Fourier transform holography. Of the alternative fine grain recording media for use with Fresnel transform holography, a photo-resist is most attractive. For best resolution, exposure times must be limited to a few picoseconds, and this calls for investigation of mechanisms to shutter the laser or gate the recording surface. The best contrast ratio between the nitrogen-bearing polymers (protein and the nucleic acids) and water is between the K-edges of oxygen and nitrogen.

  11. High-resolution single-shot spectral monitoring of hard x-ray free-electron laser radiation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Makita, M.; Karvinen, P.; Zhu, D.; Juranic, P. N.; Grünert, J.; Cartier, S.; Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Lemke, H. T.; Mozzanica, A.; Nelson, S.; et al

    2015-10-16

    We have developed an on-line spectrometer for hard x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) radiation based on a nanostructured diamond diffraction grating and a bent crystal analyzer. Our method provides high spectral resolution, interferes negligibly with the XFEL beam, and can withstand the intense hard x-ray pulses at high repetition rates of >100 Hz. The spectrometer is capable of providing shot-to-shot spectral information for the normalization of data obtained in scientific experiments and optimization of the accelerator operation parameters. We have demonstrated these capabilities of the setup at the Linac Coherent Light Source, in self-amplified spontaneous emission mode at full energy ofmore » >1 mJ with a 120 Hz repetition rate, obtaining a resolving power of Ε/δΕ > 3 × 104. In conclusion, the device was also used to monitor the effects of pulse duration down to 8 fs by analysis of the spectral spike width.« less

  12. Solid-state photon-counting hybrid detector array for high-resolution multi-energy X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sia, R.; Kleinfelder, S.; Nagarkar, V. V.

    2011-10-01

    We present in this article the development of a photon-counting, energy-discriminating modular detector based on a pixelated CdZnTe sensor coupled pixel-by-pixel to a novel Digital Pixel Sensor (DPS) readout. The detector is designed for munitions inspection, breast X-ray CT and SPECT/MRI. The current DPS design can also be used to read out other solid-state sensors. The prototype detector is 5.5 mm×5.5 mm in size, and consists of 19×19 pixels on a 250 μm pitch. The DPS is designed in a 0.35 μm process, and every pixel includes a preamplifier, a leakage-current subtraction circuit, an auto-zeroed programmable-gain stage, five comparators, a variable-delay reset circuit and five 16 bit counters. The module is expected to operate at high X-ray fluence exceeding 80 MHz/mm 2, and to improve resolution and contrast in images, while significantly enhancing their signal-to-noise ratio, and assist in identifying material composition via dual-energy imaging. The detector design, fabrication and anticipated performance are discussed.

  13. Characterization of carbon films on the Japanese smoked roof tile'Ibushi-Kawara' by high-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Motoyama, Muneyuki; Denlinger, Jonathan D.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Perera, Rupert C.C.

    2003-06-12

    Carbon films on the Japanese smoked roof tile ''Ibushi-Kawara'' were characterized by high-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. By comparing the soft X-ray emission and absorption spectra of Kawara with the reference carbon compounds, it was determined that the carbon films on Kawara consist of mostly carbon-black-like sp2 carbon atoms and that the surface also contains polyethylene-like sp3 carbon atoms. The take-off/incident-angle dependence on the X-ray emission/absorption spectra of Kawara shows that the carbon-black-like sp2 carbon atoms partially form a layer structure oriented parallel to the basal clay plane, and that the degree of orientation of the carbon films is estimated to be 50 percent that of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The microstructure of the carbon films on Kawara is one in which half of the carbon-blacklike sp2 carbon atoms form layer-structured clusters parallel to the basal clayplane and the rest of the carbon atoms form random-structured clusters which rigidly connect the layer-structured clusters.

  14. High Resolution X-ray Diffraction Studies of MBE-Grown HgCdTe Layers on Bulk-Grown CdZnTe Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarasinghe, Priyanthi M.; Qadri, Syed B.; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal S.

    2015-08-01

    The structural properties of molecular beam epitaxially (MBE)-grown Hg1- x Cd x Te epilayers on CdZnTe (211) substrate have been investigated using high-resolution x-ray topography and rocking curves. High-resolution x-ray diffraction 2 θ- θ scans of (422) reflections were utilized in calculating the out-of-plane lattice parameters of the HgCdTe layer and the CdZnTe substrate. The lattice strain of the HgCdTe layer was evaluated using the in-plane measurements of the (311) reflection. Etching seemed to improve the surface of the substrate by removing any damage caused by polishing or any post-processing. In spite of some localized line dislocations, a remarkable quality of the MBE-grown HgCdTe layer was observed. The full width at half maximum values of the HgCdTe layer and the CdZnTe substrate were determined as 43 arc-s and 16.2 arc-s, respectively.

  15. High-pressure and high-temperature mineral-fluid interface cell for high-resolution x-ray reflectivity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Changyong; Kenney-Benson, Curtis

    2013-06-01

    Ordering of water at the mineral-fluid interface is a fundamental process governing mineral hydration, ion-adsorption, dissolution, growth, and charge transfers across the mineral surface. However, the influence of pressure and temperature on this fundamental process is still largely unknown. The experimental determination is limited due to the lack of a sample cell which can properly handle the pressure and temperature of the fluidic component and simultaneously allow measurement of the interfacial structure, e.g., by high-resolution x-ray reflectivity. We recently developed a new high-pressure and high-temperature mineral-fluid interface cell to achieve the high-resolution x-ray reflectivity measurement from single crystalline mineral surfaces under the PT conditions of fluid up to ~750 K and ~40 MPa. The interfacial structures at single crystal mineral surfaces interacting with various hydrothermal fluids will promote our understanding of the molecular aspects of hydrous alteration processes of rocks in deep Earth environments. The application can be extended to mineral surface sciences, geological carbon sequestration, and nuclear engineering. Instrumental development under auspices of Deep Carbon Observatory Deep Energy Directorate and HPCAT (CDAC, GL, LLNL, UNLV).

  16. High-resolution X-ray study of the effects of deuteration on crystal growth and the crystal structure of proteinase K.

    PubMed

    Chatake, Toshiyuki; Ishikawa, Takuya; Yanagisawa, Yasuhide; Yamada, Taro; Tanaka, Ichiro; Fujiwara, Satoru; Morimoro, Yukio

    2011-11-01

    Deuteration of macromolecules is an important technique in neutron protein crystallography. Solvent deuteration of protein crystals is carried out by replacing water (H(2)O) with heavy water (D(2)O) prior to neutron diffraction experiments in order to diminish background noise. The effects of solvent deuteration on the crystallization of proteinase K (PK) with polyethylene glycol as a precipitant were investigated using high-resolution X-ray crystallography. In previous studies, eight NO(3)(-) anions were included in the PK crystal unit cell grown in NaNO(3) solution. In this study, however, the PK crystal structure did not contain NO(3)(-) anions; consequently, distortions of amino acids arising from the presence of NO(3)(-) anions were avoided in the present crystal structures. High-resolution (1.1 Å) X-ray diffraction studies showed that the degradation of PK crystals induced by solvent deuteration was so small that this degradation would be negligible for the purpose of neutron protein crystallography experiments at medium resolution. Comparison of the nonhydrogen structures of nondeuterated and deuterated crystal structures demonstrated very small structural differences. Moreover, a positive correlation between the root-mean-squared differences and B factors indicated that no systematic difference existed.

  17. Visualizing the mixed bonding properties of liquid boron with high-resolution x-ray Compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Okada, J T; Sit, P H-L; Watanabe, Y; Barbiellini, B; Ishikawa, T; Wang, Y J; Itou, M; Sakurai, Y; Bansil, A; Ishikawa, R; Hamaishi, M; Paradis, P-F; Kimura, K; Ishikawa, T; Nanao, S

    2015-05-01

    Bonding characteristics of liquid boron at 2500 K are studied by using high-resolution Compton scattering. An excellent agreement is found between the measurements and the corresponding Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. Covalent bond pairs are clearly shown to dominate in liquid boron along with the coexistence of diffuse pairs. Our study reveals the complex bonding pattern of liquid boron and gives insight into the unusual properties of this high-temperature liquid.

  18. Identification of cellulose fibres belonging to Spanish cultural heritage using synchrotron high resolution X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, L. K.; Justo, A.; Duran, A.; de Haro, M. C. Jimenez; Franquelo, M. L.; Perez Rodríguez, J. L.

    2010-05-01

    A complete characterisation of fibres used in Spanish artwork is necessary to provide a complete knowledge of these natural fibres and their stage of degradation. Textile samples employed as painting supports on canvas and one sample of unprocessed plant material were chosen for this study. All the samples were investigated by synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD). Flax and cotton have the Cellulose I structure. The values of the crystalline index (CI) were calculated for both types of fibres. The structure of Cellulose IV was associated with the unprocessed plant material. The information obtained by SR-XRD was confirmed by laboratory techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).

  19. High-resolution, high-transmission soft x-ray spectrometer for the study of biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, Oliver; Weinhardt, L.; Blum, M.; Welgand, M.; Umbach, E.; Bar, M.; Heske, C.; Denlinger, J.; Chuang, Y.-D.; McKinney, W.; Hussain, Z.; Gullikson, E.; Jones, M.; Batson, P.; Nelles, B.; Follath, R.

    2009-06-11

    We present a variable line-space grating spectrometer for soft s-rays that coverst the photon energy range between 130 and 650 eV. The optical design is based on the Hettrick-Underwood principle and tailored to synchrotron-based studies of radiation-sensitive biological samples. The spectrometer is able to record the entire spectral range in one shot, i.e., without any mechanical motion, at a resolving power of 1200 or better. Despite is slitless design, such a resolving power can be achieved for a source spot as large as (30 x 3000) micrometers squared, which is important for keeping beam damage effects in radiation-sensitive samples low. The high spectrometer efficiency allows recording of comprehensive two-dimensional resonant inelastic soft x-ray scatters (RIXS) maps with good statistics within several minutes. This is exemplarily demonstrated for a RIXS map of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite, which was taken with 10 min.

  20. Preparation of crystals of T7 RNA polymerase suitable for high-resolution X-ray structure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Rui; Lafer, Eileen M.; Wang, B. C.

    1991-03-01

    The crystallization of bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase is described. A number of features of the crystallization methodology are worthy of note: (1) Preparation of crystals suitable for X-ray analysis depended on removal of oligomeric forms of the enzyme which formed during purification and were not detectable by denaturing gel electrophoreris. (2) By increasing the protein supersaturation, changes in the relative interfacial growth rates were induced, resulting in increases in crystal thickness and diffraction to higher resolution. (3) The stability of the crystalline versus amorphous phase of the solid protein was shifted by the presence of glycerol in the mother liquor: crystallization was dependent on the presence of at least 15% glycerol. The high density and viscosity of glycerol mother liquors reduced convective and diffusive flow and eliminated crystal sedimentation. The implications and possible mechanisms of the glycerol effect on crystallization are discussed and the generality and extension of this effect is suggested.

  1. 3D printing of preclinical X-ray computed tomographic data sets.

    PubMed

    Doney, Evan; Krumdick, Lauren A; Diener, Justin M; Wathen, Connor A; Chapman, Sarah E; Stamile, Brian; Scott, Jeremiah E; Ravosa, Matthew J; Van Avermaete, Tony; Leevy, W Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional printing allows for the production of highly detailed objects through a process known as additive manufacturing. Traditional, mold-injection methods to create models or parts have several limitations, the most important of which is a difficulty in making highly complex products in a timely, cost-effective manner.(1) However, gradual improvements in three-dimensional printing technology have resulted in both high-end and economy instruments that are now available for the facile production of customized models.(2) These printers have the ability to extrude high-resolution objects with enough detail to accurately represent in vivo images generated from a preclinical X-ray CT scanner. With proper data collection, surface rendering, and stereolithographic editing, it is now possible and inexpensive to rapidly produce detailed skeletal and soft tissue structures from X-ray CT data. Even in the early stages of development, the anatomical models produced by three-dimensional printing appeal to both educators and researchers who can utilize the technology to improve visualization proficiency. (3, 4) The real benefits of this method result from the tangible experience a researcher can have with data that cannot be adequately conveyed through a computer screen. The translation of pre-clinical 3D data to a physical object that is an exact copy of the test subject is a powerful tool for visualization and communication, especially for relating imaging research to students, or those in other fields. Here, we provide a detailed method for printing plastic models of bone and organ structures derived from X-ray CT scans utilizing an Albira X-ray CT system in conjunction with PMOD, ImageJ, Meshlab, Netfabb, and ReplicatorG software packages. PMID:23542702

  2. 3D printing of preclinical X-ray computed tomographic data sets.

    PubMed

    Doney, Evan; Krumdick, Lauren A; Diener, Justin M; Wathen, Connor A; Chapman, Sarah E; Stamile, Brian; Scott, Jeremiah E; Ravosa, Matthew J; Van Avermaete, Tony; Leevy, W Matthew

    2013-03-22

    Three-dimensional printing allows for the production of highly detailed objects through a process known as additive manufacturing. Traditional, mold-injection methods to create models or parts have several limitations, the most important of which is a difficulty in making highly complex products in a timely, cost-effective manner.(1) However, gradual improvements in three-dimensional printing technology have resulted in both high-end and economy instruments that are now available for the facile production of customized models.(2) These printers have the ability to extrude high-resolution objects with enough detail to accurately represent in vivo images generated from a preclinical X-ray CT scanner. With proper data collection, surface rendering, and stereolithographic editing, it is now possible and inexpensive to rapidly produce detailed skeletal and soft tissue structures from X-ray CT data. Even in the early stages of development, the anatomical models produced by three-dimensional printing appeal to both educators and researchers who can utilize the technology to improve visualization proficiency. (3, 4) The real benefits of this method result from the tangible experience a researcher can have with data that cannot be adequately conveyed through a computer screen. The translation of pre-clinical 3D data to a physical object that is an exact copy of the test subject is a powerful tool for visualization and communication, especially for relating imaging research to students, or those in other fields. Here, we provide a detailed method for printing plastic models of bone and organ structures derived from X-ray CT scans utilizing an Albira X-ray CT system in conjunction with PMOD, ImageJ, Meshlab, Netfabb, and ReplicatorG software packages.

  3. High Speed Data Acquisition System for Three-Dimensional X-Ray and Neutron Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.W.; Claytor, T.N.; Sheats, M.J.

    1999-07-01

    Computed tomography for nondestructive evaluation applications has been limited by system cost, resolution, and time requirements for three-dimensional data sets. FlashCT (Flat panel Amorphous Silicon High-Resolution Computed Tomography) is a system developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to address these three problems. Developed around a flat panel amorphous silicon detector array, FlashCT is suitable for low to medium energy x-ray and neutron computed tomography at 127-micron resolution. Overall system size is small, allowing rapid transportation to a variety of radiographic sources. System control software was developed in LabVIEW for Windows NT to allow multithreading of data acquisition, data correction, and staging motor control. The system control software simplifies data collection and allows fully automated control of the data acquisition process, leading toward remote or unattended operation. The first generation of the FlashCT Data Acquisition System was completed in Au gust 1998, and since that time the system has been tested using x-ray sources ranging in energy from 60 kV to 20MV. The system has also been used to collect data for thermal neutron computed tomography at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). System improvements have been proposed to provide faster data collection and greater dynamic range during data collection.

  4. High resolution crystal structure of the methylcobalamin analogues ethylcobalamin and butylcobalamin by X-ray synchrotron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Luciana; Smith, Clyde A; Smith, Jessica A; Axhemi, Armend; Miller, Abby; Wang, Sihe; Brasch, Nicola E; Jacobsen, Donald W

    2009-07-20

    The X-ray crystal structures of the methylcobalamin (MeCbl) analogues ethylcobalamin (EtCbl) and butylcobalamin (BuCbl) are reported. The X-ray crystal structures of EtCbl and BuCbl were obtained with some of the lowest crystallographic residuals ever achieved for cobalamins (R = 0.0468 and 0.0438, respectively). The Co-C bond distances for EtCbl and BuCbl are 2.023(2) and 2.028(4) A, whereas the Co-alpha-5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (Co-N3B) bond distances were 2.232(1) and 2.244(1) A, respectively. Although EtCbl and BuCbl displayed a longer Co-N3B bond than that observed in the naturally occurring methylcobalamin, the orientation of the alpha-5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole moiety with respect to the corrin ring did not vary substantially among the structures. The lengthening of both Co-C and Co-N3B bonds in EtCbl and BuCbl can be attributed to the "inverse" trans influence exerted by the sigma-donating alkyl groups, typically observed in alkylcobalamins. Analysis of the molecular surface maps showed that the alkyl ligands in EtCbl and BuCbl are directed toward the hydrophobic side of the corrin ring. The corrin fold angles in EtCbl and BuCbl were determined to be 14.7 degrees and 13.1 degrees, respectively. A rough correlation exists between the corrin fold angle and the length of the Co-N3B bond, and both alkylcobalamins follow the same trend.

  5. Fatigue History and in-situ Loading Studies of the overload Effect Using High Resolution X-ray Strain Profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Croft,M.; Jisrawi, N.; Zhong, Z.; Holtz, R.; Sadananda, K.; Skaritka, J.; Tsakalakos, T.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments are used to perform local crack plane strain profiling of 4140 steel compact tension specimens fatigued at constant amplitude, subjected to a single overload cycle, then fatigued some more at constant amplitude. X-ray strain profiling results on a series of samples employing in-situ load cycling are correlated with the crack growth rate (da/dN) providing insight into the da/dN retardation known as the 'overload effect'. Immediately after the overload, the strain under maximum load is greatly reduced but the range of strain, between zero and maximum load, remains unchanged compared to the pre-overload values. At the point of maximum retardation, it is the strain range that is greatly reduced while the maximum-load strain has begun to recover to the pre-overload value. For a sample that has recovered to approximately half of the original da/dN value following the overload, the strain at maximum load is fully recovered while the strain range, though partially recovered, is still substantially reduced. The dominance of the strain range in the overload effect is clearly indicated. Subject to some assumptions, strong quantitative support for a crack growth rate driving force of the suggested form [(K{sub max}){sup -p}({Delta}K){sup p}]{sup {gamma}} is found. A dramatic nonlinear load dependence in the spatial distribution of the strain at maximum retardation is also demonstrated: at low load the response is dominantly at the overload position; whereas at high loads it is dominantly at the crack tip position. This transfer of load response away from the crack tip to the overload position appears fundamental to the overload effect for high R-ratio fatigue as studied here.

  6. A high resolution gamma-ray and hard X-ray spectrometer (HIREGS) for long duration balloon flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelling, M.; Feffer, P. T.; Hurley, K.; Kane, S. R.; Lin, R. P.; Mcbride, S.; Primbsch, J. H.; Smith, D. M.; Youseffi, K.; Zimmer, G.

    1992-01-01

    The elements of a high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer, developed for observations of solar flares, are described. Emphasis is given to those aspects of the system that relate to its operation on a long duration balloon platform. The performance of the system observed in its first flight, launched from McMurdo Station, Antarctica on 10 January, 1992, is discussed. Background characteristics of the antarctic balloon environment are compared with those observed in conventional mid-latitude balloon flights and the general advantages of long duration ballooning are discussed.

  7. X-ray Computed Tomography Observation of Methane Hydrate Dissociation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomutsa, L.; Freifeld, B.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Stern, L.A.

    2002-01-01

    Deposits of naturally occurring methane hydrate have been identified in permafrost and deep oceanic environments with global reserves estimated to be twice the total amount of energy stored in fossil fuels. The fundamental behavior of methane hydrate in natural formations, while poorly understood, is of critical importance if the economic recovery of methane from hydrates is to be accomplished. In this study, computed X-ray tomography (CT) scanning is used to image an advancing dissociation front in a heterogeneous gas hydrate/sand sample at 0.1 MPa. The cylindrical methane hydrate and sand aggregate, 2.54 cm in diameter and 6.3 cm long, was contained in a PVC sample holder that was insulated on all but one end. At the uninsulated end, the dissociated gas was captured and the volume of gas monitored. The sample was initially imaged axially using X-ray CT scanning within the methane hydrate stability zone by keeping the sample temperature at 77??K. Subsequently, as the sample warmed through the methane hydrate dissociation point at 194??K and room pressure, gas was produced and the temperature at the bottom of the sample plug was monitored while CT images were acquired. The experiment showed that CT imaging can resolve the reduction in density (as seen by a reduction in beam attenuation) of the hydrate/sand aggregate due to the dissociation of methane hydrate. In addition, a comparison of CT images with gas flow and temperature measurements reveals that the CT scanner is able to resolve accurately and spatially the advancing dissociation front. Future experiments designed to better understand the thermodynamics of hydrate dissociation are planned to take advantage of the temporal and spatial resolution that the CT scanner provides.

  8. X-ray Computed Tomography of coal: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maylotte, D.H.; Spiro, C.L.; Kosky, P.G.; Lamby, E.J.

    1986-12-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is a method of mapping with x-rays the internal structures of coal. The technique normally produces 2-D images of the internal structures of an object. These images can be recast to create pseudo 3-D representations. CT of coal has been explored for a variety of different applications to coal and coal processing technology. In a comparison of CT data with conventional coal analyses and petrography, CT was found to offer a good indication of the total ash content of the coal. The spatial distribution of the coal mineral matter as seen with CT has been suggested as an indicator of coal washability. Studies of gas flow through coal using xenon gas as a tracer have shown the extremely complicated nature of the modes of penetration of gas through coal, with significant differences in the rates at which the gas can pass along and across the bedding planes of coal. In a special furnace designed to allow CT images to be taken while the coal was being heated, the pyrolysis and gasification of coal have been studied. Gasification rates with steam and CO/sub 2/ for a range of coal ranks have been obtained, and the location of the gasification reactions within the piece of coal can be seen. Coal drying and the progress of the pyrolysis wave into coal have been examined when the coal was subjected to the kind of sudden temperature jump that it might experience in fixed bed gasifier applications. CT has also been used to examine stable flow structures within model fluidized beds and the accessibility of lump coal to microbial desulfurization. 53 refs., 242 figs., 26 tabs.

  9. High resolution X-ray structures of mouse major urinary protein nasal isoform in complex with pheromones

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Miller, Samantha; Zou, Qin; Novotny, Milos V.; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2010-09-07

    In mice, the major urinary proteins (MUP) play a key role in pheromonal communication by binding and transporting semiochemicals. MUP-IV is the only isoform known to be expressed in the vomeronasal mucosa. In comparison with the MUP isoforms that are abundantly excreted in the urine, MUP-IV is highly specific for the male mouse pheromone 2-sec-butyl-4,5-dihydrothiazole (SBT). To examine the structural basis of this ligand preference, we determined the X-ray crystal structure of MUP-IV bound to three mouse pheromones: SBT, 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, and 2-heptanone. We also obtained the structure of MUP-IV with 2-ethylhexanol bound in the cavity. These four structures show that relative to the major excreted MUP isoforms, three amino acid substitutions within the binding calyx impact ligand coordination. The F103 for A along with F54 for L result in a smaller cavity, potentially creating a more closely packed environment for the ligand. The E118 for G substitution introduces a charged group into a hydrophobic environment. The sidechain of E118 is observed to hydrogen bond to polar groups on all four ligands with nearly the same geometry as seen for the water-mediated hydrogen bond network in the MUP-I and MUP-II crystal structures. These differences in cavity size and interactions between the protein and ligand are likely to contribute to the observed specificity of MUP-IV.

  10. High resolution X-ray structures of mouse major urinary protein nasal isoform in complex with pheromones.

    PubMed

    Perez-Miller, Samantha; Zou, Qin; Novotny, Milos V; Hurley, Thomas D

    2010-08-01

    In mice, the major urinary proteins (MUP) play a key role in pheromonal communication by binding and transporting semiochemicals. MUP-IV is the only isoform known to be expressed in the vomeronasal mucosa. In comparison with the MUP isoforms that are abundantly excreted in the urine, MUP-IV is highly specific for the male mouse pheromone 2-sec-butyl-4,5-dihydrothiazole (SBT). To examine the structural basis of this ligand preference, we determined the X-ray crystal structure of MUP-IV bound to three mouse pheromones: SBT, 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, and 2-heptanone. We also obtained the structure of MUP-IV with 2-ethylhexanol bound in the cavity. These four structures show that relative to the major excreted MUP isoforms, three amino acid substitutions within the binding calyx impact ligand coordination. The F103 for A along with F54 for L result in a smaller cavity, potentially creating a more closely packed environment for the ligand. The E118 for G substitution introduces a charged group into a hydrophobic environment. The sidechain of E118 is observed to hydrogen bond to polar groups on all four ligands with nearly the same geometry as seen for the water-mediated hydrogen bond network in the MUP-I and MUP-II crystal structures. These differences in cavity size and interactions between the protein and ligand are likely to contribute to the observed specificity of MUP-IV.

  11. X-ray microtomography (micro-CT): a reference technology for high-resolution quantification of xylem embolism in trees.

    PubMed

    Cochard, H; Delzon, S; Badel, E

    2015-01-01

    As current methods for measuring xylem embolism in trees are indirect and prone to artefacts, there is an ongoing controversy over the capacity of trees to resist or recover from embolism. The debate will not end until we get direct visualization of the vessel content. Here, we propose desktop X-ray microtomography (micro-CT) as a reference direct technique to quantify xylem embolism and thus validate more widespread measurements based upon either hydraulic or acoustic methods. We used desktop micro-CT to measure embolism levels in dehydrated or centrifuged shoots of laurel - a long-vesseled species thought to display daily cycles of embolism formation and refilling. Our direct observations demonstrate that this Mediterranean species is highly resistant to embolism and is not vulnerable to drought-induced embolism in a normal range of xylem tensions. We therefore recommend that embolism studies in long-vesseled species should be validated by direct methods such as micro-CT to clear up any misunderstandings on their physiology.

  12. A Quantitative Analysis of Room Temperature Recrystallization Kinetics in Electroplated Copper Films using High Resolution X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    A Ying; K Witt; J Jordan-Sweet; R Rosenberg; I Noyan

    2011-12-31

    Time-resolved in situ x-ray diffraction measurements were used to study the room-temperature recrystallization kinetics of electroplated copper thin films with thicknesses between 400 and 1000 nm. The thinnest films exhibited limited recrystallization and subsequent growth of grains, while recrystallized grains in the thicker films grew until all as-plated microstructure was consumed. For all films, recrystallized grains that belonged to the majority texture component, <111>, started growing after the shortest incubation time. These grains exhibited volumetric growth until they achieved the film thickness. After this point the growth mode became planar, with the <111>-type grains growing in the plane of the film. Grains with the <111> direction normal to the film surface started growing after the <111>-type grains switched to planar growth. However, the planar growth of this texture component finished at the same time as the growth of the <111> grains. Profile fitting of the 111 peak permitted the separation of the diffraction signals from recrystallized and as-plated grain populations. The average strains in these two populations, calculated from the peak position of the corresponding {l_brace}111{r_brace} reflections, were different, indicating a heterogeneous stress state within this texture component. The increasing volume fraction of recrystallized <111> grains with time was monitored via the variation in the diffracted intensity. This variation could be represented by the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov model.

  13. High-resolution x-ray diffraction study of the heavy-fermion compound YbBiPt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueland, B. G.; Saunders, S. M.; Bud'Ko, S. L.; Schmiedeshoff, G. M.; Canfield, P. C.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A. I.

    YbBiPt is a heavy-fermion compound possessing significant short-range antiferromagnetic correlations below T* = 0 . 7 K, fragile antiferromagnetic order below TN = 0 . 4 K, a Kondo temperature of TK ~ 1 K, and crystalline-electric-field splitting (CEF) on the order of E /kB = 1 - 10 K. Its lattice is face-centered cubic at ambient temperature, but certain data, particularly those from studies aimed at determining the CEF level scheme, suggest that the lattice distorts at lower temperature. Here, we present results from high-energy x-ray diffraction experiments which show that, within our experimental resolution of ~ 6 - 10 ×10-5 Å, no structural phase transition occurs between 1 . 5 and 50 K. Despite this result, we demonstrate that the compound's thermal expansion may be modeled using CEF level schemes appropriate for Yb3+ residing on a site with either cubic or less than cubic point symmetry. Work at the Ames Laboratory was supported by the US DOE, BES, DMSE, under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358. Work at Occidental College was supported by the NSF under DMR-1408598. This research used resources at the Advanced Photon Source a US DOE, Office of Science, User Facility.

  14. High-resolution elemental mapping of human placental chorionic villi using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Punshon, Tracy; Chen, Si; Finney, Lydia; Howard, Louisa; Jackson, Brian P.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Ornvold, Kim

    2015-01-01

    The placenta is the organ that mediates transport of nutrients and waste materials between mother and fetus. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microanalysis (SXRF) is a tool for imaging the distribution and quantity of elements in biological tissue, which can be used to study metal transport across biological membranes. Our aims were to pilot placental biopsy specimen preparation techniques that could be integrated into an ongoing epidemiology birth bohort study without harming rates of sample acquisition. We studied the effects of fixative (formalin or glutaraldehyde) and storage duration (30 days or immediate processing) on metal distribution and abundance and investigated a thaw-fixation protocol for archived specimens stored at −80°C. We measured fixative elemental composition with and without a placental biopsy via ICP-MS to quantify fixative-induced elemental changes. Formalin fixed specimens showed hemolysis of erythrocytes. The glutaraldehyde-paraformaldehyde solution in HEPES buffer (GTA-HEPES) had superior anatomical preservation, avoided hemolysis and minimized elemental loss, although some cross-linking of exogenous Zn was evident. Elemental loss from tissue stored in fixative for 1 month showed variable losses (≈ 40% with GTA-HEPES), suggesting storage duration be controlled for. Thawing of tissue held at −80°C in GTA-HEPES solution provided high quality visual images and elemental images. PMID:26138895

  15. High-resolution elemental mapping of human placental chorionic villi using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Punshon, Tracy; Chen, Si; Finney, Lydia; Howard, Louisa; Jackson, Brian P.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Ornvold, Kim

    2015-07-03

    The placenta is the organ that mediates transport of nutrients and waste materials between mother and fetus. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microanalysis is a tool for imaging the distribution and quantity of elements in biological tissue, which can be used to study metal transport across biological membranes. Our aims were to pilot placental biopsy specimen preparation techniques that could be integrated into an ongoing epidemiology birth cohort study without harming rates of sample acquisition. We studied the effects of fixative (formalin or glutaraldehyde) and storage duration (30 days or immediate processing) on metal distribution and abundance and investigated a thaw-fixation protocol for archived specimens stored at -80° C. We measured fixative elemental composition with and without a placental biopsy via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to quantify fixative-induced elemental changes. Formalin-fixed specimens showed hemolysis of erythrocytes. The glutaraldehyde-paraformaldehyde solution in HEPES buffer (GTA-HEPES) had superior anatomical preservation, avoided hemolysis, and minimized elemental loss, although some cross-linking of exogenous Zn was evident. Elemental loss from tissue stored in fixative for 1 month showed variable losses (≈ 40 % with GTA-HEPES), suggesting storage duration be controlled for. Lastly, thawing of tissue held at -80 °C in a GTA-HEPES solution provided high-quality visual images and elemental images

  16. High-resolution elemental mapping of human placental chorionic villi using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Punshon, Tracy; Chen, Si; Finney, Lydia; Howard, Louisa; Jackson, Brian P.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Ornvold, Kim

    2015-07-03

    The placenta is the organ that mediates transport of nutrients and waste materials between mother and fetus. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microanalysis is a tool for imaging the distribution and quantity of elements in biological tissue, which can be used to study metal transport across biological membranes. Our aims were to pilot placental biopsy specimen preparation techniques that could be integrated into an ongoing epidemiology birth cohort study without harming rates of sample acquisition. We studied the effects of fixative (formalin or glutaraldehyde) and storage duration (30 days or immediate processing) on metal distribution and abundance and investigated a thaw-fixationmore » protocol for archived specimens stored at -80° C. We measured fixative elemental composition with and without a placental biopsy via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to quantify fixative-induced elemental changes. Formalin-fixed specimens showed hemolysis of erythrocytes. The glutaraldehyde-paraformaldehyde solution in HEPES buffer (GTA-HEPES) had superior anatomical preservation, avoided hemolysis, and minimized elemental loss, although some cross-linking of exogenous Zn was evident. Elemental loss from tissue stored in fixative for 1 month showed variable losses (≈ 40 % with GTA-HEPES), suggesting storage duration be controlled for. Lastly, thawing of tissue held at -80 °C in a GTA-HEPES solution provided high-quality visual images and elemental images« less

  17. Volume Visualizing High-Resolution Turbulence Computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clyne, John; Scheitlin, Tim; Weiss, Jeffrey B.

    Using several volume-visualization packages including a new package we developed called Volsh, we investigate a 25-Gbyte dataset from a 2563 computation of decaying quasi-geostrophic turbulence. We compare surface fitting and direct volume rendering approaches, as well as a number of techniques for producing feature-revealing spatial cues. We also study the pros and cons of using batch and interactive tools for visualizing the data and discuss the relative merits of using each approach. We find that each tool has its own advantages and disadvantages, and a combination of tools is most effective at exploring large four-dimensional scalar datasets. The resulting visualizations show several new phenomena in the dynamics of coherent vortices.

  18. Fully Convergent Chemical Synthesis of Ester Insulin: Determination of the High Resolution X-ray Structure by Racemic Protein Crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Avital-Shmilovici, Michal; Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Gates, Zachary P.; Phillips, Nelson B.; Weiss, Michael A.; Kent, Stephen B.H.

    2013-01-01

    Efficient total synthesis of insulin is important to enable the application of medicinal chemistry to the optimization of the properties of this important protein molecule. Recently we described ‘ester insulin’ – a novel form of insulin in which the function of the 35 residue C-peptide of proinsulin is replaced by a single covalent bond – as a key intermediate for the efficient total synthesis of insulin. Here we describe a fully convergent synthetic route to the ester insulin molecule from three unprotected peptide segments of approximately equal size. The synthetic ester insulin polypeptide chain folded much more rapidly than proinsulin, and at physiological pH. Both the D-protein and L-protein enantiomers of monomeric DKP ester insulin (i.e. [AspB10, LysB28, ProB29]ester insulin) were prepared by total chemical synthesis. The atomic structure of the synthetic ester insulin molecule was determined by racemic protein X-ray crystallography to a resolution of 1.6 Å. Diffraction quality crystals were readily obtained from the racemic mixture of {D-DKP ester insulin + L-DKP ester insulin}, whereas crystals were not obtained from the L-ester insulin alone even after extensive trials. Both the D-protein and L-protein enantiomers of monomeric DKP ester insulin were assayed for receptor binding and in diabetic rats, before and after conversion by saponification to the corresponding DKP insulin enantiomers. L-DKP ester insulin bound weakly to the insulin receptor, while synthetic L-DKP insulin derived from the L-DKP ester insulin intermediate was fully active in binding to the insulin receptor. The D- and L-DKP ester insulins and D-DKP insulin were inactive in lowering blood glucose in diabetic rats, while synthetic L-DKP insulin was fully active in this biological assay. The structural basis of the lack of biological activity of ester insulin is discussed. PMID:23343390

  19. Three-dimensional analysis of vesicle and crystal fragment textures in pumice using high-resolution X-ray CT: Textural evidence of eruptive processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketcham, R. A.; Gardner, J. E.; Abbott, S.

    2011-12-01

    Three-dimensional analysis of high-resolution X-ray computed tomographic (CT) imagery of pumice from Popocatépetl Volcano in central Mexico yields fresh insights into processes of vesicle formation and coalescence and crystal fragmentation that occur during explosive volcanism. Six ~2 cm pumice fragments of varying bulk vesicularity were imaged at ~20 μm resolution. Three-dimensional blob and fabric analysis quantitatively document textural features, and visualization facilitated contextualization of measurements and overall interpretation. Vesicles range in size from mm-scale to below the resolution of the scan data. By comparing the whole-sample 3D vesicle size distributions derived from CT with more detailed distributions from sub-volumes obtained by standard petrographic analysis, we can discern two distinct, roughly log-normal populations in each sample. Vesicles in all samples have preferred orientations, and fabric analysis based on the star volume distribution and displayed as 3D rose diagrams documents a range of preferred shapes from elongate to flattened. Aspect ratios range from 1 to 6, and converge to values of ~2-3 with increasing size. Surface to volume ratios show increasing departure from sphericity with increasing size, which is probably attributable in large part to irregular shapes caused by coalescence. The vesicle fabric was strongest in the highest-vesicularity sample. Some pumices showed evidence of welding or poor mixing between two or more differently devolatilized portions of melt. Interfaces are in some cases apparently welded, with low-vesicularity glass contact zones, and in others are simply sub-planar intersections between distinct glasses. In one instance of the latter, correlated vesicle and phenocryst orientations across both melt portions and not parallel to their interface suggests that their juxtaposition took place before final eruption, while there was still time for fabric development. The pumices show abundant evidence of

  20. Domain wall transformations and hopping in La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO(3) nanostructures imaged with high resolution x-ray magnetic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Finizio, S; Foerster, M; Krüger, B; Vaz, C A F; Miyawaki, T; Mawass, M A; Peña, L; Méchin, L; Hühn, S; Moshnyaga, V; Büttner, F; Bisig, A; Le Guyader, L; El Moussaoui, S; Valencia, S; Kronast, F; Eisebitt, S; Kläui, M

    2014-11-12

    We investigate the effect of electric current pulse injection on domain walls in La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO(3) (LSMO) half-ring nanostructures by high resolution x-ray magnetic microscopy at room temperature. Due to the easily accessible Curie temperature of LSMO, we can employ reasonable current densities to induce the Joule heating necessary to observe effects such as hopping of the domain walls between different pinning sites and nucleation/annihilation events. Such effects are the dominant features close to the Curie temperature, while spin torque is found to play a small role close to room temperature. We are also able to observe thermally activated domain wall transformations and we find that, for the analyzed geometries, the vortex domain wall configuration is energetically favored, in agreement with micromagnetic simulations. PMID:25336527

  1. High-Resolution Hard X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Spectrometers Based on Superconducting Absorbers Coupled to Superconducting Transition Edge Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    van den Berg, M.; Chow, D.; Loshak, A.; Cunningham, M.F.; Barbee, T.W.; Matthias, F.; Labov, S.E.

    2000-09-21

    We are developing detectors based on bulk superconducting absorbers coupled to superconducting transition edge sensors (TES) for high-resolution spectroscopy of hard X-rays and soft gamma-rays. We have achieved an energy resolution of 70 eV FWHM at 60 keV using a 1 x 1 x 0.25 mm{sup 3} Sn absorber coupled to a Mo/Cu multilayer TES with a transition temperature of 100 mK. The response of the detector is compared with a simple model using only material properties data and characteristics derived from IV-measurements. We have also manufactured detectors using superconducting absorbers with a higher stopping power, such as Pb and Ta. We present our first measurements of these detectors, including the thermalization characteristics of the bulk superconducting absorbers. The differences in performance between the detectors are discussed and an outline of the future direction of our detector development efforts is given.

  2. Improved Ga grading of sequentially produced Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells studied by high resolution X-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Schöppe, Philipp; Schnohr, Claudia S.; Oertel, Michael; Kusch, Alexander; Johannes, Andreas; Eckner, Stefanie; Reislöhner, Udo; Ronning, Carsten; Burghammer, Manfred; Martínez-Criado, Gema

    2015-01-05

    There is particular interest to investigate compositional inhomogeneity of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cell absorbers. We introduce an approach in which focused ion beam prepared thin lamellas of complete solar cell devices are scanned with a highly focused synchrotron X-ray beam. Analyzing the resulting fluorescence radiation ensures high resolution compositional analysis combined with high spatial resolution. Thus, we are able to detect subtle variations of the Ga/(Ga + In) ratio down to 0.01 on a submicrometer scale. We observed that for sequentially processed solar cells a higher selenization temperature leads to absorbers with almost homogenous Ga/(Ga + In) ratio, which significantly improved the conversion efficiency.

  3. Crystallization temperature determination of Itokawa particles by plagioclase thermometry with X-ray diffraction data obtained by a high-resolution synchrotron Gandolfi camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masahiko; Nakamura, Tomoki; Noguchi, Takaaki; Nakato, Aiko; Ishida, Hatsumi; Yada, Toru; Shirai, Kei; Fujimura, Akio; Ishibashi, Yukihiro; Abe, Masanao; Okada, Tatsuaki; Ueno, Munetaka; Mukai, Toshifumi

    2014-02-01

    The crystallization temperatures of Itokawa surface particles recovered by the space probe Hayabusa were estimated by a plagioclase geothermometer using sodic plagioclase triclinicity. The Δ131-index required for the thermometer, which is the difference in X-ray diffraction peak positions between the 131 and 13¯1 reflections of plagioclase, was obtained by a high-resolution synchrotron Gandolfi camera developed for the third generation synchrotron radiation beamline, BL15XU at SPring-8. Crystallization temperatures were successfully determined from the Δ131-indices for four particles. The observed plagioclase crystallization temperatures were in a range from 655 to 660 °C. The temperatures indicate crystallization temperatures of plagioclases in the process of prograde metamorphism before the peak metamorphic stage.

  4. The XMM-Newton View of Stellar Coronae: High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of Capella

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audard, M.; Behar, E.; Guedel, M.; Raassen, A. J. J.; Porquet, D.; Mewe, R.; Foley, C. A.; Bromage, G. E.

    2000-01-01

    We present the high-resolution RGS spectrum of the bright stellar binary Capella observed by the XMM-Newton satellite. A multi-thermal approach has been applied to fit the data and derive elemental abundances. The differential emission measure distribution is reconstructed using a Chebychev polynomial fit. The DEM shape is found to display a sharp peak around 7 MK, consistent with previous EUVE and ASCA results. A small but significant amount of emission measure is required around 1.8 MK in order to explain the O VII He-like triplet and the C VI Ly(alpha) line. Using the sensitivity to temperature of dielectronic recombination lines from O VI around 22 A, we confirm that the cool plasma temperature needs to be higher than 1.2 MK. In the approximation of a cool plasma described by one temperature, we used line ratios from the forbidden, intercombination, and resonance lines of the O VII triplet and derived an average density for the cool coronal plasma at the low density limit. A tentative study of line ratios from the M XI triplet gives an average temperature close to the sharp peak in emission measure and an average density of the order of 10(exp 12)cu cm, three orders of magnitude higher than for O VII. Implications for the coronal physics of Capella are discussed. We complement this paper with a discussion of the importance of the atomic code uncertainties on the spectral fitting procedure.

  5. Three-dimensional high resolution X-ray imaging and quantification of lithium ion battery mesocarbon microbead anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariq, F.; Yufit, V.; Kishimoto, M.; Shearing, P. R.; Menkin, S.; Golodnitsky, D.; Gelb, J.; Peled, E.; Brandon, N. P.

    2014-02-01

    In order to improve lithium ion batteries it is important to characterise real electrode geometries and understand how their 3D structure may affect performance. In this study, high resolution synchrotron nano-CT was used to acquire 3D tomography datasets of mesocarbon microbead (MCMB) based anodes down to a 16 nm voxel size. A specimen labelling methodology was used to produce anodes that enhance the achievable image contrast, and image processing routines were utilised to successfully segment features of interest from a challenging dataset. The 3D MCMB based anode structure was analysed revealing a heterogeneous and bi-modally distributed microstructure. The microstructure was quantified through calculations of surface area, volume, connectivity and tortuosity factors. In doing so, two different methods, random walk and diffusion based, were used to determine tortuosity factors of both MCMB and pore/electrolyte microstructures. The tortuosity factors (2-7) confirmed the heterogeneity of the anode microstructure for this field of view and demonstrated small MCMB particles interspersed between large MCMB particles cause an increase in tortuosity factors. The anode microstructure was highly connected, which was also caused by the presence of small MCMB particles. The complexity in microstructure suggests inhomogeneous local lithium ion distribution would occur within the anode during operation.

  6. Package for Interactive Analysis of Line Emission (Analysis of UV-X-Ray High-Resolution Emission Spectra)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashyap, Vinay; Hunter, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    PINTofALE is an IDL based package to analyze high-resolution grating spectra. The first version was made available to the public on 3 February 2001. Since then we have carried out numerous changes, and the current release is version 1.5, released on 9 October 2002. The changes include upgrades to handle higher versions of IDL, the new version of the CHIANTI database (v4), major enhancements in user-friendliness, improved handling of response matrices, the ability to handle 24-bit color, access to the Atomic Plasma Emission Database (APED), and beta releases of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) based DEM fitting routines. Plans for the future include: inclusion of MCMC techniques in the fitting programs, enhanced graphics capabilities, an overhaul of the line and continuum database structure, and bug fixes. In September 2002, we hired a data analyst (LiWei Lin) to work on PINTofALE. Mr.Lin is concentrating on incorporating MCMC as well as simpler Monte-Carlo techniques, fast RMF convolution, etc., into the code base, as well as reviewing the existing documentation and searching for bugs. A detailed description of the package, together with fairly detailed documentation, example walks-throughs, and downloadable tar files, are available on-line from http://hea-www. harvard.edu/PINTofALE/

  7. Gold nanoparticles as high-resolution X-ray imaging contrast agents for the analysis of tumor-related micro-vasculature

    SciTech Connect

    Chien C.; Yong C.; Hsiang-Hsin, C.; Sheng-Feng, L.; Kang-Chao W.; Xiaoqing C.; Yeukuang, H.; Petibois, C.; Margaritondo, G.

    2012-03-12

    Angiogenesis is widely investigated in conjunction with cancer development, in particular because of the possibility of early stage detection and of new therapeutic strategies. However, such studies are negatively affected by the limitations of imaging techniques in the detection of microscopic blood vessels (diameter 3-5 {micro}m) grown under angiogenic stress. We report that synchrotron-based X-ray imaging techniques with very high spatial resolution can overcome this obstacle, provided that suitable contrast agents are used. We tested different contrast agents based on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for the detection of cancer-related angiogenesis by synchrotron microradiology, microtomography and high resolution X-ray microscopy. Among them only bare-AuNPs in conjunction with heparin injection provided sufficient contrast to allow in vivo detection of small capillary species (the smallest measured lumen diameters were 3-5 {micro}m). The detected vessel density was 3-7 times higher than with other nanoparticles. We also found that bare-AuNPs with heparin allows detecting symptoms of local extravascular nanoparticle diffusion in tumor areas where capillary leakage appeared. Although high-Z AuNPs are natural candidates as radiology contrast agents, their success is not guaranteed, in particular when targeting very small blood vessels in tumor-related angiography. We found that AuNPs injected with heparin produced the contrast level needed to reveal--for the first time by X-ray imaging--tumor microvessels with 3-5 {micro}m diameter as well as extravascular diffusion due to basal membrane defenestration. These results open the interesting possibility of functional imaging of the tumor microvasculature, of its development and organization, as well as of the effects of anti-angiogenic drugs.

  8. Human thyroid specimen imaging by fluorescent x-ray computed tomography with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Tohoru; Yu, Quanwen; Yashiro, Toru; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hasegawa, Yasuo; Itai, Yuji; Akatsuka, Takao

    1999-09-01

    Fluorescent x-ray computed tomography (FXCT) is being developed to detect non-radioactive contrast materials in living specimens. The FXCT system consists of a silicon (111) channel cut monochromator, an x-ray slit and a collimator for fluorescent x ray detection, a scanning table for the target organ and an x-ray detector for fluorescent x-ray and transmission x-ray. To reduce Compton scattering overlapped on the fluorescent K(alpha) line, incident monochromatic x-ray was set at 37 keV. The FXCT clearly imaged a human thyroid gland and iodine content was estimated quantitatively. In a case of hyperthyroidism, the two-dimensional distribution of iodine content was not uniform, and thyroid cancer had a small amount of iodine. FXCT can be used to detect iodine within thyroid gland quantitatively and to delineate its distribution.

  9. On the origin of soft X-rays in obscured AGN: answers from high-resolution spectroscopy with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guainazzi, Matteo; Bianchi, Stefano

    2007-02-01

    We present results of a high-resolution soft X-ray (0.2-2 keV) spectroscopic study of a sample of 69 nearby obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs) observed with the reflection grating spectrometer (RGS) onboard XMM-Newton. This is the largest sample ever studied with this technique so far. The main conclusions of our study can be summarized as follows: (i) narrow radiative recombination continua are detected in about 36 per cent of the objects in our sample (in 26 per cent their intrinsic width is <=10 eV); (ii) higher order transitions are generally enhanced with respect to pure photoionization, indicating that resonant scattering plays an important role in the ionization/excitation balance. These results support the scenario, whereby the active nucleus is responsible for the X-ray `soft excess' almost ubiquitously observed in nearby obscured AGNs via photoionization of circumnuclear gas. They confirm on a statistical basis the conclusions drawn from the detailed study of the brightest spectra in the sample. Furthermore, we propose a criterion to statistically discriminate between AGN-photoionized sources and starburst galaxies, based on intensity of the forbidden component of the OVII Heα triplet (once normalized to the OVIII Lyα) coupled with the integrated luminosity in He- and H-like oxygen lines.

  10. Data-fusion of high resolution X-ray CT, SEM and EDS for 3D and pseudo-3D chemical and structural characterization of sandstone.

    PubMed

    De Boever, Wesley; Derluyn, Hannelore; Van Loo, Denis; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Cnudde, Veerle

    2015-07-01

    When dealing with the characterization of the structure and composition of natural stones, problems of representativeness and choice of analysis technique almost always occur. Since feature-sizes are typically spread over the nanometer to centimeter range, there is never one single technique that allows a rapid and complete characterization. Over the last few decades, high resolution X-ray CT (μ-CT) has become an invaluable tool for the 3D characterization of many materials, including natural stones. This technique has many important advantages, but there are also some limitations, including a tradeoff between resolution and sample size and a lack of chemical information. For geologists, this chemical information is of importance for the determination of minerals inside samples. We suggest a workflow for the complete chemical and structural characterization of a representative volume of a heterogeneous geological material. This workflow consists of combining information derived from CT scans at different spatial resolutions with information from scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. PMID:25939085

  11. High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy to probe quantum dynamics in collisions of Ar17+,18+ ions with atoms and solids, towards clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamour, E.; Prigent, C.; Ramillon, J.-M.; Rozet, J.-P.; Steydli, S.; Trassinelli, M.; Vernhet, D.

    2015-07-01

    We report on studies of projectile excited states produced by electron capture in both low and high velocity regimes, and when highly charged ions (HCIs) collide either with dilute or dense matter. Quantum effects in the interaction dynamics are probed via high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy for Ar17+ at 7 keV u-1 and for Ar18+ at 13.6 MeV u-1 on Ar, N2 or CH4 gas targets and on carbon solid foils. Relevant comparison between those two collision velocity regimes, and between gaseous and solid targets reveal specific features. In particular, the effect of multiple capture process occurring within a single-collision with gaseous target can be compared with the consequence of multistep collisions arising at surfaces and in solid-bulk at low velocity. At high velocity, beside evidence for collective response of the target electrons due to the wake field induced by HCI passing through the solid-bulk, we demonstrate that excitation and ionization collision processes damp the populations of projectile excited states for long ion transit times. The evolution of the np population as a function of n in solid is at variance from the 1/n3 law found in gas, and the disagreement increases with solid target thickness. We have also tackled studies of HCIs in collision with clusters showing that x-ray spectroscopy provides a powerful tool to sign the presence of clusters in a supersonic gas jet.

  12. Data-fusion of high resolution X-ray CT, SEM and EDS for 3D and pseudo-3D chemical and structural characterization of sandstone.

    PubMed

    De Boever, Wesley; Derluyn, Hannelore; Van Loo, Denis; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Cnudde, Veerle

    2015-07-01

    When dealing with the characterization of the structure and composition of natural stones, problems of representativeness and choice of analysis technique almost always occur. Since feature-sizes are typically spread over the nanometer to centimeter range, there is never one single technique that allows a rapid and complete characterization. Over the last few decades, high resolution X-ray CT (μ-CT) has become an invaluable tool for the 3D characterization of many materials, including natural stones. This technique has many important advantages, but there are also some limitations, including a tradeoff between resolution and sample size and a lack of chemical information. For geologists, this chemical information is of importance for the determination of minerals inside samples. We suggest a workflow for the complete chemical and structural characterization of a representative volume of a heterogeneous geological material. This workflow consists of combining information derived from CT scans at different spatial resolutions with information from scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  13. The dust-scattering component of X-ray extinction: effects on continuum fitting and high-resolution absorption edge structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrales, L. R.; García, J.; Wilms, J.; Baganoff, F.

    2016-05-01

    Small angle scattering by dust grains causes a significant contribution to the total interstellar extinction for any X-ray instrument with sub-arcminute resolution (Chandra, Swift, XMM-Newton). However, the dust-scattering component is not included in the current absorption models: phabs, TBabs, and TBnew. We simulate a large number of Chandra spectra to explore the bias in the spectral fit and NH measurements obtained without including extinction from dust scattering. We find that without incorporating dust scattering, the measured NH will be too large by a baseline level of 25 per cent. This effect is modulated by the imaging resolution of the telescope, because some amount of unresolved scattered light will be captured within the aperture used to extract point source information. In high-resolution spectroscopy, dust scattering significantly enhances the total extinction optical depth and the shape of the photoelectric absorption edges. We focus in particular on the Fe-L edge at 0.7 keV, showing that the total extinction template fits well to the high-resolution spectrum of three X-ray binaries from the Chandra archive: GX 9+9, XTE J1817-330, and Cyg X-1. In cases where dust is intrinsic to the source, a covering factor based on the angular extent of the dusty material must be applied to the extinction curve, regardless of angular imaging resolution. This approach will be particularly relevant for dust in quasar absorption line systems and might constrain clump sizes in active galactic nuclei.

  14. Catalytic Mechanism of Perosamine N-Acetyltransferase Revealed by High-Resolution X-ray Crystallographic Studies and Kinetic Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Thoden, James B.; Reinhardt, Laurie A.; Cook, Paul D.; Menden, Patrick; Cleland, W.W.; Holden, Hazel M.

    2012-09-17

    N-Acetylperosamine is an unusual dideoxysugar found in the O-antigens of some Gram-negative bacteria, including the pathogenic Escherichia coli strain O157:H7. The last step in its biosynthesis is catalyzed by PerB, an N-acetyltransferase belonging to the left-handed {beta}-helix superfamily of proteins. Here we describe a combined structural and functional investigation of PerB from Caulobacter crescentus. For this study, three structures were determined to 1.0 {angstrom} resolution or better: the enzyme in complex with CoA and GDP-perosamine, the protein with bound CoA and GDP-N-acetylperosamine, and the enzyme containing a tetrahedral transition state mimic bound in the active site. Each subunit of the trimeric enzyme folds into two distinct regions. The N-terminal domain is globular and dominated by a six-stranded mainly parallel {beta}-sheet. It provides most of the interactions between the protein and GDP-perosamine. The C-terminal domain consists of a left-handed {beta}-helix, which has nearly seven turns. This region provides the scaffold for CoA binding. On the basis of these high-resolution structures, site-directed mutant proteins were constructed to test the roles of His 141 and Asp 142 in the catalytic mechanism. Kinetic data and pH-rate profiles are indicative of His 141 serving as a general base. In addition, the backbone amide group of Gly 159 provides an oxyanion hole for stabilization of the tetrahedral transition state. The pH-rate profiles are also consistent with the GDP-linked amino sugar substrate entering the active site in its unprotonated form. Finally, for this investigation, we show that PerB can accept GDP-3-deoxyperosamine as an alternative substrate, thus representing the production of a novel trideoxysugar.

  15. X-ray computed tomography for additive manufacturing: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A.; Maskery, I.; Leach, R. K.

    2016-07-01

    In this review, the use of x-ray computed tomography (XCT) is examined, identifying the requirement for volumetric dimensional measurements in industrial verification of additively manufactured (AM) parts. The XCT technology and AM processes are summarised, and their historical use is documented. The use of XCT and AM as tools for medical reverse engineering is discussed, and the transition of XCT from a tool used solely for imaging to a vital metrological instrument is documented. The current states of the combined technologies are then examined in detail, separated into porosity measurements and general dimensional measurements. In the conclusions of this review, the limitation of resolution on improvement of porosity measurements and the lack of research regarding the measurement of surface texture are identified as the primary barriers to ongoing adoption of XCT in AM. The limitations of both AM and XCT regarding slow speeds and high costs, when compared to other manufacturing and measurement techniques, are also noted as general barriers to continued adoption of XCT and AM.

  16. Impurity precipitation in atomized particles evidenced by nano x-ray diffraction computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnin, Anne; Wright, Jonathan P.; Tucoulou, Rémi; Palancher, Hervé

    2014-08-25

    Performances and physical properties of high technology materials are influenced or even determined by their initial microstructure and by the behavior of impurity phases. Characterizing these impurities and their relations with the surrounding matrix is therefore of primary importance but it unfortunately often requires a destructive approach, with the risk of misinterpreting the observations. The improvement we have done in high resolution X-ray diffraction computed tomography combined with the use of an X-ray nanoprobe allows non-destructive crystallographic description of materials with microscopic heterogeneous microstructure (with a grain size between 10 nm and 10 μm). In this study, the grain localization in a 2D slice of a 20 μm solidified atomized γU-Mo particle is shown and a minority U(C,O) phase (1 wt. %) with sub-micrometer sized grains was characterized inside. Evidence is presented showing that the onset of U(C,O) grain crystallization can be described by a precipitation mechanism since one single U-Mo grain has direct orientation relationship with more than one surrounding U(C,O) grains.

  17. A theoretical and experimental evaluation of the microangiographic fluoroscope: A high-resolution region-of-interest x-ray imager

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, D. R.; Ionita, Ciprian; Rudin, S.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: The increasing need for better image quality and high spatial resolution for successful endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs) and the inherent limitations of the state-of-the-art detectors provide motivation to develop a detector system tailored to the specific, demanding requirements of neurointerventional applications.Method: A microangiographic fluoroscope (MAF) was developed to serve as a high-resolution, region-of-interest (ROI) x-ray imaging detector in conjunction with large lower-resolution full field-of-view (FOV) state-of-the-art x-ray detectors. The newly developed MAF is an indirect x-ray imaging detector capable of providing real-time images (30 frames per second) with high-resolution, high sensitivity, no lag and low instrumentation noise. It consists of a CCD camera coupled to a Gen 2 dual-stage microchannel plate light image intensifier (LII) through a fiber-optic taper. A 300 {mu}m thick CsI(Tl) phosphor serving as the front end is coupled to the LII. The LII is the key component of the MAF and the large variable gain provided by it enables the MAF to operate as a quantum-noise-limited detector for both fluoroscopy and angiography. Results: The linear cascade model was used to predict the theoretical performance of the MAF, and the theoretical prediction showed close agreement with experimental findings. Linear system metrics such as MTF and DQE were used to gauge the detector performance up to 10 cycles/mm. The measured zero frequency DQE(0) was 0.55 for an RQA5 spectrum. A total of 21 stages were identified for the whole imaging chain and each stage was characterized individually. Conclusions: The linear cascade model analysis provides insight into the imaging chain and may be useful for further development of the MAF detector. The preclinical testing of the prototype detector in animal procedures is showing encouraging results and points to the potential for significant impact on EIGIs when used in conjunction with a state

  18. A theoretical and experimental evaluation of the microangiographic fluoroscope: A high-resolution region-of-interest x-ray imager

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, D. R.; Ionita, Ciprian; Rudin, S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The increasing need for better image quality and high spatial resolution for successful endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs) and the inherent limitations of the state-of-the-art detectors provide motivation to develop a detector system tailored to the specific, demanding requirements of neurointerventional applications.Method: A microangiographic fluoroscope (MAF) was developed to serve as a high-resolution, region-of-interest (ROI) x-ray imaging detector in conjunction with large lower-resolution full field-of-view (FOV) state-of-the-art x-ray detectors. The newly developed MAF is an indirect x-ray imaging detector capable of providing real-time images (30 frames per second) with high-resolution, high sensitivity, no lag and low instrumentation noise. It consists of a CCD camera coupled to a Gen 2 dual-stage microchannel plate light image intensifier (LII) through a fiber-optic taper. A 300 μm thick CsI(Tl) phosphor serving as the front end is coupled to the LII. The LII is the key component of the MAF and the large variable gain provided by it enables the MAF to operate as a quantum-noise-limited detector for both fluoroscopy and angiography.Results: The linear cascade model was used to predict the theoretical performance of the MAF, and the theoretical prediction showed close agreement with experimental findings. Linear system metrics such as MTF and DQE were used to gauge the detector performance up to 10 cycles∕mm. The measured zero frequency DQE(0) was 0.55 for an RQA5 spectrum. A total of 21 stages were identified for the whole imaging chain and each stage was characterized individually.Conclusions: The linear cascade model analysis provides insight into the imaging chain and may be useful for further development of the MAF detector. The preclinical testing of the prototype detector in animal procedures is showing encouraging results and points to the potential for significant impact on EIGIs when used in conjunction with a state

  19. Arbutin: Isolation, X-ray structure and computional studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nycz, Jacek E.; Malecki, Grzegorz; Morag, Monika; Nowak, Gerard; Ponikiewski, Lukasz; Kusz, Joachim; Switlicka, Anna

    2010-09-01

    Arbutin, an active component originated from Serratula quinquefolia for skin-whitening use and treating skin related allergic inflammation, was characterized by microanalysis, FTIR, UV-Vis, multinuclear NMR spectroscopy, and single crystal X-ray diffraction method. The geometries of the studied compound were optimized in singlet states using the density functional theory (DFT) method with B3LYP functional. Electronic spectra were calculated by TDDFT method. In general, the predicted bond lengths and angles are in a good agreement with the values based on the X-ray crystal structure data.

  20. Dual-gate photo thin-film transistor: a “smart” pixel for high- resolution and low-dose X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Ou, Hai; Chen, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Since its emergence a decade ago, amorphous silicon flat panel X-ray detector has established itself as a ubiquitous platform for an array of digital radiography modalities. The fundamental building block of a flat panel detector is called a pixel. In all current pixel architectures, sensing, storage, and readout are unanimously kept separate, inevitably compromising resolution by increasing pixel size. To address this issue, we hereby propose a “smart” pixel architecture where the aforementioned three components are combined in a single dual-gate photo thin-film transistor (TFT). In other words, the dual-gate photo TFT itself functions as a sensor, a storage capacitor, and a switch concurrently. Additionally, by harnessing the amplification effect of such a thin-film transistor, we for the first time created a single-transistor active pixel sensor. The proof-of-concept device had a W/L ratio of 250μm/20μm and was fabricated using a simple five-mask photolithography process, where a 130nm transparent ITO was used as the top photo gate, and a 200nm amorphous silicon as the absorbing channel layer. The preliminary results demonstrated that the photocurrent had been increased by four orders of magnitude due to light-induced threshold voltage shift in the sub-threshold region. The device sensitivity could be simply tuned by photo gate bias to specifically target low-level light detection. The dependence of threshold voltage on light illumination indicated that a dynamic range of at least 80dB could be achieved. The "smart" pixel technology holds tremendous promise for developing high-resolution and low-dose X-ray imaging and may potentially lower the cancer risk imposed by radiation, especially among paediatric patients.

  1. High-resolution X-ray absorption near edge structure studies of monophasic Tl 2Ba 2Ca 2Cu 3O 10-δ (Tl-2223) superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. M.; Chung, S. C.; Liu, R. S.

    1996-08-01

    High-resolution O K-edge and Cu L 23-edge X-ray-absorption near-edge-structure (XANES) spectra of a monophasic high-T c Tl 2Ba 2Ca 2Cu 3O 10-δ (Tl-2223) superconductor in powder form were measured using the total-electron yield (TEY) and total-X-ray-fluorescence yield (TFY) techniques. Near the O 1s edge, three distinct pre-edge peaks with maxima at 528.3, 529.6, and 530.8 eV are revealed in the TFY spectrum. On the contrary, these pre-edge peaks have almost diminished in the TEY spectrum. The observed differences between the TFY and TEY spectra can be explained by the presence of an oxygen depletion layer. We ascribe these pre-edge peaks to the core-level excitations of O 1s electrons to O 2p holes located in the CuO 2 planes, in the BaO planes, and in the TlO planes, respectively. This assignment is supported by the local-density approximation (LDA) band-structure calculations. Moreover, based on the Cu L 23-edge TFY spectrum, the high-energy structures at ˜ 932.8 and 953.0 eV are attributed to the transitions from the Cu(2p {3}/{2}, {1}/{2})3d 9L ground states to the Cu(2p {3}/{2}, {1}/{2}) -13d 10L excited states, where L denotes the O 2p ligand hole.

  2. Experimental Realisation of High-sensitivity Laboratory X-ray Grating-based Phase-contrast Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Birnbacher, Lorenz; Willner, Marian; Velroyen, Astrid; Marschner, Mathias; Hipp, Alexander; Meiser, Jan; Koch, Frieder; Schröter, Tobias; Kunka, Danays; Mohr, Jürgen; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to perform high-sensitivity X-ray phase-contrast imaging with laboratory grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (gbPC-CT) setups is of great interest for a broad range of high-resolution biomedical applications. However, achieving high sensitivity with laboratory gbPC-CT setups still poses a challenge because several factors such as the reduced flux, the polychromaticity of the spectrum, and the limited coherence of the X-ray source reduce the performance of laboratory gbPC-CT in comparison to gbPC-CT at synchrotron facilities. In this work, we present our laboratory X-ray Talbot-Lau interferometry setup operating at 40 kVp and describe how we achieve the high sensitivity yet unrivalled by any other laboratory X-ray phase-contrast technique. We provide the angular sensitivity expressed via the minimum resolvable refraction angle both in theory and experiment, and compare our data with other differential phase-contrast setups. Furthermore, we show that the good stability of our high-sensitivity setup allows for tomographic scans, by which even the electron density can be retrieved quantitatively as has been demonstrated in several preclinical studies. PMID:27040492

  3. BraX-Ray: An X-Ray of the Brazilian Computer Science Graduate Programs

    PubMed Central

    Digiampietri, Luciano A.; Mena-Chalco, Jesús P.; Vaz de Melo, Pedro O. S.; Malheiro, Ana P. R.; Meira, Dânia N. O.; Franco, Laryssa F.; Oliveira, Leonardo B.

    2014-01-01

    Research productivity assessment is increasingly relevant for allocation of research funds. On one hand, this assessment is challenging because it involves both qualitative and quantitative analysis of several characteristics, most of them subjective in nature. On the other hand, current tools and academic social networks make bibliometric data web-available to everyone for free. Those tools, especially when combined with other data, are able to create a rich environment from which information on research productivity can be extracted. In this context, our work aims at characterizing the Brazilian Computer Science graduate programs and the relationship among themselves. We (i) present views of the programs from different perspectives, (ii) rank the programs according to each perspective and a combination of them, (iii) show correlation between assessment metrics, (iv) discuss how programs relate to another, and (v) infer aspects that boost programs' research productivity. The results indicate that programs with a higher insertion in the coauthorship network topology also possess a higher research productivity between 2004 and 2009. PMID:24728179

  4. BraX-Ray: an X-ray of the Brazilian computer science graduate programs.

    PubMed

    Digiampietri, Luciano A; Mena-Chalco, Jesús P; Vaz de Melo, Pedro O S; Malheiro, Ana P R; Meira, Dânia N O; Franco, Laryssa F; Oliveira, Leonardo B

    2014-01-01

    Research productivity assessment is increasingly relevant for allocation of research funds. On one hand, this assessment is challenging because it involves both qualitative and quantitative analysis of several characteristics, most of them subjective in nature. On the other hand, current tools and academic social networks make bibliometric data web-available to everyone for free. Those tools, especially when combined with other data, are able to create a rich environment from which information on research productivity can be extracted. In this context, our work aims at characterizing the Brazilian Computer Science graduate programs and the relationship among themselves. We (i) present views of the programs from different perspectives, (ii) rank the programs according to each perspective and a combination of them, (iii) show correlation between assessment metrics, (iv) discuss how programs relate to another, and (v) infer aspects that boost programs' research productivity. The results indicate that programs with a higher insertion in the coauthorship network topology also possess a higher research productivity between 2004 and 2009.

  5. High resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the calcaneus: age-related changes in trabecular structure and comparison with dual X-ray absorptiometry measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouyang, X.; Selby, K.; Lang, P.; Engelke, K.; Klifa, C.; Fan, B.; Zucconi, F.; Hottya, G.; Chen, M.; Majumdar, S.; Genant, H. K.

    1997-01-01

    A high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol, together with specialized image processing techniques, was applied to the quantitative measurement of age-related changes in calcaneal trabecular structure. The reproducibility of the technique was assessed and the annual rates of change for several trabecular structure parameters were measured. The MR-derived trabecular parameters were compared with calcaneal bone mineral density (BMD), measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in the same subjects. Sagittal MR images were acquired at 1.5 T in 23 healthy women (mean age: 49.3 +/- 16.6 [SD]), using a three-dimensional gradient echo sequence. Image analysis procedures included internal gray-scale calibration, bone and marrow segmentation, and run-length methods. Three trabecular structure parameters, apparent bone volume (ABV/TV), intercept thickness (I.Th), and intercept separation (I.Sp) were calculated from the MR images. The short- and long-term precision errors (mean %CV) of these measured parameters were in the ranges 1-2% and 3-6%, respectively. Linear regression of the trabecular structure parameters vs. age showed significant correlation: ABV/TV (r2 = 33.7%, P < 0.0037), I.Th (r2 = 26.6%, P < 0.0118), I.Sp (r2 = 28.9%, P < 0.0081). These trends with age were also expressed as annual rates of change: ABV/TV (-0.52%/year), I.Th (-0.33%/year), and I.Sp (0.59%/year). Linear regression analysis also showed significant correlation between the MR-derived trabecular structure parameters and calcaneal BMD values. Although a larger group of subjects is needed to better define the age-related changes in trabecular structure parameters and their relation to BMD, these preliminary results demonstrate that high-resolution MRI may potentially be useful for the quantitative assessment of trabecular structure.

  6. Transformation of nanodiamond into carbon onions: A comparative study by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, small-angle x-ray scattering, and ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O.; Solonin, Yurii M.; Batchelder, David N.; Brydson, Rik

    2005-04-01

    The structural properties of both nanodiamond particles synthesized by detonation and the products of their transformation into carbon onions via vacuum annealing at 1000 and 1500°C have been studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), electron energy-loss spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD), small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), and Raman spectroscopy. The advantages of UV Raman spectroscopy over visible Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of these carbon nanomaterials are demonstrated. It was found that the synthesized nanodiamond particles have a composite core-shell structure comprising an ordered diamond core covered by a disordered (amorphous) outer shell formed by the mixed sp2/sp3 bonding of carbon atoms. The observed structure of the nanodiamond particles are comparable with the structure of the bucky diamond clusters comprising a diamond core and a reconstructed surface which stabilizes the cluster at the average diameter of ˜30Å, as predicted recently from theoretical studies. Assuming a spherical shape for the particles and employing a two-step boundary model of electron density distribution developed in this work to describe the SAXS patterns produced by the core-shell structure of the nanodiamond particles, it was evaluated that the average diameter of the core is ˜30Å and the average thickness of the shell is ˜8Å; values which are in agreement with results obtained from HRTEM and XRD measurements. A discrepancy between these results and average diamond crystallite size obtained from Raman spectra by applying the phonon confinement model (35-45Å ) is discussed. It is hypothesized from analysis of broadening of the XRD diamond peaks that at the nanoscale under influence of the particle shape, which is not strictly of a cubic (or spherical) symmetry, a slight hexagonal distortion of the cubic diamond structure appears in the nanodiamond particles. The transformation of the nanodiamond into carbon onions proceeds from

  7. The evolution of Ga and As core levels in the formation of Fe/GaAs (001): A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Jamie D. W.; Neal, James R.; Shen, Tiehan H.; Morton, Simon A.; Tobin, James G.; Dan Waddill, G.; Matthew, Jim A. D.; Greig, Denis; Hopkinson, Mark

    2008-07-15

    A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of Ga and As 3d core levels has been conducted for Fe/GaAs (001) as a function of Fe thickness. This work has provided unambiguous evidence of substrate disrupting chemical reactions induced by the Fe overlayer--a quantitative analysis of the acquired spectra indicates significantly differing behavior of Ga and As during Fe growth, and our observations have been compared with existing theoretical models. Our results demonstrate that the outdiffusing Ga and As remain largely confined to the interface region, forming a thin intermixed layer. Whereas at low coverages Fe has little influence on the underlying GaAs substrate, the onset of substrate disruption when the Fe thickness reaches 3.5 A results in major changes in the energy distribution curves (EDCs) of both As and Ga 3d cores. Our quantitative analysis suggests the presence of two additional As environments of metallic character: one bound to the interfacial region and another which, as confirmed by in situ oxidation experiments, surface segregates and persists over a wide range of overlayer thickness. Analysis of the corresponding Ga 3d EDCs found not two, but three additional environments--also metallic in nature. Two of the three are interface resident whereas the third undergoes outdiffusion at low Fe coverages. Based on the variations of the integrated intensities of each component, we present a schematic of the proposed chemical makeup of the Fe/GaAs (001) system.

  8. The evolution of Ga and As core levels in the formation of Fe/GaAs (001):A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Jamie; Neal, James; Shen, Tiehan; Morton, Simon; Tobin, James; Waddill, George Dan; Matthew, Jim; Greig, Denis; Hopkinson, Mark

    2008-07-14

    A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of Ga and As 3d core levels has been conducted for Fe/GaAs (001) as a function of Fe thickness. This work has provided unambiguous evidence of substrate disrupting chemical reactions induced by the Fe overlayer--a quantitative analysis of the acquired spectra indicates significantly differing behavior of Ga and As during Fe growth, and our observations have been compared with existing theoretical models. Our results demonstrate that the outdiffusing Ga and As remain largely confined to the interface region, forming a thin intermixed layer. Whereas at low coverages Fe has little influence on the underlying GaAs substrate, the onset of substrate disruption when the Fe thickness reaches 3.5 Angstrom results in major changes in the energy distribution curves (EDCs) of both As and Ga 3d cores. Our quantitative analysis suggests the presence of two additional As environments of metallic character: one bound to the interfacial region and another which, as confirmed by in situ oxidation experiments, surface segregates and persists over a wide range of overlayer thickness. Analysis of the corresponding Ga 3d EDCs found not two, but three additional environments--also metallic in nature. Two of the three are interface resident whereas the third undergoes outdiffusion at low Fe coverages. Based on the variations of the integrated intensities of each component, we present a schematic of the proposed chemical makeup of the Fe/GaAs (001) system.

  9. A portable high-resolution soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet spectrometer designed for the Shanghai EBIT and the Shanghai low energy EBITs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhan; Zhao, Ruifeng; Li, Wenxian; Tu, Bingsheng; Yang, Yang; Xiao, Jun; Huldt, Sven; Hutton, Roger; Zou, Yaming

    2014-06-01

    A portable high resolution soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer has been developed for spectroscopic research at the Shanghai Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) laboratory. A unique way of aligning the grazing incidence spectrometer using the zero order of the grating is introduced. This method is realized by extending the range of the movement of the CCD detector to cover the zero order. The alignment can be done in a few minutes, thus leading to a portable spectrometer. The high vacuum needed to be compatible with the EBITs is reached by mounting most of the translation and rotation stages outside the chamber. Only one high vacuum compatible linear guide is mounted inside the chamber. This is to ensure the convenient interchange of the gratings needed to enable wavelength coverage of the whole range of 10 to 500 Å. Spectra recorded with one of our low energy EBITs shows that a resolving power of above 800 can be achieved. In the slitless configuration used in this work, we found the resolving power to be limited by the width of the EBIT plasma. When mounted on the Shanghai EBIT which is a high energy EBIT and has a narrower EBIT plasma width, the estimated resolving power will be around 1400 at 221.15 Å. PMID:24985802

  10. High-resolution X-ray spectra of solar flares. III - General spectral properties of X1-X5 type flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Feldman, U.; Kreplin, R. W.; Cohen, L.

    1980-01-01

    High-resolution X-ray spectra of six class X1-X5 solar flares are discussed. The spectra were recorded by spaceborne Bragg crystal spectrometers in the ranges 1.82-1.97, 2.98-3.07 and 3.14-3.24 A. Electron temperatures derived from dielectronic satellite line to resonance line ratios for Fe XXV and Ca XIX are found to remain fairly constant around 22,000,000 and 16,000,000 K respectively during the rise phase of the flares, then decrease by approximately 6,000,000 K during the decay phase. Nonthermal motions derived from line widths for the April 27, 1979 event are found to be greatest during the rise phase (approximately 130 km/sec) and decrease to about 60 km/sec during decay. Volume emission measures for Fe XXV, Ca XIX and Ca XX are derived from photon fluxes as a function of temperature, and examination of the intensity behavior of the Fe K alpha emission as a function of time indicates that it is a result of fluorescence. Differences between the present and previous observations of temperature variation are discussed, and it is concluded that the flare plasmas are close to ionization equilibrium for the flares investigated.

  11. A portable high-resolution soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet spectrometer designed for the Shanghai EBIT and the Shanghai low energy EBITs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhan; Zhao, Ruifeng; Li, Wenxian; Tu, Bingsheng; Yang, Yang; Xiao, Jun; Huldt, Sven; Hutton, Roger; Zou, Yaming

    2014-06-01

    A portable high resolution soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer has been developed for spectroscopic research at the Shanghai Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) laboratory. A unique way of aligning the grazing incidence spectrometer using the zero order of the grating is introduced. This method is realized by extending the range of the movement of the CCD detector to cover the zero order. The alignment can be done in a few minutes, thus leading to a portable spectrometer. The high vacuum needed to be compatible with the EBITs is reached by mounting most of the translation and rotation stages outside the chamber. Only one high vacuum compatible linear guide is mounted inside the chamber. This is to ensure the convenient interchange of the gratings needed to enable wavelength coverage of the whole range of 10 to 500 Å. Spectra recorded with one of our low energy EBITs shows that a resolving power of above 800 can be achieved. In the slitless configuration used in this work, we found the resolving power to be limited by the width of the EBIT plasma. When mounted on the Shanghai EBIT which is a high energy EBIT and has a narrower EBIT plasma width, the estimated resolving power will be around 1400 at 221.15 Å.

  12. A portable high-resolution soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet spectrometer designed for the Shanghai EBIT and the Shanghai low energy EBITs

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zhan; Zhao, Ruifeng; Li, Wenxian; Tu, Bingsheng; Yang, Yang Xiao, Jun; Hutton, Roger; Zou, Yaming; Huldt, Sven

    2014-06-15

    A portable high resolution soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer has been developed for spectroscopic research at the Shanghai Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) laboratory. A unique way of aligning the grazing incidence spectrometer using the zero order of the grating is introduced. This method is realized by extending the range of the movement of the CCD detector to cover the zero order. The alignment can be done in a few minutes, thus leading to a portable spectrometer. The high vacuum needed to be compatible with the EBITs is reached by mounting most of the translation and rotation stages outside the chamber. Only one high vacuum compatible linear guide is mounted inside the chamber. This is to ensure the convenient interchange of the gratings needed to enable wavelength coverage of the whole range of 10 to 500 Å. Spectra recorded with one of our low energy EBITs shows that a resolving power of above 800 can be achieved. In the slitless configuration used in this work, we found the resolving power to be limited by the width of the EBIT plasma. When mounted on the Shanghai EBIT which is a high energy EBIT and has a narrower EBIT plasma width, the estimated resolving power will be around 1400 at 221.15 Å.

  13. Structure of shock compressed model basaltic glass: Insights from O K-edge X-ray Raman scattering and high-resolution 27Al NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung Keun; Park, Sun Young; Kim, Hyo-Im; Tschauner, Oliver; Asimow, Paul; Bai, Ligang; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul

    2012-05-29

    The detailed atomic structures of shock compressed basaltic glasses are not well understood. Here, we explore the structures of shock compressed silicate glass with a diopside-anorthite eutectic composition (Di{sub 64}An{sub 36}), a common Fe-free model basaltic composition, using oxygen K-edge X-ray Raman scattering and high-resolution {sup 27}Al solid-state NMR spectroscopy and report previously unknown details of shock-induced changes in the atomic configurations. A topologically driven densification of the Di{sub 64}An{sub 36} glass is indicated by the increase in oxygen K-edge energy for the glass upon shock compression. The first experimental evidence of the increase in the fraction of highly coordinated Al in shock compressed glass is found in the {sup 27}Al NMR spectra. This unambiguous evidence of shock-induced changes in Al coordination environments provides atomistic insights into shock compression in basaltic glasses and allows us to microscopically constrain the magnitude of impact events or relevant processes involving natural basalts on Earth and planetary surfaces.

  14. High resolution soft x-ray bending magnet beamline 9.3.2 with circularly polarized radiation capability at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Z.; Heimann, P.A.; McKinney, W.; Padmore, H.A.; Huff, W.R.A.; Kellar, S.A.; Moler, E.J. |; Fadley, C.S. |; Shirley, D.A.

    1995-08-01

    Bending magnet beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) was designed for high resolution spectroscopy in the soft x-ray energy region, covering a range from 30 eV to 1500 eV with three gratings. The monochromator itself is a standard fixed included angle 55 m spherical grating monochromator and was originally used at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) as a prototype for later insertion device based monochromators for the ALS. For operations at the ALS, the toroidal pre-mirror used at SSRL to vertically focus onto the entrance slit and horizontally focus onto the exit slit was replaced by two separate crossed mirrors (Kirkpatrick-Baez configuration). Circularly polarized radiation is obtained by inserting a water-cooled movable aperture in front of the vertically focusing mirror to allow selecting the beam either above or below the horizontal plane. To maintain a stable beam intensity through the entrance slit, the photocurrent signals from the upper and lower jaws of the entrance slit are utilized to set a feedback loop with the vertically deflecting mirror Piezoelectric drive. The beamline end station has a rotatable platform (through 60{degree}) that accommodates two experimental chambers, enabling the synchrotron radiation to be directed to either one without breaking vacuum.

  15. The Evolution of Ga and As Core Levels in the Formation of Fe/GaAs(001): A High Resolution Soft X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic Study

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J W; Neal, J R; Shen, T H; Morton, S A; Tobin, J G; Waddill, G D; Matthew, J D; Greig, D; Hopkinson, M

    2006-12-08

    A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of Ga and As 3d core levels has been conducted for Fe/GaAs (001) as a function of Fe thickness. This work has provided unambiguous evidence of substrate disrupting chemical reactions induced by the Fe overlayer--a quantitative analysis of the acquired spectra indicates significantly differing behavior of Ga and As during Fe growth, and our observations have been compared with existing theoretical models. Our results demonstrate that the outdiffusing Ga and As remain largely confined to the interface region, forming a thin intermixed layer. Whereas at low coverages Fe has little influence on the underlying GaAs substrate, the onset of substrate disruption when the Fe thickness reaches 3.5 {angstrom} results in major changes in the energy distribution curves (EDCs) of both As and Ga 3d cores. Our quantitative analysis suggests the presence of two new As environments of metallic character; one bound to the interfacial region and another which, as confirmed by in-situ oxidation experiments, surface segregates and persists over a wide range of overlayer thickness. Analysis of the corresponding Ga 3d EDCs found not two, but three new environments--also metallic in nature. Two of the three are interface-resident whereas the third undergoes outdiffusion at low Fe coverages. Based on the variations of the integrated intensities of each component, we present a schematic of the proposed chemical make-up of the Fe/GaAs (001) system.

  16. High-resolution x-ray study of nematic-smectic-A and smectic-A-reentrant-nematic transitions in liquid-crystal-aerosil gels.

    PubMed

    Ramazanoglu, M; Larochelle, S; Garland, C W; Birgeneau, R J

    2008-03-01

    We have studied the effects of quenched random disorder created by dispersed aerosil nanoparticle gels on the nematic to smectic- A (N- SmA ) and smectic- A to reentrant nematic ( SmA -RN) phase transitions of thermotropic liquid-crystal mixtures of hexyloxycyanobiphenyl (6OCB) and octyloxycyanobiphenyl (8OCB). These effects are probed using high-resolution synchrotron x-ray diffraction techniques. We find that the reentrant characteristics of the system are largely unchanged by the presence of the aerosil gel network. By comparing measurements of the smectic static structure amplitude for this 8OCB- 6OCB+aerosil system with those for butyloxybenzilidene-octylaniline (4O.8)+aerosil gels, we find that the short-range smectic order in the smectic- A phase is significantly weaker in the reentrant system. This result is consistent with the behavior seen in pure 8OCB-6OCB mixtures. The strength of the smectic ordering decreases progressively as the 6OCB concentration is increased. Detailed line shape analysis shows that the high- and low-temperature nematic phases (N and RN) are similar to each other.

  17. High-Resolution X-Ray Study of Nematic-Smectic-A And Smectic-A-Reentrant-Nematic Transitions in Liquid-Crystal-Aerosil Gels

    SciTech Connect

    Ramazanoglu, M.; Larochelle, S.; Garland, C.W.; Birgeneau, R.J.

    2009-05-21

    We have studied the effects of quenched random disorder created by dispersed aerosil nanoparticle gels on the nematic to smectic- A (N- SmA ) and smectic- A to reentrant nematic ( SmA -RN) phase transitions of thermotropic liquid-crystal mixtures of hexyloxycyanobiphenyl (6OCB) and octyloxycyanobiphenyl (8OCB). These effects are probed using high-resolution synchrotron x-ray diffraction techniques. We find that the reentrant characteristics of the system are largely unchanged by the presence of the aerosil gel network. By comparing measurements of the smectic static structure amplitude for this 8OCB- 6OCB+aerosil system with those for butyloxybenzilidene-octylaniline (4O.8)+aerosil gels, we find that the short-range smectic order in the smectic- A phase is significantly weaker in the reentrant system. This result is consistent with the behavior seen in pure 8OCB-6OCB mixtures. The strength of the smectic ordering decreases progressively as the 6OCB concentration is increased. Detailed line shape analysis shows that the high- and low-temperature nematic phases (N and RN) are similar to each other.

  18. High-resolution fluorescence mapping of impurities in historical zinc oxide pigments: hard X-ray nanoprobe applications to the paints of Pablo Picasso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadio, Francesca; Rose, Volker

    2013-04-01

    Here for the first time we describe the use of high resolution nanoprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF) mapping for the analysis of artists' paints, hierarchically complex materials typically composed of binder, pigments, fillers, and other additives. The work undertaken at the nanoprobe sought to obtain highly spatially resolved, highly sensitive mapping of metal impurities (Pb, Cd, Fe, and other metals) in submicron particles of zinc oxide pigments used in early 20th century artists' tube paints and enamel paints, with particular emphasis on Ripolin, a popular brand of French house paint used extensively by Pablo Picasso and some of his contemporaries. Analysis revealed that the Zn oxide particles only contain a little Fe, proving that the highest quality Zn oxide pigment, free of Pb and Cd, was used for Ripolin house paints as well as artists' paints. Nanoprobe XRF mapping also demonstrated that artists' tube paints generally have more abundant fillers and additional whites (based on Pb, Ti, Ca) than Ripolin paints, which contain mostly pure zinc oxide. The chemical characterization of paints at the nanoscale opens the path to a better understanding of their fabrication and chemical reactivity.

  19. Region of interest processing for iterative reconstruction in x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Felix K.; Nasirudin, Radin A.; Mei, Kai; Fehringer, Andreas; Pfeiffer, Franz; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Noël, Peter B.

    2015-03-01

    The recent advancements in the graphics card technology raised the performance of parallel computing and contributed to the introduction of iterative reconstruction methods for x-ray computed tomography in clinical CT scanners. Iterative maximum likelihood (ML) based reconstruction methods are known to reduce image noise and to improve the diagnostic quality of low-dose CT. However, iterative reconstruction of a region of interest (ROI), especially ML based, is challenging. But for some clinical procedures, like cardiac CT, only a ROI is needed for diagnostics. A high-resolution reconstruction of the full field of view (FOV) consumes unnecessary computation effort that results in a slower reconstruction than clinically acceptable. In this work, we present an extension and evaluation of an existing ROI processing algorithm. Especially improvements for the equalization between regions inside and outside of a ROI are proposed. The evaluation was done on data collected from a clinical CT scanner. The performance of the different algorithms is qualitatively and quantitatively assessed. Our solution to the ROI problem provides an increase in signal-to-noise ratio and leads to visually less noise in the final reconstruction. The reconstruction speed of our technique was observed to be comparable with other previous proposed techniques. The development of ROI processing algorithms in combination with iterative reconstruction will provide higher diagnostic quality in the near future.

  20. Recent Advances in Computational Studies of Charge Exchange X-ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumbee, Renata

    2016-06-01

    Interest in astrophysical sources of charge exchange (CX) has grown since X-ray emission from comet Hyakutake was first observed, the origin of which is primarily due to CX processes between neutral species in the comet’s atmosphere and highly charged ions from the solar wind. More recent observations have shown that CX may have a significant contribution to the X-ray emission spectra of a wide variety of environments within our solar system including solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with neutral gases in the heliosphere and in planetary atmospheres, as well as beyond the solar system in galaxy clusters, supernova remnants, and star forming galaxies.While the basic process of CX has been studied for many decades, the reliability of the existing data is not uniform, and the coverage of the astrophysically important projectile and target combinations and collisional velocities is insufficient. The need for reliable and robust CX X-ray emission models will only be amplified with the with the high resolution X-ray spectra expected from the soft X-ray imaging calorimeter spectrometer (SXS) onboard the Hitomi X-ray observatory. In this talk, I will discuss recent advances in theoretical CX cross sections and X-ray modeling with a focus on CX diagnostics. The need for experimental X-ray spectra and cross sections for benchmarking current theory will also be highlighted. This work was performed in collaboration with David Lyons, Patrick Mullen, David Schultz, Phillip Stancil, and Robin Shelton. Work at UGA was partially supported by NASA grant NNX09AC46G.

  1. Deterministic Computer-Controlled Polishing Process for High-Energy X-Ray Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Gufran S.; Gubarev, Mikhail; Speegle, Chet; Ramsey, Brian

    2010-01-01

    A deterministic computer-controlled polishing process for large X-ray mirror mandrels is presented. Using tool s influence function and material removal rate extracted from polishing experiments, design considerations of polishing laps and optimized operating parameters are discussed

  2. High-resolution x-ray scattering study of the effect of quenched random disorder on the nematic smectic- A transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramazanoglu, M.; Larochelle, S.; Garland, C. W.; Birgeneau, R. J.

    2007-06-01

    Using high-resolution x-ray scattering, the effect of quenched random disorder (QRD) on the second-order nematic smectic- A (N-SmA) phase transition in butyloxybenzilidene-octylaniline (4O.8) has been studied. 4O.8 is a nonpolar liquid crystal (LC) with a monomeric smectic- A phase. The QRD is created by aerosil nanoparticles which gelate to form a three-dimensional network, confining the LC. The QRD caused by the aerosil gel generates quenched random fields acting on both the nematic and smectic- A order parameters. This results in the destruction of the quasi-long-range order of the smectic- A phase. The x-ray scattering data are modeled with a structure factor composed of two terms, one thermal and one static, corresponding to the connected and disconnected susceptibilities, respectively. Unlike previous studies, the two parts of the structure factor are decoupled by allowing different thermal and static correlation lengths. Our fitting procedure involves temperature-dependent and temperature-independent (global) variables. The amplitude and the parallel correlation length for the thermal part of the line-shape show critical-like behavior both above and below the transition temperature. Detailed analysis reveals that the thermal correlation length does not truly diverge at the phase transition. This effect is discussed on the basis of a cutoff for the divergence caused by the random fields generated by the aerosil network confining the liquid crystal. The intensity of the static term in the line-shape behaves like the order parameter squared at a conventional second-order phase transition. The effective order parameter critical exponent shows an evolution with increasing aerosil gel density ranging from the Gaussian tricritical value to the 3D- XY value. The results of a pseudocritical scaling analysis are compared to an analysis of 4O.8+aerosil heat capacity data and discussed using a phenomenological correlation between the nematic range of pure liquid

  3. High-resolution x-ray scattering study of the effect of quenched random disorder on the nematic-smectic-A transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ramazanoglu, M.; Larochelle, S.; Garland, C. W.; Birgeneau, R. J.

    2007-06-15

    Using high-resolution x-ray scattering, the effect of quenched random disorder (QRD) on the second-order nematic-smectic-A (N-SmA) phase transition in butyloxybenzilidene-octylaniline (4O.8) has been studied. 4O.8 is a nonpolar liquid crystal (LC) with a monomeric smectic-A phase. The QRD is created by aerosil nanoparticles which gelate to form a three-dimensional network, confining the LC. The QRD caused by the aerosil gel generates quenched random fields acting on both the nematic and smectic-A order parameters. This results in the destruction of the quasi-long-range order of the smectic-A phase. The x-ray scattering data are modeled with a structure factor composed of two terms, one thermal and one static, corresponding to the connected and disconnected susceptibilities, respectively. Unlike previous studies, the two parts of the structure factor are decoupled by allowing different thermal and static correlation lengths. Our fitting procedure involves temperature-dependent and temperature-independent (global) variables. The amplitude and the parallel correlation length for the thermal part of the line-shape show critical-like behavior both above and below the transition temperature. Detailed analysis reveals that the thermal correlation length does not truly diverge at the phase transition. This effect is discussed on the basis of a cutoff for the divergence caused by the random fields generated by the aerosil network confining the liquid crystal. The intensity of the static term in the line-shape behaves like the order parameter squared at a conventional second-order phase transition. The effective order parameter critical exponent shows an evolution with increasing aerosil gel density ranging from the Gaussian tricritical value to the 3D-XY value. The results of a pseudocritical scaling analysis are compared to an analysis of 4O.8+aerosil heat capacity data and discussed using a phenomenological correlation between the nematic range of pure liquid crystals and

  4. X-ray structures and computational studies of several cathinones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nycz, Jacek E.; Malecki, Grzegorz; Zawiazalec, Marcin; Pazdziorek, Tadeusz

    2011-09-01

    2-(Ethylamino)-1-(4-methylphenyl)propan-1-one (shortly named 4-MEC) ( 1a), 1-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-(methylamino)propan-1-one (shortly named methylone or 3,4-methylenedioxymethcathinone) ( 1b), 1-(3,4-dimethylphenyl)-2-(methylamino)propan-1-one ( 1c), 2-methylamino-1-(4-methylphenyl)propan-1-one (shortly named mephedrone; 4-MMC or 4-methylmethcathinone) ( 1d) and 2-(methylamino)-1-phenylbutan-1-one (shortly named buphedrone) ( 1e) and their aminium salts ( 2a-e), are examples of cathinones which were characterized by FTIR, UV-Vis, multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. By single crystal X-ray diffraction method structures of 2a, 2b, 2c and 2d were determined. NMR solution spectra showed readily diagnostic H-1 and C-13 signals from methyl, ethyl, N-methyl or N-ethyl groups. The diastereotopic methylene protons of 1a appear as an ABX 3, and 1e and 2e appear as an ABMX 3 system. The geometries of the studied compounds were optimized in singlet states using the density functional theory (DFT) method with B3LYP functional. Electronic spectra were calculated by TDDFT method. In general, the predicted bond lengths and angles are in good agreement with the values based on the X-ray crystal structure data.

  5. X-ray computed tomography for virtually unrolling damaged papyri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegra, Dario; Ciliberto, Enrico; Ciliberto, Paolo; Petrillo, Giuseppe; Stanco, Filippo; Trombatore, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    The regular format for ancient works of literature was the papyrus roll. Recently many efforts to perform virtual restoration of this archeological artifact have been done. In fact the case of ancient rolled papyrus is very intriguing. Old papyruses are the substrates of very important historical information, probably being the use of papyrus dated to the Pre-Dynastic Period. Papyrus degradation is often very hard so that physical unrolling is sometime absolutely impossible. In this paper, authors describe their effort in setting a new virtual restoration methodology based on software manipulation of X-ray tomographic images. A realistic model, obtained by painting a hieroglyph inscription of Thutmosis III on a papyrus substrate made by the original method described by Plinius the Elder and by pigments and binders compatible with the Egyptian use (ochers with natural glue), was made for the X-ray investigation. A GE Optima 660 64 slice was used to obtain a stack of tomographic slices of the rolled model. Each slice appears as spiral. The intensity variations along the cross-sectional result from ink on the papyrus. The files were elaborated with original software, written by the use of MATLAB high-level language, and the final result was quite similar to the radiography of the physically unrolled sheet.

  6. A comparative study of high resolution cone beam X-ray tomography and synchrotron tomography applied to Fe- and Al-alloys.

    PubMed

    Kastner, Johann; Harrer, Bernhard; Requena, Guillermo; Brunke, Oliver

    2010-10-01

    X-ray computed tomography (XCT) has become a very important method for non-destructive 3D-characterization and evaluation of materials. Due to measurement speed and quality, XCT systems with cone beam geometry and matrix detectors have gained general acceptance. Continuous improvements in the quality and performance of X-ray tubes and XCT devices have led to cone beam CT systems that can now achieve spatial resolutions down to 1 μm and even below. However, the polychromatic nature of the source, limited photon flux and cone beam artefacts mean that there are limits to the quality of the CT-data achievable; these limits are particularly pronounced with materials of higher density like metals. Synchrotron radiation offers significant advantages by its monochromatic and parallel beam of high brilliance. These advantages usually cause fewer artefacts, improved contrast and resolution.Tomography data of a steel sample and of two multi-phase Al-samples (AlSi12Ni1, AlMg5Si7) are recorded by advanced cone beam XCT-systems with a μ-focus (μXCT) and a sub-μm (nano-focus, sub-μXCT) X-ray source with voxel dimensions between 0.4 and 3.5 μm and are compared with synchrotron computed tomography (sXCT) with 0.3 μm/voxel. CT data features like beam hardening and ring artefacts, detection of details, sharpness, contrast, signal-to-noise ratio and the grey value histogram are systematically compared. In all cases μXCT displayed the lowest performance. Sub-μXCT gives excellent results in the detection of details, spatial and contrast resolution, which are comparable to synchrotron-XCT recordings. The signal-to-noise ratio is usually significantly lower for sub-μXCT compared with the two other methods. With regard to measurement costs "for industrial users", scanning volume, accessibility and user-friendliness sub-μXCT has significant advantages in comparison to synchrotron-XCT.

  7. The Best of Both Worlds: 3D X-ray Microscopy with Ultra-high Resolution and a Large Field of View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Gelb, J.; Yang, Y.; Guan, Y.; Wu, W.; Chen, J.; Tian, Y.

    2011-09-01

    3D visualizations of complex structures within various samples have been achieved with high spatial resolution by X-ray computed nanotomography (nano-CT). While high spatial resolution generally comes at the expense of field of view (FOV). Here we proposed an approach that stitched several 3D volumes together into a single large volume to significantly increase the size of the FOV while preserving resolution. Combining this with nano-CT, 18-μm FOV with sub-60-nm resolution has been achieved for non-destructive 3D visualization of clustered yeasts that were too large for a single scan. It shows high promise for imaging other large samples in the future.

  8. Comprehensive Non-Destructive Conservation Documentation of Lunar Samples Using High-Resolution Image-Based 3D Reconstructions and X-Ray CT Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenfeld, E. H.; Evans, C. A.; Oshel, E. R.; Liddle, D. A.; Beaulieu, K.; Zeigler, R. A.; Hanna, R. D.; Ketcham, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    Established contemporary conservation methods within the fields of Natural and Cultural Heritage encourage an interdisciplinary approach to preservation of heritage material (both tangible and intangible) that holds "Outstanding Universal Value" for our global community. NASA's lunar samples were acquired from the moon for the primary purpose of intensive scientific investigation. These samples, however, also invoke cultural significance, as evidenced by the millions of people per year that visit lunar displays in museums and heritage centers around the world. Being both scientifically and culturally significant, the lunar samples require a unique conservation approach. Government mandate dictates that NASA's Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office develop and maintain protocols for "documentation, preservation, preparation and distribution of samples for research, education and public outreach" for both current and future collections of astromaterials. Documentation, considered the first stage within the conservation methodology, has evolved many new techniques since curation protocols for the lunar samples were first implemented, and the development of new documentation strategies for current and future astromaterials is beneficial to keeping curation protocols up to date. We have developed and tested a comprehensive non-destructive documentation technique using high-resolution image-based 3D reconstruction and X-ray CT (XCT) data in order to create interactive 3D models of lunar samples that would ultimately be served to both researchers and the public. These data enhance preliminary scientific investigations including targeted sample requests, and also provide a new visual platform for the public to experience and interact with the lunar samples. We intend to serve these data as they are acquired on NASA's Astromaterials Acquisistion and Curation website at http://curator.jsc.nasa.gov/. Providing 3D interior and exterior documentation of astromaterial

  9. Crystal-structure analysis of four mineral samples of anhydrite, CaSO[subscript 4], using synchrotron high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    Antao, Sytle M.

    2014-05-28

    The crystal structures of four samples of anhydrite, CaSO{sub 4}, were obtained by Rietveld refinements using synchrotron high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction (HRPXRD) data and space group Amma. As an example, for one sample of anhydrite from Hants County, Nova Scotia, the unit-cell parameters are a = 7.00032(2), b = 6.99234(1), c = 6.24097(1) {angstrom}, and V = 305.487(1) {angstrom}{sup 3} with a > b. The eight-coordinated Ca atom has an average distance of 2.4667(4) {angstrom}. The tetrahedral SO{sub 4} group has two independent S-O distances of 1.484(1) to O1 and 1.478(1) {angstrom} to O2 and an average distance of 1.4810(5) {angstrom}. The three independent O-S-O angles [108.99(8) x 1, 110.38(3) x 4, 106.34(9){sup o} x 1; average [6] = 109.47(2){sup o}] and S-O distances indicate that the geometry of the SO{sub 4} group is quite distorted in anhydrite. The four anhydrite samples have structural trends where the a, b, and c unit-cell parameters increase linearly with increasing unit-cell volume, V, and their average and distances are nearly constant. The grand mean = 2.4660(2) {angstrom}, and grand mean = 1.4848(3) {angstrom}, the latter is longer than 1.480(1) {angstrom} in celestite, SrSO{sub 4}, as expected.

  10. Progress in electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) based, high-resolution, high-sensitivity x-ray detector for fluoroscopy and radiography

    PubMed Central

    Kuhls, Andrew T.; Yadava, Girijesh; Patel, Vikas; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    A new high-resolution, high-sensitivity, low-noise x-ray detector based on EMCCDs has been developed. The EMCCD detector module consists of a 1kx1k, 8μm pixel EMCCD camera coupled to a CsI(Tl) scintillating phosphor via a fiber optic taper (FOT). Multiple modules can be used to provide the desired field-of-view (FOV). The detector is capable of acquisitions over 30fps. The EMCCD’s variable gain of up to 2000x for the pixel signal enables high sensitivity for fluoroscopic applications. With a 3:1 FOT, the detector can operate with a 144μm effective pixel size, comparable to current flat-panel detectors. Higher resolutions of 96 and 48μm pixel size can also be achieved with various binning modes. The detector MTFs and DQEs were calculated using a linear-systems analysis. The zero frequency DQE was calculated to be 59% at 74 kVp. The DQE for the 144μm pixel size was shown to exhibit quantum-noise limited behavior down to ~0.1μR using a conservative 30x gain. At this low exposure, gains above 30x showed limited improvements in DQE suggesting such increased gains may not be necessary. For operation down to 48μm pixel sizes, the detector instrumentation noise equivalent exposure (INEE), defined as the exposure where the instrumentation noise equals the quantum-noise, was <0.1μR for a 20x gain. This new technology may provide improvements over current flat-panel detectors for applications such as fluoroscopy and angiography requiring high frame rates, resolution, dynamic range and sensitivity while maintaining essentially no lag and very low INEE. Initial images from a prototype detector are also presented. PMID:21654934

  11. Arterial microcalcification in atherosclerotic patients with and without chronic kidney disease: a comparative high-resolution scanning X-ray diffraction analysis.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Dagmar-Christiane; Behets, Geert J; Hakenberg, Oliver W; Voigt, Mathias; Vervaet, Benjamin A; Robijn, Stef; Kundt, Günther; Schareck, Wolfgang; D'Haese, Patrick C; Haffner, Dieter

    2012-06-01

    Vascular calcification, albeit heterogeneous in terms of biological and physicochemical properties, has been associated with ageing, lifestyle, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is unknown whether or not moderately impaired renal function (CKD stages 2-4) affects the physiochemical composition and/or the formation of magnesium-containing tricalcium phosphate ([Ca,Mg](3)[PO(4)](2), whitlockite) in arterial microcalcification. Therefore, a high-resolution scanning X-ray diffraction analysis (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, France) utilizing histological sections of paraffin-embedded arterial specimens derived from atherosclerotic patients with normal renal function (n = 15) and CKD (stages 2-4, n = 13) was performed. This approach allowed us to spatially assess the contribution of calcium phosphate (apatite) and whitlockite to arterial microcalcification. Per group, the number of samples (13 vs. 12) with sufficient signal intensity and total lengths of regions (201 vs. 232 μm) giving rise to diffractograms ("informative regions") were comparable. Summarizing all informative regions per group into one composite sample revealed calcium phosphate/apatite as the leading mineral phase in CKD patients, whereas in patients with normal renal function the relative contribution of whitlockite and calcium phosphate/apatite was on the same order of magnitude (CKD, calcium phosphate/apatite 157 μm, whitlockite 38.7 μm; non-CKD, calcium phosphate/apatite 79.0 μm, whitlockite 94.1 μm; each p < 0.05). Our results, although based on a limited number of samples, indicate that chronic impairment of renal function affects local magnesium homeostasis and thus contributes to the physicochemical composition of microcalcification in atherosclerotic patients.

  12. Multiple pinhole collimator based microscopic x-ray luminescence computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Li, Changqing

    2016-03-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) is a new hybrid imaging modality, which has the capability to improve optical spatial resolution to hundreds of micrometers for deep targets. In this paper, we report a multiple pinhole collimator based microscopic X-ray luminescence computed tomography (microXLCT) system for small animal imaging. Superfine collimated X-ray pencil beams are used to excite deeply embedded phosphor particles, allowing us to obtain sub-millimeter optical spatial resolution in deep tissues. Multiple collimated X-ray beams are generated by mounting an array of pinholes in the front of a powerful X-ray tube. With multiple X-ray beams scanning, the phosphor particles in the region of the multiple beams are excited simultaneously, which requires less scanning time compared with a single beam scanning. The emitted optical photons on the top surface of the phantom are measured with an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera. Meanwhile, an X-ray detector is used to determine the X-ray beam size and position, which are used as structural guidance in the microXLCT image reconstruction. To validate the performance of our proposed multiple pinhole based microXLCT imaging system, we have performed numerical simulations and a phantom experiment. In the numerical simulations, we simulated a cylindrical phantom with two and six embedded targets, respectively. In the simulations, we used four parallel X-ray beams with the beam diameter of 0.1 mm and the beam interval of 3.2 mm. We can reconstruct deeply embedded multiple targets with a target diameter of 0.2 mm using measurements in six projections, which indicated that four parallel X-ray beam scan could reduce scanning time without comprising the reconstructed image quality. In the phantom experiment, we generated two parallel X-ray beams with the beam diameter of 0.5 mm and the beam interval of 4.2 mm. We scanned a phantom of one target with the two parallel X-ray beams. The target was

  13. Monitoring of stainless-steel slag carbonation using X-ray computed microtomography.

    PubMed

    Boone, Marijn A; Nielsen, Peter; De Kock, Tim; Boone, Matthieu N; Quaghebeur, Mieke; Cnudde, Veerle

    2014-01-01

    Steel production is one of the largest contributors to industrial CO2 emissions. This industry also generates large amounts of solid byproducts, such as slag and sludge. In this study, fine grained stainless-steel slag (SSS) is valorized to produce compacts with high compressive strength without the use of a hydraulic binder. This carbonation process is investigated on a pore-scale level to identify how the mineral phases in the SSS react with CO2, where carbonates are formed, and what the impact of these changes is on the pore network of the carbonated SSS compact. In addition to conventional research techniques, high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (HRXCT) is applied to visualize and quantify the changes in situ during the carbonation process. The results show that carbonates mainly precipitate at grain contacts and in capillary pores and this precipitation has little effect on the connectivity of the pore space. This paper also demonstrates the use of a custom-designed polymer reaction cell that allows in situ HRXCT analysis of the carbonation process. This shows the distribution and influence of water and CO2 in the pore network on the carbonate precipitation and, thus, the influence on the compressive strength development of the waste material.

  14. X-ray computed tomography system using a multipixel photon counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Osawa, Akihiro; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Nagao, Jiro; Abderyim, Purkhet; Nomiya, Seiichiro; Hitomi, Keitaro; Ogawa, Akira; Sato, Shigehiro

    2008-08-01

    A photon-counting K-edge x-ray Computed Tomography (CT) system is useful for discriminating photon energy and for decreasing absorbed dose for patients. The CT system is of the first generation type and consists of an x-ray generator, a turn table, a translation stage, a two-stage controller, a multipixel photon counter (MPPC) module, a 0.5-mm-thick zinc oxide (ZnO) scintillator, a counter board (CB), and a personal computer (PC). Tomography is accomplished by repeating the translation and rotation of an object. Penetrating x-ray photons from the object are detected by the scintillator in conjunction with the MPPC module, and the event signals are counted by the CB. Without using energy discriminating, photon counting CT was carried out by controlling x-ray spectra.

  15. Achieving high-resolution soft-tissue imaging with cone-beam CT: a two-pronged approach for modulation of x-ray fluence and detector gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, S. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Moseley, D. J.; Keller, H.; Shkumat, N. A.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2005-04-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) presents a highly promising and challenging advanced application of flat-panel detectors (FPDs). The great advantage of this adaptable technology is in the potential for sub-mm 3D spatial resolution in combination with soft-tissue detectability. While the former is achieved naturally by CBCT systems incorporating modern FPD designs (e.g., 200 - 400 um pixel pitch), the latter presents a significant challenge due to limitations in FPD dynamic range, large field of view, and elevated levels of x-ray scatter in typical CBCT configurations. We are investigating a two-pronged strategy to maximizing soft-tissue detectability in CBCT: 1) front-end solutions, including novel beam modulation designs (viz., spatially varying compensators) that alleviate detector dynamic range requirements, reduce x-ray scatter, and better distribute imaging dose in a manner suited to soft-tissue visualization throughout the field of view; and 2) back-end solutions, including implementation of an advanced FPD design (Varian PaxScan 4030CB) that features dual-gain and dynamic gain switching that effectively extends detector dynamic range to 18 bits. These strategies are explored quantitatively on CBCT imaging platforms developed in our laboratory, including a dedicated CBCT bench and a mobile isocentric C-arm (Siemens PowerMobil). Pre-clinical evaluation of improved soft-tissue visibility was carried out in phantom and patient imaging with the C-arm device. Incorporation of these strategies begin to reveal the full potential of CBCT for soft-tissue visualization, an essential step in realizing broad utility of this adaptable technology for diagnostic and image-guided procedures.

  16. X-ray clusters in a cold dark matter + lambda universe: A direct, large-scale, high-resolution, hydrodynamic simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1994-01-01

    A new, three-dimensional, shock-capturing, hydrodynamic code is utilized to determine the distribution of hot gas in a cold dark matter (CDM) + lambda model universe. Periodic boundary conditions are assumed: a box with size 85/h Mpc, having cell size 0.31/h Mpc, is followed in a simulation with 270(exp 3) = 10(exp 7.3) cells. We adopt omega = 0.45, lambda = 0.55, h identically equal to H/100 km/s/Mpc = 0.6, and then, from the cosmic background explorer (COBE) and light element nucleosynthesis, sigma(sub 8) = 0.77, omega(sub b) = 0.043. We identify the X-ray emitting clusters in the simulation box, compute the luminosity function at several wavelength bands, the temperature function and estimated sizes, as well as the evolution of these quantities with redshift. This open model succeeds in matching local observations of clusters in contrast to the standard omega = 1, CDM model, which fails. It predicts an order of magnitude decline in the number density of bright (h nu = 2-10 keV) clusters from z = 0 to z = 2 in contrast to a slight increase in the number density for standard omega = 1, CDM model. This COBE-normalized CDM + lambda model produces approximately the same number of X-ray clusters having L(sub x) greater than 10(exp 43) erg/s as observed. The background radiation field at 1 keV due to clusters is approximately the observed background which, after correction for numerical effects, again indicates that the model is consistent with observations.

  17. Computing with high-resolution upwind schemes for hyperbolic equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakravarthy, S. R.; Osher, S.

    1985-01-01

    Computational aspects of modern high-resolution upwind finite-difference schemes for hyperbolic systems of conservation laws are examined. An operational unification is demonstrated for constructing a wide class of flux-difference-split and flux-split schemes based on the design principles underlying total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes. Consideration is also given to TVD scheme design by preprocessing, the extension of preprocessing and postprocessing approaches to general control volumes, the removal of expansion shocks and 'glitches', relaxation methods for implicit TVD schemes, and a new family of high-accuracy TVD schemes.

  18. Visualization of x-ray computer tomography using computer-generated holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daibo, Masahiro; Tayama, Norio

    1998-09-01

    The theory converted from x-ray projection data to the hologram directly by combining the computer tomography (CT) with the computer generated hologram (CGH), is proposed. The purpose of this study is to offer the theory for realizing the all- electronic and high-speed seeing through 3D visualization system, which is for the application to medical diagnosis and non- destructive testing. First, the CT is expressed using the pseudo- inverse matrix which is obtained by the singular value decomposition. CGH is expressed in the matrix style. Next, `projection to hologram conversion' (PTHC) matrix is calculated by the multiplication of phase matrix of CGH with pseudo-inverse matrix of the CT. Finally, the projection vector is converted to the hologram vector directly, by multiplication of the PTHC matrix with the projection vector. Incorporating holographic analog computation into CT reconstruction, it becomes possible that the calculation amount is drastically reduced. We demonstrate the CT cross section which is reconstituted by He-Ne laser in the 3D space from the real x-ray projection data acquired by x-ray television equipment, using our direct conversion technique.

  19. High resolution 3D laboratory x-ray tomography data of femora from young, 1-14 day old C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Bortel, Emely L; Duda, Georg N; Mundlos, Stefan; Willie, Bettina M; Fratzl, Peter; Zaslansky, Paul

    2015-09-01

    This data article contains high resolution (1.2 µm effective pixel size) lab-based micro-computed tomography (µCT) reconstructed volume data of the femoral mid-shafts from young C57BL/6 mice. This data formed the basis for the analyses of bone structural development in healthy mice, including closed and open porosity as reported in Bortel et al. [1]. The data reveals changes seen in bone material and porosity distribution observed when mouse bones transform from porous scaffolds into solid structures during normal organogenesis.

  20. In vivo X-Ray Computed Tomographic Imaging of Soft Tissue with Native, Intravenous, or Oral Contrast

    PubMed Central

    Wathen, Connor A.; Foje, Nathan; van Avermaete, Tony; Miramontes, Bernadette; Chapaman, Sarah E.; Sasser, Todd A.; Kannan, Raghuraman; Gerstler, Steven; Leevy, W. Matthew

    2013-01-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is one of the most commonly utilized anatomical imaging modalities for both research and clinical purposes. CT combines high-resolution, three-dimensional data with relatively fast acquisition to provide a solid platform for non-invasive human or specimen imaging. The primary limitation of CT is its inability to distinguish many soft tissues based on native contrast. While bone has high contrast within a CT image due to its material density from calcium phosphate, soft tissue is less dense and many are homogenous in density. This presents a challenge in distinguishing one type of soft tissue from another. A couple exceptions include the lungs as well as fat, both of which have unique densities owing to the presence of air or bulk hydrocarbons, respectively. In order to facilitate X-ray CT imaging of other structures, a range of contrast agents have been developed to selectively identify and visualize the anatomical properties of individual tissues. Most agents incorporate atoms like iodine, gold, or barium because of their ability to absorb X-rays, and thus impart contrast to a given organ system. Here we review the strategies available to visualize lung, fat, brain, kidney, liver, spleen, vasculature, gastrointestinal tract, and liver tissues of living mice using either innate contrast, or commercial injectable or ingestible agents with selective perfusion. Further, we demonstrate how each of these approaches will facilitate the non-invasive, longitudinal, in vivo imaging of pre-clinical disease models at each anatomical site. PMID:23711461

  1. Assessment of natural enamel lesions with optical coherence tomography in comparison with microfocus x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Espigares, Jorge; Sadr, Alireza; Hamba, Hidenori; Shimada, Yasushi; Otsuki, Masayuki; Tagami, Junji; Sumi, Yasunori

    2015-01-01

    A technology to characterize early enamel lesions is needed in dentistry. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive method that provides high-resolution cross-sectional images. The aim of this study is to compare OCT with microfocus x-ray computed tomography ([Formula: see text]) for assessment of natural enamel lesions in vitro. Ten human teeth with visible white spot-like changes on the enamel smooth surface and no cavitation (ICDAS code 2) were subjected to imaging by μCT (SMX-100CT, Shimadzu) and 1300-nm swept-source OCT (Dental SS-OCT, Panasonic Health Care). In [Formula: see text], the lesions appeared as radiolucent dark areas, while in SS-OCT, they appeared as areas of increased signal intensity beneath the surface. An SS-OCT attenuation coefficient based on Beer-Lambert law could discriminate lesions from sound enamel. Lesion depth ranged from 175 to [Formula: see text] in SS-OCT. A correlation between [Formula: see text] and SS-OCT was found regarding lesion depth ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]) and also surface layer thickness ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]). The images obtained clinically in real time using the dental SS-OCT system are suitable for the assessment of natural subsurface lesions and their surface layer, providing comparable images to a laboratory high-resolution [Formula: see text] without the use of x-ray. PMID:26158079

  2. Assessment of natural enamel lesions with optical coherence tomography in comparison with microfocus x-ray computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Espigares, Jorge; Sadr, Alireza; Hamba, Hidenori; Shimada, Yasushi; Otsuki, Masayuki; Tagami, Junji; Sumi, Yasunori

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. A technology to characterize early enamel lesions is needed in dentistry. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive method that provides high-resolution cross-sectional images. The aim of this study is to compare OCT with microfocus x-ray computed tomography (μCT) for assessment of natural enamel lesions in vitro. Ten human teeth with visible white spot-like changes on the enamel smooth surface and no cavitation (ICDAS code 2) were subjected to imaging by μCT (SMX-100CT, Shimadzu) and 1300-nm swept-source OCT (Dental SS-OCT, Panasonic Health Care). In μCT, the lesions appeared as radiolucent dark areas, while in SS-OCT, they appeared as areas of increased signal intensity beneath the surface. An SS-OCT attenuation coefficient based on Beer–Lambert law could discriminate lesions from sound enamel. Lesion depth ranged from 175 to 606  μm in SS-OCT. A correlation between μCT and SS-OCT was found regarding lesion depth (R=0.81, p<0.001) and also surface layer thickness (R=0.76, p<0.005). The images obtained clinically in real time using the dental SS-OCT system are suitable for the assessment of natural subsurface lesions and their surface layer, providing comparable images to a laboratory high-resolution μCT without the use of x-ray. PMID:26158079

  3. Local X-ray Computed Tomography Imaging for Mineralogical and Pore Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, G.; Willson, C. S.

    2015-12-01

    Sample size, material properties and image resolution are all tradeoffs that must be considered when imaging porous media samples with X-ray computed tomography. In many natural and engineered samples, pore and throat sizes span several orders of magnitude and are often correlated with the material composition. Local tomography is a nondestructive technique that images a subvolume, within a larger specimen, at high resolution and uses low-resolution tomography data from the larger specimen to reduce reconstruction error. The high-resolution, subvolume data can be used to extract important fine-scale properties but, due to the additional noise associated with the truncated dataset, it makes segmentation of different materials and mineral phases a challenge. The low-resolution data of a larger specimen is typically of much higher-quality making material characterization much easier. In addition, the imaging of a larger domain, allows for mm-scale bulk properties and heterogeneities to be determined. In this research, a 7 mm diameter and ~15 mm in length sandstone core was scanned twice. The first scan was performed to cover the entire diameter and length of the specimen at an image voxel resolution of 4.1 μm. The second scan was performed on a subvolume, ~1.3 mm in length and ~2.1 mm in diameter, at an image voxel resolution of 1.08 μm. After image processing and segmentation, the pore network structure and mineralogical features were extracted from the low-resolution dataset. Due to the noise in the truncated high-resolution dataset, several image processing approaches were applied prior to image segmentation and extraction of the pore network structure and mineralogy. Results from the different truncated tomography segmented data sets are compared to each other to evaluate the potential of each approach in identifying the different solid phases from the original 16 bit data set. The truncated tomography segmented data sets were also compared to the whole

  4. Scattering-compensated cone beam x-ray luminescence computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng; Rong, Junyan; Pu, Huangsheng; Liu, Wenlei; Liao, Qimei; Lu, Hongbing

    2016-04-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) opens new possibilities to perform molecular imaging with x-ray. It is a dual modality imaging technique based on the principle that some nanophosphors can emit near-infrared (NIR) light when excited by x-rays. The x-ray scattering effect is a great issue in both CT and XLCT reconstruction. It has been shown that if the scattering effect compensated, the reconstruction average relative error can be reduced from 40% to 12% in the in the pencil beam XLCT. However, the scattering effect in the cone beam XLCT has not been proved. To verify and reduce the scattering effect, we proposed scattering-compensated cone beam x-ray luminescence computed tomography using an added leading to prevent the spare x-ray outside the irradiated phantom in order to decrease the scattering effect. Phantom experiments of two tubes filled with Y2O3:Eu3+ indicated that the proposed method could reduce the scattering by a degree of 30% and can reduce the location error from 1.8mm to 1.2mm. Hence, the proposed method was feasible to the general case and actual experiments and it is easy to implement.

  5. Charge-density distribution and electrostatic flexibility of ZIF-8 based on high-resolution X-ray diffraction data and periodic calculations.

    PubMed

    Novaković, Sladjana B; Bogdanović, Goran A; Heering, Christian; Makhloufi, Gamall; Francuski, Djordje; Janiak, Christoph

    2015-03-16

    The electron-density distribution in a prototypical porous coordination polymer ZIF-8 has been obtained in an approach combining high-resolution X-ray diffraction data and Invariom refinement. In addition, the periodic quantum-chemical calculation has been used to describe the theoretical density features of ZIF-8 in the same geometry (m1) and also in a "high-pressure" form of ZIF-8 (m2) characterized by conformational change with respect to the methylimidazolate linker. A thorough comparison of the electronic and electrostatic properties in two limiting structural forms of ZIF-8 proposes additional aspects on diffusion and adsorption processes occurring within the framework. The dimensions of the four-membered (FM) and six-membered (SM) apertures of the β cage are reliably determined from the total electron-density distribution. The analysis shows that FM in m2 becomes competitive in size to the SM aperture and should be considered for the diffusion of small molecules and cations. Bader's topological analysis (quantum theory of atoms in molecules) shows similar properties of both ZIF-8 forms. On the other hand, analysis of their electrostatic properties reveals tremendous differences. The study suggests exceptional electrostatic flexibility of the ZIF-8 framework, where small conformational changes lead to a significantly different electrostatic potential (EP) distribution, a feature that could be important for the function and dynamics of the ZIF-8 framework. The cavity surface in m1 contains 38 distinct regions with moderately positive, negative, or neutral EP and weakly positive EP in the cavity volume. In contrast to m1, the m2 form displays only two regions of different EP, with the positive one taking the whole cavity surface and the strong negative one localized entirely in the FM apertures. The EP in the cavity volume is also more positive than that in m1. A pronounced influence of the linker reorientation on the EP of the ZIF-8 forms is related to the

  6. High-resolution X-ray structure of the DNA-binding protein HU from the hyper-thermophilic Thermotoga maritima and the determinants of its thermostability.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, Evangelos; Rypniewski, Wojciech R; Vorgias, Constantinos R E

    2003-04-01

    The histone-like DNA-binding proteins (HU) are a convenient model for studying factors affecting thermostability because of their relatively simple, easily comparable structures, their common function, and their presence in organisms of widely differing thermostability. We report the determination of the high-resolution structure (1.53 A) at 273 K and 100 K of the HU protein from the hyper-thermophilic eubacterium Thermotoga maritima(HU Tmar, T(m)=80.5 degrees C). The structural data presented clearly show that the HU Tmar has a fold similar to its thermophilic homologue HU from Bacillus stearothermophilus (HU Bst). Based on primary structure analysis, as well as on the results of mutational analysis of HU Bst ( T(m)=61.6 degrees C) and Bacillus subtilis (HU Bsu, T(m)=39.7 degrees C), we have designed and produced several single and combined mutations to study their effect on the thermostability of the recombinant HU Tmar. Among others, the triplet mutant HU Tmar-G15E/E34D/V42I ( T(m)=35.9 degrees C) has converted the extreme thermophilic protein HU Tmar to mesophilic, like HU Bsu. In an attempt to analyze the various mutants of HU Tmar, we crystallized the point mutation HU Tmar-E34D, in which Glu34 was replaced by Asp, similar to the mesophilic HU Bsu. The mutant has T(m)=72.9 degrees C, as measured by circular dichroism, 7.6 degrees C lower than the wild type. The crystal structure of HU Tmar-E34D was determined at 100 K and refined at 1.72 A resolution. A comparison with the wild-type structures clearly shows that two hydrogen bonds have been disrupted between Glu34 from one subunit and Thr13 from the other subunit, and vice versa. Our analysis points to this as the prime cause of the destabilization compared to the wild type. The three new structures were compared, together with the X-ray structure of a similar protein, HU Bst, with the aim of relating their structural properties and different thermal stability. The presented results show that the HU Tmar

  7. Digital computer processing of X-ray photos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, R.; Selzer, R. H.

    1967-01-01

    Digital computers correct various distortions in medical and biological photographs. One of the principal methods of computer enhancement involves the use of a two-dimensional digital filter to modify the frequency spectrum of the picture. Another computer processing method is image subtraction.

  8. Design and performance of a versatile curved-crystal spectrometer for high-resolution spectroscopy in the tender x-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavčič, M.; Budnar, M.; Mühleisen, A.; Gasser, F.; Žitnik, M.; Bučar, K.; Bohinc, R.

    2012-03-01

    A complete in-vacuum curved-crystal x-ray emission spectrometer in Johansson geometry has been constructed for a 2-6 keV energy range with sub natural line-width energy resolution. The spectrometer is designed to measure x-ray emission induced by photon and charged particle impact on solid and gaseous targets. It works with a relatively large x-ray source placed inside the Rowland circle and employs position sensitive detection of diffracted x-rays. Its compact modular design enables fast and easy installation at a synchrotron or particle accelerator beamline. The paper presents main characteristics of the spectrometer and illustrates its capabilities by showing few selected experimental examples.

  9. Design and performance of a versatile curved-crystal spectrometer for high-resolution spectroscopy in the tender x-ray range

    SciTech Connect

    Kavcic, M.; Budnar, M.; Muehleisen, A.; Gasser, F.; Zitnik, M.; Bucar, K.; Bohinc, R.

    2012-03-15

    A complete in-vacuum curved-crystal x-ray emission spectrometer in Johansson geometry has been constructed for a 2-6 keV energy range with sub natural line-width energy resolution. The spectrometer is designed to measure x-ray emission induced by photon and charged particle impact on solid and gaseous targets. It works with a relatively large x-ray source placed inside the Rowland circle and employs position sensitive detection of diffracted x-rays. Its compact modular design enables fast and easy installation at a synchrotron or particle accelerator beamline. The paper presents main characteristics of the spectrometer and illustrates its capabilities by showing few selected experimental examples.

  10. Design and performance of a versatile curved-crystal spectrometer for high-resolution spectroscopy in the tender x-ray range.

    PubMed

    Kavčič, M; Budnar, M; Mühleisen, A; Gasser, F; Žitnik, M; Bučar, K; Bohinc, R

    2012-03-01

    A complete in-vacuum curved-crystal x-ray emission spectrometer in Johansson geometry has been constructed for a 2-6 keV energy range with sub natural line-width energy resolution. The spectrometer is designed to measure x-ray emission induced by photon and charged particle impact on solid and gaseous targets. It works with a relatively large x-ray source placed inside the Rowland circle and employs position sensitive detection of diffracted x-rays. Its compact modular design enables fast and easy installation at a synchrotron or particle accelerator beamline. The paper presents main characteristics of the spectrometer and illustrates its capabilities by showing few selected experimental examples.

  11. A computer controlled television detector for light, X-rays and particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalata, K.

    1981-01-01

    A versatile, high resolution, software configurable, two-dimensional intensified vidicon quantum detector system has been developed for multiple research applications. A thin phosphor convertor allows the detection of X-rays below 20 keV and non-relativistic particles in addition to visible light, and a thicker scintillator can be used to detect X-rays up to 100 keV and relativistic particles. Faceplates may be changed to allow any active area from 1 to 40 mm square, and active areas up to 200 mm square are possible. The image is integrated in a digital memory on any software specified array size up to 4000 x 4000. The array size is selected to match the spatial resolution, which ranges from 10 to 100 microns depending on the operating mode, the active area, and the photon or particle energy. All scan and data acquisition parameters are under software control to allow optimal data collection for each application.

  12. Optimization of X-ray tomography through a cooperative computing system in grid

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Moin Goraya, Major Singh

    2015-08-28

    Cooperative Computing implemented as Cooperative Computing System (CCS) in grid has been proved a considerably reliable technique to execute the tasks with real time constraints in a grid environment. This technique can be applied in many high performance distributed computing applications. HPC has a large number of applications in various fields of physics. One such application in radiation physics is X-ray tomography. X-Ray tomography contains numerous applications in various fields of science, technology and research. As the technology is changing from analog to digital in almost all the scenarios, this paper presents an idea towards the attachment of X-ray tomography assembly to HPC environment so as to obtain the highly reliable optimization.

  13. High-resolution computed tomography of the normal larynx

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, P.M.; Korobkin, M.

    1983-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) provides a unique method of evaluating abnormalities of the larynx by virture of its cross-sectional images. Several reports have demonstrated its utility in staging laryngeal carcinoma and defining the extent of injury in cases of laryngeal trauma. In order to appreciate subtle abnormalities of the larynx, a thorough understanding of the normal structures in this small anatomic area is crucial. Although previous studies have defined the normal CT anatomy of the larynx, many of the CT-anatomic correlations of the normal larynx used earlier-generation CT scanners with relatively poor resolution or were limited to transaxial images. High-resolution transaxial, coronal, and sagittal CT in vivo images are correlated with line drawings displaying normal laryngeal anatomy. The exquisite anatomic detail apparent in these images provides a sound basis for understanding subtle abnormalities in pathologic cases. (JMT)

  14. Wolter X-Ray Microscope Computed Tomography Ray-Trace Model with Preliminary Simulation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J A

    2006-02-27

    It is proposed to build a Wolter X-ray Microscope Computed Tomography System in order to characterize objects to sub-micrometer resolution. Wolter Optics Systems use hyperbolic, elliptical, and/or parabolic mirrors to reflect x-rays in order to focus or magnify an image. Wolter Optics have been used as telescopes and as microscopes. As microscopes they have been used for a number of purposes such as measuring emission x-rays and x-ray fluoresce of thin biological samples. Standard Computed Tomography (CT) Systems use 2D radiographic images, from a series of rotational angles, acquired by passing x-rays through an object to reconstruct a 3D image of the object. The x-ray paths in a Wolter X-ray Microscope will be considerably different than those of a standard CT system. There is little information about the 2D radiographic images that can be expected from such a system. There are questions about the quality, resolution and focusing range of an image created with such a system. It is not known whether characterization information can be obtained from these images and whether these 2D images can be reconstructed to 3D images of the object. A code has been developed to model the 2D radiographic image created by an object in a Wolter X-ray Microscope. This code simply follows the x-ray through the object and optics. There is no modeling at this point of other effects, such as scattering, reflection losses etc. Any object, of appropriate size, can be used in the model code. A series of simulations using a number of different objects was run to study the effects of the optics. The next step will be to use this model to reconstruct an object from the simulated data. Funding for the project ended before this goal could be accomplished. The following documentation includes: (1) background information on current X-ray imaging systems, (2) background on Wolter Optics, (3) description of the Wolter System being used, (4) purpose, limitations and development of the modeling

  15. Computational analysis of high resolution unsteady airloads for rotor aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quackenbush, Todd R.; Lam, C.-M. Gordon; Wachspress, Daniel A.; Bliss, Donald B.

    1994-01-01

    The study of helicopter aerodynamic loading for acoustics applications requires the application of efficient yet accurate simulations of the velocity field induced by the rotor's vortex wake. This report summarizes work to date on the development of such an analysis, which builds on the Constant Vorticity Contour (CVC) free wake model, previously implemented for the study of vibratory loading in the RotorCRAFT computer code. The present effort has focused on implementation of an airload reconstruction approach that computes high resolution airload solutions of rotor/rotor-wake interactions required for acoustics computations. Supplementary efforts on the development of improved vortex core modeling, unsteady aerodynamic effects, higher spatial resolution of rotor loading, and fast vortex wake implementations have substantially enhanced the capabilities of the resulting software, denoted RotorCRAFT/AA (AeroAcoustics). Results of validation calculations using recently acquired model rotor data show that by employing airload reconstruction it is possible to apply the CVC wake analysis with temporal and spatial resolution suitable for acoustics applications while reducing the computation time required by one to two orders of magnitude relative to that required by direct calculations. Promising correlation with this body of airload and noise data has been obtained for a variety of rotor configurations and operating conditions.

  16. Measuring the efficacy of a root biobarrier with x-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Tollner, E.W.; Murphy, C.E. Jr. . Dept. of Agricultural Engineering)

    1990-08-16

    X-ray computed tomography is a useful tool for investigating soil physical properties nondestructively. There is a need to develop proper calibration relationships between soil properties and the x-ray absorption coefficient. The objective of the work was to evaluate soil factors affecting the x-ray absorption coefficient. Based on a theoretical analysis, experimental data from five soils and on results of several other investigators, it was concluded that for many applications, one calibration relationship is applicable to a wide range of soils. The montmorillinitic clay used in the study required special handling due to the extreme shrinkage of this soil upon drying. Knowledge of chemical composition enables approximations but not exact predictions of the x-ray absorption coefficient. The results suggested some reasonable alternative to exhaustive calibration for each anticipated soil condition. Quantification of root activity in terms of root growth and indirectly through water uptake is necessary for understanding plant growth dynamics. X-ray computed tomography (CT) enables qualitative as well as two quantitative outputs, one of which can lead to conclusions regarding root activity. A greenhouse study involving soil columns (Lakeland sand, bulk density 1.4 Mg/m{sup 3}) planted to soybean, Bahiagras, and control (no vegetation) was conducted in 1989. A treflan based on chemical barrier was placed in half of the soil column of each species. The mean x-ray absorption correlated to water content. Results suggested that root presence can also be indirectly inferred based on water content drawn down during planned stress events. It was concluded that x-ray CT may have a niche in soil-water-plant relation studies, particularly when plant species have large roots. 35 refs., 13 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. SAXES, a high resolution spectrometer for resonant x-ray emission in the 400-1600 eV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiringhelli, G.; Piazzalunga, A.; Dallera, C.; Trezzi, G.; Braicovich, L.; Schmitt, T.; Strocov, V. N.; Betemps, R.; Patthey, L.; Wang, X.; Grioni, M.

    2006-11-15

    We present a 5 m long spectrometer for soft x rays to be used at a synchrotron radiation beamline for resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering in the 400-1600 eV energy range. It is based on a variable line spacing spherical grating (average groove density of 3200 mm{sup -1}, R=58.55 m) and a charge coupled device two dimensional detector. With an x-ray spot on the sample of 10 {mu}m, the targeted resolving power is higher than 10 000 at all energies below 1100 eV and better than 7000 at 1500 eV. The off-line tests made with Al and Mg K{alpha}{sub 1,2} fluorescence emissions indicate that the spectrometer can actually work at 12 000 and 17 000 resolving power at the L{sub 3} edges of Cu (930 eV) and of Ti (470 eV), respectively. SAXES (superadvanced x-ray emission spectrometer) is mounted on a rotating platform allowing to vary the scattering angle from 25 degree sign to 130 degree sign . The spectrometer will be operational at the ADRESS (advanced resonant spectroscopies) beamline of the Swiss Light Source from 2007.

  18. 3D chemical imaging in the laboratory by hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Egan, C. K.; Jacques, S. D. M.; Wilson, M. D.; Veale, M. C.; Seller, P.; Beale, A. M.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Withers, P. J.; Cernik, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of laboratory based hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography which allows the internal elemental chemistry of an object to be reconstructed and visualised in three dimensions. The method employs a spectroscopic X-ray imaging detector with sufficient energy resolution to distinguish individual elemental absorption edges. Elemental distributions can then be made by K-edge subtraction, or alternatively by voxel-wise spectral fitting to give relative atomic concentrations. We demonstrate its application to two material systems: studying the distribution of catalyst material on porous substrates for industrial scale chemical processing; and mapping of minerals and inclusion phases inside a mineralised ore sample. The method makes use of a standard laboratory X-ray source with measurement times similar to that required for conventional computed tomography. PMID:26514938

  19. Characterization of Scalar Mixing in Dense Gaseous Jets Using X-Ray Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunnmon, Jared; Kim, Tae Wook; Kovscek, Anthony; Fahrig, Rebecca; Ihme, Matthias

    2014-11-01

    An experimental technique based on X-Ray Computed Tomography (XCT) is used to characterize scalar mixing of gaseous jets at Reynolds numbers up to 20,000. In this study, the mixing of a krypton jet with ambient air is considered. The high radiodensity of the krypton gas enables non-intrusive volumetric measurements of gas density and mixture composition based on spatial variations in x-ray attenuation. Comparisons to theoretical and computational results are presented, and the viability of this diagnostic technique is assessed. Important aspects of x-ray attenuation theory and practice are considered in data processing and their impacts on future development of this technique are discussed. Support from DoD through the NDSEG Fellowship Program and from NIH through S10 Shared Instrumentation Grant S10RR026714-01 are gratefully acknowledged.

  20. 3D chemical imaging in the laboratory by hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Egan, C K; Jacques, S D M; Wilson, M D; Veale, M C; Seller, P; Beale, A M; Pattrick, R A D; Withers, P J; Cernik, R J

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of laboratory based hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography which allows the internal elemental chemistry of an object to be reconstructed and visualised in three dimensions. The method employs a spectroscopic X-ray imaging detector with sufficient energy resolution to distinguish individual elemental absorption edges. Elemental distributions can then be made by K-edge subtraction, or alternatively by voxel-wise spectral fitting to give relative atomic concentrations. We demonstrate its application to two material systems: studying the distribution of catalyst material on porous substrates for industrial scale chemical processing; and mapping of minerals and inclusion phases inside a mineralised ore sample. The method makes use of a standard laboratory X-ray source with measurement times similar to that required for conventional computed tomography. PMID:26514938