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Sample records for high-spatial resolution mid-ir

  1. High Spatial Resolution Mid-IR Imaging of V838 Monocerotis: Evidence of New Circumstellar Dust Creation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winsiewski, John P.; Clampin, Mark; Bjorkman, Karen S.; Barry, Richard K.

    2008-01-01

    The eruptive variable V838 Monocerotis experienced three dramatic outbursts in early 2002. Its unexpectedly erratic photometric behavior wes matched by strong spectroscopic variability, in which the srar transitioned through the F, K, G spectral type s in 2002 February, reseabled a M5 supergiant by 2002 Aprll, and had a L-type super qiant spectram in 2002 October. The star is also infamous for producisg e spectacu lar light echo whose evolction has beer traced by HST/ACS. We report high sFatial resolution 11.2 and 18.1 micron imagicq of V838 Nonoceroris obrained with Genini Ob servatory's Klchelle in 2007 March. The 2007 flux density of the unresclved stellar core of is rouqhly 2 tixes brighter than zhaz observed in 2C04. We interpret tkese aata as evidecce t-at V838 Mon has experienced a new circumsellar dust creatioc evezt. We suggest that this newly c reated dust is Likely clumpy, and speculate that one (or ore) of Ekese clumps migh t have passed through the line-cf-sight in late 2036, prodccing the brief rnalti-wav elength pkotonetric event reported by Bond (2006) and Yunari ez a1 (2007). A gap o f spatially exzended therrrzl (18 micron) emission is present over radial distances of 1860 - 93000 AU from che central source. Assuming ejecta material expands at a constant velocity of 300-500 km/s, this gap suggests that no prior significanz circ unstellar dust production events have occurred withiin the past approx. 900-1500 years.

  2. High-spatial resolution measurements of NO density and temperature by Mid-IR QCLAS in open-air confined plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeni Simeni, M.; Laux, C. O.; Stancu, G. D.

    2017-07-01

    Radial distributions of absolute nitric oxide (NO) density and gas temperature are measured in atmospheric confined plasmas using Mid-IR quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS). Two ro-vibrational transitions of the fundamental band are probed in the electronic ground state NO(X) at 1900.076 cm-1 and 1900.517 cm-1, respectively. Plasmas are generated using nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) discharges in air at atmospheric pressure. The spatial measurements are radially performed halfway between the discharge electrodes with a resolution down to 0.3 mm by the Abel inversion technique. The gas temperature is determined using two methods: (i) based on the ratio of the two ro-vibrational absorption lines and (ii) based on the collisional broadening line shape. The local NO density is obtained from local absorption coefficients and temperature dependent line strengths. The results were found in good agreement. The time averaged gas temperature and density at the discharge center are found at 800(±100) K and 2(±0.2)  ×  1015 cm-3, respectively. The FWHM of the NO density radial profile is found at 6-7 mm. This is large compared to the discharge channel width, i.e. typically below 0.5 mm, which is explained mainly by hot reactive jets induced in the post-discharge.

  3. High spatial frequency laser induced periodic surface structure formation in germanium by mid-IR femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Drake. R.; Kafka, Kyle R. P.; Lai, Yu Hang; Wang, Zhou; Zhang, Kaikai; Li, Hui; Blaga, Cosmin I.; Yi, Allen Y.; DiMauro, Louis F.; Chowdhury, Enam A.

    2016-10-01

    Formation of high spatial frequency laser induced periodic surface structures (HSFL) in germanium by 90 fs mid-IR pulses at a 1 kHz repetition rate with wavelengths between λ = 2 and 3.6 μm was studied with varying angle of incidence and polarization. The period of these structures varied from λ/3 to λ/8. A modified surface-scattering model including Drude excitation and the optical Kerr effect explains the spatial period scaling of HSFL across the mid-IR wavelengths. Transmission electron microscopy shows the presence of a 30 nm amorphous layer above the structure of crystalline germanium. Various mechanisms including two photon absorption and defect-induced amorphization are discussed as probable causes for the formation of this layer.

  4. Super-resolution imaging with mid-IR photothermal microscopy on the single particle level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongming; Kuno, Masaru; Hartland, Gregory

    2015-08-01

    Photothermal microscopy has achieved single molecule sensitivity. However, the analytes are usually restricted to be natural absorbers in the visible light region. Mid-infrared (MIR) imaging, on the other hand, provides a wealth of information, but encounters difficulties of diffraction-limited spatial resolution and scarcity of ideal detectors. Here we present Mid-IR photothermal heterodyne imaging (MIR-PHI) microscopy as a high sensitivity, super-resolution mid-IR imaging technique. In MIR-PHI, a tunable Mid- IR pulsed laser at 150 kHz is used to excite a micron sized particle. Energy relaxation creates a temperature gradient around the particle, changing the refractive index of the surrounding solvent and creating a thermal lens. A collinear, counter propagating probe beam (a 532 nm CW laser) is modified by the thermal lens and generates a super-resolution photothermal image. We studied 1.1 μm polystyrene beads at the single particle level using this technique. Various solvents with different heat capacities and refractive indices are tested for the best image contrast. The wide applicability and potentially high sensitivity of this technique make it promising for biological imaging and identification.

  5. Tunable Microcavity-Stabilized Quantum Cascade Laser for Mid-IR High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Borri, Simone; Siciliani de Cumis, Mario; Insero, Giacomo; Bartalini, Saverio; Cancio Pastor, Pablo; Mazzotti, Davide; Galli, Iacopo; Giusfredi, Giovanni; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Eliyahu, Danny; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Akikusa, Naota; Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute; De Natale, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The need for highly performing and stable methods for mid-IR molecular sensing and metrology pushes towards the development of more and more compact and robust systems. Among the innovative solutions aimed at answering the need for stable mid-IR references are crystalline microresonators, which have recently shown excellent capabilities for frequency stabilization and linewidth narrowing of quantum cascade lasers with compact setups. In this work, we report on the first system for mid-IR high-resolution spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser locked to a CaF2 microresonator. Electronic locking narrows the laser linewidth by one order of magnitude and guarantees good stability over long timescales, allowing, at the same time, an easy way for finely tuning the laser frequency over the molecular absorption line. Improvements in terms of resolution and frequency stability of the source are demonstrated by direct sub-Doppler recording of a molecular line. PMID:26901199

  6. New High-Resolution Absorption Cross-Section Measurements of HCFC-142B in the Mid-Ir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bris, Karine; Strong, Kimberly; Melo, Stella

    2009-06-01

    HCFC-142b (1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane) is a temporary substitute for ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). However, due to its high absorption cross-sections in the mid-IR, HCFC-142b is also a highly potent greenhouse gas, now detectable from space by satellite missions. So far, the accuracy of the retrieval has been limited by the lack of reference data in a range of temperatures compatible with atmospheric observations. We present new absorption cross section measurements of HCFC-142b at high-resolution (0.02 cm^{-1}) from 223 K to 283 K in the 600 cm^{-1}- 4000 cm^{-1} spectral window. The composite spectra are calculated for each temperature from a set of acquisitions at different pressures by Fourier transform spectroscopy.

  7. New high spectral resolution spectrograph and mid-IR camera for the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, Alan T.; Bus, Schelte J.; Connelley, Michael; Rayner, John

    2016-10-01

    The NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) is a 3.0 m infrared telescope located at an altitude of 4.2 km near the summit of Mauna Kea on the island of Hawaii. The IRTF was established by NASA to support planetary science missions. We show new observational capabilities resulting from the completion of iSHELL, a 1-5 μm echelle spectrograph with resolving power of 70,000 using a 0.375 arcsec slit. This instrument will be commissioned starting in August 2016. The spectral grasp of iSHELL is enormous due to the cross-dispersed design and use of a 2Kx2K HgCdTe array. Raw fits files will be publicly archived, allowing for more effective use of the large amount of spectral data that will be collected. The preliminary observing manual for iSHELL, containing the instrument description, observing procedures and estimates of sensitivity can be downloaded at http://irtfweb.ifa.hawaii.edu/~ishell/iSHELL_observing_manual.pdf. This manual and instrument description papers can be downloaded at http://bit.ly/28NFiMj. We are also working to restore to service our 8-25 μm camera, MIRSI. It will be upgraded with a closed cycle cooler that will eliminate the need for liquid helium and allow continuous use of MIRSI on the telescope. This will enable a wider range of Solar System studies at mid-IR wavelengths, with particular focus on thermal observations of NEOs. The MIRSI upgrade includes plans to integrate a visible CCD camera that will provide simultaneous imaging and guiding capabilities. This visible imager will utilize similar hardware and software as the MORIS system on SpeX. The MIRSI upgrade is being done in collaboration with David Trilling (NAU) and Joseph Hora (CfA). For further information on the IRTF and its instruments including visitor instruments, see: http:// irtfweb.ifa.hawaii.edu/. We gratefully acknowledge the support of NASA contract NNH14CK55B, NASA Science Mission Directorate, and NASA grant NNX15AF81G (Trilling, Hora) for the upgrade of MIRSI.

  8. Absorption Spectroscopy and Imaging from the Visible through Mid-IR with 20 nm Resolution Using AFM probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centrone, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Correlated nanoscale composition and optical property maps are important to engineer nanomaterials in applications ranging from photovoltaics to sensing and therapeutics. Wavelengths (λs) from the visible to near-IR probe electronic transitions in materials, providing information regarding band gap and defects while light in mid-IR probes vibrational transitions and provide chemical composition. However, light diffraction limits the lateral resolution of conventional micro-spectroscopic techniques to approximately λ/2, which is insufficient to image nanomaterials. Additionally, the λ-dependent resolution impedes direct comparison of spectral maps from different spectral ranges. Photo Thermal Induced Resonance (PTIR) is a novel technique that circumvents light diffraction by employing an AFM tip as a local detector for measuring light absorption with λ-independent nanoscale resolution. Our PTIR setup combines an AFM microscope with three lasers providing λ-tunability from 500 nm to 16000 nm continuously. The AFM tip transduces locally the sample thermal expansion induced by light absorption into large cantilever oscillations. Local absorption spectra (electronic or vibrational) and maps are obtained recording the amplitude of the tip deflection as a function of λ and position, respectively. The working principles of the PTIR technique will be described first, and nano-patterned polymer samples will be used to evaluate its lateral resolution, sensitivity and linearity. Results show that the PTIR signal intensity is proportional to the local absorbed energy suggesting applicability of this technique for quantitative chemical analysis at nanoscale, at least for thin (less than 1000 nm thick) samples. Additionally, a λ-independent resolution as high as 20 nm is demonstrated across the whole spectral range. In the second part of the talk, PTIR will be applied to image the dark plasmonic resonance of gold Asymmetric Split Ring Resonators (A-SRRs) in the mid-IR

  9. The dusty tori of nearby QSOs as constrained by high-resolution mid-IR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Paredes, M.; Aretxaga, I.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; González-Martín, O.; Lopéz-Rodríguez, E.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Diaz Santos, T.; Elitzur, M.; Esquej, P.; Hernán-Caballero, A.; Ichikawa, K.; Nikutta, R.; Packham, C.; Pereira-Santaella, M.; Telesco, C.

    2017-06-01

    We present mid-infrared (MIR; 7.5-13.5 μm) imaging and spectroscopy observations obtained with the CanariCam (CC) instrument on the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio CANARIAS for a sample of 20 nearby, MIR bright and X-ray luminous quasi-stellar objects (QSOs). We find that for the majority of QSOs the MIR emission is unresolved at angular scales ˜0.3 arcsec, corresponding to physical scales ≲600 pc. We find that the higher-spatial resolution CC spectra have similar shapes to those obtained with Spitzer/IRS, and hence we can assume that the spectra are not heavily contaminated by extended emission in the host galaxy. We thus take advantage of the higher signal-to-noise ratio Spitzer/IRS spectra, as a fair representation of the nuclear emission, to decompose it into a combination of active galactic nuclei (AGN), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and stellar components. In most cases, the AGN is the dominant component, with a median contribution of 85 per cent of the continuum light at MIR (5-15 μm) within the IRS slit. This IR AGN emission is well reproduced by clumpy torus models. We find evidence for significant differences in the parameters that describe the dusty tori of QSOs when compared with the same parameters of Seyfert 1 and 2 nuclei. In particular, we find a lower number of clouds (N0 ≲ 12), steeper radial distribution of clouds (q ˜ 1.5-3.0) and clouds that are less optically thick (τV ≲ 100) than in Seyfert 1, which could be attributed to dusty structures that have been partially evaporated and piled up by the higher radiation field in QSOs. We find that the combination of the angular width σtorus, viewing angle i, and number of clouds along the equatorial line, N0, produces large escape probabilities (Pesc > 2 per cent) and low geometrical covering factors (f2 ≲ 0.6), as expected for AGN with broad lines in their optical spectra.

  10. High Spatial Resolution Thermal Satellite Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert

    2003-01-01

    This document in the form of viewslides, reviews various low-cost alternatives to high spatial resolution thermal satellite technologies. There exists no follow-on to Landsat 7 or ASTER high spatial resolution thermal systems. This document reviews the results of the investigation in to the use of new technologies to create a low-cost useful alternative. Three suggested technologies are examined. 1. Conventional microbolometer pushbroom modes offers potential for low cost Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) thermal or ASTER capability with at least 60-120 ground sampling distance (GSD). 2. Backscanning could produce MultiSpectral Thermal Imager performance without cooled detectors. 3. Cooled detector could produce hyperspectral thermal class system or extremely high spatial resolution class instrument.

  11. Photoplethysmographic imaging of high spatial resolution

    PubMed Central

    Kamshilin, Alexei A.; Miridonov, Serguei; Teplov, Victor; Saarenheimo, Riku; Nippolainen, Ervin

    2011-01-01

    We present a new method of formation photoplethysmographic images with high spatial resolution from video recordings of a living body in the reflection geometry. The method (patent pending) is based on lock-in amplification of every pixel of the recorded video frames. A reference function required for synchronous detection of cardiovascular pulse waves is formed from the same frames. The method is featured by ability to visualize dynamic changes in cardiovascular pulse wave during the cardiac (or respiratory) cycle. We demonstrate that the system is capable to detect the minimal irritations of the body such as gentle scratching of the skin by own finger. PMID:21483621

  12. A deep look at the nuclear region of UGC 5101 through high angular resolution mid-IR data with GTC/CanariCam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Paredes, M.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Aretxaga, I.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Hernán-Caballero, A.; González-Martín, O.; Pereira-Santaella, M.; Packham, C.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Elitzur, M.; Esquej, P.; García-Bernete, I.; Imanishi, M.; Levenson, N. A.; Rodríguez Espinosa, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    We present an analysis of the nuclear infrared (IR, 1.6-18 μm) emission of the ultraluminous IR galaxy UGC 5101 to derive the properties of its active galactic nucleus (AGN) and its obscuring material. We use new mid-IR high angular resolution (0.3-0.5 arcsec) imaging using the Si-2 filter (λC = 8.7 μm) and 7.5-13 μm spectroscopy taken with CanariCam (CC) on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio CANARIAS. We also use archival Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS and Subaru/COMICS imaging and Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy. We estimate the near- and mid-IR unresolved nuclear emission by modelling the imaging data with GALFIT. We decompose the Spitzer/IRS and CC spectra using a power-law component, which represents the emission due to dust heated by the AGN, and a starburst component, both affected by foreground extinction. We model the resulting unresolved near- and mid-IR, and the starburst subtracted CC spectrum with the CLUMPY torus models of Nenkova et al. The derived geometrical properties of the torus, including the large covering factor and the high foreground extinction needed to reproduce the deep 9.7 μm silicate feature, are consistent with the lack of strong AGN signatures in the optical. We derive an AGN bolometric luminosity Lbol ˜ 1.9 × 1045 erg s-1 that is in good agreement with other estimates in the literature.

  13. Classification of High Spatial Resolution, Hyperspectral ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA announced the availability of the final report,High Spatial Resolution, Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Imagery of the Little Miami River Watershed in Southwest Ohio, USA . This report and associated land use/land cover (LULC) coverage is the result of a collaborative effort among an interdisciplinary team of scientists with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA's) Office of Research and Development in Cincinnati, Ohio. A primary goal of this project is to enhance the use of geography and spatial analytic tools in risk assessment, and to improve the scientific basis for risk management decisions affecting drinking water and water quality. The land use/land cover classification is derived from 82 flight lines of Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) hyperspectral imagery acquired from July 24 through August 9, 2002 via fixed-wing aircraft.

  14. High Spatial Resolution Spectroscopy of Semiconductor Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Timothy D.; Gershoni, David; Pfeiffer, Loren N.

    1996-03-01

    Several recent reports employing high spatial resolution have revealed the dominance of exciton localization in the low temperature luminescence of semiconductor quantum structures.^[1-3] Understanding this localization is of critical importance for the reliable studies of low dimensional structures such as quantum wells, quantum wires and quantum dots. We report on low temperature and high spatial resolution photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation studies of cleaved edge overgrown (CEO) single quantum wires. These samples permit the direct and unambiguous comparison between the optical properties of a (100) oriented quantum well, a (110) oriented quantum well, and the quantum wire which is formed at their intersection. Using low temperature near field optical spectroscopy, and a novel diffraction limited far field apparatus, we determine the carrier diffusion length dependence on pump wavelength and sample temperature in both the 2d systems and the genuinely 1D wire system. We also measure the absorption strength of the 1D system and find it to be a factor of 3 stronger than the absorption of the associated 2D systems.^[2] Using low temperature near field optical spectroscopy, and a novel diffraction limited far field apparatus, we also determine the carrier diffusion length dependence on pump wavelength and sample temperature. ^[1] H. F. Hess, E. Betzig, T. D. Harris, L. N. Pfeiffer, and K. W. West, Science 264, 1740 (1994). ^[2] T. D. Harris, D. Gershoni, R. D. Grober, L. Pfeiffer, K. West, and N. Chand, Appl. Phys. Lett, in press (1996) ^[3] D. Gammon, E. S. Snow, and D. S. Katzer, Appl. Phys. Lett. 67, 2391 (1995)

  15. High spatial resolution performance of pixelated scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigeta, Kazuki; Fujioka, Nobuyasu; Murai, Takahiro; Hikita, Izumi; Morinaga, Tomohiro; Tanino, Takahiro; Kodama, Haruhito; Okamura, Masaki

    2017-03-01

    In indirect conversion flat panel detectors (FPDs) for digital X-ray imaging, scintillating materials such as Terbiumdoped Gadolinium Oxysulfide (Gadox) convert X-ray into visible light, and an amorphous silicon (a-Si) photodiode array converts the light into electrons. It is, however, desired that the detector spatial resolution is improved because the light spreading inside scintillator causes crosstalk to next a-Si photodiode pixels and the resolution is degraded compared with direct conversion FPDs which directly convert X-ray into electrons by scintillating material such as amorphous selenium. In this study, the scintillator was pixelated with same pixel pitch as a-Si photodiode array by barrier rib structure to limit the light spreading, and the detector spatial resolution was improved. The FPD with pixelated scintillator was manufactured as follows. The barrier rib structure with 127μm pitch was fabricated on a substrate by a photosensitive organic-inorganic paste method, and a reflective layer was coated on the surface of the barrier rib, then the structure was filled up with Gadox particles. The pixelated scintillator was aligned with 127μm pixel pitch of a-Si photodiode array and set as a FPD. The FPD with pixelated scintillator showed high modulation transfer function (MTF) and 0.94 at 1cycle/mm and 0.88 at 2cycles/mm were achieved. The MTF values were almost equal to the maximum value that can be theoretically achieved in the FPD with 127μm pixel pitch of a-Si photodiode array. Thus the FPD with pixelated scintillators has great potential to apply for high spatial resolution applications such as mammography and nondestructive testing.

  16. Solar system events at high spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Baines, K H; Gavel, D T; Getz, A M; Gibbartd, S G; MacIntosh, B; Max, C E; McKay, C P; Young, E F; de Pater, I

    1999-02-19

    Until relatively recent advances in technology, astronomical observations from the ground were limited in image resolution by the blurring effects of earth's atmosphere. The blur extent, ranging typically from 0.5 to 2 seconds of arc at the best astronomical sights, precluded ground-based observations of the details of the solar system's moons, asteroids, and outermost planets. With the maturing of a high resolution image processing technique called speckle imaging the resolution limitation of the atmosphere can now be largely overcome. Over the past three years they have used speckle imaging to observe Titan, a moon of Saturn with an atmospheric density comparable to Earth's, Io, the volcanically active innermost moon of Jupiter, and Neptune, a gas giant outer planet which has continually changing planet-encircling storms. These observations were made at the world's largest telescope, the Keck telescope in Hawaii and represent the highest resolution infrared images of these objects ever taken.

  17. High spatial resolution restoration of IRAS images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grasdalen, Gary L.; Inguva, R.; Dyck, H. Melvin; Canterna, R.; Hackwell, John A.

    1990-01-01

    A general technique to improve the spatial resolution of the IRAS AO data was developed at The Aerospace Corporation using the Maximum Entropy algorithm of Skilling and Gull. The technique has been applied to a variety of fields and several individual AO MACROS. With this general technique, resolutions of 15 arcsec were achieved in 12 and 25 micron images and 30 arcsec in 60 and 100 micron images. Results on galactic plane fields show that both photometric and positional accuracy achieved in the general IRAS survey are also achieved in the reconstructed images.

  18. High spatial resolution passive microwave sounding systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, D. H.; Rosenkranz, P. W.; Bonanni, P. G.; Gasiewski, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    Two extensive series of flights aboard the ER-2 aircraft were conducted with the MIT 118 GHz imaging spectrometer together with a 53.6 GHz nadir channel and a TV camera record of the mission. Other microwave sensors, including a 183 GHz imaging spectrometer were flown simultaneously by other research groups. Work also continued on evaluating the impact of high-resolution passive microwave soundings upon numerical weather prediction models.

  19. High Spatial Resolution Commercial Satellite Imaging Product Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert E.; Pagnutti, Mary; Blonski, Slawomir; Ross, Kenton W.; Stnaley, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    NASA Stennis Space Center's Remote Sensing group has been characterizing privately owned high spatial resolution multispectral imaging systems, such as IKONOS, QuickBird, and OrbView-3. Natural and man made targets were used for spatial resolution, radiometric, and geopositional characterizations. Higher spatial resolution also presents significant adjacency effects for accurate reliable radiometry.

  20. High spatial resolution probes for neurobiology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunning, D. E.; Kenney, C. J.; Litke, A. M.; Mathieson, K.

    2009-06-01

    Position-sensitive biological neural networks, such as the brain and the retina, require position-sensitive detection methods to identify, map and study their behavior. Traditionally, planar microelectrodes have been employed to record the cell's electrical activity with device limitations arising from the electrode's 2-D nature. Described here is the development and characterization of an array of electrically conductive micro-needles aimed at addressing the limitations of planar electrodes. The capability of this array to penetrate neural tissue improves the electrode-cell electrical interface and allows more complicated 3-D networks of neurons, such as those found in brain slices, to be studied. State-of-the-art semiconductor fabrication techniques were used to etch and passivate conformally the metal coat and fill high aspect ratio holes in silicon. These are subsequently transformed into needles with conductive tips. This process has enabled the fabrication of arrays of unprecedented dimensions: 61 hexagonally close-packed electrodes, ˜200 μm tall with 60 μm spacing. Electroplating the tungsten tips with platinum ensure suitable impedance values (˜600 kΩ at 1 kHz) for the recording of neuronal signals. Without compromising spatial resolution of the neuronal recordings, this array adds a new and exciting dimension to the study of biological neural networks.

  1. Solar Flares at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2012-0055 Solar Flares at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Professor Mihalis Mathioudakis Queen’s...2012 2. REPORT TYPE Final Report 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) 20 July 2009 – 19 July 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Solar Flares at High Spatial and...Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Solar flares vary in

  2. High spatial resolution measurements of ram accelerator gas dynamic phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkey, J. B.; Burnham, E. A.; Bruckner, A. P.

    1992-01-01

    High spatial resolution experimental tube wall pressure measurements of ram accelerator gas dynamic phenomena are presented. The projectile resembles the centerbody of a ramjet and travels supersonically through a tube filled with a combustible gaseous mixture, with the tube acting as the outer cowling. Pressure data are recorded as the projectile passes by sensors mounted in the tube wall at various locations along the tube. Data obtained by using a special highly instrumented section of tube has allowed the recording of gas dynamic phenomena with a spatial resolution on the order of one tenth the projectile length. High spatial resolution tube wall pressure data from the three regimes of propulsion studied to date (subdetonative, transdetonative, and superdetonative) are presented and reveal the 3D character of the flowfield induced by projectile fins and the canting of the projectile body relative to the tube wall. Also presented for comparison to the experimental data are calculations made with an inviscid, 3D CFD code.

  3. Photoacoustic lymphatic imaging with high spatial-temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Catherine; Yao, Junjie; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-11-01

    Despite its critical function in coordinating the egress of inflammatory and immune cells out of tissues and maintaining fluid balance, the causative role of lymphatic network dysfunction in pathological settings is still understudied. Engineered-animal models and better noninvasive high spatial-temporal resolution imaging techniques in both preclinical and clinical studies will help to improve our understanding of different lymphatic-related pathologic disorders. Our aim was to take advantage of our newly optimized noninvasive wide-field fast-scanning photoacoustic (PA) microcopy system to coordinately image the lymphatic vasculature and its flow dynamics, while maintaining high resolution and detection sensitivity. Here, by combining the optical-resolution PA microscopy with a fast-scanning water-immersible microelectromechanical system scanning mirror, we have imaged the lymph dynamics over a large field-of-view, with high spatial resolution and advanced detection sensitivity. Depending on the application, lymphatic vessels (LV) were spectrally or temporally differentiated from blood vessels. Validation experiments were performed on phantoms and in vivo to identify the LV. Lymphatic flow dynamics in nonpathological and pathological conditions were also visualized. These results indicate that our newly developed PA microscopy is a promising tool for lymphatic-related biological research.

  4. Concepts for compact mid-IR spectroscopy in photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cu-Nguyen, Phuong-Ha; Wang, Ziyu; Zappe, Hans

    2016-11-01

    Mid-infrared (IR) spectroscopy, typically 3 to 5 µm, is often the technology of choice to monitor the interaction between and concentration of molecules during photochemical reactions. However, classical mid-IR spectrometers are bulky, complex and expensive, making them unsuitable for use in the miniaturized microreactors increasingly being employed for chemical synthesis. We present here the concept for an ultra-miniaturized mid-IR spectrometer directly integrated onto a chemical microreactor to monitor the chemical reaction. The spectrometer is based on micro-machined Fabry-Perot resonator filters realized using pairs of Bragg mirrors to achieve a high spectral resolution. The fabrication of the optical filters is outlined and the measurement of transmittance spectra in the mid-IR range show a good agreement with theory and are thus promising candidates for a fully integrated system.

  5. Science with High Spatial Resolution Far-Infrared Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terebey, Susan (Editor); Mazzarella, Joseph M. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this workshop was to discuss new science and techniques relevant to high spatial resolution processing of far-infrared data, with particular focus on high resolution processing of IRAS data. Users of the maximum correlation method, maximum entropy, and other resolution enhancement algorithms applicable to far-infrared data gathered at the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) for two days in June 1993 to compare techniques and discuss new results. During a special session on the third day, interested astronomers were introduced to IRAS HIRES processing, which is IPAC's implementation of the maximum correlation method to the IRAS data. Topics discussed during the workshop included: (1) image reconstruction; (2) random noise; (3) imagery; (4) interacting galaxies; (5) spiral galaxies; (6) galactic dust and elliptical galaxies; (7) star formation in Seyfert galaxies; (8) wavelet analysis; and (9) supernova remnants.

  6. High spatial resolution measurements in a single stage ram accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkey, J. B.; Burnham, E. A.; Bruckner, A. P.

    1992-01-01

    High spatial resolution experimental tube wall pressure measurements of ram accelerator gas dynamic phenomena are presented in this paper. The ram accelerator is a ramjet-in-tube device which operates in a manner similar to that of a conventional ramjet. The projectile resembles the centerbody of a ramjet and travels supersonically through a tube filled with a combustible gaseous mixture, with the tube acting as the outer cowling. Pressure data are recorded as the projectile passes by sensors mounted in the tube wall at various locations along the tube. Utilization of special highly instrumented sections of tube has allowed the recording of gas dynamic phenomena with high resolution. High spatial resolution tube wall pressure data from the three regimes of propulsion studied to date (subdetonative, transdetonative, and superdetonative) in a single stage gas mixture are presented and reveal the three-dimensional character of the flow field induced by projectile fins and the canting of the fins and the canting of the projectile body relative to the tube wall. Also presented for comparison to the experimental data are calculations made with an inviscid, three-dimensional CFD code. The knowledge gained from these experiments and simulations is useful in understanding the underlying nature of ram accelerator propulsive regimes, as well as assisting in the validation of three-dimensional CFD coded which model unsteady, chemically reactive flows.

  7. A Very High Spatial Resolution Detector for Small Animal PET

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai Shah, M.S.

    2007-03-06

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an in vivo analog of autoradiography and has the potential to become a powerful new tool in imaging biological processes in small laboratory animals. PET imaging of small animals can provide unique information that can help in advancement of human disease models as well as drug development. Clinical PET scanners used for human imaging are bulky, expensive and do not have adequate spatial resolution for small animal studies. Hence, dedicated, low cost instruments are required for conducting small animal studies with higher spatial resolution than what is currently achieved with clinical as well as dedicated small animal PET scanners. The goal of the proposed project is to investigate a new all solid-state detector design for small animal PET imaging. Exceptionally high spatial resolution, good timing resolution, and excellent energy resolution are expected from the proposed detector design. The Phase I project was aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of producing high performance solid-state detectors that provide high sensitivity, spatial resolution, and timing characteristics. Energy resolution characteristics of the new detector were also investigated. The goal of the Phase II project is to advance the promising solid-state detector technology for small animal PET and determine its full potential. Detectors modules will be built and characterized and finally, a bench-top small animal PET system will be assembled and evaluated.

  8. Using a high spatial resolution tactile sensor for intention detection.

    PubMed

    Castellini, Claudio; Koiva, Risto

    2013-06-01

    Intention detection is the interpretation of biological signals with the aim of automatically, reliably and naturally understanding what a human subject desires to do. Although intention detection is not restricted to disabled people, such methods can be crucial in improving a patient's life, e.g., aiding control of a robotic wheelchair or of a self-powered prosthesis. Traditionally, intention detection is done using, e.g., gaze tracking, surface electromyography and electroencephalography. In this paper we present exciting initial results of an experiment aimed at intention detection using a high-spatial-resolution, high-dynamic-range tactile sensor. The tactile image of the ventral side of the forearm of 9 able-bodied participants was recorded during a variable-force task stimulated at the fingertip. Both the forces at the fingertip and at the forearm were synchronously recorded. We show that a standard dimensionality reduction technique (Principal Component Analysis) plus a Support Vector Machine attain almost perfect detection accuracy of the direction and the intensity of the intended force. This paves the way for high spatial resolution tactile sensors to be used as a means for intention detection.

  9. High spatial resolution soft-x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer-Ilse, W.; Medecki, H.; Brown, J.T.

    1997-04-01

    A new soft x-ray microscope (XM-1) with high spatial resolution has been constructed by the Center for X-ray Optics. It uses bending magnet radiation from beamline 6.1 at the Advanced Light Source, and is used in a variety of projects and applications in the life and physical sciences. Most of these projects are ongoing. The instrument uses zone plate lenses and achieves a resolution of 43 nm, measured over 10% to 90% intensity with a knife edge test sample. X-ray microscopy permits the imaging of relatively thick samples, up to 10 {mu}m thick, in water. XM-1 has an easy to use interface, that utilizes visible light microscopy to precisely position and focus the specimen. The authors describe applications of this device in the biological sciences, as well as in studying industrial applications including structured polymer samples.

  10. High Spatial Resolution Fe XII Observations of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Paola; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo

    2016-08-01

    We use UV spectral observations of active regions with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to investigate the properties of the coronal Fe xii 1349.4 Å emission at unprecedented high spatial resolution (˜0.33″). We find that by using appropriate observational strategies (i.e., long exposures, lossless compression), Fe xii emission can be studied with IRIS at high spatial and spectral resolution, at least for high-density plasma (e.g., post-flare loops and active region moss). We find that upper transition region (TR; moss) Fe xii emission shows very small average Doppler redshifts ({v}{{D}} ˜ 3 km s-1) as well as modest non-thermal velocities (with an average of ˜24 km s-1 and the peak of the distribution at ˜15 km s-1). The observed distribution of Doppler shifts appears to be compatible with advanced three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations in which impulsive heating is concentrated at the TR footpoints of a hot corona. While the non-thermal broadening of Fe xii 1349.4 Å peaks at similar values as lower resolution simultaneous Hinode Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) measurements of Fe xii 195 Å, IRIS observations show a previously undetected tail of increased non-thermal broadening that might be suggestive of the presence of subarcsecond heating events. We find that IRIS and EIS non-thermal line broadening measurements are affected by instrumental effects that can only be removed through careful analysis. Our results also reveal an unexplained discrepancy between observed 195.1/1349.4 Å Fe xii intensity ratios and those predicted by the CHIANTI atomic database.

  11. High-spatial-resolution nanoparticle x-ray fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Jakob C.; Vâgberg, William; Vogt, Carmen; Lundström, Ulf; Larsson, Daniel H.; Hertz, Hans M.

    2016-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence tomography (XFCT) has potential for high-resolution 3D molecular x-ray bio-imaging. In this technique the fluorescence signal from targeted nanoparticles (NPs) is measured, providing information about the spatial distribution and concentration of the NPs inside the object. However, present laboratory XFCT systems typically have limited spatial resolution (>1 mm) and suffer from long scan times and high radiation dose even at high NP concentrations, mainly due to low efficiency and poor signal-to-noise ratio. We have developed a laboratory XFCT system with high spatial resolution (sub-100 μm), low NP concentration and vastly decreased scan times and dose, opening up the possibilities for in-vivo small-animal imaging research. The system consists of a high-brightness liquid-metal-jet microfocus x-ray source, x-ray focusing optics and an energy-resolving photon-counting detector. By using the source's characteristic 24 keV line-emission together with carefully matched molybdenum nanoparticles the Compton background is greatly reduced, increasing the SNR. Each measurement provides information about the spatial distribution and concentration of the Mo nanoparticles. A filtered back-projection method is used to produce the final XFCT image.

  12. Progress toward accurate high spatial resolution actinide analysis by EPMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jercinovic, M. J.; Allaz, J. M.; Williams, M. L.

    2010-12-01

    High precision, high spatial resolution EPMA of actinides is a significant issue for geochronology, resource geochemistry, and studies involving the nuclear fuel cycle. Particular interest focuses on understanding of the behavior of Th and U in the growth and breakdown reactions relevant to actinide-bearing phases (monazite, zircon, thorite, allanite, etc.), and geochemical fractionation processes involving Th and U in fluid interactions. Unfortunately, the measurement of minor and trace concentrations of U in the presence of major concentrations of Th and/or REEs is particularly problematic, especially in complexly zoned phases with large compositional variation on the micro or nanoscale - spatial resolutions now accessible with modern instruments. Sub-micron, high precision compositional analysis of minor components is feasible in very high Z phases where scattering is limited at lower kV (15kV or less) and where the beam diameter can be kept below 400nm at high current (e.g. 200-500nA). High collection efficiency spectrometers and high performance electron optics in EPMA now allow the use of lower overvoltage through an exceptional range in beam current, facilitating higher spatial resolution quantitative analysis. The U LIII edge at 17.2 kV precludes L-series analysis at low kV (high spatial resolution), requiring careful measurements of the actinide M series. Also, U-La detection (wavelength = 0.9A) requires the use of LiF (220) or (420), not generally available on most instruments. Strong peak overlaps of Th on U make highly accurate interference correction mandatory, with problems compounded by the ThMIV and ThMV absorption edges affecting peak, background, and interference calibration measurements (especially the interference of the Th M line family on UMb). Complex REE bearing phases such as monazite, zircon, and allanite have particularly complex interference issues due to multiple peak and background overlaps from elements present in the activation

  13. Dynamic Raman imaging system with high spatial and temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Dai, Yinzhen; He, Hao; Lv, Ruiqi; Zong, Cheng; Ren, Bin

    2017-09-01

    There is an increasing need to study dynamic changing systems with significantly high spatial and temporal resolutions. In this work, we integrated point-scanning, line-scanning, and wide-field Raman imaging techniques into a single system. By using an Electron Multiplying CCD (EMCCD) with a high gain and high frame rate, we significantly reduced the time required for wide-field imaging, making it possible to monitor the electrochemical reactions in situ. The highest frame rate of EMCDD was ˜50 fps, and the Raman images for a specific Raman peak can be obtained by passing the signal from the sample through the Liquid Crystal Tunable Filter. The spatial resolutions of scanning imaging and wide-field imaging with a 100× objective (NA = 0.9) are 0.5 × 0.5 μm2 and 0.36 × 0.36 μm2, respectively. The system was used to study the surface plasmon resonance of Au nanorods, the surface-enhanced Raman scattering signal distribution for Au Nanoparticle aggregates, and dynamic Raman imaging of an electrochemical reacting system.

  14. Monte Carlo code for high spatial resolution ocean color simulations.

    PubMed

    D'Alimonte, Davide; Zibordi, Giuseppe; Kajiyama, Tamito; Cunha, José C

    2010-09-10

    A Monte Carlo code for ocean color simulations has been developed to model in-water radiometric fields of downward and upward irradiance (E(d) and E(u)), and upwelling radiance (L(u)) in a two-dimensional domain with a high spatial resolution. The efficiency of the code has been optimized by applying state-of-the-art computing solutions, while the accuracy of simulation results has been quantified through benchmark with the widely used Hydrolight code for various values of seawater inherent optical properties and different illumination conditions. Considering a seawater single scattering albedo of 0.9, as well as surface waves of 5 m width and 0.5 m height, the study has shown that the number of photons required to quantify uncertainties induced by wave focusing effects on E(d), E(u), and L(u) data products is of the order of 10(6), 10(9), and 10(10), respectively. On this basis, the effects of sea-surface geometries on radiometric quantities have been investigated for different surface gravity waves. Data products from simulated radiometric profiles have finally been analyzed as a function of the deployment speed and sampling frequency of current free-fall systems in view of providing recommendations to improve measurement protocols.

  15. Proceedings of the 2004 High Spatial Resolution Commercial Imagery Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    ; Innovative Approaches to Analysis of Lidar Data for the National Map; Changes in Imperviousness near Military Installations; Geopositional Accuracy Evaluations of QuickBird and OrbView-3: Civil and Commercial Applications Project (CCAP); Geometric Accuracy Assessment: OrbView ORTHO Products; QuickBird Radiometric Calibration Update; OrbView-3 Radiometric Calibration; QuickBird Radiometric Characterization; NASA Radiometric Characterization; Establishing and Verifying the Traceability of Remote-Sensing Measurements to International Standards; QuickBird Applications; Airport Mapping and Perpetual Monitoring Using IKONOS; OrbView-3 Relative Accuracy Results and Impacts on Exploitation and Accuracy Improvement; Using Remotely Sensed Imagery to Determine Impervious Surface in Sioux Falls, South Dakota; Applying High-Resolution Satellite Imagery and Remotely Sensed Data to Local Government Applications: Sioux Falls, South Dakota; Automatic Co-Registration of QuickBird Data for Change Detection Applications; Developing Coastal Surface Roughness Maps Using ASTER and QuickBird Data Sources; Automated, Near-Real Time Cloud and Cloud Shadow Detection in High Resolution VNIR Imagery; Science Applications of High Resolution Imagery at the USGS EROS Data Center; Draft Plan for Characterizing Commercial Data Products in Support of Earth Science Research; Atmospheric Correction Prototype Algorithm for High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Earth Observing Imaging Systems; Determining Regional Arctic Tundra Carbon Exchange: A Bottom-Up Approach; Using IKONOS Imagery to Assess Impervious Surface Area, Riparian Buffers and Stream Health in the Mid-Atlantic Region; Commercial Remote Sensing Space Policy Civil Implementation Update; USGS Commercial Remote Sensing Data Contracts (CRSDC); and Commercial Remote Sensing Space Policy (CRSSP): Civil Near-Term Requirements Collection Update.

  16. Proceedings of the 2004 High Spatial Resolution Commercial Imagery Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    ; Innovative Approaches to Analysis of Lidar Data for the National Map; Changes in Imperviousness near Military Installations; Geopositional Accuracy Evaluations of QuickBird and OrbView-3: Civil and Commercial Applications Project (CCAP); Geometric Accuracy Assessment: OrbView ORTHO Products; QuickBird Radiometric Calibration Update; OrbView-3 Radiometric Calibration; QuickBird Radiometric Characterization; NASA Radiometric Characterization; Establishing and Verifying the Traceability of Remote-Sensing Measurements to International Standards; QuickBird Applications; Airport Mapping and Perpetual Monitoring Using IKONOS; OrbView-3 Relative Accuracy Results and Impacts on Exploitation and Accuracy Improvement; Using Remotely Sensed Imagery to Determine Impervious Surface in Sioux Falls, South Dakota; Applying High-Resolution Satellite Imagery and Remotely Sensed Data to Local Government Applications: Sioux Falls, South Dakota; Automatic Co-Registration of QuickBird Data for Change Detection Applications; Developing Coastal Surface Roughness Maps Using ASTER and QuickBird Data Sources; Automated, Near-Real Time Cloud and Cloud Shadow Detection in High Resolution VNIR Imagery; Science Applications of High Resolution Imagery at the USGS EROS Data Center; Draft Plan for Characterizing Commercial Data Products in Support of Earth Science Research; Atmospheric Correction Prototype Algorithm for High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Earth Observing Imaging Systems; Determining Regional Arctic Tundra Carbon Exchange: A Bottom-Up Approach; Using IKONOS Imagery to Assess Impervious Surface Area, Riparian Buffers and Stream Health in the Mid-Atlantic Region; Commercial Remote Sensing Space Policy Civil Implementation Update; USGS Commercial Remote Sensing Data Contracts (CRSDC); and Commercial Remote Sensing Space Policy (CRSSP): Civil Near-Term Requirements Collection Update.

  17. Global anthropogenic heat flux database with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Y.; Varquez, A. C. G.; Kanda, M.

    2017-02-01

    This study developed a top-down method for estimating global anthropogenic heat emission (AHE), with a high spatial resolution of 30 arc-seconds and temporal resolution of 1 h. Annual average AHE was derived from human metabolic heating and primary energy consumption, which was further divided into three components based on consumer sector. The first and second components were heat loss and heat emissions from industrial sectors equally distributed throughout the country and populated areas, respectively. The third component comprised the sum of emissions from commercial, residential, and transportation sectors (CRT). Bulk AHE from the CRT was proportionally distributed using a global population dataset, with a radiance-calibrated nighttime lights adjustment. An empirical function to estimate monthly fluctuations of AHE based on gridded monthly temperatures was derived from various Japanese and American city measurements. Finally, an AHE database with a global coverage was constructed for the year 2013. Comparisons between our proposed AHE and other existing datasets revealed that the problem of overestimation of AHE intensity in previous top-down models was mitigated by the separation of energy consumption sectors; furthermore, the problem of AHE underestimation at central urban areas was solved by the nighttime lights adjustment. A strong agreement in the monthly profiles of AHE between our database and other bottom-up datasets further proved the validity of the current methodology. Investigations of AHE for the 29 largest urban agglomerations globally highlighted that the share of heat emissions from CRT sectors to the total AHE at the city level was 40-95%; whereas that of metabolic heating varied with the city's level of development by a range of 2-60%. A negative correlation between gross domestic product (GDP) and the share of metabolic heating to a city's total AHE was found. Globally, peak AHE values were found to occur between December and February, while

  18. Polarimetry of sunspot penumbrae with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello González, N.; Okunev, O. V.; Domínguez Cerdeña, I.; Kneer, F.; Puschmann, K. G.

    2005-04-01

    We present two-dimensional high-spatial-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of sunspot penumbrae. They were obtained in April 2002 and May 2003 with the "Göttingen" Fabry-Pérot spectrometer at the Vacuum Tower Telescope at the Observatorio del Teide (Tenerife). Speckle methods were applied for image reconstruction which resulted in a spatial resolution of 0.5 arcsec in the magnetograms of the penumbrae. We analysed Stokes I and V profiles of the Fe II 6149 Å line, which exhibits no instrumental Stokes Q/U→ V crosstalk, and of the Fe I line pair at 6302 Å. The main results are the following: 1) on scales larger than 0.5 arcsec, the intensity pattern of penumbrae stays the same in the continuum and core images of the 6301.5 Å line, which stem from 0 km and 300 km (above τ_5=1), respectively. Yet at scales of 0.5 arcsec and smaller the pattern in the two spectral features is clearly different. 2) On the limb side of sunspots the Evershed flow is carried by dark filaments and on the centre side by bright features and their somewhat weakened tails. We explain this with a picture in which the velocity of hot rising gas is best seen on the centre side, while on the limb side the horizontal outward and possibly downward flows are seen when the gas has cooled down. 3) The un-combed structure of the magnetic field is confirmed. On the limb side, the more horizontal fields coincide with dark fibrils or with diffuse intensity structures. Generally, the more horizontal fields are located at the positions of strong outflows. 4) Strong line-of-sight components of the magnetic fields are not found in bright filaments but in dark structures, somewhat displaced from the darkest parts. Their positions do not coincide with those of the strongest velocity fields. In general, our results are compatible with the picture of low lying flow channels coincident with the horizontal magnetic field, or possibly emerging and diving down into sub-photospheric layers, like a "sea

  19. High-Temporal-Resolution High-Spatial-Resolution Spaceborne SAR Based on Continuously Varying PRF.

    PubMed

    Men, Zhirong; Wang, Pengbo; Li, Chunsheng; Chen, Jie; Liu, Wei; Fang, Yue

    2017-07-25

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is a well-established and powerful imaging technique for acquiring high-spatial-resolution images of the Earth's surface. With the development of beam steering techniques, sliding spotlight and staring spotlight modes have been employed to support high-spatial-resolution applications. In addition to this strengthened high-spatial-resolution and wide-swath capability, high-temporal-resolution (short repeat-observation interval) represents a key capability for numerous applications. However, conventional SAR systems are limited in that the same patch can only be illuminated for several seconds within a single pass. This paper considers a novel high-squint-angle system intended to acquire high-spatial-resolution spaceborne SAR images with repeat-observation intervals varying from tens of seconds to several minutes within a single pass. However, an exponentially increased range cell migration would arise and lead to a conflict between the receive window and 'blind ranges'. An efficient data acquisition technique for high-temporal-resolution, high-spatial-resolution and high-squint-angle spaceborne SAR, in which the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) is continuously varied according to the changing slant range, is presented in this paper. This technique allows echo data to remain in the receive window instead of conflicting with the transmitted pulse or nadir echo. Considering the precision of hardware, a compromise and practical strategy is also proposed. Furthermore, a detailed performance analysis of range ambiguities is provided with respect to parameters of TerraSAR-X. For strong point-like targets, the range ambiguity of this technique would be better than that of uniform PRF technique. For this innovative technique, a resampling strategy and modified imaging algorithm have been developed to handle the non-uniformly sampled echo data. Simulations are performed to validate the efficiency of the proposed technique and the associated

  20. Mid-IR FORCAST/SOFIA Observations of M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikola, T.; Herter, T. L.; Vacca, W. D.; Adams, J. D.; De Buizer, J. M.; Gull, G. E.; Henderson, C. P.; Keller, L. D.; Morris, M. R.; Schoenwald, J.; Stacey, G.; Tielens, A.

    2012-04-01

    We present 75'' × 75'' size maps of M82 at 6.4 μm, 6.6 μm, 7.7 μm, 31.5 μm, and 37.1 μm with a resolution of ~4'' that we have obtained with the mid-IR camera FORCAST on SOFIA. We find strong emission from the inner 60'' (~1 kpc) along the major axis, with the main peak 5'' west-southwest of the nucleus and a secondary peak 4'' east-northeast of the nucleus. The detailed morphology of the emission differs among the bands, which is likely due to different dust components dominating the continuum emission at short mid-IR wavelengths and long mid-IR wavelengths. We include Spitzer-IRS and Herschel/PACS 70 μm data to fit spectral energy distribution templates at both emission peaks. The best-fitting templates have extinctions of AV = 18 and AV = 9 toward the main and secondary emission peak and we estimated a color temperature of 68 K at both peaks from the 31 μm and 37 μm measurement. At the emission peaks the estimated dust masses are on the order of 104 M ⊙.

  1. High spatial resolution mid-infrared spectroscopy of NGC 5253: The stellar content of the embedded super-star cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Hernández, N. L.; Schaerer, D.; Sauvage, M.

    2005-01-01

    We present the N-band (8-13 μm) spectrum of the hidden compact radio super-star cluster in NGC 5253, C2, obtained with TIMMI2 on the ESO 3.6 m telescope. The spectrum is characterised by a rising continuum due to warm dust, a silicate absorption and a strong [S IV] line at 10.5 μm. Weaker lines of [Ar II]I at 9.0 μm and [Ne II] at 12.8 μm are also present. The continuum can be modelled by an optically thick emission from hot (Td=253 ± 1 K) dust emission extinguished by a cold foreground dust screen and a silicate absorption feature with Asil = 0.73 ± 0.05 mag. We show how the spatial scale of the observations greatly determine the mid-IR appearance of NGC 5253 and the important implications that this has on the interpretation of line fluxes in terms of the properties (age, IMF, etc.) of the embedded cluster. We have modelled the observed line fluxes towards C2 using photoionisation models with the most recent spectral energy distributions available to describe the integrated properties of the stellar cluster. The detailed dependence of the mid-IR lines on parameters such as the cluster age, upper mass cutoff and power law index of the IMF, as well as the local abundance, the presence of internal dust and the density structure is largely discussed. Strong constraints on the geometry based on high spatial resolution observations at different wavelengths - near-IR (HST and Keck), mid-IR (TIMMI2) and radio (VLA) - allows us to restrain the ionisation parameters to values log U ≥-0.5 dex. This constraint on U leads to two possible solutions for the age and upper mass cutoff of C2: 1) a young (<4 Myr) cluster with a ``non-standard'' IMF having a low upper mass cutoff Mup,< 50 M⊙; and 2) a cluster of ˜ 5-6 Myr with a standard high upper mass cutoff (Mup,˜ 100 M⊙). A young age of <4 Myr would agree with the lack of supernovae signatures in C2 and in case of being confirmed, would be the first indication for a ``non-standard'', low upper mass cutoff of the IMF

  2. Tunable mid IR plasmon in GZO nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Hamza, M K; Bluet, J-M; Masenelli-Varlot, K; Canut, B; Boisron, O; Melinon, P; Masenelli, B

    2015-07-28

    Degenerate metal oxide nanoparticles are promising systems to expand the significant achievements of plasmonics into the infrared (IR) range. Among the possible candidates, Ga-doped ZnO nanocrystals are particularly suited for mid IR, considering their wide range of possible doping levels and thus of plasmon tuning. In the present work, we report on the tunable mid IR plasmon induced in degenerate Ga-doped ZnO nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are produced by a plasma expansion and exhibit unprotected surfaces. Tuning the Ga concentration allows tuning the localized surface plasmon resonance. Moreover, the plasmon resonance is characterized by a large damping. By comparing the plasmon of nanocrystal assemblies to that of nanoparticles dispersed in an alumina matrix, we investigate the possible origins of such damping. We demonstrate that it partially results from the self-organization of the naked particles and also from intrinsic inhomogeneity of dopants.

  3. Research Relative to High Spatial Resolution Passive Microwave Sounding Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, D. H.; Rosenkranz, P. W.

    1984-01-01

    Methods to obtain high resolution passive microwave weather observations, and understanding of their probable impact on numerical weather prediction accuracy were investigated. The development of synthetic aperture concepts for geosynchronous passive microwave sounders were studied. The effects of clouds, precipitation, surface phenomena, and atmospheric thermal fine structure on a scale of several kilometers were examined. High resolution passive microwave sounders (e.g., AMSU) with an increased number of channels will produce initialization data for numerical weather prediction (NWP) models with both increased spatial resolution and coverage. The development of statistical models for error growth in high resolution primitive equation NWP models which permit the consequences of various observing system alternatives, including sensors and assimilation times and procedures is discussed. A high resolution three dimensional primitive equation NWP model to determine parameters in an error growth model similar to that formulated by Lorenz, but with more degrees of freedom is utilized.

  4. High spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging of cystic adventitial disease of the popliteal artery.

    PubMed

    Maged, Ismaeel M; Turba, Ulku C; Housseini, Ahmed M; Kern, John A; Kron, Irving L; Hagspiel, Klaus D

    2010-02-01

    High spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of patients with cystic adventitial disease can demonstrate connections between cysts in the adventitia and the adjacent joint, which is important for successful treatment. The inability to identify these during surgery can lead to a recurrence; thus, high spatial resolution MRI has the potential to affect therapy. This article presents the high spatial resolution MRI findings of cystic adventitial disease in a series of three consecutive patients and discusses the relevance of these findings to the etiology and therapy.

  5. Remote Measurements of the Atmosphere with High Spatial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinman, J. A.; Marzano, F. S.; Mugnai, A.

    2009-09-01

    Global atmosphere-ocean models are now operating at 3.5 km resolution and mesoscale weather prediction models operating at 1.7 km resolution have been used for the analysis of hurricanes. One can expect that weather prediction models will operate at resolutions better than 5 km during the coming decade. Microwave sensors have contributed valuable information about rainfall and sea surface winds. The Precipitation Radar (PR) onboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) can address this need. However it may be nearing the end of its life, and its replacement by the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is expected no earlier than 2013. Recently the four Italian Cosmo-SkyMed, and the German Terra-SAR X-band synthetic aperture radars (SAR’s) have displayed rain distributions with resolution better than 0.5 km. The Quickscat also now provides distributions of rainfall and sea surface winds with 2.5 km resolution. We will describe rainfall retrieval algorithms, show rainfall distributions retrieved from Terra-SAR, and discuss errors in those measurements. We will also describe multi-frequency radar measurements of sea surface winds and rainfall during hurricanes. Although most remotely sensed rainfall and wind data can be expected to be obtained from satellites, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV’s) with one week cruising duration and ~180 kg payloads flying at 18 km height may become attractive platforms from which severe weather can be tracked with high resolution.

  6. Near diffraction limited mid-IR spectromicroscopy using frequency upconversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Nicolai; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2014-02-01

    Mid-infrared microscopy and spectroscopy is interesting due to its medical, biological and chemical applications. Spectromicroscopy can be used for histopathology, sample analysis and diagnosis. The ability to do spectromicroscopy in the 2.5 to 4.5 μm wavelength range where many organic molecules have their fundamental vibrations, with the addition of sufficient spectroscopic resolution to resolve these bands, can e.g. potentially allow for diagnostics without the need for staining of the sample. On a longer timeframe, mid-IR spectromicroscopy has the potential for in-vivo diagnostics, combining morphological and spectral imaging. Recent developments in nonlinear frequency upconversion, have demonstrated the potential to perform both imaging and spectroscopy in the mid-IR range at unparalleled low levels of illumination, the low upconversion detector noise being orders of magnitude below competing technologies. With these applications in mind, we have incorporated microscopy optics into an image upconversion system, achieving near diffraction limited spatial resolution in the 3 μm range. Spectroscopic information is further acquired by appropriate control of the phase match condition of the upconversion process. Multispectral images for a region of interest can be obtained by XY-scanning this region of interest within the field of view of the mid-IR upconversion system. Thus, the whole region of interest can be imaged with all available converter wavelengths, and the spectral representation becomes equal for all points in the image. In addition, the range of converted/imaged wavelengths can be tuned continuously by changing the temperature of the crystal, or discretely by using a different poling channel in the PPLN crystal.

  7. Quantifying mangrove chlorophyll from high spatial resolution imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heenkenda, Muditha K.; Joyce, Karen E.; Maier, Stefan W.; de Bruin, Sytze

    2015-10-01

    Lower than expected chlorophyll concentration of a plant can directly limit photosynthetic activity, and resultant primary production. Low chlorophyll concentration may also indicate plant physiological stress. Compared to other terrestrial vegetation, mangrove chlorophyll variations are poorly understood. This study quantifies the spatial distribution of mangrove canopy chlorophyll variation using remotely sensed data and field samples over the Rapid Creek mangrove forest in Darwin, Australia. Mangrove leaf samples were collected and analyzed for chlorophyll content in the laboratory. Once the leaf area index (LAI) of sampled trees was estimated using the digital cover photography method, the canopy chlorophyll contents were calculated. Then, the nonlinear random forests regression algorithm was used to describe the relationship between canopy chlorophyll content and remotely sensed data (WorldView-2 satellite image bands and their spectral transformations), and to estimate the spatial distribution of canopy chlorophyll variation. The imagery was evaluated at full 2 m spatial resolution, as well as at decreased resampled resolutions of 5 m and 10 m. The root mean squared errors with validation samples were 0.82, 0.64 and 0.65 g/m2 for maps at 2 m, 5 m and 10 m spatial resolution respectively. The correlation coefficient was analyzed for the relationship between measured and predicted chlorophyll values. The highest correlation: 0.71 was observed at 5 m spatial resolution (R2 = 0.5). We therefore concluded that estimating mangrove chlorophyll content from remotely sensed data is possible using red, red-edge, NIR1 and NIR2 bands and their spectral transformations as predictors at 5 m spatial resolution.

  8. TDDA technology for high spatial resolution SWIR InGaAs imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jianxin; Wang, Yueming; Zhuang, Xiaoqiong; Yao, Yi; Wang, Shengwei; Zhao, Ding; Shu, Rong; Wang, Jianyu

    2016-11-01

    With the development of remote sensing technology, shortwave infrared (SWIR) imaging technology has got more and more attention because of its ability through the fog and high spatial resolution. High spatial resolution SWIR imaging often requires high frame frequency. If the frame frequency is too high, it could cause the shortage of the image's signal to noise ratio (SNR), seriously affecting image quality. In order to solve the contradiction between high spatial resolution and sensitivity, time delay and digital accumulation (TDDA) technology is proposed in this paper to improve system's SNR and image quality. A prototype of SWIR imaging system based on a large format area InGaAs detector is designed, which demonstrates TDDA technology. The experiment results indicate that TDDA technology can increase system's SNR of the square root of accumulative stage and improve image's uniformity. The results in this paper are helpful for the improvement and application of high spatial resolution SWIR imaging technology.

  9. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS OF LOOPS IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, David H.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, Harry P.; Winebarger, Amy R.

    2013-08-01

    Understanding how the solar corona is structured is of fundamental importance to determine how the Sun's upper atmosphere is heated to high temperatures. Recent spectroscopic studies have suggested that an instrument with a spatial resolution of 200 km or better is necessary to resolve coronal loops. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) achieved this performance on a rocket flight in 2012 July. We use Hi-C data to measure the Gaussian widths of 91 loops observed in the solar corona and find a distribution that peaks at about 270 km. We also use Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data for a subset of these loops and find temperature distributions that are generally very narrow. These observations provide further evidence that loops in the solar corona are often structured at a scale of several hundred kilometers, well above the spatial scale of many proposed physical mechanisms.

  10. Atmospheric Correction Prototype Algorithm for High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Earth Observing Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the creation of a prototype algorithm for atmospheric correction using high spatial resolution earth observing imaging systems. The objective of the work was to evaluate accuracy of a prototype algorithm that uses satellite-derived atmospheric products to generate scene reflectance maps for high spatial resolution (HSR) systems. This presentation focused on preliminary results of only the satellite-based atmospheric correction algorithm.

  11. Development of an Objective High Spatial Resolution Soil Moisture Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavodsky, B.; Case, J.; White, K.; Bell, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Drought detection, analysis, and mitigation has become a key challenge for a diverse set of decision makers, including but not limited to operational weather forecasters, climatologists, agricultural interests, and water resource management. One tool that is heavily used is the United States Drought Monitor (USDM), which is derived from a complex blend of objective data and subjective analysis on a state-by-state basis using a variety of modeled and observed precipitation, soil moisture, hydrologic, and vegetation and crop health data. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center currently runs a real-time configuration of the Noah land surface model (LSM) within the NASA Land Information System (LIS) framework. The LIS-Noah is run at 3-km resolution for local numerical weather prediction (NWP) and situational awareness applications at select NOAA/National Weather Service (NWS) forecast offices over the Continental U.S. (CONUS). To enhance the practicality of the LIS-Noah output for drought monitoring and assessing flood potential, a 30+-year soil moisture climatology has been developed in an attempt to place near real-time soil moisture values in historical context at county- and/or watershed-scale resolutions. This LIS-Noah soil moisture climatology and accompanying anomalies is intended to complement the current suite of operational products, such as the North American Land Data Assimilation System phase 2 (NLDAS-2), which are generated on a coarser-resolution grid that may not capture localized, yet important soil moisture features. Daily soil moisture histograms are used to identify the real-time soil moisture percentiles at each grid point according to the county or watershed in which the grid point resides. Spatial plots are then produced that map the percentiles as proxies to the different USDM categories. This presentation will highlight recent developments of this gridded, objective soil moisture index, comparison to subjective

  12. SQUID-NDE of semiconductor samples with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, J.; Schurig, Th; Lüdge, A.; Riemann, H.

    2000-05-01

    We developed a SQUID-based, noninvasive method for the investigation of semiconductor wafers. It is based on the detection of excited photocurrents via their magnetic field by means of a highly sensitive SQUID system. Our method allows the visualization of small growth-related fluctuations of the doping level of the semiconductor with a spatial resolution of a few tens of a micrometre determined by the excitation spot size. Numerical simulations of the magnetic signals have been performed, the results of which show a reasonable agreement with the experiments.

  13. High-spatial-resolution passive microwave sounding systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, David H.; Barrett, J. W.; Bonanni, Pierino Gianni; Chiarchiaro, W. J., II; Rosenkranz, P. W.

    1991-01-01

    During this period the emphasis was on the following: (1) further design, construction, and testing of the improved 54-GHz portion of the 54-118 GHz microwave temperature sounder (MTS) aircraft radiometer system in preparation for ER-2 observations in July 1991; and (2) final analysis and documentation of procedures for detecting and analyzing thermal waves in our 118-GHz MTS imagery. In addition, we have new unpublished measurements of dry-air attenuation at frequencies of 54 to 66 GHz and over a temperature range of 280K to 326K; these measurements should enable us to improve further our atmospheric transmittance models. It was further noted that the proposed SSMIS conical-scanning microwave spectrometer on the military DMSP Block 5D-3 spacecraft designed to measure stratospheric and mesospheric temperature profiles will be observing the Zeeman-split oxygen lines with sufficient spectral resolution that the changing Doppler shifts with view angle will substantially degrade the potential system performance unless remedied; this was briefly studied and documented.

  14. Methods of photoelectrode characterization with high spatial and temporal resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, Daniel V.; Baxter, Jason B.; John, Jimmy; Lewis, Nathan S.; Moffat, Thomas P.; Ogitsu, Tadashi; O'Neil, Glen D.; Pham, Tuan Anh; Talin, A. Alec; Velazquez, Jesus M.; Wood, Brandon C.

    2015-06-19

    Here, materials and photoelectrode architectures that are highly efficient, extremely stable, and made from low cost materials are required for commercially viable photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting technology. A key challenge is the heterogeneous nature of real-world materials, which often possess spatial variation in their crystal structure, morphology, and/or composition at the nano-, micro-, or macro-scale. Different structures and compositions can have vastly different properties and can therefore strongly influence the overall performance of the photoelectrode through complex structure–property relationships. A complete understanding of photoelectrode materials would also involve elucidation of processes such as carrier collection and electrochemical charge transfer that occur at very fast time scales. We present herein an overview of a broad suite of experimental and computational tools that can be used to define the structure–property relationships of photoelectrode materials at small dimensions and on fast time scales. A major focus is on in situ scanning-probe measurement (SPM) techniques that possess the ability to measure differences in optical, electronic, catalytic, and physical properties with nano- or micro-scale spatial resolution. In situ ultrafast spectroscopic techniques, used to probe carrier dynamics involved with processes such as carrier generation, recombination, and interfacial charge transport, are also discussed. Complementing all of these experimental techniques are computational atomistic modeling tools, which can be invaluable for interpreting experimental results, aiding in materials discovery, and interrogating PEC processes at length and time scales not currently accessible by experiment. In addition to reviewing the basic capabilities of these experimental and computational techniques, we highlight key opportunities and limitations of applying these tools for the development of PEC materials.

  15. Methods of photoelectrode characterization with high spatial and temporal resolution

    DOE PAGES

    Esposito, Daniel V.; Baxter, Jason B.; John, Jimmy; ...

    2015-06-19

    Here, materials and photoelectrode architectures that are highly efficient, extremely stable, and made from low cost materials are required for commercially viable photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting technology. A key challenge is the heterogeneous nature of real-world materials, which often possess spatial variation in their crystal structure, morphology, and/or composition at the nano-, micro-, or macro-scale. Different structures and compositions can have vastly different properties and can therefore strongly influence the overall performance of the photoelectrode through complex structure–property relationships. A complete understanding of photoelectrode materials would also involve elucidation of processes such as carrier collection and electrochemical charge transfer that occurmore » at very fast time scales. We present herein an overview of a broad suite of experimental and computational tools that can be used to define the structure–property relationships of photoelectrode materials at small dimensions and on fast time scales. A major focus is on in situ scanning-probe measurement (SPM) techniques that possess the ability to measure differences in optical, electronic, catalytic, and physical properties with nano- or micro-scale spatial resolution. In situ ultrafast spectroscopic techniques, used to probe carrier dynamics involved with processes such as carrier generation, recombination, and interfacial charge transport, are also discussed. Complementing all of these experimental techniques are computational atomistic modeling tools, which can be invaluable for interpreting experimental results, aiding in materials discovery, and interrogating PEC processes at length and time scales not currently accessible by experiment. In addition to reviewing the basic capabilities of these experimental and computational techniques, we highlight key opportunities and limitations of applying these tools for the development of PEC materials.« less

  16. High-spatial-resolution passive microwave sounding systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, D. H.; Rosenkranz, P. W.

    1994-01-01

    The principal contributions of this combined theoretical and experimental effort were to advance and demonstrate new and more accurate techniques for sounding atmospheric temperature, humidity, and precipitation profiles at millimeter wavelengths, and to improve the scientific basis for such soundings. Some of these techniques are being incorporated in both research and operational systems. Specific results include: (1) development of the MIT Microwave Temperature Sounder (MTS), a 118-GHz eight-channel imaging spectrometer plus a switched-frequency spectrometer near 53 GHz, for use on the NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft, (2) conduct of ER-2 MTS missions in multiple seasons and locations in combination with other instruments, mapping with unprecedented approximately 2-km lateral resolution atmospheric temperature and precipitation profiles, atmospheric transmittances (at both zenith and nadir), frontal systems, and hurricanes, (3) ground based 118-GHz 3-D spectral images of wavelike structure within clouds passing overhead, (4) development and analysis of approaches to ground- and space-based 5-mm wavelength sounding of the upper stratosphere and mesosphere, which supported the planning of improvements to operational weather satellites, (5) development of improved multidimensional and adaptive retrieval methods for atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles, (6) development of combined nonlinear and statistical retrieval techniques for 183-GHz humidity profile retrievals, (7) development of nonlinear statistical retrieval techniques for precipitation cell-top altitudes, and (8) numerical analyses of the impact of remote sensing data on the accuracy of numerical weather predictions; a 68-km gridded model was used to study the spectral properties of error growth.

  17. Optoelectronic image scanning with high spatial resolution and reconstruction fidelity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craubner, Siegfried I.

    2002-02-01

    In imaging systems the detector arrays deliver at the output time-discrete signals, where the spatial frequencies of the object scene are mapped into the electrical signal frequencies. Since the spatial frequency spectrum cannot be bandlimited by the front optics, the usual detector arrays perform a spatial undersampling and as a consequence aliasing occurs. A means to partially suppress the backfolded alias band is bandwidth limitation in the reconstruction low-pass, at the price of resolution loss. By utilizing a bilinear detector array in a pushbroom-type scanner, undersampling and aliasing can be overcome. For modeling the perception, the theory of discrete systems and multirate digital filter banks is applied, where aliasing cancellation and perfect reconstruction play an important role. The discrete transfer function of a bilinear array can be imbedded into the scheme of a second-order filter bank. The detector arrays already build the analysis bank and the overall filter bank is completed with the synthesis bank, for which stabilized inverse filters are proposed, to compensate for the low-pass characteristics and to approximate perfect reconstruction. The synthesis filter branch can be realized in a so-called `direct form,' or the `polyphase form,' where the latter is an expenditure-optimal solution, which gives advantages when implemented in a signal processor. This paper attempts to introduce well-established concepts of the theory of multirate filter banks into the analysis of scanning imagers, which is applicable in a much broader sense than for the problems addressed here. To the author's knowledge this is also a novelty.

  18. High spatial resolution mid-infrared studies of planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skemer, Andrew

    I present the results of six papers related the formation and evolution of planets and planetary systems, all of which are based on high-resolution, ground-based, mid-infrared observations. The first three chapters are studies of T Tauri binaries. T Tauri stars are young, low mass stars, whose disks form the building blocks of extrasolar planets. The first chapter is a study of the 0.68"/0.12" triple system, T Tauri. Our spatially resolved N-band photometry reveals silicate absorption towards one component, T Tau Sa, indicating the presence of an edge-on disk, which is in contrast to the other components. The second chapter is an adaptive optics fed N-band spectroscopy study of the 0.88" binary, UY Aur. We find that the dust grains around UY Aur A are ISM-like, while the mineralogy of the dust around UY Aur B is more uncertain, due to self-extinction. The third chapter presents a survey of spatially resolved silicate spectroscopy for nine T Tauri binaries. We find with 90%-95% confidence that the silicate features of the binaries are more similar than those of randomly paired single stars. This implies that a shared binary property, such as age or composition, is an important parameter in dust grain evolution. The fourth chapter is a study of the planetary system, 2MASS 1207. We explore the source of 2MASS 1207 b's under-luminosity, which has typically been explained as the result of an edge-on disk of large, grey-extincting dust grains. We find that the edge-on disk theory is incompatible with several lines of evidence, and suggest that 2MASS 1207 b's appearance can be explained by a thick cloudy atmosphere, which might be typical among young, planetary systems. The fifth chapter is a study of the white dwarf, Sirius B, which in the context of this thesis is being studied as a post-planetary system. Our N-band imaging demonstrates that Sirius B does not have an infrared excess, in contrast to previous results. The sixth chapter is a study of mid

  19. Device for high spatial resolution chemical analysis of a sample and method of high spatial resolution chemical analysis

    DOEpatents

    Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-10-06

    A system and method for analyzing a chemical composition of a specimen are described. The system can include at least one pin; a sampling device configured to contact a liquid with a specimen on the at least one pin to form a testing solution; and a stepper mechanism configured to move the at least one pin and the sampling device relative to one another. The system can also include an analytical instrument for determining a chemical composition of the specimen from the testing solution. In particular, the systems and methods described herein enable chemical analysis of specimens, such as tissue, to be evaluated in a manner that the spatial-resolution is limited by the size of the pins used to obtain tissue samples, not the size of the sampling device used to solubilize the samples coupled to the pins.

  20. Error Estimation in an Optimal Interpolation Scheme for High Spatial and Temporal Resolution SST Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigney, Matt; Jedlovec, Gary; LaFontaine, Frank; Shafer, Jaclyn

    2010-01-01

    Heat and moisture exchange between ocean surface and atmosphere plays an integral role in short-term, regional NWP. Current SST products lack both spatial and temporal resolution to accurately capture small-scale features that affect heat and moisture flux. NASA satellite is used to produce high spatial and temporal resolution SST analysis using an OI technique.

  1. Evaluating the Value of High Spatial Resolution in National Capacity Expansion Models using ReEDS

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Venkat; Cole, Wesley

    2016-11-14

    Power sector capacity expansion models (CEMs) have a broad range of spatial resolutions. This paper uses the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, a long-term national scale electric sector CEM, to evaluate the value of high spatial resolution for CEMs. ReEDS models the United States with 134 load balancing areas (BAs) and captures the variability in existing generation parameters, future technology costs, performance, and resource availability using very high spatial resolution data, especially for wind and solar modeled at 356 resource regions. In this paper we perform planning studies at three different spatial resolutions--native resolution (134 BAs), state-level, and NERC region level--and evaluate how results change under different levels of spatial aggregation in terms of renewable capacity deployment and location, associated transmission builds, and system costs. The results are used to ascertain the value of high geographically resolved models in terms of their impact on relative competitiveness among renewable energy resources.

  2. High spatial resolution X-ray and gamma ray imaging system using diffraction crystals

    DOEpatents

    Smither, Robert K [Hinsdale, IL

    2011-05-17

    A method and a device for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation are provided. The device comprises a plurality of arrays, with each array comprising a plurality of elements comprising a first collimator, a diffracting crystal, a second collimator, and a detector.

  3. High spatial resolution three-dimensional mapping of vegetation spectral dynamics using computer vision

    Treesearch

    Jonathan P. Dandois; Erle C. Ellis

    2013-01-01

    High spatial resolution three-dimensional (3D) measurements of vegetation by remote sensing are advancing ecological research and environmental management. However, substantial economic and logistical costs limit this application, especially for observing phenological dynamics in ecosystem structure and spectral traits. Here we demonstrate a new aerial remote sensing...

  4. High spatial Resolution mapping of Venus Mesospheric Winds by infrared heterodyne Spectroscopy of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnabend, G.; Sornig, M.; Krötz, P.; Stupar, D.; Livengood, T.; Schieder, R.; Kostiuk, T.

    2007-08-01

    We present wind measurements in the Venusian upper mesosphere / lower thermosphere by means of infrared heterodyne spectroscopy of CO2 features at 959.3917 cm-1. Observations are carried out using the Cologne Tuneable Heterodyne Infrared Spectrometer (THIS) from May 25th to June 6th 2007 shortly before Venus superior conjunction at the McMath-Pierce solar telescope on Kitt Peak in Arizona. Providing high spectral resolution winds can be retrieved from Doppler-shifts of CO2 non-thermal emission from the upper mesosphere. The sub-solar to anti-solar flow (SS-AS flow) and the retrograde superrotating zonal circulation (RSZ) are targeted and observations are carried out systematically on the day-side of the planet which is illuminated appr. 50%. The mesospheric region is of special interest because it is the not very well understood transitions zone form the RSZ dominated troposphere and the SS-AS flow dominated thermosphere. Measurements are part of the coordinated ground-based observing campaign to support VenusExpress from May 25th to June 9th. Complementary ground based observing methods probing wind velocities at different altitudes in the atmosphere of Venus provide the possibility to get a vertical wind profile. E.g. Doppler shifts of CO2 lines at visible wavelength together with reflected solar Frauenhofer lines probe dynamics at the cloud tops and a few kilometer above while interferometric CO millimeter observations provide information about the lower mesosphere and sub-millimeter spectral line observations are pointing to a region between 95 and 105km. The presented mid- IR measurements probe an altitude of 100-120km.

  5. Classification of high spatial resolution imagery using optimal Gabor-filters-based texture features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yindi; Wu, Bo

    2007-06-01

    Texture analysis has received great attention in the interpretation of high-resolution satellite images. This paper aims to find optimal filters for discriminating between residential areas and other land cover types in high spatial resolution satellite imagery. Moreover, in order to reduce the blurring border effect, inherent in texture analysis and which introduces important errors in the transition areas between different texture units, a classification procedure is designed for such high spatial resolution satellite images as follows. Firstly, residential areas are detected using Gabor texture features, and two clusters, one a residential area and the other not, are detected using the fuzzy C-Means algorithm, in the frequency space based on Gabor filters. Sequentially, a mask is generated to eliminate residential areas so that other land-cover types would be classified accurately, and not interfered with the spectrally heterogeneous residential areas. Afterwards, other objects are classified using spectral features by the MAP (maximum a posterior) - ICM (iterated conditional mode) classification algorithm designed to enforce the spatial constraints into classification. Experimental results on high spatial resolution remote sensing data confirm that the proposed algorithm provide remarkably better detection accuracy than conventional approaches in terms of both objective measurements and visual evaluation.

  6. Test-retest reliability of high spatial resolution diffusion tensor and diffusion kurtosis imaging.

    PubMed

    Shahim, Pashtun; Holleran, Laurena; Kim, Joong H; Brody, David L

    2017-09-11

    We assessed the test-retest reliability of high spatial resolution diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI). Diffusion MRI was acquired using a Siemens 3 Tesla Prisma scanner with 80 mT/m gradients and a 32-channel head coil from each of 3 concussive traumatic brain injury (cTBI) patients and 4 controls twice 0 to 24 days apart. Coefficients of variation (CoV) for DTI parameters were calculated in each DTI Studio parcellated white matter tract at 1.25 mm and 1.75 mm isotropic voxel resolution, as well as DKI parameters at 1.75 mm isotropic. Overall, fractional anisotropy had the best reliability, with mean CoV at 5% for 1.25 mm and 3.5% for 1.75 mm isotropic voxels. Mean CoV for the other DTI metrics were <7.0% for both 1.25 and 1.75 mm isotropic voxels. The mean CoV was ≤4.5% across the DKI metrics. In the commonly injured orbitofrontal and temporal pole regions CoV was <3.5% for all parameters. Thus, with appropriate processing, high spatial resolution advanced diffusion MRI has good to excellent test-retest reproducibility in both human cTBI patients and controls. However, further technical improvements will be needed to reliably discern the most subtle diffusion abnormalities, especially at high spatial resolution.

  7. Novel mid-IR quantum cascade laser waveguide coupling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyu, David; Choa, Fow-Sen; Chen, Xing; Trivedi, Sudhir

    2011-02-01

    Signal modulations and coherent signal detections are important for both communications and remote sensing applications. Photonic integration reduces size, weight, cost, and improves the performance of these systems as demonstrated by integrated DFB-laser modulators, receivers and transceivers at near-IR wavelength regions. However, due to the difficulties of waveguide coupling, photonic integration in the mid-IR wavelength range is under-developed. We developed a technique that can monitor mid-IR coupling based on the negative photoconductivity in quantum cascaded (QC) materials that can simplify and optimize laser waveguide coupling in the mid-IR wavelength range.

  8. Achieving High Spatial Resolution Surface Plasmon Resonance Microscopy with Image Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Shan, Xiaonan; Wang, Shaopeng; Tao, Nongjian

    2017-03-07

    Surface plasmon resonance microscopy (SPRM) is a powerful platform for biomedical imaging and molecular binding kinetics analysis. However, the spatial resolution of SPRM along the plasmon propagation direction (longitudinal) is determined by the decaying length of the plasmonic wave, which can be as large as tens of microns. Different methods have been proposed to improve the spatial resolution, but each at the expense of decreased sensitivity or temporal resolution. Here we present a method to achieve high spatial resolution SPRM based on deconvolution of complex field. The method does not require additional optical setup and improves the spatial resolution in the longitudinal direction. We applied the method to image nanoparticles and achieved close-to-diffraction limit resolution in both longitudinal and transverse directions.

  9. Distinguishing and quantification of the human visual pathways using high spatial resolution diffusion tensor tractography

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Arash; Hasan, Khader M.; Adapa, Pavani; Razmandi, Azadeh; Keser, Zafer; Lincoln, John; Kramer, Larry A.

    2014-01-01

    Quantification of the living human visual system using MRI methods has been challenging, but several applications demand a reliable and time-efficient data acquisition protocol. In this study, we demonstrate the utility of high spatial resolution diffusion tensor fiber tractography (DTT) in reconstructing and quantifying the human visual pathways. Five healthy males, age range 24–37 years, were studied after approval of the Institutional Review Board (IRB) at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. We acquired diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data with 1-mm slice thickness on a 3.0 Tesla clinical MRI scanner and analyzed the data using DTT with the fiber assignment by continuous tractography (FACT) algorithm. By utilizing the high spatial resolution DTI protocol with FACT algorithm, we were able to reconstruct and quantify bilateral optic pathways including the optic chiasm, optic tract, optic radiations free of contamination from neighboring white matter tracts. PMID:24856625

  10. Measurement Sets and Sites Commonly Used for High Spatial Resolution Image Product Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Scientists within NASA's Applied Sciences Directorate have developed a well-characterized remote sensing Verification & Validation (V&V) site at the John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC). This site has enabled the in-flight characterization of satellite high spatial resolution remote sensing system products form Space Imaging IKONOS, Digital Globe QuickBird, and ORBIMAGE OrbView, as well as advanced multispectral airborne digital camera products. SSC utilizes engineered geodetic targets, edge targets, radiometric tarps, atmospheric monitoring equipment and their Instrument Validation Laboratory to characterize high spatial resolution remote sensing data products. This presentation describes the SSC characterization capabilities and techniques in the visible through near infrared spectrum and examples of calibration results.

  11. Radiometric Calibration Assessment of Commercial High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Image Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurt; Leisso, Nathan; Buchanan, John

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the results of commercial high spatial resolution sensors. The topics include: 1) Reflectance-based approach; 2) U of A test sites; 3) Test Site Selection; 4) Resort Living; 5) Aerosol parameters; 6) Surface reflectance retrieval; 7) Accuracy/precision; 8) Data sets; 9) June 23, 2005 for Ikonos; 10) QuickBird Results; 11) Ikonos results; 12) Orbview results; 13) Ikonos redux; and 14) Overall results.

  12. Mid-IR semiconductor lasers for chemical sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, C. J.; Yang, R. Q.

    2003-01-01

    The development of mid-IR semiconductor diode lasers based on type-II interband cascade structures is presented. How these diode lasers can be developed to meet the requirements in chemical sensing applications is discussed.

  13. Mid-IR semiconductor lasers for chemical sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, C. J.; Yang, R. Q.

    2003-01-01

    The development of mid-IR semiconductor diode lasers based on type-II interband cascade structures is presented. How these diode lasers can be developed to meet the requirements in chemical sensing applications is discussed.

  14. Application requirement analysis of high spectral and high spatial resolution satellite for environment remote sensing monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S. H.; Yang, Y. P.; Zhao, Z. H.; Yao, Y. J.; Mao, X. J.; Wu, Y. T.; Gao, Y. H.

    2016-03-01

    China's environmental situation is still grim, environmental pressure continues to increase. The demand of environmental protection work in the new era for high resolution remote sensing application will continue to increase. Environmental monitoring has multi factor, quantitative inversion and high precision as features, environment department need to use a wide spectrum of remote sensing data with high spectral resolution capability to monitor the total amount of pollutants in macro scale and long time series. The implementation of the high resolution earth observation project provides support for the improvement of the quantitative application of environmental remote sensing. On the basis of sorting out the key work of environmental protection, the application requirements of high spectral resolution and high spatial resolution satellite remote sensing in the field of environmental protection and the building needs of national environmental remote sensing application platform are put forward.

  15. Ultrafast laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for high spatial resolution chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorba, Vassilia; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2011-02-01

    Femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to identify the spatial resolution limitations and assess the minimal detectable mass restrictions in laser-ablation based chemical analysis. The atomic emission of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) dopants in transparent dielectric Mica matrices was studied, to find that both these elements could be detected from 450 nm diameter ablation craters, full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM). Under optimal conditions, mass as low as 220 ag was measured, demonstrating the feasibility of using laser-ablation based chemical analysis to achieve high spatial resolution elemental analysis in real-time and at atmospheric pressure conditions.

  16. Evaluating the Value of High Spatial Resolution in National Capacity Expansion Models using ReEDS

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Venkat; Cole, Wesley

    2016-07-18

    This poster is based on the paper of the same name, presented at the IEEE Power & Energy Society General Meeting, July18, 2016. Power sector capacity expansion models (CEMs) have a broad range of spatial resolutions. This paper uses the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, a long-term national scale electric sector CEM, to evaluate the value of high spatial resolution for CEMs. ReEDS models the United States with 134 load balancing areas (BAs) and captures the variability in existing generation parameters, future technology costs, performance, and resource availability using very high spatial resolution data, especially for wind and solar modeled at 356 resource regions. In this paper we perform planning studies at three different spatial resolutions - native resolution (134 BAs), state-level, and NERC region level - and evaluate how results change under different levels of spatial aggregation in terms of renewable capacity deployment and location, associated transmission builds, and system costs. The results are used to ascertain the value of high geographically resolved models in terms of their impact on relative competitiveness among renewable energy resources.

  17. High-spatial-resolution microwave and related observations as diagnostics of coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    1986-01-01

    High spatial resolution microwave observations of coronal loops, together with theoretical models for the loop emission, can provide detailed information about the temperature, density, and magnetic field within the loop, as well as the environment around the loop. The capability for studying magnetic fields is particularly important, since there is no comparable method for obtaining direct information about coronal magnetic fields. Knowledge of the magnetic field strength and structure in coronal loops is important for understanding both coronal heating and flares. With arc-second-resolution microwave observations from the Very Large Array (VLA), supplemental high-spectral-resolution microwave data from a facility such as the Owens Valley frequency-agile interferometer, and the ability to obtain second-of-arc resolution EUV aor soft X ray images, the capability already exists for obtaining much more detailed information about coronal plasma and magnetic structures than is presently available. This capability is discussed.

  18. A system for optically controlling neural circuits with very high spatial and temporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Pandarinath, Chethan; Carlson, Eric T.; Nirenberg, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetics offers a powerful new approach for controlling neural circuits. It has a vast array of applications in both basic and clinical science. For basic science, it opens the door to unraveling circuit operations, since one can perturb specific circuit components with high spatial (single cell) and high temporal (millisecond) resolution. For clinical applications, it allows new kinds of selective treatments, because it provides a method to inactivate or activate specific components in a malfunctioning circuit and bring it back into a normal operating range [1–3]. To harness the power of optogenetics, though, one needs stimulating tools that work with the same high spatial and temporal resolution as the molecules themselves, the channelrhodopsins. To date, most stimulating tools require a tradeoff between spatial and temporal precision and are prohibitively expensive to integrate into a stimulating/recording setup in a laboratory or a device in a clinical setting [4, 5]. Here we describe a Digital Light Processing (DLP)-based system capable of extremely high temporal resolution (sub-millisecond), without sacrificing spatial resolution. Furthermore, it is constructed using off-the-shelf components, making it feasible for a broad range of biology and bioengineering labs. Using transgenic mice that express channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), we demonstrate the system’s capability for stimulating channelrhodopsin-expressing neurons in tissue with single cell and sub-millisecond precision. PMID:25699292

  19. High spatial resolution absorption contrast imaging with electron-beam excitation assisted optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inami, Wataru; Fukuta, Masahiro; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu

    2016-11-01

    We present high spatial-resolution label-free imaging with an electron-beam excitation-assisted optical microscope (EXA microscope). The EXA microscope improves the spatial resolution down to 100 nm. To realize the high spatial resolution, a nanoscale optical spot is generated by irradiating a fluorescent thin film with a focused electron beam whose spot size is less than 10 nm. The size of the optical spot becomes smaller than the diffraction limited spot size and is reduced to about 100 nm, because the light emission is localized in nanometer-sized region. In this microscopy, it is not necessary to label a specimen for imaging beyond the diffraction limit of the light. The specimen stage is separated from the vacuum chamber of the scanning electron microscope by the fluorescent thin film and a specimen under atmospheric pressure can be imaged. We demonstrated that the high spatial resolution absorption contrast imaging of the crystal of vitamin B9 having absorption at UV wavelengths. The absorption wavelength matches with the wavelength of the emission of the fluorescent thin film we deposited. The fine crystal structure was imaged beyond the optical diffraction limit. The image contrast corresponded with the thickness of the crystal measured with an atomic force microscope (AFM). The illumination light is absorbed with the vitamin B9 crystal and the intensity of the transmitted light depends on the thickness of the vitamin B9 crystal. The EXA microscope is useful for analysis of growth of a crystal, bio-imaging, and so on.

  20. Pushing the boundaries of diagnostic CT systems for high spatial resolution imaging tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Bastida, Juan P.; Gomez-Cardona, Daniel; Garrett, John W.; Szczykutowicz, Timothy P.; Chen, Guang-Hong; Li, Ke

    2017-03-01

    In a previous work [Cruz-Bastida et al Med. Phys. 43, 2399 (2016)], the spatial resolution performance of a new High-Resolution (Hi-Res) multi-detector row CT (MDCT) scan mode and the associated High Definition (HD) reconstruction kernels was systematically characterized. The purpose of the present work was to study the noise properties of the Hi-Res scan mode and the joint impact of spatial resolution and noise characteristics on high contrast and high spatial resolution imaging tasks. Using a physical phantom and a diagnostic MDCT system, equipped with both Hi-Res and conventional scan modes, noise power spectrum (NPS) measurements were performed at 8 off-centered positions (0 to 14 cm with an increment of 2 cm) for 8 non-HD kernels and 7 HD kernels. An in vivo rabbit experiment was then performed to demonstrate the potential clinical value of the Hi-Res scan mode. Without the HD kernels, the Hi-Res scan mode preserved the shape of the NPS and slightly increased noise magnitude across all object positions. The combined use of the Hi-Res scan mode and HD kernels led to a greater noise increase and pushed the NPS towards higher frequencies, particularly for those edge-preserving or edge-enhancing HD kernels. Results of the in vivo rabbit study demonstrate important trade-offs between spatial resolution and noise characteristics. Overall, for a given high contrast and high spatial resolution imaging task (bronchi imaging), the benefit of spatial resolution improvement introduced by the Hi-Res scan mode outweighs the potential noise amplification, leading to better overall imaging performance for both centered and off-centered positions.

  1. Mid-IR Spectral Search for Salt SIgnatures on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Tracy M.; Retherford, Kurt D.; Hanley, Jennifer; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Tsang, Constantine; Roth, Lorenz

    2016-10-01

    We present mid-IR spectra of Europa's leading and trailing hemispheres obtained with the NASA IRTF/TEXES instrument on March 28 and March 30, 2015. The observations span from ~10 - 11 microns with a resolving power of R ~2500. Few observations of Europa have been made at these wavelengths, and the high spectral resolution of the instrument enables the identification of distinguishing spectral features in this relatively unexplored bandpass. While the leading hemisphere of Europa consists of relatively pure water ice, the trailing hemisphere's surface contains a mix of ice and some other component, causing the surface to appear reddish at visible wavelengths. We compare the spectra from the trailing hemisphere with those from the leading, pure-ice hemisphere and with recent laboratory measurements of chlorinated salts, which have distinct spectral signatures at these wavelengths. We find that the signal obtained from Europa's leading hemisphere is 5-10 times lower than the signal obtained from the trailing hemisphere, likely due to a temperature difference between the hemispheres. We discern several spectral features that are present in the trailing hemisphere but not in the spectra of the leading hemisphere, though the explanation for these features is not yet apparent.

  2. Grism performance for mid-IR (5 - 40 micron) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennico, K. A.; Keller, L. D.; Mar, D. J.; Herter, T. L.; Jaffe, D. T.; Adams, J. D.; Greene, T. P.

    2006-06-01

    This paper addresses the performance of a suite of grisms as part of an Astrobiology Science and Instrument Development (ASTID) Program to implement a moderate resolution spectroscopic capability in the mid/far-IR facility instrument FORCAST for the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). A moderate resolution mid-IR spectrometer on SOFIA will offer advantages not available to either ground or space-based instruments after the Spitzer Space Telescope ceases operation in ~2008. SOFIA will begin operations in 2008 and will have an operational lifetime of ~20 years. From aircraft altitudes, it will be possible to cover a wide range of wavelengths, particularly in the critical 5-9 micron band, where detection of astrobiologically interesting molecules have key spectral signatures that are not accessible from the ground The FORCAST grism suite consists of six grisms: four monolithic Si grisms and two KRS-5 grisms. These devices will allow long-slit low-resolution (R = 100-300) and short-slit, cross-dispersed high-resolution spectroscopic modes (R = 800-1200) over select wavelengths in the 5-40 μm spectral range and enable observing programs to gather both images and spectra in a single SOFIA flight. The silicon grisms demonstrate a new family of dispersive elements with good optical performance for spectroscopy from 1.2-8 μm and beyond 18 μm. After SOFIA flies, the grism modes in FORCAST will complement other first generation instruments on SOFIA and provide follow-up capability of bright sources observed with Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on Spitzer. This paper highlights the design of the grism suite for FORCAST and the current laboratory cryogenic performance of the silicon grisms.

  3. High spatial and temporal resolution mobile incoherent Doppler lidar for sea surface wind measurements.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Shen; Liu, Bing-Yi; Wu, Song-Hua; Li, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Zhang-Jun

    2008-07-01

    A mobile Doppler lidar based on an injection-seeded diode-pumped Nd:YAG pulsed laser with a high repetition rate was developed to measure the sea surface wind (SSW) with high spatial and temporal resolution. The system was operated during the 2007 Qingdao International Regatta to measure the distribution of SSW in the racing area in real time with 50-100 m horizontal resolution and 2-10 min temporal resolution. An observation of nonuniform distribution of SSW is presented. The lidar results are compared with both buoy and wind tower measurements, which show good agreement. This lidar can be used advantageously for the 2008 Olympic sailing games as well as for observing mesoscale and microscale meteorology processes.

  4. High-spatial-resolution mapping of catalytic reactions on single particles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chung-Yeh; Wolf, William J; Levartovsky, Yehonatan; Bechtel, Hans A; Martin, Michael C; Toste, F Dean; Gross, Elad

    2017-01-26

    The critical role in surface reactions and heterogeneous catalysis of metal atoms with low coordination numbers, such as found at atomic steps and surface defects, is firmly established. But despite the growing availability of tools that enable detailed in situ characterization, so far it has not been possible to document this role directly. Surface properties can be mapped with high spatial resolution, and catalytic conversion can be tracked with a clear chemical signature; however, the combination of the two, which would enable high-spatial-resolution detection of reactions on catalytic surfaces, has rarely been achieved. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy has been used to image and characterize single turnover sites at catalytic surfaces, but is restricted to reactions that generate highly fluorescing product molecules. Herein the chemical conversion of N-heterocyclic carbene molecules attached to catalytic particles is mapped using synchrotron-radiation-based infrared nanospectroscopy with a spatial resolution of 25 nanometres, which enabled particle regions that differ in reactivity to be distinguished. These observations demonstrate that, compared to the flat regions on top of the particles, the peripheries of the particles-which contain metal atoms with low coordination numbers-are more active in catalysing oxidation and reduction of chemically active groups in surface-anchored N-heterocyclic carbene molecules.

  5. High-spatial-resolution mapping of catalytic reactions on single particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chung-Yeh; Wolf, William J.; Levartovsky, Yehonatan; Bechtel, Hans A.; Martin, Michael C.; Toste, F. Dean; Gross, Elad

    2017-01-01

    The critical role in surface reactions and heterogeneous catalysis of metal atoms with low coordination numbers, such as found at atomic steps and surface defects, is firmly established. But despite the growing availability of tools that enable detailed in situ characterization, so far it has not been possible to document this role directly. Surface properties can be mapped with high spatial resolution, and catalytic conversion can be tracked with a clear chemical signature; however, the combination of the two, which would enable high-spatial-resolution detection of reactions on catalytic surfaces, has rarely been achieved. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy has been used to image and characterize single turnover sites at catalytic surfaces, but is restricted to reactions that generate highly fluorescing product molecules. Herein the chemical conversion of N-heterocyclic carbene molecules attached to catalytic particles is mapped using synchrotron-radiation-based infrared nanospectroscopy with a spatial resolution of 25 nanometres, which enabled particle regions that differ in reactivity to be distinguished. These observations demonstrate that, compared to the flat regions on top of the particles, the peripheries of the particles—which contain metal atoms with low coordination numbers—are more active in catalysing oxidation and reduction of chemically active groups in surface-anchored N-heterocyclic carbene molecules.

  6. A high spatial resolution Stokes polarimeter for motional Stark effect imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Thorman, Alex; Michael, Clive; Howard, John

    2013-06-15

    We describe an enhanced temporally switched interfero-polarimeter that has been successfully deployed for high spatial resolution motional Stark effect imaging on the KSTAR superconducting tokamak. The system utilizes dual switching ferroelectric liquid crystal waveplates to image the full Stokes vector of elliptically polarized and Doppler-shifted Stark-Zeeman Balmer-alpha emission from high energy neutral beams injected into the magnetized plasma. We describe the optical system and compare its performance against a Mueller matrix model that takes account of non-ideal performance of the switching ferro-electric liquid crystal waveplates and other polarizing components.

  7. Properties of Be Star Disks at High Spatial Resolution Invited Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, G. H.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents an observational overview of the properties of Be star disks. The presence of circumstellar gas around Be stars can be inferred from observations of the double-peaked emission line profiles, infrared excesses, and linear polarization. High spatial resolution interferometric observations have confirmed that the gas exists in a flattened disk. The geometry and angular size of the disks at different wavelengths can be used to probe the density structure. The combination of spectroscopy and interferometry can be used to study the kinematics of the rotating disks and investigate asymmetries that arise from one-armed density waves in the circumstellar material.

  8. Radiometric Calibration Assessment of Commercial High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Image Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holekamp, Kara; Aaron, David; Thome, Kurtis

    2006-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of commercial imaging satellite products is required to ensure that science and application communities can better understand their properties. Inaccurate radiometric calibrations can lead to erroneous decisions and invalid conclusions and can limit intercomparisons with other systems. To address this calibration need, satellite at-sensor radiance values were compared to those estimated by each independent team member to determine the sensor's radiometric accuracy. The combined results of this evaluation provide the user community with an independent assessment of these commercially available high spatial resolution sensors' absolute calibration values.

  9. Cumulus cloud base height estimation from high spatial resolution Landsat data - A Hough transform approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berendes, Todd; Sengupta, Sailes K.; Welch, Ron M.; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Navar, Murgesh

    1992-01-01

    A semiautomated methodology is developed for estimating cumulus cloud base heights on the basis of high spatial resolution Landsat MSS data, using various image-processing techniques to match cloud edges with their corresponding shadow edges. The cloud base height is then estimated by computing the separation distance between the corresponding generalized Hough transform reference points. The differences between the cloud base heights computed by these means and a manual verification technique are of the order of 100 m or less; accuracies of 50-70 m may soon be possible via EOS instruments.

  10. Cumulus cloud base height estimation from high spatial resolution Landsat data - A Hough transform approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berendes, Todd; Sengupta, Sailes K.; Welch, Ron M.; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Navar, Murgesh

    1992-01-01

    A semiautomated methodology is developed for estimating cumulus cloud base heights on the basis of high spatial resolution Landsat MSS data, using various image-processing techniques to match cloud edges with their corresponding shadow edges. The cloud base height is then estimated by computing the separation distance between the corresponding generalized Hough transform reference points. The differences between the cloud base heights computed by these means and a manual verification technique are of the order of 100 m or less; accuracies of 50-70 m may soon be possible via EOS instruments.

  11. High spatial resolution multiplexing of fiber Bragg gratings using single-arm frequency-shifted interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Zeng; Zhou, Ciming; Guo, Huiyong; Fan, Dian; Ou, Yiwen; Liu, Yi; Sun, Chunran; Qian, Li

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate a high spatial resolution multiplexing scheme for fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors based on single-arm frequency-shifted interferometry (SA-FSI). The SA-FSI system uses an incoherent broadband source, a slow detector, and an electro-optic modulator (EOM). By sweeping the frequency of EOM and taking the fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the interference signal, we resolved the locations of FBGs distributed both in parallel and in series along fiber links despite their reflection spectral overlap. Eighteen weak FBGs ( 5% reflectivity) separated by 0.1 m were clearly resolved experimentally, sweeping EOM modulation frequency in the range of 2-11 GHz.

  12. High spatial resolution brain functional MRI using submillimeter balanced steady-state free precession acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Pei-Hsin; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Wu, Ming-Long; Chuang, Tzu-Chao; Shih, Yi-Yu; Huang, Teng-Yi

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: One of the technical advantages of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is its precise localization of changes from neuronal activities. While current practice of fMRI acquisition at voxel size around 3 × 3 × 3 mm{sup 3} achieves satisfactory results in studies of basic brain functions, higher spatial resolution is required in order to resolve finer cortical structures. This study investigated spatial resolution effects on brain fMRI experiments using balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging with 0.37 mm{sup 3} voxel volume at 3.0 T. Methods: In fMRI experiments, full and unilateral visual field 5 Hz flashing checkerboard stimulations were given to healthy subjects. The bSSFP imaging experiments were performed at three different frequency offsets to widen the coverage, with functional activations in the primary visual cortex analyzed using the general linear model. Variations of the spatial resolution were achieved by removing outerk-space data components. Results: Results show that a reduction in voxel volume from 3.44 × 3.44 × 2 mm{sup 3} to 0.43 × 0.43 × 2 mm{sup 3} has resulted in an increase of the functional activation signals from (7.7 ± 1.7)% to (20.9 ± 2.0)% at 3.0 T, despite of the threefold SNR decreases in the original images, leading to nearly invariant functional contrast-to-noise ratios (fCNR) even at high spatial resolution. Activation signals aligning nicely with gray matter sulci at high spatial resolution would, on the other hand, have possibly been mistaken as noise at low spatial resolution. Conclusions: It is concluded that the bSSFP sequence is a plausible technique for fMRI investigations at submillimeter voxel widths without compromising fCNR. The reduction of partial volume averaging with nonactivated brain tissues to retain fCNR is uniquely suitable for high spatial resolution applications such as the resolving of columnar organization in the brain.

  13. Observing conditions and mid-IR data quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Rachel; Wong, Andre; Geballe, Tom; Volk, Kevin; Hayward, Tom; Dillman, Matt; Fisher, Robert Scott; Radomski, James

    2008-07-01

    Ground-based mid-infrared (mid-IR) observations appear to be widely perceived as esoteric and demanding, and very sensitive to observing conditions. Although the principles of observing in the background-limited regime are well-known, it is difficult for the non-specialist to find specific information on exactly how mid-IR data can be affected by environmental conditions. Understanding these effects is important for the efficiency of mid-IR queue observing, the ability of classical observers to adapt their programs to the prevailing conditions, and the standard of data being delivered. Through operating mid-IR instruments in the queue at Gemini we have amassed a considerable database of standard star observations taken under a wide range of atmospheric conditions and in a variety of instrumental configurations. These data can be used to illustrate the effect of factors such as water vapour column, airmass, cloud cover, etc. on observed quantities like raw sky background, residual background, atmospheric transmission and image FWHM. Here we present some preliminary results from this study, which we hope to be of use to observatory users and staff as a guide to which environmental conditions are truly important to mid- IR imaging observations, and which can safely be neglected.

  14. Mapping Spatial Variability in Health and Wealth Indicators in Accra, Ghana Using High Spatial Resolution Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engstrom, R.; Ashcroft, E.

    2014-12-01

    There has been a tremendous amount of research conducted that examines disparities in health and wealth of persons between urban and rural areas however, relatively little research has been undertaken to examine variations within urban areas. A major limitation to elucidating differences with urban areas is the lack of social and demographic data at a sufficiently high spatial resolution to determine these differences. Generally the only available data that contain this information are census data which are collected at most every ten years and are often difficult to obtain at a high enough spatial resolution to allow for examining in depth variability in health and wealth indicators at high spatial resolutions, especially in developing countries. High spatial resolution satellite imagery may be able to provide timely and synoptic information that is related to health and wealth variability within a city. In this study we use two dates of Quickbird imagery (2003 and 2010) classified into the vegetation-impervious surface-soil (VIS) model introduced by Ridd (1995). For 2003 we only have partial coverage of the city, while for 2010 we have a mosaic, which covers the entire city of Accra, Ghana. Variations in the VIS values represent the physical variations within the city and these are compared to variations in economic, and/or sociodemographic data derived from the 2000 Ghanaian census at two spatial resolutions, the enumeration area (approximately US Census Tract) and the neighborhood for the city. Results indicate a significant correlation between both vegetation and impervious surface to type of cooking fuel used in the household, population density, housing density, availability of sewers, cooking space usage, and other variables. The correlations are generally stronger at the neighborhood level and the relationships are stable through time and space. Overall, the results indicate that information derived from high resolution satellite data is related to

  15. Estimation of the high-spatial-resolution variability in extreme wind speeds for forestry applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venäläinen, Ari; Laapas, Mikko; Pirinen, Pentti; Horttanainen, Matti; Hyvönen, Reijo; Lehtonen, Ilari; Junila, Päivi; Hou, Meiting; Peltola, Heli M.

    2017-07-01

    The bioeconomy has an increasing role to play in climate change mitigation and the sustainable development of national economies. In Finland, a forested country, over 50 % of the current bioeconomy relies on the sustainable management and utilization of forest resources. Wind storms are a major risk that forests are exposed to and high-spatial-resolution analysis of the most vulnerable locations can produce risk assessment of forest management planning. In this paper, we examine the feasibility of the wind multiplier approach for downscaling of maximum wind speed, using 20 m spatial resolution CORINE land-use dataset and high-resolution digital elevation data. A coarse spatial resolution estimate of the 10-year return level of maximum wind speed was obtained from the ERA-Interim reanalyzed data. Using a geospatial re-mapping technique the data were downscaled to 26 meteorological station locations to represent very diverse environments. Applying a comparison, we find that the downscaled 10-year return levels represent 66 % of the observed variation among the stations examined. In addition, the spatial variation in wind-multiplier-downscaled 10-year return level wind was compared with the WAsP model-simulated wind. The heterogeneous test area was situated in northern Finland, and it was found that the major features of the spatial variation were similar, but in some locations, there were relatively large differences. The results indicate that the wind multiplier method offers a pragmatic and computationally feasible tool for identifying at a high spatial resolution those locations with the highest forest wind damage risks. It can also be used to provide the necessary wind climate information for wind damage risk model calculations, thus making it possible to estimate the probability of predicted threshold wind speeds for wind damage and consequently the probability (and amount) of wind damage for certain forest stand configurations.

  16. Effects of daily, high spatial resolution a priori profiles of satellite-derived NOx emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughner, J.; Zare, A.; Cohen, R. C.

    2016-12-01

    The current generation of space-borne NO2 column observations provides a powerful method of constraining NOx emissions due to the spatial resolution and global coverage afforded by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). The greater resolution available in next generation instruments such as TROPOMI and the capabilities of geosynchronous platforms TEMPO, Sentinel-4, and GEMS will provide even greater capabilities in this regard, but we must apply lessons learned from the current generation of retrieval algorithms to make the best use of these instruments. Here, we focus on the effect of the resolution of the a priori NO2 profiles used in the retrieval algorithms. We show that for an OMI retrieval, using daily high-resolution a priori profiles results in changes in the retrieved VCDs up to 40% when compared to a retrieval using monthly average profiles at the same resolution. Further, comparing a retrieval with daily high spatial resolution a priori profiles to a more standard one, we show that emissions derived increase by 100% when using the optimized retrieval.

  17. Overview of LBTI: a multipurpose facility for high spatial resolution observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinz, P. M.; Defrère, D.; Skemer, A.; Bailey, V.; Stone, J.; Spalding, E.; Vaz, A.; Pinna, E.; Puglisi, A.; Esposito, S.; Montoya, M.; Downey, E.; Leisenring, J.; Durney, O.; Hoffmann, W.; Hill, J.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Mennesson, B.; Danchi, W.; Morzinski, K.; Grenz, P.; Skrutskie, M.; Ertel, S.

    2016-08-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI) is a high spatial resolution instrument developed for coherent imaging and nulling interferometry using the 14.4 m baseline of the 2×8.4 m LBT. The unique telescope design, comprising of the dual apertures on a common elevation-azimuth mount, enables a broad use of observing modes. The full system is comprised of dual adaptive optics systems, a near-infrared phasing camera, a 1-5 μm camera (called LMIRCam), and an 8-13 μm camera (called NOMIC). The key program for LBTI is the Hunt for Observable Signatures of Terrestrial planetary Systems (HOSTS), a survey using nulling interferometry to constrain the typical brightness from exozodiacal dust around nearby stars. Additional observations focus on the detection and characterization of giant planets in the thermal infrared, high spatial resolution imaging of complex scenes such as Jupiter's moon, Io, planets forming in transition disks, and the structure of active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Several instrumental upgrades are currently underway to improve and expand the capabilities of LBTI. These include: Improving the performance and limiting magnitude of the parallel adaptive optics systems; quadrupling the field of view of LMIRcam (increasing to 20"x20"); adding an integral field spectrometry mode; and implementing a new algorithm for path length correction that accounts for dispersion due to atmospheric water vapor. We present the current architecture and performance of LBTI, as well as an overview of the upgrades.

  18. Exact two-dimensional zonal wavefront reconstruction with high spatial resolution in lateral shearing interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Fengzhao; Li, Jie; Wang, Xiangzhao; Bu, Yang

    2016-05-01

    A novel zonal method is proposed for exact discrete reconstruction of a two-dimensional wavefront with high spatial resolution for lateral shearing interferometry. Four difference wavefronts measured in the x and y shear directions are required. Each of the two shear directions is measured twice with different shear amounts. The shear amounts of the second measurements of the x and y directions are Sx+1 pixels and Sy+1 pixels, where Sx pixels and Sy pixels are the shear amounts of the first measurements in the x and y directions, respectively. The shear amount in each direction can be chosen freely, provided that it is below a maximum value determined by the pupil shape and the number of samples N in that direction; thus, the choices are not limited by the more stringent condition required by previous methods, namely, that the shear amounts must be divisors of N. This method can exactly reconstruct any wavefront at evaluation points up to an arbitrary constant if the data is noiseless, and high spatial resolution can be achieved even with large shear amounts. The method is applicable not only to square pupils, but also to general pupil shapes if a sufficient number of Gerchberg iterations are employed. In this study, the validity and capability of the method were confirmed by numerical experiments. In addition, the experiments demonstrated that the method is stable with respect to noise in the difference wavefronts.

  19. Ship detection in high spatial resolution remote sensing image based on improved sea-land segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Na; Zhang, Qiaochu; Zhao, Huijie; Dong, Chao; Meng, Lingjie

    2016-10-01

    A new method to detect ship target at sea based on improved segmentation algorithm is proposed in this paper, in which the improved segmentation algorithm is applied to precisely segment land and sea. Firstly, mean value is replaced instead of average variance value in Otsu method in order to improve the adaptability. Secondly, Mean Shift algorithm is performed to separate the original high spatial resolution remote sensing image into several homogeneous regions. At last, the final sea-land segmentation result can be located combined with the regions in preliminary sea-land segmentation result. The proposed segmentation algorithm performs well on the segment between water and land with affluent texture features and background noise, and produces a result that can be well used in shape and context analyses. Ships are detected with settled shape characteristics, including width, length and its compactness. Mean Shift algorithm can smooth the background noise, utilize the wave's texture features and helps highlight offshore ships. Mean shift algorithm is combined with improved Otsu threshold method in order to maximizes their advantages. Experimental results show that the improved sea-land segmentation algorithm on high spatial resolution remote sensing image with complex texture and background noise performs well in sea-land segmentation, not only enhances the accuracy of land and sea boarder, but also preserves detail characteristic of ships. Compared with traditional methods, this method can achieve accuracy over 90 percent. Experiments on Worldview images show the superior, robustness and precision of the proposed method.

  20. A Method of Spatial Mapping and Reclassification for High-Spatial-Resolution Remote Sensing Image Classification

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guizhou; Liu, Jianbo; He, Guojin

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new classification method for high-spatial-resolution remote sensing images based on a strategic mechanism of spatial mapping and reclassification. The proposed method includes four steps. First, the multispectral image is classified by a traditional pixel-based classification method (support vector machine). Second, the panchromatic image is subdivided by watershed segmentation. Third, the pixel-based multispectral image classification result is mapped to the panchromatic segmentation result based on a spatial mapping mechanism and the area dominant principle. During the mapping process, an area proportion threshold is set, and the regional property is defined as unclassified if the maximum area proportion does not surpass the threshold. Finally, unclassified regions are reclassified based on spectral information using the minimum distance to mean algorithm. Experimental results show that the classification method for high-spatial-resolution remote sensing images based on the spatial mapping mechanism and reclassification strategy can make use of both panchromatic and multispectral information, integrate the pixel- and object-based classification methods, and improve classification accuracy. PMID:24453808

  1. Mediterranean Land Use and Land Cover Classification Assessment Using High Spatial Resolution Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhag, Mohamed; Boteva, Silvena

    2016-10-01

    Landscape fragmentation is noticeably practiced in Mediterranean regions and imposes substantial complications in several satellite image classification methods. To some extent, high spatial resolution data were able to overcome such complications. For better classification performances in Land Use Land Cover (LULC) mapping, the current research adopts different classification methods comparison for LULC mapping using Sentinel-2 satellite as a source of high spatial resolution. Both of pixel-based and an object-based classification algorithms were assessed; the pixel-based approach employs Maximum Likelihood (ML), Artificial Neural Network (ANN) algorithms, Support Vector Machine (SVM), and, the object-based classification uses the Nearest Neighbour (NN) classifier. Stratified Masking Process (SMP) that integrates a ranking process within the classes based on spectral fluctuation of the sum of the training and testing sites was implemented. An analysis of the overall and individual accuracy of the classification results of all four methods reveals that the SVM classifier was the most efficient overall by distinguishing most of the classes with the highest accuracy. NN succeeded to deal with artificial surface classes in general while agriculture area classes, and forest and semi-natural area classes were segregated successfully with SVM. Furthermore, a comparative analysis indicates that the conventional classification method yielded better accuracy results than the SMP method overall with both classifiers used, ML and SVM.

  2. Mapping urban and peri-urban agriculture using high spatial resolution satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, Dionys; Buehler, Yves; Kellenberger, Tobias W.

    2009-03-01

    In rapidly changing peri-urban environments where biophysical and socio-economic processes lead to spatial fragmentation of agricultural land, remote sensing offers an efficient tool to collect land cover/land use (LCLU) data for decision-making. Compared to traditional pixel-based approaches, remote sensing with object-based classification methods is reported to achieve improved classification results in complex heterogeneous landscapes. This study assessed the usefulness of object-oriented analysis of Quickbird high spatial resolution satellite data to classify urban and peri-urban agriculture in a limited peri-urban area of Hanoi, Vietnam. The results revealed that segmentation was essential in developing the object-oriented classification approach. Accurate segmentation of shape and size of an object enhanced classification with spectral, textural, morphological, and topological features. A qualitative, visual comparison of the classification results showed successful localisation and identification of most LCLU classes. Quantitative evaluation was conducted with a classification error matrix reaching an overall accuracy of 67% and a kappa coefficient of 0.61. In general, object-oriented classification of high spatial resolution satellite data proved the promising approach for LCLU analysis at village level. Capturing small-scale urban and peri-urban agricultural diversity offers a considerable potential for environmental monitoring. Challenges remain with the delineation of field boundaries and LCLU diversity on more spatially extensive datasets.

  3. Matrix Sublimation/Recrystallization for Imaging Proteins by Mass Spectrometry at High Spatial Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junhai; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    We have employed matrix deposition by sublimation for protein image analysis on tissue sections using a hydration/recrystallization process that produces high quality MALDI mass spectra and high spatial resolution ion images. We systematically investigated different washing protocols, the effect of tissue section thickness, the amount of sublimated matrix per unit area and different recrystallization conditions. The results show that an organic solvent rinse followed by ethanol/water rinses substantially increased sensitivity for the detection of proteins. Both the thickness of tissue section and amount of sinapinic acid sublimated per unit area have optimal ranges for maximal protein signal intensity. Ion images of mouse and rat brain sections at 50, 20 and 10 µm spatial resolution are presented and are correlated with H&E stained optical images. For targeted analysis, histology directed imaging can be performed using this protocol where MS analysis and H&E staining are performed on the same section. PMID:21639088

  4. High Spatial Resolution STXM at 6.2 keV Photon Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Vila-Comamala, Joan; Kewish, Cameron M.; Thibault, Pierre; Guzenko, Vitaliy; Gorelick, Sergey; Menzel, Andreas; Bunk, Oliver; David, Christian; Dierolf, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz; Pilvi, Tero; Faerm, Elina; Ritala, Mikko

    2010-04-06

    We report on a zone-doubling technique that bypasses the electron-beam lithography limitations for the production of X-ray diffractive optics and enables the fabrication of Fresnel zone plates with smaller outermost zone widths than other well-established approaches. We have applied this method to manufacture hard X-ray Fresnel zone plates with outermost zone widths of 25 and 20 nm. These lenses have been tested in scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at energies up to 6.2 keV, producing images of test structures that demonstrate a spatial resolution of 25 nm. High spatial resolution STXM images of several biological specimens have been acquired in transmission, dark-field and differential phase contrast modes.

  5. Optimal Gabor filter-based edge detection of high spatial resolution remotely sensed images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Haohao; Xiao, Pengfeng; Feng, Xuezhi

    2017-01-01

    Edge extraction from high spatial resolution (HSR) remotely sensed images is one of the essential tasks for image segmentation and object identification. We present an optimal Gabor-based edge detection method which mainly focuses on selecting optimal parameters, including central frequency and spectrum scale, for Gabor filter. The central frequency is automatically optimized by phase randomization and the human visual system-based structure similarity index. Next, the optimal spectrum scale is determined based on two-dimensional power spectrum density. The edge detection method is comprehensively discussed in the analysis of parameter sensitivity, overall performance, and comparative tests with several widely used methods. Qualitative and quantitative experimental studies, performed on six test images with various spatial resolution, show that the proposed method provides a promising solution to edge detection from HSR remotely sensed images.

  6. High-Spatial-Resolution Multichannel Thomson Scattering Measurements for Atmospheric Pressure Microdischarge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Akihiro; Iwamoto, Kazushige

    2004-08-01

    High-spatial-resolution multichannel Thomson scattering measurement scheme is applied to the diagnostics of a microplasma produced between two knife-edge electrodes separated by a 100 μm microgap and driven by 2.45 GHz microwave. The method provides spatial profile of electron density, electron temperature, and gas temperature simultaneously in a single measurement, with a spatial resolution of ˜ 25 μm; the gas temperature is derived from the spectrum of rotational Raman scattering caused by molecules contained in the discharge gas. Measurements are carried out for discharges with air and He/N2(5%) mixture gas at atmospheric pressure and the differences in the basic plasma parameters are discussed.

  7. Cyclical thinning of black phosphorus with high spatial resolution for heterostructure devices.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Matthew C; Namgung, Seon; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Koester, Steven J

    2017-03-13

    A high-spatial resolution, cyclical thinning method for realizing black phosphorus (BP) heterostructures is reported. This process utilizes a cyclic technique involving BP surface oxidation and vacuum annealing to create BP flakes as thin as 1.6 nm. The process also utilizes a spatially patternable mask created by evaporating Al that oxidizes to form Al2O3 which stabilizes the unetched BP regions and enables the formation of lateral heterostructures with spatial resolution as small as 150 nm. This thinning/patterning technique has also been used to create the first ever lateral heterostructure BP MOSFET in which half of a BP flake was thinned in order to increase its band gap. This heterostructure MOSFET showed an on-to-off current ratio improvement of 1000× compared to homojunction MOSFETs.

  8. Full-field, high-spatial-resolution detection of local structural damage from low-resolution random strain field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongchao; Sun, Peng; Nagarajaiah, Satish; Bachilo, Sergei M.; Weisman, R. Bruce

    2017-07-01

    Structural damage is typically a local phenomenon that initiates and propagates within a limited area. As such high spatial resolution measurement and monitoring is often needed for accurate damage detection. This requires either significantly increased costs from denser sensor deployment in the case of global simultaneous/parallel measurements, or increased measurement time and labor in the case of global sequential measurements. This study explores the feasibility of an alternative approach to this problem: a computational solution in which a limited set of randomly positioned, low-resolution global strain measurements are used to reconstruct the full-field, high-spatial-resolution, two-dimensional (2D) strain field and rapidly detect local damage. The proposed approach exploits the implicit low-rank and sparse data structure of the 2D strain field: it is highly correlated without many edges and hence has a low-rank structure, unless damage-manifesting itself as sparse local irregularity-is present and alters such a low-rank structure slightly. Therefore, reconstruction of the full-field, high-spatial-resolution strain field from a limited set of randomly positioned low-resolution global measurements is modeled as a low-rank matrix completion framework and damage detection as a sparse decomposition formulation, enabled by emerging convex optimization techniques. Numerical simulations on a plate structure are conducted for validation. The results are discussed and a practical iterative global/local procedure is recommended. This new computational approach should enable the efficient detection of local damage using limited sets of strain measurements.

  9. High-Spatial-Resolution Thermal Infrared Satellite Images for Lake Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steissberg, T. E.; Hook, S. J.; Schladow, G.

    2006-12-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) satellite images can be used to study transport processes in lakes, such as wind-driven upwelling and surface circulation, providing a measure of spatial variability and horizontal distribution of water temperature that conventional field-based measurements cannot provide. High-spatial-resolution TIR images provide a detailed view of fine-scale processes, such as surface jets, that cannot be clearly resolved in moderate-resolution images, and they enable the accurate measurement of surface transport and circulation patterns. The surface temperature maps derived from high-resolution thermal infrared ASTER and Landsat ETM+ images, in conjunction with moderate-resolution TIR images acquired by MODIS, enabled the characterization of wind-driven upwelling and the measurement of surface currents and circulation at Lake Tahoe, California-Nevada, USA. The images, paired with in situ surface temperature and meteorological data, have shown that wind-driven partial upwelling events occur at least twice monthly throughout the spring and summer stratified period, transporting water from intermediate depths to the surface. These are important events that contribute to the patchiness and heterogeneity that characterize natural aquatic systems. The high spatial resolution of ASTER and ETM+ and the small time separation between their subsequent overpasses allow the surface currents and general circulation in lakes and coastal environments to be accurately quantified using the maximum cross-correlation method. The surface currents and circulation at Lake Tahoe were measured using a pair of cross-platform high-resolution TIR images acquired 38 minutes apart by ETM+ and ASTER. Mean currents of 5--10 cm/s were measured, with maximum currents approaching 35 cm/s. The eastward transport of a surface jet extending from an upwelling front was clearly apparent, with 15--30 cm/s currents. The vector field delineated three gyres, consistent with surface drifter

  10. A Mid-IR Search for Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachter, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the dearth of relatively faint, compact planetary nebulae (PNe) in uncrowded fields that could serve as potential spectral calibration sources for the Euclid Mission, we have conducted a search for PNe at high Galactic latitudes based on WISE data. Previous studies have largely focused on the Galactic Plane or searched for mid-IR counterparts to optically selected PNe. We instead identify the WISE mid-IR color locus of PNe and investigate the cataloged sources fulfilling these color criteria. We will present preliminary results from this study, including new PNe candidates.

  11. Use of radiochromic film as a high-spatial resolution dosimeter by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Jamal Ahmad; Park, Hyeonsuk; Park, So-Yeon; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2016-08-01

    Due to increasing demand for high-spatial resolution dosimetry, radiochromic films have been investigated as potential candidates but are often limited by the scanning system, e.g., flatbed optical scanner. In this study, Raman spectroscopy in conjunction with a microscope was selected as an alternative method for high-spatial resolution dosimetry of radiochromic film. Unlaminated Gafchromic™ EBT3 films were irradiated with doses between 0 and 50 Gy using 6 MV x-rays of a clinical linear accelerator. Depth profiling from the surface of unlaminated film was performed to acquire the maximum Raman intensity peaks of C≡C and C=C stretching bands of diacetylene polymer. The Raman mapping technique for a region of interest (200 × 200, 30 × 30 μm(2)) was developed to reduce a large variation in a Raman spectrum produced with a sampling resolution of a few μm. The preprocessing of Raman spectra was carried out to determine a dosimetric relationship with the amount of diacetylene polymerization. Due to partial diacetylene polymerization upon irradiation, two Raman peaks of C=C and C≡C stretching bands were observed around 1447 and 2060 cm(-1), respectively. The maximum intensities of the two peaks were obtained by positioning a focused laser spot on the surface of unlaminated film. For the dose range of 0-50 Gy, the band heights of both C≡C and C=C peaks increase asymptotically with increasing doses and can be fit with an exponential function of two components. The relative standard deviation in Raman mapping was found to be less than ±5%. By using this technique, dose uniformity was found to be within ±2%. The Raman intensity for C=C and C≡C peaks increases with an increase in the amount of diacetylene polymerization due to an increase in dose. This study shows the potential of Raman spectroscopy as an alternative for absolute dosimetry verifications with a high-spatial resolution of a few μm, but these findings need to be further validated for the purpose

  12. High-spatial resolution multispectral and panchromatic satellite imagery for mapping perennial desert plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsharrah, Saad A.; Bruce, David A.; Bouabid, Rachid; Somenahalli, Sekhar; Corcoran, Paul A.

    2015-10-01

    The use of remote sensing techniques to extract vegetation cover information for the assessment and monitoring of land degradation in arid environments has gained increased interest in recent years. However, such a task can be challenging, especially for medium-spatial resolution satellite sensors, due to soil background effects and the distribution and structure of perennial desert vegetation. In this study, we utilised Pleiades high-spatial resolution, multispectral (2m) and panchromatic (0.5m) imagery and focused on mapping small shrubs and low-lying trees using three classification techniques: 1) vegetation indices (VI) threshold analysis, 2) pre-built object-oriented image analysis (OBIA), and 3) a developed vegetation shadow model (VSM). We evaluated the success of each approach using a root of the sum of the squares (RSS) metric, which incorporated field data as control and three error metrics relating to commission, omission, and percent cover. Results showed that optimum VI performers returned good vegetation cover estimates at certain thresholds, but failed to accurately map the distribution of the desert plants. Using the pre-built IMAGINE Objective OBIA approach, we improved the vegetation distribution mapping accuracy, but this came at the cost of over classification, similar to results of lowering VI thresholds. We further introduced the VSM which takes into account shadow for further refining vegetation cover classification derived from VI. The results showed significant improvements in vegetation cover and distribution accuracy compared to the other techniques. We argue that the VSM approach using high-spatial resolution imagery provides a more accurate representation of desert landscape vegetation and should be considered in assessments of desertification.

  13. In-duct identification of fluid-borne source with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Yong-Ho; Ih, Jeong-Guon; Bodén, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Source identification of acoustic characteristics of in-duct fluid machinery is required for coping with the fluid-borne noise. By knowing the acoustic pressure and particle velocity field at the source plane in detail, the sound generation mechanism of a fluid machine can be understood. The identified spatial distribution of the strength of major radiators would be useful for the low noise design. Conventional methods for measuring the source in a wide duct have not been very helpful in investigating the source properties in detail because their spatial resolution is improper for the design purpose. In this work, an inverse method to estimate the source parameters with a high spatial resolution is studied. The theoretical formulation including the evanescent modes and near-field measurement data is given for a wide duct. After validating the proposed method to a duct excited by an acoustic driver, an experiment on a duct system driven by an air blower is conducted in the presence of flow. A convergence test for the evanescent modes is performed to find the necessary number of modes to regenerate the measured pressure field precisely. By using the converged modal amplitudes, very-close near-field pressure to the source is regenerated and compared with the measured pressure, and the maximum error was -16.3 dB. The source parameters are restored from the converged modal amplitudes. Then, the distribution of source parameters on the driver and the blower is clearly revealed with a high spatial resolution for kR<1.84 in which range only plane waves can propagate to far field in a duct. Measurement using a flush mounted sensor array is discussed, and the removal of pure radial modes in the modeling is suggested.

  14. Determination of a high spatial resolution geopotential model using atomic clock comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lion, G.; Panet, I.; Wolf, P.; Guerlin, C.; Bize, S.; Delva, P.

    2017-01-01

    Recent technological advances in optical atomic clocks are opening new perspectives for the direct determination of geopotential differences between any two points at a centimeter-level accuracy in geoid height. However, so far detailed quantitative estimates of the possible improvement in geoid determination when adding such clock measurements to existing data are lacking. We present a first step in that direction with the aim and hope of triggering further work and efforts in this emerging field of chronometric geodesy and geophysics. We specifically focus on evaluating the contribution of this new kind of direct measurements in determining the geopotential at high spatial resolution (≈ 10 km). We studied two test areas, both located in France and corresponding to a middle (Massif Central) and high (Alps) mountainous terrain. These regions are interesting because the gravitational field strength varies greatly from place to place at high spatial resolution due to the complex topography. Our method consists in first generating a synthetic high-resolution geopotential map, then drawing synthetic measurement data (gravimetry and clock data) from it, and finally reconstructing the geopotential map from that data using least squares collocation. The quality of the reconstructed map is then assessed by comparing it to the original one used to generate the data. We show that adding only a few clock data points (less than 1% of the gravimetry data) reduces the bias significantly and improves the standard deviation by a factor 3. The effect of the data coverage and data quality on the results is investigated, and the trade-off between the measurement noise level and the number of data points is discussed.

  15. Determination of a high spatial resolution geopotential model using atomic clock comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lion, G.; Panet, I.; Wolf, P.; Guerlin, C.; Bize, S.; Delva, P.

    2017-06-01

    Recent technological advances in optical atomic clocks are opening new perspectives for the direct determination of geopotential differences between any two points at a centimeter-level accuracy in geoid height. However, so far detailed quantitative estimates of the possible improvement in geoid determination when adding such clock measurements to existing data are lacking. We present a first step in that direction with the aim and hope of triggering further work and efforts in this emerging field of chronometric geodesy and geophysics. We specifically focus on evaluating the contribution of this new kind of direct measurements in determining the geopotential at high spatial resolution (≈ 10 km). We studied two test areas, both located in France and corresponding to a middle (Massif Central) and high (Alps) mountainous terrain. These regions are interesting because the gravitational field strength varies greatly from place to place at high spatial resolution due to the complex topography. Our method consists in first generating a synthetic high-resolution geopotential map, then drawing synthetic measurement data (gravimetry and clock data) from it, and finally reconstructing the geopotential map from that data using least squares collocation. The quality of the reconstructed map is then assessed by comparing it to the original one used to generate the data. We show that adding only a few clock data points (less than 1% of the gravimetry data) reduces the bias significantly and improves the standard deviation by a factor 3. The effect of the data coverage and data quality on the results is investigated, and the trade-off between the measurement noise level and the number of data points is discussed.

  16. Beyond spicule dynamics: spicule and fibril spectroscopy at high spatial and temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes Domingos Pereira, T.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.

    2015-12-01

    Solar spicules are chromospheric fibrils observed at the solar limb. They are observed everywhere in the Sun, but their origin is not yet understood. Much of our understanding of spicules has been obtained through filtergram observations and/or focused on the dynamics of spicules. Spectroscopic studies have been usually limited by spatial extent/resolution, temporal resolution, or variable seeing. In this work we make use of a unique time series of imaging spectroscopy at high spatial and temporal resolution, obtained with the Swedish Solar Telescope under excellent seeing and coordinated with the IRIS mission. With these data we characterize the evolution of spectra along quiet Sun fibrils and spicules, and discuss what makes them visible in filtergrams and sets them apart from other chromospheric fibrils. With combined H-alpha and Ca II H high-resolution observations we also discuss how spicules appear in these two lines, a long standing issue that has been interpreted in conflicting ways. Finally, using the wide range of IRIS diagnostics we put together the spectral evolution of spicules through the chromosphere and transition region.

  17. High Spatial Resolution Auger Spectroscopy and Nucleation and Growth Studies of SILVER/SILICON(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Frank C. H.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to analyse the composition of a sample at high spatial resolution using Auger Electron Spectroscopy is very desirable for both industrial and academic research. The spatial resolution of the traditional Auger instrument is typically limited by the incident beam size to the range of 0.1-1 mum. This dissertation reports the efforts of construction, testing and utilizing a new Auger spectrometer with a nanometer incident probe in a scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). In order to use the 100 keV electron beam of the STEM for the Auger experiment, a low energy electron beam deflection system was designed and constructed. The testing of such deflection system and the spectrometer, both in a test chamber with different hardware configuration and in the microscope, was very extensive. Both Auger spectra and images can be obtained in the microscope with excellent energy resolution in a relatively short time. Quantitative analysis of the data showed a spatial resolution of less than 10 nm was achieved with a good collection efficiency. More quantitative work was carried on the Silver/Silicon(100) system as the application of the Auger instrument. Nucleation and growth phenomena of Ag on Si at both room and elevated temperatures was studied with the microscope operating both in Auger and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) mode. Suggestions for the further improvement of the Auger instrument and the Ag/Si(100) case study are made.

  18. High spatial resolution imaging for structural health monitoring based on virtual time reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jian; Shi, Lihua; Yuan, Shenfang; Shao, Zhixue

    2011-05-01

    Lamb waves are widely used in structural health monitoring (SHM) of plate-like structures. Due to the dispersion effect, Lamb wavepackets will be elongated and the resolution for damage identification will be strongly affected. This effect can be automatically compensated by the time reversal process (TRP). However, the time information of the compensated waves is also removed at the same time. To improve the spatial resolution of Lamb wave detection, virtual time reversal (VTR) is presented in this paper. In VTR, a changing-element excitation and reception mechanism (CERM) rather than the traditional fixed excitation and reception mechanism (FERM) is adopted for time information conservation. Furthermore, the complicated TRP procedure is replaced by simple signal operations which can make savings in the hardware cost for recording and generating the time-reversed Lamb waves. After the effects of VTR for dispersive damage scattered signals are theoretically analyzed, the realization of VTR involving the acquisition of the transfer functions of damage detecting paths under step pulse excitation is discussed. Then, a VTR-based imaging method is developed to improve the spatial resolution of the delay-and-sum imaging with a sparse piezoelectric (PZT) wafer array. Experimental validation indicates that the damage scattered wavepackets of A0 mode in an aluminum plate are partly recompressed and focalized with their time information preserved by VTR. Both the single damage and the dual adjacent damages in the plate can be clearly displayed with high spatial resolution by the proposed VTR-based imaging method.

  19. Improving the quantification at high spatial resolution using a field emission electron microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinard, P. T.; Richter, S.

    2014-03-01

    The capabilities of field emitter electron microprobes to perform quantitative measurements at high spatial resolution are discussed. Using Fe-Cr-C particles in a bearing steel (SAE 52100) as example, a generic procedure was established to find the optimal analytical conditions (beam energy, beam current and acquisition time). The influence of these parameters on the accuracy, precision and spatial resolution was evaluated using experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. A quantification procedure was developed for soft X-ray lines, taking into account the overlap of high order X-ray lines and background anomalies. The accuracy of Ka- and La-lines was verified using reference materials. A relationship between experimental and simulated X-ray intensities was determined to evaluate the measurement precision. The spatial resolution of each X-ray line was calculated from the simulated lateral and depth X-ray intensity distribution using simulations integrating experimentally measured beam diameters. The optimal analytical conditions for the studied sample were found to be 5 keV, 10 nA and 10 s acquisition time. Further specialized techniques to improve the spatial resolution are presented: focused ion beam preparation of thin lamella and wedge, and Monte Carlo based reconstruction. The feasibility of the latter to quantify features smaller than the X-ray emission volume was demonstrated.

  20. High spatial resolution impedance measurement of EIS sensors for light addressable cell adhesion monitoring.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Wang, Jun; Liu, Qingjun; Zhang, Wei; Cai, Hua; Wang, Ping

    2011-02-15

    In this paper, impedance measurement of electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor (EIS) structure with high spatial resolution was proposed to monitor cell adhesion. The light addressing ability of this work overcomes the geometrical restrict of cell culture on conventional impedance detection devices such as interdigitated electrode (IDE) and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS). Instead of studying cells on predetermined sites of IDE and ECIS, cells cultured anywhere on EIS sensor surface can be addressed and selected as target cells. Principle and primary models for high resolution impedance detection were described and tested by experiments. The EIS sensor was investigated in terms of its intrinsic characteristics, like impedance behavior, voltage characteristic, frequency dependency and photovoltaic effect. Optimized working condition was studied for cell experiments. Cell adhesion under treatment of 0.1% Triton X-100 was monitored using rat kidney cells as the source. Results showed good sensitivity (10% change of impedance) and resolution (40 μm) for cell adhesion impedance detection and suggested this work should be suitable for monitoring cell impedance. Further improvements on sensitivity, spatial resolution were discussed as well as the further applications for single cell monitoring and cell adhesion imaging. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Cr:ZnSe planar waveguide mid-IR laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willimas, J. E.; Martyshkin, D. V.; Fedorov, V. V.; Moskalev, I. S.; Camata, R. P.; Mirov, S. B.

    2011-02-01

    Middle infrared (mid-IR) chromium-doped zinc selenide (Cr:ZnSe) bulk lasers have attracted a lot of attention due to their unique combination of optical and laser properties facilitating a wide range of potential scientific, industrial, and medical applications. Utilization of thin film waveguide geometry enabling good thermal management and control of beam quality is a viable pathway for compact chip-integrated optical laser design. Cr:ZnSe thin films are also promising as saturable absorbers and mode-lockers of the cavities of solid state lasers operating over 1.3-2.1 μm. We recently reported the first successful demonstration of mid-IR Cr:ZnSe planar waveguide lasing at 2.6 μm under gain-switched short-pulse (5 ns) 1.56 μm excitation as well as the passive Q-switching of the cavity of a fiber-pumped Er:YAG laser operating at 1645 nm using a highly doped Cr:ZnSe thin film. PLD grown Cr:ZnSe waveguide were fabricated on sapphire substrates (Cr:ZnSe/sapphire) with chromium concentration of 1018-1019 cm-3. Further development of mid-IR lasing in the Cr:ZnSe planar waveguide under continuous wave excitation were investigated. In addition, deposition of Cr:ZnSe-based thin film structures on n-type GaAs substrates were also investigated for possible mid-IR electroluminescence.

  2. Spatiotemporal neurodynamics underlying internally and externally driven temporal prediction: a high spatial resolution ERP study.

    PubMed

    Mento, Giovanni; Tarantino, Vincenza; Vallesi, Antonino; Bisiacchi, Patrizia Silvia

    2015-03-01

    Temporal prediction (TP) is a flexible and dynamic cognitive ability. Depending on the internal or external nature of information exploited to generate TP, distinct cognitive and brain mechanisms are engaged with the same final goal of reducing uncertainty about the future. In this study, we investigated the specific brain mechanisms involved in internally and externally driven TP. To this end, we employed an experimental paradigm purposely designed to elicit and compare externally and internally driven TP and a combined approach based on the application of a distributed source reconstruction modeling on a high spatial resolution electrophysiological data array. Specific spatiotemporal ERP signatures were identified, with significant modulation of contingent negative variation and frontal late sustained positivity in external and internal TP contexts, respectively. These different electrophysiological patterns were supported by the engagement of distinct neural networks, including a left sensorimotor and a prefrontal circuit for externally and internally driven TP, respectively.

  3. Evaluation of high spatial resolution imaging of magnetic stray fields for early damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegemann, Robert; Cabeza, Sandra; Pelkner, Matthias; Lyamkin, Viktor; Sonntag, Nadja; Bruno, Giovanni; Skrotzki, Birgit; Kreutzbruck, Marc

    2017-02-01

    The paper discusses the evaluation of elastic and plastic strain states in two low-carbon steels of the same steel group with high spatial resolution GMR (giant magneto resistance) sensors. The residual stress distributions of tungsten inert gas welded plates were determined by means of neutron diffraction as a reference. The normal component of local residual magnetic stray fields arise in the vicinity of the positions of maximum stress. The experiments performed on flat tensile specimen indicate that the boundaries of plastic deformations are a source of stray fields. The spatial variations of magnetic stray fields for both the weld and the tensile samples are in the order of the earths magnetic field.

  4. LiF crystals as high spatial resolution neutron imaging detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubayashi, M.; Faenov, A.; Pikuz, T.; Fukuda, Y.; Kato, Y.; Yasuda, R.; Iikura, H.; Nojima, T.; Sakai, T.

    2011-09-01

    Neutron imaging by color center formation in LiF crystals was applied to a sensitivity indicator (SI) as a standard samples for neutron radiography. The SI was exposed to a 5 mm pinhole-collimated thermal neutron beam with an LiF crystal and a neutron imaging plate (NIP) for 120 min in the JRR-3M thermal neutron radiography facility. The image in the LiF crystal was read out using a laser confocal microscope. All gaps were clearly observed in images for both the LiF crystal and the NIP. The experimental results showed that LiF crystals have excellent characteristics as neutron imaging detectors in areas such as high spatial resolution.

  5. High spatial resolution IR observations of young stellar objects - A possible disk surrounding HL Tauri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grasdalen, G. L.; Strom, S. E.; Strom, K. M.; Capps, R. W.; Thompson, D.; Castelaz, M.

    1984-01-01

    High spatial resolution images of the T Tauri star HL Tau were obtained at 1.6 microns and 2.2 microns. The original images as well as maximum entropy image reconstructions reveal a circumstellar envelope structure, similar at both wavelenghts, and extended along P.A. = 112 deg; the 10 percent width of the structure is 1.9 sec (300 AU at 160 pc). The extended structure is interpreted as light scattered toward earth by dust in a disk surrounding this young stellar object. Polarization measurements made at 2.2 microns support this hypothesis. The total solid particle mass is, at minimum, 5 x 10 to the -7th solar mass.

  6. Chenge Detection Method for Wetland Surface Conditions using NDVI Values of High Spatial Resolution Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeshita, Shinichi; Suzuki, Kenji

    In this study, a new method has been proposed that can reveal changes of wetland surface condition using high spatial resolution satellite data (IKONOS) for actual wetland managements. The method can detect the wetland surface change based on the NDVI change domain in wetlands using bi-temporal satellite data through analyzing ‘coordinate of NDVI change’. We applied the method to Kawaminami wetland in Miyazaki prefecture for comparing the calculation results and actual state of wetland with observed groundwater level data. As the results, it was able to extract artificial change of the wetland surface precisely and to detect differences of the wetness of the surface in two imageries. For satellite data analysis, it was indicated that utilization of supplementary climate data such as rainfall is important. The proposed method is effective for actual wetland managements, because it is simple and practical.

  7. Practical method of shadow detection and removal for high spatial resolution remote sensing image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ru; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Xia; Chen, Zhengchao; Wei, Zheng; Zheng, Lanfen

    2007-11-01

    High spatial resolution remote sensing image (HSRRSI) has received a warm welcome in many fields. However, building shadows of large area on HSRRSI (up to 30% in some cases) are one of the biggest hindrances for further applications in many fields. To keep a balance between precision and efficiency required by applications during shadow removal, this paper introduces a creative and practical strategy based on the theory of the pulse coupled neural network (PCNN). By applying the simplified model of PCNN, shadows on HSRRSI had been detected and removed respectively. When applied to HSRRSI, the method could not only remove the shadows, but also keep the contrast between removed areas with shadows and other areas without shadows from being too big, which might distort the image. Therefore the satisfactory result is gained.

  8. Extraction of marine debris in the Sea of Japan using high-spatial-resolution satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    The flow of marine debris in the Sea of Japan causes extensive damage to coastal environments. It is important to understand the debris flow in the ocean for environmental research. The small size of most marine debris in the Sea of Japan makes it impossible to be confirmed directly, even when using high-spatial-resolution satellite imagery. Thus, to extract candidate pixels containing possible marine debris, pixels with spectra that differ from those of the surrounding ocean and wave crests were identified. As a first step towards monitoring marine debris, a previously proposed method for identifying marine debris floating in the Sea of Japan uses a histogram showing the distance from the regression line of the scatter diagram of satellite spectral bands. In this paper, a new method using a spectral angle mapper (SAM) in four- or eight-dimensional space corresponding to satellite spectral bands is proposed. The validity of the method using SAM is also discussed.

  9. High spatial resolution IR observations of young stellar objects - A possible disk surrounding HL Tauri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grasdalen, G. L.; Strom, S. E.; Strom, K. M.; Capps, R. W.; Thompson, D.; Castelaz, M.

    1984-01-01

    High spatial resolution images of the T Tauri star HL Tau were obtained at 1.6 microns and 2.2 microns. The original images as well as maximum entropy image reconstructions reveal a circumstellar envelope structure, similar at both wavelenghts, and extended along P.A. = 112 deg; the 10 percent width of the structure is 1.9 sec (300 AU at 160 pc). The extended structure is interpreted as light scattered toward earth by dust in a disk surrounding this young stellar object. Polarization measurements made at 2.2 microns support this hypothesis. The total solid particle mass is, at minimum, 5 x 10 to the -7th solar mass.

  10. Estimating Vegetation Structure in African Savannas using High Spatial Resolution Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsson, C.; Hanan, N. P.

    2016-12-01

    High spatial resolution satellite imagery allows for detailed mapping of trees in savanna landscapes, including estimates of woody cover, tree densities, crown sizes, and the spatial pattern of trees. By linking these vegetation parameters to rainfall and soil properties we gain knowledge of how the local environment influences vegetation. A thorough understanding of the underlying ecosystem processes is key to assessing the future productivity and stability of these ecosystems. In this study, we have processed and analyzed hundreds of sites sampled from African savannas across a wide range of rainfall and soil conditions. The vegetation at each site is classified using unsupervised classification with manual assignment into woody, herbaceous and bare cover classes. A crown delineation method further divides the woody areas into individual tree crowns. The results show that rainfall, soil, and topography interactively influence vegetation structure. We see that both total rainfall and rainfall seasonality play important roles and that soil type influences woody cover and the sizes of tree crowns.

  11. Extraction of urban network from high-spatial-resolution imagery using multiresolution analysis and wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couloigner, Isabelle; Ranchin, Thierry

    1998-10-01

    This paper presents a new method to extract, semi- automatically, quadrangular urban road network from high spatial resolution imagery. A quadrangular network is generally composed of different classes of streets in a hierarchical system. The developed method is based both on the multiresolution analysis and on the wavelet transform. The multiresolution analysis allows a multiscale analysis of images and thus the extraction of the streets in a class-by- class way. The wavelet transform enables the modeling of information at different characteristic scales. In the problem, it allows the extraction of the topography of streets. These two mathematical tools are combined in the `a trous' algorithm. The application of this algorithm to images of urban areas has been used to develop semi- automatic multiresolution processing. This method will help photo-interpreters in their cartographic works by a partial automation of tasks.

  12. Optical Trapping Enabled Parallel Delivery of Biological Stimuli with High Spatial and Temporal Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, Daniel R.; Schneider, Thomas; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a method that employs nanocapsules, optical trapping, and single-pulse laser photolysis for delivering bioactive molecules to cells with both high spatial and temporal resolutions. This method is particularly suitable for a cell-culture setting, in which a single nanocapsule can be optically trapped and positioned at a pre-defined location next to the cell, followed by single-pulse laser photolysis to release the contents of the nanocapsule onto the cell. To parallelize this method such that a large array of nanocapsules can be manipulated, positioned, and photolyzed simultaneously, we have turned to the use of spatial light modulators and holographic beam shaping techniques. This paper outlines the progress we have made so far and details the issues we had to address in order to achieve efficient parallel optical manipulations of nanocapsules and particles. PMID:24465114

  13. Cumulus cloud field morphology and spatial patterns derived from high spatial resolution Landsat imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, S. K.; Welch, R. M.; Navar, M. S.; Berendes, T. A.; Chen, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    Using high-spatial-resolution Landsat MSS imagery, the cumulus cloud morphology, cloud nearest-neighbor distributions, and cloud clumping scales were investigated. It is shown that the cloud-size distribution can be represented by a mixture of two power laws; clouds of diameters less than 1 km have power-law slope range of 1.4-2.3, while larger clouds have slopes from 2.1 to 4.75. The break in power-law slope occurs at the cloud size that makes the largest contribution to cloud cover. Results suggest that larger clouds grow at the expense of smaller clouds. It was also found that the cloud inhomogeneities have significant impact on radiative fluxes.

  14. Ultra-High Spatial Resolution, Multi-Energy CT using Photon Counting Detector Technology.

    PubMed

    Leng, S; Gutjahr, R; Ferrero, A; Kappler, S; Henning, A; Halaweish, A; Zhou, W; Montoya, J; McCollough, C

    2017-02-11

    Two ultra-high-resolution (UHR) imaging modes, each with two energy thresholds, were implemented on a research, whole-body photon-counting-detector (PCD) CT scanner, referred to as sharp and UHR, respectively. The UHR mode has a pixel size of 0.25 mm at iso-center for both energy thresholds, with a collimation of 32 × 0.25 mm. The sharp mode has a 0.25 mm pixel for the low-energy threshold and 0.5 mm for the high-energy threshold, with a collimation of 48 × 0.25 mm. Kidney stones with mixed mineral composition and lung nodules with different shapes were scanned using both modes, and with the standard imaging mode, referred to as macro mode (0.5 mm pixel and 32 × 0.5 mm collimation). Evaluation and comparison of the three modes focused on the ability to accurately delineate anatomic structures using the high-spatial resolution capability and the ability to quantify stone composition using the multi-energy capability. The low-energy threshold images of the sharp and UHR modes showed better shape and texture information due to the achieved higher spatial resolution, although noise was also higher. No noticeable benefit was shown in multi-energy analysis using UHR compared to standard resolution (macro mode) when standard doses were used. This was due to excessive noise in the higher resolution images. However, UHR scans at higher dose showed improvement in multi-energy analysis over macro mode with regular dose. To fully take advantage of the higher spatial resolution in multi-energy analysis, either increased radiation dose, or application of noise reduction techniques, is needed.

  15. Ultra-high spatial resolution multi-energy CT using photon counting detector technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, S.; Gutjahr, R.; Ferrero, A.; Kappler, S.; Henning, A.; Halaweish, A.; Zhou, W.; Montoya, J.; McCollough, C.

    2017-03-01

    Two ultra-high-resolution (UHR) imaging modes, each with two energy thresholds, were implemented on a research, whole-body photon-counting-detector (PCD) CT scanner, referred to as sharp and UHR, respectively. The UHR mode has a pixel size of 0.25 mm at iso-center for both energy thresholds, with a collimation of 32 × 0.25 mm. The sharp mode has a 0.25 mm pixel for the low-energy threshold and 0.5 mm for the high-energy threshold, with a collimation of 48 × 0.25 mm. Kidney stones with mixed mineral composition and lung nodules with different shapes were scanned using both modes, and with the standard imaging mode, referred to as macro mode (0.5 mm pixel and 32 × 0.5 mm collimation). Evaluation and comparison of the three modes focused on the ability to accurately delineate anatomic structures using the high-spatial resolution capability and the ability to quantify stone composition using the multi-energy capability. The low-energy threshold images of the sharp and UHR modes showed better shape and texture information due to the achieved higher spatial resolution, although noise was also higher. No noticeable benefit was shown in multi-energy analysis using UHR compared to standard resolution (macro mode) when standard doses were used. This was due to excessive noise in the higher resolution images. However, UHR scans at higher dose showed improvement in multi-energy analysis over macro mode with regular dose. To fully take advantage of the higher spatial resolution in multi-energy analysis, either increased radiation dose, or application of noise reduction techniques, is needed.

  16. Ultra-High Spatial Resolution, Multi-Energy CT using Photon Counting Detector Technology

    PubMed Central

    Leng, S.; Gutjahr, R.; Ferrero, A.; Kappler, S.; Henning, A.; Halaweish, A.; Zhou, W.; Montoya, J.; McCollough, C.

    2017-01-01

    Two ultra-high-resolution (UHR) imaging modes, each with two energy thresholds, were implemented on a research, whole-body photon-counting-detector (PCD) CT scanner, referred to as sharp and UHR, respectively. The UHR mode has a pixel size of 0.25 mm at iso-center for both energy thresholds, with a collimation of 32 × 0.25 mm. The sharp mode has a 0.25 mm pixel for the low-energy threshold and 0.5 mm for the high-energy threshold, with a collimation of 48 × 0.25 mm. Kidney stones with mixed mineral composition and lung nodules with different shapes were scanned using both modes, and with the standard imaging mode, referred to as macro mode (0.5 mm pixel and 32 × 0.5 mm collimation). Evaluation and comparison of the three modes focused on the ability to accurately delineate anatomic structures using the high-spatial resolution capability and the ability to quantify stone composition using the multi-energy capability. The low-energy threshold images of the sharp and UHR modes showed better shape and texture information due to the achieved higher spatial resolution, although noise was also higher. No noticeable benefit was shown in multi-energy analysis using UHR compared to standard resolution (macro mode) when standard doses were used. This was due to excessive noise in the higher resolution images. However, UHR scans at higher dose showed improvement in multi-energy analysis over macro mode with regular dose. To fully take advantage of the higher spatial resolution in multi-energy analysis, either increased radiation dose, or application of noise reduction techniques, is needed. PMID:28392615

  17. Estimating babassu palm density using automatic palm tree detection with very high spatial resolution satellite images.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Alessio Moreira; Mitja, Danielle; Delaître, Eric; Demagistri, Laurent; de Souza Miranda, Izildinha; Libourel, Thérèse; Petit, Michel

    2017-05-15

    High spatial resolution images as well as image processing and object detection algorithms are recent technologies that aid the study of biodiversity and commercial plantations of forest species. This paper seeks to contribute knowledge regarding the use of these technologies by studying randomly dispersed native palm tree. Here, we analyze the automatic detection of large circular crown (LCC) palm tree using a high spatial resolution panchromatic GeoEye image (0.50 m) taken on the area of a community of small agricultural farms in the Brazilian Amazon. We also propose auxiliary methods to estimate the density of the LCC palm tree Attalea speciosa (babassu) based on the detection results. We used the "Compt-palm" algorithm based on the detection of palm tree shadows in open areas via mathematical morphology techniques and the spatial information was validated using field methods (i.e. structural census and georeferencing). The algorithm recognized individuals in life stages 5 and 6, and the extraction percentage, branching factor and quality percentage factors were used to evaluate its performance. A principal components analysis showed that the structure of the studied species differs from other species. Approximately 96% of the babassu individuals in stage 6 were detected. These individuals had significantly smaller stipes than the undetected ones. In turn, 60% of the stage 5 babassu individuals were detected, showing significantly a different total height and a different number of leaves from the undetected ones. Our calculations regarding resource availability indicate that 6870 ha contained 25,015 adult babassu palm tree, with an annual potential productivity of 27.4 t of almond oil. The detection of LCC palm tree and the implementation of auxiliary field methods to estimate babassu density is an important first step to monitor this industry resource that is extremely important to the Brazilian economy and thousands of families over a large scale. Copyright

  18. Vegetation index correction to reduce background effects in orchards with high spatial resolution imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Beek, Jonathan; Tits, Laurent; Somers, Ben; Deckers, Tom; Janssens, Pieter; Coppin, Pol

    2014-10-01

    High spatial resolution satellite imagery provides an alternative for time consuming and labor intensive in situ measurements of biophysical variables, such as chlorophyll and water content. However, despite the high spatial resolution of current satellite sensors, mixtures of canopies and backgrounds will be present, hampering the estimation of biophysical variables. Traditional correction methodologies use spectral differences between canopies and backgrounds, but fail with spectrally similar canopies and backgrounds. In this study, the lack of a generic solution to reduce background effects is tackled. Through synthetic imagery, the mixture problem was demonstrated with regards to the estimation of biophysical variables. A correction method was proposed, rescaling vegetation indices based on the canopy cover fraction. Furthermore, the proposed method was compared to traditional background correction methodologies (i.e. soil-adjusted vegetation indices and signal unmixing) for different background scenarios. The results of a soil background scenario showed the inability of soil-adjusted vegetation indices to reduce background admixture effects, while signal unmixing and the proposed method removed background influences for chlorophyll (ΔR2 = ~0.3; ΔRMSE = ~1.6 μg/cm2) and water (ΔR2 = ~0.3; ΔRMSE = ~0.5 mg/cm2) related vegetation indices. For the weed background scenario, signal unmixing was unable to remove the background influences for chlorophyll content (ΔR2 = -0.1; ΔRMSE = -0.6 μg/cm 2 ), while the proposed correction method reduced background effects (ΔR2= 0.1; ΔRMSE = 0.4 μg/cm2). Overall, the proposed vegetation index correction method reduced the background influence irrespective of background type, making useful comparison between management blocks possible.

  19. COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES AT HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION TOWARD ORION-KL. II. KINEMATICS

    SciTech Connect

    Friedel, D. N.; Widicus Weaver, S. L. E-mail: susanna.widicus.weaver@emory.edu

    2012-08-01

    It has recently been suggested that chemical processing can shape the spatial distributions of complex molecules in the Orion-KL region and leads to the nitrogen-oxygen 'chemical differentiation' seen in previous observations of this source. Orion-KL is a very dynamic region, and it is therefore also possible that physical conditions can shape the molecular distributions in this source. Only high spatial resolution observations can provide the information needed to disentangle these effects. Here, we present millimeter imaging studies of Orion-KL at various beam sizes using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. We compare molecular images with high spatial resolution images that trace the temperature, density, and kinematics of the source in order to investigate the effects of physical conditions on molecular distributions. These observations were conducted at {lambda} = 3 mm and included transitions of ethyl cyanide [C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN], methyl formate [HCOOCH{sub 3}], formic acid [HCOOH], acetone [(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CO], SiO, and methanol [CH{sub 3}OH]. We find differences in the molecular distributions as a function of each of the aforementioned physical factors. These results indicate that acetone may be produced by chemical processing and is robust to large changes in physical conditions, while formic acid is readily destroyed by gas-phase processing in warm and dense regions. We also find that while the spatial distributions of ethyl cyanide and methyl formate are not distinct as is suggested by the concept of 'chemical differentiation', local physical conditions shape the small-scale emission structure for these species.

  20. COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES AT HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION TOWARD ORION-KL. I. SPATIAL SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.; Friedel, Douglas N. E-mail: friedel@astro.illinois.edu

    2012-08-01

    Here we present high spatial resolution (<1'') observations of molecular emission in Orion-KL conducted using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. This work was motivated by recent millimeter continuum imaging studies of this region conducted at a similarly high spatial resolution, which revealed that the bulk of the emission arises from numerous compact sources, rather than the larger-scale extended structures typically associated with the Orion Hot Core and Compact Ridge. Given that the spatial extent of molecular emission greatly affects the determination of molecular abundances, it is important to determine the true spatial scale for complex molecules in this region. Additionally, it has recently been suggested that the relative spatial distributions of complex molecules in a source might give insight into the chemical mechanisms that drive complex chemistry in star-forming regions. In order to begin to address these issues, this study seeks to determine the spatial distributions of ethyl cyanide [C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN], dimethyl ether [(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}O], methyl formate [HCOOCH{sub 3}], formic acid [HCOOH], acetone [(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CO], SiO, methanol [CH{sub 3}OH], and methyl cyanide [CH{sub 3}CN] in Orion-KL at {lambda} = 3 mm. We find that for all observed molecules, the molecular emission arises from multiple components of the cloud that include a range of spatial scales and physical conditions. Here, we present the results of these observations and discuss the implications for studies of complex molecules in star-forming regions.

  1. Standardized cell samples for midIR technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastl, Lena; Rommel, Christina E.; Kemper, Björn; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    2015-03-01

    The application of midIR spectroscopy towards human cell and tissue samples is impaired by the need for technical solutions and lacking sample standards for technology development. We here present the standardization of stable test samples for the continuous development and testing of novel optical system components. We have selected cell lines representing the major cellular skin constituents keratinocytes and fibroblasts (NIH-3T3, HaCaT). In addition, two skin cancer cell types (A-375 and SK-MEL-28 cells) were analyzed. Cells were seeded on CaF2 substrates and measured dried and under aqueous medium as well as fixated and unfixated. Several independent cell preparations were analyzed with an FTIR spectrometer in the wave number range from 1000 - 4000 cm-1. The obtained data demonstrate that fixed and dehydrated cells on CaF2 can be stored in pure ethanol for several weeks without significant losses in quality of the spectral properties. The established protocol of cell seeding on CaF2 substrates, chemical fixation, dehydration, storage under ethanol and air-drying is suitable for the production of reliable midIR standards. The retrieved spectra demonstrate that fixed cells on CaF2 can be prepared reproducibly; with stable midIR spectral properties over several weeks and properties mimicking reliable unfixed cells. Moreover, the fixated samples on CaF2 show clear differences in the cell type specific spectra that can be identified by principle component analysis. In summary, the standardized cell culture samples on CaF2 substrates are suitable for the development of a midIR device and the optimization of the specific midIR spectra.

  2. A Continued Census of Mid-IR Variability from ULXs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Ryan; Kasliwal, Mansi; Heida, Marianne; Walton, Dom

    2017-04-01

    The nature of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) that radiate at luminosities >10^39 erg/s is still a mystery. ULXs are believed to be binaries with an accreting compact object and stellar mass-donor companion, but such high luminosities require accretion rates that are factors of 100 greater than the Eddington limit for accretion onto a neutron star or stellar mass black hole. The difficulties in interpreting ULXs are largely attributed to current observational challenges in determining their orbital properties as well as the properties of the mass-donor companion. Recently, near- and mid-infrared (IR) observations have been demonstrated as powerful diagnostics of the mass-donor companion and the circumstellar environment of ULXs. For example, serendipitous Spitzer/IRAC observations of the ULX Holmberg II X-1 in our Spitzer Infrared Intensive Transients Survey (SPIRITS) revealed the first detection of mid-IR variability from a ULX, where we claimed that the mid-IR emission arises from a dusty circumbinary torus in the winds of a supergiant B[e] mass-donor companion. We identified 5 additional mid-IR ULX counterparts detected by Spitzer/IRAC, one of which shows significant variability like Holmberg II X-1. Although we are finding a growing sample of ULXs exhibiting mid-IR variability, it is unclear what causes it. Notably, the week - year cadence baselines of the SPIRITS observations are inadequate for resolving variability timescales consistent with several observed ULX orbital periods. In this proposal, we request time-series observations of 6 ULXs with cadence baselines ranging from 0.5 days to 1 week in order to identify the timescales associated mid-IR variability.

  3. Nitric oxide microsensor for high spatial resolution measurements in biofilms and sediments.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Frank; Polerecky, Lubos; de Beer, Dirk

    2008-02-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a ubiquitous biomolecule that is known as a signaling compound in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. In addition, NO is involved in all conversions of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle: denitrification, nitrification, and the anaerobic oxidation of ammonium (Anammox). Until now, NO has not been measured with high spatial resolution within microbial communities, such as biofilms, sediments, aggregates, or microbial mats, because the available sensors are not robust enough and their spatial resolution is insufficient. Here we describe the fabrication and application of a novel Clark-type NO microsensor with an internal reference electrode and a guard anode. The NO microsensor has a spatial resolution of 60-80 microm, a sensitivity of 2 pA microM-1, and a detection limit of approximately 30 nM. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) was found to be a major interfering compound for the electrochemical detection of NO. The application of the novel NO microsensor to nitrifying biofilms and marine sediments revealed dynamic NO concentration profiles with peaks in the oxic parts of the samples. The local concentrations suggested that NO may be an important bioactive compound in natural environments. The consumption and production of NO occurs in separate regions of stratified microbial communities and indicates that it is linked to distinct biogeochemical cycles.

  4. Multi-wavelength mid-IR light source for gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karioja, Pentti; Alajoki, Teemu; Cherchi, Matteo; Ollila, Jyrki; Harjanne, Mikko; Heinilehto, Noora; Suomalainen, Soile; Viheriälä, Jukka; Zia, Nouman; Guina, Mircea; Buczyński, Ryszard; Kasztelanic, Rafał; Kujawa, Ireneusz; Salo, Tomi; Virtanen, Sami; Kluczyński, Paweł; Sagberg, Hâkon; Ratajczyk, Marcin; Kalinowski, Przemyslaw

    2017-02-01

    Cost effective multi-wavelength light sources are key enablers for wide-scale penetration of gas sensors at Mid-IR wavelength range. Utilizing novel Mid-IR Si-based photonic integrated circuits (PICs) filter and wide-band Mid-IR Super Luminescent Light Emitting Diodes (SLEDs), we show the concept of a light source that covers 2.5…3.5 μm wavelength range with a resolution of <1nm. The spectral bands are switchable and tunable and they can be modulated. The source allows for the fabrication of an affordable multi-band gas sensor with good selectivity and sensitivity. The unit price can be lowered in high volumes by utilizing tailored molded IR lens technology and automated packaging and assembling technologies. The status of the development of the key components of the light source are reported. The PIC is based on the use of micron-scale SOI technology, SLED is based on AlGaInAsSb materials and the lenses are tailored heavy metal oxide glasses fabricated by the use of hot-embossing. The packaging concept utilizing automated assembly tools is depicted. In safety and security applications, the Mid-IR wavelength range covered by the novel light source allows for detecting several harmful gas components with a single sensor. At the moment, affordable sources are not available. The market impact is expected to be disruptive, since the devices currently in the market are either complicated, expensive and heavy instruments, or the applied measurement principles are inadequate in terms of stability and selectivity.

  5. Extraction Of Hydrological Parameters Using High Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing For KINEROS2 Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeh, Yuval; Blumberg, Dan G.; Cohen, Hai; Morin, Efrat; Maman, Shimrit

    2016-04-01

    Arid and semi-arid environments cover more than one-third of Earth's land surface; these environments are especially vulnerable to flash flood hazards due to the poor understanding of the phenomenon and the lack of meteorological, geomorphological, and hydrological data. For many years, catchment characteristics have been observed using point-based measurements such as rain gauges and soil sample analysis. Furthermore, flood modeling techniques are not always available in ungauged catchments or in regions where data are sparse. In comparison to point-based observations, using remote sensing technologies can provide continuous spatial hydrological parameters and variables. The advances in remote sensing technologies including weather radar-based quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) and Earth observing satellites, provide new geo-spatial data using high spatial and temporal resolution for basin-scale geomorphological analysis and hydrological models. This study used high spatial resolution remote sensing to extract some of the main input parameters of Kinematic Runoff and Erosion Model (KINEROS2), for the arid medium size Rahaf watershed (76 km^2}), located in the Judean Desert, Israel. During the research a high resolution land cover map of Rahaf basin was created using WorldView-2 multispectral satellite imageries; surface roughness was estimated using SIR-C and COSMO-SkyMed Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) spaceborne sensors; and rainstorm characteristics were extracted from ground-based meteorological radar. Finally, all the remotely sensed extracted data were used as inputs for the KINEROS2 through Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment (AGWA) tool. The model-simulated peak flow and volume were then compared to runoff measurements from the watershed's pouring point. This research demonstrates the ability of using remotely sensed extracted data as inputs for the KINEROS2 model. Using AGWA, each simulated storm was successfully calibrated, when the average

  6. Monitoring of Antarctic moss ecosystems using a high spatial resolution imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malenovsky, Zbynek; Lucieer, Arko; Robinson, Sharon; Harwin, Stephen; Turner, Darren; Veness, Tony

    2013-04-01

    The most abundant photosynthetically active plants growing along the rocky Antarctic shore are mosses of three species: Schistidium antarctici, Ceratodon purpureus, and Bryum pseudotriquetrum. Even though mosses are well adapted to the extreme climate conditions, their existence in Antarctica depends strongly on availability of liquid water from snowmelt during the short summer season. Recent changes in temperature, wind speed and stratospheric ozone are stimulating faster evaporation, which in turn influences moss growing rate, health state and abundance. This makes them an ideal bio-indicator of the Antarctic climate change. Very short growing season, lasting only about three months, requires a time efficient, easily deployable and spatially resolved method for monitoring the Antarctic moss beds. Ground and/or low-altitude airborne imaging spectroscopy (called also hyperspectral remote sensing) offers a fast and spatially explicit approach to investigate an actual spatial extent and physiological state of moss turfs. A dataset of ground-based spectral images was acquired with a mini-Hyperspec imaging spectrometer (Headwall Inc., the USA) during the Antarctic summer 2012 in the surroundings of the Australian Antarctic station Casey (Windmill Islands). The collection of high spatial resolution spectral images, with pixels about 2 cm in size containing from 162 up to 324 narrow spectral bands of wavelengths between 399 and 998 nm, was accompanied with point moss reflectance measurements recorded with the ASD HandHeld-2 spectroradiometer (Analytical Spectral Devices Inc., the USA). The first spectral analysis indicates significant differences in red-edge and near-infrared reflectance of differently watered moss patches. Contrary to high plants, where the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) represents an estimate of green biomass, NDVI of mosses indicates mainly the actual water content. Similarly to high plants, reflectance of visible wavelengths is

  7. Multi-temporal, high spatial resolution water level monitoring of the Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, S.; Wdowinski, S.; Kim, S.

    2008-05-01

    Water level information in South Florida's Everglades is very important for understanding the hydrology of this fragile ecosystem. Currently water levels are determined by a dense stage (water level) network providing high spatial resolution observation. However, because there are a finite number of stage stations in Everglades, water levels in areas located between stage stations can only be estimated by interpolation. Space-borne Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) techniques were successfully used to detect high spatial resolution (20-50 meter pixel resolution) water level changes in the Everglades and other wetlands. However, the InSAR observations are relative, providing measure of water level changes (not absolute). In this study we presents a new InSAR technique which enables to estimate a time series of absolute water levels using radar observations acquired successively over the Everglades. In this preliminary stage, we limit our study to Water Conservation Area 1 (WCA1), which is a managed area located in the northern section of the Everglades. The main advantage of the new technique is the reconstruction of absolute water level information instead of previous approaches calculating only relative water level changes. The new technique is called Small Temporal Baseline Subset (STBAS), which utilizes highly coherent interferometric phases obtained only with relatively short time difference between two SAR acquisitions (e.g. 24 or 48 recurrence periods in Radarsat-1 SAR system). The observed interferometric observations have to be calibrated with ground truth data as the reference wetland sheet flow vary daily. We use daily stage data measured at 13 stage stations in WCA1 to calibrate the space-based observations. This information is integrated using the Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) method to generate a time series of absolute water levels. Our calibration-validation study shows a very good fit to the stage data. The correlation

  8. Recent advances in the determination of a high spatial resolution geopotential model using chronometric geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lion, Guillaume; Guerlin, Christine; Bize, Sébastien; Wolf, Peter; Delva, Pacôme; Panet, Isabelle

    2016-04-01

    Current methods to determine the geopotential are mainly based on indirect approaches using gravimetric, gradiometric and topographic data. Satellite missions (GRACE, GOCE) have contributed significantly to improve the knowledge of the Earth's gravity field with a spatial resolution of about 90 km, but it is not enough to access, for example, to the geoid variation in hilly regions. While airborne and ground-based gravimeters provide the high resolution, the problem of these technics is that the accuracy is hampered by the heterogeneous coverage of gravity data (ground and offshore). Recent technological advances in atomic clocks are opening new perspectives in the determination of the geopotential. To date, the best of them reach a stability of 1.6×10-18 (NIST, RIKEN + Univ. Tokyo) in just 7 hours of integration, an accuracy of 2.0×10-18 (JILA). Using the relation of the relativistic gravitational redshift, this corresponds to a determination of geopotential differences at the 0.1 m²/s² level (or 1 cm in geoid height). In this context, the present work aims at evaluating the contribution of optical atomic clocks for the determination of the geopotential at high spatial resolution. To do that, we have studied a test area surrounding the Massif Central in the middle of southern of France. This region, consists in low mountain ranges and plateaus, is interesting because, the gravitational field strength varies greatly from place to place at high resolution due to the relief. Here, we present the synthetic tests methodology: generation of synthetic gravity and potential data, then estimation of the potential from these data using the least-squares collocation and assessment of the clocks contribution. We shall see how the coverage of the data points (realistic or not) can affect the results, and discuss how to quantify the trade-off between the noise level and the number of data points used.

  9. Occult fractures of the waist of the scaphoid: early diagnosis by high-spatial-resolution sonography.

    PubMed

    Hauger, Olivier; Bonnefoy, Olivier; Moinard, Maryse; Bersani, Daniel; Diard, François

    2002-05-01

    This study evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of high-spatial-resolution sonography in the diagnosis of occult fractures of the waist of the scaphoid. Sonography of the scaphoid bone with a 12-MHz transducer was performed in 54 patients with clinically suspected scaphoid fracture and normal findings on initial radiographs, including specific scaphoid images. Three levels of clinical suspicion were considered: high (20%), moderate (30%), and low (50%). Attention was paid to the continuity of the scaphoid cortex and to the surrounding soft tissues (i.e., hemarthrosis or hematoma). Data from early sonograms were then compared with the results of radiography repeated 10-14 days after the initial trauma. In cases of persistent suspicion despite normal findings on follow-up radiographs, the presence of fracture was evaluated on CT (four patients), MR imaging (one patient), or bone scanning (one patient). Follow-up examinations proved fracture of the scaphoid waist in five patients. In all patients, diagnosis of fracture was suspected on initial sonograms showing cortical disruption associated with soft-tissue abnormalities. There was one false-positive finding and no false-negative results. Using cortical disruption as a diagnostic criterion, we found the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of high-resolution sonography for the depiction of scaphoid fracture to be 100%, 98%, and 98%, respectively. Using soft-tissue abnormalities alone as a criterion, we found the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of high-resolution sonography to be 100%, 65%, and 68%, respectively. The overall prevalence of occult fracture was 9%, ranging from 3.7% for low suspicion to 27% for high suspicion of fracture. High-resolution sonography is a reliable and accurate method of evaluating occult fractures of the scaphoid waist. Cortical disruption is the diagnostic key. Soft-tissue abnormalities alone lack specificity.

  10. An optical setup for electric field measurements in MRI with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Simon; Bitzer, Andreas; Bock, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Electric field measurements in the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging environment are important to assess potentially dangerous radio-frequency (RF) heating in the vicinity of metallic structures such as coils, implants or catheters. So far, E-field measurements have been performed with dipole antennas that lag of limited spatial resolution and which are difficult to use in the magnet bore as they interfere with the RF transmit field of the MRI system. In this work an electro-optic sensor is presented that utilizes the Pockels effect to measure the E-field in a clinical MR system with high spatial resolution. This sensor consists of dielectric materials only and thus, it only minimally influences the measured E-field distribution. A 10 m long flexible optical fiber connects the small sensor head to a remote processing unit where the optical signal is transformed into an electrical output signal. Spatially resolved qualitative E-field measurements were performed in a 1.5 T clinical MR system in the vicinity of metallic samples and an active tracking catheter with a resolution of up to 1 mm. The near-field pattern of a resonant U-shaped metallic sample was clearly identified and compared with numerical simulations. A more complex field behavior was found for the tracking catheter where strong E-field enhancements were observed at the distal tip and at its proximal part outside the phantom solution. Due to its sub-mm spatial resolution the optical sensor approach provides detailed insight into the complex and difficult to access field distributions close to implants and metallic structures and has turned out to be promising tool for MRI field and safety inspections.

  11. Enhanced Sensitivity for High Spatial Resolution Lipid Analysis by Negative Ion Mode MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Peggi M.; Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Baldwin, H. Scott; Caprioli, Richard

    2012-01-01

    We have achieved enhanced lipid imaging to a ~10 μm spatial resolution using negative ion mode matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry, sublimation of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid as the MALDI matrix and a sample preparation protocol that uses aqueous washes. We report on the effect of treating tissue sections by washing with volatile buffers at different pHs prior to negative ion mode lipid imaging. The results show that washing with ammonium formate, pH 6.4, or ammonium acetate, pH 6.7, significantly increases signal intensity and number of analytes recorded from adult mouse brain tissue sections. Major lipid species measured were glycerophosphoinositols, glycerophosphates, glycerolphosphoglycerols, glycerophosphoethanolamines, glycerophospho-serines, sulfatides, and gangliosides. Ion images from adult mouse brain sections that compare washed and unwashed sections are presented and show up to fivefold increases in ion intensity for washed tissue. The sample preparation protocol has been found to be applicable across numerous organ types and significantly expands the number of lipid species detectable by imaging mass spectrometry at high spatial resolution. PMID:22243218

  12. High spatial resolution Hall sensor array for edge plasma magnetic field measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yuhong; Maurer, David A.; Navratil, Gerald A.; Rivera, Nicholas

    2005-09-15

    A one-dimensional, high-spatial resolution, 20-element Hall sensor array has been developed to directly measure the edge plasma perpendicular magnetic field and its fluctuations as a function of radius with 4-mm resolution. The array employs new small-area, high-sensitivity indium antimonide (InSb) Hall probes in combination with a high-density seven-layer printed circuit board to provide for connections to supply Hall current, record the measured Hall voltage output signals, and mitigate inductive pickup. A combination of bench and in situ measurements is described that provides absolute calibration of the diagnostic array in the presence of a strong transverse magnetic field component that is approximately 1000 times greater than the perpendicular fluctuating field needed to be resolved by the diagnostic. The Hall probes calibrated using this method are capable of magnetic field measurements with a sensitivity of 7 V/T over the frequency band from 0 to 20 kHz.

  13. Large patch convolutional neural networks for the scene classification of high spatial resolution imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yanfei; Fei, Feng; Zhang, Liangpei

    2016-04-01

    The increase of the spatial resolution of remote-sensing sensors helps to capture the abundant details related to the semantics of surface objects. However, it is difficult for the popular object-oriented classification approaches to acquire higher level semantics from the high spatial resolution remote-sensing (HSR-RS) images, which is often referred to as the "semantic gap." Instead of designing sophisticated operators, convolutional neural networks (CNNs), a typical deep learning method, can automatically discover intrinsic feature descriptors from a large number of input images to bridge the semantic gap. Due to the small data volume of the available HSR-RS scene datasets, which is far away from that of the natural scene datasets, there have been few reports of CNN approaches for HSR-RS image scene classifications. We propose a practical CNN architecture for HSR-RS scene classification, named the large patch convolutional neural network (LPCNN). The large patch sampling is used to generate hundreds of possible scene patches for the feature learning, and a global average pooling layer is used to replace the fully connected network as the classifier, which can greatly reduce the total parameters. The experiments confirm that the proposed LPCNN can learn effective local features to form an effective representation for different land-use scenes, and can achieve a performance that is comparable to the state-of-the-art on public HSR-RS scene datasets.

  14. Polysilicon-based flexible temperature sensor for brain monitoring with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhizhen; Li, Chunyan; Hartings, Jed; Ghosh, Sthitodhi; Narayan, Raj; Ahn, Chong

    2017-02-01

    Temperature is one of the most important variables in brain monitoring, since changes of focal brain temperature are closely coupled to cerebral physiology and pathophysiological phenomena in injured brain. In this work, a highly accurate temperature sensor with polysilicon thermistors has been developed on flexible polyimide for monitoring brain temperature with high spatial resolution. The temperature sensors have a response time of 1.5 s and sensitivity of  -0.0031 °C-1. Thermal hysteresis of the sensor in the physiological temperature range of 30-45 °C was found to be less than 0.1 °C. With silicon nitride as the passivation layer, the temperature sensor exhibits drift of less than 0.3 °C for 3 d in water. In vivo tests of the sensor show a low noise level of 0.025  ±  0.03 °C, and the expected transient increases in cortical temperature associated with cortical spreading depolarization. The temperature sensor developed in this work is suitable for monitoring brain temperature with the desired high sensitivity and resolution.

  15. Image quality phantom and parameters for high spatial resolution small-animal SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Eric P.; Harteveld, Anita A.; Meeuwis, Antoi P. W.; Disselhorst, Jonathan A.; Beekman, Freek J.; Oyen, Wim J. G.; Boerman, Otto C.

    2011-10-01

    At present, generally accepted standards to characterize small-animal single photon emission tomographs (SPECT) do not exist. Whereas for small-animal positron emission tomography (PET), the NEMA NU 4-2008 guidelines are available, such standards are still lacking for small-animal SPECT. More specifically, a dedicated image quality (IQ) phantom and corresponding IQ parameters are absent. The structures of the existing PET IQ phantom are too large to fully characterize the sub-millimeter spatial resolution of modern multi-pinhole SPECT scanners, and its diameter will not fit into all scanners when operating in high spatial resolution mode. We therefore designed and constructed an adapted IQ phantom with smaller internal structures and external diameter, and a facility to guarantee complete filling of the smallest rods. The associated IQ parameters were adapted from NEMA NU 4. An additional parameter, effective whole-body sensitivity, was defined since this was considered relevant in view of the variable size of the field of view and the use of multiple bed positions as encountered in modern small-animal SPECT scanners. The usefulness of the phantom was demonstrated for 99mTc in a USPECT-II scanner operated in whole-body scanning mode using a multi-pinhole mouse collimator with 0.6 mm pinhole diameter.

  16. Optophysiological Approach to Resolve Neuronal Action Potentials with High Spatial and Temporal Resolution in Cultured Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pagès, Stéphane; Côté, Daniel; De Koninck, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Cell to cell communication in the central nervous system is encoded into transient and local membrane potential changes (ΔVm). Deciphering the rules that govern synaptic transmission and plasticity entails to be able to perform Vm recordings throughout the entire neuronal arborization. Classical electrophysiology is, in most cases, not able to do so within small and fragile neuronal subcompartments. Thus, optical techniques based on the use of fluorescent voltage-sensitive dyes (VSDs) have been developed. However, reporting spontaneous or small ΔVm from neuronal ramifications has been challenging, in part due to the limited sensitivity and phototoxicity of VSD-based optical measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of water soluble VSD, ANNINE-6plus, with laser-scanning microscopy to optically record ΔVm in cultured neurons. We show that the sensitivity (>10% of fluorescence change for 100 mV depolarization) and time response (sub millisecond) of the dye allows the robust detection of action potentials (APs) even without averaging, allowing the measurement of spontaneous neuronal firing patterns. In addition, we show that back-propagating APs can be recorded, along distinct dendritic sites and within dendritic spines. Importantly, our approach does not induce any detectable phototoxic effect on cultured neurons. This optophysiological approach provides a simple, minimally invasive, and versatile optical method to measure electrical activity in cultured neurons with high temporal (ms) resolution and high spatial (μm) resolution. PMID:22016723

  17. High spatial resolution PIV and CH-PLIF measurements of a Shear Layer Stabilized Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Christopher; Chterev, Ianko; Seitzman, Jerry; Lieuwen, Tim

    2014-11-01

    In practical combustors, flames stabilize in thin shear layers with very high strain rates, which alter the flame burning rate - either enhancing or diminishing reaction rates, and even leading to extinction. Therefore, the bulk velocity that provides stable operation in these combustors is limited, presumably due to the associated maximum stretch rate that the flame is able to withstand. The focus of this work is to develop a deeper understanding of the interaction between flow and flame for a shear layer stabilized, premixed flame. This study consists of planar, high resolution, simultaneous PIV and CH-PLIF measurements, in a 8 x 6 mm plane with 0.11 mm and 0.16 mm PIV vector and CH-PLIF image resolution, respectively, of the flame stabilization region in a swirling jet. The hydrodynamic strain induced stretch rate along the high CH concentration layer of the flame front is calculated from these measurements. In addition, this study elucidates the unsteady behavior of the flame in the thin shear layer. The measured flame stretch is highly spatially and temporally dependent, and dominated by contributions from normal and shear strain terms of axial velocity. Although normal strain is much greater than shear, the near horizontal flame orientation results in neither strain term dominating flame stretch. Furthermore, the flame angle changes the sign of the shear strain contributions as observed experimentally, an important implication for reduced order modeling approaches.

  18. Quantifying tree mortality in a mixed species woodland using multitemporal high spatial resolution satellite imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrity, Steven R.; Allen, Craig D.; Brumby, Steven P.; Gangodagamage, Chandana; McDowell, Nate G.; Cai, D. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Widespread tree mortality events have recently been observed in several biomes. To effectively quantify the severity and extent of these events, tools that allow for rapid assessment at the landscape scale are required. Past studies using high spatial resolution satellite imagery have primarily focused on detecting green, red, and gray tree canopies during and shortly after tree damage or mortality has occurred. However, detecting trees in various stages of death is not always possible due to limited availability of archived satellite imagery. Here we assess the capability of high spatial resolution satellite imagery for tree mortality detection in a southwestern U.S. mixed species woodland using archived satellite images acquired prior to mortality and well after dead trees had dropped their leaves. We developed a multistep classification approach that uses: supervised masking of non-tree image elements; bi-temporal (pre- and post-mortality) differencing of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and red:green ratio (RGI); and unsupervised multivariate clustering of pixels into live and dead tree classes using a Gaussian mixture model. Classification accuracies were improved in a final step by tuning the rules of pixel classification using the posterior probabilities of class membership obtained from the Gaussian mixture model. Classifications were produced for two images acquired post-mortality with overall accuracies of 97.9% and 98.5%, respectively. Classified images were combined with land cover data to characterize the spatiotemporal characteristics of tree mortality across areas with differences in tree species composition. We found that 38% of tree crown area was lost during the drought period between 2002 and 2006. The majority of tree mortality during this period was concentrated in piñon-juniper (Pinus edulis-Juniperus monosperma) woodlands. An additional 20% of the tree canopy died or was removed between 2006 and 2011, primarily in areas

  19. High Spatial Resolution Airborne Multispectral Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Data for Analysis of Urban Landscape Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have used airborne multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data collected at a high spatial resolution (i.e., 10m) over several cities in the United States to study thermal energy characteristics of the urban landscape. These TIR data provide a unique opportunity to quantify thermal responses from discrete surfaces typical of the urban landscape and to identify both the spatial arrangement and patterns of thermal processes across the city. The information obtained from these data is critical to understanding how urban surfaces drive or force development of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect, which exists as a dome of elevated air temperatures that presides over cities in contrast to surrounding non-urbanized areas. The UHI is most pronounced in the summertime where urban surfaces, such as rooftops and pavement, store solar radiation throughout the day, and release this stored energy slowly after sunset creating air temperatures over the city that are in excess of 2-4'C warmer in contrast with non-urban or rural air temperatures. The UHI can also exist as a daytime phenomenon with surface temperatures in downtown areas of cities exceeding 38'C. The implications of the UHI are significant, particularly as an additive source of thermal energy input that exacerbates the overall production of ground level ozone over cities. We have used the Airborne Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS), flown onboard a Lear 23 jet aircraft from the NASA Stennis Space Center, to acquire high spatial resolution multispectral TIR data (i.e., 6 bandwidths between 8.2-12.2 (um) over Huntsville, Alabama, Atlanta, Georgia, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Sacramento, California. These TIR data have been used to produce maps and other products, showing the spatial distribution of heating and cooling patterns over these cities to better understand how the morphology of the urban landscape affects development of the UHI. In turn, these data have been used

  20. High Spatial Resolution Airborne Multispectral Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Data for Analysis of Urban Landscape Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have used airborne multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data collected at a high spatial resolution (i.e., 10m) over several cities in the United States to study thermal energy characteristics of the urban landscape. These TIR data provide a unique opportunity to quantify thermal responses from discrete surfaces typical of the urban landscape and to identify both the spatial arrangement and patterns of thermal processes across the city. The information obtained from these data is critical to understanding how urban surfaces drive or force development of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect, which exists as a dome of elevated air temperatures that presides over cities in contrast to surrounding non-urbanized areas. The UHI is most pronounced in the summertime where urban surfaces, such as rooftops and pavement, store solar radiation throughout the day, and release this stored energy slowly after sunset creating air temperatures over the city that are in excess of 2-4'C warmer in contrast with non-urban or rural air temperatures. The UHI can also exist as a daytime phenomenon with surface temperatures in downtown areas of cities exceeding 38'C. The implications of the UHI are significant, particularly as an additive source of thermal energy input that exacerbates the overall production of ground level ozone over cities. We have used the Airborne Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS), flown onboard a Lear 23 jet aircraft from the NASA Stennis Space Center, to acquire high spatial resolution multispectral TIR data (i.e., 6 bandwidths between 8.2-12.2 (um) over Huntsville, Alabama, Atlanta, Georgia, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Sacramento, California. These TIR data have been used to produce maps and other products, showing the spatial distribution of heating and cooling patterns over these cities to better understand how the morphology of the urban landscape affects development of the UHI. In turn, these data have been used

  1. Generation of remotely sensed reference data using low altitude, high spatial resolution hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, McKay D.; van Aardt, Jan; Kerekes, John P.

    2016-05-01

    Exploitation of imaging spectroscopy (hyperspectral) data using classification and spectral unmixing algorithms is a major research area in remote sensing, with reference data required to assess algorithm performance. However, we are limited by our inability to generate rapid, accurate, and consistent reference data, thus making quantitative algorithm analysis difficult. As a result, many investigators present either limited quantitative results, use synthetic imagery, or provide qualitative results using real imagery. Existing reference data typically classify large swaths of imagery pixel-by-pixel, per cover type. While this type of mapping provides a first order understanding of scene composition, it is not detailed enough to include complexities such as mixed pixels, intra-end-member variability, and scene anomalies. The creation of more detailed ground reference data based on field work, on the other hand, is complicated by the spatial scale of common hyperspectral data sets. This research presents a solution to this challenge via classification of low altitude, high spatial resolution (1m GSD) National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) hyperspectral imagery, on a pixel-by-pixel basis, to produce sub-pixel reference data for high altitude, lower spatial resolution (15m GSD) AVIRIS imagery. This classification is performed using traditional classification techniques, augmented by (0.3m GSD) NEON RGB data. This paper provides a methodology for generating large scale, sub-pixel reference data for AVIRIS imagery using NEON imagery. It also addresses challenges related to the fusion of multiple remote sensing modalities (e.g., different sensors, sensor look angles, spatial registration, varying scene illumination, etc.). A new algorithm for spatial registration of hyperspectral imagery with disparate resolutions is presented. Several versions of reference data results are compared to each other and to direct spectral unmixing of AVIRIS data. Initial results are

  2. Quantitative FRET Analysis by Fast Acquisition Time Domain FLIM at High Spatial Resolution in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Parra, Sergi; Audugé, Nicolas; Coppey-Moisan, Maïté; Tramier, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative analysis in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments in live cells for protein interaction studies is still a challenging issue. In a two-component system (FRET and no FRET donor species), fitting of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data gives the fraction of donor molecules involved in FRET (fD) and the intrinsic transfer efficiency. But when fast FLIM acquisitions are used to monitor dynamic changes in protein-protein interactions at high spatial and temporal resolutions in living cells, photon statistics and time resolution are limited. In this case, fitting procedures are not reliable, even for single lifetime donors. We introduce the new concept of a minimal fraction of donor molecules involved in FRET (mfD), coming from the mathematical minimization of fD. We find particular advantage in the use of mfD because it can be obtained without fitting procedures and it is derived directly from FLIM data. mfD constitutes an interesting quantitative parameter for live cell studies because it is related to the minimal relative concentration of interacting proteins. For multi-lifetime donors, the process of fitting complex fluorescence decays to find at least four reliable lifetimes is a near impossible task. Here, mfD extension for multi-lifetime donors is the only quantitative determinant. We applied this methodology for imaging the interaction between the bromodomains of TAFII250 and acetylated histones H4 in living cells at high resolution. We show the existence of discrete acetylated chromatin domains where the minimal fraction of bromodomain interacting with acetylated H4 oscillates from 0.26 to 0.36 and whose size is smaller than half of one micron cube. We demonstrate that mfD by itself is a useful tool to investigate quantitatively protein interactions in live cells, especially when using fast FRET-FLIM acquisition times. PMID:18539634

  3. Mid-IR laser system for advanced neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klosner, M.; Wu, C.; Heller, D. F.

    2014-03-01

    We present work on a laser system operating in the near- and mid-IR spectral regions, having output characteristics designed to be optimal for cutting various tissue types. We provide a brief overview of laser-tissue interactions and the importance of controlling certain properties of the light beam. We describe the principle of operation of the laser system, which is generally based on a wavelength-tunable alexandrite laser oscillator/amplifier, and multiple Raman conversion stages. This configuration provides robust access to the mid-IR spectral region at wavelengths, pulse energies, pulse durations, and repetition rates that are attractive for neurosurgical applications. We summarize results for ultra-precise selective cutting of nerve sheaths and retinas with little collateral damage; this has applications in procedures such as optic-nerve-sheath fenestration and possible spinal repair. We also report results for cutting cornea, and dermal tissues.

  4. The Need for High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Thermal Remote Sensing Data In Urban Heat Island Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.

    2006-01-01

    Although the study of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect dates back to the early 1800's when Luke Howard discovered London s heat island, it has only been with the advent of thermal remote sensing systems that the extent, characteristics, and impacts of the UHI have become to be understood. Analysis of the UHI effect is important because above all, this phenomenon can directly influence the health and welfare of urban residents. For example, in 1995, over 700 people died in Chicago due to heat-related causes. UHI s are characterized by increased temperature in comparison to rural areas and mortality rates during a heat wave increase exponentially with the maximum temperature, an effect that is exacerbated by the UHI. Aside from the direct impacts of the UHI on temperature, UHI s can produce secondary effects on local meteorology, including altering local wind patterns, increased development of clouds and fog, and increasing rates of precipitation either over, or downwind, of cities. Because of the extreme heterogeneity of the urban surface, in combination with the sprawl associated with urban growth, thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data have become of significant importance in understanding how land cover and land use characteristics affect the development and intensification of the UHI. TIR satellite data have been used extensively to analyze the surface temperature regimes of cities to help observe and measure the impacts of surface temperatures across the urban landscape. However, the spatial scales at which satellite TIR data are collected are for the most part, coarse, with the finest readily available TIR data collected by the Landsat ETM+ sensor at 60m spatial resolution. For many years, we have collected high spatial resolution (10m) data using an airborne multispectral TIR sensor over a number of cities across the United States. These high resolution data have been used to develop an understanding of how discrete surfaces across the urban environment

  5. The Need for High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Thermal Remote Sensing Data In Urban Heat Island Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.

    2006-01-01

    Although the study of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect dates back to the early 1800's when Luke Howard discovered London s heat island, it has only been with the advent of thermal remote sensing systems that the extent, characteristics, and impacts of the UHI have become to be understood. Analysis of the UHI effect is important because above all, this phenomenon can directly influence the health and welfare of urban residents. For example, in 1995, over 700 people died in Chicago due to heat-related causes. UHI s are characterized by increased temperature in comparison to rural areas and mortality rates during a heat wave increase exponentially with the maximum temperature, an effect that is exacerbated by the UHI. Aside from the direct impacts of the UHI on temperature, UHI s can produce secondary effects on local meteorology, including altering local wind patterns, increased development of clouds and fog, and increasing rates of precipitation either over, or downwind, of cities. Because of the extreme heterogeneity of the urban surface, in combination with the sprawl associated with urban growth, thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data have become of significant importance in understanding how land cover and land use characteristics affect the development and intensification of the UHI. TIR satellite data have been used extensively to analyze the surface temperature regimes of cities to help observe and measure the impacts of surface temperatures across the urban landscape. However, the spatial scales at which satellite TIR data are collected are for the most part, coarse, with the finest readily available TIR data collected by the Landsat ETM+ sensor at 60m spatial resolution. For many years, we have collected high spatial resolution (10m) data using an airborne multispectral TIR sensor over a number of cities across the United States. These high resolution data have been used to develop an understanding of how discrete surfaces across the urban environment

  6. The Need for High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Thermal Remote Sensing Data In Urban Heat Island Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quattrochi, D. A.; Luvall, J. C.

    2006-12-01

    Although the study of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect dates back to the early 1800's when Luke Howard discovered London's heat island, it has only been with the advent of thermal remote sensing systems that the extent, characteristics, and impacts of the UHI have become to be understood. Analysis of the UHI effect is important because above all, this phenomenon can directly influence the health and welfare of urban residents. For example, in 1995, over 700 people died in Chicago due to heat-related causes. UHI's are characterized by increased temperature in comparison to rural areas and mortality rates during a heat wave increase exponentially with the maximum temperature, an effect that is exacerbated by the UHI. Aside from the direct impacts of the UHI on temperature, UHI's can produce secondary effects on local meteorology, including altering local wind patterns, increased development of clouds and fog, and increasing rates of precipitation either over, or downwind, of cities. Because of the extreme heterogeneity of the urban surface, in combination with the sprawl associated with urban growth, thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data have become of significant importance in understanding how land cover and land use characteristics affect the development and intensification of the UHI. TIR satellite data have been used extensively to analyze the surface temperature regimes of cities to help observe and measure the impacts of surface temperatures across the urban landscape. However, the spatial scales at which satellite TIR data are collected are for the most part, coarse, with the finest readily available TIR data collected by the Landsat ETM+ sensor at 60m spatial resolution. For many years, we have collected high spatial resolution (10m) data using an airborne multispectral TIR sensor over a number of cities across the United States. These high resolution data have been used to develop an understanding of how discrete surfaces across the urban environment

  7. Interference systems for wideband mid-IR VO2 mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, Oleg B.; Konovalova, O. P.; Sidorov, Aleksandr I.; Shaganov, Igor I.

    1999-01-01

    We performed the analyze of principles of wide-band VO2- mirrors creation for mid-IR (2.5 - 12 micrometers ) laser radiation control. It was shown, that the choice of interference system of VO2-mirror makes possible to extend region of maximum reflection change up to 1 - 2 (mu) . Calculations and experimental results are presented for mirrors with dR/d>0 and <0 with the change of reflection coefficient from 0.1 up to 94 - 98%.

  8. Development of a high spatial resolution neutron imaging system and performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lei

    The combination of a scintillation screen and a charged coupled device (CCD) camera is a digitized neutron imaging technology that has been widely employed for research and industry application. The maximum of spatial resolution of scintillation screens is in the range of 100 mum and creates a bottleneck for the further improvement of the overall system resolution. In this investigation, a neutron sensitive micro-channel plate (MCP) detector with pore pitch of 11.4 mum is combined with a cooled CCD camera with a pixel size of 6.8 mum to provide a high spatial resolution neutron imaging system. The optical path includes a high reflection front surface mirror for keeping the camera out of neutron beam and a macro lens for achieving the maximum magnification that could be achieved. All components are assembled into an aluminum light tight box with heavy radiation shielding to protect the camera as well as to provide a dark working condition. Particularly, a remote controlled stepper motor is also integrated into the system to provide on-line focusing ability. The best focus is guaranteed through use of an algorithm instead of perceptual observation. An evaluation routine not previously utilized in the field of neutron radiography is developed in this study. Routines like this were never previously required due to the lower resolution of other systems. Use of the augulation technique to obtain presampled MTF addresses the problem of aliasing associated with digital sampling. The determined MTF agrees well with the visual inspection of imaging a testing target. Other detector/camera combinations may be integrated into the system and their performances are also compared. The best resolution achieved by the system at the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Texas at Austin is 16.2 lp/mm, which is equivalent to a minimum resolvable spacing of 30 mum. The noise performance of the device is evaluated in terms of the noise power spectrum (NPS) and the detective quantum

  9. Development of mid-IR lasers for Laser Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soibel, Alexander; Mansour, Kamjou; Spiers, Gary; Forouhar, Siamak

    2005-01-01

    There is an existing need in JPL and in NASA for development of mid-IR lasers, such as Quantum Cascade (QC) lasers, for in-situ and remote laser spectrometers. Mid-IR, compact, low power consumption laser spectrometers have a great potential for detection and measurements of planetary gases and biological important biomarker molecules such as H20, H202, CH4, and many additional chemical species on Mars and other Solar system planets. Another potential application of QC lasers for future NASA mission is in high power remote Laser Reflectance Spectrometers (LRS). In LSR instrument, mid-infrared lasers will act as the illumination source for conducting active mid-IR reflectance spectroscopy of solid-surfaced objects in the outer Solar System. These spectrometers have the potential to provide an incredible amount of information about the compositions of surfaces in the outer Solar System. In this work, we will discuss our current effort at JPL to advance QC lasers to a level that the laser performance, operational requirements and reliability be compatible with the instruments demands for space exploration applications.

  10. High Spatial Resolution MRI of Cystic Adventitial Disease of the Iliofemoral Vein Communicating with the Hip Joint

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelides, Michael; Pantziara, Maria Ioannidis, Kleanthis

    2013-05-14

    Venous cystic adventitial disease (CAD) is an extremely rare entity, and so far less than 20 cases have been described in the literature. Herein, we describe the imaging findings of CAD of iliofemoral vein in a 51-year-old woman who presented with leg swelling with special emphasis on high spatial resolution MRI, which demonstrated communication of the cyst with the hip joint. To our knowledge, this is the first description of high spatial resolution MRI findings in venous CAD supporting a new theory about the pathogenesis of venous CAD.

  11. Very high spatial resolution study of multiplicity in T Tauri systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, S.

    2015-05-01

    We present first relevant results from our survey to search multiplicity in T Tauri systems and its relation with disk presence and planet formation on these young stars. This very high spatial resolution survey is being developed with Lucky Imaging techniques using the instruments FastCam and AOLI at the Observatorios de Canarias. Although still in an initial phase, we have already studied some systems, such as the one formed by the triplet LkHα 263, an edge-on disk and a close binary pair (0.4 arcsec), and LkHα 262, an M0 star with an unresolved companion. They have been long discussed to be bounded (Ducourant et al. 2005). Our new data, combined with previously available Adaptive Optics near infrared images (Jayawardhana et al. 2002) have leaded us to the following: a) there is orbital motion of the pair LkHα 263 AB and the component C is comoving with it. b) the likely existence of a close companion to LkHα 262. c) LkHα 262 and 263 are gravitationally bounded, thus, this system is one of the few quintuple pre-main sequence systems known till now. Besides the resolved edge-on thick disk around LkHα 263 C, the SEDs developed by us show the presence of disks around either 263 A, 263 B or both of them and also around 262. A deeper study of this particular system can be seen in Velasco et al. (2015).

  12. High Spatial Resolution Observations of Pores and the Formation of a Rudimentary Penumbra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, G.; Xu, Y.; Wang, H.; Denker, C.

    2003-11-01

    We present high spatial resolution observation of small-scale magnetic activity in solar active region NOAA 9539. The observations were obtained on 2001 July 15 using the 65 cm vacuum reflector and 25 cm refractor of the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The data sets include time series of speckle reconstructed continuum images at 5200 Å, Hα filtergrams (blue line wing, line center, and red line wing), and line-of-sight magnetograms. Two pores, separated by a light bridge, were located in the central part of NOAA 9539. The formation of penumbral filaments near the light bridge indicated a sudden change of the local magnetic field topology from almost vertical to strongly inclined magnetic fields, which allowed cool material previously suspended in a filament to stream downward. During the downward motion of the cool material, Hα Dopplergrams revealed twisted streamlines along the filament. Finally, there are several well-defined Hα brightenings, Ellerman bombs (EBs), occurred near the region where the downflow of materials fell in. The EBs reside near a magnetic inversion line and are stationary, as opposed to EBs associated with moving magnetic features. We also found that the horizontal flow field of the white-light images derived from local correlation tracking is different from the previous observations. The horizontal movements in the superpenumbrae of leading sunspot and the following sunspots are opposite.

  13. High Spatial Resolution Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Human Optic Nerve Lipids and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, David M. G.; Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Rose, Kristie L.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2015-06-01

    The human optic nerve carries signals from the retina to the visual cortex of the brain. Each optic nerve is comprised of approximately one million nerve fibers that are organized into bundles of 800-1200 fibers surrounded by connective tissue and supportive glial cells. Damage to the optic nerve contributes to a number of blinding diseases including: glaucoma, neuromyelitis optica, optic neuritis, and neurofibromatosis; however, the molecular mechanisms of optic nerve damage and death are incompletely understood. Herein we present high spatial resolution MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) analysis of lipids and proteins to define the molecular anatomy of the human optic nerve. The localization of a number of lipids was observed in discrete anatomical regions corresponding to myelinated and unmyelinated nerve regions as well as to supporting connective tissue, glial cells, and blood vessels. A protein fragment from vimentin, a known intermediate filament marker for astrocytes, was observed surrounding nerved fiber bundles in the lamina cribrosa region. S100B was also found in supporting glial cell regions in the prelaminar region, and the hemoglobin alpha subunit was observed in blood vessel areas. The molecular anatomy of the optic nerve defined by MALDI IMS provides a firm foundation to study biochemical changes in blinding human diseases.

  14. High spatial resolution spectroscopy of Tycho’s SNR with Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yun-Dong; Yang, Xue-Juan

    2017-02-01

    We present high spatial resolution X-ray spectroscopy of Tycho’s supernova remnant (SNR) using observational data from Chandra. The whole remnant was divided into 26 × 27 regions, with each of them covering 20\\prime\\prime × 20\\prime\\prime. We selected 536 pixels with enough events to generate spectra and fit them with an absorbed two component non-equilibrium ionization model. We obtained maps of absorbing column density, weight-averaged temperature, ionization age and abundances for O, Ne, Mg, Si, S and Fe, with emission used to determine the weight. The abundance maps and the finding that Fe abundance is not correlated with any other element suggest that Fe is located at a smaller radius than other elements, supporting the onion shell model with emission from more massive elements peaking more toward the center. A tight correlation between Si and S abundances support both Si and S coming from explosive O-burning and/or incomplete Si-burning. O and Ne abundances show no correlation with any other element. Considering that O, Ne and Mg are all synthesized in the same process (C/Ne-burning), we suggest that O/Ne/Mg might mix well with other elements during the explosion of the supernova and the expansion of the SNR.

  15. High spatial resolution proteomic comparison of the brain in humans and chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Bauernfeind, Amy L; Reyzer, Michelle L; Caprioli, Richard M; Ely, John J; Babbitt, Courtney C; Wray, Gregory A; Hof, Patrick R; Sherwood, Chet C

    2015-10-01

    We performed high-throughput mass spectrometry at high spatial resolution from individual regions (anterior cingulate and primary motor, somatosensory, and visual cortices) and layers of the neocortex (layers III, IV, and V) and cerebellum (granule cell layer), as well as the caudate nucleus in humans and chimpanzees. A total of 39 mass spectrometry peaks were matched with probable protein identifications in both species, allowing for comparison in expression. We explored how the pattern of protein expression varies across regions and cortical layers to provide insights into the differences in molecular phenotype of these neural structures between species. The expression of proteins differed principally in a region- and layer-specific pattern, with more subtle differences between species. Specifically, human and chimpanzee brains were similar in their distribution of proteins related to the regulation of transcription and enzyme activity but differed in their expression of proteins supporting aerobic metabolism. Whereas most work assessing molecular expression differences in the brains of primates has been performed on gene transcripts, this dataset extends current understanding of the differential molecular expression that may underlie human cognitive specializations.

  16. Diagnosis of occult scaphoid fracture with high-spatial-resolution sonography: a prospective blind study.

    PubMed

    Fusetti, C; Poletti, P A; Pradel, P H; Garavaglia, G; Platon, A; Della Santa, D R; Bianchi, S

    2005-09-01

    Evaluation of diagnostic accuracy of high-spatial-resolution sonography (HSR-S) in occult scaphoid fractures. HSR-S was performed in 24 patients with clinically suspected fracture and normal radiographs. Three levels of clinical suspicion were considered (high, intermediate, and low). Three levels of sonographic suspicion were defined on the basis of cortical interruption, radiocarpal effusion, and scapho-trapezium-trapezoid effusion. Three positive criteria were interpreted as being highly indicative of fracture. Data from sonograms were compared with computed tomography (CT) scans. CT scanning demonstrated a fracture of the scaphoid in five patients. The global sensitivity of HSR-S for detection of occult scaphoid fracture was 100% and the specificity 79%. All patients with demonstrated occult fracture had a high sonography index of suspicion. A high sonography index of suspicion was correlated with 100% sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value. HSR-S is a reliable, available, and cost-effective method in early diagnosis of occult fractures of the scaphoid. The presence of three defined criteria is required to assess the diagnosis.

  17. High spatial resolution Mg/Al maps of the western Crisium and Sulpicius Gallus regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonfeld, E.

    High spatial resolution Mg/Al ratio maps of the western Crisium and Sulpicius Gallus regions of the moon are presented. The data is from the X-ray fluorescence experiment and the image enhancement technique in the Laplacian subtraction method using a special least-squares version of the Laplacian to reduce noise amplification. In the highlands region west of Mare Crisium several relatively small patches of smooth material have high local Mg/Al ratio similar to values found in mare sites, suggesting volcanism in the highlands. In the same highland region there were other smooth areas with no high Mg/Al local values and they are probably Cayley Formation material produced by impact mass wasting. The Sulpicius Gallus region has variable Mg/Al ratios. In this region there are several high Mg/Al ratio spots, two of which occur at the highland-mare interface. Another high Mg/Al ratio area corresponds to the Sulpicius Gallus Rima I region. The high Mg/Al ratio material in the Sulpicius Gallus region is probably pyroclastic.

  18. High spatial resolution Mg/Al maps of the western Crisium and Sulpicius Gallus regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonfeld, E.

    1982-01-01

    High spatial resolution Mg/Al ratio maps of the western Crisium and Sulpicius Gallus regions of the moon are presented. The data is from the X-ray fluorescence experiment and the image enhancement technique in the Laplacian subtraction method using a special least-squares version of the Laplacian to reduce noise amplification. In the highlands region west of Mare Crisium several relatively small patches of smooth material have high local Mg/Al ratio similar to values found in mare sites, suggesting volcanism in the highlands. In the same highland region there were other smooth areas with no high Mg/Al local values and they are probably Cayley Formation material produced by impact mass wasting. The Sulpicius Gallus region has variable Mg/Al ratios. In this region there are several high Mg/Al ratio spots, two of which occur at the highland-mare interface. Another high Mg/Al ratio area corresponds to the Sulpicius Gallus Rima I region. The high Mg/Al ratio material in the Sulpicius Gallus region is probably pyroclastic.

  19. The Geospectral Camera: a Compact and Geometrically Precise Hyperspectral and High Spatial Resolution Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delauré, B.; Michiels, B.; Biesemans, J.; Livens, S.; Van Achteren, T.

    2013-04-01

    Small unmanned aerial vehicles are increasingly being employed for environmental monitoring at local scale, which drives the demand for compact and lightweight spectral imagers. This paper describes the geospectral camera, which is a novel compact imager concept. The camera is built around an innovative detector which has two sensor elements on a single chip and therefore offers the functionality of two cameras within the volume of a single one. The two sensor elements allow the camera to derive both spectral information as well as geometric information (high spatial resolution imagery and a digital surface model) of the scene of interest. A first geospectral camera prototype has been developed. It uses a linear variable optical filter which is installed in front of one of the two sensors of the MEDUSA CMOS imager chip. A accompanying software approach has been developed which exploits the simultaneous information of the two sensors in order to extract an accurate spectral image product. This method has been functionally demonstrated by applying it on image data acquired during an airborne acquisition.

  20. The Circumstellar Environment of T Tauri S at High Spatial and Spectral Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchêne, G.; Ghez, A. M.; McCabe, C.; Ceccarelli, C.

    2005-08-01

    We have obtained the first high spatial (0.05") and spectral (R~35,000) resolution 2 μm spectrum of the T Tau S tight binary system using adaptive optics on the Keck II telescope. We have also obtained the first 3.8 and 4.7 μm images that resolve the three components of the T Tau multiple system, as well as new 1.6 and 2.2 μm images. Together with its very red near-infrared colors, the spectrum of T Tau Sb shows that this T Tauri star is extincted by a roughly constant extinction of AV~15 mag, which is probably the 0.7"×0.5" circumbinary structure recently observed in absorption in the ultraviolet. T Tau Sa, which is also observed through this screen and is actively accreting, further possesses a small edge-on disk that is evidenced by warm (390 K), narrow overtone CO rovibrational absorption features in our spectrum. We find that T Tau Sa is most likely an intermediate-mass star surrounded by a semitransparent 2-3 AU radius disk whose asymmetries and short Keplerian rotation explain the large photometric variability of the source on relatively short timescales. We also show that molecular hydrogen emission exclusively arises from the gas that surrounds T Tau S and that its spatial and kinematic structure, while providing suggestive evidence of a jetlike structure, is highly complex.

  1. Diamond chip under single-photon driving as a high spatial resolution quantum magnetometer and electrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukanov, Alexander V.; Kateev, Igor Y.

    2016-12-01

    The problem of practical realization of a compact sensing device with high-spatial resolution is addressed. The principle of external field measuring uses analysis of transmission or reflection spectra from a diamond microstructure composed of three-microring optical resonators. Due to Zeeman and Stark shifts of energy levels of NV-centers formed in the microring edge the hybrid electron-photon spectrum changes depending on the strength and direction of magnetic and electric fields, respectively. A probe laser with a tunable wavelength excites the structure in a single-photon regime and its response enables one to detect the fields via spectral behavior. The model of the sensor dynamics accounts for both coherent driving and incoherent processes (center relaxation, dephasing and photon leakage) in terms of Lindblad formalism. With use of the finite-difference time-domain numerical method a three-ring spectrum is calculated and eigenmodes close to NV-center zero-phonon line are found. Electromagnetic field shows whispering-gallery behavior, so NV-center is coupled to a common three-ring mode antinode. As we show in the steady-state regime our approach gives the possibility of external fields measuring in a large intensity range with high sensitivity.

  2. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION SURVEY OF GRAIN SIZE INFORMATION ON RIVER BED BY IMAGE PROCESSING

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Keisuke; Ihara, Kazuki; Yasuda, Shingo

    We tried a method of grain sizing by image processing which is available to survey and analyze in short time. The high-efficiency method actualizes high spatial resolution information of grain size distribution. Thus, the information has a vailability to express a situation of stream flow better than traditional grain sizing methods. For this reason, we paid attention to 50 m reservoir area upper from the check dam in mountainous region and surveyed the grain distribution at 26 sites and river channel landform. The grain sizing by image processing provided the appropriate result qualitatively. Moreover we estimated the critical diameter of moving from hydraulic information simultaneously. A qualitative appropriate result is showed less than 50 mm error as a result, however, quantitative response is not found between the critical diameter of moving and the grain size distribution surveyed. Meanwhile,the different grain sizing methods that are image processing and traditional sieving are used to cover the bilateral weak point. Thereby, a peak of grain existence probability is found in the threshold diameter between image processing and sieving. This result indicates that it is necessary to change the threshold diameter much larger than the limit of image processing grain sizing.

  3. High spatial resolution mapping of the Cepheus A region at 20, 50, and 100 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, H. B., Jr.; Lester, D. F.; Harvey, P. M.; Joy, M.; Telesco, C. M.; Decher, R.; Werner, M. W.

    1990-01-01

    The Cepheus A region at 20 microns has been mapped, and a bright, unresolved central source with a peak flux of 41 Jy into a 4.0 arcsec x 4.3 arcsec beam has been detected. One-dimensional slit scans have been obtained in two perpendicular directions across Cepheus A at 50 and 100 microns using a high spatial-resolution sampling technique. The temperature and optical depth profile of the far-IR emission are determined, and a peak temperature of 46 K and peak 100 micron optical depth of 0.4 are derived. Maximum entropy deconvolution of the far-IR scans indicate that there is a bright central core with clumpy extended emission. Within errors the position of the 50/100 micron peak is the same as the 20-micron source; this is interpreted as indicating that the 20 micron radiation represents the short-wavelength emission from the core of the dust cloud seen in the far-IR. It is concluded that an embedded source provides the major source of luminosity in the Cepheus A region.

  4. High spatial resolution imaging mass spectrometry of human optic nerve lipids and proteins.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David M G; Spraggins, Jeffrey M; Rose, Kristie L; Schey, Kevin L

    2015-06-01

    The human optic nerve carries signals from the retina to the visual cortex of the brain. Each optic nerve is comprised of approximately one million nerve fibers that are organized into bundles of 800-1200 fibers surrounded by connective tissue and supportive glial cells. Damage to the optic nerve contributes to a number of blinding diseases including: glaucoma, neuromyelitis optica, optic neuritis, and neurofibromatosis; however, the molecular mechanisms of optic nerve damage and death are incompletely understood. Herein we present high spatial resolution MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) analysis of lipids and proteins to define the molecular anatomy of the human optic nerve. The localization of a number of lipids was observed in discrete anatomical regions corresponding to myelinated and unmyelinated nerve regions as well as to supporting connective tissue, glial cells, and blood vessels. A protein fragment from vimentin, a known intermediate filament marker for astrocytes, was observed surrounding nerved fiber bundles in the lamina cribrosa region. S100B was also found in supporting glial cell regions in the prelaminar region, and the hemoglobin alpha subunit was observed in blood vessel areas. The molecular anatomy of the optic nerve defined by MALDI IMS provides a firm foundation to study biochemical changes in blinding human diseases.

  5. High Spatial Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of Cas A with Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue-Juan; Lu, Fang-Jun; Chen, Li

    2008-08-01

    We present high spatial resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A with the Chandra observations. The X-ray emitting region of this remnant was divided into 38 × 34 pixels of 10″× 10″ each. Spectra of 960 pixels were created and fitted with an absorbed two component non-equilibrium ionization model. From the results of the spectral analysis we obtained maps of absorbing column density, temperatures, ionization ages, and the abundances of Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ca and Fe. The Si, S and possibly Ca abundance maps show obvious jet structures, while Fe does not follow the jet but seems to be distributed perpendicular to it. The abundances of Si, S and Ca show tight correlations between one another over a range of about two dex. This suggests that they are ejecta from explosive O-burning and incomplete Si-burning. Meanwhile, the Ne abundance is well correlated with that of Mg, indicating them to be the ashes of explosive C/Ne burning. The Fe abundance is positively correlated with that of Si when the latter is lower than 3 times the solar value, and is negatively correlated when higher. We suggest that such a two phase correlation is due to the different ways in which Fe was synthesized.

  6. Geodesic topological analysis of trabecular bone microarchitecture from high-spatial resolution magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Krug, Roland; Huber, Markus B; Hyun, Ben; Eckstein, Felix; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M

    2009-02-01

    In vivo assessment of trabecular bone microarchitecture could improve the prediction of fracture risk and the efficacy of osteoporosis treatment and prevention. Geodesic topological analysis (GTA) is introduced as a novel technique to quantify the trabecular bone microarchitecture from high-spatial resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images. Trabecular bone parameters that quantify the scale, topology, and anisotropy of the trabecular bone network in terms of its junctions are the result of GTA. The reproducibility of GTA was tested with in vivo images of human distal tibiae and radii (n = 6) at 1.5 Tesla; and its ability to discriminate between subjects with and without vertebral fracture was assessed with ex vivo images of human calcanei at 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla (n = 30). GTA parameters yielded an average reproducibility of 4.8%, and their individual areas under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis for fracture discrimination performed better at 3.0 than at 1.5 Tesla reaching values of up to 0.78 (p < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that fracture discrimination was improved by combining GTA parameters, and that GTA combined with bone mineral density (BMD) allow for better discrimination than BMD alone (AUC = 0.95; p < 0.001). Results indicate that GTA can substantially contribute in studies of osteoporosis involving imaging of the trabecular bone microarchitecture.

  7. Quantitative and high spatial resolution d33 measurement of piezoelectric bulk and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetty, Smitha; Yang, Jung In; Stitt, Joe; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-11-01

    A single beam laser interferometer based on a modified Mirau detection scheme with a vertical resolution of ˜5 pm was developed for localized d33 measurements on patterned piezoelectric films. The tool provides high spatial resolution (˜2 μm), essential for understanding scaling and processing effects in piezoelectric materials. This approach enables quantitative information on d33, currently difficult in local measurement techniques such as piezoresponse force microscopy. The interferometer is built in a custom microscope and employs a phase lock-in technique in order to detect sub-Angstrom displacements. d33 measurements on single crystal 0.67PbMg0.33Nb0.67O3-0.33PbTiO3 and bulk PbZrTiO3-5A ceramics demonstrated agreement within <3% with measurements using a double beam laser interferometer. Substrate bending contributions to out-of-plane strain, observed in thin continuous PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 films grown on Si substrates is reduced for electrode diameters smaller than 100 μm. Direct scanning across room temperature and 150 °C poled 5 μm and 10 μm features etched in 0.5 μm thick PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 films doped with 1% Nb confirmed minimal substrate contributions to the effective d33,f. Furthermore, enhanced d33,f values were observed along the feature edges due to partial declamping from the substrate, thus validating the application of single beam interferometry on finely patterned electrodes.

  8. Carbon budget estimation of a subarctic catchment using a dynamic ecosystem model at high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J.; Miller, P. A.; Persson, A.; Olefeldt, D.; Pilesjo, P.; Heliasz, M.; Jackowicz-Korczynski, M.; Yang, Z.; Smith, B.; Callaghan, T. V.; Christensen, T. R.

    2015-05-01

    A large amount of organic carbon is stored in high-latitude soils. A substantial proportion of this carbon stock is vulnerable and may decompose rapidly due to temperature increases that are already greater than the global average. It is therefore crucial to quantify and understand carbon exchange between the atmosphere and subarctic/arctic ecosystems. In this paper, we combine an Arctic-enabled version of the process-based dynamic ecosystem model, LPJ-GUESS (version LPJG-WHyMe-TFM) with comprehensive observations of terrestrial and aquatic carbon fluxes to simulate long-term carbon exchange in a subarctic catchment at 50 m resolution. Integrating the observed carbon fluxes from aquatic systems with the modeled terrestrial carbon fluxes across the whole catchment, we estimate that the area is a carbon sink at present and will become an even stronger carbon sink by 2080, which is mainly a result of a projected densification of birch forest and its encroachment into tundra heath. However, the magnitudes of the modeled sinks are very dependent on future atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Furthermore, comparisons of global warming potentials between two simulations with and without CO2 increase since 1960 reveal that the increased methane emission from the peatland could double the warming effects of the whole catchment by 2080 in the absence of CO2 fertilization of the vegetation. This is the first process-based model study of the temporal evolution of a catchment-level carbon budget at high spatial resolution, including both terrestrial and aquatic carbon. Though this study also highlights some limitations in modeling subarctic ecosystem responses to climate change, such as aquatic system flux dynamics, nutrient limitation, herbivory and other disturbances, and peatland expansion, our study provides one process-based approach to resolve the complexity of carbon cycling in subarctic ecosystems while simultaneously pointing out the key model developments for capturing

  9. Quantitative and high spatial resolution d{sub 33} measurement of piezoelectric bulk and thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Shetty, Smitha Yang, Jung In; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Stitt, Joe

    2015-11-07

    A single beam laser interferometer based on a modified Mirau detection scheme with a vertical resolution of ∼5 pm was developed for localized d{sub 33} measurements on patterned piezoelectric films. The tool provides high spatial resolution (∼2 μm), essential for understanding scaling and processing effects in piezoelectric materials. This approach enables quantitative information on d{sub 33}, currently difficult in local measurement techniques such as piezoresponse force microscopy. The interferometer is built in a custom microscope and employs a phase lock-in technique in order to detect sub-Angstrom displacements. d{sub 33} measurements on single crystal 0.67PbMg{sub 0.33}Nb{sub 0.67}O{sub 3}-0.33PbTiO{sub 3} and bulk PbZrTiO{sub 3}-5A ceramics demonstrated agreement within <3% with measurements using a double beam laser interferometer. Substrate bending contributions to out-of-plane strain, observed in thin continuous PbZr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48}O{sub 3} films grown on Si substrates is reduced for electrode diameters smaller than 100 μm. Direct scanning across room temperature and 150 °C poled 5 μm and 10 μm features etched in 0.5 μm thick PbZr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48}O{sub 3} films doped with 1% Nb confirmed minimal substrate contributions to the effective d{sub 33,f}. Furthermore, enhanced d{sub 33,f} values were observed along the feature edges due to partial declamping from the substrate, thus validating the application of single beam interferometry on finely patterned electrodes.

  10. Measuring radon-222 in soil gas with high spatial and temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Huxtable, Darren; Read, David; Shaw, George

    2017-02-01

    In order to exploit (222)Rn as a naturally-occurring tracer in soils we need to sample and measure radon isotopes in soil gas with high spatial and temporal resolution, without disturbing in situ activity concentrations and fluxes. Minimisation of sample volume is key to improving the resolution with which soil gas can be sampled; an analytical method is then needed which can measure radon with appropriate detection limits and precision for soil gas tracer studies. We have designed a soil gas probe with minimal internal dead volume to allow us to sample soil gas volumes of 45 cm(3). Radon-222 is extracted from these samples into a mineral oil-based scintillation cocktail before counting on a conventional liquid scintillation counter. A detection limit of 320 Bq m(-3) (in soil gas) is achievable with a 1 h count. This could be further reduced but, in practice, is sufficient for our purpose since (222)Rn in soil gas typically ranges from 2000-50,000 Bq m(-3). The method is simple and provides several advantages over commonly used field-portable instruments, including smaller sample volumes, speed of deployment and reliability under field conditions. The major limitation is the need to count samples in a liquid scintillation counter within 2-3 days of collection, due to the short (3.824 day) radioactive half-life of (222)Rn. The method is not applicable to the very short-lived (55 s half-life) (220)Rn.

  11. Evaluating the Value of High Spatial Resolution in National Capacity Expansion Models using ReEDS: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Venkat; Cole, Wesley

    2016-07-01

    Power sector capacity expansion models (CEMs) have a broad range of spatial resolutions. This paper uses the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, a long-term national scale electric sector CEM, to evaluate the value of high spatial resolution for CEMs. ReEDS models the United States with 134 load balancing areas (BAs) and captures the variability in existing generation parameters, future technology costs, performance, and resource availability using very high spatial resolution data, especially for wind and solar modeled at 356 resource regions. In this paper we perform planning studies at three different spatial resolutions--native resolution (134 BAs), state-level, and NERC region level--and evaluate how results change under different levels of spatial aggregation in terms of renewable capacity deployment and location, associated transmission builds, and system costs. The results are used to ascertain the value of high geographically resolved models in terms of their impact on relative competitiveness among renewable energy resources.

  12. Estimation of crops biomass and evapotranspiration from high spatial and temporal resolutions remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claverie, Martin; Demarez, Valérie; Duchemin, Benoît.; Ceschia, Eric; Hagolle, Olivier; Ducrot, Danielle; Keravec, Pascal; Beziat, Pierre; Dedieu, Pierre

    2010-05-01

    Carbon and water cycles are closely related to agricultural activities. Agriculture has been indeed identified by IPCC 2007 report as one of the options to sequester carbon in soil. Concerning the water resources, their consumptions by irrigated crops are called into question in view of demographic pressure. In the prospect of an assessment of carbon production and water consumption, the use of crop models at a regional scale is a challenging issue. The recent availability of high spatial resolution (10 m) optical sensors associated to high temporal resolution (1 day) such as FORMOSAT-2 and, in the future, Venµs and SENTINEL-2 will offer new perspectives for agricultural monitoring. In this context, the objective of this work is to show how multi-temporal satellite observations acquired at high spatial resolution are useful for a regional monitoring of following crops biophysical variables: leaf area index (LAI), aboveground biomass (AGB) and evapotranspiration (ET). This study focuses on three summer crops dominant in South-West of France: maize, sunflower and soybean. A unique images data set (82 FORMOSAT-2 images over four consecutive years, 2006-2009) was acquired for this project. The experimental data set includes LAI and AGB measurements over eight agricultural fields. Two fields were intensively monitored where ET flux were measured with a 30 minutes time step using eddy correlation methods. The modelisation approach is based on FAO-56 method coupled with a vegetation functioning model based on Monteith theory: the SAFY model [5]. The model operates at a daily time step model to provide estimates of plant characteristics (LAI, AGB), soil conditions (soil water content) and water use (ET). As a key linking variable, LAI is deduced from FORMOSAT-2 reflectances images, and then introduced into the SAFY model to provide spatial and temporal estimates of these biophysical variables. Most of the SAFY parameters are crop related and have been fixed according to

  13. Sunglint effects on the characterization of optically active substances in high spatial resolution airborne hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streher, A. S.; Faria Barbosa, C. Clemente; Soares Galvão, L.; Goodman, J. A.; Silva, T. S.

    2013-05-01

    Sunglint, also known as the specular reflection of light from water surfaces, is a component of sensor-received radiance that represents a confounding factor on the characterization of water bodies by remote sensing. In airborne remote sensing images, the effect of sunglint can be minimized by optimizing the flight paths, directing the sensor towards or away from the Sun, and by keeping solar zenith angles between 30° and 60°. However, these guidelines cannot always be applied, often due to the irregular spatial pattern of lakes, estuaries and coastlines. The present study assessed the impact of sunglint on the relationship between the optically active substances (OAS) concentration, in optically complex waters, and the spectral information provided by an airborne high spatial resolution hyperspectral sensor (SpecTIR). The Ibitinga reservoir, located in southeastern Brazil (state of São Paulo), was selected as the study area because of its meandering shape. As a result, there is demanding constant changes in data acquisition geometry to achieve complete coverage, therefore not allowing sunglint conditions to be minimized during image acquisition. Field data collection was carried out on October 23 and 24, 2011. During these two days, 15 water stations along the reservoir were sampled, concurrently with the SpecTIR image acquisition in 357 bands (398-2455 nm) and at 3 m spatial resolution. Chlorophyll, pheophytin, total suspended solids, organic and inorganic suspended solids and colored dissolved matter were determined in laboratory. The images were corrected for the atmospheric effects using the Fast Line-of-sight Atmospheric Analysis of Spectral Hypercubes (FLAASH) algorithm and then geometrically corrected. In order to evaluate the sunglint effects on the OAS characterization, the images were corrected for such effects using the deglint algorithm from Goodman et al. (2008). The SpecTIR 662-nm band reflectance was selected to be correlated to the OAS due to

  14. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF INERTIAL FUSION TARGET PLASMAS USING BUBBLE NEWTRON DETECTORS

    SciTech Connect

    FISHER,RK

    2002-10-01

    OAK B202 HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF INERTIAL FUSION TARGET PLASMAS USING BUBBLE NEWTRON DETECTORS. Bubble detectors, which can detect neutrons with a spatial resolution of 5 to 30 {micro}, are a promising approach to high-resolution imaging of NIF target plasmas. Gel bubble detectors were used in successful proof-of-principle imaging experiments on OMEGA. Until recently, bubble detectors appeared to be the only approach capable of achieving neutron images of NIF targets with the desired 5 {micro} spatial resolution in the target plane. In 2001, NIF reduced the required standoff distance from the target, so that diagnostic components can now be placed as close as 10 cm to the target plasma. This will allow neutron imaging with higher magnification and may make it possible to obtain 5 {micro}m resolution images on NIF using deuterated scintillators. Having accomplished all that they can hope to on OMEGA using gel detectors, they suggested that the 2002 NLUF shots be used to allow experimental tests of the spatial resolution of the CEA-built deuterated scintillators. The preliminary CEA data from the June 2002 run appears to show the spatial resolution using the deuterated scintillator detector array is improved over that obtained in earlier experiments using the proton-based scintillators. Gel detectors, which consist of {approx} 10 {micro}m diameter drops of bubble detector liquid suspended in an inactive support gel that occupies {approx} 99% of the detector volume, were chosen for the initial tests on OMEGA since they are easy to use. The bubbles could be photographed several hours after the neutron exposure. Imaging NIF target plasmas at neutron yields of 10{sup 15} will require a higher detection efficiency detector. Using a liquid bubble chamber detector should result in {approx} 1000 times higher neutron detection efficiency which is comparable to that possible using scintillation detectors. A pressure-cycled liquid bubble detector will require a light

  15. Prototyping and Testing a Wireless Sensor Network to Retrieve SWE at High Spatial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, D.; Barros, A. P.

    2007-12-01

    A critical challenge in snow research from space is the ability to obtain measurements at the spatial and temporal resolution to characterize the statistical structure of the space-time variability of the physical properties of the snowpack within an area consistent with the pixel resolution in snow hydrology models or that expected from a future NASA mission dedicated to cold region processes. That is, observations of relevant snow dielectric properties are necessary at high spatial and temporal resolution during the accumulation and melt seasons. We present a new wireless sensor network prototype consisting of multiple antennas and buried low-power, multi- channel transmitters operating in L-band that communicate to a central pod equipped with a Vector Signal Analyzer (VSA) that receives, processes and manages the data. Only commercial off-the-shelf hard-ware parts were used to build the sensors. Because the sensors are very low cost and run autonomously, one envisions that self-organizing networks of large numbers of such sensors might be distributed over very large areas, therefore proving much needed data sets for scaling studies. The measurement strategy consists of placing the transmitters the land surface in the beginning of the snow season which are then run autonomously till the end of the spring and waken at pre-determined time-intervals to emit radio frequency signals and thus sample the snowpack. Along with the sensors, an important component of this work entails the development of an estimation algorithm to estimate snow dielectric properties, snow density, and volume fraction of snow (VF) from the time-of-travel, amplitude and phase modification of the multi-channel RF signals as they propagate through the snow-pack. Here, we present results from full system testing and evaluation of the sensors that were conducted at Duke University using ¢®¡Æsynthetic¢®¡¾ limited-area snowpacks (0.5 by 0.5 m2 and 1 by 2 m2) constructed of various

  16. Improving urban land use and land cover classification from high-spatial-resolution hyperspectral imagery using contextual information

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this paper, we propose approaches to improve the pixel-based support vector machine (SVM) classification for urban land use and land cover (LULC) mapping from airborne hyperspectral imagery with high spatial resolution. Class spatial neighborhood relationship is used to correct the misclassified ...

  17. Classification of High Spatial Resolution, Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Imagery of the Little Miami River Watershed in Southwest Ohio, USA (Final)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA announced the availability of the final report,High Spatial Resolution, Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Imagery of the Little Miami River Watershed in Southwest Ohio, USA . This report and associated land use/land cover (LULC) coverage is the result o...

  18. INTERPOLATION OF TEMPERATURE AND NON-URBAN OZONE EXPOSURE AT HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION OVER THE WESTERN UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to assess the impact of natural and anthropogenic stresses on forest ecosystems, it is necessary to interpolate air temperature and tropospheric ozone (O3) exposure values at high spatial resolution over complex terrain. The proposed interpolation approach was selected ...

  19. Classification of High Spatial Resolution, Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Imagery of the Little Miami River Watershed in Southwest Ohio, USA (Final)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA announced the availability of the final report,High Spatial Resolution, Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Imagery of the Little Miami River Watershed in Southwest Ohio, USA . This report and associated land use/land cover (LULC) coverage is the result o...

  20. CLASSIFICATION OF HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION, HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING IMAGERY OF THE LITTLE MIAMI RIVER WATERSHED IN SOUTHWEST OHIO, USA (FINAL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document and associated land use/land cover (LULC) coverage, entitled Classification of High Spatial Resolution, Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Imagery of the Little Miami River Watershed in Southwest Ohio, USA, is the result of a collaborative effort among an interdisci...

  1. INTERPOLATION OF TEMPERATURE AND NON-URBAN OZONE EXPOSURE AT HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION OVER THE WESTERN UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to assess the impact of natural and anthropogenic stresses on forest ecosystems, it is necessary to interpolate air temperature and tropospheric ozone (O3) exposure values at high spatial resolution over complex terrain. The proposed interpolation approach was selected ...

  2. High spatial- and temporal-resolution anthropogenic heat discharge estimation in Los Angeles County, California.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuanfan; Weng, Qihao

    2017-07-22

    Anthropogenic heat flux (Qf), which originates through energy consumption from buildings, industrial plants, vehicle exhausts, and human metabolism releases, is an important component in the urban Surface Energy Balance (SEB) system, and is key to understanding of many urban environmental issues. The present study provided a hybrid Qf modeling approach, which combined the inventory and GIS approach to create a 365-day hourly Qf profile at 120 m spatial resolution in Los Angeles County, California, USA. Qf was estimated by separate calculation of heat release from buildings, traffics, and human metabolism, respectively. The results indicated that Qf showed different magnitudes and diurnal patterns between workdays (dual-peak shape) and weekends/holidays, and also varied with seasons, and land use types. Qf yielded the highest values in the summer workdays, with its maximum value of 7.76 w/m(2). Qf in hot summer workdays was obviously higher than that in the average summer workdays, which caused by higher demands for space cooling in buildings, and can reach 8.14 w/m(2) at maximum. Building energy consumption was identified as the dominant contributor to the Qf in Downtown Los Angeles, which was found to have the largest mean Qf throughout the year among all neighborhoods. It can be concluded that Qf in the downtown was more significant in workdays than that in non-workdays, and its maximum value can reach 100 w/m(2). It is suggested that our approach may have wider applicability for Qf estimation in large areas compared with the existing studies, as all the data used were available to the public. A high spatial and temporal Qf profile, which can readily be incorporated into urban energy balance and Urban Heat Island (UHI) studies, provides valuable data and information for pertinent government agencies and researchers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Brightness of Solar Magnetic Elements As a Function of Magnetic Flux at High Spatial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahil, F.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Solanki, S. K.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the relationship between the photospheric magnetic field of small-scale magnetic elements in the quiet-Sun (QS) at disk center and the brightness at 214, 300, 313, 388, 397, and 525.02 nm. To this end, we analyzed spectropolarimetric and imaging time series acquired simultaneously by the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment magnetograph and the SuFI filter imager on board the balloon-borne observatory {{S}}{{UNRISE}} during its first science flight in 2009, with high spatial and temporal resolution. We find a clear dependence of the contrast in the near ultraviolet and the visible on the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field, B LOS, which is best described by a logarithmic model. This function effectively represents the relationship between the Ca ii H-line emission and B LOS and works better than the power-law fit adopted by previous studies. This, along with the high contrast reached at these wavelengths, will help with determining the contribution of small-scale elements in the QS to the irradiance changes for wavelengths below 388 nm. At all wavelengths, including the continuum at 525.40 nm, the intensity contrast does not decrease with increasing B LOS. This result also strongly supports the fact that {{S}}{{UNRISE}} has resolved small strong magnetic field elements in the internetwork, resulting in constant contrasts for large magnetic fields in our continuum contrast at 525.40 nm versus the B LOS scatterplot, unlike the turnover obtained in previous observational studies. This turnover is due to the intermixing of the bright magnetic features with the dark intergranular lanes surrounding them.

  4. In-duct identification of a rotating sound source with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Yong-Ho; Ih, Jeong-Guon; Bodén, Hans

    2015-11-01

    To understand and reduce the flow noise generation from in-duct fluid machines, it is necessary to identify the acoustic source characteristics precisely. In this work, a source identification technique, which can identify the strengths and positions of the major sound radiators in the source plane, is studied for an in-duct rotating source. A linear acoustic theory including the effects of evanescent modes and source rotation is formulated based on the modal summation method, which is the underlying theory for the inverse source reconstruction. A validation experiment is conducted on a duct system excited by a loudspeaker in static and rotating conditions, with two different speeds, in the absence of flow. Due to the source rotation, the measured pressure spectra reveal the Doppler effect, and the amount of frequency shift corresponds to the multiplication of the circumferential mode order and the rotation speed. Amplitudes of participating modes are estimated at the shifted frequencies in the stationary reference frame, and the modal amplitude set including the effect of source rotation is collected to investigate the source behavior in the rotating reference frame. By using the estimated modal amplitudes, the near-field pressure is re-calculated and compared with the measured pressure. The obtained maximum relative error is about -25 and -10 dB for rotation speeds at 300 and 600 rev/min, respectively. The spatial distribution of acoustic source parameters is restored from the estimated modal amplitude set. The result clearly shows that the position and magnitude of the main sound source can be identified with high spatial resolution in the rotating reference frame.

  5. Mapping of North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution by inversion of SCIAMACHY satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wecht, Kevin J.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Frankenberg, Christian; Jiang, Zhe; Blake, Donald R.

    2014-06-01

    We estimate methane emissions from North America with high spatial resolution by inversion of Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) satellite observations using the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry (GEOS-Chem) chemical transport model and its adjoint. The inversion focuses on summer 2004 when data from the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment-North America (INTEX-A) aircraft campaign over the eastern U.S. are available to validate the SCIAMACHY retrievals and evaluate the inversion. From the INTEX-A data we identify and correct a water vapor-dependent bias in the SCIAMACHY data. We conduct an initial inversion of emissions on the horizontal grid of GEOS-Chem (1/2° × 2/3°) to identify correction tendencies relative to the Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) v4.2 emission inventory used as a priori. We then cluster these grid cells with a hierarchical algorithm to extract the maximum information from the SCIAMACHY observations. A 1000 cluster ensemble can be adequately constrained, providing 100 km resolution across North America. Analysis of results indicates that the Hudson Bay Lowland wetlands source is 2.1 Tg a-1, lower than the a priori but consistent with other recent estimates. Anthropogenic U.S. emissions are 30.1 ± 1.3 Tg a-1, compared to 25.8 Tg a-1 and 28.3 Tg a-1 in the EDGAR v4.2 and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) inventories, respectively. We find that U.S. livestock emissions are 40% greater than in these two inventories. No such discrepancy is apparent for overall U.S. oil and gas emissions, although this may reflect some compensation between overestimate of emissions from storage/distribution and underestimate from production. We find that U.S. livestock emissions are 70% greater than the oil and gas emissions, in contrast to the EDGAR v4.2 and EPA inventories where these two sources are of comparable magnitude.

  6. ALMA high spatial resolution observations of the dense molecular region of NGC 6302.

    PubMed

    Santander-García, M; Bujarrabal, V; Alcolea, J; Castro-Carrizo, A; Sánchez Contreras, C; Quintana-Lacaci, G; Corradi, R L M; Neri, R

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism behind the shaping of bipolar planetary nebulae is still poorly understood. It is becoming increasingly clear that the main agents must operate at their innermost regions, where a significant equatorial density enhancement should be present and related to the collimation of light and jet launching from the central star preferentially towards the polar directions. Most of the material in this equatorial condensation must be lost during the asymptotic giant branch as stellar wind and later released from the surface of dust grains to the gas phase in molecular form. Accurately tracing the molecule-rich regions of these objects can give valuable insight into the ejection mechanisms themselves. We investigate the physical conditions, structure and velocity field of the dense molecular region of the planetary nebula NGC 6302 by means of ALMA band 7 interferometric maps. The high spatial resolution of the (12)CO and (13)CO J=3-2 ALMA data allows for an analysis of the geometry of the ejecta in unprecedented detail. We built a spatio-kinematical model of the molecular region with the software SHAPE and performed detailed non-LTE calculations of excitation and radiative transfer with the shapemol plug-in. We find that the molecular region consists of a massive ring out of which a system of fragments of lobe walls emerge and enclose the base of the lobes visible in the optical. The general properties of this region are in agreement with previous works, although the much greater spatial resolution of the data allows for a very detailed description. We confirm that the mass of the molecular region is 0.1 M⊙. Additionally, we report a previously undetected component at the nebular equator, an inner, younger ring inclined ~60° with respect to the main ring, showing a characteristic radius of 7.5×10(16) cm, a mass of 2.7×10(-3) M⊙, and a counterpart in optical images of the nebula. This inner ring has the same kinematical age as the northwest optical lobes

  7. ALMA high spatial resolution observations of the dense molecular region of NGC 6302

    PubMed Central

    Santander-García, M.; Bujarrabal, V.; Alcolea, J.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Sánchez Contreras, C.; Quintana-Lacaci, G.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Neri, R.

    2016-01-01

    Context The mechanism behind the shaping of bipolar planetary nebulae is still poorly understood. It is becoming increasingly clear that the main agents must operate at their innermost regions, where a significant equatorial density enhancement should be present and related to the collimation of light and jet launching from the central star preferentially towards the polar directions. Most of the material in this equatorial condensation must be lost during the asymptotic giant branch as stellar wind and later released from the surface of dust grains to the gas phase in molecular form. Accurately tracing the molecule-rich regions of these objects can give valuable insight into the ejection mechanisms themselves. Aims We investigate the physical conditions, structure and velocity field of the dense molecular region of the planetary nebula NGC 6302 by means of ALMA band 7 interferometric maps. Methods The high spatial resolution of the 12CO and 13CO J=3−2 ALMA data allows for an analysis of the geometry of the ejecta in unprecedented detail. We built a spatio-kinematical model of the molecular region with the software SHAPE and performed detailed non-LTE calculations of excitation and radiative transfer with the shapemol plug-in. Results We find that the molecular region consists of a massive ring out of which a system of fragments of lobe walls emerge and enclose the base of the lobes visible in the optical. The general properties of this region are in agreement with previous works, although the much greater spatial resolution of the data allows for a very detailed description. We confirm that the mass of the molecular region is 0.1 M⊙. Additionally, we report a previously undetected component at the nebular equator, an inner, younger ring inclined ~60° with respect to the main ring, showing a characteristic radius of 7.5×1016 cm, a mass of 2.7×10−3 M⊙, and a counterpart in optical images of the nebula. This inner ring has the same kinematical age as the

  8. Carbon budget estimation of a subarctic catchment using a dynamic ecosystem model at high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J.; Miller, P. A.; Persson, A.; Olefeldt, D.; Pilesjö, P.; Heliasz, M.; Jackowicz-Korczynski, M.; Yang, Z.; Smith, B.; Callaghan, T. V.; Christensen, T. R.

    2015-01-01

    Large amount of organic carbon is stored in high latitude soils. A substantial proportion of this carbon stock is vulnerable and may decompose rapidly due to temperature increases that are already greater than the global average. It is therefore crucial to quantify and understand carbon exchange between the atmosphere and subarctic/arctic ecosystems. In this paper, we combine an arctic-enabled version of the process-based dynamic ecosystem model, LPJ-GUESS (version LPJG-WHyMe-TFM) with comprehensive observations of terrestrial and aquatic carbon fluxes to simulate long-term carbon exchange in a subarctic catchment comprising both mineral and peatland soils. The model is applied at 50 m resolution and is shown to be able to capture the seasonality and magnitudes of observed fluxes at this fine scale. The modelled magnitudes of CO2 uptake generally follow the descending sequence: birch forest, non-permafrost Eriophorum, Sphagnum and then tundra heath during the observation periods. The catchment-level carbon fluxes from aquatic systems are dominated by CO2 emissions from streams. Integrated across the whole catchment, we estimate that the area is a carbon sink at present, and will become an even stronger carbon sink by 2080, which is mainly a result of a projected densification of birch forest and its encroachment into tundra heath. However, the magnitudes of the modelled sinks are very dependent on future atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Furthermore, comparisons of global warming potentials between two simulations with and without CO2 increase since 1960 reveal that the increased methane emission from the peatland could double the warming effects of the whole catchment by 2080 in the absence of CO2 fertilization of the vegetation. This is the first process-based model study of the temporal evolution of a catchment-level carbon budget at high spatial resolution, integrating comprehensive and diverse fluxes including both terrestrial and aquatic carbon. Though this

  9. ALMA high spatial resolution observations of the dense molecular region of NGC 6302

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santander-García, M.; Bujarrabal, V.; Alcolea, J.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Sánchez Contreras, C.; Quintana-Lacaci, G.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Neri, R.

    2017-01-01

    Context. The mechanism behind the shaping of bipolar planetary nebulae is still poorly understood. It is becoming increasingly clear that the main agents must operate at their innermost regions, where a significant equatorial density enhancement should be present and related to the collimation of light and jet launching from the central star preferentially towards the polar directions. Most of the material in this equatorial condensation must be lost during the asymptotic giant branch as stellar wind and later released from the surface of dust grains to the gas phase in molecular form. Accurately tracing the molecule-rich regions of these objects can give valuable insight into the ejection mechanisms themselves. Aims: We investigate the physical conditions, structure and velocity field of the dense molecular region of the planetary nebula NGC 6302 by means of ALMA band 7 interferometric maps. Methods: The high spatial resolution of the 12CO and 13CO J = 3-2 ALMA data allows for an analysis of the geometry of the ejecta in unprecedented detail. We built a spatio-kinematical model of the molecular region with the software SHAPE and performed detailed non-LTE calculations of excitation and radiative transfer with the shapemol plug-in. Results: We find that the molecular region consists of a massive ring out of which a system of fragments of lobe walls emerge and enclose the base of the lobes visible in the optical. The general properties of this region are in agreement with previous works, although the much greater spatial resolution of the data allows for a very detailed description. We confirm that the mass of the molecular region is 0.1 M⊙. Additionally, we report a previously undetected component at the nebular equator, an inner, younger ring inclined 60° with respect to the main ring, showing a characteristic radius of 7.5 × 1016 cm, a mass of 2.7 × 10-3M⊙, and a counterpart in optical images of the nebula. This inner ring has the same kinematical age as

  10. High-spatial resolution numerical simulations of in-water radiative transfer processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alimonte, D.; Kajiyama, T.; Zibordi, G.

    2012-04-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of radiative processes allow for addressing optical radiometric problems strictly linked to complex geometries. Within such a context, MC simulations have been used to investigate uncertainties affecting in-water radiometric measurements performed with free-fall optical profilers commonly utilized for the vicarious calibration of space sensors or the validation of satellite ocean color primary products (e.g, the normalized water leaving radiance). Specifically, a MC code (henceforth called MOX) has been developed to simulate in-water and above-water radiometric fields with high spatial-resolution (up to 1 cm) over a 2-dimensional (2D) domain of tens of meters. This has been achieved by exploiting high performance computing (HPC) solutions (e.g., parallel programs and job-scheduling based on novel performance prediction and optimization schemes) to trace up to 10^12 photons. A dedicated study, focused on the simulation of in-water radiometric fields, has led to the generation of virtual optical profiles accounting for perturbations due to light focusing effect by sea-surface gravity and capillary waves at a spatial resolution comparable to that of actual measurements. Different from field experiments, which are often constrained by environmental factors like illumination conditions and sea-water optical properties, numerical simulations permits analyzing realistic cases whereas allowing for a free input parameter selection. MOX simulations have shown that uncertainties induced by focusing effects upon radiometric data products can be reduced by slowing the deployment speed of free-fall optical profilers, rather than increasing the sampling frequency (i.e., while keeping the same number of samples per depth unit). This result has confirmed the appropriateness of profiling techniques (i.e., multicasting) so far solely supported by a limited number of field measurements and has additionally suggested the possibility of investigating further

  11. The mid-IR silicon photonics sensor platform (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimerling, Lionel; Hu, Juejun; Agarwal, Anuradha M.

    2017-02-01

    Advances in integrated silicon photonics are enabling highly connected sensor networks that offer sensitivity, selectivity and pattern recognition. Cost, performance and the evolution path of the so-called `Internet of Things' will gate the proliferation of these networks. The wavelength spectral range of 3-8um, commonly known as the mid-IR, is critical to specificity for sensors that identify materials by detection of local vibrational modes, reflectivity and thermal emission. For ubiquitous sensing applications in this regime, the sensors must move from premium to commodity level manufacturing volumes and cost. Scaling performance/cost is critically dependent on establishing a minimum set of platform attributes for point, wearable, and physical sensing. Optical sensors are ideal for non-invasive applications. Optical sensor device physics involves evanescent or intra-cavity structures for applied to concentration, interrogation and photo-catalysis functions. The ultimate utility of a platform is dependent on sample delivery/presentation modalities; system reset, recalibration and maintenance capabilities; and sensitivity and selectivity performance. The attributes and performance of a unified Glass-on-Silicon platform has shown good prospects for heterogeneous integration on materials and devices using a low cost process flow. Integrated, single mode, silicon photonic platforms offer significant performance and cost advantages, but they require discovery and qualification of new materials and process integration schemes for the mid-IR. Waveguide integrated light sources based on rare earth dopants and Ge-pumped frequency combs have promise. Optical resonators and waveguide spirals can enhance sensitivity. PbTe materials are among the best choices for a standard, waveguide integrated photodetector. Chalcogenide glasses are capable of transmitting mid-IR signals with high transparency. Integrated sensor case studies of i) high sensitivity analyte detection in

  12. Dust processing in photodissociation regions. Mid-IR emission modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compiègne, M.; Abergel, A.; Verstraete, L.; Habart, E.

    2008-12-01

    Context: Mid-infrared spectroscopy of dense illuminated ridges (or photodissociation regions, PDRs) suggests dust evolution. Such evolution must be reflected in the gas physical properties through processes like photo-electric heating or H2 formation. Aims: With Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) and ISOCAM data, we study the mid-IR emission of closeby, well known PDRs. Focusing on the band and continuum dust emissions, we follow their relative contributions and analyze their variations in terms of abundance of dust populations. Methods: In order to disentangle dust evolution and excitation effects, we use a dust emission model that we couple to radiative transfer. Our dust model reproduces extinction and emission of the standard interstellar medium that we represent with diffuse high galactic latitude clouds called Cirrus. We take the properties of dust in Cirrus as a reference to which we compare the dust emission from more excited regions, namely the Horsehead and the reflection nebula NGC 2023 North. Results: We show that in both regions, radiative transfer effects cannot account for the observed spectral variations. We interpret these variations in term of changes of the relative abundance between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, mid-IR band carriers) and very small grains (VSGs, mid-IR continuum carriers). Conclusions: We conclude that the PAH/VSG abundance ratio is 2.4 times smaller at the peak emission of the Horsehead nebula than in the Cirrus case. For NGC 2023 North where spectral evolution is observed across the northern PDR, we conclude that this ratio is ~5 times lower in the dense, cold zones of the PDR than in its diffuse illuminated part where dust properties seem to be the same as in Cirrus. We conclude that dust in PDRs seems to evolve from “dense” to “diffuse” properties at the small spatial scale of the dense illuminated ridge.

  13. High-Spatial- and High-Spectral-Resolution Observations of the Inhomogeneous Outer Atmosphere of the M Giant BK Vir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnaka, K.

    2011-09-01

    We present high-spatial- and high-spectral-resolution observations of the normal M-type AGB star BK Vir using the AMBER instrument at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer. AMBER's high spatial resolution (9.5 mas) and high spectral resolution (λ/Δλ = 12000) enable us to probe the inhomogeneous structure of the atmosphere using the CO first-overtone lines near 2.3μm. The AMBER data in the CO lines reveal the presence of inhomogeneous CO layers, which are much more extended than predicted by hydrostatic photospheric models. These AMBER observations are the first to spatially resolve the “warm molecular envelope” toward AGB stars in individual CO lines.

  14. Multiplexing of spatial modes in the mid-IR region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailele, Lucas; Maweza, Loyiso; Dudley, Angela; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Rosales-Guzman, Carmelo; Forbes, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    Traditional optical communication systems optimize multiplexing in polarization and wavelength both trans- mitted in fiber and free-space to attain high bandwidth data communication. Yet despite these technologies, we are expected to reach a bandwidth ceiling in the near future. Communications using orbital angular momentum (OAM) carrying modes offers infinite dimensional states, providing means to increase link capacity by multiplexing spatially overlapping modes in both the azimuthal and radial degrees of freedom. OAM modes are multiplexed and de-multiplexed by the use of spatial light modulators (SLM). Implementation of complex amplitude modulation is employed on laser beams phase and amplitude to generate Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) modes. Modal decomposition is employed to detect these modes due to their orthogonality as they propagate in space. We demonstrate data transfer by sending images as a proof-of concept in a lab-based scheme. We demonstrate the creation and detection of OAM modes in the mid-IR region as a precursor to a mid-IR free-space communication link.

  15. SPICA: Mid-IR exoplanet spectroscopy in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, I. P.; Swinyard, B.; Tessenyi, M.; Tinetti, G.

    2014-04-01

    In less than three decades, the field of exoplanetary science has undergone nothing short of a revolution. We have gone from the oddball discovery of a 'planetary sized object' orbiting a pulsar star (Wolszczan and Frail, 1992) to efficient and systematic all-sky surveys with nearly two thousand confirmed exoplanets and over three thousand candidates awaiting confirmation (Burke et al., 2013). With such wealth of systems discovered, we are constantly edging closer to finding the holy grail of planetary science: an Earth analogue with habitable conditions. To understand conditions of habitability, we must characterise the exoplanets. This is best achieved by the spectroscopy of their atmospheres in the near to mid-IR wavelength ranges (5-20 microns) where complex molecules emit. Whilst JWST/MIRI does cover these wavelength ranges in four separate filters, the importance of oneshot, simultaneous wavelength coverage to constrain stellar and planetary variability cannot be overstated. In this talk we will present the concept of a highstability spectrograph on the proposed SPICA mission, featuring a continuous wavelength coverage from the near to mid-IR, ideally placed to characterise warm- Neptunes to habitable zone planets.

  16. Mid-IR water and silicate relation in protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonellini, S.; Bremer, J.; Kamp, I.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Lahuis, F.; Thi, W.-F.; Woitke, P.; Meijerink, R.; Aresu, G.; Spaans, M.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Mid-IR water lines from protoplanetary disks around T Tauri stars have a detection rate of 50%. Models have identified multiple physical properties of disks such as dust-to-gas mass ratio, dust size power law distribution, disk gas mass, disk inner radius, and disk scale height as potential explanations for the current detection rate. Aims: In this study, we aim to break degeneracies through constraints obtained from observations. We search for a connection between mid-IR water line fluxes and the strength of the 10 μm silicate feature. Methods: We analyze observed water line fluxes from three blends at 15.17, 17.22 and 29.85 μm published earlier and compute the 10 μm silicate feature strength from Spitzer spectra to search for possible trends. We use a series of published ProDiMo thermo-chemical models, to explore disk dust and gas properties, and also the effects of different central stars. In addition, we produced two standard models with different dust opacity functions, and one with a parametric prescription for the dust settling. Results: Our series of models that vary properties of the grain size distribution suggest that mid-IR water emission anticorrelates with the strength of the 10 μm silicate feature. The models also show that the increasing stellar bolometric luminosity simultaneously enhance the strength of this dust feature and the water lines fluxes. No correlation is found between the observed mid-IR water lines and the 10 μm silicate strength. Two-thirds of the targets in our sample show crystalline dust features, and the disks are mainly flaring. Our sample shows the same difference in the peak strength between amorphous and crystalline silicates that was noted in earlier studies, but our models do not support this intrinsic difference in silicate peak strength. Individual properties of our models are not able to reproduce the most extreme observations, suggesting that more complex dust properties (e.g., vertically changing) are

  17. Satellite monitoring at high spatial resolution of water bodies used for irrigation purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baup, F.; Flanquart, S.; Marais-Sicre, C.; Fieuzal, R.

    2012-04-01

    have a surface inferior to 10 ha (0.1 km2). Temporal analyses, over the year 2010, show that only five lakes offer a strong surface dynamic (from 21% to 125% of evolution). The weak signal observed over all the other lakes are due to the banks of lakes (steep slope). The long term analyses, from 2003 to middle of 2011, show alternation of wet and dry years due to rainfalls variations. Annual cycle are also well marked showing filling and emptying phases respectively occurring in spring and at the end of summer. Filling phase is both attributed to runoff contributions over the watershed and to pumping effects. Irrigation and evaporation are the main factors during emptying phases. Two examples of water storages estimates are presented over one specific watershed. To conclude, high spatial resolution images appear suitable for mapping water bodies at fine scale. Limitations come from the form of the edge of the lake (steep or slight slope) and only 3% of lakes can be monitored over the studied area. In the following, interferometric approaches will be evaluated to estimate the height of water bodies, improving the estimate of water storage.

  18. Land cover mapping and change detection in urban watersheds using QuickBird high spatial resolution satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, David Barry

    The objective of this research was to develop methods for urban land cover analysis using QuickBird high spatial resolution satellite imagery. Such imagery has emerged as a rich commercially available remote sensing data source and has enjoyed high-profile broadcast news media and Internet applications, but methods of quantitative analysis have not been thoroughly explored. The research described here consists of three studies focused on the use of pan-sharpened 61-cm spatial resolution QuickBird imagery, the spatial resolution of which is the highest of any commercial satellite. In the first study, a per-pixel land cover classification method is developed for use with this imagery. This method utilizes a per-pixel classification approach to generate an accurate six-category high spatial resolution land cover map of a developing suburban area. The primary objective of the second study was to develop an accurate land cover change detection method for use with QuickBird land cover products. This work presents an efficient fuzzy framework for transforming map uncertainty into accurate and meaningful high spatial resolution land cover change analysis. The third study described here is an urban planning application of the high spatial resolution QuickBird-based land cover product developed in the first study. This work both meaningfully connects this exciting new data source to urban watershed management and makes an important empirical contribution to the study of suburban watersheds. Its analysis of residential roads and driveways as well as retail parking lots sheds valuable light on the impact of transportation-related land use on the suburban landscape. Broadly, these studies provide new methods for using state-of-the-art remote sensing data to inform land cover analysis and urban planning. These methods are widely adaptable and produce land cover products that are both meaningful and accurate. As additional high spatial resolution satellites are launched and the

  19. High Spatial Resolution Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Organic Layers in an Organic Light-Emitting Diode

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Yuko; Nakajima, Yoji; Isemura, Tsuguhide; Yamamoto, Kiyoshi; Satoh, Takaya; Aoki, Jun; Toyoda, Michisato

    2016-01-01

    To improve the durability of organic materials in electronic devices, an analytical method that can obtain information about the molecular structure directly from specific areas on a device is desired. For this purpose, laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (LDI-MSI) is one of the most promising methods. The high spatial resolution stigmatic LDI-MSI with MULTUM-IMG2 in the direct analysis of organic light-emitting diodes was shown to obtain a detailed mass image of organic material in the degraded area after air exposure. The mass image was observed to have a noticeably improved spatial resolution over typical X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, generally used technique in analysis of electronic devices. A prospective m/z was successfully deduced from the high spatial resolution MSI data. Additionally, mass resolution and accuracy using a spiral-orbit TOF mass spectrometer, SpiralTOF, were also investigated. The monoisotopic mass for the main component, N,N′-di-1-naphthalenyl-N,N′-diphenyl-1,1′-biphenyl-4,4′-diamine (m/z 588), was measured with a mass resolution of approximately 80,000 and a mass error of about 5 mDa using an external calibrant. This high mass resolution and accuracy data successfully deduced a possible elemental composition of partially remained material in the degraded area, C36H24, which was determined as anthracene, 9-[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl-10-(2-naphthalenyl) by combining structural information with high-energy CID data. The high spatial resolution of 1 μm in LDI-MSI along with high mass resolution and accuracy could be useful in obtaining molecular structure information directly from specific areas on a device, and is expected to contribute to the evolution of electrical device durability. PMID:28101440

  20. Seismic Study of the Subsurface Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Interior from High Spatial Resolution Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korzennik, Sylvain G.

    1997-01-01

    We have carried out the data reduction and analysis of Mt. Wilson 60' solar tower high spatial resolution observations. The reduction of the 100-day-long summer of 1990 observation campaign in terms of rotational splittings was completed leading to an excess of 600,000 splittings. The analysis of these splittings lead to a new inference of the solar internal rotation rate as a function of depth and latitude.

  1. Constraining magnetic fields morphologies using mid-IR polarization: observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Han; Li, Dan; Pantin, Eric; Telesco, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    Polarization arises from aligned dust grains in magnetic fields, and thus the direction of polarization can trace the direction of B fields. We present the mid-IR imaging and spectropolarimetry observations made with the GTC's CanariCam of the Herbig Ae star WL 16. WL 16 is embedded in/behind the ρ Ophiuchus molecular cloud with visual extinction of ~31 mag. It exhibits large and extended (~900 AU) emission, which is believed to come from the emission of PAHs and very small dust grains. Uniform polarization vectors from imaging polarization and the absorption-dominated polarization profile from spectropolarimetry consistently indicate a uniform foreground magnetic field oriented at about 30 deg from the North.We also model the predicted polarization patterns expected to arise from different magnetic field morphologies, which can be distinguished by high-resolution observations. As an example, we present the mid-IR polarization modeling of AB Aur, a well-studied Herbig Ae star. We incorporate polarization from dichroic absorption, emission and scattering in the modeling. The observed polarization structures are well reproduced by two components: emissive polarization arising from a poloidal B field and scattering polarization by 0.01-1 μm dust grains.

  2. A miniature cryogenic scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer for mid-IR to submm astronomical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parshley, Stephen C.; Vavagiakis, Eve M.; Nikola, Thomas; Stacey, Gordon J.

    2014-07-01

    We have designed and evaluated a Miniature Cryogenic Scanning Fabry-Perot (MCSF) interferometer which can be inserted into the optical path of a mid-IR camera to observe fine structure lines in the 25-40 μm wavelength regime. The MCSF uses free standing metal meshes as its filters and can scan over a length of ~2 mm. The short wavelength range in which the MCSF will be used requires very tight fabrication tolerances to maintain the parallelism of the meshes to within 0.15 μm and to obviate the need for dynamic parallelizing adjusters. A monolithic notch flexure design delivers these properties and minimizes the number of moving parts, maximizing reliability. The scanning mechanism includes a cryogenic stepper motor that drives a miniature fine-adjustment screw via a worm gear assembly. This allows for a step resolution of 1 step ~ 14 nm when operating in full step mode. Finite Element Analysis of the MCSF's monolithic flexure guided the design and confirmed that the MCSF will remain within required limits over the course of operation. We developed the MCSF for use in the mid-IR camera FORCAST on the 2.5 meter SOFIA telescope.

  3. [Examination of upper abdominal region in high spatial resolution diffusion-weighted imaging using 3-Tesla MRI].

    PubMed

    Terada, Masaki; Matsushita, Hiroki; Oosugi, Masanori; Inoue, Kazuyasu; Yaegashi, Taku; Anma, Takeshi

    2009-03-20

    The advantage of the higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3-Tesla) has the possibility of contributing to the improvement of high spatial resolution without causing image deterioration. In this study, we compared SNR and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value with 3-Tesla as the condition in the diffusion-weighted image (DWI) parameter of the 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (1.5-Tesla) and we examined the high spatial resolution images in the imaging method [respiratory-triggering (RT) method and breath free (BF) method] and artifact (motion and zebra) in the upper abdominal region of DWI at 3-Tesla. We have optimized scan parameters based on phantom and in vivo study. As a result, 3-Tesla was able to obtain about 1.5 times SNR in comparison with the 1.5-Tesla, ADC value had few differences. Moreover, the RT method was effective in correcting the influence of respiratory movement in comparison with the BF method, and image improvement by the effective acquisition of SNR and reduction of the artifact were provided. Thus, DWI of upper abdominal region was a useful sequence for the high spatial resolution in 3-Tesla.

  4. Autonomous agricultural remote sensing systems with high spatial and temporal resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Haitao

    . It suggested that a 16.5% forward overlap and a 15% lateral overlap were required to avoiding missing desired mapping area when the UAV flies above 45 m high with 4.5 mm lens. A whole field mosaic image can be generated according to the individual image georeferencing information. A 0.569 m mosaic error has been achieved and this accuracy is sufficient for many of the intended precision agricultural applications. With careful interpretation, the UAV images are an excellent source of high spatial and temporal resolution data for precision agricultural applications. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  5. Breath testing with a mid-IR laser spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namjou, Khosrow; McCann, Patrick J.; Potter, William T.

    1999-10-01

    A mid-IR tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) equipped with a multiple-pass gas cell was used to measure breath samples from a number of student volunteers at the University of Oklahoma. Test subjects included one to two pack-a-day cigarette smokers and non-smokers. The concentrations of four different molecules, N2O, 12CO2, 13CO2 and CO, were measured by each laser scan in the 2206.1 cm-1 to 2207 cm-1 spectral range. The average concentration of nitrous oxide (N2O) increased slightly for smokers versus non-smokers and was generally higher (12%) than the approximately 255 ppm concentration measured in ambient air. Carbon monoxide concentrations, however, were much higher in breath samples from cigarette smokers. Ambient concentrations of carbon monoxide, approximately 0.4 ppm, increased from approximately 1.0 ppm in non-smokers to levels over 13.4 ppm in smokers. These measurements provide clear evidence of the well-known effect that cigarette smoking has on replacing oxygen with carbon monoxide in human hemoglobin. Carbon dioxide concentrations of smokers were generally decreased by approximately 12%. Mid-IR laser measurements also provided 13CO2/12CO2 isotope ratio values, and smokers had a approximately 30% greater concentration of isotopic 13C in their breath. The possible mechanisms for 13CO2 isotopic increases are at present unknown. Overall, long-path TDL spectroscopy of exhalation products is a uniquely powerful tool. The TDL systems can be used for noninvasive diagnosis of a wide range of metabolisms and pathologies.

  6. Detection of Urban Land-cover Change in Altamira, the Brazilian Amazon With High Spatial Resolution Multi-sensor Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Lu, D.; Moran, E. F.; Dutra, L. V.; Calvi, M. F.

    2016-12-01

    Abstract:The hydroelectric dam construction in Belo Monte beginning in 2011 has resulted in rapid urban land cover change in Altamira, Para State, Brazil due to boomed population from less than 80 thousand persons before 2010 to more than 150 thousand persons in 2015. The rapid urbanization has produced many problems in urban planning and environmental conditions. It is an urgent work to monitor annual urban land cover change. However, the frequent cloud cover in the moist tropical region is a big problem constraining the acquisition of cloud-free optical sensor data. Thanks to the availability of different satellite images with high spatial resolution and high temporal resolutions, we collected RapidEye imagery in 2011 and 2012, Pleiades imagery in 2013 and 2014, and SPOT 6 imagery in 2015 with spatial resolutions from 0.5 m to 5 m for this research. This research proposed a comprehensive change detection approach using very high spatial resolution multi-sensor satellite images to examine annually urban land cover change in a moist tropical region of the Brazilian Amazon. A hybrid approach consisting of decision tree and cluster analysis based on spectral signatures, segmentation, vegetation indices, and textural images was proposed to classify the images into six land cover classes: impervious surface area, bare soils, water, pasture, primary forest, and non-forest vegetation. In order to improve the classification accuracy, the classified result was visually interpreted for each land cover class and the result was modified if classification errors were identified. The classified images were converted into vector format and object-based change detection approach was used to explore the annual land cover changes. The spatial patterns and annual land cover change rates were analyzed, and they were further related to household survey data to understand the relationships between and interactions of urbanization and population migration and economic conditions

  7. Compressed sensing cine imaging with high spatial or high temporal resolution for analysis of left ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Goebel, Juliane; Nensa, Felix; Schemuth, Haemi P; Maderwald, Stefan; Gratz, Marcel; Quick, Harald H; Schlosser, Thomas; Nassenstein, Kai

    2016-08-01

    To assess two compressed sensing cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences with high spatial or high temporal resolution in comparison to a reference steady-state free precession cine (SSFP) sequence for reliable quantification of left ventricular (LV) volumes. LV short axis stacks of two compressed sensing breath-hold cine sequences with high spatial resolution (SPARSE-SENSE HS: temporal resolution: 40 msec, in-plane resolution: 1.0 × 1.0 mm(2) ) and high temporal resolution (SPARSE-SENSE HT: temporal resolution: 11 msec, in-plane resolution: 1.7 × 1.7 mm(2) ) and of a reference cine SSFP sequence (standard SSFP: temporal resolution: 40 msec, in-plane resolution: 1.7 × 1.7 mm(2) ) were acquired in 16 healthy volunteers on a 1.5T MR system. LV parameters were analyzed semiautomatically twice by one reader and once by a second reader. The volumetric agreement between sequences was analyzed using paired t-test, Bland-Altman plots, and Passing-Bablock regression. Small differences were observed between standard SSFP and SPARSE-SENSE HS for stroke volume (SV; -7 ± 11 ml; P = 0.024), ejection fraction (EF; -2 ± 3%; P = 0.019), and myocardial mass (9 ± 9 g; P = 0.001), but not for end-diastolic volume (EDV; P = 0.079) and end-systolic volume (ESV; P = 0.266). No significant differences were observed between standard SSFP and SPARSE-SENSE HT regarding EDV (P = 0.956), SV (P = 0.088), and EF (P = 0.103), but for ESV (3 ± 5 ml; P = 0.039) and myocardial mass (8 ± 10 ml; P = 0.007). Bland-Altman analysis showed good agreement between the sequences (maximum bias ≤ -8%). Two compressed sensing cine sequences, one with high spatial resolution and one with high temporal resolution, showed good agreement with standard SSFP for LV volume assessment. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:366-374. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Yb fiber laser pumped mid-IR source based on difference frequency generation and its application to ammonia detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuoka, N.; Yamaguchi, S.; Nanri, K.; Fujioka, T.; Richter, D.; Tittel, F. K.

    2001-01-01

    A Yb fiber laser pumped cw narrow-linewidth tunable mid-IR source based on a difference frequency generation (DFG) in a periodically poled LiNbO3 (PPLN) crystal for trace gas detection was demonstrated. A high power Yb fiber laser and a distributed feedback (DFB) laser diode were used as DFG pump sources. This source generated mid-IR at 3 microns with a powers of 2.5 microW and a spectral linewidth of less than 30 MHz. A frequency tuning range of 300 GHz (10 cm-1) was obtained by varying the current and temperature of the DFB laser diode. A high-resolution NH3 absorption Doppler-broadened spectrum at 3295.4 cm-1 (3.0345 microns) was obtained at a cell pressure of 27 Pa from which a detection sensitivity of 24 ppm m was estimated.

  9. High-speed multi-THz-range mode-hop-free tunable mid-IR laser spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Courtois, Jérémie; Bouchendira, Rym; Cadoret, Malo; Ricciardi, Iolanda; Mosca, Simona; De Rosa, Maurizio; De Natale, Paolo; Zondy, Jean-Jacques

    2013-06-01

    We report on a widely (2.25 THz or 75 cm(-1)) and rapidly (4.5 THz/s) mode-hop-free (MHF) tunable mid-IR laser source at ~3.3 μm, consisting of a 5%-MgO:LiNbO(3) singly resonant optical parametric oscillator (SRO) pumped by an automated broadly MHF tunable extended-cavity diode laser (ECDL). The broad and rapid MHF tuning capability of the ECDL is readily transferred to the SRO idler wave owing to the quasi-noncritical pump spectral acceptance bandwidth of the quasi-phase-matching. Fast and broadband high-resolution Doppler spectroscopy measurements of the ν(3) band of CH(4) are presented to illustrate the performance of the mid-IR optical parametric oscillator spectrometer.

  10. Yb fiber laser pumped mid-IR source based on difference frequency generation and its application to ammonia detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuoka, N.; Yamaguchi, S.; Nanri, K.; Fujioka, T.; Richter, D.; Tittel, F. K.

    2001-01-01

    A Yb fiber laser pumped cw narrow-linewidth tunable mid-IR source based on a difference frequency generation (DFG) in a periodically poled LiNbO3 (PPLN) crystal for trace gas detection was demonstrated. A high power Yb fiber laser and a distributed feedback (DFB) laser diode were used as DFG pump sources. This source generated mid-IR at 3 microns with a powers of 2.5 microW and a spectral linewidth of less than 30 MHz. A frequency tuning range of 300 GHz (10 cm-1) was obtained by varying the current and temperature of the DFB laser diode. A high-resolution NH3 absorption Doppler-broadened spectrum at 3295.4 cm-1 (3.0345 microns) was obtained at a cell pressure of 27 Pa from which a detection sensitivity of 24 ppm m was estimated.

  11. High spatial resolution imaging of methane and other trace gases with the airborne Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulley, Glynn C.; Duren, Riley M.; Hopkins, Francesca M.; Hook, Simon J.; Vance, Nick; Guillevic, Pierre; Johnson, William R.; Eng, Bjorn T.; Mihaly, Jonathan M.; Jovanovic, Veljko M.; Chazanoff, Seth L.; Staniszewski, Zak K.; Kuai, Le; Worden, John; Frankenberg, Christian; Rivera, Gerardo; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Miller, Charles E.; Malakar, Nabin K.; Sánchez Tomás, Juan M.; Holmes, Kendall T.

    2016-06-01

    Currently large uncertainties exist associated with the attribution and quantification of fugitive emissions of criteria pollutants and greenhouse gases such as methane across large regions and key economic sectors. In this study, data from the airborne Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) have been used to develop robust and reliable techniques for the detection and wide-area mapping of emission plumes of methane and other atmospheric trace gas species over challenging and diverse environmental conditions with high spatial resolution that permits direct attribution to sources. HyTES is a pushbroom imaging spectrometer with high spectral resolution (256 bands from 7.5 to 12 µm), wide swath (1-2 km), and high spatial resolution (˜ 2 m at 1 km altitude) that incorporates new thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing technologies. In this study we introduce a hybrid clutter matched filter (CMF) and plume dilation algorithm applied to HyTES observations to efficiently detect and characterize the spatial structures of individual plumes of CH4, H2S, NH3, NO2, and SO2 emitters. The sensitivity and field of regard of HyTES allows rapid and frequent airborne surveys of large areas including facilities not readily accessible from the surface. The HyTES CMF algorithm produces plume intensity images of methane and other gases from strong emission sources. The combination of high spatial resolution and multi-species imaging capability provides source attribution in complex environments. The CMF-based detection of strong emission sources over large areas is a fast and powerful tool needed to focus on more computationally intensive retrieval algorithms to quantify emissions with error estimates, and is useful for expediting mitigation efforts and addressing critical science questions.

  12. Spatializing vineyard hydric status within heterogeneous Mediterranean watershed from high spatial resolution optical remote sensing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galleguillos, M.; Jacob, F.; Prevot, L.; Lagacherie, P.

    2009-04-01

    Land surface evapotranspiration is one of key hydrological inputs that determine hydric status within Mediterranean vineyards. Its knowledge in a spatially distributed manner is of interest for the monitoring of vine activity throughout the cultural cycle, and for the acquainting of hydrological modeling as upper boundary conditions. Due to vineyard landscape structures, mostly including small fields, the use of remote sensing has not been extensively investigated, apart from airborne observations. Spaceborne ASTER data, collected over the optical domain at high spatial resolution, are of strong interest for the mapping of vineyard hydric status in relation with surface and soil properties, provided vine thermal and hydric status are strongly linked. The objective of this study is to assess the performances of two spatialized approaches devoted to the mapping of instantaneous surface energy fluxes from optical remote sensing. Amongst the candidate methods to be foreseen for the mapping of vineyard water status from remote sensing, we consider two single layer methods characterized by their simplicities and feasibilities, in terms of implementation and input requirements. The first method is the Simplified Surface Energy Balance Index (S-SEBI, proposed by Roerink et al., 2000) and the second is the Water Deficit Index (WDI, designed by Moran et al., 1994). They differ by the way they use the spatial information captured over the solar and thermal domains, for the differentiating based retrieving of water status and evapotranspiration. First, the spatial information can be characterized through the temperature - vegetation index triangle that is controlled by soil moisture (WDI), or through the temperature - albedo diagram that is controlled by radiative and evaporative processes (S-SEBI). Second, evaporative extremes can be determined according to theoretical considerations and related formalisms (WDI), or assigned according to variabilities captured through thermal

  13. Mid-IR Spectra Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Herbig Ae/Be stars are intermediate mass pre-main sequence stars, the higher mass analogues to the T Tauri stars. Because of their higher mass, they are expected form more rapidly than the T Tauri stars. Whether the Herbig Ae/Be stars accrete only from collapsing infalling envelopes or whether accrete through geometrically flattened viscous accretion disks is of current debate. When the Herbig Ae/Be stars reach the main sequence they form a class called Vega-like stars which are known from their IR excesses to have debris disks, such as the famous beta Pictoris. The evolutionary scenario between the pre-main sequence Herbig Ae/Be stars and the main sequence Vega-like stars is not yet revealed and it bears on the possibility of the presence of Habitable Zone planets around the A stars. Photometric studies of Herbig Ae/Be stars have revealed that most are variable in the optical, and a subset of stars show non-periodic drops of about 2 magnitudes. These drops in visible light are accompanied by changes in their colors: at first the starlight becomes reddened, and then it becomes bluer, the polarization goes from less than 0.1 % to roughly 1% during these minima. The theory postulated by V. Grinnin is that large cometary bodies on highly eccentric orbits occult the star on their way to being sublimed, for systems that are viewed edge-on. This theory is one of several controversial theories about the nature of Herbig Ae/Be stars. A 5 year mid-IR spectrophotometric monitoring campaign was begun by Wooden and Butner in 1992 to look for correlations between the variations in visible photometry and mid-IR dust emission features. Generally the approximately 20 stars that have been observed by the NASA Ames HIFOGS spectrometer have been steady at 10 microns. There are a handful, however, that have shown variable mid-IR spectra, with 2 showing variations in both the continuum and features anti-correlated with visual photometry, and 3 showing variations in the emission

  14. Practical Considerations for High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, M; Boyden, K; Browning, N D; Campbell, G H; Colvin, J D; DeHope, B; Frank, A M; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F; Kim, J S; King, W E; LaGrange, T B; Pyke, B J; Reed, B W; Shuttlesworth, R M; Stuart, B C; Torralva, B R

    2006-05-01

    Although recent years have seen significant advances in the spatial resolution possible in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), the temporal resolution of most microscopes is limited to video rate at best. This lack of temporal resolution means that our understanding of dynamic processes in materials is extremely limited. High temporal resolution in the TEM can be achieved, however, by replacing the normal thermionic or field emission source with a photoemission source. In this case the temporal resolution is limited only by the ability to create a short pulse of photoexcited electrons in the source, and this can be as short as a few femtoseconds. The operation of the photo-emission source and the control of the subsequent pulse of electrons (containing as many as 5 x 10{sup 7} electrons) create significant challenges for a standard microscope column that is designed to operate with a single electron in the column at any one time. In this paper, the generation and control of electron pulses in the TEM to obtain a temporal resolution <10{sup -6} s will be described and the effect of the pulse duration and current density on the spatial resolution of the instrument will be examined. The potential of these levels of temporal and spatial resolution for the study of dynamic materials processes will also be discussed.

  15. Feasibility study of a high-spatial resolution x-ray computed tomography using sub-pixel shift method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneyama, Akio; Baba, Rika; Sumitani, Kazushi; Hirai, Yasuharu

    2015-02-01

    A high-spatial resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT) adopting a sub-pixel shift method has been developed. By calculating sectional images, using plural CT datasets obtained by scanning the X-ray imager, the spatial resolution can be reduced relative to the sub-pixel size of an X-ray imager. Feasibility observations of a biomedical sample were performed using 12-keV monochromatic synchrotron radiation and a photon-counting X-ray imager 174-μm pixels in size. Four CT measurements were performed to obtain datasets at different positions of the X-ray imager. Fine sectional images were obtained successfully, and the spatial resolution was estimated as 80-μm, which corresponds to just under half the pixel size of the imager. In addition, a fine 3D image was also obtained by scanning the imager two-dimensionally.

  16. Feasibility study of a high-spatial resolution x-ray computed tomography using sub-pixel shift method

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneyama, Akio Baba, Rika; Sumitani, Kazushi; Hirai, Yasuharu

    2015-02-23

    A high-spatial resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT) adopting a sub-pixel shift method has been developed. By calculating sectional images, using plural CT datasets obtained by scanning the X-ray imager, the spatial resolution can be reduced relative to the sub-pixel size of an X-ray imager. Feasibility observations of a biomedical sample were performed using 12-keV monochromatic synchrotron radiation and a photon-counting X-ray imager 174-μm pixels in size. Four CT measurements were performed to obtain datasets at different positions of the X-ray imager. Fine sectional images were obtained successfully, and the spatial resolution was estimated as 80-μm, which corresponds to just under half the pixel size of the imager. In addition, a fine 3D image was also obtained by scanning the imager two-dimensionally.

  17. Magnetoencephalographically directed review of high-spatial-resolution surface-coil MR images improves lesion detection in patients with extratemporal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Moore, Kevin R; Funke, Michael E; Constantino, Tawnya; Katzman, Gregory L; Lewine, Jeffrey David

    2002-12-01

    To determine whether (a) interictal magnetoencephalographic (MEG) epileptiform activity corresponds to anatomic abnormalities at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, (b) high-spatial-resolution MR imaging depicts lesions in regions without MEG spike activity, (c) MEG-directed review of high-spatial-resolution MR images enables detection of abnormalities not apparent on conventional MR images, and (d) MEG information results in a greater number of diagnosed lesions at re-review of conventional MR images. Twenty patients with neocortical epilepsy were evaluated with MEG, conventional brain MR imaging with a head coil, and high-spatial-resolution MR imaging with either a surface coil (n = 17) or a high-spatial-resolution birdcage coil (n = 3). Abnormal MEG foci were compared with corresponding anatomic areas on conventional and high-spatial-resolution MR images to determine the presence (concordance) or absence (discordance) of anatomic lesions corresponding to foci of abnormal MEG activity. Forty-four epileptiform MEG foci were identified. Twelve foci (27%) were concordant with an anatomic abnormality at high-spatial-resolution MR imaging, and 32 foci (73%) were discordant. Results of high-spatial-resolution MR imaging were normal in eight patients, and 23 lesions were detected in the remaining 12 patients. Twelve lesions (52%) were concordant with abnormal MEG epileptiform activity, and 11 (48%) were discordant (ie, there was normal MEG activity in the region of the anatomic abnormality). At retrospective reevaluation of conventional MR images with MEG guidance, four occult gray matter migration lesions that had initially been missed were observed. An additional patient with MEG-concordant postoperative gliosis was readily identified with high-spatial-resolution MR images but not with conventional MR images. Review of MEG-localized epileptiform areas on high-spatial-resolution MR images enables detection of epileptogenic neocortical lesions, some of which are occult on

  18. High spatial resolution increases the specificity of block-design BOLD fMRI studies of overt vowel production.

    PubMed

    Soltysik, David A; Hyde, James S

    2008-06-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) studies of tasks involving orofacial motion, such as speech, are prone to problems related to motion-induced magnetic field variations. Orofacial motion perturbs the static magnetic field, leading to signal changes that correlate with the task and corrupt activation maps with false positives or signal loss. These motion-induced signal changes represent a contraindication for the implementation of fMRI to study the neurophysiology of orofacial motion. An fMRI experiment of a structured, non-semantic vowel production task was performed using four different voxel volumes and three different slice orientations in an attempt to find a set of acquisition parameters leading to activation maps with maximum specificity. Results indicate that the use of small voxel volumes (2 x 2 x 3 mm(3)) yielded a significantly higher percentage of true positive activation compared to the use of larger voxel volumes. Slice orientation did not have as great an impact as spatial resolution, although coronal slices appeared superior at high spatial resolutions. Furthermore, it was found that combining the strategy of high spatial resolution with an optimum task duration and post-processing methods for separating true and false positives greatly improved the specificity of single-subject, block-design fMRI studies of structured, overt vowel production.

  19. High Spatial Resolution Increases the Specificity of Block-Design BOLD fMRI Studies of Overt Vowel Production

    PubMed Central

    Soltysik, David A.; Hyde, James S.

    2008-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) studies of tasks involving orofacial motion, such as speech, are prone to problems related to motion-induced magnetic field variations. Orofacial motion perturbs the static magnetic field, leading to signal changes that correlate with the task and corrupt activation maps with false positives or signal loss. These motion-induced signal changes represent a contraindication for the implementation of fMRI to study the neurophysiology of orofacial motion. An fMRI experiment of a structured, non-semantic vowel production task was performed using four different voxel volumes and three different slice orientations in an attempt to find a set of acquisition parameters leading to activation maps with maximum specificity. Results indicate that the use of small voxel volumes (2×2×3 mm3) yielded a significantly higher percentage of true positive activation compared to the use of larger voxel volumes. Slice orientation did not have as great an impact as spatial resolution, although coronal slices appeared superior at high spatial resolutions. Furthermore, it was found that combining the strategy of high spatial resolution with an optimum task duration and post-processing methods for separating true and false positives greatly improved the specificity of single-subject, block-design fMRI studies of structured, overt vowel production. PMID:18387825

  20. Use of shadow for enhancing mapping of perennial desert plants from high-spatial resolution multispectral and panchromatic satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsharrah, Saad A.; Bouabid, Rachid; Bruce, David A.; Somenahalli, Sekhar; Corcoran, Paul A.

    2016-07-01

    Satellite remote-sensing techniques face challenges in extracting vegetation-cover information in desert environments. The limitations in detection are attributed to three major factors: (1) soil background effect, (2) distribution and structure of perennial desert vegetation, and (3) tradeoff between spatial and spectral resolutions of the satellite sensor. In this study, a modified vegetation shadow model (VSM-2) is proposed, which utilizes vegetation shadow as a contextual classifier to counter the limiting factors. Pleiades high spatial resolution, multispectral (2 m), and panchromatic (0.5 m) images were utilized to map small and scattered perennial arid shrubs and trees. We investigated the VSM-2 method in addition to conventional techniques, such as vegetation indices and prebuilt object-based image analysis. The success of each approach was evaluated using a root sum square error metric, which incorporated field data as control and three error metrics related to commission, omission, and percent cover. Results of the VSM-2 revealed significant improvements in perennial vegetation cover and distribution accuracy compared with the other techniques and its predecessor VSM-1. Findings demonstrated that the VSM-2 approach, using high-spatial resolution imagery, can be employed to provide a more accurate representation of perennial arid vegetation and, consequently, should be considered in assessments of desertification.

  1. Damage detection in a cantilever beam under dynamic conditions using a distributed, fast, and high spatial resolution Brillouin interrogator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motil, A.; Davidi, R.; Bergman, A.; Botsev, Y.; Hahami, M.; Tur, M.

    2016-05-01

    The ability of Brillouin-based fiber-optic sensing to detect damage in a moving cantilever beam is demonstrated. A fully computerized, distributed and high spatial resolution (10cm) Fast-BOTDA interrogator (50 full-beam Brillouin-gain-spectra per second) successfully directly detected an abnormally stiffened (i.e., `damaged') 20cm long segment in a 6m Aluminum beam, while the beam was in motion. Damage detection was based on monitoring deviations of the measured strain distribution along the beam from that expected in the undamaged case.

  2. Processing of high spatial resolution information obtained from satellites of Resource-P series according to the level 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremeev, V.; Kuznetcov, A.; Poshekhonov, V.; Presniakov, O.; Zenin, V.; Svetelkin, P.; Kochergin, A.

    2016-10-01

    The present paper has described main functioning principles of imagery instruments of high spatial resolution of Russian satellites "Resource-P". Processing of images obtained from these instruments according to the level 1 includes: relative radiometric correction, stitching of video data obtained from separate CCD-matrices, geometric matching of multitemporal multispectral images from optoelectronic converters (OEC), pansharpening, saving of results in distribution formats. Stages for acquisition of a high-precision model for the Earth surface imagery being a base of processing are considered. Descriptions of algorithms for realization of mentioned processing types, examples of their practical usage and also precise characteristics of outputs are described.

  3. High spatial resolution x-ray spectroscopy with the XM-1 X-ray microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Lewis E.; Denbeaux, Greg; Meyer-Ilse, Werner

    2000-06-01

    The XM-1 x-ray microscope was built to obtain high-resolution transmission images from a wide variety of thick (< 10 micron) samples. Modeled after a "conventional" full-field microscope, XM-1 makes use of zone plates (ZP) for the condenser and objective elements. The XM-1 x-ray microscope has been shown to have a spatial resolution of 36 nm by doing a 10%-90% edge scan across a knife edge. Moreover, the condenser ZP and pinhole combination yields good spectral resolution to λ/Δλ of 700. We have shown that with this energy resolution we can distinguish between different elements and some chemical states. We can see spectra with adequate signal to noise even for individual 36nm pixels. With these capabilities, we are beginning work on various experiments in which we will distinguish different chemical species of specific elements within a sample.

  4. Imaging at high spatial resolution: Soft x-ray microscopy to 15nm

    SciTech Connect

    Attwood, D.; Chao, W.; Anderson, E.; Liddle, J.A.; Harteneck, B.; Fischer, P.; Schneider, G.; Le Gros, M.; Larabell, C.

    2006-04-05

    Soft x-ray microscopy has now achieved 15 nm spatial resolution with new zone plates and bending magnet radiation. Combined with elemental sensitivity and flexible sample environment (applied magnetic or electric fields, wet samples, windows, overcoatings) this emerges as a valuable tool for nanoscience and nanotechnology, complimenting common electron and scanning tip microscopies. In this presentation we describe recent advances in spatial resolution, expectations for the near future, and applications to magnetic materials, bio-tomography, etc.

  5. fMRI at High Spatial Resolution: Implications for BOLD-Models

    PubMed Central

    Goense, Jozien; Bohraus, Yvette; Logothetis, Nikos K.

    2016-01-01

    As high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and fMRI of cortical layers become more widely used, the question how well high-resolution fMRI signals reflect the underlying neural processing, and how to interpret laminar fMRI data becomes more and more relevant. High-resolution fMRI has shown laminar differences in cerebral blood flow (CBF), volume (CBV), and neurovascular coupling. Features and processes that were previously lumped into a single voxel become spatially distinct at high resolution. These features can be vascular compartments such as veins, arteries, and capillaries, or cortical layers and columns, which can have differences in metabolism. Mesoscopic models of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response therefore need to be expanded, for instance, to incorporate laminar differences in the coupling between neural activity, metabolism and the hemodynamic response. Here we discuss biological and methodological factors that affect the modeling and interpretation of high-resolution fMRI data. We also illustrate with examples from neuropharmacology and the negative BOLD response how combining BOLD with CBF- and CBV-based fMRI methods can provide additional information about neurovascular coupling, and can aid modeling and interpretation of high-resolution fMRI. PMID:27445782

  6. Design of a mid-IR polarimeter for SOFIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packham, C.; Escuti, M.; Boreman, G.; Quijano, I.; Ginn, J. C.; Franklin, B.; Axon, D. J.; Hough, J. H.; Jones, T. J.; Roche, P. F.; Tamura, M.; Telesco, C. M.; Levenson, N.; Rodgers, J. M.; McGuire, J. P.

    2008-07-01

    Mid-infrared polarimetry remains an underexploited technique; where available it is limited in spectral coverage from the ground, and conspicuously absent from the Spitzer, JWST and Herschel instrument suites. The unique characteristics of SOFIA afford unprecedented spectral coverage and sensitivity in the mid-infrared waveband. We discuss the preliminary optical design for a 5-40μm spectro-polarimeter for use on SOFIA, the SOFIA Mid-InfraRed Polarimeter (SMIRPh). The design furthers the existing 5-40μm imaging and spectroscopic capabilities of SOFIA, and draws on experience gained through the University of Florida's mid-IR imagers, spectrometer and polarimeter designs of T-ReCS and CanariCam. We pay special attention to the challenges of obtaining polarimetric materials suitable at both these wavelengths and cryogenic temperatures. Finally, we (briefly) present an overview of science highlights that could be performed from a 5-40μm imaging- and spectro-polarimeter on SOFIA. Combined with the synergy between the possible future far-IR polarimeter, Hale, this instrument would provide the SOFIA community with unique and exciting science capabilities, leaving a unique scientific legacy.

  7. Synoptic Mid-IR Spectra ToO Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helton, L. Andrew; Woodward, Chick; Evans, Nye; Geballe, Tom; Spitzer Nova Team

    2007-02-01

    Stars are the engines of energy production and chemical evolution in our Universe, depositing radiative and mechanical energy into their environments and enriching the ambient ISM with elements synthesized in their interiors and dust grains condensed in their atmospheres. Classical novae (CN) contribute to this cycle of chemical enrichment through explosive nucleosynthesis and the violent ejection of material dredged from the white dwarf progenitor and mixed with the accreted surface layers. We propose to obtain mid-IR spectra of a new galactic CN in outburst to investigate aspects of the CN phenomenon including the in situ formation and mineralogy of nova dust and the elemental abundances resulting from thermonuclear runaway. Synoptic, high S/N Michelle spectra permit: 1) determination of the grain size distribution and mineral composition of nova dust; 2) estimation of chemical abundances of nova ejecta from coronal and other emission line spectroscopy; and 3) measurement of the density and masses of the ejecta. This Gemini `Target of Opportunity' initiative (trigger K=5- 8 mag, assuming adequate PWFS guide stars exist) complements our extensive Spitzer, Chandra, Swift, XMM-Newton CN DDT/ToO programs.

  8. Mid-IR enhanced laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Staci; Ford, Alan; Akpovo, Codjo A.; Johnson, Lewis

    2016-08-01

    A double-pulsed laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) technique utilizing wavelengths in the mid-infrared (MIR) for the second pulse, referred to as double-pulse LAMIS (DP-LAMIS), was examined for its effect on detection limits compared to single-pulse laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS). A MIR carbon dioxide (CO2) laser pulse at 10.6 μm was employed to enhance spectral emissions from nanosecond-laser-induced plasma via mid-IR reheating and in turn, improve the determination of the relative abundance of isotopes in a sample. This technique was demonstrated on a collection of 10BO and 11BO molecular spectra created from enriched boric acid (H3BO3) isotopologues in varying concentrations. Effects on the overall ability of both LAMIS and DP-LAMIS to detect the relative abundance of boron isotopes in a starting sample were considered. Least-squares fitting to theoretical models was used to deduce plasma parameters and understand reproducibility of results. Furthermore, some optimization for conditions of the enhanced emission was achieved, along with a comparison of the overall emission intensity, plasma density, and plasma temperature generated by the two techniques.

  9. Mid-IR Spectra of Refractory Minerals Relevant to Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauhari, Shekeab

    2008-09-01

    On 4 July 2005 the Spitzer Space Telescope obtained mid-IR ( 5-40 µm) spectra of the ejecta from the hypervelocity impact of the Deep Impact projectile with comet 9P/Tempel 1. Spectral modeling demonstrates that there are abundant minerals present in the ejecta including Ca/Fe/Mg-rich silicates, carbonates, phyllosilicates, water ice, amorphous carbon, and sulfides [1]. However, precise mineralogical identifications are hampered by the lack of comprehensive 5 - 40 µm spectral measurements of the emissivity for a broad compositional range of these materials. Here, we present our initial results for 2 - 50 µm transmission spectra and absorption constants for materials relevant to comets, including pyrrhotite, pyrite, and several phyllosilicate (clay) minerals. Measuring the transmission of materials over the full spectral range sensitive by Spitzer requires grinding the minerals into submicron powders and then mixing them with KBr (for the 1-25 um region) and polyethylene (16-50 um region) to form pellets. Transmission measurements of sub-micron sulfides are particularly difficult to obtain because the minerals oxidize rapidly upon grinding and subsequent handling unless special care is taken. A detailed description of our sample preparation and measurement technique will be provided to assist other researchers in their attempts to acquire similar spectra. References: [1] Lisse, C.M. et al., Science 313, 635 - 640 (2006)

  10. Mid-IR Imaging and Polarimetry of Highly Evolved Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurgenson, C. A.; Stencel, R. E.; Theil, D. S.

    2001-12-01

    We present imaging and polarimetry observation results at selected mid-IR wavelengths taken with the University of Denver's TNTCAM2 at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory's 2.3 m aperture telescope. Post AGB objects include the luminous blue variable AFGL 2298, CW Leo and R CrB. Planetary Nebulae include the Butterfly Nebula M 2-9 and NGC 7027. The characteristics of spectral emission distribution, dust emissivity and magnetic field orientation based on spatial intensity distribution and polarization will be discussed. The objects were chosen for their advanced state of stellar evolution and evidence of resolved nebular structure. In reconstructing our chopped and nodded images, we used a constrained least squares technique called the projected Landweber Method based on work done by Bertero et al. PASP (2000) 112;1121-1137 and the adaptation of the technique by Linz et al. A&A 2002 (in preparation). We acknowledge helpful conversations with Craig Smith, and support for this work from NSF grant AST 9724506, and from the estate of William Herschel Womble.

  11. High spatial resolution upgrade of the electron cyclotron emission radiometer for the DIII-D tokamak

    DOE PAGES

    Truong, D. D.; Austin, M. E.

    2014-11-01

    The 40-channel DIII-D electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer provides measurements of Te(r,t) at the tokamak midplane from optically thick, second harmonic X-mode emission over a frequency range of 83-130 GHz. Heterodyning divides this frequency range into three 2-18 GHz intermediate frequency (IF) bands. The frequency spacing of the radiometer’s channels results in a spatial resolution of ~1-3 cm, depending on local magnetic field and electron temperature. A new high resolution subsystem has been added to the DIII-D ECE radiometer to make sub-centimeter (0.6-0.8 cm) resolution Te measurements. The high resolution subsystem branches off from the regular channels’ IF bands andmore » consists of a microwave switch to toggle between IF bands, a switched filter bank for frequency selectivity, an adjustable local oscillator and mixer for further frequency down-conversion, and a set of eight microwave filters in the 2-4 GHz range. We achieved a higher spatial resolution through the use of a narrower (200 MHz) filter bandwidth and closer spacing between the filters’ center frequencies (250 MHz). This configuration allows for full coverage of the 83-130 GHz frequency range in 2 GHz bands. Depending on the local magnetic field, this translates into a “zoomed-in” analysis of a ~2-4 cm radial region. These high resolution channels will be most useful in the low-field side edge region where modest Te values (1-2 keV) result in a minimum of relativistic broadening. Some expected uses of these channels include mapping the spatial dependence of Alfven eigenmodes, geodesic acoustic modes, and externally applied magnetic perturbations. Initial Te measurements, which demonstrate that the desired resolution is achieved, is presented.« less

  12. High spatial resolution upgrade of the electron cyclotron emission radiometer for the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, D. D.; Austin, M. E.

    2014-11-01

    The 40-channel DIII-D electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer provides measurements of Te(r,t) at the tokamak midplane from optically thick, second harmonic X-mode emission over a frequency range of 83-130 GHz. Heterodyning divides this frequency range into three 2-18 GHz intermediate frequency (IF) bands. The frequency spacing of the radiometer’s channels results in a spatial resolution of ~1-3 cm, depending on local magnetic field and electron temperature. A new high resolution subsystem has been added to the DIII-D ECE radiometer to make sub-centimeter (0.6-0.8 cm) resolution Te measurements. The high resolution subsystem branches off from the regular channels’ IF bands and consists of a microwave switch to toggle between IF bands, a switched filter bank for frequency selectivity, an adjustable local oscillator and mixer for further frequency down-conversion, and a set of eight microwave filters in the 2-4 GHz range. We achieved a higher spatial resolution through the use of a narrower (200 MHz) filter bandwidth and closer spacing between the filters’ center frequencies (250 MHz). This configuration allows for full coverage of the 83-130 GHz frequency range in 2 GHz bands. Depending on the local magnetic field, this translates into a “zoomed-in” analysis of a ~2-4 cm radial region. These high resolution channels will be most useful in the low-field side edge region where modest Te values (1-2 keV) result in a minimum of relativistic broadening. Some expected uses of these channels include mapping the spatial dependence of Alfven eigenmodes, geodesic acoustic modes, and externally applied magnetic perturbations. Initial Te measurements, which demonstrate that the desired resolution is achieved, is presented.

  13. Object Based Image Analysis Combining High Spatial Resolution Imagery and Laser Point Clouds for Urban Land Cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Xiaoliang; Zhao, Guihua; Li, Jonathan; Yang, Yuanxi; Fang, Yong

    2016-06-01

    With the rapid developments of the sensor technology, high spatial resolution imagery and airborne Lidar point clouds can be captured nowadays, which make classification, extraction, evaluation and analysis of a broad range of object features available. High resolution imagery, Lidar dataset and parcel map can be widely used for classification as information carriers. Therefore, refinement of objects classification is made possible for the urban land cover. The paper presents an approach to object based image analysis (OBIA) combing high spatial resolution imagery and airborne Lidar point clouds. The advanced workflow for urban land cover is designed with four components. Firstly, colour-infrared TrueOrtho photo and laser point clouds were pre-processed to derive the parcel map of water bodies and nDSM respectively. Secondly, image objects are created via multi-resolution image segmentation integrating scale parameter, the colour and shape properties with compactness criterion. Image can be subdivided into separate object regions. Thirdly, image objects classification is performed on the basis of segmentation and a rule set of knowledge decision tree. These objects imagery are classified into six classes such as water bodies, low vegetation/grass, tree, low building, high building and road. Finally, in order to assess the validity of the classification results for six classes, accuracy assessment is performed through comparing randomly distributed reference points of TrueOrtho imagery with the classification results, forming the confusion matrix and calculating overall accuracy and Kappa coefficient. The study area focuses on test site Vaihingen/Enz and a patch of test datasets comes from the benchmark of ISPRS WG III/4 test project. The classification results show higher overall accuracy for most types of urban land cover. Overall accuracy is 89.5% and Kappa coefficient equals to 0.865. The OBIA approach provides an effective and convenient way to combine high

  14. High-spatial-resolution mapping of precipitable water vapour using SAR interferograms, GPS observations and ERA-Interim reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wei; Liao, Mingsheng; Zhang, Lu; Li, Wei; Yu, Weimin

    2016-09-01

    A high spatial and temporal resolution of the precipitable water vapour (PWV) in the atmosphere is a key requirement for the short-scale weather forecasting and climate research. The aim of this work is to derive temporally differenced maps of the spatial distribution of PWV by analysing the tropospheric delay "noise" in interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). Time series maps of differential PWV were obtained by processing a set of ENVISAT ASAR (Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar) images covering the area of southern California, USA from 6 October 2007 to 29 November 2008. To get a more accurate PWV, the component of hydrostatic delay was calculated and subtracted by using ERA-Interim reanalysis products. In addition, the ERA-Interim was used to compute the conversion factors required to convert the zenith wet delay to water vapour. The InSAR-derived differential PWV maps were calibrated by means of the GPS PWV measurements over the study area. We validated our results against the measurements of PWV derived from the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) which was located together with the ASAR sensor on board the ENVISAT satellite. Our comparative results show strong spatial correlations between the two data sets. The difference maps have Gaussian distributions with mean values close to zero and standard deviations below 2 mm. The advantage of the InSAR technique is that it provides water vapour distribution with a spatial resolution as fine as 20 m and an accuracy of ˜ 2 mm. Such high-spatial-resolution maps of PWV could lead to much greater accuracy in meteorological understanding and quantitative precipitation forecasts. With the launch of Sentinel-1A and Sentinel-1B satellites, every few days (6 days) new SAR images can be acquired with a wide swath up to 250 km, enabling a unique operational service for InSAR-based water vapour maps with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution.

  15. Applications of Full-Field X-ray Microscopy for High Spatial Resolution Magnetic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denbeaux, Gregory; Chao, Weilun; Fischer, Peter; Kusinski, Greg; Le Gros, Mark; Pearson, Angelic; Schneider, Gerd

    2001-03-01

    The XM-1 soft x-ray microscope, located at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has recently been established as a tool for high-resolution imaging of magnetic domains. It is a "conventional" full-field transmission microscope which is able to achieve a resolution of 25 nm by using high-precision zone plates. It uses off-axis bend magnet radiation to illuminate samples with elliptically polarized light. When the illumination energy is tuned to absorption edges of specific elements, it can be used as an element-specific probe of magnetism on a 25 nm scale with a contrast provided by magnetic circular dichroism. The illumination energy can be tuned between 250-850 eV. This allows imaging of specific elements including chromium, iron and cobalt. The spectral resolution has been shown to be E/DE = 500-700. This spectral resolution allows a high sensitivity so that magnetization has been imaged within layers as thin as 3 nm. Since this is a photon based magnetic microscopy, fields can be applied to the sample even during imaging without affect ng the spatial resolution. Recent magnetic imaging results will be shown.

  16. Polysilicon based flexible temperature sensor for high spatial resolution brain temperature monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zhizhen Wu; Chunyan Li; Hartings, Jed; Narayan, Raj K; Ahn, Chong

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a flexible temperature sensor with ultra-small polysilicon thermistors for brain temperature monitoring. In vitro sensitivity, resolution, thermal hysteresis and long term stability tests were performed. Temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) of -0.0031/ °C and resolution of 0.1 °C were obtained for the sensor. Thermal hysteresis for temperature range of 30~45 °C was less than 0.1 °C. With silicon nitride as the passivation layer, the temperature sensor showed a drift within 0.3 °C for 3 days long term stability test in water. In vivo tests showed a clear correlation between the localized brain temperature and electrocorticography (ECoG) signal during spreading depolarization. The developed flexible temperature sensor with small size polysilicon thermistors can be adopted for high resolution brain temperature mapping as well as multimodal monitoring with limited sensing space.

  17. Differential pulse-width pair BOTDA for high spatial resolution sensing.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenhai; Bao, Xiaoyi; Li, Yun; Chen, Liang

    2008-12-22

    A differential pulse-width pair Brillouin optical time domain analysis (DPP-BOTDA) for centimeter spatial resolution sensing using meter equivalent pulses is proposed. This scheme uses the time domain waveform subtraction at the same scanned Brillouin frequency obtained from pulse lights with different pulse-widths (e.g. 50ns and 49ns) to form the differential Brillouin gain spectrum (BGS) at each fiber location. The spatial resolution is defined by the average of the rise and fall time equivalent fiber length for a small stress section rather than the pulse-width difference equivalent length. The spatial resolution of 0.18m for the 50/49ns pulse pair and 0.15m for 20/19ns pulse pair over 1km sensing length with Brillouin frequency shift accuracy of 2.6MHz are demonstrated.

  18. High spatial resolution distributed sensing in optical fibers by Brillouin gain-profile tracing.

    PubMed

    Sperber, Tom; Eyal, Avishay; Tur, Moshe; Thévenaz, Luc

    2010-04-12

    A novel BOTDA technique for distributed sensing of the Brillouin frequency in optical fibers with cm-order spatial resolution is proposed. The technique is based upon a simple modulation scheme, requiring only a single long pump pulse for acoustic excitation, and no subsequent interrogating pulse. Instead, the desired spatial mapping of the Brillouin response is extracted by taking the derivative of the probe signal. As a result, the spatial resolution is limited by the fall-time of the pump modulation, and the phenomena of secondary "echo" signals, typically appearing in BOTDA sensing methods based upon pre-excitation, is mitigated. Experimental demonstration of the detection of a Brillouin frequency variation significantly smaller than the natural Brillouin linewidth, with a 2cm spatial resolution, is presented.

  19. The analysis of high spatial resolution UV and X-ray images by computational modeling. [coronagraphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vesecky, J. F.; Antiochos, S. K.; Underwood, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Very high resolution stereoscopic images of high temperature loop structures observed at UV and X-ray wavelengths in the solar corona can be used to understand physical processes in the corona. An existing computational model is described and sample results are given to demonstrate that computational modeling of coronal structures can indeed take advantage of very high resolution images. The sample results include the run of temperature and number density along a typical loop and the variation of the differential emission measure with temperature. The integration of the differential emission measure with temperature along a column commensurate with an instrument's spatial resolution is the relevant parameter obtained from UV and X-ray observations. The effects of loop geometry and energy input are examined.

  20. High spatial resolution ZnO scintillator for an in situ imaging device in EUV region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Ren; Nakazato, Tomoharu; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Yamanoi, Kohei; Empizo, Melvin John Fernandez; Hori, Tatsuhiro; Fukuda, Kazuhito; Minami, Yuki; Sarukura, Nobuhiko; Tanaka, Momoko; Nishikino, Masaharu; Fukuda, Tsuguo

    2014-10-01

    A single shot image of a ZnO crystal excited by the EUV laser of Kansai Photon Science Institute was captured. The evaluated EUV beam waist radii from the ZnO emission pattern along the horizontal and vertical axes are 5.0 and 4.7 μm, respectively. The expected focal spot size of EUV laser and the spatial resolution of the magnifier (including the Schwarzschild objectives and lenses) are however 1 and 4 μm, respectively. The discrepancy on the spatial resolutions is attributed to exciton diffusion. We estimated the ZnO exciton diffusion length from the effective decay time which is shortened by exciton-exciton collision quenching and which is dependence on excitation energy density. Our results indicate that the short lifetime of ZnO is required to improve the spatial resolution.

  1. High spatial resolution upgrade of the electron cyclotron emission radiometer for the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, D. D.; Austin, M. E.

    2014-11-15

    The 40-channel DIII-D electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer provides measurements of T{sub e}(r,t) at the tokamak midplane from optically thick, second harmonic X-mode emission over a frequency range of 83–130 GHz. The frequency spacing of the radiometer's channels results in a spatial resolution of ∼1–3 cm, depending on local magnetic field and electron temperature. A new high resolution subsystem has been added to the DIII-D ECE radiometer to make sub-centimeter (0.6–0.8 cm) resolution T{sub e} measurements. The high resolution subsystem branches off from the regular channels’ IF bands and consists of a microwave switch to toggle between IF bands, a switched filter bank for frequency selectivity, an adjustable local oscillator and mixer for further frequency down-conversion, and a set of eight microwave filters in the 2–4 GHz range. Higher spatial resolution is achieved through the use of a narrower (200 MHz) filter bandwidth and closer spacing between the filters’ center frequencies (250 MHz). This configuration allows for full coverage of the 83–130 GHz frequency range in 2 GHz bands. Depending on the local magnetic field, this translates into a “zoomed-in” analysis of a ∼2–4 cm radial region. Expected uses of these channels include mapping the spatial dependence of Alfven eigenmodes, geodesic acoustic modes, and externally applied magnetic perturbations. Initial T{sub e} measurements, which demonstrate that the desired resolution is achieved, are presented.

  2. AspWood: High-Spatial-Resolution Transcriptome Profiles Reveal Uncharacterized Modularity of Wood Formation in Populus tremula[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sundell, David; Kumar, Manoj; Kucukoglu, Melis; Kumar, Vikash; Mannapperuma, Chanaka; Niittylä, Totte

    2017-01-01

    Trees represent the largest terrestrial carbon sink and a renewable source of ligno-cellulose. There is significant scope for yield and quality improvement in these largely undomesticated species, and efforts to engineer elite varieties will benefit from improved understanding of the transcriptional network underlying cambial growth and wood formation. We generated high-spatial-resolution RNA sequencing data spanning the secondary phloem, vascular cambium, and wood-forming tissues of Populus tremula. The transcriptome comprised 28,294 expressed, annotated genes, 78 novel protein-coding genes, and 567 putative long intergenic noncoding RNAs. Most paralogs originating from the Salicaceae whole-genome duplication had diverged expression, with the exception of those highly expressed during secondary cell wall deposition. Coexpression network analyses revealed that regulation of the transcriptome underlying cambial growth and wood formation comprises numerous modules forming a continuum of active processes across the tissues. A comparative analysis revealed that a majority of these modules are conserved in Picea abies. The high spatial resolution of our data enabled identification of novel roles for characterized genes involved in xylan and cellulose biosynthesis, regulators of xylem vessel and fiber differentiation and lignification. An associated web resource (AspWood, http://aspwood.popgenie.org) provides interactive tools for exploring the expression profiles and coexpression network. PMID:28655750

  3. Optically based quantification of absolute cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) with high spatial resolution in rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Sakadžić, Sava; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Boas, David A.

    2010-02-01

    Measuring oxygen delivery in brain tissue is important for identifying the pathophysiological changes associated with brain injury and various diseases such as cancer, stroke, and Alzheimer's disease. We have developed a multi-modal imaging system for minimally invasive measurement of cerebral oxygenation and blood flow in small animals with high spatial resolution. The system allows for simultaneous measurement of blood flow using Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography, and oxygen partial pressure (pO2) using either confocal or multiphoton phosphorescence lifetime imaging with exogenous porphyrin-based dyes sensitive to dissolved oxygen. Here we present the changes in pO2 and blood flow in superficial cortical vessels of Sprague Dawley rats in response to conditions such as hypoxia, hyperoxia, and functional stimulation. pO2 measurements display considerable heterogeneity over distances that cannot be resolved with more widely used oxygen-monitoring techniques such as BOLD-fMRI. Large increases in blood flow are observed in response to functional stimulation and hypoxia. Our system allows for quantification of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) with high spatial resolution, providing a better understanding of metabolic dynamics during functional stimulation and under various neuropathologies. Ultimately, better insight into the underlying mechanisms of neuropathologies will facilitate the development of improved therapeutic strategies to minimize damage to brain tissue.

  4. High energy high repetition rate compact picosecond Holmium YLF laser for mid-IR OPCPA pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Daniel; Biegert, Jens; Matras, Guillaume; Simon-Boisson, Christophe

    2017-02-01

    The development of coherent light sources with emission in the mid-IR is currently undergoing a remarkable revolution. The mid-IR spectral range has always been of tremendous interest, mainly to spectroscopists, due to the ability of mid-IR light to access rotational and vibrational resonances of molecules which give rise to superb sensitivity upon optical probing [1-3]. Previously, high energy resolution was achieved with narrowband lasers or parametric sources, but the advent of frequency comb sources has revolutionized spectroscopy by providing high energy resolution within the frequency comb structure of the spectrum and at the same time broadband coverage and short pulse duration [4-6]. Such carrier to envelope phase (CEP) controlled light waveforms, when achieved at ultrahigh intensity, give rise to extreme effects such as the generation of isolated attosecond pulses in the vacuum to extreme ultraviolet range (XUV) [7]. Motivated largely by the vast potential of attosecond science, the development of ultraintense few-cycle and CEP stable sources has intensified [8], and it was recognized that coherent soft X-ray radiation could be generated when driving high harmonic generation (HHG) with long wavelength sources [9-11]. Recently, based on this concept, the highest waveform controlled soft X-ray flux [12] and isolated attosecond pulse emission at 300 eV [13] was demonstrated via HHG from a 1850 nm, sub-2-cycle source [14]. Within strong field physics, long wavelength scaling may lead to further interesting physics such as the direct reshaping of the carrier field [15], scaling of quantum path dynamics [16], the breakdown of the dipole approximation [17] or direct laser acceleration [18]. The experimental development of long wavelength light sources therefore holds great promise in many fields of science and will lead to numerous applications beyond strong field physics and attosecond science. In this paper, we present results about a high energy picosecond

  5. Derivation of high spatial resolution albedo from UAV digital imagery: application over the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Jonathan C.; Hubbard, Alun; Box, Jason E.; Brough, Stephen; Cameron, Karen; Cook, Joseph M.; Cooper, Matthew; Doyle, Samuel H.; Edwards, Arwyn; Holt, Tom; Irvine-Fynn, Tristram; Jones, Christine; Pitcher, Lincoln H.; Rennermalm, Asa K.; Smith, Laurence C.; Stibal, Marek; Snooke, Neal

    2017-05-01

    Measurements of albedo are a prerequisite for modelling surface melt across the Earth's cryosphere, yet available satellite products are limited in spatial and/or temporal resolution. Here, we present a practical methodology to obtain centimetre resolution albedo products with accuracies of 5% using consumer-grade digital camera and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technologies. Our method comprises a workflow for processing, correcting and calibrating raw digital images using a white reference target, and upward and downward shortwave radiation measurements from broadband silicon pyranometers. We demonstrate the method with a set of UAV sorties over the western, K-sector of the Greenland Ice Sheet. The resulting albedo product, UAV10A1, covers 280 km2, at a resolution of 20 cm per pixel and has a root-mean-square difference of 3.7% compared to MOD10A1 and 4.9% compared to ground-based broadband pyranometer measurements. By continuously measuring downward solar irradiance, the technique overcomes previous limitations due to variable illumination conditions during and between surveys over glaciated terrain. The current miniaturization of multispectral sensors and incorporation of upward facing radiation sensors on UAV packages means that this technique will likely become increasingly attractive in field studies and used in a wide range of applications for high temporal and spatial resolution surface mapping of debris, dust, cryoconite and bioalbedo and for directly constraining surface energy balance models.

  6. Spatial Classification of Orchards and Vineyards with High Spatial Resolution Panchromatic Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Timothy; Steinmaus, Karen L.

    2005-02-01

    New high resolution single spectral band imagery offers the capability to conduct image classifications based on spatial patterns in imagery. A classification algorithm based on autocorrelation patterns was developed to automatically extract orchards and vineyards from satellite imagery. The algorithm was tested on IKONOS imagery over Granger, WA, which resulted in a classification accuracy of 95%.

  7. Use of UAS remote sensing data to estimate crop ET at high spatial resolution

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Estimation of the spatial distribution of evapotranspiration (ET) based on remotely sensed imagery has become useful for managing water in irrigated agricultural at various spatial scales. However, data acquired by conventional satellites (Landsat, ASTER, etc.) lack the spatial resolution to capture...

  8. Theoretical motivation for high spatial resolution, hard X-ray observations during solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.

    1986-01-01

    The important role played by hard X-ray radiation as a diagnostic of impulsive phase energy transport mechanism is reviewed. It is argued that the sub-arc second resolution offered by an instrument such as the Pinhole/Occulter Facility (P/OF) can greatly increase our understanding of such mechanisms.

  9. Unexpected materials in a Rembrandt painting characterized by high spatial resolution cluster-TOF-SIMS imaging.

    PubMed

    Sanyova, Jana; Cersoy, Sophie; Richardin, Pascale; Laprévote, Olivier; Walter, Philippe; Brunelle, Alain

    2011-02-01

    The painting materials of the Portrait of Nicolaes van Bambeeck (Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium, Brussels, inv. 155) painted by Rembrandt van Rijn in 1641 has been studied using high resolution cluster-TOF-SIMS imaging. In the first step, a moderate spatial resolution (2 μm) was used to characterize the layer structure and the chemical composition of each layer on account of a high mass resolution. Then, in the second step, and despite a low mass resolution, the cluster primary ion beam was focused well below 1 μm in order to reveal smaller structures in the painting sample. The study confirmed the presence of starch in the second ground layer, which is quite surprising and, at least for Rembrandt paintings, has never been reported before. TOF-SIMS also indicated the presence of proteins, which, added to the size and shape of lake particles, suggests that it was manufactured from shearings (waste of textile manufacturing) of dyed wool, used as the source of the dyestuff. The analyses have also shown various lead carboxylates, being the products of the interaction between lead white and the oil of the binding medium. These findings considerably contribute to the understanding of Rembrandt's studio practice and thus demonstrate the importance and potential of cluster-TOF-SIMS imaging in the characterization on a submicrometer scale of artist painting materials.

  10. A High Spatial Resolution Depth Sensing Method Based on Binocular Structured Light.

    PubMed

    Yao, Huimin; Ge, Chenyang; Xue, Jianru; Zheng, Nanning

    2017-04-08

    Depth information has been used in many fields because of its low cost and easy availability, since the Microsoft Kinect was released. However, the Kinect and Kinect-like RGB-D sensors show limited performance in certain applications and place high demands on accuracy and robustness of depth information. In this paper, we propose a depth sensing system that contains a laser projector similar to that used in the Kinect, and two infrared cameras located on both sides of the laser projector, to obtain higher spatial resolution depth information. We apply the block-matching algorithm to estimate the disparity. To improve the spatial resolution, we reduce the size of matching blocks, but smaller matching blocks generate lower matching precision. To address this problem, we combine two matching modes (binocular mode and monocular mode) in the disparity estimation process. Experimental results show that our method can obtain higher spatial resolution depth without loss of the quality of the range image, compared with the Kinect. Furthermore, our algorithm is implemented on a low-cost hardware platform, and the system can support the resolution of 1280 × 960, and up to a speed of 60 frames per second, for depth image sequences.

  11. Drought planning and management: using high spatial resolution as part of the solution.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Leslie Lyons; Perrone, Debra; Jacobi, John H; Hornberger, George M

    2015-03-03

    Water scarcity is intensified by drought, a phenomenon that impacts many sectors of society and affects virtually all climate zones. The Palmer drought indices are widely used by scientists and policy makers to understand drought and model its components. Despite the spatial heterogeneity and variability in variables required by the Palmer model, regional index values are most commonly used for real-time drought assessment. Local stakeholders charged with developing flexible and tailored water management policies have articulated the need for drought indices calculated at finer spatial resolutions than a regional scale. We use the Pacific Northwest United States (U.S.) as a study area to demonstrate the differences between drought indices calculated for U.S. climate divisions with those calculated at a 0.5° by 0.5° latitude/longitude resolution. Our results indicate that regional values of the two cumulative Palmer drought indices do not represent finer-resolution values well. For half of the study area, the pictures of drought (as determined by regional and finer-resolution values) are drastically different more than 30% of the time. Thus, quite often water managers do not have a clear understanding of the relative severity of drought in their area, which can have serious implications for drought mitigation and adaptation.

  12. A High Spatial Resolution Depth Sensing Method Based on Binocular Structured Light

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Huimin; Ge, Chenyang; Xue, Jianru; Zheng, Nanning

    2017-01-01

    Depth information has been used in many fields because of its low cost and easy availability, since the Microsoft Kinect was released. However, the Kinect and Kinect-like RGB-D sensors show limited performance in certain applications and place high demands on accuracy and robustness of depth information. In this paper, we propose a depth sensing system that contains a laser projector similar to that used in the Kinect, and two infrared cameras located on both sides of the laser projector, to obtain higher spatial resolution depth information. We apply the block-matching algorithm to estimate the disparity. To improve the spatial resolution, we reduce the size of matching blocks, but smaller matching blocks generate lower matching precision. To address this problem, we combine two matching modes (binocular mode and monocular mode) in the disparity estimation process. Experimental results show that our method can obtain higher spatial resolution depth without loss of the quality of the range image, compared with the Kinect. Furthermore, our algorithm is implemented on a low-cost hardware platform, and the system can support the resolution of 1280 × 960, and up to a speed of 60 frames per second, for depth image sequences. PMID:28397759

  13. Two color multichannel heterodyne interferometer set up for high spatial resolution electron density profile measurements in TJ-II

    SciTech Connect

    Pedreira, P.; Criado, A. R.; Acedo, P.; Esteban, L.; Sanchez, M.; Sanchez, J.

    2010-10-15

    A high spatial resolution two color [CO{sub 2}, {lambda}=10.6 {mu}m/Nd:YAG (Nd:YAG denotes neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet), and {lambda}=1.064 {mu}m] expanded-beam multichannel heterodyne interferometer has been installed on the TJ-II stellarator. Careful design of the optical system has allowed complete control on the evolution of both Gaussian beams along the interferometer, as well as the evaluation and optimization of the spatial resolution to be expected in the measurements. Five CO{sub 2} (measurement) channels and three Nd:YAG (vibration compensation) channels have been used to illuminate the plasma with a probe beam of 100 mm size. An optimum interpolation method has been applied to recover both interferometric phasefronts prior to mechanical vibration subtraction. The first results of the installed diagnostic are presented in this paper.

  14. Development of a point-electrode conductivity salinometer with high spatial resolution for use in very saline solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Grimmer, D.P.; Jones, G.F.; Tafoya, J.; Fitzgerald, T.J.

    1983-12-01

    A conductivity probe and circuit were developed to measure salinities in sodium chloride salt-gradient solar ponds. A point-electrode salinometer design was chosen to give spatial resolution approximately 0.039 in. (1 mm). Such high spatial resolution was necessary to study the behavior of thermohaline columns in the vicinity of convective/conductive zone interfaces. The point-electrode conductivity instrument was designed for use in up to 25% (by weight) salinities with immersion times on the order of magnitude of 0.1 year or longer. Drift in the instrument, caused principally by changes in the surface condition of the platinum probe tip and reflected by changes in the probe cell constant, required periodic in situ calibration against the measured specific gravity of withdrawn fluid samples.

  15. Development of a point-electrode conductivity salinometer with high spatial resolution for use in very saline solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Grimmer, D.P.; Jones, G.F.; Tafoya, J.; Fitzgerald, T.J.

    1983-03-01

    A conductivity probe and circuit were developed to measure salinities in sodium chloride salt-gradient solar ponds. A point-electrode salinometer design was chosen to give a spatial resolution of approximately 1 mm (0.039 in.). (Such high spatial resolution was necessary to study the behavior of thermohaline columns in the vicinity of convective/conductive zone interfaces.) The point-electrode conductivity instrument was designed for use in up to 25 wt % salinities with immersion times of about 0.1 year or longer. Drift in the instrument, caused principally by changes in the surface condition of the platinum probe tip and reflected by changes in the probe cell constant, required periodic in situ calibration against the measured specific gravity of withdrawn fluid samples. Other methods of salinity/density measurement are discussed.

  16. Development of a point-electrode conductivity salinometer with high spatial resolution for use in very saline solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.F.; Fitzgerald, T.J.; Grimmer, D.P.; Tafoya, J.

    1983-06-01

    A conductivity probe and circuit were developed to measure salinities in sodium chloride salt-gradient solar ponds. A point-electrode salinometer design was chosen to give a spatial resolution of approximately 1 mm (0.039 in.). Such high spatial resolution was necessary to study the behavior of thermohaline columns in the vicinity of convective/conductive zone boundaries. The point-electrode conductivity instrument was designed for use in up to 25 wt % salinities with immersion times of about 0.1 year or longer. Drift in the instrument, however, caused principally by changes in the surface condition of the platinum probe tip and reflected by changes in the probe cell constant, required periodic in situ calibration against the measured specific gravity of withdrawn fluid samples.

  17. High spatial resolution mapping of folds and fractures using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruden, A. R.; Vollgger, S.

    2016-12-01

    The emerging capability of UAV photogrammetry combines a simple and cost-effective method to acquire digital aerial images with advanced computer vision algorithms that compute spatial datasets from a sequence of overlapping digital photographs from various viewpoints. Depending on flight altitude and camera setup, sub-centimeter spatial resolution orthophotographs and textured dense point clouds can be achieved. Orientation data can be collected for detailed structural analysis by digitally mapping such high-resolution spatial datasets in a fraction of time and with higher fidelity compared to traditional mapping techniques. Here we describe a photogrammetric workflow applied to a structural study of folds and fractures within alternating layers of sandstone and mudstone at a coastal outcrop in SE Australia. We surveyed this location using a downward looking digital camera mounted on commercially available multi-rotor UAV that autonomously followed waypoints at a set altitude and speed to ensure sufficient image overlap, minimum motion blur and an appropriate resolution. The use of surveyed ground control points allowed us to produce a geo-referenced 3D point cloud and an orthophotograph from hundreds of digital images at a spatial resolution < 10 mm per pixel, and cm-scale location accuracy. Orientation data of brittle and ductile structures were semi-automatically extracted from these high-resolution datasets using open-source software. This resulted in an extensive and statistically relevant orientation dataset that was used to 1) interpret the progressive development of folds and faults in the region, and 2) to generate a 3D structural model that underlines the complex internal structure of the outcrop and quantifies spatial variations in fold geometries. Overall, our work highlights how UAV photogrammetry can contribute to new insights in structural analysis.

  18. The importance of high spatial resolution for the performance of atmospheric chemistry-transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantzius Hansen, Kaj

    2010-05-01

    We have investigated the importance of spatial resolution for the performance of the Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model (DEHM), a state-of-the-art atmospheric chemistry-transport model covering the majority of the Northern Hemisphere with a horizontal grid resolution of 150 km X 150 km. DEHM has 29 vertical layers in terrain-following sigma-coordinates extending up to a height of 100 hPa. Two-way nesting options with a nesting factor of three can be applied with higher resolution over a limited area of the model. At present the model can be run without nests or with one, two or three nests, each with resolutions of 50 km X 50 km, 16.7 km X 16.7 km, and 5.6 km X 5.6 km, respectively. The model includes a comprehensive chemistry scheme with more than 100 reactions and 67 atmospheric constituents, of which 4 relate to primary particulates (PM2.5, PM10, TSP and sea salt), other species are SOx, NOx, NHx, VOCs, and secondary inorganic particulates. DEHM is driven by meteorological data from the numerical weather prediction model MM5v3. Three simulations were performed with DEHM: one simulation with only the mother domain, one simulation with one nest over Europe, and one simulation with an additional nest covering Denmark and surrounding countries. All three simulations cover the period from 1989 to 2006. The predicted concentrations were evaluated against measurements from the EMEP monitoring network. Only sites within the innermost nest were included in the evaluation and the evaluations of the three simulations were compared to test the influence of spatial resolution on the performance of the model.

  19. High spatial resolution thermal mapping of radiofrequency ablation lesions using a novel thermochromic liquid crystal myocardial phantom.

    PubMed

    Chik, William W B; Barry, Michael Anthony Tony; Thavapalachandran, Sujitha; Midekin, Christine; Pouliopoulos, Jim; Lim, Toon Wei; Sivagangabalan, Gopal; Thomas, Stuart P; Ross, David L; McEwan, Alistair L; Kovoor, Pramesh; Thiagalingam, Aravinda

    2013-11-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation causes thermal mediated irreversible myocardial necrosis. This study aimed to (i) characterize the thermal characteristics of RF ablation lesions with high spatial resolution using a thermochromic liquid crystal (TLC) myocardial phantom; and (ii) compare the thermochromic lesions with in vivo and in vitro ablation lesions. The myocardial phantom was constructed from a vertical sheet of TLC film, with color change between 50 °C (red) to 78 °C (black), embedded within a gel matrix, with impedance titrated to equal that of myocardium. Saline, with impedance titrated to blood values at 37 °C, was used as supernatant. A total of 51 RF ablations were performed. This comprised 17 ablations in the thermochromic gel phantom, bovine myocardial in vitro targets and ovine in vivo ablations, respectively. There was no difference in lesion dimensions between the thermochromic gel and in vivo ablations (lesion width 10.2 ± 0.2 vs 10.2 ± 2.4, P = 0.93; and depth 6.3 ± 0.1 vs 6.5 ± 1.7, P = 0.74). The spatial resolution of the thermochromic film was tested using 2 thermal point-sources that were progressively opposed and was demonstrated to be <300 μm. High spatial resolution thermal mapping of in vitro RF lesions with spatial resolution of at least 300 μm is possible using a thermochromic liquid crystal myocardial phantom model, with a good correlation to in vivo RF ablations. This model may be useful for assessing the thermal characteristics of RF lesions created using different ablation parameters and catheter technologies. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. OSIS: remote sensing code for estimating aerosol optical properties in urban areas from very high spatial resolution images.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Colin; Briottet, Xavier; Santer, Richard

    2011-10-01

    The achievement of new satellite or airborne remote sensing instruments enables the more precise study of cities with metric spatial resolutions. For studies such as the radiative characterization of urban features, knowledge of the atmosphere and particularly of aerosols is required to perform first an atmospheric compensation of the remote sensing images. However, to our knowledge, no efficient aerosol characterization technique adapted both to urban areas and to very high spatial resolution images has yet been developed. The goal of this paper is so to present a new code to characterize aerosol optical properties, OSIS, adapted to urban remote sensing images of metric spatial resolution acquired in the visible and near-IR spectral domains. First, a new aerosol characterization method based on the observation of shadow/sun transitions is presented, offering the advantage to avoid the assessment of target reflectances. Its principle and the modeling of the signal used to solve the retrieval equation are then detailed. Finally, a sensitivity study of OSIS from synthetic images simulated by the radiative transfer code AMARTIS v2 is also presented. This study has shown an intrinsic precision of this tool of Δτ(a)=0.1.τ(a) ± (0.02 + 0.4.τ(a)) for retrieval of aerosol optical thicknesses. This study shows that OSIS is a powerful tool for aerosol characterization that has a precision similar to satellite products for the aerosol optical thicknesses retrieval and that can be applied to every very high spatial resolution instrument, multispectral or hyperspectral, airborne or satellite.

  1. Laser Beam Filtration for High Spatial Resolution MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zavalin, Andre; Yang, Junhai; Caprioli, Richard

    2013-01-01

    We describe an easy and inexpensive way to provide a highly defined Gaussian shaped laser spot on target of 5 μm diameter for Imaging Mass Spectrometry using a commercial MALDI TOF instrument that is designed to produce a 20 μm diameter laser beam on target at its lowest setting. A 25 μm pinhole filter on a swivel arm was installed in the laser beam optics outside the vacuum ion source chamber so it is easily flipped into or out of the beam as desired by the operator. The resulting ion images at 5 μm spatial resolution are sharp since the satellite secondary laser beam maxima have been removed by the filter. Ion images are shown to demonstrate the performance and are compared to the method of oversampling to achieve higher spatial resolution when only a larger laser beam spot on target is available. PMID:23661425

  2. High spatial resolution BOTDA using simultaneously launched gain and loss pump pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motil, A.; Danon, O.; Peled, Y.; Tur, M.

    2013-05-01

    We report a 10cm spatial resolution in a Brillouin-based distributed sensing system using two simultaneously launched gain and loss pump pulses, having slightly different durations. Post-recording subtraction of the probe signal, excited by the shorter pulse, from the corresponding one, obtained from the longer pump pulse, is no longer required, since it is done automatically by the overlapping parts of the gain and loss pump pulses. Using a 30ns gain pump pulse and a 29ns loss pump pulse we were able to improve upon previously published results, achieving a distributed strain measurement along a standard single mode optical fiber with a spatial resolution of ~10cm. This technique does not broaden the involved Brillouin gain spectra so that the strain/temperature sensitivity is not compromised.

  3. Current source imaging for high spatial resolution magnetocardiography in normal and abnormal rat cardiac muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, S.; Iramina, K.; Goto, K.; Ueno, S.

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of our study was to identify the current source produced by acute ischemia and infarction. We measured magnetocardiograms (MCG) and electrocardiograms (ECG) of five male rats using a high-resolution dc superconducting quantum interference device gradiometer in a magnetically shielded room after performing coronary artery occlusion. The spatial resolution of the detecting magnetic field of our system is higher than the typical system, thus permitting the measurement of magnetic fields in small animals. Distribution of the magnetic fields B(t) and distribution of |rot B(t)|, which corresponded to the distribution of the current source, were imaged by 12-channel MCGs. As a result, the distribution of current source changes in the affected area of the myocardium during the ST segment, and amplitude of the peak significantly increased after occlusion. Our system can be used to help clarify the mechanism of the ST shift related to severe heart disease.

  4. High spatial resolution observations of 137Cs in northern Britain and Ireland from airborne geophysical survey.

    PubMed

    Scheib, Cathy; Beamish, David

    2010-09-01

    This study reports the (137)Cs data derived from three regional and national scale High Resolution Airborne Resource and Environmental Surveys (HiRES) in northern Britain and Ireland. The detailed spatial resolution, combined with the large areas these surveys collectively cover, gives insight into large-scale deposition patterns and possible subsequent re-distribution of (137)Cs on a level that was previously not possible. The largest survey area considered covers the whole of Northern Ireland. All three data sets display some clustering of higher (137)Cs activities on high ground together with regional scale NNW-SSE and NW-SE banding features. We interpret these as representing a series of rainfall interceptions of the repeated passage of the Chernobyl plume. Our observations, obtained at 200 m flight line intervals, appear to provide significant detail in relation to existing knowledge of large scale along-wind deposition of (137)Cs.

  5. TMT Solar System ISDT: Giant planet atmospheres at high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Michael H.; Marchis, Franck; de Pater, Imke

    2014-07-01

    Giant planet atmospheric research involves bright targets, so the primary advantage of TMT will be the high angular resolution made possible by its large aperture. A multi-conjugate adaptive optics experiment on the VLT in 2008 successfully demonstrated that good angular resolution could be achieved across the full Jupiter disk. This experiment ran for almost two hours, much longer than can be done on single-guidestar systems with smaller isoplanatic angles.Spectroscopy and filtered imaging in the infrared reveal a wealth of dynamical tracers, including ices and hazes, temperatures, ammonia and methane concentrations, para hydrogen fractions, and phosphine. These quantities vary spatially, tracing the direction and magnitude of vertical transport at multiple levels in the atmosphere. At the fine spatial scales possible with AO-corrected TMT observations, these dynamical tracers will reveal the detailed circulation of vortices, storms, and jets in outer planet atmospheres.

  6. Implications of high-spatial-resolution thermal infrared (Termoskan) data for Mars landing site selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, Bruce H.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal infrared observations of Mars from spacecraft provide physical information about the upper thermal skin depth of the surface, which is on the order of a few centimeters in depth and thus very significant for lander site selection. The Termoskan instrument onboard the Soviet Phobos '88 spacecraft acquired the highest spatial-resolution thermal infrared data obtained for Mars, ranging in resolution from 300 m to 3 km per pixel. It simultaneously obtained broadband reflected solar flux data. Although the 6 deg N - 30 deg S Termoskan coverage only slightly overlaps the nominal Mars Pathfinder target range, the implications of Termoskan data for that overlap region and the extrapolations that can be made to other regions give important clues for optimal landing site selection.

  7. Laser beam filtration for high spatial resolution MALDI imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zavalin, Andre; Yang, Junhai; Caprioli, Richard

    2013-07-01

    We describe an easy and inexpensive way to provide a highly defined Gaussian shaped laser spot on target of 5 μm diameter for imaging mass spectrometry using a commercial MALDI TOF instrument that is designed to produce a 20 μm diameter laser beam on target at its lowest setting. A 25 μm pinhole filter on a swivel arm was installed in the laser beam optics outside the vacuum ion source chamber so it is easily flipped into or out of the beam as desired by the operator. The resulting ion images at 5 μm spatial resolution are sharp since the satellite secondary laser beam maxima have been removed by the filter. Ion images are shown to demonstrate the performance and are compared with the method of oversampling to achieve higher spatial resolution when only a larger laser beam spot on target is available.

  8. Continuous monitoring of snowpack displacement at high spatial and temporal resolution with terrestrial radar interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caduff, Rafael; Wiesmann, Andreas; Bühler, Yves; Pielmeier, Christine

    2015-02-01

    Terrestrial radar interferometry is used in geotechnical applications for monitoring hazardous Earth or rock movements. In this study, we use it to continuously monitor snowpack displacements. As test site, the Dorfberg slope at Davos, Switzerland, was measured continuously during March 2014. The line of sight displacement was retrieved at a spatial resolution of millimeter to centimeter and a temporal resolution of up to 1 min independent of visibility. The results reveal several temperature-driven diurnal acceleration and deceleration cycles. The initiation of a small full-depth glide avalanche was observed after 50 cm total differential displacement. The maximum measured displacement of another differential glide area reached 43 cm/h without resulting in a full-depth avalanche even after a total measured differential displacement of 4.5 m. In regard of the difficulty to predict full-depth glide avalanches on the regional scale, the presented method has big potential for operational snow glide monitoring on critical slopes.

  9. High spatial resolution image object classification for terrestrial oil spill contamination mapping in West Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hese, S.; Schmullius, C.

    2009-04-01

    This work is a part of the OSCaR pilot study (Oil Spill Contamination mapping in Russia). A synergetic concept for an object based and multi temporal mapping and classification system for terrestrial oil spill pollution using a test area in West Siberia is presented. An object oriented image classification system is created to map contaminated soils, vegetation and changes in the oil exploration well infrastructure in high resolution data. Due to the limited spectral resolution of Quickbird data context information and image object structure are used as additional features building a structural object knowledge base for the area. The distance of potentially polluted areas to industrial land use and infrastructure objects is utilized to classify crude oil contaminated surfaces. Additionally the potential of Landsat data for dating of oil spill events using change indicators is tested with multi temporal Landsat data from 1987, 1995 and 2001. OSCaR defined three sub-projects: (1) high resolution mapping of crude oil contaminated surfaces, (2) mapping of industrial infrastructure change, (3) dating of oil spill events using multi temporal Landsat data. Validation of the contamination mapping results has been done with field data from Russian experts provided by the Yugra State University in Khanty-Mansiyskiy. The developed image object structure classification system has shown good results for the severely polluted areas with good overall classification accuracy. However it has also revealed the need for direct mapping of hydrocarbon substances. Oil spill event dating with Landsat data was very much limited by the low spatial resolution of Landsat TM 5 data, small scale character of oil spilled surfaces and limited information about oil spill dates.

  10. In-Flight Edge Response Measurements for High Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blonski, Slawomir; Pagnutti, Mary; Ryan, Robert; Zanoni, Vicki

    2001-01-01

    In-flight measurement of spatial resolution were conducted as part of the ASA Scientific Data Purchase (SDP) Validation and Verification (V&V) process. Characterization included remote sensing systems with ground sample distance (GSD) of 1 meter or less, such as the panchromatic imager on-board the ICONOS satellite and the airborne ADAR System 5500 multispectral instrument. Final image products were used to evaluate the effect of both the image acquisition system (e.g., optics, electronics, motion, jitter, atmosphere) and image post-processing (e.g., resampling, modulation trasfer function (MTF) compensator). Spatial resolution was characterized by full width at half maximum (FWHM) of an edge response-derived line spread function. This was found to be a more robust measure of spatial resolution than the value of NTF at Nyquist frequency The edge responses were analysed using the tilted-edge technique that ovecomes the spatial sampling limitations of the digital imaging systems. As an enhancement to existing algorithms, the slope of the edge response and the orientation of the edge target were determined by a single computational process. Adjacent black and white square panels, either painted on a flat surface or deployed as traps, formed the ground-based edge targets used in the tests. Orientation of the deployable tarps was optimized beforehand, based on simulations of the imaging system. Numerous edge target images were analyzed for each of the tested sensors. The effect of such factors as acquisition geometry, temporal variability, MTF compensation, and GSD on spatial resolution were investigated.

  11. In-Flight Edge Response Measurements for High Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blonski, Slawomir; Pagnutti, Mary; Ryan, Robert; Zanoni, Vicki

    2001-01-01

    In-flight measurement of spatial resolution were conducted as part of the ASA Scientific Data Purchase (SDP) Validation and Verification (V&V) process. Characterization included remote sensing systems with ground sample distance (GSD) of 1 meter or less, such as the panchromatic imager on-board the ICONOS satellite and the airborne ADAR System 5500 multispectral instrument. Final image products were used to evaluate the effect of both the image acquisition system (e.g., optics, electronics, motion, jitter, atmosphere) and image post-processing (e.g., resampling, modulation trasfer function (MTF) compensator). Spatial resolution was characterized by full width at half maximum (FWHM) of an edge response-derived line spread function. This was found to be a more robust measure of spatial resolution than the value of NTF at Nyquist frequency The edge responses were analysed using the tilted-edge technique that ovecomes the spatial sampling limitations of the digital imaging systems. As an enhancement to existing algorithms, the slope of the edge response and the orientation of the edge target were determined by a single computational process. Adjacent black and white square panels, either painted on a flat surface or deployed as traps, formed the ground-based edge targets used in the tests. Orientation of the deployable tarps was optimized beforehand, based on simulations of the imaging system. Numerous edge target images were analyzed for each of the tested sensors. The effect of such factors as acquisition geometry, temporal variability, MTF compensation, and GSD on spatial resolution were investigated.

  12. Evaluation of Sun Glint Correction Algorithms for High-Spatial Resolution Hyperspectral Imagery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGERY Chad I. Miller Civilian, Department of the Navy B.S., Humboldt State University, 2003 Submitted in partial fulfillment of the...75 LIST OF REFERENCES Berk, Alexander , Lawrence S. Bernstein, and David C. Robertson. MODTRAN: A moderate resolution model for...Introductory Remote Sensing - Principles and Concepts. London, U.K.: Routledge, 2000. Goetz, Alexander F. H., Gregg Vane, Jerry E. Solomon, and Barrett N

  13. High spatial resolution shortwave infrared imaging technology based on time delay and digital accumulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jianxin; Wang, Yueming; Zhuang, Xiaoqiong; Yao, Yi; Wang, Shengwei; Zhao, Ding; Shu, Rong; Wang, Jianyu

    2017-03-01

    Shortwave infrared (SWIR) imaging technology attracts more and more attention by its fascinating ability of penetrating haze and smoke. For application of spaceborne remote sensing, spatial resolution of SWIR is lower compared with that of visible light (VIS) wavelength. It is difficult to balance between the spatial resolution and signal to noise ratio (SNR). Some conventional methods, such as enlarging aperture of telescope, image motion compensation, and analog time delay and integration (TDI) technology are used to gain SNR. These techniques bring in higher cost of satellite, complexity of system or other negative factors. In this paper, time delay and digital accumulation (TDDA) method is proposed to achieve higher spatial resolution. The method can enhance the SNR and non-uniformity of system theoretically. A prototype of SWIR imager consists of opto-mechanical, 1024 × 128 InGaAs detector, and electronics is designed and integrated to prove TDDA method. Both of measurements and experimental results indicate TDDA method can promote SNR of system approximated of the square root of accumulative stage. The results exhibit that non-uniformity of system is also improved by this approach to some extent. The experiment results are corresponded with the theoretical analysis. Based on the experiments results, it is proved firstly that the goal of 1 m ground sample distance (GSD) in orbit of 500 km is feasible with the TDDA stage of 30 for SWIR waveband (0.9-1.7 μm).

  14. Low-Cost Ultra-High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Mapping of Intertidal Rock Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, M.; Johnson-Roberson, M.; Murphy, R.

    2012-07-01

    Intertidal ecosystems have primarily been studied using field-based sampling; remote sensing offers the ability to collect data over large areas in a snapshot of time which could compliment field-based sampling methods by extrapolating them into the wider spatial and temporal context. Conventional remote sensing tools (such as satellite and aircraft imaging) provide data at relatively course, sub-meter resolutions or with limited temporal resolutions and relatively high costs for small-scale environmental science and ecology studies. In this paper, we describe a low-cost, kite-based imaging system and photogrammetric pipeline that was developed for constructing highresolution, 3D, photo-realistic terrain models of intertidal rocky shores. The processing pipeline uses automatic image feature detection and matching, structure-from-motion and photo-textured terrain surface reconstruction algorithms that require minimal human input and only a small number of ground control points and allow the use of cheap, consumer-grade digital cameras. The resulting maps combine colour and topographic information at sub-centimeter resolutions over an area of approximately 100m, thus enabling spatial properties of the intertidal environment to be determined across a hierarchy of spatial scales. Results of the system are presented for an intertidal rock platform at Cape Banks, Sydney, Australia. Potential uses of this technique include mapping of plant (micro- and macro-algae) and animal (e.g. gastropods) assemblages at multiple spatial and temporal scales.

  15. High-spatial-resolution MWPC for medical imaging with positron emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Del Guerra, A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Schwartz, G.; Sleaford, B.

    1982-03-01

    The performance of a 15 x 15 cm/sup 2/ MultiWire Proportional Chamber (MWPC) with lead glass tube converter is presented. A standard Argon-Methane (70-30) gas mixture has been used at various pressures between 1.0 and 2.0 atm. For 511 keV ..gamma..-rays incident almost perpendicular onto a 1.0 cm thick lead glass tube converter, a detection efficiency of 4.5%, a time resolution of 130 ns (FWHM) and a spatial resolution of 1.3 mm (FWHM) has been obtained at 2 atm. Fast delay lines, capacitively coupled to the cathodes, standard integrated amplifiers and comparator electronics have been adopted for the position read-out. The use of fast delay lines (specific delay 8 ns/cm) ensures a high rate capability. A multiplanar positron camera is proposed, made of six MWPC modules arranged to form the lateral surface of a hexagonal prism. Each module (50 x 50 cm/sup 2/) will have a 2 cm thick converter on both sides of the chamber and will be operating at 2 atm. The expected performance is presented and compared with that of a recent multi-ring BGO camera, and is shown to be superior in spatial resolution and comparable in event rate at a considerably lower cost.

  16. Examination of Tropical Forest Structure Using Field Data and High Spatial Resolution Image Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palace, M.; Keller, M.; Hunter, M.; Braswell, B.; Hagen, S.; Lefsky, M.

    2007-12-01

    Structural properties of tropical forests are an important component in ecological studies, yet they are difficult to quantify. Remote sensing of forest canopy structure estimation has greatly advanced to due the aid of high resolution satellite images. Field based methods of canopy structure have also improved due to the involvement of handheld laser range finders, which aid in gauging height, width, and depth of tree canopies. Using a handheld laser rangefinder we estimated canopy depth and generated canopy profiles from this data. Previously, we developed a crown characterization algorithm that uses high resolution satellite image data and have applied this algorithm in undisturbed tropical forests with good results. In this work we have further developed the algorithm to examine canopy depth using two allometric equations, developed from field data, that relate crown width to the top of the canopy and bottom of the canopy. Modification of our original algorithm also involved the incorporation of site specific allometric equations developed from field based measurements. Automated analysis of IKONOS imagery was used to estimate the distribution of canopy elements at various heights and their spatial locations. A comparison between the field based data and the estimates derived from remotely sensed images was conducted at four sites throughout Amazonia. We further compared our estimates of canopy structure with results from large footprint LIDAR data from GLAS. Ability to estimate canopy profiles and forest structural properties in vast areas of the Brazilian Amazon using high resolution imagery will help us to understand the regional carbon balance.

  17. Prostate Cancer Detection Using High-Spatial Resolution MRI at 7.0 Tesla: Correlation with Histopathologic Findings at Radical Prostatectomy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0253 TITLE: Prostate Cancer Detection Using High-Spatial Resolution...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Prostate Cancer Detection Using High-Spatial Resolution MRI at 7.0 Tesla: Correlation with Histopathologic Findings at Radical...endorectal coils, avoiding the need for this comparatively invasive devise. These initial steps are now being followed with testing in prostate cancer

  18. Use of High Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing for Hydro-Geomorphologic Analysis of Medium-sized Arid Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeh, Yuval; Blumberg, Dan G.; Cohen, Hai; Morin, Efrat; Maman, Shimrit

    2016-04-01

    Arid environments are often remote, expansive, difficult to access and especially vulnerable to flash flood hazards due to the poor understanding of the phenomenon and the lack of meteorological, geomorphological, and hydrological data. For many years, catchment characteristics have been observed using point-based measurements such as rain gauges and soil sample analysis; on the other hand, use of remote sensing technologies can provide spatially continuous hydrological parameters and variables. The advances in remote sensing technologies can provide new geo-spatial data using high spatial and temporal resolution for basin-scale geomorphological analysis and hydrological models. This study used high spatial resolution remote sensing for hydro-geomorphologic analysis of the arid medium size Rahaf watershed (76 km2), located in the Judean Desert, Israel. During the research a high resolution geomorphological map of Rahaf basin was created using WorldView-2 multispectral satellite imageries; surface roughness was estimated using SIR-C and COSMO-SkyMed Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) spaceborne sensors; and rainstorm characteristics were extracted using ground-based meteorological radar. The geomorphological mapping of Rahaf into 17 classes with good accuracy. The surface roughness extraction using SAR over the basin showed that the correlation between the COSMO-SkyMed backscatter coefficient and the surface roughness was very strong with an R2 of 0.97. This study showed that using x-band spaceborne sensors with high spatial resolution, such as COSMO-SkyMed, are more suitable for surface roughness evaluation in flat arid environments and should be in favor with longer wavelength operating sensors such as the SIR-C. The current study presents an innovative method to evaluate Manning's hydraulic roughness coefficient (n) in arid environments using radar backscattering. The weather radar rainfall data was calibrated using rain gauges located in the watershed. The

  19. Calibration of Fuji BAS-SR type imaging plate as high spatial resolution x-ray radiography recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ji; Zheng, Jianhua; Zhang, Xing; Chen, Li; Wei, Minxi

    2017-05-01

    Image Plates as x-ray recorder have advantages including reusable, high dynamic range, large active area, and so on. In this work, Fuji BAS-SR type image plate combined with BAS-5000 scanner is calibrated. The fade rates of Image Plates has been measured using x-ray diffractometric in different room temperature; the spectral response of Image Plates has been measured using 241Am radioactive sealed source and fitting with linear model; the spatial resolution of Image Plates has been measured using micro-focus x-ray tube. The results show that Image Plates has an exponent decade curve and double absorption edge response curve. The spatial resolution of Image Plates with 25μ/50μ scanner resolution is 6.5lp/mm, 11.9lp/mm respectively and gold grid radiography is collected with 80lp/mm spatial resolution using SR-type Image Plates. BAS-SR type Image Plates can do high spatial resolution and quantitative radiographic works. It can be widely used in High energy density physics (HEDP), inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and laboratory astronomy physics.

  20. Mid-IR laser source using hollow waveguide beam combining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, Ian F.; Thorne, Daniel H.; Lamb, Robert A.; Jenkins, R. M.

    2016-03-01

    Hollow waveguide technology is a route to efficient beam combining of multiple laser sources in a compact footprint. It is a technology appropriate for combining free-space or fibre-coupled beams generated by semiconductor, fibre or solidstate laser sources. This paper will present results of a breadboard mid-IR system comprising four laser sources combined using a hollow waveguide optical circuit. In this approach the individual dichroic beam combiner components are held in precision alignment slots in the hollow waveguide circuit and the different input wavelengths are guided between the components to a common output port. The hollow waveguide circuit is formed in the surface of a Macor (machinable glass-ceramic) substrate using precision CNC machining techniques. The hollow waveguides have fundamentally different propagation characteristics to solid core waveguides leading to transmission characteristics close to those of the atmosphere while still providing useful light guidance properties. The transmission efficiency and power handling of the hollow waveguide circuit can be designed to be very high across a broad waveband range. Three of the sources are quantum cascade lasers (QCLs), a semiconductor laser technology providing direct generation of midwave IR output. The combined beams provide 4.2 W of near diffraction-limited output co-boresighted to better than 20 µrad. High coupling efficiency into the waveguides is demonstrated, with negligible waveguide transmission losses. The overall transmission of the hollow waveguide beam combining optical circuit, weighted by the laser power at each wavelength, is 93%. This loss is dominated by the performance of the dichroic optics used to combine the beams.

  1. A UV to mid-IR study of AGN selection

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sun Mi; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Assef, Roberto; Brown, Michael J. I.; Stern, Daniel; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Moustakas, John

    2014-07-20

    We classify the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 431,038 sources in the 9 deg{sup 2} Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS). There are up to 17 bands of data available per source, including ultraviolet (GALEX), optical (NDWFS), near-IR (NEWFIRM), and mid-infrared (IRAC and MIPS) data, as well as spectroscopic redshifts for ∼20,000 objects, primarily from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. We fit galaxy, active galactic nucleus (AGN), stellar, and brown dwarf templates to the observed SEDs, which yield spectral classes for the Galactic sources and photometric redshifts and galaxy/AGN luminosities for the extragalactic sources. The photometric redshift precision of the galaxy and AGN samples are σ/(1 + z) = 0.040 and σ/(1 + z) = 0.169, respectively, with the worst 5% outliers excluded. On the basis of the χ{sub ν}{sup 2} of the SED fit for each SED model, we are able to distinguish between Galactic and extragalactic sources for sources brighter than I = 23.5 mag. We compare the SED fits for a galaxy-only model and a galaxy-AGN model. Using known X-ray and spectroscopic AGN samples, we confirm that SED fitting can be successfully used as a method to identify large populations of AGNs, including spatially resolved AGNs with significant contributions from the host galaxy and objects with the emission line ratios of 'composite' spectra. We also use our results to compare with the X-ray, mid-IR, optical color, and emission line ratio selection techniques. For an F-ratio threshold of F > 10, we find 16,266 AGN candidates brighter than I = 23.5 mag and a surface density of ∼1900 AGN deg{sup –2}.

  2. A new vehicle emission inventory for China with high spatial and temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, B.; Huo, H.; Zhang, Q.; Yao, Z. L.; Wang, X. T.; Yang, X. F.; Liu, H.; He, K. B.

    2013-12-01

    This study is the first in a series of papers that aim to develop high-resolution emission databases for different anthropogenic sources in China. Here we focus on on-road transportation. Because of the increasing impact of on-road transportation on regional air quality, developing an accurate and high-resolution vehicle emission inventory is important for both the research community and air quality management. This work proposes a new inventory methodology to improve the spatial and temporal accuracy and resolution of vehicle emissions in China. We calculate, for the first time, the monthly vehicle emissions (CO, NMHC, NOx, and PM2.5) for 2008 in 2364 counties (an administrative unit one level lower than city) by developing a set of approaches to estimate vehicle stock and monthly emission factors at county-level, and technology distribution at provincial level. We then introduce allocation weights for the vehicle kilometers traveled to assign the county-level emissions onto 0.05° × 0.05° grids based on the China Digital Road-network Map (CDRM). The new methodology overcomes the common shortcomings of previous inventory methods, including neglecting the geographical differences between key parameters and using surrogates that are weakly related to vehicle activities to allocate vehicle emissions. The new method has great advantages over previous methods in depicting the spatial distribution characteristics of vehicle activities and emissions. This work provides a better understanding of the spatial representation of vehicle emissions in China and can benefit both air quality modeling and management with improved spatial accuracy.

  3. A Reliable, Feasible Method to Observe Neighborhoods at High Spatial Resolution.

    PubMed

    Kepper, Maura M; Sothern, Melinda S; Theall, Katherine P; Griffiths, Lauren A; Scribner, Richard A; Tseng, Tung-Sung; Schaettle, Paul; Cwik, Jessica M; Felker-Kantor, Erica; Broyles, Stephanie T

    2017-01-01

    Systematic social observation (SSO) methods traditionally measure neighborhoods at street level and have been performed reliably using virtual applications to increase feasibility. Research indicates that collection at even higher spatial resolution may better elucidate the health impact of neighborhood factors, but whether virtual applications can reliably capture social determinants of health at the smallest geographic resolution (parcel level) remains uncertain. This paper presents a novel, parcel-level SSO methodology and assesses whether this new method can be collected reliably using Google Street View and is feasible. Multiple raters (N=5) observed 42 neighborhoods. In 2016, inter-rater reliability (observed agreement and kappa coefficient) was compared for four SSO methods: (1) street-level in person; (2) street-level virtual; (3) parcel-level in person; and (4) parcel-level virtual. Intra-rater reliability (observed agreement and kappa coefficient) was calculated to determine whether parcel-level methods produce results comparable to traditional street-level observation. Substantial levels of inter-rater agreement were documented across all four methods; all methods had >70% of items with at least substantial agreement. Only physical decay showed higher levels of agreement (83% of items with >75% agreement) for direct versus virtual rating source. Intra-rater agreement comparing street- versus parcel-level methods resulted in observed agreement >75% for all but one item (90%). Results support the use of Google Street View as a reliable, feasible tool for performing SSO at the smallest geographic resolution. Validation of a new parcel-level method collected virtually may improve the assessment of social determinants contributing to disparities in health behaviors and outcomes. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Matrix recrystallization for MALDI-MS imaging of maize lipids at high-spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Duenas, Maria Emilia; Carlucci, Laura; Lee, Young Jin

    2016-06-27

    Matrix recrystallization is optimized and applied to improve lipid ion signals in maize embryos and leaves. A systematic study was performed varying solvent and incubation time. During this study, unexpected side reactions were found when methanol was used as a recrystallization solvent, resulting in the formation of a methyl ester of phosphatidic acid. Furthermore, using an optimum recrystallization condition with isopropanol, there is no apparent delocalization demonstrated with a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) pattern and maize leaf images obtained at 10 μm spatial resolution.

  5. High spatial resolution photographs of the sun in L alpha radiation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinz, D. K.

    1973-01-01

    Photographs of the sun in predominantly L alpha radiation (centered at 1215.67 A) with 3-sec spatial resolution were taken from an Aerobee rocket shortly after fourth contact by the moon on the eclipse day of July 10, 1972. This preliminary reporting of the results describes the instrument and shows two of the photographs taken. The supergranulation is manifest, and active regions and filaments are well resolved over the entire disk. Densitometer traces across the disk are presented, giving the flux incident on the earth from active regions, cell boundaries, and filaments.

  6. Implementation of a Gaussian Beam Laser and Aspheric Optics for High Spatial Resolution MALDI Imaging MS

    PubMed Central

    Zavalin, Andre; Yang, Junhai; Haase, Andreas; Holle, Armin; Caprioli, Richard

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the use of a Gaussian beam laser for MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry to provide a precisely defined laser spot of 5 µm diameter on target using a commercial MALDI TOF instrument originally designed to produce a 20 µm diameter laser beam spot at its smallest setting. A Gaussian beam laser was installed in the instrument in combination with an aspheric focusing lens. This ion source produced sharp ion images at 5 µm spatial resolution with signals of high intensity as shown for images from thin tissue sections of mouse brain. PMID:24692046

  7. Mapping seagrass coverage and spatial patterns with high spatial resolution IKONOS imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Ruiliang; Bell, Susan

    2017-02-01

    Seagrass habitats in subtidal coastal waters provide a variety of ecosystem functions and services and there is an increasing need to acquire information on spatial and temporal dynamics of this resource. Here, we explored the capability of IKONOS (IKO) data of high resolution (4 m) for mapping seagrass cover [submerged aquatic vegetation (%SAV) cover] along the mid-western coast of Florida, USA. We also compared seagrass maps produced with IKO data with that obtained using the Landsat TM sensor with lower resolution (30 m). Both IKO and TM data, collected in October 2009, were preprocessed to calculate water depth invariant bands to normalize the effect of varying depth on bottom spectra recorded by the two satellite sensors and further the textural information was extracted from IKO data. Our results demonstrate that the high resolution IKO sensor produced a higher accuracy than the TM sensor in a three-class % SAV cover classification. Of note is that the OA of %SAV cover mapping at our study area created with IKO data was 5-20% higher than that from other studies published. We also examined the spatial distribution of seagrass over a spatial range of 4-240 m using the Ripley's K function [L(d)] and IKO data that represented four different grain sizes [4 m (one IKO pixel), 8 m (2 × 2 IKO pixels), 12 m (3 × 3 IKO pixels), and 16 m (4 × 4 IKO pixels)] from moderate-dense seagrass cover along a set of six transects. The Ripley's K metric repeatedly indicated that seagrass cover representing 4 m × 4 m pixels displayed a dispersed (or slightly dispersed) pattern over distances of <4-8 m, and a random or slightly clustered pattern of cover over 9-240 m. The spatial pattern of seagrass cover created with the three additional grain sizes (i.e., 2 × 24 m IKO pixels, 3 × 34 m IKO pixels, and 4 × 4 m IKO pixels) show a dispersed (or slightly dispersed) pattern across 4-32 m and a random or slightly clustered pattern across 33-240 m. Given the first report on using

  8. Implementation of a Gaussian Beam Laser and Aspheric Optics for High Spatial Resolution MALDI Imaging MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavalin, Andre; Yang, Junhai; Haase, Andreas; Holle, Armin; Caprioli, Richard

    2014-06-01

    We have investigated the use of a Gaussian beam laser for MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry to provide a precisely defined laser spot of 5 μm diameter on target using a commercial MALDI TOF instrument originally designed to produce a 20 μm diameter laser beam spot at its smallest setting. A Gaussian beam laser was installed in the instrument in combination with an aspheric focusing lens. This ion source produced sharp ion images at 5 μm spatial resolution with signals of high intensity as shown for images from thin tissue sections of mouse brain.

  9. Matrix Recrystallization for MALDI-MS Imaging of Maize Lipids at High-Spatial Resolution.

    PubMed

    Dueñas, Maria Emilia; Carlucci, Laura; Lee, Young Jin

    2016-09-01

    Matrix recrystallization is optimized and applied to improve lipid ion signals in maize embryos and leaves. A systematic study was performed varying solvent and incubation time. During this study, unexpected side reactions were found when methanol was used as a recrystallization solvent, resulting in the formation of a methyl ester of phosphatidic acid. Using an optimum recrystallization condition with isopropanol, there is no apparent delocalization demonstrated with a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) pattern and maize leaf images obtained at 10 μm spatial resolution. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  10. Matrix Recrystallization for MALDI-MS Imaging of Maize Lipids at High-Spatial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueñas, Maria Emilia; Carlucci, Laura; Lee, Young Jin

    2016-09-01

    Matrix recrystallization is optimized and applied to improve lipid ion signals in maize embryos and leaves. A systematic study was performed varying solvent and incubation time. During this study, unexpected side reactions were found when methanol was used as a recrystallization solvent, resulting in the formation of a methyl ester of phosphatidic acid. Using an optimum recrystallization condition with isopropanol, there is no apparent delocalization demonstrated with a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) pattern and maize leaf images obtained at 10 μm spatial resolution.

  11. Implementation of a Gaussian beam laser and aspheric optics for high spatial resolution MALDI imaging MS.

    PubMed

    Zavalin, Andre; Yang, Junhai; Haase, Andreas; Holle, Armin; Caprioli, Richard

    2014-06-01

    We have investigated the use of a Gaussian beam laser for MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry to provide a precisely defined laser spot of 5 μm diameter on target using a commercial MALDI TOF instrument originally designed to produce a 20 μm diameter laser beam spot at its smallest setting. A Gaussian beam laser was installed in the instrument in combination with an aspheric focusing lens. This ion source produced sharp ion images at 5 μm spatial resolution with signals of high intensity as shown for images from thin tissue sections of mouse brain.

  12. Auger electron spectroscopy at high spatial resolution and nA primary beam currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, G.; Poppa, H.; Moorhead, D.; Bales, M.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental Auger microprobe system is described which incorporates a field-emission electron gun and total beam currents in the nanoampere range. The distinguishing characteristics of this system include a large multistation UHV specimen chamber, pulse counting and fully digital Auger signal-processing techniques, and digital referencing methods to eliminate the effects of beam instabilities. Some preliminary results obtained with this system are described, and it is concluded that field-emission electron sources can be used for high-resolution Auger electron spectroscopy with primary-beam spots of less than 100 nm and beam currents of the order of 1 nA.

  13. High spatial and temporal resolution charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the HL-2A tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y. L.; Yu, D. L.; Liu, L.; Ida, K.; von Hellermann, M.; Cao, J. Y.; Sun, A. P.; Ma, Q.; Chen, W. J.; Liu, Yi; Yan, L. W.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Liu, Yong

    2014-10-01

    A 32/64-channel charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostic system is developed on the HL-2A tokamak (R = 1.65 m, a = 0.4 m), monitoring plasma ion temperature and toroidal rotation velocity simultaneously. A high throughput spectrometer (F/2.8) and a pitch-controlled fiber bundle enable the temporal resolution of the system up to 400 Hz. The observation geometry and an optimized optic system enable the highest radial resolution up to ˜1 cm at the plasma edge. The CXRS system monitors the carbon line emission (C VI, n = 8-7, 529.06 nm) whose Doppler broadening and Doppler shift provide ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity during the neutral beam injection. The composite CX spectral data are analyzed by the atomic data and analysis structure charge exchange spectroscopy fitting (ADAS CXSFIT) code. First experimental results are shown for the case of HL-2A plasmas with sawtooth oscillations, electron cyclotron resonance heating, and edge transport barrier during the high-confinement mode (H-mode).

  14. High Spatial Resolution Investigations of Microchannel Plate Imaging Properties for UV Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, Oswald

    1996-01-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) photon counting detectors are currently being used with great success on many of the recent NASA/ESA ultraviolet (UV) astrophysics missions that make observations in the 1OO A - 1600 A range. These include HUT, the Wide Field Camera on ROSAT, EUVE, ALEXIS, ORFEUS, and SOHO. These devices have also been chosen to fly on future UV astrophysics missions such as FUSE, FUVITA, IMAGE, and both the HST STIS and Advanced Camera instruments. During the period of this award we have fabricated a dual-chamber vacuum test facility to carry out laboratory testing of detector resolution, image stability and linearity, and flat field performance to enable us to characterize the performance of MCPs and their associated read-out architectures. We have also fabricated and tested a laboratory 'test-bed' delay line detector, which can accommodate MCP's with a wide range of formats and run at high data rates, to continue our studies of MCP image fixed pattern noise, and particularly for new small pore MCP's which have recently come onto the market. These tests were mainly focussed on the assessment of cross delay-line (XDL) and double delay line (DDL) anode read-out schemes, with particular attention being focussed on flat-field and spatial resolution performance.

  15. Helium beam shadowing for high spatial resolution patterning of antibodies on microstructured diagnostic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cacao, Eliedonna; Sherlock, Tim; Nasrullah, Azeem; Kemper, Steven; Knoop, Jennifer; Kourentzi, Katerina; Ruchhoeft, Paul; Stein, Gila E; Atmar, Robert L; Willson, Richard C

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a technique for the high-resolution, self-aligning, and high-throughput patterning of antibody binding functionality on surfaces by selectively changing the reactivity of protein-coated surfaces in specific regions of a workpiece with a beam of energetic helium particles. The exposed areas are passivated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and no longer bind the antigen. We demonstrate that patterns can be formed (1) by using a stencil mask with etched openings that forms a patterned exposure, or (2) by using angled exposure to cast shadows of existing raised microstructures on the surface to form self-aligned patterns. We demonstrate the efficacy of this process through the patterning of anti-lysozyme, anti-Norwalk virus, and anti-Escherichia coli antibodies and the subsequent detection of each of their targets by the enzyme-mediated formation of colored or silver deposits, and also by binding of gold nanoparticles. The process allows for the patterning of three-dimensional structures by inclining the sample relative to the beam so that the shadowed regions remain unaltered. We demonstrate that the resolution of the patterning process is of the order of hundreds of nanometers, and that the approach is well-suited for high throughput patterning.

  16. Helium beam shadowing for high spatial resolution patterning of antibodies on microstructured diagnostic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cacao, Eliedonna; Sherlock, Tim; Nasrullah, Azeem; Kemper, Steven; Knoop, Jennifer; Kourentzi, Katerina; Ruchhoeft, Paul; Stein, Gila E; Atmar, Robert L; Willson, Richard C

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We have developed a technique for the high-resolution, self-aligning, and high-throughput patterning of antibody binding functionality on surfaces by selectively changing the reactivity of protein-coated surfaces in specific regions of a workpiece with a beam of energetic helium particles. The exposed areas are passivated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and no longer bind the antigen. We demonstrate that patterns can be formed (1) by using a stencil mask with etched openings that forms a patterned exposure, or (2) by using angled exposure to cast shadows of existing raised microstructures on the surface to form self-aligned patterns. We demonstrate the efficacy of this process through the patterning of anti-lysozyme, anti-Norwalk virus, and anti-Escherichia coli antibodies and the subsequent detection of each of their targets by the enzyme-mediated formation of colored or silver deposits, and also by binding of gold nanoparticles. The process allows for the patterning of three-dimensional structures by inclining the sample relative to the beam so that the shadowed regions remain unaltered. We demonstrate that the resolution of the patterning process is of the order of hundreds of nanometers, and that the approach is well-suited for high throughput patterning. PMID:24706125

  17. High spatial and temporal resolution charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Y. L.; Yu, D. L. Liu, L.; Cao, J. Y.; Sun, A. P.; Ma, Q.; Chen, W. J.; Liu, Yi; Yan, L. W.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Liu, Yong; Ida, K.; Hellermann, M. von

    2014-10-01

    A 32/64-channel charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostic system is developed on the HL-2A tokamak (R = 1.65 m, a = 0.4 m), monitoring plasma ion temperature and toroidal rotation velocity simultaneously. A high throughput spectrometer (F/2.8) and a pitch-controlled fiber bundle enable the temporal resolution of the system up to 400 Hz. The observation geometry and an optimized optic system enable the highest radial resolution up to ~1 cm at the plasma edge. The CXRS system monitors the carbon line emission (C VI, n = 8–7, 529.06 nm) whose Doppler broadening and Doppler shift provide ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity during the neutral beam injection. The composite CX spectral data are analyzed by the atomic data and analysis structure charge exchange spectroscopy fitting (ADAS CXSFIT) code. First experimental results are shown for the case of HL-2A plasmas with sawtooth oscillations, electron cyclotron resonance heating, and edge transport barrier during the high-confinement mode (H-mode)

  18. High-spatial-resolution sub-surface imaging using a laser-based acoustic microscopy technique.

    PubMed

    Balogun, Oluwaseyi; Cole, Garrett D; Huber, Robert; Chinn, Diane; Murray, Todd W; Spicer, James B

    2011-01-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy techniques operating at frequencies in the gigahertz range are suitable for the elastic characterization and interior imaging of solid media with micrometer-scale spatial resolution. Acoustic wave propagation at these frequencies is strongly limited by energy losses, particularly from attenuation in the coupling media used to transmit ultrasound to a specimen, leading to a decrease in the depth in a specimen that can be interrogated. In this work, a laser-based acoustic microscopy technique is presented that uses a pulsed laser source for the generation of broadband acoustic waves and an optical interferometer for detection. The use of a 900-ps microchip pulsed laser facilitates the generation of acoustic waves with frequencies extending up to 1 GHz which allows for the resolution of micrometer-scale features in a specimen. Furthermore, the combination of optical generation and detection approaches eliminates the use of an ultrasonic coupling medium, and allows for elastic characterization and interior imaging at penetration depths on the order of several hundred micrometers. Experimental results illustrating the use of the laser-based acoustic microscopy technique for imaging micrometer-scale subsurface geometrical features in a 70-μm-thick single-crystal silicon wafer with a (100) orientation are presented.

  19. Examining nanoparticle assemblies using high spatial resolution x-ray microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenneson, P. M.; Luggar, R. D.; Morton, E. J.; Gundogdu, O.; Tüzün, U.

    2004-09-01

    An experimental system has been designed to examine the assembly of nanoparticles in a variety of process engineering applications. These applications include the harvesting from solutions of nanoparticles into green parts, and the subsequent sintering into finished components. The system is based on an x-ray microtomography with a spatial resolution down to 5μm. The theoretical limitations in x-ray imaging are considered to allow experimental optimization. A standard nondestructive evaluation type apparatus with a small focal-spot x-ray tube, high-resolution complementary metal oxide semiconductor flat-panel pixellated detector, and a mechanical rotational stage is used to image the static systems. Dynamic sintering processes are imaged using the same x-ray source and detector but a custom rotational stage which is contained in an environmental chamber where the temperature, atmospheric pressure, and compaction force can be controlled. Three-dimensional tomographic data sets are presented here for samples from the pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, biotechnology, and nanoparticle handling industries and show the microscopic features and defects which can be resolved with the system.

  20. High spatial resolution two-dimensional position sensitive detector for the performance of coincidence experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ceolin, D.; Chaplier, G.; Lemonnier, M.; Garcia, G.A.; Miron, C.; Nahon, L.; Simon, M.; Leclercq, N.; Morin, P.

    2005-04-01

    A position sensitive detector (PSD) adapted to the technical and mechanical specifications of our angle and energy resolved electron-ion(s) coincidence experiments is described in this article. The device, whose principle is very similar to the one detailed by J. H. D. Eland [Meas. Sci. Technol. 5, 1501 (1994)], is composed by a set of microchannel plates and a delay line anode. The originality comes from the addition in front of the encoding surface of a ceramic disk covered by a resistive surface. The capacitive coupling between the anode and the resistive plane has the double advantage of eliminating the spatial modulations due to the lattice of the anode and also of sensitizing a greater number of electrodes, increasing thus considerably the accuracy of the position measurements. The tests carried out with a time to digital conversion module of 250 ps resolution showed that a spatial resolution better than 50 {mu}m and a dead time of 160 ns can be achieved. Typical images obtained with the help of the EPICEA and DELICIOUS coincidence setups are also shown.

  1. A Global Climate Model Agent for High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Data

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Lynn S.; Daily, Jeffrey A.; Henry, Michael J.; Palmer, Bruce J.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Dazlich, Donald A.; Heikes, Ross P.; Randall, David

    2015-02-01

    Fine cell granularity in modern climate models can produce terabytes of data in each snapshot, causing significant I/O overhead. To address this issue, a method of reducing the I/O latency of high-resolution climate models by identifying and selectively outputting regions of interest is presented. Working with a Global Cloud Resolving Model and running with up to 10240 processors on a Cray XE6, this method provides significant I/O bandwidth reduction depending on the frequency of writes and size of the region of interest. The implementation challenges of determining global parameters in a strictly core-localized model and properly formatting output files that only contain subsections of the global grid are addressed, as well as the overall bandwidth impact and benefits of the method. The gains in I/O throughput provided by this method allow dual output rates for high-resolution climate models: a low-frequency global snapshot as well as a high-frequency regional snapshot when events of particular interest occur.

  2. High spatial and temporal resolution charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the HL-2A tokamak.

    PubMed

    Wei, Y L; Yu, D L; Liu, L; Ida, K; von Hellermann, M; Cao, J Y; Sun, A P; Ma, Q; Chen, W J; Liu, Yi; Yan, L W; Yang, Q W; Duan, X R; Liu, Yong

    2014-10-01

    A 32/64-channel charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostic system is developed on the HL-2A tokamak (R = 1.65 m, a = 0.4 m), monitoring plasma ion temperature and toroidal rotation velocity simultaneously. A high throughput spectrometer (F/2.8) and a pitch-controlled fiber bundle enable the temporal resolution of the system up to 400 Hz. The observation geometry and an optimized optic system enable the highest radial resolution up to ∼1 cm at the plasma edge. The CXRS system monitors the carbon line emission (C VI, n = 8-7, 529.06 nm) whose Doppler broadening and Doppler shift provide ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity during the neutral beam injection. The composite CX spectral data are analyzed by the atomic data and analysis structure charge exchange spectroscopy fitting (ADAS CXSFIT) code. First experimental results are shown for the case of HL-2A plasmas with sawtooth oscillations, electron cyclotron resonance heating, and edge transport barrier during the high-confinement mode (H-mode).

  3. Identifying landscape features associated with Rift Valley fever virus transmission, Ferlo region, Senegal, using very high spatial resolution satellite imagery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Dynamics of most of vector-borne diseases are strongly linked to global and local environmental changes. Landscape changes are indicators of human activities or natural processes that are likely to modify the ecology of the diseases. Here, a landscape approach developed at a local scale is proposed for extracting mosquito favourable biotopes, and for testing ecological parameters when identifying risk areas of Rift Valley fever (RVF) transmission. The study was carried out around Barkedji village, Ferlo region, Senegal. Methods In order to test whether pond characteristics may influence the density and the dispersal behaviour of RVF vectors, and thus the spatial variation in RVFV transmission, we used a very high spatial resolution remote sensing image (2.4 m resolution) provided by the Quickbird sensor to produce a detailed land-cover map of the study area. Based on knowledge of vector and disease ecology, seven landscape attributes were defined at the pond level and computed from the land-cover map. Then, the relationships between landscape attributes and RVF serologic incidence rates in small ruminants were analyzed through a beta-binomial regression. Finally, the best statistical model according to the Akaike Information Criterion corrected for small samples (AICC), was used to map areas at risk for RVF. Results Among the derived landscape variables, the vegetation density index (VDI) computed within a 500 m buffer around ponds was positively correlated with serologic incidence (p<0.001), suggesting that the risk of RVF transmission was higher in the vicinity of ponds surrounded by a dense vegetation cover. The final risk map of RVF transmission displays a heterogeneous spatial distribution, corroborating previous findings from the same area. Conclusions Our results highlight the potential of very high spatial resolution remote sensing data for identifying environmental risk factors and mapping RVF risk areas at a local scale. PMID:23452759

  4. Classification of high spatial resolution images by means of a Gabor wavelet decomposition and a support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraldi, Andrea; Bruzzone, Lorenzo

    2004-11-01

    Very high spatial resolution satellite images, acquired by third-generation commercial remote sensing (RS) satellites (like Ikonos and QuickBird), are characterized by a tremendous spatial complexity, i.e. surface objects are described by a combination of spectral, textural and shape information. Potentially capable of dealing with the spatial complexity of such images, context-sensitive data mapping systems, e.g. employing filter sets designed for texture feature analysis/synthesis, have been extensively studied in pattern recognition literature in recent years. In this work, four implementations of a two-stage classification scheme for the analysis of high spatial resolution images are compared. Competing first stage (feature extraction) implementations of increasing complexity are: 1) a standard multi-scale dyadic Gaussian pyramid image decomposition, and 2) an original almost complete (near-orthogonal) basis for the Gabor wavelet transform of an input image at selected spatial frequencies (i.e. band-pass filter central frequency and filter orientation pairs). The second stage of the classification scheme consists of: a) an ensemble of pixel-based two-class support vector machines (SVMs) applied to the multi-class classification problem according to the one-against-one strategy, exploiting the well-known SVM's capability of dealing with high dimensional mapping problems; and b) a traditional two-phase supervised learning pixel-based Radial Basis Function (RBF) network. In a badly-posed Ikonos image classification experiment, SVM combined with the two filter sets provide an interesting compromise between ease of use (i.e. easy free parameter selection), classification accuracy, robustness to changes in surface properties, capability of detecting genuine, but small, image details as well as linear structures. Qualitatively and quantitatively, the multi-scale multi-orientation almost complete Gabor wavelet transform appears superior to the dyadic multi

  5. Design considerations for a high-spatial-resolution positron camera with dense-drift-space MWPC's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delguerra, A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Schwartz, G.; Nelson, W. R.

    1982-10-01

    A multiplane Positron Camera is proposed, made of six MWPC modules arranged to form the lateral surface of a hexagonal prism. Each module (50 x 50 sq cm) has a 2 cm thick lead-glass tube converter on both sides of a MWPC pressurized to 2 atm. Experimental measurements are presented to show how to reduce the parallax error by determining in which of the two converter layers the photon has interacted. The results of a detailed Monte Carlo calculation for the efficiency of this type of converter are shown to be in excellent agreement with the experimental measurements. The expected performance of the Positron Camera is presented: a true coincidence rate of 56,000 counts/s (with an equal accidental coincidence rate and a 30% Compton scatter contamination) and a spatial resolution better than 5.0 mm (FWHM) for a 400 micron Ci pointlike source embedded in a 10 cm radius water phantom.

  6. Analysis of spatial inhomogeneities in cumulus clouds using high spatial resolution Landsat data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Lindsay; Welch, R. M.; Musil, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Aircraft observations and high resolution Landsat MSS digital data are used to determine the sizes of spatial inhomogeneities ('holes') in cumulus clouds. The majority of holes are found near cloud edges, but the larger holes tend to be found in cloud interiors. Aircraft measurements show these cloud spatial inhomogeneities in the range of 100 to 500 m, while Landsat data show them in the range of 100 m to 3 km. The number of holes per cloud decreases exponentially with increasing hole diameter. Small clouds not only have smaller holes, but also fewer holes than large clouds. Large clouds have large holes in them, as well as large numbers of the smaller holes. The total cloud area occupied by holes increases with increasing cloud size.

  7. A fast, high spatial resolution optical tomographic scanner for measurement of absorption in gel dosimetry.

    PubMed

    van Doom, T; Bhat, M; Rutten, T P; Tran, T; Costanzo, A

    2005-06-01

    A fast tomographic optical density measurement system has been constructed and evaluated for application in Fricke 3D gel dosimetry. Although the potential for full three-dimensional radiation dosimetry with Fricke gel dosimeters has been extensively reported, its application has been limited due to a lack of fast optical density measurement systems. In this work, the emphasis of the design has been to achieve a short scan time through the use of precision optics and minimal moving parts. The system has been demonstrated in the laboratory to be able to achieve better than 1mm resolution and a scanning time per tomographic slice of 2.4 seconds. Full volumetric sampling of a 10 cm diameter by 7cm long cylinder can be achieved in 3 minutes. When applied with a Fricke based gel dosimeter a linear response between reconstructed CT number and absolute dose was better than 3%.

  8. High spatial resolution confocal microscope with independent excitation and detection scanning capabilities.

    PubMed

    Marcet, S; Ouellet-Plamondon, C; Francoeur, S

    2009-06-01

    We present the design of a confocal microscope adapted for optical spectroscopy and imaging at cryogenic temperatures. This system is based on the existing approach of partly inserting the optical components of the microscope inside a helium-bath cryostat. It provides a spatial resolution approaching the diffraction limit with a mechanical stability allowing uninterrupted integration times exceeding 10 h and allows keeping track of a single emitter for unlimited periods of time. Furthermore, our design allows scanning the excitation spot and detection area independently of the sample position. This feature provides the means to perform probeless transport experiments on one-dimensional nanostructures. The scanning capabilities of this microscope are fully detailed and characterized using the photoluminescence of single nitrogen dyads at 4.5 K.

  9. Analysis of spatial inhomogeneities in cumulus clouds using high spatial resolution Landsat data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Lindsay; Welch, R. M.; Musil, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Aircraft observations and high resolution Landsat MSS digital data are used to determine the sizes of spatial inhomogeneities ('holes') in cumulus clouds. The majority of holes are found near cloud edges, but the larger holes tend to be found in cloud interiors. Aircraft measurements show these cloud spatial inhomogeneities in the range of 100 to 500 m, while Landsat data show them in the range of 100 m to 3 km. The number of holes per cloud decreases exponentially with increasing hole diameter. Small clouds not only have smaller holes, but also fewer holes than large clouds. Large clouds have large holes in them, as well as large numbers of the smaller holes. The total cloud area occupied by holes increases with increasing cloud size.

  10. High-spatial-resolution monitoring of strong magnetic field using Rb vapor nanometric-thin cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakhumyan, G.; Leroy, C.; Pashayan-Leroy, Y.; Sarkisyan, D.; Auzinsh, M.

    2011-08-01

    We have implemented the so-called λ-Zeeman technique (LZT) to investigate individual hyperfine transitions between Zeeman sublevels of the Rb atoms in a strong external magnetic field B in the range of 2500 - 5000 G (recently it was established that LZT is very convenient for the range of 10 - 2500 G). Atoms are confined in a nanometric thin cell (NTC) with the thickness L = λ, where λ is the resonant wavelength 794 nm for Rb D 1 line. Narrow velocity selective optical pumping (VSOP) resonances in the transmission spectrum of the NTC are split into several components in a magnetic field with the frequency positions and transition probabilities depending on the B-field. Possible applications are described, such as magnetometers with nanometric local spatial resolution and tunable atomic frequency references.

  11. Nanogap based graphene coated AFM tips with high spatial resolution, conductivity and durability.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Mario; Gao, Teng; Yin, Zixuan; Zhang, Yanfeng; Liu, Zhongfan; Tong, Yuzhen; Shen, Ziyong; Duan, Huiling

    2013-11-21

    After one decade of analyzing the intrinsic properties of graphene, interest into the development of graphene-based devices and micro electromechanical systems is increasing. Here, we fabricate graphene-coated atomic force microscope tips by growing the graphene on copper foil and transferring it onto the apex of a commercially available AFM tip. The resulting tip exhibits surprising enhanced resolution in nanoscale electrical measurements. By means of topographic AFM maps and statistical analyses we determine that this superior performance may be related to the presence of a nanogap between the graphene and the tip apex, which reduces the tip radius and tip-sample contact area. In addition, the graphene-coated tips show a low tip-sample interaction, high conductivity and long life times. The novel fabrication-friendly tip could improve the quality and reliability of AFM experiments, while reducing the cost of AFM-based research.

  12. A new silicon drift detector for high spatial resolution STEM-XEDS: performance and applications.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Patrick J; Paulauskas, Tadas; Rowlands, Neil; Nicholls, Alan W; Low, Ke-Bin; Bhadare, Santokh; Klie, Robert F

    2014-08-01

    A newly designed, 100 mm2, silicon drift detector has been installed on an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope equipped with an ultra-high resolution pole piece, without requiring column modifications. With its unique, windowless design, the detector's active region is in close proximity to the sample, resulting in a dramatic increase in count rate, while demonstrating an increased sensitivity to low energy X-rays and a muted tilt dependence. Numerous examples of X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry are presented on relevant materials such as Al x Ga1-x N nanowires, perovskite oxides, and polycrystalline CdTe thin films, across both varying length scales and accelerating voltages.

  13. High spatial resolution fiber optical sensors for simultaneous temperature and chemical sensing for energy industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Aidong; Huang, Sheng; Li, Shuo; Zaghloul, Mohamed; Ohodnicki, Paul; Buric, Michael; Chen, Kevin P.

    2017-05-01

    This paper demonstrates optical fibers as high-temperature sensor platforms. Through engineering and onfiber integration of functional metal oxide sensory materials, we report the development of an integrated sensor solution to perform temperature and chemical measurements for high-temperature energy applications. Using the Rayleigh optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) distributed sensing scheme, the temperature and hydrogen concentration were measured along the fiber. To overcome the weak Rayleighbackscattering intensity exhibited by conventional optical fibers, an ultrafast laser was used to enhance the Rayleigh scattering by a direct laser writing method. Using the Rayleigh-enhanced fiber as sensor platform, both temperature and hydrogen reaction were monitored at high temperature up to 750°C with 4-mm spatial resolution.

  14. Reversible cryo-arrest for imaging molecules in living cells at high spatial resolution

    PubMed Central

    Sabet, Ola; Wehner, Frank; Konitsiotis, Antonios; Fuhr, Günther R.; Bastiaens, Philippe I. H.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of molecules in living cells hamper precise imaging of molecular patterns by functional and super resolution microscopy. Circumventing lethal chemical fixation, an on-stage cryo-arrest was developed for consecutive imaging of molecular patterns within the same living, but arrested cells. The reversibility of consecutive cryo-arrests was demonstrated by the high survival rate of different cell lines and intact growth factor signaling that was not perturbed by stress response. Reversible cryo-arrest was applied to study the evolution of ligand-induced receptor tyrosine kinase activation at different scales. The nanoscale clustering of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in the plasma membrane was assessed by single molecule localization microscopy and endosomal microscale activity patterns of ephrin receptor type-A (EphA2) by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. We thereby demonstrate that reversible cryo-arrest allows the precise determination of molecular patterns while conserving the dynamic capabilities of living cells. PMID:27400419

  15. High spatial and temporal resolution photon/electron counting detector for synchrotron radiation research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Lebedev, G. V.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J. V.; Hull, J. S.; McPhate, J. B.; Jozwiak, C.; Chen, Y.; Guo, J. H.; Shen, Z. X.; Hussain, Z.

    2007-10-01

    This paper reports on the development of a high resolution electron/photon/ion imaging system which detects events with a timing accuracy of <160 ps FWHM and a two-dimensional spatial accuracy of ˜50 μm FWHM. The event counting detector uses microchannel plates for signal amplification and can sustain counting rates exceeding 1.5 MHz for evenly distributed events (0.4 MHz with 10% dead time for randomly distributed events). The detector combined with a time-of-flight angular resolved photoelectron energy analyzer was tested at a synchrotron beamline. The results of these measurements illustrate the unique capabilities of the analytical system, allowing simultaneous imaging of photoelectrons in momentum space and measurement of the energy spectrum, as well as filtering the data in user defined temporal and/or spatial windows.

  16. Correlative electron and X-ray microscopy: probing chemistry and bonding with high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Goode, Angela E; Porter, Alexandra E; Ryan, Mary P; McComb, David W

    2015-02-07

    Two powerful and complementary techniques for chemical characterisation of nanoscale systems are electron energy-loss spectroscopy in the scanning transmission electron microscope, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the scanning transmission X-ray microscope. A correlative approach to spectro-microscopy may not only bridge the gaps in spatial and spectral resolution which exist between the two instruments, but also offer unique opportunities for nanoscale characterisation. This review will discuss the similarities of the two spectroscopy techniques and the state of the art for each microscope. Case studies have been selected to illustrate the benefits and limitations of correlative electron and X-ray microscopy techniques. In situ techniques and radiation damage are also discussed.

  17. High-spatial-resolution scanning capacitance microscope using all-metal probe with quartz tuning fork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naitou, Yuichi; Ookubo, Norio

    2004-09-01

    The scanning capacitance microscope (SCM) reported here uses a frequency modulation (FM) technique to control the distance between the sample and an all-metal probe. The probe was attached to a quartz tuning fork in a configuration minimizing the perturbation due to the probe. The FM-SCM yields two images of ∂C/∂V and ∂C/∂Z signals, where C is capacitance sensed by the probe, Z the probe-sample distance, and V a bias voltage, respectively. On a cross section of a field effect transistor, the two-dimensional p -n junction locus was observed with a spatial resolution better than 5nm in the ∂C/∂V image. The ∂C/∂Z images of polysilicon gate electrodes and highly doped source/drain regions have higher contrast than the ∂C/∂V images.

  18. New fluorescence imaging probe with high spatial resolution for in vivo applications.

    PubMed

    Bonnans, V; Gharbi, T; Pieralli, C; Wacogne, B; Humbert, Ph

    2004-01-01

    A new fiberized fluorescence imaging probe is presented. This device can potentially be used for a wide range of biological or medical applications. By exploiting the chromatic aberrations of gradient index lenses, the excitation blue or near-UV excitation light is focused on the sample surface, while the red fluorescence signal is efficiently launched back to collecting fibers. The excitation fiber is single mode at the working wavelength so that a resolution of 5 microm is obtained over a scanning area of several square millimeters. Experimental fluorescence images are presented. They concern either self-fabricated fluorescent microsamples or views of leaves that constitute an example of biological tissues analysis. The probe can also be adapted for spectroscopic investigations.

  19. Mapping ephemeral stream networks in desert environments using very-high-spatial-resolution multispectral remote sensing

    DOE PAGES

    Hamada, Yuki; O'Connor, Ben L.; Orr, Andrew B.; ...

    2016-03-26

    In this paper, understanding the spatial patterns of ephemeral streams is crucial for understanding how hydrologic processes influence the abundance and distribution of wildlife habitats in desert regions. Available methods for mapping ephemeral streams at the watershed scale typically underestimate the size of channel networks. Although remote sensing is an effective means of collecting data and obtaining information on large, inaccessible areas, conventional techniques for extracting channel features are not sufficient in regions that have small topographic gradients and subtle target-background spectral contrast. By using very high resolution multispectral imagery, we developed a new algorithm that applies landscape information tomore » map ephemeral channels in desert regions of the Southwestern United States where utility-scale solar energy development is occurring. Knowledge about landscape features and structures was integrated into the algorithm using a series of spectral transformation and spatial statistical operations to integrate information about landscape features and structures. The algorithm extracted ephemeral stream channels at a local scale, with the result that approximately 900% more ephemeral streams was identified than what were identified by using the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Hydrography Dataset. The accuracy of the algorithm in detecting channel areas was as high as 92%, and its accuracy in delineating channel center lines was 91% when compared to a subset of channel networks that were digitized by using the very high resolution imagery. Although the algorithm captured stream channels in desert landscapes across various channel sizes and forms, it often underestimated stream headwaters and channels obscured by bright soils and sparse vegetation. While further improvement is warranted, the algorithm provides an effective means of obtaining detailed information about ephemeral streams, and it could make a significant contribution

  20. Mapping ephemeral stream networks in desert environments using very-high-spatial-resolution multispectral remote sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Yuki; O'Connor, Ben L.; Orr, Andrew B.; Wuthrich, Kelsey K.

    2016-03-26

    In this paper, understanding the spatial patterns of ephemeral streams is crucial for understanding how hydrologic processes influence the abundance and distribution of wildlife habitats in desert regions. Available methods for mapping ephemeral streams at the watershed scale typically underestimate the size of channel networks. Although remote sensing is an effective means of collecting data and obtaining information on large, inaccessible areas, conventional techniques for extracting channel features are not sufficient in regions that have small topographic gradients and subtle target-background spectral contrast. By using very high resolution multispectral imagery, we developed a new algorithm that applies landscape information to map ephemeral channels in desert regions of the Southwestern United States where utility-scale solar energy development is occurring. Knowledge about landscape features and structures was integrated into the algorithm using a series of spectral transformation and spatial statistical operations to integrate information about landscape features and structures. The algorithm extracted ephemeral stream channels at a local scale, with the result that approximately 900% more ephemeral streams was identified than what were identified by using the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Hydrography Dataset. The accuracy of the algorithm in detecting channel areas was as high as 92%, and its accuracy in delineating channel center lines was 91% when compared to a subset of channel networks that were digitized by using the very high resolution imagery. Although the algorithm captured stream channels in desert landscapes across various channel sizes and forms, it often underestimated stream headwaters and channels obscured by bright soils and sparse vegetation. While further improvement is warranted, the algorithm provides an effective means of obtaining detailed information about ephemeral streams, and it could make a significant contribution toward

  1. Predicting vehicular emissions in high spatial resolution using pervasively measured transportation data and microscopic emissions model

    SciTech Connect

    Nyhan, Marguerite; Sobolevsky, Stanislav; Kang, Chaogui; Robinson, Prudence; Corti, Andrea; Szell, Michael; Streets, David; Lu, Zifeng; Britter, Rex; Barrett, Steven R. H.; Ratti, Carlo

    2016-06-07

    Air pollution related to traffic emissions pose an especially significant problem in cities; this is due to its adverse impact on human health and well-being. Previous studies which have aimed to quantify emissions from the transportation sector have been limited by either simulated or coarsely resolved traffic volume data. Emissions inventories form the basis of urban pollution models, therefore in this study, Global Positioning System (GPS) trajectory data from a taxi fleet of over 15,000 vehicles were analyzed with the aim of predicting air pollution emissions for Singapore. This novel approach enabled the quantification of instantaneous drive cycle parameters in high spatio-temporal resolution, which provided the basis for a microscopic emissions model. Carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate matter (PM) emissions were thus estimated. Highly localized areas of elevated emissions levels were identified, with a spatio-temporal precision not possible with previously used methods for estimating emissions. Relatively higher emissions areas were mainly concentrated in a few districts that were the Singapore Downtown Core area, to the north of the central urban region and to the east of it. Daily emissions quantified for the total motor vehicle population of Singapore were found to be comparable to another emissions dataset Results demonstrated that high resolution spatio-temporal vehicle traces detected using GPS in large taxi fleets could be used to infer highly localized areas of elevated acceleration and air pollution emissions in cities, and may become a complement to traditional emission estimates, especially in emerging cities and countries where reliable fine-grained urban air quality data is not easily available. This is the first study of its kind to investigate measured microscopic vehicle movement in tandem with microscopic emissions modeling for a substantial study domain.

  2. Monitoring the Environment using High-Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing: Contribution to Health Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourre, Y. M.; Lacaux, J.

    2007-12-01

    Presence (density) of mosquitoes linked to Rift Valley Fever (RVF) epidemics in the Ferlo (Senegal) is evaluated by monitoring the environment from space. Using five SPOT-5 high-resolution images (~10m spatial resolution, on August 17th, 2006) a meridional transect of 290 x 60 km2 is analyzed for the first time. Four major ecozones are thus identified: Senegal River valley; sandy Ferlo; sandy-clayey Ferlo; and steppe/cultivated areas, from north to south, respectively. An integrated/multidisciplinary approach using remote-sensing leads to a composited Zones Potentially Occupied by Mosquitoes (or ZPOMs, with extrema). It is found that at the peak of the rainy season, the area occupied by ponds is of 12,817 ha ± 10% (i.e., ~ 0.8 % of the transect) with a mean ZPOM 17 times larger i.e.: 212,813 ha ± 10 % (or ~14 % of the transect). ZPOMs characteristics (minimum and maximum) at the ecozones levels with different hydrological mechanisms, are presented. Ponds and ZPOMs inter-annual variabilities and RVF risks, are subsequently highlighted by comparing statistics in the so-called Barkedji zone (sandy-clayey Ferlo with a hydrofossil riverbed), for the very humid year of 2003, and the near normal rainfall year of 2006. It is shown that at the end of August 2003/2006, ponds (ZPOMs) areas, were already ~22 (~5) times larger. The key roles played by isolated ponds for animals' exposure to RVF risks are thus identified. These results highlight the importance of monitoring the changing environment when linkages with public health exist. The ZPOM approach is to be adapted for other vector-borne diseases such as malaria, dengue fever, in different places of the world. Results are meant to be included into Health Information Systems (HIS) on an operational basis, in order to minimize socio-economical impacts from epidemics.

  3. Predicting vehicular emissions in high spatial resolution using pervasively measured transportation data and microscopic emissions model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyhan, Marguerite; Sobolevsky, Stanislav; Kang, Chaogui; Robinson, Prudence; Corti, Andrea; Szell, Michael; Streets, David; Lu, Zifeng; Britter, Rex; Barrett, Steven R. H.; Ratti, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    Air pollution related to traffic emissions pose an especially significant problem in cities; this is due to its adverse impact on human health and well-being. Previous studies which have aimed to quantify emissions from the transportation sector have been limited by either simulated or coarsely resolved traffic volume data. Emissions inventories form the basis of urban pollution models, therefore in this study, Global Positioning System (GPS) trajectory data from a taxi fleet of over 15,000 vehicles were analyzed with the aim of predicting air pollution emissions for Singapore. This novel approach enabled the quantification of instantaneous drive cycle parameters in high spatio-temporal resolution, which provided the basis for a microscopic emissions model. Carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate matter (PM) emissions were thus estimated. Highly localized areas of elevated emissions levels were identified, with a spatio-temporal precision not possible with previously used methods for estimating emissions. Relatively higher emissions areas were mainly concentrated in a few districts that were the Singapore Downtown Core area, to the north of the central urban region and to the east of it. Daily emissions quantified for the total motor vehicle population of Singapore were found to be comparable to another emissions dataset. Results demonstrated that high-resolution spatio-temporal vehicle traces detected using GPS in large taxi fleets could be used to infer highly localized areas of elevated acceleration and air pollution emissions in cities, and may become a complement to traditional emission estimates, especially in emerging cities and countries where reliable fine-grained urban air quality data is not easily available. This is the first study of its kind to investigate measured microscopic vehicle movement in tandem with microscopic emissions modeling for a substantial study domain.

  4. Comparing carbon storage of Siberian tundra and taiga permafrost ecosystems at very high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewert, Matthias B.; Hanisch, Jessica; Weiss, Niels; Kuhry, Peter; Maximov, Trofim C.; Hugelius, Gustaf

    2015-10-01

    Permafrost-affected ecosystems are important components in the global carbon (C) cycle that, despite being vulnerable to disturbances under climate change, remain poorly understood. This study investigates ecosystem carbon storage in two contrasting continuous permafrost areas of NE and East Siberia. Detailed partitioning of soil organic carbon (SOC) and phytomass carbon (PC) is analyzed for one tundra (Kytalyk) and one taiga (Spasskaya Pad/Neleger) study area. In total, 57 individual field sites (24 and 33 in the respective areas) have been sampled for PC and SOC, including the upper permafrost. Landscape partitioning of ecosystem C storage was derived from thematic upscaling of field observations using a land cover classification from very high resolution (2 × 2 m) satellite imagery. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling was used to explore patterns in C distribution. In both environments the ecosystem C is mostly stored in the soil (≥86%). At the landscape scale C stocks are primarily controlled by the presence of thermokarst depressions (alases). In the tundra landscape, site-scale variability of C is controlled by periglacial geomorphological features, while in the taiga, local differences in catenary position, soil texture, and forest successions are more important. Very high resolution remote sensing is highly beneficial to the quantification of C storage. Detailed knowledge of ecosystem C storage and ground ice distribution is needed to predict permafrost landscape vulnerability to projected climatic changes. We argue that vegetation dynamics are unlikely to offset mineralization of thawed permafrost C and that landscape-scale reworking of SOC represents the largest potential changes to C cycling.

  5. Estimating global and North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; Maasakkers, J. D.; Lundgren, E.; Andrews, A. E.; Biraud, S. C.; Boesch, H.; Bowman, K. W.; Deutscher, N. M.; Dubey, M. K.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Hase, F.; Kuze, A.; Notholt, J.; Ohyama, H.; Parker, R.; Payne, V. H.; Sussmann, R.; Sweeney, C.; Velazco, V. A.; Warneke, T.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wunch, D.

    2015-06-01

    We use 2009-2011 space-borne methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to estimate global and North American methane emissions with 4° × 5° and up to 50 km × 50 km spatial resolution, respectively. GEOS-Chem and GOSAT data are first evaluated with atmospheric methane observations from surface and tower networks (NOAA/ESRL, TCCON) and aircraft (NOAA/ESRL, HIPPO), using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as a platform to facilitate comparison of GOSAT with in situ data. This identifies a high-latitude bias between the GOSAT data and GEOS-Chem that we correct via quadratic regression. Our global adjoint-based inversion yields a total methane source of 539 Tg a-1 with some important regional corrections to the EDGARv4.2 inventory used as a prior. Results serve as dynamic boundary conditions for an analytical inversion of North American methane emissions using radial basis functions to achieve high resolution of large sources and provide error characterization. We infer a US anthropogenic methane source of 40.2-42.7 Tg a-1, as compared to 24.9-27.0 Tg a-1 in the EDGAR and EPA bottom-up inventories, and 30.0-44.5 Tg a-1 in recent inverse studies. Our estimate is supported by independent surface and aircraft data and by previous inverse studies for California. We find that the emissions are highest in the southern-central US, the Central Valley of California, and Florida wetlands; large isolated point sources such as the US Four Corners also contribute. Using prior information on source locations, we attribute 29-44 % of US anthropogenic methane emissions to livestock, 22-31 % to oil/gas, 20 % to landfills/wastewater, and 11-15 % to coal. Wetlands contribute an additional 9.0-10.1 Tg a-1.

  6. Estimating global and North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; Maasakkers, J. D.; Biraud, S. C.; Boesch, H.; Bowman, K. W.; Deutscher, N. M.; Dubey, M. K.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Hase, F.; Kuze, A.; Notholt, J.; Ohyama, H.; Parker, R.; Payne, V. H.; Sussmann, R.; Velazco, V. A.; Warneke, T.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wunch, D.

    2015-02-01

    We use 2009-2011 space-borne methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to constrain global and North American inversions of methane emissions with 4° × 5° and up to 50 km × 50 km spatial resolution, respectively. The GOSAT data are first evaluated with atmospheric methane observations from surface networks (NOAA, TCCON) and aircraft (NOAA/DOE, HIPPO), using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as a platform to facilitate comparison of GOSAT with in situ data. This identifies a high-latitude bias between the GOSAT data and GEOS-Chem that we correct via quadratic regression. The surface and aircraft data are subsequently used for independent evaluation of the methane source inversions. Our global adjoint-based inversion yields a total methane source of 539 Tg a-1 and points to a large East Asian overestimate in the EDGARv4.2 inventory used as a prior. Results serve as dynamic boundary conditions for an analytical inversion of North American methane emissions using radial basis functions to achieve high resolution of large sources and provide full error characterization. We infer a US anthropogenic methane source of 40.2-42.7 Tg a-1, as compared to 24.9-27.0 Tg a-1 in the EDGAR and EPA bottom-up inventories, and 30.0-44.5 Tg a-1 in recent inverse studies. Our estimate is supported by independent surface and aircraft data and by previous inverse studies for California. We find that the emissions are highest in the South-Central US, the Central Valley of California, and Florida wetlands, large isolated point sources such as the US Four Corners also contribute. We attribute 29-44% of US anthropogenic methane emissions to livestock, 22-31% to oil/gas, 20% to landfills/waste water, and 11-15% to coal with an additional 9.0-10.1 Tg a-1 source from wetlands.

  7. GIEMS-D3: A new long-term, dynamical, high-spatial resolution inundation extent dataset at global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aires, Filipe; Miolane, Léo; Prigent, Catherine; Pham Duc, Binh; Papa, Fabrice; Fluet-Chouinard, Etienne; Lehner, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    The Global Inundation Extent from Multi-Satellites (GIEMS) provides multi-year monthly variations of the global surface water extent at 25kmx25km resolution. It is derived from multiple satellite observations. Its spatial resolution is usually compatible with climate model outputs and with global land surface model grids but is clearly not adequate for local applications that require the characterization of small individual water bodies. There is today a strong demand for high-resolution inundation extent datasets, for a large variety of applications such as water management, regional hydrological modeling, or for the analysis of mosquitos-related diseases. A new procedure is introduced to downscale the GIEMS low spatial resolution inundations to a 3 arc second (90 m) dataset. The methodology is based on topography and hydrography information from the HydroSHEDS database. A new floodability index is adopted and an innovative smoothing procedure is developed to ensure the smooth transition, in the high-resolution maps, between the low-resolution boxes from GIEMS. Topography information is relevant for natural hydrology environments controlled by elevation, but is more limited in human-modified basins. However, the proposed downscaling approach is compatible with forthcoming fusion with other more pertinent satellite information in these difficult regions. The resulting GIEMS-D3 database is the only high spatial resolution inundation database available globally at the monthly time scale over the 1993-2007 period. GIEMS-D3 is assessed by analyzing its spatial and temporal variability, and evaluated by comparisons to other independent satellite observations from visible (Google Earth and Landsat), infrared (MODIS) and active microwave (SAR).

  8. High Spatial Resolution Isotopic Abundance Measurements by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry: Status and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeegan, K. D.

    2007-12-01

    Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, SIMS or ion microprobe analysis, has become an important tool for geochemistry because of its ability study the distributions of elemental and isotopic abundances in situ on polished samples with high (typically a few microns to sub-micron) spatial resolution. In addition, SIMS exhibits high sensitivity for a wide range of elements (H to Pu) so that isotope analyses can sometimes be performed for elements that comprise only trace quantities of some mineral phase (e.g., Pb in zircon) or on major and/or minor elements in very small samples (e.g., presolar dust grains). Offsetting these positive attributes are analytical difficulties due to the complexity of the sputtering source of analyte ions: (1) relatively efficient production of molecular ion species (especially from a complex matrix such as most natural minerals) that cause interferences at the same nominal mass as atomic ions of interest, and (2) quantitation problems caused by variations in the ionization efficiencies of different elements and/or isotopes depending upon the chemical state of the sample surface during sputtering--the so-called "matrix effects". Despite the availability of high mass resolution instruments (e.g., SHRIMP II/RG, CAMECA 1270/1280/NanoSIMS), the molecular ion interferences effectively limit the region of the mass table that can be investigated in most samples to isotope systems at Ni or lighter or at Os or heavier. The matrix effects and the sensitivity of instrumental mass discrimination to the physical state of the sample surface can hamper reproducibility and have contributed to a view that SIMS analyses, especially for so- called stable isotopes, are most appropriate for extraterrestrial samples which are often small, rare, and can exhibit large magnitude isotopic effects. Recent improvements in instrumentation and technique have extended the scope of SIMS isotopic analyses and applications now range from geochronology to paleoclimatology to

  9. High Spatial Resolution Analysis of Carbonates by In Situ Excimer Laser Ablation MC-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuttleworth, S.; Lloyd, N.; Douthitt, C.

    2012-12-01

    Speleothems are important climate archives. The time resolution of the paleochlimate proxies depends on the growth rates and the precision limitation of the analytical instrumentation [1]. As a consequence, for speleothems, better analytical precision combined with better spatial resolution will always be the goal, driven by a need to probe the timing and duration of climate events [1]. The Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus with Jet Interface option offers unparalleled MC-ICP-MS sensitivity for heavy elements. An ion yield of >3 % has previously been reported for uranium solutions introduced by desolvating nebulizer[2]. For laser ablation Hf, the Jet Interface with N2 addition significantly improved sensitivity, which allowed precise and accurate 176Hf/177Hf ratios to be calculated using a spot size of just 25 μm diameter [3]. A Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus with Jet Interface option was coupled with a Photon Machines excimer laser ablation system. This system features a short pulse width (4ns) 193 nm excimer laser and the HELEX 2 volume sample cell. The 193nm wavelength has been shown to reduce the particle size distribution of the aerosol produced by the laser ablation process [4] and this in turn has been shown to help minimize the effects of fractionation by ensuring that particles are in a size range so as to avoid incomplete vaporization and ionization in the plasma [5]. In this work we investigate U-Th dating of carbonates. Accurate LA U-Th isotope measurements on carbonates with U concentrations smaller than 1 μg/g are difficult due to small ion beams [1]. Hoffman et. al. [1] noted individual LA U-Th ratio precisions of about 2% (2 sigma) on a 134 ka sample with 134 μg/g U concentration. In this work we apply a combination of the high sampling efficiency two volume cell plus mixed gas plasmas to further enhance the capability. [1] Hoffman, D.L., et al. (2009). Chemical Geology. 259 253-261 [2] Bouman, C., et al. (2009). Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta. 73

  10. The altitude of Neptune cloud features from high-spatial-resolution near-infrared spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbard, S. G.; de Pater, I.; Roe, H. G.; Martin, S.; Macintosh, B. A.; Max, C. E.

    2003-12-01

    We report on observations of Neptune from the 10-meter W.M. Keck II Telescope on June 17-18 (UT) 2000 and August 2-3 (UT) 2002 using the adaptive optics (AO) system to obtain a spatial resolution of 0.06 arcseconds. With this spatial resolution we can obtain spectra of individual bright features on the disk of Neptune in a filter centered near 2 microns. The use of a gas-only, simple reflecting layer radiative transfer model allows us to estimate the best fit altitudes of 18 bright features seen on these 4 nights and to set a constraint on the fraction of hydrogen in ortho/para equilibrium. On these nights there were three main types of features observed: northern hemisphere features in the range from +30 to -45 degrees; southern hemisphere features in the range from -30 to -50 degrees; and small southern features at -70 degrees. We find that the altitudes of the northern features are in the range from 0.023-0.064 bar, which places them in Neptune's stratosphere. Southern features at -30 to -50 degrees are mainly at altitudes from 0.10 to 0.14 bars. The small features at -70 degrees are somewhat deeper in the upper troposphere, at 0.17 and 0.27 bars. This pattern of features located at higher altitudes in the northern hemisphere and lower altitudes in the south has also been noted by previous observers. The best fits for all the observed spectra give a value of 1.0 for the fraction of hydrogen in ortho/para equilibrium; the value of the helium fraction is less well constrained by the data at 0.24. We suggest that the southern mid-latitude features are methane haze circulated up from below, while the -70° features may be isolated areas of upwelling in a general area of subsidence. Northern bright features may be due to subsidence of stratospheric haze material rather than upwelling and condensation of methane gas. We suggest that convection efficiently transports methane ice clouds to the tropopause in the Southern mid latitudes and thus plays a key role in the

  11. The variable stellar wind of Rigel probed at high spatial and spectral resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesneau, O.; Kaufer, A.; Stahl, O.; Colvinter, C.; Spang, A.; Dessart, L.; Prinja, R.; Chini, R.

    2014-06-01

    Context. Luminous BA-type supergiants are the brightest stars in the visible that can be observed in distant galaxies and are potentially accurate distance indicators. The impact of the variability of the stellar winds on the distance determination remains poorly understood. Aims: Our aim is to probe the inhomogeneous structures in the stellar wind using spectro-interferometric monitoring. Methods: We present a spatially resolved, high-spectral resolution (R = 12 000) K-band temporal monitoring of the bright supergiant β Orionis (Rigel, B8 Iab) using AMBER at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). Rigel was observed in the Brγ line and its nearby continuum once per month over 3 months in 2006-2007, and 5 months in 2009-2010. These unprecedented observations were complemented by contemporaneous optical high-resolution spectroscopy. We analyse the near-IR spectra and visibilities with the 1D non-LTE radiative-transfer code CMFGEN. The differential and closure phase signals are evidence of asymmetries that are interpreted as perturbations of the wind. Results: A systematic visibility decrease is observed across the Brγ line indicating that at a radius of about 1.25 R∗ the photospheric absorption is filled by emission from the wind. During the 2006-2007 period the Brγ and likely the continuum forming regions were larger than in the 2009-2010 epoch. Using CMFGEN we infer a mass-loss rate change of about 20% between the two epochs. We also find time variations in the differential visibilities and phases. The 2006-2007 period is characterised by noticeable variations in the differential visibilities in Doppler position and width and by weak variations in differential and closure phase. The 2009-2010 period is much quieter with virtually no detectable variations in the dispersed visibilities but a strong S-shaped signal is observed in differential phase coinciding with a strong ejection event discernible in the optical spectra. The differential phase signal

  12. Estimating global and North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data

    DOE PAGES

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; ...

    2015-02-18

    We use 2009–2011 space-borne methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to constrain global and North American inversions of methane emissions with 4° × 5° and up to 50 km × 50 km spatial resolution, respectively. The GOSAT data are first evaluated with atmospheric methane observations from surface networks (NOAA, TCCON) and aircraft (NOAA/DOE, HIPPO), using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as a platform to facilitate comparison of GOSAT with in situ data. This identifies a high-latitude bias between the GOSAT data and GEOS-Chem that we correct via quadratic regression. The surface and aircraft data are subsequently usedmore » for independent evaluation of the methane source inversions. Our global adjoint-based inversion yields a total methane source of 539 Tg a−1 and points to a large East Asian overestimate in the EDGARv4.2 inventory used as a prior. Results serve as dynamic boundary conditions for an analytical inversion of North American methane emissions using radial basis functions to achieve high resolution of large sources and provide full error characterization. We infer a US anthropogenic methane source of 40.2–42.7 Tg a−1, as compared to 24.9–27.0 Tg a−1 in the EDGAR and EPA bottom-up inventories, and 30.0–44.5 Tg a−1 in recent inverse studies. Our estimate is supported by independent surface and aircraft data and by previous inverse studies for California. We find that the emissions are highest in the South-Central US, the Central Valley of California, and Florida wetlands, large isolated point sources such as the US Four Corners also contribute. We attribute 29–44% of US anthropogenic methane emissions to livestock, 22–31% to oil/gas, 20% to landfills/waste water, and 11–15% to coal with an additional 9.0–10.1 Tg a−1 source from wetlands.« less

  13. Estimating global and North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data

    DOE PAGES

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; ...

    2015-06-30

    We use 2009–2011 space-borne methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to estimate global and North American methane emissions with 4° × 5° and up to 50 km × 50 km spatial resolution, respectively. GEOS-Chem and GOSAT data are first evaluated with atmospheric methane observations from surface and tower networks (NOAA/ESRL, TCCON) and aircraft (NOAA/ESRL, HIPPO), using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as a platform to facilitate comparison of GOSAT with in situ data. This identifies a high-latitude bias between the GOSAT data and GEOS-Chem that we correct via quadratic regression. Our global adjoint-based inversion yields a totalmore » methane source of 539 Tg a−1 with some important regional corrections to the EDGARv4.2 inventory used as a prior. Results serve as dynamic boundary conditions for an analytical inversion of North American methane emissions using radial basis functions to achieve high resolution of large sources and provide error characterization. We infer a US anthropogenic methane source of 40.2–42.7 Tg a−1, as compared to 24.9–27.0 Tg a−1 in the EDGAR and EPA bottom-up inventories, and 30.0–44.5 Tg a−1 in recent inverse studies. Our estimate is supported by independent surface and aircraft data and by previous inverse studies for California. We find that the emissions are highest in the southern–central US, the Central Valley of California, and Florida wetlands; large isolated point sources such as the US Four Corners also contribute. Using prior information on source locations, we attribute 29–44 % of US anthropogenic methane emissions to livestock, 22–31 % to oil/gas, 20 % to landfills/wastewater, and 11–15 % to coal. Wetlands contribute an additional 9.0–10.1 Tg a−1.« less

  14. High-spatial resolution and high-spectral resolution detector for use in the measurement of solar flare hard X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, U. D.; Orwig, Larry E.

    1988-01-01

    In the areas of high spatial resolution, the evaluation of a hard X-ray detector with 65 micron spatial resolution for operation in the energy range from 30 to 400 keV is proposed. The basic detector is a thick large-area scintillator faceplate, composed of a matrix of high-density scintillating glass fibers, attached to a proximity type image intensifier tube with a resistive-anode digital readout system. Such a detector, combined with a coded-aperture mask, would be ideal for use as a modest-sized hard X-ray imaging instrument up to X-ray energies as high as several hundred keV. As an integral part of this study it was also proposed that several techniques be critically evaluated for X-ray image coding which could be used with this detector. In the area of high spectral resolution, it is proposed to evaluate two different types of detectors for use as X-ray spectrometers for solar flares: planar silicon detectors and high-purity germanium detectors (HPGe). Instruments utilizing these high-spatial-resolution detectors for hard X-ray imaging measurements from 30 to 400 keV and high-spectral-resolution detectors for measurements over a similar energy range would be ideally suited for making crucial solar flare observations during the upcoming maximum in the solar cycle.

  15. X-ray phase-contrast tomography for high-spatial-resolution zebrafish muscle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vågberg, William; Larsson, Daniel H.; Li, Mei; Arner, Anders; Hertz, Hans M.

    2015-11-01

    Imaging of muscular structure with cellular or subcellular detail in whole-body animal models is of key importance for understanding muscular disease and assessing interventions. Classical histological methods for high-resolution imaging methods require excision, fixation and staining. Here we show that the three-dimensional muscular structure of unstained whole zebrafish can be imaged with sub-5 μm detail with X-ray phase-contrast tomography. Our method relies on a laboratory propagation-based phase-contrast system tailored for detection of low-contrast 4-6 μm subcellular myofibrils. The method is demonstrated on 20 days post fertilization zebrafish larvae and comparative histology confirms that we resolve individual myofibrils in the whole-body animal. X-ray imaging of healthy zebrafish show the expected structured muscle pattern while specimen with a dystrophin deficiency (sapje) displays an unstructured pattern, typical of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The method opens up for whole-body imaging with sub-cellular detail also of other types of soft tissue and in different animal models.

  16. High-spatial-resolution mapping of the oxygen concentration in cortical tissue (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaswal, Rajeshwer S.; Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Fu, Buyin; Boas, David A.; Sakadžic, Sava

    2016-03-01

    Due to a lack of imaging tools for high-resolution imaging of cortical tissue oxygenation, the detailed maps of the oxygen partial pressure (PO2) around arterioles, venules, and capillaries remain largely unknown. Therefore, we have limited knowledge about the mechanisms that secure sufficient oxygen delivery in microvascular domains during brain activation, and provide some metabolic reserve capacity in diseases that affect either microvascular networks or the regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF). To address this challenge, we applied a Two-Photon PO2 Microscopy to map PO2 at different depths in mice cortices. Measurements were performed through the cranial window in the anesthetized healthy mice as well as in the mouse models of microvascular dysfunctions. In addition, microvascular morphology was recorded by the two-photon microscopy at the end of each experiment and subsequently segmented. Co-registration of the PO2 measurements and exact microvascular morphology enabled quantification of the tissue PO2 dependence on distance from the arterioles, capillaries, and venules at various depths. Our measurements reveal significant spatial heterogeneity of the cortical tissue PO2 distribution that is dominated by the high oxygenation in periarteriolar spaces. In cases of impaired oxygen delivery due to microvascular dysfunction, significant reduction in tissue oxygenation away from the arterioles was observed. These tissue domains may be the initial sites of cortical injury that can further exacerbate the progression of the disease.

  17. Reconstruction of the Abydos ROSETTA/Philae landing site at very high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capanna, Claire; Jorda, Laurent; Lamy, Philippe L.; Gaskell, Robert W.; FAURY, Guillaume; DELMAS, Cédric; DURAND, Joelle; GAUDON, Philippe; GARMIER, Romain; JURADO, Eric; OSIRIS Team

    2016-10-01

    The Rosetta/Philae module landed in a very uneven area called Abydos. The landing site has beenidentified on images of this region acquired by the OSIRIS imaging system aboard the orbiterbefore (Oct. 2014) and after (Dec. 2014) the landing (Lamy et al., in prep.).Abydos exhibits a complex topography including numerous cliffs, several overhangs and lots ofboulders (Lucchetti et al. A&A 585, L1, 2016). This makes its reconstruction a challenging taskfor 3D reconstruction techniques.We use a very carefully selected set of high-resolution OSIRIS images acquired betweenMarch 2016 and August 2016 to reconstruct the detailed topography of the Abydos neighborhoodusing a method called ``multiresolution photoclinometry by deformation'' (MPCD, Capanna et al.,The Visual Computer, 29(6-8): 825-835, 2013). We also check the compatibility of the local DTMcomparing the panoramic images obtained by the CIVA-P instrument aboard PHILAE with syntheticimages created with the DTM, and we compute the distances, incidence and emission angles duringthe acquisition of these images.

  18. Radiofrequency field inhomogeneity compensation in high spatial resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passeri, Alessandro; Mazzuca, Stefano; Del Bene, Veronica

    2014-06-01

    Clinical magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) is a non-invasive functional technique, whose mathematical framework falls into the category of linear inverse problems. However, its use in medical diagnostics is hampered by two main problems, both linked to the Fourier-based technique usually implemented for spectra reconstruction: poor spatial resolution and severe blurring in the spatial localization of the reconstructed spectra. Moreover, the intrinsic ill-posedness of the MRSI problem might be worsened by (i) spatially dependent distortions of the static magnetic field (B0) distribution, as well as by (ii) inhomogeneity in the power deposition distribution of the radiofrequency magnetic field (B1). Among several alternative methods, slim (Spectral Localization by IMaging) and bslim (B0 compensated slim) are reconstruction algorithms in which a priori information concerning the spectroscopic target is introduced into the reconstruction kernel. Nonetheless, the influence of the B1 field, particularly when its operating wavelength is close to the size of the human organs being studied, continues to be disregarded. starslim (STAtic and Radiofrequency-compensated slim), an evolution of the slim and bslim methods, is therefore proposed, in which the transformation kernel also includes the B1 field inhomogeneity map, thus allowing almost complete 3D modelling of the MRSI problem. Moreover, an original method for the experimental determination of the B1 field inhomogeneity map specific to the target under evaluation is also included. The compensation capabilities of the proposed method have been tested and illustrated using synthetic raw data reproducing the human brain.

  19. Imaging the propagation of shock waves with both high temporal and high spatial resolution using XFELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schropp, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    The emergence of x-ray sources of the fourth generation, so called x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), comes along with completely new research opportunities in various scientific fields. During the last year we developed an x-ray microscope based on beryllium compound refractive lenses (Be-CRLs), which is especially optimized for the XFEL environment and provides focusing capabilities down to 100nm and even below. Based on magnified x-ray phase contrast imaging, this new setup enables us to pursue high-resolution x-ray imaging experiments with single XFEL-pulses. In a first experiment, carried out at the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) endstation of the LCLS, the performance of the instrument was investigated by direct imaging of shock waves in different materials. The shock wave was induced by an intense 150 ps optical laser pulse. The evolution of the shock wave was then monitored with the XFEL-beam. In this contribution we report on first analysis results of phase contrast imaging of shock waves in matter. In collaboration with Brice Arnold, Eric Galtier, Hae Ja Lee, Bob Nagler, Jerome Hastings, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA; Damian Hicks, Yuan Ping, Gilbert Collins, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551, USA; and Robert Hoppe, Vivienne Meier, Jens Patommel, Frank Seiboth, Christian Schroer, Institute of Structural Physics, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden, Germany.

  20. Object-Based Arctic Sea Ice Feature Extraction through High Spatial Resolution Aerial photos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, X.; Xie, H.

    2015-12-01

    High resolution aerial photographs used to detect and classify sea ice features can provide accurate physical parameters to refine, validate, and improve climate models. However, manually delineating sea ice features, such as melt ponds, submerged ice, water, ice/snow, and pressure ridges, is time-consuming and labor-intensive. An object-based classification algorithm is developed to automatically extract sea ice features efficiently from aerial photographs taken during the Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition in summer 2010 (CHINARE 2010) in the MIZ near the Alaska coast. The algorithm includes four steps: (1) the image segmentation groups the neighboring pixels into objects based on the similarity of spectral and textural information; (2) the random forest classifier distinguishes four general classes: water, general submerged ice (GSI, including melt ponds and submerged ice), shadow, and ice/snow; (3) the polygon neighbor analysis separates melt ponds and submerged ice based on spatial relationship; and (4) pressure ridge features are extracted from shadow based on local illumination geometry. The producer's accuracy of 90.8% and user's accuracy of 91.8% are achieved for melt pond detection, and shadow shows a user's accuracy of 88.9% and producer's accuracies of 91.4%. Finally, pond density, pond fraction, ice floes, mean ice concentration, average ridge height, ridge profile, and ridge frequency are extracted from batch processing of aerial photos, and their uncertainties are estimated.

  1. High spatial resolution monitoring of the activity of BA supergiant winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesneau, Olivier; Dessart, Luc; Kaufer, Andreas; Mourard, Denis; Stahl, Otmar; Prinja, Raman K.; Owocki, Stan P.

    2011-07-01

    There are currently two optical interferometry recombiners that can provide spectral resolutions better than 10000, AMBER/VLTI operating in the H-K bands, and VEGA/CHARA, recently commissioned, operating in the visible. These instruments are well suited to study the wind activity of the brightest AB supergiants in our vicinity, in lines such as Hα or Brγ. We present here the first observations of this kind, performed on Rigel (B8Ia) and Deneb (A2Ia). Rigel was monitored by AMBER in two campaigns, in 2006-2007 and 2009-2010, and observed in 2009 by VEGA; whereas Deneb was monitored in 2008-2009 by VEGA. The extension of the Hα and Brγ line forming regions were accurately measured and compared with CMFGEN models of both stars. Moreover, clear signs of activity were observed in the differential visibility and phases. These pioneer observations are still limited, but show the path for a better understanding of the spatial structure and temporal evolution of localized ejections using optical interferometry.

  2. High Spatial Resolution Studies of Blastwave Interactions in the Vela Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, William

    1997-01-01

    The report targeted two interaction zones within the Vela supernova remnant for HRI observation and data reduction and analysis. Approximately 40 ksec of HRI integration time was awarded for each of the awarded target regions, one at priority 2 and one at priority 3. The observations have been completed for the priority 2 observation. Some observations have been made of the priority 3 target, however the data have not yet been received by the PI. The priority 2 data have been received and analyzed and the results have been prepared for publication. The chief results are as follows: (1) the radial profile of the X-ray emission from the western rim is characterized by a sudden increase in emission at the blastwave interaction region which is unresolved spatially at HRI resolution. The profile is consistent with the expanding blastwave from the remnant encountering a large, coherent structure in the surrounding ISM; (2) the X-ray emission lags slightly 'behind', approx. 10(exp 16)cm the H(alpha) and OIII optical filaments, consistent with the expected spatial profile of the emission assuming parameters derived from earlier PSPC observations of the region. the combination of the X-ray and optical interference filter data allow us to set limits on the distance to the Vela remnant and the general nature of the blastwave interactions in the remnant.

  3. Determination of porcine corneal layers with high spatial resolution by simultaneous second and third harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jay, L; Brocas, A; Singh, K; Kieffer, J-C; Brunette, I; Ozaki, T

    2008-10-13

    We describe a dual, second harmonic generation (SHG) and third harmonic generation (THG) microscope, with the aim to obtain large-scale images of the cornea that can simultaneously resolve the micron-thick thin layers. We use an Ytterbium femtosecond laser as the laser source, the longer wavelength of which reduces scattering and allows simultaneous SHG and THG imaging. We measure one-dimensional SHG and THG profiles across the entire thickness of pig cornea, detected in both the forward and backward directions. These profiles allow us to clearly distinguish all the porcine corneal layers (epithelium, stroma, Descemet's membrane and endothelium). From these profiles, longitudinal cross sectional images of the corneal layers are generated, providing large scale topographic information with high-spatial resolution. The ability to obtain both SHG and THG signals in epi-detection on fresh eyes gives promising hopes for in vivo applications.

  4. Rapid measurement of transversal flow velocity vector with high spatial resolution using speckle decorrelation optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lei; Su, Ya; Wang, Yimin; Chen, Lei; Li, Wenping; Wang, Hongjie; Li, Zhihong; Steve Yao, X

    2017-09-15

    We propose and demonstrate a novel method that uses only three sets of B-scans to accurately determine both the direction and the speed of a transversal flow using speckle decorrelation optical coherence tomography. Our tri-scan method has the advantages of high measurement speed, high spatial resolution, and insensitivity to the flow speed. By introducing error maps, we show that the flow angle inaccuracy can be minimized by choosing the measurement result with a lesser error between results obtained from the x- and y-scans. Finally, we demonstrate that the flow angle measurement accuracy can be further improved for the high-speed flows by increasing the speed of the x- and y-scans.

  5. Two-dimensional high spatial-resolution dosimeter using europium doped potassium chloride: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Li, H. Harold; Driewer, Joseph P.; Han, Zhaohui; Low, Daniel A.; Yang, Deshan; Xiao, Zhiyan

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has shown that KCl:Eu2+ has great potential for use in megavoltage radiation therapy dosimetry because this material exhibits excellent storage performance and is reusable due to strong radiation hardness. This work reports the authors’ attempts to fabricate 2D KCl:Eu2+ storage phosphor films (SPFs) using both a physical vapor deposition (PVD) method and a tape casting method. X ray diffraction analysis showed that a 10 µm thick PVD sample was composed of highly crystalline KCl. No additional phases were observed, suggesting that the europium activator had completed been incorporated into the KCl matrix. Photostimulated luminescence and photoluminescence spectra suggested that F (Cl-) centers were the electron storage centers post×ray irradiation and that Eu2+ cations acted as luminescence centers in the photostimulation process. The 150-µm thick casted KCl:Eu2+ SPF showed sub-millimeter spatial resolution. Monte Carlo simulations further demonstrated that the admixture of 20% KCl:Eu2+ and 80% low Z polymer binder exhibited almost no energy dependence in a 6 MV beam. KCl:Eu2+ pellet samples showed a large dynamic range from 0.01 cGy to 60 Gy dose-to-water, and saturated at approximately 500 Gy as a result of KCl’s intrinsic high radiation hardness. Taken together, this work provides strong evidence that KCl:Eu2+ based SPF with associated readout apparatus could result in a novel electronic film system that has all the desirable features associated with classic radiographic film and, importantly, water equivalence and the capability of permanent identification of each detector. PMID:24651448

  6. High Spatial Resolution Study of Microbe-Carbonate-Silicate Interfaces by FIB and TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzerara, K.; Menguy, N.; Guyot, F.; Vanni, C.; Gillet, P.

    2003-12-01

    High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), chemical micro-analysis (EDX) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) are among the most powerful analytical techniques for studying microbe-mineral interactions, allowing to observe the microbe-mineral interface at almost the angstrom scale, to evidence transformations of the mineral structure and chemical alterations at the nanometer scale. However, the samples must be very thin and only a small area can be investigated. A key limitation for using this technique is thus to prepare natural geomicrobiological samples which combine hard minerals, preventing use of ultramicrotomy, with soft organic matter inadequate to ion milling procedures. Additionaly the areas of interest are usually restricted to few micrometer large areas which have to be selected from macroscopic samples. In this study we present two procedures : micromanipulation and FIB (Focused Ion Beam) which allow the study of microbe-mineral interfaces with TEM. The micromanipulation procedure has been presented in Benzerara et al (2003, PNAS). We have evidenced nannobacteria-like objects at the surface of the Tatahouine orthopyroxenite meteorite fallen in the tunisian desert in 1931. SEM observations suggest a complex interaction pattern between the nannobacteria-like objects, the pyroxene and microorganisms which have colonized the surface of the meteorite during its seventy years of residence on Earth. The TEM study on the very same area shows that the nannobacteria-like rods are actually well-crystallized nanometric calcite single crystals surrounded by an amorphous layer of carbonate composition. Those morphologies and structures are unusual for calcite single crystals. We discuss these observations in regard to the criteria of biogenicity i.e. biosignatures. Moreover, we examine the implications for carbonate production associated to silicate bio-weathering under aridic conditions. This work is relevant both to astrobiological and

  7. River reach classification for the Greater Mekong Region at high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouellet Dallaire, C.; Lehner, B.

    2014-12-01

    River classifications have been used in river health and ecological assessments as coarse proxies to represent aquatic biodiversity when comprehensive biological and/or species data is unavailable. Currently there are no river classifications or biological data available in a consistent format for the extent of the Greater Mekong Region (GMR; including the Irrawaddy, the Salween, the Chao Praya, the Mekong and the Red River basins). The current project proposes a new river habitat classification for the region, facilitated by the HydroSHEDS (HYDROlogical SHuttle Elevation Derivatives at multiple Scales) database at 500m pixel resolution. The classification project is based on the Global River Classification framework relying on the creation of multiple sub-classifications based on different disciplines. The resulting classes from the sub-classification are later combined into final classes to create a holistic river reach classification. For the GMR, a final habitat classification was created based on three sub-classifications: a hydrological sub-classification based only on discharge indices (river size and flow variability); a physio-climatic sub-classification based on large scale indices of climate and elevation (biomes, ecoregions and elevation); and a geomorphological sub-classification based on local morphology (presence of floodplains, reach gradient and sand transport). Key variables and thresholds were identified in collaboration with local experts to ensure that regional knowledge was included. The final classification is composed 54 unique final classes based on 3 sub-classifications with less than 15 classes each. The resulting classifications are driven by abiotic variables and do not include biological data, but they represent a state-of-the art product based on best available data (mostly global data). The most common river habitat type is the "dry broadleaf, low gradient, very small river". These classifications could be applied in a wide range of

  8. Quantifying the erosion effect on current carbon budget of European agricultural soils at high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Lugato, Emanuele; Paustian, Keith; Panagos, Panos; Jones, Arwyn; Borrelli, Pasquale

    2016-05-01

    The idea of offsetting anthropogenic CO2 emissions by increasing global soil organic carbon (SOC), as recently proposed by French authorities ahead of COP21 in the 'four per mil' initiative, is notable. However, a high uncertainty still exits on land C balance components. In particular, the role of erosion in the global C cycle is not totally disentangled, leading to disagreement whether this process induces lands to be a source or sink of CO2. To investigate this issue, we coupled soil erosion into a biogeochemistry model, running at 1 km(2) resolution across the agricultural soils of the European Union (EU). Based on data-driven assumptions, the simulation took into account also soil deposition within grid cells and the potential C export to riverine systems, in a way to be conservative in a mass balance. We estimated that 143 of 187 Mha have C erosion rates <0.05 Mg C ha(-1) yr(-1), although some hot-spot areas showed eroded SOC >0.45 Mg C ha(-1) yr(-1). In comparison with a baseline without erosion, the model suggested an erosion-induced sink of atmospheric C consistent with previous empirical-based studies. Integrating all C fluxes for the EU agricultural soils, we estimated a net C loss or gain of -2.28 and +0.79 Tg yr(-1) of CO2 eq, respectively, depending on the value for the short-term enhancement of soil C mineralization due to soil disruption and displacement/transport with erosion. We concluded that erosion fluxes were in the same order of current carbon gains from improved management. Even if erosion could potentially induce a sink for atmospheric CO2, strong agricultural policies are needed to prevent or reduce soil erosion, in order to maintain soil health and productivity. © 2015 The Authors. Global Change Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Unveiling SU Aurigae in the Near-Infrared: New High Spatial Resolution Results Using Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Abhijit; Ge, Jian

    2004-05-01

    We present new results on the circumstellar nebulosity around SU Aurigae, a T Tauri star of about 2 Msolar and 5 Myr old at 152 pc in the J, H, and K bands using high-resolution adaptive optics imaging (0.30") with the Penn State Near-IR Imager and Spectrograph at the 100 inch (2.5 m) Mount Wilson telescope. A comparison with Hubble Space Telescope STIS optical (0.2-1.1 μm) images shows that the orientation of the circumstellar nebulosity in the near-IR extends from position angle 210° to 270° in the H and K bands and up to 300° in the J band. We call the circumstellar nebulosity seen between 210° and 270° an ``IR nebulosity.'' We find that the IR nebulosity (which extends up to 3.5" in the J band and 2.5" in the K band) is due to scattered light from the central star. The IR nebulosity is either a cavity formed by the stellar outflows or part of the circumstellar disk. We present a schematic three-dimensional geometric model of the disk and jet of SU Aur based on STIS and our near-IR observations. According to this model, the IR nebulosity is part of the circumstellar disk seen at high inclination angles. The extension of the IR nebulosity is consistent with estimates of the disk diameter of 50-400 AU in radius, from earlier millimeter K-band interferometric observations and SED fittings.

  10. Assimilation of satellite NO2 observations at high spatial resolution using OSSEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xueling; Mizzi, Arthur P.; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Fung, Inez Y.; Cohen, Ronald C.

    2017-06-01

    Observations of trace gases from space-based instruments offer the opportunity to constrain chemical and weather forecast and reanalysis models using the tools of data assimilation. In this study, observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) are performed to investigate the potential of high space- and time-resolution column measurements as constraints on urban NOx emissions. The regional chemistry-meteorology assimilation system where meteorology and chemical variables are simultaneously assimilated is comprised of a chemical transport model, WRF-Chem, the Data Assimilation Research Testbed, and a geostationary observation simulator. We design OSSEs to investigate the sensitivity of emission inversions to the accuracy and uncertainty of the wind analyses and the emission updating scheme. We describe the overall model framework and some initial experiments that point out the first steps toward an optimal configuration for improving our understanding of NOx emissions by combining space-based measurements and data assimilation. Among the findings we describe is the dependence of errors in the estimated NOx emissions on the wind forecast errors, showing that wind vectors with a RMSE below 1 m s-1 allow inference of NOx emissions with a RMSE of less than 30 mol/(km2 × h) at the 3 km scale of the model we use. We demonstrate that our inference of emissions is more accurate when we simultaneously update both NOx emissions and NOx concentrations instead of solely updating emissions. Furthermore, based on our analyses, we recommend carrying out meteorology assimilations to stabilize NO2 transport from the initial wind errors before starting the emission assimilation. We show that wind uncertainties (calculated as a spread around a mean wind) are not important for estimating NOx emissions when the wind uncertainties are reduced below 1.5 m s-1. Finally, we present results assessing the role of separate vs. simultaneous chemical and meteorological assimilation in a model

  11. The Circumstellar Environment of Rigel Probed at High Spatial and Spectral Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufer, A.; Chesneau, O.; Stahl, O.; Colvinter, C.; Spang, A.; Dessart, L.; Prinja, R.; Chini, R.

    2012-12-01

    The presence of highly structured circumstellar environments in late B- and early A-type supergiants is well established through extensive spectroscopic, photometric, and polarimetric time series observations. The circumstellar structures are located within a few stellar radii in the transition zone from the stellar photosphere to the inner wind region of the expanding envelopes of the stars. The physical mechanisms that generate the observed circumstellar structures remain subject of debate. Coupling of stellar surface structures into the inner wind regions combined with rotational modulation is generally favoured with the surface structure being results of multi-mode non-radial pulsation patterns or complex magnetic fields structures. However, little observational evidence is available to narrow down the underlying mechanisms. Optical and near-IR interferometry at high spectral resolution has high potential to shed new light on the circumstellar environments of massive supergiants. We present first results from spectro-interferometric studies of the prototypical late-B supergiant Rigel (β Orionis, B8 Ia). Rigel has for the first time been monitored over several rotational cycles with the AMBER 3-beam combiner instrument at the VLTI in 2006-2007 and 2009-2010. The observations targeted the photosphere- and wind-sensitive Brγ line at a resolving power of R=12 000. The analysis of the measured interferometric visibilities provides constraints on the extension of the line-forming region in photosphere and wind; the observed variability of the differential phases across the line profile gives indications on the dynamics and the geometry of the circumstellar structures of Rigel. A possible link between high-velocity absorptions (HVA) and the observed S-shaped signals in the differential phases is discussed.

  12. Daily air temperature interpolated at high spatial resolution over a large mountainous region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dodson, R.; Marks, D.

    1997-01-01

    Two methods are investigated for interpolating daily minimum and maximum air temperatures (Tmin and Tmax) at a 1 km spatial resolution over a large mountainous region (830 000 km2) in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The methods were selected because of their ability to (1) account for the effect of elevation on temperature and (2) efficiently handle large volumes of data. The first method, the neutral stability algorithm (NSA), used the hydrostatic and potential temperature equations to convert measured temperatures and elevations to sea-level potential temperatures. The potential temperatures were spatially interpolated using an inverse-squared-distance algorithm and then mapped to the elevation surface of a digital elevation model (DEM). The second method, linear lapse rate adjustment (LLRA), involved the same basic procedure as the NSA, but used a constant linear lapse rate instead of the potential temperature equation. Cross-validation analyses were performed using the NSA and LLRA methods to interpolate Tmin and Tmax each day for the 1990 water year, and the methods were evaluated based on mean annual interpolation error (IE). The NSA method showed considerable bias for sites associated with vertical extrapolation. A correction based on climate station/grid cell elevation differences was developed and found to successfully remove the bias. The LLRA method was tested using 3 lapse rates, none of which produced a serious extrapolation bias. The bias-adjusted NSA and the 3 LLRA methods produced almost identical levels of accuracy (mean absolute errors between 1.2 and 1.3??C), and produced very similar temperature surfaces based on image difference statistics. In terms of accuracy, speed, and ease of implementation, LLRA was chosen as the best of the methods tested.

  13. Global assessment of shipping emissions in 2015 on a high spatial and temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Lasse; Jalkanen, Jukka-Pekka; Kukkonen, Jaakko

    2017-10-01

    We present a comprehensive global shipping emission inventory and the global activities of ships for the year 2015. The emissions were evaluated using the Ship Traffic Emission Assessment Model (STEAM3), which uses Automatic Identification System data to describe the traffic activities of ships. We have improved the model regarding (i) the evaluation of the missing technical specifications of ships, and (ii) the treatment of shipping activities in case of sparse satellite AIS-data. We have developed a model for the collection and processing of available information on the technical specifications, using data assimilation techniques. We have also developed a path regeneration model that constructs, whenever necessary, the detailed geometry of the ship routes. The presented results for fuel consumption were qualitatively in agreement both with those in the 3rd Greenhouse Gas Study of the International Maritime Organisation and those reported by the International Energy Agency. We have also presented high-resolution global spatial distributions of the shipping emissions of NOx, CO2, SO2 and PM2.5. The emissions were also analysed in terms of selected sea areas, ship categories, the sizes of ships and flag states. The emission datasets provided by this study are available upon request; the datasets produced by the model can be utilized as input data for air quality modelling on a global scale, including the full temporal and spatial variation of shipping emissions for the first time. Dispersion modelling using this inventory as input can be used to assess the impacts of various emission abatement scenarios. The emission computation methods presented in this paper could also be used, e.g., to provide annual updates of the global ship emissions.

  14. Lateral diffusion measurement at high spatial resolution by scanning microphotolysis in a confocal microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Kubitscheck, U; Wedekind, P; Peters, R

    1994-01-01

    Fluorescence photobleaching methods have been widely used to study diffusion processes in the plasma membrane of single living cells and other membrane systems. Here we describe the application of a new photobleaching technique, scanning microphotolysis. Employing a recently developed extension module to a commercial confocal microscope, an intensive laser beam was switched on and off during scanning according to a user definable image mask. Thereby the location, geometry, and number of photolysed spots could be chosen arbitrarily, their size ranging from tens of micrometers down to the diffraction limit. Therewith we bleached circular areas on the surface of single living 3T3 cells labeled with the fluorescent lipid analog NBD-HPC. Subsequently, the fluorescence recovery process was observed using the attenuated laser beam for excitation. This yielded image stacks representing snapshots of the spatial distribution of fluorescent molecules. From these we computed the radial distribution functions of the photobleached dye molecules. The variance of these distributions is linearly related to the diffusion constant, time, and the mobile fraction of the diffusing species. Furthermore, we compared directly the theoretically expected and measured distribution functions, and could thus determine the diffusion coefficient from each single image. The results of these two new evaluation methods (D = 0.3 +/- 0.1 micron 2/s) agreed well with the outcome of conventional fluorescence recovery measurements. We show that by scanning microphotolysis information on dynamical processes such as diffusion of lipids or proteins can be acquired at the superior spatial resolution of a confocal laser scanning microscope. Images FIGURE 2 Fig.2b PMID:7811951

  15. High spatial and angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging reveals forniceal damage related to memory impairment☆

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Katherine A.; Sakaie, Ken E.; Lowe, Mark J.; Lin, Jian; Stone, Lael; Bermel, Robert A.; Beall, Erik B.; Rao, Stephen M.; Trapp, Bruce D.; Phillips, Micheal D.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), particularly those measures associated with a specific white matter pathway, have consistently shown correlations with function. This study sought to investigate correlations between DTI measures in the fornix and common cognitive deficits in MS patients, including episodic memory, working memory and attention. Materials and Methods Patients with MS and group age- and sex-matched controls underwent high-resolution diffusion scanning (1-mm isotropic voxels) and cognitive testing. Manually drawn forniceal regions of interest were applied to individual maps of tensor-derived measures, and mean values of transverse diffusivity (TD), mean diffusivity (MD), longitudinal diffusivity (LD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) were calculated. Results In 40 patients with MS [mean age±S.D.=42.55±9.1 years; Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS)=2.0±1.2; Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC) score=0.38±0.46] and 20 healthy controls (mean age±S.D.=41.35±9.7 years; EDSS=0.0±0; MSFC score=0.74±0.24), we found that FA, MD and TD values in the fornix were significantly different between groups (P<.03), and patient performance on the Brief Visuospatial Memory Test-Revised (BVMT-R) was correlated with DTI measures (P<.03). Discussion These results are consistent with findings of axonal degeneration in MS and support the use of DTI as an indicator of disease progression. PMID:23295147

  16. Two-dimensional high spatial-resolution dosimeter using europium doped potassium chloride: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. Harold; Driewer, Joseph P.; Han, Zhaohui; Low, Daniel A.; Yang, Deshan; Xiao, Zhiyan

    2014-04-01

    Recent research has shown that KCl:Eu2+ has great potential for use in megavoltage radiation therapy dosimetry because this material exhibits excellent storage performance and is reusable due to strong radiation hardness. This work reports the authors’ attempts to fabricate 2D KCl:Eu2+ storage phosphor films (SPFs) using both a physical vapor deposition (PVD) method and a tape casting method. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that a 10 µm thick PVD sample was composed of highly crystalline KCl. No additional phases were observed, suggesting that the europium activator had been completely incorporated into the KCl matrix. Photostimulated luminescence and photoluminescence spectra suggested that F (Cl-) centers were the electron storage centers post x-ray irradiation and that Eu2+ cations acted as luminescence centers in the photostimulation process. The 150 µm thick casted KCl:Eu2+ SPF showed sub-millimeter spatial-resolution. Monte Carlo simulations further demonstrated that the admixture of 20% KCl:Eu2+ and 80% low Z polymer binder exhibited almost no energy-dependence in a 6 MV beam. KCl:Eu2+ pellet samples showed a large dynamic range from 0.01 cGy to 60 Gy dose-to-water, and saturated at approximately 500 Gy as a result of KCl's intrinsic high radiation hardness. Taken together, this work provides strong evidence that KCl:Eu2+-based SPF with associated readout apparatus could result in a novel electronic film system that has all the desirable features associated with classic radiographic film and, importantly, water equivalence and the capability of permanent identification of each detector.

  17. High Spatial Resolution Studies of Epithermal Neutron Emission from the Lunar Poles: Constraints on Hydrogen Mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boynton, W. V.; Droege, G. F.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; McClanahan, T. P.; Sanin, A. B.; Litvak, M. L.; Schaffner, M.; Chin, G.; Evans, L. G.; Garvin, J. B.; Harshman, K.; Malakhov, A.; Milikh, G.; Sagdeev, R.; Starr, R.

    2012-01-01

    The data from the collimated sensors of the LEND instrument are shown to be of exceptionally high quality. Counting uncertainties are about 0.3% relative and are shown to be the only significant source of random error, thus conclusions based on small differences in count rates are valid. By comparison with the topography of Shoemaker crater, the spatial resolution of the instrument is shown to be consistent with the design value of 5 km for the radius of the circle over which half the counts from the lunar surface would be determined. The observed epithermal-neutron suppression factor due to the hydrogen deposit in Shoemaker crater of 0.25 plus or minus 0.04 cps is consistent with the collimated field-of-view rate of 1.7 cps estimated by Mitrofanov et al. (2010a). The statistical significance of the neutron suppressed regions (NSRs) relative to the larger surrounding polar region is demonstrated, and it is shown that they are not closely related to the permanently shadowed regions. There is a significant increase in H content in the polar regions independent of the H content of the NSRs. The non-NSR H content increases directly with latitude, and the rate of increase is virtually identical at both poles. There is little or no increase with latitude outside the polar region. Various mechanisms to explain this steep increase in the non-NSR polar H with latitude are investigated, and it is suggested that thermal volatilization is responsible for the increase because it is minimized at the low surface temperatures close to the poles.

  18. Use of ultra-high spatial resolution aerial imagery in the estimation of chaparral wildfire fuel loads.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ian T; O'Leary, John F; Stow, Douglas A; Uyeda, Kellie A; Riggan, Phillip J

    2016-12-01

    Development of methods that more accurately estimate spatial distributions of fuel loads in shrublands allows for improved understanding of ecological processes such as wildfire behavior and postburn recovery. The goal of this study is to develop and test remote sensing methods to upscale field estimates of shrubland fuel to broader-scale biomass estimates using ultra-high spatial resolution imagery captured by a light-sport aircraft. The study is conducted on chaparral shrublands located in eastern San Diego County, CA, USA. We measured the fuel load in the field using a regression relationship between basal area and aboveground biomass of shrubs and estimated ground areal coverage of individual shrub species by using ultra-high spatial resolution imagery and image processing routines. Study results show a strong relationship between image-derived shrub coverage and field-measured fuel loads in three even-age stands that have regrown approximately 7, 28, and 68 years since last wildfire. We conducted ordinary least square analysis using ground coverage as the independent variable regressed against biomass. The analysis yielded R (2) values ranging from 0.80 to 0.96 in the older stands for the live shrub species, while R (2) values for species in the younger stands ranged from 0.32 to 0.89. Pooling species-based data into larger sample sizes consisting of a functional group and all-shrub classes while obtaining suitable linear regression models supports the potential for these methods to be used for upscaling fuel estimates to broader areal extents, without having to classify and map shrubland vegetation at the species level.

  19. Visualization and quantification of whole rat heart laminar structure using high-spatial resolution contrast-enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Benoist, David; Benson, Alan P.; White, Ed; Tanner, Steven F.; Holden, Arun V.; Dobrzynski, Halina; Bernus, Olivier; Radjenovic, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown by histology that cardiac myocytes are organized into laminae and this structure is important in function, both influencing the spread of electrical activation and enabling myocardial thickening in systole by laminar sliding. We have carried out high-spatial resolution three-dimensional MRI of the ventricular myolaminae of the entire volume of the isolated rat heart after contrast perfusion [dimeglumine gadopentate (Gd-DTPA)]. Four ex vivo rat hearts were perfused with Gd-DTPA and fixative and high-spatial resolution MRI was performed on a 9.4T MRI system. After MRI, cryosectioning followed by histology was performed. Images from MRI and histology were aligned, described, and quantitatively compared. In the three-dimensional MR images we directly show the presence of laminae and demonstrate that these are highly branching and are absent from much of the subepicardium. We visualized these MRI volumes to demonstrate laminar architecture and quantitatively demonstrated that the structural features observed are similar to those imaged in histology. We showed qualitatively and quantitatively that laminar architecture is similar in the four hearts. MRI can be used to image the laminar architecture of ex vivo hearts in three dimensions, and the images produced are qualitatively and quantitatively comparable with histology. We have demonstrated in the rat that: 1) laminar architecture is consistent between hearts; 2) myolaminae are absent from much of the subepicardium; and 3) although localized orthotropy is present throughout the myocardium, tracked myolaminae are branching structures and do not have a discrete identity. PMID:22021329

  20. Broadband mid-IR subharmonic OPOs for molecular spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leindecker, Nick; Marandi, Alireza; Vodopyanov, Konstantin L.; Byer, Robert L.

    2012-02-01

    We generate broadband mid-infrared frequency combs via degenerate optical parametric oscillation in a subharmonic OPO. This technique efficiently transfers the desirable properties of shorter wavelength mode-locked sources to the mid- IR. Our OPO resonator is a 3m or 4m ring cavity composed of one pair of concave mirrors with R=50mm and four flat mirrors, all but one of which are gold coated with > 99% reflection. A single dielectric mirror is used to introduce the pump (2.05 micron from IMRA America, 75 MHz, 80 fs, 600mW or 1.55 micron from Menlo Systems C-fiber, 100 MHz, 70 fs, 350 mW or 1.56 micron from Toptica Photonics FemtoFiber Pro, 80 MHz, 85 fs, 380 mW). The dielectric mirror is transmissive for the pump and reflective in a 2.5- 4 micron or 3- 6 micron (for 2 micron pump) range. Broadband parametric gain around the 3.1-micron subharmonic is provided by short (0.2-0.5mm) periodically poled lithium niobate (MgO:PPLN) at Brewster angle. Crystals were cut from Crystal Technology Inc. material having QPM period of 34.8 microns for type 0 (e=e+e) phase matching at t=32 deg. C. With the 2-micron pump, orientation patterned gallium arsenide from BAE systems is used as the non-linear material In both systems, the enormous acceptance bandwidth at degeneracy, typical for OPOs with type 0 (or type I) phase-matching, gives broad bandwidth and makes temperature tuning insignificant. Broadband oscillation is achieved when signal/idler are brought into degenerate resonance by fine-tuning the cavity length with a mirror on a piezo stage. Using an 8% reflective pellicle, we outcouple a frequency comb of more than 1000nm bandwidth, centered around 3.1 microns from the Er/PPLN system. A 1mm or 2.5mm thick ZnSe plate at Brewster angle provides 2nd-order group velocity dispersion compensation, improving the OPO bandwidth. The OPO threshold was measured to be < 30mW. When locked, the OPO outputs 60 mW of average power centered at 3.1 microns. With the Tm/OP-GaAs system we

  1. High spatial and spectral resolution near-infrared mapping of Europa with ESO/VLT/ SINFONI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligier, Nicolas; Carter, John; Poulet, François; Langevin, Yves; Dumas, Christophe; Gourgeot, Florian

    2014-11-01

    Europa is a major exobiological target of interest owing to the possibility of a sub-surface briny ocean deeply buried under a water ice dominated crust several km thick (Dalton et al., 2010). The upcoming ESA L-class mission JUICE to the Jupiter system and its ambitious payload will address this question, in particular through compositional remote sensing in the near-infrared (MAJIS) and visible (MAJIS and JANUS) wavelength range.In order to improve our knowledge mainly acquired by the instrument NIMS on the Galileo spacecraft, we have started a compositional mapping campaign of the icy moons using adaptive optics on ground-based observations from the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile. Thanks to five nights of observation on the integral field spectrograph SINFONI, we have obtained spatially resolved spectra of nearly the entire surface of Europa, with a spectral resolution of 0.5 nm in the wavelength range 1.48-2.42 μm for a pixel scale of 12.5 by 25 m.a.s, equivalent to 35 by 70 km on Europa’s surface.In this wavelength range, the spectra are generally dominated by crystalline and amorphous water-ice absorption features, but the distorted and asymmetric aspect of the 2.0 μm water-ice band on Europa’s leading side confirms the presence of non-ice minerals such as sulfuric acid hydrate (Carlson et al., 2005) and magnesium sulfates such as epsomite (MgSO4 - 7H2O) (Brown et al., 2013).Our first analysis reveals that the maps of the ice-water bands at 1.65 μm and 2.0 μm are, as expected, dominated by the leading/trailing effect, but also well correlated to well-identified geological structures as Pwyll Crater and Tara Regio. Global maps of relevant spectral parameters will be presented so as to showcase the spectral inhomogeneity of the surface of Europa for both major and minor signatures. No narrow signature, which could indicate the presence of material of exobiological interest, has been so far detected in this complex data set. By the time of the

  2. Very high spatial resolution optical and radar imagery in tracking water level fluctuations of a small inland reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, R. N.; Tormos, T.; Danis, P.-A.

    2015-06-01

    Tracking water level fluctuations in small lakes and reservoirs is important in order to better understand and manage these ecosystems. A geographic object-based image analysis (GEOBIA) method using very high spatial and temporal resolution optical (Pléiades) and radar (COSMO-SkyMed and TerraSAR-X) remote sensing imagery is presented here which (1) tracks water level fluctuations via variations in water surface area and (2) avoids common difficulties found in using single-band radar images for water-land image classification. Results are robust, with over 98% of image surface area correctly classified into land or water, R2 = 0.963 and RMSE = 0.42 m for a total water level fluctuation range of 5.94 m. Multispectral optical imagery is found to be more straightforward in producing results than single-band radar imagery, but the latter crucially increase temporal resolution to the point where fluctuations can be satisfactorily tracked in time. Moreover, an analysis suggests that high and medium spatial resolution imagery is sufficient, in at least some cases, in tracking the water level fluctuations of small inland reservoirs. Finally, limitations of the methodology presented here are briefly discussed along with potential solutions to overcome them.

  3. Glucose and Lactate Miniaturized Biosensors for SECM-Based High-Spatial Resolution Analysis: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Soldà, Alice; Valenti, Giovanni; Marcaccio, Massimo; Giorgio, Marco; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Paolucci, Francesco; Rapino, Stefania

    2017-09-22

    With the aim of developing miniaturized enzymatic biosensors suitable for in vitro diagnostic applications, such as monitoring of metabolites at single cell level, glucose and lactate biosensors were fabricated by immobilizing enzymes (glucose oxidase and lactate oxidase, respectively) on 10 μm Pt ultramicroelectrodes. These electrodes are meant to be employed as probes for scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), which is a unique technique for high-spatial-resolution electrochemical-based analysis. The use of enzymatic moieties improves sensitivity, time scale response, and information content of the microprobes; however, protein immobilization is a key step in the biosensor preparation that greatly affects the overall performance. A crucial aspect is the miniaturization of the sensing, preserving their sensitivity. In this work, we investigated the most common enzyme immobilization techniques. Several fabrication routes are reported and the main figures of merit, such as sensitivity, detection limit, response time, reproducibility, spatial resolution, biosensor efficiency, permeability, selectivity, and the ability to block electro-active interfering species, are investigated and compared. With the intent of using the microprobes for in vitro functional imaging of single living cells, we carefully evaluate the spatial resolution achieved by our modified electrodes on 2D SECM imaging. Metabolic activity of single MCF10A cells were obtained by monitoring the glucose concentrations in close proximity of single living cell, using the UME-based biosensor probes prepared. A voltage-switch approach was implemented to disentangle the topographical contribution of the cells enabling quantitative measurements of cellular uptakes.

  4. A comprehensive biomass burning emission inventory with high spatial and temporal resolution in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying; Xing, Xiaofan; Lang, Jianlei; Chen, Dongsheng; Cheng, Shuiyuan; Wei, Lin; Wei, Xiao; Liu, Chao

    2017-02-01

    . As for the straw burning emission of various crops, corn straw burning has the largest contribution to all of the pollutants considered, except for CH4; rice straw burning has highest contribution to CH4 and the second largest contribution to other pollutants, except for SO2, OC, and Hg; wheat straw burning is the second largest contributor to SO2, OC, and Hg and the third largest contributor to other pollutants. Heilongjiang, Shandong, and Henan provinces located in the north-eastern and central-southern regions of China have higher emissions compared to other provinces in China. Gridded emissions, which were obtained through spatial allocation based on the gridded rural population and fire point data from emission inventories at county resolution, could better represent the actual situation. High biomass burning emissions are concentrated in the areas with more agricultural and rural activity. The months of April, May, June, and October account for 65 % of emissions from in-field crop residue burning, while, regarding EC, the emissions in January, February, October, November, and December are relatively higher than other months due to biomass domestic burning in heating season. There are regional differences in the monthly variations of emissions due to the diversity of main planted crops and climatic conditions. Furthermore, PM2.5 component results showed that OC, Cl-, EC, K+, NH4+, elemental K, and SO42- are the main PM2.5 species, accounting for 80 % of the total emissions. The species with relatively high contribution to NMVOC emission include ethylene, propylene, toluene, mp-xylene, and ethyl benzene, which are key species for the formation of secondary air pollution. The detailed biomass burning emission inventory developed by this study could provide useful information for air-quality modelling and could support the development of appropriate pollution-control strategies.

  5. [The Change Detection of High Spatial Resolution Remotely Sensed Imagery Based on OB-HMAD Algorithm and Spectral Features].

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Chen, Yun-hao; Jiang, Wei-guo

    2015-06-01

    The high spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery has abundant detailed information of earth surface, and the multi-temporal change detection for the high resolution remotely sensed imagery can realize the variations of geographical unit. In terms of the high spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery, the traditional remote sensing change detection algorithms have obvious defects. In this paper, learning from the object-based image analysis idea, we proposed a semi-automatic threshold selection algorithm named OB-HMAD (object-based-hybrid-MAD), on the basis of object-based image analysis and multivariate alternative detection algorithm (MAD), which used the spectral features of remotely sensed imagery into the field of object-based change detection. Additionally, OB-HMAD algorithm has been compared with other the threshold segmentation algorithms by the change detection experiment. Firstly, we obtained the image object by the multi-solution segmentation algorithm. Secondly, we got the object-based difference image object using MAD and minimum noise fraction rotation (MNF) for improving the SNR of the image object. Then, the change objects or area are classified using histogram curvature analysis (HCA) method for the semi-automatic threshold selection, which determined the threshold by calculated the maximum value of curvature of the histogram, so the HCA algorithm has better automation than other threshold segmentation algorithms. Finally, the change detection results are validated using confusion matrix with the field sample data. Worldview-2 imagery of 2012 and 2013 in case study of Beijing were used to validate the proposed OB-HMAD algorithm. The experiment results indicated that OB-HMAD algorithm which integrated the multi-channel spectral information could be effectively used in multi-temporal high resolution remotely sensed imagery change detection, and it has basically solved the "salt and pepper" problem which always exists in the pixel-based change

  6. Species classification using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)-acquired high spatial resolution imagery in a heterogeneous grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bing; He, Yuhong

    2017-06-01

    Investigating spatio-temporal variations of species composition in grassland is an essential step in evaluating grassland health conditions, understanding the evolutionary processes of the local ecosystem, and developing grassland management strategies. Space-borne remote sensing images (e.g., MODIS, Landsat, and Quickbird) with spatial resolutions varying from less than 1 m to 500 m have been widely applied for vegetation species classification at spatial scales from community to regional levels. However, the spatial resolutions of these images are not fine enough to investigate grassland species composition, since grass species are generally small in size and highly mixed, and vegetation cover is greatly heterogeneous. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) as an emerging remote sensing platform offers a unique ability to acquire imagery at very high spatial resolution (centimetres). Compared to satellites or airplanes, UAVs can be deployed quickly and repeatedly, and are less limited by weather conditions, facilitating advantageous temporal studies. In this study, we utilize an octocopter, on which we mounted a modified digital camera (with near-infrared (NIR), green, and blue bands), to investigate species composition in a tall grassland in Ontario, Canada. Seven flight missions were conducted during the growing season (April to December) in 2015 to detect seasonal variations, and four of them were selected in this study to investigate the spatio-temporal variations of species composition. To quantitatively compare images acquired at different times, we establish a processing flow of UAV-acquired imagery, focusing on imagery quality evaluation and radiometric correction. The corrected imagery is then applied to an object-based species classification. Maps of species distribution are subsequently used for a spatio-temporal change analysis. Results indicate that UAV-acquired imagery is an incomparable data source for studying fine-scale grassland species composition

  7. Modeling Above-Ground Biomass Across Multiple Circum-Arctic Tundra Sites Using High Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räsänen, Aleksi; Juutinen, Sari; Aurela, Mika; Virtanen, Tarmo

    2017-04-01

    Biomass is one of the central bio-geophysical variables in Earth observation for tracking plant productivity, and flow of carbon, nutrients, and water. Most of the satellite based biomass mapping exercises in Arctic environments have been performed by using rather coarse spatial resolution data, e.g. Landsat and AVHRR which have spatial resolutions of 30 m and >1 km, respectively. While the coarse resolution images have high temporal resolution, they are incapable of capturing the fragmented nature of tundra environment and fine-scale changes in vegetation and carbon exchange patterns. Very high spatial resolution (VHSR, spatial resolution 0.5-2 m) satellite images have the potential to detect environmental variables with an ecologically sound spatial resolution. The usage of VHSR images has, nevertheless, been modest so far in biomass modeling in the Arctic. Our objectives were to use VHSR for predicting above ground biomass in tundra landscapes, evaluate whether a common predictive model can be applied across circum-Arctic tundra and peatland sites having different types of vegetation, and produce knowledge on distribution of plant functional types (PFT) in these sites. Such model development is dependent on ground-based surveys of vegetation with the same spatial resolution and extent with the VHSR images. In this study, we conducted ground-based surveys of vegetation composition and biomass in four different arctic tundra or peatland areas located in Russia, Canada, and Finland. First, we sorted species into PFTs and developed PFT-specific models to predict biomass on the basis of non-destructive measurements (cover, height). Second, we predicted overall biomass on landscape scale by combinations of single bands and vegetation indices of very high resolution satellite images (QuickBird or WorldView-2 images of the eight sites). We compared area-specific empirical regression models and common models that were applied across all sites. We found that NDVI was

  8. Temporal characterization of the Stanford Mid-IR FEL by frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, B.A.; DeLong, K.W.; Trebino, R.

    1995-02-01

    We measure the time-dependent intensity and phase of laser pulses from the Stanford Mid-IR FEL. We present the first measurements of near-transform-limited, linearly chirped, and sideband modulated FEL pulses.

  9. Mid-IR spectra of pre-main sequence Herbig stars: An explanation for the non-detections of water lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonellini, S.; Kamp, I.; Lahuis, F.; Woitke, P.; Thi, W.-F.; Meijerink, R.; Aresu, G.; Spaans, M.; Güdel, M.; Liebhart, A.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The mid-IR detection rate of water lines in disks around Herbig stars disks is about 5%, while it is around 50% for disks around T Tauri stars. The reason for this is still unclear. Aims: In this study, we want to find an explanation for the different detection rates between low mass and high mass pre-main-sequence stars in the mid-IR regime. Methods: We ran disk models with stellar parameters adjusted to spectral types B9 through M2, using the radiation thermo-chemical disk modelling code ProDiMo. We explored also a small parameter space around a standard disk model, considering dust-to-gas mass ratio, disk gas mass, mixing coefficient for dust settling, flaring index, dust maximum size, and size power law distribution index. We produced convolved spectra at the resolution of Spitzer, IRS, JWST MIRI, and VLT VISIR spectrographs. We applied random noise derived from typical Spitzer spectra for a direct comparison with observations. Results: The strength of the mid-IR water lines correlates directly with the luminosity of the central star. The models show that it is possible to suppress the water emission; however, current observations are not sensitive enough to detect mid-IR lines in disks for most of the explored parameters. The presence of noise in the spectra, combined with the high continuum flux (noise level is proportional to the continuum flux), is the most likely explanation for the non-detections towards Herbig stars. Conclusions: Mid-IR spectra with resolution higher than 20 000 are needed to investigate water in protoplanetary disks. Intrinsic differences in disk structure, such as inner gaps, gas-to-dust ratio, dust size and distribution, and inner disk scale height, between Herbig and T Tauri star disks are able to explain a lower water detection rate in disks around Herbig stars.

  10. SU-E-T-415: An Ionization Chamber Array with High Spatial Resolution for External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Togno, M; Wilkens, J; Menichelli, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To characterize an ionization chamber array technology with high spatial resolution and high charge collection efficiency for external beam radiotherapy. Methods: The prototype under test is a linear array of air vented ionization chambers developed by IBA Dosimetry, consisting of 80 pixels with 3.5mm spatial resolution and 4mm{sup 3} sensitive volume. The detector was characterized in a plastic phantom with {sup 60} Co radiation and MV X-rays from an ELEKTA Agility LINAC (with flattened and unflattened beam qualities). Bias voltage was varied in order to evaluate charge collection efficiency. A commercial array of ionization chambers (MatriXX Evolution, IBA Dosimetry) and an amorphous silicon flat panel in direct conversion configuration were used as references. Results: Repeatability (0.4%) and stability under continuous gamma irradiation (0.3%) are very good, in spite of low active volume and sensitivity (∼200pC/Gy). Charge collection efficiency is higher than 99% already at 150V with ∼2mGy dose per pulse, leading to a ±1.1% sensitivity change with dose per pulse in the range 0.09-2mGy (covering all flattened and unflattened applications). Measured dose profiles are in agreement with MatriXX for fields larger than 2×2cm{sup 2}, in which case the linear array offers a much better characterization of the penumbra region. Down to 1×1cm{sup 2}, measured profiles are in very good agreement with the flat panel. Conclusion: The array represents a valuable tool for the characterization of treatment fields in which high spatial resolution is required, together with the dosimetric performance of air vented ionization chambers. Such a technology would be particularly valuable in association with advanced treatment modalities such as rotational radiotherapy, stereotactic treatments (even with unflattened beam qualities) and proton therapy, due to the insensitivity of the chambers on dose per pulse. In the future, a two dimensional prototype based on this

  11. On the creation of high spatial resolution imaging spectroscopy data from multi-temporal low spatial resolution imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wei; van Aardt, Jan; Messinger, David

    2017-05-01

    The Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) mission aims to provide global imaging spectroscopy data to the benefit of especially ecosystem studies. The onboard spectrometer will collect radiance spectra from the visible to short wave infrared (VSWIR) regions (400-2500 nm). The mission calls for fine spectral resolution (10 nm band width) and as such will enable scientists to perform material characterization, species classification, and even sub-pixel mapping. However, the global coverage requirement results in a relatively low spatial resolution (GSD 30m), which restricts applications to objects of similar scales. We therefore have focused on the assessment of sub-pixel vegetation structure from spectroscopy data in past studies. In this study, we investigate the development or reconstruction of higher spatial resolution imaging spectroscopy data via fusion of multi-temporal data sets to address the drawbacks implicit in low spatial resolution imagery. The projected temporal resolution of the HyspIRI VSWIR instrument is 15 days, which implies that we have access to as many as six data sets for an area over the course of a growth season. Previous studies have shown that select vegetation structural parameters, e.g., leaf area index (LAI) and gross ecosystem production (GEP), are relatively constant in summer and winter for temperate forests; we therefore consider the data sets collected in summer to be from a similar, stable forest structure. The first step, prior to fusion, involves registration of the multi-temporal data. A data fusion algorithm then can be applied to the pre-processed data sets. The approach hinges on an algorithm that has been widely applied to fuse RGB images. Ideally, if we have four images of a scene which all meet the following requirements - i) they are captured with the same camera configurations; ii) the pixel size of each image is x; and iii) at least r2 images are aligned on a grid of x/r - then a high-resolution image, with a pixel

  12. AN ACTIVE-PASSIVE COMBINED ALGORITHM FOR HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION RETRIEVAL OF SOIL MOISTURE FROM SATELLITE SENSORS (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi, V.; Mladenova, I. E.; Narayan, U.

    2009-12-01

    Soil moisture is known to be an essential factor in controlling the partitioning of rainfall into surface runoff and infiltration and solar energy into latent and sensible heat fluxes. Remote sensing has long proven its capability to obtain soil moisture in near real-time. However, at the present time we have the Advanced Scanning Microwave Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board NASA’s AQUA platform is the only satellite sensor that supplies a soil moisture product. AMSR-E coarse spatial resolution (~ 50 km at 6.9 GHz) strongly limits its applicability for small scale studies. A very promising technique for spatial disaggregation by combining radar and radiometer observations has been demonstrated by the authors using a methodology is based on the assumption that any change in measured brightness temperature and backscatter from one to the next time step is due primarily to change in soil wetness. The approach uses radiometric estimates of soil moisture at a lower resolution to compute the sensitivity of radar to soil moisture at the lower resolution. This estimate of sensitivity is then disaggregated using vegetation water content, vegetation type and soil texture information, which are the variables on which determine the radar sensitivity to soil moisture and are generally available at a scale of radar observation. This change detection algorithm is applied to several locations. We have used aircraft observed active and passive data over Walnut Creek watershed in Central Iowa in 2002; the Little Washita Watershed in Oklahoma in 2003 and the Murrumbidgee Catchment in southeastern Australia for 2006. All of these locations have different soils and land cover conditions which leads to a rigorous test of the disaggregation algorithm. Furthermore, we compare the derived high spatial resolution soil moisture to in-situ sampling and ground observation networks

  13. High spatial resolution burn severity mapping of the New Jersey Pine Barrens with WorldView-3 near-infrared and shortwave infrared imagery

    Treesearch

    Timothy A. Warner; Nicholas S. Skowronski; Michael R. Gallagher

    2017-01-01

    The WorldView-3 (WV-3) sensor, launched in 2014, is the first highspatial resolution scanner to acquire imagery in the shortwave infrared (SWIR). A spectral ratio of the SWIR combined with the nearinfrared (NIR) can potentially provide an effective differentiation of wildfire burn severity. Previous high spatial resolution sensors were limited to data fromthe visible...

  14. a Kernel Method Based on Topic Model for Very High Spatial Resolution (vhsr) Remote Sensing Image Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Linmei; Shen, Li; Li, Zhipeng

    2016-06-01

    A kernel-based method for very high spatial resolution remote sensing image classification is proposed in this article. The new kernel method is based on spectral-spatial information and structure information as well, which is acquired from topic model, Latent Dirichlet Allocation model. The final kernel function is defined as K = u1Kspec + u2Kspat + u3Kstru, in which Kspec, Kspat, Kstru are radial basis function (RBF) and u1 + u2 + u3 = 1. In the experiment, comparison with three other kernel methods, including the spectral-based, the spectral- and spatial-based and the spectral- and structure-based method, is provided for a panchromatic QuickBird image of a suburban area with a size of 900 × 900 pixels and spatial resolution of 0.6 m. The result shows that the overall accuracy of the spectral- and structure-based kernel method is 80 %, which is higher than the spectral-based kernel method, as well as the spectral- and spatial-based which accuracy respectively is 67 % and 74 %. What's more, the accuracy of the proposed composite kernel method that jointly uses the spectral, spatial, and structure information is highest among the four methods which is increased to 83 %. On the other hand, the result of the experiment also verifies the validity of the expression of structure information about the remote sensing image.

  15. Laser Ablation - Accelerator Mass Spectrometry: An Approach for Rapid Radiocarbon Analyses of Carbonate Archives at High Spatial Resolution.

    PubMed

    Welte, Caroline; Wacker, Lukas; Hattendorf, Bodo; Christl, Marcus; Fohlmeister, Jens; Breitenbach, Sebastian F M; Robinson, Laura F; Andrews, Allen H; Freiwald, André; Farmer, Jesse R; Yeman, Christiane; Synal, Hans-Arno; Günther, Detlef

    2016-09-06

    A new instrumental setup, combining laser ablation (LA) with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), has been investigated for the online radiocarbon ((14)C) analysis of carbonate records. Samples were placed in an in-house designed LA-cell, and CO2 gas was produced by ablation using a 193 nm ArF excimer laser. The (14)C/(12)C abundance ratio of the gas was then analyzed by gas ion source AMS. This configuration allows flexible and time-resolved acquisition of (14)C profiles in contrast to conventional measurements, where only the bulk composition of discrete samples can be obtained. Three different measurement modes, i.e. discrete layer analysis, survey scans, and precision scans, were investigated and compared using a stalagmite sample and, subsequently, applied to terrestrial and marine carbonates. Depending on the measurement mode, a precision of typically 1-5% combined with a spatial resolution of 100 μm can be obtained. Prominent (14)C features, such as the atomic bomb (14)C peak, can be resolved by scanning several cm of a sample within 1 h. Stalagmite, deep-sea coral, and mollusk shell samples yielded comparable signal intensities, which again were comparable to those of conventional gas measurements. The novel LA-AMS setup allowed rapid scans on a variety of sample materials with high spatial resolution.

  16. High-Spatial-Resolution OH and CH2O PLIF Visualization in a Dual-Mode Scramjet Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geipel, Clayton M.

    2017-01-01

    A high-spatial-resolution planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging system was constructed and used to image a cavity-stabilized, premixed ethylene-air flame. The flame was created within a continuous flow, electrically-heated supersonic combustion facility consisting of a Mach 2 nozzle, an isolator with flush-wall fuel injectors, a combustor with a cavity flameholder of height 9 mm and optical access, and an extender. Tests were conducted at total temperature 1200 K, total pressure 300 kPa, equivalence ratio near 0.4 in the combustor, and Mach number near 0.6 in the combustor. A frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser pumped a dye laser, which produced light at 283.55 nm. The beam was shaped into a light sheet with full width half-maximum 25 microns, which illuminated a streamwise plane that bisected the cavity. An intensified camera system imaged OH in this plane with a square 6.67 mm field of view and in-plane resolution 39 microns. Images were taken between the backward-facing step and 120 mm downstream of the step. OH structures as small as 110 microns were observed. CH2O was excited using 352.48 nm light; the smallest observed CH2O structures were approximately 200 microns wide. Approximately 15,000 images per species were processed and used to compute composite images.

  17. A scintillator fabricated by solid-state diffusion bonding for high spatial resolution x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameshima, Takashi; Sato, Takahiro; Kudo, Togo; Ono, Shun; Ozaki, Kyosuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina

    2016-07-01

    Lens-coupled two-dimensional indirect X-ray detectors with thin-film scintillators are important for high spatial resolution X-ray imaging. To achieve high quality high-resolution images, we propose a novel fabrication method for thin-film scintillators based on solid-state diffusion bonding. Scintillators were successfully produced with thicknesses of 5, 10, and 20 μm, with a surface flatness better than λ/10. X-ray imaging performance with a point spread function of 8 μm FWHM was demonstrated with a prototype X-ray detector equipped with a 20-μm-thick scintillator, at an effective spatial sampling of 4 μm/pixel and a field of view of 2.56 x 1.92 mm2. At the request of all authors of the paper and with the agreement of the proceedings editors an updated version of this article was published on 1 September 2016. An older version of the paper was inadvertently supplied to AIP Publishing and the final version is now available.

  18. High-Spatial-Resolution OH PLIF Visualization in a Cavity-Stabilized Ethylene-Air Turbulent Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geipel, Clayton M.; Rockwell, Robert D.; Chelliah, Harsha K.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Spelker, Christopher A.; Hashem, Zeid; Danehy, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    High-spatial-resolution OH planar laser-induced fluorescence was measured for a premixed ethylene-air turbulent flame in an electrically-heated Mach 2 continuous-flow facility (University of Virginia Supersonic Combustion Facility, Configuration E.) The facility comprised a Mach 2 nozzle, an isolator with flush-wall fuel injectors, a combustor with optical access, and an extender. The flame was anchored at a cavity flameholder with a backward-facing step of height 9 mm. The temperature-insensitive Q1(8) transition of OH was excited using laser light of wavelength 283.55 nm. A spatial filter was used to create a laser sheet approximately 25 microns thick based on full-width at half maximum (FWHM). Extension tubes increased the magnification of an intensified camera system, achieving in-plane resolution of 40 microns based on a 50% modulation transfer function (MTF). The facility was tested with total temperature 1200 K, total pressure 300 kPa, local fuel/air equivalence ratios of approximately 0.4, and local Mach number of approximately 0.73 in the combustor. A test case with reduced total temperature and another with reduced equivalence ratio were also tested. PLIF images were acquired along a streamwise plane bisecting the cavity flameholder, from the backward facing step to 120 mm downstream of the step. The smallest observed features in the flow had width of approximately 110 microns. Flame surface density was calculated for OH PLIF images.

  19. High spatial and temporal resolution measurement of mechanical properties in hydrogels by non-contact laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoya, N.; Terashima, Y.; Umenai, K.; Maeda, S.

    2016-09-01

    Gels have received increased attention as potential materials for biological materials because they can exhibit similar mechanical properties. One obstacle for using gels is that their mechanical properties are significantly altered by defects, such as an inhomogeneous crosslink density distribution. If these defects could be detected and the values and spatial distributions of mechanical properties in the gel could be determined, it would be possible to apply gels for several fields. To achieve the high spatial and temporal resolution measurement of mechanical properties in hydrogels, in our method, a conventional contact excitation device is replaced with a non-contact excitation using laser ablation for the input and magnetic resonance elastography to measure stress waves is replaced with the Schlieren method with a high-speed camera. Magnetic resonance elastography is a local measurement technique, and consequently, requires a lot of time to characterize a sample, as well as does not have sufficient spatial resolution to obtain a broad range of elasticity coefficients of gels. We use laser ablation to apply non-contact impulse excitations to gels to generate stress waves inside them. We can determine mechanical properties of gels using the stress waves' propagation velocity.

  20. Uncovering the deactivation mechanism of Au catalyst with operando high spatial resolution IR and X-ray microspectroscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Elad

    2016-06-01

    Detecting the reaction mechanism of multistep catalytic transformations is essential for optimization of these complex processes. In this study, the mechanism of catalyst deactivation within a flow reactor was studied under reaction conditions. Spectral mapping of the catalyst and the organic phase along a flow reactor were performed with micrometer-sized synchrotron-based X-ray and IR beams, respectively, with a spatial resolution of 15 μm. Heterogeneous Au catalyst was packed in a flow reactor and activated toward the cascade reaction of pyran formation. X-ray absorption microspectroscopy measurements revealed that the highly oxidized Au(III), which is the catalytically active species, was continuously reduced along the flow reactor. IR microspectroscopy measurements detected a direct correlation between the reduction of the Au catalyst and deactivation of the catalytic process. It was observed that within 1.5 mm from the reactor's inlet all the catalytic reactivity was quenched. Microspectroscopy measurements determined that the reduction of Au(III) was induced by nucleophilic attack of butanol, which is one of the reactants in this reaction. Slower deactivation rates were measured once the reactants concentration was decreased by an order of magnitude. Under these conditions the reaction path within the flow reactor was increased from 1.5 to 6 mm. These results demonstrate the molecular level understanding of reaction mechanism which can be achieved by high spatial resolution microspectroscopy measurements.

  1. Redox and speciation mapping of rock thin sections using high spatial resolution full-field imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Andrade, V.; Susini, J.; Salomé, M.; Beraldin, O.; Heymes, T.; Lewin, E.

    2009-04-01

    Because of their complex genesis, natural rocks are the most often heterogeneous systems, with various scale-level heterogeneities for both chemistry and structure. In the last decade, the dramatic improvements of hyperspectral imaging techniques provided new tools for accurate material characterisation. Most of these micro- and nano- analytical techniques rely on scanning instruments, which offer high spatial resolution but suffer from long acquisition times imposing practical limits on the field of view. Conversely, full-field imaging techniques rely on a fast parallel acquisition but have limited resolution. Although soft X-ray full-field microscopes based on Fresnel zone plates are commonly used for high resolution imaging, its combination with spectroscopy is challenging and 2D chemical mapping still difficult. For harder X-rays, lensless X-ray microscope based on simple propagation geometry is easier and can be readily used for 2D spectro-microscopy. A full-field experimental setup was optimized at the ESRF-ID21 beamline to image iron redox and speciation distributions in rocks thin sections. The setup comprises a Si111 or Si220 (E = 0.4 eV) monochromator, a special sample stage and a sensitive camera associated with a brand new GGG:Eu light conversion scintillator and high magnification visible light optics. The pixel size ranges from 1.6 to 0.16 m according to the optic used. This instrument was used to analyse phyllosilicates and oxides of metamorphic sediments coming from the Aspromonte nappes-pile in Calabria. Iron chemical state distributions were derived - from images of 1000 Ã- 2000 Ã- 30 m3 rock thin sections - by subtraction of absorption images above and below the Fe K-edge. Using an automatic stitching reconstruction, a wide field image (4Ã-3 mm2 with a 1 m2 resolution for a total of about 12 millions pixels) of Fetotal elemental distribution was produced. Moreover, -XANES analyses (more than 1 million individual -XANES spectra) were performed

  2. High-spatial-resolution velocity measurements derived using Local Divergence-Free Fitting of SuperDARN observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, W. A.; Hampton, D. L.; Otto, A.

    2016-02-01

    technique for the most part do not show the direct relationship between the convection and the localized luminosity features nearly as well as the LDFF results. Some of the features found in the LDFF fitting are simply not present in the results from the global fits. The LDFF technique should find application in a variety of studies where high-spatial-resolution estimates of plasma flows are required. The example study presented here, which examined the details of flows in the region of auroral arcs, is representative of such problems.

  3. Renal Arteries: Isotropic, High-Spatial-Resolution, Unenhanced MR Angiography with Three-dimensional Radial Phase Contrast1

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Darren P.; Johnson, Kevin M.; Landgraf, Benjamin R.; Bley, Thorsten A.; Reeder, Scott B.; Schiebler, Mark L.; Grist, Thomas M.; Wieben, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively compare a new three-dimensional (3D) radial phase-contrast magnetic resonance (MR) angiographic method with contrast material–enhanced MR angiography for anatomic assessment of the renal arteries. Materials and Methods: An institutional review board approved this prospective HIPAA-compliant study. Informed consent was obtained. Twenty-seven subjects (mean age, 52.6 years ± 20.5 [standard deviation]) were imaged with respiratory-gated phase-contrast vastly undersampled isotropic projection reconstruction (VIPR) prior to contrast-enhanced MR angiographic acquisition with a 3.0-T clinical system. The imaging duration for phase-contrast VIPR was 10 minutes and provided magnitude and complex difference (“angiographic”) images with 3D volumetric (320 mm) coverage and isotropic high spatial resolution (1.25 mm3). Quantitative analysis consisted of comparing vessel diameters between the two techniques. Qualitative assessment included evaluation of the phase-contrast VIPR and contrast-enhanced MR angiographic techniques for artifacts, noise, and image quality. Bland-Altman analysis was used for comparison of quantitative measurements, and the Wilcoxon signed rank test was used for comparison of qualitative scores. Results: Phase-contrast VIPR images were successfully acquired in all subjects. The vessel diameters measured with phase-contrast VIPR were slightly greater than those measured with contrast-enhanced MR angiography (mean bias = 0.09 mm). Differences in mean artifact, quality scores for the proximal renal arteries, and overall image quality scores between phase-contrast VIPR and contrast-enhanced MR angiographic techniques were not statistically significant (P = .31 and .29, .27 and .39, and .43 and .69 for readers 1 and 2, respectively). The quality scores for the segmental renal arteries were higher for phase-contrast VIPR than for contrast-enhanced MR angiography (P < .05). Although the noise scores were higher with phase

  4. Exploration of very high spatial resolution data for vegetation mapping using cartographic ontologies: Identifying life forms to mapping formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Gallegos, Hugo Benigno

    Vegetation mapping is often considered the process of identifying landscape patterns of individuals or clusters of species or life forms (LF). At the landscape scale, the larger pattern represented by individuals or clusters represents the conceptualization of "vegetation mapping" and can be used as a building block to describe an ecosystem. To represent these building blocks or LF a "common entity (CE)" concept is introduced to represent the components of Formations as described by the National Vegetation Classification (NVC) system. The NVC has established protocols to consistently represent plant communities and promote coordinated management, particularly across jurisdictional boundaries. However, it is not a universal standard and the methods of producing detailed maps of vegetation CE from very high spatial resolution (VHR) remote sensing data are important research questions. This research addressed how best to understand and represent plant cover in arid regions, the most effective methods of mapping vegetation cover using high spatial resolution data, how to assess the accuracy of these maps, and their value in establishing more standardized mapping protocols across ecosystems. Utilizing VHR products from the IKONOS and QuickBird sensors the study focused on the Coronado National Memorial and Chiricahua National Monument in Arizona and Los Ajos and Pinacate - Grand Desierto Biosphere Reserves in Mexico. Individual CE were semi-automatically mapped incorporating spectral, textural and geostatistical variables. The results were evaluated across sensors, study sites, and input variables. In addition, multiple methods of acquiring field data for accuracy assessment were evaluated and then an evaluation was made of a semi-automatic determination of Formation based on CE. The results of the study suggest consistency across study sites using the IKONOS data. A comparison between VHR products from the same place is feasible but sensor spectral differences may

  5. From high spatial resolution imagery to spatial indicators : Application for hydromorphy follow-up on Bourgneuf wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailly, J. S.; Puech, C.; Lukac, F.; Massé, J.

    2003-04-01

    On Atlantic coastal wetlands, the understanding of hydrological processes may refer to hydraulic surface structures characterization as small ditches or channels networks, permanent and temporary water bodies. Moreover to improve the understanding, this characerization should be realized regarding different seasons and different spatial scales: elementary parcel, managment unit and whole wetland scales. In complement to usual observations on a few local ground points, high spatial resolution remote sensing may be a good information support for extraction and characterization on elementary objects, especially water bodies, permanents or temporary ones and ditches. To carry out a floow-up on wetlands, a seasonal image acquisition rate, reachable from most of satelite systems, is in that case informative for hydrological needs. In this work, georeferencing methods on openfield wetlands have been handled with care in order to use diachronic images or combined geographical data; lack of relief, short vegetation and well structured landscape make this preprocess easier in comparison to other landscape situations. In this presentation we focus on spatial hydromorphy parameters constructed from images with specific processes. Especially, hydromorphy indicators for parcels or managment units have been developped using an IRC winter-spring-summer metric resolution set of images: these descriptors are based on water areas evolution or hydrophyl vegetations presence traducing hydrodynamic submersion behaviour in temporary water bodies. An other example presents a surface water network circulation indicator elaborated on IRC aerial photography combined with vectorized geographic database. This indicator is based on ditches width and vegetation presence : a specific process uses vectorized geo data set to define transects across ditches on which classified image analysis is carried out (supervised classification). These first results proposing hydromorphy descriptors from very

  6. A carrier phase delay technique for along-track sea surface slope determination at high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardellach, Estel; Soulat, François

    2016-04-01

    This study presents a new processing technique for radar altimeter systems to retrieve the slope of the instantaneous sea surface along the specular point trajectory at high resolution (kilometer level or below). Initially, the technique has been designed as a way to improve and complement bi-static passive altimetry observation done with signals of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS reflectometry or GNSS-R). However, its applicability is not limited to bi-static systems, and it could be extended to mono-static ones such as Doppler altimeters. The technique uses synthetic focusing techniques to obtain a simultaneous stack of reflected EM signals from a broad set of 'scatterers' along the specular point trajectory. The phase information derived from an interferometric processing should be symmetrical with respect to the central (actual) specular point when the surface does not present any along track gradient. Therefore, any surface slopes along this direction will be depicted through the phase asymmetries with respect to the central specular point. We propose an interferometric inversion scheme to retrieve the slope along the track at high spatial resolution, with estimates that are in principle free of media corrections (e.g., tropospheric delay) given the differential measurements applied within baselines of few hundreds of meters. This technique can contribute improving the resolution of fine topographic structures with low-precision group-delay altimetric systems, such as GNSS-R, and it also has potential to improve mono-static Doppler altimeter measurements over open ocean and coastal areas. We will present the technique, the theoretical frame as well as results obtained with synthetic data and preliminary results based on actual data.

  7. From AWE-GEN to AWE-GEN-2d: a high spatial and temporal resolution weather generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peleg, Nadav; Fatichi, Simone; Paschalis, Athanasios; Molnar, Peter; Burlando, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    A new weather generator, AWE-GEN-2d (Advanced WEather GENerator for 2-Dimension grid) is developed following the philosophy of combining physical and stochastic approaches to simulate meteorological variables at high spatial and temporal resolution (e.g. 2 km x 2 km and 5 min for precipitation and cloud cover and 100 m x 100 m and 1 h for other variables variable (temperature, solar radiation, vapor pressure, atmospheric pressure and near-surface wind). The model is suitable to investigate the impacts of climate variability, temporal and spatial resolutions of forcing on hydrological, ecological, agricultural and geomorphological impacts studies. Using appropriate parameterization the model can be used in the context of climate change. Here we present the model technical structure of AWE-GEN-2d, which is a substantial evolution of four preceding models (i) the hourly-point scale Advanced WEather GENerator (AWE-GEN) presented by Fatichi et al. (2011, Adv. Water Resour.) (ii) the Space-Time Realizations of Areal Precipitation (STREAP) model introduced by Paschalis et al. (2013, Water Resour. Res.), (iii) the High-Resolution Synoptically conditioned Weather Generator developed by Peleg and Morin (2014, Water Resour. Res.), and (iv) the Wind-field Interpolation by Non Divergent Schemes presented by Burlando et al. (2007, Boundary-Layer Meteorol.). The AWE-GEN-2d is relatively parsimonious in terms of computational demand and allows generating many stochastic realizations of current and projected climates in an efficient way. An example of model application and testing is presented with reference to a case study in the Wallis region, a complex orography terrain in the Swiss Alps.

  8. Mid-IR emission of galaxies in the Virgo cluster. II. Integrated properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, A.; Lequeux, J.; Sauvage, M.; Boulade, O.; Boulanger, F.; Cesarsky, D.; Dupraz, C.; Madden, S.; Viallefond, F.; Vigroux, L.

    1998-07-01

    We analyse the integrated properties of the Mid-IR emission of a complete, optically selected sample of galaxies in the Virgo cluster observed with the ISOCAM instrument on board the ISO satellite. The ISOCAM data allows us to construct the luminosity distribution at 6.75 and 15 mu m of galaxies for different morphological classes. These data are used to study the spectral energy distribution of galaxies of different type and luminosity in the wavelength range 2000 Angstroms - 100 mu m. The analysis shows that the Mid-IR emission up to 15 mu m of optically-selected, normal early-type galaxies (E, S0 and S0a) is dominated by the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of the cold stellar component. The Mid-IR emission of late-type galaxies is instead dominated by the thermal emission from dust. As in the Milky Way, the small dust grains emitting in the Mid-IR have an excess of emission if compared to big grains emitting in the Far-IR. While the Far-IR emission of galaxies increases with the intensity of the interstellar radiation field, their Mid-IR emission is non-linearly related to the UV radiation field. The spectral energy distributions of the target galaxies indicate that there is a linear relationship between the UV radiation field and the Mid-IR emission of galaxies for low or intermediate activities of star formation, while the emission from the hot dust seems to drop for strong UV fields. The Mid-IR colour of late-type galaxies is not related to their activity of star formation. The properties of the dust emission in the Mid-IR seem more related to the mass than to the morphological type of the target galaxy. Since the activity of star formation is anticorrelated to the mass of galaxies, this reflects a relationship between the emission of dust in the Mid-IR and the UV radiation field: galaxies with the lowest Mid-IR emission for a given UV field are low mass, dwarf galaxies. These observational evidences are easily explained if the carriers of the Unidentified Infrared Bands

  9. Mid-IR laser absorption diagnostics for hydrocarbon vapor sensing in harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingbeil, Adam Edgar

    Fuel/air stoichiometry is an important parameter in modern combustion devices because it has a profound influence on efficiency, power, and pollutant formation. As engine technologies continue to advance, diagnostics and sensors are becoming essential for studying fundamental combustion processes and characterizing performance of combustion-based engines. Optical-absorption diagnostics have been used previously to probe various species in these environments and to infer quantities such as concentration, temperature, pressure, and velocity. However, there have been only a limited number of demonstrations of optical diagnostics for hydrocarbon fuels. This thesis describes the development of mid-IR optical-absorption sensors for time-resolved measurements of hydrocarbon species to infer critical parameters such as concentration and temperature. These sensors provide the necessary sensitivity and time resolution for measurements in shock tubes, pulse detonation engines, and internal combustion engines. Different aspects of the research conducted are summarized below. An FTIR spectrometer is used to measure the temperature-dependent absorption spectra of a selection of hydrocarbon species and blended fuels in the ˜3.3 mum region of the fundamental C-H stretching vibration. This spectroscopic library provides the first high-temperature spectral information for many of the species studied and facilitates development of sensitive diagnostics for various applications. This unique database also enables modelling of the absorption spectra of blended fuels such as gasoline. An ethylene and propane diagnostic is designed for measuring fuel concentration in a pulse detonation engine using a fixed-wavelength helium-neon laser. Time-resolved measurements during fired tests of a repetitively pulsed engine reveal non-ideal cycle-to-cycle interactions that cause a substantial amount of fuel to leave the engine unburned. By quantifying the fuel loading and identifying the amount of

  10. Evaluation of eight high spatial resolution gridded precipitation products in Adige Basin (Italy) at multiple temporal and spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zheng; Liu, Junzhi; Tuo, Ye; Chiogna, Gabriele; Disse, Markus

    2016-12-15

    This study provides a comprehensive evaluation of eight high spatial resolution gridded precipitation products in Adige Basin located in Italy within 45-47.1°N. The Adige Basin is characterized by a complex topography, and independent ground data are available from a network of 101 rain gauges during 2000-2010. The eight products include the Version 7 TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis 3B42 product, three products from CMORPH (the Climate Prediction Center MORPHing technique), i.e., CMORPH_RAW, CMORPH_CRT and CMORPH_BLD, PCDR (Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks-Climate Data Record), PGF (Global Meteorological Forcing Dataset for land surface modelling developed by Princeton University), CHIRPS (Climate Hazards Group InfraRed Precipitation with Station data) and GSMaP_MVK (Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation project Moving Vector with Kalman-filter product). All eight products are evaluated against interpolated rain gauge data at the common 0.25° spatial resolution, and additional evaluations at native finer spatial resolution are conducted for CHIRPS (0.05°) and GSMaP_MVK (0.10°). Evaluation is performed at multiple temporal (daily, monthly and annual) and spatial scales (grid and watershed). Evaluation results show that in terms of overall statistical metrics the CHIRPS, TRMM and CMORPH_BLD comparably rank as the top three best performing products, while the PGF performs worst. All eight products underestimate and overestimate the occurrence frequency of daily precipitation for some intensity ranges. All products tend to show higher error in the winter months (December-February) when precipitation is low. Very slight difference can be observed in the evaluation metrics and aspects between at the aggregated 0.25° spatial resolution and at the native finer resolutions (0.05°) for CHIRPS and (0.10°) for GSMaP_MVK products. This study has implications

  11. High spatial resolution optical imaging of the multiple T Tauri system Lk Hα 262/Lk Hα 263

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, S.; Rebolo, R.; Oscoz, A.; Mackay, C.; Labadie, L.; Pérez Garrido, A.; Crass, J.; Díaz-Sánchez, A.; Femenía, B.; González-Escalera, V.; King, D. L.; López, R. L.; Puga, M.; Rodríguez-Ramos, L. F.; Zuther, J.

    2016-08-01

    We report high spatial resolution i' band imaging of the multiple T Tauri system LkHα 262/LkHα 263 obtained during the first commissioning period of the Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager (AOLI) at the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope, using its Lucky Imaging mode. AOLI images have provided photometry for each of the two components LkHα 263 A and B (0.41 arcsec separation) and marginal evidence for an unresolved binary or a disc in LkHα 262. The AOLI data combined with previously available and newly obtained optical and infrared imaging show that the three components of LkHα 263 are comoving, that there is orbital motion in the AB pair, and, remarkably, that LkHα 262-263 is a common proper motion system with less than 1 mas yr-1 relative motion. We argue that this is a likely five-component gravitationally bounded system. According to BT-settl models the mass of each of the five components is close to 0.4 M⊙ and the age is in the range 1-2 Myr. The presence of discs in some of the components offers an interesting opportunity to investigate the formation and evolution of discs in the early stages of multiple very low mass systems. In particular, we provide tentative evidence that the disc in 263C could be coplanar with the orbit of 263AB.

  12. Object-based habitat mapping using very high spatial resolution multispectral and hyperspectral imagery with LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onojeghuo, Alex Okiemute; Onojeghuo, Ajoke Ruth

    2017-07-01

    This study investigated the combined use of multispectral/hyperspectral imagery and LiDAR data for habitat mapping across parts of south Cumbria, North West England. The methodology adopted in this study integrated spectral information contained in pansharp QuickBird multispectral/AISA Eagle hyperspectral imagery and LiDAR-derived measures with object-based machine learning classifiers and ensemble analysis techniques. Using the LiDAR point cloud data, elevation models (such as the Digital Surface Model and Digital Terrain Model raster) and intensity features were extracted directly. The LiDAR-derived measures exploited in this study included Canopy Height Model, intensity and topographic information (i.e. mean, maximum and standard deviation). These three LiDAR measures were combined with spectral information contained in the pansharp QuickBird and Eagle MNF transformed imagery for image classification experiments. A fusion of pansharp QuickBird multispectral and Eagle MNF hyperspectral imagery with all LiDAR-derived measures generated the best classification accuracies, 89.8 and 92.6% respectively. These results were generated with the Support Vector Machine and Random Forest machine learning algorithms respectively. The ensemble analysis of all three learning machine classifiers for the pansharp QuickBird and Eagle MNF fused data outputs did not significantly increase the overall classification accuracy. Results of the study demonstrate the potential of combining either very high spatial resolution multispectral or hyperspectral imagery with LiDAR data for habitat mapping.

  13. Linear Response Equilibrium versus echo-planar encoding for fast high-spatial resolution 3D chemical shift imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Rudolf Fritz; Baltes, Christof; Weiss, Kilian; Pazhenkottil, Aju; Rudin, Markus; Boesiger, Peter; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2011-07-01

    In this work Linear Response Equilibrium (LRE) and Echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI) are compared in terms of sensitivity per unit time and power deposition. In addition an extended dual repetition time scheme to generate broad stopbands for improved inherent water suppression in LRE is presented. The feasibility of LRE and EPSI for assessing cholesterol esters in human carotid plaques with high spatial resolution of 1.95 × 1.15 × 1.15 mm 3 on a clinical 3T MR system is demonstrated. In simulations and phantom experiments it is shown that LRE has comparable but lower sensitivity per unit time relative to EPSI despite stronger signal generated. This relates to the lower sampling efficiency in LRE relative to EPSI as a result of limited gradient performance on clinical MR systems. At the same time, power deposition of LRE is significantly reduced compared to EPSI making it an interesting niche application for in vivo high field spectroscopic imaging of metabolites within a limited bandwidth.

  14. Spectroscopic-tomography of biological membrane with high-spatial resolution by the imaging-type 2D Fourier spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Asuka; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Qi, Wei; Takuma, Takashi; Ishimaru, Ichirou

    2011-07-01

    We proposed the imaging-type 2-dimensional Fourier spectroscopy that is the phase-shift interferometry between the objective lights. The proposed method can measure the 2D spectral image at the limited depth. Because of the imaging optical system, the 2D spectral images can be measured in high spatial resolution. And in the depth direction, we can get the spectral distribution only in the focal plane. In this report, we mention about the principle of the proposed wide field imaging-type 2D Fourier spectroscopy. And, we obtained the spectroscopic tomography of biological tissue of mouse's ear. In the visible region, we confirmed the difference of spectral characteristics between blood vessel region and other region. In the near infrared region (λ=900nm~1700nm), we can obtain the high-contrast blood vessel image of mouse's ear in the deeper part by InGaAs camera. Furthermore, in the middle infrared region(λ=8μ~14μm), we have successfully measured the radiation spectroscopic-imaging with wild field of view by the infrared module, such as the house plants. Additionally, we propose correction geometrical model that can convert the mechanical phase-shift value into the substantial phase difference in each oblique optical axes. We successfully verified the effectiveness of the proposed correction geometrical model and can reduce the spectral error into the error range into +/-3nm using the He-Ne laser whose wavelength 632.8nm.

  15. Scene Classfication Based on the Semantic-Feature Fusion Fully Sparse Topic Model for High Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiqi; Zhong, Yanfei; Zhang, Liangpei

    2016-06-01

    Topic modeling has been an increasingly mature method to bridge the semantic gap between the low-level features and high-level semantic information. However, with more and more high spatial resolution (HSR) images to deal with, conventional probabilistic topic model (PTM) usually presents the images with a dense semantic representation. This consumes more time and requires more storage space. In addition, due to the complex spectral and spatial information, a combination of multiple complementary features is proved to be an effective strategy to improve the performance for HSR image scene classification. But it should be noticed that how the distinct features are fused to fully describe the challenging HSR images, which is a critical factor for scene classification. In this paper, a semantic-feature fusion fully sparse topic model (SFF-FSTM) is proposed for HSR imagery scene classification. In SFF-FSTM, three heterogeneous features - the mean and standard deviation based spectral feature, wavelet based texture feature, and dense scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) based structural feature are effectively fused at the latent semantic level. The combination of multiple semantic-feature fusion strategy and sparse based FSTM is able to provide adequate feature representations, and can achieve comparable performance with limited training samples. Experimental results on the UC Merced dataset and Google dataset of SIRI-WHU demonstrate that the proposed method can improve the performance of scene classification compared with other scene classification methods for HSR imagery.

  16. (Electron-beam induced spectroscopies at very high spatial resolution): Foreign trip report, April 26--March 12, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, J.

    1988-03-28

    At the Workshop on ''Electron-Beam Induced Spectroscopies at Very High Spatial Resolution,'' held in Aussois, France, the state of the art and where the field is (or should be) going was treated in depth. At the workshop the traveler made oral presentations on ionization localization effects on ALCHEMI measurements of Ni/sub 3/Al-based alloys, the complementary use of atom-probe field-ion microscopy, a rapporteur summary of the session on X-ray detectors, and a poster presentation on EXELFS characterization of amorphous and crystalline SiC and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Much useful information was obtained at the workshop that will directly influence the analytical electron microscopy research at ORNL. In visits to the Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne, Switzerland, the the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, France, and to the Universite Paris-Sud, Centre d'Orsay, France, the performance of and research conducted with Philips EM430ST, JEM 4000EX, and VG HB5 instruments with various attachments and modifications were discussed. Demonstration provided by the hosts on these special instruments were particularly useful.

  17. Vertically integrated metal-clad/silicon dioxide-shell microtube arrays for high-spatial-resolution light stimuli in saline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, M.; Nakamura, T.; Matsuo, T.; Goryu, A.; Ishida, M.; Kawano, T.

    2014-04-01

    Microdevices composed of integrated microscale light source arrays are powerful tools in optogenetic applications. Herein, we prepared vertically aligned 3-μm inner diameter silicon dioxide (SiO2) tube-based optical light waveguide arrays. To increase the locality of the light stimuli through the tube, we also fabricated metal-cladded SiO2 tubes using iridium (Ir). After filling the tube with a saline solution, the saline-core/Ir-clad/SiO2-shell waveguide exhibited light stimuli without spreading. With a 532-nm wavelength, the half-power width of the light intensity measured 10 μm above the tube tip was 3 μm, while that of the saline/SiO2-shell waveguide was 9.6 μm, which was more than three times wider. Such high-spatial-resolution optical light stimuli will offer a new class of optogenetic applications, including light stimuli for specific regions of a neuron (e.g., axons or dendrites).

  18. A Dual Functional Electroactive and Fluorescent Probe for Coupled Measurements of Vesicular Exocytosis with High Spatial and Temporal Resolution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Savy, Alexandra; Maurin, Sylvie; Grimaud, Laurence; Darchen, François; Quinton, Damien; Labbé, Eric; Buriez, Olivier; Delacotte, Jérôme; Lemaître, Frédéric; Guille-Collignon, Manon

    2017-02-20

    In this work, Fluorescent False Neurotransmitter 102 (FFN102), a synthesized analogue of biogenic neurotransmitters, was demonstrated to show both pH-dependent fluorescence and electroactivity. To study secretory behaviors at the single-vesicle level, FFN102 was employed as a new fluorescent/electroactive dual probe in a coupled technique (amperometry and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM)). We used N13 cells, a stable clone of BON cells, to specifically accumulate FFN102 into their secretory vesicles, and then optical and electrochemical measurements of vesicular exocytosis were experimentally achieved by using indium tin oxide (ITO) transparent electrodes. Upon stimulation, FFN102 started to diffuse out from the acidic intravesicular microenvironment to the neutral extracellular space, leading to fluorescent emissions and to the electrochemical oxidation signals that were simultaneously collected from the ITO electrode surface. The correlation of fluorescence and amperometric signals resulting from the FFN102 probe allows real-time monitoring of single exocytotic events with both high spatial and temporal resolution. This work opens new possibilities in the investigation of exocytotic mechanisms.

  19. Acoustic waves in the solar atmosphere at high spatial resolution. II. Measurement in the Fe I 5434 Å line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello González, N.; Flores Soriano, M.; Kneer, F.; Okunev, O.; Shchukina, N.

    2010-11-01

    Aims: We investigate the energy supply of the solar chromosphere by acoustic waves. Methods: A time sequence with high spatial and temporal resolution from the quiet Sun disc centre in Fe i 5434 Å (Landé factor g = 0) is analysed. We used models from a numerical simulation of granular convection and apply NLTE spectral line transfer to determine the height of formation. For estimates of acoustic energy flux, we adopted wave propagation with inclinations of the wave vector with respect to the vertical of 0°, 30°, and 45°. For a granular and an intergranular model, the transmissions of the atmosphere to high-frequency waves were determined for the three inclination angles. Wavelet and Fourier analyses were performed and the resulting power spectra were corrected for atmospheric transmission. Results: We find waves with periods down to ~40 s. They occur intermittently in space and time. The velocity signal is formed at a height of 500 km in the granular model and at 620 km in the intergranule. At periods shorter than the acoustic cutoff (~190 s), ~40% of the waves occur above granules and ~60% above intergranules. By adopting vertical propagation, we estimate total fluxes above granules of 2750-3360 W m-2, and of 910-1 000 W m-2 above intergranules. The weighted average is 1730-2 060 W m-2. The estimates of the total fluxes increase by 15% when inclined wave propagation of 45° is assumed.

  20. High Spatial Resolution Photometric Imaging of the Area Around the Nucleus of C/2011 W3 Lovejoy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    We propose to observe the newly discovered comet C/2011 W3 Lovejoy at one epoch near its closest approach to the Earth in early-January 2012. Lovejoy is a member of the Kreutz group of sungrazing comets and is the first sungrazing comet known to have survived perihelion during the era of modern observations {since 1970}. Its size is currently unconstrained but is critical for understanding Lovejoy?s place in the Kreutz group hierarchy {either as one of the 1600+ known ?pygmy? fragments or one of a handful of major fragments of the parent body, which support and fuel the rest}. Kreutz comets are known to fragment frequently, and we expect that Hubble?s high spatial resolution will reveal individual fragments undetectable by any other means. We will estimate the size distribution of these fragments. Due to Lovejoy?s extreme southern declination, small solar elongation, and 300+ year orbit, these observations can only be obtained using Hubble, and cannot be accomplished at any other epoch.

  1. Adjusting Spectral Indices for Spectral Response Function Differences of Very High Spatial Resolution Sensors Simulated from Field Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Cundill, Sharon L.; van der Werff, Harald M. A.; van der Meijde, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The use of data from multiple sensors is often required to ensure data coverage and continuity, but differences in the spectral characteristics of sensors result in spectral index values being different. This study investigates spectral response function effects on 48 spectral indices for cultivated grasslands using simulated data of 10 very high spatial resolution sensors, convolved from field reflectance spectra of a grass covered dike (with varying vegetation condition). Index values for 48 indices were calculated for original narrow-band spectra and convolved data sets, and then compared. The indices Difference Vegetation Index (DVI), Global Environmental Monitoring Index (GEMI), Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), Modified Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI2) and Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), which include the difference between the near-infrared and red bands, have values most similar to those of the original spectra across all 10 sensors (1:1 line mean 1:1R2 > 0.960 and linear trend mean ccR2 > 0.997). Additionally, relationships between the indices’ values and two quality indicators for grass covered dikes were compared to those of the original spectra. For the soil moisture indicator, indices that ratio bands performed better across sensors than those that difference bands, while for the dike cover quality indicator, both the choice of bands and their formulation are important. PMID:25781511

  2. High spatial resolution infrared micro-spectroscopy reveals the mechanism of leaf lignin decomposition by aquatic fungi.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Janice L; Baldwin, Darren S; Tobin, Mark J; Puskar, Ljiljana; Kappen, Peter; Rees, Gavin N; Silvester, Ewen

    2013-01-01

    Organic carbon is a critical component of aquatic systems, providing energy storage and transfer between organisms. Fungi are a major decomposer group in the aquatic carbon cycle, and are one of few groups thought to be capable of breaking down woody (lignified) tissue. In this work we have used high spatial resolution (synchrotron light source) infrared micro-spectroscopy to study the interaction between aquatic fungi and lignified leaf vein material (xylem) from River Redgum trees (E. camaldulensis) endemic to the lowland rivers of South-Eastern Australia. The work provides spatially explicit evidence that fungal colonisation of leaf litter involves the oxidative breakdown of lignin immediately adjacent to the fungal tissue and depletion of the lignin-bound cellulose. Cellulose depletion occurs over relatively short length scales (5-15 µm) and highlights the likely importance of mechanical breakdown in accessing the carbohydrate content of this resource. Low bioavailability compounds (oxidized lignin and polyphenols of plant origin) remain in colonised leaves, even after fungal activity diminishes, and suggests a possible pathway for the sequestration of carbon in wetlands. The work shows that fungi likely have a critical role in the partitioning of lignified material into a biodegradable fraction that can re-enter the aquatic carbon cycle, and a recalcitrant fraction that enters long-term storage in sediments or contribute to the formation of dissolved organic carbon in the water column.

  3. Indirect Terahertz Spectroscopy of Molecular Ions Using Highly Accurate and Precise Mid-Ir Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Andrew A.; Ford, Kyle B.; Kreckel, Holger; Perera, Manori; Crabtree, Kyle N.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2009-06-01

    With the advent of Herschel and SOFIA, laboratory methods capable of providing molecular rest frequencies in the terahertz and sub-millimeter regime are increasingly important. As of yet, it has been difficult to perform spectroscopy in this wavelength region due to the limited availability of radiation sources, optics, and detectors. Our goal is to provide accurate THz rest frequencies for molecular ions by combining previously recorded microwave transitions with combination differences obtained from high precision mid-IR spectroscopy. We are constructing a Sensitive Resolved Ion Beam Spectroscopy setup which will harness the benefits of kinematic compression in a molecular ion beam to enable very high resolution spectroscopy. This ion beam is interrogated by continuous-wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy using a home-made widely tunable difference frequency laser that utilizes two near-IR lasers and a periodically-poled lithium niobate crystal. Here, we report our efforts to optimize our ion beam spectrometer and to perform high-precision and high-accuracy frequency measurements using an optical frequency comb. footnote

  4. First Light Report on TGIRS - DU's New mid-IR Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stencel, R. E.; Creech-Eakman, M. J.; Klebe, D. I.; Williams, W. J.

    1996-12-01

    We present a first light report on TGIRS, Denver University Astronomy Program's new Two Grating mid-InfraRed Spectrometer. The instrument was designed and assembled in a little over a year, has been tested in the lab and will be acquiring data at a telescope. This spectrometer was built specifically to study mid-IR silicate features of Long Period Variable stars. We plan to present alignment and throughput test results, along with sample spectra over its bandpass of 7 to 14 microns, at a resolution of about 750. A novel feature of TGIRS is its use of a mechanical cryocooling system that utilizes a Gifford-McMahon cryocooler. We will report on the success of vibrational isolation of the detector and optics from the piston action. The design and construction of this instrument forms the basis for a PhD thesis by graduate student M. Creech-Eakman. We plan for TGIRS to become a facility instrument at our newly built Meyer-Womble Observatory, one of the highest observatories in the world, at an elevation of 14,148 feet, atop Mt. Evans near Denver. From this vantage, above 90 percent of the telluric water vapor, we anticipate that substantial quantities of high-quality spectra can be obtained for monitoring studies.

  5. Object-based methods for individual tree identification and tree species classification from high-spatial resolution imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Le

    2003-10-01

    Modern forest management poses an increasing need for detailed knowledge of forest information at different spatial scales. At the forest level, the information for tree species assemblage is desired whereas at or below the stand level, individual tree related information is preferred. Remote Sensing provides an effective tool to extract the above information at multiple spatial scales in the continuous time domain. To date, the increasing volume and readily availability of high-spatial-resolution data have lead to a much wider application of remotely sensed products. Nevertheless, to make effective use of the improving spatial resolution, conventional pixel-based classification methods are far from satisfactory. Correspondingly, developing object-based methods becomes a central challenge for researchers in the field of Remote Sensing. This thesis focuses on the development of methods for accurate individual tree identification and tree species classification. We develop a method in which individual tree crown boundaries and treetop locations are derived under a unified framework. We apply a two-stage approach with edge detection followed by marker-controlled watershed segmentation. Treetops are modeled from radiometry and geometry aspects. Specifically, treetops are assumed to be represented by local radiation maxima and to be located near the center of the tree-crown. As a result, a marker image was created from the derived treetop to guide a watershed segmentation to further differentiate overlapping trees and to produce a segmented image comprised of individual tree crowns. The image segmentation method developed achieves a promising result for a 256 x 256 CASI image. Then further effort is made to extend our methods to the multiscales which are constructed from a wavelet decomposition. A scale consistency and geometric consistency are designed to examine the gradients along the scale-space for the purpose of separating true crown boundary from unwanted

  6. Bias Adjustment of high spatial/temporal resolution Satellite Precipitation Estimation relying on Gauge-Based precipitation over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Pan, Y.; Shen, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Satellite precipitation data has been widely used in the forecasting and research of weather and climate because of its high spatial/temporal resolution, especially in the area of limited access to ground-based measurements. The distribution of gauge stations in China is very uniform with most gauge stations located in Eastern China and few gauge stations located in Western China. So the using of satellite precipitation data in China is very important. Although the satellite precipitation data has a good spatial construction, its estimation value is less accurate and has distinct systematic bias comparing to gauge-based one. The bias of satellite precipitation data should be adjusted before using it. In this paper, the CMORPH (Climate Prediction Center Morphing Technique) 30-min precipitation products is chosen to represent the large-scale precipitation of China and be adjusted based on hourly rain gauge analysis over China by interpolating from more than 10000 stations collected and quality controlled by the National Meteorological Information Center of the China Meteorological by using a probability density function (PDF) matching method (Wang and Xie, 2005). After bias-adjustment by PDF matching, we get a less systematic bias and high-resolution satellite precipitation product, which is hourly precipitation on a 0.1°latitude/longitude grid over China. Adjusted values are more close to the gauge observations, and the probability density function of corrected precipitation products is the same as that of the gauge-based precipitation. In Western China, the quantity value of corrected precipitation estimates is obviously increased comparing to the original estimate value. On the other hand, the spatial construction is still maintenance of satellite products.

  7. New light-amplifier-based detector designs for high spatial resolution and high sensitivity CBCT mammography and fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudin, Stephen; Kuhls, Andrew T.; Yadava, Girijesh K.; Josan, Gaurav C.; Wu, Ye; Chityala, Ravishankar N.; Rangwala, Hussain S.; Ionita, N. Ciprian; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2006-03-01

    New cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) mammography system designs are presented where the detectors provide high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, low noise, wide dynamic range, negligible lag and high frame rates similar to features required for high performance fluoroscopy detectors. The x-ray detectors consist of a phosphor coupled by a fiber-optic taper to either a high gain image light amplifier (LA) then CCD camera or to an electron multiplying CCD. When a square-array of such detectors is used, a field-of-view (FOV) to 20 x 20 cm can be obtained where the images have pixel-resolution of 100 μm or better. To achieve practical CBCT mammography scan-times, 30 fps may be acquired with quantum limited (noise free) performance below 0.2 μR detector exposure per frame. Because of the flexible voltage controlled gain of the LA's and EMCCDs, large detector dynamic range is also achievable. Features of such detector systems with arrays of either generation 2 (Gen 2) or 3 (Gen 3) LAs optically coupled to CCD cameras or arrays of EMCCDs coupled directly are compared. Quantum accounting analysis is done for a variety of such designs where either the lowest number of information carriers off the LA photo-cathode or electrons released in the EMCCDs per x-ray absorbed in the phosphor are large enough to imply no quantum sink for the design. These new LA- or EMCCD-based systems could lead to vastly improved CBCT mammography, ROI-CT, or fluoroscopy performance compared to systems using flat panels.

  8. Automatic change detection of buildings in urban environment from very high spatial resolution images using existing geodatabase and prior knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouziani, Mourad; Goïta, Kalifa; He, Dong-Chen

    2010-01-01

    The updating of geodatabases (GDB) in urban environments is a difficult and expensive task. It may be facilitated by an automatic change detection method. Several methods have been developed for medium and low spatial resolution images. This study proposes a new method for change detection of buildings in urban environments from very high spatial resolution images (VHSR) and using existing digital cartographic data. The proposed methodology is composed of several stages. The existing knowledge on the buildings and the other urban objects are first modelled and saved in a knowledge base. Some change detection rules are defined at this stage. Then, the image is segmented. The parameters of segmentation are computed thanks to the integration between the image and the geodatabase. Thereafter, the segmented image is analyzed using the knowledge base to localize the segments where the change of building is likely to occur. The change detection rules are then applied on these segments to identify the segments that represent the changes of buildings. These changes represent the updates of buildings to be added to the geodatabase. The data used in this research concern the city of Sherbrooke (Quebec, Canada) and the city of Rabat (Morocco). For Sherbrooke, we used an Ikonos image acquired in October 2006 and a GDB at the scale of 1:20,000. For Rabat, a QuickBird image acquired in August 2006 has been used with a GDB at the scale of 1:10,000. The rate of good detection is 90%. The proposed method presents some limitations on the detection of the exact contours of the buildings. It could be improved by including a shape post-analysis of detected buildings. The proposed method could be integrated into a cartographic update process or as a method for the quality assessment of a geodatabase. It could be also be used to identify illegal building work or to monitor urban growth.

  9. A DOI Detector With Crystal Scatter Identification Capability for High Sensitivity and High Spatial Resolution PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Z.; Prout, D. L.; Silverman, R. W.; Herman, H.; Dooraghi, A.; Chatziioannou, A. F.

    2015-01-01

    potentially lead to a high spatial resolution, high sensitivity and DOI PET system. PMID:26478600

  10. High-Spatial and High-Mass Resolution Imaging of Surface Metabolites of Arabidopsis thaliana by Laser Desorption-Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using Colloidal Silver

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Ji Hyun; Song, Zhihong; Liu, Zhenjiu; Nikolau, Basil J.; Yeung, Edward S.; and Lee, Young Jin

    2010-03-17

    High-spatial resolution and high-mass resolution techniques are developed and adopted for the mass spectrometric imaging of epicuticular lipids on the surface of Arabidopsis thaliana. Single cell level spatial resolution of {approx}12 {micro}m was achieved by reducing the laser beam size by using an optical fiber with 25 {micro}m core diameter in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer and improved matrix application using an oscillating capillary nebulizer. Fine chemical images of a whole flower were visualized in this high spatial resolution showing substructure of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anthers. The LTQ-Orbitrap with a MALDI ion source was adopted to achieve MS imaging in high mass resolution. Specifically, isobaric silver ion adducts of C29 alkane (m/z 515.3741) and C28 aldehyde (m/z 515.3377), indistinguishable in low-resolution LTQ, can now be clearly distinguished and their chemical images could be separately constructed. In the application to roots, the high spatial resolution allowed molecular MS imaging of secondary roots and the high mass resolution allowed direct identification of lipid metabolites on root surfaces.

  11. Peripheral Vasculature: High-Temporal- and High-Spatial-Resolution Three-dimensional Contrast-enhanced MR Angiography1

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Clifton R.; Glockner, James F.; Stanson, Anthony W.; Riederer, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of performing high-spatial-resolution (1-mm isotropic) time-resolved three-dimensional (3D) contrast material–enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) angiography of the peripheral vasculature with Cartesian acquisition with projection-reconstruction–like sampling (CAPR) and eightfold accelerated two-dimensional (2D) sensitivity encoding (SENSE). Materials and Methods: All studies were approved by the institutional review board and were HIPAA compliant; written informed consent was obtained from all participants. There were 13 volunteers (mean age, 41.9; range, 27–53 years). The CAPR sequence was adapted to provide 1-mm isotropic spatial resolution and a 5-second frame time. Use of different receiver coil element sizes for those placed on the anterior-to-posterior versus left-to-right sides of the field of view reduced signal-to-noise ratio loss due to acceleration. Results from eight volunteers were rated independently by two radiologists according to prominence of artifact, arterial to venous separation, vessel sharpness, continuity of arterial signal intensity in major arteries (anterior and posterior tibial, peroneal), demarcation of origin of major arteries, and overall diagnostic image quality. MR angiographic results in two patients with peripheral vascular disease were compared with their results at computed tomographic angiography. Results: The sequence exhibited no image artifact adversely affecting diagnostic image quality. Temporal resolution was evaluated to be sufficient in all cases, even with known rapid arterial to venous transit. The vessels were graded to have excellent sharpness, continuity, and demarcation of the origins of the major arteries. Distal muscular branches and the communicating and perforating arteries were routinely seen. Excellent diagnostic quality rating was given for 15 (94%) of 16 evaluations. Conclusion: The feasibility of performing high-diagnostic-quality time-resolved 3D

  12. High Spatial Resolution Forecasting of Long-Term Monthly Precipitation and Mean Temperature Trends in Data Scarce Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosier, T. M.; Hill, D. F.; Sharp, K. V.

    2013-12-01

    High spatial resolution time-series data are critical for many hydrological and earth science studies. Multiple groups have developed historical and forecast datasets of high-resolution monthly time-series for regions of the world such as the United States (e.g. PRISM for hindcast data and MACA for long-term forecasts); however, analogous datasets have not been available for most data scarce regions. The current work fills this data need by producing and freely distributing hindcast and forecast time-series datasets of monthly precipitation and mean temperature for all global land surfaces, gridded at a 30 arc-second resolution. The hindcast data are constructed through a Delta downscaling method, using as inputs 0.5 degree monthly time-series and 30 arc-second climatology global weather datasets developed by Willmott & Matsuura and WorldClim, respectively. The forecast data are formulated using a similar downscaling method, but with an additional step to remove bias from the climate variable's probability distribution over each region of interest. The downscaling package is designed to be compatible with a number of general circulation models (GCM) (e.g. with GCMs developed for the IPCC AR4 report and CMIP5), and is presently implemented using time-series data from the NCAR CESM1 model in conjunction with 30 arc-second future decadal climatologies distributed by the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research. The resulting downscaled datasets are 30 arc-second time-series forecasts of monthly precipitation and mean temperature available for all global land areas. As an example of these data, historical and forecast 30 arc-second monthly time-series from 1950 through 2070 are created and analyzed for the region encompassing Pakistan. For this case study, forecast datasets corresponding to the future representative concentration pathways 45 and 85 scenarios developed by the IPCC are presented and compared. This exercise highlights a range of potential

  13. Skeletal muscle fiber analysis by atmospheric pressure scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging at high mass and high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Garrett, Timothy J; Carter, Christy S; Spengler, Bernhard; Yost, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscles are composed of heterogeneous muscle fibers with various fiber types. These fibers can be classified into different classes based on their different characteristics. MALDI mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) has been applied to study and visualize different metabolomics profiles of different fiber types. Here, skeletal muscles were analyzed by atmospheric pressure scanning microprobe MALDI-MSI at high spatial and high mass resolution.

  14. The Berkeley High spatial Resolution (BEHR) OMI NO2 retrieval: Effects of emission control technology and the economic recession over the U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R. C.; Russell, A. R.; Valin, L. C.

    2012-12-01

    We describe the Berkeley High Spatial Resolution OMI NO2 retrieval and analyses of trends in urban and rural locations in the U.S. based on that retrieval. The role of catalytic convertors and other emission control technologies and the global recession of the last 5 years will be assessed.

  15. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER): Data Products for the High Spatial Resolution Imager on NASA's EOS-AMI Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is a high spatial resolution, multispectral imager with along-track stereo capabilities scheduled for launch on the first NASA spacecraft of the Earth Observing System (EOS AM-1) in mid-1999.

  16. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER): Data Products for the High Spatial Resolution Imager on NASA's EOS-AMI Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is a high spatial resolution, multispectral imager with along-track stereo capabilities scheduled for launch on the first NASA spacecraft of the Earth Observing System (EOS AM-1) in mid-1999.

  17. Measurements of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Other Related Tracers at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution in an Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgeron, J.; Yasuhara, S.; Rella, C.; Jacobson, G. A.; Chiao, S.

    2012-12-01

    Measurements of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Other Related Tracers at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution in an Urban Environment Jeff Forgeron1,2, Scott Yasuhara1,2, Chris Rella1, Gloria Jacobson1, Sen Chiao2 1Picarro Inc., 3105 Patrick Henry Drive, Santa Clara California 95054 USA 2San Jose State University, 1 Washington Square, San Jose California USA JeffAForgeron@gmail.com The ability to quantify sources and sinks of carbon dioxide and methane on the urban scale is essential for understanding the atmospheric drivers to global climate change. In the 'top-down' approach, overall carbon fluxes are determined by combining remote measurements of carbon dioxide concentrations with complex atmospheric transport models, and these emissions measurements are compared to 'bottom-up' predictions based on detailed inventories of the sources and sinks of carbon, both anthropogenic and biogenic in nature. This approach, which has proven to be effective at continental scales, becomes challenging to implement at urban scales, due to poorly understood atmospheric transport models and high variability of the emissions sources in space (e.g., factories, highways, green spaces) and time (rush hours, factory shifts and shutdowns, and diurnal and seasonal variation in residential energy use). New measurement and analysis techniques are required to make sense of the carbon dioxide signal in cities. Here we present detailed, high spatial- and temporal- resolution greenhouse gas measurements made by multiple Picarro-CRDS analyzers in Silicon Valley in California. Real-time carbon dioxide data from a 12-month period are combined with real-time carbon monoxide, methane, acetylene, and carbon-13 measurements to partition the observed carbon dioxide concentrations between different anthropogenic sectors (e.g., transport, residential) and biogenic sources. Real-time wind rose data are also combined with real-time methane data to help identify the direction of local emissions of methane

  18. In-situ 3D high-spatial resolution aquifer characterization with hydraulic parameter distribution at decameter scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, R.; Brauchler, R.; Hu, L.; Qiu, P.

    2015-12-01

    Currently, a major challenge in aquifer characterization is the determination of hydraulic parameters with high-spatial resolution. Since the mid-90's, various working groups have developed numerical evaluation approaches for hydraulic tomography: the inversion of hydraulic tests that have been recorded using tomographic arrangements. The practical application is often associated with long test times, complex evaluations, and prolonged computation times. In our study, a hydraulic tomographical data set consisted of 450 drawdown curves produced by a series of short term pumping tests conducted over 4 working days. Data was collected by two scientists without a technical staff. The tests were performed at the test site "Stegemühle", Göttingen, Germany in a confined sand and gravel aquifer with a thickness of 2-3 m. For the inversion, an approach has been used, which is based on the transformation of the groundwater flow equation into a form of Eikonal equation (Vasco et al., 2000). Utilizing this approach, the hydraulic data can be inverted using an Eikonal solver e.g. SIRT. This Eikonal solver is considerably computationally efficient and allows hundreds of draw down curves to be inverted on a standard laptop within minutes. Following the methodology described in Brauchler et al. 2013, 3D distribution of diffusivity and specific storage were directly reconstructed, and subsequently their product: the hydraulic conductivity. This study exemplifies that the required data can be recorded and analyzed efficiently in the field, which is a vital precondition for the in-situ field aquifer characterization with hydraulic tomography. Literature Vasco, D.W., Keers, H., Karasaki, K. (2000) Estimation of reservoir properties using transient pressure data: An asymptotic approach. Water Resour. Res. 36(12), 3447-3465 Brauchler, R., Hu, R., Hu, L., Jimenéz, S., Bayer, P., Ptak, T. (2013) Rapid field application of hydraulic tomography for resolving aquifer heterogeneity in

  19. An object-based approach to delineate wetlands across landscapes of varied disturbance with high spatial resolution satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mui, Amy; He, Yuhong; Weng, Qihao

    2015-11-01

    Mapping wetlands across both natural and human-altered landscapes is important for the management of these ecosystems. Though they are considered important landscape elements providing both ecological and socioeconomic benefits, accurate wetland inventories do not exist in many areas. In this study, a multi-scale geographic object-based image analysis (GEOBIA) approach was employed to segment three high spatial resolution images acquired over landscapes of varying heterogeneity due to human-disturbance to determine the robustness of this method to changing scene variability. Multispectral layers, a digital elevation layer, normalized-difference vegetation index (NDVI) layer, and a first-order texture layer were used to segment images across three segmentation scales with a focus on accurate delineation of wetland boundaries and wetland components. Each ancillary input layer contributed to improving segmentation at different scales. Wetlands were classified using a nearest neighbor approach across a relatively undisturbed park site and an agricultural site using GeoEye1 imagery, and an urban site using WorldView2 data. Successful wetland classification was achieved across all study sites with an accuracy above 80%, though results suggest that overall a higher degree of landscape heterogeneity may negatively affect both segmentation and classification. The agricultural site suffered from the greatest amount of over and under segmentation, and lowest map accuracy (kappa: 0.78) which was partially attributed to confusion among a greater proportion of mixed vegetated classes from both wetlands and uplands. Accuracy of individual wetland classes based on the Canadian Wetland Classification system varied between each site, with kappa values ranging from 0.64 for the swamp class and 0.89 for the marsh class. This research developed a unique approach to mapping wetlands of various degrees of disturbance using GEOBIA, which can be applied to study other wetlands of similar

  20. Analysis of Vegetation Within A Semi-Arid Urban Environment Using High Spatial Resolution Airborne Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Ridd, Merrill K.

    1998-01-01

    High spatial resolution (5 m) remote sensing data obtained using the airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) sensor for daytime and nighttime have been used to measure thermal energy responses for 2 broad classes and 10 subclasses of vegetation typical of the Salt Lake City, Utah urban landscape. Polygons representing discrete areas corresponding to the 10 subclasses of vegetation types have been delineated from the remote sensing data and are used for analysis of upwelling thermal energy for day, night, and the change in response between day and night or flux, as measured by the TIMS. These data have been used to produce three-dimensional graphs of energy responses in W/ sq m for day, night, and flux, for each urban vegetation land cover as measured by each of the six channels of the TIMS sensor. Analysis of these graphs provides a unique perspective for both viewing and understanding thermal responses, as recorded by the TIMS, for selected vegetation types common to Salt Lake City. A descriptive interpretation is given for each of the day, night, and flux graphs along with an analysis of what the patterns mean in reference to the thermal properties of the vegetation types surveyed in this study. From analyses of these graphs, it is apparent that thermal responses for vegetation can be highly varied as a function of the biophysical properties of the vegetation itself, as well as other factors. Moreover, it is also seen where vegetation, particularly trees, has a significant influence on damping or mitigating the amount of thermal radiation upwelling into the atmosphere across the Salt Lake City urban landscape. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  1. Visualization of Active Glucocerebrosidase in Rodent Brain with High Spatial Resolution following In Situ Labeling with Fluorescent Activity Based Probes.

    PubMed

    Herrera Moro Chao, Daniela; Kallemeijn, Wouter W; Marques, Andre R A; Orre, Marie; Ottenhoff, Roelof; van Roomen, Cindy; Foppen, Ewout; Renner, Maria C; Moeton, Martina; van Eijk, Marco; Boot, Rolf G; Kamphuis, Willem; Hol, Elly M; Aten, Jan; Overkleeft, Hermen S; Kalsbeek, Andries; Aerts, Johannes M F G

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease is characterized by lysosomal accumulation of glucosylceramide due to deficient activity of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase (GBA). In cells, glucosylceramide is also degraded outside lysosomes by the enzyme glucosylceramidase 2 (GBA2) of which inherited deficiency is associated with ataxias. The interest in GBA and glucosylceramide metabolism in the brain has grown following the notion that mutations in the GBA gene impose a risk factor for motor disorders such as α-synucleinopathies. We earlier developed a β-glucopyranosyl-configured cyclophellitol-epoxide type activity based probe (ABP) allowing in vivo and in vitro visualization of active molecules of GBA with high spatial resolution. Labeling occurs through covalent linkage of the ABP to the catalytic nucleophile residue in the enzyme pocket. Here, we describe a method to visualize active GBA molecules in rat brain slices using in vivo labeling. Brain areas related to motor control, like the basal ganglia and motor related structures in the brainstem, show a high content of active GBA. We also developed a β-glucopyranosyl cyclophellitol-aziridine ABP allowing in situ labeling of GBA2. Labeled GBA2 in brain areas can be identified and quantified upon gel electrophoresis. The distribution of active GBA2 markedly differs from that of GBA, being highest in the cerebellar cortex. The histological findings with ABP labeling were confirmed by biochemical analysis of isolated brain areas. In conclusion, ABPs offer sensitive tools to visualize active GBA and to study the distribution of GBA2 in the brain and thus may find application to establish the role of these enzymes in neurodegenerative disease conditions such as α-synucleinopathies and cerebellar ataxia.

  2. High-spatial-resolution imagery helps map deposits of the large (VEI 4) 2010 Merapi Volcano eruption and their impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solikhin, Akhmad; Thouret, Jean-Claude; Liew, Soo Chin; Gupta, Avijit; Sayudi, Dewi Sri; Oehler, Jean-François; Kassouk, Zeineb

    2015-03-01

    The 26 October-23 November 2010 eruption is Merapi's largest event (VEI 4) over the past 140 years. We used high-spatial-resolution (HSR) imagery from GeoEye, Pléiades, IKONOS, and SPOT5 satellites to assess the extent and effects of the pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) and subsequent lahars. We have tracked the geomorphic and structural (fracturing) changes of Merapi's summit crater and dome between 2008 and 2012. The 4 September 2011 GeoEye image shows that due to the explosive eruption, the summit area lost about 10 × 106 m3. The eruption enlarged the SSE-trending Gendol breach to be 1.3 × 0.3 × 0.2 km. The 2010 tephra and PDC deposits covered about 26 km2 in the two catchments of Gendol and Opak Rivers on Merapi's south flank, i.e., 60-75 % of the total PDC deposit area, with a total bulk volume of 45 × 106 m3. The tephra-fall deposit covered an area of about 1300 km2 with a range in volume of 18-21 × 106 m3. Supervised and object-oriented classification on HSR imagery enables us to map in detail the PDC deposits across the Gendol-Opak catchment. We delineated 16 spectrally and/or texturally distinct units of PDC deposits and compared them with previously published results. They encompass high-energy surge deposits within ca. 8 km of the summit, valley-confined PDC deposits channeled as far as 16.5 km in the Gendol River, and widespread overbank PDC with ash-cloud surge deposits on valley margins.

  3. Monitoring of vegetation impact due to trampling on Cadillac Mountain summit using high spatial resolution remote sensing data sets.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Kook; Daigle, John J

    2012-11-01

    Cadillac Mountain--the highest peak along the eastern seaboard of the United States--is a major tourist destination in Acadia National Park, Maine. Managing vegetation impact due to trampling on the Cadillac Mountain summit is extremely challenging because of the large number of visitors and the general open nature of landscape in this fragile subalpine environmental setting. Since 2000, more intensive management strategies--based on placing physical barriers and educational messages for visitors--have been employed to protect threatened vegetation, decrease vegetation impact, and enhance vegetation recovery in the vicinity of the summit loop trail. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the management strategies employed. For this purpose, vegetation cover changes between 2001 and 2007 were detected using multispectral high spatial resolution remote sensing data sets. A normalized difference vegetation index was employed to identify the rates of increase and decrease in the vegetation areas. Three buffering distances (30, 60, and 90 m) from the edges of the trail were used to define multiple spatial extents of the site, and the same spatial extents were employed at a nearby control site that had no visitors. No significant differences were detected between the mean rates of vegetation increase and decrease at the experimental site compared with a nearby control site in the case of a small spatial scale (≤30 m) comparison (in all cases P > 0.05). However, in the medium (≤60 m) and large (≤90 m) spatial scales, the rates of increased vegetation were significantly greater and rates of decreased vegetation significantly lower at the experimental site compared with the control site (in all cases P < 0.001). Research implications are explored that relate to the spatial extent of the radial patterns of impact of trampling on vegetation at the site level. Management implications are explored in terms of the spatial strategies used to

  4. Automated mapping of impervious surfaces in urban and suburban areas: Linear spectral unmixing of high spatial resolution imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; He, Yuhong

    2017-02-01

    Quantifying impervious surfaces in urban and suburban areas is a key step toward a sustainable urban planning and management strategy. With the availability of fine-scale remote sensing imagery, automated mapping of impervious surfaces has attracted growing attention. However, the vast majority of existing studies have selected pixel-based and object-based methods for impervious surface mapping, with few adopting sub-pixel analysis of high spatial resolution imagery. This research makes use of a vegetation-bright impervious-dark impervious linear spectral mixture model to characterize urban and suburban surface components. A WorldView-3 image acquired on May 9th, 2015 is analyzed for its potential in automated unmixing of meaningful surface materials for two urban subsets and one suburban subset in Toronto, ON, Canada. Given the wide distribution of shadows in urban areas, the linear spectral unmixing is implemented in non-shadowed and shadowed areas separately for the two urban subsets. The results indicate that the accuracy of impervious surface mapping in suburban areas reaches up to 86.99%, much higher than the accuracies in urban areas (80.03% and 79.67%). Despite its merits in mapping accuracy and automation, the application of our proposed vegetation-bright impervious-dark impervious model to map impervious surfaces is limited due to the absence of soil component. To further extend the operational transferability of our proposed method, especially for the areas where plenty of bare soils exist during urbanization or reclamation, it is still of great necessity to mask out bare soils by automated classification prior to the implementation of linear spectral unmixing.

  5. Analysis of Vegetation Within A Semi-Arid Urban Environment Using High Spatial Resolution Airborne Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Ridd, Merrill K.

    1998-01-01

    High spatial resolution (5 m) remote sensing data obtained using the airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) sensor for daytime and nighttime have been used to measure thermal energy responses for 2 broad classes and 10 subclasses of vegetation typical of the Salt Lake City, Utah urban landscape. Polygons representing discrete areas corresponding to the 10 subclasses of vegetation types have been delineated from the remote sensing data and are used for analysis of upwelling thermal energy for day, night, and the change in response between day and night or flux, as measured by the TIMS. These data have been used to produce three-dimensional graphs of energy responses in W/ sq m for day, night, and flux, for each urban vegetation land cover as measured by each of the six channels of the TIMS sensor. Analysis of these graphs provides a unique perspective for both viewing and understanding thermal responses, as recorded by the TIMS, for selected vegetation types common to Salt Lake City. A descriptive interpretation is given for each of the day, night, and flux graphs along with an analysis of what the patterns mean in reference to the thermal properties of the vegetation types surveyed in this study. From analyses of these graphs, it is apparent that thermal responses for vegetation can be highly varied as a function of the biophysical properties of the vegetation itself, as well as other factors. Moreover, it is also seen where vegetation, particularly trees, has a significant influence on damping or mitigating the amount of thermal radiation upwelling into the atmosphere across the Salt Lake City urban landscape. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  6. The mid-IR and near-IR interferometry of AGNs: key results and their implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, M.

    2015-09-01

    Infrared interferometry has been very productive in directly probing the structure of AGNs at sub-pc scales. With tens of objects already probed in the mid-IR and near-IR, I will summarize the key results and im- plications from this direct exploration. The Keck interferometry in the near-IR and VLTI in the mid-IR shaped the luminosity dependence of the torus size and structure, while the latter also revealed an equatorial structure at several Rsub (dust sublimation radius), and a polar-elongated region at a few tens of Rsub. Notably, this polar component seems to dominate the compact mid-IR flux. This component can persuasively be attributed to a polar outflow. However, interferometry, through emissivity estimations, also indicates that it is not a UV-optically-thin cloud but participating in the obscuration of the nucleus. I will discuss how to accommodate all these facts to build a consistent picture.

  7. Energy-scalable pulsed mid-IR source using orientation-patterned GaAs.

    PubMed

    French, Douglas; Peterson, Rita; Jovanovic, Igor

    2011-02-15

    Coherent mid-IR sources based on orientation-patterned GaAs (OPGaAs) are of significant interest in diverse scientific, medical, and military applications. The generation of long-wavelength mid-IR beams in OPGaAs using optical parametric oscillation exhibits limitations in the obtainable pulse energy and peak power. The master oscillator power amplifier concept is demonstrated in OPGaAs, by which a mid-IR source based on optical parametric oscillation can be scaled to high energy by amplification of the output of the optical parametric oscillator in an optical parametric amplifier (OPA). A fivefold increase in the pulse energy is obtained using this method by amplifying 3.85μm pulses in an OPGaAs OPA pumped by a Th,Ho:YLF Q-switched laser.

  8. [The design and application of domestic mid-IR fiber optics].

    PubMed

    Weng, Shi-fu; Gao, Jian-ping; Xu, Yi-zhuang; Yang, Li-min; Bian, Bei-ya; Xiang, Hai-bo; Wu, Jin-guang

    2004-05-01

    The combination of mid-IR fiber optics and FTIR has made the non-invasive determination of samples in situ, with long distances, and in vivo possible. In this paper domestic mid-IR fiber optics was improved to investigate the transmission ability of fiber optics and its application to the sample determination. New design was applied to obtaining one bare fiber optics, which has a minor energy loss and higher signal-to-noise ratio. The spectra of H2O/EtOH and tissue samples were measured using the new designed fiber optics and the results show that home-made mid-IR fiber optics can be applied to the field of determination of general and biological samples.

  9. Measurements of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Other Related Tracers at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution in an Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuhara, Scott; Forgeron, Jeff; Rella, Chris; Franz, Patrick; Jacobson, Gloria; Chiao, Sen; Saad, Nabil

    2013-04-01

    The ability to quantify sources and sinks of carbon dioxide and methane on the urban scale is essential for understanding the atmospheric drivers to global climate change. In the 'top-down' approach, overall carbon fluxes are determined by combining remote measurements of carbon dioxide concentrations with complex atmospheric transport models, and these emissions measurements are compared to 'bottom-up' predictions based on detailed inventories of the sources and sinks of carbon, both anthropogenic and biogenic in nature. This approach, which has proven to be effective at continental scales, becomes challenging to implement at urban scales, due to poorly understood atmospheric transport models and high variability of the emissions sources in space (e.g., factories, highways, green spaces) and time (rush hours, factory shifts and shutdowns, and diurnal and seasonal variation in residential energy use). New measurement and analysis techniques are required to make sense of the carbon dioxide signal in cities. Here we present detailed, high spatial- and temporal- resolution greenhouse gas measurements made by multiple Picarro-CRDS analyzers in Silicon Valley in California. Real-time carbon dioxide data from a 20-month period are combined with real-time carbon monoxide, methane, and acetylene to partition the observed carbon dioxide concentrations between different anthropogenic sectors (e.g., transport, residential) and biogenic sources. Real-time wind rose data are also combined with real-time methane data to help identify the direction of local emissions of methane. High resolution WRF models are also included to better understand the dynamics of the boundary layer. The ratio between carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide is shown to vary over more than a factor of two from season to season or even from day to night, indicating rapid but frequent shifts in the balance between different carbon dioxide sources. Additional information is given by acetylene, a fossil fuel

  10. The Hestia Project: High Spatial Resolution Fossil Fuel Carbon Dioxide Emissions Quantification at Hourly Scale in Indianapolis, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Gurney, K. R.

    2009-12-01

    In order to advance the scientific understanding of carbon exchange with the land surface and contribute to sound, quantitatively-based U.S. climate change policy interests, quantification of greenhouse gases emissions drivers at fine spatial and temporal scales is essential. Quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions, the primary greenhouse gases, has become a key component to cost-effective CO2 emissions mitigation options and a carbon trading system. Called the ‘Hestia Project’, this pilot study generated CO2 emissions down to high spatial resolution and hourly scale for the greater Indianapolis region in the USA through the use of air quality and traffic monitoring data, remote sensing, GIS, and building energy modeling. The CO2 emissions were constructed from three data source categories: area, point, and mobile. For the area source emissions, we developed an energy consumption model using DOE/EIA survey data on building characteristics and energy consumption. With the Vulcan Project’s county-level CO2 emissions and simulated building energy consumption, we quantified the CO2 emissions for each individual building by allocating Vulcan emissions to roughly 50,000 structures in Indianapolis. The temporal pattern of CO2 emissions in each individual building was developed based on temporal patterns of energy consumption. The point sources emissions were derived from the EPA National Emissions Inventory data and effluent monitoring of electricity producing facilities. The mobile source CO2 emissions were estimated at the month/county scale using the Mobile6 combustion model and the National Mobile Inventory Model database. The month/county scale mobile source CO2 emissions were downscaled to the “native” spatial resolution of road segments every hour using a GIS road atlas and traffic monitoring data. The result is shown in Figure 1. The resulting urban-scale inventory can serve as a baseline of current CO2 emissions and should be of immediate use to

  11. High spatial resolution WorldView-2 imagery for mapping NDVI and its relationship to temporal urban landscape evapotranspiration factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nouri, Hamideh; Beecham, Simon; Anderson, Sharolyn; Nagler, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Evapotranspiration estimation has benefitted from recent advances in remote sensing and GIS techniques particularly in agricultural applications rather than urban environments. This paper explores the relationship between urban vegetation evapotranspiration (ET) and vegetation indices derived from newly-developed high spatial resolution WorldView-2 imagery. The study site was Veale Gardens in Adelaide, Australia. Image processing was applied on five images captured from February 2012 to February 2013 using ERDAS Imagine. From 64 possible two band combinations of WorldView-2, the most reliable one (with the maximum median differences) was selected. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) values were derived for each category of landscape cover, namely trees, shrubs, turf grasses, impervious pavements, and water bodies. Urban landscape evapotranspiration rates for Veale Gardens were estimated through field monitoring using observational-based landscape coefficients. The relationships between remotely sensed NDVIs for the entire Veale Gardens and for individual NDVIs of different vegetation covers were compared with field measured urban landscape evapotranspiration rates. The water stress conditions experienced in January 2013 decreased the correlation between ET and NDVI with the highest relationship of ET-Landscape NDVI (Landscape Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) for shrubs (r2 = 0.66) and trees (r2 = 0.63). However, when the January data was excluded, there was a significant correlation between ET and NDVI. The highest correlation for ET-Landscape NDVI was found for the entire Veale Gardens regardless of vegetation type (r2 = 0.95, p > 0.05) and the lowest one was for turf (r2 = 0.88, p > 0.05). In support of the feasibility of ET estimation by WV2 over a longer period, an algorithm recently developed that estimates evapotranspiration rates based on the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) from MODIS was employed. The results revealed a significant positive

  12. High spatial resolution three-dimensional mapping of vegetation spectral dynamics using computer vision and hobbyist unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandois, J. P.; Ellis, E. C.

    2013-12-01

    High spatial resolution three-dimensional (3D) measurements of vegetation by remote sensing are advancing ecological research and environmental management. However, substantial economic and logistical costs limit this application, especially for observing phenological dynamics in ecosystem structure and spectral traits. Here we demonstrate a new aerial remote sensing system enabling routine and inexpensive aerial 3D measurements of canopy structure and spectral attributes, with properties similar to those of LIDAR, but with RGB (red-green-blue) spectral attributes for each point, enabling high frequency observations within a single growing season. This 'Ecosynth' methodology applies photogrammetric ''Structure from Motion'' computer vision algorithms to large sets of highly overlapping low altitude (< 130 m) aerial photographs acquired using off-the-shelf digital cameras mounted on an inexpensive (< USD$4000), lightweight (< 2 kg), hobbyist-grade unmanned aerial system (UAS). Ecosynth 3D point clouds with densities of 30 - 67 points m-2 were produced using commercial computer vision software from digital photographs acquired repeatedly by UAS over three 6.25 ha (250 m x 250 m) Temperate Deciduous forest sites in Maryland USA. Ecosynth canopy height maps (CHMs) were strong predictors of field-measured tree heights (R2 0.63 to 0.84) and were highly correlated with a LIDAR CHM (R 0.87) acquired 4 days earlier, though Ecosynth-based estimates of aboveground biomass densities included significant errors (31 - 36% of field-based estimates). Repeated scanning of a 0.25 ha forested area at six different times across a 16 month period revealed ecologically significant dynamics in canopy color at different heights and a structural shift upward in canopy density, as demonstrated by changes in vertical height profiles of point density and relative RGB brightness. Changes in canopy relative greenness were highly correlated (R2 = 0.88) with MODIS NDVI time series for the same

  13. Fast events and waves in an active region of the Sun observed in Hα with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Andrade Nuño, B.; Bello González, N.; Blanco Rodríguez, J.; Kneer, F.; Puschmann, K. G.

    2008-08-01

    Context: We study the chromosphere of an active region of the Sun in the Hα line. Aims: The development of new instrumentation and new methods of data analysis allows to scrutinize the dynamics of the solar chromosphere with high spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution. The observations we present shed light on some magneto-dynamic processes occurring above an active region in the chromosphere. Methods: We took a time series of 55 min in Hα from AR 10875 at θ≈36°. We used the “Göttingen” Fabry-Perot spectrometer at the Vacuum Tower Telescope, Observatorio del Teide/Tenerife, to obtain two-dimensional spectrograms in Hα. Adaptive optics and image reconstruction yielded a spatial resolution better than 0.5 arcsec throughout the time sequence. From the wealth of structures, we selected areas of interest to study further, in detail, some ongoing processes. Results: A small straight surge developed aside of a pore with upward phase speed of 100 km s-1 and line-of-sight (LOS) velocity of 15 km s-1. The surge retreated rapidly with LOS velocity of 45 km s-1 at its mouth. It underwent a rebound and fell back again. Two sympathetic mini-flares were observed that lasted only approximately 40 s, but showed strong Hα emission. We found magnetoacoustic waves in long fibrils as mainly short wave trains, short packets or pulses, i.e., solitary waves consisting of small (1´´-2´´) blobs. They start at either end of the fibrils and travel with phase speeds of 12-14 km s-1, i.e., close to the tube speed and approximately the sound velocity for sufficiently large magnetic field strengths. Some waves speed up to reach velocities of the order of 30 km s-1. This is much lower than the expected Alfvén velocity of ≥200 km s-1 for reasonable magnetic field strengths and mass densities. We suggest that slow waves are not purely longitudinal, but possess gas velocities perpendicular to the direction of propagation of few km s-1. Also, fast waves travel along sinuous

  14. Wavelength-agile coherent tunable mid-IR ZGP-OPO source and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Abedin, Kazi Monowar; Ito, Hiromasa

    2007-05-01

    We report the demonstration of a wavelength-agile coherent tunable mid-infrared (IR) ZnGeP2 (ZGP) optical parametric oscillator (OPO). The mid-IR wavelength was tuned by varying the KTiOPO4 (KTP) OPO pumping wavelength, while the ZGP crystal angle remained fixed. The wavelength of pump OPO was controlled by changing the KTP crystals angle using a Galvano-optical beam scanner. Our mid-IR source can jump to a arbitrary wavelength without scanning through the intermediate wavelengths. A nonlinear optical crystal ZGP is suitable for OPOs in the mid-IR region. In most cases of mid-IR light generation using an OPO, the wavelength tuning is achieved by controlling the phase-matching angle or temperature of the nonlinear optical crystal. However, there are several disadvantages of this method including the walk-off angle, beam pass instability, refraction losses due to the high refractive index of ZGP (n~3.1), slow tuning rate, and so forth. Therefore, we developed a 2-μm-band pump-wavelength tunable mid-IR ZGP-OPO source. The mid-IR wavelength from the ZGP-OPO could be tuned from 5 to 9.8 μm, when the pump wavelength was controlled from 1.95 to 2.3 μm. The output pulse energy at 8μm was 1.3mJ/pulse at repetition rate of 30Hz. As an application of random wavelength accessibility, we could achieve the real-time measurement of phase change (solidification) of candle wax by measuring the change of absorption at two arbitrary wavelengths. We selected two wavelengths on the spectrum where significant changes of absorption upon solidification were detected and performed two-wavelength absorption measurements as the sample is allowed to cool from melted state.

  15. Photonic crystals and Bragg gratings for the mid-IR and terahertz spectral ranges

    SciTech Connect

    Usikova, A. A. Il’inskaya, N. D.; Matveev, B. A.; Shubina, T. V.; Kop’ev, P. S.

    2013-12-15

    A method for the fabrication of 2D periodic structures by contact optical photolithography with image inversion is reported. The optical properties of photonic crystals and Bragg gratings for mid-IR and terahertz emitters are considered. The possibility of raising the integral emission intensity of light-emitting diodes for the mid-IR spectral range is demonstrated. The requirements to gratings for the output of terahertz emission generated by surface plasmons excited in layers of narrow-gap degenerate semiconductors with an accumulation layer are determined.

  16. High spatial and temporal resolution retrospective cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance from shortened free breathing real-time acquisitions.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hui; Kellman, Peter; Larocca, Gina; Arai, Andrew E; Hansen, Michael S

    2013-11-14

    Cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is challenging in patients who cannot perform repeated breath holds. Real-time, free-breathing acquisition is an alternative, but image quality is typically inferior. There is a clinical need for techniques that achieve similar image quality to the segmented cine using a free breathing acquisition. Previously, high quality retrospectively gated cine images have been reconstructed from real-time acquisitions using parallel imaging and motion correction. These methods had limited clinical applicability due to lengthy acquisitions and volumetric measurements obtained with such methods have not previously been evaluated systematically. This study introduces a new retrospective reconstruction scheme for real-time cine imaging which aims to shorten the required acquisition. A real-time acquisition of 16-20s per acquired slice was inputted into a retrospective cine reconstruction algorithm, which employed non-rigid registration to remove respiratory motion and SPIRiT non-linear reconstruction with temporal regularization to fill in missing data. The algorithm was used to reconstruct cine loops with high spatial (1.3-1.8 × 1.8-2.1 mm²) and temporal resolution (retrospectively gated, 30 cardiac phases, temporal resolution 34.3 ± 9.1 ms). Validation was performed in 15 healthy volunteers using two different acquisition resolutions (256 × 144/192 × 128 matrix sizes). For each subject, 9 to 12 short axis and 3 long axis slices were imaged with both segmented and real-time acquisitions. The retrospectively reconstructed real-time cine images were compared to a traditional segmented breath-held acquisition in terms of image quality scores. Image quality scoring was performed by two experts using a scale between 1 and 5 (poor to good). For every subject, LAX and three SAX slices were selected and reviewed in the random order. The reviewers were blinded to the reconstruction approach and acquisition protocols a