Science.gov

Sample records for high-spatial resolution mid-ir

  1. High Spatial Resolution Mid-IR Imaging of V838 Monocerotis: Evidence of New Circumstellar Dust Creation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winsiewski, John P.; Clampin, Mark; Bjorkman, Karen S.; Barry, Richard K.

    2008-01-01

    The eruptive variable V838 Monocerotis experienced three dramatic outbursts in early 2002. Its unexpectedly erratic photometric behavior wes matched by strong spectroscopic variability, in which the srar transitioned through the F, K, G spectral type s in 2002 February, reseabled a M5 supergiant by 2002 Aprll, and had a L-type super qiant spectram in 2002 October. The star is also infamous for producisg e spectacu lar light echo whose evolction has beer traced by HST/ACS. We report high sFatial resolution 11.2 and 18.1 micron imagicq of V838 Nonoceroris obrained with Genini Ob servatory's Klchelle in 2007 March. The 2007 flux density of the unresclved stellar core of is rouqhly 2 tixes brighter than zhaz observed in 2C04. We interpret tkese aata as evidecce t-at V838 Mon has experienced a new circumsellar dust creatioc evezt. We suggest that this newly c reated dust is Likely clumpy, and speculate that one (or ore) of Ekese clumps migh t have passed through the line-cf-sight in late 2036, prodccing the brief rnalti-wav elength pkotonetric event reported by Bond (2006) and Yunari ez a1 (2007). A gap o f spatially exzended therrrzl (18 micron) emission is present over radial distances of 1860 - 93000 AU from che central source. Assuming ejecta material expands at a constant velocity of 300-500 km/s, this gap suggests that no prior significanz circ unstellar dust production events have occurred withiin the past approx. 900-1500 years.

  2. Polarization sensitive ultrafast mid-IR pump probe micro-spectrometer with diffraction limited spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Kaucikas, M; Barber, J; Van Thor, J J

    2013-04-01

    A setup of ultrafast transient infrared IR spectrometer is described in this paper that employed Schwarzschild objectives to focus the probe beam to a diffraction limited spot. Thus measurements were performed with very high spatial resolution in the mid-IR spectral region. Furthermore, modulating the polarization of the probe light enabled detecting transient dichroism of the sample. These capabilities of the setup were applied to study transient absorption of Photosystem II core complex and to image an organized film of methylene blue chloride dye. Moreover, a study of noise sources in a pump probe measurement is presented. The predicted noise level of the current setup was 8.25 μOD in 10(4) acquisitions and compared very well with the experimental observation of 9.6 μOD.

  3. Performance of a high-resolution mid-IR optical-parametric-oscillator transient absorption spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Echebiri, Geraldine O; Smarte, Matthew D; Walters, Wendell W; Mullin, Amy S

    2014-06-16

    We report on a mid-IR optical parametric oscillator (OPO)-based high resolution transient absorption spectrometer for state-resolved collisional energy transfer. Transient Doppler-broadened line profiles at λ = 3.3 μm are reported for HCl R7 transitions following gas-phase collisions with vibrationally excited pyrazine. The instrument noise, analyzed as a function of IR wavelength across the absorption line, is as much as 10 times smaller than in diode laser-based measurements. The reduced noise is attributed to larger intensity IR light that has greater intensity stability, which in turn leads to reduced detector noise and better frequency locking for the OPO.

  4. Tunable Microcavity-Stabilized Quantum Cascade Laser for Mid-IR High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Sensing.

    PubMed

    Borri, Simone; Siciliani de Cumis, Mario; Insero, Giacomo; Bartalini, Saverio; Cancio Pastor, Pablo; Mazzotti, Davide; Galli, Iacopo; Giusfredi, Giovanni; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Eliyahu, Danny; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Akikusa, Naota; Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute; De Natale, Paolo

    2016-02-17

    The need for highly performing and stable methods for mid-IR molecular sensing and metrology pushes towards the development of more and more compact and robust systems. Among the innovative solutions aimed at answering the need for stable mid-IR references are crystalline microresonators, which have recently shown excellent capabilities for frequency stabilization and linewidth narrowing of quantum cascade lasers with compact setups. In this work, we report on the first system for mid-IR high-resolution spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser locked to a CaF₂ microresonator. Electronic locking narrows the laser linewidth by one order of magnitude and guarantees good stability over long timescales, allowing, at the same time, an easy way for finely tuning the laser frequency over the molecular absorption line. Improvements in terms of resolution and frequency stability of the source are demonstrated by direct sub-Doppler recording of a molecular line.

  5. Tunable Microcavity-Stabilized Quantum Cascade Laser for Mid-IR High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Sensing.

    PubMed

    Borri, Simone; Siciliani de Cumis, Mario; Insero, Giacomo; Bartalini, Saverio; Cancio Pastor, Pablo; Mazzotti, Davide; Galli, Iacopo; Giusfredi, Giovanni; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Eliyahu, Danny; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Akikusa, Naota; Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute; De Natale, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The need for highly performing and stable methods for mid-IR molecular sensing and metrology pushes towards the development of more and more compact and robust systems. Among the innovative solutions aimed at answering the need for stable mid-IR references are crystalline microresonators, which have recently shown excellent capabilities for frequency stabilization and linewidth narrowing of quantum cascade lasers with compact setups. In this work, we report on the first system for mid-IR high-resolution spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser locked to a CaF₂ microresonator. Electronic locking narrows the laser linewidth by one order of magnitude and guarantees good stability over long timescales, allowing, at the same time, an easy way for finely tuning the laser frequency over the molecular absorption line. Improvements in terms of resolution and frequency stability of the source are demonstrated by direct sub-Doppler recording of a molecular line. PMID:26901199

  6. Tunable Microcavity-Stabilized Quantum Cascade Laser for Mid-IR High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Borri, Simone; Siciliani de Cumis, Mario; Insero, Giacomo; Bartalini, Saverio; Cancio Pastor, Pablo; Mazzotti, Davide; Galli, Iacopo; Giusfredi, Giovanni; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Eliyahu, Danny; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Akikusa, Naota; Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute; De Natale, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The need for highly performing and stable methods for mid-IR molecular sensing and metrology pushes towards the development of more and more compact and robust systems. Among the innovative solutions aimed at answering the need for stable mid-IR references are crystalline microresonators, which have recently shown excellent capabilities for frequency stabilization and linewidth narrowing of quantum cascade lasers with compact setups. In this work, we report on the first system for mid-IR high-resolution spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser locked to a CaF2 microresonator. Electronic locking narrows the laser linewidth by one order of magnitude and guarantees good stability over long timescales, allowing, at the same time, an easy way for finely tuning the laser frequency over the molecular absorption line. Improvements in terms of resolution and frequency stability of the source are demonstrated by direct sub-Doppler recording of a molecular line. PMID:26901199

  7. New High-Resolution Absorption Cross-Section Measurements of HCFC-142B in the Mid-Ir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bris, Karine; Strong, Kimberly; Melo, Stella

    2009-06-01

    HCFC-142b (1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane) is a temporary substitute for ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). However, due to its high absorption cross-sections in the mid-IR, HCFC-142b is also a highly potent greenhouse gas, now detectable from space by satellite missions. So far, the accuracy of the retrieval has been limited by the lack of reference data in a range of temperatures compatible with atmospheric observations. We present new absorption cross section measurements of HCFC-142b at high-resolution (0.02 cm^{-1}) from 223 K to 283 K in the 600 cm^{-1}- 4000 cm^{-1} spectral window. The composite spectra are calculated for each temperature from a set of acquisitions at different pressures by Fourier transform spectroscopy.

  8. New high spectral resolution spectrograph and mid-IR camera for the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, Alan T.; Bus, Schelte J.; Connelley, Michael; Rayner, John

    2016-10-01

    The NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) is a 3.0 m infrared telescope located at an altitude of 4.2 km near the summit of Mauna Kea on the island of Hawaii. The IRTF was established by NASA to support planetary science missions. We show new observational capabilities resulting from the completion of iSHELL, a 1–5 μm echelle spectrograph with resolving power of 70,000 using a 0.375 arcsec slit. This instrument will be commissioned starting in August 2016. The spectral grasp of iSHELL is enormous due to the cross-dispersed design and use of a 2Kx2K HgCdTe array. Raw fits files will be publicly archived, allowing for more effective use of the large amount of spectral data that will be collected. The preliminary observing manual for iSHELL, containing the instrument description, observing procedures and estimates of sensitivity can be downloaded at http://irtfweb.ifa.hawaii.edu/~ishell/iSHELL_observing_manual.pdf. This manual and instrument description papers can be downloaded at http://bit.ly/28NFiMj. We are also working to restore to service our 8–25 μm camera, MIRSI. It will be upgraded with a closed cycle cooler that will eliminate the need for liquid helium and allow continuous use of MIRSI on the telescope. This will enable a wider range of Solar System studies at mid-IR wavelengths, with particular focus on thermal observations of NEOs. The MIRSI upgrade includes plans to integrate a visible CCD camera that will provide simultaneous imaging and guiding capabilities. This visible imager will utilize similar hardware and software as the MORIS system on SpeX. The MIRSI upgrade is being done in collaboration with David Trilling (NAU) and Joseph Hora (CfA). For further information on the IRTF and its instruments including visitor instruments, see: http:// irtfweb.ifa.hawaii.edu/. We gratefully acknowledge the support of NASA contract NNH14CK55B, NASA Science Mission Directorate, and NASA grant NNX15AF81G (Trilling, Hora) for the upgrade of MIRSI.

  9. Absorption Spectroscopy and Imaging from the Visible through Mid-IR with 20 nm Resolution Using AFM probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centrone, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Correlated nanoscale composition and optical property maps are important to engineer nanomaterials in applications ranging from photovoltaics to sensing and therapeutics. Wavelengths (λs) from the visible to near-IR probe electronic transitions in materials, providing information regarding band gap and defects while light in mid-IR probes vibrational transitions and provide chemical composition. However, light diffraction limits the lateral resolution of conventional micro-spectroscopic techniques to approximately λ/2, which is insufficient to image nanomaterials. Additionally, the λ-dependent resolution impedes direct comparison of spectral maps from different spectral ranges. Photo Thermal Induced Resonance (PTIR) is a novel technique that circumvents light diffraction by employing an AFM tip as a local detector for measuring light absorption with λ-independent nanoscale resolution. Our PTIR setup combines an AFM microscope with three lasers providing λ-tunability from 500 nm to 16000 nm continuously. The AFM tip transduces locally the sample thermal expansion induced by light absorption into large cantilever oscillations. Local absorption spectra (electronic or vibrational) and maps are obtained recording the amplitude of the tip deflection as a function of λ and position, respectively. The working principles of the PTIR technique will be described first, and nano-patterned polymer samples will be used to evaluate its lateral resolution, sensitivity and linearity. Results show that the PTIR signal intensity is proportional to the local absorbed energy suggesting applicability of this technique for quantitative chemical analysis at nanoscale, at least for thin (less than 1000 nm thick) samples. Additionally, a λ-independent resolution as high as 20 nm is demonstrated across the whole spectral range. In the second part of the talk, PTIR will be applied to image the dark plasmonic resonance of gold Asymmetric Split Ring Resonators (A-SRRs) in the mid-IR

  10. Mid-IR DIAL for high-resolution mapping of explosive precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitev, V.; Babichenko, S.; Bennes, J.; Borelli, R.; Dolfi-Bouteyre, A.; Fiorani, L.; Hespel, L.; Huet, T.; Palucci, A.; Pistilli, M.; Puiu, A.; Rebane, O.; Sobolev, I.

    2013-10-01

    A DIAL instrument on a moving platform is seen as a valuable remote sensing component in a sensor network for area monitoring, targeting sites involved in unauthorised explosive manufacturing. Such instrument will perform the area mapping of the vapour concentration of key substances, known to be used as precursors in explosive fabrication, such as acetone and nitromethane. The IR spectra of acetone and nitromethane vapours have been defined from available spectroscopy databases and from laboratory measurements as showing optimal spectral band for the DIAL operation in the spectral range of 3.0 μm - 3.5 μm. The DIAL operation has been numerically simulated, with inputs based on the HITRAN database, the U.S. Standard Atmosphere and aerosol simulation software package OPAC. A combination of OPO and OPA has been chosen as a transmitter, where the idler wavelength is used for probing, with wavelength tuning in sequence. A scanner mounted on top of the coaxially aligned laser and receiver, is capable of covering almost 360 degrees horizontally and +/-30 degrees vertically. The detection is performed by a photovoltaic photodiode with 4-stage cooling, with a signal digitalisation having 14 bit amplitude resolution and 125 Ms/s sampling rate. Here we present the development and the first test of the DIAL instrument.

  11. High Spatial Resolution Thermal Satellite Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert

    2003-01-01

    This document in the form of viewslides, reviews various low-cost alternatives to high spatial resolution thermal satellite technologies. There exists no follow-on to Landsat 7 or ASTER high spatial resolution thermal systems. This document reviews the results of the investigation in to the use of new technologies to create a low-cost useful alternative. Three suggested technologies are examined. 1. Conventional microbolometer pushbroom modes offers potential for low cost Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) thermal or ASTER capability with at least 60-120 ground sampling distance (GSD). 2. Backscanning could produce MultiSpectral Thermal Imager performance without cooled detectors. 3. Cooled detector could produce hyperspectral thermal class system or extremely high spatial resolution class instrument.

  12. A deep look at the nuclear region of UGC 5101 through high angular resolution mid-IR data with GTC/CanariCam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Paredes, M.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Aretxaga, I.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Hernán-Caballero, A.; González-Martín, O.; Pereira-Santaella, M.; Packham, C.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Elitzur, M.; Esquej, P.; García-Bernete, I.; Imanishi, M.; Levenson, N. A.; Rodríguez Espinosa, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    We present an analysis of the nuclear infrared (IR, 1.6-18 μm) emission of the ultraluminous IR galaxy UGC 5101 to derive the properties of its active galactic nucleus (AGN) and its obscuring material. We use new mid-IR high angular resolution (0.3-0.5 arcsec) imaging using the Si-2 filter (λC = 8.7 μm) and 7.5-13 μm spectroscopy taken with CanariCam (CC) on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio CANARIAS. We also use archival Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS and Subaru/COMICS imaging and Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy. We estimate the near- and mid-IR unresolved nuclear emission by modelling the imaging data with GALFIT. We decompose the Spitzer/IRS and CC spectra using a power-law component, which represents the emission due to dust heated by the AGN, and a starburst component, both affected by foreground extinction. We model the resulting unresolved near- and mid-IR, and the starburst subtracted CC spectrum with the CLUMPY torus models of Nenkova et al. The derived geometrical properties of the torus, including the large covering factor and the high foreground extinction needed to reproduce the deep 9.7 μm silicate feature, are consistent with the lack of strong AGN signatures in the optical. We derive an AGN bolometric luminosity Lbol ˜ 1.9 × 1045 erg s-1 that is in good agreement with other estimates in the literature.

  13. High Spatial Resolution Spectroscopy of Semiconductor Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Timothy D.; Gershoni, David; Pfeiffer, Loren N.

    1996-03-01

    Several recent reports employing high spatial resolution have revealed the dominance of exciton localization in the low temperature luminescence of semiconductor quantum structures.^[1-3] Understanding this localization is of critical importance for the reliable studies of low dimensional structures such as quantum wells, quantum wires and quantum dots. We report on low temperature and high spatial resolution photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation studies of cleaved edge overgrown (CEO) single quantum wires. These samples permit the direct and unambiguous comparison between the optical properties of a (100) oriented quantum well, a (110) oriented quantum well, and the quantum wire which is formed at their intersection. Using low temperature near field optical spectroscopy, and a novel diffraction limited far field apparatus, we determine the carrier diffusion length dependence on pump wavelength and sample temperature in both the 2d systems and the genuinely 1D wire system. We also measure the absorption strength of the 1D system and find it to be a factor of 3 stronger than the absorption of the associated 2D systems.^[2] Using low temperature near field optical spectroscopy, and a novel diffraction limited far field apparatus, we also determine the carrier diffusion length dependence on pump wavelength and sample temperature. ^[1] H. F. Hess, E. Betzig, T. D. Harris, L. N. Pfeiffer, and K. W. West, Science 264, 1740 (1994). ^[2] T. D. Harris, D. Gershoni, R. D. Grober, L. Pfeiffer, K. West, and N. Chand, Appl. Phys. Lett, in press (1996) ^[3] D. Gammon, E. S. Snow, and D. S. Katzer, Appl. Phys. Lett. 67, 2391 (1995)

  14. Solar system events at high spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Baines, K H; Gavel, D T; Getz, A M; Gibbartd, S G; MacIntosh, B; Max, C E; McKay, C P; Young, E F; de Pater, I

    1999-02-19

    Until relatively recent advances in technology, astronomical observations from the ground were limited in image resolution by the blurring effects of earth's atmosphere. The blur extent, ranging typically from 0.5 to 2 seconds of arc at the best astronomical sights, precluded ground-based observations of the details of the solar system's moons, asteroids, and outermost planets. With the maturing of a high resolution image processing technique called speckle imaging the resolution limitation of the atmosphere can now be largely overcome. Over the past three years they have used speckle imaging to observe Titan, a moon of Saturn with an atmospheric density comparable to Earth's, Io, the volcanically active innermost moon of Jupiter, and Neptune, a gas giant outer planet which has continually changing planet-encircling storms. These observations were made at the world's largest telescope, the Keck telescope in Hawaii and represent the highest resolution infrared images of these objects ever taken.

  15. High spatial resolution restoration of IRAS images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grasdalen, Gary L.; Inguva, R.; Dyck, H. Melvin; Canterna, R.; Hackwell, John A.

    1990-01-01

    A general technique to improve the spatial resolution of the IRAS AO data was developed at The Aerospace Corporation using the Maximum Entropy algorithm of Skilling and Gull. The technique has been applied to a variety of fields and several individual AO MACROS. With this general technique, resolutions of 15 arcsec were achieved in 12 and 25 micron images and 30 arcsec in 60 and 100 micron images. Results on galactic plane fields show that both photometric and positional accuracy achieved in the general IRAS survey are also achieved in the reconstructed images.

  16. High Spatial Resolution Commercial Satellite Imaging Product Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert E.; Pagnutti, Mary; Blonski, Slawomir; Ross, Kenton W.; Stnaley, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    NASA Stennis Space Center's Remote Sensing group has been characterizing privately owned high spatial resolution multispectral imaging systems, such as IKONOS, QuickBird, and OrbView-3. Natural and man made targets were used for spatial resolution, radiometric, and geopositional characterizations. Higher spatial resolution also presents significant adjacency effects for accurate reliable radiometry.

  17. Multi-beam synchrotron infrared chemical imaging with high spatial resolution: Beamline realization and first reports on image restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasse, Michael J.; Mattson, Eric C.; Reininger, Ruben; Kubala, Tim; Janowski, Sebastian; El-Bayyari, Zuheir; Hirschmugl, Carol J.

    2011-09-01

    Table-top Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) imaging using focal plane array (FPA) multi-element detectors is an increasingly popular chemical microscopy technique because it can provide microspectroscopic images of large sample areas in short times at moderate spatial resolution. The novel IR beamline IRENI at the Synchrotron Radiation Center (Wisconsin, USA), the first dedicated multi-beam synchrotron-based FT-IR imaging system, offers, within minutes, high quality chemical images at the highest available spatial resolution (diffraction-limited at all mid-IR wavelengths) with a pixel size of 0.54×0.54 μm 2 for transmission measurements. Due to this very high spatial sampling, mathematical image enhancement algorithms such as deconvolution and total variation (TV) reconstruction can be implemented to improve image contrast and thus spatial resolution. This is demonstrated for US Air force (USAF) targets, micron-sized aluminum beads, and a single living algal cell.

  18. High spatial resolution measurements of ram accelerator gas dynamic phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkey, J. B.; Burnham, E. A.; Bruckner, A. P.

    1992-01-01

    High spatial resolution experimental tube wall pressure measurements of ram accelerator gas dynamic phenomena are presented. The projectile resembles the centerbody of a ramjet and travels supersonically through a tube filled with a combustible gaseous mixture, with the tube acting as the outer cowling. Pressure data are recorded as the projectile passes by sensors mounted in the tube wall at various locations along the tube. Data obtained by using a special highly instrumented section of tube has allowed the recording of gas dynamic phenomena with a spatial resolution on the order of one tenth the projectile length. High spatial resolution tube wall pressure data from the three regimes of propulsion studied to date (subdetonative, transdetonative, and superdetonative) are presented and reveal the 3D character of the flowfield induced by projectile fins and the canting of the projectile body relative to the tube wall. Also presented for comparison to the experimental data are calculations made with an inviscid, 3D CFD code.

  19. Photoacoustic lymphatic imaging with high spatial-temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Catherine; Yao, Junjie; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-11-01

    Despite its critical function in coordinating the egress of inflammatory and immune cells out of tissues and maintaining fluid balance, the causative role of lymphatic network dysfunction in pathological settings is still understudied. Engineered-animal models and better noninvasive high spatial-temporal resolution imaging techniques in both preclinical and clinical studies will help to improve our understanding of different lymphatic-related pathologic disorders. Our aim was to take advantage of our newly optimized noninvasive wide-field fast-scanning photoacoustic (PA) microcopy system to coordinately image the lymphatic vasculature and its flow dynamics, while maintaining high resolution and detection sensitivity. Here, by combining the optical-resolution PA microscopy with a fast-scanning water-immersible microelectromechanical system scanning mirror, we have imaged the lymph dynamics over a large field-of-view, with high spatial resolution and advanced detection sensitivity. Depending on the application, lymphatic vessels (LV) were spectrally or temporally differentiated from blood vessels. Validation experiments were performed on phantoms and in vivo to identify the LV. Lymphatic flow dynamics in nonpathological and pathological conditions were also visualized. These results indicate that our newly developed PA microscopy is a promising tool for lymphatic-related biological research.

  20. Photoacoustic lymphatic imaging with high spatial-temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Martel, Catherine; Yao, Junjie; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Wang, Lihong V

    2014-11-01

    Despite its critical function in coordinating the egress of inflammatory and immune cells out of tissues and maintaining fluid balance, the causative role of lymphatic network dysfunction in pathological settings is still understudied. Engineered-animal models and better noninvasive high spatial-temporal resolution imaging techniques in both preclinical and clinical studies will help to improve our understanding of different lymphatic-related pathologic disorders. Our aim was to take advantage of our newly optimized noninvasive wide-field fast-scanning photoacoustic (PA) microcopy system to coordinately image the lymphatic vasculature and its flow dynamics, while maintaining high resolution and detection sensitivity. Here, by combining the optical-resolution PA microscopy with a fast-scanning water-immersible microelectromechanical system scanning mirror, we have imaged the lymph dynamics over a large field-of-view, with high spatial resolution and advanced detection sensitivity. Depending on the application, lymphatic vessels (LV) were spectrally or temporally differentiated from blood vessels. Validation experiments were performed on phantoms and in vivo to identify the LV. Lymphatic flow dynamics in nonpathological and pathological conditions were also visualized. These results indicate that our newly developed PA microscopy is a promising tool for lymphatic-related biological research.

  1. Science with High Spatial Resolution Far-Infrared Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terebey, Susan (Editor); Mazzarella, Joseph M. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this workshop was to discuss new science and techniques relevant to high spatial resolution processing of far-infrared data, with particular focus on high resolution processing of IRAS data. Users of the maximum correlation method, maximum entropy, and other resolution enhancement algorithms applicable to far-infrared data gathered at the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) for two days in June 1993 to compare techniques and discuss new results. During a special session on the third day, interested astronomers were introduced to IRAS HIRES processing, which is IPAC's implementation of the maximum correlation method to the IRAS data. Topics discussed during the workshop included: (1) image reconstruction; (2) random noise; (3) imagery; (4) interacting galaxies; (5) spiral galaxies; (6) galactic dust and elliptical galaxies; (7) star formation in Seyfert galaxies; (8) wavelet analysis; and (9) supernova remnants.

  2. High spatial resolution measurements in a single stage ram accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkey, J. B.; Burnham, E. A.; Bruckner, A. P.

    1992-01-01

    High spatial resolution experimental tube wall pressure measurements of ram accelerator gas dynamic phenomena are presented in this paper. The ram accelerator is a ramjet-in-tube device which operates in a manner similar to that of a conventional ramjet. The projectile resembles the centerbody of a ramjet and travels supersonically through a tube filled with a combustible gaseous mixture, with the tube acting as the outer cowling. Pressure data are recorded as the projectile passes by sensors mounted in the tube wall at various locations along the tube. Utilization of special highly instrumented sections of tube has allowed the recording of gas dynamic phenomena with high resolution. High spatial resolution tube wall pressure data from the three regimes of propulsion studied to date (subdetonative, transdetonative, and superdetonative) in a single stage gas mixture are presented and reveal the three-dimensional character of the flow field induced by projectile fins and the canting of the fins and the canting of the projectile body relative to the tube wall. Also presented for comparison to the experimental data are calculations made with an inviscid, three-dimensional CFD code. The knowledge gained from these experiments and simulations is useful in understanding the underlying nature of ram accelerator propulsive regimes, as well as assisting in the validation of three-dimensional CFD coded which model unsteady, chemically reactive flows.

  3. High spatial-resolution IRAS images of M51

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canterna, R.; Hackwell, John A.; Grasdalen, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    High spatial-resolution (approx. equal to 30 seconds) images of M51 in the four Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) bands (12, 25, 60, and 100 microns) have been obtained. The spatial variation in flux in all four bands is coincident with the spiral features seen in H alpha and 6 cm with a few exceptions. In the nuclear region (4 minutes) the position of the peak of maximum intensity shifts in relation to the visual nucleus: it is coincident with the nucleus at 12 microns, shifts approximately 45 seconds to south-southwest, and is 45 seconds northwest of the nucleus at 60 and 100 microns.

  4. Multichannel Thomson scattering systems with high spatial resolution (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.; Bretz, N.; Dimock, D.; Grek, B.; Long, D.; Palladino, R.; Tolnas, E.

    1986-08-01

    Thomson scattering systems capable of providing snapshot profiles of electron temperature and density with high spatial resolution (>50 points) have become routine diagnostics on the Princeton large torus (PLT), Princeton divertor experiment (PDX), and tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) tokamaks. The design parameters of these systems are compared. Particular attention is given to describing those new components and techniques which have contributed most to improved data quality and reliability in the ten-year evolution of these systems. Examples of recent TFTR T-italic/sub e-italic/(R-italic) and n-italic/sub e-italic/(R-italic) profiles are presented.

  5. Multichannel Thomson scattering systems with high spatial resolution (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, D.; Bretz, N.; Dimock, D.; Grek, B.; Long, D.; Palladino, R.; Tolnas, E.

    1986-08-01

    Thomson scattering systems capable of providing snapshot profiles of electron temperature and density with high spatial resolution (>50 points) have become routine diagnostics on the Princeton large torus (PLT), Princeton divertor experiment (PDX), and tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) tokamaks. The design parameters of these systems are compared. Particular attention is given to describing those new components and techniques which have contributed most to improved data quality and reliability in the ten-year evolution of these systems. Examples of recent TFTR Te(R) and ne(R) profiles are presented.

  6. A Very High Spatial Resolution Detector for Small Animal PET

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai Shah, M.S.

    2007-03-06

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an in vivo analog of autoradiography and has the potential to become a powerful new tool in imaging biological processes in small laboratory animals. PET imaging of small animals can provide unique information that can help in advancement of human disease models as well as drug development. Clinical PET scanners used for human imaging are bulky, expensive and do not have adequate spatial resolution for small animal studies. Hence, dedicated, low cost instruments are required for conducting small animal studies with higher spatial resolution than what is currently achieved with clinical as well as dedicated small animal PET scanners. The goal of the proposed project is to investigate a new all solid-state detector design for small animal PET imaging. Exceptionally high spatial resolution, good timing resolution, and excellent energy resolution are expected from the proposed detector design. The Phase I project was aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of producing high performance solid-state detectors that provide high sensitivity, spatial resolution, and timing characteristics. Energy resolution characteristics of the new detector were also investigated. The goal of the Phase II project is to advance the promising solid-state detector technology for small animal PET and determine its full potential. Detectors modules will be built and characterized and finally, a bench-top small animal PET system will be assembled and evaluated.

  7. CRISTA, a cryogenic IR telescope with high spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Barthol, P.; Grossmann, K.U.; Offermann, D.

    1994-12-31

    A limb sounding cryogenic IR telescope named CRISTA (CRyogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere) has been developed to study dynamic disturbances in the middle atmosphere with high spatial (horizontal and vertical) resolution. For this purpose, it measures mid and far IR emissions of several trace constituents at earth`s limb using three independent telescopes with high off-axis rejection performance. Height profiles are derived from simultaneous scans of the three telescope LOS. The radiation received is spectrally analyzed by gating spectrometers followed by Si:Ga and Ge:Ga detectors. High sensitivity together with improved spatial resolution leads to a spacing of only 500 km to 600 km between two adjacent measurement points and thus to a far more detailed picture of the atmosphere compared to present day satellite experiments. CRISTA, integrated in the free-flyer ASTROSPAS, will be launched 1994 by the Space Shuttle for a short duration mission and will be part of ATLAS 3.

  8. High spatial resolution soft-x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer-Ilse, W.; Medecki, H.; Brown, J.T.

    1997-04-01

    A new soft x-ray microscope (XM-1) with high spatial resolution has been constructed by the Center for X-ray Optics. It uses bending magnet radiation from beamline 6.1 at the Advanced Light Source, and is used in a variety of projects and applications in the life and physical sciences. Most of these projects are ongoing. The instrument uses zone plate lenses and achieves a resolution of 43 nm, measured over 10% to 90% intensity with a knife edge test sample. X-ray microscopy permits the imaging of relatively thick samples, up to 10 {mu}m thick, in water. XM-1 has an easy to use interface, that utilizes visible light microscopy to precisely position and focus the specimen. The authors describe applications of this device in the biological sciences, as well as in studying industrial applications including structured polymer samples.

  9. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF THERMAL EMISSION FROM DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Moerchen, Margaret M.; Telesco, Charles M.; Packham, Christopher

    2010-11-10

    We have obtained subarcsecond mid-IR images of a sample of debris disks within 100 pc. For our sample of 19 A-type debris disk candidates chosen for their IR excess, we have resolved, for the first time, five sources plus the previously resolved disk around HD 141569. Two other sources in our sample have been ruled out as debris disks since the time of sample selection. Three of the six resolved sources have inferred radii of 1-4 AU (HD 38678, HD 71155, and HD 181869), and one source has an inferred radius {approx}10-30 AU (HD 141569). Among the resolved sources with detections of excess IR emission, HD 71155 appears to be comparable in size (r {approx} 2 AU) to the solar system's asteroid belt, thus joining {zeta} Lep (HD 38678, reported previously) to comprise the only two resolved sources of that class. Two additional sources (HD 95418 and HD 139006) show spatial extents that imply disk radii of {approx}1-3 AU, although the excess IR fluxes are not formally detected with better than 2{sigma} significance. For the unresolved sources, the upper limits on the maximum radii of mid-IR disk emission are in the range {approx}1-20 AU, four of which are comparable in radius to the asteroid belt. We have compared the global color temperatures of the dust to that expected for the dust in radiative equilibrium at the distances corresponding to the observed sizes or limits on the sizes. In most cases, the temperatures estimated via these two methods are comparable, and therefore, we see a generally consistent picture of the inferred morphology and the global mid-IR emission. Finally, while our sample size is not statistically significant, we note that the older sources (>200 Myr) host much warmer dust (T {approx}> 400 K) than younger sources (in the tens of Myr).

  10. High Spatial Resolution Fe XII Observations of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Paola; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo

    2016-08-01

    We use UV spectral observations of active regions with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to investigate the properties of the coronal Fe xii 1349.4 Å emission at unprecedented high spatial resolution (˜0.33″). We find that by using appropriate observational strategies (i.e., long exposures, lossless compression), Fe xii emission can be studied with IRIS at high spatial and spectral resolution, at least for high-density plasma (e.g., post-flare loops and active region moss). We find that upper transition region (TR; moss) Fe xii emission shows very small average Doppler redshifts ({v}{{D}} ˜ 3 km s‑1) as well as modest non-thermal velocities (with an average of ˜24 km s‑1 and the peak of the distribution at ˜15 km s‑1). The observed distribution of Doppler shifts appears to be compatible with advanced three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations in which impulsive heating is concentrated at the TR footpoints of a hot corona. While the non-thermal broadening of Fe xii 1349.4 Å peaks at similar values as lower resolution simultaneous Hinode Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) measurements of Fe xii 195 Å, IRIS observations show a previously undetected tail of increased non-thermal broadening that might be suggestive of the presence of subarcsecond heating events. We find that IRIS and EIS non-thermal line broadening measurements are affected by instrumental effects that can only be removed through careful analysis. Our results also reveal an unexplained discrepancy between observed 195.1/1349.4 Å Fe xii intensity ratios and those predicted by the CHIANTI atomic database.

  11. High Spatial Resolution Fe XII Observations of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Paola; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo

    2016-08-01

    We use UV spectral observations of active regions with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to investigate the properties of the coronal Fe xii 1349.4 Å emission at unprecedented high spatial resolution (˜0.33″). We find that by using appropriate observational strategies (i.e., long exposures, lossless compression), Fe xii emission can be studied with IRIS at high spatial and spectral resolution, at least for high-density plasma (e.g., post-flare loops and active region moss). We find that upper transition region (TR; moss) Fe xii emission shows very small average Doppler redshifts ({v}{{D}} ˜ 3 km s-1) as well as modest non-thermal velocities (with an average of ˜24 km s-1 and the peak of the distribution at ˜15 km s-1). The observed distribution of Doppler shifts appears to be compatible with advanced three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations in which impulsive heating is concentrated at the TR footpoints of a hot corona. While the non-thermal broadening of Fe xii 1349.4 Å peaks at similar values as lower resolution simultaneous Hinode Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) measurements of Fe xii 195 Å, IRIS observations show a previously undetected tail of increased non-thermal broadening that might be suggestive of the presence of subarcsecond heating events. We find that IRIS and EIS non-thermal line broadening measurements are affected by instrumental effects that can only be removed through careful analysis. Our results also reveal an unexplained discrepancy between observed 195.1/1349.4 Å Fe xii intensity ratios and those predicted by the CHIANTI atomic database.

  12. An RPC-PET prototype with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, A.; Carolino, N.; Correia, C. M. B. A.; Ferreira Marques, R.; Fonte, P.; González-Díaz, D.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Macedo, M. P.; Policarpo, A.

    2004-11-01

    A small positron emission tomography system, based on the timing RPC technology has been built and tested. This first prototype is aimed at validating the expectations, derived from simulations, of a very high spatial resolution, which could be of value for the imaging of small animals. The system is composed of two counting heads, able to measure the photon interaction point in two dimensions, the transaxial dimension and the Depth of Interaction. Each head is composed of 16 independent stacked RPCs made from copper and glass (anode) electrodes. Point-like 22Na sources were so far reconstructed, using the standard filtered back-projection algorithm, with a spatial accuracy of 0.6 mm FWHM, free of parallax error.

  13. High spatial resolution infrared camera as ISS external experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckehard, Lorenz; Frerker, Hap; Fitch, Robert Alan

    High spatial resolution infrared camera as ISS external experiment for monitoring global climate changes uses ISS internal and external resources (eg. data storage). The optical experiment will consist of an infrared camera for monitoring global climate changes from the ISS. This technology was evaluated by the German small satellite mission BIRD and further developed in different ESA projects. Compared to BIRD the presended instrument uses proven sensor advanced technologies (ISS external) and ISS on board processing and storage capabili-ties (internal). The instrument will be equipped with a serial interfaces for TM/TC and several relay commands for the power supply. For data processing and storage a mass memory is re-quired. The access to actual attitude data is highly desired to produce geo referenced maps-if possible by an on board processing.

  14. High-spatial-resolution nanoparticle x-ray fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Jakob C.; Vâgberg, William; Vogt, Carmen; Lundström, Ulf; Larsson, Daniel H.; Hertz, Hans M.

    2016-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence tomography (XFCT) has potential for high-resolution 3D molecular x-ray bio-imaging. In this technique the fluorescence signal from targeted nanoparticles (NPs) is measured, providing information about the spatial distribution and concentration of the NPs inside the object. However, present laboratory XFCT systems typically have limited spatial resolution (>1 mm) and suffer from long scan times and high radiation dose even at high NP concentrations, mainly due to low efficiency and poor signal-to-noise ratio. We have developed a laboratory XFCT system with high spatial resolution (sub-100 μm), low NP concentration and vastly decreased scan times and dose, opening up the possibilities for in-vivo small-animal imaging research. The system consists of a high-brightness liquid-metal-jet microfocus x-ray source, x-ray focusing optics and an energy-resolving photon-counting detector. By using the source's characteristic 24 keV line-emission together with carefully matched molybdenum nanoparticles the Compton background is greatly reduced, increasing the SNR. Each measurement provides information about the spatial distribution and concentration of the Mo nanoparticles. A filtered back-projection method is used to produce the final XFCT image.

  15. Progress toward accurate high spatial resolution actinide analysis by EPMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jercinovic, M. J.; Allaz, J. M.; Williams, M. L.

    2010-12-01

    High precision, high spatial resolution EPMA of actinides is a significant issue for geochronology, resource geochemistry, and studies involving the nuclear fuel cycle. Particular interest focuses on understanding of the behavior of Th and U in the growth and breakdown reactions relevant to actinide-bearing phases (monazite, zircon, thorite, allanite, etc.), and geochemical fractionation processes involving Th and U in fluid interactions. Unfortunately, the measurement of minor and trace concentrations of U in the presence of major concentrations of Th and/or REEs is particularly problematic, especially in complexly zoned phases with large compositional variation on the micro or nanoscale - spatial resolutions now accessible with modern instruments. Sub-micron, high precision compositional analysis of minor components is feasible in very high Z phases where scattering is limited at lower kV (15kV or less) and where the beam diameter can be kept below 400nm at high current (e.g. 200-500nA). High collection efficiency spectrometers and high performance electron optics in EPMA now allow the use of lower overvoltage through an exceptional range in beam current, facilitating higher spatial resolution quantitative analysis. The U LIII edge at 17.2 kV precludes L-series analysis at low kV (high spatial resolution), requiring careful measurements of the actinide M series. Also, U-La detection (wavelength = 0.9A) requires the use of LiF (220) or (420), not generally available on most instruments. Strong peak overlaps of Th on U make highly accurate interference correction mandatory, with problems compounded by the ThMIV and ThMV absorption edges affecting peak, background, and interference calibration measurements (especially the interference of the Th M line family on UMb). Complex REE bearing phases such as monazite, zircon, and allanite have particularly complex interference issues due to multiple peak and background overlaps from elements present in the activation

  16. Monte Carlo code for high spatial resolution ocean color simulations.

    PubMed

    D'Alimonte, Davide; Zibordi, Giuseppe; Kajiyama, Tamito; Cunha, José C

    2010-09-10

    A Monte Carlo code for ocean color simulations has been developed to model in-water radiometric fields of downward and upward irradiance (E(d) and E(u)), and upwelling radiance (L(u)) in a two-dimensional domain with a high spatial resolution. The efficiency of the code has been optimized by applying state-of-the-art computing solutions, while the accuracy of simulation results has been quantified through benchmark with the widely used Hydrolight code for various values of seawater inherent optical properties and different illumination conditions. Considering a seawater single scattering albedo of 0.9, as well as surface waves of 5 m width and 0.5 m height, the study has shown that the number of photons required to quantify uncertainties induced by wave focusing effects on E(d), E(u), and L(u) data products is of the order of 10(6), 10(9), and 10(10), respectively. On this basis, the effects of sea-surface geometries on radiometric quantities have been investigated for different surface gravity waves. Data products from simulated radiometric profiles have finally been analyzed as a function of the deployment speed and sampling frequency of current free-fall systems in view of providing recommendations to improve measurement protocols.

  17. Monte Carlo code for high spatial resolution ocean color simulations.

    PubMed

    D'Alimonte, Davide; Zibordi, Giuseppe; Kajiyama, Tamito; Cunha, José C

    2010-09-10

    A Monte Carlo code for ocean color simulations has been developed to model in-water radiometric fields of downward and upward irradiance (E(d) and E(u)), and upwelling radiance (L(u)) in a two-dimensional domain with a high spatial resolution. The efficiency of the code has been optimized by applying state-of-the-art computing solutions, while the accuracy of simulation results has been quantified through benchmark with the widely used Hydrolight code for various values of seawater inherent optical properties and different illumination conditions. Considering a seawater single scattering albedo of 0.9, as well as surface waves of 5 m width and 0.5 m height, the study has shown that the number of photons required to quantify uncertainties induced by wave focusing effects on E(d), E(u), and L(u) data products is of the order of 10(6), 10(9), and 10(10), respectively. On this basis, the effects of sea-surface geometries on radiometric quantities have been investigated for different surface gravity waves. Data products from simulated radiometric profiles have finally been analyzed as a function of the deployment speed and sampling frequency of current free-fall systems in view of providing recommendations to improve measurement protocols. PMID:20830183

  18. Proceedings of the 2004 High Spatial Resolution Commercial Imagery Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    ; Innovative Approaches to Analysis of Lidar Data for the National Map; Changes in Imperviousness near Military Installations; Geopositional Accuracy Evaluations of QuickBird and OrbView-3: Civil and Commercial Applications Project (CCAP); Geometric Accuracy Assessment: OrbView ORTHO Products; QuickBird Radiometric Calibration Update; OrbView-3 Radiometric Calibration; QuickBird Radiometric Characterization; NASA Radiometric Characterization; Establishing and Verifying the Traceability of Remote-Sensing Measurements to International Standards; QuickBird Applications; Airport Mapping and Perpetual Monitoring Using IKONOS; OrbView-3 Relative Accuracy Results and Impacts on Exploitation and Accuracy Improvement; Using Remotely Sensed Imagery to Determine Impervious Surface in Sioux Falls, South Dakota; Applying High-Resolution Satellite Imagery and Remotely Sensed Data to Local Government Applications: Sioux Falls, South Dakota; Automatic Co-Registration of QuickBird Data for Change Detection Applications; Developing Coastal Surface Roughness Maps Using ASTER and QuickBird Data Sources; Automated, Near-Real Time Cloud and Cloud Shadow Detection in High Resolution VNIR Imagery; Science Applications of High Resolution Imagery at the USGS EROS Data Center; Draft Plan for Characterizing Commercial Data Products in Support of Earth Science Research; Atmospheric Correction Prototype Algorithm for High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Earth Observing Imaging Systems; Determining Regional Arctic Tundra Carbon Exchange: A Bottom-Up Approach; Using IKONOS Imagery to Assess Impervious Surface Area, Riparian Buffers and Stream Health in the Mid-Atlantic Region; Commercial Remote Sensing Space Policy Civil Implementation Update; USGS Commercial Remote Sensing Data Contracts (CRSDC); and Commercial Remote Sensing Space Policy (CRSSP): Civil Near-Term Requirements Collection Update.

  19. Estimating Regional Changes in Soil Carbon with High Spatial Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    West, Tristram O.; Brandt, Craig C; Marland, Gregg; De La Torre Ugarte, Daniel G; Larson, James; Hellwinckel, Chad M; Wilson, Bradly; Tyler, Donald G; Nelson, Richard G

    2008-01-01

    To manage lands locally for carbon sequestration and for emissions reductions it is useful to have a system that can monitor and predict changes in soil carbon and greenhouse gas emissions with high spatial resolution. We are developing a carbon accounting framework that can estimate carbon dynamics and net emissions associated with changes in land management. One component of this framework integrates field measurements, inventory data, and remote sensing products to estimate changes in soil carbon and to estimate where these changes are likely to occur at a sub-county (30m x 30m) resolution. We applied this framework component to a mid-western region of the US that consists of 679 counties approximately centered around Iowa. We estimate the 1990 baseline soil carbon to a maximum depth of 3m for this region to be 4,117 Tg C. Cumulative soil carbon accumulation of 70.3 Tg C is estimated for this region between 1991-2000, of which 33.8 Tg C is due to changes in tillage intensity. Without accounting for soil carbon loss following changes to more intensive tillage practices, our estimate increases to 45.0 Tg C. This difference indicates that on-site permanence of soil carbon associated with a change to less intensive tillage practices is approximately 75% if no additional economic incentives are provided for soil carbon sequestration practices. This carbon accounting framework offers a method to integrate inventory and remote sensing data on an annual basis and to transparently account for alternating annual trends in land management and associated carbon stocks and fluxes.

  20. Fiber Delivery of mid-IR lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kriesel, J.M.; Gat, N.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Myers, Tanya L.; Bledt, Carlos M.; Harrington, James P.

    2011-08-24

    Fiber optics for the visible to near infrared (NIR) wavelength regimes (i.e. = 0.42 {mu}m) have proven to be extremely useful for a myriad of applications such as telecommunications, illumination, and sensors because they enable convenient, compact, and remote delivery of laser beams. Similarly, there is a need for fiber optics operating at longer wavelengths. For example, systems operating in the mid-IR regime (i.e., = 314 {mu}m) are being developed to detect trace molecular species with far-reaching applications, such as detecting explosives on surfaces, pollutants in the environment, and biomarkers in the breath of a patient. Furthermore, with the increasing availability of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) which are semiconductor lasers that operate in the mid-IR regime additional uses are rapidly being developed. Here, we describe the development of hollow-core fibers for delivery of high-quality mid-IR laser beams across a broad spectral range.

  1. Visualization of microvascularity in glioblastoma multiforme with 8-T high-spatial-resolution MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Christoforidis, Gregory A; Grecula, John C; Newton, Herbert B; Kangarlu, Allahyar; Abduljalil, Amir M; Schmalbrock, Petra; Chakeres, Donald W

    2002-10-01

    We used 8-T high-spatial-resolution gradient-echo MR imaging to directly visualize microvascularity in pathologically proved glioblastoma multiforme. Images were compared with 1.5-T high-spatial-resolution fast spin-echo T2-weighted images and digital subtraction angiograms. Preliminary data indicate that 8-T high-spatial-resolution MR imaging may enable the identification of areas of abnormal microvascularity in glioblastoma multiforme that are not visible with other routine clinical techniques.

  2. Mid-IR FORCAST/SOFIA Observations of M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikola, T.; Herter, T. L.; Vacca, W. D.; Adams, J. D.; De Buizer, J. M.; Gull, G. E.; Henderson, C. P.; Keller, L. D.; Morris, M. R.; Schoenwald, J.; Stacey, G.; Tielens, A.

    2012-04-01

    We present 75'' × 75'' size maps of M82 at 6.4 μm, 6.6 μm, 7.7 μm, 31.5 μm, and 37.1 μm with a resolution of ~4'' that we have obtained with the mid-IR camera FORCAST on SOFIA. We find strong emission from the inner 60'' (~1 kpc) along the major axis, with the main peak 5'' west-southwest of the nucleus and a secondary peak 4'' east-northeast of the nucleus. The detailed morphology of the emission differs among the bands, which is likely due to different dust components dominating the continuum emission at short mid-IR wavelengths and long mid-IR wavelengths. We include Spitzer-IRS and Herschel/PACS 70 μm data to fit spectral energy distribution templates at both emission peaks. The best-fitting templates have extinctions of AV = 18 and AV = 9 toward the main and secondary emission peak and we estimated a color temperature of 68 K at both peaks from the 31 μm and 37 μm measurement. At the emission peaks the estimated dust masses are on the order of 104 M ⊙.

  3. Tunable mid IR plasmon in GZO nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Hamza, M K; Bluet, J-M; Masenelli-Varlot, K; Canut, B; Boisron, O; Melinon, P; Masenelli, B

    2015-07-28

    Degenerate metal oxide nanoparticles are promising systems to expand the significant achievements of plasmonics into the infrared (IR) range. Among the possible candidates, Ga-doped ZnO nanocrystals are particularly suited for mid IR, considering their wide range of possible doping levels and thus of plasmon tuning. In the present work, we report on the tunable mid IR plasmon induced in degenerate Ga-doped ZnO nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are produced by a plasma expansion and exhibit unprotected surfaces. Tuning the Ga concentration allows tuning the localized surface plasmon resonance. Moreover, the plasmon resonance is characterized by a large damping. By comparing the plasmon of nanocrystal assemblies to that of nanoparticles dispersed in an alumina matrix, we investigate the possible origins of such damping. We demonstrate that it partially results from the self-organization of the naked particles and also from intrinsic inhomogeneity of dopants.

  4. Quantifying mangrove chlorophyll from high spatial resolution imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heenkenda, Muditha K.; Joyce, Karen E.; Maier, Stefan W.; de Bruin, Sytze

    2015-10-01

    Lower than expected chlorophyll concentration of a plant can directly limit photosynthetic activity, and resultant primary production. Low chlorophyll concentration may also indicate plant physiological stress. Compared to other terrestrial vegetation, mangrove chlorophyll variations are poorly understood. This study quantifies the spatial distribution of mangrove canopy chlorophyll variation using remotely sensed data and field samples over the Rapid Creek mangrove forest in Darwin, Australia. Mangrove leaf samples were collected and analyzed for chlorophyll content in the laboratory. Once the leaf area index (LAI) of sampled trees was estimated using the digital cover photography method, the canopy chlorophyll contents were calculated. Then, the nonlinear random forests regression algorithm was used to describe the relationship between canopy chlorophyll content and remotely sensed data (WorldView-2 satellite image bands and their spectral transformations), and to estimate the spatial distribution of canopy chlorophyll variation. The imagery was evaluated at full 2 m spatial resolution, as well as at decreased resampled resolutions of 5 m and 10 m. The root mean squared errors with validation samples were 0.82, 0.64 and 0.65 g/m2 for maps at 2 m, 5 m and 10 m spatial resolution respectively. The correlation coefficient was analyzed for the relationship between measured and predicted chlorophyll values. The highest correlation: 0.71 was observed at 5 m spatial resolution (R2 = 0.5). We therefore concluded that estimating mangrove chlorophyll content from remotely sensed data is possible using red, red-edge, NIR1 and NIR2 bands and their spectral transformations as predictors at 5 m spatial resolution.

  5. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS OF LOOPS IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, David H.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, Harry P.; Winebarger, Amy R.

    2013-08-01

    Understanding how the solar corona is structured is of fundamental importance to determine how the Sun's upper atmosphere is heated to high temperatures. Recent spectroscopic studies have suggested that an instrument with a spatial resolution of 200 km or better is necessary to resolve coronal loops. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) achieved this performance on a rocket flight in 2012 July. We use Hi-C data to measure the Gaussian widths of 91 loops observed in the solar corona and find a distribution that peaks at about 270 km. We also use Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data for a subset of these loops and find temperature distributions that are generally very narrow. These observations provide further evidence that loops in the solar corona are often structured at a scale of several hundred kilometers, well above the spatial scale of many proposed physical mechanisms.

  6. Atmospheric Correction Prototype Algorithm for High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Earth Observing Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the creation of a prototype algorithm for atmospheric correction using high spatial resolution earth observing imaging systems. The objective of the work was to evaluate accuracy of a prototype algorithm that uses satellite-derived atmospheric products to generate scene reflectance maps for high spatial resolution (HSR) systems. This presentation focused on preliminary results of only the satellite-based atmospheric correction algorithm.

  7. Elemental Analysis of Glass Optical Fibres with High Spatial Resolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, Andrew

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The properties of glass optical fibres are very strongly dependent on the elemental concentration profiles of the fibre cores. Core dopants such as germanium define the core refractive index, which in turn defines the manner in which the light is transmitted through the fibre. Erbium in fibre cores can facilitate the operation of fibre lasers and aluminium in turn can control the erbium distribution. The aim of the project described in this thesis was to measure the elemental concentration profiles in a variety of fibre cores using X-ray microanalysis in an electron microscope. Conventional X-ray microanalysis of bulk samples has an analytical resolution in the order of a micron. With monomode optical fibre cores having cores typically three microns in diameter the resolution of the conventional technique is plainly inadequate. An experimental technique has been developed for the preparation of thin cross-sectional samples of glass optical fibres. Application of this technique has facilitated the preparation and analysis of thin film specimens with an average thickness of 400 microns. This approach has allowed analysis to be performed with an effective spatial resolution of 100-300 nm. The technique has been applied to the determination of germanium concentration in Raman fibres, to the investigation of erbium confinement in erbium doped fibres and to the investigation of inter-ionic diffusion in semiconductor doped fibres. It has been shown that the germanium, and hence refractive index, profile of germanium doped fibres is not changed by the process of fibre drawing. Evidence has been gathered supporting the theory of erbium confinement by aluminium and an important degree of elemental diffusion has been shown to take place during the drawing of semiconductor doped fibres. In addition an experimental technique has been developed for the preparation of thin cross-sectional samples of glass optical fibres.

  8. Development of an Objective High Spatial Resolution Soil Moisture Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavodsky, B.; Case, J.; White, K.; Bell, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Drought detection, analysis, and mitigation has become a key challenge for a diverse set of decision makers, including but not limited to operational weather forecasters, climatologists, agricultural interests, and water resource management. One tool that is heavily used is the United States Drought Monitor (USDM), which is derived from a complex blend of objective data and subjective analysis on a state-by-state basis using a variety of modeled and observed precipitation, soil moisture, hydrologic, and vegetation and crop health data. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center currently runs a real-time configuration of the Noah land surface model (LSM) within the NASA Land Information System (LIS) framework. The LIS-Noah is run at 3-km resolution for local numerical weather prediction (NWP) and situational awareness applications at select NOAA/National Weather Service (NWS) forecast offices over the Continental U.S. (CONUS). To enhance the practicality of the LIS-Noah output for drought monitoring and assessing flood potential, a 30+-year soil moisture climatology has been developed in an attempt to place near real-time soil moisture values in historical context at county- and/or watershed-scale resolutions. This LIS-Noah soil moisture climatology and accompanying anomalies is intended to complement the current suite of operational products, such as the North American Land Data Assimilation System phase 2 (NLDAS-2), which are generated on a coarser-resolution grid that may not capture localized, yet important soil moisture features. Daily soil moisture histograms are used to identify the real-time soil moisture percentiles at each grid point according to the county or watershed in which the grid point resides. Spatial plots are then produced that map the percentiles as proxies to the different USDM categories. This presentation will highlight recent developments of this gridded, objective soil moisture index, comparison to subjective

  9. Trace metal imaging with high spatial resolution: applications in biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhenyu; Caruso, Joseph A; Lai, Barry; Matusch, Andreas; Becker, J Sabine

    2011-01-01

    New generations of analytical techniques for imaging of metals are pushing hitherto boundaries of spatial resolution and quantitative analysis in biology. Because of this, the application of these imaging techniques described herein to the study of the organization and dynamics of metal cations and metal-containing biomolecules in biological cell and tissue is becoming an important issue in biomedical research. In the current review, three common metal imaging techniques in biomedical research are introduced, including synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). These are exemplified by a demonstration of the dopamine-Fe complexes, by assessment of boron distribution in a boron neutron capture therapy cell model, by mapping Cu and Zn in human brain cancer and a rat brain tumor model, and by the analysis of metal topography within neuromelanin. These studies have provided solid evidence that demonstrates that the sensitivity, spatial resolution, specificity, and quantification ability of metal imaging techniques is suitable and highly desirable for biomedical research. Moreover, these novel studies on the nanometre scale (e.g., of individual single cells or cell organelles) will lead to a better understanding of metal processes in cells and tissues.

  10. High spatial resolution 10 micron imaging of IRC + 10216

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, E. E.; Danchi, W. C.; Townes, C. H.; Mclaren, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    Precise high-resolution 10-micron images of the carbon star IRC + 10216 have been obtained with a scanned linear array. The low noise and high dynamic range of these images permit deconvolution of the telescope point-spread function, revealing the radial brightness distribution of the circumstellar dust shell: approximate reflection symmetry is found in west-east scans, with a distinct division into two components of diameter about 0.40 and 2.2 arcsec. It is shown that this morphology is consistent with published interferometric data that had cast doubt upon an earlier, idealized two-component model. The observed brightness distribution implies that the circumstellar dust density may deviate substantially from the 1/r squared radial dependence expected for spherically symmetric outflow with constant velocity and constant rate of mass loss.

  11. High spatial and temporal resolution studies of ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Charles Rankin, Jr.

    The subject of this thesis is the investigation of the polar structure and dynamics of ferroelectric thin films using newly developed high resolution optical, scanning- force microscopy and time-resolved methods. A technique based on confocal scanning optical microscopy (CSOM) is used to image the ferroelectric polarization of BaxSr1-xTiO 3 (BST) thin films at room temperature with sub-micron spatial resolution. Films of both paraelectric (x = 0.5) and ferroelectric ( x = 0.8) compositions show a coexistence of both paraelectric and ferroelectric phases on the smallest scale resolvable with this technique. These results suggest that non-uniform stress is responsible for the strong inhomogeneous thermal broadening of the ferroelectric phase transition, and that dielectric loss in thin films may be dominated by a relatively small fraction of nanometer-sized regions. Apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy (ANSOM) is used to map the inhomogeneous ferroelectric polarization in BaxSr 1-xTiO3 thin films. Images of nanometer-scale ferroelectric domains in BaxSr1-xTiO3 thin films are obtained with 30 Å spatial resolution using ANSOM. The images exhibit inhomogeneities in the ferroelectric polarization over the smallest scales that can be observed, and are largely uncorrelated with topographic features. The application of an in-plane static electric field causes domain reorientation and domain-wall motion over distances as small as 40 Å. These results demonstrate the promise of ANSOM for imaging near-atomic-scale polarization fluctuations in ferroelectric materials. Interferometric ANSOM is described in detail, including a practical description of how ANSOM images are acquired. A discussion of the various contrast mechanisms in ANSOM is followed by a prescription for eliminating a certain class of topographic artifacts. For the imaging of polarization in ferroelectric thin films, the linear electro-optic effect provides the central contrast mechanism. High-resolution

  12. High spatial resolution spectrometry of rafting macroalgae (Sargassum)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szekielda, Karl H.; Marmorino, George O.; Bowles, Jeffrey H.; Gillis, David

    2010-04-01

    Data with 0.4-m spatial resolution acquired ~2 km off the southeast Florida coast using the airborne Portable Hyperspectral Imager for Low-Light Spectroscopy (PHILLS) have been analyzed with the objective of identifying drifting surface macroalgae (Sargassum) through its spectral signature in at-sensor radiance. The observed spectral features of Sargassum include a peak at a wavelength of ~0.570 μm and a photosynthetic 'red edge' between 0.673 and 0.699 μm. Sargassum also exhibits high radiance in the reflected near-infrared but is impacted by the atmospheric absorption bands of water vapor at 0.720 μm and oxygen at 0.756 μm. The spectral signature is clearest and largest in amplitude where the Sargassum occurs as small surface aggregations, or rafts, which tend to lie at the downwind ends of narrow Sargassum windrows. The quantity of floating Sargassum was estimated within a single pixel by linearly mixing a spectrum of Sargassum-free water with varying percentages of a spectrum from a pixel assumed completely filled with floating plants. For our study site about 2.3% of the ocean area is classified as having some Sargassum coverage, with pixels completely filled with Sargassum being rare (only 0.2% of the classified Sargassum pixels) and pixels with the least-resolvable amount of Sargassum (~10% filled) being the most common.

  13. Interfacial shear stress measurement using high spatial resolution multiphase PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.

    2015-06-01

    In multiphase flows, form drag and viscous shear stress transfer momentum between phases. For numerous environmental and man-made flows, it is of primary importance to predict this transfer at a liquid-gas interface. In its general expression, interfacial shear stress involves local velocity gradients as well as surface velocity, curvature, and surface tension gradients. It is therefore a challenging quantity to measure experimentally or compute numerically. In fact, no experimental work to date has been able to directly resolve all the terms contributing to the shear stress in the case of curved and moving surfaces. In an attempt to fully resolve the interface shear stress when surface tension gradients are negligible, high-resolution particle image velocimetry (PIV) data are acquired simultaneously on both sides of a water-air interface. The flow consists of a well-conditioned uniform and homogeneous water jet discharging in quiescent air, which exhibits two-dimensional surface waves as a result of a shear layer instability below the surface. PIV provides velocity fields in both phases, while planar laser-induced fluorescence is used to track the interface and obtain its curvature. To compute the interfacial shear stress from the data, several processing schemes are proposed and compared, using liquid and/or gas phase data. Vorticity at the surface, which relates to the shear stress through the dynamic boundary condition at the surface, is also computed and provides additional strategies for estimating the shear. The various schemes are in agreement within the experimental uncertainties, validating the methodology for experimentally resolving this demanding quantity.

  14. Methods of photoelectrode characterization with high spatial and temporal resolution

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Esposito, Daniel V.; Baxter, Jason B.; John, Jimmy; Lewis, Nathan S.; Moffat, Thomas P.; Ogitsu, Tadashi; O'Neil, Glen D.; Pham, Tuan Anh; Talin, A. Alec; Velazquez, Jesus M.; et al

    2015-06-19

    Here, materials and photoelectrode architectures that are highly efficient, extremely stable, and made from low cost materials are required for commercially viable photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting technology. A key challenge is the heterogeneous nature of real-world materials, which often possess spatial variation in their crystal structure, morphology, and/or composition at the nano-, micro-, or macro-scale. Different structures and compositions can have vastly different properties and can therefore strongly influence the overall performance of the photoelectrode through complex structure–property relationships. A complete understanding of photoelectrode materials would also involve elucidation of processes such as carrier collection and electrochemical charge transfer that occurmore » at very fast time scales. We present herein an overview of a broad suite of experimental and computational tools that can be used to define the structure–property relationships of photoelectrode materials at small dimensions and on fast time scales. A major focus is on in situ scanning-probe measurement (SPM) techniques that possess the ability to measure differences in optical, electronic, catalytic, and physical properties with nano- or micro-scale spatial resolution. In situ ultrafast spectroscopic techniques, used to probe carrier dynamics involved with processes such as carrier generation, recombination, and interfacial charge transport, are also discussed. Complementing all of these experimental techniques are computational atomistic modeling tools, which can be invaluable for interpreting experimental results, aiding in materials discovery, and interrogating PEC processes at length and time scales not currently accessible by experiment. In addition to reviewing the basic capabilities of these experimental and computational techniques, we highlight key opportunities and limitations of applying these tools for the development of PEC materials.« less

  15. Methods of photoelectrode characterization with high spatial and temporal resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, Daniel V.; Baxter, Jason B.; John, Jimmy; Lewis, Nathan S.; Moffat, Thomas P.; Ogitsu, Tadashi; O'Neil, Glen D.; Pham, Tuan Anh; Talin, A. Alec; Velazquez, Jesus M.; Wood, Brandon C.

    2015-06-19

    Here, materials and photoelectrode architectures that are highly efficient, extremely stable, and made from low cost materials are required for commercially viable photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting technology. A key challenge is the heterogeneous nature of real-world materials, which often possess spatial variation in their crystal structure, morphology, and/or composition at the nano-, micro-, or macro-scale. Different structures and compositions can have vastly different properties and can therefore strongly influence the overall performance of the photoelectrode through complex structure–property relationships. A complete understanding of photoelectrode materials would also involve elucidation of processes such as carrier collection and electrochemical charge transfer that occur at very fast time scales. We present herein an overview of a broad suite of experimental and computational tools that can be used to define the structure–property relationships of photoelectrode materials at small dimensions and on fast time scales. A major focus is on in situ scanning-probe measurement (SPM) techniques that possess the ability to measure differences in optical, electronic, catalytic, and physical properties with nano- or micro-scale spatial resolution. In situ ultrafast spectroscopic techniques, used to probe carrier dynamics involved with processes such as carrier generation, recombination, and interfacial charge transport, are also discussed. Complementing all of these experimental techniques are computational atomistic modeling tools, which can be invaluable for interpreting experimental results, aiding in materials discovery, and interrogating PEC processes at length and time scales not currently accessible by experiment. In addition to reviewing the basic capabilities of these experimental and computational techniques, we highlight key opportunities and limitations of applying these tools for the development of PEC materials.

  16. High spatial resolution mid-infrared studies of planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skemer, Andrew

    I present the results of six papers related the formation and evolution of planets and planetary systems, all of which are based on high-resolution, ground-based, mid-infrared observations. The first three chapters are studies of T Tauri binaries. T Tauri stars are young, low mass stars, whose disks form the building blocks of extrasolar planets. The first chapter is a study of the 0.68"/0.12" triple system, T Tauri. Our spatially resolved N-band photometry reveals silicate absorption towards one component, T Tau Sa, indicating the presence of an edge-on disk, which is in contrast to the other components. The second chapter is an adaptive optics fed N-band spectroscopy study of the 0.88" binary, UY Aur. We find that the dust grains around UY Aur A are ISM-like, while the mineralogy of the dust around UY Aur B is more uncertain, due to self-extinction. The third chapter presents a survey of spatially resolved silicate spectroscopy for nine T Tauri binaries. We find with 90%-95% confidence that the silicate features of the binaries are more similar than those of randomly paired single stars. This implies that a shared binary property, such as age or composition, is an important parameter in dust grain evolution. The fourth chapter is a study of the planetary system, 2MASS 1207. We explore the source of 2MASS 1207 b's under-luminosity, which has typically been explained as the result of an edge-on disk of large, grey-extincting dust grains. We find that the edge-on disk theory is incompatible with several lines of evidence, and suggest that 2MASS 1207 b's appearance can be explained by a thick cloudy atmosphere, which might be typical among young, planetary systems. The fifth chapter is a study of the white dwarf, Sirius B, which in the context of this thesis is being studied as a post-planetary system. Our N-band imaging demonstrates that Sirius B does not have an infrared excess, in contrast to previous results. The sixth chapter is a study of mid

  17. Device for high spatial resolution chemical analysis of a sample and method of high spatial resolution chemical analysis

    DOEpatents

    Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-10-06

    A system and method for analyzing a chemical composition of a specimen are described. The system can include at least one pin; a sampling device configured to contact a liquid with a specimen on the at least one pin to form a testing solution; and a stepper mechanism configured to move the at least one pin and the sampling device relative to one another. The system can also include an analytical instrument for determining a chemical composition of the specimen from the testing solution. In particular, the systems and methods described herein enable chemical analysis of specimens, such as tissue, to be evaluated in a manner that the spatial-resolution is limited by the size of the pins used to obtain tissue samples, not the size of the sampling device used to solubilize the samples coupled to the pins.

  18. Mid-IR Ultra-Deep Spectroscopy of the Cosmic Infrared Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lin; Bertoldi, Frank; Blain, Andrew; Caputi, Karina; Cesarsky, Catherine; Dole, Herve; Draine, Bruce; Fadda, Dario; Flores, Hector; Frayer, Dave; Genzel, Reinhard; Helou, George; Lagache, Guilaine; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Lutz, Dieter; Puget, Jean-Loup; Sajina, Anna; Sanders, Dave; Spoon, Henrik; Veilleux, Sylvain

    2006-05-01

    We propose to obtain low resolution, mid-IR spectra of a sample of 48 galaxies at z~1 and 2 with 24um flux densities between 0.15-0.5mJy in the CDFS. These sub-mJy 24um sources are shown to dominate the Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) emission at 70 & 160um (Dole et al. 2006). Their redshift distribution peaks around 1, with a secondary peak at z~2. This implies these sources are LIRGs and ULIRGs at z=1 and 2, respectively. Measurements of IR luminosity functions support these findings and directly show these populations are responsible for more than 70% of the total (UV+IR) luminosity density at z=0.8-2.5. The proposed program is the natural extension of our previous studies of brighter, mJy 24um galaxies. Our primary goal is to characterize the mid-IR spectral properties of the galaxies producing the bulk of CIB. Specifically, we will disentangle the AGN/SB contribution to mid-IR emission, thus constrain the estimate of bolometric luminosities. The proposed spectra, in combination with brighter samples from previous IRS surveys, will allow us to trace the evolution of AGN/SB ratio, strength of PAH emission and mid-IR opacities as a function of L(ir) and z. The deep mid-IR spectra, together with the existing multi-wavelength dataset, will provide the lasting legacy for the astronomical communities for many years to come.

  19. High spatial resolution X-ray and gamma ray imaging system using diffraction crystals

    DOEpatents

    Smither, Robert K.

    2011-05-17

    A method and a device for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation are provided. The device comprises a plurality of arrays, with each array comprising a plurality of elements comprising a first collimator, a diffracting crystal, a second collimator, and a detector.

  20. Using High Spatial Resolution to Improve BOLD fMRI Detection at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Claise, Béatrice; Jean, Betty

    2015-01-01

    For different functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments using blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast, the acquisition of T2*-weighted scans at a high spatial resolution may be advantageous in terms of time-course signal-to-noise ratio and of BOLD sensitivity when the regions are prone to susceptibility artifacts. In this study, we explore this solution by examining how spatial resolution influences activations elicited when appetizing food pictures are viewed. Twenty subjects were imaged at 3 T with two different voxel volumes, 3.4 μl and 27 μl. Despite the diminution of brain coverage, we found that high-resolution acquisition led to a better detection of activations. Though known to suffer to different degrees from susceptibility artifacts, the activations detected by high spatial resolution were notably consistent with those reported in published activation likelihood estimation meta-analyses, corresponding to taste-responsive regions. Furthermore, these regions were found activated bilaterally, in contrast with previous findings. Both the reduction of partial volume effect, which improves BOLD contrast, and the mitigation of susceptibility artifact, which boosts the signal to noise ratio in certain regions, explained the better detection noted with high resolution. The present study provides further evidences that high spatial resolution is a valuable solution for human BOLD fMRI, especially for studying food-related stimuli. PMID:26550990

  1. Design and performance of a high spatial resolution, time-of-flight PET detector

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Srilalan; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Werner, Matthew E.; Kaul, Madhuri; Newcomer, F. M.; Karp, Joel S.; Surti, Suleman

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a high spatial resolution PET detector with time-of-flight capabilities. With an emphasis on high spatial resolution and sensitivity, we initially evaluated the performance of several 1.5 × 1.5 and 2.0 × 2.0 mm2 and 12–15 mm long LYSO crystals read out by several appropriately sized PMTs. Experiments to evaluate the impact of reflector on detector performance were performed and the final detector consisted of a 32 × 32 array of 1.5 × 1.5 × 15 mm3 LYSO crystals packed with a diffuse reflector and read out by a single Hamamatsu 64 channel multi-anode PMT. Such a design made it compact, modular and offered a cost-effective solution to obtaining excellent energy and timing resolution. To minimize the number of readout signals, a compact front-end readout electronics that summed anode signals along each of the orthogonal directions was also developed. Experimental evaluation of detector performance demonstrates clear discrimination of the crystals within the detector. An average energy resolution (FWHM) of 12.7 ± 2.6% and average coincidence timing resolution (FWHM) of 348 ps was measured, demonstrating suitability for use in the development of a high spatial resolution time-of-flight scanner for dedicated breast PET imaging. PMID:25246711

  2. High spatial resolution image restoration from subpixel-shifted hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Lijuan; Zhou, Shubo; Yuan, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The spatial resolution of hyperspectral imaging systems is constrained by a spatial-spectral resolution tradeoff and current technique limitations. However, spatial resolution is a critical feature for applications that require high spatial resolution and utilization of details. We present a method of restoring high-resolution (HR) images from a set of low-resolution (LR) hyperspectral data cubes with subpixel shifts across different bands. A new observation model is introduced to demonstrate LR hyperspectral images at different bands and an HR image that covers all these bands. A regularized super-resolution (SR) algorithm is then implemented to solve the problem. Experiments of the proposed algorithm and existing SR algorithms are performed and the results are evaluated. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed SR method. Moreover, the image fusion results also demonstrate that the restored image is suitable for enhancing the spatial resolution of entire hyperspectral data cubes.

  3. Distinguishing and quantification of the human visual pathways using high-spatial-resolution diffusion tensor tractography.

    PubMed

    Kamali, Arash; Hasan, Khader M; Adapa, Pavani; Razmandi, Azadeh; Keser, Zafer; Lincoln, John; Kramer, Larry A

    2014-09-01

    Quantification of the living human visual system using MRI methods has been challenging, but several applications demand a reliable and time-efficient data acquisition protocol. In this study, we demonstrate the utility of high-spatial-resolution diffusion tensor fiber tractography (DTT) in reconstructing and quantifying the human visual pathways. Five healthy males, age range 24-37years, were studied after approval of the institutional review board (IRB) at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. We acquired diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data with 1-mm slice thickness on a 3.0-Tesla clinical MRI scanner and analyzed the data using DTT with the fiber assignment by continuous tractography (FACT) algorithm. By utilizing the high-spatial-resolution DTI protocol with FACT algorithm, we were able to reconstruct and quantify bilateral optic pathways including the optic chiasm, optic tract, optic radiations free of contamination from neighboring white matter tracts.

  4. Distinguishing and quantification of the human visual pathways using high spatial resolution diffusion tensor tractography

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Arash; Hasan, Khader M.; Adapa, Pavani; Razmandi, Azadeh; Keser, Zafer; Lincoln, John; Kramer, Larry A.

    2014-01-01

    Quantification of the living human visual system using MRI methods has been challenging, but several applications demand a reliable and time-efficient data acquisition protocol. In this study, we demonstrate the utility of high spatial resolution diffusion tensor fiber tractography (DTT) in reconstructing and quantifying the human visual pathways. Five healthy males, age range 24–37 years, were studied after approval of the Institutional Review Board (IRB) at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. We acquired diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data with 1-mm slice thickness on a 3.0 Tesla clinical MRI scanner and analyzed the data using DTT with the fiber assignment by continuous tractography (FACT) algorithm. By utilizing the high spatial resolution DTI protocol with FACT algorithm, we were able to reconstruct and quantify bilateral optic pathways including the optic chiasm, optic tract, optic radiations free of contamination from neighboring white matter tracts. PMID:24856625

  5. Measurement Sets and Sites Commonly Used for High Spatial Resolution Image Product Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Scientists within NASA's Applied Sciences Directorate have developed a well-characterized remote sensing Verification & Validation (V&V) site at the John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC). This site has enabled the in-flight characterization of satellite high spatial resolution remote sensing system products form Space Imaging IKONOS, Digital Globe QuickBird, and ORBIMAGE OrbView, as well as advanced multispectral airborne digital camera products. SSC utilizes engineered geodetic targets, edge targets, radiometric tarps, atmospheric monitoring equipment and their Instrument Validation Laboratory to characterize high spatial resolution remote sensing data products. This presentation describes the SSC characterization capabilities and techniques in the visible through near infrared spectrum and examples of calibration results.

  6. Radiometric Calibration Assessment of Commercial High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Image Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurt; Leisso, Nathan; Buchanan, John

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the results of commercial high spatial resolution sensors. The topics include: 1) Reflectance-based approach; 2) U of A test sites; 3) Test Site Selection; 4) Resort Living; 5) Aerosol parameters; 6) Surface reflectance retrieval; 7) Accuracy/precision; 8) Data sets; 9) June 23, 2005 for Ikonos; 10) QuickBird Results; 11) Ikonos results; 12) Orbview results; 13) Ikonos redux; and 14) Overall results.

  7. High spatial resolution Land Surface Temperature estimation over urban areas with uncertainty indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitraka, Zina; Lazzarini, Michele; Doxani, Georgia; Del Frate, Fabio; Ghedira, Hosni

    2014-05-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is a key variable for studying land surface processes and interactions with the atmosphere and it is listed in the Earth System Data Records (ESDRs) identified by international organizations like Global Climate Observing System. It is a valuable source of information for a range of topics in earth sciences and essential for urban climatology studies. Detailed, frequent and accurate LST mapping may support various urban applications, like the monitoring of urban heat island. Currently, no spaceborne instruments provide frequent thermal imagery at high spatial resolution, thus there is a need for synergistic algorithms that combine different kinds of data for LST retrieval. Moreover, knowing the confidence level of any satellite-derived product is highly important to the users, especially when referred to the urban environment, which is extremely heterogenic. The developed method employs spatial-spectral unmixing techniques for improving the spatial resolution of thermal measurements, combines spectral library information for emissivity estimation and applies a split-window algorithm to estimate LST with an uncertainty estimation inserted in the final product. A synergistic algorithm that utilizes the spatial information provided by visible and near-infrared measurements with more frequent low resolution thermal measurements provides excellent means for high spatial resolution LST estimation. Given the low spatial resolution of thermal infrared sensors, the measured radiation is a combination of radiances of different surface types. High spatial resolution information is used to quantify the different surface types in each pixel and then the measured radiance of each pixel is decomposed. The several difficulties in retrieving LST from space measurements, mainly related to the temperature-emissivity coupling and the atmospheric contribution to the thermal measurements, and the measurements themselves, introduce uncertainties in the final

  8. Mid-IR semiconductor lasers for chemical sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, C. J.; Yang, R. Q.

    2003-01-01

    The development of mid-IR semiconductor diode lasers based on type-II interband cascade structures is presented. How these diode lasers can be developed to meet the requirements in chemical sensing applications is discussed.

  9. Ultrafast laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for high spatial resolution chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorba, Vassilia; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2011-02-01

    Femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to identify the spatial resolution limitations and assess the minimal detectable mass restrictions in laser-ablation based chemical analysis. The atomic emission of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) dopants in transparent dielectric Mica matrices was studied, to find that both these elements could be detected from 450 nm diameter ablation craters, full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM). Under optimal conditions, mass as low as 220 ag was measured, demonstrating the feasibility of using laser-ablation based chemical analysis to achieve high spatial resolution elemental analysis in real-time and at atmospheric pressure conditions.

  10. High-spatial-resolution microwave and related observations as diagnostics of coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    1986-01-01

    High spatial resolution microwave observations of coronal loops, together with theoretical models for the loop emission, can provide detailed information about the temperature, density, and magnetic field within the loop, as well as the environment around the loop. The capability for studying magnetic fields is particularly important, since there is no comparable method for obtaining direct information about coronal magnetic fields. Knowledge of the magnetic field strength and structure in coronal loops is important for understanding both coronal heating and flares. With arc-second-resolution microwave observations from the Very Large Array (VLA), supplemental high-spectral-resolution microwave data from a facility such as the Owens Valley frequency-agile interferometer, and the ability to obtain second-of-arc resolution EUV aor soft X ray images, the capability already exists for obtaining much more detailed information about coronal plasma and magnetic structures than is presently available. This capability is discussed.

  11. A system for optically controlling neural circuits with very high spatial and temporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Pandarinath, Chethan; Carlson, Eric T.; Nirenberg, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetics offers a powerful new approach for controlling neural circuits. It has a vast array of applications in both basic and clinical science. For basic science, it opens the door to unraveling circuit operations, since one can perturb specific circuit components with high spatial (single cell) and high temporal (millisecond) resolution. For clinical applications, it allows new kinds of selective treatments, because it provides a method to inactivate or activate specific components in a malfunctioning circuit and bring it back into a normal operating range [1–3]. To harness the power of optogenetics, though, one needs stimulating tools that work with the same high spatial and temporal resolution as the molecules themselves, the channelrhodopsins. To date, most stimulating tools require a tradeoff between spatial and temporal precision and are prohibitively expensive to integrate into a stimulating/recording setup in a laboratory or a device in a clinical setting [4, 5]. Here we describe a Digital Light Processing (DLP)-based system capable of extremely high temporal resolution (sub-millisecond), without sacrificing spatial resolution. Furthermore, it is constructed using off-the-shelf components, making it feasible for a broad range of biology and bioengineering labs. Using transgenic mice that express channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), we demonstrate the system’s capability for stimulating channelrhodopsin-expressing neurons in tissue with single cell and sub-millisecond precision. PMID:25699292

  12. Time-Resolved High-Spatial-Resolution Measurements of Underwater Laser Ionization and Filamentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T. G.; Kaganovich, D.; Helle, M. H.; Penano, J.; Ting, A.; Gordon, D.

    2013-10-01

    Laser triggering and guiding of underwater electrical discharges are being investigated and developed at NRL for applications including advanced micromachining and low-frequency laser acoustic generation. As part of this development we recently made several high-spatial-resolution, time-resolved measurements of underwater optical filamentation and laser ionization. Using 2-laser pump-probe backlit imaging techniques, we were able to achieve time resolution as short as 35 fs and spatial resolution down to 1 micron. Shadowgraph images show few-micron diameter gas bubbles forming throughout the pump beam path in ps timescales. Microbubble numbers and density increased with pulse energy and time during the pump pulse. We also obtained time-resolved spectra of ns-laser-ionized water, revealing black-body radiation lasting more than 100 ns after the ionizing pulse. Results from ongoing underwater laser ionization, filamentation, and discharge-guiding experiments will be presented. This work is supported by NRL Base Funds.

  13. High spatial and temporal resolution phase contrast imaging of shock wave using the LCLS beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hae Ja; Galtier, E.; Nagler, B.; Schropp, A.; Hastings, J. B.; Lee, R. W.; Collins, G. W.; Ping, Y.; Schroer, C. G.

    2012-10-01

    A new technique using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the x-ray free electron laser source, was developed at Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) endstation to provide high spatial and temporal resolution phase contrast imaging of shock waves in matter. The LCLS has high peak brightness enabling a high beam current of a few mJ/pulse to be focused into a small spot to achieve high imaging resolution < 1 μm. 150 ps, 140 mJ, 800 nm short pulse laser beam was focused to produce shock waves in a material. We collected the first high resolution phase contrast movies of shock propagation inside materials. These results provide the first in-situ imaging of the shock front width, deformation length and time scale behind the shock of materials with free electron laser.

  14. Measurement of residual stresses on ceramic materials with high spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kozaczek, K.J.; Ruud, C.O.; Fitting, J.D.

    1993-12-31

    A fast x-ray diffraction technique has been developed for measuring the residual stresses with high spatial resolution in ceramic materials. This resolution is limited by the mean size of grains and the radiation type. The effective diffraction elastic constants were experimentally determined for alumina as (E/l+{nu})){sub (1016)} = 200 GPa. The accuracy of XRD measurement of residual stresses with the spatial resolution of 170 {mu}m and precision {plus_minus} 15 MPa was verified experimentally by strain gauge measurements. The stress field around a singular Kovar pin brazed to alumina was asymmetric with high tangential stresses in the vicinity of the pin decreasing with the distance from the pin.

  15. Mid-IR Spectral Search for Salt SIgnatures on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Tracy M.; Retherford, Kurt D.; Hanley, Jennifer; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Tsang, Constantine; Roth, Lorenz

    2016-10-01

    We present mid-IR spectra of Europa's leading and trailing hemispheres obtained with the NASA IRTF/TEXES instrument on March 28 and March 30, 2015. The observations span from ~10 – 11 microns with a resolving power of R ~2500. Few observations of Europa have been made at these wavelengths, and the high spectral resolution of the instrument enables the identification of distinguishing spectral features in this relatively unexplored bandpass. While the leading hemisphere of Europa consists of relatively pure water ice, the trailing hemisphere's surface contains a mix of ice and some other component, causing the surface to appear reddish at visible wavelengths. We compare the spectra from the trailing hemisphere with those from the leading, pure-ice hemisphere and with recent laboratory measurements of chlorinated salts, which have distinct spectral signatures at these wavelengths. We find that the signal obtained from Europa's leading hemisphere is 5-10 times lower than the signal obtained from the trailing hemisphere, likely due to a temperature difference between the hemispheres. We discern several spectral features that are present in the trailing hemisphere but not in the spectra of the leading hemisphere, though the explanation for these features is not yet apparent.

  16. The measurement of the presampled MTF of a high spatial resolution neutron imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Raymond Lei.; Biegalski, Steven R.

    2007-11-01

    A high spatial resolution neutron imaging device was developed at the Mark II TRIGA reactor at The University of Texas at Austin. As the modulation transfer function (MTF) is recognized as a well-established parameter for evaluation of imaging system resolution, the aliasing associated with digital sampling adds complexity to its measurement. Aliasing is especially problematic when using a high spatial resolution micro-channel plate (MCP) neutron detector that has a pixel grid size similar to that of a CCD array. To compensate for the aliasing an angulated edge method was used to evaluate the neutron imaging facility, overcoming aliasing by obtaining an oversampled edge spread function (ESF). Baseline correction was applied to the ESF to remove the noticeable trends and the LSF was multiplied by Hann window to obtain a smoothed version of presampled MTF. The computing procedure is confirmed by visual inspection of a testing phantom; in addition, it is confirmed by comparison to the MTF measurement of a scintillation screen with a known MTF curve.

  17. A high spatial resolution Stokes polarimeter for motional Stark effect imaging.

    PubMed

    Thorman, Alex; Michael, Clive; Howard, John

    2013-06-01

    We describe an enhanced temporally switched interfero-polarimeter that has been successfully deployed for high spatial resolution motional Stark effect imaging on the KSTAR superconducting tokamak. The system utilizes dual switching ferroelectric liquid crystal waveplates to image the full Stokes vector of elliptically polarized and Doppler-shifted Stark-Zeeman Balmer-alpha emission from high energy neutral beams injected into the magnetized plasma. We describe the optical system and compare its performance against a Mueller matrix model that takes account of non-ideal performance of the switching ferro-electric liquid crystal waveplates and other polarizing components. PMID:23822345

  18. Cumulus cloud base height estimation from high spatial resolution Landsat data - A Hough transform approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berendes, Todd; Sengupta, Sailes K.; Welch, Ron M.; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Navar, Murgesh

    1992-01-01

    A semiautomated methodology is developed for estimating cumulus cloud base heights on the basis of high spatial resolution Landsat MSS data, using various image-processing techniques to match cloud edges with their corresponding shadow edges. The cloud base height is then estimated by computing the separation distance between the corresponding generalized Hough transform reference points. The differences between the cloud base heights computed by these means and a manual verification technique are of the order of 100 m or less; accuracies of 50-70 m may soon be possible via EOS instruments.

  19. Radiometric Calibration Assessment of Commercial High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Image Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holekamp, Kara; Aaron, David; Thome, Kurtis

    2006-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of commercial imaging satellite products is required to ensure that science and application communities can better understand their properties. Inaccurate radiometric calibrations can lead to erroneous decisions and invalid conclusions and can limit intercomparisons with other systems. To address this calibration need, satellite at-sensor radiance values were compared to those estimated by each independent team member to determine the sensor's radiometric accuracy. The combined results of this evaluation provide the user community with an independent assessment of these commercially available high spatial resolution sensors' absolute calibration values.

  20. A high spatial resolution Stokes polarimeter for motional Stark effect imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Thorman, Alex; Michael, Clive; Howard, John

    2013-06-15

    We describe an enhanced temporally switched interfero-polarimeter that has been successfully deployed for high spatial resolution motional Stark effect imaging on the KSTAR superconducting tokamak. The system utilizes dual switching ferroelectric liquid crystal waveplates to image the full Stokes vector of elliptically polarized and Doppler-shifted Stark-Zeeman Balmer-alpha emission from high energy neutral beams injected into the magnetized plasma. We describe the optical system and compare its performance against a Mueller matrix model that takes account of non-ideal performance of the switching ferro-electric liquid crystal waveplates and other polarizing components.

  1. High spatial resolution brain functional MRI using submillimeter balanced steady-state free precession acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Pei-Hsin; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Wu, Ming-Long; Chuang, Tzu-Chao; Shih, Yi-Yu; Huang, Teng-Yi

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: One of the technical advantages of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is its precise localization of changes from neuronal activities. While current practice of fMRI acquisition at voxel size around 3 × 3 × 3 mm{sup 3} achieves satisfactory results in studies of basic brain functions, higher spatial resolution is required in order to resolve finer cortical structures. This study investigated spatial resolution effects on brain fMRI experiments using balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging with 0.37 mm{sup 3} voxel volume at 3.0 T. Methods: In fMRI experiments, full and unilateral visual field 5 Hz flashing checkerboard stimulations were given to healthy subjects. The bSSFP imaging experiments were performed at three different frequency offsets to widen the coverage, with functional activations in the primary visual cortex analyzed using the general linear model. Variations of the spatial resolution were achieved by removing outerk-space data components. Results: Results show that a reduction in voxel volume from 3.44 × 3.44 × 2 mm{sup 3} to 0.43 × 0.43 × 2 mm{sup 3} has resulted in an increase of the functional activation signals from (7.7 ± 1.7)% to (20.9 ± 2.0)% at 3.0 T, despite of the threefold SNR decreases in the original images, leading to nearly invariant functional contrast-to-noise ratios (fCNR) even at high spatial resolution. Activation signals aligning nicely with gray matter sulci at high spatial resolution would, on the other hand, have possibly been mistaken as noise at low spatial resolution. Conclusions: It is concluded that the bSSFP sequence is a plausible technique for fMRI investigations at submillimeter voxel widths without compromising fCNR. The reduction of partial volume averaging with nonactivated brain tissues to retain fCNR is uniquely suitable for high spatial resolution applications such as the resolving of columnar organization in the brain.

  2. High spatial resolution remote sensing imagery improves GPP predictions in disturbed, semi-arid woodlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krofcheck, D. J.; Eitel, J.; Vierling, L. A.; Schulthess, U.; Litvak, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    Climate across the globe is changing and consequently the productivity of terrestrial vegetation is changing with it. Gross primary productivity (GPP) is an integral part of the carbon cycle, yet challenging to measure everywhere, all the time. Efforts to estimate GPP in the context of climate change are becoming continually more salient of the need for models sensitive to the heterogeneous nature of drought and pest induced disturbance. Given the increased availability of high spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery, their use in ecosystem scale GPP estimation is becoming increasingly viable. We used a simple linear model with inputs derived from RapidEye time series data (5 meter spatial resolution) as compared to MODIS inputs (250 meter spatial resolution) to estimate GPP in intact and girdled PJ woodland to simulate drought and pest induced disturbance. An area equal to the MODIS pixels measured was aggregated using RapidEye data centered on the flux towers for comparison purposes. We generated four model runs, two using only MODIS or RapidEye spectral vegetation indices (VIs) and two using MODIS and RapidEye VIs combined at both the control and disturbed tower site. Our results suggest that for undisturbed regions, MODIS derived VIs perform better than the higher spatial resolution RapidEye VIs when a moisture sensitive index is incorporated into the model (RMSE of 17.51for MODIS vs. 22.71 for RapidEye). Modeling GPP in disturbed regions however benefits from the inclusion of high spatial resolution data (RMSE of 14.83 for MODIS vs. 14.70 for RapidEye). This discrepancy may have to do with the disparate scale of a MODIS pixel and the size of the tower fetch. Our results suggest that the best source of VI's for the modeling GPP in semi-arid woodlands depends on the level of disturbance in the landscape. Given that the rate and extent of drought and insect induced mortality events in terrestrial forests are projected to increase with our changing climate

  3. Mapping Spatial Variability in Health and Wealth Indicators in Accra, Ghana Using High Spatial Resolution Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engstrom, R.; Ashcroft, E.

    2014-12-01

    There has been a tremendous amount of research conducted that examines disparities in health and wealth of persons between urban and rural areas however, relatively little research has been undertaken to examine variations within urban areas. A major limitation to elucidating differences with urban areas is the lack of social and demographic data at a sufficiently high spatial resolution to determine these differences. Generally the only available data that contain this information are census data which are collected at most every ten years and are often difficult to obtain at a high enough spatial resolution to allow for examining in depth variability in health and wealth indicators at high spatial resolutions, especially in developing countries. High spatial resolution satellite imagery may be able to provide timely and synoptic information that is related to health and wealth variability within a city. In this study we use two dates of Quickbird imagery (2003 and 2010) classified into the vegetation-impervious surface-soil (VIS) model introduced by Ridd (1995). For 2003 we only have partial coverage of the city, while for 2010 we have a mosaic, which covers the entire city of Accra, Ghana. Variations in the VIS values represent the physical variations within the city and these are compared to variations in economic, and/or sociodemographic data derived from the 2000 Ghanaian census at two spatial resolutions, the enumeration area (approximately US Census Tract) and the neighborhood for the city. Results indicate a significant correlation between both vegetation and impervious surface to type of cooking fuel used in the household, population density, housing density, availability of sewers, cooking space usage, and other variables. The correlations are generally stronger at the neighborhood level and the relationships are stable through time and space. Overall, the results indicate that information derived from high resolution satellite data is related to

  4. Observing conditions and mid-IR data quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Rachel; Wong, Andre; Geballe, Tom; Volk, Kevin; Hayward, Tom; Dillman, Matt; Fisher, Robert Scott; Radomski, James

    2008-07-01

    Ground-based mid-infrared (mid-IR) observations appear to be widely perceived as esoteric and demanding, and very sensitive to observing conditions. Although the principles of observing in the background-limited regime are well-known, it is difficult for the non-specialist to find specific information on exactly how mid-IR data can be affected by environmental conditions. Understanding these effects is important for the efficiency of mid-IR queue observing, the ability of classical observers to adapt their programs to the prevailing conditions, and the standard of data being delivered. Through operating mid-IR instruments in the queue at Gemini we have amassed a considerable database of standard star observations taken under a wide range of atmospheric conditions and in a variety of instrumental configurations. These data can be used to illustrate the effect of factors such as water vapour column, airmass, cloud cover, etc. on observed quantities like raw sky background, residual background, atmospheric transmission and image FWHM. Here we present some preliminary results from this study, which we hope to be of use to observatory users and staff as a guide to which environmental conditions are truly important to mid- IR imaging observations, and which can safely be neglected.

  5. Exact two-dimensional zonal wavefront reconstruction with high spatial resolution in lateral shearing interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Fengzhao; Li, Jie; Wang, Xiangzhao; Bu, Yang

    2016-05-01

    A novel zonal method is proposed for exact discrete reconstruction of a two-dimensional wavefront with high spatial resolution for lateral shearing interferometry. Four difference wavefronts measured in the x and y shear directions are required. Each of the two shear directions is measured twice with different shear amounts. The shear amounts of the second measurements of the x and y directions are Sx+1 pixels and Sy+1 pixels, where Sx pixels and Sy pixels are the shear amounts of the first measurements in the x and y directions, respectively. The shear amount in each direction can be chosen freely, provided that it is below a maximum value determined by the pupil shape and the number of samples N in that direction; thus, the choices are not limited by the more stringent condition required by previous methods, namely, that the shear amounts must be divisors of N. This method can exactly reconstruct any wavefront at evaluation points up to an arbitrary constant if the data is noiseless, and high spatial resolution can be achieved even with large shear amounts. The method is applicable not only to square pupils, but also to general pupil shapes if a sufficient number of Gerchberg iterations are employed. In this study, the validity and capability of the method were confirmed by numerical experiments. In addition, the experiments demonstrated that the method is stable with respect to noise in the difference wavefronts.

  6. A method of spatial mapping and reclassification for high-spatial-resolution remote sensing image classification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guizhou; Liu, Jianbo; He, Guojin

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new classification method for high-spatial-resolution remote sensing images based on a strategic mechanism of spatial mapping and reclassification. The proposed method includes four steps. First, the multispectral image is classified by a traditional pixel-based classification method (support vector machine). Second, the panchromatic image is subdivided by watershed segmentation. Third, the pixel-based multispectral image classification result is mapped to the panchromatic segmentation result based on a spatial mapping mechanism and the area dominant principle. During the mapping process, an area proportion threshold is set, and the regional property is defined as unclassified if the maximum area proportion does not surpass the threshold. Finally, unclassified regions are reclassified based on spectral information using the minimum distance to mean algorithm. Experimental results show that the classification method for high-spatial-resolution remote sensing images based on the spatial mapping mechanism and reclassification strategy can make use of both panchromatic and multispectral information, integrate the pixel- and object-based classification methods, and improve classification accuracy.

  7. VIIRS plus CrIMSS TPW - continuing the record of high spatial resolution moisture determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, W. P.; Borbas, E. E.; Li, Z.; Dobor, L.

    2015-12-01

    Total column water vapor properties are being derived from merged VIIRS infrared measurements and CrIMSS (CrIS plus ATMS) water vapor soundings in an attempt to continue the depiction of global moisture at high spatial resolution started with MODIS. While MODIS has two channels within the 6.5-μm H2O band and four channels within the 15-μm CO2 band, VIIRS has no infrared (IR) absorption channels. However, the VIIRS IR windows at 8.6, 10.8 and 12 μm give some indication of low level moisture (which constitutes much of the total column amount) and CrIMSS provide complementary column moisture determinations . The VIIRS/CrIMSS algorithm follows the approach used for MODIS; a clear sky regression relationship is established between total precipitable water vapor (TPW) and VIIRS IR window brightness temperatures (BTs) and CrIMSS water vapor soundings calculated from a global training radiosonde based profile data set. A high spatial resolution surface emissivity database is used to help differentiate surface emission and atmospheric moisture absorption. CrIMSS is added in clear and partly cloudy regions to enhance the TPW depiction and to extend the coverage. This poster presents comparisons of MODIS, VIIRS-only, VIIRS-CrIMSS TPW determinations and validations against ground truth MWR and GPS.

  8. Study on mosaic method for new mode satellite images with high spatial resolution covering urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Qiong; Wang, Zhiyong; Wen, Qiang; Li, Wei; Gao, Lianru

    2014-11-01

    New imaging mode has been brought up for collecting multiple scenes in one pass, as is implemented on World View-II. This greatly helps for acquiring high spatial resolution images that cover urban areas, and is to be adopted in the coming Chinese satellites. This paper is to discuss the mosaic characteristic and propose a mosaic line generation method by integrating correlation and the road information. The mosaic line is formed by linking the unique mosaic point on each line restricted within the road. We position the starting point by connectivity analysis of the road lines, and then locate the adjacent point along the road with connectivity analysis. A weighed vector, combining correlation and distance to centre of the road, is used to pick the best point. The points are located on the road unless it is unavoidable, for example, the road ends or the line touches edge of the image. This method provides instant mosaic line generation for urban areas with road information available in most cases. By resorting to the road, the mosaic line is more applicable since many problems for mosaic of high spatial resolution images are solved, for example, tilting of the buildings, the shadows, motions of the vehicles etc. Experiments have been done with WV-II images and gained favorable results.

  9. Mapping urban and peri-urban agriculture using high spatial resolution satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, Dionys; Buehler, Yves; Kellenberger, Tobias W.

    2009-03-01

    In rapidly changing peri-urban environments where biophysical and socio-economic processes lead to spatial fragmentation of agricultural land, remote sensing offers an efficient tool to collect land cover/land use (LCLU) data for decision-making. Compared to traditional pixel-based approaches, remote sensing with object-based classification methods is reported to achieve improved classification results in complex heterogeneous landscapes. This study assessed the usefulness of object-oriented analysis of Quickbird high spatial resolution satellite data to classify urban and peri-urban agriculture in a limited peri-urban area of Hanoi, Vietnam. The results revealed that segmentation was essential in developing the object-oriented classification approach. Accurate segmentation of shape and size of an object enhanced classification with spectral, textural, morphological, and topological features. A qualitative, visual comparison of the classification results showed successful localisation and identification of most LCLU classes. Quantitative evaluation was conducted with a classification error matrix reaching an overall accuracy of 67% and a kappa coefficient of 0.61. In general, object-oriented classification of high spatial resolution satellite data proved the promising approach for LCLU analysis at village level. Capturing small-scale urban and peri-urban agricultural diversity offers a considerable potential for environmental monitoring. Challenges remain with the delineation of field boundaries and LCLU diversity on more spatially extensive datasets.

  10. High-spatial resolution multispectral and panchromatic satellite imagery for mapping perennial desert plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsharrah, Saad A.; Bruce, David A.; Bouabid, Rachid; Somenahalli, Sekhar; Corcoran, Paul A.

    2015-10-01

    The use of remote sensing techniques to extract vegetation cover information for the assessment and monitoring of land degradation in arid environments has gained increased interest in recent years. However, such a task can be challenging, especially for medium-spatial resolution satellite sensors, due to soil background effects and the distribution and structure of perennial desert vegetation. In this study, we utilised Pleiades high-spatial resolution, multispectral (2m) and panchromatic (0.5m) imagery and focused on mapping small shrubs and low-lying trees using three classification techniques: 1) vegetation indices (VI) threshold analysis, 2) pre-built object-oriented image analysis (OBIA), and 3) a developed vegetation shadow model (VSM). We evaluated the success of each approach using a root of the sum of the squares (RSS) metric, which incorporated field data as control and three error metrics relating to commission, omission, and percent cover. Results showed that optimum VI performers returned good vegetation cover estimates at certain thresholds, but failed to accurately map the distribution of the desert plants. Using the pre-built IMAGINE Objective OBIA approach, we improved the vegetation distribution mapping accuracy, but this came at the cost of over classification, similar to results of lowering VI thresholds. We further introduced the VSM which takes into account shadow for further refining vegetation cover classification derived from VI. The results showed significant improvements in vegetation cover and distribution accuracy compared to the other techniques. We argue that the VSM approach using high-spatial resolution imagery provides a more accurate representation of desert landscape vegetation and should be considered in assessments of desertification.

  11. In-duct identification of fluid-borne source with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Yong-Ho; Ih, Jeong-Guon; Bodén, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Source identification of acoustic characteristics of in-duct fluid machinery is required for coping with the fluid-borne noise. By knowing the acoustic pressure and particle velocity field at the source plane in detail, the sound generation mechanism of a fluid machine can be understood. The identified spatial distribution of the strength of major radiators would be useful for the low noise design. Conventional methods for measuring the source in a wide duct have not been very helpful in investigating the source properties in detail because their spatial resolution is improper for the design purpose. In this work, an inverse method to estimate the source parameters with a high spatial resolution is studied. The theoretical formulation including the evanescent modes and near-field measurement data is given for a wide duct. After validating the proposed method to a duct excited by an acoustic driver, an experiment on a duct system driven by an air blower is conducted in the presence of flow. A convergence test for the evanescent modes is performed to find the necessary number of modes to regenerate the measured pressure field precisely. By using the converged modal amplitudes, very-close near-field pressure to the source is regenerated and compared with the measured pressure, and the maximum error was -16.3 dB. The source parameters are restored from the converged modal amplitudes. Then, the distribution of source parameters on the driver and the blower is clearly revealed with a high spatial resolution for kR<1.84 in which range only plane waves can propagate to far field in a duct. Measurement using a flush mounted sensor array is discussed, and the removal of pure radial modes in the modeling is suggested.

  12. Beyond spicule dynamics: spicule and fibril spectroscopy at high spatial and temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes Domingos Pereira, T.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.

    2015-12-01

    Solar spicules are chromospheric fibrils observed at the solar limb. They are observed everywhere in the Sun, but their origin is not yet understood. Much of our understanding of spicules has been obtained through filtergram observations and/or focused on the dynamics of spicules. Spectroscopic studies have been usually limited by spatial extent/resolution, temporal resolution, or variable seeing. In this work we make use of a unique time series of imaging spectroscopy at high spatial and temporal resolution, obtained with the Swedish Solar Telescope under excellent seeing and coordinated with the IRIS mission. With these data we characterize the evolution of spectra along quiet Sun fibrils and spicules, and discuss what makes them visible in filtergrams and sets them apart from other chromospheric fibrils. With combined H-alpha and Ca II H high-resolution observations we also discuss how spicules appear in these two lines, a long standing issue that has been interpreted in conflicting ways. Finally, using the wide range of IRIS diagnostics we put together the spectral evolution of spicules through the chromosphere and transition region.

  13. Improving the quantification at high spatial resolution using a field emission electron microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinard, P. T.; Richter, S.

    2014-03-01

    The capabilities of field emitter electron microprobes to perform quantitative measurements at high spatial resolution are discussed. Using Fe-Cr-C particles in a bearing steel (SAE 52100) as example, a generic procedure was established to find the optimal analytical conditions (beam energy, beam current and acquisition time). The influence of these parameters on the accuracy, precision and spatial resolution was evaluated using experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. A quantification procedure was developed for soft X-ray lines, taking into account the overlap of high order X-ray lines and background anomalies. The accuracy of Ka- and La-lines was verified using reference materials. A relationship between experimental and simulated X-ray intensities was determined to evaluate the measurement precision. The spatial resolution of each X-ray line was calculated from the simulated lateral and depth X-ray intensity distribution using simulations integrating experimentally measured beam diameters. The optimal analytical conditions for the studied sample were found to be 5 keV, 10 nA and 10 s acquisition time. Further specialized techniques to improve the spatial resolution are presented: focused ion beam preparation of thin lamella and wedge, and Monte Carlo based reconstruction. The feasibility of the latter to quantify features smaller than the X-ray emission volume was demonstrated.

  14. High spatial resolution IR observations of young stellar objects - A possible disk surrounding HL Tauri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grasdalen, G. L.; Strom, S. E.; Strom, K. M.; Capps, R. W.; Thompson, D.; Castelaz, M.

    1984-01-01

    High spatial resolution images of the T Tauri star HL Tau were obtained at 1.6 microns and 2.2 microns. The original images as well as maximum entropy image reconstructions reveal a circumstellar envelope structure, similar at both wavelenghts, and extended along P.A. = 112 deg; the 10 percent width of the structure is 1.9 sec (300 AU at 160 pc). The extended structure is interpreted as light scattered toward earth by dust in a disk surrounding this young stellar object. Polarization measurements made at 2.2 microns support this hypothesis. The total solid particle mass is, at minimum, 5 x 10 to the -7th solar mass.

  15. The plasma and magnetic field properties of coronal loops observed at high spatial resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, D. F.; Holman, G. D.; Davis, J. M.; Kundu, M. R.; Shevgaonkar, R. K.

    1987-01-01

    Two data sets are analyzed in order to improve understanding of the plasma and magnetic field properties of active region coronal loops. Each set consists of coaligned, high spatial resolution soft X-ray, microwave, and magnetogram images that are used to compare observations of coronal loops and their feet in the photosphere and to constrain possible microwave emission mechanisms. The loops are found to have plasma parameters typical of quiescent active region loops. Each loop has a compact microwave source with peak brightness temperature T(b) = 1-2.5 x 10 to the 6th K cospatial with or near the loop apex. No complete loops are imaged in microwaves. The loop emission observed at 4.9 GHz is best described by fourth harmonic gyroresonance emission from a dipole loop model, but with less field variation along the loop than in the models of Holman and Kundu (1985).

  16. Vegetation index correction to reduce background effects in orchards with high spatial resolution imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Beek, Jonathan; Tits, Laurent; Somers, Ben; Deckers, Tom; Janssens, Pieter; Coppin, Pol

    2014-10-01

    High spatial resolution satellite imagery provides an alternative for time consuming and labor intensive in situ measurements of biophysical variables, such as chlorophyll and water content. However, despite the high spatial resolution of current satellite sensors, mixtures of canopies and backgrounds will be present, hampering the estimation of biophysical variables. Traditional correction methodologies use spectral differences between canopies and backgrounds, but fail with spectrally similar canopies and backgrounds. In this study, the lack of a generic solution to reduce background effects is tackled. Through synthetic imagery, the mixture problem was demonstrated with regards to the estimation of biophysical variables. A correction method was proposed, rescaling vegetation indices based on the canopy cover fraction. Furthermore, the proposed method was compared to traditional background correction methodologies (i.e. soil-adjusted vegetation indices and signal unmixing) for different background scenarios. The results of a soil background scenario showed the inability of soil-adjusted vegetation indices to reduce background admixture effects, while signal unmixing and the proposed method removed background influences for chlorophyll (ΔR2 = ~0.3; ΔRMSE = ~1.6 μg/cm2) and water (ΔR2 = ~0.3; ΔRMSE = ~0.5 mg/cm2) related vegetation indices. For the weed background scenario, signal unmixing was unable to remove the background influences for chlorophyll content (ΔR2 = -0.1; ΔRMSE = -0.6 μg/cm 2 ), while the proposed correction method reduced background effects (ΔR2= 0.1; ΔRMSE = 0.4 μg/cm2). Overall, the proposed vegetation index correction method reduced the background influence irrespective of background type, making useful comparison between management blocks possible.

  17. Predicting Real-Time Soil Carbon Fluxes in Alaska at High Spatial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, J.; Stieglitz, M.; Cheng, Y.; Pan, F.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we employ 3 full years (2009 - 2011) of high spatial resolution (7.5 km) hourly snapshots of snow depth and air temperatures throughout Alaska from Weather Underground (WU). We do so in order to demonstrate the practicalities of using real-time weather data to predict soil CO2 fluxes over large areas. As a preliminary step, hourly snow depth and air temperatures reported from WU were compared with observations from SNOTEL stations. WU reported hourly-daily air temperatures were consistent with observations. Likewise, snow depth in the interior of Alaska and on the North Slope matched observations well. In the Southeast coastal areas, WU reported snow depth were consistently low. We then used a simple empirical ground temperature scheme (Cheng et al., 2010) along with snow depth and air temperatures reported from WU to predict soil temperatures. Using these generated soil temperatures, as well as antecedent precipitation, a simple soil decomposition model was then calibrated with biophysical data from Barrow and Toolik Lake, Alaska. Post-calibration, model parameters were kept fixed and the model was run over the full hourly 2009 - 2011 record for the over 700 stations where we have measured soil carbon profiles. To test robustness, the model was calibrated independently at all location where we have good biophysical information and subsequently run over the remaining stations. These simulations demonstrate the degree to which real-time weather data can be trusted to provide an accurate high spatial resolution picture of daily, monthly, and seasonal soil C fluxes at high latitudes.

  18. COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES AT HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION TOWARD ORION-KL. I. SPATIAL SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.; Friedel, Douglas N. E-mail: friedel@astro.illinois.edu

    2012-08-01

    Here we present high spatial resolution (<1'') observations of molecular emission in Orion-KL conducted using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. This work was motivated by recent millimeter continuum imaging studies of this region conducted at a similarly high spatial resolution, which revealed that the bulk of the emission arises from numerous compact sources, rather than the larger-scale extended structures typically associated with the Orion Hot Core and Compact Ridge. Given that the spatial extent of molecular emission greatly affects the determination of molecular abundances, it is important to determine the true spatial scale for complex molecules in this region. Additionally, it has recently been suggested that the relative spatial distributions of complex molecules in a source might give insight into the chemical mechanisms that drive complex chemistry in star-forming regions. In order to begin to address these issues, this study seeks to determine the spatial distributions of ethyl cyanide [C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN], dimethyl ether [(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}O], methyl formate [HCOOCH{sub 3}], formic acid [HCOOH], acetone [(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CO], SiO, methanol [CH{sub 3}OH], and methyl cyanide [CH{sub 3}CN] in Orion-KL at {lambda} = 3 mm. We find that for all observed molecules, the molecular emission arises from multiple components of the cloud that include a range of spatial scales and physical conditions. Here, we present the results of these observations and discuss the implications for studies of complex molecules in star-forming regions.

  19. COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES AT HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION TOWARD ORION-KL. II. KINEMATICS

    SciTech Connect

    Friedel, D. N.; Widicus Weaver, S. L. E-mail: susanna.widicus.weaver@emory.edu

    2012-08-01

    It has recently been suggested that chemical processing can shape the spatial distributions of complex molecules in the Orion-KL region and leads to the nitrogen-oxygen 'chemical differentiation' seen in previous observations of this source. Orion-KL is a very dynamic region, and it is therefore also possible that physical conditions can shape the molecular distributions in this source. Only high spatial resolution observations can provide the information needed to disentangle these effects. Here, we present millimeter imaging studies of Orion-KL at various beam sizes using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. We compare molecular images with high spatial resolution images that trace the temperature, density, and kinematics of the source in order to investigate the effects of physical conditions on molecular distributions. These observations were conducted at {lambda} = 3 mm and included transitions of ethyl cyanide [C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN], methyl formate [HCOOCH{sub 3}], formic acid [HCOOH], acetone [(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CO], SiO, and methanol [CH{sub 3}OH]. We find differences in the molecular distributions as a function of each of the aforementioned physical factors. These results indicate that acetone may be produced by chemical processing and is robust to large changes in physical conditions, while formic acid is readily destroyed by gas-phase processing in warm and dense regions. We also find that while the spatial distributions of ethyl cyanide and methyl formate are not distinct as is suggested by the concept of 'chemical differentiation', local physical conditions shape the small-scale emission structure for these species.

  20. Development of a US Carbon Dioxide Emission Inventory with High Spatial and Temporal Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, G. J.; Petron, G.; McKeen, S.; Capps, S.; Trainer, M.

    2006-12-01

    Power generation and transportation are responsible for about 40 percent and 33 percent, respectively, of the CO2 generated from US fossil fuel combustion. We are developing a US CO2 emission inventory of the power generation and on-road motor vehicle sectors that incorporates the high spatial and temporal resolution available in a variety of data sets. CO2 emission data with up to hourly resolution are measured by continuous emission monitors installed at most US power generation facilities. CO2 emissions from on-road motor vehicles are determined from annual Federal Highway Administration statistics on gasoline and diesel sales in every US state. These statewide data are spatially allocated to 4-km resolution using the EPA's National Emission Inventory estimates of NOx and CO emissions from on-road gasoline and diesel combustion. The inventory incorporating these highly resolved components is compared with other available bottom-up estimates of CO2 sources for the US. Comparisons are also made between this inventory and atmospheric measurements from air quality field studies during the past decade.

  1. Extraction Of Hydrological Parameters Using High Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing For KINEROS2 Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeh, Yuval; Blumberg, Dan G.; Cohen, Hai; Morin, Efrat; Maman, Shimrit

    2016-04-01

    Arid and semi-arid environments cover more than one-third of Earth's land surface; these environments are especially vulnerable to flash flood hazards due to the poor understanding of the phenomenon and the lack of meteorological, geomorphological, and hydrological data. For many years, catchment characteristics have been observed using point-based measurements such as rain gauges and soil sample analysis. Furthermore, flood modeling techniques are not always available in ungauged catchments or in regions where data are sparse. In comparison to point-based observations, using remote sensing technologies can provide continuous spatial hydrological parameters and variables. The advances in remote sensing technologies including weather radar-based quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) and Earth observing satellites, provide new geo-spatial data using high spatial and temporal resolution for basin-scale geomorphological analysis and hydrological models. This study used high spatial resolution remote sensing to extract some of the main input parameters of Kinematic Runoff and Erosion Model (KINEROS2), for the arid medium size Rahaf watershed (76 km^2}), located in the Judean Desert, Israel. During the research a high resolution land cover map of Rahaf basin was created using WorldView-2 multispectral satellite imageries; surface roughness was estimated using SIR-C and COSMO-SkyMed Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) spaceborne sensors; and rainstorm characteristics were extracted from ground-based meteorological radar. Finally, all the remotely sensed extracted data were used as inputs for the KINEROS2 through Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment (AGWA) tool. The model-simulated peak flow and volume were then compared to runoff measurements from the watershed's pouring point. This research demonstrates the ability of using remotely sensed extracted data as inputs for the KINEROS2 model. Using AGWA, each simulated storm was successfully calibrated, when the average

  2. TNTCAM MARK II: A New Mid-IR Array Imager/Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klebe, D. I.; Stencel, R. E.; Theil, D.

    1997-12-01

    We present design considerations for a new mid-IR (5-25mu m) imaging polarimeter, TNTCAM II. Built around a 256x256 Si:As BIB array from Boeing, as an imager the camera will be unparalleled by any instrument currently in use at these wavelengths. Access to this instrument is planned as part of the funding agreement under the NSF Major Research Infrastructure grant supporting its development. This camera can contribute to the understanding of YSOs and evolved stars, obtaining high resolution mid-IR observations of dusty environments immediately surrounding these objects. In ordinary imaging mode mosaics of extended objects can be made in 2x2 arcmin intervals. In polarimetry mode, assuming adequate grain alignment timescales, magnetic fields in YSOs can be probed by dust emission from hot cores. The camera can better constrain grain alignment scenarios in young stellar environments. Emission (rather than scattering) dominates signal at mid-IR wavelengths, allowing determination of grain alignment in a source. This enables distinction between models explaining near-IR polarization seen in dust shells surrounding late red giants, i.e. scattering from asymmetric shells or aligned grains. There are no mid-IR array polarimeters in operation. In polarimetry mode, TNTCAM II will be sensitive to linear polarizations as small as 0.2%. We have chosen the simple approach of imaging one state at a time and modulating polarization at a frequency high enough to remove atmospheric and system noise fluctuations. Dewar design and the optical system are discussed, including the pros and cons of rotating waveplates or an Abbe-Konig "K"-mirror to modulate the polarization, and the use of a rotating window assembly allowing on-the-fly f-ratio adjustment and observation across the entire 5-25mu m band. We acknowledge support under NSF grant AST-9724506 to the University of Denver.

  3. Standardized cell samples for midIR technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastl, Lena; Rommel, Christina E.; Kemper, Björn; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    2015-03-01

    The application of midIR spectroscopy towards human cell and tissue samples is impaired by the need for technical solutions and lacking sample standards for technology development. We here present the standardization of stable test samples for the continuous development and testing of novel optical system components. We have selected cell lines representing the major cellular skin constituents keratinocytes and fibroblasts (NIH-3T3, HaCaT). In addition, two skin cancer cell types (A-375 and SK-MEL-28 cells) were analyzed. Cells were seeded on CaF2 substrates and measured dried and under aqueous medium as well as fixated and unfixated. Several independent cell preparations were analyzed with an FTIR spectrometer in the wave number range from 1000 - 4000 cm-1. The obtained data demonstrate that fixed and dehydrated cells on CaF2 can be stored in pure ethanol for several weeks without significant losses in quality of the spectral properties. The established protocol of cell seeding on CaF2 substrates, chemical fixation, dehydration, storage under ethanol and air-drying is suitable for the production of reliable midIR standards. The retrieved spectra demonstrate that fixed cells on CaF2 can be prepared reproducibly; with stable midIR spectral properties over several weeks and properties mimicking reliable unfixed cells. Moreover, the fixated samples on CaF2 show clear differences in the cell type specific spectra that can be identified by principle component analysis. In summary, the standardized cell culture samples on CaF2 substrates are suitable for the development of a midIR device and the optimization of the specific midIR spectra.

  4. Monitoring of Antarctic moss ecosystems using a high spatial resolution imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malenovsky, Zbynek; Lucieer, Arko; Robinson, Sharon; Harwin, Stephen; Turner, Darren; Veness, Tony

    2013-04-01

    The most abundant photosynthetically active plants growing along the rocky Antarctic shore are mosses of three species: Schistidium antarctici, Ceratodon purpureus, and Bryum pseudotriquetrum. Even though mosses are well adapted to the extreme climate conditions, their existence in Antarctica depends strongly on availability of liquid water from snowmelt during the short summer season. Recent changes in temperature, wind speed and stratospheric ozone are stimulating faster evaporation, which in turn influences moss growing rate, health state and abundance. This makes them an ideal bio-indicator of the Antarctic climate change. Very short growing season, lasting only about three months, requires a time efficient, easily deployable and spatially resolved method for monitoring the Antarctic moss beds. Ground and/or low-altitude airborne imaging spectroscopy (called also hyperspectral remote sensing) offers a fast and spatially explicit approach to investigate an actual spatial extent and physiological state of moss turfs. A dataset of ground-based spectral images was acquired with a mini-Hyperspec imaging spectrometer (Headwall Inc., the USA) during the Antarctic summer 2012 in the surroundings of the Australian Antarctic station Casey (Windmill Islands). The collection of high spatial resolution spectral images, with pixels about 2 cm in size containing from 162 up to 324 narrow spectral bands of wavelengths between 399 and 998 nm, was accompanied with point moss reflectance measurements recorded with the ASD HandHeld-2 spectroradiometer (Analytical Spectral Devices Inc., the USA). The first spectral analysis indicates significant differences in red-edge and near-infrared reflectance of differently watered moss patches. Contrary to high plants, where the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) represents an estimate of green biomass, NDVI of mosses indicates mainly the actual water content. Similarly to high plants, reflectance of visible wavelengths is

  5. An optical setup for electric field measurements in MRI with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Simon; Bitzer, Andreas; Bock, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Electric field measurements in the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging environment are important to assess potentially dangerous radio-frequency (RF) heating in the vicinity of metallic structures such as coils, implants or catheters. So far, E-field measurements have been performed with dipole antennas that lag of limited spatial resolution and which are difficult to use in the magnet bore as they interfere with the RF transmit field of the MRI system. In this work an electro-optic sensor is presented that utilizes the Pockels effect to measure the E-field in a clinical MR system with high spatial resolution. This sensor consists of dielectric materials only and thus, it only minimally influences the measured E-field distribution. A 10 m long flexible optical fiber connects the small sensor head to a remote processing unit where the optical signal is transformed into an electrical output signal. Spatially resolved qualitative E-field measurements were performed in a 1.5 T clinical MR system in the vicinity of metallic samples and an active tracking catheter with a resolution of up to 1 mm. The near-field pattern of a resonant U-shaped metallic sample was clearly identified and compared with numerical simulations. A more complex field behavior was found for the tracking catheter where strong E-field enhancements were observed at the distal tip and at its proximal part outside the phantom solution. Due to its sub-mm spatial resolution the optical sensor approach provides detailed insight into the complex and difficult to access field distributions close to implants and metallic structures and has turned out to be promising tool for MRI field and safety inspections.

  6. An optical setup for electric field measurements in MRI with high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Simon; Bitzer, Andreas; Bock, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Electric field measurements in the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging environment are important to assess potentially dangerous radio-frequency (RF) heating in the vicinity of metallic structures such as coils, implants or catheters. So far, E-field measurements have been performed with dipole antennas that lag of limited spatial resolution and which are difficult to use in the magnet bore as they interfere with the RF transmit field of the MRI system. In this work an electro-optic sensor is presented that utilizes the Pockels effect to measure the E-field in a clinical MR system with high spatial resolution. This sensor consists of dielectric materials only and thus, it only minimally influences the measured E-field distribution. A 10 m long flexible optical fiber connects the small sensor head to a remote processing unit where the optical signal is transformed into an electrical output signal. Spatially resolved qualitative E-field measurements were performed in a 1.5 T clinical MR system in the vicinity of metallic samples and an active tracking catheter with a resolution of up to 1 mm. The near-field pattern of a resonant U-shaped metallic sample was clearly identified and compared with numerical simulations. A more complex field behavior was found for the tracking catheter where strong E-field enhancements were observed at the distal tip and at its proximal part outside the phantom solution. Due to its sub-mm spatial resolution the optical sensor approach provides detailed insight into the complex and difficult to access field distributions close to implants and metallic structures and has turned out to be promising tool for MRI field and safety inspections. PMID:25984961

  7. Recent advances in the determination of a high spatial resolution geopotential model using chronometric geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lion, Guillaume; Guerlin, Christine; Bize, Sébastien; Wolf, Peter; Delva, Pacôme; Panet, Isabelle

    2016-04-01

    Current methods to determine the geopotential are mainly based on indirect approaches using gravimetric, gradiometric and topographic data. Satellite missions (GRACE, GOCE) have contributed significantly to improve the knowledge of the Earth's gravity field with a spatial resolution of about 90 km, but it is not enough to access, for example, to the geoid variation in hilly regions. While airborne and ground-based gravimeters provide the high resolution, the problem of these technics is that the accuracy is hampered by the heterogeneous coverage of gravity data (ground and offshore). Recent technological advances in atomic clocks are opening new perspectives in the determination of the geopotential. To date, the best of them reach a stability of 1.6×10-18 (NIST, RIKEN + Univ. Tokyo) in just 7 hours of integration, an accuracy of 2.0×10-18 (JILA). Using the relation of the relativistic gravitational redshift, this corresponds to a determination of geopotential differences at the 0.1 m²/s² level (or 1 cm in geoid height). In this context, the present work aims at evaluating the contribution of optical atomic clocks for the determination of the geopotential at high spatial resolution. To do that, we have studied a test area surrounding the Massif Central in the middle of southern of France. This region, consists in low mountain ranges and plateaus, is interesting because, the gravitational field strength varies greatly from place to place at high resolution due to the relief. Here, we present the synthetic tests methodology: generation of synthetic gravity and potential data, then estimation of the potential from these data using the least-squares collocation and assessment of the clocks contribution. We shall see how the coverage of the data points (realistic or not) can affect the results, and discuss how to quantify the trade-off between the noise level and the number of data points used.

  8. High spatial resolution Hall sensor array for edge plasma magnetic field measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yuhong; Maurer, David A.; Navratil, Gerald A.; Rivera, Nicholas

    2005-09-15

    A one-dimensional, high-spatial resolution, 20-element Hall sensor array has been developed to directly measure the edge plasma perpendicular magnetic field and its fluctuations as a function of radius with 4-mm resolution. The array employs new small-area, high-sensitivity indium antimonide (InSb) Hall probes in combination with a high-density seven-layer printed circuit board to provide for connections to supply Hall current, record the measured Hall voltage output signals, and mitigate inductive pickup. A combination of bench and in situ measurements is described that provides absolute calibration of the diagnostic array in the presence of a strong transverse magnetic field component that is approximately 1000 times greater than the perpendicular fluctuating field needed to be resolved by the diagnostic. The Hall probes calibrated using this method are capable of magnetic field measurements with a sensitivity of 7 V/T over the frequency band from 0 to 20 kHz.

  9. High spatial resolution Hall sensor array for edge plasma magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuhong; Maurer, David A.; Navratil, Gerald A.; Rivera, Nicholas

    2005-09-01

    A one-dimensional, high-spatial resolution, 20-element Hall sensor array has been developed to directly measure the edge plasma perpendicular magnetic field and its fluctuations as a function of radius with 4-mm resolution. The array employs new small-area, high-sensitivity indium antimonide (InSb) Hall probes in combination with a high-density seven-layer printed circuit board to provide for connections to supply Hall current, record the measured Hall voltage output signals, and mitigate inductive pickup. A combination of bench and in situ measurements is described that provides absolute calibration of the diagnostic array in the presence of a strong transverse magnetic field component that is approximately 1000 times greater than the perpendicular fluctuating field needed to be resolved by the diagnostic. The Hall probes calibrated using this method are capable of magnetic field measurements with a sensitivity of 7V/T over the frequency band from 0 to 20 kHz.

  10. Matrix sublimation/recrystallization for imaging proteins by mass spectrometry at high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junhai; Caprioli, Richard M

    2011-07-15

    We have employed matrix deposition by sublimation for protein image analysis on tissue sections using a hydration/recrystallization process that produces high-quality MALDI mass spectra and high-spatial-resolution ion images. We systematically investigated different washing protocols, the effect of tissue section thickness, the amount of sublimated matrix per unit area, and different recrystallization conditions. The results show that an organic solvent rinse followed by ethanol/water rinses substantially increased sensitivity for the detection of proteins. Both the thickness of the tissue section and the amount of sinapinic acid sublimated per unit area have optimal ranges for maximal protein signal intensity. Ion images of mouse and rat brain sections at 50, 20, and 10 μm spatial resolution are presented and are correlated with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained optical images. For targeted analysis, histology-directed imaging can be performed using this protocol where MS analysis and H&E staining are performed on the same section.

  11. Atmospheric Correction of High-Spatial-Resolution Commercial Satellite Imagery Products Using MODIS Atmospheric Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Holekamp, Kara; Ryan, Robert E.; Vaughan, Ronald; Russell, Jeffrey A.; Prados, Don; Stanley, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Remotely sensed ground reflectance is the basis for many inter-sensor interoperability or change detection techniques. Satellite inter-comparisons and accurate vegetation indices such as the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, which is used to describe or to imply a wide variety of biophysical parameters and is defined in terms of near-infrared and redband reflectance, require the generation of accurate reflectance maps. This generation relies upon the removal of solar illumination, satellite geometry, and atmospheric effects and is generally referred to as atmospheric correction. Atmospheric correction of remotely sensed imagery to ground reflectance, however, has been widely applied to only a few systems. In this study, we atmospherically corrected commercially available, high spatial resolution IKONOS and QuickBird imagery using several methods to determine the accuracy of the resulting reflectance maps. We used extensive ground measurement datasets for nine IKONOS and QuickBird scenes acquired over a two-year period to establish reflectance map accuracies. A correction approach using atmospheric products derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer data created excellent reflectance maps and demonstrated a reliable, effective method for reflectance map generation.

  12. Atmospheric Correction of High-Spatial-Resolution Commercial Satellite Imagery Products Using MODIS Atmospheric Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Holekamp, Kara; Ryan, Robert E.; Vaughan, Ronand; Russell, Jeff; Prados, Don; Stanley, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Remotely sensed ground reflectance is the foundation of any interoperability or change detection technique. Satellite intercomparisons and accurate vegetation indices, such as the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), require the generation of accurate reflectance maps (NDVI is used to describe or infer a wide variety of biophysical parameters and is defined in terms of near-infrared (NIR) and red band reflectances). Accurate reflectance-map generation from satellite imagery relies on the removal of solar and satellite geometry and of atmospheric effects and is generally referred to as atmospheric correction. Atmospheric correction of remotely sensed imagery to ground reflectance has been widely applied to a few systems only. The ability to obtain atmospherically corrected imagery and products from various satellites is essential to enable widescale use of remotely sensed, multitemporal imagery for a variety of applications. An atmospheric correction approach derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) that can be applied to high-spatial-resolution satellite imagery under many conditions was evaluated to demonstrate a reliable, effective reflectance map generation method. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  13. Large patch convolutional neural networks for the scene classification of high spatial resolution imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yanfei; Fei, Feng; Zhang, Liangpei

    2016-04-01

    The increase of the spatial resolution of remote-sensing sensors helps to capture the abundant details related to the semantics of surface objects. However, it is difficult for the popular object-oriented classification approaches to acquire higher level semantics from the high spatial resolution remote-sensing (HSR-RS) images, which is often referred to as the "semantic gap." Instead of designing sophisticated operators, convolutional neural networks (CNNs), a typical deep learning method, can automatically discover intrinsic feature descriptors from a large number of input images to bridge the semantic gap. Due to the small data volume of the available HSR-RS scene datasets, which is far away from that of the natural scene datasets, there have been few reports of CNN approaches for HSR-RS image scene classifications. We propose a practical CNN architecture for HSR-RS scene classification, named the large patch convolutional neural network (LPCNN). The large patch sampling is used to generate hundreds of possible scene patches for the feature learning, and a global average pooling layer is used to replace the fully connected network as the classifier, which can greatly reduce the total parameters. The experiments confirm that the proposed LPCNN can learn effective local features to form an effective representation for different land-use scenes, and can achieve a performance that is comparable to the state-of-the-art on public HSR-RS scene datasets.

  14. Optophysiological Approach to Resolve Neuronal Action Potentials with High Spatial and Temporal Resolution in Cultured Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pagès, Stéphane; Côté, Daniel; De Koninck, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Cell to cell communication in the central nervous system is encoded into transient and local membrane potential changes (ΔVm). Deciphering the rules that govern synaptic transmission and plasticity entails to be able to perform Vm recordings throughout the entire neuronal arborization. Classical electrophysiology is, in most cases, not able to do so within small and fragile neuronal subcompartments. Thus, optical techniques based on the use of fluorescent voltage-sensitive dyes (VSDs) have been developed. However, reporting spontaneous or small ΔVm from neuronal ramifications has been challenging, in part due to the limited sensitivity and phototoxicity of VSD-based optical measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of water soluble VSD, ANNINE-6plus, with laser-scanning microscopy to optically record ΔVm in cultured neurons. We show that the sensitivity (>10% of fluorescence change for 100 mV depolarization) and time response (sub millisecond) of the dye allows the robust detection of action potentials (APs) even without averaging, allowing the measurement of spontaneous neuronal firing patterns. In addition, we show that back-propagating APs can be recorded, along distinct dendritic sites and within dendritic spines. Importantly, our approach does not induce any detectable phototoxic effect on cultured neurons. This optophysiological approach provides a simple, minimally invasive, and versatile optical method to measure electrical activity in cultured neurons with high temporal (ms) resolution and high spatial (μm) resolution. PMID:22016723

  15. Quantifying tree mortality in a mixed species woodland using multitemporal high spatial resolution satellite imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrity, Steven R.; Allen, Craig D.; Brumby, Steven P.; Gangodagamage, Chandana; McDowell, Nate G.; Cai, D. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Widespread tree mortality events have recently been observed in several biomes. To effectively quantify the severity and extent of these events, tools that allow for rapid assessment at the landscape scale are required. Past studies using high spatial resolution satellite imagery have primarily focused on detecting green, red, and gray tree canopies during and shortly after tree damage or mortality has occurred. However, detecting trees in various stages of death is not always possible due to limited availability of archived satellite imagery. Here we assess the capability of high spatial resolution satellite imagery for tree mortality detection in a southwestern U.S. mixed species woodland using archived satellite images acquired prior to mortality and well after dead trees had dropped their leaves. We developed a multistep classification approach that uses: supervised masking of non-tree image elements; bi-temporal (pre- and post-mortality) differencing of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and red:green ratio (RGI); and unsupervised multivariate clustering of pixels into live and dead tree classes using a Gaussian mixture model. Classification accuracies were improved in a final step by tuning the rules of pixel classification using the posterior probabilities of class membership obtained from the Gaussian mixture model. Classifications were produced for two images acquired post-mortality with overall accuracies of 97.9% and 98.5%, respectively. Classified images were combined with land cover data to characterize the spatiotemporal characteristics of tree mortality across areas with differences in tree species composition. We found that 38% of tree crown area was lost during the drought period between 2002 and 2006. The majority of tree mortality during this period was concentrated in piñon-juniper (Pinus edulis-Juniperus monosperma) woodlands. An additional 20% of the tree canopy died or was removed between 2006 and 2011, primarily in areas

  16. Modern high spatial resolution approaches to crustal evolution studies - pitfalls and progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehouse, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Developments in analytical techniques for in situ geochronology and isotope geochemistry over the past few decades have contributed greatly to our understanding of the processes of Precambrian crustal evolution, plate tectonics, the development of Earth's hydrosphere and atmosphere and conditions for the development of life on Earth. The further back in time we go, however, the more complex the geology, requiring that we unravel and/or try to see through multiple phases of disturbance. Such geological complexity complicates interpretation and can lead to conflicting viewpoints on such key questions as when plate tectonics began on Earth, when it evolved to a process essentially similar to that of today and the nature and habitability of a potentially pre-plate tectonic Earth in the Hadean. This presentation will review, with case studies, some of the crucial aspects of applying and interpreting high spatial resolution in situ methods and some of the potential pitfalls. Obtaining accurate and precise geochronology is an essential first step in any study of Precambrian geology, whether it is the primary goal or provides a supporting framework to other diverse applications. To this end, high spatial resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and laser ablation inductiively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS), typically combined with relevant imaging methods such as cathode luminescence (CL) are widely used to investigate the U-Pb systematics of complex zircon. In general precision is merely an analytical hurdle that we are good (and continually getting better) at clearing, but accuracy commonly contains not just an analytical element (e.g. calibration of standards) but also a considerable subjective element in order to unravel the commonly polyphase evolution of early Precambrian zircon. Examples of such problematic interpretations from the Neoarchean Lewisian Complex of northwest Scotland and the Paleoarchean Napier Complex of Antarctica will be

  17. High Spatial Resolution Airborne Multispectral Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Data for Analysis of Urban Landscape Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have used airborne multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data collected at a high spatial resolution (i.e., 10m) over several cities in the United States to study thermal energy characteristics of the urban landscape. These TIR data provide a unique opportunity to quantify thermal responses from discrete surfaces typical of the urban landscape and to identify both the spatial arrangement and patterns of thermal processes across the city. The information obtained from these data is critical to understanding how urban surfaces drive or force development of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect, which exists as a dome of elevated air temperatures that presides over cities in contrast to surrounding non-urbanized areas. The UHI is most pronounced in the summertime where urban surfaces, such as rooftops and pavement, store solar radiation throughout the day, and release this stored energy slowly after sunset creating air temperatures over the city that are in excess of 2-4'C warmer in contrast with non-urban or rural air temperatures. The UHI can also exist as a daytime phenomenon with surface temperatures in downtown areas of cities exceeding 38'C. The implications of the UHI are significant, particularly as an additive source of thermal energy input that exacerbates the overall production of ground level ozone over cities. We have used the Airborne Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS), flown onboard a Lear 23 jet aircraft from the NASA Stennis Space Center, to acquire high spatial resolution multispectral TIR data (i.e., 6 bandwidths between 8.2-12.2 (um) over Huntsville, Alabama, Atlanta, Georgia, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Sacramento, California. These TIR data have been used to produce maps and other products, showing the spatial distribution of heating and cooling patterns over these cities to better understand how the morphology of the urban landscape affects development of the UHI. In turn, these data have been used

  18. Generation of remotely sensed reference data using low altitude, high spatial resolution hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, McKay D.; van Aardt, Jan; Kerekes, John P.

    2016-05-01

    Exploitation of imaging spectroscopy (hyperspectral) data using classification and spectral unmixing algorithms is a major research area in remote sensing, with reference data required to assess algorithm performance. However, we are limited by our inability to generate rapid, accurate, and consistent reference data, thus making quantitative algorithm analysis difficult. As a result, many investigators present either limited quantitative results, use synthetic imagery, or provide qualitative results using real imagery. Existing reference data typically classify large swaths of imagery pixel-by-pixel, per cover type. While this type of mapping provides a first order understanding of scene composition, it is not detailed enough to include complexities such as mixed pixels, intra-end-member variability, and scene anomalies. The creation of more detailed ground reference data based on field work, on the other hand, is complicated by the spatial scale of common hyperspectral data sets. This research presents a solution to this challenge via classification of low altitude, high spatial resolution (1m GSD) National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) hyperspectral imagery, on a pixel-by-pixel basis, to produce sub-pixel reference data for high altitude, lower spatial resolution (15m GSD) AVIRIS imagery. This classification is performed using traditional classification techniques, augmented by (0.3m GSD) NEON RGB data. This paper provides a methodology for generating large scale, sub-pixel reference data for AVIRIS imagery using NEON imagery. It also addresses challenges related to the fusion of multiple remote sensing modalities (e.g., different sensors, sensor look angles, spatial registration, varying scene illumination, etc.). A new algorithm for spatial registration of hyperspectral imagery with disparate resolutions is presented. Several versions of reference data results are compared to each other and to direct spectral unmixing of AVIRIS data. Initial results are

  19. Estimation of grassland use intensities based on high spatial resolution LAI time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asam, S.; Klein, D.; Dech, S.

    2015-04-01

    The identification and surveillance of agricultural management and the measurement of biophysical canopy parameters in grasslands is relevant for environmental protection as well as for political and economic reasons, as proper grassland management is partly subsidized. An ideal monitoring tool is remote sensing due to its area wide continuous observations. However, due to small-scaled land use patterns in many parts of central Europe, a high spatial resolution is needed. In this study, the feasibility of RapidEye data to derive leaf area index (LAI) time series and to relate them to grassland management practices is assessed. The study area is the catchment of river Ammer in southern Bavaria, where agricultural areas are mainly grasslands. While extensively managed grasslands are maintained with one to two harvests per year and no or little fertilization, intensive cultivation practices compass three to five harvests per year and turnover pasturing. Based on a RapidEye time series from 2011 with spatial resolution of 6.5 meters, LAI is derived using the inverted radiation transfer model PROSAIL. The LAI in this area ranges from 1.5 to 7.5 over the vegetation period and is estimated with an RMSE between 0.7 and 1.1. The derived LAI maps cover 85 % of the study area's grasslands at least seven times. Using statistical metrics of the LAI time series, different grassland management types can be identified: very intensively managed meadows, intensively managed meadows, intensively managed pastures, and extensively managed meadows and moor. However, a precise identification of the mowing dates highly depends on the coincidence with satellite data acquisitions. Further analysis should focus therefor on the selection of the temporal resolution of the time series as well as on the performance of further vegetation parameters and indices compared to LAI.

  20. Geometric-optics forest canopy modelling for high spatial resolution imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, R.A., Edwards, G.; Gauthier, R.P.

    1996-11-01

    This research studies processes influencing the radiometric appearance of a forest at fine spatial resolution. A canopy radiance model, Treatment of Radiance Emerging from Light Interactions in a Treed Environment (TRELITE), was formulated using a geometric-optical approach. This model explored the relationship between image radiometric textures and canopy physical parameters. TRELITE`s geometric parameters of influence were tree shape, pixel dimension, source and viewing directions, and forest configuration. TRELITE`s optical parameters and interaction processes were collimated and sky irradiance, surface reflectivity, object transmissivity, and projected and mutual shading. Simulated airborne images were generated from a physical representation of these parameters. Four conifer plantation test sites were chosen to evaluate the influence of the modelled parameters on the scene radiance. The Multispectral Electro-Optical Imaging Scanner (MEIS-II), with 45 cm spatial resolution for eight channels spanning visible to near-infrared, measured scene radiance. MEIS image radiance patterns were analyzed for single trees, in four monospecific stands. The influence on the simulated radiance of the modelled canopy factors in TRELITE were examined, on a single tree basis, to determine relative importance in high spatial resolution imagery. Several modelling options were tested. Among them, the most appropriate tree outline shape was the truncated ellipse. Details of simulated images, particularly those in shaded areas, compared more favorably with airborne images when both collimated and diffuse illumination were modelled. Three processes emerged which were imperative to successful simulation: mutual shading (on-object and between object), bidirectional reflectance, and light transmissivity through crowns. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. The Need for High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Thermal Remote Sensing Data In Urban Heat Island Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.

    2006-01-01

    Although the study of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect dates back to the early 1800's when Luke Howard discovered London s heat island, it has only been with the advent of thermal remote sensing systems that the extent, characteristics, and impacts of the UHI have become to be understood. Analysis of the UHI effect is important because above all, this phenomenon can directly influence the health and welfare of urban residents. For example, in 1995, over 700 people died in Chicago due to heat-related causes. UHI s are characterized by increased temperature in comparison to rural areas and mortality rates during a heat wave increase exponentially with the maximum temperature, an effect that is exacerbated by the UHI. Aside from the direct impacts of the UHI on temperature, UHI s can produce secondary effects on local meteorology, including altering local wind patterns, increased development of clouds and fog, and increasing rates of precipitation either over, or downwind, of cities. Because of the extreme heterogeneity of the urban surface, in combination with the sprawl associated with urban growth, thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data have become of significant importance in understanding how land cover and land use characteristics affect the development and intensification of the UHI. TIR satellite data have been used extensively to analyze the surface temperature regimes of cities to help observe and measure the impacts of surface temperatures across the urban landscape. However, the spatial scales at which satellite TIR data are collected are for the most part, coarse, with the finest readily available TIR data collected by the Landsat ETM+ sensor at 60m spatial resolution. For many years, we have collected high spatial resolution (10m) data using an airborne multispectral TIR sensor over a number of cities across the United States. These high resolution data have been used to develop an understanding of how discrete surfaces across the urban environment

  2. Development of a high spatial resolution neutron imaging system and performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lei

    The combination of a scintillation screen and a charged coupled device (CCD) camera is a digitized neutron imaging technology that has been widely employed for research and industry application. The maximum of spatial resolution of scintillation screens is in the range of 100 mum and creates a bottleneck for the further improvement of the overall system resolution. In this investigation, a neutron sensitive micro-channel plate (MCP) detector with pore pitch of 11.4 mum is combined with a cooled CCD camera with a pixel size of 6.8 mum to provide a high spatial resolution neutron imaging system. The optical path includes a high reflection front surface mirror for keeping the camera out of neutron beam and a macro lens for achieving the maximum magnification that could be achieved. All components are assembled into an aluminum light tight box with heavy radiation shielding to protect the camera as well as to provide a dark working condition. Particularly, a remote controlled stepper motor is also integrated into the system to provide on-line focusing ability. The best focus is guaranteed through use of an algorithm instead of perceptual observation. An evaluation routine not previously utilized in the field of neutron radiography is developed in this study. Routines like this were never previously required due to the lower resolution of other systems. Use of the augulation technique to obtain presampled MTF addresses the problem of aliasing associated with digital sampling. The determined MTF agrees well with the visual inspection of imaging a testing target. Other detector/camera combinations may be integrated into the system and their performances are also compared. The best resolution achieved by the system at the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Texas at Austin is 16.2 lp/mm, which is equivalent to a minimum resolvable spacing of 30 mum. The noise performance of the device is evaluated in terms of the noise power spectrum (NPS) and the detective quantum

  3. Mid-IR laser system for advanced neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klosner, M.; Wu, C.; Heller, D. F.

    2014-03-01

    We present work on a laser system operating in the near- and mid-IR spectral regions, having output characteristics designed to be optimal for cutting various tissue types. We provide a brief overview of laser-tissue interactions and the importance of controlling certain properties of the light beam. We describe the principle of operation of the laser system, which is generally based on a wavelength-tunable alexandrite laser oscillator/amplifier, and multiple Raman conversion stages. This configuration provides robust access to the mid-IR spectral region at wavelengths, pulse energies, pulse durations, and repetition rates that are attractive for neurosurgical applications. We summarize results for ultra-precise selective cutting of nerve sheaths and retinas with little collateral damage; this has applications in procedures such as optic-nerve-sheath fenestration and possible spinal repair. We also report results for cutting cornea, and dermal tissues.

  4. High Spatial Resolution MRI of Cystic Adventitial Disease of the Iliofemoral Vein Communicating with the Hip Joint

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelides, Michael; Pantziara, Maria Ioannidis, Kleanthis

    2013-05-14

    Venous cystic adventitial disease (CAD) is an extremely rare entity, and so far less than 20 cases have been described in the literature. Herein, we describe the imaging findings of CAD of iliofemoral vein in a 51-year-old woman who presented with leg swelling with special emphasis on high spatial resolution MRI, which demonstrated communication of the cyst with the hip joint. To our knowledge, this is the first description of high spatial resolution MRI findings in venous CAD supporting a new theory about the pathogenesis of venous CAD.

  5. High Spatial Resolution Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Human Optic Nerve Lipids and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, David M. G.; Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Rose, Kristie L.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2015-06-01

    The human optic nerve carries signals from the retina to the visual cortex of the brain. Each optic nerve is comprised of approximately one million nerve fibers that are organized into bundles of 800-1200 fibers surrounded by connective tissue and supportive glial cells. Damage to the optic nerve contributes to a number of blinding diseases including: glaucoma, neuromyelitis optica, optic neuritis, and neurofibromatosis; however, the molecular mechanisms of optic nerve damage and death are incompletely understood. Herein we present high spatial resolution MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) analysis of lipids and proteins to define the molecular anatomy of the human optic nerve. The localization of a number of lipids was observed in discrete anatomical regions corresponding to myelinated and unmyelinated nerve regions as well as to supporting connective tissue, glial cells, and blood vessels. A protein fragment from vimentin, a known intermediate filament marker for astrocytes, was observed surrounding nerved fiber bundles in the lamina cribrosa region. S100B was also found in supporting glial cell regions in the prelaminar region, and the hemoglobin alpha subunit was observed in blood vessel areas. The molecular anatomy of the optic nerve defined by MALDI IMS provides a firm foundation to study biochemical changes in blinding human diseases.

  6. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION SURVEY OF GRAIN SIZE INFORMATION ON RIVER BED BY IMAGE PROCESSING

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Keisuke; Ihara, Kazuki; Yasuda, Shingo

    We tried a method of grain sizing by image processing which is available to survey and analyze in short time. The high-efficiency method actualizes high spatial resolution information of grain size distribution. Thus, the information has a vailability to express a situation of stream flow better than traditional grain sizing methods. For this reason, we paid attention to 50 m reservoir area upper from the check dam in mountainous region and surveyed the grain distribution at 26 sites and river channel landform. The grain sizing by image processing provided the appropriate result qualitatively. Moreover we estimated the critical diameter of moving from hydraulic information simultaneously. A qualitative appropriate result is showed less than 50 mm error as a result, however, quantitative response is not found between the critical diameter of moving and the grain size distribution surveyed. Meanwhile,the different grain sizing methods that are image processing and traditional sieving are used to cover the bilateral weak point. Thereby, a peak of grain existence probability is found in the threshold diameter between image processing and sieving. This result indicates that it is necessary to change the threshold diameter much larger than the limit of image processing grain sizing.

  7. The Geospectral Camera: a Compact and Geometrically Precise Hyperspectral and High Spatial Resolution Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delauré, B.; Michiels, B.; Biesemans, J.; Livens, S.; Van Achteren, T.

    2013-04-01

    Small unmanned aerial vehicles are increasingly being employed for environmental monitoring at local scale, which drives the demand for compact and lightweight spectral imagers. This paper describes the geospectral camera, which is a novel compact imager concept. The camera is built around an innovative detector which has two sensor elements on a single chip and therefore offers the functionality of two cameras within the volume of a single one. The two sensor elements allow the camera to derive both spectral information as well as geometric information (high spatial resolution imagery and a digital surface model) of the scene of interest. A first geospectral camera prototype has been developed. It uses a linear variable optical filter which is installed in front of one of the two sensors of the MEDUSA CMOS imager chip. A accompanying software approach has been developed which exploits the simultaneous information of the two sensors in order to extract an accurate spectral image product. This method has been functionally demonstrated by applying it on image data acquired during an airborne acquisition.

  8. High spatial resolution proteomic comparison of the brain in humans and chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Bauernfeind, Amy L; Reyzer, Michelle L; Caprioli, Richard M; Ely, John J; Babbitt, Courtney C; Wray, Gregory A; Hof, Patrick R; Sherwood, Chet C

    2015-10-01

    We performed high-throughput mass spectrometry at high spatial resolution from individual regions (anterior cingulate and primary motor, somatosensory, and visual cortices) and layers of the neocortex (layers III, IV, and V) and cerebellum (granule cell layer), as well as the caudate nucleus in humans and chimpanzees. A total of 39 mass spectrometry peaks were matched with probable protein identifications in both species, allowing for comparison in expression. We explored how the pattern of protein expression varies across regions and cortical layers to provide insights into the differences in molecular phenotype of these neural structures between species. The expression of proteins differed principally in a region- and layer-specific pattern, with more subtle differences between species. Specifically, human and chimpanzee brains were similar in their distribution of proteins related to the regulation of transcription and enzyme activity but differed in their expression of proteins supporting aerobic metabolism. Whereas most work assessing molecular expression differences in the brains of primates has been performed on gene transcripts, this dataset extends current understanding of the differential molecular expression that may underlie human cognitive specializations. PMID:25779868

  9. Assessing NO2 variability over urban areas at high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, M. L.; Szykman, J.; Knepp, T. N.; Chen, G.; Crawford, J. H.; Janz, S. J.; Kowalewski, M. G.; Fishman, J.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is a short-lived species within the troposphere, contributing to the production of ozone and aerosols. It is concentrated in urban and industrial areas where an abundance of point and mobile sources exist. Due to its short lifetime, it is difficult to capture the variability of NO2 and represent it within atmospheric chemistry transport models. Understanding this variability is important for emission controls, health impacts, and photochemistry. This analysis uses in situ aircraft measurements collected during ARCTAS-CARB, ICARTT, TexAQS-2000, TexAQS-2006, and DISCOVER-AQ as well as high spatial resolution column measurements of NO2 from the NASA GSFC Airborne Compact Atmospheric Mapper (ACAM) instrument collected during the first DISCOVER-AQ deployment, to assess the variability over urban areas. First order structure functions are used to generate statistics over a range of spatial scales. Column density is calculated from the DISCOVER-AQ profiles to assess the variability of a column within the aircraft profile. Results show that spatial variability depends on the airmass being sampled, polluted versus background conditions.

  10. Carbon budget estimation of a subarctic catchment using a dynamic ecosystem model at high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J.; Miller, P. A.; Persson, A.; Olefeldt, D.; Pilesjo, P.; Heliasz, M.; Jackowicz-Korczynski, M.; Yang, Z.; Smith, B.; Callaghan, T. V.; Christensen, T. R.

    2015-05-01

    A large amount of organic carbon is stored in high-latitude soils. A substantial proportion of this carbon stock is vulnerable and may decompose rapidly due to temperature increases that are already greater than the global average. It is therefore crucial to quantify and understand carbon exchange between the atmosphere and subarctic/arctic ecosystems. In this paper, we combine an Arctic-enabled version of the process-based dynamic ecosystem model, LPJ-GUESS (version LPJG-WHyMe-TFM) with comprehensive observations of terrestrial and aquatic carbon fluxes to simulate long-term carbon exchange in a subarctic catchment at 50 m resolution. Integrating the observed carbon fluxes from aquatic systems with the modeled terrestrial carbon fluxes across the whole catchment, we estimate that the area is a carbon sink at present and will become an even stronger carbon sink by 2080, which is mainly a result of a projected densification of birch forest and its encroachment into tundra heath. However, the magnitudes of the modeled sinks are very dependent on future atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Furthermore, comparisons of global warming potentials between two simulations with and without CO2 increase since 1960 reveal that the increased methane emission from the peatland could double the warming effects of the whole catchment by 2080 in the absence of CO2 fertilization of the vegetation. This is the first process-based model study of the temporal evolution of a catchment-level carbon budget at high spatial resolution, including both terrestrial and aquatic carbon. Though this study also highlights some limitations in modeling subarctic ecosystem responses to climate change, such as aquatic system flux dynamics, nutrient limitation, herbivory and other disturbances, and peatland expansion, our study provides one process-based approach to resolve the complexity of carbon cycling in subarctic ecosystems while simultaneously pointing out the key model developments for capturing

  11. Quantitative and high spatial resolution d{sub 33} measurement of piezoelectric bulk and thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Shetty, Smitha Yang, Jung In; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Stitt, Joe

    2015-11-07

    A single beam laser interferometer based on a modified Mirau detection scheme with a vertical resolution of ∼5 pm was developed for localized d{sub 33} measurements on patterned piezoelectric films. The tool provides high spatial resolution (∼2 μm), essential for understanding scaling and processing effects in piezoelectric materials. This approach enables quantitative information on d{sub 33}, currently difficult in local measurement techniques such as piezoresponse force microscopy. The interferometer is built in a custom microscope and employs a phase lock-in technique in order to detect sub-Angstrom displacements. d{sub 33} measurements on single crystal 0.67PbMg{sub 0.33}Nb{sub 0.67}O{sub 3}-0.33PbTiO{sub 3} and bulk PbZrTiO{sub 3}-5A ceramics demonstrated agreement within <3% with measurements using a double beam laser interferometer. Substrate bending contributions to out-of-plane strain, observed in thin continuous PbZr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48}O{sub 3} films grown on Si substrates is reduced for electrode diameters smaller than 100 μm. Direct scanning across room temperature and 150 °C poled 5 μm and 10 μm features etched in 0.5 μm thick PbZr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48}O{sub 3} films doped with 1% Nb confirmed minimal substrate contributions to the effective d{sub 33,f}. Furthermore, enhanced d{sub 33,f} values were observed along the feature edges due to partial declamping from the substrate, thus validating the application of single beam interferometry on finely patterned electrodes.

  12. Development of mid-IR lasers for Laser Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soibel, Alexander; Mansour, Kamjou; Spiers, Gary; Forouhar, Siamak

    2005-01-01

    There is an existing need in JPL and in NASA for development of mid-IR lasers, such as Quantum Cascade (QC) lasers, for in-situ and remote laser spectrometers. Mid-IR, compact, low power consumption laser spectrometers have a great potential for detection and measurements of planetary gases and biological important biomarker molecules such as H20, H202, CH4, and many additional chemical species on Mars and other Solar system planets. Another potential application of QC lasers for future NASA mission is in high power remote Laser Reflectance Spectrometers (LRS). In LSR instrument, mid-infrared lasers will act as the illumination source for conducting active mid-IR reflectance spectroscopy of solid-surfaced objects in the outer Solar System. These spectrometers have the potential to provide an incredible amount of information about the compositions of surfaces in the outer Solar System. In this work, we will discuss our current effort at JPL to advance QC lasers to a level that the laser performance, operational requirements and reliability be compatible with the instruments demands for space exploration applications.

  13. Sunglint effects on the characterization of optically active substances in high spatial resolution airborne hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streher, A. S.; Faria Barbosa, C. Clemente; Soares Galvão, L.; Goodman, J. A.; Silva, T. S.

    2013-05-01

    Sunglint, also known as the specular reflection of light from water surfaces, is a component of sensor-received radiance that represents a confounding factor on the characterization of water bodies by remote sensing. In airborne remote sensing images, the effect of sunglint can be minimized by optimizing the flight paths, directing the sensor towards or away from the Sun, and by keeping solar zenith angles between 30° and 60°. However, these guidelines cannot always be applied, often due to the irregular spatial pattern of lakes, estuaries and coastlines. The present study assessed the impact of sunglint on the relationship between the optically active substances (OAS) concentration, in optically complex waters, and the spectral information provided by an airborne high spatial resolution hyperspectral sensor (SpecTIR). The Ibitinga reservoir, located in southeastern Brazil (state of São Paulo), was selected as the study area because of its meandering shape. As a result, there is demanding constant changes in data acquisition geometry to achieve complete coverage, therefore not allowing sunglint conditions to be minimized during image acquisition. Field data collection was carried out on October 23 and 24, 2011. During these two days, 15 water stations along the reservoir were sampled, concurrently with the SpecTIR image acquisition in 357 bands (398-2455 nm) and at 3 m spatial resolution. Chlorophyll, pheophytin, total suspended solids, organic and inorganic suspended solids and colored dissolved matter were determined in laboratory. The images were corrected for the atmospheric effects using the Fast Line-of-sight Atmospheric Analysis of Spectral Hypercubes (FLAASH) algorithm and then geometrically corrected. In order to evaluate the sunglint effects on the OAS characterization, the images were corrected for such effects using the deglint algorithm from Goodman et al. (2008). The SpecTIR 662-nm band reflectance was selected to be correlated to the OAS due to

  14. Estimation of crops biomass and evapotranspiration from high spatial and temporal resolutions remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claverie, Martin; Demarez, Valérie; Duchemin, Benoît.; Ceschia, Eric; Hagolle, Olivier; Ducrot, Danielle; Keravec, Pascal; Beziat, Pierre; Dedieu, Pierre

    2010-05-01

    Carbon and water cycles are closely related to agricultural activities. Agriculture has been indeed identified by IPCC 2007 report as one of the options to sequester carbon in soil. Concerning the water resources, their consumptions by irrigated crops are called into question in view of demographic pressure. In the prospect of an assessment of carbon production and water consumption, the use of crop models at a regional scale is a challenging issue. The recent availability of high spatial resolution (10 m) optical sensors associated to high temporal resolution (1 day) such as FORMOSAT-2 and, in the future, Venµs and SENTINEL-2 will offer new perspectives for agricultural monitoring. In this context, the objective of this work is to show how multi-temporal satellite observations acquired at high spatial resolution are useful for a regional monitoring of following crops biophysical variables: leaf area index (LAI), aboveground biomass (AGB) and evapotranspiration (ET). This study focuses on three summer crops dominant in South-West of France: maize, sunflower and soybean. A unique images data set (82 FORMOSAT-2 images over four consecutive years, 2006-2009) was acquired for this project. The experimental data set includes LAI and AGB measurements over eight agricultural fields. Two fields were intensively monitored where ET flux were measured with a 30 minutes time step using eddy correlation methods. The modelisation approach is based on FAO-56 method coupled with a vegetation functioning model based on Monteith theory: the SAFY model [5]. The model operates at a daily time step model to provide estimates of plant characteristics (LAI, AGB), soil conditions (soil water content) and water use (ET). As a key linking variable, LAI is deduced from FORMOSAT-2 reflectances images, and then introduced into the SAFY model to provide spatial and temporal estimates of these biophysical variables. Most of the SAFY parameters are crop related and have been fixed according to

  15. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF INERTIAL FUSION TARGET PLASMAS USING BUBBLE NEWTRON DETECTORS

    SciTech Connect

    FISHER,RK

    2002-10-01

    OAK B202 HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF INERTIAL FUSION TARGET PLASMAS USING BUBBLE NEWTRON DETECTORS. Bubble detectors, which can detect neutrons with a spatial resolution of 5 to 30 {micro}, are a promising approach to high-resolution imaging of NIF target plasmas. Gel bubble detectors were used in successful proof-of-principle imaging experiments on OMEGA. Until recently, bubble detectors appeared to be the only approach capable of achieving neutron images of NIF targets with the desired 5 {micro} spatial resolution in the target plane. In 2001, NIF reduced the required standoff distance from the target, so that diagnostic components can now be placed as close as 10 cm to the target plasma. This will allow neutron imaging with higher magnification and may make it possible to obtain 5 {micro}m resolution images on NIF using deuterated scintillators. Having accomplished all that they can hope to on OMEGA using gel detectors, they suggested that the 2002 NLUF shots be used to allow experimental tests of the spatial resolution of the CEA-built deuterated scintillators. The preliminary CEA data from the June 2002 run appears to show the spatial resolution using the deuterated scintillator detector array is improved over that obtained in earlier experiments using the proton-based scintillators. Gel detectors, which consist of {approx} 10 {micro}m diameter drops of bubble detector liquid suspended in an inactive support gel that occupies {approx} 99% of the detector volume, were chosen for the initial tests on OMEGA since they are easy to use. The bubbles could be photographed several hours after the neutron exposure. Imaging NIF target plasmas at neutron yields of 10{sup 15} will require a higher detection efficiency detector. Using a liquid bubble chamber detector should result in {approx} 1000 times higher neutron detection efficiency which is comparable to that possible using scintillation detectors. A pressure-cycled liquid bubble detector will require a light

  16. CLASSIFICATION OF HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION, HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING IMAGERY OF THE LITTLE MIAMI RIVER WATERSHED IN SOUTHWEST OHIO, USA (FINAL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document and associated land use/land cover (LULC) coverage, entitled Classification of High Spatial Resolution, Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Imagery of the Little Miami River Watershed in Southwest Ohio, USA, is the result of a collaborative effort among an interdisci...

  17. Improving urban land use and land cover classification from high-spatial-resolution hyperspectral imagery using contextual information

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper, we propose approaches to improve the pixel-based support vector machine (SVM) classification for urban land use and land cover (LULC) mapping from airborne hyperspectral imagery with high spatial resolution. Class spatial neighborhood relationship is used to correct the misclassified ...

  18. INTERPOLATION OF TEMPERATURE AND NON-URBAN OZONE EXPOSURE AT HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION OVER THE WESTERN UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to assess the impact of natural and anthropogenic stresses on forest ecosystems, it is necessary to interpolate air temperature and tropospheric ozone (O3) exposure values at high spatial resolution over complex terrain. The proposed interpolation approach was selected ...

  19. High temporal and high spatial resolution MR angiography (4D-MRA).

    PubMed

    Hadizadeh, D R; Marx, C; Gieseke, J; Schild, H H; Willinek, W A

    2014-09-01

    In the first decade of the twenty-first century, whole-body magnetic resonance scanners with high field strengths (and thus potentially better signal-to-noise ratios) were developed. At the same time, parallel imaging and "echo-sharing" techniques were refined to allow for increasingly high spatial and temporal resolution in dynamic magnetic resonance angiography ("time-resolved" = TR-MRA). This technological progress facilitated tracking the passage of intra-venously administered contrast agent boluses as well as the acquisition of volume data sets at high image refresh rates ("4D-MRA"). This opened doors for many new applications in non-invasive vascular imaging, including simultaneous anatomic and functional analysis of many vascular pathologies including arterio-venous malformations. Different methods were established to acquire 4D-MRA using various strategies to acquire k-space trajectories over time in order to optimize imaging according to clinical needs. These include "keyhole"-based techniques (e. g. 4D-TRAK), TRICKS - both with and without projection - and HYPR-reconstruction, TREAT, and TWIST. Some of these techniques were first introduced in the 1980 s and 1990 s, were later enhanced and modified, and finally implemented in the products of major vendors. In the last decade, a large number of studies on the clinical applications of TR-MRA was published. This manuscript provides an overview of the development of TR-MRA methods and the 4D-MRA techniques as they are currently used in the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of vascular diseases in various parts of the body. PMID:24955647

  20. In-duct identification of a rotating sound source with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Yong-Ho; Ih, Jeong-Guon; Bodén, Hans

    2015-11-01

    To understand and reduce the flow noise generation from in-duct fluid machines, it is necessary to identify the acoustic source characteristics precisely. In this work, a source identification technique, which can identify the strengths and positions of the major sound radiators in the source plane, is studied for an in-duct rotating source. A linear acoustic theory including the effects of evanescent modes and source rotation is formulated based on the modal summation method, which is the underlying theory for the inverse source reconstruction. A validation experiment is conducted on a duct system excited by a loudspeaker in static and rotating conditions, with two different speeds, in the absence of flow. Due to the source rotation, the measured pressure spectra reveal the Doppler effect, and the amount of frequency shift corresponds to the multiplication of the circumferential mode order and the rotation speed. Amplitudes of participating modes are estimated at the shifted frequencies in the stationary reference frame, and the modal amplitude set including the effect of source rotation is collected to investigate the source behavior in the rotating reference frame. By using the estimated modal amplitudes, the near-field pressure is re-calculated and compared with the measured pressure. The obtained maximum relative error is about -25 and -10 dB for rotation speeds at 300 and 600 rev/min, respectively. The spatial distribution of acoustic source parameters is restored from the estimated modal amplitude set. The result clearly shows that the position and magnitude of the main sound source can be identified with high spatial resolution in the rotating reference frame.

  1. High spatial resolution 100 micron observations of the M83 bar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, B. J.; Lester, Dan F.; Harvey, P. M.

    1990-01-01

    A program of high spatial resolution far-infrared observations of galaxies using the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), was conducted to better understand the role of star formation, the general interstellar radiation field, and non-thermal activity in powering the prodigious far-infrared luminosities seen in spiral and interacting galaxies. Here, researchers present observations of the central region of the well-known barred spiral M83 (NGC 5236). The resultant channel 3 scans for M83 and IRC + 10216, after co-addition and smoothing, are shown. These data show that M83 is extended at 100 microns compared to a point source. A simple Gaussian deconvolution of the M83 data with the point source profile from IRC+10216 gives a full width half maximum (FWHM) of about 19 seconds for M83. By comparison with IRC+10216, researchers obtain a flux for the unresolved component in M83 of about 110 Jy. This is about 1/6 the total flux for M83 (Rice et al. 1988) and about 1/2 the PSC flux. The M83 and IRC+10216 profiles in the cross-scan direction (SE-NW) were also compared, and show that M83 is extended in this direction as well, with a width of about 18 seconds. A comparison of the different channel profiles for M83 and IRC+10216 shows that there is an asymmetry in the M83 data, in that the maximum in the profiles shifts from southeast to northwest as channel number increases. This corresponds to the extension in the bar seen in the CO data. Thus the far-infrared emission in the central region of M83 tends to trace the CO bar. The new 100 micron data is also compared with previous H alpha observations from the literature, to determine how well the far-infrared traces the stellar structure, the star formation as measured by H alpha, and the optical colors.

  2. High Spatial Resolution Observations of Two Young Protostars in the R Corona Australis Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groppi, Christopher E.; Hunter, Todd R.; Blundell, Raymond; Sandell, Göran

    2007-11-01

    We present multiwavelength, high spatial resolution imaging of the IRS 7 region in the R Corona Australis molecular cloud. Our observations include 1.1 mm continuum and HCO+ J=3-->2 images from the Submillimeter Array (SMA), 12CO J=3-->2 outflow maps from the DesertStar heterodyne array receiver on the Heinrich Hertz Telescope (HHT), 450 and 850 μm continuum images from SCUBA, and archival Spitzer IRAC and MIPS 24 μm images. The accurate astrometry of the IRAC images allow us to identify IRS 7 with the centimeter source VLA 10W (IRS 7A) and the X-ray source XW. The SMA 1.1 mm image reveals two compact continuum sources that are also distinguishable at 450 μm. SMA 1 coincides with X-ray source CXOU J190156.4-365728 and VLA centimeter source 10E (IRS 7B) and is seen in the IRAC and MIPS images. SMA 2 has no infrared counterpart but coincides with centimeter source VLA 9. Spectral energy distributions constructed from SMA, SCUBA, and Spitzer data yield bolometric temperatures of 83 K for SMA 1 and <=70 K for SMA 2. These temperatures along with the submillimeter to total luminosity ratios indicate that SMA 2 is a Class 0 protostar, while SMA 1 is a Class 0/Class I transitional object (L=17+/-6 Lsolar). The 12CO J=3-->2 outflow map shows one major and possibly several smaller outflows centered on the IRS 7 region, with masses and energetics consistent with previous work. We identify the Class 0 source SMA 2/VLA 9 as the main driver of this outflow. The complex and clumpy spatial and velocity distribution of the HCO+ J=3-->2 emission is not consistent with either bulk rotation, or any known molecular outflow activity.

  3. Automated road network extraction from high spatial resolution multi-spectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiaoping

    road network. The extracted road network is evaluated against a reference dataset using a line segment matching algorithm. The entire process is unsupervised and fully automated. Based on extensive experimentation on a variety of remotely-sensed multi-spectral images, the proposed methodology achieves a moderate success in automating road network extraction from high spatial resolution multi-spectral imagery.

  4. High-spatial resolution numerical simulations of in-water radiative transfer processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alimonte, D.; Kajiyama, T.; Zibordi, G.

    2012-04-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of radiative processes allow for addressing optical radiometric problems strictly linked to complex geometries. Within such a context, MC simulations have been used to investigate uncertainties affecting in-water radiometric measurements performed with free-fall optical profilers commonly utilized for the vicarious calibration of space sensors or the validation of satellite ocean color primary products (e.g, the normalized water leaving radiance). Specifically, a MC code (henceforth called MOX) has been developed to simulate in-water and above-water radiometric fields with high spatial-resolution (up to 1 cm) over a 2-dimensional (2D) domain of tens of meters. This has been achieved by exploiting high performance computing (HPC) solutions (e.g., parallel programs and job-scheduling based on novel performance prediction and optimization schemes) to trace up to 10^12 photons. A dedicated study, focused on the simulation of in-water radiometric fields, has led to the generation of virtual optical profiles accounting for perturbations due to light focusing effect by sea-surface gravity and capillary waves at a spatial resolution comparable to that of actual measurements. Different from field experiments, which are often constrained by environmental factors like illumination conditions and sea-water optical properties, numerical simulations permits analyzing realistic cases whereas allowing for a free input parameter selection. MOX simulations have shown that uncertainties induced by focusing effects upon radiometric data products can be reduced by slowing the deployment speed of free-fall optical profilers, rather than increasing the sampling frequency (i.e., while keeping the same number of samples per depth unit). This result has confirmed the appropriateness of profiling techniques (i.e., multicasting) so far solely supported by a limited number of field measurements and has additionally suggested the possibility of investigating further

  5. Carbon budget estimation of a subarctic catchment using a dynamic ecosystem model at high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J.; Miller, P. A.; Persson, A.; Olefeldt, D.; Pilesjö, P.; Heliasz, M.; Jackowicz-Korczynski, M.; Yang, Z.; Smith, B.; Callaghan, T. V.; Christensen, T. R.

    2015-01-01

    Large amount of organic carbon is stored in high latitude soils. A substantial proportion of this carbon stock is vulnerable and may decompose rapidly due to temperature increases that are already greater than the global average. It is therefore crucial to quantify and understand carbon exchange between the atmosphere and subarctic/arctic ecosystems. In this paper, we combine an arctic-enabled version of the process-based dynamic ecosystem model, LPJ-GUESS (version LPJG-WHyMe-TFM) with comprehensive observations of terrestrial and aquatic carbon fluxes to simulate long-term carbon exchange in a subarctic catchment comprising both mineral and peatland soils. The model is applied at 50 m resolution and is shown to be able to capture the seasonality and magnitudes of observed fluxes at this fine scale. The modelled magnitudes of CO2 uptake generally follow the descending sequence: birch forest, non-permafrost Eriophorum, Sphagnum and then tundra heath during the observation periods. The catchment-level carbon fluxes from aquatic systems are dominated by CO2 emissions from streams. Integrated across the whole catchment, we estimate that the area is a carbon sink at present, and will become an even stronger carbon sink by 2080, which is mainly a result of a projected densification of birch forest and its encroachment into tundra heath. However, the magnitudes of the modelled sinks are very dependent on future atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Furthermore, comparisons of global warming potentials between two simulations with and without CO2 increase since 1960 reveal that the increased methane emission from the peatland could double the warming effects of the whole catchment by 2080 in the absence of CO2 fertilization of the vegetation. This is the first process-based model study of the temporal evolution of a catchment-level carbon budget at high spatial resolution, integrating comprehensive and diverse fluxes including both terrestrial and aquatic carbon. Though this

  6. Dust processing in photodissociation regions. Mid-IR emission modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compiègne, M.; Abergel, A.; Verstraete, L.; Habart, E.

    2008-12-01

    Context: Mid-infrared spectroscopy of dense illuminated ridges (or photodissociation regions, PDRs) suggests dust evolution. Such evolution must be reflected in the gas physical properties through processes like photo-electric heating or H2 formation. Aims: With Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) and ISOCAM data, we study the mid-IR emission of closeby, well known PDRs. Focusing on the band and continuum dust emissions, we follow their relative contributions and analyze their variations in terms of abundance of dust populations. Methods: In order to disentangle dust evolution and excitation effects, we use a dust emission model that we couple to radiative transfer. Our dust model reproduces extinction and emission of the standard interstellar medium that we represent with diffuse high galactic latitude clouds called Cirrus. We take the properties of dust in Cirrus as a reference to which we compare the dust emission from more excited regions, namely the Horsehead and the reflection nebula NGC 2023 North. Results: We show that in both regions, radiative transfer effects cannot account for the observed spectral variations. We interpret these variations in term of changes of the relative abundance between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, mid-IR band carriers) and very small grains (VSGs, mid-IR continuum carriers). Conclusions: We conclude that the PAH/VSG abundance ratio is 2.4 times smaller at the peak emission of the Horsehead nebula than in the Cirrus case. For NGC 2023 North where spectral evolution is observed across the northern PDR, we conclude that this ratio is ~5 times lower in the dense, cold zones of the PDR than in its diffuse illuminated part where dust properties seem to be the same as in Cirrus. We conclude that dust in PDRs seems to evolve from “dense” to “diffuse” properties at the small spatial scale of the dense illuminated ridge.

  7. Combining high temporal and high spatial resolution thermal infrared datasets to detect volcanic precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reath, K. A.; Dehn, J.; Ramsey, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Most volcanoes produce some level of precursory activity prior to an eruption. In certain cases, the precursors can be interpreted to make forecasts about the time and magnitude of the impending eruption. Furthermore, subtle changes in this activity can be used to determine the style of an eruption at volcanoes known for differing eruption types. This study focuses on the effectiveness of using thermal infrared (TIR) spaceborne sensors to track volcanic precursors from thermal changes at the summit of volcanoes using data from both the ASTER and AVHRR sensors by focusing on the Kamchatka (Russia) region. At Bezymianny volcano, a clear increase in activity commonly occurs before an eruption, which has allowed predictions to be made months ahead of time. In other cases, such as the Tolbachik eruption in 2012, no precursors were detected before the large scale effusive eruption. However, most volcanoes do not fall into these extremes, as is the case with Kliuchevskoi volcano. Three large eruptions (e.g., 2005, 2007, 2009) have occurred at Kliuchevskoi in the past decade. Before each of these eruptions, AVHRR and ASTER detected thermal anomalies (pixels with radiant energy significantly above the background). High temporal but low spatial resolution (i.e., hours; 1 km) AVHRR data are ideal for detecting high energy events occurring over short time periods. In contrast, high spatial but low temporal resolution (i.e., days to weeks; 90 m) ASTER data enables the detection of much lower levels of activity. These smaller thermal anomalies are more commonly associated with the longer time scale pre-eruptive phase at Kliuchevskoi. The problem occurs where attempting to detect patterns in these anomalies over time. Only volcanic activity that produces a large amount of radiant energy can be seen with the relatively poor spatial resolution of AVHRR, and ASTER will commonly miss shorter duration activity. In this study, we use ASTER data to track low-level anomalies months prior

  8. Satellite monitoring at high spatial resolution of water bodies used for irrigation purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baup, F.; Flanquart, S.; Marais-Sicre, C.; Fieuzal, R.

    2012-04-01

    have a surface inferior to 10 ha (0.1 km2). Temporal analyses, over the year 2010, show that only five lakes offer a strong surface dynamic (from 21% to 125% of evolution). The weak signal observed over all the other lakes are due to the banks of lakes (steep slope). The long term analyses, from 2003 to middle of 2011, show alternation of wet and dry years due to rainfalls variations. Annual cycle are also well marked showing filling and emptying phases respectively occurring in spring and at the end of summer. Filling phase is both attributed to runoff contributions over the watershed and to pumping effects. Irrigation and evaporation are the main factors during emptying phases. Two examples of water storages estimates are presented over one specific watershed. To conclude, high spatial resolution images appear suitable for mapping water bodies at fine scale. Limitations come from the form of the edge of the lake (steep or slight slope) and only 3% of lakes can be monitored over the studied area. In the following, interferometric approaches will be evaluated to estimate the height of water bodies, improving the estimate of water storage.

  9. SPICA: Mid-IR exoplanet spectroscopy in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, I. P.; Swinyard, B.; Tessenyi, M.; Tinetti, G.

    2014-04-01

    In less than three decades, the field of exoplanetary science has undergone nothing short of a revolution. We have gone from the oddball discovery of a 'planetary sized object' orbiting a pulsar star (Wolszczan and Frail, 1992) to efficient and systematic all-sky surveys with nearly two thousand confirmed exoplanets and over three thousand candidates awaiting confirmation (Burke et al., 2013). With such wealth of systems discovered, we are constantly edging closer to finding the holy grail of planetary science: an Earth analogue with habitable conditions. To understand conditions of habitability, we must characterise the exoplanets. This is best achieved by the spectroscopy of their atmospheres in the near to mid-IR wavelength ranges (5-20 microns) where complex molecules emit. Whilst JWST/MIRI does cover these wavelength ranges in four separate filters, the importance of oneshot, simultaneous wavelength coverage to constrain stellar and planetary variability cannot be overstated. In this talk we will present the concept of a highstability spectrograph on the proposed SPICA mission, featuring a continuous wavelength coverage from the near to mid-IR, ideally placed to characterise warm- Neptunes to habitable zone planets.

  10. Land cover mapping and change detection in urban watersheds using QuickBird high spatial resolution satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, David Barry

    The objective of this research was to develop methods for urban land cover analysis using QuickBird high spatial resolution satellite imagery. Such imagery has emerged as a rich commercially available remote sensing data source and has enjoyed high-profile broadcast news media and Internet applications, but methods of quantitative analysis have not been thoroughly explored. The research described here consists of three studies focused on the use of pan-sharpened 61-cm spatial resolution QuickBird imagery, the spatial resolution of which is the highest of any commercial satellite. In the first study, a per-pixel land cover classification method is developed for use with this imagery. This method utilizes a per-pixel classification approach to generate an accurate six-category high spatial resolution land cover map of a developing suburban area. The primary objective of the second study was to develop an accurate land cover change detection method for use with QuickBird land cover products. This work presents an efficient fuzzy framework for transforming map uncertainty into accurate and meaningful high spatial resolution land cover change analysis. The third study described here is an urban planning application of the high spatial resolution QuickBird-based land cover product developed in the first study. This work both meaningfully connects this exciting new data source to urban watershed management and makes an important empirical contribution to the study of suburban watersheds. Its analysis of residential roads and driveways as well as retail parking lots sheds valuable light on the impact of transportation-related land use on the suburban landscape. Broadly, these studies provide new methods for using state-of-the-art remote sensing data to inform land cover analysis and urban planning. These methods are widely adaptable and produce land cover products that are both meaningful and accurate. As additional high spatial resolution satellites are launched and the

  11. Seismic Study of the Subsurface Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Interior from High Spatial Resolution Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korzennik, Sylvain G.

    1997-01-01

    We have carried out the data reduction and analysis of Mt. Wilson 60' solar tower high spatial resolution observations. The reduction of the 100-day-long summer of 1990 observation campaign in terms of rotational splittings was completed leading to an excess of 600,000 splittings. The analysis of these splittings lead to a new inference of the solar internal rotation rate as a function of depth and latitude.

  12. [Examination of upper abdominal region in high spatial resolution diffusion-weighted imaging using 3-Tesla MRI].

    PubMed

    Terada, Masaki; Matsushita, Hiroki; Oosugi, Masanori; Inoue, Kazuyasu; Yaegashi, Taku; Anma, Takeshi

    2009-03-20

    The advantage of the higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3-Tesla) has the possibility of contributing to the improvement of high spatial resolution without causing image deterioration. In this study, we compared SNR and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value with 3-Tesla as the condition in the diffusion-weighted image (DWI) parameter of the 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (1.5-Tesla) and we examined the high spatial resolution images in the imaging method [respiratory-triggering (RT) method and breath free (BF) method] and artifact (motion and zebra) in the upper abdominal region of DWI at 3-Tesla. We have optimized scan parameters based on phantom and in vivo study. As a result, 3-Tesla was able to obtain about 1.5 times SNR in comparison with the 1.5-Tesla, ADC value had few differences. Moreover, the RT method was effective in correcting the influence of respiratory movement in comparison with the BF method, and image improvement by the effective acquisition of SNR and reduction of the artifact were provided. Thus, DWI of upper abdominal region was a useful sequence for the high spatial resolution in 3-Tesla.

  13. Autonomous agricultural remote sensing systems with high spatial and temporal resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Haitao

    . It suggested that a 16.5% forward overlap and a 15% lateral overlap were required to avoiding missing desired mapping area when the UAV flies above 45 m high with 4.5 mm lens. A whole field mosaic image can be generated according to the individual image georeferencing information. A 0.569 m mosaic error has been achieved and this accuracy is sufficient for many of the intended precision agricultural applications. With careful interpretation, the UAV images are an excellent source of high spatial and temporal resolution data for precision agricultural applications. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  14. A miniature cryogenic scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer for mid-IR to submm astronomical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parshley, Stephen C.; Vavagiakis, Eve M.; Nikola, Thomas; Stacey, Gordon J.

    2014-07-01

    We have designed and evaluated a Miniature Cryogenic Scanning Fabry-Perot (MCSF) interferometer which can be inserted into the optical path of a mid-IR camera to observe fine structure lines in the 25-40 μm wavelength regime. The MCSF uses free standing metal meshes as its filters and can scan over a length of ~2 mm. The short wavelength range in which the MCSF will be used requires very tight fabrication tolerances to maintain the parallelism of the meshes to within 0.15 μm and to obviate the need for dynamic parallelizing adjusters. A monolithic notch flexure design delivers these properties and minimizes the number of moving parts, maximizing reliability. The scanning mechanism includes a cryogenic stepper motor that drives a miniature fine-adjustment screw via a worm gear assembly. This allows for a step resolution of 1 step ~ 14 nm when operating in full step mode. Finite Element Analysis of the MCSF's monolithic flexure guided the design and confirmed that the MCSF will remain within required limits over the course of operation. We developed the MCSF for use in the mid-IR camera FORCAST on the 2.5 meter SOFIA telescope.

  15. Neuron absorption study and mid-IR optical excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dingkai; Chen, Xing; Vadala, Shilpa; Leach, Jennie; Kostov, Yordan; Bewley, William W.; Kim, Chul-Soo; Kim, Mijin; Canedy, Chadwick L.; Merritt, Charles D.; Vurgaftman, Igor; Meyer, Jerry R.; Choa, Fow-Sen

    2012-02-01

    Neuronal optical excitation can provide non-contacting tools to explore brain circuitry and a durable stimulation interface for cardiac pacing and visual as well as auditory sensory neuronal stimulation. To obtain accurate absorption spectra, we scan the transmission of neurons in cell culture medium, and normalize it by subtracting out the absorption spectrum of the medium alone. The resulting spectra show that the main neuronal absorption peaks are in the 3000- 6000nm band, although there is a smaller peak near 1450nm. By coupling the output of a 3μm interband cascade laser (ICL) into a mid-IR fluorozirconate fiber, we can effectively deliver more than 1J/cm2 photon intensity to the excitation site for neuronal stimulation.

  16. Optimization of mid-IR photothermal imaging for tissue analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totachawattana, Atcha; Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Sander, Michelle Y.

    2015-08-01

    Photothermal imaging in the mid-infrared enables highly sensitive, label-free microscopy by relying on bond-specific characterization of functional groups within the samples. In a pump-probe configuration, the mid-infrared (mid-IR) pump laser is tuned to characteristic vibrational modes and through localized absorption thermal changes in the refractive index are induced. The shorter wavelength probe scatter can be detected with lock-in technology, utilizing highly sensitive detectors at telecommunication wavelengths. This mitigates the need of complex detector technology as required for traditional infrared spectroscopy/Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. The presented photothermal system integrates a high brightness quantum cascade laser that can be tuned continuously over a spectral range of interest with a fiber probe laser. Fiber laser technology features a compact footprint and offers robust performance metrics and reduced sensitivity to environmental perturbations compared to free-space laser configurations. In systematic spectroscopy studies where the probe laser parameters were modified, we demonstrate that the signal-to-noise ratio can be significantly enhanced by utilizing a mode-locked laser compared to a continuous-wave laser. With a raster-scanning approach, photothermal spectroscopy can be extended to hyperspectral label-free mid-infrared imaging to combine spectral content with localized sample details. By tuning the pump laser to the amide-I absorption band around 1650 cm-1 in biological tissue samples, the spectral characteristics can provide insight into the secondary structure of proteins (e.g. amyloid plaques; alpha-helix, beta-sheet). We present the versatility of our mid-IR photothermal system by analyzing histopathological tissue sections of cancerous tissue in a non-contact, non-destructive approach with good sensitivity.

  17. Breath testing with a mid-IR laser spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namjou, Khosrow; McCann, Patrick J.; Potter, William T.

    1999-10-01

    A mid-IR tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) equipped with a multiple-pass gas cell was used to measure breath samples from a number of student volunteers at the University of Oklahoma. Test subjects included one to two pack-a-day cigarette smokers and non-smokers. The concentrations of four different molecules, N2O, 12CO2, 13CO2 and CO, were measured by each laser scan in the 2206.1 cm-1 to 2207 cm-1 spectral range. The average concentration of nitrous oxide (N2O) increased slightly for smokers versus non-smokers and was generally higher (12%) than the approximately 255 ppm concentration measured in ambient air. Carbon monoxide concentrations, however, were much higher in breath samples from cigarette smokers. Ambient concentrations of carbon monoxide, approximately 0.4 ppm, increased from approximately 1.0 ppm in non-smokers to levels over 13.4 ppm in smokers. These measurements provide clear evidence of the well-known effect that cigarette smoking has on replacing oxygen with carbon monoxide in human hemoglobin. Carbon dioxide concentrations of smokers were generally decreased by approximately 12%. Mid-IR laser measurements also provided 13CO2/12CO2 isotope ratio values, and smokers had a approximately 30% greater concentration of isotopic 13C in their breath. The possible mechanisms for 13CO2 isotopic increases are at present unknown. Overall, long-path TDL spectroscopy of exhalation products is a uniquely powerful tool. The TDL systems can be used for noninvasive diagnosis of a wide range of metabolisms and pathologies.

  18. Yb fiber laser pumped mid-IR source based on difference frequency generation and its application to ammonia detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuoka, N.; Yamaguchi, S.; Nanri, K.; Fujioka, T.; Richter, D.; Tittel, F. K.

    2001-01-01

    A Yb fiber laser pumped cw narrow-linewidth tunable mid-IR source based on a difference frequency generation (DFG) in a periodically poled LiNbO3 (PPLN) crystal for trace gas detection was demonstrated. A high power Yb fiber laser and a distributed feedback (DFB) laser diode were used as DFG pump sources. This source generated mid-IR at 3 microns with a powers of 2.5 microW and a spectral linewidth of less than 30 MHz. A frequency tuning range of 300 GHz (10 cm-1) was obtained by varying the current and temperature of the DFB laser diode. A high-resolution NH3 absorption Doppler-broadened spectrum at 3295.4 cm-1 (3.0345 microns) was obtained at a cell pressure of 27 Pa from which a detection sensitivity of 24 ppm m was estimated.

  19. Yb fiber laser pumped mid-IR source based on difference frequency generation and its application to ammonia detection.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, N; Yamaguchi, S; Nanri, K; Fujioka, T; Richter, D; Tittel, F K

    2001-02-01

    A Yb fiber laser pumped cw narrow-linewidth tunable mid-IR source based on a difference frequency generation (DFG) in a periodically poled LiNbO3 (PPLN) crystal for trace gas detection was demonstrated. A high power Yb fiber laser and a distributed feedback (DFB) laser diode were used as DFG pump sources. This source generated mid-IR at 3 microns with a powers of ~2.5 microW and a spectral linewidth of less than 30 MHz. A frequency tuning range of 300 GHz (10 cm-1) was obtained by varying the current and temperature of the DFB laser diode. A high-resolution NH3 absorption Doppler-broadened spectrum at 3295.4 cm-1 (3.0345 microns) was obtained at a cell pressure of 27 Pa from which a detection sensitivity of 24 ppm m was estimated. PMID:11676447

  20. High spatial resolution imaging of methane and other trace gases with the airborne Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulley, Glynn C.; Duren, Riley M.; Hopkins, Francesca M.; Hook, Simon J.; Vance, Nick; Guillevic, Pierre; Johnson, William R.; Eng, Bjorn T.; Mihaly, Jonathan M.; Jovanovic, Veljko M.; Chazanoff, Seth L.; Staniszewski, Zak K.; Kuai, Le; Worden, John; Frankenberg, Christian; Rivera, Gerardo; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Miller, Charles E.; Malakar, Nabin K.; Sánchez Tomás, Juan M.; Holmes, Kendall T.

    2016-06-01

    Currently large uncertainties exist associated with the attribution and quantification of fugitive emissions of criteria pollutants and greenhouse gases such as methane across large regions and key economic sectors. In this study, data from the airborne Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) have been used to develop robust and reliable techniques for the detection and wide-area mapping of emission plumes of methane and other atmospheric trace gas species over challenging and diverse environmental conditions with high spatial resolution that permits direct attribution to sources. HyTES is a pushbroom imaging spectrometer with high spectral resolution (256 bands from 7.5 to 12 µm), wide swath (1-2 km), and high spatial resolution (˜ 2 m at 1 km altitude) that incorporates new thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing technologies. In this study we introduce a hybrid clutter matched filter (CMF) and plume dilation algorithm applied to HyTES observations to efficiently detect and characterize the spatial structures of individual plumes of CH4, H2S, NH3, NO2, and SO2 emitters. The sensitivity and field of regard of HyTES allows rapid and frequent airborne surveys of large areas including facilities not readily accessible from the surface. The HyTES CMF algorithm produces plume intensity images of methane and other gases from strong emission sources. The combination of high spatial resolution and multi-species imaging capability provides source attribution in complex environments. The CMF-based detection of strong emission sources over large areas is a fast and powerful tool needed to focus on more computationally intensive retrieval algorithms to quantify emissions with error estimates, and is useful for expediting mitigation efforts and addressing critical science questions.

  1. Practical Considerations for High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, M; Boyden, K; Browning, N D; Campbell, G H; Colvin, J D; DeHope, B; Frank, A M; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F; Kim, J S; King, W E; LaGrange, T B; Pyke, B J; Reed, B W; Shuttlesworth, R M; Stuart, B C; Torralva, B R

    2006-05-01

    Although recent years have seen significant advances in the spatial resolution possible in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), the temporal resolution of most microscopes is limited to video rate at best. This lack of temporal resolution means that our understanding of dynamic processes in materials is extremely limited. High temporal resolution in the TEM can be achieved, however, by replacing the normal thermionic or field emission source with a photoemission source. In this case the temporal resolution is limited only by the ability to create a short pulse of photoexcited electrons in the source, and this can be as short as a few femtoseconds. The operation of the photo-emission source and the control of the subsequent pulse of electrons (containing as many as 5 x 10{sup 7} electrons) create significant challenges for a standard microscope column that is designed to operate with a single electron in the column at any one time. In this paper, the generation and control of electron pulses in the TEM to obtain a temporal resolution <10{sup -6} s will be described and the effect of the pulse duration and current density on the spatial resolution of the instrument will be examined. The potential of these levels of temporal and spatial resolution for the study of dynamic materials processes will also be discussed.

  2. High spatial resolution recording of near-infrared hologram based on photo-induced phase transition of vanadium dioxide film.

    PubMed

    Sui, Xiubao; Zeng, Junjie; Chen, Qian; Gu, Guohua

    2015-04-01

    We present a method to record near-infrared (NIR) hologram at high spatial resolution. This method up-converts the NIR holograms to visible holograms taking advantage of the photo-induced phase transition characteristic of vanadium dioxide (VO2) material, and subsequently, the visible holograms are recorded by a high-resolution visible CMOS sensor. Obviously the pitch of visible sensor is much smaller than NIR sensors, so our method can extremely increase the recording resolution of NIR holograms. The experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of our method. Our method can improve the viewing angle of NIR holography to observe large-scale objects and shorten the observation distance so that the application area of NIR holography is expanded. It has the potential to become a more effective NIR hologram recording method.

  3. Feasibility study of a high-spatial resolution x-ray computed tomography using sub-pixel shift method

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneyama, Akio Baba, Rika; Sumitani, Kazushi; Hirai, Yasuharu

    2015-02-23

    A high-spatial resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT) adopting a sub-pixel shift method has been developed. By calculating sectional images, using plural CT datasets obtained by scanning the X-ray imager, the spatial resolution can be reduced relative to the sub-pixel size of an X-ray imager. Feasibility observations of a biomedical sample were performed using 12-keV monochromatic synchrotron radiation and a photon-counting X-ray imager 174-μm pixels in size. Four CT measurements were performed to obtain datasets at different positions of the X-ray imager. Fine sectional images were obtained successfully, and the spatial resolution was estimated as 80-μm, which corresponds to just under half the pixel size of the imager. In addition, a fine 3D image was also obtained by scanning the imager two-dimensionally.

  4. Mid-IR Spectra Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Herbig Ae/Be stars are intermediate mass pre-main sequence stars, the higher mass analogues to the T Tauri stars. Because of their higher mass, they are expected form more rapidly than the T Tauri stars. Whether the Herbig Ae/Be stars accrete only from collapsing infalling envelopes or whether accrete through geometrically flattened viscous accretion disks is of current debate. When the Herbig Ae/Be stars reach the main sequence they form a class called Vega-like stars which are known from their IR excesses to have debris disks, such as the famous beta Pictoris. The evolutionary scenario between the pre-main sequence Herbig Ae/Be stars and the main sequence Vega-like stars is not yet revealed and it bears on the possibility of the presence of Habitable Zone planets around the A stars. Photometric studies of Herbig Ae/Be stars have revealed that most are variable in the optical, and a subset of stars show non-periodic drops of about 2 magnitudes. These drops in visible light are accompanied by changes in their colors: at first the starlight becomes reddened, and then it becomes bluer, the polarization goes from less than 0.1 % to roughly 1% during these minima. The theory postulated by V. Grinnin is that large cometary bodies on highly eccentric orbits occult the star on their way to being sublimed, for systems that are viewed edge-on. This theory is one of several controversial theories about the nature of Herbig Ae/Be stars. A 5 year mid-IR spectrophotometric monitoring campaign was begun by Wooden and Butner in 1992 to look for correlations between the variations in visible photometry and mid-IR dust emission features. Generally the approximately 20 stars that have been observed by the NASA Ames HIFOGS spectrometer have been steady at 10 microns. There are a handful, however, that have shown variable mid-IR spectra, with 2 showing variations in both the continuum and features anti-correlated with visual photometry, and 3 showing variations in the emission

  5. Damage detection in a cantilever beam under dynamic conditions using a distributed, fast, and high spatial resolution Brillouin interrogator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motil, A.; Davidi, R.; Bergman, A.; Botsev, Y.; Hahami, M.; Tur, M.

    2016-05-01

    The ability of Brillouin-based fiber-optic sensing to detect damage in a moving cantilever beam is demonstrated. A fully computerized, distributed and high spatial resolution (10cm) Fast-BOTDA interrogator (50 full-beam Brillouin-gain-spectra per second) successfully directly detected an abnormally stiffened (i.e., `damaged') 20cm long segment in a 6m Aluminum beam, while the beam was in motion. Damage detection was based on monitoring deviations of the measured strain distribution along the beam from that expected in the undamaged case.

  6. Imaging at high spatial resolution: Soft x-ray microscopy to 15nm

    SciTech Connect

    Attwood, D.; Chao, W.; Anderson, E.; Liddle, J.A.; Harteneck, B.; Fischer, P.; Schneider, G.; Le Gros, M.; Larabell, C.

    2006-04-05

    Soft x-ray microscopy has now achieved 15 nm spatial resolution with new zone plates and bending magnet radiation. Combined with elemental sensitivity and flexible sample environment (applied magnetic or electric fields, wet samples, windows, overcoatings) this emerges as a valuable tool for nanoscience and nanotechnology, complimenting common electron and scanning tip microscopies. In this presentation we describe recent advances in spatial resolution, expectations for the near future, and applications to magnetic materials, bio-tomography, etc.

  7. High Spatial Resolution Soil Moisture with Passive Active Sensors Using a Change Detection Approach: Studies Using SMAPVEX12 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, B.; Lakshmi, V.; Bindlish, R.; Jackson, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    Soil moisture is an important variable in many areas of geosciences. The passive microwave sensors have been providing soil moisture of various spatial resolutions and are available for all-weather conditions. However, restricted by the antenna diameter of microwave radiometer, the spatial resolution of passive microwave soil moisture product is at tens of kilometers and needs to be improved for many applications. The SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) is set to be launched in late 2014 and will be the first mission to provide L-band radar/radiometer soil moisture retrievals at three resolutions. The SMAPVEX12 is a pre-launch field validation experiment for evaluating and testing the soil moisture retrievals acquired from SMAP satellite. Airborne data using PALS (Passive/Active L-band Sensor) at two along-track resolutions (650 m and 1590 m) and UAVSAR (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar) at 5 m spatial resolution as well as in-situ measurements were collected during the campaign. The study will implement a Single Channel Algorithm (SCA) to retrieve soil moisture from high/low altitude PALS L-band radiometer observations, as well as produce downscaled soil moisture change by combining low spatial resolution soil moisture retrievals and high spatial resolution PALS L-band radar observations through a change-detection algorithm, which models the relationship between change in radar backscatter and the change in soil moisture.

  8. fMRI at High Spatial Resolution: Implications for BOLD-Models.

    PubMed

    Goense, Jozien; Bohraus, Yvette; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2016-01-01

    As high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and fMRI of cortical layers become more widely used, the question how well high-resolution fMRI signals reflect the underlying neural processing, and how to interpret laminar fMRI data becomes more and more relevant. High-resolution fMRI has shown laminar differences in cerebral blood flow (CBF), volume (CBV), and neurovascular coupling. Features and processes that were previously lumped into a single voxel become spatially distinct at high resolution. These features can be vascular compartments such as veins, arteries, and capillaries, or cortical layers and columns, which can have differences in metabolism. Mesoscopic models of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response therefore need to be expanded, for instance, to incorporate laminar differences in the coupling between neural activity, metabolism and the hemodynamic response. Here we discuss biological and methodological factors that affect the modeling and interpretation of high-resolution fMRI data. We also illustrate with examples from neuropharmacology and the negative BOLD response how combining BOLD with CBF- and CBV-based fMRI methods can provide additional information about neurovascular coupling, and can aid modeling and interpretation of high-resolution fMRI.

  9. fMRI at High Spatial Resolution: Implications for BOLD-Models

    PubMed Central

    Goense, Jozien; Bohraus, Yvette; Logothetis, Nikos K.

    2016-01-01

    As high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and fMRI of cortical layers become more widely used, the question how well high-resolution fMRI signals reflect the underlying neural processing, and how to interpret laminar fMRI data becomes more and more relevant. High-resolution fMRI has shown laminar differences in cerebral blood flow (CBF), volume (CBV), and neurovascular coupling. Features and processes that were previously lumped into a single voxel become spatially distinct at high resolution. These features can be vascular compartments such as veins, arteries, and capillaries, or cortical layers and columns, which can have differences in metabolism. Mesoscopic models of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response therefore need to be expanded, for instance, to incorporate laminar differences in the coupling between neural activity, metabolism and the hemodynamic response. Here we discuss biological and methodological factors that affect the modeling and interpretation of high-resolution fMRI data. We also illustrate with examples from neuropharmacology and the negative BOLD response how combining BOLD with CBF- and CBV-based fMRI methods can provide additional information about neurovascular coupling, and can aid modeling and interpretation of high-resolution fMRI. PMID:27445782

  10. fMRI at High Spatial Resolution: Implications for BOLD-Models.

    PubMed

    Goense, Jozien; Bohraus, Yvette; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2016-01-01

    As high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and fMRI of cortical layers become more widely used, the question how well high-resolution fMRI signals reflect the underlying neural processing, and how to interpret laminar fMRI data becomes more and more relevant. High-resolution fMRI has shown laminar differences in cerebral blood flow (CBF), volume (CBV), and neurovascular coupling. Features and processes that were previously lumped into a single voxel become spatially distinct at high resolution. These features can be vascular compartments such as veins, arteries, and capillaries, or cortical layers and columns, which can have differences in metabolism. Mesoscopic models of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response therefore need to be expanded, for instance, to incorporate laminar differences in the coupling between neural activity, metabolism and the hemodynamic response. Here we discuss biological and methodological factors that affect the modeling and interpretation of high-resolution fMRI data. We also illustrate with examples from neuropharmacology and the negative BOLD response how combining BOLD with CBF- and CBV-based fMRI methods can provide additional information about neurovascular coupling, and can aid modeling and interpretation of high-resolution fMRI. PMID:27445782

  11. High spatial resolution upgrade of the electron cyclotron emission radiometer for the DIII-D tokamak.

    PubMed

    Truong, D D; Austin, M E

    2014-11-01

    The 40-channel DIII-D electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer provides measurements of Te(r,t) at the tokamak midplane from optically thick, second harmonic X-mode emission over a frequency range of 83-130 GHz. The frequency spacing of the radiometer's channels results in a spatial resolution of ∼1-3 cm, depending on local magnetic field and electron temperature. A new high resolution subsystem has been added to the DIII-D ECE radiometer to make sub-centimeter (0.6-0.8 cm) resolution Te measurements. The high resolution subsystem branches off from the regular channels' IF bands and consists of a microwave switch to toggle between IF bands, a switched filter bank for frequency selectivity, an adjustable local oscillator and mixer for further frequency down-conversion, and a set of eight microwave filters in the 2-4 GHz range. Higher spatial resolution is achieved through the use of a narrower (200 MHz) filter bandwidth and closer spacing between the filters' center frequencies (250 MHz). This configuration allows for full coverage of the 83-130 GHz frequency range in 2 GHz bands. Depending on the local magnetic field, this translates into a "zoomed-in" analysis of a ∼2-4 cm radial region. Expected uses of these channels include mapping the spatial dependence of Alfven eigenmodes, geodesic acoustic modes, and externally applied magnetic perturbations. Initial Te measurements, which demonstrate that the desired resolution is achieved, are presented.

  12. Object Based Image Analysis Combining High Spatial Resolution Imagery and Laser Point Clouds for Urban Land Cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Xiaoliang; Zhao, Guihua; Li, Jonathan; Yang, Yuanxi; Fang, Yong

    2016-06-01

    With the rapid developments of the sensor technology, high spatial resolution imagery and airborne Lidar point clouds can be captured nowadays, which make classification, extraction, evaluation and analysis of a broad range of object features available. High resolution imagery, Lidar dataset and parcel map can be widely used for classification as information carriers. Therefore, refinement of objects classification is made possible for the urban land cover. The paper presents an approach to object based image analysis (OBIA) combing high spatial resolution imagery and airborne Lidar point clouds. The advanced workflow for urban land cover is designed with four components. Firstly, colour-infrared TrueOrtho photo and laser point clouds were pre-processed to derive the parcel map of water bodies and nDSM respectively. Secondly, image objects are created via multi-resolution image segmentation integrating scale parameter, the colour and shape properties with compactness criterion. Image can be subdivided into separate object regions. Thirdly, image objects classification is performed on the basis of segmentation and a rule set of knowledge decision tree. These objects imagery are classified into six classes such as water bodies, low vegetation/grass, tree, low building, high building and road. Finally, in order to assess the validity of the classification results for six classes, accuracy assessment is performed through comparing randomly distributed reference points of TrueOrtho imagery with the classification results, forming the confusion matrix and calculating overall accuracy and Kappa coefficient. The study area focuses on test site Vaihingen/Enz and a patch of test datasets comes from the benchmark of ISPRS WG III/4 test project. The classification results show higher overall accuracy for most types of urban land cover. Overall accuracy is 89.5% and Kappa coefficient equals to 0.865. The OBIA approach provides an effective and convenient way to combine high

  13. High-spatial-resolution mapping of precipitable water vapour using SAR interferograms, GPS observations and ERA-Interim reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wei; Liao, Mingsheng; Zhang, Lu; Li, Wei; Yu, Weimin

    2016-09-01

    A high spatial and temporal resolution of the precipitable water vapour (PWV) in the atmosphere is a key requirement for the short-scale weather forecasting and climate research. The aim of this work is to derive temporally differenced maps of the spatial distribution of PWV by analysing the tropospheric delay "noise" in interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). Time series maps of differential PWV were obtained by processing a set of ENVISAT ASAR (Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar) images covering the area of southern California, USA from 6 October 2007 to 29 November 2008. To get a more accurate PWV, the component of hydrostatic delay was calculated and subtracted by using ERA-Interim reanalysis products. In addition, the ERA-Interim was used to compute the conversion factors required to convert the zenith wet delay to water vapour. The InSAR-derived differential PWV maps were calibrated by means of the GPS PWV measurements over the study area. We validated our results against the measurements of PWV derived from the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) which was located together with the ASAR sensor on board the ENVISAT satellite. Our comparative results show strong spatial correlations between the two data sets. The difference maps have Gaussian distributions with mean values close to zero and standard deviations below 2 mm. The advantage of the InSAR technique is that it provides water vapour distribution with a spatial resolution as fine as 20 m and an accuracy of ˜ 2 mm. Such high-spatial-resolution maps of PWV could lead to much greater accuracy in meteorological understanding and quantitative precipitation forecasts. With the launch of Sentinel-1A and Sentinel-1B satellites, every few days (6 days) new SAR images can be acquired with a wide swath up to 250 km, enabling a unique operational service for InSAR-based water vapour maps with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution.

  14. Study of mid IR fiber transmission and mode patterns under laser induced stimulated Brillouin scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C.; Chong, Yat C.; Zhou, Hongyi

    1990-01-01

    Mid IR fiber transmission and exit radiation mode patterns at various incident CO2 laser power levels appear to be effective diagnostic tools for monitoring laser induced stimulated Brillouin scattering in various mid IR fibers. Such processes are deemed to be essential mechanisms for fiber-optic amplifiers and switches as potential replacements of current repeaters and bistable devices.

  15. HIGH SPATIAL-RESOLUTION IMAGING OF TE INCLUSIONS IN CZT MATERIAL.

    SciTech Connect

    CAMARDA, G.S.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CARINI, G.A.; CUI, Y.; KOHMAN, K.T.; LI, L.; JAMES, R.B.

    2006-08-13

    We present new results from our studies of defects in current single-crystal CdZnTe material. Our previous measurements, carried out on thin ({approx}1 mm) and long (>12 mm) CZT detectors, indicated that small (1-20 {micro}m) Te inclusions can significantly degrade the device's energy resolution and detection efficiency. We are conducting detailed studies of the effects of Te inclusions by employing different characterization techniques with better spatial resolution, such as quantitative fluorescence mapping, X-ray micro-diffraction, and TEM. Also, IR microscopy and gamma-mapping with pulse-shape analysis with higher spatial resolution generated more accurate results in the areas surrounding the micro-defects (Te inclusions). Our results reveal how the performance of CdZnTe detectors is influenced by Te inclusions, such as their spatial distribution, concentration, and size. We also discuss a model of charge transport through areas populated with Te inclusions.

  16. The analysis of high spatial resolution UV and X-ray images by computational modeling. [coronagraphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vesecky, J. F.; Antiochos, S. K.; Underwood, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Very high resolution stereoscopic images of high temperature loop structures observed at UV and X-ray wavelengths in the solar corona can be used to understand physical processes in the corona. An existing computational model is described and sample results are given to demonstrate that computational modeling of coronal structures can indeed take advantage of very high resolution images. The sample results include the run of temperature and number density along a typical loop and the variation of the differential emission measure with temperature. The integration of the differential emission measure with temperature along a column commensurate with an instrument's spatial resolution is the relevant parameter obtained from UV and X-ray observations. The effects of loop geometry and energy input are examined.

  17. Evidencing the need for high spatial resolution in angle-resolved photoemission experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joucken, Frédéric; Reckinger, Nicolas; Lorcy, Stéphane; Avila, José; Chen, Chaoyu; Lagoute, Jérôme; Colomer, Jean-François; Ghijsen, Jacques; Asensio, Maria Carmen; Sporken, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) is the most direct tool to measure the electronic structure of materials. In particular, fine features of the spectra can be analyzed for evaluating the electron self-energy. Owing to a setup allowing ARPES investigation with submicron resolution and state-of-the-art energy and momentum resolution, we show here first that ARPES spectra of pristine and virtually undoped monolayer graphene acquired on a small spot do not display manifestations of self-energy. We next demonstrate that, although the region of the sample investigated is a unique graphene domain, it displays faint spatial inhomogeneity, both in its crystallographic orientation and its thickness, which is undetectable with conventional ARPES but renders the spectra improper for self-energy extraction. These results indicate that care should be taken when analyzing ARPES spectra obtained with poor spatial resolution.

  18. High spatial resolution distributed sensing in optical fibers by Brillouin gain-profile tracing.

    PubMed

    Sperber, Tom; Eyal, Avishay; Tur, Moshe; Thévenaz, Luc

    2010-04-12

    A novel BOTDA technique for distributed sensing of the Brillouin frequency in optical fibers with cm-order spatial resolution is proposed. The technique is based upon a simple modulation scheme, requiring only a single long pump pulse for acoustic excitation, and no subsequent interrogating pulse. Instead, the desired spatial mapping of the Brillouin response is extracted by taking the derivative of the probe signal. As a result, the spatial resolution is limited by the fall-time of the pump modulation, and the phenomena of secondary "echo" signals, typically appearing in BOTDA sensing methods based upon pre-excitation, is mitigated. Experimental demonstration of the detection of a Brillouin frequency variation significantly smaller than the natural Brillouin linewidth, with a 2cm spatial resolution, is presented.

  19. High spatial resolution upgrade of the electron cyclotron emission radiometer for the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, D. D.; Austin, M. E.

    2014-11-15

    The 40-channel DIII-D electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer provides measurements of T{sub e}(r,t) at the tokamak midplane from optically thick, second harmonic X-mode emission over a frequency range of 83–130 GHz. The frequency spacing of the radiometer's channels results in a spatial resolution of ∼1–3 cm, depending on local magnetic field and electron temperature. A new high resolution subsystem has been added to the DIII-D ECE radiometer to make sub-centimeter (0.6–0.8 cm) resolution T{sub e} measurements. The high resolution subsystem branches off from the regular channels’ IF bands and consists of a microwave switch to toggle between IF bands, a switched filter bank for frequency selectivity, an adjustable local oscillator and mixer for further frequency down-conversion, and a set of eight microwave filters in the 2–4 GHz range. Higher spatial resolution is achieved through the use of a narrower (200 MHz) filter bandwidth and closer spacing between the filters’ center frequencies (250 MHz). This configuration allows for full coverage of the 83–130 GHz frequency range in 2 GHz bands. Depending on the local magnetic field, this translates into a “zoomed-in” analysis of a ∼2–4 cm radial region. Expected uses of these channels include mapping the spatial dependence of Alfven eigenmodes, geodesic acoustic modes, and externally applied magnetic perturbations. Initial T{sub e} measurements, which demonstrate that the desired resolution is achieved, are presented.

  20. Mid-IR enhanced laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Staci; Ford, Alan; Akpovo, Codjo A.; Johnson, Lewis

    2016-08-01

    A double-pulsed laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) technique utilizing wavelengths in the mid-infrared (MIR) for the second pulse, referred to as double-pulse LAMIS (DP-LAMIS), was examined for its effect on detection limits compared to single-pulse laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS). A MIR carbon dioxide (CO2) laser pulse at 10.6 μm was employed to enhance spectral emissions from nanosecond-laser-induced plasma via mid-IR reheating and in turn, improve the determination of the relative abundance of isotopes in a sample. This technique was demonstrated on a collection of 10BO and 11BO molecular spectra created from enriched boric acid (H3BO3) isotopologues in varying concentrations. Effects on the overall ability of both LAMIS and DP-LAMIS to detect the relative abundance of boron isotopes in a starting sample were considered. Least-squares fitting to theoretical models was used to deduce plasma parameters and understand reproducibility of results. Furthermore, some optimization for conditions of the enhanced emission was achieved, along with a comparison of the overall emission intensity, plasma density, and plasma temperature generated by the two techniques.

  1. Optically based quantification of absolute cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) with high spatial resolution in rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Sakadžić, Sava; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Boas, David A.

    2010-02-01

    Measuring oxygen delivery in brain tissue is important for identifying the pathophysiological changes associated with brain injury and various diseases such as cancer, stroke, and Alzheimer's disease. We have developed a multi-modal imaging system for minimally invasive measurement of cerebral oxygenation and blood flow in small animals with high spatial resolution. The system allows for simultaneous measurement of blood flow using Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography, and oxygen partial pressure (pO2) using either confocal or multiphoton phosphorescence lifetime imaging with exogenous porphyrin-based dyes sensitive to dissolved oxygen. Here we present the changes in pO2 and blood flow in superficial cortical vessels of Sprague Dawley rats in response to conditions such as hypoxia, hyperoxia, and functional stimulation. pO2 measurements display considerable heterogeneity over distances that cannot be resolved with more widely used oxygen-monitoring techniques such as BOLD-fMRI. Large increases in blood flow are observed in response to functional stimulation and hypoxia. Our system allows for quantification of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) with high spatial resolution, providing a better understanding of metabolic dynamics during functional stimulation and under various neuropathologies. Ultimately, better insight into the underlying mechanisms of neuropathologies will facilitate the development of improved therapeutic strategies to minimize damage to brain tissue.

  2. Visualization and quantification of whole rat heart laminar structure using high-spatial resolution contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Stephen H; Benoist, David; Benson, Alan P; White, Ed; Tanner, Steven F; Holden, Arun V; Dobrzynski, Halina; Bernus, Olivier; Radjenovic, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown by histology that cardiac myocytes are organized into laminae and this structure is important in function, both influencing the spread of electrical activation and enabling myocardial thickening in systole by laminar sliding. We have carried out high-spatial resolution three-dimensional MRI of the ventricular myolaminae of the entire volume of the isolated rat heart after contrast perfusion [dimeglumine gadopentate (Gd-DTPA)]. Four ex vivo rat hearts were perfused with Gd-DTPA and fixative and high-spatial resolution MRI was performed on a 9.4T MRI system. After MRI, cryosectioning followed by histology was performed. Images from MRI and histology were aligned, described, and quantitatively compared. In the three-dimensional MR images we directly show the presence of laminae and demonstrate that these are highly branching and are absent from much of the subepicardium. We visualized these MRI volumes to demonstrate laminar architecture and quantitatively demonstrated that the structural features observed are similar to those imaged in histology. We showed qualitatively and quantitatively that laminar architecture is similar in the four hearts. MRI can be used to image the laminar architecture of ex vivo hearts in three dimensions, and the images produced are qualitatively and quantitatively comparable with histology. We have demonstrated in the rat that: 1) laminar architecture is consistent between hearts; 2) myolaminae are absent from much of the subepicardium; and 3) although localized orthotropy is present throughout the myocardium, tracked myolaminae are branching structures and do not have a discrete identity.

  3. Use of UAS remote sensing data to estimate crop ET at high spatial resolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estimation of the spatial distribution of evapotranspiration (ET) based on remotely sensed imagery has become useful for managing water in irrigated agricultural at various spatial scales. However, data acquired by conventional satellites (Landsat, ASTER, etc.) lack the spatial resolution to capture...

  4. Theoretical motivation for high spatial resolution, hard X-ray observations during solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.

    1986-01-01

    The important role played by hard X-ray radiation as a diagnostic of impulsive phase energy transport mechanism is reviewed. It is argued that the sub-arc second resolution offered by an instrument such as the Pinhole/Occulter Facility (P/OF) can greatly increase our understanding of such mechanisms.

  5. Spatial Classification of Orchards and Vineyards with High Spatial Resolution Panchromatic Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Timothy; Steinmaus, Karen L.

    2005-02-01

    New high resolution single spectral band imagery offers the capability to conduct image classifications based on spatial patterns in imagery. A classification algorithm based on autocorrelation patterns was developed to automatically extract orchards and vineyards from satellite imagery. The algorithm was tested on IKONOS imagery over Granger, WA, which resulted in a classification accuracy of 95%.

  6. Mapping Mercury's Surface Composition at High Spatial Resolution with the MESSENGER X-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittler, L. R.; Weider, S. Z.; Starr, R. D.; Vorburger, A.; Solomon, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Previous global maps of Mg/Si and Al/Si and partial maps of S/Si, Ca/Si, and Fe/Si on Mercury's surface derived from orbital data acquired by the MESSENGER X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) have been highly variable in resolution because of MESSENGER's eccentric orbit and high northern periapsis. The typical spatial resolution at northern latitudes in earlier maps was 200-500 km, a scale that allowed large geochemical terranes to be defined and chemical measurements to be made of features hundreds of kilometers in extent, but so far there have been very few analyses at smaller scales. MESSENGER is now orbiting at the lowest periapsis altitudes so far in the mission, and XRS measurements can thus be made at substantially improved resolution. For example, measurements with resolutions <100 km constituted 1% of the northern-hemisphere observations that were used to make the previous maps, but they make up 31% of those obtained in May and June of 2014. Preliminary analysis of these higher-resolution XRS data confirms the broad-scale geochemical features that have already been identified, but also reveals smaller-scale chemical heterogeneities. For instance, targeted XRS measurements indicate that the high-reflectance smooth plains deposit, about 125 km in extent, at the center of the Rachmaninoff basin has Mg/Si=0.6, higher than for other smooth plains deposits with similar reflectance characteristics (for which Mg/Si is typically <0.4), but similar to the darker material surrounding the unit. Although the high-resolution maps that we continue to generate have limited coverage, they reveal substantial chemical heterogeneity at the 100-km scale both within the northern volcanic plains and within the large high-Mg region that has been previously identified. In many cases, the chemical heterogeneity we observe is closely associated with spatial variations in spectral reflectance properties. Continued observations at ever lower altitudes will allow chemical mapping on Mercury at

  7. High spatial resolution characterization of silicon solar cells using thermoreflectance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiaoer; Hu, Xiaolin; Al-Hemyari, Kadhair; McCarthy, Kevin; Domash, Lawrence; Hudgings, Janice A.

    2011-09-01

    Thermoreflectance imaging is shown to be a high resolution, non-contact method of quantitatively characterizing device performance and identifying electrical shunts in conventional multicrystalline silicon solar cells. Results are in quantitative agreement with a commercial lock-in infrared thermography system but offer an order of magnitude improvement in spatial resolution. Highly resolved thermoreflectance imaging enables extraction of quantitative, spatially resolved device performance characteristics, including local IV curves and local diode ideality factors, offering detailed physical characterization of performance-limiting defects that cannot be obtained from conventional bulk cell testing. Finally, thermoreflectance maps of heat spreading from a point defect provide a simple means of quantifying thermal parameters such as thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity, which are key field performance indicators.

  8. Cryo X-ray microscopy with high spatial resolution in amplitude and phase contrast.

    PubMed

    Schneider, G

    1998-11-01

    The resolution of transmission X-ray microscopes (TXMs) using zone plate optics is presently about 30 nm. Theory and experiments presented here show that this resolution can be obtained in radiation sensitive hydrated biological material by using shock frozen samples. For this purpose the interaction of X-rays with matter and the image formation with zone plates is described. For the first time the influence of the limited apertures of the condenser and the zone plate objective are in included in calculations of the image contrast, the photon density and radiation dose required for the object illumination. Model considerations show that lowest radiation dose and high image contrast are obtained in optimized phase contrast which exploits absorption as well as phase shift. The damaging effect of the absorbed X-rays is quantitatively evaluated by radiation-induced kinetics showing that cryogenic samples are structurally stable. To verify these theoretical models the TXM was modified to allow imaging of frozen-hydrated samples at atmospheric pressure. Details inside cells and algae as small as 35 nm are visible at 2.4 nm wavelength in amplitude contrast mode. At this resolution the cryogenic samples show no structural changes. As predicted, optimized phase contrast shows structures inside the frozen-hydrated objects with high contrast. Stereo-pair images of algae reveal the 3D organization of the organelles. Element analysis and micro-tomography of whole cryogenic cells are possible. PMID:9836467

  9. High Spatial Resolution Europa Coverage by the Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The NIMS instrument on the Galileo spacecraft, which is being used to map the mineral and ice properties over the surfaces of the Jovian moons, produces global spectral images at modest spatial resolution and high resolution spectral images for small selected regions on the satellites. This map illustrates the high resolution coverage of Europa obtained by NIMS through the April 1997 G7 orbit.

    The areas covered are displayed on a Voyager-derived map. A good sampling of the dark trailing-side material (180 to 360 degrees) has been obtained, with less coverage of Europa's leading side.

    The false-color composites use red, green and blue to represent the infrared brightnesses at 0.7, 1.51 and 1.82 microns respectively. Considerable variations are evident and are related to the composition and sizes of the surface grains.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  10. Use of High Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing for Hydro-Geomorphologic Analysis of Medium-sized Arid Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeh, Yuval; Blumberg, Dan G.; Cohen, Hai; Morin, Efrat; Maman, Shimrit

    2016-04-01

    Arid environments are often remote, expansive, difficult to access and especially vulnerable to flash flood hazards due to the poor understanding of the phenomenon and the lack of meteorological, geomorphological, and hydrological data. For many years, catchment characteristics have been observed using point-based measurements such as rain gauges and soil sample analysis; on the other hand, use of remote sensing technologies can provide spatially continuous hydrological parameters and variables. The advances in remote sensing technologies can provide new geo-spatial data using high spatial and temporal resolution for basin-scale geomorphological analysis and hydrological models. This study used high spatial resolution remote sensing for hydro-geomorphologic analysis of the arid medium size Rahaf watershed (76 km2), located in the Judean Desert, Israel. During the research a high resolution geomorphological map of Rahaf basin was created using WorldView-2 multispectral satellite imageries; surface roughness was estimated using SIR-C and COSMO-SkyMed Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) spaceborne sensors; and rainstorm characteristics were extracted using ground-based meteorological radar. The geomorphological mapping of Rahaf into 17 classes with good accuracy. The surface roughness extraction using SAR over the basin showed that the correlation between the COSMO-SkyMed backscatter coefficient and the surface roughness was very strong with an R2 of 0.97. This study showed that using x-band spaceborne sensors with high spatial resolution, such as COSMO-SkyMed, are more suitable for surface roughness evaluation in flat arid environments and should be in favor with longer wavelength operating sensors such as the SIR-C. The current study presents an innovative method to evaluate Manning's hydraulic roughness coefficient (n) in arid environments using radar backscattering. The weather radar rainfall data was calibrated using rain gauges located in the watershed. The

  11. Implementation of a Gaussian beam laser and aspheric optics for high spatial resolution MALDI imaging MS.

    PubMed

    Zavalin, Andre; Yang, Junhai; Haase, Andreas; Holle, Armin; Caprioli, Richard

    2014-06-01

    We have investigated the use of a Gaussian beam laser for MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry to provide a precisely defined laser spot of 5 μm diameter on target using a commercial MALDI TOF instrument originally designed to produce a 20 μm diameter laser beam spot at its smallest setting. A Gaussian beam laser was installed in the instrument in combination with an aspheric focusing lens. This ion source produced sharp ion images at 5 μm spatial resolution with signals of high intensity as shown for images from thin tissue sections of mouse brain.

  12. Matrix Recrystallization for MALDI-MS Imaging of Maize Lipids at High-Spatial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueñas, Maria Emilia; Carlucci, Laura; Lee, Young Jin

    2016-09-01

    Matrix recrystallization is optimized and applied to improve lipid ion signals in maize embryos and leaves. A systematic study was performed varying solvent and incubation time. During this study, unexpected side reactions were found when methanol was used as a recrystallization solvent, resulting in the formation of a methyl ester of phosphatidic acid. Using an optimum recrystallization condition with isopropanol, there is no apparent delocalization demonstrated with a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) pattern and maize leaf images obtained at 10 μm spatial resolution.

  13. Magnetic resonance microscopy of chemically fixed human embryos at high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Otake, Yosuke; Handa, Shinya; Kose, Katsumi; Shiota, Kohei; Yamada, Shigehito; Uwabe, Chigako

    2015-01-01

    We acquired magnetic resonance (MR) microscopic images of chemically fixed human embryos of Carnegie stages 16 to 22 with a large image matrix (256 × 256 × 512) using an MR microscope that we developed with a 9.4-tesla vertical wide-bore superconducting magnet and a dual-channel receiver system to extend the dynamic range of the MR signal. The images showed clear anatomical structures at spatial resolutions of (40 µm)(3) to (60 µm)(3). We concluded that the experimental technique we developed will aid construction of the next anatomical database of the collection of chemically fixed human embryos. PMID:25740236

  14. Matrix recrystallization for MALDI-MS imaging of maize lipids at high-spatial resolution

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Duenas, Maria Emilia; Carlucci, Laura; Lee, Young Jin

    2016-06-27

    Matrix recrystallization is optimized and applied to improve lipid ion signals in maize embryos and leaves. A systematic study was performed varying solvent and incubation time. During this study, unexpected side reactions were found when methanol was used as a recrystallization solvent, resulting in the formation of a methyl ester of phosphatidic acid. Furthermore, using an optimum recrystallization condition with isopropanol, there is no apparent delocalization demonstrated with a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) pattern and maize leaf images obtained at 10 μm spatial resolution.

  15. Matrix Recrystallization for MALDI-MS Imaging of Maize Lipids at High-Spatial Resolution.

    PubMed

    Dueñas, Maria Emilia; Carlucci, Laura; Lee, Young Jin

    2016-09-01

    Matrix recrystallization is optimized and applied to improve lipid ion signals in maize embryos and leaves. A systematic study was performed varying solvent and incubation time. During this study, unexpected side reactions were found when methanol was used as a recrystallization solvent, resulting in the formation of a methyl ester of phosphatidic acid. Using an optimum recrystallization condition with isopropanol, there is no apparent delocalization demonstrated with a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) pattern and maize leaf images obtained at 10 μm spatial resolution. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  16. Implementation of a Gaussian Beam Laser and Aspheric Optics for High Spatial Resolution MALDI Imaging MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavalin, Andre; Yang, Junhai; Haase, Andreas; Holle, Armin; Caprioli, Richard

    2014-06-01

    We have investigated the use of a Gaussian beam laser for MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry to provide a precisely defined laser spot of 5 μm diameter on target using a commercial MALDI TOF instrument originally designed to produce a 20 μm diameter laser beam spot at its smallest setting. A Gaussian beam laser was installed in the instrument in combination with an aspheric focusing lens. This ion source produced sharp ion images at 5 μm spatial resolution with signals of high intensity as shown for images from thin tissue sections of mouse brain.

  17. High spatial and temporal resolution charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the HL-2A tokamak.

    PubMed

    Wei, Y L; Yu, D L; Liu, L; Ida, K; von Hellermann, M; Cao, J Y; Sun, A P; Ma, Q; Chen, W J; Liu, Yi; Yan, L W; Yang, Q W; Duan, X R; Liu, Yong

    2014-10-01

    A 32/64-channel charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostic system is developed on the HL-2A tokamak (R = 1.65 m, a = 0.4 m), monitoring plasma ion temperature and toroidal rotation velocity simultaneously. A high throughput spectrometer (F/2.8) and a pitch-controlled fiber bundle enable the temporal resolution of the system up to 400 Hz. The observation geometry and an optimized optic system enable the highest radial resolution up to ∼1 cm at the plasma edge. The CXRS system monitors the carbon line emission (C VI, n = 8-7, 529.06 nm) whose Doppler broadening and Doppler shift provide ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity during the neutral beam injection. The composite CX spectral data are analyzed by the atomic data and analysis structure charge exchange spectroscopy fitting (ADAS CXSFIT) code. First experimental results are shown for the case of HL-2A plasmas with sawtooth oscillations, electron cyclotron resonance heating, and edge transport barrier during the high-confinement mode (H-mode).

  18. High spatial and temporal resolution charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the HL-2A tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y. L.; Yu, D. L.; Liu, L.; Ida, K.; von Hellermann, M.; Cao, J. Y.; Sun, A. P.; Ma, Q.; Chen, W. J.; Liu, Yi; Yan, L. W.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Liu, Yong

    2014-10-01

    A 32/64-channel charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostic system is developed on the HL-2A tokamak (R = 1.65 m, a = 0.4 m), monitoring plasma ion temperature and toroidal rotation velocity simultaneously. A high throughput spectrometer (F/2.8) and a pitch-controlled fiber bundle enable the temporal resolution of the system up to 400 Hz. The observation geometry and an optimized optic system enable the highest radial resolution up to ˜1 cm at the plasma edge. The CXRS system monitors the carbon line emission (C VI, n = 8-7, 529.06 nm) whose Doppler broadening and Doppler shift provide ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity during the neutral beam injection. The composite CX spectral data are analyzed by the atomic data and analysis structure charge exchange spectroscopy fitting (ADAS CXSFIT) code. First experimental results are shown for the case of HL-2A plasmas with sawtooth oscillations, electron cyclotron resonance heating, and edge transport barrier during the high-confinement mode (H-mode).

  19. A Global Climate Model Agent for High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Data

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Lynn S.; Daily, Jeffrey A.; Henry, Michael J.; Palmer, Bruce J.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Dazlich, Donald A.; Heikes, Ross P.; Randall, David

    2015-02-01

    Fine cell granularity in modern climate models can produce terabytes of data in each snapshot, causing significant I/O overhead. To address this issue, a method of reducing the I/O latency of high-resolution climate models by identifying and selectively outputting regions of interest is presented. Working with a Global Cloud Resolving Model and running with up to 10240 processors on a Cray XE6, this method provides significant I/O bandwidth reduction depending on the frequency of writes and size of the region of interest. The implementation challenges of determining global parameters in a strictly core-localized model and properly formatting output files that only contain subsections of the global grid are addressed, as well as the overall bandwidth impact and benefits of the method. The gains in I/O throughput provided by this method allow dual output rates for high-resolution climate models: a low-frequency global snapshot as well as a high-frequency regional snapshot when events of particular interest occur.

  20. Optical and radar analysis of auroral curls at high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlgren, Hanna; Kaila, Kari; Ivchenko, Nickolay; Lanchester, Betty; Whiter, Daniel; Marklund, Göran; Aikio, Anita

    Auroral arcs can develop small-scale distortions known as vortex streets or curls. Optical ground-based observations of this phenomenon have indicated that curls are often associated with shear flows. For a comprehensive analysis of the temporal and spatial characteristics associated with the formation and evolution of curls, high resolution optical measurements are required. We report here on an event study of an arc evolving into curls and associated with counter-streaming structures, observed on 23 November 2006 by ground-based optical instrumentation and measured by the European Incoherent Scatter Radar (EISCAT) located outside Tromso, Norway. The optical Instrumentation consisted of three, narrow field-of-view (3 deg x 3 deg) imagers (Auroral Structure and Kinetics), each equipped with different passband filters, together with a white light video camera (FOV: 45 deg x 60 deg, 25 Hz) providing the large-scale context of the event. The temporal evolution of the smallest structures was recorded at a time resolution of 20 Hz. Shear velocities between the center and the edge of the arc are investigated, and the origin and evolution of the observed small-scale auroral features are discussed in the light of existing theories.

  1. Helium beam shadowing for high spatial resolution patterning of antibodies on microstructured diagnostic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cacao, Eliedonna; Sherlock, Tim; Nasrullah, Azeem; Kemper, Steven; Knoop, Jennifer; Kourentzi, Katerina; Ruchhoeft, Paul; Stein, Gila E; Atmar, Robert L; Willson, Richard C

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a technique for the high-resolution, self-aligning, and high-throughput patterning of antibody binding functionality on surfaces by selectively changing the reactivity of protein-coated surfaces in specific regions of a workpiece with a beam of energetic helium particles. The exposed areas are passivated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and no longer bind the antigen. We demonstrate that patterns can be formed (1) by using a stencil mask with etched openings that forms a patterned exposure, or (2) by using angled exposure to cast shadows of existing raised microstructures on the surface to form self-aligned patterns. We demonstrate the efficacy of this process through the patterning of anti-lysozyme, anti-Norwalk virus, and anti-Escherichia coli antibodies and the subsequent detection of each of their targets by the enzyme-mediated formation of colored or silver deposits, and also by binding of gold nanoparticles. The process allows for the patterning of three-dimensional structures by inclining the sample relative to the beam so that the shadowed regions remain unaltered. We demonstrate that the resolution of the patterning process is of the order of hundreds of nanometers, and that the approach is well-suited for high throughput patterning. PMID:24706125

  2. High spatial and temporal resolution charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Y. L.; Yu, D. L. Liu, L.; Cao, J. Y.; Sun, A. P.; Ma, Q.; Chen, W. J.; Liu, Yi; Yan, L. W.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Liu, Yong; Ida, K.; Hellermann, M. von

    2014-10-01

    A 32/64-channel charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostic system is developed on the HL-2A tokamak (R = 1.65 m, a = 0.4 m), monitoring plasma ion temperature and toroidal rotation velocity simultaneously. A high throughput spectrometer (F/2.8) and a pitch-controlled fiber bundle enable the temporal resolution of the system up to 400 Hz. The observation geometry and an optimized optic system enable the highest radial resolution up to ~1 cm at the plasma edge. The CXRS system monitors the carbon line emission (C VI, n = 8–7, 529.06 nm) whose Doppler broadening and Doppler shift provide ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity during the neutral beam injection. The composite CX spectral data are analyzed by the atomic data and analysis structure charge exchange spectroscopy fitting (ADAS CXSFIT) code. First experimental results are shown for the case of HL-2A plasmas with sawtooth oscillations, electron cyclotron resonance heating, and edge transport barrier during the high-confinement mode (H-mode)

  3. High spatial resolution surface imaging and analysis of fungal cells using SEM and AFM.

    PubMed

    Kaminskyj, Susan G W; Dahms, Tanya E S

    2008-06-01

    We review the use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and force spectroscopy (FS) for probing the ultrastructure, chemistry, physical characteristics and motion of fungal cells. When first developed, SEM was used to image fixed/dehydrated/gold coated specimens, but here we describe more recent SEM developments as they apply to fungal cells. CryoSEM offers high resolution for frozen fungal samples, whereas environmental SEM allows the analysis of robust samples (e.g. spores) under ambient conditions. Dual beam SEM, the most recently developed, adds manipulation capabilities along with element detection. AFM has similar lateral and better depth resolution compared to SEM, and can image live cells including growing fungal hyphae. FS can analyze cell wall chemistry, elasticity and dynamic cell characteristics. The integration of AFM with optical microscopy will allow examination of individual molecules or cellular structures in the context of fungal cell architecture. SEM and AFM are complementary techniques that are clarifying our understanding of fungal biology. PMID:18068995

  4. Helium beam shadowing for high spatial resolution patterning of antibodies on microstructured diagnostic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cacao, Eliedonna; Sherlock, Tim; Nasrullah, Azeem; Kemper, Steven; Knoop, Jennifer; Kourentzi, Katerina; Ruchhoeft, Paul; Stein, Gila E; Atmar, Robert L; Willson, Richard C

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We have developed a technique for the high-resolution, self-aligning, and high-throughput patterning of antibody binding functionality on surfaces by selectively changing the reactivity of protein-coated surfaces in specific regions of a workpiece with a beam of energetic helium particles. The exposed areas are passivated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and no longer bind the antigen. We demonstrate that patterns can be formed (1) by using a stencil mask with etched openings that forms a patterned exposure, or (2) by using angled exposure to cast shadows of existing raised microstructures on the surface to form self-aligned patterns. We demonstrate the efficacy of this process through the patterning of anti-lysozyme, anti-Norwalk virus, and anti-Escherichia coli antibodies and the subsequent detection of each of their targets by the enzyme-mediated formation of colored or silver deposits, and also by binding of gold nanoparticles. The process allows for the patterning of three-dimensional structures by inclining the sample relative to the beam so that the shadowed regions remain unaltered. We demonstrate that the resolution of the patterning process is of the order of hundreds of nanometers, and that the approach is well-suited for high throughput patterning. PMID:24706125

  5. Helium beam shadowing for high spatial resolution patterning of antibodies on microstructured diagnostic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cacao, Eliedonna; Sherlock, Tim; Nasrullah, Azeem; Kemper, Steven; Knoop, Jennifer; Kourentzi, Katerina; Ruchhoeft, Paul; Stein, Gila E; Atmar, Robert L; Willson, Richard C

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a technique for the high-resolution, self-aligning, and high-throughput patterning of antibody binding functionality on surfaces by selectively changing the reactivity of protein-coated surfaces in specific regions of a workpiece with a beam of energetic helium particles. The exposed areas are passivated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and no longer bind the antigen. We demonstrate that patterns can be formed (1) by using a stencil mask with etched openings that forms a patterned exposure, or (2) by using angled exposure to cast shadows of existing raised microstructures on the surface to form self-aligned patterns. We demonstrate the efficacy of this process through the patterning of anti-lysozyme, anti-Norwalk virus, and anti-Escherichia coli antibodies and the subsequent detection of each of their targets by the enzyme-mediated formation of colored or silver deposits, and also by binding of gold nanoparticles. The process allows for the patterning of three-dimensional structures by inclining the sample relative to the beam so that the shadowed regions remain unaltered. We demonstrate that the resolution of the patterning process is of the order of hundreds of nanometers, and that the approach is well-suited for high throughput patterning.

  6. High Spatial Resolution Investigations of Microchannel Plate Imaging Properties for UV Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, Oswald

    1996-01-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) photon counting detectors are currently being used with great success on many of the recent NASA/ESA ultraviolet (UV) astrophysics missions that make observations in the 1OO A - 1600 A range. These include HUT, the Wide Field Camera on ROSAT, EUVE, ALEXIS, ORFEUS, and SOHO. These devices have also been chosen to fly on future UV astrophysics missions such as FUSE, FUVITA, IMAGE, and both the HST STIS and Advanced Camera instruments. During the period of this award we have fabricated a dual-chamber vacuum test facility to carry out laboratory testing of detector resolution, image stability and linearity, and flat field performance to enable us to characterize the performance of MCPs and their associated read-out architectures. We have also fabricated and tested a laboratory 'test-bed' delay line detector, which can accommodate MCP's with a wide range of formats and run at high data rates, to continue our studies of MCP image fixed pattern noise, and particularly for new small pore MCP's which have recently come onto the market. These tests were mainly focussed on the assessment of cross delay-line (XDL) and double delay line (DDL) anode read-out schemes, with particular attention being focussed on flat-field and spatial resolution performance.

  7. Identifying landscape features associated with Rift Valley fever virus transmission, Ferlo region, Senegal, using very high spatial resolution satellite imagery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Dynamics of most of vector-borne diseases are strongly linked to global and local environmental changes. Landscape changes are indicators of human activities or natural processes that are likely to modify the ecology of the diseases. Here, a landscape approach developed at a local scale is proposed for extracting mosquito favourable biotopes, and for testing ecological parameters when identifying risk areas of Rift Valley fever (RVF) transmission. The study was carried out around Barkedji village, Ferlo region, Senegal. Methods In order to test whether pond characteristics may influence the density and the dispersal behaviour of RVF vectors, and thus the spatial variation in RVFV transmission, we used a very high spatial resolution remote sensing image (2.4 m resolution) provided by the Quickbird sensor to produce a detailed land-cover map of the study area. Based on knowledge of vector and disease ecology, seven landscape attributes were defined at the pond level and computed from the land-cover map. Then, the relationships between landscape attributes and RVF serologic incidence rates in small ruminants were analyzed through a beta-binomial regression. Finally, the best statistical model according to the Akaike Information Criterion corrected for small samples (AICC), was used to map areas at risk for RVF. Results Among the derived landscape variables, the vegetation density index (VDI) computed within a 500 m buffer around ponds was positively correlated with serologic incidence (p<0.001), suggesting that the risk of RVF transmission was higher in the vicinity of ponds surrounded by a dense vegetation cover. The final risk map of RVF transmission displays a heterogeneous spatial distribution, corroborating previous findings from the same area. Conclusions Our results highlight the potential of very high spatial resolution remote sensing data for identifying environmental risk factors and mapping RVF risk areas at a local scale. PMID:23452759

  8. A UV to mid-IR study of AGN selection

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sun Mi; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Assef, Roberto; Brown, Michael J. I.; Stern, Daniel; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Moustakas, John

    2014-07-20

    We classify the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 431,038 sources in the 9 deg{sup 2} Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS). There are up to 17 bands of data available per source, including ultraviolet (GALEX), optical (NDWFS), near-IR (NEWFIRM), and mid-infrared (IRAC and MIPS) data, as well as spectroscopic redshifts for ∼20,000 objects, primarily from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. We fit galaxy, active galactic nucleus (AGN), stellar, and brown dwarf templates to the observed SEDs, which yield spectral classes for the Galactic sources and photometric redshifts and galaxy/AGN luminosities for the extragalactic sources. The photometric redshift precision of the galaxy and AGN samples are σ/(1 + z) = 0.040 and σ/(1 + z) = 0.169, respectively, with the worst 5% outliers excluded. On the basis of the χ{sub ν}{sup 2} of the SED fit for each SED model, we are able to distinguish between Galactic and extragalactic sources for sources brighter than I = 23.5 mag. We compare the SED fits for a galaxy-only model and a galaxy-AGN model. Using known X-ray and spectroscopic AGN samples, we confirm that SED fitting can be successfully used as a method to identify large populations of AGNs, including spatially resolved AGNs with significant contributions from the host galaxy and objects with the emission line ratios of 'composite' spectra. We also use our results to compare with the X-ray, mid-IR, optical color, and emission line ratio selection techniques. For an F-ratio threshold of F > 10, we find 16,266 AGN candidates brighter than I = 23.5 mag and a surface density of ∼1900 AGN deg{sup –2}.

  9. Mid-IR laser source using hollow waveguide beam combining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, Ian F.; Thorne, Daniel H.; Lamb, Robert A.; Jenkins, R. M.

    2016-03-01

    Hollow waveguide technology is a route to efficient beam combining of multiple laser sources in a compact footprint. It is a technology appropriate for combining free-space or fibre-coupled beams generated by semiconductor, fibre or solidstate laser sources. This paper will present results of a breadboard mid-IR system comprising four laser sources combined using a hollow waveguide optical circuit. In this approach the individual dichroic beam combiner components are held in precision alignment slots in the hollow waveguide circuit and the different input wavelengths are guided between the components to a common output port. The hollow waveguide circuit is formed in the surface of a Macor (machinable glass-ceramic) substrate using precision CNC machining techniques. The hollow waveguides have fundamentally different propagation characteristics to solid core waveguides leading to transmission characteristics close to those of the atmosphere while still providing useful light guidance properties. The transmission efficiency and power handling of the hollow waveguide circuit can be designed to be very high across a broad waveband range. Three of the sources are quantum cascade lasers (QCLs), a semiconductor laser technology providing direct generation of midwave IR output. The combined beams provide 4.2 W of near diffraction-limited output co-boresighted to better than 20 µrad. High coupling efficiency into the waveguides is demonstrated, with negligible waveguide transmission losses. The overall transmission of the hollow waveguide beam combining optical circuit, weighted by the laser power at each wavelength, is 93%. This loss is dominated by the performance of the dichroic optics used to combine the beams.

  10. Quantitative materials contrast at high spatial resolution with a novel near-field scanning microwave microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imtiaz, Atif

    A novel Near-Field Scanning Microwave Microscope (NSMM) has been developed where a Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) is used for tip-to-sample distance control. The technique is non-contact and non-destructive. The same tip is used for both STM and NSMM, and STM helps maintain the tip-to-sample distance at a nominal height of 1 nm. Due to this very small tip-to-sample separation, the contribution to the microwave signals due to evanescent (non-propagating) waves cannot be ignored. I describe different evanescent wave models developed so far to understand the complex tip-to-sample interaction at microwave frequencies. Propagating wave models are also discussed, since they are still required to understand some aspects of the tip-to-sample interaction. Numerical modeling is also discussed for these problems. I demonstrate the sensitivity of this novel microscope to materials property contrast. The materials contrast is shown in spatial variations on the surface of metal thin films, Boron-doped Semiconductor and Colossal Magneto-Resistive (CMR) thin films. The height dependence of the contrast shows sensitivity to nano-meter sized features when the tip-to-sample separation is below 100 nm. By adding a cone of height 4 nm to the tip, I am able to explain a 300 kHz deviation observed in the frequency shift signal, when tip-to-sample separation is less than 10 nm. In the absence of the cone, the frequency shift signal should continue to show the logarithmic behavior as a function of height. I demonstrate sub-micron spatial resolution with this novel microscope, both in tip-to-sample capacitance Cx and materials contrast in sheet resistance Rx. The spatial resolution in Cx is demonstrated to be at-least 2.5 nm on CMR thin films. The spatial resolution in Rx is shown to be sub-micron by measuring a variably Boron-doped Silicon sample which was prepared using the Focus Ion Beam (FIB) technique.

  11. Low-k Material Characterization with High Spatial Resolution: k Value and E Modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zschech, Ehrenfried; Potapov, Pavel; Chumakov, Dmytro; Engelmann, Hans-Juergen; Geisler, Holm; Sukharev, Valeriy

    2007-10-01

    Plasma processes for resist stripping, via etching and post-etch cleaning remove C and H containing molecular groups from the near-surface layer of organosilicate glass (OSG). Particularly, composition and chemical bonding of low-k materials are changed. In this paper, the effect of chemical bonding on permittivity and elastic modulus is studied. Compositional analysis and chemical bonding characterization of structured ILD films with nanometer resolution is done with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The fine structure near the C-K electron energy loss edge allows to differentiate between C-H, C-C, and C-O bonds, and consequently, between individual low-k materials and their modifications. Dielectric permittivity changes are studied based on VEELS (valence EELS) measurements and subsequent Kramers-Kronig analysis. The elastic modulus is determined with atomic force microscopy (AFM) in force modulation (FM) mode. Nanoindentation was applied as a complementary technique to obtain reference data.

  12. Design considerations for a high-spatial-resolution positron camera with dense-drift-space MWPC's

    SciTech Connect

    Del Guerra, A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Schwartz, G.; Nelson, W.R.

    1982-10-01

    A multiplane Positron Cameris is proposed, made of six MWPC modules arranged to form the lateral surface of a hexagonal prism. Each module (50 x 50 cm/sup 2/) has a 2 cm thick lead-glass tube converter on both sides of a MWPC pressurized to 2 atm. Experimental measurements are presented to show how to reduce the parallax error by determining in which of the two converter layers the photon has interacted. The results of a detailed Monte Carlo calculation for the efficiency of this type of converter are shown to be in excellent agreement with the experimental measurements. The expected performance of the Positron Camera is presented: a true coincidence rate of 56,000 counts/s (with an equal accidental coincidence rate and a 30% Compton scatter contamination) and a spatial resolution better than 5.0 mm (FWHM) for a 400 ..mu.. Ci point-like source embedded in a 10 cm radius water phantom.

  13. Time-Resolved High-Spatial-Resolution Measurements of Underwater Laser Ionization and Filamentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Ted; Helle, Mike; Kaganovich, Dmitri; Ting, Antonio; Penano, Joe; Hafizi, Bahman; Chen, Yu-Hsin

    2014-10-01

    Intense underwater laser propagation, filamentation, and ionization are being investigated at NRL for applications including laser-guided discharges, advanced micromachining, and low-frequency laser acoustic generation. Time-resolved spectroscopy of intense underwater propagation and filamentation reveal strong Stimulated molecular Raman Scattering with ps temporal structure and frequency chirp. In addition, fs-time-resolution perpendicular shadowgraph images of ns underwater laser ionization reveal gas microbubble generation throughout the pump beam path. These microbubbles form in ps timescales with remarkably uniform initial diameters of a few-microns. Simulations using the HELCAP 4D nonlinear laser propagation code accurately predict measured filament fluence profiles and propagation, but also indicate complex, time-dependent and axially non-uniform plasma behavior. Results from recent experiments and simulations will be presented. This work is supported by NRL Base Funds.

  14. A fast, high spatial resolution optical tomographic scanner for measurement of absorption in gel dosimetry.

    PubMed

    van Doom, T; Bhat, M; Rutten, T P; Tran, T; Costanzo, A

    2005-06-01

    A fast tomographic optical density measurement system has been constructed and evaluated for application in Fricke 3D gel dosimetry. Although the potential for full three-dimensional radiation dosimetry with Fricke gel dosimeters has been extensively reported, its application has been limited due to a lack of fast optical density measurement systems. In this work, the emphasis of the design has been to achieve a short scan time through the use of precision optics and minimal moving parts. The system has been demonstrated in the laboratory to be able to achieve better than 1mm resolution and a scanning time per tomographic slice of 2.4 seconds. Full volumetric sampling of a 10 cm diameter by 7cm long cylinder can be achieved in 3 minutes. When applied with a Fricke based gel dosimeter a linear response between reconstructed CT number and absolute dose was better than 3%.

  15. Design considerations for a high-spatial-resolution positron camera with dense-drift-space MWPC's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delguerra, A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Schwartz, G.; Nelson, W. R.

    1982-10-01

    A multiplane Positron Camera is proposed, made of six MWPC modules arranged to form the lateral surface of a hexagonal prism. Each module (50 x 50 sq cm) has a 2 cm thick lead-glass tube converter on both sides of a MWPC pressurized to 2 atm. Experimental measurements are presented to show how to reduce the parallax error by determining in which of the two converter layers the photon has interacted. The results of a detailed Monte Carlo calculation for the efficiency of this type of converter are shown to be in excellent agreement with the experimental measurements. The expected performance of the Positron Camera is presented: a true coincidence rate of 56,000 counts/s (with an equal accidental coincidence rate and a 30% Compton scatter contamination) and a spatial resolution better than 5.0 mm (FWHM) for a 400 micron Ci pointlike source embedded in a 10 cm radius water phantom.

  16. Reversible cryo-arrest for imaging molecules in living cells at high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Masip, Martin E; Huebinger, Jan; Christmann, Jens; Sabet, Ola; Wehner, Frank; Konitsiotis, Antonios; Fuhr, Günther R; Bastiaens, Philippe I H

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of molecules in living cells hampers precise imaging of molecular patterns by functional and super-resolution microscopy. We developed a method that circumvents lethal chemical fixation and allows on-stage cryo-arrest for consecutive imaging of molecular patterns within the same living, but arrested, cells. The reversibility of consecutive cryo-arrests was demonstrated by the high survival rate of different cell lines and by intact growth factor signaling that was not perturbed by stress response. Reversible cryo-arrest was applied to study the evolution of ligand-induced receptor tyrosine kinase activation at different scales. The nanoscale clustering of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in the plasma membrane was assessed by single-molecule localization microscopy, and endosomal microscale activity patterns of ephrin receptor A2 (EphA2) were assessed by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. Reversible cryo-arrest allows the precise determination of molecular patterns while conserving the dynamic capabilities of living cells.

  17. High spatial resolution, low-noise Brillouin dynamic gratings reflectometry based on digital pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Bergman, A; Langer, T; Tur, M

    2016-08-01

    Digital pulse compression was used to enhance the performance of optical time-domain reflectometry, employing Brillouin dynamic gratings (BDGs) in polarization-maintaining fibers. The fundamental and unique issues in BDG field-reflection are addressed, and rules for proper selection of the coding and detection techniques are formulated. While coding in BDG applications generally requires coherent processing of the reflection, conditions are established for use of direct detection. A 256-bit Golay complementary unipolar probe code is used to demonstrate an eightfold signal-to-noise ratio enhancement in the measurement of the Brillouin gain spectrum (BGS), with a spatial resolution of 2 cm and a full-BGS acquisition rate of 133⅓ kHz, resulting in an equivalent reduction in the estimation error of small Brillouin frequency shifts. PMID:27472639

  18. Comparing carbon storage of Siberian tundra and taiga permafrost ecosystems at very high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewert, Matthias B.; Hanisch, Jessica; Weiss, Niels; Kuhry, Peter; Maximov, Trofim C.; Hugelius, Gustaf

    2015-10-01

    Permafrost-affected ecosystems are important components in the global carbon (C) cycle that, despite being vulnerable to disturbances under climate change, remain poorly understood. This study investigates ecosystem carbon storage in two contrasting continuous permafrost areas of NE and East Siberia. Detailed partitioning of soil organic carbon (SOC) and phytomass carbon (PC) is analyzed for one tundra (Kytalyk) and one taiga (Spasskaya Pad/Neleger) study area. In total, 57 individual field sites (24 and 33 in the respective areas) have been sampled for PC and SOC, including the upper permafrost. Landscape partitioning of ecosystem C storage was derived from thematic upscaling of field observations using a land cover classification from very high resolution (2 × 2 m) satellite imagery. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling was used to explore patterns in C distribution. In both environments the ecosystem C is mostly stored in the soil (≥86%). At the landscape scale C stocks are primarily controlled by the presence of thermokarst depressions (alases). In the tundra landscape, site-scale variability of C is controlled by periglacial geomorphological features, while in the taiga, local differences in catenary position, soil texture, and forest successions are more important. Very high resolution remote sensing is highly beneficial to the quantification of C storage. Detailed knowledge of ecosystem C storage and ground ice distribution is needed to predict permafrost landscape vulnerability to projected climatic changes. We argue that vegetation dynamics are unlikely to offset mineralization of thawed permafrost C and that landscape-scale reworking of SOC represents the largest potential changes to C cycling.

  19. Monitoring the Environment using High-Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing: Contribution to Health Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourre, Y. M.; Lacaux, J.

    2007-12-01

    Presence (density) of mosquitoes linked to Rift Valley Fever (RVF) epidemics in the Ferlo (Senegal) is evaluated by monitoring the environment from space. Using five SPOT-5 high-resolution images (~10m spatial resolution, on August 17th, 2006) a meridional transect of 290 x 60 km2 is analyzed for the first time. Four major ecozones are thus identified: Senegal River valley; sandy Ferlo; sandy-clayey Ferlo; and steppe/cultivated areas, from north to south, respectively. An integrated/multidisciplinary approach using remote-sensing leads to a composited Zones Potentially Occupied by Mosquitoes (or ZPOMs, with extrema). It is found that at the peak of the rainy season, the area occupied by ponds is of 12,817 ha ± 10% (i.e., ~ 0.8 % of the transect) with a mean ZPOM 17 times larger i.e.: 212,813 ha ± 10 % (or ~14 % of the transect). ZPOMs characteristics (minimum and maximum) at the ecozones levels with different hydrological mechanisms, are presented. Ponds and ZPOMs inter-annual variabilities and RVF risks, are subsequently highlighted by comparing statistics in the so-called Barkedji zone (sandy-clayey Ferlo with a hydrofossil riverbed), for the very humid year of 2003, and the near normal rainfall year of 2006. It is shown that at the end of August 2003/2006, ponds (ZPOMs) areas, were already ~22 (~5) times larger. The key roles played by isolated ponds for animals' exposure to RVF risks are thus identified. These results highlight the importance of monitoring the changing environment when linkages with public health exist. The ZPOM approach is to be adapted for other vector-borne diseases such as malaria, dengue fever, in different places of the world. Results are meant to be included into Health Information Systems (HIS) on an operational basis, in order to minimize socio-economical impacts from epidemics.

  20. Predicting vehicular emissions in high spatial resolution using pervasively measured transportation data and microscopic emissions model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyhan, Marguerite; Sobolevsky, Stanislav; Kang, Chaogui; Robinson, Prudence; Corti, Andrea; Szell, Michael; Streets, David; Lu, Zifeng; Britter, Rex; Barrett, Steven R. H.; Ratti, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    Air pollution related to traffic emissions pose an especially significant problem in cities; this is due to its adverse impact on human health and well-being. Previous studies which have aimed to quantify emissions from the transportation sector have been limited by either simulated or coarsely resolved traffic volume data. Emissions inventories form the basis of urban pollution models, therefore in this study, Global Positioning System (GPS) trajectory data from a taxi fleet of over 15,000 vehicles were analyzed with the aim of predicting air pollution emissions for Singapore. This novel approach enabled the quantification of instantaneous drive cycle parameters in high spatio-temporal resolution, which provided the basis for a microscopic emissions model. Carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate matter (PM) emissions were thus estimated. Highly localized areas of elevated emissions levels were identified, with a spatio-temporal precision not possible with previously used methods for estimating emissions. Relatively higher emissions areas were mainly concentrated in a few districts that were the Singapore Downtown Core area, to the north of the central urban region and to the east of it. Daily emissions quantified for the total motor vehicle population of Singapore were found to be comparable to another emissions dataset. Results demonstrated that high-resolution spatio-temporal vehicle traces detected using GPS in large taxi fleets could be used to infer highly localized areas of elevated acceleration and air pollution emissions in cities, and may become a complement to traditional emission estimates, especially in emerging cities and countries where reliable fine-grained urban air quality data is not easily available. This is the first study of its kind to investigate measured microscopic vehicle movement in tandem with microscopic emissions modeling for a substantial study domain.

  1. Estimating global and North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; Maasakkers, J. D.; Lundgren, E.; Andrews, A. E.; Biraud, S. C.; Boesch, H.; Bowman, K. W.; Deutscher, N. M.; Dubey, M. K.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Hase, F.; Kuze, A.; Notholt, J.; Ohyama, H.; Parker, R.; Payne, V. H.; Sussmann, R.; Sweeney, C.; Velazco, V. A.; Warneke, T.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wunch, D.

    2015-06-01

    We use 2009-2011 space-borne methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to estimate global and North American methane emissions with 4° × 5° and up to 50 km × 50 km spatial resolution, respectively. GEOS-Chem and GOSAT data are first evaluated with atmospheric methane observations from surface and tower networks (NOAA/ESRL, TCCON) and aircraft (NOAA/ESRL, HIPPO), using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as a platform to facilitate comparison of GOSAT with in situ data. This identifies a high-latitude bias between the GOSAT data and GEOS-Chem that we correct via quadratic regression. Our global adjoint-based inversion yields a total methane source of 539 Tg a-1 with some important regional corrections to the EDGARv4.2 inventory used as a prior. Results serve as dynamic boundary conditions for an analytical inversion of North American methane emissions using radial basis functions to achieve high resolution of large sources and provide error characterization. We infer a US anthropogenic methane source of 40.2-42.7 Tg a-1, as compared to 24.9-27.0 Tg a-1 in the EDGAR and EPA bottom-up inventories, and 30.0-44.5 Tg a-1 in recent inverse studies. Our estimate is supported by independent surface and aircraft data and by previous inverse studies for California. We find that the emissions are highest in the southern-central US, the Central Valley of California, and Florida wetlands; large isolated point sources such as the US Four Corners also contribute. Using prior information on source locations, we attribute 29-44 % of US anthropogenic methane emissions to livestock, 22-31 % to oil/gas, 20 % to landfills/wastewater, and 11-15 % to coal. Wetlands contribute an additional 9.0-10.1 Tg a-1.

  2. Design and fabrication of a direction sensitive MEMS shear stress sensor with high spatial and temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, A. V.; Haque, M. A.

    2004-12-01

    Shear stress at the fluid-wall interface is one of the most frequently studied parameters in fluid dynamics. It is also a parameter of very small magnitude and calls for high resolution force sensors. Macroscopic sensors compromise dynamic bandwidth for the required high resolution and therefore cannot resolve shear stress data in space and/or time, which is very important for fundamental understanding in non-laminar fluid dynamics. We exploit the linear reduction in stiffness accompanied by cubic reduction in mass by miniaturization to design and fabricate a novel micro-electro-mechanical sensor (MEMS) for direct measurement of shear stress along and across the direction of fluid flow, with 0.01 Pa resolution and 50 kHz bandwidth along the flow. The mechanical component of the sensor is a floating beam element and capacitive comb drives supported by an in-plane torsional spring. A resonant RLC circuit, capable of sub-femtofarad capacitive sensing, is used to sense the displacement in the floating beam under shear. Fabrication of the sensor is demonstrated using silicon-on wafer (SOI) technology. The small overall size of the sensor, wide range of measurement, large bandwidth and high spatial and temporal resolution will make it useful in a wide variety of civil and military applications such as aerospace, automotive, marine and biomedical.

  3. High Spatial Resolution Isotopic Abundance Measurements by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry: Status and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeegan, K. D.

    2007-12-01

    Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, SIMS or ion microprobe analysis, has become an important tool for geochemistry because of its ability study the distributions of elemental and isotopic abundances in situ on polished samples with high (typically a few microns to sub-micron) spatial resolution. In addition, SIMS exhibits high sensitivity for a wide range of elements (H to Pu) so that isotope analyses can sometimes be performed for elements that comprise only trace quantities of some mineral phase (e.g., Pb in zircon) or on major and/or minor elements in very small samples (e.g., presolar dust grains). Offsetting these positive attributes are analytical difficulties due to the complexity of the sputtering source of analyte ions: (1) relatively efficient production of molecular ion species (especially from a complex matrix such as most natural minerals) that cause interferences at the same nominal mass as atomic ions of interest, and (2) quantitation problems caused by variations in the ionization efficiencies of different elements and/or isotopes depending upon the chemical state of the sample surface during sputtering--the so-called "matrix effects". Despite the availability of high mass resolution instruments (e.g., SHRIMP II/RG, CAMECA 1270/1280/NanoSIMS), the molecular ion interferences effectively limit the region of the mass table that can be investigated in most samples to isotope systems at Ni or lighter or at Os or heavier. The matrix effects and the sensitivity of instrumental mass discrimination to the physical state of the sample surface can hamper reproducibility and have contributed to a view that SIMS analyses, especially for so- called stable isotopes, are most appropriate for extraterrestrial samples which are often small, rare, and can exhibit large magnitude isotopic effects. Recent improvements in instrumentation and technique have extended the scope of SIMS isotopic analyses and applications now range from geochronology to paleoclimatology to

  4. Estimating global and North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; Maasakkers, J. D.; Lundgren, E.; Andrews, A. E.; Biraud, S. C.; Boesch, H.; Bowman, K. W.; Deutscher, N. M.; et al

    2015-06-30

    We use 2009–2011 space-borne methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to estimate global and North American methane emissions with 4° × 5° and up to 50 km × 50 km spatial resolution, respectively. GEOS-Chem and GOSAT data are first evaluated with atmospheric methane observations from surface and tower networks (NOAA/ESRL, TCCON) and aircraft (NOAA/ESRL, HIPPO), using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as a platform to facilitate comparison of GOSAT with in situ data. This identifies a high-latitude bias between the GOSAT data and GEOS-Chem that we correct via quadratic regression. Our global adjoint-based inversion yields a totalmore » methane source of 539 Tg a−1 with some important regional corrections to the EDGARv4.2 inventory used as a prior. Results serve as dynamic boundary conditions for an analytical inversion of North American methane emissions using radial basis functions to achieve high resolution of large sources and provide error characterization. We infer a US anthropogenic methane source of 40.2–42.7 Tg a−1, as compared to 24.9–27.0 Tg a−1 in the EDGAR and EPA bottom-up inventories, and 30.0–44.5 Tg a−1 in recent inverse studies. Our estimate is supported by independent surface and aircraft data and by previous inverse studies for California. We find that the emissions are highest in the southern–central US, the Central Valley of California, and Florida wetlands; large isolated point sources such as the US Four Corners also contribute. Using prior information on source locations, we attribute 29–44 % of US anthropogenic methane emissions to livestock, 22–31 % to oil/gas, 20 % to landfills/wastewater, and 11–15 % to coal. Wetlands contribute an additional 9.0–10.1 Tg a−1.« less

  5. Estimating global and North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; Maasakkers, J. D.; Biraud, S. C.; Boesch, H.; Bowman, K. W.; Deutscher, N. M.; Dubey, M. K.; Griffith, D. W. T.; et al

    2015-02-18

    We use 2009–2011 space-borne methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to constrain global and North American inversions of methane emissions with 4° × 5° and up to 50 km × 50 km spatial resolution, respectively. The GOSAT data are first evaluated with atmospheric methane observations from surface networks (NOAA, TCCON) and aircraft (NOAA/DOE, HIPPO), using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as a platform to facilitate comparison of GOSAT with in situ data. This identifies a high-latitude bias between the GOSAT data and GEOS-Chem that we correct via quadratic regression. The surface and aircraft data are subsequently usedmore » for independent evaluation of the methane source inversions. Our global adjoint-based inversion yields a total methane source of 539 Tg a−1 and points to a large East Asian overestimate in the EDGARv4.2 inventory used as a prior. Results serve as dynamic boundary conditions for an analytical inversion of North American methane emissions using radial basis functions to achieve high resolution of large sources and provide full error characterization. We infer a US anthropogenic methane source of 40.2–42.7 Tg a−1, as compared to 24.9–27.0 Tg a−1 in the EDGAR and EPA bottom-up inventories, and 30.0–44.5 Tg a−1 in recent inverse studies. Our estimate is supported by independent surface and aircraft data and by previous inverse studies for California. We find that the emissions are highest in the South-Central US, the Central Valley of California, and Florida wetlands, large isolated point sources such as the US Four Corners also contribute. We attribute 29–44% of US anthropogenic methane emissions to livestock, 22–31% to oil/gas, 20% to landfills/waste water, and 11–15% to coal with an additional 9.0–10.1 Tg a−1 source from wetlands.« less

  6. High Spatial Resolution Analysis of Carbonates by In Situ Excimer Laser Ablation MC-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuttleworth, S.; Lloyd, N.; Douthitt, C.

    2012-12-01

    Speleothems are important climate archives. The time resolution of the paleochlimate proxies depends on the growth rates and the precision limitation of the analytical instrumentation [1]. As a consequence, for speleothems, better analytical precision combined with better spatial resolution will always be the goal, driven by a need to probe the timing and duration of climate events [1]. The Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus with Jet Interface option offers unparalleled MC-ICP-MS sensitivity for heavy elements. An ion yield of >3 % has previously been reported for uranium solutions introduced by desolvating nebulizer[2]. For laser ablation Hf, the Jet Interface with N2 addition significantly improved sensitivity, which allowed precise and accurate 176Hf/177Hf ratios to be calculated using a spot size of just 25 μm diameter [3]. A Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus with Jet Interface option was coupled with a Photon Machines excimer laser ablation system. This system features a short pulse width (4ns) 193 nm excimer laser and the HELEX 2 volume sample cell. The 193nm wavelength has been shown to reduce the particle size distribution of the aerosol produced by the laser ablation process [4] and this in turn has been shown to help minimize the effects of fractionation by ensuring that particles are in a size range so as to avoid incomplete vaporization and ionization in the plasma [5]. In this work we investigate U-Th dating of carbonates. Accurate LA U-Th isotope measurements on carbonates with U concentrations smaller than 1 μg/g are difficult due to small ion beams [1]. Hoffman et. al. [1] noted individual LA U-Th ratio precisions of about 2% (2 sigma) on a 134 ka sample with 134 μg/g U concentration. In this work we apply a combination of the high sampling efficiency two volume cell plus mixed gas plasmas to further enhance the capability. [1] Hoffman, D.L., et al. (2009). Chemical Geology. 259 253-261 [2] Bouman, C., et al. (2009). Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta. 73

  7. Reconstruction of the Abydos ROSETTA/Philae landing site at very high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capanna, Claire; Jorda, Laurent; Lamy, Philippe L.; Gaskell, Robert W.; FAURY, Guillaume; DELMAS, Cédric; DURAND, Joelle; GAUDON, Philippe; GARMIER, Romain; JURADO, Eric; OSIRIS Team

    2016-10-01

    The Rosetta/Philae module landed in a very uneven area called Abydos. The landing site has beenidentified on images of this region acquired by the OSIRIS imaging system aboard the orbiterbefore (Oct. 2014) and after (Dec. 2014) the landing (Lamy et al., in prep.).Abydos exhibits a complex topography including numerous cliffs, several overhangs and lots ofboulders (Lucchetti et al. A&A 585, L1, 2016). This makes its reconstruction a challenging taskfor 3D reconstruction techniques.We use a very carefully selected set of high-resolution OSIRIS images acquired betweenMarch 2016 and August 2016 to reconstruct the detailed topography of the Abydos neighborhoodusing a method called ``multiresolution photoclinometry by deformation'' (MPCD, Capanna et al.,The Visual Computer, 29(6-8): 825-835, 2013). We also check the compatibility of the local DTMcomparing the panoramic images obtained by the CIVA-P instrument aboard PHILAE with syntheticimages created with the DTM, and we compute the distances, incidence and emission angles duringthe acquisition of these images.

  8. X-ray phase-contrast tomography for high-spatial-resolution zebrafish muscle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vågberg, William; Larsson, Daniel H.; Li, Mei; Arner, Anders; Hertz, Hans M.

    2015-11-01

    Imaging of muscular structure with cellular or subcellular detail in whole-body animal models is of key importance for understanding muscular disease and assessing interventions. Classical histological methods for high-resolution imaging methods require excision, fixation and staining. Here we show that the three-dimensional muscular structure of unstained whole zebrafish can be imaged with sub-5 μm detail with X-ray phase-contrast tomography. Our method relies on a laboratory propagation-based phase-contrast system tailored for detection of low-contrast 4-6 μm subcellular myofibrils. The method is demonstrated on 20 days post fertilization zebrafish larvae and comparative histology confirms that we resolve individual myofibrils in the whole-body animal. X-ray imaging of healthy zebrafish show the expected structured muscle pattern while specimen with a dystrophin deficiency (sapje) displays an unstructured pattern, typical of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The method opens up for whole-body imaging with sub-cellular detail also of other types of soft tissue and in different animal models.

  9. X-ray phase-contrast tomography for high-spatial-resolution zebrafish muscle imaging

    PubMed Central

    Vågberg, William; Larsson, Daniel H.; Li, Mei; Arner, Anders; Hertz, Hans M.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of muscular structure with cellular or subcellular detail in whole-body animal models is of key importance for understanding muscular disease and assessing interventions. Classical histological methods for high-resolution imaging methods require excision, fixation and staining. Here we show that the three-dimensional muscular structure of unstained whole zebrafish can be imaged with sub-5 μm detail with X-ray phase-contrast tomography. Our method relies on a laboratory propagation-based phase-contrast system tailored for detection of low-contrast 4–6 μm subcellular myofibrils. The method is demonstrated on 20 days post fertilization zebrafish larvae and comparative histology confirms that we resolve individual myofibrils in the whole-body animal. X-ray imaging of healthy zebrafish show the expected structured muscle pattern while specimen with a dystrophin deficiency (sapje) displays an unstructured pattern, typical of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The method opens up for whole-body imaging with sub-cellular detail also of other types of soft tissue and in different animal models. PMID:26564785

  10. X-ray phase-contrast tomography for high-spatial-resolution zebrafish muscle imaging.

    PubMed

    Vågberg, William; Larsson, Daniel H; Li, Mei; Arner, Anders; Hertz, Hans M

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of muscular structure with cellular or subcellular detail in whole-body animal models is of key importance for understanding muscular disease and assessing interventions. Classical histological methods for high-resolution imaging methods require excision, fixation and staining. Here we show that the three-dimensional muscular structure of unstained whole zebrafish can be imaged with sub-5 μm detail with X-ray phase-contrast tomography. Our method relies on a laboratory propagation-based phase-contrast system tailored for detection of low-contrast 4-6 μm subcellular myofibrils. The method is demonstrated on 20 days post fertilization zebrafish larvae and comparative histology confirms that we resolve individual myofibrils in the whole-body animal. X-ray imaging of healthy zebrafish show the expected structured muscle pattern while specimen with a dystrophin deficiency (sapje) displays an unstructured pattern, typical of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The method opens up for whole-body imaging with sub-cellular detail also of other types of soft tissue and in different animal models. PMID:26564785

  11. Object-Based Arctic Sea Ice Feature Extraction through High Spatial Resolution Aerial photos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, X.; Xie, H.

    2015-12-01

    High resolution aerial photographs used to detect and classify sea ice features can provide accurate physical parameters to refine, validate, and improve climate models. However, manually delineating sea ice features, such as melt ponds, submerged ice, water, ice/snow, and pressure ridges, is time-consuming and labor-intensive. An object-based classification algorithm is developed to automatically extract sea ice features efficiently from aerial photographs taken during the Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition in summer 2010 (CHINARE 2010) in the MIZ near the Alaska coast. The algorithm includes four steps: (1) the image segmentation groups the neighboring pixels into objects based on the similarity of spectral and textural information; (2) the random forest classifier distinguishes four general classes: water, general submerged ice (GSI, including melt ponds and submerged ice), shadow, and ice/snow; (3) the polygon neighbor analysis separates melt ponds and submerged ice based on spatial relationship; and (4) pressure ridge features are extracted from shadow based on local illumination geometry. The producer's accuracy of 90.8% and user's accuracy of 91.8% are achieved for melt pond detection, and shadow shows a user's accuracy of 88.9% and producer's accuracies of 91.4%. Finally, pond density, pond fraction, ice floes, mean ice concentration, average ridge height, ridge profile, and ridge frequency are extracted from batch processing of aerial photos, and their uncertainties are estimated.

  12. High Spatial Resolution Studies of Blastwave Interactions in the Vela Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, William

    1997-01-01

    The report targeted two interaction zones within the Vela supernova remnant for HRI observation and data reduction and analysis. Approximately 40 ksec of HRI integration time was awarded for each of the awarded target regions, one at priority 2 and one at priority 3. The observations have been completed for the priority 2 observation. Some observations have been made of the priority 3 target, however the data have not yet been received by the PI. The priority 2 data have been received and analyzed and the results have been prepared for publication. The chief results are as follows: (1) the radial profile of the X-ray emission from the western rim is characterized by a sudden increase in emission at the blastwave interaction region which is unresolved spatially at HRI resolution. The profile is consistent with the expanding blastwave from the remnant encountering a large, coherent structure in the surrounding ISM; (2) the X-ray emission lags slightly 'behind', approx. 10(exp 16)cm the H(alpha) and OIII optical filaments, consistent with the expected spatial profile of the emission assuming parameters derived from earlier PSPC observations of the region. the combination of the X-ray and optical interference filter data allow us to set limits on the distance to the Vela remnant and the general nature of the blastwave interactions in the remnant.

  13. Structural health monitoring by using fiber-optic distributed strain sensors with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, Hideaki; Wada, Daichi; Igawa, Hirotaka

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we review our researches on the topics of the structural health monitoring (SHM) with the fiber-optic distributed strain sensor. Highly-dense information on strains in a structure can be useful to identify some kind of existing damages or applied loads in implementation of SHM. The fiber-optic distributed sensors developed by the authors have been applied to the damage detection of a single-lap joint and load identification of a beam simply supported. We confirmed that the applicability of the distributed sensor to SHM could be improved as making the spatial resolution higher. In addition, we showed that the simulation technique considering both structural and optical effects seamlessly in strain measurement could be powerful tools to evaluate the performance of a sensing system and design it for SHM. Finally, the technique for simultaneous distributed strain and temperature measurement using the PANDA-fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is shown in this paper, because problems caused by the cross-sensitivity toward strain and temperature would be always inevitable in strain measurement for SHM.

  14. High-spatial-resolution mapping of the oxygen concentration in cortical tissue (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaswal, Rajeshwer S.; Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Fu, Buyin; Boas, David A.; Sakadžic, Sava

    2016-03-01

    Due to a lack of imaging tools for high-resolution imaging of cortical tissue oxygenation, the detailed maps of the oxygen partial pressure (PO2) around arterioles, venules, and capillaries remain largely unknown. Therefore, we have limited knowledge about the mechanisms that secure sufficient oxygen delivery in microvascular domains during brain activation, and provide some metabolic reserve capacity in diseases that affect either microvascular networks or the regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF). To address this challenge, we applied a Two-Photon PO2 Microscopy to map PO2 at different depths in mice cortices. Measurements were performed through the cranial window in the anesthetized healthy mice as well as in the mouse models of microvascular dysfunctions. In addition, microvascular morphology was recorded by the two-photon microscopy at the end of each experiment and subsequently segmented. Co-registration of the PO2 measurements and exact microvascular morphology enabled quantification of the tissue PO2 dependence on distance from the arterioles, capillaries, and venules at various depths. Our measurements reveal significant spatial heterogeneity of the cortical tissue PO2 distribution that is dominated by the high oxygenation in periarteriolar spaces. In cases of impaired oxygen delivery due to microvascular dysfunction, significant reduction in tissue oxygenation away from the arterioles was observed. These tissue domains may be the initial sites of cortical injury that can further exacerbate the progression of the disease.

  15. Emerging and vector-borne diseases: Role of high spatial resolution and hyperspectral images in analyses and forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Mark L.

    Many infectious diseases that are emerging or transmitted by arthropod vectors have a strong link to landscape features. Depending on the source of infection or ecology of the transmitting vector, micro-habitat characteristics at the spatial scale of square meters or less may be important. Recently, satellite images have been used to classify habitats in an attempt to understand associations with infectious diseases. Whether high spatial resolution and hyperspectral (HSRH) images can be useful in studies of such infectious diseases is addressed. The nature of questions that such studies address and the desired accuracy and precision of answers will determine the utility of HSRH data. Need for such data should be based on the goals of the effort. Examples of kinds of questions and applications are discussed. The research implications and public health applications may depend on available analytic tools as well as epidemiological observations.

  16. Two-dimensional high spatial-resolution dosimeter using europium doped potassium chloride: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Li, H Harold; Driewer, Joseph P; Han, Zhaohui; Low, Daniel A; Yang, Deshan; Xiao, Zhiyan

    2014-04-21

    Recent research has shown that KCl:Eu²⁺ has great potential for use in megavoltage radiation therapy dosimetry because this material exhibits excellent storage performance and is reusable due to strong radiation hardness. This work reports the authors' attempts to fabricate 2D KCl:Eu²⁺ storage phosphor films (SPFs) using both a physical vapor deposition (PVD) method and a tape casting method. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that a 10 µm thick PVD sample was composed of highly crystalline KCl. No additional phases were observed, suggesting that the europium activator had been completely incorporated into the KCl matrix. Photostimulated luminescence and photoluminescence spectra suggested that F (Cl(-)) centers were the electron storage centers post x-ray irradiation and that Eu²⁺ cations acted as luminescence centers in the photostimulation process. The 150 µm thick casted KCl:Eu²⁺ SPF showed sub-millimeter spatial-resolution. Monte Carlo simulations further demonstrated that the admixture of 20% KCl:Eu²⁺ and 80% low Z polymer binder exhibited almost no energy-dependence in a 6 MV beam. KCl:Eu²⁺ pellet samples showed a large dynamic range from 0.01 cGy to 60 Gy dose-to-water, and saturated at approximately 500 Gy as a result of KCl's intrinsic high radiation hardness. Taken together, this work provides strong evidence that KCl:Eu²⁺-based SPF with associated readout apparatus could result in a novel electronic film system that has all the desirable features associated with classic radiographic film and, importantly, water equivalence and the capability of permanent identification of each detector.

  17. Daily air temperature interpolated at high spatial resolution over a large mountainous region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dodson, R.; Marks, D.

    1997-01-01

    Two methods are investigated for interpolating daily minimum and maximum air temperatures (Tmin and Tmax) at a 1 km spatial resolution over a large mountainous region (830 000 km2) in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The methods were selected because of their ability to (1) account for the effect of elevation on temperature and (2) efficiently handle large volumes of data. The first method, the neutral stability algorithm (NSA), used the hydrostatic and potential temperature equations to convert measured temperatures and elevations to sea-level potential temperatures. The potential temperatures were spatially interpolated using an inverse-squared-distance algorithm and then mapped to the elevation surface of a digital elevation model (DEM). The second method, linear lapse rate adjustment (LLRA), involved the same basic procedure as the NSA, but used a constant linear lapse rate instead of the potential temperature equation. Cross-validation analyses were performed using the NSA and LLRA methods to interpolate Tmin and Tmax each day for the 1990 water year, and the methods were evaluated based on mean annual interpolation error (IE). The NSA method showed considerable bias for sites associated with vertical extrapolation. A correction based on climate station/grid cell elevation differences was developed and found to successfully remove the bias. The LLRA method was tested using 3 lapse rates, none of which produced a serious extrapolation bias. The bias-adjusted NSA and the 3 LLRA methods produced almost identical levels of accuracy (mean absolute errors between 1.2 and 1.3??C), and produced very similar temperature surfaces based on image difference statistics. In terms of accuracy, speed, and ease of implementation, LLRA was chosen as the best of the methods tested.

  18. Quantifying the erosion effect on current carbon budget of European agricultural soils at high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Lugato, Emanuele; Paustian, Keith; Panagos, Panos; Jones, Arwyn; Borrelli, Pasquale

    2016-05-01

    The idea of offsetting anthropogenic CO2 emissions by increasing global soil organic carbon (SOC), as recently proposed by French authorities ahead of COP21 in the 'four per mil' initiative, is notable. However, a high uncertainty still exits on land C balance components. In particular, the role of erosion in the global C cycle is not totally disentangled, leading to disagreement whether this process induces lands to be a source or sink of CO2. To investigate this issue, we coupled soil erosion into a biogeochemistry model, running at 1 km(2) resolution across the agricultural soils of the European Union (EU). Based on data-driven assumptions, the simulation took into account also soil deposition within grid cells and the potential C export to riverine systems, in a way to be conservative in a mass balance. We estimated that 143 of 187 Mha have C erosion rates <0.05 Mg C ha(-1) yr(-1), although some hot-spot areas showed eroded SOC >0.45 Mg C ha(-1) yr(-1). In comparison with a baseline without erosion, the model suggested an erosion-induced sink of atmospheric C consistent with previous empirical-based studies. Integrating all C fluxes for the EU agricultural soils, we estimated a net C loss or gain of -2.28 and +0.79 Tg yr(-1) of CO2 eq, respectively, depending on the value for the short-term enhancement of soil C mineralization due to soil disruption and displacement/transport with erosion. We concluded that erosion fluxes were in the same order of current carbon gains from improved management. Even if erosion could potentially induce a sink for atmospheric CO2, strong agricultural policies are needed to prevent or reduce soil erosion, in order to maintain soil health and productivity.

  19. High Spatial Resolution Studies of Epithermal Neutron Emission from the Lunar Poles: Constraints on Hydrogen Mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boynton, W. V.; Droege, G. F.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; McClanahan, T. P.; Sanin, A. B.; Litvak, M. L.; Schaffner, M.; Chin, G.; Evans, L. G.; Garvin, J. B.; Harshman, K.; Malakhov, A.; Milikh, G.; Sagdeev, R.; Starr, R.

    2012-01-01

    The data from the collimated sensors of the LEND instrument are shown to be of exceptionally high quality. Counting uncertainties are about 0.3% relative and are shown to be the only significant source of random error, thus conclusions based on small differences in count rates are valid. By comparison with the topography of Shoemaker crater, the spatial resolution of the instrument is shown to be consistent with the design value of 5 km for the radius of the circle over which half the counts from the lunar surface would be determined. The observed epithermal-neutron suppression factor due to the hydrogen deposit in Shoemaker crater of 0.25 plus or minus 0.04 cps is consistent with the collimated field-of-view rate of 1.7 cps estimated by Mitrofanov et al. (2010a). The statistical significance of the neutron suppressed regions (NSRs) relative to the larger surrounding polar region is demonstrated, and it is shown that they are not closely related to the permanently shadowed regions. There is a significant increase in H content in the polar regions independent of the H content of the NSRs. The non-NSR H content increases directly with latitude, and the rate of increase is virtually identical at both poles. There is little or no increase with latitude outside the polar region. Various mechanisms to explain this steep increase in the non-NSR polar H with latitude are investigated, and it is suggested that thermal volatilization is responsible for the increase because it is minimized at the low surface temperatures close to the poles.

  20. Two-dimensional high spatial-resolution dosimeter using europium doped potassium chloride: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Li, H. Harold; Driewer, Joseph P.; Han, Zhaohui; Low, Daniel A.; Yang, Deshan; Xiao, Zhiyan

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has shown that KCl:Eu2+ has great potential for use in megavoltage radiation therapy dosimetry because this material exhibits excellent storage performance and is reusable due to strong radiation hardness. This work reports the authors’ attempts to fabricate 2D KCl:Eu2+ storage phosphor films (SPFs) using both a physical vapor deposition (PVD) method and a tape casting method. X ray diffraction analysis showed that a 10 µm thick PVD sample was composed of highly crystalline KCl. No additional phases were observed, suggesting that the europium activator had completed been incorporated into the KCl matrix. Photostimulated luminescence and photoluminescence spectra suggested that F (Cl-) centers were the electron storage centers post×ray irradiation and that Eu2+ cations acted as luminescence centers in the photostimulation process. The 150-µm thick casted KCl:Eu2+ SPF showed sub-millimeter spatial resolution. Monte Carlo simulations further demonstrated that the admixture of 20% KCl:Eu2+ and 80% low Z polymer binder exhibited almost no energy dependence in a 6 MV beam. KCl:Eu2+ pellet samples showed a large dynamic range from 0.01 cGy to 60 Gy dose-to-water, and saturated at approximately 500 Gy as a result of KCl’s intrinsic high radiation hardness. Taken together, this work provides strong evidence that KCl:Eu2+ based SPF with associated readout apparatus could result in a novel electronic film system that has all the desirable features associated with classic radiographic film and, importantly, water equivalence and the capability of permanent identification of each detector. PMID:24651448

  1. MOSFET dosimetry with high spatial resolution in intense synchrotron-generated x-ray microbeams

    SciTech Connect

    Siegbahn, E. A.; Braeuer-Krisch, E.; Bravin, A.; Nettelbeck, H.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2009-04-15

    Various dosimeters have been tested for assessing absorbed doses with microscopic spatial resolution in targets irradiated by high-flux, synchrotron-generated, low-energy ({approx}30-300 keV) x-ray microbeams. A MOSFET detector has been used for this study since its radio sensitive element, which is extraordinarily narrow ({approx}1 {mu}m), suits the main applications of interest, microbeam radiation biology and microbeam radiation therapy (MRT). In MRT, micrometer-wide, centimeter-high, and vertically oriented swaths of tissue are irradiated by arrays of rectangular x-ray microbeams produced by a multislit collimator (MSC). We used MOSFETs to measure the dose distribution, produced by arrays of x-ray microbeams shaped by two different MSCs, in a tissue-equivalent phantom. Doses were measured near the center of the arrays and maximum/minimum (peak/valley) dose ratios (PVDRs) were calculated to determine how variations in heights and in widths of the microbeams influenced this for the therapy, potentially important parameter. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the absorbed dose distribution in the phantom were also performed. The results show that when the heights of the irradiated swaths were below those applicable to clinical therapy (<1 mm) the MC simulations produce estimates of PVDRs that are up to a factor of 3 higher than the measured values. For arrays of higher microbeams (i.e., 25 {mu}mx1 cm instead of 25x500 {mu}m{sup 2}), this difference between measured and simulated PVDRs becomes less than 50%. Closer agreement was observed between the measured and simulated PVDRs for the Tecomet MSC (current collimator design) than for the Archer MSC. Sources of discrepancies between measured and simulated doses are discussed, of which the energy dependent response of the MOSFET was shown to be among the most important.

  2. Two-dimensional high spatial-resolution dosimeter using europium doped potassium chloride: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. Harold; Driewer, Joseph P.; Han, Zhaohui; Low, Daniel A.; Yang, Deshan; Xiao, Zhiyan

    2014-04-01

    Recent research has shown that KCl:Eu2+ has great potential for use in megavoltage radiation therapy dosimetry because this material exhibits excellent storage performance and is reusable due to strong radiation hardness. This work reports the authors’ attempts to fabricate 2D KCl:Eu2+ storage phosphor films (SPFs) using both a physical vapor deposition (PVD) method and a tape casting method. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that a 10 µm thick PVD sample was composed of highly crystalline KCl. No additional phases were observed, suggesting that the europium activator had been completely incorporated into the KCl matrix. Photostimulated luminescence and photoluminescence spectra suggested that F (Cl-) centers were the electron storage centers post x-ray irradiation and that Eu2+ cations acted as luminescence centers in the photostimulation process. The 150 µm thick casted KCl:Eu2+ SPF showed sub-millimeter spatial-resolution. Monte Carlo simulations further demonstrated that the admixture of 20% KCl:Eu2+ and 80% low Z polymer binder exhibited almost no energy-dependence in a 6 MV beam. KCl:Eu2+ pellet samples showed a large dynamic range from 0.01 cGy to 60 Gy dose-to-water, and saturated at approximately 500 Gy as a result of KCl's intrinsic high radiation hardness. Taken together, this work provides strong evidence that KCl:Eu2+-based SPF with associated readout apparatus could result in a novel electronic film system that has all the desirable features associated with classic radiographic film and, importantly, water equivalence and the capability of permanent identification of each detector.

  3. High spatial resolution studies of epithermal neutron emission from the lunar poles: Constraints on hydrogen mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, W. V.; Droege, G. F.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; McClanahan, T. P.; Sanin, A. B.; Litvak, M. L.; Schaffner, M.; Chin, G.; Evans, L. G.; Garvin, J. B.; Harshman, K.; Malakhov, A.; Milikh, G.; Sagdeev, R.; Starr, R.

    2012-12-01

    The data from the collimated sensors of the LEND instrument are shown to be of exceptionally high quality. Counting uncertainties are about 0.3% relative and are shown to be the only significant source of random error, thus conclusions based on small differences in count rates are valid. By comparison with the topography of Shoemaker crater, the spatial resolution of the instrument is shown to be consistent with the design value of 5 km for the radius of the circle over which half the counts from the lunar surface would be determined. The observed epithermal-neutron suppression factor due to the hydrogen deposit in Shoemaker crater of 0.25 ± 0.04 cps is consistent with the collimated field-of-view rate of 1.7 cps estimated by Mitrofanov et al. (2010a). The statistical significance of the neutron suppressed regions (NSRs) relative to the larger surrounding polar region is demonstrated, and it is shown that they are not closely related to the permanently shadowed regions. There is a significant increase in H content in the polar regions independent of the H content of the NSRs. The non-NSR H content increases directly with latitude, and the rate of increase is virtually identical at both poles. There is little or no increase with latitude outside the polar region. Various mechanisms to explain this steep increase in the non-NSR polar H with latitude are investigated, and it is suggested that thermal volatilization is responsible for the increase because it is minimized at the low surface temperatures close to the poles.

  4. High Spatial Resolution Study of Microbe-Carbonate-Silicate Interfaces by FIB and TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzerara, K.; Menguy, N.; Guyot, F.; Vanni, C.; Gillet, P.

    2003-12-01

    High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), chemical micro-analysis (EDX) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) are among the most powerful analytical techniques for studying microbe-mineral interactions, allowing to observe the microbe-mineral interface at almost the angstrom scale, to evidence transformations of the mineral structure and chemical alterations at the nanometer scale. However, the samples must be very thin and only a small area can be investigated. A key limitation for using this technique is thus to prepare natural geomicrobiological samples which combine hard minerals, preventing use of ultramicrotomy, with soft organic matter inadequate to ion milling procedures. Additionaly the areas of interest are usually restricted to few micrometer large areas which have to be selected from macroscopic samples. In this study we present two procedures : micromanipulation and FIB (Focused Ion Beam) which allow the study of microbe-mineral interfaces with TEM. The micromanipulation procedure has been presented in Benzerara et al (2003, PNAS). We have evidenced nannobacteria-like objects at the surface of the Tatahouine orthopyroxenite meteorite fallen in the tunisian desert in 1931. SEM observations suggest a complex interaction pattern between the nannobacteria-like objects, the pyroxene and microorganisms which have colonized the surface of the meteorite during its seventy years of residence on Earth. The TEM study on the very same area shows that the nannobacteria-like rods are actually well-crystallized nanometric calcite single crystals surrounded by an amorphous layer of carbonate composition. Those morphologies and structures are unusual for calcite single crystals. We discuss these observations in regard to the criteria of biogenicity i.e. biosignatures. Moreover, we examine the implications for carbonate production associated to silicate bio-weathering under aridic conditions. This work is relevant both to astrobiological and

  5. Visualization and quantification of whole rat heart laminar structure using high-spatial resolution contrast-enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Benoist, David; Benson, Alan P.; White, Ed; Tanner, Steven F.; Holden, Arun V.; Dobrzynski, Halina; Bernus, Olivier; Radjenovic, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown by histology that cardiac myocytes are organized into laminae and this structure is important in function, both influencing the spread of electrical activation and enabling myocardial thickening in systole by laminar sliding. We have carried out high-spatial resolution three-dimensional MRI of the ventricular myolaminae of the entire volume of the isolated rat heart after contrast perfusion [dimeglumine gadopentate (Gd-DTPA)]. Four ex vivo rat hearts were perfused with Gd-DTPA and fixative and high-spatial resolution MRI was performed on a 9.4T MRI system. After MRI, cryosectioning followed by histology was performed. Images from MRI and histology were aligned, described, and quantitatively compared. In the three-dimensional MR images we directly show the presence of laminae and demonstrate that these are highly branching and are absent from much of the subepicardium. We visualized these MRI volumes to demonstrate laminar architecture and quantitatively demonstrated that the structural features observed are similar to those imaged in histology. We showed qualitatively and quantitatively that laminar architecture is similar in the four hearts. MRI can be used to image the laminar architecture of ex vivo hearts in three dimensions, and the images produced are qualitatively and quantitatively comparable with histology. We have demonstrated in the rat that: 1) laminar architecture is consistent between hearts; 2) myolaminae are absent from much of the subepicardium; and 3) although localized orthotropy is present throughout the myocardium, tracked myolaminae are branching structures and do not have a discrete identity. PMID:22021329

  6. High spatial and spectral resolution near-infrared mapping of Europa with ESO/VLT/ SINFONI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligier, Nicolas; Carter, John; Poulet, François; Langevin, Yves; Dumas, Christophe; Gourgeot, Florian

    2014-11-01

    Europa is a major exobiological target of interest owing to the possibility of a sub-surface briny ocean deeply buried under a water ice dominated crust several km thick (Dalton et al., 2010). The upcoming ESA L-class mission JUICE to the Jupiter system and its ambitious payload will address this question, in particular through compositional remote sensing in the near-infrared (MAJIS) and visible (MAJIS and JANUS) wavelength range.In order to improve our knowledge mainly acquired by the instrument NIMS on the Galileo spacecraft, we have started a compositional mapping campaign of the icy moons using adaptive optics on ground-based observations from the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile. Thanks to five nights of observation on the integral field spectrograph SINFONI, we have obtained spatially resolved spectra of nearly the entire surface of Europa, with a spectral resolution of 0.5 nm in the wavelength range 1.48-2.42 μm for a pixel scale of 12.5 by 25 m.a.s, equivalent to 35 by 70 km on Europa’s surface.In this wavelength range, the spectra are generally dominated by crystalline and amorphous water-ice absorption features, but the distorted and asymmetric aspect of the 2.0 μm water-ice band on Europa’s leading side confirms the presence of non-ice minerals such as sulfuric acid hydrate (Carlson et al., 2005) and magnesium sulfates such as epsomite (MgSO4 - 7H2O) (Brown et al., 2013).Our first analysis reveals that the maps of the ice-water bands at 1.65 μm and 2.0 μm are, as expected, dominated by the leading/trailing effect, but also well correlated to well-identified geological structures as Pwyll Crater and Tara Regio. Global maps of relevant spectral parameters will be presented so as to showcase the spectral inhomogeneity of the surface of Europa for both major and minor signatures. No narrow signature, which could indicate the presence of material of exobiological interest, has been so far detected in this complex data set. By the time of the

  7. Mid-IR optical amplification and detection using quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dingkai; Chen, Xing; Cheng, Liwei; Belyanin, Alexey; Choa, Fow-Sen

    2013-12-16

    Amplification and detection characteristics of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are studied. The QCL amplifier has an adjustable bandwidth and tunable gain peak to function as a tunable mid-IR filter. By biasing the QCL slightly below its threshold, we demonstrated more than 11dB optical gain and over 28dB electrical gain at specified wavelengths. In the electrical gain measurement process, the resonant amplifier also functioned as a detector. Mid-IR amplification and detection can be achieved using the same material for the laser source. This indicates that intersubband based gain materials can be ideal candidates for mid-IR photonic integrations.

  8. Very high spatial resolution optical and radar imagery in tracking water level fluctuations of a small inland reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, R. N.; Tormos, T.; Danis, P.-A.

    2015-06-01

    Tracking water level fluctuations in small lakes and reservoirs is important in order to better understand and manage these ecosystems. A geographic object-based image analysis (GEOBIA) method using very high spatial and temporal resolution optical (Pléiades) and radar (COSMO-SkyMed and TerraSAR-X) remote sensing imagery is presented here which (1) tracks water level fluctuations via variations in water surface area and (2) avoids common difficulties found in using single-band radar images for water-land image classification. Results are robust, with over 98% of image surface area correctly classified into land or water, R2 = 0.963 and RMSE = 0.42 m for a total water level fluctuation range of 5.94 m. Multispectral optical imagery is found to be more straightforward in producing results than single-band radar imagery, but the latter crucially increase temporal resolution to the point where fluctuations can be satisfactorily tracked in time. Moreover, an analysis suggests that high and medium spatial resolution imagery is sufficient, in at least some cases, in tracking the water level fluctuations of small inland reservoirs. Finally, limitations of the methodology presented here are briefly discussed along with potential solutions to overcome them.

  9. Clipping of TE-CO2 laser pulse using gas breakdown technique for high spatial resolution gas plume detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasmi, Taieb

    2014-06-01

    High stability and energy-efficient TE-CO2 laser pulse clipper using gas breakdown techniques for high spatial resolution chemical plume detection is presented. The most dominant time constant, attributed to TE-CO2 unclipped laser pulses, is its nitrogen tail which extends for several microseconds beyond the gain-switched spike. Near-field scattered signal, produced by unclipped laser pulses, interferes with the weak signal backscattered from the long range and far field atmospheric aerosols which ultimately degrades the range resolution of LIDARS to some hundreds of meters. Short laser pulses can be obtained by various techniques such as mode locking, free induction decay, pulse slicing with electro-optic switched. However, output pulses from these require further amplification for any useful application due to their very low energy content. This problem is circumvented in this work by the use of a plasma clipper that achieves high range-resolved remote sensing in the atmosphere. Complete extinction of the nitrogen tail is obtained at pressures extending from 375 up to 1500 Torr for nitrogen and argon gases and approximately 105, for helium. Optimum pressures for helium, argon, and nitrogen, that provide the best stability of the transmitted energy and complete extinction of the nitrogen tail, are identified. Excellent range resolutions can be achieved with TE-CO2 laser-based LIDAR systems. Clipped laser pulses are also field tested.

  10. High spatial resolution laser cavity extinction and laser-induced incandescence in low-soot-producing flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, B.; Gao, Y.; Balusamy, S.; Hochgreb, S.

    2015-09-01

    Accurate measurement techniques for in situ determination of soot are necessary to understand and monitor the process of soot particle production. One of these techniques is line-of-sight extinction, which is a fast, low-cost and quantitative method to investigate the soot volume fraction in flames. However, the extinction-based technique suffers from relatively high measurement uncertainty due to low signal-to-noise ratio, as the single-pass attenuation of the laser beam intensity is often insufficient. Multi-pass techniques can increase the sensitivity, but may suffer from low spatial resolution. To overcome this problem, we have developed a high spatial resolution laser cavity extinction technique to measure the soot volume fraction from low-soot-producing flames. A laser beam cavity is realised by placing two partially reflective concave mirrors on either side of the laminar diffusion flame under investigation. This configuration makes the beam convergent inside the cavity, allowing a spatial resolution within 200 μm, whilst increasing the absorption by an order of magnitude. Three different hydrocarbon fuels are tested: methane, propane and ethylene. The measurements of soot distribution across the flame show good agreement with results using laser-induced incandescence (LII) in the range from around 20 ppb to 15 ppm.

  11. Are the yields of major cereal crops stagnating? Results from the newly developed high spatial resolution crop yield time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, D. K.; Ramankutty, N.; Foley, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    A variety of global scale studies that use crop yield time series for the last 50 years have remained constrained to using national level information due to the lack of high spatial resolution crop yield time series data. In this presentation we will unveil a new global crop yield data set for the 1961-2008 time period, at 5 min spatial resolution, and covering 174 crops. We developed this data by collecting national and sub-national harvested area and production information for individual crops. This new dataset can be used to answer questions related to global agriculture at a resolution and over a time period not previously possible. We have used this new dataset to address the question of whether the yields of the three important cereal crops -- maize, rice and wheat -- are stagnating as widely reported. Our results show that while in the older crop belts of the world yield improvements have slowed, a green revolution type of major yield increases in maize, rice and wheat are continuing in newly cultivated areas of the world.

  12. Lithographic Microfabrication of a 16-Electrode Array on a Probe Tip for High Spatial Resolution Electrochemical Localization of Exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Wigström, Joakim; Dunevall, Johan; Najafinobar, Neda; Lovrić, Jelena; Wang, Jun; Ewing, Andrew G; Cans, Ann-Sofie

    2016-02-16

    We report the lithographic microfabrication of a movable thin film microelectrode array (MEA) probe consisting of 16 platinum band electrodes placed on top of a supporting borosilicate glass substrate. These 1.2 μm wide electrodes were tightly packed and positioned parallel in two opposite rows within a 20 μm × 25 μm square area and with a distance less than 10 μm from the edge of the glass substrate. We demonstrate the ability to control and place the probe in close proximity to the surface of adherent bovine chromaffin cells and to amperometrically record single exocytosis release events with high spatiotemporal resolution. The two-dimensional position of single exocytotic events occurring in the center gap area separating the two rows of MEA band electrodes and that were codetected by electrodes in both rows was determined by analysis of the fractional detection of catecholamine released between electrodes and exploiting random walk simulations. Hence, two-dimensional electrochemical imaging recording of exocytosis release between the electrodes within this area was achieved. Similarly, by modeling the current spikes codetected by parallel adjacent band electrodes positioned in the same electrode row, a one-dimensional imaging of exocytosis with submicrometer resolution was accomplished within the area. The one- and two-dimensional electrochemical imaging using the MEA probe allowed for high spatial resolution of exocytosis activity and revealed heterogeneous release of catecholamine at the chromaffin cell surface.

  13. [The Change Detection of High Spatial Resolution Remotely Sensed Imagery Based on OB-HMAD Algorithm and Spectral Features].

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Chen, Yun-hao; Jiang, Wei-guo

    2015-06-01

    The high spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery has abundant detailed information of earth surface, and the multi-temporal change detection for the high resolution remotely sensed imagery can realize the variations of geographical unit. In terms of the high spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery, the traditional remote sensing change detection algorithms have obvious defects. In this paper, learning from the object-based image analysis idea, we proposed a semi-automatic threshold selection algorithm named OB-HMAD (object-based-hybrid-MAD), on the basis of object-based image analysis and multivariate alternative detection algorithm (MAD), which used the spectral features of remotely sensed imagery into the field of object-based change detection. Additionally, OB-HMAD algorithm has been compared with other the threshold segmentation algorithms by the change detection experiment. Firstly, we obtained the image object by the multi-solution segmentation algorithm. Secondly, we got the object-based difference image object using MAD and minimum noise fraction rotation (MNF) for improving the SNR of the image object. Then, the change objects or area are classified using histogram curvature analysis (HCA) method for the semi-automatic threshold selection, which determined the threshold by calculated the maximum value of curvature of the histogram, so the HCA algorithm has better automation than other threshold segmentation algorithms. Finally, the change detection results are validated using confusion matrix with the field sample data. Worldview-2 imagery of 2012 and 2013 in case study of Beijing were used to validate the proposed OB-HMAD algorithm. The experiment results indicated that OB-HMAD algorithm which integrated the multi-channel spectral information could be effectively used in multi-temporal high resolution remotely sensed imagery change detection, and it has basically solved the "salt and pepper" problem which always exists in the pixel-based change

  14. [The Change Detection of High Spatial Resolution Remotely Sensed Imagery Based on OB-HMAD Algorithm and Spectral Features].

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Chen, Yun-hao; Jiang, Wei-guo

    2015-06-01

    The high spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery has abundant detailed information of earth surface, and the multi-temporal change detection for the high resolution remotely sensed imagery can realize the variations of geographical unit. In terms of the high spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery, the traditional remote sensing change detection algorithms have obvious defects. In this paper, learning from the object-based image analysis idea, we proposed a semi-automatic threshold selection algorithm named OB-HMAD (object-based-hybrid-MAD), on the basis of object-based image analysis and multivariate alternative detection algorithm (MAD), which used the spectral features of remotely sensed imagery into the field of object-based change detection. Additionally, OB-HMAD algorithm has been compared with other the threshold segmentation algorithms by the change detection experiment. Firstly, we obtained the image object by the multi-solution segmentation algorithm. Secondly, we got the object-based difference image object using MAD and minimum noise fraction rotation (MNF) for improving the SNR of the image object. Then, the change objects or area are classified using histogram curvature analysis (HCA) method for the semi-automatic threshold selection, which determined the threshold by calculated the maximum value of curvature of the histogram, so the HCA algorithm has better automation than other threshold segmentation algorithms. Finally, the change detection results are validated using confusion matrix with the field sample data. Worldview-2 imagery of 2012 and 2013 in case study of Beijing were used to validate the proposed OB-HMAD algorithm. The experiment results indicated that OB-HMAD algorithm which integrated the multi-channel spectral information could be effectively used in multi-temporal high resolution remotely sensed imagery change detection, and it has basically solved the "salt and pepper" problem which always exists in the pixel-based change

  15. Temporal characterization of the Stanford Mid-IR FEL by frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, B.A.; DeLong, K.W.; Trebino, R.

    1995-02-01

    We measure the time-dependent intensity and phase of laser pulses from the Stanford Mid-IR FEL. We present the first measurements of near-transform-limited, linearly chirped, and sideband modulated FEL pulses.

  16. Enhanced crop discrimination using the mid-IR (1.55-1.75μm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungar, S. G.; Goward, S. N.

    Improvements in crop discrimination can be realized by using mid-IR bands (1.55-1.75 μm and 2.08-2.35 μm) which are sensitive to canopy moisture content. Analyses of data from two growing seasons in Webster County, Iowa clearly indicate that corn and soybeans are highly separable in the mid-IR from early season through harvest. This contrasts sharply with visible and near-IR bands where corn and soybeans are confused throughout much of the growing season. The mid-IR temporal reflectance behavior appears to result from differences between C4 monocot and C3 dicot internal leaf structure. If this hypothesis holds, mid-IR observations should improve discrimination in other instances where similar differences in internal leaf structure are present.

  17. SU-E-T-415: An Ionization Chamber Array with High Spatial Resolution for External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Togno, M; Wilkens, J; Menichelli, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To characterize an ionization chamber array technology with high spatial resolution and high charge collection efficiency for external beam radiotherapy. Methods: The prototype under test is a linear array of air vented ionization chambers developed by IBA Dosimetry, consisting of 80 pixels with 3.5mm spatial resolution and 4mm{sup 3} sensitive volume. The detector was characterized in a plastic phantom with {sup 60} Co radiation and MV X-rays from an ELEKTA Agility LINAC (with flattened and unflattened beam qualities). Bias voltage was varied in order to evaluate charge collection efficiency. A commercial array of ionization chambers (MatriXX Evolution, IBA Dosimetry) and an amorphous silicon flat panel in direct conversion configuration were used as references. Results: Repeatability (0.4%) and stability under continuous gamma irradiation (0.3%) are very good, in spite of low active volume and sensitivity (∼200pC/Gy). Charge collection efficiency is higher than 99% already at 150V with ∼2mGy dose per pulse, leading to a ±1.1% sensitivity change with dose per pulse in the range 0.09-2mGy (covering all flattened and unflattened applications). Measured dose profiles are in agreement with MatriXX for fields larger than 2×2cm{sup 2}, in which case the linear array offers a much better characterization of the penumbra region. Down to 1×1cm{sup 2}, measured profiles are in very good agreement with the flat panel. Conclusion: The array represents a valuable tool for the characterization of treatment fields in which high spatial resolution is required, together with the dosimetric performance of air vented ionization chambers. Such a technology would be particularly valuable in association with advanced treatment modalities such as rotational radiotherapy, stereotactic treatments (even with unflattened beam qualities) and proton therapy, due to the insensitivity of the chambers on dose per pulse. In the future, a two dimensional prototype based on this

  18. Performance assessment of the single photon emission microscope: high spatial resolution SPECT imaging of small animal organs.

    PubMed

    Mejia, J; Reis, M A; Miranda, A C C; Batista, I R; Barboza, M R F; Shih, M C; Fu, G; Chen, C T; Meng, L J; Bressan, R A; Amaro, E

    2013-11-01

    The single photon emission microscope (SPEM) is an instrument developed to obtain high spatial resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images of small structures inside the mouse brain. SPEM consists of two independent imaging devices, which combine a multipinhole collimator, a high-resolution, thallium-doped cesium iodide [CsI(Tl)] columnar scintillator, a demagnifying/intensifier tube, and an electron-multiplying charge-coupling device (CCD). Collimators have 300- and 450-µm diameter pinholes on tungsten slabs, in hexagonal arrays of 19 and 7 holes. Projection data are acquired in a photon-counting strategy, where CCD frames are stored at 50 frames per second, with a radius of rotation of 35 mm and magnification factor of one. The image reconstruction software tool is based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. Our aim was to evaluate the spatial resolution and sensitivity attainable with the seven-pinhole imaging device, together with the linearity for quantification on the tomographic images, and to test the instrument in obtaining tomographic images of different mouse organs. A spatial resolution better than 500 µm and a sensitivity of 21.6 counts·s-1·MBq-1 were reached, as well as a correlation coefficient between activity and intensity better than 0.99, when imaging 99mTc sources. Images of the thyroid, heart, lungs, and bones of mice were registered using 99mTc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals in times appropriate for routine preclinical experimentation of <1 h per projection data set. Detailed experimental protocols and images of the aforementioned organs are shown. We plan to extend the instrument's field of view to fix larger animals and to combine data from both detectors to reduce the acquisition time or applied activity. PMID:24270908

  19. AN ACTIVE-PASSIVE COMBINED ALGORITHM FOR HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION RETRIEVAL OF SOIL MOISTURE FROM SATELLITE SENSORS (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi, V.; Mladenova, I. E.; Narayan, U.

    2009-12-01

    Soil moisture is known to be an essential factor in controlling the partitioning of rainfall into surface runoff and infiltration and solar energy into latent and sensible heat fluxes. Remote sensing has long proven its capability to obtain soil moisture in near real-time. However, at the present time we have the Advanced Scanning Microwave Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board NASA’s AQUA platform is the only satellite sensor that supplies a soil moisture product. AMSR-E coarse spatial resolution (~ 50 km at 6.9 GHz) strongly limits its applicability for small scale studies. A very promising technique for spatial disaggregation by combining radar and radiometer observations has been demonstrated by the authors using a methodology is based on the assumption that any change in measured brightness temperature and backscatter from one to the next time step is due primarily to change in soil wetness. The approach uses radiometric estimates of soil moisture at a lower resolution to compute the sensitivity of radar to soil moisture at the lower resolution. This estimate of sensitivity is then disaggregated using vegetation water content, vegetation type and soil texture information, which are the variables on which determine the radar sensitivity to soil moisture and are generally available at a scale of radar observation. This change detection algorithm is applied to several locations. We have used aircraft observed active and passive data over Walnut Creek watershed in Central Iowa in 2002; the Little Washita Watershed in Oklahoma in 2003 and the Murrumbidgee Catchment in southeastern Australia for 2006. All of these locations have different soils and land cover conditions which leads to a rigorous test of the disaggregation algorithm. Furthermore, we compare the derived high spatial resolution soil moisture to in-situ sampling and ground observation networks

  20. Mid-IR spectra of pre-main sequence Herbig stars: An explanation for the non-detections of water lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonellini, S.; Kamp, I.; Lahuis, F.; Woitke, P.; Thi, W.-F.; Meijerink, R.; Aresu, G.; Spaans, M.; Güdel, M.; Liebhart, A.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The mid-IR detection rate of water lines in disks around Herbig stars disks is about 5%, while it is around 50% for disks around T Tauri stars. The reason for this is still unclear. Aims: In this study, we want to find an explanation for the different detection rates between low mass and high mass pre-main-sequence stars in the mid-IR regime. Methods: We ran disk models with stellar parameters adjusted to spectral types B9 through M2, using the radiation thermo-chemical disk modelling code ProDiMo. We explored also a small parameter space around a standard disk model, considering dust-to-gas mass ratio, disk gas mass, mixing coefficient for dust settling, flaring index, dust maximum size, and size power law distribution index. We produced convolved spectra at the resolution of Spitzer, IRS, JWST MIRI, and VLT VISIR spectrographs. We applied random noise derived from typical Spitzer spectra for a direct comparison with observations. Results: The strength of the mid-IR water lines correlates directly with the luminosity of the central star. The models show that it is possible to suppress the water emission; however, current observations are not sensitive enough to detect mid-IR lines in disks for most of the explored parameters. The presence of noise in the spectra, combined with the high continuum flux (noise level is proportional to the continuum flux), is the most likely explanation for the non-detections towards Herbig stars. Conclusions: Mid-IR spectra with resolution higher than 20 000 are needed to investigate water in protoplanetary disks. Intrinsic differences in disk structure, such as inner gaps, gas-to-dust ratio, dust size and distribution, and inner disk scale height, between Herbig and T Tauri star disks are able to explain a lower water detection rate in disks around Herbig stars.

  1. Uncovering the deactivation mechanism of Au catalyst with operando high spatial resolution IR and X-ray microspectroscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Elad

    2016-06-01

    Detecting the reaction mechanism of multistep catalytic transformations is essential for optimization of these complex processes. In this study, the mechanism of catalyst deactivation within a flow reactor was studied under reaction conditions. Spectral mapping of the catalyst and the organic phase along a flow reactor were performed with micrometer-sized synchrotron-based X-ray and IR beams, respectively, with a spatial resolution of 15 μm. Heterogeneous Au catalyst was packed in a flow reactor and activated toward the cascade reaction of pyran formation. X-ray absorption microspectroscopy measurements revealed that the highly oxidized Au(III), which is the catalytically active species, was continuously reduced along the flow reactor. IR microspectroscopy measurements detected a direct correlation between the reduction of the Au catalyst and deactivation of the catalytic process. It was observed that within 1.5 mm from the reactor's inlet all the catalytic reactivity was quenched. Microspectroscopy measurements determined that the reduction of Au(III) was induced by nucleophilic attack of butanol, which is one of the reactants in this reaction. Slower deactivation rates were measured once the reactants concentration was decreased by an order of magnitude. Under these conditions the reaction path within the flow reactor was increased from 1.5 to 6 mm. These results demonstrate the molecular level understanding of reaction mechanism which can be achieved by high spatial resolution microspectroscopy measurements.

  2. Laser Ablation - Accelerator Mass Spectrometry: An Approach for Rapid Radiocarbon Analyses of Carbonate Archives at High Spatial Resolution.

    PubMed

    Welte, Caroline; Wacker, Lukas; Hattendorf, Bodo; Christl, Marcus; Fohlmeister, Jens; Breitenbach, Sebastian F M; Robinson, Laura F; Andrews, Allen H; Freiwald, André; Farmer, Jesse R; Yeman, Christiane; Synal, Hans-Arno; Günther, Detlef

    2016-09-01

    A new instrumental setup, combining laser ablation (LA) with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), has been investigated for the online radiocarbon ((14)C) analysis of carbonate records. Samples were placed in an in-house designed LA-cell, and CO2 gas was produced by ablation using a 193 nm ArF excimer laser. The (14)C/(12)C abundance ratio of the gas was then analyzed by gas ion source AMS. This configuration allows flexible and time-resolved acquisition of (14)C profiles in contrast to conventional measurements, where only the bulk composition of discrete samples can be obtained. Three different measurement modes, i.e. discrete layer analysis, survey scans, and precision scans, were investigated and compared using a stalagmite sample and, subsequently, applied to terrestrial and marine carbonates. Depending on the measurement mode, a precision of typically 1-5% combined with a spatial resolution of 100 μm can be obtained. Prominent (14)C features, such as the atomic bomb (14)C peak, can be resolved by scanning several cm of a sample within 1 h. Stalagmite, deep-sea coral, and mollusk shell samples yielded comparable signal intensities, which again were comparable to those of conventional gas measurements. The novel LA-AMS setup allowed rapid scans on a variety of sample materials with high spatial resolution. PMID:27396439

  3. a Kernel Method Based on Topic Model for Very High Spatial Resolution (vhsr) Remote Sensing Image Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Linmei; Shen, Li; Li, Zhipeng

    2016-06-01

    A kernel-based method for very high spatial resolution remote sensing image classification is proposed in this article. The new kernel method is based on spectral-spatial information and structure information as well, which is acquired from topic model, Latent Dirichlet Allocation model. The final kernel function is defined as K = u1Kspec + u2Kspat + u3Kstru, in which Kspec, Kspat, Kstru are radial basis function (RBF) and u1 + u2 + u3 = 1. In the experiment, comparison with three other kernel methods, including the spectral-based, the spectral- and spatial-based and the spectral- and structure-based method, is provided for a panchromatic QuickBird image of a suburban area with a size of 900 × 900 pixels and spatial resolution of 0.6 m. The result shows that the overall accuracy of the spectral- and structure-based kernel method is 80 %, which is higher than the spectral-based kernel method, as well as the spectral- and spatial-based which accuracy respectively is 67 % and 74 %. What's more, the accuracy of the proposed composite kernel method that jointly uses the spectral, spatial, and structure information is highest among the four methods which is increased to 83 %. On the other hand, the result of the experiment also verifies the validity of the expression of structure information about the remote sensing image.

  4. Mapping the trajectory of the stria terminalis of the human limbic system using high spatial resolution diffusion tensor tractography.

    PubMed

    Kamali, Arash; Yousem, David M; Lin, Doris D; Sair, Haris I; Jasti, Siva P; Keser, Zafer; Riascos, Roy F; Hasan, Khader M

    2015-11-01

    The human limbic system is composed of gray and white matter structures which have been known to have a role in core processes such as motivation, memory, emotion, social behavior, self-awareness as well as certain primitive instincts. Multiple functional studies investigated some of these brain tasks in human brain limbic system. However, the underlying fine fiber pathways of the limbic system including the trajectory of the stria terminalis have not been delineated separately by prior diffusion weighted imaging. The ability to trace the underlying fiber anatomy noninvasively using diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) would be helpful to study the neurophysiology of these tracts in different functions in future functional studies. Few studies have focused on the stria terminalis using diffusion tensor tractography. Yet, the trajectory of the stria terminalis and some fine subtrajectories of the fornix have not been elucidated by prior DTT studies. We decided to further investigate these fine neuronal trajectory using tractography and high spatial resolution diffusion tensor imaging on 3T. Fifteen healthy right-handed men (age range 24-37 years) were studied. We delineated the detailed trajectories of the stria terminalis and fornix bilaterally in fifteen normal adult human brains. Using a high resolution DTT technique, we demonstrate for the first time, the trajectory of stria terminalis as well as detailed precommissural and postcommissural connectivity of the forniceal columns.

  5. A scintillator fabricated by solid-state diffusion bonding for high spatial resolution x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameshima, Takashi; Sato, Takahiro; Kudo, Togo; Ono, Shun; Ozaki, Kyosuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina

    2016-07-01

    Lens-coupled two-dimensional indirect X-ray detectors with thin-film scintillators are important for high spatial resolution X-ray imaging. To achieve high quality high-resolution images, we propose a novel fabrication method for thin-film scintillators based on solid-state diffusion bonding. Scintillators were successfully produced with thicknesses of 5, 10, and 20 μm, with a surface flatness better than λ/10. X-ray imaging performance with a point spread function of 8 μm FWHM was demonstrated with a prototype X-ray detector equipped with a 20-μm-thick scintillator, at an effective spatial sampling of 4 μm/pixel and a field of view of 2.56 x 1.92 mm2. At the request of all authors of the paper and with the agreement of the proceedings editors an updated version of this article was published on 1 September 2016. An older version of the paper was inadvertently supplied to AIP Publishing and the final version is now available.

  6. Laser Ablation - Accelerator Mass Spectrometry: An Approach for Rapid Radiocarbon Analyses of Carbonate Archives at High Spatial Resolution.

    PubMed

    Welte, Caroline; Wacker, Lukas; Hattendorf, Bodo; Christl, Marcus; Fohlmeister, Jens; Breitenbach, Sebastian F M; Robinson, Laura F; Andrews, Allen H; Freiwald, André; Farmer, Jesse R; Yeman, Christiane; Synal, Hans-Arno; Günther, Detlef

    2016-09-01

    A new instrumental setup, combining laser ablation (LA) with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), has been investigated for the online radiocarbon ((14)C) analysis of carbonate records. Samples were placed in an in-house designed LA-cell, and CO2 gas was produced by ablation using a 193 nm ArF excimer laser. The (14)C/(12)C abundance ratio of the gas was then analyzed by gas ion source AMS. This configuration allows flexible and time-resolved acquisition of (14)C profiles in contrast to conventional measurements, where only the bulk composition of discrete samples can be obtained. Three different measurement modes, i.e. discrete layer analysis, survey scans, and precision scans, were investigated and compared using a stalagmite sample and, subsequently, applied to terrestrial and marine carbonates. Depending on the measurement mode, a precision of typically 1-5% combined with a spatial resolution of 100 μm can be obtained. Prominent (14)C features, such as the atomic bomb (14)C peak, can be resolved by scanning several cm of a sample within 1 h. Stalagmite, deep-sea coral, and mollusk shell samples yielded comparable signal intensities, which again were comparable to those of conventional gas measurements. The novel LA-AMS setup allowed rapid scans on a variety of sample materials with high spatial resolution.

  7. Redox and speciation mapping of rock thin sections using high spatial resolution full-field imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Andrade, V.; Susini, J.; Salomé, M.; Beraldin, O.; Heymes, T.; Lewin, E.

    2009-04-01

    Because of their complex genesis, natural rocks are the most often heterogeneous systems, with various scale-level heterogeneities for both chemistry and structure. In the last decade, the dramatic improvements of hyperspectral imaging techniques provided new tools for accurate material characterisation. Most of these micro- and nano- analytical techniques rely on scanning instruments, which offer high spatial resolution but suffer from long acquisition times imposing practical limits on the field of view. Conversely, full-field imaging techniques rely on a fast parallel acquisition but have limited resolution. Although soft X-ray full-field microscopes based on Fresnel zone plates are commonly used for high resolution imaging, its combination with spectroscopy is challenging and 2D chemical mapping still difficult. For harder X-rays, lensless X-ray microscope based on simple propagation geometry is easier and can be readily used for 2D spectro-microscopy. A full-field experimental setup was optimized at the ESRF-ID21 beamline to image iron redox and speciation distributions in rocks thin sections. The setup comprises a Si111 or Si220 (E = 0.4 eV) monochromator, a special sample stage and a sensitive camera associated with a brand new GGG:Eu light conversion scintillator and high magnification visible light optics. The pixel size ranges from 1.6 to 0.16 m according to the optic used. This instrument was used to analyse phyllosilicates and oxides of metamorphic sediments coming from the Aspromonte nappes-pile in Calabria. Iron chemical state distributions were derived - from images of 1000 Ã- 2000 Ã- 30 m3 rock thin sections - by subtraction of absorption images above and below the Fe K-edge. Using an automatic stitching reconstruction, a wide field image (4Ã-3 mm2 with a 1 m2 resolution for a total of about 12 millions pixels) of Fetotal elemental distribution was produced. Moreover, -XANES analyses (more than 1 million individual -XANES spectra) were performed

  8. Exploration of very high spatial resolution data for vegetation mapping using cartographic ontologies: Identifying life forms to mapping formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Gallegos, Hugo Benigno

    Vegetation mapping is often considered the process of identifying landscape patterns of individuals or clusters of species or life forms (LF). At the landscape scale, the larger pattern represented by individuals or clusters represents the conceptualization of "vegetation mapping" and can be used as a building block to describe an ecosystem. To represent these building blocks or LF a "common entity (CE)" concept is introduced to represent the components of Formations as described by the National Vegetation Classification (NVC) system. The NVC has established protocols to consistently represent plant communities and promote coordinated management, particularly across jurisdictional boundaries. However, it is not a universal standard and the methods of producing detailed maps of vegetation CE from very high spatial resolution (VHR) remote sensing data are important research questions. This research addressed how best to understand and represent plant cover in arid regions, the most effective methods of mapping vegetation cover using high spatial resolution data, how to assess the accuracy of these maps, and their value in establishing more standardized mapping protocols across ecosystems. Utilizing VHR products from the IKONOS and QuickBird sensors the study focused on the Coronado National Memorial and Chiricahua National Monument in Arizona and Los Ajos and Pinacate - Grand Desierto Biosphere Reserves in Mexico. Individual CE were semi-automatically mapped incorporating spectral, textural and geostatistical variables. The results were evaluated across sensors, study sites, and input variables. In addition, multiple methods of acquiring field data for accuracy assessment were evaluated and then an evaluation was made of a semi-automatic determination of Formation based on CE. The results of the study suggest consistency across study sites using the IKONOS data. A comparison between VHR products from the same place is feasible but sensor spectral differences may

  9. From AWE-GEN to AWE-GEN-2d: a high spatial and temporal resolution weather generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peleg, Nadav; Fatichi, Simone; Paschalis, Athanasios; Molnar, Peter; Burlando, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    A new weather generator, AWE-GEN-2d (Advanced WEather GENerator for 2-Dimension grid) is developed following the philosophy of combining physical and stochastic approaches to simulate meteorological variables at high spatial and temporal resolution (e.g. 2 km x 2 km and 5 min for precipitation and cloud cover and 100 m x 100 m and 1 h for other variables variable (temperature, solar radiation, vapor pressure, atmospheric pressure and near-surface wind). The model is suitable to investigate the impacts of climate variability, temporal and spatial resolutions of forcing on hydrological, ecological, agricultural and geomorphological impacts studies. Using appropriate parameterization the model can be used in the context of climate change. Here we present the model technical structure of AWE-GEN-2d, which is a substantial evolution of four preceding models (i) the hourly-point scale Advanced WEather GENerator (AWE-GEN) presented by Fatichi et al. (2011, Adv. Water Resour.) (ii) the Space-Time Realizations of Areal Precipitation (STREAP) model introduced by Paschalis et al. (2013, Water Resour. Res.), (iii) the High-Resolution Synoptically conditioned Weather Generator developed by Peleg and Morin (2014, Water Resour. Res.), and (iv) the Wind-field Interpolation by Non Divergent Schemes presented by Burlando et al. (2007, Boundary-Layer Meteorol.). The AWE-GEN-2d is relatively parsimonious in terms of computational demand and allows generating many stochastic realizations of current and projected climates in an efficient way. An example of model application and testing is presented with reference to a case study in the Wallis region, a complex orography terrain in the Swiss Alps.

  10. Proteohistography--direct analysis of tissue with high sensitivity and high spatial resolution using ProteinChip technology.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Günther; Melle, Christian; Schimmel, Bettina; Bleul, Annett; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2006-01-01

    On the proteomic level, all tissues, tissue constituents, or even single cells are heterogeneous, but the biological relevance of this cannot be adequately investigated with any currently available technique. The analysis of proteins of small tissue areas by any proteomic approach is limited by the number of required cells. Increasing the number of cells only serves to lower the spatial resolution of expressed proteins. To enhance sensitivity and spatial resolution we developed Proteohistography. Laser microdissection was used to mark special areas of interest on tissue sections attached to glass slides. These areas were positioned under microscopic control directly on an affinity chromatographic ProteinChip Array so that cells were lysed and their released proteins bound on a spatially defined point. The ProteinChip System, surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS), allows the laser to be steered to up to 215 distinct positions across the surface of the spot, enabling a high spatial resolution of measured protein profiles for the analyzed tissue area. Protein profiles of the single positions were visually plotted over the used tissue section to visualize distribution proteohistologically. Results show that the spatial distribution of detectable proteins could be used as a Proteohistogram for a given tissue area. Consequently, this procedure can provide additional information to both a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-based approach and immunohistochemistry, as it is more sensitive, highly quantitative, and no specific antibody is needed. Hence, proteomic heterogeneity can be visualized even if proteins are not known or identified. PMID:16148310

  11. Adjusting spectral indices for spectral response function differences of very high spatial resolution sensors simulated from field spectra.

    PubMed

    Cundill, Sharon L; van der Werff, Harald M A; van der Meijde, Mark

    2015-03-13

    The use of data from multiple sensors is often required to ensure data coverage and continuity, but differences in the spectral characteristics of sensors result in spectral index values being different. This study investigates spectral response function effects on 48 spectral indices for cultivated grasslands using simulated data of 10 very high spatial resolution sensors, convolved from field reflectance spectra of a grass covered dike (with varying vegetation condition). Index values for 48 indices were calculated for original narrow-band spectra and convolved data sets, and then compared. The indices Difference Vegetation Index (DVI), Global Environmental Monitoring Index (GEMI), Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), Modified Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI2) and Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), which include the difference between the near-infrared and red bands, have values most similar to those of the original spectra across all 10 sensors (1:1 line mean 1:1R2 > 0.960 and linear trend mean ccR2 > 0.997). Additionally, relationships between the indices' values and two quality indicators for grass covered dikes were compared to those of the original spectra. For the soil moisture indicator, indices that ratio bands performed better across sensors than those that difference bands, while for the dike cover quality indicator, both the choice of bands and their formulation are important.

  12. Scene Classfication Based on the Semantic-Feature Fusion Fully Sparse Topic Model for High Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiqi; Zhong, Yanfei; Zhang, Liangpei

    2016-06-01

    Topic modeling has been an increasingly mature method to bridge the semantic gap between the low-level features and high-level semantic information. However, with more and more high spatial resolution (HSR) images to deal with, conventional probabilistic topic model (PTM) usually presents the images with a dense semantic representation. This consumes more time and requires more storage space. In addition, due to the complex spectral and spatial information, a combination of multiple complementary features is proved to be an effective strategy to improve the performance for HSR image scene classification. But it should be noticed that how the distinct features are fused to fully describe the challenging HSR images, which is a critical factor for scene classification. In this paper, a semantic-feature fusion fully sparse topic model (SFF-FSTM) is proposed for HSR imagery scene classification. In SFF-FSTM, three heterogeneous features - the mean and standard deviation based spectral feature, wavelet based texture feature, and dense scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) based structural feature are effectively fused at the latent semantic level. The combination of multiple semantic-feature fusion strategy and sparse based FSTM is able to provide adequate feature representations, and can achieve comparable performance with limited training samples. Experimental results on the UC Merced dataset and Google dataset of SIRI-WHU demonstrate that the proposed method can improve the performance of scene classification compared with other scene classification methods for HSR imagery.

  13. High Spatial Resolution Infrared Micro-Spectroscopy Reveals the Mechanism of Leaf Lignin Decomposition by Aquatic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Janice L.; Baldwin, Darren S.; Tobin, Mark J.; Puskar, Ljiljana; Kappen, Peter; Rees, Gavin N.; Silvester, Ewen

    2013-01-01

    Organic carbon is a critical component of aquatic systems, providing energy storage and transfer between organisms. Fungi are a major decomposer group in the aquatic carbon cycle, and are one of few groups thought to be capable of breaking down woody (lignified) tissue. In this work we have used high spatial resolution (synchrotron light source) infrared micro-spectroscopy to study the interaction between aquatic fungi and lignified leaf vein material (xylem) from River Redgum trees (E. camaldulensis) endemic to the lowland rivers of South-Eastern Australia. The work provides spatially explicit evidence that fungal colonisation of leaf litter involves the oxidative breakdown of lignin immediately adjacent to the fungal tissue and depletion of the lignin-bound cellulose. Cellulose depletion occurs over relatively short length scales (5–15 µm) and highlights the likely importance of mechanical breakdown in accessing the carbohydrate content of this resource. Low bioavailability compounds (oxidized lignin and polyphenols of plant origin) remain in colonised leaves, even after fungal activity diminishes, and suggests a possible pathway for the sequestration of carbon in wetlands. The work shows that fungi likely have a critical role in the partitioning of lignified material into a biodegradable fraction that can re-enter the aquatic carbon cycle, and a recalcitrant fraction that enters long-term storage in sediments or contribute to the formation of dissolved organic carbon in the water column. PMID:23577169

  14. Correction to ``Extracting Man-Made Objects From High Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing Images via Fast Level Set Evolutions''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongbin; Shi, Wenzhong; Wang, Qunming; Miao, Zelang

    2015-10-01

    Object extraction from remote sensing images has long been an intensive research topic in the field of surveying and mapping. Most existing methods are devoted to handling just one type of object and little attention has been paid to improving the computational efficiency. In recent years, level set evolution (LSE) has been shown to be very promising for object extraction in the community of image processing and computer vision because it can handle topological changes automatically while achieving high accuracy. However, the application of state-of-the-art LSEs is compromised by laborious parameter tuning and expensive computation. In this paper, we proposed two fast LSEs for man-made object extraction from high spatial resolution remote sensing images. The traditional mean curvature-based regularization term is replaced by a Gaussian kernel and it is mathematically sound to do that. Thus a larger time step can be used in the numerical scheme to expedite the proposed LSEs. In contrast to existing methods, the proposed LSEs are significantly faster. Most importantly, they involve much fewer parameters while achieving better performance. The advantages of the proposed LSEs over other state-of-the-art approaches have been verified by a range of experiments.

  15. Improving the quantification of land cover pressure on stream ecological status at the riparian scale using High Spatial Resolution Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tormos, T.; Kosuth, P.; Durrieu, S.; Villeneuve, B.; Wasson, J. G.

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the interest of High Spatial Resolution Imagery (HSRI) and the limits of coarse land cover data such as CORINE Land Cover (CLC), for the accurate characterization of land cover structure along river corridors and of its functional links with freshwater ecological status on a large scale. For this purpose, we compared several spatial indicators built from two land cover maps of the Herault River corridor (southern France): one derived from the CLC database, the other derived from HSRI. The HSRI-derived map was obtained using a supervised object-based classification of multi-source remotely-sensed images (SPOT 5 XS-10 m and aerial photography-0.5 m) and presents an overall accuracy of 70%. The comparison between the two sets of spatial indicators highlights that the HSRI-derived map allows more accuracy in the quantification of land cover pressures near the stream: the spatial structure of the river landscape is finely resolved and the main attributes of riparian vegetation can be quantified in a reliable way. The next challenge will consist in developing an operational methodology using HSRI for large-scale mapping of river corridor land cover, for spatial indicator computation and for the development of related pressure/impact models, in order to improve the prediction of stream ecological status.

  16. Adjusting Spectral Indices for Spectral Response Function Differences of Very High Spatial Resolution Sensors Simulated from Field Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Cundill, Sharon L.; van der Werff, Harald M. A.; van der Meijde, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The use of data from multiple sensors is often required to ensure data coverage and continuity, but differences in the spectral characteristics of sensors result in spectral index values being different. This study investigates spectral response function effects on 48 spectral indices for cultivated grasslands using simulated data of 10 very high spatial resolution sensors, convolved from field reflectance spectra of a grass covered dike (with varying vegetation condition). Index values for 48 indices were calculated for original narrow-band spectra and convolved data sets, and then compared. The indices Difference Vegetation Index (DVI), Global Environmental Monitoring Index (GEMI), Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), Modified Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI2) and Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), which include the difference between the near-infrared and red bands, have values most similar to those of the original spectra across all 10 sensors (1:1 line mean 1:1R2 > 0.960 and linear trend mean ccR2 > 0.997). Additionally, relationships between the indices’ values and two quality indicators for grass covered dikes were compared to those of the original spectra. For the soil moisture indicator, indices that ratio bands performed better across sensors than those that difference bands, while for the dike cover quality indicator, both the choice of bands and their formulation are important. PMID:25781511

  17. High spatial resolution optical imaging of the multiple T Tauri system Lk Hα 262/Lk Hα 263

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, S.; Rebolo, R.; Oscoz, A.; Mackay, C.; Labadie, L.; Pérez Garrido, A.; Crass, J.; Díaz-Sánchez, A.; Femenía, B.; González-Escalera, V.; King, D. L.; López, R. L.; Puga, M.; Rodríguez-Ramos, L. F.; Zuther, J.

    2016-08-01

    We report high spatial resolution i' band imaging of the multiple T Tauri system LkHα 262/LkHα 263 obtained during the first commissioning period of the Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager (AOLI) at the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope, using its Lucky Imaging mode. AOLI images have provided photometry for each of the two components LkHα 263 A and B (0.41 arcsec separation) and marginal evidence for an unresolved binary or a disc in LkHα 262. The AOLI data combined with previously available and newly obtained optical and infrared imaging show that the three components of LkHα 263 are comoving, that there is orbital motion in the AB pair, and, remarkably, that LkHα 262-263 is a common proper motion system with less than 1 mas yr-1 relative motion. We argue that this is a likely five-component gravitationally bounded system. According to BT-settl models the mass of each of the five components is close to 0.4 M⊙ and the age is in the range 1-2 Myr. The presence of discs in some of the components offers an interesting opportunity to investigate the formation and evolution of discs in the early stages of multiple very low mass systems. In particular, we provide tentative evidence that the disc in 263C could be coplanar with the orbit of 263AB.

  18. Automatic change detection of buildings in urban environment from very high spatial resolution images using existing geodatabase and prior knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouziani, Mourad; Goïta, Kalifa; He, Dong-Chen

    2010-01-01

    The updating of geodatabases (GDB) in urban environments is a difficult and expensive task. It may be facilitated by an automatic change detection method. Several methods have been developed for medium and low spatial resolution images. This study proposes a new method for change detection of buildings in urban environments from very high spatial resolution images (VHSR) and using existing digital cartographic data. The proposed methodology is composed of several stages. The existing knowledge on the buildings and the other urban objects are first modelled and saved in a knowledge base. Some change detection rules are defined at this stage. Then, the image is segmented. The parameters of segmentation are computed thanks to the integration between the image and the geodatabase. Thereafter, the segmented image is analyzed using the knowledge base to localize the segments where the change of building is likely to occur. The change detection rules are then applied on these segments to identify the segments that represent the changes of buildings. These changes represent the updates of buildings to be added to the geodatabase. The data used in this research concern the city of Sherbrooke (Quebec, Canada) and the city of Rabat (Morocco). For Sherbrooke, we used an Ikonos image acquired in October 2006 and a GDB at the scale of 1:20,000. For Rabat, a QuickBird image acquired in August 2006 has been used with a GDB at the scale of 1:10,000. The rate of good detection is 90%. The proposed method presents some limitations on the detection of the exact contours of the buildings. It could be improved by including a shape post-analysis of detected buildings. The proposed method could be integrated into a cartographic update process or as a method for the quality assessment of a geodatabase. It could be also be used to identify illegal building work or to monitor urban growth.

  19. Surface solar radiation variability over Eastern Mediterranean: A high spatial resolution view from satellite and ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandri, Georgia; Georgoulias, Aristeidis K.; Meleti, Charikleia; Balis, Dimitris

    2013-04-01

    Surface Solar Radiation (SSR) has been measured for decades from ground-based observations for several spots around the planet. On the other hand, during the last decades, satellite observations made possible the assessment of the spatial variability of the SSR at a global as well as regional scale. In this study, a detailed view of the SSR spatiotemporal variability is presented at a high spatial resolution, focusing on the region of Eastern Mediterranean. This is a region of particular interest since it is affected by aerosols of various origins (continental, sea, dust and biomass burning particles) and encloses countries with significant socioeconomical changes during the last decades. The SSR satellite data used in this study have been obtained from the Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) (www.cmsaf.eu). The CM SAF SSR dataset is based on reflections in the visible channel of Meteosat First Generation, has a spatial resolution of 0.03ox0.03o and spans from 1983 to 2005. The satellite observations are validated against ground-based measurements for the city of Thessaloniki, a coastal city of ~1 million inhabitants in northern Greece, situated in the heart of Eastern Mediterranean. Measurements from two pyranometers, an Eppley Precision pyranometer (1983-1992) and a Kipp & Zonen CM-11 pyranometer (1993-2005), both located at the center of the city, were homogenized and a uniform time series for the 23 year period was constructed. SSR was also calculated with the use of MODIS level-2 aerosol and cloud satellite data for the region of Thessaloniki and the Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) model. These new satellite-based results are compared to both CM SAF and ground-based observations in order to examine whether SBDART and MODIS could be further used for the investigation of the spatial patterns of SSR in the area.

  20. New light-amplifier-based detector designs for high spatial resolution and high sensitivity CBCT mammography and fluoroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rudin, Stephen; Kuhls, Andrew T.; Yadava, Girijesh K.; Josan, Gaurav C.; Wu, Ye; Chityala, Ravishankar N.; Rangwala, Hussain S.; Ciprian Ionita, N.; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    New cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) mammography system designs are presented where the detectors provide high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, low noise, wide dynamic range, negligible lag and high frame rates similar to features required for high performance fluoroscopy detectors. The x-ray detectors consist of a phosphor coupled by a fiber-optic taper to either a high gain image light amplifier (LA) then CCD camera or to an electron multiplying CCD. When a square-array of such detectors is used, a field-of-view (FOV) to 20 × 20 cm can be obtained where the images have pixel-resolution of 100 µm or better. To achieve practical CBCT mammography scan-times, 30 fps may be acquired with quantum limited (noise free) performance below 0.2 µR detector exposure per frame. Because of the flexible voltage controlled gain of the LA’s and EMCCDs, large detector dynamic range is also achievable. Features of such detector systems with arrays of either generation 2 (Gen 2) or 3 (Gen 3) LAs optically coupled to CCD cameras or arrays of EMCCDs coupled directly are compared. Quantum accounting analysis is done for a variety of such designs where either the lowest number of information carriers off the LA photo-cathode or electrons released in the EMCCDs per x-ray absorbed in the phosphor are large enough to imply no quantum sink for the design. These new LA- or EMCCD-based systems could lead to vastly improved CBCT mammography, ROI-CT, or fluoroscopy performance compared to systems using flat panels. PMID:21297904

  1. Integration of the GG model with SEBAL to produce time series of evapotranspiration of high spatial resolution at watershed scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Di; Singh, Vijay P.

    2010-11-01

    Lack of good quality satellite images because of cloud contamination or long revisit time severely degrades predictions of evapotranspiration (ET) time series at watershed/regional scales from satellite-based surface flux models. We integrate the feedback model developed by Granger and Gray (the GG model) with the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL), with the objective to generate ET time series of high spatial resolution and reliable temporal distribution at watershed scales. First, SEBAL is employed to yield estimates of ET for the Baiyangdian watershed in a semihumid climatic zone in north China on cloud-free days, where there exists the complementary relationship (CR) between actual ET and pan ET. These estimates constitute input to the GG model to inversely derive the relationship between the relative evaporation and the relative drying power of the air. Second, the modified GG model is used to yield ET time series on a daily basis simply by using routine meteorological data and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) albedo and leaf area index products. Results suggest that the modified GG model that has incorporated remotely sensed ET can effectively extend remote sensing based ET to days without images and improve spatial representation of ET at watershed scales. Utility of the evaporative fraction method and the crop coefficients approaches to extrapolate ET time series depends largely on the number and interval of good quality satellite images. Comparison of ET time series from the two techniques and the proposed integration method for days with daily net radiation larger than 100 W m-2 and corresponding pan ET clearly shows that only the integration method can exhibit an asymmetric CR at the watershed scale and daily time scale. Validation performed using hydrologic budget calculations indicate that the proposed method has the highest accuracy in terms of annual estimates of ET for both watersheds in north China.

  2. Revealing the ventral amygdalofugal pathway of the human limbic system using high spatial resolution diffusion tensor tractography.

    PubMed

    Kamali, Arash; Sair, Haris I; Blitz, Ari M; Riascos, Roy F; Mirbagheri, Saeedeh; Keser, Zafer; Hasan, Khader M

    2016-09-01

    The amygdala is known to have a role in core processes regulated by the limbic system such as motivation, memory, emotion, social behavior, self-awareness as well as certain primitive instincts. Several functional studies have investigated some of these brain tasks of the human limbic system. However, the underlying neuronal fiber connectivity of the amygdalo-diencephalon, as part of the limbic system, has not been delineated separately by prior diffusion-weighted imaging studies. The ability to trace the underlying fiber connections individually will be helpful in understanding the neurophysiology of these tracts in different functions. To date, few diffusion-weighted studies have focused on the amygdala, yet the fine connections of the amygdala, hypothalamus, septum or other adjacent limbic structures have yet to be elucidated by diffusion-weighted tractography studies. We therefore aimed to further investigate these fine neuronal connections using fiber tractography and high spatial resolution diffusion tensor imaging on 3T on 15 healthy right-handed male human subjects (age range 24-37 years). The ventral amygdalofugal pathway, anterior commissure and stria terminalis are the three main efferent pathways of the amygdala. We delineated the detailed trajectories of the ventral amygdalofugal tract, anterior commissure and their connections bilaterally in 15 normal adult human brains. Using a high-resolution diffusion tensor tractography technique, for the first time, we were able to demonstrate the trajectory of amygdalofugal tract and its connections to the hypothalamic and septal nuclei. We further revealed, for the first time, the close relationship of the amygdalofugal tract and anterior commissure with the fornix, stria terminalis and uncinate fasciculus bilaterally in 15 healthy adult human brains.

  3. A DOI Detector With Crystal Scatter Identification Capability for High Sensitivity and High Spatial Resolution PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Z.; Prout, D. L.; Silverman, R. W.; Herman, H.; Dooraghi, A.; Chatziioannou, A. F.

    2015-01-01

    potentially lead to a high spatial resolution, high sensitivity and DOI PET system. PMID:26478600

  4. Indirect Terahertz Spectroscopy of Molecular Ions Using Highly Accurate and Precise Mid-Ir Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Andrew A.; Ford, Kyle B.; Kreckel, Holger; Perera, Manori; Crabtree, Kyle N.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2009-06-01

    With the advent of Herschel and SOFIA, laboratory methods capable of providing molecular rest frequencies in the terahertz and sub-millimeter regime are increasingly important. As of yet, it has been difficult to perform spectroscopy in this wavelength region due to the limited availability of radiation sources, optics, and detectors. Our goal is to provide accurate THz rest frequencies for molecular ions by combining previously recorded microwave transitions with combination differences obtained from high precision mid-IR spectroscopy. We are constructing a Sensitive Resolved Ion Beam Spectroscopy setup which will harness the benefits of kinematic compression in a molecular ion beam to enable very high resolution spectroscopy. This ion beam is interrogated by continuous-wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy using a home-made widely tunable difference frequency laser that utilizes two near-IR lasers and a periodically-poled lithium niobate crystal. Here, we report our efforts to optimize our ion beam spectrometer and to perform high-precision and high-accuracy frequency measurements using an optical frequency comb. footnote

  5. High-Spatial and High-Mass Resolution Imaging of Surface Metabolites of Arabidopsis thaliana by Laser Desorption-Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using Colloidal Silver

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Ji Hyun; Song, Zhihong; Liu, Zhenjiu; Nikolau, Basil J.; Yeung, Edward S.; and Lee, Young Jin

    2010-03-17

    High-spatial resolution and high-mass resolution techniques are developed and adopted for the mass spectrometric imaging of epicuticular lipids on the surface of Arabidopsis thaliana. Single cell level spatial resolution of {approx}12 {micro}m was achieved by reducing the laser beam size by using an optical fiber with 25 {micro}m core diameter in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer and improved matrix application using an oscillating capillary nebulizer. Fine chemical images of a whole flower were visualized in this high spatial resolution showing substructure of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anthers. The LTQ-Orbitrap with a MALDI ion source was adopted to achieve MS imaging in high mass resolution. Specifically, isobaric silver ion adducts of C29 alkane (m/z 515.3741) and C28 aldehyde (m/z 515.3377), indistinguishable in low-resolution LTQ, can now be clearly distinguished and their chemical images could be separately constructed. In the application to roots, the high spatial resolution allowed molecular MS imaging of secondary roots and the high mass resolution allowed direct identification of lipid metabolites on root surfaces.

  6. High Spatial Resolution Forecasting of Long-Term Monthly Precipitation and Mean Temperature Trends in Data Scarce Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosier, T. M.; Hill, D. F.; Sharp, K. V.

    2013-12-01

    High spatial resolution time-series data are critical for many hydrological and earth science studies. Multiple groups have developed historical and forecast datasets of high-resolution monthly time-series for regions of the world such as the United States (e.g. PRISM for hindcast data and MACA for long-term forecasts); however, analogous datasets have not been available for most data scarce regions. The current work fills this data need by producing and freely distributing hindcast and forecast time-series datasets of monthly precipitation and mean temperature for all global land surfaces, gridded at a 30 arc-second resolution. The hindcast data are constructed through a Delta downscaling method, using as inputs 0.5 degree monthly time-series and 30 arc-second climatology global weather datasets developed by Willmott & Matsuura and WorldClim, respectively. The forecast data are formulated using a similar downscaling method, but with an additional step to remove bias from the climate variable's probability distribution over each region of interest. The downscaling package is designed to be compatible with a number of general circulation models (GCM) (e.g. with GCMs developed for the IPCC AR4 report and CMIP5), and is presently implemented using time-series data from the NCAR CESM1 model in conjunction with 30 arc-second future decadal climatologies distributed by the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research. The resulting downscaled datasets are 30 arc-second time-series forecasts of monthly precipitation and mean temperature available for all global land areas. As an example of these data, historical and forecast 30 arc-second monthly time-series from 1950 through 2070 are created and analyzed for the region encompassing Pakistan. For this case study, forecast datasets corresponding to the future representative concentration pathways 45 and 85 scenarios developed by the IPCC are presented and compared. This exercise highlights a range of potential

  7. Measurements of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Other Related Tracers at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution in an Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgeron, J.; Yasuhara, S.; Rella, C.; Jacobson, G. A.; Chiao, S.

    2012-12-01

    Measurements of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Other Related Tracers at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution in an Urban Environment Jeff Forgeron1,2, Scott Yasuhara1,2, Chris Rella1, Gloria Jacobson1, Sen Chiao2 1Picarro Inc., 3105 Patrick Henry Drive, Santa Clara California 95054 USA 2San Jose State University, 1 Washington Square, San Jose California USA JeffAForgeron@gmail.com The ability to quantify sources and sinks of carbon dioxide and methane on the urban scale is essential for understanding the atmospheric drivers to global climate change. In the 'top-down' approach, overall carbon fluxes are determined by combining remote measurements of carbon dioxide concentrations with complex atmospheric transport models, and these emissions measurements are compared to 'bottom-up' predictions based on detailed inventories of the sources and sinks of carbon, both anthropogenic and biogenic in nature. This approach, which has proven to be effective at continental scales, becomes challenging to implement at urban scales, due to poorly understood atmospheric transport models and high variability of the emissions sources in space (e.g., factories, highways, green spaces) and time (rush hours, factory shifts and shutdowns, and diurnal and seasonal variation in residential energy use). New measurement and analysis techniques are required to make sense of the carbon dioxide signal in cities. Here we present detailed, high spatial- and temporal- resolution greenhouse gas measurements made by multiple Picarro-CRDS analyzers in Silicon Valley in California. Real-time carbon dioxide data from a 12-month period are combined with real-time carbon monoxide, methane, acetylene, and carbon-13 measurements to partition the observed carbon dioxide concentrations between different anthropogenic sectors (e.g., transport, residential) and biogenic sources. Real-time wind rose data are also combined with real-time methane data to help identify the direction of local emissions of methane

  8. Skeletal muscle fiber analysis by atmospheric pressure scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging at high mass and high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Garrett, Timothy J; Carter, Christy S; Spengler, Bernhard; Yost, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscles are composed of heterogeneous muscle fibers with various fiber types. These fibers can be classified into different classes based on their different characteristics. MALDI mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) has been applied to study and visualize different metabolomics profiles of different fiber types. Here, skeletal muscles were analyzed by atmospheric pressure scanning microprobe MALDI-MSI at high spatial and high mass resolution.

  9. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER): Data Products for the High Spatial Resolution Imager on NASA's EOS-AMI Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is a high spatial resolution, multispectral imager with along-track stereo capabilities scheduled for launch on the first NASA spacecraft of the Earth Observing System (EOS AM-1) in mid-1999.

  10. In-situ 3D high-spatial resolution aquifer characterization with hydraulic parameter distribution at decameter scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, R.; Brauchler, R.; Hu, L.; Qiu, P.

    2015-12-01

    Currently, a major challenge in aquifer characterization is the determination of hydraulic parameters with high-spatial resolution. Since the mid-90's, various working groups have developed numerical evaluation approaches for hydraulic tomography: the inversion of hydraulic tests that have been recorded using tomographic arrangements. The practical application is often associated with long test times, complex evaluations, and prolonged computation times. In our study, a hydraulic tomographical data set consisted of 450 drawdown curves produced by a series of short term pumping tests conducted over 4 working days. Data was collected by two scientists without a technical staff. The tests were performed at the test site "Stegemühle", Göttingen, Germany in a confined sand and gravel aquifer with a thickness of 2-3 m. For the inversion, an approach has been used, which is based on the transformation of the groundwater flow equation into a form of Eikonal equation (Vasco et al., 2000). Utilizing this approach, the hydraulic data can be inverted using an Eikonal solver e.g. SIRT. This Eikonal solver is considerably computationally efficient and allows hundreds of draw down curves to be inverted on a standard laptop within minutes. Following the methodology described in Brauchler et al. 2013, 3D distribution of diffusivity and specific storage were directly reconstructed, and subsequently their product: the hydraulic conductivity. This study exemplifies that the required data can be recorded and analyzed efficiently in the field, which is a vital precondition for the in-situ field aquifer characterization with hydraulic tomography. Literature Vasco, D.W., Keers, H., Karasaki, K. (2000) Estimation of reservoir properties using transient pressure data: An asymptotic approach. Water Resour. Res. 36(12), 3447-3465 Brauchler, R., Hu, R., Hu, L., Jimenéz, S., Bayer, P., Ptak, T. (2013) Rapid field application of hydraulic tomography for resolving aquifer heterogeneity in

  11. Visualization of Active Glucocerebrosidase in Rodent Brain with High Spatial Resolution following In Situ Labeling with Fluorescent Activity Based Probes

    PubMed Central

    Herrera Moro Chao, Daniela; Kallemeijn, Wouter W.; Marques, Andre R. A.; Orre, Marie; Ottenhoff, Roelof; van Roomen, Cindy; Foppen, Ewout; Renner, Maria C.; Moeton, Martina; van Eijk, Marco; Boot, Rolf G.; Kamphuis, Willem; Hol, Elly M.; Aten, Jan; Overkleeft, Hermen S.; Kalsbeek, Andries; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease is characterized by lysosomal accumulation of glucosylceramide due to deficient activity of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase (GBA). In cells, glucosylceramide is also degraded outside lysosomes by the enzyme glucosylceramidase 2 (GBA2) of which inherited deficiency is associated with ataxias. The interest in GBA and glucosylceramide metabolism in the brain has grown following the notion that mutations in the GBA gene impose a risk factor for motor disorders such as α-synucleinopathies. We earlier developed a β-glucopyranosyl-configured cyclophellitol-epoxide type activity based probe (ABP) allowing in vivo and in vitro visualization of active molecules of GBA with high spatial resolution. Labeling occurs through covalent linkage of the ABP to the catalytic nucleophile residue in the enzyme pocket. Here, we describe a method to visualize active GBA molecules in rat brain slices using in vivo labeling. Brain areas related to motor control, like the basal ganglia and motor related structures in the brainstem, show a high content of active GBA. We also developed a β-glucopyranosyl cyclophellitol-aziridine ABP allowing in situ labeling of GBA2. Labeled GBA2 in brain areas can be identified and quantified upon gel electrophoresis. The distribution of active GBA2 markedly differs from that of GBA, being highest in the cerebellar cortex. The histological findings with ABP labeling were confirmed by biochemical analysis of isolated brain areas. In conclusion, ABPs offer sensitive tools to visualize active GBA and to study the distribution of GBA2 in the brain and thus may find application to establish the role of these enzymes in neurodegenerative disease conditions such as α-synucleinopathies and cerebellar ataxia. PMID:26418157

  12. An object-based approach to delineate wetlands across landscapes of varied disturbance with high spatial resolution satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mui, Amy; He, Yuhong; Weng, Qihao

    2015-11-01

    Mapping wetlands across both natural and human-altered landscapes is important for the management of these ecosystems. Though they are considered important landscape elements providing both ecological and socioeconomic benefits, accurate wetland inventories do not exist in many areas. In this study, a multi-scale geographic object-based image analysis (GEOBIA) approach was employed to segment three high spatial resolution images acquired over landscapes of varying heterogeneity due to human-disturbance to determine the robustness of this method to changing scene variability. Multispectral layers, a digital elevation layer, normalized-difference vegetation index (NDVI) layer, and a first-order texture layer were used to segment images across three segmentation scales with a focus on accurate delineation of wetland boundaries and wetland components. Each ancillary input layer contributed to improving segmentation at different scales. Wetlands were classified using a nearest neighbor approach across a relatively undisturbed park site and an agricultural site using GeoEye1 imagery, and an urban site using WorldView2 data. Successful wetland classification was achieved across all study sites with an accuracy above 80%, though results suggest that overall a higher degree of landscape heterogeneity may negatively affect both segmentation and classification. The agricultural site suffered from the greatest amount of over and under segmentation, and lowest map accuracy (kappa: 0.78) which was partially attributed to confusion among a greater proportion of mixed vegetated classes from both wetlands and uplands. Accuracy of individual wetland classes based on the Canadian Wetland Classification system varied between each site, with kappa values ranging from 0.64 for the swamp class and 0.89 for the marsh class. This research developed a unique approach to mapping wetlands of various degrees of disturbance using GEOBIA, which can be applied to study other wetlands of similar

  13. Analysis of Vegetation Within A Semi-Arid Urban Environment Using High Spatial Resolution Airborne Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Ridd, Merrill K.

    1998-01-01

    High spatial resolution (5 m) remote sensing data obtained using the airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) sensor for daytime and nighttime have been used to measure thermal energy responses for 2 broad classes and 10 subclasses of vegetation typical of the Salt Lake City, Utah urban landscape. Polygons representing discrete areas corresponding to the 10 subclasses of vegetation types have been delineated from the remote sensing data and are used for analysis of upwelling thermal energy for day, night, and the change in response between day and night or flux, as measured by the TIMS. These data have been used to produce three-dimensional graphs of energy responses in W/ sq m for day, night, and flux, for each urban vegetation land cover as measured by each of the six channels of the TIMS sensor. Analysis of these graphs provides a unique perspective for both viewing and understanding thermal responses, as recorded by the TIMS, for selected vegetation types common to Salt Lake City. A descriptive interpretation is given for each of the day, night, and flux graphs along with an analysis of what the patterns mean in reference to the thermal properties of the vegetation types surveyed in this study. From analyses of these graphs, it is apparent that thermal responses for vegetation can be highly varied as a function of the biophysical properties of the vegetation itself, as well as other factors. Moreover, it is also seen where vegetation, particularly trees, has a significant influence on damping or mitigating the amount of thermal radiation upwelling into the atmosphere across the Salt Lake City urban landscape. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  14. Measurements of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Other Related Tracers at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution in an Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuhara, Scott; Forgeron, Jeff; Rella, Chris; Franz, Patrick; Jacobson, Gloria; Chiao, Sen; Saad, Nabil

    2013-04-01

    The ability to quantify sources and sinks of carbon dioxide and methane on the urban scale is essential for understanding the atmospheric drivers to global climate change. In the 'top-down' approach, overall carbon fluxes are determined by combining remote measurements of carbon dioxide concentrations with complex atmospheric transport models, and these emissions measurements are compared to 'bottom-up' predictions based on detailed inventories of the sources and sinks of carbon, both anthropogenic and biogenic in nature. This approach, which has proven to be effective at continental scales, becomes challenging to implement at urban scales, due to poorly understood atmospheric transport models and high variability of the emissions sources in space (e.g., factories, highways, green spaces) and time (rush hours, factory shifts and shutdowns, and diurnal and seasonal variation in residential energy use). New measurement and analysis techniques are required to make sense of the carbon dioxide signal in cities. Here we present detailed, high spatial- and temporal- resolution greenhouse gas measurements made by multiple Picarro-CRDS analyzers in Silicon Valley in California. Real-time carbon dioxide data from a 20-month period are combined with real-time carbon monoxide, methane, and acetylene to partition the observed carbon dioxide concentrations between different anthropogenic sectors (e.g., transport, residential) and biogenic sources. Real-time wind rose data are also combined with real-time methane data to help identify the direction of local emissions of methane. High resolution WRF models are also included to better understand the dynamics of the boundary layer. The ratio between carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide is shown to vary over more than a factor of two from season to season or even from day to night, indicating rapid but frequent shifts in the balance between different carbon dioxide sources. Additional information is given by acetylene, a fossil fuel

  15. The Hestia Project: High Spatial Resolution Fossil Fuel Carbon Dioxide Emissions Quantification at Hourly Scale in Indianapolis, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Gurney, K. R.

    2009-12-01

    In order to advance the scientific understanding of carbon exchange with the land surface and contribute to sound, quantitatively-based U.S. climate change policy interests, quantification of greenhouse gases emissions drivers at fine spatial and temporal scales is essential. Quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions, the primary greenhouse gases, has become a key component to cost-effective CO2 emissions mitigation options and a carbon trading system. Called the ‘Hestia Project’, this pilot study generated CO2 emissions down to high spatial resolution and hourly scale for the greater Indianapolis region in the USA through the use of air quality and traffic monitoring data, remote sensing, GIS, and building energy modeling. The CO2 emissions were constructed from three data source categories: area, point, and mobile. For the area source emissions, we developed an energy consumption model using DOE/EIA survey data on building characteristics and energy consumption. With the Vulcan Project’s county-level CO2 emissions and simulated building energy consumption, we quantified the CO2 emissions for each individual building by allocating Vulcan emissions to roughly 50,000 structures in Indianapolis. The temporal pattern of CO2 emissions in each individual building was developed based on temporal patterns of energy consumption. The point sources emissions were derived from the EPA National Emissions Inventory data and effluent monitoring of electricity producing facilities. The mobile source CO2 emissions were estimated at the month/county scale using the Mobile6 combustion model and the National Mobile Inventory Model database. The month/county scale mobile source CO2 emissions were downscaled to the “native” spatial resolution of road segments every hour using a GIS road atlas and traffic monitoring data. The result is shown in Figure 1. The resulting urban-scale inventory can serve as a baseline of current CO2 emissions and should be of immediate use to

  16. Fast events and waves in an active region of the Sun observed in Hα with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Andrade Nuño, B.; Bello González, N.; Blanco Rodríguez, J.; Kneer, F.; Puschmann, K. G.

    2008-08-01

    Context: We study the chromosphere of an active region of the Sun in the Hα line. Aims: The development of new instrumentation and new methods of data analysis allows to scrutinize the dynamics of the solar chromosphere with high spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution. The observations we present shed light on some magneto-dynamic processes occurring above an active region in the chromosphere. Methods: We took a time series of 55 min in Hα from AR 10875 at θ≈36°. We used the “Göttingen” Fabry-Perot spectrometer at the Vacuum Tower Telescope, Observatorio del Teide/Tenerife, to obtain two-dimensional spectrograms in Hα. Adaptive optics and image reconstruction yielded a spatial resolution better than 0.5 arcsec throughout the time sequence. From the wealth of structures, we selected areas of interest to study further, in detail, some ongoing processes. Results: A small straight surge developed aside of a pore with upward phase speed of 100 km s-1 and line-of-sight (LOS) velocity of 15 km s-1. The surge retreated rapidly with LOS velocity of 45 km s-1 at its mouth. It underwent a rebound and fell back again. Two sympathetic mini-flares were observed that lasted only approximately 40 s, but showed strong Hα emission. We found magnetoacoustic waves in long fibrils as mainly short wave trains, short packets or pulses, i.e., solitary waves consisting of small (1´´-2´´) blobs. They start at either end of the fibrils and travel with phase speeds of 12-14 km s-1, i.e., close to the tube speed and approximately the sound velocity for sufficiently large magnetic field strengths. Some waves speed up to reach velocities of the order of 30 km s-1. This is much lower than the expected Alfvén velocity of ≥200 km s-1 for reasonable magnetic field strengths and mass densities. We suggest that slow waves are not purely longitudinal, but possess gas velocities perpendicular to the direction of propagation of few km s-1. Also, fast waves travel along sinuous

  17. High spatial resolution WorldView-2 imagery for mapping NDVI and its relationship to temporal urban landscape evapotranspiration factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nouri, Hamideh; Beecham, Simon; Anderson, Sharolyn; Nagler, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Evapotranspiration estimation has benefitted from recent advances in remote sensing and GIS techniques particularly in agricultural applications rather than urban environments. This paper explores the relationship between urban vegetation evapotranspiration (ET) and vegetation indices derived from newly-developed high spatial resolution WorldView-2 imagery. The study site was Veale Gardens in Adelaide, Australia. Image processing was applied on five images captured from February 2012 to February 2013 using ERDAS Imagine. From 64 possible two band combinations of WorldView-2, the most reliable one (with the maximum median differences) was selected. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) values were derived for each category of landscape cover, namely trees, shrubs, turf grasses, impervious pavements, and water bodies. Urban landscape evapotranspiration rates for Veale Gardens were estimated through field monitoring using observational-based landscape coefficients. The relationships between remotely sensed NDVIs for the entire Veale Gardens and for individual NDVIs of different vegetation covers were compared with field measured urban landscape evapotranspiration rates. The water stress conditions experienced in January 2013 decreased the correlation between ET and NDVI with the highest relationship of ET-Landscape NDVI (Landscape Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) for shrubs (r2 = 0.66) and trees (r2 = 0.63). However, when the January data was excluded, there was a significant correlation between ET and NDVI. The highest correlation for ET-Landscape NDVI was found for the entire Veale Gardens regardless of vegetation type (r2 = 0.95, p > 0.05) and the lowest one was for turf (r2 = 0.88, p > 0.05). In support of the feasibility of ET estimation by WV2 over a longer period, an algorithm recently developed that estimates evapotranspiration rates based on the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) from MODIS was employed. The results revealed a significant positive

  18. High spatial resolution three-dimensional mapping of vegetation spectral dynamics using computer vision and hobbyist unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandois, J. P.; Ellis, E. C.

    2013-12-01

    High spatial resolution three-dimensional (3D) measurements of vegetation by remote sensing are advancing ecological research and environmental management. However, substantial economic and logistical costs limit this application, especially for observing phenological dynamics in ecosystem structure and spectral traits. Here we demonstrate a new aerial remote sensing system enabling routine and inexpensive aerial 3D measurements of canopy structure and spectral attributes, with properties similar to those of LIDAR, but with RGB (red-green-blue) spectral attributes for each point, enabling high frequency observations within a single growing season. This 'Ecosynth' methodology applies photogrammetric ''Structure from Motion'' computer vision algorithms to large sets of highly overlapping low altitude (< 130 m) aerial photographs acquired using off-the-shelf digital cameras mounted on an inexpensive (< USD$4000), lightweight (< 2 kg), hobbyist-grade unmanned aerial system (UAS). Ecosynth 3D point clouds with densities of 30 - 67 points m-2 were produced using commercial computer vision software from digital photographs acquired repeatedly by UAS over three 6.25 ha (250 m x 250 m) Temperate Deciduous forest sites in Maryland USA. Ecosynth canopy height maps (CHMs) were strong predictors of field-measured tree heights (R2 0.63 to 0.84) and were highly correlated with a LIDAR CHM (R 0.87) acquired 4 days earlier, though Ecosynth-based estimates of aboveground biomass densities included significant errors (31 - 36% of field-based estimates). Repeated scanning of a 0.25 ha forested area at six different times across a 16 month period revealed ecologically significant dynamics in canopy color at different heights and a structural shift upward in canopy density, as demonstrated by changes in vertical height profiles of point density and relative RGB brightness. Changes in canopy relative greenness were highly correlated (R2 = 0.88) with MODIS NDVI time series for the same

  19. The mid-IR and near-IR interferometry of AGNs: key results and their implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, M.

    2015-09-01

    Infrared interferometry has been very productive in directly probing the structure of AGNs at sub-pc scales. With tens of objects already probed in the mid-IR and near-IR, I will summarize the key results and im- plications from this direct exploration. The Keck interferometry in the near-IR and VLTI in the mid-IR shaped the luminosity dependence of the torus size and structure, while the latter also revealed an equatorial structure at several Rsub (dust sublimation radius), and a polar-elongated region at a few tens of Rsub. Notably, this polar component seems to dominate the compact mid-IR flux. This component can persuasively be attributed to a polar outflow. However, interferometry, through emissivity estimations, also indicates that it is not a UV-optically-thin cloud but participating in the obscuration of the nucleus. I will discuss how to accommodate all these facts to build a consistent picture.

  20. Energy-scalable pulsed mid-IR source using orientation-patterned GaAs.

    PubMed

    French, Douglas; Peterson, Rita; Jovanovic, Igor

    2011-02-15

    Coherent mid-IR sources based on orientation-patterned GaAs (OPGaAs) are of significant interest in diverse scientific, medical, and military applications. The generation of long-wavelength mid-IR beams in OPGaAs using optical parametric oscillation exhibits limitations in the obtainable pulse energy and peak power. The master oscillator power amplifier concept is demonstrated in OPGaAs, by which a mid-IR source based on optical parametric oscillation can be scaled to high energy by amplification of the output of the optical parametric oscillator in an optical parametric amplifier (OPA). A fivefold increase in the pulse energy is obtained using this method by amplifying 3.85μm pulses in an OPGaAs OPA pumped by a Th,Ho:YLF Q-switched laser.

  1. Mid IR pulsed light source for laser ultrasonic testing of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatano, H.; Watanabe, M.; Kitamura, K.; Naito, M.; Yamawaki, H.; Slater, R.

    2015-09-01

    A quasi-phase-matched (QPM) optical parametric oscillator (OPO) was developed using a periodically poled Mg-doped stoichiometric LiTaO3 crystal to generate mid-IR light for excitation of laser ultrasound in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP). The ultrasound generation efficiency was measured at the three different wavelengths that emanate from the OPO: 1.064 μm, 1.59/1.57 μm, and 3.23/3.30 μm. The measurements indicate that mid-IR 3.2-3.3 μm light generates the most efficient ultrasonic waves in CFRP with the least laser damage. We used mid-IR light in conjunction with a laser interferometer to demonstrate the detection of flaws/defects in CFRP such as the existence of air gaps that mimic delamination and voids in CFRP, and the inhomogeneous adhesion of CFRP material to a metal plate was also clearly detected.

  2. High spatial and temporal resolution retrospective cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance from shortened free breathing real-time acquisitions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is challenging in patients who cannot perform repeated breath holds. Real-time, free-breathing acquisition is an alternative, but image quality is typically inferior. There is a clinical need for techniques that achieve similar image quality to the segmented cine using a free breathing acquisition. Previously, high quality retrospectively gated cine images have been reconstructed from real-time acquisitions using parallel imaging and motion correction. These methods had limited clinical applicability due to lengthy acquisitions and volumetric measurements obtained with such methods have not previously been evaluated systematically. Methods This study introduces a new retrospective reconstruction scheme for real-time cine imaging which aims to shorten the required acquisition. A real-time acquisition of 16-20s per acquired slice was inputted into a retrospective cine reconstruction algorithm, which employed non-rigid registration to remove respiratory motion and SPIRiT non-linear reconstruction with temporal regularization to fill in missing data. The algorithm was used to reconstruct cine loops with high spatial (1.3-1.8 × 1.8-2.1 mm2) and temporal resolution (retrospectively gated, 30 cardiac phases, temporal resolution 34.3 ± 9.1 ms). Validation was performed in 15 healthy volunteers using two different acquisition resolutions (256 × 144/192 × 128 matrix sizes). For each subject, 9 to 12 short axis and 3 long axis slices were imaged with both segmented and real-time acquisitions. The retrospectively reconstructed real-time cine images were compared to a traditional segmented breath-held acquisition in terms of image quality scores. Image quality scoring was performed by two experts using a scale between 1 and 5 (poor to good). For every subject, LAX and three SAX slices were selected and reviewed in the random order. The reviewers were blinded to the reconstruction approach and

  3. Development of indicators of urban quality of life through very high spatial resolution remote sensing: A case study of Hanoi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Thi Thanh Hien

    In studies of urban quality of life, the information that can be extracted from satellite images is limited by image resolution and by the standard method of pixel classification. Recently, very high spatial resolution (VHSR) satellite images have allowed the development of new remote sensing application, especially for complex urban areas. Despite of the numerous advantages of the object-oriented approach for VHSR image processing, the parameters used to carry it out, especially at the object creation stage, are not very well documented. Moreover, the evaluation of urban quality of life has never considered the perception of inhabitants of the zones under study. This dissertation therefore addresses these two issues and aims 1) at testing a systematic ways of achieving the best parameters for object-oriented classification with the software Definiens and 2) at quantifying the relation between objective indicators and perceived satisfaction. Hoan Kiem district, in Hanoi, Vietnam, was chosen as our zone of interest. The image used for this study is a 0,7m spatial resolution Quickbird image. In the first part of the dissertation, we identify eight land occupation classes on the image: lakes, river, parks, groups of trees along streets, isolated trees, large road and residential blocks. Using these classes and additional cartographic information, we calculate nine quality of life indicators that correspond to two central aspects of urban life: commodity (urban services) and amenity (urban landscape). For each group of indicators, we carried out a principal components analysis to obtain non-correlated components. We then conducted a survey with eight city planning experts who live and work in the zone under study to Obtain an assessment of the satisfaction of inhabitants towards their area of residence. The weight of each component in the determination of quality of life was achieved through an ordinal regression whose independent variables are the components and the

  4. AMBER/VLTI observations of η Carinae with high spatial resolution and spectral resolutions of λ/Δ λ = 1500 and 12 000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigelt, G.; Driebe, T.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Kraus, S.; Petrov, R.; Schertl, D.

    2007-10-01

    We present the first NIR interferometric observations of the LBV η Carinae with high spectral resolution [Weigelt et al., 2007. Near-infrared interferometry of η Carinae with spectral resolutions of 1500 and 12000 using AMBER/VLTI. A&A 464, 87.]. Our observations demonstrate the potential of AMBER/VLTI to unveil new structures on the scales of milliarcseconds. The aim of this work is to study the wavelength dependence of η Car's optically thick wind region with a high spatial resolution of 5 mas (11 AU) and high spectral resolution. The observations were carried out with three 8.2 m VLTI Unit Telescopes. The raw data are interferograms obtained with spectral resolutions of λ/Δ λ = 1500 (MR-K mode) and 12 000 (HR-K mode). The observations were performed in the wavelength range around both the HeI 2.059 μm and the Brγ 2.166 μm emission lines. The spectrally dispersed AMBER interferograms allow us to investigate the wavelength dependence of the visibility, differential phase, and closure phase of η Car. If we fit [Hillier, D.J., Davidson, K., Ishibashi, K., Gull, T., 2001. On the Nature of the Central Source in η Carinae. ApJ 553, 837] model visibilities (Hillier et al., 2001) to the observed AMBER visibilities, we obtain 50% encircled-energy diameters of 4.3, 6.5, and 9.6 mas in the 2.17 μm continuum, the HeI, and the Brγ emission lines, respectively. We find good agreement between the measured visibilities and the predictions of the radiative transfer model of Hillier et al. (2001). Our observations support theoretical models of anisotropic winds from fast-rotating, luminous hot stars with enhanced high-velocity mass loss near the polar regions.

  5. Photonic crystals and Bragg gratings for the mid-IR and terahertz spectral ranges

    SciTech Connect

    Usikova, A. A. Il’inskaya, N. D.; Matveev, B. A.; Shubina, T. V.; Kop’ev, P. S.

    2013-12-15

    A method for the fabrication of 2D periodic structures by contact optical photolithography with image inversion is reported. The optical properties of photonic crystals and Bragg gratings for mid-IR and terahertz emitters are considered. The possibility of raising the integral emission intensity of light-emitting diodes for the mid-IR spectral range is demonstrated. The requirements to gratings for the output of terahertz emission generated by surface plasmons excited in layers of narrow-gap degenerate semiconductors with an accumulation layer are determined.

  6. A search for excess mid-IR emission from cataclysmic variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubus, G.; Campbell, R.; Kern, B.; Taam, R.; Spruit, H.

    Cataclysmic variables (CVs) regularly eject matter through winds and novae outbursts. A small fraction of this material may stay bound and accumulate around the binary in a disk. The strong braking exerted on the red dwarf by such a circumbinary (CB) disk would explain several puzzles in our current understanding of CV evolution. Thermal emission from CB disks could easily have gone unnoticed since the mid-IR emission of CVs remains largely unexplored. We present the results of a near- and mid-IR survey of 8 CVs obtained at the Keck I in Sep. 2002.

  7. Perfect light trapping in mid-IR using patterned ZnO structures (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vangala, Shivashankar R.; Nader, Nima; Cleary, Justin W.; Guo, Junpeng; Leedy, Kevin D.; Hendrickson, Joshua R.

    2015-09-01

    Plasmonic assisted mid-IR light trapping using 1D grating structures patterned in Ga-ZnO is demonstrated. FDTD simulations of these structures with proper grating period and depth show the light trapping into a resonant mode resulting in a close to 100% reflection dip in the 4-8 µm wavelength regime. The 1D grating structures of different periods are fabricated using standard photolithography followed by etching. The resonant reflection dips in the experimentally measured spectra well agree with the FDTD simulation, exhibiting light trapping in the mid-IR as predicted.

  8. Broadband femtosecond parametric amplification in KTA close to mid-IR transparency cutoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potemkin, F. V.; Migal, E. A.; Podshivalov, A. A.; Gordienko, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    We report an increase in conversion efficiency and significant broadening of signal and idler bandwidth in the collinear KTA optical parametric amplifier operating close to mid-IR transparency cutoff (5.2 μm) for a visible and near IR pump. Using a 1.24 μm pump we have produced 2 μJ idler pulses at 3.8 μm central wavelength with a bandwidth supporting 65 fs transform limited duration. Further tuning to mid-IR up to 5 μm could be achieved with a 620 nm pump.

  9. Measurements of Carbon Dioxide, Carbon Monoxide, and Other Related Tracers at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution in an Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rella, C.; Jacobson, G.

    2012-04-01

    The ability to quantify the sources and sinks of carbon dioxide on the urban scale is essential for understanding the atmospheric drivers to global climate change. In the 'top-down' approach, overall carbon fluxes are determined by combining remote measurements of carbon dioxide concentrations with complex atmospheric transport models, and these emissions measurements are compared to "bottoms-up" predictions based on detailed inventories of the sources and sinks of carbon, both anthropogenic and biogenic in nature. This approach, which has been proven to be effective at continental scales, becomes challenging to implement at the urban scale, due to poorly understood micrometeorological atmospheric transport models and high variability of the emissions sources in space (e.g., factories, highways, residences) and time (rush hours, factory shifts and shutdowns, residential energy usage variability during the day and over the year). New measurement and analysis techniques are required to make sense of the carbon dioxide signal in cities. Here we present detailed, high spatial- and temporal-resolution greenhouse gas measurements in Silicon Valley in California. The synthesis of two experimental campaigns is presented: real-time measurements from two ten-meter urban 'towers,' and ground-based mobile mapping measurements. Real-time carbon dioxide data from a nine-month period are combined with real-time carbon monoxide, methane, acetylene, and carbon 13 measurements to partition the observed CO2 concentrations between different anthropogenic sectors (e.g., transport, residential) and biogenic sources. The carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide ratio is shown to vary over more than a factor of two from season to season or even from day to night, indicating rapid and frequent shifts in the balance between different carbon dioxide sources. Clear differences are seen between the two urban sites, which are separated by 7 km. Further information is given by the carbon 13 signature

  10. Measurements of Carbon Dioxide and Carbon Monoxide at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution in an Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rella, C.; Jacobson, G. A.; Crosson, E.

    2011-12-01

    The ability to take inventory of critical greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane and quantify their sources and sinks is essential for understanding the atmospheric drivers to global climate change. "Top down" inversion measurements and models are used to quantify net carbon fluxes into the atmosphere. The overall carbon fluxes are determined by combining remote measurements of carbon dioxide concentrations with complex atmospheric transport models, and these emissions measurements are compared to "bottoms-up" predictions based on detailed inventories of the sources and sinks of carbon, both anthropogenic and biogenic in nature. At smaller distance scales, such as that of a city or even smaller, the basic framework underpinning the inversion modeling technique begins to break down: atmospheric transport models, which are well understood at a length scale of 100 km, work poorly or not at all at a 100m distance scale. Furthermore, the variability of the emissions sources in space (e.g., factories, highways, residences) and time (rush hours, factory shifts and shutdowns, residential energy usage variability during the day and over the year) complicate the interpretation of the measured signals. In this paper we present detailed, high spatial- and temporal-resolution greenhouse gas measurements in Silicon Valley, CA. The results of two experimental campaigns are presented: a 10m urban 'tower' and ground-based mobile mapping measurements. In both campaigns, real-time carbon dioxide data are combined with real-time carbon monoxide measurements to partition the observed CO2 concentrations between anthropogenic and biogenic sources . The urban tower measurements are made continuously over a period of many weeks. The mobile maps of the vicinity of the urban tower are taken repeatedly over a period of several days, and at different times of the day and under different atmospheric conditions, to assess the robustness and repeatability of the maps. Initial

  11. A spectral-structural bag-of-features scene classifier for very high spatial resolution remote sensing imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bei; Zhong, Yanfei; Zhang, Liangpei

    2016-06-01

    Land-use classification of very high spatial resolution remote sensing (VHSR) imagery is one of the most challenging tasks in the field of remote sensing image processing. However, the land-use classification is hard to be addressed by the land-cover classification techniques, due to the complexity of the land-use scenes. Scene classification is considered to be one of the expected ways to address the land-use classification issue. The commonly used scene classification methods of VHSR imagery are all derived from the computer vision community that mainly deal with terrestrial image recognition. Differing from terrestrial images, VHSR images are taken by looking down with airborne and spaceborne sensors, which leads to the distinct light conditions and spatial configuration of land cover in VHSR imagery. Considering the distinct characteristics, two questions should be answered: (1) Which type or combination of information is suitable for the VHSR imagery scene classification? (2) Which scene classification algorithm is best for VHSR imagery? In this paper, an efficient spectral-structural bag-of-features scene classifier (SSBFC) is proposed to combine the spectral and structural information of VHSR imagery. SSBFC utilizes the first- and second-order statistics (the mean and standard deviation values, MeanStd) as the statistical spectral descriptor for the spectral information of the VHSR imagery, and uses dense scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) as the structural feature descriptor. From the experimental results, the spectral information works better than the structural information, while the combination of the spectral and structural information is better than any single type of information. Taking the characteristic of the spatial configuration into consideration, SSBFC uses the whole image scene as the scope of the pooling operator, instead of the scope generated by a spatial pyramid (SP) commonly used in terrestrial image classification. The experimental

  12. Relating Multi-Scale Phenology to Arctic Ecosystem Parameters Using Various High Spatial and Spectral Resolution Remote Sensing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, S. A.; Melendez, M.; Tweedie, C. E.; Oberbauer, S. F.

    2012-12-01

    The need to improve the spatial and temporal scaling and extrapolation of plot level ecosystem properties and processes to the landscape level remains a persistent research challenge in the Arctic. Plant and landscape phenology is sensitive to a number of variable environmental factors such as soil moisture, temperature, and radiation. Seasonal and inter-annual environmental differences in these factors and phenology can affect surface energy and carbon balance and reflectance. Therefore improved scaling and extrapolation of phenological dynamics from the plot level to the landscape level is key to further understanding the impact of climate and other environmental change in arctic terrestrial ecosystems. This study contributes to the US Arctic Observing Network and focuses on a range of remotely sensed spectral indices derived from ground-based hyperspectral reflectance, time-lapse photography, kite aerial photography (KAP), and satellite imagery during the 2010-2012 snow free periods for the Networked Info-Mechanical Systems (NIMS) grids (2 x 50 meters) located in Barrow and Atqasuk, Alaska. Range of greenness indices have been calculated for different vegetation types (i.e. dry, moist, wet, aquatic) within each site. Preliminary results show that NDVI values acquired from ground based hyperspectral reflectance show similar seasonal and interannual trends as the 2G-RB index values derived for both the KAP and time-lapse time series photography for both study locations. An increase in peak season NDVI and 2G-RB values for dry, moist, and wet vegetation types were seen between the years of 2011 and 2012 for ground reflectance and KAP platforms in Barrow. While peak season 2G-RB values for dry, moist, and wet vegetation types increased using the time-lapse images between the years of 2011 and 2012 in Atqasuk. Intercomparison with high spatial resolution satellite imagery is on going. Plot level measurements have provided detailed insight into a range of ecosystem

  13. Daily High Spatial Resolution Evapotranspiration Estimation Using Multi-Satellite Data Fusion Approach in Agricultural and Forested Sites in the U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Anderson, M. C.; Semmens, K. A.; Gao, F.; Kustas, W. P.; Hain, C.; Schull, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET), as a major part of the water balance, is a key indicator of vegetation stress and also represents various types of water usage strategies. High spatial and temporal resolution ET mapping can provide detailed information about daily vegetation water use and soil moisture status at finer scales, which is important to water management and vegetation condition monitoring. This research employs a multi-scale ET modeling system which is based on the two source surface energy balance (TSEB) model. We discuss the utility of applying this modeling system over an irrigated agriculture area in California and a forested site in North Carolina. The multi-scale ET modeling system integrates the Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse model and associated disaggregation scheme (ALEXI/DisALEXI) and fuses the ET estimations from both MODIS (1km, daily) and Landsat (30m, bi-weekly). The Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflective Fusion Model (STARFM) is used to retrieve high spatial and temporal resolution ET. A Data Mining Sharpener (DMS) methodology is used in the system to sharpen the native Landsat thermal infrared band (TIR) to 30m resolution. Comparing with Landsat only ET retrievals, this ET modeling system can optimize the usage of multi-satellite data, which are in different temporal and spatial resolution, to maximize the utility of high spatial and temporal ET estimation. Daily high spatial resolution ET retrievals are compared with observations from local flux towers. Determining how model output of daily water use information can be employed in irrigation and forest management applications will be discussed.

  14. Piezo activated mode tracking system for widely tunable mode-hop-free external cavity mid-IR semiconductor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wysocki, Gerard (Inventor); Tittel, Frank K. (Inventor); Curl, Robert F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A widely tunable, mode-hop-free semiconductor laser operating in the mid-IR comprises a QCL laser chip having an effective QCL cavity length, a diffraction grating defining a grating angle and an external cavity length with respect to said chip, and means for controlling the QCL cavity length, the external cavity length, and the grating angle. The laser of claim 1 wherein said chip may be tuned over a range of frequencies even in the absence of an anti-reflective coating. The diffraction grating is controllably pivotable and translatable relative to said chip and the effective QCL cavity length can be adjusted by varying the injection current to the chip. The laser can be used for high resolution spectroscopic applications and multi species trace-gas detection. Mode-hopping is avoided by controlling the effective QCL cavity length, the external cavity length, and the grating angle so as to replicate a virtual pivot point.

  15. Revealing molecular structure and dynamics through high-order harmonic generation driven by mid-IR fields

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, R.; Siegel, T.; Brugnera, L.; Ivanov, M. Yu.; Marangos, J. P.; Procino, I.; Underwood, Jonathan G.; Altucci, C.; Velotta, R.; Springate, E.; Froud, C.; Turcu, I. C. E.; Patchkovskii, S.; Smirnova, O.

    2010-05-15

    High-order harmonic generation (HHG) from molecules produces spectra that are modulated by interferences that encode both the static structure and the electron dynamics initiated by interaction with the laser field. Using a midinfrared (mid-IR) laser at 1300 nm, we are able to study the region of the harmonic spectrum containing such interferences in CO{sub 2} over a wide range of intensities. This allows for isolation and characterization of interference minima arising due to subcycle electronic dynamics triggered by the laser field, which had previously been identified but not systematically separated. Our experimental and theoretical results demonstrate important steps toward combining attosecond temporal and angstrom-scale spatial resolution in molecular HHG imaging.

  16. Mid-IR Photonic-Crystal Interband Cascade Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mijin; Kim, Chul Soo; Bewley, William; Canedy, Chadwick; Lindle, James; Nolde, Jill; Larrabee, Diane; Vurgaftman, Igor; Meyer, Jerry

    2008-03-01

    Photonic-crystal distributed-feedback (PCDFB) semiconductor lasers have the potential to maintain optical coherence over very large areas. We report an electrically pumped PCDFB laser operating in a true single mode in the mid-infrared. A two-dimensional grating was formed on top of an interband cascade laser emitting at 3.3 μm by patterning a high-index Ge layer. The grating and the 400-μm-wide gain stripe were tilted by 20^o with respect to the facet. Current spreading was prevented by ion bombarding the region outside the gain stripe rather than etching of a ridge. The gain region at the back of the cavity was also terminated by ion bombardment, since feedback from the back facet is undesirable. A single mode was emitted with maximum cw output power > 60 mW, resolution-limited spectral linewidth (side-mode suppression ratio 27 dB), and single-lobe spatial far-field with angular full width at half maximum of 0.5^o. Comparison of the near and far field patterns indicated effective M^2 3. The observation of low efficiency is thought to be due primarily to inadequate grating coupling, which can be remedied by thickening the Ge layer.

  17. Grism Performance for Mid-IR (5-40 microns) Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennico, K. A.; Mar, D. J.; Jaffe, D. T.; Marsh, J. P.; Keller, L. D.; Herter, T. L.; Greene, T. P.; Adams, J. D.

    2006-01-01

    Grisms provide a straightforward method to transform an imager into a spectrometer with little change to the original imaging optics. This paper addresses the performance of a suite of grisms as part of an Astrobiology Science and Instrument Development (ASTID) Program to implement a moderate resolution spectroscopic capability to the mid/far-IR facility instrument FORCAST for the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) [see accompanying abstract by Adams et al.]. A moderate resolution mid-IR spectrometer on SOFIA will offer advantages not available to either ground or space-based instruments after the Spitzer Space Telescope ceases operation in approx. 2007. SOFIA will begin operations in 2007 and will have an operational lifetime of approx. 20 years. From aircraft altitudes, it will be possible to cover a range of wavelengths, particularly in the critical 5-9 micron band, where detection of astrobiologically interesting molecules have key spectral signatures, that are not accessible from the ground. This grism suite consists of six grisms: four monolithic Si grisms [see accompanying abstract by Mar et al.] and two KRS-5 grisms. These devices will allow long slit low-resolution and short slit, cross-dispersed high-resolution spectroscopic modes selectable by simply moving the camera filter wheels. This configuration will enable observing programs to gather images and spectra in a single SOFIA flight. The four silicon grisms, whose performance is highlighted in this paper, will operate in the following wavelength ranges: 5-8, 17-28, and 28-37 microns. In the 5-8 micron range, R=1200 is achievable for a 2 arcsecond slit using the grism as a cross-disperser. For the 17-28 and 28-37 micron ranges, the resolving powers are R approx. 130, 250 when used in low orders with a slit of 3 arcseconds. The silicon grisms demonstrate a new family of dispersive elements with good optical performance for spectroscopy from 1.2-8 micron and beyond 18 microns

  18. Skeletal muscle fiber analysis by atmospheric pressure scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging at high mass and high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Garrett, Timothy J; Carter, Christy S; Spengler, Bernhard; Yost, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscles are composed of heterogeneous muscle fibers with various fiber types. These fibers can be classified into different classes based on their different characteristics. MALDI mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) has been applied to study and visualize different metabolomics profiles of different fiber types. Here, skeletal muscles were analyzed by atmospheric pressure scanning microprobe MALDI-MSI at high spatial and high mass resolution. PMID:27198224

  19. Mid-IR Properties of an Unbiased AGN Sample of the Local Universe. 1; Emission-Line Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, K. A.; Melendez, M.; Muhotzky, R. F.; Kraemer, S.; Engle, K.; Malumuth. E.; Tueller, J.; Markwardt, C.; Berghea, C. T.; Dudik, R. P.; Winter, L. M.; Armus, L.

    2010-01-01

    \\Ve compare mid-IR emission-lines properties, from high-resolution Spitzer IRS spectra of a statistically-complete hard X-ray (14-195 keV) selected sample of nearby (z < 0.05) AGN detected by the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) aboard Swift. The luminosity distribution for the mid-infrared emission-lines, [O IV] 25.89 microns, [Ne II] 12.81 microns, [Ne III] 15.56 microns and [Ne V] 14.32 microns, and hard X-ray continuum show no differences between Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 populations, although six newly discovered BAT AGNs are shown to be under-luminous in [O IV], most likely the result of dust extinction in the host galaxy. The overall tightness of the mid-infrared correlations and BAT luminosities suggests that the emission lines primarily arise in gas ionized by the AGN. We also compared the mid-IR emission-lines in the BAT AGNs with those from published studies of star-forming galaxies and LINERs. We found that the BAT AGN fall into a distinctive region when comparing the [Ne III]/[Ne II] and the [O IV]/[Ne III] quantities. From this we found that sources that have been previously classified in the mid-infrared/optical as AGN have smaller emission line ratios than those found for the BAT AGNs, suggesting that, in our X-ray selected sample, the AGN represents the main contribution to the observed line emission. Overall, we present a different set of emission line diagnostics to distinguish between AGN and star forming galaxies that can be used as a tool to find new AGN.

  20. Calibration of a high spatial resolution laser two-color heterodyne interferometer for density profile measurements in the TJ-II stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Acedo, Pablo; Pedreira, P.; Criado, A. R.; Lamela, Horacio; Sanchez, Miguel; Sanchez, Joaquin

    2008-10-15

    A high spatial resolution two-color (CO{sub 2}, {lambda}=10.6 {mu}m, He-Ne, {lambda}=633 nm) interferometer for density profile measurements in the TJ-II stellarator is under development and installation, based in the currently operational single channel two-color heterodyne interferometer. To achieve the objectives of 32 channels, with 4-5 mm lateral separation between plasma chords, careful design and calibration of the interferometric waveforms for both the measurement and vibration compensation wavelengths are undertaken. The first step has been to set up in our laboratories an expanded-beam heterodyne/homodyne interferometer to evaluate the quality of both interferometric wavefronts, a reported source of poor vibration compensation and thus low resolution in the density profile measurements. This novel interferometric setup has allowed us to calibrate the spatial resolution in the profile measurements resulting in {approx}2 mm lateral resolution in the reconstruction of the interferometric wavefront.

  1. High power pumped mid-IR wavelength systems using nonlinear frequency mixing (NFM) devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Lang, Robert J. (Inventor); Waarts, Robert G. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Laser diode pumped mid-IR wavelength systems include at least one high power, near-IR wavelength, injection and/or sources wherein one or both of such sources may be tunable providing a pump wave output beam to a quasi-phase matched (QPM) nonlinear frequency mixing (NFM) device. The NFM device may be a difference frequency mixing (DFM) device or an optical parametric oscillation (OPO) device. Wavelength tuning of at least one of the sources advantageously provides the ability for optimizing pump or injection wavelengths to match the QPM properties of the NFM device enabling a broad range of mid-IR wavelength selectivity. Also, pump powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Raman/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device. Further, polarization conversion using Raman or Brillouin wavelength shifting is provided to optimize frequency conversion efficiency in the NFM device.

  2. High power pumped MID-IR wavelength devices using nonlinear frequency mixing (NFM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Lang, Robert J. (Inventor); Waarts, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Laser diode pumped mid-IR wavelength sources include at least one high power, near-IR wavelength, injection and/or sources wherein one or both of such sources may be tunable providing a pump wave output beam to a quasi-phase matched (QPM) nonlinear frequency mixing (NFM) device. The NFM device may be a difference frequency mixing (DFM) device or an optical parametric oscillation (OPO) device. Wavelength tuning of at least one of the sources advantageously provides the ability for optimizing pump or injection wavelengths to match the QPM properties of the NFM device enabling a broad range of mid-IR wavelength selectivity. Also, pump powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Raman/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device. Further, polarization conversion using Raman or Brillouin wavelength shifting is provided to optimize frequency conversion efficiency in the NFM device.

  3. Mid-IR gain media based on transition metal-doped II-VI chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirov, S. B.; Fedorov, V. V.; Martyshkin, D. V.; Moskalev, I. S.; Mirov, M. S.; Gafarov, O.; Martinez, A.; Peppers, J.; Smolski, V.; Vasilyev, S.; Gapontsev, V.

    2016-02-01

    Progress in fabrication and mid-IR lasing of Cr and Fe thermal-diffusion and radiation enhanced thermal diffusion doped II-VI binary and ternary polycrystals is reported. We demonstrate novel design of mid-IR Fe:ZnSe and Cr:ZnSe/S solid state lasers with significant improvement of output average power up to 35W@4.1 μm and 57W@2.5 μm and 20W@2.94 μm. We report significantly improved output characteristics of polycrystalline Cr:ZnS/Se lasers in gain-switched regime: 16 mJ at 200 Hz, pulse duration 5 ns with tunability over 2400-3000 nm as well as Kerr-Lens-Mode-Locked regime in terms of average power (up to 2 W), peak power and pulse energy (0.5 MW and 24 nJ, respectively), and pulse duration (less than 29 fs).

  4. Mid-IR supercontinuum pumped by femtosecond pulses from thulium doped all-fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiaqi; Sun, Biao; Liu, Jiayun; Yan, Zhiyu; Li, Nanxi; Tan, Eng Leong; Wang, Qijie; Yu, Xia

    2016-06-27

    We present a mid-infrared (mid-IR) supercontinuum (SC) light source pumped by femtosecond pulses from a thulium doped fiber amplifier (TDFA) at 2 μm. An octave-spanning spectrum from 1.1 to 3.7 μm with an average power of 253 mW has been obtained from a single mode ZBLAN fiber. Spectral flatness of 10 dB over a 1390 nm range has been obtained in the mid-IR region from 1940 - 3330 nm. It is resulted from the enhanced self phase modulation process in femtosecond regime. The all-fiber configuration makes such broadband coherent source a compact candidate for various applications. PMID:27410556

  5. Mid-IR Spectra of HED Meteorites and Synthetic Pyroxenes: Reststrahlen Features (9-12 micron)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Lucy F.; Emery, Joshua P.; Moskovitz, Nicholas A.

    2010-01-01

    In an earlier study. Hamilton (2000) mapped the behavior of the 9-12 micron reststrahlen structures with composition in a suite of primarily natural terrestrial pyroxenes. Here we examine the same set of reststrahlen features in the spectra of diogenites and eucrites and place them in the context of the terrestrial samples and of a suite of well-characterized synthetic pyroxenes. The results will be useful to the interpretation of mid-IR spectra of 4 Vesta and other basaltic asteroids.

  6. Potential of mid IR spectroscopy in the rapid label free identification of skin malignancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastl, Lena; Kemper, Björn; Lloyd, Gavin R.; Nallala, Jayakrupakar; Stone, Nick; Naranjo, Valery; Penaranda, Francisco; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    The rapid inspection of suspicious skin lesions for pathological cell types is the objective of optical point of care diagnostics technologies. A marker free fast diagnosis of skin malignancies would overcome the limitations of the current gold standard surgical biopsy. The time consuming and costly biopsy procedure requires the inspection of each sample by a trained pathologist, which limits the analysis of potentially malignant lesions. Optical technologies like RAMAN or infrared spectroscopy, which provide both, localization and chemical information, can be used to differentiate malignant from healthy tissue by the analysis of multi cell structures and cell type specific spectra. We here report the application of midIR spectroscopy towards fast and reliable skin diagnostics. Within the European research project MINERVA we developed standardized in vitro skin systems with increasing complexity, from single skin cell types as fibroblasts, keratinocytes and melanoma cells, to mixtures of these and finally three dimensional human skin equivalents. The standards were characterized in the established midIR range and also with newly developed systems for fast imaging up to 12 μm. The analysis of the spectra by novel data processing algorithms demonstrated the clear separation of all cell types, especially the tumor cells. The signals from single cell layers were sufficient for cell type differentiation. We have compared different midIR systems and found all of them suitable for specific cell type identification. Our data demonstrate the potential of midIR spectroscopy for fast image acquisition and an improved data processing as sensitive and specific optical biopsy technology.

  7. Negative curvature hollow core fibers for Raman lasing in the mid IR spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolyadin, A. N.; Alagashev, G. K.; Pryamikov, A. D.; Gladyshev, A. V.; Kosolapov, A. F.; Biriukov, A. S.; Bufetov, IA

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we consider a problem of using negative curvature hollow-core fibers for creation of Raman lasers in the mid IR spectral range. New designs of this type of fibers with cladding formed by one layer of double nested capillaries are discussed and their optical properties are investigated numerically and experimentally. It will be shown that it is possible to reduce the Raman generation threshold by decreasing an effective mode area in such fibers using nested capillaries in the cladding.

  8. Bayesian High-redshift Quasar Classification from Optical and Mid-IR Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Gordon T.; Myers, Adam D.; Peters, Christina M.; Krawczyk, Coleman M.; Chase, Greg; Ross, Nicholas P.; Fan, Xiaohui; Jiang, Linhua; Lacy, Mark; McGreer, Ian D.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Riegel, Ryan N.

    2015-08-01

    We identify 885,503 type 1 quasar candidates to i≲ 22 using the combination of optical and mid-IR photometry. Optical photometry is taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III: Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-III/BOSS), while mid-IR photometry comes from a combination of data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) “AllWISE” data release and several large-area Spitzer Space Telescope fields. Selection is based on a Bayesian kernel density algorithm with a training sample of 157,701 spectroscopically confirmed type 1 quasars with both optical and mid-IR data. Of the quasar candidates, 733,713 lack spectroscopic confirmation (and 305,623 are objects that we have not previously classified as photometric quasar candidates). These candidates include 7874 objects targeted as high-probability potential quasars with 3.5\\lt z\\lt 5 (of which 6779 are new photometric candidates). Our algorithm is more complete to z\\gt 3.5 than the traditional mid-IR selection “wedges” and to 2.2\\lt z\\lt 3.5 quasars than the SDSS-III/BOSS project. Number counts and luminosity function analysis suggest that the resulting catalog is relatively complete to known quasars and is identifying new high-z quasars at z\\gt 3. This catalog paves the way for luminosity-dependent clustering investigations of large numbers of faint, high-redshift quasars and for further machine-learning quasar selection using Spitzer and WISE data combined with other large-area optical imaging surveys.

  9. Invited Article: Multiple-octave spanning high-energy mid-IR supercontinuum generation in bulk quadratic nonlinear crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Binbin; Bache, Morten

    2016-08-01

    Bright and broadband coherent mid-IR radiation is important for exciting and probing molecular vibrations. Using cascaded nonlinearities in conventional quadratic nonlinear crystals like lithium niobate, self-defocusing near-IR solitons have been demonstrated that led to very broadband supercontinuum generation in the visible, near-IR, and short-wavelength mid-IR. Here we conduct an experiment where a mid-IR crystal is pumped in the mid-IR. The crystal is cut for noncritical interaction, so the three-wave mixing of a single mid-IR femtosecond pump source leads to highly phase-mismatched second-harmonic generation. This self-acting cascaded process leads to the formation of a self-defocusing soliton at the mid-IR pump wavelength and after the self-compression point multiple octave-spanning supercontinua are observed. The results were recorded in a commercially available crystal LiInS2 pumped in the 3-4 μm range with 85 fs 50 μJ pulse energy, with the broadest supercontinuum covering 1.6-7.0 μm. We measured up 30 μJ energy in the supercontinuum, and the energy promises to scale favorably with an increased pump energy. Other mid-IR crystals can readily be used as well to cover other pump wavelengths and target other supercontinuum wavelength ranges.

  10. AQUARIUS, the next generation mid-IR detector for ground-based astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, Derek; Finger, Gert; Jakob, Gerd; Eschbaumer, Siegfried; Mehrgan, Leander; Meyer, Manfred; Steigmeier, Joerg

    2012-07-01

    ESO has recently funded the development of the AQUARIUS detector at Raytheon Vision Systems, a new mega-pixel Si:As Impurity Band Conduction array for use in ground based astronomical applications at wavelengths between 3 - 28 μm. The array has been designed to have low noise, low dark current, switchable gain and be read out at very high frame rates. It has 64 individual outputs capable of pixel read rates of 3MHz, implying continuous data-rates in excess of 300 Mbytes/second. It is scheduled for deployment into the VISIR instrument at the VLT in 2012, for next generation VLTI instruments and base-lined for METIS, the mid-IR candidate instrument for the E-ELT. A new mid-IR test facility has been developed for AQUARIUS detector development which includes a low thermal background cryostat, high speed cryogenic pre-amplification and high speed data acquisition and detector operation at 5K. We report on all the major performance aspects of this new detector including conversion gain, read noise, dark generation rate, linearity, well capacity, pixel operability, low frequency noise, persistence and electrical cross-talk. We describe the many possible readout modes of this detector and their application. We also report on external issues with the operation of these detectors at such low temperatures. Finally we report on the electronic developments required to operate such a detector at the required high data rates and in a typical mid-IR instrument.

  11. Use of UAS Remote Sensing Data (AggieAir) to Estimate Crop ET at High Spatial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ELarab, M.; Torres, A.; Nieto Solana, H.; Kustas, W. P.; Song, L.; Alfieri, J. G.; Prueger, J. H.; McKee, L.; Anderson, M. C.; Jensen, A.; McKee, M.; Alsina, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Estimation of the spatial distribution of evapotranspiration (ET) based on remotely sensed imagery has become useful for managing water in irrigated agricultural at various spatial scales. Currently, data acquired by conventional satellites (Landsat, ASTER, etc.) lack the needed spatial resolution to capture variability of interest to support evapotranspiration estimates. In this study, an unmanned aerial system (UAS), called AggieAirTM, was used to acquire high-resolution imagery in the visual, near infrared (0.15m resolution) and thermal infrared spectra (0.6m resolution). AggieAir flew over two study sites in Utah and Central Valley of California. The imagery was used as input to a surface energy balance model based on the Mapping Evapotranspiration with Internalized Calibration (METRIC) modeling approach. The discussion will highlight the ET estimation methodologies and the implications of having high resolution ET maps.

  12. Geostatistical uncertainty of assessing air quality using high-spatial-resolution lichen data: A health study in the urban area of Sines, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Manuel C; Pinho, P; Branquinho, C; Llop, Esteve; Pereira, Maria J

    2016-08-15

    In most studies correlating health outcomes with air pollution, personal exposure assignments are based on measurements collected at air-quality monitoring stations not coinciding with health data locations. In such cases, interpolators are needed to predict air quality in unsampled locations and to assign personal exposures. Moreover, a measure of the spatial uncertainty of exposures should be incorporated, especially in urban areas where concentrations vary at short distances due to changes in land use and pollution intensity. These studies are limited by the lack of literature comparing exposure uncertainty derived from distinct spatial interpolators. Here, we addressed these issues with two interpolation methods: regression Kriging (RK) and ordinary Kriging (OK). These methods were used to generate air-quality simulations with a geostatistical algorithm. For each method, the geostatistical uncertainty was drawn from generalized linear model (GLM) analysis. We analyzed the association between air quality and birth weight. Personal health data (n=227) and exposure data were collected in Sines (Portugal) during 2007-2010. Because air-quality monitoring stations in the city do not offer high-spatial-resolution measurements (n=1), we used lichen data as an ecological indicator of air quality (n=83). We found no significant difference in the fit of GLMs with any of the geostatistical methods. With RK, however, the models tended to fit better more often and worse less often. Moreover, the geostatistical uncertainty results showed a marginally higher mean and precision with RK. Combined with lichen data and land-use data of high spatial resolution, RK is a more effective geostatistical method for relating health outcomes with air quality in urban areas. This is particularly important in small cities, which generally do not have expensive air-quality monitoring stations with high spatial resolution. Further, alternative ways of linking human activities with their

  13. Indoor air quality (IAQ) assessment in a multistorey shopping mall by high-spatial-resolution monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    PubMed

    Amodio, M; Dambruoso, P R; de Gennaro, Gianluigi; de Gennaro, L; Loiotile, A Demarinis; Marzocca, A; Stasi, F; Trizio, L; Tutino, M

    2014-12-01

    In order to assess indoor air quality (IAQ), two 1-week monitoring campaigns of volatile organic compounds (VOC) were performed in different areas of a multistorey shopping mall. High-spatial-resolution monitoring was conducted at 32 indoor sites located in two storehouses and in different departments of a supermarket. At the same time, VOC concentrations were monitored in the mall and parking lot area as well as outdoors. VOC were sampled at 48-h periods using diffusive samplers suitable for thermal desorption. The samples were then analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The data analysis and chromatic maps indicated that the two storehouses had the highest VOC concentrations consisting principally of terpenes. These higher TVOC concentrations could be a result of the low efficiency of the air exchange and intake systems, as well as the large quantity of articles stored in these small spaces. Instead, inside the supermarket, the food department was the most critical area for VOC concentrations. To identify potential emission sources in this department, a continuous VOC analyzer was used. The findings indicated that the highest total VOC concentrations were present during cleaning activities and that these activities were carried out frequently in the food department. The study highlights the importance of conducting both high-spatial-resolution monitoring and high-temporal-resolution monitoring. The former was able to identify critical issues in environments with a complex emission scenario while the latter was useful in interpreting the dynamics of each emission source.

  14. Combining HJ CCD, GF-1 WFV and MODIS Data to Generate Daily High Spatial Resolution Synthetic Data for Environmental Process Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mingquan; Huang, Wenjiang; Niu, Zheng; Wang, Changyao

    2015-01-01

    The limitations of satellite data acquisition mean that there is a lack of satellite data with high spatial and temporal resolutions for environmental process monitoring. In this study, we address this problem by applying the Enhanced Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (ESTARFM) and the Spatial and Temporal Data Fusion Approach (STDFA) to combine Huanjing satellite charge coupled device (HJ CCD), Gaofen satellite no. 1 wide field of view camera (GF-1 WFV) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data to generate daily high spatial resolution synthetic data for land surface process monitoring. Actual HJ CCD and GF-1 WFV data were used to evaluate the precision of the synthetic images using the correlation analysis method. Our method was tested and validated for two study areas in Xinjiang Province, China. The results show that both the ESTARFM and STDFA can be applied to combine HJ CCD and MODIS reflectance data, and GF-1 WFV and MODIS reflectance data, to generate synthetic HJ CCD data and synthetic GF-1 WFV data that closely match actual data with correlation coefficients (r) greater than 0.8989 and 0.8643, respectively. Synthetic red- and near infrared (NIR)-band data generated by ESTARFM are more suitable for the calculation of Normalized Different Vegetation Index (NDVI) than the data generated by STDFA. PMID:26308017

  15. Combining HJ CCD, GF-1 WFV and MODIS Data to Generate Daily High Spatial Resolution Synthetic Data for Environmental Process Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mingquan; Huang, Wenjiang; Niu, Zheng; Wang, Changyao

    2015-08-20

    The limitations of satellite data acquisition mean that there is a lack of satellite data with high spatial and temporal resolutions for environmental process monitoring. In this study, we address this problem by applying the Enhanced Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (ESTARFM) and the Spatial and Temporal Data Fusion Approach (STDFA) to combine Huanjing satellite charge coupled device (HJ CCD), Gaofen satellite no. 1 wide field of view camera (GF-1 WFV) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data to generate daily high spatial resolution synthetic data for land surface process monitoring. Actual HJ CCD and GF-1 WFV data were used to evaluate the precision of the synthetic images using the correlation analysis method. Our method was tested and validated for two study areas in Xinjiang Province, China. The results show that both the ESTARFM and STDFA can be applied to combine HJ CCD and MODIS reflectance data, and GF-1 WFV and MODIS reflectance data, to generate synthetic HJ CCD data and synthetic GF-1 WFV data that closely match actual data with correlation coefficients (r) greater than 0.8989 and 0.8643, respectively. Synthetic red- and near infrared (NIR)-band data generated by ESTARFM are more suitable for the calculation of Normalized Different Vegetation Index (NDVI) than the data generated by STDFA.

  16. Indoor air quality (IAQ) assessment in a multistorey shopping mall by high-spatial-resolution monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    PubMed

    Amodio, M; Dambruoso, P R; de Gennaro, Gianluigi; de Gennaro, L; Loiotile, A Demarinis; Marzocca, A; Stasi, F; Trizio, L; Tutino, M

    2014-12-01

    In order to assess indoor air quality (IAQ), two 1-week monitoring campaigns of volatile organic compounds (VOC) were performed in different areas of a multistorey shopping mall. High-spatial-resolution monitoring was conducted at 32 indoor sites located in two storehouses and in different departments of a supermarket. At the same time, VOC concentrations were monitored in the mall and parking lot area as well as outdoors. VOC were sampled at 48-h periods using diffusive samplers suitable for thermal desorption. The samples were then analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The data analysis and chromatic maps indicated that the two storehouses had the highest VOC concentrations consisting principally of terpenes. These higher TVOC concentrations could be a result of the low efficiency of the air exchange and intake systems, as well as the large quantity of articles stored in these small spaces. Instead, inside the supermarket, the food department was the most critical area for VOC concentrations. To identify potential emission sources in this department, a continuous VOC analyzer was used. The findings indicated that the highest total VOC concentrations were present during cleaning activities and that these activities were carried out frequently in the food department. The study highlights the importance of conducting both high-spatial-resolution monitoring and high-temporal-resolution monitoring. The former was able to identify critical issues in environments with a complex emission scenario while the latter was useful in interpreting the dynamics of each emission source. PMID:24448884

  17. Determination of total column water vapor in the atmosphere at high spatial resolution from AVIRIS data using spectral curve fitting and band ratioing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Bo-Cai; Goetz, F. H.

    1990-01-01

    Techniques are developed for quantitative retrievals of high spatial resolution column atmospheric water vapor that is largely contained in the lower portion of the troposphere. One method consists of curve fitting observed spectra with simulated spectra in the 1.14 microns or the 0.94 micron water vapor band absorption region. The other method is a simple band ratioing technique, which requires less computer time than the curve fitting method. The advantage of the technique over humidity sounding by IR emission measurements is that the retrieved column water vapor amounts over land surfaces have significantly higher precision.

  18. Developing a CCD camera with high spatial resolution for RIXS in the soft X-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soman, M. R.; Hall, D. J.; Tutt, J. H.; Murray, N. J.; Holland, A. D.; Schmitt, T.; Raabe, J.; Schmitt, B.

    2013-12-01

    The Super Advanced X-ray Emission Spectrometer (SAXES) at the Swiss Light Source contains a high resolution Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera used for Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS). Using the current CCD-based camera system, the energy-dispersive spectrometer has an energy resolution (E/ΔE) of approximately 12,000 at 930 eV. A recent study predicted that through an upgrade to the grating and camera system, the energy resolution could be improved by a factor of 2. In order to achieve this goal in the spectral domain, the spatial resolution of the CCD must be improved to better than 5 μm from the current 24 μm spatial resolution (FWHM). The 400 eV-1600 eV energy X-rays detected by this spectrometer primarily interact within the field free region of the CCD, producing electron clouds which will diffuse isotropically until they reach the depleted region and buried channel. This diffusion of the charge leads to events which are split across several pixels. Through the analysis of the charge distribution across the pixels, various centroiding techniques can be used to pinpoint the spatial location of the X-ray interaction to the sub-pixel level, greatly improving the spatial resolution achieved. Using the PolLux soft X-ray microspectroscopy endstation at the Swiss Light Source, a beam of X-rays of energies from 200 eV to 1400 eV can be focused down to a spot size of approximately 20 nm. Scanning this spot across the 16 μm square pixels allows the sub-pixel response to be investigated. Previous work has demonstrated the potential improvement in spatial resolution achievable by centroiding events in a standard CCD. An Electron-Multiplying CCD (EM-CCD) has been used to improve the signal to effective readout noise ratio achieved resulting in a worst-case spatial resolution measurement of 4.5±0.2 μm and 3.9±0.1 μm at 530 eV and 680 eV respectively. A method is described that allows the contribution of the X-ray spot size to be deconvolved from these

  19. Preliminary evaluation of a monolithic detector module for integrated PET/MRI scanner with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, R.; Gonzalez, A. J.; Bettiol, M.; Fabbri, A.; Cinti, M. N.; Preziosi, E.; Borrazzo, C.; Conde, P.; Pellegrini, R.; Di Castro, E.; Majewski, S.

    2015-06-01

    The proposal of Mindview European Project concerns with the development of a very high resolution and high efficiency brain dedicated PET scanner simultaneously working with a Magnetic Resonance scanner, that expects to visualize neurotransmitter pathways and their disruptions in the quest to better diagnose schizophrenia. On behalf of this project, we propose a low cost PET module for the first prototype, based on monolithic crystals, suitable to be integrated with a head Radio Frequency (RF) coil. The aim of the suggested module is to achieve high performances in terms of efficiency, planar spatial resolution (expected about 1 mm) and discrimination of gamma Depth Of Interaction (DOI) in order to reduce the parallax error. Our preliminary results are very promising: a DOI resolution of about 3 mm, a spatial resolution ranging from about 1 to 1.5 mm and a good position linearity.

  20. Influence of Scale Effect and Model Performance in Downscaling ASTER Land Surface Temperatures to a Very High Spatial Resolution in an Agricultural Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J.; Li, G.; Liu, S.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, X.

    2015-12-01

    At present land surface temperatures (LSTs) can be generated from thermal infrared remote sensing with spatial resolutions from ~100 m to tens of kilometers. However, LSTs with high spatial resolution, e.g. tens of meters, are still lack. The purpose of LST downscaling is to generate LSTs with finer spatial resolutions than their native spatial resolutions. The statistical linear or nonlinear regression models are most frequently used for LST downscaling. The basic assumption of these models is the scale-invariant relationships between LST and its descriptors, which is questioned but rare researches have been reported. In addition, few researches can be found for downscaling satellite LST or TIR data to a high spatial resolution, i.e. better than 100 m or even finer. The lack of LST with high spatial resolution cannot satisfy the requirements of applications such as evapotranspiration mapping at the field scale. By selecting a dynamically developing agricultural oasis as the study area, the aim of this study is to downscale the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) LSTs to 15 m, to satisfy the requirement of evapotranspiration mapping at the field scale. Twelve ASTER images from May to September in 2012, covering the entire growth stage of maize, were selected. Four statistical models were evaluated, including one global model, one piecewise model, and two local models. The influence from scale effect in downscaling LST was quantified. The downscaled LSTs are evaluated from accuracy and image quality. Results demonstrate that the influence from scale effect varies according to models and the maize growth stage. Significant influence about -4 K to 6 K existed at the early stage and weaker influence existed in the middle stage. When compared with the ground measured LSTs, the downscaled LSTs resulted from the global and local models yielded higher accuracies and better image qualities than the local models. In addition to the

  1. Development of high-spatial and high-mass resolution mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) and its application to the study of small metabolites and endogenous molecules of plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Ji Hyun

    2012-01-01

    High-spatial and high-mass resolution laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric (MS) imaging technology was developed for the attainment of MS images of higher quality containing more information on the relevant cellular and molecular biology in unprecedented depth. The distribution of plant metabolites is asymmetric throughout the cells and tissues, and therefore the increase in the spatial resolution was pursued to reveal the localization of plant metabolites at the cellular level by MS imaging. For achieving high-spatial resolution, the laser beam size was reduced by utilizing an optical fiber with small core diameter (25 μm) in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer. Matrix application was greatly improved using oscillating capillary nebulizer. As a result, single cell level spatial resolution of ~ 12 μm was achieved. MS imaging at this high spatial resolution was directly applied to a whole Arabidopsis flower and the substructures of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anther were successfully visualized. MS imaging of high spatial resolution was also demonstrated to the secondary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana and a high degree of localization of detected metabolites was successfully unveiled. This was the first MS imaging on the root for molecular species. MS imaging with high mass resolution was also achieved by utilizing the LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer for the direct identification of the surface metabolites on the Arabidopsis stem and root and differentiation of isobaric ions having the same nominal mass with no need of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS imaging at high-spatial and high-mass resolution was also applied to cer1 mutant of the model system Arabidopsis thaliana to demonstrate its usefulness in biological studies and reveal associated metabolite changes in terms of spatial distribution and/or abundances compared to those of wild-type. The spatial

  2. High spatial and temporal resolution wide-field imaging of neuron activity using quantum NV-diamond

    PubMed Central

    Hall, L. T.; Beart, G. C. G.; Thomas, E. A.; Simpson, D. A.; McGuinness, L. P.; Cole, J. H.; Manton, J. H.; Scholten, R. E.; Jelezko, F.; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Petrou, S.; Hollenberg, L. C. L.

    2012-01-01

    A quantitative understanding of the dynamics of biological neural networks is fundamental to gaining insight into information processing in the brain. While techniques exist to measure spatial or temporal properties of these networks, it remains a significant challenge to resolve the neural dynamics with subcellular spatial resolution. In this work we consider a fundamentally new form of wide-field imaging for neuronal networks based on the nanoscale magnetic field sensing properties of optically active spins in a diamond substrate. We analyse the sensitivity of the system to the magnetic field generated by an axon transmembrane potential and confirm these predictions experimentally using electronically-generated neuron signals. By numerical simulation of the time dependent transmembrane potential of a morphologically reconstructed hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron, we show that the imaging system is capable of imaging planar neuron activity non-invasively at millisecond temporal resolution and micron spatial resolution over wide-fields. PMID:22574249

  3. Using multi-satellite data fusion to estimate daily high spatial resolution evapotranspiration over a forested site in North Carolina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse model and associated disaggregation scheme (ALEXI/DisALEXI). Satellite-based ET retrievals from both the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectoradiometer (MODIS; 1km, daily) and Landsat (30m, bi-weekly) are fused with The Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflective Fusion ...

  4. The use of spaceborne X-band radar to measure high spatial and temporal resolution volcanic processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, J.; Wadge, G.; Ebmeier, S. K.; Parks, M.; Muller, C.

    2012-12-01

    InSAR has been frequently used to measure the pressurisation of magma reservoirs, which typically deforms the ground surface over distances of tens of kilometres and lasts for several years. Yet, there are other deformation signals on volcanoes that are smaller in scale and occur more rapidly for which the current use of C-band and L-band satellites is poorly suited but which may be accessible using the new generations of high resolution X-band satellites. We use TerraSAR-X which produces images with 2 m resolution every 11 days to target a range of volcanoes which are either frequently erupting, displaying signs of unrest or edifice stability. We assess the suitability of the data in terms of coherence and geometric distortion and compare it to ground-based observations including GPS and tilt. The current limiting factor for volcano applications is the availability of a high resolution Digital Elevation Model. We will present results from Arenal, Tungurahua, Galeras, Santorini, Alutu and Soufriere Hills and demonstrate the ability of high resolution X-band InSAR to detect a wide range of processes over various timescales.

  5. Non-Invasive Measurement of Frog Skin Reflectivity in High Spatial Resolution Using a Dual Hyperspectral Approach

    PubMed Central

    Liebisch, Frank; Walter, Achim; Greven, Hartmut; Rascher, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Background Most spectral data for the amphibian integument are limited to the visible spectrum of light and have been collected using point measurements with low spatial resolution. In the present study a dual camera setup consisting of two push broom hyperspectral imaging systems was employed, which produces reflectance images between 400 and 2500 nm with high spectral and spatial resolution and a high dynamic range. Methodology/Principal Findings We briefly introduce the system and document the high efficiency of this technique analyzing exemplarily the spectral reflectivity of the integument of three arboreal anuran species (Litoria caerulea, Agalychnis callidryas and Hyla arborea), all of which appear green to the human eye. The imaging setup generates a high number of spectral bands within seconds and allows non-invasive characterization of spectral characteristics with relatively high working distance. Despite the comparatively uniform coloration, spectral reflectivity between 700 and 1100 nm differed markedly among the species. In contrast to H. arborea, L. caerulea and A. callidryas showed reflection in this range. For all three species, reflectivity above 1100 nm is primarily defined by water absorption. Furthermore, the high resolution allowed examining even small structures such as fingers and toes, which in A. callidryas showed an increased reflectivity in the near infrared part of the spectrum. Conclusion/Significance Hyperspectral imaging was found to be a very useful alternative technique combining the spectral resolution of spectrometric measurements with a higher spatial resolution. In addition, we used Digital Infrared/Red-Edge Photography as new simple method to roughly determine the near infrared reflectivity of frog specimens in field, where hyperspectral imaging is typically difficult. PMID:24058464

  6. Dynamics of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on silicon by high spatial and temporal resolution imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, X.; Jia, T. Q. Peng, N. N.; Feng, D. H.; Zhang, S. A.; Sun, Z. R.

    2014-04-14

    The formation dynamics of periodic ripples induced by femtosecond laser pulses (pulse duration τ = 50 fs and central wavelength λ = 800 nm) are studied by a collinear pump-probe imaging technique with a temporal resolution of 1 ps and a spatial resolution of 440 nm. The ripples with periods close to the laser wavelength begin to appear upon irradiation of two pump pulses at surface defects produced by the prior one. The rudiments of periodic ripples emerge in the initial tens of picoseconds after fs laser irradiation, and the ripple positions keep unmoved until the formation processes complete mainly in a temporal span of 1500 ps. The results suggest that the periodic deposition of laser energy during the interaction between femtosecond laser pulses and sample surface plays a dominant role in the formation of periodic ripples.

  7. Facile and high spatial resolution ratio-metric luminescence thermal mapping in microfluidics by near infrared excited upconversion nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Cao, Wenbin; Li, Shunbo; Wen, Weijia

    2016-02-01

    A local area temperature monitor is important for precise control of chemical and biological processes in microfluidics. In this work, we developed a facile method to realize micron spatial resolution of temperature mapping in a microfluidic channel quickly and cost effectively. Based on the temperature dependent fluorescence emission of NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+ upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) under near-infrared irradiation, ratio-metric imaging of UCNPs doped polydimethylsiloxane can map detailed temperature distribution in the channel. Unlike some reported strategies that utilize temperature sensitive organic dye (such as Rhodamine) to achieve thermal sensing, our method is highly chemically inert and physically stable without any performance degradation in long term operation. Moreover, this method can be easily scaled up or down, since the spatial and temperature resolution is determined by an optical imaging system. Our method supplied a simple and efficient solution for temperature mapping on a heterogeneous surface where usage of an infrared thermal camera was limited.

  8. High spatial resolution, dynamic, and distributed fiber optic strain sensing based on phasorial Brillouin dynamic gratings reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, A.; Langer, T.; Tur, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a novel fiber-optic sensing technique based on the distributed measurement of Brillouin-induced phase-shift in the reflection from Brillouin dynamic gratings in polarization-maintaining fibers. Subject to signal to noise considerations, the strain sensitivity of the phase-shift in the reflection of a pulsed probe, orthogonally polarized to the gratings-generating pumps, is independent of the pulse width, suggesting the potential to achieve higher spatial resolutions than those offered by slope-assisted, phasorial Brillouin sensing techniques in standard single-mode fibers. We report the measurement of 500Hz strain vibrations (at a sampling rate of 1MHz) with a spatial resolution of 20cm.

  9. Efficient data extraction method for near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) systems with high spatial and temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong-Kwan; Choi, Min-Gyu; Kim, Jae-Myoung; Bae, Hyeon-Min

    2013-04-01

    An hardware-efficient method for the extraction of hemodynamic responses in near-infrared spectroscopy systems is proposed to increase the spatial and temporal resolution. The performance improvement is attributed to high signal-to-noise ratio receivers, a modulation scheme, and a multi-input-multi-output based data extraction algorithm. The proposed system shows more than twofold improvement in the figure of merit compared to conventional designs. Experimental results support the validity of the proposed system. PMID:23853299

  10. Kite Aerial Photography for Low-Cost, Ultra-high Spatial Resolution Multi-Spectral Mapping of Intertidal Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Bryson, Mitch; Johnson-Roberson, Matthew; Murphy, Richard J.; Bongiorno, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Intertidal ecosystems have primarily been studied using field-based sampling; remote sensing offers the ability to collect data over large areas in a snapshot of time that could complement field-based sampling methods by extrapolating them into the wider spatial and temporal context. Conventional remote sensing tools (such as satellite and aircraft imaging) provide data at limited spatial and temporal resolutions and relatively high costs for small-scale environmental science and ecologically-focussed studies. In this paper, we describe a low-cost, kite-based imaging system and photogrammetric/mapping procedure that was developed for constructing high-resolution, three-dimensional, multi-spectral terrain models of intertidal rocky shores. The processing procedure uses automatic image feature detection and matching, structure-from-motion and photo-textured terrain surface reconstruction algorithms that require minimal human input and only a small number of ground control points and allow the use of cheap, consumer-grade digital cameras. The resulting maps combine imagery at visible and near-infrared wavelengths and topographic information at sub-centimeter resolutions over an intertidal shoreline 200 m long, thus enabling spatial properties of the intertidal environment to be determined across a hierarchy of spatial scales. Results of the system are presented for an intertidal rocky shore at Jervis Bay, New South Wales, Australia. Potential uses of this technique include mapping of plant (micro- and macro-algae) and animal (e.g. gastropods) assemblages at multiple spatial and temporal scales. PMID:24069206

  11. Energy-selective neutron imaging with high spatial resolution and its impact on the study of crystalline-structured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, E. H.; Peetermans, S.; Josic, L.; Leber, H.; van Swygenhoven, H.

    2014-01-01

    Crystalline-structured materials with preferentially large grains were investigated by means of energy-selective neutron imaging methods (transmission radiography and tomography) under the conditions of the best possible spatial resolution at the ICON facility, SINQ, and PSI. Because of the cold spectrum at that beam line, access to the Bragg diffraction features was possible even when the energy resolution of the used selector device was only 15%. Grains with a size below the detector resolution (approximately 25 μm) are not visible, and a quasi-homogeneous contrast variation is found when the neutron energy is varied.In the cases of welded stainless steel samples and rolled Al plates, we obtained structural information from a very short exposure of approximately 60 s. Tomographic examinations of these samples at suitable neutron energies qualitatively verified the radiographic findings by showing the same features in the bulk. Comparison to common electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) investigations in selected regions of the samples provided a complete verification of the neutron-image data with respect to the grain size and the different grain orientations. The method of energy-selective neutron imaging provides an easy and straightforward approach for non-invasive material research that can be performed without any sample preparation if the most suitable neutron energy is chosen. Further studies will be necessary to extend the experimental data base to other materials with different crystal structures and grain sizes. A comparison to diffraction data will enhance the quantitative value of the investigations.

  12. Cross calibration between XRF and ICP-MS for high spatial resolution analysis of ombrotrophic peat cores for palaeoclimatic studies.

    PubMed

    Poto, Luisa; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Crowhurst, Simon; Agostinelli, Claudio; Spolaor, Andrea; Cairns, Warren R L; Cozzi, Giulio; Barbante, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Ombrotrophic peatlands are remarkable repositories of high-quality climatic signals because their only source of nutrients is precipitation. Although several analytical techniques are available for analysing inorganic components in peat samples, they generally provide only low-resolution data sets. Here we present a new analytical approach for producing high-resolution data on main and trace elements from ombrotrophic peat cores. Analyses were carried out on a 7-m-long peat core collected from Danta di Cadore, North-Eastern Italy (46° 34' 16″ N, 12° 29' 58″ E). Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn, Ga, Sr, Y, Cd, Ba and Pb were detected at a resolution of 2.5 mm with a non-destructive X-ray fluorescence core scanner (XRF-CS). Calibration and quantification of the XRF-CS intensities was obtained using collision reaction cell inductively coupled plasma quadruple mass spectrometry (CRC-ICP-QMS). CRC-ICP-QMS measurements were carried out on discrete samples at a resolution of 1 cm, after dissolution of 150-mg aliquots with 9 ml HNO3 and 1 ml HF at 220 °C in a microwave system. We compare qualitative XRF-CS and quantitative CRC-ICP-MS data and, however the several sources of variability of the data, develop a robust statistical approach to determine the R (2) and the coefficient of a simple regression model together with confidence intervals. Perfect positive correlations were estimated for Cd, Cr, Pb, Sr, Ti and Zn; high positive correlations for Ba (0.8954), Y (0.7378), Fe (0.7349) and Cu (0.7028); while moderate positive correlations for Ga (0.5951) and Ca (0.5435). With our results, we demonstrate that XRF scanning techniques can be used, together with other well-established geochemical techniques (such as ICP-MS), to produce high-resolution (up to 2.5 mm) quantitative data from ombrotrophic peat bog cores.

  13. Compact TDLAS based sensor design using interband cascade lasers for mid-IR trace gas sensing.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lei; Tittel, Frank K; Li, Chunguang; Sanchez, Nancy P; Wu, Hongpeng; Zheng, Chuantao; Yu, Yajun; Sampaolo, Angelo; Griffin, Robert J

    2016-03-21

    Two compact TDLAS sensor systems based on different structural optical cores were developed. The two optical cores combine two recent developments, gallium antimonide (GaSb)-based ICL and a compact multipass gas cell (MPGC) with the goal to create compact TDLAS based sensors for the mid-IR gas detection with high detection sensitivity and low power consumption. The sensors achieved minimum detection limits of ~5 ppbv and ~8 ppbv, respectively, for CH4 and C2H6 concentration measurements with a 3.7-W power consumption. PMID:27136873

  14. High performance, low dissipation quantum cascade lasers across the mid-IR range.

    PubMed

    Bismuto, Alfredo; Blaser, Stéphane; Terazzi, Romain; Gresch, Tobias; Muller, Antoine

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we present the development of low consumption quantum cascade lasers across the mid-IR range. In particular, short cavity single-mode lasers with optimised facet reflectivities have been fabricated from 4.5 to 9.2 μm. Threshold dissipated powers as low as 0.5 W were obtained in continuous wave operation at room temperature. In addition, the beneficial impact of reducing chip length on laser mounting yield is discussed. High power single-mode lasers from the same processed wafers are also presented.

  15. Compact Highly Sensitive Multi-species Airborne Mid-IR Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Dirk; Weibring, P.; Walega, J.; Fried, Alan; Spuler, Scott M.; Taubman, Matthew S.

    2015-02-01

    We report on the development and airborne field deployment of a mid-IR laser based spectrometer. The instrument was configured for the simultaneous in-situ detection of formaldehyde (CH2O) and ethane (C2H6). Numerous mechanical, optical, electronic, and software improvements over a previous instrument design resulted in reliable highly sensitive airborne operation with long stability times yielding 90% airborne measurement coverage during the recent air quality study over the Colorado front range, FRAPPÉ 2014. Airborne detection sensitivities of ~ 15 pptv (C2H6) and ~40 pptv (CH2O) were generally obtained for 1 s of averaging for simultaneous detection.

  16. Development of vertically aligned ZnO-nanowires scintillators for high spatial resolution x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Masakazu Komori, Jun; Shimidzu, Kaiji; Izaki, Masanobu; Uesugi, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2015-02-23

    Newly designed scintillator of (0001)-oriented ZnO vertical nanowires (vnws) for X-ray imaging was prepared on a Ga-doped ZnO/soda-lime glass by electrodeposition, and the light emission feature was estimated in a synchrotron radiation facility. The ZnO-vnws scintillator revealed a strong light emission and improved resolution on CMOS image compared with that for the ZnO-layer scintillator, although the light emission performance was deteriorated in comparison to the Lu{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12:}Ce{sup 3+}. The light emission property closely related to the nanostructure and the resultant photoluminescence characteristic.

  17. Harmful algal bloom characterization at ultra-high spatial and temporal resolution using small unmanned aircraft systems.

    PubMed

    Van der Merwe, Deon; Price, Kevin P

    2015-04-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) degrade water quality and produce toxins. The spatial distribution of HAbs may change rapidly due to variations wind, water currents, and population dynamics. Risk assessments, based on traditional sampling methods, are hampered by the sparseness of water sample data points, and delays between sampling and the availability of results. There is a need for local risk assessment and risk management at the spatial and temporal resolution relevant to local human and animal interactions at specific sites and times. Small, unmanned aircraft systems can gather color-infrared reflectance data at appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions, with full control over data collection timing, and short intervals between data gathering and result availability. Data can be interpreted qualitatively, or by generating a blue normalized difference vegetation index (BNDVI) that is correlated with cyanobacterial biomass densities at the water surface, as estimated using a buoyant packed cell volume (BPCV). Correlations between BNDVI and BPCV follow a logarithmic model, with r(2)-values under field conditions from 0.77 to 0.87. These methods provide valuable information that is complimentary to risk assessment data derived from traditional risk assessment methods, and could help to improve risk management at the local level. PMID:25826055

  18. Harmful algal bloom characterization at ultra-high spatial and temporal resolution using small unmanned aircraft systems.

    PubMed

    Van der Merwe, Deon; Price, Kevin P

    2015-03-27

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) degrade water quality and produce toxins. The spatial distribution of HAbs may change rapidly due to variations wind, water currents, and population dynamics. Risk assessments, based on traditional sampling methods, are hampered by the sparseness of water sample data points, and delays between sampling and the availability of results. There is a need for local risk assessment and risk management at the spatial and temporal resolution relevant to local human and animal interactions at specific sites and times. Small, unmanned aircraft systems can gather color-infrared reflectance data at appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions, with full control over data collection timing, and short intervals between data gathering and result availability. Data can be interpreted qualitatively, or by generating a blue normalized difference vegetation index (BNDVI) that is correlated with cyanobacterial biomass densities at the water surface, as estimated using a buoyant packed cell volume (BPCV). Correlations between BNDVI and BPCV follow a logarithmic model, with r(2)-values under field conditions from 0.77 to 0.87. These methods provide valuable information that is complimentary to risk assessment data derived from traditional risk assessment methods, and could help to improve risk management at the local level.

  19. Harmful Algal Bloom Characterization at Ultra-High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Using Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    PubMed Central

    Van der Merwe, Deon; Price, Kevin P.

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) degrade water quality and produce toxins. The spatial distribution of HAbs may change rapidly due to variations wind, water currents, and population dynamics. Risk assessments, based on traditional sampling methods, are hampered by the sparseness of water sample data points, and delays between sampling and the availability of results. There is a need for local risk assessment and risk management at the spatial and temporal resolution relevant to local human and animal interactions at specific sites and times. Small, unmanned aircraft systems can gather color-infrared reflectance data at appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions, with full control over data collection timing, and short intervals between data gathering and result availability. Data can be interpreted qualitatively, or by generating a blue normalized difference vegetation index (BNDVI) that is correlated with cyanobacterial biomass densities at the water surface, as estimated using a buoyant packed cell volume (BPCV). Correlations between BNDVI and BPCV follow a logarithmic model, with r2-values under field conditions from 0.77 to 0.87. These methods provide valuable information that is complimentary to risk assessment data derived from traditional risk assessment methods, and could help to improve risk management at the local level. PMID:25826055

  20. Research on fatigue damage detection for wind turbine blade based on high-spatial-resolution DPP-BOTDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinlong; Dong, Yongkang; Li, Hui

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a fatigue damage detection system used for wind turbine blade is successfully developed by using highspatial- resolution differential pulse-width pair Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (DPP-BOTDA) sensing system. A piece of polarization-maintaining optical fiber is bonded on the blade surface to form the distributed sensing network. A DPP-BOTDA system, with a spatial resolution of 20cm and sampling interval of 1cm, is adopted to measuring distributed strain and detecting fatigue damage of wind turbine blade during fatigue test using the differential pulse pair of 39.5ns/41.5ns. Strain and the Brillouin gain spectra changes from undamaged state to fatigue failure are experimentally presented. The experimental results reveal that fatigue damage changes the strain distribution especially around the high strain area, and the width, amplitude and central frequency of the Brillouin gain spectra are sensitive to fatigue damage as the stiffness degradation and accumulated cracks change local strain gradient. As the damage becomes larger, the width of the Brillouin gain spectra becomes broader. Consequently, location and size of fatigue damage could be estimated. The developed system shows its potentiality for developing highly reliable wind turbine monitoring system as the effectiveness of damage detection and distributed sensing.

  1. Digitized neutron imaging with high spatial resolution at a low power research reactor: I. Analysis of detector performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawisky, M.; Hameed, F.; Dyrnjaja, E.; Springer, J.

    2008-03-01

    Imaging techniques provide an indispensable tool for investigation of materials. Neutrons, due to their specific properties, offer a unique probe for many aspects of condensed matter. Neutron imaging techniques present a challenging experimental task, especially at a low power research reactor. The Atomic Institute with a 250 kW TRIGA MARK II reactor looks back at a long tradition in neutron imaging. Here we report on the advantages gained in a recent upgrade of the imaging instrument including the acquisition of a thin-plate scintillation detector, a single counting micro-channel plate detector, and an imaging plate detector in combination with a high resolution scanner. We analyze the strengths and limitations of each detector in the field of neutron radiography and tomography, and demonstrate that high resolution digitized imaging down to the 50 μm scale can be accomplished with weak beam intensities of 1.3×10 5 n/cm 2 s, if appropriate measures are taken for the inevitable extension of measurement times. In a separate paper we will present some promising first results from the fields of engineering and geology.

  2. An approach for mapping large-area impervious surfaces: Synergistic use of Landsat-7 ETM+ and high spatial resolution imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yang, L.; Huang, C.; Homer, C.G.; Wylie, B.K.; Coan, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    A wide range of urban ecosystem studies, including urban hydrology, urban climate, land use planning, and resource management, require current and accurate geospatial data of urban impervious surfaces. We developed an approach to quantify urban impervious surfaces as a continuous variable by using multisensor and multisource datasets. Subpixel percent impervious surfaces at 30-m resolution were mapped using a regression tree model. The utility, practicality, and affordability of the proposed method for large-area imperviousness mapping were tested over three spatial scales (Sioux Falls, South Dakota, Richmond, Virginia, and the Chesapeake Bay areas of the United States). Average error of predicted versus actual percent impervious surface ranged from 8.8 to 11.4%, with correlation coefficients from 0.82 to 0.91. The approach is being implemented to map impervious surfaces for the entire United States as one of the major components of the circa 2000 national land cover database.

  3. High spatial resolution mapping of malaria transmission risk in the Gambia, west Africa, using LANDSAT TM satellite imagery.

    PubMed

    Bøgh, Claus; Lindsay, Steven W; Clarke, Siân E; Dean, Andy; Jawara, Musa; Pinder, Margaret; Thomas, Christopher J

    2007-05-01

    Understanding local variability in malaria transmission risk is critically important when designing intervention or vaccine trials. Using a combination of field data, satellite image analysis, and GIS modeling, we developed a high-resolution map of malaria entomological inoculation rates (EIR) in The Gambia, West Africa. The analyses are based on the variation in exposure to malaria parasites experienced in 48 villages in 1996 and 21 villages in 1997. The entomological inoculation rate (EIR) varied from 0 to 166 infective bites per person per rainy season. Detailed field surveys identified the major Anopheles gambiae s.l. breeding habitats. These habitats were mapped by classification of a LANDSAT TM satellite image with an overall accuracy of 85%. Village EIRs decreased as a power function based on the breeding areas size and proximity. We use this relationship and the breeding habitats to map the variation in EIR over the entire 2500-km(2) study area.

  4. High spatial resolution observations of Orion bright bar: CS (J = 1-0) and H51. cap alpha. emission

    SciTech Connect

    Omodaka, T.; Hayashi, M.; Hasegawa, T.

    1984-07-15

    High-resolution strip maps of CS (J = 1-0) and H51..cap alpha.. line emission across the Orion bright bar are presented. The intensity of CS emission is weaker in the H II region with a rapid increase at the optical bar, while the H51 ..cap alpha.. line was detected only on the side of the H II region. The variation of the CS intensity can be reproduced by a beam-convolved step function with the position of the step coincident with the ionization front. The molecular cloud associated with the bright bar is redshifted relative to the ambient molecular cloud by about 2 km s/sup -1/. This may suggest the dynamical interactions between the molecular cloud and the H II region excited by the Trapezium stars.

  5. High spatial resolution NO2 tropospheric slant columns retrieved from OMI spatial-zoom spectra using an earthshine reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Jasdeep S.; Leigh, Roland J.; Monks, Paul S.

    2014-08-01

    Future satellite instruments measuring urban NO2 will need to have high spatio-temporal resolution in order to improve air quality model forecasts. However, the likely cost and data telemetry requirements for such instruments will be high with current techniques. In this work we propose a new retrieval algorithm for deriving tropospheric NO2 slant column densities (SCDs) by DOAS fitting an earthshine reference spectrum measured over the Pacific to account for stratospheric NO2, which would eliminate the need for a solar reference and simplify instrument and retrieval design. The retrieval is tested by fitting earthshine radiance spectra measured by the Ozone Measuring Instrument (OMI) during its spatial-zoom mode (nadir pixel size: 13 x 12 km2) and super-zoom mode (nadir pixel size: 13 x 3 km2) using a Pacific reference spectrum. Transects taken over urban areas showed that the retrieval appears to retrieve tropospheric NO2 SCDs with good agreement with the operational L2 DOMINO product over regions with high NOx emissions. The retrieval also appeared to supress across-track striping without the need for a posteriori correction and showed sensitivity to absorption due to sand and liquid water over deserts and oceans. Comparisons with operational-scale retrievals also showed improved SCD precision, if random noise is expected to be the cause of retrieval uncertainty.

  6. Analysis of the long-term surface wind variability over complex terrain using a high spatial resolution WRF simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Pedro A.; González-Rouco, J. Fidel; Montávez, Juan P.; García-Bustamante, E.; Navarro, J.; Dudhia, J.

    2013-04-01

    This work uses a WRF numerical simulation from 1960 to 2005 performed at a high horizontal resolution (2 km) to analyze the surface wind variability over a complex terrain region located in northern Iberia. A shorter slice of this simulation has been used in a previous study to demonstrate the ability of the WRF model in reproducing the observed wind variability during the period 1992-2005. Learning from that validation exercise, the extended simulation is herein used to inspect the wind behavior where and when observations are not available and to determine the main synoptic mechanisms responsible for the surface wind variability. A principal component analysis was applied to the daily mean wind. Two principal modes of variation accumulate a large percentage of the wind variability (83.7%). The first mode reflects the channeling of the flow between the large mountain systems in northern Iberia modulated by the smaller topographic features of the region. The second mode further contributes to stress the differentiated wind behavior over the mountains and valleys. Both modes show significant contributions at the higher frequencies during the whole analyzed period, with different contributions at lower frequencies during the different decades. A strong relationship was found between these two modes and the zonal and meridional large scale pressure gradients over the area. This relationship is described in the context of the influence of standard circulation modes relevant in the European region like the North Atlantic Oscillation, the East Atlantic pattern, East Atlantic/Western Russia pattern, and the Scandinavian pattern.

  7. Investigating the effect of pixel size of high spatial resolution FTIR imaging for detection of colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, G. R.; Nallala, J.; Stone, N.

    2016-03-01

    FTIR is a well-established technique and there is significant interest in applying this technique to medical diagnostics e.g. to detect cancer. The introduction of focal plane array (FPA) detectors means that FTIR is particularly suited to rapid imaging of biopsy sections as an adjunct to digital pathology. Until recently however each pixel in the image has been limited to a minimum of 5.5 µm which results in a comparatively low magnification image or histology applications and potentially the loss of important diagnostic information. The recent introduction of higher magnification optics gives image pixels that cover approx. 1.1 µm. This reduction in image pixel size gives images of higher magnification and improved spatial detail can be observed. However, the effect of increasing the magnification on spectral quality and the ability to discriminate between disease states is not well studied. In this work we test the discriminatory performance of FTIR imaging using both standard (5.5 µm) and high (1.1 µm) magnification for the detection of colorectal cancer and explore the effect of binning to degrade high resolution images to determine whether similar diagnostic information and performance can be obtained using both magnifications. Results indicate that diagnostic performance using high magnification may be reduced as compared to standard magnification when using existing multivariate approaches. Reduction of the high magnification data to standard magnification via binning can potentially recover some of the lost performance.

  8. Nano silver and nano zinc-oxide in surface waters - exposure estimation for Europe at high spatial and temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Egon; Johnson, Andrew C; Keller, Virginie D J; Williams, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Nano silver and nano zinc-oxide monthly concentrations in surface waters across Europe were modeled at ~6 x 9 km spatial resolution. Nano-particle loadings from households to rivers were simulated considering household connectivity to sewerage, sewage treatment efficiency, the spatial distribution of sewage treatment plants, and their associated populations. These loadings were used to model temporally varying nano-particle concentrations in rivers, lakes and wetlands by considering dilution, downstream transport, water evaporation, water abstraction, and nano-particle sedimentation. Temporal variability in concentrations caused by weather variation was simulated using monthly weather data for a representative 31-year period. Modeled concentrations represent current levels of nano-particle production.Two scenarios were modeled. In the most likely scenario, half the river stretches had long-term average concentrations exceeding 0.002 ng L(-1) nano silver and 1.5 ng L(-1) nano zinc oxide. In 10% of the river stretches, these concentrations exceeded 0.18 ng L(-1) and 150 ng L(-1), respectively. Predicted concentrations were usually highest in July. PMID:25463731

  9. Nano silver and nano zinc-oxide in surface waters - exposure estimation for Europe at high spatial and temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Egon; Johnson, Andrew C; Keller, Virginie D J; Williams, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Nano silver and nano zinc-oxide monthly concentrations in surface waters across Europe were modeled at ~6 x 9 km spatial resolution. Nano-particle loadings from households to rivers were simulated considering household connectivity to sewerage, sewage treatment efficiency, the spatial distribution of sewage treatment plants, and their associated populations. These loadings were used to model temporally varying nano-particle concentrations in rivers, lakes and wetlands by considering dilution, downstream transport, water evaporation, water abstraction, and nano-particle sedimentation. Temporal variability in concentrations caused by weather variation was simulated using monthly weather data for a representative 31-year period. Modeled concentrations represent current levels of nano-particle production.Two scenarios were modeled. In the most likely scenario, half the river stretches had long-term average concentrations exceeding 0.002 ng L(-1) nano silver and 1.5 ng L(-1) nano zinc oxide. In 10% of the river stretches, these concentrations exceeded 0.18 ng L(-1) and 150 ng L(-1), respectively. Predicted concentrations were usually highest in July.

  10. Preparing a landslide and shadow inventory map from high-spatial-resolution imagery facilitated by an expert system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-Chien

    2015-01-01

    An expert system was developed to integrate all useful spatial information and help the interpreters determine the landslide and shaded areas quickly and accurately. The intersection of two spectral indices, namely the normalized difference vegetation index and the normalized green red difference index, as well as the first principle component of the panchromatic band, is employed to automatically determine the regional thresholds of nonvegetation and dark areas. These boundaries are overlaid on the locally enhanced image and the digital topography model to closely inspect each area with a preferred viewing direction. The other geospatial information can be switched on and off to facilitate interpretation. This new approach is tested with 2 m pan-sharpened multispectral imagery from Formosat-2 taken on August 24, 2009, for several disaster areas of Typhoon Morakot. The generated inventory of landslide and shadow areas is validated with the one manually delineated from the 25 cm aerial photos taken on the same day. The production, user, and overall accuracies are higher than 82%, 85%, and 98%, respectively. The fall in production and user accuracies mainly comes from the differences in resolution. This new approach is as accurate as the general approach of manual delineation and visual interpretation, yet significantly reduces the required time.

  11. Monolithically integrated mid-IR interband cascade laser and photodetector operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfi, Hossein; Li, Lu; Shazzad Rassel, S. M.; Yang, Rui Q.; Corrége, Cédric J.; Johnson, Matthew B.; Larson, Preston R.; Gupta, James A.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the demonstration of a monolithically integrated mid-IR interband cascade (IC) laser and photodetector operating at room temperature. The base structure for the integrated laser and detector is a six-stage type-I IC laser with GaInAsSb quantum well active regions. The laser/detector pair was defined using focused ion beam milling. The laser section lased in cw mode with an emission wavelength of ˜3.1 μm at 20 °C and top-illuminated photodetectors fabricated from the same wafer had Johnson-noise-limited detectivity of 1.05 × 109 cm Hz1/2/W at this wavelength and temperature. Under the same condition, the detectivity for the edge illumination configuration for the monolithically integrated laser/photodetector pairs is projected to be as high as 1.85 × 1010 cm Hz1/2/W, as supported by experimentally observed high photocurrent and open-circuit voltage. These high performance characteristics for monolithically integrated IC devices show great prospects for on-chip integration of mid-IR photonic devices for miniaturized sensors and on-chip optical communication systems.

  12. Low loss SiGe graded index waveguides for mid-IR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, M.; Labeye, P.; Grand, G.; Hartmann, J. M.; Boulila, F.; Carras, M.; Nicoletti, S.

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years Mid InfraRed (MIR) photonics has received renewed interest for a variety of commercial, scientific and military applications. This paper reports the design, the fabrication and the characterization of SiGe/Si based graded index waveguides and photonics integrated devices. The thickness and the Ge concentration of the core layer were optimized to cover the full [3 - 8 μm] band. The developed SiGe/Si stack has been used to fabricate straight waveguides and basic optical functions such as Y-junction, crossings and couplers. Straight waveguides showed losses as low as 1 dB/cm at λ = 4.5 μm and 2 dB/cm at 7.4 μm. Likewise straight waveguides, basic functions exhibit nearly theoretical behavior with losses compatible with the implementation of more complex functions in integrated photonics circuits. To the best of our knowledge, the performances of those Mid-IR waveguides significantly exceed the state of the art, confirming the feasibility of using graded SiGe/Si devices in a wide range of wavelengths. These results represent a capital breakthrough to develop a photonic platform working in the Mid-IR range.

  13. Tunable parametric amplifier for mid-IR application based on highly nonlinear chalcogenide material

    SciTech Connect

    Maji, Partha Sona; Roy Chaudhuri, Partha

    2015-06-28

    A novel dispersion controlling technique towards attaining tunable parametric amplification based on highly nonlinear photonic crystal fibers has been investigated. Selective infiltration of the liquid into the air-holes leads to alter the zero dispersion wavelength towards a broader parametric gain in the mid-IR spectrum by only changing the temperature of the system externally. The dispersion profile specially the zero dispersion wavelengths can be well tuned around the pumping wavelength, thereby generating several hundred nanometer parametric bandwidth in near-IR to mid-IR region. The tunability of the photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) can also be useful for generating new frequencies in both the red- and blue-shifted regions far from the pumping wavelength. Our numerical calculations reveal that we could achieve very wide band fiber optic parametric amplifier both in the communication wavelength and in the IR region. Also two different types of PCFs can be used to achieve same broadband wavelength spectra however with a tradeoff between the fiber lengths and pump power.

  14. Photodiode-Based X-Ray Beam-Position Monitor With High Spatial-Resolution for the NSLS-II Beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, P.S.; Siddons, D. P.

    2009-05-25

    We developed a photodiode-based monochromatic X-ray beam-position monitor (X-BPM) with high spatial resolution for the project beamlines of the NSLS-II. A ring array of 32 Si PIN-junction photodiodes were designed for use as a position sensor, and a low-noise HERMES4 ASIC chip was integrated into the electronic readout system. A series of precision measurements to characterize electrically the Si-photodiode sensor and the ASIC chip demonstrated that the inherent noise is sufficiently below tolerance levels. Following up modeling of detector's performance, including geometrical optimization using a Gaussian beam, we fabricated and assembled a first prototype. In this paper, we describe the development of this new state-of-the-art X-ray BPM along the beamline, in particular, downstream from the monochromator.

  15. Strong intermolecular vibrational coupling through cyclic hydrogen-bonded structures revealed by ultrafast continuum mid-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stingel, Ashley M; Calabrese, Carmella; Petersen, Poul B

    2013-12-12

    Cyclic hydrogen-bonded structures are common motifs in biological systems, providing structural stability and mediating proton transfer for redox reactions. The mechanism of proton transfer across hydrogen-bonded interfaces depends on the strength of the intermolecular coupling between bridging OH/NH vibrational modes. Here we present a novel ultrafast continuum mid-IR spectroscopy experiment to study the vibrational dynamics of the 7-azaindole-acetic acid (7AI-Ac) heterodimer as a model system for asymmetric cyclic hydrogen-bonded structures. In addition to spreading of the excitation across the whole OH band within the time resolution of the experiment, excitation of a 300 cm(-1) region of the ∼1000 cm(-1) broad OH stretching mode of the acetic acid monomer leads to a frequency shift in the NH stretching mode of the 7AI monomer. This indicates that the NH and OH stretching modes located on the two monomers are strongly coupled despite being separated by 750 cm(-1). The strong coupling further causes the OH and NH bands to decay with a common decay time of ∼2.5 ps. This intermolecular coupling is mediated through the hydrogen-bonded structure of the 7AI-Ac heterodimer and is likely a general property of cyclic hydrogen-bonded structures. Characterizing the vibrational dynamics of and the coupling between the high-frequency OH/NH modes will be important for understanding proton transfer across such molecular interfaces.

  16. MERTIS-thermal infrared imaging of Mercury: advances in mid-IR remote sensing technology for planetary exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Gabriele E.; Hiesinger, Harald; Helbert, Jörn; Peter, Gisbert; Walter, Ingo

    2010-09-01

    MERTIS (MErcury Radiometer and Thermal infrared Imaging Spectrometer) is part of ESA's BepiColombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter mission to the innermost planet of the Solar system. MERTIS is designed to identify rock-forming minerals, to map the surface composition, and to study the surface temperature variations with an uncooled microbolometer detector in the hot environment of Mercury. MERTIS is an advanced IR instrument combining a pushbroom IR grating spectrometer (TIS) with a radiometer (TIR) sharing the same optics, instrument electronics and in-fight calibration components for a wavelength range of 7-14 and 7-40 μm, respectively. First results of the ongoing MESSENGER project at Mercury have shown a more complex geology and higher variability of features than previously thought. The MESSENGER studies have demonstrated the need to gain global high-resolution mid-IR spectral and temperature data to achieve a better understanding of the planetary genesis. The MERTIS measurements will acquire this currently missing data set. This article gives a summary of the instrument requirements and its design. We are reporting on the actual instrument development progress, and the status of system and subsystem qualification efforts.

  17. A region-based high spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery classification algorithm based on multiscale fusion and feature weighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Leiguang; Mei, Tiancan; Qin, Qianqin

    2009-10-01

    With the availability of high resolution multispectral imagery from sensors, it is possible to identify small-scale features in urban environment. Given attributes of image structure such as color, texture, have the character of highly scale dependency, a hierarchy segment fusion algorithm based on region deviation is proposed to extract more robust features and benefit single semantic level land cover classification. The fusion algorithm proposed is divided into in two successive sub-tasks: mean shift (MS) filtering based pre-segmentation and hierarchical segment optimization. Presegmentation is applied to get boundary- preserved and spectrally homogeneous initial regions, and then, a family of nested image partitions with ascending region areas is constructed by iteratively merging procedure. In every scale, regions of the corresponding critical size are evaluated according to potential region merge risk, which is measured by the region standard deviation change before and after a virtual merge. If a region measurement is larger than a specified change threshold, the region will be preserved to the next level and labeled as a candidate segment for following regionbased classification. Otherwise the segment will be merged to the next scale level. After fusing segments in different scales, a novel weighted minimum distance classifier is employed to get supervised classification result, in which every feature band's deviation is used to calculate its own weight. We show results for classification of a HR image over Washington DC Mall area taken by the HYDICE sensor. Different features combined with designed classifier have proved that fused segments provided a robust feature extraction and improve classification accuracy.

  18. Design and evaluation of an innovative MRI-compatible Braille stimulator with high spatial and temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Debowska, Weronika; Wolak, Tomasz; Soluch, Pawel; Orzechowski, Mateusz; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2013-02-15

    Neural correlates of Braille reading have been widely studied with different neuroimaging techniques. Nevertheless, the exact brain processes underlying this unique activity are still unknown, due to suboptimal accuracy of imaging and/or stimuli delivery methods. To study somatosensory perception effectively, the stimulation must reflect parameters of the natural stimulus and must be applied with precise timing. In functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) providing these characteristics requires technologically advanced solutions and there have been several successful direct tactile stimulation devices designed that allow investigation of somatotopic organization of brain sensory areas. They may, however, be of limited applicability in studying brain mechanisms related to such distinctive tactile activity as Braille reading. In this paper we describe the design and experimental evaluation of an innovative MRI-compatible Braille Character Stimulator (BCS) enabling precise and stable delivery of standardized Braille characters with high temporal resolution. Our device is fully programmable, flexible in stimuli delivery and can be easily implemented in any research unit. The Braille Character Stimulator was tested with a same-different discrimination task on Braille characters during an event-related fMRI experiment in eleven right-handed sighted adult subjects. The results show significant activations in several cortical areas, including bilateral primary (SI) and secondary somatosensory (SII) cortices, bilateral premotor and supplementary motor areas, inferior frontal gyri, inferior temporal gyri and precuneus, as well as contralateral (to the stimulated hand) thalamus. The results validate the use of the BCS as a method of effective stimuli application in fMRI studies, in both sighted and visually impaired subjects.

  19. A systematic comparison of different object-based classification techniques using high spatial resolution imagery in agricultural environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Manchun; Ma, Lei; Blaschke, Thomas; Cheng, Liang; Tiede, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    Geographic Object-Based Image Analysis (GEOBIA) is becoming more prevalent in remote sensing classification, especially for high-resolution imagery. Many supervised classification approaches are applied to objects rather than pixels, and several studies have been conducted to evaluate the performance of such supervised classification techniques in GEOBIA. However, these studies did not systematically investigate all relevant factors affecting the classification (segmentation scale, training set size, feature selection and mixed objects). In this study, statistical methods and visual inspection were used to compare these factors systematically in two agricultural case studies in China. The results indicate that Random Forest (RF) and Support Vector Machines (SVM) are highly suitable for GEOBIA classifications in agricultural areas and confirm the expected general tendency, namely that the overall accuracies decline with increasing segmentation scale. All other investigated methods except for RF and SVM are more prone to obtain a lower accuracy due to the broken objects at fine scales. In contrast to some previous studies, the RF classifiers yielded the best results and the k-nearest neighbor classifier were the worst results, in most cases. Likewise, the RF and Decision Tree classifiers are the most robust with or without feature selection. The results of training sample analyses indicated that the RF and adaboost. M1 possess a superior generalization capability, except when dealing with small training sample sizes. Furthermore, the classification accuracies were directly related to the homogeneity/heterogeneity of the segmented objects for all classifiers. Finally, it was suggested that RF should be considered in most cases for agricultural mapping.

  20. Optimal attributes for the object based detection of giant reed in riparian habitats: A comparative study between Airborne High Spatial Resolution and WorldView-2 imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Maria Rosário; Aguiar, Francisca C.; Silva, João M. N.; Ferreira, Maria Teresa; Pereira, José M. C.

    2014-10-01

    Giant reed is an aggressive invasive plant of riparian ecosystems in many sub-tropical and warm-temperate regions, including Mediterranean Europe. In this study we tested a set of geometric, spectral and textural attributes in an object based image analysis (OBIA) approach to map giant reed invasions in riparian habitats. Bagging Classification and Regression Tree were used to select the optimal attributes and to build the classification rules sets. Mapping accuracy was performed using landscape metrics and the Kappa coefficient to compare the topographical and geometric similarity between the giant reed patches obtained with the OBIA map and with a validation map derived from on-screen digitizing. The methodology was applied in two high spatial resolution images: an airborne multispectral imagery and the newly WorldView-2 imagery. A temporal coverage of the airborne multispectral images was radiometrically calibrated with the IR-Mad transformation and used to assess the influence of the phenological variability of the invader. We found that optimal attributes for giant reed OBIA detection are a combination of spectral, geometric and textural information, with different scoring selection depending on the spectral and spatial characteristics of the imagery. WorldView-2 showed higher mapping accuracy (Kappa coefficient of 77%) and spectral attributes, including the newly yellow band, were preferentially selected, although a tendency to overestimate the total invaded area, due to the low spatial resolution (2 m of pixel size vs. 50 cm) was observed. When airborne images were used, geometric attributes were primarily selected and a higher spatial detail of the invasive patches was obtained, due to the higher spatial resolution. However, in highly heterogeneous landscapes, the low spectral resolution of the airborne images (4 bands instead of the 8 of WorldView-2) reduces the capability to detect giant reed patches. Giant reed displays peculiar spectral and geometric

  1. TH-C-19A-12: Two-Dimensional High Spatial-Resolution Dosimeter Using Europium Doped Potassium Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H; Yang, D; Xiao, Z; Driewer, J; Han, Z; Low, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Recent research has shown that KCl:Eu2+ has great potential for use in megavoltage radiation therapy dosimetry because this material exhibits excellent storage performance and is reusable due to strong radiation hardness. This work reports our attempts to fabricate 2D KCl:Eu2+ storage phosphor films (SPFs) using both a physical vapor deposition (PVD) method and a tape casting method. Methods: A thin layer of KCl:Eu2+ was deposited on a substrate of borosilicate glass (e.g., laboratory slides) with a PVD system. For tape casting, a homogenous suspension containing storage phosphor particles, liquid vehicle and polymer binder was formed and subsequently cast by doctor-blade onto a polyethylene terephthalate substrate to form a 150 μm thick SPF. Results: X ray diffraction analysis showed that a 10 μm thick PVD sample was composed of highly crystalline KCl. No additional phases were observed, suggesting that the europium activator had completed been incorporated into the KCl matrix. Photostimulated luminescence and photoluminescence spectra suggested that F (Cl−) centers were the electron storage centers post x ray irradiation and that Eu2+ cations acted as luminescence centers in the photostimulation process. The 150 μm thick casted KCl:Eu2+ SPF showed sub-millimeter spatial resolution. Monte Carlo simulations further demonstrated that the admixture of 20% KCl:Eu2+ and 80% low Z polymer binder exhibited almost no energy dependence in a 6 MV beam. KCl:Eu2+ pellet samples showed a large dynamic range from 0.01 cGy to 60 Gy dose-to-water, and saturated at approximately 500 Gy as a Result of its intrinsic high radiation hardness. Conclusions: This discovery research provides strong evidence that KCl:Eu2+ based SPF with associated readout apparatus could Result in a novel electronic film system that has all the desirable features associated with classic radiographic film and, importantly, water equivalence and the capability of permanent identification of

  2. Application of the mid-IR radio correlation to the Ĝ sample and the search for advanced extraterrestrial civilisations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    Wright et al. (2014, ApJ, 792, 26) have embarked on a search for advanced Karadashev Type III civilisations via the compilation of a sample of sources with extreme mid-IR emission and colours. The aim is to furnish a list of candidate galaxies that might harbour an advanced Kardashev Type III civilisation; in this scenario, the mid-IR emission is then primarily associated with waste heat energy by-products. I apply the mid-IR radio correlation to this Glimpsing Heat from Alien Technology (Ĝ) sample, a catalogue of 93 candidate galaxies compiled by Griffith et al. (2015, ApJS, 217, 25). I demonstrate that the mid-IR and radio luminosities are correlated for the sample, determining a k-corrected value of q22 = 1.35 ± 0.42. By comparison, a similar measurement for 124 galaxies drawn from the First Look Survey (FLS) has q22 = 0.87 ± 0.27. The statistically significant difference of the mean value of q22 for these two samples, taken together with their more comparable far-IR properties, suggests that the Ĝ sample shows excessive emission in the mid-IR. The fact that the Ĝ sample largely follows the mid-IR radio correlation strongly suggests that the vast majority of these sources are associated with galaxies in which natural astrophysical processes are dominant. This simple application of the mid-IR radio correlation can substantially reduce the number of false positives in the Ĝ catalogue since galaxies occupied by advanced Kardashev Type III civilisations would be expected to exhibit very high values of q. I identify nine outliers in the sample with q22> 2 of which at least three have properties that are relatively well explained via standard astrophysical interpretations e.g. dust emission associated with nascent star formation and/or nuclear activity from a heavily obscured AGN. The other outliers have not been studied in any great detail, and are deserving of further observation. I also note that the comparison of resolved mid-IR and radio images of galaxies

  3. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF INERTIAL FUSION TARGET PLASMAS USING BUBBLE NEUTRON DETECTORS, Final Report for the Period November 1, 1999 - February 28, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    FISHER,RK

    2003-02-01

    OAK B202 HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF INERTIAL FUSION TARGET PLASMAS USING BUBBLE NEUTRON DETECTORS. Bubble detectors, which can detect neutrons with a spatial 5 to 30 {micro}, are the most promising approach to imaging NIF target plasmas with the desired 5 {micro} spatial resolution in the target plane. Gel bubble detectors are being tested to record neutron images of ICF implosions in OMEGA experiments. By improving the noise reduction techniques used in analyzing the data taken in June 2000, we have been able to image the neutron emission from 6 {center_dot} 10{sup 13} yield DT target plasmas with a target plane spatial resolution of {approx} 140 {micro}. As expected, the spatial resolution was limited by counting statistics as a result of the low neutron detection efficiency of the easy-to-use gel bubble detectors. The results have been submitted for publication and will be the subject of an invited talk at the October 2001 Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society. To improve the counting statistics, data was taken in May 2001 using a stack of four gel detectors and integrated over a series of up to seven high-yield DT shots. Analysis of the 2001 data is still in its early stages. Gel detectors were chosen for these initial tests since the bubbles can be photographed several hours after the neutron exposure. They consist of {approx} 5000 drops ({approx} 100 {micro} in diameter) of bubble detector liquid/cm{sup 3} suspended in an inactive support gel that occupies {approx} 99% of the detector volume. Using a liquid bubble chamber detector and a light scattering system to record the bubble locations a few microseconds after the neutron exposure when the bubbles are {approx} 10 {micro} in diameter, should result in {approx} 1000 times higher neutron detection efficiency and a target plane resolution on OMEGA of {approx} 10 to 50 {micro}.

  4. A Q-switched Ho:YAG laser assisted nanosecond time-resolved T-jump transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy with high sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Li, Deyong; Li, Yunliang; Li, Hao; Wu, Xianyou; Yu, Qingxu; Weng, Yuxiang

    2015-05-01

    Knowledge of dynamical structure of protein is an important clue to understand its biological function in vivo. Temperature-jump (T-jump) time-resolved transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy is a powerful tool in elucidating the protein dynamical structures and the folding/unfolding kinetics of proteins in solution. A home-built setup of T-jump time-resolved transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy with high sensitivity is developed, which is composed of a Q-switched Cr, Tm, Ho:YAG laser with an output wavelength at 2.09 μm as the T-jump heating source, and a continuous working CO laser tunable from 1580 to 1980 cm(-1) as the IR probe. The results demonstrate that this system has a sensitivity of 1 × 10(-4) ΔOD for a single wavelength detection, and 2 × 10(-4) ΔOD for spectral detection in amide I' region, as well as a temporal resolution of 20 ns. Moreover, the data quality coming from the CO laser is comparable to the one using the commercial quantum cascade laser.

  5. A Q-switched Ho:YAG laser assisted nanosecond time-resolved T-jump transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy with high sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Li, Deyong; Li, Yunliang; Li, Hao; Wu, Xianyou; Yu, Qingxu; Weng, Yuxiang

    2015-05-01

    Knowledge of dynamical structure of protein is an important clue to understand its biological function in vivo. Temperature-jump (T-jump) time-resolved transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy is a powerful tool in elucidating the protein dynamical structures and the folding/unfolding kinetics of proteins in solution. A home-built setup of T-jump time-resolved transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy with high sensitivity is developed, which is composed of a Q-switched Cr, Tm, Ho:YAG laser with an output wavelength at 2.09 μm as the T-jump heating source, and a continuous working CO laser tunable from 1580 to 1980 cm(-1) as the IR probe. The results demonstrate that this system has a sensitivity of 1 × 10(-4) ΔOD for a single wavelength detection, and 2 × 10(-4) ΔOD for spectral detection in amide I' region, as well as a temporal resolution of 20 ns. Moreover, the data quality coming from the CO laser is comparable to the one using the commercial quantum cascade laser. PMID:26026512

  6. A Q-switched Ho:YAG laser assisted nanosecond time-resolved T-jump transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy with high sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Deyong; Li, Yunliang; Li, Hao; Weng, Yuxiang; Wu, Xianyou; Yu, Qingxu

    2015-05-15

    Knowledge of dynamical structure of protein is an important clue to understand its biological function in vivo. Temperature-jump (T-jump) time-resolved transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy is a powerful tool in elucidating the protein dynamical structures and the folding/unfolding kinetics of proteins in solution. A home-built setup of T-jump time-resolved transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy with high sensitivity is developed, which is composed of a Q-switched Cr, Tm, Ho:YAG laser with an output wavelength at 2.09 μm as the T-jump heating source, and a continuous working CO laser tunable from 1580 to 1980 cm{sup −1} as the IR probe. The results demonstrate that this system has a sensitivity of 1 × 10{sup −4} ΔOD for a single wavelength detection, and 2 × 10{sup −4} ΔOD for spectral detection in amide I′ region, as well as a temporal resolution of 20 ns. Moreover, the data quality coming from the CO laser is comparable to the one using the commercial quantum cascade laser.

  7. Identification of red supergiants in nearby galaxies with mid-IR photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britavskiy, N. E.; Bonanos, A. Z.; Mehner, A.; García-Álvarez, D.; Prieto, J. L.; Morrell, N. I.

    2014-02-01

    Context. The role of episodic mass loss in massive-star evolution is one of the most important open questions of current stellar evolution theory. Episodic mass loss produces dust and therefore causes evolved massive stars to be very luminous in the mid-infrared and dim at optical wavelengths. Aims: We aim to increase the number of investigated luminous mid-IR sources to shed light on the late stages of these objects. To achieve this we employed mid-IR selection criteria to identity dusty evolved massive stars in two nearby galaxies. Methods: The method is based on mid-IR colors, using 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm photometry from archival Spitzer Space Telescope images of nearby galaxies and J-band photometry from 2MASS. We applied our criteria to two nearby star-forming dwarf irregular galaxies, Sextans A and IC 1613, selecting eight targets, which we followed-up with spectroscopy. Results: Our spectral classification and analysis yielded the discovery of two M-type supergiants in IC 1613, three K-type supergiants and one candidate F-type giant in Sextans A, and two foreground M giants. We show that the proposed criteria provide an independent way for identifying dusty evolved massive stars that can be extended to all nearby galaxies with available Spitzer/IRAC images at 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm. Based on observations made with the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), installed in the Spanish Observatorio de El Roque de Los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, on the island of La Palma, and the 2.5 m du Pont telescope in operation at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.Spectra are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/562/A75

  8. AQUARIUS: the next generation mid-IR detector for ground-based astronomy, an update.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, Derek; Finger, Gert; Jakob, Gerd; Beckmann, Udo

    2014-07-01

    ESO has already published data from a preliminary laboratory analysis on the new mid-IR detector, AQUARIUS, at the previous SPIE conference of 2012, held in Amsterdam2. This data analysis indicated that this new mid-IR Si:As IBC detector, from Raytheon Vision Systems, was an excellent astronomical detector when compared to previous generations of this detector type, specifically in terms of stability, read noise and cosmetic quality. Since that time, the detector has been deployed into the VISIR1 instrument at the VLT, with very mixed performance results, especially when used with the telescope secondary mirror, to chop between two areas of sky to do background subtraction and at the same time when many frames are co-added to improve the signal to noise performance. This is the typical mode of operation for a mid-IR instrument on a ground based telescope. Preliminary astronomical data analysis indicated that the new detector was a factor of two to three times less sensitive in terms of its signal to noise per unit time performance when directly compared to the old DRS detector that AQUARIUS was designed to replace. To determine the reason for this loss of sensitivity, the instrument was removed from the telescope and not offered to the ESO user community. A detector testing campaign was then initiated in our laboratory to determine the reasons for this loss of sensitivity, assuming that it was an issue with the new detector itself. This paper reports on our latest laboratory measurements to determine the reasons for this loss of sensitivity. We specifically report on indirect measurements made to measure the quantum efficiency of the detector, which can be difficult to measure directly. We also report on a little known source of noise, called Excess Low Frequency Noise (ELFN). Detailed analysis and testing has confirmed that this ELFN is the reason for the loss of instrument sensitivity. This has been proven by a re-commissioning phase at the telescope with the

  9. New Mid-IR Lasers Based on Rare-Earth-Doped Sulfide and Chloride Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nostrand, M

    2000-09-01

    Applications in remote-sensing and military countermeasures have driven a need for compact, solid-state mid-IR lasers. Due to multi-phonon quenching, non-traditional hosts are needed to extend current solid-state, room-temperature lasing capabilities beyond {approx} 4 {micro}m. Traditional oxide and fluoride hosts have effective phonon energies in the neighborhood of 1000 cm{sup -1} and 500 cm{sup -1}, respectively. These phonons can effectively quench radiation above 2 and 4 {micro}m, respectively. Materials with lower effective phonon energies such as sulfides and chlorides are the logical candidates for mid-IR (4-10 {micro}m) operation. In this report, laser action is demonstrated in two such hosts, CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4} and KPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5}. The CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} laser operating at 4.3 {micro}m represents the first sulfide laser operating beyond 2 {micro}m. The KPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5}:Dy{sup 3+} laser operating at 2.4 {micro}m represents the first operation of a chloride-host laser in ambient conditions. Laser action is also reported for CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} at 2.4 {micro}m, CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} at 1.4 {micro}m, and KPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5}:Nd{sup 3+} at 1.06 {micro}m. Both host materials have been fully characterized, including lifetimes, absorption and emission cross sections, radiative branching ratios, and radiative quantum efficiencies. Radiative branching ratios and radiative quantum efficiencies have been determined both by the Judd-Ofelt method (which is based on absorption measurements), and by a novel method described herein which is based on emission measurements. Modeling has been performed to predict laser performance, and a new method to determine emission cross section from slope efficiency and threshold data is developed. With the introduction and laser demonstration of rare-earth-doped CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4} and KPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5}, direct generation of mid-IR laser radiation in a solid-state host has been demonstrated. In

  10. High Spatial Resolution Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance at 7.0 Tesla in Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy – First Experiences: Lesson Learned from 7.0 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Prothmann, Marcel; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Töpper, Agnieszka; Dieringer, Matthias A.; Shahid, Etham; Graessl, Andreas; Rieger, Jan; Lysiak, Darius; Thalhammer, C.; Huelnhagen, Till; Kellman, Peter; Niendorf, Thoralf; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) provides valuable information in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) based on myocardial tissue differentiation and the detection of small morphological details. CMR at 7.0T improves spatial resolution versus today’s clinical protocols. This capability is as yet untapped in HCM patients. We aimed to examine the feasibility of CMR at 7.0T in HCM patients and to demonstrate its capability for the visualization of subtle morphological details. Methods We screened 131 patients with HCM. 13 patients (9 males, 56 ±31 years) and 13 healthy age- and gender-matched subjects (9 males, 55 ±31years) underwent CMR at 7.0T and 3.0T (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). For the assessment of cardiac function and morphology, 2D CINE imaging was performed (voxel size at 7.0T: (1.4x1.4x2.5) mm3 and (1.4x1.4x4.0) mm3; at 3.0T: (1.8x1.8x6.0) mm3). Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was performed at 3.0T for detection of fibrosis. Results All scans were successful and evaluable. At 3.0T, quantification of the left ventricle (LV) showed similar results in short axis view vs. the biplane approach (LVEDV, LVESV, LVMASS, LVEF) (p = 0.286; p = 0.534; p = 0.155; p = 0.131). The LV-parameters obtained at 7.0T where in accordance with the 3.0T data (pLVEDV = 0.110; pLVESV = 0.091; pLVMASS = 0.131; pLVEF = 0.182). LGE was detectable in 12/13 (92%) of the HCM patients. High spatial resolution CINE imaging at 7.0T revealed hyperintense regions, identifying myocardial crypts in 7/13 (54%) of the HCM patients. All crypts were located in the LGE-positive regions. The crypts were not detectable at 3.0T using a clinical protocol. Conclusions CMR at 7.0T is feasible in patients with HCM. High spatial resolution gradient echo 2D CINE imaging at 7.0T allowed the detection of subtle morphological details in regions of extended hypertrophy and LGE. PMID:26863618

  11. Macro and micro full field x-ray fluorescence with an X-ray pinhole camera presenting high energy and high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Romano, Francesco Paolo; Caliri, Claudia; Cosentino, Luigi; Gammino, Santo; Giuntini, Lorenzo; Mascali, David; Neri, Lorenzo; Pappalardo, Lighea; Rizzo, Francesca; Taccetti, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    This work describes a tabletop (50 cm × 25 cm × 25 cm) full field X-ray pinhole camera (FF-XPC) presenting high energy- and high spatial-resolution. The FF-XPC consists of a conventional charge-coupled device (CCD) detector coupled, in a coaxial geometry, to a pinhole collimator of small diameter. The X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is induced on the samples with an external low-power X-ray tube. The use of the CCD as an energy dispersive X-ray detector was obtained by adopting a multi-image acquisition in single photon counting and by developing a processing algorithm to be applied in real-time to each of the acquired image-frames. This approach allowed the measurement of X-ray spectra with an energy resolution down to 133 eV at the reference value of 5.9 keV. The detection of the X-ray fluorescence through the pinhole-collimator allowed the two-dimensional elemental mapping of the irradiated samples. Two magnifications (M), determined by the relative sample-pinhole-CCD distances, are used in the present setup. A low value of M (equal to 0.35×) allows the macro-FF-XRF of large area samples (up to 4 × 4 cm(2)) with a spatial resolution down to 140 μm; a large magnification (M equal to 6×) is used for the micro-FF-XRF of small area samples (2.5 × 2.5 mm(2)) with a spatial resolution down to 30 μm.

  12. A Keck Adaptive Optics Survey of a Representative Sample of Gravitationally Lensed Star-forming Galaxies: High Spatial Resolution Studies of Kinematics and Metallicity Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leethochawalit, Nicha; Jones, Tucker A.; Ellis, Richard S.; Stark, Daniel P.; Richard, Johan; Zitrin, Adi; Auger, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    We discuss spatially resolved emission line spectroscopy secured for a total sample of 15 gravitationally lensed star-forming galaxies at a mean redshift of z≃ 2 based on Keck laser-assisted adaptive optics observations undertaken with the recently improved OSIRIS integral field unit (IFU) spectrograph. By exploiting gravitationally lensed sources drawn primarily from the CASSOWARY survey, we sample these sub-L{}* galaxies with source-plane resolutions of a few hundred parsecs ensuring well-sampled 2D velocity data and resolved variations in the gas-phase metallicity. Such high spatial resolution data offer a critical check on the structural properties of larger samples derived with coarser sampling using multiple-IFU instruments. We demonstrate how kinematic complexities essential to understanding the maturity of an early star-forming galaxy can often only be revealed with better sampled data. Although we include four sources from our earlier work, the present study provides a more representative sample unbiased with respect to emission line strength. Contrary to earlier suggestions, our data indicate a more diverse range of kinematic and metal gradient behavior inconsistent with a simple picture of well-ordered rotation developing concurrently with established steep metal gradients in all but merging systems. Comparing our observations with the predictions of hydrodynamical simulations suggests that gas and metals have been mixed by outflows or other strong feedback processes, flattening the metal gradients in early star-forming galaxies.

  13. In vivo functional connectome of human brainstem nuclei of the ascending arousal, autonomic and motor systems by high spatial resolution 7 Tesla fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Bianciardi, Marta; Toschi, Nicola; Eichner, Cornelius; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Setsompop, Kawin; Brown, Emery N.; Hamalainen, Matti S.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2016-01-01

    Object To map the in vivo human functional connectivity of several brainstem nuclei with the rest of the brain by using seed-based correlation of ultra-high magnetic field functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Materials and Methods We used the recently developed template of 11 brainstem nuclei derived from multi-contrast structural MRI at 7 Tesla as seed regions to determine their connectivity to the rest of the brain. To achieve this, we utilized the increased contrast-to-noise ratio of 7 Tesla fMRI compared to 3 Tesla and the time efficient simultaneous multi-slice imaging to cover the brain with high spatial resolution (1.1 mm-isotropic nominal resolution) while maintaining a short repetition time (2.5 s). Results The delineated Pearson’s correlation-based functional connectivity diagrams (connectomes) of 11 brainstem nuclei of the ascending arousal, motor and autonomic systems from 12 controls are presented and discussed in the context of existing histology and animal work. Conclusion Considering that the investigated brainstem nuclei play a crucial role in several vital functions, the delineated preliminary connectomes might prove useful for future in vivo research and clinical studies of human brainstem function and pathology, including disorders of consciousness, sleep disorders, autonomic disorders, Parkinson’s disease and other motor disorders. PMID:27126248

  14. High spatial resolution particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Boatner, Lynn A.; Mihalczo, John T.

    2015-10-13

    Disclosed below are representative embodiments of methods, apparatus, and systems for detecting particles, such as radiation or charged particles. One exemplary embodiment disclosed herein is particle detector comprising an optical fiber with a first end and second end opposite the first end. The optical fiber of this embodiment further comprises a doped region at the first end and a non-doped region adjacent to the doped region. The doped region of the optical fiber is configured to scintillate upon interaction with a target particle, thereby generating one or more photons that propagate through the optical fiber and to the second end. Embodiments of the disclosed technology can be used in a variety of applications, including associated particle imaging and cold neutron scattering.

  15. High spatial resolution particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Boatner, Lynn A.; Mihalczo, John T.

    2012-09-04

    Disclosed below are representative embodiments of methods, apparatus, and systems for detecting particles, such as radiation or charged particles. One exemplary embodiment disclosed herein is particle detector comprising an optical fiber with a first end and second end opposite the first end. The optical fiber of this embodiment further comprises a doped region at the first end and a non-doped region adjacent to the doped region. The doped region of the optical fiber is configured to scintillate upon interaction with a target particle, thereby generating one or more photons that propagate through the optical fiber and to the second end. Embodiments of the disclosed technology can be used in a variety of applications, including associated particle imaging and cold neutron scattering.

  16. A Mid-IR Investigation of the GMBCG Catalogue using WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, James; Yan, Haojing

    2016-01-01

    We present the preliminary results of a mid-infrared study of the Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) of 55424 galaxy clusters. The clusters are taken from the Gaussian Mixture Brightest Cluster Galaxy (GMBCG) catalog based upon SDSS Data Release 7, covering the redshift range of 0.1 < z < 0.55. Of particular interest, we investigate 458 BCGs that have significant detection at 22um according to the Wide-Field Infrared Survey (WISE) passband 4 (W4). We find that the mid-IR emissions of most of them are predominantly from star formation, which is quite contrary to the usual notion that low redshift BCGs are old, passively evolving galaxies (i.e. "red and dead"). We discuss the implications of our results.

  17. Giantically blue-shifted visible light in femtosecond mid-IR filament in fluorides.

    PubMed

    Dormidonov, A E; Kompanets, V O; Chekalin, S V; Kandidov, V P

    2015-11-01

    A giant blue shift (more than 3000 nm) of an isolated visible band of supercontinuum was discovered and studied in the single filament regime of Mid-IR femtosecond laser pulse at powers slightly exceeding critical power for self-focusing in fluorides. At the pulse central wavelength increasing from 3000 nm to 3800 nm the spectral maximum of the visible band is shifted from 570 nm and 520 nm up to 400 nm and 330 nm for BaF(2) and CaF(2), respectively, its spectral width (FWHM) being reduced from 50 - 70 nm to 14 nm. It is shown that the formation of this narrow visible wing is a result of the interference of the supercontinuum components in the anomalous group velocity dispersion regime. PMID:26561190

  18. Detection of no and S-Nitrosocompounds Using Mid-Ir Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stsiapura, Vitali; Shuali, Vincent K.; Ziegler, Angela; Lehmann, Kevin K.; Gaston, Benjamin M.

    2013-06-01

    Metabolic reactions of S-nitrosothiols have received much attention in biochemistry and medicine since S-nitrosocompounds can act not only as donors of nitric oxide (NO) in an organism but can themselves be involved in signal transduction. In the past few decades, the primary means of detecting S-nitrosocompounds in biological media has been through chemiluminescence detection of NO, a technique that limits the sensitivity to ppb levels and is not able to trace isotopologues of NO. Here we present a cw-CRD instrument for detection of NO isotopologues released from S-nitrosocompounds with a sensitivity of 27 pptv of NO in 100 torr He (after averaging of ˜400 ringdowns). A mid-IR ec-QCL laser (Daylight Solutions) is used to excite the ringdown cavity of finesse ˜10000 and probe the NO fundamental ro-vibrational band in the 5.2 - 5.3 μm range.

  19. Wide-field FTIR microscopy using mid-IR pulse shaping

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Arnaldo L.; Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Ostrander, Joshua S.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new table-top technique for collecting wide-field Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microscopic images by combining a femtosecond pulse shaper with a mid-IR focal plane array. The pulse shaper scans the delay between a pulse pair extremely rapidly for high signal-to-noise, while also enabling phase control of the individual pulses to under-sample the interferograms and subtract background. Infrared absorption images were collected for a mixture of W(CO)6 or Mn2(CO)10 absorbed polystyrene beads, demonstrating that this technique can spatially resolve chemically distinct species. The images are sub-diffraction limited, as measured with a USAF test target patterned on CaF2 and verified with scalar wave simulations. We also find that refractive, rather than reflective, objectives are preferable for imaging with coherent radiation. We discuss this method with respect to conventional FTIR microscopes. PMID:26191843

  20. Wide-field FTIR microscopy using mid-IR pulse shaping.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Arnaldo L; Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Ostrander, Joshua S; Zanni, Martin T

    2015-07-13

    We have developed a new table-top technique for collecting wide-field Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microscopic images by combining a femtosecond pulse shaper with a mid-IR focal plane array. The pulse shaper scans the delay between a pulse pair extremely rapidly for high signal-to-noise, while also enabling phase control of the individual pulses to under-sample the interferograms and subtract background. Infrared absorption images were collected for a mixture of W(CO)₆ or Mn₂(CO)₁₀ absorbed polystyrene beads, demonstrating that this technique can spatially resolve chemically distinct species. The images are sub-diffraction limited, as measured with a USAF test target patterned on CaF₂ and verified with scalar wave simulations. We also find that refractive, rather than reflective, objectives are preferable for imaging with coherent radiation. We discuss this method with respect to conventional FTIR microscopes.

  1. Non-destructive testing of mid-IR optical fiber using infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Marc-André; Fortin, Vincent; Vallée, Réal; Farley, Vincent; Lagueux, Philippe; Guyot, Éric; Marcotte, Frédérick

    2016-05-01

    Optical fiber lasers offers the advantage of being relatively compact and efficient. However, the materials such as fluoride and chalcogenide glasses used for their fabrication must be exempt of defects in order to make efficient laser systems. However, most existing quality control techniques are not compatible with chalcogenide fibers because of their limited transparency in the visible spectral range. For this reason, the Université Laval's Centre d'optique, photonique et laser (COPL), in Quebec City, Canada, has developed a novel non-destructive testing (NDT) methodology based on infrared imaging to address this problem. The results show how this simple screening technique eases the selection of high-quality fibers for the design of high-power mid-IR lasers.

  2. High-efficiency near- and mid-IR intra-cavity OPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilmer, J.; Yin, Y.; Iadevaia, A.

    2010-04-01

    The near and mid-IR spectral region is of significant interest due to the atmospheric windows present in this region. Applications of lasers operating in this spectral region range from their use in remote sensing LIDAR, IR counter measures (IRCM), spectroscopy and Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) sensing systems. We report the development of a compact, highly efficient, high power intra-cavity pumped all-solid-state optical parametric oscillator (OPO) producing nanosecond pulses at kHz repetition rates with an output tunable from 1.5 microns to 3.4 microns with pulse energies up to 10mJ. With our novel Intra-Cavity OPO design, pump to signal conversion efficiencies up to 65% (which is very close to its quantum efficiency) at room temperature are achievable.

  3. Mid-IR fiber-optic reflectance spectroscopy for identifying the finish on wooden furniture.

    PubMed

    Poli, T; Chiantore, O; Nervo, M; Piccirillo, A

    2011-05-01

    Mid-IR fiber-optic reflectance spectroscopy (FORS) is a totally noninvasive infrared analytical technique allowing the investigation of artworks without the need for any sampling. The development and optimization of this analytical methodology can provide a tool that is capable of supporting conservators during the first steps of their interventions, yielding fast results and dramatically reducing the number of samples needed to identify the materials involved. Furthermore, since reflection IR spectra suffer from important spectral anomalies that complicate accurate spectral interpretation, it is important to characterize known reference materials and substrates in advance. This work aims to verify the possibility of investigating and identifying the most widely used wood finishes by means of fiber-optic (chalcogenide and metal halides) mid-infrared spectroscopy. Two historically widely employed wood finishes (beeswax, shellac) and two modern ones (a hydrogenated hydrocarbon resin and a microcrystalline wax) were investigated in an extended IR range (from 1000 to 6000 cm(-1)) with reflectance spectroscopy and with FORS. The broad spectral response of the MCT detector was exploited in order to include overtones and combination bands from the NIR spectral range in the investigation. The reflectance spectra were compared with those collected in transmission mode in order to highlight modifications to shapes and intensities, to assign absorptions, and finally to select "marker" bands indicating the presence of certain finishing materials, even when applied onto a substrate such as wood, which shows many absorptions in the mid-infrared region. After the characterization, the different products were applied to samples of aged pear wood and investigated with the same techniques in order to check the ability of mid-IR FORS to reveal the presence and composition of the product on the wooden substrate.

  4. Mid-IR Kerr-lens mode-locked polycrystalline Cr2+:ZnS lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyev, Sergey; Moskalev, Igor; Mirov, Mike; Mirov, Sergey; Gapontsev, Valentin

    2016-05-01

    This paper summarizes recent improvements of output characteristics of polycrystalline Cr:ZnS/Se master oscillators in Kerr-Lens-Mode-Locked regime: 1.9 W average power at 41 fs pulse duration, 24 nJ pulse energy and 515 kW peak power with efficiency of 19% with regards to 1567 nm pump power from linearly polarized Er-fiber laser. A simple design of mid-IR fs Cr:ZnS MOPA enabled power scaling to 6.8 W at 79 MHz repetition rate. This was accompanied by a 2 fold spectral broadening to 600 nm at -10 dB level, pulse compression from 44 to <30 fs, and overall 25 % optical to optical efficiency. Improved dispersion management of the resonator enabled pulse duration of Cr:ZnS master oscillator approaching 2 optical cycles (<26 fs) and 500 nm (27 THz) bandwidth of the spectrum at half-maximum. Further improvements of the optical coatings will result in octave-spanning polycrystalline Cr2+:ZnS/ZnSe lasers. In this work we also report on recent progress in spinning ring gain element technology and show new unprecedented output power levels for Cr:ZnSe laser gain media: ~140 W at 2400-2500 nm spectral range and ~32 W at 2940-2950 nm in CW regime of operation. High gain of the spinning ring Cr:ZnSe power amplifier demonstrated in this work may potentially enable scaling up the femtosecond mid-IR Cr:ZnS MOPA up to 70-100W.

  5. Characterization of protein and carbohydrate mid-IR spectral features in crop residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Hangshu; Zhang, Yonggen; Wang, Mingjun; Li, Zhongyu; Wang, Zhibo; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-08-01

    To the best of our knowledge, a few studies have been conducted on inherent structure spectral traits related to biopolymers of crop residues. The objective of this study was to characterize protein and carbohydrate structure spectral features of three field crop residues (rice straw, wheat straw and millet straw) in comparison with two crop vines (peanut vine and pea vine) by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) technique with attenuated total reflectance (ATR). Also, multivariate analyses were performed on spectral data sets within the regions mainly related to protein and carbohydrate in this study. The results showed that spectral differences existed in mid-IR peak intensities that are mainly related to protein and carbohydrate among these crop residue samples. With regard to protein spectral profile, peanut vine showed the greatest mid-IR band intensities that are related to protein amide and protein secondary structures, followed by pea vine and the rest three field crop straws. The crop vines had 48-134% higher spectral band intensity than the grain straws in spectral features associated with protein. Similar trends were also found in the bands that are mainly related to structural carbohydrates (such as cellulosic compounds). However, the field crop residues had higher peak intensity in total carbohydrates region than the crop vines. Furthermore, spectral ratios varied among the residue samples, indicating that these five crop residues had different internal structural conformation. However, multivariate spectral analyses showed that structural similarities still exhibited among crop residues in the regions associated with protein biopolymers and carbohydrate. Further study is needed to find out whether there is any relationship between spectroscopic information and nutrition supply in various kinds of crop residue when fed to animals.

  6. Characterization of protein and carbohydrate mid-IR spectral features in crop residues.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hangshu; Zhang, Yonggen; Wang, Mingjun; Li, Zhongyu; Wang, Zhibo; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-08-14

    To the best of our knowledge, a few studies have been conducted on inherent structure spectral traits related to biopolymers of crop residues. The objective of this study was to characterize protein and carbohydrate structure spectral features of three field crop residues (rice straw, wheat straw and millet straw) in comparison with two crop vines (peanut vine and pea vine) by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) technique with attenuated total reflectance (ATR). Also, multivariate analyses were performed on spectral data sets within the regions mainly related to protein and carbohydrate in this study. The results showed that spectral differences existed in mid-IR peak intensities that are mainly related to protein and carbohydrate among these crop residue samples. With regard to protein spectral profile, peanut vine showed the greatest mid-IR band intensities that are related to protein amide and protein secondary structures, followed by pea vine and the rest three field crop straws. The crop vines had 48-134% higher spectral band intensity than the grain straws in spectral features associated with protein. Similar trends were also found in the bands that are mainly related to structural carbohydrates (such as cellulosic compounds). However, the field crop residues had higher peak intensity in total carbohydrates region than the crop vines. Furthermore, spectral ratios varied among the residue samples, indicating that these five crop residues had different internal structural conformation. However, multivariate spectral analyses showed that structural similarities still exhibited among crop residues in the regions associated with protein biopolymers and carbohydrate. Further study is needed to find out whether there is any relationship between spectroscopic information and nutrition supply in various kinds of crop residue when fed to animals.

  7. Remote sensing of potential lunar resources. 2: High spatial resolution mapping of spectral reflectance ratios and implications for nearside mare TiO2 content`

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melendrez, David E.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Larson, Stephen M.; Singer, Robert B.

    1994-01-01

    High spatial resolution maps illustrating variations in spectral reflectance 400/560 nm ratio values have been generated for the following mare regions: (1) the border between southern Mare Serenitatis and northern Mare Tranquillitatis (including the MS-2 standard area and Apollo 17 landing site), (2) central Mare Tranquillitatis, (3) Oceanus Procellarum near Seleucus, and (4) southern Oceanus Procellarum and Flamsteed. We have also obtained 320-1000 nm reflectance spectra of several sites relative to MS-2 to facilitate scaling of the images and provide additional information on surface composition. Inferred TiO2 abundances for these mare regions have been determined using an empirical calibration which relates the weight percent TiO2 in mature mare regolith to the observed 400/560 nm ratio. Mare areas with high TiO2 abundances are probably rich in ilmenite (FeTiO3) a potential lunar resource. The highest potential TiO2 concentrations we have identified in the nearside maria occur in central Mare Tranquillitatis. Inferred TiO2 contents for these areas are greater than 9 wt% and are spatially consistent with the highest-TiO2 regions mapped previously at lower spatial resolution. We note that the morphology of surface units with high 400/560 nm ratio values increases in complexity at higher spatial resolutions. Comparisons have been made with previously published geologic maps, Lunar Orbiter IV, and ground-based images, and some possible morphologic correlatins have been found between our mapped 400/560 nm ratio values and volcanic landforms such as lava flows, mare domes, and collapse pits.

  8. High spatial resolution mapping of deposition layers on plasma facing materials by laser ablation microprobe time-of-flight mass spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Qingmei; Li, Cong; Hai, Ran; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Chunlei; Ding, Hongbin; Zhou, Yan; Yan, Longwen; Duan, Xuru

    2014-05-15

    A laser ablation microprobe time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (LAM-TOF-MS) system with high spatial resolution, ∼20 nm in depth and ∼500 μm or better on the surface, is developed to analyze the composition distributions of deposition layers on the first wall materials or first mirrors in tokamak. The LAM-TOF-MS system consists of a laser ablation microprobe combined with a TOF-MS and a data acquisition system based on a LabVIEW program software package. Laser induced ablation combined with TOF-MS is an attractive method to analyze the depth profile of deposited layer with successive laser shots, therefore, it can provide information for composition reconstruction of the plasma wall interaction process. In this work, we demonstrate that the LAM-TOF-MS system is capable of characterizing the depth profile as well as mapping 2D composition of deposited film on the molybdenum first mirror retrieved from HL-2A tokamak, with particular emphasis on some of the species produced during the ablation process. The presented LAM-TOF-MS system provides not only the 3D characterization of deposition but also the removal efficiency of species of concern.

  9. An Improved STARFM with Help of an Unmixing-Based Method to Generate High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Remote Sensing Data in Complex Heterogeneous Regions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Dengfeng; Zhang, Jinshui; Zhu, Xiufang; Pan, Yaozhong; Liu, Hongli; Yuan, Zhoumiqi; Yun, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Remote sensing technology plays an important role in monitoring rapid changes of the Earth's surface. However, sensors that can simultaneously provide satellite images with both high temporal and spatial resolution haven't been designed yet. This paper proposes an improved spatial and temporal adaptive reflectance fusion model (STARFM) with the help of an Unmixing-based method (USTARFM) to generate the high spatial and temporal data needed for the study of heterogeneous areas. The results showed that the USTARFM had higher accuracy than STARFM methods in two aspects of analysis: individual bands and of heterogeneity analysis. Taking the predicted NIR band as an example, the correlation coefficients (r) for the USTARFM, STARFM and unmixing methods were 0.96, 0.95, 0.90, respectively (p-value < 0.001); Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) values were 0.0245, 0.0300, 0.0401, respectively; and ERGAS values were 0.5416, 0.6507, 0.8737, respectively. The USTARM showed consistently higher performance than STARM when the degree of heterogeneity ranged from 2 to 10, highlighting that the use of this method provides the capacity to solve the data fusion problems faced when using STARFM. Additionally, the USTARFM method could help researchers achieve better performance than STARFM at a smaller window size from its heterogeneous land surface quantitative representation.

  10. Transplantation of epiphytic bioaccumulators (Tillandsia capillaris) for high spatial resolution biomonitoring of trace elements and point sources deconvolution in a complex mining/smelting urban context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goix, Sylvaine; Resongles, Eléonore; Point, David; Oliva, Priscia; Duprey, Jean Louis; de la Galvez, Erika; Ugarte, Lincy; Huayta, Carlos; Prunier, Jonathan; Zouiten, Cyril; Gardon, Jacques

    2013-12-01

    Monitoring atmospheric trace elements (TE) levels and tracing their source origin is essential for exposure assessment and human health studies. Epiphytic Tillandsia capillaris plants were used as bioaccumulator of TE in a complex polymetallic mining/smelting urban context (Oruro, Bolivia). Specimens collected from a pristine reference site were transplanted at a high spatial resolution (˜1 sample/km2) throughout the urban area. About twenty-seven elements were measured after a 4-month exposure, also providing new information values for reference material BCR482. Statistical power analysis for this biomonitoring mapping approach against classical aerosols surveys performed on the same site showed the better aptitude of T. Capillaris to detect geographical trend, and to deconvolute multiple contamination sources using geostatistical principal component analysis. Transplanted specimens in the vicinity of the mining and smelting areas were characterized by extreme TE accumulation (Sn > Ag > Sb > Pb > Cd > As > W > Cu > Zn). Three contamination sources were identified: mining (Ag, Pb, Sb), smelting (As, Sn) and road traffic (Zn) emissions, confirming results of previous aerosol survey.

  11. An Improved STARFM with Help of an Unmixing-Based Method to Generate High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Remote Sensing Data in Complex Heterogeneous Regions

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Dengfeng; Zhang, Jinshui; Zhu, Xiufang; Pan, Yaozhong; Liu, Hongli; Yuan, Zhoumiqi; Yun, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Remote sensing technology plays an important role in monitoring rapid changes of the Earth's surface. However, sensors that can simultaneously provide satellite images with both high temporal and spatial resolution haven’t been designed yet. This paper proposes an improved spatial and temporal adaptive reflectance fusion model (STARFM) with the help of an Unmixing-based method (USTARFM) to generate the high spatial and temporal data needed for the study of heterogeneous areas. The results showed that the USTARFM had higher accuracy than STARFM methods in two aspects of analysis: individual bands and of heterogeneity analysis. Taking the predicted NIR band as an example, the correlation coefficients (r) for the USTARFM, STARFM and unmixing methods were 0.96, 0.95, 0.90, respectively (p-value < 0.001); Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) values were 0.0245, 0.0300, 0.0401, respectively; and ERGAS values were 0.5416, 0.6507, 0.8737, respectively. The USTARM showed consistently higher performance than STARM when the degree of heterogeneity ranged from 2 to 10, highlighting that the use of this method provides the capacity to solve the data fusion problems faced when using STARFM. Additionally, the USTARFM method could help researchers achieve better performance than STARFM at a smaller window size from its heterogeneous land surface quantitative representation. PMID:26861334

  12. An Improved STARFM with Help of an Unmixing-Based Method to Generate High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Remote Sensing Data in Complex Heterogeneous Regions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Dengfeng; Zhang, Jinshui; Zhu, Xiufang; Pan, Yaozhong; Liu, Hongli; Yuan, Zhoumiqi; Yun, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Remote sensing technology plays an important role in monitoring rapid changes of the Earth's surface. However, sensors that can simultaneously provide satellite images with both high temporal and spatial resolution haven't been designed yet. This paper proposes an improved spatial and temporal adaptive reflectance fusion model (STARFM) with the help of an Unmixing-based method (USTARFM) to generate the high spatial and temporal data needed for the study of heterogeneous areas. The results showed that the USTARFM had higher accuracy than STARFM methods in two aspects of analysis: individual bands and of heterogeneity analysis. Taking the predicted NIR band as an example, the correlation coefficients (r) for the USTARFM, STARFM and unmixing methods were 0.96, 0.95, 0.90, respectively (p-value < 0.001); Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) values were 0.0245, 0.0300, 0.0401, respectively; and ERGAS values were 0.5416, 0.6507, 0.8737, respectively. The USTARM showed consistently higher performance than STARM when the degree of heterogeneity ranged from 2 to 10, highlighting that the use of this method provides the capacity to solve the data fusion problems faced when using STARFM. Additionally, the USTARFM method could help researchers achieve better performance than STARFM at a smaller window size from its heterogeneous land surface quantitative representation. PMID:26861334

  13. Integration of high spatial resolution land cover maps to understand opposing trends in vegetation productivity: A case study for the Dry Chaco ecoregion of South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehammer, A.; Fensholt, R.; Horion, S.; Tagesson, T.

    2013-12-01

    Time series analysis of coarse spatial resolution satellite images, especially AVHRR-NDVI data records, has been widely used to characterize long term vegetation dynamics at regional, continental and global scales. However, studies of greening and browning trends show contradictory results depending on input data sets or examined vegetation productivity metrics. Annual cycles of vegetation reflectance respond in a variety of ways to change in climate and/or human induced activities, which make the interpretation and validation of trends at global scale difficult. Integrating high spatial resolution land cover data for analysis can provide accurate evidence of change in land cover/use such as deforestation or expansion/reduction of agricultural land. To bridge scales between coarse resolution data and in-situ observations, this research aims to create multi-temporal, high resolution land cover maps. These maps should add an independent information layer to understand trends found in global earth observation records. To test the framework of this study, the Dry Chaco ecoregion, covering Northern Argentina, Eastern Bolivia and Western Paraguay, is explored as opposing trends are found for this region for the period 1982 to 2010. Not only are results based on yearly NDVI sums of the GIMMS (Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies; 3g) and VIP (Vegetation Index and Phenology; version 2) datasets diverging, but also a comparison of the annual mean with the growing season small integral (both derived from GIMMS 3g) yields opposing trends. In this study we hypothesize that these differences in trends are related to land cover change and several researchers report deforestation in favor of industrial agriculture. Landsat images are used to create regional land cover maps. To overcome the problem of product availability and acquisition mismatch between years, an object-based classification approach based on multiple images per year is applied. First results are

  14. A novel As2S5-tellurite hybrid photonic crystal fiber for long mid-IR supercontinuum fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diouf, Mbaye; Ben Salem, Amine; Cherif, Rim; Wague, Ahmadou; Zghal, Mourad

    2015-08-01

    We numerically demonstrate the supercontinuum (SC) generation in a novel chalcogenide As2S5 nanowire embeddedcore into Tellurite photonic crystal fiber (PCF). This hybrid As2S5-tellurite small core PCF has a pitch of 0.7 μm and air hole diameter of 0.2 μm. It exhibits a zero dispersion wavelength (ZDW) of 3.25 μm with an overall highly engineered group velocity dispersion (GVD) shifted to the mid-IR wavelengths region. By injecting 100 fs hyperbolic-secant input pulses delivered by available tunable optical parametric oscillator (OPO) system at the pump wavelength of 3.389 μm, we obtain a broadband coherent mid-IR SC generated in only 1 mm-long PCF with a peak power of 8.8 kW. An ultralarge mid-IR bandwidth extending from 1000 to 7200 nm is generated with more than 60% of the total power which is available beyond 3 μm. The proposed hybrid PCF structure shows to be very promising for designing new compact, stable and powerful SC fiber laser sources in the long mid-IR wavelength region.

  15. Experimental verification and analysis of wavelength effect on pulse stretching and compressing in mid-IR chirped-pulse amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Haizhe; Yuan, Peng; Zhao, Kun; Zhang, Lifu; Ma, Jingui; Li, Ying; Fan, Dianyuan

    2016-02-01

    As a consequence of the general experimental challenge to detect signals in mid-IR range, taking dispersive chirped near-IR laser pulses as the injected signal source seems to be an artistic route avoiding the daunting mid-IR stretcher and constantly was applied in moderate energy mid-IR optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifications (OPCPA) systems. In this paper we study the wavelength effect on pulse stretching and compressing in detail. Beginning with the theoretical analysis on each dispersion term of grating pairs, we evaluate the residual dispersions when pulse stretcher and compressor work at distinct wavelengths, which shows that this wavelength effect will result in poorly compressed pulses far from transform-limited. Via proof-of-principle experiments based on mid-IR OPCPAs and corresponding numerical simulations, we show that this artful configuration led to un-compressible pulses of ∼2 ps with a time-bandwidth product of ∼ 10 when the chirped-pulse duration is ∼400 ps. To overcome this effect, we demonstrate a simple design of pulse stretcher and compressor. The presented design consisted of a reflection grism-pair compressor can simultaneously cancel the quadric and cubic dispersions of conventional grating based stretcher, showing a potential ability of supporting high-contrast, sub-100-fs pulse-duration and 10,000× of pulse expansion.

  16. Simulation and study of material with diffuse scattering in the near- and mid-IR spectral ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazov, A. L.; Guk, E. G.; Matveentsev, A. V.; Podlaskin, B. G.; Sukharev, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    Fabrication of efficient scattering materials based on uniform layer of metallized fine powder on the surface of thermoplastic polymer is analyzed. Spectra of diffuse reflection and scattering indicatrix of the materials in the near- and mid-IR spectral ranges are studied.

  17. Free space optical communications systems using Mid-IR quantum cascade and low-power femtosecond laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrigan, Paul

    Free Space Optical (FSO) communication is a line of sight telecom technology delivering low-cost, high-volume bandwidth through the air (˜$20,000/1 day/Gbps). It is an appealing solution to the "Last-Mile" bottleneck in metropolitan areas where fiber optic deployment can be prohibitive. Over the past decade commercial design has incorporated traditional telecom components without reviewing the optimal physical layer. We therefore present a systematic investigation of physical light propagation for different laser wavelengths, investigating loss processes, margins and inherent security features. FSO's "Achilles Heel" is adverse weather which attenuates currently promoted continuous wave Near-IR systems (CW-1.55-mum). In certain conditions link range may be reduced to 50m. Absorption and Mie-scattering of light are the major obstacles for clear transmission. As scattering efficiency is coupled to the particle size to wavelength ratio, micron sized fog particles are the worst attenuators. Moving off the commercial basis we present two transmission and scattering studies demonstrating and explaining enhanced link performance for a longer wavelength Mid-IR (8.1-mum) vs. CW system and for low-power femtosecond pulse vs. CW system. We present data from the world's longest outdoor, collinear, multi-wavelength, FSO link and demonstrate that at its peak Mid-IR light attenuates 300% less power or equivalently has 3x deployable range potential. Our real-world result shows the empirical benchmark "Kruse-Mie Relation" which to date has discouraged Mid-IR industrial advancement incorrectly predicts a decrease in transmission for Mid-IR by up to 220%. We also present results for an indoor fog chamber experiment with artificial fog recording even stronger Mid-IR gains (+2000% power delivery). An indoor scattering measurement demonstrates Mid-IR light scatters 10x less power, accounting for the tremendous transmission gains and also demonstrating Mid-IR's inherent security

  18. Object-based assessment of burn severity in diseased forests using high-spatial and high-spectral resolution MASTER airborne imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Metz, Margaret R.; Rizzo, David M.; Dillon, Whalen W.; Meentemeyer, Ross K.

    2015-04-01

    Forest ecosystems are subject to a variety of disturbances with increasing intensities and frequencies, which may permanently change the trajectories of forest recovery and disrupt the ecosystem services provided by trees. Fire and invasive species, especially exotic disease-causing pathogens and insects, are examples of disturbances that together could pose major threats to forest health. This study examines the impacts of fire and exotic disease (sudden oak death) on forests, with an emphasis on the assessment of post-fire burn severity in a forest where trees have experienced three stages of disease progression pre-fire: early-stage (trees retaining dried foliage and fine twigs), middle-stage (trees losing fine crown fuels), and late-stage (trees falling down). The research was conducted by applying Geographic Object-Based Image Analysis (GEOBIA) to MASTER airborne images that were acquired immediately following the fire for rapid assessment and contained both high-spatial (4 m) and high-spectral (50 bands) resolutions. Although GEOBIA has gradually become a standard tool for analyzing high-spatial resolution imagery, high-spectral resolution data (dozens to hundreds of bands) can dramatically reduce computation efficiency in the process of segmentation and object-based variable extraction, leading to complicated variable selection for succeeding modeling. Hence, we also assessed two widely used band reduction algorithms, PCA (principal component analysis) and MNF (minimum noise fraction), for the delineation of image objects and the subsequent performance of burn severity models using either PCA or MNF derived variables. To increase computation efficiency, only the top 5 PCA and MNF and top 10 PCA and MNF components were evaluated, which accounted for 10% and 20% of the total number of the original 50 spectral bands, respectively. Results show that if no band reduction was applied the models developed for the three stages of disease progression had relatively

  19. VLT near- to mid-IR imaging and spectroscopy of the M 17 UC1 - IRS5 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiwei; Nürnberger, Dieter E. A.; Chini, Rolf; Jiang, Zhibo; Fang, Min

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We investigate the surroundings of the hypercompact H ii region M 17 UC1 to probe the physical properties of the associated young stellar objects and the environment of massive star formation. Methods: We use diffraction-limited near-IR (VLT/NACO) and mid-IR (VLT/VISIR) images to reveal the different morphologies at various wavelengths. Likewise, we investigate the stellar and nebular content of the region with VLT/SINFONI integral field spectroscopy with a resolution R ˜ 1500 at H + K bands. Results: Five of the seven point sources in this region show L-band excess emission. A geometric match is found between the H2 emission and near-IR polarized light in the vicinity of IRS5A, and between the diffuse mid-IR emission and near-IR polarization north of UC1. The H2 emission is typical for dense photodissociation regions (PDRs), which are initially far-ultraviolet pumped and repopulated by collisional de-excitation. The spectral types of IRS5A and B273A are B3-B7 V/III and G4-G5 III, respectively. The observed infrared luminosity LIR in the range 1-20 μm is derived for three objects; we obtain 2.0 × 103 L⊙ for IRS5A, 13 L⊙ for IRS5C, and 10 L⊙ for B273A. Conclusions: IRS5 might be a young quadruple system. Its primary star IRS5A is confirmed to be a high-mass protostellar object (˜9 M⊙, ˜1 × 105 yrs); it might have terminated accretion due to the feedback from stellar activities (radiation pressure, outflow) and the expanding H ii region of M 17. The object UC1 might also have terminated accretion because of the expanding hypercompact H ii region, which it ionizes. The disk clearing process of the low-mass young stellar objects in this region might be accelerated by the expanding H ii region. The outflows driven by UC1 are running south-north with its northeastern side suppressed by the expanding ionization front of M 17; the blue-shifted outflow lobe of IRS5A is seen in two types of tracers along the same line of sight in the form of H2 emission

  20. Mapping of Eelgrass (Zostera marina) at Sidney Spit, Gulf Islands National Park Reserve of Canada, Using High Spatial Resolution Remote Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Jennifer D.

    The main goal of this thesis was to evaluate the use of high spatial remote imagery to map the location and biophysical parameters of eelgrass in marine areas around Sidney Spit, a part of the Gulf Islands National Park Reserve of Canada (GINPRC). To meet this goal, three objectives were addressed: (1) Define key spectral variables that provide optimum separation between eelgrass and its associated benthic substrates, using in situ hyperspectral measurements, and simulated IKONOS and Landsat 7ETM+ spectral response; (2) evaluate the efficacy of these key variables in classification of the high spatial resolution imagery, AISA and IKONOS, at various levels of processing, to determine the processing methodology that offers the highest eelgrass mapping accuracy; and (3) evaluate the potential of "value-added" classification of two eelgrass biophysical indicators, LAI and epiphyte type. In situ hyperspectral measurements acquired at Sidney Spit in August 2008 provided four different data sets: above water spectra, below water spectral profiles, water-corrected spectra, and pure endmember spectra. In Chapter 3, these data sets were examined with first derivative analysis to determine the unique spectral variables of eelgrass and associated benthic substrates. The most effective variables in discriminating eelgrass from all other substrates were selected using data reduction statistics: M-statistic analysis and multiple discriminant analyses (MDA). These selected spectral variables enabled eelgrass classification accuracy of 98% when separating six classes on above water data: shallow (< 3 m deep) eelgrass, deep (> 3 m) eelgrass, shallow sand, deep sand, shallow green algae, and spectrally deep water. The variables were located mainly in the green wavelengths, where light penetrates to the greatest depth: the slope from 500 -- 530 nm, and the first derivatives at 566 nm, 580 nm, and 602 nm. The same data were classified with 96% accuracy after correcting for the water

  1. Geology, tectonics, and the 2002-2003 eruption of the Semeru volcano, Indonesia: Interpreted from high-spatial resolution satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solikhin, Akhmad; Thouret, Jean-Claude; Gupta, Avijit; Harris, Andy J. L.; Liew, Soo Chin

    2012-02-01

    The paper illustrates the application of high-spatial resolution satellite images in interpreting volcanic structures and eruption impacts in the Tengger-Semeru massif in east Java, Indonesia. We use high-spatial resolution images (IKONOS and SPOT 5) and aerial photos in order to analyze the structures of Semeru volcano and map the deposits. Geological and tectonic mapping is based on two DEMs and on the interpretation of aerial photos and four SPOT and IKONOS optical satellite images acquired between 1996 and 2002. We also compared two thermal Surface Kinetic Temperature ASTER images before and after the 2002-2003 eruption in order to delineate and evaluate the impacts of the pyroclastic density currents. Semeru's principal structural features are probably due to the tectonic setting of the volcano. A structural map of the Tengger-Semeru massif shows four groups of faults orientated N40, N160, N75, and N105 to N140. Conspicuous structures, such as the SE-trending horseshoe-shaped scar on Semeru's summit cone, coincide with the N160-trending faults. The direction of minor scars on the east flank parallels the first and second groups of faults. The Semeru composite cone hosts the currently active Jonggring-Seloko vent. This is located on, and buttressed against, the Mahameru edifice at the head of a large scar that may reflect a failure plane at shallow depth. Dipping 35° towards the SE, this failure plane may correspond to a weak basal layer of weathered volcaniclastic rocks of Tertiary age. We suggest that the deformation pattern of Semeru and its large scar may be induced by flank spreading over the weak basal layer of the volcano. It is therefore necessary to consider the potential for flank and summit collapse in the future. The last major eruption took place in December 2002-January 2003, and involved emplacement of block-and-ash flows. We have used the 2003 ASTER Surface Kinetic Temperature image to map the 2002-2003 pyroclastic density current deposits. We

  2. Very High Spatial Resolution Isotope and Elemental Imaging of Pre-Solar SiC Grains: Topographic and Imaging Artefacts that may lead to Apparent, but Spurious, Heterogeneity Within Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, I. C.; Clarke, A.; Henkel, T.; Moore, K. L.; McMahon, G.

    2016-08-01

    This study acquired high spatial resolution NanoSIMS elemental and isotopic imaging of pre-solar SiC grains, both of acid-residue grains and in situ in meteorite thin sections. Artefacts that can create spurious heterogeneity were studied.

  3. Quantum well intersubband lifetimes measured by mid-IR pump-probe experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, G.L.; Sung, B.; Proctor, M.

    1995-12-31

    Semiconductor quantum wells exhibit quantum-confined electronic energy levels, or subbands, that are similar to one-dimensional {open_quotes}particle in a box{close_quotes} wavefunctions. The light effective mass of electrons allows large spatial extents of the wavefunctions and concomitantly large dipole overlaps between states. These large dipoles have been exploited in a variety of experiments including nonlinear frequency conversion, infrared photodetection, and lasing. A key parameter for many devices is the upper state lifetime. The decay of carriers in the upper state is believed to be dominated by optical phonon scattering and lifetimes on-the order of 1ps are expected. While Raman and saturation measurements have shown good agreement with theory, direct pump-probe measurements have reported longer lifetimes, partially due to carrier heating. In this paper, we discuss our mid-IR (5{mu}m) pump-probe measurements of intersubband lifetimes, performed at the Stanford Picosecond Free Electron Laser Center. At low excitation densities we observe lifetimes of about 1.5 ps, in good agreement with phonon theory. At high excitation densities the lifetime increases to 3.5 ps, demonstrating the transition from the low- to high-excitation agree.

  4. Switching to Infrared! A New Method for Non-professional Imaging in the mid-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, T. G.

    2006-05-01

    With the continuing expansion of amateur astronomy, some work has been done in the near infrared where CCD's are still sensitive in the 1 micron range. In order to advance into the mid-infrared out to 12 microns, expensive CCD arrays are required that use exotic sensor materials such as Mercury-Cadmium- Telluride (MCT). With the advent of eBay, used MCT detectors cooled by liquid nitrogen are now obtainable at reasonable cost. They are functionally limited to a single pixel, which would generally make them unsuitable for imaging. Raster scanning of the image field in conjunction with a single pixel sensor to rapidly assemble an infrared image is described as a solution to this problem. The image presented here is believed to be the first mid-IR telescopic image of Mars taken by a non-professional. The use of MCT sensors in conjunction with products such as the AO-7 and advanced scripting will be discussed as further roads for development.

  5. Thermoplasmonic Study of a Triple Band Optical Nanoantenna Strongly Coupled to Mid IR Molecular Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Dihan; Ho, Chong Pei; Pitchappa, Prakash; Yang, Bin; Yang, Chunsheng; Lee, Chengkuo

    2016-02-01

    We report the first thermal study of a triple band plasmonic nanoantenna strongly coupled to a molecular mode at mid IR wavelength (MW IR). The hybrid plasmonic structure supports three spatially and spectrally variant resonances of which two are magnetic and one is dipolar in nature. A hybridized mode is excited by coupling the structure’s plasmonic mode with the vibrational mode of PMMA at 5.79 μm. Qualitative agreement between the spectral changes in simulation and experiment clearly indicates that resistive heating is the dominant mechanisms behind the intensity changes of the dipolar and magnetic peaks. The study also unveils the thermal insensitivity of the coupled mode intensity as the temperature is increased. We propose a mechanism to reduce the relative intensity change of the coupled mode at elevated temperature by mode detuning and surface current engineering and demonstrate less than 9% intensity variation. Later, we perform a temperature cycling test and investigate into the degradation of the Au-PMMA composite device. The failure condition is identified to be primarily associated with the surface chemistry of the material interface rather than the deformation of the nanopatterns. The study reveals the robustness of the strongly coupled hybridized mode even under multiple cycling.

  6. Spectral Confirmation of New Galactic LBV and WN Stars Associated With Mid-IR Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stringfellow, Guy; Gvaramadze, Vasilii V.

    2014-08-01

    Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) stars represent an extremely rare class and short-lived phase in the lives of very luminous massive stars with high mass loss rates. Extragalactic LBVs are responsible for producing false supernovae (SN), the SN Impostors, and have been directly linked with the progenitors of actual SN, indicating the LBV phase can be a final endpoint for massive star evolution. Yet only a few confirmed LBVs have been identified in the Galaxy. Their stellar evolution is poorly constrained by observations, and the physical reason for their unstable nature, both in terms of moderate spectral and photometric variability of a few magnitudes and the giant eruptions a la η Car that rival SN explosions, remains a mystery. Newly discovered mid-IR shells act as signposts, pointing to the central massive stars (LBV and Wolf-Rayet [WR] stars) that produced them. We have undertaken a spectroscopic survey of possible progenitor stars within these shells and are discovering that many are LBVs and WN-type WR transitional stars. We propose to extend this IR spectral survey to the south to search for new progenitor stars associated with dozens of newly identified shells. This survey should result in a substantial increase of new WRs and candidate LBVs for continued future study. Spectral analysis will yield new insights into the winds and physical properties of these rare and important objects, and lead to a better understanding of the physics driving giant eruptions.

  7. Thermoplasmonic Study of a Triple Band Optical Nanoantenna Strongly Coupled to Mid IR Molecular Mode

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Dihan; Ho, Chong Pei; Pitchappa, Prakash; Yang, Bin; Yang, Chunsheng; Lee, Chengkuo

    2016-01-01

    We report the first thermal study of a triple band plasmonic nanoantenna strongly coupled to a molecular mode at mid IR wavelength (MW IR). The hybrid plasmonic structure supports three spatially and spectrally variant resonances of which two are magnetic and one is dipolar in nature. A hybridized mode is excited by coupling the structure’s plasmonic mode with the vibrational mode of PMMA at 5.79 μm. Qualitative agreement between the spectral changes in simulation and experiment clearly indicates that resistive heating is the dominant mechanisms behind the intensity changes of the dipolar and magnetic peaks. The study also unveils the thermal insensitivity of the coupled mode intensity as the temperature is increased. We propose a mechanism to reduce the relative intensity change of the coupled mode at elevated temperature by mode detuning and surface current engineering and demonstrate less than 9% intensity variation. Later, we perform a temperature cycling test and investigate into the degradation of the Au-PMMA composite device. The failure condition is identified to be primarily associated with the surface chemistry of the material interface rather than the deformation of the nanopatterns. The study reveals the robustness of the strongly coupled hybridized mode even under multiple cycling. PMID:26916549

  8. Progress toward mid-IR chip-scale integrated-optic TDLAS gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frish, Michael B.; Shankar, Raji; Bulu, Irfan; Frank, Ian; Laderer, Matthew C.; Wainner, Richard T.; Allen, Mark G.; Lončar, Marko

    2013-01-01

    We are building prototype chip-scale low-power integrated-optic gas-phase chemical sensors based on mid-infrared (3-5μm) Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS). TDLAS is able to sense many gas phase chemicals with high sensitivity and selectivity. Novel gas sensing elements using low-loss resonant photonic crystal cavities or waveguides will permit compact integration of a laser source, sampling elements, and detector in configurations suitable for inexpensive mass production. Recently developed Interband Cascade Lasers (ICLs) that operate at room temperature with low power consumption are expected to serve as monochromatic sources to probe the mid-IR molecular spectral transitions. Practical challenges to fabricating these sensors include: a) selecting and designing the high-Q microresonator sensing element appropriate for the selected analyte; b) coupling laser light into and out of the sensing element; and c) device thermal management, especially stabilizing laser temperature with the precision needed for sensitive spectroscopic detection. This paper describes solutions to these challenges.

  9. Variations of the Mid-IR Aromatic Features Inside and Among Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galliano, F.; Madden, S.C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Peeters, E.; Jones, A. P.

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of a systematic study of mid-IR spectra of Galactic regions, Magellanic H II regions, and galaxies of various types (dwarf, spiral, starburst), observed by the satellites ISO and Spitzer. We study the relative variations of the 6.2, 7.7, 8.6 and 11.3 micron features inside spatially resolved objects (such as M 82, M 51, 30 Doradus, M 17 and the Orion bar), as well as among 90 integrated spectra of 50 objects. Our main results are that the 6.2, 7.7 and 8.6 micron bands are essentially tied together, while the ratios between these bands and the 11.3 micron band varies by one order of magnitude. This implies that the properties of the PAHs are remarkably universal throughout our sample, and that the relative variations of the band ratios are mainly controlled by the fraction of ionized PAHs. In particular, we show that we can rule out the modification of the PAH size distribution as an explanation of these variations. Using a few well-studied Galactic regions (including the spectral image of the Orion bar), we give an empirical relation between the I(6.2)/I(11.3) ratio and the ionization/recombination ratio Go/n(sub e) x square root of(T(sub gas)). Finally, we discuss the physical interpretation of the I(6.2)/I(11.3) ratio, on galactic size scales.

  10. Thermoplasmonic Study of a Triple Band Optical Nanoantenna Strongly Coupled to Mid IR Molecular Mode.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Dihan; Ho, Chong Pei; Pitchappa, Prakash; Yang, Bin; Yang, Chunsheng; Lee, Chengkuo

    2016-01-01

    We report the first thermal study of a triple band plasmonic nanoantenna strongly coupled to a molecular mode at mid IR wavelength (MW IR). The hybrid plasmonic structure supports three spatially and spectrally variant resonances of which two are magnetic and one is dipolar in nature. A hybridized mode is excited by coupling the structure's plasmonic mode with the vibrational mode of PMMA at 5.79 μm. Qualitative agreement between the spectral changes in simulation and experiment clearly indicates that resistive heating is the dominant mechanisms behind the intensity changes of the dipolar and magnetic peaks. The study also unveils the thermal insensitivity of the coupled mode intensity as the temperature is increased. We propose a mechanism to reduce the relative intensity change of the coupled mode at elevated temperature by mode detuning and surface current engineering and demonstrate less than 9% intensity variation. Later, we perform a temperature cycling test and investigate into the degradation of the Au-PMMA composite device. The failure condition is identified to be primarily associated with the surface chemistry of the material interface rather than the deformation of the nanopatterns. The study reveals the robustness of the strongly coupled hybridized mode even under multiple cycling. PMID:26916549

  11. Continued Development Of A Sensitive Mid-IR Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer Using A Quantum Cascade Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumfield, Brian E.; Stewart, Jacob T.; McCall, Benjamin, J.

    2010-11-01

    Since its initial discovery in 1985, it has been postulated that buckminsterfullerene (C60) should be present in space. Over the past 25 years there has been indirect evidence for the presence of extrasolar C60. This indirect evidence comes from the analysis of micrometeorite impact craters from a satellite called the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Also, studies of the isotopic ratio of Ar found encapsulated in C60 from extinction impact event sediemnts provides indirect evidence for extrasolar source of fullerenes. This past summer emission from C60 in the young planetary nebula Tc1 provided the first direct evidence of C60 in space. This was quickly followed by detection of emission from gas phase C60 pumped by ultraviolet radiation in the reflection nebulae NGC2023 and NGC7023. While these studies have confirmed the presence of C60 in space, it is difficult to use emission to estimate the column density and temperature of the gas phase C60. In the case of emission via UV pumping, the presence of C60 in the gas phase could extend beyond the region of high UV ux. For these reasons, it would be beneficial to search for a C60 absorption signal in the mid-IR. We are developing a sensitive mid-infrared cavity ringdown spectrometer for acquiring a cold gas phase spectrum of buckminsterfullerene (C60) ~8.5 μm. A high-resolution absorption spectrum of this vibrational band would aid in astronomical searches for a C60 absorption signal. Recently, a significant number of experimental improvements have enhanced both the sensitivity and the resolution of the instrument. The addition of a Fresnel quarter wave rhomb and a wire grid polarizer have mitigated the impact of optical cavity back-reflection on the laser stability and enabled mode-hop free tunability. Finer laser current control has allowed for the collection of spectra with a frequency step resolution of 2 MHz. We have tested the spectrometer by re-scanning &nu8 band of methylene bromide in a slit nozzle

  12. An investigation of the potential of optical computed tomography for imaging of synchrotron-generated x-rays at high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Simon J.; Brochard, Thierry; Adamovics, John; Krstajic, Nikola; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke

    2010-03-01

    X-ray microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a novel form of treatment, currently in its preclinical stage, which uses microplanar x-ray beams from a synchrotron radiation source. It is important to perform accurate dosimetry on these microbeams, but, to date, there has been no accurate enough method available for making 3D dose measurements with isotropic, high spatial resolution to verify the results of Monte Carlo dose simulations. Here, we investigate the potential of optical computed tomography for satisfying these requirements. The construction of a simple optical CT microscopy (optical projection tomography) system from standard commercially available hardware is described. The measurement of optical densities in projection data is shown to be highly linear (r2 = 0.999). The depth-of-field (DOF) of the imaging system is calculated based on the previous literature and measured experimentally using a commercial DOF target. It is shown that high quality images can be acquired despite the evident lack of telecentricity and despite DOF of the system being much lower than the sample diameter. Possible reasons for this are discussed. Results are presented for a complex irradiation of a 22 mm diameter cylinder of the radiochromic polymer PRESAGE™, demonstrating the exquisite 'dose-painting' abilities available in the MRT hutch of beamline ID-17 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Dose distributions in this initial experiment are equally well resolved on both an optical CT scan and a corresponding transmission image of radiochromic film, down to a line width of 83 µm (6 lp mm-1) with an MTF value of 0.40. A group of 33 µm wide lines was poorly resolved on both the optical CT and film images, and this is attributed to an incorrect exposure time calculation, leading to under-delivery of dose. Image artefacts in the optical CT scan are discussed. PRESAGE™ irradiated using the microbeam facility is proposed as a suitable material for producing phantom

  13. High spatial resolution time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography of lower extremity tumors at 3T: Comparison with computed tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang; Jin, Teng; Li, Ting; Morelli, John; Li, Xiaoming

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare diagnostic value of high spatial resolution time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography with interleaved stochastic trajectory (TWIST) using Gadobutrol to Computed tomography angiography (CTA) for preoperative evaluation of lower extremity tumors.This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board. Fifty consecutive patients (31 men, 19 women, age range 18-80 years, average age 42.7 years) with lower extremity tumors underwent TWIST magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and CTA. Digital subtraction angiography was available for 8 patients. Image quality of MRA was compared with CTA by 2 radiologists according to a 4-point Likert scale. Arterial involvement by tumor was compared using kappa test between MRA and CTA. The ability to identify feeding arteries and arterio-venous fistulae (AVF) was compared using Wilcoxon signed rank test and McNemar test, respectively.Image quality of MRA and CTA was rated without a statistically significant difference (3.88 ± 0.37 vs. 3.97 ± 0.16, P = 0.135). Intramodality agreement was high for the identification of arterial invasion (kappa = 0.806 ± 0.073 for Reader 1, kappa = 0.805 ± 0.073 for Reader 2). Readers found AVF in 27 of 50 MRA cases and 14 of 50 CTA cases (P < 0.001). Mean feeding arteries identified with MRA were significantly more than that with CTA (2.08 ± 1.72 vs. 1.62 ± 1.52, P = .02).TWIST MRA is a reliable imaging modality for the assessment of lower extremity tumors. TWIST MRA is comparable to CTA for the identification of AVF and feeding arteries. PMID:27631262

  14. Analysis of the seasonal and interannual evolution of Jakobshavn Isbrae from 2010-2013 using high spatial/temporal resolution DEM and velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shean, D. E.; Joughin, I. R.; Smith, B. E.; Moratto, Z. M.; Alexandrov, O.; Floricioiu, D.; Morin, P. J.; Porter, C. C.; Beyer, R. A.; Fong, T.

    2013-12-01

    Greenland's large marine-terminating outlet glaciers have displayed marked retreat, speedup, and thinning in recent decades. Jakobshavn Isbrae, one of Greenland's largest outlet glaciers, has retreated ~15 km, accelerated ~150%, and thinned ~200 m since the early 1990s. Here, we present the first comprehensive analysis of high spatial (~2-5 m/px) and temporal (daily-monthly) resolution elevation and velocity data for Jakobshavn from 7/2010 to 7/2013. We have developed an automated processing pipeline using open-source software (Ames Stereo Pipeline, GDAL/OGR, NumPy/SciPy, etc.) to produce orthoimage, digital elevation model (DEM), and surface velocity products from DigitalGlobe WorldView-1/2 stereo imagery (~0.5 m/px, ~17 km swath width). Our timeseries consists of 35 WV DEMs (~2-4 m/px) covering the lower trunks of the main+north branches and fjord, but also extending >110 km inland. We supplement this record with 7 TanDEM-X DEMs (~5 m/px, ~35 km swath width) between 6/2011-9/2012. Elevation data from IceBridge ATM/LVIS, ICESat GLAS, and GPS campaigns provide absolute control data over fixed surfaces (i.e., exposed bedrock). Observed WV DEM offsets are consistent with DigitalGlobe's published value of 5.0 m CE90/LE90 horizontal/vertical accuracy. After DEM co-registration, we observe sub-meter horizontal and vertical absolute accuracy. Velocity data are derived from TerraSAR-X data with 11 day repeat interval. Supplemental velocity data are derived through correlation of high-resolution WV DEM/image data. The contemporaneous DEM and velocity data provide full 3D displacement vectors for each time interval, allowing for the analysis of both Eulerian and Lagrangian elevation change. The lower trunk of Jakobshavn displays significant seasonal velocity variations, with recent rates of ~8 km/yr during winter to >17 km/yr during summer. DEM data show corresponding elevation changes of -30 to -45 m in summer and +15 to +20 m in winter, corresponding to integrated volumes

  15. Line-of-sight data transmission system based on mid IR quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taslakov, M.; Simeonov, V.; van den Bergh, H.

    2008-02-01

    We report on an application of a pulsed distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (QCL) for an open path data transmission. A pulse QCL in the 1046 cm -1 range (28.7 THz) is used as a carrier signal source. The QCL is modulated with 50 ns pulses at repetition rate of 100 kHz, used as a sub-carrier. This sub-carrier is frequency modulated with a low frequency signal with bandwidth of 20 kHz (high quality sound signal). Data transmission experiments over 6 km open path were successfully completed. Pulse frequency modulation (PFM) technique instead of the usually used amplitude modulation was chosen because of its high immunity against amplitude noise and amplitude instabilities caused by atmospheric turbulence and aerosols. The quality of the demodulated signal is good enough, characterized by low distortion, low noise, high dynamic range and wide frequency band, even for detected signal variation of more than thousand times. The haze immunity of the Mid IR communication channel was studied in a laboratory and in a real open path conditions. The QCL beam was transmitted through a 60 cm cell, filled with water aerosol with high optical density in the visible. Despite the high aerosol optical density, sufficient to suppress completely a probe 20 mW 532 nm beam at a 5 cm distance, no distortion in the IR transmission was observed passing full 60 cm. The real 6 km open path transmission in a fog confirms the high haze immunity of IR beam propagation. The distance could be increased up to a few tens of kilometers. The bandwidth can be increased significantly up to a MHz range using a higher sub-carrier or up to a GHz range performing a direct frequency modulation of the laser frequency using CW QCL.

  16. Object-based assessment of burn severity in diseased forests using high-spatial and high-spectral resolution MASTER airborne imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Metz, Margaret R.; Rizzo, David M.; Dillon, Whalen W.; Meentemeyer, Ross K.

    2015-04-01

    Forest ecosystems are subject to a variety of disturbances with increasing intensities and frequencies, which may permanently change the trajectories of forest recovery and disrupt the ecosystem services provided by trees. Fire and invasive species, especially exotic disease-causing pathogens and insects, are examples of disturbances that together could pose major threats to forest health. This study examines the impacts of fire and exotic disease (sudden oak death) on forests, with an emphasis on the assessment of post-fire burn severity in a forest where trees have experienced three stages of disease progression pre-fire: early-stage (trees retaining dried foliage and fine twigs), middle-stage (trees losing fine crown fuels), and late-stage (trees falling down). The research was conducted by applying Geographic Object-Based Image Analysis (GEOBIA) to MASTER airborne images that were acquired immediately following the fire for rapid assessment and contained both high-spatial (4 m) and high-spectral (50 bands) resolutions. Although GEOBIA has gradually become a standard tool for analyzing high-spatial resolution imagery, high-spectral resolution data (dozens to hundreds of bands) can dramatically reduce computation efficiency in the process of segmentation and object-based variable extraction, leading to complicated variable selection for succeeding modeling. Hence, we also assessed two widely used band reduction algorithms, PCA (principal component analysis) and MNF (minimum noise fraction), for the delineation of image objects and the subsequent performance of burn severity models using either PCA or MNF derived variables. To increase computation efficiency, only the top 5 PCA and MNF and top 10 PCA and MNF components were evaluated, which accounted for 10% and 20% of the total number of the original 50 spectral bands, respectively. Results show that if no band reduction was applied the models developed for the three stages of disease progression had relatively

  17. High spatial resolution geochemistry and textural characteristics of 'microtektite' glass spherules in proximal Cretaceous-Paleogene sections: Insights into glass alteration patterns and precursor melt lithologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belza, Joke; Goderis, Steven; Smit, Jan; Vanhaecke, Frank; Baert, Kitty; Terryn, Herman; Claeys, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    Using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), we have conducted spatially resolved trace element analysis on fresh, unaltered microtektite glasses linked to the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary Chicxulub crater and on their surrounding alteration phases. This unique approach offers the opportunity to study in situ and at high spatial resolution both the mixing of different target lithologies and the variation of the major and trace element budget during the alteration process. In addition, two-dimensional element distribution maps reveal important geochemical information beyond the capabilities of single spot laser drilling. Glasses from two localities in opposite quadrants from the source crater were studied. At the Beloc locality (Haiti), the glass population is dominated by the presence of yellow high-Ca glass and black andesitic glass formed by admixture of carbonate/dolomite/anhydrite platform lithologies with crystalline basement. These glasses alter according to the well-established hydration-palagonitization model postulated for mafic volcanic glasses. REEs become progressively leached from the glass to below the detection limit for the applied spot size, while immobile Zr, Hf, Nb, and Ta passively accumulate in the process exhibiting both inter-element ratios and absolute concentrations similar to those for the original glass. In contrast, The Arroyo El Mimbral locality (NE Mexico) is characterized by abundant green glass fragments high in Si, Al and alkalis, and low in Mg, Ca, Fe. Low Si black glass is less abundant though similar in composition to the black glass variety at Beloc. The alteration pattern of high-Si, Al green glass at the Mimbral locality is more complex, including numerous competing reaction processes (ion-exchange, hydration, dissolution, and secondary mineral precipitation) generally controlled by the pH and composition of the surrounding fluid. All green, high-Si, Al glasses are hydrated and

  18. Decadal changes in all and clear-sky shortwave radiation from high spatial resolution satellite-derived and ground-based observations over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Lorenzo, A.; Enriquez-Alonso, A.; Wild, M.; Trentmann, J.; Sanchez-Romero, A.; Posselt, R.; Hakuba, M. Z.; Bartok, B.; Vicente-Serrano, S. M.; Calbo Angrill, J.

    2015-12-01

    Trends of all-sky downward surface shortwave radiation (SSR) from high-spatial resolution satellite-derived data over Europe from 1983 to 2010 are first presented. The results show a widespread (i.e., non-local dimension) brightening in the major part of Europe, especially since the mid-1990s and in springtime. There is a mean increase of SSR of around 2 Wm-2 per decade over the whole Europe, which, taking into account that the satellite-derived product lacks of aerosol variations, can be related to a decrease in the cloud radiative effects over Europe. The reported increase in SSR is slightly lower than the obtained using high-quality ground-based series over Europe. Secondly, clear-sky SSR estimates have been derived as the result of the difference between ground-based and satellite-derived all-sky SSR data (i.e., this latter lacking direct aerosol effects). The results highlight that these residual series can be useful to estimate clear-sky SSR trends, pointing to a significant increase during the period 1983-2010, with higher rates of around 2 Wm-2 per decade over central and eastern Europe. This increase in clear-sky SSR is mainly due to a strong increase from the mid-1980s to the late 1990s, possibly linked to a decrease in anthropogenic emissions and a recovery from the El Chichón and Pinatubo volcanic eruptions. These results are in line with observations and other estimates of clear-sky SSR (e.g., by making use of sunshine duration records), as well as reported anthropogenic aerosol emissions and concentrations in Europe. Overall, from the results of this study it can be concluded that around one third of the brightening trend in Europe from 1983 to 2010 can be explained by direct aerosol effects, whereas the other two third is related to clouds, i.e. via changes in natural cloud variability and/or aerosol indirect effect on clouds.

  19. Rapid High Spatial Resolution Chemical Characterization of Soil Structure to Illuminate Nutrient Distribution Mechanisms Related to Carbon Cycling Using Laser Ablation Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, R. K.; Alexander, M. L. L.; Newburn, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    Soils contain approximately half of Earth's terrestrial carbon. As such, it is important to understand the factors that control the cycling of this soil organic carbon between the land and the atmosphere. Models that attribute the persistence of soil organic carbon to the intrinsic properties of the molecules themselves are inconsistent with recent observations— for example, materials that are more thermodynamically stable have been found to have a shorter lifetime in soils than ones that are less stable, and vice versa. A new explanation has therefore been posited that invokes ecosystem properties as a whole, and not just intrinsic molecular properties, as the kinetic factor controlling soil carbon dynamics. Because soil dynamics occur on a small scale, techniques with high spatial resolution are required for their study. Existing techniques such as TOF-SIMS require preparation of the sample and introduction into a high vacuum system, and do not address the need to examine large numbers of sample systems without perturbation of chemical and physical properties. To address this analytical challenge, we have coupled a laser ablation (LA) module to an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), thereby enabling sample introduction and subsequent measurement of small amounts of soil organic matter by the laser ablation aerosol mass spectrometer (LA-AMS). Due to the adjustable laser beam width, the LA-AMS can probe spot sizes ranging from 1-150 μm in diameter, liberating from 10-100 ng/pulse. With a detection limit of 1 pM, the AMS allows for chemical characterization of the ablated material in terms of elemental ratios, compound classes, and TOC/TOM ratios. Furthermore, the LA-AMS is capable of rapid, in-situ sampling under ambient conditions, thereby eliminating the need for sample processing or transport before analysis. Here, we will present the first results from systematic studies aimed at validating the LA-AMS method as well as results from initial measurements

  20. On the potential of mid-IR lasers for generating high harmonics with subnanometer wavelengths in gases

    SciTech Connect

    Emelin, M Yu; Ryabikin, M Yu

    2013-03-31

    The influence of the magnetic field of a laser pulse and the depletion of bound levels of working-medium atoms on the generation of high harmonics of mid-IR laser radiation in gases is investigated using numerical quantum-mechanical calculations. The maximum attainable spectral widths of high harmonics are estimated for model atoms with different ionisation potentials taking into account the aforementioned limiting effects. It is shown (within a two-dimensional model) that high harmonics with wavelengths to several angstroms can be generated by irradiating helium atoms with high-power femtosecond pulses of a laser [5] with a centre wavelength of 3.9 {mu}m. The possibility of observing experimentally relativistic effects using modern desktop mid-IR laser sources is demonstrated. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  1. High power multi-color OPCPA source with simultaneous femtosecond deep-UV to mid-IR outputs.

    PubMed

    Baudisch, M; Wolter, B; Pullen, M; Hemmer, M; Biegert, J

    2016-08-01

    Many experimental investigations demand synchronized pulses at various wavelengths, ideally with very short pulse duration and high repetition rate. Here we describe a femtosecond multi-color optical parametric chirped pulse amplifier (OPCPA) with simultaneous outputs from the deep-UV to the mid-IR with optical synchronization. The high repetition rate of 160 kHz is well suited to compensate for low interaction probability or low cross section in strong-field interactions. Our source features high peak powers in the tens to hundreds of MW regime with pulse durations below 110 fs, which is ideal for pump-probe experiments of nonlinear and strong-field physics. We demonstrate its utility by strong-field ionization experiments of xenon in the near- to mid-IR. PMID:27472624

  2. Classification of edible oils and modeling of their physico-chemical properties by chemometric methods using mid-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Aderval S.; da Silva, Arnaldo P.; Ferré, Joan; Boqué, Ricard

    This research work describes two studies for the classification and characterization of edible oils and its quality parameters through Fourier transform mid infrared spectroscopy (FT-mid-IR) together with chemometric methods. The discrimination of canola, sunflower, corn and soybean oils was investigated using SVM-DA, SIMCA and PLS-DA. Using FT-mid-IR, DPLS was able to classify 100% of the samples from the validation set, but SIMCA and SVM-DA were not. The quality parameters: refraction index and relative density of edible oils were obtained from reference methods. Prediction models for FT-mid-IR spectra were calculated for these quality parameters using partial least squares (PLS) and support vector machines (SVM). Several preprocessing alternatives (first derivative, multiplicative scatter correction, mean centering, and standard normal variate) were investigated. The best result for the refraction index was achieved with SVM as well as for the relative density except when the preprocessing combination of mean centering and first derivative was used. For both of quality parameters, the best results obtained for the figures of merit expressed by the root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) and prediction (RMSEP) were equal to 0.0001.

  3. Mid-IR band gap engineering of CdxPb1-xS nanocrystals by mechanochemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Guo-Long; Liu, Limin; Wu, Weibing

    2014-06-01

    Composition-tunable ternary CdxPb1-xS nanocrystals (NCs) are very important materials for remote sensing and detecting in the infrared (IR) wavelength region. They are, however, almost exclusively prepared by wet chemical routes which lead to surface-capped nanoparticles. The surface capping molecules could move their absorption peaks from mid-IR to near IR wavelength region. However, surface clean CdxPb1-xS nanocrystals (NCs) would demonstrate intrinsic optical spectrum in the mid-IR region. Herein, we present a physical mechanical alloying (MA) process being applied to prepare tens of grams of surface clean CdxPb1-xS nanocrystals within the composition range of x = 0.0 to 0.4. The average particle size is smaller than 9 nm. The as-milled nanocrystals are chemically homogenous. The CdxPb1-xS nanocrystals show a continuous lattice contraction with Cd content. There is an exponential indirect band gap-composition relationship. This MA method shows the ability to continuously and precisely tune the band gap energies of ternary CdxPb1-xS semiconductor nanocrystals from mid-IR region (2638 nm) to NIR wavelength region (1240 nm) through chemical composition.

  4. Revealing molecular structure and dynamics through high harmonic generation driven by mid-IR fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marangos, Jonathan

    2010-03-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) from molecules has recently been shown to be a promising tool for measuring instantaneous molecular structure, sub-femtosecond domain structural rearrangements in molecules and even hole dynamics initiated by laser field ionisation. To fully exploit this promise it is essential that we can; (1) systematically decouple structural and dynamic effects so that both may simultaneously be determined in the measurement, (2) can extend the method of molecular HHG imaging to a wide range of molecules. Here we demonstrate important steps towards both these objectives. Up until now HHG imaging measurements have been restricted to drive laser wavelengths close to 800nm, due to the availability of CPA titanium sapphire lasers, which dictates the use of relatively high intensities (> 2.5 x 10^14 Wcm-2) if a harmonic spectrum spanning to ˜70 eV is to be observed which is required for extracting structural data from most small molecules. By using a mid-IR laser (at 1300 nm) we show that with an intensity ˜ 1 x 10^14 W cm-2 we can observe a wide molecular harmonic spectrum spanning to ˜ 70 eV even in molecules where ionization saturation would clamp the cut-off to much lower energies if an 800nm field were used. Thus we have been able to observe evidence for two-centre interference in two new molecules, N2O and C2H2 for the first time. Moreover we can use the ability to observe a broad harmonic spectrum over a large range of intensities to reveal the subtle interplay between structural and dynamic effects in CO2 and so provide a new window into hole dynamics. [4pt] In collaboration with R. Torres, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London; O. Smirnova, Max-Born-Institute, Berlin; T. Siegel and L. Brugnera, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London; I. Procino and Jonathan G. Underwood, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London; C. Altucci and R. Velotta, CNSIM and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli

  5. Mid-IR and far-IR investigation of AgI-doped silver diborate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgens, J.J.; Martin, S.W.

    1996-03-01

    The structures of {ital x}AgI+(1{minus}{ital x})Ag{sub 2}O{center_dot}2B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses, where 0.2{le}{ital x}{le}0.6, have been investigated using mid- and far-infrared spectroscopy. The mid-IR spectra revealed that in those glasses prepared using AgNO{sub 3} as the starting material for Ag{sub 2}O, the BO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}/BO{sub 3} ratio is constant with increasing amounts of AgI as would be expected form the proposed behavior of AgI in these glasses. However, a survey of the literature revealed those glasses prepared from pure Ag{sub 2}O show a strong linear dependence of the BO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}/BO{sub 3} ratio on AgI content. Most probably, in those glasses prepared with Ag{sub 2}O the Ag{sub 2}O/B{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio changes with AgI content due to the decomposition of Ag{sub 2}O during melting. This different behavior is associated with AgNO{sub 3} decomposing to Ag{sub 2}O with heating followed by incorporation into the glassy network. For Ag{sub 2}O used directly, it is proposed that it decomposes to Ag metal and O{sub 2}(gas) with heating before it can be incorporated into the borate network. This latter behavior decreases with increasing AgI in the batch composition because AgI lowers the liquidus temperature of the melt considerably. The far-IR analysis of the AgI-doped silver diborate glasses suggests that there are three coordination environments for the Ag{sup +} ions; one with iodide anions and the other two with oxygen ions. It is proposed that the separate oxygen coordination environments for the Ag{sup +} ions arise from one with bridging oxygens of BO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} units, and the other with nonbridging oxygens on BO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} units. Furthermore, it is proposed that the Ag{sup +} ions in the iodide-ion environments progressively agglomerate into disordered regions of AgI, but do not form structures similar to {alpha}-AgI. (Abstract Truncated)

  6. 2 μm and mid-IR fiber-laser-based sources for OCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieleck, C.; Berrou, A.; Kneis, C.; Donelan, B.; Eichhorn, M.

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes new laser sources and non linear conversion setups for 2 μm and mid-IR generation based on fiber technologies developed at ISL. Especially for jamming heat-seeking missiles, these novel designs allow to propose future compact, efficient and integrable laser systems. The specialty of the ISL technology lies in the use of single 2 μm fiber laser oscillators, which deliver the full output peak power to pump optical parametric oscillators or nonlinear fibers. No multi-stage amplifiers at 2 μm or 1.55 μm are necessary to efficiently pump non linear converters to obtained useful energies in the mid-infrared spectral range. This technology leads to efficient, simple and promising setups to be implemented in flying platforms. The best results achieved in continuous-wave (CW), Q-switched (QS) and mode-locked (ML) regimes with fiber lasers based on Tm3+-doped and Tm3+,Ho3+-codoped fibers are presented. Up to 70 W of average power was achieved around 2 μm with a Tm3+-doped fiber in CW regime. In ML regimes, at a repetition rate of 66 MHz, 50 W of average power was reached. In QS regime, up to 32 W of average power was generated around 2 μm with a polarization maintaining Tm3+-doped fiber at a repetition rate of 40 kHz. With a Tm3+,Ho3+-codoped fiber, up to 25 W of average power was obtained around 2070 nm in Q-switched regime. For example at 50 kHz, the pulse duration was around 50 ns at the maximum output power. The M2 was estimated to be less than 1.2. The emission from QS fiber lasers was used to directly pump OP-GaAs and ZGP OPOs. For example, in band II, up to 6.5 W of averaged power was recently obtained from a ZGP OPO pumped by a Tm3+-doped fiber laser. At 40 kHz repetition rate, the pulse duration was around 65 ns at the maximum output power. For 3 W of averaged output power, the M2 of the signal beam was estimated to be less than 2.1 and less than 2.4 for the idler beam. Using a mode-locked Tm3+-doped fiber laser to pump a ZBLAN fiber at an

  7. Direct gap Ge1-ySny alloys: Fabrication and design of mid-IR photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senaratne, C. L.; Wallace, P. M.; Gallagher, J. D.; Sims, P. E.; Kouvetakis, J.; Menéndez, J.

    2016-07-01

    Chemical vapor deposition methods were developed, using stoichiometric reactions of specialty Ge3H8 and SnD4 hydrides, to fabricate Ge1-ySny photodiodes with very high Sn concentrations in the 12%-16% range. A unique aspect of this approach is the compatible reactivity of the compounds at ultra-low temperatures, allowing efficient control and systematic tuning of the alloy composition beyond the direct gap threshold. This crucial property allows the formation of thick supersaturated layers with device-quality material properties. Diodes with composition up to 14% Sn were initially produced on Ge-buffered Si(100) featuring previously optimized n-Ge/i-Ge1-ySny/p-Ge1-zSnz type structures with a single defected interface. The devices exhibited sizable electroluminescence and good rectifying behavior as evidenced by the low dark currents in the I-V measurements. The formation of working diodes with higher Sn content up to 16% Sn was implemented by using more advanced n-Ge1-xSnx/i-Ge1-ySny/p-Ge1-zSnz architectures incorporating Ge1-xSnx intermediate layers (x ˜ 12% Sn) that served to mitigate the lattice mismatch with the Ge platform. This yielded fully coherent diode interfaces devoid of strain relaxation defects. The electrical measurements in this case revealed a sharp increase in reverse-bias dark currents by almost two orders of magnitude, in spite of the comparable crystallinity of the active layers. This observation is attributed to the enhancement of band-to-band tunneling when all the diode layers consist of direct gap materials and thus has implications for the design of light emitting diodes and lasers operating at desirable mid-IR wavelengths. Possible ways to engineer these diode characteristics and improve carrier confinement involve the incorporation of new barrier materials, in particular, ternary Ge1-x-ySixSny alloys. The possibility of achieving type-I structures using binary and ternary alloy combinations is discussed in detail, taking into account

  8. Estimation of reactogenicity of preparations produced on the basis of photoinactivated live vaccines against brucellosis and tularaemia on the organismic level.2. Using the method of speckle-microscopy with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulianova, O. V.; Uianov, S. S.; Li, Pengcheng; Luo, Qingming

    2011-04-01

    The method of speckle microscopy was adapted to estimate the reactogenicity of the prototypes of vaccine preparations against extremely dangerous infections. The theory is proposed to describe the mechanism of formation of the output signal from the super-high spatial resolution speckle microscope. The experimental studies show that bacterial suspensions, irradiated in different regimes of inactivation, do not exert negative influence on the blood microcirculations in laboratory animals.

  9. Estimation of reactogenicity of preparations produced on the basis of photoinactivated live vaccines against brucellosis and tularaemia on the organismic level. 2. Using the method of speckle-microscopy with high spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ulianova, O V; Uianov, S S; Li Pengcheng; Luo Qingming

    2011-04-30

    The method of speckle microscopy was adapted to estimate the reactogenicity of the prototypes of vaccine preparations against extremely dangerous infections. The theory is proposed to describe the mechanism of formation of the output signal from the super-high spatial resolution speckle microscope. The experimental studies show that bacterial suspensions, irradiated in different regimes of inactivation, do not exert negative influence on the blood microcirculations in laboratory animals. (optical technologies in biophysics and medicine)

  10. High-spatial resolution SIMS U-Pb zircon dating on Malay tin granites: New insights to crustal evolution of the Malaysian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, S.; Searle, M. P.; Whitehouse, M. J.; Chung, S.; Robb, L. J.; Ghani, A. A.; Sone, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Southeast Asian tin granite province has previously been recognized as comprising three distinct granitic belt (Cobbing et al., 1986): (1) Middle Permian - Late Triassic Eastern Province with mainly subduction-related I-type granites associated with Cu-Au deposits, (2) Late Permian - Early Jurassic Main Range Province with mainly S-type granites associated with Sn-W deposits, and (3) Late Triassic - Cretaceous Western Province with mixed I- and S-type granites associated with Sn-W deposits. These ages were obtained mainly using whole rock Rb-Sr and K-Ar geochronology in the 70s and 80s, methods that are no longer considered suitable for obtaining crystallization ages of granites due to unstable behaviour of these isotopes in hydrothermal systems. During 2011 we collected over 50 samples of granites across all three zones in Northern Malaysia for U-Pb dating using high-spatial resolution precision SIMS at the Swedish Museum of Natural History. The results reveal a westward younging trend across the Malay Peninsula. The Eastern Province hornblende- and biotite-granites in Eastern Malaysia formed by subduction-related processes have ages lying between 220-285 Ma. The Main Range Province dominantly S-type granites in west and central Malaysia have ages lying between 206-226 Ma. These include dominantly biotite granites with less common tourmaline+biotite leucocratic granites related to crustal thickening processes following collision of Sibumasu with Indochina and closing of the Palaeo-Tethyan Bentong-Raub suture zone. Some enigmatic young Cretaceous zircon rim ages (c. 81-80 Ma) may indicate a young hydrothermal - metasomatic origin for some tin mineralization from both the Eastern Province (Tioman Island) and the Western province (Phuket, Thailand) (Searle et al., 2012). Granites in Malaysia cannot be simply categorized as I-, S- or A-type as most of them failed to show distinctive minerals for classification and there is considerable overlap in geochemical

  11. Fourier transform two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy using an octave-spanning mid-IR probe.

    PubMed

    Gaynor, James D; Courtney, Trevor L; Balasubramanian, Madhumitha; Khalil, Munira

    2016-06-15

    The development of coherent Fourier transform two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2D EV) spectroscopy with acousto-optic pulse-shaper-generated near-UV pump pulses and an octave-spanning broadband mid-IR probe pulse is detailed. A 2D EV spectrum of a silicon wafer demonstrates the full experimental capability of this experiment, and a 2D EV spectrum of dissolved hexacyanoferrate establishes the viability of our 2D EV experiment for studying condensed phase molecular ensembles. PMID:27304316

  12. WISE Non-Detection of the AXP 4U 0142+61 at Mid-IR Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Wang, Z.

    2011-07-01

    Mid-IR imaging of the field of the anomalous X-ray pulsar (AXP) 4U 0142+61 was carried out with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) between 2010 Feb. 3-7 at WISE bands 3.4, 4.6, 11.6, and 22.1 microns (Wright et al. 2010, ApJ, 140, 1868). We analyzed the four band images of the source field from the WISE preliminary data release (http://wise2.ipac.caltech.edu/docs/release/prelim/index.html).

  13. Highly coherent mid-IR supercontinuum by self-defocusing solitons in lithium niobate waveguides with all-normal dispersion.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hairun; Zhou, Binbin; Zeng, Xianglong; Bache, Morten

    2014-05-19

    We numerically investigate self-defocusing solitons in a lithium niobate (LN) waveguide designed to have a large refractive index (RI) change. The waveguide evokes strong waveguide dispersion and all-normal dispersion is found in the entire guiding band spanning the near-IR and the beginning of the mid-IR. Meanwhile, a self-defocusing nonlinearity is invoked by the cascaded (phase-mismatched) second-harmonic generation under a quasi-phase-matching pitch. Combining this with the all-normal dispersion, mid-IR solitons can form and the waveguide presents the first all-nonlinear and solitonic device where no linear dispersion (i.e. non-solitonic) regimes exist within the guiding band. Soliton compressions at 2 μm and 3 μm are investigated, with nano-joule single cycle pulse formations and highly coherent octave-spanning supercontinuum generations. With an alternative design on the waveguide dispersion, the soliton spectral tunneling effect is also investigated, with which few-cycle pico-joule pulses at 2 μm are formed by a near-IR pump. PMID:24921341

  14. Solitonic supercontinuum of femtosecond mid-IR pulses in W-type index tellurite fibers with two zero dispersion wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedenburg, S.; Steinle, T.; Mörz, F.; Steinmann, A.; Nguyen, D.; Rhonehouse, D.; Zong, J.; Chavez-Pirson, A.; Giessen, H.

    2016-11-01

    We present a detailed experimental parameter study on mid-IR supercontinuum generation in W-type index tellurite fibers, which reveals how the core diameter, pump wavelength, fiber length, and pump power dramatically influence the spectral broadening. As pump source, we use femtosecond mid-IR pulses from a post-amplified optical parametric oscillator tunable between 1.7 μm and 4.1 μm at 43 MHz repetition rate. We are able to generate red-shifted dispersive waves up to a wavelength of 5.1 μm by pumping a tellurite fiber in the anomalous dispersion regime between its two zero dispersion wavelengths. Distinctive soliton dynamics can be identified as the main broadening mechanism resulting in a maximum spectral width of over 2000 nm with output powers of up to 160 mW. We experimentally demonstrated that efficient spectral broadening with considerably improved power proportion in the important first atmospheric transmission window between 3 and 5 μm can be achieved in robust W-type tellurite fibers pumped at long wavelengths by ultra-fast lasers.

  15. The CRRP and SMHASH programs: Mapping the Milky Way and its neighbours with RR Lyraes in the mid IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scowcroft, Victoria; Freedman, Wendy L.; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Madore, Barry; Crrp Team, Smhash Team

    2015-01-01

    The CRRP and SMHASH programs are Spitzer Warm mission programs studying RR Lyrae in the Milky Way and its nearest neighbors.The calibration program (CRRP) studies individual calibrator RR Lyrae stars that will be observed by Gaia, in addition to 45 MW and LMC globular clusters and 36 fields in the MW bulge and halo. These observations provide the calibration of the RR Lyrae mid-IR PL relation, allow us to measure metallicity effects using objects such as ω Cen, and will allow us to study the structure of the MW itself.Our follow-on program, SMHASH, builds on the CRRP foundation to do a larger scale structural study of the MW. In this program we have targeted the Sagittarius dwarf, Sagittarius and Orphan Streams and several dwarf galaxies neighboring the MW.I will discuss the two programs, giving preliminary results showing the first measurements of the RR Lyrae mid-IR PL relation from full phase coverage observations. I will show how the measurements from CRRP/SMHASH are critical for both the structural studies of the MW and for an independent measure of the distance to the LMC, providing a complementary test of the Cepheid distance ladder.

  16. New IR imaging modalities for cancer detection and for intra-cell chemical mapping with a sub-diffraction mid-IR s-SNOM.

    PubMed

    Amrania, H; Drummond, L; Coombes, R C; Shousha, S; Woodley-Barker, L; Weir, K; Hart, W; Carter, I; Phillips, C C

    2016-06-23

    We present two new modalities for generating chemical maps. Both are mid-IR based and aimed at the biomedical community, but they differ substantially in their technological readiness. The first, so-called "Digistain", is a technologically mature "locked down" way of acquiring diffraction-limited chemical images of human cancer biopsy tissue. Although it is less flexible than conventional methods of acquiring IR images, this is an intentional, and key, design feature. It allows it to be used, on a routine basis, by clinical personnel themselves. It is in the process of a full clinical evaluation and the philosophy behind the approach is discussed. The second modality is a very new, probe-based "s-SNOM", which we are developing in conjunction with a new family of tunable "Quantum Cascade Laser" (QCL) diode lasers. Although in its infancy, this instrument can already deliver ultra-detailed chemical images whose spatial resolutions beat the normal diffraction limit by a factor of ∼1000. This is easily enough to generate chemical maps of the insides of single cells for the first time, and a range of new possible scientific applications are explored.

  17. Time‐of‐flight secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging of biological samples with delayed extraction for high mass and high spatial resolutions

    PubMed Central

    Vanbellingen, Quentin P.; Elie, Nicolas; Eller, Michael J.; Della‐Negra, Serge; Touboul, David

    2015-01-01

    Rationale In Time‐of‐Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF‐SIMS), pulsed and focused primary ion beams enable mass spectrometry imaging, a method which is particularly useful to map various small molecules such as lipids at the surface of biological samples. When using TOF‐SIMS instruments, the focusing modes of the primary ion beam delivered by liquid metal ion guns can provide either a mass resolution of several thousand or a sub‐µm lateral resolution, but the combination of both is generally not possible. Methods With a TOF‐SIMS setup, a delayed extraction applied to secondary ions has been studied extensively on rat cerebellum sections in order to compensate for the effect of long primary ion bunches. Results The use of a delayed extraction has been proven to be an efficient solution leading to unique features, i.e. a mass resolution up to 10000 at m/z 385.4 combined with a lateral resolution of about 400 nm. Simulations of ion trajectories confirm the experimental determination of optimal delayed extraction and allow understanding of the behavior of ions as a function of their mass‐to‐charge ratio. Conclusions Although the use of a delayed extraction has been well known for many years and is very popular in MALDI, it is much less used in TOF‐SIMS. Its full characterization now enables secondary ion images to be recorded in a single run with a submicron spatial resolution and with a mass resolution of several thousand. This improvement is very useful when analyzing lipids on tissue sections, or rare, precious, or very small size samples. © 2015 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26395603

  18. Taheri-Saramad x-ray detector (TSXD): A novel high spatial resolution x-ray imager based on ZnO nano scintillator wires in polycarbonate membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, A.; Saramad, S.; Ghalenoei, S.; Setayeshi, S.

    2014-01-01

    A novel x-ray imager based on ZnO nanowires is designed and fabricated. The proposed architecture is based on scintillation properties of ZnO nanostructures in a polycarbonate track-etched membrane. Because of higher refractive index of ZnO nanowire compared to the membrane, the nanowire acts as an optical fiber that prevents the generated optical photons to spread inside the detector. This effect improves the spatial resolution of the imager. The detection quantum efficiency and spatial resolution of the fabricated imager are 11% and <6.8 μm, respectively.

  19. Taheri-Saramad x-ray detector (TSXD): A novel high spatial resolution x-ray imager based on ZnO nano scintillator wires in polycarbonate membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Taheri, A. Saramad, S.; Ghalenoei, S.; Setayeshi, S.

    2014-01-15

    A novel x-ray imager based on ZnO nanowires is designed and fabricated. The proposed architecture is based on scintillation properties of ZnO nanostructures in a polycarbonate track-etched membrane. Because of higher refractive index of ZnO nanowire compared to the membrane, the nanowire acts as an optical fiber that prevents the generated optical photons to spread inside the detector. This effect improves the spatial resolution of the imager. The detection quantum efficiency and spatial resolution of the fabricated imager are 11% and <6.8 μm, respectively.

  20. Regular ‘breathing’ of a near-single-cycle light bullet in mid-IR filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekalin, S. V.; Kompanets, V. O.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Dormidonov, A. E.; Kandidov, V. P.

    2016-06-01

    Experimental and numerical studies of a temporal evolution of a light bullet formed in isotropic LiF by mid-IR femtosecond pulse (2600-3350 nm) of power, slightly exceeding the critical power for self-focusing, are presented. For the first time regular oscillations of the light bullet field peak amplitude during its propagation in a filament were registered by investigation of induced color centers in LiF. It was revealed that color centers in a single laser pulse filament have the strictly periodic structure with a length of separate sections about 30 μm, which increases with a laser pulse wavelength decreasing. It was shown that the origin of a light bullet modulation is a periodical change of the light field amplitude of a near single-cycle wave packet in a filament, due to a difference of the wave packet group velocity and the carrier wave phase velocity.

  1. Complex formation in liquid diethyl ether-chloroform mixtures examined by 2D correlation MID-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutsyk, Andrii; Ilchenko, Oleksii; Pilgun, Yuriy; Obukhovsky, Vyacheslav; Nikonova, Viktoria

    2016-11-01

    Molecular complexes formation in diethyl ether-chloroform liquid solution is investigated by Mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy. The spectra were measured in spectral ranges of 1000-1550 cm-1 and 2650-3100 cm-1. 2D correlation analysis of spectral data indicates the presence of a third component in the solution. Excess spectroscopy shows that maximum of complex concentration is concentrated at around of 55% (vol.) of diethyl ether. 2D codistribution analysis supports such conclusion and provides the order of species distribution. Three-components MCR decomposition of spectral data was performed for the determination of concentration and spectral profiles of mixture components. Spectral transformations due to intermolecular interactions are in full agreement with those calculated according to density functional theory with B3LYP functional and cc-pVTz basis set for the case of equimolecular complex.

  2. Performance characteristics of narrow linewidth fiber laser pumped mid-IR difference frequency mixing light source for methane detection.

    PubMed

    Ashizawa, Hiroaki; Ohara, Shinobu; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Takahashi, Masao; Endo, Masamori; Nanri, Kenzo; Fujioka, Tomoo; Tittel, Frank K

    2003-03-01

    A high-power, narrow-linewidth Yb fiber laser with a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) pumped difference frequency generation (DFG) in a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal was investigated in detail. A mid-IR power of approximately 2.3 microW at 3.3 micrometers with a slope efficiency of 0.85 mW/W2 was achieved. A Doppler-broadened absorption spectrum of CH4 at 3038.497 cm-1 (3.2911 micrometers) was obtained with a 0.1-m long-gas cell at a pressure of 133 Pa. The linewidth of the DFG source was evaluated to be less than 96 MHz from the observed spectral linewidth. Real-time monitoring of CH4 (approximately 1.78 ppm) in ambient air in a multipass cell which has an optical path length of 10 m was also demonstrated. PMID:12959140

  3. Temporal characterization of mid-IR free-electron-laser pulses by frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, B.A.; Krumbuegel, M.A.; Trebino, R.

    1997-05-01

    We performed what we believe are the first practical full-temporal-characterization measurements of ultrashort pulses from a free-electron laser (FEL). Second-harmonic-generation frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) was used to measure a train of mid-IR pulses distorted by a saturated water-vapor absorption line and showing free-induction decay. The measured direction of time was unambiguous because of prior knowledge regarding free-induction decay. These measurements require only 10{percent} of the power of the laser beam and demonstrate that FROG can be implemented as a pulse diagnostic simultaneously with other experiments on a FEL. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital Optical Society of America}

  4. Performance characteristics of narrow linewidth fiber laser pumped mid-IR difference frequency mixing light source for methane detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashizawa, Hiroaki; Ohara, Shinobu; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Takahashi, Masao; Endo, Masamori; Nanri, Kenzo; Fujioka, Tomoo; Tittel, Frank K.

    2003-01-01

    A high-power, narrow-linewidth Yb fiber laser with a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) pumped difference frequency generation (DFG) in a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal was investigated in detail. A mid-IR power of approximately 2.3 microW at 3.3 micrometers with a slope efficiency of 0.85 mW/W2 was achieved. A Doppler-broadened absorption spectrum of CH4 at 3038.497 cm-1 (3.2911 micrometers) was obtained with a 0.1-m long-gas cell at a pressure of 133 Pa. The linewidth of the DFG source was evaluated to be less than 96 MHz from the observed spectral linewidth. Real-time monitoring of CH4 (approximately 1.78 ppm) in ambient air in a multipass cell which has an optical path length of 10 m was also demonstrated.

  5. 2D IR spectroscopy at 100 kHz utilizing a Mid-IR OPCPA laser source.

    PubMed

    Luther, Bradley M; Tracy, Kathryn M; Gerrity, Michael; Brown, Susannah; Krummel, Amber T

    2016-02-22

    We present a 100 kHz 2D IR spectrometer. The system utilizes a ytterbium all normal dispersion fiber oscillator as a common source for the pump and seed beams of a MgO:PPLN OPCPA. The 1030 nm OPCPA pump is generated by amplification of the oscillator in cryocooled Yb:YAG amplifiers, while the 1.68 μm seed is generated in a OPO pumped by the oscillator. The OPCPA outputs are used in a ZGP DFG stage to generate 4.65 μm pulses. A mid-IR pulse shaper delivers pulse pairs to a 2D IR spectrometer allowing for data collection at 100 kHz. PMID:26907062

  6. High Spatial Resolution Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Data for Analysis of the Atlanta, Georgia, Urban Heat Island Effect and Its Impacts on the Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.

    2007-01-01

    the impact of increased urban heating on air quality. The urban landscape impacts surface thermal energy exchanges that determine development of the UHI. This paper will illustrate how we are using high spatial remote sensing data collected over the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area in conjunction with other geographic information, to perform a detailed urban land cover classification and to determine the contribution of these land covers to the urban heat island effect. Also, the spatial arrangement of the land covers and the impact on urban heating from these selected patterns of development are evaluated. Additionally, this paper will show how these data are being used as inputs to improve air quality modeling for Atlanta, including potential benefits from UHI mitigation.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Mid-IR QSO spectral templates (Hill+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, A. R.; Gallagher, S. C.; Deo, R. P.; Peeters, E.; Richards, G. T.

    2014-11-01

    We coordinate cross matched the SDSS quasar catalogue (Schneider et al., 2010AJ....139.2360S, Cat. VII/260) with the Spitzer (Werner et al. 2004ApJS..154....1W) Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) archive, using a match radius of 2 arcsec, yielding 184 low-resolution (R~60-130) MIR spectra. We selected all data which had short-low (SL; 5.1-14.3um) and/or long-low (LL; 13.9-39.9um) modules (although not all objects necessarily had both modules), opting to keep only the low-resolution data. (2 data files).

  8. MID-IR SPECTRA OF TYPE Ia SN 2014J IN M82 SPANNING THE FIRST 4 MONTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Telesco, Charles M.; Li, Dan; Barnes, Peter J.; Mariñas, Naibí; Zhang, Han; Höflich, Peter; Álvarez, Carlos; Fernández, Sergio; Rebolo, Rafael; Hough, James H.; Levenson, N. A.; Pantin, Eric; Roche, Patrick E-mail: phoeflich77@gmail.com

    2015-01-10

    We present a time series of 8-13 μm spectra and photometry for SN 2014J obtained 57, 81, 108, and 137 days after the explosion using CanariCam on the Gran Telescopio Canarias. This is the first mid-IR time series ever obtained for a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia). These observations can be understood within the framework of the delayed detonation model and the production of ∼0.6 M {sub ☉} of {sup 56}Ni, consistent with the observed brightness, the brightness decline relation, and the γ-ray fluxes. The [Co III] line at 11.888 μm is particularly useful for evaluating the time evolution of the photosphere and measuring the amount of {sup 56}Ni and thus the mass of the ejecta. Late-time line profiles of SN 2014J are rather symmetric and not shifted in the rest frame. We see argon emission, which provides a unique probe of mixing in the transition layer between incomplete burning and nuclear statistical equilibrium. We may see [Fe III] and [Ni IV] emission, both of which are observed to be substantially stronger than indicated by our models. If the latter identification is correct, then we are likely observing stable Ni, which might imply central mixing. In addition, electron capture, also required for stable Ni, requires densities larger than ∼1 × 10{sup 9} g cm{sup –3}, which are expected to be present only in white dwarfs close to the Chandrasekhar limit. This study demonstrates that mid-IR studies of SNe Ia are feasible from the ground and provide unique information, but it also indicates the need for better atomic data.

  9. The circumbinary dusty disk of upsilon Sgr revealed by mid-IR interferometric observations with the VLTI/MIDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneau, D.; Netolický, M.; Chesneau, O.; Harmanec, P.; Koubský, P.; Mourard, D.; Stee, P.

    2008-11-01

    The first mid-IR interferometric observations of a hydrogen-deficient binary star, υ Sgr, were carried out using the MIDI/VLTI instrument between April 2007 and May 2008. The dusty circumbinary envelope is resolved in the N band (8-13.5 μ m), and has a typical size of 20 x 14 mas. The calibrated fringe visibilities, the mid-IR spectrum and the SED were fitted using models computed with the radiative transfer code MC3D using several mixtures of carbon and silicate dust, in order to determine the geometry and chemical composition of the envelope. The best model we obtain is a geometrically thin and dense disk with an inner radius of R_{in} ≃ 6.0AU and a scale height h_{100} ≃ 3.5 AU. The inclination of the disk is i ≃ 50° and its position angle is PA ≃ 80°. The chemical composition of the dust is approximatelya ratio of 60% of carbon dust and 40% of silicate dust. We constrained for the first time the geometry and the chemistry of the circumbinary dusty envelope of υ Sgr. It is now clear that the components of υ Sgr are massive stars (> 10 M_⊙) and the results are compatible with evolutionary scenario proposed by Delgado & Thomas (1981) of a binary with massive components experiencing several phases of important mass transfer leading to the hydrogen-deficient primary star. However, complementary spectro-interferometric observations in the near infrared and the visible are mandatory to investigate the complex structure of the inner circumstellar environment and directly resolve the stellar components of the υ Sgr system.

  10. A High-Spatial-Resolution, Localized MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth Product for Use in Air Quality Exposure Assessment During Large Wildfire Smoke Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, M. C.; Raffuse, S. M.; DeWinter, J. L.; Craig, K. J.; Jumbam, L. K.; Fruin, S.; Lurmann, F.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) has potential use for determining the intra-urban variability of airborne particulate matter exposure during wildfire events; however, the standard Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD products have limitations for this application. Specifically, the 10x10 km resolution is too coarse for intra-urban population exposure assessments, the assumed aerosol optical properties are not representative of biomass burning aerosol, and the cloud masking algorithm misinterprets heavy smoke as clouds. We developed a localized MODIS AOD product at 1.5 and 2.5 km resolutions and tested the performance in northern California during the 2008 wildfires. The localized product's algorithm uses local biomass burning aerosol optical properties, local surface reflectance data, and a relaxed cloud filter. During the 2008 season, persistent heavy smoke was produced over northern California and the San Joaquin Valley for over two months. As California is both highly populated and covered with a relatively dense network of ground-based aerosol monitoring stations, this event provided an excellent opportunity to develop the AOD product and test its ability to predict aerosol concentrations on the ground to assess population exposure. We will present our methodology and discuss its potential for air quality and public health applications.

  11. Compact pnCCD-based X-ray camera with high spatial and energy resolution: a color X-ray camera.

    PubMed

    Scharf, O; Ihle, S; Ordavo, I; Arkadiev, V; Bjeoumikhov, A; Bjeoumikhova, S; Buzanich, G; Gubzhokov, R; Günther, A; Hartmann, R; Kühbacher, M; Lang, M; Langhoff, N; Liebel, A; Radtke, M; Reinholz, U; Riesemeier, H; Soltau, H; Strüder, L; Thünemann, A F; Wedell, R

    2011-04-01

    For many applications there is a requirement for nondestructive analytical investigation of the elemental distribution in a sample. With the improvement of X-ray optics and spectroscopic X-ray imagers, full field X-ray fluorescence (FF-XRF) methods are feasible. A new device for high-resolution X-ray imaging, an energy and spatial resolving X-ray camera, is presented. The basic idea behind this so-called "color X-ray camera" (CXC) is to combine an energy dispersive array detector for X-rays, in this case a pnCCD, with polycapillary optics. Imaging is achieved using multiframe recording of the energy and the point of impact of single photons. The camera was tested using a laboratory 30 μm microfocus X-ray tube and synchrotron radiation from BESSY II at the BAMline facility. These experiments demonstrate the suitability of the camera for X-ray fluorescence analytics. The camera simultaneously records 69,696 spectra with an energy resolution of 152 eV for manganese K(α) with a spatial resolution of 50 μm over an imaging area of 12.7 × 12.7 mm(2). It is sensitive to photons in the energy region between 3 and 40 keV, limited by a 50 μm beryllium window, and the sensitive thickness of 450 μm of the chip. Online preview of the sample is possible as the software updates the sums of the counts for certain energy channel ranges during the measurement and displays 2-D false-color maps as well as spectra of selected regions. The complete data cube of 264 × 264 spectra is saved for further qualitative and quantitative processing.

  12. Developing a bright 17 keV x-ray source for probing high-energy-density states of matter at high spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Huntington, C. M.; Park, H.-S.; Maddox, B. R.; Barrios, M. A.; Benedetti, R.; Braun, D. G.; Landen, O. L.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Remington, B. A.; Hohenberger, M.; Regan, S. P.

    2015-04-15

    A set of experiments were performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to develop and optimize a bright, 17 keV x-ray backlighter probe using laser-irradiated Nb foils. High-resolution one-dimensional imaging was achieved using a 15 μm wide slit in a Ta substrate to aperture the Nb He{sub α} x-rays onto an open-aperture, time integrated camera. To optimize the x-ray source for imaging applications, the effect of laser pulse shape and spatial profile on the target was investigated. Two laser pulse shapes were used—a “prepulse” shape that included a 3 ns, low-intensity laser foot preceding the high-energy 2 ns square main laser drive, and a pulse without the laser foot. The laser spatial profile was varied by the use of continuous phase plates (CPPs) on a pair of shots compared to beams at best focus, without CPPs. A comprehensive set of common diagnostics allowed for a direct comparison of imaging resolution, total x-ray conversion efficiency, and x-ray spectrum between shots. The use of CPPs was seen to reduce the high-energy tail of the x-ray spectrum, whereas the laser pulse shape had little effect on the high-energy tail. The measured imaging resolution was comparably high for all combinations of laser parameters, but a higher x-ray flux was achieved without phase plates. This increased flux was the result of smaller laser spot sizes, which allowed us to arrange the laser focal spots from multiple beams and produce an x-ray source which was more localized behind the slit aperture. Our experiments are a first demonstration of point-projection geometry imaging at NIF at the energies (>10 keV) necessary for imaging denser, higher-Z targets than have previously been investigated.

  13. Comparison of performance of object-based image analysis techniques available in open source software (Spring and Orfeo Toolbox/Monteverdi) considering very high spatial resolution data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodoro, Ana C.; Araujo, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for remote sensing applications is becoming more frequent. However, this type of information can result in several software problems related to the huge amount of data available. Object-based image analysis (OBIA) has proven to be superior to pixel-based analysis for very high-resolution images. The main objective of this work was to explore the potentialities of the OBIA methods available in two different open source software applications, Spring and OTB/Monteverdi, in order to generate an urban land cover map. An orthomosaic derived from UAVs was considered, 10 different regions of interest were selected, and two different approaches were followed. The first one (Spring) uses the region growing segmentation algorithm followed by the Bhattacharya classifier. The second approach (OTB/Monteverdi) uses the mean shift segmentation algorithm followed by the support vector machine (SVM) classifier. Two strategies were followed: four classes were considered using Spring and thereafter seven classes were considered for OTB/Monteverdi. The SVM classifier produces slightly better results and presents a shorter processing time. However, the poor spectral resolution of the data (only RGB bands) is an important factor that limits the performance of the classifiers applied.

  14. Morphology of the nucleus of Comet 67P/Churyumov--Gerasimenko from stereo and high spatial resolution OSIRIS-NAC images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, P. L.; Groussin, O.; Romeuf, D.; Auger, A. T.; Jorda, L.; Capanna, C.; Faury, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) of the OSIRIS imaging system aboard ESA's Rosetta spacecraft has acquired images of the surface of the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko at scales down to 0.2 m/pixel. We employ a variety of techniques to characterize its morphology. Digital terrain modeling (DTM), indispensable for quantitative morphological analysis is performed using stereophotoclinometry (SPC). Depending upon the observational coverage, the resolution of the DTMs exceeds 1 m in the most favorable cases. The ultimate stereographic analysis is performed by exploiting pairs of images able to produce anaglyphs whose spatial resolution surpasses that of the DTMs. Digital image filtering and contrast enhancement techniques are applied on the original images as appropriate. We first concentrate on the dust covered terrains possibly resulting from airfall deposits, on the quasi circular depressions or basins possibly connected to collapses of the underground terrain, and on large scarps that suggest extensive mass disruption. We pay special attention to lithologies that may give clues to the subsurface structure of the nucleus. Our ultimate goal is to understand the processes at work on the nucleus, directly or indirectly connected to its activity as there appears to a variety of processes far beyond what was classically considered in the past, for instance airfall deposits, surface dust transport, mass wasting, and insolation weathering.

  15. Design, Construction, and Initial Test of High Spatial Resolution Thermometry Arrays for Detection of Surface Temperature Profiles on SRF Cavities in Super Fluid Helium

    SciTech Connect

    Ari Palczewski, Rongli Geng, Grigory Eremeev

    2011-07-01

    We designed and built two high resolution (0.6-0.55mm special resolution [1.1-1.2mm separation]) thermometry arrays prototypes out of the Allen Bradley 90-120 ohm 1/8 watt resistor to measure surface temperature profiles on SRF cavities. One array was designed to be physically flexible and conform to any location on a SRF cavity; the other was modeled after the common G-10/stycast 2850 thermometer and designed to fit on the equator of an ILC (Tesla 1.3GHz) SRF cavity. We will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each array and their construction. In addition we will present a case study of the arrays performance on a real SRF cavity TB9NR001. TB9NR001 presented a unique opportunity to test the performance of each array as it contained a dual (4mm separation) cat eye defect which conventional methods such as OST (Oscillating Superleak second-sound Transducers) and full coverage thermometry mapping were unable to distinguish between. We will discuss the new arrays ability to distinguish between the two defects and their preheating performance.

  16. Morphology of the nucleus of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from stereo and high spatial resolution OSIRIS-NAC images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, Philippe; Groussin, Olivier; Romeuf, David; Thomas, Nicolas; Auger, Anne-Thérèse; Jorda, Laurent; Gaskell, Robert; Capanna, Claire; Llebaria, Antoine

    2015-04-01

    The Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) of the OSIRIS imaging system aboard ESA's Rosetta spacecraft has acquired images of the surface of the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko at scales down to 0.2 m/pixel. We employ a variety of techniques to characterize its morphology. Digital terrain modeling (DTM), indispensable for quantitative morphological analysis is performed using stereophotoclinometry (SPC). Depending upon the observational coverage, the resolution of the DTMs exceed 1 m in the most favorable cases. The ultimate stereographic analysis is performed by exploiting pairs of images able to produce anaglyphs whose spatial resolution surpasses that of the DTMs. Digital image filtering and contrast enhancement techniques are applied on the original images as appropriate. We first concentrate on the dust covered terrains possibly resulting from airfall deposits, on the quasi-circular depressions or basins possibly connected to collapses of the underground terrain, and on large scarps that suggest extensive mass disruption. We pay special attention to lithologies that may give clues to the subsurface structure of the nucleus. Our ultimate goal is to understand the processes at work on the nucleus, directly or indirectly connected to its activity as there appears to a variety of processes far beyond what was classicaly considered in the past, for instance airfall deposits, surface dust transport, mass wasting, and insolation weathering.

  17. Measuring the hydrogen/deuterium exchange of proteins at high spatial resolution by mass spectrometry: overcoming gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium scrambling.

    PubMed

    Rand, Kasper D; Zehl, Martin; Jørgensen, Thomas J D

    2014-10-21

    Proteins are dynamic molecules that exhibit conformational flexibility to function properly. Well-known examples of this are allosteric regulation of protein activity and ligand-induced conformational changes in protein receptors. Detailed knowledge of the conformational properties of proteins is therefore pertinent to both basic and applied research, including drug development, since the majority of drugs target protein receptors and a growing number of drugs introduced to the market are therapeutic peptides or proteins. X-ray crystallography provides a static picture at atomic resolution of the lowest-energy structure of the native ensemble. There is a growing need for sensitive analytical tools to explore all of the significant molecular structures in the conformational landscape of proteins. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has recently emerged as a powerful method for characterizing protein conformational dynamics. The basis of this method is the fact that backbone amides in stable hydrogen-bonded structures (e.g., α-helices and β-sheets) are protected against exchange with the aqueous solvent. All protein structures are dynamic, however, and eventually all of the protecting hydrogen bonds will transiently break as the protein--according to thermodynamic principles--cycles through partially unfolded states that correspond to excited free energy levels. As a result, all of the backbone amides will eventually become temporarily solvent-exposed and exchange-competent over time. Consequently, a folded protein in D2O will gradually incorporate deuterium into its backbone amides, and the kinetics of the process can be readily monitored by mass spectrometry. The deuterium uptake kinetics for the intact protein (global exchange kinetics) represents the sum of the exchange kinetics for the individual backbone amides. Local exchange kinetics is typically achieved by using pepsin digestion under quench conditions (i.e., under cold

  18. Simulation, optimization and testing of a novel high spatial resolution X-ray imager based on Zinc Oxide nanowires in Anodic Aluminium Oxide membrane using Geant4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfandi, F.; Saramad, S.

    2015-07-01

    In this work, a new generation of scintillator based X-ray imagers based on ZnO nanowires in Anodized Aluminum Oxide (AAO) nanoporous template is characterized. The optical response of ordered ZnO nanowire arrays in porous AAO template under low energy X-ray illumination is simulated by the Geant4 Monte Carlo code and compared with experimental results. The results show that for 10 keV X-ray photons, by considering the light guiding properties of zinc oxide inside the AAO template and suitable selection of detector thickness and pore diameter, the spatial resolution less than one micrometer and the detector detection efficiency of 66% are accessible. This novel nano scintillator detector can have many advantages for medical applications in the future.

  19. Mapping pan-Arctic methane emissions at high spatial resolution using an adjoint atmospheric transport and inversion method and process-based wetland and lake biogeochemical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Z.; Zhuang, Q.; Henze, D. K.; Frankenberg, C.; Dlugokencky, E.; Sweeney, C.; Turner, A. J.

    2015-11-01

    Understanding methane emissions from the Arctic, a fast warming carbon reservoir, is important for projecting changes in the global methane cycle under future climate scenarios. Here we optimize Arctic methane emissions with a nested-grid high-resolution inverse model by assimilating both high-precision surface measurements and column-average SCIAMACHY satellite retrievals of methane mole fraction. For the first time, methane emissions from lakes are integrated into an atmospheric transport and inversion estimate, together with prior wetland emissions estimated by six different biogeochemical models. We find that, the global methane emissions during July 2004-June 2005 ranged from 496.4 to 511.5 Tg yr-1, with wetland methane emissions ranging from 130.0 to 203.3 Tg yr-1. The Arctic methane emissions during July 2004-June 2005 were in the range of 14.6-30.4 Tg yr-1, with wetland and lake emissions ranging from 8.8 to 20.4 Tg yr-1 and from 5.4 to 7.9 Tg yr-1 respectively. Canadian and Siberian lakes contributed most of the estimated lake emissions. Due to insufficient measurements in the region, Arctic methane emissions are less constrained in northern Russia than in Alaska, northern Canada and Scandinavia. Comparison of different inversions indicates that the distribution of global and Arctic methane emissions is sensitive to prior wetland emissions. Evaluation with independent datasets shows that the global and Arctic inversions improve estimates of methane mixing ratios in boundary layer and free troposphere. The high-resolution inversions provide more details about the spatial distribution of methane emissions in the Arctic.

  20. The National Biomass and Carbon Dataset 2000: A High Spatial Resolution Baseline to Reduce Uncertainty in Carbon Accounting and Flux Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellndorfer, J. M.; Walker, W. S.; Hoppus, M.; Westfall, J.; Lapoint, E.

    2005-12-01

    A major goal of the North American Carbon Program (NACP) is to develop a quantitative scientific basis for regional to continental scale carbon accounting to reduce uncertainties about the carbon cycle component of the climate system. Given the highly complementary nature and quasi-synchronous data acquisition of the 2000 Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and the Landsat-based 2001 National Land Cover Database (NLCD, 2001), an exceptional opportunity exists for exploiting data synergies afforded by the fusion of these high-resolution data sources. Accurate area-based estimates of terrestrial biomass and carbon require biophysical measures that capture both horizontal and vertical vegetation structure. Whereas the thematic layers of the NLCD are suitable for characterizing horizontal vegetation structure (i.e., cover type, canopy density, etc.), SRTM provides information relating to the vertical structure, i.e., primarily height. Research from pilot study sites in Georgia, Michigan, and California have shown that SRTM height information, analyzed in conjunction with bald Earth elevation data from the National Elevation Dataset (NED), is highly correlated with vegetation canopy height. Currently, a project funded under the NASA 'Carbon Cycle Science' program ('The National Biomass and Carbon Dataset 2000 - NBCD 2000') is underway to generate a 'millennium' high-resolution ecoregional database of circa-2000 vegetation canopy height, aboveground biomass, and carbon stocks for the conterminous U.S. which will provide an unprecedented baseline against which to compare data products from the next generation of advanced microwave and optical remote sensing platforms. In the NBCD2000 initiative, data are analyzed in 60 ecologically diverse regions, consistent with the NLCD 2001 mapping zones, which cover the en