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Sample records for high-speed laser micromachining

  1. Ultra high-speed micromachining of transparent materials using high PRF ultrafast lasers and new resonant scanning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harth, F.; Piontek, M. C.; Herrmann, T.; L'huillier, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Irradiation of focused laser pulses to transparent materials leads to structural changes and can be used for the fabrication of e.g. LED light guiding components. In these applications both small spot sizes and a high lateral resolution in the μm range are absolutely essential. In order to achieve the industrially required throughput of nearly one million laser markings per second, ultrafast lasers with 100 W of average power and pulse repetition frequencies of several MHz are required. Laser machining of polymers additionally necessitates a wide spatial separation of the markings to avoid heat accumulation effects. Therefore, neither commercially available galvanometer based nor Polygon based scanners with their limited scan speed can be used for beam deflection. In our work, we developed an experimental setup based

  2. High-speed AFM probe with micromachined membrane tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byungki; Kwak, Byung Hyung; Jamil, Faize

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents a micromachined silicon membrane type AFM tip designed to move nearly 1µm by electrostatic force. Since the tip can be vibrated in small amplitude with AC voltage input and can be displaced up to 1μm by DC voltage input, an additional piezo actuator is not required for scanning of submicron features. The micromachined membrane tips are designed to have 100 kHz ~ 1 MHz resonant frequency. Displacement of the membrane tip is measured by an optical interferometer using a micromachined diffraction grating on a quartz wafer which is positioned behind the membrane tip.

  3. Micromachining with copper lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Martyn R. H.; Bell, Andy; Foster-Turner, Gideon; Rutterford, Graham; Chudzicki, J.; Kearsley, Andrew J.

    1997-04-01

    In recent years the copper laser has undergone extensive development and has emerged as a leading and unique laser for micromachining. The copper laser is a high average power (10 - 250 W), high pulse repetition rate (2 - 32 kHz), visible laser (511 nm and 578 nm) that produces high peak power (typically 200 kW), short pulses (30 ns) and very good beam quality (diffraction limited). This unique set of laser parameters results in exceptional micro-machining in a wide variety of materials. Typical examples of the capabilities of the copper laser include the drilling of small holes (10 - 200 micrometer diameter) in materials as diverse as steel, ceramic, diamond and polyimide with micron precision and low taper (less than 1 degree) cutting and profiling of diamond. Application of the copper laser covers the electronic, aerospace, automotive, nuclear, medical and precision engineering industries.

  4. Trends in laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaebler, Frank; van Nunen, Joris; Held, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Laser Micromachining is well established in industry. Depending on the application lasers with pulse length from μseconds to femtoseconds and wavelengths from 1064nm and its harmonics up to 5μm or 10.6μm are used. Ultrafast laser machining using pulses with pico or femtosecond duration pulses is gaining traction, as it offers very precise processing of materials with low thermal impact. Large-scale industrial ultrafast laser applications show that the market can be divided into various sub segments. One set of applications demand low power around 10W, compact footprint and are extremely sensitive to the laser price whilst still demanding 10ps or shorter laser pulses. A second set of applications are very power hungry and only become economically feasible for large scale deployments at power levels in the 100+W class. There is also a growing demand for applications requiring fs-laser pulses. In our presentation we would like to describe these sub segments by using selected applications from the automotive and electronics industry e.g. drilling of gas/diesel injection nozzles, dicing of LED substrates. We close the presentation with an outlook to micromachining applications e.g. glass cutting and foil processing with unique new CO lasers emitting 5μm laser wavelength.

  5. Micromachining using femtosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toenshoff, Hans K.; Ostendorf, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan; Korte, Frank; Bauer, Thorsten

    2000-11-01

    Femtosecond laser systems have been proved to be effective tools for high precision micro-machining. Almost all solid materials can be processed with high precision. The dependence on material properties like thermal conductivity, transparency, heat- or shock sensitivity is strongly reduced and no significant influence on the remaining bulk material is observed after ablation using femtosecond laser pulses. In contrast to conventional laser processing, where the achievable precision is reduced due to a formed liquid phase causing burr formation, the achievable precision using femtosecond pulses is only limited by the diffraction of the used optics. Potential applications of this technique, aincluding the structuring of biodegradable polymers for cardiovascular implants, so-called stents, as well as high precision machining of transparent materials are presented.

  6. Laser Trigger For High Speed Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Rong-Seng; Lin, Chin-Wu; Cheng, Tung

    1987-09-01

    High speed camera coorperated with laser trigger to catch high speed unpredictable events has many applications: such as scoring system for the end game of missile interception, war head explosive study etc. When the event happening in a very short duration, the repetition rate of the laser ranging must be as high as 5K herze and the pulse duration should be less than 10 nsec. In some environment, like inside the aircraft, the abailable space for high speed camera to set up is limited, large film capacity camera could not be used. In order to use the small capacity film, the exact trigger time for the camera are especially important. The target velocity, camera acceleration characteristics, speed regulation, camera size, weight and the ruggedness are all be considered before the laser trigger be designed. Electric temporal gate is used to measure the time of flight ranging datum. The triangular distance measurement principle are also used to get the ranging when the base line i.e. the distance between the laser transmitter and receiver are large enough.

  7. Fiber laser for high speed laser transfer printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkovšek, Rok; Novak, Vid; Agrež, Vid

    2017-01-01

    High speed industrial laser transfer printing requires high power lasers that can deliver pulses on demand and having arbitrary pulse duration in range of few nanoseconds to milliseconds or more. A special kind of MOPA fiber laser is presented using wavelength multiplexing to achieve pulses on demand with minimal transients. The system is further tested in printing application.

  8. High speed sampling circuit design for pulse laser ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Rui-hai; Gao, Xuan-yi; Zhang, Yan-mei; Li, Huan; Guo, Hai-chao; Guo, Xiao-kang; He, Shi-jie

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, with the rapid development of digital chip, high speed sampling rate analog to digital conversion chip can be used to sample narrow laser pulse echo. Moreover, high speed processor is widely applied to achieve digital laser echo signal processing algorithm. The development of digital chip greatly improved the laser ranging detection accuracy. High speed sampling and processing circuit used in the laser ranging detection system has gradually been a research hotspot. In this paper, a pulse laser echo data logging and digital signal processing circuit system is studied based on the high speed sampling. This circuit consists of two parts: the pulse laser echo data processing circuit and the data transmission circuit. The pulse laser echo data processing circuit includes a laser diode, a laser detector and a high sample rate data logging circuit. The data transmission circuit receives the processed data from the pulse laser echo data processing circuit. The sample data is transmitted to the computer through USB2.0 interface. Finally, a PC interface is designed using C# language, in which the sampling laser pulse echo signal is demonstrated and the processed laser pulse is plotted. Finally, the laser ranging experiment is carried out to test the pulse laser echo data logging and digital signal processing circuit system. The experiment result demonstrates that the laser ranging hardware system achieved high speed data logging, high speed processing and high speed sampling data transmission.

  9. Apparatus for precision micromachining with lasers

    DOEpatents

    Chang, J.J.; Dragon, E.P.; Warner, B.E.

    1998-04-28

    A new material processing apparatus using a short-pulsed, high-repetition-rate visible laser for precision micromachining utilizes a near diffraction limited laser, a high-speed precision two-axis tilt-mirror for steering the laser beam, an optical system for either focusing or imaging the laser beam on the part, and a part holder that may consist of a cover plate and a back plate. The system is generally useful for precision drilling, cutting, milling and polishing of metals and ceramics, and has broad application in manufacturing precision components. Precision machining has been demonstrated through percussion drilling and trepanning using this system. With a 30 W copper vapor laser running at multi-kHz pulse repetition frequency, straight parallel holes with size varying from 500 microns to less than 25 microns and with aspect ratios up to 1:40 have been consistently drilled with good surface finish on a variety of metals. Micromilling and microdrilling on ceramics using a 250 W copper vapor laser have also been demonstrated with good results. Materialographic sections of machined parts show little (submicron scale) recast layer and heat affected zone. 1 fig.

  10. Apparatus for precision micromachining with lasers

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Jim J.; Dragon, Ernest P.; Warner, Bruce E.

    1998-01-01

    A new material processing apparatus using a short-pulsed, high-repetition-rate visible laser for precision micromachining utilizes a near diffraction limited laser, a high-speed precision two-axis tilt-mirror for steering the laser beam, an optical system for either focusing or imaging the laser beam on the part, and a part holder that may consist of a cover plate and a back plate. The system is generally useful for precision drilling, cutting, milling and polishing of metals and ceramics, and has broad application in manufacturing precision components. Precision machining has been demonstrated through percussion drilling and trepanning using this system. With a 30 W copper vapor laser running at multi-kHz pulse repetition frequency, straight parallel holes with size varying from 500 microns to less than 25 microns and with aspect ratios up to 1:40 have been consistently drilled with good surface finish on a variety of metals. Micromilling and microdrilling on ceramics using a 250 W copper vapor laser have also been demonstrated with good results. Materialogroaphic sections of machined parts show little (submicron scale) recast layer and heat affected zone.

  11. Micromachining of Silicon Carbide using femtosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farsari, M.; Filippidis, G.; Zoppel, S.; Reider, G. A.; Fotakis, C.

    2007-04-01

    We have demonstrated micromachining of bulk 3C silicon carbide (3C- SiC) wafers by employing 1028nm wavelength femtosecond laser pulses of energy less than 10 nJ directly from a femtosecond laser oscillator, thus eliminating the need for an amplified system and increasing the micromachining speed by more than four orders of magnitude.

  12. High-speed vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, K.L.; Ochiai, M.; Hietala, V.M.

    1997-03-01

    High speed modulation and pulsing are reported for oxide-confined vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes (VCSELs) with inverted doping and proton implantation to reduce the extrinsic limitations.

  13. Method and apparatus for precision laser micromachining

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Jim; Warner, Bruce E.; Dragon, Ernest P.

    2000-05-02

    A method and apparatus for micromachining and microdrilling which results in a machined part of superior surface quality is provided. The system uses a near diffraction limited, high repetition rate, short pulse length, visible wavelength laser. The laser is combined with a high speed precision tilting mirror and suitable beam shaping optics, thus allowing a large amount of energy to be accurately positioned and scanned on the workpiece. As a result of this system, complicated, high resolution machining patterns can be achieved. A cover plate may be temporarily attached to the workpiece. Then as the workpiece material is vaporized during the machining process, the vapors condense on the cover plate rather than the surface of the workpiece. In order to eliminate cutting rate variations as the cutting direction is varied, a randomly polarized laser beam is utilized. A rotating half-wave plate is used to achieve the random polarization. In order to correctly locate the focus at the desired location within the workpiece, the position of the focus is first determined by monitoring the speckle size while varying the distance between the workpiece and the focussing optics. When the speckle size reaches a maximum, the focus is located at the first surface of the workpiece. After the location of the focus has been determined, it is repositioned to the desired location within the workpiece, thus optimizing the quality of the machined area.

  14. Review of laser micromachining in contract manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, Glenn; Gu, Bo

    1998-06-01

    This paper explores the wide range of laser micromachining applications used in contract manufacturing. Contract manufacturing is used in several key industries such as microelectronics packaging, semiconductor, data storage, medical devices, communications, peripherals, automobiles and aerospace. Material types includes plastics, metals, ceramics, inorganics and composites. However laser micromachining is just one available technology for micromachining and other methods will be reviewed. Contract manufacturing offers two important glimpses of the future. Firstly prototype work for new applications often beings in contract manufacturing. Secondly, contract manufacturing can be an economic springboard to allow laser systems to be installed in a production environment.

  15. Improved pulse laser ranging algorithm based on high speed sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xuan-yi; Qian, Rui-hai; Zhang, Yan-mei; Li, Huan; Guo, Hai-chao; He, Shi-jie; Guo, Xiao-kang

    2016-10-01

    Narrow pulse laser ranging achieves long-range target detection using laser pulse with low divergent beams. Pulse laser ranging is widely used in military, industrial, civil, engineering and transportation field. In this paper, an improved narrow pulse laser ranging algorithm is studied based on the high speed sampling. Firstly, theoretical simulation models have been built and analyzed including the laser emission and pulse laser ranging algorithm. An improved pulse ranging algorithm is developed. This new algorithm combines the matched filter algorithm and the constant fraction discrimination (CFD) algorithm. After the algorithm simulation, a laser ranging hardware system is set up to implement the improved algorithm. The laser ranging hardware system includes a laser diode, a laser detector and a high sample rate data logging circuit. Subsequently, using Verilog HDL language, the improved algorithm is implemented in the FPGA chip based on fusion of the matched filter algorithm and the CFD algorithm. Finally, the laser ranging experiment is carried out to test the improved algorithm ranging performance comparing to the matched filter algorithm and the CFD algorithm using the laser ranging hardware system. The test analysis result demonstrates that the laser ranging hardware system realized the high speed processing and high speed sampling data transmission. The algorithm analysis result presents that the improved algorithm achieves 0.3m distance ranging precision. The improved algorithm analysis result meets the expected effect, which is consistent with the theoretical simulation.

  16. Laser Micromachining Fabrication of THz Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DrouetdAubigny, C.; Walker, C.; Jones, B.; Groppi, C.; Papapolymerou, J.; Tavenier, C.

    2001-01-01

    Laser micromachining techniques can be used to fabricate high-quality waveguide structures and quasi-optical components to micrometer accuracies. Successful GHz designs can be directly scaled to THz frequencies. We expect this promising technology to allow the construction of the first fully integrated THz heterodyne imaging arrays. At the University of Arizona, construction of the first laser micromachining system designed for THz waveguide components fabrication has been completed. Once tested and characterized our system will be used to construct prototype THz lx4 focal plane mixer arrays, magic tees, AR coated silicon lenses, local oscillator source phase gratings, filters and more. Our system can micro-machine structures down to a few microns accuracy and up to 6 inches across in a short time. This paper discusses the design and performance of our micromachining system, and illustrates the type, range and performance of components this exciting new technology will make accessible to the THz community.

  17. Calibration of high-speed imaging by laser triangulation.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Hans; Hertegård, Stellan

    2004-01-01

    A method was developed for absolute calibration of endoscopic vocal fold images using laser triangulation. The laser is attached to a rigid endoscope with 8-degrees angle in relation to the optical axis of the endoscope. A special software is used for calibration and measurements from high-speed images. The equipment can provide measurements both in horizontal and vertical planes, and can be used for calibrated measurements of vocal fold length, amplitude of vocal fold vibrations and vertical movements.

  18. Picosecond Semiconductor Lasers For Characterizing High-Speed Image Shutters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, T. S.; Janson, F. J.; Yates, G. J.; Jaramillo, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    A portable system that utilizes solid state electronic timing circuits and a pulsed semiconductor laser for characterizing the optical gate sequence of high-speed image shutters, including microchannel-plate intensifier tubes (MCPTs), and silicon-intensified target vidicons (SITVs), is described and compared to earlier methods of characterization. Gate sequences obtained using the system and streak camera data of the semiconductor laser pulse are presented, with a brief discussion of the electronic delay timing and avalanche circuits used in the system.

  19. High-speed spectral tuning CARS microscopy using AOTF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Mamoru; Iwatsuka, Junichi; Niioka, Hirohiko; Araki, Tsutomu

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a high speed spectral tuning CARS microscopy system using a mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser with an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) in the cavity. Since the wavelength of the laser is tunable with the applied radio frequency to the AOTF, the wavelength is electrically tunable.The pulse duration of the laser is about 10 ps, tunable range is 800 nm to 930 nm, and the tuning speed is ms order. The laser is synchronized with another mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser laser our own method using a balance cross-correlator and phase lock loop technique. The synchronized lasers are used for light source of multi-focus CARS microscopy system using a microlens array scanner, and the hyperspectral imaging of adipocyte cells is demonstrated.

  20. A decoder architecture for high-speed frre space laser communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Michael; Nakashima, Michael; Hamkins, Jon; Moision, Bruce; Barsoum, Maged

    2005-01-01

    We present a decoding architecture for high-speed free-space laser communications. This system will be used by NASA's Mars Laser Communication Demonstration project, the first use of high-speed laser communication from deep space.

  1. Laser micromachining of goldblack coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelms, N.; Dowson, J.; Rizvi, N.; Rohr, T.

    2006-09-01

    Goldblack deposits have been used as high-absorption coatings for thermal infrared detectors for a number of years, principally on large single, or few pixel detectors. We present a new technique that allows the benefits of goldblack to be applied to the current generation of small pixel silicon micromachined thermal infrared detectors.

  2. Laser Micromachining of THz Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-29

    such an instrument [3] for use on the Large Binocular Telescope now being constructed on Mount Graham, Arizona. Before operation the cell is evacuated...micromachined, 2 THz array receiver being developed for SOFIA, the Stratospheric Observatory for Far Infrared •: Astronomy [3]. Test feedhorns for the array

  3. High-Speed Operation of Interband Cascade Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soibel, Alexander; Hill, Cory J.; Keo, Sam A.; Wright, Malcom W.; Farr, William H.; Yang, Rui Q.; Liu, H. C.

    2010-01-01

    Optical sources operating in the atmospheric window of 3-5 microns are of particular interest for the development of free-space optical communication link. It is more advantageous to operate the free-space optical communication link in 3-5-microns atmospheric transmission window than at the telecom wavelength of 1.5 m due to lower optical scattering, scintillation, and background radiation. However, the realization of optical communications at the longer wavelength has encountered significant difficulties due to lack of adequate optical sources and detectors operating in the desirable wavelength regions. Interband Cascade (IC) lasers are novel semiconductor lasers that have a great potential for the realization of high-power, room-temperature optical sources in the 3-5-microns wavelength region, yet no experimental work, until this one, was done on high-speed direct modulation of IC lasers. Here, highspeed interband cascade laser, operating at wavelength 3.0 m, has been developed and the first direct measurement of the laser modulation bandwidth has been performed using a unique, highspeed quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP). The developed laser has modulation bandwidth exceeding 3 GHz. This constitutes a significant increase of the IC laser modulation bandwidth over currently existing devices. This result has demonstrated suitability of IC lasers as a mid-IR light source for multi-GHz free-space optical communications links

  4. Application Of CO2 Lasers To High Speed Blanking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, L. E.

    1986-11-01

    While laser cutting of sheetmetal has attained wide acceptance in the automotive industry for the purposes of prototyping and very limited preproduction work, the production rates possible with currently available systems have precluded the use of this technique in a production environment. The device design to be described embodies a high speed X-Y positioner carrying a cutting head with limited Z-axis capability. This approach confers two main benefits, first, production rate is limited only by laser power, since the positioner technology selected will permit movement at rates up to 1.5 m/s (60 in/s), second, the use of a high speed non-contact surface follower to control the Z-axis movement reduces the need to clamp the workpiece rigidly to a precision reference surface. The realized reduction of the clamping requirement permits some latitude in the feed methods that can be employed, allowing the use of coil or sheet feeding as appropriate. The author will provide estimated production rates for the proposed design and demonstrate that a suitable choice of laser source and material feed will permit the production of parts at a rate and cost comparable to conventional blanking with the advantage of much greater flexibility and reduced retooling time.

  5. High-Speed Optical Diagnostics of Laser-Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin Suaidi, Mohamad Kadim

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The interaction of an 8 ns, 10 mJ and 1.06 μm infrared pulse of radiation from a Q-switched Nd-YAG laser with water near a solid boundary is studied using high speed photographic techniques. The laser-liquid interaction has been used to generate high frequency sound waves by the mechanism of dielectric breakdown of the liquid around the beam waist of the focused laser beam. This leads to the production of a short duration plasma which rapidly heats and vaporises the surrounding liquid giving rise to a vapour cavity and the formation of a cavitation bubble resulting in the emission of a spherical acoustic wave. The acoustic transient associated with the breakdown, in turn interacted with a liquid-polymer interface leading to the generation of acoustic waves at this boundary and the propagation of stress-waves in the solid. Diagnostics of the laser-interaction events are recorded using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer illuminated by a sub-nanosecond nitrogen laser-pumped dye laser and computer-controlled video-imaging and capture systems. Measurements of the transient pressure distributions from the digitally recorded interferograms are carried out using a process known as Abel inversion. Dynamic photoelastic studies of the stress-waves propagation in the solid are performed using a circular polariscope arrangement thus producing the photoelastic fringe patterns. Identification of the wave structures are greatly enhanced by also recording the events in schlieren and focused shadowgraphy as well as by the combination of the above techniques. The initial part of the project also involved the design and development of a nitrogen laser and tunable dye laser system. The short-duration and high peak power output pulse of the nitrogen laser is then used to pump the dye laser giving sufficiently high power output with good spectral linewidth to provide an ideal light source for high-speed photography of the laser

  6. Micro Mirrors for High-speed Laser Deflection and Patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, Harald; Grahmann, Jan; Sandner, Thilo; Wagner, Michael; Dauderstädt, Ulrike; Schmidt, Jan-Uwe

    This paper focuses on high-speed optical MEMS Scanners and Micro Mirror Arrays. Devices supporting spot/pixel rateshigher than 10 Mpixel/s are considered and discussed regarding limits and possibilities to further improve speed and optical properties. Several variants of both types, developed by our group, are presented. Scanning Micro Mirrors with frequencies up to 100 kHz enable spot rates of up to 130 Mpixels / s at 650 nm. Bragg-coatings enable high power applications up to 20 W (beam ø2 mm). Challenges like static and dynamic mirror planariy are discussed. A 29-kHz-scanner for laser projection serves as application example. Highly parallel operated Micro Mirror Arrays extend pattern speed to 10 Gpixel / s including analog grey scaling. Irradiation tests prove stable operation of the mirrors at DUV. Prospects regarding optical planarity and high reflective coatings are discussed. By means of two examples, laser patterning of semiconductor masks and laser patterning of Printed Circuit Boards, properties of the spatial light modulators are presented. The two device classes are compared regarding spot/pixel rate and frequency. The comparison includes representative MEMS device examples from literature.

  7. High Speed Laser with 100 Ghz Resonance Frequency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-28

    practical limit occurs when the detuned master laser encounters the next-order laser modes (i.e. Fabry - Perot modes). Our current DFB slave laser...lasers and vertical- cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), showing the broad applicability of the technique and that the coupling Q (optical quality...Q-factor, and also increases as the injection power and optical frequency increase. Additionally, we show that lasers with very different cavity

  8. Laser micromachining of semiconductors for photonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nantel, Marc; Yashkir, Yuri; Lee, Seong K.; Mugford, Chas; Hockley, Bernard S.

    2001-10-01

    For decades, precisely machining silicon has been critical for the success of the semiconductor industry. This has traditionally been done through wet chemical etching, but in the pursuit of integrating photonics devices on a single chip, other techniques are worth exploring. This quest opens up interest in finding a non-wet, non-contact, arbitrary-shape milling technique for silicon. In this paper, we present our latest work in the laser micromachining of silicon. A kilohertz-repetition-rate diode-pumped Nd:YLF laser (in infrared, green or ultraviolet modes) is focused on the surface of silicon wafers in a chlorine atmosphere for an enhanced magnitude and control of the etching rate. In the chlorine atmosphere, much less debris is deposited on the surface around the cut, sub-damage threshold machining is achieved for a better control of the etching depth, and etching rates ranging from 20-300,000 micron-cube/s have been measured. In particular, the use of an infrared laser beam is singled out, along with the advantages that it holds. Results of simulations highlight the particular characteristics of the various wavelength chosen for the machining.

  9. Laser balancing demonstration on a high-speed flexible rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuth, R. S.; Rio, R. A.; Fleming, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes a flexible rotor system used for two-plane laser balancing and an experimental demonstration of the laser material removal method for balancing. A laboratory test rotor was modified to accept balancing corrections using a laser metal removal method while the rotor is at operating speed. The laser setup hardware required to balance the rotor using two correction planes is described. The test rig optical configuration and a neodymium glass laser were assembled and calibrated for material removal rates. Rotor amplitudes before and after balancing, trial and correction weights, rotor speed during operation of laser, and balancing time were documented. The rotor was balanced through the first bending critical speed using the laser material removal procedure to apply trial weights and correction weights without stopping the rotor.

  10. High-speed microvia formation with UV solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunsky, Corey M.; Matsumoto, Hisashi; Simenson, Glenn

    2002-02-01

    Laser drilling has emerged in the last five years as the most widely accepted method of creating microvias in high- density electronic inter connect and chip packaging devices. Most commercially available laser drilling tools are currently based on one of two laser types: far-IR CO2 lasers and UV solid state lasers at 355 nm. While CO2 lasers are recognized for their high average power and drilling throughput, UV lasers are known for high precision material removal and their ability to drill the smallest vias, with diameters down to about 25-30 micrometers now achievable in production. This paper presents a historical overview of techniques for drilling microvias with UV solid state lasers. Blind and through via formation by percussion drilling, trepanning, spiralling, and image projection with a shaped beam are discussed. Advantages and range of applicability of each technique are summarized. Drivers of throughput scaling over the last five years are outlined and representative current-generation performance is presented.

  11. Study of high speed combustion flows by laser velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of laser velocimetry in a high temperature jet was assessed in a model of an aircraft engine combustor. Experiments show that the problems encountered in measuring combustion flow can flow can be overcome by a carefully designed optical set-up and an appropriate signal processing and data acquisition system. Laser Doppler velocimetry provides useful information about coherent structures in hot free jets. The measurements agree with measurements in an isothermal jet.

  12. Laser micromachining of thin films for optoelectronic devices and packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, David F.; Williams, John A.; Hopcroft, Matthew A.; Boyle, Billy; He, Johnny H.; Syms, Richard R. A.

    2003-04-01

    Focused laser micromachining in an optical microscope system is used to prototype packages for optoelectronic devices and to investigate new materials with potential applications in packaging. Micromachined thin fims are proposed as mechanical components to locate fibers and other optical and electrical components on opto-assemblies. This paper reports prototype structures which are micromachined in silicon carbide to produce beams 5 μm thick by (1) laser cutting a track in a SiC coated Si wafer, (2) undercutting by anisotropic silicon etching using KOH in water, and (3) trimming if necessary with the laser system. This approach has the advantage of fast turn around and proof of concept. Mechanical test data are obtained from the prototype SiC beam package structures by testing with a stylus profilometer. The Youngs modulus obtained for chemical vapor deposited silicon carbide is 360 +/- 50 GPa indicating that it is a promising material for packaging applications.

  13. Laser synchronized high-speed shutter for spectroscopic application

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Paul C.; Porter, Eldon L.; Prast, Thomas L.; Sunnarborg, Duane A.

    2002-01-01

    A fast mechanical shutter, based on rotating chopper wheels, has been designed and implemented to shutter the entrance slit of a spectrograph. This device enables an exposure time of 9 .mu.s to be achieved for a 0.8 mm wide spectrograph entrance slit, achieves 100% transmission in the open state, and an essentially infinite extinction ratio. The device further incorporates chopper wheel position sensing electronics to permit the synchronous triggering of a laser source.

  14. Deep ultraviolet laser micromachining of novel fibre optic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Dou, J.; Herman, P. R.; Fricke-Begemann, T.; Ihlemann, J.; Marowsky, G.

    2007-04-01

    A deep ultraviolet F2 laser, with output at 157-nm wavelength, has been adopted for micro-shaping the end facets of single and multi-mode silica optical fibres. The high energy 7.9-eV photons drive strong interactions in the wide-bandgap silica fibres to enable the fabrication of surface-relief microstructures with high spatial resolution and smooth surface morphology. Diffraction gratings, focusing lenses, and Mach-Zehnder interferometric structures have been micromachined onto the cleaved-fibre facets and optically characterized. F2-laser micromachining is shown to be a rapid and facile means for direct-writing of novel infibre photonic components.

  15. A summary of laser and microwave flow control in high-speed flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, D.

    2013-06-01

    Laser and microwave discharge in air has emerged as an effective method for flow control in high-speed flows. Computational and experimental research has demonstrated its capability for significant drag reduction and mitigation of adverse interactions in high-speed flows. The paper presents a summary of key computational and experimental studies performed at Rutgers University in collaboration with the Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Moscow, Russia) and St. Petersburg State University (St. Petersburg, Russia).

  16. High-speed laser communications in UAV scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griethe, Wolfgang; Gregory, Mark; Heine, Frank; Kämpfner, Hartmut

    2011-05-01

    Optical links, based on coherent homodyne detection and BPSK modulation with bidirectional data transmission of 5.6 Gbps over distances of about 5,000 km and BER of 10-8, have been sufficiently verified in space. The verification results show that this technology is suitable not only for space applications but also for applications in the troposphere. After a brief description of the Laser Communication Terminal (LCT) for space applications, the paper consequently discusses the future utilization of satellite-based optical data links for Beyond Line of Sight (BLOS) operations of High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV). It is shown that the use of optical frequencies is the only logical consequence of an ever-increasing demand for bandwidth. In terms of Network Centric Warfare it is highly recommended that Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) of the future should incorporate that technology which allows almost unlimited bandwidth. The advantages of optical communications especially for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) are underlined. Moreover, the preliminary design concept of an airborne laser communication terminal is described. Since optical bi-directional links have been tested between a LCT in space and a TESAT Optical Ground Station (OGS), preliminary analysis on tracking and BER performance and the impact of atmospheric disturbances on coherent links will be presented.

  17. Application of laser velocimetry to unsteady flows in large scale high speed tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, F. K.

    1983-01-01

    Flowfield measurements obtained in several large scale, high speed facilities are presented. Sampling bias and seeding problems are addressed and solutions are outlined. The laser velocimeter systems and data reduction procedures which were used in the experiments are also described. The work demonstrated the potential of the laser velocimeter for applications in other than closely controlled, smallscale laboratory situations.

  18. A general high-speed laser drilling method for nonmetal thin material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhijian; Xu, Guangsheng; Xu, Zhou; Xu, Zhiqiang

    2013-05-01

    Many nonmetal film products, such as herbal plaster, medical adhesive tape and farm plastic film, require drilling dense small holes to enhance the permeability without affecting the appearance. For many medium and small enterprises, a low-cost, high-speed laser drilling machine with the ability of processing different kinds of nonmetal material is highly demanded. In this paper, we proposed a general purpose high-speed laser drilling method for micro-hole production on thin nonmetal film. The system utilizes a rotating polygonal mirror to perform high-speed laser scan, which is simpler and more efficient than the oscillating mirror scan. In this system, an array of closepacked paraboloid mirrors is mounted on the laser scan track to focus the high-power laser onto the material sheet, which could produce up to twenty holes in a single scan. The design of laser scan and focusing optics is optimized to obtain the best holes' quality, and the mirrors can be flexibly adjusted to get different drilling parameters. The use of rotating polygonal mirror scan and close-packed mirror array focusing greatly improves the drilling productivity to enable the machine producing thirty thousand holes per minute. With proper design, the hold uniformity can also get improved. In this paper, the detailed optical and mechanical design is illustrated, the high-speed laser drilling principle is introduced and the preliminary experimental results are presented.

  19. Mid-ultraviolet pulsed laser micromachining of SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Litao; Li, Mingxing; Lin, Haipeng; Hu, Jinping; Tang, Qingju; Liu, Chunsheng

    2014-11-01

    This paper provides an investigation of the ablation behavior of single crystal 4H-SiC and 6H-SiC wafer to improve the manufacturability and high-temperature performance of SiC using laser applications. 266nm pulsed laser micromachining of SiC was investigated. The purpose is to establish suitable laser parametric regime for the fabrication of high accuracy, high spatial resolution and thin diaphragms for high-temperature MEMS pressure sensor applications. Etch rate, ablation threshold and quality of micromachined features were evaluated. The governing ablation mechanisms, such as thermal vaporization, phase explosion, and photomechanical fragmentation, were correlated with the effects of pulse energy. The ablation threshold is obtained with ultraviolet pulsed laser ablation. The results suggested ultraviolet pulsed laser's potential for rapid manufacturing. Excellent quality of machined features with little collateral thermal damage was obtained in the lower pulse energy range. The leading material removal mechanisms under these conditions were discussed.

  20. CIGS thin-film solar module processing: case of high-speed laser scribing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gečys, Paulius; Markauskas, Edgaras; Nishiwaki, Shiro; Buecheler, Stephan; de Loor, Ronny; Burn, Andreas; Romano, Valerio; Račiukaitis, Gediminas

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the laser processing of the CIGS thin-film solar cells in the case of the high-speed regime. The modern ultra-short pulsed laser was used exhibiting the pulse repetition rate of 1 MHz. Two main P3 scribing approaches were investigated – ablation of the full layer stack to expose the molybdenum back-contact, and removal of the front-contact only. The scribe quality was evaluated by SEM together with EDS spectrometer followed by electrical measurements. We also modelled the electrical behavior of a device at the mini-module scale taking into account the laser-induced damage. We demonstrated, that high-speed process at high laser pulse repetition rate induced thermal damage to the cell. However, the top-contact layer lift-off processing enabled us to reach 1.7 m/s scribing speed with a minimal device degradation. Also, we demonstrated the P3 processing in the ultra-high speed regime, where the scribing speed of 50 m/s was obtained. Finally, selected laser processes were tested in the case of mini-module scribing. Overall, we conclude, that the top-contact layer lift-off processing is the only reliable solution for high-speed P3 laser scribing, which can be implemented in the future terawatt-scale photovoltaic production facilities.

  1. CIGS thin-film solar module processing: case of high-speed laser scribing.

    PubMed

    Gečys, Paulius; Markauskas, Edgaras; Nishiwaki, Shiro; Buecheler, Stephan; De Loor, Ronny; Burn, Andreas; Romano, Valerio; Račiukaitis, Gediminas

    2017-01-13

    In this paper, we investigate the laser processing of the CIGS thin-film solar cells in the case of the high-speed regime. The modern ultra-short pulsed laser was used exhibiting the pulse repetition rate of 1 MHz. Two main P3 scribing approaches were investigated - ablation of the full layer stack to expose the molybdenum back-contact, and removal of the front-contact only. The scribe quality was evaluated by SEM together with EDS spectrometer followed by electrical measurements. We also modelled the electrical behavior of a device at the mini-module scale taking into account the laser-induced damage. We demonstrated, that high-speed process at high laser pulse repetition rate induced thermal damage to the cell. However, the top-contact layer lift-off processing enabled us to reach 1.7 m/s scribing speed with a minimal device degradation. Also, we demonstrated the P3 processing in the ultra-high speed regime, where the scribing speed of 50 m/s was obtained. Finally, selected laser processes were tested in the case of mini-module scribing. Overall, we conclude, that the top-contact layer lift-off processing is the only reliable solution for high-speed P3 laser scribing, which can be implemented in the future terawatt-scale photovoltaic production facilities.

  2. CIGS thin-film solar module processing: case of high-speed laser scribing

    PubMed Central

    Gečys, Paulius; Markauskas, Edgaras; Nishiwaki, Shiro; Buecheler, Stephan; De Loor, Ronny; Burn, Andreas; Romano, Valerio; Račiukaitis, Gediminas

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the laser processing of the CIGS thin-film solar cells in the case of the high-speed regime. The modern ultra-short pulsed laser was used exhibiting the pulse repetition rate of 1 MHz. Two main P3 scribing approaches were investigated – ablation of the full layer stack to expose the molybdenum back-contact, and removal of the front-contact only. The scribe quality was evaluated by SEM together with EDS spectrometer followed by electrical measurements. We also modelled the electrical behavior of a device at the mini-module scale taking into account the laser-induced damage. We demonstrated, that high-speed process at high laser pulse repetition rate induced thermal damage to the cell. However, the top-contact layer lift-off processing enabled us to reach 1.7 m/s scribing speed with a minimal device degradation. Also, we demonstrated the P3 processing in the ultra-high speed regime, where the scribing speed of 50 m/s was obtained. Finally, selected laser processes were tested in the case of mini-module scribing. Overall, we conclude, that the top-contact layer lift-off processing is the only reliable solution for high-speed P3 laser scribing, which can be implemented in the future terawatt-scale photovoltaic production facilities. PMID:28084403

  3. Real-Time Control of Ultrafast Laser Micromachining by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Tao; Li, Jinggao; Longtin, Jon P.

    2004-03-01

    Ultrafast laser micromachining provides many advantages for precision micromachining. One challenging problem, however, particularly for multilayer and heterogeneous materials, is how to prevent a given material from being ablated, as ultrafast laser micromachining is generally material insensitive. We present a real-time feedback control system for an ultrafast laser micromachining system based on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The characteristics of ultrafast LIBS are reviewed and discussed so as to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. Comparison methods to identify the material emission patterns are developed, and several of the resulting algorithms were implemented into a real-time computer control system. LIBS-controlled micromachining is demonstrated for the fabrication of microheater structures on thermal sprayed materials. Compared with a strictly passive machining process without any such feedback control, the LIBS-based system provides several advantages including less damage to the substrate layer, reduced machining time, and more-uniform machining features.

  4. Parametric studies on the nanosecond laser micromachining of the materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tański, M.; Mizeraczyk, J.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper the results of an experimental studies on nanosecond laser micromachining of selected materials are presented. Tested materials were thin plates made of aluminium, silicon, stainless steel (AISI 304) and copper. Micromachining of those materials was carried out using a solid state laser with second harmonic generation λ = 532 nm and a pulse width of τ = 45 ns. The effect of laser drilling using single laser pulse and a burst of laser pulses, as well as laser cutting was studied. The influence of laser fluence on the diameter and morphology of a post ablation holes drilled with a single laser pulse was investigated. The ablation fluence threshold (Fth) of tested materials was experimentally determined. Also the drilling rate (average depth per single laser pulse) of holes drilled with a burst of laser pulses was determined for all tested materials. The studies of laser cutting process revealed that a groove depth increases with increasing average laser power and decreasing cutting speed. It was also found that depth of the laser cut grooves is a linear function of number of repetition of a cut. The quantitative influence of those parameters on the groove depth was investigated.

  5. High-speed off-axis holographic cinematography with a copper-vapor-pumped dye laser.

    PubMed

    Lauterborn, W; Judt, A; Schmitz, E

    1993-01-01

    A series of coherent light pulses is generated by pumping a dye laser with the pulsed output of a copper-vapor laser at rates of as much as 20 kHz. Holograms are recorded at this pulse rate on a rotating holographic plate. This technique of high-speed holographic cinematography is demonstrated by viewing the bubble filaments that appear in water under the action of a sound field of high intensity.

  6. Development and Fielding of High-Speed Laser Shadowgraphy for Electro-Magnetically Driven Cylindrical Implosions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    shockwave in a cylindrical geometry provides fundamental benchmarks used in the modeling of 1-D and 2-D hydrodynamic phenomena from high or solid...DEVELOPMENT AND FIELDING OF HIGH-SPEED LASER SHADOWGRAPHY FOR ELECTRO -MAGNETICALLY DRIVEN CYLINDRICAL IMPLOSIONS J. P. Roberts, G. Rodriguez...an electro -magnetically driven solid density liner implosion in Lucite is described. The laser shadowgraphy system utilizes an advanced high-energy

  7. Small high-speed dynamic target at close range laser active imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jun; Wang, Du-yue; Zhang, Zheng; Zhang, Yue; Dai, Qin

    2016-11-01

    In the shooting range measuring, all-weather, high speed, unattended, the new concepts such as the remote control is gradually applied. In this paper, a new type of low cost range measurement system, using FPGA + MCU as electronic control system of laser active illumination and high-speed CMOS camera, data to the rear zone by using optical fiber communications, transmission and realizes the remote control of unmanned, due to the low cost of front-end equipment, can be used as consumables replacement at any time, combined with distributed layout principle, can maximum limit close to the measured with mutilate ability goal, thus to achieve the goal of small high-speed dynamic imaging from close range.

  8. Influences of carrier diffusion and radial mode field pattern on high speed characteristics for microring lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Xiao-Meng; Huang, Yong-Zhen Yang, Yue-De; Zou, Ling-Xiu; Long, Heng; Liu, Bo-Wen; Xiao, Jin-Long; Du, Yun

    2014-04-21

    High-speed directly modulated microlasers are potential light sources for on-chip optical interconnection and photonic integrated circuits. In this Letter, dynamic characteristics are studied for microring lasers by rate equation analysis considering radial carrier hole burning and diffusion and experimentally. The coupled modes with a wide radial field pattern and the injection current focused in the edge area of microring resonator can greatly improve the high speed response curve due to the less carrier hole burning. The small-signal response curves of a microring laser connected with an output waveguide exhibit a larger 3 dB bandwidth and smaller roll-off at low frequency than that of the microdisk laser with the same radius of 15 μm, which accords with the simulation results.

  9. Laser Micromachining and Information Discovery Using a Dual Beam Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Theppakuttaikomaraswamy, Senthil P.

    2001-01-01

    Lasers have proven to be among the most promising tools for micromachining because they can process features down to the size of the laser wavelength (smaller than 1 micrometer) and they provide a non-contact technology for machining. The demand for incorporating in-situ diagnostics technology into the micromachining environment is driven by the increasing need for producing micro-parts of high quality and accuracy. Laser interferometry can be used as an on-line monitoring tool and it is the aim of this work to enhance the understanding and application of Michelson interferometry principle for the in-situ diagnostics of the machining depth on the sub-micron and micron scales. micromachining is done on two different materials and a comprehensive investigation is done to control the width and depth of the machined feature. To control the width of the feature, laser micromachining is done on copper and a detailed analysis is performed. The objective of this experiment is to make a precision mask for sputtering with an array of holes on it using an Nd:YAG laser of 532 nm wavelength. The diameter of the hole is 50 μm and the spacing between holes (the distance between the centers) is 100 μm. Michelson interferometer is integrated with a laser machining system to control the depth of machining. An excimer laser of 308 nm wavelength is used for micromachining. A He-Ne laser of 632.8 nm wavelength is used as the light source for the interferometer. Interference patterns are created due to the change in the path length between the two interferometer arms. The machined depth information is obtained from the interference patterns on an oscilloscope detected by a photodiode. To compare the predicted depth by the interferometer with the true machining depth, a surface profilometer is used to measure the actual machining depth on the silicon. It is observed that the depths of machining obtained by the surface profile measurement are in accordance with the interferometer

  10. Laser beam hardening of cast carbon steels, plain cast irons, and high-speed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bylica, Andrzej; Adamiak, Stanislaw; Bochnowski, Wojciech; Dziedzic, Andrzej

    2000-11-01

    The examinations of the structure, hardness and abrasion resistance of surface layer of Fe-C alloys having the contents of carbon up to 4% and high-speed steel: 6-5-2, 4- 4-2-5+C after laser hardening are presented in the paper. They are compared with the properties obtained after conventional hardening. Laser of impulse operation - YAG:Nd and of continuous operation - CO2 were used. Analysis of structure was carried out based on metallographic and fractographic examinations as well as on X-ray properties, parameters of laser and conventional heat treatment of steels were defined.

  11. Vascular tissue engineering by computer-aided laser micromachining.

    PubMed

    Doraiswamy, Anand; Narayan, Roger J

    2010-04-28

    Many conventional technologies for fabricating tissue engineering scaffolds are not suitable for fabricating scaffolds with patient-specific attributes. For example, many conventional technologies for fabricating tissue engineering scaffolds do not provide control over overall scaffold geometry or over cell position within the scaffold. In this study, the use of computer-aided laser micromachining to create scaffolds for vascular tissue networks was investigated. Computer-aided laser micromachining was used to construct patterned surfaces in agarose or in silicon, which were used for differential adherence and growth of cells into vascular tissue networks. Concentric three-ring structures were fabricated on agarose hydrogel substrates, in which the inner ring contained human aortic endothelial cells, the middle ring contained HA587 human elastin and the outer ring contained human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. Basement membrane matrix containing vascular endothelial growth factor and heparin was to promote proliferation of human aortic endothelial cells within the vascular tissue networks. Computer-aided laser micromachining provides a unique approach to fabricate small-diameter blood vessels for bypass surgery as well as other artificial tissues with complex geometries.

  12. Study of cavitation bubble dynamics during Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy by high-speed camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian J.; Xuan, Jason R.; Yu, Honggang; Devincentis, Dennis

    2016-02-01

    Although laser lithotripsy is now the preferred treatment option for urolithiasis, the mechanism of laser pulse induced calculus damage is still not fully understood. This is because the process of laser pulse induced calculus damage involves quite a few physical and chemical processes and their time-scales are very short (down to sub micro second level). For laser lithotripsy, the laser pulse induced impact by energy flow can be summarized as: Photon energy in the laser pulse --> photon absorption generated heat in the water liquid and vapor (super heat water or plasma effect) --> shock wave (Bow shock, acoustic wave) --> cavitation bubble dynamics (oscillation, and center of bubble movement , super heat water at collapse, sonoluminscence) --> calculus damage and motion (calculus heat up, spallation/melt of stone, breaking of mechanical/chemical bond, debris ejection, and retropulsion of remaining calculus body). Cavitation bubble dynamics is the center piece of the physical processes that links the whole energy flow chain from laser pulse to calculus damage. In this study, cavitation bubble dynamics was investigated by a high-speed camera and a needle hydrophone. A commercialized, pulsed Ho:YAG laser at 2.1 mu;m, StoneLightTM 30, with pulse energy from 0.5J up to 3.0 J, and pulse width from 150 mu;s up to 800 μs, was used as laser pulse source. The fiber used in the investigation is SureFlexTM fiber, Model S-LLF365, a 365 um core diameter fiber. A high-speed camera with frame rate up to 1 million fps was used in this study. The results revealed the cavitation bubble dynamics (oscillation and center of bubble movement) by laser pulse at different energy level and pulse width. More detailed investigation on bubble dynamics by different type of laser, the relationship between cavitation bubble dynamics and calculus damage (fragmentation/dusting) will be conducted as a future study.

  13. High power CO2 laser development with AOM integration for ultra high-speed pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohrer, Markus; Vaupel, Matthias; Nirnberger, Robert; Weinberger, Bernhard; Jamalieh, Murad

    2017-01-01

    There is a 500 billion USD world market for packaging expected to grow to a trillion in 2030. Austria plays an important role world wide for high speed laser engraving applications — especially when it comes to high end solutions. Such high end solutions are fundamental for the production of print forms for the packaging and decorating industry (e. g. cans). They are additionally used for security applications (e. g. for printing banknotes), for the textile printing industry and for creating embossing forms (e. g. for the production of dashboards in the automotive industry). High speed, high precision laser engraving needs laser resonators with very stable laser beams (400 - 800W) especially in combination with AOMs. Based upon a unique carbon fiber structure - stable within the sub-micrometer range - a new resonator has been developed, accompanied by most recent thermo-mechanical FEM calculations. The resulting beam is evaluated on an automated optical bench using hexapods, allowing to optimize the complete beam path with collimators and AOM. The major steps related to laser engraving of dry offset printing plates during the full workflow from the artists design to the printed result on an aluminum can is presented in this paper as well as laser characteristics, AOM integration and correlative CLSM and SEM investigation of the results.

  14. Hydrodynamic Instability in High-speed Direct Laser Deposition for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turichin, Gleb; Zemlyakov, Evgeny; Klimova, Olga; Babkin, Konstantin

    High speed direct laser deposition, when product forms from metal powder, transferred by gas-powder jet, supplied coaxially or non-coaxially to focused laser beam, in one of most prospective additive technologies for production parts for aircraft engines. The limit of process productivity is connected with development of hydrodynamic instability of the melt pool in conditions of high power laser action and material supply by gas-powder jet. Theoretical analysis and experiments allowed clarified a physical nature of instability appearance, determine a stability conditions and invent a methods which allow avoid instability in deposition process. Nozzles for direct laser deposition, designed with consideration of stability conditions, allow get a level of process productivity more then 2 kg/h. The developed technology of deposition and technological equipment, based on high power fiber laser, has been used for manufacturing of parts for "high temperature" unit of aircraft engine.

  15. Precision Control Module For UV Laser 3D Micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wen-Hong; Hung, Min-Wei; Chang, Chun-Li

    2011-01-01

    UV laser has been widely used in various micromachining such as micro-scribing or patterning processing. At present, most of the semiconductors, LEDs, photovoltaic solar panels and touch panels industries need the UV laser processing system. However, most of the UV laser processing applications in the industries utilize two dimensional (2D) plane processing. And there are tremendous business opportunities that can be developed, such as three dimensional (3D) structures of micro-electromechanical (MEMS) sensor or the precision depth control of indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films edge insulation in touch panels. This research aims to develop a UV laser 3D micromachining module that can create the novel applications for industries. By special designed beam expender in optical system, the focal point of UV laser can be adjusted quickly and accurately through the optical path control lens of laser beam expender optical system. Furthermore, the integrated software for galvanometric scanner and focal point adjustment mechanism is developed as well, so as to carry out the precise 3D microstructure machining.

  16. Laser Beam MicroMachining (LBMM) - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Sanjay; Yadava, Vinod

    2015-10-01

    The use of short and ultrashort laser pulses for micromachining application is an emerging technology. Laser Beam MicroMachining (LBMM) has revolutionized many industries by providing innovative solutions in numerous industrial micro-engineering applications. High-intensity short or ultrashort laser pulses are powerful thermal energy source for creating micro-features in wide range of materials. These lasers can precisely ablate various types of materials with little or no collateral damage. An overview of LBMM is given so that we can obtain a current view of capabilities and tradeoffs associated with LBMM of sub-micron size. The fundamental understanding of ultrafast laser ablation process has been elucidated and the various research activities performed with nanosecond, picosecond and femtosecond, lasers have been discussed to understand the physical mechanisms and the critical experimental parameters involved in the LBMM. The critical analysis of various theoretical and experimental models used to describe the performance analysis of LBMM has been elaborated so that we can identify the relevant principles underlying the process.

  17. Micromachining of polydimethylsiloxane induced by laser plasma EUV light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, S.; Makimura, T.; Okazaki, K.; Nakamura, D.; Takahashi, A.; Okada, T.; Niino, H.; Murakami, K.

    2011-06-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is fundamental materials in the field of biotechnology. Because of its biocompatibility, microfabricated PDMS sheets are applied to micro-reactors and microchips for cell culture. Conventionally, the microstructures were fabricated by means of cast or imprint using molds, however it is difficult to fabricate the structures at high aspect ratios such as through-holes/vertical channels. The fabrication of the high-aspect structures would enable us to stack sheets to realize 3D fluidic circuits. In order to achieve the micromachining, direct photo-ablation by short wavelength light is promising. In the previous works, we investigated ablation of transparent materials such as silica glass and poly(methyl methacrylate) induced by irradiation with laser plasma EUV light. We achieved smooth and fine nanomachining. In this work, we applied our technique to PDMS micromachining. We condensed the EUV light onto PDMS surfaces at high power density up to 108 W/cm2 using a Au coated ellipsoidal mirror. We found that PDMS sheet was ablated at a rate up to 440 nm/shot. It should be emphasized that through hole with a diameter of 1 μm was fabricated in a PDMS sheet with a thickness of 4 μm. Thus we demonstrated the micromachining of PDMS sheets using laser plasma EUV light.

  18. Vertical cavity surface-emitting laser scanning cytometer for high speed analysis of cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gourley, P.L.; McDonald, A.E.; Gourley, M.F.

    1995-12-31

    We have constructed a new semiconductor laser device that may be useful in high speed characterization of cell morphology for diagnosis of disease. This laser device has critical advantages over conventional cell fluorescence detection methods since it provides intense, monochromatic, low-divergence fight signals that are emitted from lasing modes confined by a cell. Further, the device integrates biological structures with semiconductor materials at the wafer level to reduce device size and simplify cell preparation. In this paper we discuss operational characteristics of the prototype cytometer and present preliminary data for blood cells and dielectric spheres.

  19. New high-speed photography technique for observation of fluid flow in laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, Ingemar; Gren, Per; Powell, John; Kaplan, Alexander F. H.

    2010-10-01

    Recent developments in digital high-speed photography allow us to directly observe the surface topology and flow conditions of the melt surface inside a laser evaporated capillary. Such capillaries (known as keyholes) are a central feature of deep penetration laser welding. For the first time, it can be confirmed that the liquid capillary surface has a rippled, complex topology, indicative of subsurface turbulent flow. Manipulation of the raw data also provides quantitative measurements of the vertical fluid flow from the top to the bottom of the keyhole.

  20. Laser micromachining of chemically altered polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.

    1998-08-01

    During the last decade laser processing of polymers has become an important field of applied and fundamental research. One of the most promising proposals, to use laser ablation as dry etching technique in photolithography, has not yet become an industrial application. Many disadvantages of laser ablation, compared to conventional photolithography, are the result of the use of standard polymers. These polymers are designed for totally different applications, but are compared to the highly specialized photoresist. A new approach to laser polymer ablation will be described; the development of polymers, specially designed for high resolution laser ablation. These polymers have photolabile groups in the polymer backbone, which decompose upon laser irradiation or standard polymers are modified for ablation at a specific irradiation wavelength. The absorption maximum can be tailored for specific laser emissino lines, e.g. 351, 308 and 248 nm lines of excimer lasers. The authors show that with this approach many problems associated with the application of laser ablation for photolithography can be solved. The mechanism of ablation for these photopolymers is photochemical, whereas for most of the standard polymers this mechanism is photothermal. The photochemical decomposition mechanism results in high resolution ablation with no thermal damage at the edges of the etched structures. In addition there are no redeposited ablation products or surface modifications of the polymer after ablation.

  1. Applications of laser lithography on oxide film to titanium micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvy, P.-F.; Hoffmann, P.; Landolt, D.

    2003-03-01

    Due to its good biocompatibility titanium is widely used for dental and orthopaedics implants and for biomedical microsystems. For these applications one needs specific micromachining methods. A new four-step method for electrochemical micromachining of titanium is presented here, which implies anodic oxidation, Excimer laser sensitising irradiation, anodic dissolution, and ultrasonic cleaning. The method is applied to the fabrication of two 3D model structures, surface structuring of a cylinder and machining of a complex two-level architecture. The absence of debris and of a heat affected zone as well as the resulting surface smoothness are the main advantages of the process. Ways to improve the still limited processing speed are discussed with regards to potential applications.

  2. Primary research on image of plasma in CO II laser welding with high-speed photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinhe; Ma, Licai; Xie, Yaozheng; Zhang, Yong

    2006-02-01

    In this paper the image by high-speed photography of plasma in CO II laser welding is studied including the area of these images, the change rate of these images, the isogray line of the image and the maximal variation of the image gray. The used laser is RS850 made in German and the high-speed photography is NAC-10 made in Japan. The weld material is low carbon steel. The welding parameters include laser power 4KW, welding speed 1.2m/min, shielding gas Helium, Helium flow rate 11L/min. The parameters for high-speed photography are as exposure time 1/5000 of second, shoot frequency 1000 frame/s. According to the analyses the main conclusion as follows: In the experiment, the values of gray of these images cover from 40 to 255. The area of the plasma is oscillation and the average frequency of the oscillation is about 300Hz. The laser welding plasma can be divided to three parts: periphery, smoothness and core from the external to inner. The isogray line of the periphery is very irregular because of shocking of the shielding gas and the metal spatter. In the core region, the thermal motion of the electrons is violent, so there is lots of little division with complex shape. The gap of isogrey line in the periphery region and core region are larger than it in the smoothing region. The isogrey lines of the image in the melting pool link with the isogray line of the image of the laser welding plasma, so it can be used to checking the temperature field each other. There exits an isothermal kernel in the core region.

  3. A High Speed Calibration Method for Laser Positioner by Constant Velocity Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Hiroyuki

    This paper describes a high speed calibration method for laser positioner by scanning work area under constant velocity. Laser positioner consists of sinusoidal laser encoder, DC motor and the controller. The encoder has diffraction grating scale and laser optics. It generates sine and cosine outputs according to the travel distance. Qualities of the scale and the optics contribute to the fluctuation of output signal amplitude, DC offset and relative phase. First, the controller collects the output data under constant velocity of 4 samples per 1 sine wave length. The parameter can be estimated by simplified discrete Fourier transform method. Calibration data are collected every quarter sine wave length over all positioner work area. The result is stored in the table then referred by the controller in real time operation. Experiment results are also reported for HDD servo track writer application.

  4. High-speed quantitative phase imaging of dynamic thermal deformation in laser irradiated films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Lucas N.; Brown, Andrew K.; Olson, Kyle D.; Talghader, Joseph J.

    2015-11-01

    We present a technique for high-speed imaging of the dynamic thermal deformation of transparent substrates under high-power laser irradiation. Traditional thermal sensor arrays are not fast enough to capture thermal decay events. Our system adapts a Mach-Zender interferometer, along with a high-speed camera to capture phase images on sub-millisecond time-scales. These phase images are related to temperature by thermal expansion effects and by the change of refractive index with temperature. High power continuous-wave and long-pulse laser damage often hinges on thermal phenomena rather than the field-induced effects of ultra-short pulse lasers. Our system was able to measure such phenomena. We were able to record 2D videos of 1 ms thermal deformation waves, with 6 frames per wave, from a 100 ns, 10 mJ Q-switched Nd:YAG laser incident on a yttria-coated glass slide. We recorded thermal deformation waves with peak temperatures on the order of 100 degrees Celsius during non-destructive testing.

  5. Combustion Effects in Laser-oxygen Cutting: Basic Assumptions, Numerical Simulation and High Speed Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, Alexander V.; Ermolaev, Grigory V.

    Laser-oxygen cutting is very complicated for theoretical description technological process. Iron-oxygen combustion playing a leading role making it highly effective, able to cut thicker plates and, at the same time, producing special types of striations and other defects on the cut surface. In this paper results of numerical simulation based on elementary assumptions on iron-oxygen combustion are verified with high speed visualization of laser-oxygen cutting process. On a base of assumption that iron oxide lost its protective properties after melting simulation of striation formation due cycles of laser induced non self-sustained combustion is proposed. Assumption that reaction limiting factor is oxygen transport from the jet to cutting front allows to calculate reaction intensity by solving Navier - Stokes and diffusion system in gas phase. Influence of oxygen purity and pressure is studied theoretically. The results of numerical simulation are examined with high speed visualization of laser-oxygen cutting of 4-20 mm mild steel plates at cutting conditions close to industrial.

  6. Q-Switched Nd: YAG Laser Micro-Machining System

    SciTech Connect

    Messaoud, S.; Allam, A.; Siserir, F.; Bouceta, Y.; Kerdja, T.; Ouadjaout, D.

    2008-09-23

    In this paper, we present the design of a low cost Q-switched Nd: YAG laser micro-machining system for photo masks fabrication. It consists of: Nd:YAG laser source, beam delivery system, X-Y table, PC, The CCD camera and TV monitor. The synchronization between the laser source and the X-Y table is realised by NI PCI-7342, the two axis MID-7602 and LabVIEW based program. The first step of this work consists of engraving continuous and discontinuous lines on a thin film metal with a 100 {mu}m resolution by using the YG 980 Quantel Q-switched Nd:YAG laser.

  7. 4 Gbps direct modulation of 450 nm GaN laser for high-speed visible light communication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changmin; Zhang, Chong; Cantore, Michael; Farrell, Robert M; Oh, Sang Ho; Margalith, Tal; Speck, James S; Nakamura, Shuji; Bowers, John E; DenBaars, Steven P

    2015-06-15

    We demonstrate high-speed data transmission with a commercial high power GaN laser diode at 450 nm. 2.6 GHz bandwidth was achieved at an injection current of 500 mA using a high-speed visible light communication setup. Record high 4 Gbps free-space data transmission rate was achieved at room temperature.

  8. High-speed modelocked semiconductor lasers and applications in coherent photonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wangkuen

    1.55-mum high-speed modelocked semiconductor lasers are theoretically and experimentally studied for various coherent photonic system applications. The modelocked semiconductor lasers (MSLs) are designed with high-speed (>5 GHz) external cavity configurations utilizing monolithic two-section curved semiconductor optical amplifiers. By exploiting the saturable absorber section of the monolithic device, passive or hybrid mode-locking techniques are used to generate short optical pulses with broadband optical frequency combs. Laser frequency stability is improved by applying the Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) frequency stabilization technique to the MSLs. The improved laser performance after the frequency stabilization (a frequency drifting of less than 350 MHz), is extensively studied with respect to the laser linewidth (˜ 3 MHz), the relative intensity noise (RIN) (< -150 dB/Hz), as well as the modal RIN (˜ 3 dB reduction). MSL to MSL, and tunable laser to MSL synchronization is demonstrated by using a dual-mode injection technique and a modulation sideband injection technique, respectively. Dynamic locking behavior and locking bandwidth are experimentally and theoretically studied. Stable laser synchronization between two MSLs is demonstrated with an injection seed power on the order of a few microwatt. Several coherent heterodyne detections based on the synchronized MSL systems are demonstrated for applications in microwave photonic links and ultra-dense wavelength division multiplexing (UD-WDM) system. In addition, efficient coherent homodyne balanced receivers based on synchronized MSLs are developed and demonstrated for a spectrally phase-encoded optical CDMA (SPE-OCDMA) system.

  9. Profile characteristics of excimer laser micromachined features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabat, Martin D.; O'Keeffe, Terence R.; Ho, Wen

    1993-04-01

    In our work with excimer lasers, we observe a complex depth profile in processed blind holes that is energy, material, and process independent. This feature occurs when processing ceramics, polyimide, semiconductors, and metals. Further it occurs under different optical configurations. An understanding of this phenomena is essential when micron-precision features are required. We present our findings and explore explanations.

  10. Quasi-continuous burst-mode laser for high-speed planar imaging.

    PubMed

    Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Miller, Joseph D; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R; Danczyk, Stephen A; Meyer, Terrence R

    2012-04-15

    The pulse-burst duration of a compact burst-mode Nd:YAG laser is extended by one order of magnitude compared to previous flashlamp-pumped designs by incorporating a fiber oscillator and diode-pumped solid-state amplifiers. The laser has a linewidth of <2 GHz at 1064.3 nm with 150 mJ per individual pulse at 10 kHz. The performance of the system is evaluated by using the third-harmonic output at 354.8 nm for high-speed planar laser-induced fluorescence of formaldehyde in a lifted methane-air diffusion flame. A total of 100 and 200 sequential images of unsteady fluid-flame interactions are acquired at repetition rates of 10 kHz and 20 kHz, respectively.

  11. PULPAL TEMPERATURE INCREASE WITH HIGH-SPEED HANDPIECE, ER:YAG LASER AND ULTRASOUND TIPS

    PubMed Central

    Mollica, Fernanda Brandão; Camargo, Fernanda Pelogia; Zamboni, Sandra Costa; Pereira, Sarina Maciel Braga; Teixeira, Symone Cristina; Nogueira, Lafayette

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare intrapulpal temperature increase produced by high-speed handpiece, Er:YAG laser and CVDentus ultrasound tips during cavity preparation. Thirty bovine mandibular incisors with an enamel/dentin thickness of 4 mm at buccal surface had their roots amputated and were allocated to the following groups (n=10): Group I- high-speed handpiece; Group II- noncontact Er:YAG laser (250 mJ/4Hz); and Group III- CVDentus ultrasouns tips. All devices were used with water cooling. Class V cavities were prepared to a depth of 3.5 mm, measured with a periodontal probe. A type T thermocouple was placed inside the pulp chamber to determine the temperature increase (°C), which was recorded by a data acquisition system ADS 2000 IP (Lynx Technology) linked to a notebook computer. Data were analyzed statistically by oneway ANOVA and Tukey's test (p=0.05). The mean temperature rises were: 1.10°C (±0.56) for Group I, 0.84°C (±0.55) for Group II, and 3.00°C (± 1.34) for Group III. There were no statistically significant differences (p>0.05) between Groups I and II, but both of them differed significantly from Group III (p<0.05). In conclusion, the use of Er:YAG laser and high-speed handpiece for cavity preparation resulted in similar temperature increase. Although ultrasound tips generated significantly higher intrapulpal temperature increase, it remained below the critical value of 5.5°C and may be considered safe for use. PMID:19089220

  12. Pulpal temperature increase with high-speed handpiece, Er:YAG laser and ultrasound tips.

    PubMed

    Mollica, Fernanda Brandão; Camargo, Fernanda Pelogia; Zamboni, Sandra Costa; Pereira, Sarina Maciel Braga; Teixeira, Symone Cristina; Nogueira, Lafayette

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare intrapulpal temperature increase produced by high-speed handpiece, Er:YAG laser and CVDentus ultrasound tips during cavity preparation. Thirty bovine mandibular incisors with an enamel/dentin thickness of 4 mm at buccal surface had their roots amputated and were allocated to the following groups (n=10): Group I- high-speed handpiece; Group II- noncontact Er:YAG laser (250 mJ/4 Hz); and Group III- CVDentus ultrasouns tips. All devices were used with water cooling. Class V cavities were prepared to a depth of 3.5 mm, measured with a periodontal probe. A type T thermocouple was placed inside the pulp chamber to determine the temperature increase (degrees C), which was recorded by a data acquisition system ADS 2000 IP (Lynx Technology) linked to a notebook computer. Data were analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p=0.05). The mean temperature rises were: 1.10 degrees C (+/-0.56) for Group I, 0.84 degrees C (+/-0.55) for Group II, and 3.00 degrees C (+/- 1.34) for Group III. There were no statistically significant differences (p>0.05) between Groups I and II, but both of them differed significantly from Group III (p<0.05). In conclusion, the use of Er:YAG laser and high-speed handpiece for cavity preparation resulted in similar temperature increase. Although ultrasound tips generated significantly higher intrapulpal temperature increase, it remained below the critical value of 5.5 degrees C and may be considered safe for use.

  13. Full-field high-speed laser Doppler imaging system for blood-flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serov, Alexandre; Lasser, Theo

    2006-02-01

    We describe the design and performance of a new full-field high-speed laser Doppler imaging system developed for mapping and monitoring of blood flow in biological tissue. The total imaging time for 256x256 pixels region of interest is 1.2 seconds. An integrating CMOS image sensor is utilized to detect Doppler signal in a plurality of points simultaneously on the sample illuminated by a divergent laser beam of a uniform intensity profile. The integrating property of the detector improves the signal-to-noise ratio of the measurement, which results in high-quality flow-images provided by the system. The new technique is real-time, non-invasive and the instrument is easy to use. The wide range of applications is one of the major challenges for a future application of the imager. High-resolution high-speed laser Doppler perfusion imaging is a promising optical technique for diagnostic and assessing the treatment effect of the diseases such as e.g. atherosclerosis, psoriasis, diabetes, skin cancer, allergies, peripheral vascular diseases, skin irritancy and wound healing. We present some biological applications of the new imager and discuss the perspectives for the future implementations of the imager for clinical and physiological applications.

  14. Technological Aspects of High Speed Direct Laser Deposition Based on Heterophase Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turichin, G. A.; Klimova, O. G.; Zemlyakov, E. V.; Babkin, K. D.; Kolodyazhnyy, D. Yu.; Shamray, F. A.; Travyanov, A. Ya.; Petrovskiy, P. V.

    The article deals with physical peculiarities and technology of high speed processes of direct laser deposition. On the base of theoretic research and computer modeling the powder transfer has been optimized, increasing process stability and productivity. Principles of nozzles design also have been developed in accordance with technological needs. An influence of process mode on product properties and material structure was defined for heat resisted Ni-based superalloys. Developed technology provided the mechanic properties of products on the level of rolled material and allows avoid heat treatment and HIP in production process. Possible ways for increasing process performance and economic efficiency also have been discussed.

  15. High Speed 1.55 μm Lasers for Fiber Optic Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Paul A.

    This paper describes the essential elements for creating a practical wide bandwidth directly modulated laser source. This includes considerations of the intrinsic limitations of the laser structure, due to the resonant frequency and damping of the laser output, together with carrier transport issues to allow carriers in the device active region to be efficiently modulated at high speeds. The use of a P-doped compressively strained multiple-quantum well active region to provide high intrinsic speed and remove transport limitations is described, together with record setting results of 25 GHz modulation bandwidth for a 1.55 μm Fabry-Perot laser and 26 GHz bandwidth for a 1.55 μm DFB laser. The challenges of providing high bandwidth electrical connections to the laser on a suitable submount, together with fiber attachment and microwave packaging are discussed. Results of fully packaged 1.55 μm DFB lasers with 25 GHz modulation bandwidth are shown. Digital modulation of the packaged 1.55 μm DFB including impedance matching is described, and the transient wavelength chirp is presented. This low chirp is reduced further using an optical filter, to provide a 10 GBit/s source that can transmit error free over 38.5 km of standard optical fiber.

  16. Femtosecond laser micromachining of aluminum surfaces under controlled gas atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, G. M.; Jackson, M. J.

    2006-04-01

    The interaction of 180 femtosecond (fs), 775 nm laser pulses with the surface of aluminum under controlled gas atmospheres at ambient pressure has been investigated to study material redeposition, residual surface roughness, and ablation rate. The effect of using various gases to protect the surface of the material appears to interfere with the effects of the plasma and can change the resulting microstructure of the machined surface. By varying the combinations of fluence and laser-scanning speed during ultrafast ablation at high repetition rates, an optimum micromachining condition can be reached, depending on the type of gas used during machining. The debris produced under certain laser-machining conditions tends to produce pure aluminum nanoparticles that are deposited very close to the machined feature by the gas used to protect the surface of the aluminum.

  17. Laser direct imaging of transparent indium tin oxide electrodes using high speed stitching techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Pi-Ying; Hsiao, Wen-Tse; Chung, Chien-Kai; Tseng, Shih-Feng; Liao, Ien-Chang

    2014-09-01

    To accomplish an electrode patterning in large area, we present a high speed stitching technique used in an ultraviolet laser processing system and investigate the interaction between laser beams and indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films deposited on glass substrates. After optimizing the process parameters of the laser direct imaging (LDI) for the large-area electrode patterning, the ablated lines looked like regularly fish-scale marks of about a 40 μm diameter and a 120 nm depth around the processing path. The parameters includes the laser power of 1W, the scanning speed of galvanometers of 800 mm/s, and the laser pulse repetition frequency of 50 kHz. Moreover, the resistance value of the ablated ITO thin film is larger than 200MΩ that is electrically insulated from the other regions of electrode structure. LDI technology with UV laser beam has great potential applications in patterning on wafer or sapphire substrates and patterning a conductive layer deposited on the touch panels for semiconductor and optoelectric industries, respectively.

  18. High speed photoacoustic tomography system with low cost portable pulsed diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Sivasubramanian, Kathyayini; Pramanik, Manojit

    2015-07-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a potential hybrid imaging modality that has attracted great attention in the fields of medical imaging. In order to generate photoacoustic signal efficiently Q-switched Nd:YAG pump lasers capable of generating tens of millijoules of nanosecond laser pulses have been widely used. However, PAT systems using such lasers have limitations in clinical applications because of their high cost, large size, and cooling requirements. Furthermore, the low pulse repetition rate (PRR) of tens of hertz is not suitable for real-time PAT. So, there is a need for inexpensive, compact, simple, fast imaging system for clinical applications. Nanosecond pulsed laser diodes could meet these requirements. In this work, we present a high-speed photoacoustic tomography imaging system that uses a compact and yet relatively powerful near-infrared pulsed laser diode. The PAT system was tested on phantoms to verify its potential imaging speed. Photoacoustic reconstructed images at different scanning speeds are presented. With single ultrasound detector scanning, the system could provide PA image ~10 times faster than the Nd:YAG laser based systems.

  19. Superamphiphobic miniature boat fabricated by laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Kai; Dong, Xinran; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Cong; Duan, Ji'an

    2017-03-01

    We fabricated a superamphiphobic miniature boat with marked drag reduction and excellent loading capacity using femtosecond laser direct writing technology. The as-prepared superamphiphobic surface of the boat exhibited apparent contact angles larger than 150° toward both water and oil. Miniature boats with the superamphiphobic surface slid effortlessly on both water and oil-polluted water surfaces, with an increase in sliding distance by up to 52% and load increase of up to 27% compared with those of a boat with an untreated surface. A potential mechanism that explains the excellent performance of the superamphiphobic miniature boat was also discussed. This work provides a simple and economically viable strategy to obtain advanced surfaces for use in microfluidics and marine engineering.

  20. Experimental evaluation of spot dancing of laser beam in atmospheric propagation using high-speed camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Moriya; Akiba, Makoto; Kuri, Toshiaki; Ohtani, Naoki

    2003-04-01

    We investigated the frequency spectra and two-dimensional (2-D) distributions of the beam-centroid fluctuation created by spot dancing, which are needed to optimize the design of the tracking system, by using a novel spot-dancing measurement method to suppress the effect of building and/or transmitter vibration. In this method, two laser beams are propagated apart from each other and observed simultaneously using high-speed cameras. The position of each beam centroid is obtained using an image processing system. The effect of transmitter vibration is suppressed by taking the difference between the 2-D coordinate data of the beam-centroid positions. The frequency spectra are calculated using the fast Fourier transform. The beam spots of two HeNe lasers propagated 100 m (indoor) and 750 m (open-air) were observed using a high-speed camera of 10,000 frame/sec. Frequency spectra of the beam-centroid variance of up to 5 kHz could be observed. We also measured the variations of spot dancing in two days when the rates of sunshine were 100% and 0%.

  1. High-speed Optical Coherence Tomography for Management after Laser in Situ Keratomileusis

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Mariana; Li, Yan; Song, Jonathan C.; Huang, David

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report applications of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in the management of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) related problems. SETTING: Doheny Eye Institute and Department of Ophthalmology, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. METHODS: Five patients referred for LASIK-related problems were enrolled in a prospective observational study. Clinical examination, ultrasound (US) pachymetry, Placido ring slit-scanning corneal topography (Orbscan II, Bausch & Lomb), and high-speed corneal OCT were performed. RESULTS: In cases of regression and keratectasia, OCT provided thickness measurements of the cornea, flap, and posterior stromal bed. Locations of tissue loss and flap interface planes were identified in a case with a recut enhancement complication. The information was used to determine whether further laser ablation was safe, confirm keratectasia, and manage complications. Optical coherence tomography measurements of central corneal thickness agreed well with US pachymetry measurements (difference 6.4 mm G 11.7 [SD]) (P Z .026), while Orbscan significantly underestimated corneal thickness (-67.5 ± 72.5 μm) (P = .17). CONCLUSIONS: High-speed OCT provided noncontact imaging and measurement of LASIK anatomy. It was useful in monitoring LASIK results and evaluating complications. PMID:17081866

  2. Freeze frame analysis on high speed cinematography of Nd/YAG laser explosions in ocular tissues.

    PubMed

    Vernon, S A; Cheng, H

    1986-05-01

    High speed colour cinematography at 400 frames per second was used to photograph both single and train burst Nd/YAG laser applications in ox eyes at threshold energy levels. Measurements of the extent and speed of particle scatter and tissue distortion from the acoustic transient were made from a sequential freeze frame analysis of the films. Particles were observed to travel over 8 mm from the site of Nd/YAG application 20 milliseconds after a single pulse at initial speeds in excess of 20 km/h. The use of train bursts of pulses was seen to increase the number of particles scattered and project the wavefront of particles further from the point of laser application.

  3. Travelling wave analysis on high-speed performance of Q-modulated distributed feedback laser.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Jiankun; Zhu, Hongli; Liu, Dekun; Wang, Lei; He, Jian-Jun

    2012-01-30

    The structure of a Q-modulated distributed feedback laser is designed and simulated. A large reflectivity modulation of the rear reflector is achieved by using an anti-resonant cavity formed by two deep trenches with the one between the modulator and phase section filled by a high index dielectric material. The travelling wave model is presented to analyze the high speed performance of the laser. Due to the effect of the wave propagation in the structure, the modulation extinction ratio decreases with increasing cavity length. It is shown that 40 Gb/s RZ signal modulation can be achieved with an extinction ratio of 7 dB and 10 dB, respectively, for a cavity length of 500 μm and 300 μm.

  4. High-speed, image-based eye tracking with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Christy K.; Yang, Qiang; Arathorn, David W.; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; de Boer, Johannes F.; Roorda, Austin

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a high-speed, image-based tracking scanning laser ophthalmoscope (TSLO) that can provide high fidelity structural images, real-time eye tracking and targeted stimulus delivery. The system was designed for diffraction-limited performance over an 8° field of view (FOV) and operates with a flexible field of view of 1°–5.5°. Stabilized videos of the retina were generated showing an amplitude of motion after stabilization of 0.2 arcmin or less across all frequencies. In addition, the imaging laser can be modulated to place a stimulus on a targeted retinal location. We show a stimulus placement accuracy with a standard deviation less than 1 arcmin. With a smaller field size of 2°, individual cone photoreceptors were clearly visible at eccentricities outside of the fovea. PMID:23082300

  5. High-speed high-resolution heterodyne interferometer using a laser with low beat frequency.

    PubMed

    Diao, Xiaofei; Hu, Pengcheng; Xue, Zi; Kang, Yanhui

    2016-01-01

    A high-speed high-resolution heterodyne interferometer using a laser with low beat frequency is developed. The interferometer has two spatially separated parallel beams with different frequencies. Two interference signals with opposite Doppler shift are optically generated by the interferometric optics. The measurement electronics uses two identical phasemeters for the two opposite interference signals. The two interference signals are selectively used according to the speed of the target, which makes sure that the Doppler shift of the selected signal is always positive, so that the measurable speed is no longer limited by the beat frequency of the laser source. Experimental results show that the measurement resolution is 0.62 nm. The measurable speed can exceed the restriction determined by the beat frequency. Compared with a commercial interferometer, the displacement difference is less than 40 nm in a travel range of 900 mm.

  6. Laser micromachining of biofactory-on-a-chip devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, Julian P.; Goater, Andrew D.; Hayden, Christopher J.; Tame, John A.

    2002-06-01

    Excimer laser micromachining provides a flexible means for the manufacture and rapid prototyping of miniaturized systems such as Biofactory-on-a-Chip devices. Biofactories are miniaturized diagnostic devices capable of characterizing, manipulating, separating and sorting suspension of particles such as biological cells. Such systems operate by exploiting the electrical properties of microparticles and controlling particle movement in AC non- uniform stationary and moving electric fields. Applications of Biofactory devices are diverse and include, among others, the healthcare, pharmaceutical, chemical processing, environmental monitoring and food diagnostic markets. To achieve such characterization and separation, Biofactory devices employ laboratory-on-a-chip type components such as complex multilayer microelectrode arrays, microfluidic channels, manifold systems and on-chip detection systems. Here we discuss the manufacturing requirements of Biofactory devices and describe the use of different excimer laser micromachined methods both in stand-alone processes and also in conjunction with conventional fabrication processes such as photolithography and thermal molding. Particular attention is given to the production of large area multilayer microelectrode arrays and the manufacture of complex cross-section microfluidic channel systems for use in simple distribution and device interfacing.

  7. Method of high speed flow field influence and restrain on laser communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Li-xin; Wang, Chun-hui; Qian, Cun-zhu; Wang, Shuo; Zhang, Li-zhong

    2013-08-01

    For laser communication performance which carried by airplane or airship, due to high-speed platform movement, the air has two influences in platform and laser communication terminal window. The first influence is that aerodynamic effect causes the deformation of the optical window; the second one is that a shock wave and boundary layer would be generated. For subsonic within the aircraft, the boundary layer is the main influence. The presence of a boundary layer could change the air density and the temperature of the optical window, which causes the light deflection and received beam spot flicker. Ultimately, the energy hunting of the beam spot which reaches receiving side increases, so that the error rate increases. In this paper, aerodynamic theory is used in analyzing the influence of the optical window deformation due to high speed air. Aero-optics theory is used to analyze the influence of the boundary layer in laser communication link. Based on this, we focused on working on exploring in aerodynamic and aero-optical effect suppression method in the perspective of the optical window design. Based on planning experimental aircraft types and equipment installation location, we optimized the design parameters of the shape and thickness of the optical window, the shape and size of air-management kit. Finally, deformation of the optical window and air flow distribution were simulated by fluid simulation software in the different mach and different altitude fly condition. The simulation results showed that the optical window can inhibit the aerodynamic influence after optimization. In addition, the boundary layer is smoothed; the turbulence influence is reduced, which meets the requirements of the airborne laser communication.

  8. Single step high-speed printing of continuous silver lines by laser-induced forward transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puerto, D.; Biver, E.; Alloncle, A.-P.; Delaporte, Ph.

    2016-06-01

    The development of high-speed ink printing process by Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) is of great interest for the printing community. To address the problems and the limitations of this process that have been previously identified, we have performed an experimental study on laser micro-printing of silver nanoparticle inks by LIFT and demonstrated for the first time the printing of continuous conductive lines in a single pass at velocities of 17 m/s using a 1 MHz repetition rate laser. We investigated the printing process by means of a time-resolved imaging technique to visualize the ejection dynamics of single and adjacent jets. The control of the donor film properties is of prime importance to achieve single step printing of continuous lines at high velocities. We use a 30 ps pulse duration laser with a wavelength of 343 nm and a repetition rate from 0.2 to 1 MHz. A galvanometric mirror head controls the distance between two consecutives jets by scanning the focused beam along an ink-coated donor substrate at different velocities. Droplets and lines of silver inks are laser-printed on glass and PET flexible substrates and we characterized their morphological quality by atomic force microscope (AFM) and optical microscope.

  9. Studying the mechanism of micromachining by short pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadag, Shiva

    The semiconductor materials like Si and the transparent dielectric materials like glass and quartz are extensively used in optoelectronics, microelectronics, and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) industries. The combination of these materials often go hand in hand for applications in MEMS such as in chips for pressure sensors, charge coupled devices (CCD), and photovoltaic (PV) cells for solar energy generation. The transparent negative terminal of the solar cell is made of glass on one surface of the PV cell. The positive terminal (cathode) on the other surface of the solar cell is made of silicon with a glass negative terminal (anode). The digital watches and cell phones, LEDs, micro-lens, optical components, and laser optics are other examples for the application of silicon and or glass. The Si and quartz are materials extensively used in CCD and LED for digital cameras and CD players respectively. Hence, three materials: (1) a semiconductor silicon and transparent dielectrics,- (2) glass, and (3) quartz are chosen for laser micromachining as they have wide spread applications in microelectronics industry. The Q-switched, nanosecond pulsed lasers are most extensively used for micro-machining. The nanosecond type of short pulsed laser is less expensive for the end users than the second type, pico or femto, ultra-short pulsed lasers. The majority of the research work done on these materials (Si, SiO 2, and glass) is based on the ultra-short pulsed lasers. This is because of the cut quality, pin point precision of the drilled holes, formation of the nanometer size microstructures and fine features, and minimally invasive heat affected zone. However, there are many applications such as large surface area dicing, cutting, surface cleaning of Si wafers by ablation, and drilling of relatively large-sized holes where some associated heat affected zone due to melting can be tolerated. In such applications the nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of materials is very

  10. High speed visible light communication using blue GaN laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, S.; Viola, S.; Giuliano, G.; Najda, S. P.; Perlin, P.; Suski, T.; Marona, L.; Leszczyński, M.; Wisniewski, P.; Czernecki, R.; Targowski, G.; Watson, M. A.; White, H.; Rowe, D.; Laycock, L.; Kelly, A. E.

    2016-10-01

    GaN-based laser diodes have been developed over the last 20 years making them desirable for many security and defence applications, in particular, free space laser communications. Unlike their LED counterparts, laser diodes are not limited by their carrier lifetime which makes them attractive for high speed communication, whether in free space, through fiber or underwater. Gigabit data transmission can be achieved in free space by modulating the visible light from the laser with a pseudo-random bit sequence (PRBS), with recent results approaching 5 Gbit/s error free data transmission. By exploiting the low-loss in the blue part of the spectrum through water, data transmission experiments have also been conducted to show rates of 2.5 Gbit/s underwater. Different water types have been tested to monitor the effect of scattering and to see how this affects the overall transmission rate and distance. This is of great interest for communication with unmanned underwater vehicles (UUV) as the current method using acoustics is much slower and vulnerable to interception. These types of laser diodes can typically reach 50-100 mW of power which increases the length at which the data can be transmitted. This distance could be further improved by making use of high power laser arrays. Highly uniform GaN substrates with low defectivity allow individually addressable laser bars to be fabricated. This could ultimately increase optical power levels to 4 W for a 20-emitter array. Overall, the development of GaN laser diodes will play an important part in free space optical communications and will be vital in the advancement of security and defence applications.

  11. Beam shaping applications in laser micromachining for the microelectronics industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunsky, Corey M.

    2001-10-01

    Laser micromachining has been a part of the manufacturing process for semiconductors and microelectronics devices for several decades. More recent applications such as the drilling of microvia holes in high-density electronic packages have recently entered broad industrial use for high-volume production. In such applications, process stability and throughput are key drivers of commercial success. Particularly in the UV, where solid-state laser power is growing rapidly but is still limited to less than 10 watts, innovations that permit the available laser power to be applied at the work surface more efficiently are of interest. Within the last two years, the use of beam shapers to create round laser spots with near-uniform irradiance at the work surface has been demonstrated. Shaping the irradiance profile has been shown to both increase process speed and improve the quality of the drilled holes, which range in diameter between 20 and 150 micrometers . This paper gives an historical overview of laser via drilling, presents the Gaussian-to-flattop beam shaping optics used in the microvia laser drills, and discusses the process results obtained.

  12. Efficient femtosecond laser micromachining of bulk 3C-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farsari, M.; Filippidis, G.; Zoppel, S.; Reider, G. A.; Fotakis, C.

    2005-09-01

    We demonstrate surface micromachining of bulk 3C silicon carbide (3C-SiC) wafers by employing tightly focused infrared femtosecond laser pulses of energy less than 10 nJ directly from a femtosecond laser oscillator, thus eliminating the need for an amplified system and increasing the micromachining speed by more than four orders of magnitude. In addition, we show that high aspect ratio through-tapered vias can be drilled in 400 µm thick wafers using an amplified femtosecond laser.

  13. Experimental investigation by laser ultrasonics for high speed train axle diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Cavuto, A; Martarelli, M; Pandarese, G; Revel, G M; Tomasini, E P

    2015-01-01

    The present paper demonstrates the applicability of a laser-ultrasonic procedure to improve the performances of train axle ultrasonic inspection. The method exploits an air-coupled ultrasonic probe that detects the ultrasonic waves generated by a high-power pulsed laser. As a result, the measurement chain is completely non-contact, from generation to detection, this making it possible to considerably speed up inspection time and make the set-up more flexible. The main advantage of the technique developed is that it works in thermo-elastic regime and it therefore can be considered as a non-destructive method. The laser-ultrasonic procedure investigated has been applied for the inspection of a real high speed train axle provided by the Italian railway company (Trenitalia), on which typical fatigue defects have been expressly created according to standard specifications. A dedicated test bench has been developed so as to rotate the axle with the angle control and to speed up the inspection of the axle surface. The laser-ultrasonic procedure proposed can be automated and is potentially suitable for regular inspection of train axles. The main achievements of the activity described in this paper are: – the study of the effective applicability of laser-ultrasonics for the diagnostic of train hollow axles with variable sections by means of a numerical FE model, – the carrying out of an automated experiment on a real train axle, – the analysis of the sensitivity to experimental parameters, like laser source – receiving probe distance and receiving probe angular position, – the demonstration that the technique is suitable for the detection of surface defects purposely created on the train axle.

  14. Progress and issues for high-speed vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lear, Kevin L.; Al-Omari, Ahmad N.

    2007-02-01

    Extrinsic electrical, thermal, and optical issues rather than intrinsic factors currently constrain the maximum bandwidth of directly modulated vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs). Intrinsic limits based on resonance frequency, damping, and K-factor analysis are summarized. Previous reports are used to compare parasitic circuit values and electrical 3dB bandwidths and thermal resistances. A correlation between multimode operation and junction heating with bandwidth saturation is presented. The extrinsic factors motivate modified bottom-emitting structures with no electrical pads, small mesas, copper plated heatsinks, and uniform current injection. Selected results on high speed quantum well and quantum dot VCSELs at 850 nm, 980 nm, and 1070 nm are reviewed including small-signal 3dB frequencies up to 21.5 GHz and bit rates up to 30 Gb/s.

  15. Technology of High-speed Direct Laser Deposition from Ni-based Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimova-Korsmik, Olga; Turichin, Gleb; Zemlyakov, Evgeniy; Babkin, Konstantin; Petrovsky, Pavel; Travyanov, Andrey

    Recently, additive manufacturing is the one of most perspective technologies; it can replace conventional methods of casting and subsequent time-consuming machining. One of the most interesting additive technologies - high-speed direct laser deposition (HSDLD) allows realizing heterophase process during the manufacturing, which there is process takes place with a partial melting of powder. This is particularly important for materials, which are sensitive to strong fluctuations of temperature treatment regimes, like nickel base alloys with high content of gamma prime phase. This alloys are interested for many industrial areas, mostly there are used in engine systems, aircraft and shipbuilding, aeronautics. Heating and cooling rates during the producing process determine structure and affect on its properties. Using HSDLD process it possible to make a products from Ni superalloys with ultrafine microstructure and satisfactory mechanical characteristics without special subsequent heatreatment.

  16. High-speed laser-assisted cutting of strong transparent materials using picosecond Bessel beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, M. K.; Jedrkiewicz, O.; Sabonis, V.; Mikutis, M.; Recchia, S.; Aprea, A.; Bollani, M.; Trapani, P. Di

    2015-08-01

    We report single-pass cutting of strong transparent glass materials of 700 μm thickness with a speed up to 270 mm/s using single-shot nanostructuring technique exploiting picosecond, zero-order Bessel beams at laser wavelength of 1030 nm. Particularly, we present results of a systematic study of cutting of tempered glass which has high resistance to thermal and mechanical shocks due to the inhomogeneous material properties along its thickness, and homogeneous glass that identify a unique focusing geometry and a finite pitch dependency, for which cutting with high quality and high reproducibility can be achieved. These results represent a significant advancement in the field of high-speed cutting of technologically important transparent materials.

  17. High-Speed X-Ray Analysis of Spatter Formation in Laser Welding of Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heider, A.; Sollinger, J.; Abt, F.; Boley, M.; Weber, R.; Graf, T.

    Due to their very good electrical and thermal conductivity copper materials are more and more demanded for industrial applications. For the assembly of copper based parts an effective and reliable welding process is required. At lower feed rates and high penetration depth respectively, welds in copper suffer from many weld defects such as pores and melt ejections. Keyhole instabilities during welding result in most cases in weld defects. In this paper high-speed X-ray imaging of the welding process is used to analyze keyhole instabilities with respect to the formation of weld defects. By means of X-ray observation of the welding process it is shown that bubble formation at the tip of the capillary is one mechanism which causes weld defects such as melt ejections and pores. Furthermore the influence of laser power modulation on bubble formation is discussed.

  18. A 5-mm piezo-scanning fiber device for high speed ultrafast laser microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    Ferhanoglu, Onur; Yildirim, Murat; Subramanian, Kaushik; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2014-01-01

    Towards developing precise microsurgery tools for the clinic, we previously developed image-guided miniaturized devices using low repetition rate amplified ultrafast lasers for surgery. To improve the speed of tissue removal while reducing device diameter, here we present a new 5-mm diameter device that delivers high-repetition rate laser pulses for high speed ultrafast laser microsurgery. The device consists of an air-core photonic bandgap fiber (PBF) for the delivery of high energy pulses, a piezoelectric tube actuator for fiber scanning, and two aspheric lenses for focusing the light. Its inline optical architecture provides easy alignment and substantial size reduction to 5 mm diameter as compared to our previous MEMS-scanning devices while realizing improved intensity squared (two-photon) lateral and axial resolutions of 1.16 μm and 11.46 μm, respectively. Our study also sheds light on the maximum pulse energies that can be delivered through the air-core PBF and identifies cladding damage at the input facet of the fiber as the limiting factor. We have achieved a maximum energy delivery larger than 700 nJ at 92% coupling efficiency. An in depth analysis reveals how this value is greatly affected by possible slight misalignments of the beam during coupling and the measured small beam pointing fluctuations. In the absence of these imperfections, self-phase modulation becomes the limiting factor for the maximum energy delivery, setting the theoretical upper bound to near 2 μJ for a 1-m long, 7-μm, air-core PBF. Finally, the use of a 300 kHz repetition rate fiber laser enabled rapid ablation of 150 µm x 150 µm area within only 50 ms. Such ablation speeds can now allow the surgeons to translate the surgery device as fast as ~4 mm/s to continuously remove a thin layer of a 150 µm wide tissue. Thanks to a high optical transmission efficiency of the in-line optical architecture of the device and improved resolution, we could successfully perform ablation of

  19. Fast spectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy with high-speed tunable picosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Cahyadi, Harsono; Iwatsuka, Junichi; Minamikawa, Takeo; Niioka, Hirohiko; Araki, Tsutomu; Hashimoto, Mamoru

    2013-09-01

    We develop a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy system equipped with a tunable picosecond laser for high-speed wavelength scanning. An acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) is integrated in the laser cavity to enable wavelength scanning by varying the radio frequency waves applied to the AOTF crystal. An end mirror attached on a piezoelectric actuator and a pair of parallel plates driven by galvanometer motors are also introduced into the cavity to compensate for changes in the cavity length during wavelength scanning to allow synchronization with another picosecond laser. We demonstrate fast spectral imaging of 3T3-L1 adipocytes every 5  cm-1 in the Raman spectral region around 2850  cm-1 with an image acquisition time of 120 ms. We also demonstrate fast switching of Raman shifts between 2100 and 2850  cm-1, corresponding to CD2 symmetric stretching and CH2 symmetric stretching vibrations, respectively. The fast-switching CARS images reveal different locations of recrystallized deuterated and nondeuterated stearic acid.

  20. Solid polymer electrolyte composite membrane comprising laser micromachined porous support

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Han [Waltham, MA; LaConti, Anthony B [Lynnfield, MA; Mittelsteadt, Cortney K [Natick, MA; McCallum, Thomas J [Ashland, MA

    2011-01-11

    A solid polymer electrolyte composite membrane and method of manufacturing the same. According to one embodiment, the composite membrane comprises a rigid, non-electrically-conducting support, the support preferably being a sheet of polyimide having a thickness of about 7.5 to 15 microns. The support has a plurality of cylindrical pores extending perpendicularly between opposing top and bottom surfaces of the support. The pores, which preferably have a diameter of about 5 microns, are made by laser micromachining and preferably are arranged in a defined pattern, for example, with fewer pores located in areas of high membrane stress and more pores located in areas of low membrane stress. The pores are filled with a first solid polymer electrolyte, such as a perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) polymer. A second solid polymer electrolyte, which may be the same as or different than the first solid polymer electrolyte, may be deposited over the top and/or bottom of the first solid polymer electrolyte.

  1. Laser micromachining as a metallization tool for microfluidic polymer stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brettschneider, T.; Dorrer, C.; Czurratis, D.; Zengerle, R.; Daub, M.

    2013-03-01

    A novel assembly approach for the integration of metal structures into polymeric microfluidic systems is described. The presented production process is completely based on a single solid-state laser source, which is used to incorporate metal foils into a polymeric multi-layer stack by laser bonding and ablation processes. Chemical reagents or glues are not required. The polymer stack contains a flexible membrane which can be used for realizing microfluidic valves and pumps. The metal-to-polymer bond was investigated for different metal foils and plasma treatments, yielding a maximum peel strength of Rps = 1.33 N mm-1. A minimum structure size of 10 µm was determined by 3D microscopy of the laser cut line. As an example application, two different metal foils were used in combination to micromachine a standardized type-T thermocouple on a polymer substrate. An additional laser process was developed which allows metal-to-metal welding in close vicinity to the polymer substrate. With this process step, the reliability of the electrical contact could be increased to survive at least 400 PCR temperature cycles at very low contact resistances.

  2. High-speed multi-frame laser Schlieren for visualization of explosive events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. A.; Murphy, M. J.; Landon, C. D.; Mason, T. A.; Adrian, R. J.; Akinci, A. A.; Martinez, M. E.; Thomas, K. A.

    2007-09-01

    High-Speed Multi-Frame Laser Schlieren is used for visualization of a range of explosive and non-explosive events. Schlieren is a well-known technique for visualizing shock phenomena in transparent media. Laser backlighting and a framing camera allow for Schlieren images with very short (down to 5 ns) exposure times, band pass filtering to block out explosive self-light, and 14 frames of a single explosive event. This diagnostic has been applied to several explosive initiation events, such as exploding bridgewires (EBW), Exploding Foil Initiators (EFI) (or slappers), Direct Optical Initiation (DOI), and ElectroStatic Discharge (ESD). Additionally, a series of tests have been performed on "cut-back" detonators with varying initial pressing (IP) heights. We have also used this Diagnostic to visualize a range of EBW, EFI, and DOI full-up detonators. The setup has also been used to visualize a range of other explosive events, such as explosively driven metal shock experiments and explosively driven microjets. Future applications to other explosive events such as boosters and IHE booster evaluation will be discussed. Finite element codes (EPIC, CTH) have been used to analyze the schlieren images to determine likely boundary or initial conditions to determine the temporal-spatial pressure profile across the output face of the detonator. These experiments are part of a phased plan to understand the evolution of detonation in a detonator from initiation shock through run to detonation to full detonation to transition to booster and booster detonation.

  3. True color blood flow imaging using a high-speed laser photography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Sheng; Lin, Cheng-Hsien; Sun, Yung-Nien; Ho, Chung-Liang; Hsu, Chung-Chi

    2012-10-01

    Physiological changes in the retinal vasculature are commonly indicative of such disorders as diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration. Thus, various methods have been developed for noninvasive clinical evaluation of ocular hemodynamics. However, to the best of our knowledge, current ophthalmic instruments do not provide a true color blood flow imaging capability. Accordingly, we propose a new method for the true color imaging of blood flow using a high-speed pulsed laser photography system. In the proposed approach, monochromatic images of the blood flow are acquired using a system of three cameras and three color lasers (red, green, and blue). A high-quality true color image of the blood flow is obtained by assembling the monochromatic images by means of image realignment and color calibration processes. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is demonstrated by imaging the flow of mouse blood within a microfluidic channel device. The experimental results confirm the proposed system provides a high-quality true color blood flow imaging capability, and therefore has potential for noninvasive clinical evaluation of ocular hemodynamics.

  4. World record in high speed laser surface microstructuring of polymer and steel using direct laser interference patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Valentin; Roch, Teja; Lasagni, Andrés. F.

    2016-03-01

    Periodic surfaces structures with micrometer or submicrometer resolution produced on the surface of components can be used to improve their mechanical, biological or optical properties. In particular, these surfaces can control the tribological performance of parts, for instance in the automotive industry. In the last years, substantial efforts have been made to develop new technologies capable to produce functionalized surfaces. One of these technologies is the Direct Laser Interference Patterning (DLIP) technology, which permits to combine high fabrication speed with high resolution even in the sub-micrometer range. In DLIP, a laser beam is split into two or more coherent beams which are guided to interfere on the work piece surface. This causes modulated laser intensities over the component's surface, enabling the direct fabrication of a periodic pattern based on selective laser ablation or melting. Depending on the angle between the laser beams and the wavelength of the laser, the pattern's spatial period can be perfectly controlled. In this study, we introduce new modular DLIP optical heads, developed at the Fraunhofer IWS and the Technische Universität Dresden for high-speed surface laser patterning of polymers and metals. For the first time it is shown that effective patterning speeds of up to 0.90 m2/min and 0.36 m2/min are possible on polymer and metals, respectively. Line- and dot-like surface architectures with spatial periods between 7 μm and 22 μm are shown.

  5. Investigating high speed phenomena in laser plasma interactions using dilation x-ray imager (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, S. R. Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Ayers, M. J.; Piston, K.; Felker, B.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Chung, T.; Sammuli, B.; Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L.

    2014-11-15

    The DIlation X-ray Imager (DIXI) is a new, high-speed x-ray framing camera at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) sensitive to x-rays in the range of ≈2–17 keV. DIXI uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps, a ≈10× improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the NIF (≈100 ps resolution), and otherwise only attainable with 1D streaked imaging. The pulse-dilation technique utilizes a voltage ramp to impart a velocity gradient on the signal-bearing electrons. The temporal response, spatial resolution, and x-ray sensitivity of DIXI are characterized with a short x-ray impulse generated using the COMET laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. At the NIF a pinhole array at 10 cm from target chamber center (tcc) projects images onto the photocathode situated outside the NIF chamber wall with a magnification of ≈64×. DIXI will provide important capabilities for warm-dense-matter physics, high-energy-density science, and inertial confinement fusion, adding important capabilities to temporally resolve hot-spot formation, x-ray emission, fuel motion, and mix levels in the hot-spot at neutron yields of up to 10{sup 17}. We present characterization data as well as first results on electron-transport phenomena in buried-layer foil experiments.

  6. High-speed laser ablation of metal with pico- and subpicosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazhukin, V. I.; Demin, M. M.; Shapranov, A. V.

    2014-05-01

    The mechanism of the high-speed ablation of aluminum with pico- and subpicosecond (10-11-10-13 s) laser pulses is considered. Mathematical modeling based on the continuum non-equilibrium two-temperature (TTM) model revealed that in a relatively narrow range of fluence 0.25-0.7 J/cm2, the regime of mechanical fragmentation of the irradiated surface is realized. The maximum values of the lattice temperature for the specified range of fluence are 2100-3500 K. The removal of the material is mechanical due to the negative stresses in the rarefaction wave following the shock wave. Explicit tracking of temporal and spatial position of the melting front has allowed establishing its role in the generation of superheated metastable states in the solid phase and the propagation of the shock wave. The removed material with total thickness of 60-100 nm is a collection of separate plates with thickness from 1 nm to 55 nm.

  7. A laser-induced heat flux technique for convective heat transfer measurements in high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. R.; Keith, T. G., Jr.; Hingst, W. R.

    1991-01-01

    A technique is developed to measure the local convective heat transfer coefficient on a model surface in a supersonic flow field. The technique uses a laser to apply a discrete local heat flux at the model test surface, and an infrared camera system determines the local temperature distribution due to the heating. From this temperature distribution and an analysis of the heating process, a local convective heat transfer coefficient is determined. The technique was used to measure the local surface convective heat transfer coefficient distribution on a flat plate at nominal Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0. The flat plate boundary layer initially was laminar and became transitional in the measurement region. The experimentally determined convective heat transfer coefficients were generally higher than the theoretical predictions for flat plate laminar boundary layers. However, the results indicate that this nonintrusive optical measurement technique has the potential to measure surface convective heat transfer coefficients in high-speed flowfields.

  8. A laser-induced heat flux technique for convective heat transfer measurements in high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. R.; Keith, T. G., Jr.; Hingst, W. R.

    1991-01-01

    A technique is developed to measure the local convective heat transfer coefficient on a model surface in a supersonic flow field. The technique uses a laser to apply a discrete local heat flux at the model test surface, and an infrared camera system determines the local temperature distribution due to the heating. From this temperature distribution and an analysis of the heating process, a local convective heat transfer coefficient is determined. The technique was used to measure the local surface convective heat transfer coefficient distribution on a flat plate at nominal Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0. The flat plate boundary layer initially was laminar and became transitional in the measurement region. The experimentally determined convective heat transfer coefficients were generally higher than the theoretical predictions for flat plate laminar boundary layers. However, the results indicate that this nonintrusive optical measurement technique has the potential to measure surface convective heat transfer coefficients in high speed flow fields.

  9. Characterization of a fast CMOS imaging sensor for high-speed laser detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadei, Bruno; Le Normand, J. P.; Hu, Y.; Cunin, Bernard

    2003-07-01

    CMOS active pixel sensors (APS) have performances competitive with charge-coupled device (CCD) technology, and offer advantages in on-chip functionality, system power reduction, cost and miniaturization. In this paper, we present characterization of a fast CMOS APS used in an imager for high-speed laser detections, which can replace the streak cameras. It produces the intensity information in function of one spatial dimension and time [I = f(x,t)] from one frame in two spatial dimensions. The time information is obtained for the first prototype camera to delay successively the integration phase in each pixel of the same row. The different noise sources of the APS sensors such as shot noise due to the photo sensor, the thermal noise and flicker noise due to the readout transistors and the photon shot noise are presented to determine the fundamental limits on image sensor. The first prototype FAMOSI (FAst MOS Imager) is composed of 64 x 64 active pixels. The simulation and experimental results show that a conversion gain of 6.73 +/- 0.25 μV/e- has been obtained with a noise level of 87 +/- 3e- rms. The power consumption of the chip is 25 mW at 50 images/sec.

  10. Thermoelectric Device Fabrication Using Thermal Spray and Laser Micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewolde, Mahder; Fu, Gaosheng; Hwang, David J.; Zuo, Lei; Sampath, Sanjay; Longtin, Jon P.

    2016-02-01

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are solid-state devices that convert heat directly into electricity. They are used in many engineering applications such as vehicle and industrial waste-heat recovery systems to provide electrical power, improve operating efficiency and reduce costs. State-of-art TEG manufacturing is based on prefabricated materials and a labor-intensive process involving soldering, epoxy bonding, and mechanical clamping for assembly. This reduces their durability and raises costs. Additive manufacturing technologies, such as thermal spray, present opportunities to overcome these challenges. In this work, TEGs have been fabricated for the first time using thermal spray technology and laser micromachining. The TEGs are fabricated directly onto engineering component surfaces. First, current fabrication techniques of TEGs are presented. Next, the steps required to fabricate a thermal spray-based TEG module, including the formation of the metallic interconnect layers and the thermoelectric legs are presented. A technique for bridging the air gap between two adjacent thermoelectric elements for the top layer using a sacrificial filler material is also demonstrated. A flat 50.8 mm × 50.8 mm TEG module is fabricated using this method and its performance is experimentally characterized and found to be in agreement with expected values of open-circuit voltage based on the materials used.

  11. Transportable optical ground station for high-speed free-space laser communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Amita; Brechtelsbauer, Martin

    2012-10-01

    Near real-time data downlinks from aircrafts, satellites and high altitude platforms via high-speed laser commu- nication links is an important research topic at the Institute of Communications and Navigation of the German Aerospace Center (DLR). Ground stations for such scenarios are usually fixed at a certain location. With a mo- tivation to provide a ground station that is quickly and easily deployed anywhere in the world, a transportable optical ground station (TOGS) has been developed. TOGS features a pneumatically deployable Cassegrain-type telescope with main mirror diameter of 60 cm, including optical tracking and receiving system. For calibration of position and attitude, multiple sensors like dual-antenna GPS and inclination sensors have been installed. In order to realize these systems, robust software that operates and controls them is essential. The software is platform independent and is aimed to be used on both mobile and ground terminals. It includes implementa- tion of accurate pointing, acquisition and tracking algorithms, hardware drivers, and user interfaces. Important modules of the software are GPS tracking, optical tracking, star- and satellite tracking, and calibration of the TOGS itself. Recently, a first successful data-downlink from an aircraft to TOGS using GPS tracking has been performed. To streamline the software development and testing process, some simulation environments like mount simulator, aircraft path simulator, tracking camera simulator and tracking error analysis tool have also been developed. This paper presents the overall hardware/software structure of the TOGS, and gives results of the tracking accuracy improvement techniques like GPS extrapolation and optical tracking.

  12. High-Speed Photography

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.; Schelev, M.Y.

    1998-08-01

    The applications of high-speed photography to a diverse set of subjects including inertial confinement fusion, laser surgical procedures, communications, automotive airbags, lightning etc. are briefly discussed. (AIP) {copyright} {ital 1998 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.}

  13. High-speed and wide bandwidth Fourier domain mode-locked wavelength swept laser with multiple SOAs.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Min Yong; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Qiang; Chen, Zhongping

    2008-02-18

    We report on the development of a high-speed, wide bandwidth Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) wavelength swept laser of around 1300 nm using two gain media for high-resolution and high-speed Fourier domain optical coherence tomography. The wavelength swept laser is capable of FWHM scanning range of more than 135 nm at 45.6 kHz sweeping rate. The measured axial resolution of the forward scan is 6.6 microm in air and 4.7 microm in tissue. The peak power is 11.4 mW for both the forward and backward scans. The measured system sensitivity is achieved up to 100.7 dB. We also demonstrate OCT imaging using the FDML wavelength swept laser with two semiconductor optical amplifiers.

  14. Pulsed laser micromachining of Mg-Cu-Gd bulk metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsuan-Kai; Lee, Ching-Jen; Hu, Ting-Ting; Li, Chun-Han; Huang, J. C.

    2012-06-01

    Micromachining of Mg-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is performed using two kinds of pulsed nanosecond lasers: a 355 nm ultraviolet (UV) laser and a 1064 nm infrared (IR) laser. Precision machining on the micrometer scale and the preservation of amorphous or short-range order characteristics are important for the application of BMGs in micro-electro-mechanical systems. A higher micromachining rate is achieved using the UV laser than using the IR laser due to a better absorption rate of the former by Mg-based BMGs and a higher photon energy. The cutting depth of Mg-based BMGs ranges from 1 to 80 μm depending on the laser parameters. By appropriate adjustment of the laser power and scan speed, successful machining of the Mg-based BMG with preservation of the amorphous phase is achieved after the laser irradiation process. Short-pulse laser cutting represents a suitable alternative for machining of micro components.

  15. Femtosecond laser micromachined ridge waveguide lasers in Nd:YAG ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yuechen; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R.; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Zhou, Shengqiang; Chen, Feng

    2013-12-01

    We report on the fabrication of ridge waveguides in Nd:YAG ceramic by using femtosecond laser micromachining of the surface of a He ion implanted planar waveguide. Under optical pump of 808 nm light, continuous wave waveguide lasers have been realized at 1.06 μm at room temperature in the Nd:YAG ceramic ridge waveguide system, reaching a maximum output power of 46 mW. The lasing threshold of ˜64.9 mW and the slope efficiency of 42.5% are obtained for the ridge waveguide system, which shows superior lasing performance to the Nd:YAG ceramic planar waveguide.

  16. High speed, intermediate resolution, large area laser beam induced current imaging and laser scribing system for photovoltaic devices and modules.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Adam B; Song, Zhaoning; DeWitt, Jonathan L; Stone, Jon M; Krantz, Patrick W; Royston, John M; Zeller, Ryan M; Mapes, Meghan R; Roland, Paul J; Dorogi, Mark D; Zafar, Syed; Faykosh, Gary T; Ellingson, Randy J; Heben, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a laser beam induced current imaging tool for photovoltaic devices and modules that utilizes diode pumped Q-switched lasers. Power densities on the order of one sun (100 mW/cm(2)) can be produced in a ∼40 μm spot size by operating the lasers at low diode current and high repetition rate. Using galvanostatically controlled mirrors in an overhead configuration and high speed data acquisition, large areas can be scanned in short times. As the beam is rastered, focus is maintained on a flat plane with an electronically controlled lens that is positioned in a coordinated fashion with the movements of the mirrors. The system can also be used in a scribing mode by increasing the diode current and decreasing the repetition rate. In either mode, the instrument can accommodate samples ranging in size from laboratory scale (few cm(2)) to full modules (1 m(2)). Customized LabVIEW programs were developed to control the components and acquire, display, and manipulate the data in imaging mode.

  17. High speed, intermediate resolution, large area laser beam induced current imaging and laser scribing system for photovoltaic devices and modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Adam B.; Song, Zhaoning; DeWitt, Jonathan L.; Stone, Jon M.; Krantz, Patrick W.; Royston, John M.; Zeller, Ryan M.; Mapes, Meghan R.; Roland, Paul J.; Dorogi, Mark D.; Zafar, Syed; Faykosh, Gary T.; Ellingson, Randy J.; Heben, Michael J.

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a laser beam induced current imaging tool for photovoltaic devices and modules that utilizes diode pumped Q-switched lasers. Power densities on the order of one sun (100 mW/cm2) can be produced in a ˜40 μm spot size by operating the lasers at low diode current and high repetition rate. Using galvanostatically controlled mirrors in an overhead configuration and high speed data acquisition, large areas can be scanned in short times. As the beam is rastered, focus is maintained on a flat plane with an electronically controlled lens that is positioned in a coordinated fashion with the movements of the mirrors. The system can also be used in a scribing mode by increasing the diode current and decreasing the repetition rate. In either mode, the instrument can accommodate samples ranging in size from laboratory scale (few cm2) to full modules (1 m2). Customized LabVIEW programs were developed to control the components and acquire, display, and manipulate the data in imaging mode.

  18. High speed imaging of an Er,Cr:YSGG laser in a model of a root canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdaasdonk, Rudolf; Blanken, Jan; van Heeswijk, Hans; de Roode, Rowland; Klaessens, John

    2007-02-01

    Laser systems of various wavelengths and pulse characteristics have been introduced in dentistry. At present, the range of applications for the different systems is being investigated mainly differentiating between soft and hard tissue applications. For the preparation of root canals both hard and soft tissues are involved. Ideally, one would like to use one laser system for the whole treatment. In this study, we studied the characteristics of the pulsed 2,78 Er,Cr:YSGG laser (Biolase, Waterlase Millenium), in view of root canal cleaning and desinfection. The laser energy was fiber delivered with fiber tip diameters from 400 μm down to 200 μm. Special thermal and high speed imaging techniques were applied in a transparent model of a tapered root canal and slices cut from human teeth. High speed imaging revealed the dynamics of an explosive vapor bubble at the tip of the Er laser in water and the root canal model. Typically for Erbium lasers, within a time span of several hundred μs, a longitudinal bubble expanded to maximum size of 5 mm length and 2 mm diameter at 100 mJ and imploded afterwards. In the root canal, the explosive bubble created turbulent high speed water streaming which resects soft tissue from the hard tissue. Thermal imaging showed the dynamics of all lasers heating of the canal wall up to several mm depending on the wavelength and energy settings. The mechanism of smear layer removal and sterilization in the root canal, is attributed to cavitation effects induced by the pulsed laser. The heat generation into the dentine wall was minimal.

  19. Calibration of ultra high speed laser engraving processes by correlating influencing variables including correlative evaluation with SEM and CLSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohrer, Markus; Vaupel, Matthias; Nirnberger, Robert; Weinberger, Bernhard

    2016-03-01

    Laser engraving is used for decades as a well-established process e. g. for the production of print and embossing forms for many goods in daily life, e. g. decorated cans and printed bank notes. Up to now it is more or less a so-called fire-and-forget process. From the original artist's plan to the digitization, then from the laser source itself (with electronic signals, RF and plasma discharge regarding CO2 lasers) to the behavior of the optical beam delivery — especially if an AOM is used — to the interaction of the laser beam with the material itself is a long process chain. The most recent results using CO2 lasers with AOMs and the research done with scanning electron microscope (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) — as a set for correlative microscopy to evaluate the high speed engraving characteristics — are presented in this paper.

  20. Modelling of micromachining of human tooth enamel by erbium laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Belikov, A V; Skrypnik, A V; Shatilova, K V

    2014-08-31

    We consider a 3D cellular model of human tooth enamel and a photomechanical cellular model of enamel ablation by erbium laser radiation, taking into account the structural peculiarities of enamel, energy distribution in the laser beam cross section and attenuation of laser energy in biological tissue. The surface area of the texture in enamel is calculated after its micromachining by erbium laser radiation. The influence of the surface area on the bond strength of enamel with dental filling materials is discussed. A good correlation between the computer simulation of the total work of adhesion and experimentally measured bond strength between the dental filling material and the tooth enamel after its micromachining by means of YAG : Er laser radiation is attained. (laser biophotonics)

  1. High-speed two-dimensional laser scanner based on Bragg gratings stored in photothermorefractive glass.

    PubMed

    Yaqoob, Zahid; Arain, Muzammil A; Riza, Nabeel A

    2003-09-10

    A high-speed free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner with high-speed wavelength selection coupled with narrowband volume Bragg gratings stored in photothermorefractive (PTR) glass is reported. The proposed scanner with no moving parts has a modular design with a wide angular scan range, accurate beam pointing, low scanner insertion loss, and two-dimensional beam scan capabilities. We present a complete analysis and design procedure for storing multiple tilted Bragg-grating structures in a single PTR glass volume (for normal incidence) in an optimal fashion. Because the scanner design is modular, many PTR glass volumes (each having multiple tilted Bragg-grating structures) can be stacked together, providing an efficient throughput with operations in both the visible and the infrared (IR) regions. A proof-of-concept experimental study is conducted with four Bragg gratings in independent PTR glass plates, and both visible and IR region scanner operations are demonstrated.

  2. Noise performance of high-speed radio over fiber links employing vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M.; Bakry, A.; Mahmoud, S. W. Z.

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates the intensity noise in high-speed vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and its contribution to the noise performance of radio over fiber (RoF) links. We evaluate the sinusoidal modulation of VCSELs in terms of the second-order harmonic distortion (2HD) and third-order intermodulation distortion (IMD3) in additions to the relative intensity noise (RIN). The spurious-free dynamic range of the proposed VCSEL is estimated. The noise performance of the RoF link is assessed by the noise figure. The modulation characteristics of the VCSEL and the gain and noise factor (NF) of the fiber link are compared under conventional and high-speed modulations of VCSELs. Also, we present comparison of the NF between short (300 m) and relatively long (2 km) fibers.

  3. High speed intravascular photoacoustic imaging with fast optical parametric oscillator laser at 1.7 μm.

    PubMed

    Piao, Zhonglie; Ma, Teng; Li, Jiawen; Wiedmann, Maximilian T; Huang, Shenghai; Yu, Mingyue; Kirk Shung, K; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Chang-Seok; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-08-24

    Intravascular photoacoustic imaging at 1.7 μm spectral band has shown promising capabilities for lipid-rich vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque detection. In this work, we report a high speed catheter-based integrated intravascular photoacoustic/intravascular ultrasound (IVPA/IVUS) imaging system with a 500 Hz optical parametric oscillator laser at 1725 nm. A lipid-mimicking phantom and atherosclerotic rabbit abdominal aorta were imaged at 1 frame per second, which is two orders of magnitude faster than previously reported in IVPA imaging with the same wavelength. Clear photoacoustic signals by the absorption of lipid rich deposition demonstrated the ability of the system for high speed vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques detection.

  4. High speed intravascular photoacoustic imaging with fast optical parametric oscillator laser at 1.7 μm

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Zhonglie; Ma, Teng; Li, Jiawen; Wiedmann, Maximilian T.; Huang, Shenghai; Yu, Mingyue; Kirk Shung, K.; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Chang-Seok; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular photoacoustic imaging at 1.7 μm spectral band has shown promising capabilities for lipid-rich vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque detection. In this work, we report a high speed catheter-based integrated intravascular photoacoustic/intravascular ultrasound (IVPA/IVUS) imaging system with a 500 Hz optical parametric oscillator laser at 1725 nm. A lipid-mimicking phantom and atherosclerotic rabbit abdominal aorta were imaged at 1 frame per second, which is two orders of magnitude faster than previously reported in IVPA imaging with the same wavelength. Clear photoacoustic signals by the absorption of lipid rich deposition demonstrated the ability of the system for high speed vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques detection. PMID:26339072

  5. Modelling of micromachining of human tooth enamel by erbium laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, A. V.; Skrypnik, A. V.; Shatilova, K. V.

    2014-08-01

    We consider a 3D cellular model of human tooth enamel and a photomechanical cellular model of enamel ablation by erbium laser radiation, taking into account the structural peculiarities of enamel, energy distribution in the laser beam cross section and attenuation of laser energy in biological tissue. The surface area of the texture in enamel is calculated after its micromachining by erbium laser radiation. The influence of the surface area on the bond strength of enamel with dental filling materials is discussed. A good correlation between the computer simulation of the total work of adhesion and experimentally measured bond strength between the dental filling material and the tooth enamel after its micromachining by means of YAG : Er laser radiation is attained.

  6. Acoustic comparison of Er,Cr:YSGG laser and dental high speed handpiece for primary anterior tooth preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorden, Monserrat; Chen, Jung-Wei; Easley, Elisabeth; Li, Yiming; Kurti, R. Steven

    The acoustics of a dental hard tissue laser (Er,Cr:YSGG laser, Waterlase MD, Biolase, USA) and a traditional dental high speed hand piece (Midwest®, Dentsply International, USA) were compared in vitro using a simple approach that can be easily adapted for in vivo studies. Thirty one extracted caries and restoration free primary anterior teeth were selected. These teeth were sectioned along a symmetry axis to give two identical halves for use in a split study. These halves were randomly assigned to either the laser (experimental) or the high speed (control) group. A miniature electret microphone was coupled to the sample using a polymer and used to collect the acoustic signal at the interface of the pulp chamber. This signal was captured periodically by a digitizing oscilloscope and multiple traces were stored for subsequent analysis. 2x1x1mm3 preparations were made according to manufacturers recommendations for the given method. Each cavity was prepared by the same clinician and calibration tests were performed to ensure consistency. The measurements indicated that the peak acoustic pressures as well as cumulative acoustic effects (due to duty cycle) were significantly higher (P<0.001, T-test) with the dental hand piece than with the dental laser. Our study suggests the need for further investigations into the neurological implications of acoustic effects in dental patient care such as pain studies.

  7. Visualization of hair follicles using high-speed optical coherence tomography based on a Fourier domain mode locking laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, M.-T.; Chang, F.-Y.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system with a Fourier domain mode locking (FDML) laser is proposed for a dermatology study. The homemade FDML laser is one kind of frequency-sweeping light source, which can provide output power of >20 mW and an output spectrum of 65 nm in bandwidth centered at 1300 nm, enabling imaging with an axial resolution of 12 μm in the OCT system. To eliminate the forward scans from the laser output and insert the delayed backward scans, a Mach-Zehnder configuration is implemented. Compared with conventional frequency-sweeping light sources, the FDML laser can achieve much higher scan rates, as high as ˜240 kHz, which can provide a three-dimensional imaging rate of 4 volumes/s. Furthermore, the proposed high-speed SS-OCT system can provide three-dimensional (3D) images with reduced motion artifacts. Finally, a high-speed SS-OCT system is used to visualize hair follicles, demonstrating the potential of this technology as a tool for noninvasive diagnosis of alopecia.

  8. High-throughput machining using a high-average power ultrashort pulse laser and high-speed polygon scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schille, Joerg; Schneider, Lutz; Streek, André; Kloetzer, Sascha; Loeschner, Udo

    2016-09-01

    High-throughput ultrashort pulse laser machining is investigated on various industrial grade metals (aluminum, copper, and stainless steel) and Al2O3 ceramic at unprecedented processing speeds. This is achieved by using a high-average power picosecond laser in conjunction with a unique, in-house developed polygon mirror-based biaxial scanning system. Therefore, different concepts of polygon scanners are engineered and tested to find the best architecture for high-speed and precision laser beam scanning. In order to identify the optimum conditions for efficient processing when using high-average laser powers, the depths of cavities made in the samples by varying the processing parameter settings are analyzed and, from the results obtained, the characteristic removal values are specified. For overlapping pulses of optimum fluence, the removal rate is as high as 27.8 mm3/min for aluminum, 21.4 mm3/min for copper, 15.3 mm3/min for stainless steel, and 129.1 mm3/min for Al2O3, when a laser beam of 187 W average laser powers irradiates. On stainless steel, it is demonstrated that the removal rate increases to 23.3 mm3/min when the laser beam is very fast moving. This is thanks to the low pulse overlap as achieved with 800 m/s beam deflection speed; thus, laser beam shielding can be avoided even when irradiating high-repetitive 20-MHz pulses.

  9. Laser beam welding quality monitoring system based in high-speed (10 kHz) uncooled MWIR imaging sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linares, Rodrigo; Vergara, German; Gutiérrez, Raúl; Fernández, Carlos; Villamayor, Víctor; Gómez, Luis; González-Camino, Maria; Baldasano, Arturo; Castro, G.; Arias, R.; Lapido, Y.; Rodríguez, J.; Romero, Pablo

    2015-05-01

    The combination of flexibility, productivity, precision and zero-defect manufacturing in future laser-based equipment are a major challenge that faces this enabling technology. New sensors for online monitoring and real-time control of laserbased processes are necessary for improving products quality and increasing manufacture yields. New approaches to fully automate processes towards zero-defect manufacturing demand smarter heads where lasers, optics, actuators, sensors and electronics will be integrated in a unique compact and affordable device. Many defects arising in laser-based manufacturing processes come from instabilities in the dynamics of the laser process. Temperature and heat dynamics are key parameters to be monitored. Low cost infrared imagers with high-speed of response will constitute the next generation of sensors to be implemented in future monitoring and control systems for laser-based processes, capable to provide simultaneous information about heat dynamics and spatial distribution. This work describes the result of using an innovative low-cost high-speed infrared imager based on the first quantum infrared imager monolithically integrated with Si-CMOS ROIC of the market. The sensor is able to provide low resolution images at frame rates up to 10 KHz in uncooled operation at the same cost as traditional infrared spot detectors. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the new sensor technology, a low-cost camera was assembled on a standard production laser welding head, allowing to register melting pool images at frame rates of 10 kHz. In addition, a specific software was developed for defect detection and classification. Multiple laser welding processes were recorded with the aim to study the performance of the system and its application to the real-time monitoring of laser welding processes. During the experiments, different types of defects were produced and monitored. The classifier was fed with the experimental images obtained. Self

  10. Fiber inline Michelson interferometer fabricated by one-step femtosecond laser micromachining for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Lei; Wu, Hongbin; Wang, Cong; Yu, Yingyu; Wang, Sumei; Xiao, Hai

    2013-12-01

    A fiber inline Michelson interferometer fiber optic sensor was presented for sensing applications, including high temperature performance and refractive index change. The sensor was fabricated using one-step femtosecond (fs) laser micromachining technique. A step structure at the tip of a single mode optical fiber was formed during the micromachining process. The device had a loss of 16 dB and an interference visibility exceeding 18 dB. The capability of this device for temperature sensing up to 1000 °C and refractive index sensing application in various concentrations of ethanol solution were all demonstrated.

  11. High-speed dispersion-tuned wavelength-swept fiber laser using a reflective SOA and a chirped FBG.

    PubMed

    Takubo, Yuya; Yamashita, Shinji

    2013-02-25

    We present a high-speed wavelength-swept fiber laser based on a dispersion tuning method using a reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA) and a chirped fiber Bragg grating (CFBG). By using these devices, the cavity length can be shortened drastically. The short cavity improves the laser performance at high sweep rates over 200 kHz. We achieve a sweep range of 60 nm and an output power of 8.4 mW at 100 kHz sweep. We applied the dispersion-tuned fiber laser to the swept-source OCT system and successfully obtained OCT images of an adhesive tape at up to 250 kHz sweep rate.

  12. High-speed visualization and radiated pressure measurement of a laser-induced gas bubble in glycerin-water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Takehiro; Kondo, Tomoki; Ando, Keita

    2016-11-01

    We study the dynamics of a spherical gaseous bubble created by focusing a nanosecond laser pulse at 532 nm into a large volume of glycerin-water solutions. Free oscillation of the bubble and shock wave emission from the bubble dynamics are recorded by a high-speed camera together with a pulse laser stroboscope; concurrently, pressure radiated from the oscillating bubble is measured by a hydrophone. The bubble achieves a mechanical equilibrium after free oscillation is damped out; the equilibrium state stays for a while, unlike vapor bubbles. We speculate that the bubble content is mainly gases originally dissolved in the liquid (i.e., air). The bubble dynamics we observed are compared to Rayleigh-Plesset-type calculations that account for diffusive effects; the (unknown) initial pressure just after laser focusing is tuned to obtain agreement between the experiment and the calculation. Moreover, viscous effects on the shock propagation are examined with the aid of compressible Navier-Stokes simulation.

  13. Performance characterization of low-cost, high-speed, portable pulsed laser diode photoacoustic tomography (PLD-PAT) system.

    PubMed

    Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Pramanik, Manojit

    2015-10-01

    Photoacoustic tomography systems that uses Q-switched Nd:YAG/OPO pulsed lasers are expensive, bulky, and hence limits its use in clinical applications. The low pulse repetition rate of these lasers makes it unsuitable for real-time imaging when used with single-element ultrasound detector. In this work, we present a pulsed laser diode photoacoustic tomography (PLD-PAT) system that integrates a compact PLD inside a single-detector circular scanning geometry. We compared its performance against the traditional Nd:YAG/OPO based PAT system in terms of imaging depth, resolution, imaging time etc. The PLD provides near-infrared pulses at ~803 nm wavelength with pulse energy ~1.4 mJ/pulse at 7 kHz repetition rate. The PLD-PAT system is capable of providing 2D image in scan time as small as 3 sec with a signal-to-noise ratio ~30. High-speed and deep-tissue imaging is demonstrated on phantoms and biological samples. The PLD-PAT system is inexpensive, portable, allows high-speed PAT imaging, and its performance is as good as traditional expensive OPO based PAT system. Therefore, it holds promises for future translational biomedical imaging applications.

  14. High-speed scanning of critical structures in aviation using coordinate measurement machine and the laser ultrasonic.

    PubMed

    Swornowski, Pawel J

    2012-01-01

    Aviation is one of the know-how spheres containing a great deal of responsible sub-assemblies, in this case landing gear. The necessity for reducing production cycle times while achieving better quality compels metrologists to look for new and improved ways to perform inspection of critical structures. This article describes the ability to determine the shape deviation and location of defects in landing gear using coordinate measuring machines and laser ultrasonic with high-speed scanning. A nondestructive test is the basis for monitoring microcrack and corrosion propagation in the context of a damage-tolerant design approach. This article presents an overview of the basics and of the various metrological aspects of coordinate measurement and a nondestructive testing method in terms of high-speed scanning. The new test method (laser ultrasonic) promises to produce the necessary increase in inspection quality, but this is limited by the wide range of materials, geometries, and structure aeronautic parts used. A technique combining laser ultrasonic and F-SAFT (Fourier-Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique) processing has been proposed for the detection of small defects buried in landing gear. The experimental results of landing gear inspection are also presented.

  15. Three-Dimensional Optical Reconstruction of Vocal Fold Kinematics Using High-Speed Video With a Laser Projection System.

    PubMed

    Luegmair, Georg; Mehta, Daryush D; Kobler, James B; Döllinger, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Vocal fold kinematics and its interaction with aerodynamic characteristics play a primary role in acoustic sound production of the human voice. Investigating the temporal details of these kinematics using high-speed videoendoscopic imaging techniques has proven challenging in part due to the limitations of quantifying complex vocal fold vibratory behavior using only two spatial dimensions. Thus, we propose an optical method of reconstructing the superior vocal fold surface in three spatial dimensions using a high-speed video camera and laser projection system. Using stereo-triangulation principles, we extend the camera-laser projector method and present an efficient image processing workflow to generate the three-dimensional vocal fold surfaces during phonation captured at 4000 frames per second. Initial results are provided for airflow-driven vibration of an ex vivo vocal fold model in which at least 75% of visible laser points contributed to the reconstructed surface. The method captures the vertical motion of the vocal folds at a high accuracy to allow for the computation of three-dimensional mucosal wave features such as vibratory amplitude, velocity, and asymmetry.

  16. High-speed, three-dimensional tomographic laser-induced incandescence imaging of soot volume fraction in turbulent flames.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Terrence R; Halls, Benjamin R; Jiang, Naibo; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R

    2016-12-26

    High-speed, laser-based tomographic imaging of the three-dimensional time evolution of soot volume fraction in turbulent jet diffusion flames is demonstrated to be feasible at rates of 10 kHz or higher. The fundamental output of a burst-mode Nd:YAG laser with 1 J/pulse is utilized for volumetric impulsive heating of soot particles with a laser fluence of 0.1 J/cm2, enabling signal-to-noise ratios of ~100:1 in images of the resulting incandescence. The three-dimensional morphology of the soot distribution is captured with a spatial resolution of <1.5 mm using as few as four viewing angles, with convergence of the soot volume fraction to within ~95% occurring with seven or more viewing angles. Uniqueness of the solution is demonstrated using two sets of eight images captured at the same time instant, with agreement to >90% in peak values between the two sets. These data establish parameters for successful high-speed, three-dimensional imaging of the soot volume fraction within highly transient combustion environments.

  17. Metallic nanoparticles grown in the core of femtosecond laser micromachined waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, J. M. P.; Ferreira, P. H. D.; Mendonça, C. R.; Manzani, D.; Napoli, M.; Ribeiro, S. J. L.

    2014-05-21

    3D-waveguides containing silver nanoparticles have been fabricated in tungsten lead–pyrophosphate glass by femtosecond laser micromachining. Nucleation and growth of nanoparticles occur in a single step process when high repetition rate laser (MHz) is employed, while an additional annealing is required for the irradiation using kHz laser system. The presence of nanoparticles locally changes the refractive index, and, therefore, the elliptical structures produced by direct laser writing were able to guide light. By increasing the pulse energy applied during the micromachining, the waveguide size increased from 2 to 30 μm, while their propagation loss decrease from 1.4 to 0.5 dB/mm at 632.8 nm.

  18. High-speed laser-induced fluorescence and spark plug absorption sensor diagnostics for mixing and combustion studies in engines.

    PubMed

    Cundy, Michael; Schucht, Torsten; Thiele, Olaf; Sick, Volker

    2009-02-01

    Simultaneous high-speed in-cylinder measurements of laser-induced fluorescence of biacetyl as a fuel tracer and mid-infrared broadband absorption of fuel and combustion products (water and carbon dioxide) using a spark plug probe are compared in an optical engine. The study addresses uncertainties and the applicability of absorption measurements at a location slightly offset to the spark plug when information about mixing at the spark plug is desired. Absorbance profiles reflect important engine operation events, such as valve opening and closing, mixing, combustion, and outgassing from crevices.

  19. Micromachining of polyurethane (PU) polymer using a KrF excimer laser (248 nm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sarabpreet; Sharma, Sunil

    2014-12-01

    Polyurethane (PU) polymer, due to its biocompatibility, weather resistance, and favorable physical properties, finds a number of applications in medical implants, protective coatings, and as a prototype material for structural components in MEMS devices. An excimer laser (wavelength = 248 nm, FWHM = 25 ns) is employed for micromachining of polyurethane (PU) polymer. For air environment, the ablation rate is 0.18 μm/pulse and for underwater environment, the ablation rate is 0.07 μm/pulse (with underwater ablation threshold as 0.10 J/cm2), which concluded low taper angles (∼32°) for in air as compared to high taper angles (∼65°) with underwater micromachining. The experimental results for air and under water micromachining demonstrate ablation process as a combination of photo-thermal and photo-chemical mechanism.

  20. High speed three-dimensional laser scanner with real time processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavelle, Joseph P. (Inventor); Schuet, Stefan R. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A laser scanner computes a range from a laser line to an imaging sensor. The laser line illuminates a detail within an area covered by the imaging sensor, the area having a first dimension and a second dimension. The detail has a dimension perpendicular to the area. A traverse moves a laser emitter coupled to the imaging sensor, at a height above the area. The laser emitter is positioned at an offset along the scan direction with respect to the imaging sensor, and is oriented at a depression angle with respect to the area. The laser emitter projects the laser line along the second dimension of the area at a position where a image frame is acquired. The imaging sensor is sensitive to laser reflections from the detail produced by the laser line. The imaging sensor images the laser reflections from the detail to generate the image frame. A computer having a pipeline structure is connected to the imaging sensor for reception of the image frame, and for computing the range to the detail using height, depression angle and/or offset. The computer displays the range to the area and detail thereon covered by the image frame.

  1. Experimental and theoretical study of the laser micro-machining of glass using high-repetition-rate ultrafast laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashkir, Yuri; Liu, Qiang

    2006-04-01

    We present a systematic study of the ultrafast laser micro-machining of glass using a Ti:Spp laser with moderate pulse energy (<5 μJ) at a high repetition rate (50 kHz). Optimal conditions were identified for high resolution surface laser etching, and via drilling. Several practical applications were developed: glass templates for micro fluid diffraction devices, phase gratings for excimer laser projection techniques, micro fluid vertical channel-connectors, etc. It is demonstrated that the interaction of ultrafast laser pulses with glass combines several different processes (direct ablation, explosive material ejection, and thermal material modification). A dynamic numerical model was developed for this process. It was successfully used for modelling of laser micro-machining with arbitrary 3D translations of the target.

  2. Fiber laser micromachining of magnesium alloy tubes for biocompatible and biodegradable cardiovascular stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Ali Gökhan; Previtali, Barbara; Colombo, Daniele; Ge, Qiang; Vedani, Maurizio; Petrini, Lorenza; Wu, Wei; Biffi, Carlo Alberto

    2012-02-01

    Magnesium alloys constitute an attractive solution for cardiovascular stent applications due to their intrinsic properties of biocompatibility and relatively low corrosion resistance in human-body fluids, which results in as a less intrusive treatment. Laser micromachining is the conventional process used to cut the stent mesh, which plays the key role for the accurate reproduction of the mesh design and the surface quality of the produced stent that are important factors in ensuring the mechanical and corrosion resistance properties of such a kind of devices. Traditionally continuous or pulsed laser systems working in microsecond pulse regime are employed for stent manufacturing. Pulsed fiber lasers on the other hand, are a relatively new solution which could balance productivity and quality aspects with shorter ns pulse durations and pulse energies in the order of mJ. This work reports the study of laser micromachining and of AZ31 magnesium alloy for the manufacturing of cardiovascular stents with a novel mesh design. A pulsed active fiber laser system operating in nanosecond pulse regime was employed for the micromachining. Laser parameters were studied for tubular cutting on a common stent material, AISI 316L tubes with 2 mm in diameter and 0.2 mm in thickness and on AZ31 tubes with 2.5 mm in diameter and 0.2 in thickness. In both cases process parameters conditions were examined for reactive and inert gas cutting solutions and the final stent quality is compared.

  3. Characterization of calculus migration during Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy by high speed camera using suspended pendulum method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian James; Rajabhandharaks, Danop; Xuan, Jason Rongwei; Chia, Ray W. J.; Hasenberg, Tom

    2014-03-01

    Calculus migration is a common problem during ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy procedure to treat urolithiasis. A conventional experimental method to characterize calculus migration utilized a hosting container (e.g. a "V" grove or a test tube). These methods, however, demonstrated large variation and poor detectability, possibly attributing to friction between the calculus and the container on which the calculus was situated. In this study, calculus migration was investigated using a pendulum model suspended under water to eliminate the aforementioned friction. A high speed camera was used to study the movement of the calculus which covered zero order (displacement), 1st order (speed) and 2nd order (acceleration). A commercialized, pulsed Ho:YAG laser at 2.1 um, 365-um core fiber, and calculus phantom (Plaster of Paris, 10×10×10mm cube) were utilized to mimic laser lithotripsy procedure. The phantom was hung on a stainless steel bar and irradiated by the laser at 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5J energy per pulse at 10Hz for 1 second (i.e., 5, 10, and 15W). Movement of the phantom was recorded by a high-speed camera with a frame rate of 10,000 FPS. Maximum displacement was 1.25+/-0.10, 3.01+/-0.52, and 4.37+/-0.58 mm for 0.5, 1, and 1.5J energy per pulse, respectively. Using the same laser power, the conventional method showed <0.5 mm total displacement. When reducing the phantom size to 5×5×5mm (1/8 in volume), the displacement was very inconsistent. The results suggested that using the pendulum model to eliminate the friction improved sensitivity and repeatability of the experiment. Detailed investigation on calculus movement and other causes of experimental variation will be conducted as a future study.

  4. High-speed laser anemometer system for intrarotor flow mapping in turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. A.; Strazisar, A. J.; Seasholtz, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    A fringe-type laser anemometer with innovative features is described. The innovative features include: (1) rapid, efficient data acquisition processes, (2) detailed graphic display of data being accumulated, and (3) input laser-beam positioning that allows greater optical access to the intrarotor region. Results are presented that demonstrate the anemometer's capability in flow mapping within a transonic axial-flow compressor rotor.

  5. Lithium iron phosphate battery electrode integrity following high speed pulsed laser cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutey, Adrian H. A.; Fiorini, Maurizio; Fortunato, Alessandro; Carmignato, Simone

    2015-05-01

    Laser exposures are performed on lithium iron phosphate battery electrodes at with process parameters based on those leading to the smallest heat affected zone for low power laser exposure at . Scanning electron microscopy and Raman analysis are performed along the resulting cut edges to characterize macroscopic, chemical and microstructural changes resulting from laser exposure. The increase in velocity with respect to previous studies is found to limit macroscopic changes to areas directly exposed to the laser beam and greatly suppress or completely eliminate microstructural and chemical changes resulting from thermal conduction effects in the metallic conductor layers. These results confirm laser technology as a viable, more flexible solution to mechanical blanking devices for the cutting of lithium iron phosphate battery electrode films.

  6. Micromachining of microchannel on the polycarbonate substrate with CO 2 laser direct-writing ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Heng; Chen, Tao; Yao, Liying; Zuo, Tiechuan

    2009-05-01

    Low-power CO 2 laser direct-writing ablation was used to micromachine a microchannel on the polycarbonate substrate in this work. The influence of the process parameters (the laser power, the moving velocity of the laser beam and the scanning times) on the micromachining quality (the depth, the width and their aspect ratio) of the microchannel was experimentally studied. The depth and width of microchannel both increase with the increase of the laser power and the decrease of the moving velocity of the laser beam. When higher laser power and slower moving velocity were used, the polycarbonate surface bore more heat irradiated from the CO 2 laser for longer time which results in the formation of deeper and wider molten pool, hence the ability to fabricate bigger microchannel. Because of the effect of the laser power on the depth and width of microchannels, higher aspect (depth/width) ratio could be achieved using slower moving velocity and higher laser power, and it would reach a steady state when the laser power increases to 9.0 W possibly caused by the effect of laser power on the different directions of microchannel. The polycarbonate-polycarbonate chip was bonded with hot-press bonding technique.

  7. High-speed measurements of steel-plate deformations during laser surface processing.

    PubMed

    Jezersek, Matija; Gruden, Valter; Mozina, Janez

    2004-10-04

    In this paper we present a novel approach to monitoring the deformations of a steel plate's surface during various types of laser processing, e.g., engraving, marking, cutting, bending, and welding. The measuring system is based on a laser triangulation principle, where the laser projector generates multiple lines simultaneously. This enables us to measure the shape of the surface with a high sampling rate (80 Hz with our camera) and high accuracy (+/-7 microm). The measurements of steel-plate deformations for plates of different thickness and with different illumination patterns are presented graphically and in an animation.

  8. High-speed ultrashort pulse fiber ring laser using charcoal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenbo; Hu, Hongyu; Zhang, Xiang; Zhao, Shuai; Fu, Kan; Dutta, Niloy K

    2016-03-20

    A mode-locked erbium-doped fiber ring laser that is easy to set up is proposed and experimentally demonstrated to generate a high-repetition-rate optical pulse train with an ultrashort pulse width. The laser combines a rational harmonic mode-locking technique and charcoal nanoparticles as saturable absorbers. Compared to a solely active mode-locking scheme, the scheme with charcoal nanoparticles can remove the supermodes and narrow the pulse width by a factor of 0.57 at a repetition rate of 20 GHz. Numerical simulation of the laser performance is also provided, which shows good agreement with the experimental results.

  9. Microstructure and its effect on toughness and wear resistance of laser surface melted and post heat treated high speed steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åhman, Leif

    1984-10-01

    High speed steel hacksaw blade blanks were laser surface melted and rapidly solidified along one edge. The laser melting resulted in complete carbide dissolution. By subsequent machining and heat treatments saw teeth were manufactured with a refined internal structure of the edges and corners. The structure was fully martensitic with a uniform and dense dispersion of small primary carbides. Sawing tests in quenched and tempered steel showed that blade life was somewhat improved, as compared to conventionally heat treated blades. The increased wear resistance is believed to be due to improved toughness along with high hardness caused by the refined carbide structure. Sawing tests in austenitic stainless steel did not give any significant improvement in performance. The effect of the altered microstructure on performance is likely to be more or less pronounced depending on application, tool and work material.

  10. Nd:YAG laser micromachining of SiC precision structures for MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreutz, Ernst-Wolfgang; Weichenhain, Ruth; Horn, Alexander

    2001-04-01

    Micromachining of SiC with 1(omega) , 2(omega) , 3(omega) -Nd:YAG laser radiation with pulse durations in the ps to ns regime is performed in various processing gas atmospheres as a function of processing variables showing the influence of the heat and pressure load onto the precision of geometric structures generated. The physical and chemical processes involved in micromachining with laser radiation are characterized by a machine vision system and the produced structures are analyzed by profilometry, optical and electron microscopy as well as X- photoelectron spectroscopy. 3D microstructures are produced by scanning and turning the laser beam onto the material surface, width of structures < 100 micrometers and surface roughness < 2 micrometers , for example, require an overlap < 0.8 independent of the type of processing gas under investigation.

  11. Nano-strip grating lines self-organized by a high speed scanning CW laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Satoru; Ito, Takeshi; Akiyama, Kensuke; Yasui, Manabu; Kato, Chihiro; Tanaka, Satomi; Hirabayashi, Yasuo; Mastuno, Akira; Nire, Takashi; Funakubo, Hiroshi; Yoshimoto, Mamoru

    2011-04-01

    After a laser annealing experiment on Si wafer, we found an asymmetric sheet resistance on the surface of the wafer. Periodic nano-strip grating lines (nano-SGLs) were self-organized along the trace of one-time scanning of the continuous wave (CW) laser. Depending on laser power, the nano-trench formed with a period ranging from 500 to 800 nm with a flat trough between trench structures. This simple method of combining the scanning laser with high scanning speed of 300 m min - 1 promises a large area of nanostructure fabrication with a high output. As a demonstration of the versatile method, concentric circles were drawn on silicon substrate rotated by a personal computer (PC) cooling fan. Even with such a simple system, the nano-SGL showed iridescence from the concentric circles.

  12. Femtosecond two-photon laser-induced fluorescence of krypton for high-speed flow imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yejun; Capps, Cade; Kulatilaka, Waruna D

    2017-02-15

    Ultrashort-pulse (femtosecond-duration) two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (fs-TPLIF) of an inert gas tracer krypton (Kr) is investigated. A detailed spectroscopic study of fluorescence channels followed by the 5p'←←4p excitation of Kr at 204.1 nm is reported. The experimental line positions in the 750-840 nm emission region agree well with the NIST Atomic Spectra Database. The present work provides an accurate listing of relative line strengths in this spectral region. In the range of laser pulse energies investigated, a quadratic dependence was observed between the Kr-TPLIF signal and the laser pulse energy. The single-laser-shot 2D TPLIF images recorded in an unsteady jet demonstrate the potential of using fs excitation at 204.1 nm for mixing and flow diagnostic studies using Kr as an inert gas tracer.

  13. High-speed photography during laser-based gall bladder stone lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokaj, Jahja O.

    2001-04-01

    Shadowgraphy of gall bladder stone, which is held by a basket and immersed in a civete is performed. The exposure time is determined by the time of a N-Dye laser pulse used as a lightening source for photography. The shadowgram is projected in the objective of a camera which is connected to a microscope. The light coming from the laser, illuminates the civete collecting optical information of the stone and physical phenomena appearing above the stone. On top of the stone a tip of optical fiber is fixed, which is used for transmitting Ho:Yag laser power to the stone. Using a computer and time delay the laser pulses used for destruction and illumination are synchronized. Since the N-Dye laser pulse is pico-second range and the Ho:Yag laser pulse is in the range of micro-second, many image frames are obtained within the time of one pulse applied during the destruction. It is known that in the process of stone destruction several phenomena like plume, plasma, shock wave and bubble formation take place. However, the physical mechanism of the stone destruction is not yet completely understood. From the obtained results the above phenomena are studied which gives new information and clue for understanding some of the mentioned phenomena. The laser power which is guided by an optical fiber into the gall bladder or kidney of the human body can damage the living tissue and cause some serious health problems. For this reason the fiber needs to be oriented properly during the action of the laser power.

  14. High-speed deposition of titanium carbide coatings by laser-assisted metal–organic CVD

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yansheng; Tu, Rong; Goto, Takashi

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A semiconductor laser was first used to prepare wide-area LCVD-TiC{sub x} coatings. • The effect of laser power for the deposition of TiC{sub x} coatings was discussed. • TiC{sub x} coatings showed a columnar cross section and a dense surface texture. • TiC{sub x} coatings had a 1–4 order lower laser density than those of previous reports. • This study gives the possibility of LCVD applying on the preparation of TiC{sub x} coating. - Abstract: A semiconductor laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) of titanium carbide (TiC{sub x}) coatings on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate using tetrakis (diethylamido) titanium (TDEAT) and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} as source materials were investigated. The influences of laser power (P{sub L}) and pre-heating temperature (T{sub pre}) on the microstructure and deposition rate of TiC{sub x} coatings were examined. Single phase of TiC{sub x} coatings were obtained at P{sub L} = 100–200 W. TiC{sub x} coatings had a cauliflower-like surface and columnar cross section. TiC{sub x} coatings in the present study had the highest R{sub dep} (54 μm/h) at a relative low T{sub dep} than those of conventional CVD-TiC{sub x} coatings. The highest volume deposition rate (V{sub dep}) of TiC{sub x} coatings was about 4.7 × 10{sup −12} m{sup 3} s{sup −1}, which had 3–10{sup 5} times larger deposition area and 1–4 order lower laser density than those of previous LCVD using CO{sub 2}, Nd:YAG and argon ion laser.

  15. Can fiber laser improve high speed multi-pulse drilling of aeronautic alloy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, M.; Loumena, C.; Bussière, A.; Kling, R.; Delor, C.; Freysz, E.

    2016-03-01

    Processing of helicopter engines faster, better and more reliably is the triptych which binds LOMA, ALPhANOV and TURBOMECA. In current production machines, flash lamp pumped lasers are employed to drill thousands of cooling holes with specific geometries and diameters to ensure a homogeneous air flow over the surface. However we aim to enhance the production process. Therefore, the three partners started an initiative to identify and overcome the shortcomings of the current process, where the laser source is a key element for improvement. In this paper, we report on the latest developments in multi-pulse drilling using an IPG fiber laser. The latter delivers, at a tunable repetition rate (from single shot up to 2 kHz), laser pulses whose width and peak power are adjustable in between 0.2 - 10 ms and 0 - 12 kW respectively. We have focused our work on drilling of thick sheets of metal alloys with different geometries and different processing strategies. We will show that using such laser system it is possible to decrease the processing time while limiting the heat affected zones and collateral effects. Finally, the impact of the different physical processes in play during the drilling on the geometry of the holes will be discussed.

  16. Femtosecond-pulsed laser micromachining of a 4H SiC wafer for MEMS pressure sensor diaphragms and via holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yuanyuan; Nair, Rajeev; Molian, Raathai; Molian, Pal

    2008-03-01

    The challenging issues in conventional microfabrication of SiC pressure sensor diaphragms from bulk wafers are low etch rates, thicker (>40 µm) diaphragms, low spatial resolutions, rough surfaces and substantial contamination. In via hole drilling of SiC, the critical concern is the low drilling speed (nm per minute). In this work, femtosecond (fs)-pulsed laser ablation was conducted to overcome some of these deficiencies. Circular diaphragms (0.5 to 1 mm) by trepanning mode and via holes (30-50 µm) by percussion drilling mode were micromachined in 250 µm thick 4H-SiC single crystals using an 800 nm wavelength, 120 fs, 1 mJ Ti:sapphire laser. Pulse energy, number of pulses and scan rate were varied to obtain a high etch rate and high quality features. Results showed that the etch rates are 2-10 µm per pulse, diaphragm thicknesses are 20-200 µm, surface roughness is 1-2 µm Ra and via hole drilling speeds are up to 25 µm per second. The etch depth control was well within ± 1%. High aspect ratio features with excellent spatial resolutions were obtained due to the absence of thermal damages such as a recast layer and contamination. Thus, femtosecond-pulsed laser ablation by virtue of its unique characteristics such as multiphoton ionization and the absence of lattice heating offers high speed, precision and accuracy in micromachining 4H-SiC wafers.

  17. High-speed measurement of an air transect's temperature shift heated by laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, WenYu; Jiang, ZongFu; Xi, Fengjie; Li, Qiang; Xie, Wenke

    2005-02-01

    Laser beam heat the air on the optic path, Beam-deflection optical tomography is a non-intrusive method to measure the 2-dimension temperature distribution in the transect. By means of linear Hartmann Sensor at the rate of 27kHz, the optic path was heated by a 2.7μm HF laser, continuous and high time resolution gradients of optic phase were obtained. the result of analysing and calculation showed the temperament shift in the heated beam path was not higher than 50K when the HF laser power was 9W. The experiment showed that it is a practical non-intrusive temperature shift measurement method for a small area aero-optical medium.

  18. High-speed directly modulated 1.5μm quantum dot lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banyoudeh, Saddam; Abdollahinia, Alireza; Eyal, Ori; Schnabel, Florian; Sichkovskyi, Vitalii; Eisenstein, Gadi; Reithmaier, Johann P.

    2016-03-01

    Due to the discrete density of states distribution and spatial localization of carriers in quantum dot (QD) material, the dynamics should be strongly enhanced in comparison to quantum well material. Based on improved 1.5 μm InAs/InGaAlAs/InP QD gain material short cavity ridge waveguide lasers were fabricated. Devices with cavity, lengths of 230 to 338 μm with high reflection coatings on the backside exhibit record value for any QD laser in small and large signal modulation performance with up to 15 GHz and 36 GBit/s, respectively, obtained at 14 °C. Due to the high temperature stability of threshold current and external differential efficiency, the lasers exhibit also nearly constant modulation bandwidth between 14-60 °C.

  19. High-speed laser anemometry based on spectrally resolved Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.

    1991-01-01

    Laser anemometry in unseeded flows based on the measurement of the spectrum of Rayleigh scattered laser light is reviewed. The use of molecular scattering avoids the well known problems (particle lag, biasing effects, seed generation, seed injection) of seeded flows. The fundamental limits on velocity measurement accuracy are determined using maximum likelihood methods. Measurement of the Rayleigh spectrum with scanning Fabry-Perot interferometers is analyzed and accuracy limits are established for both single pass and multipass configurations. Multipass configurations have much higher selectivity and are needed for measurements where there is a large amount of excess noise caused by stray laser light. It is shown that Rayleigh scattering is particularly useful for supersonic and hypersonic flows. The results of the analysis are compared with measurements obtained with a Rayleigh scattering diagnostic developed for study of the exhaust plume of a small hydrogen-oxygen rocket, where the velocities are in the range of 1000 to 5000 m/sec.

  20. CW laser strategies for simultaneous, multi-parameter measurements in high-speed gas flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Di Rosa, M. D.; Philippe, L. C.; Arroyo, M. P.; Hanson, R. K.

    1992-01-01

    Strategies utilizing continuous wave (CW) lasers are considered which are capable of simultaneously measuring the flow parameters of velocity, temperature, and pressure at sampling rates exceeding 3 kHz. Velocity is determined from the Doppler shift of the spectral profile, temperature is extracted from intensity ratios of multiple lines, and pressure is measured from either the collision of broadening or the magnitude of absorption. Distinctions between strategies concern the specifics of probe spacies (NO, OH, O2, and H2O) in terms of nominal probe wavelength, equipment, and detection scheme. CW lasers were applied to path-integrated absorption measurements of transient shock-tube flows and spatially resolved laser-induced fluorescence measurements of underexpanded jets.

  1. High-speed high-sensitivity infrared spectroscopy using mid-infrared swept lasers (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, David T. D.; Groom, Kristian M.; Hogg, Richard A.; Revin, Dmitry G.; Cockburn, John W.; Rehman, Ihtesham U.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is a highly attractive read-out technology for compositional analysis of biomedical specimens because of its unique combination of high molecular sensitivity without the need for exogenous labels. Traditional techniques such as FTIR and Raman have suffered from comparatively low speed and sensitivity however recent innovations are challenging this situation. Direct mid-IR spectroscopy is being speeded up by innovations such as MEMS-based FTIR instruments with very high mirror speeds and supercontinuum sources producing very high sample irradiation levels. Here we explore another possible method - external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL's) with high cavity tuning speeds (mid-IR swept lasers). Swept lasers have been heavily developed in the near-infrared where they are used for non-destructive low-coherence imaging (OCT). We adapt these concepts in two ways. Firstly by combining mid-IR quantum cascade gain chips with external cavity designs adapted from OCT we achieve spectral acquisition rates approaching 1 kHz and demonstrate potential to reach 100 kHz. Secondly we show that mid-IR swept lasers share a fundamental sensitivity advantage with near-IR OCT swept lasers. This makes them potentially able to achieve the same spectral SNR as an FTIR instrument in a time x N shorter (N being the number of spectral points) under otherwise matched conditions. This effect is demonstrated using measurements of a PDMS sample. The combination of potentially very high spectral acquisition rates, fundamental SNR advantage and the use of low-cost detector systems could make mid-IR swept lasers a powerful technology for high-throughput biomedical spectroscopy.

  2. Method and apparatus for reducing quantization error in laser gyro test data through high speed filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J.G.; Brown, A.K.; Matthews, A.

    1987-01-06

    A method is described for processing ring laser gyroscope test data comprising the steps of: (a) accumulating the data over a preselected sample period; and (b) filtering the data at a predetermined frequency so that non-time dependent errors are reduced by a substantially greater amount than are time dependent errors; then (c) analyzing the random walk error of the filtered data.

  3. High-speed energy efficient selective removal of large area copper layer by laser induced delamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmetec, Blaž; Kovačič, Drago; Možina, Janez; Podobnik, Boštjan

    2009-07-01

    An indirect laser-induced method for selective removal of large copper areas from a printed circuit board is theoretically and experimentally investigated. The results show that the threshold condition for the process involves phase transition of the epoxy-based substrate resin. Optimal parameters for maximizing process speed are found and discussed.

  4. Aerodynamic distortion propagation calculation in application of high-speed target detection by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yonghui; Sun, Huayan; Zhao, Yanzhong; Chen, Jianbiao

    2015-10-01

    Active laser detection technique has a broad application prospect in antimissile and air defense, however the aerodynamic flow field around the planes and missiles cause serious distortion effect on the detecting laser beams. There are many computational fluid dynamics(CFD) codes that can predict the air density distribution and also the density fluctuations of the flow field, it's necessary for physical optics to be used to predict the distortion properties after propagation through the complex process. Aiming at the physical process of laser propagation in "Cat-eye" lenses and aerodynamic flow field for twice, distortion propagation calculation method is researched in this paper. In the minds of dividing the whole process into two parts, and tread the aero-optical optical path difference as a phase distortion, the incidence and reflection process are calculated using Collins formula and angular spectrum diffraction theory respectively. In addition, turbulent performance of the aerodynamic flow field is estimated according to the electromagnetic propagation theory through a random medium, the rms optical path difference and Strehl ratio of the turbulent optical distortion are obtained. Finally, Computational fluid mechanics and aero-optical distortion properties of the detecting laser beams are calculated with the hemisphere-on-cylinder turret as an example, calculation results are showed and analysed.

  5. Digital high-speed camera system for combustion research using UV-laser diagnostic under microgravity at Bremen drop tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renken, Hartmut; Bolik, T.; Eigenbrod, Ch.; Koenig, Jens; Rath, Hans J.

    1997-04-01

    A digital high-speed camera- and recording system for 2D UV- laser spectroscopy was recently completed at Bremen drip tower. At the moment the primary users are the microgravity combustion researchers. The current project studies the reaction zones during the process of combustion. Particularly OH-radicals are detected 2D by using the method of laser induced predissociation fluorescence (LIPF). A pulsed high-energy excimer lasersystem combined with a two- staged intensified CCD-camera allows a repetition rate of 250 images per second, according to the maximum laser pulse repetition. The laser system is integrated at the top of the 110 m high evacuatable drop tube. Motorized mirrors are necessary to achieve a stable beam position within the area of interest during the drop of the experiment-capsule. The duration of 1 drop will be 4.7 seconds. About 1500 images are captured and stored onboard the drop capsule 96 Mbyte RAM image storagesystem. After saving capsule and data, a special PC-based image processing software visualizes the movies and extracts physical information out of the images. Now, after two and a half years of development the system is working operational and capable of high temporal 2D LIPF- measuring of OH, H2O, O2 and CO concentrations and 2D temperature distribution of these species.

  6. Laser-triangulation device for in-line measurement of road texture at medium and high speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigada, Alfredo; Mancosu, Federico; Manzoni, Stefano; Zappa, Emanuele

    2010-10-01

    The knowledge of the friction coefficient between road and tyres is a very precious information to implement vehicle active control, especially considering the optimisation of the braking action. One of the most important parameters able to influence such a coefficient is the road texture (microtexture and macrotexture). Although different methods are now available to perform reliable texture measurements, no well-established techniques currently exist for measuring the pavement texture at medium-high speed with real time data analysis during the usual vehicle operations. This paper presents a method, based on two identical industrial laser-triangulation displacement transducers, allowing to get real time reliable road micro and macrotexture measurements during standard vehicle operations, even at medium and high speed. The presence of two transducers also allows to estimate the instantaneous vehicle speed, which is needed to obtain the road texture from the sensor time-histories. This means that the presented system can be considered as a stand-alone device able to give as an output the road texture (micro and macro) and also the vehicle speed without any other input. The paper also underlines the advantages of this method and its drawbacks. The method reliability is evidenced by some real time outdoor tests on the different road surfaces of the Pirelli test track and at different vehicle speeds.

  7. Frequency tuning of polarization oscillations: Toward high-speed spin-lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lindemann, Markus Gerhardt, Nils C.; Hofmann, Martin R.; Pusch, Tobias; Michalzik, Rainer

    2016-01-25

    Spin-controlled vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (spin-VCSELs) offer a high potential to overcome several limitations of conventional purely charged-based laser devices. Presumably, the highest potential of spin-VCSELs lies in their ultrafast spin and polarization dynamics, which can be significantly faster than the intensity dynamics in conventional devices. Here, we experimentally demonstrate polarization oscillations in spin-VCSELs with frequencies up to 44 GHz. The results show that the oscillation frequency mainly depends on the cavity birefringence, which can be tuned by applying mechanical strain to the VCSEL structure. A tuning range of about 34 GHz is demonstrated. By measuring the polarization oscillation frequency and the birefringence governed mode splitting as a function of the applied strain simultaneously, we are able to investigate the correlation between birefringence and polarization oscillations in detail. The experimental findings are compared to numerical calculations based on the spin-flip model.

  8. High-speed mass-transport phenomena during carburization of aluminum alloy by laser plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fariaut, F.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Semmar, N.; Le Menn, E.

    2006-04-01

    In the excimer laser carburizing process reported here, aluminum alloy samples have been treated in a propylene atmosphere, producing aluminum carbide surface layers. The layers have been characterized by nuclear reaction analysis that has shown carbon incorporation. X-ray diffraction at grazing incidence has evidenced aluminum carbide (Al4C3) phase. This study helps the understanding of the incorporation mechanisms of carbon in a surface. A micro-thermocapillary effect induced by heterogeneous surface formation has been evidenced. This original mass-transport phenomenon is very efficient in improving the carbon incorporation yield and hence in obtaining carbide layers several μm in thickness with a reduced laser pulse number. In order to obtain this micro-thermocapillary effect, the binary diagram of ceramic compounds must contain a peritectic.

  9. 1.55 µm high speed low chirp electroabsorption modulated laser arrays based on SAG scheme.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuanbing; Wang, Qi Jie; Pan, Jiaoqing

    2014-12-15

    We demonstrate a cost-effective 1.55 µm low chirp 4 × 25 Gbit/s electroabsorption modulated laser (EML) array with 0.8 nm channel spacing by varying ridge width of the lasers and using selective area growth (SAG) integration scheme. The devices for all the 4 channels within the EML array show uniform threshold currents around 18 mA and high SMSRs over 45 dB. The output optical power of each channel is about 9 mW at an injection current of 100 mA. The typical chirp value of single EML measured by a fiber resonance method varied from 2.2 to -4 as the bias voltage was increased from 0 V to 2.5 V. These results show that the EML array is a suitable light source for 100 Gbit/s optical transmissions.

  10. High-Speed Laser Scanner Maps a Surface in Three Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavelle, Joseph; Schuet, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    A scanning optoelectronic instrument generates the digital equivalent of a threedimensional (X,Y,Z) map of a surface that spans an area with resolution on the order of 0.005 in. ( 0.125mm). Originally intended for characterizing surface flaws (e.g., pits) on space-shuttle thermal-insulation tiles, the instrument could just as well be used for similar purposes in other settings in which there are requirements to inspect the surfaces of many objects. While many commercial instruments can perform this surface-inspection function, the present instrument offers a unique combination of capabilities not available in commercial instruments. This instrument utilizes a laser triangulation method that has been described previously in NASA Tech Briefs in connection with simpler related instruments used for different purposes. The instrument includes a sensor head comprising a monochrome electronic camera and two lasers. The camera is a high-resolution

  11. Characterization of a Laser-Generated Perturbation in High-Speed Flow for Receptivity Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Amanda; Schneider, Steven P.; Kegerise, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of receptivity can contribute to the development of an amplitude-based method of transition prediction. This type of prediction model would incorporate more physics than the semi-empirical methods, which are widely used. The experimental study of receptivity requires a characterization of the external disturbances and a study of their effect on the boundary layer instabilities. Characterization measurements for a laser-generated perturbation were made in two different wind tunnels. These measurements were made with hot-wire probes, optical techniques, and pressure transducer probes. Existing methods all have their limitations, so better measurements will require the development of new instrumentation. Nevertheless, the freestream laser-generated perturbation has been shown to be about 6 mm in diameter at a static density of about 0.045 kg/cubic m. The amplitude of the perturbation is large, which may be unsuitable for the study of linear growth.

  12. High-speed laser anemometry based on spectrally resolved Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    Laser anemometry in unseeded flows based on the measurement of the spectrum of Rayleigh scattered laser light is reviewed. The use of molecular scattering avoids the well-known problems (particle lag, biasing effects, seed generation, seed injection) of seeded flows. The fundamental limits on velocity measurement accuracy are determined using maximum likelihood methods. Measurement of the Rayleigh spectrum with scanning Fabry-Perot interferometers is analyzed and accuracy limits are established for both single pass and multi-pass configurations. Multi-pass configurations have much higher selectivity and are needed for measurements where there is a large amount of excess noise caused by stray laser light. It is shown that Rayleigh scattering is particularly useful for supersonic and hypersonic flows. The results of the analysis are compared with measurements obtained with a Rayleigh scattering diagnostic developed for study of the exhaust plume of a small hydrogen-oxygen rocket, where the velocities are in the range 1000 to 5000 m/sec.

  13. Femtosecond laser micro-machined polyimide films for cell scaffold applications.

    PubMed

    Antanavičiūtė, Ieva; Šimatonis, Linas; Ulčinas, Orestas; Gadeikytė, Aušra; Abakevičienė, Brigita; Tamulevičius, Sigitas; Mikalayeva, Valeryia; Skeberdis, Vytenis Arvydas; Stankevičius, Edgaras; Tamulevičius, Tomas

    2016-12-11

    Engineering of sophisticated synthetic 3D scaffolds that allow controlling behavior and location of the cells requires advanced micro/nano fabrication techniques. Ultrafast laser micro-machining employing a 1030 nm wavelength Yb:KGW femtosecond laser and a micro-fabrication workstation for micro-machining of commercially available 12.7 and 25.4 µm thickness polyimide (PI) film was applied. Mechanical properties of the fabricated scaffolds, i.e., arrays of differently spaced holes, were examined via custom-built uniaxial micro-tensile testing and finite element method simulations. We demonstrate that experimental micro-tensile testing results could be numerically simulated and explained by 2-material model, assuming that 2-6 µm width rings around the holes possessed up to 5 times higher Young's modulus and yield stress compared with the rest of the laser intacted PI film areas of "dog-bone" shaped specimens. That was attributed to material modification around the micro-machined holes in the vicinity of the position of the focused laser beam track during trepanning drilling. We demonstrate that virgin PI films provide a suitable environment for the mobility, proliferation, and intercellular communication of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and discuss how cell behavior varies on the micro-machined PI films with holes of different diameters (3.1, 8.4, and 16.7 µm) and hole spacing (30, 35, 40, and 45 µm). We conclude that the holes of 3.1 µm diameter were sufficient for metabolic and genetic communication through membranous tunneling tubes between cells residing on the opposite sides of PI film but prevented the trans-migration of cells through the holes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. The Laser MicroJet (LMJ): a multi-solution technology for high quality micro-machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Tuan Anh; Richerzhagen, Bernold; Snowdon, Paul C.; Wood, David; Maropoulos, Paul G.

    2007-02-01

    The field of laser micromachining is highly diverse. There are many different types of lasers available in the market. Due to their differences in irradiating wavelength, output power and pulse characteristic they can be selected for different applications depending on material and feature size [1]. The main issues by using these lasers are heat damages, contamination and low ablation rates. This report examines on the application of the Laser MicroJet(R) (LMJ), a unique combination of a laser beam with a hair-thin water jet as a universal tool for micro-machining of MEMS substrates, as well as ferrous and non-ferrous materials. The materials include gallium arsenide (GaAs) & silicon wafers, steel, tantalum and alumina ceramic. A Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm (infra red) and frequency doubled 532 nm (green) were employed for the micro-machining of these materials.

  15. Calculus migration characterization during Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy by high-speed camera using suspended pendulum method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian James; Rajabhandharaks, Danop; Xuan, Jason Rongwei; Chia, Ray W J; Hasenberg, Thomas

    2017-04-12

    Calculus migration is a common problem during ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy procedure to treat urolithiasis. A conventional experimental method to characterize calculus migration utilized a hosting container (e.g., a "V" grove or a test tube). These methods, however, demonstrated large variation and poor detectability, possibly attributed to the friction between the calculus and the container on which the calculus was situated. In this study, calculus migration was investigated using a pendulum model suspended underwater to eliminate the aforementioned friction. A high-speed camera was used to study the movement of the calculus which covered zero order (displacement), first order (speed), and second order (acceleration). A commercialized, pulsed Ho:YAG laser at 2.1 μm, a 365-μm core diameter fiber, and a calculus phantom (Plaster of Paris, 10 × 10 × 10 mm(3)) was utilized to mimic laser lithotripsy procedure. The phantom was hung on a stainless steel bar and irradiated by the laser at 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 J energy per pulse at 10 Hz for 1 s (i.e., 5, 10, and 15 W). Movement of the phantom was recorded by a high-speed camera with a frame rate of 10,000 FPS. The video data files are analyzed by MATLAB program by processing each image frame and obtaining position data of the calculus. With a sample size of 10, the maximum displacement was 1.25 ± 0.10, 3.01 ± 0.52, and 4.37 ± 0.58 mm for 0.5, 1, and 1.5 J energy per pulse, respectively. Using the same laser power, the conventional method showed <0.5 mm total displacement. When reducing the phantom size to 5 × 5 × 5 mm(3) (one eighth in volume), the displacement was very inconsistent. The results suggested that using the pendulum model to eliminate the friction improved sensitivity and repeatability of the experiment. A detailed investigation on calculus movement and other causes of experimental variation will be conducted as a future study.

  16. Portable laser synthesizer for high-speed multi-dimensional spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Demos, Stavros G [Livermore, CA; Shverdin, Miroslav Y [Sunnyvale, CA; Shirk, Michael D [Brentwood, CA

    2012-05-29

    Portable, field-deployable laser synthesizer devices designed for multi-dimensional spectrometry and time-resolved and/or hyperspectral imaging include a coherent light source which simultaneously produces a very broad, energetic, discrete spectrum spanning through or within the ultraviolet, visible, and near infrared wavelengths. The light output is spectrally resolved and each wavelength is delayed with respect to each other. A probe enables light delivery to a target. For multidimensional spectroscopy applications, the probe can collect the resulting emission and deliver this radiation to a time gated spectrometer for temporal and spectral analysis.

  17. High-speed imaging of Raleigh-Taylor instabilities in laser-driven plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Alan M.; Gillespie, Calvin H.; Trott, Wayne M.

    1997-05-01

    We have previously reported our observations of the dynamic behavior of laser driven plates. Recent improvements and modification of the imaging techniques have identified and provided measurements of Raleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities that occur in these events. The microscope system in the LLNL Micro Detonics Facility, was converted to an epi- illuminated polarization configuration. A double pulse nanosecond illuminator and a second independently focusable frame camera were also added to the system. A laser driven plate, that is a dense solid driven by a laser heated, lower density plasma, is inherently R-T unstable. The characteristics and growth of the instability determine whether or not the plate remains intact. In earlier reports we correlated the surface patterning of thin plates with the fiber-optical transmission modes. In subsequent experiments we noted that the plasma burn through patterning in thin plates and the surface patterning of thicker plates did not correspond to the thin plate early time patterning. These observations led to the suspicion of R-T instability. A series of experiments correlating plate thickness and pattern spatial frequency has verified the instability. The plates are aluminum, deposited on the ends of optical fibers. They are launched by a YAG laser pulse traveling down the fiber. Plate velocities are several kilometers per second and characteristic dimensions of the instabilities are a few to tens of microns. Several techniques were used to examine the plates, the most successful being specularly reflecting polarization microscopy looking directly at the plate as it flies toward the camera. These images gave data on the spatial frequencies of the instabilities but could not give the amplitudes. To measure the amplitude of the instability a semi-transparent witness plate was placed a known distance from the plate. As above, the plate was observed using the polarization microscope but using the streak camera as the detector

  18. Investigation of temporal contrast effects in femtosecond pulse laser micromachining of metals.

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Benjamin (Pennsylvania State University, Freeport, PA); Palmer, Jeremy Andrew

    2006-06-01

    Femtosecond pulse laser drilling has evolved to become a preferred process for selective (maskless) micromachining in a variety of materials, including metals, polymers, semiconductors, ceramics, and living tissue. Manufacturers of state-of-the-art femtosecond laser systems advertise the inherent advantage of micromachining with ultra short pulses: the absence of a heat affected zone. In the ideal case, this leads to micro and nano scale features without distortion due to melt or recast. However, recent studies have shown that this is limited to the low fluence regime in many cases. High dynamic range autocorrelation studies were performed on two commercial Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser systems to investigate the possible presence of a nanosecond pedestal in the femtosecond pulse produced by chirped pulse amplification. If confirmed, nanosecond temporal phenomena may explain many of the thermal effects witnessed in high fluence micromachining. The material removal rate was measured in addition to feature morphology observations for percussion micro drilling of metal substrates in vacuum and ambient environments. Trials were repeated with proposed corrective optics installed, including a variable aperture and a nonlinear frequency doubling crystal. Results were compared. Although the investigation of nanosecond temporal phenomena is ongoing, early results have confirmed published accounts of higher removal rates in a vacuum environment.

  19. High-speed and crack-free direct-writing of microchannels on glass by an IR femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulushev, Evgeny; Bessmeltsev, Victor; Dostovalov, Alexandr; Goloshevsky, Nikolay; Wolf, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    Fabrication of high-resolution 3D structures with laser radiation on the surface of brittle materials has always been a challenging task. Even with femtosecond laser machining, micro-cracks and edge chipping occur. In order to evaluate processing modes optimal both in quality and productivity, we investigated high-speed (50 kHz) femtosecond laser processing of BK7 glass with the use of design of experiments and regression analysis. An automated inspection technique was developed to extract quality characteristics of test-objects. A regression model was obtained appropriate to fabricate microchannels with a predefined depth in the range of 1-30 μm with average accuracy of 5%. It was found that high quality machining modes are in the range of 0.91-2.27 μJ energy pulses, overlap of 53-62%, three and more number of passes. A material removal rate higher than 0.3 mm3/min was reached and microfluidic structures were formed based on data obtained.

  20. High-speed pre-clinical brain imaging using pulsed laser diode based photoacoustic tomography (PLD-PAT) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Pramanik, Manojit

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a promising biomedical imaging modality for small animal imaging, breast cancer imaging, monitoring of vascularisation, tumor angiogenesis, blood oxygenation, total haemoglobin concentration etc. The existing PAT systems that uses Q-switched Nd:YAG and OPO nanosecond lasers have limitations in clinical applications because they are expensive, non-potable and not suitable for real-time imaging due to their low pulse repetition rate. Low-energy pulsed near-infrared diode laser which are low-cost, compact, and light-weight (<200 grams), can be used as an alternate. In this work, we present a photoacoustic tomography system with a pulsed laser diode (PLD) that can nanosecond pulses with pulse energy 1.3 mJ/pulse at ~803 nm wavelength and 7000 Hz repetition rate. The PLD is integrated inside a single-detector circular scanning geometric system. To verify the high speed imaging capabilities of the PLD-PAT system, we performed in vivo experimental results on small animal brain imaging using this system. The proposed system is portable, low-cost and can provide real-time imaging.

  1. Long Wavelength Multiple Quantum Well Lasers for High-Speed Modulation Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    X-1.3g.tm) modified multiquantum well laser’ Applied Physics Letters 46(11) pp1 0 36 -1038 [2] Y Sasai, J Ohya and M Ogura, (1989) ’Spectral...returned. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE MB No. 0704-0188 PLdc raparg bJm, fo t ai o t o l m rIVU, i H towugmq 1 hour pe r in fl tkiu fV kwI-JB mwrwi, insbg...cdsu V os mes. gaiwu-g ". WWto g the dea ?Uw d cYi"Ou FuvimMl tmcmd Homio Said axftwts saud Wfa bui, wv ar ON ’v W a of trus coo do faf t.oI M c to

  2. A laser-optical sensor system for blade vibration detection of high-speed compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Mathias; Dreier, Florian; Günther, Philipp; Wilke, Ulrich; Fischer, Andreas; Büttner, Lars; Holzinger, Felix; Schiffer, Heinz-Peter; Czarske, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    Improved efficiency as well as increased lifetime of turbines and compressors are important goals in turbomachinery development. A significant enhancement to accomplish these aims can be seen in online monitoring of the operating parameters of the machines. During the operation of compressors it is of high interest to predict critical events like flutter or stall which can be achieved by observing blade deformations and vibrations. We have developed a laser Doppler distance sensor (LDDS), which is capable of simultaneously measuring the radial blade expansions, the circumferential blade deflections as well as the circumferential velocities of the rotor blade tips. As a result, an increase of blade vibrations is measured before stall at characteristic frequencies. While the detected vibration frequencies and the vibration increase are in agreement with the measurement results of a commercial capacitive blade tip timing system, the measured values of the vibration amplitudes differ by a factor of three. This difference can be mainly attributed to the different measurement locations and to the different measurement approaches. Since the LDDS is applicable to metal as well as ceramic, carbon-fiber and glass-fiber reinforced composite blades, a universally applicable sensor system for stall prediction and status monitoring is presented.

  3. High-speed identification of polymers by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moench, Ingo; Sattmann, R.; Noll, Reinhard

    1997-09-01

    One way to reduce the increasing waste streams of used polymers is an efficient material recycling. This requires a technology for the separation of polymer mixtures into different material fractions. For this purpose the principal suitability of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy was investigated. Plasma emission spectra of LDPE, HDPE, PP, PET, PVC, and PS were studied. Basic investigations were performed in order to assess the influence of different measurement parameters and to optimize the analytical performance. More than 140 spectra lines are identified, which can be related to C, H, O, N, C2, CN and CH from the bulk material and the atmosphere and to Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Sn, Ti and Zn from additives of the polymer. Estimated detection limits of down to 2 ppm are achieved for metallic additives. Different artificial neural networks were tested for the evaluation of the spectra. PET and PVC can be identified unambiguously detecting the characteristic elements oxygen and chlorine. For plastics, which differ in their contents of inorganic additives, the line emission of additives can be used as `fingerprints' of the plastics. In this way identification accuracies of 87% to 100% for PE, PP, PET and PVC are achieved.

  4. Picosecond laser micromachining of nitinol and platinum-iridium alloy for coronary stent applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, N.; Whitehead, D.; Boor, A.; Oppenlander, W.; Liu, Z.; Li, L.

    2012-03-01

    The demand for micromachining of coronary stents by means of industrial lasers rises quickly for treating coronary artery diseases, which cause more than one million deaths each year. The most widely used types of laser for stent manufacturing are Nd:YAG laser systems with a wavelength of 1064 nm with pulse lengths of 10-3-10-2 seconds. Considerable post-processing is required to remove heat-affected zones (HAZ), and to improve surface finishes and geometry. Using a third harmonic laser radiation of picosecond laser (6×10-12 s pulse duration) in UV range, the capability of the picosecond laser micromachining of nitinol and platinum-iridium alloy for coronary stent applications are presented. In this study dross-free cut of nitinol and platinum-iridium alloy tubes are demonstrated and topography analysis of the cut surface is carried out. The HAZ characteristics have been investigated by means of microscopic examinations and measurement of micro-hardness distribution near the cut zones.

  5. High-speed automated DNA sequencing utilizing from-the-side laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphall, Michael S.; Brumley, Robert L., Jr.; Buxton, Erin C.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1995-04-01

    The Human Genome Initiative is an ambitious international effort to map and sequence the three billion bases of DNA encoded in the human genome. If successfully completed, the resultant sequence database will be a tool of unparalleled power for biomedical research. One of the major challenges of this project is in the area of DNA sequencing technology. At this time, virtually all DNA sequencing is based upon the separation of DNA fragments in high resolution polyacrylamide gels. This method, as generally practiced, is one to two orders of magnitude too slow and expensive for the successful completion of the Human Genome projection. One reasonable approach is improved sequencing of DNA fragments is to increase the performance of such gel-based sequencing methods. Decreased sequencing times may be obtained by increasing the magnitude of the electric field employed. This is not possible with conventional sequencing, due to the fact that the additional heat associated with the increased electric field cannot be adequately dissipated. Recent developments in the use of thin gels have addressed this problem. Performing electrophoresis in ultrathin (50 to 100 microns) gels greatly increases the heat transfer efficiency, thus allowing the benefits of larger electric fields to be obtained. An increase in separation speed of about an order of magnitude is readily achieved. Thin gels have successfully been used in capillary and slab formats. A detection system has been designed for use with a multiple fluorophore sequencing strategy in horizontal ultrathin slab gels. The system employs laser through-the-side excitation and a cooled CCD detector; this allows for the parallel detection of up to 24 sets of four fluorescently labeled DNA sequencing reactions during their electrophoretic separation in ultrathin (115 micrometers ) denaturing polyacrylamide gels. Four hundred bases of sequence information is obtained from 100 ng of M13 template DNA in an hour, corresponding to an

  6. Pulsed UV and ultrafast laser micromachining of surface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apte, Paul; Sykes, Neil

    2015-07-01

    We describe and compare the cutting and patterning of various "difficult" materials using pulsed UV Excimer, picosecond and femtosecond laser sources. Beam delivery using both fast galvanometer scanners and scanning mask imaging are described. Each laser source has its own particular strengths and weaknesses, and the optimum choice for an application is also decided by financial constraints. With some materials notable improvements in process quality have been observed using femtosecond lasers compared to picosecond lasers, which makes for an interesting choice now that cost effective reliable femtosecond systems are increasingly available. By contrast Pulsed UV Excimer lasers offer different imaging characteristics similar to mask based Lithographic systems and are particularly suited to the processing of polymers. We discuss optimized beam delivery techniques for these lasers.

  7. High speed photoacoustic imaging with fast OPO laser at 1.7 μm (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Zhonglie; Teng, Ma; Li, Jiawen; Qu, Yueqiao; Yu, Mingyue; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Chang-Seok; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-03-01

    Acute cardiovascular events are mostly due to a blood clot or thrombus induced by the sudden rupture of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques within coronary artery walls. Based on the high optical absorption contrast of the lipid rich plaques within the vessel wall, intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging at 1.7 μm spectral band has shown promising capabilities for detecting of lipid composition, but the translation of the technology for in vivo application is limited by the slow imaging speed. In this work, we will present a high speed integrated IVPA/US imaging system with a 500 Hz optical parametric oscillator laser at 1725 nm (5 nm linewidth). A miniature catheter with 1.0 mm outer diameter was designed with a polished 200 μm multimode fiber and an ultrasound transducer with 45 MHz center frequency. Two optical illumination methods by gradient-index (GRIN) lens and ball lens are introduced and compared for higher spatial resolution. At 1725 nm, atherosclerotic rabbit abdominal aorta was imaged at two frame per second, which is more than one order of magnitude faster than previous reported IVPA imaging. Furthermore, by wide tuning range of the laser wavelength from 1680 nm to 1770 nm, spectroscopic photoacoustic analysis of lipid-mimicking phantom and an human atherosclerotic artery was performed ex vivo.

  8. High-Speed Laser Image Analysis of Plume Angles for Pressurised Metered Dose Inhalers: The Effect of Nozzle Geometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Young, Paul M; Murphy, Seamus; Fletcher, David F; Long, Edward; Lewis, David; Church, Tanya; Traini, Daniela

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate aerosol plume geometries of pressurised metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) using a high-speed laser image system with different actuator nozzle materials and designs. Actuators made from aluminium, PET and PTFE were manufactured with four different nozzle designs: cone, flat, curved cone and curved flat. Plume angles and spans generated using the designed actuator nozzles with four solution-based pMDI formulations were imaged using Oxford Lasers EnVision system and analysed using EnVision Patternate software. Reduced plume angles for all actuator materials and nozzle designs were observed with pMDI formulations containing drug with high co-solvent concentration (ethanol) due to the reduced vapour pressure. Significantly higher plume angles were observed with the PTFE flat nozzle across all formulations, which could be a result of the nozzle geometry and material's hydrophobicity. The plume geometry of pMDI aerosols can be influenced by the vapour pressure of the formulation, nozzle geometries and actuator material physiochemical properties.

  9. Development of a high speed laser scanning confocal microscope with an acquisition rate up to 200 frames per second.

    PubMed

    Choi, S; Kim, P; Boutilier, R; Kim, M Y; Lee, Y J; Lee, H

    2013-10-07

    There has been an increasing interest for observing fast biological phenomena such as cell movements in circulations and action potentials. The laser scanning confocal microscopy offers a good spatial resolution and optical sectioning ability to observe various in vivo animal models. We developed a high speed laser scanning confocal microscope capable of acquiring 512 by 512 pixel images at 200 fps (frames per second). We have incorporated a fast rotating polygonal scanning mirror with 128 facets for the X-axis scanner. In order to increase the throughput of the Y-axis scanner, we applied a bi-directional scanning method for vertical scanning. This made it possible to scan along the Y-axis two times during each scanner motion cycle. For the image acquisition, we used a custom photomultiplier tube amplifier with a broad frequency band. In addition, custom imaging software was written for the new microscope. In order to verify the acquisition speed of the developed confocal microscope, a resolution target moving at a series of constant speeds and a sedated mouse with slight movements due to heartbeats were observed. By comparing successive frames, the frame acquisition speeds were calculated.

  10. Target geometry and rigidity determines laser-induced cavitation bubble transport and nanoparticle productivity - a high-speed videography study.

    PubMed

    Kohsakowski, Sebastian; Gökce, Bilal; Tanabe, Rie; Wagener, Philipp; Plech, Anton; Ito, Yoshiro; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2016-06-28

    Laser-induced cavitation has mostly been studied in bulk liquid or at a two-dimensional wall, although target shapes for the particle synthesis may strongly affect bubble dynamics and interfere with particle productivity. We investigated the dynamics of the cavitation bubble induced by pulsed-laser ablation in liquid for different target geometries with high-speed laser microsecond videography and focus on the collapse behaviour. This method enables us observations in a high time resolution (intervals of 1 μs) and single-pulse experiments. Further, we analyzed the nanoparticle productivity, the sizes of the synthesized nanoparticles and the evolution of the bubble volume for each different target shape and geometry. For the ablation of metal (Ag, Cu, Ni) wire tips a springboard-like behaviour after the first collapse is observed which can be correlated with vertical projectile motion. Its turbulent friction in the liquid causes a very efficient transport and movement of the bubble and ablated material into the bulk liquid and prevents particle redeposition. This effect is influenced by the degree of freedom of the wire as well as the material properties and dimensions, especially the Young's modulus. The most efficient and largest bubble movement away from the wire was observed for a thin (500 μm) silver wire with velocities up to 19.8 m s(-1) and for materials with a small Young's modulus and flexural rigidity. We suggest that these observations may contribute to upscaling strategies and increase of particle yield towards large synthesis of colloids based on targets that may continuously be fed.

  11. Gated high speed optical detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S. I.; Carson, L. M.; Neal, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and test of two gated, high speed optical detectors for use in high speed digital laser communication links are discussed. The optical detectors used a dynamic crossed field photomultiplier and electronics including dc bias and RF drive circuits, automatic remote synchronization circuits, automatic gain control circuits, and threshold detection circuits. The equipment is used to detect binary encoded signals from a mode locked neodynium laser.

  12. High speed video shooting with continuous-wave laser illumination in laboratory modeling of wind - wave interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandaurov, Alexander; Troitskaya, Yuliya; Caulliez, Guillemette; Sergeev, Daniil; Vdovin, Maxim

    2014-05-01

    Three examples of usage of high-speed video filming in investigation of wind-wave interaction in laboratory conditions is described. Experiments were carried out at the Wind - wave stratified flume of IAP RAS (length 10 m, cross section of air channel 0.4 x 0.4 m, wind velocity up to 24 m/s) and at the Large Air-Sea Interaction Facility (LASIF) - MIO/Luminy (length 40 m, cross section of air channel 3.2 x 1.6 m, wind velocity up to 10 m/s). A combination of PIV-measurements, optical measurements of water surface form and wave gages were used for detailed investigation of the characteristics of the wind flow over the water surface. The modified PIV-method is based on the use of continuous-wave (CW) laser illumination of the airflow seeded by particles and high-speed video. During the experiments on the Wind - wave stratified flume of IAP RAS Green (532 nm) CW laser with 1.5 Wt output power was used as a source for light sheet. High speed digital camera Videosprint (VS-Fast) was used for taking visualized air flow images with the frame rate 2000 Hz. Velocity air flow field was retrieved by PIV images processing with adaptive cross-correlation method on the curvilinear grid following surface wave profile. The mean wind velocity profiles were retrieved using conditional in phase averaging like in [1]. In the experiments on the LASIF more powerful Argon laser (4 Wt, CW) was used as well as high-speed camera with higher sensitivity and resolution: Optronics Camrecord CR3000x2, frame rate 3571 Hz, frame size 259×1696 px. In both series of experiments spherical 0.02 mm polyamide particles with inertial time 7 ms were used for seeding airflow. New particle seeding system based on utilization of air pressure is capable of injecting 2 g of particles per second for 1.3 - 2.4 s without flow disturbance. Used in LASIF this system provided high particle density on PIV-images. In combination with high-resolution camera it allowed us to obtain momentum fluxes directly from

  13. Excimer laser micromachining of TiN films from chromium and copper sacrificial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, A. J.; Ghantasala, M. K.; Hayes, J. P.; Harvey, E. C.; Doyle, E. D.

    2002-10-01

    This paper presents results on the laser micromachining of TiN films. Machining performance was evaluated in terms of patterning quality and the ability to remove TiN with minimal interference with an underlying sacrificial layer. TiN was arc-deposited onto (100) silicon substrate with chromium (Cr) and copper (Cu) sacrificial layers. Films were also deposited onto bare silicon substrates under the same conditions. These films were analysed for their composition and structure using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction techniques. Laser micromachining was performed using a KrF excimer laser at 248 nm. The effect of fluence and number of shots on the machined features has been investigated in detail. The patterned features were examined using optical, confocal and scanning electron microscopes. The characteristics observed were analysed and compared in all three sets of samples. The results showed selective removal of TiN films from Cr and Cu sacrificial layers under different conditions. The machining of TiN from (100) silicon showed relatively poor definition of patterned features. The analysis of these results indicated that laser machining of TiN from Cr and Cu layers is best explained using the explosion mechanism of removal.

  14. Depth and surface roughness control on laser micromachined polyimide for direct-write deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratap, Bhanu; Arnold, Craig B.; Pique, Alberto

    2003-01-01

    We are examining surface characteristics of ultraviolet pulsed-laser micromachined structures in polymide as a function of the incident laser energy and the distance between subsequent laser spots in order to prepare surfaces for laser direct-write deposition of metals. Variations in the spot-to-spot translation distance provide an alternative means of average depth and roughness control when compared to fluence changes and focal distance variations. We find that the average depth is proportional to the inverse of the translation distance, while the root mean square surface roughness reaches a minimum when the translation distance is approximately equal to the full width half maximum of a single ablation mark on the surface. Conductive silver metal lines are deposited on the surface machined features demonstrating the ability to produce conductors with good adhesion over stepped structures on polyimide.

  15. Femtosecond laser micromachining of dielectric materials for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farson, Dave F.; Choi, Hae Woon; Zimmerman, Burr; Steach, Jeremy K.; Chalmers, Jeffery J.; Olesik, Susan V.; Lee, L. James

    2008-03-01

    Techniques for microfluidic channel fabrication in soda-lime glass and fused quartz using femtosecond laser ablation and ablation in conjunction with polymer coating for surface roughness improvement were tested. Systematic experiments were done to characterize how process variables (laser fluence, scanning speed and focus spot overlap, and material properties) affect the machining feature size and quality. Laser fluence and focus spot overlap showed the strongest influence on channel depth and roughness. At high fluence, the surface roughness was measured to be between 395 nm and 731 nm RMS. At low fluence, roughness decreased to 100 nm-350 nm RMS and showed a greater dependence on overlap. The surface roughness of laser ablation was also dependent on the material properties. For the same laser ablation parameters, soda-lime glass surfaces were smoother than fused quartz. For some applications, especially those using quartz, smoother channels are desired. A hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) polymer coating was applied and the roughness of the coated channels was improved to 10-50 nm RMS.

  16. High-intensity fibre laser design for micro-machining applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Neria, D. I.; Martinez-Piñón, F.; Hernandez-Escamilla, H.; Alvarez-Chavez, J. A.

    2010-11-01

    This work is focused on the design of a 250W high-intensity continuous-wave fibre optic laser with a 15μm spot size beam and a beam parameter product (BPP) of 1.8 for its use on Laser-assisted Cold Spray process (LCS) in the micro-machining areas. The metal-powder deposition process LCS, is a novel method based on Cold Spray technique (CS) assisted by laser technology. The LCS accelerates metal powders by the use of a high-pressure gas in order to achieve flash welding of particles over substrate. In LCS, the critical velocity of impact is lower with respect with CS while the powder particle is heated before the deposition by a laser beam. Furthermore, LCS does not heat the powder to achieve high temperatures as it happens in plasma processes. This property puts aside cooling problems which normally happen in sintered processes with high oxygen/nitrogen concentration levels. LCS will be used not only in deposition of thin layers. After careful design, proof of concept, experimental data, and prototype development, it should be feasible to perform micro-machining precise work with the use of the highintensity fibre laser presented in this work, and selective deposition of particles, in a similar way to the well-known Direct Metal Laser Sintering process (DMLS). The fibre laser consists on a large-mode area, Yb3+-doped, semi-diffraction limited, 25-m fibre laser cavity, operating in continuous wave regime. The fibre shows an arguably high slope-efficiency with no signs of roll-over. The measured M2 value is 1.8 and doping concentration of 15000ppm. It was made with a slight modification of the traditional MCVD technique. A full optical characterization will be presented.

  17. Distribution of biomolecules in porous nitrocellulose membrane pads using confocal laser scanning microscopy and high-speed cameras.

    PubMed

    Mujawar, Liyakat Hamid; Maan, Abid Aslam; Khan, Muhammad Kashif Iqbal; Norde, Willem; van Amerongen, Aart

    2013-04-02

    The main focus of our research was to study the distribution of inkjet printed biomolecules in porous nitrocellulose membrane pads of different brands. We produced microarrays of fluorophore-labeled IgG and bovine serum albumin (BSA) on FAST, Unisart, and Oncyte-Avid slides and compared the spot morphology of the inkjet printed biomolecules. The distribution of these biomolecules within the spot embedded in the nitrocellulose membrane was analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy in the "Z" stack mode. By applying a "concentric ring" format, the distribution profile of the fluorescence intensity in each horizontal slice was measured and represented in a graphical color-coded way. Furthermore, a one-step diagnostic antibody assay was performed with a primary antibody, double-labeled amplicons, and fluorophore-labeled streptavidin in order to study the functionality and distribution of the immune complex in the nitrocellulose membrane slides. Under the conditions applied, the spot morphology and distribution of the primary labeled biomolecules was nonhomogenous and doughnut-like on the FAST and Unisart nitrocellulose slides, whereas a better spot morphology with more homogeneously distributed biomolecules was observed on the Oncyte-Avid slide. Similar morphologies and distribution patterns were observed when the diagnostic one-step nucleic acid microarray immunoassay was performed on these nitrocellulose slides. We also investigated possible reasons for the differences in the observed spot morphology by monitoring the dynamic behavior of a liquid droplet on and in these nitrocellulose slides. Using high speed cameras, we analyzed the wettability and fluid flow dynamics of a droplet on the various nitrocellulose substrates. The spreading of the liquid droplet was comparable for the FAST and Unisart slides but different, i.e., slower, for the Oncyte-Avid slide. The results of the spreading of the droplet and the penetration behavior of the liquid in the

  18. In-fiber whispering-gallery-mode resonator fabricated by femtosecond laser micromachining.

    PubMed

    Shi, Leilei; Zhu, Tao; Huang, Dongmei; Liu, Min; Deng, Ming; Huang, Wei

    2015-08-15

    An in-fiber whispering-gallery-mode resonator fabricated by femtosecond laser micromachining is demonstrated. The cylinder resonator cavity is fabricated by scanning the D-fiber cladding with infrared femtosecond pulses along a cylindrical trace with a radius of 25 μm and height of 20 μm. Quality factor on the order of 10(3) is achieved by smoothing the cavity surface with an ultrasonic cleaner, which is mainly limited by the surface roughness of several hundred nanometers. Resonant characteristics and polarization dependence of the proposed resonator are also studied in detail. Our method takes a step forward in the integration of whispering-gallery-mode resonators.

  19. Femtosecond laser micromachining of Fabry-Perot cavity in fibre Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorin, Rodrigo; Cidade, Fernando N.; Adachi, Jociel L. S.; Rossi, Lucieli; de Oliveira, Valmir; Abe, Ilda; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-09-01

    A 10 μm (length) × 75 μm (depth) open channel is fabricated in fibre Bragg gratings (FBG) by femtosecond laser micromachining. The FBG Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity formed by this complex structure has a length of 4 mm; value estimated from interference spectrum for the air open channel. Reflection spectra of FBG FP cavity as a function of the temperature shows the cavity phase change. The sensor is thermally characterized by filling polymer in the channel and subsequent UV curing; the results show a period shift of approximately 12 x10-3, value obtained of interferometer pattern for 30°C temperature range.

  20. Micromachining of transparent materials by laser ablation of organic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Niino, Hiroyuki; Yabe, Akira

    2000-11-01

    Transparent materials such as fused silica, quartz, calcium fluoride, and fluorocarbon polymer were etched upon irradiation of organic solution containing pyrene with a conventional KrF excimer laser. Threshold fluence for etching was 240 mJ/cm2 for fused silica. Etch rate remarkably depended on a concentration of pyrene: higher etch rate with the increase of pyrene concentration. It means that pyrene molecules play an important role in this process. The etch rate can be easily controlled through changing a laser pulse number, a laser fluence and a concentration of solution. The mechanism for this process is discussed by cyclic multiphotonic absorption of pyrene in the excited states, thermal relaxation, and formation of super-heated solution. As the results, it is suggested that the process is based on the combination of two processes in the interface between the transparent materials and the liquid: one is a heating process by a super-heated liquid and the other is an attacking process by a high temperature and pressure vapor.

  1. High-speed singulation of electronic packages using a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser in a water jet and realization of a 200-W green laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Frank R.; Hu, Wentao; Spiegel, Akos; Vago, Nandor; Richerzhagen, Bernold

    2003-07-01

    Each electronic chip is packaged in order to connect the integrated circuit and the printed circuit board. In consequence high-speed singulation of packages is an important step in the manufacturing process of electronic devices. The widely used technique of abrasive sawing encounters problems due to the combination of different materials used in packages such as copper and mold compound. The sawing blade rapidly blunts because of the copper adhering to the saw blade and covering the diamonds. In fact, the abrasive saw, well adapted to silicon wafer sawing, has problems to adapt to package materials. It has already been shown that the water jet guided laser can be used for efficient high quality singulation of leadframe based packages. In this technique a low-pressure water jet guides the laser beam like an optical fiber, providing efficient cooling of the cutting kerf at exactly the point that was heated during the laser pulse. We present new cutting results using a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser with 100 W average power, and the combination setup for generating a 200 W green laser beam. The timing between the two lasers can be precisely controlled.

  2. Industrial grade fiber-coupled laser systems delivering ultrashort high-power pulses for micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pricking, Sebastian; Welp, Petra; Overbuschmann, Johannes; Nutsch, Sebastian; Gebs, Raphael; Fleischhaker, Robert; Kleinbauer, Jochen; Wolf, Martin; Budnicki, Aleksander; Sutter, Dirk H.; Killi, Alexander; Mielke, Michael

    2016-03-01

    We report on an industrial fiber-delivered laser system producing ultra-short pulses in the range of a few picoseconds down to a few hundred femtoseconds with high average power suitable for high-precision micromachining. The delivery fiber is a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber with a Kagomé shaped lattice and a hypocycloid core wall enabling the guiding of laser radiation over several meters with exceptionally low losses and preservation of high beam quality (M2<1.3). The mode-matching and coupling optics are integrated into the laser head providing a compact footprint without the need for external boxes. The laser head is carefully designed regarding its thermo-mechanical properties to allow a highly reliable coupling stability. The exchangeable delivery fiber is packaged using Trumpf's well established LLK-D connectors which offer a very high mechanical precision, the possibility to add water cooling, as well as full featured safety functions. The fiber is hermetically sealed and protected by a robust but flexible shield providing bend protection and break detection. We show the linear and nonlinear optical properties of the transported laser radiation and discuss its feasibility for pulse compression. Measurements are supported by simulation of pulse propagation by solving the nonlinear Schrödinger equation implementing the split-step Fourier method. In addition, mode properties are measured and confirmed by finite element method simulations. The presented industrial laser system offers the known advantages of ultra-short pulses combined with the flexibility of fiber delivery yielding a versatile tool perfectly suitable for all kinds of industrial micromachining applications.

  3. Picosecond pulsed laser ablation and micromachining of 4H-SiC wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molian, Pal; Pecholt, Ben; Gupta, Saurabh

    2009-02-01

    Ultra-short pulsed laser ablation and micromachining of n-type, 4H-SiC wafer was performed using a 1552 nm wavelength, 2 ps pulse, 5 μJ pulse energy erbium-doped fiber laser with an objective of rapid etching of diaphragms for pressure sensors. Ablation rate, studied as a function of energy fluence, reached a maximum of 20 nm per pulse at 10 mJ/cm 2, which is much higher than that achievable by the femtosecond laser for the equivalent energy fluence. Ablation threshold was determined as 2 mJ/cm 2. Scanning electron microscope images supported the Coulomb explosion (CE) mechanism by revealing very fine particulates, smooth surfaces and absence of thermal effects including melt layer formation. It is hypothesized that defect-activated absorption and multiphoton absorption mechanisms gave rise to a charge density in the surface layers required for CE and enabled material expulsion in the form of nanoparticles. Trenches and holes micromachined by the picosecond laser exhibited clean and smooth edges and non-thermal ablation mode for pulse repetition rates less than 250 kHz. However carbonaceous material and recast layer were noted in the machined region when the pulse repetition rate was increased 500 kHz that could be attributed to the interaction between air plasma and micro/nanoparticles. A comparison with femtosecond pulsed lasers shows the promise that picosecond lasers are more efficient and cost effective tools for creating sensor diaphragms and via holes in 4H-SiC.

  4. A cantilever based optical fiber acoustic sensor fabricated by femtosecond laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Yuan, Lei; Huang, Jie; Xiao, Hai

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a pure silica micro-cantilever based optical fiber sensor for acoustic wave detection. The cantilever is directly fabricated by fs laser micromachining on an optical fiber tip functioning as an inline Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI). The applied acoustic wave pressurizes the micro-cantilever beam and the corresponding dynamic signals can be probed by the FPI. The thickness, length, and width of the micro-cantilever beam can be flexibly designed and fabricated so that the sensitivity, frequency response, and the total measurement range can be varied to fit many practical applications. Experimental results will be presented and analyzed. Due to the assembly free fabrication of the fs-laser, multiple micro-cantilever beams could be potentially fabricated in/on a single optical fiber for quasi-distributed acoustic mapping with high spatial resolution.

  5. Study of fiber-tip damage mechanism during Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy by high-speed camera and the Schlieren method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian J.; Getzan, Grant; Xuan, Jason R.; Yu, Honggang

    2015-02-01

    Fiber-tip degradation, damage, or burn back is a common problem during the ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy procedure to treat urolithiasis. Fiber-tip burn back results in reduced transmission of laser energy, which greatly reduces the efficiency of stone comminution. In some cases, the fiber-tip degradation is so severe that the damaged fiber-tip will absorb most of the laser energy, which can cause the tip portion to be overheated and melt the cladding or jacket layers of the fiber. Though it is known that the higher the energy density (which is the ratio of the laser energy fluence over the cross section area of the fiber core), the faster the fiber-tip degradation, the damage mechanism of the fibertip is still unclear. In this study, fiber-tip degradation was investigated by visualization of shockwave, cavitation/bubble dynamics, and calculus debris ejection with a high-speed camera and the Schlieren method. A commercialized, pulsed Ho:YAG laser at 2.12 um, 273/365/550-um core fibers, and calculus phantoms (Plaster of Paris, 10x10x10 mm cube) were utilized to mimic the laser lithotripsy procedure. Laser energy induced shockwave, cavitation/bubble dynamics, and stone debris ejection were recorded by a high-speed camera with a frame rate of 10,000 to 930,000 fps. The results suggested that using a high-speed camera and the Schlieren method to visualize the shockwave provided valuable information about time-dependent acoustic energy propagation and its interaction with cavitation and calculus. Detailed investigation on acoustic energy beam shaping by fiber-tip modification and interaction between shockwave, cavitation/bubble dynamics, and calculus debris ejection will be conducted as a future study.

  6. Laser-micromachined and laminated microfluidic components for miniaturized thermal, chemical, and biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter M.; Matson, Dean W.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Stewart, Donald C.; Lin, Yuehe

    1999-03-01

    Microchannel microfluidic components are being developed for heat transfer, chemical reactor, chemical analysis, and biological analytical applications. Specific applications include chemical sensing, DNA replication, blood analysis, capillary electrophoresis, fuel cell reactors, high temperature chemical reactors, heat pumps, combustors, and fuel processors. Two general types of component architectures have been developed and the fabrication processes defined. All involve a lamination scheme using plastic, ceramic, or metal laminates, as opposed to planar components. The first type is a stacked architecture that utilizes functionality built in each layer, with fluid flow interconnects between layers. Each layer of the laminate has specific microchannel geometry, and performs a specific function. Polymeric materials are used primarily. Fabrication processes used are laser micromachining, wet and dry etching, and coating deposition. the laminates can also be micromolded plastics. The second architecture employs laminates to form internal microchannels and interconnects. Materials include ceramic tapes and high temperature metals. Catalysts can be placed in the microchannels. Fabrication processes used are diffusion bonding, ceramic bonding and firing, photochemical etching, and electrochemical micromachining. Bonding, thus sealing, the laminates is an important issue. Process conditions have been develop to reduce distortion of the laminates and to hermetically seal the components.

  7. Micromachining NiTi tubes for use in medical devices by using a femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chia-Hung; Chang, Fuh-Yu; Chang, Tien-Li; Chang, Yu-Ting; Huang, Kai-Wen; Liang, Po-Chin

    2015-03-01

    Recent growth in medical device technology has been substantially driven by developments in laser micromachining, which is a powerful fabrication technique in which nickel-titanium (Nitinol, NiTi) alloy materials that exhibit superelastic and shape memory properties are formed (e.g., self-expanding stents). In this study a NiTi tube curve surface process is proposed, involving a femtosecond laser process and a galvano-mirror scanner. The diameter of the NiTi tube was 5.116 mm, its thickness was 0.234 mm, and its length was 100 mm. The results indicated that during the machine process the ablation mechanism of the NiTi tubes was changed by altering the machining path. The path alteration enhanced the laser ablation rate from 12.3 to 26.7 μm/J. Thus the path alteration contributed to a wide kerf line, enabling the assisted air to efficiently remove the debris deposited at the bottom of the kerf during the laser ablation process. The results indicated that the NiTi tube curve process enhanced the laser ablation rate by two times and reduced the amount of energy accumulated within the materials by 50% or more. By altering the machining path using the scanning system, this process can decrease the production of heat affected zones (the accumulation of thermal energy) in medical device applications.

  8. Underwater femtosecond laser micromachining of thin nitinol tubes for medical coronary stent manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, Noorhafiza; Li, Lin

    2012-06-01

    Microprofiling of medical coronary stents has been dominated by the use of Nd:YAG lasers with pulse lengths in the range of a few milliseconds, and material removal is based on the melt ejection with a high-pressure gas. As a result, recast and heat-affected zones are produced, and various post-processing procedures are required to remove these defects. This paper reports a new approach of machining stents in submerged conditions using a 100-fs pulsed laser. A comparison is given of dry and underwater femtosecond laser micromachining techniques of nickel-titanium alloy (nitinol) typically used as the material for coronary stents. The characteristics of laser interactions with the material have been studied. A femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser system (wavelength of 800 nm, pulse duration of 100 fs, repetition rate of 1 kHz) was used to perform the cutting process. It is observed that machining under a thin water film resulted in no presence of heat-affected zone, debris, spatter or recast with fine-cut surface quality. At the optimum parameters, the results obtained with dry cutting showed nearly the same cut surface quality as with cutting under water. However, debris and recast formation still appeared on the dry cut, which is based on material vaporization. Physical processes involved during the cutting process in a thin water film, i.e. bubble formation and shock waves, are discussed.

  9. High speed multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongxiao; Brustle, Anne; Gautam, Vini; Cockburn, Ian; Gillespie, Cathy; Gaus, Katharina; Lee, Woei Ming

    2016-12-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy has emerged as a powerful technique to visualize cellular processes in-vivo. Real time processes revealed through live imaging provided many opportunities to capture cellular activities in living animals. The typical parameters that determine the performance of multiphoton microscopy are speed, field of view, 3D imaging and imaging depth; many of these are important to achieving data from in-vivo. Here, we provide a full exposition of the flexible polygon mirror based high speed laser scanning multiphoton imaging system, PCI-6110 card (National Instruments) and high speed analog frame grabber card (Matrox Solios eA/XA), which allows for rapid adjustments between frame rates i.e. 5 Hz to 50 Hz with 512 × 512 pixels. Furthermore, a motion correction algorithm is also used to mitigate motion artifacts. A customized control software called Pscan 1.0 is developed for the system. This is then followed by calibration of the imaging performance of the system and a series of quantitative in-vitro and in-vivo imaging in neuronal tissues and mice.

  10. Ferrofluid-based optofluidic switch using femtosecond laser-micromachined waveguides.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yu; Bragheri, Francesca; Valentino, Gianna; Morris, Karl; Bellini, Nicola; Osellame, Roberto

    2015-02-20

    We present a portable optofluidic switch using a ferrofluid plug in a commercially produced microfluidic chip with waveguides added via femtosecond laser micromachining (FLM). FLM enabled the one-step fabrication of highly reproducible, perfectly aligned integrated waveguides orthogonally crossing an existing microfluidic channel. In the "ON" state for each output, the ferrofluid plug is outside the intersection and input light arrives at the output with relatively small loss. In the "OFF" state, the plug is inside the intersection and the input light is absorbed. The same plug is used to turn ON and OFF several parallel waveguides with contrast ratios of 22 dB or better. In addition, the plug is driven periodically using an electromagnet combined with a permanent magnet for frequency-dependent characterization. Photodiode data show high contrast up to 50 Hz and linear frequency response up to 1 KHz.

  11. Planar waveguide Michelson interferometer fabricated by using 157nm mask laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Haihong; Ran, Zengling; Wu, Xuezhong; Yang, Ke; Jiang, Yuan; Rao, Yunjiang

    2015-07-01

    A Michelson interferometer is fabricated on silica planar waveguide by using the one-step technology based on 157nm mask laser micromachining. The fabrication time for one device is ~10s. Experimental results show that such an interferometer has an excellent fringe contrast of >20dB. Its temperature and refractive index (RI) responses are tested by observing the wavelength shift of the interferometric fringes, which shows linear characteristics with a thermo-coefficient of ~9.5pm/°C and a RI-coefficient of ~36.7nm/RIU, respectively. The fabrication technology may pave a new way for direct writing of planar silica waveguide devices for sensing applications with high efficiency and quality.

  12. Miniature in-line photonic crystal fiber etalon fabricated by 157 nm laser micromachining.

    PubMed

    Ran, Z L; Rao, Y J; Deng, H Y; Liao, X

    2007-11-01

    A miniature in-line fiber-optic Fabry-Perot etalon is fabricated on a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) by using 157 nm laser micromachining for the first time to our knowledge. Experimental results show that such a PCF-based etalon has an excellent fringe visibility of up to approximately 26 dB due to the mirror-finish quality of the two cavity surfaces inside the PCF. This etalon can be used as an ideal sensor for precise strain measurement under high temperature of up to 800 degrees C. It can also offer some other outstanding advantages, such as fast and easy fabrication, high reproducibility, capacity of mass production, low cost, low temperature-strain cross-sensitivity, and high signal-to-noise ratio.

  13. Micromachined mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conant, Robert Alan

    mirrors scanning in orthogonal directions to reflect a modulated laser beam in a raster pattern. By interfacing this raster-scanning system with a computer video card, we demonstrate a full-motion video system with resolution of 41 x 52 pixels and grayscale capability. The dynamic deformation of the surface-micromachined MEMS mirrors used in this video display is shown to be the factor that limits its optical resolution. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  14. Ultrafast laser with an average power of 120 W at 515 nm and a highly dynamic repetition rate in the MHz range for novel applications in micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harth, F.; Piontek, M. C.; Herrmann, T.; L'huillier, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    A new generation of resonant scanners in the kHz-range shows ultra-high deflection speeds of more than 1000m/s but suffer from an inherent nonlinear mirror oscillation. If this oscillation is not compensated, a typical bitmap, written point by point, would be strongly distorted because of the decreasing spot distance at the turning point of the scanning mirror. However, this can be avoided by a dynamic adaption of the repetition rate (RR) of the ultrafast laser. Since resonant scanners are operated in the 10 kHz-range, this means that the RR has to be continuously swept up to several 10 000 times per second between e.g. 5MHz and 10 MHz. High-speed continuous adaption of the RR could also optimize laser micromachining of narrow curved geometries, where nowadays a time consuming approximation with numerous vectors is required. We present a laser system, which is capable of sweeping the RR more than 32 000 times per second between 5MHz and 10MHz at an average output power of more than 120W at 515nm with a pulse duration of about 40 ps. The laser consists of a semiconductor oscillator, a 3-stage fiber pre-amplifier, a solid state InnoSlab power amplifier and a SHG stage. We systematically analyzed the dynamic of the laser system as well as the spectral and temporal behavior of the optical pulses. Switching the repetition rate typically causes a varying pulse energy, which could affect the machining quality over one scanning line. This effect will be analyzed and discussed. Possible techniques to compensate or avoid this effect will be considered.

  15. Fracture Forces of Dentin after Surface Treatment with High Speed Drill Compared to Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Franzen, Rene; Kianimanesh, Nasrin; Marx, Rudolf; Ahmed, Asma; Gutknecht, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Dental tooth restorative procedures may weaken the structural integrity of the tooth, with the possibility of leading to fracture. In this study we present findings of coronal dentin strength after different techniques of surface modification. The fracture strength of dentin beams after superficial material removal with a fine diamond bur high speed drill hand piece, Er:YAG (2.94 μm, 8 J/cm2), and Er,Cr:YSGG (2.78 μm, 7.8 J/cm2) laser irradiation slightly above the ablation threshold was measured by a four-point bending apparatus. Untreated dentin beams served as a control. A total of 58 dentin beams were manufactured from sterilized human extracted molars using the coronal part of the available dentin. Mean values of fracture strength were calculated as 82.0 ± 27.3 MPa for the control group (n = 10), 104.5 ± 26.3 MPa for high speed drill treatment (n = 10), 96.1 ± 28.1 MPa for Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation (n = 20), and 89.1 ± 36.3 MPa for Er:YAG laser irradiation (n = 18). Independent Student's t-tests showed no significant difference between each two groups (p > 0.05). Within the parameter settings and the limits of the experimental setup used in this study, both lasers systems as well as the high speed drill do not significantly weaken coronal dentin after surface treatment. PMID:26962473

  16. High speed photography and pulsed laser holography for diagnostic investigations of mixture formation and vibration in reciprocating engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegand, H.; Wanders, K.; Mueller, J.; Steinbichler, H.

    1983-08-01

    Using high speed photography, injection and mixture formation processes were recorded and the ignition delay time was determined at full load of a reference diesel engine at 2500 rpm. Pressure was measured by a quartz pressure transducer. Pressure increase was compared with ignition delay. Using holographic interferometry, the injection jet interaction with its environment in the atmosphere was shown. In order to identify the optimum points for fixing antiknocking sensors, holographic interferometry is recommended, because of its high local resolution. For localizing noise sources, holographic recording and evaluation of the vibration modes of complete engine transmission systems under sinusoidal and operational excitation is useful.

  17. Auto-ignition and flame stabilization of pulsed methane jets in a hot vitiated coflow studied with high-speed laser and imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, C. M.; Gounder, J. D.; Meier, W.; Aigner, M.

    2012-08-01

    The auto-ignition of a pulsed methane jet issuing into a laminar coflow of hot exhaust products of a lean premixed hydrogen/air flat flame was examined using high-speed laser and optical measurement techniques with frame rates of 5 kHz or more. OH* chemiluminescence was used to determine the downstream location of the first auto-ignition kernel as well as the stabilization height of the steady-state lifted jet flame. OH planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) was used to determine further details of the auto-ignition with a higher spatial resolution. Simultaneous imaging of broadband luminosity from a viewing angle perpendicular to the OH* chemiluminescence was applied, to three-dimensionally reconstruct the ignition kernel location in space and to determine whether the first occurrence of the kernel was within or beyond the PLIF laser sheet. The development and expansion of the jet was characterized by high-speed Schlieren imaging. Statistics have been compiled for both the ignition time as well as the downstream location of the first auto-ignition kernel and the stabilization height of the steady-state lifted jet flame. From the PLIF images it was found that auto-ignition tended to occur at the interface between bulges of the inflowing jet and the coflow. For steady-state conditions, auto-ignition kernels were observed frequently below the flame base, emphasizing that the lifted jet flame is stabilized by auto-ignition.

  18. A high speed three-dimensional spectral domain optical coherence tomography with <2 μm axial resolution using wide bandwidth femtosecond mode-locked laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Hiroto; Baba, Motoyoshi; Suzuki, Masayuki; Yoneya, Shin

    2013-06-01

    We have developed an ultra-high-resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) equipment, using a 200 nm bandwidth spectrometer and a mode-locked femtosecond laser. We have characterized this OCT, obtaining high spatial resolution in the axial direction of less than 2 μm in air via single scanning, within only 20 ms. This corresponds to an ultra-high resolution of less than 1.3 μm for measurements at the fundus retina. High resolution and high speed imaging enables us to selectively obtain a clear three dimensional (3D) lamina cribrosa itself from a 3D optic disc (OD) image in vivo.

  19. Responses of polymers to laser plasma EUV light beyond ablation threshold and micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makimura, Tetsuya; Torii, Shuichi; Okazaki, Kota; Nakamura, Daisuke; Takahashi, Akihiko; Niino, Hiroyuki; Okada, Tatsuo; Murakami, Kouichi

    2011-06-01

    We have investigated responses of PDMS, PMMA and acrylic block copolymers (BCP) to EUV light from laserproduced plasma beyond ablation thresholds and micromachining. We generated wide band EUV light around 100 eV by irradiation of Ta targets with Nd:YAG laser light. In addition, narrow band EUV light at 11 and 13 nm were generated by irradiation of solid Xe and Sn targets, respectively, with pulsed CO2 laser light. The generated EUV light was condensed onto samples, using an ellipsoidal mirror. The EUV light was incident through windows of contact masks on the samples. We found that through-holes with a diameter of 1 μm can be fabricated in PDMS sheets with thicknesses of 10 μm. PDMS sheets are ablated if they are irradiated with EUV light beyond a threshold power density, while PDMS surfaces were modified by irradiation with the narrow band EUV light at lower power densities. Effective ablation of PMMA sheets can be applied to a LIGA-like process for fabricating micro-structures of metals using the practical apparatus. Furthermore, BCP sheets were ablated to have micro-structures. Thus, we have developed a practical technique for microma chining of PMMA, PDMS and BCP sheets in a micrometer scale.

  20. Micro-Machining Characteristics of Ceramics by Harmonics of Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Sakagawa, Tomokazu; Nakamura, Hikaru; Uno, Yoshiyuki

    Aluminum nitride and silicon carbide are expected as a useful material for the substrate in semiconductor industry because of their excellent properties. Precision micro-machining without crack and with little heat affected zone is required for their applications. Shorter wavelength makes it possible to remove a material with little heat affected zone because of its high photon energy. Therefore, effects of wavelength on machining characteristics of AlN and SiC in micro-drilling using Q-swithched YAG harmonics were experimentally investigated. The drilled depth increased with decreasing the wavelength. Under the reduced pressure condition, the drilled depth increased, and the better surface integrity could be obtained compared to the atmospheric pressure condition. The circumference region around the drilled hole was oxidized for all the case, and the oxidization in the case of fourth harmonic was more remarkable than that in second harmonic. In the initial stage of drilling for AlN with fundamental wavelength, the irradiated point expanded by the absorption of laser beam with increasing the number of laser pulse, and the processing was carried out by crumbling the grain due to the thermal expansion. On the other hand, the higher harmonics could make a hole at the irradiated point from the initial stage without thermal expansion.

  1. High speed handpieces

    PubMed Central

    Bhandary, Nayan; Desai, Asavari; Shetty, Y Bharath

    2014-01-01

    High speed instruments are versatile instruments used by clinicians of all specialties of dentistry. It is important for clinicians to understand the types of high speed handpieces available and the mechanism of working. The centers for disease control and prevention have issued guidelines time and again for disinfection and sterilization of high speed handpieces. This article presents the recent developments in the design of the high speed handpieces. With a view to prevent hospital associated infections significant importance has been given to disinfection, sterilization & maintenance of high speed handpieces. How to cite the article: Bhandary N, Desai A, Shetty YB. High speed handpieces. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):130-2. PMID:24653618

  2. High speed holographic cine-recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Donald; Watts, David; Gordon, Joseph; Lysogorski, Charles; Powers, Aaron; Perry, John; Chenette, Eugene; Hudson, Roger; Young, Raymond

    2005-08-01

    Air Force Research Laboratory and North Dancer Labs researchers have completed the initial development and transition to operational use of a high-speed holographic movie system. This paper documents the first fully operational use of a novel and unique experimental capability for high-speed holographic movies and high-speed cinema interferometry. In this paper we document the initial experiments that were performed with the High Speed Holographic Recorder (HSHR) at the Munitions Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory Site at Eglin, AFB, Florida. These experiments were performed to assess the possibilities for high-speed cine-laser holography combined with high-speed videography to document the formation and propagation of plumes of materials created by impact of high-speed projectiles. This paper details the development of the experimental procedures and initial results of this new tool. After successful integration and testing the system was delivered to Arnold Engineering Development Center.

  3. High-speed concatenation of frequency ramps using sampled grating distributed Bragg reflector laser diode sources for OCT resolution enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Brandon; Derickson, Dennis

    2010-02-01

    Wavelength tunable sampled grating distributed Bragg reflector (SG-DBR) lasers used for telecommunications applications have previously demonstrated the ability for linear frequency ramps covering the entire tuning range of the laser at 100 kHz repetition rates1. An individual SG-DBR laser has a typical tuning range of 50 nm. The InGaAs/InP material system often used with SG-DBR lasers allows for design variations that cover the 1250 to 1650 nm wavelength range. This paper addresses the possibility of concatenating the outputs of tunable SGDBR lasers covering adjacent wavelength ranges for enhancing the resolution of OCT measurements. This laser concatenation method is demonstrated by combining the 1525 nm to 1575 nm wavelength range of a "C Band" SG-DBR laser with the 1570nm to 1620 nm wavelength coverage of an "L-Band" SG-DBR laser. Measurements show that SGDBR lasers can be concatenated with a transition switching time of less than 50 ns with undesired leakage signals attenuated by 50 dB.

  4. The influence of ArF excimer laser micromachining on physicochemical properties of bioresorbable poly(L-lactide)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepak, Bogusz D.; Antończak, Arkadiusz J.; Szustakiewicz, Konrad; Pezowicz, Celina; Abramski, Krzysztof M.

    2016-03-01

    The main advantage of laser processing is a non-contact character of material removal and high precision attainable thanks to low laser beam dimensions. This technique enables forming a complex, submillimeter geometrical shapes such as vascular stents which cannot be manufactured using traditional techniques e.g. injection moulding or mechanical treatment. In the domain of nanosecond laser sources, an ArF excimer laser appears as a good candidate for laser micromachining of bioresorbable polymers such as poly(L-lactide). Due to long pulse duration, however, there is a risk of heat diffusion and accumulation in the material. In addition, due to short wavelength (193 nm) photochemical process can modify the chemical composition of ablated surfaces. The motivation for this research was to evaluate the influence of laser micromachining on physicochemical properties of poly(L-lactide). We performed calorimetric analysis of laser machined samples by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It allowed us to find the optimal process parameters for heat affected zone (HAZ) reduction. The chemical composition of the ablated surface was investigated by FTIR in attenuated total reflectance (ATR) mode.

  5. Vertical Emitting, Ring Geometry, Ultra-Low Threshold and Ultra-High Speed Quantum Well Lasers for Optical Interconnect

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    substrates were fabricated to simulate the conditions to be expected in laser fabrication . Several methods of preparation for grating definition were...is evident, its height is the upper limited considered for laser fabrication . The left hand side of the figure shows the fabricated grating, its

  6. Digital Photonic Production of Micro Structures in Glass by In-Volume Selective Laser-Induced Etching using a High Speed Micro Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottmann, Jens; Hermans, Martin; Ortmann, Jürgen

    Digital photonic production of 3D microfluidic devices and assembled micro mechanics inside fused silica glass is carried out using ISLE directly from digital CAD data. To exploit the potential productivity of new high average power fs-lasers >150 W a modular high speed scanning system has been developed. Acousto-optical beam deflection, galvo-scanners and translation stages are controlled by CAM software. Using a lens with 10 mm focal length a focus radius of 1 μm is scanned with a velocity of 12 m/s on 400 μm track radius enabling the up-scaling of the ISLE- process using fs-laser radiation with up to 30 W.

  7. High-speed Intravascular Photoacoustic Imaging of Lipid-laden Atherosclerotic Plaque Enabled by a 2-kHz Barium Nitrite Raman Laser

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pu; Ma, Teng; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Liang, Shanshan; Hui, Jie; Shung, K. Kirk; Roy, Sukesh; Sturek, Michael; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Lipid deposition inside the arterial wall is a key indicator of plaque vulnerability. An intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) catheter is considered a promising device for quantifying the amount of lipid inside the arterial wall. Thus far, IVPA systems suffered from slow imaging speed (~50 s per frame) due to the lack of a suitable laser source for high-speed excitation of molecular overtone vibrations. Here, we report an improvement in IVPA imaging speed by two orders of magnitude, to 1.0 s per frame, enabled by a custom-built, 2-kHz master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA)-pumped, barium nitrite [Ba(NO3)2] Raman laser. This advancement narrows the gap in translating the IVPA technology to the clinical setting. PMID:25366991

  8. Minimisation of the thermal load of the ablation in high-speed laser corneal refractive surgery: the 'intelligent thermal effect control' of the AMARIS platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsmann, Ulrich; Sauer, Udo; Dressler, Katharina; Triefenbach, Nico; Arba Mosquera, Samuel

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the extent that minimisation of the thermal load of the ablation in high-speed laser corneal refractive surgery is possible. To do this, thermal load from ablations onto flat PMMA plates was recorded with an infrared thermal camera and analysed for different flying-spot sorting algorithms (from pure randomised to 36 Hz local frequency) using a 500 Hz laser system with a fluence of 500 mJ/cm2, and aspheric ablation profiles. Each ablation configuration was repeated three times. Thermal load valid for corneal ablations was modelled based upon the results from ablations onto flat PMMA plates. It was found that the thermal load of ablations onto flat PMMA plates declines steadily when the allowed local frequency decreases or when the diameter of the blocked area increases. With this laser system, a local frequency of 39 Hz dynamically controlled over a diameter of 3.865 mm seems to be optimal for avoiding corneal collagen denaturation with minimum compromise on treatment duration. Peak temperature changes of 48°C in PMMA (16°C equivalent cornea) using pure randomised flying-spot sorting algorithms were reduced to 27°C in PMMA (9°C equivalent cornea) using 36 Hz local frequency over a blocked diameter of 4.25 mm. Average temperature changes of 15°C in PMMA (5°C equivalent cornea) using pure randomised flying-spot sorting algorithms were reduced to 7°C in PMMA (2°C equivalent cornea) using 36 Hz local frequency over a blocked diameter of 4.25 mm. Hence, minimisation of the thermal load of the ablation in high-speed laser corneal refractive surgery seems feasible using 'Intelligent Thermal Effect Control'. Clinical evaluations of human eyes are needed to confirm the preliminary simulated results presented here.

  9. Novel 1.3-micron high-speed directly modulated semiconductor laser device designs and the development of wafer bonding technology for compliant-substrate fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Joseph

    2000-10-01

    High speed optical sources at 1.3 mum are required to drive the fiber optic infrastructure around the world. Of the three components that make up an optical link, these sources limit the overall data transmission capacity of these networks. The importance of operating at 1.3 mum, has led device engineers to rely on InP-based devices, though inferior in many ways to devices based on GaAs. This work seeks to develop new device designs to improve the directly modulated bandwidths of 1.3 mum lasers. Elevated temperatures degrade the DC and high speed performance of semiconductor lasers. InP-based devices are especially susceptible to temperature variations. Lasers were flip chip bonded to diamond heat sinks to improve heat removal from these devices. Although dramatic improvements were seen in their DC performance, the lasers' high frequency response did not improve. Other factors such, as carrier heating, likely limited the performance of these devices. Device designs on GaAs emitting at 1.3 mum were sought as a replacement for the troublesome InP devices. Laser structures employing ordered quantum wells on GaAs (111) substrates have been proposed. Theoretical calculations indicate that 1.3 mum emission should be achievable, and 1.55 mum emission may be possible. Experimental evidence from devices based on GaAs (111) indicates that such lasers should outperform their InP-based counterparts. Lasers grown on InGaAs-like substrates, either bulk ternary or compliant substrates, are promising candidates for improving 1.3 mum device performance. In anticipation of availability of such substrates, a toolkit for designing InxGa1--xAs quantum well lasers on InyGa 1--yAs substrates has been developed. The choice of well and substrate compositions, well width and desired percentage strain combinations emitting at 1.3 mum can be made using a few simple graphs. An analytical valence band model has been employed to qualitatively test competing device designs. Twist bonded compliant

  10. Improved hollow-core photonic crystal fiber design for delivery of nanosecond pulses in laser micromachining applications.

    PubMed

    Shephard, Jonathan D; Couny, Francois; Russell, Phillip St J; Jones, Julian D C; Knight, Jonathan C; Hand, Duncan P

    2005-07-20

    We report the delivery of high-energy nanosecond pulses (approximately 65 ns pulse width) from a high-repetition-rate (up to 100 kHz) Q-switched Nd:YAG laser through the fundamental mode of a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) at 1064 nm. The guided mode in the HC-PCF has a low overlap with the glass, allowing delivery of pulses with energies above those attainable with other fibers. Energies greater than 0.5 mJ were delivered in a single spatial mode through the hollow-core fiber, providing the pulse energy and high beam quality required for micromachining of metals. Practical micromachining of a metal sheet by fiber delivery has been demonstrated.

  11. Laser micromachined isoelectric focusing devices on polymer substrate for electrospray mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuehe; Wen, Jenny; Fan, Xiang; Matson, Dean W.; Smith, Richard D.

    1999-08-01

    A microfabricated device for isoelectric focusing (IEF) incorporating an optimized electrospray ionization (ESI) tip was constructed on polycarbonate plates using a laser micromachining technique. The separation channels on an IEF chip were 16 cm long, 50 micrometers wide and 30 micrometers deep. Electrical potentials used for IEF focusing and electrospray were applied through platinum electrodes placed in the buffer reservoirs, and which were isolated from the separation channel by molecular porous membranes. On-line ESI produced directly from a sharp `tip' on the microchip was evaluated. The results indicate that this design can produce a stable electrospray that is further improved and made more flexible with the assistance of sheath gas and sheath liquid. Error analysis of the spectral data shows that the standard deviation in signal intensity for an analyte peak was less than approximately 5% over 3 hours. The production of stable electrosprays directly from microchip IEF devices represents a step towards easily- fabricated microanalytical devices. IEF separations of protein mixtures were demonstrated for uncoated polycarbonate microchips. On-line IEF/ESI-MS was demonstrated using the microfabricated chip with an ion-trap ESI mass spectrometer for characterization of protein mixtures.

  12. High-speed cutting of thin materials with a Q-switched laser in a water-jet versus conventional laser cutting with a free running laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Frank R.; Boillat, Christophe; Buchilly, Jean-Marie; Spiegel, Akos; Vago, Nandor; Richerzhagen, Bernold

    2003-07-01

    Cutting of thin material, c.f. stencils, stents and thin wafers, is an important market for laser machining. Traditionally this task is performed using flash-lamp pumped, free-running Nd:YAG lasers. Using the water-jet guided laser technology, we experienced that the use of Q-switched lasers leads to superior results while cutting a variety of thin materials. In this technique, the laser is conducted to the work piece by total internal reflection in a thin stable water-jet, comparable to the core of an optical fiber. Utilizing this system, we obtain burr-free, slightly tapered cuts at the same speed as the classical laser cutting and without distinguishable heat affected zone. The main difference is, except the water-jet usage, the pulse duration which is approximately 400 ns instead of 20 to 200 μs in the case of free running lasers. Up to 40'000 high quality apertures per hour can be achieved in stencil mask cutting with the new system. We will compare qualitatively the two possibilities: conventional laser cutting with free-running lasers and water-jet guided laser cutting with Q-switched lasers. The results will be discussed in terms of the different physical effects involved in the material removal upon both methods. In particular the importance of molten material expulsion by the water-jet will be pointed out and compared to the action of the assist-gas. The mentioned effects show that the combination of short pulse laser and water-jet will be beneficial for the production of a wide range of precision parts.

  13. All-diode-pumped quasi-continuous burst-mode laser for extended high-speed planar imaging.

    PubMed

    Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Miller, Joseph D; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R; Meyer, Terrence R

    2013-01-14

    An all-diode-pumped, multistage Nd:YAG amplifier is investigated as a means of extending the duration of high-power, burst-mode laser pulse sequences to an unprecedented 30 ms or more. The laser generates 120 mJ per pulse at 1064.3 nm with a repetition rate of 10 kHz, which is sufficient for a wide range of planar laser diagnostics based on fluorescence, Raman scattering, and Rayleigh scattering, among others. The utility of the technique is evaluated for image sequences of formaldehyde fluorescence in a lifted methane-air diffusion flame. The advantages and limitations of diode pumping are discussed, along with long-pulse diode-bar performance characteristics to guide future designs.

  14. High speed fabrication of absorbance-enhanced micro-nanostructures on nickel surface using hundred-nanosecond pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jinxiang; Zhang, Jingyuan; Liang, Hao; Wang, Yibo; Zhang, Zhiyan; Liu, Yannan; Lin, Xuechun

    2017-01-01

    We report the generation of micro-nanostructures on nickel surface using a pulsed laser with pulse duration of 100/200 ns. The blacken nickel, which is covered with dense broccoli-like clusters having strong light trapping capacity covering broad spectrum (200-2000 nm), can be produced at a high laser scanning speed up to 100 mm/s. The absorbance of the blacken nickel can be over 98% in the UV, more than 97% in the visible, and over 90% in the near IR. In addition, by treating the nickel surface with two crossing scans of the laser, highly organized and shape-controllable periodic arrays of hump-craters can be fabricated.

  15. Advanced micromachining combining nanosecond lasers with water jet-guided laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauchard, A.; Lee, K.; Vago, N.; Pavius, M.; Obi, S.

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents the first scribing results obtained by combining a short-pulse 10ns green laser with the water jet-guided laser technology. A number of high-potential applications are presented, from the grooving of low-k silicon wafers, the scribing of metallic and amorphous Si layers of thin film solar cells, the grooving of SiC wafers, and dot marking of Si wafers. The combination of a short pulse laser beam with the water jet-guided laser technology offers a new industry-proven alternative for grooving and scribing processes, providing superior speed and quality compared to legacy laser technologies.

  16. Toward the development of high-speed microscopic ESPI system for monitoring laser heating/drilling of alumina (Al(2)O(3)) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslan, Mustafa

    2000-10-01

    The problem of cracking/failure of ceramic substrates during the laser shaping process (i.e. heat treatment, drilling, scribing, and cutting) due to large localized thermal stresses within the narrow heat-affected zone on the ceramics has been acknowledged by designers and electronic parts manufacturing industries. In addition to the large localized thermal stresses in the heat-affected zone, the brittle nature of ceramics catalyze the possibility of cracking/failure of the ceramic substrates during the laser shaping process. The knowledge of the stress distribution in the ceramic substrate is important in understanding the cracking/failure problem and solving it. Since it is impossible to measure stress directly, the physical parameters of the actual system subjected to the operating conditions, such as temperatures or displacements that can be related directly to stresses, can be measured experimentally. This research examined ceramic behavior under laser shaping. Specifically, it was conducted to develop an optimum optical measurement system in order to identify and measure the thermal deformation of alumina (Al2O 3) substrates during the laser heating/drilling process. Necessary research and development was performed to build a special electronic speckle pattern interferometry setup called high-speed microscopic ESPI (HSM-ESPI) system to measure transient out-of-plane deformation. By using commercial software the images of speckle patterns were image-processed to quantify whole-field transient out-of-plane displacement measurements. A CO2 laser beam radiation was used as the thermal loading and it was applied at the center of the substrates during the experiments. Local laser heating and drilling experiments were conducted depending on laser beam intensity. Another optical system, laser displacement meter (LDM), that measures single point absolute out-of-plane deformation, was setup to verify HSM-ESPI results. A finite element model (FEM) was developed in

  17. High Speed Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Robert E.; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Schmitz, Frederic H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    An overview of the NASA High Speed Research Program will be presented from a NASA Headquarters perspective. The presentation will include the objectives of the program and an outline of major programmatic issues.

  18. Comparative histopathological analysis of human pulps after class I cavity preparation with a high-speed air-turbine handpiece or Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kina, J. F.; Benitez, P. C.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.; Bagnato, V. S.; Martinez, T. C.; Oliveira, C. F.; Hebling, J.; Costa, C. A. S.

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to comparatively evaluate the response of human pulps after cavity preparation with different devices. Deep class I cavities were prepared in sound mandibular premolars using either a high-speed air-turbine handpiece (Group 1) or an Er:YAG laser (Group 2). Following total acid etching and the application of an adhesive system, all cavities were restored with composite resin. Fifteen days after the clinical procedure, the teeth were extracted and processed for analysis under optical microscopy. In Group 1 in which the average for the remaining dentin thickness (RDT) between the cavity floor and the coronal pulp was 909.5 μm, a discrete inflammatory response occurred in only one specimen with an RDT of 214 μm. However, tissue disorganization occurred in most specimens. In Group 2 (average RDT = 935.2 μm), the discrete inflammatory pulp response was observed in only one specimen (average RDT = 413 μm). It may be concluded that the high-speed air-turbine handpiece caused greater structural alterations in the pulp, although without inducing inflammatory processes.

  19. Predictive modeling, simulation, and optimization of laser processing techniques: UV nanosecond-pulsed laser micromachining of polymers and selective laser melting of powder metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criales Escobar, Luis Ernesto

    One of the most frequently evolving areas of research is the utilization of lasers for micro-manufacturing and additive manufacturing purposes. The use of laser beam as a tool for manufacturing arises from the need for flexible and rapid manufacturing at a low-to-mid cost. Laser micro-machining provides an advantage over mechanical micro-machining due to the faster production times of large batch sizes and the high costs associated with specific tools. Laser based additive manufacturing enables processing of powder metals for direct and rapid fabrication of products. Therefore, laser processing can be viewed as a fast, flexible, and cost-effective approach compared to traditional manufacturing processes. Two types of laser processing techniques are studied: laser ablation of polymers for micro-channel fabrication and selective laser melting of metal powders. Initially, a feasibility study for laser-based micro-channel fabrication of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) via experimentation is presented. In particular, the effectiveness of utilizing a nanosecond-pulsed laser as the energy source for laser ablation is studied. The results are analyzed statistically and a relationship between process parameters and micro-channel dimensions is established. Additionally, a process model is introduced for predicting channel depth. Model outputs are compared and analyzed to experimental results. The second part of this research focuses on a physics-based FEM approach for predicting the temperature profile and melt pool geometry in selective laser melting (SLM) of metal powders. Temperature profiles are calculated for a moving laser heat source to understand the temperature rise due to heating during SLM. Based on the predicted temperature distributions, melt pool geometry, i.e. the locations at which melting of the powder material occurs, is determined. Simulation results are compared against data obtained from experimental Inconel 625 test coupons fabricated at the National

  20. High-speed multi-exposure laser speckle contrast imaging with a single-photon counting camera.

    PubMed

    Dragojević, Tanja; Bronzi, Danilo; Varma, Hari M; Valdes, Claudia P; Castellvi, Clara; Villa, Federica; Tosi, Alberto; Justicia, Carles; Zappa, Franco; Durduran, Turgut

    2015-08-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) has emerged as a valuable tool for cerebral blood flow (CBF) imaging. We present a multi-exposure laser speckle imaging (MESI) method which uses a high-frame rate acquisition with a negligible inter-frame dead time to mimic multiple exposures in a single-shot acquisition series. Our approach takes advantage of the noise-free readout and high-sensitivity of a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) array to provide real-time speckle contrast measurement with high temporal resolution and accuracy. To demonstrate its feasibility, we provide comparisons between in vivo measurements with both the standard and the new approach performed on a mouse brain, in identical conditions.

  1. Micromachined spinneret

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Galambos, Paul

    2007-11-06

    A micromachined spinneret is disclosed which has one or more orifices through which a fiber-forming material can be extruded to form a fiber. Each orifice is surrounded by a concentric annular orifice which allows the fiber to be temporarily or permanently coated with a co-extrudable material. The micromachined spinneret can be formed by a combination of surface and bulk micromachining.

  2. Laser tabbed die: A repairable, high-speed die-interconnection technology. 1994 LDRD final report 93-SR-089

    SciTech Connect

    Malba, V.; Bernhardt, A.F.

    1995-09-01

    A unique technology for multichip module production is presented. The technology, called Laser Tabbed Die (L-TAB), consists of a method for forming surface-mount-type {open_quotes}gull wing{close_quotes} interconnects on bare dice. The dice are temporarily bonded to a sacrificial substrate which has a polymer thin film coated onto it. The gull wings are formed on the side of the die with a direct-write laser patterning process which allows vertical as well as horizontal image formation. Using the laser patterning system, trenches are formed in a positive electrodeposited photoresist (EDPR) which is plated onto a metal seed layer, allowing copper to be electroplated through the resultant mask. After stripping the resist and the metal seed layer, the polymer film on the substrate is dissolved, releasing the chip with the {open_quotes}gull wings{close_quotes} intact. The chips are then bonded onto a circuit board or permanent substrate with solder or conductive adhesive.

  3. The laser micro-machining system for diamond anvil cell experiments and general precision machining applications at the High Pressure Collaborative Access Team.

    PubMed

    Hrubiak, Rostislav; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Rod, Eric; Shen, Guoyin

    2015-07-01

    We have designed and constructed a new system for micro-machining parts and sample assemblies used for diamond anvil cells and general user operations at the High Pressure Collaborative Access Team, sector 16 of the Advanced Photon Source. The new micro-machining system uses a pulsed laser of 400 ps pulse duration, ablating various materials without thermal melting, thus leaving a clean edge. With optics designed for a tight focus, the system can machine holes any size larger than 3 μm in diameter. Unlike a standard electrical discharge machining drill, the new laser system allows micro-machining of non-conductive materials such as: amorphous boron and silicon carbide gaskets, diamond, oxides, and other materials including organic materials such as polyimide films (i.e., Kapton). An important feature of the new system is the use of gas-tight or gas-flow environmental chambers which allow the laser micro-machining to be done in a controlled (e.g., inert gas) atmosphere to prevent oxidation and other chemical reactions in air sensitive materials. The gas-tight workpiece enclosure is also useful for machining materials with known health risks (e.g., beryllium). Specialized control software with a graphical interface enables micro-machining of custom 2D and 3D shapes. The laser-machining system was designed in a Class 1 laser enclosure, i.e., it includes laser safety interlocks and computer controls and allows for routine operation. Though initially designed mainly for machining of the diamond anvil cell gaskets, the laser-machining system has since found many other micro-machining applications, several of which are presented here.

  4. The laser micro-machining system for diamond anvil cell experiments and general precision machining applications at the High Pressure Collaborative Access Team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrubiak, Rostislav; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Rod, Eric; Shen, Guoyin

    2015-07-01

    We have designed and constructed a new system for micro-machining parts and sample assemblies used for diamond anvil cells and general user operations at the High Pressure Collaborative Access Team, sector 16 of the Advanced Photon Source. The new micro-machining system uses a pulsed laser of 400 ps pulse duration, ablating various materials without thermal melting, thus leaving a clean edge. With optics designed for a tight focus, the system can machine holes any size larger than 3 μm in diameter. Unlike a standard electrical discharge machining drill, the new laser system allows micro-machining of non-conductive materials such as: amorphous boron and silicon carbide gaskets, diamond, oxides, and other materials including organic materials such as polyimide films (i.e., Kapton). An important feature of the new system is the use of gas-tight or gas-flow environmental chambers which allow the laser micro-machining to be done in a controlled (e.g., inert gas) atmosphere to prevent oxidation and other chemical reactions in air sensitive materials. The gas-tight workpiece enclosure is also useful for machining materials with known health risks (e.g., beryllium). Specialized control software with a graphical interface enables micro-machining of custom 2D and 3D shapes. The laser-machining system was designed in a Class 1 laser enclosure, i.e., it includes laser safety interlocks and computer controls and allows for routine operation. Though initially designed mainly for machining of the diamond anvil cell gaskets, the laser-machining system has since found many other micro-machining applications, several of which are presented here.

  5. The laser micro-machining system for diamond anvil cell experiments and general precision machining applications at the High Pressure Collaborative Access Team

    SciTech Connect

    Hrubiak, Rostislav; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Rod, Eric; Shen, Guoyin

    2015-07-15

    We have designed and constructed a new system for micro-machining parts and sample assemblies used for diamond anvil cells and general user operations at the High Pressure Collaborative Access Team, sector 16 of the Advanced Photon Source. The new micro-machining system uses a pulsed laser of 400 ps pulse duration, ablating various materials without thermal melting, thus leaving a clean edge. With optics designed for a tight focus, the system can machine holes any size larger than 3 μm in diameter. Unlike a standard electrical discharge machining drill, the new laser system allows micro-machining of non-conductive materials such as: amorphous boron and silicon carbide gaskets, diamond, oxides, and other materials including organic materials such as polyimide films (i.e., Kapton). An important feature of the new system is the use of gas-tight or gas-flow environmental chambers which allow the laser micro-machining to be done in a controlled (e.g., inert gas) atmosphere to prevent oxidation and other chemical reactions in air sensitive materials. The gas-tight workpiece enclosure is also useful for machining materials with known health risks (e.g., beryllium). Specialized control software with a graphical interface enables micro-machining of custom 2D and 3D shapes. The laser-machining system was designed in a Class 1 laser enclosure, i.e., it includes laser safety interlocks and computer controls and allows for routine operation. Though initially designed mainly for machining of the diamond anvil cell gaskets, the laser-machining system has since found many other micro-machining applications, several of which are presented here.

  6. InGaAlAs RW-based electro-absorption-modulated DFB-lasers for high-speed applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehrle, Martin; Klein, Holger; Bornholdt, Carsten; Przyrembel, Georges; Sigmund, Ariane; Molzow, Wolf-Dietrich; Troppenz, Ute; Bach, Heinz-Gunter

    2014-05-01

    Electro-absorption modulated 10G and 25G DFB lasers (EML) are key components in transmission systems for long reach (up to 10 km) and extended reach (up to 80 km) applications. The next generation Ethernet will most likely be 400 Gb/s which will require components with even higher bandwidth. Commercially available EMLs are regarded as high-cost components due to their separate epitaxial butt-coupling growth process to separately optimize the DFB laser and the electro-absorption modulator (EAM). Alternatively the selective area growth (SAG) technique is used to achieve different MQW bandgaps in the DFB and EAM section of an EML. However for a lot of applications an emission wavelength within a narrow wavelength window is required enforcing a temperature controlled operation. All these applications can be covered with the developed EML devices that use a single InGaAlAs MQW waveguide for both the DFB and the EAM enabling a low-cost fabrication process similar to a conventional DFB laser diode. It will be shown that such devices can be used for 25Gb/s and 40Gb/s applications with excellent performance. By an additional monolithic integration of an impedance matching circuit the module fabrication costs can be reduced but also the modulation bandwidth of the devices can be further enhanced. Up to 70Gb/s modulation with excellent eye openings can be achieved. This novel approach opens the possibility for 100Gb/s NRZ EMLs and thus 4x100Gb/s NRZ EML-based transmitters in future. Also even higher bitrates seem feasible using more complex modulation formats such as e.g. DMT and PAM.

  7. Multi-meter fiber-delivery and pulse self-compression of milli-Joule femtosecond laser and fiber-aided laser-micromachining.

    PubMed

    Debord, B; Alharbi, M; Vincetti, L; Husakou, A; Fourcade-Dutin, C; Hoenninger, C; Mottay, E; Gérôme, F; Benabid, F

    2014-05-05

    We report on damage-free fiber-guidance of milli-Joule energy-level and 600-femtosecond laser pulses into hypocycloid core-contour Kagome hollow-core photonic crystal fibers. Up to 10 meter-long fibers were used to successfully deliver Yb-laser pulses in robustly single-mode fashion. Different pulse propagation regimes were demonstrated by simply changing the fiber dispersion and gas. Self-compression to ~50 fs, and intensity-level nearing petawatt/cm(2) were achieved. Finally, free focusing-optics laser-micromachining was also demonstrated on different materials.

  8. Optical coherence elastography based on high speed imaging of single-hot laser-induced acoustic waves at 16 kHz frame rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Hsieh, Bao-Yu; Wei, Wei; Shen, Tueng; Pelivanov, Ivan; O'Donnell, Matthew; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-03-01

    Shear wave OCE (SW-OCE) is a novel technique that relies on the detection of the localized shear wave speed to map tissue elasticity. In this study, we demonstrate high speed imaging to capture single-shot transient shear wave propagation for SW-OCE. The fast imaging speed is achieved using a Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) high-speed swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) system. The frame rate of shear wave imaging is 16 kHz, at an A-line rate of ~1.62 MHz, enabling the detection of high-frequency shear waves up to 8 kHz in bandwidth. Several measures are taken to improve the phase-stability of the SS-OCT system, and the measured displacement sensitivity is ~10 nanometers. To facilitate non-contact elastography, shear waves are generated with the photo-thermal effect using an ultra-violet pulsed laser. High frequency shear waves launched by the pulsed laser contain shorter wavelengths and carry rich localized elasticity information. Benefiting from single-shot acquisition, each SWI scan only takes 2.5 milliseconds, and the reconstruction of the elastogram can be performed in real-time with ~20 Hz refresh rate. SW-OCE measurements are demonstrated on porcine cornea ex vivo. This study is the first demonstration of an all-optical method to perform real-time 3D SW-OCE. It is hoped that this technique will be applicable in the clinic to obtain high-resolution localized quantitative measurements of tissue biomechanical properties.

  9. Full-field linear and nonlinear measurements using Continuous-Scan Laser Doppler Vibrometry and high speed Three-Dimensional Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, David A.; Allen, Matthew S.; Yang, Shifei; Beberniss, Timothy J.

    2017-03-01

    Spatially detailed dynamic measurements of thin, lightweight structures can be difficult to obtain due to the structure's low mass and complicated deformations under certain loading conditions. If traditional contacting sensors, such as accelerometers, strain gauges, displacement transducers, etc., are used, the total number of measurement locations available is limited by the weight added and the effect each sensor has on the local stiffness of the contact area. Other non-contacting sensors, such as Laser Doppler Vibrometers (LDV), laser triangulation sensors, proximity sensors, etc., do not affect the dynamics of a structure, but are limited to single point measurements. In contrast, a few recently developed non-contacting measurement techniques have been shown to be capable of simultaneously measuring the response over a wide measurement field. Two techniques are considered here: Continuous-Scan Laser Doppler Vibrometry (CSLDV) and high speed Three-Dimensional Digital Image Correlation (3D DIC). With the use of these techniques, unprecedented measurement resolution can be achieved. In this work, the linear and nonlinear deformations of a clamped, nominally flat beam and plate under steady state sinusoidal loading will be measured using both techniques. In order to assess their relative merits, the linear natural frequencies, mode shapes, and nonlinear deformation shapes measured with each method are compared. Both measurement systems give comparable results in many cases, although 3D DIC is more accurate for spatially complex deformations at large amplitudes and CSLDV is more accurate at low amplitudes and when the spatial deformation pattern is simpler.

  10. Application of a digital high-speed camera system for combustion research by using UV laser diagnostics under microgravity at Bremen drop tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renken, Hartmut; Bolik, T.; Eigenbrod, Ch.; Koenig, Jens; Rath, Hans J.

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes a digital high-speed camera- and recording system that will be used primary for combustion research under microgravity ((mu) g) at Bremen drop tower. To study the reactionzones during the process of combustion particularly OH-radicals are detected 2D by using the method of laser induced predissociation fluorescence (LIPF). A pulsed high-energy excimer lasersystem combined with a two- staged intensified CCD-camera allows a repetition rate of 250 images (256 X 256 pixel) per second, according to the maximum laser pulse repetition. The laser system is integrated at the top of the 110 m high evacutable drop tube. Motorized mirrors are necessary to achieve a stable beam position within the area of interest during the drop of the experiment-capsule. The duration of 1 drop will be 4.7 seconds (microgravity conditions). About 1500 images are captured and stored onboard the drop capsule 96 Mbyte RAM image storagesystem. After saving capsule and datas, a special PC-based image processing software visualizes the movies and extracts physical information out of the images. Now, after two and a half years of developments the system is working operational and capable of high temporal 2D LIPF- measuring of OH, H2O, O2, and CO concentrations and 2D temperature distribution of these species.

  11. CW laser strategies for multi-parameter measurements of high-speed flows containing either NO or O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dirosa, M. D.; Chang, A. Y.; Davidson, D. F.; Hanson, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of gasdynamic quantities were performed using a rapid-tuning CW dye laser to resolve Doppler-shifted spectral features in either the O2 Schumann-Runge bands or the NO gamma band near 225 nm. With the rapid-tuning capability, spectral features were acquired at a repetition rate of 4 kHz. Monitoring O2 transitions provided estimates of velocities while monitoring collision-broadened NO line pairs provided simultaneous measurements of velocity, temperature and pressure. Experiments were first performed in absorption within the transient one-dimensional flows generated in a shock tube. Agreement between measured and theoretical values, as calculated from one-dimensional shock relations, was typically better than 5 percent. The method was extended to fluorescence detection of NO in a static cell. Temperature and pressure were extracted from recorded profiles, and the results agreed well with expected values.

  12. Optical fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer cavity fabricated by femtosecond laser micromachining and fusion splicing for refractive index sensing.

    PubMed

    Liao, C R; Hu, T Y; Wang, D N

    2012-09-24

    We demonstrate a fiber in-line Fabry-Perot interferometer cavity sensor for refractive index measurement. The interferometer cavity is formed by drilling a micro-hole at the cleaved fiber end facet, followed by fusion splicing. A micro-channel is inscribed by femtosecond laser micromachining to vertically cross the cavity to allow liquid to flow in. The refractive index sensitivity obtained is ~994 nm/RIU (refractive index unit). Such a device is simple in configuration, easy for fabrication and reliable in operation due to extremely low temperature cross sensitivity of ~4.8 × 10(-6) RIU/°C.

  13. High-speed phosphor thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, N.; Baum, E.; Brübach, J.; Dreizler, A.

    2011-10-01

    Phosphor thermometry is a semi-invasive surface temperature measurement technique utilising the luminescence properties of doped ceramic materials. Typically, these phosphor materials are coated onto the object of interest and are excited by a short UV laser pulse. Up to now, primarily Q-switched laser systems with repetition rates of 10 Hz were employed for excitation. Accordingly, this diagnostic tool was not applicable to resolve correlated temperature transients at time scales shorter than 100 ms. This contribution reports on the first realisation of a high-speed phosphor thermometry system employing a highly repetitive laser in the kHz regime and a fast decaying phosphor. A suitable material was characterised regarding its temperature lifetime characteristic and its measurement precision. Additionally, the influence of laser power on the phosphor coating was investigated in terms of heating effects. A demonstration of this high-speed technique has been conducted inside the thermally highly transient system of an optically accessible internal combustion engine. Temperatures have been measured with a repetition rate of 6 kHz corresponding to one sample per crank angle degree at 1000 rpm.

  14. High-speed phosphor thermometry.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, N; Baum, E; Brübach, J; Dreizler, A

    2011-10-01

    Phosphor thermometry is a semi-invasive surface temperature measurement technique utilising the luminescence properties of doped ceramic materials. Typically, these phosphor materials are coated onto the object of interest and are excited by a short UV laser pulse. Up to now, primarily Q-switched laser systems with repetition rates of 10 Hz were employed for excitation. Accordingly, this diagnostic tool was not applicable to resolve correlated temperature transients at time scales shorter than 100 ms. This contribution reports on the first realisation of a high-speed phosphor thermometry system employing a highly repetitive laser in the kHz regime and a fast decaying phosphor. A suitable material was characterised regarding its temperature lifetime characteristic and its measurement precision. Additionally, the influence of laser power on the phosphor coating was investigated in terms of heating effects. A demonstration of this high-speed technique has been conducted inside the thermally highly transient system of an optically accessible internal combustion engine. Temperatures have been measured with a repetition rate of 6 kHz corresponding to one sample per crank angle degree at 1000 rpm.

  15. On the fabrication of minimizing bulges and reducing the feature dimensions of microchannels using novel CO2 laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, C. K.; Lin, S. L.

    2011-06-01

    The shape of a cross-microchannel in polymer is a common pattern in MEMS and can be fabricated using traditional CO2 laser micromachining in air-cooling environment. However, it always suffers some problems during the fabrication process such as bulges, splashes, resolidification and the appearance of a heat affected zone around the rims of channels. In this paper, a novel method of Foil-Assisted CO2 LAser Micromachining (FACLAM) is proposed to fabricate the cross-microchannels in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) by significantly diminishing the bulges and the channel's feature sizes. The feature size of the cross-channel can be greatly reduced from 229.1 to 63.6 µm with no clogging effect shown in the cross-junction position. The bulge height of the PMMA microchannel using FACLAM was reduced from the conventional size of 8.2 µm to as small as 0.2 µm. The ANSYS software was also used to analyze the temperature distribution of the PMMA microchannel during machining in air-cooling environment and with foil-mask assistance. The FACLAM approach can improve laser processing quality in air-cooling environment and has the merits of low-cost, easy fabrication and high surface quality.

  16. High speed laser drilling of metals using a high repetition rate, high average power ultrafast fiber CPA system.

    PubMed

    Ancona, A; Röser, F; Rademaker, K; Limpert, J; Nolte, S; Tünnermann, A

    2008-06-09

    We present an experimental study on the drilling of metal targets with ultrashort laser pulses at high repetition rates (from 50 kHz up to 975 kHz) and high average powers (up to 68 Watts), using an ytterbium-doped fiber CPA system. The number of pulses to drill through steel and copper sheets with thicknesses up to 1 mm have been measured as a function of the repetition rate and the pulse energy. Two distinctive effects, influencing the drilling efficiency at high repetition rates, have been experimentally found and studied: particle shielding and heat accumulation. While the shielding of subsequent pulses due to the ejected particles leads to a reduced ablation efficiency, this effect is counteracted by heat accumulation. The experimental data are in good qualitative agreement with simulations of the heat accumulation effect and previous studies on the particle emission. However, for materials with a high thermal conductivity as copper, both effects are negligible for the investigated processing parameters. Therefore, the full power of the fiber CPA system can be exploited, which allows to trepan high-quality holes in 0.5mm-thick copper samples with breakthrough times as low as 75 ms.

  17. High-speed polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography scan engine based on Fourier domain mode locked laser.

    PubMed

    Bonesi, Marco; Sattmann, Harald; Torzicky, Teresa; Zotter, Stefan; Baumann, Bernhard; Pircher, Michael; Götzinger, Erich; Eigenwillig, Christoph; Wieser, Wolfgang; Huber, Robert; Hitzenberger, Christoph K

    2012-11-01

    We report on a new swept source polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography scan engine that is based on polarization maintaining (PM) fiber technology. The light source is a Fourier domain mode locked laser with a PM cavity that operates in the 1300 nm wavelength regime. It is equipped with a PM buffer stage that doubles the fundamental sweep frequency of 54.5 kHz. The fiberization allows coupling of the scan engine to different delivery probes. In a first demonstration, we use the system for imaging human skin at an A-scan rate of 109 kHz. The system illuminates the sample with circularly polarized light and measures reflectivity, retardation, optic axis orientation, and Stokes vectors simultaneously. Furthermore, depolarization can be quantified by calculating the degree of polarization uniformity (DOPU). The high scanning speed of the system enables dense sampling in both, the x- and y-direction, which provides the opportunity to use 3D evaluation windows for DOPU calculation. This improves the spatial resolution of DOPU images considerably.

  18. Underwater wireless transmission of high-speed QAM-OFDM signals using a compact red-light laser.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Song, Yuhang; Yu, Xiangyu; Lin, Aobo; Kong, Meiwei; Han, Jun; Deng, Ning

    2016-04-18

    We first study the transmission property of red light in water in terms of extinction coefficient and channel bandwidth via Monte Carlo simulation, with an interesting finding that red light outperforms blue-green light in highly turbid water. We further propose and experimentally demonstrate a broadband underwater wireless optical communication system based on a simple and cost-effective TO56 red-light laser diode. We demonstrate a 1.324-Gb/s transmission at a bit error rate (BER) of 2.02 × 10-3 over a 6-m underwater channel, by using 128-QAM OFDM signals and a low-cost 150-MHz positive-intrinsic-negative photodetector, with a record spectral efficiency higher than 7.32 bits/Hz. By using an avalanche photodetector and 32-QAM OFDM signals, we have achieved a record bit rate of 4.883 Gb/s at a BER of 3.20 × 10-3 over a 6-m underwater channel.

  19. Single-shot selective laser micromachining of filtered arc deposited TiN films from chromium underlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, Andrew J.; Ghantasala, Muralidhar K.; Evans, Peter E.; Hayes, Jason P.; Harvey, Erol C.; Doyle, E. Derry

    2002-11-01

    This paper presents the results on single-shot laser micromachining of filtered arc deposited TiN films and compares the machining characteristics of the films deposited under partially and fully filtered conditions. Machining performance was evaluated in terms of patterning quality and the ability to perform selective removal of top TiN film with minimal interference to an underlying layer. TiN was arc-deposited onto silicon substrate with a chromium layer on the top. These films were analysed for their composition and microstructure using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) before and after laser machining. Under single shot conditions the effect of fluence on the machined features has been investigated. The results showed selective removal of TiN films with a single shot from the underlying Cr layer. Further, this work clearly shows a distinction between the laser machining characteristics of the films deposited under different filtering conditions and substrate temperatures.

  20. Laser micro-machining of waveguide devices for sub-mm and far IR interferometry and detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drou't d'Aubigny, Christian Y.; Walker, Christopher K.; Golish, Dathon; Swain, Mark R.; Dumont, Philip J.; Lawson, Peter R.

    2003-02-01

    Laser induced, micro-chemical etching is a promising new technology that can be used to fabricate three dimensional structures many millimeters across with micrometer accuracy. Laser micromachining possesses a significant edge over more conventional techniques. It does not require the use of masks and is not confined to crystal planes. A non-contact process, it eliminates tool wear and vibration problems associated with classical milling machines. At the University of Arizona we have constructed the first such laser micromaching system optimized for the fabrication of THz and far IR waveguide and quasi-optical components. Our system can machine many millimeters across down to a few microns accuracy in a short time, with a remarkable surface finish. This paper presents the design, operation and performance of our system, and its applications to waveguide devices for sub millimeter and far IR interferometry.

  1. 450-nm GaN laser diode enables high-speed visible light communication with 9-Gbps QAM-OFDM.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yu-Chieh; Hsieh, Dan-Hua; Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Chen, Hsiang-Yu; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2015-05-18

    A TO-38-can packaged Gallium nitride (GaN) blue laser diode (LD) based free-space visible light communication (VLC) with 64-quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) and 32-subcarrier orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) transmission at 9 Gbps is preliminarily demonstrated over a 5-m free-space link. The 3-dB analog modulation bandwidth of the TO-38-can packaged GaN blue LD biased at 65 mA and controlled at 25°C is only 900 MHz, which can be extended to 1.5 GHz for OFDM encoding after throughput intensity optimization. When delivering the 4-Gbps 16-QAM OFDM data within 1-GHz bandwidth, the error vector magnitude (EVM), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and bit-error-rate (BER) of the received data are observed as 8.4%, 22.4 dB and 3.5 × 10(-8), respectively. By increasing the encoded bandwidth to 1.5 GHz, the TO-38-can packaged GaN blue LD enlarges its transmission capacity to 6 Gbps but degrades its transmitted BER to 1.7 × 10(-3). The same transmission capacity of 6 Gbps can also be achieved with a BER of 1 × 10(-6) by encoding 64-QAM OFDM data within 1-GHz bandwidth. Using the 1.5-GHz full bandwidth of the TO-38-can packaged GaN blue LD provides the 64-QAM OFDM transmission up to 9 Gbps, which successfully delivers data with an EVM of 5.1%, an SNR of 22 dB and a BER of 3.6 × 10(-3) passed the forward error correction (FEC) criterion.

  2. High-speed ablation of ultradeep channels by a phase-conjugate dynamically controlled passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Basiev, T T; Garnov, S V; Klimentov, S M; Pivovarov, P A; Gavrilov, A V; Smetanin, S N; Solokhin, S A; Fedin, A V

    2007-10-31

    Parameters of high-speed ablation of ultradeep channels by controlled pulse trains from a single-mode phase-conjugate dynamic cavity Nd:YAG laser emitting 20-200-ns, 70-250-mJ pulses at a pulse repetition rate in a train of 40-250 kHz are studied. The optimal parameters of ablation are found, for which a long-lived region of a hot rarefied gas was maintained in the ultradeep channel, which suppressed the shielding action of the surface plasma. The control of the lasing process during ablation optimises not only the heating and plasma formation, but also the removal of the processed material in the pause between laser pulses. Adaptive regulation of lasing parameters during ablation made it possible to obtain ultradeep channels of length 8-27 mm and diameters 80-300 {mu}m of the input and output holes in metals (aluminium, steel and Inconel 718 nickel superalloy) and ultrahard ceramics (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, AlN, SiC). (special issue devoted to the 25th anniversary of the a.m. prokhorov general physics institute)

  3. High speed door assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shapiro, Carolyn

    1993-01-01

    A high speed door assembly, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  4. High speed door assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shapiro, C.

    1993-04-27

    A high speed door assembly is described, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  5. High speed holographic digital recorder.

    PubMed

    Roberts, H N; Watkins, J W; Johnson, R H

    1974-04-01

    Concepts, feasibility experiments, and key component developments are described for a holographic digital record/reproduce system with the potential for 1.0 Gbit/sec rates and higher. Record rates of 500 Mbits/sec have been demonstrated with a ten-channel acoustooptic modulator array and a mode-locked, cavity-dumped argon-ion laser. Acoustooptic device technology has been advanced notably during the development of mode lockers, cavity dumpers, beam deflectors, and multichannel modulator arrays. The development of high speed multichannel photodetector arrays for the readout subsystem requires special attention. The feasibility of 1.0 Gbits/sec record rates has been demonstrated.

  6. Laser micro-machinability of borosilicate glass surface-modified by electric field-assisted ion-exchange method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsusaka, S.; Kobayakawa, T.; Hidai, H.; Morita, N.

    2012-08-01

    In order to improve the laser micro-machinability of borosilicate glass, the glass surface was doped with metal (silver or copper) ions by an electric field-assisted ion-exchange method. Doped ions drifted and diffused into the glass substrate under a DC electric field. The concentration of metal ions within the doped area was approximately constant because the ion penetration was caused by substitution between dopant metal and inherent sodium ions. Nanosecond ultraviolet laser irradiation of metal-containing regions produced flat, smooth and defect-free holes. However, the shapes of holes were degraded when the processed hole bottoms reached ion penetration depths. A numerical analysis of ionic drift-diffusion behaviour in glass material under an electric field was also carried out. The calculated results for penetration depth and ionic flux showed good agreement with the measured values.

  7. High Speed Vortex Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Allen, Jerry M.

    2000-01-01

    A review of the research conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Langley Research Center (LaRC) into high-speed vortex flows during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s is presented. The data reviewed is for flat plates, cavities, bodies, missiles, wings, and aircraft. These data are presented and discussed relative to the design of future vehicles. Also presented is a brief historical review of the extensive body of high-speed vortex flow research from the 1940s to the present in order to provide perspective of the NASA LaRC's high-speed research results. Data are presented which show the types of vortex structures which occur at supersonic speeds and the impact of these flow structures to vehicle performance and control is discussed. The data presented shows the presence of both small- and large scale vortex structures for a variety of vehicles, from missiles to transports. For cavities, the data show very complex multiple vortex structures exist at all combinations of cavity depth to length ratios and Mach number. The data for missiles show the existence of very strong interference effects between body and/or fin vortices and the downstream fins. It was shown that these vortex flow interference effects could be both positive and negative. Data are shown which highlights the effect that leading-edge sweep, leading-edge bluntness, wing thickness, location of maximum thickness, and camber has on the aerodynamics of and flow over delta wings. The observed flow fields for delta wings (i.e. separation bubble, classical vortex, vortex with shock, etc.) are discussed in the context of' aircraft design. And data have been shown that indicate that aerodynamic performance improvements are available by considering vortex flows as a primary design feature. Finally a discussing of a design approach for wings which utilize vortex flows for improved aerodynamic performance at supersonic speed is presented.

  8. High speed flywheel

    DOEpatents

    McGrath, Stephen V.

    1991-01-01

    A flywheel for operation at high speeds utilizes two or more ringlike coments arranged in a spaced concentric relationship for rotation about an axis and an expansion device interposed between the components for accommodating radial growth of the components resulting from flywheel operation. The expansion device engages both of the ringlike components, and the structure of the expansion device ensures that it maintains its engagement with the components. In addition to its expansion-accommodating capacity, the expansion device also maintains flywheel stiffness during flywheel operation.

  9. Micromachined, Electrostatically Deformable Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartman, Randall K.; Wang, Paul K. C.; Miller, Linda M.; Kenny, Thomas W.; Kaiser, William J.; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Agronin, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    Micromachined, closed-loop, electrostatically actuated reflectors (microCLEARs) provide relatively simple and inexpensive alternatives to large, complex, expensive adaptive optics used to control wavefronts of beams of light in astronomy and in experimental laser weapons. Micromachining used to make deformable mirror, supporting structure, and actuation circuitry. Development of microCLEARs may not only overcome some of disadvantages and limitations of older adaptive optics but may also satisfy demands of potential market for small, inexpensive deformable mirrors in electronically controlled film cameras, video cameras, and other commercial optoelectronic instruments.

  10. Development and application of a high-speed planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging system to evaluate liquid and vapor phases of sprays from a multi-hole diesel fuel injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrish, S. E.; Zink, R. J.

    2013-02-01

    A high-speed imaging system capable of acquiring elastic scattering images and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) images in a near-simultaneous fashion has been developed. Acquiring both elastic scattering and PLIF images enables the liquid phase to be discriminated from the vapor phase. High-speed imaging allows the temporal evolution of flow structures to be evaluated. Images of sprays from a multi-hole diesel fuel injector operating under engine-like conditions were acquired. The vapor phase images reveal intricate fluid dynamic structures that exhibit a high degree of variability, indicative of a turbulent gas jet.

  11. High speed transient sampler

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-11-28

    A high speed sampler comprises a meandered sample transmission line for transmitting an input signal, a straight strobe transmission line for transmitting a strobe signal, and a plurality of sampling gates along the transmission lines. The sampling gates comprise a four terminal diode bridge having a first strobe resistor connected from a first terminal of the bridge to the positive strobe line, a second strobe resistor coupled from the third terminal of the bridge to the negative strobe line, a tap connected to the second terminal of the bridge and to the sample transmission line, and a sample holding capacitor connected to the fourth terminal of the bridge. The resistance of the first and second strobe resistors is much higher than the signal transmission line impedance in the preferred system. This results in a sampling gate which applies a very small load on the sample transmission line and on the strobe generator. The sample holding capacitor is implemented using a smaller capacitor and a larger capacitor isolated from the smaller capacitor by resistance. The high speed sampler of the present invention is also characterized by other optimizations, including transmission line tap compensation, stepped impedance strobe line, a multi-layer physical layout, and unique strobe generator design. A plurality of banks of such samplers are controlled for concatenated or interleaved sample intervals to achieve long sample lengths or short sample spacing. 17 figs.

  12. High speed transient sampler

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A high speed sampler comprises a meandered sample transmission line for transmitting an input signal, a straight strobe transmission line for transmitting a strobe signal, and a plurality of sampling gates along the transmission lines. The sampling gates comprise a four terminal diode bridge having a first strobe resistor connected from a first terminal of the bridge to the positive strobe line, a second strobe resistor coupled from the third terminal of the bridge to the negative strobe line, a tap connected to the second terminal of the bridge and to the sample transmission line, and a sample holding capacitor connected to the fourth terminal of the bridge. The resistance of the first and second strobe resistors is much higher than the signal transmission line impedance in the preferred system. This results in a sampling gate which applies a very small load on the sample transmission line and on the strobe generator. The sample holding capacitor is implemented using a smaller capacitor and a larger capacitor isolated from the smaller capacitor by resistance. The high speed sampler of the present invention is also characterized by other optimizations, including transmission line tap compensation, stepped impedance strobe line, a multi-layer physical layout, and unique strobe generator design. A plurality of banks of such samplers are controlled for concatenated or interleaved sample intervals to achieve long sample lengths or short sample spacing.

  13. Laser surface texturing of cast iron steel: dramatic edge burr reduction and high speed process optimisation for industrial production using DPSS picosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruneel, David; Kearsley, Andrew; Karnakis, Dimitris

    2015-07-01

    In this work we present picosecond DPSS laser surface texturing optimisation of automotive grade cast iron steel. This application attracts great interest, particularly in the automotive industry, to reduce friction between moving piston parts in car engines, in order to decrease fuel consumption. This is accomplished by partially covering with swallow microgrooves the inner surface of a piston liner and is currently a production process adopting much longer pulse (microsecond) DPSS lasers. Lubricated interface conditions of moving parts require from the laser process to produce a very strictly controlled surface topography around the laser formed grooves, whose edge burr height must be lower than 100 nm. To achieve such a strict tolerance, laser machining of cast iron steel was investigated using an infrared DPSS picosecond laser (10ps duration) with an output power of 16W and a repetition rate of 200 kHz. The ultrashort laser is believed to provide a much better thermal management of the etching process. All studies presented here were performed on flat samples in ambient air but the process is transferrable to cylindrical geometry engine liners. We will show that reducing significantly the edge burr below an acceptable limit for lubricated engine production is possible using such lasers and remarkably the process window lies at very high irradiated fluences much higher that the single pulse ablation threshold. This detailed experimental work highlights the close relationship between the optimised laser irradiation conditions as well as the process strategy with the final size of the undesirable edge burrs. The optimised process conditions are compatible with an industrial production process and show the potential for removing extra post)processing steps (honing, etc) of cylinder liners on the manufacturing line saving time and cost.

  14. Remote Transmission at High Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Omni and NASA Test Operations at Stennis entered a Dual-Use Agreement to develop the FOTR-125, a 125 megabit-per-second fiber-optic transceiver that allows accurate digital recordings over a great distance. The transceiver s fiber-optic link can be as long as 25 kilometers. This makes it much longer than the standard coaxial link, which can be no longer than 50 meters.The FOTR-125 utilizes laser diode transmitter modules and integrated receivers for the optical interface. Two transmitters and two receivers are employed at each end of the link with automatic or manual switchover to maximize the reliability of the communications link. NASA uses the transceiver in Stennis High-Speed Data Acquisition System (HSDAS). The HSDAS consists of several identical systems installed on the Center s test stands to process all high-speed data related to its propulsion test programs. These transceivers allow the recorder and HSDAS controls to be located in the Test Control Center in a remote location while the digitizer is located on the test stand.

  15. HIGH SPEED CAMERA

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, B.T. Jr.; Davis, W.C.

    1957-12-17

    This patent relates to high speed cameras having resolution times of less than one-tenth microseconds suitable for filming distinct sequences of a very fast event such as an explosion. This camera consists of a rotating mirror with reflecting surfaces on both sides, a narrow mirror acting as a slit in a focal plane shutter, various other mirror and lens systems as well as an innage recording surface. The combination of the rotating mirrors and the slit mirror causes discrete, narrow, separate pictures to fall upon the film plane, thereby forming a moving image increment of the photographed event. Placing a reflecting surface on each side of the rotating mirror cancels the image velocity that one side of the rotating mirror would impart, so as a camera having this short a resolution time is thereby possible.

  16. High speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogardus, Scott; Loper, Brent; Nauman, Chris; Page, Jeff; Parris, Rusty; Steinbach, Greg

    1990-01-01

    The design process of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) combines existing technology with the expectation of future technology to create a Mach 3.0 transport. The HSCT was designed to have a range in excess of 6000 nautical miles and carry up to 300 passengers. This range will allow the HSCT to service the economically expanding Pacific Basin region. Effort was made in the design to enable the aircraft to use conventional airports with standard 12,000 foot runways. With a takeoff thrust of 250,000 pounds, the four supersonic through-flow engines will accelerate the HSCT to a cruise speed of Mach 3.0. The 679,000 pound (at takeoff) HSCT is designed to cruise at an altitude of 70,000 feet, flying above most atmospheric disturbances.

  17. High speed packet switching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This document constitutes the final report prepared by Proteon, Inc. of Westborough, Massachusetts under contract NAS 5-30629 entitled High-Speed Packet Switching (SBIR 87-1, Phase 2) prepared for NASA-Greenbelt, Maryland. The primary goal of this research project is to use the results of the SBIR Phase 1 effort to develop a sound, expandable hardware and software router architecture capable of forwarding 25,000 packets per second through the router and passing 300 megabits per second on the router's internal busses. The work being delivered under this contract received its funding from three different sources: the SNIPE/RIG contract (Contract Number F30602-89-C-0014, CDRL Sequence Number A002), the SBIR contract, and Proteon. The SNIPE/RIG and SBIR contracts had many overlapping requirements, which allowed the research done under SNIPE/RIG to be applied to SBIR. Proteon funded all of the work to develop new router interfaces other than FDDI, in addition to funding the productization of the router itself. The router being delivered under SBIR will be a fully product-quality machine. The work done during this contract produced many significant findings and results, summarized here and explained in detail in later sections of this report. The SNIPE/RIG contract was completed. That contract had many overlapping requirements with the SBIR contract, and resulted in the successful demonstration and delivery of a high speed router. The development that took place during the SNIPE/RIG contract produced findings that included the choice of processor and an understanding of the issues surrounding inter processor communications in a multiprocessor environment. Many significant speed enhancements to the router software were made during that time. Under the SBIR contract (and with help from Proteon-funded work), it was found that a single processor router achieved a throughput significantly higher than originally anticipated. For this reason, a single processor router was

  18. High Speed Ice Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour-Pierce, Alexandra; Sammonds, Peter; Lishman, Ben

    2014-05-01

    Many different tribological experiments have been run to determine the frictional behaviour of ice at high speeds, ostensibly with the intention of applying results to everyday fields such as winter tyres and sports. However, experiments have only been conducted up to linear speeds of several metres a second, with few additional subject specific studies reaching speeds comparable to these applications. Experiments were conducted in the cold rooms of the Rock and Ice Physics Laboratory, UCL, on a custom built rotational tribometer based on previous literature designs. Preliminary results from experiments run at 2m/s for ice temperatures of 271 and 263K indicate that colder ice has a higher coefficient of friction, in accordance with the literature. These results will be presented, along with data from further experiments conducted at temperatures between 259-273K (in order to cover a wide range of the temperature dependent behaviour of ice) and speeds of 2-15m/s to produce a temperature-velocity-friction map for ice. The effect of temperature, speed and slider geometry on the deformation of ice will also be investigated. These speeds are approaching those exhibited by sports such as the luge (where athletes slide downhill on an icy track), placing the tribological work in context.

  19. High speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the design and marketability of a next generation supersonic transport. Apogee Aeronautics Corporation has designated its High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT): Supercruiser HS-8. Since the beginning of the Concorde era, the general consensus has been that the proper time for the introduction of a next generation Supersonic Transport (SST) would depend upon the technical advances made in the areas of propulsion (reduction in emissions) and material composites (stronger, lighter materials). It is believed by many in the aerospace industry that these beforementioned technical advances lie on the horizon. With this being the case, this is the proper time to begin the design phase for the next generation HSCT. The design objective for a HSCT was to develop an aircraft that would be capable of transporting at least 250 passengers with baggage at a distance of 5500 nmi. The supersonic Mach number is currently unspecified. In addition, the design had to be marketable, cost effective, and certifiable. To achieve this goal, technical advances in the current SST's must be made, especially in the areas of aerodynamics and propulsion. As a result of these required aerodynamic advances, several different supersonic design concepts were reviewed.

  20. Nondestructive characterization of micromachined ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooney, Adam; Hix, Kenneth E.; Yaney, Perry; Zhan, Qiwen; Dosser, Larry R.; Blackshire, James L.

    2005-05-01

    The aerospace, automotive, and electronic industries are finding increasing need for components made from silicon carbide (SiC) and silicon nitride (Si3N4). The development and use of miniaturized ceramic parts, in particular, is of significant interest in a variety of critical applications. As these application areas grow, manufacturers are being asked to find new and better solutions for machining and forming ceramic materials with microscopic precision. Recent advances in laser machining technologies are making precision micromachining of ceramics a reality. Questions regarding micromachining accuracy, residual melt region effects, and laser-induced microcracking are of critical concern during the machining process. In this activity, a variety of nondestructive inspection methods have been used to investigate the microscopic features of laser-machined ceramic components. The primary goal was to assess the micromachined areas for machining accuracy and microcracking using laser ultrasound, scanning electron microscopy, and white-light interference microscopic imaging of the machined regions.

  1. Optimization of micropipette fabrication by laser micromachining for application in an ultrafine atmospheric pressure plasma jet using response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Liu, Jingquan; Yang, Bin; Chen, Xiang; Wang, Xiaolin; Yang, Chunsheng

    2016-06-01

    The optimization of the laser micromachining process for special tapered micropipettes was investigated using response surface methodology. Three process parameters for the CO2 laser-based micropipette puller (P-2000, Sutter Instrument) were chosen as variables, namely heat, velocity and pull. The targeted length L TVS of the tapered variant section with a tip diameter of 10 μm was taken as a response. The optimum process parameters with L TVS of 7.3 mm were determined by analyzing the response surface three-dimension surface plots. The central composite design was selected to optimize the process variables, and the experimental data were fitted into a reduced cubic polynomial model. The high R 2 value (99.66%) and low coefficient of variation (0.73%) indicated the statistical significance of the model and good precision for the experiment. The optimization result showed that the best parameters were with the heat, velocity and pull values of 850, 53 and 170, respectively. The result was verified by a CO2 laser-based micropipette puller three times with length L TVS at 7.26 mm, 7.35 mm and 7.36 mm with the same optimized parameters. Then, the application to the ultrafine atmospheric pressure He/O2 plasma jets was carried out and micro-hole etching of the parylene-C film was realized with length L TVS at 6.29 mm, 7.35 mm and 8.02 mm. The results showed that the micro-plasma jet with an L TVS of 7.35 mm had the minimum applied voltage of 12.7 kV and the minimum micro-etching diameter of 45 μm with the deepest etching depth of 2.8 μm.

  2. Femtosecond laser micromachining for the realization of fully integrated photonic and microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, S. M.; Osellame, R.; Ramponi, R.

    2015-02-01

    Femtosecond laser microprocessing is a direct, maskless fabrication technique that has attracted much attention in the past 10 years due to its unprecedented versatility in the 3D patterning of transparent materials. Two common modalities of femtosecond laser microfabrication include buried optical waveguide writing and surface laser ablation, which have been applied to a wide range of transparent substrates including glasses, polymers and crystals. In two photon polymerization, a third modality of femtosecond laser fabrication, focused femtosecond laser pulses drive photopolymerization in photoresists, enabling the writing of complex 3D structures with submicrometer resolution. In this paper, we discuss several microdevices realized by these diverse modalities of femtosecond laser microfabrication, for applications in microfluidics, sensing and quantum information.

  3. Application of melt ejection criterion in simulation of micromachining with laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semak, Vladimir V.; Schriempf, J. T.; Knorovsky, G. A.; MacCallum, D. O.

    2003-07-01

    The theoretical criterion defining the threshold pulse energy and beam intensity required for melt ejection is proposed. The results of numerical simulation present dependencies of the threshold pulse energy and beam intensity as functions of laser pulse duration and beam radius. The experimental verification of proposed criterion is described and the comparison of theoretical predictions and measurements is presented. The criterion is applied for simulation of laser drilling metal foil with thickness in the range 25 μm - 125 μm using laser beam with 12 μm beam radius and pulse durations 10 ns and 100 ns. The computational results are used to interpret the results of experimental study of laser drilling of 125 μm aluminum foil using a single mode beam of a XeCl laser performed at the Nederlands Centrum voor Laser Research (NCLR) and the University of Twente. Additional results on Nd:YAG spot welds in pure Ni are also presented.

  4. High speed printing with polygon scan heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, Glenn

    2016-03-01

    To reduce and in many cases eliminate the costs associated with high volume printing of consumer and industrial products, this paper investigates and validates the use of the new generation of high speed pulse on demand (POD) lasers in concert with high speed (HS) polygon scan heads (PSH). Associated costs include consumables such as printing ink and nozzles, provisioning labor, maintenance and repair expense as well as reduction of printing lines due to high through put. Targets that are applicable and investigated include direct printing on plastics, printing on paper/cardboard as well as printing on labels. Market segments would include consumer products (CPG), medical and pharmaceutical products, universal ID (UID), and industrial products. In regards to the POD lasers employed, the wavelengths include UV(355nm), Green (532nm) and IR (1064nm) operating within the repetition range of 180 to 250 KHz.

  5. Simultaneous high-speed gas property measurements at the exhaust gas recirculation cooler exit and at the turbocharger inlet of a multicylinder diesel engine using diode-laser-absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jatana, Gurneesh S; Magee, Mark; Fain, David; Naik, Sameer V; Shaver, Gregory M; Lucht, Robert P

    2015-02-10

    A diode-laser-absorption-spectroscopy-based sensor system was used to perform high-speed (100 Hz to 5 kHz) measurements of gas properties (temperature, pressure, and H(2)O vapor concentration) at the turbocharger inlet and at the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooler exit of a diesel engine. An earlier version of this system was previously used for high-speed measurements of gas temperature and H(2)O vapor concentration in the intake manifold of the diesel engine. A 1387.2 N m tunable distributed feedback diode laser was used to scan across multiple H(2)O absorption transitions, and the direct absorption signal was recorded using a high-speed data acquisition system. Compact optical connectors were designed to conduct simultaneous measurements in the intake manifold, the EGR cooler exit, and the turbocharger inlet of the engine. For measurements at the turbocharger inlet, these custom optical connectors survived gas temperatures as high as 800 K using a simple and passive arrangement in which the temperature-sensitive components were protected from high temperatures using ceramic insulators. This arrangement reduced system cost and complexity by eliminating the need for any active water or oil cooling. Diode-laser measurements performed during steady-state engine operation were within 5% of the thermocouple and pressure sensor measurements, and within 10% of the H(2)O concentration values derived from the CO(2) gas analyzer measurements. Measurements were also performed in the engine during transient events. In one such transient event, where a step change in fueling was introduced, the diode-laser sensor was able to capture the 30 ms change in the gas properties; the thermocouple, on the other hand, required 7.4 s to accurately reflect the change in gas conditions, while the gas analyzer required nearly 600 ms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first implementation of such a simple and passive arrangement of high-temperature optical connectors as well

  6. Comparison of Above Bandgap Laser and MeV Ion Induced Single Event Transients in High-Speed Si Photonic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, Jamie S.; Hirao, Toshio; Onoda, Shinobu; Itoh, Hisayoshi; Edmonds, Larry; Johnston, Allan

    2006-01-01

    We illustrate inherent differences between Single Event Transients generated by an above bandgap picosecond lasers and MeV heavy ions by comparing transient currents collected with an ion microbeam and picosecond laser with varying track waist.

  7. Fiber laser micromachining of thin NiTi tubes for shape memory vascular stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Li, Dong Bo; Tong, Yi Fei; Zhu, Yu Fu

    2016-07-01

    Nickel titanium (NiTi) alloy has widely been used in the vascular stent manufacturing due to its excellent properties. Neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser is commonly used for the preparation of metal vascular stents. Recently, fiber lasers have been used for stent profiling for better cutting quality. To investigate the cutting-kerf characters of NiTi vascular stents fabricated by fiber laser cutting, laser cutting experiments with thin NiTi tubes were conducted in this study, while NiTi sheets were used in other fiber laser cutting studies. Different with striation topography, new topographies such as layer topography and topography mixed with layers and striations were observed, and the underlying reason for new topographies was also discussed. Comparative research on different topographies was conducted through analyzing the surface roughness, kerf width, heat-affected zone (HAZ) and dross formation. Laser cutting process parameters have a comprehensive influence on the cutting quality; in this study, the process parameters' influences on the cutting quality were studied from the view of power density along the cutting direction. The present research provides a guideline for improving the cutting quality of NiTi vascular stents.

  8. Fabrication of low-loss ridge waveguides in z-cut lithium niobate by combination of ion implantation and UV picosecond laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolze, M.; Herrmann, T.; L'huillier, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Ridge waveguides in ferroelectric materials like LiNbO3 attended great interest for highly efficient integrated optical devices, for instance, electro-optic modulators, frequency converters and ring resonators. The main challenges are the realization of high index barrier towards the substrate and the processing of smooth ridges for minimized scattering losses. For fabricating ridges a variety of techniques, like chemical and wet etching as well as optical grade dicing, have been investigated in detail. Among them, laser micromachining offers a versatile and flexible processing technology, but up to now only a limited side wall roughness has been achieved by this technique. Here we report on laser micromachining of smooth ridges for low-loss optical waveguides in LiNbO3. The ridges with a top width of 7 µm were fabricated in z-cut LiNbO3 by a combination of UV picosecond micromachining and thermal annealing. The laser processing parameters show a strong influence on the achievable sidewall roughness of the ridges and were systematically investigated and optimized. Finally, the surface quality is further improved by an optimized thermal post-processing. The roughness of the ridges were analysed with confocal microscopy and the scattering losses were measured at an optical characterization wavelength of 632.8 nm by using the end-fire coupling method. In these investigations the index barrier was formed by multi-energy low dose oxygen ion implantation technology in a depth of 2.7 μm. With optimized laser processing parameters and thermal post-processing a scattering loss as low as 0.1 dB/cm has been demonstrated.

  9. Low-threshold whispering-gallery-mode microlasers fabricated in a Nd:glass substrate by three-dimensional femtosecond laser micromachining.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jintian; Xu, Yingxin; Song, Jiangxin; Zeng, Bin; He, Fei; Xu, Huailiang; Sugioka, Koji; Fang, Wei; Cheng, Ya

    2013-05-01

    We report on fabrication of whispering-gallery-mode microlasers in a Nd:glass chip by femtosecond laser three-dimensional micromachining. The main fabrication procedures include the fabrication of freestanding microdisks supported by thin pillars by femtosecond laser ablation of the glass substrate immersed in water, followed by CO2 laser annealing for surface smoothing. The quality (Q) factor of the fabricated microcavity is measured to be 1.065×10(6). Lasing is observed at a pump threshold as low as ~69 μW at room temperature with a continuous-wave laser diode operating at 780 nm. This technique allows for fabrication of microcavities of high Q factors in various dielectric materials, such as glasses and crystals.

  10. Femtosecond laser 3D micromachining and its applications to biochip fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Koji

    2014-03-01

    Femtosecond lasers have opened up new avenues in materials processing due to their unique characteristics of ultra-short pulse widths and extremely high peak intensities that induce strong absorption in even transparent materials due to nonlinear multiphoton absorption. Then, the femtosecond laser can directly fabricate three-dimensional microfluidic, micromechanic, microelectronic, and micro-optical components in glass. These microcomponents can be easily integrated in a single glass microchip, which enable us to fabricate functional biochips quickly screening large number of biological analytes. In this talk, the detailed fabrication procedure of biochips using the femtosecond laser and applications of the fabricated biochips to material synthesis, analysis of biochemical samples, and determination of functions of microorganisms are introduced.

  11. Fabrication of high-Q lithium niobate microresonators using femtosecond laser micromachining

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jintian; Xu, Yingxin; Fang, Zhiwei; Wang, Min; Song, Jiangxin; Wang, Nengwen; Qiao, Lingling; Fang, Wei; Cheng, Ya

    2015-01-01

    We report on fabrication of high-Q lithium niobate (LN) whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microresonators suspended on silica pedestals by femtosecond laser direct writing followed by focused ion beam (FIB) milling. The micrometer-scale (diameter ~82 μm) LN resonator possesses a Q factor of ~2.5 × 105 around 1550 nm wavelength. The combination of femtosecond laser direct writing with FIB enables high-efficiency, high-precision nanofabrication of high-Q crystalline microresonators. PMID:25627294

  12. Microchips fabricated by femtosecond laser micromachining in glass for observation of aquatic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, Y.; Sugioka, K.; Kawano, H.; Ishikawa, I.; Miyawaki, A.; Midorikawa, K.

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) hollow microstructures embedded in photostructurable glass by a nonlinear multiphoton absorption process using a femtosecond (fs) laser. Fs laser direct writing followed by annealing and successive wet etching in dilute hydrofluoric (HF) acid solution resulted in the rapid manufacturing of microchips with 3-D hollow microstructures for the dynamic observation of living microorganisms in fresh water. The embedded microchannel structure enables us to analyze the continuous motion of Euglena gracilis and Dinoflagellate. Such microchips, referred to as nano-aquariums realize the efficient and highly functional observation of microorganisms.

  13. Mechanism and experimental study on three-dimensional facula shaping in femtosecond laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xuetao; Tu, Dawei; Cai, Jianwen

    2015-10-01

    Because of the laser beam waist and diffraction effect of the lens, the focal spot light field in femtosecond laser microprocessing has an ellipsoidal spatial distribution. This leads to the gap between two processing layers increasing along the axial direction, and the distribution density of processing points decreasing along the horizontal direction. This directly reduces the resolution of the microprocessing, and badly affects the machining accuracy and surface quality. We established a mathematical model for three-dimensional (3-D) laser beam shaping based on the Fresnel diffraction theory and designed a kind of four-ring complex amplitude transmittance phase plate by using a global optimization algorithm and genetic algorithm to simultaneously realize transverse and axial 3-D shaping. We numerically showed that the transverse and axial gains of the focal facula after 3-D shaping are 0.77 and 0.68, respectively, where the corresponding peak energy ratio is 0.36, the transverse and axial sidelobe energies are 0.28 and 0.62, respectively, and the defocusing amount is -0.08. We also constructed a confocal/two-photon microscope system to experimentally achieve a better shaping effect in the case of femtosecond laser fabrication at a point on the thin film of a photochromic material.

  14. High-speed massively parallel scanning

    DOEpatents

    Decker, Derek E.

    2010-07-06

    A new technique for recording a series of images of a high-speed event (such as, but not limited to: ballistics, explosives, laser induced changes in materials, etc.) is presented. Such technique(s) makes use of a lenslet array to take image picture elements (pixels) and concentrate light from each pixel into a spot that is much smaller than the pixel. This array of spots illuminates a detector region (e.g., film, as one embodiment) which is scanned transverse to the light, creating tracks of exposed regions. Each track is a time history of the light intensity for a single pixel. By appropriately configuring the array of concentrated spots with respect to the scanning direction of the detection material, different tracks fit between pixels and sufficient lengths are possible which can be of interest in several high-speed imaging applications.

  15. Narrow linewidth comb realized with a mode-locked fiber laser using an intra-cavity waveguide electro-optic modulator for high-speed control.

    PubMed

    Iwakuni, Kana; Inaba, Hajime; Nakajima, Yoshiaki; Kobayashi, Takumi; Hosaka, Kazumoto; Onae, Atsushi; Hong, Feng-Lei

    2012-06-18

    We have developed an optical frequency comb using a mode-locked fiber ring laser with an intra-cavity waveguide electro-optic modulator controlling the optical length in the laser cavity. The mode-locking is achieved with a simple ring configuration and a nonlinear polarization rotation mechanism. The beat note between the laser and a reference laser and the carrier envelope offset frequency of the comb were simultaneously phase locked with servo bandwidths of 1.3 MHz and 900 kHz, respectively. We observed an out-of-loop beat between two identical combs, and obtained a coherent δ-function peak with a signal to noise ratio of 70 dB/Hz.

  16. Optical Micromachining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Under an SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) with Marshall Space Flight Center, Potomac Photonics, Inc., constructed and demonstrated a unique tool that fills a need in the area of diffractive and refractive micro-optics. It is an integrated computer-aided design and computer-aided micro-machining workstation that will extend the benefits of diffractive and micro-optic technology to optical designers. Applications of diffractive optics include sensors and monitoring equipment, analytical instruments, and fiber optic distribution and communication. The company has been making diffractive elements with the system as a commercial service for the last year.

  17. Temporally focused femtosecond laser pulses for low numerical aperture micromachining through optically transparent materials.

    PubMed

    Vitek, Dawn N; Adams, Daniel E; Johnson, Adrea; Tsai, Philbert S; Backus, Sterling; Durfee, Charles G; Kleinfeld, David; Squier, Jeffrey A

    2010-08-16

    Temporal focusing of spatially chirped femtosecond laser pulses overcomes previous limitations for ablating high aspect ratio features with low numerical aperture (NA) beams. Simultaneous spatial and temporal focusing reduces nonlinear interactions, such as self-focusing, prior to the focal plane so that deep (approximately 1 mm) features with parallel sidewalls are ablated at high material removal rates (25 microm(3) per 80 microJ pulse) at 0.04-0.05 NA. This technique is applied to the fabrication of microfluidic devices by ablation through the back surface of thick (6 mm) fused silica substrates. It is also used to ablate bone under aqueous immersion to produce craniotomies.

  18. High-Speed Electrochemical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Momotenko, Dmitry; Byers, Joshua C; McKelvey, Kim; Kang, Minkyung; Unwin, Patrick R

    2015-09-22

    The design, development, and application of high-speed scanning electrochemical probe microscopy is reported. The approach allows the acquisition of a series of high-resolution images (typically 1000 pixels μm(-2)) at rates approaching 4 seconds per frame, while collecting up to 8000 image pixels per second, about 1000 times faster than typical imaging speeds used up to now. The focus is on scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM), but the principles and practicalities are applicable to many electrochemical imaging methods. The versatility of the high-speed scan concept is demonstrated at a variety of substrates, including imaging the electroactivity of a patterned self-assembled monolayer on gold, visualization of chemical reactions occurring at single wall carbon nanotubes, and probing nanoscale electrocatalysts for water splitting. These studies provide movies of spatial variations of electrochemical fluxes as a function of potential and a platform for the further development of high speed scanning with other electrochemical imaging techniques.

  19. Micromachining of optically transparent materials by laser ablation of a solution containing pyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, Akira; Niino, Hiroyuki; Wang, Jun

    2001-01-01

    Optically transparent materials such as fused silica, quartz crystal, calcium fluoride, and fluorocarbon polymer were etched upon irradiation of organic solution containing pyrene with a conventional KrF or XeCl excimer laser. Threshold fluences for etching were 240 mJ/cm2 for fused silica, 330 mJ/cm2 for quartz crystal, 740 mJ/cm2 for calcium fluoride, and 45 mJ/cm2 for fluorocarbon polymer. These threshold values were remarkably low compared with those of direct ablation by using conventional lasers. Their etch rates remarkably depended on a concentration of pyrene: the etch rate became higher as the pyrene concentration increased. It means that pyrene molecules play an important role in this process. The mechanisms for this process is discussed by cyclic multiphotonic absorption of pyrene in the excited states, thermal relaxation, and formation of super-heated solution. As the results suggest, the process is based on the combination of two physical processes in the interface between the transparent materials and the liquid: one is a heating process by a super-heated liquid and the other is an attacking process by a high temperature and pressure vapor. The mechanism is also referred to thermal properties of materials.

  20. SEAL FOR HIGH SPEED CENTRIFUGE

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.W.

    1957-12-17

    A seal is described for a high speed centrifuge wherein the centrifugal force of rotation acts on the gasket to form a tight seal. The cylindrical rotating bowl of the centrifuge contains a closure member resting on a shoulder in the bowl wall having a lower surface containing bands of gasket material, parallel and adjacent to the cylinder wall. As the centrifuge speed increases, centrifugal force acts on the bands of gasket material forcing them in to a sealing contact against the cylinder wall. This arrangememt forms a simple and effective seal for high speed centrifuges, replacing more costly methods such as welding a closure in place.

  1. High speed multiwire photon camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved multiwire proportional counter camera having particular utility in the field of clinical nuclear medicine imaging. The detector utilizes direct coupled, low impedance, high speed delay lines, the segments of which are capacitor-inductor networks. A pile-up rejection test is provided to reject confused events otherwise caused by multiple ionization events occuring during the readout window.

  2. High speed multiwire photon camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An improved multiwire proportional counter camera having particular utility in the field of clinical nuclear medicine imaging. The detector utilizes direct coupled, low impedance, high speed delay lines, the segments of which are capacitor-inductor networks. A pile-up rejection test is provided to reject confused events otherwise caused by multiple ionization events occurring during the readout window.

  3. High-speed multispectral confocal biomedical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Carver, Gary E.; Locknar, Sarah A.; Morrison, William A.; Krishnan Ramanujan, V.; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. A new approach for generating high-speed multispectral confocal images has been developed. The central concept is that spectra can be acquired for each pixel in a confocal spatial scan by using a fast spectrometer based on optical fiber delay lines. This approach merges fast spectroscopy with standard spatial scanning to create datacubes in real time. The spectrometer is based on a serial array of reflecting spectral elements, delay lines between these elements, and a single element detector. The spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution of the instrument is described and illustrated by multispectral images of laser-induced autofluorescence in biological tissues. PMID:24658777

  4. High-speed scanning ablation of dental hard tissues with a λ=9.3-μm CO2 laser: heat accumulation and peripheral thermal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Daniel; Staninec, Michal; Lee, Chulsung; Fried, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    A mechanically scanned CO2 laser operated at high laser pulse repetition rates can be used to rapidly and precisely remove dental decay. This study aims to determine whether these laser systems can safely ablate enamel and dentin without excessive heat accumulation and peripheral thermal damage. Peripheral thermal damage can adversely impact the mechanical strength of the irradiated tissue, particularly for dentin, and reduce the adhesion characteristics of the modified surfaces. Samples were derived from noncarious extracted molars. Pulpal temperatures were recorded using microthermocouples situated at the pulp chamber roof of samples (n=12), which were occlusally ablated using a rapid-scanning, water-cooled 300 Hz CO2 laser over a two minute time course. The mechanical strength of facially ablated dentin (n=10) was determined via four-point bend test and compared to control samples (n=10) prepared with 320 grit wet sand paper to simulate conventional preparations. Composite-to-enamel bond strength was measured via single-plane shear test for ablated/non-etched (n=10) and ablated/acid-etched (n=8) samples and compared to control samples (n=9) prepared by 320 grit wet sanding. Thermocouple measurements indicated that the temperature remained below ambient temperature at 19.0°C (s.d.=0.9) if water-cooling was used. There was no discoloration of either dentin and enamel, the treated surfaces were uniformly ablated and there were no cracks observable on the laser treated surfaces. Fourpoint bend tests yielded mean mechanical strengths of 18.2 N (s.d.=4.6) for ablated dentin and 18.1 N (s.d.=2.7) for control (p>0.05). Shear tests yielded mean bond strengths of 31.2 MPa (s.d.=2.5, p<0.01) for ablated/acid-etched samples, 5.2 MPa (s.d.=2.4, p<0.001) for ablated/non-etched samples, and 37.0 MPa (s.d.=3.6) for control. The results indicate that a rapid-scanning 300 Hz CO2 laser can effectively ablate dentin and enamel without excessive heat accumulation and with minimal

  5. Laser velocimeter systems analysis applied to a flow survey above a stalled wing. [conducted in Langley high-speed 7 by 10 foot tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. H., Jr.; Meyers, J. F.; Hepner, T. E.

    1977-01-01

    A laser velocimeter operating in the backscatter mode was used to survey the flow above a stalled wing. Polarization was used to separate the two orthogonal velocity components of the fringe-type laser velocimeter, and digital counters were used for data processing. The velocities of the kerosene seed particles were measured with less than 2 percent uncertainty. The particle velocity measurements were collected into histograms. The flow field survey was carried out above an aspect-ratio-8 stalled wing with an NACA 0012 section. The angle of attack was 19.5 deg, the Mach number was 0.49, and the Reynolds number was 1,400,000. The flow field was characterized by the periodic shedding of discrete vortices from near the crest of the airfoil.

  6. High-speed assembly language (80386/80387) programming for laser spectra scan control and data acquisition providing improved resolution water vapor spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    An assembly language program using the Intel 80386 CPU and 80387 math co-processor chips was written to increase the speed of data gathering and processing, and provide control of a scanning CW ring dye laser system. This laser system is used in high resolution (better than 0.001 cm-1) water vapor spectroscopy experiments. Laser beam power is sensed at the input and output of white cells and the output of a Fabry-Perot. The assembly language subroutine is called from Basic, acquires the data and performs various calculations at rates greater than 150 faster than could be performed by the higher level language. The width of output control pulses generated in assembly language are 3 to 4 microsecs as compared to 2 to 3.7 millisecs for those generated in Basic (about 500 to 1000 times faster). Included are a block diagram and brief description of the spectroscopy experiment, a flow diagram of the Basic and assembly language programs, listing of the programs, scope photographs of the computer generated 5-volt pulses used for control and timing analysis, and representative water spectrum curves obtained using these programs.

  7. Correlative microscopy including CLSM and SEM to improve high-speed, high-resolution laser-engraved print and embossing forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohrer, Markus; Schweitzer, Michael; Nirnberger, Robert; Weinberger, Bernhard

    2015-10-01

    The industrial market for processing large-scale films has seen dramatic changes since the 1980s and has almost completely been replaced by lasers and digital processes. A commonly used technology for engraving screens, print and embossing forms in the printing industry, well known since then, is the use of RF-excited CO2 lasers with a beam power up to about 1 kW, modulated in accordance to the pattern to be engraved. Future needs for high-security printing (banknotes, security papers, passports, etc.) will require laser engraving of at least half a million or even more structured elements with a depth from some μm up to 500 μm. Industry now wants photorealistic pictures in packaging design, which requires a similar performance. To ensure 'trusted pulses' from the digital process to the print result the use of correlative microscopy (CLSM and SEM) is demonstrated as a complete chain for a correlative print process in this paper.

  8. Cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy with a ps-pulsed UV laser for sensitive, high-speed measurements in a shock tube.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengkai; Sun, Kai; Davidson, David F; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K

    2016-01-11

    We report the first application of cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) with a ps-pulsed UV laser for sensitive and rapid gaseous species time-history measurements in a transient environment (in this study, a shock tube). The broadband nature of the ps pulses enabled instantaneous coupling of the laser beam into roughly a thousand cavity modes, which grants excellent immunity to laser-cavity coupling noise in environments with heavy vibrations, even with an on-axis alignment. In this proof-of-concept experiment, we demonstrated an absorption gain of 49, which improved the minimum detectable absorbance by ~20 compared to the conventional single-pass strategy at similar experimental conditions. For absorption measurements behind reflected shock waves, an effective time-resolution of ~2 μs was achieved, which enabled time-resolved observations of transient phenomena, such as the vibrational relaxation of O(2) demonstrated here. The substantial improvement in detection sensitivity, together with microsecond measurement resolution implies excellent potential for studies of transient physical and chemical processes in nonequilibrium situations, particularly via measurements of weak absorptions of trace species in dilute reactive systems.

  9. High-speed rotorcraft propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, John W.; Fitzpatrick, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    Recently completed high-speed rotorcraft design studies for NASA provide the basis to assess technology needs for the development of these aircraft. Preliminary analysis of several concepts possessing helicopter-like hover characteristics and cruise capabilities in the 450 knot regime, led to the selection of two concepts for further study. The concepts selected included the Rotor/Wing and the Tilt Wing. The two unique concepts use turbofan and turboshaft engines respectively. Designs, based on current technology for each, established a baseline configuration from which technology trade studies could be conducted. Propulsion technology goals from the IHPTET program established the advanced technolgy year. Due to high-speed requirements, each concept possesses its own unique propulsion challenges. Trade studies indicate that achieving th IHPTET Phase III goals significantly improves the effectiveness of both concepts. Increased engine efficiency is particularly important to VTOL aircraft by reducing gross weight.

  10. High Speed Photometry for BUSCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, O.; Reif, K.

    The camera BUSCA (Bonn University Simultaneous CAmera) is a standard instrument at the 2.2m telescope at Calar Alto Observatory (Spain) since 2001. At the moment some modifications of BUSCA are planned and partially realised. One major goal is the replacement of the old thick CCDs in the blue, yellow-green, and near-infrared channels. The newer CCDs have better cosmetics and performance in sensitivity. The other goal is to replace the old "Heidelberg"-style controller with a newly designed controller with the main focus on high-speed readout and on an advanced windowing mechanism. We present a theoretical analysis of the new controller design and its advantage in high speed photometry of rapidly pulsating stars. As an example PG1605+072 was chosen which was observed with BUSCA before in 2001 and 2002.

  11. Focused Mission High Speed Combatant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-05-09

    hull types to determine which hull type best meets the requirements for the Focused Mission High Speed Combatant. The first step in the analysis...MAPC, uses parametric models and scaling to create high level designs of various hull types. The inputs are desired speed , range, payload, sea state...reached 10 SWATH vessels exhibit superior seakeeping at near zero speed compared to other hull forms 5 Assumes 2 equal-sized GE Gas Turbines 11

  12. High-Speed Multiplexed Spatiotemporally Resolved Measurements of Exhaust Gas Recirculation Dynamics in a Multi-Cylinder Engine Using Laser Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jihyung; Prikhodko, Vitaly; Parks, James E; Perfetto, Anthony; Geckler, Sam; Partridge, William P

    2016-04-01

    The need for more environmentally friendly and efficient energy conversion is of paramount importance in developing and designing next-generation internal combustion (IC) engines for transportation applications. One effective solution to reducing emissions of mono-nitrogen oxides (NOx) is exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), which has been widely implemented in modern vehicles. However, cylinder-to-cylinder and cycle-to-cycle variations in the charge-gas uniformity can be a major barrier to optimum EGR implementation on multi-cylinder engines, and can limit performance, stability, and efficiency. Precise knowledge and fine control over the EGR system is therefore crucial, particularly for optimizing advanced engine concepts such as reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI). An absorption-based laser diagnostic was developed to study spatiotemporal charge-gas distributions in an IC engine intake manifold in real-time. The laser was tuned to an absorption band of carbon dioxide (CO2), a standard exhaust-gas marker, near 2.7 µm. The sensor was capable of probing four separate measurement locations simultaneously, and independently analyzing EGR fraction at speeds of 5 kHz (1.2 crank-angle degree (CAD) at 1 k RPM) or faster with high accuracy. The probes were used to study spatiotemporal EGR non-uniformities in the intake manifold and ultimately promote the development of more efficient and higher performance engines.

  13. High-Speed Multiplexed Spatiotemporally Resolved Measurements of Exhaust Gas Recirculation Dynamics in a Multi-Cylinder Engine Using Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Yoo, Jihyung; Prikhodko, Vitaly; Parks, James E.; ...

    2016-04-01

    The need for more environmentally friendly and efficient energy conversion is of paramount importance in developing and designing next-generation internal combustion (IC) engines for transportation applications. One effective solution to reducing emissions of mono-nitrogen oxides (NOx) is exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), which has been widely implemented in modern vehicles. However, cylinder-to-cylinder and cycle-to-cycle variations in the charge-gas uniformity can be a major barrier to optimum EGR implementation on multi-cylinder engines, and can limit performance, stability, and efficiency. Precise knowledge and fine control over the EGR system is thus crucial, particularly for optimizing advanced engine concepts such as reactivity controlled compressionmore » ignition (RCCI). An absorption-based laser diagnostic was developed to study spatiotemporal charge-gas distributions in an IC engine intake manifold in real-time. The laser was tuned to an absorption band of carbon dioxide (CO2), a standard exhaust-gas marker, near 2.7 µm. The sensor was capable of probing four separate measurement locations simultaneously, and independently analyzing EGR fraction at speeds of 5 kHz (1.2 crank-angle degree (CAD) at 1 k RPM) or faster with high accuracy. Lastly, the probes were used to study spatiotemporal EGR non-uniformities in the intake manifold and ultimately promote the development of more efficient and higher performance engines.« less

  14. High-Speed Multiplexed Spatiotemporally Resolved Measurements of Exhaust Gas Recirculation Dynamics in a Multi-Cylinder Engine Using Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jihyung; Prikhodko, Vitaly; Parks, James E.; Perfetto, Anthony; Geckler, Sam; Partridge, William P.

    2016-04-01

    The need for more environmentally friendly and efficient energy conversion is of paramount importance in developing and designing next-generation internal combustion (IC) engines for transportation applications. One effective solution to reducing emissions of mono-nitrogen oxides (NOx) is exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), which has been widely implemented in modern vehicles. However, cylinder-to-cylinder and cycle-to-cycle variations in the charge-gas uniformity can be a major barrier to optimum EGR implementation on multi-cylinder engines, and can limit performance, stability, and efficiency. Precise knowledge and fine control over the EGR system is thus crucial, particularly for optimizing advanced engine concepts such as reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI). An absorption-based laser diagnostic was developed to study spatiotemporal charge-gas distributions in an IC engine intake manifold in real-time. The laser was tuned to an absorption band of carbon dioxide (CO2), a standard exhaust-gas marker, near 2.7 µm. The sensor was capable of probing four separate measurement locations simultaneously, and independently analyzing EGR fraction at speeds of 5 kHz (1.2 crank-angle degree (CAD) at 1 k RPM) or faster with high accuracy. Lastly, the probes were used to study spatiotemporal EGR non-uniformities in the intake manifold and ultimately promote the development of more efficient and higher performance engines.

  15. High-speed imaging system for observation of discharge phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, R.; Kusano, H.; Ito, Y.

    2008-11-01

    A thin metal electrode tip instantly changes its shape into a sphere or a needlelike shape in a single electrical discharge of high current. These changes occur within several hundred microseconds. To observe these high-speed phenomena in a single discharge, an imaging system using a high-speed video camera and a high repetition rate pulse laser was constructed. A nanosecond laser, the wavelength of which was 532 nm, was used as the illuminating source of a newly developed high-speed video camera, HPV-1. The time resolution of our system was determined by the laser pulse width and was about 80 nanoseconds. The system can take one hundred pictures at 16- or 64-microsecond intervals in a single discharge event. A band-pass filter at 532 nm was placed in front of the camera to block the emission of the discharge arc at other wavelengths. Therefore, clear images of the electrode were recorded even during the discharge. If the laser was not used, only images of plasma during discharge and thermal radiation from the electrode after discharge were observed. These results demonstrate that the combination of a high repetition rate and a short pulse laser with a high speed video camera provides a unique and powerful method for high speed imaging.

  16. High-Speed, Integrated Ablation Cell and Dual Concentric Injector Plasma Torch for Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Douglas, David N; Managh, Amy J; Reid, Helen J; Sharp, Barry L

    2015-11-17

    In recent years, laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) has gained increasing importance for biological analysis, where ultratrace imaging at micrometer resolution is required. However, while undoubtedly a valuable research tool, the washout times and sensitivity of current technology have restricted its routine and clinical application. Long periods between sampling points are required to maintain adequate spatial resolution. Additionally, temporal signal dispersion reduces the signal-to-noise ratio, which is a particular concern when analyzing discrete samples, such as individual particles or cells. This paper describes a novel, two-volume laser ablation cell and integrated ICP torch designed to minimize aerosol dispersion for fast, efficient sample transport. The holistic design utilizes a short, continuous diameter fused silica conduit, which extends from the point of ablation, through the ICP torch, and into the base of the plasma. This arrangement removes the requirement for a dispersive component for argon addition, and helps to keep the sample on axis with the ICP cone orifice. Hence, deposition of sample on the cones is theoretically reduced with a resulting improvement in the absolute sensitivity (counts per unit mole). The system described here achieved washouts of 1.5, 3.2, and 4.9 ms for NIST 612 glass, at full width half, 10%, and 1% maximum, respectively, with an 8-14-fold improvement in absolute sensitivity, compared to a single volume ablation cell. To illustrate the benefits of this performance, the system was applied to a contemporary bioanalytical challenge, specifically the analysis of individual biological cells, demonstrating similar improvements in performance.

  17. Using Concatenated Profiles from High-Speed Laser Profile Scanners to Estimate Debris-Flow Characteristics: A Novel Approach Based on Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquemart, M. F.; Meier, L.; Graf, C.; Morsdorf, F.

    2015-12-01

    We use globally unique datasets from paired laser profile scanners to measure debris-flow height, velocity and discharge in two well-known debris-flow channels in Switzerland. Since 2011, these scanners have been scanning passing debris flows at rates of up to 75 Hz, acquiring millions of cross-bed profiles. The profiles can be concatenated through time, generating unique 2.5D representations of passing debris flows. Applying a large-scale Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) approach to these datasets has proven successful to measure surface flow velocities. Flow height can also be estimated from the laser scanners, and thus a discharge estimate can be given. To account for changes to the channel bed due to erosion and deposition during the debris flow, we compute two flow height estimates using a pre-event as well as a post-event channel geometry in order to visualize discharge variability.Velocity outliers need to be excluded to provide reliable estimates of peak discharge, and changes to the channel bed are assumed to be the largest source of uncertainty. However, the latter problem is inherent to all debris-flow discharge measurements, and we have found the new system to offer distinct advantages over the conventional system relying on geophones and a radar gauge. The wide scan angle of up to 190° renders the scanners insensitive to changes of the flow path, and the point density of roughly 20 points per meter offer unprecedented spatial coverage.In addition, the geometries of the cross-bed profiles have been analyzed, revealing distinct changes of cross-flow convexity between the front and the tail of the flows in several cases. This is assumed to indicate changes of debris-flow mixtures, but further research is needed to better understand this signal.We hope that our preliminary analysis and toolbox will facilitate working with these kinds of datasets so as to further improve debris-flow understanding, monitoring and modeling efforts in the future.

  18. Detection and isolation of rare cells by 2-step enrichment high-speed flow cytometry/cell sorting and single cell LEAP laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zordan, M. D.; Leary, James F.

    2011-02-01

    The clonal isolation of rare cells, especially cancer and stem cells, in a population is important to the development of improved medical treatment. We have demonstrated that the Laser-Enabled Analysis and Processing (LEAP, Cyntellect Inc., San Diego, CA) instrument can be used to efficiently produce single cell clones by photoablative dilution. Additionally, we have also shown that cells present at low frequencies can be cloned by photoablative dilution after they are pre-enriched by flow cytometry based cell sorting. Circulating tumor cells were modeled by spiking isolated peripheral blood cells with cells from the lung carcinoma cell line A549. Flow cytometry based cell sorting was used to perform an enrichment sort of A549 cells directly into a 384 well plate. Photoablative dilution was performed with the LEAPTM instrument to remove any contaminating cells, and clonally isolate 1 side population cell per well. We were able to isolate and grow single clones of side population cells using this method at greater than 90% efficiency. We have developed a 2 step method that is able to perform the clonal isolation of rare cells based on a medically relevant functional phenotype.

  19. Flexible high-speed CODEC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segallis, Greg P.; Wernlund, Jim V.; Corry, Glen

    1993-01-01

    This report is prepared by Harris Government Communication Systems Division for NASA Lewis Research Center under contract NAS3-25087. It is written in accordance with SOW section 4.0 (d) as detailed in section 2.6. The purpose of this document is to provide a summary of the program, performance results and analysis, and a technical assessment. The purpose of this program was to develop a flexible, high-speed CODEC that provides substantial coding gain while maintaining bandwidth efficiency for use in both continuous and bursted data environments for a variety of applications.

  20. High-Speed TCP Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, David E.; Gassman, Holly; Beering, Dave R.; Welch, Arun; Hoder, Douglas J.; Ivancic, William D.

    1999-01-01

    Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) is the underlying protocol used within the Internet for reliable information transfer. As such, there is great interest to have all implementations of TCP efficiently interoperate. This is particularly important for links exhibiting long bandwidth-delay products. The tools exist to perform TCP analysis at low rates and low delays. However, for extremely high-rate and lone-delay links such as 622 Mbps over geosynchronous satellites, new tools and testing techniques are required. This paper describes the tools and techniques used to analyze and debug various TCP implementations over high-speed, long-delay links.

  1. High speed quantitative digital microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, K. R.; Price, K. H.; Eskenazi, R.; Ovadya, M. M.; Navon, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    Modern digital image processing hardware makes possible quantitative analysis of microscope images at high speed. This paper describes an application to automatic screening for cervical cancer. The system uses twelve MC6809 microprocessors arranged in a pipeline multiprocessor configuration. Each processor executes one part of the algorithm on each cell image as it passes through the pipeline. Each processor communicates with its upstream and downstream neighbors via shared two-port memory. Thus no time is devoted to input-output operations as such. This configuration is expected to be at least ten times faster than previous systems.

  2. A high speed sequential decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, H., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The performance and theory of operation for the High Speed Hard Decision Sequential Decoder are delineated. The decoder is a forward error correction system which is capable of accepting data from binary-phase-shift-keyed and quadriphase-shift-keyed modems at input data rates up to 30 megabits per second. Test results show that the decoder is capable of maintaining a composite error rate of 0.00001 at an input E sub b/N sub o of 5.6 db. This performance has been obtained with minimum circuit complexity.

  3. Multiplexed broadband beam steering system utilizing high speed MEMS mirrors.

    PubMed

    Knoernschild, Caleb; Kim, Changsoon; Lu, Felix P; Kim, Jungsang

    2009-04-27

    We present a beam steering system based on micro-electromechanical systems technology that features high speed steering of multiple laser beams over a broad wavelength range. By utilizing high speed micromirrors with a broadband metallic coating, our system has the flexibility to simultaneously incorporate a wide range of wavelengths and multiple beams. We demonstrate reconfiguration of two independent beams at different wavelengths (780 and 635 nm) across a common 5x5 array with 4 micros settling time. Full simulation of the optical system provides insights on the scalability of the system. Such a system can provide a versatile tool for applications where fast laser multiplexing is necessary.

  4. High-speed optogenetic circuit mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustine, George J.; Chen, Susu; Gill, Harin; Katarya, Malvika; Kim, Jinsook; Kudolo, John; Lee, Li M.; Lee, Hyunjeong; Lo, Shun Qiang; Nakajima, Ryuichi; Park, Min-Yoon; Tan, Gregory; Tang, Yanxia; Teo, Peggy; Tsuda, Sachiko; Wen, Lei; Yoon, Su-In

    2013-03-01

    Scanning small spots of laser light allows mapping of synaptic circuits in brain slices from transgenic mice expressing channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2). These light spots photostimulate presynaptic neurons expressing ChR2, while postsynaptic responses can be monitored in neurons that do not express ChR2. Correlating the location of the light spot with the amplitude of the postsynaptic response elicited at that location yields maps of the spatial organization of the synaptic circuits. This approach yields maps within minutes, which is several orders of magnitude faster than can be achieved with conventional paired electrophysiological methods. We have applied this high-speed technique to map local circuits in many brain regions. In cerebral cortex, we observed that maps of excitatory inputs to pyramidal cells were qualitatively different from those measured for interneurons within the same layers of the cortex. In cerebellum, we have used this approach to quantify the convergence of molecular layer interneurons on to Purkinje cells. The number of converging interneurons is reduced by treatment with gap junction blockers, indicating that electrical synapses between interneurons contribute substantially to the spatial convergence. Remarkably, gap junction blockers affect convergence in sagittal cerebellar slices but not in coronal slices, indicating sagittal polarization of electrical coupling between interneurons. By measuring limb movement or other forms of behavioral output, this approach also can be used in vivo to map brain circuits non-invasively. In summary, ChR2-mediated high-speed mapping promises to revolutionize our understanding of brain circuitry.

  5. Small Scale High Speed Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, Adam P. (Inventor); Droppers, Lloyd J. (Inventor); Lehman, Matthew K. (Inventor); Mehra, Amitav (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A small scale, high speed turbomachine is described, as well as a process for manufacturing the turbomachine. The turbomachine is manufactured by diffusion bonding stacked sheets of metal foil, each of which has been pre-formed to correspond to a cross section of the turbomachine structure. The turbomachines include rotating elements as well as static structures. Using this process, turbomachines may be manufactured with rotating elements that have outer diameters of less than four inches in size, and/or blading heights of less than 0.1 inches. The rotating elements of the turbomachines are capable of rotating at speeds in excess of 150 feet per second. In addition, cooling features may be added internally to blading to facilitate cooling in high temperature operations.

  6. High-speed data search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, James N.

    1994-01-01

    The high-speed data search system developed for KSC incorporates existing and emerging information retrieval technology to help a user intelligently and rapidly locate information found in large textual databases. This technology includes: natural language input; statistical ranking of retrieved information; an artificial intelligence concept called semantics, where 'surface level' knowledge found in text is used to improve the ranking of retrieved information; and relevance feedback, where user judgements about viewed information are used to automatically modify the search for further information. Semantics and relevance feedback are features of the system which are not available commercially. The system further demonstrates focus on paragraphs of information to decide relevance; and it can be used (without modification) to intelligently search all kinds of document collections, such as collections of legal documents medical documents, news stories, patents, and so forth. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the usefulness of statistical ranking, our semantic improvement, and relevance feedback.

  7. Experiments on high speed ejectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to investigate the flow and the performance of thrust augmenting ejectors for flight Mach numbers in the range of 0.5 to 0.8, primary air stagnation pressures up to 107 psig (738 kPa), and primary air stagnation temperatures up to 1250 F (677 C). The experiment verified the existence of the second solution ejector flow, where the flow after complete mixing is supersonic. Thrust augmentation in excess of 1.2 was demonstrated for both hot and cold primary jets. The experimental ejector performed better than the corresponding theoretical optimal first solution ejector, where the mixed flow is subsonic. Further studies are required to realize the full potential of the second solution ejector. The research program was started by the Flight Dynamics Research Corporation (FDRC) to investigate the characteristic of a high speed ejector which augments thrust of a jet at high flight speeds.

  8. Flexible High Speed Codec (FHSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segallis, G. P.; Wernlund, J. V.

    1991-01-01

    The ongoing NASA/Harris Flexible High Speed Codec (FHSC) program is described. The program objectives are to design and build an encoder decoder that allows operation in either burst or continuous modes at data rates of up to 300 megabits per second. The decoder handles both hard and soft decision decoding and can switch between modes on a burst by burst basis. Bandspreading is low since the code rate is greater than or equal to 7/8. The encoder and a hard decision decoder fit on a single application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) chip. A soft decision applique is implemented using 300 K emitter coupled logic (ECL) which can be easily translated to an ECL gate array.

  9. High speed sampler and demultiplexer

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-12-26

    A high speed sampling demultiplexer based on a plurality of sampler banks, each bank comprising a sample transmission line for transmitting an input signal, a strobe transmission line for transmitting a strobe signal, and a plurality of sampling gates at respective positions along the sample transmission line for sampling the input signal in response to the strobe signal. Strobe control circuitry is coupled to the plurality of banks, and supplies a sequence of bank strobe signals to the strobe transmission lines in each of the plurality of banks, and includes circuits for controlling the timing of the bank strobe signals among the banks of samplers. Input circuitry is included for supplying the input signal to be sampled to the plurality of sample transmission lines in the respective banks. The strobe control circuitry can repetitively strobe the plurality of banks of samplers such that the banks of samplers are cycled to create a long sample length. Second tier demultiplexing circuitry is coupled to each of the samplers in the plurality of banks. The second tier demultiplexing circuitry senses the sample taken by the corresponding sampler each time the bank in which the sampler is found is strobed. A plurality of such samples can be stored by the second tier demultiplexing circuitry for later processing. Repetitive sampling with the high speed transient sampler induces an effect known as ``strobe kickout``. The sample transmission lines include structures which reduce strobe kickout to acceptable levels, generally 60 dB below the signal, by absorbing the kickout pulses before the next sampling repetition. 16 figs.

  10. High speed sampler and demultiplexer

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A high speed sampling demultiplexer based on a plurality of sampler banks, each bank comprising a sample transmission line for transmitting an input signal, a strobe transmission line for transmitting a strobe signal, and a plurality of sampling gates at respective positions along the sample transmission line for sampling the input signal in response to the strobe signal. Strobe control circuitry is coupled to the plurality of banks, and supplies a sequence of bank strobe signals to the strobe transmission lines in each of the plurality of banks, and includes circuits for controlling the timing of the bank strobe signals among the banks of samplers. Input circuitry is included for supplying the input signal to be sampled to the plurality of sample transmission lines in the respective banks. The strobe control circuitry can repetitively strobe the plurality of banks of samplers such that the banks of samplers are cycled to create a long sample length. Second tier demultiplexing circuitry is coupled to each of the samplers in the plurality of banks. The second tier demultiplexing circuitry senses the sample taken by the corresponding sampler each time the bank in which the sampler is found is strobed. A plurality of such samples can be stored by the second tier demultiplexing circuitry for later processing. Repetitive sampling with the high speed transient sampler induces an effect known as "strobe kickout". The sample transmission lines include structures which reduce strobe kickout to acceptable levels, generally 60 dB below the signal, by absorbing the kickout pulses before the next sampling repetition.

  11. Very high-speed digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez López, Carlos; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando; Rodríguez Vera, Ramón; Moreno, David; Barrientos, Bernardino

    2006-08-01

    It is reported for the first time the use of a high speed camera in digital holography with an out of plane sensitivity. The camera takes the image plane holograms of a cw laser illuminated rectangular framed polyester material at a rate of 5000 per second, that is a spacing of 200 microseconds between holograms, and 512 by 500 pixels at 10 bit resolution. The freely standing object has a random movement due to non controlled environmental air currents. As is usual with this technique each digital hologram is Fourier processed in order to obtain upon comparison with a consecutive digital hologram the phase map of the displacement. High quality results showing the amplitude and direction of the random movement are presented.

  12. Very high speed cw digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-López, Carlos; de La Torre-Ibarra, Manuel H.; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando

    2006-10-01

    It is reported for the first time the use of a very high speed camera in digital holographic interferometry with an out of plane sensitivity setup. The image plane holograms of a spherical latex balloon illuminated by a cw laser were acquired at a rate of 4000 frames per second, representing a time spacing between holograms of 250 microseconds, for 512 × 512 pixels at 8 bits resolution. Two types of tests were accomplished for a proof of principle of the technique, one with no constrains on the object which meant random movements due to non controlled environmental air currents, and the other with specific controlled conditions on the object. Results presented correspond to a random sample of sequential digital holograms, chosen from a 1 second exposure, individually Fourier processed in order to perform the usual comparison by subtraction between consecutive pairs thus obtaining the phase map of the object out of plane displacement, shown as a movie.

  13. A new design for a high speed spindle

    SciTech Connect

    Weck, M.; Fischer, S.; Holster, P.; Carlisle, K.; Chen, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Precision grinding and micromachining both impose high demands on the machine behavior, since the achievable workpiece accuracy is determined not only by the technological parameters but also by the characteristics of the applicated machine components. Ultraprecision surface quality and the mechanical fabrication of structures in the micron range can only be achieved by using machine tools which have appropriate spindles. Structures cannot be manufactured using spindle types of which the radial error motion is greater than the level of contour accuracy or surface roughness required. In addition, the spindle speed is an important value. Not only a certain cutting speed is needed from the technological point of view, but also the machining time required for microstructuring surfaces is reduced by deploying a high frequency spindle, thereby increasing the economic efficiency of the technique. Hence, the main purpose of the project was to develop a high speed spindle with properties concerning accuracy, speed and stiffness beyond commercially available ones.

  14. Preliminary study of high-speed machining

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, R.E.

    1980-07-01

    The feasibility of a high speed machining process has been established for application to Bendix aluminum products, based upon information gained through visits to existing high speed machining facilities and by the completion of a representative Bendix part using this process. The need for an experimental high speed machining capability at Bendix for further process evaluation is established.

  15. High-speed pressure clamp.

    PubMed

    Besch, Stephen R; Suchyna, Thomas; Sachs, Frederick

    2002-10-01

    We built a high-speed, pneumatic pressure clamp to stimulate patch-clamped membranes mechanically. The key control element is a newly designed differential valve that uses a single, nickel-plated piezoelectric bending element to control both pressure and vacuum. To minimize response time, the valve body was designed with minimum dead volume. The result is improved response time and stability with a threefold decrease in actuation latency. Tight valve clearances minimize the steady-state air flow, permitting us to use small resonant-piston pumps to supply pressure and vacuum. To protect the valve from water contamination in the event of a broken pipette, an optical sensor detects water entering the valve and increases pressure rapidly to clear the system. The open-loop time constant for pressure is 2.5 ms for a 100-mmHg step, and the closed-loop settling time is 500-600 micros. Valve actuation latency is 120 micros. The system performance is illustrated for mechanically induced changes in patch capacitance.

  16. High speed imager test station

    DOEpatents

    Yates, G.J.; Albright, K.L.; Turko, B.T.

    1995-11-14

    A test station enables the performance of a solid state imager (herein called a focal plane array or FPA) to be determined at high image frame rates. A programmable waveform generator is adapted to generate clock pulses at determinable rates for clock light-induced charges from a FPA. The FPA is mounted on an imager header board for placing the imager in operable proximity to level shifters for receiving the clock pulses and outputting pulses effective to clock charge from the pixels forming the FPA. Each of the clock level shifters is driven by leading and trailing edge portions of the clock pulses to reduce power dissipation in the FPA. Analog circuits receive output charge pulses clocked from the FPA pixels. The analog circuits condition the charge pulses to cancel noise in the pulses and to determine and hold a peak value of the charge for digitizing. A high speed digitizer receives the peak signal value and outputs a digital representation of each one of the charge pulses. A video system then displays an image associated with the digital representation of the output charge pulses clocked from the FPA. In one embodiment, the FPA image is formatted to a standard video format for display on conventional video equipment. 12 figs.

  17. High speed imager test station

    DOEpatents

    Yates, George J.; Albright, Kevin L.; Turko, Bojan T.

    1995-01-01

    A test station enables the performance of a solid state imager (herein called a focal plane array or FPA) to be determined at high image frame rates. A programmable waveform generator is adapted to generate clock pulses at determinable rates for clock light-induced charges from a FPA. The FPA is mounted on an imager header board for placing the imager in operable proximity to level shifters for receiving the clock pulses and outputting pulses effective to clock charge from the pixels forming the FPA. Each of the clock level shifters is driven by leading and trailing edge portions of the clock pulses to reduce power dissipation in the FPA. Analog circuits receive output charge pulses clocked from the FPA pixels. The analog circuits condition the charge pulses to cancel noise in the pulses and to determine and hold a peak value of the charge for digitizing. A high speed digitizer receives the peak signal value and outputs a digital representation of each one of the charge pulses. A video system then displays an image associated with the digital representation of the output charge pulses clocked from the FPA. In one embodiment, the FPA image is formatted to a standard video format for display on conventional video equipment.

  18. Hypereutectoid high-speed steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kremnev, L.S.

    1986-01-01

    Half of the tungsten and molybdenum contained in R6M5 and R18 steels is concentrated in the undissolved eutectic carbides hindering austenitic grain gowth in hardening and providing the necessary strength and impact strength. This article describes the tungsten-free low-alloy high-speed steel 11M5F with a chemical composition of 1.03-1.10% C, 5.2-5.7% Mo, 3.8-4.2% Cr, 1.3-1.7% V, 0.3-0.6% Si, and 0.3% Ce. The properties of 11M5F and R6M5 steels are examined and compared. The results of production and laboratory tests of the cutting properties of tools of the steels developed showed their high effectiveness, especially of 11M5F steel with 1% A1. The life of tools of the tungsten-free steels is two or three times greater than the life of tools of R6M5 steel.

  19. Quiet High-Speed Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieber, Lysbeth; Repp, Russ; Weir, Donald S.

    1996-01-01

    A calibration of the acoustic and aerodynamic prediction methods was performed and a baseline fan definition was established and evaluated to support the quiet high speed fan program. A computational fluid dynamic analysis of the NASA QF-12 Fan rotor, using the DAWES flow simulation program was performed to demonstrate and verify the causes of the relatively poor aerodynamic performance observed during the fan test. In addition, the rotor flowfield characteristics were qualitatively compared to the acoustic measurements to identify the key acoustic characteristics of the flow. The V072 turbofan source noise prediction code was used to generate noise predictions for the TFE731-60 fan at three operating conditions and compared to experimental data. V072 results were also used in the Acoustic Radiation Code to generate far field noise for the TFE731-60 nacelle at three speed points for the blade passage tone. A full 3-D viscous flow simulation of the current production TFE731-60 fan rotor was performed with the DAWES flow analysis program. The DAWES analysis was used to estimate the onset of multiple pure tone noise, based on predictions of inlet shock position as a function of the rotor tip speed. Finally, the TFE731-60 fan rotor wake structure predicted by the DAWES program was used to define a redesigned stator with the leading edge configured to minimize the acoustic effects of rotor wake / stator interaction, without appreciably degrading performance.

  20. 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1936-01-01

    Control panel below the test section of the 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (8-Foot HST). Authorized July 17, 1933, construction of the 8-Foot HST was paid for with funds from the Federal Public Works Administration. Manly Hood and Russell Robinson designed the unusual facility which could produce a 500 mph wind stream across an 8-Foot test section. The concrete shell was not part of the original design. Like most projects funded through New Deal programs, the PWA restricted the amount of money which could be spent on materials. The majority of funds were supposed to be expended on labor. Though originally, Hood and Robinson had planned a welded steel pressure vessel around the test section, PWA officials proposed the idea of concrete. This picture shows the test section inside the igloo-like structure with walls of 1-foot thick reinforced concrete. The thick walls were needed 'because of the Bernoulli effect, [which meant that] the text chamber had to withstand powerful, inwardly directed pressure. Operating personnel located inside the igloo were subjected to pressures equivalent to 10,000-foot altitude and had to wear oxygen masks and enter through airlocks. A heat exchanger removed the large quantities of heat generated by the big fan.'

  1. Micromachined Dust Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory H.; Bradley, James G.

    1993-01-01

    Micromachined traps devised to capture dust particles for analysis without contaminating them. Based on micromachined structures retaining particles, rather than adhesives or greases interfering with scanning-electron-microscope analysis or x-ray imaging. Unlike maze traps and traps enmeshing particles in steel wool or similar materials, micromachined traps do not obscure trapped particles. Internal geometries of traps range from simple cones to U-shapes, all formed by etching silicon.

  2. Magneto-optical system for high speed real time imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baziljevich, M.; Barness, D.; Sinvani, M.; Perel, E.; Shaulov, A.; Yeshurun, Y.

    2012-08-01

    A new magneto-optical system has been developed to expand the range of high speed real time magneto-optical imaging. A special source for the external magnetic field has also been designed, using a pump solenoid to rapidly excite the field coil. Together with careful modifications of the cryostat, to reduce eddy currents, ramping rates reaching 3000 T/s have been achieved. Using a powerful laser as the light source, a custom designed optical assembly, and a high speed digital camera, real time imaging rates up to 30 000 frames per seconds have been demonstrated.

  3. Magneto-optical system for high speed real time imaging.

    PubMed

    Baziljevich, M; Barness, D; Sinvani, M; Perel, E; Shaulov, A; Yeshurun, Y

    2012-08-01

    A new magneto-optical system has been developed to expand the range of high speed real time magneto-optical imaging. A special source for the external magnetic field has also been designed, using a pump solenoid to rapidly excite the field coil. Together with careful modifications of the cryostat, to reduce eddy currents, ramping rates reaching 3000 T/s have been achieved. Using a powerful laser as the light source, a custom designed optical assembly, and a high speed digital camera, real time imaging rates up to 30 000 frames per seconds have been demonstrated.

  4. High-speed pulse-shape generator, pulse multiplexer

    DOEpatents

    Burkhart, Scott C.

    2002-01-01

    The invention combines arbitrary amplitude high-speed pulses for precision pulse shaping for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The circuitry combines arbitrary height pulses which are generated by replicating scaled versions of a trigger pulse and summing them delayed in time on a pulse line. The combined electrical pulses are connected to an electro-optic modulator which modulates a laser beam. The circuit can also be adapted to combine multiple channels of high speed data into a single train of electrical pulses which generates the optical pulses for very high speed optical communication. The invention has application in laser pulse shaping for inertial confinement fusion, in optical data links for computers, telecommunications, and in laser pulse shaping for atomic excitation studies. The invention can be used to effect at least a 10.times. increase in all fiber communication lines. It allows a greatly increased data transfer rate between high-performance computers. The invention is inexpensive enough to bring high-speed video and data services to homes through a super modem.

  5. 850-nm Zn-diffusion vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with with oxide-relief structure for high-speed and energy-efficient optical interconnects from very-short to medium (2km) reaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jin-Wei; Wei, Chia-Chien; Chen, Jason (Jyehong); Yang, Ying-Jay

    2015-03-01

    High-speed and "green" ~850 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) have lately attracted lots of attention due to their suitability for applications in optical interconnects (OIs). To further enhance the speed and its maximum allowable linking distance of VCSELs are two major trends to meet the requirement of OI in next generation data centers. Recently, by use of the advanced 850 nm VCSEL technique, data rate as high as 64 Gbit/sec over 57m and 20 Gbit/sec over 2km MMF transmission have been demonstrated, respectively. Here, we will review our recent work about 850 nm Zn-diffusion VCSELs with oxide-relief apertures to further enhance the above-mentioned performances. By using Zn-diffusion, we can not only reduce the device resistance but also manipulate the number of optical modes to benefit transmission. Combing such device, which has excellent single-mode (SMSR >30 dB) and high-power (~7mW) performance, with advanced modulation format (OFDM), record-high bit-rate-distance-product through MMF (2.3 km×28 Gbit/sec) has been demonstrated. Furthermore, by selective etching away the oxide aperture inside Zn-diffusion VCSEL, significant enhancement of device speed, D-factor, and reliability can be observed. With such unique VCSEL structure, >40 Gbit/sec energy-efficient transmission over 100m MMF under extremely low-driving current density (<10kA/cm2) has been successfully demonstrated.

  6. Design of noise barrier inspection system for high-speed railway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bingqian; Shao, Shuangyun; Feng, Qibo; Ma, Le; Cholryong, Kim

    2016-10-01

    The damage of noise barriers will highly reduce the transportation safety of the high-speed railway. In this paper, an online inspection system of noise barrier based on laser vision for the safety of high-speed railway is proposed. The inspection system, mainly consisted of a fast camera and a line laser, installed in the first carriage of the high-speed CIT(Composited Inspection Train).A Laser line was projected on the surface of the noise barriers and the images of the light line were received by the camera while the train is running at high speed. The distance between the inspection system and the noise barrier can be obtained based on laser triangulation principle. The results of field tests show that the proposed system can meet the need of high speed and high accuracy to get the contour distortion of the noise barriers.

  7. High speed imaging - An important industrial tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Alton; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1986-01-01

    High-speed photography, which is a rapid sequence of photographs that allow an event to be analyzed through the stoppage of motion or the production of slow-motion effects, is examined. In high-speed photography 16, 35, and 70 mm film and framing rates between 64-12,000 frames per second are utilized to measure such factors as angles, velocities, failure points, and deflections. The use of dual timing lamps in high-speed photography and the difficulties encountered with exposure and programming the camera and event are discussed. The application of video cameras to the recording of high-speed events is described.

  8. High-Speed Digital Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Vine, Glenn; Shaddock, Daniel A.; Ware, Brent; Spero, Robert E.; Wuchenich, Danielle M.; Klipstein, William M.; McKenzie, Kirk

    2012-01-01

    Digitally enhanced heterodyne interferometry (DI) is a laser metrology technique employing pseudo-random noise (PRN) codes phase-modulated onto an optical carrier. Combined with heterodyne interferometry, the PRN code is used to select individual signals, returning the inherent interferometric sensitivity determined by the optical wavelength. The signal isolation arises from the autocorrelation properties of the PRN code, enabling both rejection of spurious signals (e.g., from scattered light) and multiplexing capability using a single metrology system. The minimum separation of optical components is determined by the wavelength of the PRN code.

  9. High-Speed Ring Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wysocky, Terry; Kopf, Edward, Jr.; Katanyoutananti, Sunant; Steiner, Carl; Balian, Harry

    2010-01-01

    The high-speed ring bus at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) allows for future growth trends in spacecraft seen with future scientific missions. This innovation constitutes an enhancement of the 1393 bus as documented in the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 1393-1999 standard for a spaceborne fiber-optic data bus. It allows for high-bandwidth and time synchronization of all nodes on the ring. The JPL ring bus allows for interconnection of active units with autonomous operation and increased fault handling at high bandwidths. It minimizes the flight software interface with an intelligent physical layer design that has few states to manage as well as simplified testability. The design will soon be documented in the AS-1393 standard (Serial Hi-Rel Ring Network for Aerospace Applications). The framework is designed for "Class A" spacecraft operation and provides redundant data paths. It is based on "fault containment regions" and "redundant functional regions (RFR)" and has a method for allocating cables that completely supports the redundancy in spacecraft design, allowing for a complete RFR to fail. This design reduces the mass of the bus by incorporating both the Control Unit and the Data Unit in the same hardware. The standard uses ATM (asynchronous transfer mode) packets, standardized by ITU-T, ANSI, ETSI, and the ATM Forum. The IEEE-1393 standard uses the UNI form of the packet and provides no protection for the data portion of the cell. The JPL design adds optional formatting to this data portion. This design extends fault protection beyond that of the interconnect. This includes adding protection to the data portion that is contained within the Bus Interface Units (BIUs) and by adding to the signal interface between the Data Host and the JPL 1393 Ring Bus. Data transfer on the ring bus does not involve a master or initiator. Following bus protocol, any BIU may transmit data on the ring whenever it has data received from its host. There

  10. Numerical simulation of inclination vibration in magnetic induction micromachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.-Y.; Zhou, J.-B.; Zhang, W.-M.; Meng, G.

    2008-02-01

    This paper studies the inclination vibration of an axial-flux magnetic induction micromachine which is supported by hydrostatic thrust bearings. A mechanical model for the rotor and the corresponding fluid-film bearing is combined with an electromagnetic force model to study the linear and nonlinear rotordynamics of the system. Results obtained for the stability show that magnetic induction micromachine would encounter severe instability problem at high speed operations. The model developed here could serve as a useful reference for design optimization and operation scheme.

  11. High speed cooled CCD experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, C.R.; Albright, K.L.; Yates, G.J.

    1998-12-31

    Experiments were conducted using cooled and intensified CCD cameras. Two different cameras were identically tested using different Optical test stimulus variables. Camera gain and dynamic range were measured by varying microchannel plate (MCP) voltages and controlling light flux using neutral density (ND) filters to yield analog digitized units (ADU) which are digitized values of the CCD pixel`s analog charge. A Xenon strobe (5 {micro}s FWHM, blue light, 430 nm) and a doubled Nd.yag laser (10 ns FWHM, green light, 532 nm) were both used as pulsed illumination sources for the cameras. Images were captured on PC desktop computer system using commercial software. Camera gain and integration time values were adjusted using camera software. Mean values of camera volts versus input flux were also obtained by performing line scans through regions of interest. Experiments and results will be discussed.

  12. Rapid micromachining of high aspect ratio holes in fused silica glass by high repetition rate picosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimelahi, Samira; Abolghasemi, Ladan; Herman, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    We present multiple methods of high aspect ratio hole drilling in fused silica glass, taking advantage of high power and high repetition rate picosecond lasers and flexible beam delivery methods to excise deep holes with minimal collateral damage. Combinations of static and synchronous scanning of laser focus were explored over a range of laser repetition rates and burst-train profiles that dramatically vary laser plume interaction dynamics, heat-affected zone, and heat accumulation physics. Chemically assisted etching of picosecond laser modification tracks are also presented as an extension from femtosecond laser writing of volume nanograting to form high aspect ratio (77) channels. Processing windows are identified for the various beam delivery methods that optimize the laser exposure over energy, wavelength, and repetition rate to reduce microcracking and deleterious heating effects. The results show the benefits of femtosecond laser interactions in glass extend into the picosecond domain, where the attributes of higher power further yield wide processing windows and significantly faster fabrication speed. High aspect ratio holes of 400 μm depth were formed over widely varying rates of 333 holes per second for mildly cracked holes in static-focal positioning through to one hole per second for low-damage and taper free holes in synchronous scanning.

  13. Reducing Heating In High-Speed Cinematography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Howard A.

    1989-01-01

    Infrared-absorbing and infrared-reflecting glass filters simple and effective means for reducing rise in temperature during high-speed motion-picture photography. "Hot-mirror" and "cold-mirror" configurations, employed in projection of images, helps prevent excessive heating of scenes by powerful lamps used in high-speed photography.

  14. High Speed Video for Airborne Instrumentation Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, Ting; Reaves, Matthew; Mauldin, Kendall

    2006-01-01

    A flight-worthy high speed color video system has been developed. Extensive system development and ground and environmental. testing hes yielded a flight qualified High Speed Video System (HSVS), This HSVS was initially used on the F-15B #836 for the Lifting Insulating Foam Trajectory (LIFT) project.

  15. High-Speed Photography with Computer Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Loren M.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the use of a microcomputer as an intervalometer for the control and timing of several flash units to photograph high-speed events. Applies this technology to study the oscillations of a stretched rubber band, the deceleration of high-speed projectiles in water, the splashes of milk drops, and the bursts of popcorn kernels. (MDH)

  16. Lightweight, high speed bearing balls: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Low mass bearing balls with hardened iron-plated surfaces can eliminate problems of low fatigue strength and flexure fatigue, and lead to increased life and reliability of high speed ball bearings. Low mass balls exert lower centrifugal forces on outer race of bearing thus eliminating detrimental effect of high speed operation.

  17. Effects of high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser micromachining on the physical and chemical properties of polylactide (PLA).

    PubMed

    Jia, Wei; Luo, Yiming; Yu, Jian; Liu, Bowen; Hu, Minglie; Chai, Lu; Wang, Chingyue

    2015-10-19

    The effects of femtosecond laser ablation, with 115 fs pulses at 1040 nm wavelength and 57 MHz repetition-rate, on the physical and chemical properties of polylactide (PLA) were studied in air and in water. The surface of the PLA sample ablated by high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser was analysed using field emission scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, raman spectroscopy, as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Compared with the experiments in the air at ambient temperature, melting resolidification was negligible for the experiments conducted under water. Neither in air nor under water did oxidation and crystallization process take place in the laser ablated surface. In addition, the intensity of some oxygen related peaks increased for water experiments, probably due to the hydrolysis. Meantime, the chemical shift to higher energies appeared in C1s XPS spectrum of laser processing in water. Interestingly, a large amount of defects were observed after laser processing in air, while no significant change was shown under water experiments. This indicates that thermal and mechanical effects by high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser ablation in water are quite limited, which could be even ignored.

  18. High Speed, High Accuracy Stage for Advanced Lithography. Phase I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    noise and 5nm LSB of our laser interferometer. Zerodur Mounting bar Base expended in this direction Sensor heads Interferometer mirror ...state of the art. Their CORE machine claims an accuracy of 80nm over a 6- inch square field. This machine uses high-speed mirrors to scan multiple...variety of optical paths. If the laboratory is not quiet (e.g. if the interferometer mirror is moving, or if people are talking in the laboratory

  19. High-speed OCT light sources and systems [Invited

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Thomas; Huber, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Imaging speed is one of the most important parameters that define the performance of optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems. During the last two decades, OCT speed has increased by over three orders of magnitude. New developments in wavelength-swept lasers have repeatedly been crucial for this development. In this review, we discuss the historical evolution and current state of the art of high-speed OCT systems, with focus on wavelength swept light sources and swept source OCT systems. PMID:28270988

  20. Gage for micromachining system

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Donald M.

    1979-02-27

    A gage for measuring the contour of the surface of an element of a micromachining tool system and of a work piece machined by the micromachining tool system. The gage comprises a glass plate containing two electrical contacts and supporting a steel ball resting against the contacts. As the element or workpiece is moved against the steel ball, the very slight contact pressure causes an extremely small movement of the steel ball which breaks the electrical circuit between the two contacts. The contour information is supplied to a dedicated computer controlling the micromachining tool so that the computer knows the contour of the element and the work piece to an accuracy of .+-. 25 nm. The micromachining tool system with X- and omega-axes is used to machine spherical, aspherical, and irregular surfaces with a maximum contour error of 100 nanometers (nm) and surface waviness of no more than 0.8 nm RMS.

  1. Ultra-high-speed bionanoscope for cell and microbe imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etoh, T. Goji; Vo Le, Cuong; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Ikuko; Miyawaki, Atshushi; Dao, Vu T. S.; Nguyen, Hoang Dung; Yokoi, Sayoko; Yoshida, Shigeru; Nakano, Hitoshi; Takehara, Kohsei; Saito, Yoshiharu

    2008-11-01

    We are developing an ultra-high-sensitivity and ultra-high-speed imaging system for bioscience, mainly for imaging of microbes with visible light and cells with fluorescence emission. Scarcity of photons is the most serious problem in applications of high-speed imaging to the scientific field. To overcome the problem, the system integrates new technologies consisting of (1) an ultra-high-speed video camera with sub-ten-photon sensitivity with the frame rate of more than 1 mega frames per second, (2) a microscope with highly efficient use of light applicable to various unstained and fluorescence cell observations, and (3) very powerful long-pulse-strobe Xenon lights and lasers for microscopes. Various auxiliary technologies to support utilization of the system are also being developed. One example of them is an efficient video trigger system, which detects a weak signal of a sudden change in a frame under ultra-high-speed imaging by canceling high-frequency fluctuation of illumination light. This paper outlines the system with its preliminary evaluation results.

  2. Lubrication and cooling for high speed gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.

    1985-01-01

    The problems and failures occurring with the operation of high speed gears are discussed. The gearing losses associated with high speed gearing such as tooth mesh friction, bearing friction, churning, and windage are discussed with various ways shown to help reduce these losses and thereby improve efficiency. Several different methods of oil jet lubrication for high speed gearing are given such as into mesh, out of mesh, and radial jet lubrication. The experiments and analytical results for the various methods of oil jet lubrication are shown with the strengths and weaknesses of each method discussed. The analytical and experimental results of gear lubrication and cooling at various test conditions are presented. These results show the very definite need of improved methods of gear cooling at high speed and high load conditions.

  3. Investigation of impact of photonic crystal fiber structure modified by femtosecond laser micromachining on long period gratings' sensing characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shujing; Wu, Jingwei; Luo, Mingyan; Ji, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    The sensing characteristics of long period gratings (LPGs) in photonic crystal fiber (PCF) can be changed by using femtosecond laser to modify the PCF waveguide structure although dispersive characteristic plays a key role in determining the sensitivity. Based on the coupled local-mode theory, the coupling behaviors and spectral characteristics of the LPGs in PCF fabricated by a femtosecond laser and a CO2 laser are analyzed which are supported by experiment results. When the distance between the central of fiber core and the peak of the drilled hole, namely the micro-hole diameter is about 3.5 μm, the temperature and strain sensitivities are changed by 27% (from 6.20 to 7.81 pm/°C) and -21% (from -2.41 to -1.91 pm/με) in comparison with the changes of the sensitivities that is induced by CO2 laser. The investigation demonstrates that the local structural changes of PCF have an impact on the sensitivity of LPGs. The investigation demonstrates the versatility of the technique in potential applications to design the desired sensitivity of fiber grating flexibly by forming proper geometrical modulations.

  4. Agile Electromagnetics Exploiting High Speed Logic (AEEHSL).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    examination and alteration of codes and filter weights 3. READ Mode - This mode enables the reading or replaying of the data from the digital tape recorder...available in this subsystems are used to initialize the * radar, clock the code from the high-speed code storage memory to drive the code modulator, delay...correlation process. There is storage space within the high speed memory for 32 codes of length 64 bits or less. The radiated code can be changed by a

  5. ERROR CORRECTION IN HIGH SPEED ARITHMETIC,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The errors due to a faulty high speed multiplier are shown to be iterative in nature. These errors are analyzed in various aspects. The arithmetic coding technique is suggested for the improvement of high speed multiplier reliability. Through a number theoretic investigation, a large class of arithmetic codes for single iterative error correction are developed. The codes are shown to have near-optimal rates and to render a simple decoding method. The implementation of these codes seems highly practical. (Author)

  6. High-speed mirror-scanning tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, HengWei

    1999-06-01

    This paper introduces a high speed single-mirror scanner developed by us as a versatile tracker. It can be connected with a high speed camera, a TV tracker (or color video recorder) /measurer/recorder. It can be guided by a computer, a joystick (automatic or manual) or TV tracker. In this paper, we also present the advantages of our scanner contrasted with the limitations of fixed camera system. In addition, several usable projects of mirror scanner are discussed.

  7. High Speed Imaging of Cavitation around Dental Ultrasonic Scaler Tips.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Nina; Pecheva, Emilia; Dehghani, Hamid; Sammons, Rachel L; Wang, Qianxi X; Leppinen, David M; Walmsley, A Damien

    2016-01-01

    Cavitation occurs around dental ultrasonic scalers, which are used clinically for removing dental biofilm and calculus. However it is not known if this contributes to the cleaning process. Characterisation of the cavitation around ultrasonic scalers will assist in assessing its contribution and in developing new clinical devices for removing biofilm with cavitation. The aim is to use high speed camera imaging to quantify cavitation patterns around an ultrasonic scaler. A Satelec ultrasonic scaler operating at 29 kHz with three different shaped tips has been studied at medium and high operating power using high speed imaging at 15,000, 90,000 and 250,000 frames per second. The tip displacement has been recorded using scanning laser vibrometry. Cavitation occurs at the free end of the tip and increases with power while the area and width of the cavitation cloud varies for different shaped tips. The cavitation starts at the antinodes, with little or no cavitation at the node. High speed image sequences combined with scanning laser vibrometry show individual microbubbles imploding and bubble clouds lifting and moving away from the ultrasonic scaler tip, with larger tip displacement causing more cavitation.

  8. High Speed Imaging of Cavitation around Dental Ultrasonic Scaler Tips

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Nina; Pecheva, Emilia; Dehghani, Hamid; Sammons, Rachel L.; Wang, Qianxi X.; Leppinen, David M.; Walmsley, A. Damien

    2016-01-01

    Cavitation occurs around dental ultrasonic scalers, which are used clinically for removing dental biofilm and calculus. However it is not known if this contributes to the cleaning process. Characterisation of the cavitation around ultrasonic scalers will assist in assessing its contribution and in developing new clinical devices for removing biofilm with cavitation. The aim is to use high speed camera imaging to quantify cavitation patterns around an ultrasonic scaler. A Satelec ultrasonic scaler operating at 29 kHz with three different shaped tips has been studied at medium and high operating power using high speed imaging at 15,000, 90,000 and 250,000 frames per second. The tip displacement has been recorded using scanning laser vibrometry. Cavitation occurs at the free end of the tip and increases with power while the area and width of the cavitation cloud varies for different shaped tips. The cavitation starts at the antinodes, with little or no cavitation at the node. High speed image sequences combined with scanning laser vibrometry show individual microbubbles imploding and bubble clouds lifting and moving away from the ultrasonic scaler tip, with larger tip displacement causing more cavitation. PMID:26934340

  9. Detection of object vibrations from high speed infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunescu, Gabriela; Lutzmann, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Remote detection of vibrational features from an object is important for many short range civil applications, but it is also of interest for long range applications in the defense and security area. The well-established laser Doppler vibrometry technique is widely used as a high-sensitivity, non-contact method. The development of camera technology in recent years made image-based methods reliable passive alternatives for vibration and dynamic measurements. Very sensitive applications have been demonstrated using high speed cameras in the visual spectral range. However, for long range applications, where turbulence becomes a limiting factor, image acquisition in the short- to mid-wave IR region would be desirable, as the atmospheric effects attenuate at longer wavelength. In this paper, we investigate experimentally the vibration detection from short- and mid-wave IR image sequences using high speed imaging technique. Experiments on the extraction of vibration signature under strong local turbulence conditions are presented.

  10. Characterizing pyrotechnic igniter output with high-speed schlieren imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaggs, M. N.; Hargather, M. J.; Cooper, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Small-scale pyrotechnic igniter output has been characterized using a high-speed schlieren imaging system for observing critical features of the post-combustion flow. The diagnostic, with laser illumination, was successfully applied towards the quantitative characterization of the output from Ti/KClO_4 and TiH_{1.65}/KClO_4 pyrotechnic igniters. The high-speed image sequences showed shock motion, burned gas expansion, and particle motion. A statistical-based analysis methodology for tracking the full-field shock motion enabled straightforward comparisons across the experimental parameters of pyrotechnic material and initial density. This characterization of the mechanical energy of the shock front within the post-combustion environment is a necessary addition to the large body of literature focused on pyrotechnic combustion behavior within the powder bed. Ultimately, understanding the role that the combustion behavior has on the resulting multiphase environment is required for tailored igniter development and comparative performance assessments.

  11. Vertical-emitting, ring-geometry, ultra-low threshold and ultra-high-speed quantum-well lasers for optical interconnect. Status report No. 6, Jun-Sep 90

    SciTech Connect

    Mittelstein, M.; Bar-Chaim, N.

    1990-09-01

    Emphasis was placed on the following efforts: design and implementation of a test station for vertical emitting lasers; ridge waveguide structure and ring configiuration lasers; refinement of grating fabrication for repeatability; and single quantum well material investigation, Keywords: Ring lasers; Optical waveguides; Lasers (R.H.)

  12. Rapid fabrication of a four-layer PMMA-based microfluidic chip using CO2-laser micromachining and thermal bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xueye; Shen, Jienan; Zhou, Mengde

    2016-10-01

    A smart design method to transform the original two-layer microfluidic chip into a four-layer 3D microfluidic chip is proposed. A novel fabrication method is established to rapidly and effectively produce a four-layer microfluidic chip device made entirely from polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Firstly, the CO2-laser cuts the PMMA sheets by melting and blowing away vaporized material from the parent material to obtain high-quality channels of the microfluidic chip. An orthogonal experimental method is used to study its processing stability. In addition, a simple, rapid thermal bonding technique is successfully applied in fabricating the four-layer microfluidic chip, which has a bond strength of 1.3 MPa. A wooden pole is used to improve the accuracy of the alignment. Finally, a mixing experiment with blue ink and water is carried out, which proves that this smart design method and rapid manufacturing technology are successful.

  13. High Speed Digital Camera Technology Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, Sandra D.

    2009-01-01

    A High Speed Digital Camera Technology Review (HSD Review) is being conducted to evaluate the state-of-the-shelf in this rapidly progressing industry. Five HSD cameras supplied by four camera manufacturers participated in a Field Test during the Space Shuttle Discovery STS-128 launch. Each camera was also subjected to Bench Tests in the ASRC Imaging Development Laboratory. Evaluation of the data from the Field and Bench Tests is underway. Representatives from the imaging communities at NASA / KSC and the Optical Systems Group are participating as reviewers. A High Speed Digital Video Camera Draft Specification was updated to address Shuttle engineering imagery requirements based on findings from this HSD Review. This draft specification will serve as the template for a High Speed Digital Video Camera Specification to be developed for the wider OSG imaging community under OSG Task OS-33.

  14. Scientific Visualization in High Speed Network Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaziri, Arsi; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    In several cases, new visualization techniques have vastly increased the researcher's ability to analyze and comprehend data. Similarly, the role of networks in providing an efficient supercomputing environment have become more critical and continue to grow at a faster rate than the increase in the processing capabilities of supercomputers. A close relationship between scientific visualization and high-speed networks in providing an important link to support efficient supercomputing is identified. The two technologies are driven by the increasing complexities and volume of supercomputer data. The interaction of scientific visualization and high-speed networks in a Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation/visualization environment are given. Current capabilities supported by high speed networks, supercomputers, and high-performance graphics workstations at the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility (NAS) at NASA Ames Research Center are described. Applied research in providing a supercomputer visualization environment to support future computational requirements are summarized.

  15. Micro benchtop optics by bulk silicon micromachining

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Pocha, Michael D.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Deri, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Micromachining of bulk silicon utilizing the parallel etching characteristics of bulk silicon and integrating the parallel etch planes of silicon with silicon wafer bonding and impurity doping, enables the fabrication of on-chip optics with in situ aligned etched grooves for optical fibers, micro-lenses, photodiodes, and laser diodes. Other optical components that can be microfabricated and integrated include semi-transparent beam splitters, micro-optical scanners, pinholes, optical gratings, micro-optical filters, etc. Micromachining of bulk silicon utilizing the parallel etching characteristics thereof can be utilized to develop miniaturization of bio-instrumentation such as wavelength monitoring by fluorescence spectrometers, and other miniaturized optical systems such as Fabry-Perot interferometry for filtering of wavelengths, tunable cavity lasers, micro-holography modules, and wavelength splitters for optical communication systems.

  16. Micromachined electrical cauterizer

    DOEpatents

    Lee, A.P.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Northrup, M.A.

    1999-08-31

    A micromachined electrical cauterizer is disclosed. Microstructures are combined with microelectrodes for highly localized electro cauterization. Using boron etch stops and surface micromachining, microneedles with very smooth surfaces are made. Micromachining also allows for precision placement of electrodes by photolithography with micron sized gaps to allow for concentrated electric fields. A microcauterizer is fabricated by bulk etching silicon to form knife edges, then parallelly placed microelectrodes with gaps as small as 5 {mu}m are patterned and aligned adjacent the knife edges to provide homeostasis while cutting tissue. While most of the microelectrode lines are electrically insulated from the atmosphere by depositing and patterning silicon dioxide on the electric feedthrough portions, a window is opened in the silicon dioxide to expose the parallel microelectrode portion. This helps reduce power loss and assist in focusing the power locally for more efficient and safer procedures. 7 figs.

  17. Micromachined electrical cauterizer

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Northrup, M. Allen

    1999-01-01

    A micromachined electrical cauterizer. Microstructures are combined with microelectrodes for highly localized electro cauterization. Using boron etch stops and surface micromachining, microneedles with very smooth surfaces are made. Micromachining also allows for precision placement of electrodes by photolithography with micron sized gaps to allow for concentrated electric fields. A microcauterizer is fabricated by bulk etching silicon to form knife edges, then parallelly placed microelectrodes with gaps as small as 5 .mu.m are patterned and aligned adjacent the knife edges to provide homeostasis while cutting tissue. While most of the microelectrode lines are electrically insulated from the atmosphere by depositing and patterning silicon dioxide on the electric feedthrough portions, a window is opened in the silicon dioxide to expose the parallel microelectrode portion. This helps reduce power loss and assist in focusing the power locally for more efficient and safer procedures.

  18. Micro-machined resonator

    DOEpatents

    Godshall, N.A.; Koehler, D.R.; Liang, A.Y.; Smith, B.K.

    1993-03-30

    A micro-machined resonator, typically quartz, with upper and lower micro-machinable support members, or covers, having etched wells which may be lined with conductive electrode material, between the support members is a quartz resonator having an energy trapping quartz mesa capacitively coupled to the electrode through a diaphragm; the quartz resonator is supported by either micro-machined cantilever springs or by thin layers extending over the surfaces of the support. If the diaphragm is rigid, clock applications are available, and if the diaphragm is resilient, then transducer applications can be achieved. Either the thin support layers or the conductive electrode material can be integral with the diaphragm. In any event, the covers are bonded to form a hermetic seal and the interior volume may be filled with a gas or may be evacuated. In addition, one or both of the covers may include oscillator and interface circuitry for the resonator.

  19. Micro-machined resonator

    DOEpatents

    Godshall, Ned A.; Koehler, Dale R.; Liang, Alan Y.; Smith, Bradley K.

    1993-01-01

    A micro-machined resonator, typically quartz, with upper and lower micro-machinable support members, or covers, having etched wells which may be lined with conductive electrode material, between the support members is a quartz resonator having an energy trapping quartz mesa capacitively coupled to the electrode through a diaphragm; the quartz resonator is supported by either micro-machined cantilever springs or by thin layers extending over the surfaces of the support. If the diaphragm is rigid, clock applications are available, and if the diaphragm is resilient, then transducer applications can be achieved. Either the thin support layers or the conductive electrode material can be integral with the diaphragm. In any event, the covers are bonded to form a hermetic seal and the interior volume may be filled with a gas or may be evacuated. In addition, one or both of the covers may include oscillator and interface circuitry for the resonator.

  20. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Sommargren, Gary E.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  1. Release etch modeling analysis and the use of laser scanning microscopy for etch time prediction of micromachined structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matamis, George; Gogoi, Bishnu P.; Monk, David J.; McNeil, Andrew; Burrows, Veronica A.

    2000-08-01

    An alternative non-destructive analysis method using laser scanning microscopy (LSM) was used to study etch release distances in MEMS pressure sensor. The LSM method eliminates samples preparation and is easy to implement in a MEMS manufacturing environment. In this study, various diaphragm structures were etched using a highly concentrated HF based solution. Experimental etch data were obtained for both SiO2 and PSG films under these various structures. Both the height and the width of the sacrificial layer port/channel had a significant effect on etch rate for both films. As expected, a non-linear etch rate was obtained for both SiO2 and PSG films. Since the HF concentration changes over time in a manufacturing bath process, careful selection of processing time is required in order to fully release MEMS structures. Future theoretical modeling with the assistance of experimental data obtained in this study is being pursued to strengthen past work done by Eaton et al, Monk et al, and Liu et al.

  2. Membrane patterned by pulsed laser micromachining for proton exchange membrane fuel cell with sputtered ultra-low catalyst loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuynet, S.; Caillard, A.; Kaya-Boussougou, S.; Lecas, T.; Semmar, N.; Bigarré, J.; Buvat, P.; Brault, P.

    2015-12-01

    Proton exchange membranes were nano- and micro-patterned on their cathode side by pressing them against stainless steel molds previously irradiated by a Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser. The membranes were associated to ultra-low loaded thin catalytic layers (25 μgPt cm-2) prepared by plasma magnetron sputtering. The Pt catalyst was sputtered either on the membrane or on the porous electrode. The fuel cell performance in dry conditions were found to be highly dependent on the morphology of the membrane surface. When nanometric ripples covered by a Pt catalyst were introduced on the surface of the membrane, the fuel cell outperformed the conventional one with a flat membrane. By combining nano- and micro-patterns (nanometric ripples and 11-24 μm deep craters), the performance of the cells was clearly enhanced. The maximum power density achieved by the fuel cell was multiplied by a factor of 3.6 (at 50 °C and 3 bar): 438 mW cm-2 vs 122 mW cm-2. This improvement is due to high catalyst utilization with a high membrane conductivity. When Pt is sputtered on the porous electrode (and not on the membrane), the contribution of the patterned membrane to the fuel cell efficiency was less significant, except in the presence of nanometric ripples. This result suggests that the patterning of the membrane must be consistent with the way the catalyst is synthesized, on the membrane or on the porous electrode.

  3. High Speed and Slow Motion: The Technology of Modern High Speed Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Michael; Mollmann, Klaus-Peter

    2011-01-01

    The enormous progress in the fields of microsystem technology, microelectronics and computer science has led to the development of powerful high speed cameras. Recently a number of such cameras became available as low cost consumer products which can also be used for the teaching of physics. The technology of high speed cameras is discussed,…

  4. High speed hydrogen/graphite interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, A. J.; Hamman, R.; Sharma, O. P.; Harrje, D. T.

    1974-01-01

    Various aspects of a research program on high speed hydrogen/graphite interaction are presented. Major areas discussed are: (1) theoretical predictions of hydrogen/graphite erosion rates; (2) high temperature, nonequilibrium hydrogen flow in a nozzle; and (3) molecular beam studies of hydrogen/graphite erosion.

  5. High-Speed Sealift Technology. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    Engineering Directorate Technology Projection Report HIGH-SPEED SEALIFT TECHNOLOGY Volume 1 BY OWEN K. RITTER MICHAEL T. TEMPLEMAN...7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Surface Warfare Center,Carderock Division,Total Ship Systems Engineering Directorate...11 3.4.3.2 Diesel Engines

  6. High speed optical tomography for flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Ray; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1987-01-01

    A novel optical architecture (based on holographic optical elements) for making high speed tomographic measurements is presented. The system is designed for making density or species concentration measurements in a nonsteady fluid or combustion flow. Performance evaluations of the optical system are discussed, and a test phase object was successfully reconstructed using this optical arrangement.

  7. High-speed adaptive optics for imaging of the living human eye

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yongxin; Zhang, Tianjiao; Meadway, Alexander; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhang, Yuhua

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of high frequency temporal fluctuation of human ocular wave aberration dictates the necessity of high speed adaptive optics (AO) correction for high resolution retinal imaging. We present a high speed AO system for an experimental adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). We developed a custom high speed Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and maximized the wavefront detection speed based upon a trade-off among the wavefront spatial sampling density, the dynamic range, and the measurement sensitivity. We examined the temporal dynamic property of the ocular wavefront under the AOSLO imaging condition and improved the dual-thread AO control strategy. The high speed AO can be operated with a closed-loop frequency up to 110 Hz. Experiment results demonstrated that the high speed AO system can provide improved compensation for the wave aberration up to 30 Hz in the living human eye. PMID:26368408

  8. High speed intravascular photoacoustic imaging of atherosclerotic arteries (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Zhonglie; Ma, Teng; Qu, Yueqiao; Li, Jiawen; Yu, Mingyue; He, Youmin; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Chang-Seok; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the industrialized nations. Accurate quantification of both the morphology and composition of lipid-rich vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque are essential for early detection and optimal treatment in clinics. In previous works, intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging for detection of lipid-rich plaque within coronary artery walls has been demonstrated in ex vivo, but the imaging speed is still limited. In order to increase the imaging speed, a high repetition rate laser is needed. In this work, we present a high speed integrated IVPA/US imaging system with a 500 Hz optical parametric oscillator laser at 1725 nm. A miniature catheter with 1.0 mm outer diameter was designed with a 200 μm multimode fiber and an ultrasound transducer with 45 MHz center frequency. The fiber was polished at 38 degree and enclosed in a glass capillary for total internal reflection. An optical/electrical rotary junction and pull-back mechanism was applied for rotating and linearly scanning the catheter to obtain three-dimensional imaging. Atherosclerotic rabbit abdominal aorta was imaged as two frame/second at 1725 nm. Furthermore, by wide tuning range of the laser wavelength from 1680 nm to 1770 nm, spectroscopic photoacoustic analysis of lipid-mimicking phantom and an human atherosclerotic artery was performed ex vivo. The results demonstrated that the developed IVPA/US imaging system is capable for high speed intravascular imaging for plaque detection.

  9. Insect wing deformation measurements using high speed digital holographic interferometry.

    PubMed

    Aguayo, Daniel D; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando; De la Torre-I, Manuel H; Salas-Araiza, Manuel D; Caloca-Mendez, Cristian; Gutierrez Hernandez, David Asael

    2010-03-15

    An out-of-plane digital holographic interferometry system is used to detect and measure insect's wing micro deformations. The in-vivo phenomenon of the flapping is registered using a high power cw laser and a high speed camera. A series of digital holograms with the deformation encoded are obtained. Full field deformation maps are presented for an eastern tiger swallowtail butterfly (Pterourus multicaudata). Results show no uniform or symmetrical deformations between wings. These deformations are in the order of hundreds of nanometers over the entire surface. Out-of-plane deformation maps are presented using the unwrapped phase maps.

  10. Micromachined double resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, Roman (Inventor); Tang, Tony K. (Inventor); Shcheglov, Kirill (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A micromachined resonator mountable to an external support structure has a proof mass coupled to a base structure by a first spring structure, the base structure having a plurality of electrodes, and a second spring structure coupling the base structure to the external support structure.

  11. Micromachined peristaltic pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Micromachined pumps including a channel formed between a first membrane and a substrate or between first and second flexible membranes. A series of electrically conductive strips is applied to a surface of the substrate or one of the membranes. Application of a sequential voltage to the series of strips causes a region of closure to progress down the channel to achieve a pumping action.

  12. Micromachined Fluid Inertial Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shiqiang; Zhu, Rong

    2017-01-01

    Micromachined fluid inertial sensors are an important class of inertial sensors, which mainly includes thermal accelerometers and fluid gyroscopes, which have now been developed since the end of the last century for about 20 years. Compared with conventional silicon or quartz inertial sensors, the fluid inertial sensors use a fluid instead of a solid proof mass as the moving and sensitive element, and thus offer advantages of simple structures, low cost, high shock resistance, and large measurement ranges while the sensitivity and bandwidth are not competitive. Many studies and various designs have been reported in the past two decades. This review firstly introduces the working principles of fluid inertial sensors, followed by the relevant research developments. The micromachined thermal accelerometers based on thermal convection have developed maturely and become commercialized. However, the micromachined fluid gyroscopes, which are based on jet flow or thermal flow, are less mature. The key issues and technologies of the thermal accelerometers, mainly including bandwidth, temperature compensation, monolithic integration of tri-axis accelerometers and strategies for high production yields are also summarized and discussed. For the micromachined fluid gyroscopes, improving integration and sensitivity, reducing thermal errors and cross coupling errors are the issues of most concern. PMID:28216569

  13. Micromachined Fluid Inertial Sensors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shiqiang; Zhu, Rong

    2017-02-14

    Micromachined fluid inertial sensors are an important class of inertial sensors, which mainly includes thermal accelerometers and fluid gyroscopes, which have now been developed since the end of the last century for about 20 years. Compared with conventional silicon or quartz inertial sensors, the fluid inertial sensors use a fluid instead of a solid proof mass as the moving and sensitive element, and thus offer advantages of simple structures, low cost, high shock resistance, and large measurement ranges while the sensitivity and bandwidth are not competitive. Many studies and various designs have been reported in the past two decades. This review firstly introduces the working principles of fluid inertial sensors, followed by the relevant research developments. The micromachined thermal accelerometers based on thermal convection have developed maturely and become commercialized. However, the micromachined fluid gyroscopes, which are based on jet flow or thermal flow, are less mature. The key issues and technologies of the thermal accelerometers, mainly including bandwidth, temperature compensation, monolithic integration of tri-axis accelerometers and strategies for high production yields are also summarized and discussed. For the micromachined fluid gyroscopes, improving integration and sensitivity, reducing thermal errors and cross coupling errors are the issues of most concern.

  14. Micromachined Artificial Haircell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chang (Inventor); Engel, Jonathan (Inventor); Chen, Nannan (Inventor); Chen, Jack (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A micromachined artificial sensor comprises a support coupled to and movable with respect to a substrate. A polymer, high-aspect ratio cilia-like structure is disposed on and extends out-of-plane from the support. A strain detector is disposed with respect to the support to detect movement of the support.

  15. Pulse Detonation Engines for High Speed Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.

    2002-01-01

    Revolutionary concepts in propulsion are required in order to achieve high-speed cruise capability in the atmosphere and for low cost reliable systems for earth to orbit missions. One of the advanced concepts under study is the air-breathing pulse detonation engine. Additional work remains in order to establish the role and performance of a PDE in flight applications, either as a stand-alone device or as part of a combined cycle system. In this paper, we shall offer a few remarks on some of these remaining issues, i.e., combined cycle systems, nozzles and exhaust systems and thrust per unit frontal area limitations. Currently, an intensive experimental and numerical effort is underway in order to quantify the propulsion performance characteristics of this device. In this paper, we shall highlight our recent efforts to elucidate the propulsion potential of pulse detonation engines and their possible application to high-speed or hypersonic systems.

  16. High Speed Research Program Sonic Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A. (Technical Monitor); Beier, Theodor H.; Heaton, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this sonic fatigue summary is to provide major findings and technical results of studies, initiated in 1994, to assess sonic fatigue behavior of structure that is being considered for the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). High Speed Research (HSR) program objectives in the area of sonic fatigue were to predict inlet, exhaust and boundary layer acoustic loads; measure high cycle fatigue data for materials developed during the HSR program; develop advanced sonic fatigue calculation methods to reduce required conservatism in airframe designs; develop damping techniques for sonic fatigue reduction where weight effective; develop wing and fuselage sonic fatigue design requirements; and perform sonic fatigue analyses on HSCT structural concepts to provide guidance to design teams. All goals were partially achieved, but none were completed due to the premature conclusion of the HSR program. A summary of major program findings and recommendations for continued effort are included in the report.

  17. High speed technology development and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, D. R.; Brown, E. R.; Dickson, J. F.

    1986-10-01

    Semiconductor technology suited to high on-board data handling rates was investigated. Very high speed discrete logic and high speed gate arrays; single chip digital signal processors and single chip floating point processing peripherals; and analog CCD technologies and custom designed CCD chips for synthetic aperture radar applications were assessed. The 2 micron CMOS technology is highly reliable, supporting semicustom design techniques. Process JGC, the CCD technology, is highly reliable except for tolerance to ionizing radiation. Reliability of the ECL 16-bit serial-parallel parallel-serial converter junction isolated bipolar process, process WZA, is compromised by a design error and oxide contamination contributing to high leakage levels. The bipolar circuit is tolerant to an ionizing radiation of 20kRad. Step stress environmental testing to 200 C produces no failures in CMOS and CCD technologies, but accelerates the degradation of the oxide contaminated bipolar process. All technologies are susceptible to single event upsets.

  18. Abbreviated annealing of high-speed steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zablotskii, V.K.; Bartel, G.P.

    1987-07-01

    The authors investigate the structural and phase transformations during the heating, holding, and cooling of high-speed steels of two basic groups: tungsten (R18, R12, R12F3, and R12F4K5) and tungsten-molybdenum (R6M5, 10R6M5, R6M5K5, R8M3, 10R8M3, and R8M3K6S) steels in the forged state. They propose a cooling regime with complete alpha-gamma recrystallization whose implementation at a Soviet steel plant has made it possible to reduce the duration of heat treatment and increase productivity by 20% in cutting the annealed high-speed steels.

  19. DAC 22 High Speed Civil Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Between tests, NASA research engineer Dave Hahne inspects a tenth-scale model of a supersonic transport model in the 30- by 60-Foot Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The model is being used in support of NASA's High-Speed Research (HSR) program. Langley researchers are applying advance aerodynamic design methods to develop a wing leading-edge flap system which significantly improves low-speed fuel efficiency and reduces noise generated during takeoff operation. Langley is NASA's lead center for the agency's HSR program, aimed at developing technology to help U.S. industry compete in the rapidly expanding trans-oceanic transport market. A U.S. high-speed civil transport is expected to fly in about the year 2010. As envisioned, it would fly 300 passengers across the Pacific in about four hours at Mach 2.4 (approximately 1,600 mph/1950 kph) for a modest increase over business class fares.

  20. Plasma guiding and deflection of high speed projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Miles, Richard; PU Team

    2016-09-01

    The deposition of energy in the air in front of a high-speed projectile can lead to both the reduction of drag and the production of steering moments. Modeling has shown that the major contributor to the drag reduction and the steering moment is the high temperature, low density region that is produced by the energy addition. If the energy addition is off axis, it leads to a non symmetric pressure distribution on the projectile as it passes through this region, producing steering control authority that increases nonlinearly with Mach number. Experiments with a tethered projectile and subsequently with a rotating projectile using pulsed laser energy addition were reported. More recent experiments with a 30-mm diameter projectile in M =3.5 flow have been undertaken using a nozzle driven by a pulsed shock tunnel 9.5 m in length and 100 mm internal diameter. Energy was deposited by Nd-YAG laser with pulse energy of about 3 Joules at 1064nm. The laser pulse duration was 5-6 ns. Preliminary results indicate that the laser spark - flow interaction changes the angular momentum of the model for with a laser pulse energy of 2.85 J, the angle between laser spark axis and the flow 30-0 and a flow speed 1100 m/s.

  1. Data Capture Technique for High Speed Signaling

    DOEpatents

    Barrett, Wayne Melvin; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul William; Gara, Alan Gene; Jackson, Rory; Kopcsay, Gerard Vincent; Nathanson, Ben Jesse; Vranas, Paylos Michael; Takken, Todd E.

    2008-08-26

    A data capture technique for high speed signaling to allow for optimal sampling of an asynchronous data stream. This technique allows for extremely high data rates and does not require that a clock be sent with the data as is done in source synchronous systems. The present invention also provides a hardware mechanism for automatically adjusting transmission delays for optimal two-bit simultaneous bi-directional (SiBiDi) signaling.

  2. High-speed Digital Color Imaging Pyrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    and environment of the events. To overcome these challenges, we have characterized and calibrated a digital high-speed color camera that may be...correction) to determine their effect on the calculated temperature. Using this technique with a Phantom color camera , we measured the temperature of...constant value of approximately 1980~K. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Pyrometry, color camera 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT

  3. The NASA high-speed turboprop program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugan, J. F.; Miller, B. A.; Graber, E. J.; Sagerser, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    Technology readiness for Mach 0.7 to 0.8 turboprop powered aircraft with the potential for fuel savings and DOC reductions of up to 30 and 15 percent respectively relative to current in-service aircraft is addressed. The areas of propeller aeroacoustics, propeller structures, turboprop installed performance, aircraft cabin environment, and turboprop engine and aircraft studies are emphasized. Large scale propeller characteristics and high speed propeller flight research tests using a modified testbed aircraft are also considered.

  4. The high-speed camera ULTRACAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, T. R.; Dhillon, V. S.

    2006-08-01

    ULTRACAM is a high-speed, tri-band CCD camera designed for observations of time variable celestial objects. Commissioned on the 4.2m WHT in La Palma, it has now been used for observations of many types of phenomena and objects including stellar occultations, accreting black-holes, neutron stars and white dwarfs, pulsars, eclipsing binaries and pulsating stars. In this paper we describe the salient features of ULTRACAM and discuss some of the results of its use.

  5. Architectures and applications of high-speed vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yoshihiro; Oku, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Masatoshi

    2014-11-01

    With the progress made in high-speed imaging technology, image processing systems that can process images at high frame rates, as well as their applications, are expected. In this article, we examine architectures for high-speed vision systems, and also dynamic image control, which can realize high-speed active optical systems. In addition, we also give an overview of some applications in which high-speed vision is used, including man-machine interfaces, image sensing, interactive displays, high-speed three-dimensional sensing, high-speed digital archiving, microvisual feedback, and high-speed intelligent robots.

  6. Wafer scale micromachine assembly method

    DOEpatents

    Christenson, Todd R.

    2001-01-01

    A method for fusing together, using diffusion bonding, micromachine subassemblies which are separately fabricated is described. A first and second micromachine subassembly are fabricated on a first and second substrate, respectively. The substrates are positioned so that the upper surfaces of the two micromachine subassemblies face each other and are aligned so that the desired assembly results from their fusion. The upper surfaces are then brought into contact, and the assembly is subjected to conditions suited to the desired diffusion bonding.

  7. Micromachined peristaltic pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A micromachined pump including a channel formed in a semiconductor substrate by conventional processes such as chemical etching. A number of insulating barriers are established in the substrate parallel to one another and transverse to the channel. The barriers separate a series of electrically conductive strips. An overlying flexible conductive membrane is applied over the channel and conductive strips with an insulating layer separating the conductive strips from the conductive membrane. Application of a sequential voltage to the series of strips pulls the membrane into the channel portion of each successive strip to achieve a pumping action. A particularly desirable arrangement employs a micromachined push-pull dual channel cavity employing two substrates with a single membrane sandwiched between them.

  8. Micromachined Precision Inertial Instruments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-11-01

    and vacuum packaging techniques to achieve degree-per-hour inertial micro-gyroscopes. A single-wafer, all-silicon, high aspect-ratio p...Although vacuum packaging substantially reduces the mechanical noise of a surface micromachined accelerometer and lowers the output noise floor...it is desirable to operate sensors in atmosphere since vacuum packaging is not cost effective [15]. Figure 10: Performance improvements for In

  9. Modeling an optical micromachine probe

    SciTech Connect

    Mittas, A.; Dickey, F.M.; Holswade, S.C.

    1997-08-01

    Silicon micromachines are fabricated using Surface Micro-Machining (SMM) techniques. Silicon micromachines include engines that consist of orthogonally oriented linear comb drive actuators mechanically connected to a rotating gear. These gears are as small a 50-{micro}m in diameter and can be driven at rotation rates exceeding 300,000-rpm. Measuring and analyzing microengine performance is basic to micromachine development and system applications. Optical techniques offer the potential for measuring long term statistical performance data and transient responses needed to optimize designs and manufacturing techniques. The authors describe the modeling of an optical probe developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Experimental data will be compared with output from the model.

  10. Micromachined silicon seismic transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Armour, D.L.; Fleming, R.P.

    1995-08-01

    Batch-fabricated silicon seismic transducers could revolutionize the discipline of CTBT monitoring by providing inexpensive, easily depolyable sensor arrays. Although our goal is to fabricate seismic sensors that provide the same performance level as the current state-of-the-art ``macro`` systems, if necessary one could deploy a larger number of these small sensors at closer proximity to the location being monitored in order to compensate for lower performance. We have chosen a modified pendulum design and are manufacturing prototypes in two different silicon micromachining fabrication technologies. The first set of prototypes, fabricated in our advanced surface- micromachining technology, are currently being packaged for testing in servo circuits -- we anticipate that these devices, which have masses in the 1--10 {mu}g range, will resolve sub-mG signals. Concurrently, we are developing a novel ``mold`` micromachining technology that promises to make proof masses in the 1--10 mg range possible -- our calculations indicate that devices made in this new technology will resolve down to at least sub-{mu}G signals, and may even approach to 10{sup {minus}10} G/{radical}Hz acceleration levels found in the low-earth-noise model.

  11. Comparing flat top and Gaussian focal beam shapes when micromachining steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd E.; Ohar, Orest

    2011-10-01

    Laser micromachining, drilling and marking is extensively used within the aerospace, automotive and firearms industries. The unique properties of lasers make them ideal tools for micromachining a wide diversity of materials, including steel alloys [1]. We describe the results of micromachining of low carbon steel and stainless steel alloys, using a high powered diode pumped solid state (DPSS) laser operating at a wavelength of 355nm. The laser was configured with beam conditioning optics to produce either a flat top beam or a Gaussian output which was then sent through a galvanometer scanner and telecentric lens beam delivery system. This paper outlines the interrelationship of process variables when micromachining fine features in steel and stainless steel alloys. Process variables measured included the optimum laser focus plane, energy density, galvanometer scan rate, and pulse overlap and focal spot diameter. Optimum process performance was evaluated based on a dimensional comparison of the micromachined features from each test coupon, including uniformity and surface roughness of the micromachined surface and the minimization of surface irregularities (stalagmite type slag / debris / corn row patterns) and taper angle of the micromachined feature side walls.

  12. High Speed SPM of Functional Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Huey, Bryan D.

    2015-08-14

    The development and optimization of applications comprising functional materials necessitates a thorough understanding of their static and dynamic properties and performance at the nanoscale. Leveraging High Speed SPM and concepts enabled by it, efficient measurements and maps with nanoscale and nanosecond temporal resolution are uniquely feasible. This includes recent enhancements for topographic, conductivity, ferroelectric, and piezoelectric properties as originally proposed, as well as newly developed methods or improvements to AFM-based mechanical, friction, thermal, and photoconductivity measurements. The results of this work reveal fundamental mechanisms of operation, and suggest new approaches for improving the ultimate speed and/or efficiency, of data storage systems, magnetic-electric sensors, and solar cells.

  13. Structure of High-Speed Sprays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    AD-Ri65 655 STRUCTURE OF HIGH-SPEED SPRAYS(U) PRINCETON UNIV NJ 1 /2 DEPT OF MECHRNICRL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING BRACCO FEB 85 ARO-i8333.7-EG DRAG29...and vaporization was negligible. During the second 3-year ARO grant for the period July 81-June 84 drop sizes ( 1 ) were measured by photography in the...tial drop size has been evaluated only preliminarily ( 1 ). But the prediction of the intact core length Is both weaker and largely untested. It Is weaker

  14. High Speed Solid State Circuit Breaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podlesak, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Fort Monmouth, NJ, has developed and is installing two 3.3 MW high speed solid state circuit breakers at the Army's Pulse Power Center. These circuit breakers will interrupt 4160V three phase power mains in no more than 300 microseconds, two orders of magnitude faster than conventional mechanical contact type circuit breakers. These circuit breakers utilize Gate Turnoff Thyristors (GTO's) and are currently utility type devices using air cooling in an air conditioned enclosure. Future refinements include liquid cooling, either water or two phase organic coolant, and more advanced semiconductors. Each of these refinements promises a more compact, more reliable unit.

  15. High-speed spectroradiometer for remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, T; Shimizu, H; Yasuoka, Y

    1987-11-15

    A high-speed spectroradiometer designed for spectral reflectance measurement in remote sensing is described. This instrument uses a monochromatic grating and a photomultiplier system for light detection and sweeps over the 400-850-nm wavelength spectral range with the spectral resolution of 2 nm within 1 s. The instrument has the inherent advantage of portability and speed of operation which make it particularly suitable for field work in the area of fast moving surfaces, e.g., water with wave motion. Some applications of its use in laboratory and field experiments also have been presented. The instrument would seem to be an appropriate instrument for ground data collection in remote sensing.

  16. Characterization and Compensation of High Speed Digitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, P; Teruya, A; Lowry, M

    2005-04-04

    Increasingly, ADC technology is being pressed into service for single single-shot instrumentation applications that were formerly served by vacuum-tube based oscilloscopes and streak cameras. ADC technology, while convenient, suffers significant performance impairments. Thus, in these demanding applications, a quantitative and accurate representation of these impairments is critical to an understanding of measurement accuracy. We have developed a phase-plane behavioral model, implemented it in SIMULINK and applied it to interleaved, high-speed ADCs (up to 4 gigasamples/sec). We have also developed and demonstrated techniques to effectively compensate for these impairments based upon the model.

  17. An SAE high speed ring bus overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroeger, Brian W.; Shih, Hubert

    An overview of the protocols and important features of the SAE high-speed ring bus (HSRB) standard is presented here, along with the functional design of a typical ring interface unit architecture. The counterrotating ring topology, with both loopback and bypass mechanisms, provides the high degree of fault tolerance desirable in many military and avionic systems. The error-detection, fault-detection, and recovery mechanisms are briefly described to illustrate the robustness of the HSRB system. The reserved-priority token-passing protocol is shown to provide efficient and deterministic performance, uselful in real-time applications where messages must be transmitted predictably, quickly, and reliably.

  18. Continuous QKD and high speed data encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbinden, Hugo; Walenta, Nino; Guinnard, Olivier; Houlmann, Raphael; Wen, Charles Lim Ci; Korzh, Boris; Lunghi, Tommaso; Gisin, Nicolas; Burg, Andreas; Constantin, Jeremy; Legré, Matthieu; Trinkler, Patrick; Caselunghe, Dario; Kulesza, Natalia; Trolliet, Gregory; Vannel, Fabien; Junod, Pascal; Auberson, Olivier; Graf, Yoan; Curchod, Gilles; Habegger, Gilles; Messerli, Etienne; Portmann, Christopher; Henzen, Luca; Keller, Christoph; Pendl, Christian; Mühlberghuber, Michael; Roth, Christoph; Felber, Norbert; Gürkaynak, Frank; Schöni, Daniel; Muheim, Beat

    2013-10-01

    We present the results of a Swiss project dedicated to the development of high speed quantum key distribution and data encryption. The QKD engine features fully automated key exchange, hardware key distillation based on finite key security analysis, efficient authentication and wavelength division multiplexing of the quantum and the classical channel and one-time pas encryption. The encryption device allows authenticated symmetric key encryption (e.g AES) at rates of up to 100 Gb/s. A new quantum key can uploaded up to 1000 times second from the QKD engine.

  19. High-Speed Propeller for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagerser, D. A.; Gatzen, B. S.

    1986-01-01

    Engine efficiency increased. Propeller blades required to be quite thin and highly swept to minimize compressibility losses and propeller noise during high-speed cruise. Use of 8 or 10 blades with highpropeller-power loading allows overall propeller diameter to be kept relatively small. Area-ruled spinner and integrated nacelle shape reduce compressibility losses in propeller hub region. Finally, large modern turboshaft engine and gearbox provide power to advanced propeller. Fuel savings of 30 to 50 percent over present systems anticipated. Propfan system adaptable to number of applications, such as highspeed (subsonic) business and general-aviation aircraft, and military aircraft including V/STOL.

  20. High-speed scanning ablation of dental hard tissues with a λ = 9.3 μm CO2 laser: adhesion, mechanical strength, heat accumulation, and peripheral thermal damage.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Daniel; Chang, Kwang; Hedayatollahnajafi, Saba; Staninec, Michal; Chan, Kenneth; Lee, Robert; Fried, Daniel

    2011-07-01

    CO(2) lasers can be operated at high laser pulse repetition rates for the rapid and precise removal of dental decay. Excessive heat accumulation and peripheral thermal damage is a concern when using high pulse repetition rates. Peripheral thermal damage can adversely impact the mechanical strength of the irradiated tissue, particularly for dentin, and reduce the adhesion characteristics of the modified surfaces. The interpulpal temperature rise was recorded using microthermocouples situated at the roof of the pulp chamber on teeth that were occlusally ablated using a rapidly-scanned CO(2) laser operating at 9.3 μm with a pulse duration of 10 to 15 μs and repetition rate of 300 Hz over a 2 min time course. The adhesion strength of laser treated enamel and dentin surfaces was measured for various laser scanning parameters with and without post-ablation acid etching using the single-plane shear test. The mechanical strength of laser-ablated dentin surfaces were determined via the four-point bend test and compared to control samples prepared with 320 grit wet sand paper to simulate conventional preparations. Thermocouple measurements indicated that the temperature remained below ambient temperature if water-cooling was used. There was no discoloration of either dentin or enamel laser treated surfaces, the surfaces were uniformly ablated, and there were no cracks visible. Four-point bend tests yielded mean mechanical strengths of 18.2 N (s.d. = 4.6) for ablated dentin and 18.1 N (s.d. = 2.7) for control (p > 0.05). Shear tests yielded mean bond strengths approaching 30 MPa for both enamel and dentin under certain irradiation conditions. These values were slightly lower than nonirradiated acid-etched control samples. Additional studies are needed to determine if the slightly lower bond strength than the acid-etched control samples is clinically significant. These measurements demonstrate that enamel and dentin surfaces can be rapidly ablated by CO(2) lasers with

  1. High-speed scanning ablation of dental hard tissues with a λ = 9.3 μm CO2 laser: adhesion, mechanical strength, heat accumulation, and peripheral thermal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Daniel; Chang, Kwang; Hedayatollahnajafi, Saba; Staninec, Michal; Chan, Kenneth; Lee, Robert; Fried, Daniel

    2011-07-01

    CO2 lasers can be operated at high laser pulse repetition rates for the rapid and precise removal of dental decay. Excessive heat accumulation and peripheral thermal damage is a concern when using high pulse repetition rates. Peripheral thermal damage can adversely impact the mechanical strength of the irradiated tissue, particularly for dentin, and reduce the adhesion characteristics of the modified surfaces. The interpulpal temperature rise was recorded using microthermocouples situated at the roof of the pulp chamber on teeth that were occlusally ablated using a rapidly-scanned CO2 laser operating at 9.3 μm with a pulse duration of 10 to 15 μs and repetition rate of 300 Hz over a 2 min time course. The adhesion strength of laser treated enamel and dentin surfaces was measured for various laser scanning parameters with and without post-ablation acid etching using the single-plane shear test. The mechanical strength of laser-ablated dentin surfaces were determined via the four-point bend test and compared to control samples prepared with 320 grit wet sand paper to simulate conventional preparations. Thermocouple measurements indicated that the temperature remained below ambient temperature if water-cooling was used. There was no discoloration of either dentin or enamel laser treated surfaces, the surfaces were uniformly ablated, and there were no cracks visible. Four-point bend tests yielded mean mechanical strengths of 18.2 N (s.d. = 4.6) for ablated dentin and 18.1 N (s.d. = 2.7) for control (p > 0.05). Shear tests yielded mean bond strengths approaching 30 MPa for both enamel and dentin under certain irradiation conditions. These values were slightly lower than nonirradiated acid-etched control samples. Additional studies are needed to determine if the slightly lower bond strength than the acid-etched control samples is clinically significant. These measurements demonstrate that enamel and dentin surfaces can be rapidly ablated by CO2 lasers with minimal

  2. High-Speed Edge-Detecting Line Scan Smart Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokop, Norman F.

    2012-01-01

    A high-speed edge-detecting line scan smart camera was developed. The camera is designed to operate as a component in a NASA Glenn Research Center developed inlet shock detection system. The inlet shock is detected by projecting a laser sheet through the airflow. The shock within the airflow is the densest part and refracts the laser sheet the most in its vicinity, leaving a dark spot or shadowgraph. These spots show up as a dip or negative peak within the pixel intensity profile of an image of the projected laser sheet. The smart camera acquires and processes in real-time the linear image containing the shock shadowgraph and outputting the shock location. Previously a high-speed camera and personal computer would perform the image capture and processing to determine the shock location. This innovation consists of a linear image sensor, analog signal processing circuit, and a digital circuit that provides a numerical digital output of the shock or negative edge location. The smart camera is capable of capturing and processing linear images at over 1,000 frames per second. The edges are identified as numeric pixel values within the linear array of pixels, and the edge location information can be sent out from the circuit in a variety of ways, such as by using a microcontroller and onboard or external digital interface to include serial data such as RS-232/485, USB, Ethernet, or CAN BUS; parallel digital data; or an analog signal. The smart camera system can be integrated into a small package with a relatively small number of parts, reducing size and increasing reliability over the previous imaging system..

  3. Applications for high-speed infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Austin A.

    2005-03-01

    The phrase high-speed imaging is generally associated with short exposure times, fast frame rates or both. Supersonic projectiles, for example, are often impossible to see with the unaided eye, and require strobe photography to stop their apparent motion. It is often necessary to image high-speed objects in the infrared region of the spectrum, either to detect them or to measure their surface temperature. Conventional infrared cameras have time constants similar to the human eye, so they too, are often at a loss when it comes to photographing fast-moving hot targets. Other types of targets or scenes such as explosions change very rapidly with time. Visualizing those changes requires an extremely high frame rate combined with short exposure times in order to slow down a dynamic event so that it can be studied and quantified. Recent advances in infrared sensor technology and computing power have pushed the envelope of what is possible to achieve with commercial IR camera systems.

  4. Pressure Distribution Over Airfoils at High Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, L J; Dryden, H L

    1927-01-01

    This report deals with the pressure distribution over airfoils at high speeds, and describes an extension of an investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of certain airfoils which was presented in NACA Technical Report no. 207. The results presented in report no. 207 have been confirmed and extended to higher speeds through a more extensive and systematic series of tests. Observations were also made of the air flow near the surface of the airfoils, and the large changes in lift coefficients were shown to be associated with a sudden breaking away of the flow from the upper surface. The tests were made on models of 1-inch chord and comparison with the earlier measurements on models of 3-inch chord shows that the sudden change in the lift coefficient is due to compressibility and not to a change in the Reynolds number. The Reynolds number still has a large effect, however, on the drag coefficient. The pressure distribution observations furnish the propeller designer with data on the load distribution at high speeds, and also give a better picture of the air-flow changes.

  5. MM-122: High speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demarest, Bill; Anders, Kurt; Manchec, John; Yang, Eric; Overgaard, Dan; Kalkwarf, Mike

    1992-01-01

    The rapidly expanding Pacific Rim market along with other growing markets indicates that the future market potential for a high speed civil transport is great indeed. The MM-122 is the answer to the international market desire for a state of the art, long range, high speed civil transport. It will carry 250 passengers a distance of 5200 nm at over twice the speed of sound. The MM-122 is designed to incorporate the latest technologies in the areas of control systems, propulsions, aerodynamics, and materials. The MM-122 will accomplish these goals using the following design parameters. First, a double delta wing planform with highly swept canards and an appropriately area ruled fuselage will be incorporated to accomplish desired aerodynamic characteristics. Propulsion will be provided by four low bypass variable cycle turbofan engines. A quad-redundant fly-by-wire flight control system will be incorporated to provide appropriate static stability and level 1 handling qualities. Finally, the latest in conventional metallic and modern composite materials will be used to provide desired weight and performance characteristics. The MM-122 incorporates the latest in technology and cost minimization techniques to provide a viable solution to this future market potential.

  6. High-speed civil transport study. Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A system of study of the potential for a high speed commercial transport aircraft addressed technology, economic, and environmental constraints. Market projections indicated a need for fleets of transport with supersonic or greater cruise speeds by the years 2000 to 2005. The associated design requirements called for a vehicle to carry 250 to 300 passengers over a range of 5000 to 6000 nautical miles. The study was initially unconstrained in terms of vehicle characteristics, such as cruise speed, propulsion systems, fuels, or structural materials. Analyses led to a focus on the most promising vehicle concepts. These were concepts that used a kerosene type fuel and cruised at Mach numbers between 2.0 to 3.2. Further systems study identified the impact of environmental constraints (for community noise, sonic boom, and engine emissions) on economic attractiveness and technological needs. Results showed that current technology cannot produce a viable high speed civil transport. Significant advances are needed to take off gross weight and allow for both economic attractiveness and environment acceptability. Specific technological requirements were identified to meet these needs.

  7. Study of high-speed civil transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A systems study to identify the economic potential for a high-speed commercial transport (HSCT) has considered technology, market characteristics, airport infrastructure, and environmental issues. Market forecasts indicate a need for HSCT service in the 2000/2010 time frame conditioned on economic viability and environmental acceptability. Design requirements focused on a 300 passenger, 3 class service, and 6500 nautical mile range based on the accelerated growth of the Pacific region. Compatibility with existing airports was an assumed requirement. Mach numbers between 2 and 25 were examined in conjunction with the appropriate propulsion systems, fuels, structural materials, and thermal management systems. Aircraft productivity was a key parameter with aircraft worth, in comparison to aircraft price, being the airline-oriented figure of merit. Aircraft screening led to determination that Mach 3.2 (TSJF) would have superior characteristics to Mach 5.0 (LNG) and the recommendation that the next generation high-speed commercial transport aircraft use a kerosene fuel. The sensitivity of aircraft performance and economics to environmental constraints (e.g., sonic boom, engine emissions, and airport/community noise) was identified together with key technologies. In all, current technology is not adequate to produce viable HSCTs for the world marketplace. Technology advancements must be accomplished to meet environmental requirements (these requirements are as yet undetermined for sonic boom and engine emissions). High priority is assigned to aircraft gross weight reduction which benefits both economics and environmental aspects. Specific technology requirements are identified and national economic benefits are projected.

  8. High-speed civil transport study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A system study of the potential for a high-speed commercial transport has addressed technological, economic, and environmental constraints. Market projections indicate a need for fleets of transports with supersonic or greater cruise speeds by the year 2000 to 2005. The associated design requirements called for a vehicle to carry 250 to 300 passengers over a range of 5,000 to 6,000 nautical miles. The study was initially unconstrained in terms of vehicle characteristic, such as cruise speed, propulsion systems, fuels, or structural materials. Analyses led to a focus on the most promising vehicle concepts. These were concepts that used a kerosene-type fuel and cruised at Mach numbers between 2.0 to 3.2. Further systems study identified the impact of environmental constraints (for community noise, sonic boom, and engine emissions) on economic attractiveness and technological needs. Results showed that current technology cannot produce a viable high-speed civil transport; significant advances are required to reduce takeoff gross weight and allow for both economic attractiveness and environmental accepatability. Specific technological requirements were identified to meet these needs.

  9. ACTS High-Speed VSAT Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Quang K.

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) developed by NASA has demonstrated the breakthrough technologies of Ka-band transmission, spot-beam antennas, and onboard processing. These technologies have enabled the development of very small and ultrasmall aperture terminals (VSAT s and USAT's), which have capabilities greater than have been possible with conventional satellite technologies. The ACTS High Speed VSAT (HS VSAT) is an effort at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field to experimentally demonstrate the maximum user throughput data rate that can be achieved using the technologies developed and implemented on ACTS. This was done by operating the system uplinks as frequency division multiple access (FDMA), essentially assigning all available time division multiple access (TDMA) time slots to a single user on each of two uplink frequencies. Preliminary results show that, using a 1.2-m antenna in this mode, the High Speed VSAT can achieve between 22 and 24 Mbps of the 27.5 Mbps burst rate, for a throughput efficiency of 80 to 88 percent.

  10. High-speed 3D imaging by parallel phase-shifting digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awatsuji, Yasuhiro; Xia, Peng; Matoba, Osamu

    2015-07-01

    As a high-speed three-dimensional (3D) imaging technique, parallel phase-shifting digital holography is presented. This technique records a single hologram of an object with an image sensor having a phase-shift array device and reconstructs the instantaneous 3D image of the object with a computer. In this technique, a single hologram in which the multiple holograms required for phase-shifting digital holography are multiplexed by using space-division multiplexing technique pixel by pixel. Also, we present a high-speed parallel phase-shifting digital holography system. The system consists of an interferometer, a continuous-wave laser, and a high-speed polarization imaging camera. Motion pictures of dynamic phenomena at the rate of up to 1,000,000 frames per second have been achieved by the high-speed system.

  11. CMOS-compatible fabrication, micromachining, and bonding strategies for silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, John; Jones, Richard; Paniccia, Mario J.

    2011-02-01

    The adoption of optical technologies by high-volume consumer markets is severely limited by the cost and complexity of manufacturing complete optical transceiver systems. This is in large part because "boutique" semiconductor fabrication processes are required for III-V lasers, modulators, and photodetectors; furthermore, precision bonding and painstaking assembly are needed to integrate or assemble such dissimilar devices and materials together. On the other hand, 200mm and 300mm silicon process technology has been bringing ever-increasing computing power to the masses by relentless cost reduction for several decades. Intel's silicon photonics program aims to marry this CMOS infrastructure and recent developments in MEMS manufacturing with the burgeoning field of microphotonics to make low cost, high-speed optical links ubiquitous. In this paper, we will provide an overview of several aspects of silicon photonics technology development in a CMOS fabrication line. First, we will describe fabrication strategies from the MEMS industry for micromachining silicon to create passive optical devices such as mirrors, waveguides, and facets, as well as alignment features. Second, we will discuss some of the challenges of fabricating hybrid III-V lasers on silicon, including such aspects as hybrid integration of InP-based materials with silicon using various bonding methods, etching of InP films, and contact formation using CMOS-compatible metals.

  12. High-speed growth of YBa2Cu3O7 - δ film with high critical temperature on MgO single crystal substrate by laser chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Pei; Ito, Akihiko; Tu, Rong; Goto, Takashi

    2010-12-01

    a-axis- and c-axis-oriented YBa2Cu3O7 - δ films were prepared on a (100) MgO single crystal substrate by chemical vapor deposition enhanced by a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser. A c-axis-oriented YBCO film with a critical temperature of 89 K was prepared at a high deposition rate of 57 µm h - 1, about 2-600 times higher than that of conventional chemical vapor deposition.

  13. High speed nanotechnology-based photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, Russell M.; Pradhan, Ranjit D.; Parfenov, Alexander V.; Holmstedt, Jason; Esterkin, Vladimir; Menon, Naresh; Aye, Tin M.; Chua, Kang-Bin; Schindler, Axel; Balandin, Alexander A.; Nichter, James E.

    2005-08-01

    An inexpensive, easily integrated, 40 Gbps photoreceiver operating in the communications band would revolutionize the telecommunications industry. While generation of 40 Gbps data is not difficult, its reception and decoding require specific technologies. We present a 40 Gbps photoreceiver that exceeds the capabilities of current devices. This photoreceiver is based on a technology we call "nanodust." This new technology enables nanoscale photodetectors to be embedded in matrices made from a different semiconductor, or directly integrated into a CMOS amplification circuit. Photoreceivers based on quantum dust technology can be designed to operate in any spectral region, including the telecommunications bands near 1.31 and 1.55 micrometers. This technology also lends itself to normal-incidence detection, enabling a large detector size with its associated increase in sensitivity, even at high speeds and reception wavelengths beyond the capability of silicon.

  14. Design of a high speed business transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The design of a High Speed Business Transport (HSBT) was considered by the Aeronautical Design Class during the academic year 1989 to 1990. The project was chosen to offer an opportunity to develop user friendliness for some computer codes such as WAVE DRAG, supplied by NASA/Langley, and to experiment with several design lessons developed by Dr. John McMasters and his colleages at Boeing. Central to these design lessons was an appeal to marketing and feasibility considerations. There was an emphasis upon simplified analytical techniques to study trades and to stimulate creative thinking before committing to extensive analytical activity. Two designs stood out among all the rest because of the depth of thought and consideration of alternatives. One design, the Aurora, used a fixed wing design to satisfy the design mission: the Viero used a swept wing configuration to overcome problems related to supersonic flight. A summary of each of these two designs is given.

  15. Development of a Revolutionary High Speed Spindle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agba, Emmanuel I.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the development of a hydraulic motor driven spindle system to be employed for high speed machining of composite materials and metals. The spindle system is conceived to be easily retrofitted into conventional milling machines. The need for the hydraulic spindle arises because of the limitations placed on conventional electric motor driven spindles by the low cutting power and the presence of vibrational phenomena associated with voltage frequency at high rotational speeds. Also, the electric motors are usually large and expensive when power requirements are moderately high. In contrast, hydraulic motor driven spindles promise a distinct increase in spindle life over the conventional electric motor driven spindles. In this report, existing technologies applicable to spindle holder for severe operating conditions were reviewed, conceptual designs of spindle holder system were developed and evaluated, and a detailed design of an acceptable concept was conducted. Finally, a rapid prototype of the design was produced for design evaluation.

  16. Technology needs for high-speed rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, John; Orourke, Matthew; Martin, Christopher; Lovenguth, Marc; Mitchell, Clark

    1991-01-01

    A study to determine the technology development required for high-speed rotorcraft development was conducted. The study begins with an initial assessment of six concepts capable of flight at, or greater than 450 knots with helicopter-like hover efficiency (disk loading less than 50 pfs). These concepts were sized and evaluated based on measures of effectiveness and operational considerations. Additionally, an initial assessment of the impact of technology advances on the vehicles attributes was made. From these initial concepts a tilt wing and rotor/wing concepts were selected for further evaluation. A more detailed examination of conversion and technology trade studies were conducted on these two vehicles, each sized for a different mission.

  17. HIGH SPEED KERR CELL FRAMING CAMERA

    DOEpatents

    Goss, W.C.; Gilley, L.F.

    1964-01-01

    The present invention relates to a high speed camera utilizing a Kerr cell shutter and a novel optical delay system having no moving parts. The camera can selectively photograph at least 6 frames within 9 x 10/sup -8/ seconds during any such time interval of an occurring event. The invention utilizes particularly an optical system which views and transmits 6 images of an event to a multi-channeled optical delay relay system. The delay relay system has optical paths of successively increased length in whole multiples of the first channel optical path length, into which optical paths the 6 images are transmitted. The successively delayed images are accepted from the exit of the delay relay system by an optical image focusing means, which in turn directs the images into a Kerr cell shutter disposed to intercept the image paths. A camera is disposed to simultaneously view and record the 6 images during a single exposure of the Kerr cell shutter. (AEC)

  18. High speed civil transport aerodynamic optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James S.

    1994-01-01

    This is a report of work in support of the Computational Aerosciences (CAS) element of the Federal HPCC program. Specifically, CFD and aerodynamic optimization are being performed on parallel computers. The long-range goal of this work is to facilitate teraflops-rate multidisciplinary optimization of aerospace vehicles. This year's work is targeted for application to the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), one of four CAS grand challenges identified in the HPCC FY 1995 Blue Book. This vehicle is to be a passenger aircraft, with the promise of cutting overseas flight time by more than half. To meet fuel economy, operational costs, environmental impact, noise production, and range requirements, improved design tools are required, and these tools must eventually integrate optimization, external aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, heat transfer, controls, and perhaps other disciplines. The fundamental goal of this project is to contribute to improved design tools for U.S. industry, and thus to the nation's economic competitiveness.

  19. Active control system for high speed windmills

    DOEpatents

    Avery, Don E.

    1988-01-01

    A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed.

  20. Merging of high speed argon plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Case, A.; Messer, S.; Brockington, S.; Wu, L.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Elton, R.

    2013-01-15

    Formation of an imploding plasma liner for the plasma liner experiment (PLX) requires individual plasma jets to merge into a quasi-spherical shell of plasma converging on the origin. Understanding dynamics of the merging process requires knowledge of the plasma phenomena involved. We present results from the study of the merging of three plasma jets in three dimensional geometry. The experiments were performed using HyperV Technologies Corp. 1 cm Minirailguns with a preionized argon plasma armature. The vacuum chamber partially reproduces the port geometry of the PLX chamber. Diagnostics include fast imaging, spectroscopy, interferometry, fast pressure probes, B-dot probes, and high speed spatially resolved photodiodes, permitting measurements of plasma density, temperature, velocity, stagnation pressure, magnetic field, and density gradients. These experimental results are compared with simulation results from the LSP 3D hybrid PIC code.

  1. Active control system for high speed windmills

    DOEpatents

    Avery, D.E.

    1988-01-12

    A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed. 4 figs.

  2. High-speed shutter for mirror cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimenko, Vladimir V.; Klimashin, V. P.; Drozhbin, Yu. A.

    1999-06-01

    High-speed mirror cameras are mainly used for investigations of quick processes in a wide spectral range of radiation including ultraviolet and infrared regions (from 0.2 to 11 micrometer). High-speed shutters for these cameras must be non-selective and when opened must transmit the whole radiation without refraction, absorption and scattering. Electromechanical, electrodynamic and induction-dynamic shutters possess such properties because their optical channels contain no medium. Electromechanical shutters are devices where the displacement of the working blind which opens or closes an aperture is produced by a spring. Such shutters are relatively slow and are capable of closing an aperture of 50 mm in diameter in 10 - 15 ms. Electrodynamic and induction-dynamic shutters are devices where displacement of a blind is produced by the electromagnetic interaction between circuits with electric currents. In induction-dynamic shutter the secondary circuit is current-conducting blind itself in which a short-circuited loop forms. The latter is more quick because of the lower mass of its moveable secondary circuit. For this reason induction-dynamic shutters with a flat primary circuit coil and a tightly fitted to it load- bearing aluminum plate have been investigated. The blind which opens or closes an aperture was attached to this plate. The dependencies of cut-off time on the form, size and the number of turns of the primary circuit coil, on size, type of material, thickness and weight of the load-bearing plate and the blind, as well as on capacitance in the discharge circuit and the capacitor voltage have been investigated. The influence of the environmental atmosphere on the cut-off time was also studied. For this purpose the shutter was placed into the chamber where vacuum up to 10- atm could be produced. As a result the values of the above mentioned parameters have been optimized and the designs of the shutters which are shown have been developed.

  3. Computation of high-speed reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clutter, James Keith

    A computational study has been conducted for high-speed reacting flows relevant to munition problems, including shock-induced combustion and gun muzzle blast. The theoretical model considers inviscid and viscous flows, multi-species, finite rate chemical reaction schemes, and turbulence. Both the physical and numerical aspects are investigated to determine their impact on simulation accuracy. A range of hydrogen and oxygen reaction mechanisms are evaluated for the shock-induced combustion flow scenario. Characteristics of the mechanisms such as the induction time, heat release rate, and second explosion limit are found to impact the accuracy of the computation. On the numerical side, reaction source term treatments, including logarithmic weighting and scaling modifications, are investigated to determine their effectiveness in addressing numerical errors caused by disparate length scales between chemical reactions and fluid dynamics. It is demonstrated that these techniques can enhance solution accuracy. Computations of shock-induced combustion have also been performed using a κ-ɛ model to account for the turbulent transport of species and heat. An algebraic model of the temperature fluctuations has been used to estimate the impact of the turbulent effect on the chemical reaction source terms. The turbulence effects when represented with the current models are found to be minimal in the shock-induced combustion flow investigated in the present work. For the gun system simulations, computations for both a large caliber howitzer and small caliber firearms are carried out. A reduced kinetic scheme and an algebraic turbulence model are employed. The present approach, which accounts for the chemical reaction aspects of the gun muzzle blast problem, is found to improve the prediction of peak overpressures and can capture the effects produced by small caliber firearm sound suppressors. The present study has established the numerical and physical requirements for

  4. TOPICAL REVIEW: Plasmas in high speed aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bletzinger, P.; Ganguly, B. N.; Van Wie, D.; Garscadden, A.

    2005-02-01

    A review is presented of the studies in the former Soviet Union and in the USA of the mutual interactions of plasmas and high speed flows and shocks. There are reports from as early as the 1980s of large changes in the standoff distance ahead of a blunt body in ballistic tunnels, significantly reduced drag and modifications of travelling shocks in bounded weakly ionized gases. Energy addition to the flow results in an increase in the local sound speed that leads to expected modifications of the flow and changes to the pressure distribution around a vehicle due to the decrease in local Mach number. The critical question was, did a plasma provide a significant energy multiplier for the system? There have been a large number of experimental studies on the influence of a weakly ionized plasma on relatively low Mach number shocks and inherently also on the influence of the shock on the plasma. This literature is reviewed and illustrated with representative examples. The convergence through more controlled experiments and improved modelling to a physics understanding of the effects being essentially due to heating is outlined. It is demonstrated that the heating in many cases is global; however, tailored experiments with positive columns, dielectric barrier discharges and focused microwave plasmas can produce very localized heating. The latter appears more attractive for energy efficiency in flow control. Tailored localized ionization and thermal effects are also of interest for high speed inlet shock control and for producing reliable ignition for short residence time combustors, and work in these areas is also reviewed.

  5. High-Speed, Three Dimensional Object Composition Mapping Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, M Y

    2001-02-14

    This document overviews an entirely new approach to determining the composition--the chemical-elemental, isotopic and molecular make-up--of complex, highly structured objects, moreover with microscopic spatial resolution in all 3 dimensions. The front cover depicts the new type of pulsed laser system at the heart of this novel technology under adjustment by Alexis Wynne, and schematically indicates two of its early uses: swiftly analyzing the 3-D composition governed structure of a transistor circuit with both optical and mass-spectrometric detectors, and of fossilized dinosaur and turtle bones high-speed probed by optical detection means. Studying the composition-cued 3-D micro-structures of advanced composite materials and the microscopic scale composition-texture of biological tissues are two near-term examples of the rich spectrum of novel applications enabled by this field-opening analytic tool-set.

  6. High-speed coherent Raman fingerprint imaging of biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Charles H., Jr.; Lee, Young Jong; Heddleston, John M.; Hartshorn, Christopher M.; Walker, Angela R. Hight; Rich, Jeremy N.; Lathia, Justin D.; Cicerone, Marcus T.

    2014-08-01

    An imaging platform based on broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering has been developed that provides an advantageous combination of speed, sensitivity and spectral breadth. The system utilizes a configuration of laser sources that probes the entire biologically relevant Raman window (500-3,500 cm-1) with high resolution (<10 cm-1). It strongly and efficiently stimulates Raman transitions within the typically weak ‘fingerprint’ region using intrapulse three-colour excitation, and utilizes the non-resonant background to heterodyne-amplify weak Raman signals. We demonstrate high-speed chemical imaging in two- and three-dimensional views of healthy murine liver and pancreas tissues as well as interfaces between xenograft brain tumours and the surrounding healthy brain matter.

  7. Butterflies' wings deformations using high speed digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando; Aguayo, Daniel D.; de La Torre-Ibarra, Manuel H.; Salas-Araiza, Manuel D.

    2011-08-01

    A variety of efforts in different scientific disciplines have tried to mimic the insect's in-flight complex system. The gained knowledge has been applied to improve the performance of different flying artifacts. In this research report it is presented a displacement measurement on butterflies' wings using the optical noninvasive Digital Holographic Interferometry technique with out of plane sensitivity, using a high power cw laser and a high speed CMOS camera to record the unrepeatable displacement movements on these organic tissues. A series of digital holographic interferograms were recorded and the experimental results for several butterflies during flapping events. The relative unwrapped phase maps micro-displacements over the whole wing surface are shown in a wire-mesh representation. The difference between flying modes is remarkably depicted among them.

  8. Simple high-speed confocal line-scanning microscope.

    PubMed

    Im, Kang-Bin; Han, Sumin; Park, Hwajoon; Kim, Dongsun; Kim, Beop-Min

    2005-06-27

    Using a line scan camera and an acousto-optic deflector (AOD), we constructed a high-speed confocal laser line-scanning microscope that can generate confocal images (512 x 512 pixels) with up to 191 frames/s without any mechanically moving parts. The line scanner consists of an AOD and a cylindrical lens, which creates a line focus sweeping over the sample. The measured resolutions in z (depth), x (perpendicular to line focus), and y (direction of line focus) directions are 3.3 mum, 0.7 mum and 0.9 mum, respectively, with a 50x objective lens. This confocal microscope may be useful for analyzing fast phenomena during biological and chemical interactions and for fast 3D image reconstruction.

  9. MEMS high-speed angular-position sensing system with rf wireless transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Winston; Li, Wen J.

    2001-08-01

    A novel surface-micromachined non-contact high-speed angular-position sensor with total surface area under 4mm2 was developed using the Multi-User MEMS Processes (MUMPs) and integrated with a commercial RF transmitter at 433MHz carrier frequency for wireless signal detection. Currently, a 2.3 MHz internal clock of our data acquisition system and a sensor design with a 13mg seismic mass is sufficient to provide visual observation of a clear sinusoidal response wirelessly generated by the piezoresistive angular-position sensing system within speed range of 180 rpm to around 1000 rpm. Experimental results showed that the oscillation frequency and amplitude are related to the input angular frequency of the rotation disk and the tilt angle of the rotation axis, respectively. These important results could provide groundwork for MEMS researchers to estimate how gravity influences structural properties of MEMS devices under different circumstances.

  10. High-speed Particle Image Velocimetry Near Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Louise; Sick, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Multi-dimensional and transient flows play a key role in many areas of science, engineering, and health sciences but are often not well understood. The complex nature of these flows may be studied using particle image velocimetry (PIV), a laser-based imaging technique for optically accessible flows. Though many forms of PIV exist that extend the technique beyond the original planar two-component velocity measurement capabilities, the basic PIV system consists of a light source (laser), a camera, tracer particles, and analysis algorithms. The imaging and recording parameters, the light source, and the algorithms are adjusted to optimize the recording for the flow of interest and obtain valid velocity data. Common PIV investigations measure two-component velocities in a plane at a few frames per second. However, recent developments in instrumentation have facilitated high-frame rate (> 1 kHz) measurements capable of resolving transient flows with high temporal resolution. Therefore, high-frame rate measurements have enabled investigations on the evolution of the structure and dynamics of highly transient flows. These investigations play a critical role in understanding the fundamental physics of complex flows. A detailed description for performing high-resolution, high-speed planar PIV to study a transient flow near the surface of a flat plate is presented here. Details for adjusting the parameter constraints such as image and recording properties, the laser sheet properties, and processing algorithms to adapt PIV for any flow of interest are included. PMID:23851899

  11. High Speed Analysis Of Free Flights With A Parabolic Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Scharring, Stefan; Eckel, Hans-Albert; Roeser, Hans-Peter

    2010-05-06

    A laser-based rangefinder with high temporal resolution, synchronized with a laser burst, is employed for fast on-site analysis of pulsed free flights. Additional high speed recordings from two different angles of view allow for full 3D-reconstruction of the trajectory and calibration of the rangefinder data. This reveals the whole dynamics of the flyer including the lateral and angular impulse coupling components as well as information on the detonation process. The employment of an ignition pin enhances the reproducibility of the momentum coupling due to a more reliable plasma ignition during the flight. The impact of initial lateral offset is studied and shows beam-riding properties of the parabolic craft within a small range. Back-driving forces are derived and compared with the theoretical model. The flight stability is evaluated with respect to the minimization and compensation of the lateral and angular momentum in a hovering experiment. Stable laser acceleration ranges up to 3 m altitude. Ballistic free flights close to the laboratory ceiling at 7.8 m are reported.

  12. Measurements of speed of response of high-speed visible and IR optical detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, H. E.; Osmundson, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A technique for measuring speed of response of high speed visible and IR optical detectors to mode-locked Nd:YAG laser pulses is described. Results of measurements of response times of four detectors are presented. Three detectors that can be used as receivers in a 500-MHz optical communication system are tested.

  13. A prototype high-speed optically-steered X-band phased array antenna.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pengfei; Tang, Suning; Raible, Daniel E

    2013-12-30

    We develop a prototype of optically-steered X-band phased array antenna with capabilities of multi-band and multi-beam operations. It exploits high-speed wavelength tunable lasers for optical true-time delays over a dispersive optical fiber link, enabling agile, broadband and vibration-free RF beam steering with large angle.

  14. Cryogenic, high speed, turbopump bearing cooling requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, Fred J.; Gibson, Howard G.; Cannon, James L.; Cody, Joe C.

    1988-01-01

    Although the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) has repeatedly demonstrated the capability to perform during launch, the High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP) main shaft bearings have not met their 7.5 hour life requirement. A tester is being employed to provide the capability of subjecting full scale bearings and seals to speeds, loads, propellants, temperatures, and pressures which simulate engine operating conditions. The tester design permits much more elaborate instrumentation and diagnostics than could be accommodated in an SSME turbopump. Tests were made to demonstrate the facilities; and the devices' capabilities, to verify the instruments in its operating environment and to establish a performance baseline for the flight type SSME HPOTP Turbine Bearing design. Bearing performance data from tests are being utilized to generate: (1) a high speed, cryogenic turbopump bearing computer mechanical model, and (2) a much improved, very detailed thermal model to better understand bearing internal operating conditions. Parametric tests were also made to determine the effects of speed, axial loads, coolant flow rate, and surface finish degradation on bearing performance.

  15. Sensor study for high speed autonomous operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Anne; La Celle, Zachary; Lacaze, Alberto; Murphy, Karl; Del Giorno, Mark; Close, Ryan

    2015-06-01

    As robotic ground systems advance in capabilities and begin to fulfill new roles in both civilian and military life, the limitation of slow operational speed has become a hindrance to the wide-spread adoption of these systems. For example, military convoys are reluctant to employ autonomous vehicles when these systems slow their movement from 60 miles per hour down to 40. However, these autonomous systems must operate at these lower speeds due to the limitations of the sensors they employ. Robotic Research, with its extensive experience in ground autonomy and associated problems therein, in conjunction with CERDEC/Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD), has performed a study to specify system and detection requirements; determined how current autonomy sensors perform in various scenarios; and analyzed how sensors should be employed to increase operational speeds of ground vehicles. The sensors evaluated in this study include the state of the art in LADAR/LIDAR, Radar, Electro-Optical, and Infrared sensors, and have been analyzed at high speeds to study their effectiveness in detecting and accounting for obstacles and other perception challenges. By creating a common set of testing benchmarks, and by testing in a wide range of real-world conditions, Robotic Research has evaluated where sensors can be successfully employed today; where sensors fall short; and which technologies should be examined and developed further. This study is the first step to achieve the overarching goal of doubling ground vehicle speeds on any given terrain.

  16. High speed curved position sensitive detector

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Robert W.; Wilson, Jack W.

    1989-01-01

    A high speed curved position sensitive porportional counter detector for use in x-ray diffraction, the detection of 5-20 keV photons and the like. The detector employs a planar anode assembly of a plurality of parallel metallic wires. This anode assembly is supported between two cathode planes, with at least one of these cathode planes having a serpentine resistive path in the form of a meander having legs generally perpendicular to the anode wires. This meander is produced by special microelectronic fabrication techniques whereby the meander "wire" fans outwardly at the cathode ends to produce the curved aspect of the detector, and the legs of the meander are small in cross-section and very closely spaced whereby a spatial resolution of about 50 .mu.m can be achieved. All of the other performance characteristics are about as good or better than conventional position sensitive proportional counter type detectors. Count rates of up to 40,000 counts per second with 0.5 .mu.s shaping time constants are achieved.

  17. High speed point derivative microseismic detector

    DOEpatents

    Uhl, James Eugene; Warpinski, Norman Raymond; Whetten, Ernest Blayne

    1998-01-01

    A high speed microseismic event detector constructed in accordance with the present invention uses a point derivative comb to quickly and accurately detect microseismic events. Compressional and shear waves impinging upon microseismic receiver stations disposed to collect waves are converted into digital data and analyzed using a point derivative comb including assurance of quiet periods prior to declaration of microseismic events. If a sufficient number of quiet periods have passed, the square of a two point derivative of the incoming digital signal is compared to a trip level threshold exceeding the determined noise level to declare a valid trial event. The squaring of the derivative emphasizes the differences between noise and signal, and the valid event is preferably declared when the trip threshold has been exceeded over a temporal comb width to realize a comb over a given time period. Once a trial event has been declared, the event is verified through a spatial comb, which applies the temporal event comb to additional stations. The detector according to the present invention quickly and accurately detects initial compressional waves indicative of a microseismic event which typically exceed the ambient cultural noise level by a small amount, and distinguishes the waves from subsequent larger amplitude shear waves.

  18. High speed point derivative microseismic detector

    DOEpatents

    Uhl, J.E.; Warpinski, N.R.; Whetten, E.B.

    1998-06-30

    A high speed microseismic event detector constructed in accordance with the present invention uses a point derivative comb to quickly and accurately detect microseismic events. Compressional and shear waves impinging upon microseismic receiver stations disposed to collect waves are converted into digital data and analyzed using a point derivative comb including assurance of quiet periods prior to declaration of microseismic events. If a sufficient number of quiet periods have passed, the square of a two point derivative of the incoming digital signal is compared to a trip level threshold exceeding the determined noise level to declare a valid trial event. The squaring of the derivative emphasizes the differences between noise and signal, and the valid event is preferably declared when the trip threshold has been exceeded over a temporal comb width to realize a comb over a given time period. Once a trial event has been declared, the event is verified through a spatial comb, which applies the temporal event comb to additional stations. The detector according to the present invention quickly and accurately detects initial compressional waves indicative of a microseismic event which typically exceed the ambient cultural noise level by a small amount, and distinguishes the waves from subsequent larger amplitude shear waves. 9 figs.

  19. Technology needs for high speed rotorcraft (3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detore, Jack; Conway, Scott

    1991-01-01

    The spectrum of vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) type aircraft is examined to determine which aircraft are most likely to achieve high subsonic cruise speeds and have hover qualities similar to a helicopter. Two civil mission profiles are considered: a 600-n.mi. mission for a 15- and a 30-passenger payload. Applying current technology, only the 15- and 30-passenger tiltfold aircraft are capable of attaining the 450-knot design goal. The two tiltfold aircraft at 450 knots and a 30-passenger tiltrotor at 375 knots were further developed for the Task II technology analysis. A program called High-Speed Total Envelope Proprotor (HI-STEP) is recommended to meet several of these issues based on the tiltrotor concept. A program called Tiltfold System (TFS) is recommended based on the tiltrotor concept. A task is identified to resolve the best design speed from productivity and demand considerations based on the technology that emerges from the recommended programs. HI-STEP's goals are to investigate propulsive efficiency, maneuver loads, and aeroelastic stability. Programs currently in progress that may meet the other technology needs include the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) (NASA Lewis) and the Advanced Structural Concepts Program funded through NASA Langley.

  20. High speed multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Fereidouni, Farzad; Reitsma, Keimpe; Gerritsen, Hans C

    2013-05-20

    We report a spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging system based on time gated single photon detection with a fixed gate width of 200 ps and 7 spectral channels. Time gated systems can operate at high count rates but usually have large gate widths and sample only part of the fluorescence decay curve. In the system presented in this work, the fluorescence signal is sampled using a high speed transceiver. An error analysis is carried out to characterize the performance of both lifetime and spectral detection. The effect of gate width and spectral channel width on the accuracy of estimated lifetimes and spectral widths is described. The performance of the whole instrument is evaluated at count rates of up to 12 MHz. Accurate fluorescence lifetimes (error < 2%) are recorded at count rates as high as 5 MHz. This is limited by the PMT performance, not by the electronics. Analysis of the large spectral lifetime image sets is challenging and time-consuming. Here, we demonstrate the use of lifetime and spectral phasors for analyzing images of fibroblast cells with 2 different labeled components. The phasor approach provides a fast and intuitive way of analyzing the results of spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging experiments.

  1. CMOS Image Sensors for High Speed Applications

    PubMed Central

    El-Desouki, Munir; Deen, M. Jamal; Fang, Qiyin; Liu, Louis; Tse, Frances; Armstrong, David

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in deep submicron CMOS technologies and improved pixel designs have enabled CMOS-based imagers to surpass charge-coupled devices (CCD) imaging technology for mainstream applications. The parallel outputs that CMOS imagers can offer, in addition to complete camera-on-a-chip solutions due to being fabricated in standard CMOS technologies, result in compelling advantages in speed and system throughput. Since there is a practical limit on the minimum pixel size (4∼5 μm) due to limitations in the optics, CMOS technology scaling can allow for an increased number of transistors to be integrated into the pixel to improve both detection and signal processing. Such smart pixels truly show the potential of CMOS technology for imaging applications allowing CMOS imagers to achieve the image quality and global shuttering performance necessary to meet the demands of ultrahigh-speed applications. In this paper, a review of CMOS-based high-speed imager design is presented and the various implementations that target ultrahigh-speed imaging are described. This work also discusses the design, layout and simulation results of an ultrahigh acquisition rate CMOS active-pixel sensor imager that can take 8 frames at a rate of more than a billion frames per second (fps). PMID:22389609

  2. High-speed Civil Transport Aircraft Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miake-Lye, Richard C.; Matulaitis, J. A.; Krause, F. H.; Dodds, Willard J.; Albers, Martin; Hourmouziadis, J.; Hasel, K. L.; Lohmann, R. P.; Stander, C.; Gerstle, John H.

    1992-01-01

    Estimates are given for the emissions from a proposed high speed civil transport (HSCT). This advanced technology supersonic aircraft would fly in the lower stratosphere at a speed of roughly Mach 1.6 to 3.2 (470 to 950 m/sec or 920 to 1850 knots). Because it would fly in the stratosphere at an altitude in the range of 15 to 23 km commensurate with its design speed, its exhaust effluents could perturb the chemical balance in the upper atmosphere. The first step in determining the nature and magnitude of any chemical changes in the atmosphere resulting from these proposed aircraft is to identify and quantify the chemically important species they emit. Relevant earlier work is summarized, dating back to the Climatic Impact Assessment Program of the early 1970s and current propulsion research efforts. Estimates are provided of the chemical composition of an HSCT's exhaust, and these emission indices are presented. Other aircraft emissions that are not due to combustion processes are also summarized; these emissions are found to be much smaller than the exhaust emissions. Future advances in propulsion technology, in experimental measurement techniques, and in understanding upper atmospheric chemistry may affect these estimates of the amounts of trace exhaust species or their relative importance.

  3. High Speed Fibre Optic Backbone LAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Masaaki; Hara, Shingo; Kajita, Yuji; Kashu, Fumitoshi; Ikeuchi, Masaru; Hagihara, Satoshi; Tsuzuki, Shinji

    1987-09-01

    Our firm has developed the SUMINET-4100 series, a fibre optic local area network (LAN), to serve the communications system trunk line needs for facilities, such as steel refineries, automobile plants and university campuses, that require large transmission capacity, and for the backbone networks used in intelligent building systems. The SUMINET-4100 series is already in service in various fields of application. Of the networks available in this series, the SUMINET-4150 has a trunk line speed of 128 Mbps and the multiplexer used for time division multiplexing (TDM) was enabled by designing an ECL-TTL gate array (3000 gates) based custom LSI. The synchronous, full-duplex V.24 and V.3.5 interfaces (SUMINET-2100) are provided for use with general purpose lines. And the IBM token ring network, the SUMINET-3200, designed for heterogeneous PCs and the Ethernet can all be connected to sub loops. Further, the IBM 3270 TCA and 5080 CADAM can be connected in the local mode. Interfaces are also provided for the NTT high-speed digital service, the digital PBX systems, and the Video CODEC system. The built-in loop monitor (LM) and network supervisory processor (NSP) provide management of loop utilization and send loop status signals to the host CPU's network configuration and control facility (NCCF). These built-in functions allow both the computer system and LAN to be managed from a single source at the host. This paper outlines features of the SUMINET-4150 and provides an example of its installation.

  4. 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (HST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    Semi-automatic readout equipment installed in the 1950s used for data recording and reduction in the 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (HST). A 1957 NACA report on wind tunnel facilities at Langley included these comments on the data recording and reduction equipment for the 8-foot HST: 'The data recording and reduction equipment used for handling steady force and pressure information at the Langley 8-foot transonic tunnel is similar to that described for the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel. Very little dynamic data recording equipment, however, is available.' The description of the 16-foot transonic tunnel equipment is as follows: 'A semiautomatic force data readout system provides tabulated raw data and punch card storage of raw data concurrent with the operation of the wind tunnel. Provision is made for 12 automatic channels of strain gage-data output, and eight channels of four-digit manually operated inputs are available for tabulating and punching constants, configuration codes, and other information necessary for data reduction and identification. The data are then processed on electronic computing machines to obtain the desired coefficients. These coefficients and their proper identification are then machine tabulated to provide a printed record of the results. The punched cards may also be fed into an automatic plotting device for the preparation of plots necessary for data analysis.'

  5. High speed exhaust gas recirculation valve

    SciTech Connect

    Fensom, Rod; Kidder, David J.

    2005-01-18

    In order to minimize pollutants such as Nox, internal combustion engines typically include an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve that can be used to redirect a portion of exhaust gases to an intake conduit, such as an intake manifold, so that the redirected exhaust gases will be recycled. It is desirable to have an EGR valve with fast-acting capabilities, and it is also desirable to have the EGR valve take up as little space as possible. An exhaust gas recirculation valve is provided that includes an exhaust passage tube, a valve element pivotally mounted within the exhaust passage tube, a linear actuator; and a gear train. The gear train includes a rack gear operatively connected to the linear actuator, and at least one rotatable gear meshing with the rack gear and operatively connected to the valve element to cause rotation of the valve element upon actuation of the linear actuator. The apparatus provides a highly compact package having a high-speed valve actuation capability.

  6. Exhaust emissions from high speed passenger ferries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, D. A.

    Exhaust emission measurements have been carried out on-board three high-speed passenger ferries (A, B and C) during normal service routes. Ship A was powered by conventional, medium-speed, marine diesel engines, Ship B by gas turbine engines and Ship C conventional, medium-speed, marine diesel engines equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems for NO x abatement. All ships had similar auxiliary engines (marine diesels) for generating electric power on-board. Real-world emission factors of NOx, SO2, CO, CO 2, NMVOC, CH4, N2O, NH3, PM and PAH at steady-state engine loads and for complete voyages were determined together with an estimate of annual emissions. In general, Ship B using gas turbines showed favourable NO x, PM and PAH emissions but at the expense of higher fuel consumption and CO 2 emissions. Ship C with the SCR had the lowest NO x emissions but highest NH 3 emissions especially during harbour approaches and stops. The greatest PM and PAH specific emissions were measured from auxiliary engines operating at low engine loads during harbour stops. Since all ships used a low-sulphur gas oil, SO 2 emissions were relatively low in all cases.

  7. Material constraints on high-speed design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucur, Diana; Militaru, Nicolae

    2015-02-01

    Current high-speed circuit designs with signal rates up to 100Gbps and above are implying constraints for dielectric and conductive materials and their dependence of frequency, for component elements and for production processes. The purpose of this paper is to highlight through various simulation results the frequency dependence of specific parameters like insertion and return loss, eye diagrams, group delay that are part of signal integrity analyses type. In low-power environment designs become more complex as the operation frequency increases. The need for new materials with spatial uniformity for dielectric constant is a need for higher data rates circuits. The fiber weave effect (FWE) will be analyzed through the eye diagram results for various dielectric materials in a differential signaling scheme given the fact that the FWE is a phenomenon that affects randomly the performance of the circuit on balanced/differential transmission lines which are typically characterized through the above mentioned approaches. Crosstalk between traces is also of concern due to propagated signals that have tight rise and fall times or due to high density of the boards. Criteria should be considered to achieve maximum performance of the designed system requiring critical electronic properties.

  8. CMOS Image Sensors for High Speed Applications.

    PubMed

    El-Desouki, Munir; Deen, M Jamal; Fang, Qiyin; Liu, Louis; Tse, Frances; Armstrong, David

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in deep submicron CMOS technologies and improved pixel designs have enabled CMOS-based imagers to surpass charge-coupled devices (CCD) imaging technology for mainstream applications. The parallel outputs that CMOS imagers can offer, in addition to complete camera-on-a-chip solutions due to being fabricated in standard CMOS technologies, result in compelling advantages in speed and system throughput. Since there is a practical limit on the minimum pixel size (4∼5 μm) due to limitations in the optics, CMOS technology scaling can allow for an increased number of transistors to be integrated into the pixel to improve both detection and signal processing. Such smart pixels truly show the potential of CMOS technology for imaging applications allowing CMOS imagers to achieve the image quality and global shuttering performance necessary to meet the demands of ultrahigh-speed applications. In this paper, a review of CMOS-based high-speed imager design is presented and the various implementations that target ultrahigh-speed imaging are described. This work also discusses the design, layout and simulation results of an ultrahigh acquisition rate CMOS active-pixel sensor imager that can take 8 frames at a rate of more than a billion frames per second (fps).

  9. High speed image correlation for vibration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, T.; Wood, R.; Splitthof, K.

    2009-08-01

    Digital speckle correlation techniques have already been successfully proven to be an accurate displacement analysis tool for a wide range of applications. With the use of two cameras, three dimensional measurements of contours and displacements can be carried out. With a simple setup it opens a wide range of applications. Rapid new developments in the field of digital imaging and computer technology opens further applications for these measurement methods to high speed deformation and strain analysis, e.g. in the fields of material testing, fracture mechanics, advanced materials and component testing. The high resolution of the deformation measurements in space and time opens a wide range of applications for vibration analysis of objects. Since the system determines the absolute position and displacements of the object in space, it is capable of measuring high amplitudes and even objects with rigid body movements. The absolute resolution depends on the field of view and is scalable. Calibration of the optical setup is a crucial point which will be discussed in detail. Examples of the analysis of harmonic vibration and transient events from material research and industrial applications are presented. The results show typical features of the system.

  10. The high speed civil transport and NASA's High Speed Research (HSR) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    Ongoing studies being conducted not only in this country but in Europe and Asia suggest that a second generation supersonic transport, or High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), could become an important part of the 21st century international air transportation system. However, major environmental compatibility and economic viability issues must be resolved if the HSCT is to become a reality. This talk will overview the NASA High-Speed Research (HSR) program which is aimed at providing the U.S. industry with a technology base to allow them to consider launching an HSCT program early in the next century. The talk will also discuss some of the comparable activities going on within Europe and Japan.

  11. Development of high-speed balancing technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuth, R.; Zorzi, E.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation into laser material removal showed that laser burns act in a manner typical of mechanical stress raisers causing a reduction in fatigue strength; the fatigue strength is lowered relative to the smooth specimen fatigue strength. Laser-burn zones were studied for four materials: Alloy Steel 4340, Stainless Steel 17-4 PH, Inconel 718, and Aluminum Alloy 6061-T6. Calculations were made of stress concentration factors K, for laser-burn grooves of each material type. A comparison was then made to experimentally determine the fatigue strength reduction factor. These calculations and comparisons indicated that, except for the 17-4 PH material, good agreement (a ratio of close to 1.0) existed between Kt and Kf. The performance of the 17-4 PH material has been attributed to early crack initiation due to the lower fatigue resistance of the soft, unaged laser-affected zone. Also covered in this report is the development, implementation, and testing of an influence coefficient approach to balancing a long, slender shaft under applied-torque conditions. Excellent correlation existed between the analytically predicted results and those data obtained from testing.

  12. High-Speed Data Recorder for Space, Geodesy, and Other High-Speed Recording Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taveniku, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    A high-speed data recorder and replay equipment has been developed for reliable high-data-rate recording to disk media. It solves problems with slow or faulty disks, multiple disk insertions, high-altitude operation, reliable performance using COTS hardware, and long-term maintenance and upgrade path challenges. The current generation data recor - ders used within the VLBI community are aging, special-purpose machines that are both slow (do not meet today's requirements) and are very expensive to maintain and operate. Furthermore, they are not easily upgraded to take advantage of commercial technology development, and are not scalable to multiple 10s of Gbit/s data rates required by new applications. The innovation provides a softwaredefined, high-speed data recorder that is scalable with technology advances in the commercial space. It maximally utilizes current technologies without being locked to a particular hardware platform. The innovation also provides a cost-effective way of streaming large amounts of data from sensors to disk, enabling many applications to store raw sensor data and perform post and signal processing offline. This recording system will be applicable to many applications needing realworld, high-speed data collection, including electronic warfare, softwaredefined radar, signal history storage of multispectral sensors, development of autonomous vehicles, and more.

  13. High performing micromachined retroreflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundvall, Axel; Nikolajeff, Fredrik; Lindstrom, Tomas

    2003-10-01

    This paper reports on the realization of a type of micromachined retroreflecting sheeting material. The geometry presented has high reflection efficiency even at large incident angles, and it can be manufactured through polymer replication techniques. The paper consists of two parts: A theoretical section outlining the design parameters and their impact on the optical performance, and secondly, an experimental part comprising both manufacturing and optical evaluation for a candidate retroreflecting sheet material in traffic control devices. Experimental data show that the retroreflecting properties are promising. The retroreflector consists of a front layer of densely packed spherical microlenses, a back surface of densely packed spherical micromirrors, and a transparent spacer layer. The thickness of the spacer layer determines in part the optical characteristics of the retroreflector.

  14. Micromachined electrode array

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    2007-12-11

    An electrode array is disclosed which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array, in certain embodiments, can include a plurality of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. In other embodiments of the electrode array, the electrodes can be fixed to the substrate. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, and can include electrode tips having an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis.

  15. High-speed line scanning confocal microscope for biological imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Chang-Keun; Ju, Sung-Bin; Cho, Yong-Jin; Jeong, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Beop-Min

    2007-02-01

    We constructed a high-speed laser line-scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) using He-Ne laser (633 nm), a line CCD camera, and an acousto-optic deflector (AOD). The line scanner consists of an AOD and a cylindrical lens, which create a line focus sweeping over the sample. The line scanner generates two-dimensional confocal images (512× 512 pixel image) up to 191 frames per second with no mechanically-moving parts. This system is configured as an inverted microscope for imaging biological organisms or tissues. Images of various biological samples were obtained including rabbit cornea, onion cells, mouse melanoma tumor cells (B16BL6), and human breast tumor cells (BT-20). The frame rate may be further improved up to over 700 frames per second when the image size is reduced (512×128 pixel image). This system may be useful for analyzing fast phenomena during biological and chemical interactions and for imaging 3D structures rapidly.

  16. High-speed frequency-domain terahertz coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Yahng, Ji Sang; Park, Choon-Su; Lee, Hwi Don; Kim, Chang-Seok; Yee, Dae-Su

    2016-01-25

    High-speed frequency-domain terahertz (THz) coherence tomography is demonstrated using frequency sweeping of continuous-wave THz radiation and beam steering. For axial scanning, THz frequency sweeping with a kHz sweep rate and a THz sweep range is executed using THz photomixing with an optical beat source consisting of a wavelength-swept laser and a distributed feedback laser diode. During the frequency sweep, frequency-domain THz interferograms are measured using coherent homodyne detection employing signal averaging for noise reduction and used as axial-scan data via fast Fourier transform. Axial-scan data are acquired while scanning a transverse range of 100 × 100 mm(2) by use of a THz beam scanner with moving neither sample nor THz transmitter/receiver unit. It takes 100 s to acquire axial-scan data for 100 × 100 points with 5 averaged traces at a sweep rate of 1 kHz. THz tomographic images of a glass fiber reinforced polymer sample with artificial internal defects are presented, acquired using the tomography system.

  17. Photodetector having high speed and sensitivity

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention provides a photodetector having an advantageous combination of sensitivity and speed; it has a high sensitivity while retaining high speed. In a preferred embodiment, visible light is detected, but in some embodiments, x-rays can be detected, and in other embodiments infrared can be detected. The present invention comprises a photodetector having an active layer, and a recombination layer. The active layer has a surface exposed to light to be detected, and comprises a semiconductor, having a bandgap graded so that carriers formed due to interaction of the active layer with the incident radiation tend to be swept away from the exposed surface. The graded semiconductor material in the active layer preferably comprises Al.sub.1-x Ga.sub.x As. An additional sub-layer of graded In.sub.1-y Ga.sub.y As may be included between the Al.sub.1-x Ga.sub.x As layer and the recombination layer. The recombination layer comprises a semiconductor material having a short recombination time such as a defective GaAs layer grown in a low temperature process. The recombination layer is positioned adjacent to the active layer so that carriers from the active layer tend to be swept into the recombination layer. In an embodiment, the photodetector may comprise one or more additional layers stacked below the active and recombination layers. These additional layers may include another active layer and another recombination layer to absorb radiation not absorbed while passing through the first layers. A photodetector having a stacked configuration may have enhanced sensitivity and responsiveness at selected wavelengths such as infrared.

  18. High Speed/ Low Effluent Process for Ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    M. Clark Dale

    2006-10-30

    n this project, BPI demonstrated a new ethanol fermentation technology, termed the High Speed/ Low Effluent (HS/LE) process on both lab and large pilot scale as it would apply to wet mill and/or dry mill corn ethanol production. The HS/LE process allows very rapid fermentations, with 18 to 22% sugar syrups converted to 9 to 11% ethanol ‘beers’ in 6 to 12 hours using either a ‘consecutive batch’ or ‘continuous cascade’ implementation. This represents a 5 to 8X increase in fermentation speeds over conventional 72 hour batch fermentations which are the norm in the fuel ethanol industry today. The ‘consecutive batch’ technology was demonstrated on a large pilot scale (4,800 L) in a dry mill corn ethanol plant near Cedar Rapids, IA (Xethanol Biofuels). The pilot demonstrated that 12 hour fermentations can be accomplished on an industrial scale in a non-sterile industrial environment. Other objectives met in this project included development of a Low Energy (LE) Distillation process which reduces the energy requirements for distillation from about 14,000 BTU/gal steam ($0.126/gal with natural gas @ $9.00 MCF) to as low as 0.40 KW/gal electrical requirements ($0.022/gal with electricity @ $0.055/KWH). BPI also worked on the development of processes that would allow application of the HS/LE fermentation process to dry mill ethanol plants. A High-Value Corn ethanol plant concept was developed to produce 1) corn germ/oil, 2) corn bran, 3) ethanol, 4) zein protein, and 5) nutritional protein, giving multiple higher value products from the incoming corn stream.

  19. High Speed Dynamics in Brittle Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiermaier, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Brittle Materials under High Speed and Shock loading provide a continuous challenge in experimental physics, analysis and numerical modelling, and consequently for engineering design. The dependence of damage and fracture processes on material-inherent length and time scales, the influence of defects, rate-dependent material properties and inertia effects on different scales make their understanding a true multi-scale problem. In addition, it is not uncommon that materials show a transition from ductile to brittle behavior when the loading rate is increased. A particular case is spallation, a brittle tensile failure induced by the interaction of stress waves leading to a sudden change from compressive to tensile loading states that can be invoked in various materials. This contribution highlights typical phenomena occurring when brittle materials are exposed to high loading rates in applications such as blast and impact on protective structures, or meteorite impact on geological materials. A short review on experimental methods that are used for dynamic characterization of brittle materials will be given. A close interaction of experimental analysis and numerical simulation has turned out to be very helpful in analyzing experimental results. For this purpose, adequate numerical methods are required. Cohesive zone models are one possible method for the analysis of brittle failure as long as some degree of tension is present. Their recent successful application for meso-mechanical simulations of concrete in Hopkinson-type spallation tests provides new insight into the dynamic failure process. Failure under compressive loading is a particular challenge for numerical simulations as it involves crushing of material which in turn influences stress states in other parts of a structure. On a continuum scale, it can be modeled using more or less complex plasticity models combined with failure surfaces, as will be demonstrated for ceramics. Models which take microstructural

  20. Chromotomosynthesis for high speed hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostick, Randall L.; Perram, Glen P.

    2012-09-01

    A rotating direct vision prism, chromotomosynthetic imaging (CTI) system operating in the visible creates hyperspectral imagery by collecting a set of 2D images with each spectrally projected at a different rotation angle of the prism. Mathematical reconstruction techniques that have been well tested in the field of medical physics are used to reconstruct the data to produce the 3D hyperspectral image. The instrument operates with a 100 mm focusing lens in the spectral range of 400-900 nm with a field of view of 71.6 mrad and angular resolution of 0.8-1.6 μrad. The spectral resolution is 0.6 nm at the shortest wavelengths, degrading to over 10 nm at the longest wavelengths. Measurements using a pointlike target show that performance is limited by chromatic aberration. The accuracy and utility of the instrument is assessed by comparing the CTI results to spatial data collected by a wideband image and hyperspectral data collected using a liquid crystal tunable filter (LCTF). The wide-band spatial content of the scene reconstructed from the CTI data is of same or better quality as a single frame collected by the undispersed imaging system with projections taken at every 1°. Performance is dependent on the number of projections used, with projections at 5° producing adequate results in terms of target characterization. The data collected by the CTI system can provide spatial information of equal quality as a comparable imaging system, provide high-frame rate slitless 1-D spectra, and generate 3-D hyperspectral imagery which can be exploited to provide the same results as a traditional multi-band spectral imaging system. While this prototype does not operate at high speeds, components exist which will allow for CTI systems to generate hyperspectral video imagery at rates greater than 100 Hz. The instrument has considerable potential for characterizing bomb detonations, muzzle flashes, and other battlefield combustion events.

  1. Identification of intraretinal neovascularization by high-speed indocyanine green angiography in idiopathic perifoveal telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Soheilian, Masoud; Tavallali, Ali; Peyman, Gholam A

    2007-01-01

    Rapid advances in imaging technology have dramatically improved our understanding of the flow patterns of intraretinal circulation in normal and diseased states. To identify the angiographic features and flow pattern of retinal circulation in a patient with type 2 idiopathic perifoveal telangiectasia, dynamic simultaneous high-speed videoangiography using confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy was performed. This diagnostic tool provides enhanced anatomic resolution of retinal arterioles otherwise poorly defined by regular fluorescein and static indocyanine green angiography. High-speed indocyanine green angiography demonstrated dynamic flow abnormalities such as intraretinal neovascular complex and retino-retinal anastomosis in idiopathic perifoveal telangiectasia.

  2. Oriented microtexturing on the surface of high-speed steel cutting tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, A. V.; Tarasov, S. Yu.; Podgornyh, O. A.; Shamarin, N. N.; Filippova, E. O.

    2016-11-01

    Microtexturing the metal cutting tool surfaces is a novel technique intended for enhancing the workability of these tools. The microtexturing is used in machining the titanium alloys for air-space applications for reducing the adhesion wear of metal cutting blades. This paper is focused on forming the microtextured dotted, banded and overlapped areas on the surfaces of high-speed steel samples. The treated areas have been examined using laser scanning microscopy for the microtexture pattern and roughness. It has been shown that the microtextured surfaces obtained on the high-speed steel samples were free of cracks. Surface pattern and roughness of all three microtextured areas have been examined and analyzed.

  3. 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (HST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    Interior view of the slotted throat test section installed in the 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (HST) in 1950. The slotted region is about 160 inches in length. In this photograph, the sting-type model support is seen straight on. In a NASA report, the test section is described as follows: 'The test section of the Langley 8-foot transonic tunnel is dodecagonal in cross section and has a cross-sectional area of about 43 square feet. Longitudinal slots are located between each of the 12 wall panels to allow continuous operation through the transonic speed range. The slots contain about 11 percent of the total periphery of the test section. Six of the twelve panels have windows in them to allow for schlieren observations. The entire test section is enclosed in a hemispherical shaped chamber.' John Becker noted that the tunnel's 'final achievement was the development and use in routine operations of the first transonic slotted throat. The investigations of wing-body shapes in this tunnel led to Whitcomb's discovery of the transonic area rule.' James Hansen described the origins of the the slotted throat as follows: 'In 1946 Langley physicist Ray H. Wright conceived a way to do transonic research effectively in a wind tunnel by placing slots in the throat of the test section. The concept for what became known as the slotted-throat or slotted-wall tunnel came to Wright not as a solution to the chronic transonic problem, but as a way to get rid of wall interference (i.e., the mutual effect of two or more meeting waves or vibrations of any kind caused by solid boundaries) at subsonic speeds. For most of the year before Wright came up with this idea, he had been trying to develop a theoretical understanding of wall interference in the 8-Foot HST, which was then being repowered for Mach 1 capability.' When Wright presented these ideas to John Stack, the response was enthusiastic but neither Wright nor Stack thought of slotted-throats as a solution to the transonic problem, only

  4. High Speed Link Radiated Emission Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisognin, P.; Pelissou, P.; Cissou, R.; Giniaux, M.; Vargas, O.

    2016-05-01

    To control the radiated emission of high-speed link and associated unit, the current approach is to implement overall harness shielding on cables bundles. This method is very efficient in the HF/ VHF (high frequency/ very high frequency) and UHF (ultra-high frequency) ranges when the overall harness shielding is properly bonded on EMC back-shell. Unfortunately, with the increasing frequency, the associated half wavelength matches with the size of Sub-D connector that is the case for the L band. Therefore, the unit connectors become the main source of interference emission. For the L-band and S-band, the current technology of EMC back-shell leaves thin aperture matched with the L band half wavelength and therefore, the shielding effectiveness is drastically reduced. In addition, overall harness shielding means significant increases of the harness mass.Airbus D&S Toulouse and Elancourt investigated a new solution to avoid the need of overall harness shielding. The objective is to procure EM (Electro-Magnetic) clean unit connected to cables bundles free of any overall harness shielding. The proposed solution is to implement EMC common mode filtering on signal interfaces directly on unit PCB as close as possible the unit connector.Airbus D&S Elancourt designed and manufactured eight mock-ups of LVDS (Low Voltage Differential Signaling) interface PCBs' with different solutions of filtering. After verification of the signal integrity, three mock-ups were retained (RC filter and two common mode choke coil) in addition to the reference one (without EMC filter).Airbus D&S Toulouse manufactured associated LVDS cable bundles and integrated the RX (Receiver) and TX (Transmitter) LVDS boards in shielded boxes.Then Airbus D&S performed radiated emission measurement of the LVDS links subassemblies (e.g. RX and TX boxes linked by LVDS cables) according to the standard test method. This paper presents the different tested solutions and main conclusions on the feasibility of such

  5. High speed operation of permanent magnet machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Refaie, Ayman M.

    This work proposes methods to extend the high-speed operating capabilities of both the interior PM (IPM) and surface PM (SPM) machines. For interior PM machines, this research has developed and presented the first thorough analysis of how a new bi-state magnetic material can be usefully applied to the design of IPM machines. Key elements of this contribution include identifying how the unique properties of the bi-state magnetic material can be applied most effectively in the rotor design of an IPM machine by "unmagnetizing" the magnet cavity center posts rather than the outer bridges. The importance of elevated rotor speed in making the best use of the bi-state magnetic material while recognizing its limitations has been identified. For surface PM machines, this research has provided, for the first time, a clear explanation of how fractional-slot concentrated windings can be applied to SPM machines in order to achieve the necessary conditions for optimal flux weakening. A closed-form analytical procedure for analyzing SPM machines designed with concentrated windings has been developed. Guidelines for designing SPM machines using concentrated windings in order to achieve optimum flux weakening are provided. Analytical and numerical finite element analysis (FEA) results have provided promising evidence of the scalability of the concentrated winding technique with respect to the number of poles, machine aspect ratio, and output power rating. Useful comparisons between the predicted performance characteristics of SPM machines equipped with concentrated windings and both SPM and IPM machines designed with distributed windings are included. Analytical techniques have been used to evaluate the impact of the high pole number on various converter performance metrics. Both analytical techniques and FEA have been used for evaluating the eddy-current losses in the surface magnets due to the stator winding subharmonics. Techniques for reducing these losses have been

  6. High-speed dual Langmuir probe.

    PubMed

    Lobbia, Robert B; Gallimore, Alec D

    2010-07-01

    In an effort to temporally resolve the electron density, electron temperature, and plasma potential for turbulent plasma discharges, a unique high-speed dual Langmuir probe (HDLP) has been developed. A traditional single Langmuir probe of cylindrical geometry (exposed to the plasma) is swept simultaneously with a nearby capacitance and noise compensating null probe (fully insulated from the plasma) to enable bias sweep rates on a microsecond timescale. Traditional thin-sheath Langmuir probe theory is applied for interpretation of the collected probe data. Data at a sweep rate of 100 kHz are presented; however the developed system is capable of running at 1 MHz-near the upper limit of the applied electrostatic Langmuir probe theory for the investigated plasma conditions. Large sets (100,000 sweeps at each of 352 spatial locations) of contiguous turbulent plasma properties are collected using simple electronics for probe bias driving and current measurement attaining 80 dB signal-to-noise measurements with dc to 1 MHz bandwidth. Near- and far-field plume measurements with the HDLP system are performed downstream from a modern Hall effect thruster where the time-averaged plasma properties exhibit the approximate ranges: electron density n(e) from (1x10(15))-(5x10(16)) m(-3), electron temperature T(e) from 1 to 3.5 eV, and plasma potential V(p) from 5 to 15 V. The thruster discharge of 200 V (constant anode potential) and 2 A (average discharge current) displays strong, 2.2 A peak-to-peak, current oscillations at 19 kHz, characteristic of the thruster "breathing mode" ionization instability. Large amplitude discharge current fluctuations are typical for most Hall thrusters, yet the HDLP system reveals the presence of the same 19 kHz fluctuations in n(e)(t), T(e)(t), and V(p)(t) throughout the entire plume with peak-to-peak divided by mean plasma properties that average 94%. The propagation delays between the discharge current fluctuations and the corresponding plasma

  7. High-speed ethanol micro-droplet impact on a solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Yuta; Kiyama, Akihito; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki

    2016-11-01

    Recently, droplet impact draws great attention in the fluid mechanics. In previous work, micro-droplet impact on a solid surface at velocities up to 100 m s-1 was studied. However the study was only on water micro-droplets. In this study, we experimentally investigate high-speed impact of ethanol micro-droplets in order to confirm the feature about maximum spreading radius with another liquid. A droplet is generated from a laser-induced high-speed liquid jet. The diameter of droplets is around 80 μm and the velocity is larger than 30 m s-1. The surface tension of ethanol is 22.4 mNm-1 and density is 789 kgm-3. Weber number ranges We >1000. By using a high-speed camera, we investigate the deformation of droplets as a function of Weber number. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number JP26709007.

  8. LiH as Fuel for High Speed Propulsion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2011-0058 LiH as Fuel for High Speed Propulsion Claudio Bruno Domenico Simone University of Rome...COVERED (From – To) 9 August 2010 – 09 August 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE LiH as Fuel for High Speed Propulsion 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8655-10-1...1-3091 ________________________________________________________________________________ 1 LiH as Fuel for High Speed Propulsion

  9. Chicago-St. Louis high speed rail plan

    SciTech Connect

    Stead, M.E.

    1994-12-31

    The Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT), in cooperation with Amtrak, undertook the Chicago-St. Louis High Speed Rail Financial and Implementation Plan study in order to develop a realistic and achievable blueprint for implementation of high speed rail in the Chicago-St. Louis corridor. This report presents a summary of the Price Waterhouse Project Team`s analysis and the Financial and Implementation Plan for implementing high speed rail service in the Chicago-St. Louis corridor.

  10. Water Containment Systems for Testing High-Speed Flywheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trase, Larry; Thompson, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    Water-filled containers are used as building blocks in a new generation of containment systems for testing high-speed flywheels. Such containment systems are needed to ensure safety by trapping high-speed debris in the event of centrifugal breakup or bearing failure. Traditional containment systems for testing flywheels consist mainly of thick steel rings. The effectiveness of this approach to shielding against high-speed debris was demonstrated in a series of tests.

  11. High speed photography, videography, and photonics III; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, August 22, 23, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponseggi, B. G. (Editor); Johnson, H. C. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Papers are presented on the picosecond electronic framing camera, photogrammetric techniques using high-speed cineradiography, picosecond semiconductor lasers for characterizing high-speed image shutters, the measurement of dynamic strain by high-speed moire photography, the fast framing camera with independent frame adjustments, design considerations for a data recording system, and nanosecond optical shutters. Consideration is given to boundary-layer transition detectors, holographic imaging, laser holographic interferometry in wind tunnels, heterodyne holographic interferometry, a multispectral video imaging and analysis system, a gated intensified camera, a charge-injection-device profile camera, a gated silicon-intensified-target streak tube and nanosecond-gated photoemissive shutter tubes. Topics discussed include high time-space resolved photography of lasers, time-resolved X-ray spectrographic instrumentation for laser studies, a time-resolving X-ray spectrometer, a femtosecond streak camera, streak tubes and cameras, and a short pulse X-ray diagnostic development facility.

  12. Enhanced high-speed coherent diffraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potier, Jonathan; Fricker, Sebastien; Idir, Mourad

    2011-03-01

    Due to recent advances in X-ray microscopy, we are now able to image objects with nanometer resolution thanks to Synchrotron beam lines or Free Electron Lasers (FEL). The PCI (Phase Contrast Imaging) is a robust technique that can recover the wavefront from measurements of only few intensity pictures in the Fresnel diffraction region. With our fast straightforward calculus methods, we manage to provide the phase induced by a microscopic specimen in few seconds. We can therefore obtain high contrasted images from transparent materials at very small scales. To reach atomic resolution imaging and thus make a transition from the near to the far field, the Coherent Diffraction Imaging (CDI) technique finds its roots in the analysis of diffraction patterns to obtain the phase of the altered complex wave. Theoretical results about existence and uniqueness of this retrieved piece of information by both iterative and direct algorithms have already been released. However, performances of algorithms remain limited by the coherence of the X-ray beam, presence of random noise and the saturation threshold of the detector. We will present reconstructions of samples using an enhanced version of HIO algorithm improving the speed of convergence and its repeatability. As a first step toward a practical X-Ray CDI system, initial images for reconstructions are acquired with the laser-based CDI system working in the visible spectrum.

  13. Nanopatterned Quantum Dot Lasers for High Speed, High Efficiency, Operation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-27

    growth using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). These methods allowed us to realize quantum dot active regions in which the injected carriers...on a higher energy (excited state) QD transition. Further improvements in QD growth and pre-etching are expected to lead to ground state emission...significantly better diffusion and chemical barrier than SiOx. Therefore, SiNx deposited by PECVD has been chosen as a dielectric mask. Also, in order to

  14. Multi-criteria optimization in CO2 laser ablation of multimode polymer waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamrin, K. F.; Zakariyah, S. S.; Sheikh, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    High interconnection density associated with current electronics products poses certain challenges in designing circuit boards. Methods, including laser-assisted microvia drilling and surface mount technologies for example, are being used to minimize the impacts of the problems. However, the bottleneck is significantly pronounced at bit data rates above 10 Gbit/s where losses, especially those due to crosstalk, become high. One solution is optical interconnections (OI) based on polymer waveguides. Laser ablation of the optical waveguides is viewed as a very compatible technique with ultraviolet laser sources, such as excimer and UV Nd:YAG lasers, being used due to their photochemical nature and minimal thermal effect when they interact with optical materials. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the application of grey relational analysis to determine the optimized processing parameters concerning fabrication of multimode optical polymer waveguides by using infra-red 10.6 μm CO2 laser micromachining to etch acrylate-based photopolymer (Truemode™). CO2 laser micromachining offers a low cost and high speed fabrication route needed for high volume productions as the wavelength of CO2 lasers can couple well with a variety of polymer substrates. Based on the highest grey relational grade, the optimized processing parameters are determined at laser power of 3 W and scanning speed of 100 mm/s.

  15. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert A.; Seager, Carleton H.

    1996-01-01

    An electrostatic chuck is faced with a patterned silicon plate 11, created y micromachining a silicon wafer, which is attached to a metallic base plate 13. Direct electrical contact between the chuck face 15 (patterned silicon plate's surface) and the silicon wafer 17 it is intended to hold is prevented by a pattern of flat-topped silicon dioxide islands 19 that protrude less than 5 micrometers from the otherwise flat surface of the chuck face 15. The islands 19 may be formed in any shape. Islands may be about 10 micrometers in diameter or width and spaced about 100 micrometers apart. One or more concentric rings formed around the periphery of the area between the chuck face 15 and wafer 17 contain a low-pressure helium thermal-contact gas used to assist heat removal during plasma etching of a silicon wafer held by the chuck. The islands 19 are tall enough and close enough together to prevent silicon-to-silicon electrical contact in the space between the islands, and the islands occupy only a small fraction of the total area of the chuck face 15, typically 0.5 to 5 percent. The pattern of the islands 19, together with at least one hole 12 bored through the silicon veneer into the base plate, will provide sufficient gas-flow space to allow the distribution of the helium thermal-contact gas.

  16. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.A.; Seager, C.H.

    1996-12-10

    An electrostatic chuck is faced with a patterned silicon plate, created by micromachining a silicon wafer, which is attached to a metallic base plate. Direct electrical contact between the chuck face (patterned silicon plate`s surface) and the silicon wafer it is intended to hold is prevented by a pattern of flat-topped silicon dioxide islands that protrude less than 5 micrometers from the otherwise flat surface of the chuck face. The islands may be formed in any shape. Islands may be about 10 micrometers in diameter or width and spaced about 100 micrometers apart. One or more concentric rings formed around the periphery of the area between the chuck face and wafer contain a low-pressure helium thermal-contact gas used to assist heat removal during plasma etching of a silicon wafer held by the chuck. The islands are tall enough and close enough together to prevent silicon-to-silicon electrical contact in the space between the islands, and the islands occupy only a small fraction of the total area of the chuck face, typically 0.5 to 5 percent. The pattern of the islands, together with at least one hole bored through the silicon veneer into the base plate, will provide sufficient gas-flow space to allow the distribution of the helium thermal-contact gas. 6 figs.

  17. Micromachine friction test apparatus

    DOEpatents

    deBoer, Maarten P.; Redmond, James M.; Michalske, Terry A.

    2002-01-01

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) friction test apparatus is disclosed for determining static or dynamic friction in MEM devices. The friction test apparatus, formed by surface micromachining, is based on a friction pad supported at one end of a cantilevered beam, with the friction pad overlying a contact pad formed on the substrate. A first electrostatic actuator can be used to bring a lower surface of the friction pad into contact with an upper surface of the contact pad with a controlled and adjustable force of contact. A second electrostatic actuator can then be used to bend the cantilevered beam, thereby shortening its length and generating a relative motion between the two contacting surfaces. The displacement of the cantilevered beam can be measured optically and used to determine the static or dynamic friction, including frictional losses and the coefficient of friction between the surfaces. The test apparatus can also be used to assess the reliability of rubbing surfaces in MEM devices by producing and measuring wear of those surfaces. Finally, the friction test apparatus, which is small in size, can be used as an in situ process quality tool for improving the fabrication of MEM devices.

  18. Inspection of Powder Flow During LMD Deposition by High Speed Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, Javier; Rodríguez, Ángel; Amado, José Manuel; Yáñez, Armando J.

    Laser cladding and LMD (Laser Metal Deposition) processes are continuously gaining ground in aerospace and energy industries. One of the known issues with that kind of processes is the difficulty of maintaining a constant and well distributed powder flow mass rate between the nozzle and the substrate. In this work, a method for real time inspection of powder distribution and mass flow rate is presented. Inference of mass flow rate and powder distribution is made using a high speed camera and a laser illumination device. Both on-process and off-process monitoring can be achieved. Different experimental results for the validation of the proposed method are presented.

  19. High-speed electromechanical shutter for imaging spectrographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention presents a high-speed electromechanical shutter which has at least two rotary beam choppers that are synchronized using a phase-locked loop electronic control to reduce the duty cycle. These choppers have blade means that can comprise discs or drums, each having about 60 (+/-15) slots which are from about 0.3 to about 0.8 mm wide and about 5 to about 20 mm long (radially) which are evenly distributed through out 360?, and a third rotary chopper which is optically aligned has a small number of slots, such as for example, 1 to 10 slots which are about 1 to about 2 mm wide and about 5 to about 20 mm long (radially). Further the blade means include phase slots that allow the blade means to be phase locked using a closed loop control circuit. In addition, in a preferred embodiment, the system also has a leaf shutter. Thus the invention preferably achieves a gate width of less than about 100 microseconds, using motors that operate at 3000 to 10,000 rpm, and with a phase jitter of less than about 1.5 microseconds, and further using an aperture with more than about 75% optical transmission with a clear aperture of about 0.8 mm?10 mm. The system can be synchronized to external sources at 0 6 kHz lasers, data acquisition systems, and cameras.

  20. Mixing Diagnostics in Confined, High-Speed Droplet Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Brian; Hidrovo, Carlos

    2012-11-01

    Fast mixing remains a major challenge in droplet-based microfluidics. The low Reynolds number operating regime of most mixing devices signifies orderly flows that are devoid of any inertial characteristics. To increase droplet mixing rates, a novel technique is under development that uses a high Reynolds number gaseous phase for droplet generation and transport and promotes mixing through binary droplet collisions at velocities near 1m/s. Limitations in existing mixing diagnostic methodologies has persuaded cultivation of a new technique for measuring droplet collision mixing in confined microchannels. The technique employs single fluorophore laser-induced fluorescence, custom image processing, and meaningful statistical analysis for monitoring and quantifying mixing in high-speed droplet collisions. Mixing progress is revealed through two statistics that separate the roles of convective rearrangement and molecular diffusion during the mixing process. The end result is a viewing window into the rich dynamics of droplet collisions with spatial and temporal resolutions of 1 μm and 25 μs, respectively. Experimental results obtained across a decade of Reynolds and Peclet numbers reveal a direct link between droplet mixing time and the collision convective timescale. This work provides valuable insight into the emerging field of two-phase gas-liquid microfluidics and opens the door to fundamental research possibilities not offered by traditional oil-based architectures.